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Sample records for workers making lead

  1. What makes workers happy?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Meer, P.H.; Wielers, R.J.J.

    2013-01-01

    This article answers the question what makes workers happy? It does so by combining insights from micro-economics, sociology and psychology. Basis is the standard utility function of a worker that includes income and hours of work and is elaborated with job characteristics. In this way it is

  2. Lead toxicity in battery workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qasim, Saeeda Fouzia; Baloch, Malka

    2014-11-01

    Lead poisoning is a medical condition caused by increased levels of lead in the body. Routes of exposure include contaminated air, water, soil, food and consumer products. Occupational exposure is the main cause of lead poisoning in the adults. Two cases of occupational lead poisoning in adult battery workers are hereby presented. Both male patients had initial non-specific symptoms of intermittent abdominal pain, fatigue and headache for 6 - 8 years. Later on, they developed psychosis, slurred speech, tremors of hands and initially underwent treatment for Parkinsonism and Wilson's disease because of clinical misdiagnosis. They were diagnosed with lead poisoning later and were treated successfully with lead chelator (CaNa2 EDTA).

  3. Eryptosis in lead-exposed workers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aguilar-Dorado, Itzel-Citlalli [Biochemistry Department, Centro de Investigación y Estudios Avanzados IPN, México, DF (Mexico); Hernández, Gerardo [Section of Methodology of Science, Centro de Investigación y Estudios Avanzados IPN, México, DF (Mexico); Quintanar-Escorza, Martha-Angelica [Faculty of Medicine, UJED, Durango, DGO (Mexico); Maldonado-Vega, María [CIATEC, León, GTO (Mexico); Rosas-Flores, Margarita [Biochemistry Department, Centro de Investigación y Estudios Avanzados IPN, México, DF (Mexico); Calderón-Salinas, José-Víctor, E-mail: jcalder@cinvestav.mx [Biochemistry Department, Centro de Investigación y Estudios Avanzados IPN, México, DF (Mexico)

    2014-12-01

    Eryptosis is a physiological phenomenon in which old and damaged erythrocytes are removed from circulation. Erythrocytes incubated with lead have exhibited major eryptosis. In the present work we found evidence of high levels of eryptosis in lead exposed workers possibly via oxidation. Blood samples were taken from 40 male workers exposed to lead (mean blood lead concentration 64.8 μg/dl) and non-exposed workers (4.2 μg/dl). The exposure to lead produced an intoxication characterized by 88.3% less δ-aminolevulinic acid dehydratase (δALAD) activity in lead exposed workers with respect to non-lead exposed workers. An increment of oxidation in lead exposed workers was characterized by 2.4 times higher thiobarbituric acid-reactive substance (TBARS) concentration and 32.8% lower reduced/oxidized glutathione (GSH/GSSG) ratio. Oxidative stress in erythrocytes of lead exposed workers is expressed in 192% higher free calcium concentration [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i} and 1.6 times higher μ-calpain activity with respect to non-lead exposed workers. The adenosine triphosphate (ATP) concentration was not significantly different between the two worker groups. No externalization of phosphatidylserine (PS) was found in non-lead exposed workers (< 0.1%), but lead exposed workers showed 2.82% externalization. Lead intoxication induces eryptosis possibly through a molecular pathway that includes oxidation, depletion of reduced glutathione (GSH), increment of [Ca{sup 2+}], μ-calpain activation and externalization of PS in erythrocytes. Identifying molecular signals that induce eryptosis in lead intoxication is necessary to understand its physiopathology and chronic complications. - Graphical abstract: Fig. 1. (A) Blood lead concentration (PbB) and (B) phosphatidylserine externalization on erythrocyte membranes of non-lead exposed (□) and lead exposed workers (■). Values are mean ± SD. *Significantly different (P < 0.001). - Highlights: • Erythrocytes of lead exposed workers

  4. Lead contamination of paint remediation workers' vehicles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boraiko, Carol; Wright, Eva M; Ralston, Faye

    2013-03-01

    Exposure to lead has been shown to be harmful to adults; it is a teratogen, it can damage the peripheral nervous system, and it adversely affects the reproductive system. Professional lead-based paint remediation workers are at risk of exposure to lead dust. The authors' study was conducted to determine if these remediation workers transfer lead from their work site to their vehicles and then potentially expose their families. It was hypothesized that remediation workers transported the lead from the remediation work site to the floorboards of their vehicles due to not following required protective equipment use. The laboratory's level of quantitation for lead on the wipe samples, 10 microg/ft2, was used to indicate lead contamination. This level was exceeded in 50% of the floorboards sampled. These results confirm that many vehicle floorboards used by remediation workers are contaminated with lead dust, potentially resulting in transfer of lead dust. The ultimate detrimental outcome could be the transfer of lead particles to other family members, causing the poisoning of a child or other at-risk person.

  5. Lead intoxication in Sydney Harbour Bridge workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pollock, C A; Ibels, L S

    1988-02-01

    Thirty-eight Sydney Harbour Bridge workers were assessed for possible lead intoxication. Forty-seven per cent were found to have significant lead intoxication as assessed by calcium disodium edetate chelation (Ca EDTA) testing and were subsequently effectively and safely treated with Ca EDTA. The prevalence of neurological, constitutional, gastrointestinal and musculoskeletal symptoms was significantly greater in those with, than those without, lead toxicity. Although blood lead levels and, to a lesser extent, hematological parameters were of some use in diagnosis, they were not sufficiently sensitive and thus should not be used in screening workers at risk of lead intoxication. Ca EDTA testing remains the diagnostic method of choice. Patients exposed to lead dust and fumes, in whom symptoms of lead intoxication are present, should undergo such testing and if a positive result is obtained, then EDTA chelation therapy should be instituted.

  6. Occupational health programme for lead workers in battery plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Byung-Kook

    The realization of problems resulting from the exposure to undue high lead levels of workers in lead-using industries, particularly in storage battery plants, has given rise to a new occupational health service, the so-called type specific (harmful agent specific) group occupational health. In 1988, the Korean Ministry of Labor designated the Institute of Industrial Medicine, Soonchunhyang University, as an authorized organization to take care of lead workers in lead industries. The following occupational health services are provided by the Institute: (i) physical health examination; (ii) biological monitoring with zinc protoporphyrin, urine δ-aminolevulinic acid and blood lead; (iii) respiratory protection with maintenance-free respirators; (iv) measurement of the environmental condition of workplaces; (v) health education. A three-year occupational health programme for lead workers has contributed to improvements in the working conditions of lead industries, particularly in large-scale battery plants, and has decreased the unnecessary high lead burden of workers through on-going medical surveillance with biological monitoring and health education schemes. The strong commitment of both employers and the government to improve the working conditions of lead industries, together with the full cooperation of lead workers, has served to reduce the high lead burdens of lead workers. This decreases the number of lead-poisoning cases and provides more comfortable workplaces, particularly in battery plants.

  7. Occupational health programme for lead workers in battery plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, B.K. (Soonchunhyang Univ., Chunan (Korea, Republic of). Inst. of Industrial Medicine)

    1992-03-15

    The realization of problems resulting from the exposure to undue high lead levels of workers in lead-using industries, particularly in storage battery plants, has given rise to a new occupational health service, the so-called type specific (harmful agent specific) group occupational health. In 1988, the Korean Ministry of Labor designated the Institute of Industrial Medicine, Soonchunhyang University, as an authorized organization to take care of lead workers in lead industries. The following occupational health services are provided by the Institute: (i) physical health examination; (ii) biological monitoring with zinc protoporphyrin, urine [delta]-aminolevulinic acid and blood lead; (iii) respiratory protection with maintenance-free respirators; (iv) measurement of the environmental condition of workplaces; (v) health education. A three-year occupational health programme for lead workers has contributed to improvements in the working conditions of lead industries, particularly in large-scale battery plants, and has decreased the unnecessary high lead burden of workers through on-going medical surveillance with biological monitoring and health education schemes. The strong commitment of both employers and the government to improve the working conditions of lead industries, together with the full cooperation of lead workers, has served to reduce the high lead burdens of lead workers. This decreases the number of lead-poisoning cases and provides more comfortable workplaces, particularly in battery plants. (orig.).

  8. Correlation between lead in plasma and other indicators of lead exposure among lead-exposed workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirata, M; Yoshida, T; Miyajima, K; Kosaka, H; Tabuchi, T

    1995-01-01

    In order to clarify the bioavailability of lead in plasma (PbP), we performed a study on five workers in a Japanese factory manufacturing lead glass-based paints. Blood and urine samples were obtained over a period of 15 months, during which time the workers took it in turns to perform sifting work (with the highest level of lead exposure) for 1-month periods. A total of 75 sets of blood and urine samples were thus obtained. We determined whole blood lead (PbB), PbP, Urinary coproporphyrin (CPU), urinary delta-aminolevulinic acid (ALAU), urinary lead (PbU) and ALA in plasma (ALAP). In the 15 sets of samples obtained at the end of the period with a high level of lead exposure, PbP correlated significantly with ALAU, CPU, PbU and ALAP, but PbB correlated significantly only with PbU. In the 60 sets of samples obtained following a low level of lead exposure, correlation coefficients between the concentrations of PbP and of ALAU, CPU and PbU exceeded those between the concentrations of PbB and of ALAU, CPU and PbU. These findings indicate that PbP is a better dose indicator of lead biochemically available for heme synthesis and that PbU has a closer correlation with PbP than with PbB.

  9. Take home lead exposure in children of oil field workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Fahad

    2011-06-01

    Childhood lead poisoning is a major, preventable environmental health problem. While residential lead-based paint and lead contaminated dust and soil are the most common sources of childhood lead poisoning, children can also be at risk if they live with an adult with a job or hobby that involves exposure to lead. Currently, the Oklahoma Childhood Lead Poisoning Prevention Program (OCLPPP) has a small number of cases of "take home" lead exposure in children of oil field workers. These workers may come in contact with a threading compound, "pipe dope" that can contain large amounts of lead. Workers handling this product may be exposed to lead by not following safety instructions. Additionally workers may not be provided the facilities to shower and change out of the contaminated clothing before leaving the work location. The OCLPPP recommends employers and worksites should consider effective alternative options like lead free biodegradable pipe dopes or dope free connections to prevent workers and their families from adverse health effects associated with lead.

  10. Fertility of male workers exposed to cadmium, lead, or manganese.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gennart, J P; Buchet, J P; Roels, H; Ghyselen, P; Ceulemans, E; Lauwerys, R

    1992-06-01

    The effect of exposure to cadmium, lead, or manganese on male reproductive function was examined in 1988-1989 in Belgian blue-collar workers. The workers were exposed to cadmium in two smelters (n = 83; geometric mean urinary cadmium level = 6.94 micrograms/g of creatinine; mean duration of exposure = 24 years), to lead in a battery factory (n = 74; mean blood lead level = 46.3 micrograms/dl; mean duration of exposure = 10.7 years), or to manganese (manganese dioxide) in a dry alkaline battery plant (n = 70; median atmospheric concentration of total manganese dust = 0.71 mg/m3; mean duration of exposure = 6.2 years). Fertility in these workers and in an unexposed population (n = 138) was assessed by examining the birth experiences of their wives through a logistic regression model. The probability of a live birth was not different between the unexposed workers and the cadmium- or manganese-exposed workers before or after the onset of exposure. While the fertility of the lead-exposed workers was somewhat greater than that of the unexposed before the onset of exposure, a significant decrease in fertility was observed during the period of exposure to the metal (odds ratio = 0.65, 95% confidence interval 0.43-0.98).

  11. Fertility of Danish battery workers exposed to lead.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonde, J P; Kolstad, H

    1997-12-01

    Inorganic lead may impair male fecundity through its action on the germinal epithelium, the endocrine system or both, but information on possible impact on fertility in exposed populations is limited. Fertility was examined in 1349 male battery plant employees and in 9596 reference company employees over a follow-up of 25,949 and 183,414 person years respectively. The cohorts were identified by records in a national pension fund and information on births was obtained from the Danish Population Register. In a subset of the battery worker cohort, the average level of lead in blood was 35.9 micrograms/dl (4639 blood samples on 1654 person years in 400 workers; SD 13.0; range 3-125). The birth rate was analysed by logistic regression on occupational exposure and several extraneous determinants (age, parity, calendar year, and previous children). The birth-rate was not reduced in years at risk from exposure to lead in comparison with years not-at-risk; either in comparison with not-at-risk years within the battery plant cohort (odds ratio [OR] = 0.997, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.88-1.13), or in comparison with the external reference population (OR = 0.983, 95% CI: 0.87-1.11). Inorganic lead seems not to impair fertility among Danish battery workers. This finding does not rule out that the time taken to achieve a pregnancy is increased among battery workers because most pregnancies in Denmark are planned.

  12. Evaluation of Symptoms and Characteristic Features of Lead Poisoning and their Assistance in Clinical Decision Making

    OpenAIRE

    D'souza HS; Menezes G; Dsouza SA; Venkatesh T

    2015-01-01

    Aim of the present study is to evaluate the symptoms and characteristics features in lead based industrial workers and accessing their reliability in clinical decision making and diagnosing lead toxicity. Study involves 15 industrial workers (exposed) and 15 non-exposed individuals, matched for age, sex and nationality selected from Bangalore, India. Association of various symptoms and characteristic features in exposed and non-exposed groups were evaluated and their association with high ...

  13. Making and Breaking of Lead Halide Perovskites

    KAUST Repository

    Manser, Joseph S.

    2016-02-16

    kinetics can be tailored to yield improved thin film homogeneity. Because degradation of the as-formed perovskite film is in many ways analogous to its initial formation, the same suite of monitoring techniques reveals the moisture-induced transformation of low band gap methylammonium lead iodide (CH3NH3PbI3) to wide band gap hydrate compounds. The rate of degradation is increased upon exposure to light. Interestingly, the hydration process is reversible under certain conditions. This facile formation and subsequent chemical lability raises the question of whether CH3NH3PbI3 and its analogues are thermodynamically stable phases, thus posing a significant challenge to the development of transformative perovskite photovoltaics. Adequately addressing issues of structural and chemical stability under real-world operating conditions is paramount if perovskite solar cells are to make an impact beyond the benchtop. Expanding our fundamental knowledge of lead halide perovskite formation and degradation pathways can facilitate fabrication of stable, high-quality perovskite thin films for the next generation of photovoltaic and light emitting devices.

  14. Making and Breaking of Lead Halide Perovskites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manser, Joseph S; Saidaminov, Makhsud I; Christians, Jeffrey A; Bakr, Osman M; Kamat, Prashant V

    2016-02-16

    kinetics can be tailored to yield improved thin film homogeneity. Because degradation of the as-formed perovskite film is in many ways analogous to its initial formation, the same suite of monitoring techniques reveals the moisture-induced transformation of low band gap methylammonium lead iodide (CH3NH3PbI3) to wide band gap hydrate compounds. The rate of degradation is increased upon exposure to light. Interestingly, the hydration process is reversible under certain conditions. This facile formation and subsequent chemical lability raises the question of whether CH3NH3PbI3 and its analogues are thermodynamically stable phases, thus posing a significant challenge to the development of transformative perovskite photovoltaics. Adequately addressing issues of structural and chemical stability under real-world operating conditions is paramount if perovskite solar cells are to make an impact beyond the benchtop. Expanding our fundamental knowledge of lead halide perovskite formation and degradation pathways can facilitate fabrication of stable, high-quality perovskite thin films for the next generation of photovoltaic and light emitting devices.

  15. Lead and Cadmium Toxicity in Tile Manufacturing Workers in Assiut, Egypt

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ragaa M Abd Elmaaboud

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Occupational lead and cadmium exposure are important health issues in developing countries. This study aimed to detect toxic metal contents in raw materials used to make tiles and to assess exposure health impacts on workers. The study sample consisted of 74 tile workers, having a mean age of 35.2 years, in the Industrial City of Arab El Awamer, Assiut (Egypt. Elemental analysis of the raw materials was performed by using scanning electron microscopy. The data collection questionnaire was divided into two parts; the first included demographic data, symptoms attributed to toxic elements and possible sources of exposure to metals. The second part was designated to assess heavy metal exposure health impacts through clinical examination and biological  investigations. Many toxic elements were identified in the raw materials used to make tiles, and the most abundant were lead and cadmium. Analysis of the clinical data revealed that 66% of the workers suffered from headache, constipation (8%, abdominal colic (33.8% and 30% suffered from a variety of respiratory problems such as dyspnea (60%, cough (13% and chest tightness (27%. Fifty percent of the workers complained of weak grip, 33.8% of foot drop, and 54% had tremors. Burton’s line in gums was present in 28% of workers and 28.2% were diagnosed with constrictive lung diseases. Of the 74 workers, 90.5 % showed toxic lead levels and 80% had toxic cadmium levels. 10.8% had abnormal alpha glutathione levels with a positive strong linear correlation between lead and cadmium levels and years of work. It is mandatory to develop and implement measures to prevent these hazardous exposure effects among tile industry workers.

  16. (Still) making waves : ageing knowledge workers and intergenerational learning

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    dr. Donald Ropes

    2011-01-01

    This literature review explores ways older workers might continue to make waves and impact their work organization. The topic of the paper is grounded in the problem of an ageing organizational population looming in the near future. The work presented here is a start to helping management in

  17. [Acute inorganic lead poisoning in workers employed on building renovation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liberatori, Roberta; Romeo, R; Restieri, Rosetta; Sarrini, Daniela; Parducci, A D; Puccetti, Monica; Loi, F; Sartorelli, P

    2010-01-01

    Occupationally, there are a number of work processes that constitute a long-term risk as sources of exposure to lead. In these processes the presence of lead is not evident but represents a hidden risk of poisoning. Study of two cases of hidden exposure to lead that were discovered during renovation work on a historical building. Acute lead poisoning symptoms appeared in the 2 workers. The current protocol for treatment of lead poisoning was applied, which consisted in administration of a chelating agent (EDTA), with subsequent monitoring of indicators of dose (PbB. blood lead level, PbU: urinary lead level) and indicators of effect (erythrocyte Protoporphyrin IX, urinary delta-aminolevulinic acid (ALA-U), urinary coproporphyrins). The lead colic and anaemia appeared at PbB values (102 microg/dl e 104 microg/dl) that were higher than the PbB action value (40 microg/dl) and higher than the limit value (60 microg/dl). The gravity of the symptoms, the high number of persons potentially involved, the difficulty of reclamation and probable urban contamination, with relative consequences concerning particularly infants and women infertile age, are sufficient grounds to require effective legislative action and improvement in the services available at the hospitals involved.

  18. Reproductive conflict in social insects: Male production by workers in a slave-making ant

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brunner, Elizabeth; Trindl, Andreas; Falk, Karl H.

    2005-01-01

    AbstractIn insect societies, workers cooperate but may also pursue their individual interests, such as laying viable male eggs. The case of obligatory slave-making ants is of particular interest because workers do not engage in maintenance activities and foraging. Therefore, worker egg laying...... by producing their own sons than workers in nonparasitic species. In this study we investigated worker reproduction in four natural colonies of the slave-making ant Polyergus rufescens, using highly variable microsatellite markers. Our results show that workers produce up to 100% of the males. This study thus...... presents the first direct evidence of an almost complete takeover of male reproduction by workers in ants....

  19. Lead-elevated activity of xanthine oxidase in lead-exposed workers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sławomir Kasperczyk

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: The aim of the present study was to explore the connection between lead toxicity and the activity of xanthine oxidase (XO. In addition, we indicated the uric acid (UA and creatinine levels and concentration of erythrocyte malondialdehyde (MDA to estimate oxidative stress intensity. Materials and Methods: The examined group consisted of 125 healthy male employees of zinc and lead works. The examined group was divided into tertiles according to blood lead levels. In the collected blood samples, concentrations of lead-exposure indices, UA, creatinine, and MDA as well as activity of XO were measured concomitantly. The control group consisted of 32 healthy male administrative workers who were exposed to lead only environmentally. Results: XO activity and MDA level were significantly elevated in all tertiles compared to the control group. Creatinine level was significantly elevated in the medium and high tertiles. However, the level of UA was significantly elevated in the high tertile, while in the low and medium tertile only a tendency toward higher values was observed. Conclusions: Occupational exposure to lead induces activity of XO. This induction may contribute to the observed simultaneously increased oxidative stress, measured as MDA level, and the increased level of UA. Med Pr 2013;64(2:175–180

  20. [Relationship between XRCC3 gene polymorphism and susceptibility to lead poisoning in male lead-exposed workers].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiang-quan; Zhang, Zhong

    2013-06-01

    To investigate the relationship between genetic polymorphism of X-ray repair cross-complementing gene 3 (XRCC3) and susceptibility to lead poisoning in male lead-exposed workers. Peripheral venous blood and morning urine samples were collected from 326 male lead-exposed workers in a storage battery factory in Fuzhou. Blood lead, urine lead, blood zinc protoporphyrin (ZPP), blood calcium, and blood iron were measured. The genotype of XRCC3 was determined by polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism method. The relationship between XRCC3 gene polymorphism and susceptibility to lead poisoning in male lead-exposed workers was analyzed. Genetic polymorphism of XRCC3 was seen in the 326 subjects. The frequency distribution of XRCC3 genotypes, XRCC3-241CC (wild type), XRCC3-241CT (heterozygous mutation), and XRCC3-241TT (homozygous mutation), was in accordance with the Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium (P > 0.05). There were no significant differences in urine lead, blood ZPP, blood calcium, and blood iron between the lead-exposed workers with different XRCC3 genotypes (P > 0.05). The workers with XRCC3-241CT/TT had a significantly higher mean blood lead level than those with XRCC3-241CC (P lead level of 1.90 µmol/L as the cutoff value, the chi-square test and logistic regression analysis showed that the proportion of workers with XRCC3-241CT/TT was significantly higher than that of workers with XRCC3-241CC in the subjects with high blood leads (P lead was significantly higher in the workers with XRCC3-241CT/TT than in those with XRCC3-241CC (OR = 2.34, 95%CI = 1.61 ∼ 5.13); the multivariate linear regression analysis showed that the workers with XRCC3-241CT/TT had high blood lead levels (β = 0.116, P lead absorption (β = 0.188, P lead absorption (β = -0.247, P lead levels (β = -0.145, P lead at workplace, the workers with XRCC3-241CT/TT have a significantly higher blood lead level than those with XRCC3-241CC, so the genotype of XRCC3-241CT

  1. Lead poisoning in shooting-range workers in Gauteng Province, South Africa: Two case studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathee, A; De Jager, P; Naidoo, S; Naicker, N

    2017-03-29

    Lead exposure constitutes a major public health concern globally. Relative to developed nations, lead exposure is understudied and poorly addressed in Africa, and there is a dearth of information available to inform lead poisoning prevention strategies, even in high-risk groups such as workers in shooting ranges who are potentially exposed to lead daily. Two workers at a private shooting range in Gauteng, South Africa (SA), had blood lead levels and exposure histories taken. Workers had highly elevated blood lead levels and clinical symptoms associated with elevated blood lead levels. Workers in private SA shooting ranges are vulnerable to lead exposure and poisoning, and scaled-up action is required to protect them and their families, as well as shooting-range users, from lead and the related health risks.

  2. Lead poisoning in shooting-range workers in Gauteng Province, South Africa: Two case studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S Naidoo

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Background. Lead exposure constitutes a major public health concern globally. Relative to developed nations, lead exposure is understudied and poorly addressed in Africa, and there is a dearth of information available to inform lead poisoning prevention strategies, even in high-risk groups such as workers in shooting ranges who are potentially exposed to lead daily. Methods. Two workers at a private shooting range in Gauteng, South Africa (SA, had blood lead levels and exposure histories taken. Results. Workers had highly elevated blood lead levels and clinical symptoms associated with elevated blood lead levels. Conclusion. Workers in private SA shooting ranges are vulnerable to lead exposure and poisoning, and scaled-up action is required to protect them and their families, as well as shooting-range users, from lead and the related health risks.

  3. Reproductive conflict in social insects: male production by workers in a slave-making ant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunner, Elisabeth; Trindl, Andreas; Falk, Karl H; Heinze, Juergen; D'Ettorre, Patrizia

    2005-11-01

    In insect societies, workers cooperate but may also pursue their individual interests, such as laying viable male eggs. The case of obligatory slave-making ants is of particular interest because workers do not engage in maintenance activities and foraging. Therefore, worker egg laying is expected to be less detrimental for colony efficiency than in related, nonparasitic species. Furthermore, as slave-making workers usually do not perform brood care and thus might have little power in manipulating sex allocation, they might be more strongly selected to increase their direct fitness by producing their own sons than workers in nonparasitic species. In this study we investigated worker reproduction in four natural colonies of the slave-making ant Polyergus rufescens, using highly variable microsatellite markers. Our results show that workers produce up to 100% of the males. This study thus presents the first direct evidence of an almost complete takeover of male reproduction by workers in ants.

  4. Blood lead and erythrocyte protoporphyrin levels in association with smoking and personal hygienic behaviour among lead exposed workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karita, K; Nakao, M; Ohwaki, K; Yamanouchi, Y; Nishikitani, M; Nomura, K; Sato, M; Yano, E

    2005-05-01

    To investigate the effects of smoking and personal hygienic behaviour on blood lead (BPb) and free erythrocyte protoporphyrin levels (FEP) in lead exposed workers. Subjects were 105 lead exposed male workers in a battery recycling plant during the years 2000-03. BPb and FEP were measured as part of the ongoing occupational surveillance. Each worker completed a questionnaire for assessment of smoking and four measures of personal hygienic behaviour (glove and mask use, hand and face washing before meals during working hours). Statistically significant decreases in mean BPb and FEP occurred during the three years. The proportion of BPb reduction in the non-smoking workers was significantly higher (mean 24.3%) than in the smoking workers (15.3%). When the workers were classified into three groups (excellent, good, and poor) based on the four personal hygienic behavioural indicators, the greatest decreases of BPb and FEP were observed in the non-smoking workers of the excellent group. The consistent use of protection devices and cleanliness at work appeared to contribute to the lowering of BPb and FEP. Cessation of smoking in the workplace was also of importance.

  5. Do social interactions in the workplace lead to productivity spillover among co-workers?

    OpenAIRE

    Cornelissen, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Should one expect a worker’s productivity, and thus wage, to depend on the productivity of his/her co-workers in the same workplace, even if the workers carry out completely independent tasks and do not engage in team work? This may well be the case because social interaction among co-workers can lead to productivity spillover through knowledge spillover or peer pressure. The available empirical evidence suggests that, due to such peer effects, co-worker productivity positively affects a work...

  6. Evaluation of the relationship between blood lead level and prevalence of oral complications in Koushk lead mine workers, Yazd province

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    Tabrizizadeh M

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aim: Lead is one of the most dangerous metallic poisons which can lead to acute and chronic poisoning with a broad range of systemic and oral signs. The aim of this study was to evaluate the relationship between the prevalence of oral complications and blood lead level in workers employed in Koushk lead mines, Yazd province. Materials and Methods: This analytical study was conducted on 70 subjects employed in Koushk lead mines and 70 workers in Yazdbaf textile factory as control group. A questionnaire including demographic information and medical questions was completed for each case and oral manifestations were recorded, as well. Blood samples were taken from subjects and blood lead level was measured by atomic absorption spectrophotometer. Data were analyzed using t, Chi-Square and Mann Whitney tests with p<0.05 as the limit of significance. Results: The mean lead level was 7.06 µg/dl in case group and 4.97µg/dl in control group (P= 0.039. In case group, 3 subjects had blood lead level more than 20µg/dl. Statistical analysis showed significant differences regarding neurologic disorder, chronic fatigue, existence of lead line, mucous pigmentation, gingivitis, tongue burning, taste sense reduction and DMF between case and control groups (P<0.05. Conclusion: Based on the results of this study, since the mean blood lead level in mine workers was in normal limits, the observed symptoms were not related to systemic poisoning. Direct contact of the oral mucosa with the lead in breathing air or other factors related to overall health problems in mine workers may be responsible for the present findings. Further studies are recommended on similar subjects working in different conditions.

  7. Clinical and Laboratory Findings of Lead Hepatotoxicity in the Workers of a Car Battery Manufacturing Factory

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Bita Dadpour; Reza Afshari; Seyed Reza Mousavi; Sina Kianoush; Mohamad Reza Keramati; Vali Allah Moradi; Mahmood Sadeghi; Faezeh Madani Sani; Mahdi Balali Mood

    2016-01-01

    .... This study was designed to investigate the clinical manifestations and pathological parameters of hepatic dysfunction and its relationship with blood and urine lead concentrations in a car battery-manufacturing workers. Methods...

  8. Lead poisoning in shooting-range workers in Gauteng Province ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    private indoor shooting range in greater Johannesburg. Blood lead levels were determined using a LeadCare II (Magellan Diagnostics,. USA) portable testing system, with a 50 μL aliquot of whole blood obtained from a finger prick following the thorough washing of hands with soap and water. Ethical approval for this work, ...

  9. Immunological effects of long-term lead exposure among Taiwanese workers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuo, Hsienwen; Hsiao, Tsuenying [Institute of Environmental Health, China Medical College, Taichung (Taiwan); Lai, Jimshoung [School of Occupational Safety and Health, China Medical College, Taichung (Taiwan)

    2001-12-01

    Exposure to lead has been shown to have a deleterious effect on the immune system. However, the findings of previous studies have been inconsistent. This may have been due to the increased susceptibility to intracellular pathogens and increased polyclonal and antigen-specific responses on exposure to lead. The objective of the current study was to evaluate the immune function of long-term workers with lead in a battery manufacturing plant. Junior high school teachers were used as a control group. Our results showed that the percentage of monocytes was significantly higher among lead workers than in the control group, but T8 cell levels were lower. The T4/T8 ratio was significantly higher among lead workers (1.42) than in the control group (1.18). After adjustment for age, gender and disease using multiple linear regression models, the percentage of B-cells and number of lymphocytes, monocytes and granulocytes were all significantly decreased among lead workers compared with the control group. Our findings showed that lead caused a marked immunotoxic and immunosuppressive effect among long-term lead workers. (orig.)

  10. The Worker Rights Consortium Makes Strides toward Legitimacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van der Werf, Martin

    2000-01-01

    Discusses the rapid growth of the Workers Rights Consortium, a student-originated group with 44 member institutions which opposes sweatshop labor conditions especially in the apparel industry. Notes disagreements about the number of administrators on the board of directors and about the role of industry representives. Compares this group with the…

  11. Fertility rates among lead workers and professional bus drivers: a comparative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, S; Hwang, S A; Marshall, E G; Stone, R; Chen, J

    1996-05-01

    We examined the relationship between lead exposure and fertility among men in a retrospective cohort study. Fertility (1981-1992) of lead-exposed workers was determined from birth certificate information and was compared with that of nonexposed workers. The exposed group consisted of 4256 reproductive-age male workers reported to the New York State Heavy Metals Registry. The comparison group consisted of a random sample of male bus drivers licensed in the state of New York; these men were frequency-matched by age and residence to the men who were exposed to lead. The actual number of births among lead workers was lower than the expected number of births for that group (standardized fertility ratio [SFR] = 0.88; 95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.81-0.95), especially among those who had elevated blood lead levels for longer than 5 years (SFR = 0.43; 95% confidence interval [CI]: = 0.31, 0.59). Even after adjusting for age, race, education, and residence, workers with > 5 years of exposure had reduced likelihood of fathering a child than those with a shorter period of exposure (relative risk, 0.38; 95% CI: 0.23, 0.61). Our study indicates that men with a long duration of lead exposure might have reduced fertility.

  12. Clinical and Laboratory Findings of Lead Hepatotoxicity in the Workers of a Car Battery Manufacturing Factory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bita Dadpour

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: Occupational lead poisoning is common in workers of some industries, but lead hepatotoxicity has rarely been reported. Several animal studies have revealed lead induced liver damage but clinical studies concerning the manifestations of lead induced liver toxicity in humans are scares. This study was designed to investigate the clinical manifestations and pathological parameters of hepatic dysfunction and its relationship with blood and urine lead concentrations in a car battery-manufacturing workers. Methods: This cross sectional study was carried out in Mashhad, Iran, during April-June 2011. One hundred and twelve workers underwent blood and urine sampling for determination of lead concentrations and liver function tests. Clinical signs and symptoms of possible lead hepatotoxicity were investigated. Results: Mean (±SD age of the workers was 28.78 (±5.17 yr with a daytime work of 8.67 (±1.41 h and mean work duration of 3.89 (±2.40 yr. Mean blood lead concentration (BLC and urine lead concentration (ULC were 398.95 (±177.41 µg/l and 83.67(±50 μg/l, respectively. We found no correlation between the clinical findings and BLC or ULC. A weak correlation (R: 0.27, P=0.087 between serum alkaline phosphatase concentration and BLC was obtained. No significant relationship was found between other liver function tests and BLC or ULC. Conclusion: We found no specific clinical and laboratory abnormalities of liver in the workers of car battery manufacturer who had chronic lead toxicity. Further investigations with more specific laboratory tests such as LDH5 and gamma glutamyl transferase (GGT as well as novel biomarkers of metal induced hepatotoxicity might be helpful in evaluating lead hepatotoxicity.

  13. [Study on relationships between biomarkers in workers with low-level occupational lead exposure].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Hong; Zhang, Hengdong; Zhou, Qianqian; Gong, Wei; Zhu, Baoli; Li, Wenchao; Zhou, Yang

    2015-06-01

    To investigate the lead exposure, its effects, and the relationships between biomarkers of susceptibility in the workers with low-level occupational lead exposure, and to explore its sensitivity and practical value to evaluate the health hazard. The concentrations of lead fume and lead dust in workplaces of a lead acid storage battery enterprise in Jiangsu Province, China, were measured by occupational health monitoring method. The blood samples of 233 workers with occupational lead exposure and 76 non-occupational lead exposure were collected to measure the blood lead (Pb-B) level using graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry (GFAAS), the zinc Protoporphyrin (ZPP) level with blood fluorescence assay, and the delta-aminolevulinic acid dehydratase (ALAD) concentration by a spectrophotometer, and to determine the gene polymorphism of ALAD with TaqMan real-time polymerase chain reaction. At the same time, their urine samples were collected to measure urine lead (Pb-U) concentration with GFAAS and delta-aminolevulinic acid (ALA-U) concentration with a spectrophotometer. The correlations between the above indices were analyzed by multiple linear regression method. The concentration of lead fume in 18 testing sites and the concentration of lead dust in 30 testing sites were 0.002-0.019 mg/m3 and 0.004-0.013 mg/m3, respectively. Pb-B level was positively correlated with Pb-U concentration (r=0.62, Plead exposure. Among 233 workers, 218 (93.6%) had ≤70 µg/L Pb-U, and 15 (6.9%) had ≥400≥g/L Pb-B. Pb-B level was not correlated with ZPP level as Pb-B level was 0.05). And in 233 workers with occupational lead exposure, there were no significant differences in Pb-B level, ZPP level, and ALAD activity between the workers with ALAD1-2 genotype and the workers with ALAD1-1 genotype (P>0.05). In 76 workers with non-occupational lead exposure, there was no significant difference in Pb-B level between the workers with ALAD1-2 genotype and the workers with ALAD1

  14. Transnational Social Workers: Making the Profession a Transnational Professional Space

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Allen Bartley

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper draws on research conducted in New Zealand from 2009 to 2011 with overseas-qualified social workers as members of a global profession experiencing both great international demand for their skills and unparalleled flows of professional transnationalism. In line with the international social work literature, this cohort of migrant professionals offers a range of needed skill and expertise as well as unique challenges to local employers, client communities, and the social work profession as a whole. With a specific focus on mixed-methods data dealing with participants' induction experiences and engagement with professional bodies, this paper argues that migrant social workers have created in New Zealand a transnational professional space that demands a response from local social work stakeholders.

  15. Occupational lead exposure among automotive garage workers - a case study for Jimma town, Ethiopia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adela, Yalemsew; Ambelu, Argaw; Tessema, Dejene A

    2012-07-09

    In Ethiopia, although there are numerous small-scale and medium industries which use lead-based raw materials that may pose health risks to workers, there are no workplace regulations for lead exposure. Moreover, there are no studies carried out on the blood lead levels (BLLs) of workers or on the contribution of common workplace practices to lead poisoning. A cross-sectional study on the BLLs of 45 automotive garage workers and 40 non-garage workers was carried out in the town of Jimma, Ethiopia. In addition to BLL analysis, data on some risk factors such as smoking, and chewing 'khat' (the leaves of Catha adulis) were gathered through structured questionnaires and interviews and data analysis was performed using SPSS (version 16). The t-test was used to compare mean BLLs of study groups. The analysis of variance (ANOVA), Kruskal-Wallis, Pearson chi-square and odds ratio tests were used to investigate the associations between specific job type, smoking and/or 'khat' chewing, service years and occurrence of non-specific symptoms with BLLs. The mean BLL of the automotive-garage workers was found to be significantly greater than that of the controls. The BLLs of all the lead-exposed individuals were found to be over 10 μg/dL, and 53% of them had BLLs ranging 12 - 20 μg/dL, with the remaining 47% having over 20 μg/dL. The BLL of the workers increased with the duration of working in an automotive garage.Individuals involved in manual car painting comprise a larger percentage (58%) of those with the highest BLLs (≥ 20 μg/dL). Lead accumulation in individuals who chew 'khat' in the work place was found to be faster than in those who are not used to chewing 'khat'. 'Khat' is an evergreen shrub native to tropical East Africa, with dark green opposite leaves which are chewed when fresh for their stimulating effects. The findings of the study have clearly demonstrated that the BLLs of automotive-garage workers in Jimma town are considerably high with a range of

  16. Occupational lead exposure among automotive garage workers – a case study for Jimma town, Ethiopia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adela Yalemsew

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In Ethiopia, although there are numerous small-scale and medium industries which use lead-based raw materials that may pose health risks to workers, there are no workplace regulations for lead exposure. Moreover, there are no studies carried out on the blood lead levels (BLLs of workers or on the contribution of common workplace practices to lead poisoning. Method A cross-sectional study on the BLLs of 45 automotive garage workers and 40 non-garage workers was carried out in the town of Jimma, Ethiopia. In addition to BLL analysis, data on some risk factors such as smoking, and chewing ‘khat’ (the leaves of Catha adulis were gathered through structured questionnaires and interviews and data analysis was performed using SPSS (version 16. The t-test was used to compare mean BLLs of study groups. The analysis of variance (ANOVA, Kruskal-Wallis, Pearson chi-square and odds ratio tests were used to investigate the associations between specific job type, smoking and/or ‘khat’ chewing, service years and occurrence of non-specific symptoms with BLLs. Results The mean BLL of the automotive-garage workers was found to be significantly greater than that of the controls. The BLLs of all the lead-exposed individuals were found to be over 10 μg/dL, and 53% of them had BLLs ranging 12 – 20 μg/dL, with the remaining 47% having over 20 μg/dL. The BLL of the workers increased with the duration of working in an automotive garage. Individuals involved in manual car painting comprise a larger percentage (58% of those with the highest BLLs (≥ 20 μg/dL. Lead accumulation in individuals who chew ‘khat’ in the work place was found to be faster than in those who are not used to chewing ‘khat’. ‘Khat’ is an evergreen shrub native to tropical East Africa, with dark green opposite leaves which are chewed when fresh for their stimulating effects. Conclusion The findings of the study have clearly demonstrated that the

  17. Ethical dilemmas in general hospitals: social workers' contribution to ethical decision-making.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landau, R

    2000-01-01

    Thirty-two hospital social workers, fourteen of them directors of social work services and eighteen direct practitioners, were interviewed about their perception of the factors influencing social workers' contribution to the resolution of ethical dilemmas in general hospitals in Israel. Findings revealed that while ethical decision-making in hospitals is an interdisciplinary process, social workers' contribution to the process is affected by rivalry between social workers and other members of the health team, personality differences, type of ward and the nature of the ethical dilemma. Participants of the study had quite a clear perception of their role and of the unique knowledge-base social work can offer, including knowledge of the individual and family life course, understanding and skills in coping with diseases, and systems thinking. In order to increase their influence in ethical decision-making, the hospital social workers felt they must put more effort into developing their relationships with the other professionals involved in ethical decision-making both by making themselves more indispensable and by making their contribution explicit through greater documentation of their activities. The findings also implied that in order to gain more power and be accepted as equal partners in multidisciplinary teams, hospital social workers should improve their communication skills when interacting with representatives of other heath care professions.

  18. Lead intoxication in paint removal workers on the Sydney Harbour Bridge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pollock, C A; Ibels, L S

    Lead intoxication is far more prevalent than is recognized by those persons who are exposed to lead fumes and dust in industry, as the early symptoms of intoxication are subtle and non-specific. The levels of lead in blood are a poor reflection of lead stores in the body and their potential toxicity, but are used frequently as the only test for screening of lead intoxication. Chelation of lead with calcium-EDTA is a more sensitive test to detect those persons who are at risk of toxicity. Industrial workers who are exposed regularly to lead must be screened on a periodic basis and a diagnosis of lead poisoning must be considered if substantial morbidity is to be avoided. We report six cases of men with significant lead intoxication who were employed on the Sydney Harbour Bridge, all of whom have benefited symptomatically from calcium-EDTA chelation therapy.

  19. Occupational lead poisoning in workers of traditional tile factories in Mashhad, Northeast of Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balali-Mood, M; Shademanfar, S; Rastegar Moghadam, J; Afshari, R; Namaei Ghassemi, M; Allah Nemati, H; Keramati, M R; Neghabian, J; Balali-Mood, B; Zare, G

    2010-01-01

    Occupational lead poisoning is a health problem in Iran. It has not previously been studied in traditional tile makers. To determine the prevalence of lead poisoning and its complications in traditional tile workers in Mashhad, Northwest of Iran. We visited workers in two traditional tile factories and collected data by direct history taking and physical examination. Blood and urine lead concentrations were measured by heated graphite atomization technique. Overall, 108 men with mean±SD age of 37±7.8 years were studied. The mean±SD length of daily lead exposure was 9.8±6 years. The mean±SD blood lead concentration was 520.5±323.2 μg/L. The main objective clinical findings were the presence of lead line (64.8%), peripheral neuropathy of the upper extremities (37%), depressed deep tendon reflexes in the upper extremities (25.7%), tremor (23.3%), peripheral neuropathy of the lower extremities (17%) and abdominal tenderness (15.1%). The subjective findings were mainly attributed to the central nervous system and included loss of memory (57%), moodiness (56.1%), agitation (47.7%), drowsiness (36.4%) and headache (29.9%). There was no statistically significant correlation between the blood lead concentration and glomerular filtration rate. However, there were significant correlations between the blood lead concentration and each of the urine lead concentration (p<0.001), diastolic blood pressure (p = 0.04), serum triglyceride level (p = 0.043), high density lipoprotein level (p = 0.012), and basophilic stippling (p = 0.048). Blood lead level, however, did not have any significant correlation with the presence of lead line. In traditional tile workers, lead toxicity is not uncommon and the toxic effects of lead were found more often on the teeth (bone), central and peripheral nervous system, hematological and lipid profiles than on the renal function.

  20. Associations of low-level urine cadmium with kidney function in lead workers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weaver, Virginia M.; Kim, Nam-Soo; Jaar, Bernard G.; Schwartz, Brian S.; Parsons, Patrick J.; Steuerwald, Amy J.; Todd, Andrew C.; Simon, David; Lee, Byung-Kook

    2010-01-01

    Objectives Low-level cadmium exposure, e.g., urinary cadmium < 2.0 μg/g creatinine, is widespread; recent data suggest nephrotoxicity even at these lower levels. Few studies have examined the impact of low-level cadmium exposure in workers who are occupationally exposed to other nephrotoxicants such as lead. Methods We evaluated associations of urine cadmium, a measure of cumulative dose, with four glomerular filtration measures and N-acetyl-β-D-glucosaminidase (NAG) in lead workers. Recent and cumulative lead dose was assessed via blood and tibia lead, respectively. Results In 712 lead workers, mean (SD) blood and tibia lead, urine cadmium, and estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) using the Modification of Diet in Renal Disease equation were 23.1 (14.1) μg/dl, 26.6 (28.9) μg Pb/g bone mineral, 1.15 (0.66) μg/g creatinine, and 97.4 (19.2) ml/min/1.73m2, respectively. After adjustment for age, sex, body mass index, urine creatinine, smoking, alcohol, education, annual income, diastolic blood pressure, current or former lead worker job status, new or returning study participant, and blood and tibia lead, higher ln-urine cadmium was associated with higher calculated creatinine clearance, eGFR (β = 8.7 ml/min/1.73 m2; 95% CI = 5.4, 12.1) and ln-NAG but lower serum creatinine. Conclusions Potential explanations for these results include a normal physiologic response in which urine cadmium levels reflect renal filtration; the impact of adjustment for urine dilution with creatinine in models of kidney outcomes; and cadmium-related hyperfiltration. PMID:20974743

  1. Predictors of plasma lead among lithographic print shop workers in Mexico City.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juárez-Pérez, Cuauhtémoc Arturo; Aguilar-Madrid, Guadalupe; Smith, Donald R; Lacasaña-Navarro, Marina; Téllez-Rojo, Martha María; Piacitteli, Gregory; Hu, Howard; Hernández-Avila, Mauricio

    2004-09-01

    Plasma lead is considered a biological marker that reflects the fraction of lead in blood that is toxicologically available. We examined the relationship between plasma lead and other biomarkers of lead exposure in 69 lithographic print shop workers. Lead was measured in plasma and whole blood (by inductively coupled plasma-magnetic sector mass spectrometry), in bone (by 109Cd X-ray fluorescence), and in hand wipes and occupational air samples. Personal hygiene habits at work were surveyed. Mean age was 47 years and 86% (n=59) were men. Mean lead levels were 0.3 microg/L in plasma, 11.9 microg/dL in blood, 46.7 microg/g in patella, and 27.6 microg/g in tibia. Taken together, two multivariate linear models explained 57% of variability in plasma lead levels. Predictors for the first model were lead in patella (beta = 0.006), blood (beta = 0.008), and hygiene index (beta = -0.11). Predictors for the second model were lead in tibia (beta = 0.008), blood (beta = 0.008), and hygiene index (beta = -0.13). This study demonstrates that accumulated bone stores and hygiene habits are both significant independent predictors of plasma lead levels in active workers at this print shop.

  2. [Changes in peripheral hemogram among workers with short-term lead exposure].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Xiao-na; Tan, Xia-you; Wu, Lin; Chen, Pei-xian

    2013-08-01

    To examine the effect of short-term occupational lead exposure on the inflammatory response system in blood among workers. A total of 255 lead-exposed workers (length of service ≤1 year) at an electronics factory in Dongguan, China (exposure group), as well as 205 managers without any occupational exposure at another factory (control group), were included in the study. Occupational physical examination was done to get peripheral blood counts. The blood lead levels of workers were determined by atomic absorption spectrometry. The relationship between blood lead and peripheral hemogram was analyzed using SPSS software. The exposure group had blood lead levels of 0.07∼1.70 µmol/L, falling within the normal range. The leukocyte count, percentage of granulocytes, and absolute value of granulocytes were significantly higher in the exposure group than in the control group, and the results remained unchanged after adjustment for age and sex (P 0.05). Short-term occupational lead exposure may increase the counts of inflammatory cells in blood, but it has little effect on red blood cells and hemoglobin.

  3. Making up” Workers in an Inclusive Organisation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dahl, Dorte Boesby

    2014-01-01

    Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to investigate the unintended consequences of managing inclusion and diversity and how these unintended consequences relate to organisation members’ mediation between work tasks and practices of inclusion and diversity. Design/methodology/approach – The study...... uses critical diversity and inclusion studies as the theoretical context and a Danish municipal centre responsible for parking patrol as the empirical context. The researcher has conducted interviews and participant observation in this organisation and particularly analyses the “making up” of abstract...... categories of employees and the mundane “making of” employees in the light of diversity and inclusion practices. Findings – The analysis shows that parking attendants are “made up” as an increasingly professionalised brand and that the inclusive policy of diversity becomes part of this brand. However...

  4. The effect of the hemochromatosis (HFE genotype on lead load and iron metabolism among lead smelter workers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guangqin Fan

    Full Text Available Both an excess of toxic lead (Pb and an essential iron disorder have been implicated in many diseases and public health problems. Iron metabolism genes, such as the hemochromatosis (HFE gene, have been reported to be modifiers for lead absorption and storage. However, the HFE gene studies among the Asian population with occupationally high lead exposure are lacking.To explore the modifying effects of the HFE genotype (wild-type, H63D variant and C282Y variant on the Pb load and iron metabolism among Asian Pb-workers with high occupational exposure.Seven hundred and seventy-one employees from a lead smelter manufacturing company were tested to determine their Pb intoxication parameters, iron metabolic indexes and identify the HFE genotype. Descriptive and multivariate analyses were conducted.Forty-five H63D variant carriers and no C282Y variant carrier were found among the 771 subjects. Compared with subjects with the wild-type genotype, H63D variant carriers had higher blood lead levels, even after controlling for factors such as age, sex, marriage, education, smoking and lead exposure levels. Multivariate analyses also showed that the H63D genotype modifies the associations between the blood lead levels and the body iron burden/transferrin.No C282Y variant was found in this Asian population. The H63D genotype modified the association between the lead and iron metabolism such that increased blood lead is associated with a higher body iron content or a lower transferrin in the H63D variant. It is indicated that H63D variant carriers may be a potentially highly vulnerable sub-population if they are exposed to high lead levels occupationally.

  5. The Choice Project: Peer Workers Promoting Shared Decision Making at a Youth Mental Health Service.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simmons, Magenta Bender; Batchelor, Samantha; Dimopoulos-Bick, Tara; Howe, Deb

    2017-08-01

    In youth mental health services, consumer participation is essential, but few implementation strategies exist to engage young consumers. This project evaluated an intervention implemented in an Australian youth mental health service that utilized peer workers to promote shared decision making via an online tool. All new clients ages 16-25 were invited to participate in this nonrandomized comparative study, which used a historical comparison group (N=80). Intervention participants (N=149) engaged with a peer worker and used the online tool before and during their intake assessment. Pre- and postintake data were collected for both groups; measures included decisional conflict, perceived shared decision making, and satisfaction. A series of paired t tests, analyses of variance, and multiple regressions were conducted to assess differences in scores across intervention and comparison groups and pre- and postintake assessments. Ratings of perceived shared decision making with intake workers were higher in the intervention group than in the comparison group (p=.015). In both groups, decisional conflict scores were significantly lower after the intake assessment (pshared decision making and lower decisional conflict were associated with satisfaction (pshared decision making reported feeling more involved in their assessment. Feeling involved and having lower decisional conflict after seeing an intake worker were important for client satisfaction. These findings demonstrate the importance of both peer work and shared decision making for promoting optimal outcomes in youth mental health services.

  6. Blood Lead Levels and Cause-Specific Mortality of Inorganic Lead-Exposed Workers in South Korea.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Min-Gi Kim

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to identify the association of blood lead level (BLL with mortality in inorganic lead-exposed workers of South Korea. A cohort was compiled comprising 81,067 inorganic lead exposed workers working between January 1, 2000, and December 31, 2004. This cohort was merged with the Korean National Statistical Office to follow-up for mortality between 2000 and 2008. After adjusting for age and other carcinogenic metal exposure, all-cause mortality (Relative risk [RR] 1.36, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.03-1.79, digestive disease (RR 3.23, 95% CI 1.33-7.86, and intentional self-harm (RR 2.92, 95% CI 1.07-7.81 were statistically significantly higher in males with BLL >20 μg/dl than of those with BLL ≤10μg/dl. The RR of males with BLL of 10-20 μg/dl was statistically higher than of those with BLL ≤10μg/dl in infection (RR 3.73. 95% CI, 1.06-13.06. The RRs of females with 10-20 μg/dl BLL was statistically significantly greater than those with BLL <10μg/dl in all-cause mortality (RR 1.93, 95% CI 1.16-3.20 and colon and rectal cancer (RR 13.42, 95% CI 1.21-149.4. The RRs of females with BLL 10-20 μg/dl (RR 10.45, 95% CI 1.74-62.93 and BLL ≥20 μg/dl (RR 12.68, 95% CI 1.69-147.86 was statistically significantly increased in bronchus and lung cancer. The increased suicide of males with ≥20 μg/dl BLLs, which might be caused by major depression, might be associated with higher lead exposure. Also, increased bronchus and lung cancer mortality in female workers with higher BLL might be related to lead exposure considering low smoking rate in females. The kinds of BLL-associated mortality differed by gender.

  7. High blood lead levels in ceramic folk art workers in Michoacan, Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandez, G O; Martinez, R R; Fortoul, T I; Palazuelos, E

    1997-01-01

    Ceramic folk art workers are at risk for developing lead intoxication. These workers live in small settlements, which often lack sanitation services, and these individuals work with ceramics in their homes. The study population comprised individuals of all ages from three rural communities in central Michoacan (Tzintzuntzan, Tzintzunzita, and Colonia Lazaro Cardenas). A survey questionnaire, which was provided to each individual, included questions about household characteristics, presence of a clay oven in the home, and use of lead oxide ("greta") and other hazardous products. Venous blood samples were obtained from the workers. We found lead exposure to be reduced if the home floor was covered and if the house had been painted < or =1 y prior to study. Blood lead levels exceeded the maximum level permitted, but the levels were lower than those found in the 1970s, during which time study techniques for analyzing samples differed from those used in the present study. In addition, activity patterns of the populations differed during the two studies.

  8. Lead Paint Poisonings: How Can Innovative Technology Make a Difference?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lead is a toxic metal that may cause a range of health effects, from behavioral problems and learning disabilities, to seizures and death. Children six years old and under are most at risk. Exposure to lead usually occurs due to the presence of deteriorating lead-based paint (LBP...

  9. Correlation between Blood Lead Levels and Anaemia in Commercial Enamel Paint Industry Workers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. Mazumdar

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: Lead causes acute, sub-acute or chronic poisoning through occupational exposure along with decrease in some trace elements like iron, whose absorption, distribution, metabolism and elimination being affected. Iron deficiency is a serious problem especially in developing countries and lead toxicity can augment anaemia directly by decreasing absorption of Iron and also by inhibiting enzymes of heme synthesis. Aim and Objectives: To assess haematological indices and serum iron and ferritin levels in Enamel paint industry workers who are exposed to very high Lead levels due to their occupation, and determine iron deficiency anaemia. Materials and Methods: Blood lead concentration was measured by Atomic Absorption Spectrophotometric (AAS method. Haematological tests were performed using cell counter to measure haemoglobin, red blood cell and white blood cell count, etc. Mean corpuscular volume, mean corpuscular haemoglobin and mean corpuscular haemoglobin concentration were calculated. Serum ferritin and iron levels were assayed by chemilumenescence and spectrophotometric methods respectively. Results: All the parameters measured and calculated were found to be altered in paint workers as compared to healthy controls, with significant increase in blood lead level and decrease in the haematological as well as other analyte values. Conclusion: There seems to be a direct relationship between chronic lead exposure and the haematological disturbances, resulting in iron deficiency anaemia. Hence awareness about this association should be increased and protective measures should be implied accordingly.

  10. Alloys for making electrode supports in lead accumulators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dalibard, G.; Viaud, N.

    1981-03-03

    Low antimony alloys of lead are used for casting electrode supports in lead accumulators. They include less than 4% antimony by weight to avoid various poisoning effects of antimony on the electrochemical processes involved. Such alloys tend to have grains of excessive size which can lead to brittle castings. To reduce the grain size the present invention includes an additive constituted by a rare earth or a mixture of rare earths, e.g., misch metal at between 0.001% and 1% by weight, and preferably at 2%. The invention also provides an electrode support cast fr the alloy, an electrode including such a support and a lead acid battery including such electrodes.

  11. Lead

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... is serious about making sure companies that break the law are held accountable In the past year, EPA ... the health effects of lead in drinking water The law mandates no-lead products for drinking water after ...

  12. Association of Lead Exposure, Serum Uric Acid and Parameters of Renal Function in Nigerian Lead-Exposed Workers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    DD Alasia

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: The presence of hyperuricemia and renal function impairment, especially in the absence of urate stone formation is strongly suggestive of lead nephropathy. The evaluation of this association is essential in areas where lead exposure is still prevalent and uncontrolled. Objective: To determine the relationship between serum uric acid and renal function indices in lead-exposed workers. Methods: A cross-sectional study of 190 adults with occupational lead exposure and 80 adults (comparison group, matched for age and sex was performed in Port Harcourt, South-south Nigeria. Blood lead was used as the biomarker of lead exposure while serum urea, serum creatinine, urine albumin (using urine albumin:creatinine ratio, estimated glomerular filtration rate (GFR and serum uric acid were the renal function indices measured. Results: Occupationally lead-exposed subjects had a significantly (p = 0.008 higher mean±SD blood lead levels (50.37±24.58 μg/dL than the comparison group (41.40±26.85. The mean±SD serum urea (8.6±2.3 mg/dL, creatinine (1.0±0.2 mg/dL and serum uric acid (4.6±1.2 mg/dL were significantly (p < 0.01 higher in the study subjects than the comparison group (7.6±2.4, 0.9±0.2, and 3.9±1.1 mg/dL, respectively. The mean±SD creatinine clearance was significantly (p = 0.002 lower in the study subjects than the comparison group (98.9±21.3 vs. 108.2±25.2 mL/min/1.72 m2. Serum uric acid level correlated positively with serum creatinine (r = 0.134 and negatively with GFR (r = ‑0.151. Conclusion: People with occupational lead exposure are at risk of developing hyperuricemia and renal impairment.

  13. Clinical, Toxicological, Biochemical, and Hematologic Parameters in Lead Exposed Workers of a Car Battery Industry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sina Kianoush

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Lead is a toxic element which causes acute, subacute or chronic poisoning through environmental and occupational exposure. The aim of this study was to investigate clinical and laboratory abnormalities of chronic lead poisoning among workers of a car battery industry. Methods: Questionnaires and forms were designed and used to record demographic data, past medical histories and clinical manifestations of lead poisoning. Blood samples were taken to determine biochemical (using Auto Analyzer; Model BT3000 and hematologic (using Cell Counter Sysmex; Model KX21N parameters. An atomic absorption spectrometer (Perkin-Elmer, Model 3030, USA was used to determine lead concentration in blood and urine by heated graphite atomization technique. Results: A total of 112 men mean age 28.78±5.17 years, who worked in a car battery industry were recruited in the present study. The most common signs/symptoms of lead poisoning included increased excitability 41.9%, arthralgia 41.0%, fatigue 40.1%, dental grey discoloration 44.6%, lead line 24.1%, increased deep tendon reflexes (DTR 22.3%, and decreased DTR (18.7%. Blood lead concentration (BLC was 398.95 µg/L±177.40, which was significantly correlated with duration of work (P=0.044 but not with the clinical manifestations of lead poisoning. However, BLC was significantly correlated with urine lead concentration (83.67 µg/L±49.78; r2=0.711; P<0.001, mean corpuscular hemoglobin (r=-0.280; P=0.011, mean corpuscular hemoglobin concentration (r=-0.304; P=0.006 and fasting blood sugar or FBS (r=-0.258; P=0.010. Conclusion: Neuropsychiatric and skeletal findings were common manifestations of chronic occupational lead poisoning. BLC was significantly correlated with duration of work, urine lead concentration, two hemoglobin indices and FBS.

  14. A cohort mortality study of lead-exposed workers in the USA, Finland and the UK.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steenland, Kyle; Barry, Vaughn; Anttila, Ahti; Sallmén, Markku; McElvenny, Damien; Todd, A C; Straif, Kurt

    2017-11-01

    To investigate further whether inorganic lead is a carcinogen among adults, or associated with increased blood pressure and kidney damage, via a large mortality study. We conducted internal analyses via Cox regression of mortality in three cohorts of lead-exposed workers with blood lead (BL) data (USA, Finland, UK), including over 88 000 workers and over 14 000 deaths. Our exposure metric was maximum BL. We also conducted external analyses using country-specific background rates. The combined cohort had a median BL of 26 µg/dL, a mean first-year BL test of 1990 and was 96% male. Fifty per cent had more than one BL test (mean 7). Significant (p40 µg/dL; for bladder, lung and larynx cancer; and for COPD. In a small subsample of the US cohort (n=115) who were interviewed, we found no association between smoking and BL. We found strong positive mortality trends, with increasing BL level, for several outcomes in internal analysis. Many of these outcomes are associated with smoking, for which we had no data. A borderline trend was found for brain cancer, not associated with smoking. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  15. Markers of early renal changes induced by industrial pollutants. II. Application to workers exposed to lead.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cárdenas, A; Roels, H; Bernard, A M; Barbon, R; Buchet, J P; Lauwerys, R R; Roselló, J; Ramis, I; Mutti, A; Franchini, I

    1993-01-01

    The present study has been carried out in the framework of a collaborative research project on the development of new markers of nephrotoxicity. A battery of more than 20 potential indicators of renal changes has been applied to 50 workers exposed to lead (Pb) and 50 control subjects. After application of selection criteria 41 exposed and 41 control workers were eventually retained for the final statistical analysis. The average blood Pb concentration of exposed workers was 480 micrograms/l and their mean duration of exposure was 14 years. The battery of tests included parameters capable of detecting functional deficits (for example, urinary proteins of low or high molecular weight), biochemical alterations (for example, urinary eicosanoids, glycosaminoglycans, sialic acid) or cell damage (for example, urinary tubular antigens or enzymes) at different sites of the nephron or the kidney. The most outstanding effect found in workers exposed to Pb was an interference with the renal synthesis of eicosanoids, resulting in lower urinary excretion of 6-keto-PGF1 alpha and an enhanced excretion of thromboxane (TXB2). The health significance of these biochemical alterations, detectable at low exposure to Pb is unknown. As they were not associated with any sign of renal dysfunction, they may represent reversible biochemical effects or only contribute to the degradation of the renal function from the onset of clinical Pb nephropathy. The urinary excretion of some tubular antigens was also positively associated with duration of exposure to Pb. Another effect of Pb that might deserve further study is a significant increase in urinary sialic acid concentration. PMID:8431388

  16. Mortality of lead smelter workers: A follow-up study with exposure assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertke, Stephen J; Lehman, Everett J; Wurzelbacher, Steven J; Hein, Misty J

    2016-11-01

    Lead exposure has been linked to impaired renal function and kidney failure. High lead exposures have been associated with increased mortality from certain cancers, hypertension, cardiovascular disease, and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). We extended vital status follow-up on a cohort of 1,990 lead smelter workers by 25 years and computed standardized mortality ratios and rate ratios (RR) stratified by cumulative lead exposure. The update added 13,823 person-years at risk and 721 deaths. Increased risk of mortality was observed for the a priori outcomes of lung cancer, cardiovascular disease (including cerebrovascular disease), chronic kidney disease, and ALS. However, of these outcomes, only cardiovascular, cerebrovascular, and chronic kidney diseases were associated with a positive exposure-response in RR analyses. This study reaffirms the association of lead exposure with cardiovascular and kidney diseases; however, increased mortality observed for certain cancers is not likely to be due to lead exposure. Am. J. Ind. Med. 59:979-986, 2016. Published 2016. This article is a U.S. Government work and is in the public domain in the USA. Published 2016. This article is a U.S. Government work and is in the public domain in the USA.

  17. Activity-based analyses lead to better decision making.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Player, S

    1998-08-01

    Activity-based costing (ABC) and activity-based management (ABM) are cost-management tools that are relatively new to the healthcare industry. ABC is used for strategic decision making. It assesses the costs associated with specific activities and resources and links those costs to specific internal and external customers of the healthcare enterprise (e.g., patients, service lines, and physician groups) to determine the costs associated with each customer. This cost information then can be adjusted to account for anticipated changes and to predict future costs. ABM, on the other hand, supports operations by focusing on the causes of costs and how costs can be reduced. It assesses cost drivers that directly affect the cost of a product or service, and uses performance measures to evaluate the financial or nonfinancial benefit an activity provides. By identifying each cost driver and assessing the value the element adds to the healthcare enterprise, ABM provides a basis for selecting areas that can be changed to reduce costs.

  18. GFR and Blood Lead Levels in Gas Station Workers Based on δ-Alad Gene Polymorphisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lantip Rujito

    2015-04-01

    showed that the proportion of ALAD genotype for ALAD 1-1, 1-2 and 2-2 were 94.7%, 5.3%, and 0% respectively. The mean of serum levels in homozygous 1-1 was 15.94 ppb and heterozygote 1-2 was 1.15 ppb. GFR of participants ranged from 71.11 mL/min to 185.20 mL/min with a mean of 117.34mL/min. There was no correlation between serum Pb and GFR (p = 0.19. Study also could not determine the correlation between GFR and ALAD gene Polymorphism. Discussion: Study then concluded that there was no correlation between blood lead levels in the GFR on each δ-ALAD genotypes. Keywords: Lead intoxication, GFR, δ-ALAD, gas station workers

  19. Smoking, diet, and health behaviors among lead-exposed blue-collar workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahar, D R; Kristal-Boneh, E; Froom, P; Harari, G; Ribak, J

    1999-01-01

    The objectives of the study were to compare dietary intake by smoking levels in blue-collar Israeli workers occupationally exposed to lead and thus identify additional areas for health-enhancing intervention in addition to smoking cessation. One hundred and eighty-seven male industrial employees who were exposed to lead through their work were screened at the worksite to evaluate health status and dietary intake. Smokers had higher intakes of fat, cholesterol, calcium, riboflavin, and vitamin E per day. They were consuming more meat and high-fat dairy products. Dose-response relationships were shown for fat and energy intake by smoking level. Thus, smoking is associated with other adverse health behaviors. When conducting epidemiologic or occupational studies, analyses should include adjustment for the fact that the lifestyles of smokers may also be unhealthy in other ways.

  20. Leading to Decide or Deciding to Lead? Understanding the Relationship between Teacher Leadership and Decision Making

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emira, Mahmoud

    2010-01-01

    This article, first, examines how Egyptian teachers and senior teachers (formal leaders) define leadership and whether the length of their teaching experience has an effect on their views. Second, it explores their perspectives on the relationship between teacher leadership and decision making. The research sample is a mixed group of 20 Egyptian…

  1. Constructions of accountability in child protection workers decision-making processes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schrøder, Ida Marie

    2014-01-01

    In order to meet public and political demands on more transparent and efficient public spending the Danish local governments have, as in many other European countries, implemented strict budget constraints and decision control. Within child protection work the aim has been to strengthen managerial...... accountability in the hopes that child protection workers would be motivated to take into account budget constraints, and public economy in general, when deciding on social interventions. Inspired by the sociological practice-oriented accounting literature, this paper explores child protection workers...... construction of accountability as relational effects of these new forms of accounting practice. The paper draws on the preliminary results from a 2 ½ year mixed method study of how budgeting and accounting practice influences the processes of decision-making in child protection work. The data has been...

  2. Occupational exposure and biological evaluation of lead in Iranian workers-a systematic review and meta-analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kourosh Sayehmiri

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Lead exposure is considered as a global health problem. The irreparable harmful effects of this heavy metal on human have been proven in various studies. Comparing to general population, workers in related industries are more exposed to lead. Several studies have investigated lead occupational exposure and its biological evaluation in Iran; however there is no overall estimate. Thus, the present study was conducted to determine the occupational exposure to lead and its biological evaluation in Iranian workers, using systematic review and meta-analysis. Material and Method: This study was carried out based on information obtained from databases including Magiran, Iranmedex, SID, Medlib, Trials Register, Scopus, Pubmed, Science Direct, Cochran, Embase, Medline, Web of Science, Springer, Online Library Wiley, and Google Scholar from 1991 to 2016, using standard key words. All of the reviewed papers which met the inclusion criteria have been evaluated. Data combination was performed according to Random Effects Model using Stata software version 11.1. Result: In the 34 qualified studies, the mean blood lead level (BLL concentration in Iranian workers was estimated 42.8µg/dl (95% CI: 35.15-50.49. The minimum and maximum BLL were belonged to west (28.348µg/dl and center (45.928µg/dl regions of Iran, respectively. Considering different occupations, the lowest mean value was reported in textile industry workers (12.3 µg/dl, while the highest value was for zinc-lead mine workers (72.6 µg/dl. Mean breathing air lead level of Iranian workers reported in 4 studies was estimated 0.23 mg/m3 (95% CI: 0.14-0.33. Conclusion: According to the high concentration of BLL and breathing air, it is recommended to increase protective measures and frequent screening. Scheduled clinical and paraclinical examination should also be performed for workers.

  3. Association of office and ambulatory blood pressure with blood lead in workers before occupational exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Wen-Yi; Efremov, Ljupcho; Mujaj, Blerim; Zhang, Zhen-Yu; Wei, Fang-Fei; Huang, Qi-Fang; Thijs, Lutgarde; Vanassche, Thomas; Nawrot, Tim S; Staessen, Jan A

    2017-11-09

    In view of decreasing lead exposure and guidelines endorsing ambulatory above office blood pressure (BP) measurement, we reassessed association of BP with blood lead (BL) in 236 newly employed men (mean age, 28.6 years) without previous lead exposure not treated for hypertension. Office BP was the mean of five auscultatory readings at one visit. Twenty-four-hour BP was recorded at 15- and 30-minute intervals during wakefulness and sleep. BL was determined by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. Systolic/diastolic office BP averaged 120.0/80.7 mm Hg, and the 24-hour, awake, and asleep BP 125.5/73.6, 129.3/77.9, and 117.6/65.0 mm Hg, respectively. The geometric mean of blood lead was 4.5 μg/dL (interquartile range, 2.60-9.15 μg/dL). In multivariable-adjusted analyses, effect sizes associated with BL doubling were 0.79/0.87 mm Hg (P = .11/.043) for office BP and 0.29/-0.25, 0.60/-0.10, and -0.40/-0.43 mm Hg for 24-hour, awake, and asleep BP (P ≥ .33). Neither office nor 24-hour ambulatory hypertension was related to BL (P ≥ .14). A clinically relevant white coat effect (WCE; office minus awake BP, ≥20/≥10 mm Hg) was attributable to exceeding the systolic or diastolic threshold in 1 and 45 workers, respectively. With BL doubling, the systolic/diastolic WCE increased by 0.20/0.97 mm Hg (P = .57/.046). Accounting for the presence of a diastolic WCE, reduced the association size of office diastolic BP with BL to 0.39 mm Hg (95% confidence interval, -0.20 to 1.33; P = .15). In conclusion, a cross-sectional analysis of newly hired workers before lead exposure identified the WCE as confounder of the association between office BP and BL and did not reveal any association between ambulatory BP and BL. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Effects of Lead Exposure and Genetic Polymorphisms on ALAD and GPx Activities in Brazilian Battery Workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Cunha Martins, Airton; Mazzaron Barcelos, Gustavo Rafael; Jacob Ferreira, Anna Laura Bechara; de Souza, Marilesia Ferreira; de Syllos Cólus, Ilce Mara; Antunes, Lusânia Maria Greggi; Bastos Paoliello, Monica Maria; Adeyemi, Joseph A; Barbosa, Fernando

    2015-01-01

    Lead (Pb) is a toxic metal that is widely used by metallurgical industries such as car battery recycling. Exposure to the metal may modify the redox status of the cells and consequently result in changes in activities of important enzymes such as delta-aminolevulinic acid dehydratase (ALAD) and glutathione peroxidase (GPx). Similarly, genetic polymorphisms may modulate the activities of enzymes related to detoxification processes of the metal and may modify Pb body burden. Therefore, the aims of the present study were (i) to evaluate the correlation between blood lead levels (BLL) and activities of the enzymes ALAD and GPx, and (ii) to determine whether activities of these enzymes may be influenced by polymorphisms in ALAD and GPx genes in Brazilian automotive battery workers chronically exposed to Pb, as well as the effects of these polymorphisms on BLL. Our study included 257 participants; BLL were determined by inductively couple plasma-mass spectrometry (ICP-MS), and the activities of the enzymes ALAD and GPx were quantified spectrophotometrically; and genotyping of ALAD (rs1800435) and GPx-1 (rs1800668) polymorphisms was performed by TaqMan assays (real-time polymerase chain reaction, RT-PCR). Significant negative correlations were found between BLL and ALAD activity. Subjects who carried at least one polymorphic allele for ALAD gene displayed markedly lower ALAD activities, while no significant effect was observed regarding GPx-1 polymorphism and activity of the same enzyme. Further, ALAD and GPx-1 polymorphisms exerted no marked influence on BLL. Taken together, our results showed that BLL affected ALAD but not GPx activities, and these were not modulated by polymorphisms in ALAD and GPx gene. Further, the rs1800435 SNP showed a tendency to modulate ALAD activity, while the rs1800668 SNP did not modulate GPx activity in Brazilian automotive battery workers exposed to Pb.

  5. Uroporphyrinogen-I-synthetase activity in red blood cells of lead-exposed workers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    El-Waseef, A.

    1982-01-01

    Lead-exposed (n . 26) and control (n . 12) subjects were investigated for their blood lead concentration erythrocyte 5-amino-laevulinic acid dehydratase (5-ALAD) and erythrocyte uroporphyrinogen-I-synthetase (URO-I-S) activity; 5-amino-laevulinic acid (5-ALA) and porphobilinogen (PBG) were used as substrates in the synthetase assay. In the lead workers erythrocyte 5-ALA dehydratase was grossly inhibited but with PBG as substrate the synthetase activity was not significantly different from the control group. With 5-ALA as substrate the synthetase assay showed marked inhibition. Addition of zinc (0.1 mmol/l) and dithiotheritol (0.5 mmol/l) brought the activities of both the dehydratase and synthetase (using 5-ALA as substrate) back into the ranges seen in the control group. With porphobilinogen as substrate higher concentrations of zinc caused inhibition of the synthetase, whilst reduction of added zinc to 0.01 mmol/l resulted in stimulation of the synthetase. A good correlation (r . 0.87) was obtained in synthetase assay when PBG and 5-aminolaevulinate (with added zinc and dithiothreitol) were used as substrates. With these additions 5-ALA may be used as a substrate in the URO-I-S assay in the investigation of latent cases of acute intermittent porphyria.

  6. Serum Neuron-Specific Enolase, Biogenic Amino-Acids and Neurobehavioral Function in Lead-Exposed Workers from Lead-Acid Battery Manufacturing Process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K Ravibabu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The interaction between serum neuron-specific enolase (NSE, biogenic amino-acids and neurobehavioral function with blood lead levels in workers exposed to lead form lead-acid battery manufacturing process was not studied. Objective: To evaluate serum NSE and biogenic amino-acids (dopamine and serotonin levels, and neurobehavioral performance among workers exposed to lead from lead-acid storage battery plant, and its relation with blood lead levels (BLLs. Methods: In a cross-sectional study, we performed biochemical and neurobehavioral function tests on 146 workers exposed to lead from lead-acid battery manufacturing process. BLLs were assessed by an atomic absorption spectrophotometer. Serum NSE, dopamine and serotonin were measured by ELISA. Neurobehavioral functions were assessed by CDC-recommended tests—simple reaction time (SRT, symbol digit substitution test (SDST, and serial digit learning test (SDLT. Results: There was a significant correlation (r 0.199, p<0.05 between SDST and BLL. SDLT and SRT had also a significant positive correlation (r 0.238, p<0.01. NSE had a negative correlation (r –0.194, p<0.05 with serotonin level. Multiple linear regression analysis revealed that both SRT and SDST had positive significant associations with BLL. SRT also had a positive significant association with age. Conclusion: Serum NSE cannot be used as a marker for BLL. The only domain of neurobehavioral function tests that is affected by increased BLL in workers of lead-acid battery manufacturing process is that of the “attention and perception” (SDST.

  7. A qualitative exploration of work-related head injury: vulnerability at the intersection of workers' decision making and organizational values.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kontos, P; Grigorovich, A; Nowrouzi, B; Sharma, B; Lewko, J; Mollayeva, T; Colantonio, A

    2017-10-18

    Work-related head injury is a critical public health issue due to its rising prevalence; the association with profound disruption of workers' lives; and significant economic burdens in terms of medical costs and lost wages. Efforts to understand and prevent these types of injuries have largely been dominated by epidemiological research and safety science, which has focused on identifying risk at the level of the individual worker, population group, or organizational sector. Limited research has focused on the perspectives of the workers, a key stakeholder group for informing understanding of vulnerability to work-related head injury. This study explored workers' perspectives to better understand their decision-making and how and why their injuries occurred. We conducted a qualitative study using in-depth semi-structured interviews with thirty-two adult workers who had sustained a work-related head injury. Workers were recruited from an urban clinic in central Ontario, Canada. Labour Process Theory informed the thematic analysis. Three hazardous work conditions were identified: insufficient training; inadequate staffing; and inattention to the physical environment. In addition, professional and organizational norms were implicated in vulnerability to head injury including putting the client before the worker and the pressure to work unsafely. The findings also highlight a complex interrelationship between workers' decision-making and professional and organizational norms that produces vulnerability to head injury, a vulnerability which oftentimes is reproduced by workers' decisions to work despite hazardous conditions. Our findings suggest that, beyond the need to redress the inattention to hazards in the physical environment, there is a need to address norms that influence worker decision-making to improve the safety of workers. Using Labour Process Theory highlights an important social dynamic within workplace sectors that could inform future development and

  8. Interaction of blood lead and delta-aminolevulinic acid dehydratase genotype on markers of heme synthesis and sperm production in lead smelter workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexander, B H; Checkoway, H; Costa-Mallen, P; Faustman, E M; Woods, J S; Kelsey, K T; van Netten, C; Costa, L G

    1998-04-01

    The gene that encodes gamma-aminolevulinic acid dehydratase (ALAD) has a polymorphism that may modify lead toxicokinetics and ultimately influence individual susceptibility to lead poisoning. To evaluate the effect of the ALAD polymorphism on lead-mediated outcomes, a cross-sectional study of male employees from a lead-zinc smelter compared associations between blood lead concentration and markers of heme synthesis and semen quality with respect to ALAD genotype. Male employees were recruited via postal questionnaire to donate blood and urine for analysis of blood lead, zinc protoporphyrin (ZPP), urinary coproporphyrin (CPU), and ALAD genotype, and semen samples for semen analysis. Of the 134 workers who had ALAD genotypes completed, 114 (85%) were ALAD1-1 (ALAD1) and 20 (15%) were ALAD1-2 (ALAD2). The mean blood lead concentrations for ALAD1 and ALAD2 were 23.1 and 28.4 microg/dl (p = 0.08), respectively. ZPP/heme ratios were higher in ALAD1 workers (68.6 vs. 57.8 micromol/ml; p = 0.14), and the slope of the blood lead ZPP linear relationship was greater for ALAD1 (2.83 vs. 1.50, p = 0.06). No linear relationship between CPU and blood lead concentration was observed for either ALAD1 or ALAD2. The associations of blood lead concentration with ZPP, CPU, sperm count, and sperm concentration were more evident in workers with the ALAD1 genotype and blood lead concentrations >/= 40 microg/dl. The ALAD genetic polymorphism appears to modify the association between blood lead concentration and ZPP. However, consistent modification of effects were not found for CPU, sperm count, or sperm concentration.

  9. Causality pattern of the blood lead, monoamine oxidase A, and serotonin levels in brass home industry workers chronically exposed to lead

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aditya Marianti

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The present study aims to analyse the effects of lead (Pb chronic exposure on blood lead levels, Monoamine oxidase A enzyme (MAO A and serotonin levels of brass craftsmen in Pati, Central Java, Indonesia, and to examine the connections among these three variables. The brass home industry area was polluted by lead. Thus, it chronically exposes the workers to lead pollution. Therefore, their blood lead level increased and later raised the level of MAO A and reduced the level of serotonin. Path analysis results show that the path coefficient (ñ of lead effects in decreasing serotonin through MAO A pathway is -0.411. Furthermore, lead effects that directly affect serotonin level without passing through MAO A pathway is -0.391 with residual coefficient (e of 0.572. In conclusion, the increase of blood lead level causes an increase in level of MAO A and drop in the level of serotonin.

  10. Beta-carotene reduces oxidative stress, improves glutathione metabolism and modifies antioxidant defense systems in lead-exposed workers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kasperczyk, Sławomir, E-mail: kaslav@mp.pl [Dept. of Biochemistry, School of Medicine with the Division of Dentistry, Medical University of Silesia, ul. Jordana 19, 41-808 Zabrze (Poland); Dobrakowski, Michał [Dept. of Biochemistry, School of Medicine with the Division of Dentistry, Medical University of Silesia, ul. Jordana 19, 41-808 Zabrze (Poland); Kasperczyk, Janusz [Dept. of Environmental Medicine and Epidemiology, School of Medicine with the Division of Dentistry, Medical University of Silesia, ul. Jordana 19, 41-808 Zabrze (Poland); Ostałowska, Alina; Zalejska-Fiolka, Jolanta; Birkner, Ewa [Dept. of Biochemistry, School of Medicine with the Division of Dentistry, Medical University of Silesia, ul. Jordana 19, 41-808 Zabrze (Poland)

    2014-10-01

    The aim of this study was to determine whether beta-carotene administration reduces oxidative stress and influences antioxidant, mainly glutathione-related, defense systems in workers chronically exposed to lead. The population consisted of two randomly divided groups of healthy male volunteers exposed to lead. Workers in the first group (reference group) were not administered any antioxidants, while workers in the second group (CAR group) were treated orally with 10 mg of beta-carotene once a day for 12 weeks. Biochemical analysis included measuring markers of lead-exposure and oxidative stress in addition to the levels and activities of selected antioxidants. After treatment, levels of malondialdehyde, lipid hydroperoxides and lipofuscin significantly decreased compared with the reference group. However, the level of glutathione significantly increased compared with the baseline. Treatment with beta-carotene also resulted in significantly decreased glutathione peroxidase activity compared with the reference group, while the activities of other glutathione-related enzymes and of superoxide dismutase were not significantly changed. However, the activities of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase and catalase, as well as the level of alpha-tocopherol, were significantly higher after treatment compared with the baseline. Despite controversy over the antioxidant properties of beta-carotene in vivo, our findings showed reduced oxidative stress after beta-carotene supplementation in chronic lead poisoning. - Highlights: • Beta-carotene reduces oxidative stress in lead-exposed workers. • Beta-carotene elevates glutathione level in lead-exposed workers. • Beta-carotene administration could be beneficial in lead poisoning.

  11. Challenging Operations: An Ethical Framework to Assist Humanitarian Aid Workers in their Decision-making Processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clarinval, Caroline; Biller-Andorno, Nikola

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: This paper aims to raise awareness regarding ethical issues in the context of humanitarian action, and to offer a framework for systematically and effectively addressing such issues. Methods: Several cases highlight ethical issues that humanitarian aid workers are confronted with at different levels over the course of their deployments. The first case discusses a situation at a macro-level concerning decisions being made at the headquarters of a humanitarian organization. The second case looks at meso-level issues that need to be solved at a country or regional level. The third case proposes an ethical dilemma at the micro-level of the individual patient-provider relationship. Discussion: These real-life cases have been selected to illustrate the ethical dimension of conflicts within the context of humanitarian action that might remain unrecognized in everyday practice. In addition, we propose an ethical framework to assist humanitarian aid workers in their decision-making process. The framework draws on the principles and values that guide humanitarian action and public health ethics more generally. Beyond identifying substantive core values, the framework also includes a ten-step process modelled on tools used in the clinical setting that promotes a transparent and clear decision-making process and improves the monitoring and evaluation of aid interventions. Finally, we recommend organizational measures to implement the framework effectively. Conclusion: This paper uses a combination of public health/clinical ethics concepts and practices and applies them to the decision-making challenges encountered in relief operations in the humanitarian aid context. PMID:24987575

  12. The influence of β-carotene on homocysteine level and oxidative stress in lead-exposed workers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sławomir Kasperczyk

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Oxidative stress is involved in lead toxicity. This suggests that some antioxidants may play a role in the treatment of lead poisoning. In the light of this, the aim of the study was to determine whether β-carotene administration reduces oxidative stress and homocysteine level in workers chronically exposed to lead. Material and Methods: The exposed population included healthy male workers exposed to lead who were randomly divided into 2 groups (mean blood lead level ca. 44 μg/dl. Workers in the 1st group (N = 49, reference group had no antioxidants, drugs, vitamins or dietary supplements administered, while workers in the 2nd group (N = 33 had β-carotene administered in a dose of 10 mg per day for 12 weeks. Biochemical analysis included markers of lead-exposure and the level of malondialdehyde (MDA, an oxidative stress biomarker. We also measured the level of homocysteine (Hcy and thiol groups as well as the activity of superoxide dismutase (SOD and its isoenzyme EC-SOD in serum. Results: After supplementation, the level of MDA significantly decreased, compared to baseline, by 16%, and to the reference group. When compared to the reference group, Hcy level was also significantly decreased. However, the level of thiol groups was significantly higher after supplementation with β-carotene compared to the reference group. Analogically, the activity of SOD and EC-SOD was significantly higher compared to the baseline and to the reference group. Conclusions: Despite some controversies over antioxidant properties of β-carotene, our results indicate that its antioxidant action could provide some beneficial effects in lead poisoning independent of chelation. Med Pr 2014;65(3:309–316

  13. Role of Workers' Education in Making Trade Unions Effective Agents for Change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pihl, Bent

    1988-01-01

    Discusses how unions with strong leadership training can help workers with their problems and describes the education needs of union members. Describes typical union policies for workers' education, as well as essential features of a workers' education program. Covers curriculum development and long-range planning. (CH)

  14. A Model of Supervisor Decision-Making in the Accommodation of Workers with Low Back Pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams-Whitt, Kelly; Kristman, Vicki; Shaw, William S; Soklaridis, Sophie; Reguly, Paula

    2016-09-01

    Purpose To explore supervisors' perspectives and decision-making processes in the accommodation of back injured workers. Methods Twenty-three semi-structured, in-depth interviews were conducted with supervisors from eleven Canadian organizations about their role in providing job accommodations. Supervisors were identified through an on-line survey and interviews were recorded, transcribed and entered into NVivo software. The initial analyses identified common units of meaning, which were used to develop a coding guide. Interviews were coded, and a model of supervisor decision-making was developed based on the themes, categories and connecting ideas identified in the data. Results The decision-making model includes a process element that is described as iterative "trial and error" decision-making. Medical restrictions are compared to job demands, employee abilities and available alternatives. A feasible modification is identified through brainstorming and then implemented by the supervisor. Resources used for brainstorming include information, supervisor experience and autonomy, and organizational supports. The model also incorporates the experience of accommodation as a job demand that causes strain for the supervisor. Accommodation demands affect the supervisor's attitude, brainstorming and monitoring effort, and communication with returning employees. Resources and demands have a combined effect on accommodation decision complexity, which in turn affects the quality of the accommodation option selected. If the employee is unable to complete the tasks or is reinjured during the accommodation, the decision cycle repeats. More frequent iteration through the trial and error process reduces the likelihood of return to work success. Conclusion A series of propositions is developed to illustrate the relationships among categories in the model. The model and propositions show: (a) the iterative, problem solving nature of the RTW process; (b) decision resources necessary

  15. [EVALUATION OF THE CARCINOGENIC RISK OF LEAD IN THE COHORT STUDY OF MALE WORKERS OCCUPATIONALLY EXPOSED TO INORGANIC LEAD IN 27 MOSCOW PRINTING-HOUSES].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ilychova, S A; Zaridze, D G

    2015-01-01

    As millions of people worldwide are expoed to inorganic lead, both in the workplace and in general environment, its potential carcinogenicity is an important health problem. Although lead has been shown to be carcinogenic in laboratory animals, epidemiological studies have been inconclusive, and the relationship between lead and human cancer is still unclear. There were several limitations that complicated the analysis and evaluation of the carcinogenic potential of lead compounds. In particular, many of the cohort studies of lead and cancer, mostly among heavily lead-exposed workers, have been limited by a failure to identify and control for covariates, especially co-exposures to other metals such as arsenic, cadmium, and chromium, which have been shown to be carcinogenic. Most of the epidemiological studies unfortunately do not have data on dose-response. The scientific merit of our study is the virtual absence of confounding by other known carcinogens. Another advantage of our study is the presence of three occupational sub-cohorts with different levels and routes of lead exposure. Most previous studies have data on dose-response provided only by comparisons of exposed to unexposed persons. In summary, the results of this cohort study suggest that occupational exposure to lead may increase the risk of cancers of the pancreas, kidney and rectum. In conclusion, despite several limitations, the results of our study add to the evidence that carcinogenicity to humans may be an additional adverse health effect of lead.

  16. CaNa2EDTA chelation attenuates cell damage in workers exposed to lead--a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Čabarkapa, A; Borozan, S; Živković, L; Stojanović, S; Milanović-Čabarkapa, M; Bajić, V; Spremo-Potparević, B

    2015-12-05

    Lead induced oxidative cellular damage and long-term persistence of associated adverse effects increases risk of late-onset diseases. CaNa2EDTA chelation is known to remove contaminating metals and to reduce free radical production. The objective was to investigate the impact of chelation therapy on modulation of lead induced cellular damage, restoration of altered enzyme activities and lipid homeostasis in peripheral blood of workers exposed to lead, by comparing the selected biomarkers obtained prior and after five-day CaNa2EDTA chelation intervention. The group of smelting factory workers diagnosed with lead intoxication and current lead exposure 5.8 ± 1.2 years were administered five-day CaNa2EDTA chelation. Elevated baseline activity of antioxidant enzymes Cu, Zn-SOD and CAT as well as depleted thiols and increased protein degradation products-carbonyl groups and nitrites, pointing to Pb induced oxidative damage, were restored toward normal values following the treatment. Lead showed inhibitor potency on both RBC AChE and BChE in exposed workers, and chelation re-established the activity of BChE, while RBC AChE remained unaffected. Also, genotoxic effect of lead detected in peripheral blood lymphocytes was significantly decreased after therapy, exhibiting 18.9% DNA damage reduction. Administration of chelation reversed the depressed activity of serum PON 1 and significantly decreased lipid peroxidation detected by the post-chelation reduction of MDA levels. Lactate dehydrogenase LDH1-5 isoenzymes levels showed evident but no significant trend of restoring toward normal control values following chelation. CaNa2EDTA chelation ameliorates the alterations linked with Pb mediated oxidative stress, indicating possible benefits in reducing health risks associated with increased oxidative damage in lead exposed populations. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. The impact of data integrity on decision making in early lead discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beck, Bernd; Seeliger, Daniel; Kriegl, Jan M

    2015-09-01

    Data driven decision making is a key element of today's pharmaceutical research, including early drug discovery. It comprises questions like which target to pursue, which chemical series to pursue, which compound to make next, or which compound to select for advanced profiling and promotion to pre-clinical development. In the following paper we will exemplify how data integrity, i.e. the context data is generated in and auxiliary information that is provided for individual result records, can influence decision making in early lead discovery programs. In addition we will describe some approaches which we pursue at Boehringer Ingelheim to reduce the risk for getting misguided.

  18. [Factors influencing electrocardiogram results in workers exposed to noise in steel-making and steel-rolling workshops of an iron and steel plant].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Y H; Yu, S F; Gu, G Z; Chen, G S; Zhou, W H; Wu, H; Jiao, J

    2016-02-20

    To investigate the factors influencing the electrocardiogram results in the workers exposed to noise in steel-making and steel rolling workshops of an iron and steel plant. From September to December, 2013, cluster sampling was used to select 3 150 workers exposed to noise in the steel-making and steel-rolling workshops of an iron and steel plant, and a questionnaire survey and physical examinations were performed. The number of valid workers was 2 915, consisting of 1 606 workers in the steel-rolling workshop and 1 309 in the steel-making workshop. The electrocardiogram results of the workers in steel-making and steel-rolling workshops were analyzed. The overall abnormal rate of electrocardiogram was 26.35%, and the workers in the steel-making workshop had a significantly higher abnormal rate of electrocardiogram than those in the steel-rolling workshop(32.24% vs 21.54%, Pelectrocardiogram than female workers(27.59% vs 18.61%, Pelectrocardiogram than those who did not drink(28.17% vs 23.75%, Pelectrocardiogram than those who were not exposed to high temperature(29.43% vs 20.14%, Pelectrocardiogram in the workers with cumulative noise exposure levels of electrocardiogram results. High cumulative noise exposure, alcohol consumption, and high temperature may affect the abnormal rate of electrocardiogram in the workers exposed to noise in steel-making and steel-rolling workshops.

  19. Montessori-based training makes a difference for home health workers & their clients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorzelle, Gregg J; Kaiser, Kathy; Camp, Cameron J

    2003-01-01

    Home care visits can last several hours. Home care workers are often at a loss on how to fill time spent in homes of clients. The challenge is how to use this time in ways that are productive and engaging for both clients and home health workers. The authors trained home health aides to implement Montessori-based activities while interacting with clients who have dementia. The results were amazing. Among other positive results, the authors found a statistically significant increase in the amount of pleasure displayed by clients after health workers received training.

  20. Salmonellosis outbreak due to chicken contact leading to a foodborne outbreak associated with infected delicatessen workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hedican, Erin; Miller, Ben; Ziemer, Brian; LeMaster, Pam; Jawahir, Selina; Leano, Fe; Smith, Kirk

    2010-08-01

    Salmonella is the most common bacterial cause of foodborne outbreaks in the United States. Starting in June 2007, investigation of a cluster of Salmonella Montevideo cases with indistinguishable pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) patterns resulted in the identification of an outbreak associated with contact with chickens purchased from a single hatchery. Nine Minnesota cases from May through August 2007 were part of this outbreak. Cases with the outbreak PFGE pattern of Salmonella Montevideo continued to occur in Minnesota after August, but none of these cases reported chicken contact. The majority of these cases resided in the same town in rural Minnesota. Routine interviews revealed that all cases from these counties purchased groceries from the same local grocery store, with two specifically reporting consuming items from the grocery store delicatessen in the week before illness. As a result, an investigation into the delicatessen was initiated. Illness histories and stool samples were collected from all delicatessen employees, and food and environmental samples were collected. None of the employees reported experiencing recent gastrointestinal symptoms, but the outbreak PFGE subtype of Salmonella Montevideo was identified from stool from two food workers. Food and environmental samples collected tested negative for Salmonella. One of the positive employees reported having chickens at home, but the animals did not test positive for Salmonella. The positive food workers were excluded from work until they had two consecutive negative stool cultures for Salmonella. There was no evidence of ongoing transmission thereafter. This was an outbreak of Salmonella Montevideo infections that began as an animal-contact-associated outbreak which subsequently resulted in a foodborne outbreak associated with infected food workers. These outbreaks illustrate the complex epidemiology of salmonellosis.

  1. An analysis of multimodal occupational exposure leading to blood borne infections among health care workers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N Lakshmi Priya

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Occupational exposure poses a significant risk of transmission of blood-borne pathogens to healthcare workers (HCWs. Adherence to standard precautions, awareness about post exposure prophylaxis is poor in developing countries. This retrospective study analyzes the self-reported cases of occupational exposure in a tertiary care hospital. During the study period, 105 HCWs sustained occupational exposure to blood and body fluids. Majority of the victims 36 (34.2% were interns and the clinical practice that led to the occupational exposure was withdrawal of blood (45.7%. Good infection control practices and emphasis on appropriate disposal are needed to increase the occupational safety for HCWs.

  2. Do better–informed workers make better retirement choices? A test based on the Social Security Statement

    OpenAIRE

    Giovanni Mastrobuoni

    2007-01-01

    In 1995, the Social Security Administration started sending out the annual Social Security Statement. It contains information about the worker’s estimated benefits at the ages 62, 65, and 70. We use this unique natural experiment to analyze the retirement and claiming decision making. First, we find that, despite the previ- ous availability of information, the Statement has a significant impact on workers’ knowledge about their benefits. These findings are consistent with a model where worker...

  3. Organising against appropriation. How self-employed workers in the creative industries make things work

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cnossen, Boukje

    2018-01-01

    Although larger firms have several advantages when it comes to operating in competitive markets, western economies have a growing number of one-person firms or individual entrepreneurs. This creates new relevance for the question of how selfemployed workers can organise themselves in order to

  4. Stress Responses and Decision Making in Child Protection Workers Faced with High Conflict Situations

    Science.gov (United States)

    LeBlanc, Vicki R.; Regehr, Cheryl; Shlonsky, Aron; Bogo, Marion

    2012-01-01

    Introduction: The assessment of children at risk of abuse and neglect is a critical societal function performed by child protection workers in situations of acute stress and conflict. Despite efforts to improve the reliability of risk assessments through standardized measures, available tools continue to rely on subjective judgment. The goal of…

  5. Role of ALAD and VDR genotypes on the association of low blood lead level with serum uric acid and blood pressure in automobile paint workers of Karachi, Pakistan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadaf, Sadia; Siddiqui, Afaq Ahmed; Ansari, Maqsood Ali

    2017-11-01

    Lead is an environmental pollutant having nephrotoxic effects even at low level. Its continuous exposure is associated with increased serum uric acid level that resulting in renal insufficiency. This research was conducted to see the effects of delta-aminolevulinic acid dehydratase (ALAD) and vitamin D receptor (VDR) genotypes on biochemical parameters and blood pressure (BP) of automobile workers having low blood lead level (BLL) with continuous lead exposure. Automobile paints workers with ALAD 1-2 genotype showed the positive association of BLL with diastolic BP (ppaint workers having ALAD 1-2 genotypes are at the risk of increased diastolic BP. The research also foretells that combination of ALAD 1-2/VDR BB may play a significant role against lead induced nephrotoxicity at low BLL with continuous lead exposure.

  6. The association between low levels of lead in blood and occupational noise-induced hearing loss in steel workers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hwang, Yaw-Huei [Institute of Occupational Medicine and Industrial Hygiene, College of Public Health, National Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan, ROC Rm. 735, 17, Xu-Zhou Rd., Taipei, Taiwan, ROC (China); Department of Public Health, College of Public Health, National Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan, ROC Rm. 735, 17, Xu-Zhou Rd., Taipei, Taiwan, ROC (China); Chiang, Han-Yueh [Institute of Occupational Medicine and Industrial Hygiene, College of Public Health, National Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan, ROC Rm. 735, 17, Xu-Zhou Rd., Taipei, Taiwan, ROC (China); Yen-Jean, Mei-Chu [Division of Family Medicine, E-Da Hospital, Taiwan, ROC 1, E-Da Rd., Jiau-Shu Tsuen, Yan-Chau Shiang, Kaohsiung County, Taiwan, ROC (China); I-Shou University, Kaohsiung County, Taiwan, ROC 1, Sec. 1, Syuecheng Rd., Da-Shu Shiang, Kaohsiung County, Taiwan, ROC (China); Wang, Jung-Der, E-mail: jdwang@ntu.edu.tw [Institute of Occupational Medicine and Industrial Hygiene, College of Public Health, National Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan, ROC Rm. 735, 17, Xu-Zhou Rd., Taipei, Taiwan, ROC (China); Department of Public Health, College of Public Health, National Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan, ROC Rm. 735, 17, Xu-Zhou Rd., Taipei, Taiwan, ROC (China); Department of Internal Medicine, National Taiwan University Hospital and National Taiwan University College of Medicine, Taipei, Taiwan, ROC No. 1, Chang-Teh St., Taipei, Taiwan, ROC (China)

    2009-12-15

    As the use of leaded gasoline has ceased in the last decade, background lead exposure has generally been reduced. The aim of this study was to examine the effect of low-level lead exposure on human hearing loss. This study was conducted in a steel plant and 412 workers were recruited from all over the plant. Personal information such as demographics and work history was obtained through a questionnaire. All subjects took part in an audiometric examination of hearing thresholds, for both ears, with air-conducted pure tones at frequencies of 500, 1000, 2000, 3000, 4000, 6000 and 8000 Hz. Subjects' blood samples were collected and analyzed for levels of manganese, copper, zinc, arsenic, cadmium and lead with inductive couple plasma-mass spectrometry. Meanwhile, noise levels in different working zones were determined using a sound level meter with A-weighting network. Only subjects with hearing loss difference of no more than 15 dB between both ears and had no congenital abnormalities were included in further data analysis. Lead was the only metal in blood found significantly correlated with hearing loss for most tested sound frequencies (p < 0.05 to p < 0.0001). After adjustment for age and noise level, the logistic regression model analysis indicated that elevated blood lead over 7 {mu}g/dL was significantly associated with hearing loss at the sound frequencies of 3000 through 8000 Hz with odds ratios raging from 3.06 to 6.26 (p < 0.05 {approx} p < 0.005). We concluded that elevated blood lead at level below 10 {mu}g/dL might enhance the noise-induced hearing loss. Future research needs to further explore the detailed mechanism.

  7. Elevation of zinc protoporphyrin levels in lead workers with iron- sufficient microcytosis.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ronin, D.; Strehl, F.; Human Resources

    1998-05-01

    Zinc protoporphyrin (ZPP) measurement is a required test under the Occupational Safety and Health Administration's lead standard. However, there is no mention of the influence of hemoglobinopathy on the ZPP test value. We undertook a retrospective laboratory review of 382 employees at the Argonne National Laboratory who had been subjects in a lead surveillance program since 1982. A total of 321 samples were analyzed, after female subjects and samples with abnormally high bilirubin levels were excluded. A group with low mean red blood cell volume (MCV; less than 80.0 fL) was compared with a group with normal MCV (greater or equal to 80.0 fL). A statistically significant difference was noted in ZPP (P < 0.007) and total bilirubin (P< 0.0003) values of two groups. There was no statistically significant difference noted in age, lead levels, or iron levels between the two groups. Abnormally high ZPP levels may occur in individuals with hemoglobinopathies. Only a minor part of this elevation could be explained by the higher bilirubin levels.

  8. The Level of Selenium and Oxidative Stress in Workers Chronically Exposed to Lead.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pawlas, Natalia; Dobrakowski, Michał; Kasperczyk, Aleksandra; Kozłowska, Agnieszka; Mikołajczyk, Agnieszka; Kasperczyk, Sławomir

    2016-03-01

    The possible beneficial role of selenium (Se) on the oxidative stress induced by lead (Pb) is still unclear in humans. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to explore the associations among the Se levels, chronic Pb exposure, oxidative stress parameters, and parameters characterizing the function of the antioxidant defense system in men who are occupationally exposed to Pb. Based on the median serum Se concentrations, the 324 study subjects were divided into two subgroups: a subgroup with a low Se level (L-Se) and a subgroup with a high Se level (H-Se). The levels of lead (PbB) and zinc protoporphyrin (ZPP) in the blood and the delta-aminolevulinic acid (ALA) level in the urine served as indices of Pb exposure. The PbB level was significantly lower in the H-Se group compared to that in the L-Se group by 6 %. The levels of 8-hydroxyguanosine and lipofuscin (LPS) and the activity of superoxide dismutase were significantly lower in the H-Se group compared to that in the L-Se group by 17, 19, and 11 %, respectively. However, the glutathione level (GSH) and the activities of glutathione peroxidase (GPx) and catalase were significantly higher by 9, 23, and 3 %. Spearman correlations showed positive associations between the Se level and GPx activity and GSH level. A lower serum Se level in chronically Pb-exposed subjects is associated with higher Pb blood levels and an elevated erythrocyte LPS level, which reflects the intensity of oxidative stress. Besides, in a group of Pb-exposed subjects with lower serum Se level, depleted GSH pool and decreased activity of GPx in erythrocytes were reported. However, the present results are inadequate to recommend Se supplementation for chronic lead exposure at higher doses than would be included in a normal diet except for selenium deficiency.

  9. Lead

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Test Safety Alert: Learn about CDC Recommendations Second Informational Call (CDC-RFA-17-1701PPHF17), April 5, 2017, ... CLPPP CAP Healthy Homes Assessment Tools Lead Health Literacy Initiative Refugee Tool Kit Resources Healthy Homes and ...

  10. Differences in national legislation for the implementation of lead regulations included in the European directive for the protection of the health and safety of workers with occupational exposure to chemical agents (98/24/EC).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Andrew; Angerer, Jurgen; Arnaud, Josiane; Claeys, Françoise; Kristiansen, Jesper; Mazarrasa, Olav; Menditto, Antonio; Patriarca, Marina; Pineau, Alain; Valkonen, Sinikka; Weykamp, Cas

    2007-01-01

    The European Council Directive 98/24 on the protection of the health and safety of workers exposed to chemical agents sets out provisions for environmental and biological monitoring, making specific reference to binding limit values and health surveillance measures for those with exposure to lead To compare how the Directive has been implemented at a national level in EU countries and to determine whether workers receive equivalent protection. Information on selected key issues was collected from 14 EU countries by means of a structured questionnaire. National occupational exposure limit values generally reflect that set by the Directive (0.15 mg/m(3)), but in five cases lower limits are set. National binding biological limit values range from 20 microg/100 ml blood in one country up to 80 microg/100 ml blood in others. The risk to the unborn child is generally recognised with specific measures for women of child-bearing potential or those that are pregnant or breast feeding. In only three countries are special arrangements included for young workers. Limits at which medical surveillance is put into effect are more consistent at 40 microg/100 ml in most countries. The Directive also refers to guidelines for health surveillance but none have been issued with respect to lead. Thus monitoring strategies and requirements for analytical performance vary considerably. The results of this survey suggest that protection of workers against the risk of exposure to lead at work is far from uniform across the European Union. Such disparity may also have implications on the requirements set at national level for laboratories measuring lead in blood and/or air. In the interest of harmonisation within the EU, further consideration should be given to the Annex II of the EC Directive 98/24, taking into account the suggestions for lower binding limit values for lead; this should include full guidelines for medical surveillance and requirements for laboratories should be issued.

  11. What makes you work while you are sick? Evidence from a survey of workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Böckerman, Petri; Laukkanen, Erkki

    2010-02-01

    Sickness absenteeism has been a focus of the EU Labour Force Surveys since the early 1970s. In contrast, sickness presenteeism is a newcomer. Based on surveys, this concept emerged in the empirical literature as late as the 1990s. Knowledge of the determinants of sickness presenteeism is still relatively sparse. The article examines the prevalence of sickness presenteeism in comparison with sickness absenteeism, using survey data covering 725 Finnish union members in 2008. We estimate logit models. The predictor variables capture working-time arrangements and the rules at the workplace. We include control variables such as the sector of the economy and educational attainment. Controlling for worker characteristics, we find that sickness presenteeism is much more sensitive to working-time arrangements than sickness absenteeism is. Permanent full-time work, mismatch between desired and actual working hours, shift or period work and overlong working weeks increase sickness presenteeism. We also find an interesting trade-off between sickness categories: regular overtime decreases sickness absenteeism, but increases sickness presenteeism. Two work-related sickness categories, absenteeism and presenteeism, are counterparts. However, the explanations for their prevalence point to different factors.

  12. Estimation of calcium, magnesium, cadmium, and lead in biological samples from paralyzed quality control and production steel mill workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afridi, Hassan Imran; Talpur, Farah Naz; Kazi, Tasneem Gul; Kazi, Naveed; Arain, Sadaf Sadia; Shah, Faheem

    2015-06-01

    The determination of trace and toxic metals in the biological samples of human beings is an important clinical screening procedure. The aim of the present study was to compare the level of essential trace and toxic elements cadmium (Cd), calcium (Ca), lead (Pb), and magnesium (Mg) in biological samples (whole blood, urine, and scalp hair) of male paralyzed production (PPW) and quality control workers (PQW) of a steel mill, age ranged (35-55 years). For comparison purposes, healthy age-matched exposed referent subjects (EC), working in steel mill and control subjects (NEC), who were not working in industries and lived far away from the industrial areas, were selected as control subjects. The concentrations of electrolytes and toxic elements in biological samples were measured by atomic absorption spectrometry after microwave-assisted acid digestion. The validity and accuracy of the methodology were checked using certified reference materials. The results of this study showed that the mean values of Cd and Pb were significantly higher in scalp hair, blood, and urine samples of PPW and PQW as compared to NEC and EC (p < 0.001), whereas the concentrations of Ca and Mg were found to be lower in the scalp hair and blood but higher in the urine samples of PPW and PQW. The results show the need for immediate improvements in workplace, ventilation, and industrial hygiene practices.

  13. Sexual difference in juvenile-hormone titer in workers leads to sex-biased soldier differentiation in termites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toga, Kouhei; Hanmoto, Shutaro; Suzuki, Ryutaro; Watanabe, Dai; Miura, Toru; Maekawa, Kiyoto

    2016-04-01

    In termites, the soldier caste, with its specialized defensive morphology, is one of the most important characteristics for sociality. Most of the basal termite species have both male and female soldiers, and the soldier sex ratio is almost equal or only slightly biased. However, in the apical lineages (especially family Termitidae), there are many species that have soldiers with strongly biased sex ratio. Generally in termites, since high juvenile hormone (JH) titer is required for soldier differentiation from a worker via a presoldier stage, it was hypothesized that the biased soldier-sex ratio was caused by differences in JH sensitivity and/or JH titer between male and female workers. Therefore, we focused on the presoldier differentiation and the worker JH titer in species with only male soldiers (Nasutitermes takasagoensis) and with both male and female soldiers (Reticulitermes speratus) in natural conditions. In the former species, there are four types of workers; male minor, male medium, female medium and female major workers, and presoldiers differentiate from male minor workers. First, we tried to artificially induce presoldiers from male and female workers. In N. takasagoensis, the presoldier differentiation rate and mortality was significantly higher in male minor workers. Morphological analyses showed that both male and female induced presoldiers possessed normal soldier-specific morphologies. It was suggested that female workers, from which soldiers do not differentiate under natural conditions, also maintained the physiological and developmental potential for soldier differentiation. In R. speratus, however, no differences were observed in solder differentiation rate and mortality between male and female workers. Second, the JH titers of each sex/type of workers were quantified by high performance liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry in two different seasons (April and December). The results showed that, in N. takasagoensis, JH titer in male minor

  14. Living 'a life like ours': support workers' accounts of substitute decision-making in residential care homes for adults with intellectual disabilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunn, M C; Clare, I C H; Holland, A J

    2010-02-01

    In England and Wales, the Mental Capacity Act 2005 (MCA) provides a new legal framework to regulate substitute decision-making relating to the welfare of adults who lack the capacity to make one or more autonomous decisions about their care and support. Any substitute decision made on behalf of an adult lacking capacity must be in his/her 'best interests'. However, the value of adopting established principles and procedures for substitute decision-making in practice is uncertain, and little is known about the legal or ethical dynamics of social care support, including the day-to-day residential support provided to adults with intellectual disabilities (ID). Methods This paper reports a qualitative, grounded theory analysis of 21 interviews with support workers working in residential care homes for adults with ID, and observations of care practices. Results In contrast to the narrow legal responsibilities placed upon them, it is argued that support workers interpret substitute decision-making within a broad moral account of their care role, orientating their support towards helping residents to live 'a life like ours'. In so doing, support workers describe how they draw on their own values and life experiences to shape the substitute decisions that they make on behalf of residents. Conclusions Support workers' accounts reveal clear discrepancies between the legal regulation of substitute decision-making and the ways that these support workers make sense of their work. Such discrepancies have implications both for the implementation of the MCA, and for the role of support workers' values in the conceptualisation and delivery of 'good' care.

  15. Healthcare workers' decision-making about transmission-based infection control precautions is improved by a guidance summary card.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russell, C D; Young, I; Leung, V; Morris, K

    2015-07-01

    Transmission-based precautions (TBPs) are infection control measures designed to interrupt pathogen transmission. Success relies on early recognition of patients with potentially infectious syndromes, then the implementation of appropriate TBPs. We are aware of no literature evaluating interventions to facilitate healthcare workers (HCWs) in implementing TBPs. To evaluate the impact of a TBP guidance summary card on HCWs' decision-making about the appropriate implementation of TBPs. A prospective audit was carried out to assess HCWs' ability to make decisions about TBP implementation. Following the first audit phase, staff were issued with a guidance card summarizing local TBP guidelines, identifying and addressing relevant TBP measures for infectious syndromes and specific organisms. The audit cycle was then completed to assess the impact of this intervention. Baseline knowledge of appropriate TBP measures was low. Provision of a TBP summary card was significantly associated with the ability of staff carrying the card to correctly decide what TBPs are required in a variety of clinical situations, including Clostridium difficile infection [N = 107; odds ratio (OR): 27.0; 95% confidence interval (CI): 8.37-86.8; P Healthcare Infection Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Children’s Lead Exposure: A Multimedia Modeling Analysis to Guide Public Health Decision-Making

    Science.gov (United States)

    BACKGROUND: Drinking water and other sources for lead are the subject of public health concerns around the Flint, Michigan, drinking water and East Chicago, Indiana, lead in soil crises. In 2015, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA)’s National Drinking Water Advis...

  17. A Systems Model to Make, Market, and Lead Your Way towards Sustained Growth

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Raman Kumar Agrawalla

    2017-01-01

    .... Marketing is a key business function to market and lead a business towards sustained profitable growth but the problem is it lacks a systems perspective in its operations, strategy, and practice...

  18. Children's Lead Exposure: A Multimedia Modeling Analysis to Guide Public Health Decision-Making.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zartarian, Valerie; Xue, Jianping; Tornero-Velez, Rogelio; Brown, James

    2017-09-12

    Drinking water and other sources for lead are the subject of public health concerns around the Flint, Michigan, drinking water and East Chicago, Indiana, lead in soil crises. In 2015, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA)'s National Drinking Water Advisory Council (NDWAC) recommended establishment of a "health-based, household action level" for lead in drinking water based on children's exposure. The primary objective was to develop a coupled exposure-dose modeling approach that can be used to determine what drinking water lead concentrations keep children's blood lead levels (BLLs) below specified values, considering exposures from water, soil, dust, food, and air. Related objectives were to evaluate the coupled model estimates using real-world blood lead data, to quantify relative contributions by the various media, and to identify key model inputs. A modeling approach using the EPA's Stochastic Human Exposure and Dose Simulation (SHEDS)-Multimedia and Integrated Exposure Uptake and Biokinetic (IEUBK) models was developed using available data. This analysis for the U.S. population of young children probabilistically simulated multimedia exposures and estimated relative contributions of media to BLLs across all population percentiles for several age groups. Modeled BLLs compared well with nationally representative BLLs (0-23% relative error). Analyses revealed relative importance of soil and dust ingestion exposure pathways and associated Pb intake rates; water ingestion was also a main pathway, especially for infants. This methodology advances scientific understanding of the relationship between lead concentrations in drinking water and BLLs in children. It can guide national health-based benchmarks for lead and related community public health decisions. https://doi.org/10.1289/EHP1605.

  19. Evaluating the Knowledge, Attitude and Safety Performance in the Prevention of Occupational Accidents among Workers in One of Iran Khodro's Piece Making Companies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehdi kangavari

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Occupational accidents are one of important events in the world. Individual affecting factors on accidents are knowledge, attitude and perception of risk. So this study aimed to determine knowledge, attitude and safety performance in prevention of occupational accidents at one of Iran Khodro's piece making companies' workers. In this cross-sectional study, 212 workers from Mehrcam Pars Company selected by stratified random method at each working site in 2015. By simple random sampling, subjects were enrolled. Questionnaire was completed by workers through self-reporting. Questionnaire consisted of demographic and underlying information and questions about safety knowledge, attitude and performance in the workplace. Data were analyzed using SPSS 21 software. The average workers' age was 34.3 year with a standard deviation of 4.7%. 35.8% were not trained in terms of performing their job. 48.1% of participants had no history of injuries in site, but others reported suffers from mild to severe intensity. There was significant relationship between educational situation with attitude and safety performance. There was significant relationship between job experience with safety knowledge, attitude and performance. Age and workers' safety attitude was a predictive of safety performance. The results showed that there is significant relationship between safety knowledge, attitude and performance in the workplace with some variables. So in order to improve the overall situation of safety, some measures can be effective such as raising the knowledge of personnel, safety staff's participation management, balancing work and time. Keywords: Safety, Prevention, Occupational Accidents, Workers

  20. Leading team learning: what makes interprofessional teams learn to work well?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatalalsingh, Carole; Reeves, Scott

    2014-11-01

    This article describes an ethnographic study focused on exploring leaders of team learning in well-established nephrology teams in an academic healthcare organization in Canada. Employing situational theory of leadership, the article provides details on how well established team members advance as "learning leaders". Data were gathered by ethnographic methods over a 9-month period with the members of two nephrology teams. These learning to care for the sick teams involved over 30 regulated health professionals, such as physicians, nurses, social workers, pharmacists, dietitians and other healthcare practitioners, staff, students and trainees, all of whom were collectively managing obstacles and coordinating efforts. Analysis involved an inductive thematic analysis of observations, reflections, and interview transcripts. The study indicated how well established members progress as team-learning leaders, and how they adapt to an interprofessional culture through the activities they employ to enable day-to-day learning. The article uses situational theory of leadership to generate a detailed illumination of the nature of leaders' interactions within an interprofessional context.

  1. Optimising seasonal streamflow forecast lead time for operational decision making in Australia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schepen, Andrew; Zhao, Tongtiegang; Wang, Q. J.; Zhou, Senlin; Feikema, Paul

    2016-10-01

    Statistical seasonal forecasts of 3-month streamflow totals are released in Australia by the Bureau of Meteorology and updated on a monthly basis. The forecasts are often released in the second week of the forecast period, due to the onerous forecast production process. The current service relies on models built using data for complete calendar months, meaning the forecast production process cannot begin until the first day of the forecast period. Somehow, the bureau needs to transition to a service that provides forecasts before the beginning of the forecast period; timelier forecast release will become critical as sub-seasonal (monthly) forecasts are developed. Increasing the forecast lead time to one month ahead is not considered a viable option for Australian catchments that typically lack any predictability associated with snowmelt. The bureau's forecasts are built around Bayesian joint probability models that have antecedent streamflow, rainfall and climate indices as predictors. In this study, we adapt the modelling approach so that forecasts have any number of days of lead time. Daily streamflow and sea surface temperatures are used to develop predictors based on 28-day sliding windows. Forecasts are produced for 23 forecast locations with 0-14- and 21-day lead time. The forecasts are assessed in terms of continuous ranked probability score (CRPS) skill score and reliability metrics. CRPS skill scores, on average, reduce monotonically with increase in days of lead time, although both positive and negative differences are observed. Considering only skilful forecast locations, CRPS skill scores at 7-day lead time are reduced on average by 4 percentage points, with differences largely contained within +5 to -15 percentage points. A flexible forecasting system that allows for any number of days of lead time could benefit Australian seasonal streamflow forecast users by allowing more time for forecasts to be disseminated, comprehended and made use of prior to

  2. ECG lead misplacement by colour – What difference does it make ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Coronary artery disease (CAD) and deaths from CAD are on the increase in sub-Saharan Africa. As a result the number of ECGs being recorded is increasing. Lead misplacement is associated with changes in the ECG recording, some of which can mimic significant clinical conditions. A large body of research ...

  3. Renal effects and erythrocyte oxidative stress in long-term low-level lead-exposed adolescent workers in auto repair workshops

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oektem, Faruk [Suleyman Demirel University Hospital, Department of Pediatric Nephrology, Medical Faculty, Isparta (Turkey); Arslan, Meltem Koyuncu; Duendar, Bumin; Erguerhan Ilhan, Inci [Suleyman Demirel University Hospital, Department of Pediatrics, Medical Faculty, Isparta (Turkey); Delibas, Namik [Suleyman Demirel University Hospital, Department of Biochemistiry and Clinical Biochemistry, Medical Faculty, Isparta (Turkey); Gueltepe, Mustafa [Haydarpasa Hospital, Department of Biochemistry, Gulhane Military Medical Academy, Istanbul (Turkey)

    2004-12-01

    Lead poisoning is an old but persistent public health problem in developing countries. The present study investigated blood lead levels and its effects on markers of renal function and parameters of erythrocyte oxidative stress in adolescent male auto repair workers in Turkey. Blood Pb level and the ALAD index (logarithm of activated {delta}-aminolaevulinic acid dehydratase/nonactivated {delta}-aminolaevulinic acid dehydratase) were measured as indicators of exposure to Pb. Markers of tubular damage urine N-acetyl-{beta}-d-glucosaminidase (NAG), {beta}{sub 2}-microglobulin ({beta}-2 MG), creatinine (Cr), uric acid (UA), and calcium, markers of glomerular filtration blood urea nitrogen (BUN), serum Cr, UA, and parameters of oxidative damage in erythrocyte were studied in 79 Pb-exposed adolescent and 71 healthy control subjects. Blood lead levels and ALAD index were found significantly higher in the study group than that of normal control group. BUN, UA level, and glomerular filtration rates were detected in normal range in the lead-exposed group. Urinary NAG excretion and calciuria were higher in the study group than in controls. Urinary excretion of NAG was positively correlated with the blood lead levels (r=0.427). There was no relationship between blood lead levels and UA or {beta}-2 MG in urine. Malondialdehyde and glutathione peroxidase levels were significantly elevated in lead-exposed adolescents than controls, but changes in the catalase and superoxide dismutase activities in lead-exposed adolescents did not reach statistical significance. In conclusion, chronic low-dose lead exposure seems as a cause of subtle renal impacts in adolescent workers of auto repair workshops. Lead-induced oxidative stress in erythrocytes probably contributes to these subclinical renal effects. (orig.)

  4. A simple route for making surfactant free lead sulfide (PbS) quantum dots

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alam, Firoz; Kumar, Neetesh; Dutta, Viresh, E-mail: vdutta@ces.iitd.ac.in

    2015-05-15

    Highlights: • Surfactant free PbS NCs were successfully synthesised using CoSP technique. • The technique eliminates the requirements of washing to remove the ligands. • Grinding using mortar and pestle creates well separated PbS QDs. • Surfactant free PbS NCs are stable and do not show any degradation with time. - Abstract: An efficient, cost effective and less time consuming method suitable for mass production of surfactant free quantum dots (QDs) of lead sulfide (PbS) is reported. PbS nanocrystals (NCs) are first synthesised by continuous spray pyrolysis (CoSP) technique and de-agglomeration into PbS quantum dots (QDs) is achieved by vigorous mechanical grinding using mortar and pestle. Lead acetate and thiourea were used as the precursor materials for preparation of surfactant free PbS NCs. The broadening in XRD peaks of ground NCs as compared to as synthesized PbS NCs clearly indicated the reduction in particle size to be QDs of PbS. The TEM images also showed that ground PbS NCs were nearly spherical in shape having an average diameter in the range of 4–6 nm. The shift in optical gap from 0.41 eV to 1.47 eV supported the QD formation.

  5. The relevance of hyperuricemia and metabolic syndrome and the effect of blood lead level on uric Acid concentration in steelmaking workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Deul; Choi, Won-Jun; Oh, Jae-Seok; Yi, Min-Kee; Han, Sung-Woo; Yun, Jong-Wan; Han, Sang-Hwan

    2013-10-25

    Uric acid concentration is known to increase the prevalence of metabolic syndrome by affecting its components, resulting in increased risk of cerebrovascular and cardiovascular diseases, and long-term lead exposure is known to affect this serum uric acid level. In this study, we aimed to examine the association between the causes of hyperuricemia and metabolic syndrome, and to determine whether an increased blood lead level affects hyperuricemia. Anthropometric measurements, surveys, and blood tests were conducted between May and June 2012 in 759 men working in the steelmaking process at a domestic steel company. Workers were divided into 2 groups according to the presence or absence of hyperuricemia, and an analysis was performed to examine its association with metabolic syndrome. In addition, the workers were divided into 3 groups according to the blood lead level to analyze the association between blood lead and hyperuricemia. The geometric mean (standard deviation) of the blood lead levels in the hyperuricemia group was significantly higher than that of the healthy group (3.8 [1.8] vs. 3.3 [1.8] μg/dL). The adjusted odds ratio for metabolic syndrome of the hyperuricemia group increased significantly to 1.787 (1.125-2.839) compared with the healthy group. In addition, the adjusted odds ratios for the occurrence of hyperuricemia in the tertile 2 (2.61-4.50 μg/dL) and tertile 3 groups (>4.50 μg/dL) according to blood lead level significantly increased to 1.763 (1.116-2.784) and 1.982 (1.254-3.132), respectively, compared with the tertile 1 group (metabolic syndrome, while lead seems to increase the serum uric acid level even at a considerably low blood level. Therefore, attention should be given to patients with hyperuricemia and metabolic syndrome who are prone to lead exposure, and a prospective study should be conducted to identify their causal relationship.

  6. Big losses lead to irrational decision-making in gambling situations: relationship between deliberation and impulsivity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuji Takano

    Full Text Available In gambling situations, we found a paradoxical reinforcing effect of high-risk decision-making after repeated big monetary losses. The computerized version of the Iowa Gambling Task (Bechara et al., 2000, which contained six big loss cards in deck B', was conducted on normal healthy college students. The results indicated that the total number of selections from deck A' and deck B' decreased across trials. However, there was no decrease in selections from deck B'. Detailed analysis of the card selections revealed that some people persisted in selecting from the "risky" deck B' as the number of big losses increased. This tendency was prominent in self-rated deliberative people. However, they were implicitly impulsive, as revealed by the matching familiar figure test. These results suggest that the gap between explicit deliberation and implicit impulsivity drew them into pathological gambling.

  7. A Systems Model to Make, Market, and Lead Your Way towards Sustained Growth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raman Kumar Agrawalla

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Business enterprises exist in a world that is fiercely competitive, tied with huge global uncertainties. They always encounter increasing pressure on prices and margins. Hence, irrespective of their domain of operations and industry, businesses are naturally concerned about their growth, specifically sustained profitable growth, in today’s world. Marketing is a key business function to market and lead a business towards sustained profitable growth but the problem is it lacks a systems perspective in its operations, strategy, and practice. Further, given the confluence and systemic interactions of various economic, digital, and competitive forces; the challenge for different business functions—including marketing—increases tremendously. In this context, it is important for business enterprises to have a systems perspective to find their ways to growth that will be sustained. This calls for a holistic approach to assimilate and steer the business functions in any enterprise. The present conceptual paper focuses on an important business function for sustained growth in a holistic way and presents a systems model, called ‘Value Based Business Approach (VBBA-marketing’, which has potential to guide and steer companies and business enterprises to create a path for their sustained profitable growth.

  8. A new working class in the making? The rise of the peasant workers and implications for social policy in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mok, Ka Ho; Ngok, Kinglun

    2011-01-01

    The major objective of this article is to critically examine changes in social stratification and social mobility of the peasant workers in the post-Mao period, with particular reference to examine whether and how the selected peasant workers in Dongguan city in South China have asserted themselves in protecting their labour rights. The present studies is based upon intensive policy and documentary analysis, in-depth interviews, focus group discussions and survey in getting first-hand data from conducting fieldwork in China. Migrant workers in Dongguan city in South China. Although peasant workers are becoming more concerned with their economic and social rights, they have not attempted to organize themselves as organized social organizations in protecting their own interests. Despite the fact that peasant workers may have a greater awareness of the interests as a social group, such a consciousness has not been developed into a distinct class identity. Without a distinct class identity, coupled with a lack of organized social forces in asserting their class interests, peasant workers have not formed themselves into an organized social class right now, especially as many of them still consider themselves having a peasant status instead of obtaining a new citizenship associated with working in urban China.

  9. Frontline health care workers and perceived career mobility: do high-performance work practices make a difference?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dill, Janette S; Morgan, Jennifer Craft; Weiner, Bryan

    2014-01-01

    The use of high-performance work practices (HPWPs) related to career development (e.g., tuition remission, career ladders) is becoming more common in health care organizations, where skill shortages and concerns about quality of care have led to increasing investment in the frontline health care workforce. However, few studies have examined the effectiveness of these policies in shaping the career trajectories of health care workers. The aim of this study is to examine how HPWPs that focus on career development are related to an individuals' perceived mobility with their current employer. We will also examine the relationships between perceived mobility, job satisfaction, and turnover intent. We use confirmatory factor analysis and structural equation modeling to examine the relationships between HPWPs and perceived mobility in a sample of 947 frontline health care workers in 22 health care organizations across the United States. The findings suggest that tuition remission and educational release time positively predict perceived mobility. Measures of perceived organizational support in one's current position (e.g., financial rewards, workload, and autonomy) and perceived supervisor support for career development are also significant predictors of perceived mobility. Finally, perceived mobility is a significant predictor of job satisfaction and intent to stay with current employer. Our findings suggest that HPWPs related to career development may be effective tools in improving workers' assessments of their own career potential and improving overall job satisfaction of frontline health care workers. Consequently, HPWPs related to career development may help employers both retain valuable workers and fill worker shortages.

  10. Vitamin-Fortified Snack Food May Lead Consumers to Make Poor Dietary Decisions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verrill, Linda; Wood, Dallas; Cates, Sheryl; Lando, Amy; Zhang, Yuanting

    2017-03-01

    -fortified may cause consumers to make poor dietary decisions. Copyright © 2017 Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Population genetics in the state of Nuevo Leon, Mexico. II. Genetic markers, frequencies and their possible association with chromosome damage in workers exposed to lead

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garza-Chapa, R.; Leal-Garza, C.; Sanchez-Anzaldo, F.J.

    1980-01-01

    In order to find out genetic variability and its possible association with chromosomic damage, we studied the ABO, Rh and MN blood groups as well as the ability to taste PTC, ear lobe type and mid-digital hair, in 77 workers exposed to lead oxides. From each person a blood sample was taken for chromosome analysis in cultured lymphocytes and for lead determination. At the same time a urine sample was taken for delta-aminolevulinic acid (ALA) determinations. No significant association was found between genetic markers and chromosome damage. Association was observed between blood lead levels, and urinary ALA with some genetic markers like ABO and MN blood groups and ear lobe type.

  12. Worker participation - the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kwantes, J.H.

    2014-01-01

    Worker participation relates to the involvement of workers in the management decision-making processes. In this article attention is focused on worker participation related to occupational safety and health in the Netherlands. Worker participation can refer either to direct or indirect participation

  13. Communicating uncertainty can lead to less decision satisfaction: a necessary cost of involving patients in shared decision making?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Politi, Mary C; Clark, Melissa A; Ombao, Hernando; Dizon, Don; Elwyn, Glyn

    2011-03-01

    Given the large number of interventions of uncertain effectiveness, research on communicating uncertainty is needed to examine its impact on patients' health decisions. To examine physicians' communication of uncertainty and its impact on patients' decisions and decision satisfaction. Participants included female patients seen in a breast health centre whose physicians were discussing a decision with them, with no clear 'best' choice based on outcome evidence. Decision communication was measured using the OPTION scale, a measure of the degree to which physicians involve patients in a decision-making process. One-to-two weeks after the discussion, patients reported their satisfaction with the decision-making process and their decision. Decisions were verified in medical charts with patient consent. Seventy-five women agreed to participate (94% response rate). The mean translated score of the OPTION scale was 68.0 (SD 18.3), but only 33.2 (SD 19.1) for the uncertainty items. Among cancer patients, communicating uncertainty was negatively related to decision satisfaction (P uncertainty in relation to patients' decision satisfaction (P uncertainty might lead to less decision satisfaction among women facing cancer treatment decisions; this could be a natural outcome of the decision making process. Involving patients in decisions might help them tolerate uncertainty. Future studies should consider assessing other outcomes (e.g. knowledge, physician support) of the decision making process. There may be trade-offs between acknowledging uncertainty and immediate decision satisfaction. © 2010 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  14. Co-exposure to lead increases the renal response to low levels of cadmium in metallurgy workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hambach, R; Lison, D; D'Haese, P C; Weyler, J; De Graef, E; De Schryver, A; Lamberts, L V; van Sprundel, M

    2013-10-24

    Research on the effect of co-exposure to Cd and Pb on the kidney is scarce. The objective of the present study was to assess the effect of co-exposure to these metals on biomarkers of early renal effect. Cd in blood (Cd-B), Cd in urine (Cd-U), Pb in blood (Pb-B) and urinary renal biomarkers, i.e., microalbumin (μ-Alb), beta-2-microglobulin (β₂-MG), retinol binding protein (RBP), N-acetyl-β-d-glucosaminidase (NAG), intestinal alkaline phosphatase (IAP) were measured in 122 metallurgic refinery workers examined in a cross-sectional survey. The median Cd-B, Cd-U, Pb-B were: 0.8 μg/l (IQR = 0.5, 1.2), 0.5 μg/g creatinine (IQR = 0.3, 0.8) and 158.5 μg/l (IQR = 111.0, 219.3), respectively. The impact of Cd-B on the urinary excretion of NAG and IAP was only evident among workers with Pb-B concentrations ≥ 75th percentile. The association between Cd-U and the renal markers NAG and RBP was also evidenced when Pb-B ≥ 75th percentile. No statistically significant interaction terms were observed for the associations between Cd-B or Cd-U and the other renal markers under study (i.e., μ-Alb and β2-MG). Our findings indicate that Pb increases the impact of Cd exposure on early renal biomarkers. Copyright © 2013 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  15. What Makes Migrant Live-in Home Care Workers in Elder Care Be Satisfied with Their Job?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iecovich, Esther

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: The study aims to examine job satisfaction of migrant live-in home care workers who provide care to frail older adults and to examine the extent to which quality of relationships between the care provider and care recipient and workplace characteristics is associated with job satisfaction. Design and Methods: A convenience sample that…

  16. Make

    CERN Document Server

    Frauenfelder, Mark

    2012-01-01

    The first magazine devoted entirely to do-it-yourself technology projects presents its 29th quarterly edition for people who like to tweak, disassemble, recreate, and invent cool new uses for technology. MAKE Volume 29 takes bio-hacking to a new level. Get introduced to DIY tracking devices before they hit the consumer electronics marketplace. Learn how to build an EKG machine to study your heartbeat, and put together a DIY bio lab to study athletic motion using consumer grade hardware.

  17. DNA damage and repair assessed by comet assay in workers exposed to lead in a battery recycling.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahara Valverde

    2015-05-01

    In addition to these findings, DNA damage determined by comet assay was sensible to reflect lead exposure levels related to specific activities inside this factory. Human biomonitoring studies through comet assay could be robust when additional biomarkers are determined at time.

  18. [Prevalence and influence factors of hypertension among the workers exposed to noise in steel making and steel rolling workshop of an iron and steel plant].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yanhong; Chen, Guoshun; Yu, Shanfa

    2015-05-01

    To investigate the prevalence and influence factors of hypertension among the workers exposed to noise in steel making and steel rolling workshop of an iron and steel plant. Using cluster sampling method, 3 150 workers exposed to noise participated in this study. According to do questionnaire survey and blood pressure measurement, 2 924 workers were tested, among which 1 313 workers were from steel making workshop and 1 611 workers were from steel rolling workshop. The relationships between different demographic characteristics, different habits, and different cumulative noise exposures of workers exposed to noise and hypertension were analyzed. For the hypertension prevalence rate, the total prevalence rate was 27.43% (802/2 924), the male was higher than the female (29.88 % (753/2 520) vs 12.13% (49/404), χ² = 55.13, P < 0.001), married ones were higher than the unmarried (29.84% (718/2 406) vs 16.22% (84/518), χ² = 39.76, P < 0.001), the smoking subjects were higher than the no smoking (30.31% (438/1 445) vs 24.61% (364/1 479), χ² = 11.93, P = 0.001), drinking ones were higher than the no drinking (31.53% (541/1 716) vs 21.61% (261/1 208), χ² = 35.05, P < 0.001). The hypertension prevalence rates among the subjects with education background in junior high school and below, high school (secondary) and university and above were separately 44.96%(125/278), 29.95%(455/1 519) and 19.70%(222/1 127) (χ² = 81.65, P < 0.001), among cumulative exposure groups 77-89, 90-94, 95-99, 100-104 and 105-113 were separately 8.43% (14/166), 14.48% (53/366), 24.28% (297/1 223), 36.65% (335/914) and 40.39%(103/255) (χ² = 127.58, P < 0.001). Multivariate logistic regression analysis showed that workers who exposed to cumulative noise in 95-99, 100-104 and 105-113 dB(A) ·year had the higher risk of hypertension, the OR (95%CI) were 1.84 (95% CI: 1.35-2.51), 1.74 (95% CI: 1.24-2.45) and 1.68 (95% CI: 1.09-2.58). Drinking (OR = 1.60, 95% CI: 1.32-1.95) and BMI ≥ 24.0 kg

  19. Risk of cancer in workers exposed to styrene at eight British companies making glass-reinforced plastics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coggon, David; Ntani, Georgia; Harris, E Clare; Palmer, Keith T

    2015-03-01

    To provide further information on the risks of lymphohaematopoietic (LH) and other cancers associated with styrene. We extended follow-up to December 2012 for 7970 workers at eight companies in England which used styrene in the manufacture of glass-reinforced plastics. Mortality was compared with that for England and Wales by the person-years method, and summarised by SMRs with 95% CIs. A supplementary nested case-control analysis compared styrene exposures, lagged by 5 years, in 122 incident or fatal cases of LH cancer and 1138 matched controls. A total of 3121 cohort members had died (2022 since the last follow-up). No elevation of mortality was observed for LH cancer, either in the full cohort (62 deaths, SMR 0.90, 95% CI 0.69 to 1.15), or in those with more than background exposure to styrene (38 deaths, SMR 0.82, 95% CI 0.58 to 1.14). Nor did the case-control analysis suggest any association with LH cancer. In comparison with background exposure, the OR for non-Hodgkin's lymphoma/chronic lymphocytic leukaemia in workers with high exposure (estimated 8-h time-weighted average of 40-100 ppm) for ≥1 year was 0.54 (95% CI 0.23 to 1.27). Mortality from lung cancer was significantly elevated, and risk increased progressively across exposure categories, with an SMR of 1.44 (95% CI 1.10 to 1.86) in workers highly exposed for ≥1 year. We found no evidence that styrene causes LH cancer. An association with lung cancer is not consistently supported by other studies. It may have been confounded by smoking, but would be worth checking further. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  20. Human lead metabolism: Chronic exposure, bone lead and physiological models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleming, David Eric Berkeley

    Exposure to lead is associated with a variety of detrimental health effects. After ingestion or inhalation, lead may be taken up from the bloodstream and retained by bone tissue. X-ray fluorescence was used to make in vivo measurements of bone lead concentration at the tibia and calcaneus for 367 active and 14 retired lead smelter workers. Blood lead levels following a labour disruption were used in conjunction with bone lead readings to examine the endogenous release of lead from bone. Relations between bone lead and a cumulative blood lead index differed depending on time of hiring. This suggests that the transfer of lead from blood to bone has changed over time, possibly as a result of varying exposure conditions. A common polymorphism in the δ-aminolevulinate dehydratase (ALAD) enzyme may influence the distribution of lead in humans. Blood lead levels were higher for smelter workers expressing the more rare ALAD2 allele. Bone lead concentrations, however, were not significantly different. This implies that a smaller proportion of lead in blood is distributed to tissue for individuals expressing the ALAD2 allele. The O'Flaherty physiological model of lead metabolism was modified slightly and tested with input from the personal exposure histories of smelter workers. The model results were consistent with observation in tern of endogenous exposure to lead and accumulation of lead in cortical bone. Modelling the calcaneus as a trabecular bone site did not reproduce observed trends. variations in lead metabolism between different trabecular sites may therefore be significant. The model does not incorporate a genetic component, and its output did not reflect observed differences in this respect. This result provides further support for the influence of the ALAD polymorphism on lead metabolism. Experimental trials with a digital spectrometer revealed superior energy resolution and count throughput relative to the conventional X-ray fluorescence system. The associated

  1. Proteomic analysis of serum of workers occupationally exposed to arsenic, cadmium, and lead for biomarker research: A preliminary study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kossowska, Barbara, E-mail: barbara@immchem.am.wroc.pl [Department of Chemistry and Immunochemistry, Wroclaw Medical University, Bujwida 44a, 50-345 Wroclaw (Poland); Dudka, Ilona, E-mail: ilona.dudka@pwr.wroc.pl [Medicinal Chemistry and Microbiology Group, Department of Chemistry, Wroclaw University of Technology, Wybrzeze Wyspianskiego 27, 50-370 Wroclaw (Poland); Bugla-Ploskonska, Gabriela, E-mail: gabriela.bugla-ploskonska@microb.uni.wroc.pl [Department of Microbiology, Institute of Genetics and Microbiology, University of Wroclaw, Przybyszewskiego 63/77, 51-148 Wroclaw (Poland); Szymanska-Chabowska, Anna, E-mail: aszyman@mp.pl [Department of Internal and Occupational Medicine, Wroclaw Medical University, Wybrzeze L. Pasteura 4, 50-367 Wroclaw (Poland); Doroszkiewicz, Wlodzimierz, E-mail: wlodzimierz.doroszkiewicz@microb.uni.wroc.pl [Department of Microbiology, Institute of Genetics and Microbiology, University of Wroclaw, Przybyszewskiego 63/77, 51-148 Wroclaw (Poland); Gancarz, Roman, E-mail: roman.gancarz@pwr.wroc.pl [Medicinal Chemistry and Microbiology Group, Department of Chemistry, Wroclaw University of Technology, Wybrzeze Wyspianskiego 27, 50-370 Wroclaw (Poland); Andrzejak, Ryszard, E-mail: ryszard@chzaw.am.wroc.pl [Department of Internal and Occupational Medicine, Wroclaw Medical University, Wybrzeze L. Pasteura 4, 50-367 Wroclaw (Poland); Antonowicz-Juchniewicz, Jolanta, E-mail: jola@chzaw.am.wroc.pl [Department of Internal and Occupational Medicine, Wroclaw Medical University, Wybrzeze L. Pasteura 4, 50-367 Wroclaw (Poland)

    2010-10-15

    The main factor of environmental contamination is the presence of the heavy metals lead, cadmium, and arsenic. The aim of serum protein profile analysis of people chronically exposed to heavy metals is to find protein markers of early pathological changes. The study was conducted in a group of 389 healthy men working in copper foundry and 45 age-matched non-exposed healthy men. Toxicological test samples included whole blood, serum, and urine. Thirty-seven clinical parameters were measured. Based on the parameters values of the healthy volunteers, the centroid in 37-dimensional space was calculated. The individuals in the metal-exposed and control groups were ordered based on the Euclidean distance from the centroid defined by the first component according to Principal Component Analysis (PCA). Serum samples of two individuals, one from the control and one from the metal-exposed group, were chosen for proteomic analysis. In optimized conditions of two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2-DE), two protein maps were obtained representing both groups. Twenty-eight corresponding protein spots from both protein maps were chosen and identified based on PDQuest analysis and the SWISS-2DPAGE database. From a panel of six proteins with differences in expression greater than a factor of two, three potential markers with the highest differences were selected: hemoglobin-spot 26 (pI 7.05, Mw 10.53), unidentified protein-spot 27 (pI 6.73, Mw 10.17), and unidentified protein-spot 25 (pI 5.75, Mw 12.07). Further studies are required to prove so far obtained results. Identified proteins could serve as potential markers of preclinical changes and could be in the future included in biomonitoring of people exposed to heavy metals.

  2. Proteomic analysis of serum of workers occupationally exposed to arsenic, cadmium, and lead for biomarker research: a preliminary study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kossowska, Barbara; Dudka, Ilona; Bugla-Płoskońska, Gabriela; Szymańska-Chabowska, Anna; Doroszkiewicz, Włodzimierz; Gancarz, Roman; Andrzejak, Ryszard; Antonowicz-Juchniewicz, Jolanta

    2010-10-15

    The main factor of environmental contamination is the presence of the heavy metals lead, cadmium, and arsenic. The aim of serum protein profile analysis of people chronically exposed to heavy metals is to find protein markers of early pathological changes. The study was conducted in a group of 389 healthy men working in copper foundry and 45 age-matched non-exposed healthy men. Toxicological test samples included whole blood, serum, and urine. Thirty-seven clinical parameters were measured. Based on the parameters values of the healthy volunteers, the centroid in 37-dimensional space was calculated. The individuals in the metal-exposed and control groups were ordered based on the Euclidean distance from the centroid defined by the first component according to Principal Component Analysis (PCA). Serum samples of two individuals, one from the control and one from the metal-exposed group, were chosen for proteomic analysis. In optimized conditions of two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2-DE), two protein maps were obtained representing both groups. Twenty-eight corresponding protein spots from both protein maps were chosen and identified based on PDQuest analysis and the SWISS-2DPAGE database. From a panel of six proteins with differences in expression greater than a factor of two, three potential markers with the highest differences were selected: hemoglobin-spot 26 (pI 7.05, Mw 10.53), unidentified protein-spot 27 (pI 6.73, Mw 10.17), and unidentified protein-spot 25 (pI 5.75, Mw 12.07). Further studies are required to prove so far obtained results. Identified proteins could serve as potential markers of preclinical changes and could be in the future included in biomonitoring of people exposed to heavy metals. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Lead levels - blood

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blood lead levels ... is used to screen people at risk for lead poisoning. This may include industrial workers and children ... also used to measure how well treatment for lead poisoning is working. Lead is common in the ...

  4. Comparing Machine Learning and Decision Making Approaches to Forecast Long Lead Monthly Rainfall: The City of Vancouver, Canada

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zahra Zahmatkesh

    2018-01-01

    calibration period (NSE up to 0.9 but they fail for the validation (NSE of 0.2 and forecasting (negative NSE. The TOPSIS method delivers better rainfall forecasting performance with the NSE of about 0.7. Moreover, the number of predictors that are used in the TOPSIS model are significantly less than those required by the ANNs to show an acceptable performance (7 against 47 for forecasting RCU and 6 against 32 for forecasting RMAX. Reliable and precise rainfall forecasting, with adequate lead time, benefits enhanced flood warning and decision making to reduce potential flood damages.

  5. Fostering shared decision making by occupational therapists and workers involved in accidents resulting in persistent musculoskeletal disorders: A study protocol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stacey Dawn

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background From many empirical and theoretical points of view, the implementation of shared decision making (SDM in work rehabilitation for pain due to a musculoskeletal disorder (MSD is justified but typically the SDM model applies to a one on one encounter between a healthcare provider and a patient and not to an interdisciplinary team. Objectives To adapt and implement an SDM program adapted to the realities of work rehabilitation for pain associated with a MSD. More specific objectives are to adapt an SDM program applicable to existing rehabilitation programs, and to evaluate the extent of implementation of the SDM program in four rehabilitation centres. Method For objective one, we will use a mixed perspective combining a theory-based development program/intervention and a user-based perspective. The users are the occupational therapists (OTs and clinical coordinators. The strategies for developing an SDM program will include consulting the scientific literature and group consensus with clinicians-experts. A sample of convenience of eight OTs, four clinical coordinators and four psychologists all of whom have been working full-time in MSD rehabilitation for more than two years will be recruited from four collaborating rehabilitation centres. For objective two, using the same criteria as for objective one, we will first train eight OTs in SDM. Second, using a descriptive design, the extent to which the SDM program has been implemented will be assessed through observations of the SDM process. The observation data will be triangulated with the dyadic working alliance questionnaire, and findings from a final individual interview with each OT. A total of five patients per trained OT will be recruited, for a total of 40 patients. Patients will be eligible if they have a work-related disability for more than 12 weeks due to musculoskeletal pain and plan to start their work rehabilitation programs. Discussion This study will be the first

  6. Fostering shared decision making by occupational therapists and workers involved in accidents resulting in persistent musculoskeletal disorders: a study protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coutu, Marie-France; Légaré, France; Durand, Marie-José; Corbière, Marc; Stacey, Dawn; Loisel, Patrick; Bainbridge, Lesley

    2011-03-17

    From many empirical and theoretical points of view, the implementation of shared decision making (SDM) in work rehabilitation for pain due to a musculoskeletal disorder (MSD) is justified but typically the SDM model applies to a one on one encounter between a healthcare provider and a patient and not to an interdisciplinary team. To adapt and implement an SDM program adapted to the realities of work rehabilitation for pain associated with a MSD. More specific objectives are to adapt an SDM program applicable to existing rehabilitation programs, and to evaluate the extent of implementation of the SDM program in four rehabilitation centres. For objective one, we will use a mixed perspective combining a theory-based development program/intervention and a user-based perspective. The users are the occupational therapists (OTs) and clinical coordinators. The strategies for developing an SDM program will include consulting the scientific literature and group consensus with clinicians-experts. A sample of convenience of eight OTs, four clinical coordinators and four psychologists all of whom have been working full-time in MSD rehabilitation for more than two years will be recruited from four collaborating rehabilitation centres. For objective two, using the same criteria as for objective one, we will first train eight OTs in SDM. Second, using a descriptive design, the extent to which the SDM program has been implemented will be assessed through observations of the SDM process. The observation data will be triangulated with the dyadic working alliance questionnaire, and findings from a final individual interview with each OT. A total of five patients per trained OT will be recruited, for a total of 40 patients. Patients will be eligible if they have a work-related disability for more than 12 weeks due to musculoskeletal pain and plan to start their work rehabilitation programs. This study will be the first evaluation of the program and it is expected that improvements will

  7. Worker Entrepreneurship.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doucouliagos, Chris

    1992-01-01

    Evaluates the experience of worker entrepreneurship, highlighting successes and failures in Europe, and analyzes the relative importance of factors to worker entrepreneurship such as access to finance, education and training, organizational culture, and worker risk taking. (JOW)

  8. Unexpected effect of dry olive leaf extract on the level of DNA damage in lymphocytes of lead intoxicated workers, before and after CaNa2EDTA chelation therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Čabarkapa, Andrea; Dekanski, Dragana; Živković, Lada; Milanović-Čabarkapa, Mirjana; Bajić, Vladan; Topalović, Dijana; Giampieri, Francesca; Gasparrini, Massimiliano; Battino, Maurizio; Spremo-Potparević, Biljana

    2017-08-01

    The CaNa2EDTA chelation therapy is often practiced with antioxidant supplementation. Dry olive leaf extract (DOLE) is natural product with antioxidant and DNA protective properties. The effects of DOLE on the levels of DNA damage were investigated ex vivo in peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBLs) of 19 workers occupationally exposed to lead (Pb), before and after CaNa2EDTA chelation therapy. DOLE demonstrated pronounced radical scavenging activity in concentrations ≥1 mg/mL, and showed no genotoxicity per se, in concentrations 0.125-1 mg/mL. The level of DNA damage in PBLs of workers before chelation therapy was elevated (24.21 ± 14.26) compared to controls (6.0 ± 3.37). The incubation of PBLs before chelation therapy with selected concentration of DOLE lead to a severe increase of DNA damage (64.03 ± 20.96), exhibiting prooxidant rather than antioxidant effect. After the five-day CaNa2EDTA chelation regimen, DNA damage in PBLs of workers decreased (8.26 ± 4.62) significantly compared to baseline. Treatment of PBLs with DOLE after chelation, again produced high level of damage (41.82 ± 23.17) and the acute prooxidant effects of DOLE remained, but, DNA damage was less severe than before chelation. The DOLE exhibits prooxidant effect in presence of Pb in lymphocytes of exposed workers, and its effect is less pronounced following the removal of Pb after standard chelation therapy. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Intoxicação por chumbo e cádmio em trabalhadores de oficinas para reforma de baterias em Salvador, Brasil Lead and cadmium poisoning among workers in small establishments for repairing batteries in Salvador, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernando Martins Carvalho

    1985-10-01

    cadmium poisoning among workers from the sector engaged in repairing batteries for motor vehicles was carried out. Thirty-nine workers from 19 small establishments, existent in the urban area of Salvador City, State of Bahia, Brazil, were studied. Conditions of hygiene at work place, biological characterization of the workforce and workers' perception of occupational hazards were evaluated and related to blood levels of cadmium, lead, erythroprotoporphyrin and hematocrit. Concentrations of cadmium and lead in blood were determined by flameless atomic absorption spectrophotometry techniques. Thirty-six (92.3% out of the 39 workers mentioned that their job could be hazardous to their health. Brazilian legislation on safety, hygiene and occupational medicine considers lead and cadmium poisoning as being professional diseases when occurring among people working on repairing batteries. However, only 7 (17.9% out the 39 workers knew that they were potentially eligible for benefits from present legislation. None of the 39 workers knew that they had been exposed to cadmium nor about the occupational risks arising from this exposure. Geometric mean and standard deviation of cadmium in blood levels was extremely high (0.074; 2.3 µmol/1, with 97.4% of the working population exceeding the reference limit of 0.009 µmol/1. Mean level of lead in blood was 2.06; 1.4 µmol/l. Only one worker presented blood lead level higher than 3.36 mmol/1, which placed him at a higher risk of presenting clinical lead poisoning. Mean level of erythroprotoporphyrin was 0.86; 3.1 µmol/l. Two workers had low hematocrit levels : 37 and 38%, respectively. In the whole group, hematocrit levels were poorly correlated with lead or with cadmium levels in blood. A brief, oriented clinical examination did not reveal any clear cases of lead or cadmium poisoning. Higher levels of cadmium and lead in blood were associated with workers' ages above 19 years of age, with amount of time spent in the

  10. "What makes you think you have special privileges because you are a police officer?" A qualitative exploration of police's role in the risk environment of female sex workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherman, Susan G; Footer, Katherine; Illangasekare, Samantha; Clark, Erin; Pearson, Erin; Decker, Michele R

    2015-01-01

    Worldwide, female sex workers (FSWs) have high rates of HIV. Many factors that escalate their risk lay outside of their control, primarily in the environments in which they practice sex. An understudied yet powerful risk environment is that of police. We qualitatively explored sex workers' interactions with police in their personal and professional lives. Thirty-five FSWs were purposively sampled in Baltimore, MD, in 2012. Women discussed experiences of police verbal harassment, sexual exploitation, extortion, and a lack of police responsiveness to 911 calls in emergencies, largely partner violence. Women's mistrust of police was often developed at an early age and further reinforced by interactions in their personal and professional lives. The study underscores the need for targeting police in reducing sex workers' HIV and other risks. The case for police's role in generating risk is evident, which could be addressed through structural interventions targeting both police practices and policies.

  11. What makes pregnant workers sick: why, when, where and how? An exploratory study in the ready-made garment industry in Bangladesh.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akhter, Sadika; Rutherford, Shannon; Chu, Cordia

    2017-10-30

    Bangladesh has made significant progress in reducing maternal mortality. Many factors have contributed to this; one is the socio-economic development of the country. The ready-made garment industry is at the forefront of this development creating employment for many women. However, the work environment has the potential to create health problems, particularly for vulnerable groups such as pregnant women. This paper explores perceptions of health problems during pregnancy of factory workers, in this important industry in Bangladesh. This study was conducted in four factories using qualitative research methods to provide a view of pregnant workers' health risks beyond a bio-medical approach. Data was collected through in-depth interviews of pregnant workers and observations of their homes and workplaces. Further, key informant interviews with factory health care providers, government officials and employers revealed different perspectives and experiences. Data was collected in the local language (Bengali), then transcribed and analysed using a framework analysis approach. Female workers reported that participation in paid work created an opportunity for them to earn money but pregnancy and the nature of the job, including being pressured to meet the production quota, pressure to leave the job because of their pregnancy and withholding of maternity benefits, cause stress, anxiety and may contribute to hypertensive disorders of pregnancy. This was confirmed by factory doctors who suggested that developing hypertensive disorders during pregnancy was influenced by the nature of work and stress. The employers seemed focused on profit and meeting quotas and the health of pregnant workers appeared to be a lower priority. This study found that the government lacks the resources to understand the extent of the problem or the level of compliance with maternity related regulations. These results indicate the vulnerability of female workers to physical and mental stress at work

  12. In vivo measurement of lead in the bones of smelter workers using the four-element 'clover-leaf' geometry detector system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Behinaein, Sepideh; Chettle, David R; Egden, Lesley M [Department of Medical Physics and Applied Radiation Sciences, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario, L8S 4K1 (Canada); Atanackovic, Jovica [AECL, Chalk River Laboratories, Dosimetry Services, K0J 1J0, Ontario (Canada); Fleming, David E B [Department of Physics, Mount Allison University, Sackville, New Brunswick, E4L 1E6 (Canada); Nie, Linda H [School of Health Sciences, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 47907 (United States); Richard, Norbert; Stever, Susan, E-mail: behinas@mcmaster.ca [Occupational Health Services, Xstrata Zinc, Brunswick Smelter, Belledune, New Brunswick, E8G 2M1 (Canada)

    2011-02-07

    A total of 497 smelter employees from New Brunswick participated in a bone lead survey conducted by McMaster University in 2008 to examine the efficiency of lead exposure control programmes and a four-element 'clover-leaf' geometry detector system. Nearly 42% of the subjects had participated in both the previous surveys performed in 1994 and 1999. After developing the clover-leaf geometry system in 2006, the reliability of the system based on examining the consistency of four detectors and improving the minimum detection limit (MDL) was tested for the first time in 2008 by measuring lead levels of a large population that was occupationally exposed to lead. The Z test was used to study the distribution of the lead concentration calculated based on K{sub {alpha}} and K{sub {beta}} lead x-rays, where the results were broadly consistent with a normal distribution criterion, with relatively small means and standard deviations of between 1 and 2. The MDL of the clover-leaf geometry system was improved on average for tibia and calcaneus by a factor of 3.1 compared to the 1999 and 1994 surveys in which a conventional system (one detector) was used. Furthermore, by comparing the results of the three mentioned surveys, the 2008 results were found to represent the highest precision.

  13. Motivating the Knowledge Worker

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    important. Herzberg . The Two-factor Theory asserts that motivators and de- motivators are mutually exclusive sets of factors. This research supports... MOTIVATING THE KNOWLEDGE WORKER David E. Frick Commonly accepted economic theory suggests that workers are rational actors and make decisions that...what ignites your passion and the passion of those around you” (p. 109). Public Service Motivation Theory (Crewson, 1997; Houston, 2000; Perry

  14. Migrant Workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Social and Labour Bulletin, 1983

    1983-01-01

    Discusses a new German law to encourage foreign workers to return to their home countries, employment exchanges for young foreigners in Germany, and a training program for migrant workers in India. (SK)

  15. A Thailand case study based on quantitative assessment: does a national lead agency make a difference in pre-hospital care development in middle income countries?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suriyawongpaisal, Paibul; Aekplakorn, Wichai; Tansirisithikul, Rassamee

    2014-12-12

    Emergency Medical Institute of Thailand (EMIT) has been established as a national lead agency to improve emergency medical service systems since December 2008. However up to now, there has not been any published systematic assessment of its performance to guide further policy decisions. This study assesses the 4-year pre-hospital care coverage and performance in Thailand after EMIT establishment. The assessment makes use of 1,171,564 records from a national data set for pre-hospital care i.e., Information Technology for Emergency Medical Service System (ITEMS) in 2012. Comparing with historical data, we found evidence indicating the national lead agency making differences in two basic requirements of pre-hospital care i.e., the coverage was increased by at least 1.4 times higher than the majority reported figures among 11 out of the total 13 regions of the country at baseline; and mean total response time for critical-coded patients, the longest in our study, is 1.6 times shorter than previously reported figure in 2008 (48.46 minutes). Analysis of the national data set also revealed quite substantial missing values indicating a need for further improvement. When historical data was not available, we compared our findings with international figures. Over triage rate of 28.4% for advanced life support (ALS) ambulance was found which is roughly a third of that reported in Taiwan. Almost all patients were stabilized and/or treated regardless of being transferred to hospitals in contrast to the scenarios in the U.S. systems which may probably be due to different payment mechanism. Relying on circumstantial evidences, we identified probable stagnation in pre-hospital care coverage for patients visiting emergency department after the establishment of the lead agency. This national data assessment shows progression in certain basic pre-hospital care requirements in Thailand. However, it needs regular systematic evaluation and there is still room for improvement of pre

  16. [The value of terminal force of P wave in V1 lead in the diagnosis of coal-worker's pneumoconiosis with pulmonary heart disease complicated by left ventricular hypertrophy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bao, Ying

    2012-01-01

    To determine the value of terminal force of P wave in V1 lead (Ptf-V1) in the diagnosis of coal-workers' pneumoconiosis with pulmonary heart disease complicated by left ventricular hypertrophy. Select the coal-worker with pneumoconiosis postmortem examination cases which were pathologically diagnosed as pulmonary heart disease complicated by left ventricular hypertrophy and can measure Ptf-V1. Select 14 cases with ECG left axis deviation, no deviation and right axis deviation. Measure and analyze the Ptf-V1 value, the thickness of left and right ventricular wall. There's obvious discrepancy in ventricular wall thickness mean in ECG left axis deviation, no deviation and right axis deviation groups, the discrepancy have statistical significance (F1 = 32.18, P left ventricular wall is thicker in ECG left axis deviation group [(1.81 +/- 0.18) cm] than in no deviation [(1.47 +/- 0.15) cm] and right axis deviation groups [(1.39 +/- 0.10) cm], the discrepancy have statistical significance with (P left axis deviation group [(0.79 +/- 0.14) cm] than in no deviation group [(0.58 +/- 0.14) cm], the discrepancy have statistical significance with (P axis deviation group [(0.71 +/- 0.14) cm] than in no deviation group, the discrepancy have statistical significance with (P left axis deviation Ptf-V1 relevance ratio 85.71% is higher than in no deviation (35.70%) and right axis deviation groups (28.57%), the discrepancy have statistical significance with (P left ventricular wall thickness in ECG left axis deviation and no deviation groups (r1 = 0.92, P left ventricular morphosis and function especially left atrium loading change. ECG Ptf-V1 combined with ECG left axis deviation is valuable to the diagnosis of coal-workers with pneumoconiosis complicated by left ventricular hypertrophy.

  17. "Knowing I can be helpful makes me feel good inside, it makes me feel essential": community health care workers' experiences of conducting a home-based rehabilitation intervention for people living with HIV in KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cobbing, Saul; Chetty, Verusia; Hanass-Hancock, Jill; Myezwa, Hellen

    2017-10-01

    People living with HIV (PLHIV) are living longer lives on antiretroviral therapy and are prone to a wide range of disabilities. Innovative strategies are required to meet the rehabilitation needs of PLHIV, particularly in resource-poor communities where HIV is endemic and access to institution-based rehabilitation is limited. Home-based rehabilitation (HBR) is one such approach, but there is a paucity of research related to HBR programmes for PLHIV or the experiences of community care workers (CCWs) involved in these programmes. Following a four month randomised controlled trial of a HBR intervention designed specifically for PLHIV in KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa; four CCWs were interviewed. This study employed a qualitative research design, using semi-structured interviews to explore these workers' experiences of being involved in carrying out this intervention. Participants reported how their personal development, improvement in their own health and increased feelings of self-worth enabled them to successfully implement the intervention. Participants also described a number of inhibitors, including stigma and environmental challenges related to the distances between patients' homes, the steep terrain and the hot climate. Despite this, the participants felt empowered by acquiring knowledge and skills that enabled them to shift roles beyond rehabilitation provision. The findings of this study should be considered when employing a task shifting approach in the development and implementation of HBR interventions for PLHIV. By employing a less specialised cadre of community workers to conduct basic HBR interventions, both the relative lack of qualified rehabilitation professionals and the high levels of disability in HIV-epidemic communities can be simultaneously addressed.

  18. Living "a Life like Ours": Support Workers' Accounts of Substitute Decision-Making in Residential Care Homes for Adults with Intellectual Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunn, M. C.; Clare, I. C. H.; Holland, A. J.

    2010-01-01

    Background: In England and Wales, the "Mental Capacity Act 2005" (MCA) provides a new legal framework to regulate substitute decision-making relating to the welfare of adults who lack the capacity to make one or more autonomous decisions about their care and support. Any substitute decision made on behalf of an adult lacking capacity…

  19. Student Lead Nanosatellite Design/Build Projects: making a cost effective approach to Earth and Space Observational Science even more cost efficient

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bottoms, J.; Lange, B. A.; AlbertaSat

    2011-12-01

    With the advancement of technologies and the miniaturization of sensors and electrical/computational components satellites are also undergoing miniaturization. With lower manufacturing cost and a decreased design/build cycle (~2 years from start to launch), compared to conventional large scale satellites, nanosatellites have become a cost effective alternative for satellite Earth and Space Observations. The University of Alberta student nanosatellite (10x10x30cm; Canada. AlbertaSat-1 will be launched in early 2013, after a 2 year design/build process and environmental testing. AlbertaSat-1 will be an Earth Observation satellite monitoring GHG (CO2, H2O & CH4) concentrations over many regions of the earth with the use of a NIR spectrometer. Here we present the planning, design and future manufacturing of AlbertaSat-1 with a focus on budget and cost effective solutions. Since this is a student project, AlbertaSat-1 will incur certain benefits making them exempt from certain financial requirements and obtaining services and equipment at very low or no cost. The largest cost benefit of AlbertaSat-1 is the virtual elimination of labor costs by having a team consisting of only unpaid students. Labor costs of typical satellite missions can be a very costly component. The educational components of such projects offer more indirect benefits to effective development of this industry/discipline, nevertheless just as important, by developing skills and knowledge that can only be learned through realistic hands on design/build projects. Student lead projects and student design/build initiatives such as CSDC (among many others in the U.S. and Europe lead by NASA and ESA, respectively) will have a major impact on shaping the future of Space and Earth Observational Sciences. We will present the future implications of such student projects and initiatives for the development of research and engineering in Space and Earth Observational Sciences.

  20. A computer-human interaction model to improve the diagnostic accuracy and clinical decision-making during 12-lead electrocardiogram interpretation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cairns, Andrew W; Bond, Raymond R; Finlay, Dewar D; Breen, Cathal; Guldenring, Daniel; Gaffney, Robert; Gallagher, Anthony G; Peace, Aaron J; Henn, Pat

    2016-12-01

    The 12-lead Electrocardiogram (ECG) presents a plethora of information and demands extensive knowledge and a high cognitive workload to interpret. Whilst the ECG is an important clinical tool, it is frequently incorrectly interpreted. Even expert clinicians are known to impulsively provide a diagnosis based on their first impression and often miss co-abnormalities. Given it is widely reported that there is a lack of competency in ECG interpretation, it is imperative to optimise the interpretation process. Predominantly the ECG interpretation process remains a paper based approach and whilst computer algorithms are used to assist interpreters by providing printed computerised diagnoses, there are a lack of interactive human-computer interfaces to guide and assist the interpreter. An interactive computing system was developed to guide the decision making process of a clinician when interpreting the ECG. The system decomposes the interpretation process into a series of interactive sub-tasks and encourages the clinician to systematically interpret the ECG. We have named this model 'Interactive Progressive based Interpretation' (IPI) as the user cannot 'progress' unless they complete each sub-task. Using this model, the ECG is segmented into five parts and presented over five user interfaces (1: Rhythm interpretation, 2: Interpretation of the P-wave morphology, 3: Limb lead interpretation, 4: QRS morphology interpretation with chest lead and rhythm strip presentation and 5: Final review of 12-lead ECG). The IPI model was implemented using emerging web technologies (i.e. HTML5, CSS3, AJAX, PHP and MySQL). It was hypothesised that this system would reduce the number of interpretation errors and increase diagnostic accuracy in ECG interpreters. To test this, we compared the diagnostic accuracy of clinicians when they used the standard approach (control cohort) with clinicians who interpreted the same ECGs using the IPI approach (IPI cohort). For the control cohort, the

  1. Increasing the frequency of hand washing by healthcare workers does not lead to commensurate reductions in staphylococcal infection in a hospital ward

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kerr Kevin G

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Hand hygiene is generally considered to be the most important measure that can be applied to prevent the spread of healthcare-associated infection (HAI. Continuous emphasis on this intervention has lead to the widespread opinion that HAI rates can be greatly reduced by increased hand hygiene compliance alone. However, this assumes that the effectiveness of hand hygiene is not constrained by other factors and that improved compliance in excess of a given level, in itself, will result in a commensurate reduction in the incidence of HAI. However, several researchers have found the law of diminishing returns to apply to hand hygiene, with the greatest benefits occurring in the first 20% or so of compliance, and others have demonstrated that poor cohorting of nursing staff profoundly influences the effectiveness of hand hygiene measures. Collectively, these findings raise intriguing questions about the extent to which increasing compliance alone can further reduce rates of HAI. Methods In order to investigate these issues further, we constructed a deterministic Ross-Macdonald model and applied it to a hypothetical general medical ward. In this model the transmission of staphylococcal infection was assumed to occur after contact with the transiently colonized hands of HCWs, who, in turn, acquire contamination only by touching colonized patients. The aim of the study was to evaluate the impact of imperfect hand cleansing on the transmission of staphylococcal infection and to identify, whether there is a limit, above which further hand hygiene compliance is unlikely to be of benefit. Results The model demonstrated that if transmission is solely via the hands of HCWs, it should, under most circumstances, be possible to prevent outbreaks of staphylococcal infection from occurring at a hand cleansing frequencies Conclusion Although our study confirmed hand hygiene to be an effective control measure, it demonstrated that the law of

  2. Promoting male partner HIV testing and safer sexual decision making through secondary distribution of self-tests by HIV-negative female sex workers and women receiving antenatal and post-partum care in Kenya: a cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thirumurthy, Harsha; Masters, Samuel H; Mavedzenge, Sue Napierala; Maman, Suzanne; Omanga, Eunice; Agot, Kawango

    2016-06-01

    Increased uptake of HIV testing by men in sub-Saharan Africa is essential for the success of combination prevention. Self-testing is an emerging approach with high acceptability, but little evidence exists on the best strategies for test distribution. We assessed an approach of providing multiple self-tests to women at high risk of HIV acquisition to promote partner HIV testing and to facilitate safer sexual decision making. In this cohort study, HIV-negative women aged 18-39 years were recruited at two sites in Kisumu, Kenya: a health facility with antenatal and post-partum clinics and a drop-in centre for female sex workers. Participants gave informed consent and were instructed on use of oral fluid based rapid HIV tests. Participants enrolled at the health facility received three self-tests and those at the drop-in centre received five self-tests. Structured interviews were conducted with participants at enrolment and over 3 months to determine how self-tests were used. Outcomes included the number of self-tests distributed by participants, the proportion of participants whose sexual partners used a self-test, couples testing, and sexual behaviour after self-testing. Between Jan 14, 2015, and March 13, 2015, 280 participants were enrolled (61 in antenatal care, 117 in post-partum care, and 102 female sex workers); follow-up interviews were completed for 265 (96%). Most participants with primary sexual partners distributed self-tests to partners: 53 (91%) of 58 participants in antenatal care, 91 (86%) of 106 in post-partum care, and 64 (75%) of 85 female sex workers. 82 (81%) of 101 female sex workers distributed more than one self-test to commercial sex clients. Among self-tests distributed to and used by primary sexual partners of participants, couples testing occurred in 27 (51%) of 53 in antenatal care, 62 (68%) of 91 from post-partum care, and 53 (83%) of 64 female sex workers. Among tests received by primary and non-primary sexual partners, two (4%) of 53

  3. Pseudo-outbreak of tuberculosis in poultry plant workers, Sussex County, Delaware.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Dennis Y; Ridzon, Renee; Giles, Beverly; Mireles, Teresa

    2002-12-01

    Delaware is a leading US poultry-producing state, and foreign-born workers make up a significant percentage of those employed by Delaware's poultry plants. In Sussex County, Delaware, a high percentage of the poultry workers are from two countries with a high incidence of tuberculosis (TB), Mexico and Guatemala, and thus are at risk for TB infection and disease. Furthermore, their risk of TB may be increased because many of these workers live in crowded conditions and lack access to medical care.

  4. Making sense of health care delivery Where does the close to community health care worker fit in? – The case for congestive heart failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Iyngkaran

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Close to community health care workers (CTC-HCW is an increasingly used term to describe the emergence of a new partner in health services delivery. In strengthening arguments for this part of the health workforce the authorities, health staffers, supporters, sceptics and perhaps clients will look to the academicians and the evidence base to determine the fate of this group. There is no doubt, CTC-HCW are a vital resource, whose importance is tied to socio-demo-geographic variables. Regardless of what the common perceptions of its importance are, the evolving evidence base could suggest either way. In this short commentary we would like to highlight the importance of a balanced and common sense approach in these arguments. An important example is heart failure where the majority have an associated comorbidity and one in four would also suffer with cognitive or mood disturbances. It is unclear how the CTC-HCW would fare for this devastating syndrome. In moving forward it is important we understand there are: strengths and limitations in the evidence gathering processes; indecision as to the questions; uncertainty of the starting points to gather evidence; and sociodemogeographic biases, which have to be factored before determining the fate of this much needed health care resource.

  5. Personal decision-making criteria related to seasonal and pandemic A(H1N1 influenza-vaccination acceptance among French healthcare workers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lila Bouadma

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Influenza-vaccination rates among healthcare workers (HCW remain low worldwide, even during the 2009 A(H1N1 pandemic. In France, this vaccination is free but administered on a voluntary basis. We investigated the factors influencing HCW influenza vaccination. METHODS: In June-July 2010, HCW from wards of five French hospitals completed a cross-sectional survey. A multifaceted campaign aimed at improving vaccination coverage in this hospital group was conducted before and during the 2009 pandemic. Using an anonymous self-administered questionnaire, we assessed the relationships between seasonal (SIV and pandemic (PIV influenza vaccinations, and sociodemographic and professional characteristics, previous and current vaccination statuses, and 33 statements investigating 10 sociocognitive domains. The sociocognitive domains describing HCWs' SIV and PIV profiles were analyzed using the classification-and-regression-tree method. RESULTS: Of the HCWs responding to our survey, 1480 were paramedical and 401 were medical with 2009 vaccination rates of 30% and 58% for SIV and 21% and 71% for PIV, respectively (p<0.0001 for both SIV and PIV vaccinations. Older age, prior SIV, working in emergency departments or intensive care units, being a medical HCW and the hospital they worked in were associated with both vaccinations; while work shift was associated only with PIV. Sociocognitive domains associated with both vaccinations were self-perception of benefits and health motivation for all HCW. For medical HCW, being a role model was an additional domain associated with SIV and PIV. CONCLUSIONS: Both vaccination rates remained low. Vaccination mainly depended on self-determined factors and for medical HCW, being a role model.

  6. Childcare Workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Ludmilla

    1986-01-01

    Discusses various aspects of the career of child-care worker: working conditions, employment possibilities, qualifications and advancement, job outlook, earnings, related occupations, and sources of additional information. (CT)

  7. Order acceptance and scheduling policies for a make-to-order environment with family-dependent lead and batch setup times

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Germs, R.; Foreest, Van N.D.

    2013-01-01

    In many make-to-order production situations with batch setup times, customer orders are grouped into family-dependent batches to limit the loss of capacity due to setups. These batches, however, cannot be too large, since the make-to-order character requires that orders have to be produced in time.

  8. "Making the best of what we have": The lived experiences of community psychiatric nurses, day centre managers and social workers supporting clients with dementia attending a generic day care service.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laird, Elizabeth A; McGurk, Phyllis; Reid, Bernie; Ryan, Assumpta

    2017-12-01

    This study explored the experiences and perspectives of community psychiatric nurses, day centre managers and social workers about supporting clients living with and without dementia attending a generic day care service. The purpose of the study was to elucidate approaches that enable clients living with dementia to access and derive benefit from the service. In the light of international ageing demographics and strategy towards social inclusion, it is anticipated that demand for generic day care services for clients living with and without dementia will increase. A descriptive qualitative design utilised three focus groups for data collection. Community psychiatric nurses (n = 4), day centre mangers (n = 4) and social workers (n = 12) participated in the study. Data analysis informed a narrative description of the approaches that support adults living with dementia in day care. An exhaustive description is encapsulated in five key themes. These are "easing the transition to day care," "proactively managing supervision and complexity of need," "sustaining the person and family carer," making the best of what we have" and "encountering a need for change," The data conveyed a sensitivity to the life story and needs of clients with dementia. Whilst the data revealed deficits in the physical environment of the centres, there were indications of the generation of a positive social environment. A generic day care service that provides an integrated blend of care and treatment and social and recreational support to older adults, irrespective of whether they have or have not dementia, is realistic and manageable. The routine of day centre attendance may have value in sustaining clients with dementia and family care-giving relationships. Approaches to support the attendance of clients with dementia at day care include home visits, life story work, proactive supervision and careful planning of social groupings and recreational activities. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. Myth-Busting Is a Bust for Patient Education: Making Salient Older Adults' Misconceptions about Osteoarthritis Fails to Lead to Lasting Corrections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ansburg, Pamela I.

    2016-01-01

    Older adults hold many misconceptions about health and wellness that reduce their health literacy. To counter these misconceptions, health educators commonly turn to educational interventions that include myth-busting--making explicit health-related myths and refuting those myths. Because of typical age-related changes in memory functioning, there…

  10. Migrating Worker

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Hans

    This is the preliminary report on the results obtained in the Migrating Worker-project. This project was initiated by the Danish Ministry of Finance with the aim of illustrating the effects of the 1408/71 agreement and the bilateral double taxation agreements Denmark has with the countries included...

  11. Sound-Making Actions Lead to Immediate Plastic Changes of Neuromagnetic Evoked Responses and Induced β-Band Oscillations during Perception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, Bernhard; Barat, Masihullah; Fujioka, Takako

    2017-06-14

    Auditory and sensorimotor brain areas interact during the action-perception cycle of sound making. Neurophysiological evidence of a feedforward model of the action and its outcome has been associated with attenuation of the N1 wave of auditory evoked responses elicited by self-generated sounds, such as talking and singing or playing a musical instrument. Moreover, neural oscillations at β-band frequencies have been related to predicting the sound outcome after action initiation. We hypothesized that a newly learned action-perception association would immediately modify interpretation of the sound during subsequent listening. Nineteen healthy young adults (7 female, 12 male) participated in three magnetoencephalographic recordings while first passively listening to recorded sounds of a bell ringing, then actively striking the bell with a mallet, and then again listening to recorded sounds. Auditory cortex activity showed characteristic P1-N1-P2 waves. The N1 was attenuated during sound making, while P2 responses were unchanged. In contrast, P2 became larger when listening after sound making compared with the initial naive listening. The P2 increase occurred immediately, while in previous learning-by-listening studies P2 increases occurred on a later day. Also, reactivity of β-band oscillations, as well as θ coherence between auditory and sensorimotor cortices, was stronger in the second listening block. These changes were significantly larger than those observed in control participants (eight female, five male), who triggered recorded sounds by a key press. We propose that P2 characterizes familiarity with sound objects, whereas β-band oscillation signifies involvement of the action-perception cycle, and both measures objectively indicate functional neuroplasticity in auditory perceptual learning. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT While suppression of auditory responses to self-generated sounds is well known, it is not clear whether the learned action-sound association

  12. Appendectomy due to lead poisoning: a case-report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aghilinejad M

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Lead poisoning is a common occupational health hazard in developing countries and many misdiagnoses and malpractices may occur due to unawareness of lead poisoning symptoms. Case presentation We report a case of occupational lead poisoning in an adult battery worker with abdominal colic who initially underwent appendectomy with removal of normal appendix. Later on he was diagnosed with lead poisoning and was treated appropriately with lead chelator (CaNa2EDTA. Conclusion Lead poisoning is frequently overlooked as the differential diagnosis of acute abdomen which may result in unnecessary surgery. Appropriate occupational history taking is helpful in making a correct diagnosis. Occupational lead poisoning is a preventable disorder and a serious challenge for the health and labor authorities in developing countries.

  13. Construction Worker Fatigue Prediction Model Based on System Dynamic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wahyu Adi Tri Joko

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Construction accident can be caused by internal and external factors such as worker fatigue and unsafe project environment. Tight schedule of construction project forcing construction worker to work overtime in long period. This situation leads to worker fatigue. This paper proposes a model to predict construction worker fatigue based on system dynamic (SD. System dynamic is used to represent correlation among internal and external factors and to simulate level of worker fatigue. To validate the model, 93 construction workers whom worked in a high rise building construction projects, were used as case study. The result shows that excessive workload, working elevation and age, are the main factors lead to construction worker fatigue. Simulation result also shows that these factors can increase worker fatigue level to 21.2% times compared to normal condition. Beside predicting worker fatigue level this model can also be used as early warning system to prevent construction worker accident

  14. Misplaced Inventory and Lead-Time in the Supply Chain: Analysis of Decision-Making on RFID Investment with Service Level

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li-Hao Zhang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Radio-frequency identification (RFID, as the key technology of Internet of Things (IoT, has been hailed as a major innovation to solve misplaced inventory and reduce lead-time. Many retailers have been pushing their suppliers to invest this technology. However, its associated costs seem to prohibit its widespread application. This paper analyzes the situation of service level in a retail supply chain, which has resulted from misplaced inventory and lead-time. By newsvendor model, we analyze the difference between with- and without-RFID technologies in service level of centralized and decentralized supply chains, respectively. Then with different service levels, we determine the tag cost thresholds at which RFID technology investment becomes profitable in centralized and decentralized supply chains, respectively. Furthermore, we apply a linear transfer payment coefficient strategy to coordinate with the decentralized supply chain. It is found that whether the adoption of RFID technology improves the service level depends on the cost of RFID tag in the centralized system, but it improves the service level in the decentralized system when only the supplier bears the cost of RFID tag. Moreover, the same cost thresholds of RFID tag with different service levels exist in both the centralized and the decentralized cases.

  15. Invited Commentary: Little Steps Lead to Huge Steps-It's Time to Make Physical Inactivity Our Number 1 Public Health Enemy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Church, Timothy S

    2016-11-01

    The analysis plan and article in this issue of the Journal by Evenson et al. (Am J Epidemiol 2016;184(9):621-632) is well-conceived, thoughtfully conducted, and tightly written. The authors utilized the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey data set to examine the association between accelerometer-measured physical activity level and mortality and found that meeting the 2013 federal Physical Activity Guidelines resulted in a 35% reduction in risk of mortality. The timing of these findings could not be better, given the ubiquitous nature of personal accelerometer devices. The masses are already equipped to routinely quantify their activity, and now we have the opportunity and responsibility to provide evidenced-based, tailored physical activity goals. We have evidenced-based physical activity guidelines, mass distribution of devices to track activity, and now scientific support indicating that meeting the physical activity goal, as assessed by these devices, has substantial health benefits. All of the pieces are in place to make physical inactivity a national priority, and we now have the opportunity to positively affect the health of millions of Americans. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  16. Comparison of community health worker-led diabetes medication decision-making support for low-income Latino and African American adults with diabetes using e-Health tools versus print materials: A randomized controlled trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heisler, Michele; Choi, Hwajung; Palmisano, Gloria; Mase, Rebecca; Richardson, Caroline; Fagerlin, Angela; Montori, Victor M.; Spencer, Michael; An, Laurence C.

    2015-01-01

    Background Health care centers serving low-income communities have scarce resources to support medication decision-making among patients with poorly controlled diabetes. Objective We compared outcomes between community health worker (CHW) use of a tailored, interactive web-based tablet-delivered tool (iDecide) versus use of print educational materials. Design A randomized two-arm trial from 2011-2013. Trial Registration NCT01427660. Setting Community health center in Detroit serving a Latino and African American low-income population. Participants 188 adults with a hemoglobinA1c >7.5% (55%) or who reported questions, concerns, or difficulty taking diabetes medications Primary Funding Sources Agency for Health Care Quality and Research (1R18HS019256-01) and P30DK092926 (MCDTR) Measurements Primary outcomes were changes in knowledge about anti-hyperglycemic medications, patient-reported medication decisional conflict, and satisfaction with anti-hyperglycemic medication information. We also examined changes in diabetes distress, self-efficacy, medication adherence, and A1c. Intervention Participants were randomized to receive a 1-2 hour session with a CHW using either iDecide or printed educational materials and two follow-up calls. Results 94% of participants completed three-month follow-up. Both groups improved across most measures. iDecide participants reported greater improvements in satisfaction with medication information (helpfulness, p=.007; clarity, p=.03) and in diabetes distress compared to the print materials group (pdetermine whether the greater improvements in satisfaction with medication information and diabetes distress achieved in the iDecide group at three months translate into better longer-term diabetes outcomes. PMID:25402398

  17. Can informed choice invitations lead to inequities in intentions to make lifestyle changes among participants in a primary care diabetes screening programme? Evidence from a randomized trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kellar, I; Mann, E; Kinmonth, A L; Prevost, A T; Sutton, S; Marteau, T M

    2011-09-01

    To test whether information about benefits and harms of screening for type 2 diabetes increases intentions to make lifestyle changes amongst attenders, predominantly among the socially advantaged and those with a strong future time orientation. Planned subgroup analysis of attenders for screening participating in a randomized controlled trial of an informed choice invitation vs a standard invitation to attend for type 2 diabetes screening. Potentially eligible participants were identified from practice registers using routine data which were used to calculate risk scores for diabetes for all aged 40-69 years without known type 2 diabetes and area deprivation based on post code. In total, 1272 individuals in the top 25% risk category were randomized to receive one of two invitations to attend their practices for screening: an informed choice invitation or a standard invitation. The subsequent attenders completed self-report measures of future time orientation and deprivation immediately before undergoing a screening test. Individual-level deprivation demonstrated a significant moderator effect [F (4,635) = 4.32, P = 0.002]: individuals who were high in deprivation had lower intentions to engage in lifestyle change following receipt of the informed choice invitation. However, intentions were not patterned by deprivation when it was assessed at the area-level using the Index of Multiple Deprivation 2007. The hypothesized moderating effect of future time orientation on invitation type was also supported [F(14,613) = 2.46, P = 0.002): individuals low in future time orientation had markedly lower intentions to engage in lifestyle change following receipt of an informed choice invitation compared with a standard invitation for screening. Efforts to enhance informed choice where the implications of diagnosis are a requirement for lifestyle change may require that the immediate benefits are communicated, and efforts to address the apparent barriers to diabetes self

  18. The role of labor organizations in tobacco control: what do unionized workers think?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Rebecca J; Weisman, Susan R; Jones, Resa M; Erickson, Darin

    2009-01-01

    Examine unionized workers' knowledge and attitudes about workplace tobacco use, their exposure to secondhand smoke, and the role of labor unions in addressing smoking and cessation coverage policies. Random-digit dial telephone survey. Unionized workers in Minnesota (N = 508). Knowledge and attitudes about workplace tobacco use and tobacco control policy making. Multiple logistic regression. The majority of respondents viewed secondhand smoke exposure as an important workplace health and safety issue, a health risk to nonsmokers, and a driver of increased health care costs, but smokers were less likely than nonsmokers to agree. Only 7% of respondents supported their unions taking the lead in tobacco control policy making. A large majority of those surveyed rated smoking cessation programs as an important benefit for which their labor unions could bargain; however, smokers and those whose workplaces allowed smoking were less likely than their counterparts to agree. Most unionized workers were aware of the health effects of exposure to secondhand smoke and supported union bargaining for restrictions on workplace smoking and cessation programs, although few workers supported their unions taking the lead in initiating worksite smoking policies. Results suggest that campaigns to promote smoke-free worksites should be tailored to unionized workers, and further collaborations with labor unions to promote policy change are needed.

  19. Decontamination Supplies Under the Worker Protection Standard

    Science.gov (United States)

    Employers at agricultural establishments must make sure that decontamination supplies for washing off pesticides and pesticide residues are available to workers and handlers. Learn about specific requirements for the type and location of these supplies.

  20. Lead Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Links Patient Resources For Health Professionals Subscribe Search Lead Send Us Your Feedback Choose Topic At a ... Related Content View Sources Also Known As Blood Lead Test Blood Lead Level BLL Formal Name Lead, ...

  1. The Foreign Workers and Foreign Workers' German.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blackshire-Belay, Carol

    Foreign Workers' German (FWG) refers to the acquired German language skills of workers from various countries who were recruited to West Germany between 1955 and 1973 to fill menial, undesirable jobs. Contact between these workers and native German speakers was limited because of the nature of the foreigners' work, the tendency toward residential…

  2. Organic Lead Toxicology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiří Patočka

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Lead is one of the oldest known and most widely studied occupational and environmental poison. Despite intensive study, there is still debate about the toxic effects of lead, both from low-level exposure in the general population owing to environmental pollution and historic use of lead in paint and plumbing and from exposure in the occupational setting. Significant position have organic lead compounds used more than 60 years as antiknock additives in gasoline. Chemical and toxicological characteristics of main tetraalkyl leads used as gasoline additives are discussed in this article. The majority of industries historically associated with high lead exposure have made dramatic advances in their control of occupational exposure. However, cases of unacceptably high exposure and even of frank lead poisoning are still seen, predominantly in the demolition and tank cleaning industries. Nevertheless, in most industries blood lead levels have declined below levels at which signs or symptoms are seen and the current focus of attention is on the subclinical effects of exposure. The significance of some of these effects for the overt health of the workers is often the subject of debate. Inevitably there is pressure to reduce lead exposure in the general population and in working environments, because current studies show that no level of lead exposure appears to be a ‘safe’ and even the current ‘low’ levels of exposure, especially in children, are associated with neurodevelopmental deficits.

  3. Lead Poisoning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lead is a metal that occurs naturally in the earth's crust. Lead can be found in all parts of our ... from human activities such as mining and manufacturing. Lead used to be in paint; older houses may ...

  4. Community Health Worker Handbook.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perales, Aurora Rodriguez

    An experienced community health worker describes her experiences in the field as a basis for recommended guidelines for the role, philosophy, aims, and goals of community health workers. The role of the community health worker as a member of the health care team is explored, and the problem of recognition for community health workers is considered…

  5. Restructuring Foreign Worker Policy and Community Transformation in Malaysia

    OpenAIRE

    Aziz, Mohd Amar; Ayob, Noor Hadzlida; Abdulsomad, Kamaruddin

    2017-01-01

    Malaysia is one of the most rapidly growing economies in Asia and is blessed with foreign workers inflow to sustain the economic growth process. However, the strong national sentiments among the local community, which harbors ill perception towards the foreign workers, lead to regrettably vague policies concerning foreign workers. As far as this issue is concerned, Malaysia needs to reform the policy regulations so that foreign workers will be able to integrate into the economic transformatio...

  6. The Impact of Community Health Workers on the Self-Determination, Self-Sufficiency, and Decision-Making Ability of Low-Income Women and Mothers of Young Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovach, Andrea Crivelli; Becker, Julie; Worley, Heidi

    2004-01-01

    Pregnant women at high risk for adverse health outcomes can benefit from the services of community health workers. Maternity Care Coalition identifies at risk women and provides links to health care and social services through the MOMobile Program. The purpose of this study was to explore (a) the relationship formed between community health…

  7. Catalysts of worker-to-worker violence and incivility in hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamblin, Lydia E; Essenmacher, Lynnette; Upfal, Mark J; Russell, Jim; Luborsky, Mark; Ager, Joel; Arnetz, Judith E

    2015-09-01

    To identify common catalysts of worker-to-worker violence and incivility in hospital settings. Worker-to-worker violence and incivility are prevalent forms of mistreatment in healthcare workplaces. These are forms of counterproductive work behaviour that can lead to negative outcomes for employees, patients and the organisation overall. Identifying the factors that lead to co-worker mistreatment is a critical first step in the development of interventions targeting these behaviours. Retrospective descriptive study. Qualitative content analysis was conducted on the total sample (n = 141) of employee incident reports of worker-to-worker violence and incivility that were documented in 2011 at a large American hospital system. More than 50% of the incidents involved nurses, and the majority of incidents did not involve physical violence. Two primary themes emerged from the analysis: Work Behaviour and Work Organisation. Incidents in the Work Behaviour category were often sparked by unprofessional behaviour, disagreement over responsibilities for work tasks or methods of patient care, and dissatisfaction with a co-worker's performance. Incidents in the Work Organisation category involved conflicts or aggression arising from failure to following protocol, patient assignments, limited resources and high workload. Incidents of worker-to-worker violence and incivility stemmed from dissatisfaction with employee behaviour or from organisational practices or work constraints. These incident descriptions reflect worker dissatisfaction and frustration, resulting from poor communication and collaboration between employees, all of which threaten work productivity. Violence and incivility between hospital employees can contribute to turnover of top performers, hinder effective teamwork and jeopardise the quality of patient care. Identification of common catalysts for worker-to-worker violence and incivility informs the development of mistreatment prevention programmes that can be

  8. Applying Popular Education with Workers in China: Possibilities and Challenges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yee, Rita Kwok Hoi

    2004-01-01

    All education programmes are designed to make changes. Few are clear on how change is defined, or what specifically needs to be changed. Yet the way that educators interpret this magic word makes all the difference to the content and method of programmes. Customarily, most Chinese workers' education programmes are designed to change workers, in…

  9. Factors influencing worker use of personal protective eyewear.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lombardi, David A; Verma, Santosh K; Brennan, Melanye J; Perry, Melissa J

    2009-07-01

    To identify and describe the array of factors that influence a workers' decision to wear personal protective eyewear (PPE) and the barriers that exist in preventing their use. A series of focus groups enrolled workers and supervisors primarily from manufacturing, construction, or service/retail industries that had potential exposure to eye injury hazards in their job tasks. Focus group sessions were facilitated to collect qualitative and quantitative data in two categories, "sought information" and "emergent themes", related to the factors influencing use of PPE. We conducted a series of 7 groups with 51 participants, 36 (71%) males and 15 (29%) females ranging in age from 19 to 64 years old, from a variety of occupations including construction (24%), production (22%), installation, repair and maintenance (14%), and healthcare (10%). Most were highly experienced in their occupation (>10 years); males (86%) and females (53%), and had received some safety training in the past (82%). The majority of workers in this study were required to wear PPE on their worksite (78%), however only 55% had a dedicated safety officer. A conceptual model that summarizes the "sought information" and "emergent themes" is presented that depicts the decision making process for the factors influencing use of PPE and consists of three primary branches; perceptions of hazards and risks, "barriers" to PPE usage, and enforcement and reinforcement. Lack of comfort/fit, and fogging and scratching of the eyewear were suggested as the most important barriers to PPE usage. Younger age and lack of safety training were other important factors affecting use of PPE. Several potentially modifiable factors identified would lead to an increase in workers' PPE use and encourage supervisors to provide ongoing positive feedback on the continuous use of PPE by workers at risk for an eye injury.

  10. Occupational Stress Among Home Healthcare Workers: Integrating Worker and Agency-Level Factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zoeckler, Jeanette M

    2018-02-01

    Home healthcare work is physically and emotionally exhausting. In addition, home healthcare workers frequently work under precarious work arrangements for low wages and in poor work conditions. Little is known about how sources of job strain for home healthcare workers might be reduced. This research examines the occupational stressors among paid home care workers by analyzing home healthcare agency characteristics and individual home healthcare workers' experiences in upstate New York agencies (n = 9). The study augments existing theoretical models and describes new sources of stress arising from the nature of agency-based caregiving. Results feature the analysis of both agency executives' (n = 20) and home healthcare workers' narratives (n = 25) to make the agency's inner workings more transparent. Agency structures and culture are implicated in the lack of progress to address home care workers' health problems. Policy change should focus on compensation, healthier work conditions, and training requirements.

  11. Client Abuse to Public Welfare Workers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Strøbæk, Pernille Solveig; Korczynski, Marek

    2016-01-01

    We analyse a case study of workers’ experience of client abuse in a Danish public welfare organisation. We make an original contribution by putting forward two different theoretical expectations of the case. One expectation is that the case follows a pattern of customer abuse processes in a social...... market economy – in which workers are accorded power and resources, in which workers tend to frame the abuse as the outcome of a co-citizen caught in system failure and in which workers demonstrate some resilience to abuse. Another expectation is that New Public Management reforms push the case to follow...... patterns of customer abuse associated with a liberal market economy – in which the customer is treated as sovereign against the relatively powerless worker, and in which workers bear heavy emotional costs of abuse. Our findings show a greater match to the social processes of abuse within a social market...

  12. Lead poisoning

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... or dust from lead-based paint. Toys and furniture painted before 1976. Painted toys and decorations made ... by decades of car exhaust or years of house paint scrapings. Lead is more common in soil ...

  13. Lead Poisoning

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... a hard, durable surface. In 1977, federal regulations banned lead from paint for general use. But homes ... OTHERS: Lead has recently been found in some plastic mini-blinds and vertical blinds which were made ...

  14. Relational Leading

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Mette Vinther; Rasmussen, Jørgen Gulddahl

    2015-01-01

    This first chapter presents the exploratory and curious approach to leading as relational processes – an approach that pervades the entire book. We explore leading from a perspective that emphasises the unpredictable challenges and triviality of everyday life, which we consider an interesting......, relevant and realistic way to examine leading. The chapter brings up a number of concepts and contexts as formulated by researchers within the field, and in this way seeks to construct a first understanding of relational leading....

  15. Correlación de protoporfirina zinc y plomo en sangre en trabajadores de fábricas de baterías, de Bogotá, Colombia Correlation of zinc protoporphyrin with blood lead levels in car battery industry workers in Bogota, Colombia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Omayda Cárdenas-Bustamante

    2001-06-01

    Full Text Available Objetivo. Determinar la utilidad de la protoporfirina zinc en sangre (PPz como indicador de exposición a plomo en trabajadores de fábricas de baterías. Material y métodos. Se hizo un estudio transversal en 116 trabajadores de fábricas de baterías del sector informal en Bogotá, Colombia. La información sobre variables generales, ocupacionales y de salud fue obtenida por medio de una entrevista con los trabajadores. Se establecieron dos categorías para los valores de PPz: aquellos por debajo del valor límite de (70 µg/dl, y aquellos por arriba de este valor. Se empleó análisis de regresión lineal para medir la correlación entre los valores logarítmicos de PPz (>70 µg/dl y plomo en sangre (PbS (>38 µg/dl. Resultados. Se encontró un coeficiente de correlación semilogarítmica r=0.54, además de posibles asociaciones estadísticamente significativas entre los niveles elevados de PPz y el oficio actual de exposición directa (RM:3.35, IC 95% 1.02-11.91; p:0.02, emplear plomo como materia prima (RM:7.80, IC 95% 2.96-21.03; phttp://www.insp.mx/salud/index.htmlObjective. To determine the usefulness of zinc protoporphyrin in blood (PPz as an indicator of lead exposure in workers of the homemade car battery industry. Material and methods. A cross-sectional study was performed in 116 workers of the car battery industry in Bogotá, Colombia. Data on general, occupational, and health variables were collected by interview. Two categories of PPz values were established: Those below the cutoff value (70 µg/dL and those above it. A linear regression analysis was performed to measure the correlation between logarithm values of PPz (>70 µg/dL and lead in blood (PbB (>38 µg/dL. Results. A semi-logarithmic correlation coefficient of r=0.54 was found, and statistically significant associations between high levels of PPz and direct exposure to lead were observed (OR:3.35, 95% IC 1.02-11.91; p:0.02; for workers who often use lead as a raw material

  16. Distúrbios neurológicos em trabalhadores com baixos níveis de chumbo no sangue: II-Disfunções neurocomportamentais Neurological disturbances in workers with low levels of lead in the blood: II-Neuropsychological disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ricardo Cordeiro

    1996-08-01

    Full Text Available Trata-se de um estudo observacional, transversal, com população de estudo aleatorizada, cujo objetivo foi contribuir para a avaliação da validade dos limites de tolerância biológica (LTB estabelecidos no Brasil para a plumbemia (Pb-S e a excreção urinária do ácido delta-aminolevulínico (ALA-U. Para tanto, foi aplicada uma variação do WHO Neurobehavioral Core Test Battery a um grupo de trabalhadores expostos ao chumbo, cujos valores de Pb-S e ALA-U encontravam-se no momento bem como nos 2 anos precedentes abaixo dos LTB brasileiros. Os resultados foram comparados aos obtidos por intermédio da aplicação da mesma bateria de testes, em um grupo-controle não exposto ao chumbo. No grupo exposto foram encontrados sinais de comprometimento da memória, humor e coordenação motora fina que diferiam significativamente dos resultados obtidos no grupo-controle (p = 0,02. Os resultados apontam contra a validação dos LTB estabelecidos no Brasil para a Pb-S e a ALA-U.This is a cross-sectional study with a randomized choice of individuals aiming at studying the validity of the Brazilian biological exposure limits applied to lead level in the blood (PbB and delta-aminolevulinic acid in the urine (ALAU, which are 60 µ/dl and 10 mg/g.creat., respectively. Thus, twenty workers, whose PbB and ALAU values have been below these limits over the past two years, were selected at random at a battery plant in the State of S. Paulo, Brazil. The workers were submitted to a variation of the WHO Neurobehavioral Core Test Battery. The results were compared with those obtained for workers of a control group also chosen at random. The lead workers showed memory, mood and motor coordination disorders. Comparing these results with those obtained from the control group, a significant difference was observed (p-value < 0.02. The results indicate that the Brazilian biological exposure limits above should be reconsidered.

  17. Coal worker's pneumoconiosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/000130.htm Coal worker's pneumoconiosis To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Coal worker's pneumoconiosis (CWP) is a lung disease that ...

  18. Substituição das soldas estanho-chumbo na manufatura: efeitos na saúde do trabalhador e no desempenho ambiental Substitution of tin-lead solders in manufacturing: impacts on workers' health and on the environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cecilia Maria Villas Bôas de Almeida

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available As soldas à base de estanho-chumbo (63Sn/37Pb são largamente utilizadas no Brasil e no mundo. Este estudo aplica a avaliação em emergia em um fabricante de soldas brandas à base de estanho e chumbo e outros metais. O cálculo da emergia por unidade de três tipos de solda mostra que mais recursos são utilizados para produzir uma tonelada de soldas livres de chumbo do que para produzir soldas à base de estanho e chumbo. O indicador DALY (Disability Adjusted Life Years foi utilizado para comparar as emissões na atmosfera dos três tipos de produção de soldas e os resultados apontam para a adoção das soldas à base de chumbo, quando se considera todo o ciclo de vida do produto. A diferença entre os resultados obtidos por avaliações locais e globais é discutida.Tin-lead solders (Sn63-Pb37 have been widely used in Brazil and worldwide. This study evaluates the emergy in a company that manufactures soft solders based on tin, lead, and other metals. The calculation of emergy per unit of three types of solder showed that more resources are used to produce one ton of lead-free solders than those used to produce tin-lead solders. The DALY (Disability Adjusted Life Years indicator was used to assess the emissions to air of three types of solder. The results favor the use of tin-lead solders when the whole product life-cycle is evaluated. The difference between the results obtained by local and global assessments is discussed.

  19. The worker profile autocontrolled

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jairo Omar Delgado Mora

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available This document is part of two deliveries. In this first paper is to make an approach to the concept of self-control from the very beginning with Sakichi Toyoda, founder of what the industry Toyota Motor Company, additionally taking some excerpts of the concept issued by teachers and the psychologist Henry Murray, a professor at the university Harvard precursor test TAT personality test creator, pen applied world wide by psychologists David McCllelan, also a psychologist and a pioneer in the study of human needs and the concept of competence; Professor Jeffrey Pfeffer of Stanford University organizational behavior and theory, Frederick Hertzberg, Psychologist and strong influential in business management, Kronfly Cruz, lawyer and investigator of social and administrative sciences, Charles Perrow, a sociologist at Yale University and Stanford , who studies the impact of large organizations in society, among others. The study reflects the need to meet organizational objectives related to the physicochemical characteristics of the finished product in a plant of the company’s main beers in the country. In this paper, we intend to make an approximation of worker self -controlled, which when compared with the powers, generic, specific and technical area established by the brewery, will allow generating a methodology to adjust these competencies and to obtain the target profile drawn. This comparison and development of the methodology proposed is the subject of the second work planned.

  20. Occupational Health Management in the Lead Industry: The Korean Experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Byung-Kook Lee

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available In 1967, the problem of occupational lead exposure came to public attention in Korea. Since then, regular progress has been made in lowering workplace lead exposures, instituting new workplace controls, and implementing health examinations of exposed workers. Past serious lead poisoning episodes made it possible to introduce biological monitoring programs on a voluntary basis in high-lead-exposure facilities in Korea. Industry-specific occupational health services for lead workers in Korea during the last 22 years can be categorized into three phases. During the first phase (1988-1993, efforts were directed at increasing awareness among workers about the hazards of lead exposure, biological monitoring of blood zinc protoporphyrin began, and a respiratory protection program was introduced. During the second phase (1994-1997, a computerized health management system for lead workers was developed, blood-lead measurement was added to biologic monitoring, and engineering controls were introduced in the workplace to lower air-lead levels to comply with air-lead regulations. Finally, during the third phase (1998-present, a new biomarker, bone-lead measurement by X-ray fluorescence, was introduced. Bone-lead measurement proved to be useful for assessing body burden and to demonstrate past lead exposure in retired workers. Occupational health service practice for lead workers, including the industry-specific group occupational health system, has brought considerable success in the prevention of lead poisoning and in reducing the lead burden in Korean lead workers during the last several decades. The successful achievement of prevention of lead poisoning in Korea was a result of the combined efforts of lead workers, employers, relevant government agencies, and academic institutes.

  1. Burnout among Social Workers in Iran: Relations to Individual Characteristics and Client Violence

    OpenAIRE

    Padyab, Mojgan; Richter, Jörg; Nygren, Lennart; Ghazinour, Mehdi

    2013-01-01

    Social workers are considered a professional group at high risk of burnout. Noticing the insufficient human resource management and understaffed social work centers, Iranian social workers are faced with a considerable level of physical and mental stress, which can lead to burnout. A national study on 390 social workers was conducted. Among social workers, 10.9% had experienced burnout and 17.4% are at risk of developing burnout. Social workers scored higher in burnout if they were dissatisfi...

  2. 'Depression is not an illness. It's up to you to make yourself happy': Perceptions of Chinese health professionals and community workers about older Chinese immigrants' experiences of depression and anxiety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haralambous, Betty; Dow, Briony; Goh, Anita; Pachana, Nancy A; Bryant, Christina; LoGiudice, Dina; Lin, Xiaoping

    2016-12-01

    The aim of this study was to improve our understanding of depression and anxiety among older immigrant Chinese Australians. The study was based on the National Ageing Research Institute's Cultural Exchange Model, an iterative process of exchange between researchers and stakeholders. The project involved a range of components including consultations with health professionals and community workers about perceptions of depression and anxiety within the Chinese community. This paper reports on these consultation findings. Thematic analysis generated five main categories to explain participants' perceptions of depression and anxiety within the Chinese community. Themes included: lack of knowledge; personal weakness rather than illness; stigma; somatisation; and experience of migration in later life. Responses to questions about education and information dissemination were collated separately and reported. Views of depression and anxiety among older Chinese people suggest that educating the community may be an important way to improve mental health literacy and help-seeking behaviour. © 2016 AJA Inc.

  3. Lead Toxicity

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... blue-gray metal that is mined from the earth’s crust. • Lead has been used for many industrial ... including the kidneys, heart, and reproductive system, • Pregnant women should know that the developing fetus is very ...

  4. Lead Poisoning

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... has also been associated with juvenile delinquency and criminal behavior. In adults, lead can increase blood pressure ... and-forth manner, but rather from left to right (or vise-versa), or from the top of ...

  5. Lead Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... poison you. Most lead is present as an inorganic compound and does not move well through the ... D. R., Editors (© 2006). Contemporary Practice in Clinical Chemistry: AACC Press, Washington, DC. Pp 474. Wu, A. (© ...

  6. HAIR LEAD CONCENTRATION IN NAKHLAK LEAD MINERS VERSUS CONTROL GROUP

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N IZADI

    2002-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Lead poisoning is a major problem in environmental health. Exposure can occur via air, soil, food and water. Occupational exposure is the most common source of lead poisoning in adults. Lead miners are exposed to an additional source of poisoning in long term. Hair analysis may be used to evaluate chronic lead toxicity. This study compare the hair lead concentration in Nakhlak lead miners and Mohammadieh people who live 130 km far from the lead mine. Methods. Hair samples from 24 Nakhlak lead miners and 26 adult men of Mohammadieh village were gathered, washed by detergent and distilled water and dissolved by wet digestion. Lead concentrations of the samples were measured by flame atomic absorption spectroscopy. Results. There was a significant difference between hair lead concentration of Nakhlak lead miners and Mohammadieh people (P < 0.001. The mean of lead concentrations were 52.43±27.7 µg/g (mean ± SD and 17.32±3.43 µg/g hair of the lead mine workers and the Mohammadieh people, respectively. There was also a significant regression between the number of exposure years and the lead concentration of hair in Nakhlak lead miners (P < 0.001, r=0.8. Discussion. Presence of lead compounds in work environment especially in the air may be an important factor for the difference between hair lead concentration of Nakhlak lead miners and Mohammadieh people. However, the hair lead concentration in Mohammadieh people is also reasonably high. It means that these people are also exposed to lead through the other sources e.g. food, soil, water and air.

  7. Respiratory risks in broiler production workers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M do CB de Alencar

    2004-03-01

    Full Text Available There are many situations that involve health risks to the Brazilian rural worker, and animal production is just one of them. Inhalation of organic dust, which has many microorganisms, leads in general to respiratory allergic reactions in some individuals, "asthma-like syndrome", and mucous membrane inflammation syndrome, that is a complex of nasal, eye, and throat complaints. Furthermore, workers might have farmer's hypersensitivity pneumonia, that is a respiratory health risk along the years. The objective of this study was to evaluate the potential pulmonary health risks in poultry production workers in the region of Curitiba, PR, Brazil. Interviews using a pre-elaborated questionnaire with 40 questions were made with 37 broiler production workers, which were submitted to a pulmonary function test. Results of restrictive function with lower FEV1 (the maximum respiratory potential, the forced expiratory volume in the first second of exhalation and FVC (forced vital capacity represented 24.32% of the total of workers, and severe obstruction represented 2.70%. Other symptoms were found in 67.57% of the workers as well. The results showed that those who work more than 4 years and within more than one poultry house, exceeding 5 hours per day of work, presented higher pulmonary health risks. It is concluded that the activities within broiler houses may induce allergic respiratory reaction in workers. The use of IPE (individual protection equipment besides special attention to the air quality inside the housing may be advised in a preventive way.

  8. Motivating Workers in Construction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jason E. Barg

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The study of the motivation of construction workers is limited to a relatively small body of knowledge. Although there is considerable research available regarding motivation and productivity, few researchers have provided a comprehensive analysis on the motivation of construction workers. The research stated that productivity in construction has not improved compared to other industry sectors such as manufacturing. This trend has been echoed in publications throughout the past five decades, and suggested that motivation is one of the key factors impacting productivity. This paper offers a comprehensive review of the published work that directly links the key words—construction and motivation. The findings have been presented in five themes, that is, motivation models, environment and culture, incentives and empowerment, and worker management. This paper concludes with two methods suggested by previous researchers to improve motivation of construction workers: (1 relevant worker incentives (intrinsic or extrinsic and (2 improved management practices, specifically regarding communication with workers.

  9. Mortality among rubber workers: V. processing workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delzell, E; Monson, R R

    1982-07-01

    Cause-specific mortality was evaluated among 2,666 men employed in the processing division of a rubber manufacturing plant. The division was divided into two sections: front processing (compounding, mixing and milling operations) and back processing (extrusion, calendering, cement mixing and rubberized fabrics operations). Mortality rates for all processing workers combined and for men in each section were compared with rates for U.S. White males or for workers employed in other divisions of the same plant. Compared with either referent group, men in the processing division had increased mortality from leukemia, emphysema, and cancers of the stomach, large intestine, and biliary passages and liver. An excess number of deaths from stomach and larger intestine cancer was found predominantly among men in the front processing section (33 observed vs. 17.7 expected deaths, based on rates in nonprocessing workers). Increased mortality from leukemia (14 observed vs. 7.3 expected) and from emphysema (22 observed vs. 11.0 expected) was present among men employed in the back processing section. Examination of mortality from these causes according to age and the year starting work, duration of employment, and years since starting work in the relevant sections of the processing division suggested that observed excesses of stomach cancer, large intestine cancer, leukemia, and emphysema among processing workers are related to occupational exposures. These results are consistent with the findings of studies of other groups of rubber workers.

  10. Ecotoxicology: Lead

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheuhammer, A.M.; Beyer, W.N.; Schmitt, C.J.; Jorgensen, Sven Erik; Fath, Brian D.

    2008-01-01

    Lead (Pb) is a naturally occurring metallic element; trace concentrations are found in all environmental media and in all living things. However, certain human activities, especially base metal mining and smelting; combustion of leaded gasoline; the use of Pb in hunting, target shooting, and recreational angling; the use of Pb-based paints; and the uncontrolled disposal of Pb-containing products such as old vehicle batteries and electronic devices have resulted in increased environmental levels of Pb, and have created risks for Pb exposure and toxicity in invertebrates, fish, and wildlife in some ecosystems.

  11. Interviewing media workers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heike Graf

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available The focus of this article is on the use of Niklas Luhmann’s systems theoretical approach in order to analyse interviews conducted with media workers concerning their experiences of ethnic diversity in newsrooms. Applying systems theory means constructing the interview as a social system and seeing the “data” as observations produced by the observer and not as representations of a reality. The first part of the article describes the interview methodology and the second part provides examples, from the current study, of how systems theory can be applied in order to analyse interviews. Using a difference-theoretical approach means looking at the distinctions the informants make when talking about their experiences. These main guiding distinctions can be summarised as immigrant background/competence as well as advantage/competence. Using the guiding distinction of inclusion/exclusion when interpreting the interviewees’ statements, the interdependencies of mechanisms of inclusion and exclusion in newsrooms related to ethnic background can be examined.

  12. Overcoming Barriers to Shared Decision Making

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... to a palliative care specialist or social worker. Barrier: Disagreeing with the doctor Solution: In shared decision making, the patient and doctor are partners. And sometimes, partners disagree. Communication is critical if a disagreement occurs. If a ...

  13. Burn-Out: Occupational Hazard of the Child Care Worker

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freudenberger, Herbert J.

    1977-01-01

    Discusses emotional and practical stress factors confronting child care workers, especially those in adolescent intake residences or group homes. Makes recommendations to agencies on ways to improve administration-worker communication and staff training and emphasizes need for clear-cut goals, schedules and work routines. Suggests ways for workers…

  14. Optimal Incentive Contracts when Workers envy their Boss

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.J. Dur (Robert); A. Glazer (Amihai)

    2004-01-01

    textabstractA worker's utility may increase in his own income, but envy can make his utility decline with his employer's income. Such behavior may call for high-powered incentives, so that increased effort by the worker little increases the income of his employer. This paper employs a

  15. Awareness of workers on Hazards Exposure and Safety Measure in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Awareness of workers on Hazards Exposure and Safety Measure in an Aluminum industry in Ojo L.G.A. of Lagos State. ... The study makes recommendations to further improve knowledge and awareness of hazards in the work place towards safely control measures. Keywords: Knowledge, Hazards, Workers, Aluminum ...

  16. Does Work Contribute to Successful Aging Outcomes in Older Workers?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanders, Martha J.; McCready, Jack W.

    2010-01-01

    Older workers are the fastest growing segment of the labor force, yet little is known about designing jobs for older workers that optimize their experiences relative to aging successfully. This study examined the contribution of workplace job design (opportunities for decision-making, skill variety, coworker support, supervisor support) to…

  17. Leading men

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bekker-Nielsen, Tønnes

    2016-01-01

    Through a systematic comparison of c. 50 careers leading to the koinarchate or high priesthood of Asia, Bithynia, Galatia, Lycia, Macedonia and coastal Pontus, as described in funeral or honorary inscriptions of individual koinarchs, it is possible to identify common denominators but also disting...

  18. Medical interpretation for immigrant workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forst, Linda; Masters, Deborah; Zanoni, Joseph; Avila, Susan; Chaidez, Francisco; Miller, Arlene

    2012-01-01

    Foreign-born workers have high rates of occupational mortality and morbidity, despite downward trends for the U.S. workforce overall. They have limited access to health care services. Medical interpreters (MIs) facilitate care of acutely injured, low-English-proficiency (LEP) patients, including those sustaining occupational injuries. Our goal was to assess the potential for MIs to serve as advocates of LEP patients injured at work and to deliver preventive messages. We conducted interviews and a focus group of MIs regarding their attitudes toward foreign-born workers, knowledge of occupational health, and perceived roles. They were familiar with occupational injuries and sympathetic toward foreign-born workers, and they described their roles as conduits, cultural brokers, and advocates for hospitals, providers, and patients. More detailed and representative data would require a larger investigation. However, the time-sensitive nature of policy-making at this point mandates that occupational health stakeholders participate in the national dialogue on standards, training, and licensure for MIs to promote improved access and quality of health care for LEP patients who have been injured at work.

  19. 75 FR 6031 - Policy Paper on Revised Risk Assessment Methods for Workers, Children of Workers in Agricultural...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-02-05

    ... Register of December 9, 2009, making available for comment a policy paper entitled ``Revised Risk... AGENCY Policy Paper on Revised Risk Assessment Methods for Workers, Children of Workers in Agricultural... agricultural fields. The December 9, 2009 notice announced the availability of the policy paper and opened a...

  20. Health impacts of garage workers: A preliminary study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muttamara, S. (AIT, Bangkok (Thailand). Division of Environmental Engineering); Alwis, K.U.

    1994-05-01

    This research study was carried out in two automobile repair garages situated in the Bangkok metropolitan area, employing 47 and 12 workers respectively. Air sampling, biological monitoring (blood, urine), noise monitoring, and audiometry of workers were done to assess the occupational environment and its impact on the workers. The occupational hygiene survey was carried out to observe the working conditions of both garages. It was found that conditions at both sites have a strong negative impact on the health of workers. The lead in air of Garage 1 was 0.20 mg/m[sup 3] which is the same as the threshold limit value (TLV) for lead in air for a working environment. The level of lead in blood of four workers of each garage was above the exposed level. According to the occupational hygiene survey carried out at both garages, 79% of workers of Garage 1 and 70% of workers of Gage 2 suffered from redness of the eyes (eye pain, gritty feeling), and 5% and 2% of workers of Garage 1 and Garage 2 respectively, complained about breathing difficulties. Control measures should be taken to minimize pollution due to dust, fumes, and noise which would reduce the health impacts and lead to a healthier workforce.

  1. Guidance for Older Workers in Denmark and Spain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plant, Peter; Lopez-Sanchez, Maria Jose

    2011-01-01

    Guidance has a role to play in helping older workers to lead meaningful and fruitful lives; inside, outside, on the edge of the labour market, or in voluntary work with examples from two very different European countries: Denmark and Spain. This paper aims to draw attention to older workers guidance from an economic policy approach. It will be…

  2. Are Social Workers Homophobic?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wisniewski, Jack J.; Toomey, Beverly G.

    1987-01-01

    Describes a study of attitudes towards homosexuality in representative sample of social workers (N=77) in Columbus, Ohio using Hudson's Index of Attitudes toward Homosexuals. Results lend preliminary empirical support to the implied assumption that social workers manifest signs of homophobia. (ABL)

  3. Workers' Education in Palestine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elayassa, Wajih

    2013-01-01

    Due to the political context and the restrictions placed on general freedoms and trade union activities, workers' education in Palestine remained informal and largely reliant on oral memory until the early 1990s. For decades, it was an integral part of political education. Workers' education only became a stand-alone field after the establishment…

  4. Special Issue: Rural Workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodson, Elizabeth; And Others

    1995-01-01

    The issue discusses the role of the International Labour Office in the field of workers' education for rural workers and their organizations. Articles discuss labor conditions, child labor in agriculture, gender and equality training, trade unions, fair trade, and changing patterns of food production. Appendixes include information about…

  5. Preventing occupational stress in healthcare workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva-Junior, João Silvestre

    2016-01-01

    Healthcare workers can suffer from occupational stress which may lead to serious mental and physical health problems. To evaluate the effectiveness of work and person-directed interventions in preventing stress at work in healthcare workers. We searched the Cochrane Depression Anxiety and Neurosis Group trials Specialised Register, MEDLINE, PsychInfo and Cochrane Occupational Health Field database. Randomised controlled clinical trials (RCT) of interventions aimed at preventing psychological stress in healthcare workers. For work-directed interventions interrupted time series and prospective cohort were also eligible. Two authors independently extracted data and assessed trial quality. Meta-analysis and qualitative synthesis were performed where appropriate. We identified 14 RCTs, three cluster-randomised trials and two crossover trials, including a total of 1,564 participants in intervention groups and 1,248 controls. Two trials were of high quality. Interventions were grouped into 1) person-directed: cognitive-behavioural, relaxation, music-making, therapeutic massage and multicomponent; and 2) work-directed: attitude change and communication, support from colleagues and participatory problem solving and decision-making, and changes in work organisation. There is limited evidence that person-directed interventions can reduce stress (standardised mean difference or SMD -0.85; 95% CI -1.21, -0.49); burnout: Emotional Exhaustion (weighted mean difference or WMD -5.82; 95% CI -11.02, -0.63) and lack of Personal Accomplishment (WMD -3.61; 95% CI -4.65, -2.58); and anxiety: state anxiety (WMD -9.42; 95% CI -16.92, -1.93) and trait anxiety (WMD -6.91; 95% CI -12.80, -1.01). One trial showed that stress remained low a month after intervention (WMD -6.10; 95% CI -8.44, -3.76). Another trial showed a reduction in Emotional Exhaustion (Mean Difference or MD -2.69; 95% CI -4.20, -1.17) and in lack of Personal Accomplishment (MD -2.41; 95% CI -3.83, -0.99) maintained up to

  6. Preventing occupational stress in healthcare workers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jani H. Ruotsalainen

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Healthcare workers can suffer from occupational stress which may lead to serious mental and physical health problems. OBJECTIVES: To evaluate the effectiveness of work and person-directed interventions in preventing stress at work in healthcare workers. METHODS: Search methods: We searched the Cochrane Depression Anxiety and Neurosis Group trials Specialised Register, MEDLINE, PsychInfo and Cochrane Occupational Health Field database. Selection criteria: Randomised controlled clinical trials (RCT of interventions aimed at preventing psychological stress in healthcare workers. For work-directed interventions interrupted time series and prospective cohort were also eligible. Data collection and analysis: Two authors independently extracted data and assessed trial quality. Meta-analysis and qualitative synthesis were performed where appropriate. MAIN RESULTS: We identified 14 RCTs, three cluster-randomised trials and two crossover trials, including a total of 1,564 participants in intervention groups and 1,248 controls. Two trials were of high quality. Interventions were grouped into 1 person-directed: cognitive-behavioural, relaxation, music-making, therapeutic massage and multicomponent; and 2 work-directed: attitude change and communication, support from colleagues and participatory problem solving and decision-making, and changes in work organisation. There is limited evidence that person-directed interventions can reduce stress (standardised mean difference or SMD -0.85; 95% CI -1.21, -0.49; burnout: Emotional Exhaustion (weighted mean difference or WMD -5.82; 95% CI -11.02, -0.63 and lack of Personal Accomplishment (WMD -3.61; 95% CI -4.65, -2.58; and anxiety: state anxiety (WMD -9.42; 95% CI -16.92, -1.93 and trait anxiety (WMD -6.91; 95% CI -12.80, -1.01. One trial showed that stress remained low a month after intervention (WMD -6.10; 95% CI -8.44, -3.76. Another trial showed a reduction in Emotional Exhaustion (Mean

  7. Who Leads China's Leading Universities?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Futao

    2017-01-01

    This study attempts to identify the major characteristics of two different groups of institutional leaders in China's leading universities. The study begins with a review of relevant literature and theory. Then, there is a brief introduction to the selection of party secretaries, deputy secretaries, presidents and vice presidents in leading…

  8. Canadian tourist and Dominican Republic sex workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herold, E S

    1992-01-01

    The Dominican Republic is a popular tourist destination for Canadians. The country's sex industry for tourists developed markedly in the 1980s. The Puerto Plata/Sosua area is currently one of the most popular tourist sites and claimed the highest incidence of AIDS in 1989 at 23.2 cases/100,000 people. Two pilot phases of the Dominican Sex Workers and Canadian Tourists Study have been conducted to obtain methodological and empirical data to use in developing a major study of sex and tourism. First phase interviews were held only with beachboys who make money by having relations with female tourists, while phase two interviews were held with beachboys, female sex workers, and female and male tourists. Results indicate that female tourists consider their relations with male sex workers to be primarily social, while male tourists see their relations with female sex workers as more casual, sexual, and monetarily based. Further, women are more likely than men to continue their relationships with sex workers after returning to Canada; many help their men to immigrate and some get married. To learn more about the dynamics of tourism, sex, and AIDS prevention, the author proposes individual studies exploring the characteristics of each of the following four populations: male and female sex workers and male and female tourists.

  9. Client retention and health among sex workers in Nairobi, Kenya.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Izugbara, Chimaraoke O

    2012-12-01

    It is still a small body of research that directly addresses female sex workers' relationships with their regular commercial male partners. I used ethnographic data from Nairobi, Kenya to interrogate motivations and strategies for recruiting and retaining regular male clients among female sex workers (FSWs). Regular commercial male partners, popularly called customer care, wera or wesh by Nairobi's FSWs, played diverse roles in their lives. Client retention enabled sex workers to manage the risk of reduced marriage prospects, guaranteed them steady work, livelihoods, and incomes, and prevented their victimization and harassment. To retain clients, sex workers obliged them a great deal, pretended they had quit prostitution, and sometimes resorted to magical practices. However, these strategies were also accompanied by risks that reinforced the vulnerability of sex workers. Lack of critical attention to sex workers' practices for managing perceived risks in their particular type of work may hamper current programmatic efforts to make their job safer.

  10. Job evaluation in worker fitness determination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodgers, S H

    1988-01-01

    To assess work fitness on a placement exam requires detailed assessment of repetitive manual capabilities specific for the job, ability to withstand static loading of the back and other muscle groups in the working position, and tolerance of the heat and humidity conditions of the work environment. Less specific tests, such as aerobic capacity stress tests, grip strength, and back examination may not accurately reflect the demands of repetitive job activities and, therefore, may not satisfy the legal requirements of Title VII. Only occasionally will a job analysis lead to the establishment of a concrete capacity standard against which a potential worker's fitness or risk for injury can be measured in the physician's office. The most valuable contributions of a careful, quantitative job analysis are likely to be the identification of particular anatomic structures (e.g., joints and muscles) that will be subjected to high stress and a clear understanding of the job so that reasonable accommodation of the worker or modifications of the job and workplace can be considered. In summary, the following observations can be made: 1. Intensity of effort, continuous duration of effort, and frequency of repetition are the key factors for evaluating the physical demands on muscle groups during work. 2. Intensity of effort can be estimated by using psychophysical scaling techniques and by obtaining ratings from several people. 3. Timing the effort and recovery times for specific muscle groups during a task of interest can be used to quantify the possible fatigue. It will also provide information about ways to improve the task to bring it within the capabilities of more people. 4. Total workload is most easily evaluated by using estimation methods or lists of comparable jobs and then performing a time-weighted calculation of the full shift's work requirements. The workload should be related to the aerobic capacities of the active muscles. 5. Environmental heat and humidity reduce

  11. Student internships with unions and workers: building the occupational health and safety movement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bateson, Gail

    2013-01-01

    One of the most successful programs to recruit young professionals to the occupational safety and health field was launched more than 35 years ago, in 1976. Created by the Montefiore Medical Center's Department of Social Medicine collaborating with Tony Mazzocchi of the Oil, Chemical and Atomic Workers International Union (OCAW), it placed medical, nursing, and public health students in summer internships with local unions to identify and solve health and safety problems in the workplace. The experience of working with and learning from workers about the complex interactions of political, economic, and scientific-technological issues surrounding workplace conditions inspired many students to enter and stay in our field. Many former interns went on to make important medical and scientific contributions directly linked to their union-based projects. Former interns are now among the leaders within the occupational health and safety community, holding key positions in leading academic institutions and governmental agencies.

  12. Workplace violence and the meaning of work in healthcare workers: A phenomenological study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamothe, Josianne; Guay, Stephane

    2017-01-01

    Workplace violence (WPV) has been associated with turnover intentions and reduced job satisfaction, yet the mechanisms behind such associations are still nebulous. Studying the way people make sense of their work in the context of WPV could lead to a better understanding of its consequences. The objective of this exploratory study is to identify key features of meaning of work (MOW) in a group of healthcare workers and explain how these features can change following an act of WPV. Researchers recruited 15 healthcare workers (11 women - 4 men) who had previously been the victim of a serious physical or sexual assault by a patient. A phenomenological approach was used. Two main themes were identified: MOW and relationships with others and MOW and relationship with the self. WPV might have the potential to trigger negative changes in the way some workers perceive their colleagues, their patients and their organisation. It can also interfere with their sense of self-accomplishment; all workers however, were still able to find positive meaning in 'contribution' and 'autonomy'. WPV has the potential to change certain aspects of MOW that could help explain why WPV is associated with lowered job satisfaction, compassion fatigue, and higher turnover. Also, finding meaning through contribution and autonomy can be a form of resilience.

  13. Participation in decision-making process, incentives and training as ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study investigates the relationships among participation in decision-making process, incentives, training and organizational commitment among some industrial workers. Measures on participation in decision-making, incentives, training and organizational commitment were employed to collect data from the workers in ...

  14. Ergonomics study for workers at food production industry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohd Fazi Hamizatun

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The health constraint faced by production workers affects the quality of the work. The productivity of the workers is affected by the Work-related Musculoskeletal Disorder (WMSD which limits the movement of the workers. The comfort workplace condition, known as ergonomic environment is important to prevent the occurrence of the WMSD. Proper ergonomic workplace considers the condition of the workers while doing the assigned work. The objectives of this study are to identify the current problems related to ergonomic in food production process, to analyse the actual production data by using Rapid Upper Limb Assessment (RULA and Rapid Entire Body Assessment (REBA and to recommend the ergonomic workplace environment based on the condition of the study. The study was done at a Small and Medium Enterprises (SME food production company in the Klang Valley of Malaysia. The condition of the workers affects the productivity of the company due to workers’ health deficiency. From the findings, the workers are exposed to the awkward postures which leads to the Work-Musculoskeletal Disorders (WMSDs. Besides, the best height of the worker at the study area (critical area to prevent the worker from WMSDs is within 155 cm to 160 cm. The results show that the workers are exposed to the WMSD in different level of risks which causes high absenteeism among the workers.

  15. Anemia risk in relation to lead exposure in lead-related manufacturing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nan-Hung Hsieh

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Lead-exposed workers may suffer adverse health effects under the currently regulated blood lead (BPb levels. However, a probabilistic assessment about lead exposure-associated anemia risk is lacking. The goal of this study was to examine the association between lead exposure and anemia risk among factory workers in Taiwan. Methods We first collated BPb and indicators of hematopoietic function data via health examination records that included 533 male and 218 female lead-exposed workers between 2012 and 2014. We used benchmark dose (BMD modeling to estimate the critical effect doses for detection of abnormal indicators. A risk-based probabilistic model was used to characterize the potential hazard of lead poisoning for job-specific workers by hazard index (HI. We applied Bayesian decision analysis to determine whether BMD could be implicated as a suitable BPb standard. Results Our results indicated that HI for total lead-exposed workers was 0.78 (95% confidence interval: 0.50–1.26 with risk occurrence probability of 11.1%. The abnormal risk of anemia indicators for male and female workers could be reduced, respectively, by 67–77% and 86–95% by adopting the suggested BPb standards of 25 and 15 μg/dL. Conclusions We conclude that cumulative exposure to lead in the workplace was significantly associated with anemia risk. This study suggests that current BPb standard needs to be better understood for the application of lead-exposed population protection in different scenarios to provide a novel standard for health management. Low-level lead exposure risk is an occupational and public health problem that should be paid more attention.

  16. Anemia risk in relation to lead exposure in lead-related manufacturing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsieh, Nan-Hung; Chung, Shun-Hui; Chen, Szu-Chieh; Chen, Wei-Yu; Cheng, Yi-Hsien; Lin, Yi-Jun; You, Su-Han; Liao, Chung-Min

    2017-05-05

    Lead-exposed workers may suffer adverse health effects under the currently regulated blood lead (BPb) levels. However, a probabilistic assessment about lead exposure-associated anemia risk is lacking. The goal of this study was to examine the association between lead exposure and anemia risk among factory workers in Taiwan. We first collated BPb and indicators of hematopoietic function data via health examination records that included 533 male and 218 female lead-exposed workers between 2012 and 2014. We used benchmark dose (BMD) modeling to estimate the critical effect doses for detection of abnormal indicators. A risk-based probabilistic model was used to characterize the potential hazard of lead poisoning for job-specific workers by hazard index (HI). We applied Bayesian decision analysis to determine whether BMD could be implicated as a suitable BPb standard. Our results indicated that HI for total lead-exposed workers was 0.78 (95% confidence interval: 0.50-1.26) with risk occurrence probability of 11.1%. The abnormal risk of anemia indicators for male and female workers could be reduced, respectively, by 67-77% and 86-95% by adopting the suggested BPb standards of 25 and 15 μg/dL. We conclude that cumulative exposure to lead in the workplace was significantly associated with anemia risk. This study suggests that current BPb standard needs to be better understood for the application of lead-exposed population protection in different scenarios to provide a novel standard for health management. Low-level lead exposure risk is an occupational and public health problem that should be paid more attention.

  17. Asthma among mink workers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grøntved, Berit; Carstensen, Ole; Petersen, Rolf

    2014-01-01

    We report two cases of asthma among mink workers. The first case is about a mink farmer who had asthma that was difficult to treat. In the medical history there was no clear relation to work, and no conclusive work relation with peak flow monitoring. He had a positive histamine release test to mink...... urine. The second case is about a mink farm worker, who had an asthma attack when handling mink furs. Peak flow monitoring showed a clear relation to this work, but there were no signs of allergy. We conclude that these two cases suggest an increased risk of asthma among mink workers....

  18. A systematic review on status of lead pollution and toxicity in Iran; Guidance for preventive measures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdollahi Mohammad

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Lead is an old environmental metal which is presented everywhere and lead poisoning is an important health issue in many countries in the world including Iran. It is known as a silent environmental disease which can have life-long adverse health effects. In children, the most vulnerable population, mental development of children health effects is of the greatest influence. Low level lead exposure can significantly induce motor dysfunctions and cognitive impairment in children. The sources of lead exposure vary among countries. Occupational lead exposure is an important health issue in Iran and mine workers, employees of paint factories, workers of copying centers, drivers, and tile making factories are in higher risk of lead toxicity. Moreover lead processing industry has always been a major of concern which affects surface water, drinking waters, and ground waters, even water of Caspian Sea, Persian Gulf and rivers due to increasing the number of industries in vicinity of rivers that release their waste discharges into river or sea. In addition, lead contamination of soil and air especially in vicinity of polluted and industrialized cities is another health problem in Iran. Even foods such as rice and fishes, raw milk, and vegetables which are the most common food of Iranian population are polluted to lead in some area of Iran. Adding lead to the opium is a recently health hazard in Iran that has been observed among opium addicts. There are few studies evaluated current status of lead exposure and toxicity in the Iranian children and pregnant women which should be taken into account of authorities. We recommend to identify sources, eliminate or control sources, and monitor environmental exposures and hazards to prevent lead poisoning.

  19. A Systematic Review on Status of Lead Pollution and Toxicity in Iran; Guidance for Preventive Measures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parissa Karrari

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Lead is an old environmental metal which is presented everywhere and lead poisoning is an important health issue in many countries in the world including Iran. It is known as a silent environmental disease which can have life-long adverse health effects. In children, the most vulnerable population, mental development of children health effects is of the greatest influence. Low level lead exposure can significantly induce motor dysfunctions and cognitive impairment in children. The sources of lead exposure vary among countries. Occupational lead exposure is an important health issue in Iran and mine workers, employees of paint factories, workers of copying centers, drivers,and tile making factories are in higher risk of lead toxicity. Moreover lead processing industry has always been amajor of concern which affects surface water, drinking waters, and ground waters, even water of Caspian Sea,Persian Gulf and rivers due to increasing the number of industries in vicinity of rivers that release their waste discharges into river or sea. In addition, lead contamination of soil and air especially in vicinity of polluted andindustrialized cities is another health problem in Iran. Even foods such as rice and fishes, raw milk, and vegetables which are the most common food of Iranian population are polluted to lead in some area of Iran. Adding lead to the opium is a recently health hazard in Iran that has been observed among opium addicts. There are few studiesevaluated current status of lead exposure and toxicity in the Iranian children and pregnant women which should be taken into account of authorities. We recommend to identify sources, eliminate or control sources, and monitor environmental exposures and hazards to prevent lead poisoning.

  20. A systematic review on status of lead pollution and toxicity in Iran; Guidance for preventive measures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karrari, Parissa; Mehrpour, Omid; Abdollahi, Mohammad

    2012-01-01

    Lead is an old environmental metal which is presented everywhere and lead poisoning is an important health issue in many countries in the world including Iran. It is known as a silent environmental disease which can have life-long adverse health effects. In children, the most vulnerable population, mental development of children health effects is of the greatest influence. Low level lead exposure can significantly induce motor dysfunctions and cognitive impairment in children. The sources of lead exposure vary among countries. Occupational lead exposure is an important health issue in Iran and mine workers, employees of paint factories, workers of copying centers, drivers, and tile making factories are in higher risk of lead toxicity. Moreover lead processing industry has always been a major of concern which affects surface water, drinking waters, and ground waters, even water of Caspian Sea, Persian Gulf and rivers due to increasing the number of industries in vicinity of rivers that release their waste discharges into river or sea. In addition, lead contamination of soil and air especially in vicinity of polluted and industrialized cities is another health problem in Iran. Even foods such as rice and fishes, raw milk, and vegetables which are the most common food of Iranian population are polluted to lead in some area of Iran. Adding lead to the opium is a recently health hazard in Iran that has been observed among opium addicts. There are few studies evaluated current status of lead exposure and toxicity in the Iranian children and pregnant women which should be taken into account of authorities. We recommend to identify sources, eliminate or control sources, and monitor environmental exposures and hazards to prevent lead poisoning.

  1. Increased Sensitization of Health Workers Leading to Detection of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Laboratory investigations included routine urine microscopy and full blood count. Further analysis inc luded viral analysis for enteroviruses , cytomegalovirus among others, copper levels and thiocyanate levels. Results: Preliminary laboratory results indicated no viral infections. Thiocyanate and copper levels are yet to be ...

  2. Increased Sensitization of Health Workers Leading to Detection of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    thiocyanate levels. Results: Preliminary laboratory results indicated no viral ... H1N1v, Ebola and now Zika underscore the need to invest in effective .... wild polio virus. This was followed by the standard 60 day follow up. It was during the 60 day follow up that more cases were discovered and reported to the Mongu district.

  3. Does circular migration lead to "guest worker" outcomes?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Doomernik, J.

    2013-01-01

    At first at the level of the European Commission, and increasingly also in the European Union’s member states, it is being recognized that past labour migration management tools have more or less serious drawbacks in that they produce undesired outcomes and do not sufficiently attain the objectives

  4. Workers Compensation Claim Data -

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Transportation — This data set contains DOT employee workers compensation claim data for current and past DOT employees. Types of data include claim data consisting of PII data (SSN,...

  5. Advanced worker protection system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Caldwell, B.; Duncan, P.; Myers, J. [Oceaneering Space Systems, Houston, TX (United States)

    1995-10-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE) is in the process of defining the magnitude and diversity of Decontamination and Decommissioning (D&D) obligations at its numerous sites. The DOE believes that existing technologies are inadequate to solve many challenging problems such as how to decontaminate structures and equipment cost effectively, what to do with materials and wastes generated, and how to adequately protect workers and the environment. Preliminary estimates show a tremendous need for effective use of resources over a relatively long period (over 30 years). Several technologies are being investigated which can potentially reduce D&D costs while providing appropriate protection to DOE workers. The DOE recognizes that traditional methods used by the EPA in hazardous waste site clean up activities are insufficient to provide the needed protection and worker productivity demanded by DOE D&D programs. As a consequence, new clothing and equipment which can adequately protect workers while providing increases in worker productivity are being sought for implementation at DOE sites. This project describes the development of an Advanced Worker Protection System (AWPS) which will include a life-support backpack with liquid air for cooling and as a supply of breathing gas, protective clothing, respirators, communications, and support equipment.

  6. Flexible work schedules, older workers, and retirement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siegenthaler, J K; Brenner, A M

    2000-01-01

    Older workers in the United States indicate that they would prefer flexible work arrangements rather than abrupt retirement, yet management has done very little to make this possible. A review of two bodies of literature from the late 1980s is presented: social science writings including sociological, gerontological, and economic literature, and business and management literature. There is a clash between the way jobs are traditionally scheduled and the needs of growing numbers of older workers. Workers continue to be subject to obstacles to phased retirement due to the structuring of health care and pension benefits, downsizing, organizational inflexibility, and "corporate culture." Thus, general views among social scientists regarding the desirability of flexible schedules toward retirement will not produce real changes unless management becomes committed to such changes and they are securely embedded in company policies.

  7. Edirne’de süpürge üretimi çalışanlarında SO2 etkisinin değerlendirilmesi - 2012/Evaluation of SO2 effetcs among workers of the broom-making business in Edirne-2012

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ufuk berberoğlu

    2013-08-01

    bölümde çalışma sırasında, kişisel koruyucu maske kullanılmalıdır. Anahtar kelimeler: İç ortam havası, SO2, süpürge işçileri, solunum fonksiyon testi  Abstract Objective: Sulphur dioxide (SO2,which is encountered in the ambient air of the working rooms used for making brooms, is a gas that primarily affects the respiratory system of the staff. Method: This study was conducted to investigate the exposure to SO2 which is used in the production process in broom-making in Edirne between January-February of 2012. A questionnaire was applied to 25 broom-makers and to 25 other individuals. The study included demographic data, a history and a physical examination of the respiratory system, and the results of spirometry. The amount of SO2 in the rooms used for the industrial processes were measure by a Gas Alert Micro 5 brand device. Results: The average age of the workers affected by SO2 and of the non exposured group were (47.6±1.2, 45.2±3.4 respectively and the rates of smoking were (64%, 64% similar (p>0.05. Differences in sputum levels (32% and 16%, p<0.05 and cough rates (24% and 12%, p<0.05 for the workers and controls respectively were statistically significant; whereas dyspnea (20% and 20%, p>0.05 and pathological respiratory sounds ratios (12% and 12%, p>0.05 were similar. Spirometry findings including FEV1, FVC, FEV1/FVC and MEF (FEF25-75% were significantly lower for the workers than the control group (p<0.05. Conclusion: SO2 room gas amounts were higher than both WHO and National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH standards. SO2 gas amounts higher than the standards are harmful especially for the respiratory system of the workers. Workers in this industry should be warned of the potential risks and should be educated. Workers of the complex using SO2 should use masks during working hours and rooms should have efficient air-conditioning. Key Words: Indoor air, SO2, sweeper workers, pulmonary function test  

  8. Adaptation of the older worker to occupational challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moyers, Penelope A; Coleman, Shelley D

    2004-01-01

    The occupational adaptation practice model guided the search for and the analysis of the literature on the older worker. The purpose of this literature review was to: identify the occupational challenges that older workers experience, determine ways in which the occupational therapist can promote the occupational adaptation of older workers, and articulate the research and policy changes implied in the model related to health and improved productivity. The analysis of the worker's personal characteristics, work tasks, and environments highlighted the types of occupational challenges that may overwhelm the older worker's adaptive capacity. Straining adaptive capacity of the older worker leads to degradation in levels of mastery. The occupational therapist and others could assist the older worker to achieve relative mastery in response to occupational challenges through ergonomic solutions, training, assistive devices, management policy, and health promotion. Combined efforts of the employer, of the occupational therapist, and of the older work to capitalize on the older worker's years of experience, existing skills, and knowledge facilitates higher job satisfaction, better performance, and an increased sense of well-being in the older worker.

  9. Steel making

    CERN Document Server

    Chakrabarti, A K

    2014-01-01

    "Steel Making" is designed to give students a strong grounding in the theory and state-of-the-art practice of production of steels. This book is primarily focused to meet the needs of undergraduate metallurgical students and candidates for associate membership examinations of professional bodies (AMIIM, AMIE). Besides, for all engineering professionals working in steel plants who need to understand the basic principles of steel making, the text provides a sound introduction to the subject.Beginning with a brief introduction to the historical perspective and current status of steel making together with the reasons for obsolescence of Bessemer converter and open hearth processes, the book moves on to: elaborate the physiochemical principles involved in steel making; explain the operational principles and practices of the modern processes of primary steel making (LD converter, Q-BOP process, and electric furnace process); provide a summary of the developments in secondary refining of steels; discuss principles a...

  10. Migration of health workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buchan, James

    2008-01-01

    The discussion and debate stimulated by these papers focused across a range of issues but there were four main areas of questioning: "measuring" and monitoring migration (issues related to comparability, completeness and accuracy of data sets on human resources); the impact of migration of health workers on health systems; the motivations of individual health workers to migrate (the "push" and "pull" factors) and the effect of policies designed either to reduce migration (e.g "self ufficiency") or to stimulate it (e.g active international recruitment). It was recognised that there was a critical need to examine migratory flows within the broader context of all health care labour market dynamics within a country, that increasing migration of health workers was an inevitable consequence of globalisation, and that there was a critical need to improve monitoring so as to better inform policy formulation and policy testing in this area.

  11. Job Crafting: Older Workers' Mechanism for Maintaining Person-Job Fit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Carol M; Tetrick, Lois E

    2017-01-01

    Aging at work is a dynamic process. As individuals age, their motives, abilities and values change as suggested by life-span development theories (Lang and Carstensen, 2002; Kanfer and Ackerman, 2004). Their growth and extrinsic motives weaken while intrinsic motives increase (Kooij et al., 2011), which may result in workers investing their resources in different areas accordingly. However, there is significant individual variability in aging trajectories (Hedge et al., 2006). In addition, the changing nature of work, the evolving job demands, as well as the available opportunities at work may no longer be suitable for older workers, increasing the likelihood of person-job misfit. The potential misfit may, in turn, impact how older workers perceive themselves on the job, which leads to conflicting work identities. With the traditional job redesign approach being a top-down process, it is often difficult for organizations to take individual needs and skills into consideration and tailor jobs for every employee (Berg et al., 2010). Therefore, job crafting, being an individualized process initiated by employees themselves, can be a particularly valuable mechanism for older workers to realign and enhance their demands-abilities and needs-supplies fit. Through job crafting, employees can exert personal agency and make changes to the task, social and cognitive aspects of their jobs with the goal of improving their work experience (Wrzesniewski and Dutton, 2001). Building on the Life Span Theory of Control (Heckhausen and Schulz, 1995), we posit that job crafting, particularly cognitive crafting, will be of increasing value as employees age. Through reframing how they think of their job and choosing to emphasize job features that are personally meaningful, older workers can optimize their resources to proactively redesign their jobs and maintain congruent, positive work identities.

  12. Ethical dilemmas faced by hospice social workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dennis, Mary Kate; Washington, Karla T; Koenig, Terry L

    2014-10-01

    Ethical decision making is critically important in hospice social work. Through in-depth interviews, researchers explored ethical dilemmas faced by 14 hospice social workers and the processes they used to move toward resolution. The dilemmas were integrated into a framework focused on the sources of ethical conflict: the client system, the agency, and the profession. Processes involved in resolving ethical dilemmas included consulting with other professionals, weighing the pros and cons of options, and bringing about desired outcomes. Findings suggest that hospice teams should be provided with opportunities to meaningfully discuss ethical decision making. Further, the involvement of social workers in administrative leadership is recommended to increase the likelihood that discipline-specific perspectives are incorporated into formal policies and procedures that shape practice in ethically complex situations.

  13. Magnesium Diboride Current Leads

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panek, John

    2010-01-01

    A recently discovered superconductor, magnesium diboride (MgB2), can be used to fabricate conducting leads used in cryogenic applications. Dis covered to be superconducting in 2001, MgB2 has the advantage of remaining superconducting at higher temperatures than the previously used material, NbTi. The purpose of these leads is to provide 2 A of electricity to motors located in a 1.3 K environment. The providing environment is a relatively warm 17 K. Requirements for these leads are to survive temperature fluctuations in the 5 K and 11 K heat sinks, and not conduct excessive heat into the 1.3 K environment. Test data showed that each lead in the assembly could conduct 5 A at 4 K, which, when scaled to 17 K, still provided more than the required 2 A. The lead assembly consists of 12 steelclad MgB2 wires, a tensioned Kevlar support, a thermal heat sink interface at 4 K, and base plates. The wires are soldered to heavy copper leads at the 17 K end, and to thin copper-clad NbTi leads at the 1.3 K end. The leads were designed, fabricated, and tested at the Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe - Institut foer Technische Physik before inclusion in Goddard's XRS (X-Ray Spectrometer) instrument onboard the Astro-E2 spacecraft. A key factor is that MgB2 remains superconducting up to 30 K, which means that it does not introduce joule heating as a resistive wire would. Because the required temperature ranges are 1.3-17 K, this provides a large margin of safety. Previous designs lost superconductivity at around 8 K. The disadvantage to MgB2 is that it is a brittle ceramic, and making thin wires from it is challenging. The solution was to encase the leads in thin steel tubes for strength. Previous designs were so brittle as to risk instrument survival. MgB2 leads can be used in any cryogenic application where small currents need to be conducted at below 30 K. Because previous designs would superconduct only at up to 8 K, this new design would be ideal for the 8-30 K range.

  14. Ethical decision making: the person in the process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattison, M

    2000-05-01

    Ethical decisions made by social workers are shaped by the decision maker and the process used to resolve ethical dilemmas. Although systematic guidelines for resolving ethical dilemmas offer social workers a logical approach to the decision-making sequence, it is inevitable that discretionary judgments will condition the ultimate choice of action. Social workers are influenced by professional roles, practice experiences, individualized perspectives, personal preferences, motivations, and attitudes. Through reflective self-awareness social workers can recognize their value preferences and be alert to the ways in which these values unknowingly influence the resolution of ethical dilemmas. Understanding which values or ethical principles were given priority from among competing alternatives can inform social workers about their value patterning. This article challenges social workers to view current ethical decisions as linked to other ethical decisions they have made in the past or will make in the future. An approach to developing keener insight into value patterning is presented.

  15. Training "Expendable" Workers: Temporary Foreign Workers in Nursing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Alison; Foster, Jason; Cambre, Carolina

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to explore the experiences of Temporary Foreign Workers in health care in Alberta, Canada. In 2007-2008, one of the regional health authorities in the province responded to a shortage of workers by recruiting 510 health-care workers internationally; most were trained as Registered Nurses (RNs) in the Philippines.…

  16. Making Movies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crompton, Zoe; Davies, Emma

    2012-01-01

    Children enjoy making movies but can it help them to understand science? In this article, the authors discuss how creating stop-frame animations of salt dissolving can deepen children's understanding of this process. (Contains 1 figure.)

  17. Making space

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Karen Kershaw

    Making space an enquiry into women's participation in local politics in Rajasthan. Alice Albin Morris, Geeta Sharma and Arun Kumar. UNNATI Organisation for Development Education. India. Parallel Sessions II - Session B ...

  18. Stress in Humanitarian Workers

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user

    Stress in Humanitarian Workers: Case of the UNHCR Office in Senegal. S A Dia, A S Mohamed, M C Gaye Fall,. M Ndiaye. NB Dieng,. Department of Occupational Medicine and Forensic Medicine, Cheikh Anta Diop University at Dakar, Senegal. Corresponding author. Azhar Salim Mohamed. Dakar Fann, Sénégal, Tel: + ...

  19. Dislocated Worker Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988

    Due to the severe economic decline in the automobile manufacturing industry in southeastern Michigan, a Dislocated Workers Program has been developed through the partnership of the Flint Area Chamber of Commerce, three community colleges, the National Center for Research in Vocational Education, the Michigan State Department of Education, the…

  20. Migrant Worker Serial Killer: Schizophrenia’s Effects on Violence

    OpenAIRE

    Frank, Megan

    2014-01-01

    Migrant workers are susceptible to violence because they are viewed as easier targets dueto their lack of assets within their new land. Between February 1, 1971 and May 19, 1971 inSutter County, California 25 migrant workers were murdered by a man with schizophrenianamed Juan Vallejo Corona. Schizophrenia is a mental illness that is often explained by reducedemotional responses and lack of rationale within decision-making. Schizophrenia is prevalentwithin populations of individuals who have c...

  1. Another Look at Women Workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodson, R.

    1986-01-01

    Women now comprise 30 percent of trade union membership worldwide. The International Labour Organisation's Workers' Education Branch is attempting to improve the status of women workers and increase their participation in union activities and labor education. (SK)

  2. New Dimensions of Workers' Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitehouse, John R. W.

    1978-01-01

    The author suggests that labor education, by its organization through trade unions, is clearly distinguished from general adult education activities, although workers obviously participate in adult education. He discusses various ILO workers' education programs around the world. (MF)

  3. Occupational allergic contact dermatitis among construction workers in India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarma Nilendu

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Allergic contact dermatitis is one of the important occupational hazards in construction workers and it often leads to poor quality of life of the workers with substantial financial loss. However, this is often a neglected entity. There are no past studies on the construction workers in Indian subcontinent. Objective: This pilot study has been done to assess the allergological profile among the workers engaged in construction of roads and bridges. Materials and Methods: The study was conducted among the workers working on construction of a bridge, flyover, and roads in West Bengal, India. Sixteen workers were selected on clinical suspicion. Ten were selected randomly and patch tested with Indian standard battery of patch test allergens. Analysis of reactions and relevance of positive test was assessed as per standard guidelines. Results: All the workers were men. Average age of workers was 24.8 years (range, 19-34 years. Dermatitis affected exposed parts in 93.75% and covered areas in 62.5%. Total positive test was 24 and relevant 11. Most common allergens were chromate (relevant allergy/RA: in 60% of patch tested workers, epoxy resin (RA: 30%, cobalt (RA: 20%, nickel (RA: 20%, thiuram mixture (RA: 10% and black rubber mix (RA: 10%. Two cases (20% had irritant contact dermatitis. Conclusion: The result indicated that chromate is the most frequent allergen among construction workers in this part of India. High frequency of involvement of the covered areas as well as the exposed areas highlighted the fact that the allergens had access to most body parts of the workers.

  4. lead glass brick

    CERN Multimedia

    When you look through the glass at a picture behind, the picture appears raised up because light is slowed down in the dense glass. It is this density (4.06 gcm-3) that makes lead glass attractive to physicists. The refractive index of the glass is 1.708 at 400nm (violet light), meaning that light travels in the glass at about 58% its normal speed. At CERN, the OPAL detector uses some 12000 blocks of glass like this to measure particle energies.

  5. Market Structure and Worker Quality.

    OpenAIRE

    Belman, Dale; John S. Heywood

    1990-01-01

    It is frequently asserted, although never directly tested, that firms in more monopolistic industries hire better-qualified workers. This paper presents two new results. First, worker quality (education in particular) is a strong determinant of whether a worker is employed in a concentrated industry when using a traditional data source. Second, upon expanding the data to include measures of research and development, workers of better quality are actually no more likely to locate in concentrat...

  6. Appendectomy due to lead poisoning: a case-report

    OpenAIRE

    Aghilinejad M; AH Mehrparvar; Mohammadi S

    2008-01-01

    Abstract Background Lead poisoning is a common occupational health hazard in developing countries and many misdiagnoses and malpractices may occur due to unawareness of lead poisoning symptoms. Case presentation We report a case of occupational lead poisoning in an adult battery worker with abdominal colic who initially underwent appendectomy with removal of normal appendix. Later on he was diagnosed with lead poisoning and was treated appropriately with lead chelator (CaNa2EDTA). Conclusion ...

  7. Workers' marginal costs of commuting

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van Ommeren, Jos; Fosgerau, Mogens

    2009-01-01

    This paper applies a dynamic search model to estimate workers' marginal costs of commuting, including monetary and time costs. Using data on workers' job search activity as well as moving behaviour, for the Netherlands, we provide evidence that, on average, workers' marginal costs of one hour of ...

  8. Community Health Worker. Program Manual.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perales, Aurora, Ed.; And Others

    Prepared to provide specific and detailed information that can be utilized by persons involved in setting up and/or already involved in the process of providing training for community health workers, the guide is divided into seven sections: (1) Philosophy and Description of Community Health Worker Role; (2) A Community Health Worker Looks at the…

  9. Older Workers. Myths and Realities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imel, Susan

    An increasing proportion of the work force is aging at the same time that the workplace is changing in ways that are detrimental to older workers. Attitudes and beliefs about older workers appear to be ambivalent. Studies show that employers and managers stereotype older workers as loyal and possessing good work habits but inflexible and difficult…

  10. Dermatologic Diseases in Silk Workers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J S Pasricha

    1985-01-01

    Full Text Available A survey of 112 workers of a silk facory near Bangalore, for dermatologic diseases revealed (1 a characteristic wearing off of the medial halves of the distal free edges of the finger nail plates in 10 of the 15 cocoonsorters, (2 maceration of the palms in 58 workers of the boiling and reeling section, and (3 pitted keratolysis of the palms, in 42 workers, also from the boiling and reeling section. There was no clinical evidence of contact dermatitis, and patch tests with the silk thread from the cocoons in 25 workers showed a very mild reaction in 2 workers and a doubtful reaction in another two. In addition, one worker from the skeining section had crisscross superficial fissures on the finger tips caused by friction, two workers had paronychia ′of the fingers and four workers had dermatophytFNx01t fingers webs. As in the previous survey, these workers also had a high incidence of ichthyosis (92 workers and hyperketatosis of the palms (62 workers and soles (110 workers.

  11. Burnout among Social Workers in Iran: Relations to Individual Characteristics and Client Violence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Padyab, Mojgan; Richter, Jörg; Nygren, Lennart; Ghazinour, Mehdi

    2013-01-01

    Social workers are considered a professional group at high risk of burnout. Noticing the insufficient human resource management and understaffed social work centers, Iranian social workers are faced with a considerable level of physical and mental stress, which can lead to burnout. A national study on 390 social workers was conducted. Among social workers, 10.9% had experienced burnout and 17.4% are at risk of developing burnout. Social workers scored higher in burnout if they were dissatisfied with their income, had experienced violence, or had lower self-esteem. Findings are discussed with regard to Iranian context and recommendations for authorities of Iranian state welfare organizations are made. PMID:23777730

  12. Burnout among social workers in Iran: relations to individual characteristics and client violence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Padyab, Mojgan; Richter, Jörg; Nygren, Lennart; Ghazinour, Mehdi

    2013-05-02

    Social workers are considered a professional group at high risk of burnout. Noticing the insufficient human resource management and understaffed social work centers, Iranian social workers are faced with a considerable level of physical and mental stress, which can lead to burnout. A national study on 390 social workers was conducted. Among social workers, 10.9% had experienced burnout and 17.4% are at risk of developing burnout. Social workers scored higher in burnout if they were dissatisfied with their income, had experienced violence, or had lower self-esteem. Findings are discussed with regard to Iranian context and recommendations for authorities of Iranian state welfare organizations are made.

  13. Governing sex workers in Timor Leste.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrington, Carol

    2011-01-01

    This paper argues that international security forces in Timor Leste depend upon civilian partners in HIV/AIDs "knowledge networks" to monitor prostitutes' disease status. These networks produce mobile expertise, techniques of government and forms of personhood that facilitate international government of distant populations without overt coercion. HIV/AIDs experts promote techniques of peer education, empowerment and community mobilisation to construct women who sell sex as health conscious sex workers. Such techniques make impoverished women responsible for their disease status, obscuring the political and economic contexts that produced that status. In the militarised context of Timor Leste, knowledge of the sexual conduct of sub-populations labelled high risk circulates among global HIV/AIDs knowledge networks, confirming their expert status while obscuring the sexual harm produced by military intervention. HIV/AIDs knowledge networks have recently begun to build Timorese sex worker organisations by contracting an Australian sex worker NGO to train a Timorese NGO tasked with building sex worker identity and community. Such efforts fail to address the needs and priorities of the women supposedly empowered. The paper engages theories of global knowledge networks, mobile technologies of government, and governmentality to analyse policy documents, reports, programmes, official statements, speeches, and journalistic accounts regarding prostitution in Timor Leste.

  14. Redução do lead time e entregas no prazo em pequenas e médias empresas que fabricam sob encomenda: a abordagem Worload Control (WLC para o Planejamento e Controle da Produção (PCP Lead time reduction and improved tardiness performance in small and medium sized Make-to-Order Companies: the Workload Control (WLC approach, a solution for Production Planning and Control (PPC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthias Thurer

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available A maior parte da literatura a respeito de Planejamento e Controle da Produção (PCP é focada em estudar e desenvolver aplicativos para grandes empresas, principalmente de ambiente repetitivo. Nesse contexto, são as poucas as alternativas para o PCP para pequenas e médias empresas que fabricam sob encomenda, as quais têm papel fundamental na atual economia brasileira. Em resposta a essa demanda, o presente trabalho objetiva apresentar uma abordagem para o PCP denominada Controle de Carga (Workload Control - WLC. Essa abordagem é reconhecidamente um método com potencial para trazer melhorias no lead time, no estoque em processo e na pontualidade de entregas em ambientes que fabricam sob encomenda (Make-To-Order - MTO. Primeiramente, o artigo apresenta a abordagem WLC, revisando e discutindo os principais assuntos tratados pela literatura internacional na área. Após isso, o desempenho do WLC é avaliado por meio de simulação. Os resultados mostram o potencial de melhorias no lead time e nas ordens em atraso que o WLC pode trazer a pequenas e médias empresas que fabricam sob encomenda. Dessa forma, o presente trabalho pretende contribuir tanto para a teoria a respeito de tal abordagem, praticamente introduzindo tal assunto na literatura brasileira, como para a prática, fornecendo e demonstrando, por meio de simulação, aos gerentes de PCP, uma alternativa para suas empresas trabalharem rumo a baixos lead times e de acordo com modernos paradigmas de produção, tais como o Lean Manufacturing e o Quick Response Manufacturing.The majority of Production Planning and Control (PPC literature is focused on the study and development of solutions for large companies, especially in repetitive environments. Therefore, there are few specific PPC solutions available in the literature for small and medium sized companies (SMC operating in a Make -to-Order (MTO environment. This paper presents the Workload Control (WLC, which is a useful PPC approach

  15. Making Yugoslavs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Christian Axboe

    . By the time Aleksandar was killed by an assassin’s bullet five years later, he not only had failed to create a unified Yugoslav nation but his dictatorship had also contributed to an increase in interethnic tensions.   In Making Yugoslavs, Christian Axboe Nielsen uses extensive archival research to explain...

  16. Immigrants and Native Workers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Foged, Mette; Peri, Giovanni

    Using a database that includes the universe of individuals and establishments in Denmark over the period 1991-2008 we analyze the effect of a large inflow of non-European (EU) immigrants on Danish workers. We first identify a sharp and sustained supply-driven increase in the inflow of non......-EU immigrants in Denmark, beginning in 1995 and driven by a sequence of international events such as the Bosnian, Somalian and Iraqi crises. We then look at the response of occupational complexity, job upgrading and downgrading, wage and employment of natives in the short and long run. We find...... that the increased supply of non-EU low skilled immigrants pushed native workers to pursue more complex occupations. This reallocation happened mainly through movement across firms. Immigration increased mobility of natives across firms and across municipalities but it did not increase their probability...

  17. Tuberculosis in healthcare workers, Scotland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pollock, Kevin G; McDonald, Eisin; Smith-Palmer, Alison; Johnston, Fiona; Ahmed, Syed

    2017-08-01

    In an attempt to explore healthcare worker acquisition of tuberculosis infection, we conducted population-based surveillance of all cases recorded as healthcare workers reported to Enhanced Surveillance of Mycobacterial Infection from 2000 to 2015. Over the study period, the mean incidence rate of tuberculosis among all healthcare workers was 15.4 per 100,000 healthcare workers. However, the incidence rate of tuberculosis amongst those healthcare workers born outside the UK was 164.8 per 100,000 compared with 5.0 per 100,000 UK-born healthcare workers. Fifty-seven per cent of all non-UK-born healthcare workers were diagnosed within five years of their arrival in the UK and would have been new entrants to the NHS. An effective new entrant occupational health screening programme for latent tuberculosis infection may have prevented some of these active cases of infection.

  18. [Alcohol and construction workers].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mosconi, G; Riva, M M; Lorenzi, S; Silva, Giulia; Bartolozzi, F; Pavesi, Greta; Bancone, Claudia; Bettineschi, O; Magno, D

    2007-01-01

    On the basis of the data drawn by national and international literature and the introduction of recent legislation concerning "alcohol and alcohol-related problems", we studied alcohol consumption and the consequences that alcohol abuse has on health, working ability, accidents and absenteeism in construction workers. We studied alcohol consumption in two groups of building workers over different periods (1996-2000; 2006). In 142 workers alcohol concentration was measured in expired air during the periodic health surveillance examination and during work on building sites. We also analyzed the relationship between declared alcohol consumption, accidents and absenteeism. Our study showed a reduction in the average consumption of alcohol over the last ten years but confirmed the role of alcohol-related diseases as a cause of work limitations or work disability. On the other hand, "breathalysing" demonstrated that alcohol consumption during pauses in work is still common. The results of this study confirm the correlation between frequency/seriousness of accidents, absenteeism and average consumption of alcohol.

  19. Making Glass

    OpenAIRE

    Parker, K.; Moore, S.

    2012-01-01

    Journal article comproses: critical reflection, 'Making Glass', HD film with monologue, followed by 'Glass', HD film, stop-motion microscopic and macro photographs In this practice-led exploration of modalities of écriture féminine, I map the shifting subjectivities generated by Glass, a stop-motion animation that performs femininity through close examination and play with glass fragments found among the briny debris of an urban beach. University of Winchester

  20. OSHA issues new guidelines on lead.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1979-12-07

    The OSHA (Occupational Safety and Health Administration) issued new lead exposure standards which were effective February 1979. The policy provides that workers in childbearing years should receive protected earnings and benefits for 18 months while temporarily removed from their regular job to one with less lead exposure. Excessive lead exposure can reduce sex drive, cause impotence and sterility in men, and cause reduced fertility and menstrual disorders in women. Children of exposed parents may have birth defects, mental retardation, or die in their first year.

  1. MakingMaking Money'

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjerg, Ole; Dunne, Stephen

    2015-01-01

    Stephen Dunne recently sat down with Ole Bjerg to chair a discussion about his new book Making Money: The Philosophy of Crisis Capitalism (Verso, 2014). We publish an elaborated version of the book’s concluding chapter – ‘Life after Debt’ – within this special issue. This interview and question...

  2. Making business models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gudiksen, Sune Klok; Poulsen, Søren Bolvig; Buur, Jacob

    2014-01-01

    , the modelling approaches proposed still rely on linear, rational conceptions and causal reasoning. Through six business cases we argue that participatory design has a role to play, and indeed, can lead the way into another approach to business modelling, which we call business model making. The paper...... illustrates how the application of participatory business model design toolsets can open up discussions on alternative scenarios through improvisation, mock-up making and design game playing, before qualitative judgment on the most promising scenario is carried out....

  3. Value Preferences of Social Workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tartakovsky, Eugene; Walsh, Sophie D

    2018-02-07

    The current study examines value preferences of social workers in Israel. Using a theoretical framework of person-environment fit paradigm and theory of values, the study compared social workers (N = 641, mean age = 37.7 years, 91 percent female) with a representative sample of Israeli Jews (N = 1,600, mean age = 44.2, 52 percent female). Questionnaires included personal value preferences and sociodemographic variables (gender, age, education, religiosity, and immigrant status). Multivariate analysis of covariance showed that value preferences of social workers differed significantly from those of the general population. Analyses of covariance showed that social workers reported a higher preference for self-transcendence and a lower preference for conservation and self-enhancement values. Results have significance for the selection, training, and supervision of social workers. They suggest that it is important to assess to what extent selection processes for social workers are primarily recruiting social workers with shared values, thus creating an overly homogenous population of social workers. An understanding of personal value motivations can help social workers in their own process of self-development and growth, and to understand how the profession can fulfill their basic motivations. © 2018 National Association of Social Workers.

  4. Snapshots from a leading eco-city

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mehlsen, Camilla

    2009-01-01

    The government of Singapore wants to make Singapore the leading Eco-city in Asia. Professor Kim Chuan Goh explains why this might be an achievable goal.......The government of Singapore wants to make Singapore the leading Eco-city in Asia. Professor Kim Chuan Goh explains why this might be an achievable goal....

  5. Industry shutdown rates and permanent layoffs: evidence from firm-worker matched data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kim P. Huynh

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Firm shutdown creates a turbulent situation for workers as it leads directly to layoffs for its workers. An additional consideration is whether a firm’s shutdown within an industry creates turbulence for workers at other continuing firms. Using data drawn from the Longitudinal Worker File, a Canadian firm-worker matched employment database, we investigate the impact of industry shutdown rates on workers at continuing firm. This paper exploits variation in shutdown rates across industries and within an industry over time to explain the rate of permanent layoffs and the growth of workers’ earnings. We find an increase in industry shutdown rates increases the probability of permanent layoffs and decreases earnings growth for workers at continuing firms.

  6. Restaurant Manager and Worker Food Safety Certification and Knowledge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Laura G.; Le, Brenda; Wong, Melissa R.; Reimann, David; Nicholas, David; Faw, Brenda; Davis, Ernestine; Selman, Carol A.

    2017-01-01

    Over half of foodborne illness outbreaks occur in restaurants. To combat these outbreaks, many public health agencies require food safety certification for restaurant managers, and sometimes workers. Certification entails passing a food safety knowledge examination, which is typically preceded by food safety training. Current certification efforts are based on the assumption that certification leads to greater food safety knowledge. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention conducted this study to examine the relationship between food safety knowledge and certification. We also examined the relationships between food safety knowledge and restaurant, manager, and worker characteristics. We interviewed managers (N = 387) and workers (N = 365) about their characteristics and assessed their food safety knowledge. Analyses showed that certified managers and workers had greater food safety knowledge than noncertified managers and workers. Additionally, managers and workers whose primary language was English had greater food safety knowledge than those whose primary language was not English. Other factors associated with greater food safety knowledge included working in a chain restaurant, working in a larger restaurant, having more experience, and having more duties. These findings indicate that certification improves food safety knowledge, and that complex relationships exist among restaurant, manager, and worker characteristics and food safety knowledge. PMID:25361386

  7. Restaurant manager and worker food safety certification and knowledge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Laura G; Le, Brenda; Wong, Melissa R; Reimann, David; Nicholas, David; Faw, Brenda; Davis, Ernestine; Selman, Carol A

    2014-11-01

    Over half of foodborne illness outbreaks occur in restaurants. To combat these outbreaks, many public health agencies require food safety certification for restaurant managers, and sometimes workers. Certification entails passing a food safety knowledge examination, which is typically preceded by food safety training. Current certification efforts are based on the assumption that certification leads to greater food safety knowledge. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention conducted this study to examine the relationship between food safety knowledge and certification. We also examined the relationships between food safety knowledge and restaurant, manager, and worker characteristics. We interviewed managers (N=387) and workers (N=365) about their characteristics and assessed their food safety knowledge. Analyses showed that certified managers and workers had greater food safety knowledge than noncertified managers and workers. Additionally, managers and workers whose primary language was English had greater food safety knowledge than those whose primary language was not English. Other factors associated with greater food safety knowledge included working in a chain restaurant, working in a larger restaurant, having more experience, and having more duties. These findings indicate that certification improves food safety knowledge, and that complex relationships exist among restaurant, manager, and worker characteristics and food safety knowledge.

  8. [Occupational digestive diseases in chemical industry workers of West Siberia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pomytkina, T E; Pershin, A N

    2010-01-01

    The high incidence of chronic digestive diseases is recorded in chemical industry workers exposed to the isolated action of noxious substances. The aim of the investigation was to make a hygienic assessment of the risk for occupational digestive diseases in chemical industry workers exposed to a combination of noxious drugs. The working conditions and the prevalence of digestive diseases were studied in 4120 workers engaged in chemical and auxiliary processes. Under the isolated action of noxious substances, the workers had an average of 35% increase in the incidence of digestive diseases than unexposed ones (p 4.0-11.1 and 3.5-10.7 times higher, respectively (p < 0.05) than in the unexposed subjects.

  9. Making Yugoslavs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Christian Axboe

    . By the time Aleksandar was killed by an assassin’s bullet five years later, he not only had failed to create a unified Yugoslav nation but his dictatorship had also contributed to an increase in interethnic tensions.   In Making Yugoslavs, Christian Axboe Nielsen uses extensive archival research to explain...... the failure of the dictatorship’s program of forced nationalization. Focusing on how ordinary Yugoslavs responded to Aleksandar’s nationalization project, the book illuminates an often-ignored era of Yugoslav history whose lessons remain relevant not just for the study of Balkan history but for many...

  10. THE MAKING OF DECISION MAKING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leonardo Yuji Tamura

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Quantum Electronics was a Brazilian startup in the 1990's that was acquired by an American equity fund in 2012. They are currently the largest manufacturer of vehicle tracking and infotainment systems. The company was founded by three college friends, who are currently executives at the company: Camilo Santos, Pedro Barbosa and Luana Correa. Edward Hutter was sent by the equity fund to take over the company’s finances, but is having trouble making organizational decisions with his colleagues. As a consultant, I was called to help them improve their decision making process and project prioritization. I adapted and deployed our firm's methodology, but, in the end, its adequacy is shown to be very much in question. The author of this case study intends to explore how actual organizational decisions rely on different decision models and their assumptions, .as well as demonstrate that a decision model is neither absolutely good nor bad as its quality is context dependent.

  11. Radiological worker training

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-10-01

    This Handbook describes an implementation process for core training as recommended in Implementation Guide G441.12, Radiation Safety Training, and as outlined in the DOE Radiological Control Standard (RCS). The Handbook is meant to assist those individuals within the Department of Energy, Managing and Operating contractors, and Managing and Integrating contractors identified as having responsibility for implementing core training recommended by the RCS. This training is intended for radiological workers to assist in meeting their job-specific training requirements of 10 CFR 835. While this Handbook addresses many requirements of 10 CFR 835 Subpart J, it must be supplemented with facility-specific information to achieve full compliance.

  12. ECG monitoring leads and special leads.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Francis, Johnson

    ECG monitoring is common place in the hospital and even pre-hospital setting. The need for different types of lead systems in different settings has been emphasised. Simple three electrode bipolar recording is ubiquitous for monitoring. This can be used to record modified bipolar chest leads as well. Using five leads gives the option of getting a chest lead in addition to bipolar limb leads, enhancing detection of ischemia during procedures. Lead stability is important when the movement of the subject is maximum as in exercise testing. Mason-Likar modification with limb leads shifted to the torso is popular for exercise testing, though the diagnostic value of the ECG is altered. Lund system with leads on proximal part of limbs have both stability and fair diagnostic value. EASI lead system permits derivation of 12 leads from just five electrodes. Lewis lead and the newly devised modified limb lead system are useful in enhancing detection of atrial activity. Fontaine lead has been designed to improve visualization of Epsilon wave in arrhythmogenic right ventricular dysplasia. Copyright © 2016 Indian Heart Rhythm Society. Production and hosting by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Psychoneurotic and behavioural changes among a group of lead exposed printers in Egypt

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frais, R.; Kamal, A.M.; Massoud, A. (Ain Shams Univ., Cairo (Egypt). Dept. of Community, Environmental and Occupational Medicine); Hendy, S. (Ministry of Health, Cairo (Egypt)); Okasha, A. (Ain Shams Univ., Cairo (Egypt). Dept. of Psychiatry)

    1990-09-01

    This study was initiated to explore the possibility of using simple psychometric tests for the early detection of affection of brain intellectual functions and prevalence of neurotic symptoms among asymptomatic lead exposed workers in developing countries. For this purpose 110 male lead exposed printers and 34 controls were examined using Middlesex Hospital Questionnaire (MHQ) and the following verbal and performance psychometeric tests: Digit Span, Similarities, Digit symbol, Block design, Trail making parts A and B. In addition, levels of blood lead and urinary coproporphyrin (UCP) were determined. Although the mean levels of blood lead and UCP of examined printers ware 46.5 {plus minus} 15 {mu}g/dl and 1.0 {plus minus} ug/mg creatinie respectively i.e. within the currently acceptable safe values, subjects showed statistically significant poorer psychometric performance and more frequent neurotic symptoms than the controls. Blood lead level, UCP and duration of exposure correlated significantly with results of some of the used psychometric tests. The results point to the applicability of psychometric tests in monitoring the neurotoxic effect of lead even by using simple tests in developing countries and confirm the suggestion of WHO to decrease the current safe value of lead exposure. (orig.).

  14. Surface hydrocarbons of queen eggs regulate worker reproduction in a social insect

    OpenAIRE

    Endler, Annett; Liebig, Jürgen; Schmitt,Thomas; Jane E Parker; Jones,Graeme R.; Schreier, Peter; Hölldobler, Bert

    2004-01-01

    A hitherto largely unresolved problem in behavioral biology is how workers are prevented from reproducing in large insect societies with high relatedness. Signals of the queen are assumed to inform the nestmates about her presence in the colony, which leads to indirect fitness benefits for workers. In the ant Camponotus floridanus, we found such a signal located on queen-laid eggs. In groups of workers that were regularly provided with queen-laid eggs, larvae, and cocoons, with larvae and coc...

  15. Physical activity of office workers

    OpenAIRE

    E Biernat; Tomaszewski, P.; K Milde

    2010-01-01

    Inactivity or insufficient physical activity is risk factor for metabolic or cardiovascular diseases. In most of cases the nature of work of office employees does not require high physical efforts and consists mostly of sitting but the reports on leisure activity of office workers are still lacking. Thus, the aim of the study was to assess physical activity of civil and local administration workers and bank officials. 293 randomly selected office workers took part in the study. They were recr...

  16. Historical View on Lead: Guidelines and Regulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pohl, Hana R; Ingber, Susan Z; Abadin, Henry G

    2017-04-10

    Lead has been used in many commodities for centuries. As a result, human exposure has occurred through the production and use of these lead-containing products. For example, leaded gasoline, lead-based paint, and lead solder/pipes in water distribution systems have been important in terms of exposure potential to the general population. Worker exposures occur in various industrial activities such as lead smelting and refining, battery manufacturing, steel welding or cutting operations, printing, and construction. Some industrial locations have also been a source of exposure to the surrounding communities. While the toxicity of relatively high lead exposures has been recognized for centuries, modern scientific studies have shown adverse health effects at very low doses, particularly in the developing nervous system of fetuses and children. This chapter reflects on historical and current views on lead toxicity. It also addresses the development and evolution of exposure prevention policies. As discussed here, these lead policies target a variety of potential exposure routes and sources. The changes reflect our better understanding of lead toxicity. The chapter provides lead-related guidelines and regulations currently valid in the U. S. and in many countries around the world. The reader will learn about the significant progress that has been made through regulations and guidelines to reduce exposure and prevent lead toxicity.

  17. Career development of knowledge workers

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    M.Com. (Business Management) The knowledge economy developed out of the need for more complex products and services. The workers who are able to create such complex products and services are called knowledge workers. The term knowledge worker refers to the fact that the worker needs to be able to deal with large amounts of information, analyse and then generate knowledge out of this vast wealth of data and then be able to use this knowledge to create the necessary products and services to ...

  18. Recommended Vaccines for Healthcare Workers

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology (APIC). Increasing Flu Vaccination Rates among Healthcare Workers Position statements from professional organizations, mandatory influenza vaccination policies, and many helpful ...

  19. HIV prevention among female sex workers in Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheibe, A; Drame, F M; Shannon, K

    2012-01-01

    Sex work occurs to meet the demand for sexual services and is a universal phenomenon. In Africa sex work takes many forms and is an important source of income for many women. Yet sex worker reproductive health needs remain largely unmet. The criminalisation of sex work; community and service provider stigma; violence; substance use and limited access to health services and prevention commodities contribute to the high HIV burden evident among female sex workers in Africa. Following UNAIDS' three pillar approach to HIV prevention and sex work we present an overview of current opportunities, barriers and suggestions to improve HIV prevention policy and programming for sex work in Africa. Universal access to a comprehensive package of HIV services is the first pillar. Reproductive health commodities; voluntary and anonymous HIV counselling and testing; treatment of sexually transmitted infections, HIV and opportunistic infections; harm reduction for substance use and psychosocial support services make up the recommended package of services. The second pillar is a sex worker-supportive environment. The inclusion of sex worker programmes within national HIV strategic planning; sex worker-led community mobilisation and the establishment of sex work community networks (comprised of sex workers, health service providers, law enforcers and other stakeholders) enable effective programme implementation and are recommended. The reduction of sex worker vulnerability and addressing structural issues form the final pillar. The decriminalisation of sex work; development of supportive policy; gender equality and economic development are key factors that need to be addressed to increase sex worker resilience. Evidence supports the public health benefit of human rights based approaches to HIV prevention; moralistic and restrictive policy and laws towards sex work are harmful and should be removed. The establishment of these pillars will increase sex worker safety and enhance the

  20. Learn about Lead

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Protection Agency Search Search Lead Contact Us Share Learn about Lead General Lead Information Read more about ... water, soil, consumer products, food, and occupational settings. Learn more about sources of lead exposure: At home ...

  1. Lead Poisoning Prevention Tips

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... or removed safely. How are children exposed to lead? Lead-based paint and lead contaminated dust are ... What can be done to prevent exposure to lead? It is important to determine the construction year ...

  2. Preventing occupational stress in healthcare workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruotsalainen, Jani H; Verbeek, Jos H; Mariné, Albert; Serra, Consol

    2015-04-07

    Healthcare workers can suffer from occupational stress as a result of lack of skills, organisational factors, and low social support at work. This may lead to distress, burnout and psychosomatic problems, and deterioration in quality of life and service provision. To evaluate the effectiveness of work- and person-directed interventions compared to no intervention or alternative interventions in preventing stress at work in healthcare workers. We searched the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), MEDLINE, EMBASE, PsycINFO, CINAHL, NIOSHTIC-2 and Web of Science up to November 2013. Randomised controlled trials (RCTs) of interventions aimed at preventing psychological stress in healthcare workers. For organisational interventions, interrupted time-series and controlled before-and-after (CBA) studies were also eligible. Two review authors independently extracted data and assessed trial quality. We used Standardised Mean Differences (SMDs) where authors of trials used different scales to measure stress or burnout. We combined studies that were similar in meta-analyses. We used the GRADE system to rate the quality of the evidence. In this update, we added 39 studies, making a total of 58 studies (54 RCTs and four CBA studies), with 7188 participants. We categorised interventions as cognitive-behavioural training (CBT) (n = 14), mental and physical relaxation (n = 21), combined CBT and relaxation (n = 6) and organisational interventions (n = 20). Follow-up was less than one month in 24 studies, one to six in 22 studies and more than six months in 12 studies. We categorised outcomes as stress, anxiety or general health.There was low-quality evidence that CBT with or without relaxation was no more effective in reducing stress symptoms than no intervention at one month follow-up in six studies (SMD -0.27 (95% Confidence Interval (CI) -0.66 to 0.13; 332 participants). But at one to six months follow-up in seven studies (SMD -0.38, 95% CI -0.59 to -0

  3. Making Aliens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andreadis, A.

    During the next few decades, the decisions we make will determine the future of our biosphere and our species. In this context, space exploration will literally answer a question that has preoccupied us ever since we became self-aware: What is going to happen to us? Reaching and inhabiting other planets is often considered an extension of human exploration and occupation of Earth but the analogy is useful only as a metaphor. Whatever the extremes of Earth, we can live almost everywhere on it because we started and evolved here. Given the vagaries of chance in every event of planetmaking, we will never find an Earth twin. To live under strange skies will require courage, ingenuity and stamina ­ but above all, it will require a hard look at our assumptions, including what it means to be human.

  4. Educating Brazilian workers about AIDS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-12-01

    This article contains a the script for a slide-tape presentation entitled Working Against AIDS, a presentation developed by the Brazil Family Planning Association (BEMFAM) which is designed to debunk common misconceptions about the disease. This audio-visual, which targets Brazilian workers, can be used during talks, seminars, and meetings. A discussion of the issues involved usually follows the presentation of Working Against AIDS. The presentation contains 30 illustrated slides (these are included in the article). The presentation begins by explaining that much of the information concerning AIDS is prejudicial and misleading. The next few slides point out some of the common misconceptions about AIDS, such as claims denying the existence of the disease, or suggestions that only homosexuals and prostitutes are at risk. The presentation then goes on to explain the ways in which the virus can and cannot be transmitted. Then it discusses how the virus destroys the body's natural defenses and explains the ensuing symptoms. Slides 14 and 15 point out that no cure yet exists for AIDS, making prevention essential. Slides 16-23 explain what actions are considered to be high risk and which ones do not entail risk. Noting that AIDS can be prevented, slide 24 says that the disease should not present an obstacle to spontaneous manifestations of human relations. The next slide explains that condoms should always be used when having sex with someone who could be infected with AIDS. Finally slides 26-30 demonstrate the proper way to use and dispose of a condom.

  5. Leading successful change 8 keys to making change work

    CERN Document Server

    Shea, Gregory P

    2013-01-01

    Why do as many as 75% of change initiatives fail?We live in an era where constant change is the norm rather than the exception. Given globalization, increased competition, and constant technological turnover, no organization can run in place: change is not optional. However, the sad fact is that the vast majority of change efforts fail. As authors Gregory P. Shea and Cassie A. Solomon argue, they do not fail for a lack of trying or leadership. Chances are you have led or been part of a failed change. But why did it fail and how can the next change be successfully implemented?In this essential

  6. ADVANCED WORKER PROTECTION SYSTEM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Judson Hedgehock

    2001-03-16

    From 1993 to 2000, OSS worked under a cost share contract from the Department of Energy (DOE) to develop an Advanced Worker Protection System (AWPS). The AWPS is a protective ensemble that provides the user with both breathing air and cooling for a NIOSH-rated duration of two hours. The ensemble consists of a liquid air based backpack, a Liquid Cooling Garment (LCG), and an outer protective garment. The AWPS project was divided into two phases. During Phase 1, OSS developed and tested a full-scale prototype AWPS. The testing showed that workers using the AWPS could work twice as long as workers using a standard SCBA. The testing also provided performance data on the AWPS in different environments that was used during Phase 2 to optimize the design. During Phase 1, OSS also performed a life-cycle cost analysis on a representative clean up effort. The analysis indicated that the AWPS could save the DOE millions of dollars on D and D activities and improve the health and safety of their workers. During Phase 2, OSS worked to optimize the AWPS design to increase system reliability, to improve system performance and comfort, and to reduce the backpack weight and manufacturing costs. To support this design effort, OSS developed and tested several different generations of prototype units. Two separate successful evaluations of the ensemble were performed by the International Union of Operation Engineers (IUOE). The results of these evaluations were used to drive the design. During Phase 2, OSS also pursued certifying the AWPS with the applicable government agencies. The initial intent during Phase 2 was to finalize the design and then to certify the system. OSS and Scott Health and Safety Products teamed to optimize the AWPS design and then certify the system with the National Institute of Occupational Health and Safety (NIOSH). Unfortunately, technical and programmatic difficulties prevented us from obtaining NIOSH certification. Despite the inability of NIOSH to certify

  7. The Relationship between Transformational Leadership and Knowledge Workers' Self-Directed Learning Readiness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aparicio, Ricardo Antonio

    2013-01-01

    The rapid pace of change for knowledge workers competing globally necessitates ongoing continuous learning. Increasingly, knowledge workers will need to be ready--willing and able--to engage in self-directed learning. This makes it important to understand what factors in the work environment might be related to the self-directed learning…

  8. Relocating Precarity and Resiliency within Montreal: The Artists' Bloc of the Immigrant Workers' Centre

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Koby Rogers; Salamanca, Manuel

    2017-01-01

    In this document we describe our experience relocating precarity and resiliency by way of arts activism, to denounce and make visible social injustices experienced by im/migrant communities in Montreal. Under the umbrella of the Immigrant Workers' Centre, and other allies from the im/migrant workers' movement, we combine knowledge building, action…

  9. Can Workers Answer Their Questions about Occupational Safety and Health: Challenges and Solutions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rhebergen, Martijn; van Dijk, Frank; Hulshof, Carel

    2012-01-01

    Many workers have questions about occupational safety and health (OSH). Answers to these questions empower them to further improve their knowledge about OSH, make good decisions about OSH matters and improve OSH practice when necessary. Nevertheless, many workers fail to find the answers to their

  10. Mobile Applications for Knowledge Workers and Field Workers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefan Stieglitz

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, the diffusion of mobile applications (mobile apps has risen significantly. Nowadays, mobile business apps are strongly emerging in business, enhancing productivity and employees’ satisfaction, whilst the usage of customized individual enterprise apps is still an exception. Standardized business apps enable basic functionalities, for example, mobile data storage and exchange (e.g., Dropbox, communication (e.g., Skype, and other routine processes, which support mobile workers. In addition, mobile apps can, for example, increase the flexibility of mobile workers by easing the access to firm’s information from outside the enterprise and by enabling ubiquitous collaboration. Hence, mobile apps can generate competitive advantages and can increase work efficiency on a broad scale. But mobile workers form no coherent group. Our research reveals, based on two case studies, that they can be clustered into two groups: knowledge workers and field workers. Knowledge workers and field workers fulfill different tasks and work in different environments. Hence, they have different requirements for mobile support. In this paper we conclude that standardized mobile business apps cannot meet the different requirements of various groups of mobile workers. Task- and firm-specific (individualized requirements determine the specification, implementation, and application of mobile apps.

  11. Towards improving workers' health by matching work and workers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zoer, I.

    2014-01-01

    From an occupational health perspective, the match between work and workers was the central topic in this thesis. The term ‘work’ was used to encompass a combination of physical, mental and psychosocial work demands. The term ‘workers’ represents the resources of workers, in terms of physical,

  12. A Comparison of Workers Employed in Hazardous Jobs in Terms of Job Satisfaction, Perceived Job Risk and Stress: Turkish Jean Sandblasting Workers, Dock Workers, Factory Workers and Miners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sunal, Ayda Buyuksahin; Sunal, Onur; Yasin, Fatma

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to compare job satisfaction, perception of job risk, stress symptoms and vulnerability to stress of miners, dock workers, jean sandblasting workers and factory workers. A job satisfaction scale and stress audit scale were applied to 220 workers. Results revealed that dock and jean sandblasting workers perceived their…

  13. Sex workers, unite! (Litigating for sex workers' freedom of association in Russia).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arps, F S E Freddie; Golichenko, Mikhail

    2014-12-11

    The existing legal framework in Russia makes sex work and related activities punishable offenses, leaving sex workers stigmatized, vulnerable to violence, and disproportionally affected by HIV and other sexually transmitted infections. In 2013, the Ministry of Justice, supported by the courts, refused registration and official recognition to the first all-Russia association of sex workers, referring to the fact that sex work is under administrative and criminal punitive bans and therefore the right of association for sex workers is unjustified. In light of international human rights standards, in particular the jurisprudence of the European Court of Human Rights, we examine in this paper whether the overall punitive legal ban on sex work in Russia is discriminatory. The government's positive obligations concerning discrimination against sex workers whose activities are consensual and between adults, and whose working conditions leave them among society's most vulnerable, should outweigh their punitive laws and policies around sex work. The scope of legal criminalization is narrow: it should apply only in exceptional cases where it is clearly justified. Copyright © 2014 Arps and Golichenko. This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution Non-Commercial License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/3.0/), which permits unrestricted non-commercial use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited.

  14. Accidents with biological material in workers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cleonice Andréa Alves Cavalcante

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available The objective was to describe the accidents with biological material occurred among workers of Rio Grande do Norte, Brazil, between 2007 and 2009. Secondary data were collected in the National Notifiable Diseases Surveillance System by exporting data to Excel using Tabwin. Among the types of occupational accidents reported in the state, the biological accidents (no. = 1,170 accounted for 58.3% with a predominance of cases among nurses (48.6%. The percutaneous exposure was the most frequent occurrence and the circumstances of the accidents were related to the handling of sharps and the most common organic material was blood (63.5%. More than 50% of the workers were vaccinated against hepatitis B, but without information regarding the evaluation of vaccine response. The study revealed the need of improvement in the quality of the information, once the sub-entries and inconsistencies make the National Notifiable Diseases Surveillance System less trustworthy in the characterization of the affected workers.

  15. Biosorption of lead phosphates by lead-tolerant bacteria as a mechanism for lead immobilization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Sánchez, Viridiana; Guzmán-Moreno, Jesús; Rodríguez-González, Vicente; Flores-de la Torre, Juan Armando; Ramírez-Santoyo, Rosa María; Vidales-Rodríguez, Luz Elena

    2017-08-01

    The study of metal-tolerant bacteria is important for bioremediation of contaminated environments and development of green technologies for material synthesis due to their potential to transform toxic metal ions into less toxic compounds by mechanisms such as reduction, oxidation and/or sequestration. In this study, we report the isolation of seven lead-tolerant bacteria from a metal-contaminated site at Zacatecas, México. The bacteria were identified as members of the Staphylococcus and Bacillus genera by microscopic, biochemical and 16S rDNA analyses. Minimal inhibitory concentration of these isolates was established between 4.5 and 7.0 mM of Pb(NO3)2 in solid and 1.0-4.0 mM of Pb(NO3)2 in liquid media. A quantitative analysis of the lead associated to bacterial biomass in growing cultures, revealed that the percentage of lead associated to biomass was between 1 and 37% in the PbT isolates. A mechanism of complexation/biosorption of lead ions as inorganic phosphates (lead hydroxyapatite and pyromorphite) in bacterial biomass, was determined by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction analyses. Thus, the ability of the lead-tolerant isolates to transform lead ions into stable and highly insoluble lead minerals make them potentially useful for immobilization of lead in mining waste.

  16. Pain coping in injured workers with chronic pain: what's unique about workers?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, Leah A; Carroll, Linda J; Voaklander, Donald C; Gross, Douglas P; Beach, Jeremy R

    2012-01-01

    Pain caused by a work injury is a complex phenomenon comprising multiple factors, e.g. age, gender, prior health status, occupation, job demands, and severity of injury. Little research has focused on injured workers with chronic pain. This study investigates injured workers' pain coping. A descriptive cross-sectional study design was used to measure coping strategies of injured workers in a work rehabilitation program. Differences in coping strategies by demographics, injury-related variables, pain, disability, and depression were measured. n = 479. The coping strategy with the highest mean score was "coping self statements" (Mean = 19.4, SD = 7.6), followed by "praying/hoping" (Mean = 18.2, SD = 9.7), and "catastrophizing" (Mean = 17.5, SD = 8.0). Statistical differences for coping strategies were noted between gender, marital status, depression levels, self-perceived disability levels, and pain (p cope with pain. In conditions in which there may be a perceived lack of control (high pain intensity, high self-perceived disability, and high self rated depression), there were significantly higher amounts of both "catastrophizing" and "praying and hoping". Therefore, workers with high pain and high self-perceived disability are more likely catastrophize their pain, leading to poor recovery outcomes.

  17. School Social Workers and Multiculturalism: Changing the Environment for Success

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joseph, Alfred L.; Slovak, Karen; Broussard, C. Anne; Webster, Paula Sunanon

    2012-01-01

    Dropping out, a phenomenon heavily concentrated in communities of color, hampers the academic success of multicultural students. Multiculturalism can help make school an inviting place for vulnerable youths, and school social workers (SSWRs) are in a position to advocate for school environments that are conducive to academic success. The present…

  18. Rural Workers at a Disadvantage in Job Opportunities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGranahan, David A.

    1988-01-01

    Population distribution and community size make rural areas better suited to production than managerial jobs. Production jobs, however, are threatened by business cycles, foreign competition and technological displacement, more so than by education levels of rural workers. Links outmigration in rural areas to low wages. (Author/TES)

  19. Economic Globalization and Workers: introduction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    E-J. Visser (Evert-Jan); M.P. van Dijk (Meine Pieter)

    2006-01-01

    textabstractThis dossier deals with the impact of economic globalisation on workers, especially in developing nations: their employment opportunities, wage income, job security and other aspects of decent work (ILO 1999, 2002). This is a highly relevant theme. Not only do workers in the EU, the

  20. EXTENSION WORKERS' OPINIONS REGARDING THE ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The primary purpose of the study was to determine extension worker's opinions regarding the influence of the National Maize Competition (NAMCOM) on the farmers' agricultural practices and experiences in the Manzini region. A census population of front-line extension workers in charge of the participating areas in ...

  1. [PAH exposure in asphalt workers].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garattini, Siria; Sarnico, Michela; Benvenuti, Alessandra; Barbieri, P G

    2010-01-01

    There has been interest in evaluating the potential carcinogenicity of bitumen fumes in asphalt workers since the 1960's. The IARC classified air-refined bitumens as possible human carcinogens, while coal-tar fumes were classified as known carcinogens. Occupational/environmental PAH exposure can be measured by several urinary markers. Urinary 1-OHP has become the most commonly used biological marker of PAH exposure in asphalt workers. The aim of this study was to assess asphalt workers' exposure levels by monitoring 1-OHP urinary excretion and compare this data with those of non-occupationally exposed subjects. We investigated three groups of asphalt workers: 100 in summer 2007, 29 in winter 2007, and 148 during summer 2008 and compared 1-OHP urinary concentrations using Kruskall-Wallis test. Median 1-OHP urinary concentrations during the three biomonitoring sampling periods were 0.65, 0.17 and 0.53 microg/g creatinine respectively. There was a significant difference in 1-OHP values between the three groups (p < 0.001). our study showed that PAH exposure of asphalt workers' is higher than that observed in the general population and in workers in urban areas. Our results suggest that PAH exposure in the three groups studied is not sufficiently kept under control by the use of personal protective equipment and that biomonitoring is useful in evaluating PAH exposure and for risk assessment. Regulations need to be enforced for workers exposed to cancer risk, such as the register of workers exposed to carcinogens.

  2. Technological Change: Helping Workers Adjust.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mowery, David C.

    1987-01-01

    Discusses some of the problems in employment shifts and unemployment caused by new technologies in offices and factories. Addresses the Job Training Partnership Act (Title III) which was established as the primary assistance vehicle for displaced workers. Calls for workers to receive sufficient time to adjust to technologies. (TW)

  3. Retraining Displaced Workers. Policy Brief

    Science.gov (United States)

    LaLonde, Robert; Sullivan, Daniel

    2010-01-01

    Robert LaLonde of the University of Chicago and Daniel Sullivan of the Federal Reserve Bank of Chicago suggest that retraining through our nation's community colleges is a way to reduce the skills gaps of at least some of these displaced workers and increase their reemployment earnings. Although workers may still experience significant earnings…

  4. National Association of Social Workers

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Social Worker Shortage In hardest hit states, more social workers needed in child welfare and addiction treatment. Join NASW today! What's New NASW Condemns President Trump's DACA Decision Decision to rescind Deferred Action ... the American Culture This Social Justice Brief examines gun violence in a public ...

  5. Cancer mortality and morbidity among rubber workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monson, R R; Fine, L J

    1978-10-01

    Mortality and morbidity from cancer among a cohort of 13,570 white male rubber workers were examined. Each man worked for at least 5 years at the Akron, Ohio, plant of the B. F. Goodrich Company. The potential period of follow-up was from January 1, 1940 to June 30, 1976. Departmental work histories were based primarily on records maintained by Local no. 5, United Rubber Workers. The occurrence of cancer was measured by death certificates and by a survey of Akron-area hospital tumor registries from 1964 to 1974. Two types of analyses were made: 1) an external comparison of mortality rates of rubber workers versus rates of U.S. white males, and 2) an internal comparison of cancer morbidity rates among persons who were employed in various work areas of the plant. Excess cases of specific cancers (observed/expected numbers) among workers in specific work areas included: stomach and intestine: rubber making (30/14.4); lung: tire curing (31/14.1), fuel cells and/or deicers (46/29.1); bladder: chemical plant (6/2.4), and tire building (16/10.7); skin cancer: tire assembly (12/1.9); brain cancer: tire assembly (8/2.0); lymphatic cancer: tire building (8/3.2); and leukemia: calendering (8/2.2), tire curing (8/2.6), tire building (12/7.5), elevators (4/1.4), tubes (4/1.6), and rubber fabrics (4/1.1). Agents that may be responsible for these excesses were considered.

  6. Immunologic findings in confectionary workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuskin, E; Kanceljak, B; Mustajbegovic, J; Schachter, E N

    1994-12-01

    Food allergies are frequent in the general population. There are however, few studies of immunologic responses among workers in the confectionary industry. To assess immunologic and clinical findings of workers in a confectionary plant. Immunologic (skin tests and serum IgE) and respiratory findings (symptoms and lung function) were studied in a group of 71 confectionary workers (mean age: 35 years and mean exposure: 11 years). Skin prick testing with food extracts used in the manufacturing of candies and pastries demonstrated that the most frequent positive skin reaction occurred with extracts of cacao (31%), followed by reactions to chocolate (9%), cocoa (6%), hazelnut (6%), and sugar (2%). Increased serum IgE levels were found in 13.0% and increased IgM serum levels in 52.1% of these confectionary workers. The prevalence of asthma (26.1%) and dyspnea (26.1%) in workers with positive skin tests was significantly higher than in workers with negative skin tests (asthma: 2.0%, P = .004; dyspnea: 4.1%, P = .001). There was a high prevalence of acute respiratory symptoms during the work shift, but no significant association with immunologic tests was found. Similarly, both skin test positive and skin test negative workers exhibited significant across shift changes in lung function; however, no significant differences in baseline lung function or across-shift changes were noted between skin test positive and negative workers. Pre-shift administration of disodium cromoglycate (DSCG) significantly diminished across-shift reductions in FEF50 and FEF25 for both skin test positive and skin test negative workers. These data suggest that exposure to environmental factors in confectionary plants is associated with frequent respiratory symptoms of an irritative nature. Specific skin testing may be useful in characterizing confectionary workers at risk for the development of occupational asthma.

  7. HIV/AIDS prevalence among South African health workers

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In a hospital study of deaths of female nurses in Zambia,. Buve et al.' estimated that the HIV I AIDS mortality ... practitioners, nurses on registers and rolls, other professionals such as social workers and physiotherapists, ..... colleagues, which may lead to low morale and burnout. Third, occupational exposure to HIV is highly ...

  8. Tobacco and alcohol use among healthcare workers in three public ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Tobacco use is a risk factor for most of the leading causes of death in the world. Healthcare workers (HCWs) can play an important role in assisting patients to stop smoking, but this role is undermined if they themselves smoke. The study determined the prevalence of tobacco smoking and alcohol use among ...

  9. Lead and the Romans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reddy, Aravind; Braun, Charles L.

    2010-01-01

    Lead poisoning has been a problem since early history and continues into modern times. An appealing characteristic of lead is that many lead salts are sweet. In the absence of cane and beet sugars, early Romans used "sugar of lead" (lead acetate) to sweeten desserts, fruits, and sour wine. People most at risk would have been those who…

  10. Why a Domestic Workers Bill of Rights?

    OpenAIRE

    Appelbaum, Lauren D

    2010-01-01

    In August 2010, the California State Legislature passed a Resolution for a Domestic Workers Bill of Rights. This resolution highlights the work done by domestic workers in the state and the labor violations faced by these workers. The resolution calls for the fair treatment of these workers, noting that domestic workers have a right to be treated with respect and dignity. On November 29, 2010, New York State enacted a new Domestic Workers Bill of Rights, which guarantees basic work standards ...

  11. Asthma characteristics in cleaning workers, workers in other risk jobs and office workers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zock, JP; Kogevinas, M; Sunyer, J; Jarvis, D; Toren, K; Anto, JM

    Several studies have demonstrated an excess risk for asthma among cleaning workers. The aim of this analysis was to compare clinical, immunological and functional characteristics associated with asthma in cleaners and other occupational groups. Cleaners, workers exposed to high molecular weight (MW)

  12. Leading Your Leaders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hale, Wayne N.

    2008-01-01

    life is good. More often when an unbelievably difficult test fails, we are left with a very long discussion of why and what was wrong in the design or execution of the test. Make sure that the test is well defined. Even then, it is important to explain to your leaders what inherent accuracy (or error) the test conditions or equipment have and what the assumptions or initial conditions were for the test. Test results without a good understanding of the test's accuracy or the pedigree of the test assumptions are worth very little. Finally, there is flight test data. Always limited, never at the edge of the envelope, it still shows how the real hardware works in a combined environment. Flight experience is dangerous because it typically doesn't show how close to the edge of the cliff the equipment is operating, but it does demonstrate how the hardware really works. A flight test is the ultimate test, again taken with the knowledge that it is probably not the extreme but something more like the middle of the environmental and systems performance. Good understanding of a problem and its solution always relies on a combination of all these methods. Be sure to lead your leaders by using all the tools you have at your disposal. At the end of the day, decisions in space flight always come down to a risk trade. Our business is not remotely safe, not in the sense that the public, the media, or our legislators use the term. Everything we do has a risk, cost, schedule, or performance trade-off. For your leaders to make an appropriate decision, you need to educate them, lead them, talk with them, and engage them in the discussion until full understanding takes place. It's your job. *

  13. Estimating workers' marginal valuation of employer health benefits: would insured workers prefer more health insurance or higher wages?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Royalty, Anne Beeson

    2008-01-01

    In recent years the cost of health insurance has been increasing much faster than wages. In the face of these rising costs, many employers will have to make difficult decisions about whether to cut back health benefits or to compensate workers with lower wages or lower wage growth. In this paper, we ask the question, "Which do workers value more -- one additional dollar's worth of health benefits or one more dollar in their pockets?" Using a new approach to obtaining estimates of insured workers' marginal valuation of health benefits this paper estimates how much, on average, employees value the marginal dollar paid by employers for their workers' health insurance. We find that insured workers value the marginal health premium dollar at significantly less than the marginal wage dollar. However, workers value insurance generosity very highly. The marginal dollar spent on health insurance that adds an additional dollar's worth of observable dimensions of plan generosity, such as lower deductibles or coverage of additional services, is valued at significantly more than one dollar.

  14. Lead (Pb) Air Pollution

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Environmental Protection Agency Search Search Lead (Pb) Air Pollution Contact Us Share As a result of EPA's ... protect aquatic and terrestrial ecosystems. Lead (Pb) Air Pollution Basic Information How does lead get in the ...

  15. Improvement of worker safety through the investigation of the site response to rockbursts

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Hagan, TO

    1998-12-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this investigation is to improve worker safety through a better understanding of mine excavation response to rockbursts. The improved understanding should lead to improved mine layout and support design. The project is continuation...

  16. Vaccination of healthcare workers: A review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haviari, Skerdi; Bénet, Thomas; Saadatian-Elahi, Mitra; André, Philippe; Loulergue, Pierre; Vanhems, Philippe

    2015-01-01

    Vaccine-preventable diseases are a significant cause of morbidity and mortality. As new vaccines are proving to be effective and as the incidence of some infections decreases, vaccination practices are changing. Healthcare workers (HCWs) are particularly exposed to and play a role in nosocomial transmission, which makes them an important target group for vaccination. Most vaccine-preventable diseases still carry a significant risk of resurgence and have caused outbreaks in recent years. While many professional societies favor vaccination of HCWs as well as the general population, recommendations differ from country to country. In turn, vaccination coverage varies widely for each microorganism and for each country, making hospitals and clinics vulnerable to outbreaks. Vaccine mandates and non-mandatory strategies are the subject of ongoing research and controversies. Optimal approaches to increase coverage and turn the healthcare workforce into an efficient barrier against infectious diseases are still being debated. PMID:26291642

  17. Work-Related Health Effects among Wastewater Treatment Plants Workers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MA Albatanony

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Raw sewage contains various pathogenic organisms including bacteria, viruses, fungus, worms and protozoa. Workers at wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs are exposed to these organisms as well as to H2S gas causing many health hazards. Objectives: To assess some work-related health effects among WWTPs workers with special emphasis on the most common infections as well as cardiopulmonary disorders. Methods: 43 workers at Berket Al-Sabih WWTPs were studied. An equal number of non-exposed comparison group were also studied. All participants were asked about their personal demographic data, symptoms suggesting infection, respiratory tract impairment and cardiovascular manifestations. Spirometric measurements were made at the end of the work shift. A resting standard 12-lead ECG was also taken for each participant. For those with a positive ECG finding, echocardiography was also performed. Serum examination for antibodies against hepatitis A virus (HAV and hepatitis E virus (HEV was also done. A heparinized blood sample to measure sulf-hemoglobin, as an indicator of H2S exposure, was taken. Stool was analyzed by polymerase chain reaction (PCR for Leptospira spirochete. Results: WWTPs workers suffered from body ache, abdominal pain, wheeze, asthma and dyspnea more frequently than the comparison group (p<0.05. An obstructive pattern of pulmonary function impairment and a higher mean sulf-hemoglobin% were significantly more common among WWTPs workers than the comparison group. Antibody levels against HAV and HEV as well as frequency of positive stool PCR test results for L. spirochete were significantly higher among WWTPs workers than the comparison group. The prevalence of left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH according to ECG and mean ejection fraction (EF as measured by echocardiography were significantly more frequent in WWTPs workers than in the comparison group. Conclusion: WWTPs workers are high risk of developing various infections and

  18. Oxidative DNA damage during sleep periods among nightshift workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhatti, Parveen; Mirick, Dana K; Randolph, Timothy W; Gong, Jicheng; Buchanan, Diana Taibi; Zhang, Junfeng Jim; Davis, Scott

    2016-08-01

    Oxidative DNA damage may be increased among nightshift workers because of suppression of melatonin, a cellular antioxidant, and/or inflammation related to sleep disruption. However, oxidative DNA damage has received limited attention in previous studies of nightshift work. From two previous cross-sectional studies, urine samples collected during a night sleep period for 217 dayshift workers and during day and night sleep (on their first day off) periods for 223 nightshift workers were assayed for 8-hydroxydeoxyguanosine (8-OH-dG), a marker of oxidative DNA damage, using high-performance liquid chromatography with electrochemical detection. Urinary measures of 6-sulfatoxymelatonin (aMT6s), a marker of circulating melatonin levels, and actigraphy-based sleep quality data were also available. Nightshift workers during their day sleep periods excreted 83% (p=0.2) and 77% (p=0.03) of the 8-OH-dG that dayshift workers and they themselves, respectively, excreted during their night sleep periods. Among nightshift workers, higher aMT6s levels were associated with higher urinary 8-OH-dG levels, and an inverse U-shaped trend was observed between 8-OH-dG levels and sleep efficiency and sleep duration. Reduced excretion of 8-OH-dG among nightshift workers during day sleep may reflect reduced functioning of DNA repair machinery, which could potentially lead to increased cellular levels of oxidative DNA damage. Melatonin disruption among nightshift workers may be responsible for the observed effect, as melatonin is known to enhance repair of oxidative DNA damage. Quality of sleep may similarly impact DNA repair. Cellular levels of DNA damage will need to be evaluated in future studies to help interpret these findings. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  19. Medical Surveillance for Former Workers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tim Takaro

    2009-05-29

    The Former Hanford Worker Medical Monitoring Program, directed by the Occupational and Environmental Medicine Program at the University of Washington, served former production and other non-construction workers who were potentially exposed to workplace hazards while working for the USDOE or its contractors at Hanford. The USDOE Former Workers Program arose from Congressional action in the Defense Authorization of 1993 (Public Law 102). Section 3162 stated that, “The Secretary shall establish and carry out a program for the identification and ongoing medical evaluation of current and former Department of Energy employees who are subject to significant health risks as a result of exposure of such employees to hazardous or radioactive substances during such employment.” (This also covers former employees of USDOE contractors and subcontractors.) The key objective has been to provide these former workers with medical evaluations in order to determine whether workers have experienced significant risk due to workplace exposure to hazards. Exposures to asbestos, beryllium, and noise can produce specific medical conditions: asbestosis, berylliosis, and noise-induced hearing loss (NIHL). Each of these conditions can be identified by specific, non-invasive screening tests, which are widely available. Treatments are also available for individuals affected by these conditions. This project involved two phases. Phase I involved a needs and risk assessment, characterizing the nature and extent of workplace health hazards which may have increased the risk for long-term health effects. We categorized jobs and tasks by likelihood of exposures to specific workplace health hazards; and located and established contact with former Hanford workers. Phase II involved implementation of medical monitoring programs for former workers whose individual work history indicated significant risk for adverse health effects. We identified 118,000 former workers, employed from 1943 to 1997

  20. Improving productivity and welfare among workers of small and household textile and garment units in India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanjay RODE

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Global Production System has changed remarkably over the period of time. In order to cope up with the change in the nature and type of production, the small and household garment and textile units are employing the younger and skilled labor force. The workers in these units are employed on the contract, causal and temporary basis. They are not given the different benefits as applicable to the large scale unit workers. Such workers are employed more hours and weekly holidays are not given to them. The small and household units are simply maximizing their interest and profit. Such capitalist nature of productive activities makes the labor worse. They are given less wages and classified as unskilled workers. Workers are not given proper training and security of work by these units. Their access to productive assets and standard of living is low as compare to the large unit’s workers. In order to improve the workers conditions, minimum wage should be given to all workers in small and household units. Such units must maintain their annual records of transactions. Small and household units must send their workers for compulsory training. Work place environment, minimum hours of work are required to regulate in these sectors. Immediate steps will have positive impact on workers earning and standard of living. It will help for further productivity enhancement.

  1. PARENTAL SKILLS TRAINING IN GROUPS: REFLECTIVE PRACTICE OF SOCIAL WORKERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorūnė Vyšniauskytė-Rimkienė

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The role of parents in children’s life is essential. Constantly changing world, fast life rhythm dictates new needs for parents raising children: what was suitable fifty, thirty or even ten years ago now cannot be suitable for contemporary parents. Parenting skills training becomes more and more popular for parents to learn new skills and to get support while bringing up their children. This article reveals reflective practice of social workers while implementing parenting skills training program “Effective Parenting Skills” using groups format during the period of seven years. The program teaching parental skills – “Effective Parenting Skills” is based upon elements of the Dutch programs “Opvoeden Zo” from the Netherlands Youth Institute (Nederlands Jeugdinstituut, NJI in Utrecht and “3 x Groei” from PI Research in Amsterdam/Duivendrecht. The elements are adapted for performing parental skill training in Lithuania. The program was developed as part of the project “Positive Parenting” funded by the Dutch Government. Positive parenting is a way of raising your children effectively and respectfully influencing their behavior. Positive parenting helps to respect children’s rights: parents raise their children in a more democratic (positive, supportive, protective way. This leads to more competent and healthy children and more self-confident parents. Parenting skills training was organized in closed groups of parents, the duration of which was from 12 to 14 hours. “Effective Parenting Skills” program was led by two social workers for parents with different parenting experience and needs. Reflective practice reveals positive outcome for parents who attended “Effective Parenting Skills” program. Positive influence for parents was connected not only with training material of the program, but also with such processes in groups as sharing one’s experience, mutual aid between each other, learning from their peers

  2. Extending a model of precarious employment: A qualitative study of immigrant workers in Spain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porthé, Victoria; Ahonen, Emily; Vázquez, M Luisa; Pope, Catherine; Agudelo, Andrés Alonso; García, Ana M; Amable, Marcelo; Benavides, Fernando G; Benach, Joan

    2010-04-01

    Since the 1980s, changes in the labor market have modified power relations between capital and labor, leading to greater levels of precarious employment among workers. Globalization has led to a growth in migration, as people leave their countries in search of work. We aimed to describe the dimensions of precarious employment for immigrant workers in Spain. Qualitative study using analytic induction. Criterion sampling was used to recruit 129 immigrant workers in Spain with documented and undocumented administrative status. Data quality was ensured by triangulation. Immigrant workers reported that precarious employment is characterized by high job instability, a lack of power for negotiating employment conditions, and defenselessness against high labor demands. They described insufficient wages, long working hours, limited social benefits, and difficulty in exercising their rights. Undocumented workers reported greater defenselessness and worse employment conditions. This study allowed us to describe the dimensions of precarious employment in immigrant workers. (c) 2010 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  3. Informal economy and migrant worker.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Concha Carrasco Carpio

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The present article is based on the analysis of the information obtained by an empirical estimation conducted among 1103 non-European immigrants, representative of the fifteen more relevant nationalities in Spain. The main target of this research has been to analyze the situation of the immigrant worker in the informal sector of the Spanish labour market. This informal sector has not been created by the immigrant workers. The irregular immigrant worker can not achieve legal job contracts; this situation does not exclude them from the labour market, but it limits their participation in the informal sector.

  4. Ethical Considerations For Social Workers Working with Muslim Refugees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCleary, Jennifer Simmelink; Chaudhry, Serena

    2017-01-01

    In 2016 almost 39,000 Muslim refugees entered the United States, representing a record of admissions during a time of elevated anti-Muslim political rhetoric and public sentiment. Anti-Muslim attitudes and policies can affect refugees' ability to successfully resettle and contribute to decreased health status. Given the current social and political moment there is an ethical imperative for social workers to engage in resistance to anti-Muslim sentiment and the encoding of Islamophobia in resettlement policy. In this article, the authors explore constraints on resettlement social workers' engagement with advocacy and make suggestions for ethical practice that promotes social and emotional well-being.

  5. Understanding sickness presenteeism through the experience of immigrant workers in a context of economic crisis

    OpenAIRE

    Galon,Tanyse; Briones Vozmediano, Erica; Agudelo Suárez, Andrés A; Felt, Emily B.; García Benavides, Fernando; Ronda Pérez, Elena

    2014-01-01

    Background: Previous economic recessions show that immigrant workers may experience longer periods of unemployment, a situation that may lead employees to presenteeism, the act of working in spite of a health problem. This study explored perceptions about the factors that lead to presenteeism in immigrant workers considering the context of economic crisis. Methods: Six focus group discussions were held (February 2012), with men and women from Colombia, Ecuador, and Morocco (n = 44) living in ...

  6. Drowning: a leading killer!

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nuno Domingos Garrido

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Drowning kills at least 372,000 people worldwide every year and is the 3rd leading cause of unintentional death, accounting for 7% of all deaths stemming from accidents (WHO, 2014. Conceptually, “drowning” is a complex and multi-faceted phenomenon, characterized as a chain of events (Bierens, 2006. Drowning is defined as the process of experiencing respiratory impairment from immersion or submersion in liquid. Research on drowning as a phenomenon presents several difficulties - most of all, that global data concerning the number of occurrences are not accurate. Nevertheless, detailed analysis of the registered incidents allows the identification of risk factors of drowning. An in-depth analysis of the risk factors is the basis for the creation of targeted and effective strategies to prevent drowning. Due to variability of situations which could lead to a drowning episode, experts suggest the adoption of a multi-layer prevention model, rather than opting for isolated measures, since no single measure can prevent all deaths and injuries caused by submersion. Among the preventive measures we would like to emphasize instruction in swimming and water safety. So, what does "knowing how to swim" really mean? Some authors define mastery of this competence as swimming a given distance, while others put the emphasis on how this/any given distance is swum (Stallman, Junge, & Blixt, 2008. It has long been realized that there is no contradiction between learning those competencies which make a person less susceptible to drowning and those competencies which prepare the path towards higher levels of performance and competition. Aquatic movement researchers and practitioners and drowning prevention researchers and practitioners, share in the responsibility for drowning prevention though they are often unaware of it. The question “What should be taught to children?” is too infrequently asked. There remains great variation in what is taught and programs

  7. Cryogenic current leads

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zizek, F.

    1982-01-01

    Theoretical, technical and design questions are examined of cryogenic current leads for SP of magnetic systems. Simplified mathematical models are presented for the current leads. To illustrate modeling, the calculation is made of the real current leads for 500 A and three variants of current leads for 1500 A for the enterprise ''Shkoda.''

  8. A Review of Measures against Increasing Temperature and Climate Change for the Safeguard of Workers in India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ranjit Kumar Dehury

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Severe heat causes various health related problems among the workers in India. Working under hot and humid environment damages health of workers especially the agriculture labourers, construction workers, rickshaw pullers, venders, brick kiln workers and daily wage labourers. High humidity and high temperature can leads to heat stress even in 38°C temperature. The damage might be temporary, like heat related injuries to permanent like, critical heat stroke. Sometimes, it leads to occupational hazards which is irreversible in nature. Despite these serious issues, there is minimal preparation which exposes the workers to serious conditions. This paper evaluates various consequences of climate change and increasing temperature on the workers. Various databases like PubMed, Scopus and Google Scholar have been enquired to bring evidences across industry and places. The effects of heat and temperature were thematically arranged to understand the seriousness of the issues. Suggestions and way forwards are also discussed for the solution for workers and sustainability of various sectors depending on labourers working under the heat of sun. The paper suggests the requirement of creating a heat combating environment by coordinating among various government departments and agencies for the welfare of the workers. The industrial workers have to be provided with sufficient measures by various industries as per the governing laws. The agriculture and brick kiln workers have to work in mild heat and with sufficient protection to avoid consequences. The government need to monitor the unorganised sectors for protection of workers by law enforcing organs.

  9. Facts about Hospital Worker Safety

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and Worker Safety: Opportunities for Synergy, Collaboration, and Innovation . 5 Bureau of Labor Statistics. Case and Demographic ... Shea, and M. Martinez. 2009. The lift team’s importance to a successful safe patient handling program. Journal ...

  10. NGO field workers in Pakistan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Haroon SIDDIQUE

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available NGOs came into the society in their present form after World War II and more precisely in 1960s. Before that also different forms of philanthropy existed. Like elsewhere in the world, in Pakistan also state and the market were the two sectors catering for different needs of the people. When foreign funding started coming into the poor countries, the channel of NGOs was considered more appropriate including the fact they had roots in the society and the benefit could reach the far flung areas. NGO field workers are the real actors in the NGOs’ activities but sadly the NGOs those raise the slogans of working for the destitute do not bother to facilitate the NGO field workers. Eventually the NGO field workers are facing problems of job insecurity, poor salary structure, unhealthy working environment and even harassment especially in case of women NGO field workers in Pakistan

  11. Silicosis in silica flour workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banks, D E; Morring, K L; Boehlecke, B A; Althouse, R B; Merchant, J A

    1981-10-01

    In July 1979, the health of 86 current and ex-workers at 2 silica mining and milling operations in southern Illinois was examined using a respiratory questionnaire, spirometry, and chest radiographs. None of 25 current workers with less than 1 yr of exposure to silica dust had radiographic evidence of silicosis. For 61 current workers and ex-workers with 1 or more yr of exposure, chest radiographs showed 16 (26%) with simple silicosis and 7 (11%) with progressive massive fibrosis. Of these 23, 8 with simple silicosis and 3 with progressive massive fibrosis began work after the first Mine Safety and Health Administration inspection in 1973. These data and a review of federal dust inspection results between 1973 and 1979 showed that these cases of silicosis could have been prevented by effecting compliance with the existing dust standard.

  12. Contingent Faculty as Nonideal Workers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kezar, Adrianna; Bernstein-Sierra, Samantha

    2016-01-01

    This chapter explores how contingent faculty address the issue of work and family and demonstrates the importance of understanding the diversity of contingent faculty experiences and of underemployment rather than notions of the ideal worker to explain their work lives.

  13. Workers' Control in Three Countries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayes, Edward

    1976-01-01

    Describes a video tape which examines the kinds of worker participation in management schemes that exist in the United States, Sweden, and Yugoslavia. Can be ordered from: Edward Hayes, Department of Government, Ohio University, Athens, Ohio 45701. (Author/DB)

  14. Workers' compensation and hepatitis C

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Sfikas, P M

    2000-01-01

    Dentists may be required to pay workers' compensation benefits for an employee with hepatitis C even if the employee was not working at the dentist's office at the time he or she contracted the disease...

  15. Outplacement for Underserved Women Workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freeman, Suzanne C.; Haring-Hidore, Marilyn

    1988-01-01

    Describes an outplacement program for hourly women workers that assisted participants in identifying skills, interests, and values; identified community resources; taught job hunting skills; and encouraged participation in a support group. (JOW)

  16. Determination of Lead in Blood by Atomic Absorption Spectrophotometry1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selander, Stig; Cramér, Kim

    1968-01-01

    Lead in blood was determined by atomic absorption spectrophotometry, using a wet ashing procedure and a procedure in which the proteins were precipitated with trichloroacetic acid. In both methods the lead was extracted into isobutylmethylketone before measurement, using ammonium pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate as chelator. The simpler precipitation procedure was shown to give results identical with those obtained with the ashing technique. In addition, blood specimens were examined by the precipitation method and by spectral analysis, which method includes wet ashing of the samples, with good agreement. All analyses were done on blood samples from `normal' persons or from lead-exposed workers, and no additions of inorganic lead were made. The relatively simple protein precipitation technique gave accurate results and is suitable for the large-scale control of lead-exposed workers. PMID:5663425

  17. Goal setting and worker motivation

    OpenAIRE

    Goerg, Sebastian J.

    2015-01-01

    Employers want motivated and productive employees. Are there ways to increase employee motivation without relying solely on monetary incentives, such as pay-for-performance schemes? One tool that has shown promise in recent decades for improving worker performance is setting goals, whether they are assigned by management or self-chosen. Goals are powerful motivators for workers, with the potential for boosting productivity in an organization. However, if not chosen carefully or if used in uns...

  18. "Cloud" health-care workers.

    OpenAIRE

    Sherertz, R J; Bassetti, S.; Bassetti-Wyss, B.

    2001-01-01

    Certain bacteria dispersed by health-care workers can cause hospital infections. Asymptomatic health-care workers colonized rectally, vaginally, or on the skin with group A streptococci have caused outbreaks of surgical site infection by airborne dispersal. Outbreaks have been associated with skin colonization or viral upper respiratory tract infection in a phenomenon of airborne dispersal of Staphylococcus aureus called the "cloud" phenomenon. This review summarizes the data supporting the e...

  19. Active Strategies for Older Workers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Hans

    This report is also to be published by ETUI (Euruopean Trade Unions' Institute) in a book on Active Strategies for Older Workers. It is the National report for Denmark and contains a short section on characteristics of the Danish labour market, with a special focus on the situation of the elderly...... the older workers in the labour force. A third section will focus on the initiatives taken to promote senior policies also from the government....

  20. Health care utilization of workers' compensation claimants associated with mild traumatic brain injury: a historical population-based cohort study of workers injured in 1997-1998.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kristman, Vicki L; Côté, Pierre; Yang, Xiaoqing; Hogg-Johnson, Sheilah; Vidmar, Marjan; Rezai, Mana

    2014-03-01

    To compare the health care use of workers with an injury before and after making a workers' compensation claim for mild traumatic brain injury (MTBI). Cohort study of workers with an MTBI who received workers' compensation benefits. Workers' compensation system in Ontario, Canada. Workers (N=728) who made an incident claim involving MTBI to the Ontario Workplace Safety and Insurance Board between 1997 and 1998. We linked workers' compensation and Ontario Health Insurance Plan files and collected all health care services accrued during the year before and 2 years after the claim was initiated. Not applicable. We report our results as a 7-day simple moving average of health care services per 1000 claimants per day. We stratified our analysis by age, sex, the preclaim level of health care utilization, diagnostic category, and health care specialty. Over the 2 years, 728 claims related to MTBI were filed by workers with an injury. The majority of the claims (65.8%) were filed by men, and 28.3% were filed by those aged between 25 and 34 years. The cumulative rate of health care utilization was stable (mean=67.6 visits/1000 claimants per day; 95% confidence interval [CI], 65.0-70.2) throughout the year before claim initiation. Health care utilization peaked during the first 4 weeks following the initiation of the claim (mean=274.3 visits/1000 claimants per day; 95% CI, 172.2-376.4) and remained on average 182% higher than that at baseline throughout the 5th to 12th week postclaim. Two years after the initiation of the claim, utilization remained 9.5% higher than the preclaim level. The increase was more pronounced (125% higher) for workers with less than the median preclaim utilization level. Making a workers' compensation claim involving MTBI is associated with a long-term increase in health care use. Copyright © 2014 American Congress of Rehabilitation Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. 29 CFR 779.409 - Handicapped workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Handicapped workers. 779.409 Section 779.409 Labor... Students, Learners, and Handicapped Workers § 779.409 Handicapped workers. Regulations have been issued... handicapped workers at wages lower than the minimum wage applicable under section 6 of the Act. These...

  2. 29 CFR 525.4 - Patient workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Patient workers. 525.4 Section 525.4 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) WAGE AND HOUR DIVISION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR REGULATIONS EMPLOYMENT OF WORKERS WITH DISABILITIES UNDER SPECIAL CERTIFICATES § 525.4 Patient workers. With respect to patient workers...

  3. The Older Worker. Myths and Realities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stein, David; Rocco, Tonette S.

    Although workplaces are searching for ways to increase productivity, older workers asking for increased career development opportunities are neglected by most workplaces. Age alone may not be a defining characteristic of an older worker. Perhaps becoming an older worker is more situational than chronological. Retirement for future older workers is…

  4. Migrant women farm workers in the occupational health literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Habib, Rima R; Fathallah, Fadi A

    2012-01-01

    Little attention has been given to the vulnerable populations of migrant women agricultural workers. A systemic review in PubMed was carried out (1990-2008) using terms related to migrant agricultural workers, with specific focus on women. Case studies from Lebanon and California are presented to highlight key physical, psychosocial, and cultural risk factors among these working populations. The review revealed a host of potential problems that span from pesticide exposure and musculoskeletal disorders to socio-cultural barriers. Comprehensive exposure-outcome and intervention studies focusing specifically on migrant women in agriculture are lacking. In depth studies focusing on the work environment of migrant women workers in the agricultural sector are needed. Personal and environmental factors that influence health should be considered in any effective intervention aiming to influence policy making and have a positive impact on these vulnerable working populations.

  5. Engaging health care workers to prevent catheter-associated urinary tract infection and avert patient harm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fakih, Mohamad G; Krein, Sarah L; Edson, Barbara; Watson, Sam R; Battles, James B; Saint, Sanjay

    2014-10-01

    Preventing catheter-associated urinary tract infection (CAUTI) remains a significant challenge for US hospitals. The "On the CUSP: Stop CAUTI" initiative represents the single largest national effort (involving >950 hospitals) to mitigate urinary catheter risk. The program brings together key organizations to assist state hospital associations and hospitals by providing education and coaching support, addressing both the technical aspects of preventing CAUTI and CAUTI-specific socio-adaptive challenges. At the local level, engaging health care workers, from physicians and nurses to other ancillary services, is critical. This includes (1) making the importance of addressing CAUTI stakeholder specific, (2) ensuring support from leaders of essential disciplines, (3) underscoring the importance of the collaborative nature of CAUTI prevention, and (4) identifying champions within the organization to lead and be accountable for the work. Sustainability is ensured by integrating the process into the health care worker's daily routine activities. Copyright © 2014 Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology, Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Quality of Life Satisfaction among Workers and Non-Workers in Uruguay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gandelman, Nestor; Piani, Giorgina

    2013-01-01

    In this paper we use data from a population survey on quality of life dimensions conducted in Uruguay to analyze the self reported well-being among workers and non workers. Along with the literature, we find that the probability of being happy is greater for workers than non-workers. Specifically, we find evidence that workers tend to be more…

  7. Are Empathy and Compassion Bad for the Professional Social Worker?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Nilsson

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Recent studies have shown that social workers and other professional helpers who work with traumatized individuals run a risk of developing compassion fatigue or secondary traumatic stress. Some researchers have hypothesized that helpers do this as a result of feeling too much empathy or too much compassion for their clients, thereby implying that empathy and compassion may be bad for the professional social worker. This paper investigates these hypotheses. Based on a review of current research about empathy and compassion it is argued that these states are not the causes of compassion fatigue. Hence, it is argued that empathy and compassion are not bad for the professional social worker in the sense that too much of one or the other will lead to compassion fatigue.

  8. Composite collective decision-making.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czaczkes, Tomer J; Czaczkes, Benjamin; Iglhaut, Carolin; Heinze, Jürgen

    2015-06-22

    Individual animals are adept at making decisions and have cognitive abilities, such as memory, which allow them to hone their decisions. Social animals can also share information. This allows social animals to make adaptive group-level decisions. Both individual and collective decision-making systems also have drawbacks and limitations, and while both are well studied, the interaction between them is still poorly understood. Here, we study how individual and collective decision-making interact during ant foraging. We first gathered empirical data on memory-based foraging persistence in the ant Lasius niger. We used these data to create an agent-based model where ants may use social information (trail pheromones), private information (memories) or both to make foraging decisions. The combined use of social and private information by individuals results in greater efficiency at the group level than when either information source was used alone. The modelled ants couple consensus decision-making, allowing them to quickly exploit high-quality food sources, and combined decision-making, allowing different individuals to specialize in exploiting different resource patches. Such a composite collective decision-making system reaps the benefits of both its constituent parts. Exploiting such insights into composite collective decision-making may lead to improved decision-making algorithms. © 2015 The Author(s) Published by the Royal Society. All rights reserved.

  9. Worker Attitudes towards Mental Health Problems and Disclosure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    CS Dewa

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: There is a significant proportion of workers with mental disorders who either are struggling at work or who are trying to return to work from a disability leave. Objective: Using a population-based survey of working adults in Ontario, Canada, this paper examines the perceptions of workers towards mental disorders in the workplace. Methods: Data are from a sample of 2219 working adults identified through random digit dialing who either completed a telephone questionnaire administered by professional interviewers or a web-based survey. Results: A third of workers would not tell their managers if they experienced mental health problems. Rather than a single factor, workers more often identified a combination of factors that would encourage disclosure to their managers. One of the most identified disincentives was the fear of damaging their careers. The most pervasive reasons for concerns about a colleague with a mental health problem included safety and the colleague's reliability. Conclusion: Although critical for workers who experience a mental disorder and who find work challenging, a significant proportion do not seek support. One barrier is fear of negative repercussions. Organizations' policies can create safe environments and the provision of resources and training to managers that enable them to implement them. By making disclosure safe, stigma and the burden of mental disorders in the workplace can be decreased.

  10. Leading clever people.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goffee, Rob; Jones, Gareth

    2007-03-01

    In an economy driven by ideas and intellectual know-how, top executives recognize the importance of employing smart, highly creative people. But if clever people have one defining characteristic, it's that they do not want to be led. So what is a leader to do? The authors conducted more than 100 interviews with leaders and their clever people at major organizations such as PricewaterhouseCoopers, Cisco Systems, Novartis, the BBC, and Roche. What they learned is that the psychological relationships effective leaders have with their clever people are very different from the ones they have with traditional followers. Those relationships can be shaped by seven characteristics that clever people share: They know their worth--and they know you have to employ them if you want their tacit skills. They are organizationally savvy and will seek the company context in which their interests are most generously funded. They ignore corporate hierarchy; although intellectual status is important to them, you can't lure them with promotions. They expect instant access to top management, and if they don't get it, they may think the organization doesn't take their work seriously. They are plugged into highly developed knowledge networks, which both increases their value and makes them more of a flight risk. They have a low boredom threshold, so you have to keep them challenged and committed. They won't thank you--even when you're leading them well. The trick is to act like a benevolent guardian: to grant them the respect and recognition they demand, protect them from organizational rules and politics, and give them room to pursue private efforts and even to fail. The payoff will be a flourishing crop of creative minds that will enrich your whole organization.

  11. Occupational health policy and immigrant workers in the agriculture, forestry, and fishing sector.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liebman, Amy K; Wiggins, Melinda F; Fraser, Clermont; Levin, Jeffrey; Sidebottom, Jill; Arcury, Thomas A

    2013-08-01

    Immigrant workers make up an important portion of the hired workforce in the Agricultural, Forestry and Fishing (AgFF) sector, one of the most hazardous industry sectors in the US. Despite the inherent dangers associated with this sector, worker protection is limited. This article describes the current occupational health and safety policies and regulatory standards in the AgFF sector and underscores the regulatory exceptions and limitations in worker protections. Immigration policies and their effects on worker health and safety are also discussed. Emphasis is placed on policies and practices in the Southeastern US. Worker protection in the AgFF sector is limited. Regulatory protections are generally weaker than other industrial sectors and enforcement of existing regulations is woefully inadequate. The vulnerability of the AgFF workforce is magnified by worker immigration status. Agricultural workers in particular are affected by a long history of "exceptionalism" under the law as many regulatory protections specifically exclude this workforce. A vulnerable workforce and high-hazard industries require regulatory protections that, at a minimum, are provided to workers in other industries. A systematic policy approach to strengthen occupational safety and health in the AgFF sector must address both immigration policy and worker protection regulations. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. ‘Face’ and psychological processes of laid-off workers in transitional China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bingxin Wang

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The objective was to explore the psychological experiences of laid-off workers in contemporary transitional China and to formulate a theoretical model of these. Methods: In-depth interviews of 26 laid-off workers were conducted and analysed using grounded theory techniques. Results: Four themes underline the psychological processes of these laid-off workers – feeling of loss, feeling of physical pain, feeling of fatalism, and final acceptance. These are characterized by Chinese culture and its philosophy – feeling of loss is dominated by their loss of face (diu mianzi, physical pain is a somatization of their mental painfulness, their fatalism is traced back to the Chinese ancient theocratic concept of Tian Ming, and their acceptance of reality to their final making face (zheng mianzi is sourced from both Confucianism and Daoism. Conclusion: The psychological experience of laid-off workers (or unemployed workers is likely to have varied manifestations in different cultural contexts. The psychological processes of Chinese laid-off workers (or unemployed workers might be different from those of laid-off workers in Western countries. A therapeutic intervention to cater for the needs of laid-off workers derived from the four themes might be effective.

  13. Male sex workers: practices, contexts, and vulnerabilities for HIV acquisition and transmission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baral, Stefan David; Friedman, M Reuel; Geibel, Scott; Rebe, Kevin; Bozhinov, Borche; Diouf, Daouda; Sabin, Keith; Holland, Claire E; Chan, Roy; Cáceres, Carlos F

    2015-01-17

    Male sex workers who sell or exchange sex for money or goods encompass a very diverse population across and within countries worldwide. Information characterising their practices, contexts where they live, and their needs is limited, because these individuals are generally included as a subset of larger studies focused on gay men and other men who have sex with men (MSM) or even female sex workers. Male sex workers, irrespective of their sexual orientation, mostly offer sex to men and rarely identify as sex workers, using local or international terms instead. Growing evidence indicates a sustained or increasing burden of HIV among some male sex workers within the context of the slowing global HIV pandemic. Several synergistic facilitators could be potentiating HIV acquisition and transmission among male sex workers, including biological, behavioural, and structural determinants. Criminalisation and intersectional stigmas of same-sex practices, commercial sex, and HIV all augment risk for HIV and sexually transmitted infections among male sex workers and reduce the likelihood of these people accessing essential services. These contexts, taken together with complex sexual networks among male sex workers, define this group as a key population underserved by current HIV prevention, treatment, and care services. Dedicated efforts are needed to make those services available for the sake of both public health and human rights. Evidence-based and human rights-affirming services dedicated specifically to male sex workers are needed to improve health outcomes for these men and the people within their sexual networks. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Lead content of foodstuffs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, D G; Aldous, K M

    1974-05-01

    The lead content of a number of foodstuffs, particularly baby fruit juices and milk, is reported. Samples were analyzed in quadruplicate by using an automated Delves cup atomic absorption procedure. A large proportion of the products examined contained significant amounts of lead. Of 256 metal can examined, the contents of 62% contained a lead level of 100 mug/l. or more, 37% contained 200 mug/l. or more and 12% contained 400 mug/l. lead or more. Of products in glass and aluminum containers, only 1% had lead levels in excess of 200 mug/l. Lead levels of contents also correlate with the seam length/volume ratio of the leaded seam can. A survey of bulk milk showed a mean lead level of 40 mug/l. for 270 samples; for canned evaporated milk the mean level was 202 mug/l. These data indicate a potential health hazard.

  15. Lead and tap water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Water contaminated with lead ... The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) monitors drinking water in the United States. It requires water suppliers to produce annual water quality reports. These reports include information about lead amounts, and they ...

  16. Character and Effective Leadership of the Knowledge Worker

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khoury, Anne E. [Univ. of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2005-04-20

    work, leaders have the personal characteristics that engender trust and commitment. In other words, as study results confirmed, the most effective leader-managers establish trusting relationships and strengthen others--they enable others; and, are just, fair, sincere, and recognize contributions--they encourage the heart. Based on study findings, the leadership development model proposed was founded on the premise that character can be developed, particularly if done so through assessment and challenging assignments, with coaching, mentoring, and peer network support. However, development of character requires a shift in our leadership development programs. What causes this shift is a focus on learning by doing through challenging assignments and teaching others rather than learning through event focused assessment and course work. Character cannot be learned in the classroom; it needs to be developed through experience and then learned by feedback, reflection, coaching, and teaching others. Study findings indicated that knowledge workers want to be encouraged, believed in and lead by those they trust to inspire them to accomplish the goals and objectives of the organization. To cause a workforce to generate intellectual capital for the organization, study findings found that the leader-manager's ''character'' does make a difference.

  17. Motor vehicle fatalities among oil and gas extraction workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Retzer, Kyla D; Hill, Ryan D; Pratt, Stephanie G

    2013-03-01

    Motor vehicle crashes are the leading cause of work-related fatality in the U.S. as well as in the oil and gas extraction industry. This study describes the characteristics of motor vehicle-related fatalities in the oil and gas extraction industry using data from the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics' Census of Fatal Occupational Injuries. It compares the risk of dying in a motor vehicle crash in this industry to other major industries and among different types and sizes of oil and gas extraction companies. There were 202 oil and gas extraction workers who died in a work-related motor vehicle crash from 2003 to 2009. The motor vehicle fatality rate for workers in this industry was 8.5 times that of all private wage and salary workers (7.6 vs. 0.9, pvehicle crash. Pick-up trucks were the most frequent type of vehicle occupied by the fatally injured worker (n=104, 51.5%). Safety belt non-use was identified in 38.1% (n=77) of the cases. Increased focus on motor vehicle safety in this industry is needed, in particular among small establishments. Extraction workers who drive light duty vehicles need to be a specific focus. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  18. NA49: lead-lead collision

    CERN Multimedia

    1996-01-01

    This is an image of an actual lead ion collision taken from tracking detectors on the NA49 experiment, part of the heavy ion project at CERN. These collisions produce a very complicated array of hadrons as the heavy ions break up. It is hoped that one of these collisions will eventually create a new state of matter known as quark-gluon plasma.

  19. Improving pneumonia case-management in Benin: a randomized trial of a multi-faceted intervention to support health worker adherence to Integrated Management of Childhood Illness guidelines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lama Marcel

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Pneumonia is a leading cause of death among children under five years of age. The Integrated Management of Childhood Illness strategy can improve the quality of care for pneumonia and other common illnesses in developing countries, but adherence to these guidelines could be improved. We evaluated an intervention in Benin to support health worker adherence to the guidelines after training, focusing on pneumonia case management. Methods We conducted a randomized trial. After a health facility survey in 1999 to assess health care quality before Integrated Management of Childhood Illness training, health workers received training plus either study supports (job aids, non-financial incentives and supervision of workers and supervisors or "usual" supports. Follow-up surveys were conducted in 2001, 2002 and 2004. Outcomes were indicators of health care quality for Integrated Management-defined pneumonia. Further analyses included a graphical pathway analysis and multivariable logistic regression modelling to identify factors influencing case-management quality. Results We observed 301 consultations of children with non-severe pneumonia that were performed by 128 health workers in 88 public and private health facilities. Although outcomes improved in both intervention and control groups, we found no statistically significant difference between groups. However, training proceeded slowly, and low-quality care from untrained health workers diluted intervention effects. Per-protocol analyses suggested that health workers with training plus study supports performed better than those with training plus usual supports (20.4 and 19.2 percentage-point improvements for recommended treatment [p = 0.08] and "recommended or adequate" treatment [p = 0.01], respectively. Both groups tended to perform better than untrained health workers. Analyses of treatment errors revealed that incomplete assessment and difficulties processing clinical findings

  20. Assessing the Effect of Simultaneous Exposure to Noise and Cigarette Smoke on Workers' Blood Pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahimpour, Farzane; Rafiei Manesh, Ehsan; Jarahi, Lida; Eghbali, Saba

    2016-11-01

    Noise, as the most common pollutant in the industrial environment, can lead to hearing loss and negatively affect other organs such as the cardiovascular system. Cigarette smoking is a popular habit among some workers, and can also have a negative effect on the cardiovascular system. This study was aimed to investigate the effect of simultaneous exposure to noise and cigarette smoke on the blood pressure of workers at a manufacturing factory. This cross-sectional study enrolled 604 workers at a steel factory. Information relating to workers' demography, employment, and risk factors were recorded. Based on the level of smoking per day, workers exposed to noise fell into one of the four following groups: 1) Non-smokers exposed to noise workers. The mean systolic blood pressure (SBP) and diastolic blood pressure (DBP) were 112.3 and 73.9 mmHg, respectively. A significant difference was observed between systolic and diastolic blood pressures in four groups (P=0.001). Posthoc test showed a significant difference between groups 1 and 3 (P=0.001). Regression analysis indicated no significant difference in workers who were simultaneously exposed to noise and cigarette smoke. This study demonstrates that noise is an important factor in terms of hypertension, with no significant differences observed in the prevalence of hypertension between workers who were simultaneously exposed to noise and cigarette smoke. It is suggested that workers' blood pressure should be regularly monitored in noisy environments.

  1. [Comparative analysis of gynaecological status of workers from textile and metal industry].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milovanović, Aleksandar; Dotlić, Jelena; Jakovljević, Branko; Milovanović, Jovica; Petković, Slavica; Djorac, Aleksandar; Blagojević, Tatjana

    2008-01-01

    Female workers in textile and metal industry are exposed to various physical and chemical hazards that can lead to the occurrence of gynaecological diseases. The aim of this study was to estimate the frequency of gynaecological diseases among workers of textile and metal industries. The investigation comprised 197 female workers, 148 from textile and 49 from metal industry, aged from 26 to 57 years. All subjects were hospitalized based on non-gynaecological diagnoses. Gynaecological diagnoses included: tumours of the genital organs and breasts, cervical ectopy and lacerations, inflammatory diseases, disturbances of static of genital organs, cysts, and irregularities of menstrual cycle. Textile workers were significantly younger than metal workers, but the groups were comparable according to total and exposure work-time, qualifications and diagnosis on hospital admission. Gynaecological diseases were diagnosed among all investigated subjects. About 80% were diagnosed with tumours and inflammatory diseases. A highly statistically significant difference was observed among groups according to the presence of cervical ectopy and lacerations, which were more frequent among textile workers. Comparison of gynaecological status of workers revealed that, among textile workers, cervical ectopy and lacerations were more frequent than among workers in metal industry.

  2. Does age affect the relationship between control at work and sleep disturbance for shift workers?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loudoun, Rebecca Jane; Muurlink, Olav; Peetz, David; Murray, Georgina

    2014-12-01

    Among miners, shift work, aging and lack of control at work may be factors leading to increased sleep problems. Such risk factors may also operate in interaction, resulting in an even increased harm for sleep disruption. The present study aims at evaluating these relationships drawing on a sample of Australian mine and energy workers and their partners. The workers were mainly men. All performed shift work that included either nights (95%) or multiple shifts (92%), usually both (87%), while 36% were aged 50 years or above. The results show that low latitude over work activities is associated with higher sleep disturbances across the sample, though the effects are clearer amongst younger workers. By contrast, for younger workers, control over shift scheduling is not associated with sleep disturbances but for workers aged 50 or more, low control results in more sleep disturbance. Misalignment between shift workers and partner work schedules, and partner dissatisfaction with shift worker's employment and shift worker's work-life balance, are also associated with more sleep disturbances amongst shift workers.

  3. Lead Poisoning (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Needs a Kidney Transplant Vision Facts and Myths Lead Poisoning KidsHealth > For Parents > Lead Poisoning Print A ... Family en español La intoxicación por plomo About Lead Poisoning If you have young kids, it's important ...

  4. Lead Poisoning in Childhood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pueschel, Siegfried M., Ed.; Linakis, James G., Ed.; Anderson, Angela C., Ed.

    The magnitude of childhood lead poisoning has been inexplicably neglected by modern medicine and by legislators. However, since the 1970s, increased attention has been focused on lead poisoning, and advances have been made in several areas, including understanding of the neurodevelopmental and behavioral ramifications of lead poisoning, and…

  5. Lead poisoning: An overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gendel, Neil

    1993-01-01

    A problem that should be of great concern to all of us is the lead poisoning of children. First, I would like to present a short overview concerning the reasons everyone should care about lead poisoning, then discuss the history of lead poisoning, what is happening today across the country, and the future.

  6. Lead Poisoning in Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drummond, A. H., Jr.

    1981-01-01

    Early symptoms of lead poisoning in children are often overlooked. Lead poisoning has its greatest effects on the brain and nervous system. The obvious long-term solution to the lead poisoning problem is removal of harmful forms of the metal from the environment. (JN)

  7. The worker profile autocontrolled

    OpenAIRE

    Jairo Omar Delgado Mora

    2015-01-01

    This document is part of two deliveries. In this first paper is to make an approach to the concept of self-control from the very beginning with Sakichi Toyoda, founder of what the industry Toyota Motor Company, additionally taking some excerpts of the concept issued by teachers and the psychologist Henry Murray, a professor at the university Harvard precursor test TAT personality test creator, pen applied world wide by psychologists David McCllelan, also a psychologist and a pioneer in the st...

  8. Risk of high blood pressure in salt workers working near salt milling plants: A cross-sectional and interventional study

    OpenAIRE

    Sachdev Raman; Mathur Murli; Haldiya Kripa; Saiyed Habibulla N

    2005-01-01

    Abstract Background Workers working close to salt milling plants may inhale salt particles floating in the air, leading to a rise in plasma sodium, which, in turn, may increase the blood pressure and the risk of hypertension. Methods To test the above hypothesis, occupational health check-up camps were organized near salt manufacturing units and all workers were invited for a free health examination. The workers who worked with dry salt in the vicinity of salt milling plants were defined as "...

  9. Emotion work and well-being of client service workers within small and medium enterprises / Sonja Joubert

    OpenAIRE

    Joubert, Sonja

    2008-01-01

    Frontline client service workers are central to the service elements of any small and medium enterprise. People who have much customer or client contact are seen to be subject to stronger emotional display rules. These display rules may result in compromising the psychological and/or physical health of workers, because they often lead to a disturbing dissonance between felt emotions and the emotions one must exhibit. It is, therefore, of vital importance for service workers to exhibit Emotion...

  10. Physical activity of office workers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E Biernat

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Inactivity or insufficient physical activity is risk factor for metabolic or cardiovascular diseases. In most of cases the nature of work of office employees does not require high physical efforts and consists mostly of sitting but the reports on leisure activity of office workers are still lacking. Thus, the aim of the study was to assess physical activity of civil and local administration workers and bank officials. 293 randomly selected office workers took part in the study. They were recruited from employees of local (n=97 or civil (n=119 administration authorities or banks (n=77 and subjected to interviews with the use of IPAQ questionnaire (short version. Low physical activity was noted in about 70% of local administration employees, in almost 50% of bank officials and about 35% of workers employed in civil administration. Total daily time spent on sitting was on average 9.7±1.7 hour/day irrespectively of gender or group studied. Very low level of physical activity of Polish office workers may be a result of improper habits of spending spare time, low awareness of beneficial effects of physical activity and still insufficient promotion of healthy/active lifestyle in East-European countries.

  11. Musculoskeletal diseases in forestry workers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vuković Slađana

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available The most common hazards in the forestry that may induce disorders of the musculoskeletal system are vibrations, unfavorable microclimatic conditions, noise, over-time working hours, work load and long-term repeated movements. The objective of this study was to analyze the prevalence of musculoskeletal diseases and its difference among workers engaged in various jobs in the forestry. Two groups of workers were selected: woodcutters operating with chain-saw (N=33 and other loggers (N=32. Selected workers were of the similar age and had similar total length of employment as well as the length of service in the forestry. Both groups of workers employed in the forestry had the high prevalence of musculoskeletal diseases (woodcutters 69.7% and other loggers 62.5%, respectively. Degenerative diseases of spinal column were very frequent, in dependently of the type of activity in the forestry. Non-significantly higher risk of carpal tunnel syndrome was found in woodcutters with chain-saw compared to workers having other jobs in the forestry (OR=3.09; 95%CI=0.64-19.72. The lateral epicondylitis was found only in woodcutters operating with chain-saw with the prevalence of 18.2%.

  12. Occupational Dermatoses among Cottage Industry Workers of Kashmir Valley in North India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akhtar, Saniya; Hassan, Iffat; Rasool, Farhan; Bhat, Yasmeen J; Sheikh, Gousia

    2017-01-01

    Cottage industry is usually a small-scale industry operated from home by family members using their own equipment. Kashmir has a unique cottage industry of its own which deals with production of many handicrafts, which may lead to a peculiar pattern of skin diseases in these artisans. Aim: The aim of this study was to find out the pattern of skin disorders in the cottage industry workers of Kashmir valley, with primary focus on the occupation-related dermatoses and to identify the most common cutaneous manifestation in these workers. This was a cross-sectional descriptive study in which 1062 cottage industry workers engaged in different crafts were screened. A detailed history taking and examination was carried out in each worker and the diagnosis was made on clinical grounds. Wherever deemed necessary, relevant investigations were done to establish the nature of the disease. A total of 1062 workers were evaluated for the presence of skin disorders. The male-to-female ratio was 1:1.5. The mean age of the study group was 30.3 years ± 10.79 years, with maximum number of workers (164) belonging to the crewel embroidery industry. The mean duration of work was 6.4 ± 2.08 hours/day. A total of 953 workers (89.7%) had cutaneous manifestations, with callosities being the most common finding seen in 371 workers (35%), followed by cumulative insult dermatitis seen in 201 workers (19%). Cottage industry of Kashmir valley is a unique occupational group where a high percentage of workers had cutaneous manifestations related to their occupation, with callosities being the most common finding. Information and better knowledge regarding these dermatoses are important in devising strategies to improve the health scenario of these workers. Simple measures such as proper use of instruments, use of protective gloves, guarded use of chemicals, and hand washing may be very beneficial in reducing the burden of health problems in these workers.

  13. The Effects of Changes in the Foreign Worker Quota on the Native Workers under Efficiency Wages

    OpenAIRE

    島田, 章

    2005-01-01

    Assuming a small open economy where wages are determined by the efficiency wage hypothesis, we investigate how the changes in the foreign worker quota affect native worker employment, wage and expected lifetime utility. For this purpose, we assume that the foreign worker quota is smaller than the number of foreign workers who are willing to migrate to the small open economy. We also assume that the per capita effective labor force of native workers is larger than that offoreign workers. We sh...

  14. Lead encephalopathy in adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janapareddy Vijaya Bhaskara Rao

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Lead poisoning is a common occupational health hazard in developing countries. We report the varied clinical presentation, diagnostic and management issues in two adult patients with lead encephalopathy. Both patients worked in a battery manufacturing unit. Both patients presented with seizures and one patient also complained of abdominal colic and vomiting. Both were anemic and a lead line was present. Blood lead level in both the patients was greater than 25 µg/dl. Magnetic resonance imaging of brain revealed bilateral symmetric involvement of the thalamus, lentiform nucleus in both patients and also the external capsules, sub-cortical white matter in one patient. All these changes, seen as hyperintensities in T2-weighted images suggested demyelination. They were advised avoidance of further exposure to lead and were treated with anti-epileptics; one patient also received D-penicillamine. They improved well on follow-up. Lead encephalopathy is an uncommon but important manifestation of lead toxicity in adults.

  15. Lead in the environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pattee, Oliver H.; Pain, Deborah J.; Hoffman, David J.; Rattner, Barnett A.; Burton, G. Allen; Cairns, John

    2003-01-01

    Anthropogenic uses of lead have probably altered its availability and environmental distribution more than any other toxic element. Consequently, lead concentrations in many living organisms may be approaching thresholds of toxicity for the adverse effects of lead. Such thresholds are difficult to define, as they vary with the chemical and physical form of lead, exposure regime, other elements present and also vary both within and between species. The technological capability to accurately quantify low lead concentrations has increased over the last decade, and physiological and behavioral effects have been measured in wildlife with tissue lead concentrations below those previously considered safe for humans.s.236 Consequently. lead criteria for the protection of wildlife and human health are frequently under review, and 'thresholds' of lead toxicity are being reconsidered. Proposed lead criteria for the protection of natural resources have been reviewed by Eisler. Uptake of lead by plants is limited by its generally low availability in soils and sediments, and toxicity may be limited by storage mechanisms and its apparently limited translocation within most plants. Lead does not generally accumulate within the foliar parts of plants, which limits its transfer to higher trophic levels. Although lead may concentrate in plant and animal tissues, no evidence of biomagnification exists. Acid deposition onto surface waters and soils with low buffering capacity may influence the availability of lead for uptake by plants and animals, and this may merit investigation at susceptible sites. The biological significance of chronic low-level lead exposure to wildlife is sometimes difficult to quantify. Animals living in urban environments or near point sources of lead emission are inevitably subject to greater exposure to lead and enhanced risk of lead poisoning. Increasingly strict controls on lead emissions in many countries have reduced exposure to lead from some sources

  16. ALICE: Simulated lead-lead collision

    CERN Document Server

    2003-01-01

    This track is an example of simulated data modelled for the ALICE detector on the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN, which will begin taking data in 2008. ALICE will focus on the study of collisions between nuclei of lead, a heavy element that produces many different particles when collided. It is hoped that these collisions will produce a new state of matter known as the quark-gluon plasma, which existed billionths of a second after the Big Bang.

  17. Life-circumstances, working conditions and HIV risk among street and nightclub-based sex workers in Lusaka, Zambia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agha, Sohail; Chulu Nchima, Mwaba

    2004-07-01

    The principal objective of this study was to conduct formative research among sex workers in Lusaka, Zambia, to understand how sex workers' perceptions of their personal identity influences safer sex practices. In-depth interviews were conducted with 20 sex workers in Lusaka, Zambia, including both nightclub and street-based sex workers. Findings indicate important differences of self perception and identity between nightclub-based sex workers and street-based sex workers. The latter have a professional identity and are willing to be publicly acknowledged as sex workers. This makes it easier for them to convince clients to use condoms. In contrast, nightclub-based sex workers are less likely to wish to be identified as sex workers. They are motivated by the desire to meet a man who will perhaps marry them and change their lives. As a consequence, they do not publicly acknowledge their risk of STI/HIV infection and many go against their better judgement by not using condoms. Factors such as the stigmatization of sex work, the harassment of sex workers and the lack of protection available to them interact with sex workers' perceptions of their personal identities and influence their ability to take precautions during high-risk sexual encounters.

  18. [Calculation of workers' health care costs].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rydlewska-Liszkowska, Izabela

    2006-01-01

    In different health care systems, there are different schemes of organization and principles of financing activities aimed at ensuring the working population health and safety. Regardless of the scheme and the range of health care provided, economists strive for rationalization of costs (including their reduction). This applies to both employers who include workers' health care costs into indirect costs of the market product manufacture and health care institutions, which provide health care services. In practice, new methods of setting costs of workers' health care facilitate regular cost control, acquisition of detailed information about costs, and better adjustment of information to planning and control needs in individual health care institutions. For economic institutions and institutions specialized in workers' health care, a traditional cost-effect calculation focused on setting costs of individual products (services) is useful only if costs are relatively low and the output of simple products is not very high. But when products form aggregates of numerous actions like those involved in occupational medicine services, the method of activity based costing (ABC), representing the process approach, is much more useful. According to this approach costs are attributed to the product according to resources used during different activities involved in its production. The calculation of costs proceeds through allocation of all direct costs for specific processes in a given institution. Indirect costs are settled on the basis of resources used during the implementation of individual tasks involved in the process of making a new product. In this method, so called map of processes/actions consisted in the manufactured product and their interrelations are of particular importance. Advancements in the cost-effect for the management of health care institutions depend on their managerial needs. Current trends in this regard primarily depend on treating all cost reference

  19. Quits and Job Changes among Home Care Workers in Maine: The Role of Wages, Hours, and Benefits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, Lisa

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: Figuring out how to make home care jobs more attractive has become a top policy priority. This study investigates the impact of wages, hours, and benefits on the retention of home care workers. Design and Methods: Using a 2-wave survey design and a sample of home care workers from Maine, the factors associated with turnover intentions,…

  20. Medical surveillance of outside workers in base nuclear facilities; Surveillance medicale des travailleurs exterieurs dans les installations nucleaires de base

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anon.

    1997-06-01

    Here are described two bylaws relative to the training of doctors in charge of the radiation protection of outside enterprises workers and susceptible to intervene in nuclear facilities, and to the entitlement clauses of medical services in charge to make the medical surveillance of outside enterprises workers intervening in nuclear facilities. (N.C.).

  1. Meet the local policy workers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wimmelmann, Camilla L.; Vallgårda, Signild; Jensen, Anja MB

    2017-01-01

    Reporting on an interview and observation based study in Danish municipalities, this article deals with local policy workers, and takes departure in the great variation we observed in implementation of centrally issued health promotion guidelines. We present five types of local policy workers, each...... of whom we found typified a specific way of reasoning and implementing the guidelines. This typology illustrates the diversity found within a group of local policy workers, and helps explain the variability reported in most studies on policy/guideline implementation. On the level of individuals, variation...... in the same positions receiving the same set of guidelines implement them differently, and suggest that local policy workers’ professionally related experiences affect the frames in which they translate the guidelines and decide upon the strategies of implementation. As such, this article illustrates...

  2. Illinois Wind Workers Group

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    David G. Loomis

    2012-05-28

    The Illinois Wind Working Group (IWWG) was founded in 2006 with about 15 members. It has grown to over 200 members today representing all aspects of the wind industry across the State of Illinois. In 2008, the IWWG developed a strategic plan to give direction to the group and its activities. The strategic plan identifies ways to address critical market barriers to the further penetration of wind. The key to addressing these market barriers is public education and outreach. Since Illinois has a restructured electricity market, utilities no longer have a strong control over the addition of new capacity within the state. Instead, market acceptance depends on willing landowners to lease land and willing county officials to site wind farms. Many times these groups are uninformed about the benefits of wind energy and unfamiliar with the process. Therefore, many of the project objectives focus on conferences, forum, databases and research that will allow these stakeholders to make well-educated decisions.

  3. Policy practice in practice: the inputs of social workers in legislative committees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss-Gal, Idit

    2013-10-01

    This article presents findings of an empirical study of the involvement of social workers in the policy formulation process. Despite support for policy practice, there has been limited empirical study of social workers' involvement in policy practice, which leaves us with little systematic knowledge of social workers' role in the policy formulation process. This study expands the knowledge of social workers' role in this process by identifying their inputs into Israeli legislative committees. Based on a content analysis of the minutes of 85 parliamentary committee meetings held during the 15th and 16th Knesset sessions (1999 to 2006), the study reveals five main inputs: placing matters on the agenda, providing information, providing explanations, expressing opinions and making suggestions, and commenting on the manner of the discussion, and 23 subinputs. These inputs underscore three main functions that social workers perform, or may perform, with respect to policy: challenging policy, facilitating policy, and enriching policy.

  4. Knowledge Worker Mobility in Context

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wright, Mike; Tartari, Valentina; Huang, Kenneth G.

    2018-01-01

    Scholars are paying more attention to knowledge workers (KW) as they gain importance in the knowledge-based economy. Knowledge worker mobility (KWM) can involve various forms of employee and entrepreneurial movements: the transfer of employees from one organization to another either through...... locational movement or through a change in ownership, the transfer of employees within the same organization but in different units and/or geographies, and the spinning off by employees into new ventures. KWM spans a variety of different contexts which have rarely been explored in prior research. We focus...

  5. Chronic occupational exposure to lead and its impact on oral health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Said, Khaled F; El-Ghamry, Amina M; Mahdy, Nehad H; El-Bestawy, Nagwa A

    2008-01-01

    Chronic Lead exposure favours the formation of cheilitis, fissures, ulcers and epithelial desquamation of the tongue, palate and other parts of the oral mucous membranes. The tissues of oral cavity may be affected by toxic agents either by direct action as in exposure to sulfuric acid fumes or through systemic exposure as in poisoning with heavy metals e.g. lead.. The Present study aimed to investigate the oral health condition of industrial workers exposed to lead in Alexandria governorate. The samples included all workers chronically exposed to lead fumes or dust in a storage battery plant (400 workers) and working in seven departments where lead exposure was present. These departments were evaluated environmentally for lead in air and their workers for lead in blood. Oral medical examinations were carried out according to the items of WHO sheet designed for oral health survey with some modifications. Results of the present study revealed that chronic exposure to lead significantly affects oral health condition among exposed workers and strongly correlates with increasing level of blood lead among them. It can be concluded that the most common adverse effects of lead on dental health of exposed workers were the significant increase in the prevalence of periodontal diseases (gingivitis and periodontitis expressed as PI) and in the prevalence of decay (caries), missed and filled teeth (expressed as DMFT index) and dental abrasions. Moreover,these findings were found to be related to lead concentration in air in the studied departments and to blood lead level. On the other hand, exposure to lead was found to have insignificant effect on calculus formation (expressed as CI-S) or oral debris (expressed as (DI-S)or both together expressed as (OHI-S).

  6. Toxicological analysis of the risk of lead exposure in metal processing

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: To evaluate toxicological risks for workers who are exposed to lead in their work environment. Methods: Since it is an important indicator of toxicological risk, a statistical analysis of lead concentration and biological lead toxicity markers in blood and urine were performed for both exposed and control groups.

  7. Noise, Worker Perception, and Worker Concentration in Timber Harvesting Activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Efi Yuliati Yovi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Timber harvesting activities are unquestionably related with high risk of work accidents and health disorders.Such activities were not only burdened the workers with heavy physical workloads due to uneasy workingenvironment, and massive work materials and tools, but also physiopsychologically burdened workers as theywere imposed with both mechanical and acoustic vibrations (noise produced by the chainsaw. However,  it is acommon practice that most of the workers still ignored the importance of the use of noise reduction devices suchas earmuff or ear plug.  This study was aimed to reveal the factual effects of noise on work concentration of theworkers to provide a scientific basis in supporting efforts in improving workers’ attitude.  The results confirmedthat chainsaw might produce noise during operation.  Noise intensities received by both right and left ears werenot significantly different, indicating that left-handed and normal workers received similar degree of noise inboth side of ears. Further, results also showed that there was a significant difference on the perception and workconcentration of chainsaw operators versus sedentary people to the noise.  These findings proved that hearingability of chainsaw operators had declined due to frequent noise exposure.Keywords: timber harvesting, physio-psychological disorder, noise, chainsaw

  8. [An example of migrating workers advisory services: the Turin District council project].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giachino, G M; Di Cuia, S; Andreazza, M; Manzon, M; Becchis, G

    2011-01-01

    The regulations that govern the job admission procedure in Italy has been revised in the last 15 years in order to improve the work demand and supply meeting and this development is outlined. The reform is centered on the Employment Offices introduction: they cover the province setting up a network wich distributes various service and attends workers and companies to promote employment opportunities. The special status of the migrating workers, wich are a weaker social part compared to national workers, is stressed. In support of this category a new form of civil service executive has been inaugurated, the educational mediator, who knows foreign workers language and culture and leads them to integrate into italian society. In the end migrating workers occupational levels trend in the last 3 years is reported, sorted by nationality and line of work.

  9. The Escalating of Numbers of Foreign Workers in Construction Site

    OpenAIRE

    Mat Salleh Norazlin; Mamter Shahela; Lop Nor Suzila; Mohd Kamar Izatul Farrita; Mohamad Hamdan Noor Aishah

    2014-01-01

    This paper is evaluating the factors effecting the increasing in the numbers of foreign workers on site. A critical review of the literature was abstract because of the Malaysian economics is booming and the characteristics of the construction industry itself make the foreigners comfortable works on site. This paper discusses the results from the conducted questionnaire survey among the contractors in Selangor. Based on the average index, there are several factors identified by the respondent...

  10. Lead-Free Piezoelectrics

    CERN Document Server

    Nahm, Sahn

    2012-01-01

    Ecological restrictions in many parts of the world are demanding the elimination of Pb from all consumer items. At this moment in the piezoelectric ceramics industry, there is no issue of more importance than the transition to lead-free materials. The goal of Lead-Free Piezoelectrics is to provide a comprehensive overview of the fundamentals and developments in the field of lead-free materials and products to leading researchers in the world. The text presents chapters on demonstrated applications of the lead-free materials, which will allow readers to conceptualize the present possibilities and will be useful for both students and professionals conducting research on ferroelectrics, piezoelectrics, smart materials, lead-free materials, and a variety of applications including sensors, actuators, ultrasonic transducers and energy harvesters.

  11. Workers of Acromyrmex echinatior leafcutter ants police worker-laid eggs, but not reproductive workers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dijkstra, Michiel B.; van Zweden, Jelle Stijn; Dirchsen, Maria

    2010-01-01

    Nonreproductive workers of many eusocial Hymenoptera 'police' the colony, that is, they attack reproductive sister workers or destroy their eggs (unfertilized; developing into haploid males). Several ultimate causes of policing have been proposed, including (1) an increase in colony productivity...

  12. [Lead intoxication in shipscrapping employees in Taiwan].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiang, H C; Chang, P Y

    1989-05-01

    The shipscrapping industry in Taiwan is located at Kaohsiung harbor. The scrapping yard at Kaohsiung can be divided into the "Da-Jen" area and the "Da-Lin" area, including 23 and 13 docks respectively. About 5000-8000 dock workers are employed in the yard. Because shipscrapping has been considered to be a "temporary" industry by the secondary metal dealers, so the dealers did not well equip and offer the appropriate safety and health programs for the industry. Of those who work on the docks the metal burners are those most continuously exposed to substantial amounts of inorganic lead and other unidentified metals along with health stresses such as noise, asbestos, explosions and accidents. In this study, 140 oxyacetylene torch metal burners (83 working on scrapping ships and 57 working at the yard) and 21 dock workers without direct lead exposure as the control group were included. The mean values of blood lead and urine lead were 63.22 +/- 22.04 micrograms/d1 and 122.15 +/- 44.10 micrograms/1 for metal burners on the ship, and 65.25 +/- 37.11 micrograms/d1 and 101.54 +/- 37.11 micrograms/1 for the metal burners at the yard, values for the control group were 37.24 +/- 20.63 micrograms/d1 and 67.62 +/- 38.39 micrograms/1 respectively. The subjective symptoms mainly were fatigue, numbness over extremities, headache and dizzness. There were 49 metal burners, 35% of the total burners examined in this study, whose blood lead exceeded 80 micrograms/d1 with more than 2 suspicious intoxication symptoms. The precautions in terms of environmental mornitoring, medical surveillance and engineering control should be taken.

  13. Lead and the skin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Allen, B.R.; Moore, M.R.; Hunter, J.A.A.

    1975-01-01

    The increasing use of lead will continue to give rise to problems of toxicity. Protective measures have resulted in florid lead poisoning becoming rare. Attention has recently turned to the possibility of prolonged exposure to low doses of lead causing morbidity in the absence of the classical clinical features of poisoning. Lead is absorbed mostly through the lungs and gastrointestinal tract. Some is also absorbed through the skin but with inorganic compounds the amount is small. Shortly after the most widely used compound, tetraethyl lead, was first manufactured, cases of toxicity began to occur. Manufacture was forbidden until plant design produced greater safety. Significant absorption can occur through the skin. The hazard to those handling leaded gasoline in a normal manner is probably small, mainly because 95 percent of a dose applied to the open skin surface evaporates. Hair has been used as a biopsy material to assess lead exposure. The biological effects of lead poisoning are discussed, including the synergistic effects of lead and agents provoking porphyria.

  14. Land reform: "making their own miracle": a case study of a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In the late eighties Dr Pieter Kieviet from the farm Kievietsvcalley in the Badplaas area of Mpumalanga realized that his farming enterprise need a change in management and decision making. The idea was to develop a participative approach between owner and workers. In June 1996 the Ebukhosini Worker's Trust was ...

  15. Musculoskeletal disorders and associated disabilities among bank workers

    OpenAIRE

    Surajo Kamilu Sulaiman; Kamalanathan P; Aminu Alhassan Ibrahim; Jibril M. Nuhu

    2015-01-01

    Background: Musculoskeletal disorders (MSDs) are among the most common health problems encountered in the workplace around the globe leading to disabling conditions there by reducing human performance and subsequently quality of life. The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of MSDs and associated disabilities and also to identify the risk factors responsible for their occurrence among bank workers in Kancheepuram district, Tamil Nadu, India. Methods: Annual prevalence of MS...

  16. Productivity in Knowledge Worker Teams

    OpenAIRE

    Moreno Romero, Ana María; Mahou Fernández, Ángel; Varanki, H.

    2013-01-01

    The use of Information and Communication Technologies in work pro- cesses has not brought the expected productivity improvement. Some studies even suggest that the always-on model decreases productivity. This article proposes work teams as a new unit for knowledge worker productivity analysis in organizations. Organizations? ability to adopt new analysis measures is analyzed in three case studies.

  17. Wage inflation and worker uncertainty

    OpenAIRE

    Mark E. Schweitzer

    1997-01-01

    Compares two possible explanations of why pay increases continue to be moderate in a vigorous labor market--workers' uncertainty about their jobs and human resource managers' wage-setting behavior--and looks at how each explanation matches the evidence on the timing of inflation and wage changes.

  18. The Migration of Technical Workers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dahl, Michael S.; Sorenson, Olav

    2010-01-01

    Using panel data on the Danish population, we estimated the revealed preferences of scientists and engineers for the places in which they choose to work. Our results indicate that these technical workers exhibit substantial sensitivity to differences in wages but that they have even stronger pref...

  19. Girl domestic workers in Kenya.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mzungu, M

    1999-03-01

    This article exposes the conditions among children who are forced by their poor families to assume domestic work in households in Kenya. It is an accepted practice for parents to place daughters in households to help with housework and baby-sitting. The Sinaga Women and Child Labor Resource Center in Nairobi finds this exploitative and part of a wider practice that institutionalizes violence against women. The Center was established in 1995 to challenge the practice of child domestic labor. The Center's research reveals that child domestic workers tend to come from large, poor, and rural families or from urban slums. Wages are low or exchanged for shoes, clothes, and food. The hours of work are long. Mistreatment may include sexual molestation by male household members, beatings, verbal abuse, and mistrust. There is little recourse. Complaints from child workers or others outside the household can result in further mistreatment. Action against mistreatment is complicated by the prevailing image of activists as frustrated women with vendettas against men. The Center focuses on rehabilitation, literacy training, marketable skill development, and awareness creation. Counseling includes parents, children, and employers. Public awareness campaigns have resulted in employer referrals of youth workers for training. Other groups are joining the effort to improve conditions for child domestic workers.

  20. [Mental health and life style changes in young workers].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomei, G; Cangemi, C; Giubilati, R; Fioravanti, M

    2007-01-01

    Lifestyle's alterations are hazardous for health. On one hand they produce a high rate of mortality and disease, on the other hand they cause a reduction of work outcomes and an increase of occupational accidents with important consequences for both worker's health and his/her financial status. The aim of this study is to review the scientific literature for possible relationships between mental health and lifestyle alterations of young workers. We considered as lifestyle factors the attitudes towards: smoking, alcohol consumption, eating, use of medications and doping substances, physical activity and sleeping. From our study it clearly emerges the existence of correlation between lifestyle habits and mental health; in fact behavioural alterations can produce problems of mental health and vice versa. Furthermore, some work peculiarities can lead to psychic disturbances and/or to unhealthy habits which can themselves cause negative effects on working activity. It is very important for young workers to understand that unhealthy behaviours, which can be corrected, are hazardous in terms of health and safety for both the single worker and the collectivity and that those behaviours can enhances the other working risks. Because there is a close interaction between mental health and lifestyles, it would be necessary a careful promotion of mental health on workplaces and to take all the preventive measures, with particular regard for those related to the work organization, in order to reduce the onset, exacerbation and unmasking of mental disorders and psychological difficulties. In working environment, the occupational health physician and his relationship with the patient are of fundamental importance. During preventive and periodic medical examinations, the occupational health physician should take detailed information on young worker's habits regarding smoking, alcohol consumption, eating, physical activity, sleeping, pharmacological abuse and possible presence of

  1. DEGREE OF BURNOUT AMONG EMERGENCY HEALTHCARE WORKERS AND FACTORS INFLUENCING LEVEL OF BURNOUT: A STUDY PROTOCOL

    OpenAIRE

    Shyamanta; Sashibha; Navoneela; Marami; Bornali; Sakhee; Anjana; Dipesh

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND Burnout is a feeling of failure and exhaustion. It is felt both at the physical and emotional level. Depletion of the person’s resources is a consequence and also has an impact on the organisation. Nature of the work itself makes emergency healthcare workers vulnerable to burnout. METHOD This study is designed to measure the degree of burnout among emergency healthcare workers in a hospital and to identify the factors that influence burnout. The study h...

  2. Understanding sickness presenteeism through the experience of immigrant workers in a context of economic crisis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galon, Tanyse; Briones-Vozmediano, Erica; Agudelo-Suárez, Andrés A; Felt, Emily B; Benavides, Fernando G; Ronda, Elena

    2014-08-01

    Previous economic recessions show that immigrant workers may experience longer periods of unemployment, a situation that may lead employees to presenteeism, the act of working in spite of a health problem. This study explored perceptions about the factors that lead to presenteeism in immigrant workers considering the context of economic crisis. Six focus group discussions were held (February 2012), with men and women from Colombia, Ecuador, and Morocco (n=44) living in Spain and selected by theoretical sample. A qualitative content analysis was performed. Four categories were identified as factors that influence the occurrence of presenteeism in a context of economic crisis: poor employment conditions, fear of unemployment, employer/employee relationship, and difficulties in finding temporary replacement workers. Furthermore, musculoskeletal, respiratory, and mental problems were related to presenteeism. It is important to develop strategies to protect workers from negative working conditions that are associated with deterioration of health. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Do working environment interventions reach shift workers?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nabe-Nielsen, Kirsten; Jørgensen, Marie Birk; Garde, Anne Helene

    2016-01-01

    workers were less likely to be reached by workplace interventions. For example, night workers less frequently reported that they had got more flexibility (OR 0.5; 95 % CI 0.3-0.7) or that they had participated in improvements of the working procedures (OR 0.6; 95 % CI 0.5-0.8). Quality of leadership......PURPOSE: Shift workers are exposed to more physical and psychosocial stressors in the working environment as compared to day workers. Despite the need for targeted prevention, it is likely that workplace interventions less frequently reach shift workers. The aim was therefore to investigate whether...... the reach of workplace interventions varied between shift workers and day workers and whether such differences could be explained by the quality of leadership exhibited at different times of the day. METHODS: We used questionnaire data from 5361 female care workers in the Danish eldercare sector...

  4. Workers' Education in Africa: A Fresh Look.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diallo, Abdoulaye Lelouma

    1988-01-01

    Workers' education is the irreplaceable instrument of trade unions in the exercise of their new functions as they become more complex. Workers' education in Africa must develop in such a way as to meet a plurality of needs. (JOW)

  5. Special Issue: Workers' Education and the Environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Labour Education, 1994

    1994-01-01

    Includes papers from symposium on "Workers' Education and the Environment": "All Mobilizing to Contribute" (Taylor); "Trade Union Participation in Environmental Protection and Sustainable Development" (Brett); "ILO's Environment Policy and Programmes" (Kohler); "Workers' Education and the Environment in…

  6. Effect of occupational lead-exposure on blood pressure, serum aldosterone level and plasma renin activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shouman, A E; El-Safty, I A

    2000-01-01

    Numerous observations have indicated a relationship between lead exposure and elevated blood pressure. The present study aims to investigate the association between occupational lead-exposure and elevated blood pressure as well as serum aldosterone level and plasma renin activity as parameters affecting blood pressure. Fifty occupationally lead-exposed (16 males and 34 females) and 50 non-exposed (15 males and 34 females) workers were selected after application of certain exclusion criteria. All workers were admitted to complete clinical examination, including standard blood pressure measurement. Also, blood lead level, serum aldosterone concentration and plasma renin activity were estimated. The results of both occupationally lead-exposed males and females demonstrated no significant differences regarding age, work duration, systolic and diastolic blood pressures when compared to occupationally non-exposed males and females; respectively. In addition, occupationally lead-exposed males and females revealed a significant increase in blood lead level and serum aldosterone concentration in comparison to their controls. Moreover, plasma renin activity is significantly decreased among the lead-exposed male workers while it is significantly increased among the lead-exposed female workers in comparison to their controls. It is concluded that serum aldosterone level and plasma renin activity are affected by occupationally low-level of lead exposure, and the present study provide further support for the association between blood lead exposure and blood pressure related hormones.

  7. EFFECT OF LEAD ACETATE

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    MICROSOFT

    The project was conducted to evaluate the effect of lead administered as lead acetate at different dosage levels via drinking water in broiler chicks. Thirty-five healthy chicks were divided into seven groups (five chicks each) and one group was kept as un-medicated control. Groups A, B, C, D, E and F were medicated with ...

  8. Leading Acquisition Reform

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-22

    Army and Undersecretary of Defense for Acquisition, for a reduction of the Excalibur and Accelerated Precision Mortar initiative rounds.25...Can’t Dance? Leading a Great Enterprise Through Dramatic Change, (New York: HarperCollins Publishers, 2003), 235. 13 John P. Kotter , Leading Change

  9. Developmental immunotoxicology of lead.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dietert, Rodney R; Lee, Ji-Eun; Hussain, Irshad; Piepenbrink, Michael

    2004-07-15

    The heavy metal, lead, is a known developmental immunotoxicant that has been shown to produce immune alterations in humans as well as other species. Unlike many compounds that exert adverse immune effects, lead exposure at low to moderate levels does not produce widespread loss of immune cells. In contrast, changes resulting from lead exposure are subtle at the immune cell population level but, nevertheless, can be functionally dramatic. A hallmark of lead-induced immunotoxicity is a pronounced shift in the balance in T helper cell function toward T helper 2 responses at the expense of T helper 1 functions. This bias alters the nature and range of immune responses that can be produced thereby influencing host susceptibility to various diseases. Immunotoxic responses to lead appear to differ across life stages not only quantitatively with regard to dose response, but also qualitatively in terms of the spectrum of immune alterations. Experimental studies in several lab animal species suggest the latter stages of gestation are a period of considerable sensitivity for lead-induced immunotoxicity. This review describes the basic characteristics of lead-induced immunotoxicity emphasizing experimental animal results. It also provides a framework for the consideration of toxicant exposure effects across life stages. The existence of and probable basis for developmental windows of immune hyper-susceptibility are presented. Finally, the potential for lead to serve as a perinatal risk factor for childhood asthma as well as other diseases is considered.

  10. Lead - nutritional considerations

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... lead soldered cans goes into effect. If imported wine containers have a lead foil wrapper, wipe the rim and neck of the bottle with a towel moistened with lemon juice, vinegar, or wine before using. DO NOT store wine, spirits, or ...

  11. The Australian Work Exposures Study: Occupational Exposure to Lead and Lead Compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Driscoll, Timothy R; Carey, Renee N; Peters, Susan; Glass, Deborah C; Benke, Geza; Reid, Alison; Fritschi, Lin

    2016-01-01

    The aims of this study were to produce a population-based estimate of the prevalence of work-related exposure to lead and its compounds, to identify the main circumstances of exposures, and to collect information on the use of workplace control measures designed to decrease those exposures. Data came from the Australian Workplace Exposures Study, a nationwide telephone survey which investigated the current prevalence and circumstances of work-related exposure to 38 known or suspected carcinogens, including lead, among Australian workers aged 18-65 years. Using the web-based tool, OccIDEAS, semi-quantitative information was collected about exposures in the current job held by the respondent. Questions were addressed primarily at tasks undertaken rather than about self-reported exposures. A total of 307 (6.1%) of the 4993 included respondents were identified as probably being exposed to lead in the course of their work. Of these, almost all (96%) were male; about half worked in trades and technician-related occupations, and about half worked in the construction industry. The main tasks associated with probable exposures were, in decreasing order: soldering; sanding and burning off paint while painting old houses, ships, or bridges; plumbing work; cleaning up or sifting through the remains of a fire; radiator-repair work; machining metals or alloys containing lead; mining; welding leaded steel; and working at or using indoor firing ranges. Where information on control measures was available, inconsistent use was reported. Applied to the Australian working population, approximately 6.3% [95% confidence interval (CI) = 5.6-7.0] of all workers (i.e. 631000, 95% CI 566000-704000 workers) were estimated to have probable occupational exposure to lead. Lead remains an important exposure in many different occupational circumstances in Australia and probably other developed countries. This information can be used to support decisions on priorities for intervention and control

  12. Factors Influencing Seasonal Influenza Vaccination Uptake in Emergency Medical Services Workers: A Concept Mapping Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subramaniam, Dipti P; Baker, Elizabeth A; Zelicoff, Alan P; Elliott, Michael B

    2016-08-01

    Seasonal influenza has serious impacts on morbidity and mortality and has a significant economic toll through lost workforce time and strains on the health system. Health workers, particularly emergency medical services (EMS) workers have the potential to transmit influenza to those in their care, yet little is known of the factors that influence EMS workers' decisions regarding seasonal influenza vaccination (SIV) uptake, a key factor in reducing potential for transmitting disease. This study utilizes a modified Theory of Planned Behavior (TPB) model as a guiding framework to explore the factors that influence SIV uptake in EMS workers. Concept mapping, which consists of six-stages (preparation, generation, structuring, representation, interpretation, and utilization) that use quantitative and qualitative approaches, was used to identify participants' perspectives towards SIV. This study identified nine EMS-conceptualized factors that influence EMS workers' vaccination intent and behavior. The EMS-conceptualized factors align with the modified TPB model and suggest the need to consider community-wide approaches that were not initially conceptualized in the model. Additionally, the expansion of non-pharmaceutical measures went above and beyond original conceptualization. Overall, this study demonstrates the need to develop customized interventions such as messages highlighting the importance of EMS workers receiving SIV as the optimum solution. EMS workers who do not intend to receive the SIV should be provided with accurate information on the SIV to dispel misconceptions. Finally, EMS workers should also receive interventions which promote voluntary vaccination, encouraging them to be proactive in the health decisions they make for themselves.

  13. Representations of workers with hearing loss in Canadian newspapers: a thematic analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koerber, Raphaelle; Jennings, Mary Beth; Shaw, Lynn; Cheesman, Margaret

    2017-04-01

    Participation in the labour force with a hearing impairment presents a number of challenges. This study describes how Canadian newspapers represent workers with hearing loss. Taking a critical framing theory approach, thematic analysis was performed through coding relevant articles, abstracting and hierarchically categorising themes. Seven English-language Canadian newspapers were searched for publications between 1995 and 2016. Twenty-six articles met our criteria: discussing paid workers with hearing loss who used English rather than sign language on the job and making reference to workers' competence. We identified a global theme, Focussing on a good worklife or focussing on a limited worklife, composed of three organising themes (1) Prominent individuals struggle, take action, and continue despite hearing loss, (2) Workers with hearing loss in the community create their best day themselves, and (3) Workers with hearing loss, as a generalised whole, are portrayed as either competent or limited. The dominant framing portrays individual workers as ingenious, determined, and successful. Negative framings were predominantly generalisations to these workers as a group. To generate more positive framings, professionals can build relationships with consumer groups and, when contacted by the media, direct journalists to interview workers with hearing loss.

  14. Abortion services for sex workers in Uganda: successful strategies in an urban clinic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marlow, Heather M; Shellenberg, Kristen; Yegon, Erick

    2014-01-01

    Sex workers' need for safe abortion services in Uganda is greater than that of the population of women of reproductive age because of their number of sexual contacts, the inconsistent use of contraception and their increased risk of forced sex, rape or other forms of physical and sexual violence. We sought to understand sex workers' experiences with induced abortion services or post-abortion care (PAC) at an urban clinic in Uganda. We conducted nine in-depth interviews with sex workers. All in-depth interviews were audiotaped, transcribed, translated, computer recorded and coded for analysis. We identified several important programmatic considerations for safe abortion services for sex workers. Most important is creating community-level interventions in which women can speak openly about abortion, creating a support network among sex workers, training peer educators, and making available a community outreach educator and community outreach workshops on abortion. At the health facility, it is important for service providers to treat sex workers with care and respect, allow sex workers to be accompanied to the health facility and guarantee confidentiality. These programmatic elements help sex workers to access safe abortion services and should be tried with all women of reproductive age to improve women's access to safe abortion in Uganda.

  15. Hatchery workers' IgG antibody profiles to airborne bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brauner, Paul; Gromöller, Silvana; Pfeifer, Yvonne; Wilharm, Gottfried; Jäckel, Udo

    2017-04-01

    Occupational exposure to high concentrations of airborne bacteria in poultry production is related to an increased risk of respiratory disorders. However, etiology and in particular microorganisms' potential role in pathogenesis still needs to be elucidated. Thus, detection of specific antibodies against occupational microbial antigens may lead to identification of potentially harmful species. For the purpose of IgG titer determination, indirect immunofluorescence on various bacterial isolates from duck hatchery air was combined with image-based quantification of fluorescence intensity. Moreover, in addition to established assays with pure bacterial cultures, a new approach utilized complex bioaerosol samples for detection of anti-microbial antibodies in human sera by determination of percentages of antibody-bound cells in different serum dilutions. Mean titers in sera from hatchery workers and a non-exposed control group did not display significant differences for most tested isolates and application of comprehensive cluster analysis to entire titer data revealed no structure reflecting workers and controls group. Furthermore, determination of immunoreactivity to the complete microbial community in workplace air displayed similar proportions of antibody-bound cells in both groups. Although no general differences in immunoreaction patterns were observed, mean titers to a Proteus mirabilis isolate and to 3 of 4 distinct Acinetobacter baumannii isolates were higher in the group of hatchery workers than in the reference group indicating a potential applicability as exposure markers. We conclude, despite long term bioaerosol exposure, hatchery workers' IgG antibody profiles to tested antigens did not differ substantially from those of the control group. However, increased workers' titers to A. baumannii and clinical relevance of this species should lead to further investigations regarding potential involvement in pathogenesis of occupational respiratory disorders

  16. Lead toxicity: Current concerns

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goyer, R.A. (Univ. of Western Ontario, London (Canada))

    1993-04-01

    Over the 20-year period since the first issue of Environmental Health Perspectives was published, there has been considerable progress in the understanding of the potential toxicity of exposure to lead. Many of these advances have been reviewed in published symposia, conferences, and review papers in EHP. This brief review identifies major advances as well as a number of current concerns that present opportunities for prevention and intervention strategies. The major scientific advance has been the demonstration that blood lead (PbB) levels of 10-15 micrograms/dL in newborn and very young infants result in cognitive and behavioral deficits. Further support for this observation is being obtained by prospective or longitudinal studies presently in progress. The mechanism(s) for the central nervous system effects of lead is unclear but involve lead interactions within calcium-mediated intracellular messenger systems and neurotransmission. Effects of low-level lead exposure on blood pressure, particularly in adult men, may be related to the effect of lead on calcium-mediated control of vascular smooth muscle contraction and on the renin-angiotensin system. Reproductive effects of lead have long been suspected, but low-level effects have not been well studied. Whether lead is a carcinogen or its association with renal adenocarcinoma is a consequence of cystic nephropathy is uncertain. Major risk factors for lead toxicity in children in the United States include nutrition, particularly deficiencies of essential metals, calcium, iron, and zinc, and housing and socioeconomic status. A goal for the year 2000 is to reduce prevalence of blood lead levels exceeding 15 micrograms/dL. 97 refs.

  17. The Escalating of Numbers of Foreign Workers in Construction Site

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mat Salleh Norazlin

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper is evaluating the factors effecting the increasing in the numbers of foreign workers on site. A critical review of the literature was abstract because of the Malaysian economics is booming and the characteristics of the construction industry itself make the foreigners comfortable works on site. This paper discusses the results from the conducted questionnaire survey among the contractors in Selangor. Based on the average index, there are several factors identified by the respondents such as shortage of manpower, reluctant of local labour, project increased the demand for labour and accelerating economic development. This factor will improve the decision making process in recruiting labour on site.

  18. Guest workers in the underground economy

    OpenAIRE

    Djajic, S.; Mesnard, A.

    2013-01-01

    Guest-worker programs have been providing rapidly growing economies with millions of foreign workers over the last couple of decades. With the duration of stay strictly limited by program rules in some host countries and wages paid to guest workers often set at sub-market levels, many migrants choose to overstay and seek unauthorized employment. The model we develop examines how the wage of illegal aliens and the flow of guest workers transiting to undocumented status are affected by the rule...

  19. How foreign-born workers foster exports

    OpenAIRE

    Marchal, Léa; Nedoncelle, Clément

    2017-01-01

    We investigate the export-enhancing effect of foreign workers at the firm level. We first develop a theoretical framework of heterogeneous firms, assuming that foreign workers allow for productivity gains and convey valuable information on foreign markets. We illustrate that foreign workers foster exports at the extensive and the intensive margins. This effect can be decomposed in a general effect - to which any foreign worker contributes - and a destination-specific effect - to which only fo...

  20. Respiratory Disorders Among Workers in Slaughterhouses

    OpenAIRE

    Kasaeinasab, Abbasali; Jahangiri, Mehdi; Karimi, Ali; Tabatabaei, Hamid Reza; Safari, Sonia

    2016-01-01

    Background: Workers in slaughterhouses are exposed to a wide range of biological contaminants, such as bacteria and fungi, due to their working environment. This study aimed to assess the prevalence of respiratory disorders among workers in slaughterhouses. Methods: This study was conducted on 81 workers in slaughterhouses and 81 healthy office workers as a reference group. The American Thoracic Society standard respiratory symptoms questionnaire was used to determine the prevalence of res...

  1. Optimal correction in spectacles: intervention effects on eyestrain and musculoskeletal discomfort among postal workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hemphälä, H; Nylén, P; Eklund, J

    2014-01-01

    The static posture of postal workers when sorting mail can lead to musculoskeletal discomfort. Research has shown a connection between eyestrain and upper-body musculoskeletal discomfort in general, including postal workers. A previous study of postal workers found that most of those with eye strain were in need of a new correction in their existing spectacles. Evaluate intervention effects on eyestrain and musculoskeletal discomfort with new spectacles for postal workers. Postal workers subjectively reported eyestrain, musculoskeletal discomfort and their opinions of the visual environment via questionnaires pre- and post-intervention. After an eye examination the postal workers were divided into two groups: those who needed new spectacles and those who did not. Those who needed new spectacles showed a higher prevalence of eyestrain and musculoskeletal discomfort pre-intervention. Post-intervention, the postal workers rated their vision better and the average eyestrain and musculoskeletal discomfort decreased for both groups. These workers also experienced a decrease in discomfort on the left (static) side of the neck while sorting mail. An intervention providing the optimal correction reduces eyestrain and decreases musculoskeletal discomfort, especially from the neck.

  2. Occupational Health Hazards in Sanitary Workers of Chandrapur City, Central India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Priyanka V. Patil

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available About 198 sanitary workers work in Chandrapur Municipal Corporation, out of which 20 workers (10% of the population was selected as a sample size (all male workers. The study was carried out from November 2015 to January 2016. Occupational health hazards of these workers were analyzed through questionnaire survey and Peak Expiratory Flow Rate (PEFR analysis. The results of the study showed that, these workers were exposed to a number of environmental and occupational hazards leading to musculoskeletal disorders (85%, exposure to harmful gases (65%, respiratory problems (45%, headache (40%, dermatological problem (35%, gastrointestinal (10% and leptospirosis (10% during work. It was further observed that the workers were suffering from cough and cold (90%, skin problems (50%, allergies (15%, malaria and typhoid (15%, bronchitis lung and asthmatic problems (10% and hearing disorder (5% etc. after completion of work. The PEFR values were lower in exposed workers. Reduction in PEFR values was directly proportional with exposure duration. To reduce occupational health hazards, workers must be made alert and aware of potential health risk arising from their work. Reduction in exposure and use of personal protective equipments such as face mask, gloves, gum boots, caps, apron etc. should be encouraged.International Journal of EnvironmentVolume-6, Issue-3, Jun-Aug 2017, page: 15-24

  3. Work-related Musculoskeletal Disorders in Korea Provoked by Workers' Collective Compensation Claims against Work Intensification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Dongmug; Kim, Youngki; Lee, Young-Il; Koh, Sangbaek; Kim, Inah; Lee, Hoonkoo

    2014-01-01

    This article presents the process of workers' problems with work related musculoskeletal disorders (WMSDs), the introduction of risk assessments (RA) for their prevention, and the consequences of this process in Korea. In 1997, economic crisis caused a rapid increase of massive layoffs, worker dispatch system introduction, job insecurity, and use of irregular workers resulting in work intensification. Work intensification increased WMSDs, which created massive workers' compensation collective claims. Workers argued for the reduction of work intensity. The RAs introduced as a consequence of the workers' struggle is unique in the world. Whereas these RAs were expected to play a pivotal role in WMSDs prevention, they dis not due to workers' lack of engagement after the compensation struggle. In fact, changes in the compensation judgment system and criteria have resulted in lower compensation approval rates leading to lower workers' compensation claims. The Korean experience provides insight into WMSDs causes in a globalized world. In such a the globalized world, work intensification as the result of work flexibility could be an international trend.

  4. [Sleep disorders and life-style related disease in shift workers].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiba, Shigeru

    2014-02-01

    A substantial proportion (-27%) of workers in Japan is engaged in shift work. Many epidemiological studies have shown that the consequences of shift work range from transient and reversible insomnia/sleepiness to major deleterious lifestyle-related disease and cancer pathogenesis. The present paper reviews evidence on sleep disorders and lifestyle-related disease in shift workers and the proposed pathophysiological pathways by which sleep restriction and circadian misalignment may lead to lifestyle-related disease and cancer genesis.

  5. 29 CFR 780.920 - Workers transported must be fruit or vegetable harvest workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Workers transported must be fruit or vegetable harvest workers. 780.920 Section 780.920 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) WAGE AND HOUR DIVISION... Employees § 780.920 Workers transported must be fruit or vegetable harvest workers. Clause (B) of section 13...

  6. Students, Temporary Workers and Co-Op Workers: An Experimental Investigation on Social Preferences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Davide Dragone

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available We conduct an artefactual field experiment to compare the individual preferences and propensity to cooperate of three pools of subjects: Undergraduate students, temporary workers and permanent workers. We find that students are more selfish and contribute less than workers. Temporary and permanent contract workers have similar other-regarding preferences and display analogous contribution patterns in an anonymous Public Good Game.

  7. Problems and Conditions of Workers' Organisations in Agriculture and Implications for Workers' Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Labour Education, 1975

    1975-01-01

    The background, achievements, problems, and future plans of various workers' organizations in agriculture are discussed: International Federation of Plantation, Agricultural, and Allied Workers; Trade Union International of Agricultural, Forestry, and Plantation Workers; World Federation of Agricultural Workers; and the Asian Trade Union College.…

  8. Productivity Strategies Ranking of Knowledge Workers | Najafi ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    It is commonly recognized that knowledge is the only source of core competence in the knowledge based companies, but the productivity rate of Knowledge Workers is always Low. Based on Knowledge Workers' characteristics, in this paper, we seek to identify factors influencing the Productivity of Knowledge Workers, and ...

  9. the Bakery workers in Ibadan, Nigeria.

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    common during the working hours among the bakery workers and 23.16% of the subjects studied suffered some degree of ... was used to assess the symptoms of the Bakery workers. At the Bakeries, the height and weight of each subject was .... of the safety measures. Finally, education of the workers and the employers is ...

  10. Signaling and Screening of Workers' Motivation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J. Delfgaauw (Josse); A.J. Dur (Robert)

    2005-01-01

    textabstractThis paper develops a model in which workers to a certain extent like to exert effort at the workplace. We examine the implications of workers' motivation for optimal monetary incentive schemes. We show that in the optimum motivated workers work harder and are willing to work for a lower

  11. The Worker's Cooperative = Cooperativas de Trabajadores Duenos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernandez, Mayra Lee

    Written in Spanish and English (on facing pages), this manual is a practical guide for those interested in forming a worker-owned cooperative. It includes examples based on the personal experience of teaching about cooperativism and worker-owned cooperatives to a group of construction workers with diverse levels of education; vocabulary and…

  12. Child Welfare Worker Caseload: What's Just Right?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamatani, Hide; Engel, Rafael; Spjeldnes, Solveig

    2009-01-01

    This study was designed to establish a caseload standard for child welfare workers. Understanding reasonable workload expectations for child welfare workers is a cornerstone of quality service provision and the recruitment and retention of qualified workers. Because of the analytic complexity of this question, qualitative and quantitative methods…

  13. Association between supervisors behavior and wage workers job stress in Korea: analysis of the fourth Korean working conditions survey

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Shin Uk Kang; Byeong Jin Ye; ByoungGwon Kim; Jung Il Kim; Jung Woo Kim

    2017-01-01

    Background Changes in supervisors’ behavior lead to changes in the workplace environment and could reduce aggression, poor manner to job, and physical and emotional strain in workers [1]. [...]supervisors...

  14. Leading Strategic Leader Teams

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-03-25

    develop teams which provide them capacity and diversity to make sound decisions.1 Strategic leader and top management teams exist throughout...looks at whether a leader should use a team to make a decision; it does not look at how to manage a team process to produce desired outcomes. Yet, the...choices on how to operate his/her team. Leaders of strategic leader teams must recognize and understand how they can manage the processes utilized

  15. Effects of background music on concentration of workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Rong-Hwa; Shih, Yi-Nuo

    2011-01-01

    Background music is a common element in daily living and the workplace. Determination of whether background music affects human work concentration is a relevant concern. Studies have found background music influences human behavior, and this study attempts to understand how background music and listener fondness for types of music affects worker concentration. This study analyzes how different types of background music--and how listeners' degree of preference for the background music--can affect listener concentration in attention testing through Randomized Controlled Trial (RCT). Data were collected from 89 workers. The participants ranged in age between 19 and 28 years old, with an average age of 24 years old. We conclude background music influenced listener attention. This influence has more to do with listener fondness for the music than with type of music. Compared to situations without background music, the likelihood of background music affecting test-taker attention performance is likely to increase with the degree to which the test-taker likes or dislikes the music. It is important not to select music that workers strongly like or dislike when making a selection of background music to avoid negatively affecting worker concentration.

  16. How many workers are employed in California agriculture?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philip Martin

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available In 2014, the average employment of hired workers in California crop and livestock agriculture, counting all occupations, rose by 10% to 410,900. However, although the state reports the number of jobs on farms regularly, it does not report the number of workers who fill these jobs. We analyzed all Social Security numbers reported by farm employers in 2014 and found two workers for each average or year-round equivalent farm job, making the total number of farmworkers employed in agriculture 829,300, or twice average employment. Approximately 83% of farmworkers had their maximum earnings with an agricultural employer in 2014, and almost 80% of those primary farmworkers were employed by crop support firms (392,000 or fruit and nut farms (154,000. Over 60% of all workers had only one farm employer, followed by 27% with two or more farm employers, and 35% were employed in Kern (116,000, Fresno (96,000 and Monterey (82,000 counties. These data show that California has a remarkably stable farm workforce: most farmworkers are attached to one farm employer, often a labor contractor who moves them from farm to farm.

  17. Risk assessment of aggression toward emergency health care workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martini, A; Fantini, S; D'Ovidio, M C; Ceracchi, A; De Santis, A

    2012-04-01

    Health care and social service workers face a significant risk of job-related violence. To develop a method for quantitative evaluation of the risk of violence, as required by Italian and European regulations, against extra-hospital emergency health care workers employed by the Regional Emergency Healthcare Service (ARES 118) in the Lazio Region in Italy. Violence to the ARES 118 workers during working hours was examined by analysing injuries reported by them between 2005 and 2007. The assessment method proposed should give a numerical indicator of the risk of violence for each homogeneous group. The quantitative risk was evaluated on the basis of variables such as the days off work for each episode, the total number of aggressive attacks, the type of health intervention involved, etc. The rate of accidents related to aggression during working hours at the ARES unit was 6.3%, which is significantly higher than the figure of 2% reported for the entire health care sector. The present evaluation is largely based on analysis of the Injury Register. To increase the sensitivity of the method so that it closely reflects active reporting of events, it would be necessary to implement a procedure for reporting events in a 'company register of acts of violence' and to make workers more aware of the need to report all such episodes.

  18. Mobile Applications for Knowledge Workers and Field Workers

    OpenAIRE

    Stefan Stieglitz; Christoph Lattemann; Tobias Brockmann

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, the diffusion of mobile applications (mobile apps) has risen significantly. Nowadays, mobile business apps are strongly emerging in business, enhancing productivity and employees’ satisfaction, whilst the usage of customized individual enterprise apps is still an exception. Standardized business apps enable basic functionalities, for example, mobile data storage and exchange (e.g., Dropbox), communication (e.g., Skype), and other routine processes, which support mobile worker...

  19. Pulmonary function in automobile repair workers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chattopadhyay O

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Background : Automobile repair shop is a place where workers are exposed to harmful chemicals and toxic substances. Objective : To study the occurrence of obstructive and restrictive pulmonary impairment among automobile garage workers. Methods : A cross sectional study involving 151 automobile garage workers from 14 randomly selected garages of urban Kolkata. The study variables were Forced Expiratory Volume in 1 second (FEV 1 , Forced Vital Capacity (FVC, Peak Expiratory Flow Rate (PE FR, age, smoking habit, duration of work, type of work, and respiratory symptoms. The study was analysed using Regression equations, and Chi-square test. Results : All the workers were male. Obstructive impairment was seen in 25.83% of the workers whereas restrictive impairment was seen in 21.19% of the workers. Mixed obstructive and restrictive impairment was seen in 10.6% of the workers. The frequency of obstructive impairment was higher in older workers. In the age group of less than 20 years, 13.6% of the workers had obstructive impairment while 42.86% of workers above 40 years of age had obstructive impairment. Obstructive impairment was more frequently observed in battery repair workers (58.33% and spray painters (37.5% while 16.67% of the body repair workers and 30.19% of the engine mechanics had obstructive impairment. Obstructive impairment was more frequently observed in smokers (53.1 % as compared to ex-smokers (33.3% and non-smokers (6.4%. Obstructive impairment was more frequently observed in workers who had been working for a longer duration. Conclusion: Nearly 36.4% of the automobile garage workers had some form of pulmonary function impairment; obstructive and/or restrictive. The use of personal protective equipment, worker education, and discontinuation of the use of paints containing toxic pigments are recommended.

  20. Unitizing worker expertise and maximizing the brain reward centers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martinez, Anthony Bert [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2010-01-01

    knowledge of SH&E professionals on the benefits and opportunities for leveraging brain science. This will include an overview of the components of the brain reward pathway and the biological mechanisms that make workers feel a sense of gratification when they contribute their ideas toward improving occupational safety. On-the-job examples where it is hypothesized that the brain reward pathway was activated in workers will be provided. Finally, the presentation will include a model illustrating the importance of empowering workers to participate in occupational safety programs. SH&E professionals can use this model to maintain a robust safety and health program with limited resources. The model will also help SH&E professionals prepare for challenges in the SH&E fields by showing them how to allocate more time for strategic planning of emerging issues. Many recent best selling business books such as Wikinomics, Crowdsourcing, and Sway, illustrate how the benefit of harnessing the collective knowledge of employees is a key to company success. Companies like Google and Pixar have mastered the ability to capture empFoyee knowledge in terms of technology. Why should occupational safety be any different? Workers know how to improve safety in their workplace. SH&E professionals can harness this collective safety knowledge just as top companies do with technology, and workers will feel grateful for contributing.

  1. Lead User Innovation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brem, Alexander; Larsen, Henry

    2015-01-01

    User innovation and especially the integration of lead users is a key topic in the innovation management literature of recent years. This paper contributes by providing a rare perspective into what easily could be seen as innovation failure, shown from two perspectives. We show how a lack of shared...... imagination hampers participation and kills innovation between interdependent stakeholders at the threshold between invention and innovation in practice. We present a first case in the fun-sport industry where an external lead user and diverse firm representatives in different functions fail to create......, deliver and capture the value of an innovatively new device together. From the perspective of the lead user, we show antecedents and effects of social interaction between organizational actors and the lead user on the development of social capital, especially trust and shared imagination. The second case...

  2. Formal recycling of e-waste leads to increased exposure to toxic metals: an occupational exposure study from Sweden.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Julander, Anneli; Lundgren, Lennart; Skare, Lizbet; Grandér, Margaretha; Palm, Brita; Vahter, Marie; Lidén, Carola

    2014-12-01

    Electrical and electronic waste (e-waste) contains multiple toxic metals. However, there is currently a lack of exposure data for metals on workers in formal recycling plants. The objective of this study was to evaluate workers' exposure to metals, using biomarkers of exposure in combination with monitoring of personal air exposure. We assessed exposure to 20 potentially toxic metals among 55 recycling workers and 10 office workers at three formal e-waste recycling plants in Sweden. Workers at two of the plants were followed-up after 6 months. We collected the inhalable fraction and OFC (37-mm) fraction of particles, using personal samplers, as well as spot samples of blood and urine. We measured metal concentrations in whole blood, plasma, urine, and air filters using inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry following acid digestion. The air sampling indicated greater airborne exposure, 10 to 30 times higher, to most metals among the recycling workers handling e-waste than among the office workers. The exposure biomarkers showed significantly higher concentrations of chromium, cobalt, indium, lead, and mercury in blood, urine, and/or plasma of the recycling workers, compared with the office workers. Concentrations of antimony, indium, lead, mercury, and vanadium showed close to linear associations between the inhalable particle fraction and blood, plasma, or urine. In conclusion, our study of formal e-waste recycling shows that workers performing recycling tasks are exposed to multiple toxic metals. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  3. Risk of high blood pressure in salt workers working near salt milling plants: A cross-sectional and interventional study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sachdev Raman

    2005-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Workers working close to salt milling plants may inhale salt particles floating in the air, leading to a rise in plasma sodium, which, in turn, may increase the blood pressure and the risk of hypertension. Methods To test the above hypothesis, occupational health check-up camps were organized near salt manufacturing units and all workers were invited for a free health examination. The workers who worked with dry salt in the vicinity of salt milling plants were defined as "non-brine workers," while those working in brine pans located far away from milling plants were defined as "brine workers." Blood pressure (BP was measured during each clinical examination. In all, 474 non-brine workers and 284 brine workers were studied. Results Mean systolic blood pressure of non-brine workers (122.1 ± 13.3 mm Hg was significantly higher than that of brine workers (118.8 ± 12.8 mm Hg, p 3 air. Conclusion Inhalation of salt particles in non-brine workers may be an occupational cause of increased blood pressure.

  4. Lung health and heart rate variability changes in salt workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glad Mohesh, M I; Sundaramurthy, A

    2016-04-01

    India is the third largest salt producing country in the World, with a global annual production of 230 million tonnes. Large number of salt workers get employed in these salt milling plants risking their life from the effects of salt. Recent foreign evidences reported that these salt workers are exposed to aerosol salt particles that disturb their lung and cardiovascular autonomic control. To compare the status of lung health, cardiovascular autonomic control and biochemical changes in a group of salt industry workers with that of the age-matched normal subjects. Volunteers of both sexes (25-35 years) were divided into Group I (n=10) controls and Group II (n=10) non-brine salt workers in salt milling plants. From fasting blood sample, complete blood count, plasma electrolyte and lipid profile estimation were done. After resting for 15min, blood pressure and lead II ECG were recorded. Spirometry was done using RMS Helios spirometer. Data collected were later analysed using GraphPad Prism 5.0 with statistical significance set at pworkers in the salt industry has shown a little or no impact on the respiratory system, however there are changes in the blood and cardiovascular system, which need to be further studied to understand the long-term influences of salt in this population. Copyright © 2015 Tuberculosis Association of India. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Long term respiratory health effects in textile workers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Peggy S.; Christiani, David C.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose of review Over 60 million people worldwide work in the textile or clothing industry. Recent studies have recognized the contribution of workplace exposures to chronic lung diseases, in particular chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Early studies in textile workers have focused on the relationship between hemp or cotton dust exposure and the development of a syndrome termed Byssinosis. The purpose of this review is to evaluate the effect of long term exposure to organic dust in textile workers on chronic respiratory disease in the broader context of disease classifications such as reversible or irreversible obstructive lung disease (i.e. asthma or COPD), and restrictive lung disease. Recent findings Cessation of exposure to cotton dusts leads to improvement in lung function. Recent animal models have suggested a shift in the lung macrophage:dendritic cell population as a potential mechanistic explanation for persistent inflammation in the lung due to repeated cotton-dust related endotoxin exposure. Other types of textile dust, such as silk, may contribute to COPD in textile workers. Summary Textile dust related obstructive lung disease has characteristics of both asthma and COPD. Significant progress has been made in the understanding of chronic lung disease due to organic dust exposure in textile workers. PMID:23361196

  6. Observed and predicted silicosis risks in heavy clay workers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, B.G.; Soutar, C.A. [Institute of Occupational Medicine, Edinburgh (United Kingdom)

    2007-12-15

    There is increasing pressure to tighten the regulation of workers' exposures to airborne silica, which can lead to severe and in some cases rapid development of disease. However, estimated risks from respirable silica vary greatly across industries. The aim of the paper is to clarify differences in risks between workers in the heavy clay and coal industries with documented exposures to respirable silica, in order to assist decisions on whether further investigation of possible differences might be justified. We applied a published equation for radiological risks from exposure to respirable silica, from a study of Scottish coalworkers (with unusually high exposures) to exposure estimates from an epidemiological study of heavy clay workers, by the same research team and using similar methods. The equation based on coalworkers' risks predicted in the heavy clay workers 31 cases of abnormalities at grade 2/1 + on the International Labour Organization scale, greatly in excess of the eight cases observed. Statistical variation is an implausible explanation (P < 0.0001). While there were some methodological differences between the studies, the disparity in risks provides some support for the case for further investigation of possible differences.

  7. Seat Belt Use Among Adult Workers - 21 States, 2013.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boal, Winifred L; Li, Jia; Rodriguez-Acosta, Rosa L

    2016-06-17

    Roadway incidents involving motorized vehicles accounted for 24% of fatal occupational injuries in the United States during 2013 and were the leading cause of fatal injuries among workers.* In 2013, workers' compensation costs for serious, nonfatal injuries among work-related roadway incidents involving motorized land vehicles were estimated at $2.96 billion.(†) Seat belt use is a proven method to reduce injuries to motor vehicle occupants (1). Use of lap/shoulder seat belts reduces the risk for fatal injuries to front seat occupants of cars by 45% and the risk to light truck occupants by 60%.(§) To characterize seat belt use among adult workers by occupational group, CDC analyzed data from the 2013 Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS) and found that not always using a seat belt was significantly associated with occupational group after controlling for factors known to influence seat belt use. Occupational groups with the highest prevalences of not always using a seat belt included construction and extraction; farming, fishing, and forestry; and installation, maintenance, and repair. To increase seat belt use among persons currently employed, states can enact and enforce primary seat belt laws, employers can set and enforce safety policies requiring seat belt use by all vehicle occupants, and seat belt safety advocates can target interventions to workers in occupational groups with lower reported seat belt use.

  8. Developments in lead-acid batteries: a lead producer's perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frost, P. C.

    Rapid progress is being made in many aspects of materials, design and construction for lead-acid batteries. Much of this work has taken place under the auspices of the Advanced Lead-Acid Battery Consortium (ALABC). From the general tone of the literature, it seems likely that several of these developments will be adopted in commercial products, and that there will be cross-fertilization between the emerging electric vehicle (EV) battery technology and the starting, lighting and ignition (SLI) battery. Given the impetus for improvement from several different factors, the development process appears to be accelerating. To those not intimately involved in the battery design and specification process, it is not clear which of the possible developments will make it from the laboratory to general commercial adoption. Some of the possible changes in materials, design and construction could have an impact on the recovery, recycling, smelting and refining of lead-acid batteries. Some of the possible developments are outlined and their possible impact is discussed. It is likely that negative effects may be minimized if battery developments are considered from other perspectives, largely based on the overall life-cycle, as early in the design phase of new products as possible. Three strategies for minimizing undesirable effects are advocated: first, improved communication between car manufacturers, battery manufacturers and lead producers second, use of life-cycle analysis (LCA) to identify and optimize all attributes of the product throughout its life-cycle third, concerted and coordinated action to deal with issues important to the industry once trends are identified.

  9. Dexterity tests data contribute to reduction in leaded glovebox gloves use

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cournoyer, Michael E [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Lawton, Cindy M [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Castro, Amanda M [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2008-01-01

    Programmatic operations at the Los Alamos National Laboratory Plutonium Facility (TA-55) involve working with various amounts of plutonium and other highly toxic, alphaemitting materials. The spread of radiological contamination on surfaces and airborne contamination and excursions of contaminants into the operator's breathing zone are prevented through the use of a variety of gloveboxes. Through an integrated approach, controls have been developed and implemented through an efficient Glovebox Glove Integrity Program (GGJP). A key element of this program is to consider measures that lower the overall risk of glovebox operations. Line management owning glovebox processes through this program make decisions on which type of glovebox gloves (the weakest component of this safety significant system) would perform in these aggressive environments. As Low As Reasonably Achievable (ALARA) considerations must be balanced with glove durability and worker dexterity, both of which affect the final overall risk of the operation. In the past, lead-loaded (leaded) glovebox gloves made from Hypalon(reg.) had been the workhorse of programmatic operations at TA-55. Replacing leaded gloves with unleaded gloves for certain operations would lower the overall risk as well as reduced the amount of mixed TRU waste. This effort contributes to Los Alamos National Laboratory Continuous Improvement Program by improving the efficiency, cost effectiveness, and formality of glovebox operations. In the following report, the pros and cons of wearing leaded glovebox gloves, the effect of leaded gloves versus unleaded gloves on task performance using standard dexterity tests, the justification for switching from leaded to unleaded gloves, and pollution prevention benefits of this dramatic change in the glovebox system are presented.

  10. Dexterity test data contribute to reduction in leaded glovebox gloves use

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cournoyer, Michael E [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Lawton, Cindy M [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Castro, Amanda M [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Costigan, Stephen A [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Schreiber, Stephen [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2009-01-01

    Programmatic operations at the Los Alamos National Laboratory Plutonium Facility (T A-55) involve working with various amounts of plutonium and other highly toxic, alpha-emitting materials. The spread of radiological contamination on surfaces, airborne contamination, and excursions of contaminants into the operator's breathing zone are prevented through the use of a variety of gloveboxes. Using an integrated approach, controls have been developed and implemented through an efficient Glovebox Glove Integrity Program. A key element of this program is to consider measures that lower the overall risk of glovebox operations. Line management who own glovebox processes through this program make decisions on which type of glovebox gloves (hereafter referred to as gloves), the weakest component of this safety-significant system, would perform best in these aggressive environments. As Low as Reasonably Achievable considerations must be balanced with glove durability and worker dexterity, both of which affect the final overall risk of the operation. In the past, lead-loaded (leaded) gloves made from Hypalon(reg.) were the primary glove for programmatic operations at TA55. Replacing leaded gloves with unleaded gloves for certain operations would lower the overall risk as well as reduce the amount of mixed transuranic waste. This effort contributes to the Los Alamos National Laboratory Continuous Improvement Program by improving the efficiency, cost-effectiveness, and formality of glovebox operations. In this report, the pros and cons of wearing leaded gloves, the effect of leaded gloves versus unleaded gloves on task performance using standard dexterity tests, the justification for switching from leaded to unleaded gloves, and the pollution prevention benefits of this dramatic change in the glovebox system are presented.

  11. TEACHERS’ GRADING DECISION MAKING

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Ida Isnawati; Ali Saukah

    2017-01-01

    This study investigated teachers' grading decision making, focusing on their beliefs underlying their grading decision making, their grading practices and assessment types, and factors they considered...

  12. Accommodation training in foreign workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takada, Masumi; Miyao, Masaru; Matsuura, Yasuyuki; Takada, Hiroki

    2013-01-01

    By relaxing the contracted focus-adjustment muscles around the eyeball, known as the ciliary and extraocular muscles, the degree of pseudomyopia can be reduced. This understanding has led to accommodation training in which a visual target is presented in stereoscopic video clips. However, it has been pointed out that motion sickness can be induced by viewing stereoscopic video clips. In Measurement 1 of the present study, we verified whether the new 3D technology reduced the severity of motion sickness in accordance with stabilometry. We then evaluated the short-term effects of accommodation training using new stereoscopic video clips on foreign workers (11 females) suffering from eye fatigue in Measurement 2. The foreign workers were trained for three days. As a result, visual acuity was statistically improved by continuous accommodation training, which will help promote ciliary muscle stretching.

  13. Federal workers' compensation program basics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mallon, Timothy M; Grizzell, Tifani L; Nelson, Cameron J L; Nelson, Cameron L; Hodgson, Michael

    2015-03-01

    Primary health care providers may not be familiar with the Federal Employees' Compensation Act (FECA) and Department of Defense regulations that govern injured workers' rights, benefits, and procedures to follow when an injured employee is seen in the military medical treatment facility. The FECA program was examined and each section reviewed to facilitate provider involvement from time of injury to final disposition of a claim and employee return to work. The best practices in case management are highlighted as well. Several areas of the FECA program require coordination between members of the installation Federal Worker's Compensation team. Areas requiring extensive communication by all team members were emphasized. Successful installation FECA programs engage all members of the FECA team in a collaborative fashion to share information, prevent injuries, and keep costs low.

  14. Do working environment interventions reach shift workers?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nabe-Nielsen, Kirsten; Jørgensen, Marie Birk; Garde, Anne Helene; Clausen, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Shift workers are exposed to more physical and psychosocial stressors in the working environment as compared to day workers. Despite the need for targeted prevention, it is likely that workplace interventions less frequently reach shift workers. The aim was therefore to investigate whether the reach of workplace interventions varied between shift workers and day workers and whether such differences could be explained by the quality of leadership exhibited at different times of the day. We used questionnaire data from 5361 female care workers in the Danish eldercare sector. The questions concerned usual working hours, quality of leadership, and self-reported implementation of workplace activities aimed at stress reduction, reorganization of the working hours, and participation in improvements of working procedures or qualifications. Compared with day workers, shift workers were less likely to be reached by workplace interventions. For example, night workers less frequently reported that they had got more flexibility (OR 0.5; 95 % CI 0.3-0.7) or that they had participated in improvements of the working procedures (OR 0.6; 95 % CI 0.5-0.8). Quality of leadership to some extent explained the lack of reach of interventions especially among fixed evening workers. In the light of the evidence of shift workers' stressful working conditions, we suggest that future studies focus on the generalizability of results of the present study and on how to reach this group and meet their needs when designing and implementing workplace interventions.

  15. The adaptive significance of inquiline parasite workers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sumner, Seirian; Nash, David R; Boomsma, Jacobus J

    2003-01-01

    Social parasites exploit the socially managed resources of their host's society. Inquiline social parasites are dependent on their host throughout their life cycle, and so many of the traits inherited from their free-living ancestor are removed by natural selection. One trait that is commonly lost...... is the worker caste, the functions of which are adequately fulfilled by host workers. The few inquiline parasites that have retained a worker caste are thought to be at a transitional stage in the evolution of social parasitism, and their worker castes are considered vestigial and non-adaptive. However......, this idea has not been tested. Furthermore, whether inquiline workers have an adaptive role outside the usual worker repertoire of foraging, brood care and colony maintenance has not been examined. In this paper, we present data that suggest that workers of the inquiline ant Acromyrmex insinuator play...

  16. Bird fanciers lung in mushroom workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayes, J; Barrett, M

    2015-04-01

    Hypersensitivity pneumonitis has been described in mushrooms workers caused by exposure to mushroom or fungal spores in the compost used to grow mushrooms. We describe two mushroom workers who developed hypersensitivity pneumonitis due to exposure to avian proteins found in poultry manure which was used in producing mushroom compost. Both workers were employed in the compost production area. Both presented with typical features of HP. Both workers had negative serological and precipitin studies to Apergillus fumigatus, Saccarhopolyspora rectivirgula and thermophilic actinomycetes but had positive responses to poultry antibodies. Neither was exposed to mushroom spores. Both workers required initial therapy with corticosteroids. Relocation with avoidance of further exposure resulted in complete cure in one worker and change in work practice with the use of personal protections equipment resulted in the second workerclinical stabilisation. These are the first reported cases of bird fanciers lung in mushroom workers.

  17. Rash in a foreign worker

    OpenAIRE

    Nurjahan, MI; Tevaraj, P

    2016-01-01

    Hookworm-related cutaneous larva migrans (HrCLM) is a zoonosis which is endemic in many sub-tropic and tropical countries including Malaysia. We report a case of a 40-year old plantation worker who presented with a pruritic rash on his abdomen. It is important for clinicians to diagnose and treat HrCLM promptly as this condition results in considerable morbidity when treatment is delayed.

  18. Rash in a foreign worker.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nurjahan, M I; Tevaraj, P

    2016-01-01

    Hookworm-related cutaneous larva migrans (HrCLM) is a zoonosis which is endemic in many sub-tropic and tropical countries including Malaysia. We report a case of a 40-year old plantation worker who presented with a pruritic rash on his abdomen. It is important for clinicians to diagnose and treat HrCLM promptly as this condition results in considerable morbidity when treatment is delayed.

  19. Evaluation of warehouse workers productivity

    OpenAIRE

    Štěpánková, Anna

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this diploma thesis is to create a new system to measure and evaluate the productivity of warehouse processes in Euromedia books wholesale warehouse. The Warehouse management system (WMS) is implemented in the warehouse, so the company has information about processes within warehouse. However, the system does not have any tool to measure and report the productivity of individual workers and shifts. So the manager of the warehouse does not have enough data for efficient human resour...

  20. Heterogeneous Workers, Trade, and Migration

    OpenAIRE

    Heiland, Inga; Kohler, Wilhelm

    2013-01-01

    We argue that the narrative of variety-induced gains from trade in differentiated goods needs revision. If producing differentiated varieties of a good requires differentiated skills and if the work force is heterogeneous in these skills, then firms are likely to have monopsony power. We show that trade then has adverse labor market effects: It increases the monopsony power of firms and worsens the average quality of matches between firms and workers. We also show that international migration...

  1. Childhood lead poisoning associated with lead dust contamination of family vehicles and child safety seats - Maine, 2008.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-08-21

    Persons employed in high-risk lead-related occupations can transport lead dust home from a worksite through clothing, shoes, tools, or vehicles. During 2008, the Maine Childhood Lead Poisoning Prevention Program (MCLPPP) identified 55 new cases of elevated (>or=15 microg/dL) venous blood lead levels (BLLs) among children aged lead poisoning cases in Maine during 2003-2007 had been linked to lead hazards in the child's home, no lead-based paint or dust or water with elevated lead levels were found inside the homes associated with six of the 2008 cases (i.e., five families, including one family with two affected siblings). An expanded environmental investigation determined that these six children were exposed to lead dust in the family vehicles and in child safety seats. The sources of the lead dust were likely household contacts who worked in high-risk lead exposure occupations. Current recommendations for identifying and reducing risk from take-home lead poisoning include 1) ensuring that children with elevated BLLs are identified through targeted blood lead testing, 2) directing prevention activities to at-risk workers and employers, and 3) improving employer safety protocols. State and federal prevention programs also should consider, when appropriate, expanded environmental lead dust testing to include vehicles and child safety seats.

  2. Foreign workers in South Korea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Su-Jin Lim

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available In today’s global age many people cross national borders in search of better work and more wages. According to IOM, more than 100 000 000 workers leave their homeland and migrate to another country for this reason. Europe and North America have already experienced increase in foreign labor for many decades but nowadays, it is very common to see foreign laborers in Asian countries. As the number of foreign laborers rapidly increased, however, so did many social problems in relation to these workers. No country is safe from or immune to such social problems in regards to the foreign workers especially with a much easier and more efficient transportation system. In case of South Korea, the history of foreign labor may not be as long as other nations but as of 2007, it boasts of more than 250 000 foreign laborers and is thus facing just as many social problems as well. In order to investigate such social issues, this article explores the history of foreign laborers and their current situation in South Korea. Furthermore, this artticle examines both internal and external factors which may have caused exponential growth of foreign labor market in South Korea in the past decade.

  3. Showing stitches: making and home-making

    OpenAIRE

    Hendon, Zoë; Museum of Domestic Design & Architecture

    2003-01-01

    This talk accompanied an exhibition entitled "Stitch: the art and craft of home-making", held at the Museum of Domestic Design & Architecture in 2003.The paper reflected on the process of curating the exhibition, and explored ideas of 'home' and 'home-making', creativity, identity and memory, as well as discussing the theoretical challenges associated with exhibiting 'the ordinary'.

  4. What makes a leader?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goleman, D

    1999-01-01

    Superb leaders have very different ways of directing a team, a division, or a company. Some are subdued and analytical; others are charismatic and go with their gut. And different of situations call for different types of leadership. Most mergers need a sensitive negotiator at the helm whereas many turnarounds require a more forceful kind of authority. Psychologist and noted author Daniel Goleman has found, however, that effective leaders are alike in one crucial way: they all have a high degree of what has come to be known as emotional intelligence. In fact, Goleman's research at nearly 200 large, global companies revealed that emotional intelligence--especially at the highest levels of a company--is the sine qua non for leadership. Without it, a person can have first-class training, an incisive mind, and an endless supply of good ideas, but he still won't make a great leader. The components of emotional intelligence--self-awareness, self-regulation, motivation, empathy, and social skill--can sound unbusinesslike. But exhibiting emotional intelligence at the workplace does not mean simply controlling your anger or getting along with people. Rather it means understanding your own and other people's emotional makeup well enough to move people in the direction of accomplishing your company's goals. In this article, the author discusses each component of emotional intelligence and shows through examples how to recognize it in potential leaders, how and why it leads to measurable business results, and how it can be learned. It takes time and, most of all, commitment. But the benefits that come from having a well-developed emotional intelligence, both for the individual and the organization, make it worth the effort.

  5. Nov 06 make up

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Winnie

    Ornstein, 1992). Conversely, Green (1995) found that the general public in Scotland had a relatively liberal view of people with HIV. In South Africa, in spite of campaigns by governments and AIDS workers to improve AIDS knowledge and promote tolerance, the epidemic continues to be characterised by denial, stigma ...

  6. Lead toxicity in plants

    OpenAIRE

    Sharma, Pallavi; Dubey, Rama Shanker

    2005-01-01

    Contamination of soils by heavy metals is of widespread occurrence as a result of human, agricultural and industrial activities. Among heavy metals, lead is a potential pollutant that readily accumulates in soils and sediments. Although lead is not an essential element for plants, it gets easily absorbed and accumulated in different plant parts. Uptake of Pb in plants is regulated by pH, particle size and cation exchange capacity of the soils as well as by root exudation and other physico-che...

  7. Lead Poisoning at an Indoor Firing Range.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Kyung Wook; Park, Won Ju

    2017-10-01

    In March 2014, a 39-year-old Korean male presented with a 6-month history of various nonspecific symptoms including dizziness, fatigue, asthenia, irritability, elevated blood pressure, palpitation, eyestrain, and tinnitus. His occupational history revealed that he had been working as an indoor firing range manager for 13 months; therefore, he was subjected to a blood lead level (BLL) test. The test results showed a BLL of 64 μg/dL; hence, he was diagnosed with lead poisoning and immediately withdrawn from work. As evident from the workplace environmental monitoring, the level of lead exposure in the air exceeded its limit (0.015-0.387 mg/m³). He received chelation treatment with calcium-disodium ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (1 g/day) for 5 days without any adverse effects. In the follow-up results after 2 months, the BLL had decreased to 9.7 μg/dL and the symptoms resolved. This report represents the first occupational case of lead poisoning in firing ranges in Korea, and this necessitates institutional management to prevent the recurrence of poisoning through this route. Workplace environmental monitoring should be implemented for indoor firing ranges, and the workers should undergo regularly scheduled special health examinations. In clinical practice, it is essential to question the patient about his occupational history. © 2017 The Korean Academy of Medical Sciences.

  8. Decision-Making Deficits Among Maltreated Children

    OpenAIRE

    Weller, Joshua A.; Fisher, Philip A.

    2012-01-01

    Although maltreated children involved with child welfare services are known to exhibit elevated levels of health-risking behaviors, little is known about their decision-making processes leading to these behaviors. Research findings suggest that maltreated children exhibit developmental delays in neurocognitive and emotional regulation systems that could adversely impact their abilities to make decisions under conditions of risk. Whereas prior researchers have examined risky decision making as...

  9. Making ecological models adequate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Getz, Wayne M.; Marshall, Charles R.; Carlson, Colin J.; Giuggioli, Luca; Ryan, Sadie J.; Romañach, Stephanie; Boettiger, Carl; Chamberlain, Samuel D.; Larsen, Laurel; D'Odorico, Paolo; O'Sullivan, David

    2018-01-01

    Critical evaluation of the adequacy of ecological models is urgently needed to enhance their utility in developing theory and enabling environmental managers and policymakers to make informed decisions. Poorly supported management can have detrimental, costly or irreversible impacts on the environment and society. Here, we examine common issues in ecological modelling and suggest criteria for improving modelling frameworks. An appropriate level of process description is crucial to constructing the best possible model, given the available data and understanding of ecological structures. Model details unsupported by data typically lead to over parameterisation and poor model performance. Conversely, a lack of mechanistic details may limit a model's ability to predict ecological systems’ responses to management. Ecological studies that employ models should follow a set of model adequacy assessment protocols that include: asking a series of critical questions regarding state and control variable selection, the determinacy of data, and the sensitivity and validity of analyses. We also need to improve model elaboration, refinement and coarse graining procedures to better understand the relevancy and adequacy of our models and the role they play in advancing theory, improving hind and forecasting, and enabling problem solving and management.

  10. Leading through Conflict

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerzon, Mark

    2006-01-01

    This article talks about leading significant learning opportunities through conflict of ideas in a school system. Catalyzing school change can turn emotional differences of opinion into learning opportunities. Leaders who want to deal effectively with these challenging, often tense situations need to be more than good managers. They need to be…

  11. Turning lead into gold

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Steffen Moltrup Ernø

    For years the field of entrepreneurship has been blinded by the alchemical promise of turning lead into gold, of finding the ones most likely to become the next Branson, Zuckerberg or Gates. The promise has been created in the midst of political and scientific agendas where certain individuals...

  12. Relational Perspectives on Leading

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Relational Perspectives on Leading discusses leadership from a relational and social constructionism perspective as practiced on an everyday basis between people. The book pursues a fast growing, practice-based approach - particularly within the Anglo-Saxon parts of the world - to organization...

  13. Relational Perspectives on Leading

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Mette Vinther; Rasmussen, Jørgen Gulddahl

    2015-01-01

    Relational Perspectives on Leading discusses leadership from a relational and social constructionism perspective as practiced on an everyday basis between people. The book pursues a fast growing, practice-based approach - particularly within the Anglo-Saxon parts of the world - to organization...

  14. Possible role of zinc in diminishing lead-related occupational stress-a zinc nutrition concern.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wani, Ab Latif; Ahmad, Ajaz; Shadab, G G H A; Usmani, Jawed Ahmad

    2017-03-01

    Lead and zinc are mostly present at the same occupational source and usually found as co-contaminants. Lead is known to associate with detrimental effects to humans. Zinc however is an essential nutrient and its deficiency causes debilitating effects on growth and development. Besides, it acts as core ion of important enzymes and proteins. The purpose of this study was to examine if zinc concentrations are associated with blood lead levels and if zinc may prevent lead-induced DNA damage. Blood samples were collected from 92 workers as participants occupationally exposed to lead or lead and zinc and 38 comparison participants having no history of such exposure. Lead and zinc levels were determined from blood by atomic absorption spectrophotometry and genetic damage was assessed by comet assay. Correlation was calculated by Spearman's rho. Lead concentrations were observed to increase among workers with increase in years of exposure. There was a significant difference (p lead levels between workers and controls. In addition, significant difference (p lead, while as the inverse effect of zinc on DNA damage. The results suggest that zinc may influence body lead absorption and may have a role in preventing the genetic damage caused by lead.

  15. Safety representatives' views on their interaction with workers in a context of unequal power relations: an exploratory qualitative study in Barcelona (Spain).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ollé-Espluga, Laia; Menéndez-Fuster, María; Muntaner, Carles; Benach, Joan; Vergara-Duarte, Montse; Vázquez, María Luisa

    2014-03-01

    The interaction between workers and safety representatives (SRs), a factor that determines SRs' effectiveness, is an unexplored issue within occupational health research. We undertook a qualitative exploratory interpretative-descriptive study by means of semi-structured interviews with SRs from Barcelona (Spain) to analyze the SRs' perspective on the interaction with workers and its determinants SRs' interaction with workers is mainly limited to information processes and to identifying occupational hazards. Prominent factors determining this interaction are associated with the way SRs understand and carry out their role, the firm sector and size, and workers' fear of dismissal, exacerbated by changes in the labor market and the current economic crisis. Interaction with workers is influenced by a more prevalent technical-legal view of the SRs' role and by unequal power relations between workers and management. Poor interaction with workers might lead to decreasing SRs' effectiveness. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Access to Health Care by Migrant Farm Workers on Fruit Plantations in Eastern Thailand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thetkathuek, Anamai; Jaidee, Wanlop; Jaidee, Patchana

    2017-01-01

    This study was undertaken to elucidate factors that influenced access to health care for migrant farm workers from Cambodia employed on fruit plantations in eastern Thailand. Data were collected from 861 participants via interview questions and focus group discussions. The results revealed that 58.2% of immigrant workers were male, averaged 30.4 years of age, and 56.3% had no formal education. In the past year, 28% reported back pain and 25% had joint pain. Most of the workers (89.8%) received health care services at a nearby government health promotion hospital (THPH). From the analysis of factors contributing to the access to health services among immigrant farm workers, the data indicate that the Cambodian workers had few concerns with their ability to access health care services, reporting high and medium levels of satisfaction (with odds ratios [ORs] of 6.19 and 3.94, respectively) versus being unsatisfied. The differences between those who reported significant minor illnesses and serious illness were important, as workers with significant complaints were 3.17 and 4.85 times more likely, respectively, to have sought medical treatment than those not reporting illness. The main recommendation resulting from this study is that factors leading to higher degrees of satisfaction with health care services by migrant farm workers for preventative care could be improved.

  17. Molting Site Fidelity in Workers of Formosan Subterranean Termites (Isoptera: Rhinotermitidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kakkar, G; Osbrink, W; Mullins, A; Su, N-Y

    2017-09-25

    Spatial assessment of molting in workers of Coptotermes formosanus Shiraki was conducted in laboratory-reared colonies using extended foraging arenas. Workers at a premolt stage were found concentrated in the nest or in a planar arena near the nest. However, molting individuals were found exclusively in the central nest and they stayed inside or near the central nest for at least 36 h postmolting. The absence of premolt workers at foraging sites suggests that the workers have an affinity to the nest for molting and the second study on nest-fidelity evaluation suggested that the workers molt in the proximity of eggs. The molting site fidelity by workers in a colony ensures that speeding up the time for mortality induced by chitin synthesis inhibitor (CSI) baits will not result in an inhibitory cascade of dead termites around the bait stations. Thus, speeding up the elimination of a C. formosanus colony using CSI baits with the addition of molt-accelerating compounds will not lead to secondary repellency. Reasons for the molting-site fidelity amongst workers in a colony are discussed. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Entomological Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  18. Compassion Fatigue among Healthcare, Emergency and Community Service Workers: A Systematic Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fiona Cocker

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Compassion fatigue (CF is stress resulting from exposure to a traumatized individual. CF has been described as the convergence of secondary traumatic stress (STS and cumulative burnout (BO, a state of physical and mental exhaustion caused by a depleted ability to cope with one’s everyday environment. Professionals regularly exposed to the traumatic experiences of the people they service, such as healthcare, emergency and community service workers, are particularly susceptible to developing CF. This can impact standards of patient care, relationships with colleagues, or lead to more serious mental health conditions such as posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD, anxiety or depression. A systematic review of the effectiveness of interventions to reduce CF in healthcare, emergency and community service workers was conducted. Thirteen relevant studies were identified, the majority of which were conducted on nurses (n = 10. Three included studies focused on community service workers (social workers, disability sector workers, while no studies targeting emergency service workers were identified. Seven studies reported a significant difference post-intervention in BO (n = 4 or STS (n = 3. This review revealed that evidence of the effectiveness of CF interventions in at-risk health and social care professions is relatively recent. Therefore, we recommend more research to determine how best to protect vulnerable workers at work to prevent not only CF, but also the health and economic consequences related to the ensuing, and more disabling, physical and mental health outcomes.

  19. Female sex workers' empowerment strategies amid HIV-related socioeconomic vulnerabilities in Cameroon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cange, Charles W; LeBreton, Matthew; Saylors, Karen; Billong, Serge; Tamoufe, Ubald; Fokam, Pamella; Baral, Stefan

    2017-10-01

    Research has consistently demonstrated that female sex workers use a variety of empowerment strategies to protect one another and their families. This study examines the strategies Cameroonian sex workers employ to do so. In-depth interviews and focus-group discussions were conducted with 100 sex workers. Coded texts were analysed for recurring themes. Sex workers reported being concerned with physical violence and sexual assault and demands from authorities for bribes to avoid fines and/or imprisonment. Women described strategies such as 'looking out for' each other when faced with security threats. Many reported staying in sex work to provide for their children through education and other circumstances to allow them to lead a better life. Sex worker mothers reported not using condoms when clients offered higher pay, or with intimate partners, even when they understood the risk of HIV transmission to themselves. Concern for their children's quality of life took precedence over HIV-related risks, even when sex workers were the children's primary carers. A sex worker empowerment programme with a focus on family-oriented services could offer an effective and novel approach to increasing coverage of HIV prevention, treatment and care in Cameroon.

  20. Contract case managers prove cost effective in federal workers' compensation programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mallon, Timothy Michael; Cloeren, Marianne; Firestone, Lisa Michelle; Burch, Helen Christine

    2008-03-01

    This pilot study examined whether contract case managers are cost effective in reducing workers' compensation (WC) costs and preventing injuries. We placed contract medical case managers at four installations where they employed private industry best practices. A needs assessment was performed and site-specific targeted interventions were developed. Case managers improved WC program effectiveness by ensuring command support, and strengthening the case management process. They minimized lost work time and provided the WC team resources to review the oldest cases. Case managers cost $1.25 million and they generated $4.4 million in savings for a 3.52 return on investment. Case managers removed 73 workers from long-term rolls by making use of vocational rehabilitation, finding modified duty jobs, offering workers medical retirement, and terminating benefits when workers refused to work after being offered a job. This study of medical case managers demonstrates they can reduce WC costs.

  1. Migration, Agency, and the Sex Industry: Practitioners' Perspectives on Foreign Sex Workers in Turkey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaya, Omur; Erez, Edna

    2017-09-01

    The article presents the political, economic, and sociocultural factors that make Turkey an attractive destination for foreign sex workers, and reviews trends in official statistics of arrested traffickers, rescued victims, and deportation of migrant illegal sex workers. In-depth interviews of 20 law enforcement and nongovernmental organizations staff members, who in the course of their work come into close contact with foreign sex workers, shed light on the statistics. The interview data provide insights into the structure of the Turkish sex market, the factors that bring foreign women to work in this market, and the impact of legal reforms on the circumstances of foreign sex workers. The article concludes with the implications of the findings for public policy.

  2. A recommended integrated mechanism to enhance OSH management of blue-collar foreign workers in Taiwan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Hung-Chang; Cheng, Shu-Fang; Wang, Ya-Huei; Lee, Lien-Hsiung

    2014-01-01

    This study examines the roles and functions of businesses, labor-exporting countries' representative offices in Taiwan, religious organizations, and manpower agencies in promoting occupational safety and health (OSH). It also offers advice to Taiwanese authorities on making policies and improvements regarding the oversight mechanism mandated by the Labor Safety and Health Act, giving them an idea of what to focus on when enforcing control over blue-collar foreign workers' OSH conditions. This study also proposes that Taiwanese authorities may serve not only as an overseer/inspector of those hiring blue-collar foreign workers in Taiwan, but also expand their role to lay down policies regarding a variety of OSH teaching materials in the blue-collar foreign workers' native languages (spoken or written), the qualifications of translators in blue-collar foreign workers' OSH training programs, and regulations concerning the longer hours such training programs take.

  3. Agricultural Worker Injury Comparative Risk Assessment Methodology: Assessing Corn and Biofuel Switchgrass Production Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwab, Charles V; Mosher, Gretchen A; Ryan, Saxon J

    2017-07-31

    Keeping workers safe is a continuing challenge in agricultural production. Risk assessment methodologies have been used widely in other industries to better understand systems and enhance decision making, yet their use in production agriculture has been limited. This article describes the considerations and the approach taken to measure the difference in worker injury risks between two agricultural production systems. A model was developed specifically for the comparison of worker injury risk between corn and biofuel switchgrass production systems. The model is composed of injury and exposure values that were used in a Monte Carlo simulation. The output of this risk assessment shows that approximately 99% of the values from the Monte Carlo simulation rank corn production as a greater worker injury risk than biofuel switchgrass production. Furthermore, the greatest contributing factors for each production system were identified as harvest, and that finding aligns with current literature. Copyright© by the American Society of Agricultural Engineers.

  4. Health workers coping with having a relative in palliative care for cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schiavon, Aline Blaas; Muniz, Rosani Manfrin; Azevedo, Norlai Alves de; Cardoso, Daniela Habekost; Matos, Michele Rodrigues; Arrieira, Isabel Cristina Oliveira

    2016-03-01

    Objective To know the experience of health workers who are coping with having a relative in palliative care for cancer. Methodology A qualitative study conducted with four family members of cancer patients in palliative care. Data were collected by means of semi-structured interviews from November to December, 2014, at the home of the participants. The data were analysed using the operative proposal of Minayo. Results Two themes emerged, Health worker and family member coping with a cancer diagnosis and Health worker and family member coping with the proximity of death. Conclusions Being a family member and a health professional at the same time demanded greater involvement in care and caused distress since these workers witnessed the suffering of a family member with a terminal disease. However, their professional knowledge supported decision-making during the care process.

  5. Managing the public health risk of a 'sex worker' with hepatitis B infection: legal and ethical considerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poll, Ray

    2011-10-01

    This paper examines the ethical issues faced by health workers managing a fictional case of a female sex worker who is hepatitis B positive with a high level of virus but is asymptomatic. According to guidelines she does not require treatment herself, but is potentially highly infectious to others. Recent legal cases in the UK show it can be criminal to pass on HIV or hepatitis B infection sexually if the risk is known and the partner has not been informed. However, there is no statute or case law showing that health workers are required to intervene to prevent such a potential 'crime', particularly when the partners are unknown, as in this case. The health workers could respond in various ways. They could do nothing, thus making further infection probable. They could advise the sex worker to use condoms and to inform her clients. They could treat the sex worker to reduce her level of infectivity, although there is no benefit to her. They could disclose the sex worker's status, although breaking confidentiality is a serious matter ethically and may be of no benefit to the unknown client group. Regulating prostitution might help; but sex workers with infection may work off licence. This paper discusses the clinical, moral and ethical issues associated with such a scenario and concludes that the most beneficial course is to target clients, through health education, to recognise the potential risks of infection from a sex worker and to take suitable precautions including immunisation against hepatitis B.

  6. 75 FR 25037 - Lead; Clearance and Clearance Testing Requirements for the Renovation, Repair, and Painting Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-06

    ... children have included effects on attention, executive functions, language, memory, learning, and... of lead effects on learning ability, memory and attention (Ref. 2, section 5.3.5), as well as... Blood-Lead Study of R&R Workers Who Specialize in Renovations of Old or Historic Homes (Ref. 12), was...

  7. Factors Affecting the Productivity of Government Workers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jerry P. Haenisch

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available While there have been a variety of studies concerning government worker motivation and productivity, few, if any, studies have focused specifically on state government workers’ perceptions about what factors affect their productivity. With more than 5 million workers employed by state governments in the United States, any improvement in state workplace productivity could have significant financial and service impact for society. In this study, state government workers identified those factors perceived as most affecting their workplace productivity. Data were collected through a survey offered to state government workers in the state of Wyoming. Factor analysis was used to derive key productivity factors from survey responses. The results indicate that state government workers appreciate having freedom and autonomy, like their jobs and the sense of achievement, and welcome teamwork, but feel limited by poor supervision and management, poor communications, and insufficient budgets and staffing. To improve productivity, the workers would eliminate bureaucracy, supervise better, and improve communication.

  8. TRAINING DURING ISO 9001 IMPLEMENTATION AND WORKERS INVOLVEMENT INTO THE QUALITY MANAGEMENT PROCESS IN MONTENEGRO

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marc-Arthur Diaye

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available According to several researchers, workers involvement into the implementation of a quality system in a firm is a key of its success. Since training can improve workers involvement during the implementation of a quality system in a firm, we try in this paper to evaluate quantitatively in the case of Montenegro, the impact of training of workers' involvement. Using an original data set about two leading firms from Montenegro, we show that the coefficient associated with the training variable is on average about -1.44 and is significant at a level of 1%. That is workers who are not trained during the ISO 9001 implementation are strongly less involved into the quality management process of their firms.

  9. The relationship between musculoskeletal symptoms, postures and the fit between workers' anthropometrics and their computer workstation configuration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Nancy A; Moehling, Krissy

    2013-01-01

    Awkward postures during computer use are assumed to be related to the fit between the worker and the workstation configuration, with greater mismatches leading to higher levels of musculoskeletal symptoms (MSS). The objective of this study was to examine if chronic MSS of the neck/shoulder, back, and wrist/hands was associated with 1) discrepancies between workstation setups and worker anthropometrics and 2) workers' postures. Secondary analysis on data collected from a randomized controlled cross-over design trial (N=74). Subjects' workstation configurations, baseline levels of MSS, working postures, and anthropometrics were measured. Correlations were completed to determine the association between postures and discrepancies between the worker anthropometrics and workstation configuration. Associations were examined between postures, workstation discrepancies and worker MSS. There were only 3 significant associations between worker posture and MSS, and 3 significant associations between discrepancies in worker/workstation set-up and MSS. The relationship between chronic MSS and the workers computer workstation configuration is multifactorial. While postures and the fit between the worker and workstation may be associated with MSS, other variables need to be explored to better understand the phenomenon.

  10. Hand hygiene among laboratory workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alp, Emine; Haverkate, Diana; Voss, Andreas

    2006-09-01

    We performed a study to measure the compliance of laboratory personnel with different components of hand hygiene. The level of compliance at the end of duty was 100%; however, 36.7% of subjects wore a ring, 46.9% wore a watch, and 6.1% wore a bracelet. Pathogenic microorganisms were exclusively found on hands of laboratory personnel who wore jewelry. After interventions, the level of compliance with the no-jewelry policy among laboratory personnel showed sustained improvement. Efforts to improve hand hygiene should be directed not only at healthcare workers but also at laboratory personnel.

  11. REMEDIATION FACILITY WORKER DOSE ASSESSMENT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    V. Arakali; E. Faillace

    2004-02-27

    The purpose of this design calculation is to estimate radiation doses received by personnel in the Remediation Facility performing operations to receive, prepare, open, repair, recover, disposition, and correct off-normal and non-standard conditions with casks, canisters, spent nuclear fuel (SNF) assemblies, and waste packages (WP). The specific scope of work contained in this calculation covers both collective doses and individual worker group doses on an annual basis, and includes the contributions due to external and internal radiation. The results of this calculation will be used to support the design of the Remediation Facility and provide occupational dose estimates for the License Application.

  12. Lead-Tungstate Crystal of the ALICE Photon Spectrometer (PHOS)

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    The photon spectrometer (PHOS) is designed to measure the temperature of collisions by detecting photons emerging from them. It will be made of lead tungstate crystals like these. When high-energy photons strike lead tungstate, they make it glow, or scintillate, and this glow can be measured. Lead tungstate is extremely dense (denser than iron), stopping most photons that reach it.

  13. Assessment of occupational health problems and physiological stress among the brick field workers of West Bengal, India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Banibrata Das

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: The brick field industry is one of the oldest industries in India, which employs a large number of workers of poor socioeconomic status. The main aim of the present investigation is i to determine the prevalence of musculoskeletal disorders among brick field workers, ii to determine the prevalence of respiratory disorders and physiological stress among brick field workers compared to control workers. Material and Methods: For this study, a total of 220 brick field workers and 130 control subjects were selected randomly. The control subjects were mainly involved in hand-intensive jobs. The Modified Nordic Questionnaire was applied to assess the discomfort felt among both groups of workers. Thermal stress was also assessed by measuring the WBGT index. The pulmonary functions were checked using the spirometry. Physiological assessment of the workload was carried out by recording the heart rate and blood pressure of the workers prior to work and just after work in the field. Results: Brick field workers suffered from pain especially in the lower back (98%, hands (93%, knees (86%, wrists (85%, shoulders (76% and neck (65%. Among the brick-making activities, brick field workers felt discomfort during spading for mud collection (98%, carrying bricks (95% and molding (87%. The results showed a significantly lower p value < 0.001 in FVC, FEV1, FEV1/FVC ratio and PEFR in brick field workers compared to the control group. The post-activity heart rate of the brick field workers was 148.6 beats/min, whereas the systolic and diastolic blood pressure results were 152.8 and 78.5 mm/Hg, respectively. Conclusions: This study concludes that health of the brick field workers was highly affected due to working in unhealthy working conditions for a long period of time.

  14. [The prevalence and influencing factors of eye diseases for IT industry video operation workers].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Liang-liang; Yu, Yan-yan; Yu, Wen-lan; Xu, Ming; Cao, Wen-dong; Zhang, Hong-bing; Han, Lei; Zhang, Heng-dong

    2013-05-01

    To investigate the situation of video-contact and eye diseases for IT industry video operation workers, and to analyze the influencing factors, providing scientific evidence for the make of health-strategy for IT industry video operation workers. We take the random cluster sampling method to choose 190 IT industry video operation workers in a city of Jiangsu province, analyzing the relations between video contact and eye diseases. The daily video contact time of IT industry video operation workers is 6.0-16.0 hours, whose mean value is (I 0.1 ± 1.8) hours. 79.5% of workers in this survey wear myopic lens, 35.8% of workers have a rest during their working, and 14.2% of IT workers use protective products when they feel unwell of their eyes. Following the BUT experiment, 54.7% of IT workers have the normal examine results of hinoculus, while 45.3% have the abnormal results of at least one eye. Simultaneously, 54.7% workers have the normal examine results of hinoculus in the SIT experiment, however, 42.1% workers are abnormal. According to the broad linear model, there are six influencing factors (daily mean time to video, distance between eye and displayer, the frequency of rest, whether to use protective products when they feel unwell of their eyes, the type of dis player and daily time watching TV.) have significant influence on vision, having statistical significance. At the same time, there are also six influencing factors (whether have a rest regularly,sex, the situation of diaphaneity for cornea, the shape of pupil, family history and whether to use protective products when they feel unwell of their eyes.) have significant influence on the results of BUT experiment,having statistical significance. However, there are seven influencing factors (the type of computer, sex, the shape of pupil, the situation of diaphaneity for cornea, the angle between displayer and workers' sight, the type of displayer and the height of operating floor.) have significant influence

  15. Managing, Leading, and Bossing

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-01

    Defense AT&L: July–August 2011 76 Managing , Leading, and Bossing Stan Emelander Boss Manager Leader Emelander is a project manager in the Army’s...and management . He is level II certified in program management and level I in systems engineering. Leaders fascinate us. From the smallest shop to...me about your boss” will work. Another great question is, “What’s the difference between a leader and a manager ?” Early in my career, I thought there

  16. Lead tungstate scintillation material

    CERN Document Server

    Annenkov, A N; Lecoq, P

    2002-01-01

    In this paper we summarize the results of a research programme on lead-tungstate (PWO) crystals performed by the CMS Collaboration at CERN, as well as by other groups who promoted the progress of the PWO scintillation crystal technology. Crystal properties, mass production technology, scintillation mechanism, origin of colouring, defects in crystal and radiation induced phenomena, light yield improvement and results of beam tests are described. (96 refs).

  17. Demotivating factors influencing rubber production workers

    OpenAIRE

    Mohammad Reza Iravani

    2012-01-01

    Motivation is one of the most important factors influencing workers' productivity. An increase in workers' motivation could add more value to organizations' structure and influence the profitability, significantly. In this paper, we study different factors on demotivating workers using questionnaire consist of various questions. The questionnaire is distributed among some employees who work for rubber production units located in Esfahan, Iran. The results of this survey indicate that discrimi...

  18. Productivity spillovers across firms through worker mobility

    OpenAIRE

    Stoyanov, Andrey; Zubanov, Nikolay

    2012-01-01

    Using matched firm-worker data from Danish manufacturing, we observe firm-to-firm worker movements and find that firms that hired workers from more productive firms experience productivity gains one year after the hiring. The productivity gains associated with hiring from more productive firms are equivalent to 0.35 percent per year for an average firm. Surviving a variety of statistical controls, these gains increase with education, tenure, and skill level of new hires, persist for several y...

  19. Career development of South African knowledge workers

    OpenAIRE

    Roelof van Staden; Adeline du Toit

    2011-01-01

    The demand for knowledge workers is on the increase, yet little is known about their career perceptions and attitudes. The objective of this article is to determine the factors affecting the career development of knowledge workers in South Africa. Part-time learners of a postgraduate course were used as a purposive sample and 82 completed questionnaires were received. The results of the online survey provide an interesting look at the unique career issues knowledge workers experience from a S...

  20. Problem of lead in petrol: The effect of triethyl lead

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roederer, G.

    1985-10-01

    Triethyl lead is a highly toxic derivate of the anti-knock agent tetraethyl lead. Contrary to anorganic lead compounds triethyl lead causes serious disorders in the central nervous system of poisoned mammals leading to dramatic mental changes. Triethyl lead destroys microtubuli in the cells of plants and animals. It is assumed that the neurotoxic effect of triethyl lead is caused by its interacting with the microtubuli of the nerves (neurotubuli) and their subsequent destruction.