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Sample records for wisconsin nutrition education

  1. Educational Attainment in Southeast Wisconsin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Million, Laura; Henken, Rob; Dickman, Anneliese

    2010-01-01

    In metro Milwaukee, as a part of the WIRED Initiative, the Regional Workforce Alliance (RWA)--a collaboration of organizations representing workforce development, economic development and education across southeast Wisconsin--has established the framework for pursuing the local talent dividend goal and a regional strategy for increasing…

  2. Wisconsin Earth and Space Science Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bilbrough, Larry (Technical Monitor); French, George

    2003-01-01

    The Wisconsin Earth and Space Science Education project successfilly met its objectives of creating a comprehensive online portfolio of science education curricular resources and providing a professional development program to increase educator competency with Earth and Space science content and teaching pedagogy. Overall, 97% of participants stated that their experience was either good or excellent. The favorable response of participant reactions to the professional development opportunities highlights the high quality of the professional development opportunity. The enthusiasm generated for using the curricular material in classroom settings was overwhelmingly positive at 92%. This enthusiasm carried over into actual classroom implementation of resources from the curricular portfolio, with 90% using the resources between 1-6 times during the school year. The project has had a positive impact on student learning in Wisconsin. Although direct measurement of student performance is not possible in a project of this kind, nearly 75% of participating teachers stated that they saw an increase in student performance in math and science as a result of using project resources. Additionally, nearly 75% of participants saw an increase in the enthusiasm of students towards math and science. Finally, some evidence exists that the professional development academies and curricular portfolio have been effective in changing educator behavior. More than half of all participants indicated that they have used more hands-on activities as a result of the Wisconsin Earth and Space Science Education project.

  3. Digital Learning Compass: Distance Education State Almanac 2017. Wisconsin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seaman, Julia E.; Seaman, Jeff

    2017-01-01

    This brief report uses data collected under the U.S. Department of Education's National Center for Educational Statistics (NCES) Integrated Postsecondary Education Data System (IPEDS) Fall Enrollment survey to highlight distance education data in the state of Wisconsin. The sample for this analysis is comprised of all active, degree-granting…

  4. Youth Education - Health / Nutrition

    OpenAIRE

    2004-01-01

    Deborah L. Angell: The Bug Stops Here! Cheryl L. Barber: Successful Snacks - Food, Fitness and Food Safety Learning Activities. Darcy Batura: At-Risk Youth and Household Hazardous Waste Education. Katherine L. Cason: Nutrition Mission – A Multimedia Educational Tool for Youth . Patsy A. Ezell: An Interactive Food and Nutrition Education Program for Youth. Rhea Lanting: Got Calcium? Sandy McCurdy: Reaching Teens through a Food Safety Education Partnership. Patricia Mulkeen: Choosing 4-H Fitnes...

  5. Nutrition and Educational Performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pollitt, Ernesto

    1984-01-01

    Research studies concerning how nutrition affects educational performance are examined. From a developmental perspective it seems likely that the earlier the onset and the longer the duration of the nutritional deficiency the higher the probabilities of a cognitive deficit and poor school achievement in childhood and adolescence. (RM)

  6. Applying Communication Theory in Nutrition Education Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillespie, Ardyth H.

    1981-01-01

    Reports on the state of research in nutrition communication, unmet goals in nutrition education, strategies for nutrition education and nutrition education research, and research design issues. Indicates that the field of communications offers theoretical perspectives for nutrition education research. (DS)

  7. Nutrition Education: A Multidisciplinary Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wisconsin State Dept. of Public Instruction, Madison.

    This guide for teachers, supervisors and administrators offers a conceptual framework and resources for developing a complete nutrition education program. Included are: (1) a statement of need for nutrition education, (2) definition of what nutrition education should encompass; (3) goals identified by teachers, curriculum specialists and nutrition…

  8. Revolution and Counter-Revolution: Network Mobilization to Preserve Public Education in Wisconsin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelley, Carolyn; Mead, Julie

    2017-01-01

    In this article, Kelley and Mead consider changes in the policymaking process in Wisconsin before the election of Governor Walker, in the early years following his election, and in the months preceding passage of the 2015-17 biennial budget. Kelley and Mead argue that in Wisconsin, serious and significant attacks to public education motivated by…

  9. 7 CFR 249.9 - Nutrition education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Nutrition education. 249.9 Section 249.9 Agriculture... Nutrition education. (a) Goal. Nutrition education shall emphasize the relationship of proper nutrition to... agency shall integrate nutrition education into SFMNP operations and may satisfy nutrition education...

  10. Nutrition Education Needs Pantry Clients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, Dolores K.; Shultz, Jill Armstrong; Edlefsen, Miriam; Butkus, Sue N.

    2007-01-01

    Two food pantries were surveyed for nutrition education (NE) interests and experiences. One site provided nutrition education classes; the comparison site was utilized to assess client interest in class topics. "Fixing low cost meals," "fixing quick and easy recipes," and "stretching food and food dollars" were topics…

  11. 7 CFR 248.9 - Nutrition education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Nutrition education. 248.9 Section 248.9 Agriculture... Nutrition education. (a) Goals. Nutrition education shall emphasize the relationship of proper nutrition to.... (b) Requirement. The State agency shall integrate nutrition education into FMNP operations and may...

  12. 7 CFR 246.11 - Nutrition education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Nutrition education. 246.11 Section 246.11 Agriculture... Participant Benefits § 246.11 Nutrition education. (a) General. (1) Nutrition education shall be considered a benefit of the Program, and shall be made available at no cost to the participant. Nutrition education...

  13. The evaluation of a nutrition education programme on the nutrition ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The purpose of this project was to test if learning took place through the implementation of a nutrition education programme, using specific developed nutrition education tools in pre-primary school children, aged six and seven years old, in the Vaal region. A validated nutrition knowledge questionnaire was completed with ...

  14. Nutrition Students Enhance School Health Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cotugna, Nancy; Vickery, Connie E.

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of the Nutrition Education Students and Teachers (NEST) project was to develop a model of collaboration between University of Delaware dietetics students and elementary teachers to promote nutrition education in the classroom. Design/methodology/approach: Junior and senior level students in a nutrition education course…

  15. 7 CFR 1150.116 - Nutrition education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 9 2010-01-01 2009-01-01 true Nutrition education. 1150.116 Section 1150.116 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Marketing... Order Definitions § 1150.116 Nutrition education. Nutrition education means those activities intended to...

  16. Sport and Nutrition Education Interaction on Stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozturk, Mehmet Ertugrul

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the study was to determine sport and nutrition education interaction on stress. Three groups were selected for the study: control, single treatment and social treatment under nutrition treatment, too. The groups that were under nutrition treatments should have information about the nutrition resources. This experiment was done for two…

  17. Continuing the promise: Recruiting and preparing Hmong-American educators for Central Wisconsin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leslie McClain-Ruelle

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The state of Wisconsin, and in the broader context, the middle states of the United States experienced a large influx of Hmong families starting in the early 1980’s and into the 1990’s. With this influx a large number of young, Southeast Asian children entered the PK-12 classrooms, often with the support of bilingual aides. While many of the children flourished within this newer context, they were mostly guided in their classrooms by white, Anglo educators. Although theseeducators work to meet the needs of all children, there were few to no Hmong educators working with these same children in the PK-12 setting. At the same time, a number of Hmong young adults were serving as bilingual aides in these classrooms. Project Forward, a federally funded Title VII grant, has worked to create a shift in these roles, preparing Hmong college students to become educators in the PK-12 settings. In 1999, Central Wisconsin enrolled approximately3,200 Hmong children in the PK-12 schools; at the same time, Central Wisconsin employed merely seven Hmong teachers in the classrooms. The goal of the grant program described in this paper is to prepare teachers of Southeast Asian background for early childhood, elementary, secondary and K-12 classrooms. The Central Wisconsin grant has supported a total of 35 Southeast Asian students in their pursuit of teaching careers. Fulfilling the goal of preparingteachers who can serve as role models for Southeast Asian children in our schools has met with successes and struggles. This article presents consideration of the central factors affectingrecruitment, retention and preparation of Hmong pre-service teachers in Central Wisconsin. The article includes a brief historical examination of the immigration of the Hmong population intothe United States, a consideration of the Hmong culture as it affects recruitment and retention of pre-service teachers and evidence related to successes and struggles experienced by Project

  18. Undergraduate module on nutrition education and communication ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    On average, respondents answered 96% of the questions in the questionnaire. Information was obtained on areas such as students' social/cultural interests; food and nutrition experience and expertise; food and eating habits; ideas of nutrition education and training in nutrition education; and study preferences. In addition ...

  19. Increasing educational disparities in premature adult mortality, Wisconsin, 1990-2000.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reither, Eric N; Peppard, Paul E; Remington, Patrick L; Kindig, David A

    2006-10-01

    Public health agencies have identified the elimination of health disparities as a major policy objective. The primary objective of this study is to assess changes in the association between education and premature adult mortality in Wisconsin, 1990-2000. Wisconsin death records (numerators) and US Census data (denominators) were compiled to estimate mortality rates among adults (25-64 years) in 1990 and 2000. Information on the educational status, sex, racial identification, and age of subjects was gathered from these sources. The effect of education on mortality rate ratios in 1990 and 2000 was assessed while adjusting for age, sex, and racial identification. Education exhibited a graded effect on mortality rates, which declined most among college graduates from 1990 to 2000. The relative rate of mortality among persons with less than a high school education compared to persons with a college degree increased from 2.4 to 3.1 from 1990-2000-an increase of 29%. Mortality disparities also increased, although to a lesser extent, among other educational groups. Despite renewed calls for the elimination of health disparities, evidence suggests that educational disparities in mortality increased from 1990 to 2000.

  20. Wisconsin Partnerships to Educate and Engage Public Audiences on Climate Change Topics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mooney, M. E.; Ackerman, S.; Rowley, P.; Crowley Conn, K.

    2011-12-01

    The complexity and scale of climate change-related challenges requires more than one strategy to share meaningful information with public audiences. This presentation will discuss a few initiatives to engage the public originating from the University of Wisconsin-Madison. First, a local partnership between the Cooperative Institute for Meteorological Satellite Studies (CIMSS) and the Aldo Leopold Nature Center (ALNC), an informal learning center with a new climate change "classroom" which recently acquired a Science on a Sphere (SOS) exhibit. Second, an informal education project funded by the NOAA Office of Education coordinated by CIMSS in partnership with the national SOS Network with the goal of helping museum docents share meaningful interpretation of real-time weather and climate data. CIMSS staff has been conducting weather and climate discussions on a Magic Planet display for several years. This "mini-SOS" is powered by a solar panel on the roof, modeling the essential Sun-Earth connection and the first principle of climate literacy. However, the convenient proximity of CIMSS and ALNC provides a perfect opportunity to test "SOS-scale" talking points posted on a weekly docent blog to the benefit of the entire SOS Network. Two other Wisconsin projects of note include the Wisconsin Initiative on Climate Change Impacts, a partnership between the University and the Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources, and a pilot project between CIMSS and NOAA's National Weather Service to engage storm spotters in climate mitigation and stewardship. Ideally, the synergistic benefits and lessons learned from these collaborations can inform similar efforts in order to galvanize meaningful responses to climate change.

  1. Effect of a nutrition education programme on nutritional status of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background. Globally, the prevalence of chronic and acute malnutrition and micronutrient deficiency is high in young children, especially in developing countries. Nutrition education is an important intervention to address these challenges. Objective. To determine the nutritional (anthropometric and micronutrient) status of ...

  2. Effect of nutrition education and dairy group membership on nutrition ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Effect of nutrition education and dairy group membership on nutrition knowledge, practices and diet quality for rural Kenyan farm women. ... dairy development group were more food secure and had higher intake of certain micronutrients ... to improve intake of vitamin A, iron and zinc and was developed and delivered in

  3. Health and Nutrition: Preconditions for Educational Achievement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Negussie, Birgit

    This paper discusses the importance of maternal and infant health for children's educational achievement. Education, health, and nutrition are so closely related that changes in one causes changes in the others. Improvement of maternal and preschooler health and nutrition is a precondition for improved educational achievement. Although parental…

  4. Education-Work. Knowing Where You're Going. Vocational Conference (6th, Madison, Wisconsin, August 10-12, 1981).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowles, Dean; And Others

    An August, 1981, conference in Madison, Wisconsin, brought together the state's vocational educators to explore the work-education relationship and where vocational education is going in the next decade. In the first of the four addresses, Dean Bowles, Deputy State Superintendent of Public Instruction, described upcoming challenges for secondary…

  5. Spear Fishing in Wisconsin: Multicultural Education as Symbolic Violence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    New, William; Petronicolos, Loucas

    2001-01-01

    Describes how multicultural teacher education can preserve familiar institutional and ideological mechanisms that validate social inequalities, analyzing student discourse collected during activities concerning recent conflict between Native American groups and groups opposed to the exercise of their treaty rights to fish on nonreservation lakes.…

  6. The Influence of Nutrition Education on the Food Consumption and Nutrition Attitude of Schoolchildren in Slovenia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kostanjevec, Stojan; Jerman, Janez; Koch, Verena

    2012-01-01

    In Slovenia, nutrition education is included in the compulsory education curriculum of the nine-year elementary school. The aim of nutrition education is for schoolchildren to acquire knowledge on nutrition to help them form healthy nutritional habits. This research aims at establishing whether the formal nutrition education carried out at schools…

  7. Latinos Improve Food Habits through Nutrition Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaiser, Lucia L.; Sutherlin, Jeanette M.; Yoshida, Sallie C.; Murphy, Suzanne P.; Bresnick, Stuart D.

    1998-01-01

    The Expanded Food and Nutrition Education Program, a federally funded nutrition education program in California, is undertaking to assess the needs of Latino clients and develop culturally appropriate tools to evaluate changes in food-related behaviors. Latino participants in Fresno County reported improvements in reducing fat intake, using fruits…

  8. Key Resources for Creating Online Nutrition Education for Those Participating in Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stosich, Marie C.; LeBlanc, Heidi; Kudin, Janette S.; Christofferson, Debra

    2016-01-01

    Internet-based nutrition education is becoming an important tool in serving the rural, low-income community, yet the task of creating such programming can be daunting. The authors describe the key resources used in developing an Internet-based nutrition education program for those participating in Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program…

  9. Exploring nutrition education resources and barriers, and nutrition knowledge in teachers in California.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Anna Marie; Zidenberg-Cherr, Sheri

    2015-01-01

    To determine barriers to nutrition education, nutrition education resources used, and the relationship between nutrition knowledge and whether public school teachers in California teach nutrition in the classroom. A total of 102 teachers in California participated in a Web-based survey about nutrition education barriers, resources used to plan nutrition lessons, and factors that would encourage inclusion of nutrition. A validated questionnaire was used to assess nutrition knowledge. Analyses included ordinary least-squares regression. Common barriers were lack of instructional time and unrelated subject. Teachers were unaware of many nutrition education resources. Nutrition knowledge was not associated with nutrition lessons but was positively associated with teaching high school (β = 5.13; P teachers to provide nutrition education. Larger studies are needed to determine whether this holds true in a broader sample. Copyright © 2015 Society for Nutrition Education and Behavior. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Wisconsin Secondary Vocational Education: 1978-1982 Aggregate of Data. Evaluation Report, Cycle I. Bulletin No. 3266.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wisconsin Univ. - Stout, Menomonie. Center for Vocational, Technical and Adult Education.

    The first five-year cycle of the Wisconsin Secondary Vocational Program Evaluation System was completed on December 31, 1982 to aid in planning and assessing vocational education in the state and to portray its impact at local, state and national levels. This aggregate report presents first phase data from high school self-evaluations. The second…

  11. Administrators' Perspective: Integrating Nutrition Education Into the Preschool Curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Battle, Jimmie L.; Blackwell, Jacqueline

    This paper addresses the need for and importance of integrating nutrition education into the existing preschool curriculum. Following a brief definition of nutrition education according to the White House Conference on Food, Nutrition, and Health, discussion focuses on determining who is responsible for nutrition education. It is argued that,…

  12. Barriers to effective implementation of nutrition education in Nigerian ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    One of the factors that influence people's food habits is education. This paper discussed the concept of nutrition education and the relevance of nutrition education to individual and family health. The barriers to effective implementation of nutrition education were also discussed. These include lack of contact with ...

  13. A culinary laboratory for nutrition education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacob, Michael; Stewart, Patricia; Medina-Walpole, Annette; Fong, Chin-To

    2016-06-01

    Proficiency in medical nutrition requires an understanding of food-related biochemistry and the application of this knowledge in the context of culinary, cultural, psychosocial and interprofessional components. Our aim was to develop a teaching format where medical students could learn the biochemistry of nutrition in the context of patient narratives, interactive cooking and dialogues with nutrition professionals. We designed and implemented a day-long culinary laboratory intervention (lab), which is taught to first-year medical students at the University of Rochester with the help of dietetic interns from Cornell University. Here, we present the details of the intervention, the resources used and the preliminary outcomes on student attitudes. We designed and implemented a day-long culinary lab, which is taught to first-year medical students A questionnaire with quantitative rating scales and open-ended questions was used to probe student attitudes regarding the educational approach used in the lab. Our preliminary findings suggest that the lab was well received and that the dietetic interns were viewed as effective teachers in this context. A culinary lab is a feasible educational environment for integrating the breadth of topics within the discipline of nutrition. The experiential, food-based format appears to stimulate questions central to current nutritional controversies, particularly challenges related to translating biochemical mechanism into practical nutrition interventions. Close involvement with basic science faculty members, clinical faculty members and allied health professions are essential for this type of endeavour. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. Position of the American Dietetic Association, School Nutrition Association, and Society for Nutrition Education: Comprehensive School Nutrition Services

    Science.gov (United States)

    Briggs, Marilyn; Fleischhacker, Sheila; Mueller, Constance G.

    2010-01-01

    It is the position of the American Dietetic Association (ADA), School Nutrition Association (SNA), and Society for Nutrition Education (SNE) that comprehensive, integrated nutrition services in schools, kindergarten through grade 12, are an essential component of coordinated school health programs and will improve the nutritional status, health,…

  15. Integrating Nutrition into the Physical Education Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Heather L.

    2012-01-01

    Obesity among children and teens continues to be a major public health concern in the United States. Approximately 16.9% of children and adolescents age 2-19 years are obese. To address this epidemic, schools have been encouraged to develop a coordinated school health program, which includes an interdisciplinary approach to nutrition education.…

  16. Nutrition Education for Elite Female Runners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Nancy; And Others

    1988-01-01

    A survey of the dietary habits of 115 elite female runners revealed that some did not eat wisely, pointing out nutrition education needs for these subjects in the areas of sweets, vitamin and mineral supplementation, intake of red meat, body weight and body image, eating disorders, calorie intake, and amenorrhea and stress fractures. (Author/CB)

  17. "Set the Pace": Nutrition Education DVD for Head Start Parents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adedze, Pascasie; Orr, Robin A.; Chapman-Novakofski, Karen; Donovan, Sharon M.

    2013-01-01

    Childhood overweight remains a major public health problem and innovative nutrition education programs are still needed. Thus, the "Set the Pace" is a nutrition education DVD for Head Start parents which provides visual nutrition education and physical activities to incorporate in their daily routines. (Contains 1 table.)

  18. A Qualitative Phenomenological Exploration of Teachers' Experience with Nutrition Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Elisha; Chai, Weiwen; Albrecht, Julie A.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Nutrition education delivered by classroom teachers has become a popular intervention designed to combat childhood obesity. However, few qualitative studies have explored nutrition education with teachers Purpose: The purpose of this study was to explore how elementary teachers describe their experience with nutrition education.…

  19. 7 CFR 1150.161 - Promotion, research and nutrition education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 9 2010-01-01 2009-01-01 true Promotion, research and nutrition education. 1150.161... Dairy Promotion and Research Order Promotion, Research and Nutrition Education § 1150.161 Promotion, research and nutrition education. (a) The Board shall receive and evaluate, or on its own initiative...

  20. Integrating Behavioral Economics into Nutrition Education Research and Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guthrie, Joanne F

    2017-09-01

    Nutrition education has a long history of being informed by economic thinking, with the earliest nutrition education guides incorporating household food budgeting into nutrition advice. Behavioral economics research goes beyond that traditional role to provide new insights into how consumers make choices. These insights have numerous potential applications for nutrition interventions to promote healthy food choices consistent with the US Dietary Guidelines for Americans. Research to test the value of such applications can contribute to the development of evidence-based nutrition education practice called for in federal nutrition education programs. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  1. Whetting disadvantaged adults' appetite for nutrition education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pettigrew, Simone; Biagioni, Nicole; Moore, Sarah; Pratt, Iain S

    2017-10-01

    To identify the features of a nutrition education programme for disadvantaged adults deemed most attractive and useful by participants. A two-year, multi-method, qualitative evaluation of pre and post data collected from programme participants. Data were imported into NVivo10 for coding to facilitate a thematic analysis. Western Australia. Participants Individuals attending the Western Australian FOODcents nutrition education programme that is designed to provide knowledge and skills needed to consume a healthy diet on a budget. Focus groups were conducted several weeks after course completion (five groups, forty-seven participants), observations were conducted during FOODcents sessions (thirty-one observation episodes, 237 participants), and open-ended questions were asked in pre-post hard-copy surveys administered in sessions (n 927) and an online survey administered on average six weeks after course completion (n 114). The course attributes that were found to be especially important to participants were: (i) user-friendly, practical information that could be immediately translated to their daily lives; (ii) experiential learning that involved direct contact with food products; and (iii) opportunities for social interaction. These aspects of nutrition education were described as being highly influential in the decision to participate in the course, the application of the information in their subsequent food purchase and preparation activities, and their word-of-mouth communications with others about the course. Incorporating aspects of most importance to participants into nutrition education programme delivery and promotion may increase joining rates, enjoyment, satisfaction with course content and, ultimately, the uptake of recommended behaviours.

  2. Best Practices in Nutrition Education for Low-Income Audiences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Susan; Auld, Garry; MacKinnon, Chloe; Ammerman, Alice; Hanula, Gail; Lohse, Barbara; Scott, Marci; Serrano, Elena; Tucker, Easter; Wardlaw, Mary Kay

    2014-01-01

    The Food and Nutrition Service (FNS) identified a need for a comprehensive set of best practices in nutrition education for low-income audiences for the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) educational projects, including SNAP-Ed. A comprehensive list of best practices would promote consistency and efficacy in program planning,…

  3. Effectiveness of nutrition education in Dutch primary schools

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fries, M.C.E.

    2016-01-01

    Nutrition education in Dutch primary schools” School-based nutrition education programmes have increasingly been used to teach children about nutrition and to provide them with the skills to make healthy food choices. As these programmes differ in content and delivery,

  4. Sports Nutrition Knowledge Assessment of Physical Educators and Coaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conkle, M. Terence; Tishler, Anne G.

    This study assessed the sports nutrition knowledge of current and prospective physical educators/coaches (HPEs) to determine the need for improved education in this area and to compare the nutrition knowledge of HPEs with that of foods and nutrition students (FNSs) and general college students (GENs). A researcher-developed 4-point Likert-type…

  5. Effectiveness of nutrition education in Dutch primary schools

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fries, M.C.E.

    2016-01-01

    Nutrition education in Dutch primary schools”

    School-based nutrition education programmes have increasingly been used to teach children about nutrition and to provide them with the skills to make healthy food choices. As these programmes differ in content and delivery, it

  6. Wisconsin Youth Risk Behavior and HIV/AIDS Prevention Education: Survey Results, 1991. Bulletin No. 93253.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagener, Judy; Nehls-Lowe, Barbara

    This report contains data from the 1991 Youth Risk Behavior Survey, administered to 1,440 high school students throughout Wisconsin. Included are data on the prevalence of injuries; drug use; sexual behaviors; dietary behaviors; and physical activity. The results revealed that over 80% of students rarely or never wear bicycle helmets and 50%…

  7. A Deficiency of Nutrition Education and Practice in Cardiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devries, Stephen; Agatston, Arthur; Aggarwal, Monica; Aspry, Karen E; Esselstyn, Caldwell B; Kris-Etherton, Penny; Miller, Michael; O'Keefe, James H; Ros, Emilio; Rzeszut, Anne K; White, Beth A; Williams, Kim A; Freeman, Andrew M

    2017-11-01

    Nutrition is one of the foundations of cardiovascular guidelines for risk reduction and treatment. However, little is known about whether cardiologists, cardiology fellows-in-training, and cardiovascular team members have the nutrition education and knowledge necessary to implement these guidelines. The aim of this study was to describe the educational experiences, attitudes, and practices relating to nutrition among cardiovascular professionals. Surveys completed by cardiologists, fellows-in-training, and cardiovascular team members inquired about their personal dietary habits, history of nutrition education, and attitudes regarding nutrition interventions. A total of 930 surveys were completed. Among cardiologists, 90% reported receiving no or minimal nutrition education during fellowship training, 59% reported no nutrition education during internal medicine training, and 31% reported receiving no nutrition education in medical school. Among cardiologists, 8% described themselves as having "expert" nutrition knowledge. Nevertheless, fully 95% of cardiologists believe that their role includes personally providing patients with at least basic nutrition information. The percentage of respondents who ate ≥5 servings of vegetables and fruits per day was: 20% (cardiologists), 21% (fellows-in-training), and 26% (cardiovascular team members). A large proportion of cardiovascular specialists have received minimal medical education and training in nutrition, and current trainees continue to experience significant education and training gaps. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. A prospective study of nutrition education and oral nutritional supplementation in patients with Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pivi, Glaucia A K; da Silva, Rosimeire V; Juliano, Yara; Novo, Neil F; Okamoto, Ivan H; Brant, César Q; Bertolucci, Paulo H F

    2011-09-26

    Weight loss in patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a common clinical manifestation that may have clinical significance. To evaluate if there is a difference between nutrition education and oral nutritional supplementation on nutritional status in patients with AD. A randomized, prospective 6-month study which enrolled 90 subjects with probable AD aged 65 years or older divided into 3 groups: Control Group (CG) [n = 27], Education Group (EG) [n = 25], which participated in an education program and Supplementation Group (SG) [n = 26], which received two daily servings of oral nutritional supplementation. Subjects were assessed for anthropometric data (weight, height, BMI, TSF, AC and AMC), biochemical data (total protein, albumin, and total lymphocyte count), CDR (Clinical Dementia Rating), MMSE (Mini-mental state examination), as well as dependence during meals. The SG showed a significant improvement in the following anthropometric measurements: weight (H calc = 22.12, p =nutritional supplementation is more effective compared to nutrition education in improving nutritional status.

  9. Economic analysis of bilingual interactive multimedia nutrition education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gould, Susan Martin; Anderson, Jennifer

    2002-01-01

    Interactive multimedia (IMM) provides a means to deliver accurate, consistent, and convenient nutrition education. To compare direct costs of bilingual IMM and peer nutrition education methods. Cost per unit of nutrition education for each delivery method was calculated. Touch-screen computer kiosk systems in food assistance programs. Approximately 727 low-income and Hispanic persons. Bilingual IMM and nutrition education classes taught by peer educators. Cost per unit of nutrition education delivered. Descriptive: to compare costs and determine break-even points. Initially, costs for both methods dropped and then nearly leveled for the peer method at a break-even point of 633 units, whereas those for IMM continued to decrease. Interactive multimedia is a cost-effective method of delivering nutrition education, especially to large numbers of people. Use of this technology could reach additional low-income persons at decreasing costs.

  10. Nutritional education from Molecular and Cellular Biology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zaida Ramona Betancourt Betancourt

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The nutritional education is current topic, constituting a necessity in the contemporary world, given mainly by the contribution that it makes in maintaining the human health under good conditions. Starting from this problem, it is presented this article whose objective is: to show the potential ities that the discipline Cellular and Molecular Biology offers, for the treatment of these contents, since this discipline is worked in the second semester of first year and first semester of in the formation of professors of the Biology - Geography and Bio logy - C hemistry careers which can contribute to the development of knowledge, habits and abilities that allows them to appropriate of responsible behaviours for the achievement of correct nutritional habits.

  11. SPATIAL AND TEMPORAL PATTERNS OF THE MOVEMENT OF SEASONAL AGRICULTURAL MIGRANT CHILDREN INTO WISCONSIN, EDUCATIONAL PROGRAMS FOR CHILDREN OF MIGRATORY AGRICULTURAL WORKERS IN WISCONSIN, REPORT 2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    LINDSEY, HERBERT H.; AND OTHERS

    USEFUL MEANS OF ANTICIPATING THE MOVEMENTS OF MIGRANT CHILDREN INCLUDE ANALYSIS OF CROPS, THE HARVESTING OF WHICH REQUIRES OUT-OF-STATE WORKERS, DISTRIBUTIONAL MAPS OF CROP ACREAGE, NORMAL TIME SCHEDULES FOR CROPS, AND INFORMATION ON AGRICULTURAL DEVELOPMENTS. SUCH INFORMATION ASSISTS IN THE PLANNING OF SCHOOL PROGRAMS. IN WISCONSIN, MOST MIGRANT…

  12. A Qualitative Phenomenological Exploration of Teachers' Experience With Nutrition Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Elisha; Chai, Weiwen; Albrecht, Julie A

    2016-05-03

    Background: Nutrition education delivered by classroom teachers has become a popular intervention designed to combat childhood obesity. However, few qualitative studies have explored nutrition education with teachers Purpose: The purpose of this study was to explore how elementary teachers describe their experience with nutrition education. Methods: A qualitative phenomenological approach was used. Semistructured interviews, observations, and document analysis were conducted with 10 teachers who delivered nutrition education in their classrooms. Inductive coding was used to determine invariant constituents, reduce constituents to categories, and cluster categories into themes. Reliability and validity were accomplished through intercoder agreement, audio recording, triangulation, bracketing, and member checking. Results: Results identified 5 core themes related to roles teachers play in nutrition education, the importance placed upon nutrition, motivation for supplementary activities, barriers, and a triadic relationship between students, teachers, and curriculum. Discussion: Findings reveal interactions within the nutrition education experience in which teachers balance barriers with their value of nutrition education and motivation to help students make healthy choices. Translation to Health Education Practice: Health educators should work with classroom teachers at the program design, implementation, and evaluation stages of curriculum development to better address needs and facilitate the delivery of high-quality nutrition education for students.

  13. A Qualitative Phenomenological Exploration of Teachers' Experience With Nutrition Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Elisha; Chai, Weiwen; Albrecht, Julie A.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Nutrition education delivered by classroom teachers has become a popular intervention designed to combat childhood obesity. However, few qualitative studies have explored nutrition education with teachers Purpose: The purpose of this study was to explore how elementary teachers describe their experience with nutrition education. Methods: A qualitative phenomenological approach was used. Semistructured interviews, observations, and document analysis were conducted with 10 teachers who delivered nutrition education in their classrooms. Inductive coding was used to determine invariant constituents, reduce constituents to categories, and cluster categories into themes. Reliability and validity were accomplished through intercoder agreement, audio recording, triangulation, bracketing, and member checking. Results: Results identified 5 core themes related to roles teachers play in nutrition education, the importance placed upon nutrition, motivation for supplementary activities, barriers, and a triadic relationship between students, teachers, and curriculum. Discussion: Findings reveal interactions within the nutrition education experience in which teachers balance barriers with their value of nutrition education and motivation to help students make healthy choices. Translation to Health Education Practice: Health educators should work with classroom teachers at the program design, implementation, and evaluation stages of curriculum development to better address needs and facilitate the delivery of high-quality nutrition education for students. PMID:27226814

  14. Impact of nutrition education on diabetes knowledge and attitudes of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: To evaluate the effect of a nutrition education (NE) programme on diabetes knowledge and attitudes of adults with ... Keywords: attitudes, diabetes knowledge, nutrition education, South Africa, type 2 diabetes. Introduction ...... Price C, Shandu D, Gill G. Diabetes education and empowerment: lessons from rural ...

  15. Online Nutrition Education: Enhancing Opportunities for Limited-Resource Learners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Case, Patty; Cluskey, Mary; Hino, Jeff

    2011-01-01

    Delivering nutrition education using the Internet could allow educators to reach larger audiences at lower cost. Low-income adults living in a rural community participated in focus groups to examine their interest in, experience with, and motivators to accessing nutrition education online. This audience described limited motivation in seeking…

  16. Nutrition education in medical school: a time of opportunity1234

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Horn, Linda; Rock, Cheryl L; Edwards, Marilyn S; Bales, Connie W; Kohlmeier, Martin; Akabas, Sharon R

    2014-01-01

    Undergraduate medical education has undergone significant changes in development of new curricula, new pedagogies, and new forms of assessment since the Nutrition Academic Award was launched more than a decade ago. With an emphasis on a competency-based curriculum, integrated learning, longitudinal clinical experiences, and implementation of new technology, nutrition educators have an opportunity to introduce nutrition and diet behavior–related learning experiences across the continuum of medical education. Innovative learning opportunities include bridging personal health and nutrition to community, public, and global health concerns; integrating nutrition into lifestyle medicine training; and using nutrition as a model for teaching the continuum of care and promoting interprofessional team-based care. Faculty development and identification of leaders to serve as champions for nutrition education continue to be a challenge. PMID:24646826

  17. Position of the American Dietetic Association, School Nutrition Association, and Society for Nutrition Education: comprehensive school nutrition services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Briggs, Marilyn; Fleischhacker, Sheila; Mueller, Constance G

    2010-01-01

    It is the position of the American Dietetic Association (ADA), School Nutrition Association (SNA), and Society for Nutrition Education (SNE) that comprehensive, integrated nutrition services in schools, kindergarten through grade 12, are an essential component of coordinated school health programs and will improve the nutritional status, health, and academic performance of our nation's children. Local school wellness policies may strengthen comprehensive nutrition services by encouraging multidisciplinary wellness teams, composed of school and community members, to work together in identifying local school needs, developing feasible strategies to address priority areas, and integrating comprehensive nutrition services with a coordinated school health program. This joint position paper affirms schools as an important partner in health promotion. To maximize the impact of school wellness policies on strengthening comprehensive, integrated nutrition services in schools nationwide, ADA, SNA, and SNE recommend specific strategies in the following key areas: nutrition education and promotion, food and nutrition programs available on the school campus, school-home-community partnerships, and nutrition-related health services. Copyright © 2010 Society for Nutrition Education. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Impact of a nutrition education programme on the nutrition ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The objective of this study was to ascertain nutrition knowledge amongst primary school children in an informal settlement in Gauteng, South Africa. A nutrition knowledge questionnaire was developed and tested for internal reliability using Cronbach Alpha methods. Pre- and postintervention tests were completed with ...

  19. Nutrition Education Module Appeals to Students at Georgia State

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kicklighter, Jana; Jonnalagadda, Satya S.; McClendon, Jamie; Hopkins, Barbara L.

    2005-01-01

    This article describes the development and evaluation of a nutrition education module, "Nutrition Survival Skills," for freshmen students at a large urban university. Students' perceptions of the module, presented by five nutrition graduate students as part of Freshmen Learning Communities (FLCs) and Georgia State University (GSU) 1010,…

  20. Planning Single-Event Nutrition Education: A New Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Lora Beth

    2011-01-01

    A theoretical model for planning single-event nutrition education contrasts a Practical, Foods, and Positive (PFP) emphasis to an Abstract, Nutrient, and Negative (ANN) focus on nutrition topics. Use of this model makes messages more appealing to consumers and may increase the likelihood that people will apply the nutrition information in their…

  1. 75 FR 18828 - Wisconsin Electric Power Company, Wisconsin Gas LLC, Wisconsin Public Service Corporation...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-13

    ... Energy Regulatory Commission Wisconsin Electric Power Company, Wisconsin Gas LLC, Wisconsin Public Service Corporation: Complainants; ANR Pipeline Company: Respondent; Notice of Complaint April 6, 2010....206 (2009), Wisconsin Electric Power Company, Wisconsin Gas LLC, and Wisconsin Public Service...

  2. Effects of Nutrition Education on Levels of Nutritional Awareness of Pregnant Women in Western Iran

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fallah, Farnoush; Pourabbas, Ahmad; Delpisheh, Ali; Veisani, Yousef; Shadnoush, Mahdi

    2013-01-01

    Background Maternal nutritional health, before and during pregnancy, influences the health status of herself and her developing fetus. Pregnancy is an important condition for improving nutritional knowledge. Objectives The present study aimed at determining effects of nutrition education on levels of nutritional awareness of a representative group of pregnant women in Western Iran. Patients and Methods A quasi-experimental intervention was undertaken on a random sample of pregnant women (n = 100) attending urban health centers in Ilam city (western Iran) during the year 2011 for prenatal care. A nutritional education program containing two to four lessons was undertaken for small groups of between six to ten women. Nutritional knowledge was assessed before intervention (pretest) and followed by two posttests within three weeks interval. Results The awareness level of pregnant women about healthy nutrition was significantly increased from 3% before intervention to 31% after the nutritional education intervention (P nutritional education intervention will have a positive effect on nutritional awareness of pregnant women. PMID:24348589

  3. Nutrition education for pediatric gastroenterology, hepatology, and nutrition fellows: survey of NASPGHAN fellowship training programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez, J Andres; Koyama, Tatsuki; Acra, Sari; Mascarenhas, Maria R; Shulman, Robert J

    2012-08-01

    The aim of the study was to assess the methodology and content of nutrition education during gastroenterology fellowship training and the variability among the different programs. A survey questionnaire was completed by 43 fellowship training directors of 62 active programs affiliated to the North American Society for Pediatric Gastroenterology, Hepatology, and Nutrition, including sites in the United States, Canada, and Mexico. The data were examined for patterns in teaching methodology and coverage of specific nutrition topics based on level 1 training in nutrition, which is the minimum requirement according to the published North American Society for Pediatric Gastroenterology, Hepatology, and Nutrition fellowship training guidelines. The majority of the teaching was conducted by MD-degree faculty (61%), and most of the education was provided through clinical care experiences. Only 31% of the level 1 nutrition topics were consistently covered by >80% of programs, and coverage did not correlate with the size of the programs. Competency in nutrition training was primarily assessed through questions to individuals or groups of fellows (77% and 65%, respectively). Program directors cited a lack of faculty interested in nutrition and a high workload as common obstacles for teaching. The methodology of nutrition education during gastroenterology fellowship training is, for the most part, unstructured and inconsistent among the different programs. The minimum level 1 requirements are not consistently covered. The development of core curriculums and learning modules may be beneficial in improving nutrition education.

  4. Childhood nutrition education in health promotion and disease prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olson, C. M.

    1989-01-01

    In the last 10 to 15 years, nutrition has become a major component of health promotion and chronic disease prevention. Two widely recommended strategies for incorporating nutrition education directed toward children and youth into health promotion and disease prevention efforts are school-based nutrition education and the integration of nutritional care into health care. School-based nutrition education programs targeted toward very specific eating behaviors are showing very promising results in regard to behavior and attitude change of children and adolescents. Substantial changes in health care providers' attitudes and practices and in the funding and financing of health care will be needed if nutrition education delivered in the context of routine health care is to be a major force in health promotion and disease prevention for youth. PMID:2629968

  5. A Comparative Study of University of Wisconsin-Stout Freshmen and Senior Education Major's Computing and Internet Technology Skills/Knowledge and Associated Learning Experiences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sveum, Evan Charles

    2010-01-01

    A study comparing University of Wisconsin-Stout freshmen and senior education majors' computing and Internet technology skills/knowledge and associated learning experiences was conducted. Instruments used in this study included the IC[superscript 3][R] Exam by Certiport, Inc. and the investigator's Computing and Internet Skills Learning…

  6. An Investigation of the Factors That Motivate Adults to Participate in Adult Basic Education (ABE) Classes at a Southeastern Wisconsin Community College

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crump-Phillips, Maureen R.

    2013-01-01

    This study assessed the plausibility of using Ajzen's (1991) theory of planned behavior (TPB) to identify the factors that motivate adults to participate in Adult Basic Education (ABE) classes at a Southeast Wisconsin Community College. The original TPB (Ajzen, 1991) attests that planned behaviors are determined by behavioral intentions which are…

  7. Analysis of Nutrition Education in Osteopathic Medical Schools

    OpenAIRE

    Kathaleen Briggs Early; Kelly M. Adams; Martin Kohlmeier

    2015-01-01

    Purpose. Describe nutrition education at US colleges of osteopathic medicine; determine if it meets recommended levels. Method. We surveyed 30 US colleges of osteopathic medicine (US COM) with a four-year curriculum about the amount and form of required nutrition education during the 2012/13 academic year. The online survey asked about hours of required nutrition across all 4 years and also in what types of courses this instruction occurred. We performed descriptive statistics to analyze the ...

  8. Role of Child Nutrition Programs in Health Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, M. Josephine

    The role of health educators in integrating child nutrition programs into school health education is discussed and issues attending such programs are considered. The importance of breakfast and lunch programs in the school is stressed with particular emphasis on using these programs to instruct children in sound nutritional practices. It is…

  9. Developing an Online Certification Program for Nutrition Education Assistants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christofferson, Debra; Christensen, Nedra; LeBlanc, Heidi; Bunch, Megan

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To develop an online certification program for nutrition education paraprofessionals to increase knowledge and confidence and to overcome training barriers of programming time and travel expenses. Design: An online interactive certification course based on Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program-Education and Expanded Food and…

  10. Favorable Impact of Nutrition Education on California WIC Families

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ritchie, Lorrene D.; Whaley, Shannon E.; Spector, Phil; Gomez, Judy; Crawford, Patricia B.

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To explore the impact of coordinated statewide nutrition education on Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants, and Children (WIC) family behavior regarding fruits and vegetables, whole grains, and lower-fat milk. Design: Survey of different cross-sectional samples of WIC families before and after education. Setting:…

  11. Development of a nutrition education intervention for food bank clients

    Science.gov (United States)

    The focus of this article is the development of a nutrition education intervention for food bank clients. Formative research using mixed-methods (qualitative and quantitative) and community-based participatory research principles was conducted to assess the nutrition education needs of clients obtai...

  12. Why and How Schools Make Nutrition Education Programs "Work"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porter, Kathleen J.; Koch, Pamela A.; Contento, Isobel R.

    2018-01-01

    Background: There are many potential health benefits to having nutrition education programs offered by expert outside sources in schools. However, little is known about why and how schools initiate, implement, and institutionalize them. Gaining this understanding may allow the impact and reach of nutrition and other health education programs in…

  13. A Reaction to: What about Health Educators? Nutrition Education for Allied Health Professionals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, Lori W.; Knol, Linda; Meyer, Mary Kay

    2012-01-01

    "What about Health Educators? Nutrition Education for Allied Health Professionals" describes an important issue in health care that is the provision of nutrition education. Obesity and chronic disease rates are rapidly increasing. Due to increase in the prevalence rates of obesity and nutrition-related chronic diseases, there is a growing need for…

  14. Role of behavioural feedback in nutrition education for enhancing nutrition knowledge and improving nutritional behaviour among adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Louisa Ming Yan; Fong, Shirley Siu Ming

    2018-01-01

    The integration of nutrition knowledge into nutritional behaviour can help children to develop a healthy lifestyle that may be carried forward into adulthood. E-learning enables students to take ownership of recording their dietary intake and modify their diets by making their own decisions regarding food choices and portion sizes through reflective feedback. This study investigated the role of behavioural feedback in nutrition education in modifying students' nutrition knowledge and behaviour. Ninety-five secondary students studying from Secondary 1 to Secondary 3 were recruited from five schools. Moreover, 50 and 45 students were randomly assigned to experimental and control groups, respectively. Nutrition education delivered through e-learning (NeL) was adopted to record students' diets. Online reports with behavioural feedback were provided for the experimental group but not for the control group. NeL sessions lasted for 12 weeks. The energy and nutrient profiles of the students were recorded as pre-post measurements. Pre-post nutrition knowledge was assessed using a self-administered questionnaire at the baseline and after intervention. The experimental group had significantly higher scores in the 'dietary recommendation' and 'food choices' domains of the questionnaire and demonstrated significant dietary improvement in the intake of all studied macronutrients and micronutrients. Nutrition education conducted with behavioural feedback can effectively improve adolescents' nutrition knowledge and nutritional behaviour.

  15. Development of school energy policy and energy education plans: A comparative case study in three Wisconsin school communities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lane, Jennie F.; Floress, Kristin; Rickert, Melissa

    2014-01-01

    Through a qualitative comparative case study, this investigation examined the process by which three school districts in Wisconsin, U.S.A., developed a school energy policy and complementary energy education plan. To guide the process, the researchers created an outline of recommended steps for the districts to follow. Although there were variations in the sequence and perceived ease of the steps, the Energy Task Force members involved in the process found the outline to be a supportive guide. Further analysis of the cases involved interviewing members of the Energy Task Forces to identify facilitating and obstructing factors. The study concluded that factors such as level of environmental literacy, along with aspects of the school culture and leadership, interacted to influence the successful drafting of school energy policies and education plans. In addition to introducing an outline of recommended steps that can be used by other school policy development teams interested in promoting energy efficiency, this study adds insights into the analysis of energy policy work within the context of a school setting. - Highlights: • School energy policy and complementary energy education plans can be successfully developed with guidelines for policy team membership. • Teacher agency, including environmental literacy, helps overcome barriers in developing school policy and energy education plans. • Administrative support of energy conservation is a key to the development of school energy policies and complementary energy education plans

  16. Proposal for medical school nutrition education: topics and recommendations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedman, Gerald; Kushner, Robert; Alger-Mayer, Sharon; Bistrian, Bruce; Gramlich, Leah; Marik, Paul E

    2010-01-01

    The mission of increasing the number of physician nutrition experts requires focused nutrition education directed at medical students across the 4-year curriculum and into postgraduate training. Courses should be horizontally and vertically integrated, bridging the basic sciences and clinical medicine. It is anticipated that the Liaison Committee on Medical Education and Association of American Medical Colleges will require competency in nutrition with emphasis on preventive and therapeutic applications. Barriers to implementation of nutrition courses can be overcome by using innovative teaching in association with cooperative course directors. Analysis of prior governmental efforts, through the Nutrition Academic Award, provides a basis for targeting fundamental knowledge and creative methods for achieving educational goals. Recommendations for short-term and long-term ideas for increasing the number of adequate physician nutrition experts are offered.

  17. Medical students' perceptions of nutrition education in Canadian universities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gramlich, Leah M; Olstad, Dana Lee; Nasser, Roseanne; Goonewardene, Laki; Raman, Maitreyi; Innis, Sheila; Wicklum, Sonja; Duerksen, Donald; Rashid, Mohsin; Heyland, Daren; Armstrong, David; Roy, Claude

    2010-06-01

    Patients routinely seek physicians' guidance about diet and the relation between nutrition and the prevention and treatment of disease. However, the adequacy of nutrition instruction in undergraduate medical education is questionable. The purpose of this study was to investigate Canadian medical students' perceptions of and satisfaction with their education in nutrition. At 9 universities across Canada, a 23-item survey questionnaire was distributed in English and French to undergraduate medical students after at least 8 months of medical school. Overall, 9 of 17 universities participated in the survey, and 933 of the 3267 medical students approached completed the survey (response rate, 28.6%). Mean satisfaction with nutrition instruction received during medical school was 4.7 (+/-0.06) on a scale of 1-10, where 1 is very dissatisfied and 10 is very satisfied, and there were significant differences among schools (p Students were comfortable in their ability to counsel patients regarding basic nutrition concepts and the role of nutrition in prevention of disease, but were much less comfortable discussing the role of nutrition in the treatment of disease and nutrient requirements across the lifecycle, and in identifying credible sources of nutrition information. Of the 933 respondents, 87.2% believe that their undergraduate program should dedicate more time to nutrition education. The amount of nutrition instruction correlated with student satisfaction (p students are dissatisfied with the nutrition education they receive and their ability to provide relevant and appropriate nutrition counselling. This study paves the way for further discussions and development of strategies to improve nutrition education in medical schools in Canada.

  18. How To Teach Nutrition to Kids: An Integrated, Creative Approach to Nutrition Education for Children Ages 6-10.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evers, Connie Liakos

    This book presents nutrition education activities and strategies that are child-tested and teacher-endorsed. It targets educators, nutrition professionals, parents, and other caregivers, offering the tools to teach children ages 6-10 years about nutrition in a meaningful, integrated way. Divided by subject, this resource integrates nutrition into…

  19. Position of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics: Interprofessional Education in Nutrition as an Essential Component of Medical Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hark, Lisa A; Deen, Darwin

    2017-07-01

    It is the position of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics that registered dietitian nutritionists (RDNs) should play a significant role in educating medical students, residents, fellows, and physicians in practice. The more physicians learn about the effectiveness of nutrition for the prevention and treatment of noncommunicable diseases, the more likely they are to consult with RDNs and refer patients for medical nutrition therapy. The more interprofessional education that occurs between medical students, other health professional students, and RDNs, the more likely all health care professionals will understand and value the role of the RDN in improving the quality of care provided to patients. The training and experience of RDNs make them uniquely qualified for the role of educating medical students about nutrition as it relates to health and disease. This position paper provides RDNs with the tools and language to emphasize to medical educators, course directors, curriculum committees, medical school deans, residency and fellowship directors, physicians, and other health professionals in training and practice how ongoing nutrition counseling and management, conducted by an RDN, can benefit their patients. Specific teaching settings and examples for RDNs to take a leadership role (paid and unpaid positions) in ensuring that future physicians discuss nutrition, healthy lifestyle, and physical activity with their patients, consult with RDNs, and refer patients for medical nutrition therapy are presented. This position paper supports interprofessional education in nutrition as an essential component of medical education. Copyright © 2017 Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Midwives and nutrition education during pregnancy: a literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arrish, Jamila; Yeatman, Heather; Williamson, Moira

    2014-03-01

    This review explored the extent to which the role of midwives in nutrition education during pregnancy has been reported in the literature and areas requiring further research were identified. A review of the literature was undertaken. Articles included in the review were published in English, in scholarly journals, and provided information about the knowledge, education, and attitudes of midwives towards nutrition during pregnancy. Few studies were identified. The included studies were exploratory and descriptive. Studies had reported that midwives lacked a basic knowledge of nutrition requirements during pregnancy. This might be attributed to inadequate nutrition education provided in both undergraduate and postgraduate midwifery programmes. The nutrition education components of midwifery courses were not identified within the studies reviewed. Limited international or Australian research is available that reports on the role of midwives in nutrition education during pregnancy and the nutrition content of midwifery curricula. This represents an important omission in midwives capacity to support the health of pregnant women and their babies. More research is required to explore the educational needs of midwives to enhance nutritional care for pregnant women. Copyright © 2013 Australian College of Midwives. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Bringing physician nutrition specialists into the mainstream: rationale for the Intersociety Professional Nutrition Education Consortium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998-10-01

    Given the prevalence of nutritionally related chronic diseases in American society, the training of physicians should include a focus on the relations of diet to disease. Yet, despite scientific data, public interest, US government reports, society studies, and congressional mandates, the teaching of nutrition in medical schools and residency programs remains inadequate. The authority whom patients most wish to consult for information on health-their physician-thus remains insufficiently informed about the role of diet in the prevention and treatment of disease. New efforts must be initiated to train nutrition-literate physicians. The principal obstacle to nutrition literacy among physicians is the paucity of physician nutrition specialists (PNSs) on medical school faculties who can effectively advocate for change in medical school and residency curricula and who can serve as role models for incorporating nutrition into patient care. To encourage nutrition societies to unite in addressing these issues, the Intersociety Professional Nutrition Education Consortium was founded in 1997. The Consortium aims to establish educational standards for fellowship training and a unified mechanism for posttraining certification of PNSs, and to develop a long-term plan to increase the pool of PNSs and surmount obstacles that currently impede the incorporation of nutrition education into the curricula of medical schools and primary-care residency programs.

  2. Evaluation of US Veterans Nutrition Education for Diabetes Prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erickson, Megan; Braun, Katie; List, Riesa; Utech, Anne; Moore, Carolyn; White, Donna L; Garcia, Jose M

    2016-09-01

    Evaluate the effectiveness of nutrition education interventions for diabetes prevention. Retrospective cohort design. Tertiary-care US Veterans' Hospital, July 2007 to July 2012, using pre-existing database. Prediabetic, adult veterans (n = 372), mostly men (94.4%, n = 351). Visits with existing nutrition education classes were collected. diabetes status; predictors: visits/encounters, age, body mass index, weight change, and hemoglobin A1c. Cox proportional hazards method, χ(2) test, and logistic regression. In this sample, prediabetic veterans who received nutrition education were less likely to develop diabetes when compared with prediabetic veterans who did not receive nutrition education (hazard ratio, 0.71; 95% confidence interval, 0.55-0.92; P Nutrition education was significantly associated with preventing the progression from prediabetes to diabetes in US Veterans participating in a nutrition education intervention at the Michael E. DeBakey Veterans Affairs Medical Center. Copyright © 2016 Society for Nutrition Education and Behavior. All rights reserved.

  3. Implementation of a nutrition education program in a handball team; consequences on nutritional status.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molina-López, Jorge; Molina, José Manuel; Chirosa, Luis Javier; Florea, Daniela; Sáez, Laura; Jiménez, Jorge; Planells, Paloma; Pérez de la Cruz, Antonio; Planells, Elena

    2013-01-01

    To evaluate nutritional status and dietary habits after implementation of a nutritional education program in professional handball players. Longitudinal study of 14 handball players evaluated with 72-h recall, a questionnaire on food consumption and anthropometric measures during 4 months. The intervention consisted of a nutrition education program. Energy intake was consistently below the recommended allowances. Macronutrient intakes as a percentage of total energy intake were below the recommended allowances for carbohydrates, and above recommended allowances for fats. Nutritional education was followed by a significant increase (p Nutritional education with continuous follow-up to monitor athletes' dietary habits may lead them to adopt appropriate nutritional habits to optimize dietary intakes. The lack of specific recommendations for micronutrient intakes in athletes leads to confusion regarding appropriate intakes; biochemical tests that yield normal values (albeit approaching cut-off values for deficiency) may disguise deficient status for some nutrients when strenuous exercise is involved. In-depth studies with nutrition education programs that include long-term follow-up are advisable to avoid deficiencies that can lead to irreversible damage in competitive athletes. Copyright © AULA MEDICA EDICIONES 2013. Published by AULA MEDICA. All rights reserved.

  4. Should Physical Activity Be Included in Nutrition Education? A Comparison of Nutrition Outcomes with and without In-Class Activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmer-Keenan, Debra M.; Corda, Kirsten

    2014-01-01

    Limited-resource adults' dietary intakes and nutrition behaviors improve as a result of Expanded Food and Nutrition Education Program (EFNEP)/Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program Education (SNAP-Ed) participation; however, physical activity education is needed for improved health. The experimental study reported here assessed if spending time…

  5. Education of food irradiation. Study for students majoring in nutrition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Minami, Ikuko

    2014-01-01

    As the credential for nutrition counselor with professional skills and knowledge for invalids, who also provides the nutrition education for local residence at the administrative organization, the qualification system of registered dietitian has been established in Japan. Additionally, in accordance with the legislation of Basic Act on Food Education and the revision of School Education Law, the Diet and Nutrition Teacher System has established in 2005. Therefore, registered dietitian has been approved to teach at the elementary school or junior high school as a teacher. Since registered dietitian is the educator of the “diet and nutrition,” it is important to provide proper knowledge of food irradiation at the training facility for registered dietitian. This report describes the instruction of food irradiation at the education curriculum of the registered dietitian training course. In addition, questionnaire survey result on the knowledge of food irradiation gathered from newly-enrolled students in the registered dietitian training course will also be reported. (author)

  6. Nutrition education, behavioral theories, and the scientific method: another viewpoint.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lytle, Leslie A

    2005-01-01

    In a previous viewpoint in this journal, David Buchanan suggested that the scientific model is inappropriate, ineffective, and possibly unethical in nutrition education research and championed the use of a more humanistic model. The purpose of this article is to provide a counterpoint to Buchanan's views. More specifically, this article will provide another interpretation of the current status of the scientific method in the social and behavioral sciences, will examine how the field of nutrition education has benefited from the use of the scientific method to evaluate behavioral theories, and will discuss what we are trying to achieve by using theory in nutrition education.

  7. Social media and nutrition education: the food hero experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tobey, Lauren N; Manore, Melinda M

    2014-01-01

    Social media can be a quick, low-cost, direct way for nutrition educators to broaden the scope of their targeted programs. The authors' viewpoint is that for social media to be effective, strategies for its use should follow "best practices" guidelines. This viewpoint suggests social media best practices based on experience gained from the Food Hero social marketing campaign. Understanding of how nutrition educators can take advantage of social media as a new mechanism for reaching their target audience is needed, including best practices for implementation, management, and evaluation. Copyright © 2014 Society for Nutrition Education and Behavior. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. 7 CFR Appendix to Part 227 - Apportionment of Funds for Nutrition Education and Training

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Apportionment of Funds for Nutrition Education and... NUTRITION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE CHILD NUTRITION PROGRAMS NUTRITION EDUCATION AND TRAINING PROGRAM Pt. 227, App. Appendix to Part 227—Apportionment of Funds for Nutrition Education and Training...

  9. 7 CFR 227.37 - State plan for nutrition education and training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false State plan for nutrition education and training. 227... NUTRITION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE CHILD NUTRITION PROGRAMS NUTRITION EDUCATION AND TRAINING PROGRAM State Coordinator Provisions § 227.37 State plan for nutrition education and training. (a) General...

  10. Diet and Colorectal Cancer Risk: Evaluation of a Nutrition Education Leaflet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dyer, K. J.; Fearon, K. C. H.; Buckner, K.; Richardson, R. A.

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the effect of a needs-based, nutrition education leaflet on nutritional knowledge. Design: Comparison of nutritional knowledge levels before and after exposure to a nutrition education leaflet. Setting: A regional colorectal out-patient clinic in Edinburgh. Method: A nutrition education leaflet, based on an earlier…

  11. Nutrition education for care staff and possible effects on nutritional status in residents of sheltered accommodation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faxén-Irving, G; Andrén-Olsson, B; Geijerstam, A; Basun, H; Cederholm, T

    2005-08-01

    We investigated the nutritional, cognitive and functional status in residents of two service-flat (SF) complexes and the effects of a nutrition education programme for care staff. Controlled nonrandomised study. Two SF complexes, that is community-assisted accommodation. Of 115 eligible SF residents, 80 subjects participated (age 83+/-7 y, 70% women). The nutritional status was assessed using body mass index (BMI, kg/m(2)), subjective global assessment (SGA), serum concentrations of albumin, insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I) and vitamin B(12). Cognitive and functional status were evaluated using the Mini Mental State Examination (MMSE, 0-30 points, education programme was given to the staff at one of the SF complexes. At baseline, the means of BMI and the biochemical nutritional indices were normal, whereas one-third had BMI or =10% of previous weight. According to SGA, 30% demonstrated possible or serious malnutrition. The median MMSE was 23 points (19.5-26.5, 25-75th percentile). Nearly 70% were ADL-independent. At the 5-month follow-up there were no differences in the nutritional and cognitive status of the residents. The nutritional knowledge of the staff improved slightly (Pnutritional risk. Five months after a 12-h staff nutrition education programme, no objective changes were seen in the nutritional status of the SF residents.

  12. Effect of Digital Nutrition Education Intervention on the Nutritional Knowledge Levels of Information Technology Professionals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Priya; Rani, M Usha

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to determine the changes in knowledge of information technology (IT) professionals after receiving a nutrition education intervention for a month. The sample comprised of 40 IT professionals (29 males and 11 females). The sample was drawn from four IT companies of Hyderabad city using random sampling techniques. The data on the general information of the subjects was collected. The data regarding the commonly accessed sources of nutrition and health information by the subjects was also obtained from the study. The intervention study group received nutrition education by distribution of the developed CD-ROMs to them followed by interactive sessions. To assess the impact of nutrition education intervention, the knowledge assessment questionnaire (KAQ) was developed and administered before and after the education programme. A significant improvement in the mean nutritional knowledge scores was observed among the total study subjects from 22.30 to 40.55 after the intervention (p educated groups on nutrition, physical activity and overall health education to improve their health, lifestyle and eating habits.

  13. Food and Nutrition Education in Private Indian Secondary Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rathi, Neha; Riddell, Lynn; Worsley, Anthony

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: The current Indian secondary school curriculum has been criticised for its failure to deliver relevant skills-based food and nutrition education for adolescents. The purpose of this paper is to understand the views of adolescents, their parents, teachers and school principals on the present food and nutrition curriculum and the role of…

  14. Nutrition Education. Michigan School Food Service Training Manual.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michigan State Dept. of Education, Lansing.

    Inservice training should motivate school food workers to participate in children's nutrition education. The training lesson includes a series of service manager/director guidelines, information sheets, and an audiovisual aids list. Food staff nutrition lessons for classroom presentation to grades 4 to 6 cover the daily food guide, snacks,…

  15. Nutrition education and counselling as strategic interventions to ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Malnutrition poses a significant risk for people living with HIV and accelerates disease progression. This is because adequate nutrition is essential for optimal immune function. This article discusses research on the role and use of nutrition education or counselling as a strategic intervention to improve health outcomes ...

  16. Nutrition education and promotion in the U.S

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nutrition is key at every developmental stage of life from the embryo to old age and is fundamentally important in the maintenance of health, disease prevention, and well-being. Thus, nutrition education to the American public at every sector of life and within every economic strata is paramount to...

  17. A prospective study of nutrition education and oral nutritional supplementation in patients with Alzheimer's disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brant César Q

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Weight loss in patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD is a common clinical manifestation that may have clinical significance. Objectives To evaluate if there is a difference between nutrition education and oral nutritional supplementation on nutritional status in patients with AD. Methods A randomized, prospective 6-month study which enrolled 90 subjects with probable AD aged 65 years or older divided into 3 groups: Control Group (CG [n = 27], Education Group (EG [n = 25], which participated in an education program and Supplementation Group (SG [n = 26], which received two daily servings of oral nutritional supplementation. Subjects were assessed for anthropometric data (weight, height, BMI, TSF, AC and AMC, biochemical data (total protein, albumin, and total lymphocyte count, CDR (Clinical Dementia Rating, MMSE (Mini-mental state examination, as well as dependence during meals. Results The SG showed a significant improvement in the following anthropometric measurements: weight (H calc = 22.12, p = Conclusion Oral nutritional supplementation is more effective compared to nutrition education in improving nutritional status.

  18. Nutrition education for adolescents: principals' views.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai-Yeung, Wai-Ling Theresa

    2011-01-01

    This study aimed to examine school principals' perceptions of the school environment in Hong Kong as a context for the dissemination of food knowledge and inculcation of healthy eating habits. A questionnaire survey was administered in secondary schools in Hong Kong to survey Principals' views of students' food choices, operation of the school tuck shop, and promotion of healthy eating at school. Questionnaires were disseminated to all the secondary schools offering Home Economics (300 out of 466), and 188 schools responded, making up a response rate of 63%. Collected data were analyzed using SPSS. Most of the schools (82%) claimed to have a food policy to monitor the operation of the school canteen, and about half (52%) asserted there were insufficient resources to promote healthy eating at school. Principals (88%) generally considered it not acceptable for the school tuck shop to sell junk food; however, 45% thought that banning junk food at school would not help students develop good eating habits. Only 4% of the principals believed nutrition education influenced eating habits; whereas the majority (94%) felt that even with acquisition of food knowledge, students may not be able to put theory into practice. Cooking skills were considered important but principals (92%) considered transmission of cooking skills the responsibility of the students' families. Most of the principals (94%) believed that school-family collaboration is important in promoting healthy eating. Further efforts should be made to enhance the effectiveness of school food policies and to construct healthy school environments in secondary schools.

  19. Health inequalities in Lithuania: education and nutrition habits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grabauskas, Vilius; Petkeviciene, Janina; Kriaucioniene, Vilma; Klumbiene, Jūrate

    2004-01-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate the associations between food behavior and educational level among Lithuanian adult population. Five health behavior surveys were carried out within the international Finbalt Health Monitor project in 1994-2002. For every survey the national random sample of 3000 inhabitants aged 20-64 was taken from the National Population Register. The study material was collected through mailed questionnaires covering sociodemographic characteristics and some nutrition habits. The respondents were categorized according to the level of education into three groups: persons having incomplete secondary, secondary and university education. Multiple regression analysis was used for evaluation of associations between level of education and nutrition habits. The persons with university education have a healthier diet than those with incomplete secondary education. The consumption of fish, vegetables and fruit, use of vegetable oil for cooking, was substantially higher in those with university education as compared to persons with incomplete secondary education. The proportion of persons drinking whole milk was the highest among the low educated men and women. The high-educated women consumed meat less often than those with incomplete secondary education did. However, persons with university education preferred butter on bread. The high-educated men consumed cheese daily more often than those with low education. The positive trends in nutrition habits of Lithuanians were observed between 1994 and 2002. However, educational differences in nutrition habits still remain significant. In conclusion, alongside with other health interventions, the programs aimed at reducing inequalities in health should consider the educational differences in nutrition habits of Lithuanians paying more attention to less educated persons.

  20. Past, present, and future of computer-tailored nutrition education

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J. Brug (Hans); A. Oenema (Anke); M.K. Campbell (Marci)

    2003-01-01

    textabstractComputer-tailored nutrition education is an innovative and promising tool to motivate people to make healthy dietary changes. It provides respondents with individualized feedback about their dietary behaviors, motivations, attitudes, norms, and skills and mimics the

  1. Elements of effective nutrition education for adults with Diabetes ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This review article highlights the key factors that need consideration in planning an effective nutrition education programme for adults with type 2 diabetes mellitus in ... Adequate contact time with an educator (> 10 hours), the educator's competence, provision of social support and follow-up intervention are also crucial.

  2. Microenterprise development coupled with nutrition education can ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Low income and lack of knowledge about child nutrition have been identified as key constraints to the use of Animal Source Foods (ASF) in the diets of young Ghanaian children. To improve ASF consumption among children in Ghana, the Enhancing Child Nutrition through Animal Source Food Management (ENAM) project ...

  3. The State of Nutrition Education at US Medical Schools

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kelly M. Adams

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. To assess the state of nutrition education at US medical schools and compare it with recommended instructional targets. Method. We surveyed all 133 US medical schools with a four-year curriculum about the extent and type of required nutrition education during the 2012/13 academic year. Results. Responses came from 121 institutions (91% response rate. Most US medical schools (86/121, 71% fail to provide the recommended minimum 25 hours of nutrition education; 43 (36% provide less than half that much. Nutrition instruction is still largely confined to preclinical courses, with an average of 14.3 hours occurring in this context. Less than half of all schools report teaching any nutrition in clinical practice; practice accounts for an average of only 4.7 hours overall. Seven of the 8 schools reporting at least 40 hours of nutrition instruction provided integrated courses together with clinical practice sessions. Conclusions. Many US medical schools still fail to prepare future physicians for everyday nutrition challenges in clinical practice. It cannot be a realistic expectation for physicians to effectively address obesity, diabetes, metabolic syndrome, hospital malnutrition, and many other conditions as long as they are not taught during medical school and residency training how to recognize and treat the nutritional root causes.

  4. How Important is Parental Education for Child Nutrition?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alderman, Harold; Headey, Derek D

    2017-06-01

    Existing evidence on the impacts of parental education on child nutrition is plagued by both internal and external validity concerns. In this paper we try to address these concerns through a novel econometric analysis of 376,992 preschool children from 56 developing countries. We compare a naïve least square model to specifications that include cluster fixed effects and cohort-based educational rankings to reduce biases from omitted variables before gauging sensitivity to sub-samples and exploring potential explanations of education-nutrition linkages. We find that the estimated nutritional returns to parental education are: (a) substantially reduced in models that include fixed effects and cohort rankings; (b) larger for mothers than for fathers; (c) generally increasing, and minimal for primary education; (d) increasing with household wealth; (e) larger in countries/regions with higher burdens of undernutrition; (f) larger in countries/regions with higher schooling quality; and (g) highly variable across country sub-samples. These results imply substantial uncertainty and variability in the returns to education, but results from the more stringent models imply that even the achievement of very ambitious education targets would only lead to modest reductions in stunting rates in high-burden countries. We speculate that education might have more impact on the nutritional status of the next generation if school curricula focused on directly improving health and nutritional knowledge of future parents.

  5. Establishment and issues of new educational system by nutrition teachers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maruya, Nobuko; Kaneda, Masayo; Namikawa, Shintaro; Nakajima, Tomoko; Tamon, Takako; Murai, Yoko

    2005-08-01

    The Japanese school lunch system, which has over 100 y of history, has gained world attention for its well-developed and steady system, healthy Japanese-style menus including rice, and educational programs utilizing the school lunch system. Meanwhile, risk factors of health among students have been continuously worsening for the past dozen years or so. Therefore, Japan had hastened to develop better educational programs utilizing the school lunch and nutritional teachers. Under such circumstances, the Japanese Diet passed a bill to amend the School Education Law (hereinafter called the Amendment) which includes the establishment of an educational system by nutrition teachers in May, 2004. This system will be enforced in April, 2005. This system by nutrition teachers in Japan is well organized in both the legal and administrative senses and is attracting domestic and international attention as an example of an educational measure to improve the dietary life of students. The reason for this article in English is the additional intention of enlightening other countries by showing the political promotion problems of educational administration agencies, educational contents of nutrition teachers and some issues of the new educational system by nutrition teachers.

  6. Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program: Nutrition Education and Obesity Prevention Grant Program. Final rule.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-03-31

    This rule adopts the interim rule implementing the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) nutrition education and obesity prevention grant program with changes as provided in this rule. This rule also amends SNAP regulations to implement section 28 of the Food and Nutrition Act (FNA) of 2008, as added by section 241 of the Healthy, Hunger-Free Kids Act (HHFKA) of 2010, to award grants to States for provision of nutrition education and obesity prevention programs. These programs provide services for eligible individuals that promote healthy food choices consistent with the current Dietary Guidelines for Americans (DGAs). The rule provides State agencies with requirements for implementing section 28, including the grant award process and describes the process for allocating the Federal grant funding for each State's approved SNAP-Ed plan authorized under the FNA to carry out nutrition education and obesity prevention services each fiscal year. This final rule also implements section 4028 of the Agricultural Act of 2014 (Farm Bill of 2014), which authorizes physical activity promotion in addition to promotion of healthy food choices as part of this nutrition education and obesity prevention program.

  7. Urban Health Educators' Perspectives and Practices regarding School Nutrition Education Policies

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCaughtry, Nate; Martin, Jeffrey J.; Fahlman, Mariane; Shen, Bo

    2012-01-01

    Although nutrition-related health education policies exist at national, state and local levels, the degree to which those policies affect the everyday practices of health education teachers who are charged with executing them in schools is often unclear. The purpose of this study was to examine the nutrition-related health education policy matrix…

  8. The Effects of Nutrition Education on 6th Graders Knowledge of Nutrition in Nine-Year Primary Schools in Slovenia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kostanjevec, Stojan; Jerman, Janez; Koch, Verena

    2011-01-01

    Incorporating nutrition topics in the primary school curricula should support the acquisition of nutrition knowledge in different ways and indirectly the development of healthy eating habits in children and teenagers. In Slovenia, nutrition education is part of all primary school education levels and may take the form of compulsory and/or elective…

  9. Interactive computer programs for applied nutrition education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wise, A

    1985-12-01

    DIET2 and DIET3 are programs written for a Dec2050 computer and intended for teaching applied nutrition to students of nutrition, dietetics, home economics, and hotel and institutional administration. DIET2 combines all the facilities of the separate dietary programs already available at Robert Gordon's Institute of Technology into a single package, and extends these to give students a large amount of relevant information about the nutritional balance of foods (including DHSS and NACNE recommendations) prior to choosing them for meals. Students are also helped by the inclusion of typical portion weights. They are presented with an analysis of nutrients and their balance in the menu created, with an easy mechanism for ammendation of the menu and addition of foods which provide the nutrients that are lacking. At any stage the computer can give the proportion of total nutrient provided by each meal. DIET3 is a relatively simple program that displays the nutritional profile of foods and diets semigraphically.

  10. A NUTRITION OVERVIEW THROUGH CENTURIES. THE PRESENT-DAY NEED OF NUTRITIONAL EDUCATION IN SCHOOLS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simona ILAŞ

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The type of alimentation and the food quality of individuals has undergone remarkable changes along with the progress of the human species. This study contains an historical overview regarding human nutrition from the primitive forms until the paradoxes of contemporary alimentation. Nutritional education aims to inform and to train a person about food choices, dosage and cooking, how to identify authentic food and to understand the value of nutrition. Children need a balanced diet in order to grow and to become healthy adults. The importance of nutritional education in school is discussed taking into account the need of creating healthy eating habits which should be followed through the whole life, but also the lack of physical activity to children.

  11. Innovative approaches in nutrition education in the Pacific region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jabre, B

    1981-01-01

    It has often been said that ignorance is the most cause of malnutrition. However, in the Pacific Islands rapid modernization has confronted the people with the realization that their traditional way of life is no longer applicable and socially acceptable: this has led to the adoption of practices that are not fully understood or carried out properly (as is the case in bottle feeding). The nutrition education programme described in the paper attempts to halp individuals and communities become aware of the changes taking place and their consequences, and to provide them with the knowledge they need to seek solutions by themselves. To consolidate nutrition education in the various islands, training is undertaken by the Community Education Training Centre and in the territories through in-service courses. The level of training is highly practical and stresses skills and information useful for village people. Emphasis is on methods of motivating the community and techniques in nutrition education; the use of growth charts, cooking demonstrations, vegetable gardens and the proper use of audio-visual aids. One aim is to promote the consumption of coconut milk instead of soft drinks, while a major focus is the encouragement of breast feeding. Recipes are traditional ones modified for higher nutritive value, such as the addition of vegetables, perhaps taro leaves, or banana flower to a typical fish soup. In school, learning units have also been developed to promote appreciation of local food. Apart from the conventional educational techniques and materials, new aids are being utilised, especially games: nutrition bingo, gin rummy, menu planning games, the coconut climber's game, nutrition puzzles, etc. It is the author's experience that, to be effective, nutrition education programmes have to be an integral part of a national strategy aimed at combatting malnutrition. Isolated efforts may be better than none, but results remain marginal, if only because there is such a

  12. [Popular education in health and nutrition: literature review].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mueses De Molina, C

    1993-01-01

    This literature review of popular education in health and nutrition is intended to provide the necessary theoretical framework for proposals and programs for human resource development in food and nutrition. The work contains a summary of the objectives, purposes, and methodology of popular education in general, a discussion of applications of popular education techniques to health and nutrition education, and a description of some projects based on popular education. Popular education was developed in Latin America by Paulo Freire and others as a response to political domination. Its basic objective was to make the oppressed masses aware of their condition and able to struggle for the transformation of society. Popular education views community participation, development of consciousness, and integration with social and economic activity as fundamental attributes. Participation should be developed through community organizations and should continue for the duration of the educational intervention. The right of all persons to participate in a plane of equality should be recognized. Community or popular education should be conceived as a process of permanent education that will continue throughout the lifetime of individuals and groups. Popular education is directed toward population sectors excluded from participation in employment, family, community, mass communications, education, and leisure activities. Such population sectors are concentrated in the urban periphery and in rural areas. Abandonment of traditional educational techniques and assumption of an active role by community members are elements in development of the methodology of popular education. Steps in the methodology include investigation of possible themes, selection of themes to serve as points of departure, definition of the problem, and action programs. Popular education in nutrition and health begins by asking what problems need to be remedied. The entire process of training and education in

  13. Analysis of Nutrition Education in Osteopathic Medical Schools

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kathaleen Briggs Early

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. Describe nutrition education at US colleges of osteopathic medicine; determine if it meets recommended levels. Method. We surveyed 30 US colleges of osteopathic medicine (US COM with a four-year curriculum about the amount and form of required nutrition education during the 2012/13 academic year. The online survey asked about hours of required nutrition across all 4 years and also in what types of courses this instruction occurred. We performed descriptive statistics to analyze the data. Results. Twenty-six institutions (87% response rate completed the survey. Most responding US COM (22/26, 85% do not meet the recommended minimum 25 hours of nutrition education; 8 (31% provide less than half as much. Required nutrition instruction is largely confined to preclinical courses, with an average of 15.7 hours. Only 7 of the 26 responding schools report teaching clinical nutrition practice, providing on average 4.1 hours. Conclusions. Most US COM are inadequately preparing osteopathic physicians for the challenges they will face in practice addressing the nutritional concerns of their patients. Doctors of osteopathy cannot be expected to properly treat patients or guide the prevention of cardiovascular disease, obesity, cancer, diabetes, and metabolic syndrome if they are not trained to identify and modify the contributing lifestyle factors.

  14. Education for Self-Responsibility IV: Nutrition Education Curriculum Guide. Prekindergarten-Grade 4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Texas Tech Univ., Lubbock. Home Economics Curriculum Center.

    This is the first part of a three-part curriculum guide dedicated to improving the nutritional status of children and adolescents as well as inspiring lifetime habits of healthy eating. It is also a total nutrition education program that encompasses nutritional aspects of the child's daily life both at school and at home. Teachers are provided…

  15. Education for Self-Responsibility IV: Nutrition Education Curriculum Guide. Grade 5-Grade 8.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Texas Tech Univ., Lubbock. Home Economics Curriculum Center.

    This is the second part of a three part curriculum guide dedicated to improving the nutritional status of children and adolescents as well as inspiring lifetime habits of healthy eating. It is also a total nutrition education program that encompasses nutritional aspects of the child's daily life both at school and at home. Teachers are provided…

  16. Education for Self-Responsibility IV: Nutrition Education Curriculum Guide. Grade 9-Grade 12.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Texas Tech Univ., Lubbock. Home Economics Curriculum Center.

    This is the third part of a three-part curriculum guide dedicated to improving the nutritional status of children and adolescents as well as inspiring lifetime habits of healthy eating. It is also a total nutrition education program that encompasses nutritional aspects of a student's daily life both at school and at home. Teachers are provided…

  17. Analysis of nutrition (and food education syllabus of nutrition undergraduate courses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elisabetta RECINE

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Objective: To analyze the Nutrition Education discipline syllabus in Nutrition undergraduate courses in Brazil. Methods: This is a qualitative, exploratory, descriptive cross-sectional study, carried out in the form of survey. A letter of invitation was sent to higher education institutions that had at least one class that graduated by the end of the first semester of 2010 and provided the Nutrition education discipline syllabus. The software Analyse Lexicale par Contexte d'un Ensemble de Segments de Texte (Image, Toulouse, França version 4.7 was used in the textual data analysis of the syllabuses, and the social representation theory was adopted as the theoretical model. Results: Data were obtained from 46 participant higher education institutions (11.7%, of which 18 were public institutions. Lexical analysis revealed the formation of two independent axes, which were composed respectively of words from the reference list of relevant books and articles included in the discipline syllabus and words related to the discipline program, indicating a lack of association between "reference list" and "text". As for the syllabus content, it was observed that the educational process should be composed of analysis, planning, and implementation, but these three steps (defined by classes do not seem to be related or connected to each other, demonstrating a nutrition (and food education teaching gap. Conclusion: This analysis revealed the need to restructure the nutrition education syllabuses to promote greater integration between theory and practice. However, in order to ensure higher qualification and competence of future professionals, it is suggested deeper consideration including the political-pedagogical projects of nutrition undergraduate programs and the Diretrizes Curriculares Nacionais (National Curriculum Guidelines.

  18. Effects of an individualised nutritional education and support programme on dietary habits, nutritional knowledge and nutritional status of older adults living alone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahn, Jeong-Ah; Park, JeeWon; Kim, Chun-Ja

    2017-09-07

    The effects of an individualised nutritional education and support programme on dietary habits, nutritional knowledge and nutritional status of 71 older adults living alone were examined. Although a regular dietary meal plan is recommended for improving nutritional status of older adults living alone, little research is done in this field in Korea. A pre- and post-test controlled quasi-experimental design was used at public health centres. The intervention group participated in an intensive nutritional education and support programme once a week for 8 weeks with dietary menus provided by home visiting nurses/dieticians; control group received usual care. Dietary habits and nutritional knowledge were assessed using structured questionnaires; nutritional intake status was analysed using Computer Aided Nutritional Analysis Program 5.0. The mean age of participants was 77.6 years, and 81.7% of the participants were women. At 8 weeks, there were significant interactions of group by time for dietary habits, nutritional knowledge and selected nutritional status of protein, iron and vitamins of B 2 and C. Changes over time in the mean score of dietary habits and nutritional knowledge were significantly improved in the intervention group compared to the control group. The percentages of normal nutrition intake of protein, iron and vitamins A and C in the intervention group were significantly higher than the control group at 8 weeks. Nutritional education and support programme positively impacted dietary habits, nutritional knowledge and selected nutritional status in older adults living alone, and we highlight the need for community-based nutritional education and counselling programmes. Older adults living alone in a community have relatively poor nutritional status and thus require tailored nutritional intervention according to objective nutritional analysis. It is necessary to link visiting nurses with dieticians in the community to manage effective nutritional

  19. Food and nutrition education in school environment: an integrative review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aline Tecchio Borsoi

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The Food and Nutrition Education is a strategy to promote health and healthy eating habits. The school environment rises as a suitable place to develop these actions. Through Integrative Literature Review, we could identify the characteristics of scientific production on the Food and Nutrition Education at school from 2002 to 2013. The sample of this review consisted of 17 articles. It was observed that it has been giving more emphasis to this issue from 2009. Nine of the selected studies opted for intervention methodologies, and eight of them have proposed to consolidate the practice of educators, administrators and school cafeteria owners, the understanding of Food and Nutrition Education. The actions accomplished were characterized as slightly critical and participatory strategies based on the transmission of information. It concludes the need for approaches to treating eating disorders broadly at school, through problem-solving methodologies that go beyond the mere transmission of information.

  20. Subjects' experiences of a nutrition education programme: a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Subjects' experiences of a nutrition education programme: a qualitative study of adults with type 2 diabetes mellitus living in a rural resource-limited setting in South Africa. ... Positive educator characteristics, such as competence, patience, being respectful and approachable, were cited as desirable. Conclusion: ...

  1. Australian midwives and provision of nutrition education during pregnancy: A cross sectional survey of nutrition knowledge, attitudes, and confidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arrish, Jamila; Yeatman, Heather; Williamson, Moira

    2016-10-01

    Maternal nutrition during pregnancy affects the health of the mother and the baby. Midwives are ideally placed to provide nutrition education to pregnant women. There is limited published research evidence of Australian midwives' nutrition knowledge, attitudes and confidence. To investigate Australian midwives' nutrition knowledge, attitudes and confidence in providing nutrition education during pregnancy. Members of the Australian College of Midwives (n=4770) were sent an invitation email to participate in a web-based survey, followed by two reminders. The completion rate was 6.9% (329 of 4770). The majority (86.6% and 75.7%, respectively) highly rated the importance of nutrition during pregnancy and the significance of their role in nutrition education. Midwives' nutrition knowledge was inadequate in several areas such as weight gain, dairy serves and iodine requirements (73.3%, 73.2% and 79.9% incorrect responses, respectively). The level of confidence in discussing general and specific nutrition issues ranged mostly from moderate to low. The majority of the midwives (93%) provided nutrition advice to pregnant women. This advice was mostly described as 'general' and focused on general nutrition topics. Only half of the midwives reported receiving nutrition education during midwifery education (51.1%) or after registration (54.1%). Australian midwives' attitudes towards nutrition during pregnancy and their role in educating pregnant women about it were positive but their knowledge and confidence did not align with these attitudes. This could be due to minimal nutrition education during midwifery education or during practice. Continued education to improve midwives' nutrition knowledge and confidence is essential. Copyright © 2016 Australian College of Midwives. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Urban health educators' perspectives and practices regarding school nutrition education policies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCaughtry, Nate; Martin, Jeffrey J; Fahlman, Mariane; Shen, Bo

    2012-02-01

    Although nutrition-related health education policies exist at national, state and local levels, the degree to which those policies affect the everyday practices of health education teachers who are charged with executing them in schools is often unclear. The purpose of this study was to examine the nutrition-related health education policy matrix that affected one urban school district, the health education teachers' awareness of those policies, the impact of nutrition policies on teachers' instruction and challenges teachers perceived in executing comprehensive nutrition education. The study used interpretive ethnography to examine the educational contexts and perspectives of 27 health educators from 24 middle schools in one urban district in the Midwestern United States. Data were collected through school observations, interviews with key personnel and document collection. We found that a network of nutrition-related education policies governed health education teachers' instruction, but that teachers were uniformly unaware of those policies. Without institutional coherence and clear directives, health education teachers taught little nutrition content, primarily due to poor training, professional development, instructional resources and administrative accountability. The results are discussed in light of the enormous challenges in many urban schools and the need for nutrition education professional development.

  3. Authoring a CAI Lesson in Nutrition Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ries, Carol P.; And Others

    1984-01-01

    A nutrition lesson on vegetarianism (focusing on vegetarian types, complementary protein, special-care nutrients, and diet planning) that uses a pre-developed plan which concentrates on lesson content and design has been developed. Initial planning and procedures involved in developing the unit (selecting teaching modes, text writing, formatting,…

  4. What Does Evidence-Based Mean for Nutrition Educators? Best Practices for Choosing Nutrition Education Interventions Based on the Strength of the Evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dollahite, Jamie S; Fitch, Cindy; Carroll, Jan

    Funding agencies and professional organizations are increasingly requiring community-based nutrition education programs to be evidence-based. However, few nutrition education interventions have demonstrated efficacy, particularly for interventions that address the outer layers of the socioecological model (ie, organizational, community, and public policy). This article reviews the types of evidence available to assess the likelihood that a given intervention will deliver the desired outcomes and how these types of evidence might be applied to nutrition education, and then suggests an approach for nutrition educators to evaluate the evidence and adapt interventions if necessary. Copyright © 2016 Society for Nutrition Education and Behavior. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Now Is the Moment: The State, Public Education, & Communities of Resistance in Oaxaca & Wisconsin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hones, Donald

    2012-01-01

    This study draws from narrative research, wherein stories of individuals, groups, and communities are central to the interpretation. Through a process of interpretive interactionism, the author examined the groups and institutions involved in the ongoing conflict between the state and public education in Oaxaca, and then included comparisons and…

  6. Factors influencing nutrition education for patients with low literacy skills.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macario, E; Emmons, K M; Sorensen, G; Hunt, M K; Rudd, R E

    1998-05-01

    Although there has been increasing attention to cancer prevention among low-income and minority populations, only a few nutrition interventions have addressed the special needs of people with low literacy skills. To determine the best provider and the most effective format for a nutrition intervention targeting patients with low literacy skills, we conducted interviews with literacy experts and health care providers and focus groups with members of adult basic education classes. Thirty-five literacy experts and health-center-based physicians, nurses, and nutritionists in Boston, Mass, were interviewed. In addition, 50 volunteer clients from 4 Boston-based adult basic education programs participated in 6 focus groups. Results suggested that health care providers consider nutrition to be a fundamental health education topic, but that its successful inculcation in patients with limited literacy skills is hindered mostly by insufficient provider time. Almost all providers agreed that patients need to be referred to nutritionists for nutrition education. Although most providers and patients acknowledged that patients perceive physicians to be the authorities on health, patients with low literacy skills turned first to family members and friends for health information. These results suggest that effective nutrition interventions must build on patients' social networks; appear in a visually based, interactive format; and be culturally appropriate.

  7. A novel nutrition medicine education model: the Boston University experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lenders, Carine; Gorman, Kathy; Milch, Hannah; Decker, Ashley; Harvey, Nanette; Stanfield, Lorraine; Lim-Miller, Aimee; Salge-Blake, Joan; Judd, Laura; Levine, Sharon

    2013-01-01

    Most deaths in the United States are preventable and related to nutrition. Although physicians are expected to counsel their patients about nutrition-related health conditions, a recent survey reported minimal improvements in nutrition medicine education in US medical schools in the past decade. Starting in 2006, we have developed an educational plan using a novel student-centered model of nutrition medicine education at Boston University School of Medicine that focuses on medical student-mentored extracurricular activities to develop, evaluate, and sustain nutrition medicine education. The medical school uses a team-based approach focusing on case-based learning in the classroom, practice-based learning in the clinical setting, extracurricular activities, and a virtual curriculum to improve medical students' knowledge, attitudes, and practice skills across their 4-y period of training. We have been using objectives from the NIH National Academy Awards guide and tools from the Association of American Medical Colleges to detect new areas of nutrition medicine taught at the medical school. Although we were only able to identify 20.5 h of teaching in the preclerkship years, we observed that most preclerkship nutrition medicine objectives were covered during the course of the 4-y teaching period, and extracurricular activities provided new opportunities for student leadership and partnership with other health professionals. These observations are very encouraging as new assessment tools are being developed. Future plans include further evaluation and dissemination of lessons learned using this model to improve public health wellness with support from academia, government, industry, and foundations.

  8. Do Dutch nutrition and dietetics students meet nutritional requirements during education?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roos M.B. Nieweg; Dr. C.P. van der Schans; Dr Harriët Jager-Wittenaar; Joke J. van de Kruk

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To compare the dietary intakes of Dutch nutrition and dietetics students with the Dutch RDA and the Dutch National Food Consumption Survey (DNFCS), and to assess whether dietary intake changes during education. DESIGN: Cross-sectional and longitudinal research (2004-2010). SETTING:

  9. Nutrition education for pediatric gastroenterology, hepatology, and nutrition fellows: Survey of NASPGHAN fellowship training programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    The aim of the study was to assess the methodology and content of nutrition education during gastroenterology fellowship training and the variability among the different programs. A survey questionnaire was completed by 43 fellowship training directors of 62 active programs affiliated to the North A...

  10. Nutrition Education in the Context of the United Nations Standing Committee on Nutrition Activities and Publications, 1985-2006

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engesveen, Kaia; Shrimpton, Roger

    2007-01-01

    The United Nations System Standing Committee on Nutrition (SCN) is a forum where United Nations (UN) agencies, bilateral partners, and nongovernmental agencies meet to harmonize and coordinate nutrition policy and programs. This report reviews the positions taken regarding nutrition education throughout SCN publications, annual sessions, and…

  11. Innovations in nutrition education and global health: the Bangalore Boston nutrition collaborative

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background India has a wide range of nutrition and health problems which require professionals with appropriate skills, knowledge and trans-disciplinary collaborative abilities to influence policy making at the national and global level. Methods The Bangalore Boston Nutrition Collaborative (BBNC) was established as collaboration between St. John’s Research Institute (SJRI), Harvard School of Public Health and Tufts University, with a focus on nutrition research and training. The goals of the BBNC were to conduct an interdisciplinary course, develop web-based courses and identify promising Indian students and junior faculty for graduate training in Boston. Results From 2010, an annual two-week short course in nutrition research methods was conducted on the SJRI campus taught by international faculty from Indian and US universities. More than 100 students applied yearly for approximately 30 positions. The course had didactic lectures in the morning and practical hands-on sessions in the afternoon. Student rating of the course was excellent and consistent across the years. The ratings on the design and conduct of the course significantly improved (p nutrition and global health. Efforts are ongoing to secure long term funding to sustain and expand this collaboration to deliver high quality nutrition and global health education enabled by information and communication technologies. PMID:24400811

  12. Nutrition education intervention for women with breast cancer: effect on nutritional factors and oxidative stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schiavon, Cecilia C; Vieira, Francilene G K; Ceccatto, Vanessa; de Liz, Sheyla; Cardoso, Alyne L; Sabel, Cristiane; Gonzalez-Chica, David A; da Silva, Edson L; Galvan, Daisy; Crippa, Carlos G; Di Pietro, Patricia F

    2015-01-01

    To assess the effect of a nutrition education intervention on nutritional factors and oxidative stress during treatment of breast cancer. Nonrandomized clinical trial conducted in 2010-2011, including an evaluation at baseline and after 12 months. Women from Brazil who had breast cancer, divided into an intervention group (IG) (n = 18) and comparison group (n = 75). To increase intake of fruits and vegetables and reduce red and processed meats, via telephone and printed materials. Food intake, anthropometry, and levels of lipid hydroperoxide, carbonyl proteins, reduced glutathione, and ferric reducing antioxidant power. Chi-square, Mann-Whitney or t tests for baseline data; Wilcoxon or paired t tests for intra-group outcomes, linear regression models, and Bonferroni multiplicity adjustment. The researchers observed an increase in fruit and vegetable intake, reduction in red and processed meat intake, no change in body weight, and an increase in glutathione in the IG over the comparison group. However, after Bonferroni adjustment, only the consumption of fruits and vegetables and fruit was significantly higher in IG. This study presents improved dietary changes after a theory-driven nutrition education intervention. Although the sample size is small, it has proven to be clinically relevant. Copyright © 2015 Society for Nutrition Education and Behavior. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Teachers' perceptions of school nutrition education's influence on ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Qualitative investigation can provide invaluable information towards understanding the influence of school nutrition education (NE). The study explored teachers' perceptions of the immediate impact of NE on learners' eating behaviours. Twenty-four primary school teachers in the Bronkhorstspruit district, Gauteng, South ...

  14. Impact of nutrition education on diabetes knowledge and attitudes of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: To evaluate the effect of a nutrition education (NE) programme on diabetes knowledge and attitudes of adults with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). Methods: Eighty-two adults (40–70 years) with poorly controlled T2DM (HbA1c ≥ 8%) and attending two community health centres in Moretele, North West Province ...

  15. 2010 Impacts: The Expanded Food and Nutrition Education Program (EFNEP)

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Institute of Food and Agriculture, 2011

    2011-01-01

    Since 1969, the Expanded Food and Nutrition Education Program (EFNEP) has improved the diets and food-related behaviors of program participants. Each year EFNEP enrolls more than half a million new program participants. In 2010, EFNEP reached 137,814 adults and 463,530 youth directly and nearly 400,000 family members indirectly. This paper…

  16. Nutrition education program for food bank clients: A pilot study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Many low income families depend on foods from food banks. The objective of the study was to determine program content and examine feasibility of a pilot nutrition education program for food bank clients. Formative research was conducted with staff at a local food bank and its pantries and adult clie...

  17. Nutrition education to improve dietary intake and micronutrient ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: To determine whether nutrition education targeting the child-feeding practices of low-income rural caregivers will reduce anaemia and improve vitamin A nutriture of the young children in their care. Design: A controlled intervention trial, based on experiential learning theory. Forty-six women completed a ...

  18. Educating Early Childhood Teachers about Nutrition: A Collaborative Venture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cotugna, Nancy; Vickery, Connie

    2007-01-01

    Nourishing the young child can be a challenge. This stage of life is critical to the development of positive attitudes toward maintaining a healthy diet and learning to make reasonable food choices. Educators of young children are often the gatekeepers of child nutrition. This article reports on the current nutrient needs of young children,…

  19. Applications of the marketing perspective in nutrition education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleming, P L

    1987-09-01

    The marketing paradigm is based on the premise of exchange of value, that is, value received for value given. The role of the nutrition educator as a marketer is to facilitate exchanges of value with consumers. To carry out this role, a strong orientation to the consumer, what she or he wants and needs and is willing to "pay," guides the development of the nutrition education mission, objectives, and strategies. The marketing paradigm calls for a marketing information system that includes internal record keeping, marketing intelligence gathering, and marketing research. The information is used in the marketing audit, which identifies organizational strengths and weaknesses and marketplace opportunities and barriers. Marketing objectives are formulated, and strategies for segmenting, positioning, and developing the marketing mix follow. These are translated in the marketing plan to an action plan, a budget, and profit and loss projections. Use of the marketing paradigm in nutrition education is not a panacea for organizational ills and marketplace problems. Instead, the paradigm raises issues to which nutrition educators must bring their expertise, commitment, ingenuity, and creativity.

  20. Evaluating Nutrition Education Programming by Using a Dietary Screener

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schultz, Jennifer; Litchfield, Ruth

    2016-01-01

    Short dietary assessment instruments known as screeners have potential for use in evaluating nutrition education programming because detecting change in dietary intake can demonstrate movement toward program goals. Using screeners results in objective dietary intake data but involves less administrative time, training, and cost than other…

  1. The impact of a nutrition education programme on feeding practices ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: To determine the impact of nutrition education on feeding practices of caregivers with children aged 3 to 5 years at baseline and post intervention. Methodology: A pre-test–post-test control group design was chosen using eight villages (four villages in the experimental group (E) and four villages in the control ...

  2. Nutrition education to improve dietary intake and micronutrient ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2010-11-02

    Nov 2, 2010 ... Original Research: Nutrition education to improve dietary intake and micronutrient nutriture among children. 2011;24(2) ... Design: A controlled intervention trial, based on experiential learning theory. Forty-six women .... with known RBP, CRP and AGP were used as controls.8 RBP values were corrected for ...

  3. Nutrition education promoted consumption of pulse based foods ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study was conducted to determine the effectiveness of nutrition education on the knowledge, attitude and practice of women of reproductive age using the Health Belief Model. A pre-test post-test controlled intervention study was conducted on 200 randomly selected women from Hawassa Zuria district in two groups: ...

  4. Development of nutrition education tool: healthy eating index in Thailand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taechangam, Sunard; Pinitchun, Utumporn; Pachotikarn, Chanida

    2008-01-01

    A healthful diet can reduce major risk factors for chronic diseases. To assess the dietary status of Thais and monitor changes in food consumption patterns, the Healthy Eating Index for Thais (THEI) is developed, an important tool for meeting the nutrition goals and determining people's overall diet quality. This index measures how well the diets of Thai people conform to the recommendations of the Food Guide Thailand Nutrition Flag. The THEI consists of 11 components, each representing different aspects of a healthful diet: Components 1-5 measure the degree to which a person's diet conforms to serving recommendations for the five major food groups of Thailand Nutrition Flag; Components 6, 7 and 8 measure total fat, saturated fat and added sugar consumption, respectively; Components 9 and 10 measure total cholesterol and sodium intake; and Component 11 examines variety in a person's diet. Each of the 11 components has a score ranging from 0 to 10, for a total score of 110. The dietary intake data from selected working adults were collected to derive the THEI scores. The average THEI score indicated that the diets of most people needed improvement and some individuals were more likely than others to consume a poor diet. This suggests a continued role for nutrition education and promotion efforts should result in a significant improvement of people's overall diet quality. In conclusion, the THEI is an useful index for describing overall diet quality for Thais and serves as a basic tool for providing nutrition education and promotion.

  5. Learning from evaluation: the GAFNA nutrition education project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aubel, J; Sanyang, S

    1993-01-01

    A unique characteristic of this Gambian nutrition program evaluation was the inclusion of program staff decision makers and information users in the evaluation process. The evaluation served as a learning process and a staff development exercise. The nutrition project aimed to evaluate three educational methods: nutrition talks by community health nurses, nutrition songs and dances of village-based traditional communicators, and a combination of these two methods. The nutrition education messages were directed to prevention of anemia by appropriate home garden production, breast feeding and colostrum, and feeding sick children. The evaluation process identified 15 stages, the last of which was an action plan based on lessons learned and discussed with consultants. The 15 stages were as follows: 1) identify evaluation team members personally; 2) make logistical and administrative arrangements ahead of time; 3) develop a visual display of the project; 4) organize a working group to learn about program evaluation; 5) define evaluation questions; 6) identify data collection techniques; 7) develop data collection instruments; 8) conduct interviews and observations; 9) analyze information collected; 10) formulate lessons learned; 11) summarize lessons learned; 12) assess the evaluation process; 13) develop an action plan; 14) write an evaluation report; 15) discuss evaluation results. This process made the evaluation more useful to those directly affected in the health program. Simple tools were used that were understandable to those directly affected in the health program. The evaluation process circumvented the top down approach and vague recommendations based on program weaknesses. Skills in program planning and evaluation were successfully reinforced.

  6. Systematic review of control groups in nutrition education intervention research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byrd-Bredbenner, Carol; Wu, FanFan; Spaccarotella, Kim; Quick, Virginia; Martin-Biggers, Jennifer; Zhang, Yingting

    2017-07-11

    Well-designed research trials are critical for determining the efficacy and effectiveness of nutrition education interventions. To determine whether behavioral and/or cognition changes can be attributed to an intervention, the experimental design must include a control or comparison condition against which outcomes from the experimental group can be compared. Despite the impact different types of control groups can have on study outcomes, the treatment provided to participants in the control condition has received limited attention in the literature. A systematic review of control groups in nutrition education interventions was conducted to better understand how control conditions are described in peer-reviewed journal articles compared with experimental conditions. To be included in the systematic review, articles had to be indexed in CINAHL, PubMed, PsycINFO, WoS, and/or ERIC and report primary research findings of controlled nutrition education intervention trials conducted in the United States with free-living consumer populations and published in English between January 2005 and December 2015. Key elements extracted during data collection included treatment provided to the experimental and control groups (e.g., overall intervention content, tailoring methods, delivery mode, format, duration, setting, and session descriptions, and procedures for standardizing, fidelity of implementation, and blinding); rationale for control group type selected; sample size and attrition; and theoretical foundation. The search yielded 43 publications; about one-third of these had an inactive control condition, which is considered a weak study design. Nearly two-thirds of reviewed studies had an active control condition considered a stronger research design; however, many failed to report one or more key elements of the intervention, especially for the control condition. None of the experimental and control group treatments were sufficiently detailed to permit replication of the

  7. Wisconsin EE Mandates: The Bad News and the Good News.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lane, Jennie; And Others

    1996-01-01

    Examines Wisconsin teachers' perceived competencies in, attitudes toward, and amount of class time devoted to teaching about the environment. Discusses the effects of Wisconsin environmental education mandates concerning preservice preparation in environmental education and K-12 environmental education curriculum plans. Identifies areas where the…

  8. A Survey of Medical Students’ Use of Nutrition Resources and Perceived Competency in Providing Basic Nutrition Education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rebecca Connor

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. The aims of this study were to assess where medical students obtain their nutrition information and their self-perceived level of competency in providing basic nutrition education to patients. Methods. A survey was distributed to all first through fourth year medical students at Case Western Reserve University (n=657. For statistical analysis, data was expressed as percentages of total responses and binomial regression was used to answer the study hypotheses. Results. The survey response rate was 47%. Forty-two percent of respondents selected a majority of professional nutrition resources (n=132 as their most commonly used nutrition resources, 38% selected a majority of consumer resources (n=119, and 20% selected “I do not use nutrition resources” (n=61. The most popular nutrition resource selected was consumer websites. Seventy percent of respondents reported feeling competent in their ability to provide basic nutrition education to patients (n=219. Conclusion. Medical students seem to feel competent in their ability to give basic nutrition education to patients, but they may be obtaining nutrition information from unreliable consumer-based resources. To help increase the provision of sound nutritional guidance, medical students should be taught to use reliable nutrition resources, as well as the value of referring patients to registered dietitians.

  9. It's Time to Include Nutrition Education in the Secondary Physical Education Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertelsen, Susan L.; Thompson, Ben

    2014-01-01

    Although the primary focus of physical educators is to increase students' physical activity levels and their knowledge about the importance of movement, they also have the opportunity to affect students' overall wellness by teaching nutrition and how healthy eating contributes to overall health and weight management. Nutrition concepts…

  10. Farm to School and Nutrition Education: Positively Affecting Elementary School-Aged Children's Nutrition Knowledge and Consumption Behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moss, Ashley; Smith, Sylvia; Null, Dawn; Long Roth, Sara; Tragoudas, Ulrike

    2013-02-01

    Good nutrition is crucial. School-aged children battle social and health issues such as poor nutrition, childhood obesity, and minimal nutrition knowledge. This study was a quasi-experimental design analyzing the effects of the Coordinated Approach to Child Health (CATCH) nutrition curriculum with a Farm to School program to assess nutrition knowledge of 3(rd) grade students, and to increase fruit and vegetable consumption behavior. Third grade boys and girls (n=65) participated in this study. The intervention consisted of two nutrition education classes and a farm tour. Data were collected at baseline and postintervention. Surveys assessed nutrition knowledge, fruit and vegetable consumption behavior, and awareness of farms and farmers. Chi-squared tests of independence were performed to examine the relation between the baseline and postintervention responses. Significant differences were found concerning knowledge of fiber (pfarm exposure were also significant (peducation and farm tours can positively affect school-aged children's nutrition knowledge and fruit and vegetable consumption behavior.

  11. What about Health Educators? Nutrition Education for Allied Health Professionals: A Review of the Literature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ettienne-Gittens, Reynolette; Lisako, E.; McKyer, J.; Goodson, Patricia; Guidry, Jeffrey; Outley, Corliss

    2012-01-01

    Background: Health educators are critical members of the health care team who may be called upon to provide nutrition education. However, are health educators prepared for this task? What have scholars concluded regarding this pertinent topic? Purpose: This study has three purposes: (1) to determine the definition of and criteria for nutrition…

  12. Web-Site as an Educational Tool in Biology Education: A Case of Nutrition Issue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fancovicova, Jana; Prokop, Pavol; Usak, Muhammet

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to evaluate the efficacy and feasibility of using website in biology education. We have explored the World Wide Web as a possible tool for education about health and nutrition. The websites were teaching tools for primary school students. Control groups used the traditional educational materials as books or worksheets,…

  13. Do Dutch nutrition and dietetics students meet nutritional requirements during education?

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Kruk, Joke J; Jager-Wittenaar, Harriët; Nieweg, Roos M B; van der Schans, Cees P

    2014-06-01

    To compare the dietary intakes of Dutch nutrition and dietetics students with the Dutch RDA and the Dutch National Food Consumption Survey (DNFCS), and to assess whether dietary intake changes during education. Cross-sectional and longitudinal research (2004-2010). Data collection by 7 d dietary record and questionnaire. Dutch nutrition and dietetics students. Three hundred and fifty-two first-year and 216 fourth-year students were included. One hundred and thirty-three students in three cohorts were assessed twice. Of first-year students, >80 % met the RDA for all macronutrients. Of these students only 37 % met the RDA for fibre and in 43 % intake of saturated fat was too high. Fourth-year students more often met the RDA for fruits (55 %) and vegetables (74 %) compared with first-year students (32 % and 40 %, respectively). Intake of fruits and vegetables of both first- and fourth-year students was much higher than that of DNFCS participants (where 2 % and 7 %, respectively, met the corresponding RDA). Only 80 %). Intakes of dietary fibre, Ca, Mg, Se, riboflavin, niacin, fruits, vegetables and fish improved significantly during education. Dietary intake of nutrition and dietetics students is much better than that of DNFCS participants and improved during education. However, there is still a gap between actual dietary intake and the RDA, especially for Fe, Se and vitamin D.

  14. Current Status of Nutrition Training in Graduate Medical Education From a Survey of Residency Program Directors: A Formal Nutrition Education Course Is Necessary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daley, Brian J; Cherry-Bukowiec, Jill; Van Way, Charles W; Collier, Bryan; Gramlich, Leah; McMahon, M Molly; McClave, Stephen A

    2016-01-01

    Nutrition leaders surmised graduate medical nutrition education was not well addressed because most medical and surgical specialties have insufficient resources to teach current nutrition practice. A needs assessment survey was constructed to determine resources and commitment for nutrition education from U.S. graduate medical educators to address this problem. An online survey of 36 questions was sent to 495 Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) Program Directors in anesthesia, family medicine, internal medicine, pediatrics, obstetrics/gynecology, and general surgery. Demographics, resources, and open-ended questions were included. There was a 14% response rate (72 programs), consistent with similar studies on the topic. Most (80%) of the program directors responding were from primary care programs, the rest surgical (17%) or anesthesia (3%). Program directors themselves lacked knowledge of nutrition. While some form of nutrition education was provided at 78% of programs, only 26% had a formal curriculum and physicians served as faculty at only 53%. Sixteen programs had no identifiable expert in nutrition and 10 programs stated that no nutrition training was provided. Training was variable, ranging from an hour of lecture to a month-long rotation. Seventy-seven percent of program directors stated that the required educational goals in nutrition were not met. The majority felt an advanced course in clinical nutrition should be required of residents now or in the future. Nutrition education in current graduate medical education is poor. Most programs lack the expertise or time commitment to teach a formal course but recognize the need to meet educational requirements. A broad-based, diverse universal program is needed for training in nutrition during residency. © 2015 American Society for Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition.

  15. Current Status of and Recommendations for Nutrition Education in Gastroenterology Fellowship Training in Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Jing; Raman, Maitreyi; Gramlich, Leah

    2018-04-01

    Knowledge and skill in the area of nutrition are a key competency for the gastroenterologist. However, standards for nutrition education for gastroenterology fellows in Canada do not exist, and gastroenterologists in training and in practice do not feel confident in their knowledge or skill as it relates to nutrition. This study was undertaken to identify the current status of nutrition education in gastroenterology (GI) fellowship training programs in Canada and to provide insight into the development of nutrition educational goals, processes, and evaluation. Using mixed methods, we did a survey of current and recent graduates and program directors of GI fellowship programs in Canada. We undertook a focus group with program directors and fellows to corroborate findings of the survey and to identify strategies to advance nutrition education, knowledge, and skill of trainees. In total, 89.3% of the respondents perceived that the nutrition education was important for GI training, and 82.1% of the respondents perceived nutrition care would be part of their practice. However, only 50% of respondents had a formal rotation in their program, and it was mandatory only 36% of the time. Of the respondents, 95% felt that nutrition education should be standardized within GI fellowship training. Significant gaps in nutrition education exist with GI fellowship programs in Canada. The creation of standards for nutrition education would be valued by training programs, and such a nutrition curriculum for GI fellowship training in Canada is proposed. © 2017 American Society for Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition.

  16. Active Early: one-year policy intervention to increase physical activity among early care and education programs in Wisconsin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tara L. LaRowe

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Early childcare and education (ECE is a prime setting for obesity prevention and the establishment of healthy behaviors. The objective of this quasi-experimental study was to examine the efficacy of the Active Early guide, which includes evidenced-based approaches, provider resources, and training, to improve physical activity opportunities through structured (i.e. teacher-led activity and environmental changes thereby increasing physical activity among children, ages 2–5 years, in the ECE setting. Methods Twenty ECE programs in Wisconsin, 7 family and 13 group, were included. An 80-page guide, Active Early, was developed by experts and statewide partners in the fields of ECE, public health, and physical activity and was revised by ECE providers prior to implementation. Over 12 months, ECE programs received on-site training and technical assistance to implement the strategies and resources provided in the Active Early guide. Main outcome measures included observed minutes of teacher-led physical activity, physical activity environment measured by the Environment and Policy Assessment and Observation (EPAO instrument, and child physical activity levels via accelerometry. All measures were collected at baseline, 6 months, and 12 months and were analyzed for changes over time. Results Observed teacher-led physical activity significantly increased from 30.9 ± 22.7 min at baseline to 82.3 ± 41.3 min at 12 months. The change in percent time children spent in sedentary activity decreased significantly after 12 months (−4.4 ± 14.2 % time, −29.2 ± 2.6 min, p < 0.02. Additionally, as teacher led-activity increased, percent time children were sedentary decreased (r = −0.37, p < 0.05 and percent time spent in light physical activity increased (r = 0.35, p < 0.05. Among all ECE programs, the physical activity environment improved significantly as indicated by multiple sub-scales of

  17. Active Early: one-year policy intervention to increase physical activity among early care and education programs in Wisconsin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    LaRowe, Tara L; Tomayko, Emily J; Meinen, Amy M; Hoiting, Jill; Saxler, Courtney; Cullen, Bridget

    2016-07-20

    Early childcare and education (ECE) is a prime setting for obesity prevention and the establishment of healthy behaviors. The objective of this quasi-experimental study was to examine the efficacy of the Active Early guide, which includes evidenced-based approaches, provider resources, and training, to improve physical activity opportunities through structured (i.e. teacher-led) activity and environmental changes thereby increasing physical activity among children, ages 2-5 years, in the ECE setting. Twenty ECE programs in Wisconsin, 7 family and 13 group, were included. An 80-page guide, Active Early, was developed by experts and statewide partners in the fields of ECE, public health, and physical activity and was revised by ECE providers prior to implementation. Over 12 months, ECE programs received on-site training and technical assistance to implement the strategies and resources provided in the Active Early guide. Main outcome measures included observed minutes of teacher-led physical activity, physical activity environment measured by the Environment and Policy Assessment and Observation (EPAO) instrument, and child physical activity levels via accelerometry. All measures were collected at baseline, 6 months, and 12 months and were analyzed for changes over time. Observed teacher-led physical activity significantly increased from 30.9 ± 22.7 min at baseline to 82.3 ± 41.3 min at 12 months. The change in percent time children spent in sedentary activity decreased significantly after 12 months (-4.4 ± 14.2 % time, -29.2 ± 2.6 min, p < 0.02). Additionally, as teacher led-activity increased, percent time children were sedentary decreased (r = -0.37, p < 0.05) and percent time spent in light physical activity increased (r = 0.35, p < 0.05). Among all ECE programs, the physical activity environment improved significantly as indicated by multiple sub-scales of the EPAO; scores showing the greatest increases were the

  18. Theories of nutrition education and promotion in Japan: enactment of the "Food Education Basic Law".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adachi, Miyuki

    2008-01-01

    The objective of this paper was to identify the necessity of a theory incorporating "a holistic view of food and nutrition dynamics". The generation of this theory and its potential to effect nutrition education practices, was also examined using examples of practice in Japan. The necessity and potential of a nutrition theory with "a holistic view of food and nutrition dynamics" was shown through discussions about the "Food Education Basic Law" (The Basic Law on Shokuiku) enacted in 2005 in Japan and the following case examples: a study of daily fish consumption of 2,110 school children in Japan from the viewpoint of human and food ecology; a study of school children's eating habits with their families which involved drawing a meal picture; a nutrition intervention that used a 5 point meal box system (3:1:2 meal box magic) to measure the quantity and quality appropriate for one meal; and a nutrition education program for school-aged children. Finally, a definition of nutrition education aimed at the sustainable and harmonious coexistence of both quality of life (QOL) and quality of environment (QOE) was suggested.

  19. Brazilian preliminary norms and investigation of age and education effects on the Modified Wisconsin Card Sorting Test, Stroop Color and Word test and Digit Span test in adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimmermann, Nicolle; Cardoso, Caroline de Oliveira; Trentini, Clarissa Marceli; Grassi-Oliveira, Rodrigo; Fonseca, Rochele Paz

    2015-01-01

    Executive functions are involved in a series of human neurological and psychiatric disorders. For this reason, appropriate assessment tools with age and education adjusted norms for symptom diagnosis are necessary. To present normative data for adults (19-75 year-olds; with five years of education or more) on the Modified Wisconsin Card Sorting Test (MWCST), Stroop color and word test and Digit Span test. Age and education effects were investigated. Three samples were formed after inclusion criteria and data analysis: MWCST (n=124); Digit Span (n=123), and Stroop test (n=158). Groups were divided into young (19-39), middle-aged (40-59) and older (60-75) participants with five to eight years of education and nine years of education or more. Two-way ANOVA and ANCOVA analyses were used. Education effects were found in most variables of the three tasks. An age effect was only found on color naming and color-word naming speed from the Stroop test. No interactions were detected. In countries with heterogeneous educational backgrounds, the use of stratified norms by education to assess at least some components of executive functions is essential for an ethical and accurate cognitive diagnosis.

  20. Effects of intensive nutrition education on nutritional status and quality of life among postgastrectomy patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hye Ok; Han, So Ra; Choi, Sung Il; Lee, Jung Joo; Kim, Sang Hyun; Ahn, Hong Seok; Lim, Hyunjung

    2016-02-01

    We examined the effects of 3 months of intensive education (IE) after hospital discharge compared to conventional education (CE) on nutritional status and quality of diet and life among South Korean gastrectomy patients. The study was conducted among 53 hospitalized gastrectomy in-patients (IE group, n = 28; CE group, n = 25) at Kyung Hee University Hospital at Gangdong. Baseline data were collected from electronic medical records and additional information was gathered via anthropometric measurements, assessment of nutritional status through a patient-generated, subjective global assessment (PG-SGA), diet assessment, and measures of self-efficacy and satisfaction with meals for 3 months following hospital discharge. Total PG-SGA scores were significantly higher in the CE group than in the IE group at 3-week post-discharge (5.2 in the IE group vs. 10.4 in the CE group, P Nutritional status among gastrectomy patients in the IE group improved. Relative to the CE control, the IE group demonstrated improved self-efficacy and meal satisfaction 3-week post-discharge.

  1. Evidence-informed strategies for undergraduate nutrition education: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newton, Genevieve; Bettger, William; Buchholz, Andrea; Kulak, Verena; Racey, Megan

    2015-07-01

    This review focuses on evidence-informed strategies to enhance learning in undergraduate nutrition education. Here, we describe the general shift in undergraduate education from a teacher-centered model of teaching to a student-centered model and present approaches that have been proposed to address the challenges associated with this shift. We further discuss case-based, project-based, and community-based learning, patient simulation, and virtual clinical trials as educational strategies to improve students' critical thinking and problem-solving skills; these strategies are well suited to the teaching of undergraduate nutrition. The strategies are defined, and we discuss the potential benefits to students and how they can be applied specifically to the teaching of undergraduate nutrition. Finally, we provide a critical analysis of the limitations associated with these techniques and propose several directions for future research, including research methodologies that may best evaluate teaching strategies in terms of both teaching and learning outcomes. Consideration of these evidence-informed strategies is warranted, given their ability to encourage students to develop relevant skills that will facilitate their transition beyond the university classroom.

  2. Intensive nutrition education with or without supplementary feeding improves the nutritional status of moderately-malnourished children in Bangladesh.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, S K; Fuchs, G J; Mahmud, Zeba; Ara, Gulshan; Islam, Sumaya; Shafique, Sohana; Akter, Syeda Sharmin; Chakraborty, Barnali

    2005-12-01

    This prospective randomized trial was carried out to test the efficacy of a specific intervention for reducing the extent of their malnutrition and to change behaviour of mothers relating to child-feeding practices, care-giving, and health-seeking practices under the Bangladesh Integrated Nutrition Project (BINP). The study was conducted in rural Bangladesh among 282 moderately-malnourished (weight-for-age between 61% and 75% of median of the National Center for Health Statistics standard) children aged 6-24 months. Mothers of the first intervention group received intensive nutrition education (INE group) twice a week for three months. The second intervention group received the same nutrition education, and their children received additional supplementary feeding (INE+SF group). The comparison group received nutrition education from the community nutrition promoters twice a month according to the standard routine service of BINP. The children were observed for a further six months. After three months of interventions, a significantly higher proportion of children in the INE and INE+SF groups improved (37% and 47% respectively) from moderate to mild or normal nutrition compared to the comparison group (18%) (p nutritional status of children in the intervention groups improved further from moderate to mild or normal nutrition compared to the comparison group (59% and 86% vs 30%, p nutrition education and supplementation given were highly effective, more children improved from moderate malnutrition to mild or normal nutritional status despite a higher incidence of morbidity. The frequency of child feeding and home-based complementary feeding improved significantly (p nutrition education significantly improves the status of moderately-malnourished children with or without supplementary feeding.

  3. School-based nutrition education: lessons learned and new perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-Rodrigo , C; Aranceta , J

    2001-02-01

    Nutrition is a major environmental influence on physical and mental growth and development in early life. Food habits during infancy can influence preferences and practices in later life and some evidence suggests fair to moderate tracking of food habits from childhood to adolescence. Studies support that good nutrition contributes to improving the wellbeing of children and their potential learning ability, thus contributing to better school performance. Children and young people who learn healthy eating habits, are encouraged to be physically active, to avoid smoking and to learn to manage stress, have the potential for reduced impact of chronic diseases in adulthood. Nutrition education is a key element to promoting lifelong healthy eating and exercise behaviours and should start from the early stages of life; it should also address the specific nutritional needs associated with pregnancy, including reinforcing breastfeeding. Food habits are complex in nature and multiple conditioning factors interact in their development. Young children do not choose what they eat, but their parents decide and prepare the food for them. During infancy and early childhood the family is a key environment for children to learn and develop food preferences and eating habits. As they grow and start school, teachers, peers and other people at school, together with the media and social leaders, become more important. Progressively children become more independent and start making their own food choices. The peer group is very important for adolescents and has a major influence in developing both food habits and lifestyles. Community trials suggest that nutrition education is an accessible effective tool in health promotion programmes with a focus on the development of healthy eating practices.

  4. The Intersociety Professional Nutrition Education Consortium and American Board of Physician Nutrition Specialists: what have we learned?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heimburger, Douglas C; McClave, Stephen A; Gramlich, Leah M; Merritt, Russell

    2010-01-01

    A significant obstacle to nutrition literacy among physicians is a paucity of physician nutrition specialists (PNSs) on medical school faculties who can effectively advocate for change in medical school and residency curricula, and who can serve as role models for incorporating nutrition into patient care. To address these issues, the Intersociety Professional Nutrition Education Consortium (IPNEC) developed a paradigm for PNSs that is designed to attract more physicians into the field; promulgated educational standards for fellowship training of PNSs; and established a unified mechanism for certifying PNSs, the American Board of Physician Nutrition Specialists (ABPNS). With a board of directors consisting of members nominated by 7 professional nutrition societies in addition to at-large members, the ABPNS incorporates broad participation by all professional nutrition societies that have substantial physician members. The ABPNS certificate is intended to be the premier comprehensive credential for physicians who wish to identify nutrition as an area of expertise. Certification is equally accessible to physicians with backgrounds in any of the specialties and subspecialties relevant to clinical nutrition. This article outlines the history and features of IPNEC and ABPNS and the consensus paradigm, training standards, and certification process they developed. We discuss achievements, opportunities, and challenges facing the maintenance of a consensus-based certification body in order to inform future initiatives designed to expand the number of physician nutrition specialists.

  5. Incorporating Nutrition Education Classes into Food Pantry Settings: Lessons Learned in Design and Implementation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardison-Moody, Annie; Bowen, Sarah; Bloom, J. Dara; Sheldon, Marissa; Jones, Lorelei; Leach, Brandi

    2015-01-01

    The project reported here evaluated the effectiveness of nutrition education at food pantries. We offer best practices for future Extension-based nutrition programming with this clientele. Three classes were offered at food pantries through the Expanded Food and Nutrition Education Program (EFNEP). Entry and exit surveys were collected for each…

  6. Nutrition education in Japanese medical schools: a follow-up survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orimo, Hideo; Ueno, Takahiro; Yoshida, Hiroshi; Sone, Hirohito; Tanaka, Akira; Itakura, Hiroshige

    2013-01-01

    A questionnaire survey was used to determine the status of nutrition education in Japanese medical schools in 2009. A similar survey was conducted in 2004, at which time nutritional education was determined to be inadequate in Japanese medical schools. The current questionnaire was sent to the directors of Centers for Medical Education of 80 medical schools, who represented all medical schools in Japan. Sixty-seven medical schools (83.8%) responded, of which 25 schools (37.3%) offered dedicated nutrition courses and 36 schools (53.7%) did not offer dedicated nutrition courses but offered something related to nutrition in other courses; six schools (9.0%) did not offer any nutrition education. Overall, 61 schools (91.0%) offered at least some nutritional topics in their undergraduate education. Nevertheless, only 11 schools (16.4%) seem to dedicate more than 5 hours to substantial nutrition education as judged by their syllabi. Although the mean length of the course was 11 hours, substantial nutrition education accounted for only 4.2 hours. Of the 25 medical schools that offered dedicated nutrition courses, seven schools offered the nutrition course as a stand-alone course and 18 schools offered it as an integrated course. In conclusion, the status of nutrition education in Japan has improved slightly but is still inadequate.

  7. Food and Nutrition Practices and Education Needs in Florida's Adult Family Care Homes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahl, Wendy J.; Ford, Amanda L.; Gal, Nancy J.

    2014-01-01

    A statewide survey was carried out to determine food and nutrition practices and education needs of Florida's adult family care homes (AFCHs). The 30-item survey included questions on food and nutrition education, supplement use, and menu planning. Infrequent use of menus and nutrition supplements was reported. A strong need was indicated for…

  8. Weight Loss and Maintenance and Changes in Diet and Exercise for Behavioral Counseling and Nutrition Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gormally, Jim; Rardin, David

    1981-01-01

    Compared behavioral counseling with nutrition education. Initial weight losses were similar. Behavioral participants consumed fewer calories but often used diets that were nutritionally unsound. Behavioral treatment appears best for moderate obesity, but procedures are needed for nutrition education, promoting fitness, and teaching independent…

  9. Nutrition Education in Australian Midwifery Programmes: A Mixed-Methods Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jamila Arrish

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Little research has explored how nutrition content in midwifery education prepares midwives to provide prenatal nutrition advice. This study examined the nature and extent of nutrition education provided in Australian midwifery programmes. A mixed-methods approach was used, incorporating an online survey and telephone interviews. The survey analysis included 23 course coordinators representing 24 of 50 accredited midwifery programmes in 2012. Overall, the coordinators considered nutrition in midwifery curricula and the midwife’s role as important. All programmes included nutrition content; however, eleven had only 5 to <10 hours allocated to nutrition, while two had a designated unit. Various topics were covered. Dietitians/other nutrition experts were rarely involved in teaching or reviewing the nutrition content. Interviews with seven coordinators revealed that nutrition education tended to be problem-oriented and at times based on various assumptions. Nutrition content was not informed by professional or theoretical models. The development of nutrition assessment skills or practical training for midwifery students in providing nutrition advice was lacking. As nutrition is essential for maternal and foetal health, nutrition education in midwifery programmes needs to be reviewed and minimum requirements should be included to improve midwives’ effectiveness in this area. This may require collaboration between nutrition experts and midwifery bodies.

  10. Influences of Constructivist-Oriented Nutrition Education on Urban Middle School Students' Nutrition Knowledge, Self-Efficacy, and Behaviors

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCaughtry, Nate; Fahlman, Mariane; Martin, Jeffrey J.; Shen, Bo

    2011-01-01

    Background: Health professionals are looking to nutrition-based youth health interventions in K-12 schools to combat the growing obesity crisis; however, none have explored the influences of interventions guided by constructivist learning theory. Purpose: This study examined the influences of a constructivist-oriented nutrition education program…

  11. Non-linear education gradient across the nutrition transition: mothers’ overweight and the population education transition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salinas, Daniel; Baker, David P

    2015-01-01

    Objective Previous studies found that developed and developing countries present opposite education-overweight gradients but have not considered the dynamics at different levels of national development. A U-inverted curve is hypothesized to best describe the education-overweight association. It is also hypothesized that as the nutrition transition unfolds within nations the shape of education-overweight curve change. Design Multi-level logistic regression estimates the moderating effect of the nutrition transition at the population level on education-overweight gradient. At the individual level, a non-linear estimate of the education association assesses the optimal functional form of the association across the nutrition transition. Setting Twenty-two administrations of the Demographic and Health Survey, collected at different time points across the nutrition transition in nine Latin American/Caribbean countries. Subjects Mothers of reproductive age (15–49) in each administration (n 143,258). Results In the pooled sample, a non-linear education gradient on mothers‘ overweight is found; each additional year of schooling increases the probability of being overweight up to the end of primary schooling, after which each additional year of schooling decreases the probability of overweight. Also, as access to diets of high animal fats and sweeteners increases over time, the curve‘s critical point moves to lower education levels, the detrimental positive effect of education diminishes, and both occur as the overall risk of overweight increases with greater access to harmful diets. Conclusions Both hypotheses are supported. As the nutrition transition progresses, the education-overweight curve steadily shifts to a negative linear association with higher average risk of overweight; and education, at increasingly lower levels, acts as a “social vaccine” against increasing risk of overweight. These empirical patterns fit the general “population education

  12. Non-linear education gradient across the nutrition transition: mothers' overweight and the population education transition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeon, Haram; Salinas, Daniel; Baker, David P

    2015-12-01

    Previous studies found that developed and developing countries present opposite education-overweight gradients but have not considered the dynamics at different levels of national development. An inverted U-shaped curve is hypothesized to best describe the education-overweight association. It is also hypothesized that as the nutrition transition unfolds within nations the shape of education-overweight curve changes. Multilevel logistic regression was used to estimate the moderating effect of the nutrition transition at the population level on the education-overweight gradient. At the individual level, a non-linear estimate of the education association was used to assess the optimal functional form of the association across the nutrition transition. Twenty-two administrations of the Demographic and Health Survey, collected at different time points across the nutrition transition in nine Latin American/Caribbean countries. Mothers of reproductive age (15-49 years) in each administration (n 143 258). In the pooled sample, a non-linear education gradient on mothers' overweight was found; each additional year of schooling increases the probability of being overweight up to the end of primary schooling, after which each additional year of schooling decreases the probability of overweight. Also, as access to diets high in animal fats and sweeteners increases over time, the curve's critical point moves to lower education levels, the detrimental positive effect of education diminishes, and both occur as the overall risk of overweight increases with greater access to harmful diets. Both hypotheses were supported. As the nutrition transition progresses, the education-overweight curve shifts steadily to a negative linear association with a higher average risk of overweight; and education, at increasingly lower levels, acts as a 'social vaccine' against increasing risk of overweight. These empirical patterns fit the general 'population education transition' curve hypothesis

  13. Nutrition Education by a Registered Dietitian Improves Dietary Intake and Nutrition Knowledge of a NCAA Female Volleyball Team

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valliant, Melinda W.; Pittman Emplaincourt, Heather; Wenzel, Rachel Kieckhaefer; Garner, Bethany Hilson

    2012-01-01

    Eleven female participants from a NCAA Division I volleyball team were evaluated for adequate energy and macronutrient intake during two off-seasons. Total energy and macronutrient intake were assessed by food records and results were compared against estimated needs using the Nelson equation. Dietary intervention was employed regarding the individual dietary needs of each athlete as well as a pre- and post-sports nutrition knowledge survey. Post dietary intervention, total energy, and macronutrient intake improved, as well as a significant improvement in sports nutrition knowledge (p < 0.001). Nutrition education is useful in improving dietary intake and nutrition knowledge of female athletes. PMID:22822449

  14. Assessment of nutrition and physical activity education programmes in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burke, V; Beilin, L J; Milligan, R; Thompson, C

    1995-03-01

    1. Studies in children relating blood lipids to the extent of atherosclerosis at post-mortem suggest a link between risk factors for cardiovascular disease in childhood and adult life. Tracking of blood pressure (BP) and cholesterol from childhood also supports this association. However, prospective studies have not yet established the outcome in children with increased levels of risk factors. 2. In a controlled trial in Perth, Western Australia, involving over 1000 10-12 year old children, fitness was improved by physical activity programmes which were associated with a greater fall in diastolic BP and triceps skinfolds in girls compared with controls. Sugar intake decreased in boys and fat intake fell in girls, mainly affecting participants in home nutrition programmes. 3. In higher risk children, identified by cluster analysis, major benefits were associated with the fitness and home nutrition programmes. Physical activity combined with involvement of the family in nutrition education is likely to be the most successful approach to modifying lifestyle in children, including those with higher levels of risk. 4. Undernutrition by too rigid restriction of fat intake must be avoided in young children who need calorie-dense foods. Undernutrition, in itself, may predispose to cardiovascular disease in later life. Programmes should aim to establish a prudent diet appropriate to the age of the child combined with physical activity. As regular activity and a healthy diet in adult life will reduce risks of cardiovascular disease it is likely that childhood education will establish lifestyle habits of potential long-term benefit.

  15. Nutrition Education in Australian Midwifery Programmes: A Mixed-Methods Study

    OpenAIRE

    Arrish, Jamila; Yeatman, Heather; Williamson, Moira

    2016-01-01

    Little research has explored how nutrition content in midwifery education prepares midwives to provide prenatal nutrition advice. This study examined the nature and extent of nutrition education provided in Australian midwifery programmes. A mixed-methods approach was used, incorporating an online survey and telephone interviews. The survey analysis included 23 course coordinators representing 24 of 50 accredited midwifery programmes in 2012. Overall, the coordinators considered nutrition in ...

  16. Forests of Wisconsin, 2013

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charles H. Perry

    2014-01-01

    This resource update provides an overview of forest resources in Wisconsin based on an inventory conducted by the U.S. Forest Service, Forest Inventory and Analysis (FIA) program at the Northern Research Station in cooperation with the Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources. Data estimates are based on field data collected using the FIA annualized sample design and...

  17. Dietary patterns of female university students with nutrition education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strawson, Cynthia; Bell, Rhonda; Downs, Shauna; Farmer, Anna; Olstad, Dana; Willows, Noreen

    2013-01-01

    Dietary patterns were examined in a convenience sample of 36 female University of Alberta students, all of whom had completed at least one nutrition course. Data from a validated food frequency questionnaire were used to determine if students had a dietary pattern similar to that recommended in Eating Well with Canada's Food Guide (EWCFG) or by the Traditional Healthy Mediterranean Diet Pyramid (THMDP), as measured using a Mediterranean Diet Quality Index Score. No student consumed the THMDP minimum number of portions of legumes, seeds, and nuts, of olive oil, or of whole grains. The majority did not meet the minimum EWCFG recommendations for any food group. The results suggest that nutrition education alone may be insufficient to ensure optimal dietary patterns among female university students. The methodology reported in this study is novel in assessing whether dietary patterns resemble the THMDP or the EWCFG.

  18. Systematic review of knowledge, confidence and education in nutritional genomics for students and professionals in nutrition and dietetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, O R L

    2014-06-01

    This review examines knowledge and confidence of nutrition and dietetics professionals in nutritional genomics and evaluates the teaching strategies in this field within nutrition and dietetics university programmes and professional development courses internationally. A systematic search of 10 literature databases was conducted from January 2000 to December 2012 to identify original research. Any studies of either nutrition and/or dietetics students or dietitians/nutritionists investigating current levels of knowledge or confidence in nutritional genomics, or strategies to improve learning and/or confidence in this area, were eligible. Eighteen articles (15 separate studies) met the inclusion criteria. Three articles were assessed as negative, eight as neutral and seven as positive according to the American Dietetics Association Quality Criteria Checklist. The overall ranking of evidence was low. Dietitians have low involvement, knowledge and confidence in nutritional genomics, and evidence for educational strategies is limited and methodologically weak. There is a need to develop training pathways and material to up-skill nutrition and/or dietetics students and nutrition and/or dietetics professionals in nutritional genomics through multidisciplinary collaboration with content area experts. There is a paucity of high quality evidence on optimum teaching strategies; however, methods promoting repetitive exposure to nutritional genomics material, problem-solving, collaborative and case-based learning are most promising for university and professional development programmes. © 2013 The British Dietetic Association Ltd.

  19. Understanding the State of Nutrition Education in the Head Start Classroom: A Qualitative Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carraway-Stage, Virginia; Henson, Sydney R.; Dipper, Allison; Spangler, Hillary; Ash, Sarah L.; Goodell, L. Suzanne

    2014-01-01

    Background: Early education is important for establishing healthy eating behaviors among young children; however, the literature describing nutrition education in the preschool environment is limited. Purpose: The purpose of this study was to explore teacher experiences related to the incorporation of nutrition education in Head Start preschool…

  20. Effect of educational intervention program for parents on adolescents’nutritional behaviors in Isfahan in 2016

    OpenAIRE

    Mokhtari, Fatemeh; Kazemi, Ashraf; Ehsanpour, Soheila

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Family participation is an important element on nutritional education especially for students. Parents have a key role in instilling and understanding healthy eating habits, but yet the use of family participation strategies in the nutrition education was low. The aim of this study is determining the effect of parental educational intervention program for parents on adolescents’ nutritional behaviors in Isfahan, Iran in 2016. MATERIALS AND METHODS: This study was a kind of field t...

  1. Self-Reported Nutrition Education Received by Australian Midwives before and after Registration

    OpenAIRE

    Arrish, Jamila; Yeatman, Heather; Williamson, Moira

    2017-01-01

    Educating midwives to provide nutrition advice is essential. Limited research focuses on midwives' nutrition education. This paper explores self-reported nutrition education received by Australian midwives before and after registration. It draws on quantitative and qualitative data from a larger online survey conducted with the members of the Australian College of Midwives (response rate = 6.9%, n = 329). Descriptive and content analyses were used. Of the midwives, 79.3% (n = 261) reported re...

  2. Development and evaluation of continuing education course in renal nutrition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karavetian, Mirey; Rizk, Rana

    2016-02-01

    Competent renal dietitians are crucial for better patient compliance and clinical outcomes, specifically in critical settings. The aim of this study was to develop and evaluate an evidence-based course in renal dietetics for dietitians working in health care systems where dietetic specialization is absent. Fifteen licensed dietitians working with hemodialysis patients in Lebanon were randomly recruited to participate in the course. The latter was developed by the study's primary investigator, according to evidence-based practice guidelines, and focused on all aspects of renal nutrition. Total course duration was 28 hours spread over a 2 month period. Dietitians' knowledge in renal nutrition was tested pre- and post-training through a 23-item questionnaire; the total score was expressed in percentage (insufficient knowledge). Paired-samples t test was used for statistical analysis. Overall knowledge of the dietitians significantly improved post-training and reached satisfactory levels (pre: 38.75 ± 17.20%, post: 62.08 ± 21.85%). Sub-analysis of the change in the knowledge showed significant and satisfactory improvement only in 3 topics: 1) correct body weight use in calculations, 2) energy estimation method and 3) phosphorus management. Knowledge in the fluid management significantly improved but did not achieve a satisfactory level. The course significantly improved dietitians' knowledge in renal nutrition. If adopted as part of the continuing education of dietitians in countries that lack dietetic specializations, it may serve the first step towards improving health care practice.

  3. Die Deutschen in Wisconsin (Germans in Wisconsin).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wisconsin State Dept. of Public Instruction, Madison.

    The following curriculum units comprise this course book: (1) Germans in a New Home, (2) Contributions of the Germans in Wisconsin, (3) A Letter to Germany, (4) Germans Come to Kingston, (5) First a Soldier, Then a Man of the Church (about Heinrich von Rohr), (6) A Visiting German, and (7) Germans and Music. Each unit begins with a reading of…

  4. Toward evidence-based, client-centred nutrition education guidelines: dietitian and consumer survey results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacLellan, Deborah; Morley, Catherine; Traviss, Karol; Cividin, Theresa

    2011-01-01

    Dietitian and consumer perspectives on nutrition education needs and preferences were explored, as these relate to health status Phases 1 and 2 of a three-phase, mixed-methods study are reported. Phase 1 was a national online survey of dietitians, which was designed to inform the development of a consumer survey (Phase 2). Consumers responded to an online survey about their demographics, medical conditions, and nutrition education needs (what they wanted to learn) and preferences (how they wanted to learn). Phase 3 involved teleconferenced discussion groups with dietitians across Canada to develop guidelines for nutrition education. Dietitian respondents (n=441) perceived that consumer health status was important in predicting needs and preferences for nutrition education; emotional support was considered most important for consumers with life-altering medical conditions. Consumers (n=680) expressed interest in an array of nutrition education approaches; cooking tips, recipes, and supplement advice were the most popular. Respondents with and without medical conditions had similar nutrition education needs and preferences. Because of the complexity of nutrition education and consumers' preference for a spectrum of approaches and delivery methods, evidence-based nutrition education guidelines are important to inform dietetics training for the provision of client-centred nutrition education.

  5. The Wisconsin Early Childhood Obesity Prevention Initiative: An Example of Statewide Collective Impact.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meinen, Amy; Hilgendorf, Amy; Korth, Amy L; Christens, Brian D; Breuer, Catherine; Joyner, Hilary; Polzin, Molle; Adams, Alexandra; Wolfe, Daithi; Braun, Abbe; Hoiting, Jill; Paulson, Jeanette; Cullen, Bridget; Stader, Kelli

    2016-11-01

    The Wisconsin Early Childhood Obesity Prevention Initiative (Initiative), established in 2007, seeks to address and prevent obesity in the early care and education system through nutrition and physical activity environmental and policy changes. The collaborative includes professionals from 3 state of Wisconsin Departments, the University of Wisconsin-Extension, the University of Wisconsin-Madison, and public health and early care and education organizations. This paper explores the efforts of the Initiative to advance our understanding of collective impact in practice and its value to health promotion efforts. Evaluators conducted a mixed methods case study to evaluate the application of collective impact principles by the Initiative. This included a survey of Initiative partners, review of archival documents, and qualitative interviews with Initiative leaders. Initiative partners noted progress in establishing the conditions for collective impact. Archival documents and interviews describe both formal and informal practices that helped set a common agenda, align and coordinate partner activities, and promote communication among Initiative leaders. Results also detail the important current and potential roles of “backbone” staff from healthTIDE to support the Initiative. Additionally, results suggest particularly challenging aspects of the Initiative’s impact model related to shared measurement and broader stakeholder communication. While the Initiative is still setting in place the conditions for collective impact, it has achieved significant policy, systems, and environment changes since its formation. Inclusion of nutrition and physical activity criteria in the state’s quality rating improvement system for child care centers is one of its outcomes. This case study offers several important insights about the application of collective impact in health promotion efforts, particularly in relation to the transition from previous collaborative activities, the

  6. Effect of a School-based Nutrition Education Program on the Nutritional Status of Primary School Children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parisa Keshani

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objectives: Regarding the high prevalence of unhealthy food habits among Iranian children, we aimed to assess the effect of a school-based nutrition education program on nutritional status of primary school students in Shiraz. Materials and Methods: This randomized educational controlled trial was carried out on 221 primary school age children selected by cluster sampling in the elementary schools of Shiraz-Iran. The intervention consisted of 6 nutrition education sessions carried out through one year for children, using active learning methods. Mothers’ education was carried out in person in both lecture and question-answer sessions also via sending text messages and pamphlets. Weight, height and waist circumference (WC of children were measured before and after the intervention. Also a 168-item food frequency questionnaire was completed. Two separate nutrition knowledge questionnaires were filled up by children and their mothers. Data were analyzed using SPSS version 16. Results: 171 children (83 in the case and 88 in the control group, aged 9.5-10.5 years, completed the study. Anthropometric and nutritional knowledge of the participants in both the intervention and control groups was significantly increased. Weight, height, WC and nutritional knowledge increased significantly more in the intervention group compared to the controls. Consumption of fruits and vegetables decreased in the intervention group while plain sugar and fast foods intake increased among the controls. There were no significant differences between the changes in the intake of any of the food groups in the two groups. Conclusions: In conclusion, the designed nutrition education program could increase students’ nutritional knowledge, and lead to a non-significant change towards reducing the consumption of unhealthy foods such as fast foods, sweets and salty snacks.

  7. A Nutrition Education Intervention Trial for Adolescent Girls in Isfahan: Study Design and Protocol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morvarid Ghasab Shirazi

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundNutrition behaviors of adolescent girls is of serious health concerns. Although nutrition education interventions in Iran have met with some success, most of them could not promote nutrition behavioral changes. The aim of our study is to determine a school-based nutrition education intervention to improve adolescents’ nutrition behaviors and behavioral mediators based on the social cognitive theory (SCT.Materials and MethodsThis study is a single-blind randomized controlled trial. Eligible participants will be all student girls in grade 6 and 7, their parents and teachers in Isfahan governmental schools. This multi com­ponent school-based intervention include adolescents’ nutrition education package, parents’ nutrition massages, participatory homework, parents and teachers nutrition education package, supportive group, and collaboration with decision makers. Changing in nutrition behaviors including breakfast, fruit and vegetable, snack and fast food consumption will be examined, as primary outcome. Secondary outcome will be behavioral mediators such as knowledge, self-efficacy, intention, situation, self-regulation, social support, outcome expectations and expectancies, in adolescent girls. The outcomes will be assessed at baseline, and after 3 and 6-month follow-up.DiscussionThis study evaluates a school-based, guided SCT intervention, designed to improve healthy dietary behaviors, nutrition knowledge of adolescent girls. Few behavioral interventions have targeted this high-risk population in Iran. The intervention seems to be promising and has the potential to bridge the gap of the limited program outcomes of nutrition education in Iranian adolescents.

  8. Barns of Wisconsin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson-Newlin, Karen

    2008-01-01

    In this article, the author shares a painting unit she introduced to her students. In this unit, her students painted pictures of barns and discussed the historical significance of barns in Wisconsin.

  9. Food and nutrition education in the school context: the example of the ‘EDALNU’ food and nutrition programme

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eva María Trescastro-López

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Over the course of the 20th century, the transformation of Spanish food and nutrition was consolidated. In the pre-transitional phase, in the 1950s, a renewed interest arose in the deficiencies presented by the diet given to children and in order to overcome these, an educational approach to food and nutrition was introduced. The aim of the present study was to analyse the actions implemented in schools as part of the ‘EDALNU’ Food and Nutrition Education Programme launched in 1961. An analysis of the documentation shows that the ‘EDALNU’ programme constituted the most organised and interdisciplinary food and nutrition education intervention carried out in Spain in the 20th century. This food education initiative, targeted at the school population, was crucial in ensuring an adequate diet and served to rectify certain problems. It was however insufficient to halt the growing epidemic of obesity. Be that as it may, and in spite of its limitations, the integrated approach of the ‘EDALNU’ programme, in which the school, the social context and the family were all addressed in concert, serves as an example for present day strategies in food and nutrition education.DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.14306/renhyd.17.2.11

  10. [Nutrition education in schools: potential resources for a teacher/nurse partnership].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arboix-Calas, France; Lemonnier, Geneviève

    2016-01-01

    Nutrition education in schools must be based on a collaborative approach between teachers and school nurses. The objective of this study was to compare the nutrition education representations and practices of primary school teachers and school nurses in the Languedoc-Roussillon region in the South of France. We used the theoretical framework of complexity, which is particularly suited to multifactorial phenomena such as nutrition education. We interviewed 112 primary school teachers and 33 school nurses about three aspects of their nutrition education representations and practices: actors, content and place of nutrition education at school. Nurses had a more comprehensive and complex approach to nutrition education, including a collaborative approach. However, teachers had a fairly simplistic view of nutrition education and their practice took little account of the psychosocial dimensions of nutrition and a collaborative approach. Nurses could be resources for teachers to help them change their approach to health by transforming a purely biomedical approach to health and nutrition into a more comprehensive approach, particularly taking into account in its psychological and social dimensions, which would be more appropriate to address the growing prevalence of diet-related chronic diseases in France today.

  11. THE ROLE OF EDUCATION IN THE NUTRITION TRANSITION AND ITS RELATION TO QUALITY OF LIFE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana María Dueñas Romero

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Education is a powerful tool to improve individuals quality of life; its role is evident by providing the necessary knowledge so that through autonomy, responsibility and a critical attitude, appropriate food choices are taken in order to provide welfare and health. In this paper, some factors affecting human nutrition will be discussed, the nutrition situation in Colombia, the importance of nutrition education and its relation to quality of life. It supports the idea that Colombia is currently experiencing a nutrition transition process and the problems it generates can be solved through education, affecting individuals quality of life.

  12. Nutrition risk factors among home delivered and congregate meal participants: need for enhancement of nutrition education and counseling among home delivered meal participants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wunderlich, S; Bai, Y; Piemonte, J

    2011-11-01

    The short-term impact of nutrition education and counseling intervention on nutrition risk factors among home delivered (HDM) and congregate (CGM) meal participants using Nutrition Survey Risk Screening was studied. A two-year intervention was conducted with 355 participants (n=259 CGM, n=96 HDM). Various nutrition behaviors that affect the nutrition risk score were compared. Congregate and home delivered meal locations in a northern county of New Jersey. CGM and HDM participants in a northern county of New Jersey age 60 and older. CGM participants received regular topical nutrition education and counseling in a classroom format with cooking demo, discussion, and handouts. The HDM participants only received the printed material (same handouts) and counseling by telephone. Demographics, medical condition, risk factors data were collected. All participants completed the 12 items checklist Nutrition Survey Risk Screening. Nutritional behaviors assessed include number of meals eaten per day, servings of fruits and vegetables and nutrition risk score. A score of 6 or more points was defined as persons at high risk nutritionally. The impact of the intervention was evaluated using ANOVA/chi-square on Nutrition Survey Risk Screening. Nutrition education and counseling intervention improved nutrition risk scores; 5.76 to 5.32 (p=0.14) in CGM, 8.1 to 6.1 (peffective nutrition education and counseling.

  13. Texas Nutrition Education and Training Program for Federal Fiscal Year 1990. Final Evaluation Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, Mahassen

    The U.S. Department of Agriculture's Nutrition Education and Training Program (NET) provides nutrition information and instructional resources for children and for key individuals involved in children's learning environments. The latter category includes parents, educators, and food service personnel. This document describes formal evaluation…

  14. Exploring the Feasibility of an Academic Course That Provides Nutrition Education to Collegiate Student-Athletes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karpinski, Christine

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to explore the delivery of nutrition education to collegiate student-athletes through an academic course. Existing literature has established the need for nutrition education among collegiate athletes. This article considers the collaboration of the university and the athletic department to better serve this…

  15. Cultural Adaptation of a Nutrition Education Curriculum for Latino Families to Promote Acceptance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broyles, Shelia L.; Brennan, Jesse J.; Burke, Kari Herzog; Kozo, Justine; Taras, Howard L.

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this GEM is to describe how an existing nutrition education program--Nutrition Education Aimed at Toddlers, was adapted for Latino Families to achieve a good fit by considering several components--both surface and deep structure characteristics of culture, and report indicators of its acceptability. (Contains 1 table.)

  16. The Association between Nutrition and Physical Activity Knowledge and Weight Status of Primary School Educators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalais, Lucinda; Abrahams, Zulfa; Steyn, Nelia P.; de Villiers, Anniza; Fourie, Jean M.; Hill, Jillian; Lambert, Estelle V.; Draper, Catherine E.

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate primary school educators' health status, knowledge, perceptions and behaviour regarding nutrition and physical activity. Thus, nutrition and physical activity knowledge, attitudes, behaviour and risk factors for the development of non-communicable diseases of 155 educators were assessed in a…

  17. Nutrition Education among Low-Income Older Adults: A Randomized Intervention Trial in Congregate Nutrition Sites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Roger E.; Ash, Sarah L.; McClelland, Jacquelyn W.

    2006-01-01

    Nutritional well-being among older adults is critical for maintaining health, increasing longevity, and decreasing the impact of chronic illness. However, few well-controlled studies have examined nutritional behavior change among low-income older adults. A prospective, controlled, randomized design examined a five session nutrition education…

  18. Importance-Performance Analysis (IPA) of Foodservice Operation, Dietary Life Education, and Nutrition Counseling Tasks of Nutrition Teachers and Dietitians in Jeju, Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Eun A; Chae, In Sook; Jo, Mi Na

    2017-10-22

    The purpose of this study was to analyze foodservice operation, dietary life education, and nutrition counseling tasks of nutrition teachers and dietitians in elementary, middle, and high schools in Jeju, Korea, and to provide effective ways to implement dietary life education and nutrition counseling in schools. This study surveyed 94 nutrition teachers and 46 dietitians working at elementary, middle, and high schools in Jeju during 7-14 May 2015. The importance and performance of 16 tasks of nutrition teachers and dietitians were measured using questionnaires. The data was analyzed by using the SPSS software and Importance-Performance Analysis (IPA). Importance was ranked in the order of foodservice operation (4.72), dietary life education (4.37), and nutrition counseling (4.24); and performance was ranked in the order of foodservice operation (4.48), dietary life education (3.70), and nutrition counseling (3.22). The importance-performance matrix showed that in Quadrant 4, the "Concentrate Here" item was "nutrition and dietary life education for students", while in Quadrant 2, the "Possible Overkill" item was "cost control and office management". These findings suggest that it is important to reduce unnecessary administrative and office management tasks in order for nutrition teachers and dietitians to implement effective nutrition education, dietary life education, and nutrition counseling programs.

  19. Importance–Performance Analysis (IPA of Foodservice Operation, Dietary Life Education, and Nutrition Counseling Tasks of Nutrition Teachers and Dietitians in Jeju, Korea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eun A Park

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to analyze foodservice operation, dietary life education, and nutrition counseling tasks of nutrition teachers and dietitians in elementary, middle, and high schools in Jeju, Korea, and to provide effective ways to implement dietary life education and nutrition counseling in schools. This study surveyed 94 nutrition teachers and 46 dietitians working at elementary, middle, and high schools in Jeju during 7–14 May 2015. The importance and performance of 16 tasks of nutrition teachers and dietitians were measured using questionnaires. The data was analyzed by using the SPSS software and Importance–Performance Analysis (IPA. Importance was ranked in the order of foodservice operation (4.72, dietary life education (4.37, and nutrition counseling (4.24; and performance was ranked in the order of foodservice operation (4.48, dietary life education (3.70, and nutrition counseling (3.22. The importance–performance matrix showed that in Quadrant 4, the “Concentrate Here” item was “nutrition and dietary life education for students”, while in Quadrant 2, the “Possible Overkill” item was “cost control and office management”. These findings suggest that it is important to reduce unnecessary administrative and office management tasks in order for nutrition teachers and dietitians to implement effective nutrition education, dietary life education, and nutrition counseling programs.

  20. Strategies for selecting effective patient nutrition education materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clayton, Laura H

    2010-10-01

    Nutrition and diet therapy are at the center of health promotion activities and self-management of chronic diseases. To assist an individual in making informed decisions regarding his or her diet and increase adherence to dietary recommendations or treatments, healthcare professionals must select health information that is appropriate to the client's level of understanding. A systematic approach in the evaluation of patient education material, whether in print or on the World Wide Web, must focus on the information's content, literacy level, graphical displays, layout and typography, motivating principles, cultural relevance, and feasibility. Additional criteria should be evaluated when accessing Web sites and include source, site credibility, conflict of interest, disclaimer, disclosure, navigation, and interactivity information.

  1. Opportunities and barriers to public health nutrition education in Vietnamese universities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pham, Quynh Th; Worsley, Anthony; Lawrence, Mark; Marshall, Bernie

    2017-05-01

    A core challenge for low- and middle-income countries (LMICs) in combating the negative effects of the nutrition transition is to implement appropriate prevention strategies to halt the increasing prevalence of obesity and non-communicable diseases (NCDs), against a background of prevailing under nutrition. There have been several proposals for the enhancement of university nutrition education for future health and related professionals who are expected to communicate knowledge of health risks to the broad community. However, little is known about university nutrition education in LMICs. The present study aimed to investigate professional development opportunities and barriers for university nutrition lecturers to teach public health nutrition (PHN). An online survey was conducted among 242 Vietnamese health and education professionals and university nutrition lecturers across Vietnam. Purposive sampling was used to recruit participants. Comparisons of between the groups' responses were examined via SPSS Crosstabs. The structures of the perceived barriers and desired PHN training topics were examined via factor analyses. Multiple linear regression examined the influences on lecturers' learning interests in nutrition areas. The lecturers' learning interests spanned four areas: basic nutrition, basic food, food policy and 'new' trends (e.g. food policy, marketing). Major impediments to nutrition teaching in universities divided into two groups: resource limitations and professional constraints (e.g. lack of relevant training opportunities). The lecturers' perceptions of professional constraints influenced their interest in learning about 'new' trends. The results highlighted the need and opportunities to enhance PHN professional development for nutrition lecturers in Vietnam.

  2. Understanding Standards and Assessment Policy in Science Education: Relating and Exploring Variations in Policy Implementation by Districts and Teachers in Wisconsin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Kevin John Boyett

    Current literature shows that many science teachers view policies of standards-based and test-based accountability as conflicting with research-based instruction in science education. With societal goals of improving scientific literacy and using science to spur economic growth, improving science education policy becomes especially important. To understand perceived influences of science education policy, this study looked at three questions: 1) How do teachers perceive state science standards and assessment and their influence on curriculum and instruction? 2) How do these policy perspectives vary by district and teacher level demographic and contextual differences? 3) How do district leaders' interpretations of and efforts within these policy realms relate to teachers' perceptions of the policies? To answer these questions, this study used a stratified sample of 53 districts across Wisconsin, with 343 middle school science teachers responding to an online survey; science instructional leaders from each district were also interviewed. Survey results were analyzed using multiple regression modeling, with models generally predicting 8-14% of variance in teacher perceptions. Open-ended survey and interview responses were analyzed using a constant comparative approach. Results suggested that many teachers saw state testing as limiting use of hands-on pedagogy, while standards were seen more positively. Teachers generally held similar views of the degree of influence of standards and testing regardless of their experience, background in science, credentials, or grade level taught. District SES, size and past WKCE scores had some limited correlations to teachers' views of policy, but teachers' perceptions of district policies and leadership consistently had the largest correlation to their views. District leadership views of these state policies correlated with teachers' views. Implications and future research directions are provided. Keywords: science education, policy

  3. Tickborne Powassan virus infections among Wisconsin residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Diep K Hoang; Staples, J Erin; Sotir, Mark J; Warshauer, David M; Davis, Jeffrey P

    2010-04-01

    Powassan virus (POWV) is a tickborne Flavivirus that causes a rare but potentially life-threatening illness. The first reported case of POWV infection in a Wisconsin resident occurred in 2003. Enhanced surveillance and testing detected 2 additional cases. Patient specimens with a positive or equivocal immunoglobulin M (IgM) antibody to an arbovirus were sent from commercial laboratories to the Wisconsin State Laboratory of Hygiene and forwarded to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) for confirmatory testing. Patients with laboratory confirmed POWV infections were interviewed to obtain demographic, clinical, and epidemiologic information. POWV infections were confirmed in 3 adult Wisconsin residents in 2003, 2006, and 2007; illness onsets occurred during May and June. Two patients were hospitalized and all survived. One patient had a dual infection with POWV and Anaplasma phaghocytophilum. Specimens from all 3 patients were initially reported as positive for IgM antibody to either St Louis encephalitis or California serogroup viruses; POWV-specific antibody was detected during confirmatory testing at the CDC. Each patient had exposures to known or likely tick habitats in different counties within 30 days before illness onset. These are the first diagnosed human POWV infections in Wisconsin. Because all 3 patients were initially identified as having other arboviral infections using commercial screening kits, routine confirmatory testing is essential for proper diagnosis of most arboviral infections. Wisconsin residents should be educated regarding risks of acquiring and ways to prevent POWV infection and other tickborne diseases when spending time outdoors.

  4. Awareness of food nutritive value and eating practices among Nigerian bank workers: Implications for nutritional counseling and education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eze, Ngozi M; Maduabum, Felicia O; Onyeke, Nkechi G; Anyaegunam, Ngozi J; Ayogu, Chinwe A; Ezeanwu, Bibian Amaka; Eseadi, Chiedu

    2017-03-01

    Adequate nutrition is an important aspect of a healthy lifestyle for all individuals, including bank staff. The objective of this study was to investigate the awareness of food nutritive value and eating practices among bank workers in Lagos State, Nigeria.The study adopted a cross-sectional descriptive survey design. A purposive sample of 250 bank workers took part in the study. Means and Student t tests were employed for data analysis.Results showed that bank workers were aware of the nutritive value of foods, and that eating practices commonly adopted included skipping breakfast, eating breakfast at work, buying food at work from the bank canteen, eating in between meals, buying snacks as lunch, and consuming soft drinks daily, among others. There were no significant differences between male and female bank workers in mean responses on food nutritive value or in eating practices adopted.Good eating habits will help bank workers not only to improve their nutritional well-being, but also to prevent nutrition-related diseases. The implications for nutritional counseling and education are discussed in the context of these findings.

  5. Nutrition education in European medical schools: results of an international survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, M; van Buul, V J; Wilms, E; Nellessen, N; Brouns, F J P H

    2014-07-01

    Consumers and patients are unsure of whom to trust for nutritional advice. Although medical doctors are seen as experts in nutrition and their advice is regularly followed, data are lacking on the amount of nutrition education in European medical school curricula. In line with US research, we distributed a survey on required and/or optional nutrition contact hours to medical education directors of all accredited medical schools (N=217) in Western European Union countries (N=14). In total, respondents from 32 medical schools (14.7%) from 10 countries indicated that nutrition education, in some form, was required in 68.8% of schools where, on average, 23.68 h of required nutrition education was provided. The results from this small-scale survey are comparable to a 2010 US study; conversely, European educators were satisfied with the amount of nutrition education. We substantiate the increasing concern over the inadequate amounts of nutrition education provided to medical students in Europe.

  6. Nutrition education training of health workers and other field staff to support chronically deprived communities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calderon, T A

    2001-12-01

    This paper focuses on the provision of adequate training in nutrition education to health and other community development workers for their improved performance and achievement. The difficulties encountered and special care needed when dealing with low-income, chronically deprived communities are raised. A brief analysis of past and present trends in nutrition education is presented to show the progress made from restricted, authoritative and not very successful proposals to more comprehensive and participatory approaches. The need to train and update regional and field-level personnel on the new approaches, theories and models offered by nutrition education is highlighted, but the scant availability of resources for training activities may be a great limitation for this undertaking. The contribution of educational, social, psychological and communication sciences, as well as marketing, in improving and broadening the performance of health and nutrition education is recognised. Some successful nutrition education projects, implemented in different regions, using various approaches, have managed to improve the nutrition situation of low-income groups and could be used as good examples to be followed. Recommendations for implementing nutrition education projects or activities need to consider some prerequisites, such as good knowledge and analysis of the nutrition situation, careful selection of the strategies and methods, careful planning and implementation, and clear definition of the procedures and instruments for follow-up and evaluation.

  7. Nutritional needs assessment of rural agricultural migrants of southern Brazil: designing, implementing and evaluating a nutrition education program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desai, I D; Doell, A M; Officiati, S A; Bianco, A M; Van Severen, Y; Desai, M I; Jansen, E; de Oliveira, J E

    1990-01-01

    A nutritional needs assessment was conducted among rural agricultural migrant women (target group) and children (less than 5 years). The study was conducted in Vila Diogo, a slum located on the periphery of Nuporanga, a village in Sao Paulo state, Brazil. A nutrition education program was designed on the basis of evidence obtained from demographic/socioeconomic information of the study population and a nutritional needs assessment of women (target group) and children less than 5 years of age. The nutritional needs assessment consisted of anthropometry, dietary assessment, and nutrition knowledge, attitudes, and beliefs questionnaires. Formative and summative evaluation of the nutrition education program, using appropriately selected criteria and comparisons of nutrition knowledge scores before and after the program, were used to determine program effectiveness. Major findings of the study were: Diets of Vila Diogo residents were generally simplistic, consisting primarily of rice, beans, and coffee with sugar. Vila Diogo women appeared to be at a relatively high risk for vitamin A, iron, calcium, ascorbic, and riboflavin deficiencies, based on comparisons of 24-hour dietary intake data with FAO recommendations. Children (2-5 years) appeared at high risk for vitamin A, iron, and ascorbic acid deficiencies, based on comparisons of 24-hour dietary intake data with FAO recommendations. All children less than 5 years of age had been breast-fed at birth, but more than one half of children had been weaned by the third month. Infant feeding practices during fever and diarrhea were nutritionally detrimental. Women generally recognized a relationship between dietary intake during pregnancy and fetal nourishment. Using weight-for-height index, a significant number of women were probably undernourished; a small percentage of women, however, were overweight or obese. Although children less than 5 years of age did not generally appear malnourished, a relatively large number were

  8. Nutrition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durnin, J V

    1976-07-01

    Nutrition appeared somewhat late on the scene in the I.B.P. projects in the U.K., but eventually it occupied an integral part of many of the H.A. (human adaptability) investigations. The nutritional data obtained in the studies of isolated and nearisolated communities in Tristan da Cunha and in New Guinea provided information of wide nutritional significance. There were also detailed and extensive studies in Israel which, similarly to those in New Guinea, attempted to relate nutritional factors to enviroment, working conditions, and physical fitness. Some extraordinarily low energy intakes found in Ethiopians have induced much speculation on the extent which man can adequately adapt to restricted food supplies. Interesting nutritional observations, of general importance, have also arisen from results obtained on such disparate groups as Glasgow adolescents, Tanzanian and Sudanese students, children in Malawi and vegans in the U.K.

  9. Children-at-risk for poor nutrition: expanding the approach of future professionals in educational institutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shor, Ron

    2011-08-01

    To examine how the subject of nutrition is being addressed in the work with children at risk of poor nutrition in educational institutions and what the barriers are which may hinder inclusion of this subject. A structured questionnaire was constructed for the purpose of this study and was implemented with 111 students in Israel who are working in their internships in educational institutions with children who are exposed to risk factors of poor nutrition (e.g., parental neglect, lack of knowledge, poverty). Participants attributed a high level of importance to integrating nutrition-related components in their work. However, the findings indicate less emphasis on nutrition-related components than on psycho-social-educational components, as well as a low level of collaboration with specialists in the area of nutrition. In addition, it was found that knowledge-based barriers and institutional-related systemic barriers may hinder future teachers' capabilities to incorporate those components despite their favorable approach towards this subject. The findings illuminate the need to reduce barriers hampering the individual work with children at risk of poor nutrition in educational institutions. In the training of future teachers, there is a need to advance a bio-psycho-social educational approach incorporating a knowledge base about assessing situations of poor nutrition, including how to advance an interdisciplinary collaboration with specialists in the area of nutrition. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. The Role of Extension Nutrition Education in Student Achievement of Nutrition Standards in Grades K-3: A Descriptive Evaluation of a School-Based Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnold, Mary E.; Schreiber, Debera

    2012-01-01

    This article reports the results of a descriptive evaluation of the impact of an in-school Extension nutrition education program in a small, very rural county. The evaluation focused on understanding the nature of the role the Extension educator plays in delivering nutrition education, the impact of the program on student learning and achievement…

  11. Educational Intervention for Nutrition Education in Patients Attending an Outpatient Wound Care Clinic: A Feasibility Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Lisa M; Ratcliffe, Desi; Masters, Kathleen; Story, Lachel

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether nurses could use a structured intervention to educate patients with wounds about foods that promote healing and whether this educational intervention could be provided in a cost-effective manner. Cross-sectional survey. The study was conducted at an outpatient wound care center located on a hospital campus in the Southern United States; 3 full-time nurses and 2 nurses employed on part-time status delivered the intervention. A nutrition education intervention was developed through collaborative efforts of a registered dietitian and a nurse. A cross-sectional survey design was used to (1) evaluate nurses' perceptions of the intervention and (2) identify barriers to implementation of the intervention. Direct costs related to materials and nursing time required to deliver the intervention were calculated. Participants indicated they were competent to deliver the structured intervention, and all were willing to continue its use. Survey results indicated that nurses believed the intervention was beneficial to their patients and they indicated that patients were responsive to the intervention. The intervention was found to be low cost ($8.00 per teaching session); no barriers to implementation of the intervention were identified. The results of this exploratory study suggest that a structured nutrition education intervention can be provided by nurses in outpatient wound clinics at low cost. Further study is needed to determine the impact of this intervention on nutritional intake and wound healing.

  12. [Organic food and educational actions in schools: diagnosis for health and nutrition education].

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Cunha, Elisângela; de Sousa, Anete Araújo; Machado, Neila Maria Viçosa

    2010-01-01

    This research involved a diagnosis of the educational actions and organic food of the Taste and Awareness Project (Projeto Sabor e Saber, PSS) in a state school in Florianopolis, Brazil. Based on a qualitative approach, a semi-structured interview, documentation analysis and focal groups were used for data collection. The participants were managers of School Meals; a school head and a group of students and teachers representing the school. The results indicated that the PSS has advanced in its objectives, combining the introduction of organic foods with educational actions involving food, health, nutrition and the environment but with no evaluations of this process; organic food is present in school meals, although there is no record of educational actions; food is a subject on the Science course; the themes of food, health and nutrition in the school environment come up without planning; the evaluation of students regarding the food is positive, but no reference was made to organic foods. It was concluded that the use of organic food, is still not an element of the pedagogical project. However, the research contributed to the teachers, on the need to develop educational actions in health, organic foods and nutrition, within the school community.

  13. Proceedings of the inaugural International Summit for Medical Nutrition Education and Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laur, C; Ball, L; Ahankari, A S; Avdagovska, M; Crowley, J; Deen, D; Douglas, P; Hark, L; Kohlmeier, M; Luzi, L; McCotter, L; Martyn, K; Nowson, C; Wall, C; Ray, S

    2016-11-01

    Medical Nutrition Education (MNE) has been identified as an area with potential public health impact. Despite countries having distinctive education systems, barriers and facilitators to effective MNE are consistent across borders, demanding a common platform to initiate global programmes. A shared approach to supporting greater MNE is ideal to support countries to work together. In an effort to initiate this process, the Need for Nutrition Education/Innovation Programme group, in association with their strategic partners, hosted the inaugural International Summit on Medical Nutrition Education and Research on August 8, 2015 in Cambridge, UK. Speakers from the UK, the USA, Canada, Australia, New Zealand, Italy, and India provided insights into their respective countries including their education systems, inherent challenges, and potential solutions across two main themes: (1) Medical Nutrition Education, focused on best practice examples in competencies and assessment; and (2) Medical Nutrition Research, discussing how to translate nutrition research into education opportunities. The Summit identified shared needs across regions, showcased examples of transferrable strategies and identified opportunities for collaboration in nutrition education for healthcare (including medical) professionals. These proceedings highlight the key messages presented at the Summit and showcase opportunities for working together towards a common goal of improvement in MNE to improve public health at large. Copyright © 2016 The Royal Society for Public Health. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Policy windows for school-based health education about nutrition in Ecuador

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Torres, Irene

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study is to identify opportunities in policy framing for critical health education (CHE) about food and nutrition in Ecuadorian schools. The research engages in a dialogue between the perspectives of critical nutrition and political ecology, as it seeks to clarify and develop...... a critical perspective on health promotion and health education. Critical nutrition studies and political ecology highlight the need to consider and also act upon the broader connections of, and influences on, food and nutrition. In a CHE approach, students learn to address the wider determinants of health...

  15. 7 CFR 1150.153 - Qualified State or regional dairy product promotion, research or nutrition education programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ..., research or nutrition education programs. 1150.153 Section 1150.153 Agriculture Regulations of the... § 1150.153 Qualified State or regional dairy product promotion, research or nutrition education programs... nutrition education program may apply to the Secretary for certification of qualification so that producers...

  16. Formative assessment in the development of an obesity prevention component for the Expanded Food and Nutrition Education Program in Texas

    Science.gov (United States)

    This study conducted formative research (surveys, focus groups); to assess the nutrition education needs of clients in the Texas Expanded Food and Nutrition Education Program prior to curriculum revision. Current participants in the Expanded Food and Nutrition Education Program from 3 Texas cities (...

  17. Nutritional knowledge following interventional educational sessions in children on regular hemodialysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Doaa Mohammed Youssef

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available To evaluate the impact of nutritional knowledge following interventional educational sessions in chronic dialysis patients, we studied 40 children on chronic regular hemodialysis (HD at the beginning and after six months of nutrition educational sessions using a predesigned questionnaire. We also measured the anthropometric parameters of nutrition to evaluate the impact of this education on the health of patients. We found a highly statistically significant increase in patients′ scores and in adequate knowledge using the questionnaire after the educational sessions. Our results showed a statistically significant decrease in body mass index and weight after educational sessions for six months. Moreover, there were no significant decreases in serum phosphorus, ferritin, iron and creatinine, in contrast with no significant increase in hemoglobin, serum calcium, blood urea nitrogen and serum albumin. We conclude that nutritional education is significantly effective with regard to the level of knowledge, but not with regard to the attitude and practice in children on chronic HD.

  18. Nutritional knowledge following interventional educational sessions in children on regular hemodialysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Youssef, Doaa Mohammed; Abo Al Fotoh, Mohammad Nagib; Elibehidy, Rabab Mohamed; Ramadan, Shreen Magdy Ahmad; Mohammad, Ehab Mohammady

    2015-03-01

    To evaluate the impact of nutritional knowledge following interventional educational sessions in chronic dialysis patients, we studied 40 children on chronic regular hemodialysis (HD) at the beginning and after six months of nutrition educational sessions using a predesigned questionnaire. We also measured the anthropometric parameters of nutrition to evaluate the impact of this education on the health of patients. We found a highly statistically significant increase in patients' scores and in adequate knowledge using the questionnaire after the educational sessions. Our results showed a statistically significant decrease in body mass index and weight after educational sessions for six months. Moreover, there were no significant decreases in serum phosphorus, ferritin, iron and creatinine, in contrast with no significant increase in hemoglobin, serum calcium, blood urea nitrogen and serum albumin. We conclude that nutritional education is significantly effective with regard to the level of knowledge, but not with regard to the attitude and practice in children on chronic HD.

  19. Education in a homeless shelter to improve the nutrition of young children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yousey, Yvonne; Leake, Jacquelyn; Wdowik, Melissa; Janken, Janice K

    2007-01-01

    To improve the nutritional status of homeless children by implementing an educational program for their mothers and the cafeteria staff at a homeless shelter. Program evaluation including before and after measures of mothers' nutritional knowledge and nutritional quality of foods served in the cafeteria. Fifty-six mothers with children aged 18 months to 6 years and 3 cafeteria staff. Four nutrition classes developed by a registered nutritionist were taught to mothers by clinic nurses; 3 nutrition classes were taught to the cafeteria staff by the nutritionist. Mothers scored higher on posttests than on pretests, indicating improved nutritional knowledge. Minimal differences in the nutritional quality of foods served to residents were observed after staff education. This project demonstrates the challenges of altering the nutritional status of children in a homeless shelter. Despite mothers showing better knowledge of nutritional requirements for children, the types of food served in the cafeteria were an obstacle to them in practicing what they had learned. The cafeteria staff's ability to demonstrate their learning was impeded by the constraints of food donations. Educational strategies may need to be augmented by policies to improve the nutritional status of children in homeless shelters.

  20. Application of BASNEF educational model for nutritional education among elderly patients with type 2 diabetes: improving the glycemic control

    OpenAIRE

    Gholamreza Sharifirad; Arash Najimi; Akbar Hassanzadeh; Leila Azadbakht

    2011-01-01

    Background: The objective of this study was to determine the effects of nutritional educational program on glycemic control of elderly patients with type 2 diabetes. Methods: In this parallel randomized controlled educational trial, 100 diabetic elderly patients (≥60 years) were chosen (50 in control and 50 in test group). Nutrition education based on beliefs, attitudes, subjective norms and enabling factors (BASNEF model) was conducted. Dietary intake and glycemic indices as well as the ...

  1. Nutrition Education in U.S. Medical Schools: An Assessment of Nutrition Content in USMLE STEP Preparation Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Shaily; Taylor, Katelynn H.; Berlin, Kathryn L.; Geib, Roy W.; Danek, Robin; Waite, Gabi N.

    2015-01-01

    In the U.S., the numbers of obese individuals and of obesity-related health conditions are rising. While physicians understand the need to improve patient health by promoting a healthy lifestyle, the advancement of nutrition education in medical school and residency is not keeping pace. This is evident in the inadequate time dedicated to nutrition…

  2. The Effects of Intensive Nutrition Education on Late Middle-Aged Adults with Type 2 Diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ye; Xu, Meihong; Fan, Rui; Ma, Xiaotao; Gu, Jiaojiao; Cai, Xiaxia; Liu, Rui; Chen, Qihe; Ren, Jinwei; Mao, Ruixue; Bao, Lei; Zhang, Zhaofeng; Wang, Junbo; Li, Yong

    2016-09-08

    Many patients with type 2 diabetes find it difficult to maintain good glycemic control. Undesirable glycemic control occurs greatly due to deficiencies of nutritional knowledge and difficulty in obtaining dietary prescriptions. The late middle-aged and elder individuals are the main populations that are affected by type 2 diabetes. The main purpose of this study was to investigate whether intensive nutrition education would make benefits for late middle-aged patients with type 2 diabetes. 196 patients between 50 to 65 years old meeting type 2 diabetes criteria and eligible for the program were included in a single-blinded, 30-day centralized management of an education program in China. Participants in the program were randomly divided into a usual nutrition education group or an intensive nutrition education group. The usual nutrition education group was used as a control group and received only basic health advice and principles of diabetic diets at the beginning and the end of the study. Participants in the intensive nutrition education group were arranged to receive intensive nutritional lectures about diabetes for 30 days. The primary outcomes were the changes in weight, body mass index (BMI), fasting plasma glucose (FPG), 2-h postprandial plasma glucose (PG), glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c), total glycerin (TG), total cholesterol (TC), high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-c), and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-c). After 30 days of intervention, FPG, PG, and HbA1c in the treatment group decreased significantly than the control group (p education group. However, there was no statistical significance between groups. Intensive nutrition education has significant effects on blood glucose control in late middle-aged adults with type 2 diabetes. Intensive education can cultivate good diet habits and increase physical activity, which are important for diabetes patients in the short and long terms. These findings may contribute to improving education

  3. Nutritional status of adolescents in the context of the Moroccan nutritional transition: the role of parental education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López, Pilar Montero; Anzid, Karim; Cherkaoui, Mohamed; Baali, Abdellatif; Lopez, Santiago Rodriguez

    2012-07-01

    In Morocco, the beginning of the nutritional transition is closely linked to social and economic transformations and changes in behaviour and traditional lifestyles. The objective of this study is to describe the current pattern of food consumption and the nutritional status of adolescents in the province of Ouarzazate and its association with parents' educational level. The sample comprises 327 high school students from Ouarzazate: 135 (41.3%) boys and 192 (58.7%) girls (age range 15-20 years). For both boys and girls, the results show lower height and BMI z-scores than the WHO reference values. Adolescents whose parents have a low educational level have lower height/age and BMI/age z-scores than those whose fathers have a high educational level. No differences are observed in total daily energy intake depending on fathers' educational level, but the energy provided by lipids is higher in adolescents whose fathers have a high educational background. The quality of fats consumed (MUFA+PUFA/SFA) is better among those boys whose fathers have low education, but no differences are observed for girls. The process of nutritional transition is not uniform in the sample, but depends on the socioeconomic characteristics of population groups, which include, among others, accessibility of certain food, differences in habits and lifestyles related to energy expenditure, and higher prevalence of overweight and obesity in more favoured groups.

  4. [Limits of conventional nutrition education: an example from a West African urban area].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrien, M

    1986-12-01

    The failure of conventional nutrition education, as practiced in Western Africa, is acknowledged by the author. This assessment follows the formative and summative evaluation of a nutrition education programme, directed towards the parents of hospitalized children, in a hospital, in the Ivory Coast. Often carried out within conventional health structures (maternal-child health centers, rural health centers, hospitals, etc...), the programme represents an addition to daily health care activities, with actions often too isolated and too limited to exert a decisive impact on public health. Most of the time, these programmes are conceived and implemented by health care workers who are inadequately motivated and trained in both nutrition and education. Poorly conceived messages that lack cultural, economic or social adaptation to the specified target population, authoritarian, unfeeling pedagogy, and inadequate educational tools lead to uncertain results. Results that are difficult to assess due to the absence of a clear definition of objectives and procedures for scientific evaluation. The author, in agreement with other recent studies, suggests that nutrition education should be viewed as the cumulative effect of all the various communication activities aimed at modifying those individual or community behaviours that affect the nutritional status of a given population. Multimedia nutrition education, however, can only be implemented once population needs and available communication channels have been identified. It is with the idea of promoting such multimedia activities that the network for nutrition education in Africa has been created (see p. 56).

  5. Evaluation of a preschool nutrition education program based on the theory of multiple intelligences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cason, K L

    2001-01-01

    This report describes the evaluation of a preschool nutrition education program based on the theory of multiple intelligences. Forty-six nutrition educators provided a series of 12 lessons to 6102 preschool-age children. The program was evaluated using a pretest/post-test design to assess differences in fruit and vegetable identification, healthy snack choices, willingness to taste foods, and eating behaviors. Subjects showed significant improvement in food identification and recognition, healthy snack identification, willingness to taste foods, and frequency of fruit, vegetable, meat, and dairy consumption. The evaluation indicates that the program was an effective approach for educating preschool children about nutrition.

  6. An educational model for improving diet counselling in primary care. A case study of the creative use of doctors' own diet, their attitudes to it and to nutritional counselling of their patients with diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olivarius, Niels de Fine; Palmvig, Birthe; Andreasen, Anne Helms

    2005-01-01

    Nutritional counseling; Nutritional education; Nutritional assessment; Primary care; Continuing medical education; Doctors' diet; Doctors attitudes; Doctors' knowledge; Body mass index; Educational model; Food frequency questionaire......Nutritional counseling; Nutritional education; Nutritional assessment; Primary care; Continuing medical education; Doctors' diet; Doctors attitudes; Doctors' knowledge; Body mass index; Educational model; Food frequency questionaire...

  7. Nutrition education practices of primary school teachers in a resource-constrained community in Gauteng, South Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kupolati, Mojisola D; Gericke, Gerda J; MacIntyre, Una E; Ferreira, Ronel; Fraser, William; Du Toit, Peet

    2016-01-01

    We investigated the nutrition education (NE) practices of teachers of grade 4‒7 learners in 11 primary schools (85% of total number) of the Bronkhorstspruit district (Gauteng Province) to identify opportunities for improving NE in these schools. A descriptive cross-sectional survey was carried out among a convenient sample of the teachers (N = 73) using a structured nutrition education practice questionnaire. Descriptive data analysis was done. Results showed that the majority of the teachers taught nutrition in about 10% to 20% of their teaching time. Thirty percent had no training to teach nutrition, and most teachers (86%) would like to receive training in nutrition. Teachers mostly taught nutrition as part of the curriculum (67%) and very few (18%) integrated nutrition into other subjects. Needing improvement were adequate classroom time for nutrition education delivery, continuing training in nutrition for teachers, and provision of up-to-date instructional materials for teaching nutrition.

  8. Learning from Wisconsin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniel, Jamie Owen

    2011-01-01

    Like thousands of other people from around the country and around the world, this author was heartened and inspired by the tenacity, immediacy, and creativity of the pushback by Wisconsin's public-sector unions against Governor Scott Walker's efforts to limit their collective bargaining rights. And like many others who made the trek to Madison to…

  9. Wisconsin's forest resources, 2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    C.H. Perry

    2011-01-01

    This publication provides an overview of forest resource attributes for Wisconsin based on an annual inventory conducted by the Forest Inventory and Analysis (FIA) program at the Northern Research Station of the U.S. Forest Service. These estimates, along with web-posted core tables, will be updated annually. For more information please refer to page 4 of this report...

  10. Wisconsin's forest resources, 2005

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charles, H. (Hobie) Perry; Gary J. Brand

    2006-01-01

    The annual forest inventory of Wisconsin continues, and this document reports 2001-05 moving averages for most variables and comparisons between 2000 and 2005 for growth, removals, and mortality. Summary resource tables can be generated through the Forest Inventory Mapmaker website at http://ncrs2.fs.fed.us/4801/fiadb/index. htm. Estimates from this inventory show a...

  11. Wisconsin's forest resources, 2006

    Science.gov (United States)

    C.H. Perry; V.A. Everson

    2007-01-01

    Figure 2 was revised by the author in August 2008. This publication provides an overview of forest resource attributes for Wisconsin based on an annual inventory conducted by the Forest Inventory and Analysis program at the Northern Research Station of the U.S. Forest Service from 2002-2006. These estimates, along with associated core tables postedon the Internet, are...

  12. Wisconsin's Forest Resources, 2007

    Science.gov (United States)

    C.H. Perry; V.A. Everson

    2008-01-01

    This publication provides an overview of forest resource attributes for Wisconsin based on an annual inventory conducted by the Forest Inventory and Analysis (FIA) program of the U.S. Forest Service, Northern Research Station. These estimates, along with web-posted core tables, are updated annually. For more information please refer to page 4 of this report.

  13. Wisconsin's forest resources, 2009

    Science.gov (United States)

    C.H. Perry

    2011-01-01

    This publication provides an overview of forest resource attributes for Wisconsin based on an annual inventory conducted by the Forest Inventory and Analysis (FIA) program at the Northern Research Station of the U.S. Forest Service. These estimates, along with web-posted core tables, will be updated annually. For more information, please refer to page 4 of this report...

  14. Needs and preference assessment for an in-home nutrition education program using social marketing theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Francis, Sarah L; Taylor, Martha L; Strickland, Amy Williams

    2004-01-01

    Nutrition education programs for elder caregivers (CG) and their elder care recipients (CR) are important in preventing malnutrition. Using Social Marketing Theory, this study assessed the needs and preferences for nutrition education in elder CGs and their CRs in Guilford County, NC. Thirty-two pairs of community-residing elder CGs/CRs and three focus groups (FGs) participated. Health and diet questionnaires were administered to all CGs/CRs during in-home interviews. CGs/CRs and FGs evaluated nutrition education materials. Questionnaires were analyzed using SPSS v9. Ethnograph v5.0 was used to code the interviews regarding the education materials. The CGs were middle age (58.9 years), overweight (BMI = 28.8) Caucasian women. The CRs were old (79.4 years), overweight (BMI = 26.0) Caucasian women. Identified malnutrition risk factors of CGs and CRs included inadequate fluid and dietary intake, polypharmacy, and chronic disease. Identified nutrition needs and education preferences of CGs/CRs were similar. Perceived nutrition education preferences of the FGs did not reflect the interests of the CGs/CRs. This information is being used to revise the education materials and develop an in-home nutrition education program for CGs and CRs in Guilford County, NC.

  15. [Relationship of the elderly nutrition knowledge and their education level in Nanjing].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chen; Su, Yamei; Jin, Bangquan

    2013-07-01

    To study the relationship of the elderly nutrition knowledge, eating behavior and BMI status with their education level. A questionnaire was designed to investigate 1367 elders in 26 nursing homes and communities of Nanjing. Accoording to the education lever, elders nutrition knowledge in college and high school was more than that in middle and primary school, significantly (P education groups (middle and primary school) usually watch TV or lisen to the radio get knowledge. The higher education level, the higher income for elders. For this reason, their dietary structure and eating behavior were tending to be reasonable. Compared with the education lever, age and BMI, the effect of age on BMI was more than education lever. The ratio of weight loss and obesity in 75 years old was clearly increased, their nutrition supplment needs more care. elderly education lever was a key factor on their nutrition knowledge and eating behavior (P = 0.00). In college and high school groups, elders nutrition knowledge and income were better than lower education level. However, the age was closed relative to BMI. When elders was over 75 years old, their body weight tend to loss or over and need more nutritional attention.

  16. An International Comparison of Nutrition Education Standards, Occupational Standards and Scopes of Practice for Personal Trainers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnes, Katelyn; Ball, Lauren; Desbrow, Ben

    2017-12-01

    Personal trainers are well placed to provide nutrition care in line with their recommended scope of practice. However, providing nutrition care beyond their recommended scope of practice has been identified as an industry risk. The International Confederation of Registers for Exercise Professionals (ICREPs) have international standards for nutrition knowledge and skills that are recommended for all fitness professionals, including personal trainers. This study investigates whether the ICREPs standards align with i) national nutrition education standards and ii) national nutrition occupational standards and scopes of practice for personal trainers within ICREPs affiliated countries. Content analysis of each standard and/or scope of practice was undertaken to extract nutrition statements. Extracted statements were matched with nutrition components of the ICREPs standards to result in a score based on the number of aligned ICREPs knowledge and skills criteria. Ten countries, with 16 organizations, were identified as being involved in the development of national education standards, occupational standards, or scopes of practice for personal trainers. The educational and occupational standards varied widely among countries and had minimal alignment with the ICREPs standards. As such, the expected role of personal trainers in providing nutrition care appeared to differ between countries. Further work is required to support personal trainers to develop a level of knowledge and skills that enables the provision of safe, consistent, and effective nutrition care.

  17. Childhood Obesity Study: A Pilot Study of the Effect of the Nutrition Education Program "Color My Pyramid"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Jean Burley; Pawloski, Lisa Renee; Goldberg, Patricia; Oh, Kyeung Mi; Stoehr, Ana; Baghi, Heibatollah

    2009-01-01

    The need for successful nutrition interventions is critical as the prevalence of childhood obesity increases. Thus, this pilot project examines the effect of a nutrition education program, "Color My Pyramid", on children's nutrition knowledge, self-care practices, activity levels, and nutrition status. Using a pretest-posttest,…

  18. [Effects of nutritional education on improvement of nutritional knowledge of infant's mothers in rural area in China].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Shi-an; Li, Nan; Yan, Zhi-yue; Pan, Lei; Lai, Jian-qiang; Zhao, Xian-feng

    2009-02-01

    To investigate the knowledge, attitude and practice (KAP) of young children's mothers on infant feeding and to evaluate the effects of nutritional education in the rural areas. A cluster sampling method was used to select the local health station. Five hundred and fifteen mothers, who had infants with age of 4 - 6 months, were recruited for the questionnaire survey on the nutritional knowledge in rural areas of Tianjin municipality. The mothers were randomly divided into intervention group I (160), intervention group II (180) and control group (175). The mothers in the intervention group I were educated with feeding guideline on infants and young children and had had Group lectures and advisory from experts about maternal and child nutrition for teaching them how to feed their children; while, the mothers in the intervention group II were trained with feeding guideline on infants and young children by themselves; and the mothers in the control group received routine guidance at the local health station. The follow-up evaluation on nutritional knowledge of the mothers in each group was carried out after 3 and 6 months intervention, respectively. The educational background had significant effect on KAP scores: KAP scores of the mothers with primary education or less (8.3 +/- 2.2) were significantly lower than that of the mothers educated with high school (9.4 +/- 1.6) and university (9.6 +/- 1.8) (LSD t = 3.70, P educated with feeding guideline on infants and young children, the knowledge of infant's mothers was greatly improved and KAP scores of the mothers after intervention were higher than that of the baseline (F = 183.556, P = 0.006); the percentage of correct answer on nutrition knowledge in the intervention groups was significantly higher than that of the control group. At six months of intervention, the KAP scores of intervention group I (12.0) and intervention group II (11.6) were higher than that of the control group (10.5) (LSD t = 5.96, P nutritional and

  19. The effect of a combination of nutrition education, soy and vegetable ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: The objective of the study was to determine if an integrated food and nutrition intervention, including home gardening, nutrition education and recipe development and training, would improve dietary diversity in women. Design: This was a single-system case study. Setting: The study setting was peri-urban ...

  20. Nutrition in Today's Education--As A School Nurse Sees It.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eddy, Regina M.

    This brief NEA newsletter addresses itself to the importance of good nutrition habits to the central nervous system which, in turn, exerts an effect on learning. Features include: (1) outlines for nutrition education in units for grades K-3, grades 4-6, grades 7-9, and grades 10-12; (2) a school breakfast project for a class of emotionally…

  1. Secondary School Students' Views of Food and Nutrition Education in Kolkata, India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rathi, Neha; Riddell, Lynn; Worsley, Anthony

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: School-based nutrition education programmes have the potential to reinforce healthy dietary behaviours in adolescents. The purpose of this paper is to understand the views of secondary school students in Kolkata, India, regarding the food and nutrition curriculum, food skill acquisition at school and home and barriers to learning food…

  2. Facebook Is an Effective Strategy to Recruit Low-Income Women to Online Nutrition Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lohse, Barbara

    2013-01-01

    Objective: Nutrition education research recruitment expense and effort are substantial; sample selection is crucial for intervention assessment. Effectiveness and cost of Facebook to recruit low-income women to an online nutrition program were examined, including biopsychosocial characteristics of Facebook responders. Methods: An ad appeared on…

  3. Development of the Mississippi communities for healthy living nutrition education toolkit

    Science.gov (United States)

    The objective of our study was to develop a nutrition education toolkit for communities in the Lower Mississippi Delta (LMD) with content that is current, evidence-based, culturally relevant, and user friendly. The Mississippi Communities for Fealthy Living (MCHL), an evidenced-based nutrition educa...

  4. Growing Healthy Kids: A School Enrichment Nutrition Education Program to Promote Healthy Behaviors for Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vierregger, Alyssa; Hall, Johnna; Sehi, Natalie; Abbott, Mary; Wobig, Karen; Albrecht, Julie A.; Anderson-Knott, Mindy; Koszewski, Wanda

    2015-01-01

    The Growing Healthy Kids Program is a school-based nutrition education program that teaches students in Kindergarten through 2nd grade about healthy eating, physical activity, and how their body uses food. Pre- and post-knowledge data is collected from the students to measure changes in nutrition knowledge. In the first 2 years of the program,…

  5. Educational Requirements for Entry-Level Practice in the Profession of Nutrition and Dietetics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abad-Jorge, Ana

    2012-01-01

    The profession of nutrition and dietetics has experienced significant changes over the past 100 years due to advances in nutrition science and healthcare delivery. Although these advances have prompted changes in educational requirements in other healthcare professions, the requirements for entry-level registered dietitians have not changed since…

  6. Children-at-Risk for Poor Nutrition: Expanding the Approach of Future Professionals in Educational Institutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shor, Ron

    2011-01-01

    Objectives: To examine how the subject of nutrition is being addressed in the work with children at risk of poor nutrition in educational institutions and what the barriers are which may hinder inclusion of this subject. Methods: A structured questionnaire was constructed for the purpose of this study and was implemented with 111 students in…

  7. Nutrition educator adoption and implementation of an experiential foods curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diker, Ann; Cunningham-Sabo, Leslie; Bachman, Kari; Stacey, Jane E; Walters, Lynn M; Wells, Linda

    2013-01-01

    Describe changes in Nutrition Educator (NE) and Extension Agent (EA) motivation, self-efficacy, and behavioral capability over time after experiential food tasting curriculum training. Identify promoters of curriculum adoption, implementation, and future use. Mixed methods design including surveys, lesson implementation reports, and interviews. New Mexico limited-resource schools. Convenience sample of New Mexico Extension NE (n = 42) and their EA supervisors (n = 21). Three-hour curriculum training employing Social Cognitive Theory and Diffusion of Innovations. Perceived change in motivation, self-efficacy, and behavioral capability from post-training through 8-month post-training; promoters and challenges to curriculum adoption, implementation, and future use. Repeated-measures ANOVA analyzed perceived behavior change over time. Significance was set at P ≤ .05. Qualitative responses were categorized by theme. Gains in NE motivation, self-efficacy, and behavioral capability were sustained at 8 months post-training. High adoption/implementation rates (79%) were attributed to strong implementation expectations, observational learning, experiential training elements, and perceived curriculum compatibility. Environmental factors including time constraints, personnel turnover, and scheduling conflicts proved challenging. Maximizing curriculum simplicity and compatibility and incorporating behavioral capability, observational learning, and expectations into training support adoption and use. Adaptations and techniques to problem-solve challenges should be provided to new curricula implementers. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  8. Effect of educational intervention program for parents on adolescents’nutritional behaviors in Isfahan in 2016

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mokhtari, Fatemeh; Kazemi, Ashraf; Ehsanpour, Soheila

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Family participation is an important element on nutritional education especially for students. Parents have a key role in instilling and understanding healthy eating habits, but yet the use of family participation strategies in the nutrition education was low. The aim of this study is determining the effect of parental educational intervention program for parents on adolescents’ nutritional behaviors in Isfahan, Iran in 2016. MATERIALS AND METHODS: This study was a kind of field trial that conducted on 63 girl teenagers from junior high schools of Isfahan in 2016 that were randomly divided into two groups of intervention and control. The data collection tool which was a researcher made questionnaire was completed in both groups before and 1 month after the intervention. The intervention included three training sessions for parents and giving educational compact disc and forwarding SMS. To analysis of data independent t-test and paired t-test were used. RESULTS: Paired t-test showed that in intervention group the average score of fruit (P = 0.03) and in control group the average score of vegetables (P nutritional behaviors was not a significant difference. Independent t-test showed that after intervention, mean scores nutritional behavior of adolescent girls in both groups had no significant differences. CONCLUSIONS: No significant difference was in the nutritional behaviors before and after the intervention. Hence, just educating the parents is not enough for achieving appropriate nutritional behaviors in the adolescents. PMID:29296604

  9. Effect of educational intervention program for parents on adolescents'nutritional behaviors in Isfahan in 2016.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mokhtari, Fatemeh; Kazemi, Ashraf; Ehsanpour, Soheila

    2017-01-01

    Family participation is an important element on nutritional education especially for students. Parents have a key role in instilling and understanding healthy eating habits, but yet the use of family participation strategies in the nutrition education was low. The aim of this study is determining the effect of parental educational intervention program for parents on adolescents' nutritional behaviors in Isfahan, Iran in 2016. This study was a kind of field trial that conducted on 63 girl teenagers from junior high schools of Isfahan in 2016 that were randomly divided into two groups of intervention and control. The data collection tool which was a researcher made questionnaire was completed in both groups before and 1 month after the intervention. The intervention included three training sessions for parents and giving educational compact disc and forwarding SMS. To analysis of data independent t -test and paired t -test were used. Paired t -test showed that in intervention group the average score of fruit ( P = 0.03) and in control group the average score of vegetables ( P nutritional behaviors was not a significant difference. Independent t -test showed that after intervention, mean scores nutritional behavior of adolescent girls in both groups had no significant differences. No significant difference was in the nutritional behaviors before and after the intervention. Hence, just educating the parents is not enough for achieving appropriate nutritional behaviors in the adolescents.

  10. Professional identity in entrepreneurship – the perspective from nutrition and health education

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ramsgaard, Michael Breum

    The present study investigates the construction of a professional identity as an entrepreneur in a sample of people with educational background in nutrition and health. The study examines the connection between professional identity construction and entrepreneurial business emergence using...

  11. What Do Schools Want? Assessing Elementary School Administrator and Teacher Preferences Related to Nutrition Education Program Scheduling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hermann, Janice; Parker, Stephany; Phelps, Josh; Brown, Barbara

    2011-01-01

    Extension is positioned to provide school-based nutrition education programs as required by the 2004 Child Nutrition and WIC Reauthorization Act. To enhance program acceptance and sustainability, it is important to consider school administrators' and teachers' interests and preferences regarding nutrition education programming. The project…

  12. Essentials of Nutrition Education in Medical Schools: A National Consensus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Academic Medicine, 1996

    1996-01-01

    The American Medical Student Association's Nutrition Curriculum Project assembled a 10-member advisory board to develop a comprehensive list of nutrition topics deemed essential for the adequate training of physicians. The resulting 92 topics are divided into 5 major categories: (1) biochemistry/physiology/pathophysiology; (2) nutrition…

  13. THE EFFECT OF EDUCATION USING MODIFICATION MODULE TOWARDS NUTRITIONAL INTAKE DURING PREGNANCY IN KENDARI, INDONESIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kartini

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: Energy metabolism speeds up during pregnancy that requires pregnant women to have extra amount of nutritions. Provision of education on nutrition during pregnancy is an effort to prevent and tackle malnutrition. Aim: This study aimed to determine the effect of education using modification module towards nutritional intake during pregnancy in Kendari, Indonesia Methods: This was Quasi Experimental study with pre-post design. There were 4 groups in this study, which were: 1 The group that received educational intervention using a modification module from the MHC book of the Department of Health, 2 The group that received educational intervention using MHC book of the Department of Health, 3 The group that only used modification modules from MHC book of the Department of Health, and 4 The group that only used the MHC book of Department of Health. The intervention was given for 6 months. Seventy eight of 4-months pregnant women were selected in this study. Data were collected by using 24 hours food recall instrument, and questionnaire adopted from Child and Maternal Nutrition Survey’s Questionnaire of Faculty of Public Health, Hasanuddin University. Data were analyzed by using Wilcoxon test and Kruskal Wallis test. Results: Results showed there was an effect of education by using the module modifications to the intake of nutritions during pregnancy. Increased nutrient intake was higher in pregnant women using a module class modifications. Conclusion: Education affects nutritional intake of pregnant women. Changes in nutritional intake was higher in group 1 (education modules with modifications, compared with the education group MCH handbook. It is suggested that mothers should improve the nutrition during pregnancy for the better growth of the fetus, composition and metabolic changes in the mother's body.

  14. Elements of Instruction VTAE Workshop (Wisconsin Rapids, Wisconsin, March 7-9, 1989). Final Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Howard D.

    This document describes a 3-day Wisconsin workshop on essential elements of instruction in vocational, technical, and adult education (VTAE). The workshop's content was based on the Univesity of California at Los Angeles' Teaching Model, which resulted from the work of Madeline Hunter. A three-page narrative describes some aspects of the model,…

  15. The food pyramid adapted to physically active adolescents as a nutrition education tool

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Camila Brandão Gonçalves

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to assess the understanding of the Food Pyramid Adapted to Physically Active Adolescents as an educational tool to improve nutrition knowledge. Adolescents engaged in sport training responded to a nutrition knowledge questionnaire before and after the intervention. The pyramid intervention group received the printed educational material, and the broad intervention group received the printed material followed by a lecture. As a result, mean initial nutrition knowledge was average (59.9 ± 18 points, increasing (p<0.001 after the intervention (69.1 ± 20 points without significant difference between interventions. In conclusion, adolescents' nutrition knowledge improved, even with the use of the Food Pyramid alone, indicating its use to promote nutritional knowledge.

  16. A nutrition education intervention for anthropometric and biochemical profiles of rural older Malays with metabolic syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahar, Suzana; Adznam, Siti Nur'asyura; Lee, Lai Kuan; Yusof, Noor Aini Mohd; Salleh, Mohmad; Mohamed Sakian, Noor Ibrahim

    2013-03-01

    This study aimed to determine the effectiveness of a nutrition education intervention package in improving anthropometric, clinical and biochemical indicators of rural older Malays with metabolic syndrome (MS). In this study, 47 older Malays diagnosed with MS were assigned to either the intervention group (n = 24) or the control group (n = 23) based on their geographical site. The intervention group received nutrition education via group counselling sessions, talks, and cooking and exercise demonstrations using a specifically developed healthy aging package for 6 months. The efficacy of the nutrition education intervention on anthropometric and biochemical parameters was assessed. Women in the nutrition education group showed a significant reduction in waist circumference (p nutrition education intervention maintained their total cholesterol (TC) level (p nutrition education intervention showed potential for improving TC levels in men and waist circumference in women with MS. Similar intervention studies could be initiated among the older adults in the community as a preventive measure. © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Development of a Food Safety and Nutrition Education Program for Adolescents by Applying Social Cognitive Theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jounghee; Jeong, Soyeon; Ko, Gyeongah; Park, Hyunshin; Ko, Youngsook

    2016-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop an educational model regarding food safety and nutrition. In particular, we aimed to develop educational materials, such as middle- and high-school textbooks, a teacher's guidebook, and school posters, by applying social cognitive theory. To develop a food safety and nutrition education program, we took into account diverse factors influencing an individual's behavior, such as personal, behavioral, and environmental factors, based on social cognitive theory. We also conducted a pilot study of the educational materials targeting middle-school students (n = 26), high-school students (n = 24), and dietitians (n = 13) regarding comprehension level, content, design, and quality by employing the 5-point Likert scale in May 2016. The food safety and nutrition education program covered six themes: (1) caffeine; (2) food additives; (3) foodborne illness; (4) nutrition and meal planning; (5) obesity and eating disorders; and (6) nutrition labeling. Each class activity was created to improve self-efficacy by setting one's own goal and to increase self-control by monitoring one's dietary intake. We also considered environmental factors by creating school posters and leaflets to educate teachers and parents. The overall evaluation score for the textbook was 4.0 points among middle- and high-school students, and 4.5 points among dietitians. This study provides a useful program model that could serve as a guide to develop educational materials for nutrition-related subjects in the curriculum. This program model was created to increase awareness of nutrition problems and self-efficacy. This program also helped to improve nutrition management skills and to promote a healthy eating environment in middle- and high-school students.

  18. Wisconsin's Forests 2009

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charles H. Perry; Vern A. Everson; Brett J. Butler; Susan J. Crocker; Sally E. Dahir; Andrea L. Diss-Torrance; Grant M Domke; Dale D. Gormanson; Sarah K. Herrick; Steven S. Hubbard; Terry R. Mace; Patrick D. Miles; Mark D. Nelson; Richard B. Rodeout; Luke T. Saunders; Kirk M. Stueve; Barry T. Wilson; Christopher W. Woodall

    2012-01-01

    The second full annual inventory of Wisconsin's forests reports more than 16.7 million acres of forest land with an average volume of more than 1,400 cubic feet per acre. Forest land is dominated by the oak/hickory forest-type group, which occupies slightly more than one quarter of the total forest land area; the maple/beech/birch forest-type group occupies an...

  19. Education program on medical nutrition and length of stay of critically ill patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castro, Melina Gouveia; Pompilio, Carlos Eduardo; Horie, Lilian Mika; Verotti, Cristiane Comeron Gimenez; Waitzberg, Dan Linetzky

    2013-12-01

    To evaluate the impact of a multifaceted nutritional educational intervention on the quality of nutritional therapy and clinical outcomes in critically ill patients. We conducted a prospective, non-blinded study with a non-contemporaneous control group at a 16-bed intensive care unit (ICU) at the Hospital das Clinicas, Department of Gastroenterology, University of Sao Paulo Medical School in Sao Paulo, Brazil. There were three phases. Phase 1: the quality of NT was evaluated in 50 newly admitted intensive care unit patients in a pre-educational program (Pre-EP). Phase 2: nutritional protocols were created and an education program was implemented. Phase 3: another 50 patients were enrolled and observed in a post-educational program (Post-EP) using phase 1 methodology. Nutritional Therapy practice was evaluated through nutritional assessments, adequacy of energy requirements, duration of fasting, and use of early enteral nutrition. Intensive care unit length of stay and hospital length of stay were measured as primary end-points. The pre-educational program and post-educational program groups did not differ in age, APACHE II score, gender, or nutritional assessment. The mean ± SD duration of fasting decreased (Pre-EP 3.8 ± 3.1 days vs. Post-EP: 2.2 ± 2.6 days; p = 0.002), the adequacy of nutritional therapy improved (Pre-EP 74.2% ± 33.3% vs. Post-EP 96.2% ± 23.8%; p nutrition was initiated earlier than 48 h more commonly (Pre-EP 24% vs. Post-E 60%; p = 0.001). Median intensive care unit length of stay decreased (Pre-EP: 18.5 days vs. Post-EP: 9.5 days; p nutritional educational intervention could improve the quality of nutritional therapy and may decrease intensive care unit length of stay in critically ill patients. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd and European Society for Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism. All rights reserved.

  20. The effects of educational intervention on nutritional behaviour in alcohol-dependent patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbadoro, Pamela; Ponzio, Elisa; Pertosa, Maria Elisabetta; Aliotta, Federica; D'Errico, Marcello M; Prospero, Emilia; Minelli, Andrea

    2011-01-01

    To evaluate the nutritional status and the impact of an educational intervention on nutritional behaviour in alcohol-dependent patients. A pre-and post-intervention questionnaire and a follow-up interview were administered to 58 patients of a residential alcohol treatment service. Females were at lower risk of being overweight than males, even after adjusting for amount and preferred type of alcohol beverage. Before intervention, 19% consumed 3 meals/day. Following the educational intervention, 22.2% of participants improved their knowledge. After 6 months, when 45 patients agreed to a telephone interview of whom 80% reported continued abstinence, 70.7% reported eating more than 3 meals/day. Nutritional behaviour of alcohol patients after residential treatments improved during follow-up, and it is possible that an educational intervention to increase knowledge on healthy nutrition style may have contributed.

  1. The Effects of Intensive Nutrition Education on Late Middle-Aged Adults with Type 2 Diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ye Li

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Many patients with type 2 diabetes find it difficult to maintain good glycemic control. Undesirable glycemic control occurs greatly due to deficiencies of nutritional knowledge and difficulty in obtaining dietary prescriptions. The late middle-aged and elder individuals are the main populations that are affected by type 2 diabetes. The main purpose of this study was to investigate whether intensive nutrition education would make benefits for late middle-aged patients with type 2 diabetes. Method: 196 patients between 50 to 65 years old meeting type 2 diabetes criteria and eligible for the program were included in a single-blinded, 30-day centralized management of an education program in China. Participants in the program were randomly divided into a usual nutrition education group or an intensive nutrition education group. The usual nutrition education group was used as a control group and received only basic health advice and principles of diabetic diets at the beginning and the end of the study. Participants in the intensive nutrition education group were arranged to receive intensive nutritional lectures about diabetes for 30 days. The primary outcomes were the changes in weight, body mass index (BMI, fasting plasma glucose (FPG, 2-h postprandial plasma glucose (PG, glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c, total glycerin (TG, total cholesterol (TC, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-c, and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-c. Results: After 30 days of intervention, FPG, PG, and HbA1c in the treatment group decreased significantly than the control group (p < 0.05. HbA1c reduced significantly by 0.6% in the intervention group. No significant differences in the change of blood lipids were observed between groups. However, TG, TC, and HDL-c made improvements compared with the baseline in the experimental group. Both groups had a reduction in weight and BMI within groups, especially in intensive nutrition education group. However

  2. Childhood nutrition and later fertility: pathways through education and pre-pregnant nutritional status.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graff, Mariaelisa; Yount, Kathryn M; Ramakrishnan, Usha; Martorell, Reynaldo; Stein, Aryeh D

    2010-02-01

    Better childhood nutrition is associated with earlier physical maturation during adolescence and increased schooling attainment. However, as earlier onset of puberty and increased schooling can have opposing effects on fertility, the net effect of improvements in childhood nutrition on a woman's fertility are uncertain. Using path analysis, we estimate the strength of the pathways between childhood growth and subsequent fertility outcomes in Guatemalan women studied prospectively since birth. Height for age z score at 24 months was positively related to body mass index (BMI kg/m2) and height (cm) in adolescence and to schooling attainment. BMI was negatively associated (-0.23 +/- 0.09 years per kg/m2; p nutrition, as reflected by height at 2 years, was positively associated with delayed age at first birth and fewer children born. If schooling is available for girls, increased growth during childhood will most likely result in a net decrease infertility.

  3. [Quasi-experimental evaluation of a nutritional educational intervention among home support assistants for the elderly].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barberger-Gateau, P; Helmer, C; Ouret, S; Gendron, B

    2006-06-01

    The French National Program on Nutrition and Health has defined two specific objectives targeting older persons: (i) to improve their status in calcium and vitamin D and (ii) to prevent undernutrition. Home help provides support in activities of daily living, including meals, to dependent persons. The objective of our study was to evaluate the impact of a nutritional education intervention on knowledge and practices among home support assistants for the elderly. Three facilities providing home support in Gironde (France) selected 132 home support assistants to follow an education program and 134 controls. Nutrition training was conducted in the intervention group by a dietician during two half-day sessions in May-June 2004. A non randomized controlled trial design was used for evaluation. Nutritional knowledge (20 questions) and practice (5 questions) of home support assistants were assessed by questionnaire before (April 2004) and after (September 2004) the training period in each group. Satisfaction of the intervention group was also assessed. The intervention group included 101 participants and the control group 106 persons who answered both questionnaires before and after the education program. The intervention group was significantly younger (p educated (p = 0.01) and had less often participated to previous nutrition training (p intervention for their mean scores of knowledge or practices. The intervention group significantly improved its knowledge score (mean gain 2.5 points, p nutritional education was very significant (p intervention in multivariate analyses. Satisfaction of trained home support assistants was very high. An education program of home support assistants for elderly persons can improve their nutritional knowledge, but this study cannot conclude that the intervention was efficient to improve the nutritional status of older persons.

  4. Adolescent women as a key target population for community nutrition education programs in Indonesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savage, Amy; Februhartanty, Judhiastuty; Worsley, Anthony

    2017-05-01

    Adolescence is a critical life-stage that sets the foundation for health in adulthood. Adolescent women are a unique population and should be targeted as such for nutrition promotion activities. Using Indonesia as a case study, this qualitative study aimed to identify existing nutrition promotion programs aimed at adolescent girls, how best to target this population and effective recommendations to inform nutrition education program design for this important group. Semi-structured interviews and questionnaires were conducted with ten key informants working in public health in Indonesia. Interview transcripts were analysed and coded to identify key themes. No existing nutrition education programs targeting adolescent women in Indonesia were identified. Several strategies apply to nutrition programs for adolescent girls: 1) nutrition promotion messages that are relevant to the lifestyles and interests of adolescent women; 2) technology-based interventions show promise, however, they need to be appropriately targeted to sub-groups; 3) school remains an important setting; and 4) early marriage is an important issue affecting nutritional status and engagement of adolescent girls. The informants recommended that: 1) more research is needed about the underlying motivations for behaviour change among adolescent women and ways to effectively implement the identified engagement strategies; 2) adolescent girls should be included in program design to improve its suitability and uptake; and 3) government budget and policy support is crucial to success. Adolescent women are an important population group and more research is required to identify the optimal forms of engagement to improve nutrition programs for them.

  5. Food provision in early childhood education and care services: Exploring how staff determine nutritional adequacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cole, Amanda; Vidgen, Helen; Cleland, Phoebe

    2017-02-01

    The aim of this study was to explore the methods, processes and strategies used by early childhood education and care (ECEC) services when determining the nutritional adequacy of food provided to children in their care. Semi-structured interviews (n = 22) were conducted with directors, educators and cooks at long day care services (LDCS) (n = 12) regarding nutritional adequacy, the use of tools, guidelines and checklists, menu planning and identification and management of unhealthy foods. A qualitative thematic approach was used to identify anticipated and emergent themes. Case-by-case comparisons were then made, and tables and models were created to allow for comparative analysis. LDCS relied on personal knowledge, experience and 'common sense' when determining the nutritional adequacy of the food provided to children. LDCS demonstrated a lack of awareness and use of current regulatory requirements, nutrition guidelines and recommendations, although the services were confident in providing nutrition advice to parents/carers. LDCS staff use personal knowledge and experience over evidence-based nutrition guidelines and recommendations when determining if the food provided to children is nutritionally adequate. ECEC services are recognised as important settings for obesity prevention and the development of lifetime healthy eating habits. This study highlights the complexities and inconsistencies in providing food that is nutritious and appropriate to children in care while highlighting the need to improve the use and accessibility of nutrition guidelines. © 2016 Dietitians Association of Australia.

  6. Combined intensive nutrition education and micronutrient powder supplementation improved nutritional status of mildly wasted children on Nias Island, Indonesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inayati, Dyah A; Scherbaum, Veronika; Purwestri, Ratna C; Wirawan, Nia N; Suryantan, Julia; Hartono, Susan; Bloem, Maurice A; Pangaribuan, Rosnani V; Biesalski, Hans K; Hoffmann, Volker; Bellows, Anne C

    2012-01-01

    To assess the impact of intensive nutrition education (INE) with or without the provision of micronutrient powder (MNP) on the nutritional status of mildly wasted children in Nias, Indonesia, two groups of mildly wasted (>=-1.5 to =6 to INE (n=64) or INE+MNP (n=51) in a weekly program. Another two groups of mildly wasted children who were living at a clear distance from INE and INE+MNP villages were selected to receive a monthly non-intensive nutrition education program (NNE) with or without MNP (n=50 both respectively). WHZ, weight, height, haemoglobin (Hb) level, and morbidity data were assessed at admission, during the study, and at individual discharge. Children's weight gain (g/kg body weight/day) was highest in INE+MNP group (2.2±2.1), followed by INE (1.1±0.9), NNE+MNP (0.3±0.5) and NNE (0.3±0.4) group. In both MNP intervention groups (INE+MNP, NNE+MNP), supplements significantly increased Hb value (g/L) of respective children (10.0±10.0; pINE+MNP (70.6%; n=36), followed by INE (64.1%; n=41), NNE+MNP (26.0%; n=13), and NNE (20.0%; n=10) groups (pINE+MNP group (29.9 days), followed by INE (40.0 days), NNE+MNP (80.6 days), and NNE (86.2 days) respectively (p<0.001). Weekly intensive nutrition education supported by MNP supplementation produced the best results regarding weight gain and haemoglobin status of mildly wasted children.

  7. The effect of a nutritional education program on the nutritional status of elderly patients in a long-term care hospital in Jeollanamdo province: health behavior, dietary behavior, nutrition risk level and nutrient intake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Bok Hee; Kim, Mi-Ju; Lee, Yoonna

    2012-02-01

    This study was conducted to assess improvements in nutritional status following the application of nutrition education to elderly patients in a long-term care hospital. The study was carried out from January to May 2009, during which a preliminary survey, a pretest, the application of nutrition education, and a post-test were applied in stages. The number of subjects at pretest was 81, and the number of participants included in the final analysis was 61 (18 men, 43 women), all of whom participated in both the nutrition education program and the post-test. The survey consisted of general demographic items, health behaviors, dietary behaviors, the Nutrition Screening Initiative checklist, and nutrient intake assessment (24 hour recall method). The nutrition education program lasted for four weeks. It included a basic education program, provided once a week, and mini-education program, which was offered daily during lunch times. The survey was conducted before and after the education program using the same assessment method, although some items were included only at pretest. When analyzing the changes in elderly patients after the nutritional education program, we found that, among subjective dietary behaviors, self-rated perceptions of health (P nutritional risk levels decreased. In terms of nutrient intake, subjects' intake of energy, protein, fat, carbohydrate, calcium, phosphorus, iron, vitamin A, thiamin, riboflavin, niacin, and vitamin C all increased significantly (P nutritional education is effective in improving the nutritional status of elderly patients. We hope that the results of this study can be used as preliminary data for establishing guidelines for nutrition management tailored to elderly patients in long-term care hospitals.

  8. THE EFFECT OF NUTRITIONAL EDUCATION BASED ON PENDER'S HEALTH PROMOTION MODEL ON NUTRITIONAL BEHAVIOR OF PREGNANT WOMEN: A QUASI EXPERIMENTAL RESEARCH

    OpenAIRE

    Fatemeh Shobeiri, Khadigeh Dehghan Afshari, Sasan Nazari, Saman Nazari*, Maryam Farhadian

    2018-01-01

    The health behavior of a pregnant woman, including adequate nutritional behaviors and supply of all the necessary nutrients. The objective of this study was examined the effect nutritional education based on Pender's Health Promotion Model on nutritional behavior of pregnant women referred to health centers in Hamadan city, Iran, 2016. This study was a quasiexperimental study, and its plans for the two groups (experimental and control groups). 100 women referred to health centers in Hamadan c...

  9. Design of an interactive digital nutritional education package for elderly people.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Nazlena Mohamad; Shahar, Suzana; Kee, You Lee; Norizan, Azir Rezha; Noah, Shahrul Azman Mohd

    2012-12-01

    Designing a system for the elderly is crucial, as aging is associated with physiological changes that may impair perception, cognition and other social aspects; therefore, many aspects need consideration, especially in interface design. This study was conducted to develop a digital nutritional education package (WE Sihat) by following appropriate guidelines for elderly people to achieve better design interface and interaction. Touch-screen technology was used as a platform for user interaction. The nutritional content was based on previous nutrition studies and a lifestyle education package on healthy aging, which contains four modules. The questionnaires were distributed to 31 Malay subjects aged 60-76 years old, containing an evaluation about the overall content, graphics, design layout, colour, font size, audio/video, user-perceived satisfaction and acceptance levels. The findings showed positive feedback and acceptance. Most subjects agreed that the digital nutritional education package can increase their nutritional knowledge for a healthy lifestyle and is easy to use. The touch-screen technology was also well accepted by elderly people and can be used as a kiosk for disseminating nutrition education for healthy aging.

  10. The Effectiveness of Distance Education, Using Blended Method of Delivery for Limited-Resource Audiences in the Nutrition Education Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Casey; Koszewski, Wanda M.; Behrends, Donnia

    2013-01-01

    The study reported here sought to determine if the use of distance education lessons for teaching limited resource participants in a nutrition education program (NEP) is as effective as face-to-face methodology. One hundred and six participants were in the experimental group. Data was gathered at entry and examined behavior change, nutrient intake…

  11. [Evaluation of the effectiveness of a nutrition education intervention performed by primary school teachers].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agozzino, E; Esposito, D; Genovese, S; Manzi, E; Russo Krauss, P

    2007-01-01

    This study values the effectiveness of nutrition education interventions carried out by teachers with active didactic methodologies. The research was carried out by administering a frequency of food intake questionnaire, before and after the intervention. To compare the answers given before and after the educational intervention the Wilcoxon-test was applied to dependent data. Our research confirmed that a substantial percentage of children do not show a correct nutrition and therefore nutrition education interventions are opportune and necessary. In the group with "insufficient execution" particular variations are not taken place. In the group with "sufficient execution" increase the number of subjects having breakfast, particularly with milk and biscuits, and decrease the snakes intake. Moreover there is a general decrease of intake food as meat, fish, vegetables, salami and legumes. So this educational intervention seems to have only partial effectiveness.

  12. Developing Healthy Food Preferences in Preschool Children Through Taste Exposure, Sensory Learning, and Nutrition Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nekitsing, Chandani; Hetherington, Marion M; Blundell-Birtill, Pam

    2018-02-14

    The present review was undertaken in order to summarize and evaluate recent research investigating taste exposure, sensory learning, and nutrition education interventions for promoting vegetable intake in preschool children. Overall, taste exposure interventions yielded the best outcomes for increasing vegetable intake in early childhood. Evidence from sensory learning strategies such as visual exposure and experiential learning also show some success. While nutrition education remains the most common approach used in preschool settings, additional elements are needed to strengthen the educational program for increasing vegetable intake. There is a substantial gap in the evidence base to promote vegetable intake in food fussy children. The present review reveals the relative importance of different intervention strategies for promoting vegetable intake. To strengthen intervention effects for improving vegetable intake in preschool children, future research could consider integrating taste exposure and sensory learning strategies with nutrition education within the preschool curriculum.

  13. McGovern-Dole International Food for Education and Child Nutrition Program. Fact Sheet

    Science.gov (United States)

    US Department of Agriculture, 2009

    2009-01-01

    The McGovern-Dole International Food for Education and Child Nutrition Program (McGovern-Dole program) helps support education, child development, and food security for some of the world's poorest children. It provides for donations of U.S. agricultural products, as well as financial and technical assistance, for school feeding and maternal and…

  14. Functional Foods Programs Serve as a Vehicle to Provide Nutrition Education to Groups

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cirignano, Sherri M.

    2011-01-01

    An increase in consumer interest in functional foods provides an opportunity for FCS educators to use this topic in Extension programming to promote current nutrition recommendations. The Functional Foods for Life Educational Programs (FFL) are a curriculum of six evidence-based mini-seminars that highlight specific functional foods that have the…

  15. Development and Evaluation of Nutrition Education Competencies and a Competency-Based Resource Guide for Preschool-Aged Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scherr, Rachel E.; Reed, Heather; Briggs, Marilyn; Zidenberg-Cherr, Sheri

    2011-01-01

    Purpose/Objectives: The purpose of this research was to develop and evaluate nutrition education competencies and a competency-based resource guide, Connecting the Dots...Healthy Foods, Healthy Choices, Healthy Kids (CTD), for preschool-aged children in California. Methods: Nutrition education experts and California Department of Education staff…

  16. Nutritional quality of diets fed to young children in urban slums can be improved by intensive nutrition education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palwala, Misba; Sharma, Shweta; Udipi, Shobha A; Ghugre, Padmini S; Kothari, Gopa; Sawardekar, Pradeep

    2009-12-01

    Almost half of India's children under 3 years of age are undernourished and at risk for illness and death. Poor complementary feeding practices contribute substantially to the problem. Promoting appropriate feeding practices is critical for ensuring child survival, health, and nutrition. Nutrition education is a feasible intervention and has the potential to help achieve the Millennium Goals, provided it is implemented appropriately. However, in existing programs, education is too generalized and based on information transfer. To develop and implement a need-based, situation-specific education program for mothers to bring about changes in complementary feeding practices, with emphasis on the quantity and nutritional quality of complementary feeds. Four hundred fourteen mothers or caregivers from five slums in Mumbai participated in a 3-month intervention study. Gaps in complementary feeding practices were identified at baseline. Education was given by trained fieldworkers, first to groups of 8 to 10 mothers or caregivers using innovative modules and demonstrations, followed by weekly monitoring and reinforcement. A simple checklist was used at each follow-up to assess impact, identify practices not adopted, and provide further inputs. Data collected at three follow-ups were compared with baseline and analyzed by SPSS using the chi-square test, the t-test, and ANOVA to assess whether feeding practices of the mothers or caregivers were altered favorably. The intervention process used in this study, the modules used, and the use of the checklist as a monitoring tool were successful in favorably changing complementary feeding practices. Incorporation of these in existing Growth Monitoring and Promotion programs would help to improve child nutrient intakes and thus reduce the prevalence of undernutrition.

  17. Student Perceptions of Nutrition Education at Marshall University Joan C. Edwards School of Medicine: A Resource Challenged Institution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. Elaine Hardman

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Nutrition education is an essential component of medical education if new physicians are to be equipped to address common chronic diseases, including obesity and the associated diabetes, cardiovascular disease, and cancer. Most medical students recognize this need and desire nutrition education; however, finding time in a medical school curriculum and funding are challenging. Available, free online resources and small group exercises can be utilized to provide basic, up-to-date nutrition information to medical students.

  18. The Effects of a Sports Nutrition Education Intervention on Nutritional Status, Sport Nutrition Knowledge, Body Composition, and Performance during Off Season Training in NCAA Division I Baseball Players

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabrício Eduardo Rossi, Andrew Landreth, Stacey Beam, Taylor Jones, Layne Norton, Jason Michael Cholewa

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available This study investigated the effects of a sport nutrition education intervention (SNEI on dietary intake, knowledge, body composition, and performance in NCAA Division I baseball players. Resistance trained NCAA Division I baseball players (82.4 ± 8.2 kg; 1.83 ± 0.06 m; 13.7 ± 5 % body fat participated in the study during 12 weeks of off-season training. Fifteen players volunteered for SNEI while 15 players matched for position served as controls (C for body composition and performance. The nutrition intervention group (NI received a 90 min SNEI encompassing energy intake (Kcal, carbohydrate (CHO, protein (PRO, fat, food sources, and hydration. Sport nutrition knowledge questionnaires were administered to NI pre and post. Nutritional status was determined by three-day dietary logs administered to NI pre and post. Body composition and performance (5-10-5 shuttle test, vertical jump, broad jump, 1 RM squat were measured pre and post for C and NI. Knowledge increased in NI. Pro and fat, but not CHO intake increased in NI. FM decreased pre to post in NI (11.5 ± 4.8 vs. 10.5 ± 5.4 kg but not C (11.3 ± 4.7 vs. 11.9 ± 4.5 kg. FFM increased pre to post with no differences between groups. The 5-10-5 shuttle times decreased significantly more in NI (4.58 ± 0.15 vs. 4.43 ± 0.13 sec compared to C (4.56 ± 0.18 vs. 4.50 ± 0.16 sec. Jump and squat performance increased pre to post with no differences between groups. Our findings indicate that an off season SNEI is effective at improving sport nutrition knowledge and some, but not all, nutrient intakes and performance measures in Division I baseball players.

  19. The Effects of a Sports Nutrition Education Intervention on Nutritional Status, Sport Nutrition Knowledge, Body Composition, and Performance during Off Season Training in NCAA Division I Baseball Players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossi, Fabrício Eduardo; Landreth, Andrew; Beam, Stacey; Jones, Taylor; Norton, Layne; Cholewa, Jason Michael

    2017-03-01

    This study investigated the effects of a sport nutrition education intervention (SNEI) on dietary intake, knowledge, body composition, and performance in NCAA Division I baseball players. Resistance trained NCAA Division I baseball players (82.4 ± 8.2 kg; 1.83 ± 0.06 m; 13.7 ± 5 % body fat) participated in the study during 12 weeks of off-season training. Fifteen players volunteered for SNEI while 15 players matched for position served as controls (C) for body composition and performance. The nutrition intervention group (NI) received a 90 min SNEI encompassing energy intake (Kcal), carbohydrate (CHO), protein (PRO), fat, food sources, and hydration. Sport nutrition knowledge questionnaires were administered to NI pre and post. Nutritional status was determined by three-day dietary logs administered to NI pre and post. Body composition and performance (5-10-5 shuttle test, vertical jump, broad jump, 1 RM squat) were measured pre and post for C and NI. Knowledge increased in NI. Pro and fat, but not CHO intake increased in NI. FM decreased pre to post in NI (11.5 ± 4.8 vs. 10.5 ± 5.4 kg) but not C (11.3 ± 4.7 vs. 11.9 ± 4.5 kg). FFM increased pre to post with no differences between groups. The 5-10-5 shuttle times decreased significantly more in NI (4.58 ± 0.15 vs. 4.43 ± 0.13 sec) compared to C (4.56 ± 0.18 vs. 4.50 ± 0.16 sec). Jump and squat performance increased pre to post with no differences between groups. Our findings indicate that an off season SNEI is effective at improving sport nutrition knowledge and some, but not all, nutrient intakes and performance measures in Division I baseball players.

  20. Pilot study of a budget-tailored culinary nutrition education program for undergraduate food science students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerrison, Dorothy Adair

    The primary objective of this pilot study is to provide evidence that a budget-tailored culinary nutrition program is both appropriate and applicable to undergraduate food science students both in everyday life as well as their future health careers. Two validated programs were combined into one program in order to evaluate their combined effects: Cooking With a Chef and Cooking Matters at the Store. The secondary objective of this pilot study is to evaluate the components and reliability of a questionnaire created specifically for this pilot study. A review of past literature was written, which included culinary nutrition as a source of primary prevention, the importance of incorporating cost with culinary nutrition, and the importance of incorporating cost with culinary nutrition. Based on the literature review, it was determined that a budget-tailored culinary nutrition program was appropriate and applicable to undergraduate food science students interested in pursuing health-related careers. The pilot study design was a semi-crossover study: all four groups received the program, however, two groups were first treated as the control groups. All fifty-four participants received 5 sessions of culinary nutrition information from Cooking With a Chef, collaboratively delivered by a nutrition educator and a chef, and one session of information about shopping healthy on a budget from Cooking Matters at the Store in the form of a grocery store tour led by the nutrition educator. Three questionnaires were administered to the participants that evaluated culinary nutrition and price knowledge, cooking attitudes, and opinions of the programs' relevance to participants' everyday lives and careers. Two of the questionnaires, including a questionnaire developed specifically for the pilot study, were delivered as a pre- and post-test while the third questionnaire was delivered as a post-test. Eight random participants also partook in a focus group session led by the nutrition

  1. The effect of educational program based on BASNEF model on the nutritional behavior of students

    OpenAIRE

    S. Mohammad M. Hazavehei; Asiyeh Pirzadeh; Mohammad H. Entezari; Akbar Hasanzadeh

    2011-01-01

    Background: Concerning the importance of improving nutrition in teen girls, the purpose of this study was to determine the effects of educational program on the nutritional behavior among second-grade middle school female students based on BASNEF model. Materials and Method: This experimental study were done on 72 students who was selected randomly in two equal groups of 36 students (experimental and control groups). The instruments for data collection were the BASNEF model and 24-recall ques...

  2. EVALUATING THE EFFECT OF AN EDUCATIONAL INTERVENTION ON PARENTS' NUTRITIONAL SOCIAL SUPPORT

    OpenAIRE

    Fatemeh Mokhtari1 , Soheila Ehsanpour2 and Ashraf Kazemi 3*

    2017-01-01

    Background: Social support is one of the important effective factors on health-related behaviors in different groups. The present study has evaluated the effect of an educational intervention on parents’ nutritional social support for having a healthy diet by teenagers. Methods: This field trial was conducted in two groups on the parents of 63 female early adolescent.The level of parents’ nutritional social support for having a healthy diet were measured using a questionnaire. One month after...

  3. A Collaborative Approach to Nutrition Education for College Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cousineau, Tara M.; Goldstein, Marion; Franko, Debra L.

    2004-01-01

    It is well established in the literature that college students have poor eating habits and that many barriers exist to achieving optimal nutrition for this busy population. Little is known about students' perceptions of this problem or suggestions for improving their dietary habits. Similarly, college health professionals need innovative…

  4. An Assessment of nutrition education in selected counties in New York State elementary schools (kindergarten through fifth grade).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watts, Sheldon O; Piñero, Domingo J; Alter, Mark M; Lancaster, Kristie J

    2012-01-01

    To assess the extent to which nutrition education is implemented in selected counties in New York State elementary schools (kindergarten through fifth grade) and explore how nutrition knowledge is presented in the classroom and what factors support it. Cross-sectional, self-administered survey. New York State elementary schools in selected counties. New York State elementary school teachers (n = 137). Hours spent teaching nutrition; nutrition topics, methods of teaching, education resources, and aspects of the school environment that may influence nutrition education. Crosstabs with a chi-square statistic and ANOVA. Eighty-three percent of teachers taught some nutrition (9.0 ± 10.5 hours) during the academic year. Teachers taught lessons about finding and choosing healthy food (61%), relationship between diet and health (54%), and MyPyramid (52%) most often. Suburban teachers (12.4 ± 12.5 hours) taught significantly (P = .006) more hours of nutrition than rural teachers (4.2 ± 3.9 hours). Teachers at schools with fewer than 80% nonwhite students taught significantly (P = .02) more (10.4 ± 11.4 hours) compared to schools with greater than 80% nonwhite students (5.6 ± 6.4 hours). Teachers reported that nutrition education is important and that they are willing to teach nutrition. Efforts should be made that support integrated nutrition topics, methods of instruction, and availability of resources. Copyright © 2012 Society for Nutrition Education and Behavior. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Gaps in international nutrition and child feeding guidelines: a look at the nutrition and young child feeding education of Ghanaian nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Jennie N; Brown, Helen; Ramsay, Samantha A

    2017-08-01

    To examine the nutrition and young child feeding (YCF) education and training of nurses in public health clinics of Ghana's Komenda-Edina-Eguafo-Abrem region (KEEA) in relation to global health guidelines, and how nurses served as educators for caregivers with children aged 0-5 years. A qualitative study of semi-structured one-on-one and group interviews (n 21) following a questionnaire of closed- and open-ended questions addressing child feeding, nutrition and global health recommendations. Interviews were conducted in English, audio-recorded, transcribed and coded. Descriptive data were tabulated. Content analysis identified themes from open-ended questions. KEEA public health clinics (n 12). Nurses (n 41) purposefully recruited from KEEA clinics. A model capturing nurses' nutrition and YCF education emerged with five major themes: (i) adequacy of nurses' basic knowledge in breast-feeding, complementary feeding, iron-deficiency anaemia, YCF and hygiene; (ii) nurses' delivery of nutrition and YCF information; (iii) nurses' evaluation of children's health status to measure education effectiveness; (iv) nurses' perceived barriers of caregivers' ability to implement nutrition and YCF education; and (v) a gap in global health recommendations on YCF practices for children aged 2-5 years. Nurses demonstrated adequate nutrition and YCF knowledge, but reported a lack of in-depth nutrition knowledge and YCF education for children 2-5 years of age, specifically education and knowledge of YCF beyond complementary feeding. To optimize child health outcomes, a greater depth of nutrition and YCF education is needed in international health guidelines.

  6. A theory-based newsletter nutrition education program reduces nutritional risk and improves dietary intake for congregate meal participants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Francis, Sarah L; MacNab, Lindsay; Shelley, Mack

    2014-01-01

    At-risk older adults need community-based nutrition programs that improve nutritional status and practices. This 6-month study assessed the impact of the traditional Chef Charles (CC) program (Control) compared to a theory-based CC program (Treatment) on nutritional risk (NR), dietary intakes, self-efficacy (SE), food security (FS), and program satisfaction for congregate meal participants. Participants were mostly educated, single, "food secure" White females. NR change for the treatment group was significantly higher (P = 0.042) than the control group. No differences were noted for SE or FS change and program satisfaction between groups. The overall distribution classification levels of FS changed significantly (P < .001) from pre to post. Over half (n = 46, 76.7%) reported making dietary changes and the majority (n = 52, 86.7%) rated CC as good to excellent. Results suggest the theory-based CC program (treatment) is more effective in reducing NR and dietary practices than the traditional CC program (control).

  7. Nutrition education intervention for dependent patients: protocol of a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arija, Victoria; Martín, Núria; Canela, Teresa; Anguera, Carme; Castelao, Ana I; García-Barco, Montserrat; García-Campo, Antoni; González-Bravo, Ana I; Lucena, Carme; Martínez, Teresa; Fernández-Barrés, Silvia; Pedret, Roser; Badia, Waleska; Basora, Josep

    2012-05-24

    Malnutrition in dependent patients has a high prevalence and can influence the prognosis associated with diverse pathologic processes, decrease quality of life, and increase morbidity-mortality and hospital admissions.The aim of the study is to assess the effect of an educational intervention for caregivers on the nutritional status of dependent patients at risk of malnutrition. Intervention study with control group, randomly allocated, of 200 patients of the Home Care Program carried out in 8 Primary Care Centers (Spain). These patients are dependent and at risk of malnutrition, older than 65, and have caregivers. The socioeconomic and educational characteristics of the patient and the caregiver are recorded. On a schedule of 0-6-12 months, patients are evaluated as follows: Mini Nutritional Assessment (MNA), food intake, dentures, degree of dependency (Barthel test), cognitive state (Pfeiffer test), mood status (Yesavage test), and anthropometric and serum parameters of nutritional status: albumin, prealbumin, transferrin, haemoglobin, lymphocyte count, iron, and ferritin.Prior to the intervention, the educational procedure and the design of educational material are standardized among nurses. The nurses conduct an initial session for caregivers and then monitor the education impact at home every month (4 visits) up to 6 months. The North American Nursing Diagnosis Association (NANDA) methodology will be used. The investigators will study the effect of the intervention with caregivers on the patient's nutritional status using the MNA test, diet, anthropometry, and biochemical parameters.Bivariate normal test statistics and multivariate models will be created to adjust the effect of the intervention.The SPSS/PC program will be used for statistical analysis. The nutritional status of dependent patients has been little studied. This study allows us to know nutritional risk from different points of view: diet, anthropometry and biochemistry in dependent patients at

  8. Nutrition education intervention for dependent patients: protocol of a randomized controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arija Victoria

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Malnutrition in dependent patients has a high prevalence and can influence the prognosis associated with diverse pathologic processes, decrease quality of life, and increase morbidity-mortality and hospital admissions. The aim of the study is to assess the effect of an educational intervention for caregivers on the nutritional status of dependent patients at risk of malnutrition. Methods/Design Intervention study with control group, randomly allocated, of 200 patients of the Home Care Program carried out in 8 Primary Care Centers (Spain. These patients are dependent and at risk of malnutrition, older than 65, and have caregivers. The socioeconomic and educational characteristics of the patient and the caregiver are recorded. On a schedule of 0–6–12 months, patients are evaluated as follows: Mini Nutritional Assessment (MNA, food intake, dentures, degree of dependency (Barthel test, cognitive state (Pfeiffer test, mood status (Yesavage test, and anthropometric and serum parameters of nutritional status: albumin, prealbumin, transferrin, haemoglobin, lymphocyte count, iron, and ferritin. Prior to the intervention, the educational procedure and the design of educational material are standardized among nurses. The nurses conduct an initial session for caregivers and then monitor the education impact at home every month (4 visits up to 6 months. The North American Nursing Diagnosis Association (NANDA methodology will be used. The investigators will study the effect of the intervention with caregivers on the patient’s nutritional status using the MNA test, diet, anthropometry, and biochemical parameters. Bivariate normal test statistics and multivariate models will be created to adjust the effect of the intervention. The SPSS/PC program will be used for statistical analysis. Discussion The nutritional status of dependent patients has been little studied. This study allows us to know nutritional risk from different points of

  9. The effect of a recessionary economy on food choice: implications for nutrition education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Carla K; Branscum, Paul

    2012-01-01

    To determine the effect of an economic recession on food choice behaviors. A qualitative study using semistructured, in-depth interviews followed by completion of a nutrition knowledge questionnaire and the Food Choice Questionnaire was conducted. A convenience sample from a metropolitan city in the Midwest. Women with children younger than 18 years in the household who had experienced unemployment, underemployment, or loss of a house because of foreclosure in the previous year participated (n = 25). Reported behaviors for food choices when grocery shopping and dining out and educational resources requested to inform nutrition education programs. Interviews were coded with a matrix derived from participant statements. Common behaviors were grouped and broad themes were identified. Numerous shopping strategies were recently used to save money (eg, buying only sale items, using coupons). Participants believed a healthful diet included a variety of foods with less sugar, salt, and fat. Recipes and menus that required little cost or preparation time and resources to track food expenditures were desired. Nutrition education should include money-saving shopping strategies, facilitate menu planning and cooking skills, and address food resource management to enable participants to acquire sufficient, acceptable, and nutritionally adequate food. Copyright © 2012 Society for Nutrition Education and Behavior. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Evaluation of a kindergarten-based nutrition education intervention for pre-school children in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Chuanlai; Ye, Dongqing; Li, Yingchun; Huang, Yongling; Li, Li; Gao, Yongqing; Wang, Sufang

    2010-02-01

    To evaluate the impact of nutrition education in kindergartens and to promote healthy dietary habits in children. Prospective cohort study. Four kindergartens with 1252 children were randomized to the intervention group and three with 850 children to the control group. The personal nutritional knowledge, attitudes and dietary behaviours of the parents were also investigated. Each month, children and parents in the intervention group participated in nutrition education activities. The main outcome measures were anthropometrics and diet-related behaviours of the children and the nutritional knowledge and attitudes of the parents at baseline, 6 months (mid-term) and 1 year (post-test). Baseline demographic and socio-economic characteristics were also collected. Seven kindergartens from Hefei, the capital city of Anhui Province, eastern China. Two thousand one hundred and two 4- to 6-year-old pre-schoolers from seven kindergartens participated. The prevalence of children's unhealthy diet-related behaviours decreased significantly and good lifestyle behaviours increased in the group receiving nutrition education compared with controls. Parental eating habits and attitudes to planning their children's diets also changed appreciably in the intervention group compared with the control group (P education improves pre-schoolers' lifestyle behaviours and brings about beneficial changes in parents' attitudes to planning their children's diets and their own personal eating habits.

  11. EFNEP graduates' perspectives on social media to supplement nutrition education: focus group findings from active users.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leak, Tashara M; Benavente, Lisa; Goodell, L Suzanne; Lassiter, Annie; Jones, Lorelei; Bowen, Sarah

    2014-01-01

    To identify ways to effectively use social media to communicate nutrition-related information to low-income populations. The authors conducted 4 focus groups with female Expanded Food and Nutrition Education Program graduates who used social media at least twice a week (n = 26 total). Transcripts were analyzed using the constant comparative method to identify key themes. For participants, page content, page maintenance, and networking opportunities with others were important aspects of a nutrition education social media page. Trust emerged as a central theme, because participants expressed a need for reliable information from known, credible sources and safe places to share ideas. Using social media to provide nutrition-related messages may be an effective way to encourage sustained positive behavior changes resulting from educational programming and to engage participants beyond class time. Establishing the trustworthiness of the social media site is essential to its use among low-income participants. Copyright © 2014 Society for Nutrition Education and Behavior. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Nutrition and involuntary weight loss: a pilot study of an educational intervention for nursing home surveyors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Joan C; Finucane, Thomas E; Christmas, Colleen; Vaughan, William; Schwartz, Jack; Leff, Bruce

    2007-02-01

    To describe the knowledge and attitudes of nursing home (NH) surveyors before and after a brief educational intervention related to nutrition and involuntary weight loss in nursing home residents. A questionnaire covering knowledge and attitudes about nutrition was given 1 month before and 6 months after a targeted educational intervention. State of Maryland nursing home surveyors. A 24-item questionnaire of NH surveyor knowledge (11 items) and attitudes (13 items) regarding issues related to nutrition and involuntary weight loss in NH residents. Overall surveyors' knowledge scores increased from 68% (SD, 17%) pre-intervention to 76% (SD, 18%) post-intervention (P = .11). Knowledge related to the lack of the effect of tube feeding on survival in NH residents with end-stage dementia was the only knowledge item that improved significantly with the intervention (39% correct pre-intervention and 68% correct post-intervention, P = .04). There were no changes in attitudes toward the diagnosis or treatment of nutrition after the intervention. Overall, NH surveyor knowledge related to nutrition and involuntary weight loss varied widely across topic areas. Neither knowledge nor attitudes were substantially affected by a brief educational intervention. Development of effective educational interventions for NH surveyors should be a priority for stakeholders in NH care.

  13. Effect of behavioral stage-based nutrition education on management of osteodystrophy among hemodialysis patients, Lebanon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karavetian, Mirey; de Vries, Nanne; Elzein, Hafez; Rizk, Rana; Bechwaty, Fida

    2015-09-01

    Assess the effect of intensive nutrition education by trained dedicated dietitians on osteodystrophy management among hemodialysis patients. Randomized controlled trial in 12 hospital-based hemodialysis units equally distributed over clusters 1 and 2. Cluster 1 patients were either assigned to usual care (n=96) or to individualized intensive staged-based nutrition education by a dedicated renal dietitian (n=88). Cluster 2 patients (n=210) received nutrition education from general hospital dietitians, educating their patients at their spare time from hospital duties. Main outcomes were: (1) dietary knowledge(%), (2) behavioral change, (3) serum phosphorus (mmol/L), each measured at T0 (baseline), T1 (post 6 month intervention) and T2 (post 6 month follow up). Significant improvement was found only among patients receiving intensive education from a dedicated dietitian at T1; the change regressed at T2 without statistical significance: knowledge (T0: 40.3; T1: 64; T2: 63) and serum phosphorus (T0: 1.79; T1: 1.65; T2: 1.70); behavioral stages changed significantly throughout the study (T0: Preparation, T1: Action, T2: Preparation). The intensive protocol showed to be the most effective. Integrating dedicated dietitians and stage-based education in hemodialysis units may improve the nutritional management of patients in Lebanon and countries with similar health care systems. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. [The experience of the Permanent Workshop on Health and Nutrition Education - OPEAS: training of professionals for the promotion of healthy nutrition in schools].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juzwiak, Claudia Ridel; de Castro, Paula Morcelli; Batista, Sylvia Helena Souza da Silva

    2013-04-01

    This article analyzes the experience of the Permanent Workshop on Nutrition and Health Education, which provides ongoing education on health and nutrition for school nutritionists and educators. In 2009, nutritionists, principals/management assistants, pedagogical coordinators, teachers and nutrition undergraduates attended 10 workshops, which were based on Freire and Pichon-Rivière´s framework theories. Data analysis was performed using the Discourse of the Collective Subject method. At the beginning of their participation in the OPEAS, the relationship between educators and nutritionists was distant and few interdisciplinary activities were conducted. Communication among the school team, collaborative work with involvement of the whole school community, inclusion of food and nutrition education in the curricula, and provision of food as the central pedagogical tool were considered central to the promotion of healthy nutrition. In the final evaluation four central ideas were highlighted defining OPEAS as being important for knowledge acquisition, a setting for reflection, an opportunity for integration and a platform for putting ideas into practice. Ongoing education should be implemented with school professionals aiming to foster actions to promote healthy nutrition at school.

  15. Implementing the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics Benchmarks for Nutrition Education for Children: Child-Care Providers' Perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dev, Dipti A; Carraway-Stage, Virginia; Schober, Daniel J; McBride, Brent A; Kok, Car Mun; Ramsay, Samantha

    2017-12-01

    National childhood obesity prevention policies recommend that child-care providers educate young children about nutrition to improve their nutrition knowledge and eating habits. Yet, the provision of nutrition education (NE) to children in child-care settings is limited. Using the 2011 Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics benchmarks for NE in child care as a guiding framework, researchers assessed child-care providers' perspectives regarding delivery of NE through books, posters, mealtime conversations, hands-on learning, and sensory exploration of foods to young children (aged 2 to 5 years). Using a qualitative design (realist method), individual, semistructured interviews were conducted until saturation was reached. The study was conducted during 2012-2013 and used purposive sampling to select providers. Final sample included 18 providers employed full-time in Head Start or state-licensed center-based child-care programs in Central Illinois. Child-care providers' perspectives regarding implementation of NE. Thematic analysis to derive themes using NVivo software. Three overarching themes emerged, including providers' motivators, barriers, and facilitators for delivering NE to children. Motivators for delivering NE included that NE encourages children to try new foods, NE improves children's knowledge of healthy and unhealthy foods, and NE is consistent with children's tendency for exploration. Barriers for delivering NE included that limited funding and resources for hands-on experiences and restrictive policies. Facilitators for delivering NE included providers obtain access to feasible, low-cost resources and community partners, providers work around restrictive policies to accommodate NE, and mealtime conversations are a feasible avenue to deliver NE. Providers integrated mealtime conversations with NE concepts such as food-based sensory exploration and health benefits of foods. Present study findings offer insights regarding providers' perspectives on

  16. A cost-analysis of complex workplace nutrition education and environmental dietary modification interventions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitzgerald, Sarah; Kirby, Ann; Murphy, Aileen; Geaney, Fiona; Perry, Ivan J

    2017-01-09

    The workplace has been identified as a priority setting to positively influence individuals' dietary behaviours. However, a dearth of evidence exists regarding the costs of implementing and delivering workplace dietary interventions. This study aimed to conduct a cost-analysis of workplace nutrition education and environmental dietary modification interventions from an employer's perspective. Cost data were obtained from a workplace dietary intervention trial, the Food Choice at Work Study. Micro-costing methods estimated costs associated with implementing and delivering the interventions for 1 year in four multinational manufacturing workplaces in Cork, Ireland. The workplaces were allocated to one of the following groups: control, nutrition education alone, environmental dietary modification alone and nutrition education and environmental dietary modification combined. A total of 850 employees were recruited across the four workplaces. For comparison purposes, total costs were standardised for 500 employees per workplace. The combined intervention reported the highest total costs of €31,108. The nutrition education intervention reported total costs of €28,529. Total costs for the environmental dietary modification intervention were €3689. Total costs for the control workplace were zero. The average annual cost per employee was; combined intervention: €62, nutrition education: €57, environmental modification: €7 and control: €0. Nutritionist's time was the main cost contributor across all interventions, (ranging from 53 to 75% of total costs). Within multi-component interventions, the relative cost of implementing and delivering nutrition education elements is high compared to environmental modification strategies. A workplace environmental modification strategy added marginal additional cost, relative to the control. Findings will inform employers and public health policy-makers regarding the economic feasibility of implementing and scaling dietary

  17. Southeastern Wisconsin Workplace Communication Project Curriculum Development Guide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frederick, Catherine; Huss-Lederman, Susan; Johnson, Jewelie

    The Southeastern Wisconsin Workplace Communication Project is a workplace English-as-a-Second-Language (ESL) resource and outreach program involving a partnership of businesses and adult educators in a rural area that has experienced an increase in new speakers of English in the manufacturing workforce. The guide provides workplace educators and…

  18. Beneficial Effect of Educational and Nutritional Intervention on the Nutritional Status and Compliance of Gastric Cancer Patients Undergoing Chemotherapy: A Randomized Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Feng-Lan; Wang, Yong-Qian; Peng, Li-Fen; Lin, Fang-Yu; He, Yu-Long; Jiang, Zhuo-Qin

    2017-07-01

    Surgery combined with chemotherapy is the standard treatment for gastric cancer (GC); however, chemotherapy-relative adverse effects are common and result in malnutrition and a poor prognosis. In addition, compliance to postoperative chemotherapy remains a problem. This study aimed to prospectively investigate the effect of educational and nutritional interventions on the nutritional status and compliance of GC patients undergoing postoperative chemotherapy. A total of 144 GC patients were randomized into an intervention group that received intensive individualized nutritional and educational interventions during the entire course of chemotherapy and control group that received basic nutrition care and health education during hospitalization. The nutritional status and compliance between the two groups were compared. The interventions significantly improved calorie and iron intake within 24 h after the first chemotherapy session, and improved patients' weight, hemoglobin, total serum protein, and albumin levels during the entire course of chemotherapy. The compliance rate with chemotherapy was significantly higher in the intervention group than in the control group (73.61% vs. 55.56%, P = 0.024). A combination of nutritional and educational interventions provided beneficial effect on the nutrition status and compliance of gastric patients undergoing postoperative chemotherapy, which is worthy of clinical application.

  19. The use of new technologies for nutritional education in primary schools: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosi, A; Dall'Asta, M; Brighenti, F; Del Rio, D; Volta, E; Baroni, I; Nalin, M; Coti Zelati, M; Sanna, A; Scazzina, F

    2016-11-01

    The aim of this study was evaluating if the presence of a humanoid robot could improve the efficacy of a game-based, nutritional education intervention. This was a controlled, school-based pilot intervention carried out on fourth-grade school children (8-10 years old). A total of 112 children underwent a game-based nutritional educational lesson on the importance of carbohydrates. For one group (n = 58), the lesson was carried out by a nutritional educator, the Master of Taste (MT), whereas for another group, (n = 54) the Master of Taste was supported by a humanoid robot (MT + NAO). A third group of children (n = 33) served as control not receiving any lesson. The intervention efficacy was evaluated by questionnaires administered at the beginning and at the end of each intervention. The nutritional knowledge level was evaluated by the cultural-nutritional awareness factor (AF) score. A total of 290 questionnaires were analyzed. Both MT and MT + NAO interventions significantly increased nutritional knowledge. At the end of the study, children in the MT and MT + NAO group showed similar AF scores, and the AF scores of both intervention groups were significantly higher than the AF score of the control group. This study showed a significant increase in the nutritional knowledge of children involved in a game-based, single-lesson, educational intervention performed by a figure that has a background in food science. However, the presence of a humanoid robot to support this figure's teaching activity did not result in any significant learning improvement. Copyright © 2016 The Royal Society for Public Health. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. A Novel Nutrition Medicine Education Model: the Boston University Experience123

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lenders, Carine; Gorman, Kathy; Milch, Hannah; Decker, Ashley; Harvey, Nanette; Stanfield, Lorraine; Lim-Miller, Aimee; Salge-Blake, Joan; Judd, Laura; Levine, Sharon

    2013-01-01

    Most deaths in the United States are preventable and related to nutrition. Although physicians are expected to counsel their patients about nutrition-related health conditions, a recent survey reported minimal improvements in nutrition medicine education in US medical schools in the past decade. Starting in 2006, we have developed an educational plan using a novel student-centered model of nutrition medicine education at Boston University School of Medicine that focuses on medical student–mentored extracurricular activities to develop, evaluate, and sustain nutrition medicine education. The medical school uses a team-based approach focusing on case-based learning in the classroom, practice-based learning in the clinical setting, extracurricular activities, and a virtual curriculum to improve medical students’ knowledge, attitudes, and practice skills across their 4-y period of training. We have been using objectives from the NIH National Academy Awards guide and tools from the Association of American Medical Colleges to detect new areas of nutrition medicine taught at the medical school. Although we were only able to identify 20.5 h of teaching in the preclerkship years, we observed that most preclerkship nutrition medicine objectives were covered during the course of the 4-y teaching period, and extracurricular activities provided new opportunities for student leadership and partnership with other health professionals. These observations are very encouraging as new assessment tools are being developed. Future plans include further evaluation and dissemination of lessons learned using this model to improve public health wellness with support from academia, government, industry, and foundations. PMID:23319117

  1. Evaluation of Online and In-Person Nutrition Education Related to Salt Knowledge and Behaviors among Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants, and Children Participants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Au, Lauren E; Whaley, Shannon E; Gurzo, Klara; Meza, Martha; Rosen, Nila J; Ritchie, Lorrene D

    2017-09-01

    The Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants, and Children (WIC) differs from other federal nutrition programs in that nutrition education is a required component. WIC programs traditionally provide in-person education, but recently some WIC sites have started offering online education. Education focused on reducing salt intake is an important topic for WIC participants because a high-sodium diet has been associated with high blood pressure, and low-income populations are at increased risk. Our aim was to examine the impacts of traditional in-person and online nutrition education on changes in knowledge, self-efficacy, and behaviors related to reducing salt intake in low-income women enrolled in WIC. Although a comparison of groups was not the primary focus, a randomized trial examining the impact of online and in-person nutrition education on participant knowledge, self-efficacy, and behaviors related to salt intake was conducted. Five hundred fourteen WIC participants from three Los Angeles, CA, WIC clinics received either in-person (n=257) or online (n=257) education. Questionnaires assessing salt-related knowledge, self-efficacy, and behaviors were administered at baseline and 2 to 4 months and 9 months later from November 2014 through October 2015. Positive changes in knowledge and self-efficacy were retained 2 to 4 months and 9 months later for both groups (Peducation resulted in improvements during a 9-month period in knowledge, self-efficacy, and reported behaviors associated with reducing salt intake in a low-income population. Offering an online education option for WIC participants could broaden the reach of nutrition education and lead to long-term positive dietary changes. Copyright © 2017 Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. The interventions of nutritional education on malnutrition infants mothers in Wonokromo Surabaya

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wiwik Afridah

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available 800x600 Mother’s knowledge has great affect to the nutritional status of the infants, because mother has a big role in providing the food in the family. That Knowledge was heavily influenced by social circumstances of the family's such as lack of family income that may affect the mother's in providing the food in the family. The research objective is to examine the effect of nutrition education intervention on body weight of malnutrition infants in RW 07 Wonokromo, Surabaya.This study uses a pre-experimental study design with pre-post test type approach. The subjects were children aged six months to five years who are malnutrition and poor nutrition, with indexes BW/U is less than Z score, located in Wonokromo Village, Surabaya. Sampling techniques in a study conducted by simple random sampling. Analysis of differences nutritional status of children before and after giving of nutrition education were tested by paired t test (paired t test and differences of mother’s knowledge before and after giving of nutrition education were tested by Wilcoxon signed rank test.Results of statistically tests by using a paired t-test obtained P Value (0.108 > α (0.05 means there is no different on giving of nutrition education intervention on weight infants in the RW. 07 Wonokromo Village, Surabaya. Results of statistically tests by using the Wilcoxon signed rank test obtained P Value (0.157 > α (0.05 means there is no different on giving of nutrition education intervention on parent’s knowledge level of a toddler in the RW. 07 Wonokromo Village Surabaya.Required planning and strategies to change behavior and awareness of nutrition and health. Using 4P concept for viewpoint of trainers/educators and 4C for viewpoint of participants or trained, and performed by ABC approach (Advocacy, Situation control and the Movement Atmosphere/mobilization. Normal 0 false false false IN X-NONE X-NONE MicrosoftInternetExplorer4 st1\\:*{behavior:url(#ieooui } /* Style

  3. Impact of an Interdisciplinary Food, Nutrition and Health Education Program for adolescent Brazilian volleyball players

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natália Vilela Silva DANIEL

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Objective: To evaluate the impact of an Interdisciplinary Food, Nutrition and Health Education Program on nutrition knowledge, intention to change eating behavior, and body dissatisfaction of adolescent volleyball players. Methods: The sample consisted of 10 female volleyball players from the juvenile category of the city of Santos, São Paulo, Brazil, who participated in a program with eight monthly meetings (one discussion group followed by six educational activities and one final discussion group for evaluation. Results: Nutrition knowledge, body perception, intention to change eating behavior, eating attitudes and practices were investigated using questionnaires and discussion groups before and after the athletes' participation in ludic activities designed to address nutrition strategies for athletic performance and healthy eating, and how to deal with pressure for results and self-image. Nutrition knowledge improved from 57.0%±9.9 to 63.0%±11.8 (p=0.03 of correct answers. The mean body distortion score did not change (70.0±14.9 versus 76.5±22.4, p=0.235. Six athletes advanced in their intention to change eating behavior. Positive food practices were reported during the program and the identified discourses indicated the intention of changing the daily eating habits in the future. Conclusion: The program had a positive impact on nutrition knowledge and intention of changing eating behavior; however, for other issues, especially involving emotional aspects, further interventions should be planned.

  4. Setting priorities for research in medical nutrition education: an international approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ball, Lauren; Barnes, Katelyn; Laur, Celia; Crowley, Jennifer; Ray, Sumantra

    2016-12-14

    To identify the research priorities for medical nutrition education worldwide. A 5-step stakeholder engagement process based on methodological guidelines for identifying research priorities in health. 277 individuals were identified as representatives for 30 different stakeholder organisations across 86 countries. The stakeholder organisations represented the views of medical educators, medical students, doctors, patients and researchers in medical education. Each stakeholder representative was asked to provide up to three research questions that should be deemed as a priority for medical nutrition education. Research questions were critically appraised for answerability, sustainability, effectiveness, potential for translation and potential to impact on disease burden. A blinded scoring system was used to rank the appraised questions, with higher scores indicating higher priority (range of scores possible 36-108). 37 submissions were received, of which 25 were unique research questions. Submitted questions received a range of scores from 62 to 106 points. The highest scoring questions focused on (1) increasing the confidence of medical students and doctors in providing nutrition care to patients, (2) clarifying the essential nutrition skills doctors should acquire, (3) understanding the effectiveness of doctors at influencing dietary behaviours and (4) improving medical students' attitudes towards the importance of nutrition. These research questions can be used to ensure future projects in medical nutrition education directly align with the needs and preferences of research stakeholders. Funders should consider these priorities in their commissioning of research. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  5. The Impact of Education on Nutritional Behavior Change among Clients of Sardar- Jangal Health Center in 2012

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayad Bahadori-Monfared

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objective: Nutrition is one of the effective factors in the protection of health and the prevention of disease. Therefore, determination of the relationship between nutrition choices and health of people is emphasized. The aim of this study is to determine the effectiveness of education and nutrition consultation on changing the unhealthy nutritional habits, and improving healthy nutrition behavior among the clients of Sardar-Jangal health center in 2012.    Materials and Methods: This interventional study was performed with the participation clients of Sardar Jangal health center in 2012. The sample size was 1500 and the sampling method was census. Data was gathered through a questionnaire and interview.The questionnaire included information regarding age, sex, education, employment and nutritional status. The scores between 9-11, 5-8 and less than 5, respectively, were considered as favorable, relatively favorable and unfavorable nutritional status. The participants with relatively favorable and unfavorable status were referred to nutrition education and consultation classes. At the end of the consultation classes, their nutritional status were assessed again. The data was analyzed through SPSS 21, using T-Test.Results: In the study, 1500 clients of Sardar Jangal health center participated. The sample included 383 (25.6% male and 1117 (74.4% female. The mean age of male and female was 38.3±21.1 and 36.9±17.4 respectively. Before participating in the nutrition education and consultation classes, the nutrition status of 343(30.7% of females was favorable whilst for 775 (69.3%, the nutritional status was unfavorable. Among 114 (29.8% of males it was favorable and amongst 268 (70.2% it was unfavorable. Between the mentioned clients, the nutrition status of 144 (20.1% females and 28 (12.7% males improved after nutritional consultation (P < 0.001.Conclusion: The results showed nutritional education and consultation are effective

  6. The Effect of nutrition education on knowledge, attitude, and performance about junk food consumption among students of female primary schools

    OpenAIRE

    Vardanjani, Ali Esmaeili; Reisi, Mahnoush; Javadzade, Homamodin; Pour, Zabihollah Gharli; Tavassoli, Elahe

    2015-01-01

    Background: Undoubtedly, proper nutrition has important role in safeguarding the individual from many diseases, especially chronic ones, and increasing ones physical and intellectual efficiency. Considering the importance of nutrition education to school-age kids, this research was done with the purpose of determining the effect of nutrition education on the knowledge, attitude, and performance of female students at primary school about junk food consumption. Materials and Methods: This is an...

  7. Role of Mothers’ Education on Children’s Nutritional Status in Bangladesh

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hasib Chowdhury, Golam Enamul; Hasan, Md. Mehedi

    2014-01-01

    Full text: Background: Malnutrition continues to be a major public health problem in Bangladesh. Roughly half of all children under five years in this country show evidence of chronic malnutrition. Reasons behind this range from household distribution of foods, dietary practices, distribution of land, access to education and health facilities and infrastructure development. So, as a part of building up a regular alert system, a surveillance program named Food Security Nutritional Surveillance Project (FSNSP) was setup in 2009. This study is tasked to determine the effect of mother’s education on child nutritional status. Methodology: FSNSP has been implementing a nationally representative surveillance over three major seasons in Bangladesh: post-aman harvest period (January-April); monsoon (May-August); and post-aus harvest season (September-December). The project is tasked to track key food security, nutrition and health indicators through these three seasons of the year and to build national capacity to sustain the system in the future. FSNSP also aims to provide timely information about the health, agriculture, economic, and social sectors with regard to food security and nutrition. It targets food insecure areas through seven vulnerable agro-ecological zones. The ultimate sampling unit is all households with an adolescent girl/woman from 10 to 49 years of age or a child less than five years of age. In each season, 9024 households are interviewed. Results: Almost 30% of the study children were found stunted whereas 40% were underweight and 11% were wasted of which 10.6% were moderately acute malnourished (MAM). Prevalence of under nutrition in the form of stunting, underweight and wasting varies significantly across maternal educational status. Rates of under nutrition were significantly lower among children of higher educated mothers (stunting: 17.2%, underweight: 26.3% and wasting: 10%) compared to children of illiterate mothers (stunting: 37.5%, underweight

  8. The effect of educational program based on BASNEF model on the nutritional behavior of students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Mohammad M. Hazavehei

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Concerning the importance of improving nutrition in teen girls, the purpose of this study was to determine the effects of educational program on the nutritional behavior among second-grade middle school female students based on BASNEF model. Materials and Method: This experimental study were done on 72 students who was selected randomly in two equal groups of 36 students (experimental and control groups. The instruments for data collection were the BASNEF model and 24-recall questionnaires (before and 1 month after intervention. Educational interventions were performed in 3 sessions and data were collected and analyzed by repeated measures of ANOVA, Friedman, Mann-Whitney U, independent and paired t-tests using SPSS-17 software.Results: Our findings indicated that mean scores of knowledge and BASNEF Model variables were significantly increased in the experimental group compared to the controls after intervention. Also, nutritional behavior improved significantly among the experimental group, compared to control group. Conclusion: Our finding shows the importance of nutritional education based on BASNEF model on improving nutritional behaviors in students

  9. Piloting a Cooperative Extension Service Nutrition Education Program on First-Grade Children's Willingness to Try Foods Containing Legumes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, Cassandra S.; Hermann, Janice R.

    2011-01-01

    Many nutrition education campaigns targeting children in the United States focus on increasing fruit and vegetable consumption, but most don't specifically promote legumes. The project described here sought to pilot the effect of an Extension nutrition education program on first grade children's willingness to try foods containing legumes. A…

  10. Does a Nutrition Education Programme Change the Knowledge and Practice of Healthy Diets among High School Adolescents in Chennai, India?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rani, M. Anitha; Shriraam, Vanishree; Zachariah, Rony; Harries, Anthony D.; Satyanarayana, Srinath; Tetali, Shailaja; Anchala, Raghupathy; Muthukumar, Diviya; Sathiyasekaran, B. W. C.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Nutrition education is used as a way of promoting lifelong healthy eating practices among school adolescents. There is limited published information on the impact of nutrition education programmes in India. Objectives: To assess the knowledge and practices of high school students with respect to healthy diets before and after a…

  11. What Is the Difference between a Calorie and a Carbohydrate?--Exploring Nutrition Education Opportunities in Alternative School Settings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norquest, Michele; Phelps, Josh; Hermann, Janice; Kennedy, Tay

    2015-01-01

    Extension-based nutrition educators have indicated current curricula do not engage alternative school students' interests. The study reported here explored nutrition education opportunities at alternative schools in Oklahoma. Data collection involved focus groups gathering student perspectives regarding preferred teaching and learning styles, and…

  12. Evaluating the Impact of Six Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program Education Interventions on Children's At-Home Diets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Pamela A.; Cates, Sheryl C.; Blitstein, Jonathan L.; Hersey, James C.; Kosa, Katherine M.; Long, Valerie A.; Singh, Anita; Berman, Danielle

    2015-01-01

    Background: Nutrition education in the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program Education (SNAP-Ed) is designed to promote healthy eating behaviors in a low-income target population. Purpose: To evaluate the effectiveness of six SNAP-Ed interventions delivered in child care centers or elementary school settings in increasing participating…

  13. Tornadoes Strike Northern Wisconsin

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-01-01

    A series of tornadoes ripped through the Upper Midwest region of the United States in the evening of June 7, 2007. At least five different tornadoes touched down in Wisconsin, according to the Associated Press, one of which tore through the Bear Paw Resort in northern Wisconsin. Despite dropping as much as fifteen centimeters (six inches) of rain in some places and baseball-size hail in others, authorities were reporting no deaths attributable to the storm system, and only a smattering of injuries, but considerable property damage in some areas. When the MODIS instrument on NASA's Terra satellite observed the area on June 9, 2007, the track torn through the woods by one of the tornadoes stands out quite clearly. This photo-like image uses data collected by MODIS in the normal human vision range to give a familiar natural-looking appearance. The landscape is largely a checkerboard of farms, towns, roads, and cities. The pale land is predominantly farmland where crops have not fully grown in yet. Dark blue shows the winding path of rivers and lakes dotting the landscape. The large blue lake on the east (right) side of the image is Lake Michigan. Towns and cities, including the city of Green Bay, are gray. To the north side, farmland gives way to dark green as land use shifts from agriculture to the Menominee Indian Reservation and Nicolet National Forest. The diagonal slash through the dark green forested land shows the tornado track. Bare land was revealed where the tornado tore down trees or stripped vegetation off the branches. The high-resolution image provided above is at MODIS' full spatial resolution (level of detail) of 250 meters per pixel. The MODIS Rapid Response System provides this image at additional resolutions.

  14. [Effects of individualized nutritional education programs on the level of nutrient intake and nutritional status of colorectal cancer patients undergoing palliative chemotherapy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Kwi Ock; Choi-Kwon, Smi

    2012-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of an individualized nutritional education programs on nutrient intake and nutritional status of patients with colorectal cancer who are undergoing palliative chemotherapy. Forty patients with colorectal cancer (19 experimental and 21 control patients) were recruited from a chemotherapy ward at S University Hospital in Seoul, Korea. The experimental group received two individualized nutritional counseling sessions and two telephone counseling sessions over 6 weeks. The control group received nutritional counseling after completion of data collection. Nutritional education included general guidelines for food intake while receiving chemotherapy, dietary guidelines for patients with colorectal cancer, daily meal schedules to overcome cancer, and dietary guideline for each chemotherapy side effect. Data were analyzed using χ²-test and t-test with the SPSS program 17.0. Two group comparison revealed that the experimental group had significantly improved calorie (p=.038) and total protein intake (p=.001), and serum albumin percentage change (p=.040). Body weight did not increase but remained the same as the baseline in both groups. Study results indicate that this individualized nutritional education programs are effective in enhancing nutrient intake and nutritional status of patients with colorectal cancer who are undergoing palliative chemotherapy.

  15. Effect of a school-based nutrition education program on adolescents' nutrition-related knowledge, attitudes and behaviour in rural areas of China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Dongxu; Stewart, Donald; Chang, Chun; Shi, Yuhui

    2015-07-01

    This study aimed at examining the effect of the nutrition education program on adolescents' knowledge, attitudes and behaviour in relation to nutrition in rural China. A cluster-randomised intervention trial design was employed. Two middle schools were randomly selected and assigned to the school conducting nutrition education (NE school), or to the Control school, in Mi Yun County, Beijing. From each school 65 seventh-grade students were randomly selected to participate in the study. Nutrition-related knowledge, attitudes and behaviour were measured at pre- and post-intervention surveys with the same instrument. The nutrition education lasted for 6 months. After the intervention, more students in NE school knew the main function of dairy products and vegetables, which micronutrient is rich in dairy products and beans, and in meat, and the symptom of food poisoning, than those in Control school. The rate of students who thought nutrition is very important to health, and foods with an expired date should be thrown away in NE school was higher than that in Control school (93.8 vs. 80.3 and 92.3 vs. 78.7%, respectively). The rate of students who ate vegetables and breakfast everyday in NE school was higher than that in Control school (96.9 vs. 80.3, and 89.2 vs. 75.4%, respectively). (p improving adolescents' knowledge, attitudes, and behaviour in relation to nutrition; therefore, the nutrition education with interactive and innovative intervention components is strongly recommended for future nutrition promotion programmes for adolescents.

  16. Beyond the Melting Pot and Salad Bowl Views of Cultural Diversity: Advancing Cultural Diversity Education of Nutrition Educators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Setiloane, Kelebogile Tsametse

    2016-10-01

    This article outlines how the melting pot and salad bowl views of cultural diversity have influenced the cultural training of nutrition educators and other health professionals. It explores how these views are changing in reaction to the changing demographics and health disparities seen in the US today and how the cultural training of nutrition educators has not kept up with these changing views. Suggestions for how this cultural education could be modified include placing a greater emphasis on both the cultural self-awareness of nutrition educators and the sociopolitical historical factors that influence the cultural orientation of nutrition educators and their clients. Copyright © 2016 Society for Nutrition Education and Behavior. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. International cooperation for food and nutrition security: Systematization of the participatory, contextualized, and intersectoral educational practices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luciene BURLANDY

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT The present study systematized the experience gained with the project Construindo capacidades em segurança alimentar e nutricional no Brasil, Canadá e Angola (2004-2010, Building food and nutrition security skills in Brazil, Canada, and Angola, whose objective was to qualify actions that promote food and nutrition security in the three countries using different educational practices. The activities were organized in the following subprojects: (a online distance learning courses; (b workshops to train managers, government technicians, representatives of civil society organizations, and social subjects who offered to act as a link between communities; and (c local pilot projects. The present study reports this experience. The educational practices implemented in the municipalities of Araçuaí (MG, Juazeiro (BA, and Fortaleza (CE were analyzed based on systematized information in the project reports and activity records (texts and photographs. The analytical reference was based on the concept of food and nutrition education, guided by the fundamentals of Popular Education and Paulo Freire; on the concept of food and nutrition security; and on the following analytical dimensions: participation, contextualization of educational practices, and intersectoriality. The results evidenced how educational practices contributed to the construction of shared concepts of food and nutrition security from an intersectoral and participatory perspective that values the peculiarities of diet in different socioeconomic and cultural contexts, and highlights daily situations and local traditions. They also expose the limits and potentialities of an experience of this magnitude, conducted from an interdisciplinarity perspective and using participatory methods.

  18. Nutritional education in the primary prevention of osteoporosis in perimenopausal and postmenopausal women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woźniak-Holecka, Joanna; Sobczyk, Karolina

    2014-03-01

    Osteoporosis affects millions of people in the whole world and brings about far-reaching physical and psycho-social consequences for patients and financial ones for the health care system, and therefore it is classified as one of public health problems and treated as a social disease. Women belong to the increased osteoporosis illness risk group due to lower top bone mass reached earlier in life as compared to men and due to hormonal changes occurring in the menopausal period, which affect loss of the bone mineral density (BMD). Limitation of the osteoporosis-related financial and social costs increase requires efficient preventive actions on the level of early, primary, secondary or tertiary prevention. At all the four osteoporosis prevention phases, the crucial role is played by health education and nutrition education, the latter being the key element of the former one. The nutritional education purpose is to acquaint patients with nutrition recommendations that are the basic element of the osteoporosis prevention and to make them change their nutrition habits, which will improve their osseous metabolism. The education should be based on results of the latest scientific researches and focus on recommendations relating to proper supplementing of calcium and vitamin D, simultaneously including all the other nutrition components, necessary to decrease the osteoporosis risk. The primary prevention oriented to a specific group at risk for osteoporosis, including peri- or postmenopausal women, should be provided in cooperation with the different levels' medical professionals and it should focus on causing positive changes in patients both as regards nutrition habits and physical activities.

  19. Nutritional education in the primary prevention of osteoporosis in perimenopausal and postmenopausal women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joanna Woźniak-Holecka

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Osteoporosis affects millions of people in the whole world and brings about far-reaching physical and psycho-social consequences for patients and financial ones for the health care system, and therefore it is classified as one of public health problems and treated as a social disease. Women belong to the increased osteoporosis illness risk group due to lower top bone mass reached earlier in life as compared to men and due to hormonal changes occurring in the menopausal period, which affect loss of the bone mineral density (BMD. Limitation of the osteoporosis-related financial and social costs increase requires efficient preventive actions on the level of early, primary, secondary or tertiary prevention. At all the four osteoporosis prevention phases, the crucial role is played by health education and nutrition education, the latter being the key element of the former one. The nutritional education purpose is to acquaint patients with nutrition recommendations that are the basic element of the osteoporosis prevention and to make them change their nutrition habits, which will improve their osseous metabolism. The education should be based on results of the latest scientific researches and focus on recommendations relating to proper supplementing of calcium and vitamin D, simultaneously including all the other nutrition components, necessary to decrease the osteoporosis risk. The primary prevention oriented to a specific group at risk for osteoporosis, including peri- or postmenopausal women, should be provided in cooperation with the different levels’ medical professionals and it should focus on causing positive changes in patients both as regards nutrition habits and physical activities.

  20. Nutritional education for management of osteodystrophy (NEMO) trial: Design and patient characteristics, Lebanon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karavetian, Mirey; Abboud, Saade; Elzein, Hafez; Haydar, Sarah; de Vries, Nanne

    2014-02-01

    THIS STUDY AIMS TO DETERMINE THE EFFECT OF A TRAINED DEDICATED DIETITIAN ON CLINICAL OUTCOMES AMONG LEBANESE HEMODIALYSIS (HD) PATIENTS: and thus demonstrate a viable developing country model. This paper describes the study protocol and baseline data. The study was a multicenter randomized controlled trial with parallel-group design involving 12 HD units: assigned to cluster A (n = 6) or B (n = 6). A total of 570 patients met the inclusion criteria. Patients in cluster A were randomly assigned as per dialysis shift to the following: Dedicated Dietitian (DD) (n = 133) and Existing Practice (EP) (n = 138) protocols. Cluster B patients (n = 299) received Trained Hospital Dietitian (THD) protocol. Dietitians of the DD and THD groups were trained by the research team on Kidney Disease Outcomes Quality Initiative nutrition guidelines. DD protocol included: individualized nutrition education for 2 hours/month/HD patient for 6 months focusing on renal osteodystrophy and using the Trans-theoretical theory for behavioral change. EP protocol included nutrition education given to patients by hospital dietitians who were blinded to the study. The THD protocol included nutrition education to patients given by hospital dietitian as per the training received but within hospital responsibilities, with no set educational protocol or tools. Baseline data revealed that 40% of patients were hyperphosphatemics (> 5.5 mg/dl) with low dietary adherence and knowledge of dietary P restriction in addition to inadequate daily protein intake (58.86%± 33.87% of needs) yet adequate dietary P intake (795.52 ± 366.94 mg/day). Quality of life (QOL) ranged from 48-75% of full health. Baseline differences between the 3 groups revealed significant differences in serum P, malnutrition status, adherence to diet and P chelators and in 2 factors of the QOL: physical and social functioning. The data show room for improvement in the nutritional status of the patients. The NEMO trial may be able to

  1. Early Childhood Nutrition Is Positively Associated with Adolescent Educational Outcomes: Evidence from the Andhra Pradesh Child and Parents Study (APCAPS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nandi, Arindam; Ashok, Ashvin; Kinra, Sanjay; Behrman, Jere R; Laxminarayan, Ramanan

    2016-03-09

    India's Integrated Child Development Scheme, which provides supplementary nutrition and other public health services to >91 million women and children aged nutrition provided under the Integrated Child Development Scheme with educational outcomes when the children became adolescents. We used longitudinal data from a controlled nutrition trial conducted near the city of Hyderabad, India. From 1987 to 1990, a balanced protein-energy supplement (corn-soya meal, called upma) was offered to pregnant women and children aged nutrition with school enrollment, schooling grades completed, and academic test performance of these adolescents. Children born in intervention villages were 7.8% (95% CI: 0.1%, 15.4%; P nutrition and academic performance, as measured by school test scores. Offering a nutritional supplement to pregnant women and children Nutrition Trial was associated with improved school enrollment and completion of more schooling grades when the children became adolescents. © 2016 American Society for Nutrition.

  2. Evaluation of Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program Education: Application of Behavioral Theory and Survey Validation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wyker, Brett A.; Jordan, Patricia; Quigley, Danielle L.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: Application of the Transtheoretical Model (TTM) to Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program Education (SNAP-Ed) evaluation and development and validation of an evaluation tool used to measure TTM constructs is described. Methods: Surveys were collected from parents of children receiving food at Summer Food Service Program sites prior…

  3. Evaluation of nutrition education in Africa : community research in Uganda, 1971-1972

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoorweg, J.C.; McDowell, I.

    1979-01-01

    Nutrition education is widely accepted as an important means of improving the health of young children in developing countries. Based on research carried out in Uganda in 1971-1972, this book shows how studies of changes in knowledge and attitudes can provide unique insights into both the

  4. Teachers' Perceptions of School Nutrition Education's Influence on Eating Behaviours of Learners in the Bronkhorstspruit District

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kupolati, Mojisola D.; Gericke, Gerda J.; MacIntyre, Una E.

    2015-01-01

    Qualitative investigation can provide invaluable information towards understanding the influence of school nutrition education (NE). The study explored teachers' perceptions of the immediate impact of NE on learners' eating behaviours. Twenty-four primary school teachers in the Bronkhorstspruit district, Gauteng, South Africa, who taught nutrition…

  5. The impact of nutrition education at three health centres in Central Province, Kenya

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoorweg, J.C.; Niemeijer, R.

    1980-01-01

    This report contains an account of a study of the effects of nutrition education as given at three health centres in different ecological zones in Central Province, Kenya. Two groups of mothers in similar social and economic situations were selected for interviewing: frequent and infrequent

  6. Pioneering Extension Nutrition Education with iPad Apps: A Development Story

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parmer, Sondra M.; Struempler, Barb; Funderburk, Katie; Parmer, Greg

    2017-01-01

    Technology can be an effective vehicle for Extension nutrition education. Body Quest: Food of the Warrior is a childhood obesity prevention initiative of the Alabama Cooperative Extension System that successfully incorporates technology in the classroom. With Body Quest, students learn about healthful eating through blended learning involving both…

  7. Six Characteristics of Nutrition Education Videos That Support Learning and Motivation to Learn

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramsay, Samantha A.; Holyoke, Laura; Branen, Laurel J.; Fletcher, Janice

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To identify characteristics in nutrition education video vignettes that support learning and motivation to learn about feeding children. Methods: Nine focus group interviews were conducted with child care providers in child care settings from 4 states in the western United States: California, Idaho, Oregon, and Washington. At each focus…

  8. A Mobile Farmers' Market Brings Nutrition Education to Low-Income Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellsworth, Devin; Ernst, Jenny; Snelling, Anastasia

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to examine the impact of a nutrition-education intervention delivered at low-income middle schools in Washington, DC in the USA, using a mobile farmers' market to bring hands-on lessons to schools. The program was a partnership between a local farm and university and was funded by the United States Department…

  9. Evaluating an Integrated Nutrition and Parenting Education Program for Preschoolers and Their Parents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, YaeBin

    2016-01-01

    The main purpose of the study described in this article was to test the effectiveness of Little Books and Little Cooks, a 7-week integrated nutrition and parenting education intervention designed to improve eating habits of families, strengthen relationships between parents and their children, and improve preschoolers' cooking skills. Participant…

  10. Teachers' Readiness to Implement Nutrition Education Programs: Beliefs, Attitudes, and Barriers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perikkou, Anastasia; Kokkinou, Eleni; Panagiotakos, Demosthenes B.; Yannakoulia, Mary

    2015-01-01

    Teachers' attitudes about school food environments and their readiness to implement school-based nutrition programs were investigated. A total of 1,436 primary-school teachers filled out a questionnaire on their demographic and professional characteristics and their attitudes, beliefs, and barriers for implementing health educational programs. The…

  11. Effective Nutrition Education for Aboriginal Australians: Lessons from a Diabetes Cooking Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbott, Penelope A.; Davison, Joyce E.; Moore, Louise F.; Rubinstein, Raechelle

    2012-01-01

    Objectives: To examine the experiences of Aboriginal Australians with or at risk of diabetes who attended urban community cooking courses in 2002-2007; and to develop recommendations for increasing the uptake and effectiveness of nutrition education in Aboriginal communities. Methods: Descriptive qualitative approach using semistructured…

  12. Does the Kids Cafe Program's nutrition education improve children's dietary intake? A pilot evaluation study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Our objective was to evaluate the Kids Café Program (KCP) nutrition education intervention and assess its impact on children's diet quality and body mass index (BMI) percentile. An experimental design consisting of pretest-posttest comparison groups using mixed methods was used to evaluate the 6-ses...

  13. Biomarker Evaluation Does Not Confirm Efficacy of Computer-Tailored Nutrition Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kroeze, Willemieke; Dagnelie, Pieter C.; Heymans, Martijn W.; Oenema, Anke; Brug, Johannes

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the efficacy of computer-tailored nutrition education with objective outcome measures. Design: A 3-group randomized, controlled trial with posttests at 1 and 6 months post-intervention. Setting: Worksites and 2 neighborhoods in the urban area of Rotterdam. Participants: A convenience sample of healthy Dutch adults (n = 442).…

  14. Evaluation of Traditional and Technology-Based Grocery Store Nutrition Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schultz, Jennifer; Litchfield, Ruth

    2016-01-01

    Background: A literature gap exists for grocery interventions with realistic resource expectations; few technology-based publications exist, and none document traditional comparison. Purpose: Compare grocery store traditional aisle demonstrations (AD) and technology-based (TB) nutrition education treatments. Methods: A quasi-experimental 4-month…

  15. Mississippi Communities for Healthy Living: Results of a 6-Month Nutrition Education Comparative Effectiveness Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landry, Alicia S.; Thomson, Jessica L.; Huye, Holly F.; Yadrick, Kathy; Connell, Carol L.

    2017-01-01

    Background: Improving the diet of communities experiencing health inequities can be challenging given that multiple dietary components are low in quality. Mississippi Communities for Healthy Living was designed to test the comparative effectiveness of nutrition education using a single- versus multiple-message approach to improve the diet of adult…

  16. Farm to fork—improving eating habits and nutrition education in the ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    2016-04-26

    Apr 26, 2016 ... Farm to fork—improving eating habits and nutrition education in the Caribbean ... Fund, a program of Canada's International Development Research Centre, undertaken with financial support from the Government of Canada, provided through Foreign Affairs, Trade and Development Global Affairs Canada.

  17. Integrating nutrition education into the cardiovascular curriculum changes eating habits of second-year medical students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vargas, Eric J; Zelis, Robert

    2014-01-01

    Survey of medical curricula continues to show that nutrition education is not universally adequate. One measure of nutritional educational competence is a positive change in student eating habits. The objective of this study was to evaluate whether integrating nutrition education within the second-year cardiovascular course for medical students, using the "Rate Your Plate" (RYP) questionnaire, coupled with knowledge of student personal 30-year risk of a cardiovascular event was useful in changing students' eating behaviors. Thirty-two students completed an unpublished 24-item questionnaire (modified-RYP) about their eating habits in the spring of their first year. The same students then completed the questionnaire in the spring of their second year. Paired t test was used to analyze the difference in RYP scores. Pearson correlation coefficients were calculated for the Framingham 30-year cardiovascular event risk and change in RYP score to examine whether risk knowledge may have changed eating habits. Mean scores at baseline and 1 year later were 57.19 and 58.97, respectively (paired t test, P eating healthy at baseline, integration of nutrition education within the second-year cardiovascular medical curriculum was associated with improved heart healthy eating habits. Because student attitudes about prevention counseling are influenced by personal eating habits, this suggests that students with a more healthy diet will be more likely to recommend the same for their patients. Copyright © 2014 National Lipid Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. A Formative Evaluation of the American Cancer Society "Changing the Course" Nutrition Education Curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Contento, Isobel R.; And Others

    1992-01-01

    "Changing the Course," a 15-16 session, behaviorally oriented, activity-based nutrition education curriculum for elementary students was assessed for feasibility of program implementation. The test involved 16 teachers and 702 students in the Northeast. Results showed high teacher satisfaction; student posttests revealed high achievement…

  19. Nutrition Education Needs and Learning Preferences of Michigan Students in Grades 5, 8, and 11.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Anne S.; And Others

    1994-01-01

    Study evaluated students' knowledge, attitudes, and practices regarding the Dietary Guidelines, school lunches, and nutrition instruction. Results indicated students needed education about the Food Guide Pyramid; relationships between fat, weight status, and health; and food sources of fat, salt, and fiber. Students wanted active involvement in…

  20. Impact of Technology and Culture on Home Economics and Nutrition Science Education in Developing Countries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aburime, M. O.; Uhomoibhi, J. O.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to examine and report on the impact of technology and culture on home economics and nutrition science education in developing countries with a focus on Nigeria. Design/methodology/approach: Globally and most especially in developing countries, the advent of information and communication technologies has meant…

  1. Evaluation of "College CHEF," a Campus-based, Culinary Nutrition Education Program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer McMullen

    2017-05-01

    Conclusions:  Campus-based culinary nutrition education programming has potential to positively impact college students’ fruit and vegetable consumption and cooking knowledge. Future programs should incorporate strategies such as additional opportunities to engage in hands-on practice and building cross-campus collaborations to promote sustainability.

  2. Design and evaluation of digital learning material for academic education in human nutrition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Busstra, M.C.

    2008-01-01

    E-learning and digital learning materials are becoming more and more popular. Therefore we investigated the value of digital learning material for academic education in Human Nutrition. Five digital modules were developed focusing on for example design, analysis and interpretation of nutrigenomics

  3. NUTRITION AS A FACTOR OF ADAPTATION TODDLERS TO CHILDREN'S EDUCATIONAL INSTITUTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Светлана Альбертовна Дракина

    2017-11-01

    Conclusion. Thus, the rational nutrition of children ensures improvement of local immunity and as a consequence of the increasing resistance of the child's body, as evidenced by the decrease in the number of SARS that facilitates easier period of adaptation to the children's educational institution.

  4. Improving Nutrition Education in U.S. Elementary Schools: Challenges and Opportunities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perera, Thushanthi; Frei, Simone; Frei, Balz; Wong, Siew Sun; Bobe, Gerd

    2015-01-01

    Poor food choices in childhood are core contributors to obesity and chronic diseases during adolescence and adulthood. Food choices and dietary behaviors develop in childhood and are difficult to change in adulthood. Nutrition education in elementary schools can provide children with the information and skills to develop healthy food choices and…

  5. Perception of Teachers on Health Education and Nutrition for Kindergarten Students in Kuwait

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Amari, Hanaa

    2012-01-01

    This study is designed to assess the perception of Kindergarten teachers in Kuwait regarding the role of health education in Promoting healthy nutrition for children in KG Level. For this purpose, a questionnaire was administered to 250 Kindergarten female teachers. Percentage, mean and standard deviation scores were obtained. The results of the…

  6. [Effects of the nutritional education and dietary intervention on nutritional status and bone mineral density of middle-aged and senile patients with osteoporosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Chunyan; Zhou, Ruihua; Tian, Yongzhi; Tang, Yongmei; Ning, Hongzhen; Liu, Haiyan

    2016-03-01

    To study the effect of the nutritional education and dietary intervention on nutritional status and bone mineral density (BMD) of middle-aged and senile patients with osteoporosis. Ninty middle-aged and senile osteoporosis patients were enrolled. They were randomly divided into two groups (intervention and control group) with 45 cases each. The control group was received conventional therapy and the intervention group added with nutritional education and dietary intervention for six months on the basis of conventional therapy. The methods of education and intervention included seminars, brochures distribution, dietary survey and individual guidance. The nutritional status and BMD were analyzed at the beginning and the end of the intervention respectively. After the intervention, the ratios of subjects whose intake of grain, vegetables, fruits, eggs, milk and beans in line with recommended intake of the intervention group were higher than those of the control group (P nutritional education and dietary intervention could promote middle-aged and senile patients' reasonable diet, improve their nutritional status, enhance bone mineral density and improve the effect of conventional therapy for osteoporosis.

  7. Pre-testing nutrition education materials for elderly care-givers in Boipatong

    OpenAIRE

    Gaede, Rolf J

    2013-01-01

    Abstract. The paper deals with issues and concerns relating to the process of pre-testing visual illustrations used in educational material in a community communication setting. The first part of the paper discusses how selected aspects of nutrition education materials meant for elderly care givers in Boipatong were pre‐tested using questionnaires (n=55) and focus group discussions in order to establish the target group’s views and opinions about different types of visual illustration appro...

  8. The Effect of Nutrition Education on Eating Disorders Attitude in Girls High School Students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rahiminia

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objectives: Adolescence is one of the important period in growth and evolution process, Also, eating disorders in adolescences, especially girls is one of the major problems in communities. Therefore, an effective education is of special priority for prevention of eating disorders. The current study was performed with the goal of assessment of the effect of nutrition education on eating disorders attitude in girls high school students. Methods: This non-experimental study with a single group pre- and post-test design, was performed using purposive sampling method on 97 students of the first year of high school, in 2015. Data collection tool was EAT-26 standardized questionnaire, which was completed by the participants using self-report method before and 3 months after the education. Data were analyzed using paired t-test. The significance level was set at p<0.05. Results: The mean score of abnormal eating attitude decreased from 1.7±0.04 (before education to 1.4±0.06 (after education. Also, there was a significant statistical difference between the results of before and after education (p=0.0001. Conclusion: The results of this study revealed that nutrition education has brought about desired changes in the attitude. However, the increase of nutrition awareness and attitude change can gradually lead to behavior change. Therefore, the current study can help the authorities to include a wider range of nutritional education in the curriculum of students in dorder to prevent eating disorder.

  9. Nutrition education tools used in phenylketonuria: clinician, parent and patient perspectives from three international surveys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernstein, L E; Helm, J R; Rocha, J C; Almeida, M F; Feillet, F; Link, R M; Gizewska, M

    2014-04-01

    Three international surveys were developed aiming to identify the current nutrition educational tools used in the management of phenylketonuria (PKU) and the perceived effectiveness of these tools by clinicians, parents and patients. The first two surveys were distributed through the Metabolic Dietitians ListServe (pno-metabl@listserv.cc.emory.edu), and the third survey was distributed by international clinics and the National PKU Alliance website (www.npkua.org). A total of 888 responses (S1, n = 88; S2, n = 81; S3, n = 719) were collected from all three surveys. The surveys represent participants from 17 countries, in Europe; North America (USA and Canada); Mexico; Argentina; Turkey; Australia; and Africa (Tunisia). A consistent decline in 'parents as role models' as an educational tool was observed starting at age 10 years. Patients responded they feel their families are the most effective form of education, whereas handouts were selected as the least effective educational tool by patients. Parents responded they feel the most effective educational tool is one-on-one counselling. Patients and parents show a desirable trend in wanting to attend group clinic, even in centres where this type of educational tool is not offered. There was a discrepancy between clinicians and patient views regarding the perceived effectiveness of the nutrition education tools. Future research is needed surrounding the impact nutrition education may have on improved dietary compliance in patients with PKU. © 2013 The Authors Journal of Human Nutrition and Dietetics © 2013 The British Dietetic Association Ltd.

  10. Wisconsin SRF Electron Gun Commissioning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bisognano, Joseph J. [University of Wisconsin-Madison; Bissen, M. [University of Wisconsin-Madison; Bosch, R. [University of Wisconsin-Madison; Efremov, M. [University of Wisconsin-Madison; Eisert, D. [University of Wisconsin-Madison; Fisher, M. [University of Wisconsin-Madison; Green, M. [University of Wisconsin-Madison; Jacobs, K. [University of Wisconsin-Madison; Keil, R. [University of Wisconsin-Madison; Kleman, K. [University of Wisconsin-Madison; Rogers, G. [University of Wisconsin-Madison; Severson, M. [University of Wisconsin-Madison; Yavuz, D. D. [University of Wisconsin-Madison; Legg, Robert A. [JLAB; Bachimanchi, Ramakrishna [JLAB; Hovater, J. Curtis [JLAB; Plawski, Tomasz [JLAB; Powers, Thomas J. [JLAB

    2013-12-01

    The University of Wisconsin has completed fabrication and commissioning of a low frequency (199.6 MHz) superconducting electron gun based on a quarter wave resonator (QWR) cavity. Its concept was optimized to be the source for a CW free electron laser facility. The gun design includes active tuning and a high temperature superconducting solenoid. We will report on the status of the Wisconsin SRF electron gun program, including commissioning experience and first beam measurements.

  11. Wisconsin's forest resources in 2004

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charles H. Perry

    2006-01-01

    Results of the 2000-2004 annual inventory of Wisconsin show about 16.0 million acres of forest land, more than 22.1 billion cubic feet of live volume on forest land, and nearly 593 million dry tons of all live aboveground tree biomass on timberland. Populations of jack pine budworm are increasing, and it remains a significant pest in Wisconsin forests. A complete...

  12. Pregnant Adolescents, Beliefs About Healthy Eating, Factors that Influence Food Choices, and Nutrition Education Preferences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wise, Nancy J

    2015-01-01

    Healthy eating among pregnant adolescents is essential for the well-being of developing adolescent females and their fetuses, as well as for the prevention of adult chronic illness. Understanding factors that influence and prohibit healthy eating, along with preferences for nutrition education in the pregnant adolescent population, is critical when designing and implementing appropriate nutrition education programs. The purpose of this study was to collect individual viewpoints of pregnant adolescents to facilitate the development of a nutrition intervention. This qualitative study using focus group methodology was conducted among pregnant adolescents. Participants (N = 14) were recruited through and teen parenting programs in the Mid-Atlantic region. Focus groups were guided by 6 open-ended questions that were developed based on implications from a previous study that surveyed eating habits of pregnant adolescents. Data were analyzed and coded using verbatim transcripts. Transcripts were read carefully for overall content and identification of major categories and then compared for similar and contrasting data. Four recurring themes emerged that described beliefs about healthy eating, influences on food choices, and nutrition education preferences: 1) pregnant adolescents demonstrate overall knowledge of healthy foods but are unwilling to give up unhealthy foods; 2) parents, offspring, and pregnancy influence healthy eating habits; 3) pregnant adolescents choose foods based on appearance and taste, cravings, convenience, and cost; and 4) pregnancy alters eating habits. Nutrition education in this population should be peer- and adolescent-focused and incorporate preferred methods of learning and favored incentives. Pregnant adolescents are more likely to attend educational programs that are population-specific and peer-focused, and include incentives that make cooking easier, more convenient, and affordable. Program content should be available to potential

  13. Investigating antenatal nutrition education preferences in South-East Queensland, including Maori and Pasifika women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruickshank, Andrea; Porteous, Helen E; Palmer, Michelle A

    2017-11-11

    Little is reported about the nutrition-related needs and preferences of women seeking maternity services, particularly Maori and Pasifika (M&P) women who have higher chronic disease rates in Queensland. Nutrition-related knowledge, needs, behaviours and education preferences were compared between women of M&P ancestry and non-Maori and Pasifika women (NMP). Women (≥18 years) admitted to the postnatal ward were surveyed. Anthropometry, dietary quality, nutrition education preferences, country of birth and ancestry were collected. Analysis included chi-squared and t-tests. The survey was completed by 399 eligible women. Country of birth data suggested 4% of respondents were Pasifika and failed to separately identify New Zealand Maori, whereas 18% of respondents (n=73) reported M&P ancestry. Descriptors were similar between groups (28±5 years; 91% any breastfeeding; 18% gestational diabetes mellitus; p>0.05). However M&P women were less often university educated (M&P:6(9%); NMP:71(22%), p2 children (M&P: 30(54%); NMP:70(30%), pwomen reported heavier weight at conception (M&P:79.0±20.2kg, 29.2±7.5kg/m 2 ; NMP:71.3±18.9kg, 26.3±6.5kg/m 2 , p75%) women did not know their recommended weight gain. Many respondents reported inadequate intake of vegetables (95%), fruit (29%) and dairy (69%) during pregnancy. Two-fifths (38-41%) reported interest in perinatal nutrition education, with topics including healthy eating postpartum. Findings enable targeted service delivery according to women's preferences. Collecting ancestral and maternal data to facilitate the provision of appropriate nutrition education may be critical for achieving optimal maternal outcomes in Maori and Pasifika women. Copyright © 2017 Australian College of Midwives. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Combination of flavor enhancement and chemosensory education improves nutritional status in older cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schiffman, S S; Sattely-Miller, E A; Taylor, E L; Graham, B G; Landerman, L R; Zervakis, J; Campagna, L K; Cohen, H J; Blackwell, S; Garst, J L

    2007-01-01

    Abnormalities in taste and smell functioning occur with elevated frequency in both older adults and patients with cancer. With the predicted increase in both of these populations in the coming decades, it is imperative to evaluate potential interventions that are designed to help older cancer patients compensate for the additive burden of this disease and its treatment on age-related taste and smell losses. The purpose of the current study was to determine if providing instruction and products for flavor enhancement of foods to elderly cancer patients in addition to nutritional information would improve their nutritional status, and, by extension, functional and immune status as well as quality of life. One hundred and seven subjects enrolled in the study. Fifty-four subjects were in the experimental group that received flavor enhancement plus nutritional information; fifty-three control subjects received only nutritional information. Subjects were evaluated 1 month, 3 months, and 8 months after beginning chemotherapy. At every session, subjects completed taste and smell assessments as well as questionnaires related to nutritional status, activities of daily living, and quality of life. Blood samples were also obtained to determine immune parameters. At the eight-month time point, experimental subjects had better scores on the mini nutritional assessment (MNA) and the physical function assessment of the quality of life questionnaire. Also at eight months, self-reported taste and smell perception for experimental subjects was better than that of controls as well as better than at earlier time points. Tests that assessed quantity and quality of food intake, as well as a number of immune parameters declined over time and did not differ significantly between groups. The combination of flavor enhancement, chemosensory education, and nutritional information for elderly cancer patients improved their nutritional assessment on the MNA and physical function over time. On

  15. Potential Use of Classroom Response Systems (CRS, Clickers) in Foods, Nutrition, and Dietetics Higher Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gould, Susan Martin

    2016-10-01

    Although hundreds of articles have been published about the use of classroom response systems (CRS, clickers) in higher education, few address the use in foods, nutrition, and dietetics courses, especially upper-division, major courses. This technology has the potential to increase student engagement, motivation, assessment, and, possibly, learning. Thoughtfully designed questions may stimulate discussions, especially about challenging nutrition topics. This article presents the viability and potential benefits for the use of CRS in foods, nutrition, and dietetics classes through a brief literature summary, overview of the author's experiences, and guidance for implementing this technology. Copyright © 2016 Society for Nutrition Education and Behavior. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Is a Nutrition Education Intervention Associated with a Higher Intake of Fruit and Vegetables and Improved Nutritional Knowledge among Housewives in Mauritius?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cannoosamy, Komeela; Pem, Dhandevi; Bhagwant, Suress; Jeewon, Rajesh

    2016-11-29

    The purpose of the study was to assess the determinants of nutrition behaviors and body mass index and determine the impact of a nutrition education intervention (NEI) among Mauritian housewives. A pretest-posttest design was used assessing Nutrition Knowledge (NK), Nutrition Attitudes, Fruit and Vegetable Intake (FVI), body mass index (BMI). Two hundred Mauritian housewives were recruited. The NEI was in the form of a lecture and lasted for twenty minutes. Statistical tests performed revealed that the mean NK score at baseline was 65.8 ± 6.92 and a significant increase of +17.1 at post-test and +16.1 at follow-up was observed. Determinants of NK were age, presence of elderly people, and BMI. Mean nutrition attitude score at baseline was 2.37 ± 0.22 with significant increase of +0.2 (post-test) and +0.17 at follow-up. Age, level of education, presence of elders, and NK were linked to a positive attitude. FVI was predicted by age, income, presence of elders, NK, and nutrition attitudes. Baseline FVI was 4.77 ± 1.11 which increased significantly ( p nutrition behaviors.

  17. Using social marketing principles to guide the development of a nutrition education initiative for preschool-aged children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Laura; Anderson, Jennifer; Beckstrom, Leslie; Bellows, Laura; Johnson, Susan L

    2004-01-01

    Within the field of nutrition education, social marketing has become a promising framework to systematically approach problems related to nutrition behavior. In 1997, the Colorado Nutrition Network began developing a social marketing campaign to promote healthful food choices among low-income Coloradans. A multifaceted formative evaluation plan that included focus groups, campaign concept pretesting, and a food frequency questionnaire was used to segment and scrutinize the target audience. The resulting pilot program was a blend of educational and marketing strategies targeting preschoolers that was implemented in Head Start classrooms. The 12-week intervention contained a narrow, behavior-based "try new foods" message, multiple nutrition education activities, and repeated opportunities to taste 13 novel foods. Key strategies used and findings from the formative evaluation process are presented herein in an effort to provide insight for nutrition educators interested in developing similar interventions.

  18. Application of BASNEF educational model for nutritional education among elderly patients with type 2 diabetes: improving the glycemic control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharifirad, Gholamreza; Najimi, Arash; Hassanzadeh, Akbar; Azadbakht, Leila

    2011-09-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the effects of nutritional educational program on glycemic control of elderly patients with type 2 diabetes. In this parallel randomized controlled educational trial, 100 diabetic elderly patients (≥60 years) were chosen (50 in control and 50 in test group). Nutrition education based on beliefs, attitudes, subjective norms and enabling factors (BASNEF model) was conducted. Dietary intake and glycemic indices as well as the components of the BASNEF model were assessed. The four 70-minute educational sessions were conducted in one month. Three months after training intervention, questionnaire was completed again and blood tests were performed. Increased intake in the mean daily servings of fruits (0.91± 0.82 vs. 0.17±0.79; p intervention group compared to the control group (p intervention group at the end of the study (p interventional group compared to the control group (p interventional group (p nutritional educational intervention improved dietary intakes as well as glycemic control, 3 months after intervention.

  19. Application of BASNEF educational model for nutritional education among elderly patients with type 2 diabetes: improving the glycemic control*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharifirad, Gholamreza; Najimi, Arash; Hassanzadeh, Akbar; Azadbakht, Leila

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The objective of this study was to determine the effects of nutritional educational program on glycemic control of elderly patients with type 2 diabetes. METHODS: In this parallel randomized controlled educational trial, 100 diabetic elderly patients (≥60 years) were chosen (50 in control and 50 in test group). Nutrition education based on beliefs, attitudes, subjective norms and enabling factors (BASNEF model) was conducted. Dietary intake and glycemic indices as well as the components of the BASNEF model were assessed. The four 70-minute educational sessions were conducted in one month. Three months after training intervention, questionnaire was completed again and blood tests were performed. RESULTS: Increased intake in the mean daily servings of fruits (0.91± 0.82 vs. 0.17±0.79; p intervention group compared to the control group (p intervention group at the end of the study (p interventional group compared to the control group (p interventional group (p nutritional educational intervention improved dietary intakes as well as glycemic control, 3 months after intervention. PMID:22973383

  20. Nutrition and Consumer Education as a Constituent Part of Global Education in the Light of the New Education Framework in State Schools in Southern Germany: The Case of Baden-Württemberg

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angele, Claudia

    2017-01-01

    Nutrition and consumer education may be regarded as a constituent part of global education. It is, however, necessary to explore the connections between the specific subject didactics of nutrition and consumer education, and global education more closely within current academic discourse if we are to understand it better. Currently, there is…

  1. [Preliminary analysis of ginseng industry in Wisconsin].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Li; Zhang, Wen-sheng

    2008-07-01

    To study the case of Wisconsin as the top ginseng state in United States which has come through four developing steps: beginning, stagnating, flourishing and now, downturn. The current situation of the ginseng industry in Wisconsin was briefly introduced, the federal and state management on ginseng cultivation and export, the organization of Ginseng Board of Wisconsin and their marketing style based on the field investigation and data collected from USDA and Wisconsin state. The advantages and disadvantages of Wisconsin ginseng industry were analyzed in order to provide some suggestions for Chinese medicine industry. Chinese ginseng industry should learn the organization system from Wisconsin.

  2. If You Build It They Will Come: Satisfaction of WIC Participants With Online and Traditional In-Person Nutrition Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Au, Lauren E; Whaley, Shannon; Gurzo, Klara; Meza, Martha; Ritchie, Lorrene D

    2016-05-01

    To examine satisfaction with in-person group and online nutrition education and compare findings based on language preference by Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants, and Children (WIC) participants. A total of 1,170 WIC participants were randomly assigned to 2 nutrition education modalities between March, 2014 and October, 2015 in Los Angeles, CA. Logistic regressions compared differences between groups in satisfaction outcomes. Participants in both education groups were highly satisfied regardless of modality of nutrition education (89% and 95%; P = .01). The online group reported a stronger preference for online education than did the in-person group (P online education (P online education. Online delivery of education can be an acceptable addition for WIC participants with online access. High-quality online education platforms represent an important avenue to promote continued satisfaction with nutrition education. Copyright © 2016 Society for Nutrition Education and Behavior. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Effects of price discounts and tailored nutrition education on supermarket purchases: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ni Mhurchu, Cliona; Blakely, Tony; Jiang, Yannan; Eyles, Helen C; Rodgers, Anthony

    2010-03-01

    Traditional methods to improve population diets have largely relied on individual responsibility, but there is growing interest in structural interventions such as pricing policies. The aim was to evaluate the effect of price discounts and tailored nutrition education on supermarket food and nutrient purchases. A 2 x 2 factorial randomized controlled trial was conducted in 8 New Zealand supermarkets. A total of 1104 shoppers were randomly assigned to 1 of the following 4 interventions that were delivered over 6 mo: price discounts (12.5%) on healthier foods, tailored nutrition education, discounts plus education, or control (no intervention). The primary outcome was change in saturated fat purchased at 6 mo. Secondary outcomes were changes in other nutrients and foods purchased at 6 and 12 mo. Outcomes were assessed by using electronic scanner sales data. At 6 mo, the difference in saturated fat purchased for price discounts on healthier foods compared with that purchased for no discount on healthier foods was -0.02% (95% CI: -0.40%, 0.36%; P = 0.91). The corresponding difference for tailored nutrition education compared with that for no education was -0.09% (95% CI: -0.47%, 0.30%; P = 0.66). However, those subjects who were randomly assigned to receive price discounts bought significantly more predefined healthier foods at 6 mo (11% more; mean difference: 0.79 kg/wk; 95% CI: 0.43, 1.16; P discounts nor tailored nutrition education had a significant effect on nutrients purchased. However, the significant and sustained effect of discounts on food purchases suggests that pricing strategies hold promise as a means to improve population diets.

  4. ACOG educational bulletin. Nutrition and women. Number 229, October 1996. Committee on Educational Bulletins of the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1997-01-01

    Adoption by women of dietary practices that are based on Dietary Guidelines for Americans (8) can promote improved general and reproductive health and can help prevent chronic disease. Additional guidance is indicated for helping prevent neural tube defects, iron deficiency anemia, and osteoporosis. The obstetrician-gynecologist plays an important preventive role by providing basic nutritional assessment; nutrition education; counseling concerning diet, weight, and exercise; and referral for special nutritional care as needed. The physician needs to be especially alert for serious nutrition-related problems such as eating disorders that pose a serious health risk and to stress the importance of good nutrition particularly to adolescent and elderly patients.

  5. Impact of Wisconsin Medicaid Policy Change on Dental Sealant Utilization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okunseri, Christopher; Okunseri, Elaye; Garcia, Raul I; Gonzalez, Cesar; Visotcky, Alexis; Szabo, Aniko

    2018-02-01

    In September 2006, Wisconsin Medicaid changed its policy to allow nondentists to become certified Medicaid providers and to bill for sealants in public health settings. This study examined changes in patterns of dental sealant utilization in first molars of Wisconsin Medicaid enrollees associated with a policy change. The Electronic Data Systems of Medicaid Evaluation and Decision Support for Wisconsin from 2001 to 2009. Retrospective claims data analysis of Wisconsin Dental Medicaid for children aged 6-16 years. A total of 479,847 children followed up for 1,441,300 person-years with 64,546 visits were analyzed. The rate of visits for sealants by dentists increased significantly from 3 percent per year prepolicy to 11 percent per year postpolicy, and that of nondentists increased from 18 percent per year to 20 percent after the policy change, but this was not significant. Non-Hispanic blacks had the lowest visit rates for sealant application by dentists and nondentists pre- and postpolicy periods. The Wisconsin Medicaid policy change was associated with increased rates of visits for dental sealant placement by dentists. The rate of visits with sealant placements by nondentists increased at the same rate pre- and postpolicy change. © Health Research and Educational Trust.

  6. Cross-Sectional Study of U.S. Interns' Perceptions of Clinical Nutrition Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frantz, David J; McClave, Stephen A; Hurt, Ryan T; Miller, Keith; Martindale, Robert G

    2016-05-01

    Background Medical students have historically perceived a lack of training in clinical nutrition. Rapid advances in medical science have compelled significant changes in medical education pedagogy. It is unclear what effect this has had on student's perceptions. Objective To assess interns' perception of clinical nutrition education during medical school. Design A cross-sectional survey of medical, surgical, and obstetric interns from 6 academic hospitals across the United States during the middle of their first year in November of 2010 (n = 289). Bivariate analysis and logistic regression was used to describe interns' perceptions and evaluate for factors that determined these perceptions. Results A total of 122 interns responded to the survey, for a response rate of 42%. These interns represented 72 different medical schools. Only 29% of interns reported they had been sufficiently trained in nutrition. On average, interns who reported being prepared reported a mean of 4 ± 3.4 weeks of training during medical school, while unprepared interns reported a mean of 2 ± 2.6 weeks of training (P = .02). Interns with prior graduate training in nutrition (n = 18) almost exclusively reported that medical school training was insufficient (94%, P = .02). After adjusting for age, gender, internship, undergraduate training, and being a foreign graduate, only the number of weeks of training remained significantly associated with perceived preparation (P = .03). Conclusion Most interns in medicine, surgery, and obstetrics feel unprepared to handle cases requiring knowledge of clinical nutrition. Interns feel that medical school is not adequately preparing them for the needs of clinical practice. © 2015 American Society for Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition.

  7. Effectiveness of Educational Programs on Nutritional Behavior in Addicts Referring to Baharan Hospital, Zahedan (Eastern of IR Iran)

    OpenAIRE

    Karajibani, Mansour; Montazerifar, Farzaneh; Dashipour, Alireza; Lashkaripour, Kobra; Abery, Maryam; Salari, Sajedeh

    2014-01-01

    Background: There are many factors which affect nutritional status of addicted such as lack o f knowledge, incorrect attitude toward modification of food pattern, and careless to food intake. Objectives: The aim of this study was to determine the effectiveness of educational program on nutritional behavior in addicts referring to Baharan hospital in Zahedan. Patients and Methods: Thirty-six addict patients were selected randomly. After recording general demographic data of patients, nutrition...

  8. The body composition, nutritional knowledge, attitudes, behaviors, and future education needs of senior schoolboy rugby players in Ireland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walsh, Michelle; Cartwright, Laura; Corish, Clare; Sugrue, Sheila; Wood-Martin, Ruth

    2011-10-01

    This study examined the body composition, nutritional knowledge, behaviors, attitudes, and educational needs of senior schoolboy rugby players in Ireland. Participants included 203 male rugby players age 15-18 yr competing at Senior School's Cup level in Leinster, Ireland. Estimation of body composition included measurement of height, weight, and percentage body fat (PBF; using bioelectrical impedance analysis, Tanita BC-418). Nutritional knowledge, behaviors, attitudes, and education needs were assessed by questionnaire. The range of PBF was 5.1-25.3%. Sixty-eight percent of the players in this study had a healthy PBF (10-20%), 32 (22%) were classified as underweight (benefit from appropriate nutritional education.

  9. Development and Validation of a Nutritional Education Pamphlet for Low-Literacy Pediatric Oncology Caregivers in Central America

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, Melissa; Chismark, Elisabeth A.; Mosby, Terezie; Day, Sara

    2013-01-01

    Background A culturally appropriate nutrition education pamphlet was developed and validated for low-literacy caregivers in Honduras, El Salvador, and Guatemala. Methods The pamphlet was developed after a preliminary survey of pediatric oncology nurses in the 3 countries to assess the need for education materials, caregiver literacy levels, and local eating habits. Experts in nutrition and low-literacy patient education and nurses validated the pamphlet’s content and design. Results and Conclusions Nurses expressed the need for nutrition-related pamphlets in developing countries. The pamphlet was validated positively by experts and nurses and has been circulated to pediatric oncology caregivers in Central America. PMID:20300913

  10. Impact of intensive nutritional education with carbohydrate counting on diabetes control in type 2 diabetic patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher Zipp

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Christopher Zipp, Jessica Terrone Roehr, Lucia Beck Weiss, Frank FilipettoDepartment of Family Medicine, School of Osteopathic Medicine, University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey, Stratford, NJ, USAAbstract: This pilot study assessed the impact of an intensive carbohydrate counting educational intervention on diabetes control in type 2 diabetic patients. An experimental, prospective study design was used to assess the effect of nutritional education on diabetes control. The impact and efficacy of the education were measured over a 1-year period through changes in diabetes clinical markers, including hemoglobin A1c, lipid profiles, glucose levels, patients’ energy levels, and sense of well-being. Six patients were initially enrolled in the pilot study, with only three patients completing the intervention phase and the 3-month follow-up. Two patients were followed-up at the 1-year mark for their diabetes, although neither continued participation in the study beyond the 3-month mark. Marginal improvements in clinical markers at 3 months were found. However, due to the small sample size, changes in the clinical profiles may have occurred because of variables unrelated to the nutritional intervention. Further research is indicated for the control of these variables.Keywords: type 2 diabetes, nutritional education, carbohydrate counting, diabetes control

  11. Nutrition education effective in increasing fruit and vegetable consumption among overweight and obese adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, Meredith G; Rhee, Yeong; Honrath, Kerrie; Blodgett Salafia, Elizabeth H; Terbizan, Donna

    2016-05-01

    Despite the benefits of fruit and vegetable consumption on weight and decreased risk for chronic disease, Americans' intake of fruits and vegetables is well below the recommended daily servings. While previous studies have assessed fruit and vegetable consumption and the influence of educational interventions on fruit and vegetable intake, no studies to date have examined the effects of nutrition education combined with provision of fruits and vegetables on changes in fruit and vegetable consumption among overweight and obese adults. The objectives of this study were to evaluate fruit and vegetable consumption patterns, including intake of antioxidant-rich fruits and vegetables, provide education about benefits of consuming fruits and vegetables, expose participants to different varieties of fruits and vegetables, and improve fruit and vegetable consumption. Fifty-four adults (19 men/35 women; 44.7 ± 12.1 y) were randomly assigned to one of three intervention groups. The control group received no intervention, the education group attended weekly nutrition lessons focused on benefits of fruit and vegetable consumption, and the fruit and vegetable group attended weekly nutrition lessons and received one serving of fruits and two servings of vegetables per day for 10 weeks. Intake of fruits and vegetables was assessed using semi-quantitative food frequency questionnaires and three-day food records. Findings suggested that while the majority of participants failed to consume the recommended number of servings of fruits and vegetables per day, nutrition education was helpful in improving the consumption frequency of antioxidant-rich fruits and vegetables among overweight and obese adults. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Effect of mother's education on child's nutritional status in the slums of Nairobi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abuya, Benta A; Ciera, James; Kimani-Murage, Elizabeth

    2012-06-21

    Malnutrition continues to be a critical public health problem in sub-Saharan Africa. For example, in East Africa, 48 % of children under-five are stunted while 36 % are underweight. Poor health and poor nutrition are now more a characteristic of children living in the urban areas than of children in the rural areas. This is because the protective mechanism offered by the urban advantage in the past; that is, the health benefits that historically accrued to residents of cities as compared to residents in rural settings is being eroded due to increasing proportion of urban residents living in slum settings. This study sought to determine effect of mother's education on child nutritional status of children living in slum settings. Data are from a maternal and child health project nested within the Nairobi Urban Health and Demographic Surveillance System (NUHDSS). The study involves 5156 children aged 0-42 months. Data on nutritional status used were collected between October 2009 and January 2010. We used binomial and multiple logistic regression to estimate the effect of education in the univariable and multivariable models respectively. Results show that close to 40 % of children in the study are stunted. Maternal education is a strong predictor of child stunting with some minimal attenuation of the association by other factors at maternal, household and community level. Other factors including at child level: child birth weight and gender; maternal level: marital status, parity, pregnancy intentions, and health seeking behaviour; and household level: social economic status are also independently significantly associated with stunting. Overall, mothers' education persists as a strong predictor of child's nutritional status in urban slum settings, even after controlling for other factors. Given that stunting is a strong predictor of human capital, emphasis on girl-child education may contribute to breaking the poverty cycle in urban poor settings.

  13. Informed Forces for Environmental Quality, Conference Proceedings (University of Wisconsin, Green Bay, Wisconsin, March 28-29, 1968).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wisconsin Univ., Green Bay.

    To increase understanding of the dimensions of man's impact on his environment and the key issues involved in improving that environment through education and action was the goal of the environmental quality conference held at the University of Wisconsin, Green Bay, on March 28-29, 1968. Contained in this document are the conference…

  14. School-based "Shokuiku" program in Japan: application to nutrition education in Asian countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyoshi, Miki; Tsuboyama-Kasaoka, Nobuyo; Nishi, Nobuo

    2012-01-01

    This paper provides the overview of "Shokuiku" in Japan, and discusses the future perspective on application of its concepts to nutrition education in other Asian countries. In Japan, there has been a growing concern on increase of obesity and the metabolic syndrome among middle-aged men. Additionally, child obesity has also become one of the important health problems. The increased obesity among them is possibly associated with inappropriate dietary habits (eg skipping breakfast, excessive fat intake and insufficient vegetable). Under this circumstance, the "Basic Law on Shokuiku" was enacted in 2005, which was the first law that regulates one's diets and eating habits. For effective implementation of Shokuiku program, dietitians and registered dietitians would play important roles in various settings. Japan has a long history of dietitian system as well as school-lunch programs. Later, in order to further enhance the school-based Shokuiku programs, the Diet and Nutrition Teacher System was established in April 2007. From an international point of view, "nutrition education" programs aim to improve dietary practices so as to ensure adequate energy or nutrient intake and also to reduce obesity and lifestyle-related diseases, whereas the concepts of Shokuiku have very wide approaches. Shokuiku's efforts expand to support food culture, especially through school-based programs, as well as to improve food environment by providing information on appropriate diets. These approaches can be introduced in nutrition education in other Asian countries, not only to improve one's health and nutritional status but also to secure food culture and food safety in each country.

  15. Nutrition Education in Secondary Education (7th to 11th grades Through the Crosscutting Topic “Education for Health” From an Useful-For-Life Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Francisco Quirós-Rojas

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper provides the results of a research study conducted to determine how science teachers from four schools of the San José Regional Branch of the Costa Rican Ministry of Public Education undertake the nutrition topic at their schools; and, at the same time, find out about their interest in approaching nutrition as an useful-for-life issue, through the crosscutting topic “Education for Health.” In addition, this study intended to identify the perceptions of students about good nutrition in favor of healthy a lifestyle. Based on the nature of the work, the study followed a naturalistic paradigm towards a dominant qualitative approach, in a community-based type of study.  Questionnaires and interviews were used as research instruments; the sample included 6 science teachers and 60 students of ninth grade.   The information was analyzed and triangulated. The results indicated that teachers apply the useful-for-life approach in nutrition education, empirically; innovative activities are not widely used; and there is a need to strengthen knowledge regarding the use of crosscutting topics in the curriculum. In addition, this study reported that students are aware of—but do not implement—good daily life actions to change bad eating habits and favor preventive health.  This research project puts forward teaching strategies to be applied in secondary education (7th to 11th grades to approach nutrition from this perspective.

  16. The Effectiveness of School-Based Nutritional Education Program among Obese Adolescents: A Randomized Controlled Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Supinya In-Iw

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the study was to determine the change in body weight and body mass index (BMI, as well as diet behaviors at 4 months after intervention between obese adolescent girls who participated in the school-based nutritional education program, addressed by pediatrician, compared to those who attended regular nutritional class. Methods. 49 obese girls were recruited from a secondary school. Those, were randomized into 2 groups of intervention and control. The intensive interactive nutritional program was provided to the intervention group. Weight and height, dietary record and % fat consumption, as well as self-administered questionnaires on healthy diet attitudes were collected at baseline and 4-month follow-up, and then compared between two groups. Results. There was a statistically significant change of BMI in the intervention group by  kg/m2 ( compared to the control group ( kg/m2, but no significant change in calorie and % fat consumption between groups. The attitudes on healthy eating behaviors in the intervention group were shown improving significantly (. Conclusions. Interactive and intensive nutritional education program as shown in the study was one of the most successful school-based interventions for obese adolescents.

  17. Literature research of the Nutrition Improvement Programme for Rural Compulsory Education Students in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Fan; Hu, Xiaoqi; Tian, Zuyin; Zhang, Qian; Ma, Guansheng

    2015-04-01

    To describe the Nutrition Improvement Programme for Rural Compulsory Education Students (NIPRCES) in China and to share the experiences of developing and implementing nationwide school meal programmes with other countries. The article is based on a literature review of technical documents and reports of NIPRCES and relevant national legislation, technical reports and studies on school nutrition, minutes of meetings and national conferences, and official documents of the National Office of Student Nutrition and the Chinese Center for Disease Control and Prevention. People's Republic of China. Published papers, national policies, legislation and unpublished official documents. A total of 23 million rural compulsory education students were covered by NIPRCES. In the development and implementation process of NIPRCES, fifteen ministries and national committees were involved and an efficient collaborative mechanism was established. All NIPRCES-covered schools were required to serve meals on a daily basis. By the end of June 2012, the proportions of students choosing 'school feeding', 'food package' and 'family feeding' modes were respectively 64.0 %, 32.0 % and 4.0 %. The central government subsidized school meals annually by more than $US 2.5 billion and invested $US 4.8 billion on school kitchens to support this programme. The NIPRCES is a significant movement of governmental nutritional intervention in China. Food safety, financial security, decentralization and other potential concerns should be considered and lessons can be learned from other countries. Further relevant research and a nationwide monitoring and evaluation programme are needed.

  18. Eat To Learn, Learn To Eat: The Link between Nutrition and Learning in Children. National Health/Education Consortium Occasional Paper No. 7.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Troccoli, Karen B.

    Noting that children of all socioeconomic levels are at risk for poor nutrition, and that hunger and poor nutrition in America are on the rise, this report reviews what is known about the link between nutrition and learning in children and between nutrition education and eating habits. It describes several federal and non-federal government…

  19. The effectiveness of nutritional education among women aged 60-85 on the basis of anthropometric parameters and lipid profiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedrich, Mariola; Goluch-Koniuszy, Zuzanna

    After several years of experience with guiding of an original program on health-promoting nutritional education for women during menopause, which by inducing changes in nutritional behaviour resulted in many favorable health promoting effects, on request of the students of the Association of Third Age University, an original educational program “Comprehensive stimulation of senior citizens to activity” was developed out and implemented. The objective of this study was to assess the effectiveness of four-month nutritional education and adjustments in diets of women aged 60-85, on the basis of the measurements of the selected lipid parameters in their blood tests This research project was joined by 37 female subjects aged 60-85, who are the members of the University of the Third Age in Szczecin, and whose average BMI was 31.7 kg/m2. Before the nutritional education commenced and after it was completed, the female subjects’ nutritional status was assessed (BMI, WC, WHR, WHtR) and the energy and nutritional value of their diets was examined based on the subjects’ regular journalkeeping. Keys’ atherogenic score in their diets were also computed. The applied nutritional education led to changes in the energy and nutritional value of the female subjects’ diets, which specifically improved their anthropometric parameters and the resulting BMI, WC and WHtR parameters. This fact was also reflected in a substantial decrease of the glucose level and a substantial increase of HDL-C level in the blood of the examined female subjects, as well as in the improvements in the assessed parameters TC/HDL-C, LDL-C/ HDL-C, TG/HDL-C. The analysis of the results allows to confirm, that the four-month nutritional education of elderly women resulted in changes of their erroneous dietary habits and an improvement in their nutrition.

  20. USDA Human Nutrition Research and Education Activities. A Report to Congress Covering the Period January-December 1992.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dupont, Jacqueline; And Others

    This document is the sixth annual, legislatively mandated report on the human nutrition research and education activities of the United States Department of Agriculture for fiscal year 1992 in which directions and highlights are emphasized. The report contains six sections. Section 1 is an introduction. Section 2 covers human nutrition research…

  1. An Assessment of Nutrition Education in Selected Counties in New York State Elementary Schools (Kindergarten through Fifth Grade)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watts, Sheldon O.; Pinero, Domingo J.; Alter, Mark M.; Lancaster, Kristie J.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To assess the extent to which nutrition education is implemented in selected counties in New York State elementary schools (kindergarten through fifth grade) and explore how nutrition knowledge is presented in the classroom and what factors support it. Design: Cross-sectional, self-administered survey. Setting: New York State elementary…

  2. Implementation of a Food-Based Science Curriculum Improves Fourth-Grade Educators' Self-Efficacy for Teaching Nutrition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stage, Virginia C.; Roseno, Ashley; Hodges, Caroline D.; Hovland, Jana; Diaz, Sebastian; Duffrin, Melani W.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Teacher self-efficacy for teaching nutrition can positively impact student dietary behaviors; however, limited curricular resources and professional development can serve as barriers to the provision of nutrition education in the classroom. The purpose of this study was to assess the impact of a food-based, integrative science…

  3. Challenges and opportunities for nutrition education and training in the health care professions: intraprofessional and interprofessional call to action1234

    Science.gov (United States)

    DiMaria-Ghalili, Rose Ann; Mirtallo, Jay M; Tobin, Brian W; Hark, Lisa; Van Horn, Linda; Palmer, Carole A

    2014-01-01

    Understanding and applying nutrition knowledge and skills to all aspects of health care are extremely important, and all health care professions need basic training to effectively assess dietary intake and provide appropriate guidance, counseling, and treatment to their patients. With obesity rates at an all-time high and the increasing prevalence of diabetes projected to cost the Federal government billions of dollars, the need for interprofessional nutrition education is paramount. Physicians, physician assistants, nurses, nurse practitioners, pharmacists, dentists, dental hygienists, occupational therapists, physical therapists, speech and language pathologists, and others can positively affect patient care by synchronizing and reinforcing the importance of nutrition across all specialty areas. Although nutrition is a critical component of acute and chronic disease management, as well as health and wellness across the health care professions, each profession must reevaluate its individual nutrition-related professional competencies before the establishment of meaningful interprofessional collaborative nutrition competencies. This article discusses gaps in nutrition education and training within individual health professions (ie, nursing, pharmacy, dentistry, and dietetics) and offers suggestions for educators, clinicians, researchers, and key stakeholders on how to build further capacity within the individual professions for basic and applied nutrition education. This “gaps methodology” can be applied to all health professions, including physician assistants, physical therapists, speech and language pathologists, and occupational therapists. PMID:24646823

  4. Challenges and opportunities for nutrition education and training in the health care professions: intraprofessional and interprofessional call to action.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DiMaria-Ghalili, Rose Ann; Mirtallo, Jay M; Tobin, Brian W; Hark, Lisa; Van Horn, Linda; Palmer, Carole A

    2014-05-01

    Understanding and applying nutrition knowledge and skills to all aspects of health care are extremely important, and all health care professions need basic training to effectively assess dietary intake and provide appropriate guidance, counseling, and treatment to their patients. With obesity rates at an all-time high and the increasing prevalence of diabetes projected to cost the Federal government billions of dollars, the need for interprofessional nutrition education is paramount. Physicians, physician assistants, nurses, nurse practitioners, pharmacists, dentists, dental hygienists, occupational therapists, physical therapists, speech and language pathologists, and others can positively affect patient care by synchronizing and reinforcing the importance of nutrition across all specialty areas. Although nutrition is a critical component of acute and chronic disease management, as well as health and wellness across the health care professions, each profession must reevaluate its individual nutrition-related professional competencies before the establishment of meaningful interprofessional collaborative nutrition competencies. This article discusses gaps in nutrition education and training within individual health professions (ie, nursing, pharmacy, dentistry, and dietetics) and offers suggestions for educators, clinicians, researchers, and key stakeholders on how to build further capacity within the individual professions for basic and applied nutrition education. This "gaps methodology" can be applied to all health professions, including physician assistants, physical therapists, speech and language pathologists, and occupational therapists.

  5. Impact of maternal education, employment and family size on nutritional status of children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iftikhar, Aisha; Bari, Attia; Bano, Iqbal; Masood, Qaisar

    2017-01-01

    To determine the impact of maternal education, employment, and family size on nutritional status of children. It was case control study conducted at OPD of children Hospital Lahore, from September 2015 to April 2017. Total 340 children (170 cases and 170 controls) with age range of six months to five years along with their mothers were included. Anthropometric measurements were plotted against WHO growth Charts. 170 wasted (education, employment and family size were compared between the cases and control. Confounding variables noted and dichotomized. Univariate analysis was carried out for factors under consideration i.e.; Maternal Education, employment and family size to study the association of each factor. Logistic regression analysis was applied to study the independent association. Maternal education had significant association with growth parameters; OR of 1.32 with confidence interval of (CI= 1.1 to 1.623). Employment status of mothers had OR of 1.132 with insignificant confidence interval of (CI=0.725 to 1.768). Family size had OR of one with insignificant confidence interval (CI=0.8 -1.21). Association remained same after applying bivariate logistic regression analysis. Maternal education has definite and significant effect on nutritional status of children. This is the key factor to be addressed for prevention or improvement of childhood malnutrition. For this it is imperative to launch sustainable programs at national and regional level to uplift women educational status to combat this ever increasing burden of malnutrition.

  6. A bibliometric study of food and nutrition education programmes and interventions in schools in Spain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvia Trescastro-López

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: 13.9% of children and young people in Spain today are obese, and 26.3% are overweight. It is therefore essential that healthy eating habits be developed early in life. Food and nutrition education, taught as part of health education programmes in schools, plays a fundamental role in instilling this behaviour. Te main goal of this publication was to conduct a bibliometric review in order to analyse the literature on food and nutrition education programmes and interventions in schools in Spain which have been shown to influence health and/or school children’s eating habits.Material and Methods: A cross-sectional descriptive study of the results obtained from a literature search of the databases Medline, Cochrane Library Plus en Español, Cuiden, Excelencia clínica, IBECS, Scielo, CSIC (ICYT, ISOC e IME, Lilacs, Cuidatge y Teseo. A study of bibliometric indicators: databases, journals, documents published, languages, authorship, index of collaboration, and degree of obsolescence (Burton and Kebler half-life, and Price index.Results: The search provided a total of 148 citations. The final percentage of relevant articles was 49 (33.11%. The database that provided the highest number of pertinent citations was Medline, accounting 24 (48.98%. 42 of the selected citations (85.71% corresponded to original articles. The journal with the largest number of papers was Nutrición Hospitalaria (Hospital Nutrition, accounting 11 (22.45%. The Burton and Kebler half-life was 6 years and the Price index was 42.86%.Conclusions: Many academic articles have been published concerning food and nutrition education programmes in schools in Spain, indicating the importance of acquiring healthy eating habits and behaviours in childhood and the interest this subject arouses.

  7. Nutrition education in the care of patients with chronic kidney disease and end-stage renal disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Cheryl A M; Nguyen, Hoang Anh

    2018-03-01

    Diet counseling and nutrition education are recommended in the prevention and management of chronic kidney disease (CKD) and end-stage renal disease (ESRD). The importance of effectively addressing nutrition with patients has grown given the increasing prevalence of obesity, hypertension, and diabetes; conditions which influence CKD/ESRD. Dietary advice for individuals with CKD/ESRD can be seen as complex; and successful dietary management requires careful planning, periodic assessment of nutritional status, as well as monitoring of dietary compliance. In spite of recommendations and pressing need, formal training in nutrition and adequate preparation for providers is limited; and for physicians the lack of nutrition education has been acknowledged, repeatedly, as an area for improvement in medical training curricula. It has also been suggested that dietitians have an essential role in management of CKD in the primary care setting; however, dietitians who do not practice renal education daily may need training on the specific challenges in CKD/ESRD. The objectives of this chapter were to: characterize select nutrition education resources for providers who care for patients with CKD/ESRD; summarize key dietary components emphasized in the care of patients with CKD/ESRD; and address practical considerations in educational efforts focused on nutrition and CKD/ESRD. © 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Nutrition and physical activity educational intervention on CHD risk factors: a systematic review study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahmati Najarkolaei, Fatemeh; Ghaffarpasand, Eiman; Gholami Fesharaki, Mohammad; Jonaidi Jafari, Nematollah

    2015-01-01

    Fast growing epidemic of chronic diseases causes many health challenges over the world. Regarding reported pros and cons, the aim of the current study is to review the effect of nutrition and physical educational intervention in decreasing cardiovascular risk factors. In this review study, searching has done through the English and Persian databases. Articles with other languages, lack of important information, and score 3 or less in the JADAD standard checklist were exluded from the study. In the primary search, 194 articles have been found.Through four stages of secondary search and further evaluation, 43 articles were selected. These articles were published between 1989 to 2013. According to these findings, the majority of articles showed a positive effect of nutrition and physical activity educational interventions on cardiovascular risk factors- blood cholesterol, systolic and diastolic blood pressure, as well as smoking cigarette in high risk patients. These results, suggest the necessity of continiuting nutrition and physical educational intervention for individuals with cardiovascular risk factors.

  9. An investment in children's health, nutrition and education is the foundation stone for all national development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalra, S

    1991-01-01

    A medical student at the Christian Medical College in Ludhiana, India, won first place in the First Annual Dr. S.M. Gupta Memorial Essay Contest with this essay on investing in the health, nutrition, and education of India's children. The health, nutrition, and education condition of India's children is substandard. 10% of infants die before their first birthday. 15% of children die before age 5. Many Indian children suffer from diarrhea and acute respiratory infections. Investment in immunization, oral rehydration therapy, hygiene, and health education would prevent many of these deaths and illnesses. Illness and death cost parents time, energy, and money. Children suffering from malnutrition and sickness cannot concentrate on learning. The state of today's children foretells the state of tomorrow's adults, work force, and leaders. Poor nutrition and health contribute to India's substandard economic productivity. India has 14% of the world's population, but produces only 1.2% of its gross national product. Even though India was the first country to have a national family planning program, its fertility and population growth rates are high. Investment in children's health would show parents the benefits of planning their families. It would also improve India's poor performance in sports and war as well as national prestige and socioeconomic development. The considerable number of illiterates reflect India's failure to invest in education. Females have a lower literacy rate than males. Girls in India suffer much discrimination. They receive less food, less medical care, less opportunities for education, and less recreation. National development depends on the active participation of girls. Prevention is the key: nourish the children, educate them, and keep them healthy.

  10. [Nutritional education: from ignorance to social representations in post-graduation by Rio de Janeiro (1980-98)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lima, Eronides da Silva; Oliveira, Celina Szuchmacher; Gomes, Maria do Carmo Rebello

    2003-01-01

    Tbe present article aims at analyzing the of nutrition teaching in post-graduation programs from 1980 to 1998. As the maine cause for nutrition as an academic subject, nutritional ignorance is the basic focus of dissertations from the 1980's up to 1990, showing that the beginning of researchers' education was marked by a technical and intervening approach whose subject scope followed an outside logic. After 1990, dissertations began to criticize nutrition curriculum and practice and to introduce the concept of social representations. On doing so, they kept structural concepts when relating representations and practices. Tracing back the relevant chronological facts of nutrition, as a science and as a profession, ends up to empty informers' statements, revealing that nutritionists represent their education and practice more as a result of external idealized views than as a group of meaningful representations rendered by their practice, in which relational experiences among individuals and with their social environment take place.

  11. Case-based learning facilitates critical thinking in undergraduate nutrition education: students describe the big picture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harman, Tara; Bertrand, Brenda; Greer, Annette; Pettus, Arianna; Jennings, Jill; Wall-Bassett, Elizabeth; Babatunde, Oyinlola Toyin

    2015-03-01

    The vision of dietetics professions is based on interdependent education, credentialing, and practice. Case-based learning is a method of problem-based learning that is designed to heighten higher-order thinking. Case-based learning can assist students to connect education and specialized practice while developing professional skills for entry-level practice in nutrition and dietetics. This study examined student perspectives of their learning after immersion into case-based learning in nutrition courses. The theoretical frameworks of phenomenology and Bloom's Taxonomy of Educational Objectives triangulated the design of this qualitative study. Data were drawn from 426 written responses and three focus group discussions among 85 students from three upper-level undergraduate nutrition courses. Coding served to deconstruct the essence of respondent meaning given to case-based learning as a learning method. The analysis of the coding was the constructive stage that led to configuration of themes and theoretical practice pathways about student learning. Four leading themes emerged. Story or Scenario represents the ways that students described case-based learning, changes in student thought processes to accommodate case-based learning are illustrated in Method of Learning, higher cognitive learning that was achieved from case-based learning is represented in Problem Solving, and Future Practice details how students explained perceived professional competency gains from case-based learning. The skills that students acquired are consistent with those identified as essential to professional practice. In addition, the common concept of Big Picture was iterated throughout the themes and demonstrated that case-based learning prepares students for multifaceted problems that they are likely to encounter in professional practice. Copyright © 2015 Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Development of Nutrition Education Using support tools to select a well-balanced diet in the Homemaking in Elementary School

    OpenAIRE

    Itou, Keiko; Yamaguchi, Satoshi; Yamamoto, Nami; Ishida, Hiroko

    2015-01-01

    The implementation plan of the nutrition education for children of 5th graders of the elementary school using the support tools to select a well-balanced diet was developed and practiced. The children’ behavior in the learning process were recorded and analyzed to empirically examine the effect of the nutrition education on the students in their learning process of nutrition knowledge as well as in their acquiring process of behavior to arrange a well-balanced diet.   The results were as ...

  13. Enhancing the intrinsic work motivation of community nutrition educators: how supportive supervision and job design foster autonomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dickin, Katherine L; Dollahite, Jamie S; Habicht, Jean-Pierre

    2011-01-01

    Mixed-methods research investigated the work motivation of paraprofessional community nutrition educators (CNEs) delivering a long-running public health nutrition program. In interviews, CNEs (n = 9) emphasized "freedom," supportive supervision, and "making a difference" as key sources of motivation. Community nutrition educator surveys (n = 115) confirmed high levels of autonomy, which was associated with supervisors' delegation and support, CNE decision-making on scheduling and curricula, and job satisfaction. Supervisors (n = 32) rated CNEs' job design as having inherently motivating characteristics comparable to professional jobs. Supervisory strategies can complement job design to create structured, supportive contexts that maintain fidelity, while granting autonomy to paraprofessionals to enhance intrinsic work motivation.

  14. [ASSOCIATION BETWEEN FITNESS, NUTRITIONAL STATUS AND ACADEMIC PERFORMANCE IN PHYSICAL EDUCATION STUDENTS].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godoy Cumillaf, Andrés; Valdés Badilla, Pablo; Fariña Herrera, Custodio; Cárcamo Mora, Francisco; Medina Herrera, Bernice; Meneses Sandoval, Elías; Gedda Muñoz, Relmu; Durán Agüero, Samuel

    2015-10-01

    several studies demonstrated that regular physical exercise would impact positively on the academic performance of students. to determine the association between physical fitness, nutritional status and academic performance of students of Pedagogy in Physical Education from Temuco, Chile. the sample was selected on a non-probabilistic approach, which included 208 subjects (n = 153 women and n = 55 women). The variables studied were physical fitness (short Abs, long jump with feet together, forward trunk flexion, elbow flexion and extension and "course navette" test), nutritional status (BMI) and academic performance (classified as up and down the academic average). 87.5% of students have a satisfactory fitness and a BMI of 23.8 ± 2.9 kg/m2. The students with the best academic performance were those with the higher proportion of satisfactory physical condition (92.5 %). No association between academic performance and nutritional status was determined, but it was observed between low fitness and a great risk of low academic performance (OR = 2.8, 95% CI 1.0 to 8 1; p academic achievement and physical fitness among students is observed, but no for the nutritional status and the academic performance. Copyright AULA MEDICA EDICIONES 2014. Published by AULA MEDICA. All rights reserved.

  15. The application of an occupational therapy nutrition education programme for children who are obese.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munguba, Marilene Calderaro; Valdés, Maria Teresa Moreno; da Silva, Carlos Antonio Bruno

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate an occupational therapy nutrition education programme for children who are obese with the use of two interactive games. A quasi-experimental study was carried out at a municipal school in Fortaleza, Brazil. A convenient sample of 200 children ages 8-10 years old participated in the study. Data collection comprised a semi-structured interview, direct and structured observation, and focus group, comparing two interactive games based on the food pyramid (video game and board game) used individually and then combined. Both play activities were efficient in the mediation of nutritional concepts, with a preference for the board game. In the learning strategies, intrinsic motivation and metacognition were analysed. The attention strategy was most applied at the video game. We concluded that both games promoted the learning of nutritional concepts. We confirmed the effectiveness of the simultaneous application of interactive games in an interdisciplinary health environment. It is recommended that a larger sample should be used in evaluating the effectiveness of play and video games in teaching healthy nutrition to children in a school setting. (c) 2008 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  16. Developing nutrition education resources for a multi-ethnic population in New Zealand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eyles, Helen; Mhurchu, Cliona Ni; Wharemate, Laurie; Funaki-Tahifote, Mafi; Lanumata, Tolotea; Rodgers, Anthony

    2009-01-01

    In New Zealand, the burden of nutrition-related disease is greatest among vulnerable and disadvantaged groups, including Maori and Pacific peoples. However, little research is currently available on effective ways to improve nutrition in these communities. This paper describes the development of six paper-based nutrition education resources for multi-ethnic participants in a large supermarket intervention trial. Six focus groups involving 15 Maori, 13 Pacific and 16 non-Maori, non-Pacific participants were held. A general inductive approach was applied to identify common themes around participants' understanding and thoughts on relevance and usefulness of the draft resources. Feedback from focus groups was used to modify resources accordingly. Five themes emerged across all focus groups and guided modification of the resources: (i) perceived higher cost of healthy food, (ii) difficulty in changing food-purchasing habits, (iii) lack of knowledge, understanding and information about healthy food, (iv) desire for personally relevant information that uses ethnically appropriate language and (v) other barriers to healthy eating, including limited availability of healthy food. Many issues affect the likelihood of purchase and consumption of healthy food. These issues should be taken into account when developing nutritional materials for New Zealanders and possibly other multi-ethnic populations worldwide. PMID:18974069

  17. The Effect of Health - Nutrition Education on Health Promotion in Resident Elderly in KAHRIZAK in TEHRAN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sima Ghasemi

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Aging is natural course of life which accompanied by changes of metabolism. The exchanges susceptible elderly to malnutrition in researched was do in this back ground about 3-13% of aged population involved to malnutrition that this rate increased to 30-60% in initialized elderly. In this study, we assessed the effects of medical care staff's education on nutritional situation of elderly livid in KAHRIZAK charity Foundation in TEHRAN during 4 months. Methods & Material: 192 elderlies which lived in KCF and equal or older than 65 satisfied in including to this study randomly. (50 males and 142 females although for inclusion they had not involved to an staged liver and renal disease and had not history of surgery during one months before initiated of study. We checked HB, HCT, LDL, HDL, FBS, CRP, ALB, although assessed MNA, MMSE, ADL, Norton sore before and after educational intervention. Educational workshop operated for medical and nursing staffs of KCF during 3 days. Clinical and Para clinical assessments did 4 months, again, after that, and collected data entered to EXEL and analyzed by SPSS soft wares. Results: Before educational intervention 35.9% of elderly had very sever or severe malnutrition that after intervention decreased to 18.3% mean of ALB, HB, HCT, LDL, F.B.S increased after intervention and significant (p<0/05. Nutritional situation correlated to age, mouth and swallowing disorders, poly pharmacy, cognitive condition, ADL score in eating and Norton scores significant. Conclusion: Base of this findings is concluded medical and nursing staffs nursing homes has significant effects on decrease of moderate and severe malnutrition in elderly. Education in this instated have to continues and not cross over like this study for significant Paraclinical improvements of nutritional indicators.

  18. [Impact of a nutrition education intervention in teachers, preschool and basic school-age children in Valparaiso region in Chile].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vio, Fernando; Salinas, Judith; Montenegro, Edith; González, Carmen Gloria; Lera, Lydia

    2014-06-01

    To assess the impact of a nutrition education program for teachers in the nutritional status, food knowledge and food consumption of their pre basic and basic students, and in the controls. A nutrition education intervention was conducted in pre basic and basic teachers in a school year, with a pre-post evaluation of their students, compared with a control group. Subjects were 817 students (389 men and 428 women) from pre kindergarten to the second grade. The 465 students of the intervened group were distributed in two schools (Liceo 1 = 283; Liceo 2 = 182) and 352 in the control school. The nutrition intervention consisted in 9 interactive workshops for teachers with the utilization of Information and Communication Technologies (ICT). The pre post evaluation consisted in a nutritional status assessment, and a food and nutrition survey with questions related with food knowledge and food consumption, at the beginning and at the end of the school year. There were no significant differences in nutritional status between the beginning and the end of the intervention. In one of the experimental schools (Liceo 2) there was a significant decrease in obesity, in women and in the age-group 7-9 years. In the experimental group there was a significant improvement in food knowledge and a decrease in non-healthy food consumption. In the control group, consumption of non-healthy food was stable, with a decrease in fruits and vegetables consumption. As it was demonstrated in similar studies, a short interactive nutrition education intervention with utilization of ICT in pre basic and basic teachers can produce positive changes in nutritional status of their students, improving food knowledge and healthy food consumption and decreasing non-healthy food consumption, compared with the control group. However, a strategy to incorporate parents in school nutrition education programs is still a pending issue. Copyright AULA MEDICA EDICIONES 2014. Published by AULA MEDICA. All rights

  19. Residential Energy Efficiency Potential: Wisconsin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilson, Eric J [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2017-11-27

    Energy used by Wisconsin single-family homes that can be saved through cost-effective improvements. Prepared by Eric Wilson and Noel Merket, NREL, and Erin Boyd, U.S. Department of Energy Office of Energy Policy and Systems Analysis.

  20. Wisconsin's fourth forest inventory, 1983.

    Science.gov (United States)

    John S. Jr. Spencer; W. Brad Smith; Jerold T. Hahn; Gerhard K. Raile

    1988-01-01

    The fourth inventory of the timber resource of Wisconsin shows that growing-stock volume increased from 11.2 to 15.5 billion cubic feet between 1968 and 1983, and area of timberland increased from 14.5 to 14.8 million acres. Presented are analysis and statistics on forest area and timber volume, growth, mortality, removals, and projections.

  1. Wisconsin's forest resources in 2001.

    Science.gov (United States)

    John S. Vissage; Gery J. Brand; Manfred E. Mielke

    2003-01-01

    Results of the 2001 annual inventory of Wisconsin show about 15.8 million acres of forest land, more than 21.6 billion cubic feet of live volume on forest land, and nearly 584 million dry tons of all live aboveground tree biomass on timberland. Gypsy moth, forest tent caterpillar, twolined chestnut borer, bronze birch borer, ash yellows, and white pine blister rust...

  2. Birds of Prey of Wisconsin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamerstrom, Frances

    This copiously illustrated document is designed to be a field quide to birds of prey that are common to Wisconsin, as well as to some that enter the state occasionally. An introduction discusses birds of prey with regard to migration patterns, the relationship between common names and the attitudes of people toward certain birds, and natural signs…

  3. Improvement in Nutritional Status in Patients With Chronic Kidney Disease-4 by a Nutrition Education Program With No Impact on Renal Function and Determined by Male Sex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-Torres, Almudena; González Garcia, Elena; Garcia-Llana, Helena; Del Peso, Gloria; López-Sobaler, Ana María; Selgas, Rafael

    2017-09-01

    Protein-energy wasting (PEW) is associated with increased morbidity and mortality and a rapid deterioration of kidney function in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD). However, there is little information regarding the effect of nutrition intervention. The aims of this study were to evaluate the efficacy and safety of a nutrition education program (NEP) in patients with nondialysis dependent CKD (NDD-CKD), based on the diagnostic criteria for PEW proposed by the International Society of Renal Nutrition and Metabolism. The design of the study was a 6-month longitudinal, prospective, and interventional study. The study was conducted from March 2008 to September 2011 in the Nephrology Department of La Paz University Hospital in Madrid, Spain. A total of 160 patients with NDD-CKD started the NEP, and 128 finished it. The 6-month NEP consisted of designing an individualized diet plan based on the patient's initial nutritional status, and 4 nutrition education sessions. Changes in nutritional status (PEW) and biochemical, anthropometric and body composition parameters. After 6 months of intervention, potassium and inflammation levels decreased, and an improved lipid profile was found. Body mass index lowered, with increased muscle mass and a stable fat mass. Men showed increased levels of albumin and prealbumin, and women showed decreased proteinuria levels. The prevalence of PEW decreased globally (27.3%-10.9%; P = .000), but differently in men (29.5%-6.5%; P = .000) and in women (25.4%-14.9%; P = .070), 3 of the women having worsened. Kidney function was preserved, despite increased protein intake. The NEP in NDD-CKD generally improved nutritional status as measured by PEW parameters, but individual poorer results indicated the need to pay special attention to female sex and low body mass index at the start of the program. Copyright © 2017 National Kidney Foundation, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Effect of educational training on nutrition and weight control in under-18 Spanish wrestlers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Visiedo

    Full Text Available Abstract The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of a formative program concerning nutrition, weight control, and its risks wrestlers under the age of 18 (under-18 at the Spanish national level. The sample comprised 36 under-18 wrestlers that were pre-selected for the Spanish national team. A quasi-experimental design with a pre-test and post-test was used. The dependent variableswere the knowledge of nutrition and weight control and its risks. The independent variable was the educational program. The program had three 30-minute sessions that combined talks, videos, and tasks to complete. Descriptive and inferential analyses were done (t-test, Wilcoxon test. Results indicate that the educational program was effective at increasing under-18 wrestlers’ knowledge about weight control and its risks,but was ineffective with regard to nutrition knowledge. The paper concludes with a discussion regarding the effect of the intervention program, the difficulties with including this type of knowledge and skill in the preparation of combat sport athletes, and the need for further research in this area.

  5. [Evaluation of two strategies for nutritional education using radio programs in Guadalajara, Mexico].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabrera-Pivaral, Carlos Enrique; Ninel Mayari, Centeno Lopez; Arredondo Trueba, Jose Miguel; Gonzalez Perez, Guillermo Julian; Vega Lopez, Maria Guadalupe; Valadez Figueroa, Isabel; Aldrete Rodriguez, Maria Guadalupe

    2002-01-01

    Modifying knowledge and attitudes through persuasive communication in health via radio has produced encouraging results for public health planners. This study's objective was to measure the effect of an educational strategy on knowledge and attitudes towards nutrition in two marginalized communities in Guadalajara, Mexico. Two communities were randomly selected. In each community a group of individuals was invited to be exposed to radio broadcasts. Using a coded and structured instrument, knowledge and attitudes towards the contents of nutritional education for health were measured before and after the intervention in both groups. Group A (n = 37) was organized and exposed to the dynamics of the radio forum throughout the 4 months during which the project lasted. Group B (n = 33) was not organized, and listened to the radio program according to its own cultural dynamics. Median knowledge and attitudes (KA) for group A was 56.8 in the pre-test and 74.1 in the post-test (W: p = -0.05). In group B the KA results were 53.0 and 59.2, respectively (W: p = -0.05). The results emphasize the advantages of the radio forum as a health communications strategy for human nutrition.

  6. Effect of a Nutrient Rich Foods consumer education program: results from the nutrition advice study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glanz, Karen; Hersey, James; Cates, Sheryl; Muth, Mary; Creel, Darryl; Nicholls, Jill; Fulgoni, Victor; Zaripheh, Susan

    2012-01-01

    The Nutrient Rich Foods (NRF) approach to eating uses the NRF Index, a nutrient profiling metric to help consumers choose foods that contain more vitamins, minerals, and other nutrients per kilocalorie. Research is needed to test the efficacy of dietary guidance using nutrient profiling systems to rank foods. To examine whether nutrition education and supporting materials would increase understanding of the NRF approach and improve food shopping, meal planning, consumption of nutrient-rich foods, and diet quality. Unbalanced randomized controlled trial conducted in February to May 2009 with participants assigned to NRF education group (n=128) or control group receiving standard nutrition education (n=61). Adult primary food shoppers and preparers with at least one child in the household aged 3 to 17 years. Group education session and support tools (pocket guide, shopping list, refrigerator magnet, weekly e-mail messages, and biweekly mailings). Surveys of knowledge, attitudes, and behaviors and two 24-hour telephone dietary recalls at baseline and after an 8-week intervention period. Examined time-by-treatment interactions in outcome measures. Compared to controls, NRF participants increased meal planning (+24.2% vs ?4.9%; PNutrition and Dietetics. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Binge eating under a complex reading: Subsidies for the praxis of food and nutrition education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Lúcia Magalhães BOSI

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Binge eating disorder is characterized by the consumption of large amounts of food in a short time, accompanied by the feeling of lack of control, remorse and guilt. binge eating disorder has a close interface with the obesity problem, a matter of great dimensions for health services, especially for the high comorbidity. Although this disorder is closely linked to obesity, a matter of great dimensions for healthcare, especially due to it high comorbidity, this disorder is still poorly known in its symbolic dimension, compromising actions directed to this dimension, among them those included in the scope of food and nutrition education. The purpose of this article is to delimitate the issue of binge eating disorder, under a lens based on complex thinking, in order to discuss and support the scope of the nutritional eating education, illustrating, with life experiences, the multidimensionality inherent to eating disorders. The analysis aims to highlight the challenge of working in educational practices focused on these complex disorders. Therefore, we articulated the theoretical with the empirical levels, revisiting, through a reflexive exercise, the discursive material obtained in a broad research carried out by the authors, guided by phenomenological-hermeneutics approach focusing on the understanding of binge eating disorder, with obese women who have also received this diagnosis. The analysis highlights binge eating disorder as an intense experience of suffering, which compromises the ability to innovate and reinvent behavior, in which food operates as an emotional cushion. In this context, healing requires taking an active and engaged place, feeling an active part in the self-transformation process. Thus, food and nutritional education should be conceived in the scope of a comprehensive care, as a fundamental and strategic space due to the specific nature of the practice, in potential terms.

  8. Feeding Behavior and Nutrition Education in Primary School Students: A School-Based Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahmut Kilic

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: This study of nutrition education given to primary school students was conducted to determine the effects of feeding behavior. Material and Method: This is an intervention study. Research was made at elementary schools located in the center of the province of Yozgat among 6 grade students in 2012-2013. Students were divided into 2 groups by random. Students in the intervention (n=305 and control (n=233 groups were administered a questionnaire prepared by the researcher feeding behaviors. Nutrition surveys in the intervention group after the application of the selected class are given a standardized nutrition education by intern nurses. In data analysis, the dependent and independent samples Student%u2019s t-test, ANOVA for repeated measures multivariate analysis (repeated multiple general model, chi-square, correlation and regression analysis were used. Results: Seventy-one percent point nine of the students usually make breakfast before coming school, 24.5% often bring food to school, 79.4% have at least 3 meals a day, %41.3 at least 2 times eating something between meals. After a year of this habit of the students (49.3% increases in the frequency of eating something between meals as well as a reduction of approximately 10% was determined. In the study, positive and negative eating behavior could not gain the desired level of behavior change with the education given in schools to students. However, the decline in average scores positive eating behaviors, the intervention group (%uF8E5d=3.5 than in the control group (%uF8E5d=6.4 were found to be less. Discussion: Education is an important method meets the information needs of individuals, but is insufficient in creating behavior change in a short time.

  9. The Shaping Healthy Choices Program: design and implementation methodologies for a multicomponent, school-based nutrition education intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scherr, Rachel E; Linnell, Jessica D; Smith, Martin H; Briggs, Marilyn; Bergman, Jacqueline; Brian, Kelley M; Dharmar, Madan; Feenstra, Gail; Hillhouse, Carol; Keen, Carl L; Nguyen, Lori M; Nicholson, Yvonne; Ontai, Lenna; Schaefer, Sara E; Spezzano, Theresa; Steinberg, Francene M; Sutter, Carolyn; Wright, Janel E; Young, Heather M; Zidenberg-Cherr, Sheri

    2014-01-01

    To provide a framework for implementation of multicomponent, school-based nutrition interventions. This article describes the research methods for the Shaping Healthy Choices Program, a model to improve nutrition and health-related knowledge and behaviors among school-aged children. Longitudinal, pretest/posttest, randomized, controlled intervention. Four elementary schools in California. Fourth-grade students at intervention (n = 252) and control (n = 238) schools and their parents and teachers. Power analyses demonstrate that a minimum of 159 students per group will be needed to achieve sufficient power. The sample size was determined using the variables of nutrition knowledge, vegetable preference score, and body mass index percentile. A multicomponent school-based nutrition education intervention over 1 academic year, followed by activities to support sustainability of the program. Dietary and nutrition knowledge and behavior, critical thinking skills, healthy food preferences and consumption, and physical activity will be measured using a nutrition knowledge questionnaire, a food frequency questionnaire, a vegetable preferences assessment tool, the Test of Basic Science Process Skills, digital photography of plate waste, PolarActive accelerometers, anthropometrics, a parent questionnaire, and the School and Community Actions for Nutrition survey. Evaluation will include quantitative and qualitative measures. Quantitative data will use paired t, chi-square, and Mann-Whitney U tests and regression modeling using P = .05 to determine statistical significance. Copyright © 2014 Society for Nutrition Education and Behavior. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. A nutritional education program could prevent weight loss and slow cognitive decline in Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivière, S; Gillette-Guyonnet, S; Voisin, T; Reynish, E; Andrieu, S; Lauque, S; Salva, A; Frisoni, G; Nourhashemi, F; Micas, M; Vellas, B

    2001-01-01

    Weight loss is a common problem in patients with Alzheimer's Disease (AD). It is a predictive factor of mortality and it decreases patients' and caregivers' quality of life. To determine if a nutritional education program can prevent weight loss in AD patients. 151 AD patients and their caregivers were enrolled to follow the intervention and 74 AD patients and their caregivers constituted a control group. Caregivers in the intervention group followed 9 nutritional sessions of one hour each, over one year. Caregivers in the control group didn't follow any sessions but were offered advice provided in a normal follow-up. Patients weight, nutritional state, cognitive function, autonomy, mood, behaviour disorders at baseline and at 6- and 12-month follow-up. Caregivers burden, nutritional and AD knowledge at the baseline and at the 12-month follow-up. During the year follow-up, the mean weight increased in the intervention group (0.7+/-3.6 kg) whereas it decreased in the control group (-0.7+/-5.4 kg) (pnutritional status (MNA) was maintained in the intervention group (0.3+/-2.6) whereas it decreased significantly in the control group (-1.0+/-3.4) (pnutritional state, eating behaviour disorders, depression), the weight change between the two groups was not significant (0.6+/-0.4 kg vs. -0.6+/-0. 6 kg respectively in intervention group and control group). However, the percentage of patients with significant weight loss is decreased. The MMSE change became significant between the two groups: -2.3+/-0.3 vs. -3.4+/-0.4 respectively in intervention group and control group (pnutritional educational program intended for caregivers of AD patients could have a positive effect on patients weight and cognitive function.

  11. Effects of Social Network Exposure on Nutritional Learning: Development of an Online Educational Platform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dagan, Noa; Beskin, Daniel; Brezis, Mayer; Reis, Ben Y

    2015-10-05

    Social networking sites (SNSs) such as Facebook have the potential to enhance online public health interventions, in part, as they provide social exposure and reinforcement. The objective of the study was to evaluate whether social exposure provided by SNSs enhances the effects of online public health interventions. As a sample intervention, we developed Food Hero, an online platform for nutritional education in which players feed a virtual character according to their own nutritional needs and complete a set of virtual sport challenges. The platform was developed in 2 versions: a "private version" in which a user can see only his or her own score, and a "social version" in which a user can see other players' scores, including preexisting Facebook friends. We assessed changes in participants' nutritional knowledge using 4 quiz scores and 3 menu-assembly scores. Monitoring feeding and exercising attempts assessed engagement with the platform. The 2 versions of the platform were randomly assigned between a study group (30 members receiving the social version) and a control group (33 members, private version). The study group's performance on the quizzes gradually increased over time, relative to that of the control group, becoming significantly higher by the fourth quiz (P=.02). Furthermore, the study group's menu-assembly scores improved over time compared to the first score, whereas the control group's performance deteriorated. Study group members spent an average of 3:40 minutes assembling each menu compared to 2:50 minutes in the control group, and performed an average of 1.58 daily sport challenges, compared to 1.21 in the control group (P=.03). This work focused on isolating the SNSs' social effects in order to help guide future online interventions. Our results indicate that the social exposure provided by SNSs is associated with increased engagement and learning in an online nutritional educational platform.

  12. The Price of Quality: Estimating the Cost of a Higher Quality Early Childhood Care and Education System for Southeast Wisconsin. Revised

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovach, Melissa; Dickman, Anneliese; Lam, Eva

    2010-01-01

    Throughout the United States, investments in high-quality early childhood education are seen by community leaders as a strategy for improving outcomes in areas such as K-12 education, workforce development, and economic development. Indeed, many research studies conclude that high quality early learning environments produce social, educational,…

  13. Water resources of Wisconsin: lower Wisconsin River basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hindall, S.M.; Borman, Ronald G.

    1974-01-01

    This report describes the physical environment, availability, distribution, movement, quality, and use of water in the upper Wisconsin River basin as an aid in planning and water management. The report presents general information on the basin derived from data obtained from Federal, State, and local agencies, New field data were collected in areas where information was lacking. More detailed studies of problem areas may be required in the future, as water needs and related development increase.

  14. Dairy nutrition management: Assessing a comprehensive continuing education program for veterinary practitioners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuenemann, G M; Eastridge, M L; Weiss, W P; Workman, J D; Bas, S; Rajala-Schultz, P

    2011-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the effectiveness of a team-based educational program designed to enhance the flow of applied, research-based, nutrition information to dairy veterinarians. A comprehensive dairy cattle nutrition curriculum was developed and participants from 11 veterinary practices located in 5 states (IN, NY, PA, NM, and OH), serving an estimated 186,150 dairy cattle in 469 herds, attended the 2 advanced nutrition modules (∼2.5 d each and ∼40 h of learning) held in 2009. Nutrients, feeding transition cows, calves, and heifers, dry matter intake, feed storage, metabolic diseases, evaluating cows (scoring body condition, manure, and lameness), metabolic blood profiles, and feeding behavior were discussed. Educational materials were delivered through in-class lectures, followed by case-based learning and group discussions. A farm visit and out-of-class assignments were also implemented. Attendees were assessed using pre- and post-tests of knowledge to determine the level of knowledge gained in both nutrition modules. Participants evaluated the program and provided feedback at the conclusion of each module. Veterinarians (100%) reported that the overall program, presentations, and discussions were useful. Attendees found the presented information relevant for their work (agree=60% and strongly agree=40%) and of great immediate use to them (neutral=6.5%, agree=56%, and strongly agree=37.5%). The presented materials and the implemented educational delivery methods substantially increased the knowledge level of the attendees (16.9% points increase from pre-test to post-test scores). Importance of feed particle size, ration evaluation, interpreting feed analysis, balancing carbohydrate components, and metabolic profiling in fresh cows were listed as learned concepts that participants could apply in their practices. Results suggested that both nutrition modules were relevant and effective, offering new information with immediate field

  15. The effect of educational intervention on girl's behavior regarding nutrition: Applying the beliefs, attitudes, subjective norms, and enabling factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pirzadeh, Asiyeh; Hazavei, Mohammad Mehdi; Entezari, Mohammad Hassan; Hasanzadeh, Akbar

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the effectiveness of an educational program based on the Belief, Attitude, Subjective Norm, and Enabling Factors (BASNEF) Model on the nutritional behavior among second-grade, middle school, female students in Isfahan city. This quasi-experimental study was performed on 72 students. The samples were randomly divided in two groups (36 in the intervention group and 36 in the control group). The data collection tools were validated and had reliable questionnaires. For the intervention group, a 75-minute educational session was held thrice. The control group had no education. The BASNEF model constructs guided the development of the questionnaires and content of the educational sessions. The independent t-test and paired t-test were used to analyze the data. A two-tailed P value lower than 0.05 was considered to be statistically significant. According to the results, the mean scores of knowledge and model variables (Belief, Attitude, Subjective Norm, and Enabling Factors) had a significant difference in the two groups after intervention (P educational intervention, 36.1% of the students had unfavorable nutritional behavior. In the control group, 88.9% of the students had unfavorable nutritional behavior, before and one month after intervention. The present study showed that nutrition education intervention based on the BASNEF model could promote the nutritional behavior in girl students.

  16. [Effects of high-intensity interval training and nutritional education in patients with type 2 diabetes].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mangiamarchi, Pedro; Caniuqueo, Alexis; Ramírez-Campillo, Rodrigo; Cárdenas, Patricio; Morales, Sylvana; Cano-Montoya, Johnattan; Bresciani, Guilherme; Álvarez, Cristian

    2017-07-01

    High-intensity interval training (HIIT) improves cardiometabolic markers, but its effects on the quality of life of patients with type 2 diabetes (T2D) is not well known. To determine the effects of a 12-week HIIT exercise program on cardiometabolic and quality of life variables of T2D patients. Nine T2D women were assigned to a HIIT + nutritional education (GE) and 10, to a nutritional education alone group (GC). At baseline and after each intervention, anthropometric and body composition parameters using bio-impedance were assessed, and a blood sample was obtained to measure serum lipid levels, blood glucose and glycated hemoglobin. Quality of life was assessed using the SF-12 questionnaire adapted for the Chilean population. There were no significant changes on the lipid profile variables in the GE group, although HDL cholesterol was increased significantly (p < 0.05) in the GC group. Total fat mass was decreased in the GE group from 43.5 ± 1.5 to 41.9 ± 1.5%, p < 0.01. Fasting glucose and glycated hemoglobin decreased in the GE group. There was a significant correlation between the decrease in total fat mass and that of glycated hemoglobin. There were significant increases in quality of life parameters; physical function, physical role, pain, general health, vitality, emotional role, mental health, and social function in the GE but not in the GC group. A 12-week program of HIIT plus nutritional education improves cardiometabolic and quality of life parameters on type 2 diabetics.

  17. Cost-effectiveness of a Nutrition Education Curriculum Intervention in Elementary Schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graziose, Matthew M; Koch, Pamela A; Wang, Y Claire; Lee Gray, Heewon; Contento, Isobel R

    2017-09-01

    To estimate the long-term cost-effectiveness of an obesity prevention nutrition education curriculum (Food, Health, & Choices) as delivered to all New York City fifth-grade public school students over 1 year. This study is a standard cost-effectiveness analysis from a societal perspective, with a 3% discount rate and a no-intervention comparator, as recommended by the US Panel on Cost-effectiveness in Health and Medicine. Costs of implementation, administration, and future obesity-related medical costs were included. Effectiveness was based on a cluster-randomized, controlled trial in 20 public schools during the 2012-2013 school year and linked to published estimates of childhood-to-adulthood body mass index trajectories using a decision analytic model. The Food, Health, & Choices intervention was estimated to cost $8,537,900 and result in 289 fewer males and 350 fewer females becoming obese (0.8% of New York City fifth-grade public school students), saving 1,599 quality-adjusted life-years (QALYs) and $8,098,600 in direct medical costs. Food, Health, & Choices is predicted to be cost-effective at $275/QALY (95% confidence interval, -$2,576/QALY to $2,084/QALY) with estimates up to $6,029/QALY in sensitivity analyses. This cost-effectiveness model suggests that a nutrition education curriculum in public schools is effective and cost-effective in reducing childhood obesity, consistent with the authors' hypothesis and previous literature. Future research should assess the feasibility and sustainability of scale-up. Copyright © 2016 Society for Nutrition Education and Behavior. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Nutritional education for management of osteodystrophy: Impact on serum phosphorus, quality of life, and malnutrition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karavetian, Mirey; Elzein, Hafez; Rizk, Rana; Jibai, Rime; de Vries, Nanne

    2016-07-01

    Introduction Osteodystrophy management includes dietary phosphorus restriction, which may limit protein intake, exacerbate malnutrition-inflammation syndrome and mortality among hemodialysis patients. Methods A multicenter randomized controlled trial was conducted in Lebanon, to test the hypothesis that intensive nutrition education focused on phosphorus-to-protein balance will improve patient outcomes. Six hemodialysis units were randomly assigned to the trained hospital dietitian (THD) protocol (210 patients). Six others (184 patients) were divided equally according to the patients' dialysis shifts and assigned to Dedicated Dietitian (DD) and Control protocols. Patients in the THD group received nutrition education from hospital dietitians who were trained by the study team on renal dietetics, but had limited time for hemodialysis patients. Patients in the DD group received individualized nutritional education on dietary phosphorus and protein management for 6 months (2-hour/patient/month) from study renal dietitians. Patients in the control group continued receiving routine care from hospital dietitians who had limited time for these patients and were blinded to the study. Serum phosphorus (mmol/L), malnutrition-inflammation score (MIS), health-related quality of life (HRQOL) index and length of hospital stay (LOS) were assessed at T0 (baseline), T1 (postintervention) and T2 (post6 month follow up). Findings Only the DD protocol significantly improved serum phosphorus (T0:1.78 ± 0.5, T1:1.63 ± 0.46, T2:1.69 ± 0.53), 3 domains of the HRQOL and maintained MIS at T1, but this protective effect resolved at T2. The LOS significantly dropped for all groups. Discussion The presence of competent renal dietitians fully dedicated to hemodialysis units was superior over the other protocols in temporarily improving patient outcomes. © 2016 International Society for Hemodialysis.

  19. [Improving diet quality in children through a new nutritional education programme: INFADIMED].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bibiloni, Maria Del Mar; Fernández-Blanco, Jordi; Pujol-Plana, Noemí; Martín-Galindo, Núria; Fernández-Vallejo, Maria Mercè; Roca-Domingo, Mariona; Chamorro-Medina, Juan; Tur, Josep A

    To assess the results of a nutritional education programme developed by using available local resources to improve diet quality and decrease overweight and obesity prevalence among children. A longitudinal intervention study by means of nutritional education (INFADIMED) in children (aged 3-7 years) from Vilafranca del Penedès (Barcelona, Spain), recruited from preschool centres and primary schools, with an intervention or INFADIMED group (n=319; 50.2% female) and a control group (n=880; 49.8% female). Weight, height and body mass index were measured in both groups at the beginning and at the end of the programme. Adherence to the Mediterranean diet was also assessed using the KIDMED test. Consumption of fruit or juices, vegetables, yogurt and/or cheese, pasta or rice, and nuts increased, while skipping breakfast, consumption of bakery products for breakfast, and/or consumption of sweets several times per day decreased in the INFADIMED group. INFADIMED also changed, from the beginning to the end of the study, the adherence to a Mediterranean diet: high (39.2% to 70.5%), acceptable (49.2% to 28.2%), and low (11.6% to 1.3%). Approximately 2.6% of the participants in the control group and 11.3% of the participants in the INFADIMED group who were overweight and obese changed to normal weight (odds ratio: 4.08; 95% confidence interval: 2.37-7.04). INFADIMED is a nutritional education programme with benefits on both diet quality and overweight and obesity prevalence among children. Copyright © 2017 SESPAS. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  20. Development and validation of a nutritional education pamphlet for low literacy pediatric oncology caregivers in Central America.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, Melissa; Chismark, Elisabeth A; Mosby, Terezie; Day, Sara W

    2010-12-01

    A culturally appropriate nutrition education pamphlet was developed and validated for low-literacy caregivers in Honduras, El Salvador, and Guatemala. The pamphlet was developed after a preliminary survey of pediatric oncology nurses in the 3 countries to assess the need for education materials, caregiver literacy levels, and local eating habits. Experts in nutrition and low-literacy patient education and pediatric oncology nurses validated the pamphlet's content and design. The pamphlet was validated positively and has been circulated to pediatric oncology caregivers in Central America.

  1. Childhood obesity study: a pilot study of the effect of the nutrition education program Color My Pyramid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Jean Burley; Pawloski, Lisa Renee; Goldberg, Patricia; Kyeung, Mi Oh; Stoehr, Ana; Baghi, Heibatollah

    2009-06-01

    The need for successful nutrition interventions is critical as the prevalence of childhood obesity increases. Thus, this pilot project examines the effect of a nutrition education program, Color My Pyramid, on children's nutrition knowledge, self-care practices, activity levels, and nutrition status. Using a pretest-posttest, quasiexperimental design, 126 fourth- and fifth-grade students from experimental and control schools are compared. The intervention program incorporates an online component www.MyPyramid.gov, Orem's Self-Care Deficit Nursing Theory, and consists of six classes taught over a 3-month period. Results indicated that the program increased nutrition knowledge in the control group. Furthermore, it increased activity time from pretest to posttest and decreased systolic blood pressure for children in both groups; however, there were no significant differences in BMI percentiles. The findings indicate that Color My Pyramid can be successfully employed in school settings and thus support school nursing practice.

  2. Family and Consumer Sciences Focus on the Human Dimension: The Expanded Food and Nutrition Education Program Example

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cason, Katherine L.; Chipman, Helen; Forstadt, Leslie A.; Rasco, Mattie R.; Sellers, Debra M.; Stephenson, Laura; York, De'Shoin A.

    2017-01-01

    The history of family and consumer sciences (FCS) and the Expanded Food and Nutrition Education Program (EFNEP) is discussed with an emphasis on the critical importance of the human dimension. EFNEP's focus on people, education for change, accountability, strategic partnerships, and public value are highlighted as an example and model for…

  3. [Nutrition education in schools: evaluation of a teaching method "La Main à la Pâte"].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tessier, Stéphane; Chauliac, Michel; Latscha, Béatrice Descamps; Pol, Didier

    2010-01-01

    Teaching nutrition, in the broadest sense, with a comprehensive approach at the primary school level has become an epidemiological imperative. However, conventional methods can improve knowledge but they do not have the capacity to identify how this knowledge is applied through practical implementation in everyday life. The "La main à la Pâte" programme is a hands-on innovative teaching method for science education through experience. A nutrition module, based on benchmarks of consumption of the National Health and Nutrition Programme, was tested in two regions, with 223 students CE1 (ages 7-9 years old). The evolution of behavior change has been measured by questionnaire and observation before and after the introduction of the module and compared with that of 133 students who did not participate in the initiative. The results were positive with regard to both the knowledge acquired and on the actual consumption, directly observed at the school canteen or self-reported from home. The reasons that could explain these changes might also be sought by looking at the specific implication of teachers mobilized for the programme, in particular through their meetings and discussions with parents.

  4. Teachers' perceptions of school nutrition education's influence on eating behaviours of learners in the Bronkhorstspruit District

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mojisola D Kupolati

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Qualitative investigation can provide invaluable information towards understanding the influence of school nutrition education (NE. The study explored teachers' perceptions of the immediate impact of NE on learners' eating behaviours. Twenty-four primary school teachers in the Bronkhorstspruit district, Gauteng, South Africa, who taught nutrition topics to grades four to seven learners, participated in three focus group discussions. Transcript data obtained was analysed using the thematic approach of the framework method. Findings indicated that school support for NE was limited, which undermined the capacity of school NE to influence healthy eating behaviours of learners. The need to strengthen teachers' capacity to model positive eating behaviours was identified. Learners were perceived as being not completely ignorant of healthy eating, with limited capacity to effect changes within the resource-constrained environment. Negative influences like unhealthy choices of food from food vendors and peer influences were identified as needing to be discouraged. Positive influences like the National School Nutrition Programme (NSNP and the school vegetable garden were to be encouraged. Understanding the prevailing school situation and environment and teachers' perceptions and roles in school NE is important in addressing issues that weaken the influence of NE on learners' eating behaviours.

  5. Analysis of the declared nutritional behaviours in a group of diabetology nurses educating patients about diabetes diet therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Głąbska, Dominika; Włodarek, Dariusz

    2015-01-01

    The proper nutrition in diabetes is one of the crucial elements of therapy, but in practice, diet of diabetic individuals is commonly improperly balanced, that is associated with lack of nutritional knowledge. The nurses are also often characterized by insufficient knowledge about diabetes diet therapy and poor nutritional behaviors. The aim of the study was to analyze of the declared nutritional behaviors in a group of diabetology nurses and to compare it with declared nutritional behaviors of the control group. The group of 52 nurses recruited from all the regions of Poland working with diabetic patients was analysed and compared with control group of 63 individuals - random non-diabetic patients from all the regions of Poland. They were asked about accomplishing practical recommended nutritional goals for adults in Poland and were able to indicate if they follow detailed recommended nutritional goals "always" (3 points), "sometimes" (1 point) or "never" (0 points). The diabetology nurses rarely declared fish and legumes intake (never or sometimes accomplishing goal: 87%), milk and dairy products intake (75%), as well as moderate sugar and sweets intake (69%). Nurses significantly rarer than control group declared regularity of meals (p=0.0000) and diversion of meals (p=0.0000). The lack of correlation between number of years of working with diabetic individuals and number of obtained points during assessment of nutritional behaviors was observed. The nutritional behaviors of diabetology nurses are not good, even if they educate diabetic patients on daily basis. Nutritional education should be conducted not only in groups of diabetic patients, but also, in groups of diabetology nurses.

  6. SCI-NutriNord - a Nordic Initiative on Patient Education on Nutrition for People with Spinal Cord Injury (SCI)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Steensgaard, Randi

    2017-01-01

    of evidence-based information materials about healthy eating for people with SCI at least in the Nordic languages. The aim of this multidisciplinary workshop is to: A. Inform about SCI-NutriNord and the first steps that have been taken in developing materials on nutrition as educational teaching aids...... to malnutrition Target group for this workshop is persons who have an interest in problem areas linked to nutrition and SCI, and who want to take part in the development of relevant patient education materials.......People with SCI are at high risk of developing secondary conditions of which several are linked to nutrition: overweight/obesity, chronic constipation and/or diarrhea and pressure sores are some examples. Proper nutrition is imperative to prevent and treat these conditions. However, there is a lack...

  7. Sediment yields of Wisconsin streams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hindall, S.M.; Flint, R.F.

    1970-01-01

    Sediment in Wisconsin streams causes economic and engineering problems in water management and reduces the value of water for nearly all uses. Sediment produces problems such as reduced reservoir capacity, navigation hazards, increased cost of water treatment, property damage, temporary loss of farmland, destruction of feeding and nesting grounds of fish, and destruction of wildlife habitat. Sediment in water also reduces the aesthetic value of surface waters and is detrimental to the State's tourist and recreation industry.

  8. Caregiver's education level, not income, as determining factor of dietary intake and nutritional status of individuals cared for at home.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Correa, B; Leandro Merhi, V A; Pagotto Fogaca, K; Marques de Oliveira, M R

    2009-08-01

    Home care should intervene in the nutritional status of the elderly. To analyze the nutritional status of the elderly assisted by a Home Care Program (PAD) and associate it with income and education level of the caregiver. Thirty-four individuals of both genders who received home care from PAD. The MNA (Mini Nutritional Assessment) was used along with arm circumference. Dietary intake assessment was done with three 24-hour recalls in non-consecutive days. We collected data on income, education level of the caregiver and user in years of formal education and autonomy of user. The differences between the proportions of the nominal variables were tested by the chi-square test. The continuous variables were tested for normality and if normal, the Student's t-test or ANOVA was applied. The adopted significance level was P Education level of the caregivers was a determining factor (P=0.01) for the nutritional status of the elderly while no association was found with respect to income. These findings allows us to conclude that the nutritional status of this population is worrisome and that it may be associated with low quality of life influenced by the education level of the caregiver, but also by age, economic conditions and limited autonomy of this population.

  9. Impact of nutrition education on knowledge and haemoglobin status of hill women in Uttarakhand State of India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Upadhyay, S; Kumar, A R; Raghuvanshi, R S; Singh, B B

    2011-12-01

    This study aimed to examine the impact of the use of single vs. combination of media on nutritional knowledge and haemoglobin status of women in a rural hill area in Uttarakhand State, India. Women from three villages were selected randomly and divided into three groups namely, print media group (n = 59), multimedia group (n = 53) and control group (n = 111). The print media group was exposed to nutrition education through the use of calendars on anaemia for 60 days; the multimedia group was given nutrition education through a combination of media including calendars, video films, and group discussions for 60 days. At pre-exposure stage, 62.7% of the women in the print media group, 67.9% of the multimedia group, and 66.7% of the control group had a low nutrition knowledge level. After exposure, the print media group and the multimedia group showed a significant rise in nutrition knowledge, with the multimedia group scoring significantly higher than the print media group. Overall, 69.1% of the women were anaemic with mean haemoglobin concentration of 10.74 +/- 0.86 g/dl. A non-significant rise in mean haemoglobin concentrations in the experimental groups was found at post-exposure stage. Calendars and video films are effective in increasing nutrition knowledge of illiterate hill women. Use of mass media programmes of longer duration should be encouraged to combat the nutritional problems of rural communities.

  10. Challenges and opportunities for nutrition education and training in the health care professions: intraprofessional and interprofessional call to action1234

    OpenAIRE

    DiMaria-Ghalili, Rose Ann; Mirtallo, Jay M; Tobin, Brian W; Hark, Lisa; Van Horn, Linda; Palmer, Carole A

    2014-01-01

    Understanding and applying nutrition knowledge and skills to all aspects of health care are extremely important, and all health care professions need basic training to effectively assess dietary intake and provide appropriate guidance, counseling, and treatment to their patients. With obesity rates at an all-time high and the increasing prevalence of diabetes projected to cost the Federal government billions of dollars, the need for interprofessional nutrition education is paramount. Physicia...

  11. Creating a center for global health at the University of Wisconsin-Madison.

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    Haq, Cynthia; Baumann, Linda; Olsen, Christopher W; Brown, Lori DiPrete; Kraus, Connie; Bousquet, Gilles; Conway, James; Easterday, B C

    2008-02-01

    Globalization, migration, and widespread health disparities call for interdisciplinary approaches to improve health care at home and abroad. Health professions students are pursuing study abroad in increasing numbers, and universities are responding with programs to address these needs. The University of Wisconsin (UW)-Madison schools of medicine and public health, nursing, pharmacy, veterinary medicine, and the division of international studies have created an interdisciplinary center for global health (CGH). The CGH provides health professions and graduate students with courses, field experiences, and a new Certificate in Global Health. Educational programs have catalyzed a network of enthusiastic UW global health scholars. Partnerships with colleagues in less economically developed countries provide the foundation for education, research, and service programs. Participants have collaborated to improve the education of health professionals and nutrition in Uganda; explore the interplay between culture, community development, and health in Ecuador; improve animal health and address domestic violence in Mexico; and examine successful public health efforts in Thailand. These programs supply students with opportunities to understand the complex determinants of health and structure of health systems, develop adaptability and cross-cultural communication skills, experience learning and working in interdisciplinary teams, and promote equity and reduce health disparities at home and abroad. Based on the principles of equity, sustainability, and reciprocity, the CGH provides a strong foundation to address global health challenges through networking and collaboration among students, staff, and faculty within the UW and beyond.

  12. A randomized controlled trial of a community-based nutrition education program for low-income parents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dollahite, Jamie S; Pijai, Erika I; Scott-Pierce, Michelle; Parker, Carol; Trochim, William

    2014-01-01

    Assess effectiveness of the Expanded Food and Nutrition Education Program on nutrition behaviors post-education and longitudinally. Switching replications randomized experimental design. Participants randomly assigned to immediate education (IE) or delayed education (DE). Participants in IE received intervention the first 8 weeks, and those in DE the second 8 weeks, with no intervention during alternate periods. Data were collected in 3 repeated measures. Parents (n = 168 randomized; n = 134 completed) of children in 2 Head Start and 6 low-income schools. Eight weekly workshops, based on Eating Right is Basic-Enhanced adapted to incorporate dialogue approach with experiential learning. Ten-item self-reported behavior checklist on nutrition, food resource management, food safety, and food security; responses on a 5-point scale reporting frequency of behavior. Chi-square, analysis of variance, and multiple regression. Groups were demographically similar. Both groups reported improved behaviors pre- to post-education (P vs T2). Changed IE behavior was retained T2 to T3. A multiple regression model of overall change, controlling for T1 score and educator, showed significant improvement (n = 134, β = 5.72, P < .001). Positive outcomes were supported by this experimental study in a usual program context, with reported behavior changes retained at least 2 months. Copyright © 2014 Society for Nutrition Education and Behavior. All rights reserved.

  13. The Evolution of School Health and Nutrition in the Education Sector 2000-2015 in sub-Saharan Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarr, Bachir; Fernandes, Meena; Banham, Louise; Bundy, Donald; Gillespie, Amaya; McMahon, Brie; Peel, Francis; Tang, K C; Tembon, Andy; Drake, Lesley

    2016-01-01

    To document the progression of school health and nutrition and its integration within the education sector in sub-Saharan Africa between 2000 and 2015. School health and nutrition programs have contributed to "Education for All" objectives by helping ensure that children benefit from quality education and reach their educational potential. Analysis of education sector plans (ESPs) in terms of the Focusing Resources on Effective School Health (FRESH) framework and the World Bank Systems Approach for Better Education Results (SABER) School Health survey from a set of countries in sub-Saharan Africa. Between 2000 and 2015, the presence and scope of school health and nutrition as reflected in the four FRESH pillars grew substantially in ESPs. Three of these pillars have large, upfront costs. The fourth pillar requires recurring annual budgetary allotments. Governments clearly recognize that evidence-based, contextually designed school health and nutrition programs can contribute to education sector goals. Moving into the post-2015 era, these programs can also help draw the last 10% of children into school and enhance their readiness to learn.

  14. Development and evaluation of an educational intervention program for pre-professional adolescent ballet dancers: nutrition for optimal performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doyle-Lucas, Ashley F; Davy, Brenda M

    2011-06-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to develop, implement, and evaluate a theoretically based nutritional education intervention through a DVD lecture series (three 30-minute classes) in summer intensive programs for pre-professional, adolescent ballet dancers. Objectives of this intervention program were to increase knowledge of basic sports nutrition principles and the Female Athlete Triad and promote self-efficacy for adopting healthier dietary habits. Dancers ranging from 13 to 18 years old who were attending summer intensive programs affiliated with professional ballet companies were recruited. Group One (n = 231) participated in the nutrition education program, while Group Two the control participants (n = 90) did not. Assessments of the participants' dietary status consisted of a demographic questionnaire, a Sports Nutrition Knowledge and Behavior Questionnaire, and a Food Frequency Questionnaire. The intervention group was assessed at baseline, immediately post-program, and at six weeks post-program. The control group was assessed at baseline and at six weeks post-baseline. The intervention program was effective at increasing nutrition knowledge, perceived susceptibility to the Female Athlete Triad, and self-efficacy constructs. Improvements in dietary intake were also observed among intervention group participants. To improve overall health and performance nutrition education should be incorporated into the training regimens of adolescent dancers. This potentially replicable DVD-based program may be an effective, low-cost mechanism for doing that.

  15. The Effect of Educational Package on Nutritional Knowledge and Behavior toward the Coping with Complication and Supplement Consumption

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S Mohammad Alizadeh chrnabi

    2013-07-01

    Background & aim: Proper nutrition is essential in the prevention and improvement of maternal problems and fetal health during pregnancy. The aim of this study was to determine the effect of nutrition education package on knowledge and nutritional behavior of pregnant women coping with problems and taking supplements during pregnancy. Methods: In the present clinical trial, a number of 88 pregnant women referred to health centers in Karaj, Iran, were selected and randomly divided into two groups (Intervention and control group. Two sessions of approximately 60 minutes including classes on nutrition during pregnancy was held for the intervention group using presentation, booklets, and educational film sex education with similar method was held for the control group. Data were collected through a questionnaire. The collected data was analyzed by analysis of variance with repeated measures analysis of covariance and logistic regression analyzes. Results: In the intervention group, in the field of knowledge dealing with problems during pregnancy and after the intervention supplements in two stages were significantly higher than the control group (p˂001. Scores in the intervention group in the field of nutritional problems during pregnancy included constipation, heartburn, swollen hands and feet, anemia and urinary tract infections during both stages of the intervention were better than the control group (p˂005. Iron and multivitamin supplementation in the intervention group during two phases after the intervention phase was better than the control group (p˂005. Conclusion: The content of educational package was evaluated as an appropriate policy in promoting nutritional knowledge and behavior among pregnant women. Key words: Education, knowledge behavior, nutritional supplements, pregnancy

  16. The Effect of Theory Based Nutritional Education on Fat Intake, Weight and Blood Lipids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamran, Aziz; Sharifirad, Gholamreza; Heydari, Heshmatolah; Sharifian, Elham

    2016-12-01

    Though Nutrition plays a key role in the control of hypertension, it is often forgotten in Iranian patients' diet. In fact, dietary behavior can be regarded as unsatisfactory among Iranian patients. This study was aimed to assess the effectiveness of theory based educational intervention on fat intake, weight, and blood lipids among rural hypertensive patients. This quasi experimental study was conducted on 138 hypertensive patients who had referred to Ardabil rural health centers during 2014. The nutritional education based on DASH and Health Promotion Model (HPM) was treated for six sessions. The pre-test and post-test had intervals of two and six months. Data were analyzed using SPSS-18 and Chi-square, independent-samples t-test, paired-samples t-test and repeated measure ANOVA. After treating intervention, weight, dietary fat, LDL_C and Total cholesterol, systolic and diastolic blood pressures decreased significantly in the intervention group compared with the control group (p Pender's health promotion model, affecting fat intake, blood lipids, and blood pressure, led to their decrease.

  17. Nutrition and education: a randomized trial of the effects of breakfast in rural primary school children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powell, C A; Walker, S P; Chang, S M; Grantham-McGregor, S M

    1998-10-01

    Hunger during school may prevent children in developing countries from benefiting from education. Although many countries have implemented school feeding programs, few programs have been rigorously evaluated. We conducted a randomized, controlled trial of giving breakfast to undernourished and adequately nourished children. The undernourished group comprised 407 children in grades 2-5 in 16 rural Jamaican schools (weights-for-age -1 SD). Both groups were stratified by class and school, then randomly assigned to breakfast or control groups. After the initial measurements, breakfast was provided every school day for 1 school year. Children in the control group were given one-quarter of an orange and the same amount of attention as children in the breakfast group. All children had their heights and weights measured and were given the Wide Range Achievement Test before and after the intervention. School attendance was taken from the schools' registers. Compared with the control group, height, weight, and attendance improved significantly in the breakfast group. Both groups made poor progress in Wide Range Achievement Test scores. Younger children in the breakfast group improved in arithmetic. There was no effect of nutritional group on the response to breakfast. In conclusion, the provision of a school breakfast produced small benefits in children's nutritional status, school attendance, and achievement. Greater improvements may occur in more undernourished populations; however, the massive problem of poor achievement levels requires integrated programs including health and educational inputs as well as school meals.

  18. European Society for Pediatric Gastroenterology Hepatology and Nutrition's Educational Offer and the Training Syllabus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maglione, Marco; Finizio, Daniela; Veres, Gabor; Pop, Tudor L; Continisio, Grazia I; Papadopoulou, Alexandra; Guarino, Alfredo

    2017-11-01

    The basic knowledge necessary for a European pediatric gastroenterologist/hepatologist/nutritionist is set-out in the training syllabus (TS) of the European Society for Pediatric Gastroenterology, Hepatology, and Nutrition (ESPGHAN). We retrospectively compared the topics covered in ESPGHAN's training events between 2013 and 2016 with the basic knowledge TS items. Thirty-six initiatives including e-learning were identified. Twelve (33%) courses focused on gastroenterology, 9 (25%) on hepatology, and 10 (28%) on nutrition. Five (14%) courses covered >1 field and were classified "General." The initiatives covered 12 of 57 (21%) TS items; 31 of 57 items (54%) were partially covered; and 14 of 57 (25%) not covered. Five of 9 e-learning courses covered gastroenterology topics, whereas none covered hepatology topics. ESPGHAN's 3-year educational offer partially met the training needs listed in the TS. A coordinated educational program covering all TS items would harmonize training within Europe and would provide trainees with a professional portfolio for employment purposes.

  19. Tailored nutrition education and food assistance improve adherence to HIV antiretroviral therapy: evidence from Honduras.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez, Homero; Palar, Kartika; Linnemayr, Sebastian; Smith, Alexandria; Derose, Kathryn Pitkin; Ramírez, Blanca; Farías, Hugo; Wagner, Glenn

    2014-10-01

    Food insecurity and malnutrition negatively affect adherence to antiretroviral therapy (ART) and are associated with poor HIV clinical outcomes. We examined the effect of providing household food assistance and nutrition education on ART adherence. A 12-month prospective clinical trial compared the effect of a monthly household food basket (FB) plus nutrition education (NE) versus NE alone on ART adherence on 400 HIV patients at four clinics in Honduras. Participants had been receiving ART for an average of 3.7 years and were selected because they had suboptimal adherence. Primary outcome measures were missed clinic appointments, delayed prescription refills, and self-reported missed doses of ART. These three adherence measures improved for both groups over 12 months (p < 0.01), mostly within 6 months. On-time prescription refills improved for the FB plus NE group by 19.6 % more than the group receiving NE alone after 6 months (p < 0.01), with no further change at 12 months. Change in missed appointments and self-reported missed ART doses did not significantly differ by intervention group.

  20. An educational video game for nutrition of young people: Theory and design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ledoux, Tracey; Griffith, Melissa; Thompson, Debbe; Nguyen, Nga; Watson, Kathy; Baranowski, Janice; Buday, Richard; Abdelsamad, Dina; Baranowski, Tom

    2016-01-01

    Background Playing Escape from DIAB (DIAB) and Nanoswarm (NANO), epic video game adventures, increased fruit and vegetable consumption among a multi-ethnic sample of 10–12 year old children during pilot testing. Key elements of both games were educational mini-games embedded in the overall game that promoted knowledge acquisition regarding diet, physical activity and energy balance. 95–100% of participants demonstrated mastery of these mini-games suggesting knowledge acquisition. Aim This article describes the process of designing and developing the educational mini-games. A secondary purpose was to explore the experience of children while playing the games. Method The educational games were based on Social Cognitive and Mastery Learning Theories. A multidisciplinary team of behavioral nutrition, PA, and video game experts designed, developed, and tested the mini-games. Results Alpha testing revealed children generally liked the mini-games and found them to be reasonably challenging. Process evaluation data from pilot testing revealed almost all participants completed nearly all educational mini-games in a reasonable amount of time suggesting feasibility of this approach. Conclusions Future research should continue to explore the use of video games in educating children to achieve healthy behavior changes. PMID:27547019

  1. Productivity and Time Use during Occupational Therapy and Nutrition/Dietetics Clinical Education: A Cohort Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodger, Sylvia; Stephens, Elizabeth; Clark, Michele; Ash, Susan; Hurst, Cameron; Graves, Nicholas

    2012-01-01

    Background Currently in the Australian higher education sector higher productivity from allied health clinical education placements is a contested issue. This paper will report results of a study that investigated output changes associated with occupational therapy and nutrition/dietetics clinical education placements in Queensland, Australia. Supervisors’ and students’ time use during placements and how this changes for supervisors compared to when students are not present in the workplace is also presented. Methodology/Principal Findings A cohort design was used with students from four Queensland universities, and their supervisors employed by Queensland Health. There was an increasing trend in the number of occasions of service delivered when the students were present, and a statistically significant increase in the daily mean length of occasions of service delivered during the placement compared to pre-placement levels. Conclusions/Significance A novel method for estimating productivity and time use changes during clinical education programs for allied health disciplines has been applied. During clinical education placements there was a net increase in outputs, suggesting supervisors engage in longer consultations with patients for the purpose of training students, while maintaining patient numbers. Other activities were reduced. This paper is the first time these data have been shown in Australia and form a sound basis for future assessments of the economic impact of student placements for allied health disciplines. PMID:22952964

  2. An educational video game for nutrition of young people: Theory and design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ledoux, Tracey; Griffith, Melissa; Thompson, Debbe; Nguyen, Nga; Watson, Kathy; Baranowski, Janice; Buday, Richard; Abdelsamad, Dina; Baranowski, Tom

    2016-08-01

    Playing Escape from DIAB (DIAB) and Nanoswarm (NANO) , epic video game adventures, increased fruit and vegetable consumption among a multi-ethnic sample of 10-12 year old children during pilot testing. Key elements of both games were educational mini-games embedded in the overall game that promoted knowledge acquisition regarding diet, physical activity and energy balance. 95-100% of participants demonstrated mastery of these mini-games suggesting knowledge acquisition. This article describes the process of designing and developing the educational mini-games. A secondary purpose was to explore the experience of children while playing the games. The educational games were based on Social Cognitive and Mastery Learning Theories. A multidisciplinary team of behavioral nutrition, PA, and video game experts designed, developed, and tested the mini-games. Alpha testing revealed children generally liked the mini-games and found them to be reasonably challenging. Process evaluation data from pilot testing revealed almost all participants completed nearly all educational mini-games in a reasonable amount of time suggesting feasibility of this approach. Future research should continue to explore the use of video games in educating children to achieve healthy behavior changes.

  3. Social Media as a Supplement to Face-to-Face Education: The Perspectives of Expanded Food and Nutrition Education Program Paraprofessionals and Graduates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elmer, Sarah R.; Harrison, Judy A.; da Silva, Vanessa R.

    2016-01-01

    Using social media is an inexpensive, innovative approach to supplementing direct education provided by the Expanded Food and Nutrition Education Program (EFNEP). Focus group research was conducted with EFNEP paraprofessionals (n = 33) and participants (n = 39) to inform the development of a social media presence for the program. Although…

  4. Evaluation of the effectiveness of a nutrition education intervention performed by primary school teachers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erminia Agozzino

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available

    Background: Long-term interventions based on the active involvement of students, carried out by properly prepared staff using didactic support material (brochures, games etc. including the participation/involvement of mothers or associates in community interventions; seem to be the most effective ones. This study evaluates the effectiveness of nutrition education interventions carried out by teachers with active didactic methodologies.

    Methods: The research was carried out by administering a frequency of food intake questionnaire, before and after the intervention. To compare the answers given before and after the educational intervention the Wilcoxon-test was applied to dependent data discriminating the group with “sufficient implementation” of the project versus “insufficient implementation”.

    Results: Our data demonstrates that a substantial percentage of children do not report an adequate nutritional intake, making education interventions not only opportune but necessary. In both groups there was an increase in the number of subjects having breakfast, particularly in terms of bread and biscuits intake. In the group with “sufficient implementation” there was an increase in the intake of all kinds of food with respect to the previous day’s intake and a decrease in the intake of meat, fish and legumes consumed during the previous week; in the group with “insufficient implementation” only fish intake increased significantly while vegetable intake decreased in a non-significant way. So this educational intervention appears to have been particularly effective in modifying breakfast habits and reducing snack.

  5. Evaluation of the content regarding nutrition education on catering services websites: pilot study in the educational environment

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    Nuria Rico-Sapena

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: To analyze websites quality of catering companies for schools as well as their content in nutrition food education, and to have a first experience with the assessment tool EDALCAT.Material and methods: This is a descriptive cross-sectional study. The study population are the websites of catering companies entrusted with the management of school canteens. The sample was obtained using Google search engine and a ranking of major catering companies financial, choosing those that had websites. Ten websites were selected for a pilot test according to geographic proximity to the city of Alicante and their total revenue. A homemade questionnaire (EDALCAT was designed in order to evaluate the websites. This questionnaire is composed of a block of predictors of quality with 19 variables for reliability, design and navigation; and a second block of specific contents about food education with 19 variables for content and educational activities.Results: Positive results have been obtained in 31 out of 38 questionnaire variables, except for the items: “Search engine”, “Language” (40% and “Help” (10% in the predictors of the quality block; and in the items: “Workshops”, “Recipe book”, “Web nutrition-food” (40% and “Examples” (30% in the specific contents of the food education block. All the evaluated websites exceed 50% of compliance with the quality criteria and with the minimum contents in food education, and only one of them, fails the minimum level of activity established.Conclusions: The predictors of quality and the specific content in food education were successful in all evaluated websites. Most of them got a high score in their assessment, and in their analysis of individual blocks. After the pilot study, EDALCAT questionnaire has been amended and the final EDALCAT has been obtained. Generally speaking, EDALCAT seems appropriate for evaluating the quality of catering companies websites and their content

  6. Realist synthesis of educational interventions to improve nutrition care competencies and delivery by doctors and other healthcare professionals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mogre, Victor; Scherpbier, Albert J J A; Stevens, Fred; Aryee, Paul; Cherry, Mary Gemma; Dornan, Tim

    2016-01-01

    Objective To determine what, how, for whom, why, and in what circumstances educational interventions improve the delivery of nutrition care by doctors and other healthcare professionals work. Design Realist synthesis following a published protocol and reported following Realist and Meta-narrative Evidence Synthesis: Evolving Standards (RAMESES) guidelines. A multidisciplinary team searched MEDLINE, CINAHL, ERIC, EMBASE, PsyINFO, Sociological Abstracts, Web of Science, Google Scholar and Science Direct for published and unpublished (grey) literature. The team identified studies with varied designs; appraised their ability to answer the review question; identified relationships between contexts, mechanisms and outcomes (CMOs); and entered them into a spreadsheet configured for the purpose. The final synthesis identified commonalities across CMO configurations. Results Over half of the 46 studies from which we extracted data originated from the USA. Interventions that improved the delivery of nutrition care improved skills and attitudes rather than just knowledge; provided opportunities for superiors to model nutrition care; removed barriers to nutrition care in health systems; provided participants with local, practically relevant tools and messages; and incorporated non-traditional, innovative teaching strategies. Operating in contexts where student and qualified healthcare professionals provided nutrition care in developed and developing countries, these interventions yielded health outcomes by triggering a range of mechanisms, which included feeling competent, feeling confident and comfortable, having greater self-efficacy, being less inhibited by barriers in healthcare systems and feeling that nutrition care was accepted and recognised. Conclusions These findings show how important it is to move education for nutrition care beyond the simple acquisition of knowledge. They show how educational interventions embedded within systems of healthcare can improve

  7. Health Educators and Nutrition Education: Food for Thought--A Commentary

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Rourke, Thomas; Iammarino, Nicholas

    2012-01-01

    As health educators involved in their profession, as members of their professional organizations, and as authors, reviewers, and members of various professional journal editorial boards, and along with involvement with professional preparation programs, the authors' interest was piqued by the journal article titled, "What About Health Educators?…

  8. Researching the Gap between Foodstuff’s Attractiveness and Real Nutritional Profile – Prerequisite for Strengthening Nutrition Education and Consumer Rights Protection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bogdan Cristian Onete

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Consumer`s health protection has become a major concern of global public policies, given that overweight and obesity have alarmingly increased, particularly among children and teens. The paper addresses one of the current problems caused by globalization, namely the obvious tendency of young people to choose food products based on organoleptic features and to disregard nutritional quality, with negative consequences on health. An exploratory marketing research was conducted among students for identifying the perceived importance of the sensorial dimension of food products and understanding key dimensions of buying decision process among youth. SAIN–LIM method was used to determine the nutritional profile of foodstuffs with special organoleptic features. Research results clearly show that in industrial foodstuff there is a gap between product attractiveness, which is based on exceptional sensorial properties, perceived by young consumers and real nutritional value of foods, which frequently translates into unbalanced nutritional profiles. To have a balanced diet and a healthy lifestyle, young consumers need to be informed that a tasty and good looking foodstuff is not necessarily healthy. Youth need to be properly educated in order to understand the close relationship between diet, weight and health and to develop a responsible food consumption behavior.

  9. Challenges to parent nutrition education: a qualitative study of parents of urban children attending low-income schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slusser, Wendelin; Prelip, Michael; Kinsler, Janni; Erausquin, Jennifer Toller; Thai, Chan; Neumann, Charlotte

    2011-10-01

    The present study was undertaken to learn more about parents' (i) knowledge regarding healthy foods, factors associated with food purchasing and preparation, and current nutrition education resources, (ii) barriers to and promoters for establishing healthy eating habits for children and families, and (iii) interest in participating in nutrition interventions. Focus group interviews were conducted with parents of low-income children from the Los Angeles Unified School District (LAUSD). LAUSD Title 1 elementary schools where 50 % or more of students are eligible for free/reduced-price meals. Sixty-four parents (93 % female; 84 % Hispanic/Latino) of elementary-school students. The most common barriers to eating healthy foods were cost, difficulty in getting children to eat healthier foods and easy access to fast food. Parents had a basic knowledge about what foods are healthy and received most of their nutrition education through the media. Parents expressed a desire for nutrition classes and almost all of them said they would attend a nutrition programme at their child's school. Topic areas of interest included what to purchase, how to cook healthier foods, how to encourage their children to eat healthier and how to read food labels. Parents also requested classes that engage the whole family, especially fathers. Parents in our study were interested in participating in nutrition education programmes. The information from these focus groups was used to design a parent nutrition education programme especially designed to respond to the needs of the LAUSD parents, the majority of whom are low-income and Hispanic/Latino.

  10. Water Use in Wisconsin, 2005

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buchwald, Cheryl A.

    2009-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Wisconsin Water Science Center is responsible for presenting data collected or estimated for water withdrawals and diversions every 5 years to the National Water-Use Information Program (NWUIP). This program serves many purposes such as quantifying how much, where, and for what purpose water is used; tracking and documenting water-use trends and changes; and providing these data to other agencies to support hydrologic projects. In 2005, data at both the county and subbasin levels were compiled into the USGS national water-use database system; these data are published in a statewide summary report and a national circular. This publication, Water Use in Wisconsin, 2005, presents the water-use estimates for 2005; this publication also describes how these water-use data were determined (including assumptions used), limitations of using these data, and trends in water-use data presented to the NWUIP. Estimates of water use in Wisconsin indicate that about 8,608 million gallons per day (Mgal/d) were withdrawn during 2005. Of this amount, about 7,622 Mgal/d (89 percent) were from surface-water sources and about 986 Mgal/d (11 percent) were from ground-water sources. Surface water used for cooling at thermoelectric-power plants constituted the largest portion of daily use at 6,898 Mgal/d. Water provided by public-supply water utilities is the second largest use of water and totaled 552 Mgal/d. Public supply served approximately 71 percent of the estimated 2005 Wisconsin population of 5.54 million people; two counties - Milwaukee and Dane - accounted for more than one-third of the public-supply withdrawal. Industrial and irrigation were the next major water uses at 471 and 402 Mgal/d, respectively. Non-irrigational agricultural (livestock and aquaculture) accounted for approximately 155 Mgal/d and is similar to the combined withdrawal for the remaining water-use categories of domestic, commercial, and mining (131 Mgal/d). Data on water use

  11. The effectiveness of nutritional education on the knowledge of diabetic patients using the health belief model

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    Gholamreza Sharifirad

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available

    • BACKGROUND: Patients have a major role in the control and treatment of type 2 diabetes. So, knowledge of different aspects of this disease especially diet therapy is very important for these patients. This study was conducted to determine the effectiveness of the Health Belief Model (HBM on nutrition education in type 2 diabetic patients.
    • METHOD: Eighty eight type 2 diabetic patients attending Iranian Diabetes Association seminars were randomly selected to participate in the study (44 in intervention group and 44 in control group. The intervention was consisted of two educational sessions each one for 80 minutes. Data were collected by a validated and reliable questionnaire (58 questions before intervention and one month after intervention.
    • RESULTS: After intervention, knowledge scores increased in the intervention group compared to the control group (Mean differences in the intervention and test group: 22.68 ± 15.90 vs - 2.27 ± 17.30, P < 0.001. Perceived susceptibility increased significantly in the intervention group compared to the control group (27.5 ± 18.5 vs 3.9 ± 17.2, P < 0.001. The result was the same for perceived severity, perceived threatened and perceived benefits (P < 0.001. In contrast perceived barriers reduced in the intervention group compared to the control diet (-14.7 ± 13.3 vs 0.9 ± 13.9, P < 0.001. In the intervention group, behavior grades increased more than control group (34.61 ± 14.93 vs -0.23 ± 8.52, P < 0.001.
    • CONCLUSION: The efficacy of the health belief model in nutritional education to the diabetic patients was confirmed in the present study.

  12. Food safety and sustainable nutrition workshops: educational experiences for primary school children in Turin, Italy

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    Amaranta Traversa

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available European control and prevention policies are focused to guarantee a high level of protection of consumers’ health. Foodborne diseases as obesity, diabetes, food allergy, and food-borne outbreaks are increasing. To prevent food-borne diseases, it is fundamental to involve consumers, in particular children, in educational experiences aimed to learn the proper behaviours to be applied. In this context, we designed and performed 5 educational workshops about food safety, hidden allergens in food and nutrition aimed to involve children attending primary and summer school. These experiences let us collect observations about children knowledge and behaviours. From May to October 2015, a total of 1708 children aged 6 to 11 years joined our workshops. Children were involved in listening activities, laboratory experiments, handling games and sensory experiences. All participants were familiar with food allergy and were interested to know how to behave with allergic people. Children showed great curiosity in discovering that many foods normally contain live bacteria. Less than 25% of children reported to skip breakfast, to have it watching TV or to spend few minutes for it. Many of them (>75% thought that fruits and vegetables are all year-round available and are not related to a specific period. Very few participants (<25% knew that freezing is the treatment to be applied to make fresh fish safe from parasites. Children involved in food safety and nutrition educational experiences have the opportunity to increase their awareness about the correct behaviours to prevent food-borne diseases and to improve their own critical thinking about food consumption.

  13. [Level of education comparing to eating behaviours and anthropometrical indicators of nutritional status among men of Cracovian population].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gacek, Maria; Chrzanowska, Maria

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to estimate of educating level effect as one indicator of social status on eating behaviours and anthropometrical parameters of nutritional status in professionally active men aged 20-60 at city environment. The research was conducted into 1320 workers of Tadeusz Sendzimir's Steelworks in Cracov. The research tool was the author's questionnaire which included questions about meal consumption regularity and frequency of consuming selected groups of foodstuffs. The indicators of nutritional status were fixed on the base of anthropometrical measurements, whereas the body content was estimated by method of bioimpendation with the use of electronic scales TBF-300P. Differentiation of some eating behaviours depending on the level of education was proved; but one cannot definitely estimate the relation of these parameters, as the higher educated people aged 40-60 years old more frequently declare two meal style of eating and more often consume confectionery than the lower educated; in turn vocationally educated men aged 20-40 more often declare consuming fast food products. Statistically considerable differentiation in some anthropometrical indicators of nutritional status depending of the level of education among men aged 40-60 was also proved. Men of vocational education are characterized by the highest value of WHR indicator but at the same time lower value of the 4 skin-fatty folds sum than higher educated people.

  14. The Cultural Nature of Valued Skills: A Qualitative Investigation of Postsecondary Science Education and the "Skills Gap" in Wisconsin. WCER Working Paper No. 2016-06

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benbow, Ross J.; Hora, Matthew T.

    2016-01-01

    The narrative of the "skills gap," or the notion that the United States economy suffers because employers are not able to find job applicants with workplace-ready skills (e.g., American Society for Training and Development 2012), has become an influential rallying cry in higher education funding circles in recent years. It is with these…

  15. From Mustard Seed to Harvest: Social Studies Education and Teaching about Women in the Global Community. A Report of a Wingspread Conference (Racine, Wisconsin, August 1988).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobus, Doni Kwolek; Rojas, Mary Hill

    Focusing upon the need for gender-balance in global education and the need to develop strategies that affect teaching materials, teacher training, and school curricula, the first section of this report describes how the conference was conceived and planned, lists overall objectives, and notes the general character of the participants. The second…

  16. Effectiveness of Educational Programs on Nutritional Behavior in Addicts Referring to Baharan Hospital, Zahedan (Eastern of IR Iran).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karajibani, Mansour; Montazerifar, Farzaneh; Dashipour, Alireza; Lashkaripour, Kobra; Abery, Maryam; Salari, Sajedeh

    2014-06-01

    There are many factors which affect nutritional status of addicted such as lack o f knowledge, incorrect attitude toward modification of food pattern, and careless to food intake. The aim of this study was to determine the effectiveness of educational program on nutritional behavior in addicts referring to Baharan hospital in Zahedan. Thirty-six addict patients were selected randomly. After recording general demographic data of patients, nutritional behaviors were determined. To determine the effectiveness of nutritional educational program, pre and post-tests were performed. Evaluation of nutritional behavior was determined as poor, fair and satisfactory levels. Statically analysis was performed by SPSS software. Most addict patients had a medium level of education. Improvement in knowledge, attitude and practice (KAP) of patients after intervention was observed as follows; decreasing KAP in poor level (2.8% vs. 30.6%), (3% vs. 50%), (25% vs. 80.6%), respectively; also, increasing KAP in fair level (7% vs. 55.6 %), (15% vs. 15%), (19% vs. 7%), respectively and increasing KAP in satisfactory levels (77.8% vs. 13.8%), (50% vs. 8.3%), and (22.2% vs. 0%), respectively (P education level after education (P nutritional KAP was improved in addicts. After intervention, there was a significant difference in the score of knowledge, attitude, and practice scores in patients in the current study. KAP was improved in patients after intervention including; decreased KAP in poor level and increased KAP in fair and satisfactory levels. This finding indicates that addict patients would like to modify their life style.

  17. Improving mobility for Wisconsin's elderly : brief.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-01

    By 2035, the number of elderly residents in Wisconsin is expected to nearly double, and one in four drivers on Wisconsin roads will be elderly. According to national statistics, the elderly are more likely to be involved in crashes on a per-mile basi...

  18. Maternal education and micro-geographic disparities in nutritional status among school-aged children in rural northwestern China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Cuili; Kane, Robert L; Xu, Dongjuan; Li, Lingui; Guan, Weihua; Li, Hui; Meng, Qingyue

    2013-01-01

    Prior evidence suggests geographic disparities in the effect of maternal education on child nutritional status between countries, between regions and between urban and rural areas. We postulated its effect would also vary by micro-geographic locations (indicated by mountain areas, plain areas and the edge areas) in a Chinese minority area. A cross-sectional study was conducted with a multistage random sample of 1474 school children aged 5-12 years in Guyuan, China. Child nutritional status was measured by height-for-age z scores (HAZ). Linear mixed models were used to examine its association with place of residence and maternal education. Micro-geographic disparities in child nutritional status and the level of socioeconomic composition were found. Children living in mountain areas had poorer nutritional status, even after adjusting for demographic (plain versus mountain, β = 0.16, P = 0.033; edge versus mountain, β = 0.29, P = 0.002) and socioeconomic factors (plain versus mountain, β = 0.12, P = 0.137; edge versus mountain, β = 0.25, P = 0.009). The disparities significantly widened with increasing years of mothers' schooling (maternal education*plain versus mountain: β = 0.06, P = 0.007; maternal education*edge versus mountain: β = 0.07, P = 0.005). Moreover, the association between maternal education and child nutrition was negative (β = -0.03, P = 0.056) in mountain areas but positive in plain areas (β = 0.02, P = 0.094) or in the edge areas (β = 0.04, P = 0.055). Micro-geographic disparities in child nutritional status increase with increasing level of maternal education and the effect of maternal education varies by micro-geographic locations, which exacerbates child health inequity. Educating rural girls alone is not sufficient; improving unfavorable conditions in mountain areas might make such investments more effective in promoting child health. Nutrition programs targeting to the least educated groups in plain and in edge areas would be

  19. Can an Educational Intervention Improve Iodine Nutrition Status in Pregnant Women? A Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amiri, Parisa; Hamzavi Zarghani, Najmeh; Nazeri, Pantea; Ghofranipour, Fazlollah; Karimi, Mehrdad; Amouzegar, Atieh; Mirmiran, Parvin; Azizi, Fereidoun

    2017-03-01

    Because of their increased need for iodine, pregnant women are among the high-risk groups for iodine deficiency. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of an educational program on the iodine nutrition status of pregnant women. In this randomized controlled trial, 100 pregnant women were randomly selected from five healthcare centers in the southern region of Tehran, the capital of Iran. In the intervention group, pregnant women received a four-month educational program, which included two face-to-face educational sessions, using a researcher-designed educational pamphlet in the second and third trimesters, and two follow-up telephone calls. Knowledge, attitude, and practice (KAP) scores, urinary iodine concentration (UIC), and salt iodine content were assessed at baseline and four months after the intervention. At baseline, there were significant associations between knowledge and attitude (r = 0.38, p = 0.03) between practice and UIC (r = 0.28, p = 0.01) and between UIC and iodine content of salt (r = 0.24, p = 0.009). Although a significant difference was found in mean KAP scores between the two groups after the educational intervention, scores were significantly higher in the intervention group compared with controls (p educational intervention increasing KAP among women regarding the importance of iodine and iodized salt consumption during pregnancy, their iodine status did not improve. Considering the main socio-environmental determinants of iodine deficiency, in particular, the monitoring of salt fortification, prescribing iodine containing supplements as well as improving health literacy in pregnant women seem essential strategies.

  20. Online nutrition and T2DM continuing medical education course launched on state-level medical association.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hicks, Kristen K; Murano, Peter S

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this research study was to determine whether a 1-hour online continuing medical education (CME) course focused on nutrition for type 2 diabetes would result in a gain in nutrition knowledge by practicing physicians. A practicing physician and dietitian collaborated to develop an online CME course (both webinar and self-study versions) on type 2 diabetes. This 1-hour accredited course was launched through the state-level medical association's education library, available to all physicians. Physicians (n=43) registered for the course, and of those, 31 completed the course in its entirety. A gain in knowledge was found when comparing pre- versus post-test scores related to the online nutrition CME ( P Online CME courses launched via state-level medical associations offer convenient continuing education to assist practicing physicians in addressing patient nutrition and lifestyle concerns related to chronic disease. The present diabetes CME one-credit course allowed physicians to develop basic nutrition care concepts on this topic to assist patients in a better way.

  1. Nutritional and eating education improves knowledge and practice of patients with type 2 diabetes concerning dietary intake and blood glucose control in an outlying city of China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Huan; Song, Zhenfeng; Ba, Yanhui; Zhu, Lin; Wen, Ying

    2014-10-01

    To describe the knowledge, attitudes and practices of type 2 diabetics in Yakeshi City and to assess the effect of implementation of nutritional and eating education in enhancing knowledge and practices regarding a healthy diet. A questionnaire-based survey was conducted with 162 diabetics to determine their nutrition knowledge, attitudes and practices; fifty-four participants received nutritional and eating education for 6 months. Diabetes-related nutrition knowledge, awareness, practice accuracy, dietary intake and glycaemic control were assessed before and after education. Yakeshi, a remote city in northern China. A total of 162 type 2 diabetics recruited from three hospitals, fifty-four of whom were selected randomly to receive education. Among the 162 respondents, most diabetics (75%) considered that controlling diet was important in the methods of controlling blood glucose. Scores for knowledge, practices and overall KAP (knowledge-attitude-practice) were low, but scores for attitude were high. Participants with diabetes education experiences, practice duration over 1 year or high education level all had higher scores for KAP (P education, patients' nutrition knowledge, awareness and practice accuracy improved significantly (P nutrition knowledge and practices. Nutritional and eating education was effective in improving diabetics' nutrition knowledge and practices, and this optimal practice helped them control blood glucose effectively.

  2. Aligning and Elevating University-Based Low-Income Nutrition Education through the Land-Grant University Cooperative Extension System. National Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Connie

    2014-01-01

    The nation's Land-Grant University Cooperative Extension System (LGU-CES) is committed to ensuring that low-income populations have a safe, affordable, and healthy food supply. Two low-income nutrition education programs that are core to this commitment are the Expanded Food and Nutrition Education Program (EFNEP) and the Supplemental Nutrition…

  3. Lessons Learned from the Development and Implementation of a Parent Nutrition Education Program with Low-Income Latina Mothers in an Urban School District Setting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thai, Chan Le; Prelip, Michael; Erausquin, Jennifer Toller; Slusser, Wendelin

    2012-01-01

    This article describes the steps involved in the development and implementation of a parent nutrition education workshop series for a low-income, primarily Spanish-speaking population in an urban school district setting. Overall, those parents who participated in the nutrition education workshops showed positive changes in their knowledge,…

  4. The Utility of the Memorable Messages Framework as an Intermediary Evaluation Tool for Fruit and Vegetable Consumption in a Nutrition Education Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, LaShara A.; Morgan, Susan E.; Mobley, Amy R.

    2016-01-01

    Additional strategies to evaluate the impact of community nutrition education programs on low-income individuals are needed. The objective of this qualitative study was to examine the use of the Memorable Messages Framework as an intermediary nutrition education program evaluation tool to determine what fruit and vegetable messages were reported…

  5. Job Satisfaction and Retention of Community Nutrition Educators: The Importance of Perceived Value of the Program, Consultative Supervision, and Work Relationships

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dickin, Katherine L.; Dollahite, Jamie S.; Habicht, Jean-Pierre

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To investigate how paraprofessional Community Nutrition Educators' (CNEs') perceptions of work context relate to job satisfaction and intention to leave the position. Design: Cross-sectional statewide survey of program personnel. Setting: Expanded Food and Nutrition Education Program (EFNEP) sites (n = 32) serving low- income families…

  6. Examining Internet Access and Social Media Application Use for Online Nutrition Education in SNAP-Ed Participants in Rural Illinois.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loehmer, Emily; Smith, Sylvia; McCaffrey, Jennifer; Davis, Jeremy

    2018-01-01

    To examine Internet access and interest in receiving nutrition education via social media applications among low-income adults participating in the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program Education (SNAP-Ed). A cross-sectional survey was distributed during 25 SNAP-Ed classes throughout the 16 southernmost counties of Illinois. From 188 responses, the majority of participants had Internet access (76%). Among participants aged 18-32 years (n = 51), 92% owned a smartphone with Internet access and 57% indicated that they would use online nutrition education, with most interest in e-mail (41%), Facebook (40%), and text messaging (35%). There was little interest in using blogs, Vine, Twitter, Tumblr, and Pinterest. Overall, 49% of middle-aged adults aged 33-64 years and 87% of seniors aged ≥65 years reported they would not use online nutrition education. Results indicated similar Internet accessibility in southern Illinois among low-income populations compared with national rural rates. Interest in using online nutrition education varied among SNAP-Ed participants according to age. Young adults appeared to be the most captive audience regarding online nutrition education. Results may be useful to agencies implementing SNAP-Ed to supplement current curriculum with online nutrition education for audiences aged ≤32 years. Copyright © 2017 Society for Nutrition Education and Behavior. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Effects of combined physical education and nutritional programs on schoolchildren’s healthy habits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallotta, Maria Chiara; Iazzoni, Sara; Emerenziani, Gian Pietro; Meucci, Marco; Migliaccio, Silvia; Guidetti, Laura

    2016-01-01

    Background. A multidisciplinary approach seems to be effective in creating healthy habits in children. The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of three 5-month combined physical education (PE) and nutritional interventions on body composition, physical activity (PA) level, sedentary time and eating habits of schoolchildren. Methods. Anthropometric data, weekly PA level, sedentary time and eating habits of 230 healthy students were analysed using a repeated-measures ANOVA with Group (experimental group 1 vs experimental group 2 vs control group), Adiposity Status (under fat vs normal fat vs obese), and Time (pre vs post) as factors. Results. Body fat mass percentage increased after intervention (18.92 ± 8.61% vs 19.40 ± 8.51%) in all groups. The weekly PA level significantly increased after intervention in both experimental groups. Sedentary time significantly decreased after the intervention period (565.70 ± 252.93 vs 492.10 ± 230.97 min/week, p study revealed the effectiveness of a combined PE and nutritional intervention to improve children’s healthful dietary practices and to encourage an active lifestyle. However, it needs a further appropriate development to establish patterns of healthful dietary practices that encourage an active lifestyle with which to maintain healthy habits through life. PMID:27077004

  8. Effects of combined physical education and nutritional programs on schoolchildren's healthy habits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallotta, Maria Chiara; Iazzoni, Sara; Emerenziani, Gian Pietro; Meucci, Marco; Migliaccio, Silvia; Guidetti, Laura; Baldari, Carlo

    2016-01-01

    Background. A multidisciplinary approach seems to be effective in creating healthy habits in children. The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of three 5-month combined physical education (PE) and nutritional interventions on body composition, physical activity (PA) level, sedentary time and eating habits of schoolchildren. Methods. Anthropometric data, weekly PA level, sedentary time and eating habits of 230 healthy students were analysed using a repeated-measures ANOVA with Group (experimental group 1 vs experimental group 2 vs control group), Adiposity Status (under fat vs normal fat vs obese), and Time (pre vs post) as factors. Results. Body fat mass percentage increased after intervention (18.92 ± 8.61% vs 19.40 ± 8.51%) in all groups. The weekly PA level significantly increased after intervention in both experimental groups. Sedentary time significantly decreased after the intervention period (565.70 ± 252.93 vs 492.10 ± 230.97 min/week, p study revealed the effectiveness of a combined PE and nutritional intervention to improve children's healthful dietary practices and to encourage an active lifestyle. However, it needs a further appropriate development to establish patterns of healthful dietary practices that encourage an active lifestyle with which to maintain healthy habits through life.

  9. Dairy intake and related self-regulation improved in college students using online nutrition education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poddar, Kavita H; Hosig, Kathy W; Anderson-Bill, Eileen S; Nickols-Richardson, Sharon M; Duncan, Susan E

    2012-12-01

    Dairy intake by college students is markedly lower than recommendations. Interventions to improve dairy intake based on Social Cognitive Theory (SCT) have potential to successfully change behavior by improving mediators that influence dietary choices. We aimed to use SCT to improve social support, self-efficacy, outcome expectations, self-regulation, and behavior related to dairy intake in college students. We conducted a randomized nutrition education intervention. Participants included 211 college students (mean age 20.2 ± 0.1 years; 63% women and 37% men) recruited from a university campus. Participants in the intervention group (n=107) and comparison group (n=104) received an 8-week dairy intake or stress management intervention, respectively, via electronic mail. Data collection included dairy intake from 7-day food records and SCT variables from questionnaires administered during January 2008 and April 2008. Changes in dairy intake and SCT variables (ie, social support, self-efficacy, outcome expectations, and self-regulation). Multivariate analysis of covariance, with age and sex as covariates (Peducation via electronic mail based on an SCT model improved total dairy intake and self-regulation. Participants reported increased dairy intake and better use of self-regulation strategies. Future interventions should focus on benefits of consuming low-fat vs higher-fat dairy foods. Copyright © 2012 Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Self-Efficacy and Nutrition Education: A Study of the Effect of an Intervention with Faith Community Nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gotwals, Beth

    2018-02-01

    The faith community provides an important access point for practice focused on population health at a time when health issues such as obesity and overweight are affecting large number of Americans. The purpose of this study was to examine faith community nurses' self-efficacy perceptions following a nutrition educational intervention. A convenience sample of 92 faith community nurses were randomly assigned to experimental and control groups. The t-distribution analysis revealed significant differences between the nutrition knowledge self-efficacy (p = .016) and nutrition counseling self-efficacy (p = .010) post-test scores for the experimental and control groups. This type of educational intervention provides a model to be used with faith community nurses as they integrate faith and health in this setting.

  11. The need to advance nutrition education in the training of health care professionals and recommended research to evaluate implementation and effectiveness1234

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kris-Etherton, Penny M; Akabas, Sharon R; Bales, Connie W; Bistrian, Bruce; Braun, Lynne; Edwards, Marilyn S; Laur, Celia; Lenders, Carine M; Levy, Matthew D; Palmer, Carole A; Pratt, Charlotte A; Ray, Sumantra; Rock, Cheryl L; Saltzman, Edward; Seidner, Douglas L; Van Horn, Linda

    2014-01-01

    Nutrition is a recognized determinant in 3 (ie, diseases of the heart, malignant neoplasms, cerebrovascular diseases) of the top 4 leading causes of death in the United States. However, many health care providers are not adequately trained to address lifestyle recommendations that include nutrition and physical activity behaviors in a manner that could mitigate disease development or progression. This contributes to a compelling need to markedly improve nutrition education for health care professionals and to establish curricular standards and requisite nutrition and physical activity competencies in the education, training, and continuing education for health care professionals. This article reports the present status of nutrition and physical activity education for health care professionals, evaluates the current pedagogic models, and underscores the urgent need to realign and synergize these models to reflect evidence-based and outcomes-focused education. PMID:24717343

  12. Effect of integrated school-based nutrition education on optimal dietary practices and nutritional status of school adolescents in Southwest of Ethiopia: a quasi-experimental study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamiru, Dessalegn; Argaw, Alemayehu; Gerbaba, Mulusew; Ayana, Girmay; Nigussie, Aderajew; Belachew, Tefera

    2016-12-15

    Malnutrition and infection are major barriers to educational access and achievement in low-income countries and also work in conjunction with each other in deteriorating wellness and productivity of school adolescents. A quasi-experimental design was used to evaluate the effectiveness of school-based nutrition education using a peer-led approach, health promotion through school media and health clubs. Data were collected at baseline, midline and end line from sampled participants. To account for the effect of time trend, the difference was measured using a repeated measure analysis. Variables that have p≤0.25 in the bivariate analyses were entered into multivariables to determine the independent effect of interventions. There is a significant difference in food variety between food secure and insecure households (pnutrition education programs should be a part of comprehensive school health programs to reach the students and potentially their families.

  13. Impact Of Nutrition Education On Urral School Children Of Burdwan, West Bengal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Biswas A.B

    1991-01-01

    Full Text Available A nutrition education programme was conducted for 324 children of two (boys and girls Secondary schools in a village of Burdwan district. Lesson plans and evaluation parameters were formulated based on pre- determined learning objectives. The main methods of training were lectures and discussions using simple and relevant aids. Impact of training was evaluated by pre- training and post- training assessments of knowledge, attitude and dietary practice of students. Results revealed that poor pre- training mean score of knowledge was increased significantly following training but declined thereafter, although final mean score was significantly higher than basal knowledge status. Mean score of attitude also increased significantly but did not decline. Inconsistency of results regarding change in dietary practices observed was recognized as a short coming of isolated training of children only, because dietary habit of a community depends on various factors.

  14. Effectiveness of a Nutrition Education Program to Improve Children's Chewing Habits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Nanae; Hayashi, Fumi; Yoshiike, Nobuo

    2016-01-01

    This quasi-experimental study determined whether the nutrition education program we developed to promote chewing food properly influenced children's chewing habits successfully. Four kindergarten classes in Japan (150 children, aged 5-6 years) were studied; one class received the educational program in the classroom and at home (Group A) and three classes received the program in the classroom only (Group B). The educational program was integrated into the classes' daily curriculum for five weeks. It included storytelling with large picture books, chewing consciously while eating lunch, singing a song with gestures, and greetings before and after meals (both groups). Group A also used a paper textbook and was provided information by the leaflet to encourage guardians to implement the program at home. Chewing habits before and after intervention were evaluated: (1) guardians completed seven questionnaire items related to chewing habits and chewing movement and (2) the number of chews and time spent eating the test meal were measured by a portable chewing sensor. Both approaches improved the children's chewing habits; however, no difference was found between the two groups. We concluded that this intervention could be used to improve chewing habits in young children even without active involvement of their guardians.

  15. Process evaluation of an environmental and educational nutrition intervention in residential drug-treatment facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cowan, Jennifer A; Devine, Carol M

    2012-07-01

    To evaluate the implementation of a controlled, 6-week, environmental and educational intervention to improve dietary intake and body composition, and to study the association of implementation fidelity with diet and body composition outcomes. A process evaluation documented participation, dose of nutrition education delivered, participant satisfaction, fidelity and completeness of the food environment intervention implementation, and context through observations and interviews with staff and residents. Intervention sites were scored and categorized as high or low participation and implementation and compared on essential elements of the food environment and on diet and body composition outcomes. Six urban residential drug-treatment facilities in Upstate New York. Fifty-five primarily black and white men in residential drug-treatment programmes. Participants were exposed to 94 % and 69 % of the educational and environmental elements, respectively. High implementation sites were significantly more likely to provide water and 100 % juice, offer fruit or vegetable salad, offer choices of fruits and vegetables, and limit fried foods. Mixed-model analysis of covariance revealed that participants in the high participation and implementation sites reported greater reductions in total energy, percentage of energy from sweets, daily servings of fats, oils and sweets, and BMI over the intervention period. Participants in low participation and implementation sites reported greater reductions in percentage of energy from fat. Differential implementation of environmental elements limited the intervention impact. These findings document the contribution of changes in eating environments to facilitate dietary behaviour change in community residential substance-abuse settings.

  16. Content analysis of nutritional information in paediatric oral health education leaflets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amit Arora

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The aim of this study was to determine if paediatric oral health education leaflets with a food and nutritional focus provide messages that are clear and consistent with the current Australian Dietary Guidelines and the Infant Feeding Guidelines. Methods Forty-three leaflets aimed at parents were sourced from Australian state and territory Health Departments, oral health industry partners and commercial organisations, and a content analysis was performed. Recommendations on food and drink type, consumption frequency and general diet and nutrition advice were considered and cross-referenced with the Australian Dietary Guidelines and the Infant Feeding Guidelines to identify areas of consistency and discrepancy. Results Twenty leaflets recommended reducing the consumption of sugary and/or acidic food, while 23 leaflets recommended reducing the consumption of sugary and/or acidic drinks. The majority of the leaflets advised water (n = 35 and milk (n = 23 to drink. Although 33 leaflets encouraged a healthy diet, seven of these did not specify what a healthy diet was. Twenty-eight leaflets provided early childhood-related (0–2 years feeding advice. Confusing messages were found in nine leaflets, with ambiguous recommendations that were open to individual interpretation. Conclusions There were some inconsistencies between the leaflets and the dietary and infant feeding guidelines in Australia; and across the leaflets, as not all important messages were included in any one leaflet. Government Health Departments and other relevant agencies should ensure that advisory messages regarding diet, particularly those with dental implications, are clear, complete and consistent across all dental educational leaflets.

  17. [Effectiveness of a nutritional education program in lowering blood cholesterol levels in a public health center].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seki, M; Yamaguchi, T

    1993-06-01

    An educational program for persons found to have high blood cholesterol during health examinations at the Nerima Public Health Center was begun in April, 1989. This program was differed from the usual program in two areas. First, new educational material was developed consisting of a check list of 30 items to assess eating patterns. By checking these items, participants could gain an understanding of what they should change in their eating behavior. Secondly, the table of restricted foods was not used. Participants were advised to achieve healthy eating patterns and followed up with a nutritional consultation that was held after three months, at which time they were interviewed regarding compliance and had their blood cholesterol levels measured. The effectiveness of the new educational program and the relationship between achievement of healthy eating patterns and reduction in blood cholesterol levels were analyzed. The main results were as follows: 1) In subjects (n = 79) who received the new education program in 1989-1990, serum cholesterol levels showed significant reduction, as compared with controls (n = 38) who received the usual education program in 1988-1989. 2) Subjects were divided into three groups according to their changes in serum cholesterol levels,--normalized, improved and unimproved--and the number of items complied with were counted for analysis. The mean score of compliance was highest in the normalized group with significant difference between the normalized and the unimproved groups. 3) The items of the high compliance score in the normalized group were in order of high score "to decrease high-fat meats", "to decrease cakes", "to choose lean meats and poultry without skin" and "to eat vegetables at every meal".

  18. Health Education Intervention. An Annotated Bibliography. Nutrition Education Series Issue 13.

    Science.gov (United States)

    United Nations Educational, Scientific, and Cultural Organization, Paris (France).

    This annotated bibliography contains 73 citations describing health education programs around the world. Countries represented include: Bangladesh, Egypt, Gambia, Gilbert Islands, Guatemala, Haiti, Honduras, Jamaica, Kenya, Indonesia, Nicaragua, Peru, Philippines, Swaziland, Thailand, Tunisia, Australia, Colombia, India, United Kingdom, Canada,…

  19. Dietary Changes by Expanded Food and Nutrition Education Program (EFNEP) Graduates Are Independent of Program Delivery Method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luccia, Barbara H. D.; Kunkel, Mary E.; Cason, Katherine L.

    2003-01-01

    Expanded Food and Nutrition Education Program graduates (n=1,141) who received either individual (21.3%), group (76.2%), or combined (2.5%) instruction were assessed. Independent of method, participants significantly improved the number of servings consumed from grains, vegetables, dairy, and meat and meat alternatives; total calories consumed;…

  20. Evaluation of a School-Based Multicomponent Nutrition Education Program to Improve Young Children's Fruit and Vegetable Consumption

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prelip, Michael; Kinsler, Janni; Thai, Chan Le; Erausquin, Jennifer Toller; Slusser, Wendelin

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To assess the impact of a multicomponent nutrition education program on student knowledge, attitudes, and behaviors related to consumption of fruits and vegetables (FVs). Design: Quasi-experimental pretest/posttest research design; 3 study conditions (Intervention+, Intervention, Comparison). Setting: Six schools from the Los Angeles…

  1. Use of Medical Students in a Flipped Classroom Programme in Nutrition Education for Fourth-Grade School Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    McEvoy, Christian S.; Cantore, Kathryn M.; Denlinger, LeAnn N.; Schleich, Michele A.; Stevens, Nicole M.; Swavely, Steven C.; Odom, Anne A.; Novick, Marsha B.

    2016-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the feasibility of a flipped classroom progamme, designed and implemented by medical students, in communicating nutrition education to fourth-grade school students aged 9-10 years and to characterise teachers' assessments of the progamme, which was designed to minimise the burden placed on…

  2. Creating healthful home food environments: Results of a study with participants in the Expanded Food and Nutrition Education Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Our objective was to evaluate a modified curriculum for the 6-session Texas Expanded Food and Nutrition Education Program (EFNEP), promoting healthful home food environments and parenting skills related to obesity prevention. We used a two-group randomized control trial: intervention versus usual EF...

  3. Demonstrating Impact through Replicable Analysis: Implications of an Evaluation of Arkansas's Expanded Food and Nutrition Education Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phelps, Josh; Brite-Lane, Allison; Crook, Tina; Hakkak, Reza; Fuller, Serena

    2017-01-01

    The evaluation described in this article focused on the effectiveness of Arkansas's Extension-based Expanded Food and Nutrition Education Program (EFNEP) but demonstrates an analytic approach that may be useful across Extension programs. We analyzed data from 1,810 Arkansas EFNEP participants' entry and exit Behavior Checklists to assess…

  4. Factors Influencing Adoption and Implementation of Cooking with Kids, an Experiential School-Based Nutrition Education Curriculum

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    Diker, Ann; Walters, Lynn M.; Cunningham-Sabo, Leslie; Baker, Susan S.

    2011-01-01

    Little research has been conducted to examine factors leading to adoption and implementation of nutrition education curricula. Data from two Web-based surveys (n = 313) and 27 interviews were used to explore how Diffusion of Innovations' perceived attributes contributed to adoption and implementation of Cooking with Kids (CWK) food and nutrition…

  5. Integration of Nutrition-Related Components by Early Childhood Education Professionals into Their Individual Work with Children at Risk

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    Shor, Ron; Friedman, Adina

    2009-01-01

    Poor nutrition is a major risk factor affecting proper development of children. However, there is limited knowledge about the way in which this subject is being integrated into professionals' work in early childhood education programs dealing with situations of children-at-risk. A study on this subject was conducted with 60 professionals who…

  6. Peer-Led Nutrition Education Programs for School-Aged Youth: A Systematic Review of the Literature

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    Yip, Calvin; Gates, Michelle; Gates, Allison; Hanning, Rhona M.

    2016-01-01

    To date, the impacts of school-based, peer-led nutrition education initiatives have not been summarized or assessed collectively. This review presents the current evidence, identifies knowledge gaps, and provides recommendations for future research. PubMed, Scopus, ERIC and Google Scholar were searched for refereed Canadian and American primary…

  7. How the Nutritional Foods in the Schools Committee of the Sudbury Board of Education Developed a Food Services Policy.

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    Yackman, Bernardine

    This paper chronicles the attempt by the Sudbury Board of Education (Ontario) to minimize the addiction of the children and teenagers in its schools to "junk foods." The plan involved the teaching of good eating habits and the principles of nutrition in food choices. The program used a variety of pedagogical and merchandising strategies to effect…

  8. The nutritionist educator: conceptions of students from the Nutrition program of the National University of Córdoba, Argentina

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    María Lis del Campo

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The ways in which educational initiatives have been implemented appear as dark areas regarding how they contribute to the improvement of the nutritional situation of the Argentinean population. Objective: To analyze the conceptions about the nutritionist educator of students from the Nutrition program. Materials and methods: An exploratory research with qualitative questions was conducted. 173 semi-structured interviews were made where gender, age, year of study and the basics of the nutritionist as an educator were analyzed. Intentional sampling of maximum variation and analysis of thematic content and enunciation were used. Results: 99% of students consider the nutritionist as an educator. Three major categories were built: the educational function according to the curriculum; the role of educator, in which health appears as an object of professional activity mediated by food or as a socially legitimized reference to prescribe food recommendations; and educational actions, showing differences and tensions in pedagogical conceptions. Conclusions: The reasons why the nutritionist is an educator include transmisionist visions and some others close to problematizing education based on the appropriation of curriculum and professional work. Thus, it is possible to visualize certain traits that go through the practice of graduates according to the educational concepts they build since they are students.

  9. An Examination of Alternative Poverty Measures for the Wisconsin Equalization Aid Formula.

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    Cibulka, James G.

    1986-01-01

    Wisconsin's guaranteed tax base equalization formula has no direct adjustment for the additional costs of educating poverty level pupils. This paper establishes the need for an adjustment and examines three measures (based on varying poverty definitions) to determine which provides the most equitable funding formula for educating poor children. (9…

  10. Nutrition education and introduction of broad bean-based complementary food improves knowledge and dietary practices of caregivers and nutritional status of their young children in Hula, Ethiopia.

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    Negash, Canaan; Belachew, Tefera; Henry, Carol J; Kebebu, Afework; Abegaz, Kebede; Whiting, Susan J

    2014-12-01

    Nutritious complementary foods are needed in countries where undernutrition and stunting are major problems, but mothers may be reluctant to change from traditional gruels. To test whether a recipe-based complementary feeding education intervention would improve knowledge and practice of mothers with young children in Hula, Ethiopia. A baseline survey of 200 eligible, randomly selected mother-child pairs gathered data on sociodemographic characteristics, food security status, knowledge and practices concerning complementary feeding, food group intakes of children aged 6 to 23 months by 24-hour recalls, and children's anthropometric measurements. Twice a month for 6 months, women in the intervention group received an education session consisting of eight specific messages using Alive and Thrive posters and a demonstration and tasting of a local barley and maize porridge recipe containing 30% broad beans. The control group lived in a different area and had no intervention. At 6 months, knowledge and practice scores regarding complementary feeding were significantly improved (p nutrition education over 6 months that included demonstration of a local porridge recipe with broad beans added improved the complementary feeding practices of caregivers and the nutritional status of their young children.

  11. Effectiveness of different methods for delivering tailored nutrition education to low income, ethnically diverse adults.

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    Gans, Kim M; Risica, Patricia M; Strolla, Leslie O; Fournier, Leanne; Kirtania, Usree; Upegui, David; Zhao, Julie; George, Tiffiney; Acharyya, Suddhasatta

    2009-05-05

    Computer-tailored written nutrition interventions have been shown to be more effective than non-tailored materials in changing diet, but continued research is needed. Your Healthy Life/Su Vida Saludable (YHL-SVS) was an intervention study with low income, ethnically diverse, English and Spanish-speaking participants to determine which methods of delivering tailored written nutrition materials were most effective in lowering fat and increasing fruit and vegetable (F&V) intake. YHL-SVS was a randomized controlled trial with four experimental conditions: 1) Nontailored (NT) comparison group; 2) Single Tailored (ST) packet; 3) Multiple Tailored (MT) packet mailed in four installments; 4) Multiple Re-Tailored (MRT) MT packets re-tailored between mailings via brief phone surveys. A baseline telephone survey collected information for tailoring as well as evaluation. Follow-up evaluation surveys were collected 4- and 7-months later. Primary outcomes included F&V intake and fat related behaviors. Descriptive statistics, paired t-test and ANOVA were used to examine the effectiveness of different methods of delivering tailored nutrition information. Both the ST and MT groups reported significantly higher F&V intake at 4-months than the NT and MRT groups. At 7 months, only the MT group still had significantly higher F&V intake compared to the NT group. For changes in fat-related behaviors, both the MT and MRT groups showed more change than NT at 4 months, but at 7 months, while these differences persisted, they were no longer statistically significant. There was a significant interaction of experimental group by education for change in F&V intake (P = .0085) with the lowest educational group demonstrating the most change. In this study, tailored interventions were more effective than non-tailored interventions in improving the short-term dietary behaviors of low income, ethnically diverse participants. Delivery of information in multiple smaller doses over time appeared to

  12. Effectiveness of different methods for delivering tailored nutrition education to low income, ethnically diverse adults

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    Zhao Julie

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Computer-tailored written nutrition interventions have been shown to be more effective than non-tailored materials in changing diet, but continued research is needed. Your Healthy Life/Su Vida Saludable (YHL-SVS was an intervention study with low income, ethnically diverse, English and Spanish-speaking participants to determine which methods of delivering tailored written nutrition materials were most effective in lowering fat and increasing fruit and vegetable (F&V intake. Methods YHL-SVS was a randomized controlled trial with four experimental conditions: 1 Nontailored (NT comparison group; 2 Single Tailored (ST packet; 3 Multiple Tailored (MT packet mailed in four installments; 4 Multiple Re-Tailored (MRT MT packets re-tailored between mailings via brief phone surveys. A baseline telephone survey collected information for tailoring as well as evaluation. Follow-up evaluation surveys were collected 4- and 7-months later. Primary outcomes included F&V intake and fat related behaviors. Descriptive statistics, paired t-test and ANOVA were used to examine the effectiveness of different methods of delivering tailored nutrition information. Results Both the ST and MT groups reported significantly higher F&V intake at 4-months than the NT and MRT groups. At 7 months, only the MT group still had significantly higher F&V intake compared to the NT group. For changes in fat-related behaviors, both the MT and MRT groups showed more change than NT at 4 months, but at 7 months, while these differences persisted, they were no longer statistically significant. There was a significant interaction of experimental group by education for change in F&V intake (P = .0085 with the lowest educational group demonstrating the most change. Conclusion In this study, tailored interventions were more effective than non-tailored interventions in improving the short-term dietary behaviors of low income, ethnically diverse participants. Delivery of

  13. Impact of nutritional education on nutritional status of under-five children in two rural communities of south-west Nigeria.

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    Sule, S S; Onayade, A A; Abiona, T C; Fatusi, A O; Ojofeitimi, E O; Esimai, O A; Ijadunola, K T

    2009-06-01

    This study evaluated the impact of nutritional education on knowledge, attitude and practices (KAP) of mothers concerning infants and young children feeding and their children's nutritional status in two semi-urban communities of south-west Nigeria. This is a community intervention study. We recruited 150 mothers of children aged 0-18 months independently from the intervention and control communities through a multi-stage sampling technique. We collected data with the aid of an interviewer-administered questionnaire at baseline and at six months after intervention from both communities to obtain information on feeding of infants and young children. In addition, we measured weights and heights of recruited children. Intervention involved group counselling of mothers and food demonstrations at designated health facilities. Data analysis for quantitative data was done using Epi-Info software, and for qualitative data, content analysis of major themes was used. Before intervention, recruited mothers and their children from the two communities were comparable in terms of all the parameters assessed (P>0.05 in all cases). After six months of intervention, mothers who had nutritional education demonstrated better knowledge and attitudes to key infant and young children feeding recommendations. There was also limited improvement in feeding practices. Mothers from the intervention community exclusively breastfed their infants longer with mean age at introduction of complementary foods at 5.3 months compared to 4.5 months in the control community (Pnutritional education of mothers only had positive impact on their level of KAP on infant and young children feeding.

  14. Do effects of price discounts and nutrition education on food purchases vary by ethnicity, income and education? Results from a randomised, controlled trial.

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    Blakely, Tony; Ni Mhurchu, Cliona; Jiang, Yannan; Matoe, Leonie; Funaki-Tahifote, Mafi; Eyles, Helen C; Foster, Rachel H; McKenzie, Sarah; Rodgers, Anthony

    2011-10-01

    Reducing health inequalities requires interventions that work as well, if not better, among disadvantaged populations. The aim of this study was to determine if the effects of price discounts and tailored nutrition education on supermarket food purchases (percentage energy from saturated fat and healthy foods purchased) vary by ethnicity, household income and education. A 2×2 factorial trial of 1104 New Zealand shoppers randomised to receive a 12.5% discount on healthier foods and/or tailored nutrition education (or no intervention) for 6 months. There was no overall association of price discounts or nutrition education with percentage energy from saturated fat, or nutrition education with healthy food purchasing. There was an association of price discounts with healthy food purchasing (0.79 kg/week increase; 95% CI 0.43 to 1.16) that varied by ethnicity (p=0.04): European/other 1.02 kg/week (n=755; 95% CI 0.60 to 1.43); Pacific 1.20 kg/week (n=101; 95% CI 0.06 to 2.34); Māori -0.15 kg/week (n=248; 95% CI -1.10 to 0.80). This association of price discounts with healthy food purchasing did not vary by household income or education. While a statistically significant variation by ethnicity in the effect of price discounts on food purchasing was found, the authors caution against a causal interpretation due to likely biases (eg, attrition) that differentially affected Māori and Pacific people. The study highlights the challenges in generating valid evidence by social groups for public health interventions. The null findings for tailored nutritional education across all social groups suggest that structural interventions (such as price) may be more effective.

  15. The Effect of nutrition education on knowledge, attitude, and performance about junk food consumption among students of female primary schools

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    Vardanjani, Ali Esmaeili; Reisi, Mahnoush; Javadzade, Homamodin; Pour, Zabihollah Gharli; Tavassoli, Elahe

    2015-01-01

    Background: Undoubtedly, proper nutrition has important role in safeguarding the individual from many diseases, especially chronic ones, and increasing ones physical and intellectual efficiency. Considering the importance of nutrition education to school-age kids, this research was done with the purpose of determining the effect of nutrition education on the knowledge, attitude, and performance of female students at primary school about junk food consumption. Materials and Methods: This is an experimental intervention study in Shahr-e-kord city about the reduction of junk foods consumption in 2011. Seventy-two primary girl students were randomly divided into 2 groups, experimental (36) and controls (36). Before of the educational program, self-administrative questionnaire and FFQ (Food Frequency Questionnaire) questionnaire were filled out for both the groups. The self-administrative questionnaire was completed 3 times (before, immediately, and 2 months after education), and FFQ questionnaire was completed 2 times (before and 2 months after education) by students. After pre-test, 4 educational session classes in experimental group were performed. Finally, data were collected and analyzed by SPSS 16 computer software. Results: Demographic variables of the studied population in 2 groups were similar. Before intervention, there were no significant differences regarding the knowledge, attitude, and performance in 2 groups (P > 0/05). After intervention, there were significant differences in the levels of knowledge, attitude, and performance between experimental and control groups (P effective on increasing or improving the knowledge, attitude, and performance of the students. PMID:26430680

  16. Does the Kids Café Program's Nutrition Education Improve Children's Dietary Intake? A Pilot Evaluation Study.

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    Dave, Jayna M; Liu, Yan; Chen, Tzu-An; Thompson, Deborah I; Cullen, Karen W

    2018-03-01

    To evaluate the Kids Café Program (KCP) nutrition education and assess its impact on children's diet quality and body mass index (BMI) percentile. An experimental design consisting of pretest-posttest comparison groups using mixed methods to evaluate a 6-session nutrition education intervention. Four Boys and Girls Club sites PARTICIPANTS: A total of 120 9- to 12-year-old children in the KCP (60 intervention and 60 comparison); 89% completed posttest evaluations. Trained KCP site staff taught the nutrition education curriculum at intervention sites. Healthy Eating Index-2010 using 24-hour dietary recall data (primary) and BMI percentile (secondary) ANALYSIS: Repeated-measures mixed-effects modeling RESULTS: Mean age of children was 10.2 years; mean BMI percentile was about 79; 95% were from food-insecure households. The total Healthy Eating Index-2010 score for both groups at baseline and posttest ranged from 50 to 60. At posttest, compared with baseline scores, children from both groups scored significantly lower for total vegetables, and greens and beans; the intervention group children had significantly higher sodium scores. Process evaluation indicated that 60-minute lecture-based sessions were too long after children were in school all day. This pilot study suggests that the KCP nutrition education curriculum needs improvement. Further research based on behavioral constructs is needed to refine the curriculum to encourage healthier food choices among children and using the MyPlate and the 2015-2020 Dietary Guidelines for Americans. Copyright © 2017 Society for Nutrition Education and Behavior. All rights reserved.

  17. An Untapped Resource for Increasing College Attainment: Estimating the Population of Potential First-Generation Students in Wisconsin. WISCAPE Policy Brief

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    Lazenby, Sara

    2011-01-01

    Potential first-generation students make up a large segment of Wisconsin's teenage population. To increase the pool of educated workers in Wisconsin, policymakers must work to recruit, retain, and graduate these students. Estimates of the size of the first-generation student population in the state are crucial for these efforts. This brief…

  18. A content analysis of nutrition education curricula used with low-income audiences: implications for questionnaire development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández-Garbanzo, Yenory; Griffin, Sarah; Cason, Katherine L; Loberger, Ginger; Williams, Joel; Baker, Susan; Coffee, Aubrey; Linton, Brittney; Hall, Trisha; Hayden, Victoria

    2013-07-01

    In developing recommendations for core measures/items for the evaluation of the Youth Expanded Food and Nutrition Education Program (EFNEP), three nutrition education curricula, implemented by land grant universities, were content analyzed. Selection criteria included the following: Curriculum content must include all EFNEP core content areas and must be implemented in more than one state with school children in third through fifth grades. Content analysis strategies were employed to identify and describe common areas/themes and mediators of behaviors addressed across the selected curricula. Content analysis coding was based on a list of behavioral mediators, which have empirical associations with nutrition, physical activity, and food safety. The most evident approaches identified across the three curricula were to enhance motivation, teach cognitive knowledge, and practice behavioral skills. The presence of self-regulation and environmental theory-based strategies was limited in all three curricula. In addition, multiple themes for nutrition, physical activity, and food safety were commonly addressed across curricula with multiple educational strategies. Based on these findings, recommendations for developing content appropriate measures and items for an outcome evaluation tool for Youth EFNEP are provided.

  19. Dairy Foods Intake among Female Iranian Students: A Nutrition Education Intervention Using a Health Promotion Model.

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    Dehdari, Tahereh; Yekehfallah, Fereshteh; Rahimzadeh, Mitra; Aryaeian, Naheed; Rahimi, Tahereh

    2016-10-01

    This aim of this study was to increase dairy consumption in students following an education intervention based on Pender's Health Promotion Model (Pender's HPM) variables. The study was done during September 2014-April 2015 in Savojbolagh, Alborz, Iran. The study sample included 142 middle-school female students who were allocated to either the intervention (n=71) or the comparison group (n=71). Pender's HPM variables and the daily servings of dairy foods consumed were measured in both groups by a self-administered questionnaire and a 3 d record before the intervention and 4 weeks later. The 4-week intervention was conducted for the intervention group. The data was analyzed through analysis of covariance and paired t tests. Compared to the comparison group, there were significant differences in Pender's HPM variables (except for the negative feelings, perceived barriers and competing demands), the daily servings of dairy foods consumed, and intakes of Calcium, riboflavin, and vitamin A in the intervention participants following the conducted intervention program. Developing theory-driven nutrition education programs may increase student's dairy foods intake.

  20. Impact of Theory-Based Education about Cardiovascular Disease on Preventative Nutrition Behavior of Women Aged 30-45 Years

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    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Cardiovascular disease is the leading cause of morbidity and mortality in many countries. Its prevention has been discussed by the World Health Organization. The current study determined the effect of an educational program designed to raise awareness about cardiovascular disease based on the health belief model on the preventative nutrition behavior of women aged 30-45 years. Result: Educational intervention increased the scores for knowledge and health belief model structures except when barriers were perceived (The mean consumption of calories, carbohydrates, fats, fatty acids, salt, milk groups, bread and cereals decreased, but the consumption of milk, dairy products and vegetables increased (p < 0.05. Education based on the health belief model effectively increased knowledge and promoted nutritional behavior for the prevention of cardiovascular disease.