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Sample records for wisconsin madison wi

  1. 78 FR 44596 - Notice of Inventory Completion: State Historical Society of Wisconsin, Madison, WI

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-24

    ... address in this notice by August 23, 2013. ADDRESSES: Jennifer Kolb, Wisconsin Historical Museum, 30 North Carroll Street, Madison, WI 53703, telephone (608) 261-2461, email Jennifer.Kolb@wisconsinhistory.org... request to Jennifer Kolb, Wisconsin Historical Museum, 30 North Carroll Street, Madison, WI 53703...

  2. 78 FR 48900 - Notice of Inventory Completion: State Historical Society of Wisconsin, Madison, WI

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-12

    .... 3003, of the completion of an inventory of human remains under the control of the State Historical....R50000] Notice of Inventory Completion: State Historical Society of Wisconsin, Madison, WI AGENCY... Wisconsin has completed an inventory of human remains, in consultation with the appropriate Indian tribes or...

  3. 76 FR 58032 - Notice of Intent To Repatriate a Cultural Item: State Historical Society of Wisconsin, Madison, WI

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-19

    ... shared group identity that can be reasonably traced between the sacred object/object of cultural... Cultural Item: State Historical Society of Wisconsin, Madison, WI AGENCY: National Park Service, Interior... Indian Tribe, has determined a cultural item meets the definitions of sacred object and object of...

  4. 77 FR 48538 - Notice of Inventory Completion: State Historical Society of Wisconsin, Madison, WI

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-14

    ... Historical Society of Wisconsin at the address below by September 13, 2012. ADDRESSES: Jennifer Kolb... Indian tribe that believes it satisfies the criteria in 43 CFR 10.11(c)(1) should contact Jennifer Kolb...

  5. Periodical Publishing in Wisconsin. Proceedings of the Conference on Periodical Publishing in Wisconsin (Madison, WI, May 11-12, 1978).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danky, James P., Ed.; And Others

    The papers contained in this compilation were drawn from the proceedings of a 1978 conference on periodical publishing in Wisconsin. Papers in the first section of the collection deal with the basics of publishing and cover such topics as selecting articles, starting a new publication, mailing procedures, aesthetics and layout, and printing…

  6. Madison, Wisconsin: Solar in Action (Brochure)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2011-10-01

    This brochure provides an overview of the challenges and successes of Madison, WI, a 2007 Solar America City awardee, on the path toward becoming a solar-powered community. Accomplishments, case studies, key lessons learned, and local resource information are given.

  7. Annual Gaseous Electronics Conference (39th) Held in Madison, Wisconsin on 7-10 October 1986. Program and Abstracts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1986-01-01

    DEPARTMENT MIDDLETON WI 53562 133 CULLER HALL 608-231-6959 OXFORD OH 45056 513-523-3286 ’I,. . * ,.. , . €: ,N, - * ,* 10/10/86 PAGE 12 UWEX - WISCONSIN...HAI MARCUM, DOUG JILA MIAMI UNIVERSITY UNIV.OF COLORADO 133 CULLER HALL. PHYSICS BOX 440 OXFORD OH 45056 BOULDER CO 80309 0440 513-529-3286 303-492...UNIVERSITY P.O. BOX 12211 R.T.PK NC 27709 919-549-0641 SOMMERER, TIM STORER, JONATHAN UNIV.OF WISCONSIN 3M COMPANY DEPT.OF PHYSICS 201-IE-17 MADISON WI 53715

  8. Fundamentals of composite processing : proceedings of a workshop : November 5-6, 2003, Madison, WI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jerrold E. Winandy; Frederick A. Kamke

    2004-01-01

    The USDA Forest Service, Forest Products Laboratory (Madison, Wisconsin)and the Wood-Based Composites Center of Virginia Tech (Blacksburg, Virginia) co-sponsored a conference, held November 5–6, 2003, in Madison, Wisconsin, on the fundamentals of composite processing. The goals were to assess what we know, define what we need to know, and then establish the state of...

  9. The Sixties and the Cold War University: Madison, Wisconsin and the Development of the New Left

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levin, Matthew

    2009-01-01

    The history of the sixties at the University of Wisconsin-Madison is both typical of other large universities in the United States and, at the same time, distinctive within the national and even international upheaval that marked the era. Madison's history shows how higher education transformed in the decades after World War II, influenced…

  10. Research in the Doctoral Program in Second Language Acquisition at the University of Wisconsin-Madison

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Costa, Peter I.; Bernales, Carolina; Merrill, Margaret

    2011-01-01

    Faculty and graduate students in the Doctoral Program in Second Language Acquisition (SLA) at the University of Wisconsin-Madison engage in a broad spectrum of research. From Professor Sally Magnan's research on study abroad and Professor Monika Chavez's work in foreign language policy through Professor Richard Young's examination of…

  11. Education-Work. Knowing Where You're Going. Vocational Conference (6th, Madison, Wisconsin, August 10-12, 1981).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowles, Dean; And Others

    An August, 1981, conference in Madison, Wisconsin, brought together the state's vocational educators to explore the work-education relationship and where vocational education is going in the next decade. In the first of the four addresses, Dean Bowles, Deputy State Superintendent of Public Instruction, described upcoming challenges for secondary…

  12. Proceedings of a workshop on bark beetle genetics: current status of research. Workshop on Bark Beetle Genetics; 1998 July 17-18; Madison, WI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jane L. Hayes; Kenneth F. Raffa

    1999-01-01

    This proceedings contains contributions from each author or group of authors who presented their current research at the bark beetle genetics workshop held 17-18 July 1998 on the campus of the University of Wisconsin in Madison, Wisconsin, USA. This was the second meeting on this subject; the first was held in 1992. The subject of bark beetle genetics is of growing,...

  13. Peer Development of Undergraduate Astronomers and Physicists at the University of Wisconsin - Madison

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abler, Melissa; UW-Madison, Physics Club of

    2014-01-01

    The physics club at the University of Wisconsin - Madison is actively engaged in many peer-led activities that foster development of career-oriented skills. Peer mentoring through drop-in tutoring provides peer support to promote retention in the astronomy and physics majors, as well as developing valuable teaching and communication strategies. The physics club is also heavily involved in outreach and education through demonstrations on campus, strengthening student connections to and aiding in retention of classroom information. Public demonstrations also develop valuable communication skills which will be required as a professional. Application-oriented development of students is further enhanced by semiannual visits to research facilities in the surrounding area which provide interested students the opportunity to see non-university facilities firsthand. Close contact with faculty - a valuable resource for undergraduates - is achieved through faculty attendance at club events and presentation of faculty research to interested students. Undergraduates also have the opportunity through the physics club to speak with the weekly colloquium presenter, learning more about each presenter’s experiences with graduate school, research, and career path.

  14. The Physics Learning Center at the University of Wisconsin-Madison

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nossal, S. M.; Watson, L. E.; Hooper, E.; Huesmann, A.; Schenker, B.; Timbie, P.; Rzchowski, M.

    2013-03-01

    The Physics Learning Center at the University of Wisconsin-Madison provides academic support and small-group supplemental instruction to students studying introductory algebra-based and calculus-based physics. These classes are gateway courses for majors in the biological and physical sciences, pre-health fields, engineering, and secondary science education. The Physics Learning Center offers supplemental instruction groups twice weekly where students can discuss concepts and practice with problem-solving techniques. The Center also provides students with access on-line resources that stress conceptual understanding, and to exam review sessions. Participants in our program include returning adults, people from historically underrepresented racial/ethnic groups, students from families in lower-income circumstances, students in the first generation of their family to attend college, transfer students, veterans, and people with disabilities, all of whom might feel isolated in their large introductory course and thus have a more difficult time finding study partners. We also work with students potentially at-risk for having academic difficulty (due to factors academic probation, weak math background, low first exam score, or no high school physics). A second mission of the Physics Learning Center is to provide teacher training and leadership experience for undergraduate Peer Mentor Tutors. These Peer Tutors lead the majority of the weekly group sessions in close supervision by PLC staff members. We will describe our work to support students in the Physics Learning Center, including our teacher-training program for our undergraduate Peer Mentor Tutors

  15. Creating a center for global health at the University of Wisconsin-Madison.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haq, Cynthia; Baumann, Linda; Olsen, Christopher W; Brown, Lori DiPrete; Kraus, Connie; Bousquet, Gilles; Conway, James; Easterday, B C

    2008-02-01

    Globalization, migration, and widespread health disparities call for interdisciplinary approaches to improve health care at home and abroad. Health professions students are pursuing study abroad in increasing numbers, and universities are responding with programs to address these needs. The University of Wisconsin (UW)-Madison schools of medicine and public health, nursing, pharmacy, veterinary medicine, and the division of international studies have created an interdisciplinary center for global health (CGH). The CGH provides health professions and graduate students with courses, field experiences, and a new Certificate in Global Health. Educational programs have catalyzed a network of enthusiastic UW global health scholars. Partnerships with colleagues in less economically developed countries provide the foundation for education, research, and service programs. Participants have collaborated to improve the education of health professionals and nutrition in Uganda; explore the interplay between culture, community development, and health in Ecuador; improve animal health and address domestic violence in Mexico; and examine successful public health efforts in Thailand. These programs supply students with opportunities to understand the complex determinants of health and structure of health systems, develop adaptability and cross-cultural communication skills, experience learning and working in interdisciplinary teams, and promote equity and reduce health disparities at home and abroad. Based on the principles of equity, sustainability, and reciprocity, the CGH provides a strong foundation to address global health challenges through networking and collaboration among students, staff, and faculty within the UW and beyond.

  16. Proceedings, sixth international symposium : moisture and creep effects on paper, board and containers: Madison, Wisconsin, USA, 14-15 July 2009

    Science.gov (United States)

    John M. Considine; Sally A. Ralph

    2011-01-01

    The USDA Forest Products Laboratory sponsored the 6th International Symposium: Moisture and Creep Effects on Paper, Board and Containers at the Monona Terrace Convention Center, Madison, WI, USA on 14-15 July 2009. Attendees heard 20 technical presentations; presenters were from seven different countries and three continents. Session topics included Corrugated...

  17. Evaluation of the effectiveness of an urban stormwater treatment unit in Madison, Wisconsin, 1996-97

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waschbusch, Robert J.

    1999-01-01

    An urban stormwater treatment unit was tested as part of an ongoing program of urban nonpoint- pollution research in Madison, Wis. Flow measurements were made and water samples were collected at the inlet to, outlet from, and bypass around the treatment chamber of the device that was installed to collect the runoff from a city maintenance yard.

  18. Automatic Weather Station (AWS Program operated by the University of Wisconsin-Madison during the 2011-2012 field season

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew A. Lazzara

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available During the 2011-2012 austral summer, the Antarctic Automatic Weather Station (AWS program at the University of Wisconsin?Madison completed its 32nd year of observations. Ongoing studies utilizing the network include topics in Antarctic meteorology and climate studies. This field season consisted of work throughout the Ross Island area, the Ross Ice Shelf, West Antarctica, and East Antarctica. Argos satellite transmissions are the primary method for relaying station data, but throughout this year, a number of stations in the Ross Island area have been converted to Freewave modems, with their data being relayed through McMurdo station. Each AWS station report contains information regarding the instrumentation currently installed and the work performed at each site. An overview of the AWS applications is included along with field work accomplished.

  19. Sources of phosphorus in stormwater and street dirt from two urban residential basins in Madison, Wisconsin, 1994-95

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waschbusch, Robert J.; Selbig, W.R.; Bannerman, Roger T.

    1999-01-01

    Eutrophication is a common problem for lakes in agricultural and urban areas, such as Lakes Wingra and Mendota in Madison, Wisconsin. This report describes a study to estimate the sources of phosphorus, a major contributor to eutrophication, to Lakes Wingra and Mendota from two small urban residential drainage basins. The Monroe Basin empties into Lake Wingra, and the Harper Basin into Lake Mendota. Phosphorus data were collected from streets, lawns, roofs, driveways, and parking lots (source areas) within these two basins and were used to estimate loads from each area. In addition to the samples collected from these source areas, flow-composite samples were collected at monitoring stations located at the watershed outfalls (storm sewers); discharge and rainfall also were measured. Resulting data were then used to calibrate the Source Loading and Management Model (SLAMM, version 6.3, copyright 1993, Pitt & Vorhees) for conditions in the city of Madison and determine within these basins which of the source areas are contributing the most phosphorus.

  20. The National Astronomy Consortium (NAC) - the University of Wisconsin-Madison Cohort

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hooper, Eric; Sheth, Kartik; Mills, Elisabeth A. C.; National Astronomy Consortium

    2015-01-01

    The UW-Madison Research Experiences for Undergraduates (REU) program in astrophysics (http://www.astro.wisc.edu/undergrads/uw-madison-reu-program/) is partnering with the National Radio Astronomy Observatory, the National Society of Black Physicists, and other universities in an entity called the National Astronomy Consortium (NAC; see https://sites.google.com/site/nraonac/). The mission of the NAC is to increase the numbers of students who might otherwise be overlooked by the traditional academic pipeline into STEM, or related, careers. This begins with a cohort of students who are part of the regular REU program. In addition to working on original research projects under the mentorship of university astronomers and astrophysics, the cohort students participate in professional development seminars and join other NAC cohort sites in a diversity speaker series. The mentor-student and student-student connections continue beyond the summer, including a fall meeting of the national NAC cohorts. The UW-Madison REU program is supported by the National Science Foundation through Award AST-1004881.

  1. Waste Management in Universities and Colleges. Workshop Proceedings (Madison, Wisconsin, July 9-11, 1980).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Association of Physical Plant Administrators of Universities and Colleges, Washington, DC.

    In response to a request from the Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources, Region V of the United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) sponsored a workshop on waste management in universities and colleges. It consisted of four sessions: (1) managing general university waste and regulatory concerns; (2) chemical waste management; (3)…

  2. Parking lot runoff quality and treatment efficiencies of a hydrodynamic-settling device in Madison, Wisconsin, 2005-6

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horwatich, Judy A.; Bannerman, Roger T.

    2012-01-01

    A hydrodynamic-settling device was installed in 2004 to treat stormwater runoff from a roof and parking lot located at the Water Utility Administration Building in Madison, Wis. The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources, the City of Madison, cities in the Waukesha Permit Group, Hydro International, Earth Tech, Inc., National Sanitation Foundation International, and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, monitored the device from November 2005 through September 2006 to evaluate it as part of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's Environmental Technology Verification Program. Twenty-three runoff events monitored for flow volume and water quality at the device's inlet and outlet were used to calculate the percentage of pollutant reduction for the device. The geometric mean concentrations of suspended sediment (SS), "adjusted" total suspended solids (TSS), total phosphorus (TP), dissolved phosphorus (DP), total recoverable zinc (TZn), and total recoverable copper (TCu) measured at the inlet were 107 mg/L (milligrams per liter), 92 mg/L, 0.17 mg/L, 0.05 mg/L, 38 μg/L (micrograms per liter), and 12 μg/L, respectively, and these concentrations are in the range of values observed in stormwater runoff from other parking lots in Wisconsin and Michigan. Efficiency of the settling device was calculated using the efficiency ratio and summation of loads (SOL) methods. Using the efficiency ratio method, the device reduced concentrations of SS, and DP, by 19, and 15, percent, respectively. Using the efficiency ratio method, the device increased "adjusted" TSS and TZn concentrations by 5 and 19, respectively. Bypass occurred for 3 of the 23 runoff events used in this assessment, and the bypass flow and water-quality concentrations were used to determine the efficiency of the bypass system. Concentrations of SS, "adjusted" TSS, and DP were reduced for the system by 18, 5, and 18, respectively; however, TZn increased by 5

  3. Parking Lot Runoff Quality and Treatment Efficiency of a Stormwater-Filtration Device, Madison, Wisconsin, 2005-07

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horwatich, Judy A.; Bannerman, Roger T.

    2010-01-01

    To evaluate the treatment efficiency of a stormwater-filtration device (SFD) for potential use at Wisconsin Department of Transportation (WisDOT) park-and-ride facilities, a SFD was installed at an employee parking lot in downtown Madison, Wisconsin. This type of parking lot was chosen for the test site because the constituent concentrations and particle-size distributions (PSDs) were expected to be similar to those of a typical park-and-ride lot operated by WisDOT. The objective of this particular installation was to reduce loads of total suspended solids (TSS) in stormwater runoff to Lake Monona. This study also was designed to provide a range of treatment efficiencies expected for a SFD. Samples from the inlet and outlet were analyzed for 33 organic and inorganic constituents, including 18 polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). Samples were also analyzed for physical properties, including PSD. Water-quality samples were collected for 51 runoff events from November 2005 to August 2007. Samples from all runoff events were analyzed for concentrations of suspended sediment (SS). Samples from 31 runoff events were analyzed for 15 constituents, samples from 15 runoff events were analyzed for PAHs, and samples from 36 events were analyzed for PSD. The treatment efficiency of the SFD was calculated using the summation of loads (SOL) and the efficiency ratio methods. Constituents for which the concentrations and (or) loads were decreased by the SFD include TSS, SS, volatile suspended solids, total phosphorous (TP), total copper, total zinc, and PAHs. The efficiency ratios for these constituents are 45, 37, 38, 55, 22, 5, and 46 percent, respectively. The SOLs for these constituents are 32, 37, 28, 36, 23, 8, and 48 percent, respectively. The SOL for chloride was -21 and the efficiency ratio was -18. Six chemical constituents or properties-dissolved phosphorus, chemical oxygen demand, dissolved zinc, total dissolved solids, dissolved chemical oxygen demand, and

  4. [Madison School Forests Ecology Series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madison Public Schools, WI.

    Each of these three booklets is to be used in conjunction with a field trip in the Madison, Wisconsin area, and to serve as a guide for presenting the filmstrips for each excursion. "Madison School Forests" emphasizes plant succession in a natural oak community. "Three Layers of Green in the Madison School Forest" emphasizes…

  5. Plasma Science and Innovation Center at Washington, Wisconsin, and Utah State: Final Technical Report for the University of Wisconsin-Madison

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sovinec, Carl R. [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States)

    2016-11-28

    The University of Wisconsin-Madison component of the Plasma Science and Innovation Center (PSI Center) contributed to modeling capabilities and algorithmic efficiency of the Non-Ideal Magnetohydrodynamics with Rotation (NIMROD) Code, which is widely used to model macroscopic dynamics of magnetically confined plasma. It also contributed to the understanding of direct-current (DC) injection of electrical current for initiating and sustaining plasma in three spherical torus experiments: the Helicity Injected Torus-II (HIT-II), the Pegasus Toroidal Experiment, and the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX). The effort was funded through the PSI Center's cooperative agreement with the University of Washington and Utah State University over the period of March 1, 2005 - August 31, 2016. In addition to the computational and physics accomplishments, the Wisconsin effort contributed to the professional education of four graduate students and two postdoctoral research associates. The modeling for HIT-II and Pegasus was directly supported by the cooperative agreement, and contributions to the NSTX modeling were in support of work by Dr. Bickford Hooper, who was funded through a separate grant. Our primary contribution to model development is the implementation of detailed closure relations for collisional plasma. Postdoctoral associate Adam Bayliss implemented the temperature-dependent effects of Braginskii's parallel collisional ion viscosity. As a graduate student, John O'Bryan added runtime options for Braginskii's models and Ji's K2 models of thermal conduction with magnetization effects and thermal equilibration. As a postdoctoral associate, O'Bryan added the magnetization effects for ion viscosity. Another area of model development completed through the PSI-Center is the implementation of Chodura's phenomenological resistivity model. Finally, we investigated and tested linear electron parallel viscosity, leveraged by support from

  6. Evaluation of Street Sweeping as a Stormwater-Quality-Management Tool in Three Residential Basins in Madison, Wisconsin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selbig, William R.; Bannerman, Roger T.

    2007-01-01

    Recent technological improvements have increased the ability of street sweepers to remove sediment and other debris from street surfaces; the effect of these technological advancements on stormwater quality is largely unknown. The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the City of Madison and the Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources, evaluated three street-sweeper technologies from 2002 through 2006. Regenerative-air, vacuum-assist, and mechanical-broom street sweepers were operated on a frequency of once per week (high frequency) in separate residential basins in Madison, Wis., to measure each sweeper's ability to not only reduce street-dirt yield but also improve the quality of stormwater runoff. A second mechanical-broom sweeper operating on a frequency of once per month (low frequency) was also evaluated to measure reductions in street-dirt yield only. A paired-basin study design was used to compare street-dirt and stormwater-quality samples during a calibration (no sweeping) and a treatment period (weekly sweeping). The basis of this paired-basin approach is that the relation between paired street-dirt and stormwater-quality loads for the control and tests basins is constant until a major change is made at one of the basins. At that time, a new relation will develop. Changes in either street-dirt and/or stormwater quality as a result of street sweeping could then be quantified by use of statistical tests. Street-dirt samples collected weekly during the calibration period and twice per week during the treatment period, once before and once after sweeping, were dried and separated into seven particle-size fractions ranging from less than 63 micrometers to greater than 2 millimeters. Street-dirt yield evaluation was based on a computed mass per unit length of pounds per curb-mile. An analysis of covariance was used to measure the significance of the effect of street sweeping at the end of the treatment period and to quantify any reduction in street

  7. Demonstration of the Whole-Building Diagnostician for the Federal Building and U.S. Courthouse at Milwaukee, Wisconsin, and for the University of Wisconsin at Madison

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bauman, Nathan N.; Hail, John C.

    2003-12-30

    In an effort to expand the energy savings programs within the State, the Wisconsin Division of Energy obtained funding through the Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP), with additional funding assistance through the Rebuild America Program (RBA) to install the Whole Building Diagnostician (WBD) software program as a test bed project in two of the State’s facilities in Wisconsin. This report discusses the results of this effort.

  8. Evaluation of leukocyte count in dogs with lymphoma submitted to the Madison-Wisconsin protocol by conventional technique and flow cytometryAvaliação leucocitária de cães com linfoma submetidos ao protocolo de Madison-Wisconsin pela técnica convencional e citometria de fluxo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Letícia Abrahão Anai

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Lymphoma is the most common hematopoietic tumor in dogs and one of the malignant tumors with higher occurrence in this species. It is a great experimental model due to its resemblance with the non- Hodgkin lymphoma in humans. Considering the importance of the overall changes that result from to this kind of neoplastic tumor and those due to polichemotherapy this study aimed to evaluate the absolute leukon count and the total count of CD45+ cells in the blood of 25 dogs with lymphoma. Findings were crosschecked since diagnose and then once weekly during the first eight sessions of the Madison-Wisconsin chemotherapic protocol. Total granulocyte, lymphocyte and monocyte counts obtained from a conventional automatic counter and by flow cytometry were compared. Results did not reveal statistically significant changes between the two techniques. O linfoma é o tumor de tecido hematopoético mais comum nos cães e um dos tumores malignos de maior ocorrência nesta espécie. É um ótimo modelo experimental para estudo devido a sua semelhança com o linfoma não-Hodgkin em humanos. Considerando a importância das alterações decorrentes da evolução desta neoplasia e aquelas ocorridas com o emprego da poliquimioterapia, avaliou-se o leucograma absoluto e a contagem de células CD45+ pela citometria de fluxo, no sangue de 25 cães com linfoma. Foram avaliados no momento do diagnóstico, uma vez por semana, durante as primeiras oito sessões quimioterápicas do protocolo de Madison-Wisconsin, e cujas contagens obtidas em contador automático convencional e por intermédio da citometria de fluxo, foram comparadas. Os resultados obtidos não revelaram diferenças estatisticamente significativas entre as duas técnicas utilizadas.

  9. Automatic Weather Station (AWS Program operated by the University of Wisconsin-Madison during the 2012-2013 field season: Challenges and Successes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew A. Lazzara

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available This report reviews 2012-2013 field season activities of the University of Wisconsin-Madison's Antarctic Automatic Weather Station (AWS program, summarizes the science that these sites are supporting, and outlines the factors that impact the number of AWS sites serviced in any given field season. The 2012-2013 austral summer season was unusual in the AWS network history. Challenges encountered include, but are not limited to, warmer than normal conditions in the Ross Island area impacting airfield operations, changes to logistical procedures, and competition for shared resources. A flexible work plan provides the best means for taking on these challenges while maximizing AWS servicing efforts under restricted conditions and meeting the need for routine servicing that maintaining an autonomous observing network demands.

  10. Learning from Wisconsin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniel, Jamie Owen

    2011-01-01

    Like thousands of other people from around the country and around the world, this author was heartened and inspired by the tenacity, immediacy, and creativity of the pushback by Wisconsin's public-sector unions against Governor Scott Walker's efforts to limit their collective bargaining rights. And like many others who made the trek to Madison to…

  11. Poultry Houses, WI Livestock Consortium Livestock Premises; confidentiality protected by law; use for animal health emergencies only; some aggregated county data, Published in 2009, 1:24000 (1in=2000ft) scale, Wisconsin Department of Agriculture, Trade & Consumer Protection.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC State | GIS Inventory — Poultry Houses dataset current as of 2009. WI Livestock Consortium Livestock Premises; confidentiality protected by law; use for animal health emergencies only; some...

  12. Archive of Geosample Data and Information from the University of Wisconsin Ice Island T3 Core Collection

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — From 1963 to 1972, 349 piston cores were collected from the Arctic Ocean using Ice Island T3 as a sampling platform and sent to the University of Wisconsin-Madison...

  13. Flambeau Mining Corporation, Ladysmith, Rusk County, Wisconsin. Proposed Open Pit Copper Mine and Waste Containment Area, Draft Environmental Impact Statement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1976-08-01

    blueberry plants. Surface water samples in the peat area have had a pH of 5.5 to 6. If the seepage is acidic, neutralization would not take place as it...Mt. Senario College Library Cornell Public Library University of Wisconsin Center - Barron County Library University of Wisconsin Memorial Library...Madison Madison Public Library Chippewa Falls Public Library Durand Free Library Eau Claire Public Library Mabel Tainter Memorial Free Library

  14. 78 FR 7456 - Notice Pursuant to the National Cooperative Research and Production Act of 1993-IMS Global...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-01

    ... Accountability, Lansing, MI; State of Wisconsin Dept. of Public Instruction, Madison, WI; and World-Class..., Wisconsin Virtual School, Tomahawk, WI; Hanyang Cyber University (HYCU), Seoul, REPUBLIC OF KOREA; Touro...

  15. WI Biodiesel Blending Progream Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Redmond, Maria E; Levy, Megan M

    2013-04-01

    The Wisconsin State Energy Office's (SEO) primary mission is to implement cost effective, reliable, balanced, and environmentally friendly clean energy projects. To support this mission the Wisconsin Biodiesel Blending Program was created to financially support the installation infrastructure necessary to directly sustain biodiesel blending and distribution at petroleum terminal facilities throughout Wisconsin. The SEO secured a federal directed award of $600,000 over 2.25 years. With these funds, the SEO supported the construction of inline biodiesel blending facilities at two petroleum terminals in Wisconsin. The Federal funding provided through the state provided a little less than half of the necessary investment to construct the terminals, with the balance put forth by the partners. Wisconsin is now home to two new biodiesel blending terminals. Fusion Renewables on Jones Island (in the City of Milwaukee) will offer a B100 blend to both bulk and retail customers. CITGO is currently providing a B5 blend to all customers at their Granville, WI terminal north of the City of Milwaukee.

  16. 75 FR 18828 - Wisconsin Electric Power Company, Wisconsin Gas LLC, Wisconsin Public Service Corporation...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-13

    ... Energy Regulatory Commission Wisconsin Electric Power Company, Wisconsin Gas LLC, Wisconsin Public Service Corporation: Complainants; ANR Pipeline Company: Respondent; Notice of Complaint April 6, 2010....206 (2009), Wisconsin Electric Power Company, Wisconsin Gas LLC, and Wisconsin Public Service...

  17. 78 FR 53186 - Revised Notice of Intent To Prepare an Environmental Impact Statement: Milwaukee County, Wisconsin

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-28

    ... evaluate interchanges with I-94 at 68th Street/70th Street, Hawley Road, Mitchell Boulevard, US 41/STH 341... Center West, 525 Junction Road, Suite 8000, Madison, WI 53717; Telephone: (608) 662- 2119. SUPPLEMENTARY... tie back into I-94 near 16th Street and better match the recently reconstructed Marquette Interchange...

  18. 76 FR 65776 - Notice of Final Federal Agency Actions on Proposed Highway Project in Wisconsin

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-24

    ... reconstruct I-43 from US 41 to Atkinson Drive and reconstruct the Velp Avenue, I-43, and County M interchanges. The I-43/US 41 interchange will be reconstructed as a System Interchange with directional ramps and... Projects Program Manager, Federal Highway Administration, 525 Junction Road Suite 8000, Madison, Wisconsin...

  19. Burlington Northern Taconite Transshipment Facility, Duluth-Superior Harbor, Superior Wisconsin. Environmental Assessment Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1975-03-01

    unsuitable for potable and even some industrial uses. 2.250 Water Use. The city of Superior presently obtains its entire municipal water supply from a...53, which will link Duluth-Superior to Eau Claire and Madison, Wisconsin, and to Chicago, Illinois. Duluth and Superior combined have more than 6,000

  20. Treatment strategies for the female athlete triad in the adolescent athlete: current perspectives

    OpenAIRE

    Thein-Nissenbaum, Jill; Hammer, Erin

    2017-01-01

    Jill Thein-Nissenbaum,1 Erin Hammer2 1Department of Family Medicine, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, WI, USA; 2Department of Orthopedics and Rehabilitation, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, WI, USA Abstract: Since the passage of Title IX in 1972, female sports participation has dramatically increased. The benefits of physical activity, including decreased risk for heart disease and diabetes as well as improved body image and self-esteem, far outweigh the risks. However, a s...

  1. WiMAX-WiFi convergence with OFDM bridge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Sherbaz, Ali; Adams, Chris; Jassim, Sabah

    2009-05-01

    Nowadays, Wireless and mobile communications technologies are the most important areas, which are rapidly expanding either in horizontal or vertical directions. WiMAX is trying to compete with WiFi in coverage and data rate, while the inexpensive WiFi still very popular in both personal and business use. Efficient bandwidth usage, Multi-Standard convergence and Wireless Mesh Networks (WMN) are the main vertical tends in the wireless world. WiMAX-WiFi convergence as an ideal technology that provides the best of both worlds: WiMAX new features and the low cost of the WiFi. In order to create a heterogeneous network environment, differences between the two technologies have been investigated and resolved. In the Multi-Carrier WiMAX-WiFi Convergence, the mismatch between the fixed WiMAXOFDM (Nfft=256) and the WiFi-OFDM (Nfft=64) has been confirmed as a physical layer issue that will never be solved as MAC layer problem; therefore the current proposal is how to build what we called the "Convergence-Bridge". This bridge is like an extra thin layer, which is responsible for harmonizing the mismatch. For the WiFi-OFDM physical layer, the paper has selected the IEEE 802.11n OFDM standard while it is being developed. The proposal does not suggest changing the standard itself but modifying some functions to be configurable. The IEEE 802.11 standard has fixed the configurations for WiFi mode only, while our proposal is to set up these functions for WiFi and WiMAX modes.

  2. 75 FR 25308 - Environmental Impact Statement: Winnebago County, IL and Rock County, WI

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-07

    ... DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION Federal Highway Administration Environmental Impact Statement: Winnebago County, IL and Rock County, WI AGENCY: Federal Highway Administration (FHWA), DOT. ACTION: Notice... Nye School Road northwest of Beloit, Rock County, Wisconsin to the interchange of Rockton Road and I...

  3. KiWi Vision

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schaffert, Sebastian; Bry, Francois; Dolog, Peter

    This deliverable describes the common vision of the KiWi project, ranging from motivation over use cases and usage scenarios to user interaction, system architecture and technologies, and the research that is performed as part of the project. The deliverable is intended for a wide audience to give...

  4. DIY WiFi

    CERN Document Server

    Jungnickel, Katrina

    2013-01-01

    Who makes WiFi?Why do different makers matter?What do barbeques and backyards have to do with the internet?This book explores how WiFi is made from the ground up, or in this case from the backyard out. Forged around barbeques, made of found, adapted and off-the-shelf materials and installed in ordinary domestic spaces, this book documents the collective work of individuals committed to making 'Ournet not the internet'.Drawing on rich ethnographic material, Jungnickel's research on community WiFi networking provides an overdue account of the innovative digital cultures and practices of ordinary people making extra-ordinary things. What make-do methods, mods and tales of resourceful ingenuity permit is another way of seeing how technologies come into being. It brings to life an Australian version of WiFi, enriching global studies of wireless technology by signalling the potential of comparative studies. Critically, the book presents the first sustained study of homebrew high-tech backyard technologists who imbu...

  5. Stimulating utilities to promote energy efficiency: Process evaluation of Madison Gas and Electric's Competition Pilot Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vine, E.; De Buen, O.; Goldfman, C.

    1990-12-01

    This report describes the process evaluation of the design and implementation of the Energy Conservation Competition Pilot (hereafter referred to as the Competition), ordered by the Public Service Commission of Wisconsin (PSCW) with a conceptual framework defined by PSCW staff for the Madison Gas and Electric (MGE) Company. This process evaluation documents the history of the Competition, describing the marketing strategies adopted by MGE and its competitors, customer service and satisfaction, administrative issues, the distribution of installed measures, free riders, and the impact of the Competition on MGE, its competitors, and other Wisconsin utilities. We also suggest recommendations for a future Competition, compare the Competition with other approaches that public utility commissions (PUCs) have used to motivate utilities to promote energy efficiency, and discuss its transferability to other utilities. 48 refs., 8 figs., 40 tabs.

  6. Forests of Wisconsin, 2013

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charles H. Perry

    2014-01-01

    This resource update provides an overview of forest resources in Wisconsin based on an inventory conducted by the U.S. Forest Service, Forest Inventory and Analysis (FIA) program at the Northern Research Station in cooperation with the Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources. Data estimates are based on field data collected using the FIA annualized sample design and...

  7. Improving Outreach and Surveillance Efforts Following a Large-Scale Carbon Monoxide Poisoning in Wisconsin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Creswell, Paul D; Vogt, Christy M; Wozniak, Ryan J; Camponeschi, Jenny; Werner, Mark A; Meiman, Jonathan G

    In December 2014, the largest carbon monoxide (CO) poisoning in Wisconsin's history occurred at an ice arena. Following this event, the Wisconsin Environmental Public Health Tracking (WI EPHT) Program sought to improve outreach and surveillance efforts. WI EPHT designed and distributed educational materials on CO poisoning prevention and surveyed stakeholders to gauge the effectiveness of outreach efforts. To enhance surveillance, WI EPHT utilized data from the Wisconsin Poison Center (WPC) to generate real-time alerts of anomalous numbers of CO-related calls. WI EPHT found that 42% of stakeholders reviewed the outreach materials, and 1 ice arena had installed a CO detector as a result. CO alerts were developed using WPC data and are now routinely used in statewide public health surveillance. WI EPHT staff improved CO poisoning prevention outreach and saw a positive response among stakeholders. This work demonstrates ways that health agencies can improve outreach and surveillance for CO poisoning. Improvements in these areas can bolster public health response and may prevent CO-related illness and injury.

  8. Die Deutschen in Wisconsin (Germans in Wisconsin).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wisconsin State Dept. of Public Instruction, Madison.

    The following curriculum units comprise this course book: (1) Germans in a New Home, (2) Contributions of the Germans in Wisconsin, (3) A Letter to Germany, (4) Germans Come to Kingston, (5) First a Soldier, Then a Man of the Church (about Heinrich von Rohr), (6) A Visiting German, and (7) Germans and Music. Each unit begins with a reading of…

  9. Barns of Wisconsin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson-Newlin, Karen

    2008-01-01

    In this article, the author shares a painting unit she introduced to her students. In this unit, her students painted pictures of barns and discussed the historical significance of barns in Wisconsin.

  10. Press Dry Conference 1983 Held at Madison, Wisconsin on September 7-9, 1983,

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983-01-01

    hardwood (4) Foreign particles, such as clay and responses to press drying were observed by pigments , accumulate and increase basis weight testing...Steidemann. The following FPL employees assisted with the conference: Registration and arrangements-- Judy Blaser, Sue Howards, and Eleanor Pape; coffee

  11. International Conference on Luminescence Held at Madison, Wisconsin on 13-17 August 1984.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-10-01

    Meucci , A. Scacco F. Somma (b) and M. Tonelli(c) (a) ENEA, TIB-FIS, Centro Ricerche Energia , 00044 Frascati, Italy (b) Dipartimento di Fisica...luminesce by solar ultraviolet and visible light. This instrument uses glass spacer Fabry-Perot filters of narrow bandwidth (ɘ.1 nm) to isolate a...central intensity of a Fraunhofer line to the solar continuum a few tenths of a nanometer distant; it then compares this ratio with a conjugate

  12. Building America Case Study: Optimized Slab-on-Grade Foundation Insulation Retrofits, Madison, Wisconsin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2016-05-01

    A more accurate assessment of SOG foundation insulation energy savings than traditionally possible is now feasible. This has been enabled by advances in whole building energy simulation with 3-dimensional foundation modelling integration at each time step together with an experimental measurement of the site energy savings of SOG foundation insulation. Ten SOG insulation strategies were evaluated on a test building to identify an optimum retrofit insulation strategy in a zone 6 climate (Minneapolis, MN). The optimum insulation strategy in terms of energy savings and cost effectiveness consisted of two components: (a) R-20 XPS insulation above grade, and, (b) R-20 insulation at grade (comprising an outer layer of R-10 insulation and an interior layer of R-12 poured polyurethane insulation) tapering to R-10 XPS insulation at half the below-grade wall height (the lower half of the stem wall was uninsulated). The optimum insulation strategy was applied to single and multi-family residential buildings in climate zone 4 - 7. The highest site energy savings of 5% was realized for a single family home in Duluth, MN, and the lowest savings of 1.4 percent for a 4-unit townhouse in Richmond, VA. SOG foundation insulation retrofit simple paybacks ranged from 18 to 47 years. There are other benefits of SOG foundation insulation resulting from the increase in the slab surface temperatures. These include increased occupant thermal comfort, and a decrease in slab surface condensation particularly around the slab perimeter.

  13. RadNet Air Data From Fort Madison, IA

    Science.gov (United States)

    This page presents radiation air monitoring and air filter analysis data for Fort Madison, IA from EPA's RadNet system. RadNet is a nationwide network of monitoring stations that measure radiation in air, drinking water and precipitation.

  14. Smart Growth Self-Assessment for Rural Communities: Madison County

    Science.gov (United States)

    Report from a technical assistance project to help Madison County, NY, develop a tool to help rural local governments assess how well their policies are helping them achieve the type of development they want.

  15. Engineering features of the Madison Symmetric Torus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dexter, R.N.; Kerst, D.W.; Lovell, T.W.; Prager, S.C.; Sprott, J.C.

    1987-01-01

    We describe the design parameters, unconventional features, and status of the Madison Symmetric Torus, MST, an RFP now approaching completion. A desire to minimize field errors dominated the design, leading to flanged gaps and inclusion of a pumping duct with small pump ports into the shell. No liner was to be used in the initial configuration, the versatile aluminum shell being the vacuum containment vessel (VCV). Simplified access to the inside of the vacuum vessel was accomplished by using the tank itself as single-turn poloidal as well as single-turn toroidal field coil. Thus none of the familiar toroidal or poloidal field coil sets surround the tank. A girder structure has been installed to permit removing the core-keeper and top-half of the vacuum vessel for insertion of internal shells or liners. More routinely, we intend to lift core-keeper and top half of the VCV together for entry of personnel into the VCV for changes of internal diagnostics or limiting surfaces, or for installation of movable limiters, etc. All structural features were designed to ease disassembly. 5 figs

  16. Low energy weak interactions and decays. [Partial summary of presentations at XXth International Conf. on High Energy Physics, Madison, Wisc. , July 17-23, 1980

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trilling, G.H.

    1980-09-01

    Results presented during sessions B5 to 7 at the XXth International Conference on High Energy Physics (University of Wisconsin, Madison, July 17 to 23, 1980) are discussed. Essentially all the material presented is summarized. The sessions covered various aspects of low-energy weak interactions. The following topics are addressed: CP-invariance violation, high-statistics study of ..lambda.. beta decay, parity violation in proton-nucleus scattering at 6 GeV/c, new results on the tau, charm particle decays (direct lifetime determinations, semileptonic branching ratios, comparison of semileptonic rate with theoretical expectations, further study of charm meson decays, F decays), and neutrino oscillations. 6 figures, 9 tables. (RWR)

  17. Updating progress in cancer control in Wisconsin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Treml, Kimberly B; McElroy, Jane A; Kaufman, Stephanie K; Remington, Patrick L; Wegner, Mark V

    2006-06-01

    In 1989, experts in cancer prevention, early detection, and treatment met in Madison to set the public health agenda for cancer control. Part of the plan defined target percent change in cancer mortality rates to be met by the year 2000. During the 1990s, public health and health care professionals developed programs and policies to reach these goals. The purpose of this analysis is to evaluate Wisconsin's progress in reducing cancer mortality and success in meeting the year 2000 objectives. Wisconsin mortality data for 1984-1986 and 1999-2001 were obtained from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, CDC Wonder. Percent change was calculated between the 2 time periods and compared to the 2000 target percent change for all-site cancer and site specific cancer mortality. All-site cancer mortality decreased by 7% from 1984-1986 to 1999-2001 with a greater than 16% decline in age groups <65 years. Mortality from breast, colorectal, and cervical cancer each decreased by at least 25%. Lung cancer and malignant melanoma mortality rates increased by 5% and 17%, respectively. Among additionally analyzed cancers, mortality decreased in prostate, stomach, and childhood cancers and increased in liver cancer and non-Hodgkin's lymphoma. The results of the state's cancer control effort are mixed. The year 2000 objectives were met for breast and colorectal cancer. Progress was made in reducing mortality from cervical cancer and from all sites combined, but the other year 2000 objectives were not met. Mortality rates increased for lung cancer and malignant melanoma during the 15-year period.

  18. WiFi and WiMAX Secure Deployments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Panagiotis Trimintzios

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Wireless Broadband offers incredibly fast, “always on” Internet similar to ADSL and sets the user free from the fixed access areas. In order to achieve these features standardisation was achieved for Wireless LAN (WLANs and Wireless Metropolitan Area Networks (WMANs with the advent of IEEE802.11 and IEEE802.16 family of standards, respectively. One serious concern in the rapidly developing wireless networking market has been the security of the deployments since the information is delivered freely in the air and therefore privacy and integrity of the transmitted information, along with the user-authentication procedures, become a very important issue. In this article, we present the security characteristics for the WiFi and the WiMAX networks. We thoroughly present the security mechanisms along with a threat analysis for both IEEE 802.11 and the 802.16 as well as their amendments. We summarise in a comparative manner the security characteristics and the possible residual threats for both standards. Finally focus on the necessary actions and configurations that are needed in order to deploy WiFi and WiMAX with increased levels of security and privacy.

  19. Design of the Madison Dynamo Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kendrick, R. D.; Forest, C. B.; O'Connell, R.; Nornberg, M. D.; Spence, E. J.

    2004-11-01

    A spherical dynamo experiment has been constructed at the University of Wisconsin's liquid-sodium facility. The goals of the experiment are to observe and understand magnetic instabilities driven by flow shear in MHD systems, investigate MHD turbulence for magnetic Reynolds numbers of 100, and understand the role of fluid turbulence in current generation. Magnetic field generation is possible for only specific flow geometries. The experiment consists of a 1 m diameter, spherical stainless steel vessel filled with liquid sodium at 110 Celsius. The temperature of the vessel is maintained through an actively-heated-and-cooled oil heat-exchange system. Two 100 Hp motors with impellers drive flows in the liquid sodium with flow velocities near 15 m/s. Each shaft is sealed with an oil-buffered dual mechanical cartridge seal. The experiment is automated for remote operation and data logging. The melting and transfer of one metric ton of sodium to a storage vessel is discussed. Operating parameters and performance of the experiment are presented.

  20. Wisconsin's forest resources, 2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    C.H. Perry

    2011-01-01

    This publication provides an overview of forest resource attributes for Wisconsin based on an annual inventory conducted by the Forest Inventory and Analysis (FIA) program at the Northern Research Station of the U.S. Forest Service. These estimates, along with web-posted core tables, will be updated annually. For more information please refer to page 4 of this report...

  1. Wisconsin's forest resources, 2005

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charles, H. (Hobie) Perry; Gary J. Brand

    2006-01-01

    The annual forest inventory of Wisconsin continues, and this document reports 2001-05 moving averages for most variables and comparisons between 2000 and 2005 for growth, removals, and mortality. Summary resource tables can be generated through the Forest Inventory Mapmaker website at http://ncrs2.fs.fed.us/4801/fiadb/index. htm. Estimates from this inventory show a...

  2. Wisconsin's forest resources, 2006

    Science.gov (United States)

    C.H. Perry; V.A. Everson

    2007-01-01

    Figure 2 was revised by the author in August 2008. This publication provides an overview of forest resource attributes for Wisconsin based on an annual inventory conducted by the Forest Inventory and Analysis program at the Northern Research Station of the U.S. Forest Service from 2002-2006. These estimates, along with associated core tables postedon the Internet, are...

  3. Wisconsin's Forest Resources, 2007

    Science.gov (United States)

    C.H. Perry; V.A. Everson

    2008-01-01

    This publication provides an overview of forest resource attributes for Wisconsin based on an annual inventory conducted by the Forest Inventory and Analysis (FIA) program of the U.S. Forest Service, Northern Research Station. These estimates, along with web-posted core tables, are updated annually. For more information please refer to page 4 of this report.

  4. Wisconsin's forest resources, 2009

    Science.gov (United States)

    C.H. Perry

    2011-01-01

    This publication provides an overview of forest resource attributes for Wisconsin based on an annual inventory conducted by the Forest Inventory and Analysis (FIA) program at the Northern Research Station of the U.S. Forest Service. These estimates, along with web-posted core tables, will be updated annually. For more information, please refer to page 4 of this report...

  5. Review: Davidson, Jamie S.: From Rebellion to Riots: Collective Violence on Indonesian Borneo (2008)

    OpenAIRE

    Karolina Chmielewska

    2009-01-01

    Review of the monograph: Davidson, Jamie S.: From rebellion to riots: collective violence on Indonesian Borneo. Madison, WI: University of Wisconsin Press 2008, ISBN 13-978-0-299-22580-3, 312 p. Besprechung der Monographie: Davidson, Jamie S.: From rebellion to riots: collective violence on Indonesian Borneo. Madison, WI: University of Wisconsin Press 2008, ISBN 13-978-0-299-22580-3, 312 S.

  6. 77 FR 22568 - Madison Paper Industries, FPL Energy Maine Hydro, LLC, Merimil Limited Partnership; Notice of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-16

    ... Energy Regulatory Commission Madison Paper Industries, FPL Energy Maine Hydro, LLC, Merimil Limited... annual license for Project No. 2615 is issued to the Madison Paper Industries, FPL Energy Maine Hydro... hereby given that the Madison Paper Industries, FPL Energy Maine Hydro, LLC, and Merimil Limited...

  7. El nuevo Madison Square Garden – (EE.UU.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luckman, Ch.

    1971-05-01

    Full Text Available The Madison Square Garden Sports and Amusements Center comprises the following. 1. A circular building, 129.54 m in diameter and 45.72 m high, which houses the New Madison Square Garden and many other facilities. The arena sits 20.250 spectators, who can watch hockey, basketball, cycling, boxing, circus shows, ice skating, special displays, variety shows, meetings and other kinds of performance. 2. An office block on Seventh Avenue, with a useful floor area for office use amounting to 111,500 m2 and a further 4,800 m2 of floor area on the first two floors for commercial and banking activities.Forman parte del Centro Deportivo y de Atracciones Madison Square Garden: 1 Un edificio circular, de 129,54 m de diámetro y 45,72 m de altura, que aloja el Nuevo Madison Square Garden y otras muchas instalaciones. Tiene capacidad para 20.250 asientos, y en él se pueden celebrar espectáculos de: hockey, baloncesto, ciclismo, boxeo, circo, patinaje sobre hielo, acontecimientos especiales, variedades, asambleas y otros deportes de masas, etc. 2 Un edificio de oficinas que se alza contiguo a la Séptima Avenida, con una superficie útil de 111.500 m2 destinada a oficinas, y otra de 4.800 m2, en las plantas primera y segunda, dedicada a actividades comerciales y bancarias.

  8. OXYGEN TRANSFER STUDIES AT THE MADISON METROPOLITAN SEWERAGE DISTRICT FACILITIES

    Science.gov (United States)

    Field studies at the Madison Metropolitan Sewerage District facilities were conducted over a 3-year period to obtain long-term data on the performance of fine pore aeration equipment in municipal wastewater. The studies were conducted on several basins in the East Plant containi...

  9. Wisconsin's Forests 2009

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charles H. Perry; Vern A. Everson; Brett J. Butler; Susan J. Crocker; Sally E. Dahir; Andrea L. Diss-Torrance; Grant M Domke; Dale D. Gormanson; Sarah K. Herrick; Steven S. Hubbard; Terry R. Mace; Patrick D. Miles; Mark D. Nelson; Richard B. Rodeout; Luke T. Saunders; Kirk M. Stueve; Barry T. Wilson; Christopher W. Woodall

    2012-01-01

    The second full annual inventory of Wisconsin's forests reports more than 16.7 million acres of forest land with an average volume of more than 1,400 cubic feet per acre. Forest land is dominated by the oak/hickory forest-type group, which occupies slightly more than one quarter of the total forest land area; the maple/beech/birch forest-type group occupies an...

  10. Wi-Fi/WiGig Coordination for Optimal WiGig Concurrent Transmissions in Random Access Scenario

    OpenAIRE

    Mohamed, Ehab Mahmoud; Sakaguchi, Kei; Sampei, Seiichi

    2016-01-01

    Wireless Gigabit (WiGig) access points (APs) using 60 GHz unlicensed frequency band are considered as key enablers for future Gbps WLANs. Due to its short range transmission with high susceptibility to path blocking, a multiple number of WiGig APs should be installed to fully cover a typical target environment. However, using autonomously operated WiGig APs with IEEE 802.11ad DCF, the exhaustive search analog beamforming and the maximum received power based autonomous users association preven...

  11. Campus Area Network Wi-Fi Security

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arjun K. Pillay

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Wireless connectivity devices such as mobile phones and laptops are being increasingly used by University students to access learning resources on campus networks and the Internet. Each of the mobile devices offers security protocols for connection to a Wi-Fi router. This paper presents an overview of Wi-Fi security and recommendations in relation to free Wi-Fi service at The University of Fiji.

  12. WIRELESS FIDELITY (Wi-Fi) BROADBAND NETWORK ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ES Obe

    categorized into two types: fixed and mobile wireless. The broadband fixed wireless network technologies .... 3.0 WIRELESS FIDELITYF (Wi-Fi). NETWORK IMPLEMENTATION. A Wi-Fi enabled device such as a PC, game .... Amateur radio, video senders, and cordless phones, can cause significant additional interference.

  13. Tornadoes Strike Northern Wisconsin

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-01-01

    A series of tornadoes ripped through the Upper Midwest region of the United States in the evening of June 7, 2007. At least five different tornadoes touched down in Wisconsin, according to the Associated Press, one of which tore through the Bear Paw Resort in northern Wisconsin. Despite dropping as much as fifteen centimeters (six inches) of rain in some places and baseball-size hail in others, authorities were reporting no deaths attributable to the storm system, and only a smattering of injuries, but considerable property damage in some areas. When the MODIS instrument on NASA's Terra satellite observed the area on June 9, 2007, the track torn through the woods by one of the tornadoes stands out quite clearly. This photo-like image uses data collected by MODIS in the normal human vision range to give a familiar natural-looking appearance. The landscape is largely a checkerboard of farms, towns, roads, and cities. The pale land is predominantly farmland where crops have not fully grown in yet. Dark blue shows the winding path of rivers and lakes dotting the landscape. The large blue lake on the east (right) side of the image is Lake Michigan. Towns and cities, including the city of Green Bay, are gray. To the north side, farmland gives way to dark green as land use shifts from agriculture to the Menominee Indian Reservation and Nicolet National Forest. The diagonal slash through the dark green forested land shows the tornado track. Bare land was revealed where the tornado tore down trees or stripped vegetation off the branches. The high-resolution image provided above is at MODIS' full spatial resolution (level of detail) of 250 meters per pixel. The MODIS Rapid Response System provides this image at additional resolutions.

  14. LTE OFFLOADING THROUGH WiFi NETWORKS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. N. Steputin

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The subject of the article is Wi-Fi offloading of LTE networks as one of the methods for solving a problem of the lack of availability of network resources in the future. Comparison of mobile networks offloading technologies, such as femtocells, Small Cells and Wi-Fi, is given. Architecture of cooperative LTE+Wi-Fi network including both new network components and new functions for standard LTE network components is presented as well as interaction between components. Special attention is paid to the usage of mobile IP protocols providing connection to the LTE Core both by trusted and untrusted Wi-Fi access. Evaluation of implementation effectiveness and prospective of the technology is given. The relation between amounts of users reconnected to Wi-Fi, data rate of LTE network and amount of access points are submitted as a part of the simulation of user’s equipment transition process from LTE to Wi-Fi network. A conclusion based on the research is made that stepwise phase-in of this technology enables to solve the problem of mobile network resources shortage in metropolises due to permanent traffic growth. It is presented that access points addition and transference of the customers to Wi-Fi network significantly reduce the overload on the base station herewith it increases some data rate with preservation of quality of provided services.

  15. Wisconsin SRF Electron Gun Commissioning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bisognano, Joseph J. [University of Wisconsin-Madison; Bissen, M. [University of Wisconsin-Madison; Bosch, R. [University of Wisconsin-Madison; Efremov, M. [University of Wisconsin-Madison; Eisert, D. [University of Wisconsin-Madison; Fisher, M. [University of Wisconsin-Madison; Green, M. [University of Wisconsin-Madison; Jacobs, K. [University of Wisconsin-Madison; Keil, R. [University of Wisconsin-Madison; Kleman, K. [University of Wisconsin-Madison; Rogers, G. [University of Wisconsin-Madison; Severson, M. [University of Wisconsin-Madison; Yavuz, D. D. [University of Wisconsin-Madison; Legg, Robert A. [JLAB; Bachimanchi, Ramakrishna [JLAB; Hovater, J. Curtis [JLAB; Plawski, Tomasz [JLAB; Powers, Thomas J. [JLAB

    2013-12-01

    The University of Wisconsin has completed fabrication and commissioning of a low frequency (199.6 MHz) superconducting electron gun based on a quarter wave resonator (QWR) cavity. Its concept was optimized to be the source for a CW free electron laser facility. The gun design includes active tuning and a high temperature superconducting solenoid. We will report on the status of the Wisconsin SRF electron gun program, including commissioning experience and first beam measurements.

  16. Wisconsin's forest resources in 2004

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charles H. Perry

    2006-01-01

    Results of the 2000-2004 annual inventory of Wisconsin show about 16.0 million acres of forest land, more than 22.1 billion cubic feet of live volume on forest land, and nearly 593 million dry tons of all live aboveground tree biomass on timberland. Populations of jack pine budworm are increasing, and it remains a significant pest in Wisconsin forests. A complete...

  17. WiMax network planning and optimization

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, Yan

    2009-01-01

    This book offers a comprehensive explanation on how to dimension, plan, and optimize WiMAX networks. The first part of the text introduces WiMAX networks architecture, physical layer, standard, protocols, security mechanisms, and highly related radio access technologies. It covers system framework, topology, capacity, mobility management, handoff management, congestion control, medium access control (MAC), scheduling, Quality of Service (QoS), and WiMAX mesh networks and security. Enabling easy understanding of key concepts and technologies, the second part presents practical examples and illu

  18. Wisconsin's environmental public health tracking network: information systems design for childhood cancer surveillance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanrahan, Lawrence P; Anderson, Henry A; Busby, Brian; Bekkedal, Marni; Sieger, Thomas; Stephenson, Laura; Knobeloch, Lynda; Werner, Mark; Imm, Pamela; Olson, Joseph

    2004-10-01

    In this article we describe the development of an information system for environmental childhood cancer surveillance. The Wisconsin Cancer Registry annually receives more than 25,000 incident case reports. Approximately 269 cases per year involve children. Over time, there has been considerable community interest in understanding the role the environment plays as a cause of these cancer cases. Wisconsin's Public Health Information Network (WI-PHIN) is a robust web portal integrating both Health Alert Network and National Electronic Disease Surveillance System components. WI-PHIN is the information technology platform for all public health surveillance programs. Functions include the secure, automated exchange of cancer case data between public health-based and hospital-based cancer registrars; web-based supplemental data entry for environmental exposure confirmation and hypothesis testing; automated data analysis, visualization, and exposure-outcome record linkage; directories of public health and clinical personnel for role-based access control of sensitive surveillance information; public health information dissemination and alerting; and information technology security and critical infrastructure protection. For hypothesis generation, cancer case data are sent electronically to WI-PHIN and populate the integrated data repository. Environmental data are linked and the exposure-disease relationships are explored using statistical tools for ecologic exposure risk assessment. For hypothesis testing, case-control interviews collect exposure histories, including parental employment and residential histories. This information technology approach can thus serve as the basis for building a comprehensive system to assess environmental cancer etiology.

  19. Coexistence of WiFi and WiMAX systems based on PS-request protocols.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jongwoo; Park, Suwon; Rhee, Seung Hyong; Choi, Yong-Hoon; Chung, Young-uk; Hwang, Ho Young

    2011-01-01

    We introduce both the coexistence zone within the WiMAX frame structure and a PS-Request protocol for the coexistence of WiFi and WiMAX systems sharing a frequency band. Because we know that the PS-Request protocol has drawbacks, we propose a revised PS-Request protocol to improve the performance. Two PS-Request protocols are based on the time division operation (TDO) of WiFi system and WiMAX system to avoid the mutual interference, and use the vestigial power management (PwrMgt) bit within the Frame Control field of the frames transmitted by a WiFi AP. The performance of the revised PS-Request protocol is evaluated by computer simulation, and compared to those of the cases without a coexistence protocol and to the original PS-Request protocol.

  20. Coexistence of WiFi and WiMAX Systems Based on PS-Request Protocols†

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jongwoo; Park, Suwon; Rhee, Seung Hyong; Choi, Yong-Hoon; Chung, Young-uk; Hwang, Ho Young

    2011-01-01

    We introduce both the coexistence zone within the WiMAX frame structure and a PS-Request protocol for the coexistence of WiFi and WiMAX systems sharing a frequency band. Because we know that the PS-Request protocol has drawbacks, we propose a revised PS-Request protocol to improve the performance. Two PS-Request protocols are based on the time division operation (TDO) of WiFi system and WiMAX system to avoid the mutual interference, and use the vestigial power management (PwrMgt) bit within the Frame Control field of the frames transmitted by a WiFi AP. The performance of the revised PS-Request protocol is evaluated by computer simulation, and compared to those of the cases without a coexistence protocol and to the original PS-Request protocol. PMID:22163721

  1. WiFi Assisted Multi-WiGig AP Coordination for Future Multi-Gbps WLANs

    OpenAIRE

    Mohamed, Ehab Mahmoud; Kusano, Hideyuki; Sakaguchi, Kei; Sampei, Seiichi

    2015-01-01

    Wireless Gigabit (WiGig) access points (APs) using 60 GHz unlicensed frequency band are considered as key enablers for future Gbps wireless local area networks (WLANs). Exhaustive search analog beamforming (BF) is mainly used with WiGig transmissions to overcome channel propagation loss and accomplish high rate data transmissions. Due to its short range transmission with high susceptibility to path blocking, a multiple number of WiGig APs should be installed to fully cover a typical target en...

  2. Income and Access to Higher Education: Are High Quality Universities Becoming More or Less Elite? A Longitudinal Case Study of Admissions at UW-Madison

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara E. Dahill-Brown

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Has access to selective postsecondary schools expanded or contracted? Evaluating this question has proven a difficult task because data are limited, particularly with regard to family income. We complement previous work and provide a replicable model of institutional analysis. This paper presents a detailed, quantitative assessment of admissions at the University of Wisconsin-Madison, an elite flagship public university—the type that is supposed to offer excellent opportunities to students from all backgrounds. We use an innovative measure of family income to compare applicant, admissions, and enrollment trends for low-income and minority students from 1972 to 2007. The unique aspects of this study include the more reliable measure of income and the ability to look at the full process from applications, admissions, and matriculations (demand and supply, not generally available in national datasets.

  3. Water-Quality and Lake-Stage Data for Wisconsin Lakes, Water Year 2006

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rose, W.J.; Garn, H.S.; Goddard, G.L.; Marsh, S.B.; Olson, D.L.; Robertson, Dale M.

    2007-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), in cooperation with local and other agencies, collects data at selected lakes throughout Wisconsin. These data, accumulated over many years, provide a data base for developing an improved understanding of the water quality of lakes. To make these data available to interested parties outside the USGS, the data are published annually in this report series. The locations of water-quality and lake-stage stations in Wisconsin for water year 2006 are shown in figure 1. A water year is the 12-month period from October 1 through September 30. It is designated by the calendar year in which it ends. Thus, the period October 1, 2005 through September 30, 2006 is called 'water year 2006.' The purpose of this report is to provide information about the chemical and physical characteristics of Wisconsin lakes. Data that have been collected at specific lakes, and information to aid in the interpretation of those data, are included in this report. Data collected include measurements of in-lake water quality and lake stage. Time series of Secchi depths, surface total phosphorus and chlorophyll a concentrations collected during non-frozen periods are included for all lakes. Graphs of vertical profiles of temperature, dissolved oxygen, pH, and specific conductance are included for sites where these parameters were measured. Descriptive information for each lake includes: location of the lake, area of the lake's watershed, period for which data are available, revisions to previously published records, and pertinent remarks. Additional data, such as streamflow and water quality in tributary and outlet streams of some of the lakes, are published in another volume: 'Water Resources Data-Wisconsin, 2006.' Water-resources data, including stage and discharge data at most streamflow-gaging stations, are available through the World Wide Web on the Internet. The Wisconsin Water Science Center's home page is at http://wi.water.usgs.gov/. Information on the

  4. Water-quality and Llake-stage data for Wisconsin Lakes, Water Year 2004

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rose, W.J.; Garn, H.S.; Goddard, G.L.; Marsh, S.B.; Olson, D.L.; Robertson, Dale M.

    2005-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), in cooperation with local and other agencies, collects data at selected lakes throughout Wisconsin. These data, accumulated over many years, provide a data base for developing an improved understanding of the water quality of lakes. To make these data available to interested parties outside the USGS, the data are published annually in this report series. The locations of water-quality and lake-stage stations in Wisconsin for water year 2004 are shown in figure 1. A water year is the 12-month period from October 1 through September 30. It is designated by the calendar year in which it ends. Thus, the period October 1, 2003 through September 30, 2004 is called 'water year 2004.' The purpose of this report is to provide information about the chemical and physical characteristics of Wisconsin lakes. Data that have been collected at specific lakes, and information to aid in the interpretation of those data, are included in this report. Data collected include measurements of in-lake water quality and lake stage. Time series of Secchi depths, surface total phosphorus and chlorophyll a concentrations collected during non-frozen periods are included for all lakes. Graphs of vertical profiles of temperature, dissolved oxygen, pH, and specific conductance are included for sites where these parameters were measured. Descriptive information for each lake includes: location of the lake, area of the lake's watershed, period for which data are available, revisions to previously published records, and pertinent remarks. Additional data, such as streamflow and water quality in tributary and outlet streams of some of the lakes, are published in another volume: 'Water Resources Data-Wisconsin, 2004.' Water-resources data, including stage and discharge data at most streamflow-gaging stations, are available throught the World Wide Web on the Internet. The Wisconsin Water Science Center's home page is at http://wi.water.usgs.gov/. Information on the

  5. Water-quality and lake-stage data for Wisconsin lakes, water year 2014

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manteufel, S. Bridgett; Robertson, Dale M.

    2017-05-25

    IntroductionThe U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), in cooperation with local and other agencies, collects data at selected lakes throughout Wisconsin. These data, accumulated over many years, provide a database for developing an improved understanding of the water quality of lakes. To make these data available to interested parties outside the USGS, the data are published annually in this report series. The locations of water-quality and lake-stage stations in Wisconsin for water year 2014 are shown in figure 1. A water year is the 12-month period from October 1 through September 30. It is designated by the calendar year in which it ends. Thus, the periodOctober 1, 2013, through September 30, 2014, is called “water year 2014.”The purpose of this report is to provide information about the chemical and physical characteristics of Wisconsin lakes. Data that have been collected at specific lakes, and information to aid in the interpretation of those data, are included in this report. Data collected include measurements of in-lake water quality and lake stage. Time series of Secchi depths, surface total phosphorus, and chlorophyll a concentrations collected during nonfrozen periods are included for many lakes. Graphs of vertical profiles of temperature, dissolved oxygen, pH, and specific conductance are included for sites where these parameters were measured. Descriptive information for each lake includes the location of the lake, area of the lake’s watershed, period for which data are available, revisions to previously published records, and pertinent remarks. Additional data, such as streamflow and water quality in tributary and outlet streams of some of the lakes, are published online at http://nwis.waterdata.usgs.gov/wi/nwis.Water-resources data, including stage and discharge data at most streamflow-gaging stations, are available online. The Wisconsin Water Science Center’s home page is at https://www.usgs.gov/centers/wisconsin-water-science-center. Information

  6. Water-quality and lake-stage data for Wisconsin lakes, water years 2012–2013

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manteufel, S. Bridgett; Robertson, Dale M.

    2017-05-25

    IntroductionThe U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), in cooperation with local and other agencies, collects data at selected lakes throughout Wisconsin. These data, accumulated over many years, provide a data base for developing an improved understanding of the water quality of lakes. To make these data available to interested parties outside the USGS, the data are published annually in this report series. The locations of water-quality and lake-stage stations in Wisconsin for water year 2012 are shown in figure 1. A water year is the 12-month period from October 1 through September 30. It is designated by the calendar year in which it ends. Thus, the period October 1, 2011 through September 30, 2012, is called “water year 2012.”The purpose of this report is to provide information about the chemical and physical characteristics of Wisconsin lakes. Data that have been collected at specific lakes, and information to aid in the interpretation of those data, are included in this report. Data collected include measurements of in-lake water quality and lake stage. Time series of Secchi depths, surface total phosphorus and chlorophyll a concentrations collected during non-frozen periods are included for all lakes. Graphs of vertical profiles of temperature, dissolved oxygen, pH, and specific conductance are included for sites where these parameters were measured. Descriptive information for each lake includes: location of the lake, area of the lake’s watershed, period for which data are available, revisions to previously published records, and pertinent remarks. Additional data, such as streamflow and water quality in tributary and outlet streams of some of the lakes, are published online at http://nwis.waterdata.usgs.gov/wi/nwis.Water-resources data, including stage and discharge data at most streamflow-gaging stations, are available online. The Wisconsin Water Science Center’s home page is at https://www.usgs.gov/centers/wisconsin-water-science-center. Information on

  7. [Preliminary analysis of ginseng industry in Wisconsin].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Li; Zhang, Wen-sheng

    2008-07-01

    To study the case of Wisconsin as the top ginseng state in United States which has come through four developing steps: beginning, stagnating, flourishing and now, downturn. The current situation of the ginseng industry in Wisconsin was briefly introduced, the federal and state management on ginseng cultivation and export, the organization of Ginseng Board of Wisconsin and their marketing style based on the field investigation and data collected from USDA and Wisconsin state. The advantages and disadvantages of Wisconsin ginseng industry were analyzed in order to provide some suggestions for Chinese medicine industry. Chinese ginseng industry should learn the organization system from Wisconsin.

  8. Indoor Positioning using Wi-Fi

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjærgaard, Mikkel Baun; Krarup, Mads Vering; Stisen, Allan

    The past decade has witnessed substantial research on methods for indoor Wi-Fi positioning. While much effort has gone into achieving high positioning accuracy and easing fingerprint collection, it is our contention that the general problem is not sufficiently well understood, thus preventing...... deployments and their usage by applications to become more widespread. Based on our own and published experiences on indoor Wi-Fi positioning deployments, we hypothesize the following: Current indoor Wi-Fi positioning systems and their utilization in applications are hampered by the lack of understanding...... of the requirements present in the real-world deployments. In this paper, we report findings from qualitatively studying organisational requirements for indoor Wi-Fi positioning. The studied cases and deployments cover both company and public-sector settings and the deployment and evaluation of several types...

  9. Eesti graafikud Krakówi triennaalil

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    2009-01-01

    16. septembril Poolas avatud Krakówi rahvusvahelise graafikatriennaali peanäitusel ja satelliitnäitustel esindavad Eestit Eve Kask, Ülle Marks, Benjamin Vasserman, Tiiu Prisko, Mati Veermets, Evi Tihemets

  10. WiMAX technology and network evolution

    CERN Document Server

    Etemad, Kamran

    2010-01-01

    WiMAX, the Worldwide Interoperability for Microwave Access, represents a paradigm shift in telecommunications technology. It offers the promise of cheaper, smaller, and simpler technology compared to existing broadband options such as DSL, cable, fiber, and 3G wireless.

  11. Integrating free-space optical communication links with existing WiFi (WiFO) network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liverman, S.; Wang, Q.; Chu, Y.; Duong, T.; Nguyen-Huu, D.; Wang, S.; Nguyen, T.; Wang, A. X.

    2016-02-01

    Recently, free-space optical (FSO) systems have generated great interest due to their large bandwidth potential and a line-of-sight physical layer of protection. In this paper, we propose WiFO, a novel hybrid system, FSO downlink and WiFi uplink, which will integrate currently available WiFi infrastructure with inexpensive infrared light emitting diodes. This system takes full advantage of the mobility inherent in WiFi networks while increasing the downlink bandwidth available to each end user. We report the results of our preliminary investigation that show the capabilities of our prototype design in terms of bandwidth, bit error rates, delays and transmission distances.

  12. How much can Wi-Fi offload?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hu, Liang; Coletti, Claudio; Nguyen, Huan Cong

    2012-01-01

    This paper is envisaged to provide a first quantitative study on how much indoor deployed Wi-Fi can offload the operator’s 3G HSPA macro cellular networks in a real largescale dense-urban scenario. Wi-Fi has been perceived as a costeffective mean of adding wireless capacity by leveraging low......-cost access points and unlicensed spectrum. However, the quantitative offloading gain that Wi-Fi can achieve is still unknown. We studied the Wi-Fi offloading gain as a function of access point density, where it is shown that 10 access points/km2 can already boost average user throughput by 300% and the gain...... increases linearly proportional to the access point density. Indoor Wi-Fi deployment also significantly reduces the number of users in outage, especially for indoor area. A user is considered to be in outage if they have a user throughput less than 512 kbps. We also propose three Wi-Fi deployment algorithms...

  13. Feasibility Study of Economics and Performance of Solar Photovoltaics at the Refuse Hideaway Landfill in Middleton, Wisconsin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salasovich, J.; Mosey, G.

    2011-08-01

    This report presents the results of an assessment of the technical and economic feasibility of deploying a photovoltaics (PV) system on a brownfield site at the Refuse Hideaway Landfill in Middleton, Wisconsin. The site currently has a PV system in place and was assessed for further PV installations. The cost, performance, and site impacts of different PV options were estimated. The economics of the potential systems were analyzed using an electric rate of $0.1333/kWh and incentives offered by the State of Wisconsin and by the serving utility, Madison Gas and Electric. According to the site production calculations, the most cost-effective system in terms of return on investment is the thin-film fixed-tilt technology. The report recommends financing options that could assist in the implementation of such a system.

  14. Conference on Stochastic Processes and Their Applications (18) Held in Madison, Wisconsin on 25 June - 1 July 1989

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-07-01

    sample paths Track D Room B239 Diffusion and Partial Differential Equations 2:00 - 2:20 p.m. G. Galeazzi Uniqueness of viscosity solutions of Ham...V.S.) OF HAMILTON-JACOBI--BELLMAN (IB) EQUATIONS FOR CONTROLLED DIFFUSIONS ON FINITE-DIMENSIONAL RIEMANNIAN MANIFOLDS WITH BOUNDARY Giuliano Galeazzi

  15. 77 FR 52681 - University of Wisconsin-Madison, et al.; Notice of Consolidated Decision on Applications for Duty...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-30

    ... Importation Act of 1966 (Pub. L. 89-651, as amended by Pub. L. 106-36; 80 Stat. 897; 15 CFR part 301). Related.... Campbell, Director, Subsidies Enforcement Office, Import Administration. [FR Doc. 2012-21453 Filed 8-29-12...

  16. WiMax taking wireless to the max

    CERN Document Server

    Pareek, Deepak

    2006-01-01

    With market value expected to reach 5 billion by 2007 and the endorsement of some of the biggest names in telecommunications, World Interoperability for Microwave Access (WiMAX) is poised to change the broadband wireless landscape. But how much of WiMAX's touted potential is merely hype? Now that several pre-WiMAX networks have been deployed, what are the operators saying about QoS and ROI? How and when will device manufacturers integrate WiMAX into their products? What is the business case for using WiMAX rather than any number of other established wireless alternatives?WiMAX: Taking Wireless

  17. Residential Energy Efficiency Potential: Wisconsin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilson, Eric J [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2017-11-27

    Energy used by Wisconsin single-family homes that can be saved through cost-effective improvements. Prepared by Eric Wilson and Noel Merket, NREL, and Erin Boyd, U.S. Department of Energy Office of Energy Policy and Systems Analysis.

  18. Wisconsin's fourth forest inventory, 1983.

    Science.gov (United States)

    John S. Jr. Spencer; W. Brad Smith; Jerold T. Hahn; Gerhard K. Raile

    1988-01-01

    The fourth inventory of the timber resource of Wisconsin shows that growing-stock volume increased from 11.2 to 15.5 billion cubic feet between 1968 and 1983, and area of timberland increased from 14.5 to 14.8 million acres. Presented are analysis and statistics on forest area and timber volume, growth, mortality, removals, and projections.

  19. Wisconsin's forest resources in 2001.

    Science.gov (United States)

    John S. Vissage; Gery J. Brand; Manfred E. Mielke

    2003-01-01

    Results of the 2001 annual inventory of Wisconsin show about 15.8 million acres of forest land, more than 21.6 billion cubic feet of live volume on forest land, and nearly 584 million dry tons of all live aboveground tree biomass on timberland. Gypsy moth, forest tent caterpillar, twolined chestnut borer, bronze birch borer, ash yellows, and white pine blister rust...

  20. Educational Attainment in Southeast Wisconsin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Million, Laura; Henken, Rob; Dickman, Anneliese

    2010-01-01

    In metro Milwaukee, as a part of the WIRED Initiative, the Regional Workforce Alliance (RWA)--a collaboration of organizations representing workforce development, economic development and education across southeast Wisconsin--has established the framework for pursuing the local talent dividend goal and a regional strategy for increasing…

  1. Birds of Prey of Wisconsin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamerstrom, Frances

    This copiously illustrated document is designed to be a field quide to birds of prey that are common to Wisconsin, as well as to some that enter the state occasionally. An introduction discusses birds of prey with regard to migration patterns, the relationship between common names and the attitudes of people toward certain birds, and natural signs…

  2. Personalization Component for KiWi Framework

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Durao, Frederico; Xu, Guandong; Kotowski, Jakub

    2010-01-01

    . The personalization component is responsible for addressing and delivering information to individuals regarding their roles and preferences, explicitly or implicitly inferred from their activities in the system. Personalization is a essential for KiWi since this in a multi-user environment and individuals has......In this report we present the personalization component implemented for KiWi addressing diverse aspects such as motivation scenarios, configuration management, formal models, implementations and some real case scenarios on how personalization can be applied to support software project management...... different interests and needs when using the system....

  3. Towards automated statewide land cover mapping in Wisconsin using satellite remote sensing and GIS techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cosentino, B.L.; Lillesand, T.M.

    1991-01-01

    Attention is given to an initial research project being performed by the University of Wisconsin-Madison, Environmental Remote Sensing Center in conjunction with seven local, state, and federal agencies to implement automated statewide land cover mapping using satellite remote sensing and geographical information system (GIS) techniques. The basis, progress, and future research needs for this mapping program are presented. The research efforts are directed toward strategies that integrate satellite remote sensing and GIS techniques in the generation of land cover data for multiple users of land cover information. The project objectives are to investigate methodologies that integrate satellite data with other imagery and spatial data resident in emerging GISs in the state for particular program needs, and to develop techniques that can improve automated land cover mapping efficiency and accuracy. 10 refs

  4. ESP8266 WI-FI MODULE FOR MONITORING SYSTEM APPLICATION

    OpenAIRE

    Tae-Gue Oh; Chung-Hyuk Yim; Gyu-Sik Kim

    2017-01-01

    The ESP8266 Wi-Fi module is a self-contained system-on-chip (SOC) with integrated TCP/IP protocol stacks that can give any microcontroller access to a Wi-Fi network. In this paper, the interface between the ESP8266 Wi-Fi module and arduino MCU is studied for monitoring system application. Through some experimental studies, we believe that the ESP8266 Wi-Fi module is very useful for monitoring system application.

  5. Wisconsin Partnerships to Educate and Engage Public Audiences on Climate Change Topics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mooney, M. E.; Ackerman, S.; Rowley, P.; Crowley Conn, K.

    2011-12-01

    The complexity and scale of climate change-related challenges requires more than one strategy to share meaningful information with public audiences. This presentation will discuss a few initiatives to engage the public originating from the University of Wisconsin-Madison. First, a local partnership between the Cooperative Institute for Meteorological Satellite Studies (CIMSS) and the Aldo Leopold Nature Center (ALNC), an informal learning center with a new climate change "classroom" which recently acquired a Science on a Sphere (SOS) exhibit. Second, an informal education project funded by the NOAA Office of Education coordinated by CIMSS in partnership with the national SOS Network with the goal of helping museum docents share meaningful interpretation of real-time weather and climate data. CIMSS staff has been conducting weather and climate discussions on a Magic Planet display for several years. This "mini-SOS" is powered by a solar panel on the roof, modeling the essential Sun-Earth connection and the first principle of climate literacy. However, the convenient proximity of CIMSS and ALNC provides a perfect opportunity to test "SOS-scale" talking points posted on a weekly docent blog to the benefit of the entire SOS Network. Two other Wisconsin projects of note include the Wisconsin Initiative on Climate Change Impacts, a partnership between the University and the Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources, and a pilot project between CIMSS and NOAA's National Weather Service to engage storm spotters in climate mitigation and stewardship. Ideally, the synergistic benefits and lessons learned from these collaborations can inform similar efforts in order to galvanize meaningful responses to climate change.

  6. The Wisconsin Early Childhood Obesity Prevention Initiative: An Example of Statewide Collective Impact.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meinen, Amy; Hilgendorf, Amy; Korth, Amy L; Christens, Brian D; Breuer, Catherine; Joyner, Hilary; Polzin, Molle; Adams, Alexandra; Wolfe, Daithi; Braun, Abbe; Hoiting, Jill; Paulson, Jeanette; Cullen, Bridget; Stader, Kelli

    2016-11-01

    The Wisconsin Early Childhood Obesity Prevention Initiative (Initiative), established in 2007, seeks to address and prevent obesity in the early care and education system through nutrition and physical activity environmental and policy changes. The collaborative includes professionals from 3 state of Wisconsin Departments, the University of Wisconsin-Extension, the University of Wisconsin-Madison, and public health and early care and education organizations. This paper explores the efforts of the Initiative to advance our understanding of collective impact in practice and its value to health promotion efforts. Evaluators conducted a mixed methods case study to evaluate the application of collective impact principles by the Initiative. This included a survey of Initiative partners, review of archival documents, and qualitative interviews with Initiative leaders. Initiative partners noted progress in establishing the conditions for collective impact. Archival documents and interviews describe both formal and informal practices that helped set a common agenda, align and coordinate partner activities, and promote communication among Initiative leaders. Results also detail the important current and potential roles of “backbone” staff from healthTIDE to support the Initiative. Additionally, results suggest particularly challenging aspects of the Initiative’s impact model related to shared measurement and broader stakeholder communication. While the Initiative is still setting in place the conditions for collective impact, it has achieved significant policy, systems, and environment changes since its formation. Inclusion of nutrition and physical activity criteria in the state’s quality rating improvement system for child care centers is one of its outcomes. This case study offers several important insights about the application of collective impact in health promotion efforts, particularly in relation to the transition from previous collaborative activities, the

  7. Water resources of Wisconsin: lower Wisconsin River basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hindall, S.M.; Borman, Ronald G.

    1974-01-01

    This report describes the physical environment, availability, distribution, movement, quality, and use of water in the upper Wisconsin River basin as an aid in planning and water management. The report presents general information on the basin derived from data obtained from Federal, State, and local agencies, New field data were collected in areas where information was lacking. More detailed studies of problem areas may be required in the future, as water needs and related development increase.

  8. Wi-Fi Versus Cell Phone Service

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Gary

    2006-01-01

    Regardless of whether cell phones remain the dominant platform or Wi-Fi becomes the prevalent platform, there are some things that libraries can do to improve patron service in light of evolving expectations, behaviors, and tools. People today are more nomadic, which leads to the very real possibility of having to deliver content not just to the…

  9. 76 FR 58260 - FPL Energy Maine Hydro LLC; Madison Paper Industries; Merimil Limited Partnership; Notice of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-20

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission FPL Energy Maine Hydro LLC; Madison Paper Industries; Merimil Limited Partnership; Notice of Availability of Final Environmental Assessment In accordance with the National...

  10. University of Wisconsin IAIMS planning: organizational challenges within a faculty governance model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwiatkowski, K; Brennan, P F; DeMets, D; Dahlen, K; Buchanan, J

    2000-01-01

    The University of Wisconsin-Madison Health Sciences Schools are currently in the planning stage of developing an Integrated Advanced Information Management System (IAIMS). The planning phase of this project attends to the unique opportunities that are found at the flagship campus of a large state university system. Statewide teaching and research initiatives and accelerated campus-level capital development challenge the planners to create an IAIMS plan that anticipates an emerging health science environment. Additionally, UW-Madison has an organizational culture with a strong tradition of faculty governance, which provides a very desirable and flexible decision-making environment for a cross-discipline collaborative information management initiative. Development of a shared IAIMS vision conflicts with a governance model that most directly supports intradepartmental decision-making. The challenge presented here for an IAIMS initiative has less to do with hard wiring a technical infrastructure and more to do with increased stakeholder cooperation in a highly decentralized organization with autonomous information systems.

  11. High Current, High Density Arc Plasma as a New Source for WiPAL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waleffe, Roger; Endrizzi, Doug; Myers, Rachel; Wallace, John; Clark, Mike; Forest, Cary; WiPAL Team

    2016-10-01

    The Wisconsin Plasma Astrophysics Lab (WiPAL) has installed a new array of nineteen plasma sources (plasma guns) on its 3 m diameter, spherical vacuum vessel. Each gun is a cylindrical, molybdenum, washer-stabilized, arc plasma source. During discharge, the guns are maintained at 1.2 kA across 100 V for 10 ms by the gun power supply establishing a high density plasma. Each plasma source is fired independently allowing for adjustable plasma parameters, with densities varying between 1018 -1019 m-3 and electron temperatures of 5-15 eV. Measurements were characterized using a 16 tip Langmuir probe. The plasma source will be used as a background plasma for the magnetized coaxial plasma gun (MCPG), the Terrestrial Reconnection Experiment (TREX), and as the plasma source for a magnetic mirror experiment. Temperature, density, and confinement results will be presented. This work is supported by the DoE and the NSF.

  12. Sediment yields of Wisconsin streams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hindall, S.M.; Flint, R.F.

    1970-01-01

    Sediment in Wisconsin streams causes economic and engineering problems in water management and reduces the value of water for nearly all uses. Sediment produces problems such as reduced reservoir capacity, navigation hazards, increased cost of water treatment, property damage, temporary loss of farmland, destruction of feeding and nesting grounds of fish, and destruction of wildlife habitat. Sediment in water also reduces the aesthetic value of surface waters and is detrimental to the State's tourist and recreation industry.

  13. Progress of cryogenic pulsating heat pipes at UW-Madison

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diego Fonseca, Luis; Mok, Mason; Pfotenhauer, John; Miller, Franklin

    2017-12-01

    Space agencies continuously require innovative cooling systems that are lightweight, low powered, physically flexible, easily manufactured and, most importantly, exhibit high heat transfer rates. Therefore, Pulsating Heat Pipes (PHPs) are being investigated to provide these requirements. This paper summarizes the current development of cryogenic Pulsating Heat Pipes with single and multiple evaporator sections built and successfully tested at UW-Madison. Recently, a helium based Pulsating Heat Pipe with three evaporator and three condenser sections has been operated at fill ratios between 20 % and 80 % operating temperature range of 2.9 K to 5.19 K, resulting in a maximum effective thermal conductivity up to 50,000 W/m-K. In addition, a nitrogen Pulsating Heat Pipe has been built with three evaporator sections and one condenser section. This PHP achieved a thermal performance between 32,000 W/m-K and 96,000 W/m-K at fill ratio ranging from 50 % to 80 %. Split evaporator sections are very important in order to spread cooling throughout an object of interest with an irregular temperature distribution or where multiple cooling locations are required. Hence this type of configurations is a proof of concept which hasn’t been attempted before and if matured could be applied to cryo-propellant tanks, superconducting magnets and photon detectors.

  14. Nonlinear coupling of tearing fluctuations in the Madison Symmetric Torus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sarff, J.S.; Almagri, A.F.; Cekic, M.; Den Hartog, D.J.; Fiksel, G.; Hokin, S.A.; Ji, H.; Prager, S.C.; Shen, W.; Stoneking, M.R.; Assadi, S.; Sidikman, K.L.

    1992-11-01

    Three-wave, nonlinear, tearing mode coupling has been measured in the Madison Symmetric Torus (MST) reversed-field pinch (RFP) [Fusion Technol. 19, 131 (1991)] using bispectral analysis of edge magnetic fluctuations resolved in ''k-space. The strength of nonlinear three-wave interactions satisfying the sum rules m 1 + m 2 = m 3 and n 1 + n 2 = n 3 is measured by the bicoherency. In the RFP, m=l, n∼2R/a (6 for MST) internally resonant modes are linearly unstable and grow to large amplitude. Large values of bicoherency occur for two m=l modes coupled to an m=2 mode and the coupling of intermediate toroidal modes, e.g., n=6 and 7 coupled to n=13. These experimental bispectral features agree with predicted bispectral features derived from MHD computation. However, in the experiment, enhanced coupling occurs in the ''crash'' phase of a sawtooth oscillation concomitant with a broadened mode spectrum suggesting the onset of a nonlinear cascade

  15. Water Use in Wisconsin, 2005

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buchwald, Cheryl A.

    2009-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Wisconsin Water Science Center is responsible for presenting data collected or estimated for water withdrawals and diversions every 5 years to the National Water-Use Information Program (NWUIP). This program serves many purposes such as quantifying how much, where, and for what purpose water is used; tracking and documenting water-use trends and changes; and providing these data to other agencies to support hydrologic projects. In 2005, data at both the county and subbasin levels were compiled into the USGS national water-use database system; these data are published in a statewide summary report and a national circular. This publication, Water Use in Wisconsin, 2005, presents the water-use estimates for 2005; this publication also describes how these water-use data were determined (including assumptions used), limitations of using these data, and trends in water-use data presented to the NWUIP. Estimates of water use in Wisconsin indicate that about 8,608 million gallons per day (Mgal/d) were withdrawn during 2005. Of this amount, about 7,622 Mgal/d (89 percent) were from surface-water sources and about 986 Mgal/d (11 percent) were from ground-water sources. Surface water used for cooling at thermoelectric-power plants constituted the largest portion of daily use at 6,898 Mgal/d. Water provided by public-supply water utilities is the second largest use of water and totaled 552 Mgal/d. Public supply served approximately 71 percent of the estimated 2005 Wisconsin population of 5.54 million people; two counties - Milwaukee and Dane - accounted for more than one-third of the public-supply withdrawal. Industrial and irrigation were the next major water uses at 471 and 402 Mgal/d, respectively. Non-irrigational agricultural (livestock and aquaculture) accounted for approximately 155 Mgal/d and is similar to the combined withdrawal for the remaining water-use categories of domestic, commercial, and mining (131 Mgal/d). Data on water use

  16. Promoting Success in the Physical Sciences: The University of Wisconsin's Physics Learning Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nossal, S. M.; Jacob, A. T.

    2002-05-01

    The Physics Learning Program at the University of Wisconsin-Madison provides small group, academic and mentoring support for students enrolled in algebra-based introductory physics courses. Those students accepted into our program are potentially at-risk academically in their physics course or for feeling isolated at the University. They include, among others, students who have not taken high school physics, returning adults, minority students, students with disabilities, and students with English as a second language. A core component of the program is the peer-lead teaching and mentoring groups that match upper level undergraduate physics majors with students potentially at-risk in introductory physics. The tutors receive ongoing training and supervision throughout the year. The program has expanded over the years to include staff tutors, the majority of whom are scientists who seek additional teaching experience. The Physics Peer Mentor Tutor Program is run in collaboration with a similar chemistry program at the University of Wisconsin's Chemistry Learning Center. We will describe our Physics Learning Programs and discuss some of the challenges, successes, and strategies used to work with our tutors and students.

  17. Improving mobility for Wisconsin's elderly : brief.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-01

    By 2035, the number of elderly residents in Wisconsin is expected to nearly double, and one in four drivers on Wisconsin roads will be elderly. According to national statistics, the elderly are more likely to be involved in crashes on a per-mile basi...

  18. Short report: Changes in West Nile virus seroprevalence and antibody titers among Wisconsin mesopredators 2003-2006

    Science.gov (United States)

    Docherty, D.E.; Samuel, M.D.; Egstad, K.F.; Griffin, K.M.; Nolden, C.A.; Karwal, L.; Ip, Hon S.

    2009-01-01

    After the 2001 occurrence of West Nile virus (WNV) in Wisconsin (WI), we collected sera, during 2003-2006, from south-central WI mesopredators. We tested these sera to determine WNV antibody prevalence and geometric mean antibody titer (GMAT). Four-fold higher antibody prevalence and 2-fold higher GMAT in 2003-2004 indicated greater exposure of mesopredators to WNV during the apparent epizootic phase. The period 2005-2006 was likely the enzootic phase because WNV antibody prevalence fell to a level similar to other flaviviruses. Our results suggest that, in mesopredators, vector-borne transmission is the primary route of infection and WNV antibodies persist for complement dead crow surveillance by providing additional data for the timing of public health interventions. Research is needed to clarify the dynamics of WNV infection in these mammals and their role as potential WNV amplifiers. Copyright ?? 2009 by The American Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene.

  19. Theism and Violence in the Ancient World: The Argument of Jan Assmann

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Smith, Mark S.

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Bibliographical review. Jan Assmann, Of God and Gods: Egypt, Israel, and the Rise of Monotheism (George L. Mosse Series in Modern European Cultural and Intellectual History; Madison, WI: The University of Wisconsin Press, 2008. x + 196 pp.

    Critica bibliografica. Jan Assmann, Of God and Gods: Egypt, Israel, and the Rise of Monotheism (George L. Mosse Series in Modern European Cultural and Intellectual History; Madison, WI: The University of Wisconsin Press, 2008. x + 196 pp.

  20. SeaWiFS Third Anniversary Global Biosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-01-01

    September 18,2000 is the third anniversary of the start of regular SeaWiFS operations of this remarkable planet called Earth. This SeaWiFS image is of the Global Biosphere depicting the ocean's long-term average phytoplankton chlorophyll concentration acquired between September 1997 and August 2000 combined with the SeaWiFS-derived Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI) over land during July 2000.

  1. The WiLI benchmark dataset for written language identification

    OpenAIRE

    Thoma, Martin

    2018-01-01

    This paper describes the WiLI-2018 benchmark dataset for monolingual written natural language identification. WiLI-2018 is a publicly available, free of charge dataset of short text extracts from Wikipedia. It contains 1000 paragraphs of 235 languages, totaling in 23500 paragraphs. WiLI is a classification dataset: Given an unknown paragraph written in one dominant language, it has to be decided which language it is.

  2. Arsenic and chloride data for five stream sites in the Madison River drainage, Montana, 1988

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knapton, J.R.; Brosten, Tordis M.

    1989-01-01

    Enriched geothermal waters in Yellowstone National Park contribute large quantities of arsenic to the Madison River. Because arsenic may be acutely or chronically toxic to humans when ingested, it is of concern in the upper Missouri River basin where the water is used for domestic purposes. In passage of water downstream, concentrations of arsenic in the Madison and Missouri Rivers are diluted by tributary inflows. However, insufficient information existed to describe concentrations during runoff at specific locations. As a result, a monitoring network was established to better define arsenic concentrations during the 1988 peak runoff and during periods prior to and following the runoff. In addition to arsenic, samples were analyzed for chloride because of its association with geothermal water and specific conductance because it is a surrogate measure of dissolved-solids concentration. This report presents data acquired during 1988 at five sampling stations in the Madison River drainage. (USGS)

  3. Mapping of MAC Address with Moving WiFi Scanner

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arief Hidayat

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Recently, Wifi is one of the most useful technologies that can be used for detecting and counting MAC Address. This paper described using of WiFi scanner which carried out seven times circulated the bus. The method used WiFi and GPS are to counting MAC address as raw data from the pedestrian smartphone, bus passenger or WiFi devices near from the bus as long as the bus going around the route. There are seven processes to make map WiFi data.

  4. Sharing your urban residential WiFi (UR-WiFi)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kawade, Santosh; van Bloem, J.W.H.; Abhayawardhana, V.S.; Wisely, D.

    2006-01-01

    Cheap and ubiquitous broadband wireless access is what most of the operators are aiming for. This paper analyses an innovative proposal to extend the traditional fixed coverage offered by residential broadband into an urban wireless coverage using urban residential wireless fidelity (UR-WiFi)

  5. 75 FR 27330 - FPL Energy Maine Hydro LLC, Madison Paper Industries, and Merimil Limited Partnership; Notice of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-14

    ... Energy Regulatory Commission FPL Energy Maine Hydro LLC, Madison Paper Industries, and Merimil Limited... Maine Hydro LLC, Madison Paper Industries, and Merimil Limited Partnership. e. Name of Project: Brassua... prescriptions may be filed electronically via the Internet in lieu of paper. The Commission strongly encourages...

  6. WiFi networks and malware epidemiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Hao; Myers, Steven; Colizza, Vittoria; Vespignani, Alessandro

    2009-02-03

    In densely populated urban areas WiFi routers form a tightly interconnected proximity network that can be exploited as a substrate for the spreading of malware able to launch massive fraudulent attacks. In this article, we consider several scenarios for the deployment of malware that spreads over the wireless channel of major urban areas in the US. We develop an epidemiological model that takes into consideration prevalent security flaws on these routers. The spread of such a contagion is simulated on real-world data for georeferenced wireless routers. We uncover a major weakness of WiFi networks in that most of the simulated scenarios show tens of thousands of routers infected in as little as 2 weeks, with the majority of the infections occurring in the first 24-48 h. We indicate possible containment and prevention measures and provide computational estimates for the rate of encrypted routers that would stop the spreading of the epidemics by placing the system below the percolation threshold.

  7. Wi-Fi Service enhancement at CERN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ducret, V.; Sosnowski, A.; Gonzalez Caballero, B.; Barrand, Q.

    2017-10-01

    Since the early 2000’s, the number of mobile devices connected to CERN’s internal network has increased from just a handful to well over 10,000. Wireless access is no longer simply “nice to have” or just for conference and meeting rooms; support for mobility is expected by most, if not all, of the CERN community. In this context, a full renewal of the CERN Wi-Fi network has been launched to deliver a state-of-the-art campus-wide Wi-Fi Infrastructure. We aim to deliver, in more than 200 office buildings with a surface area of over 400,000m2 and including many high-priority and high-occupation zones, an end-user experience comparable, for most applications, to a wired connection and with seamless mobility support. We describe here the studies and tests performed at CERN to ensure the solution we are deploying can meet these goals as well as delivering a single, simple, flexible and open management platform.

  8. WiFi networks and malware epidemiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Hao; Myers, Steven; Colizza, Vittoria; Vespignani, Alessandro

    2009-01-01

    In densely populated urban areas WiFi routers form a tightly interconnected proximity network that can be exploited as a substrate for the spreading of malware able to launch massive fraudulent attacks. In this article, we consider several scenarios for the deployment of malware that spreads over the wireless channel of major urban areas in the US. We develop an epidemiological model that takes into consideration prevalent security flaws on these routers. The spread of such a contagion is simulated on real-world data for georeferenced wireless routers. We uncover a major weakness of WiFi networks in that most of the simulated scenarios show tens of thousands of routers infected in as little as 2 weeks, with the majority of the infections occurring in the first 24–48 h. We indicate possible containment and prevention measures and provide computational estimates for the rate of encrypted routers that would stop the spreading of the epidemics by placing the system below the percolation threshold. PMID:19171909

  9. Addressing elderly mobility issues in Wisconsin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-01

    "The aging of baby boomers poses significant challenges to Wisconsins existing transportation infrastructure and specialized transit : programs. From 2010 to 2035, the number of elderly Wisconsinites is projected to grow by 90 percent, an increase...

  10. Predicting Scour of Bedrock in Wisconsin

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-04-01

    This research evaluates the scour potential of rocks supporting Wisconsin DOT bridge foundations. Ten highway bridges were selected for this study, of which seven are supported by shallow foundations, and five were built on sandstone in rivers/stream...

  11. Fuelwood production and sources in Wisconsin, 1981.

    Science.gov (United States)

    James E. Blyth; E. Michael Bailey; W. Brad Smith

    1984-01-01

    Discusses and analyzes the 1981 Wisconsin fuelwood production from roundwood and primary wood-using mill residue. Analyzes production by geographic area, type of producer, species, landowner class, type of land, and tree source.

  12. Eduroam: Secure WiFi roaming for education and research

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Miteff, S

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available ? No security ? ?Hotel WiFi? - captive portal ? WPA2-Personal ? Don't permit guest access Pillars of information security ? Confidentiality ? Integrity ? Availability ? Did you just DoS yourself? ? We need a better plan The better plan: WiFi roaming...

  13. Wireless Fidelity (Wi-Fi) Broadband Network Technology: An ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Wireless Fidelity (Wi-Fi) broadband network technology has made tremendous impact in the growth of broadband wireless networks. There exists today several Wi-Fi access points that allow employees, partners and customers to access corporate data from almost anywhere and anytime. Wireless broadband networks are ...

  14. 75 FR 30300 - Drawbridge Operation Regulations; Root River, Racine, WI

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-01

    ... DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 117 [Docket No. USCG-2010-0414] Drawbridge Operation Regulations; Root River, Racine, WI AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS. ACTION: Notice of temporary... Bridge at Mile 0.53 over the Root River, at Racine, WI. This deviation will temporarily change the...

  15. Wi-Fi Coexistence with Duty Cycled LTE-U

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yimin Pang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Coexistence of Wi-Fi and LTE-Unlicensed (LTE-U technologies has drawn significant concern in industry. In this paper, we investigate the Wi-Fi performance in the presence of duty cycle based LTE-U transmission on the same channel. More specifically, one LTE-U cell and one Wi-Fi basic service set (BSS coexist by allowing LTE-U devices to transmit their signals only in predetermined duty cycles. Wi-Fi stations, on the other hand, simply contend the shared channel using the distributed coordination function (DCF protocol without cooperation with the LTE-U system or prior knowledge about the duty cycle period or duty cycle of LTE-U transmission. We define the fairness of the above scheme as the difference between Wi-Fi performance loss ratio (considering a defined reference performance and the LTE-U duty cycle (or function of LTE-U duty cycle. Depending on the interference to noise ratio (INR being above or below −62 dbm, we classify the LTE-U interference as strong or weak and establish mathematical models accordingly. The average throughput and average service time of Wi-Fi are both formulated as functions of Wi-Fi and LTE-U system parameters using probability theory. Lastly, we use the Monte Carlo analysis to demonstrate the fairness of Wi-Fi and LTE-U air time sharing.

  16. Edge fluctuations in the MST [Madison Symmetric Torus] reversed field pinch

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Almagri, A.; Assadi, S.; Beckstead, J.; Chartas, G.; Crocker, N.; Den Hartog, D.; Dexter, R.; Hokin, S.; Holly, D.; Nilles, E.; Prager, S.; Rempel, T.; Sarff, J.; Scime, E.; Shen, W.; Spragins, C.; Sprott, J.; Starr, G.; Stoneking, M.; Watts, C.

    1990-10-01

    Edge magnetic and electrostatic fluctuations are measured in the Madison Symmetric Torus (MST) reversed field pinch. At low frequency ( e > p e /p e where φ and p e are the fluctuating potential and pressure, respectively). From measurements of the fluctuating density, temperature, and potential we infer that the electrostatic fluctuation induced transport of particles and energy can be substantial. 13 refs., 11 figs

  17. Comparing Adam Smith's Wealth of Nations to James Madison's Federalist #10.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mundell, Jean

    1987-01-01

    Presents a lesson which calls upon students to compare Adam Smith's WEALTH OF NATIONS to James Madison's FEDERALIST #10 to see how the ancient concept of individual rights and liberties was used to describe both economic and governmental systems. Presents questions to provide the basis for comparison. (GEA)

  18. 2006 Multibeam Mapping of cross-shelf corridor, North of Madison-Swanson - Florida

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This disk or set of disks contain high-resolution multibeam and backscatter maps of an area North of Madison-Swanson (29.1667N, 85.6667W), in the West-Florida shelf,...

  19. 76 FR 18212 - FPL Energy Maine Hydro LLC; Madison Paper Industries; Merimil Limited Partnership; Notice of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-01

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission FPL Energy Maine Hydro LLC; Madison Paper Industries; Merimil Limited... strongly encourages electronic filing, documents may also be paper-filed. To paper-file, mail an original...

  20. Tracking Human Mobility Using WiFi Signals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sapiezynski, Piotr; Stopczynski, Arkadiusz; Gatej, Radu

    2015-01-01

    We study six months of human mobility data, including WiFi and GPS traces recorded with high temporal resolution, and find that time series of WiFi scans contain a strong latent location signal. In fact, due to inherent stability and low entropy of human mobility, it is possible to assign location...... to WiFi access points based on a very small number of GPS samples and then use these access points as location beacons. Using just one GPS observation per day per person allows us to estimate the location of, and subsequently use, WiFi access points to account for 80% of mobility across a population....... These results reveal a great opportunity for using ubiquitous WiFi routers for high-resolution outdoor positioning, but also significant privacy implications of such side-channel location tracking....

  1. Challenges for Social Sensing using WiFi Signals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjærgaard, Mikkel Baun; Nurmi, Petteri

    2012-01-01

    Smartphones are an attractive option for social sensing due to their widespread market penetration rate and advanced sensing capabilities. Enabling social sensing on smartphones would require techniques that can accurately detect and characterize physical proximity, an important prerequisite...... for the capture of more complex social phenomena. One of the most promising modalities for this purpose is WiFi, as it works both indoors and outdoors, and as WiFi signal environment tends to contain significant spatial variation. A challenge in using WiFi, however, is that the signals are affected by many noise...... sources, such as fast fading, body attenuation, hardware differences and varying access points densities. In this paper we review existing work on using WiFi for social sensing and outline challenges that have to be addressed to utilize WiFi at large for social sensing....

  2. Tracking Human Mobility Using WiFi Signals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sapiezynski, Piotr; Stopczynski, Arkadiusz; Gatej, Radu; Lehmann, Sune

    2015-01-01

    We study six months of human mobility data, including WiFi and GPS traces recorded with high temporal resolution, and find that time series of WiFi scans contain a strong latent location signal. In fact, due to inherent stability and low entropy of human mobility, it is possible to assign location to WiFi access points based on a very small number of GPS samples and then use these access points as location beacons. Using just one GPS observation per day per person allows us to estimate the location of, and subsequently use, WiFi access points to account for 80% of mobility across a population. These results reveal a great opportunity for using ubiquitous WiFi routers for high-resolution outdoor positioning, but also significant privacy implications of such side-channel location tracking.

  3. Holography of Wi-fi Radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holl, Philipp M.; Reinhard, Friedemann

    2017-05-01

    Wireless data transmission systems such as wi-fi or Bluetooth emit coherent light—electromagnetic waves with a precisely known amplitude and phase. Propagating in space, this radiation forms a hologram—a two-dimensional wave front encoding a three-dimensional view of all objects traversed by the light beam. Here we demonstrate a scheme to record this hologram in a phase-coherent fashion across a meter-sized imaging region. We recover three-dimensional views of objects and emitters by feeding the resulting data into digital reconstruction algorithms. Employing a digital implementation of dark-field propagation to suppress multipath reflection, we significantly enhance the quality of the resulting images. We numerically simulate the hologram of a 10-m-sized building, finding that both localization of emitters and 3D tomography of absorptive objects could be feasible by this technique.

  4. 75 FR 56597 - University of Wisconsin; University of Wisconsin Nuclear Reactor Environmental Assessment and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-16

    ... when solid waste is generated from use of the UWNR, it is transferred to the University of Wisconsin.... In the years that solid waste was generated, less than 400 milliCuries of solid waste was transferred...; University of Wisconsin Nuclear Reactor Environmental Assessment and Finding of No Significant Impact The U.S...

  5. Rehabilitation of Delavan Lake, Wisconsin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robertson, Dale M.; Goddard, Gerald L.; Helsel, D.R.; MacKinnon, Kevin L.

    2009-01-01

    A comprehensive rehabilitation plan was developed and implemented to shift Delavan Lake, Wisconsin, from a hypereutrophic to a mesotrophic condition. The plan was threefold: (1) reduce external phosphorus (P) loading by applying Best Management Practices in the watershed, enhance an existing wetland, and short-circuit the inflows through the lake, (2) reduce internal P loading by treating the sediments with alum and removing carp, and (3) rehabilitate the fishery by removing carp and bigmouth buffalo and adding piscivores (biomanipulation). The first and second parts of the plan met with only limited success. With only minor reductions in internal and external P loading, P concentrations in the lake returned to near pre-treatment concentrations. The intensive biomanipulation and resulting trophic cascade (increased piscivores, decreased planktivores, increased large zooplankton populations, and reduced phytoplankton populations) eliminated most of the original problems in the lake (blue-green algal blooms and limited water clarity). However, now there is extensive macrophyte growth and abundant filamentous algae. Without significantly reducing the sources of the problems (high P loading) in Delavan Lake, the increased water clarity may not last. With an improved understanding of the individual components of this rehabilitation program, better future management plans can be developed for Delavan Lake and other lakes and reservoirs with similar eutrophication problems.

  6. New Epigenetic Therapeutic Intervention for Metastatic Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-04-01

    11/09/2016 University of Wisconsin-Madison, Cancer Biology Seminar Series, Madison, WI, “From Epigenetic Mechanism to Targeted Therapy” 12/22/2016...Transcription” 02/16/2017 Purdue University Cancer Center, West Lafayette, IN, “From Epigenetic Structural Mechanism to Targeted Therapy” 7 Binhua P...171,284/yr, d.c. “Structure and Mechanism of Protein Modules in Chromatin Biology” This project aims to conduct structural and biochemical analyses

  7. Characterizing a Rat Brca2 Knockout Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-05-01

    for Cancer Research, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, WI, USA; 2Genetics and Biochemistry Branch, National institute of Diabetes and Digestive...Mutagenesis 6: 495–499. Worgul BV, Smilenov L, Brenner DJ, Junk A, Zhou W, Hall EJ. (2002). Atm heterozygous mice are more sensitive to radiation-induced...environmental factors, such as animal housing, food , and mode of carcinogen administration, and/or genetic factors. The genetic influences can be

  8. Tracking Human Mobility Using WiFi Signals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sapiezynski, Piotr; Stopczynski, Arkadiusz; Gatej, Radu

    2015-01-01

    We study six months of human mobility data, including WiFi and GPS traces recorded with high temporal resolution, and find that time series of WiFi scans contain a strong latent location signal. In fact, due to inherent stability and low entropy of human mobility, it is possible to assign locatio....... These results reveal a great opportunity for using ubiquitous WiFi routers for high-resolution outdoor positioning, but also significant privacy implications of such side-channel location tracking.......We study six months of human mobility data, including WiFi and GPS traces recorded with high temporal resolution, and find that time series of WiFi scans contain a strong latent location signal. In fact, due to inherent stability and low entropy of human mobility, it is possible to assign location...... to WiFi access points based on a very small number of GPS samples and then use these access points as location beacons. Using just one GPS observation per day per person allows us to estimate the location of, and subsequently use, WiFi access points to account for 80% of mobility across a population...

  9. Community Based Networks and 5G Wi-Fi

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Williams, Idongesit

    2018-01-01

    This paper argues on why Community Based Networks should be recognized as potential 5G providers using 5G Wi-Fi. The argument is hinged on findings in a research to understand why Community Based Networks deploy telecom and Broadband infrastructure. The study was a qualitative study carried out...... inductively using Grounded Theory. Six cases were investigated. Two Community Based Network Mobilization Models were identified. The findings indicate that 5G Wi-Fi deployment by Community Based Networks is possible if policy initiatives and the 5G Wi-Fi standards are developed to facilitate the causal...

  10. Water in carbonate rocks of the Madison Group in southeastern Montana--A preliminary evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, W. Roger

    1976-01-01

    The Madison Group of Mississippian age comprises, from oldest to youngest, the Lodgepole and Mission Canyon Limestones and the Charles Formation. The Madison crops out in the Bighorn and Pryor Mountains and in the mountains west of the study area. These rocks consist of cyclically deposited normal-marine carbonates and restricted-marine carbonates and evaporites. The Madison ranges in thickness from about 700 feet (210 metres) in the Bighorn Mountains to about 2,000 feet (610 metres) in the Williston basin. The top of the Madison ranges in depth from land surface in the mountains to about 10,000 feet (3,000 metres) below land surface along the MontanaWyoming border. The potentiometric surface of water in the Madison Group slopes northeastward from the outcrops. Potentiometric lows occur in the Cat Creek anticline-Porcupine dome area along the Bighorn River and at the north end of Powder River basin. Potentiometric highs occur in outcrop areas, on the interstream divide between the Bighorn, Tongue, and Yellowstone Rivers, and along the Cedar Creek anticline. The potentiometric surface ranges from 1,200 feet (370 metres) below land surface in the topographically high areas in the southern part of the area to 1,000 feet (300 metres) above land surface along the Yellowstone River. Yields from wells range from about 50 gallons per minute (3 litres per second) at several places to a reported 1,400 gallons per minute (88 litres per second) from a flowing well on the north side of the Porcupine dome. Yields estimated or reported from drill-stem tests range from about 1 to 157 gallons per minute {0.1 to 9.9 litres per second). Water from the Madison generally contains less than 3,000 milligrams per litre dissolved solids south of T. 1 N., and from 3,000 to 10,000 milligrams per litre in most of the remaining area; in the Williston basin the concentration increases to more than 100,000 milligrams per litre. In the southeastern and southwestern parts of the area, calcium

  11. Tickborne Powassan virus infections among Wisconsin residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Diep K Hoang; Staples, J Erin; Sotir, Mark J; Warshauer, David M; Davis, Jeffrey P

    2010-04-01

    Powassan virus (POWV) is a tickborne Flavivirus that causes a rare but potentially life-threatening illness. The first reported case of POWV infection in a Wisconsin resident occurred in 2003. Enhanced surveillance and testing detected 2 additional cases. Patient specimens with a positive or equivocal immunoglobulin M (IgM) antibody to an arbovirus were sent from commercial laboratories to the Wisconsin State Laboratory of Hygiene and forwarded to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) for confirmatory testing. Patients with laboratory confirmed POWV infections were interviewed to obtain demographic, clinical, and epidemiologic information. POWV infections were confirmed in 3 adult Wisconsin residents in 2003, 2006, and 2007; illness onsets occurred during May and June. Two patients were hospitalized and all survived. One patient had a dual infection with POWV and Anaplasma phaghocytophilum. Specimens from all 3 patients were initially reported as positive for IgM antibody to either St Louis encephalitis or California serogroup viruses; POWV-specific antibody was detected during confirmatory testing at the CDC. Each patient had exposures to known or likely tick habitats in different counties within 30 days before illness onset. These are the first diagnosed human POWV infections in Wisconsin. Because all 3 patients were initially identified as having other arboviral infections using commercial screening kits, routine confirmatory testing is essential for proper diagnosis of most arboviral infections. Wisconsin residents should be educated regarding risks of acquiring and ways to prevent POWV infection and other tickborne diseases when spending time outdoors.

  12. Implementing high-speed rail in Wisconsin peer exchange.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-01-01

    The Wisconsin Department of Transportation Division of Transportation Investment Management hosted : a peer exchange on June 2 -4, 2009 in Milwaukee, Wisconsin. Representatives from four state DOTs and : two freight railroads joined representatives f...

  13. Geochemistry of the Madison and Minnelusa aquifers in the Black Hills area, South Dakota

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naus, Cheryl A.; Driscoll, Daniel G.; Carter, Janet M.

    2001-01-01

    The Madison and Minnelusa aquifers are two of the most important aquifers in the Black Hills area because of utilization for water supplies and important influences on surface-water resources resulting from large springs and streamflow- loss zones. Examination of geochemical information provides a better understanding of the complex flow systems within these aquifers and interactions between the aquifers. Major-ion chemistry in both aquifers is dominated by calcium and bicarbonate near outcrop areas, with basinward evolution towards various other water types. The most notable differences in major-ion chemistry between the Madison and Minnelusa aquifers are in concentrations of sulfate within the Minnelusa aquifer. Sulfate concentrations increase dramatically near a transition zone where dissolution of anhydrite is actively occurring. Water chemistry for the Madison and Minnelusa aquifers is controlled by reactions among calcite, dolomite, and anhydrite. Saturation indices for gypsum, calcite, and dolomite for most samples in both the Madison and Minnelusa aquifers are indicative of the occurrence of dedolomitization. Because water in the Madison aquifer remains undersaturated with respect to gypsum, even at the highest sulfate concentrations, upward leakage into the overlying Minnelusa aquifer has potential to drive increased dissolution of anhydrite in the Minnelusa Formation. Isotopic information is used to evaluate ground-water flowpaths, ages, and mixing conditions for the Madison and Minnelusa aquifers. Distinctive patterns exist in the distribution of stable isotopes of oxygen and hydrogen in precipitation for the Black Hills area, with isotopically lighter precipitation generally occurring at higher elevations and latitudes. Distributions of 18O in ground water are consistent with spatial patterns in recharge areas, with isotopically lighter 18O values in the Madison aquifer resulting from generally higher elevation recharge sources, relative to the

  14. SeaWiFS_L3b_SCWI_RRS

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The SeaWiFS instrument was launched by Orbital Sciences Corporation on the OrbView-2 (a.k.a. SeaStar) satellite in August 1997, and collected data from September...

  15. SeaWiFS_L3b_SCSU_PAR

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The SeaWiFS instrument was launched by Orbital Sciences Corporation on the OrbView-2 (a.k.a. SeaStar) satellite in August 1997, and collected data from September...

  16. SeaWiFS_L3b_DAY_POC

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The SeaWiFS instrument was launched by Orbital Sciences Corporation on the OrbView-2 (a.k.a. SeaStar) satellite in August 1997, and collected data from September...

  17. SeaWiFS_L3b_SNSP_RRS

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The SeaWiFS instrument was launched by Orbital Sciences Corporation on the OrbView-2 (a.k.a. SeaStar) satellite in August 1997, and collected data from September...

  18. SeaWiFS_L3b_CU_CHL

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The SeaWiFS instrument was launched by Orbital Sciences Corporation on the OrbView-2 (a.k.a. SeaStar) satellite in August 1997, and collected data from September...

  19. SeaWiFS_L3b_SNWI_CHL

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The SeaWiFS instrument was launched by Orbital Sciences Corporation on the OrbView-2 (a.k.a. SeaStar) satellite in August 1997, and collected data from September...

  20. SeaWiFS_L3b_DAY_LAND

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The SeaWiFS instrument was launched by Orbital Sciences Corporation on the OrbView-2 (a.k.a. SeaStar) satellite in August 1997, and collected data from September...

  1. SeaWiFS_L3b_CU_CDOM

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The SeaWiFS instrument was launched by Orbital Sciences Corporation on the OrbView-2 (a.k.a. SeaStar) satellite in August 1997, and collected data from September...

  2. SeaWiFS_L3b_SCAU_LAND

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The SeaWiFS instrument was launched by Orbital Sciences Corporation on the OrbView-2 (a.k.a. SeaStar) satellite in August 1997, and collected data from September...

  3. SeaWiFS_L3b_SCSU_CDOM

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The SeaWiFS instrument was launched by Orbital Sciences Corporation on the OrbView-2 (a.k.a. SeaStar) satellite in August 1997, and collected data from September...

  4. SeaWiFS_L3b_SCWI_CHL

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The SeaWiFS instrument was launched by Orbital Sciences Corporation on the OrbView-2 (a.k.a. SeaStar) satellite in August 1997, and collected data from September...

  5. SeaWiFS_L3b_MC_POC

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The SeaWiFS instrument was launched by Orbital Sciences Corporation on the OrbView-2 (a.k.a. SeaStar) satellite in August 1997, and collected data from September...

  6. SeaWiFS_L3b_CU_PIC

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The SeaWiFS instrument was launched by Orbital Sciences Corporation on the OrbView-2 (a.k.a. SeaStar) satellite in August 1997, and collected data from September...

  7. SeaWiFS_L3b_SCWI_LAND

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The SeaWiFS instrument was launched by Orbital Sciences Corporation on the OrbView-2 (a.k.a. SeaStar) satellite in August 1997, and collected data from September...

  8. SeaWiFS_L3b_SNAU_CDOM

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The SeaWiFS instrument was launched by Orbital Sciences Corporation on the OrbView-2 (a.k.a. SeaStar) satellite in August 1997, and collected data from September...

  9. SeaWiFS_L3b_SCSP_CDOM

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The SeaWiFS instrument was launched by Orbital Sciences Corporation on the OrbView-2 (a.k.a. SeaStar) satellite in August 1997, and collected data from September...

  10. SeaWiFS_L3b_DAY_RRS

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The SeaWiFS instrument was launched by Orbital Sciences Corporation on the OrbView-2 (a.k.a. SeaStar) satellite in August 1997, and collected data from September...

  11. SeaWiFS_L3b_SNWI_RRS

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The SeaWiFS instrument was launched by Orbital Sciences Corporation on the OrbView-2 (a.k.a. SeaStar) satellite in August 1997, and collected data from September...

  12. SeaWiFS_L3b_SCSP_RRS

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The SeaWiFS instrument was launched by Orbital Sciences Corporation on the OrbView-2 (a.k.a. SeaStar) satellite in August 1997, and collected data from September...

  13. SeaWiFS_L3b_DAY_CDOM

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The SeaWiFS instrument was launched by Orbital Sciences Corporation on the OrbView-2 (a.k.a. SeaStar) satellite in August 1997, and collected data from September...

  14. SeaWiFS_L3b_WC_PIC

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The SeaWiFS instrument was launched by Orbital Sciences Corporation on the OrbView-2 (a.k.a. SeaStar) satellite in August 1997, and collected data from September...

  15. SeaWiFS_L3b_WC_POC

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The SeaWiFS instrument was launched by Orbital Sciences Corporation on the OrbView-2 (a.k.a. SeaStar) satellite in August 1997, and collected data from September...

  16. SeaWiFS_L3b_SNWI_LAND

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The SeaWiFS instrument was launched by Orbital Sciences Corporation on the OrbView-2 (a.k.a. SeaStar) satellite in August 1997, and collected data from September...

  17. SeaWiFS_L3b_SCSU_CHL

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The SeaWiFS instrument was launched by Orbital Sciences Corporation on the OrbView-2 (a.k.a. SeaStar) satellite in August 1997, and collected data from September...

  18. SeaWiFS_L3b_SCSP_PAR

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The SeaWiFS instrument was launched by Orbital Sciences Corporation on the OrbView-2 (a.k.a. SeaStar) satellite in August 1997, and collected data from September...

  19. SeaWiFS_L3b_SCSU_PIC

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The SeaWiFS instrument was launched by Orbital Sciences Corporation on the OrbView-2 (a.k.a. SeaStar) satellite in August 1997, and collected data from September...

  20. SeaWiFS_L3b_MO_CHL

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The SeaWiFS instrument was launched by Orbital Sciences Corporation on the OrbView-2 (a.k.a. SeaStar) satellite in August 1997, and collected data from September...

  1. SeaWiFS_L3b_SCSP_POC

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The SeaWiFS instrument was launched by Orbital Sciences Corporation on the OrbView-2 (a.k.a. SeaStar) satellite in August 1997, and collected data from September...

  2. SeaWiFS_L3b_MC_CHL

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The SeaWiFS instrument was launched by Orbital Sciences Corporation on the OrbView-2 (a.k.a. SeaStar) satellite in August 1997, and collected data from September...

  3. SeaWiFS_L3b_MO_PIC

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The SeaWiFS instrument was launched by Orbital Sciences Corporation on the OrbView-2 (a.k.a. SeaStar) satellite in August 1997, and collected data from September...

  4. SeaWiFS_L3b_MC_RRS

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The SeaWiFS instrument was launched by Orbital Sciences Corporation on the OrbView-2 (a.k.a. SeaStar) satellite in August 1997, and collected data from September...

  5. SeaWiFS_L3b_SNAU_POC

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The SeaWiFS instrument was launched by Orbital Sciences Corporation on the OrbView-2 (a.k.a. SeaStar) satellite in August 1997, and collected data from September...

  6. SeaWiFS_L3b_SNSP_POC

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The SeaWiFS instrument was launched by Orbital Sciences Corporation on the OrbView-2 (a.k.a. SeaStar) satellite in August 1997, and collected data from September...

  7. 76 FR 35831 - Television Broadcasting Services; Eau Claire, WI

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-20

    ...] Television Broadcasting Services; Eau Claire, WI AGENCY: Federal Communications Commission. ACTION: Proposed rule. SUMMARY: The Commission has before it a petition for rulemaking filed by Gray Television Licensee... 73 Television, Television broadcasting. Federal Communications Commission. Barbara A. Kreisman, Chief...

  8. SeaWiFS_L3b_SNWI_CDOM

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The SeaWiFS instrument was launched by Orbital Sciences Corporation on the OrbView-2 (a.k.a. SeaStar) satellite in August 1997, and collected data from September...

  9. SeaWiFS_L3b_CU_LAND

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The SeaWiFS instrument was launched by Orbital Sciences Corporation on the OrbView-2 (a.k.a. SeaStar) satellite in August 1997, and collected data from September...

  10. SeaWiFS_L3b_MO_PAR

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The SeaWiFS instrument was launched by Orbital Sciences Corporation on the OrbView-2 (a.k.a. SeaStar) satellite in August 1997, and collected data from September...

  11. Silica-acac-supported palladium nanoparticles as an efficient and ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    bDepartment of Neuroscience, University of Wisconsin, Medical School, 1300 University Avenue,. Madison, WI ... application in the Suzuki–Miyaura reaction of various aryl halides with phenylboronic acid was investigated. ... sensitive to air and moisture, so reactions were carried out without using inert atmosphere.

  12. After the Cold War: Living with Lower Defense Spending

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-02-01

    December, 1988); Glen Pulver, Community Economic Development Strategies (Madison, WI: University of Wisconsin-Extension); Eva Galambos, Making Sense...the maze becomes even more complex. Public near Copenhagen (one of 31 technology services ing) th maz beomeseve mor coplex Pulic centers in Denmark

  13. Brooks et al., Afr J Tradit Complement Altern Med. (2013) 10(1):1-8 1

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    AJTCAM

    aDepartment of Medical Sciences, University of Wisconsin, 2015 Linden Drive Madison, WI 53706,. USAbDepartment of Computing and Biometry, ..... numerical dose because preliminary graphs of the data indicated a possible non-linear relationship between dose and the endpoints of interest. Health scores were analyzed ...

  14. Integration of Wind Energy Systems into Power Engineering Education Program at UW-Madison

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Venkataramanan, Giri [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States); Lesieutre, Bernard [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States); Jahns, Thomas [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States); Desai, Ankur R [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States)

    2012-09-01

    This project has developed an integrated curriculum focused on the power engineering aspects of wind energy systems that builds upon a well-established graduate educational program at UW- Madison. Five new courses have been developed and delivered to students. Some of the courses have been offered on multiple occasions. The courses include: Control of electric drives for Wind Power applications, Utility Applications of Power Electronics (Wind Power), Practicum in Small Wind Turbines, Utility Integration of Wind Power, and Wind and Weather for Scientists and Engineers. Utility Applications of Power Electronics (Wind Power) has been provided for distance education as well as on-campus education. Several industrial internships for students have been organized. Numerous campus seminars that provide discussion on emerging issues related to wind power development have been delivered in conjunction with other campus events. Annual student conferences have been initiated, that extend beyond wind power to include sustainable energy topics to draw a large group of stakeholders. Energy policy electives for engineering students have been identified for students to participate through a certificate program. Wind turbines build by students have been installed at a UW-Madison facility, as a test-bed. A Master of Engineering program in Sustainable Systems Engineering has been initiated that incorporates specializations that include in wind energy curricula. The project has enabled UW-Madison to establish leadership at graduate level higher education in the field of wind power integration with the electric grid.

  15. Novel Approaches to Enhance Mobile WiMAX Security

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taeshik Shon

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The IEEE 802.16 Working Group on Broadband Wireless Access Standards released IEEE 802.16-2004 which is a standardized technology for supporting broadband and wireless communication with fixed and nomadic access. After the IEEE 802.16-2004 standard, a new advanced and revised standard was released as the IEEE 802.16e-2005 amendment which is foundation of Mobile WiMAX network supporting handover and roaming capabilities. In the area of security aspects, compared to IEEE 802.16-2004, IEEE 802.16e, called Mobile WiMAX, adopts improved security architecture—PKMv2 which includes EAP authentication, AES-based authenticated encryption, and CMAC or HMAC message protection. However, there is no guarantee that PKMv2-based Mobile WiMAX network will not have security flaws. In this paper, we investigate the current Mobile WiMAX security architecture focusing mainly on pointing out new security vulnerabilities such as a disclosure of security context in network entry, a lack of secure communication in network domain, and a necessity of efficient handover supporting mutual authentication. Based on the investigation results, we propose a novel Mobile WiMAX security architecture, called RObust and Secure MobilE WiMAX (ROSMEX, to prevent the new security vulnerabilities.

  16. The Audacity of Fiber-Wireless (FiWi) Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maier, Martin; Ghazisaidi, Navid; Reisslein, Martin

    A plethora of enabling optical and wireless technologies have been emerging that can be used to build future-proof bimodal fiber-wireless (FiWi) broadband access networks. After overviewing key enabling radio-over-fiber (RoF) and radio-and-fiber (R&F) technologies and briefly surveying the state of the art of FiWi networks, we introduce an Ethernet-based access-metro FiWi network, called SuperMAN, that integrates next-generation WiFi and WiMAX networks with WDM-enhanced EPON and RPR networks. Throughout the paper we pay close attention to the technical challenges and opportunities of FiWi networks, but also elaborate on their societal benefits and potential to shift the current research focus from optical-wireless networking to the exploitation of personal and in-home computing facilities to create new unforeseen services and applications as we are about to enter the Petabyte age.

  17. Wi-Fi/MARG Integration for Indoor Pedestrian Localization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Zengshan; Jin, Yue; Zhou, Mu; Wu, Zipeng; Li, Ze

    2016-12-10

    With the wide deployment of Wi-Fi networks, Wi-Fi based indoor localization systems that are deployed without any special hardware have caught significant attention and have become a currently practical technology. At the same time, the Magnetic, Angular Rate, and Gravity (MARG) sensors installed in commercial mobile devices can achieve highly-accurate localization in short time. Based on this, we design a novel indoor localization system by using built-in MARG sensors and a Wi-Fi module. The innovative contributions of this paper include the enhanced Pedestrian Dead Reckoning (PDR) and Wi-Fi localization approaches, and an Extended Kalman Particle Filter (EKPF) based fusion algorithm. A new Wi-Fi/MARG indoor localization system, including an Android based mobile client, a Web page for remote control, and a location server, is developed for real-time indoor pedestrian localization. The extensive experimental results show that the proposed system is featured with better localization performance, with the average error 0.85 m, than the one achieved by using the Wi-Fi module or MARG sensors solely.

  18. Wi-Fi/MARG Integration for Indoor Pedestrian Localization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zengshan Tian

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available With the wide deployment of Wi-Fi networks, Wi-Fi based indoor localization systems that are deployed without any special hardware have caught significant attention and have become a currently practical technology. At the same time, the Magnetic, Angular Rate, and Gravity (MARG sensors installed in commercial mobile devices can achieve highly-accurate localization in short time. Based on this, we design a novel indoor localization system by using built-in MARG sensors and a Wi-Fi module. The innovative contributions of this paper include the enhanced Pedestrian Dead Reckoning (PDR and Wi-Fi localization approaches, and an Extended Kalman Particle Filter (EKPF based fusion algorithm. A new Wi-Fi/MARG indoor localization system, including an Android based mobile client, a Web page for remote control, and a location server, is developed for real-time indoor pedestrian localization. The extensive experimental results show that the proposed system is featured with better localization performance, with the average error 0.85 m, than the one achieved by using the Wi-Fi module or MARG sensors solely.

  19. Milwaukee, Wisconsin: Solar in Action (Brochure)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2011-10-01

    This brochure provides an overview of the challenges and successes of Milwaukee, WI, a 2008 Solar America City awardee, on the path toward becoming a solar-powered community. Accomplishments, case studies, key lessons learned, and local resource information are given.

  20. EnviroAtlas - Milwaukee, WI - Ecosystem Services by Block Group

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This EnviroAtlas dataset presents environmental benefits of the urban forest in 1,175 block groups in Milwaukee, Wisconsin. Carbon attributes, temperature reduction,...

  1. Wi-Fi is an important threat to human health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pall, Martin L

    2018-03-21

    Repeated Wi-Fi studies show that Wi-Fi causes oxidative stress, sperm/testicular damage, neuropsychiatric effects including EEG changes, apoptosis, cellular DNA damage, endocrine changes, and calcium overload. Each of these effects are also caused by exposures to other microwave frequency EMFs, with each such effect being documented in from 10 to 16 reviews. Therefore, each of these seven EMF effects are established effects of Wi-Fi and of other microwave frequency EMFs. Each of these seven is also produced by downstream effects of the main action of such EMFs, voltage-gated calcium channel (VGCC) activation. While VGCC activation via EMF interaction with the VGCC voltage sensor seems to be the predominant mechanism of action of EMFs, other mechanisms appear to have minor roles. Minor roles include activation of other voltage-gated ion channels, calcium cyclotron resonance and the geomagnetic magnetoreception mechanism. Five properties of non-thermal EMF effects are discussed. These are that pulsed EMFs are, in most cases, more active than are non-pulsed EMFs; artificial EMFs are polarized and such polarized EMFs are much more active than non-polarized EMFs; dose-response curves are non-linear and non-monotone; EMF effects are often cumulative; and EMFs may impact young people more than adults. These general findings and data presented earlier on Wi-Fi effects were used to assess the Foster and Moulder (F&M) review of Wi-Fi. The F&M study claimed that there were seven important studies of Wi-Fi that each showed no effect. However, none of these were Wi-Fi studies, with each differing from genuine Wi-Fi in three distinct ways. F&M could, at most conclude that there was no statistically significant evidence of an effect. The tiny numbers studied in each of these seven F&M-linked studies show that each of them lack power to make any substantive conclusions. In conclusion, there are seven repeatedly found Wi-Fi effects which have also been shown to be caused by other

  2. The Legal Status of Homemakers in Wisconsin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melli, Marygold Shire

    This report focuses on laws in the state of Wisconsin as they relate to homemakers. Four areas are discussed, each in separate sections: marriage, widowhood, divorce, and wife abuse. The section on marriage includes information on property rights, disability and death of homemaker, federal Equal Credit Opportunity Act, domicile, interspousal…

  3. Divided Wisconsin: Partisan Spatial Electoral Realignment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaniewski, Kazimierz J.; Simmons, James R.

    2016-01-01

    When the Republican and Democratic presidential candidates head into the general election this fall, they will be courting votes from a statewide electorate that has dramatically shifted over time, mirroring the political polarization that is happening across the country. Over the last three decades, Wisconsin's political geography has evolved…

  4. Wisconsin Public Schools at a Glance, 2016

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wisconsin Department of Public Instruction, 2016

    2016-01-01

    "Wisconsin Public Schools at a Glance" provides in a single page document statistical information on the following topics: (1) Total number of public schools (2015-16); (2) Student (2015-16); (3) Attendance & Graduation (2014-15);(4) Staff (2013-14); (5) School Funding; and (6) Student Performance (2014-15). [For the previous report…

  5. Wisconsin Public Schools at a Glance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wisconsin Department of Public Instruction, 2014

    2014-01-01

    "Wisconsin Public Schools at a Glance" provides in a single page document statistical information on the following topics: (1) Total number of public schools (2014-15); (2) Staff (2013-14); (3) Students (2013-14);(4) Report Cards (2013-14); (5) Attendance and Graduation (2012-13); (6) Student Performance (2013-14); and (7) School Funding.

  6. The University of Wisconsin OAO operating system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heacox, H. C.; Mcnall, J. F.

    1972-01-01

    The Wisconsin OAO operating system is presented which consists of two parts: a computer program called HARUSPEX, which makes possible reasonably efficient and convenient operation of the package and ground operations equipment which provides real-time status monitoring, commanding and a quick-look at the data.

  7. Genetic Analysis of Termite Colonies in Wisconsin

    Science.gov (United States)

    R.A. Arango; D.A. Marschalek; F. Green III; K.F. Raffa; M.E. Berres

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study was to document current areas of subterranean termite activity in Wisconsin and to evaluate genetic characteristics of these northern, peripheral colonies. Here, amplified fragment-length polymorphism was used to characterize levels of inbreeding, expected heterozygosity, and percent polymorphism within colonies as well as genetic structure...

  8. Stakeholders' Perceptions of Parcelization in Wisconsin's Northwoods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mark G. Rickenbach; Paul H. Gobster

    2003-01-01

    Parcelization, the process by which relatively large forest ownerships become subdivided into smaller ones, is often related to changes in ownership and can bring changes to the use of the land. Landowners, resource professionals, and others interested in Wisconsin's Northwoods were asked their views on parcelization in a series of stakeholder forums. We analyzed...

  9. Sorghum as a forage in Wisconsin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Growing moderate quality forages that meet, but do not exceed, requirements of dairy replacement heifers is not a common practice in Wisconsin; however, this forage management option would have a positive impact on the dairy industry. It is typical for heifers to gain excessive bodyweight when they ...

  10. A campus-wide Wi-Fi service for CERN

    CERN Document Server

    2016-01-01

    Improvements are coming to CERN’s Wi-Fi service as connectivity is improved in offices, restaurants and meeting rooms.   All Wi-Fi traffic will be routed via central controllers in CERN’s Computer Centre to provide a better managed service. (Image: Veronika McQuade/CERN) The IT department’s Communication Systems group has provided Wi-Fi connectivity at CERN for many years now but with a focus on meeting rooms, auditoriums and informal meeting places such as the restaurants. Although some buildings have Wi-Fi coverage in offices, most do not and CERN’s Wi-Fi service is lagging behind the demand driven by the growing number of tablets, lightweight laptops and other wireless-only devices. Furthermore, the current network infrastructure can’t cope with the many devices in the Main Auditorium during events such as the recent LIGO announcement and it often has difficulty handling the demand at Restaurant 1 during lunchtimes. The wireless access points d...

  11. 12th US-Japan Seminar: Many Body Quantum Systems from Quantum Gases to Metrology and Information Processing. Held in Madison, Wisconsin on 20-24 September 2015

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-06-03

    Patents Awarded Awards Graduate Students None Names of Post Doctorates Names of Faculty Supported Names of Under Graduate students supported Received Book...engineering or technology fields: Student Metrics This section only applies to graduating undergraduates supported by this agreement in this...Mukaiyama Thompson Furusawa Takahashi 10:05 COFFEE COFFEE COFFEE COFFEE 10:30 Demille Vuletic Aspelmeyer Zelevinsky 11:10 Simon Odom Yoshioka Nakagawa 11

  12. Dreams of the Hmong Kingdom: The Quest for Legitimation in French Indochina, 1850- 1960, by Mai Na M. Lee. Madison, University of Wisconsin Press, 2015. 430 pages.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nengher N. Vang

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available This article provides a book review of Mai Na M. Lee’s Dreams of the Hmong Kingdom: The Quest for Legitimation in French Indochina, 1850-1960. Dreams of the Hmong Kingdom. It highlights the contribution of the book to the historiography of the Hmong and provides a critical assessment of the dichotomous analytical framework that Lee uses to analyze the rivalry between Hmong messianic leaders and Hmong political brokers and the competition between the Ly and Lo clans for paramountcy in French Indochina

  13. Proceedings of 1980 Symposium ’Wood Adhesives-Research, Application, and Needs’ Held at Madison, Wisconsin on 23-25 September 1980.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-09-25

    20-30% aromatics in the industries are apparently being marketed at form of mostly toluene and xylene to maintain a fair price. the octane number...was trimmed and thin sec- ditions, Isobind 100 will reach its finaltions of the core were removed for FTIR scans, properties after 40 seconds at a...LAVENUJIERS Las Vegas, NV, August. Figure 3.- FTIR , bound core minus Fiunbound care. 4. Martin, J., Sparks, N. E., 1967. Deter- mination of Lignin in

  14. A MOVIGENIC CURRICULUM, AN EXPERIMENTAL APPROACH TO CHILDREN WITH SPECIAL LEARNING DISABILITIES CONDUCTED AT THE LONGFELLOW SCHOOL, MADISON, WISCONSIN, DURING THE 1964-65 SCHOOL YEAR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    BARSCH, RAY H.

    A PHYSIOLOGICAL APPROACH TO THE EDUCATION OF CHILDREN WITH SPECIAL LEARNING DIFFICULTIES WAS THE BASIS OF AN EXPERIMENTAL CURRICULUM. THE LEARNER WAS SEEN AS A SPACIALLY ORIENTED BEING WITH A PHYSIOLOGICAL MAKEUP DESIGNED TO TRAVEL THROUGH "EDUCATIONAL SPACE," PROCESSING INFORMATION TO HIS PROGRESSIVE ADVANTAGE. EIGHT CONSTRUCTS SERVED…

  15. Evaluation of Turf-Grass and Prairie-Vegetated Rain Gardens in a Clay and Sand Soil, Madison, Wisconsin, Water Years 2004-08

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selbig, William R.; Balster, Nicholas

    2010-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with a consortium of 19 cities, towns, and villages in Dane County, Wis., undertook a study to compare the capability of rain gardens with different vegetative species and soil types to infiltrate stormwater runoff from the roof of an adjacent structure. Two rain gardens, one planted with turf grass and the other with native prairie species, were constructed side-by-side in 2003 at two locations with different dominant soil types, either sand or clay. Each rain garden was sized to a ratio of approximately 5:1 contributing area to receiving area and to a depth of 0.5 foot. Each rain garden, regardless of vegetation or soil type, was capable of storing and infiltrating most of the runoff over the 5-year study period. Both rain gardens in sand, as well as the prairie rain garden in clay, retained and infiltrated 100 percent of all precipitation and snowmelt events during water years 2004-07. The turf rain garden in clay occasionally had runoff exceed its confining boundaries, but was still able to retain 96 percent of all precipitation and snowmelt events during the same time period. Precipitation intensity and number of antecedent dry days were important variables that influenced when the storage capacity of underlying soils would become saturated, which resulted in pooled water in the rain gardens. Because the rooftop area that drained runoff to each rain garden was approximately five times larger than the area of the rain garden itself, evapotranspiration was a small percentage of the annual water budget. For example, during water year 2005, the maximum evapotranspiration of total influent volume ranged from 21 percent for the turf rain garden in clay to 25 percent for the turf rain garden in sand, and the minimum ranged from 12 percent for the prairie rain garden in clay to 19 percent for the prairie rain garden in sand. Little to no runoff left each rain garden as effluent and a small percentage of runoff returned to the atmosphere through evapotranspiration; therefore, the remainder was considered recharge. During water year 2005, recharge was 81 to 75 percent of total influent volume for the prairie- and turf-rain gardens in sand and 87 to 78 percent for the prairie- and turf-rain gardens in clay, respectively. Maximum recharge volumes ranged from 90 to 94 percent of the total influent volume in the turf and prairie rain gardens in sand and occurred during water year 2004. Maximum recharge in the turf and prairie rain gardens in clay ranged from 89 percent during water year 2007 to 98 percent during water year 2004. Median infiltration rates were an order of magnitude greater for rain gardens planted in sand than for those in clay, regardless of vegetation type. Under similar soil conditions, rain gardens planted with turf grass had lower median infiltration rates than those planted with prairie species. Median infiltration rates were 0.28 and 0.88 inches per hour in the turf and prairie rain gardens in clay, respectively, and 2.5 and 4.2 inches per hour in the turf and prairie rain gardens in sand, respectively. In general, infiltration rates were greater during spring (April and May) and summer (June through August) months. Of the six observed exceedences of the storage capacity of the turf rain garden in clay between April-November during 2004-07, five were predicted by use of a combination of the normalized surface storage volume, the median infiltration rate, and an estimate of specific yield for soils under the rain garden to a depth equal to the uppermost limiting layer. By use of the same criteria, in water year 2008, when the contributing drainage area to the prairie rain garden in clay was doubled, all four observed exceedences of the total storage capacity were predicted. The accuracy of the predictions of when the total storage capacity of the rain gardens would be exceeded indicates that by applying measurements of the appropriate soil properties to rain g

  16. Energy consumption model on WiMAX subscriber station

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mubarakah, N.; Suherman; Al-Hakim, M. Y.; Warman, E.

    2018-02-01

    Mobile communication technologies move toward miniaturization. Mobile device’s energy source relies on its battery endurance. The smaller the mobile device, it is expected the slower the battery drains. Energy consumption reduction in mobile devices has been of interest of researcher. In order to optimize energy consumption, its usage should be predictable. This paper proposes a model of predicted energy amount consumed by the WiMAX subscriber station by using regression analysis of active WiMAX states and their durations. The proposed model was assessed by using NS-2 simulation for more than a hundred thousand of recorded energy consumptions data in every WiMAX states. The assessment show a small average deviation between predicted and measured energy consumptions, about 0.18% for training data and 0.187% and 0.191% for test data.

  17. Private drinking water quality in rural Wisconsin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knobeloch, Lynda; Gorski, Patrick; Christenson, Megan; Anderson, Henry

    2013-03-01

    Between July 1, 2007, and December 31, 2010, Wisconsin health departments tested nearly 4,000 rural drinking water supplies for coliform bacteria, nitrate, fluoride, and 13 metals as part of a state-funded program that provides assistance to low-income families. The authors' review of laboratory findings found that 47% of these wells had an exceedance of one or more health-based water quality standards. Test results for iron and coliform bacteria exceeded safe limits in 21% and 18% of these wells, respectively. In addition, 10% of the water samples from these wells were high in nitrate and 11% had an elevated result for aluminum, arsenic, lead, manganese, or strontium. The high percentage of unsafe test results emphasizes the importance of water quality monitoring to the health of nearly one million families including 300,000 Wisconsin children whose drinking water comes from a privately owned well.

  18. DNA synthesis in permeabilized WI38 and MRC5 cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Griffiths, T.D.; Carpenter, J.G.

    1980-01-01

    DNA synthesis was examined in cultures of growing WI38 and MRC5 cells made permeable to deoxyribonucleotides. Cells from late passage cultures showed a reduced rate of deoxythymidine triphosphate (dTTP) uptake as compared to cells from early- to mid-passage cultures. This reduction became evident earlier in WI38 cultures (passage 33) than in MRC5 cultures (passage 41). Although this reduced rate of incorporation appeared to be primarily due to a reduced percentage of replicating (S phase) cells in later passage cultures, some effect on the rate of DNA synthesis in replicating cells was also evident

  19. Maritime super Wi-Fi coverage based on TVWS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Jia; Chen, Baodan; Zhang, Yonghui; Huang, Fang

    2014-10-01

    After analyzing the occupancy and characteristics of television white space (TVWS), this paper proposes wireless broadband networking by using super Wi-Fi technology in maritime environment operating on TVWS. A sea surface channel model is developed for predicting maritime network coverage of super Wi-Fi technology. This channel model is based on Irregular Terrain Methodology (ITM) model with revised parameters and dual-path propagation effect. The simulations demonstrated that the sea surface channel model can accurately reflect the transmission loss of radio wave in TVWS.

  20. ANDROID CHATTING APPLICATION BASED ON WI-FI TECHNOLOGY

    OpenAIRE

    Ekata M. Lambture *, Prof. Z.M. Shaikh

    2016-01-01

    As we know that Android operating system is one of the popular operating system for mobile applications.It supports mobile applications such as Chatting based applications,File sharing applications etc. In market thosands of applications are available in which users can send-receive messages,shares the files,send images,audio,video through network connectivity such as 2G,3G,4G. Android chatting application based on wi-fi technology provides same features but using WI-FI(Wireless Fidelity)...

  1. Wisconsin Earth and Space Science Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bilbrough, Larry (Technical Monitor); French, George

    2003-01-01

    The Wisconsin Earth and Space Science Education project successfilly met its objectives of creating a comprehensive online portfolio of science education curricular resources and providing a professional development program to increase educator competency with Earth and Space science content and teaching pedagogy. Overall, 97% of participants stated that their experience was either good or excellent. The favorable response of participant reactions to the professional development opportunities highlights the high quality of the professional development opportunity. The enthusiasm generated for using the curricular material in classroom settings was overwhelmingly positive at 92%. This enthusiasm carried over into actual classroom implementation of resources from the curricular portfolio, with 90% using the resources between 1-6 times during the school year. The project has had a positive impact on student learning in Wisconsin. Although direct measurement of student performance is not possible in a project of this kind, nearly 75% of participating teachers stated that they saw an increase in student performance in math and science as a result of using project resources. Additionally, nearly 75% of participants saw an increase in the enthusiasm of students towards math and science. Finally, some evidence exists that the professional development academies and curricular portfolio have been effective in changing educator behavior. More than half of all participants indicated that they have used more hands-on activities as a result of the Wisconsin Earth and Space Science Education project.

  2. Eesti Statoil seljatas emaettevõtte WiFiga / Annika Matson

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Matson, Annika, 1976-

    2003-01-01

    Eesti teenindusjaamades pakutakse alates suvest tasuta traadita internetiühendust WiFi, Skandinaavimaades on WiFi alles paigutamisel. Lõpuks kasumis: tabelid ja diagrammid. Vt. samas: Statoili arengut pärsib maardlate ammendumine

  3. Primary Productivity, SeaWiFS and Pathfinder, 0.1 degrees, Global, EXPERIMENTAL

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Primary Productivity is calculated from SeaWiFS Chl a, Pathfinder SST, and SeaWiFS PAR data. THIS IS AN EXPERIMENTAL PRODUCT: intended strictly for scientific...

  4. Estimating travel times using Wi-Fi sensor data

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoogendoorn, S.P.; Daamen, W.; Duives, D.C.; Yuan, Y.

    2016-01-01

    Determining travel time information from Wi-Fi (or Bluetooth) sensors is not trivial due to various (often technical) reasons. In this contribution, we focus on the problem of distinguishing travel time from the time people spend performing activities (e.g. fuelling the car, standing still to watch

  5. Wi-Fi Network Communication Technology Design | Onibere ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Transmission media (like Satellite, VSAT), access method used to transmit both voice and data on the networks and underlying software and hardware requirements. Also the various standards and protocol for proper wireless networks management, the various authentication and encryption techniques of Wi -Fi network ...

  6. 76 FR 49697 - Television Broadcasting Services; Eau Claire, WI

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-11

    ...] Television Broadcasting Services; Eau Claire, WI AGENCY: Federal Communications Commission. ACTION: Final rule. SUMMARY: The Commission has before it a petition for rulemaking filed by Gray Television Licensee... the Congressional review Act, see 5 U.S.C. 801(a)(1)(A). List of Subjects in 47 CFR Part 73 Television...

  7. 76 FR 68124 - Television Broadcasting Services; Fond du Lac, WI

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-03

    ... FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION 47 CFR Part 73 [MB Docket No. 09-115, RM-11543; DA 11-1502] Television Broadcasting Services; Fond du Lac, WI AGENCY: Federal Communications Commission. ACTION: Proposed rule. SUMMARY: In this document, the Commission denies a petition for reconsideration of an August 12...

  8. 76 FR 5300 - Proposed Amendment of Class E Airspace; Cable Union, WI

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-31

    ... Federal Aviation Administration 14 CFR Part 71 Proposed Amendment of Class E Airspace; Cable Union, WI...: This action proposes to amend Class E airspace at Cable Union, WI. Decommissioning of the Seely non-directional beacon (NDB) at Cable Union Airport, Cable Union, WI, has made this action necessary for the...

  9. 76 FR 22014 - Amendment of Class E Airspace; Cable Union, WI

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-20

    ... Federal Aviation Administration 14 CFR Part 71 Amendment of Class E Airspace; Cable Union, WI AGENCY... airspace for Cable Union, WI. Decommissioning of the Seely non-directional beacon (NDB) at Cable Union Airport, Cable Union, WI, has made this action necessary to enhance the safety and management of...

  10. The role of regulation in preventing Wi-Fi over-congestion in densely populated areas

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hartog, F.T.H. den; Nijs, J.M.M. de

    2017-01-01

    Given the ever increasing number of Wi-Fi devices in use by the public, the progressing urbanisation, and the current attempts by the industry to improve Wi-Fi system performance, we here analyse the case of apartment blocks with residents increasingly suffering from Wi-Fi over-congestion. Here,

  11. ‘Winckelmann’s History of Art and Polykleitos’ from Warren G. Moon (ed., Polykleitos, the Doryphoros and Tradition, Madison, Wisconsin and London: The University of Wisconsin Press 1995

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. A. Donohue

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available This essay is an expanded version of a paper delivered in 1989 at a colloquium organized around a replica of the Doryphorus acquired by the Minneapolis Institute of Arts. Winckelmann's treatment of Polyclitus serves to introduce a wider consideration of the structure and method of his history of classical art. It is argued that, contrary to assertions that he developed his history on the basis of his empirical observation of works of classical art, Winckelmann instead adopted historiographic schemata derived directly and indirectly from ancient authors. The ancient texts themselves reflect not so much authentic information about the visual arts as formulations from a tradition of histories of the ‘technai’, the arts of civilization, that were often linked with political history. Pliny's famous statement of the decline of art is re-interpreted in this light.

  12. Elements of Instruction VTAE Workshop (Wisconsin Rapids, Wisconsin, March 7-9, 1989). Final Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Howard D.

    This document describes a 3-day Wisconsin workshop on essential elements of instruction in vocational, technical, and adult education (VTAE). The workshop's content was based on the Univesity of California at Los Angeles' Teaching Model, which resulted from the work of Madeline Hunter. A three-page narrative describes some aspects of the model,…

  13. Quality of Wisconsin stormwater, 1989-94

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bannerman, Roger T.; Legg, Andrew D.; Greb, Steven R.

    1996-01-01

    Water-quality data were compiled from four urban stormwater monitoring projects conducted in Wisconsin between 1989 and 1994. These projects included monitoring in both storm-sewer pipes and urban streams. A total of 147 constitu ents were analyzed for in stormwater sampled from 10 storm-sewer pipes and four urban streams. Land uses represented by the storm-sewer watersheds included residential, commercial, industrial, and mixed. For about one-half the con stituents, at least 10 percent of the event mean con centrations exceeded the laboratory's minimum reporting limit. Detection frequencies were greater than 75 percent for many of the heavy metals and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in both the storm sewer and stream samples, whereas detec tion frequencies were about 20 percent or greater for many of the pesticides in both types of sam ples. Stormwater concentrations for conventional constituents, such as suspended solids, chloride, total phosphorus, and fecal coliform bacteria were greater than minimum reporting limits almost 100 percent of the time. Concentrations of many of the constituents were high enough to say that stormwater in the storm sewers and urban streams might be contrib uting to the degradation of the streams. In this report, constituents defined as potential contami nants are those for which the laboratory minimum report limit was exceeded for at least 10 percent of the sampled storm events, and for which at least one event mean concentration exceeded an estab lished water-quality standard. Storm-sewer sam ples had event mean concentrations of lead, copper, zinc, cadmium, and silver that frequently exceeded Wisconsin's acute toxicity criteria for cold water fisheries. Wisconsin's human cancer criteria was exceeded almost 100 percent of the time for polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in stormwater samples from storm sewers and streams. Maximum concentrations of diazinon found in storm sewers exceeded recommended levels of diazinon. Storm

  14. Mixing zones studies of the waste water discharge from the Consolidated Paper Company into the Wisconsin River at Wisconsin Rapids, Wisconsin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoopes, J. A.; Wu, D. S.; Ganatra, R.

    1973-01-01

    Effluent concentration distributions from the waste water discharge of the Kraft Division Mill, Consolidated Paper Company, into the Wisconsin River at Wisconsin Rapids, Wisconsin, is investigated. Effluent concentrations were determined from measurements of the temperature distribution, using temperature as a tracer. Measurements of the velocity distribution in the vicinity of the outfall were also made. Due to limitations in the extent of the field observations, the analysis and comparison of the measurements is limited to the region within about 300 feet from the outfall. Effects of outfall submergence, of buoyancy and momentum of the effluent and of the pattern and magnitude of river currents on these characteristics are considered.

  15. Flood-frequency characteristics of Wisconsin streams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, John F.; Peppler, Marie C.; Danz, Mari E.; Hubbard, Laura E.

    2017-05-22

    Flood-frequency characteristics for 360 gaged sites on unregulated rural streams in Wisconsin are presented for percent annual exceedance probabilities ranging from 0.2 to 50 using a statewide skewness map developed for this report. Equations of the relations between flood-frequency and drainage-basin characteristics were developed by multiple-regression analyses. Flood-frequency characteristics for ungaged sites on unregulated, rural streams can be estimated by use of the equations presented in this report. The State was divided into eight areas of similar physiographic characteristics. The most significant basin characteristics are drainage area, soil saturated hydraulic conductivity, main-channel slope, and several land-use variables. The standard error of prediction for the equation for the 1-percent annual exceedance probability flood ranges from 56 to 70 percent for Wisconsin Streams; these values are larger than results presented in previous reports. The increase in the standard error of prediction is likely due to increased variability of the annual-peak discharges, resulting in increased variability in the magnitude of flood peaks at higher frequencies. For each of the unregulated rural streamflow-gaging stations, a weighted estimate based on the at-site log Pearson type III analysis and the multiple regression results was determined. The weighted estimate generally has a lower uncertainty than either the Log Pearson type III or multiple regression estimates. For regulated streams, a graphical method for estimating flood-frequency characteristics was developed from the relations of discharge and drainage area for selected annual exceedance probabilities. Graphs for the major regulated streams in Wisconsin are presented in the report.

  16. Archaeological Investigations at a Wisconsin Petroglyph Site

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jack Steinbring

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Preliminary test excavations at the Hensler Petroglyph Site in East Central Wisconsin, U.S.A. have disclosed the remains of aboriginal engravings below Aeolian sediments dated to ca. 15,000 years B.P. The stratified deposits lying adjacent to an engraved panel, containing 35 pecked images, have yielded animal-like cobbles, some covered with red ochre, apparently picked for some esoteric use. The site itself has unusual natural shapes in the rock formation, along with acoustical properties, lightning strikes, a magnetic anomaly, and geographic prominence. Collectively these factors are thought to have attracted the ancient rock artists to the site.

  17. Wisconsin EE Mandates: The Bad News and the Good News.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lane, Jennie; And Others

    1996-01-01

    Examines Wisconsin teachers' perceived competencies in, attitudes toward, and amount of class time devoted to teaching about the environment. Discusses the effects of Wisconsin environmental education mandates concerning preservice preparation in environmental education and K-12 environmental education curriculum plans. Identifies areas where the…

  18. Wisconsin Maternity Leave and Fringe Benefits: Policies, Practices and Problems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerner, Jennifer

    The study examines the economic implications in Wisconsin of the 1972 Equal Employment Opportunity Commission guideline which requires employers to treat maternity leave as a temporary disability. First, the static cost of the maternity leave guideline to employers is estimated for the State of Wisconsin. Second, some examination of the economic…

  19. Data Collection and Recording on the Wisconsin/GSFC X-ray Quantum Calorimeter

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Neill, Laura; X-ray Astrophysics Group at the University of Wisconsin-Madison

    2016-01-01

    The Wisconsin/GSFC X-ray Quantum Calorimeter (XQC) is an astronomical X-ray sounding rocket payload which uses a micro-calorimeter array to detect low (less than1keV) X-rays. Three different devices were evaluated to upgrade XQC's data collection and recording system. The system takes incoming data from XQC's pixel sensors and stores it to a memory card. The upgrade is a much smaller board and much more compact storage device. The Terasic DE0-Nano, Terasic DE0-Nano SoC, and the BeagleBone Black were tested to determine which would suit the needs of XQC best. The device needed to take incoming data, store it to an SD card, and be able to output it through a USB connection. The Terasic DE0-Nano is a simple FPGA, but needed some peripheral additions for an SD card slot and USB readout. The Terasic DE0-Nano SoC was a powerful FPGA and hard processor running Linux combined. It was able to do what was needed, but pulled too much power in the process. The BeagleBone Black had a microcontroller and also ran Linux. This last device ended up being the best choice, as it did not require too much power and had a very easy system already in place for USB readout. The only difficulty to deal with was programming the microcontroller in assembly language. This device is necessary due to the telemetry on XQC not being able to send all of the data down during the flight. It records valuable data about low energy X-rays so that the X-ray Astrophysics Groups at the University of Wisconsin-Madison and Goddard Space Flight Center can analyze and resolve the spectrum of the soft X-ray background.Later, using the digital logic on a Terasic DE0-Nano FPGA, a data simulator for the BeagleBone Black data collection and recording device was created. Programmed with Quartus II, the simulator uses basic digital logic components to fabricate trackable data signals and related timing signals to send to the data management device, as well as other timing signals that are asynchronous to the rest of

  20. Annie Lechenet. Jefferson-Madison, Un débat sur la République.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marie-Jeanne Rossignol

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available Annie Léchenet est une philosophe, auteure d’une thèse sur la citoyenneté chez Thomas Jefferson. Pour cet ouvrage au format imposé (128 pages, les PUF lui ont confié la mission plus ambitieuse encore consistant à présenter les idées de Jefferson et de Madison. L’angle choisi est plutôt original : alors qu’il est de tradition d’associer les deux hommes, fondateurs du parti démocrate-républicain dans les années 1790, puis proches collaborateurs politiques tout le reste de leur existence, Annie...

  1. Los puentes de Madison: una mirada de género

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sonia Herrera Sánchez

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Más allá del uso estereotipado y los lugares comunes del amor romántico y el drama, en la película Los puentes de Madison de Clint Eastwood se dibujan y se cuestionan las estrategias familiares y los roles de género de las mujeres rurales estadounidenses en los años 60 a través de su curso vital y de las relaciones sociales establecidas.Abordando cuestiones esenciales para el movimiento feminista como la maternidad, la sexualidad de la mujer, la identidad o la doble jornada en el sector agrícola y haciendo un gran uso del lenguaje audiovisual, la adaptación cinematográfica de la novela de Robert James Waller pone el acento (ya sea de forma intencionada o casual en los tabúes de las mujeres de la época y en los mandatos de género que éstas debían asumir.Beyond the stereotyped used of romantic love and drama on Clint Eastwood’s film The Bridges of Madison County are also shown and questioned family strategies and gender roles of rural women in the 1960s at United States through their lifes and established social relations.Dealing with feminist movement key issues as motherhood, female sexuality, identity, or the double work time on the agricultural sector and making extensive use of audiovisual language, the filmed adaptation of the novel written by Robert James Waller focuses on (either deliberately or accidentaly the taboos of the time women and gender mandates they sould assume.

  2. WiFi-Aided Magnetic Matching for Indoor Navigation with Consumer Portable Devices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    You Li

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a WiFi-aided magnetic matching (MM algorithm for indoor pedestrian navigation with consumer portable devices. This algorithm reduces both the mismatching rate (i.e., the rate of matching to an incorrect point that is more than 20 m away from the true value and computational load of MM by using WiFi positioning solutions to limit the MM search space. Walking tests with Samsung Galaxy S3 and S4 smartphones in two different indoor environments (i.e., Environment #1 with abundant WiFi APs and significant magnetic features, and Environment #2 with less WiFi and magnetic information were conducted to evaluate the proposed algorithm. It was found that WiFi fingerprinting accuracy is related to the signal distributions. MM provided results with small fluctuations but had a significant mismatch rate; when aided by WiFi, MM’s robustness was significantly improved. The outcome of this research indicates that WiFi and MM have complementary characteristics as the former is a point-by-point matching approach and the latter is based on profile-matching. Furthermore, performance improvement through integrating WiFi and MM depends on the environment (e.g., the signal distributions of magnetic intensity and WiFi RSS: In Environment #1 tests, WiFi-aided MM and WiFi provided similar results; in Environment #2 tests, the former was approximately 41.6% better. Our results supported that the WiFi-aided MM algorithm provided more reliable solutions than both WiFi and MM in the areas that have poor WiFi signal distribution or indistinctive magnetic-gradient features.

  3. Plasma Science and Innovation Center (PSI-Center) at Washington, Wisconsin, and Utah State, ARRA Supplement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sovinec, Carl

    2018-03-14

    The objective of the Plasma Science and Innovation Center (PSI-Center) is to develop and deploy computational models that simulate conditions in smaller, concept-exploration plasma experiments. The PSIC group at the University of Wisconsin-Madison, led by Prof. Carl Sovinec, uses and enhances the Non-Ideal Magnetohydrodynamics with Rotation, Open Discussion (NIMROD) code, https://nimrodteam.org, to simulate macroscopic plasma dynamics in a number of magnetic confinement configurations. These numerical simulations provide information on how magnetic fields and plasma flows evolve over all three spatial dimensions, which supplements the limited access of diagnostics in plasma experiments. The information gained from simulation helps explain how plasma evolves. It is also used to engineer more effective plasma confinement systems, reducing the need for building many experiments to cover the physical parameter space. The ultimate benefit is a more cost-effective approach to the development of fusion energy for peaceful power production. The supplemental funds provided by the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 were used to purchase computer components that were assembled into a 48-core system with 256 Gb of shared memory. The system was engineered and constructed by the group's system administrator at the time, Anthony Hammond. It was successfully used by then graduate student, Dr. John O'Bryan, for computing magnetic relaxation dynamics that occur during experimental tests of non-inductive startup in the Pegasus Toroidal Experiment (pegasus.ep.wisc.edu). Dr. O'Bryan's simulations provided the first detailed explanation of how the driven helical filament of electrical current evolves into a toroidal tokamak-like plasma configuration.

  4. Effects of the nuisance algae, Cladophora, on Escherichia coli at recreational beaches in Wisconsin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Englebert, Erik T; McDermott, Colleen; Kleinheinz, Gregory T

    2008-10-01

    Recreational beaches constitute a large part of the 12 billion dollar per year tourism industry in Wisconsin. Beach closures due to microbial contamination are costly in terms of lost tourism revenue and adverse publicity for an area. Escherichia coli (E. coli), is used as an indicator of microbial contamination, as high concentrations of this organism should indicate a recent fecal contamination event that may contain other, more pathogenic, bacteria. An additional problem at many beaches in the state is the nuisance algae, Cladophora. It has been hypothesized that mats of Cladophora may harbor high concentrations of E. coli. Three beaches in Door County, WI were selected for study, based on tourist activity and amounts of algae present. Concentrations of E. coli were higher within Cladophora mats than in surrounding water. Beaches displayed an E. coli concentration gradient in water extending away from the Cladophora mats, although this was not statistically significant. Likewise, the amount of Cladophora observed on a beach did not correlate with E. coli concentrations found in routine beach monitoring samples. More work is needed to determine the impact of mats of Cladophora on beach water quality, as well as likely sources of E. coli found within the mats.

  5. Nadzor in upravljanje omrežij Wi-Fi

    OpenAIRE

    PEKEVSKI, BOJAN

    2016-01-01

    Iz današnje perspektive Wi-Fi dostop je zelo pomemben za vsakogar. Uporaba interneta je ogromna in velik del uporabnikov dostopa preko 802.11 WLAN (Wi-Fi) omrežjih. Taka omrežja so preprosta za namestitev in so primerna tako za domače uporabnike, kot tudi za velika podjetja. Možnost uvedbe stabilnih omrežjih v krajih, kjer je žična rešitev težja za izvajanje ali pa ni tako stroškovno učinkovita, je samo eden izmed razlogov za široko uporabo WLAN-a. Današnja WLAN omrežja postajajo vse bolj ...

  6. Evaluating the Performance of IPTV over Fixed WiMAX

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamodi, Jamil; Salah, Khaled; Thool, Ravindra

    2013-12-01

    IEEE specifies different modulation techniques for WiMAX; namely, BPSK, QPSK, 16 QAM and 64 QAM. This paper studies the performance of Internet Protocol Television (IPTV) over Fixed WiMAX system considering different combinations of digital modulation. The performance is studied taking into account a number of key system parameters which include the variation in the video coding, path-loss, scheduling service classes different rated codes in FEC channel coding. The performance study was conducted using OPNET simulation. The performance is studied in terms of packet lost, packet jitter delay, end-to-end delay, and network throughput. Simulation results show that higher order modulation and coding schemes (namely, 16 QAM and 64 QAM) yield better performance than that of QPSK.

  7. Sending Safety Video over WiMAX in Vehicle Communications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun Steed Huang

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper reports on the design of an OPNET simulation platform to test the performance of sending real-time safety video over VANET (Vehicular Adhoc NETwork using the WiMAX technology. To provide a more realistic environment for streaming real-time video, a video model was created based on the study of video traffic traces captured from a realistic vehicular camera, and different design considerations were taken into account. A practical controller over real-time streaming protocol is implemented to control data traffic congestion for future road safety development. Our driving video model was then integrated with the WiMAX OPNET model along with a mobility model based on real road maps. Using this simulation platform, different mobility cases have been studied and the performance evaluated in terms of end-to-end delay, jitter and visual experience.

  8. Krakówi graafikasügis / Anne Untera

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Untera, Anne, 1951-

    2009-01-01

    16. septembril avatud Krakówi rahvusvahelisest graafikatriennaalist. Grand prix läks poola graafikule Joanna Piechile. Läti graafik Guntars Sietiņš pälvis Varssavi kunstiakadeemia rektori auhinna. Eestit esindavad peanäitusel Ülle Marks, Benjamin Vasserman ja Eve Kask, satelliitnäitusel "PrintArt" Katowices Tiiu Prisko ja Mati Veermets ning kutsutud osalejatega satelliitnäitusel Torunis Evi Tihemets

  9. A WiFi public address system for disaster management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrade, Nicholas; Palmer, Douglas A; Lenert, Leslie A

    2006-01-01

    The WiFi Bullhorn is designed to assist emergency workers in the event of a disaster situation by offering a rapidly configurable wireless of public address system for disaster sites. The current configuration plays either pre recorded or custom recorded messages and utilizes 802.11b networks for communication. Units can be position anywhere wireless coverage exists to help manage crowds or to recall first responders from dangerous areas.

  10. Wi-Fi Tags for the Remote and Virtual Laboratory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Ursutiu

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available With the advancement of computer technologiesto faster processors and more memory, the WorldWideWeb,wireless communication, and miniaturization of sensortechnology, it is now possible to simulate and executeengineering and science laboratory projects on a remotecomputer. With Internet connection, students have access to"virtual laboratories" via the www, experiment-orientedproblems can be now offered without the overhead incurredwhen maintaining a full laboratory. This paper investigatesthe opportunity that a new wireless sensor technologybrings to remote laboratories.G2 Microsystems of Campbell, California, USA, released in2007 the first ever ultra-low power Wi-Fi System on a Chip(SoC named G2C501. This SoC includes a 32-bit CPU,crypto accelerator, real-time clock and a versatile sensorinterface that can serve as a standalone host subsystem. TheG2C501 goes beyond today’s basic radio frequencyidentification (RFID technology to offer intelligent trackingand sensor capabilities that leverage IEEE 802.11 (Wi-Finetworks. Due to its support for multiple locationtechnologies, small form factor and ultra-low powerconsumption, the G2C502 SoC can be integrated into Wi-Fisensor tags that lower cost of ownership and meet the needsof a variety of industries including consumer electronics,pharmaceuticals, chemical manufacturing, cold chain andmore.A battery powered, small size ultra low-power Wi-Fiwireless measurement node name IP Sensor has been builtusing the G2C501 SoC. Sensors for measurement oftemperature, humidity, light, and vibration or motion arecurrently mounted on the IP Sensor board. The node is ableto read a sensor and send data to the network by using anIP-based application protocol such as UDP.This paper describes the new IP Sensor

  11. Analisis Throughput Varian TCP Pada Model Jaringan WiMAX

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Medi Taruk

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Transmission Control Protocol (TCP is a protocol that works at the transport layer of the OSI model. TCP was originally designed more destined for a wired network. However, to meet the need for the development of a very fast network technology based on the needs of the use by the user, it needs further development to the use of TCP on wireless devices. One implementation of a wireless network based on Worldwide Interoperability for Microwave Access (WiMAX network is a model that offers a variety advantage, particularly in terms of access speed. In this case, use NS-2 to see throughput at TCP variants tested, namely TCP-Tahoe, TCP-Reno, TCP-Vegas, and TCP-SACK over WiMAX network model, with few observations scenarios. The first is a look at each of these variants throughput of TCP when only one particular variant of the work in the network. Second observe all variants of TCP throughput at the same time and have the equivalent QoS, but with the possibility of a small congestion based on the capacity of the link is made sufficient. Third observed throughput with multi congestion. In WiMAX network has scheduling services are UGS, rtPS and ertPS using UDP protocol and nrtPS and BE using the TCP Protocol. By using the software network simulator (NS-2 to obtain performance comparison TCP protocol-based services on the WiMAX network with QoS parameters are throughput, packet loss, fairness and time delay.

  12. The genesis of WiFi and its applications

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2008-01-01

    In 1985 changes to US regulations caused a paradigm shift by permitting the use of radio spectrum for devices that did not need to have an end-user license. After a few years, products appeared on the market and a group developed a standard for broadband wireless communications among computers. The presentation will explain how the standard developed and was adopted by the Wi-Fi Alliance, as well as the global harmonization and expansion of the available radio spectrum to over half a GHz. The success of Wi-Fi and user innovation and initiatives makes it a vehicle to bring broadband internet to rural areas both in developing as well as in developed countries. Vic Hayes is a Senior Research Fellow at the Delft University of Technology and is writing a book titled "The genesis of Wi-Fi and the road toward global success". He holds a BSEE and joined NCR in the Netherlands in 1974. He co-established and chaired the IEEE 802.11 Standards Working Group for Wireless Local Area Networks and became known as the "Fathe...

  13. HDACs and the senescent phenotype of WI-38 cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noonan Emily J

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Normal cells possess a limited proliferative life span after which they enter a state of irreversible growth arrest. This process, known as replicative senescence, is accompanied by changes in gene expression that give rise to a variety of senescence-associated phenotypes. It has been suggested that these gene expression changes result in part from alterations in the histone acetylation machinery. Here we examine the influence of HDAC inhibitors on the expression of senescent markers in pre- and post-senescent WI-38 cells. Results Pre- and post-senescent WI-38 cells were treated with the HDAC inhibitors butyrate or trichostatin A (TSA. Following HDAC inhibitor treatment, pre-senescent cells increased p21WAF1 and β-galactosidase expression, assumed a flattened senescence-associated morphology, and maintained a lower level of proteasome activity. These alterations also occurred during normal replicative senescence of WI-38 cells, but were not accentuated further by HDAC inhibitors. We also found that HDAC1 levels decline during normal replicative senescence. Conclusion Our findings indicate that HDACs impact numerous phenotypic changes associated with cellular senescence. Reduced HDAC1 expression levels in senescent cells may be an important event in mediating the transition to a senescent phenotype.

  14. Indoor positioning using differential Wi-Fi lateration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Retscher, Guenther; Tatschl, Thomas

    2017-12-01

    For Wi-Fi positioning usually location fingerprinting or (tri)lateration are employed whereby the received signal strengths (RSSs) of the surrounding Wi-Fi Access Points (APs) are scanned on the mobile devices and used to perform localization. Within the scope of this study, the position of a mobile user is determined on the basis of lateration. Two new differential approaches are developed and compared to two common models, i.e., the one-slope and multi-wall model, for the conversion of the measured RSS of the Wi-Fi signals into ranges. The two novel methods are termed DWi-Fi as they are derived either from the well-known DGPS or VLBI positioning principles. They make use of a network of reference stations deployed in the area of interest. From continuous RSS observations on these reference stations correction parameters are derived and applied by the user in real-time. This approach leads to a reduced influence of temporal and spatial variations and various propagation effects on the positioning result. In practical use cases conducted in a multi-storey office building with three different smartphones, it is proven that the two DWi-Fi approaches outperform the common models as static positioning yielded to position errors of about 5 m in average under good spatial conditions.

  15. Economic effect of reducing nitrogen and phosphorus mass balance on Wisconsin and Québec dairy farms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pellerin, D; Charbonneau, E; Fadul-Pacheco, L; Soucy, O; Wattiaux, M A

    2017-10-01

    Our objective was to explore the trade-offs between economic performance (farm net income, FNI) and environmental outcomes (whole-farm P and N balances) of dairy farms in Wisconsin (WI; United States) and Québec (QC; Canada). An Excel-based linear program model (N-CyCLES; nutrient cycling: crops, livestock, environment, and soil) was developed to optimize feeding, cropping, and manure management as a single unit of management. In addition to FNI, P and N balances model outputs included (1) the mix of up to 9 home-grown and 17 purchased feeds for up to 5 animal groups, (2) the mix of up to 5 crop rotations in up to 5 land units and c) the mix of up to 7 fertilizers (solid and liquid manure and 5 commercial fertilizers) to allocate in each land unit. The model was parameterized with NRC nutritional guidelines and regional nutrient management planning rules. Simulations were conducted on a typical WI farm of 107 cows and 151 ha of cropland and, a Southern QC farm of 87 cows and 142 ha of cropland and all results were expressed per kg of fat- and protein-corrected milk (FPCM). In absence of constraints on P and N balances, maximum FNI was 0.12 and 0.11 $/kg of FPCM for WI and QC, respectively, with P and N balances of 1.05 and 14.29 g/kg of FPCM in WI but 0.60 and 15.70 g/kg of FPCM in QC. The achievable reduction (balance at maximum FNI minus balance when the simulation objective was to minimize P or N balance) was 0.31 and 0.54 g of P/kg of FPCM (29 and 89% reduction), but 2.37 and 3.31 g of N/kg of FPCM (17 and 24% reduction) in WI and QC, respectively. Among other factors, differences in animal unit per hectare and reliance on biological N fixation may have contributed to lower achievable reductions of whole-farm balances in WI compared with QC. Subsequent simulations to maximize FNI under increasing constraints on nutrient balances revealed that it was possible to reduce P balance, N balance, and both together by up to 33% without a substantial effect on FNI

  16. Wisconsin River at Portage, Wisconsin; Feasibility Study for Flood Control Plant of Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1977-08-01

    natural setting that the late Aldo Leopold , often called the "Father of Wildlife Management," wrote some of his famous works in the still-standing log...Protect endangered or threatened plants and animals and their ha>itats. e. Consider the Aldo Leopold Memorial Reserve. The Wisconsin Department of Natural...standing log cabin he built -- that the late 0 0 Aldo Leopold wrote some of his famous works. He also wrote about this very site and the immediate area

  17. An evaluation of the bedrock aquifer system in northeastern Wisconsin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emmons, P.J.

    1987-01-01

    Ground water is a major source of water in northeastern Wisconsin. The lower Fox River valley, located between Lake Winnebago and Green Bay in northeastern Wisconsin, is the second largest population center in Wisconsin. By 1957, ground-water withdrawals had lowered the potentiometric surface of the aquifer system as much as 440 feet below prepumping levels. With the exception of the city of Green Bay, which converted from ground water to surface water (Lake Michigan) for their municipal water supply in 1957, ground-water withdrawals have continually increased.

  18. Wisconsin 2007 Lidar Coverage, USACE National Coastal Mapping Program

    Data.gov (United States)

    Army Corps of Engineers, Department of the Army, Department of Defense — The Joint Airborne Lidar Bathymetry Technical Center of Expertise (JALBTCX) has performed a coastal survey along the Lake Superior coast of WI in 2007. The data...

  19. Wisconsin 2009 Lidar Coverage, USACE National Coastal Mapping Program

    Data.gov (United States)

    Army Corps of Engineers, Department of the Army, Department of Defense — The Joint Airborne Lidar Bathymetry Technical Center of Expertise (JALBTCX) has performed a coastal survey along the Lake Superior coast of WI in 2009. The data...

  20. Wisconsin 2008 Lidar Coverage, USACE National Coastal Mapping Program

    Data.gov (United States)

    Army Corps of Engineers, Department of the Army, Department of Defense — The Joint Airborne Lidar Bathymetry Technical Center of Expertise (JALBTCX) has performed a coastal survey along the Lake Michigan coast of WI in 2008. The data...

  1. Survey of medical radium installations in Wisconsin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tapert, A.C.; Lea, W.L.

    1975-05-01

    A radiation protection survey was performed at 70 medical radium installations in the State of Wisconsin. The requirements of the State's Radiation Protection Code were used as survey criteria. Radiation measurements of radium storage containers, radium capsule leakage tests, and monitoring of work surfaces for contamination were performed. Film badge monitoring data of whole body and extremity doses are presented for 221 individuals at 17 hospitals. Whole body doses during single treatments ranged from 10 to 1360 mrems per individual. The estimate of 500 mrems per treatment was determined as the dose aggregate to hospital personnel. Whole body doses from film badges are compared with analogous TLD doses. Four physicians and six technicians at nine hospitals participated in a study for monitoring the extremities with TLD. Cumulative extremity doses ranged from 28 to 6628 mrems per participant during the study. (U.S.)

  2. US hydropower resource assessment for Wisconsin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Conner, A.M.; Francfort, J.E.

    1996-05-01

    The Department of Energy is developing an estimate of the undeveloped hydropower potential in this country. The Hydropower Evaluation Software is a computer model that was developed by the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory for this purpose. The software measures the undeveloped hydropower resources available in the United States, using uniform criteria for measurement. The software was developed and tested using hydropower information and data provided by the Southwestern Power Administration. It is a menu-driven software program that allows the personal computer user to assign environmental attributes to potential hydropower sites, calculate development suitability factors for each site based on the environmental attributes present, and generate reports based on these suitability factors. This report details the resource assessment results for the State of Wisconsin.

  3. Streaming Multimedia via Overlay Networks using Wi-Fi Peer-to-Peer Connections

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poderys, Justas; Soler, José

    2017-01-01

    Short range ad-hoc wireless networks can be used to deliver streaming multimedia for information, entertainment and advertisement purposes. To enable short-range communication between various devices, the Wi-Fi Alliance proposed an extension to the IEEE802.11 Wi-Fi standard called Wi-Fi Peer......-to-Peer (P2P). It allows compliant devices to form ad-hoc communication groups without interrupting conventional access point-based Wi-Fi communication. This paper proposes to use Wi-Fi P2P connectivity to distribute streaming multimedia in ah-hoc formed user groups. The exchange of multimedia data...... is performed by forming an overlay network using Peer-to-Peer Streaming Peer Protocol (PPSPP). In order to make PPSPP function over WiFi P2P connections, this paper proposes a number of changes to the protocol. The performance of the proposed system is evaluated using a computer networks emulator...

  4. Evaluating wildlife mortality hotspots, habitat connectivity and potential mitigation along US 287 and MT 87 in the Madison Valley, Montana : project summary report: 8217-001.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-11-01

    The Madison Valley is situated in the Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem (GYE) and plays a key role in connecting this ecologicallyintact ecosystem to other intact areas of the Central Rockies, particularly the wildlands of central Idaho and the Selway-Bi...

  5. Geothermal applications on the Madison (Pahasapa) aquifer system in South Dakota. Final report, October 1, 1976--September 30, 1977

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gries, J.P.

    1977-09-01

    Pertinent geologic, hydrologic, and chemical data for the Madison Formation underlying western South Dakota are presented in text and in graphic form. A temperature anomaly in west central South Dakota makes 130 to 160/sup 0/F water available at depths of less than 3500 ft. A central geothermal space heating system designed for Midland, South Dakota indicates that by 1980 geothermal heat will be competitive with existing energy sources. Preliminary tests indicate the superiority of 304 or 316 stainless steel for fabrication of equipment to utilize the warm, corrosive Madison water. South Dakota has no statutes governing geothermal resources; under existing water law, geothermal water would be classified as a top priority domestic use. Suggestions are made for state legislation pertaining to the development of geothermal energy.

  6. University of Wisconsin Antarctic Soils Database, Version 1

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The University of Wisconsin Antarctic Soils Database contains data collected by Dr. James G. Bockheim and his colleagues from 1975 through 1987. Data include site...

  7. WiMAX security and quality of service an end-to-end perspective

    CERN Document Server

    Tang, Seok-Yee; Sharif, Hamid

    2010-01-01

    WiMAX is the first standard technology to deliver true broadband mobility at speeds that enable powerful multimedia applications such as Voice over Internet Protocol (VoIP), online gaming, mobile TV, and personalized infotainment. WiMAX Security and Quality of Service, focuses on the interdisciplinary subject of advanced Security and Quality of Service (QoS) in WiMAX wireless telecommunication systems including its models, standards, implementations, and applications. Split into 4 parts, Part A of the book is an end-to-end overview of the WiMAX architecture, protocol, and system requirements.

  8. On the Issues and Challenges of Fiber-Wireless (Fi-Wi Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harry Tin Win

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this article is to present various aspects of Fiber-Wireless (Fi-Wi networks, which is a technology of current interest of the researchers. Fiber-wireless technology, known in short as “Fi-Wi,” is a combination of optical-fiber-based network and wireless network. Fi-Wi has recently come forward as one of the emerging future network technologies yet the term is often mixed up with wireless-fidelity (Wi-Fi technology. In fact, Wi-Fi network could be included in a Fi-Wi architecture. Due to the unfamiliarity with the term, “Fi-Wi” and similar sounding commonly known “Wi-Fi,” many students, even academics and practitioners sometimes may not be able to differentiate between these. In the recent years, a good number of works on various issues of Fi-Wi have come out, but an overall survey with the latest advancements in the area is yet to be found. Hence, in this work, we analyze various issues and challenges of implementing Fi-Wi networks in practical scenarios to allow researchers to find future directions of research and general readers to understand the issues better.

  9. Numerical groundwater-flow model of the Minnelusa and Madison hydrogeologic units in the Rapid City area, South Dakota

    Science.gov (United States)

    Putnam, Larry D.; Long, Andrew J.

    2009-01-01

    The city of Rapid City and other water users in the Rapid City area obtain water supplies from the Minnelusa and Madison aquifers, which are contained in the Minnelusa and Madison hydrogeologic units. A numerical groundwater-flow model of the Minnelusa and Madison hydrogeologic units in the Rapid City area was developed to synthesize estimates of water-budget components and hydraulic properties, and to provide a tool to analyze the effect of additional stress on water-level altitudes within the aquifers and on discharge to springs. This report, prepared in cooperation with the city of Rapid City, documents a numerical groundwater-flow model of the Minnelusa and Madison hydrogeologic units for the 1,000-square-mile study area that includes Rapid City and the surrounding area. Water-table conditions generally exist in outcrop areas of the Minnelusa and Madison hydrogeologic units, which form generally concentric rings that surround the Precambrian core of the uplifted Black Hills. Confined conditions exist east of the water-table areas in the study area. The Minnelusa hydrogeologic unit is 375 to 800 feet (ft) thick in the study area with the more permeable upper part containing predominantly sandstone and the less permeable lower part containing more shale and limestone than the upper part. Shale units in the lower part generally impede flow between the Minnelusa hydrogeologic unit and the underlying Madison hydrogeologic unit; however, fracturing and weathering may result in hydraulic connections in some areas. The Madison hydrogeologic unit is composed of limestone and dolomite that is about 250 to 610 ft thick in the study area, and the upper part contains substantial secondary permeability from solution openings and fractures. Recharge to the Minnelusa and Madison hydrogeologic units is from streamflow loss where streams cross the outcrop and from infiltration of precipitation on the outcrops (areal recharge). MODFLOW-2000, a finite-difference groundwater

  10. Radiofrequency exposure from wireless LANs utilizing Wi-Fi technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foster, Kenneth R

    2007-03-01

    This survey measured radiofrequency (RF) fields from wireless local area networks (WLANs) using Wi-Fi technology against a background of RF fields in the environment over the frequency range 75 MHz-3 GHz. A total of 356 measurements were conducted at 55 sites (including private residences, commercial spaces, health care and educational institutions, and other public spaces) in four countries (U.S., France, Germany, Sweden). Measurements were conducted under conditions that would result in the higher end of exposures from such systems. Where possible, measurements were conducted in public spaces as close as practical to the Wi-Fi access points. Additional measurements were conducted at a distance of approximately 1 m from a laptop while it was uploading and downloading large files to the WLAN. This distance was chosen to allow a useful comparison of fields in the far-field of the antenna in the laptop, and give a representative measure of the exposure that a bystander might receive from the laptop. The exposure to the user, particularly if the antenna of the client card were placed against his or her body, would require different measurement techniques beyond the scope of this study. In all cases, the measured Wi-Fi signal levels were very far below international exposure limits (IEEE C95.1-2005 and ICNIRP) and in nearly all cases far below other RF signals in the same environments. An discusses technical aspects of the IEEE 802.11 standard on which WLANs operate that are relevant to determining the levels of RF energy exposure from WLANs. Important limiting factors are the low operating power of client cards and access points, and the low duty cycle of transmission that normally characterizes their operation.

  11. A high time resolution x-ray diagnostic on the Madison Symmetric Torus

    Science.gov (United States)

    DuBois, Ami M.; Lee, John David; Almagri, Abdulgadar F.

    2015-07-01

    A new high time resolution x-ray detector has been installed on the Madison Symmetric Torus (MST) to make measurements around sawtooth events. The detector system is comprised of a silicon avalanche photodiode, a 20 ns Gaussian shaping amplifier, and a 500 MHz digitizer with 14-bit sampling resolution. The fast shaping time diminishes the need to restrict the amount of x-ray flux reaching the detector, limiting the system dead-time. With a much higher time resolution than systems currently in use in high temperature plasma physics experiments, this new detector has the versatility to be used in a variety of discharges with varying flux and the ability to study dynamics on both slow and fast time scales. This paper discusses the new fast x-ray detector recently installed on MST and the improved time resolution capabilities compared to the existing soft and hard x-ray diagnostics. In addition to the detector hardware, improvements to the detector calibration and x-ray pulse identification software, such as additional fitting parameters and a more sophisticated fitting routine are discussed. Finally, initial data taken in both high confinement and standard reversed-field pinch plasma discharges are compared.

  12. WI-CERFP Respiratory Protection Optimization: A Detailed Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-12-01

    AU/ACSC/2015 AIR COMMAND AND STAFF COLLEGE AIR UNIVERSITY WI-CERFP RESPIRATORY PROTECTION OPTIMIZATION: A DETAILED ANALYSIS By...vii INTRODUCTION………………………………………………………………………….. 1 RESPIRATORY PROTECTION...3 Theory of Respiratory Protection…………………………………………………… 3 Air Purifying Respiratory – Detailed Configuration……………………………....... 3 Powered Air

  13. STABILIZACIJA KVADROKOPTERJA IN DALJINSKI WI-FI VIDEO NADZOR TERENA

    OpenAIRE

    Zlatarek, Miha

    2015-01-01

    V diplomskem delu smo se ukvarjali s težavnostjo izdelave kvadrokopterja in nastavitve PID parametrov za stabilizacijo letenja kvadrokopterja. Poglobiti smo se morali v samo mehansko redukcijo tresljajev, saj prenašamo video signale s pomočjo mikroračunalnika Raspberry Pi ter PiCam preko Wi-Fi omrežja. Preverili smo možnosti daljinskega video nadzora kvadrokopterja preko Raspberry Pi platforme. Opisana je celotna sestava kvadrokopterja, z opisom pripadajočih delov, ter celoten postopek na...

  14. RRM Strategies in LTE&WiMAX Interworking System

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zakrzewska, Anna; Ruepp, Sarah Renée; Berger, Michael Stübert

    high quality streaming video. In order to provide those demanding real-time multimedia and very high data rates, scarce radio resources must be used effectively to maximize the channel utilization. The presentation will focus on scheduling techniques possibly adaptable to dynamically changing network......, that could be applied in 4G systems (LTE interworking with WiMAX is considered). Furthermore, it will also discuss the Radio Resource Management (RRM) problem addressing the challenges of designing a RRM system for such a multi-RAT wireless environment. Different functionalities and possibilities...

  15. Geographic and racial variation in teen pregnancy rates in Wisconsin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Layde, Molly M; Remington, Patrick L

    2013-08-01

    Despite recent declines in teen birth rates, teenage pregnancy remains an important public health problem in Wisconsin with significant social, economic, and health-related effects. Compare and contrast teen birth rate trends by race, ethnicity, and county in Wisconsin. Teen (ages 15-19 years) birth rates (per 1000 teenage females) in Wisconsin from 2001-2010 were compared by racelethnicity and county of residence using data from the Wisconsin Interactive Statistics on Health. Teen birth rates in Wisconsin have declined by 20% over the past decade, from 35.5/1000 teens in 2001 to 28.3/1000 teens in 2010-a relative decline of 20.3%. However, trends vary by race, with declines among blacks (-33%) and whites (-26%) and increases among American Indians (+21%) and Hispanics (+30%). Minority teen birth rates continue to be 3 to 5 times greater than birth rates among whites. Rates varied even more by county, with an over 14-fold difference between Ozaukee County (7.8/1000) and Menominee County (114.2). Despite recent declines, teen pregnancy continues to be an important public health problem in Wisconsin. Pregnancy prevention programs should be targeted toward the populations and counties with the highest rates.

  16. Accesso Wi-Fi federato dell'Area della Ricerca di Pisa WiFi@PiCNR

    OpenAIRE

    Gebrehiwot, Abraham; De Vita, Andrea

    2011-01-01

    The CNR Research Area of Pisa has a Wi-FI coverage in the campus. The wireless network is designed and implemented by the Institute of Informatics and Telematics of CNR which is in charge of managing the network infrastructure and also providing a number of other services to researchers in the campus. The wireless network is a centralized solution based on Cisco Wireless LAN Controller (WLC). In the campus area various wireless networks are defined, including the SSID "guest" with a Captive P...

  17. Inferring Stop-Locations from WiFi.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Kofoed Wind

    Full Text Available Human mobility patterns are inherently complex. In terms of understanding these patterns, the process of converting raw data into series of stop-locations and transitions is an important first step which greatly reduces the volume of data, thus simplifying the subsequent analyses. Previous research into the mobility of individuals has focused on inferring 'stop locations' (places of stationarity from GPS or CDR data, or on detection of state (static/active. In this paper we bridge the gap between the two approaches: we introduce methods for detecting both mobility state and stop-locations. In addition, our methods are based exclusively on WiFi data. We study two months of WiFi data collected every two minutes by a smartphone, and infer stop-locations in the form of labelled time-intervals. For this purpose, we investigate two algorithms, both of which scale to large datasets: a greedy approach to select the most important routers and one which uses a density-based clustering algorithm to detect router fingerprints. We validate our results using participants' GPS data as well as ground truth data collected during a two month period.

  18. Effective Bandwidth Allocation for WiMAX Mesh Network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hung-Chin Jang

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper is to reduce the media access delay in a WiMAX mesh network. We observe that as the number of subscriber stations (SS in a neighborhood increases, the processes of transmission opportunity (TO competition and 3- way handshake are easy to fail. This may degrade transmission efficiency and increase packet transmission delay. Besides, the minislot allocation defined in the WiMAX mesh mode may cause many lower priority services reserve earlier minislots than that of higher priority services like rtPS. This may cause great negative impact on delay-sensitive traffic. In this paper, we design a QoS classifier to enqueue packets according to different QoS service classes, present a dynamic holdoff exponent mechanism to reduce control subframe delay, and propose a Neighborhood-Based Minislot Allocation (NBMA mechanism to reduce data subframe delay. Simulations show that the proposed methodology outperforms that of IEEE 802.16 and Baye's DynExp in delay, jitter and throughput.

  19. Automatic Construction of Wi-Fi Radio Map Using Smartphones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Tao; Li, Qingquan; Zhang, Xing

    2016-06-01

    Indoor positioning could provide interesting services and applications. As one of the most popular indoor positioning methods, location fingerprinting determines the location of mobile users by matching the received signal strength (RSS) which is location dependent. However, fingerprinting-based indoor positioning requires calibration and updating of the fingerprints which is labor-intensive and time-consuming. In this paper, we propose a visual-based approach for the construction of radio map for anonymous indoor environments without any prior knowledge. This approach collects multi-sensors data, e.g. video, accelerometer, gyroscope, Wi-Fi signals, etc., when people (with smartphones) walks freely in indoor environments. Then, it uses the multi-sensor data to restore the trajectories of people based on an integrated structure from motion (SFM) and image matching method, and finally estimates location of sampling points on the trajectories and construct Wi-Fi radio map. Experiment results show that the average location error of the fingerprints is about 0.53 m.

  20. Effects of Implementing Adaptable Channelization in Wi-Fi Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abid Hussain

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The unprecedented increase of wireless devices is now facing a serious threat of spectrum scarcity. The situation becomes even worse due to inefficient frequency distribution protocols, deployed in trivial Wi-Fi networks. The primary source of this inefficiency is static channelization used in wireless networks. In this work, we investigate the use of dynamic and flexible channelization, for optimal spectrum utilization in Wi-Fi networks. We propose optimal spectrum sharing algorithm (OSSA and analyze its effect on exhaustive list of essential network performance measuring parameters. The elementary concept of the proposed algorithm lies in the fact that frequency spectrum should be assigned to any access point (AP based on its current requirement. The OSSA algorithm assigns channels with high granularity, thus maximizing spectrum utilization by more than 20% as compared to static width channel allocation. This optimum spectrum utilization, in turn, increases throughput by almost 30% in many deployment scenarios. The achieved results depict considerable decrease in interference, while simultaneously increasing range. Similarly signal strength values at relatively longer distances improve significantly at narrower channel widths while simultaneously decreasing bit error rates. We found that almost 25% reduction in interference is possible in certain scenarios through proposed algorithm.

  1. Inferring Stop-Locations from WiFi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wind, David Kofoed; Sapiezynski, Piotr; Furman, Magdalena Anna; Lehmann, Sune

    2016-01-01

    Human mobility patterns are inherently complex. In terms of understanding these patterns, the process of converting raw data into series of stop-locations and transitions is an important first step which greatly reduces the volume of data, thus simplifying the subsequent analyses. Previous research into the mobility of individuals has focused on inferring 'stop locations' (places of stationarity) from GPS or CDR data, or on detection of state (static/active). In this paper we bridge the gap between the two approaches: we introduce methods for detecting both mobility state and stop-locations. In addition, our methods are based exclusively on WiFi data. We study two months of WiFi data collected every two minutes by a smartphone, and infer stop-locations in the form of labelled time-intervals. For this purpose, we investigate two algorithms, both of which scale to large datasets: a greedy approach to select the most important routers and one which uses a density-based clustering algorithm to detect router fingerprints. We validate our results using participants' GPS data as well as ground truth data collected during a two month period.

  2. AUTOMATIC CONSTRUCTION OF WI-FI RADIO MAP USING SMARTPHONES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Liu

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Indoor positioning could provide interesting services and applications. As one of the most popular indoor positioning methods, location fingerprinting determines the location of mobile users by matching the received signal strength (RSS which is location dependent. However, fingerprinting-based indoor positioning requires calibration and updating of the fingerprints which is labor-intensive and time-consuming. In this paper, we propose a visual-based approach for the construction of radio map for anonymous indoor environments without any prior knowledge. This approach collects multi-sensors data, e.g. video, accelerometer, gyroscope, Wi-Fi signals, etc., when people (with smartphones walks freely in indoor environments. Then, it uses the multi-sensor data to restore the trajectories of people based on an integrated structure from motion (SFM and image matching method, and finally estimates location of sampling points on the trajectories and construct Wi-Fi radio map. Experiment results show that the average location error of the fingerprints is about 0.53 m.

  3. Geology and ground-water resources of Dane County, Wisconsin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cline, Denzel R.

    1965-01-01

    The purpose of the ground-water investigation of Dane County, Wis., was to determine the occurrence, movement, quantity, quality, and availability of ground water in the unconsolidated deposits and the underlying bedrock. The relationships between ground water and surface water were studied in general in Dane County and in detail in the Madison metropolitan area. An analysis was made of the hydrologic system of the Yahara River valley and of the effects of ground-water pumpage on that system.

  4. Complete Genome Sequence of Lactobacillus curvatus Strain WiKim38 Isolated from Kimchi

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Se Hee; Jung, Min Young; Song, Jung-Hee; Lee, Moeun

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Lactobacillus curvatus WiKim38 is a potential probiotic strain isolated from kimchi, a traditional Korean fermented food. The complete genome of the WiKim38 strain consisted of a circular chromosome of 1,940,170 bp in length with a G+C content of 41.93%. PMID:28473381

  5. FeltRadio – Experiencing Community-generated WiFi Activities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fritsch, Jonas; Gronvall, Erik

    2016-01-01

    FeltRadio is a portable technology for sensing WiFi through sensorial augmentation and Electric Muscle Stimulation (EMS). The technology enables its wearer to sensorially engage with the radio waves and WiFi activities that have become an integrated part of our everyday lives. The sensorial...

  6. The making of the Women in Biology forum (WiB) at Bioclues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singhania, Reeta Rani; Madduru, Dhatri; Pappu, Pranathi; Panchangam, Sameera; Suravajhala, Renuka; Chandrasekharan, Mohanalatha

    2014-01-01

    The Women in Biology forum (WiB) of Bioclues (India) began in 2009 to promote and support women pursuing careers in bioinformatics and computational biology. WiB was formed in order to help women scientists deprived of basic research, boost the prominence of women scientists particularly from developing countries, and bridge the gender gap to innovation. WiB has also served as a platform to highlight the work of established female scientists in these fields. Several award-winning women researchers have shared their experiences and provided valuable suggestions to WiB. Headed by Mohanalatha Chandrasekharan and supported by Dr. Reeta Rani Singhania and Renuka Suravajhala, WiB has seen major progress in the last couple of years particularly in the two avenues Mentoring and Research, off the four avenues in Bioclues: Mentoring, Outreach, Research and Entrepreneurship (MORE). In line with the Bioclues vision for bioinformatics in India, the WiB Journal Club (JoC) recognizes women scientists working on functional genomics and bioinformatics, and provides scientific mentorship and support for project design and hypothesis formulation. As a part of Bioclues, WiB members practice the group's open-desk policy and its belief that all members are free to express their own thoughts and opinions. The WiB forum appreciates suggestions and welcomes scientists from around the world to be a part of their mission to encourage women to pursue computational biology and bioinformatics.

  7. The making of the Women in Biology forum (WiB at Bioclues.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reeta Rani Singhania

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The Women in Biology forum (WiB of Bioclues (India began in 2009 to promote and support women pursuing careers in bioinformatics and computational biology. WiB was formed in order to help women scientists deprived of basic research, boost the prominence of women scientists particularly from developing countries, and bridge the gender gap to innovation. WiB has also served as a platform to highlight the work of established female scientists in these fields. Several award-winning women researchers have shared their experiences and provided valuable suggestions to WiB. Headed by Mohanalatha Chandrasekharan and supported by Dr. Reeta Rani Singhania and Renuka Suravajhala, WiB has seen major progress in the last couple of years particularly in the two avenues Mentoring and Research, off the four avenues in Bioclues: Mentoring, Outreach, Research and Entrepreneurship (MORE. In line with the Bioclues vision for bioinformatics in India, the WiB Journal Club (JoC recognizes women scientists working on functional genomics and bioinformatics, and provides scientific mentorship and support for project design and hypothesis formulation. As a part of Bioclues, WiB members practice the group's open-desk policy and its belief that all members are free to express their own thoughts and opinions. The WiB forum appreciates suggestions and welcomes scientists from around the world to be a part of their mission to encourage women to pursue computational biology and bioinformatics.

  8. Mārketinga koncepcijas izveide Wi-Fi pakalpojumam Latvijā

    OpenAIRE

    Zauers, Mārtiņš 

    2008-01-01

    Maģistra darbā Wi-Fi mārketinga koncepcijas izveide Latvijā autors apkopo teoriju par mārketingu un tā koncepcijas izveidi, analizē tehnisko literatūru par Wi-Fi, Wi-Fi vēsturi, izveidošanos Latvijā un apkopo datus par Wi-Fi tirgus attīstību Latvijā, kā arī Lattelecom Wi-Fi pakalpojumu. Pētījuma mērķis ir analizēt un vērtēt Lattelecom Wi-Fi pakalpojuma pieejamību Latvijā un izstrādāt tā mārketinga koncepciju. Analizējot Wi-Fi pakalpojuma tirgu Latvijā, pētījuma daļā autors izveido Wi-Fi p...

  9. Indoor path loss prediction for Wi-Fi network in ultrahigh frequency ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In this work, Wi-Fi received signal strength was monitored in an indoor environment at 2437 MHz in ultrahigh frequency band of channel 6. The received signal strength was compressed, decomposed, filtered and reconstructed using one dimensional multi – resolution technique in order to predict how Wi-Fi received signal ...

  10. Enhancing Teaching and Learning Wi-Fi Networking Using Limited Resources to Undergraduates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarkar, Nurul I.

    2013-01-01

    Motivating students to learn Wi-Fi (wireless fidelity) wireless networking to undergraduate students is often difficult because many students find the subject rather technical and abstract when presented in traditional lecture format. This paper focuses on the teaching and learning aspects of Wi-Fi networking using limited hardware resources. It…

  11. A pathway to solving the Wi-Fi Tragedy of the Commons in apartment blocks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hartog, F. Den; Kemper, P.L.; Boltjes, B.; Raschella, A.; Bouhafs,F.; Seyedebrahimi, M.

    2017-01-01

    Surprisingly little research has quantified the severity of Wi-Fi congestion in densely populated areas. We performed a high-fidelity 3D simulation of the performance of a realistic Wi-Fi deployment in a typical apartment block. Our results show that congestion leads to significant loss of

  12. Noteworthy lichen species in Poland collected in the Świętokrzyski National Park

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Łubek

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available In this paper 25 species of the lichens new to the Świętokrzyski National Park are presented on the basis of recent collection and revision of the herbarial material from this arc. Some of these species are new to the Świętokrzykie Mountains and one have not been recorded in Poland so far.

  13. Passive WiFi monitoring of the rhythm of the campus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kalogianni, E.; Sileryte, R.; Lam, M.; Zhou, K.; Van der Ham, M.; Van der Spek, S.C.; Verbree, E.

    2015-01-01

    Within this research-driven project, passive WiFi monitoring of WiFi enabled devices was used to detect users (students, employees, visitors) of buildings at the campus of Delft University of Technology to gain insight into the Rhythm of the Campus: the occupation, duration of stay and moving

  14. LTE/Wi-Fi Coexistence in 5 GHz ISM Spectrum: Issues, Solutions and Perspectives

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abinader, Fuad; A. de Sousa Jr., Vicente; Choudhurry, Sayantan

    2018-01-01

    on the unlicensed band. Wi-Fi technology is widespread and also operates in the 5 GHz ISM spectrum bands, which may bring performance issues due to the coexistence of both technologies in the same spectrum band. This work is dedicated to the study of coexistence between LTE and Wi-Fi access systems operating in 5...

  15. WiFi in Schools, Electromagnetic Fields and Cell Phones: Alberta Health Fact Sheet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alberta Education, 2012

    2012-01-01

    Wireless devices and the networks that support them are becoming more common in Alberta schools. WiFi is a wireless networking technology that allows computers and other devices to communicate over a wireless signal. Typically the signal is carried by radio waves over an area of up to 100 meters. Through the implementation of a WiFi network,…

  16. 3G Femto or 802.11g WiFi

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Niels T.K.; Rodriguez Larrad, Ignacio; Elling, Jan

    2014-01-01

    In this paper HSPA Release 6 femto and IEEE 802.11g WiFi indoor data solutions are investigated from an end user perspective. Femto and WiFi access points are deployed at typical locations in an urban environment and end user performance is measured. Three key performance indicators (KPI) were...

  17. 76 FR 28073 - Notice of Inventory Completion: Logan Museum of Anthropology, Beloit College, Beloit, WI

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-13

    ... Museum of Anthropology, Beloit College, Beloit, WI AGENCY: National Park Service, Interior. ACTION... the Logan Museum of Anthropology, Beloit College, Beloit, WI. The human remains were removed from... assessment of the human remains was made by the Logan Museum of Anthropology, Beloit College, professional...

  18. 76 FR 28075 - Notice of Inventory Completion: Logan Museum of Anthropology, Beloit College, Beloit, WI

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-13

    ... Museum of Anthropology, Beloit College, Beloit, WI AGENCY: National Park Service, Interior. ACTION... funerary objects in the possession of the Logan Museum of Anthropology, Beloit College, Beloit, WI. The... assessment of the human remains was made by the Logan Museum of Anthropology, Beloit College, professional...

  19. Wi-Learn: An Innovative Learning Paradigm for the University of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... Wi-Learn, enfolds a set of mobile collaborative applications, such as wireless ile transfer, multiuser whiteboard sharing, audio and video conferencing, voting poll, SMS breaking news and revision quiz, using different wireless communication technologies. Keywords: M-learning, pervasive, education, WiFi, Bluetooth ...

  20. Simulátor pro pasivní multistatický radar s použitím WiFi/WiMAX

    OpenAIRE

    Sládek, Ondřej

    2017-01-01

    Diplomová práce se zabývá konceptem pasivního multistatického radaru. Radiolokačním signálem zkoumaného radaru je signál WiFi nebo WiMAX, který je vysílán nespolupracujícím vysílačem. Diplomová práce vyhodnocuje omezení, vyplývající z použití WiFi nebo WiMAX signálů. V rámci práce byl sestaven simulátor v prostředí Matlab, který ověřil základní myšlenku tohoto konceptu. Na základě výsledků simulací s reálnými parametry jsou formulovány závěry směrem k možnému využití WiFi/WiMAX radaru. Thi...

  1. WiFi : Une nouvelle façon de combler le fossé numérique ? | IDRC ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    13 juil. 2011 ... Wi-fi: a new bridge for the digital divide? Connecting to the Internet using a simple aluminum antenna and a wireless network card coul. View moreWi-fi: a new bridge for the digital divide?

  2. Impact of Wisconsin Medicaid Policy Change on Dental Sealant Utilization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okunseri, Christopher; Okunseri, Elaye; Garcia, Raul I; Gonzalez, Cesar; Visotcky, Alexis; Szabo, Aniko

    2018-02-01

    In September 2006, Wisconsin Medicaid changed its policy to allow nondentists to become certified Medicaid providers and to bill for sealants in public health settings. This study examined changes in patterns of dental sealant utilization in first molars of Wisconsin Medicaid enrollees associated with a policy change. The Electronic Data Systems of Medicaid Evaluation and Decision Support for Wisconsin from 2001 to 2009. Retrospective claims data analysis of Wisconsin Dental Medicaid for children aged 6-16 years. A total of 479,847 children followed up for 1,441,300 person-years with 64,546 visits were analyzed. The rate of visits for sealants by dentists increased significantly from 3 percent per year prepolicy to 11 percent per year postpolicy, and that of nondentists increased from 18 percent per year to 20 percent after the policy change, but this was not significant. Non-Hispanic blacks had the lowest visit rates for sealant application by dentists and nondentists pre- and postpolicy periods. The Wisconsin Medicaid policy change was associated with increased rates of visits for dental sealant placement by dentists. The rate of visits with sealant placements by nondentists increased at the same rate pre- and postpolicy change. © Health Research and Educational Trust.

  3. Wisconsin Healthy Birth Outcomes: minority health program challenges and contributions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruz, Evelyn; Guhleman, Patricia; Onheiber, Patrice Mocny

    2008-11-01

    For at least 20 years, the probability that an infant born in Wisconsin would die during the first year of life has been approximately three times greater for infants born to African American women than for those born to White women. Over the same period of time, other states have made improvements in African American infant mortality, whereas Wisconsin's ranking has fallen to last place. Various state and local efforts have been made to address the issue; however, it is only in the last 2 to 3 years that Wisconsin's high rate of African American infant mortality has become an agreed-upon health priority. This article discusses the factors that have converged to bring African American infant mortality to the forefront of Wisconsin public health policy and programs. Particular attention is given to the role of Wisconsin's Minority Health Program in relation to public health leadership and coalition building. Key actions currently underway to implement effective, evidence-based solutions are also described.

  4. Muskellunge growth potential in northern Wisconsin: implications for trophy management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faust, Matthew D.; Isermann, Daniel A.; Luehring, Mark A.; Hansen, Michael J.

    2015-01-01

    The growth potential of Muskellunge Esox masquinongy was evaluated by back-calculating growth histories from cleithra removed from 305 fish collected during 1995–2011 to determine whether it was consistent with trophy management goals in northern Wisconsin. Female Muskellunge had a larger mean asymptotic length (49.8 in) than did males (43.4 in). Minimum ultimate size of female Muskellunge (45.0 in) equaled the 45.0-in minimum length limit, but was less than the 50.0-in minimum length limit used on Wisconsin's trophy waters, while the minimum ultimate size of male Muskellunge (34.0 in) was less than the statewide minimum length limit. Minimum reproductive sizes for both sexes were less than Wisconsin's trophy minimum length limits. Mean growth potential of female Muskellunge in northern Wisconsin appears to be sufficient for meeting trophy management objectives and angler expectations. Muskellunge in northern Wisconsin had similar growth potential to those in Ontario populations, but lower growth potential than Minnesota's populations, perhaps because of genetic and environmental differences.

  5. Criminal Sentencing Alternatives. A Report of a Wingspread Conference (Racine, WI, March 21-22, 1977).

    Science.gov (United States)

    French, Rod

    This publication contains the proceedings of a Wingspread conference held in Racine, Wisconsin in March 1977, dealing with the topic of criminal sentencing alternatives. The conference grew out of a controversy within the Wisconsin Council on Criminal Justice over "determinant" versus "indeterminant" sentencing. Under a…

  6. Fusion Genes Predict Prostate Cancer Recurrence

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-10-01

    research in the principal disciplinary field(s) of the project. Summarize using language that an intelligent lay audience can understand (Scientific...products; • software; • models; • educational aids or curricula; • instruments or equipment; • research material (e.g., Germplasm; cell lines, DNA...University of Wisconsin System Madison, WI 53715 REPORT DATE: October 2017 TYPE OF REPORT: Annual PREPARED FOR: U.S. Army Medical Research and

  7. Millennium ecosystem assessment: research needs

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Carpenter, SR

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available . Specific data gaps that posed serious con- straints in the MA analy- sis include the lack of (i) global time-series infor- mation on land cover change; (ii) adequate in- formation on location and rate of desertification; (iii) global maps of wet..., University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI 53706; 2Depart- ment of Geography and Earth System Science Interdisciplinary Center, Uni- versity of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742; 3Environmental Science and Policy Program, Michigan State University, East...

  8. Cost-Effectiveness Analysis of the Residential Provisions of the 2015 IECC for Wisconsin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mendon, Vrushali V. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Zhao, Mingjie [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Taylor, Zachary T. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Poehlman, Eric A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2016-02-15

    The 2015 IECC provides cost-effective savings for residential buildings in Wisconsin. Moving to the 2015 IECC from the 2006 IECC base code is cost-effective for residential buildings in all climate zones in Wisconsin.

  9. Behavior of impurity ion velocities during the pulsed poloidal current drive in the Madison symmetric torus reversed-field pinch

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakakita, Hajime; Craig, Darren; Anderson, Jay K.; Chapman, Brett E.; Den-Hartog, Daniel J.; Prager, Stewart C.; Biewer, Ted M.; Terry, Stephen D.

    2003-01-01

    We report on passive measurements of impurity ion velocities during the pulsed poloidal current drive (PPCD) in the Madison Symmetric Torus reversed-field pinch. During PPCD, the electron temperature increased and a sudden reduction of magnetic fluctuations was observed. For this change, we have studied whether plasma velocity is affected. Plasma rotation is observed to decrease during PPCD. From measurements of line intensities for several impurities at 10 poloidal chords, it is found that the impurity line emission shifts outward. The ion temperature of impurities is reasonably connected to that measured by charge exchange recombination spectroscopy from core to edge. (author)

  10. Field Test Evaluation of Conservation Retrofits of Low-Income Single Family Buildings in Wisconsin: Summary Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ternes, M.P.

    2001-05-21

    During the winter of 1985-86, a retrofit field test was performed in 66 occupied, low-income, single-family homes in Madison, Wisconsin. The primary objectives of the field test were to (1) determine the measured energy savings and the relative benefits of a combination of envelope and mechanical equipment retrofits that were selected following a new audit-directed retrofit procedure, (2) determine the energy savings and benefits due to performing infiltration reduction work following a recently developed infiltration reduction procedure, and (3) study general occupant behavior and house thermal characteristics and their possible change following retrofit installation. This report provides an overview of the project and summarizes the findings which will be presented in detail in separate reports. Major findings from the field test include: (1) The audit-directed retrofit procedure produced an average savings of 207 therms/year/house. The procedure also more than doubled the overall cost-effectiveness of the low-income weatherization assistance program as compared with the priority system formerly used in Wisconsin. Wall insulation and condensing furnaces were the major retrofits (predicted annual energy savings greater than 100 therms/year) most often selected under the procedure. The respective average energy savings of the houses receiving wall insulation and condensing furnace. s was 14.6 and 14.3 therms/year for each $100 spent on them under the program. (2) The blower-door-guided infiltration reduction procedure reduced expenditures for infiltration reduction to about one-fourth of previous program costs (from $570/house to $106/house). The procedure also reduced the average air leakage rate in the treated houses by 16%, whereas, in a previous study, no significant reduction was found following the installation of typical infiltration reduction measures. (3) Twenty to 60% of the deviation between predicted and measured savings can be attributed to incorrect

  11. Of Needles and Haystacks: Building an Accurate Statewide Dropout Early Warning System in Wisconsin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knowles, Jared E.

    2015-01-01

    The state of Wisconsin has one of the highest four year graduation rates in the nation, but deep disparities among student subgroups remain. To address this the state has created the Wisconsin Dropout Early Warning System (DEWS), a predictive model of student dropout risk for students in grades six through nine. The Wisconsin DEWS is in use…

  12. 77 FR 71587 - Wisconsin Public Service Corporation; Notices of Intent To File License Applications, Filing of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-03

    ... Energy Regulatory Commission Wisconsin Public Service Corporation; Notices of Intent To File License.... d. Submitted By: Wisconsin Public Service Corporation. e. Name of Projects: Tomahawk Hydroelectric..., Vice President, Energy Supply Operations, Wisconsin Public Service Corporation, P.O. Box 19001, 700...

  13. 76 FR 48841 - Wisconsin Public Service Corporation; Notice of Application for Amendment of License and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-09

    ... Energy Regulatory Commission Wisconsin Public Service Corporation; Notice of Application for Amendment of..., 2011. d. Applicant: Wisconsin Public Service Corporation. e. Name of Project: High Falls Project. f.... 791a-825r. h. Applicant Contact: James Nuthals, Wisconsin Public Service Corporation, 700 North Adams...

  14. Effects of melatonin on Wi-Fi-induced oxidative stress in lens of rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tök, Levent; Nazıroğlu, Mustafa; Doğan, Salih; Kahya, Mehmet Cemal; Tök, Ozlem

    2014-01-01

    Melatonin has been considered a potent antioxidant that detoxifies a variety of reactive oxygen species in many pathophysiological states of eye. The present study was designed to determine the effects of Wi-Fi exposure on the lens oxidant, antioxidant redox systems, as well as the possible protective effects of melatonin on the lens injury induced by electromagnetic radiation (EMR). Thirty-two rats were used in the current study and they were randomly divided into four equal groups as follows: First and second groups were cage-control and sham-control rats. Rats in third group were exposed to Wi-Fi (2.45 GHz) for duration of 60 min/day for 30 days. As in the third group, the fourth group was treated with melatonin. The one-hour exposure to irradiation in second, third and fourth took place at noon each day. Lipid peroxidation levels in the lens were slightly higher in third (Wi-Fi) group than in cage and sham control groups although their concentrations were significantly (P Wi-Fi group than in cage and sham control groups although GSH-Px (P Wi-Fi + melatonin group than in Wi-Fi group. There are poor oxidative toxic effects of one hour of Wi-Fi exposure on the lens in the animals. However, melatonin supplementation in the lens seems to have protective effects on the oxidant system by modulation of GSH-Px activity.

  15. Exposure to Radiofrequency Electromagnetic Fields From Wi-Fi in Australian Schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karipidis, Ken; Henderson, Stuart; Wijayasinghe, Don; Tjong, Lydiawati; Tinker, Rick

    2017-08-01

    The increasing use of Wi-Fi in schools and other places has given rise to public concern that the radiofrequency (RF) electromagnetic fields from Wi-Fi have the potential to adversely affect children. The current study measured typical and peak RF levels from Wi-Fi and other sources in 23 schools in Australia. All of the RF measurements were much lower than the reference levels recommended by international guidelines for protection against established health effects. The typical and peak RF levels from Wi-Fi in locations occupied by children in the classroom were of the order of 10-4 and 10-2% of the exposure guidelines, respectively. Typical RF levels in the classroom were similar between Wi-Fi and radio but higher than other sources. In the schoolyard typical RF levels were higher for radio, TV and mobile phone base stations compared to Wi-Fi. The results of this study showed that the typical RF exposure of children from Wi-Fi at school is very low and comparable or lower to other sources in the environment. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press.

  16. Electromagnetic immunity of implantable pacemakers exposed to wi-fi devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattei, Eugenio; Censi, Federica; Triventi, Michele; Calcagnini, Giovanni

    2014-10-01

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate the potential for electromagnetic interference (EMI) and to assess the immunity level of implantable pacemakers (PM) when exposed to the radiofrequency (RF) field generated by Wi-Fi devices. Ten PM from five manufacturers, representative of what today is implanted in patients, have been tested in vitro and exposed to the signal generated by a Wi-Fi transmitter. An exposure setup that reproduces the actual IEEE 802.11b/g protocol has been designed and used during the tests. The system is able to amplify the Wi-Fi signal and transmits at power levels higher than those allowed by current international regulation. Such approach allows one to obtain, in case of no EMI, a safety margin for PM exposed to Wi-Fi signals, which otherwise cannot be derived if using commercial Wi-Fi equipment. The results of this study mitigate concerns about using Wi-Fi devices close to PM: none of the PM tested exhibit any degradation of their performance, even when exposed to RF field levels five times higher than those allowed by current international regulation (20 W EIRP). In conclusion, Wi-Fi devices do not pose risks of EMI to implantable PM. The immunity level of modern PM is much higher than the transmitting power of RF devices operating at 2.4 GHz.

  17. Dominant Channel Occupancy for Wi-Fi Backscatter Uplink in Industrial Internet of Things

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jung-Hyok Kwon

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a dominant channel occupancy (DCO mechanism for the Wi-Fi backscatter uplink in the industrial Internet of things (IIoT. The DCO provides high-priority channel access and reliable burst transmission to the Wi-Fi backscatter devices, thereby enabling the Wi-Fi backscatter tag to deliver its tag information to the Wi-Fi reader without interference from neighboring legacy Wi-Fi devices to guarantee the timeliness and reliability of the IIoT system. For the former, we consider three types of medium access control (MAC configurations: “carrier sense multiple access with collision avoidance (CSMA/CA starting with short inter-frame space (SIFS”, “freezing of the backoff period”, and “reduced CWmin.” In addition, the DCO uses the SIFS between burst packets to guarantee reliable burst transmission. To verify the effectiveness of DCO and determine a proper value for MAC parameters, we conduct experimental simulations under IEEE 802.11n PHY/MAC environments. The simulation results show that the reduced CWmin has the most significant effect on the channel occupancy. The Wi-Fi backscatter devices achieve much higher throughput than the separate cases when two or more configurations are used simultaneously. Moreover, the results exhibit that the use of SIFS between consecutive packets supports reliable burst transmission regardless of the transmission of the legacy Wi-Fi devices in the vicinity.

  18. Exposure to radiofrequency electromagnetic fields from Wi-Fi in Australian schools

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karipidis, Ken; Henderson, Stuart; Wijayasinghe, Don; Tjong, Lydiawati; Tinker, Rick

    2017-01-01

    The increasing use of Wi-Fi in schools and other places has given rise to public concern that the radiofrequency (RF) electromagnetic fields from Wi-Fi have the potential to adversely affect children. The current study measured typical and peak RF levels from Wi-Fi and other sources in 23 schools in Australia. All of the RF measurements were much lower than the reference levels recommended by international guidelines for protection against established health effects. The typical and peak RF levels from Wi-Fi in locations occupied by children in the classroom were of the order of 10 4 and 10 2 % of the exposure guidelines, respectively. Typical RF levels in the classroom were similar between Wi-Fi and radio but higher than other sources. In the school yard typical RF levels were higher for radio, TV and mobile phone base stations compared to Wi-Fi. The results of this study showed that the typical RF exposure of children from Wi-Fi at school is very low and comparable or lower to other sources in the environment. (authors)

  19. Electron temperature structures associated with magnetic tearing modes in the Madison Symmetric Torus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephens, Hillary Dianne

    Tearing mode induced magnetic islands have a significant impact on the thermal characteristics of magnetically confined plasmas such as those in the reversed-field-pinch. Using a state-of-the-art Thomson scattering (TS) diagnostic, electron temperature fluctuations correlated with magnetic tearing modes have been observed on the Madison Symmetric Torus reversed-field-pinch. The TS diagnostic consists of two independently triggerable Nd:YAG lasers that can each pulse up to 15 times each plasma discharge and 21 General Atomics polchromators equipped with avalanche photodiode modules. Detailed calibrations focusing on accuracy, ease of use and repeatability and in-situ measurements have been performed on the system. Electron temperature (Te) profiles are acquired at 25 kHz with 2 cm or less resolution along the minor radius, sufficient to measure the effect of an island on the profile as the island rotates by the measurement point. Bayesian data analysis techniques are developed and used to detect fluctuations over an ensemble of shots. Four cases are studied; standard plasmas in quiescent periods, through sawteeth, through core reconnection events and in plasmas where the tearing mode activity is decreased. With a spectrum of unstable tearing modes, remnant islands that tend to flatten the temperature profile are present in the core between sawtooth-like reconnection events. This flattening is characteristic of rapid parallel heat conduction along helical magnetic field lines. The spatial structure of the temperature fluctuations show that the location of the rational surface of the m/n = 1/6 tearing mode is significantly further in than equilibrium suggestions predict. The fluctuations also provide a measurement of the remnant island width which is significantly smaller than the predicted full island width. These correlated fluctuations disappear during both global and core reconnection events. In striking contrast to temperature flattening, a temperature gradient

  20. Introduction to radioactive waste management issues in Wisconsin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1977-01-01

    This brief focused on wastes from commercial production of electricity and various industrial, medical and research applications of radioactive materials. Only traditionally solid wastes are dealt with. It was organized into five parts. Part I presented an introduction to radioactivity - what it is and the biological hazards associated with it. Federal regulation of the management of radioactive wastes was discussed in Part II. Existing state laws and bills currently before the Wisconsin Legislature were described in Part III. Part IV gave background information on specific areas of potential inquiry related to radioactive wastes in Wisconsin. Part V summarized the issues identified in the brief. 2 figures, 7 tables

  1. Validation of a short form Wisconsin Upper Respiratory Symptom Survey (WURSS-21

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Highstrom Alex D

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Wisconsin Upper Respiratory Symptom Survey (WURSS is an illness-specific health-related quality-of-life questionnaire outcomes instrument. Objectives Research questions were: 1 How well does the WURSS-21 assess the symptoms and functional impairments associated with common cold? 2 How well can this instrument measure change over time (responsiveness? 3 What is the minimal important difference (MID that can be detected by the WURSS-21? 4 What are the descriptive statistics for area under the time severity curve (AUC? 5 What sample sizes would trials require to detect MID or AUC criteria? 6 What does factor analysis tell us about the underlying dimensional structure of the common cold? 7 How reliable are items, domains, and summary scores represented in WURSS? 8 For each of these considerations, how well does the WURSS-21 compare to the WURSS-44, Jackson, and SF-8? Study Design and Setting People with Jackson-defined colds were recruited from the community in and around Madison, Wisconsin. Participants were enrolled within 48 hours of first cold symptom and monitored for up to 14 days of illness. Half the sample filled out the WURSS-21 in the morning and the WURSS-44 in the evening, with the other half reversing the daily order. External comparators were the SF-8, a 24-hour recall general health measure yielding separate physical and mental health scores, and the eight-item Jackson cold index, which assesses symptoms, but not functional impairment or quality of life. Results In all, 230 participants were monitored for 2,457 person-days. Participants were aged 14 to 83 years (mean 34.1, SD 13.6, majority female (66.5%, mostly white (86.0%, and represented substantive education and income diversity. WURSS-21 items demonstrated similar performance when embedded within the WURSS-44 or in the stand-alone WURSS-21. Minimal important difference (MID and Guyatt's responsiveness index were 10.3, 0.71 for the WURSS-21 and 18.5, 0

  2. Biblioteca y Centro de Estudios de la Universidad de Wisconsin - Kenosha - . Wisconsin – (EE.UU.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hellmuth, George

    1978-12-01

    Full Text Available Continuing the line established by these same architects in previous University designs, the Library and Study Hall of the University of Wisconsin is another attempt at creating an exciting atmosphere, particularly conducive to the development of university life. It is to be noted, in this case, the arrangement of the library and study areas around a central common open space, sort of an inner courtyard used as a relaxation and sitting área, where all traffic corridors and promenades from the adjacent faculties come to meet, thus becoming the main reference point for the entire campus. The library with a current capacity for 245,000 volumes and 1,400 reading stalls is designed so it can be eventually enlarged permitting to almost double its book capacity and increasing the reading stalls to more than 2,000.

    Continuando la línea marcada por estos mismos arquitectos en anteriores proyectos de universidades, la biblioteca y el centro de estudios de la Universidad de Wisconsin procura definir atractivos espacios para el desarrollo de la vida universitaria. En este caso destaca la organización de los servicios de biblioteca y estudio en torno a un espacio comunitario central, a modo de plaza interior, destinado a sala de estar y recreo, y en donde confluyen las circulaciones que provienen de los locales adyacentes, convirtiéndolo en el principal punto de referencia del campus universitario. La biblioteca, que actualmente tiene capacidad para 245.000 volúmenes y 1.400 lectores, ha previsto una ampliación que le permitirá casi doblar el número de volúmenes y proporcionar espacio para más de 2.000 lectores.

  3. Glacial Lake Lind, Wisconsin and Minnesota

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, M.D.; Addis, K.L.; Ferber, L.R.; Hemstad, C.B.; Meyer, G.N.; Komai, L.T.

    1999-01-01

    Glacial Lake Lind developed in the pre-late Wisconsinan St. Croix River valley, Minnesota and Wisconsin, and lasted more than 1000 yr during the retreat of the Superior lobe at the end of the Wisconsinan glaciation. Lake Lind sediment consists primarily of red varved silt and clay, but also includes mud-flow deposits, nearshore silt (penecontemporaneously deformed in places), nearshore rippled sand, and deltaic sand. Lake Lind varved red clay is not part of glacial Lake Grantsburg, as suggested by earlier authors, because the red varves are separated from overlying glacial Lake Grantsburg silt and clay by a unit of deltaic and fluvial sand. Furthermore, varve correlations indicate that the base of the red varves is younger to the north, showing that the basin expanded as the Superior lobe retreated and was not a lake basin dammed to the southwest by the advancing Grantsburg sublobe. Varve correlations indicate that the Superior lobe retreated at a rate of about 200 m/yr. Uniform winter-clay thickness throughout most of the varve couplets suggests thermal stratification in the lake with clay trapped in the epilimnion; some clay would exit the lake at the outlet prior to winter freeze. Zones of thicker winter-clay layers, in places associated with mud-flow layers, indicate outlet incision, lake-level fall, and shoreline erosion and resuspension of lake clay. The most likely outlet for glacial Lake Lind was in the southwest part of the lake near the present site of Minneapolis, Minnesota. Nearshore sediment indicates that the lake level of glacial Lake Lind was around 280 m. The elevation of the base of the Lake Lind sediments indicates water depth was 20 to 55 m. Evidence in the southern part of the lake basin suggests that the Superior lobe readvanced at least once during the early stages of glacial Lake Lind. Lake Lind ended not by drainage but by being filled in by prograding deltas and outwash plains composed of sand derived from the retreating Superior lobe. It

  4. Preliminary digital model of ground-water flow in the Madison Group, Powder River Basin and adjacent areas, Wyoming, Montana, South Dakota, North Dakota, and Nebraska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konikow, Leonard F.

    1976-01-01

    A digital simulation model was used to analyze regional ground-water flow in the Madison Group aquifer in the Powder River Basin in Montana and Wyoming and adjacent areas. Most recharge to the aquifer originates in or near the outcrop areas of the Madison in the Bighorn Mountains and Black Hills, and most discharge occurs through springs and wells. Flow through the aquifer in the modeled areas was approximately 200 cubic feet per second. The aquifer can probably sustain increased ground-water withdrawals of up to several tens of cubic feet per second, but these withdrawals probably would significantly lower the potentiometric surface in the Madison aquifer in a large part of the basin. (Woodard-USGS)

  5. The making of the Women in Biology forum (WiB) at Bioclues.

    OpenAIRE

    Reeta Rani Singhania; Dhatri Madduru; Pranathi Pappu; Sameera Panchangam; Renuka Suravajhala; Mohanalatha Chandrasekharan

    2014-01-01

    The Women in Biology forum (WiB) of Bioclues (India) began in 2009 to promote and support women pursuing careers in bioinformatics and computational biology. WiB was formed in order to help women scientists deprived of basic research, boost the prominence of women scientists particularly from developing countries, and bridge the gender gap to innovation. WiB has also served as a platform to highlight the work of established female scientists in these fields. Several award-winning women resear...

  6. A comparative analysis of Indoor WiFi Positioning at a large building complex

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mathisen, Andreas; Krogh, Søren; Stisen, Allan

    2016-01-01

    Indoor Positioning based on WiFi has received extensive focus from research communities, owing its promises of ubiquitous positioning indoors for a variety of applications. The majority of the existing research on WiFi positioning centers around the improvement of positioning accuracy. However...... are in daily use. The positioning methods covered utilizes received signal strength from existing WiFi infrastructure to ease deployment and maintenance. We identify meaningful key metrics which describe different aspects of the methods’ performance. Using these metrics, we furthermore report on experiences...

  7. LTE/Wi-Fi Coexistence in 5 GHz ISM Spectrum: Issues, Solutions and Perspectives

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abinader, Fuad; A. de Sousa Jr., Vicente; Choudhurry, Sayantan

    2018-01-01

    solutions is the aggregation of ISM unlicensed spectrum to licensed bands, using wireless networks defined by IEEE and 3GPP. While Wi-Fi networks are aggregated to LTE small cells via LTE/WLAN Aggregation (LWA), in proposals like LTE-U and LAA-LTE, the LTE air interface itself is used for transmission...... on the unlicensed band. Wi-Fi technology is widespread and also operates in the 5 GHz ISM spectrum bands, which may bring performance issues due to the coexistence of both technologies in the same spectrum band. This work is dedicated to the study of coexistence between LTE and Wi-Fi access systems operating in 5...

  8. LTE, WiMAX and WLAN network design, optimization and performance analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Korowajczuk, Leonhard

    2011-01-01

    A technological overview of LTE and WiMAX LTE, WiMAX and WLAN Network Design, Optimization and Performance Analysis provides a practical guide to LTE and WiMAX technologies introducing various tools and concepts used within. In addition, topics such as traffic modelling of IP-centric networks, RF propagation, fading, mobility, and indoor coverage are explored; new techniques which increase throughput such as MIMO and AAS technology are highlighted; and simulation, network design and performance analysis are also examined. Finally, in the latter part of the book Korowajczuk gives a step-by-step

  9. Digital Learning Compass: Distance Education State Almanac 2017. Wisconsin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seaman, Julia E.; Seaman, Jeff

    2017-01-01

    This brief report uses data collected under the U.S. Department of Education's National Center for Educational Statistics (NCES) Integrated Postsecondary Education Data System (IPEDS) Fall Enrollment survey to highlight distance education data in the state of Wisconsin. The sample for this analysis is comprised of all active, degree-granting…

  10. Dragonflies are biocontrol agents in Wisconsin cranberry marshes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dragonflies (Order Odonata) are abundant predators that emerge in large hatch events each summer in Wisconsin cranberry marshes. They seem to be a potential group of biocontrol agents for pest management that may be influenced by the diversity found on the marsh. In fact, our evidence shows that dra...

  11. Southeastern Wisconsin Workplace Communication Project Curriculum Development Guide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frederick, Catherine; Huss-Lederman, Susan; Johnson, Jewelie

    The Southeastern Wisconsin Workplace Communication Project is a workplace English-as-a-Second-Language (ESL) resource and outreach program involving a partnership of businesses and adult educators in a rural area that has experienced an increase in new speakers of English in the manufacturing workforce. The guide provides workplace educators and…

  12. WEAKLY SYNCHRYRONIZED SUBPOPULATION DYNAMICS IN WISCONSIN FROGS AND TOADS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spatial synchrony in population dynamics is a topic of increasing interest in basic and applied ecology. We used data from 18 years of frog and toad calling surveys conducted throughout Wisconsin to determine the level of intraspecific synchrony among survey sites, and the relat...

  13. On Farmers’ Ground: Wisconsin Dairy Farm Nutrient Management Survey Questionnaire

    Science.gov (United States)

    This questionnaire was used during quarterly, face-to-face interviews with the fifty-four Wisconsin dairy farmers who participated in the ‘On Farmers’ Ground’ nutrient management research project. It was designed to systematically and consistently compile information on herd size and composition, l...

  14. Quaternary Glacial Mapping in Western Wisconsin Using Soil Survey Information

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oehlke, Betsy M.; Dolliver, Holly A. S.

    2011-01-01

    The majority of soils in the western Wisconsin have developed from glacial sediments deposited during the Quaternary Period (2.6 million years before present). In many regions, multiple advances and retreats have left a complex landscape of diverse glacial sediments and landforms. The soils that have developed on these deposits reflect the nature…

  15. The Wisconsin experience with incentives for demand-side management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Landgren, D.A.

    1990-01-01

    It has been noted that, within traditional regulatory frameworks for electric utilities, factors exist which discourage demand side management (DSM) and that there is a lack of positive incentives for DSM. Regulatory agencies should therefore make it possible for DSM measures to benefit from the same treatment as supply-side measures. The Wisconsin Public Service Commission (WPSC) has recognized this need and has adopted various measures accordingly. The need for efficiency incentives is described according to the particular experience of Wisconsin Electric concerning their recourse to a DSM incentive and according to new incentive models being tested in collaboration with other electricity suppliers in Wisconsin. The WPSC has concluded that the fact of considering the costs relating to DSM as expenses or capitalizing them within the rate base does not motivate the utility to promote DSM programs. The WPSC has thus decided to experiment with energy efficiency incentives in order to evaluate their eventual impact. The choice of the type of incentive had an objective of starting the process in an area where the lack of experience has created, from the regulatory point of view, a reticence on the part of utilities to engage in DSM programs. The WPSC has designed a variety of incentive models which have been adapted to each utility's own situation. Specific incentive programs developed for three Wisconsin utilities are reviewed

  16. Wisconsin's Infants and Toddlers. Publication #2015-17

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphey, David; Cooper, Mae

    2015-01-01

    Wisconsin's infants and toddlers (defined as children less than three years old) are more than 200,000 in number. Seventy-one percent are white/non-Hispanic, and the largest minority group is Hispanic, at 12 percent. Black, Asian American, and American Indian infants and toddlers make up smaller percentages. To help states target policies related…

  17. 77 FR 16674 - Establishment of the Wisconsin Ledge Viticultural Area

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-22

    .... All of the comments expressed support for the proposed Wisconsin Ledge viticultural area. TTB... label reference on a wine that indicates or implies an origin other than the wine's true place of origin... or other term identified as being viticulturally significant in part 9 of the TTB regulations, at...

  18. Skill Needs and Training Strategies in the Wisconsin Printing Industry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wisconsin Univ., Madison. Center on Wisconsin Strategy.

    A study examined the emerging skill needs in the Wisconsin printing industry, a key industry that provided the largest increase (more than 13,000 new jobs) in manufacturing employment in the state in the past decade. Eighteen interviews were conducted with industry personnel and production managers, union representatives, technical college…

  19. SeaWiFS_L3m_CU_LAND_NDVI_9km

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The SeaWiFS instrument was launched by Orbital Sciences Corporation on the OrbView-2 (a.k.a. SeaStar) satellite in August 1997, and collected data from September...

  20. SeaWiFS_L3m_MC_CDOM_9km

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The SeaWiFS instrument was launched by Orbital Sciences Corporation on the OrbView-2 (a.k.a. SeaStar) satellite in August 1997, and collected data from September...

  1. SeaWiFS_L3m_SNSP_CHL_chlor_a_9km

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The SeaWiFS instrument was launched by Orbital Sciences Corporation on the OrbView-2 (a.k.a. SeaStar) satellite in August 1997, and collected data from September...

  2. SeaWiFS_L3m_SNSP_CDOM_9km

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The SeaWiFS instrument was launched by Orbital Sciences Corporation on the OrbView-2 (a.k.a. SeaStar) satellite in August 1997, and collected data from September...

  3. SeaWiFS_L3m_WC_POC_9km

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The SeaWiFS instrument was launched by Orbital Sciences Corporation on the OrbView-2 (a.k.a. SeaStar) satellite in August 1997, and collected data from September...

  4. SeaWiFS_L3b_SNSP_KD490

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The SeaWiFS instrument was launched by Orbital Sciences Corporation on the OrbView-2 (a.k.a. SeaStar) satellite in August 1997, and collected data from September...

  5. SeaWiFS_L3m_SCSU_RRS_angstrom_9km

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The SeaWiFS instrument was launched by Orbital Sciences Corporation on the OrbView-2 (a.k.a. SeaStar) satellite in August 1997, and collected data from September...

  6. SeaWiFS_L3m_SCSU_KD490_9km

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The SeaWiFS instrument was launched by Orbital Sciences Corporation on the OrbView-2 (a.k.a. SeaStar) satellite in August 1997, and collected data from September...

  7. SeaWiFS_L3m_SNSP_LAND_NDVI_4km

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The SeaWiFS instrument was launched by Orbital Sciences Corporation on the OrbView-2 (a.k.a. SeaStar) satellite in August 1997, and collected data from September...

  8. Towards the validation of SeaWiFS in Southern African Waters: The ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    emission matrices, performed on filtered seawater samples. Modelled bio-optical data, using conditions typical of high biomass marine environments, are then used to assess the performance of a proposed SeaWiFS combined algorithm with ...

  9. SeaWiFS_L3m_YR_RRS_aot_9km

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The SeaWiFS instrument was launched by Orbital Sciences Corporation on the OrbView-2 (a.k.a. SeaStar) satellite in August 1997, and collected data from September...

  10. SeaWiFS_L3m_SNAU_CHL_chlor_a_9km

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The SeaWiFS instrument was launched by Orbital Sciences Corporation on the OrbView-2 (a.k.a. SeaStar) satellite in August 1997, and collected data from September...

  11. SeaWiFS_L3m_SCAU_LAND_NDVI_4km

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The SeaWiFS instrument was launched by Orbital Sciences Corporation on the OrbView-2 (a.k.a. SeaStar) satellite in August 1997, and collected data from September...

  12. SeaWiFS_L3m_WC_RRS_aot_9km

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The SeaWiFS instrument was launched by Orbital Sciences Corporation on the OrbView-2 (a.k.a. SeaStar) satellite in August 1997, and collected data from September...

  13. SeaWiFS_L3b_8D_LAND

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The SeaWiFS instrument was launched by Orbital Sciences Corporation on the OrbView-2 (a.k.a. SeaStar) satellite in August 1997, and collected data from September...

  14. SeaWiFS_L3m_DAY_RRS_9km

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The SeaWiFS instrument was launched by Orbital Sciences Corporation on the OrbView-2 (a.k.a. SeaStar) satellite in August 1997, and collected data from September...

  15. SeaWiFS_L3m_SNWI_PAR_9km

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The SeaWiFS instrument was launched by Orbital Sciences Corporation on the OrbView-2 (a.k.a. SeaStar) satellite in August 1997, and collected data from September...

  16. SeaWiFS_L3m_SNAU_CDOM_9km

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The SeaWiFS instrument was launched by Orbital Sciences Corporation on the OrbView-2 (a.k.a. SeaStar) satellite in August 1997, and collected data from September...

  17. SeaWiFS_L3b_R32_KD490

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The SeaWiFS instrument was launched by Orbital Sciences Corporation on the OrbView-2 (a.k.a. SeaStar) satellite in August 1997, and collected data from September...

  18. SeaWiFS_L3m_MO_RRS_angstrom_9km

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The SeaWiFS instrument was launched by Orbital Sciences Corporation on the OrbView-2 (a.k.a. SeaStar) satellite in August 1997, and collected data from September...

  19. SeaWiFS_L3b_R32_PIC

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The SeaWiFS instrument was launched by Orbital Sciences Corporation on the OrbView-2 (a.k.a. SeaStar) satellite in August 1997, and collected data from September...

  20. SeaWiFS_L3m_MO_CDOM_9km

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The SeaWiFS instrument was launched by Orbital Sciences Corporation on the OrbView-2 (a.k.a. SeaStar) satellite in August 1997, and collected data from September...

  1. SeaWiFS_L3m_8D_RRS_9km

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The SeaWiFS instrument was launched by Orbital Sciences Corporation on the OrbView-2 (a.k.a. SeaStar) satellite in August 1997, and collected data from September...

  2. SeaWiFS_L3m_R32_CHL_chlor_a_9km

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The SeaWiFS instrument was launched by Orbital Sciences Corporation on the OrbView-2 (a.k.a. SeaStar) satellite in August 1997, and collected data from September...

  3. SeaWiFS_L3b_R32_PAR

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The SeaWiFS instrument was launched by Orbital Sciences Corporation on the OrbView-2 (a.k.a. SeaStar) satellite in August 1997, and collected data from September...

  4. SeaWiFS_L3m_8D_KD490_9km

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The SeaWiFS instrument was launched by Orbital Sciences Corporation on the OrbView-2 (a.k.a. SeaStar) satellite in August 1997, and collected data from September...

  5. SeaWiFS_L3b_8D_PIC

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The SeaWiFS instrument was launched by Orbital Sciences Corporation on the OrbView-2 (a.k.a. SeaStar) satellite in August 1997, and collected data from September...

  6. SeaWiFS_L3m_R32_RRS_9km

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The SeaWiFS instrument was launched by Orbital Sciences Corporation on the OrbView-2 (a.k.a. SeaStar) satellite in August 1997, and collected data from September...

  7. SeaWiFS_L3m_CU_PAR_9km

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The SeaWiFS instrument was launched by Orbital Sciences Corporation on the OrbView-2 (a.k.a. SeaStar) satellite in August 1997, and collected data from September...

  8. SeaWiFS_L3m_MC_PIC_9km

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The SeaWiFS instrument was launched by Orbital Sciences Corporation on the OrbView-2 (a.k.a. SeaStar) satellite in August 1997, and collected data from September...

  9. SeaWiFS_L3m_SCWI_LAND_NDVI_9km

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The SeaWiFS instrument was launched by Orbital Sciences Corporation on the OrbView-2 (a.k.a. SeaStar) satellite in August 1997, and collected data from September...

  10. SeaWiFS_L3m_SNAU_RRS_9km

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The SeaWiFS instrument was launched by Orbital Sciences Corporation on the OrbView-2 (a.k.a. SeaStar) satellite in August 1997, and collected data from September...

  11. SeaWiFS_L3m_SCSU_LAND_NDVI_9km

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The SeaWiFS instrument was launched by Orbital Sciences Corporation on the OrbView-2 (a.k.a. SeaStar) satellite in August 1997, and collected data from September...

  12. SeaWiFS_L3b_8D_KD490

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The SeaWiFS instrument was launched by Orbital Sciences Corporation on the OrbView-2 (a.k.a. SeaStar) satellite in August 1997, and collected data from September...

  13. SeaWiFS_L3b_R32_RRS

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The SeaWiFS instrument was launched by Orbital Sciences Corporation on the OrbView-2 (a.k.a. SeaStar) satellite in August 1997, and collected data from September...

  14. SeaWiFS_L3m_MO_CHL_chlor_a_9km

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The SeaWiFS instrument was launched by Orbital Sciences Corporation on the OrbView-2 (a.k.a. SeaStar) satellite in August 1997, and collected data from September...

  15. SeaWiFS_L3m_WC_CHL_chlor_a_9km

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The SeaWiFS instrument was launched by Orbital Sciences Corporation on the OrbView-2 (a.k.a. SeaStar) satellite in August 1997, and collected data from September...

  16. SeaWiFS_L3m_WC_KD490_9km

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The SeaWiFS instrument was launched by Orbital Sciences Corporation on the OrbView-2 (a.k.a. SeaStar) satellite in August 1997, and collected data from September...

  17. SeaWiFS_L3m_CU_RRS_aot_9km

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The SeaWiFS instrument was launched by Orbital Sciences Corporation on the OrbView-2 (a.k.a. SeaStar) satellite in August 1997, and collected data from September...

  18. SeaWiFS_L3m_SNSP_RRS_aot_9km

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The SeaWiFS instrument was launched by Orbital Sciences Corporation on the OrbView-2 (a.k.a. SeaStar) satellite in August 1997, and collected data from September...

  19. SeaWiFS_L3m_SNSU_POC_9km

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The SeaWiFS instrument was launched by Orbital Sciences Corporation on the OrbView-2 (a.k.a. SeaStar) satellite in August 1997, and collected data from September...

  20. SeaWiFS_L3m_SNSU_CHL_chlor_a_9km

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The SeaWiFS instrument was launched by Orbital Sciences Corporation on the OrbView-2 (a.k.a. SeaStar) satellite in August 1997, and collected data from September...

  1. SeaWiFS_L3m_SNSP_PIC_9km

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The SeaWiFS instrument was launched by Orbital Sciences Corporation on the OrbView-2 (a.k.a. SeaStar) satellite in August 1997, and collected data from September...

  2. SeaWiFS_L3m_MC_KD490_9km

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The SeaWiFS instrument was launched by Orbital Sciences Corporation on the OrbView-2 (a.k.a. SeaStar) satellite in August 1997, and collected data from September...

  3. SeaWiFS_L3m_8D_POC_9km

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The SeaWiFS instrument was launched by Orbital Sciences Corporation on the OrbView-2 (a.k.a. SeaStar) satellite in August 1997, and collected data from September...

  4. SeaWiFS_L3m_MO_RRS_aot_9km

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The SeaWiFS instrument was launched by Orbital Sciences Corporation on the OrbView-2 (a.k.a. SeaStar) satellite in August 1997, and collected data from September...

  5. SeaWiFS_L3m_R32_PAR_9km

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The SeaWiFS instrument was launched by Orbital Sciences Corporation on the OrbView-2 (a.k.a. SeaStar) satellite in August 1997, and collected data from September...

  6. SeaWiFS_L3m_WC_PIC_9km

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The SeaWiFS instrument was launched by Orbital Sciences Corporation on the OrbView-2 (a.k.a. SeaStar) satellite in August 1997, and collected data from September...

  7. SeaWiFS_L3m_DAY_CDOM_9km

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The SeaWiFS instrument was launched by Orbital Sciences Corporation on the OrbView-2 (a.k.a. SeaStar) satellite in August 1997, and collected data from September...

  8. SeaWiFS_L3m_SCAU_LAND_NDVI_9km

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The SeaWiFS instrument was launched by Orbital Sciences Corporation on the OrbView-2 (a.k.a. SeaStar) satellite in August 1997, and collected data from September...

  9. SeaWiFS_L3b_SNSU_KD490

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The SeaWiFS instrument was launched by Orbital Sciences Corporation on the OrbView-2 (a.k.a. SeaStar) satellite in August 1997, and collected data from September...

  10. SeaWiFS_L3b_MO_KD490

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The SeaWiFS instrument was launched by Orbital Sciences Corporation on the OrbView-2 (a.k.a. SeaStar) satellite in August 1997, and collected data from September...

  11. SeaWiFS_L3m_R32_RRS_aot_9km

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The SeaWiFS instrument was launched by Orbital Sciences Corporation on the OrbView-2 (a.k.a. SeaStar) satellite in August 1997, and collected data from September...

  12. Collaborative WiFi Fingerprinting Using Sensor-Based Navigation on Smartphones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Peng; Zhao, Qile; Li, You; Niu, Xiaoji; Zhuang, Yuan; Liu, Jingnan

    2015-07-20

    This paper presents a method that trains the WiFi fingerprint database using sensor-based navigation solutions. Since micro-electromechanical systems (MEMS) sensors provide only a short-term accuracy but suffer from the accuracy degradation with time, we restrict the time length of available indoor navigation trajectories, and conduct post-processing to improve the sensor-based navigation solution. Different middle-term navigation trajectories that move in and out of an indoor area are combined to make up the database. Furthermore, we evaluate the effect of WiFi database shifts on WiFi fingerprinting using the database generated by the proposed method. Results show that the fingerprinting errors will not increase linearly according to database (DB) errors in smartphone-based WiFi fingerprinting applications.

  13. SeaWiFS_L3b_MC_KD490

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The SeaWiFS instrument was launched by Orbital Sciences Corporation on the OrbView-2 (a.k.a. SeaStar) satellite in August 1997, and collected data from September...

  14. SeaWiFS_L3b_8D_POC

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The SeaWiFS instrument was launched by Orbital Sciences Corporation on the OrbView-2 (a.k.a. SeaStar) satellite in August 1997, and collected data from September...

  15. SeaWiFS_L3m_SNSU_CDOM_9km

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The SeaWiFS instrument was launched by Orbital Sciences Corporation on the OrbView-2 (a.k.a. SeaStar) satellite in August 1997, and collected data from September...

  16. SAFARI 2000 SeaWiFS Images for Core Study Sites, 2000-2001

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This data set contains Sea-viewing Wide Field-of-view Sensor (SeaWiFS) imagery for the eight core study sites of Mongu, Etosha, Kasangu, Skukuza, Mutoko, Mzola,...

  17. SAFARI 2000 SeaWiFS Images for Core Study Sites, 2000-2001

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — ABSTRACT: This data set contains Sea-viewing Wide Field-of-view Sensor (SeaWiFS) imagery for the eight core study sites of Mongu, Etosha, Kasangu, Skukuza, Mutoko,...

  18. SeaWiFS_L3m_SNAU_RRS_aot_9km

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The SeaWiFS instrument was launched by Orbital Sciences Corporation on the OrbView-2 (a.k.a. SeaStar) satellite in August 1997, and collected data from September...

  19. SeaWiFS_L3m_MC_RRS_9km

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The SeaWiFS instrument was launched by Orbital Sciences Corporation on the OrbView-2 (a.k.a. SeaStar) satellite in August 1997, and collected data from September...

  20. SeaWiFS_L3m_SNSP_PAR_9km

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The SeaWiFS instrument was launched by Orbital Sciences Corporation on the OrbView-2 (a.k.a. SeaStar) satellite in August 1997, and collected data from September...

  1. SeaWiFS_L3m_YR_RRS_9km

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The SeaWiFS instrument was launched by Orbital Sciences Corporation on the OrbView-2 (a.k.a. SeaStar) satellite in August 1997, and collected data from September...

  2. SeaWiFS_L3m_SCSP_POC_9km

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The SeaWiFS instrument was launched by Orbital Sciences Corporation on the OrbView-2 (a.k.a. SeaStar) satellite in August 1997, and collected data from September...

  3. SeaWiFS_L3m_DAY_PAR_9km

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The SeaWiFS instrument was launched by Orbital Sciences Corporation on the OrbView-2 (a.k.a. SeaStar) satellite in August 1997, and collected data from September...

  4. EnviroAtlas - Green Bay, WI - Meter-Scale Urban Land Cover (MULC) Data (2010)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — The Green Bay, WI Meter-Scale Urban Land Cover (MULC) dataset comprises 936 km2 around the city of Green Bay, surrounding towns, tribal lands and rural areas in...

  5. SeaWiFS_L3m_YR_CDOM_9km

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The SeaWiFS instrument was launched by Orbital Sciences Corporation on the OrbView-2 (a.k.a. SeaStar) satellite in August 1997, and collected data from September...

  6. SeaWiFS_L3m_R32_LAND_NDVI_9km

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The SeaWiFS instrument was launched by Orbital Sciences Corporation on the OrbView-2 (a.k.a. SeaStar) satellite in August 1997, and collected data from September...

  7. EnviroAtlas - Milwaukee, WI - Meter-Scale Urban Land Cover Data (MULC) Data (2010)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — The EnviroAtlas Milwaukee, WI Meter Urban Land Cover (MULC) data and map were generated from USDA NAIP (National Agricultural Imagery Program) four band (red, green,...

  8. SeaWiFS_L3m_SCSP_PAR_9km

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The SeaWiFS instrument was launched by Orbital Sciences Corporation on the OrbView-2 (a.k.a. SeaStar) satellite in August 1997, and collected data from September...

  9. SeaWiFS_L3m_R32_PIC_9km

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The SeaWiFS instrument was launched by Orbital Sciences Corporation on the OrbView-2 (a.k.a. SeaStar) satellite in August 1997, and collected data from September...

  10. SeaWiFS_L3b_8D_CHL

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The SeaWiFS instrument was launched by Orbital Sciences Corporation on the OrbView-2 (a.k.a. SeaStar) satellite in August 1997, and collected data from September...

  11. SeaWiFS_L3m_SCWI_RRS_aot_9km

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The SeaWiFS instrument was launched by Orbital Sciences Corporation on the OrbView-2 (a.k.a. SeaStar) satellite in August 1997, and collected data from September...

  12. SeaWiFS_L3m_MC_PAR_9km

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The SeaWiFS instrument was launched by Orbital Sciences Corporation on the OrbView-2 (a.k.a. SeaStar) satellite in August 1997, and collected data from September...

  13. A new approach for indoor customer tracking based on a single Wi-Fi connection

    OpenAIRE

    Bai, Yuntian Brian; Wu, Suqin; Ren, Yongli; Ong, Kevin; Retscher, Guenther; Kealy, Allison; Tomko, Martin; Sanderson, Mark; Wu, Hongren; Zhang, Kefei

    2014-01-01

    Wi-Fi and smartphone based location tracking technologies have been widely applied in location based services (LBS). This research is a part of an Australian Research Council (ARC) project required by a large global shopping mall company located in Australia. It aims to develop an effective customer tracking approach for acquiring shopping behavior of customers and providing them better services. Currently, the log data provided by the company only recorded one Wi-Fi connection at a time for ...

  14. WiFi Data Acquisition System Applied to a Photovoltaic Powered Water Pumping Plant

    OpenAIRE

    Sandro César Silveira JUCÁ; Renata Imaculada Soares PEREIRA; Paulo Cesar Marques de CARVALHO

    2015-01-01

    The present paper describes how to design and assemble a low cost online monitoring and WiFi data acquisition system using free software applied to microgeneration based on renewable energy sources. The development of online monitoring systems for microgeneration plants based on renewable energy sources is becoming more important, considering that monitoring and data acquisition systems are applicable in stages of the microgeneration process. The monitoring and data acquisition WiFi system wa...

  15. Insecure Network, Unknown Connection: Understanding Wi-Fi Privacy Assumptions of Mobile Device Users

    OpenAIRE

    Bonné, Bram; Rovelo Ruiz, Gustavo; Quax, Peter; Lamotte, Wim

    2017-01-01

    Smartphones and other mobile devices have proliferated in the past five years. The expectation of mobile device users to always be online has led to Wi-Fi networks being offered by a variety of providers. Using these networks introduces multiple security risks. In this work, we assess to what extent the privacy stance of mobile device users corresponds with their actual behavior by conducting a study with 108 participants. Our methodology consists of monitoring Wi-Fi networks that the partici...

  16. Coexistence of ZigBee-Based WBAN and WiFi for Health Telemonitoring Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Yena; Lee, SeungSeob; Lee, SuKyoung

    2016-01-01

    The development of telemonitoring via wireless body area networks (WBANs) is an evolving direction in personalized medicine and home-based mobile health. A WBAN consists of small, intelligent medical sensors which collect physiological parameters such as electrocardiogram, electroencephalography, and blood pressure. The recorded physiological signals are sent to a coordinator via wireless technologies, and are then transmitted to a healthcare monitoring center. One of the most widely used wireless technologies in WBANs is ZigBee because it is targeted at applications that require a low data rate and long battery life. However, ZigBee-based WBANs face severe interference problems in the presence of WiFi networks. This problem is caused by the fact that most ZigBee channels overlap with WiFi channels, severely affecting the ability of healthcare monitoring systems to guarantee reliable delivery of physiological signals. To solve this problem, we have developed an algorithm that controls the load in WiFi networks to guarantee the delay requirement for physiological signals, especially for emergency messages, in environments with coexistence of ZigBee-based WBAN and WiFi. Since WiFi applications generate traffic with different delay requirements, we focus only on WiFi traffic that does not have stringent timing requirements. In this paper, therefore, we propose an adaptive load control algorithm for ZigBee-based WBAN/WiFi coexistence environments, with the aim of guaranteeing that the delay experienced by ZigBee sensors does not exceed a maximally tolerable period of time. Simulation results show that our proposed algorithm guarantees the delay performance of ZigBee-based WBANs by mitigating the effects of WiFi interference in various scenarios.

  17. Analysis of MIMO Systems used in planning a 4G-WiMAX Network in Ghana

    OpenAIRE

    Tchao, E. T.; Diawuo, K.; Ofosu, W. K.; Affum, E.

    2013-01-01

    with the increasing demand for mobile data services, Broadband Wireless Access (BWA) is emerging as one of the fastest growing areas within mobile communications. Innovative wireless communication systems, such as WiMAX, are expected to offer highly reliable broadband radio access in order to meet the increasing demands of emerging high speed data and multimedia services. In Ghana, deployment of WiMAX technology has recently begun. Planning these high capacity networks in the presence of mult...

  18. Penentuan Arah Teleskop Digital Melalui Komunikasi Wi-Fi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prima Kurniawan

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Teleskop bintang adalah sebuah perangkat instrument yang digunakan untuk melihat benda-benda langit yang jaraknya sangat jauh menjadi terasa dekat. Teleskop yang tersedia pada umumnya belum dilengkapi dengan sistem digital untuk pencitraannya dan otomatisasi untuk penentuan arahnya. Pada tugas akhir ini dibuat suatu sistem digital dan otomatisasi pada teleskop konvensional. Sistem digital digunakan untuk perekaman hasil yang didapatkan oleh teleskop dan ditampilakan pada komputer. Sistem otomatisasi dibuat untuk menentukan pergerakan sudut teleskop dengan sebuah GUI. Mekanik pergerakan teleskop diberikan 2 motor dc sebagai penggerak. Masing-masing motor dc berfungsi untuk menggerakkan tiap sumbu X dan sumbu Y. Digunakan sebuah sistem mikrokontroler menggunakan ATmega 32 sebagai pengolahan data. Fitur ADC mikrokontroler digunakan untuk mengubah data analog perubahan tegangan yang terjadi pada potensiometer menjadi perubahan data digital yang akan dikonversi menjadi nilai pergerakan perubahan sudut. Sistem ini ditambahkan sebuah router yang berfungsi sebagai akses poin untuk jalur pengiriman dan penerimaan data antara komputer dengan mikrokontroler. Ditambahkan sebuah wiznet yang mampu mengkonversi data dari komunikasi serial ke data protokol TCP/IP dan sebaliknya. Pengujian pergerakan sudut sumbu X dilakukan pada sudut 0, 45, 90, 135, 180, 255, 270, 315, dan 360 sedangkan pergerakan sumbu Y dilakukan pada sudut 0, 10, 20, 30, 40, 50, 60, 70, 80, dan 90. Hasil pengujian pada sumbu X dan Y didapatkan beberapa error pada titik-titik tertentu dengan tingkat kesalahan mencapai 3.8% untuk sumbu x dan 2.5% untuk sumbu y. Penentuan pergerakan sudut dilakukan melalui komputer dengan menggunakan komunikasi wi-fi.

  19. Wi-Fi location fingerprinting using an intelligent checkpoint sequence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Retscher, Günther; Hofer, Hannes

    2017-09-01

    For Wi-Fi positioning location fingerprinting is very common but has the disadvantage that it is very labour consuming for the establishment of a database (DB) with received signal strength (RSS) scans measured on a large number of known reference points (RPs). To overcome this drawback a novel approach is developed which uses a logical sequence of intelligent checkpoints (iCPs) instead of RPs distributed in a regular grid. The iCPs are the selected RPs which have to be passed along the way for navigation from a start point A to the destination B. They are twofold intelligent because of the fact that they depend on their meaningful selection and because of their logical sequence in their correct order. Thus, always the following iCP is known due to a vector graph allocation in the DB and only a small limited number of iCPs needs to be tested when matching the current RSS scans. This reduces the required processing time significantly. It is proven that the iCP approach achieves a higher success rate than conventional approaches. In average correct matching results of 90.0% were achieved using a joint DB including RSS scans of all employed smartphones. An even higher success rate is achieved if the same mobile device is used in both the training and positioning phase.

  20. PAPR mitigation algorithms for OFDM WiMAX link

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rashwan, Gasem; Kenshil, Salih; Matin, Mohammad

    2013-09-01

    OFDM has been adopted in many high systems due to its high data rates and to its robust performance in fading channel. OFDM distributes the data among number of carriers which are called subcarriers. The subcarriers must be orthogonal to prevent the carrier from interfering to each other. Features such overcoming ISI (inter-symbol interference) and the complexity of Designing both receiver and transmitter made it ideal technique for both wired and wireless communication as long as optical communications. However, OFDM suffers from a defect called Peak Average power ratio (PAPR). APARP is crucial drawback that limits the way that OFDM functions and reducing or mitigating this factor in wireless and optical environment will help overcome and enhance the OFDM date rate. PAPR is the main cause of inter-carrier interference and high out-of-band power, and consequently Bit error rate BER. We investigate some of the techniques that mitigate the effect of PAPR. These techniques are merged together to provide a better PAPR reduction with the existing techniques. In this paper, we are proposing a new reduction algorithm to minimize the effect of the PAPR. The results and simulation are done in Optisystem V-11 and Matlab environment. These approaches will be applied on WiMAX application and the performances between the different techniques are examined.

  1. Towards Optimal Buffer Size in Wi-Fi Networks

    KAUST Repository

    Showail, Ahmad J.

    2016-01-19

    Buffer sizing is an important network configuration parameter that impacts the quality of data traffic. Falling memory cost and the fallacy that ‘more is better’ lead to over provisioning network devices with large buffers. Over-buffering or the so called ‘bufferbloat’ phenomenon creates excessive end-to-end delay in today’s networks. On the other hand, under-buffering results in frequent packet loss and subsequent under-utilization of network resources. The buffer sizing problem has been studied extensively for wired networks. However, there is little work addressing the unique challenges of wireless environment. In this dissertation, we discuss buffer sizing challenges in wireless networks, classify the state-of-the-art solutions, and propose two novel buffer sizing schemes. The first scheme targets buffer sizing in wireless multi-hop networks where the radio spectral resource is shared among a set of con- tending nodes. Hence, it sizes the buffer collectively and distributes it over a set of interfering devices. The second buffer sizing scheme is designed to cope up with recent Wi-Fi enhancements. It adapts the buffer size based on measured link characteristics and network load. Also, it enforces limits on the buffer size to maximize frame aggregation benefits. Both mechanisms are evaluated using simulation as well as testbed implementation over half-duplex and full-duplex wireless networks. Experimental evaluation shows that our proposal reduces latency by an order of magnitude.

  2. Informed Forces for Environmental Quality, Conference Proceedings (University of Wisconsin, Green Bay, Wisconsin, March 28-29, 1968).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wisconsin Univ., Green Bay.

    To increase understanding of the dimensions of man's impact on his environment and the key issues involved in improving that environment through education and action was the goal of the environmental quality conference held at the University of Wisconsin, Green Bay, on March 28-29, 1968. Contained in this document are the conference…

  3. Ubiquity of Wi-Fi: Crowdsensing Properties for Urban Fingerprint Positioning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    LECA, C. L.

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Positioning systems based on location fingerprinting have become an area of intense research, mainly with the aim of providing indoor localization. Many challenges arise when trying to deploy location fingerprinting to an outdoor environment. The main problem is achieving coverage of large outdoor spaces, which needs an intensive data gathering effort. This paper proposes the use of mobile crowdsensing in order to build a fingerprint database consisting of Wi-Fi networks received signal strength measurements. Mobile crowdsensing is represented by the usage of smart-phones equipped with GPS and Wi-Fi sensors for the collection of fingerprints. The primary objective of this work is to prove the feasibility of urban positioning using Wi-Fi crowdsensed data by showing that Wi-Fi networks are ubiquitous in urban areas. We then examine the gathered data and report our findings on challenges in building and maintaining a large-scale fingerprint database, the influence of the data collection method on the Wi-Fi data and the influence of fading on measurements. As Wi-Fi access-points are shown to exhibit mobility, we also propose and analyze methods for detecting and classification of mobile and static access-points.

  4. An Improved Neural Network Training Algorithm for Wi-Fi Fingerprinting Positioning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Esmond Mok

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Ubiquitous positioning provides continuous positional information in both indoor and outdoor environments for a wide spectrum of location based service (LBS applications. With the rapid development of the low-cost and high speed data communication, Wi-Fi networks in many metropolitan cities, strength of signals propagated from the Wi-Fi access points (APs namely received signal strength (RSS have been cleverly adopted for indoor positioning. In this paper, a Wi-Fi positioning algorithm based on neural network modeling of Wi-Fi signal patterns is proposed. This algorithm is based on the correlation between the initial parameter setting for neural network training and output of the mean square error to obtain better modeling of the nonlinear highly complex Wi-Fi signal power propagation surface. The test results show that this neural network based data processing algorithm can significantly improve the neural network training surface to achieve the highest possible accuracy of the Wi-Fi fingerprinting positioning method.

  5. Influence of smartphone Wi-Fi signals on adipose-derived stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sang-Soon; Kim, Hyung-Rok; Kim, Min-Sook; Park, Sanghoon; Yoon, Eul-Sik; Park, Seung-Ha; Kim, Deok-Woo

    2014-09-01

    The use of smartphones is expanding rapidly around the world, thus raising the concern of possible harmful effects of radiofrequency generated by smartphones. We hypothesized that Wi-Fi signals from smartphones may have harmful influence on adipose-derived stem cells (ASCs). An in vitro study was performed to assess the influence of Wi-Fi signals from smartphones. The ASCs were incubated under a smartphone connected to a Wi-Fi network, which was uploading files at a speed of 4.8 Mbps for 10 hours a day, for a total of 5 days. We constructed 2 kinds of control cells, one grown in 37°C and the other grown in 39°C. After 5 days of Wi-Fi exposure from the smartphone, the cells underwent cell proliferation assay, apoptosis assay, and flow cytometry analysis. Three growth factors, vascular endothelial growth factor, hepatocyte growth factor, and transforming growth factor-β, were measured from ASC-conditioned media. Cell proliferation rate was higher in Wi-Fi-exposed cells and 39°C control cells compared with 37°C control cells. Apoptosis assay, flow cytometry analysis, and growth factor concentrations showed no remarkable differences among the 3 groups. We could not find any harmful effects of Wi-Fi electromagnetic signals from smartphones. The increased proliferation of ASCs under the smartphone, however, might be attributable to the thermal effect.

  6. Continuous Indoor Positioning Fusing WiFi, Smartphone Sensors and Landmarks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhi-An Deng

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available To exploit the complementary strengths of WiFi positioning, pedestrian dead reckoning (PDR, and landmarks, we propose a novel fusion approach based on an extended Kalman filter (EKF. For WiFi positioning, unlike previous fusion approaches setting measurement noise parameters empirically, we deploy a kernel density estimation-based model to adaptively measure the related measurement noise statistics. Furthermore, a trusted area of WiFi positioning defined by fusion results of previous step and WiFi signal outlier detection are exploited to reduce computational cost and improve WiFi positioning accuracy. For PDR, we integrate a gyroscope, an accelerometer, and a magnetometer to determine the user heading based on another EKF model. To reduce accumulation error of PDR and enable continuous indoor positioning, not only the positioning results but also the heading estimations are recalibrated by indoor landmarks. Experimental results in a realistic indoor environment show that the proposed fusion approach achieves substantial positioning accuracy improvement than individual positioning approaches including PDR and WiFi positioning.

  7. Continuous Indoor Positioning Fusing WiFi, Smartphone Sensors and Landmarks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Zhi-An; Wang, Guofeng; Qin, Danyang; Na, Zhenyu; Cui, Yang; Chen, Juan

    2016-09-05

    To exploit the complementary strengths of WiFi positioning, pedestrian dead reckoning (PDR), and landmarks, we propose a novel fusion approach based on an extended Kalman filter (EKF). For WiFi positioning, unlike previous fusion approaches setting measurement noise parameters empirically, we deploy a kernel density estimation-based model to adaptively measure the related measurement noise statistics. Furthermore, a trusted area of WiFi positioning defined by fusion results of previous step and WiFi signal outlier detection are exploited to reduce computational cost and improve WiFi positioning accuracy. For PDR, we integrate a gyroscope, an accelerometer, and a magnetometer to determine the user heading based on another EKF model. To reduce accumulation error of PDR and enable continuous indoor positioning, not only the positioning results but also the heading estimations are recalibrated by indoor landmarks. Experimental results in a realistic indoor environment show that the proposed fusion approach achieves substantial positioning accuracy improvement than individual positioning approaches including PDR and WiFi positioning.

  8. Calibration of SeaWiFS after two years on orbit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnes, Robert A.; McClain, Charles R.

    1999-12-01

    The Sea-viewing Wide Field-of-view Sensor (SeaWiFS) was launched on 1 August 1997, and the first Earth images were taken on 4 September 1997. Regular, daily measurements of the sun, via the onboard diffuser, started on 9 September 1997 and regular, monthly measurements of the moon on November 14, 1997. These lunar measurements, as first reported at EUROPTO'98, provide a highly sensitive method for determining the change in the radiometric sensitivity of SeaWiFS. The prelaunch radiometric calibration used by SeaWiFS was performed in the Spring of 1997 at the spacecraft manufacturer's facility. The calibration measurements were made by a team from the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) and the SeaWiFS Project. The uncertainties in this calibration range from 2% to 3% for the eight SeaWiFS bands. In addition, a set of outdoor measurements of the sun were made at the instrument manufacturer's facility in November 1993, just before the delivery of SeaWiFS to the spacecraft manufacturer. These solar measurements, using the instrument's diffuser, were combined with a separate set of solar radiometer measurements to determine the transmittance of the atmosphere. At the start of on-orbit measurements by SeaWiFS, solar measurements were made again by the instrument. These two sets of measurements make up the transfer-to-orbit experiment. From the ground measurements, the outputs of the SeaWiFS bands on orbit were predicted. For each band, the output from the initial on-orbit measurements agree with the predicted values by 21/2% or less. The uncertainties for the transfer-to-orbit experiment are estimated to be approximately 3% to 4%. From 14 November 1997 to 29 June 1999, SeaWiFS has made 20 measurements of the moon. The analysis of lunar measurements presented here has minor modifications to that presented at EUROPTO'98. The trend lines from the current analysis have been extrapolated back from 14 November 1997 to 4 September 1997 to describe the changes

  9. 75 FR 57287 - Notice of Intent to Repatriate a Cultural Item: Oshkosh Public Museum, Oshkosh, WI

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-20

    ..., after Dennis Lee, son of Gerald Lee, donated the bowl to the museum. The Wisconsin State site report... placed with or near individual human remains at the time of death or later as part of the death rite or...

  10. EnviroAtlas - Milwaukee, WI - BenMAP Results by Block Group

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This EnviroAtlas dataset demonstrates the effect of changes in pollution concentration on local populations in 1,175 block groups in Milwaukee, Wisconsin. The US...

  11. EnviroAtlas - Green Bay, WI - BenMAP Results by Block Group

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This EnviroAtlas dataset demonstrates the effect of changes in pollution concentration on local populations in 155 block groups in Green Bay, Wisconsin. The US EPA's...

  12. Evaluating export container pooling options in MN, WI, and MI's Upper Peninsula.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-01

    Research was undertaken to investigate the issues impacting the expansion of containerized cargo in : Wisconsin, Minnesota and the Upper Peninsula of Michigan. Best practices in container pooling, load matching, : inland ports and electronic tracking...

  13. EnviroAtlas - Green Bay, WI - Ecosystem Services by Block Group

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This EnviroAtlas dataset presents environmental benefits of the urban forest in 155 block groups in Green Bay, Wisconsin. Carbon attributes, temperature reduction,...

  14. Evaluating wildlife mortality hotspots, habitat connectivity and potential accommodation along US 287 and MT 87 in the Madison Valley, Montana, final report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-11-01

    The Western Transportation Institute at Montana State University (WTI) and the Craighead Institute (ChI) conducted a two-year study to investigate the effect of the major highways in the Madison Valley on road-related wildlife mortality and movement ...

  15. “DIVIDING SOVEREIGNTY”: FEDERALISMO Y REPUBLICANISMO EN LA TEORÍA POLÍTICA DE JAMES MADISON

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramón Máiz

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper explores the inner theoretical relationship between republicanism and federalism in the political thought of James Madison. In fact federalism is conceived from his point of view as a cultural and institutional device to build a true democratic government in a modern big country as the United States of America. This “happy combination” of republicanism and federalism, goes hand by hand with a design of the Union, not as a “consolidated” and centralized one, as Hamilton defended; but as quite distinctive system “partly national, partly federal”, where the states’ rights were protected in their substantive self-government and in their participation with free own voice in the general shared-government of the Union. Moreover, the political and theoretical differences between Madison and Hamilton, were notorious not only respecting the whole conception of the American State, but also reach decisively another field: what kind of Nation “America” was to be. This principled and deep differences about the nature of the American democracy (based in the “vigor of government” or in the principles of republican revolution, the model of American federalism (consolidated and eroding the state’s powers or decentralized based on “dividing sovereignty” and the nature of the American Nation (urban and industrialist “Great commercial society” or rural and commercial republic of the republics, gave birth to the creation of the Republican Party (with Thomas Jefferson –The Democratic Party after Jackson– and the first American party system. consolidation.

  16. Geodemographic Features of Human Blastomycosis in Eastern Wisconsin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Megan E. Huber

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Blastomycosis is an endemic fungal infection. In rural northern Wisconsin, blastomycosis cases are associated with certain environmental features including close proximity to waterways. Other studies have associated blastomycosis with particular soil chemicals. However, blastomycosis also occurs in urban and suburban regions. We explored the geodemographic associations of blastomycosis cases in the more urban/suburban landscape of eastern Wisconsin. Methods: We conducted a retrospective study of 193 laboratory-identified blastomycosis cases in a single eastern Wisconsin health system, 2007–2015. Controls were 250 randomly selected cases of community-diagnosed pneumonia from a similar time period. Geographic features of home addresses were explored using Google Maps. Categorical variables were analyzed with chi-square or Fisher’s exact tests and continuous variables by two-sample t-tests. Stepwise regression followed by binary logistic regression was used for multivariable analysis. Results: Compared to pneumonia cases, blastomycosis cases were younger (47.7 vs. 55.3 years and more likely to be male (67.9% vs. 45.6%, nonwhite (23.2% vs. 9.7% and machinists, automobile workers/mechanics or construction workers (32.7% vs. 7.2%; P 0.5 acres (30.4% vs. 14.2%, P = 0.0002, be < 0.25 miles from an automobile repair facility or junkyard (35.9% vs. 19.4%, P = 0.0005, and be < 0.1 miles from a park, forest or farm field (54.9% vs. 39.6%, P = 0.002. Only the latter association remained on multivariable analysis. Conclusions: Eastern Wisconsin blastomycosis case subjects were younger, more often male and more likely to live near parks/forests/fields. Novel associations of blastomycosis cases with machinery- and automobile-related occupations and/or facilities should be further explored.

  17. Borreliosis in free-ranging black bears from Wisconsin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazmierczak, J J; Amundson, T E; Burgess, E C

    1988-04-01

    Blood, kidney and tick samples were obtained from 18 hunter-killed black bears (Ursus americanus) from three sites in northern Wisconsin. A Borrelia sp., morphologically and antigenically similar to Borrelia burgdorferi, was isolated from the blood of two of the animals, and from the kidney of a third. Ixodes dammini and Dermacentor variabilis were found on the bears. This is the first report of borreliosis in the Ursidae, and of the primary vector of Lyme disease, I. dammini, from this host.

  18. Evaluation of nonpoint-source contamination, Wisconsin: water year 1999

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, John F.; Graczyk, D.J.; Corsi, Steven R.; Wierl, J.A.; Owens, D.W.

    2001-01-01

    The objective of the watershed-management evaluation monitoring program in Wisconsin is to evaluate the effectiveness of best-management practices (BMPs) for controlling nonpoint-source pollution in rural and urban watersheds. This progress report provides a summary of the data collected by the U.S Geological Survey for the program and a discussion of the results from several different detailed analyses conducted within this program.

  19. Analysis of water-level fluctuations in Wisconsin wells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patterson, G.L.; Zaporozec, A.

    1987-01-01

    More than 60 percent of the residents of Wisconsin use ground water as their primary water source. Water supplies presently are abundant, but ground-water levels continually fluctuate in response to natural factors and human-related stresses. A better understanding of the magnitude, duration, and frequency of past fluctuations, and the factors controlling these fluctuations may help anticipate future changes in ground-water levels.

  20. Water resources of Wisconsin--Lake Superior basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, H.L.; Skinner, Earl L.

    1974-01-01

    This report describes the physical environment, availability, distribution, movement, quality, and use of water in the upper Wisconsin River basin as an aid in planning and water management. The report presents general information on the basin derived from data obtained from Federal, State, and local agencies, New field data were collected in areas where information was lacking. More detailed studies of problem areas may be required in the future, as water needs and related development increase.

  1. 78 FR 48701 - Proposed Flood Hazard Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-09

    ... Martin Luther King Jr. Boulevard, Room 403, Madison, WI 53703. City of Middleton City Hall, 7426 Hubbard... County.... City County Building, 210 Martin Luther King Jr. Boulevard, Room 116, Madison, WI 53703...

  2. Effects of repeated restraint stress and WiFi signal exposure on behavior and oxidative stress in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Othman, Haifa; Ammari, Mohamed; Sakly, Mohsen; Abdelmelek, Hafedh

    2017-10-01

    Today, due to technology development and aversive events of daily life, Human exposure to both radiofrequency and stress is unavoidable. This study investigated the co-exposure to repeated restraint stress and WiFi signal on cognitive function and oxidative stress in brain of male rats. Animals were divided into four groups: Control, WiFi-exposed, restrained and both WiFi-exposed and restrained groups. Each of WiFi exposure and restraint stress occurred 2 h (h)/day during 20 days. Subsequently, various tests were carried out for each group, such as anxiety in elevated plus maze, spatial learning abilities in the water maze, cerebral oxidative stress response and cholinesterase activity in brain and serum. Results showed that WiFi exposure and restraint stress, alone and especially if combined, induced an anxiety-like behavior without impairing spatial learning and memory abilities in rats. At cerebral level, we found an oxidative stress response triggered by WiFi and restraint, per se and especially when combined as well as WiFi-induced increase in acetylcholinesterase activity. Our results reveal that there is an impact of WiFi signal and restraint stress on the brain and cognitive processes especially in elevated plus maze task. In contrast, there are no synergistic effects between WiFi signal and restraint stress on the brain.

  3. The Architecture of WiFi-Based WSN for AMR System and E-HWMP Routing Protocol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li LI

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available With the development of SoC technology in recent years, the ultra-low power WiFi System on SoC Chip has emerged. As a result, WiFi-based Wireless Sensor Networks come into use, especially used in Automatic Meter Reading. While because the nodes of Wireless Sensor Networks have limited energy supply, smaller storage capability and slower calculation ability, the current WiFi technology cannot be directly applied to WiFi-based Wireless Sensor Networks. The protocols should be upgraded and the security algorithms should be improved to meet the new requests. Firstly, this article describes the network architecture of WiFi-based WSN for AMR system and discusses the reason for using this analogous Mesh architecture. Secondly, the new Hardware architecture of WiFi-based WSN node is designed to realize the AMR system and verify the research work. The node can collect the data of power meter by WiFi and can be powered by a Lithium Battery. Thirdly, on the basis of study work of WiFi original routing protocol HWMP, a new method on improving the energy saving ability of HWMP to adapt the new features of WiFi-based WSN is proposed. And the simulation work on the new routing protocol E-HWMP has been done with NS2 and the simulation results show that the life cycle of the network has been extended to some degree.

  4. Determining climate change management priorities: A case study from Wisconsin

    Science.gov (United States)

    LeDee, Olivia E.; Ribic, Christine

    2015-01-01

    A burgeoning dialogue exists regarding how to allocate resources to maximize the likelihood of long-term biodiversity conservation within the context of climate change. To make effective decisions in natural resource management, an iterative, collaborative, and learning-based decision process may be more successful than a strictly consultative approach. One important, early step in a decision process is to identify priority species or systems. Although this promotes the conservation of select species or systems, it may inadvertently alter the future of non-target species and systems. We describe a process to screen terrestrial wildlife for potential sensitivity to climate change and then use the results to engage natural resource professionals in a process of identifying priorities for monitoring, research, and adaptation strategy implementation. We demonstrate this approach using a case study from Wisconsin. In Wisconsin, experts identified 23 out of 353 species with sufficient empirical research and management understanding to inform targeted action. Habitat management and management of hydrological conditions were the common strategies for targeted action. Although there may be an interest in adaptation strategy implementation for many species and systems, experts considered existing information inadequate to inform targeted action. According to experts, 40% of the vertebrate species in Wisconsin will require near-term intervention for climate adaptation. These results will inform state-wide conservation planning as well as regional efforts.

  5. Advanced Integration of WiFi and Inertial Navigation Systems for Indoor Mobile Positioning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evennou Frédéric

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents an aided dead-reckoning navigation structure and signal processing algorithms for self localization of an autonomous mobile device by fusing pedestrian dead reckoning and WiFi signal strength measurements. WiFi and inertial navigation systems (INS are used for positioning and attitude determination in a wide range of applications. Over the last few years, a number of low-cost inertial sensors have become available. Although they exhibit large errors, WiFi measurements can be used to correct the drift weakening the navigation based on this technology. On the other hand, INS sensors can interact with the WiFi positioning system as they provide high-accuracy real-time navigation. A structure based on a Kalman filter and a particle filter is proposed. It fuses the heterogeneous information coming from those two independent technologies. Finally, the benefits of the proposed architecture are evaluated and compared with the pure WiFi and INS positioning systems.

  6. Wi-Fi and health: review of current status of research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foster, Kenneth R; Moulder, John E

    2013-12-01

    This review summarizes the current state of research on possible health effects of Wi-Fi (a commercial name for IEEE 802.11-compliant wireless networking). In response to public concerns about health effects of Wi-Fi and wireless networks and calls by government agencies for research on possible health and safety issues with the technology, a considerable amount of technology-specific research has been completed. A series of high quality engineering studies have provided a good, but not complete, understanding of the levels of radiofrequency (RF) exposure to individuals from Wi-Fi. The limited number of technology-specific bioeffects studies done to date are very mixed in terms of quality and outcome. Unequivocally, the RF exposures from Wi-Fi and wireless networks are far below U.S. and international exposure limits for RF energy. While several studies report biological effects due to Wi-Fi-type exposures, technical limitations prevent drawing conclusions from them about possible health risks of the technology. The review concludes with suggestions for future research on the topic.

  7. Indoor Map Aided Wi-Fi Integrated Lbs on Smartphone Platforms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, C.; El-Sheimy, N.

    2017-09-01

    In this research, an indoor map aided INS/Wi-Fi integrated location based services (LBS) applications is proposed and implemented on smartphone platforms. Indoor map information together with measurements from an inertial measurement unit (IMU) and Received Signal Strength Indicator (RSSI) value from Wi-Fi are collected to obtain an accurate, continuous, and low-cost position solution. The main challenge of this research is to make effective use of various measurements that complement each other without increasing the computational burden of the system. The integrated system in this paper includes three modules: INS, Wi-Fi (if signal available) and indoor maps. A cascade structure Particle/Kalman filter framework is applied to combine the different modules. Firstly, INS position and Wi-Fi fingerprint position integrated through Kalman filter for estimating positioning information. Then, indoor map information is applied to correct the error of INS/Wi-Fi estimated position through particle filter. Indoor tests show that the proposed method can effectively reduce the accumulation positioning errors of stand-alone INS systems, and provide stable, continuous and reliable indoor location service.

  8. An Improved WiFi Indoor Positioning Algorithm by Weighted Fusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Rui; Guo, Qiang; Hu, Changzhen; Xue, Jingfeng

    2015-08-31

    The rapid development of mobile Internet has offered the opportunity for WiFi indoor positioning to come under the spotlight due to its low cost. However, nowadays the accuracy of WiFi indoor positioning cannot meet the demands of practical applications. To solve this problem, this paper proposes an improved WiFi indoor positioning algorithm by weighted fusion. The proposed algorithm is based on traditional location fingerprinting algorithms and consists of two stages: the offline acquisition and the online positioning. The offline acquisition process selects optimal parameters to complete the signal acquisition, and it forms a database of fingerprints by error classification and handling. To further improve the accuracy of positioning, the online positioning process first uses a pre-match method to select the candidate fingerprints to shorten the positioning time. After that, it uses the improved Euclidean distance and the improved joint probability to calculate two intermediate results, and further calculates the final result from these two intermediate results by weighted fusion. The improved Euclidean distance introduces the standard deviation of WiFi signal strength to smooth the WiFi signal fluctuation and the improved joint probability introduces the logarithmic calculation to reduce the difference between probability values. Comparing the proposed algorithm, the Euclidean distance based WKNN algorithm and the joint probability algorithm, the experimental results indicate that the proposed algorithm has higher positioning accuracy.

  9. Advanced Integration of WiFi and Inertial Navigation Systems for Indoor Mobile Positioning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evennou, Frédéric; Marx, François

    2006-12-01

    This paper presents an aided dead-reckoning navigation structure and signal processing algorithms for self localization of an autonomous mobile device by fusing pedestrian dead reckoning and WiFi signal strength measurements. WiFi and inertial navigation systems (INS) are used for positioning and attitude determination in a wide range of applications. Over the last few years, a number of low-cost inertial sensors have become available. Although they exhibit large errors, WiFi measurements can be used to correct the drift weakening the navigation based on this technology. On the other hand, INS sensors can interact with the WiFi positioning system as they provide high-accuracy real-time navigation. A structure based on a Kalman filter and a particle filter is proposed. It fuses the heterogeneous information coming from those two independent technologies. Finally, the benefits of the proposed architecture are evaluated and compared with the pure WiFi and INS positioning systems.

  10. Feasibility Report and Final Environmental Impact Statement, Wisconsin River at Portage, Wisconsin, Feasibility Study for Flood Control. Main Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983-12-01

    TABLE OF CONTRNTS (Continued) Item Page Aldo Leopold Shack EIS-43 Nonassessed Cultural Resources EIS-43...It was here, in and around his still standing cabin, that the late Aldo Leopold wrote some of his famous works. He also wrote about the immediate...the Fox-Wisconsin Portage Site (Wauona Trail); the Zona Gale House; the Old Indian Agency House; the Portage Canal; and the Aldo Leopold Shack. Four

  11. QoS Management and Control for an All-IP WiMAX Network Architecture: Design, Implementation and Evaluation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Michael Bohnert

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The IEEE 802.16 standard provides a specification for a fixed and mobile broadband wireless access system, offering high data rate transmission of multimedia services with different Quality-of-Service (QoS requirements through the air interface. The WiMAX Forum, going beyond the air interface, defined an end-to-end WiMAX network architecture, based on an all-IP platform in order to complete the standards required for a commercial rollout of WiMAX as broadband wireless access solution. As the WiMAX network architecture is only a functional specification, this paper focuses on an innovative solution for an end-to-end WiMAX network architecture offering in compliance with the WiMAX Forum specification. To our best knowledge, this is the first WiMAX architecture built by a research consortium globally and was performed within the framework of the European IST project WEIRD (WiMAX Extension to Isolated Research Data networks. One of the principal features of our architecture is support for end-to-end QoS achieved by the integration of resource control in the WiMAX wireless link and the resource management in the wired domains in the network core. In this paper we present the architectural design of these QoS features in the overall WiMAX all-IP framework and their functional as well as performance evaluation. The presented results can safely be considered as unique and timely for any WiMAX system integrator.

  12. Comparative Performance Evaluation of TCP Variants in WiMAX (and WLANs Network Configurations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Konstantinos Tsiknas

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available An important application for the IEEE 802.16 technology (also called WiMAX is to provide high-speed access to the Internet where the transmission control protocol (TCP is the core transport protocol. In this paper we study through extensive simulation scenarios the performance characteristics of five representative TCP schemes, namely, TCP New Reno, Vegas, Veno, Westwood, and BIC, in WiMAX (and WLANs networks, under the conditions of correlated wireless errors, asymmetric end-to-end capabilities, and link congestion. The target is to evaluate how the above conditions would affect the TCP congestion control and suggest the best schemes to be employed in WiMAX networks.

  13. QoS Provisioning Techniques for Future Fiber-Wireless (FiWi Access Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Maier

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available A plethora of enabling optical and wireless access-metro network technologies have been emerging that can be used to build future-proof bimodal fiber-wireless (FiWi networks. Hybrid FiWi networks aim at providing wired and wireless quad-play services over the same infrastructure simultaneously and hold great promise to mitigate the digital divide and change the way we live and work by replacing commuting with teleworking. After overviewing enabling optical and wireless network technologies and their QoS provisioning techniques, we elaborate on enabling radio-over-fiber (RoF and radio-and-fiber (R&F technologies. We describe and investigate new QoS provisioning techniques for future FiWi networks, ranging from traffic class mapping, scheduling, and resource management to advanced aggregation techniques, congestion control, and layer-2 path selection algorithms.

  14. Spectrum Sensing Experimentation for LTE and WiFi Unlicensed Band Operation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Milošević

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available If several different systems operate in the same frequency band, a coordination between them is needed for effective use of the available spectrum. The coordination is especially important if the systems are not designed to operate in such an environment. The very important initial phase of the coordination process is acquiring of the spectrum usage map or spectrum sensing. The paper describes the spectrum sensing experimentation in the unlicensed 5 GHz band during the WiFi or LTE transmission. It describes the experiment workflow and depicts the obtained results. The experiments were performed at NITOS testbed at the University of Thessaly, Greece, and show that it is possible to determine whether WiFi or LTE transmission is sensed. Therefore, based on spectrum sensing it will be possible to coordinate a shared access of WiFi and LTE users in the unlicensed 5 GHz band.

  15. Experimental verification of a radiofrequency power model for Wi-Fi technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Minyu; Malone, David

    2010-04-01

    When assessing the power emitted from a Wi-Fi network, it has been observed that these networks operate at a relatively low duty cycle. In this paper, we extend a recently introduced model of emitted power in Wi-Fi networks to cover conditions where devices do not always have packets to transmit. We present experimental results to validate the original model and its extension by developing approximate, but practical, testbed measurement techniques. The accuracy of the models is confirmed, with small relative errors: less than 5-10%. Moreover, we confirm that the greatest power is emitted when the network is saturated with traffic. Using this, we give a simple technique to quickly estimate power output based on traffic levels and give examples showing how this might be used in practice to predict current or future power output from a Wi-Fi network.

  16. Effect of radiofrequency radiation from Wi-Fi devices on mercury release from amalgam restorations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paknahad, Maryam; Mortazavi, S M J; Shahidi, Shoaleh; Mortazavi, Ghazal; Haghani, Masoud

    2016-01-01

    Dental amalgam is composed of approximately 50% elemental mercury. Despite concerns over the toxicity of mercury, amalgam is still the most widely used restorative material. Wi-Fi is a rapidly using local area wireless computer networking technology. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first study that evaluates the effect of exposure to Wi-Fi signals on mercury release from amalgam restorations. Standard class V cavities were prepared on the buccal surfaces of 20 non-carious extracted human premolars. The teeth were randomly divided into 2 groups (n = 10). The control group was stored in non-environment. The specimens in the experimental groups were exposed to a radiofrequency radiation emitted from standard Wi Fi devices at 2.4 GHz for 20 min. The distance between the Wi-Fi router and samples was 30 cm and the router was exchanging data with a laptop computer that was placed 20 m away from the router. The concentration of mercury in the artificial saliva in the groups was evaluated by using a cold-vapor atomic absorption Mercury Analyzer System. The independent t test was used to evaluate any significant differences in mercury release between the two groups. The mean (±SD) concentration of mercury in the artificial saliva of the Wi-Fi exposed teeth samples was 0.056 ± .025 mg/L, while it was only 0.026 ± .008 mg/L in the non-exposed control samples. This difference was statistically significant (P =0.009). Exposure of patients with amalgam restorations to radiofrequency radiation emitted from conventional Wi-Fi devices can increase mercury release from amalgam restorations.

  17. To promote public acceptance of nuclear energy by WiN-JAPAN

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuroiwa, Haruko; Kobayashi, Yoko; Ogawa, Junko

    2011-01-01

    Women in Nuclear Japan (WiN-J) has been striving to promote activities that increase public acceptance of nuclear energy especially by women. According to a public opinion poll in 2009 by the Cabient Office, Government of Japan, the ratio of men who have confidence in nuclear power plant safety was 52.1%, while the ratio of females was only 32.5%. And the ratio of negative feeling about nuclear power among males was 45.8%, while the ratio of females was 61.2%. This indicates the necessity of communication to females to encourage them to accept nuclear power. WiN-J developed two methods of communication with the public and young people about the benefits of nuclear energy and the applications of radiation in many aspects of the life. The first is town hall meetings, and the other is education for university students in the style of a Science Cafe. Surprisingly, present university student never studied about nuclear energy when they were elementary or junior high school students. However, those students will have to educate their own children to use energy wisely in consideration of the limited energy resources in the coming years. WiN-J, therefore, gives them some relevant lectures on nuclear energy and radiation. Also WiN-J can be the models for female university students who have issues such as marriage, pregnancy, promotions, and transfers which can be discussed. We have to increase the numbers of female nuclear engineers to promote public trust in the safety of nuclear power plants. For this purpose, WiN-J encourages female university students to enter the nuclear industry. We recognize that to gain people's understanding of and trust in nuclear energy may take a long time. WiN-J will continue to fulfill our challenging mission for the peaceful use of nuclear energy. (author)

  18. A Self-Adaptive Model-Based Wi-Fi Indoor Localization Method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuta, Jure; Juric, Matjaz B

    2016-12-06

    This paper presents a novel method for indoor localization, developed with the main aim of making it useful for real-world deployments. Many indoor localization methods exist, yet they have several disadvantages in real-world deployments-some are static, which is not suitable for long-term usage; some require costly human recalibration procedures; and others require special hardware such as Wi-Fi anchors and transponders. Our method is self-calibrating and self-adaptive thus maintenance free and based on Wi-Fi only. We have employed two well-known propagation models-free space path loss and ITU models-which we have extended with additional parameters for better propagation simulation. Our self-calibrating procedure utilizes one propagation model to infer parameters of the space and the other to simulate the propagation of the signal without requiring any additional hardware beside Wi-Fi access points, which is suitable for real-world usage. Our method is also one of the few model-based Wi-Fi only self-adaptive approaches that do not require the mobile terminal to be in the access-point mode. The only input requirements of the method are Wi-Fi access point positions, and positions and properties of the walls. Our method has been evaluated in single- and multi-room environments, with measured mean error of 2-3 and 3-4 m, respectively, which is similar to existing methods. The evaluation has proven that usable localization accuracy can be achieved in real-world environments solely by the proposed Wi-Fi method that relies on simple hardware and software requirements.

  19. What Can WiN Learn From Other Male Dominated Industries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomas, C.

    2015-01-01

    Thomas Thor Associates is an Executive Recruitment company solely dedicated to the Nuclear industry. We have been involved with WiN UK in 2014–2015 to help them develop their own organization, this research was part of our partnership. The main purpose of this paper is to provide a clear picture of the techniques that are used by organizations similar to WiN, and business in other industries that are similar to Nuclear, to attract more women to pursue a career in a particular industry, and to support retention and career progression of women in these industries. This paper has taken a look at all industries that require technical and engineering staff, after which the Mining, Oil and Gas, Petro-chemicals, Rail, Renewable Energy, Technology and Construction industries were found to show most similarities with Nuclear, in terms of the technical staff required and their structure on gender diversity. From here, case studies of industry organizations and professional business have been prepared in order to inform WiN of best practice in these industries and provide a benchmark for future WiN operations. Finally, the report results into giving recommendations on projects WiN could add to their current approach to achieve their objectives. The recommendations are based on the results from the case studies, focusing on attracting, recruiting, retaining and developing female professionals. In summary, the recommendations are to: highlight potential career paths for women in Nuclear, educate women on Nuclear, support the development of women and to help companies to increase their bottom line by getting WiN certified. (author)

  20. SeaWiFS technical report series. Volume 11: Analysis of selected orbit propagation models for the SeaWiFS mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patt, Frederick S.; Hoisington, Charles M.; Gregg, Watson W.; Coronado, Patrick L.; Hooker, Stanford B. (Editor); Firestone, Elaine R. (Editor); Indest, A. W. (Editor)

    1993-01-01

    An analysis of orbit propagation models was performed by the Mission Operations element of the Sea-viewing Wide Field-of-View Sensor (SeaWiFS) Project, which has overall responsibility for the instrument scheduling. The orbit propagators selected for this analysis are widely available general perturbations models. The analysis includes both absolute accuracy determination and comparisons of different versions of the models. The results show that all of the models tested meet accuracy requirements for scheduling and data acquisition purposes. For internal Project use the SGP4 propagator, developed by the North American Air Defense (NORAD) Command, has been selected. This model includes atmospheric drag effects and, therefore, provides better accuracy. For High Resolution Picture Transmission (HRPT) ground stations, which have less stringent accuracy requirements, the publicly available Brouwer-Lyddane models are recommended. The SeaWiFS Project will make available portable source code for a version of this model developed by the Data Capture Facility (DCF).

  1. Positioning indoors with Wi-Fi devices of low-cost; Posicionamento em ambientes internos com dispositivos wi-fi de baixo custo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moreira, Fabricio M.; Farias, Marcos S.; Carvalho, Paulo Victor R. de, E-mail: fabricio_mv1@hotmail.com, E-mail: msantana@ien.gov.br, E-mail: paulov@ien.gov.br [Instituto de Engenharia Nuclear (IEN/CNEN-RJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Serviço de Instrumentação

    2017-07-01

    The rhythm of research development linked to location tracking is highly linked with the advancement of wireless sensor network and wireless technologies. A classic example is the Global Positioning System (GPS), where satellites are used to send signals to receivers on earth that use these signals to compute navigation information. However, as communication between the satellites and GPS receivers require radio propagation in line of sight, the GPS system usually only works outdoors. For the growing interest in research to position tracking indoors, you must use wireless devices based on Bluetooth or Wi-Fi technology (IEEE 802.11). The aim of this work is to show the development of applications using new Wi-Fi devices (ESP8266) for the estimation of positioning and location indoors.

  2. Inferring Person-to-person Proximity Using WiFi Signals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sapiezynski, Piotr; Stopczynski, Arkadiusz; Wind, David Kofoed

    2017-01-01

    scale is a technical challenge and many commonly used approaches—including RFID badges or Bluetooth scanning—offer only limited scalability. Here we show that it is possible, in a scalable and robust way, to accurately infer person-to-person physical proximity from the lists of WiFi access points...... measured by smartphones carried by the two individuals. Based on a longitudinal dataset of approximately 800 participants with ground-truth interactions collected over a year, we show that our model performs better than the current state-of-the-art. Our results demonstrate the value of WiFi signals...

  3. Access for Internet of Things using Smartphone as a Gateway utilizing LTE and WiFi

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mathur, Prateek; Nielsen, Rasmus Hjorth; Prasad, Neeli R.

    2016-01-01

    Communicating the Internet of Things (IoT) data relying on Long-Term Evolution (LTE) and WiFi has been been presented in the relevant literature. However, this necessitates devices to have LTE/WiFi capability of their own, that has limitations in the form of power consumption, and radio access...... the data to the Internet. In this paper we present a system model wherein the smartphone functions as a gateway for the IoT devices operating on NFC, ZigBee and Bluetooth. The smartphone functioning as a gateway for transferring IoT data. The system modelled in the form of a Markov Chain based...

  4. RSSI BASED LOCATION ESTIMATION IN A WI-FI ENVIRONMENT: AN EXPERIMENTAL STUDY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Ganesh Madhan

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available In real life situations, location estimation of moving objects, armed personnel are of great importance. In this paper, we have attempted to locate targets which are mobile in a Wi-Fi environment. Radio Frequency (RF localization techniques based on Received Signal Strength Indication (RSSI algorithms are used. This study utilises Wireless Mon tool, software to provide complete technical information regarding received signal strength obtained from different wireless access points available in a campus Wi-Fi environment, considered for the study. All simulations have been done in MATLAB. The target location estimated by this approach agrees well with the actual GPS data.

  5. The SeaWiFS Quality Monitor: A Portable Field Calibration Light Source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaw, Ping-Shine; Johnson, B. Carol; Hooker, Stanford B.; Lynch, Don

    1997-01-01

    A portable and stable source, the Sea-viewing Wide Field-of-view Sensor (SeaWiFS) Quality Monitor, has been developed for use as a field instrument. The source can be used with either radiance- or irradiance-measuring sensors to transfer the laboratory calibration to the field so that the stability of the sensors can be monitored during the experiment. Temperature-controlled silicon photodiodes with colored glass filters are used to monitor the stability of the SeaWiFS Quality Monitor.

  6. Cognitive radio-based transmission energy management in Wi-Fi nodes

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Olwal, TO

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available following the adoption of the proposed CR-TEM method. The execution of the CR-TEM fosters more users? adoption of the internet services and a corresponding network gain. Figure 5: Expected network performance Fi 3 M d l f C TEM i Wi Fi d Fi 5 E d k f....kashan.co.za] INTRODUCTION The recent increased demand for various internet services, shown in Figure 1, to be delivered through energy-efficient wireless infrastructures such as Wi-Fi routers has compelled the need for a new research & development (R&D) paradigm...

  7. Dual Y-Shaped Monopole Antenna for Dual-Band WLAN/WiMAX Operations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huiqing Zhai

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A dual-band design of monopole antenna with two coupled Y-shaped strips for WLAN/WiMAX applications is presented. By the introduction of dual Y-shaped strips, two separated impedance bandwidths of 22.4% (3.28~4.10 GHz and 19.2% (4.90~5.94 GHz can be obtained to meet the specifications of the WLAN/WiMAX communication band applications. The proposed antenna is successfully simulated, designed, and measured, demonstrating the matched impedance and good radiation characteristics with an overall dimension of 17.7×26×1 mm3.

  8. Exploring relationships between Dairy Herd Improvement monitors of performance and the Transition Cow Index in Wisconsin dairy herds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schultz, K K; Bennett, T B; Nordlund, K V; Döpfer, D; Cook, N B

    2016-09-01

    Transition cow management has been tracked via the Transition Cow Index (TCI; AgSource Cooperative Services, Verona, WI) since 2006. Transition Cow Index was developed to measure the difference between actual and predicted milk yield at first test day to evaluate the relative success of the transition period program. This project aimed to assess TCI in relation to all commonly used Dairy Herd Improvement (DHI) metrics available through AgSource Cooperative Services. Regression analysis was used to isolate variables that were relevant to TCI, and then principal components analysis and network analysis were used to determine the relative strength and relatedness among variables. Finally, cluster analysis was used to segregate herds based on similarity of relevant variables. The DHI data were obtained from 2,131 Wisconsin dairy herds with test-day mean ≥30 cows, which were tested ≥10 times throughout the 2014 calendar year. The original list of 940 DHI variables was reduced through expert-driven selection and regression analysis to 23 variables. The K-means cluster analysis produced 5 distinct clusters. Descriptive statistics were calculated for the 23 variables per cluster grouping. Using principal components analysis, cluster analysis, and network analysis, 4 parameters were isolated as most relevant to TCI; these were energy-corrected milk, 3 measures of intramammary infection (dry cow cure rate, linear somatic cell count score in primiparous cows, and new infection rate), peak ratio, and days in milk at peak milk production. These variables together with cow and newborn calf survival measures form a group of metrics that can be used to assist in the evaluation of overall transition period performance. Copyright © 2016 American Dairy Science Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Water quality and the effects of changes in phosphorus loading, Red Cedar Lakes, Barron and Washburn Counties, Wisconsin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robertson, Dale M.; Rose, William J.; Garn, Herbert S.

    2003-01-01

    The Red Cedar Lakes consist of three mainstem lakes (Balsam, Hemlock and Red Cedar) on the Red Cedar River in Barron and Washburn Counties, Wisconsin. These lakes are productive because of high phosphorus loading, and classified as mesotrophic to eutrophic. Because of concerns that the water quality of these lakes was degrading, three cooperative studies were conducted by the U.S. Geological Survey between 1993 and 2003. As part of these studies, water quality in the lakes was documented in 1993?94, 1996?97, and 2000?01, and water and phosphorus budgets were constructed for water year 2001. Historical water-quality data indicated that the lakes have changed little since the late 1980s. A detailed phosphorus budget indicated that most of the 14,100 pounds of phosphorus input to the lakes during 2001 came from the upstream lakes, streams draining relatively undeveloped land upstream of Hemlock Lake, and ground water. Simulation results from two water-quality models (BATHTUB and WiLMS) indicated that about a 50-percent reduction in phosphorus loading from that measured in 2001 is required for all three lakes to be classified as mesotrophic; therefore, appreciable improvements in the water quality would require improvements in the water quality of the upstream lakes. Although the water quality of the lakes has not changed appreciably in recent years and major improvements in water quality are unlikely without major improvements to upstream lakes, continued efforts to protect the susceptible watershed are necessary to maintain the current level of water quality.

  10. An Indoor Continuous Positioning Algorithm on the Move by Fusing Sensors and Wi-Fi on Smartphones

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huaiyu Li

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Wi-Fi indoor positioning algorithms experience large positioning error and low stability when continuously positioning terminals that are on the move. This paper proposes a novel indoor continuous positioning algorithm that is on the move, fusing sensors and Wi-Fi on smartphones. The main innovative points include an improved Wi-Fi positioning algorithm and a novel positioning fusion algorithm named the Trust Chain Positioning Fusion (TCPF algorithm. The improved Wi-Fi positioning algorithm was designed based on the properties of Wi-Fi signals on the move, which are found in a novel “quasi-dynamic” Wi-Fi signal experiment. The TCPF algorithm is proposed to realize the “process-level” fusion of Wi-Fi and Pedestrians Dead Reckoning (PDR positioning, including three parts: trusted point determination, trust state and positioning fusion algorithm. An experiment is carried out for verification in a typical indoor environment, and the average positioning error on the move is 1.36 m, a decrease of 28.8% compared to an existing algorithm. The results show that the proposed algorithm can effectively reduce the influence caused by the unstable Wi-Fi signals, and improve the accuracy and stability of indoor continuous positioning on the move.

  11. Safe at Any Speed: Securing Your Wi-Fi Network Is Easier and More Important than You Might Think

    Science.gov (United States)

    Branzburg, Jeffrey

    2007-01-01

    In this article, the author relates how he discovered that not all Wi-Fi networks are secure. As such, he developed several strategies on how he can be secured whenever he connects to the Internet through a Wi-Fi connection. He discusses how one can change passwords, explains the process of encryption, and provides suggestions on other security…

  12. An Indoor Continuous Positioning Algorithm on the Move by Fusing Sensors and Wi-Fi on Smartphones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Huaiyu; Chen, Xiuwan; Jing, Guifei; Wang, Yuan; Cao, Yanfeng; Li, Fei; Zhang, Xinlong; Xiao, Han

    2015-12-11

    Wi-Fi indoor positioning algorithms experience large positioning error and low stability when continuously positioning terminals that are on the move. This paper proposes a novel indoor continuous positioning algorithm that is on the move, fusing sensors and Wi-Fi on smartphones. The main innovative points include an improved Wi-Fi positioning algorithm and a novel positioning fusion algorithm named the Trust Chain Positioning Fusion (TCPF) algorithm. The improved Wi-Fi positioning algorithm was designed based on the properties of Wi-Fi signals on the move, which are found in a novel "quasi-dynamic" Wi-Fi signal experiment. The TCPF algorithm is proposed to realize the "process-level" fusion of Wi-Fi and Pedestrians Dead Reckoning (PDR) positioning, including three parts: trusted point determination, trust state and positioning fusion algorithm. An experiment is carried out for verification in a typical indoor environment, and the average positioning error on the move is 1.36 m, a decrease of 28.8% compared to an existing algorithm. The results show that the proposed algorithm can effectively reduce the influence caused by the unstable Wi-Fi signals, and improve the accuracy and stability of indoor continuous positioning on the move.

  13. Converged delivery of WiMAX and wireline services over an extended reach passive optical access network

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Osadchiy, Alexey Vladimirovich; Prince, Kamau; Tafur Monroy, Idelfonso

    2010-01-01

    In this paper we present long-reach fiber access links supporting transmission of Worldwide Interoperability for Microwave Access (WiMAX) compliant signals. We present bi-directional full-duplex transmission of 256-state quadrature amplitude modulation (256-QAM) modulated WiMAX-compliant signals ...

  14. 78 FR 39608 - Safety Zone; Summer in the City Water Ski Show; Fox River, Green Bay, WI

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-02

    ...-AA00 Safety Zone; Summer in the City Water Ski Show; Fox River, Green Bay, WI AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS... and three boats, operating within the main channel of the Fox River. The Captain of the Port, Lake... River in Green Bay, WI. This safety zone is intended to restrict vessels from a portion of the Fox River...

  15. SeaWiFS Deep Blue Aerosol Optical Thickness Monthly Level 3 Climatology Data Gridded at 1.0 Degrees V004

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The SeaWiFS Deep Blue Level 3 Monthly Climatology Product contains monthly global climatology gridded (1 x 1 deg) data derived from SeaWiFS Deep Blue Level 3 monthly...

  16. Basement and cover-rock deformation during Laramide contraction in the Northern Madison Range (Montana) and its influence on Cenozoic basin formation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kellogg, K.S. [Geological Survey, Denver, CO (United States); Schmidt, C.J. [Western Michigan Univ., Kalamazoo, MI (United States); Young, S.W. [Conoco, Inc., Midland, TX (United States)

    1995-08-01

    Two major Laramide fault systems converge in the northwestern Madison Range: the northwest-striking, southwest-vergent Spanish Peaks reverse fault and the north-striking, east-vergent Hilgard thrust system. Analysis of foliation attitudes in basement gneiss north and south of the Spanish Peaks fault indicates that the basement in thrusted blocks of the Hilgard thrust system has been rotated by an amount similar to that of the basement-cover contact. In most places along the Hilgard thrust system, a large basement overhang, produced by thrusting of Archean blocks above rocks as young as Late Cretaceous, overlies a tight footwall syncline. This tight folding is largely concentric and was accommodated by flexural slip, resulting in severe crowding in synclinal hinges that resulted in observed or inferred features such as bedding-plane slip, imbricate and out-of-syncline thrusting, and hinge collapse. This paired fault system (the Madison normal fault system and the Hilgard thrust system) of the northern Madison Range is strikingly similar to other paired systems in southwestern Montana along and adjacent to the western margins of the Ruby Range, Snowcrest Range, Greenhorn Range, Tobacco Root Mountains, and Bridger Range. No hydrocarbon discoveries have been made in this unique structural province. However, petroleum exploration here has focused on basement-cored anticlines, both surface and subthrust, related to the two major Laramide fault systems and on the fault-bounded blocks of Tertiary rocks within the post-Laramide extensional basins. The interplay of the two Laramide fault systems during both Laramide shortening and Tertiary extension has produced a variety of possible structural traps in the Madison Range that have not yet been thoroughly investigated.

  17. Heavy metals in wild rice from northern Wisconsin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, J.P.; Chiriboga, E.; Coleman, J.; Waller, D.M.

    2000-01-01

    Wild rice grain samples from various parts of the world have been found to have elevated concentrations of heavy metals, raising concern for potential effects on human health. It was hypothesized that wild rice from north-central Wisconsin could potentially have elevated concentrations of some heavy metals because of possible exposure to these elements from the atmosphere or from water and sediments. In addition, no studies of heavy metals in wild rice from Wisconsin had been performed, and a baseline study was needed for future comparisons. Wild rice plants were collected from four areas in Bayfield, Forest, Langlade, Oneida, Sawyer and Wood Counties in September, 1997 and 1998 and divided into four plant parts for elemental analyses: roots, stems, leaves and seeds. A total of 194 samples from 51 plants were analyzed across the localities, with an average of 49 samples per part depending on the element. Samples were cleaned of soil, wet digested, and analyzed by ICP for Ag, As, Cd, Cr, Cu, Hg, Mg, Pb, Se and Zn. Roots contained the highest concentrations of Ag, As, Cd, Cr, Hg, Pb, and Se. Copper was highest in both roots and seeds, while Zn was highest just in seeds. Magnesium was highest in leaves. Seed baseline ranges for the 10 elements were established using the 95% confidence intervals of the medians. Wild rice plants from northern Wisconsin had normal levels of the nutritional elements Cu, Mg and Zn in the seeds. Silver, Cd, Hg, Cr, and Se were very low in concentration or within normal limits for food plants. Arsenic and Pb, however, were elevated and could pose a problem for human health. The pathway for As, Hg and Pb to the plants could be atmospheric.

  18. Oneida Tribe of Indians of Wisconsin Energy Optimization Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Troge, Michael [Little Bear Development Center, Oneida, WI (United States)

    2014-12-01

    Oneida Nation is located in Northeast Wisconsin. The reservation is approximately 96 square miles (8 miles x 12 miles), or 65,000 acres. The greater Green Bay area is east and adjacent to the reservation. A county line roughly splits the reservation in half; the west half is in Outagamie County and the east half is in Brown County. Land use is predominantly agriculture on the west 2/3 and suburban on the east 1/3 of the reservation. Nearly 5,000 tribally enrolled members live in the reservation with a total population of about 21,000. Tribal ownership is scattered across the reservation and is about 23,000 acres. Currently, the Oneida Tribe of Indians of Wisconsin (OTIW) community members and facilities receive the vast majority of electrical and natural gas services from two of the largest investor-owned utilities in the state, WE Energies and Wisconsin Public Service. All urban and suburban buildings have access to natural gas. About 15% of the population and five Tribal facilities are in rural locations and therefore use propane as a primary heating fuel. Wood and oil are also used as primary or supplemental heat sources for a small percent of the population. Very few renewable energy systems, used to generate electricity and heat, have been installed on the Oneida Reservation. This project was an effort to develop a reasonable renewable energy portfolio that will help Oneida to provide a leadership role in developing a clean energy economy. The Energy Optimization Model (EOM) is an exploration of energy opportunities available to the Tribe and it is intended to provide a decision framework to allow the Tribe to make the wisest choices in energy investment with an organizational desire to establish a renewable portfolio standard (RPS).

  19. Analysis of nursing home use and bed supply: Wisconsin, 1983.

    OpenAIRE

    Nyman, J A

    1989-01-01

    This article presents evidence that in 1983 excess demand was a prevailing characteristic of nursing home care markets in Wisconsin, a state with one of the highest bed to elderly population ratios. It further shows that excess demand is the source of at least three types of error in use-based estimates of the determinants of the need for nursing home care. First, if excess demand is present, estimates of the determinants of Medicaid use may simply represent a crowding out of Medicaid patient...

  20. Simulated Performance of the Wisconsin Superconducting Electron Gun

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    R.A. Bosch, K.J. Kleman, R.A. Legg

    2012-07-01

    The Wisconsin superconducting electron gun is modeled with multiparticle tracking simulations using the ASTRA and GPT codes. To specify the construction of the emittance-compensation solenoid, we studied the dependence of the output bunch's emittance upon the solenoid's strength and field errors. We also evaluated the dependence of the output bunch's emittance upon the bunch's initial emittance and the size of the laser spot on the photocathode. The results suggest that a 200-pC bunch with an emittance of about one mm-mrad can be produced for a free-electron laser.

  1. Northern red oak volume growth on four northern Wisconsin habitat types

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michael Demchik; Kevin M. Schwartz; Rory Braun; Eric. Scharenbrock

    2014-01-01

    Northern red oak (Quercus rubra) grows across much of Wisconsin. Using site factors to aid in prediction of volume and basal area increment facilitates management of red oak and other species of interest. Currently, habitat type (Wisconsin Habitat Type Classification System) is often determined when stands are inventoried. If habitat type were...

  2. 78 FR 65875 - Approval and Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans; Wisconsin; Removal of Gasoline...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-04

    ...] Approval and Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans; Wisconsin; Removal of Gasoline Vapor... Administrative Code, Chapter NR 420 Control of Organic Compound Emissions from Petroleum and Gasoline Sources... FROM PETROLEUM AND GASOLINE SOURCES. NR 420.01 as published in the (Wisconsin) Register, February, 1990...

  3. Hydrogeology of southwestern Sheboygan County, Wisconsin, in the vicinity of the Kettle Moraine Springs fish hatchery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conlon, T.D.

    1995-01-01

    This report describes the hydrogeology of the dolomite aquifer of Silurian age and its relation to springs in a study area in southwestern Sheboygan County, Wisconsin. The study was conducted at the Kettle Moraine Springs fish hatchery in cooperation with the Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources.

  4. Estimating outside-bark stem volume to any top diameter for ash in Wisconsin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul F. Doruska; Timothy D. Hart

    2010-01-01

    The future of Wisconsin's estimated 742 million ash trees (5 million of which are in urban settings composing 20 percent of Wisconsin's urban forests) is being considered based on the presence of the emerald ash borer. Part of this discussion includes the stem volumes of these ash trees.

  5. Tree seed handling, processing, testing, and storage at Hayward State Nursery, Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon Christians

    2008-01-01

    The Hayward State Nursery, Wisconsin grows more than 40 species from seeds. Up to 6000 bushels of raw unprocessed tree and shrub seeds are collected each year, and all seeds are collected in Wisconsin or adjacent states. All white spruce (Picea glauca) and some white pine seeds (Pinus strobus) are collected from orchards containing...

  6. 75 FR 71108 - Wisconsin Public Service Corporation; Notice of Application for Amendment of License and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-11-22

    ... Energy Regulatory Commission Wisconsin Public Service Corporation; Notice of Application for Amendment of... Filed: June 30, 2010. d. Applicant: Wisconsin Public Service Corporation. e. Name of Project: Tomahawk... the following hydroelectric application has been filed with the Commission and is available for public...

  7. 77 FR 40608 - Wisconsin Electric Power Company; Notice of Petition for Declaratory Order

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-10

    ... accounting treatment of a coal contract buydown; and (2) waiver of the Commission's fuel clause regulation to allow Wisconsin Electric to recoup the cost of the coal contract buydown through Wisconsin Electric's cost-based, Formula Rate Wholesale Sales Tariff. Any person desiring to intervene or to protest this...

  8. 40 CFR 81.30 - Southeastern Wisconsin Intrastate Air Quality Control Region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Quality Control Region. 81.30 Section 81.30 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... Air Quality Control Regions § 81.30 Southeastern Wisconsin Intrastate Air Quality Control Region. The Metropolitan Milwaukee Intrastate Air Quality Control Region (Wisconsin) has been renamed the Southeastern...

  9. Revolution and Counter-Revolution: Network Mobilization to Preserve Public Education in Wisconsin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelley, Carolyn; Mead, Julie

    2017-01-01

    In this article, Kelley and Mead consider changes in the policymaking process in Wisconsin before the election of Governor Walker, in the early years following his election, and in the months preceding passage of the 2015-17 biennial budget. Kelley and Mead argue that in Wisconsin, serious and significant attacks to public education motivated by…

  10. Measurements of the momentum and current transport from tearing instability in the Madison Symmetric Torus reversed-field pinch

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuritsyn, A.; Fiksel, G.; Almagri, A. F.; Miller, M. C.; Mirnov, V. V.; Prager, S. C.; Sarff, J. S.; Brower, D. L.; Ding, W. X.

    2009-01-01

    In this paper measurements of momentum and current transport caused by current driven tearing instability are reported. The measurements are done in the Madison Symmetric Torus reversed-field pinch [R. N. Dexter, D. W. Kerst, T. W. Lovell, S. C. Prager, and J. C. Sprott, Fusion Technol. 19, 131 (1991)] in a regime with repetitive bursts of tearing instability causing magnetic field reconnection. It is established that the plasma parallel momentum profile flattens during these reconnection events: The flow decreases in the core and increases at the edge. The momentum relaxation phenomenon is similar in nature to the well established relaxation of the parallel electrical current and could be a general feature of self-organized systems. The measured fluctuation-induced Maxwell and Reynolds stresses, which govern the dynamics of plasma flow, are large and almost balance each other such that their difference is approximately equal to the rate of change of plasma momentum. The Hall dynamo, which is directly related to the Maxwell stress, drives the parallel current profile relaxation at resonant surfaces at the reconnection events. These results qualitatively agree with analytical calculations and numerical simulations. It is plausible that current-driven instabilities can be responsible for momentum transport in other laboratory and astrophysical plasmas.

  11. 78 FR 42016 - Safety Zone; Discovery World Fireworks, Milwaukee Harbor, Milwaukee, WI

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-15

    ... economically affect it. 3. Assistance for Small Entities Under section 213(a) of the Small Business Regulatory...-AA00 Safety Zone; Discovery World Fireworks, Milwaukee Harbor, Milwaukee, WI AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS... Milwaukee Harbor due to 4 fireworks displays at Discovery World Pier. This safety zone is necessary to...

  12. Chlorophyll-a, Orbview-2 SeaWiFS, 0.0125 degrees, West US

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NOAA CoastWatch distributes chlorophyll-a concentration images from the Sea-viewing Wide Field-of-view Sensor (SeaWiFS) on the Orbview-2 satellite. Because data is...

  13. Chlorophyll-a, Orbview-2 SeaWiFS, 0.04167 degrees, Alaska, Science Quality

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NASA GSFC Ocean Color Web distributes science-quality chlorophyll-a concentration data from the Sea-viewing Wide Field-of-view Sensor (SeaWiFS) on the Orbview-2...

  14. Insecure Network, Unknown Connection: Understanding Wi-Fi Privacy Assumptions of Mobile Device Users

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bram Bonné

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Smartphones and other mobile devices have proliferated in the past five years. The expectation of mobile device users to always be online has led to Wi-Fi networks being offered by a variety of providers. Using these networks introduces multiple security risks. In this work, we assess to what extent the privacy stance of mobile device users corresponds with their actual behavior by conducting a study with 108 participants. Our methodology consists of monitoring Wi-Fi networks that the participants’ devices connect to and the connections made by apps on these devices, for a period of 30 days. Afterwards, participants are surveyed about their awareness and privacy sensitiveness. We show that while a higher expertise in computer networks corresponds to more awareness about the connections made by apps, neither this expertise nor the actual privacy stance of the participant translates to better security habits. Moreover, participants in general were unaware about a significant part of connections made by apps on their devices, a matter that is worsened by the fact that one third of Wi-Fi networks that participants connect to do not have any security enabled. Based on our results, we provide recommendations to network providers, developers and users on how to improve Wi-Fi security for mobile devices.

  15. Klimatisering van de energieproducerende tuinbouwkas met FiWiHex warmtewisselaars : vooronderzoek Energie producerende kas

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Campen, J.B.; Zwart, de H.F.

    2005-01-01

    De stuurgroep 'Kas als energiebron' beoogt de realisatie van een pilotproject van een energieproducerende kas. In de in dit rapport beschreven uitvoeringsvorm wordt gebruik gemaakt van hoog-rendement FiWiHEx warmtewisselaars. Verkennende onderzoeken en initiërend design hebben geleid tot een eerste

  16. 75 FR 51851 - Weather Shield Manufacturing, Inc., Corporate Office, Medford, WI; Notice of Revised...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-23

    ...] [FR Doc No: 2010-20791] DEPARTMENT OF LABOR Employment and Training Administration [TA-W-64,725] Weather Shield Manufacturing, Inc., Corporate Office, Medford, WI; Notice of Revised Determination on... Adjustment Assistance (ATAA) on behalf of workers of Weather Shield Manufacturing, Inc., Corporate Office...

  17. Device-Free Passive Identity Identification via WiFi Signals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lv, Jiguang; Yang, Wu; Man, Dapeng

    2017-11-02

    Device-free passive identity identification attracts much attention in recent years, and it is a representative application in sensorless sensing. It can be used in many applications such as intrusion detection and smart building. Previous studies show the sensing potential of WiFi signals in a device-free passive manner. It is confirmed that human's gait is unique from each other similar to fingerprint and iris. However, the identification accuracy of existing approaches is not satisfactory in practice. In this paper, we present Wii, a device-free WiFi-based Identity Identification approach utilizing human's gait based on Channel State Information (CSI) of WiFi signals. Principle Component Analysis (PCA) and low pass filter are applied to remove the noises in the signals. We then extract several entities' gait features from both time and frequency domain, and select the most effective features according to information gain. Based on these features, Wii realizes stranger recognition through Gaussian Mixture Model (GMM) and identity identification through a Support Vector Machine (SVM) with Radial Basis Function (RBF) kernel. It is implemented using commercial WiFi devices and evaluated on a dataset with more than 1500 gait instances collected from eight subjects walking in a room. The results indicate that Wii can effectively recognize strangers and can achieves high identification accuracy with low computational cost. As a result, Wii has the potential to work in typical home security systems.

  18. Unscented Kalman Filter Algorithm for WiFi-PDR Integrated Indoor Positioning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    CHEN GuoLiang

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Indoor positioning still faces lots of fundamental technical problems although it has been widely applied. A novel indoor positioning technology by using the smart phone with the assisting of the widely available and economically signals of WiFi is proposed. It also includes the principles and characteristics in indoor positioning. Firstly, improve the system's accuracy by fusing the WiFi fingerprinting positioning and PDR (ped estrian dead reckoning positioning with UKF (unscented Kalman filter. Secondly, improve the real-time performance by clustering the WiFi fingerprinting with k-means clustering algorithm. An investigation test was conducted at the indoor environment to learn about its performance on a HUAWEI P6-U06 smart phone. The result shows that compared to the pattern-matching system without clustering, an average reduction of 51% in the time cost can be obtained without degrading the positioning accuracy. When the state of personnel is walking, the average positioning error of WiFi is 7.76 m, the average positioning error of PDR is 4.57 m. After UKF fusing, the system's average positioning error is down to 1.24 m. It shows that the algorithm greatly improves the system's real-time and positioning accuracy.

  19. Complementing Security Breach of Authentication by Using Shared Authentication Information in Mobile WiMAX Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Youngwook; Lim, Hyoung-Kyu; Bahk, Saewoong

    The signalling protocol vulnerability opens DDoS problem in Mobile WiMAX networks. This letter proposes an authentication method that uses the unrevealed upper 64bits of Cipher-based MAC as a solution. It runs for MSs in idle mode and reduces the calculation complexity by 59% under DDoS attack while incurring 1% overhead under normal condition.

  20. 78 FR 20714 - Union Pacific Railroad Company-Abandonment Exemption-in Dunn County, WI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-05

    ... Surface Transportation Board Union Pacific Railroad Company--Abandonment Exemption--in Dunn County, WI. Union Pacific Railroad Company (UP) filed a verified notice of exemption under 49 CFR part 1152 subpart... the Board should be sent to UP's representative: Mack H. Shumate, Jr., Senior General Attorney, Union...