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Sample records for wood fired grain

  1. Fire resistance of exposed wood members

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robert H. White

    2004-01-01

    Fire resistance data on exposed wood beams and columns are plentiful, but few studies have been done on exposed wood members in tension and in decks. To provide data to verify the application of a new calculation procedure, a limited series of fire resistance tests were conducted on wood members loaded in tension and on exposed wood decks.

  2. Fire Safety Design of Wood Structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hertz, Kristian Dahl

    2006-01-01

    Lecture Notes on Fire Safety Design of Wood Structures including charring of wood and load bearing capacity of beams, columns, and connections.......Lecture Notes on Fire Safety Design of Wood Structures including charring of wood and load bearing capacity of beams, columns, and connections....

  3. Fire safety of wood construction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robert H. White; Mark A. Dietenberger

    2010-01-01

    Fire safety is an important concern in all types of construction. The high level of national concern for fire safety is reflected in limitations and design requirements in building codes. These code requirements and related fire performance data are discussed in the context of fire safety design and evaluation in the initial section of this chapter. Because basic data...

  4. Plasma impregnation of wood with fire retardants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pabeliña, Karel G.; Lumban, Carmencita O.; Ramos, Henry J.

    2012-02-01

    The efficacy of chemical and plasma treatments with phosphate and boric compounds, and nitrogen as flame retardants on wood are compared in this study. The chemical treatment involved the conventional method of spraying the solution over the wood surface at atmospheric condition and chemical vapor deposition in a vacuum chamber. The plasma treatment utilized a dielectric barrier discharge ionizing and decomposing the flame retardants into innocuous simple compounds. Wood samples are immersed in either phosphoric acid, boric acid, hydrogen or nitrogen plasmas or a plasma admixture of two or three compounds at various concentrations and impregnated by the ionized chemical reactants. Chemical changes on the wood samples were analyzed by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) while the thermal changes through thermo gravimetric analysis (TGA). Plasma-treated samples exhibit superior thermal stability and fire retardant properties in terms of highest onset temperature, temperature of maximum pyrolysis, highest residual char percentage and comparably low total percentage weight loss.

  5. Fire resistance of wood members with directly applied protection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robert H. White

    2009-01-01

    Fire-resistive wood construction is achieved either by having the structural elements be part of fire-rated assemblies or by using elements of sufficient size that the elements themselves have the required fire-resistance ratings. For exposed structural wood elements, the ratings in the United States are calculated using either the T.T. Lie method or the National...

  6. Wood surface roughness: an impact of wood species, grain direction and grit size

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Justina Vitosytė

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available For the research the samples of ash (Fraxinus excelsior L., birch (Betula L., black alder (Alnus glutinosa L., Scots pine (Pinus Sylvestris L. and spruce (Picea abies L. wood were used with dimensions of 270×215×15 mm. All wood samples were tangentially planed, defect free and kiln dried. Before the research, the average moisture content, wood density, number of annual rings per 1 cm, average width of annual ring and wood surface grain direction were evaluated. Different wood surface roughness of the samples was obtained sanding wood samples in the eccentric sanding stand, using standard open-type sandpaper with different grit size. The arithmetic mean value of the single roughness depths of consecutive sampling lengths parameter Rz of the sanded wood samples were measured in five sectors along the wood grain, across and in the angle of 45°, using a contact stylus profilometer. In total 1800 measurements were done during testing series. Obtained measurement results were processed by digital Gaussian filter according to DIN EN ISO 11562. In the research the dependence of wood surface on wood species, grain direction and grit size of abrasive material was evaluated.DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5755/j01.ms.21.2.5882

  7. Burning rates of wood cribs with implications for wildland fires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sara McAllister; Mark Finney

    2016-01-01

    Wood cribs are often used as ignition sources for room fire tests and the well characterized burning rates may also have applications to wildland fires. The burning rate of wildland fuel structures, whether the needle layer on the ground or trees and shrubs themselves, is not addressed in any operational fire model and no simple model exists. Several relations...

  8. The fire resistance of wood depending on material's thickness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiří Holan

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents the resisitance of wood against a pilot flame. The fire has negative effect on the wood and its properties. The fire and its high temperature cause a degradation of chemical components of wood. Hence the physical properties are changed and strength of the wood is decreased. The combustion velocity and the loss weight depend on the material's thickness. For tests have been chosen groups of samples with thickness of 5, 10, 15 and 20 mm. The result of submitted work is a time estimation of the fire penetration and an observation of weight losses coupled with visual changes observation of degraded samples. It have been established that with an action of the pilot flame the needed time to fire penetration is rising with rising material's thickness and at the same time the cumbustion velocity is decreasing.

  9. Fire resistance of engineered wood rim board products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robert H. White

    2003-01-01

    Engineered wood products, such as oriented strandboard, laminated veneer lumber, and other composite wood products, are being used more often in construction. This includes use as rim boards, which are the components around the perimeter of a floor assembly. This situation has increased the need for information about the fire resistance of these products. In this study...

  10. Fire extinguishing strength of the combustion product of wood saw ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Forty saw dust samples from four mature hard wood plants grown in southwestern part of Nigeria were analyzed for their ash contents, moisture contents, metallic contents and hence the fire extinguishing strength of the saw dust ash by classical and instrumental methods of analyses. Mahogany (Khaya ivorensis) wood saw ...

  11. 30 CFR 77.1913 - Fire-resistant wood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Fire-resistant wood. 77.1913 Section 77.1913 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR COAL MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH MANDATORY SAFETY STANDARDS, SURFACE COAL MINES AND SURFACE WORK AREAS OF UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Slope and Shaft Sinking § 77.1913 Fire-resistant...

  12. Accelerated weathering of fire-retardant-treated wood for fire testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robert H. White

    2009-01-01

    Fire-retardant-treated products for exterior applications must be subjected to actual or accelerated weathering prior to fire testing. For fire-retardant-treated wood, the two accelerated weathering methods have been Method A and B of ASTM D 2898. The rain test is Method A of ASTM D 2898. Method B includes exposures to ultraviolet (UV) sunlamps in addition to water...

  13. Wood Usage and Fire Veneration in the Pamir, Xinjiang, 2500 yr BP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Hui; Wu, Xinhua; Tang, Zihua; Zhou, Xinying; Sun, Nan; Li, Xiaoqiang

    2015-01-01

    Located on the Pamir Plateau in Xinjiang Province, China, the Ji'erzankale Necropolis dates back to 2500 yr BP. Many materials that have been unearthed in this cemetery, including shoo konghou (musical instrument), bronze mirrors and glass beads, suggest cultural transference between East and West. Furthermore, small-sized and rounded fire altars made from sweet-scented Sabina were found for the first time and regarded as implements for fire veneration. We identified 70 wooden objects from 25 tombs within the Necropolis, and found that each object had been made from one of seven tree species. Analysis revealed that the inhabitants of the region mainly used the most widely available types of wood, namely Betula and Populus. People also specifically chose inflammable Populus wood to make hearth boards and hand drills (both are used for making fire by drilling), rigid Betula wood to craft wooden plates. Salix was used for fashioning wooden sticks, while sweet-scented Sabina was the preferred choice for making fire altars. Lonicera was selected for arrow shaft manufacture and Fraxinus syriaca, which has a beautiful grain, was chosen for making musical instruments. Conscious selection of different types of wood indicates that people of the Pamir Plateau were aware of the properties of various types of timbers, and were able to exploit these properties to the full. In turn, this demonstrates their wisdom and their ability to survive in, and adapt to, their local environment.

  14. Wood Usage and Fire Veneration in the Pamir, Xinjiang, 2500 yr BP.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hui Shen

    Full Text Available Located on the Pamir Plateau in Xinjiang Province, China, the Ji'erzankale Necropolis dates back to 2500 yr BP. Many materials that have been unearthed in this cemetery, including shoo konghou (musical instrument, bronze mirrors and glass beads, suggest cultural transference between East and West. Furthermore, small-sized and rounded fire altars made from sweet-scented Sabina were found for the first time and regarded as implements for fire veneration. We identified 70 wooden objects from 25 tombs within the Necropolis, and found that each object had been made from one of seven tree species. Analysis revealed that the inhabitants of the region mainly used the most widely available types of wood, namely Betula and Populus. People also specifically chose inflammable Populus wood to make hearth boards and hand drills (both are used for making fire by drilling, rigid Betula wood to craft wooden plates. Salix was used for fashioning wooden sticks, while sweet-scented Sabina was the preferred choice for making fire altars. Lonicera was selected for arrow shaft manufacture and Fraxinus syriaca, which has a beautiful grain, was chosen for making musical instruments. Conscious selection of different types of wood indicates that people of the Pamir Plateau were aware of the properties of various types of timbers, and were able to exploit these properties to the full. In turn, this demonstrates their wisdom and their ability to survive in, and adapt to, their local environment.

  15. Reaction to fire of ETICS applied on wood particle board

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bonati Antonio

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available As well known the ETICS are diffusely used both for energy saving and thermal insulation reasons. They have been applied recently in wood buildings and in regions of southern Europe too due to green building and sustainability reasons. ITC-CNR has tested a lot of building materials and developed good knowledge about reaction to fire since the 1980 and currently, ETICS fixed directly to particle wood panels have been investigated with several SBI tests. In the case study are presented the main factors that can influence the fire reaction results when applied on wood structure are highlighted: the thickness of the insulating material, the presence of accidental damage, the flame attack from the inside. From the results obtained by tests on samples prepared with simulated accidental damages and fire from inside, some considerations are made about the hazard due to this specific construction technology and others on limits of the type of actually used standards product classification.

  16. SOURCE SAMPLING FINE PARTICULATE MATTER: WOOD-FIRED INDUSTRIAL BOILER

    Science.gov (United States)

    The report provides a profile for a wood-fired industrial boiler equipped with a multistage electrostatic precipitator control device. Along with the profile of emissions of fine particulate matter of aerodynamic diameter of 2.5 micrometers or less (PM-2.5), data are also provide...

  17. Fire Resistance of Wood Impregnated with Soluble Alkaline Silicates

    OpenAIRE

    Andrea Marisa Pereyra; Carlos Alberto Giudice

    2007-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to determine the fire performance of wood panels (Araucaria angustifolia) impregnated with soluble alkaline silicates. Commercial silicates based on sodium and potassium with 2.5/1.0 and 3.0/1.0 silica/alkali molar ratios were selected; solutions and glasses ...

  18. Multipass comminution process to produce precision wood particles of uniform size and shape with disrupted grain structure from wood chips

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dooley, James H; Lanning, David N

    2014-05-27

    A process of comminution of wood chips (C) having a grain direction to produce a mixture of wood particles (P), wherein the wood chips are characterized by an average length dimension (L.sub.C) as measured substantially parallel to the grain, an average width dimension (W.sub.C) as measured normal to L.sub.C and aligned cross grain, and an average height dimension (H.sub.C) as measured normal to W.sub.C and L.sub.C, and wherein the comminution process comprises the step of feeding the wood chips in a direction of travel substantially randomly to the grain direction one or more times through a counter rotating pair of intermeshing arrays of cutting discs (D) arrayed axially perpendicular to the direction of wood chip travel.

  19. Fire Resistance of Wood Impregnated with Soluble Alkaline Silicates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Alberto Giudice

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper is to determine the fire performance of wood panels (Araucaria angustifolia impregnated with soluble alkaline silicates. Commercial silicates based on sodium and potassium with 2.5/1.0 and 3.0/1.0 silica/alkali molar ratios were selected; solutions and glasses were previously characterized. Experimental panels were tested in a limiting oxygen chamber and in a two-foot tunnel. Results displayed a high fire-retardant efficiency using some soluble silicates.

  20. Project development of a modern wood-fired cogeneration facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    George, A.C.; Schueler, B.E.; Shield, J.J. [Polsky Energy Corp., Northbrook, IL (United States)

    1997-07-01

    The Brooklyn Energy Centre is a cogeneration facility located in Brooklyn, Nova Scotia which supplies electric energy to Nova Scotia Power Inc., and thermal energy to the adjacent Bowater Mersey Papermill. The wood-fired cogeneration facility began commercial operation in December 1995. In order to provide maximum flexibility and utilize the most economic fuels, the facility was designed to handle a wide range of fuels including bark, sawdust, whole tree chips, slash and other woodwastes, including the potential addition of coal. The fuel mix as well as seasonal fuel variations provided a challenge in designing the fuel handling system and also played a significant role in the design and selection of many other plant systems. This paper gives an overview of the importance of paying special attention to a nonhomogeneous fuel mix and to the need for an uninterruptible steam supply in the design and operation of a modern wood-fired cogeneration facility. (author)

  1. Fire-induced wounding elicits changes in the wood anatomy of North American conifers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estelle Arbellay; Markus Stoffel; Elaine K. Sutherland; Kevin T. Smith; Donald A. Falk

    2013-01-01

    Fire is a major disturbance agent in North American forests. Fires injure trees when heat transfer through the bark partially kills the cambium and the compartmentalization process results in a fire scar. Dendrochronologists use these scars in the xylem to reconstruct fire regimes. However, little information exists on the wood anatomy of fire scars. Consequently, this...

  2. Studying the effect of fire retardant coating on the fire hazard characteristics of wood using infrared thermography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasymov, Denis; Agafontsev, Mikhail

    2017-10-01

    This paper represents a study concerning the effect of fire retardant treatment «FUKAM» on the fire hazard characteristics of pine, aspen and larch. The front of model ground fire was investigated to estimate its effect on the surface of wood samples. Infrared thermography was used as a diagnostic method. The surface temperature distribution was obtained for the test wood samples after exposure to a fire front that was modeled using pine needles. The probability of ignition was estimated for the chosen experimental parameters for each kind of wood. The fire hazard characteristics of wood after fire retardant treatment showed a significant reduction in the surface temperature and the resistance to fire for the chosen parameters of the experiment compared to the same untreated samples.

  3. Comminution process to produce precision wood particles of uniform size and shape with disrupted grain structure from wood chips

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dooley, James H.; Lanning, David N.

    2015-06-23

    A process of comminution of wood chips (C) having a grain direction to produce a mixture of wood particles (P), wherein the wood chips are characterized by an average length dimension (L.sub.C) as measured substantially parallel to the grain, an average width dimension (W.sub.C) as measured normal to L.sub.C and aligned cross grain, and an average height dimension (H.sub.C) as measured normal to W.sub.C and L.sub.C, wherein W.sub.C>L.sub.C, and wherein the comminution process comprises the step of feeding the wood chips in a direction of travel substantially randomly to the grain direction through a counter rotating pair of intermeshing arrays of cutting discs (D) arrayed axially perpendicular to the direction of wood chip travel, wherein the cutting discs have a uniform thickness (T.sub.D), and wherein at least one of L.sub.C, W.sub.C, and H.sub.C is less than T.sub.D.

  4. Comminution process to produce precision wood particles of uniform size and shape with disrupted grain structure from wood chips

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dooley, James H; Lanning, David N

    2013-08-13

    A process of comminution of wood chips (C) having a grain direction to produce a mixture of wood particles (P), wherein the wood chips are characterized by an average length dimension (L.sub.C) as measured substantially parallel to the grain, an average width dimension (W.sub.C) as measured normal to L.sub.C and aligned cross grain, and an average height dimension (H.sub.C) as measured normal to W.sub.C and L.sub.C, and wherein the comminution process comprises the step of feeding the wood chips in a direction of travel substantially randomly to the grain direction through a counter rotating pair of intermeshing arrays of cutting discs (D) arrayed axially perpendicular to the direction of wood chip travel, wherein the cutting discs have a uniform thickness (T.sub.D), and wherein at least one of L.sub.C, W.sub.C, and H.sub.C is greater than T.sub.D.

  5. Properties of flat-pressed wood plastic composites containing fire retardants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nadir Ayrilmis; Jan. T. Benthien; Heiko Thoemen; Robert H. White

    2011-01-01

    This study investigated physical, mechanical, and fire properties of the flat-pressed wood plastic composites (WPCs) incorporated with various fire retardants (FRs) [5 or 15% by weight (wt)] at 50 wt % of the wood flour (WF). The WPC panels were made from dry-blended WF, polypropylene (PP) with maleic anhydride grafted PP (2 wt %), and FR powder formulations using a...

  6. Evaluation of various fire retardants for use in wood flour--polyethylene composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicole M. Stark; Robert H. White; Scott A. Mueller; Tim A. Osswald

    2010-01-01

    Wood-plastic composites represent a growing class of materials used by the residential construction industry and the furniture industry. For some applications in these industries, the fire performance of the material must be known, and in some cases improved. However, the fire performance of wood-plastic composites is not well understood, and there is little...

  7. Superheater fouling in a BFB boiler firing wood-based fuel blends

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stam, A.F.; Haasnoot, K.; Brem, Gerrit

    2014-01-01

    Four different fuel blends have been fired in a 28 MWel BFB. Wood pellets (test 0) were not problematic for about ten years, contrary to a mixture of demolition wood, wood cuttings, compost overflow, paper sludge and roadside grass (test 1) which caused excessive fouling at a superheater bundle

  8. Wood-fired fuel cells in selected buildings

    Science.gov (United States)

    McIlveen-Wright, D. R.; McMullan, J. T.; Guiney, D. J.

    The positive attributes of fuel cells for high efficiency power generation at any scale and of biomass as a renewable energy source which is not intermittent, location-dependent or very difficult to store, suggest that a combined heat and power (CHP) system consisting of a fuel cell integrated with a wood gasifier (FCIWG) may offer a combination for delivering heat and electricity cleanly and efficiently. Phosphoric acid fuel cell (PAFC) systems, fuelled by natural gas, have already been used in a range of CHP applications in urban settings. Some of these applications are examined here using integrated biomass gasification/fuel cell systems in CHP configurations. Five building systems, which have different energy demand profiles, are assessed. These are a hospital, a hotel, a leisure centre, a multi-residential community and a university hall of residence. Heat and electricity use profiles for typical examples of these buildings were obtained and the FCIWG system was scaled to the power demand. The FCIWG system was modelled for two different types of fuel cell, the molten carbonate and the phosphoric acid. In each case an oxygen-fired gasification system is proposed, in order to eliminate the need for a methane reformer. Technical, environmental and economic analyses of each version were made, using the ECLIPSE process simulation package. Since fuel cell lifetimes are not yet precisely known, economics for a range of fuel cell lifetimes have been produced. The wood-fired PAFC system was found to have low electrical efficiency (13-16%), but much of the heat could be recovered, so that the overall efficiency was 64-67%, suitable where high heat/electricity values are required. The wood-fired molten carbonate fuel cell (MCFC) system was found to be quite efficient for electricity generation (24-27%), with an overall energy efficiency of 60-63%. The expected capital costs of both systems would currently make them uncompetitive for general use, but the specific features

  9. Dosimetric properties of natural quartz grains extracted from fired materials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bluszcz, A.; Bøtter-Jensen, L.

    1995-01-01

    The paper describes an examination of the dosimetric properties of natural quartz grains extracted from ancient fired materials. Eleven samples of different origin were tested for their TL and GLSL (green light stimulated luminescence) sensitivities within the mGy dose range. Very promising results...... were obtained showing the possibility of measuring the doses of around 10 mGy with 1% precision using GLSL or TL and using the single aliquot technique for natural quartz as a dosimeter. The lowest detectable dose was estimated to be lower than 500 mu Gy. The results obtained indicate that natural...... quartz grains from selected materials could be used for the dosimetry of environmental gamma radiation for the purposes of paleodosimetric dating methods as well as for accident dosimetry....

  10. Long-term dead wood changes in a Sierra Nevada mixed conifer forest: habitat and fire hazard implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eric E. Knapp

    2015-01-01

    Dead trees play an important role in forests, with snags and coarse woody debris (CWD) used by many bird and mammal species for nesting, resting, or foraging. However, too much dead wood can also contribute to extreme fire behavior. This tension between dead wood as habitat and dead wood as fuel has raised questions about appropriate quantities in fire-dependent...

  11. Emission characteristics of modern and old-type residential boilers fired with wood logs and wood pellets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johansson, Linda S.; Leckner, Bo; Gustavsson, Lennart; Cooper, David; Tullin, Claes; Potter, Annika

    Emissions from commercial residential boilers fired with wood logs and wood pellets, have been compared. Seven boilers, selected with respect to age, design, connection to heat storage tank, and type of biofuel, were included in the study, which also covers two oil-fired boilers in comparison. The measurements of gaseous emissions comprised carbon monoxide (CO), carbon dioxide (CO 2), oxygen (O 2), total organic carbons (TOC), nitrogen oxides (NO x), polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH), and 33 volatile organic compounds (VOC). Particle emissions were characterised by mass concentration, number concentration, and the corresponding particle size distributions. In general, old-type wood boilers caused considerably higher emissions than modern wood and pellet boilers. The mass concentration of particles was 180 times larger in the worst old-type case (a water-cooled wood boiler without heat storage tank) compared to the best modern case (wood pellets). The TOC emission was shown to be correlated to the CO emission, both ranging between very low values and up to 10 000 mg/MJ, depending on design and operation. The highest emissions of unoxidised compounds occurred at the highest excess air ratio, and oxygen was not the limiting parameter for poor combustion. Instead, high excess air can be suspected to cool the combustion chamber, resulting in high CO emissions. VOC was dominated by methane. Especially from an old-type boiler the methane emissions could be high and the effect on climate change then may become larger than that of an oil boiler. However, substitution of an old-type wood boiler with a modern wood boiler attached to a storage tank or with a pellet boiler, would reduce methane emissions by 8 to 9000 times and the efficiency would increase. Most emissions could be considerably lowered by connecting the old-type wood boiler to a heat storage tank, or by charging small (in relation to the combustion chamber) batches of wood.

  12. FIRE RESISTANCE OF DOUGLAS FIR [Pseudotsuga menziesii (Mirb. Franco] WOOD TREATED WITH SOME CHEMICALS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Kemal YALINKILIÇ

    1998-02-01

    Full Text Available Combustible properties of treated douglas wood specimens and fire-retardancy of some preservatives were tested in this study. Crib test of ASTM E 160-150 was followed. Results indicated that, aqueous solutions of boric acid (BA, borax (Bx (Na2BO7 10H2O or BA + Bx mixture (7: 3, w: w had fire retardant efficacy (FRE over untreated wood and reduced the combustibility of vinil monomers (Styrene and methylmetacrylate which were applied as secondary treatment.

  13. An experimentally validated fatigue model for wood subjected to tension perpendicular to the grain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clorius, Christian Odin; Pedersen, Martin Uhre; Hoffmeyer, Preben

    2009-01-01

    This study presents an experimental investigation of fatigue in wood subjected to tension perpendicular to the grain. The study has been designed with special reference to the influence of the frequency of loading. The investigation reveals an interaction between number of load oscillations...

  14. Effect of wood grain and veneer side on loblolly pine veneer wettability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Todd E. Shupe; Chung Y. Hse; Elvin T. Choong; Leslie H. Groom

    1998-01-01

    Research was initiated to determine the effect of veneer side (tight or loose), and wood grain (earlywood or latewood) on the wettability of loblolly pine veneer. Contact angle measurements were performed with phenol-formaldehyde resin and distilled water. The resin and distilled water showed slightly higher contact angle mean values on the latewood portion for both...

  15. Complex xylo-oligosaccharides identified from hydrothermally treated Eucalyptus wood and brewery's spent grain.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kabel, M.A.; Schols, H.A.; Voragen, A.G.J.

    2002-01-01

    Hydrolysates from two hydrothermally treated xylan-rich agrobased materials, Eucalyptus wood and brewery's spent grain were fractionated by anion-exchange chromatography and size-exclusion chromatography. Hereby, several pools were obtained and they were characterised by their sugar composition.

  16. Durability of fire retardant treated wood products at humid and exterior conditions. Review of literature

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ostman, B.; Voss, A.; Hughes, A.; Hovde, P.J.; Grexa, O.

    2001-01-01

    Fire retardants may considerably improve the fire properties of wood products, but the durability, e.g. in exterior applications, has not been addressed fully. This paper reviews the existing knowledge and experience mainly from the USA with the aim of supporting further development in Europe. The

  17. In situ thermal condensation of glucose-diammonium phosphate in wood for fire and fungal decay protection

    Science.gov (United States)

    George Chen

    2009-01-01

    Thermal condensation of glucose-diammonium phosphate in wood at 160 and 190[degrees]C will protect wood against fire and decay in one treatment using an aqueous system. For fire protection, treatments at 160 or 190[degrees]C led to low flammability as evidenced by fire-tube tests. For nonleached wood, weight losses were 1.9, 2.0, and 2.0% with chemical retentions of 56...

  18. Fire development and wall endurance in sandwich and wood-frame structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlton A. Holmes; Herbert W. Eickner; John J. Brenden; Curtis C. Peters; Robert H. White

    1980-01-01

    Large-scale fire tests were conducted on seven 16- by 24-foot structures. Four of these structures were of sandwich construction with cores of plastic or paper honeycomb and three were of wood-frame construction. The wasss were loaded to a computer design loading, and the fire endurance determined under a fire exposure from a typical building contents loading of 4-1/2...

  19. Durability of the reaction to fire performance for fire retardant treated (FRT wood products in exterior applications – a ten years report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Östman Birgit

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Several long term experimental studies on the maintained reaction to fire performance of fire retardant treated (FRT wood products over time are presented. They are performed according to a European system based on earlier Nordic and North American systems and include accelerated ageing according to different procedures and natural weathering up to ten years. Main conclusions are: The hygroscopic properties are unchanged compared to untreated wood for most FRT wood products used commercially. The reaction to fire properties of FRT wood may be maintained after accelerated and natural ageing if the retention levels are high enough, but several FRT wood products loose most of their improved reaction to fire properties during weathering. Paint systems contribute considerably to maintain of the fire performance at exterior application and are usually needed to maintain the fire performance after weathering.

  20. Comminution process to produce wood particles of uniform size and shape with disrupted grain structure from veneer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dooley, James H.; Lanning, David N.

    2017-03-28

    Comminution process of wood veneer to produce wood particles, by feeding wood veneer in a direction of travel substantially normal to grain through a counter rotating pair of intermeshing arrays of cutting discs arrayed axially perpendicular to the direction of wood veneer travel, wherein the cutting discs have a uniform thickness (Td), to produce wood particles characterized by a length dimension (L) substantially equal to the Td and aligned substantially parallel to grain, a width dimension (W) normal to L and aligned cross grain, and a height dimension (H) aligned normal to W and L, wherein the W.times.H dimensions define a pair of substantially parallel end surfaces with end checking between crosscut fibers.

  1. Modeling the Emission of CO from Wood Fires using Detailed Chemical Kinetics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dederichs, Anne

    Carbon monoxide is treated as one of the most common and dangerous of gases evolving in fires. Modeling the formation of the toxic gas CO from in fire enclosures using detailed chemical kinetics is the topic of this manuscript. A semi-empirical model is developed to study the formation of CO from...... birch wood using detailed chemical kinetics on the combustion of pyrolysis gas from birch wood. The composition of the pyrolysis gas is taken from the experiment by Zanzi and coworkers. The numerical model applies a counter flow configuration involving 84 chemical species and 804 reactions. Hence...

  2. Efficiency Assessment of Support Mechanisms for Wood-Fired Cogeneration Development in Estonia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volkova, Anna; Siirde, Andres

    2010-01-01

    There are various support mechanisms for wood-fired cogeneration plants, which include both support for cogeneration development and stimulation for increasing consumption of renewable energy sources. The efficiency of these mechanisms is analysed in the paper. Overview of cogeneration development in Estonia is given with the focus on wood-fired cogeneration. Legislation acts and amendments, related to cogeneration support schemes, were described. For evaluating the efficiency of support mechanisms an indicator - fuel cost factor was defined. This indicator includes the costs related to the chosen fuel influence on the final electricity generation costs without any support mechanisms. The wood fuel cost factors were compared with the fuel cost factors for peat and oil shale. For calculating the fuel cost factors, various data sources were used. The fuel prices data were based on the average cost of fuels in Estonia for the period from 2000 till 2008. The data about operating and maintenance costs, related to the fuel type in the case of comparing wood fuel and oil shale fuel were taken from the CHP Balti and Eesti reports. The data about operating and maintenance costs used for peat and wood fuel comparison were taken from the Tallinn Elektrijaam reports. As a result, the diagrams were built for comparing wood and its competitive fuels. The decision boundary lines were constructed on the diagram for the situation, when no support was provided for wood fuels and for the situations, when various support mechanisms were provided during the last 12 years.

  3. Yearbook 1997. TULISIJA Research Programme for Wood Firing Technology; Vuosikirja - Aarsbok 1997. TULISIJA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ljung, M.; Kilpinen, P. [eds.

    1998-12-31

    Firewood is a renewable source of energy. With respect to carbon dioxide emission and change of climate, wood is a neutral fuel. Further, acidic emissions such as sulphur oxides and nitrogen oxides are low in comparison with corresponding emissions originating from other sources. Under adverse conditions, however, considerable amounts of carbon monoxide and other unburned gases may be released during the burning of wood in a fireplace. Several enterprises in Finland manufacture small-size (less than 20 kW) wood burning units, such as various types of stoves and fireplaces. One particularly interesting product is the heat storing fireplace. In recent years almost 80 % of all new houses in Finland have been fitted with these fireplaces as an additional heat source for the house. The annual turnover in manufacturing such wood burning equipment is some FIM 500-600 million in Finland. About FIM 150-200 million of this is exports. The product development of wood burning equipment has been lively in Finland. The emission issues have been and are still of ever growing importance in the marketing of fireplaces. The Control of the emission of unburned gases requires thorough mixing of gases with a sufficient quantity of combustion air at high temperatures. European fireplace standard (CEN TC 295) is under preparation and will contribute to the need for further efforts in the development of low-emission wood firing. The aim of the TULISIJA research programme for wood firing technology (1997 - 1999) is to assist manufacturers in their efforts to develop the most emission-free, yet efficient, wood firing equipment in the world. Projects during 1997 deal with the following issues: Numeric flow simulation and heat transfer; Formation and decomposition mechanisms of pollutants; Behavior of the firewood charge during combustion and Charting of temperatures and compositions in a test fireplace and the measurement of emissions

  4. Effect of Boron and Phosphate compounds on Thermal and Fire Properties of wood/HDPE composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turgay Akbulut; Nadir Ayrilmis; Turker Dundar; Ali Durmus; Robert H. White; Murat Teker

    2011-01-01

    Melting and non-isothermal crystallization behaviors, oxidative induction time, and fire performance of the injection-molded wood flour-high density polyethylene (HDPE) composites (WPCs) incorporated with different levels (4, 8, or 12 wt %) of boron compounds [borax/boric acid (BX/BA) (0.5:0.5 wt %), zinc borate (ZB)] and phosphorus compounds [mono- and di-ammonium...

  5. Resin duct characteristics in the wood of fire-scarred North American conifers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estelle Arbellay; Markus Stoffel; Elaine K. Sutherland; Kevin T. Smith; Donald A. Falk

    2013-01-01

    Traumatic resin ducts form in xylem and phloem tissue of conifers in response to abiotic wounding, fungal invasion, and insect attack. Little is known about resin duct characteristics in the wood of fire-scarred trees. The aim of this study is to quantify changes in traits of both axial and radial resin ducts, along with those of associated epithelial cells and...

  6. Comminution process to produce engineered wood particles of uniform size and shape with disrupted grain structure from veneer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dooley, James H; Lanning, David N

    2013-07-30

    Comminution process of wood veneer to produce wood particles, by feeding wood veneer in a direction of travel substantially normal to grain through a counter rotating pair of intermeshing arrays of cutting discs arrayed axially perpendicular to the direction of veneer travel, wherein the cutting discs have a uniform thickness (Td), to produce wood particles characterized by a length dimension (L) substantially equal to the Td and aligned substantially parallel to grain, a width dimension (W) normal to L and aligned cross grain, and a height dimension (H) substantially equal to the veneer thickness (Tv) and aligned normal to W and L, wherein the W.times.H dimensions define a pair of substantially parallel end surfaces with end checking between crosscut fibers.

  7. Wood-fired AFB saves plant $1. 5M yearly

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Galvin, C.

    1982-04-26

    An atmospheric fluidized-bed (AFB) boiler that burns waste wood instead of natural gas will save an Oregon plywood manufacturing plant $1.5 million in annual fuel costs and have a 3.5-year payback. The new boiler also saves maintenance costs for old equipment. The plant generates enough wood wastes (about 10 tons per hour) to fuel the Energy Products of Idaho (EPI) system and produce 50,000 pounds of steam per hour as well as hot gas for veneering. (DCK)

  8. COMPARISON BETWEEN TEST METHODS TO DETERMINE WOOD EMBEDMENT STRENGTH PARALLEL TO THE GRAIN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diego Henrique de Almeida

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT This study compares the test methods according to the ABNT NBR 7190:1997, EN 383:2007, ASTM D5764:2007, EUROCODE 5:2004, NDS:2001 standards in order to provide support to establish a new test method for determining the embedment strength of wood parallel to the grain. Parallel-to-grain tests were carried out for six wood species (Schizolobium amazonicum; Pinus elliottii; Pinus oocarpa; Hymenaea spp.; Lyptus(r: hybrid Eucalyptus grandis and Eucalyptus urophylla, and Goupia glabra using four diameters (8 mm, 10 mm, 12 mm and 16 mm for the metal pin fasteners (bolts. The experimental results obtained according to the EN 383:2007 standard were closer to the specific values for the metal-dowel connections design used by ABNT NBR 7190:1997, which are considered equal compression parallel to the grain. The use of maximum embedment force or the force causing displacement of 5 mm between the bolt and the test-piece as criteria for determining embedment strength for EN 383:2007 appears to be more appropriate than the criteria used by the Brazilian and American Standards.

  9. Economic analysis of wood- or bark-fired systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    T. H. Ellis

    1978-01-01

    The Tennessee Valley Authority, in cooperation with the U.S. Department of Agriculture and the Forest Products Research Society, is preparing three slide-tape presentations to help people evaluate wood- and bark fueled boiler systems as alternatives to ones using oil, gas, or coal. The first two presentations cover equipment selection and estimation of fuel values; the...

  10. Nanostructured Wood Hybrids for Fire-Retardancy Prepared by Clay Impregnation into the Cell Wall.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Qiliang; Medina, Lilian; Li, Yuanyuan; Carosio, Federico; Hajian, Alireza; Berglund, Lars A

    2017-10-18

    Eco-friendly materials need "green" fire-retardancy treatments, which offer opportunity for new wood nanotechnologies. Balsa wood (Ochroma pyramidale) was delignified to form a hierarchically structured and nanoporous scaffold mainly composed of cellulose nanofibrils. This nanocellulosic wood scaffold was impregnated with colloidal montmorillonite clay to form a nanostructured wood hybrid with high flame-retardancy. The nanoporous scaffold was characterized by scanning electron microscopy and gas adsorption. Flame-retardancy was evaluated by cone calorimetry, whereas thermal and thermo-oxidative stabilities were assessed by thermogravimetry. The location of well-distributed clay nanoplatelets inside the cell walls was confirmed by energy-dispersive X-ray analysis. This unique nanostructure dramatically increased the thermal stability because of thermal insulation, oxygen depletion, and catalytic charring effects. A coherent organic/inorganic charred residue was formed during combustion, leading to a strongly reduced heat release rate peak and reduced smoke generation.

  11. Effect of a fire retardant on the ignition of pine wood exposed to smoldering particles of pine bark

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasymov, Denis; Paletsky, Alexander

    2017-10-01

    This paper represents the laboratory research results on the interaction of smoldering pine bark particles with pine wood. Fire retardant treatment "FUKAM" was studied to estimate its effect on the probability of wood ignition. The wind speed and the number and geometric sizes of particles were varied in the experiments. The results have shown that the increase in the wind speed leads to the increase in the probability of wood ignition by the particles of the same size, and fire-retardant treatment significantly increases the protective properties of wood exposed to smoldering pine bark particles.

  12. Effect of a fire retardant on the ignition of pine wood exposed to smoldering particles of pine bark

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kasymov Denis

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper represents the laboratory research results on the interaction of smoldering pine bark particles with pine wood. Fire retardant treatment "FUKAM" was studied to estimate its effect on the probability of wood ignition. The wind speed and the number and geometric sizes of particles were varied in the experiments. The results have shown that the increase in the wind speed leads to the increase in the probability of wood ignition by the particles of the same size, and fire-retardant treatment significantly increases the protective properties of wood exposed to smoldering pine bark particles.

  13. The preservation of quartz grain surface textures following vehicle fire and their use in forensic enquiry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, R M; Little, M; Gibson, A; Hicks, L; Dunkerley, S; Bull, P A

    2008-09-01

    During a terrorist trial, dispute arose as to whether the temperature produced in a car fire was sufficient to destroy quartz grain surface textures. A series of seven sequential experiments showed that the temperature for quartz surface texture modification/destruction and the production of vugs, vesicles and glassy precipitation ('snowdrifting') occurred at 1200 degrees C under normal atmospheric conditions. By adding a number of man-made and natural substances, it was found that only the presence of salts depressed this modification temperature (to 900 degrees C). Experiments to determine the temperature of fire in a car indicated that the maximum temperature produced under natural conditions (810 degrees C) was insufficient to affect the quartz grain surface textures. These results confirm the use of surface texture analysis of quartz grains recovered from the remains of cars subjected to fire and their use as a forensic indicator.

  14. Fire performance, mechanical strength and dimensional stability of wood flour–polyethylene composites under the influence of different fire retardants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehdi Roohani

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Flammability is one of the most important parameters that often limit the application range of wood plastic composites. Therefore, the improvements of retardancy performance of these products have a considerable impact. The aim of this work was to evaluate the influence of expandable graphite (EG and its combination with aluminum tirhydroxide (ATH, inorganic phosphate (IP and melamine borate (MB on the flammability of wood flour–polyethylene composites. Composites were prepared by the melt compounding method and cone calorimetry as well as limited oxygen index (LOI tests was employed to study their flammability properties. Also, the effect of different fire retardants on the mechanical strength and water uptake of samples were investigated. Cone calorimetry characterization indicated that with incorporation of fire retardans heat release rate and burning rate decrease and char residual as well as the time to ignition increase. These findings ascribed to formation of char layer by fire retardants. The combination of EG and other fire retardants yielded better improvements in flame retardancy in comparison to the sample that has just EG as flame retardant. The LOI test was used to determine the lowest concentration of oxygen at which a material will maintain combustion in a flowing mixture of oxygen and nitrogen. The results showed that inclusion of fire retardants improve the LOI of sample. Furthermore, the presence of fire retardants decreased the tensile and flexural resistance (strength and modules and impact strength of samples, and increased the water absorption as well as thickness swelling. Generally, among the different treatments examined, the EG–ATH retardancy system showed highest potential in flame retardancy of composites.

  15. Ash Deposit Formation and Removal in a Straw and Wood Suspension-Fired Boiler

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shafique Bashir, Muhammad; Jensen, Peter Arendt; Frandsen, Flemming

    was limited to two weeks when 100% straw was fired due to ash deposition in the superheater region that has tube spacing specified for coal-firing (113mm). A series of 3-5 days deposit probe experiments were conducted utilizing 35 to 100% straw with wood on mass basis. The applied deposit probe was water......Utilization of biomass on large suspension-fired boilers is a potentially efficient method to reduce net CO2 emissions and reduce the consumption of fossil fuels. However, ash deposit formation on heat transfer surfaces may cuase operational problems and in severe cases lead to boiler stop...... and manual cleaning. Most studies on ash deposition and removal has been done on biomass grate boilers, while only limited data is available from biomass suspension-firing. The aim of this study was to investigate deposit mass uptake, heat uptake reduction, deposit characteristics, and deposit removal...

  16. Low-emission wood chip firing system. Emissionsarme Holzschnitzelfeuerung

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anon.

    1992-07-01

    A need wood chip heating boiler with automatic ash removal is presented with which an operating temperature of 1100 - 1200deg C can be attained due to a new combustion chamber geometry with horizontal gas neck and fireclay lining. The combustion chamber is devided into three zones: drying and degassing zone, mixing zone and the combustion zone. Structure and mode of operation are explained with a schematic diagram. The plant complies with or even remains below the required emission limits of the LRV 92 (Air Pollution Abatement Regulation). (BWI).

  17. System optimisation of automatic wood-fired heating systems; Systemoptimierung automatischer Holzheizungen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Good, J.; Nussbaumer, T. [Verenum, Zuerich (Switzerland); Jenni, A. [Ardens GmbH, Liestal (Switzerland); Buehler, R. [Umwelt und Energie, Maschwanden (Switzerland)

    2005-07-01

    This final report for the Swiss Federal Office of Energy (SFOE) discusses a system optimisation method that is being offered to operators of automatic wood-fired heating systems with ratings between 300 kW and 1 MW. The results of a survey covering 30 Swiss installations are presented and the measures recommended for improvements in performance are discussed. The report reviews the state of the installations as far as technology and financial feasibility are concerned and also takes a look at various methods of determining the annual operating efficiency of wood-fired installations as well as the limits posed on such methods. Commercial considerations that should be taken into account when planning and operating such installations are discussed. Extensive recommendations are made to manufacturers, purchasers and operators of the installations.

  18. Effect of boron compounds on physical, mechanical, and fire properties of injection molded wood plastic composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nadir Ayrilmis; Turgay Akbulut; Turker Dundar; Robert H. White; Fatih Mengeloglu; Zeki Candan; Umit Buyuksari; Erkan Avci

    2011-01-01

    Physical, mechanical, and fire properties of the injection-molded wood flour/polypropylene composites (WPCs) incorporated with different levels of boron compounds, borax/boric acid (BX/BA) (0.5:0.5 wt %) and zinc borate (ZB) (4, 8, or 12 wt %) were investigated. The effect of the coupling agent loading (2, 4, or 6 wt %), maleic anhydride-grafted PP (MAPP), on the...

  19. Residential consumer's handbook for wood-fired appliances

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dyer, D.; Maxwell, T. T.; Nunnelly, R. M.

    1981-11-01

    This manual describes the various types of wood burning appliances and accessories on the market. The characteristics of the various types of units are given to assess the best unit for a given application. Tips on selecting a unit are given. The most important overall considerations are shown to be the size (heat output) and safety features of the unit. Performance parameters, particularly heat output and efficiency, are defined. Test values for these parameters for several appliances of each type are given. This summary of results allows the various types of appliances and design features to be evaluated. This table also shows that the performance of units in a given category is very similar. Hence price, quality of construction, appearance, and type of appliance, rather than efficiency, become the most important parameters in selecting a stove in a given category.

  20. Mercury pollution in vegetables, grains and soils from areas surrounding coal-fired power plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Rui; Wu, Han; Ding, Jing; Fu, Weimin; Gan, Lijun; Li, Yi

    2017-05-01

    Mercury contamination in food can pose serious health risks to consumers and coal-fired power plants have been identified as the major source of mercury emissions. To assess the current state of mercury pollution in food crops grown near coal-fired power plants, we measured the total mercury concentration in vegetables and grain crops collected from farms located near two coal-fired power plants. We found that 79% of vegetable samples and 67% of grain samples exceeded the PTWI's food safety standards. The mercury concentrations of soil samples were negatively correlated with distances from the studied coal-fired power plants, and the mercury contents in lettuce, amaranth, water spinach, cowpea and rice samples were correlated with the mercury contents in soil samples, respectively. Also, the mercury concentrations in vegetable leaves were much higher than those in roots and the mercury content of vegetable leaves decreased significantly after water rinses. Our calculation suggests that probable weekly intake of mercury for local residents, assuming all of their vegetables and grains are from their own farmland, may exceed the toxicologically tolerable values allowed, and therefore long-term consumptions of these contaminated vegetables and grains may pose serious health risks.

  1. New methods for testing fire resistance of wood façade systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mårtensson August

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Arson in schools has been a huge problem in Sweden over the last fifteen years. The average amount of school arsons between 2000 and 2014 was 285 cases each year which corresponds to 50% of the total amount of reported fires in school buildings. This is a well-known problem and a lot of research has been done in this area. Investigations has been done about fire and heat detection systems, different technical factors significance in fire scenarios and how to prevent adolescents from starting fires. Another part of the problem that partly been investigated is how the schools are constructed. Roughly 50% of the arsons are outside of the school building. In Sweden one and two storey buildings are allowed to be built with wooden façades in accordance with the building code, which is one of the reasons many schools are built with wooden façade systems. The most critical part in a wood façade system from a fire safety perspective is concluded to be the eaves because of how they usually are built to let air pass through. Even though a wood façade isn't as well resistant to fire compared to a concrete façade, three versions of new test methods for combustible façades have been developed to make it possible to make sure in advance that a construction is resistant enough. The new test methods are focused on specific details and parts of a façade system to provide a more informative and useful result compared to SP Fire 105. Observations and measurements of flame spread and temperature changes in the eave, over the window joints and in the air gap are made. With these parameters in consideration criteria's has been chosen for a critical temperature of 280 ∘C at a critical time of 20 minutes.

  2. Relationships among wood anatomy, hydraulic conductivity, density and shear parallel to the grain in the wood of 24-year-old Handroanthus vellosoi (Bignoniaceae)

    OpenAIRE

    Longui, Eduardo Luiz; Oliveira, Ivanka Rosada de; Graebner, Ryan Combs; Freitas, Miguel Luiz Menezes; Florsheim, Sandra Monteiro Borges; Garcia, José Nivaldo

    2017-01-01

    Abstract We studied the relationships among wood anatomy, hydraulic conductivity, density and shear parallel to the grain in the stem of Handroanthus vellosoi trees with the goal to identify possible trade-offs between hydraulic conductivity and mechanical properties. For this study we felled 12 trees with 24-year-old and cut 10-cm-thick disks at three heights: base of the trunk, one meter in height, and two meters in height. We propose that the relationship between hydraulic conductivity and...

  3. How to arrange fuel supply on large scale wood fired CHP

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nickull, S. [Oy Alholmens Kraft Ab, Jakobstad (Finland)

    2001-09-01

    During the last years the utilisation of biofuels on large scale has been focused on forest industry sites where large amounts of biomass is available. Now Alholmens Kraft is constructing the world's largest bio-fired power plant in Jakobstad/ Pietarsaari, Finland. The steam boiler will have a fuel capacity of 590 MW. The power plant will use wood-based biofuel such as bark, sawdust, wood chips, cut peat, along with coal as a reserve requirement. The electrical capacity of the new power station will be 240 MW in full condensing operations generating 100 MW process steam and 60 MW district heat. Business operations will begin in October 2001. (au)

  4. Dual protection of wood surface treated with melamine-modified urea-formaldehyde resin mixed with ammonium polyphosphate against both fire and decay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xing-xia Ma; Grant T. Kirker; Ming-liang Jiang; Yu-zhang Wu

    2016-01-01

    Surface coatings of melamine-modified urea-formaldehyde resins (MUFs) containing ammonium polyphosphate (APP) have been shown to significantly improve the fire retardancy of wood by prolonging the ignition time and reducing the heat release rate, total heat released, and mass loss rate. Dual protection of wood against both decay and fire has been proposed for remedial...

  5. Design and Development of a Wood-Fired Gasifier Prototype for Synthesis Gas Production and Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neres Ann S. Manguiat

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available -Synthesis gas formation which can be transformed to useful compounds through biomass gasification is perceived as one promising process of biofuel production. A construction, design and development of an efficient and small-scale wood-fired gasifier prototype was made at Batangas State University. This study included the costs and specifications of materials, the design, components and percent conversion of the biomass to syngas by obtaining the amount of the residue. Set of operating conditions were determined so as to achieve a good performance of the gasifier; otherwise it adversely affected the operation of the prototype. The gasifier operates in a condition in which the air flow rate is 560 - 610 cm3 /min wherein the valve is half-open and the blower is turned on after 20 seconds. The gasifier will be closed after a minute of start-up. With these conditions, the gasifier works accordingly to a smooth operation. Syngas was composed of methane (2.32 % volume, carbon dioxide (10 % volume, carbon monoxide and minimal amount of hydrogen. Two (2 kg of woodchips with 90.75% conversion was the best amount of feed suited for the operation of the gasifier. This innovation comprises a method which efficiently converts the feedstock thereby enhancing the energy of the syngas produced with byproducts at minimum acceptable value. The wood-fired gasifier will be a very helpful tool in contributing to the resolution of pressing social and environmental problems such as energy security and local agricultural waste pollution.

  6. Improvements to the Understanding of the Fire Performance of Wood over the Past 30 Years-A Tribute to Robert Hawthorne White

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samuel L. Zelinka; Mark A. Dietenberger; Laura E. Hasburgh; Keith J. Bourne; Charles Boardman

    2015-01-01

    Dr. Robert Hawthorne White had a 31 year career researching the fire performance of wood and wood composites at the USDA Forest Products Laboratory. Over his career, Dr. White made substantial contributions to codes, standards, and regulations pertaining to the design of wood structures. This review article summarizes Robert’s major accomplishments as a tribute to his...

  7. Estimated Altitude of the Top of the Uppermost Unit of Fine-Grained Sediment within the Wood River Valley aquifer system, South-Central Idaho

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This dataset is the estimated altitude of the top of the uppermost fine-grained sediment within the Wood River Valley aquifer system. This map was compiled by...

  8. Full-scale Milling Tests of Wood Pellets for Combustion in a Suspension-Fired Power Plant Boiler

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Masche, Marvin; Puig Arnavat, Maria; Wadenbäck, Johan

    The size reduction of pelletized wood is crucial in suspension-fired power plants, and hence its milling characteristics are of interest to optimize the milling and combustion process. The objective of the study was to compare the size and shape of pellets disintegrated in hot water with that fro...

  9. Effect of boron and phosphate compounds on physical, mechanical, and fire properties of wood-polypropylene composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nadir Ayrilmis; Turgay Akbulut; Turker Dundar; Robert H. White; Fatih Mengeloglu; Umit Buyuksari; Zeki Candan; Erkan Avci

    2012-01-01

    Physical, mechanical, and fire properties of the injection-molded wood flour/polypropylene composites incorporated with different contents of boron compounds; borax/boric acid and zinc borate, and phosphate compounds; mono and diammonium phosphates were investigated. The effect of the coupling agent content, maleic anhydride-grafted polypropylene, on the properties of...

  10. Solution of internal ballistic problem for SRM with grain of complex shape during main firing phase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiryushkin, A. E.; Minkov, L. L.

    2017-10-01

    Solid rocket motor (SRM) internal ballistics problems are related to the problems with moving boundaries. The algorithm able to solve similar problems in axisymmetric formulation on Cartesian mesh with an arbitrary order of accuracy is considered in this paper. The base of this algorithm is the ghost point extrapolation using inverse Lax-Wendroff procedure. Level set method is used as an implicit representation of the domain boundary. As an example, the internal ballistics problem for SRM with umbrella type grain was solved during the main firing phase. In addition, flow parameters distribution in the combustion chamber was obtained for different time moments.

  11. Quantification of Ash Deposit Build-up and Removal in a Straw and Wood Suspension-Fired Boiler

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shafique Bashir, Muhammad; Jensen, Peter Arendt; Frandsen, Flemming

    2011-01-01

    deposit probe experiments revealed that deposit shedding was primarily through debonding from the surface of the tubes in the superheater region. Chemical analysis of fly ashes indicated that during suspension­firing of straw and wood, the fly ashes were rich in Si, K, Ca and Cl, but the relative......The aim of this study was to investigate ash deposit formation rate, heat uptake reduction and deposit removal by using advanced online ash deposition and sootblowing probes in a 350 MWth suspension­fired boiler, utilizing wood and straw pellets as fuel. The influence of fuel type (straw share...... in wood), probe exposure time, probe surface temperature (500, 550 and 600 oC) and flue gas temperature (600 ­1050 oC) on ash deposit formation rate, heat uptake by the probe, the fly ash and deposit characteristics, and deposit removal have been investigated. A systematic mathematical procedure was used...

  12. High temperatures in parallel or perpendicular wood grain direction: a numerical and experimental study

    OpenAIRE

    Fonseca, E.M.M.; Barreira, Luísa

    2011-01-01

    Wood is a natural material and is submitted to many constantly changing influences. Wood as a construction material presents many advantages due its high strength and stiffness to height ratios. The main advantages of timber constructions, relatively to the use of other materials, are: ease of construction and maintenance, pleasant appearance, renewable resource, lightweight. The high vulnerability of wood due accidental conditions requires a rigorous thermal and mechanical assessment. Safety...

  13. An evaluation of three wood shred blends for post-fire erosion control using indoor simulated rain events on small plots

    Science.gov (United States)

    R. B. Foltz; N. S. Wagenbrenner

    2010-01-01

    The assessment teams who make post-fire stabilization and treatment decisions are under pressure to employ more effective and economic post-fire treatments, as wild fire activity and severity has increased in recent years across the western United States. Use of forest-native wood-based materials for hillslope mulching has been on the rise due to potential...

  14. Wood

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Unterrainer, Walter

    2014-01-01

    is a renewable resource makes it predestinated for what is considered ´sustainable architecture´. But the reality is less linear and there are serious traps: In fact the lecture shows by examples that it is much easier to build very unsustainable buildings in wood than the other way round! Where does the wood...

  15. Fire safety of ETICS with wood fibreboards for multi-storey buildings – first research and development results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Küppers Judith

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Wood fibreboards can serve as alternative sustainable insulation material for external thermal insulation component systems (ETICS. In Germany, the application of ETICS with wood fibreboards is restricted to low buildings. The restrictions are mainly caused by the smouldering tendency of the wood fibreboards. Thus, the development of an ETICS with wood fibreboards for multi-storey buildings complying with the requirements would provide a new scope of application for this sustainable insulation material. This paper presents first results of standardised and innovative investigation methods as basis for the development. These investigations and analyses concern the fire behaviour, especially smouldering processes, the plaster system, other constructive protection measures as well as risk and safety analyses.

  16. Effects of post-fire wood management strategies on vegetation recovery and land surface temperature (LST) estimated from Landsat images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vlassova, Lidia; Pérez-Cabello, Fernando

    2016-02-01

    The study contributes remote sensing data to the discussion about effects of post-fire wood management strategies on forest regeneration. Land surface temperature (LST) and Normalized Differenced Vegetation Index (NDVI), estimated from Landsat-8 images are used as indicators of Pinus halepensis ecosystem recovery after 2008 fire in areas of three post-fire treatments: (1) salvage logging with wood extraction from the site on skidders in suspended position (SL); (2) snag shredding in situ leaving wood debris in place (SS) performed two years after the event; and (3) non-intervention control areas (CL) where all snags were left standing. Six years after the fire NDVI values ∼0.5 estimated from satellite images and field radiometry indicate considerable vegetation recovery due to efficient regeneration traits developed by the dominant plant species. However, two years after management activities in part of the burnt area, the effect of SL and SS on ecosystem recovery is observed in terms of both LST and NDVI. Statistically significant differences are detected between the intervened areas (SL and SS) and control areas of non-intervention (CL); no difference is registered between zones of different intervention types (SL and SS). CL areas are on average 1 °C cooler and 10% greener than those corresponding to either SL or SS, because of the beneficial effects of burnt wood residuals, which favor forest recovery through (i) enhanced nutrient cycling in soils, (ii) avoidance of soil surface disturbance and mechanical damage of seedlings typical to the managed areas, and (iii) ameliorated microclimate. The results of the study show that in fire-resilient ecosystems, such as P. halepensis forests, NDVI is higher and LST is lower in areas with no management intervention, being an indication of more favorable conditions for vegetation regeneration.

  17. Establishing fuelwood plantation and fire wood tree crop performance on the highlands of Ethiopia: The case of Eucalyptus globulus Labill.ssp globulus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mehari, A.

    1997-11-01

    This study reviews reasons for the establishment of fuelwood plantation and use of fuelwood in Ethiopia. The present and future status of fire wood and the environmental degradation and related consequences are also reviewed. 138 refs, 22 figs, 6 tabs

  18. MHD coal-fired flow facility baseline water-quality study. Woods Reservoir, May 1979-April 1980

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cooper, J.

    1980-12-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE) Magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) Coal-Fired Flow Facility (CFFF) is located on Woods Reservoir at The University of Tennessee Space Institute (UTSI). Part of the role of UTSI, as participants in the DOE program, is to document environmental aspects of coal-fired MHD. In early 1979, prior to operation of the CFFF, a water quality program was initiated to establish baseline conditions for the reservoir. The study was designed to provide an accurate assessment of water quality which could be used as a basis for comparison to evaluate the impact, if any, of the plant operation on the aquatic environment. Results of a one year baseline study of water quality on Woods Reservoir are presented in this report. The key findings are that this reservoir is a eutrophic lake. Its predominant ions are calcium and bicarbonate and its pH is circumneutral.

  19. Does the presence of large down wood at the time of a forest fire impact soil recovery?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jane E. Smith; Laurel A. Kluber; Tara N. Jennings; Donaraye McKay; Greg Brenner; Elizabeth W. Sulzman

    2017-01-01

    Fire may remove or create dead wood aboveground, but it is less clear how high severity burning of soils affects belowground microbial communities and soil processes, and for how long. In this study, we investigated soil fungal and bacterial communities and biogeochemical responses of severely burned ‘‘red” soil and less severely burned ‘‘black” soil from a burned...

  20. System and operational data for wood-chip fired district heating plants; Anlaegs- og driftsdata for flisfyrede varmevaerker

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-05-01

    The report describes conditions related to the 30 wood-chip fired district heating plants operating in Denmark at the beginning of 1994. The aim was to produce a survey of the technical installations as an aid to the establishment of future plants and to give leading personnel a collection of data as a means of comparison to help them in fault-finding procedures at their own plants. Detailed information, such as addresses, telephone numbers, capacity, design, contact persons in the case of each plant is found in the appendices. Otherwise information is given, in some cases illustrated by tables, graphs or a map (and related to the whole group of plants) on capacities, years of installation, storage conditions, transportation, stoking systems, flue gas cleaning and condensation, boilers, handling of ash etc. Operational and economical data are also presented. Two plants fired with wood pellets are described in addition to a cogeneration plant, Maabjergvaerket ved Holstebro, Denmark, that uses wood chips as fuel in conjunction with wastes, straw and natural gas. The quality of wood chips of various shapes and sizes was also investigated, based on examples from 13 of the 30 plants, and the results are presented in graphs. (AB)

  1. Wood

    Science.gov (United States)

    David W. Green; Robert H. White; Antoni TenWolde; William Simpson; Joseph Murphy; Robert J. Ross; Roland Hernandez; Stan T. Lebow

    2006-01-01

    Wood is a naturally formed organic material consisting essentially of elongated tubular elements called cells arranged in a parallel manner for the most part. These cells vary in dimensions and wall thickness with position in the tree, age, conditions of growth, and kind of tree. The walls of the cells are formed principally of chain molecules of cellulose, polymerized...

  2. Thinning and prescribed fire and projected trends in wood product potential, financial return, and fire hazard in New Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roger D. Fight; R. James Barbour; Glenn Christensen; Guy L. Pinjuv; Rao V. Nagubadi

    2004-01-01

    This work was undertaken under a joint fire science project "Assessing the need, costs, and potential benefits of prescribed fire and mechanical treatments to reduce fire hazard." This paper compares the future mix of timber projects under two treatment scenarios for New Mexico.We developed and demonstrated an analytical method that uses readily available...

  3. Thinning and prescribed fire and projected trends in wood product potential, financial return, and fire hazard in Montana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    R. James Barbour; Roger D. Fight; Glenn A. Christensen; Guy L. Pinjuv; Rao V. Nagubadi

    2004-01-01

    This work was undertaken under a joint fire science project "Assessing the need, costs, and potential benefits of prescribed fire and mechanical treatments to reduce fire hazard." This paper compares the future mix of timber products under two treatment scenarios for the state of Montana. We developed and demonstrated an analytical method that uses readily...

  4. URBAN WOOD/COAL CO-FIRING IN THE NIOSH BOILER PLANT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    James T. Cobb Jr.

    2005-02-10

    Phase I of this project began by obtaining R&D variances for permits at the NIOSH boilerplant (NBP), Emery Tree Service (ETS) and the J. A. Rutter Company (JARC) for their portions of the project. Wood for the test burn was obtained from the JARC inventory (pallets), Thompson Properties and Seven D Corporation (construction wood), and the Arlington Heights Housing Project (demolition wood). The wood was ground at ETS and JARC, delivered to the Three Rivers Terminal and blended with coal. Three one-day tests using wood/coal blends of 33% wood by volume (both construction wood and demolition wood) were conducted at the NBP. Blends using hammermilled wood were operationally successful. Emissions of SO{sub 2} and NOx decreased and that of CO increased when compared with combusting coal alone. Mercury emissions were measured and evaluated. During the first year of Phase II the principal work focused upon searching for a replacement boilerplant and developing a commercial supply of demolition wood. The NBP withdrew from the project and a search began for another stoker boilerplant in Pennsylvania to replace it on the project. Three potential commercial demolition wood providers were contacted. Two were not be able to supply wood. At the end of the first year of Phase II, discussions were continuing with the third one, a commercial demolition wood provider from northern New Jersey. During the two-and-a-third years of the contract extension it was determined that the demolition wood from northern New Jersey was impractical for use in Pittsburgh, in another power plant in central New Jersey, and in a new wood gasifier being planned in Philadelphia. However, the project team did identify sufficient wood from other sources for the gasifier project. The Principal Investigator of this project assisted a feasibility study of wood gasification in Clarion County, Pennsylvania. As a result of the study, an independent power producer in the county has initiated a small wood

  5. Post-fire wood management alters water stress, growth, and performance of pine regeneration in a Mediterranean ecosystem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maranon-Jimenez, Sara; Castro, Jorge; Querejeta, José Ignacio; Fernandez-Ondono, Emilia; Allen, Craig D.

    2013-01-01

    Extensive research has focused on comparing the impacts of post-fire salvage logging versus those of less aggressive management practices on forest regeneration. However, few studies have addressed the effects of different burnt-wood management options on seedling/sapling performance, or the ecophysiological mechanisms underlying differences among treatments. In this study, we experimentally assess the effects of post-fire management of the burnt wood on the growth and performance of naturally regenerating pine seedlings (Pinus pinaster). Three post-fire management treatments varying in degree of intervention were implemented seven months after a high-severity wildfire burned Mediterranean pine forests in the Sierra Nevada, southeast Spain: (a) “No Intervention” (NI, all burnt trees left standing); (b) “Partial Cut plus Lopping” (PCL, felling most of the burnt trees, cutting off branches, and leaving all the biomass on site without mastication); and (c) “Salvage Logging” (SL, felling the burnt trees, piling up the logs and masticating the fine woody debris). Three years after the fire, the growth, foliar nutrient concentrations, and leaf carbon, nitrogen and oxygen isotopic composition (δ13C, δ18O and δ15N) of naturally regenerating seedlings were measured in all the treatments. Pine seedlings showed greatest vigor and size in the PCL treatment, whereas growth was poorest in SL. The nutrient concentrations were similar among treatments, although greater growth in the two treatments with residual wood present indicated higher plant uptake. Seedlings in the SL treatment showed high leaf δ13C and δ18O values indicating severe water stress, in contrast to significantly alleviated water stress indications in the PCL treatment. Seedling growth and physiological performance in NI was intermediate between that of PCL and SL. After six growing seasons, P. pinaster saplings in PCL showed greater growth and cone production than SL saplings. In summary

  6. Energetic analysis of a wood fired grain drier; Analise energetica de secador de graos a lenha

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Campos, Alessandro Torres [Universidade Estadual do Oeste do Parana (UNIOESTE), Marechal Candido Rondon, PR (Brazil). Grupo de Pesquisas em Ambiencia do Oeste do Parana], e-mail: atcampos3@yahoo.com.br; Melo, Evandro de Castro; Sousa e Silva, Juarez de [Universidade Federal de Vicosa (UFV), Vicosa, MG (Brazil). Dept. de Engenharia Agricola

    2004-07-01

    Aiming at the attendance of a small and medium size group of producers a four chambers fixed-bed dryer prototype with a mechanical revolving system was designed, constructed and energy performance tested. During drying for the prototype test, using coffee the revolving operation proceeded in two chambers which were connected to the dryer plenum at different positions and at a regular three-hours intervals; the other chambers remained static. The dryer operated at a drying-air temperature of 43 deg C and an air-flow of 21 m3 min-1 m-2. In the realized test the product moisture content was reduced from 43.1 to 12.7% w.b. over a 42-hours period. The specific energy consumption was 12.752 kJ per kilogram of evaporated water. The obtained results showed that chamber 1 which was submitted to the revolving operation presented the best work conditions due to your plenum connection position. (author)

  7. Effectiveness of Polyacrylamide, Wood Shred Mulch, and Pine Needle Mulch as Post-Fire Hillslope Stabilization Treatments in Two Contrasting Volcanic Soils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonay Neris

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Post-fire hillslope stabilization treatments aim to reduce runoff-erosion risks following forest fires by counteracting the impact of fire on key soil and hillslope properties. Here we evaluate the effectiveness of wood shred mulch, long-leaved pine needle mulch, and polyacrylamide (PAM in reducing post-fire runoff and erosion in two volcanic soil types of contrasting wettability using rainfall simulations (55 mm h−1 for 30 min at the microplot (0.25 m2 scale. The cover provided by the wood shreds and pine needles led to a reduction of runoff and erosion in both the wettable—(62% and 92%, respectively, for wood shreds, and 55% and 87%, respectively, for needle mulch and the extremely water-repellent soils (44% and 61%, respectively, for wood shreds. In contrast to what might be expected, PAM did not reduce runoff or erosion when applied to the extremely water-repellent soils, suggesting that PAM should not be applied in this terrain type. Although more research is needed to determine whether the high effectiveness of pine needle mulch and wood shred mulch fully translates to coarser scales, the results are encouraging in terms of these materials’ ability to provide effective and relatively economic mitigation treatments for fire-induced runoff-erosion risks in volcanic soils.

  8. Exposures to high levels of carbon monoxide from wood-fired temazcal (steam bath) use in highland Guatemala.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Lisa M; Clark, Michael; Cadman, Brie; Canúz, Eduardo; Smith, Kirk R

    2011-01-01

    The temazcal is a wood-fired steam bath used in the rural highlands of Guatemala for bathing and healing. We measured carbon monoxide (CO) among 288 participants in 72 temazcales. Participants were drawn from communities who participated in the RESPIRE (Randomized Exposure Study of Pollution Indoors and Respiratory Effects) chimney stove intervention trial. Temazcal CO exposures were extremely high, averaging 431 parts per million (time-weighted average). Compared to kitchen wood-smoke exposures, the temazcal contributes significantly to weekly exposures, despite the fact that the population spends less time in the temazcal than in the kitchen. This report 1) describes temazcal use patterns; 2) reports participants' signs and symptoms during temazcal use; 3) models the distribution of temazcal CO concentrations; 4) assesses reliability of exhaled breath CO as a biomarker of CO exposure; and 5) provides a proportional analysis of CO concentrations from temazcal use, as compared to kitchen concentrations.

  9. Test Firing of chunk wood - Is it possible to automate the fuel supply?; Proveldning av knubbved - Aer det moejligt att automatisera braenslematningen?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Persson, Tomas; Danielsson, Bengt-Olof

    2013-05-15

    Chunk wood is a wood fuel with a fuel particle length typically between 50 and 150 mm. The ad-vantage of chunk wood compared to wood chips is that the fuel dry as fast as fuel wood, but can be produced and handled as wood chip. Technologies for efficient producing, drying and distribution of Chunk wood have been developed since the 1970:s and machines for manufacturing the fuel is available on the market, but still there is no small-scale heating equipment in operation to burn the fuel automatically. The aim of the study was to investigate how the feeding and firing of chunk wood works in a standard 200 kW biomass boiler for various types of biofuels. The main focus was on studying how the fuel feeding system works using chunk wood and if the combustion and emissions are satisfactory. The boiler have a main fuel feeding auger screw connected to the bottom of the fuel storage, followed by a cell feeder and another auger screw that is feeding the fuel into the combustion chamber. The power consumption for the fuel feeding auger screws and the CO-emissions were measured during the firing period. In order to obtain reference values for the stresses in the fuel feeding system and the CO-emissions, regular wood chips were initially fired followed by the chunk wood firing. During the chunk wood firing period several interruptions in the fuel feeding occurred, as the trigger mechanism for the motor protection stopped the fuel supply. Most of the interruptions, however, could be resolved through manual reversing of the fuel feeding auger screw. Only at two occasions the entrance to the auger screw were manually cleared from large fuel pieces. The cell feeder and the auger screw feeding the fuel into the combustion chamber were stopped twice, and to continue operating the boiler it was enough to restart the feeding system. However, as they are both operated by the same motor we do not know whether the two shutdowns that occurred were caused by feeding problems in the auger

  10. Prospects for co-firing of clean coal and creosote-treated waste wood at small-scale power stations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zandersons Janis

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available If a small-scale clean coal fueled power plant is co-fueled with 5% of creosote-treated used-up sleeper wood, the decontamination by carbonisation at 500 °C in an indirectly heated rotary kiln with the diameter 1.7 m and effective length 10 m can be realized. It should be included in the "3R Clean Coal Carbonisation Plant" system, which processes coal. It will improve the heat balance of the system, since the carbonisation of wood will deliver a lot of high caloricity pyroligneous vapour to the joint furnace of the "3R Clean Coal Carbonisation Plant". Pine wood sleeper sapwood contains 0.25% of sulphur, but the average pine sleeper wood (sapwood and heartwood 0.05% of sulphur. Most of the sulphur is lost with the pyroligneous vapour and burned in the furnace. Since the "3R Clean Coal Carbonisation Plant" is equipped with a flue gases cleaning system, the SO2 emission level will not exceed 5 mg/m3. The charcoal of the sapwood portion of sleepers and that of the average sleeper wood will contain 0.22% and 0.035% of sulphur, respectively. The increase of the carbonisation temperature does not substantially decrease the sulphur content in charcoal, although it is sufficiently low, and the charcoal can be co-fired with clean coal. The considered process is suitable for small power plants, if the biomass input in the common energy balance is 5 to 10%. If the mean distance of sleepers transportation for Central and Eastern Europe is estimated not to exceed 200 km, the co-combustion of clean coal and carbonized sleepers would be an acceptable option from the environmental and economic points of view.

  11. Fire and fire extinguishment in silos. An experimental study[Storage of wood fuel pellets]; Brand och brandslaeckning i siloanlaeggningar. En experimentell studie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Persson, Henry; Blomqvist, Per; Zhenghua Yan

    2007-01-15

    A series of four tests have been conducted with wood pellets stored in a reduced size silo. The tests were conducted in order to increase the knowledge on fire development, detection and extinction technique in silo fires. The project originated from a pre-study on the extinction of silo fires made for the Swedish Rescue Service Agency (SRV). The test silo was built of concrete rings, had a diameter of 1 m, and a height of almost 6 m, which gave a volume of 4.4 m{sup 3}. The silo was filled with wood pellets up to a height of 5 m. A local auto ignition was imitated by a coiled heating wire placed in the pellet bulk centrally in the silo and a self sustaining pyrolysis zone was established within one hour. The silo was instrumented with almost 100 thermocouples as a mean to follow the development of the pyrolysis zone and later the efficiency of the extinguishment. Gas analyses were further made, both in the top of the silo, and at four different levels in the pellet bulk. After 30 hours the extinguishment was initiated using nitrogen (N{sub 2}) and carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}), respectively. The gas was injected into the bottom of the silo. Two tests were also conducted where gas injection was combined foam application in the top of the silo. The tests showed that the pyrolysis zone preferably spreads downwards in the silo, while moisture and pyrolysis gases form a wave that slowly spreads upwards. It was difficult to detect the fire before the main 'gas wave' reached the pellet surface in the silo top, and detection time was about 20 hours in these tests. The spread of the pyrolysis zone, downward, was even slower. The slow development is probably an explanation of why real silo fires often are rather extensive once discovered. Inerting the silo with either nitrogen or carbon dioxide worked out well in the tests. The gas must be in gas phase and slowly introduced into the silo, as close to the bottom as possible. An efficient extinction implies an air

  12. Full-scale ash deposition measurements at Avedøre Power Plant unit 2 during suspension-firing of wood with and without coal ash addition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wu, Hao; Shafique Bashir, Muhammad; Jensen, Peter Arendt

    addition on deposit formation during wood suspension-firing at AVV2 was evaluated. It was revealed that the addition of coal fly ash could significantly influence the ash deposition/shedding behaviors and the deposit properties. The effect was evident at both measurement locations. At the location......The formation of deposits during suspension-firing of wood at Avedøre Power Plant unit 2 (AVV2) was studied by using an advanced deposit probe system. The tests were conducted both with and without coal ash addition, and at two different locations with flue gas temperatures of 1250-1300 oC and 750...

  13. Study on the potential use of nano-wollastonite to improve the fire resistance and dimensional stability of poplar wood (Populus nigra

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haghighi Azar

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available In this study possibility of nano-wollastonite uses for improving fire retardency of poplar wood (Populus nigra was investigated. Also, water absorption and volumetric swelling of specimens were measured. Specimens for fire resistance were prepared according to ISO 11925 standard and for physical properties ASTM D4446-2002 standard. Specimens were impregnated with nano-wollastonite (NW, using full-cell process. Rate of concentrations were, 4, 6.3, 10 and 12 percent. Five fire-retarding properties were measured including: weight loss (%, ignition point (s, duration of flame after removing the burner (s, duration of glow after removing the burner (s, and carbonized area (%. The results showed that fire-retarding properties were increased with the NW-content. Furthermore, the treated wood specimens showed higher dimensional stability.

  14. Combined particle emission reduction and heat recovery from combustion exhaust - A novel approach for small wood-fired appliances

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Messerer, A.; Poeschl, U.; Niessner, R. [Technical University of Munich, Munich (Germany). Institute of Hydrochemistry; Schmatloch, V. [EMPA, Swiss Federal Institute for Materials Research and Testing, Duebendorf (Switzerland)

    2007-07-15

    Replacing fossil fuels by renewable sources of energy is one approach to address the problem of global warming due to anthropogenic emissions of greenhouse gases. Wood combustion can help to replace fuel oil or gas. It is advisable, however, to use modern technology for combustion and exhaust gas after-treatment in order to achieve best efficiency and avoid air quality problems due to high emission levels often related to small scale wood combustion. In this study, simultaneous combustion particle deposition and heat recovery from the exhaust of two commercially available wood-fired appliances has been investigated. The experiments were performed with a miniature pipe bundle heat exchanger operating in the exhaust gas lines of a fully automated pellet burner or a closed fireplace. The system has been characterised for a wide range of aerosol inlet temperatures (135-295 {sup circle} C) and flow velocities (0.13-1.0ms{sup -1}), and particle deposition efficiencies up to 95% have been achieved. Deposition was dominated by thermophoresis and diffusion and increased with the average temperature difference and retention time in the heat exchanger. The aerosols from the two different appliances exhibited different deposition characteristics, which can be attributed to enhanced deposition of the nucleation mode particles generated in the closed fire place. The measured deposition efficiencies can be described by simple linear parameterisations derived from laboratory studies. The results of this study demonstrate the feasibility of thermophoretic particle removal from biomass burning flue gas and support the development of modified heat exchanger systems with enhanced capability for simultaneous heat recovery and particle deposition. (author)

  15. STATIC BENDING STRENGHT OF WOOD TREATED WITH FIRE RETERDANT AND WATER REPELLENT PRESERVATION CHEMICALS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hüseyin PEKER

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available This study has designed for determination of static bending strenght of mainly boron impregnated scots pine and east beech wood. Other chemicals used as control are polyethylene glycole (PEG-400 and some commercial preservatives such as Vacsol (V, Ammonıum sulphate (AS and Diammonium phospate (DAP were used by secondary process on the boron or PEG treated wood by the aim of improving static bending strenght and avoiding the leachability of both chemicals. Result indicated that static bending strenght of scots pine wood were reduced by acidic solutions of salts. In beech wood static bending strenght were also affected by neutral pH of the solution. Water repellent , surprisingly don't show their aspected protective properties of static bending strength, in general .

  16. Laboratory investigation of photochemical oxidation of organic aerosol from wood fires 2: analysis of aerosol mass spectrometer data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. P. Grieshop

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Experiments were conducted to investigate the effects of photo-oxidation on organic aerosol (OA in dilute wood smoke by exposing emissions from soft- and hard-wood fires to UV light in a smog chamber. This paper focuses on changes in OA composition measured using a unit-mass-resolution quadrupole Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (AMS. The results highlight how photochemical processing can lead to considerable evolution of the mass, volatility and level of oxygenation of biomass-burning OA. Photochemical oxidation produced substantial new OA, more than doubling the OA mass after a few hours of aging under typical summertime conditions. Aging also decreased the volatility of the OA and made it progressively more oxygenated. The results also illustrate strengths of, and challenges with, using AMS data for source apportionment analysis. For example, the mass spectra of fresh and aged BBOA are distinct from fresh motor-vehicle emissions. The mass spectra of the secondary OA produced from aging wood smoke are very similar to those of the oxygenated OA (OOA that dominates ambient AMS datasets, further reinforcing the connection between OOA and OA formed from photo-chemistry. In addition, aged wood smoke spectra are similar to those from OA created by photo-oxidizing dilute diesel exhaust. This demonstrates that the OOA observed in the atmosphere can be produced by photochemical aging of dilute emissions from different types of combustion systems operating on fuels with modern or fossil carbon. Since OOA is frequently the dominant component of ambient OA, the similarity of spectra of aged emissions from different sources represents an important challenge for AMS-based source apportionment studies.

  17. Impact of Coal Fly Ash Addition on Combustion Aerosols (PM2.5) from Full-Scale Suspension-Firing of Pulverized Wood

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Damø, Anne Juul; Wu, Hao; Frandsen, Flemming

    2014-01-01

    The formation of combustion aerosols was studied in an 800 MWth suspension-fired power plant boiler, during combustion of pulverized wood pellets with and without addition of coal fly ash as alkali capture additive. The aerosol particles were sampled and characterized by a low-pressure cascade im...

  18. Advanced air/flue gas staging based on CFD modelling for enhanced combustion and burnout in a waste-wood fired boiler

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rajh, Boštjan; Yin, Chungen; Samec, Niko

    2017-01-01

    The paper presents the impacts of the jet momentum, position and orientation of air and Recycled Flue Gas (RFG) streams on the performance of a grate-fired boiler burning waste wood via a comprehensive CFD-based parametric study. It is found that the air and RFG jets can be optimized to enhance m...

  19. Suspension-firing of wood with coal ash addition: Probe measurements of ash deposit build-up at Avedøre Power Plant (AVV2)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shafique Bashir, Muhammad; Jensen, Peter Arendt; Jappe Frandsen, Flemming

    This report is about full-scale probe measurements of deposit build-up and removal conducted at the Avedøreværket Unit 2, a 800 MWth suspension boiler, firing wood and natural gas with the addition of coal ash. Coal ash was used as an additive to capture potassium (K) from wood-firing. Investigat......This report is about full-scale probe measurements of deposit build-up and removal conducted at the Avedøreværket Unit 2, a 800 MWth suspension boiler, firing wood and natural gas with the addition of coal ash. Coal ash was used as an additive to capture potassium (K) from wood......-firing. Investigations of deposit formation rate were made by use of an advanced online ash deposition/shedding probe. Quantification of ash deposition and shedding was made via deposit mass uptake signals obtained from the deposit probe. The influence of coal ash, flue gas temperature, probe surface temperature...... and boiler load on ash deposition propensity was investigated. Results of ash deposition propensity showed increasing trend with increasing flue gas temperature. Video monitoring revealed that the deposits formed were not sticky and could be easily removed, and even at very high flue gas temperatures (> 1350...

  20. Hydrothermal Synthesis of Nanooctahedra MnFe₂O₄ onto the Wood Surface with Soft Magnetism, Fire Resistance and Electromagnetic Wave Absorption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hanwei; Yao, Qiufang; Wang, Chao; Ma, Zhongqing; Sun, Qingfeng; Fan, Bitao; Jin, Chunde; Chen, Yipeng

    2017-05-23

    In this study, nanooctahedra MnFe₂O₄ were successfully deposited on a wood surface via a low hydrothermal treatment by hydrogen bonding interactions. As-prepared MnFe₂O₄/wood composite (MW) had superior performance of soft magnetism, fire resistance and electromagnetic wave absorption. Among them, small hysteresis loops and low coercivity (magnetization-field curve of MW with saturation magnetization of 28.24 emu/g, indicating its excellent soft magnetism. The MW also exhibited a good fire-resistant property due to its initial burning time at 20 s; while only 6 s for the untreated wood (UW) in combustion experiments. Additionally, this composite revealed good electromagnetic wave absorption with a minimum reflection loss of -9.3 dB at 16.48 GHz. Therefore, the MW has great potential in the fields of special decoration and indoor electromagnetic wave absorbers.

  1. Application of TREECS to Small Arms Firing Ranges at Fort Leonard Wood, MO

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-01

    depends on the chemical form of the weathered metal product and the ambient soil chemistry . Visual MINTEQ (VM) (http://www2.lwr.kth.se/English...Dortch. April 4. Physical Scientist, Clean Water Act ( Stormwater ) Program Manager. Fort Leonard Wood, Missouri: Directorate of Public Works

  2. Fire safety

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robert H. White; Mark A. Dietenberger

    1999-01-01

    Fire safety is an important concern in all types of construction. The high level of national concern for fire safety is reflected in limitations and design requirements in building codes. These code requirements are discussed in the context of fire safety design and evaluation in the initial section of this chapter. Since basic data on fire behavior of wood products...

  3. Aalestrup wood-fired cogeneration plant. Pilot project; Aalestrup traefyret kraftvarmevaerk; Forprojekt

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Astrupgaard, N.P.; Karlsen, P.E.

    1993-11-01

    A pilot project investigating the technical and economical potentials for a small cogeneration plant (500kW) fuelled with wood wastes is described. The boiler comprises a pre-combustion area for burning wood chips and sawdust coupled to a standard two-channel industrial steam boiler supplied with an overheater after each channel providing steam at a temperature of 225 degrees centigrade. The overheater gives overheating to the level of 380 degrees centigrade. A steam motor will be used for the expansion of the steam. The total cost of the plant is estimated to be 12.2 million Danish kroners and the capacity 500/2050 kW. The payback period should be about 10 years. The design, operation and economy of the plant are illustrated and described and a number of tables exemplify related budgets and investment. (AB)

  4. CARACTHERIZATION OF BIOMASS ENERGY AND CARBONIZATION OF COFFEE GRAINS (Coffea arabica, L) AND (Cedrelinga catenaeformis), DUKE WOOD RESIDUES

    OpenAIRE

    Ailton Teixeira do Vale; Luiz Vicente Gentil; Joaquim Carlos Gonçalez; Alexandre Florian da Costa

    2007-01-01

    Brazil produces annually two million tons of coffee s husks from farms or industrial processing units. This wastematerial can be used for energy production; currently it is mainly used in agricultural practices as field straw cover up. This paperdeals with coffee s (Coffea arabica, L) husks biomass energy characteristics, including wood carbonization. As a reference, the samestudy was performed with a wood species regularly used for building construction named Cedrorana (Cedrelinga catenaefor...

  5. Laboratory investigation of photochemical oxidation of organic aerosol from wood fires 1: measurement and simulation of organic aerosol evolution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. P. Grieshop

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Experiments were conducted to investigate the effects of photo-oxidation on organic aerosol (OA emissions from flaming and smoldering hard- and soft-wood fires under plume-like conditions. This was done by exposing the dilute emissions from a small wood stove to UV light in a smog chamber and measuring the gas- and particle-phase pollutant concentrations with a suite of instruments including a Proton Transfer Reaction Mass Spectrometer (PTR-MS, an Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (AMS and a thermodenuder. The measurements highlight how atmospheric processing can lead to considerable evolution of the mass and volatility of biomass-burning OA. Photochemical oxidation produced substantial new OA, increasing concentrations by a factor of 1.5 to 2.8 after several hours of exposure to typical summertime hydroxyl radical (OH concentrations. Less than 20% of this new OA could be explained using a state-of-the-art secondary organic aerosol model and the measured decay of traditional SOA precursors. The thermodenuder data indicate that the primary OA is semivolatile; at 50°C between 50 and 80% of the fresh primary OA evaporated. Aging reduced the volatility of the OA; at 50°C only 20 to 40% of aged OA evaporated. The predictions of a volatility basis-set model that explicitly tracks the partitioning and aging of low-volatility organics was compared to the chamber data. The OA production can be explained by the oxidation of low-volatility organic vapors; the model can also reproduce observed changes in OA volatility and composition. The model was used to investigate the competition between photochemical processing and dilution on OA concentrations in plumes.

  6. Wood pellet milling tests in a suspension-fired power plant

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Masche, Marvin; Puig-Arnavat, Maria; Wadenbäck, Johan

    2018-01-01

    consumption and the differential mill pressure. The size and shape of comminuted pellets sampled from burner pipes were analyzed by dynamic image analysis and sieve analysis, respectively. The results showed that the internal pellet particle size distribution affected both the milling behavior...... at lower mill loads and lower primary airflow rates reduced the mill power consumption, the mill pressure drop, and the classifier cut size. However, this was at the expense of a higher specific grinding energy consumption. Derived 2D shape parameters for comminuted and internal pellet particles were...... similar. Mill operating changes had a negligible effect on the original elongated wood particle shape. To achieve the desired comminuted product fineness (i.e., the classifier cut size) with lower specific grinding energy consumption, power plant operators need to choose pellets with a finer internal...

  7. Ashes from straw and wood-chip fired plants for agricultural usage. Pilot project; Aske fra halm- og flisfyrede vaerker til jordbrugsmaessig anvendelse. Forprojekt

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morsing, M. [Forskningscentret for Skov og Landskab (Denmark); Westborg, S. [dk-TEKNIK (Denmark)

    1994-08-01

    The content of nutrients and heavy metals in ashes from the combustion of straw and wood chips at district heating plants is studied, on the basis of results of analyses from Danish municipalities, to determine whether such ashes are suitable for use as fertilizers. Results of the analysis of ashes from 9 wood-chip fired and 26 straw-fired plants are presented. They show significant variations in nutrient and heavy metal content which could be caused by combustion and operational conditions and/or testing methods. On condition that the phosphorous content of straw and wood-chip ashes amount to 1% of the dry matter, 50%-75% of the straw ashes and under 50% of wood chip ashes analyses are within the limit for cadmium stipulated in the Danish Ministry of the Environment`s Executive Order no. 736 on the use of wastes for agricultural purposes. This is found to be unsatisfactory. It is suggested that a closer investigation should be undertaken in order to determine which amount of straw and wood-chip ashes can be accepted for use as fertilizers in consideration of the stipulated limits for cadmium content of wastes to be used for agricultural purposes. In addition the technological and economic potentials of dosing of these ashes for this use should be investigated. Fly ash and slag were also included in the analysis results studied and it was found that the cadmium content of slag did not prevent its use as fertilizer, but that the distribution of cadmium in slag, in fly ash and in slam from flue gas cleaning systems related to the combustion of wood chips should be further investigated. (AB)

  8. Ash problem at wood fired fluidized bed plants; Askproblem vid skogsbraensleeldning i fluidbaedd

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hansson, Soeren; Nystroem, Olle; Axby, Fredrik [Sycon Energikonsult AB, Malmoe (Sweden); Andersson, Christer; Kling, Aasa [Vattenfall Utveckling AB, Aelvkarleby (Sweden)

    2001-03-01

    Several ash related problems occurs during conversion from fossil fuels to bio fuels. The most frequent and expensive problem is agglomeration of bed material (in fluidized beds) and fouling on superheating surfaces. The last problem leads to corrosion problem and decreased transfer of heat. This project is the first part of a proposed project focussed on fluidized bed combustion (FB), because FB have become the dominating technology for combustion of biofuels. The project includes this first update of what has been done by different research institutes since 1997 and results of questionnaire on operating problems to owners of fluidized bed plants. A couple of pilot studies and different thermodynamical studies of bed agglomeration with biofuel combustion have been done during the latest years. There are no published reports where the results from agglomeration tests in pilot scale are verified in full scale plants. No project was found which deals with the fouling problem in the cyclone in a circulating fluidized bed. The knowledge of the mechanisms of deposits growth on heat surfaces is incomplete and more research has to be done of what can prevent the deposit growth. Experience from full scale plants shows that the deposits on heat surfaces grows during a period and after that it falls of the heating surface. There is little knowledge of which ash and flue gas conditions that affects these conditions for bio fuel. The operational experience with wood fuels in circulating fluidized beds is that the main problem with bed material is in the inlet and outlet of the cyclone. A total desulfonated of the bed occurs only when there has been other disturbances or because of operator mistakes. There are a number of things which seem to influence on the deposit problems: (1) Boilers with long residence time have less problem than boilers with short residence time. (2) Fuel size. No plant owner have continuos analysis of the fuel size, but combustion with problem have a

  9. Development of a low-emission automatic wood-chip firing system based on pyrolysis. Entwicklung einer emissionsarmen, automatischen Holzschnitzelfeuerung nach dem Vergaserprinzip

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Graf, S. (ETH, Zurich (Switzerland))

    1991-05-01

    Within the framework of a project supported by the Commission for the Assistance of Scientific Research the prototype of a new wood chip firing has been developed. In this system wood is mainly thermally degassed. After the pyrolysis chamber the gas passes through a reduction chamber in which the nitrogen oxides evolved during degassing are reduced to elementary nitrogen. Then the combustion chamber follows which is equipped with fixed ceramic guide vanes which cause an angular momentum of the flame and thus ensure that the carbonization gases and combustion air are also in case of minimum load thoroughly mixed. After combustion the hot flue gases stream back around the pyrolysis chamber giving off a part of the heat and are then conducted to a heat exchanger. (BWI).

  10. Tubers, grains, dung and wood: studying hearth contents at the early Natufian Shubayqa 1 (north-eastern Jordan)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Otaegui, Amaia Arranz; Richter, Tobias

    Unfortunately, very few are the Natufian sites in southwest Asia that have provided large and securely dated archaeobotanical assemblages. As a result, our knowledge regarding the exploitation of plant resources during this time period is very limited. This general paucity of data largely contrasts...... charcoal. The results of the analyses highlight new practices in terms of plant food consumption and use of fuel resources during the Natufian period. The analyses reveal the importance of storage organs of wild plants in the subsistence strategies as well as the use of dung and specific wood taxa as fuel...

  11. The Asian Wood Pellet Markets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joseph A. Roos; Allen Brackley

    2012-01-01

    This study examines the three major wood pellet markets in Asia: China, Japan, and South Korea. In contrast to the United States, where most wood pellets are used for residential heating with pellet stoves, a majority of the wood pellets in Asia are used for co-firing at coal-fired power plants. Our analysis indicated that Japan is the largest importer of wood pellets...

  12. CARACTHERIZATION OF BIOMASS ENERGY AND CARBONIZATION OF COFFEE GRAINS (Coffea arabica, L AND (Cedrelinga catenaeformis, DUKE WOOD RESIDUES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ailton Teixeira do Vale

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Brazil produces annually two million tons of coffee s husks from farms or industrial processing units. This wastematerial can be used for energy production; currently it is mainly used in agricultural practices as field straw cover up. This paperdeals with coffee s (Coffea arabica, L husks biomass energy characteristics, including wood carbonization. As a reference, the samestudy was performed with a wood species regularly used for building construction named Cedrorana (Cedrelinga catenaeformis,Duke. Coffee s husks was obtained from a farm 150 km far from Brasilia city and cedrorana sawdust from a local saw mill. Thispaper presents results from energy and biomass variables like moisture content, bulk density, lower and superior heating power, ashcontent, fixed carbon, volatile matter and volumetric energy. It has also studied carbonization, charcoal, pyroligneous licqor and noncondensablegases. A comparison between Coffee s husk with 0% moisture content and Cedrorana sawdust portrays the followingresults: bulk density 144.41 kg/m3, fixed carbon 10.31%, superior heating power 4.57 kWh (or 16.46 MJ or 3.933 Mcal/kg, charcoalcontent 40,64% and heating value per cubic meter 2,179 MJ/m3

  13. Fire performance issues

    Science.gov (United States)

    S. M. Cramer; R. H. White

    1997-01-01

    The worldwide movement toward performance-based building codes is prompting the need for new computational methods to predict fire endurance of wood assemblies. Progress in the past twenty years in understanding fire endurance of individual solid wood components has been achieved in many different countries. The greatest opportunity for major advance in fire research...

  14. Radial growth and wood density of white pine in relation to fossil-fired power plant operations

    Science.gov (United States)

    W. T. Lawhon; F. W. Woods

    1976-01-01

    The objectives of this study were twofold: (1) to develop a gamma densitometry technique for measuring the relative wood density and radial growth of trees from 12 mm increment cores; and (2) to determine whether changes in the relative wood density and radial growth of "resistant" eastern white pine (Pinus strobus L.) occurred after...

  15. Laboratory investigation of fire transfer from exterior wood decks to buildings in the wildland-urban interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laura E. Hasburgh; Donald S. Stone; Samuel L. Zelinka

    2017-01-01

    In the wildland-urban interface, wood decks are a target for wildfire and may be ignited by firebrands or flaming debris. Wood decks also present a potential source for ignition of structures in the wildland-urban interface. However, their role in ignition of the adjacent structure is unclear and current regulation is based in part on anecdotal evidence. This paper...

  16. Interaction of copper wood preservatives and adhesives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charles R. Frihart

    2003-01-01

    Compared to other substrates, wood is generally easy to bond. However, adhesion is diminished when the wood surface is covered by chemicals, whether natural oils and resins or added chemicals. Among the chemicals added to wood are fire retardants and wood preservatives. Chromated copper arsenate (CCA) has been widely used to protect wood against rot and termites, but...

  17. PSNH's Northern Wood power project repowers coal-fired plant with new fluidized-bed combustor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peltier, R.

    2007-08-15

    The Northern Wood Power project permanently replaced a 50-MW coal-burning boiler (Unit 5) at Public Service of New Hampshire's Schiller station with a state-of-the-art circulating fluidized bed wood-burning boiler of the same capacity. The project, completed in December 2006, reduced emissions and expanded the local market for low-grade wood. For planning and executing the multiyear, $75 million project at no cost to its ratepayers, PSNH wins Power's 2007 Marmaduke Award for excellence in O & M. The award is named for Marmaduke Surfaceblow, the fictional marine engineer/plant troubleshoot par excellence. 7 figs., 1 tab.

  18. Effects of prescribed fire on the wood quality and marketability of four hardwood species in the central Appalachian region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janice K. Wiedenbeck; Thomas M. Schuler

    2014-01-01

    A series of research studies addressing the effect of prescribed fire on oak (Quercus spp.) regeneration has been ongoing on the Fernow Experimental Forest in northeastern West Virginia for 10 years. The study site is a mesic, mixed oak forest. Two prescribed fires were conducted in spring 2002 and 2005. In 2010, a shelterwood harvest was conducted....

  19. Precision wood particle feedstocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dooley, James H; Lanning, David N

    2013-07-30

    Wood particles having fibers aligned in a grain, wherein: the wood particles are characterized by a length dimension (L) aligned substantially parallel to the grain, a width dimension (W) normal to L and aligned cross grain, and a height dimension (H) normal to W and L; the L.times.H dimensions define two side surfaces characterized by substantially intact longitudinally arrayed fibers; the W.times.H dimensions define two cross-grain end surfaces characterized individually as aligned either normal to the grain or oblique to the grain; the L.times.W dimensions define two substantially parallel top and bottom surfaces; and, a majority of the W.times.H surfaces in the mixture of wood particles have end checking.

  20. Nepal Ambient Monitoring and Source Testing Experiment (NAMaSTE): Emissions of particulate matter from wood and dung cooking fires, brick kilns, generators, trash and crop residue burning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stone, Elizabeth; Jayarathne, Thilina; Stockwell, Chelsea; Christian, Ted; Bhave, Prakash; Siva Praveen, Puppala; Panday, Arnico; Adhikari, Sagar; Maharjan, Rashmi; Goetz, Doug; DeCarlo, Peter; Saikawa, Eri; Yokelson, Robert

    2016-04-01

    The Nepal Ambient Monitoring and Source Testing Experiment (NAMASTE) field campaign targeted the in situ characterization of widespread and under-sampled combustion sources. In Kathmandu and the Terai, southern Nepal's flat plains, samples of fine particulate matter (PM2.5) were collected from wood and dung cooking fires (n = 22), generators (n = 2), groundwater pumps (n = 2), clamp kilns (n = 3), zig-zag kilns (n = 3), trash burning (n = 4), one heating fire, and one crop residue fire. Co-located measurements of carbon dioxide, carbon monoxide, and volatile organic compounds allowed for the application of the carbon mass balance approach to estimate emission factors for PM2.5, elemental carbon, organic carbon, and water-soluble inorganic ions. Organic matter was chemically speciated using gas chromatography - mass spectrometry for polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, sterols, n-alkanes, hopanes, steranes, and levoglucosan, which accounted for 2-8% of the measured organic carbon. These data were used to develop molecular-marker based profiles for use in source apportionment modeling. This study provides quantitative emission factors for particulate matter and its constituents for many important combustion sources in Nepal and South Asia.

  1. Glueability and fire resistance of wood-mineral composites using the water glass-boron compound system; Mizu garasu-hoso kagobutsukei ni yoru mukishitsu fukugotai no secchakusei to nannensei

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Furuno, T.; Tadokoro, R.; Uehara, T. [Shimane Univ., Shimane (Japan). Faculty of Agriculture

    1995-03-15

    Wood-mineral composites have been fabricated by impregnating a water glass (sodium silicate)- boron compound into wood and its glueability and fire resistance have been examined. In other words, using buna veneers, inorganic composite wood veneers have been prepared by a double diffusion treatment and a single treatment of boron compound only. Then using a phenol-resorcinol resin adhesive, two-ply plywoods have been prepared, its adhesion strength has been obtained by a tensile-shearing test, and a combustion test has been conducted with a microburner. As a result, the glue-joint strength of the wood-mineral composites has been reduced by either the single or double treatments above in comparison with the untreated wood, and regarding the double treated veneer, its value has been 44% to 65% of that of the untreated wood. As a result of the contact angle measurement, the wood-mineral composites have become more wettable, as cos {theta} has increased, the adhesion strength has shown a trend of declining, and the wettability has had no relationship with the improvement of the glue-joint strength. Also as a result of the combustion test, a wood-mineral composite plywood using a boron compound has shown an inhibiting effect over heat and flaming. 9 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab.

  2. Effect of grain type and toasting conditions of barrels on the concentration of the volatile substances released by the wood and on the sensory characteristics of Montepulciano d'Abruzzo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bosso, A; Petrozziello, M; Santini, D; Motta, S; Guaita, M; Marulli, C

    2008-09-01

    We report the results of an aging trial of Montepulciano d'Abruzzo D.O.C. wine in commercially available oak barrels that differed in the type of wood grain (extra fine and fine) and cooperage toasting conditions: medium (EVM), light (EVL), medium for a shorter time (CM), and, finally, a single short-time pretoasting stage at high temperature (ExpT). The chemical-physical composition, the volatile substances released by the wood, and the sensory characteristics of wines after 6 and 12 mo of aging were monitored. The differences observed were mainly in the concentration of volatile substances and the olfactory characteristics of the wines. The volatile compounds that could distinguish among the wines were the cis isomer of beta-methyl-gamma-octalactone, the ratio between cis and trans octalactone, vanillin, cyclotene, maltol, 5-methyl guaiacol, and the furfuryl compounds. The concentration of cis octalactone was influenced by the type of grain of the wood, while the cis/trans octalactones ratio varied depending on the toasting conditions used in the production of the barrels (the highest concentration was in EVL). In particular, the length of time (EVM compared with CM) and the temperature (EVM compared with EVL) of the toasting process influenced the concentration of vanillin, furfuryl alcohols, cis octalactone, and 5 methyl guaiacol. Among the olfactory descriptors, statistically significant differences were detected in the notes of caramel, toasty, spicy, green pepper, coconut, and wood.

  3. Regional formation of oxidants. Caused by emissions from wood firing; Regional oxidantbildning. Till foeljd av utslaepp fraan vedeldning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andersson-Skoeld, Y. [Swedish Environmental Research Inst., Stockholm (Sweden)

    1993-09-01

    An atmospheric trajectory model has been used in case studies to calculate the regional ozone formation due to emissions from household wood burning in Sweden. The simulations are conducted in various types of environments and describe a number of different meteorological conditions. The case studies show that the ozone contribution from wood burning is low. The formation of PAN and aldehydes is more pronounced. The concentration of PAN in Sweden is, however, expected to be far below the levels affecting health and environment as are the concentrations of aldehydes. 25 refs, 7 tabs

  4. Multiscale Modeling of Grain Boundary Segregation and Embrittlement in Tungsten for Mechanistic Design of Alloys for Coal Fired Plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luo, Jian; Tomar, Vikas; Zhou, Naixie; Lee, Hongsuk

    2013-06-30

    Based on a recent discovery of premelting-like grain boundary segregation in refractory metals occurring at high temperatures and/or high alloying levels, this project investigated grain boundary segregation and embrittlement in tungsten (W) based alloys. Specifically, new interfacial thermodynamic models have been developed and quantified to predict high-temperature grain boundary segregation in the W-Ni binary alloy and W-Ni-Fe, W-Ni-Ti, W-Ni-Co, W-Ni-Cr, W-Ni-Zr and W-Ni-Nb ternary alloys. The thermodynamic modeling results have been experimentally validated for selected systems. Furthermore, multiscale modeling has been conducted at continuum, atomistic and quantum-mechanical levels to link grain boundary segregation with embrittlement. In summary, this 3-year project has successfully developed a theoretical framework in combination with a multiscale modeling strategy for predicting grain boundary segregation and embrittlement in W based alloys.

  5. A guide to residential wood heating

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2002-07-01

    Wood heating has a long history in Canada. Currently over three million Canadian households use wood-burning appliances for heating, or just to enjoy the ambience of a wood fire. This guide is one of a series of guides on renewable energy systems for residential use, compiled to assist Canadian householders to make informed decisions on renewable energy. This particular guide focuses on such matters as how to maintain the safety and efficiency of a wood heating system; how to purchase and store fuel wood; how to use fire management techniques for cleaner, virtually smokeless fires; and provides tips on what to ask when consulting wood-heating professionals. tabs., figs.

  6. Using a wood stove to heat greenhouses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gloria Whitefeather-Spears

    2009-01-01

    The Red Lake Tribal Forestry Greenhouse in Red Lake, MN, utilizes four types of outdoor furnaces for heating through the fall, winter, and spring. The WoodMaster® is a highly efficient, wood-fired furnace that provides forced-air heat to the greenhouse. The HeatmorTM furnace is an economical wood-fired alternative that can provide lower...

  7. NOS module - reducing the nitrogen oxides and dust emissions of wood-fired systems; NOS-Modul. Installation und Test - Schlussbericht

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salerno, B.

    2005-07-01

    This final report for the Swiss Federal Office of Energy (SFOE) presents the results of a project that examined the potential of reducing dust and nitrogen oxides emissions of biomass-fired systems. Two prototype installations are described with capacities of 70 - 300 kW and 150 - 500 kW, the latter being a mobile installation installed together with a silo in a container. The prototypes can burn problematical biomass such as cereals, chicken droppings, damp wood-chippings and straw. Various factors and configurations influencing the formation of emissions are examined. Cyclone technology, a catalyst using chrome-nickel shavings and a ceramic heat-exchanger are discussed. Measurements made are presented in tabular and graphical form and discussed.

  8. Wood and coal cofiring in interior Alaska: utilizing woody biomass from wildland defensible-space fire treatments and other sources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    David L. Nicholls; Stephen E. Patterson; Erin. Uloth

    2006-01-01

    Cofiring wood and coal at Fairbanks, Alaska, area electrical generation facilities represents an opportunity to use woody biomass from clearings within the borough's wildland-urban interface and from other sources, such as sawmill residues and woody material intended for landfills. Potential benefits of cofiring include air quality improvements, reduced greenhouse...

  9. Thermodynamic optimisation and computational analysis of irreversibilities in a small-scale wood-fired circulating fluidised bed adiabatic combustor

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Baloyi, J

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available An analysis of irreversibilities generated due to combustion in an adiabatic combustor burning wood was conducted. This was done for a reactant mixture varying from a rich to a lean mixture. A non-adiabatic non-premixed combustion model of a...

  10. Deposit formation in a full-scale pulverized wood-fired power plant with and without coal fly ash addition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wu, Hao; Shafique Bashir, Muhammad; Jensen, Peter Arendt

    2013-01-01

    temperatures of ~1300oC and ~800oC, respectively. It was found that during pulverized wood combustion, the deposit formation at the hightemperature location was characterized by a slow and continuous growth of deposits followed by the shedding of a large layer of deposits, while the deposit formation...

  11. Chapter 1: Wood and Society

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chrisopher D. Risbrudt

    2013-01-01

    Forests, and the wood they produce, have played an important role in human activity since before recorded history. Indeed, one of the first major innovations was utilizing fire, fueled by wood, for cooking and heating. It is very likely that early hominids used wood fires for cooking, as long as 1.5 million years ago (Clark and Harris 1985). Clear evidence of this use...

  12. Development of METHANE de-NOX Reburn Process for Wood Waste and Biomass Fired Stoker Boilers - Final Report - METHANE de-NOX Reburn Technology Manual

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    J. Rabovitser; B. Bryan; S. Wohadlo; S. Nester; J. Vaught; M. Tartan (Gas Technology Institute); R. Glickert (ESA Environmental Solutions)

    2007-12-31

    The overall objective of this project was to demonstrate the effectiveness of the METHANE de-NOX® (MdN) Reburn process in the Forest Products Industry (FPI) to provide more efficient use of wood and sludge waste (biosolids) combustion for both energy generation and emissions reduction (specifically from nitrogen oxides (NOx)) and to promote the transfer of the technology to the wide range of wood waste-fired stoker boilers populating the FPI. This document, MdN Reburn Commercial Technology Manual, was prepared to be a resource to promote technology transfer and commercialization activities of MdN in the industry and to assist potential users understand its application and installation requirements. The Manual includes a compilation of MdN commercial design data from four different stoker boiler designs that were baseline tested as part of the development effort. Design information in the Manual include boiler CFD model studies, process design protocols, engineering data sheets and commercial installation drawings. Each design package is unique and implemented in a manner to meet specific mill requirements.

  13. Development of hybrid wood-fired heating systems - Storage oven with water absorber; Entwicklung neuartiger Holz-Hybridheizsysteme. Speicheroefen mit Wasserabsorber

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huber, H.; Frei, B.; Kropf, S. [Hochschule fuer Technik und Architektur (HTA), Lucerne (Switzerland); Macquat, Y.; Gaegauf, Ch. [Oekozentrum, Langenbruck (Switzerland)

    2002-07-01

    This final report for the Swiss Federal Office of Energy (SFOE) presents the results of a project involving the development of a wood-fired storage oven fitted with an absorber that collects heat from the storage oven and distributes it by means of a conventional heating system. The results of tests made on a functional prototype and a real-life oven are presented. Also, a simulation model that was created on the basis of the functional prototype and the parameters of the real-life oven is introduced. The results obtained for various combinations of parameters such as distance between absorber piping, distance between absorber and room, firing intervals and type of integration into the building's heating system are discussed. Three standard variants for the integration in heating systems are presented, including the necessary safety equipment. The results of safety tests on a demonstration model are presented. The authors state that certain points such as the dimensioning of expansion vessels and component configuration must be looked at with particular care and that this type of hybrid oven could be useful for low-energy-consumption housing, whereby a combination with solar installations should be considered.

  14. Retrofitting oil fired boilers for pellets based pulverised wood firing at peak load; Konvertering av befintliga oljepannor till pulvereldning foer spetslast

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Malmgren, A.; Tao, L.; Wennstroem, M. [TPS Termiska Processer AB, Nykoeping (Sweden)

    2000-03-01

    The types of equipment for grinding of pellets used by commercial heat producers today are discussed. Powder from a representative number of plants has been collected and classified using a traditional vibrating sieve and an aerodynamic method 'Aeroklass'. The results show clearly that the difference in 'fluffyness' between a powder produced from pellets, briquettes or directly from wood can be identified by the aerodynamic method. The shapes of different particles are shown in microscope pictures. The requirements of burners and combustion chambers for good burnout of fuel particles are discussed theoretically. Burnout time for wood particles of different size at different temperatures are calculated and the result is presented in diagrams. It is difficult to calculate the residence time for fuel particles in a flame in a generally useful way with any precision. Some diagrams that can be used to approximate the residence time of an aerodynamically small particle, in different parts of a flame, as a function of fuel load and burner diameter are presented. The results of CFD-simulations (with Fluent) of the trajectories of different sized fuel particles in a 20 and a 10 MW flame are shown in 20 pictures. Colour coding is used to show the particle temperature, residence time and combustion stage along the trajectories. The final discussion is based on the analysis of 3 real installations of burners in the size 9 - 20 MW.

  15. Wood Condition Assessment Manual: Second Edition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robert J. Ross; Robert H. White

    2014-01-01

    This report summarizes information on condition assessment of in-service wood, including visual inspection of wood and timbers, use of ultrasound and probing/boring techniques for inspection, and assessment of wood and timbers that have been exposed to fire. The report also includes information on assigning allowable design values for in-service wood.

  16. Reaction-to-Fire of Wood Products and Other Building Materials: Part 1, Room/Corner Test Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ondrej Grexa; Mark A. Dietenberger; Robert H. White

    2012-01-01

    This project researched the assessment of reaction-to-fire of common materials using the full-scale room/corner test (ISO 9705) protocol and the predictions of time to flashover using results from the bench-scale cone calorimeter test (ISO 5660-1). Using a burner protocol of 100 kW for 10 min, followed by 300 kW for 10 min and the test materials on the walls only, we...

  17. WOOD PROPERTIES AND EFFECT OF WOOD PROPERTIES ON THE WOOD FINISHING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdulkadir Malkoçoğlu

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available Wood is basic raw material for furniture and joinery industries with wood structures. Wood is a biological material that has widely different properties depending on species, geographic area where the tree grew, the growth condition, size of the tree at harvest, sawing, and other manufacturing processes. Wood properties have been characterized within two groups as natural and manufacturing factors that effects finishing performance. Grow rate, density, knots, moisture content, extractives and juvenile wood are natural characteristics. Grain orientation, texture, drying and performance expectations are manufacturing characteristics. In this review, the effects of natural and manufacturing characteristics are discussed on the surface finishing performance of wood.

  18. Firing Tests of Thrust Controllable Solid Rocket Motors Part 1:300-mm-Diameter End-Burning Grain Motors

    OpenAIRE

    GODAI, Tomifumi; SHIMIZU, Morio; Ito, Katsuya; Tanemura, Toshiharu; Fujiwara, Tsutomu; KUSAKA, Kazuo; Kisara, Katsuto; Sato, Masahiro; Takahashi, Mamoru; Izumikawa, Muneo; 五代, 富文; 清水, 盛生; 伊藤, 克弥; 種村, 利春; 藤原, 勉

    1980-01-01

    300-mm-diameter thrust controllable solid rocket motors were successfully fired under atmospheric conditions. Thrust magnitude control was attained by changing the flow rate of the hydrogen peroxide decomposition gas injected into the solid rocket motor. Incomplete combustion termination that occurred earlier than expected was due to the excessive heat flux irradiated from the hot surfaces of the ablative insulation liner towards the extinguished propellant surface. More effective liner mater...

  19. Diffusion of bioenergy in urban areas: A socio-economic analysis of the Swiss wood-fired cogeneration plant in Basel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Madlener, Reinhard [Institute for Future Energy Consumer Needs and Behavior (FCN), Faculty of Business and Economics / E.ON Energy Research Center, RWTH Aachen University, Templergraben 55, 52056 Aachen (Germany); Voegtli, Stefan [Waldmarketing.ch, Hoehenweg 6, 4419 Lupsingen (Switzerland)

    2008-09-15

    The municipal utilities of Basel (IWB) are in the process of building a 30 MW wood-fired cogeneration plant in the city of Basel, Switzerland, a project idea that was initially proposed by visionaries from the forest sector. Despite recent doubts about its profitability due to unforeseen major increases in investment costs, the plant is attractive both politically and from a business perspective, as several goals related to the increased use of renewable energy can be achieved simultaneously. Moreover, significant woody biomass resources are awaiting further exploitation in the Basel region, which could help to improve markedly the cost effectiveness of forest maintenance. In this paper, we study the history and some of the characteristics of the project from a socio-economic perspective. Of particular interest to our study is the early involvement of a large number of stakeholders with different interests. The project constitutes a pioneering project that could serve as an important non-Scandinavian model for similar projects in other parts of Switzerland, but also in Western and Central Europe as a whole. The lengthy decision-making and planning process offers interesting insights into the socio-economic drivers and barriers of large-scale bioenergy projects in urban settings, where wood heating systems are in general not as well established as in the countryside. We find that the interest of regional forest owners to tackle the problem of over-aged and largely unprofitable forests, coupled with a political climate that (1) favours green energy projects and (2) provides incentives for the municipal utility to produce more green energy from sources other than hydropower, have been the two main success factors for developing this particular biomass plant project. (author)

  20. Influence of the operating modes of wood-fired stoves on particle emissions; Einfluss der Betriebsweise auf die Partikelemissionen von Holzoefen. Projektzusatz 1+2 zum Projekt Wirkung von Verbrennungspartikeln

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klippel, N.; Nussbaumer, T.

    2007-03-15

    This comprehensive final report for the Swiss Federal Office of Energy (SFOE) examines the influence of the operating characteristics of wood-fired stoves on their particle emissions. Four types of stove are compared: A metal stove with small combustion chamber and a low mass of ceramic lining, a stove with a large combustion chamber and heavier ceramic lining, a newly designed stove with two-stage combustion using gasification and gas oxidation in a separate combustion chamber using secondary air and a modern pellet-fired stove operated with wood and straw pellets. The report describes the measurement programme and presents the results obtained using gravimetric measurements. The spectrum of particle emissions measured for the four types of stove are presented and discussed. The correlation of carbon monoxide and fine-dust emissions is examined. The results of biological tests and the chemical analysis of the dust are discussed.

  1. Effects of combustion particles - Comparison of health relevance of wood fires and diesel engines; Wirkung von Verbrennungspartikeln. Vergleich der Gesundheitsrelevanz von Holzfeuerungen und Dieselmotoren

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klippel, N.; Nussbaumer, T.

    2007-03-15

    This comprehensive final report for the Swiss Federal Office of Energy (SFOE) takes a look at the relevance of fine-dust particles (PM10, particulate matter smaller than 10 microns) emitted from wood-fired boilers in comparison with soot from diesel engines. Medicinal basics with reference to the particles concerned are explained, including the physiology of the human respiratory system, its defence mechanisms against fine dust as well as detrimental health effects to the nose, lungs and cardio-vascular system. Also, allergic reactions and effects at cell level are discussed. The mechanisms involved in the emission of the particles in ovens and diesel engines are examined and compared. The methods used to take samples of the particles are explained and the results of cell-tests are presented and discussed. Estimates of the particle concentrations in the lung are presented and comparisons are made of loading during smog-periods. The report is rounded off with a comprehensive list of literature on the subject.

  2. Wood construction and magnetic characteristics of impregnated type magnetic wood

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oka, Hideo; Hojo, Atsushi; Seki, Kyoushiro; Takashiba, Toshio

    2002-02-01

    The results of experiments involving the AC and DC magnetic characteristics of impregnated type magnetic wood were studied by taking into consideration the wood construction and fiber direction. The experimental results show that the sufficient amount of impregnated magnetic fluid varies depending on the fiber direction and length, and the grain face of the wood material. The impregnated type magnetic wood sample that is fully impregnated by magnetic fluid has a 60% saturation magnetization compared to the saturation magnetization of magnetic fluid. Samples for which the wood fiber direction was the same as the direction of the magnetic path had a higher magnetization intensity and permeability.

  3. An 800-year fire history

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanley G. Kitchen

    2010-01-01

    "Fire in the woods!" The words are a real heart stopper. Yet in spite of its capacity to destroy, fire plays an essential role in shaping plant communities. Knowledge of the patterns of fire over long time periods is critical for understanding this role. Trees often retain evidence of nonlethal fires in the form of injuries or scars in the annual growth rings...

  4. WOOD CELLULOSE ACETATE MEMBRANE 179

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    DR. AMINU

    2013-06-01

    Jun 1, 2013 ... permeability, swellability in organic liquids and organic liquid separation potentials. The ... currently employed to deal with some of these wastes, ... a waste. This is because the wood has poor mechanical strength and cannot be used as structural support in most buildings. Although used as fuel(fire wood) ...

  5. Fatigue Damage in Wood

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clorius, Christian Odin; Pedersen, Martin Bo Uhre; Hoffmeyer, Preben

    1996-01-01

    An investigation of fatigue failure in wood subjected to load cycles in compression parallel to grain is presented. Fatigue failure is found to depend both on the total time under load and on the number of cycles.Recent accelerated fatigue research on wood is reviewed, and a discrepancy between...... to 10 Hz are used. The number of cycles to failure is found to be a poor measure of the fatigue performance of wood. Creep, maximum strain, stiffness and work are monitored throughout the fatigue tests. Accumulated creep is suggested identified with damage and a correlation between stiffness reduction...

  6. Influence of juvenile wood content on shear parallel, compression, and tension transverse to grain strength and mode I fracture toughness for loblolly pine

    Science.gov (United States)

    David E. Kretschmann

    2008-01-01

    To satisfy the increased demand for forest products, much of future timber supply is expected to be from improved trees grown on managed plantations. This fast growth resource will tend to be harvested in short-age rotations and will contain higher proportions of juvenile wood than those of current harvests. In anticipation of this resource, definitive information is...

  7. Non-invasive measurement of carbon monoxide burden in Guatemalan children and adults following wood-fired temazcal (sauna-bath) use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lam, Nick; Nicas, Mark; Ruiz-Mercado, Ilse; Thompson, Lisa M; Romero, Carolina; Smith, Kirk R

    2011-08-01

    The use of wood-fired steam baths, or temazcales, is a potentially dangerous source of CO exposure in Guatemalan Highland communities where adults and children use them regularly for bathing, relaxation, and healing purposes. Physical characteristics of children predispose them to absorb CO faster than adults, placing them at greater exposure and health risks. Efforts to quantify temazcal exposures across all age groups, however, have been hampered by the limitations in exposure measurement methods. In this pilot study we measured COHb levels in children and adults following use of the temazcal using three field-based, non-invasive CO measurement methods: CO-oximetry, exhaled breath, and by estimation of COHb using micro-environmental concentrations and time diaries. We then performed a brief comparison of methods. Average CO concentrations measured during temazcal use were 661 ± 503 ppm, approximately 10 times the 15 min WHO guideline. Average COHb levels for all participants ranged from 12-14% (max of 30%, min 2%), depending on the method. COHb levels measured in children were not significantly different from adults despite the fact that they spent 66% less time exposed. COHb measured by CO-oximetry and exhaled breath had good agreement, but precision of the former was affected substantially by random instrument error. The version of the field CO-oximeter device used in this pilot could be useful in screening for acute CO exposure events in children but may lack the precision for monitoring the burden from less extreme, but more day-to-day CO exposures (e.g. indoor solid fuel use). In urban settings, health effects in children and adults have been associated with chronic exposure to ambient CO concentrations much lower than measured in this study. Future research should focus on reducing exposure from temazcales through culturally appropriate modifications to their design and practices, and targeted efforts to educate communities on the health risks they pose

  8. Pantoea agglomerans: a mysterious bacterium of evil and good. Part II. Deleterious effects: Dust-borne endotoxins and allergens – focus on grain dust, other agricultural dusts and wood dust

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacek Dutkiewicz

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available [i][/i][i]Pantoea agglomerans[/i], a Gram-negative bacterium developing in a variety of plants as epiphyte or endophyte is particularly common in grain and grain dust, and has been identified by an interdisciplinary group from Lublin, eastern Poland, as a causative agent of work-related diseases associated with exposure to grain dust and other agricultural dusts. The concentration of [i]P. agglomerans[/i] in grain as well as in the settled grain and flour dust was found to be high, ranging from 10[sup]4[/sup] –10[sup]8 [/sup] CFU/g, while in the air polluted with grain or flour dust it ranged from 10[sup]3[/sup] –10[sup]5[/sup] CFU/m[sup]3[/sup] and formed 73.2–96% of the total airborne Gram-negative bacteria. The concentration of [i]P. agglomerans[/i] was also relatively high in the air of the facilities processing herbs and other plant materials, while it was lower in animal farms and in wood processing facilities. [i]Pantoea agglomerans[/i] produces a biologically-potent endotoxin (cell wall lipopolysaccharide, LPS. The significant part of this endotoxin occurs in dusts in the form of virus-sized globular nanoparticles measuring 10–50 nm that could be described as the ‘endotoxin super-macromolecules’. A highly significant relationship was found (R=0.804, P=0.000927 between the concentration of the viable [i]P. agglomerans[/i] in the air of various agricultural and wood industry settings and the concentration of bacterial endotoxin in the air, as assessed by the Limulus test. Although this result may be interfered by the presence of endotoxin produced by other Gram-negative species, it unequivocally suggests the primary role of the [i]P. agglomerans[/i] endotoxin as an adverse agent in the agricultural working environment, causing toxic pneumonitis (ODTS. Numerous experiments by the inhalation exposure of animals to various extracts of [i]P. agglomerans[/i] strains isolated from grain dust, including endotoxin isolated with

  9. Pantoea agglomerans: a mysterious bacterium of evil and good. Part II--Deleterious effects: Dust-borne endotoxins and allergens--focus on grain dust, other agricultural dusts and wood dust.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dutkiewicz, Jacek; Mackiewicz, Barbara; Lemieszek, Marta Kinga; Golec, Marcin; Skórska, Czesława; Góra-Florek, Anna; Milanowski, Janusz

    2016-01-01

    Pantoea agglomerans, a Gram-negative bacterium developing in a variety of plants as epiphyte or endophyte is particularly common in grain and grain dust, and has been identified by an interdisciplinary group from Lublin, eastern Poland, as a causative agent of work-related diseases associated with exposure to grain dust and other agricultural dusts. The concentration of P. agglomerans in grain as well as in the settled grain and flour dust was found to be high, ranging from 10(4)-10(8) CFU/g, while in the air polluted with grain or flour dust it ranged from 10(3)-10(5) CFU/m(3) and formed 73.2-96% of the total airborne Gram-negative bacteria. The concentration of P. agglomerans was also relatively high in the air of the facilities processing herbs and other plant materials, while it was lower in animal farms and in wood processing facilities. Pantoea agglomerans produces a biologically-potent endotoxin (cell wall lipopolysaccharide, LPS). The significant part of this endotoxin occurs in dusts in the form of virus-sized globular nanoparticles measuring 10-50 nm that could be described as the 'endotoxin super-macromolecules'. A highly significant relationship was found (R=0.804, P=0.000927) between the concentration of the viable P. agglomerans in the air of various agricultural and wood industry settings and the concentration of bacterial endotoxin in the air, as assessed by the Limulus test. Although this result may be interfered by the presence of endotoxin produced by other Gram-negative species, it unequivocally suggests the primary role of the P. agglomerans endotoxin as an adverse agent in the agricultural working environment, causing toxic pneumonitis (ODTS). Numerous experiments by the inhalation exposure of animals to various extracts of P. agglomerans strains isolated from grain dust, including endotoxin isolated with trichloroacetic acid (LPS-TCA), endotoxin nanoparticles isolated in sucrose gradient (VECN), and mixture of proteins and endotoxin obtained

  10. Mechanical properties of wood

    Science.gov (United States)

    David W. Green; Jerrold E. Winandy; David E. Kretschmann

    1999-01-01

    The mechanical properties presented in this chapter were obtained from tests of small pieces of wood termed “clear” and “straight grained” because they did not contain characteristics such as knots, cross grain, checks, and splits. These test pieces did have anatomical characteristics such as growth rings that occurred in consistent patterns within each piece. Clear...

  11. The effect of wind on burning rate of wood cribs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sara McAllister; Mark Finney

    2016-01-01

    Wood cribs are often used as ignition sources for room fire tests. A wood crib may also apply to studies of burning rate in wildland fires, because wildland fuel beds are porous and three dimensional. A unique aspect of wildland fires is the ubiquitous presence of wind. However, very little is known about what effect the increased ventilation has on the...

  12. Evaluation of measurement techniques for the effectiveness of particle precipitators for small wood-fired ovens; Evaluation von Messverfahren zur Messung der Wirksamkeit von Partikelabscheidern bei kleinen Holzfeuerungen. Schlussbericht

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Griffin, T. [Fachhochschule Nordwestschweiz, Pruefstelle fuer Holzfeuerungen, Muttenz (Switzerland); Burtscher, H. [Fachhochschule Nordwestschweiz, Institut fuer Aerosol- und Sensortechnik IAST, Brugg-Windisch (Switzerland)

    2008-01-15

    This illustrated final report for the Swiss Federal Office of Energy (SFOE) presents the results obtained in a project carried out at the University of Applied Sciences in Muttenz, Switzerland, that involved the measurement of the performance of particle precipitators for small wood-fired ovens. The measurement systems used for the gravimetric measurement of total dust emissions are dealt with. Both quantitative and qualitative observations and results are presented and discussed. Equipment used for the on-line measurements and the results obtained are discussed. Finally, a recommendation for a measurement procedure for the determination of the filtration efficiency of electrostatic particle filters for small-scale ovens is presented.

  13. Wood flour

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craig M. Clemons

    2010-01-01

    The term “wood flour” is somewhat ambiguous. Reineke states that the term wood flour “is applied somewhat loosely to wood reduced to finely divided particles approximating those of cereal flours in size, appearance, and texture.” Though its definition is imprecise, the term wood flour is in common use. Practically speaking, wood flour usually refers to wood particles...

  14. Wood flour

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craig M. Clemons; Daniel F. Caufield

    2005-01-01

    The term “wood flour” is somewhat ambiguous. Reineke states that the term wood flour “is applied somewhat loosely to wood reduced to finely divided particles approximating those of cereal flours in size, appearance, and texture”. Though its definition is imprecise, the term wood flour is in common use. Practically speaking, wood flour usually refers to wood particles...

  15. Effects of fire retardants on physical, mechanical, and fire properties of flat-pressed WPCs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nadir Ayrilmis; Jan T. Benthien; Heiko Thoemen; Robert H. White

    2012-01-01

    Physical, mechanical, and fire properties of the flat-pressed wood plastic composites (WPCs) incorporated with various fire retardants (10% by weight) at different levels of wood flour (WF) content, 40, 50, or 60 wt%, were investigated. The WPC panels were made from dry-blended WF, polypropylene (PP), and fire retardant (FR) powders with maleic anhydride-grafted PP (2...

  16. Rx fire laws: tools to protect fire: the `ecological imperative?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dale Wade; Steven Miller; Johnny Stowe; James Brenner

    2006-01-01

    The South is the birthplace of statutes and ordinances that both advocate and protect the cultural heritage of woods burning, which has been practiced in this region uninterrupted for more than 10,000 years. We present a brief overview of fire use in the South and discuss why most southern states recognized early on that periodic fire was necessary to sustain fire...

  17. Experiment on the combined combustion of wood chips and sliced straw at a wood-chip firing system at the Maabjerg plant; Forsoeg med samfyring af flis og snittet halm via flisfyringssystemet paa Maalbjergvaerket

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-08-01

    As during the last two years there have been insufficient supplies of straw for fuelling purposes in Denmark a number of combustion systems in straw-fuelled district heating plants have been adapted for burning wood other tyupes of biofuels. The aim was to demonstrate possibilities for burning sliced straw with a high moisture content and for managing and combusting various mixtures of straw and wood chips and the Maarbjerg plant in Denmark. The combustion processes are described. It is concluded that the plant must be further adapted in order to burn loose sliced straw efficiently but there were no problems connected to the combustion of a mixture of straw and wood chips. (AB)

  18. Compressive Fatigue in Wood

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clorius, Christian Odin; Pedersen, Martin Bo Uhre; Hoffmeyer, Preben

    1999-01-01

    An investigation of fatigue failure in wood subjected to load cycles in compression parallel to grain is presented. Small clear specimens of spruce are taken to failure in square wave formed fatigue loading at a stress excitation level corresponding to 80% of the short term strength. Four...... frequencies ranging from 0.01 Hz to 10 Hz are used. The number of cycles to failure is found to be a poor measure of the fatigue performance of wood. Creep, maximum strain, stiffness and work are monitored throughout the fatigue tests. Accumulated creep is suggested identified with damage and a correlation...

  19. Variables associated with the occurrence of Ips beetles, red turpentine beetle and wood borers in live and dead ponderosa pines with post-fire injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jose F. Negron; Joel McMillin; Carolyn H. Sieg; James F. Fowler; Kurt K. Allen; Linda L. Wadleigh; John A. Anhold; Ken E. Gibson

    2016-01-01

    Recently, wildfires and prescribed burning have become more frequent in conifer forests of western North America. Most studies examining the impacts of insects on trees with post-fire injury have focused on contributions to tree mortality. Few studies have examined fire-caused injuries to estimate the probability of attack by insects. Scant data quantifying...

  20. Impact of coal fly ash addition on ash transformation and deposition in a full-scale wood suspension-firing boiler

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wu, Hao; Bashir, Muhammad Shafique; Jensen, Peter Arendt

    2013-01-01

    Ash transformation and deposition during pulverized wood combustion in a full-scale power plant boiler of 800 MWth were studied with and without the addition of coal fly ash. The transient ash deposition behavior was characterized by using an advanced deposit probe system at two boiler locations...... with flue gas temperatures of about 1300 C and 800 C, respectively. The mechanisms of ash transformation and deposit formation were elaborated through a detailed characterization of the collected deposits and fly ashes. The results implied that during pulverized wood combustion, the formation of deposits...... constant after a few hours. The formed deposits, especially those at the location with low flue gas temperatures, contained a considerable amount of K2SO4, KCl, and KOH/K2CO3. With the addition of a large amount (about 4 times of the mass flow of wood ash) of coal fly ash to the boiler, these alkali...

  1. COMBUSTION PROPERTIES OF EUCALYPTUS WOOD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yalçın ÖRS

    1999-03-01

    Full Text Available In this study, the combustion properties of some impregnation materials (abiotic and biotic factors used for eucalyptus wood in interior or exterior environments were investigated. The experimental samples were prepared from Eucalyptus wood based on ASTM-D-1413-76 Tanalith-CBC, boric acid, borax, vacsol-WR, immersol-WR, polyethylen glycole-400 and ammonium sulphate were used as an impregnation material. The results indicated that, vacuum treatment on Eucalyptus gave the lowest retention value of salts. Compounds containing boron+salt increased fire resistance however water repellents decreased the wood flammability.

  2. WOOD WELDING

    OpenAIRE

    Marcos Theodoro Muller; Rafael Rodolfo de Melo; Diego Martins Stangerlin

    2010-01-01

    The term "wood welding" designates what can be defined as "welding of wood surfaces". This new process, that it provides the joint of wood pieces without the use of adhesives or any other additional material, provokes growing interest in the academic environment, although it is still in laboratorial state. Linear friction welding induced bymechanical vibration yields welded joints of flat wood surfaces. The phenomenon of the welding occurs in less time than 10 seconds, with the temperature in...

  3. Surface thermodynamic parameters of modified wood

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pokrovskaya Elena

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Energy characteristics of modified wood are studied in the paper. Application of this approach during the study of wooden materials allows forecasting the efficiency of modifiers for surface layer of wood. Phosphites, the efficient fire-retarders, were applied as modifiers. Using the example of a number of ethers with various alkoxy substituents of phosphorus atom, we have made an attempt to associate surface thermodynamic properties of modified wood and formation of properties for fire-, bio- and smoke protection. The dependence of change of energy characteristics and surface structure of wood on the nature of modifiers is determined. To study energy characteristics of wood, modified by various compounds, the following characteristics were used: σ surface tension and ΔG free enthalpy gradient. Easy Drop setting and the corresponding software were used to determine these values. According to the obtained data, the conclusion is made about the influence of modifiers on energy characteristics of wood. The high degree of modification (% P causes bigger change of Gibbs energy, which determines formation of high-level fire-, bio- and smoke protection. Diethyl phosphite is the most efficient modifier. Formation of fire-protective properties stipulates long-term operation of wood and wood-based materials.

  4. Cone calorimeter tests of wood-based decking materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robert H. White; Mark A. Dietenberger; Nicole M. Stark

    2007-01-01

    New technologies in building materials have resulted in the use of a wide variety of materials in decks. As part of our effort to address fire concerns in the wildland-urban interface, the Forest Products Laboratory has been examining the fire performance of decking products. In addition to preservative-treated wood, decking products include wood-plastic composites and...

  5. Heat resistant soy adhesives for structural wood products

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christopher G. Hunt; Charles Frihart; Jane O' Dell

    2009-01-01

    Because load-bearing bonded wood assemblies must support the structure during a fire, the limited softening and depolymerization of biobased polymers at elevated temperatures should be an advantage of biobased adhesives compared to fossil fuel-based adhesives. Because load-bearing bonded wood assemblies must support the structure during a fire, the limited softening...

  6. The effect of density and thermal diffusivity of wood on the rate of burning of wood cribs

    Science.gov (United States)

    H.D. Bruce; W.Y. Pong; W.L. Fons

    1961-01-01

    A program of research on free-burning wood fires is being conducted by the Forest Service to build up experimental data on the properties of such fires, with the iltimate objective of describing the physical phenomena in terms of fundamental laws. Density was the first wood property investigated. This report gives data on the rate of burning of cribs of five species...

  7. Thermal analysis of wood-steel hybrid construction

    OpenAIRE

    Fonseca, E.M.M.; Ramos, H.M.E.; Silva, H.J.G.; Ferreira, Débora

    2013-01-01

    The main objective of this work is to provide the thermal analysis in wood-steel hybrid elements for building constructions under fire conditions. A transient thermal analysis with nonlinear material behaviour will be solved with ANSYS program. The use of wood-steel hybrid models has major advantages as increased fire resistance, and improved high strength. Wood is a lightweight material, easy to assemble, great architectural features, thermal and acoustic characteristics. However, the high v...

  8. Fuel-supply structure of wood-fired power plants in the Northeast: Loggers' perspective. Forest Service research paper

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huyler, N.K.

    1989-07-01

    This study gauges loggers' perceptions of the impact of large biomass demand centers (electrical power generation) on the forest resource base in the Northeast. The loggers who supply these demand centers are business people with large capital investments in highly mechanized harvesting systems. Most of the loggers surveyed strongly believed that the post-harvest stand has improved as a result of fuel-wood chipping; however, the impact of chip harvesting on the forest resource base was not clear.

  9. Root tensile strength of grey alder and mountain maple grown on a coarse grained eco-engineered slope in the Swiss Alps related to wood anatomical features

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kink, Dimitri; Bast, Alexander; Meyer, Christine; Meier, Wolfgang; Egli, Markus; Gärtner, Holger

    2014-05-01

    . In order to confirm this assumption and possibly find more important root properties which have an influence on soil stabilization, the root systems of seven trees (three grey alder, four mountain maple) were excavated and analyzed. The study site is a catchment, where shallow landslides are common. It is located in the Prättigau valley in the Eastern Swiss Alps and was eco-engineered in 1997. The substrate is coarse-grained morainic material, mean annual air temperature reaches 4.64°C, average precipitation is 1170 mm, and the altitude is about 1000 m a.s.l.. The root system of each tree was uncovered carefully by hand to keep the roots undamaged, before removal it was photographed in situ to document the root distribution. The root systems were then cut into single root pieces of about 20 cm length and the position of each sample was documented. The root samples were then hierarchically classified in several root classes. The tensile strength of more than 500 samples was determined. In addition, the values for age, diameter, and root moisture were ascertained. Since it was assumed, that the cellular structure of the roots has an influence on the tensile strength, two microscopic thin-sections were prepared from all successfully tested root samples. The microscopic analysis focused on anatomical parameters such as the size and number of vessels, their distribution as well as their conductivity. The results for the final correlation between the anatomical characteristics and the root's tensile strength are presented for both tree species.

  10. Effect of Wood Preservatives on Surface Properties of Coated Wood

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Turgay Ozdemir

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Effect of wood preservatives (waterborne and organicborne on the performance of surface finishing properties is investigated. Sapwood of scots pine, (Pinus sylvestris L., oriental beech (Fagus orientalis Lipsky, and chestnut (Castanea sativa Mill. specimens (300 × 100 × 15 mm along the grain were impregnated with aqueous solution of 2% CCA, 2% Tanalith E, 1% boric acid, and Immersol aqua. Surface roughness, dry film thickness, adhesion strength, gloss measurement, scratch, and abrasion resistance were determined according to related standards for treated and untreated samples. The results indicated that surface roughness and adhesion strength depended on wood species and the chemical composition of preservatives. Generally, waterborne wood preservatives increased the surface roughness of wood while the organic-based wood preservatives decreased it. The organic-based wood preservatives decreased adhesion but they increased gloss value. Wood preservatives did not affect the scratch resistance which was found to depend on properties of the coating. All the wood preservatives increased abrasion resistance.

  11. Preservation of forest wood chips

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kofman, P.D.; Thomsen, I.M.; Ohlsson, C.; Leer, E.; Ravn Schmidt, E.; Soerensen, M.; Knudsen, P.

    1999-01-01

    As part of the Danish Energy Research Programme on biomass utilisation for energy production (EFP), this project concerns problems connected to the handling and storing of wood chips. In this project, the possibility of preserving wood chips of the Norway Spruce (Picea Abies) is addressed, and the potential improvements by anaerobic storage are tested. Preservation of wood chips aims at reducing dry matter losses from extensive heating during storage and to reduce production of fungal spores. Fungal spores pose a health hazards to workers handling the chips. Further the producers of wood chips are interested in such a method since it would enable them to give a guarantee for the delivery of homogeneous wood chips also during the winter period. Three different types of wood chips were stored airtight and further one of these was stored in accordance with normal practise and use as reference. The results showed that airtight storage had a beneficial impact on the quality of the chips: no redistribution of moisture, low dry matter losses, unfavourable conditions for microbial activity of most fungi, and the promotion of yeasts instead of fungi with airborne spores. Likewise the firing tests showed that no combustion problems, and no increased risk to the environment or to the health of staff is caused by anaerobic storage of wood chips. In all, the tests of the anaerobic storage method of forest wood chips were a success and a large-scale test of the method will be carried out in 1999. (au)

  12. Bark Beetle-Fire Associations in the Greater Yellowstone Area

    OpenAIRE

    Amman, Gene D

    1991-01-01

    The large forest fires in and around Yellowstone National Park in 1988 bring up many ecological questions, including the role of bark beetles. Bark beetles may contribute to fuel buildup over the years preceding a fire, resulting in stand replacement fires. Fire is important to the survival of seral tree species and bark beetles that reproduce in them. Without fire, seral species are ultimately replaced by climax species. Following fire, bark- and wood-boring beetles respond to fire-injured t...

  13. Influence of wood defects on some mechanical properties of two ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Effects of slope of wood grain, knot, split, ingrowth and sapwood on some mechanical wood properties of Pterygota macrocarpa (Kyere) and Piptadeniastrum africanum (Dahoma) have been studied, using structural size specimens and a 60 tonne structural wood testing machine. The study on the two tropical hardwoods ...

  14. Woody biomass supply from thinnings to reduce fire hazard in the U.S. West and its potential impact on regional wood markets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenneth E. Skog; Peter J. Ince; Henry Spelter; Andi Kramp; R. James. Barbour

    2008-01-01

    Part I of this paper identifies timberland areas in 12 western states where thinning treatments are judged to be needed to reduce fire hazard and may ?pay for themselves?? at a scale to make investment in forest product processing a realistic option. We also estimate amounts of biomass removed and costs of removal. Part II of this paper estimates the market impact if...

  15. Wood composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lars Berglund; Roger M. Rowell

    2005-01-01

    A composite can be defined as two or more elements held together by a matrix. By this definition, what we call “solid wood” is a composite. Solid wood is a three-dimensional composite composed of cellulose, hemicelluloses and lignin (with smaller amounts of inorganics and extractives), held together by a lignin matrix. The advantages of developing wood composites are (...

  16. Functional Wood

    OpenAIRE

    Cronhjort, Yrsa (ed.); Hughes, Mark (ed.); Paakkanen, Mikko (ed.); Sahi, Karola (ed.); Tukiainen, Pekka (ed.); Tulamo, Tomi (ed.); Vahtikari, Katja (ed.)

    2016-01-01

    Design has been recognized as a key discipline to bring ideas to the market. In addition to current research on human perceptions and the functional capacities of wood, this publication demonstrates the potential of wood in various applications. The designs are the results of three design courses, implemented during 2015 and 2016 at Aalto University in Finland. The Masters student courses included two Wood Studios at Aalto University’s School of Arts, Design and Architecture and the Integrate...

  17. Feasibility study for new ecolabels for the product group: Wood pellet firings. Final report; Machbarkeitsstudie fuer neue Umweltzeichen fuer die Produktgruppe: Holzpelletfeuerungen. Endbericht

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoffmann, E.; Weiss, J.; Hirschl, B.

    2002-07-01

    This assessment is a feasibility study according to ISO 14024. It deals with the question whether an ecolabel is suitable for wood pellet heating systems and how concrete criteria for an ecolabel for wood pellet heating plants could be specified. The study begins with a comprehensive market analysis in order to identify possible plants for which an ecolabel would make sense. In the main part of the study, the environmental relevance of the chosen plants is analysed. For this analysis, plant manufacturers were interviewed and a comparison between wood pellet heating systems and heating systems which use gas, oil or wood was carried out. On the basis of this analysis, it was possible to derive a number of criteria which were discussed with company representatives and other experts in this field. As a result of this dialogue and the investigation process as a whole, the introduction of an ecolabel for wood pellet heating plants can be recommended. Wood pellet heating systems are characterized by their high level of automatation and the use of standardized fuels with constant high quality. Thus, they reach high combustion quality with low emission rates, and risks of misuse are minimized. They may contribute to the increased use of renewable energies and thereby to the achievement of climate protection goals. The proposed certification principles comprise requirements regarding (a) the efficient energy use (efficiency factor under partial load and nominal load, plant's supplementary energy consumption), (b) emission values for CO, NO{sub x}, dust and organic substances, (c) the offer of additional services, as well as (d) requirements with regard to the operating instructions. The transcription of the label is proposed as 'Ecolabel.. because low emission and energy-efficient'. (orig.) [German] Beim vorliegenden Gutachten handelt es sich um eine Machbarkeitsstudie nach ISO 14024. Es behandelt die Frage, ob ein Umweltzeichen fuer Holzpelletfeuerungen

  18. Suspension-Firing of Biomass

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shafique Bashir, Muhammad; Jensen, Peter Arendt; Frandsen, Flemming

    2012-01-01

    This paper is the second of two papers, describing probe measurements of deposit buildup and removal (shedding), conducted in a 350 MWth suspension-fired boiler, firing straw and wood. Investigations of deposit buildup and shedding have been made by use of an advanced online deposit probe and a s...

  19. Synthesis and evaluation of phosphortriamidates in wood for thermal and fungal decay protection

    Science.gov (United States)

    George C. Chen

    2008-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the possibility of simplification of the process. The question in focus was simply whether phosphortriamidates impregnated wood would be as effective concerning fire resistance and fungal decay as phosphoramidate bonded wood.

  20. Assessing influence of experimental parameters on formation of PCDD/F from ash derived from fires of CCA-treated wood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tame, N W; Dlugogorski, B Z; Kennedy, E M

    2003-09-15

    Ash residues from fires of radiata pine timber, both untreated and treated with chromated copper arsenate (CCA), were analyzed for the presence of polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins and polychlorinated dibenzofurans (PCDD/F). Fire conditions were simulated using a cone calorimeter. The sensitivity of the magnitude and profile of PCDD/F in the ash under controlled experimental conditions were examined to gain an insight into the formation of PCDD/F in a system containing CCA. The total amount of PCDD/F increased from 2.0 ng/kg of ash (0.05 ng of TE/kg of ash, using WHO-TEF) for untreated radiata pine to a maximum of 2700 ng/kg of ash (78 ng of TE/kg of ash) for 0.94% CCA. Ash containing CCA showed a distinct preference for formation of PCDFs, particularly the tetrachloro homologue. It is concluded that PCDD/F formation predominantly occurred via de novo synthesis during smoldering of the char rather than during the initial flaming and pyrolysis. Furthermore, the composition of the CCA constituents present in the timber was controlled to assess whether the physical presence of Cu, a known catalyst in PCDD/F production, was sufficient to account for the formation of PCDD/F in fires of timber impregnated with CCA.

  1. Fire resistance of structural composite lumber products

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robert H. White

    2006-01-01

    Use of structural composite lumber products is increasing. In applications requiring a fire resistance rating, calculation procedures are used to obtain the fire resistance rating of exposed structural wood products. A critical factor in the calculation procedures is char rate for ASTM E 119 fire exposure. In this study, we tested 14 structural composite lumber...

  2. Wood preservation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rebecca E. Ibach

    1999-01-01

    When left untreated in many outdoor applications, wood becomes subject to degradation by a variety of natural causes. Although some trees possess naturally occurring resistance to decay (Ch. 3, Decay Resistance), many are in short supply or are not grown in ready proximity to markets. Because most commonly used wood species, such as Southern Pine, ponderosa pine, and...

  3. Charring rate of wood exposed to a constant heat flux

    Science.gov (United States)

    R. H. White; H. C. Tran

    1996-01-01

    A critical factor in the fire endurance of a wood member is its rate of charring. Most available charring rate data have been obtained using the time-temperature curves of the standard fire resistance tests (ASTM E 119 and ISO 834) to define the fire exposure. The increased use of heat release calorimeters using exposures of constant heat flux levels has broadened the...

  4. The influence of juvenile wood content on shear parallel, compression,and tension perpendicular to grain strength and mode I fracture toughness of loblolly pine at various ring orientation

    Science.gov (United States)

    David E. Kretschmann

    2008-01-01

    Forest products from improved trees grown on managed plantations and harvested in short rotations will contain higher proportions of juvenile wood than in current harvests. More information is needed on the influence of juvenile wood on lumber properties. Most information developed to date has concentrated on ultimate tensile stress, modulus of rupture, and modulus of...

  5. Suitability of live and fire-killed small-diameter ponderosa and lodgepole pine trees for manufacturing a new structural wood composite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linton, J M; Barnes, H M; Seale, R D; Jones, P D; Lowell, E C; Hummel, S S

    2010-08-01

    Finding alternative uses for raw material from small-diameter trees is a critical problem throughout the United States. In western states, a lack of markets for small-diameter ponderosa pine (Pinus ponderosa) and lodgepole pine (Pinus contorta) can contribute to problems associated with overstocking. To test the feasibility of producing structural composite lumber (SCL) beams from these two western species, we used a new technology called steam-pressed scrim lumber (SPSL) based on scrimming technology developed in Australia. Both standing green and fire-killed ponderosa and lodgepole pine logs were used in an initial test. Fire-killed logs of both species were found to be unsuitable for producing SPSL but green logs were suitable for producing SPSL. For SPSL from green material, ponderosa pine had significantly higher modulus of rupture and work-to-maximum load values than did SPSL from lodgepole pine. Modulus of elasticity was higher for lodgepole pine. The presence of blows was greater with lodgepole pine than with ponderosa. Blows had a negative effect on the mechanical properties of ponderosa pine but no significant effect on the mechanical properties of SPSL from lodgepole pine. An evaluation of non-destructive testing methods showed that X-ray could be used to determine low density areas in parent beams. The use of a sonic compression wave tester for NDE evaluation of modulus of rupture showed some promise with SPSL but requires further research. (c) 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Nepal Ambient Monitoring and Source Testing Experiment (NAMaSTE): emissions of trace gases and light-absorbing carbon from wood and dung cooking fires, garbage and crop residue burning, brick kilns, and other sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stockwell, Chelsea E.; Christian, Ted J.; Goetz, J. Douglas; Jayarathne, Thilina; Bhave, Prakash V.; Praveen, Puppala S.; Adhikari, Sagar; Maharjan, Rashmi; DeCarlo, Peter F.; Stone, Elizabeth A.; Saikawa, Eri; Blake, Donald R.; Simpson, Isobel J.; Yokelson, Robert J.; Panday, Arnico K.

    2016-09-01

    The Nepal Ambient Monitoring and Source Testing Experiment (NAMaSTE) campaign took place in and around the Kathmandu Valley and in the Indo-Gangetic Plain (IGP) of southern Nepal during April 2015. The source characterization phase targeted numerous important but undersampled (and often inefficient) combustion sources that are widespread in the developing world such as cooking with a variety of stoves and solid fuels, brick kilns, open burning of municipal solid waste (a.k.a. trash or garbage burning), crop residue burning, generators, irrigation pumps, and motorcycles. NAMaSTE produced the first, or rare, measurements of aerosol optical properties, aerosol mass, and detailed trace gas chemistry for the emissions from many of the sources. This paper reports the trace gas and aerosol measurements obtained by Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy, whole-air sampling (WAS), and photoacoustic extinctiometers (PAX; 405 and 870 nm) based on field work with a moveable lab sampling authentic sources. The primary aerosol optical properties reported include emission factors (EFs) for scattering and absorption coefficients (EF Bscat, EF Babs, in m2 kg-1 fuel burned), single scattering albedos (SSAs), and absorption Ångström exponents (AAEs). From these data we estimate black and brown carbon (BC, BrC) emission factors (g kg-1 fuel burned). The trace gas measurements provide EFs (g kg-1) for CO2, CO, CH4, selected non-methane hydrocarbons up to C10, a large suite of oxygenated organic compounds, NH3, HCN, NOx, SO2, HCl, HF, etc. (up to ˜ 80 gases in all). The emissions varied significantly by source, and light absorption by both BrC and BC was important for many sources. The AAE for dung-fuel cooking fires (4.63 ± 0.68) was significantly higher than for wood-fuel cooking fires (3.01 ± 0.10). Dung-fuel cooking fires also emitted high levels of NH3 (3.00 ± 1.33 g kg-1), organic acids (7.66 ± 6.90 g kg-1), and HCN (2.01 ± 1.25 g kg-1), where the latter could

  7. Condensing of steam in flue gas using a heat pump system in relation to a wood chip fired boiler. Roeggaskondensering med varmepumpe paa flisfyrede kedelanlaeg

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petersen, B.; Evald, A.; Vogel, G.; Bisgaard, C.

    1989-10-15

    The aim of this report is to describe existing methods for condensing steam water in flue gas in relation to combustion of forest biomas, and to describe the implementation of a plant for condensing of water in flue gas on an existing installation for combustion of wood chips. Condensing of water in flue gas, is specially interesting, because of the high content of water in forest biomas. The actual installation for the condensing of water is special, because it include a heat pump system. In this system the inlet air is humidified and heated in a heat exchanger by the flue gas. This system makes it possible to condense approximately all the water in the flue gas. It is shown, that an installation for condensing of steam water in flue gas is an advantage from an economic point of view; the pay back period for the investment will be about three years. Measurements on the installation has shown that the implementation of a plant for condensing the water in the flue gas reduces the pollution from the flue gas of approximately 85% for the emission of particles and approximately 25% for the emission of Co{sub 2} and NO{sub x}. (author).

  8. Wood handbook : wood as an engineering material.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forest Products Laboratory

    1999-01-01

    Summarizes information on wood as an engineering material. Presents properties of wood and wood-based products of particular concern to the architect and engineer. Includes discussion of designing with wood and wood-based products along with some pertinent uses.

  9. Nepal Ambient Monitoring and Source Testing Experiment (NAMaSTE: emissions of trace gases and light-absorbing carbon from wood and dung cooking fires, garbage and crop residue burning, brick kilns, and other sources

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. E. Stockwell

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The Nepal Ambient Monitoring and Source Testing Experiment (NAMaSTE campaign took place in and around the Kathmandu Valley and in the Indo-Gangetic Plain (IGP of southern Nepal during April 2015. The source characterization phase targeted numerous important but undersampled (and often inefficient combustion sources that are widespread in the developing world such as cooking with a variety of stoves and solid fuels, brick kilns, open burning of municipal solid waste (a.k.a. trash or garbage burning, crop residue burning, generators, irrigation pumps, and motorcycles. NAMaSTE produced the first, or rare, measurements of aerosol optical properties, aerosol mass, and detailed trace gas chemistry for the emissions from many of the sources. This paper reports the trace gas and aerosol measurements obtained by Fourier transform infrared (FTIR spectroscopy, whole-air sampling (WAS, and photoacoustic extinctiometers (PAX; 405 and 870 nm based on field work with a moveable lab sampling authentic sources. The primary aerosol optical properties reported include emission factors (EFs for scattering and absorption coefficients (EF Bscat, EF Babs, in m2 kg−1 fuel burned, single scattering albedos (SSAs, and absorption Ångström exponents (AAEs. From these data we estimate black and brown carbon (BC, BrC emission factors (g kg−1 fuel burned. The trace gas measurements provide EFs (g kg−1 for CO2, CO, CH4, selected non-methane hydrocarbons up to C10, a large suite of oxygenated organic compounds, NH3, HCN, NOx, SO2, HCl, HF, etc. (up to ∼ 80 gases in all. The emissions varied significantly by source, and light absorption by both BrC and BC was important for many sources. The AAE for dung-fuel cooking fires (4.63 ± 0.68 was significantly higher than for wood-fuel cooking fires (3.01 ± 0.10. Dung-fuel cooking fires also emitted high levels of NH3 (3.00 ± 1.33 g kg−1, organic acids (7.66 ± 6.90 g kg−1, and HCN

  10. Fine particle emissions in three different combustion conditions of a wood chip-fired appliance - Particulate physico-chemical properties and induced cell death

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leskinen, J.; Tissari, J.; Uski, O.; Virén, A.; Torvela, T.; Kaivosoja, T.; Lamberg, H.; Nuutinen, I.; Kettunen, T.; Joutsensaari, J.; Jalava, P. I.; Sippula, O.; Hirvonen, M.-R.; Jokiniemi, J.

    2014-04-01

    A biomass combustion reactor with a moving grate was utilised as a model system to produce three different combustion conditions corresponding to efficient, intermediate, and smouldering combustion. The efficient conditions (based on a CO level of approximately 7 mg MJ-1) corresponded to a modern pellet boiler. The intermediate conditions (CO level of approximately 300 mg MJ-1) corresponded to non-optimal settings in a continuously fired biomass combustion appliance. The smouldering conditions (CO level of approximately 2200 mg MJ-1) approached a batch combustion situation. The gaseous and particle emissions were characterised under each condition. Moreover, the ability of fine particles to cause cell death was determined using the particle emissions samples. The physico-chemical properties of the emitted particles and their toxicity were considerably different between the studied combustion conditions. In the efficient combustion, the emitted particles were small in size and large in number. The PM1 emission was low, and it was composed of ash species. In the intermediate and smouldering combustion, the PM1 emission was higher, and the particles were larger in size and smaller in number. In both of these conditions, there were high-emission peaks that produced a significant fraction of the emissions. The PAH emissions were the lowest in the efficient combustion. The smouldering combustion conditions produced the largest PAH emissions. In efficient combustion conditions, the emitted fine particles had the highest potential to cause cell death. This finding was most likely observed because these fine particles were mainly composed of inorganic ash species, and their relative contents of Zn were high. Thus, even the PM1 from optimal biomass combustion might cause health effects, but in these conditions, the particle emissions per energy unit produced were considerably lower.

  11. Coal and wood fuel for electricity production: An environmentally sound solution for waste and demolition wood

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Penninks, F.W.M. [EPON, Zwolle (Netherlands)

    1997-12-31

    Waste wood from primary wood processing and demolition presents both a problem and a potential. If disposed in landfills, it consumes large volumes and decays, producing CH{sub 4}, CO{sub 2} and other greenhouse gases. As an energy source used in a coal fired power plant it reduces the consumption of fossil fuels reducing the greenhouse effect significantly. Additional advantages are a reduction of the ash volume and the SO{sub 2} and NO{sub x} emissions. The waste wood requires collection, storage, processing and burning. This paper describes a unique project which is carried out in the Netherlands at EPON`s Gelderland Power Plant (635 MW{sub e}) where 60 000 tonnes of waste and demolition wood will be used annually. Special emphasis is given to the processing of the powdered wood fuel. Therefore, most waste and demolition wood can be converted from an environmental liability to an environmental and economic asset. (author)

  12. Wood as an adherend

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bryan H. River; Charles B. Vick; Robert H. Gillespie

    1991-01-01

    Wood is a porous, permeable, hygroscopic, orthotropic, biological composite material of extreme chemical diversity and physical intricacy. Table 1.1 provides an overview of the may variables, including wood variables, that bear on the bonding and performance of wood in wood joints and wood-based materials. Of particular note is the fact that wood properties vary...

  13. Fire and smoke retardants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drews, M. J.

    Despite a reduction in Federal regulatory activity, research concerned with flame retardancy and smoke suppression in the private sector appears to be increasing. This trend seem related to the increased utilization of plastics for end uses which traditionally have employed metal or wood products. As a result, new markets have appeared for thermally stable and fire resistance thermoplastic materials, and this in turn has spurred research and development activity. In addition, public awareness of the dangers associated with fire has increased as a result of several highly publicized hotel and restaurant fires within the past two years. The consumers recognition of flammability characteristics as important materials property considerations has increased. The current status of fire and smoke retardant chemistry and research are summarized.

  14. Alaska Wood Biomass Energy Project Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jonathan Bolling

    2009-03-02

    The purpose of the Craig Wood Fired Boiler Project is to use waste wood from local sawmilling operations to provide heat to local public buildings, in an effort to reduce the cost of operating those buildings, and put to productive use a byproduct from the wood milling process that otherwise presents an expense to local mills. The scope of the project included the acquisition of a wood boiler and the delivery systems to feed wood fuel to it, the construction of a building to house the boiler and delivery systems, and connection of the boiler facility to three buildings that will benefit from heat generated by the boiler: the Craig Aquatic Center, the Craig Elementary School, and the Craig Middle School buildings.

  15. Market review. Pellet wood gasification boiler / combination boiler. 8. ed.; Marktuebersicht. Scheitholzvergaser-/Kombikessel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Uth, Joern

    2012-01-15

    In the market review under consideration on pellet wood gasification boilers and combination boilers, the Federal Ministry of Food, Agriculture and Consumer Protection (Bonn, Federal Republic of Germany) reports on planning and installation of wood-fired heating systems, recommendations regarding to the technical assessment of boiler systems, buffers/combination boilers, prices of pellet wood gasification boilers, data sheets of the compared pellet wood gasification boilers, pellet wood combination boilers, prices of pellet wood combination boilers, data sheets of the compared pellet wood gasification boilers, list of providers.

  16. Pellet wood gasification boiler / Combination boiler. Market review. 7. ed.; Scheitholzvergaser-/Kombikessel. Marktuebersicht

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Uth, Joern

    2010-08-15

    In the market review under consideration on pellet wood gasification boilers and combination boilers, the Federal Ministry of Food, Agriculture and Consumer Protection (Bonn, Federal Republic of Germany) report on planning and installation of wood-fired heating systems, recommendations regarding to the technical assessment of boiler systems, buffers/combination boilers, prices of pellet wood gasification boilers, data sheets of the compared pellet wood gasification boilers, pellet wood combination boilers, prices of pellet wood combination boilers, data sheets of the compared pellet wood gasification boilers, list of providers.

  17. Disentangling the drivers of coarse woody debris behavior and carbon gas emissions during fire

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Weiwei; van der Werf, Guido R.; van Logtestijn, Richard S. P.; van Hal, Jurgen R.; Cornelissen, Johannes H. C.

    2016-04-01

    The turnover of coarse woody debris, a key terrestrial carbon pool, plays fundamental roles in global carbon cycling. Biological decomposition and fire are two main fates for dead wood turnover. Compared to slow decomposition, fire rapidly transfers organic carbon from the earth surface to the atmosphere. Both a-biotic environmental factors and biotic wood properties determine coarse wood combustion and thereby its carbon gas emissions during fire. Moisture is a key inhibitory environmental factor for fire. The properties of dead wood strongly affect how it burns either directly or indirectly through interacting with moisture. Coarse wood properties vary between plant species and between various decay stages. Moreover, if we put a piece of dead wood in the context of a forest fuel bed, the soil and wood contact might also greatly affect their fire behavior. Using controlled laboratory burns, we disentangled the effects of all these driving factors: tree species (one gymnosperms needle-leaf species, three angiosperms broad-leaf species), wood decay stages (freshly dead, middle decayed, very strongly decayed), moisture content (air-dried, 30% moisture content in mass), and soil-wood contact (on versus 3cm above the ground surface) on dead wood flammability and carbon gas efflux (CO2 and CO released in grams) during fire. Wood density was measured for all coarse wood samples used in our experiment. We found that compared to other drivers, wood decay stages have predominant positive effects on coarse wood combustion (for wood mass burned, R2=0.72 when air-dried and R2=0.52 at 30% moisture content) and associated carbon gas emissions (for CO2andCO (g) released, R2=0.55 when air-dried and R2=0.42 at 30% moisture content) during fire. Thus, wood decay accelerates wood combustion and its CO2 and CO emissions during fire, which can be mainly attributed to the decreasing wood density (for wood mass burned, R2=0.91 when air-dried and R2=0.63 at 30% moisture content) as wood

  18. Heat release rate of wood-plastic composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    N. M. Stark; R. H. White; C. M. Clemons

    1997-01-01

    Wood-plastic composites are becoming more important as a material that fulfills recycling needs. In this study, fire performance tests were conducted on several compositions of wood and plastic materials using the Ohio State University rate of heat release apparatus. Test results included five-minute average heat release rate in kW/m2 (HRR avg) and maximum heat release...

  19. Burning rate of solid wood measured in a heat release rate calorimeter

    Science.gov (United States)

    H. C. Tran; R. H. White

    1992-01-01

    Burning rate is a key factor in modeling fire growth and fire endurance of wood structures. This study investigated the burning rate of selected wood materials as determined by heat release, mass loss and charring rates. Thick samples of redwood, southern pine, red oak and basswood were tested in a heat release rate calorimeter. Results on ignitability and average beat...

  20. Wood Availability

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schelhaas, M.; Layos Mayr, Marian

    2017-01-01

    Estimation of the amount of wood that could potentially be harvested in a country can be accomplished using several approaches. A simple indicator is the balance between annual fellings and Net Annual Increment. However, this indicator does not take into account the actual age-class distribution of

  1. Fire History

    Data.gov (United States)

    California Department of Resources — The Fire Perimeters data consists of CDF fires 300 acres and greater in size and USFS fires 10 acres and greater throughout California from 1950 to 2002. Some fires...

  2. Fire Perimeters

    Data.gov (United States)

    California Department of Resources — The Fire Perimeters data consists of CDF fires 300 acres and greater in size and USFS fires 10 acres and greater throughout California from 1950 to 2003. Some fires...

  3. The effect of changes in lumber and furniture prices on wood furniture manufacturers' lumber usage

    Science.gov (United States)

    William G. Luppold

    1983-01-01

    Wood furniture manufacturers' demands for oak, maple, poplar, open-grain, and close-grain lumber are estimated using cross-sectional, time-series techniques. The analyses indicate that the demand for open-grain species is more price responsive than the demand for close-grain species. The calculated cross-price elasticities indicate that furniture producers do...

  4. Grain boundaries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Balluffi, R.W.; Bristowe, P.D.

    1991-01-01

    The present document is a progress report describing the work accomplished to date during the second year of our four-year grant (February 15, 1990--February 14, 1994) to study grain boundaries. The research was focused on the following three major efforts: Study of the atomic structure of grain boundaries by means of x-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy and computer modeling; study of short-circuit diffusion along grain boundaries; and development of a Thin-film Deposition/Bonding Apparatus for the manufacture of high purity bicrystals.

  5. Grain boundaries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balluffi, R. W.; Bristowe, P. D.

    The present document is a progress report describing the work accomplished to date during the second year of our four-year grant (February 15, 1990 to February 14, 1994) to study grain boundaries. The research was focused on the following three major efforts: study of the atomic structure of grain boundaries by means of x-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy and computer modeling; study of short-circuit diffusion along grain boundaries; and development of a Thin-film Deposition/Bonding Apparatus for the manufacture of high purity bicrystals.

  6. Analysis of off-axis tension test of wood specimens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jen Y. Liu

    2002-01-01

    This paper presents a stress analysis of the off-axis tension test of clear wood specimens based on orthotropic elasticity theory. The effects of Poisson's ratio and shear coupling coefficient on stress distribution are analyzed in detail. The analysis also provides a theoretical foundation for the selection of a 10° grain angle in wood specimens for the...

  7. Variation in selected solid wood properties of young Pinus patula ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    For this purpose, 10 trees were sampled from each of 17 diverse sites for wood property analyses. The effects of site, distance from the pith and differences between trees within site on wood density, transverse shrinkage, grain angle and dynamic modulus of elasticity were investigated. The site factors considered included ...

  8. Feasibility of fiberglass-reinforced bolted wood connections

    Science.gov (United States)

    D. F. Windorski; L. A. Soltis; R. J. Ross

    Bolted connections often fail by a shear plug or a splitting beneath the bolt caused by tension perpendicular-to-grain stresses as the bolt wedges its way through the wood. Preventing this type of failure would enhance the capacity and reliability of the bolted connection, thus increasing the overall integrity of a timber structure and enabling wood to compete...

  9. Wood constructions. Energy eficient, sustainable, practically proven; Holzbau Konstruktionen. Energieeffizient, nachhaltig, praxisgerecht

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lueckmann, Rudolf

    2012-07-01

    The book 'Wood constructions' provides standardized and practically proven designs, all necessary information on building physics, fire protection and additional specialized knowledge for energy efficient renovations and construction details in wood construction. The main topics of this book are: Fundamentals, timber-frame structures, wood preservation, thermal insulation, sound insulation, fire protection, energy-efficient timber buildings, timber construction systems, rehabilitation of timber structures, relevant regulations and standards.

  10. Human urinary mutagenicity after wood smoke exposure during traditional temazcal use

    OpenAIRE

    Long, Alexandra S.; Lemieux, Christine L.; Yousefi, Paul; Ruiz-Mercado, Ilse; Lam, Nicholas L.; Orellana, Carolina Romero; White, Paul A.; Smith, Kirk R.; Holland, Nina

    2014-01-01

    In Central America, the traditional temazcales or wood-fired steam baths, commonly used by many Native American populations, are often heated by wood fires with little ventilation, and this use results in high wood smoke exposure. Urinary mutagenicity has been previously employed as a non-invasive biomarker of human exposure to combustion emissions. This study examined the urinary mutagenicity in 19 indigenous Mayan families from the highlands of Guatemala who regularly use temazcales (N = 32...

  11. Significance of wood extractives for wood bonding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roffael, Edmone

    2016-02-01

    Wood contains primary extractives, which are present in all woods, and secondary extractives, which are confined in certain wood species. Extractives in wood play a major role in wood-bonding processes, as they can contribute to or determine the bonding relevant properties of wood such as acidity and wettability. Therefore, extractives play an immanent role in bonding of wood chips and wood fibres with common synthetic adhesives such as urea-formaldehyde-resins (UF-resins) and phenol-formaldehyde-resins (PF-resins). Extractives of high acidity accelerate the curing of acid curing UF-resins and decelerate bonding with alkaline hardening PF-resins. Water-soluble extractives like free sugars are detrimental for bonding of wood with cement. Polyphenolic extractives (tannins) can be used as a binder in the wood-based industry. Additionally, extractives in wood can react with formaldehyde and reduce the formaldehyde emission of wood-based panels. Moreover, some wood extractives are volatile organic compounds (VOC) and insofar also relevant to the emission of VOC from wood and wood-based panels.

  12. A project in two parts: Developing fire histories for the eastern U.S. and creating a climate-based continental fire frequency model to fill data gaps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richard Guyette; Michael Stambaugh; Daniel. Dey

    2011-01-01

    Tree-ring dated fire scars provide long-term records of fire frequency, giving land managers valuable baseline information about the fire regimes that existed prior to Euro-American settlement. However, for the East, fire history data prove difficult to acquire because the generally moister climate of the region causes rapid decay of wood. In an endeavor to fill data...

  13. Wood burning for energy production utility and industry cogeneration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matsulavage, A.; Barten, T.; Stillman, G.; Winegar, P.

    1983-06-01

    This paper describes the identification of a bank of possible cogeneration sites and the subsequent selection of the best two sites to construct a wood-fired power plant - denoted as Phase I. Phase II, the final part of the development, consists of a conceptual engineering study, including economic analyses, of those two sites. In parallel with the engineering and site development efforts, a wood availability analysis was conducted to determine the extent of the wood-fuel resource available for use on an integrated, mechanized wood harvesting basis.

  14. Reaction-to-fire performance of fire-retardant treated wooden facades in Japan with respect to accelerated weathering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nakamura Miki

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Wood has been used for building facades to enhance the aesthetic design of buildings since the revision to the evaluation method associated with the amendment of the Building Standard Law of Japan in 2000. In response, wood that has been pressure-impregnated with fire retardants (fire-retardant treated wood is often used to ensure it is safe in the event of a fire. Currently, when fire-retardant-treated wood is tested for certification of reaction to fire performance, a cone calorimeter test is conducted in Japan. This test applies radiant heat to the surface of a square specimen, 100 mm each side, immediately after it has undergone fire-retardant treatment. However, when applying fire-retardant treatment to wood, aqueous chemical injection is the standard procedure. When wood is actually used to construct a building, there is a concern about environmental forces such as wind and rain that could cause the wood to deteriorate, and concerns about performance degradation associated with aging. One of the past studies in Japan [1] conducted a cone calorimeter test after an outdoor exposure test and accelerated weathering test, compared the post-test performance with the initial performance and confirmed the amount of remaining fire retardant in the treated wood had been reduced. However, no comparison of the fireproof performance of fire-retardant wood in actual use in a building facade had been conducted in Japan. There have been already valuable researches [e.g. 2, 3] on this issue internationally, but this paper is the first step in Japan and authors hope to focus on the wooden façade construction technique and the standard façade test in Japan.

  15. Effect of changing slope of grain on ash, maple, and yellow birch in bending strength

    Science.gov (United States)

    David E. Kretschmann; James J. Bridwell; Timothy C. Nelson

    2010-01-01

    The presence of slope of grain (SoG) in wood can severely reduce the bending strength in wood. Failure to recognize the degree to which SoG can reduce strength can be catastrophic if wood is in single member use. In the United States, a growing concern in the sport of baseball relates to the high frequency of multi-piece broken wood bats. It was observed that hard...

  16. Limited oxygen index levels of impregnated Scots pine wood

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tomak, Eylem Dizman, E-mail: eylemdizman@yahoo.com [Forest Industry Engineering Department, Faculty of Forestry, Bursa Technical University, 16200 Bursa (Turkey); Cavdar, Ayfer Donmez [Interior Architecture Department, Faculty of Architecture, Karadeniz Technical University, 61080 Trabzon (Turkey)

    2013-12-10

    Highlights: • Scots pine samples were treated with 4 wood preservatives with various concentrations. • Limited oxygen index level was evaluated both for leached and un-leached samples. • All treatments improved fire retardance of samples despite some chemicals leached out. • Samples treated with fireproof agent showed the best results. • LOI of samples treated with boron powder and silicon oil was not changed by leaching. - Abstract: In this study, effect of various concentrations of boron powder, mixture of boric acid and borax, fireproof agent based on liquid blend of limestone, and silicon oil on limited oxygen index levels (LOI) of S. pine wood was investigated. Wood samples were first vacuum treated with the preservatives, and then were subjected to leaching procedure. Samples treated with fireproof agent showed the best results for improving the fire retardancy of wood, furthermore, samples treated with 25%, 50% and 100% of the solution did not burn. Leaching did not considerably change the LOI of wood samples treated with boron powder and silicon oil; however, LOI levels of samples treated with the mixture of boric acid and borax and fireproof agent were affected by leaching procedure probably arising those preservatives did not chemically bond to main wood components. All treatments improved fire retardancy of samples despite some amount of preservatives leached out from wood.

  17. The behavior of ash species in suspension fired biomass boilers

    OpenAIRE

    Jensen, Peter Arendt

    2015-01-01

    While fluid bed and grate fired boilers initially was the choice of boilers used for power production from both wood and herbaceous biomass, in recent years suspension fired boilers have been increasingly used for biomass based power production. In Denmark several large pulverized fuel boilers have been converted from coal to biomass combustion in the last 15 years. This have included co-firing of coal and straw, up to 100% firing of wood or straw andthe use of coal ash as an additive to reme...

  18. Heat and mass transfer in wooden dowels during a simulated fire: an experimental and analytical study

    Science.gov (United States)

    J. A. Mardini; A. S. Lavine; V. K.. Dhir

    1996-01-01

    Abstract--An experimental and analytical study of heat and mass transfer in wooden dowels during a simulated fire is presented in this paper. The goal of this study is to understand the processes of heat and mass transfer in wood during wildland fires. A mathematical model is developed to describe the processes of heating, drying and pyrolysis of wood until ignition...

  19. Experimental study of fire barriers preventing vertical fire spread in ETISs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xin Huang

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, the external thermal insulation system (ETIS has been applied increasingly in a large amount of buildings for energy conservation purpose. However, the increase use of combustible insulation materials in the ETIS has raised serious fire safety problems. Fires involving this type of ETIS have caused severe damage and loss. In order to improve its fire safety, fire barriers were suggested to be installed. This paper introduces fire experiments that have been done to study the effects of fire barriers on preventing vertical fire spread along the ETIS. The experiments were performed according to BS 8414-1:2002 “Fire performance of external cladding systems – Part 1: Test method for non-loadbearing external cladding systems applied to the face of the building”. The test facility consists of a 9 m high wall. The fire sources were wood cribs with a fire size of 3 ± 0.5 MW. The insulation materials were expanded polystyrene foam (EPS. The fire barrier was a horizontal strip of rockwool with a width of 300 mm. Thermocouples were used to measure temperatures outside and inside the ETIS. A series of experiments with different fire scenarios were done: no fire barrier, two fire barriers and three fire barriers at different heights. Test results were compared. The results show that the ETIS using EPS without fire barriers almost burned out, while the ETIS with fire barriers performed well in preventing fire spread. The temperatures above the fire barrier were much lower than those below the fire barrier, and most of the insulation materials above the top fire barrier stayed in place.

  20. Bondability of ipê (Tabebuia spp.) wood using ambient-curing exterior wood adhesives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniel J. Yelle

    2016-01-01

    Ipê is an extremely difficult species to bond because of its high density, interlocking grain, and high volumetric swelling–shrinkage under prolonged wet conditions. Despite its difficulties, the wood is known to be extremely durable in exterior conditions because of its resistance to microbial and insect degradation. Therefore, investigating its bondability with...

  1. Pellet fired appliances. Market survey. 7. rev. ed.; Pelletheizungen. Marktuebersicht

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2013-01-15

    The market survey under consideration reports on pellet central heating systems and pellet fired appliances. The main chapters of this market survey are concerned to: (1) Information on wood pellets and pellet fired appliances; (2) Information about the interpretation of the market survey; (3) Survey of all compared pellet fired appliances with respect to the nominal power; (4) Price lists of pellet fired appliances and pellet central heating systems; (5) Type sheets of the compared pellet fired appliances and pellet central heating systems. Finally, this brochure contains the addresses of the produces and distribution partners of pellet fired appliances and pellet central heating systems.

  2. BROMINATION OF 4-VINYLCYCLOHEXANE AND APPLYING THE RESULTING PRODUCT TO IMPROVE THE FLAME RETARDANT PROPERTIES OF WOOD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. S. Nikulina

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Currently, the demand for timber is increasing. Wood and products on its basis are considered to be the most popular in the construction industry, furniture industry, as building materials and other However, along with the positive features of this material there are also negative factors, which include low resistance to biological degradation, high temperature, resistance. Wood and materials based on it are the most flammable, and fire safety is characterized by the velocity of propagation of fire on the wooden structure. He is able to destroy it in a matter of minutes. So the wooden house elements must be protected from fire. It was therefore necessary for the fire protection of wood. It is in the handling of wood with flame retardants. Basic fire fighting methods is the impregnation of wood antipyrene composition, painting fire paint and constructive ways - insulation of timber, non-combustible compositions which can resist the fire. In the work of brominated 4-vinylcyclohexane formed as a by-product in the petrochemical industry, in chloroform synthesized compound with bromine 62-64 % and the possibility of using this product to get antiferromag composition. It is established that the application for the protective treatment of wood synthesized flame retardant has shown that this product can be used for the protective treatment of natural wood to make it flame retardant properties. Use as antiperiodic compositions bromodomain based products 4-vinylcyclohexane allows to obtain images of wood first group of flame retardant efficiency.

  3. IMPREGNATION OF WOOD COMPOSITES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Engin Derya Gezer

    2003-04-01

    Full Text Available The production of wood based structural panel and lumber composites become to increase since the wood supply is changing due to the limit of larger dimension solid sawn lumber and insufficient solid woods with enough high strength as well. As we substitute wood composites for solid wood in protected application, these composite must show resistance to wood-destroying organisms such as fungi and insects. Accordingly, the exterior structural composites is required to be treated with preservatives. This paper provides an understanding of preservative treated wood composites. The objectives of this paper includes studying how to add preservative to wood composites, examining additive effect on glue-line and evaluating the best method of manufacturing wood composites treated with preservatives.

  4. Wood structure of Trigonobalanus Excelsa G. Lozano-c., HDZ-C. & Henao (Fagaceae Wood structure of Trigonobalanus Excelsa G. Lozano-c., HDZ-C. & Henao (Fagaceae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mennega Alberta M. W.

    1980-09-01

    Full Text Available General characters: Hardly any differentiation in sapwood and heartwood. The wood greyish middle brown, with a reddish tinge. On the transverse surface growth rings not visible, the wide rays distinct with the naked eye as lighter coloured stripes. The grain straight, the texture rather fine; very hard and difficult to cut across the grain.General characters: Hardly any differentiation in sapwood and heartwood. The wood greyish middle brown, with a reddish tinge. On the transverse surface growth rings not visible, the wide rays distinct with the naked eye as lighter coloured stripes. The grain straight, the texture rather fine; very hard and difficult to cut across the grain.

  5. Regulatory aspects of fire toxicology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, G L

    1987-12-01

    Fire creates a complex toxic environment involving flame, heat, oxygen depletion, smoke, and toxic gases. The nature of that environment is dependent upon not only the materials present but on the fire event, that is, the fire scenario. Materials have different toxic gas profiles under different conditions; therefore, toxic fire gas generation is not intrinsic to any one material. Large fires in buildings constitute a severe toxic threat regardless of the materials being burned. In the past, building codes in the United States included the phrase, "no more toxic than wood," in reference to fire gases from building materials. Such phrases have recently been deleted, because of the lack of either an accepted definition or test methodology to assess toxicity. While several states have attempted regulatory activity, the most recent approach (taken by the state of New York) has been the establishment of a data bank on toxic potency of building and furnishing materials. The utility of such a data bank without available hazard analysis methodology is open to discussion, since toxic potency data are not directly applicable to toxic hazard assessment. A number of small-scale animal exposure tests have been developed to assess the potency of the toxic combustion products from combustible materials. Criticism of these tests relates to the relevance of the combustion module (a smoke generation apparatus) and the appropriateness of the animal model, particularly for irritant gases. Recent data from more than 2000 fire fatality cases and carbon monoxide exposure cases are discussed in this paper to help put small-scale laboratory test results into perspective. Toxicity is only one of the several fire properties related to materials. All fire parameters are interrelated, that is, they are not independent variables. Thus, predicting the toxicity of burning materials is a problem without a comprehensive solution. Measures have been taken, however, to reduce the number of fires and

  6. Fire water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thorpe, K. [Lawrence Webster Forrest Ltd. (United Kingdom)

    2001-01-01

    The article focuses on the value of water in fighting fires and discusses why refineries should identify water supply and distribution in contingency planning against fire. In the event of a fire, water will be required for (i) extinguishing the fire; (ii) protection of equipment and (iii) confinement of the fire. The thought process for identifying the water demand in the event of a fire is outlined. Tables give data on (a) water rates for cooling storage tanks; (b) water rates for cooling process units (c) guide to water requirements for various sizes of process units and (d) pumping requirements.

  7. The Amer demolition wood gasification project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Willeboer, W. [NV EPZ, Eindhoven (Netherlands)

    1998-12-01

    A project is described in which low quality demolition wood, which cannot be recycled to the chip board industry, is gasified. The product gas is cooled, dedusted, washed and subsequently burnt in the boiler of the coal fired co-generation unit Amer 9. This unit has a net production capacity of 600 MWe and 350 MWe heat. The unit has stringent emission limits for SO{sub 2} and NO{sub x} and produces a certified fly ash. This means that it is very important to avoid any negative effects of the wood gas on emissions and rest products of the unit. Based upon the above starting points and boundary conditions, the project has been specified with the following key figures: waste wood input 150,000 t/a; coal input saving of 70,000 t/a; CO{sub 2} emission reduction of 170,000 t/a; and electric efficiency over 35%.

  8. Precision wood particle feedstocks with retained moisture contents of greater than 30% dry basis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dooley, James H; Lanning, David N

    2014-10-28

    Wood particles having fibers aligned in a grain, wherein: the wood particles are characterized by a length dimension (L) aligned substantially parallel to the grain, a width dimension (W) normal to L and aligned cross grain, and a height dimension (H) normal to W and L; the L.times.H dimensions define two side surfaces characterized by substantially intact longitudinally arrayed fibers; the W.times.H dimensions define two cross-grain end surfaces characterized individually as aligned either normal to the grain or oblique to the grain; the L.times.W dimensions define two substantially parallel top and bottom surfaces; and, a majority of the W.times.H surfaces in the mixture of wood particles have end checking.

  9. Mechanics of Wood Machining

    CERN Document Server

    Csanády, Etele

    2013-01-01

    Wood is one of the most valuable materials for mankind, and since our earliest days wood materials have been widely used. Today we have modern woodworking machine and tools; however, the raw wood materials available are continuously declining. Therefore we are forced to use this precious material more economically, reducing waste wherever possible. This new textbook on the “Mechanics of Wood Machining” combines the quantitative, mathematical analysis of the mechanisms of wood processing with practical recommendations and solutions. Bringing together materials from many sources, the book contains new theoretical and experimental approaches and offers a clear and systematic overview of the theory of wood cutting, thermal loading in wood-cutting tools, dynamic behaviour of tool and work piece, optimum choice of operational parameters and energy consumption, the wear process of the tools, and the general regularities of wood surface roughness. Diagrams are provided for the quick estimation of various process ...

  10. Evaluating the efficacy of wood shreds for mitigating erosion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Randy B. Foltz; Natalie S. Copeland

    2009-01-01

    An erosion control product made by shredding on-site woody materials was evaluated for mitigating erosion through a series of rainfall simulations. Tests were conducted on bare soil and soil with 30, 50, and 70% cover on a coarse and a fine-grained soil. Results indicated that the wood product known as wood shreds reduced runoff and soil loss from both soil types....

  11. Fire Stations

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Homeland Security — Fire Stations in the United States Any location where fire fighters are stationed or based out of, or where equipment that such personnel use in carrying out their...

  12. Perceived quality of wood images influenced by the skewness of image histogram

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katsura, Shigehito; Mizokami, Yoko; Yaguchi, Hirohisa

    2015-08-01

    The shape of image luminance histograms is related to material perception. We investigated how the luminance histogram contributed to improvements in the perceived quality of wood images by examining various natural wood and adhesive vinyl sheets with printed wood grain. In the first experiment, we visually evaluated the perceived quality of wood samples. In addition, we measured the colorimetric parameters of the wood samples and calculated statistics of image luminance. The relationship between visual evaluation scores and image statistics suggested that skewness and kurtosis affected the perceived quality of wood. In the second experiment, we evaluated the perceived quality of wood images with altered luminance skewness and kurtosis using a paired comparison method. Our result suggests that wood images are more realistic if the skewness of the luminance histogram is slightly negative.

  13. Request for wood samples

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    NN,

    1977-01-01

    In recent years the wood collection at the Rijksherbarium was greatly expanded following a renewed interest in wood anatomy as an aid for solving classification problems. Staff members of the Rijksherbarium added to the collection by taking interesting wood samples with them from their expeditions

  14. Iron Stain on Wood

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mark Knaebe

    2013-01-01

    Iron stain, an unsightly blue–black or gray discoloration, can occur on nearly all woods. Oak, redwood, cypress, and cedar are particularly prone to iron stain because these woods contain large amounts of tannin-like extractives. The discoloration is caused by a chemical reaction between extractives in the wood and iron in steel products, such as nails, screws, and...

  15. Energy from wood

    Science.gov (United States)

    J.I. Zerbe

    2004-01-01

    In most developing countries wood and charcoal are the predominant fuels for preparation of food to maintain the quality of life that encompasses the majority of citizens. In many developing countries wood fuels are also important for small and medium size industries. Moreover, energy from wood continues to be important in industrial countries. In the USA biomass...

  16. Wood Formation in Trees

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melanie Mauriat; Gregoire Le Provost; Phillippe Rozenberg; Sylvain Delzon; Nathalie Breda; Bruno Clair; Catherine Coutand; Jean-Christoph Domec; Thierry Fourcaud; Jacqueline Grima-Pettenati; Raul Herrera; Jean-Charles Leple; Nicolas Richet; Jean-Francois Trontin; Christophe Plomion

    2014-01-01

    Among the ecosystem services provided by forests, wood provisioning takes a central position. Wood and derived products have played a critical role in the evolution of human kind and demand for raw material is increasing in a foreseeable future. Wood is used for energy production, construction and a wide variety of products for which different properties are required....

  17. The wood properties and sawn-board quality of South African-grown ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This report summarises results of past research in South Africa on the wood properties and qualities of P. maximinoi, supplemented by results of a study performed recently on an approximately 15.5-year-old provenance trial at Wilgeboom after it had been severely damaged by fire. The trees selected to study wood density, ...

  18. Thermal properties of wood reacted with a phosphorus pentoxide–amine system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong-Lin Lee; George C. Chen; Roger M. Rowell

    2004-01-01

    The objective of this research was to improve the fire-retardant properties of wood in one treatment using a phosphorus pentoxide–amine system. Phosphorus pentoxide and 16 amines including alkyl, halophenyl, and phenyl amines were compounded in N,N-dimethylformamide and the resulting solutions containing phosphoramides were reacted with wood. The characteristics of...

  19. US Fire Administration Fire Statistics

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Homeland Security — The U.S. Fire Administration collects data from a variety of sources to provide information and analyses on the status and scope of the fire problem in the United...

  20. Use of Laminated Wood Bearns in Various Structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    İbrahim TÜMEN

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available It is not very appropriate to use solid wood in curved surfaces and in large dimensions as one piece. Because the use of solid wood increases the loss and also negatively effects the strength proporties because of diagonal cut of the fibers. These disadvantages can be eliminated by using lamination technique which is done by bonding wood veneers paralel to grain direction. For this reson, the use of laminated wood materials gained important popularity nowdays. By using wood with different thickness and color proporties, laminated materials can be aesthetic and they can be used in (window frame, furniture, doors, windows, chairs etc. and because of having excellent structural industries ( roofs, exhibition areas, sport areas, bridges etc.In this study, the construction of bearns and walls using laminated materials and especially in structural applications were explained with examples.

  1. Parameters of wood welding: A study with infrared thermography

    OpenAIRE

    Ganne-Chédeville, Christelle; Properzi, Milena; Pizzi, Antonio; Leban, Jean-Michel; Pichelin, Frédéric

    2017-01-01

    Welding of wood is a well-known joining procedure that offers several advantages over traditional mechanical fasteners or gluing. During welding, extensive solid-state transformation phases occur in the so-called melting zone and the heat-affected zone. The nature and the extension of such transformations are correlated to the energy input and thus to the heat generated during the process at the wood joint interface. In the present work the influence of the welding parameters and wood grain o...

  2. The effect of fire retardants on the fire response characteristics of cellulosic materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilado, C. J.; Brauer, D. P.

    1978-01-01

    The resistance to ignition of fire retardant-treated wood, cotton, and cellulose insulation was studied. The proprietary composition used to treat wood was found to increase resistance to ignition and to reduce smoke toxicity. Cotton treated with boric acid (added by padding on or by vapor phase process) was found to have increased resistance to ignition and decreased smoke toxicity. Boric acid increased the resistance of cellulose insulation to ignition but also slightly increased the smoke toxicity.

  3. Gasification research on wood grow project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Flanigan, V J

    1981-01-09

    The GROW (Gasification Research on Wood) project consists of a research project on thermochemical degradation of wood particles (sawdust or hammermilled wood) on a pilot plant scale and utilizes a 100 cm (40 in.) diameter fluidized sand bed reactor at capacities of up to 1000 Kg/Hr (2200 lb/hr). Supplementary facilities include wood preparation and air conveying, a wood feed bin, feed and transfer screws, an air compressor with storage and filter tanks, an electrical preheater, a propane-fired preheater, a cyclone separator removing solids from product gas, a water scrubber to cool and clean product gas, a scrubber wate settling tank, a scrubber water cooler, a knockout drum, a demister to be installed in the future, a recycle compressor for recirculation, a recycle gas storage tank, a flare and stack with air blower to dispose of the gas, 2 CO/sub 2/ stripper columns to be installed in the future to remove CO/sub 2/ by caustic adsorption, caustic tanks, and the necessary piping, pumps, sampling, and measurement facilities. A brief report of progress on the project is given, followed by the safety implementation plan and operating, maintenance, and safety procedures. (MHR)

  4. Wood frame systems for wood homes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julio Cesar Molina

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available The use of constructive systems that combine strength, speed, with competitive differential techniques and mainly, compromising with the environment, is becoming more popular in Brazil. The constructive system in wood frame for houses of up to five stories is very interesting, because it is a light system, structured in reforested treated wood which allows the combination of several materials, besides allowing speed in the construction and total control of the expenses already in the project phase for being industrialized. The structural behavior of the wood frame is superior to the structural masonry in strength, thermal and acoustic comfort. However, in Brazil, the wood frame is still little known and used, due to lack of technical knowledge about the system, prejudice associated the bad use of the wood as construction material, or still, in some cases, lack of normalization. The aim of this manuscript consists of presenting the main technical characteristics and advantages of the constructive system in wood frame homes, approaching the main stages of the constructive process through examples, showing the materials used in the construction, in addition the main international normative recommendations of the project. Thus, this manuscript also hopes to contribute to the popularization of the wood frame system in Brazil, since it is a competitive, fast and ecologically correct system. Moreover, nowadays, an enormous effort of the technical, commercial and industrial section has been accomplished for the development of this system in the country.

  5. Carbon dioxide not suitable for extinguishment of smouldering silo fires: static electricity may cause silo explosion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hedlund, Frank Huess

    2018-01-01

    Smouldering fires in wood pellet silos are not uncommon. The fires are often difficult to deal with and extinguishment is a lengthy process. Injection of inert gasses to prevent oxygen from reaching the smouldering fire zone and suppress combustion is a new firefighting strategy. This article arg...

  6. Can Charcoal Provide Information About Fire Effects and Fire Severity?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belcher, Claire; Hudpsith, Victoria; Doerr, Stefan; Santin, Cristina

    2016-04-01

    Building an understanding of the impact of a wildfire is critical to the management of ecosystems. Aspects of fire severity such as the amount of soil heating, can relate to post-fire ecosystem recovery. Yet, there is no quantitative measure of this in current post-burn fire severity assessments, which are mostly qualitative ground-based visual assessments of organic matter loss, and as such can be subjective and variable between ecosystems. In order to develop a unifying fire severity assessment we explore the use of charcoal produced during a wildfire, as a tool. Charcoal has been suggested to retain some information about the nature of the fire in which it was created and one such physical property of charcoal that can be measured post-fire is its ability to reflect light when studied under oil using reflectance microscopy. The amount of light reflected varies between charcoals and is thought to be explained by the differential ordering of graphite-like phases within the char however, to what aspects of a fire's nature this alteration pertains is unknown. We have explored the formation of charcoal reflectance in 1) laboratory-based experiments using an iCone calorimeter and in 2) experimental forest scale and natural wildland fires occurring in Canada in spring 2015. In our laboratory experiments we assessed the formation and evolution of charcoal reflectance during pre-ignition heating, peak fire intensity through to the end of flaming and the transition to oxidative/smoldering heating regimes. In the prescribed and natural wildland fires we positioned the same woods used in our laboratory experiments, rigged with thermocouples in the path of oncoming fires in order to assess the resulting charcoal reflectance in response to the heating regime imposed by the fire on the samples. In this presentation we will outline our approach, findings and discuss the potential for charcoal reflectance to provide a tool in post-fire assessments seeking to determine levels of

  7. Wood production, wood technology, and biotechnological impacts.

    OpenAIRE

    2007-01-01

    In the year 2001, Prof. Dr. Ursula Kües was appointed at the Faculty of Forest Sciences and Forest Ecology of the Georg-August-University Göttingen to the chair Molecular Wood Biotechnology endowed by the Deutsche Bundesstiftung Umwelt (DBU). Her group studies higher fungi in basic and applied research. Research foci are on mushroom development and on fungal enzymes degrading wood and their applications in wood biotechnology. This book has been edited to thank the DBU for all support given to...

  8. Interactions between Fine Wood Decomposition and Flammability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weiwei Zhao

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Fire is nearly ubiquitous in the terrestrial biosphere, with profound effects on earth surface carbon storage, climate, and forest functions. Fuel quality is an important parameter determining forest fire behavior, which differs among both tree species and organs. Fuel quality is not static: when dead plant material decomposes, its structural, chemical, and water dynamic properties change, with implications for fuel flammability. However, the interactions between decomposition and flammability are poorly understood. This study aimed to determine decomposition’s effects on fuel quality and how this directly and indirectly affects wood flammability. We did controlled experiments on water dynamics and fire using twigs of four temperate tree species. We found considerable direct and indirect effects of decomposition on twig flammability, particularly on ignitability and burning time, which are important variables for fire spread. More decomposed twigs ignite and burn faster at given water content. Moreover, decomposed twigs dry out faster than fresh twigs, which make them flammable sooner when drying out after rain. Decomposed fine woody litters may promote horizontal fire spread as ground fuels and act as a fuel ladder when staying attached to trees. Our results add an important, previously poorly studied dynamic to our understanding of forest fire spread.

  9. Equivalent circuit modeling of the dielectric properties of rubber wood at low frequency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan M. Daud; Kaida B. Khalid; Aziz H.A. Sidek

    2000-01-01

    Dielectric properties of rubber wood were studied at various moisture contents and grain directions at low frequencies from 10-2 to 105 Hz. Results showed that the moisture content of wood affected the dielectric properties considerably. Dielectric data at different anisotropic directions, i.e., longitudinal, radial, and...

  10. Effect of different levels of wood ash on nutrient contents of maize ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Field experiments were conducted at Umudike in the rainforest zone and at Igbariam in the derived savanna zone in early seasons of 2001 and 2002 to study quantitatively wood ash effects on leaf nutrient compositions and grain yield. Treatments consisted of 0,2,4,6 and 8t, ha wood ash replicated thee times in a ...

  11. 36 CFR 327.10 - Fires.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... not limited to, tires, plastic and other floatation materials or treated wood products is prohibited... Fires. (a) Gasoline and other fuels, except that which is contained in storage tanks of vehicles... confined to those areas designated by the District Commander, and shall be contained in fireplaces, grills...

  12. The role of fire in ecosystem management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jerry T. Williams

    1995-01-01

    USDA Forest Service management practices have significantly changed. Past practices were predicated on a strong public expectation for commodity production and protection from the forces of nature that were perceived to threaten that goal. Fire suppression, selective logging, intensive grazing, constrained prescribed burning, and a general emphasis on wood fiber...

  13. Material Analysis for a Fire Assessment.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, Alexander; Nemer, Martin B.

    2014-08-01

    This report consolidates technical information on several materials and material classes for a fire assessment. The materials include three polymeric materials, wood, and hydraulic oil. The polymers are polystyrene, polyurethane, and melamine- formaldehyde foams. Samples of two of the specific materials were tested for their behavior in a fire - like environment. Test data and the methods used to test the materials are presented. Much of the remaining data are taken from a literature survey. This report serves as a reference source of properties necessary to predict the behavior of these materials in a fire.

  14. Carbon sequestration via wood burial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zeng Ning

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract To mitigate global climate change, a portfolio of strategies will be needed to keep the atmospheric CO2 concentration below a dangerous level. Here a carbon sequestration strategy is proposed in which certain dead or live trees are harvested via collection or selective cutting, then buried in trenches or stowed away in above-ground shelters. The largely anaerobic condition under a sufficiently thick layer of soil will prevent the decomposition of the buried wood. Because a large flux of CO2 is constantly being assimilated into the world's forests via photosynthesis, cutting off its return pathway to the atmosphere forms an effective carbon sink. It is estimated that a sustainable long-term carbon sequestration potential for wood burial is 10 ± 5 GtC y-1, and currently about 65 GtC is on the world's forest floors in the form of coarse woody debris suitable for burial. The potential is largest in tropical forests (4.2 GtC y-1, followed by temperate (3.7 GtC y-1 and boreal forests (2.1 GtC y-1. Burying wood has other benefits including minimizing CO2 source from deforestation, extending the lifetime of reforestation carbon sink, and reducing fire danger. There are possible environmental impacts such as nutrient lock-up which nevertheless appears manageable, but other concerns and factors will likely set a limit so that only part of the full potential can be realized. Based on data from North American logging industry, the cost for wood burial is estimated to be $14/tCO2($50/tC, lower than the typical cost for power plant CO2 capture with geological storage. The cost for carbon sequestration with wood burial is low because CO2 is removed from the atmosphere by the natural process of photosynthesis at little cost. The technique is low tech, distributed, easy to monitor, safe, and reversible, thus an attractive option for large-scale implementation in a world-wide carbon market.

  15. EVOLUTION OF LIGHTWEIGHT WOOD COMPOSITES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marius C. BARBU

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Lightweight boards and beams in the wood-based construction and furniture industry are not a new topic. The density reduction of panels using sandwich structure with light cores was confirmed by users like doors or mobile homes more than three decades ago. Today many ways to attain a lighter wooden structure are on offer, partially in industrial application. The first one is the use of light-weight wood species like balsa, lime, pine from southern hemisphere plantations etc. limited by the availability, strength properties, gluability and so on. A second one is the sandwich structure made from hard faces like thick veneer, thin plywood, particleboard or high density thin fiberboard and cores made from honeycomb paper, very light wood species or foams like the polystyrene one. A third way to produce a light structure is to reduce the core drastically, using predesigned skeletons with special shapes and connections to the faces. The engines for these developments are on the one hand the fast growing market of knockdown furniture and on the other hand the increasing costs for energy and raw materials. Additional factors that make weight saving a primary economical objective for most producers are transportation costs, easier handling and higher acceptance among the end users. Moreover, customers demand more for ergonomical solutions regarding packaging. Many patents were generated by researchers and developers for new one-stage production processes for sandwich panels with wood- and impregnated paper-based facings made from veneers, particles or fibres and a core consisting of expandable foams, particles or embedded hard skeletons. These ideas or prototypes could be integrated in existing continuous pressing lines for wood based panels keeping some of the advantages of the continuous production technique in matters of efficiency. Some of the challenges of the light weight wooden structure are the connection in half or final parts, resistance to

  16. Wildland fire limits subsequent fire occurrence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sean A. Parks; Carol Miller; Lisa M. Holsinger; Scott Baggett; Benjamin J. Bird

    2016-01-01

    Several aspects of wildland fire are moderated by site- and landscape-level vegetation changes caused by previous fire, thereby creating a dynamic where one fire exerts a regulatory control on subsequent fire. For example, wildland fire has been shown to regulate the size and severity of subsequent fire. However, wildland fire has the potential to influence...

  17. Using rainfall simulators to test wood shreddings for erosion control

    Science.gov (United States)

    James Gronier; Randy Foltz; Charlie Showers

    2005-01-01

    The U.S. Department of Agriculture Forest Service is considering alternative methods of erosion control when constructing roads, decommissioning roads, protecting lands burned by wildland fires, and reclaiming lands disturbed by other activities. This article is the second in a series of tech tips that discuss the use of wood shreddings for erosion control. The first...

  18. Urban Wood Waste Resource Assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wiltsee, G.

    1998-11-20

    This study collected and analyzed data on urban wood waste resources in 30 randomly selected metropolitan areas in the United States. Three major categories wood wastes disposed with, or recovered from, the municipal solid waste stream; industrial wood wastes such as wood scraps and sawdust from pallet recycling, woodworking shops, and lumberyards; and wood in construction/demolition and land clearing debris.

  19. Structure and function of wood

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alex C. Wiedenhoeft; Regis B. Miller

    2005-01-01

    Despite the many human uses to which various woods are suited, at a fundamental level wood is a complex biological structure, itself a composite of many chemistries and cell types acting together to serve the needs of the plant. Although humans have striven to understand wood in the context of wood technology, we have often overlooked the key and basic fact that wood...

  20. Thermal oxidative degradation of wood modified with aminophenylborates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Klyachenkova Olga

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Comparative thermal analysis in the presence of oxygen was carried out for samples of native pine wood and wood samples modified with aminophenylborates. Significant decrease in the amount of heat released during thermal decomposition of the modified samples was established, which is due to the increase of carbonaceous residues on the surface. Reduction of heat release during decomposition of the modified samples may be explained by the lower yield of combustible volatile products as well as by thin film of boron oxide, formed on the surface of the modified wood, that partially reflects heat flow. Produced upon the modifier decomposition water vapor and inert nitrogen oxides dilute gaseous mixture near the wood surface and isolate it from oxygen. This enhances fire-resistance of wood modified with mono- and diethanolamine(N→Bphenylborates. Hydroxyl group at the sixth carbon atom of the glucopyranose ring of cellulose participates in reactions of cellulose modification, which prevents formation of flammable levoglucosan and, consequently, improves the fire-resistance of the modified wood.

  1. Role of Moisture in the Failure of Coatings on Wood

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roger Rowell

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Most wood coating tests are done either in a short term artificial weathering chamber or long term on an outdoor rack/fence. In both cases, the coatings are exposed to both ultraviolet radiation and water. This study is focused on the influence of moisture alone on wood opaque film forming coating failures. As moisture is sorbed into the wood structure, the wood swells in proportion to the volume of water sorbed. As moisture is lost, the wood shrinks in proportion to the volume of the water lost. Moisture in the wood end grain is responsible for coating failure in, for example, window corners and end to end siding. The wood cell wall moisture can be greatly reduced by a process known as acetylation which not only reduces the moisture sorbed in the cell wall but results in high levels of dimensional stability. The reduced moisture uptake along with the stability results in less stress created between the coating wood surface interface improving the performance of the coating and increasing its useful lifetime.

  2. Chapter 9: Wood Energy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Francisco X. Aguilar; Karen Abt; Branko Glavonjic; Eugene Lopatin; Warren  Mabee

    2016-01-01

    The availabilty of information on wood energy continues to improve, particularly for commoditized woodfuels.  Wood energy consumption and production vary in the UNECE region because demand is strngly affected by weather and the prices of competing energy sources.  There has been an increase in wood energy in the power-and-heat sector in the EU28 and North American...

  3. Moisture Transport in Wood

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Astrup, T.; Hansen, K. K.; Hoffmeyer, P.

    2005-01-01

    Modelling of moisture transport in wood is of great importance as most mechanical and physical properties of wood depend on moisture content. Moisture transport in porous materials is often described by Ficks second law, but several observations indicate that this does not apply very well to wood....... Recently at the Technical University of Denmark, Department of Civil Engineering, a new model for moisture transport in wood has been developed. The model divides the transport into two phases, namely water vapour in the cell lumens and bound water in the cell walls....

  4. Nepal Ambient Monitoring and Source Testing Experiment (NAMaSTE: emissions of particulate matter from wood- and dung-fueled cooking fires, garbage and crop residue burning, brick kilns, and other sources

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Jayarathne

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available The Nepal Ambient Monitoring and Source Testing Experiment (NAMaSTE characterized widespread and under-sampled combustion sources common to South Asia, including brick kilns, garbage burning, diesel and gasoline generators, diesel groundwater pumps, idling motorcycles, traditional and modern cooking stoves and fires, crop residue burning, and heating fire. Fuel-based emission factors (EFs; with units of pollutant mass emitted per kilogram of fuel combusted were determined for fine particulate matter (PM2.5, organic carbon (OC, elemental carbon (EC, inorganic ions, trace metals, and organic species. For the forced-draft zigzag brick kiln, EFPM2.5 ranged from 12 to 19 g kg−1 with major contributions from OC (7 %, sulfate expected to be in the form of sulfuric acid (31.9 %, and other chemicals not measured (e.g., particle-bound water. For the clamp kiln, EFPM2.5 ranged from 8 to 13 g kg−1, with major contributions from OC (63.2 %, sulfate (23.4 %, and ammonium (16 %. Our brick kiln EFPM2.5 values may exceed those previously reported, partly because we sampled emissions at ambient temperature after emission from the stack or kiln allowing some particle-phase OC and sulfate to form from gaseous precursors. The combustion of mixed household garbage under dry conditions had an EFPM2.5 of 7.4 ± 1.2 g kg−1, whereas damp conditions generated the highest EFPM2.5 of all combustion sources in this study, reaching up to 125 ± 23 g kg−1. Garbage burning emissions contained triphenylbenzene and relatively high concentrations of heavy metals (Cu, Pb, Sb, making these useful markers of this source. A variety of cooking stoves and fires fueled with dung, hardwood, twigs, and/or other biofuels were studied. The use of dung for cooking and heating produced higher EFPM2.5 than other biofuel sources and consistently emitted more PM2.5 and OC than burning hardwood and/or twigs; this trend was consistent across traditional mud

  5. Fire danmarkskort

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Birger Faurholt

    2017-01-01

    Fire danmarkskort udarbejdet på baggrund af dataudtræk fra indsendte gødningsregnskaber for planperioden 2015/2016......Fire danmarkskort udarbejdet på baggrund af dataudtræk fra indsendte gødningsregnskaber for planperioden 2015/2016...

  6. On fire

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Helle Rabøl

    The title of this paper: “On fire”, refers to two (maybe three) aspects: firstly as a metaphor of having engagement in a community of practice according to Lave & Wenger (1991), and secondly it refers to the concrete element “fire” in the work of the fire fighters – and thirdly fire as a signifier...

  7. Fire Power

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denker, Deb; West, Lee

    2009-01-01

    For education administrators, campus fires are not only a distressing loss, but also a stark reminder that a campus faces risks that require special vigilance. In many ways, campuses resemble small communities, with areas for living, working and relaxing. A residence hall fire may raise the specter of careless youth, often with the complication of…

  8. Forest-fire models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haiganoush Preisler; Alan Ager

    2013-01-01

    For applied mathematicians forest fire models refer mainly to a non-linear dynamic system often used to simulate spread of fire. For forest managers forest fire models may pertain to any of the three phases of fire management: prefire planning (fire risk models), fire suppression (fire behavior models), and postfire evaluation (fire effects and economic models). In...

  9. 46 CFR 28.315 - Fire pumps, fire mains, fire hydrants, and fire hoses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Fire pumps, fire mains, fire hydrants, and fire hoses... After September 15, 1991, and That Operate With More Than 16 Individuals on Board § 28.315 Fire pumps, fire mains, fire hydrants, and fire hoses. (a) Each vessel 36 feet (11.8 meters) or more in length must...

  10. Evaluation of the Onset of Flashover in Room Fire Experiments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulsen, Annemarie; Jomaas, Grunde; Bwalya, Alex

    2013-01-01

    results showed that by lowering the thermal inertia and thereby lowering the heat loss from the room and at the same time increasing the thermal feedback, a thermal runaway occurred before significant fire spread; but only for objects composed of a mixture of plastic/rubber/textiles and wood......Two series of full scale room fire tests comprising 16 experiments are used for a study of the onset of flashover. The fire loads were varied and represented seven different commercial applications and two non-combustible linings with significantly different thermal inertia were used. The test...... be predicted by the traditional flashover temperature criterion of 500C to 600C. For fire loads composed of pure wood/celluloses the onset of flashover occurred about the same time as fire spread irrespectively of linings and at significantly higher room temperatures (725C). This can be explained...

  11. Pilot project: Wood chip combustion plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Malsburg, G. von.

    1984-01-01

    Wood chip combustion systems as an alternative heating system can be operated at a justifiable expense of money and work. With the present cost structure such a system becomes interesting at an annual heating oil consumption of 10.000 l or more. The economic efficiency depends on the one hand on the level of the fixed costs and on the price of m/sup 3/ of wood chips on the other. Satisfactory automatic operation of a wood-chip combustion system is possible. The fuel, however, must be more or less homogeneous. The system uses feeder screws and due to the little space it needs it can be fitted to almost any existing heating system. If the heat demand and the chip feed are matched well and if the exchanger surfaces are cleaned regularly the waste gas temperatures will be low. Overheating does not occur and pollution is expected to be lower than in piece-wood fueled systems because the combustion process actually alternates between full operation mode and standstill. In standstill mode only a small fire is being maintained so that the production of nitric oxides, gases and emissions (tar, soot, dust etc.) is expected to drop sharply. Measurements of all these substances will be carried out during the heating period 1983/84.

  12. Distribution of borates around point source injections in wood members exposed outside

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodney C. De Groot; Colin C. Felton; Douglas M. Crawford

    2000-01-01

    In bridge timbers, wood decay is usually found where water has accessed the end-grain surfaces. In preservative-treated members, end-grain surfaces are most likely to be those resulting from on-site framing cuts or borings. Because these at-risk surfaces are easy to see, it seems feasible to establish a program where diffusible preservatives are repetitively inserted...

  13. Heat sterilization of wood

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiping Wang

    2010-01-01

    Two important questions should be considered in heat sterilizing solid wood materials: First, what temperature–time regime is required to kill a particular pest? Second, how much time is required to heat the center of any wood configuration to the kill temperature? The entomology research on the first question has facilitated the development of international standards...

  14. Wood supply and demand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peter J. Ince; David B. McKeever

    2011-01-01

    At times in history, there have been concerns that demand for wood (timber) would be greater than the ability to supply it, but that concern has recently dissipated. The wood supply and demand situation has changed because of market transitions, economic downturns, and continued forest growth. This article provides a concise overview of this change as it relates to the...

  15. Production and characterization of carbon structures derived from wood

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Xinfeng

    The objective of this research was to produce structural carbon materials from wood, a renewable biomaterial, for advanced material application. A broad range of materials were produced for study including carbonized wood, resin infused carbon composites made from carbonized wood, and carbon nanotubes from wood fibers. The effect of slow heating on the properties of carbonized wood was studied and important carbonized wood properties were found to be produced over a range of heating rates and peak temperatures. Slow heating rates promoted the formation and growth of graphene sheets in turbostratic crystallites, which had a significant influence on the electrical resistivity and Young's modulus of the carbonized wood. A reduction in the rate of heating may be beneficial with respect to carbon properties and the prevention of crack production during the manufacture of large monolithic carbon specimens from wood and wood-based materials. Investigation of selected physical and mechanical properties of resin-infused porous carbon composites made from medium density fiberboard demonstrated that the infused material can be used in specific applications, where high mechanical strength is not required but high dimensional stability at elevated-use temperatures, fire safety, or static dissipation and shielding is required. A unique cyclic heating process has been developed to produce carbon nanotubes directly from wood fibers. Study on the oxidative behavior of carbons derived from cellulose and lignin showed that cellulose carbon ablates faster at a lower temperature in air than lignin carbon when they were prepared at temperatures lower than 500°C due to cellulose carbon's lower content of aromatic structures. It is hypothesized that the formation of carbon nanotubes during the cyclic heating process occurred via template synthesis, with the nanochannels formed from the ablation of cellulose fibrils functioning as a template. Evidence of formation of nanochannels has been

  16. Fire influences the structure of plant-bee networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peralta, Guadalupe; Stevani, Erica L; Chacoff, Natacha P; Dorado, Jimena; Vázquez, Diego P

    2017-10-01

    Fire represents a frequent disturbance in many ecosystems, which can affect plant-pollinator assemblages and hence the services they provide. Furthermore, fire events could affect the architecture of plant-pollinator interaction networks, modifying the structure and function of communities. Some pollinators, such as wood-nesting bees, may be particularly affected by fire events due to damage to the nesting material and its long regeneration time. However, it remains unclear whether fire influences the structure of bee-plant interactions. Here, we used quantitative plant-wood-nesting bee interaction networks sampled across four different post-fire age categories (from freshly-burnt to unburnt sites) in an arid ecosystem to test whether the abundance of wood-nesting bees, the breadth of resource use and the plant-bee community structure change along a post-fire age gradient. We demonstrate that freshly-burnt sites present higher abundances of generalist than specialist wood-nesting bees and that this translates into lower network modularity than that of sites with greater post-fire ages. Bees do not seem to change their feeding behaviour across the post-fire age gradient despite changes in floral resource availability. Despite the effects of fire on plant-bee interaction network structure, these mutualistic networks seem to be able to recover a few years after the fire event. This result suggests that these interactions might be highly resilient to this type of disturbance. © 2017 The Authors. Journal of Animal Ecology © 2017 British Ecological Society.

  17. Complex geometries in wood

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tamke, Martin; Ramsgaard Thomsen, Mette; Riiber Nielsen, Jacob

    2009-01-01

    The versatility of wood constructions and traditional wood joints for the production of non standard elements was in focus of a design based research. Herein we established a seamless process from digital design to fabrication. A first research phase centered on the development of a robust parame...... parametric model and a generic design language a later explored the possibilities to construct complex shaped geometries with self registering joints on modern wood crafting machines. The research was carried out as collaboration with industrial partners.......The versatility of wood constructions and traditional wood joints for the production of non standard elements was in focus of a design based research. Herein we established a seamless process from digital design to fabrication. A first research phase centered on the development of a robust...

  18. Emergence of Buprestidae, Cerambycidae, and Scolytinae (Coleoptera) from mountain pine beetle-killed and fire-killed ponderosa pines in the Black Hills, South Dakota, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheryl L. Costello; William R. Jacobi; Jose F. Negron

    2013-01-01

    Wood borers (Coleoptera: Cerambycidae and Buprestidae) and bark beetles (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) infest ponderosa pines, Pinus ponderosa P. Lawson and C. Lawson, killed by mountain pine beetle (MPB), Dendroctonus ponderosae Hopkins, and fire. No data is available comparing wood borer and bark beetle densities or species guilds associated with MPB-killed or fire-...

  19. 77 FR 71825 - Notice of Temporary Restriction of Vehicle Use and Temporary Closure to Tree Cutting and Wood...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-04

    ...: 14X1125] Notice of Temporary Restriction of Vehicle Use and Temporary Closure to Tree Cutting and Wood... harvesting and/or tree cutting on public land within the Topaz Ranch Estates (TRE) and Preacher fires burn... and a temporary closure to tree cutting and wood collecting on areas burned by the TRE and Preacher...

  20. 77 FR 25735 - Notice of Temporary Restriction of Vehicle Use and Closure to Tree Cutting and Wood Harvesting on...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-01

    ...: 14X1125] Notice of Temporary Restriction of Vehicle Use and Closure to Tree Cutting and Wood Harvesting on... and/or tree cutting on public land within the Ray May Fire burn area located south of Gardnerville...: Pursuant to 43 CFR 8364.1, restriction of cross-country vehicle travel and closure to tree cutting and wood...

  1. Wood-polymer composite: physical and mechanical properties of some wood species impregnated with styrene and methyl methacrylate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Denise Ortigosa Stolf

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to demonstrate the feasibility of obtaining wood-polymer composites (WPC displaying a performance superior to that of untreated wood from reforested genera. To this end, wood samples of Pine (Pinus caribaea and Eucalyptus (Eucalyptus grandis, whose density is compatible with this process, were impregnated with the polymeric monomers styrene and methyl methacrylate, using benzoyl peroxide to initiate the polymerization process forming free radicals. The vacuum-pressure method was used to impregnate the samples with monomer-initiator solution. The results indicated a significant improvement of all the properties investigated, including dimensional stability, for the Pine-WPC, while Eucalyptus-WPC, owing to the wood's low permeability, showed only increased values of hardness parallel and perpendicular to grain.

  2. Suspension-Firing of Biomass

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bashir, Muhammad Shafique; Jensen, Peter Arendt; Frandsen, Flemming

    2012-01-01

    This paper is Part 1 in a series of two describing probe measurements of deposit build-up and removal (shedding) in a 350 MWth suspension boiler, firing straw and wood. The influence of fuel type (straw share in wood), probe exposure time, probe surface temperature (500, 550, and 600 °C), and flue...... gas temperature (600–1050 °C) on ash deposit formation rate has been investigated. Investigations of deposit formation rate were made by use of an advanced online deposit probe that allowed nearly continuous measurement of the deposited mass. Two different measures of deposit formation rate are used...... in the analysis of the data. The first is the integral deposit formation rate (IDF-rate) found by dividing the integral mass change over integral time intervals (of order several hours) by the time interval. The IDF-rate is similar to deposit formation rates based on total deposit mass uptake divided by probe...

  3. Analysis of Selected Mechanical Properties of Construction Wood KVH and Parallam 2.0 E

    OpenAIRE

    Jaroslav Hrázský; Pavel Král

    2010-01-01

    This paper summarizes the results of the analysis of selected physical and mechanical properties of construction wood KVH and composite material Parallam 2.0 E (below Parallam). The following properties were determined: bending strength, local modulus of elasticity in bending, modulus of elasticity in pure bending, modulus of elasticity in shear by the constant span method, compression strength along the grain, compression strength across the grain, tensile strength across the grain, density ...

  4. Wood anatomy and properties of three species in the genus Spondias lakonensis (Anacardiaceae found in Thailand

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renupha Phongkrathung

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The anatomy and properties of woods in the genus Spondias (Anacardiaceae were investigated. Wood samples were collected from North and Northeast Thailand. Permanent slides of wood sections and tissue maceration were made. The specimens were observed under a light microscope and using scanning electron microscopy. The wood density, specific gravity and hardness were also investigated. It was found that the wood of all three species had indistinct growth rings and fine textured and straight grain. Kribs heterogeneous rays type I were found in Spondias lakonensis while Kribs heterogeneous rays type III were found in Spondias pinnata and Spondias cytherea. Radial canals were present in rays of all studied species. Prismatic crystals were found in the rays of S. lakonensis and S. cytherea but not in S. pinnata. Starch grains were also observed in S. pinnata and S. cytherea. The wood specific gravity of S. pinnata, S. lakonensis and S. cytherea was 0.45, 0.33 and 0.30; the wood density was 0.44, 0.33 and 0.27 g/cm3 and the wood hardness was 2795.85, 1329.26 and 1059 N, respectively. The results from this study suggest that Spondias woods can be used for agricultural utensils but they are not suitable for heavy construction.

  5. Cord Wood Testing in a Non-Catalytic Wood Stove

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Butcher, T. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Trojanowski, R. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Wei, G. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States)

    2014-06-30

    EPA Method 28 and the current wood stove regulations have been in-place since 1988. Recently, EPA proposed an update to the existing NSPS for wood stove regulations which includes a plan to transition from the current crib wood fuel to cord wood fuel for certification testing. Cord wood is seen as generally more representative of field conditions while the crib wood is seen as more repeatable. In any change of certification test fuel, there are questions about the impact on measured results and the correlation between tests with the two different fuels. The purpose of the work reported here is to provide data on the performance of a noncatalytic stove with cord wood. The stove selected has previously been certified with crib wood which provides a basis for comparison with cord wood. Overall, particulate emissions were found to be considerably higher with cord wood.

  6. Microbiota of kefir grains

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomislav Pogačić

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Kefir grains represent the unique microbial community consisting of bacteria, yeasts, and sometimes filamentous moulds creating complex symbiotic community. The complexity of their physical and microbial structures is the reason that the kefir grains are still not unequivocally elucidated. Microbiota of kefir grains has been studied by many microbiological and molecular approaches. The development of metagenomics, based on the identification without cultivation, is opening new possibilities for identification of previously nonisolated and non-identified microbial species from the kefir grains. Considering recent studies, there are over 50 microbial species associated with kefir grains. The aim of this review is to summarise the microbiota composition of kefir grains. Moreover, because of technological and microbiological significance of the kefir grains, the paper provides an insight into the microbiological and molecular methods applied to study microbial biodiversity of kefir grains.

  7. Fire Safety

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Whether the number is 911 or a regular phone number, everyone in the family should know it by ... near the phone. Include the local fire department phone number, your full home address and phone number, and ...

  8. Chapter 6: Wood energy and competing wood product markers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenneth E. Skog; Robert C. Abt; Karen Abt

    2014-01-01

    Understanding the effect of expanding wood energy markets is important to all wood-dependent industries and to policymakers debating the implementation of public programs to support the expansion of wood energy generation. A key factor in determining the feasibility of wood energy projects (e.g. wood boiler or pellet plant) is the long-term (i.e. 20-30year) supply...

  9. Structure and Function of Wood

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alex C. Wiedenhoeft

    2012-01-01

    Wood is a complex biological structure, a composite of many cell types and chemistries acting together to serve the needs of living plant. Attempting to understand wood inthe context of wood technology, we have often overlooked the basic fact that wood evolved over the course of millions of years to serve three main functions in plants-conduction of water from the...

  10. The influence of fire retardants on the properties of beech and poplar veneers and plywood

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miljković Jovan

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Rising demands for fire resistance properties of wood construction and elements matching new standards have been an important part of building codes during the last decade. On the other side, lack of more detailed research on interaction between wood species and selected fire retardant chemicals even with basically one is evident. This is particularly truth with domestic wood species. In this research, beech and poplar veneers were immersed in 25% solutions of monoammonium phosphate (MP and sodium acetate (SA and impregnated for different periods of time. To determine the preliminary level of fire retardancy achieved in veneers before manufacturing of finished plywood, thermo gravimetric (TG and derivative thermo gravimetric (DTG methods were used. TG and DTG analyses of treated and untreated wood, as well as of fire retardants alone, were performed. The next properties of impregnated and no impregnated veneers and plywood were determined: absorption of imp regnant solution (A, weight percent gain (WPG of imp regnant, equilibrium moisture content (EMC, pH values, and in the case of plywood, strength and fire resistance. Fire resistance of plywood was tested in accordance with standard test for resistance to the effects of fire and the most efficient fire retardant, monoammonium phosphate, had the same result as TG/DTG analyses, which pointed out the validity of TG methods in predicting fire resistance of future products.

  11. Wood ash. A potential forest fertilizer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuokkanen, M.; Kuokkanen, T. (Univ. of Oulu, Dept. of Chemistry (Finland)). email: toivo,kuokkanen@oulu.fi; Poeykioe, R. (City of Kemi (Finland)); Nurmesniemi, H. (Stora Enso Oyj, Veitsiluoto Mill, Kemi (Finland))

    2009-07-01

    The enhancement of wood-derived energy plays an important role in the Finnish energy and climate strategies. The use of new and upgraded biomass fuels, e.g. pellets and briquettes, has become more common in recent years, especially fuel pellets which are well suited for home heating applications. Although electrical and district heating are still the most popular heating systems in news detached and row houses in Finland, stoves and fireplaces which burn biomass fuels, e.g. logs, pellets and briquettes, are commonly used as a secondary heating system. It has been estimated that about 100 000 wood fired heating systems are currently in operation in Finland. Thousands of small-scale boilers are sold annually, and about 30% of the wood heating systems are fuelled by wood chips or pellets. Compared to traditional firewood, pellets provide possibilities for automation and optimization in the same way as for oil, with high combustion efficiency and small combustion residues. In addition, wood pellets can be stored and traded at the regional, national and international level. These features, combined with the other advantages such as environmental benefits (i.e. CO{sub 2} neutral fuel), low moisture content and bulk density (i.e. 0.28 bulk-m3 of wood pellets is equivalent to 1 bulk-m3 of wood chips), as well as a relatively high heating (i.e. calorific) value (about 17 MJ/kg), which allows long-distance transport without affecting the energy balance make wood pellets attractive in many countries from both the demand and the supply side of the market. Wood ash usually contains mineral plant nutrients, especially base cations (e.g. Ca, Mg, K), and has a strongly alkaline pH. For this reason, it would be ecologically beneficial if the ash that contains plant nutrients could be returned back to the forest ecosystem. This would save primary resources and can be seen as an example of the sustainable use of biomass. The purpose of this study was to determine the physical and

  12. Wood construction under cold climate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, Xiaodong; Hagman, Olle; Sundqvist, Bror

    2014-01-01

    As wood constructions increasingly use engineered wood products worldwide, concerns arise about the integrity of the wood and adhesives system. The glueline stability is a crucial issue for engineered wood application, especially under cold climate. In this study, Norway spruce (Picea abies...... specimens need to be tested in further work to more completely present the issue. The EN 301 and EN 302 may need to be specified based on wood species....

  13. Adenocarcinoma and wood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schraub, S; Belon-Leneutre, M; Mercier, M; Bourgeois, P

    1989-12-01

    The relation of adenocarcinoma of the facial sinuses and exposure to wood dust has been recognized for 20 years. As the tracheobronchial mucosa is similar to that lining the sinuses, a link between bronchial adenocarcinoma and wood dust exposure has been postulated. To test this hypothesis, a case-control study was conducted, based on all the histologically proven cases of adenocarcinoma of the lung reported to the tumor registry of the Doubs region of France from 1978 to 1985 and random population controls matched for age and residence. A questionnaire on occupational exposure and tobacco consumption was completed by 53 cases and 160 controls. Exposure to wood was similar for both groups, the crude relative risk (odds ratio) being 1.06; adjustment for tobacco consumption did not modify this value. Exposure to wood dust does not seem to be an occupational risk factor in the genesis of bronchial adenocarcinoma.

  14. Towards Improved Airborne Fire Detection Systems Using Beetle Inspired Infrared Detection and Fire Searching Strategies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Herbert Bousack

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Every year forest fires cause severe financial losses in many countries of the world. Additionally, lives of humans as well as of countless animals are often lost. Due to global warming, the problem of wildfires is getting out of control; hence, the burning of thousands of hectares is obviously increasing. Most important, therefore, is the early detection of an emerging fire before its intensity becomes too high. More than ever, a need for early warning systems capable of detecting small fires from distances as large as possible exists. A look to nature shows that pyrophilous “fire beetles” of the genus Melanophila can be regarded as natural airborne fire detection systems because their larvae can only develop in the wood of fire-killed trees. There is evidence that Melanophila beetles can detect large fires from distances of more than 100 km by visual and infrared cues. In a biomimetic approach, a concept has been developed to use the surveying strategy of the “fire beetles” for the reliable detection of a smoke plume of a fire from large distances by means of a basal infrared emission zone. Future infrared sensors necessary for this ability are also inspired by the natural infrared receptors of Melanophila beetles.

  15. Wood - a carbon depot

    OpenAIRE

    Lipušček, Igor; Tišler, Vesna

    2003-01-01

    The article examines the global movement of carbon dioxide, the most important greenhouse gas due to its large quantities. We studied the carbon cycle with possibilities of its extension, and analysed the mechanisms that remove carbon dioxide from the atmosphere and bind it into solid substances for a longer period of time. The focus was on carbon dioxide sink into biomass and carbon deposit in wood. On the basis of wood component data and chemical analysis of the components, we calculated th...

  16. Some Properties of Astronium graveolens Wood Along the Stem

    OpenAIRE

    Longui, Eduardo Luiz; Gondo, Cássia Christine Schmidt; Luiz de Lima, Israel; Freitas, Miguel Luiz Menezes; Florsheim, Sandra Monteiro Borges; Zanatto, Antonio Carlos Scatena; Garcia, José Nivaldo

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT We investigated the axial variation of specific gravity, shear parallel to the grain and anatomical features of Astronium graveolens wood and related these properties to the anatomy along the stem. We felled five 20-year-old trees and cut discs from four different stem heights, including stem base, 1 meter, 2 meters and 3 meters, for a total of 20 discs, and studied wood samples near the bark and at the base of trunk. Axial variations found appear to provide a balance between mechani...

  17. Experimental Investigation of Wood Decking Assemblies Exposed to Firebrand Showers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manzello, Samuel L; Suzuki, Sayaka

    2017-09-01

    Wildland-Urban Interface (WUI) fires have become a problem of great concern across multiple continents. An important mechanism of structure ignition in WUI fires and urban fires is the production of firebrands. During WUI fires, decking assemblies have been observed to be an ignition vulnerability based on post-fire damage surveys conducted by NIST and elsewhere. The authors have conducted scoping experiments and demonstrated the dangers of the dynamic process of continual, wind-driven firebrand showers landing on decking assemblies for wind speeds of 6 m/s. In this study, eight full-scale experiments were conducted with wood decking assemblies under a wind speed of 8 m/s. The basis for these new investigations was twofold: observe possible vulnerabilities of wood decking assemblies to continuous, wind-driven firebrands at higher wind speed as firebrand accumulation patterns were expected to be influenced by wind speed, and examine if wall ignition occurred due to the burning decking assembly. To this end, sections of wood decking assemblies (1.2 m by 1.2 m) were constructed and attached to a reentrant corner assembly. The deck/reentrant corner assembly was then exposed to continuous, wind-driven firebrand bombardment generated by a full-scale Continuous Feed Firebrand Generator installed in the Fire Research Wind Tunnel Facility (FRWTF) at the Building Research Institute (BRI) in Japan. The mass of firebrands required for flaming ignitions under a wind speed of 8 m/s was considerably less compared with those under a wind speed of 6 m/s. This result is postulated to be due to higher firebrand surface temperatures as the wind speed was increased. For the decking assembly to wall ignition studies, the interface between the decking assembly and the wall appeared to be a weak point; this is not addressed in the current test methods.

  18. Measuring project solar house `Buehler` at Lausen, Switzerland. A combination of window collector with a hypocaust system, a heat storage ceiling, and a wood-fired stove; Solarhaus `Buehler`, Lausen. Kombination eines Fensterkollektors mit Hypokaustensystem, Speicherdecke und Holzofen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blatter-Spalinger, M. [Forschungsstelle Solararchitektur, ETH-Hoenggerberg, Zurich (Switzerland)

    1995-01-15

    The single-family house `Buehler` is situated in the eastern Jura in Switzerland, on a south slope. It is a low energy building where a large window collector has been combined with a concrete storage ceiling, a system of murocausts (hypocaust walls), and a bricked stove standing in the living room. The rooms in the south of the lower floor are additionally equipped with radiators which are supplied with hot water from a small gas heater. The same gas-fired unit is used for subsequent heating of the warm drinking water, if the 6m{sup 2} solar collectors on the roof do not supply sufficient energy. The measuring project has been divided into three parts: - preliminary measurements (between spring and autumn 1992), with the aim of grossly examinating the system and discovering possible faults, - main measurements (during the heating period 1992/93) with detailed registration and interpretation of the energetically relevant data, - computer simulation based on the data of the main measurements. Variation of several parameters, in order to understand the acting of the system more deeply and to derive possible improvements for future buildings of this type. The study has shown that the concept for the solar house `Buehler` fulfills the expectations. The house makes a very comfortable impression, and the occupants seem to be fully satisfied with it. The energy figures are even better than planned by the architect. However, some weak points and possibilities of further improvement could still be worked out: - the concrete storage ceiling looses too much heat, - the volume of the storage ceiling should be made smaller, - leakages of the air ducts, - if the air ducts would be optimised in an aerodynamically manner, then the power consumption of the fan providing an optimal air flow could be further decreased, - in summer one could wish a more efficient ventilation of the window collector in order to prevent overheating of the rooms. (author) figs., tabs., 9 refs.

  19. A Review of Wood Plastic Composites effect on the Environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmed Taifor Azeez

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Wood Plastic Composites (WPCs are environmentally friend materials with a wide range of applications in the field of constructions, comprising high mechanical and physical properties with low cost raw materials as plastic wastes and different carpentry process wood reminder. The effects of wood, plastic waste and additives on various properties of the material such as mechanical (modulus of elasticity and modulus of rupture, physical (moisture absorption and fire retardancy have been investigated in order to push the output functions of the products to the limits of work conditions requirements. This study, overviews the importance of Wood Plastic Composites in conserving the environment by depletion post consume plastics from landfills, and the impact of these composites in developing the economic via opening new flourished markets for modern products. Both the ecological and economical requirements oblige the Iraqi government to replace the negatively healthy effects formaldehyde wood composites (medium density fiberboard MDF which are widely consumed in Iraqi markets with Wood Plastic Composites. a long-term strategy plan in which the researchers and the capitals meet under supervision of the government is very necessary and recommended in this paper to establish and develop WPCs industry in Iraq.

  20. Microscale modelling of ambient air concentrations resulting from the increased combustion of biomass firing systems within the 1{sup st} Ordinance for the Implementation of the Federal Immission Control Act (1. BImSchV); Modellrechnungen zu den Immissionsbelastungen bei einer verstaerkten Verfeuerung von Biomasse in Feuerungsanlagen der 1. BImSchV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baumbach, Guenter; Struschka, Michael; Juschka, Winfried; Carrasco, Maria; Ang, Keng Been; Hu, Lupin [Stuttgart Univ. (DE). Inst. fuer Verfahrenstechnik und Dampfkesselwesen (IVD); Baechlin, Wolfgang; Soergel, Christine [Ingenieurbuero Lohmeyer GmbH und Co. KG, Karlsruhe (Germany)

    2010-06-15

    By means of a detailed emissions modelling with subsequent highly resolved ambient air pollutant dispersion modelling an assessment method has been developed. This method is a tool for city planners to assess the effects of an increased usage of biomass in heating firings on the air quality situation in different residential areas. Emission simulations have been carried out for the combustion of wood pellets, log wood, wood chips and grain residues as well as for natural gas and heating oil. The emissions depend on the ambient temperature, the building and user specific heat demand and on the operation conditions of the firing. For the operation conditions different emission factors have been set for nominal and partial load as well as for unsteady conditions like boiler start or for shutdown of the firing. The following firings have been considered for burning the above mentioned fuels: Central heating boilers, decentralised heating networks with pellet and wood chip boilers, single stoves for additional heating and grain residue furnaces. Dependent on the ambient temperature for different regions of Germany and for a reference year of the Deutsche Wetterdienst annual emission time series with 1h resolution have been calculated for the different firing fuel combinations. Using these modelled emission data dispersion modelling was carried out for different meteorological and building specific frame conditions. A rural and an urban model area have been investigated. The emissions time series which were calculated for the individual buildings with 1h time resolution were spatially allocated and each single chimney was simulated as point source. For modelling the flow field coined by the building structure the flow model MISKAM has been applied. For dispersion simulation the model AUSTAL2000 has been used. Simulations have been carried out with three different wind and dispersion class distributions typical for many regions of Germany. A further parameter variation

  1. Fire Safety (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of Braces Eating Disorders Mitral Valve Prolapse Arrhythmias Fire Safety KidsHealth > For Parents > Fire Safety Print A ... event of a fire emergency in your home. Fire Prevention Of course, the best way to practice ...

  2. Fire Research Enclosure

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — FUNCTION: Simulates submarine fires, enclosed aircraft fires, and fires in enclosures at shore facilities .DESCRIPTION: FIRE I is a pressurizable, 324 cu m(11,400 cu...

  3. Active Fire Mapping Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Active Fire Mapping Program Current Large Incidents (Home) New Large Incidents Fire Detection Maps MODIS Satellite Imagery VIIRS Satellite Imagery Fire Detection GIS Data Fire Data in Google Earth ...

  4. Wood for the trees

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rob Garbutt

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Our paper focuses on the materiality, cultural history and cultural relations of selected artworks in the exhibition Wood for the trees (Lismore Regional Gallery, New South Wales, Australia, 10 June – 17 July 2011. The title of the exhibition, intentionally misreading the aphorism “Can’t see the wood for the trees”, by reading the wood for the resource rather than the collective wood[s], implies conservation, preservation, and the need for sustaining the originating resource. These ideas have particular resonance on the NSW far north coast, a region once rich in rainforest. While the Indigenous population had sustainable practices of forest and land management, the colonists deployed felling and harvesting in order to convert the value of the local, abundant rainforest trees into high-value timber. By the late twentieth century, however, a new wave of settlers launched a protest movements against the proposed logging of remnant rainforest at Terania Creek and elsewhere in the region. Wood for the trees, curated by Gallery Director Brett Adlington, plays on this dynamic relationship between wood, trees and people. We discuss the way selected artworks give expression to the themes or concepts of productive labour, nature and culture, conservation and sustainability, and memory. The artworks include Watjinbuy Marrawilil’s (1980 Carved ancestral figure ceremonial pole, Elizabeth Stops’ (2009/10 Explorations into colonisation, Hossein Valamanesh’s (2008 Memory stick, and AñA Wojak’s (2008 Unread book (in a forgotten language. Our art writing on the works, a practice informed by Bal (2002, Muecke (2008 and Papastergiadis (2004, becomes a conversation between the works and the themes or concepts. As a form of material excess of the most productive kind (Grosz, 2008, p. 7, art seeds a response to that which is in the air waiting to be said of the past, present and future.

  5. RESEARCH OF EFFECTIVENESS OF „PLAMOSTOP“ FIRE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrik MITRENGA

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The paper deals with testing of a water-miscible intumescent fire retardant. Experiments are conducted by thermal analysis (TG / DTG, DSC, cone calorimeter and non-standardized methods for monitoring weight loss when exposed to flame burning. Based on the experiment results and other information the most appropriate methods for testing fire retardants are reviewed. All methods by which experiments have been carried out are described. Our own method for testing fire retardants was created. It is also evaluated the effectiveness of a representative fire retardant of wood by all mentioned methods. The result of the experiment is to evaluate the suitability of each method for testing of fire retardants and evaluation fire retardant “Plamostop”.

  6. Energetic valorization of wood waste: estimation of the reduction in CO2 emissions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanneste, J; Van Gerven, T; Vander Putten, E; Van der Bruggen, B; Helsen, L

    2011-09-01

    This paper investigates the potential CO(2) emission reductions related to a partial switch from fossil fuel-based heat and electricity generation to renewable wood waste-based systems in Flanders. The results show that valorization in large-scale CHP (combined heat and power) systems and co-firing in coal plants have the largest CO(2) reduction per TJ wood waste. However, at current co-firing rates of 10%, the CO(2) reduction per GWh of electricity that can be achieved by co-firing in coal plants is five times lower than the CO(2) reduction per GWh of large-scale CHP. Moreover, analysis of the effect of government support for co-firing of wood waste in coal-fired power plants on the marginal costs of electricity generation plants reveals that the effect of the European Emission Trading Scheme (EU ETS) is effectively counterbalanced. This is due to the fact that biomass integrated gasification combined cycles (BIGCC) are not yet commercially available. An increase of the fraction of coal-based electricity in the total electricity generation from 8 to 10% at the expense of the fraction of gas-based electricity due to the government support for co-firing wood waste, would compensate entirely for the CO(2) reduction by substitution of coal by wood waste. This clearly illustrates the possibility of a 'rebound' effect on the CO(2) reduction due to government support for co-combustion of wood waste in an electricity generation system with large installed capacity of coal- and gas-based power plants, such as the Belgian one. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Microbiota of kefir grains

    OpenAIRE

    Tomislav Pogačić; Sanja Šinko; Šimun Zamberlin; Dubravka Samaržija

    2013-01-01

    Kefir grains represent the unique microbial community consisting of bacteria, yeasts, and sometimes filamentous moulds creating complex symbiotic community. The complexity of their physical and microbial structures is the reason that the kefir grains are still not unequivocally elucidated. Microbiota of kefir grains has been studied by many microbiological and molecular approaches. The development of metagenomics, based on the identification without cultivation, is opening new possibilities f...

  8. Grain Boundary Complexions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-05-01

    deter- mine bulk materials behavior and properties such as superplasticity, creep, fatigue, corrosion , strength and conductivity [2]. Grain boundary...interface (i.e. lattice mismatch accommodated by interface dislocations ), wetting transitions will not occur. A wetting transition is possible in the case...melting only starts around dislocations at low- angle grain boundaries; the grain boundary structure con- sists of isolated liquid pools separated by

  9. Compaction of cereal grain

    OpenAIRE

    Wychowaniec, J.; Griffiths, I.; Gay, A; Mughal, A.

    2013-01-01

    We report on simple shaking experiments to measure the compaction of a column of Firth oat grain. Such grains are elongated anisotropic particles with a bimodal polydispersity. In these experiments, the particle configurations start from an initially disordered, low-packing-fraction state and under vertical shaking evolve to a dense state with evidence of nematic-like structure at the surface of the confining tube. This is accompanied by an increase in the packing fraction of the grain.

  10. Compaction of cereal grain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wychowaniec, J.; Griffiths, I.; Gay, A.; Mughal, A.

    2013-11-01

    We report on simple shaking experiments to measure the compaction of a column of Firth oat grain. Such grains are elongated anisotropic particles with a bimodal polydispersity. In these experiments, the particle configurations start from an initially disordered, low-packing-fraction state and under vertical shaking evolve to a dense state with evidence of nematic-like structure at the surface of the confining tube. This is accompanied by an increase in the packing fraction of the grain.

  11. The pulp and paper properties of Sirex noctilio infested and fire ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Pinus patula is the softwood species most extensively planted in South Africa. However, large portions of these plantings are under threat from Sirex noctilio infestation and occasional forest fires. In this exploratory investigation, the effects of tree age, Sirex noctilio infestation and fire damage to wood from Pinus patula trees ...

  12. 76 FR 81998 - Methodology for Low Power/Shutdown Fire PRA

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-29

    ...) 492-3446. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Felix E. Gonzalez, Division of Risk Analysis, Office of...: (301) 251- 7596, email: [email protected] or Hugh W. Woods, Division of Risk Analysis, Office of... quantitative risk analyses of both internal events and fires. The NRC developed this LPSD fire quantitative...

  13. Comparative life cycle assessment of biomass co-firing plants with carbon capture and storage

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schakel, Wouter|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/369280784; Meerman, Hans; Talaei, Alireza; Ramírez, Andrea|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/284852414; Faaij, André

    2014-01-01

    Combining co-firing biomass and carbon capture and storage (CCS) in power plants offers attractive potential for net removal of carbon dioxide (CO2) from the atmosphere. In this study, the impact of co-firing biomass (wood pellets and straw pellets) on the emission profile of power plants with

  14. Small-diameter timber alchemy: can utilization pay the way toward fire-resistant forests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeremy S. Fried; R. Jamie Barbour; Roger D. Fight; Glenn Christensen; Guy Pinjuv

    2008-01-01

    There is growing interest in using biomass removed from hazardous fuels reduction treatments in wood-fired electrical generation facilities. An application of FIA BioSum to southwest Oregon’s Klamath ecoregion assessed the financial feasibility of fuel treatment and biomass generation under a range of product prices and fire hazard-motivated silvicultural prescriptions...

  15. Fire Synthesis

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Fire Synthesis - Preparation of Alumina Products. Tanu Mimani. Volume 16 Issue 12 December 2011 pp 1324-1332. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link: http://www.ias.ac.in/article/fulltext/reso/016/12/1324-1332. Keywords. Alumina; combustion; refractory materials; urea. Author Affiliations. Tanu Mimani1.

  16. Fire Synthesis

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 5; Issue 2. Fire Synthesis - Preparation of Alumina Products. Tanu Mimani. General Article Volume 5 Issue 2 February 2000 pp 50-57. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link: http://www.ias.ac.in/article/fulltext/reso/005/02/0050-0057 ...

  17. Forest Fires

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 6; Issue 11. Forest Fires - Origins and Ecological Paradoxes. K Narendran. General Article Volume 6 Issue 11 November 2001 pp 34-41. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link: http://www.ias.ac.in/article/fulltext/reso/006/11/0034-0041 ...

  18. Impacts: NIST Building and Fire Research Laboratory (technical and societal)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raufaste, N. J.

    1993-08-01

    The Building and Fire Research Laboratory (BFRL) of the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) is dedicated to the life cycle quality of constructed facilities. The report describes major effects of BFRL's program on building and fire research. Contents of the document include: structural reliability; nondestructive testing of concrete; structural failure investigations; seismic design and construction standards; rehabilitation codes and standards; alternative refrigerants research; HVAC simulation models; thermal insulation; residential equipment energy efficiency; residential plumbing standards; computer image evaluation of building materials; corrosion-protection for reinforcing steel; prediction of the service lives of building materials; quality of construction materials laboratory testing; roofing standards; simulating fires with computers; fire safety evaluation system; fire investigations; soot formation and evolution; cone calorimeter development; smoke detector standards; standard for the flammability of children's sleepwear; smoldering insulation fires; wood heating safety research; in-place testing of concrete; communication protocols for building automation and control systems; computer simulation of the properties of concrete and other porous materials; cigarette-induced furniture fires; carbon monoxide formation in enclosure fires; halon alternative fire extinguishing agents; turbulent mixing research; materials fire research; furniture flammability testing; standard for the cigarette ignition resistance of mattresses; support of navy firefighter trainer program; and using fire to clean up oil spills.

  19. Photodegradation of thermally modified wood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srinivas, Kavyashree; Pandey, Krishna K

    2012-12-05

    Natural wood, being biological material, undergoes rapid degradation by ultraviolet (UV) radiations and other environmental factors under outdoor exposure. In order to protect wood from such degradation, the chemical structure of wood is altered by chemical modification or heat treatment. In the present study, heat treated specimens of rubberwood (Hevea brasiliensis) were exposed to xenon light source in a weather-o-meter for different periods up to 300 h. Photostability of modified and unmodified wood was evaluated in terms of colour and chemical changes. Light coloured untreated wood became dark upon UV irradiation whereas, dark colour of heat treated wood lightened on UV exposure. CIE lightness parameter (L(*)) decreased for untreated wood whereas its value increased for heat treated wood upon irradiation. Other colour coordinates a(*) and b(*) increased with exposure duration for both untreated and heat treated wood. The overall colour change (ΔE(*)) increased for both untreated and heat treated wood. The Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) spectroscopic studies revealed severe lignin degradation of heat treated wood due to UV light exposure. Colour changes and FTIR measurements indicate that thermal modification of wood was ineffective in restricting light induced colour changes and photodegradation of wood polymers. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Relationship of vibro-mechanical properties and microstructure of wood and varnish interface in string instruments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sedighi Gilani, Marjan; Pflaum, Johanna; Hartmann, Stefan; Kaufmann, Rolf; Baumgartner, Michael; Schwarze, Francis Willis Mathew Robert

    2016-04-01

    Wood varnish coatings not only are aesthetically important, but also preserve the musical instrument from wear and fluctuations in the ambient humidity. Depending on the thickness, extent of penetration into the wood and the physical and mechanical properties after hardening, varnishes may change the mechanical and also vibro-acoustical properties of the coated wood. Contrary to studies on the chemistry of the varnish and primer used for old and contemporary musical instruments, the physical and mechanical properties of the varnished wood in relation to the geometry of their interface have been poorly studied. We implemented non-destructive test methods, i.e., vibration tests and X-ray tomography, to characterize the hardening-dependent change in the vibrational properties of master grade tone wood specimens after coating with four different varnishes. Two were manufactured in the laboratory, and two were supplied from master violin makers. For a controlled accelerated hardening of the varnish, a UV exposure method was used. It was demonstrated that varnishes increase wood damping, along and perpendicular to the grain directions. Varnishes reduce the sound radiation along the grain, but increase it in the perpendicular direction. Changes in the vibrational properties were discussed together with results of 3D images of wood and varnish microstructure, obtained from a customized tabletop X-ray microtomographic setup. For comparison, the microstructure of the interface of the varnished wood in the laboratory and of specimens from two old violins was analyzed with the same X-ray tomography setup. Laboratory varnishes with various compositions penetrated differently into the wood structure. One varnish of a master grade old violin had a higher density and was also thicker and penetrated weaker into the wood, which is more likely related to a more sophisticated primer and varnish application. The study demonstrates the importance of the vibro-mechanical properties of

  1. THE REACTION TO FIRE TEST FOR FIRE RETARDANT AND FOR COMBUSTIBLE MATERIAL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adelaida FANFAROVÁ

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Currently the natural materials become popular building material for houses, buildings and recreational property. The risk of fires in residential timber construction or eco houses cannot be completely ruled out, therefore there is a need for proper and correct implementing preventive measures and application of all available solutions, which may reduce the risk of fire as far as possible, to slow down the combustion process, to protect the life of people, animals and also the building itself until arrival members of the Fire and Rescue Services. Fireproofing of combustible materials is a specific area of fire protection. For scientific research as well as for real-life practice, not only their structural and physical properties, but also fire-technical characteristics are really important. The present researchers mostly focus on fire-retardant treatment of wood that is why the authors of this contribution focused on a different combustible material. This research article presents the experimental testing and examination of the reaction to fire test of the selected thermal insulation of hemp fiber that was impregnated by the selected fire retardant in laboratory conditions.

  2. Catalytic combustion in small wood burning appliances

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oravainen, H. [VTT Energy, Jyvaeskylae (Finland)

    1996-12-31

    There is over a million hand fired small heating appliances in Finland where about 5,4 million cubic meters of wood fuel is used. Combustion in such heating appliances is a batch-type process. In early stages of combustion when volatiles are burned, the formation of carbon monoxide (CO) and other combustible gases are difficult to avoid when using fuels that have high volatile matter content. Harmful emissions are formed mostly after each fuel adding but also during char burnout period. When the CO-content in flue gases is, say over 0.5 %, also other harmful emissions will be formed. Methane (CH{sub 4}) and other hydrocarbons are released and the amount of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH)-compounds can be remarkable. Some PAH-compounds are very carcinogenic. It has been estimated that in Finland even more than 90 % of hydrocarbon and PAH emissions are due to small scale wood combustion. Emissions from transportation is excluded from these figures. That is why wood combustion has a net effect on greenhouse gas phenomena. For example carbon monoxide emissions from small scale wood combustion are two fold compared to that of energy production in power plants. Methane emission is of the same order as emission from transportation and seven fold compared with those of energy production. Emissions from small heating appliances can be reduced by developing the combustion techniques, but also by using other means, for example catalytic converters. In certain stages of the batch combustion, temperature is not high enough, gas mixing is not good enough and residence time is too short for complete combustion. When placed to a suitable place inside a heating appliance, a catalytic converter can oxidize unburned gases in the flue gas into compounds that are not harmful to the environment. (3 refs.)

  3. Wood energy-commercial applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennel, R. P.

    1978-01-01

    Wood energy is being widely investigated in many areas of the country because of the many obvious benefits of wood fuel such as the low price per million Btus relative to coal, oil, and gas; the wide availability of noncommercial wood and the proven ability to harvest it; established technology which is reliable and free of pollution; renewable resources; better conservation for harvested land; and the potential for jobs creation. The Southeastern United States has a specific leadership role in wood energy based on its established forest products industry experience and the potential application of wood energy to other industries and institutions. Significant questions about the widespread usage of wood energy are being answered in demonstrations around the country as well as the Southeast in areas of wood storage and bulk handling; high capitalization costs for harvesting and combustion equipment; long term supply and demand contracts; and the economic feasibility of wood energy outside the forest products industry.

  4. Variation in root wood anatomy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cutler, D.F.

    1976-01-01

    Variability in the anatomy of root wood of selected specimens particularly Fraxinus excelsior L. and Acer pseudoplatanus L. in the Kew reference microscope slide collection is discussed in relation to generalised statements in the literature on root wood anatomy.

  5. Methane from wood

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schulz, T. F.; Barreto, L.; Kypreos, S.; Stucki, S

    2005-07-15

    The role of wood-based energy technologies in the Swiss energy system in the long-term is examined using the energy-system Swiss MARKAL model. The Swiss MARKAL model is a 'bottom-up' energy-systems optimization model that allows a detailed representation of energy technologies. The model has been developed as a joint effort between the Energy Economics Group (EEG) at Paul Scherrer Institute PSI) and the University of Geneva and is currently used at PSI-EEG. Using the Swiss MARKAL model, this study examines the conditions under which wood-based energy technologies could play a role in the Swiss energy system, the most attractive pathways for their use and the policy measures that could support them. Given the involvement of PSI in the ECOGAS project, especial emphasis is put on the production of bio-SNG from wood via gasification and methanation of syngas and on hydrothermal gasification of woody biomass. Of specific interest as weIl is the fraction of fuel used in passenger cars that could be produced by locally harvested wood. The report is organized as follows: Section 2 presents a brief description of the MARKAL model. Section 3 describes the results of the base case scenario, which represents a plausible, 'middle-of-the-road' development of the Swiss energy system. Section 4 discusses results illustrating the conditions under which the wood-based methanation technology could become competitive in the Swiss energy market, the role of oil and gas prices, subsidies to methanation technologies and the introduction of a competing technology, namely the wood-based Fischer-Tropsch synthesis. FinaIly, section 5 outlines some conclusions from this analysis. (author)

  6. Incorporation of treated straw and wood fly ash into clay building brick

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chen, Wan; Ottosen, Lisbeth M.; Jensen, Pernille Erland

    2016-01-01

    in the treated ash, suggests the possibility of the ash reuse in sintered clay bricks. In this study, the straw and wood fly ash treated by washing and EDR was incorporated into yellow clay bricks at different substitution rates. The properties of the clay-ash bricks were studied in terms of shrinkage, water......High Cd content in straw and wood fly ash, generated from biomass-fired power plants, prohibits its recycling as fertilizer spreading on the landfilled. To improve and alter the current mainstream of fly ash treatment by landfilling, different approaches were tried for treatment of straw and wood...

  7. Some Properties of Astronium graveolens Wood Along the Stem

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduardo Luiz Longui

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT We investigated the axial variation of specific gravity, shear parallel to the grain and anatomical features of Astronium graveolens wood and related these properties to the anatomy along the stem. We felled five 20-year-old trees and cut discs from four different stem heights, including stem base, 1 meter, 2 meters and 3 meters, for a total of 20 discs, and studied wood samples near the bark and at the base of trunk. Axial variations found appear to provide a balance between mechanical strength of the wood at stem base by the higher density and higher shear by the increase in ray frequency that contributes to locking the vertical cells and growth rings, thus preventing the stem from easily breaking when bent. For hydraulic conductivity, vessels with smaller diameter and frequency at the stem base help prevent the occurrence of embolisms that would reduce water flow along the main stem.

  8. MICROSTRUCTURE MODIFICATIONS INDUCED IN SPRUCE WOOD BY FREEZING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Bernadett SZMUTKU

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM is amodern, non-invasive method for objective andspecialized image analysis of anatomical materialfeatures at microscopic level. Referring to wood, itoffers the possibility to view in 3D a bunch ofneighboring cells, in all three grain directions.This allows the imaging of modifications thatmight appear in the structure of the wood cellmembrane (e.g. micro-fissures caused by differentfactors, including temperature variations. This paperpresents the results of the SEM analysis performedon European spruce (Picea abies samples, cut fromboards which were subjected to freezing and thawingunder different conditions of temperature variationand time of exposure.The main aim of this research was to reveal theconditions which determine the occurrence of microfissuresin the cell wall and consequently lead tostrength losses in wood.

  9. A combustion model of vegetation burning in "Tiger" fire propagation tool

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giannino, F.; Ascoli, D.; Sirignano, M.; Mazzoleni, S.; Russo, L.; Rego, F.

    2017-11-01

    In this paper, we propose a semi-physical model for the burning of vegetation in a wildland fire. The main physical-chemical processes involved in fire spreading are modelled through a set of ordinary differential equations, which describe the combustion process as linearly related to the consumption of fuel. The water evaporation process from leaves and wood is also considered. Mass and energy balance equations are written for fuel (leaves and wood) assuming that combustion process is homogeneous in space. The model is developed with the final aim of simulating large-scale wildland fires which spread on heterogeneous landscape while keeping the computation cost very low.

  10. Description of a straw/wood chip system at the power station of Southern Jutland

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hansen, N.B. [The power station of Southern Jutland (Denmark)

    1997-10-01

    A project concerning combustion of straw and wood chips in separated boilers designed for parallel operation with large coal-fired boilers is described. The concept includes the construction of a new straw and wood chip-fired system at SH (power station of Southern Jutland) in the existing unit 2 of the Ensted Power Station (EV2). This boiler is designed for parallel operation with the coal-fired boiler in unit 3 of the Ensted Power Station (EV3). The current coal/oil-fired EV2 plant was laid up on 1 April 1995. The project will amount to DKK 400 million and is expected to take 37 months to complete. The project was launched on 15 December 1994. (ln)

  11. TCP HolyWood

    OpenAIRE

    Oscar Núñez Mori

    2005-01-01

    We introduce a new end-to-end, sender side Transport Control Protocol called TCP HolyWood or in short TCP-HW. In a simulated wired environment, TCP HolyWood outperforms in average throughput, three of the more important TCP protocols ever made, we are talking about TCP Reno, TCP Westwood, and TCP Vegas; and in average jitter to TCP Reno and TCP Vegas too. In addition, according to Jain’s index, our proposal is as fair as TCP Reno, the Standard. Apresentamos um novo Protocolo de Controle de...

  12. PCM/wood composite to store thermal energy in passive building envelopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barreneche, C.; Vecstaudza, J.; Bajare, D.; Fernandez, A. I.

    2017-10-01

    The development of new materials to store thermal energy in a passive building system is a must to improve the thermal efficiency by thermal-regulating the indoor temperatures. This fact will deal with the reduction of the gap between energy supply and energy demand to achieve thermal comfort in building indoors. The aim of this work was to test properties of novel PCM/wood composite materials developed at Riga Technical University. Impregnation of PCM (phase change material) in wood increases its thermal mass and regulates temperature fluctuations during day and night. The PCM used are paraffin waxes (RT-21 and RT-27 from Rubitherm) and the wood used was black alder, the most common wood in Latvia. The PCM distribution inside wood sample has been studied as well as its thermophysical, mechanical and fire reaction properties. Developed composite materials are promising in the field of energy saving in buildings.

  13. Structure and function of wood

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alex Wiedenhoeft

    2010-01-01

    Wood is a complex biological structure, a composite of many chemistries and cell types acting together to serve the needs of a living plant. Attempting to understand wood in the context of wood technology, we have often overlooked the key and basic fact that wood evolved over the course of millions of years to serve three main functions in plants― conduction of water...

  14. Combustion Gases And Heat Release Analysis During Flame And Flameless Combustion Of Wood Pellets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Horváth Jozef

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available With the growing prices of fossil fuels, alternative fuels produced of biomass come to the fore. They are made of waste materials derived from the processing of wood and wood materials. The main objective of this study was to analyse the fire-technical characteristics of wood pellets. The study analysed three dust samples acquired from wood pellets made of various types of wood biomass. Wood pellet dust is produced when manipulating with pellets. During this process a potentially hazardous situations may occur. Biomass is chemically composed mostly of hemicellulose, cellulose and lignin. During straining of the biomass by heat flux, combustion initiation occurs. Also, there was a change in the composition of material throughout combustion gases production, and the amount of heat generated by a flame or flameless combustion. Measurement of fire characteristics was conducted according to ISO 5660-1 standard using a cone calorimeter. Two samples of wood pellet dust were tested under the heat flux of 35 kW.m−2 and 50 kW.m−2. The process of combustion, the time to ignition, the carbon monoxide concentration and the amount of released heat were observed.

  15. Wood River recovery project -- speed and cooperation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Franczak, D.F.; Santschi, M.F. [Sargent and Lundy, Chicago, IL (United States); Sander, S. [Illinois Power Co., Decatur, IL (United States)

    1998-12-31

    A unit trip is a situation avoided by power generators because it affects their bottom line. The ability to recover from the trip quickly, and restore MW generation is the desired goal. However, what do you do if you lose your unit to a disastrous fire? How do you recover from this situation? This will be the subject of this paper describing such an event which affected the Illinois Power Company`s (IPC) operation. IPC`s Wood River Power Station suffered a disastrous fire which knocked out the Station`s only two operable units--4 and 5. The fire was the result of a coal mill explosion and damaged beyond repair, the units control systems and operating capabilities. A total of 488 MW in generating capacity was lost at a time when the IPC system required all available generation now, and in the foreseeable future. This paper will describe the event, the immediate mobilization efforts, and the challenges of recovering both units in the most expedient time frame possible. The keys to the success of the recovery project will be described in detail.

  16. Classroom Demonstrations of Wood Properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foulger, A. N.

    Presented in this manual are 20 activities selected to show some of the properties of wood and how these properties relate to the cellular structure of wood. Each activity includes stated objectives, indicates materials needed, and explains procedures. Illustrations related to the activities, glossary of terms, and photographs of wood structure…

  17. Macrophotographic wood atlas of Annonaceae.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koek-Noorman, J.; Westra, L.I.T.

    2012-01-01

    In this article, a general description of the microscopic wood anatomy of Annonaceae is given. We provide a description of the wood anatomical features of the family and of all subfamilies and tribes, all from material in the Utrecht Wood collection. Hand-lens images can be an important help in

  18. Ovalbumin as a Wood Adhesive

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charles R. Frihart; Holly Satori; Zhu Rongxian; Michael J. Birkeland

    2014-01-01

    Use of proteins to bond wood dominated industrial production until the middle of the 20th century (1). The ensuing creation of the plywood and glulam beam industries allowed for more efficient use of wood resources than is possible with solid wood products. Many protein sources have been used as adhesives, including plant (soybean) and animal (blood, fish scales,...

  19. Fire Behavior (FB)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robert E. Keane

    2006-01-01

    The Fire Behavior (FB) method is used to describe the behavior of the fire and the ambient weather and fuel conditions that influence the fire behavior. Fire behavior methods are not plot based and are collected by fire event and time-date. In general, the fire behavior data are used to interpret the fire effects documented in the plot-level sampling. Unlike the other...

  20. Individual Combatant’s Weapons Firing Algorithm Phase 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-01

    Age ranges for the SMEs was fairly evenly distributed with 2 in the 26 - 20 year old group, 3 in the 31 - 36 year old group, 4 in the 37 - 42 year old...situations may require a soldier to place suppressive fire into a wide area such as a wood line, hedgerow , or small building .. While at other times

  1. Wood burning impact on PM 10 in three Austrian regions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caseiro, Alexandre; Bauer, Heidi; Schmidl, Christoph; Pio, Casimiro A.; Puxbaum, Hans

    Anhydrosugars (levoglucosan, mannosan and galactosan) were investigated during one year in three Austrian regions at three types of sites (city-heavy traffic-impacted, city-residential and background) in order to assess the magnitude of the contribution of wood smoke to the particulate matter load and its organic fraction. The annually averaged concentrations of levoglucosan ranged from 0.12 to 0.48 μg m -3. The levoglucosan concentration exhibited a strong annual cycle with higher concentrations in the cold season. The minor anhydrosugars had a similar annual trend, but their concentrations were lower by a factor of about 5 and about 25 in the cold season for mannosan and galactosan, respectively. Levoglucosan concentrations were higher at the inner-urban as compared to rural sites. The contribution of wood smoke to organic carbon and PM 10 levels was calculated using a constant ratio of levoglucosan and OC, respectively PM 10 as derived for fire wood typical for Alpine European regions [Schmidl, C., Marr, I.L., Caseiro, A.e, Kotianová, P., Berner, A., Bauer, H., Kasper-Giebl, A., Puxbaum, H., 2008a. Chemical characterisation of fine particle emissions from wood stove combustion of common woods growing in mid-European Alpine regions. Atmospheric Environment 42, 126-141]. The estimated contribution of wood smoke-OC to the OC of PM 10 ranged from one third to more than half in the cold season with higher contributions up to 70% in winter (December, January and February) in the smaller cities and the rural background. This indicates, that wood smoke is the predominant source of organic material at rural and small urban sites in central Europe. Consistently, wood smoke was an important contributor to PM 10 during the cold season, with contributions of around 10% in the Vienna larger region and around 20% at rural sites in the densely forested regions of Salzburg and Styria during the winter months. In those regions residential sites exhibited highest relative wood

  2. RHEOLOGICAL BEHAVIOUR OF CURLYMAPLE WOOD (ACER PSEUDOPLATANUS USED FOR BACK SIDE OF VIOLIN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariana Domnica STANCIU

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Stringed instruments are made of high quality wood species from physical, mechanical and acoustical point of view, being carefully selected, kiln dried and processed under specific conditions that assure micro-structural integrity. Maple wood (Acer Pseudoplatanus for musical instruments is used to getting back plates and sides for string instruments (violin family. This species of wood is valued for both acoustic qualities but mostly for aesthetic, using a natural defect of maple wood characterized by wavy grain. The paper presents the research on visco-elasticity behavior of maple wood with different types of grain deviation in wood from very curly maple to common maple. The storage modulus, loss modulus, damping capacity in varying temperature conditions and for different loading frequencies were determined using dynamical mechanical analysis (DMA. It was found that specimens characterized by very wavy grain shows a high damping capacity of frequency range between 33.33 to 50Hz, unlike specimens of common maple which do not have the capacity of frequency selectivity.

  3. Fire Symfonier

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Svend Hvidtfelt

    2009-01-01

    sidste fire symfonier. Den er måske snarere at opfatte som et præludium til disse. At påstå, at symfonierne fra Holmboes side er planlagt til at være beslægtede, ville være at gå for vidt. Alene de 26 år, der skiller den 10. fra den 13., gør påstanden - i bedste fald - dubiøs. Når deres udformning...... udkrystallisering som i de sidste små 30 år af hans virke har afkastet disse fire variationer over en grundlæggende central holmboesk fornemmelse for form, melodi, klang og rytme. Denne oplevelse har fået mig til at udforske symfonierne, for at finde til bunds i dette holmboeske fællestræk, som jeg mener her står...

  4. Mechanical properties: wood lumber versus plastic lumber and thermoplastic composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bernardo Zandomenico Dias

    Full Text Available Abstract Plastic lumber and thermoplastic composites are sold as alternatives to wood products. However, many technical standards and scientific studies state that the two materials cannot be considered to have the same structural behaviour and strength. Moreover, there are many compositions of thermoplastic-based products and plenty of wood species. How different are their mechanical properties? This study compares the modulus of elasticity and the flexural, compressive, tensile and shear strengths of such materials, as well as the materials' specific mechanical properties. It analyses the properties of wood from the coniferae and dicotyledon species and those of commercialized and experimental thermoplastic-based product formulations. The data were collected from books, scientific papers and manufacturers' websites and technical data sheets, and subsequently compiled and presented in Ashby plots and bar graphs. The high values of the compressive strength and specific compressive and tensile strengths perpendicular to the grain (width direction shown by the experimental thermoplastic composites compared to wood reveal their great potential for use in compressed elements and in functions where components are compressed or tensioned perpendicularly to the grain. However, the low specific flexural modulus and high density of thermoplastic materials limit their usage in certain civil engineering and building applications.

  5. MINERGIE modules: heat pump - heat pump/solar - wood - wood/solar; Minergie-Module Waermepumpe - Waermepumpe/Solar - Holz - Holz/Solar

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gallati, J. [Seecon GmbH, Lucerne (Switzerland); Portmann, M. [Buero Markus Portmann, Kriens (Switzerland); Zurfluh, B. [Zurfluh Lottenbach, Lucerne (Switzerland)

    2005-07-01

    This research report for the Swiss Federal Office of Energy (SFOE) presents the results of a project that examined the feasibility of setting up 'MINERGIE' low-energy-consumption module standards for the production of heat in small residential buildings. The aims of the standards and the basic idea behind the MINERGIE-modules are discussed. The concepts of the modules for heat pumps and wood-fired heating systems and their combination with solar installations are examined, as are their areas of application. The requirements placed on the modules are listed. System concepts, including simple schematics for typical installations, are presented for wood-log, wood-chippings and pellets-fired systems as well as for ground-loop and air-water heat pump systems as well as their solar-aided counterparts. The results of cost-benefit analyses are presented and questions regarding system guarantee and liability are examined.

  6. Influence of Heat Treatment Conditions on Strength Properties of Poplar Wood (Populus deltoides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamad Ghofrani

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In this research heat treatments of poplar wood in 2 different mediums (hot water and steam at 185ºC were done in the sealed autoclave for 1 and 3 hours. Specimens were compared in density and mechanical properties. Density loss in hydrothermally treated wood was higher than hygrothermally treated samples. Mechanical properties (MOR and MOE were decreased in both mediums, but strength loss was higher for hygrothermal treated samples. Compression strength parallel to grain didn’t show any significant change for hydrothermally treated wood but decreased in specimens with hygrothermal treatment. Poplar wood showed more decrease in toughness test with hygrothermal treatment. According to the results, hydrothermal treatment of poplar wood is recommended as a modification method with less negative effects on mechanical properties

  7. Identification of coniferous woods

    Science.gov (United States)

    B. Francis Kukachka

    1960-01-01

    The identification of coniferous woods is generally regarded as being more difficult than for the hardwood species. This is due to the fact that conifers are more elemental in their structure and, as a consequence, the number of diagnostic features that may he employed is proportionately smaller. Instructions are given here in the sequential use of primary diagnostic...

  8. Grant Wood: "American Gothic."

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitzgerald, Diane M.

    1988-01-01

    Presents a lesson plan which exposes students in grades 10-12 to the visual symbols and historical references contained in Grant Wood's "American Gothic." Includes background information on the artist and the painting, instructional strategies, a studio activity, and evaluation criteria. (GEA)

  9. Chapter 3: Wood Decay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dan Cullen

    2014-01-01

    A significant portion of global carbon is sequestered in forest systems. Specialized fungi have evolved to efficiently deconstruct woody plant cell walls. These important decay processes generate litter, soil bound humic substances, or carbon dioxide and water. This chapter reviews the enzymology and molecular genetics of wood decay fungi, most of which are members of...

  10. Wood waste in Europe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matos, O.; Ribeiro, R. [Biomass Centre for Energy - CBE, Miranda do Corvo (Portugal)

    1997-12-31

    The energy policy of the EC, as well as most of member states points to a sizeable increase of energy production based on renewable energy sources, wood, wood residues, agricultural residues, energy crops including SRF, organic sludges, solid residues, etc. Most recent goals indicate a desirable duplication of today`s percentage by 2010. The reasons for this interest, besides diversification of sources, less dependence on imported fuels, use of endogenous resources, expected decrease of fossil fuel reserves, use of available land, additional employment and income for rural communities, etc., are related to important environmental benefits namely in terms of emissions of hot house gases. Wood waste, resulting from forest operations, cleaning, cultural and final cuttings, and from wood based industries, constitute a special important resource by reason of quality and availability. In addition to this they do not require additional land use and the removal is beneficial. In the run-up to the becoming December`s 1997 `Climate Change Summit` in Kioto, there is mounting pressure on companies to plan on carbon cuts. (author) 6 refs., 1 tab.

  11. Tannins in tropical woods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doat, J.

    1978-01-01

    A preliminary study was made of the chemistry of pyrogallol- and catecholtannins, their general properties and methods of extraction and determination. Three methods of estimation - Lowenthal, powdered hide and spectrophotometry - were compared using two control solutions, four samples of wood and one of bark. Using the empirical powdered hide method, tannins of both types were estimated in wood and bark of various tropical species (some separately and some as a mixture), Moroccan oaks (Quercus suber and Q. ilex), and European oak 9Q. petraea). Further tests were made on the wood and bark of the two mangrove species, Rhizophora mangle and R. racemosa, by subjecting them to successive extraction with a range of solvents. None of the woods tested had as much as the 10% of tannins considered necessary in economic sources. The bark of the two mangroves, of Eucalyptus urophylla and of Prosopis africana had tannin contents over 10% and the latter two species had very favorable tannin/non-tannin ratios. All the tropical species, with the probable exception of E. urophylla, had only catecholtannins. Only the oaks and E. urophylla bark gave positive results when tested for gallotannins.

  12. History of wood machining

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peter Koch

    1967-01-01

    The history of wood machining is closely tied to advanced in metallurgy and power sources. It has been strongly and continuously shaped by prevailing economic forces and the rise and decline of other contemporary industries. This paper sketches a few of the highlights, with emphasis on developments in North America.

  13. Harvesting wood for energy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodger A. Arola; Edwin W. Miyata

    1981-01-01

    Illustrates the potential of harvesting wood for industrial energy, based on the results of five harvesting studies. Presents information on harvesting operations, equipment costs, and productivity. Discusses mechanized thinning of hardwoods, clearcutting of low-value stands and recovery of hardwood tops and limbs. Also includes basic information on the physical and...

  14. Physical-mechanical and anatomical characterization in 26-year-old Eucalyptus resinifera wood

    OpenAIRE

    Lima, Israel Luiz de; Longui, Eduardo Luiz; Freitas, Miguel Luiz Menezes; Zanatto, Antonio Carlos Scatena; Zanata, Marcelo; Florsheim, Sandra Monteiro Borges; Bortoletto Jr., Geraldo

    2014-01-01

    In the present study, we aimed to characterize Eucalyptus resinifera wood through physical and mechanical assays and wood anatomy studies, as well as determine the relationships between the properties and anatomy of wood. We used samples collected from the area close to the bark of ten 26-year-old E. resinifera trees. We concluded that the specific gravity (Gb), compression (f c0), and shear parallel to grain (f v0) were ranked in strength classes C30, C40 and C60, respectively, and that volu...

  15. Health Impacts of Climate Change-Induced Subzero Temperature Fires.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metallinou, Maria-Monika; Log, Torgrim

    2017-07-20

    General fire risk and the special risk related to cold climate cellulosic drying processes are outlined. Four recent subzero temperatures fires are studied with respect to health impacts: a wooden village fire, a single wood structure fire, a wildland urban interface (WUI) fire and a huge wildland fire. The health impacts range from stress related to loss of jobs, psychological effects of lost possessions, exposure to smoke and heat as well as immediate, or delayed, loss of lives. These four fires resulted in 32 fatalities, 385 persons hospitalized for shorter or longer periods, 104 structures lost and 1015 km² of wildland burned north of, and just south of, the Arctic Circle. It is shown that the combination of subzero temperature dry weather, strong winds, changing agricultural activities and declining snowpack may lead to previously anticipated threats to people and the environment. There are reasons to believe that these fires are a result of the ongoing climate changes. Risk impacts are discussed. Rural districts and/or vulnerable populations seem to be most affected. Training methods to identify and better monitor critical fire risk parameters are suggested to mitigate the health impacts of a possibly increasing number of such fires.

  16. Health Impacts of Climate Change-Induced Subzero Temperature Fires

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria-Monika Metallinou

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available General fire risk and the special risk related to cold climate cellulosic drying processes are outlined. Four recent subzero temperatures fires are studied with respect to health impacts: a wooden village fire, a single wood structure fire, a wildland urban interface (WUI fire and a huge wildland fire. The health impacts range from stress related to loss of jobs, psychological effects of lost possessions, exposure to smoke and heat as well as immediate, or delayed, loss of lives. These four fires resulted in 32 fatalities, 385 persons hospitalized for shorter or longer periods, 104 structures lost and 1015 km2 of wildland burned north of, and just south of, the Arctic Circle. It is shown that the combination of subzero temperature dry weather, strong winds, changing agricultural activities and declining snowpack may lead to previously anticipated threats to people and the environment. There are reasons to believe that these fires are a result of the ongoing climate changes. Risk impacts are discussed. Rural districts and/or vulnerable populations seem to be most affected. Training methods to identify and better monitor critical fire risk parameters are suggested to mitigate the health impacts of a possibly increasing number of such fires.

  17. Anomalous permittivity in fine-grain barium titanate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ostrander, Steven Paul

    Fine-grain barium titanate capacitors exhibit anomalously large permittivity. It is often observed that these materials will double or quadruple the room temperature permittivity of a coarse-grain counterpart. However, aside from a general consensus on this permittivity enhancement, the properties of the fine-grain material are poorly understood. This thesis examines the effect of grain size on dielectric properties of a self-consistent set of high density undoped barium titanate capacitors. This set included samples with grain sizes ranging from submicron to ˜20 microns, and with densities generally above 95% of the theoretical. A single batch of well characterized powder was milled, dry-pressed then isostatically-pressed. Compacts were fast-fired, but sintering temperature alone was used to control the grain size. With this approach, the extrinsic influences are minimized within the set of samples, but more importantly, they are normalized between samples. That is, with a single batch of powder and with identical green processing, uniform impurity concentration is expected. The fine-grain capacitors exhibited a room temperature permittivity of ˜5500 and dielectric losses of ˜2%. The Curie-temperature decreased by {˜}5sp°C from that of the coarse-grain material, and the two ferroelectric-ferroelectric phase transition temperatures increased by {˜}10sp°C. The grain size induced permittivity enhancement was only active in the tetragonal and orthorhombic phases. Strong dielectric anomalies were observed in samples with grain size as small as {˜}0.4\\ mum. It is suggested that the strong first-order character observed in the present data is related to control of microstructure and stoichiometry. Grain size effects on conductivity losses, ferroelectric losses, ferroelectric dispersion, Maxwell-Wagner dispersion, and dielectric aging of permittivity and loss were observed. For the fine-grain material, these observations suggest the suppression of domain wall

  18. Fire Safety Training Handbook.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montgomery County Dept. of Fire and Rescue Services, Rockville, MD. Div. of Fire Prevention.

    Designed for a community fire education effort, particularly in which local volunteers present general information on fire safety to their fellow citizens, this workbook contains nine lessons. Included are an overview of the household fire problem; instruction in basic chemistry and physics of fire, flammable liquids, portable fire extinguishers,…

  19. Determining the degree of fire retardancy of plywood with thermogravimetry, part I: Beech plywood

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gavrilović-Grmuša Ivana

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The basic motive of this work is the ever more pronounced need for fire-resistant plywood. In this work, beech veneers have been impregnated with solutions of chosen fire retardants, which are diammonium phosphate monoammonium phosphate, sodium acetate, water glass, sodium tetra borate and boric acid. To determine the preliminary level of fire retardancy achieved in veneers before manufacturing of finished plywood, thermo gravimetric (TG and derivative thermogravimetric (DTG methods are used. TG and DTG analyses of treated and untreated wood, as well as of fire retardants alone, were performed on a Perkin-Elmer TGS-2 thermo gravimetric equipment. Fire resistance of plywood was tested in accordance with standard test for resistance to the effects of fire and the most efficient fire retardants monoammonium phosphate and sodium tetra borate, had the same results as TG/DTG analyses, which points out the validity of TG methods in predicting success of fire retardants in future products.

  20. Cultivation of Schizophyllum commune mushroom on different wood substrates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P.N. Dasanayaka

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Schizophyllum commune is an edible mushroom grown on wood under natural conditions. Present study focused on cultivation of S.commune on different wood substrates since it is not commercially cultivated. A pure culture of S. commune was obtained by growing a tissue of the mushroom on Potato Dextrose Agar (PDA medium. Spawns were produced by growing the mycelium on paddy grains. Mushroom was cultivated on sawdust of seven different wood substrates. The maximum yield was observed in sawdust of jackfruit (Artocarpusheterophyllus followed by sawdust of rambutan (Nepheliumlappaceum and country almond (Terminaliacatappa. A significant difference was not observed when mango (Mangiferaindica elephant apple (Dilleniaindica, tulip wood tree (Harpulliaarborea and thungfaa (Alstoniamacrophylla sawdust used as substrate. The lowest yield was observed in thungfaa (Alstoniamacrophylla sawdust. Effect of some additives on the yield was studied and significant difference in yield was observed when rice bran and used-tea leaves used as additives. Effect of rice bran on yield was studied using different ratios of sawdust to rice bran and the highest was observed in 2:1 ratio of sawdust to rice bran. The best incubating temperature for mycelial growth on the substrate was 350C. The composition of the mushroom on a dry weight basis was; 71.4% moisture, 23.35% crude protein and 6% ash. Tested wood species are promising substrates for cultivation of S.communeas cottage industry.

  1. Processing of the wood angelim pedra (Hymenolobium petraeum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adjenane Corrêa Taques

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to verify the behavior of wood Angelim stone (Hymenolobium petraeum Ducke submitted to the machining process. The study was developed in a carpentry shop in the city of Alta Floresta-MT. 36 boards with dimensions of 150 cm x 13.5 cm x 2.5 cm, length, width and thickness were randomly selected respectively for machining tests. The tests were developed according to the machinability of equipment used by the furniture industry, planing, sanding, drill and split by nail. 8 boards of wood in the stack were selected randomly to determine the moisture, according to 7190 (ABNT, 1997. The notes used for evaluation of defects resulting in the wood during the machining processes were assigned according to ASTM D 1666 (1987. It was observed that the type of angelim stone showed excellent performance in grinding tests, no scratch on the surface piece a of the burring parts and the parts free from defects, with the burning of wood. In cracking test for nail had a good performance, because it showed cracks with the insertion of the nail and planing test a regular performance, with pullout grain, surface arrepiamento and pullout chip. Wood Angelim stone responds with quality to the machining processes in planing, sanding, drill and split by nail.

  2. Grain boundaries: Progress report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Balluffi, R.W.; Bristowe, P.D.

    1988-02-01

    Quantitative measurements of grain boundary structure factors using x-ray diffraction have been performed on low angle (001) twist boundaries in gold. Also, a computer atomistic simulation program is being implemented to examine the equilibrium properties of a series of boundaries in gold. Simulation of boundaries at room temperature have been performed. Electron microscopy of grain boundary melting in aluminum was also performed. Results indicated an absence of melting. (CBS)

  3. Crown Fire Potential

    Data.gov (United States)

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — Crown fire potential was modeled using FlamMap, an interagency fire behavior mapping and analysis program that computes potential fire behavior characteristics. The...

  4. Fire safety at home

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... over the smoke alarm as needed. Using a fire extinguisher can put out a small fire to keep it from getting out of control. Tips for use include: Keep fire extinguishers in handy locations, at least one on ...

  5. Fire Ant Bites

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Favorite Name: Category: Share: Yes No, Keep Private Fire Ant Bites Share | Fire ants are aggressive, venomous insects that have pinching ... across the United States, even into Puerto Rico. Fire ant stings usually occur on the feet or ...

  6. Fire Ant Allergy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Treatments ▸ Library ▸ Allergy Library ▸ Fire ant allergy Share | Fire Ant Allergy This article has been reviewed by Thanai Pongdee, MD, FAAAAI Fire ants are a stinging insect typically found in ...

  7. 46 CFR 28.820 - Fire pumps, fire mains, fire hydrants, and fire hoses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ..., fire hydrants, and fire hoses. (a) Each vessel must be equipped with a self-priming, power driven fire...) If multiple pumps are installed, they may be used for other purposes provided at least one pump is...

  8. Global Burned Area and Biomass Burning Emissions from Small Fires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Randerson, J. T.; Chen, Y.; vanderWerf, G. R.; Rogers, B. M.; Morton, D. C.

    2012-01-01

    In several biomes, including croplands, wooded savannas, and tropical forests, many small fires occur each year that are well below the detection limit of the current generation of global burned area products derived from moderate resolution surface reflectance imagery. Although these fires often generate thermal anomalies that can be detected by satellites, their contributions to burned area and carbon fluxes have not been systematically quantified across different regions and continents. Here we developed a preliminary method for combining 1-km thermal anomalies (active fires) and 500 m burned area observations from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) to estimate the influence of these fires. In our approach, we calculated the number of active fires inside and outside of 500 m burn scars derived from reflectance data. We estimated small fire burned area by computing the difference normalized burn ratio (dNBR) for these two sets of active fires and then combining these observations with other information. In a final step, we used the Global Fire Emissions Database version 3 (GFED3) biogeochemical model to estimate the impact of these fires on biomass burning emissions. We found that the spatial distribution of active fires and 500 m burned areas were in close agreement in ecosystems that experience large fires, including savannas across southern Africa and Australia and boreal forests in North America and Eurasia. In other areas, however, we observed many active fires outside of burned area perimeters. Fire radiative power was lower for this class of active fires. Small fires substantially increased burned area in several continental-scale regions, including Equatorial Asia (157%), Central America (143%), and Southeast Asia (90%) during 2001-2010. Globally, accounting for small fires increased total burned area by approximately by 35%, from 345 Mha/yr to 464 Mha/yr. A formal quantification of uncertainties was not possible, but sensitivity

  9. Global burned area and biomass burning emissions from small fires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Randerson, J. T.; Chen, Y.; van der Werf, G. R.; Rogers, B. M.; Morton, D. C.

    2012-12-01

    In several biomes, including croplands, wooded savannas, and tropical forests, many small fires occur each year that are well below the detection limit of the current generation of global burned area products derived from moderate resolution surface reflectance imagery. Although these fires often generate thermal anomalies that can be detected by satellites, their contributions to burned area and carbon fluxes have not been systematically quantified across different regions and continents. Here we developed a preliminary method for combining 1-km thermal anomalies (active fires) and 500 m burned area observations from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) to estimate the influence of these fires. In our approach, we calculated the number of active fires inside and outside of 500 m burn scars derived from reflectance data. We estimated small fire burned area by computing the difference normalized burn ratio (dNBR) for these two sets of active fires and then combining these observations with other information. In a final step, we used the Global Fire Emissions Database version 3 (GFED3) biogeochemical model to estimate the impact of these fires on biomass burning emissions. We found that the spatial distribution of active fires and 500 m burned areas were in close agreement in ecosystems that experience large fires, including savannas across southern Africa and Australia and boreal forests in North America and Eurasia. In other areas, however, we observed many active fires outside of burned area perimeters. Fire radiative power was lower for this class of active fires. Small fires substantially increased burned area in several continental-scale regions, including Equatorial Asia (157%), Central America (143%), and Southeast Asia (90%) during 2001-2010. Globally, accounting for small fires increased total burned area by approximately by 35%, from 345 Mha/yr to 464 Mha/yr. A formal quantification of uncertainties was not possible, but sensitivity

  10. Secondary combustion system for wood burning stove

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    von Conta, P.E.W.

    1986-12-16

    This patent describes an improved secondary combustion system for combusting the exhaust gases exiting from a fire box in a wood burning stove comprising: an insulated conduit defining an exhaust passageway leading from an intake opening to an exit opening; screen means interposed across the exhaust passageway in the vicinity of the intake opening to impart a rapid acceleration to a gas stream entering the exhaust passageway; rotation means to impart a rotation to the gas stream in a first portion of the exhaust passageway; counter-rotation means to impart a counter-rotation to the gas stream in a second portion of the exhaust passageway; deceleration means to decelerate the gas stream in the second portion of the exhaust passageway; and secondary air means to inject a source of secondary air into the exhaust passageway.

  11. Interactive wood combustion for botanical tree models

    KAUST Repository

    Pirk, Sören

    2017-11-22

    We present a novel method for the combustion of botanical tree models. Tree models are represented as connected particles for the branching structure and a polygonal surface mesh for the combustion. Each particle stores biological and physical attributes that drive the kinetic behavior of a plant and the exothermic reaction of the combustion. Coupled with realistic physics for rods, the particles enable dynamic branch motions. We model material properties, such as moisture and charring behavior, and associate them with individual particles. The combustion is efficiently processed in the surface domain of the tree model on a polygonal mesh. A user can dynamically interact with the model by initiating fires and by inducing stress on branches. The flames realistically propagate through the tree model by consuming the available resources. Our method runs at interactive rates and supports multiple tree instances in parallel. We demonstrate the effectiveness of our approach through numerous examples and evaluate its plausibility against the combustion of real wood samples.

  12. Lignin‐Retaining Transparent Wood

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Qiliang; Rojas, Ramiro; Yan, Min; Lawoko, Martin

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Optically transparent wood, combining optical and mechanical performance, is an emerging new material for light‐transmitting structures in buildings with the aim of reducing energy consumption. One of the main obstacles for transparent wood fabrication is delignification, where around 30 wt % of wood tissue is removed to reduce light absorption and refractive index mismatch. This step is time consuming and not environmentally benign. Moreover, lignin removal weakens the wood structure, limiting the fabrication of large structures. A green and industrially feasible method has now been developed to prepare transparent wood. Up to 80 wt % of lignin is preserved, leading to a stronger wood template compared to the delignified alternative. After polymer infiltration, a high‐lignin‐content transparent wood with transmittance of 83 %, haze of 75 %, thermal conductivity of 0.23 W mK−1, and work‐tofracture of 1.2 MJ m−3 (a magnitude higher than glass) was obtained. This transparent wood preparation method is efficient and applicable to various wood species. The transparent wood obtained shows potential for application in energy‐saving buildings. PMID:28719095

  13. The Fabrication and Properties Characterization of Wood-Based Flame Retardant Composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xia He

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Wood-based flame retardant composites were fabricated based on vacuum-pressure impregnating method after high intensive microwave pretreatment. The effects of ammonium polyphosphate (APP and modified nano-zinc borate (nZB addition on flame-retardation and smoke-suppression properties of wood were investigated by cone calorimeter method (CONE and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA. The results show that the heat release rate (HRR, peak heat release rate (pk-HRR, and total heat release (THR of APP-treated woods decreased greatly with increasing concentration of APP. However, mean yield of CO (Mean COY of APP-treated wood was much higher (3.5 times than that of untreated wood. Compared with wood treated with APP at a concentration of 15%, the total smoke product (TSP, Mean COY, and pk-HRR decreased by 78.4%, 71.43%, and 31.23%, when wood was treated with APP and nZB (both concentrations were at 15%. APP and nZB have synergistic effects of flame-retardation and smoke-suppression. Nano-zinc borate combined with APP would be used in wood-based composites to efficiently retard flame, reduce fire intensity, and decrease noxious (CO/smoke release.

  14. EFFECTS OF SOME BORON COMPOUNDS ON THE LEACHABILITY OF EUCALYPTUS (Eucalyptus camaldulensis Dehn. WOOD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hüseyin Tan

    2003-04-01

    Full Text Available Wood preservation effectiveness of boron compounds against biological damagers and fire is well known. But these compounds are not widely used in preservation of wood because of their leachability from wood by rain water and making wood more hyroscopic than untreated wood in damp environments. Main aim of this study is; therefore, to improve the undesired leachability properties of some boron compounds by various water repellents (WRs. Aqueous solutions with polyethyleneglycole (PEG-400 of boric acid and sodium perborate were chosen as boron compounds. WRs were used as secondary treatment chemicals which were considered as dimensional stabilizer of wood and phsical bariers of boron retained at innerparts of treated wood. Results indicated that WRs were reduced leachability of boron from wood significantly (P<0.05. Boron salts applied with. PEG were more leachable than were of equeous solutions. WRs were not found effective on reducing the leachability of boron solved in PEG. Longer leaching time caused more leachant and reduction the phsical alleviation of WRs on boron leaching.

  15. Postfire Succession of Ants (Hymenoptera: Formicidae) Nesting in Dead Wood of Northern Boreal Forest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boucher, Philippe; Hébert, Christian; Francoeur, André; Sirois, Luc

    2015-10-01

    Dead wood decomposition begins immediately after tree death and involves a large array of invertebrates. Ecological successions are still poorly known for saproxylic organisms, particularly in boreal forests. We investigated the use of dead wood as nesting sites for ants along a 60-yr postfire chronosequence in northeastern coniferous forests. We sampled a total of 1,625 pieces of dead wood, in which 263 ant nests were found. Overall, ant abundance increased during the first 30 yr after wildfire, and then declined. Leptothorax cf. canadensis Provancher, the most abundant species in our study, was absent during the first 2 yr postfire, but increased steadily until 30 yr after fire, whereas Myrmica alaskensis Wheeler, second in abundance, was found at all stages of succession in the chronosequence. Six other species were less frequently found, among which Camponotus herculeanus (Linné), Formica neorufibarbis Emery, and Formica aserva Forel were locally abundant, but more scarcely distributed. Dead wood lying on the ground and showing numerous woodborer holes had a higher probability of being colonized by ants. The C:N ratio was lower for dead wood colonized by ants than for noncolonized dead wood, showing that the continuous occupation of dead wood by ants influences the carbon and nitrogen dynamics of dead wood after wildfire in northern boreal forests. © The Authors 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Entomological Society of America. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  16. Comparative Performance of Three Magnesium Compounds on Thermal Degradation Behavior of Red Gum Wood

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yiqiang Wu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The effect of basic magnesium carbonate (BMC, magnesium hydroxide (MH, and magnesium chloride hydrate (MCH on thermal degradation of red gum wood was studied using cone calorimetry, Thermogravimetric-differential scanning calorimetry (TG-DSC analysis, and X-ray diffraction (XRD characterization. The results showed common fire retardation actions of the three compounds by releasing incombustible gas and/or water vapor to dilute combustible gas in the flaming zone, and by converting to MgO, which had a satisfactory protective wall effect on the wood. Individually, BMC absorbed heat from the wood at the pre-decomposition stage and, thus, slowed down wood pyrolysis process. It slightly increased the char yield by charring in both the charring stage and the char calcination stage. MH lost water at about 270 °C, close to the temperature at which wood thermally degraded. MH rendered wood char quickly, and the compact char layer impeded further carbonization and burning of inner wood. MCH promoted charring with Mg2+ as a Lewis acid, and increased wood char yield. MCH also released Cl· free radical and HCl at 167 °C, which easily coordinated with combustion reaction radical, and slowed down, even inhibited, the combustion chain reaction.

  17. Lump wood combustion process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubesa, Petr; Horák, Jiří; Branc, Michal; Krpec, Kamil; Hopan, František; Koloničný, Jan; Ochodek, Tadeáš; Drastichová, Vendula; Martiník, Lubomír; Malcho, Milan

    2014-08-01

    The article deals with the combustion process for lump wood in low-power fireplaces (units to dozens of kW). Such a combustion process is cyclical in its nature, and what combustion facility users are most interested in is the frequency, at which fuel needs to be stoked to the fireplace. The paper defines the basic terms such as burnout curve and burning rate curve, which are closely related to the stocking frequency. The fuel burning rate is directly dependent on the immediate thermal power of the fireplace. This is also related to the temperature achieved in the fireplace, magnitude of flue gas losses and the ability to generate conditions favouring the full burnout of the fuel's combustible component, which, at once ensures the minimum production of combustible pollutants. Another part of the paper describes experiments conducted in traditional fireplaces with a grate, at which well-dried lump wood was combusted.

  18. Species comparison of the physical properties of loblolly and slash pine wood and bark

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas L. Eberhardt; Joseph Dahlen; Laurence Schimleck

    2017-01-01

    Composition of the southern pine forest is now predominated by two species, loblolly pine (Pinus taeda L.) and slash pine (Pinus elliottii Engelm.), owing to fire suppression activities, natural regeneration on abandoned agricultural lands, and extensive planting. Comparison of the wood and bark physical properties of these...

  19. Estimating dead wood during national forest inventories: a review of inventory methodologies and suggestions for harmonization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christopher W. Woodall; Jacques Rondeux; Pieter J. Verkerk; G& #246; ran St& #229; hl

    2009-01-01

    Efforts to assess forest ecosystem carbon stocks, biodiversity, and fire hazards have spurred the need for comprehensive assessments of forest ecosystem dead wood (DW) components around the world. Currently, information regarding the prevalence, status, and methods of DW inventories occurring in the world's forested landscapes is scattered. The goal of this study...

  20. Lodgepole pine bole wood density 1 and 11 years after felling in central Montana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duncan C. Lutes; Colin C. Hardy

    2013-01-01

    Estimates of large dead and down woody material biomass are used for evaluating ecological processes and making ecological assessments, such as for nutrient cycling, wildlife habitat, fire effects, and climate change science. Many methods are used to assess the abundance (volume) of woody material, which ultimately require an estimate of wood density to convert volume...

  1. Household air pollution from wood burning in two reconstructed houses from the Danish Viking Age

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Jannie Marie; Ryhl-Svendsen, M.

    2015-01-01

    During 13 winter weeks, an experimental archeology project was undertaken in two Danish reconstructed Viking Age houses with indoor open fireplaces. Volunteers inhabited the houses under living conditions similar to those of the Viking Age, including cooking and heating by wood fire. Carbon...... to the Viking house design, the volunteer’s lack of training in attending a fire maybe also played a role. Even so, when comparing to today’s issues arising from the use of open fires, it must be assumed that also during the Viking Age, the exposure to woodsmoke was a contributing factor to health problems....

  2. Characterization and quantification of deposits build up and removal in straw suspension fired boilers. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arendt Jensen, Peter; Wedel, S.; Jappe Frandsen, F.; Dam-Johansen, K.; Shafique Bashir, M. [Technical Univ. of Denmark. CHEC Research Centre, Kgs. Lyngby (Denmark); Wadenback, J.; Thaaning Pedersen, S. [Vattenfall A/S, Copenhagen (Denmark)

    2013-07-15

    This project deals with ash deposit formation in suspension fired biomass power plant boilers. The project has been conducted in a tight collaboration between Vattenfall and the CHEC Research Centre at DTU Department of Chemical Engineering. A large part of the project has been performed by conducting advanced probe measurements at the Amagervaerkets Vattenfall owed boilers. It was the objective of the project to provide an improved understanding of ash deposit formation and removal in biomass suspension fired boilers. The project have provided a large amount of knowledge on the following issues: 1) The influence of local boiler conditions on deposit formation in suspension fired boilers using wood or co-firing straw and wood, 2) quantification of deposit removal in biomass suspension firing boilers with regards both to natural shedding and soot blower induced shedding, 3) established relations of the properties of fuel ash, fly ash and deposits, 4) use of coal ash to remedy biomass ash induced boiler deposit problems. (Author)

  3. Characterization and quantification of deposits build up and removal in straw suspension fired boilers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Peter Arendt; Shafique Bashir, Muhammad; Wedel, Stig

    This project deals with ash deposit formation in suspension fired biomass power plant boilers. The project has been conducted in a tight collaboration between Vattenfall and the CHEC Research Centre at DTU Department of Chemical Engineering. A large part of the project has been performed...... by conducting advanced probe measurements at the Amagerværkets Vattenfall owed boilers. It was the objective of the project to provide an improved understanding of ash deposit formation and removal in biomass suspension fired boilers. The project have provided a large amount of knowledge on the following issues......: 1) The influence of local boiler conditions on deposit formation in suspension fired boilers using wood or co-firing straw and wood, 2) quantification of deposit removal in biomass suspension firing boilers with regards both to natural shedding and soot blower induced shedding, 3) established...

  4. Wood Composite Adhesives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomez-Bueso, Jose; Haupt, Robert

    The global environment, in which phenolic resins are being used for wood composite manufacture, has changed significantly during the last decade. This chapter reviews trends that are driving the use and consumption of phenolic resins around the world. The review begins with recent data on volume usage and regional trends, followed by an analysis of factors affecting global markets. In a section on environmental factors, the impact of recent formaldehyde emission regulations is discussed. The section on economics introduces wood composite production as it relates to the available adhesive systems, with special emphasis on the technical requirement to improve phenolic reactivity. Advances in composite process technology are introduced, especially in regard to the increased demands the improvements place upon adhesive system performance. The specific requirements for the various wood composite families are considered in the context of adhesive performance needs. The results of research into current chemistries are discussed, with a review of recent findings regarding the mechanisms of phenolic condensation and acceleration. Also, the work regarding alternate natural materials, such as carbohydrates, lignins, tannins, and proteinaceous materials, is presented. Finally, new developments in alternative adhesive technologies are reported.

  5. CFD modeling and experience of waste-to-energy plant burning waste wood

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rajh, B.; Yin, Chungen; Samec, N.

    2013-01-01

    of waste wood combustion in a 13 MW grate-fired boiler in a WtE plant is presented. As a validation effort, the temperature profiles at a number of ports in the furnace are measured and the experimental results are compared with the CFD predictions. In the simulation, a 1D model is developed to simulate...... the conversion of the waste wood in the fuel bed on the grate, which provides the appropriate inlet boundary condition for the freeboard 3D CFD simulation. The CFD analysis reveals the detailed mixing and combustion characteristics in the waste wood-fired furnace, pinpointing how to improve the design......Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) is being increasingly used in industry for in-depth understanding of the fundamental mixing, combustion, heat transfer and pollutant formation in combustion processes and for design and optimization of Waste-to-Energy (WtE) plants. In this paper, CFD modeling...

  6. Renewable wood fuel: Fuel feed system for a pulverized coal boiler. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-01-01

    This report evaluates a pilot test program conducted by New York State Gas & Electric Corporation to evaluate the feasibility of co-firing a pulverized coal plant with renewable wood fuels. The goal was to establish that such a co-firing system can reduce air emissions while maintaining good operational procedures and cost controls. The test fuel feed system employed at Greenidge Station`s Boiler 6 was shown to be effective in feeding wood products. Emission results were promising and an economic analysis indicates that it will be beneficial to pursue further refinements to the equipment and systems. The report recommends further evaluation of the generation and emission impacts using woods of varied moisture contents and at varied Btu input rates to determine if a drying system would be a cost-effective option.

  7. Possibilities to switch from natural gas to wood fuel in DH system of Ukraine by the example of Slavutich project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Drozd, Konstantin; Geletukha, Georgiy [Scientific Engineering Centre Biomass, Kyiv (Ukraine)

    2006-07-15

    This paper is focusing on possibilities to switch from natural gas fuel to wood fuel in district heating system of Ukraine. As an example the case study of Slavutich project has been selected. In case study it was determined the capacity of new wood-fired boiler-house to be constructed. Also we estimated the wood fuel potential in the region and calculated the economical indexes of the proposed project. Taking into account the permanent natural gas prices increasing we performed the sensitivity analysis. The construction of 5 MW wood-fired boiler house is viable in current conditions (even when tariffs for heat are not yet increased nevertheless the natural gas price in Ukraine raised two times since beginning of 2006). And in the case of heat supply tariff increasing the economical indexes of the proposed project become very attractive.

  8. Fire and fire ecology: Concepts and principles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mark A. Cochrane; Kevin C. Ryan

    2009-01-01

    Fire has been central to terrestrial life ever since early anaerobic microorganisms poisoned the atmosphere with oxygen and multicellular plant life moved onto land. The combination of fuels, oxygen, and heat gave birth to fire on Earth. Fire is not just another evolutionary challenge that life needed to overcome, it is, in fact, a core ecological process across much...

  9. Vehicle fires and fire safety in tunnels

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-09-20

    Tunnels present what is arguably the most hazardous environment, from the point of view of fire safety, that members of the public ever experience. The fire safety design of tunnels is carried out by tunnel engineers on the basis of a potential fire ...

  10. Fire Service Training. Portable Fire Extinguishers. (Revised).

    Science.gov (United States)

    North Carolina State Dept. of Community Colleges, Raleigh.

    One of a set of fourteen instructional outlines for use in a course to train novice firemen, this guide covers the topic of portable fire extinguishers. Designed to be used with the Robert J. Brady Transparencies and/or the film "Portable Fire Extinguishers" and with the International Fire Service Training Association Manual No. 101,…

  11. BASIC PROPERTIES IN RELATION TO DRYING PROPERTIES OF THREE WOOD SPECIES FROM INDONESIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Efrida Basri

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available The objectives of this study were to investigate basic and drying properties of three wood species from Indonesia, i.e. kuda (Lannea coromandelica Merr., waru (Hibiscus tiliaceus L. and mindi besar (Melia dubia Cav.. The basic properties include density, shrinkages, modulus of rupture (MOR, compression parallel to grain (C//, wood strength and anatomical structures. Meanwhile, the drying properties included drying time and drying defects. The initial-final temperature and humidity for each species was based on defects that resulted from high temperature drying trial. The results showed that the drying properties were significantly affected by wood anatomical structure. The initial-final drybulb temperature and wetbulb depression   for kuda wood are 50 -70ºC and 3-30ºC respectively, while the corresponding figures for waru wood are 65-80ºC and 6-30ºC, and for mindi besar wood are 55-80ºC and 4-30ºC. These drying schedules, however, still need further trial prior to their implementation in the factory-scale operation. All wood species studied have density and considerable strength recommended in their use for light medium construction purposes. Mindi besar wood has decorative appearance so it is suitable for furniture.

  12. Chapter 6: Thermal properties, combustion, and fire retardancy of wood

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roger M. Rowell; Mark A. Dietenberger

    2013-01-01

    One of the greatest assets of cellulosic resources is their compatibility with nature, including their combustibility and degradability which allow for constant turnover and regeneration of these natural resources. A fundamental understanding of these properties and possible methods for controlling them is essential for protection and better utilization of these...

  13. Bill Ming: stories of wood, wind and fire

    OpenAIRE

    McKay, Andy

    2007-01-01

    Engaging with “ The Work and Identity of Artists” is research theme that has pre-occupied many of Andy Mckay’s film projects. A previous faculty research seminar discussed “ DV Miniatures “ , a slate of his experimental film collaborations with poets, dancers, choreographers, jazz composers, visual and performance artists which was made to celebrate “ Year of the Artist “ and funded by Arts Council England. Though there are exceptions, he has long been puzzled by the question of why main...

  14. Controlling mold on wood Pallets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carol A. Clausen

    2012-01-01

    THE WOOD PALLET AND CONTAINER INDUSTRY CONSUMES 4.5 billion board feet (BBF) of hardwoods and 1.8 BBF of softwoods for the annual production of 400-500 million solid wood pallets. While alternative materials such as plastic, corrugated paperboard and metal have entered the market, solid wood remains the material of choice for a majority of pallets on the market (more...

  15. Wood products and green chemistry

    OpenAIRE

    Pizzi, Antonio

    2016-01-01

    International audience; Key message Green chemistry for and from wood has developed numerous industrial products, namely biosourced, green wood adhesives and preservatives, foams, composite matrices, laminates, hard and flexible plastics, flexible films, and abrasive grinding discs, and their number is still growing.IntroductionThis review addresses (1) the elimination of toxic aldehydes from the most common wood panel adhesive, the one based on urea, itself a natural product, (2) biosourced ...

  16. Pulmonary responses after wood chip mulch exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wintermeyer, S F; Kuschner, W G; Wong, H; D'Alessandro, A; Blanc, P D

    1997-04-01

    Organic Dust Toxic Syndrome (ODTS) is a flu-like syndrome that can occur after inhalation of cotton, grain, wood chip dusts, or other organic dusts or aerosols. We investigated whether inflammatory pulmonary responses occur, even after relatively brief, low-level wood chip mulch exposure. Six volunteers were exposed to wood chip mulch dust. Total dust and/or endotoxin levels were measured in five subjects. Pulmonary function and peripheral blood counts were measured before and after exposure in each subject. Bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) was performed in each subject after exposure, and cell, cytokine, and protein concentrations were measured. Control BAL without previous exposure was also performed on three of the subjects. Three of six subjects had symptoms consistent with ODTS. No clinically relevant or statistically significant changes in pulmonary function tests after exposure were found. Three subjects manifested a marked elevation in neutrophil percentage in their BAL (range, 10 to 57%). When these three subjects underwent control BAL, the postexposure comparison demonstrated an increase in neutrophil levels of 154 +/- 89 x 10(3)/mL (mean +/- standard error; P = 0.22). The mean increase in BAL interleukin-8 levels after exposure, compared with paired control values, was 11.2 +/- SE 2.5 pg/mL (P = 0.047). There was also an increase in BAL interleukin-6 levels that reached borderline significance (6.4 +/- SE 2.0 pg/mL; P = 0.08). Tumor necrosis factor levels were increased in all three subjects' BAL as well (0.4 +/- SE 0.2 pg/mL), but this change was not statistically significant (P = 0.2). Our findings of increased BAL proinflammatory cytokine and neutrophil levels are consistent with the theory that cytokine networking in the lung may mediate ODTS.

  17. Use of wood ash in the treatment of high tannin sorghum for poultry ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    conniek

    There was no significant difference in feed intake between the maize based diet and the diet that contained wood ash extract treated .... 2 Provided per kg diet: Vitamin A - 12500 IU; vitamin D3 - 2500 IU; vitamin E - 20 IU; vitamin K3 - 3.0 mg; vitamin. B1 - 1.0 mg .... lysine when sorghum grain was treated with Magadi soda.

  18. Fires, ecological effects of

    Science.gov (United States)

    W. J. Bond; Robert Keane

    2017-01-01

    Fire is both a natural and anthropogenic disturbance influencing the distribution, structure, and functioning of terrestrial ecosystems around the world. Many plants and animals depend on fire for their continued existence. Others species, such as rainforest plants species, are extremely intolerant of burning and need protection from fire. The properties of a fire...

  19. Survival, growth, wood basic density and wood biomass of seven ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A performance comparison of seven-year-old individuals of 13 Casuarina species/provenances in terms of survival, growth (diameter, height and volume), wood basic density and wood biomass was undertaken at Kongowe, Kibaha, Tanzania. The trial was laid out using a randomised complete block design with four ...

  20. Corrosion of Fasteners in Wood Treated with Newer Wood Preservatives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samuel L. Zelinka

    2013-01-01

    This document compiles recent research findings related to corrosion of metals in preservative treated wood into a single report on corrosion of metals in wood. The research was conducted as part of the Research, Technology and Education portion of the National Historic Covered Bridge Preservation (NHCBP) Program administered by the Federal Highway Administration. The...

  1. Fiberboard created using the natural adhesive properties of distillers dried grains with solubles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Distillers dried grains with solubles (DDGS) were employed as a bio-based resin/adhesive. DDGS were defatted with hexane, ball ground and screened prior to use. DDGS flour was mixed dry with Paulownia wood (PW) to make composites using the following conditions: temperature of 150-195 oC, PW particle...

  2. Growth of high-density ZnO nanorods on wood with enhanced photostability, flame retardancy and water repellency

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kong, Lizhuo; Tu, Kunkun; Guan, Hao [Research Institute of Wood Industry, Chinese Academy of Forestry, Beijing 100091 (China); Wang, Xiaoqing, E-mail: wangxq@caf.ac.cn [Research Institute of Forestry New Technology, Chinese Academy of Forestry, Beijing 100091 (China); Research Institute of Wood Industry, Chinese Academy of Forestry, Beijing 100091 (China)

    2017-06-15

    Highlights: • ZnO nanorod arrays were deposited on the wood surface via a hydrothermal process. • The assembled ZnO nanorod arrays greatly enhanced the photostability of wood. • The treated wood can sustain direct exposure to flame with only minor smoldering. • The ZnO-coated wood modified with stearic acid showed a superhydrophobic surface. - Abstract: Zinc oxide (ZnO) nanorod arrays were successfully assembled on the wood surface in situ via a two-step process consisting of formation of ZnO seeds and subsequent crystal growth under hydrothermal conditions at a low temperature. The morphology and crystalline structure of the formed ZnO nanorods were studied by field-emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). Highly dense and uniform arrays of ZnO nanorods with well-defined hexagonal facets were generated on the wood surface by tuning the concentration of the ZnO growth solution during the hydrothermal treatment. Accelerated weathering tests indicated that the assembled ZnO nanorod arrays were highly protective against UV radiation and greatly enhanced the photostability of the coated wood. Meanwhile, the ZnO nanorod-coated wood can withstand continuous exposure to flame with only minor smoldering in contrast with the pristine wood catching fire easily and burning rapidly. Moreover, when further modified with low-surface-energy stearic acid, the ZnO nanorod decorated wood surface can be transformed into a superhydrophobic surface, with a water contact angle (CA) of ∼154°. Such ZnO nanorod-modified woods with enhanced photostability, flame retardancy and water repellency offer an interesting alternative to conventional wood preservation strategies, highlighting their potential applications in some novel wood products.

  3. DETERMINATION OF CHEMICAL PROPERTIES OF WOODS FROM SOUTHERN AMAZON

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. P. S. Almeida

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this work was to make conventional analyzes to determine the chemical composition of five wooden species found on the Southern Amazon area, which are: Peltogyne lecointei, Erisma uncinatum, Hymenaea courbaril, Hymenolobium petraeum and Trattinnickia burseraefolia. First of all, the samples was collected based on the availability and and primarily in the commercial interest of the wood. It was taken discs along the stem (0%, 25%, 50%, 75% and 100% of the commercial height from the trees randomly selected with the conditions of good stem and straight grain. Of those samples it was taken the specimens, transformed into sawdust to obtain the chemical properties of the wood. The sawdust went to the sieve of 40 ans 60 mesh, respectively, the fraction used to determine the percentage of total extractives, lignin and holocellulose through the sieve of 40 mesh, but stays retained on the shieve of 60 mesh. The evaluation of the results indicates that the chemical composition of the wooden species studied here have the values within the normal pattern for hardwoods ranging 1-5% extractives, 16-24% for lignin and 65-82% for holocellulose. The data indicates that Hymenaea courbaril has the highest basic specific mass, because the holocellulose content is inverse to the lignin. Erisma uncinatum and Hymenolobium petraeum has the highest extractive contente, which propose a higher natural durability related to the other wood species. The lignin on the tissue confers resistance to attack by wood borers, so the specie Hymenaea courbaril is possibly the most vulnerable to attack. However in the species studied here, the chemical composition of the woods can be significantly correlated with the technological behavior of these woods.

  4. Heat transfer mechanisms in poplar wood undergoing torrefaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sule, Idris O.; Mahmud, Shohel; Dutta, Animesh; Tasnim, Syeda Humaira

    2016-03-01

    Torrefaction, a thermal treatment process of biomass, has been proved to improve biomass combustible properties. Torrefaction is defined as a thermochemical process in reduced oxygen condition and at temperature range from 200 to 300 °C for shorter residence time whereby energy yield is maximized, can be a bridging technology that can lead the conventional system (e.g. coal-fired plants) towards a sustainable energy system. In efforts to develop a commercial operable torrefaction reactor, the present study examines the minimum input condition at which biomass is torrefied and explores the heat transfer mechanisms during torrefaction in poplar wood samples. The heat transfer through the wood sample is numerically modeled and analyzed. Each poplar wood is torrefied at temperature of 250, 270, and 300 °C. The experimental study shows that the 270 °C-treatment can be deduced as the optimal input condition for torrefaction of poplar wood. A good understanding of heat transfer mechanisms can facilitate the upscaling and downscaling of torrefaction process equipment to fit the feedstock input criteria and can help to develop treatment input specifications that can maximize process efficiency.

  5. Wood pole overhead lines

    CERN Document Server

    Wareing, Brian

    2005-01-01

    This new book concentrates on the mechanical aspects of distribution wood pole lines, including live line working, environmental influences, climate change and international standards. Other topics include statutory requirements, safety, profiling, traditional and probabilistic design, weather loads, bare and covered conductors, different types of overhead systems, conductor choice, construction and maintenance. A section has also been devoted to the topic of lightning, which is one of the major sources of faults on overhead lines. The book focuses on the effects of this problem and the strate

  6. Fire-Walking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willey, David

    2010-01-01

    This article gives a brief history of fire-walking and then deals with the physics behind fire-walking. The author has performed approximately 50 fire-walks, took the data for the world's hottest fire-walk and was, at one time, a world record holder for the longest fire-walk (www.dwilley.com/HDATLTW/Record_Making_Firewalks.html). He currently…

  7. Why do interstellar grains exist?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seab, C. G.; Hollenbach, D. J.; Mckee, C. F.; Tielens, Alexander G. G. M.

    1986-01-01

    There exists a discrepancy between calculated destruction rates of grains in the interstellar medium and postulated sources of new grains. This problem was examined by modelling the global life cycle of grains in the galaxy. The model includes: grain destruction due to supernovae shock waves; grain injection from cool stars, planetary nebulae, star formation, novae, and supernovae; grain growth by accretion in dark clouds; and a mixing scheme between phases of the interstellar medium. Grain growth in molecular clouds is considered as a mechanism or increasing the formation rate. To decrease the shock destruction rate, several new physical processes, such as partial vaporization effects in grain-grain collisions, breakdown of the small Larmor radius approximation for betatron acceleration, and relaxation of the steady-state shock assumption are included.

  8. Potential high temperature corrosion problems due to co-firing of biomass and fossil fuels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Montgomery, Melanie; Vilhelmsen, T.; Jensen, S.A.

    2007-01-01

    Over the past years, considerable high temperature corrosion problems have been encountered when firing biomass in power plants due to the high content of potassium chloride in the deposits. Therefore to combat chloride corrosion problems co-firing of biomass with a fossil fuel has been undertaken...... significant corrosion attack was due to sulphidation attack at the grain boundaries of 18-8 steel after 3 years exposure. The corrosion mechanisms and corrosion rates are compared with biomass firing and coal firing. Potential corrosion problems due to co-firing biomass and fossil fuels are discussed....

  9. Durable Feedback Control System for Small Scale Wood Chip Combustion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Korpela, T.; Bjoerkqvist, T.; Lautala, P. (Tampere Univ. of Technology, Dept. of Automation Science and Engineering, FIN-33101 Tampere (Finland)). E-mail: timo.korpela@tut.fi

    2008-10-15

    The purpose is to control wood chip combustion in an inexpensive and durable way. A control concept in order to reduce the effect of fluctuation of the fuel feed is introduced. The concept is based on temperature and lambda measurements. The main task of the control system is to set the fuel feed at a desired level after a change in the combustion conditions. Additionally, temporary fluctuations of the degree of filling of feeding screw are compensated. Test results of a 80 kW and a 200 kW commercial wood chip fired systems are introduced. The process experiments indicate that the high level control system is able to adapt to varying combustion conditions and to maintain low emission levels. Furthermore, passive means that can be exploited to stabilize the combustion are discussed. As the control concept is not dependent on the design of the combustion system, the concept is adaptable to present systems

  10. Properties of seven Colombian woods

    Science.gov (United States)

    B. A. Bendtsen; M. Chudnoff

    1981-01-01

    Woods from abroad are an important raw material to the forest products industries in the United States. A major concern in effective utilization of this resource is the lack of technical information on many species. This report presents the results of an evaluation of the mechanical properties of small, clear specimens of seven Colombian woods. These results are...

  11. The wood of Merovingian weaponry

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Tegel, W.; Muigg, B.; Büntgen, Ulf

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 65, JAN (2016), s. 148-153 ISSN 0305-4403 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) EE2.3.20.0248 Institutional support: RVO:67179843 Keywords : Early Middle Ages * Merovingian weaponry * Mineralised wood * Wood anatomy Subject RIV: EH - Ecology, Behaviour Impact factor: 2.602, year: 2016

  12. Wood anatomy of the Rhizophoraceae

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vliet, van G.J.C.M.

    1976-01-01

    The wood anatomy of 127 samples of 65 species of all 18 genera of the Rhizophoraceae is described in detail; features not observed here, but recorded in the literature are added. Wood anatomically several groups can be recognized. Three distinct groups are very homogeneous, coinciding with the

  13. Public opinion and wood energy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarah Hitchner; John Schelhas; Teppo Hujala; J. Peter Brosius

    2014-01-01

    As wood-based bioenergy continues to develop around the world, it will utilize forestlands in new ways and will have different effects on a number of stakeholders, including forest landowners, local communities, extant industries, policymakers, investors, and others. As more stakeholders become involved in the wood energy web, and as the general public becomes more...

  14. Metal bats more like wood

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Gardiner, Andy

    2011-01-01

    ... Coefficient of Resolution (BBCOR), which brings bats even closer to duplicating the properties of wood. "I would have preferred to go more slowly," said Mark Marquess, who has two national championships during his 35 years as Stanford's coach. "Everyone likes the idea of becoming more like wood, but let's say all our games were 2-1 and our attendanc...

  15. Composites from wood and plastics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craig Clemons

    2010-01-01

    Composites made from thermoplastics and fillers or reinforcements derived from wood or other natural fibers are a dynamic research area encompassing a wide variety of composite materials. For example, as the use of biopolymers grows, wood and other natural fiber sources are being investigated as renewable sources of fillers and reinforcements to modify performance....

  16. Growth of high-density ZnO nanorods on wood with enhanced photostability, flame retardancy and water repellency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Lizhuo; Tu, Kunkun; Guan, Hao; Wang, Xiaoqing

    2017-06-01

    Zinc oxide (ZnO) nanorod arrays were successfully assembled on the wood surface in situ via a two-step process consisting of formation of ZnO seeds and subsequent crystal growth under hydrothermal conditions at a low temperature. The morphology and crystalline structure of the formed ZnO nanorods were studied by field-emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). Highly dense and uniform arrays of ZnO nanorods with well-defined hexagonal facets were generated on the wood surface by tuning the concentration of the ZnO growth solution during the hydrothermal treatment. Accelerated weathering tests indicated that the assembled ZnO nanorod arrays were highly protective against UV radiation and greatly enhanced the photostability of the coated wood. Meanwhile, the ZnO nanorod-coated wood can withstand continuous exposure to flame with only minor smoldering in contrast with the pristine wood catching fire easily and burning rapidly. Moreover, when further modified with low-surface-energy stearic acid, the ZnO nanorod decorated wood surface can be transformed into a superhydrophobic surface, with a water contact angle (CA) of ∼154°. Such ZnO nanorod-modified woods with enhanced photostability, flame retardancy and water repellency offer an interesting alternative to conventional wood preservation strategies, highlighting their potential applications in some novel wood products.

  17. Some Technological Properties of Plywood after Fire Retardant Treatment in Different Concentrations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aydin DEMIR

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The treatment with fire retardant chemicals is the most effective process to protect wood and wood based products from fire. Therefore, use of fire retardant chemicals has been increased. However, the fire retardant chemicals have an effect on other physical, mechanical and some technological properties of the materials treated with them. In this study the effect of various fire retardant chemicals in different concentrations on the technological properties of plywood were examined. Poplar (Populus deltoides and scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L. were used as wood species; zinc borate, monoammonium phosphate (MAP and ammonium sulfate were used as fire retardant chemicals and UF resin was used as adhesive. The veneer sheets were treated by immersion and three different concentrations, such as 5%, 7% and 10% aqueous solutions were selected. Mechanical properties of plywood panels, such as the shear strength, bending strength and the modulus of elasticity were determined according to EN 314-1, EN 310, respectively. The surface roughness of the veneer sheets was determined according to DIN 4768 standard. As a result of this study, it was found that all the mechanical strength values of panels produced by using the veneers treated with fire retardant chemicals were lower than those of control panels. With the increasing of the solution concentration their values decreased while the surface roughness values increased.

  18. Characterisation of wood combustion ashes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maresca, Alberto

    for their composition and leaching properties. Despite the relatively large variations in the contents of nutrients and trace metals, the overall levels were comparable to typical ranges reported in the literature for other wood combustion ashes, as well as with regards to leaching. In general, the composition......The combustion of wood chips and wood pellets for the production of renewable energy in Denmark increased from 5.7 PJ to 16 PJ during the period 2000-2015, and further increases are expected to occur within the coming years. In 2012, about 22,300 tonnes of wood ashes were generated in Denmark....... Currently, these ashes are mainly landfilled, despite Danish legislation allowing their application onto forest and agricultural soils for fertilising and/or liming purposes. During this PhD work, 16 wood ash samples generated at ten different Danish combustion plants were collected and characterised...

  19. Origin of Petrified Wood Color

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    George Mustoe

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Fossil forests have world-wide distribution, commonly preserving mineralized wood that displays vivid hues and complex color patterns. However, the origin of petrified color has received little scientific attention. Color of silicified wood may be influenced by the presence of relict organic matter, but the most significant contribution comes from trace metals. This study reports quantitative analysis of trace metals in 35 silicified wood samples, determined using LA-ICP-MS spectrometry. The most important of these metals is Fe, which can produce a rainbow of hues depending on its abundance and oxidation state. Cr is the dominant colorant for bright green fossil wood from Arizona, USA and Zimbabwe, Africa. Complex color patterns result from the progressive nature of the fossilization process, which causes wood to have varying degrees of permeability during successive episodes of permineralization. These processes include simple diffusion, chromatographic separation, infiltration of groundwater along fractures and void spaces, and oxidation/reduction.

  20. Grain Boundary Segregation in Metals

    CERN Document Server

    Lejcek, Pavel

    2010-01-01

    Grain boundaries are important structural components of polycrystalline materials used in the vast majority of technical applications. Because grain boundaries form a continuous network throughout such materials, their properties may limit their practical use. One of the serious phenomena which evoke these limitations is the grain boundary segregation of impurities. It results in the loss of grain boundary cohesion and consequently, in brittle fracture of the materials. The current book deals with fundamentals of grain boundary segregation in metallic materials and its relationship to the grain boundary structure, classification and other materials properties.

  1. Industrial concessions, fires and air pollution in Equatorial Asia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spracklen, D. V.; Reddington, C. L.; Gaveau, D. L. A.

    2015-09-01

    Forest and peatland fires in Indonesia emit large quantities of smoke leading to poor air quality across Equatorial Asia. Marlier et al (2015 Environ. Res. Lett. 10 085005) explore the contribution of fires occurring on oil palm, timber (wood pulp and paper) and natural forest logging concessions to smoke emissions and exposure of human populations to the resulting air pollution. They find that one third of the population exposure to smoke across Equatorial Asia is caused by fires in oil palm and timber concessions in Sumatra and Kalimantan. Logging concessions have substantially lower fire emissions, and contribute less to air quality degradation. This represents a compelling justification to prevent reclassification of logging concessions into oil palm or timber concessions after logging. This can be achieved by including logged forests in the Indonesian moratorium on new plantations in forested areas.

  2. Southwestern Oregon's Biscuit Fire: An Analysis of Forest Resources, Fire Severity, and Fire Hazard

    Science.gov (United States)

    David L. Azuma; Glenn A. Christensen

    2005-01-01

    This study compares pre-fire field inventory data (collected from 1993 to 1997) in relation to post-fire mapped fire severity classes and the Fire and Fuels Extension of the Forest Vegetation Simulator growth and yield model measures of fire hazard for the portion of the Siskiyou National Forest in the 2002 Biscuit fire perimeter of southwestern Oregon. Post-fire...

  3. FIRES: Fire Information Retrieval and Evaluation System - A program for fire danger rating analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patricia L. Andrews; Larry S. Bradshaw

    1997-01-01

    A computer program, FIRES: Fire Information Retrieval and Evaluation System, provides methods for evaluating the performance of fire danger rating indexes. The relationship between fire danger indexes and historical fire occurrence and size is examined through logistic regression and percentiles. Historical seasonal trends of fire danger and fire occurrence can be...

  4. Fire impacts on European Boreal soils: A review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, Paulo; Oliva, Marc; Cerda, Artemi

    2016-04-01

    , Engineering and Management, 1(59), 52-62. Pereira, P., Ubeda, X., Mataix-Solera, J., Oliva, M., Novara, A. (2014) Short-term spatio-temporal spring grassland fire effects on soil colour,organic matter and water repellency in Lithuania, Solid Earth, 5, 209-225. Ryan KC. 2002. Dynamic Interactions between forest structure and fire behavioural in boreal ecosystems. Silva Fennica 36: 13-39 Toivanen T, Kotiaho JS. 2007. Mimicking natural disturbances of boreal forests: the effects of controlled burning and creating dead wood on beetle diversity. Biodiversity Conservation 16: 3193-3211.

  5. Utilizing wood wastes as reinforcement in wood cement composite bricks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nusirat Aderinsola Sadiku

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the research work undertaken to study the properties of Wood Cement Composite Bricks (WCCB from different wood wastes and cement / wood content. The WCBBs with nominal density of 1200 kg m-3 were produced from three tropical wood species and at varying cement and wood content of 2:1, 2.5:1 and 3:1 on a weight to weight basis. The properties evaluated were compressive strength, Ultra Pulse Velocity (UPV, water absorption (WA and thickness swelling (TS. The Compressive strength values ranged from 0.25 to 1.13 N mm-2 and UPV values ranged from 18753 to 49992 m s-1. The mean values of WA after 672 hours (28 days of water soaking of the WCCBs ranged from 9.50% to 47.13% where there were no noticeable change in the TS of the bricks. The observed density (OD ranged from 627 to 1159 kg m-3. A. zygia from the three wood/cement content were more dimensionally stable and better in compressive strength than the other two species where T. scleroxylon had the best performance in terms of UPV. All the properties improved with increasing cement content. WCCBs at 3.0:1 cement/wood content are suitable for structural application such as panelling, ceiling and partitioning

  6. Fire-induced Carbon Emissions and Regrowth Uptake in Western U.S. Forests: Documenting Variation Across Forest Types, Fire Severity, and Climate Regions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghimire, Bardan; Williams, Christopher A.; Collatz, George James; Vanderhoof, Melanie

    2012-01-01

    The forest area in the western United States that burns annually is increasing with warmer temperatures, more frequent droughts, and higher fuel densities. Studies that examine fire effects for regional carbon balances have tended to either focus on individual fires as examples or adopt generalizations without considering how forest type, fire severity, and regional climate influence carbon legacies. This study provides a more detailed characterization of fire effects and quantifies the full carbon impacts in relation to direct emissions, slow release of fire-killed biomass, and net carbon uptake from forest regrowth. We find important variations in fire-induced mortality and combustion across carbon pools (leaf, live wood, dead wood, litter, and duff) and across low- to high-severity classes. This corresponds to fire-induced direct emissions from 1984 to 2008 averaging 4 TgC/yr and biomass killed averaging 10.5 TgC/yr, with average burn area of 2723 sq km/yr across the western United States. These direct emission and biomass killed rates were 1.4 and 3.7 times higher, respectively, for high-severity fires than those for low-severity fires. The results show that forest regrowth varies greatly by forest type and with severity and that these factors impose a sustained carbon uptake legacy. The western U.S. fires between 1984 and 2008 imposed a net source of 12.3 TgC/yr in 2008, accounting for both direct fire emissions (9.5 TgC/yr) and heterotrophic decomposition of fire-killed biomass (6.1 TgC yr1) as well as contemporary regrowth sinks (3.3 TgC/yr). A sizeable trend exists toward increasing emissions as a larger area burns annually.

  7. Cardiovascular health effects following exposure of human volunteers during fire extinction exercises

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Maria Helena Guerra; Saber, Anne Thoustrup; Pedersen, Peter Bøgh

    2017-01-01

    firefighting exercises in a constructed firehouse and flashover container. The subjects were instructed to extinguish fires of either wood or wood with electrical cords and mattresses. The exposure to particulate matter ( PM) was assessed at various locations and personal exposure was assessed by portable PM......: Observations from this fire extinction training show that PM exposure mainly occurs in situations where firefighters removed the self-contained breathing apparatus. Altered cardiovascular disease endpoints after the firefighting exercise period were most likely due to complex effects from PM exposure, physical...... exhaustion and increased core body temperature....

  8. Influence of grain size and grain boundary recombination velocity on ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The plot of the diffusion capacitance allowed us to study the influence of the following parameters: grain size, grain boundary recombination velocity, junction recombination velocity and illumination wavelength on this capacitance. This study pointed out that junction and grain boundary recombination velocities play an ...

  9. Thermochemical pretreatment of underutilized woody biomass for manufacturing wood composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pelaez Samaniego, Manuel Raul

    Prescribed fires, one method for reducing hazardous fuel loads from forest lands in the US, are limited by geographical, environmental, and social impacts. Mechanical operations are an alternative type of fuel treatment but these processes are constrained by the difficulty of economically harvesting and/or using large amounts of low-value woody biomass. Adoption and integration of new technologies into existing wood composite facilities offer better utilization of this material. A pretreatment that enables integration of technologies in a typical composite facility will aid with diversification of product portfolio (e.g. wood composites, fuel pellets, liquid fuels, chemicals). Hot water extraction (HWE) is an option for wood pretreatment. This work provides a fundamental understanding of the physicochemical changes to wood resulting from HWE, and how these changes impact processing and performance of composites. Specific objectives were to: 1) review literature on studies related to the manufacture of composites produced with thermally pretreated wood, 2) manufacture wood plastic composites (WPC) and particleboard using HWE wood and evaluate the impacts of pretreatment on product properties, 3) develop an understanding of the effect of HWE on lignin properties, specifically lignin at the cells surface level after migration from cell walls and middle lamella, 4) discern the influence of lignin on the fiber surface on processing WPCs, and, 5) investigate the effect of changing the pretreatment environment (inert gas instead of water) on lignin behavior. Results show that HWE enhances the resistance of both WPCs and particleboard to water with positive or no effect on mechanical properties. Reduction of hemicelluloses and lignin property changes are suggested as the main reasons for enhancing interaction between wood fiber and resins during composite processing. Lignin on the surface of particles after HWE interacts with thermoplastics during WPCs compounding, thus

  10. FINE GRAIN NUCLEAR EMULSION

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliver, A.J.

    1962-04-24

    A method of preparing nuclear track emulsions having mean grain sizes less than 0.1 microns is described. The method comprises adding silver nitrate to potassium bromide at a rate at which there is always a constant, critical excess of silver ions. For minimum size grains, the silver ion concentration is maintained at the critical level of about pAg 2.0 to 5.0 during prectpitation, pAg being defined as the negative logarithm of the silver ion concentration. It is preferred to eliminate the excess silver at the conclusion of the precipitation steps. The emulsion is processed by methods in all other respects generally similar to the methods of the prior art. (AEC)

  11. Fire mosaics and reptile conservation in a fire-prone region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nimmo, D G; Kelly, L T; Spence-Bailey, L M; Watson, S J; Taylor, R S; Clarke, M F; Bennett, A F

    2013-04-01

    Fire influences the distribution of fauna in terrestrial biomes throughout the world. Use of fire to achieve a mosaic of vegetation in different stages of succession after burning (i.e., patch-mosaic burning) is a dominant conservation practice in many regions. Despite this, knowledge of how the spatial attributes of vegetation mosaics created by fire affect fauna is extremely scarce, and it is unclear what kind of mosaic land managers should aim to achieve. We selected 28 landscapes (each 12.6 km(2) ) that varied in the spatial extent and diversity of vegetation succession after fire in a 104,000 km(2) area in the semiarid region of southeastern Australia. We surveyed for reptiles at 280 sites nested within the 28 landscapes. The landscape-level occurrence of 9 of the 22 species modeled was associated with the spatial extent of vegetation age classes created by fire. Biogeographic context and the extent of a vegetation type influenced 7 and 4 species, respectively. No species were associated with the diversity of vegetation ages within a landscape. Negative relations between reptile occurrence and both extent of recently burned vegetation (≤10 years postfire, n = 6) and long unburned vegetation (>35 years postfire, n = 4) suggested that a coarse-grained mosaic of areas (e.g. >1000 ha) of midsuccessional vegetation (11-35 years postfire) may support the fire-sensitive reptile species we modeled. This age class coincides with a peak in spinifex cover, a keystone structure for reptiles in semiarid and arid Australia. Maintaining over the long term a coarse-grained mosaic of large areas of midsuccessional vegetation in mallee ecosystems will need to be balanced against the short-term negative effects of large fires on many reptile species and a documented preference by species from other taxonomic groups, particularly birds, for older vegetation. © 2012 Society for Conservation Biology.

  12. Penetration of urea-formaldehyde adhesives in wood tissue, part I: Radial penetration of UF adhesives into beech

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gavrilović-Grmuša Ivana

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Adhesive penetration plays an important role in wood adhesion, since wood is a porous material. The degree of penetration mostly depends on the wood factors, resin type and formulation and processing parameters. Tangentially cut 5 mm thick beech wood (Fagus moesiaca plies, 100 mm long (parallel to grain and 30 mm wide, were prepared for this study. The urea-formaldehyde (UF adhesive was applied to the surface of one ply. Two plies were assembled into sample so that the grains of two plies were parallel. Samples were pressed in a hydraulic press at 120°C and 0,7 MPa for 15 min. Microtome test-specimens were cut of each sample. 20 μm thick microtomes were cut by sliding microtome apparatus, exposing a bondline with a cross-sectional surface. The lack of more exhausting research on the penetration of urea-formaldehyde adhesives in wood is evident. Since ureaformaldehyde (UF glue resins were the most important type of adhesives in the wood industry in the last 60 years (Dunky, 2000, the objective of this research was microscopic detection of UF adhesive penetration in wood tissue. Four types of UF resins with different levels of polycondensation were used in this research. Safranin was added in resins, since epi-fluorescence microscope was used in this research for measuring the adhesive penetration.

  13. RECYCLING RECOVERED WOOD-BASED MATERIALS. FLATNESS, MOR AND MOE OF PANELS MADE FROM RECOVERED WOODEN BASED MATERIALS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea DEÁK

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The objective of the research was to study the mechanical properties of recovered solid wood and wood-based materials, to create new panels made of strips of recovered oak and spruce wood, particleboards and blockboards and to study their mechanical properties, feasibility and use. Flatness, MOR and MOE were determined for the solid wood and wood-based materials recovered from construction and demolition sites. Four types of experimental panels (PL1, PL2, PALL1 and PALL2 were manufactured from solid wood strips alternating with either particleboard or blockboard strips glued edge to edge. Some of their physical and mechanical properties were investigated. All new panels made from recovered materials fell within allowable limits specified in European standard requirements for panel flatness. Panels type PL2, PALL1 and PALL2 show better values for MoR and MoE parallel to the grain when compared to the respective values for the recovered wood-based materials of which they are made, but panels type PL1 show no change. Panels type PALL2 are preferable to panels type PALL1 due to better mechanical properties. Panels type PL1 and PL2 show no such differences in their structure. The results also show that these new panels can be used successfully in furniture production, provided panels type PL1, PL2 ad PALL1 do not bear loads perpendicular to the grain or receive reinforcing elements.

  14. Experimental investigation and mathematical modelling of wood combustion in a moving grate boiler

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Xiaohui; Chen, Qun; Sharifi, Vida; Swithenbank, Jim [SUWIC, Department of Chemical and Process Engineering, Sheffield University, Sheffield (United Kingdom); Bradford, Richard [Barnsley Metropolitan Borough Council, Barnsley (United Kingdom)

    2010-11-15

    The use of biomass to generate energy offers significant environmental advantages for the reduction in emissions of greenhouse gases. The main objective of this study was to investigate the performance of a small scale biomass heating plant: i.e. combustion characteristics and emissions. An extensive series of experimental tests was carried out at a small scale residential biomass heating plant i.e. wood chip fired boiler. The concentrations of CO, NO{sub x}, particulate matter in the flue gas were measured. In addition, mathematical modelling work using FLIC and FLUENT codes was carried out in order to simulate the overall performance of the wood fired heating system. Results showed that pollutant emissions from the boiler were within the relative emission limits. Mass concentration of CO emission was 550-1600 mg/m{sup 3} (10% O{sub 2}). NO{sub x} concentration in the flue gas from the wood chips combustion varied slightly between 28 and 60 ppmv. Mass concentration of PM{sub 10} in the flue gas was 205 mg/m{sup 3} (10% O{sub 2}) The modelling results showed that most of the fuel was burnt inside the furnace and little CO was released from the system due to the high flue gas temperature in the furnace. The injection of the secondary air provided adequate mixing and favourable combustion conditions in the over-bed chamber in the wood chips fired boiler. This study has shown that the use of wood heating system result in much lower CO{sub 2} emissions than from a fossil fuel e.g. coal fired heating system. (author)

  15. Grain alcohol study: summary

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    The study has concentrated upon a detailed examination of all considerations involved in the production, use, and marketing of ethyl alcohol (ethanol) as produced from the fermentation of agricultural grains. Each parameter was examined in the light of current energy markets and trends; new sources and technological, and processes for fermentation, the capability of the agricultural industry to support fermentation demand; the optimizaton of value of agricultural crops; and the efficiencies of combining related industries. Ahydrous (200 proof) ethanol makes an excellent blending component for all present automotive fuels and an excellent octane additive for unleaded fuels in proportions up to 35% without requiring modifications to current engines. There is no difference between ethanol produced by fermentation and ethanol produced synthetically from petroleum. The decision to produce ethanol one way or the other is purely economic. The agricultural industry can support a major expansion in the fermentation industry. The residue (distillers grains) from the fermentation of corn for ethanol is an excellent and economical feed for livestock and poultry. A reliable supply of distillers grain can assist in making the large beef feedlot operations more economically viable. The source materials, fuels, products and by-products of an ethanol plant, beef feedlot, gas biodigester plant, municipal waste recovery plant and a steam generated electrical plant are interrelated and mutually beneficial for energy efficiencies and economic gains when co-located. The study concludes that the establishment of such agricultural- environment industrial energy complexes, would provide a broad range of significant benefits to Indiana.

  16. Grain alcohol study: summary

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    The study has concentrated upon a detailed examination of all considerations involved in the production, use, and marketing of ethyl alcohol (Ethanol) as produced from the fermentation of agricultural grains. Each parameter was examined in the light of current energy markets and trends; new sources and technological, and processes for fermentation, the capability of the agricultural industry to support fermentaton demand; the optimization of value of agricultureal crops; and the efficiencies of combining related industries. Anhydrous (200 proof) ethanol makes an excellent blending component for all present automotive fuels and an excellent octane additive for unleaded fuels in proportions up to 35% without requiring modifications to current engines. There is no difference between ethanol produced by fermentation and ethanol produced synthetically from petroleum. The decision to produce ethanol one way or the other is purely economic. The agricultural industry can support a major expansion in the fermentation industry. The residue (distillers grains) from the fermentation of corn for ethanol is an excellent and economical feed for livestock and poultry. A reliable supply of distillers grains can assist in making the large beef feedlot operations more economically viable. The source materials, fuels, products and by-products of an ethanol plant, beef feedlot, gas biodigester plant, municipal waste recovery plant and a steam generated electrical plant are interrelated and mutually beneficial for energy efficiencies and economic gains when co-located. The study concludes that the establishment of such agricultural-environment industrial energy complexes, would provide a broad range of significant benefits to Indiana.

  17. Performance of different fire retardant products applied on Norway spruce tested in a Cone calorimeter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kögl Josef

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available On the European market there are several fire retardant products available, which reach class B in the European classification system. The producers promise their fire retardants are effective in reducing different reaction to fire parameters of wood such as the time to ignition, the mass loss rate, the heat release rate, the total heat release, the charring rate and the flame spread. This paper discusses the performance of fire retardant products as pressure impregnated wood, non-intumescence surface coatings and intumescence coatings on Norway spruce (Picea abies. The investigations are performed by using a cone calo- rimeter test according to ISO 5660. The thermal exposures of the investigations are 50 kW/m2 and the standard IS0 834 test curve. As result information about the heat release rate, the mass loss rate and the total heat release for duration of 900 seconds will be presented in this paper.

  18. Non_standard Wood

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tamke, Martin

    . Using parametric design tools and computer controlled production facilities Copenhagens Centre for IT and Architecture undertook a practice based research into performance based non-standard element design and mass customization techniques. In close cooperation with wood construction software......Non-Standard elements in architecture bear the promise of a better more specific performance (Oosterhuis 2003). A new understanding of design evolves, which is focusing on open ended approaches, able to negotiate between shifting requirements and to integrate knowledge on process and material......- and machine industry we fabricated a 1:1 demonstrator show casing the potential for performance due to digital fabrication in this sustainable material. The production of a custom made design tool helped not only to explore design variations while keeping up the link to digital production machinery...

  19. Cooling of wood briquettes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adžić Miroljub M.

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper is concerned with the experimental research of surface temperature of wood briquettes during cooling phase along the cooling line. The cooling phase is an important part of the briquette production technology. It should be performed with care, otherwise the quality of briquettes could deteriorate and possible changes of combustion characteristics of briquettes could happen. The briquette surface temperature was measured with an IR camera and a surface temperature probe at 42 sections. It was found that the temperature of briquette surface dropped from 68 to 34°C after 7 minutes spent at the cooling line. The temperature at the center of briquette, during the 6 hour storage, decreased to 38°C.

  20. Progress report on grain boundaries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balluffi, R. W.; Bristowe, P. D.

    1989-06-01

    The research was focused on the following three major areas: (1) study of the atomic structure of grain boundaries by means of X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy and computer modeling; (2) study of grain boundary phase transitions by electron microscopy and computer modeling; (3) investigation of the mechanism of high angle grain boundary migration. Results are briefly discussed.

  1. Progress report on grain boundaries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Balluffi, R.W.; Bristowe, P.D.

    1989-06-01

    The research was focused on the following three major areas: (1) study of the atomic structure of grain boundaries by means of x-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy and computer modeling; (2) study of grain boundary phase transitions by electron microscopy and computer modeling; (3) investigation of the mechanism of high angle grain boundary migration. Results are briefly discussed. 20 refs.

  2. EFFECT OF REMOVING OLEORESIN WITH VARIOUS CHEMICAL COMPOUNDS ON PHYSICAL AND MECHANICAL PROPERTIES OF KERUING WOOD (DIPTEROCARPUS SPP.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bambang Wiyono

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Keruing  (Dipterocarpus spp.  was  the  second  important  wood  export of   Indonesia. Unfortunately, this wood contains oleoresin that hinders its utilization. Currently, the method used to remove oleoresin from keruing is by soaking it into bollied sodium salt solution. Result of  this method is unsatisfactory because the residual heavy oleoresin might still appear on the wood surface. The study was conducted to determine suitable chemical compounds for removing oleoresin from keruing, and the effects on physical and mechanical properties of the wood. Four types of chemical compounds were tested, i.e. sodium chloride, oxalic acid, sulfuric acid, and nitric acid, each at the concentrations of  0.5 percent, 1.0 percent, and 1.5 percent. Wood samples were soaked in the boiling solution at different concentration level for seven hours. When the solution cooled down, the oleoresin exudated out of  the wood samples was separated. The oleoresin was weighed for recovery determination after air dried, and the wood samples were cut into smaller-sized specimens for the physical and mechanical testing (MOE, MOR, compression parallel to grain, hardness and density. Results showed that sulfuric acid was the best chemical compound for removing oleoresin, and the higher the concentration the greater the oleoresin recovery. The second best chemical compound was nitric acid at an optimum concentration of one percent. The soaking of keruing in sulfuric acid and oxalic acid solution resulted in paler wood color compare with the untreated wood sample. Nitric acid solutions caused the color of the wood surface to turn into yellow brownish. The physical and mechanical properties (MOE, MOR, compression parallel to grain, hardness and density of the oleoresin-removed keruing were slightly lower than the untreated (control samples.

  3. Treatments that enhance physical properties of wood

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roger M. Rowell; Peggy Konkol

    1987-01-01

    This paper was prepared for anyone who wants to know more about enhancing wood’s physical properties, from the amateur wood carver to the president of a forest products company. The authors describe chemical and physical treatments of wood that enhance the strength, stiffness, water repellency, and stability of wood. Five types of treatments are described: 1. water-...

  4. Physical properties and moisture relations of wood

    Science.gov (United States)

    William Simpson; Anton TenWolde

    1999-01-01

    The versatility of wood is demonstrated by a wide variety of products. This variety is a result of a spectrum of desirable physical characteristics or properties among the many species of wood. In many cases, more than one property of wood is important to the end product. For example, to select a wood species for a product, the value of appearance- type properties,...

  5. Moisture relations and physical properties of wood

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samuel V. Glass; Samuel L. Zelinka

    2010-01-01

    Wood, like many natural materials, is hygroscopic; it takes on moisture from the surrounding environment. Moisture exchange between wood and air depends on the relative humidity and temperature of the air and the current amount of water in the wood. This moisture relationship has an important influence on wood properties and performance. Many of the challenges of using...

  6. The challenge of bonding treated wood

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charles R. Frihart

    2004-01-01

    Wood products are quite durable if exposure to moisture is minimized; however, most uses of wood involve considerable exposure to moisture. To preserve the wood, chemicals are used to minimize moisture pickup, to prevent insect attack, and/or to resist microbial growth. The chemicals used as preservatives can interfere with adhesive bonds to wood. Given the many...

  7. Wood Flour Moulding Technology: Implications for Technical ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    User

    2011-04-19

    Apr 19, 2011 ... Collect wood flour or chips from the lathe or table saw or vertical sander from other machines that produce the desired wood particles/ sawdust. If it is possible grind appropriate dry wood for use. Note: Wood flour or chips from cherry, maple (temperate trees) mahogany, teak and walnut (ekom in Ibibio ...

  8. Wood Technology: Techniques, Processes, and Products

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oatman, Olan

    1975-01-01

    Seven areas of wood technology illustrates applicable techniques, processes, and products for an industrial arts woodworking curriculum. They are: wood lamination; PEG (polyethylene glycol) diffusion processes; wood flour and/or particle molding; production product of industry; WPC (wood-plastic-composition) process; residential construction; and…

  9. The Carbon Impacts of Wood Products

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richard Bergman; Maureen Puettmann; Adam Taylor; Kenneth E. Skog

    2014-01-01

    Wood products have many environmental advantages over nonwood alternatives. Documenting and publicizing these merits helps the future competitiveness of wood when climate change impacts are being considered. The manufacture of wood products requires less fossil fuel than nonwood alternative building materials such as concrete, metals, or plastics. By nature, wood is...

  10. Bioprocessing preservative-treated waste wood

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbara L. Illman; Vina W. Yang; Les. Ferge

    2000-01-01

    Disposal of preservative-treated waste wood is a growing problem worldwide. Bioprocessing the treated wood offers one approach to waste management under certain conditions. One goal is to use wood decay fungi to reduce the volume of waste with an easily managed system in a cost-effective manner. Wood decay fungi were obtained from culture collections in the Mycology...

  11. Oxalate analysis methodology for decayed wood

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carol A. Clausen; William Kenealy; Patricia K. Lebow

    2008-01-01

    Oxalate from partially decayed southern pine wood was analyzed by HPLC or colorimetric assay. Oxalate extraction efficiency, assessed by comparing analysis of whole wood cubes with ground wood, showed that both wood geometries could be extracted with comparable efficiency. To differentiate soluble oxalate from total oxalate, three extraction methods were assessed,...

  12. Potential wood protection strategies using physiological requirements of wood degrading fungi

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sailer, M.F.; Etten, B.D. van

    2004-01-01

    Due to the increasing restrictions in the use of wood preserving biocides a number of potential biocide free wood preserving alternatives are currently assessed. Wood degrading fungi require certain conditions in the wood in order to be able to use wood as a food source. This paper discusses the

  13. A review of fire interactions and mass fires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mark A. Finney; Sara S. McAllister

    2011-01-01

    The character of a wildland fire can change dramatically in the presence of another nearby fire. Understanding and predicting the changes in behavior due to fire-fire interactions cannot only be life-saving to those on the ground, but also be used to better control a prescribed fire to meet objectives. In discontinuous fuel types, such interactions may elicit fire...

  14. Wood Scrap Project. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beachy, D.

    1983-01-01

    This study investigated Utah's sawmill residue, logging residue and pinyon-juniper resource for use as an energy resource to replace supplement conventional fuels now in use. This was accomplished by analyzing existing and future supplies of wood suitable for energy use on a renewable basis and the cost effectiveness of using wood as compared to coal, natural gas, and propane. The promotion of the use and development of wood as a renewable resource to reduce Utah's dependency for selected residential, institutional, commercial, and industrial markets for conventional non-renewable forms of energy is also considered. 84 references, 21 figures, 32 tables.

  15. USANS study of wood structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garvey, Christopher J. [Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation, PMB 1, Menai, NSW 2234 (Australia)]. E-mail: Chris.Garvey@ansto.gov.au; Knott, Robert B. [Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation, PMB 1, Menai, NSW 2234 (Australia); Searson, Matthew [Centre for Horticulture and Plant Sciences, Hawkesbury Campus, University of Western Sydney (Australia); Conroy, Jann P. [Centre for Horticulture and Plant Sciences, Hawkesbury Campus, University of Western Sydney (Australia)

    2006-11-15

    Wood performs a vascular and structural function in trees. In this study we used the double-crystal diffractometer BT5 at the NIST Center for Neutron Scattering (Gaithersburg, USA) to study the pore structure inside wood sections. The slit-smeared intensity of scattered neutrons was measured from wood sections in directions parallel, orthogonal and transverse to the tree's trunk axis over a scattering vector range 0.00004-0.002 A{sup -1}. The interpretation of the data in terms of a reductionist model consisting of infinitely long cylinders (cell lumens) is discussed.

  16. Special Grain Boundaries in Ultrafine-Grained Tungsten

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dudka, O. V.; Ksenofontov, V. A.; Sadanov, E. V.; Starchenko, I. V.; Mazilova, T. I.; Mikhailovskij, I. M.

    2016-07-01

    Field ion microscopy and computer simulation were used for the study of an atomic structure high-angle grain boundary in hard-drawn ultrafine-grained tungsten wire. These boundaries with special misorientations are beyond the scope of the coincident site lattice model. It was demonstrated that the special non-coincident grain boundaries are the plane-matching boundaries, and rigid-body displacements of adjacent nanograins are normal to the misorientation axis. The vectors of rigid-body translations of grains are described by broad asymmetric statistical distribution. Mathematical modeling showed that special incommensurate boundaries with one grain oriented along the {211} plane have comparatively high cohesive energies. The grain-boundary dislocations ½ were revealed and studied at the line of local mismatch of {110} atomic planes of adjacent grains.

  17. A 6 year longitudinal study of post-fire woody carbon dynamics in California's forests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bianca N.I. Eskelson; Vicente J. Monleon; Jeremy S. Fried

    2016-01-01

    We examined the dynamics of aboveground forest woody carbon pools — live trees, standing dead trees, and down wood—during the first 6 years following wildfire across a wide range of conditions, which are characteristic of California forest fires. From repeated measurements of the same plots, we estimated change in woody carbon pools as a function of crown fire severity...

  18. United States Fire Administration

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... about our courses and how to apply Publication Electronic cigarette fires and explosions in the United States ... unique hazard to users. 62 percent of the electronic cigarette explosion and fire incidents reviewed in this ...

  19. Fire Stations - 2009

    Data.gov (United States)

    Kansas Data Access and Support Center — Fire Stations in Kansas Any location where fire fighters are stationed or based out of, or where equipment that such personnel use in carrying out their jobs is...

  20. Tunnel fire dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Ingason, Haukur; Lönnermark, Anders

    2015-01-01

    This book covers a wide range of issues in fire safety engineering in tunnels, describes the phenomena related to tunnel fire dynamics, presents state-of-the-art research, and gives detailed solutions to these major issues. Examples for calculations are provided. The aim is to significantly improve the understanding of fire safety engineering in tunnels. Chapters on fuel and ventilation control, combustion products, gas temperatures, heat fluxes, smoke stratification, visibility, tenability, design fire curves, heat release, fire suppression and detection, CFD modeling, and scaling techniques all equip readers to create their own fire safety plans for tunnels. This book should be purchased by any engineer or public official with responsibility for tunnels. It would also be of interest to many fire protection engineers as an application of evolving technical principles of fire safety.

  1. Fires and Food Safety

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Standard Forms FSIS United States Department of Agriculture Food Safety and Inspection Service About FSIS District Offices Careers ... Viewer (JSR 286) Actions ${title} Loading... Fires and Food Safety Fire! Few words can strike such terror. Residential ...

  2. Fire Stations - 2007

    Data.gov (United States)

    Kansas Data Access and Support Center — Fire Station Locations in Kansas Any location where fire fighters are stationed at or based out of, or where equipment that such personnel use in carrying out their...

  3. Filosofiens historiografi: Fire genrer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rorty, Richard

    2007-01-01

    Oversættelse af Richard Rortys artikel "Filosofiens historiografi: Fire genrer" Udgivelsesdato: 26 Oktober......Oversættelse af Richard Rortys artikel "Filosofiens historiografi: Fire genrer" Udgivelsesdato: 26 Oktober...

  4. National Fire Protection Association

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... or closed List of NFPA codes & standards National Fire Codes® Subscription Service NEC® Online Subscription Free online ... Toggle this sub-menu open or closed The fire risk of exterior walls containing combustible components Resources ...

  5. Seerley Road Fire Site

    Science.gov (United States)

    A barn caught fire at on Seerley Road, Indianapolis. Five storage drums believed to contain metallic potassium were involved in the fire. EPA will perform additional sampling as part of removal operations and safe offsite transportation.

  6. The role of fire in deep time ecosystems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Andrew C.; Bond, William J.; Collinson, Margaret E.; Glasspool, Ian J.; Brown, Sarah; Braman, Dennis R.

    2010-05-01

    Fires are very widespread in the world today and fire has also been common in the deep past. Fire is important in structuring contemporary World vegetation maintaining extensive open vegetation where the climate has the potential to support closed forests. The influence of fire on the structure of vegetation and plant traits present in a community vary depending on the fire regime. The fire regime is the characteristic pattern of fire frequency, severity (amount of biomass removed) and spatial extent. Fire regimes depend on the synergy between external physical factors and the properties of vegetation. Changes in the fire regime can be brought about by changes in external conditions such as climate, but also by changes in vegetation such as changes in flammability or productivity that influence the amount of fuel. For example, invasion of grasses into closed wooded habitats has initiated a ‘grass fire cycle' in many parts of the world triggering cascading changes in vegetation structure and composition from forest to open grassland or savanna woodland. The spread of flammable invasive species, especially grasses, has even altered fire regimes of fire-dependent flammable communities causing catastrophic ecosystem changes. We suggest that the spread of angiosperms in the Cretaceous was promoted by the development of novel fire regimes linked to the evolution of novel, highly productive (and flammable) plants. Within the limits of physical constraints on fire occurrence, Cretaceous angiosperms would have initiated a positive feedback analogous to the grass-fire cycle rapidly accumulating fuel that promoted more frequent fires, which maintained open habitats in which rapid growth-traits of angiosperms would be most favoured promoting rapid fuel accumulation etc. Frequent fires would have altered vegetation structure and composition both by increasing mortality rates of fire-damaged trees and reducing recruitment rates of seedlings and saplings where fires recurred

  7. FIRE CHARACTERISTICS FOR ADVANCED MODELLING OF FIRES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Otto Dvořák

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper summarizes the material and fire properties of solid flammable/combustible materials /substances /products, which are used as inputs for the computer numerical fire models. At the same time it gives the test standards for their determination.

  8. Corrosion Problems in Incinerators and Biomass-Fuel-Fired Boilers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deepa Mudgal

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Incinerators are widely used to burn the municipal waste, biowaste, wood, straw, and biomedical waste. Combustion of these types of waste results in generation of chlorides of sodium and potassium which may attack the metallic part of the incinerator. In biofuel-fired boilers, similar type of highly corrosive environment is present. Attempt has been made to review the corrosion problems and their solutions as per the available literature.

  9. A world on fire

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robert L. Olson; David N. Bengston

    2015-01-01

    We live in a world on fire. In just the past few years, major wildland fires have struck at least 13 U.S. states, as well as Indonesia, Australia, China, southern Europe, Russia, Canada, Bolivia, and other parts of the world. Wildland fires are increasing in number, size, and intensity. In particular, there has been an increase in large fire events—megafires—that...

  10. Air pollution forecasting by coupled atmosphere-fire model WRF and SFIRE with WRF-Chem

    CERN Document Server

    Kochanski, Adam K; Mandel, Jan; Clements, Craig B

    2013-01-01

    Atmospheric pollution regulations have emerged as a dominant obstacle to prescribed burns. Thus, forecasting the pollution caused by wildland fires has acquired high importance. WRF and SFIRE model wildland fire spread in a two-way interaction with the atmosphere. The surface heat flux from the fire causes strong updrafts, which in turn change the winds and affect the fire spread. Fire emissions, estimated from the burning organic matter, are inserted in every time step into WRF-Chem tracers at the lowest atmospheric layer. The buoyancy caused by the fire then naturally simulates plume dynamics, and the chemical transport in WRF-Chem provides a forecast of the pollution spread. We discuss the choice of wood burning models and compatible chemical transport models in WRF-Chem, and demonstrate the results on case studies.

  11. Life-cycle assessment for power generation from wood fuels and wood wastes; Oekobilanz fuer die Stromerzeugung aus Holzbrennstoffen und Altholz

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jungbluth, N.; Frischknecht, R.; Faist, M.

    2002-07-01

    This reworked final report for the Swiss Federal Office of Energy (SFOE) presents the results of life-cycle assessments made of four wood-fired systems with the goal of analysing the possibilities of labelling such plants with the Swiss eco-label 'Naturemade Star'. In addition to these case studies, three standard technologies were modelled, whereby in two of the models different waste gas filtering methods were considered. In the third model, electricity is produced from waste wood and features an advanced waste gas treatment system. The report describes the various plants and draws up eco-balances for them. Pollution emissions, such as dust, oxides of nitrogen and sulphur dioxide, are discussed and plant operation and assessment are looked at. Certification to 'Naturemade Star' standards is checked out for the case-study plant examples and for the standard plant proposed. A further eco-balance is drawn up for wood-fired power generation with impact allocated to heat and power generation based on exergy content. An appendix provides details on the physical parameters of wood and on the methods used for impact assessment.

  12. Fire and forest meteorology

    Science.gov (United States)

    SA Ferguson; T.J. Brown; M. Flannigan

    2005-01-01

    The American Meteorological Society symposia series on Fire and Forest Meteorology provides biennial forums for atmospheric and fire scientists to introduce and discuss the latest and most relevant research on weather, climate and fire. This special issue highlights significant work that was presented at the Fifth Symposium in Orlando, Florida during 16-20 November...

  13. Fire Safety Fundamentals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, Ken

    2004-01-01

    Planning and prevention is the best defense against fires in school. This is particularly true in the science laboratory due to the presence of flammable gases, liquids, combustibles, and other potential sources of fire. Teachers can prevent fires from starting by maintaining prudent lab practices when dealing with combustible and flammable…

  14. Fire as Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudolph, Robert N.

    2011-01-01

    In this article, the author describes a project that deals with fire production as an aspect of technology. The project challenges students to be survivors in a five-day classroom activity. Students research various materials and methods to produce fire without the use of matches or other modern combustion devices, then must create "fire" to keep…

  15. Forest fires in Missouri.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donald A. Haines; William A. Main; John S. Crosby

    1973-01-01

    Describes factors that contribute to forest fires on two of the State of Missouri's Protection Districts and the Clark National Forest. Includes an analysis of fire cause, annual distribution, weather, and activity by day of week; also discusses multiple-fire day.

  16. Autonomous Forest Fire Detection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Breejen, E. den; Breuers, M.; Cremer, F.; Kemp, R.A.W.; Roos, M.; Schutte, K.; Vries, J.S. de

    1998-01-01

    Forest fire detection is a very important issue in the pre-suppression process. Timely detection allows the suppression units to reach the fire in its initial stages and this will reduce the suppression costs considerably. The autonomous forest fire detection principle is based on temporal contrast

  17. Fire Department Emergency Response

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blanchard, A. [Westinghouse Savannah River Company, AIKEN, SC (United States); Bell, K.; Kelly, J.; Hudson, J.

    1997-09-01

    In 1995 the SRS Fire Department published the initial Operations Basis Document (OBD). This document was one of the first of its kind in the DOE complex and was widely distributed and reviewed. This plan described a multi-mission Fire Department which provided fire, emergency medical, hazardous material spill, and technical rescue services.

  18. Cellular aspects of wood formation

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Fromm, Jörg

    2013-01-01

    With today's ever growing economic and ecological problems, wood as a raw material takes on increasing significance as the most important renewable source of energy and as industrial feedstock for numerous products...

  19. On Erdos–Wood's conjecture

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Woods conjecture with = 2 is at least /(log ) for some positive constant > 2. ... Institute of Mathematical Sciences, C.I.T. Campus, 4th Cross Street, Taramani, Chennai 600 113, India; Harish-Chandra Research Institute, Chhatnag Road, ...

  20. Wood-pastures of Europe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Plieninger, Tobias; Hartel, Tibor; Martín-López, Berta

    2015-01-01

    Wood-pastures are archetypes of High Nature Value Farmlands in Europe and hold exceptional ecological, social, and cultural values. Yet, wood-pastures have been through a sharp decline all over Europe, mainly due to processes of agricultural intensification and abandonment. Recently, wood......-pastures have found increasing attention from conservation science and policy across Europe. In this paper we (i) perform the first pan-European assessment of wood-pastures, considering individual countries and biogeographic regions, (ii) present the ecological and social-cultural values of a wide diversity......). They are distributed across all biogeographical regions, but more abundantly in the Mediterranean and Eastern European countries. Substantial ecological values are revealed in terms of landscape level biodiversity, ecosystem dynamics, and genetic resources. Social-cultural values are related to aesthetic values...

  1. Wood and Paper Manufacturing Sectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Find EPA regulatory information for the wood product and paper manufacturing sectors, including paper, pulp and lumber. Information includes NESHAPs and effluent guidelines for pulp and paper rulemaking, and compliance guidelines

  2. Fire performance of oriented strandboard

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robert H. White; Jerrold E. Winandy

    2006-01-01

    Wood-based composites represent a continuously increasing share of the wood products market. Commercial construction will be important for future expansion of the structural panels market. Use of engineered wood products as an alternative to traditional solid wood lumber is also increasing. A recent series of cone calorimeter tests evaluated the performance of several...

  3. Wood siding : installing, finishing, maintaining

    Science.gov (United States)

    W.C. Feist; A.E. Oviatt

    1983-01-01

    Wood siding is put on houses for many good reasons. One reason is that it will keep the bright new “face” of any home attractive for many years to come. In fact, given reasonable care, wood siding will retain its beauty for centuries, as has been amply proved by its performance on houses that date back to early colonial times. It also has great versatility; and the...

  4. EVOLUTION OF LIGHTWEIGHT WOOD COMPOSITES

    OpenAIRE

    Marius C. BARBU

    2016-01-01

    Lightweight boards and beams in the wood-based construction and furniture industry are not a new topic. The density reduction of panels using sandwich structure with light cores was confirmed by users like doors or mobile homes more than three decades ago. Today many ways to attain a lighter wooden structure are on offer, partially in industrial application. The first one is the use of light-weight wood species like balsa, lime, pine from southern hemisphere plantations etc. limit...

  5. Energy release from pit fires for producing a fire model. Natural-scale analysis of energy release from pit fires for the purpose of establishing a fire model. Final report; Energiefreisetzung von Grubenbraenden zur Erstellung eines Brandmodell. Untersuchung ueber die Energiefreisetzung von Grubenbraenden im natuerlichen Massstab zur Erstellung eines Brandmodells. Schlussbericht

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holke, K.; Michelis, J.

    1996-12-31

    In the context of the research project, measurements were made regarding the energy release in pit fires. The heat flow in fires with standard wood fire objects and in fires on conveyor belts in underground fire sections of the DMT Tremonia experimental pit was measured for this purpose. It was found that the distribution of the mean total heat flow in the roadway crossection depended on the geometric arrangement of the fire object. The belt fire tests carried out have shown that the heat flow depended on the burning behaviour of the belts and with increasing flame propagation on the conveyor belt, the mean heat flow increased. Further, the temperature effects after wood and conveyor belt fires were simulated with the modified `MFIRE` simulation program and were compared with the corresponding experimental results. (orig./MSK) [Deutsch] Im Rahmen des Untersuchungsvorhabens wurden Messungen bezueglich der Energiefreisetzung bei Grubenbraenden durchgefuehrt. Hierzu wurde der Waermefluss bei Braenden mit Standardholzbrandobjekten und bei Foerdergurtbraenden in den untertaegigen Brandstrecken der DMT-Versuchsgrube Tremonia gemessen. Es zeigte sich, dass die Verteilung des mittleren Gesamtwaermeflusses im Streckenquerschnitt von der geometrischen Anordnung des Brandobjektes abhing. Die durchgefuehrten Gurtbrandversuche haben ergeben, dass der Waermefluss vom Brandverhalten der Gurte abhing und mit zunehmender Flammenausbreitung am Foerdergurt der mittlere Waermefluss zunahm. Weiterhin wurden mit dem modifizierten Simulationsprogramm `MFIRE` die Temperaturauswirkungen hinter Holz- und Foerdergurtbraenden simuliert und mit den entsprechenden experimentellen Ergebnissen verglichen. (orig./MSK)

  6. A Review of Fire Interactions and Mass Fires

    OpenAIRE

    Finney, Mark A.; McAllister, Sara S.

    2011-01-01

    The character of a wildland fire can change dramatically in the presence of another nearby fire. Understanding and predicting the changes in behavior due to fire-fire interactions cannot only be life-saving to those on the ground, but also be used to better control a prescribed fire to meet objectives. In discontinuous fuel types, such interactions may elicit fire spread where none otherwise existed. Fire-fire interactions occur naturally when spot fires start ahead of the main fire and when...

  7. Alternative grains in nutrition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jevcsák Sz.

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Many people suffer from gluten sensitivity or gluten intolerance. They have to avoid or limit their gluten intake. Sorghum and millet are gluten-free cereals, wherefore persons with gluten sensitivity or gluten intolerance could consume them. Moreover, they have a lot of positive effects due to their phenolic compounds as phenol acid or flavonoid. Antioxidant activity in sorghum is especially high in comparison with other cereals. Our aim was to compare literature data about the chemical compositions of sorghum and millet with other grains.

  8. Evolution of Interstellar Grains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allamandola, Lou J.; DeVincenzi, Donald L. (Technical Monitor)

    1998-01-01

    During the past two decades observations combined with laboratory simulations, have revolutionized our understanding of interstellar ice and dust, the raw materials from which planets, comets and stars form. Most interstellar material is concentrated in large molecular clouds where simple molecules are formed by dust-grain and gas-phase reactions. Gaseous species striking the cold (10K) dust stick, forming an icy grain mantle. This accretion, coupled with UV photolysis, produces a complex chemical mixture containing volatile, non-volatile, and isotopically fractionated species. Ices in molecular clouds contain the very simple molecules H2O, CH3OH, CO, CO2, H2, and perhaps some NH3 and H2CO, as well as more complex species. The evidence for these compounds, as well as carbon-rich materials, will be reviewed and the possible connections with comets and meteorites will be presented in the first part of the talk . The second part of the presentation will focus on interstellar/precometary ice photochemical evolution and the species likely to be found in comets. The chemical composition and photochemical evolution of realistic interstellar/pre-cometary ice analogs will be discussed. Ultraviolet photolysis of these ices produces H2, H2CO, CO2, CO, CH4, HCO, and more complex molecules. When ices representative of interstellar grains and comets are exposed to UV radiation at low temperature a series of moderately complex organic molecules are formed in the ice including: CH3CH2OH (ethanol), HC(=O)NH2 (formamide), CH3C(=O)NH2 (acetamide), and R-C=N (nitriles). Several of these are already known to be in the interstellar medium, and their presence indicates the importance of grain processing. After warming to room temperature an organic residue remains. This is composed primarily of hexamethylenetetramine (HMT, C6H12N4), with lesser amounts of polyoxymethylene-related species (POMs), amides, and ketones. This is in sharp contrast to the organic residues produced by

  9. Flammability properties and radiant fraction of FRT wood plastic composites using mass loss calorimeter under HRR hood

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mark A. Dietenberger; Charles R. Boardman; Nicole Stark

    2017-01-01

    A special test arrangement was used to assess the flammability of 4 different wood plastic composites (WPC), most with fire retardants, all of which has a tendency to high smoke production leading to high radiant energy losses to the apparatus walls. The mass loss calorimeter (MLC) was modified to include a thermopile on the exhaust pipe stack to compensate for radiant...

  10. Comparison of the Heat Release Rate from the Mass Loss Calorimeter to the Cone Calorimeter for Wood-based Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laura E. Hasburgh; Robert H. White; Mark A. Dietenberger; Charles R. Boardman

    2015-01-01

    There is a growing demand for material properties to be used as inputs in fi re behavior models designed to address building fire safety. This comparative study evaluates using the mass loss calorimeter as an alternative to the cone calorimeter for obtaining heat release rates of wood-based materials. For this study, a modified mass loss calorimeter utilized an...

  11. Life cycle environmental impacts of different construction wood waste and wood packaging waste processing methods

    OpenAIRE

    Manninen, Kaisa; Judl, Jáchym; Myllymaa, Tuuli

    2016-01-01

    This study compared the life cycle environmental impacts of different wood waste processing methods in three impact categories: climate impact, acidification impacts and eutrophication impacts. The wood waste recovery methods examined were the use of wood waste in terrace boards made out of wood composite which replace impregnated terrace boards, incineration of wood waste in a multi-fuel boiler instead of peat and the use of wood waste in the production of particleboard in either Finland or ...

  12. Fire Protection Program Manual

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sharry, J A

    2012-05-18

    This manual documents the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) Fire Protection Program. Department of Energy (DOE) Orders 420.1B, Facility Safety, requires LLNL to have a comprehensive and effective fire protection program that protects LLNL personnel and property, the public and the environment. The manual provides LLNL and its facilities with general information and guidance for meeting DOE 420.1B requirements. The recommended readers for this manual are: fire protection officers, fire protection engineers, fire fighters, facility managers, directorage assurance managers, facility coordinators, and ES and H team members.

  13. Fire retardant formulations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2017-01-01

    The present invention relates to compositions where a substrate is liable to catch fire such as bituminous products, paints, carpets or the like. The invention relates to a composition comprising 40-95 weight % of a substrate to be rendered fire resistant such as bituminous material or paint......, carpets which substrate is mixed with 5-60 weight % of a fire retardant component. The invention relates to a fire retardant component comprising or being constituted of attapulgite, and a salt being a source of a blowing or expanding agent, where the attapulgite and the salt are electrostatically...... connected by mixing and subjecting the mixture of the two components to agitation. Also, the invention relates to compositions comprising 40-95 weight % of a substrate to be rendered fire resistant mixed with 5-60 weight % of a fire retardant according to claim 1 or 2, which fire retardant component...

  14. The improved Global Fire Emissions Database (GFED) version 3: contribution of savanna, forest, deforestation, and peat fires to the global fire emissions budget

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Werf, Guido; Randerson, Jim; Giglio, Louis; Collatz, Jim; Kasibhatla, Prasad; Morton, Doug; Defries, Ruth

    2010-05-01

    Global fire activity is an important contributor to the atmospheric trace gas and aerosol burdens. New burned area datasets and top-down constraints from atmospheric concentration measurements of pyrogenic gases have decreased the large uncertainty in fire emissions estimates, but little is known about the contribution of deforestation, agricultural waste, peat, forest, and savanna fires to total global fire emissions. Here we used a revised version of the CASA biogeochemical model and improved satellite-derived estimates of area burned, fire activity, and plant productivity to calculate fire emissions for the 1997-2008 period on a 0.5°×0.5° spatial resolution with a monthly time step. For November 2000 onwards, estimates were based on burned area, active fire detections, and plant productivity from the MODIS sensor. For this time period we also calculated the breakdown of emissions into different sources. We used TRMM-VIRS and ATSR data to extend our fire time series back in time, combined with AVHRR-derived plant productivity in the pre-MODIS era. Average global fire carbon emissions were 1.9 Pg C / year with significant interannual variability over 1997-2001 (2.6 Pg C / year in 1998 and 1.5 Pg C / year in 2001) while emissions over 2002-2007 were relatively constant (varying between 1.9 and 2.0 Pg C / year), before declining in 2008 (1.6 Pg C / year). Over 2002-2007, interannual variability was still large on regional scales but on a global scale high fire years in some regions were balanced by low fire years in other regions. In the MODIS era (2001 onwards), most carbon losses were the result of fires in (wooded) savannas (68%) with lower contributions from deforestation (13%), forest (12%), agricultural waste (4%), and tropical peat fires (3%). On regional scales, these contributions vary to a large degree, and the contribution of peat fires would increase when including the 1997/1998 El Niño period with record-high fire emissions in Equatorial Asia. For

  15. Characterisation of wood combustion particles using electron probe microanalysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osán, János; Alföldy, Bálint; Török, Szabina; Van Grieken, René

    Biomass combustion for energy production has increased in recent years, mostly in domestic households and for the space heating of some public and agricultural buildings. Small wood combustion boilers are not equipped with any flue gas filtering system, and they release most of the small particles generated on combustion to the air. Particulate emissions from a 400 kW wood-fired heating plant were measured during standard winter operation. Cyclone fly ash and bottom ash, as well as ambient aerosol samples, were collected on site. The samples were analysed using conventional single-particle electron probe microanalysis (EPMA) including use of a thin-window detector allowing the determination of low- Z major elements such as C and O. The particles were classified based on the analyses obtained and using hierarchical cluster analysis. The majority of stack-gas particles were found to be in the respirable size range. Using EPMA, the wood combustion particles could be traced in the neighbouring air because of their characteristic potassium content. The cyclone- and bottom-ash particles have lower potassium contents due to alkali release during the combustion process.

  16. Enhanced oil recovery chemicals from renewable wood resources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grune, W.N.; Compere, A.L.; Griffith, W.L.; Crenshaw, J.M.

    1979-04-01

    Most of the wood pulp in the U.S. is produced by cooking, or digesting, wood chips in a chemical solution. These pulping processes have effluent streams which contain dissolved lignins, lignin breakdown products, and carbohydrates. There is a substantial economic incentive to use these materials as feedstocks for the production of high-valued micellar flood chemicals. The pulp and paper industries have practiced chemical recovery for almost a century. The largest chemical recycle processes are the internal recycle of inorganic salts for reuse in pulping. This is coupled with the use of waste organic compounds in the liquor as a fuel for directly-fired evaporation processes. Diversion of effluent and low valued streams for chemical recovery using fermentation, purification, or synthesis methods appears technically feasible in several cases. The use of new recovery processes could yield a variety of different wood-effluent based products. Some of the sugar acids in pulping liquors might be used as sequestering agents in reservoirs where there are large amounts of multivalent cations in flood brines. Fermentation production of high viscosity polymers, sequestering agents, and coagent alcohols appears worth further investigation. Tall oil acids and their derivatives can be used as surfactants in some reservoirs. Some waste constituents may adsorb preferentially on formations and thereby reduce loss of surfactants and other higher-valued chemicals.

  17. [Preparation and properties of wood/modified UF prepolymer composite materials].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Guo-Feng; Jiang, Yi-Fei; Song, Shu-Ping; Qu, Ping; Yao, Sheng; Pu, Jun-Wen

    2011-04-01

    In the present research, the urea-formaldehyde prepolymer and multilayer hot-press drying were used to modify poplar plantation. The prepolymer was impregnated into cell lumen space by pulse-dipping machine. Then the timbers were compressed and dried by the multilayer hot-press drying kiln. The results showed that the physical and chemical properties of poplar were changed in this investigation. The basic density of modified wood increased 1.06 times compared with the natural wood, and the bending strength increased 33% for modified wood, compressive strength parallel to grain increased 74%, the water absorption decreased to 97% from 104%. The crystallinity decreased slightly from 39.65 to 36.89 because of the modifier impregnated. TGA analysis showed that the heat resistance of modified wood increased, the three exothermic peaks in DTA curve of modified wood were 280, 360 and 485 degrees C which were higher than natural wood in the corresponding position FTIR analysis showed that the hydroxyl modified material has a good association phenomenon, and carbonyl content decreased. The SEM spectrum showed the distribution of the prepolymer in the modified timber.

  18. In vitro wood decay of teak (Tectona grandis by Rigidoporus cf. microporus (Meripiliaceae, Polyporales, Basidiomycota

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Sarmiento S

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The use of exotic species like teak for industry demands has increased over the last decades in Central America, however its vulnerability to decay by saprophytic fungi has not been well studied. Among these fungi, Rigidoporus spp. have been described as white rotters of dead hardwoods and conifers worldwide. In Costa Rica, R. microporus has been found growing on teak stumps. The aim of this study was to determine the effects of this white rot fungus on the chemical, mechanical and physical properties of teak wood from trees of different ages. Six and ten year old sapwood and heartwood samples were used in the assays. Severe anatomical damage and the highest weight and resistance losses were observed on 6 yr. old sapwood samples. There was an increase in the quantity of soluble materials in 1% NaOH (relative values and lignin content in all the samples analyzed, after 3 months exposure and up to the end of the experiment. Mass loss reduction and increased resistance of wood to compressive strength parallel to the grain were related to both the type of wood and the age of the tree. Knowledge of the potential damage that this fungus can cause to teak wood might help in a better selection of wood and developing more effective protection measures against decay in the field or in construction wood.

  19. Mechanical behaviour of wood T-joints. Experimental and numerical investigation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C.L. dos Santos

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Results of a double-shear single-dowel wood connection tested under monotonic quasi-static compression loading are presented and discussed in this paper. The wood used in this study was a pine wood, namely the Pinus pinaster species, which is one of the most important Portuguese species. Each connection (specimen consists of three wood members: a centre member, loaded in compression along the parallel-tograin direction and two simply supported side members, loaded along the perpendicular-to-grain direction (Tconnection. The load transfer between wood members was assured by means of a steel dowel, which is representative of the most common joining technique applied for structural details in wooden structures. The complete load-slip behaviour of the joint is obtained until failure. In particular, the values of the stiffness, the ultimate loads and the ductility were evaluated. Additionally, this investigation proposed non-linear 3D finite element models to simulate the T-joint behaviour. The interaction between the dowel and the wood members was simulated using contact finite elements. A plasticity model, based on Hill’s criterion, was used to simulate the joint ductility and cohesive damage modelling was applied to simulate the brittle failure modes (splitting observed in the side members of the joint. The simulation procedure allowed a satisfactory description of the non-linear behaviour of the T-joint including the collapse prediction.

  20. PHYSICAL AND MECHANICAL PROPERTIES OF THREE POLYSTYRENE IMPREGNATED INDONESIAN WOOD SPECIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nurwati Hadjib

    2005-07-01

    Full Text Available The disadvantage of  fast-growing species is  that they have inferior physical and mechanical properties. Polystyrene impregnation can be applied to improve physical and mechanical properties. Wood samples, which were dried  until 10% moisture content were put into impregnating tank and vacuum pressured  at 20-mm Hg  for  two hours. During  the gradual release of  vacuum, styrene monomers,  vinyl acetate  monomers  and  terburyl-peroxide catalyst was streamed  into  the tank. Afterwards, the pressure inside the tank was allowed to decrease to 500 mm Hg and kept for 60 minutes. Wood samples which had been impregnated were subsequently immersed in water, then wrapped in aluminum foils and put in the oven for 24 hours at 60°C. The samples were then tested for the polymer loading and their physical and mechanical properties. The results showed that the polymer loadings in wood plastics with the species  of origin (i.e. consecutively sengon, pine and rubber wood were 118%, 72% and 44%, respectively. Impregnation with polystyrene  (copolymer of styrene and vinyl acetate monomers could improve the physical and mechanical properties of wood plastics, i.e.  specific gravity, moisture content, water absorption,  shrinkage/ swelling, compression parallelto the wood grain, MOR and MOE. Greater  use of vinyl acetate decreased physical and mechanical properties.