WorldWideScience

Sample records for wisconsin cancer reporting

  1. Updating progress in cancer control in Wisconsin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Treml, Kimberly B; McElroy, Jane A; Kaufman, Stephanie K; Remington, Patrick L; Wegner, Mark V

    2006-06-01

    In 1989, experts in cancer prevention, early detection, and treatment met in Madison to set the public health agenda for cancer control. Part of the plan defined target percent change in cancer mortality rates to be met by the year 2000. During the 1990s, public health and health care professionals developed programs and policies to reach these goals. The purpose of this analysis is to evaluate Wisconsin's progress in reducing cancer mortality and success in meeting the year 2000 objectives. Wisconsin mortality data for 1984-1986 and 1999-2001 were obtained from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, CDC Wonder. Percent change was calculated between the 2 time periods and compared to the 2000 target percent change for all-site cancer and site specific cancer mortality. All-site cancer mortality decreased by 7% from 1984-1986 to 1999-2001 with a greater than 16% decline in age groups <65 years. Mortality from breast, colorectal, and cervical cancer each decreased by at least 25%. Lung cancer and malignant melanoma mortality rates increased by 5% and 17%, respectively. Among additionally analyzed cancers, mortality decreased in prostate, stomach, and childhood cancers and increased in liver cancer and non-Hodgkin's lymphoma. The results of the state's cancer control effort are mixed. The year 2000 objectives were met for breast and colorectal cancer. Progress was made in reducing mortality from cervical cancer and from all sites combined, but the other year 2000 objectives were not met. Mortality rates increased for lung cancer and malignant melanoma during the 15-year period.

  2. Housing Discrimination, Residential Racial Segregation, and Colorectal Cancer Survival in Southeastern Wisconsin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Yuhong; Bemanian, Amin; Beyer, Kirsten M M

    2017-04-01

    Background: Residential racial segregation is still neglected in contemporary examinations of racial health disparities, including studies of cancer. Even fewer studies examine the processes by which segregation occurs, such as through housing discrimination. This study aims to examine relationships among housing discrimination, segregation, and colorectal cancer survival in southeastern Wisconsin. Methods: Cancer incidence data were obtained from the Wisconsin Cancer Reporting System for two southeastern Wisconsin metropolitan areas. Two indices of mortgage discrimination were derived from Home Mortgage Disclosure Act data, and a measure of segregation (the location quotient) was calculated from U.S. census data; all predictors were specified at the ZIP Code Tabulation Area level. Cox proportional hazards regression was used to examine associations between mortgage discrimination, segregation, and colorectal cancer survival in southeastern Wisconsin. Results: For all-cause mortality, racial bias in mortgage lending was significantly associated with a greater hazard rate among blacks [HR = 1.37; 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.06-1.76] and among black women (HR = 1.53; 95% CI, 1.06-2.21), but not black men in sex-specific models. No associations were identified for redlining or the location quotient. Additional work is needed to determine whether these findings can be replicated in other geographical settings. Conclusions: Our findings indicate that black women in particular experience poorer colorectal cancer survival in neighborhoods characterized by racial bias in mortgage lending, a measure of institutional racism. These findings are in line with previous studies of breast cancer survival. Impact: Housing discrimination and institutional racism may be important targets for policy change to reduce health disparities, including cancer disparities. Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev; 26(4); 561-8. ©2017 AACR See all the articles in this CEBP Focus section

  3. Wisconsin's environmental public health tracking network: information systems design for childhood cancer surveillance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanrahan, Lawrence P; Anderson, Henry A; Busby, Brian; Bekkedal, Marni; Sieger, Thomas; Stephenson, Laura; Knobeloch, Lynda; Werner, Mark; Imm, Pamela; Olson, Joseph

    2004-10-01

    In this article we describe the development of an information system for environmental childhood cancer surveillance. The Wisconsin Cancer Registry annually receives more than 25,000 incident case reports. Approximately 269 cases per year involve children. Over time, there has been considerable community interest in understanding the role the environment plays as a cause of these cancer cases. Wisconsin's Public Health Information Network (WI-PHIN) is a robust web portal integrating both Health Alert Network and National Electronic Disease Surveillance System components. WI-PHIN is the information technology platform for all public health surveillance programs. Functions include the secure, automated exchange of cancer case data between public health-based and hospital-based cancer registrars; web-based supplemental data entry for environmental exposure confirmation and hypothesis testing; automated data analysis, visualization, and exposure-outcome record linkage; directories of public health and clinical personnel for role-based access control of sensitive surveillance information; public health information dissemination and alerting; and information technology security and critical infrastructure protection. For hypothesis generation, cancer case data are sent electronically to WI-PHIN and populate the integrated data repository. Environmental data are linked and the exposure-disease relationships are explored using statistical tools for ecologic exposure risk assessment. For hypothesis testing, case-control interviews collect exposure histories, including parental employment and residential histories. This information technology approach can thus serve as the basis for building a comprehensive system to assess environmental cancer etiology.

  4. Elements of Instruction VTAE Workshop (Wisconsin Rapids, Wisconsin, March 7-9, 1989). Final Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Howard D.

    This document describes a 3-day Wisconsin workshop on essential elements of instruction in vocational, technical, and adult education (VTAE). The workshop's content was based on the Univesity of California at Los Angeles' Teaching Model, which resulted from the work of Madeline Hunter. A three-page narrative describes some aspects of the model,…

  5. Perceived Neighborhood Quality and Cancer Screening Behavior: Evidence from the Survey of the Health of Wisconsin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beyer, Kirsten M M; Malecki, Kristen M; Hoormann, Kelly A; Szabo, Aniko; Nattinger, Ann B

    2016-02-01

    Socioeconomic disparities in colorectal and breast cancer screening persist, partially accounting for disparities in cancer outcomes. Some neighborhood characteristics--particularly area level socioeconomic factors--have been linked to cancer screening behavior, but few studies have examined the relationship between perceived neighborhood quality and screening behavior, which may provide more insight into the ways in which neighborhood environments shape cancer related behaviors. This study examines the relationship between several aspects of the perceived neighborhood environment and breast and colorectal cancer screening behavior among a population-based sample of Wisconsin residents. A sub-goal was to compare the relevance of different perceived neighborhood factors for different screening tests. This is a cross-sectional study of 2008-2012 data from the Survey of the Health of Wisconsin, a population-based annual survey of Wisconsin residents. An average risk sample of Black, Hispanic and White women age 50 and older (n = 1265) were selected. Survey regression analyses examined predictors of screening, as well as adherence to screening guidelines. Models controlled for individual socio-demographic information and insurance status. Perceptions of social and physical disorder, including fear of crime and visible garbage, were associated with screening rates. Findings emphasize the particular importance of these factors for colorectal cancer screening, indicating the necessity of improving screening rates in areas characterized by social disorganization, crime, and physical disorder. Additional work should be done to further investigate the pathways that explain the linkage between neighborhood conditions, perceived neighborhood risks and cancer screening behavior.

  6. Feasibility Report and Final Environmental Impact Statement, Wisconsin River at Portage, Wisconsin, Feasibility Study for Flood Control. Main Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983-12-01

    TABLE OF CONTRNTS (Continued) Item Page Aldo Leopold Shack EIS-43 Nonassessed Cultural Resources EIS-43...It was here, in and around his still standing cabin, that the late Aldo Leopold wrote some of his famous works. He also wrote about the immediate...the Fox-Wisconsin Portage Site (Wauona Trail); the Zona Gale House; the Old Indian Agency House; the Portage Canal; and the Aldo Leopold Shack. Four

  7. Evaluation of Modified Categorical Data Fuzzy Clustering Algorithm on the Wisconsin Breast Cancer Dataset

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amir Ahmad

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The early diagnosis of breast cancer is an important step in a fight against the disease. Machine learning techniques have shown promise in improving our understanding of the disease. As medical datasets consist of data points which cannot be precisely assigned to a class, fuzzy methods have been useful for studying of these datasets. Sometimes breast cancer datasets are described by categorical features. Many fuzzy clustering algorithms have been developed for categorical datasets. However, in most of these methods Hamming distance is used to define the distance between the two categorical feature values. In this paper, we use a probabilistic distance measure for the distance computation among a pair of categorical feature values. Experiments demonstrate that the distance measure performs better than Hamming distance for Wisconsin breast cancer data.

  8. Fast neutron dosimetry. Progress report, July 1, 1978-June 30, 1979. Wisconsin Medical Physics report No. WMP-109

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Attix, F.H.

    1979-01-01

    Research activities relating to neutron dosimetry at the University of Wisconsin conducted between 1961 and 1979 are comprehensively reviewed. Former principal investigators discuss the activities and accomplishments which occurred during their tenure, and the current principal investigator discusses future plans. Seven reprints of papers dealing with specific aspects of the program are included in the report, but have not been indexed separately

  9. Limnological Studies at Eau Galle Lake, Wisconsin. Report 1. Introduction and Water Quality Monitoring Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1985-03-01

    Ground water, which provides all of the potable water used in the Eau Galle River watershed, is contained in sandstone aquifers that underlie the...I D..L 4. TITLE (d &abliaU.) S. TYPE OF REPORT & PERIOD COVERED LIMNOLOGICAL STUDIES AT EAU GALLE LAKE, WISCONSIN; Report I of a series Report 1...CC40ORM 40 i"Wee 0011 N 0600404 &Rd IdeOW10 6Y black anm~w) - Eau Galle Lake, one of four Corps of Engineers reservoirs surveyed during the Environmental

  10. Analysis of k-means clustering approach on the breast cancer Wisconsin dataset.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubey, Ashutosh Kumar; Gupta, Umesh; Jain, Sonal

    2016-11-01

    Breast cancer is one of the most common cancers found worldwide and most frequently found in women. An early detection of breast cancer provides the possibility of its cure; therefore, a large number of studies are currently going on to identify methods that can detect breast cancer in its early stages. This study was aimed to find the effects of k-means clustering algorithm with different computation measures like centroid, distance, split method, epoch, attribute, and iteration and to carefully consider and identify the combination of measures that has potential of highly accurate clustering accuracy. K-means algorithm was used to evaluate the impact of clustering using centroid initialization, distance measures, and split methods. The experiments were performed using breast cancer Wisconsin (BCW) diagnostic dataset. Foggy and random centroids were used for the centroid initialization. In foggy centroid, based on random values, the first centroid was calculated. For random centroid, the initial centroid was considered as (0, 0). The results were obtained by employing k-means algorithm and are discussed with different cases considering variable parameters. The calculations were based on the centroid (foggy/random), distance (Euclidean/Manhattan/Pearson), split (simple/variance), threshold (constant epoch/same centroid), attribute (2-9), and iteration (4-10). Approximately, 92 % average positive prediction accuracy was obtained with this approach. Better results were found for the same centroid and the highest variance. The results achieved using Euclidean and Manhattan were better than the Pearson correlation. The findings of this work provided extensive understanding of the computational parameters that can be used with k-means. The results indicated that k-means has a potential to classify BCW dataset.

  11. Wisconsin Secondary Vocational Education: 1978-1982 Aggregate of Data. Evaluation Report, Cycle I. Bulletin No. 3266.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wisconsin Univ. - Stout, Menomonie. Center for Vocational, Technical and Adult Education.

    The first five-year cycle of the Wisconsin Secondary Vocational Program Evaluation System was completed on December 31, 1982 to aid in planning and assessing vocational education in the state and to portray its impact at local, state and national levels. This aggregate report presents first phase data from high school self-evaluations. The second…

  12. Wisconsin's Lake Superior Basin Water Quality Study. Technical Report No. 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dickas, Albert B., Ed.

    This hydrologic study focuses on Wisconsin's Lake Superior Basin. Water is the most important natural resource in this area which includes Douglass, Bayfield, Ashland, and Iron counties. This study was undertaken to determine the character of this hydrologic base and to determine the effects and extent of man-influenced disturbances. It includes…

  13. Wisconsin's Lake Superior Basin Water Quality Study. Supplement. Technical Report No. 2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whisnant, David M., Ed.

    During the period extending from May 1972 through April 1973, an investigation of the overall water quality conditions of streams flowing into Lake Superior from the entire state of Wisconsin was conducted. The goal of this publication was to provide much needed regional information on water quality, drainage basins, pollution sources and loads,…

  14. Affordable Housing: A Crisis for Wisconsin Families. A WisKids Count Special Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wisconsin Council on Children and Families Inc., Madison.

    Growing up in poor quality, unsafe, and/or overcrowded housing magnifies all the other challenges and disadvantages that go along with poverty. Noting that as more and more families in Wisconsin and nationwide struggle to achieve sustainable housing, the connection between housing and child well-being is becoming increasingly obvious, this WisKids…

  15. Burlington Northern Taconite Transshipment Facility, Duluth-Superior Harbor, Superior Wisconsin. Environmental Assessment Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1975-03-01

    unsuitable for potable and even some industrial uses. 2.250 Water Use. The city of Superior presently obtains its entire municipal water supply from a...53, which will link Duluth-Superior to Eau Claire and Madison, Wisconsin, and to Chicago, Illinois. Duluth and Superior combined have more than 6,000

  16. SPATIAL AND TEMPORAL PATTERNS OF THE MOVEMENT OF SEASONAL AGRICULTURAL MIGRANT CHILDREN INTO WISCONSIN, EDUCATIONAL PROGRAMS FOR CHILDREN OF MIGRATORY AGRICULTURAL WORKERS IN WISCONSIN, REPORT 2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    LINDSEY, HERBERT H.; AND OTHERS

    USEFUL MEANS OF ANTICIPATING THE MOVEMENTS OF MIGRANT CHILDREN INCLUDE ANALYSIS OF CROPS, THE HARVESTING OF WHICH REQUIRES OUT-OF-STATE WORKERS, DISTRIBUTIONAL MAPS OF CROP ACREAGE, NORMAL TIME SCHEDULES FOR CROPS, AND INFORMATION ON AGRICULTURAL DEVELOPMENTS. SUCH INFORMATION ASSISTS IN THE PLANNING OF SCHOOL PROGRAMS. IN WISCONSIN, MOST MIGRANT…

  17. University of Wisconsin, Nuclear Reactor Laboratory. Annual report, 1985-1986

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cashwell, R.J.

    1986-01-01

    Operational activities for the reactor are described concerning nuclear engineering classes from the University of Wisconsin; reactor sharing program; utility personnel training; sample irradiations and neutron activation analysis; and changes in personnel, facility, and procedures. Results of surveillance tests are presented for operating statistics and fuel exposure; emergency shutdowns and inadvertent scrams; maintenance; radioactive waste disposal; radiation exposures; environmental surveys; and publications and presentations on work based on reactor use

  18. St. Croix River Reconnaissance Report Including Stillwater, Minnesota and New Richmond, Wisconsin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-01-01

    built on the Willow River at the site of the present Domain Industries Feed Mills. It was destroyed in the flood of 1876. The New Richmond Roller...Minnesota, and iew Richmond, Wisconsin. Edward G. Rapp Colonel, Corps of Engineers District Engineer 4 -𔃾 ,.-. Ill .".,. ,K...small busi- nesses, few homes, marina- creek backup Bayport (high damage potential) marina-- Perro Creek backup, nunerous residential struc- tures

  19. 75 FR 18828 - Wisconsin Electric Power Company, Wisconsin Gas LLC, Wisconsin Public Service Corporation...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-13

    ... Energy Regulatory Commission Wisconsin Electric Power Company, Wisconsin Gas LLC, Wisconsin Public Service Corporation: Complainants; ANR Pipeline Company: Respondent; Notice of Complaint April 6, 2010....206 (2009), Wisconsin Electric Power Company, Wisconsin Gas LLC, and Wisconsin Public Service...

  20. Wisconsin's forest resources, 2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    C.H. Perry

    2011-01-01

    This publication provides an overview of forest resource attributes for Wisconsin based on an annual inventory conducted by the Forest Inventory and Analysis (FIA) program at the Northern Research Station of the U.S. Forest Service. These estimates, along with web-posted core tables, will be updated annually. For more information please refer to page 4 of this report...

  1. Wisconsin's forest resources, 2005

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charles, H. (Hobie) Perry; Gary J. Brand

    2006-01-01

    The annual forest inventory of Wisconsin continues, and this document reports 2001-05 moving averages for most variables and comparisons between 2000 and 2005 for growth, removals, and mortality. Summary resource tables can be generated through the Forest Inventory Mapmaker website at http://ncrs2.fs.fed.us/4801/fiadb/index. htm. Estimates from this inventory show a...

  2. Wisconsin's Forest Resources, 2007

    Science.gov (United States)

    C.H. Perry; V.A. Everson

    2008-01-01

    This publication provides an overview of forest resource attributes for Wisconsin based on an annual inventory conducted by the Forest Inventory and Analysis (FIA) program of the U.S. Forest Service, Northern Research Station. These estimates, along with web-posted core tables, are updated annually. For more information please refer to page 4 of this report.

  3. Wisconsin's forest resources, 2009

    Science.gov (United States)

    C.H. Perry

    2011-01-01

    This publication provides an overview of forest resource attributes for Wisconsin based on an annual inventory conducted by the Forest Inventory and Analysis (FIA) program at the Northern Research Station of the U.S. Forest Service. These estimates, along with web-posted core tables, will be updated annually. For more information, please refer to page 4 of this report...

  4. Aerial gamma ray and magnetic survey: Green Bay Quadrangle, Wisconsin. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1978-04-01

    Data obtained from a high sensitivity airborne radiometric and magnetic survey of Green Bay Quadrangle in Wisconsin are presented. All data are presented as corrected profiles of all radiometric variables, magnetic data, radar and barometric altimeter data, air temperature and airborne Bismuth contributions. Radiometric data presented are corrected for Compton Scatter, altitude dependence and atmospheric Bismuth. These data are also presented on microfiche, and digital magnetic tapes. In addition, anomaly maps and interpretation maps are presented relating known geology or soil distribution to the corrected radiometric/magnetic data

  5. Aerial gamma ray and magnetic survey: Eau Claire Quadrangle, Wisconsin/Minnesota. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1978-04-01

    Data obtained from a high sensitivity airborne radiometric and magnetic survey of the Eau Claire Quadrangle in Wisconsin/Minnesota are presented. All data are presented as corrected profiles of all radiometric variables, magnetic data, radar and barometric altimeter data, air temperature and airborne Bismuth contributions. Radiometric data presented are corrected for Compton Scatter, altitude dependence and atmospheric Bismuth. These data are also presented on microfiche, and digital magnetic tapes. In addition, anomaly maps and interpretation maps are presented relating known geology or soil distribution to the corrected radiometric/magnetic data

  6. Aerial gamma ray and magnetic survey: Rice Lake Quadrangle, Wisconsin. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1978-04-01

    Data obtained from a high sensitivity airborne radiometric and magnetic survey of the Rice Lake Quadrangle in Wisconsin are presented. All data are presented as corrected profiles of all radiometric variables, magnetic data, radar and barometric altimeter data, air temperature and airborne Bismuth contributions. Radiometric data presented are corrected for Compton Scatter, altitude dependence and atmospheric Bismuth. These data are also presented on microfiche, and digital magnetic tapes. In addition, anomaly maps and interpretation maps are presented relating known geology or soil distribution to the corrected radiometric/magnetic data

  7. Sleep-disordered Breathing and Cancer Mortality: Results from the Wisconsin Sleep Cohort Study

    OpenAIRE

    Nieto, F. Javier; Peppard, Paul E.; Young, Terry; Finn, Laurel; Hla, Khin Mae; Farré, Ramon

    2012-01-01

    Rationale: Sleep-disordered breathing (SDB) has been associated with total and cardiovascular mortality, but an association with cancer mortality has not been studied. Results from in vitro and animal studies suggest that intermittent hypoxia promotes cancer tumor growth.

  8. Health hazard evaluation report No. HETA-81-003-980, Babcock and Wilcox Co. , Milwaukee, Wisconsin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zey, J.N.; Ahrenholz, S.; Klemme, J.C.

    1981-10-01

    On October 1, 1980, the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) received a request from the International Brotherhood of Boilermakers Union, Local 1849, for a Health Hazard Evaluation of the Babcock and Wilcox Co., Tubular Products Division, Milwaukee, Wisconsin. The request involved the potential for employee exposure to biocides, dispersant and anti-scaling agents as they are added to four separate circulating water systems which cool four annealing furnaces, two reheat furnaces and one air compressor. NIOSH conducted a combined environmental and medical survey at the Milwaukee facility on November 19-20, 1980. While conducting a walk-through survey on November 19, 1980, NIOSH observed that furnace operators working near cooling systems were potentially exposed to cooling system chemicals. The furnace operators were included in employee monitoring on November 20, 1980. All concentrations obtained were below current environmental criteria. Medical interview data suggested that workers may have been exposed to potentially hazardous levels of DMF in the past.

  9. Past and prospective carbon stocks in forests of northern Wisconsin: a report from the Chequamegon-Nicolet National Forest Climate Change Response Framework

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richard Birdsey; Yude Pan; Maria Janowiak; Susan Stewart; Sarah Hines; Linda Parker; Stith Gower; Jeremy Lichstein; Kevin McCullough; Fangmin Zhang; Jing Chen; David Mladenoff; Craig Wayson; Chris. Swanston

    2014-01-01

    This report assesses past and prospective carbon stocks for 4.5 million ha of forest land in northern Wisconsin, including a baseline assessment and analysis of the impacts of disturbance and management on carbon stocks. Carbon density (amount of carbon stock per unit area) averages 237 megagrams (Mg) per ha, with the National Forest lands having slightly higher carbon...

  10. Case-control study of proximal and distal colon cancer and diet in Wisconsin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, T B; Wolf, D A

    1988-08-15

    The relationship between diet and subsite-specific colon cancer was investigated using dietary histories obtained from a statewide, population-based sample of 152 proximal colon cancer patients, 201 distal colon cancer patients and 618 general population controls. The results do not support hypotheses that (1) dietary fat and cholesterol are more strongly related to proximal colon cancer and (2) vegetables and other dietary sources of fiber are more strongly associated with distal colon cancer. Vegetable consumption over lifetime was consistently protective for both proximal and distal colon cancer. Odds ratios and 95% confidence intervals for the most significant dietary factors (based on high vs. low consumption) for proximal colon cancer were: salad, 0.29 (0.17, 0.48); miscellaneous vegetables, 0.58 (0.35, 0.97); cruciferous vegetables, 0.59 (0.35, 0.97); processed lunchmeat, 2.04 (1.31, 3.17); pan-fried foods, 1.79 (1.15, 2.80); eggs, 1.75 (1.02, 2.99) and for distal colon cancer they were: salad, 0.43 (0.28, 0.67); cruciferous vegetables, 0.44 (0.28, 0.71); cheese, 0.62 (0.40, 0.96); processed lunchmeat, 1.79 (1.17, 2.73); pan-fried foods, 1.55 (1.03, 1.27). The results support recommendations that the "prudent diet" (low-fat, high-vegetable) may reduce colon cancer risk.

  11. Cervical Cancer Screening | Cancer Trends Progress Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Cancer Trends Progress Report, first issued in 2001, summarizes our nation's advances against cancer in relation to Healthy People targets set forth by the Department of Health and Human Services.

  12. Kidney Cancer Treatment | Cancer Trends Progress Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Cancer Trends Progress Report, first issued in 2001, summarizes our nation's advances against cancer in relation to Healthy People targets set forth by the Department of Health and Human Services.

  13. Bladder Cancer Treatment | Cancer Trends Progress Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Cancer Trends Progress Report, first issued in 2001, summarizes our nation's advances against cancer in relation to Healthy People targets set forth by the Department of Health and Human Services.

  14. Ecosystem vulnerability assessment and synthesis: a report from the Climate Change Response Framework Project in northern Wisconsin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chris Swanston; Maria Janowiak; Louis Iverson; Linda Parker; David Mladenoff; Leslie Brandt; Patricia Butler; Matt St. Pierre; Anantha Prasad; Stephen Matthews; Matthew Peters; Dale Higgins; Avery. Dorland

    2011-01-01

    The forests of northern Wisconsin will likely experience dramatic changes over the next 100 years as a result of climate change. This assessment evaluates key forest ecosystem vulnerabilities to climate change across northern Wisconsin under a range of future climate scenarios. Warmer temperatures and shifting precipitation patterns are expected to influence ecosystem...

  15. Wisconsin SRF Electron Gun Commissioning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bisognano, Joseph J. [University of Wisconsin-Madison; Bissen, M. [University of Wisconsin-Madison; Bosch, R. [University of Wisconsin-Madison; Efremov, M. [University of Wisconsin-Madison; Eisert, D. [University of Wisconsin-Madison; Fisher, M. [University of Wisconsin-Madison; Green, M. [University of Wisconsin-Madison; Jacobs, K. [University of Wisconsin-Madison; Keil, R. [University of Wisconsin-Madison; Kleman, K. [University of Wisconsin-Madison; Rogers, G. [University of Wisconsin-Madison; Severson, M. [University of Wisconsin-Madison; Yavuz, D. D. [University of Wisconsin-Madison; Legg, Robert A. [JLAB; Bachimanchi, Ramakrishna [JLAB; Hovater, J. Curtis [JLAB; Plawski, Tomasz [JLAB; Powers, Thomas J. [JLAB

    2013-12-01

    The University of Wisconsin has completed fabrication and commissioning of a low frequency (199.6 MHz) superconducting electron gun based on a quarter wave resonator (QWR) cavity. Its concept was optimized to be the source for a CW free electron laser facility. The gun design includes active tuning and a high temperature superconducting solenoid. We will report on the status of the Wisconsin SRF electron gun program, including commissioning experience and first beam measurements.

  16. Wisconsin's Forests 2009

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charles H. Perry; Vern A. Everson; Brett J. Butler; Susan J. Crocker; Sally E. Dahir; Andrea L. Diss-Torrance; Grant M Domke; Dale D. Gormanson; Sarah K. Herrick; Steven S. Hubbard; Terry R. Mace; Patrick D. Miles; Mark D. Nelson; Richard B. Rodeout; Luke T. Saunders; Kirk M. Stueve; Barry T. Wilson; Christopher W. Woodall

    2012-01-01

    The second full annual inventory of Wisconsin's forests reports more than 16.7 million acres of forest land with an average volume of more than 1,400 cubic feet per acre. Forest land is dominated by the oak/hickory forest-type group, which occupies slightly more than one quarter of the total forest land area; the maple/beech/birch forest-type group occupies an...

  17. Reporting colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quirke, P; Morris, E

    2007-01-01

    The management of colorectal cancer is a team process. High-quality reporting of colorectal cancer is very important as the whole team relies upon the skill of the pathologist. Failure to report key features can lead to undertreatment of this disease. The use of a proforma has been demonstrated to be beneficial and we recommend staying with TNM5 due to scientific and reproducibility issues with TNM6. Important features in stage II/Dukes' B cases are extramural vascular invasion, peritoneal involvement, extent of extramural spread, incomplete resection and perforation. All of these may lead to adjuvant therapy being administered. The surgically created circumferential resection margin (CRM) and the mode of its creation are important features and the CRM retains its value after preoperative therapy. Regression grading should be applied only to fully resected tumours and the dissection and sampling must be standardized to allow comparison of results between trials and centres. When reporting local resections of early-stage cancers we need to look for features that predict spread to local lymph nodes to allow a full resection to be considered.

  18. Plasma Science and Innovation Center at Washington, Wisconsin, and Utah State: Final Technical Report for the University of Wisconsin-Madison

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sovinec, Carl R. [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States)

    2016-11-28

    The University of Wisconsin-Madison component of the Plasma Science and Innovation Center (PSI Center) contributed to modeling capabilities and algorithmic efficiency of the Non-Ideal Magnetohydrodynamics with Rotation (NIMROD) Code, which is widely used to model macroscopic dynamics of magnetically confined plasma. It also contributed to the understanding of direct-current (DC) injection of electrical current for initiating and sustaining plasma in three spherical torus experiments: the Helicity Injected Torus-II (HIT-II), the Pegasus Toroidal Experiment, and the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX). The effort was funded through the PSI Center's cooperative agreement with the University of Washington and Utah State University over the period of March 1, 2005 - August 31, 2016. In addition to the computational and physics accomplishments, the Wisconsin effort contributed to the professional education of four graduate students and two postdoctoral research associates. The modeling for HIT-II and Pegasus was directly supported by the cooperative agreement, and contributions to the NSTX modeling were in support of work by Dr. Bickford Hooper, who was funded through a separate grant. Our primary contribution to model development is the implementation of detailed closure relations for collisional plasma. Postdoctoral associate Adam Bayliss implemented the temperature-dependent effects of Braginskii's parallel collisional ion viscosity. As a graduate student, John O'Bryan added runtime options for Braginskii's models and Ji's K2 models of thermal conduction with magnetization effects and thermal equilibration. As a postdoctoral associate, O'Bryan added the magnetization effects for ion viscosity. Another area of model development completed through the PSI-Center is the implementation of Chodura's phenomenological resistivity model. Finally, we investigated and tested linear electron parallel viscosity, leveraged by support from

  19. Field Test Evaluation of Conservation Retrofits of Low-Income Single Family Buildings in Wisconsin: Summary Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ternes, M.P.

    2001-05-21

    During the winter of 1985-86, a retrofit field test was performed in 66 occupied, low-income, single-family homes in Madison, Wisconsin. The primary objectives of the field test were to (1) determine the measured energy savings and the relative benefits of a combination of envelope and mechanical equipment retrofits that were selected following a new audit-directed retrofit procedure, (2) determine the energy savings and benefits due to performing infiltration reduction work following a recently developed infiltration reduction procedure, and (3) study general occupant behavior and house thermal characteristics and their possible change following retrofit installation. This report provides an overview of the project and summarizes the findings which will be presented in detail in separate reports. Major findings from the field test include: (1) The audit-directed retrofit procedure produced an average savings of 207 therms/year/house. The procedure also more than doubled the overall cost-effectiveness of the low-income weatherization assistance program as compared with the priority system formerly used in Wisconsin. Wall insulation and condensing furnaces were the major retrofits (predicted annual energy savings greater than 100 therms/year) most often selected under the procedure. The respective average energy savings of the houses receiving wall insulation and condensing furnace. s was 14.6 and 14.3 therms/year for each $100 spent on them under the program. (2) The blower-door-guided infiltration reduction procedure reduced expenditures for infiltration reduction to about one-fourth of previous program costs (from $570/house to $106/house). The procedure also reduced the average air leakage rate in the treated houses by 16%, whereas, in a previous study, no significant reduction was found following the installation of typical infiltration reduction measures. (3) Twenty to 60% of the deviation between predicted and measured savings can be attributed to incorrect

  20. Reports on Cancer - Cancer Statistics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Interactive tools for access to statistics for a cancer site by gender, race, ethnicity, calendar year, age, state, county, stage, and histology. Statistics include incidence, mortality, prevalence, cost, risk factors, behaviors, tobacco use, and policies and are presented as graphs, tables, or maps.

  1. Arsenic | Cancer Trends Progress Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Cancer Trends Progress Report, first issued in 2001, summarizes our nation's advances against cancer in relation to Healthy People targets set forth by the Department of Health and Human Services.

  2. Cadmium | Cancer Trends Progress Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Cancer Trends Progress Report, first issued in 2001, summarizes our nation's advances against cancer in relation to Healthy People targets set forth by the Department of Health and Human Services.

  3. Radon | Cancer Trends Progress Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Cancer Trends Progress Report, first issued in 2001, summarizes our nation's advances against cancer in relation to Healthy People targets set forth by the Department of Health and Human Services.

  4. Benzene | Cancer Trends Progress Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Cancer Trends Progress Report, first issued in 2001, summarizes our nation's advances against cancer in relation to Healthy People targets set forth by the Department of Health and Human Services.

  5. NAEP 1992 Mathematics State Report for Wisconsin. The Trial State Assessment Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Assessment of Educational Progress, Princeton, NJ.

    In 1990, the National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP) included a Trial State Assessment which, for the first time in the NAEP's history, made voluntary state-by-state assessments. This 1992 mathematics report marks the first attempt of the National Center for Education Statistics to shift to standards-based reporting of National…

  6. Wireless Broadband Communications Systems in Rural Wisconsin. Rural Research Report. Volume 19, Issue 1, Spring 2008

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlager, Kenneth J.

    2008-01-01

    This report describes a communications system engineering planning process that demonstrates an ability to design and deploy cost-effective broadband networks in low density rural areas. The emphasis in on innovative solutions and systems optimization because of the marginal nature of rural telecommunications infrastructure investments. Otherwise,…

  7. Privileged Communication--Rights and Responsibilities of College Counselors Under Wisconsin Law. Volume 4, Number 6. Counseling Center Reports.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nolting, Earl; Leege, William

    Selected legal responsibilities of counselors under the present laws of the State of Wisconsin are reviewed. Specifically, statutes concerning privileged communication and confidentiality, drug abuse and abortion are printed in full or in part, and major questions and basic legal principles relevant to them are examined as they pertain to the…

  8. A preliminary report on the growth of the rock bass, Ambloplites rupestris (Rafinesque), in two lakes of northern Wisconsin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Stillman

    1929-01-01

    For several years the Wisconsin Geological and Natural History Survey has been making a limnological study of lakes in the northern part of the State. Because of the fact that so much has been learned of the physical, chemical and biological conditions in these lakes, the region seems particularly favorable for a study of the growth rates of fishes in relation to environmental factors.

  9. Quality of Wisconsin stormwater, 1989-94

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bannerman, Roger T.; Legg, Andrew D.; Greb, Steven R.

    1996-01-01

    Water-quality data were compiled from four urban stormwater monitoring projects conducted in Wisconsin between 1989 and 1994. These projects included monitoring in both storm-sewer pipes and urban streams. A total of 147 constitu ents were analyzed for in stormwater sampled from 10 storm-sewer pipes and four urban streams. Land uses represented by the storm-sewer watersheds included residential, commercial, industrial, and mixed. For about one-half the con stituents, at least 10 percent of the event mean con centrations exceeded the laboratory's minimum reporting limit. Detection frequencies were greater than 75 percent for many of the heavy metals and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in both the storm sewer and stream samples, whereas detec tion frequencies were about 20 percent or greater for many of the pesticides in both types of sam ples. Stormwater concentrations for conventional constituents, such as suspended solids, chloride, total phosphorus, and fecal coliform bacteria were greater than minimum reporting limits almost 100 percent of the time. Concentrations of many of the constituents were high enough to say that stormwater in the storm sewers and urban streams might be contrib uting to the degradation of the streams. In this report, constituents defined as potential contami nants are those for which the laboratory minimum report limit was exceeded for at least 10 percent of the sampled storm events, and for which at least one event mean concentration exceeded an estab lished water-quality standard. Storm-sewer sam ples had event mean concentrations of lead, copper, zinc, cadmium, and silver that frequently exceeded Wisconsin's acute toxicity criteria for cold water fisheries. Wisconsin's human cancer criteria was exceeded almost 100 percent of the time for polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in stormwater samples from storm sewers and streams. Maximum concentrations of diazinon found in storm sewers exceeded recommended levels of diazinon. Storm

  10. Water resources of Wisconsin: lower Wisconsin River basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hindall, S.M.; Borman, Ronald G.

    1974-01-01

    This report describes the physical environment, availability, distribution, movement, quality, and use of water in the upper Wisconsin River basin as an aid in planning and water management. The report presents general information on the basin derived from data obtained from Federal, State, and local agencies, New field data were collected in areas where information was lacking. More detailed studies of problem areas may be required in the future, as water needs and related development increase.

  11. SOLPLAN Report: An Assessment of Barriers and Incentives to Conservation and Alternative-Energy Use in the Residential Sector in Wisconsin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fulenwider, Claire K.; Weiss, Lonnie S.; Pfefferkorn, Carol; Wiener, Don E.; Feldman, Stephen L.

    1981-03-01

    The Alternative Energy Policy Project of the Wisconsin Center for Public Policy focused upon two principle objectives: (1) gathering and analyzing new and previously unavailable data on barriers and incentives to greater energy conservation and alternative energy commercialization in the state of Wisconsin; and (2) building consensus around alternative energy policy to develop guidelines for alternative energy policy for the state. Particular attention was paid to public involvement in the policy process and to assessing barriers and incentives from as many key sectors of the energy field as possible. Thus, data were gathered from the general public, alternative energy users, the heating industry generally, the alternative-energy industry specifically, and key decision makers. The report is divided into four principal sections. The first looks at findings and analyses dealing with barriers to greater conservation and alternative energy use. Incentives for accelerating the extent of residential conservation and alternative energy use are discussed in the second section. The decision-making process itself in energy policy has been little analyzed and seldom documented. The role of consensus-building in the alternative-energy field and analysis of the decision-making process are discussed in Section III. Appendices in Section IV provide survey instruments and descriptions, a compendium of energy-related legislation developed within the project, and various reports. The total report reflects the interactive decision-making model as it was applied in SOLPLAN. (MCW)

  12. Forests of Wisconsin, 2013

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charles H. Perry

    2014-01-01

    This resource update provides an overview of forest resources in Wisconsin based on an inventory conducted by the U.S. Forest Service, Forest Inventory and Analysis (FIA) program at the Northern Research Station in cooperation with the Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources. Data estimates are based on field data collected using the FIA annualized sample design and...

  13. Tornadoes Strike Northern Wisconsin

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-01-01

    A series of tornadoes ripped through the Upper Midwest region of the United States in the evening of June 7, 2007. At least five different tornadoes touched down in Wisconsin, according to the Associated Press, one of which tore through the Bear Paw Resort in northern Wisconsin. Despite dropping as much as fifteen centimeters (six inches) of rain in some places and baseball-size hail in others, authorities were reporting no deaths attributable to the storm system, and only a smattering of injuries, but considerable property damage in some areas. When the MODIS instrument on NASA's Terra satellite observed the area on June 9, 2007, the track torn through the woods by one of the tornadoes stands out quite clearly. This photo-like image uses data collected by MODIS in the normal human vision range to give a familiar natural-looking appearance. The landscape is largely a checkerboard of farms, towns, roads, and cities. The pale land is predominantly farmland where crops have not fully grown in yet. Dark blue shows the winding path of rivers and lakes dotting the landscape. The large blue lake on the east (right) side of the image is Lake Michigan. Towns and cities, including the city of Green Bay, are gray. To the north side, farmland gives way to dark green as land use shifts from agriculture to the Menominee Indian Reservation and Nicolet National Forest. The diagonal slash through the dark green forested land shows the tornado track. Bare land was revealed where the tornado tore down trees or stripped vegetation off the branches. The high-resolution image provided above is at MODIS' full spatial resolution (level of detail) of 250 meters per pixel. The MODIS Rapid Response System provides this image at additional resolutions.

  14. Potential effects of climate change on inland glacial lakes and implications for lake-dependent biota in Wisconsin: final report April 2013

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Michael W.; Walker, John F.; Kenow, Kevin P.; Rasmussen, Paul W.; Garrison, Paul J.; Hanson, Paul C.; Hunt, Randall J.

    2013-01-01

    The economic vitality and quality of life of many northern Wisconsin communities is closely associated with the ecological condition of the abundant water resources in the region. Climate change models predict warmer temperatures, changes to precipitation patterns, and increased evapotranspiration in the Great Lakes region. Recently (1950-2006), many regions of Wisconsin have experienced warming, and precipitation has generally increased except in far northern Wisconsin. Modeling conducted by the University of Wisconsin Nelson Environmental Institute Center for Climate Research predicts an increase in annual temperature by the middle of the 21st century of approximately 6°

  15. Die Deutschen in Wisconsin (Germans in Wisconsin).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wisconsin State Dept. of Public Instruction, Madison.

    The following curriculum units comprise this course book: (1) Germans in a New Home, (2) Contributions of the Germans in Wisconsin, (3) A Letter to Germany, (4) Germans Come to Kingston, (5) First a Soldier, Then a Man of the Church (about Heinrich von Rohr), (6) A Visiting German, and (7) Germans and Music. Each unit begins with a reading of…

  16. Short report: Changes in West Nile virus seroprevalence and antibody titers among Wisconsin mesopredators 2003-2006

    Science.gov (United States)

    Docherty, D.E.; Samuel, M.D.; Egstad, K.F.; Griffin, K.M.; Nolden, C.A.; Karwal, L.; Ip, Hon S.

    2009-01-01

    After the 2001 occurrence of West Nile virus (WNV) in Wisconsin (WI), we collected sera, during 2003-2006, from south-central WI mesopredators. We tested these sera to determine WNV antibody prevalence and geometric mean antibody titer (GMAT). Four-fold higher antibody prevalence and 2-fold higher GMAT in 2003-2004 indicated greater exposure of mesopredators to WNV during the apparent epizootic phase. The period 2005-2006 was likely the enzootic phase because WNV antibody prevalence fell to a level similar to other flaviviruses. Our results suggest that, in mesopredators, vector-borne transmission is the primary route of infection and WNV antibodies persist for complement dead crow surveillance by providing additional data for the timing of public health interventions. Research is needed to clarify the dynamics of WNV infection in these mammals and their role as potential WNV amplifiers. Copyright ?? 2009 by The American Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene.

  17. Health hazard evaluation report HETA 84-194-1549, American Federation of Grain Millers, Local 118, Superior, Wisconsin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahrenholz, S.H.

    1985-01-01

    Bulk and air samples were analyzed for carbon-tetrachloride (56235), chloroform (67663), ethylene-dichloride (107062), 1,2-dichloroethylene (540590), carbon-disulfide (75150), methyl-bromide (74839), methylene-chloride (75092), and ethylene-dibromide (106934) in a grain shipment (SIC-5153) in Superior, Wisconsin in February, 1984. The grain was aboard railcars located in a railroad yard waiting to be unloaded. The evaluation was requested by a union local and the district's Congressman due to concern that the grain had been heavily treated with chemical fumigants. The author notes that the measured concentrations should not be interpreted as worker exposures as the samples were collected for identification purposes only and were taken at locations considered unrealistic for a worker's breathing zone. Recommendations include requiring workers opening fumigated railcars to wear self contained breathing apparatus and implementing a method of tracking grain fumigation during passage through the grain handling system.

  18. Barns of Wisconsin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson-Newlin, Karen

    2008-01-01

    In this article, the author shares a painting unit she introduced to her students. In this unit, her students painted pictures of barns and discussed the historical significance of barns in Wisconsin.

  19. Financial Burden of Cancer Care | Cancer Trends Progress Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Cancer Trends Progress Report, first issued in 2001, summarizes our nation's advances against cancer in relation to Healthy People targets set forth by the Department of Health and Human Services.

  20. Cancer Survivors and Physical Activity | Cancer Trends Progress Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Cancer Trends Progress Report, first issued in 2001, summarizes our nation's advances against cancer in relation to Healthy People targets set forth by the Department of Health and Human Services.

  1. Tickborne Powassan virus infections among Wisconsin residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Diep K Hoang; Staples, J Erin; Sotir, Mark J; Warshauer, David M; Davis, Jeffrey P

    2010-04-01

    Powassan virus (POWV) is a tickborne Flavivirus that causes a rare but potentially life-threatening illness. The first reported case of POWV infection in a Wisconsin resident occurred in 2003. Enhanced surveillance and testing detected 2 additional cases. Patient specimens with a positive or equivocal immunoglobulin M (IgM) antibody to an arbovirus were sent from commercial laboratories to the Wisconsin State Laboratory of Hygiene and forwarded to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) for confirmatory testing. Patients with laboratory confirmed POWV infections were interviewed to obtain demographic, clinical, and epidemiologic information. POWV infections were confirmed in 3 adult Wisconsin residents in 2003, 2006, and 2007; illness onsets occurred during May and June. Two patients were hospitalized and all survived. One patient had a dual infection with POWV and Anaplasma phaghocytophilum. Specimens from all 3 patients were initially reported as positive for IgM antibody to either St Louis encephalitis or California serogroup viruses; POWV-specific antibody was detected during confirmatory testing at the CDC. Each patient had exposures to known or likely tick habitats in different counties within 30 days before illness onset. These are the first diagnosed human POWV infections in Wisconsin. Because all 3 patients were initially identified as having other arboviral infections using commercial screening kits, routine confirmatory testing is essential for proper diagnosis of most arboviral infections. Wisconsin residents should be educated regarding risks of acquiring and ways to prevent POWV infection and other tickborne diseases when spending time outdoors.

  2. Secondhand Smoke Exposure | Cancer Trends Progress Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Cancer Trends Progress Report, first issued in 2001, summarizes our nation's advances against cancer in relation to Healthy People targets set forth by the Department of Health and Human Services.

  3. Physical Activity | Cancer Trends Progress Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Cancer Trends Progress Report, first issued in 2001, summarizes our nation's advances against cancer in relation to Healthy People targets set forth by the Department of Health and Human Services.

  4. Red Meat Consumption | Cancer Trends Progress Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Cancer Trends Progress Report, first issued in 2001, summarizes our nation's advances against cancer in relation to Healthy People targets set forth by the Department of Health and Human Services.

  5. Fat Consumption | Cancer Trends Progress Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Cancer Trends Progress Report, first issued in 2001, summarizes our nation's advances against cancer in relation to Healthy People targets set forth by the Department of Health and Human Services.

  6. Youth Tobacco Use | Cancer Trends Progress Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Cancer Trends Progress Report, first issued in 2001, summarizes our nation's advances against cancer in relation to Healthy People targets set forth by the Department of Health and Human Services.

  7. Smoking Cessation | Cancer Trends Progress Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Cancer Trends Progress Report, first issued in 2001, summarizes our nation's advances against cancer in relation to Healthy People targets set forth by the Department of Health and Human Services.

  8. Alcohol Consumption | Cancer Trends Progress Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Cancer Trends Progress Report, first issued in 2001, summarizes our nation's advances against cancer in relation to Healthy People targets set forth by the Department of Health and Human Services.

  9. Learning from Wisconsin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniel, Jamie Owen

    2011-01-01

    Like thousands of other people from around the country and around the world, this author was heartened and inspired by the tenacity, immediacy, and creativity of the pushback by Wisconsin's public-sector unions against Governor Scott Walker's efforts to limit their collective bargaining rights. And like many others who made the trek to Madison to…

  10. Wisconsin's forest resources, 2006

    Science.gov (United States)

    C.H. Perry; V.A. Everson

    2007-01-01

    Figure 2 was revised by the author in August 2008. This publication provides an overview of forest resource attributes for Wisconsin based on an annual inventory conducted by the Forest Inventory and Analysis program at the Northern Research Station of the U.S. Forest Service from 2002-2006. These estimates, along with associated core tables postedon the Internet, are...

  11. The Legal Status of Homemakers in Wisconsin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melli, Marygold Shire

    This report focuses on laws in the state of Wisconsin as they relate to homemakers. Four areas are discussed, each in separate sections: marriage, widowhood, divorce, and wife abuse. The section on marriage includes information on property rights, disability and death of homemaker, federal Equal Credit Opportunity Act, domicile, interspousal…

  12. Wisconsin Public Schools at a Glance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wisconsin Department of Public Instruction, 2014

    2014-01-01

    "Wisconsin Public Schools at a Glance" provides in a single page document statistical information on the following topics: (1) Total number of public schools (2014-15); (2) Staff (2013-14); (3) Students (2013-14);(4) Report Cards (2013-14); (5) Attendance and Graduation (2012-13); (6) Student Performance (2013-14); and (7) School Funding.

  13. Water Use in Wisconsin, 2005

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buchwald, Cheryl A.

    2009-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Wisconsin Water Science Center is responsible for presenting data collected or estimated for water withdrawals and diversions every 5 years to the National Water-Use Information Program (NWUIP). This program serves many purposes such as quantifying how much, where, and for what purpose water is used; tracking and documenting water-use trends and changes; and providing these data to other agencies to support hydrologic projects. In 2005, data at both the county and subbasin levels were compiled into the USGS national water-use database system; these data are published in a statewide summary report and a national circular. This publication, Water Use in Wisconsin, 2005, presents the water-use estimates for 2005; this publication also describes how these water-use data were determined (including assumptions used), limitations of using these data, and trends in water-use data presented to the NWUIP. Estimates of water use in Wisconsin indicate that about 8,608 million gallons per day (Mgal/d) were withdrawn during 2005. Of this amount, about 7,622 Mgal/d (89 percent) were from surface-water sources and about 986 Mgal/d (11 percent) were from ground-water sources. Surface water used for cooling at thermoelectric-power plants constituted the largest portion of daily use at 6,898 Mgal/d. Water provided by public-supply water utilities is the second largest use of water and totaled 552 Mgal/d. Public supply served approximately 71 percent of the estimated 2005 Wisconsin population of 5.54 million people; two counties - Milwaukee and Dane - accounted for more than one-third of the public-supply withdrawal. Industrial and irrigation were the next major water uses at 471 and 402 Mgal/d, respectively. Non-irrigational agricultural (livestock and aquaculture) accounted for approximately 155 Mgal/d and is similar to the combined withdrawal for the remaining water-use categories of domestic, commercial, and mining (131 Mgal/d). Data on water use

  14. Making Sense of Key Cancer Reports

    Science.gov (United States)

    Several regularly released reports, including the Annual Report to the Nation—which is jointly released by NCI and several other organizations—provide information on important cancer trends in the United States.

  15. Wisconsin Inventor & Entrepreneur Clubs: Investment in an Innovative Approach to Entrepreneurship. Rural Research Report. Volume 20, Issue 1, Winter 2009

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wise, Greg

    2009-01-01

    Research on entrepreneurship in rural areas has increasingly stressed the importance of a supportive environment and social networks in enhancing innovation. This report examines a novel approach to promoting entrepreneurship using regional Inventor & Entrepreneur (I&E) Clubs. A telephone survey of 21 I&E Clubs was completed to collect…

  16. Forest ecosystem vulnerability assessment and synthesis for northern Wisconsin and western Upper Michigan: a report from the Northwoods Climate Change Response Framework project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maria K. Janowiak; Louis R. Iverson; David J. Mladenoff; Emily Peters; Kirk R. Wythers; Weimin Xi; Leslie A. Brandt; Patricia R. Butler; Stephen D. Handler; P. Danielle Shannon; Chris Swanston; Linda R. Parker; Amy J. Amman; Brian Bogaczyk; Christine Handler; Ellen Lesch; Peter B. Reich; Stephen Matthews; Matthew Peters; Anantha Prasad; Sami Khanal; Feng Liu; Tara Bal; Dustin Bronson; Andrew Burton; Jim Ferris; Jon Fosgitt; Shawn Hagan; Erin Johnston; Evan Kane; Colleen Matula; Ryan O' Connor; Dale Higgins; Matt St. Pierre; Jad Daley; Mae Davenport; Marla R. Emery; David Fehringer; Christopher L. Hoving; Gary Johnson; David Neitzel; Michael Notaro; Adena Rissman; Chadwick Rittenhouse; Robert. Ziel

    2014-01-01

    Forest ecosystems across the Northwoods will face direct and indirect impacts from a changing climate over the 21st century. This assessment evaluates the vulnerability of forest ecosystems in the Laurentian Mixed Forest Province of northern Wisconsin and western Upper Michigan under a range of future climates. Information on current forest conditions, observed climate...

  17. Environmental and Water Quality Operational Studies: Limnological Studies at Eau Galle, Lake, Wisconsin. Report 2. Special Studies and Summary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-03-01

    editors. The report was prepared under the supervision of Dr. Thomas Hart , Chief, APEG; Mr. Donald L. Robey, Chief, ERSD; and Dr. John Harrison, Chief...mass) compares favorably with physiological estimates (e.g., Verity 1981). Thus, the two methods of algal biomass estimation (inverted microscopy and...role of limiting nutrients. Ann. Rev. Ecol. Syst. 13:349-372. Verity , P. G. 1981. Effects of temperature, irradiance, and daylength on the marine

  18. Financial Burden of Cancer Care - Life After Cancer Summary Table | Cancer Trends Progress Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Cancer Trends Progress Report, first issued in 2001, summarizes our nation's advances against cancer in relation to Healthy People targets set forth by the Department of Health and Human Services.

  19. Synchronous triple urogenital cancer (renal cancer, bladder cancer, prostatic cancer). A case report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takada, Tsuyoshi; Honda, Masahito; Momohara, Chikahiro; Komori, Kazuhiko; Fujioka, Hideki

    2002-01-01

    A case of synchronous triple urogenital cancer, which was comprised of renal cell carcinoma of the left kidney, transitional cell carcinoma of the urinary bladder, and adenocarcinoma of the prostate, is reported. A 72-year-old Japanese male patient was referred to our outpatient clinic with the complaint of asymptomatic hematuria. At that time, his serum of level of PSA was elevated to 20 ng/ml. Cystourethroscopy showed a papillary bladder tumor and coagula through the left urinary orifice. Ultrasonography, computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging showed a mass lesion measuring about 6 cm by 5 cm in the left kidney. Angiography showed a hypervascular lesion measuring about 6 cm by 5 cm at the same site. Double cancer, consisting of renal cell carcinoma and transitional cell carcinoma of the urinary bladder, was suspected and we performed left total nephroureterectomy, hilar lymphadenectomy, and transurethral rection of the bladder tumor, one month later. At the same time, we performed a biopsy of the prostate. Histological diagnosis was renal cell carcinoma, clear cell carcinoma and transitional cell carcinoma of urinary bladder. Histological diagnosis of the prostate biopsy was moderately differentiated adenocarcinoma. Since this case fulfilled the criteria of Warren and Gates, it was classified as synchronous triple urogenital cancer. A review of the literature revealed 17 authentic cases of triple urogenital cancer, of which 14 and 10 cases were reported as a combination of renal cancer, bladder cancer and prostatic cancer, in the world and in Japan, respectively. Furthermore, he had been exposed to the atomic bomb explosion in Hiroshima in 1945. This carcinogenic precursor may be related to the development of the triple cancer. (author)

  20. Wisconsin's forest resources in 2004

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charles H. Perry

    2006-01-01

    Results of the 2000-2004 annual inventory of Wisconsin show about 16.0 million acres of forest land, more than 22.1 billion cubic feet of live volume on forest land, and nearly 593 million dry tons of all live aboveground tree biomass on timberland. Populations of jack pine budworm are increasing, and it remains a significant pest in Wisconsin forests. A complete...

  1. Penis cancer: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gregorio Sampalmieri

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Penis cancer appears as a small lesion that extends gradually to affect the whole of the glans and the shaft of the penis. Its peak incidence is in men aged 40 to 70 years. The most frequent malignant penis tumour is squamous cell carcinoma, which occurrence is probably favoured by smegma accumulation, HPV16 and 18 infection, smoke, and balanitis xerotica obliterans. Here we discuss the case of a 74-year-old man with sovrapubic pain and swelling. Physical examination reveals swollen glans with purulent secretions and oedema. The final diagnosis of squamous cell carcinoma is established by means of RMN and biopsy. Partial penectomy surgery follows. Histopathological examination shows poorly differentiated endophytic infiltrative growth. The tumour infiltrates corpus spongiosum, corpora cavernosa, and urethra. The proximal uretheral stump is free from infiltration (pT3.http://dx.doi.org/10.7175/cmi.v8i2.906 

  2. Farming, reported pesticide use, and prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ragin, Camille; Davis-Reyes, Brionna; Tadesse, Helina; Daniels, Dennis; Bunker, Clareann H; Jackson, Maria; Ferguson, Trevor S; Patrick, Alan L; Tulloch-Reid, Marshall K; Taioli, Emanuela

    2013-03-01

    Prostate cancer is the leading cancer type diagnosed in American men and is the second leading cancer diagnosed in men worldwide. Although studies have been conducted to investigate the association between prostate cancer and exposure to pesticides and/or farming, the results have been inconsistent. We performed a meta-analysis to summarize the association of farming and prostate cancer. The PubMed database was searched to identify all published case-control studies that evaluated farming as an occupational exposure by questionnaire or interview and prostate cancer. Ten published and two unpublished studies were included in this analysis, yielding 3,978 cases and 7,393 controls. Prostate cancer cases were almost four times more likely to be farmers compared with controls with benign prostate hyperplasia (BPH; meta odds ratio [OR], crude = 3.83, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.96-7.48, Q-test p value = .352; two studies); similar results were obtained when non-BPH controls were considered, but with moderate heterogeneity between studies (meta OR crude = 1.38, 95% CI = 1.16-1.64, Q-test p value = .216, I (2) = 31% [95% CI = 0-73]; five studies). Reported pesticide exposure was inversely associated with prostate cancer (meta OR crude = 0.68, 95% CI = 0.49-0.96, Q-test p value = .331; four studies), whereas no association with exposure to fertilizers was observed. Our findings confirm that farming is a risk factor for prostate cancer, but this increased risk may not be due to exposure to pesticides.

  3. [Preliminary analysis of ginseng industry in Wisconsin].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Li; Zhang, Wen-sheng

    2008-07-01

    To study the case of Wisconsin as the top ginseng state in United States which has come through four developing steps: beginning, stagnating, flourishing and now, downturn. The current situation of the ginseng industry in Wisconsin was briefly introduced, the federal and state management on ginseng cultivation and export, the organization of Ginseng Board of Wisconsin and their marketing style based on the field investigation and data collected from USDA and Wisconsin state. The advantages and disadvantages of Wisconsin ginseng industry were analyzed in order to provide some suggestions for Chinese medicine industry. Chinese ginseng industry should learn the organization system from Wisconsin.

  4. Breast cancer in pregnancy: case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kondamudi Vasantha

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available This case report is about a case of breast cancer in pregnancy at the Brooklyn hospital Center. Our patient`s case highlights some of the inherent causes of fatality in PABC and how to thread the line between the mother's health and the baby's safety to ensure a good outcome for both parties.

  5. Hydrogeology of southwestern Sheboygan County, Wisconsin, in the vicinity of the Kettle Moraine Springs fish hatchery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conlon, T.D.

    1995-01-01

    This report describes the hydrogeology of the dolomite aquifer of Silurian age and its relation to springs in a study area in southwestern Sheboygan County, Wisconsin. The study was conducted at the Kettle Moraine Springs fish hatchery in cooperation with the Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources.

  6. National Uranium Resource Evaluation. Aerial gamma ray and magnetic survey, Racine and Grand Rapids quadrangles, Michigan, Wisconsin and Illinois. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-07-01

    The Racine and Grand Rapids quadrangles of southeastern Wisconsin, northeastern Illinois, and Michigan cover a land area of 8785 square miles, and an additional water surface area of 5215 square miles. In the northeast, thick Paleozoic deposits overlie a regional downwarp of the Precambrian basement called the Michigan Basin. These Paleozoic deposits shoal to only 500 feet in the southwest corner of the survey area. The entire region is covered by a mantle of Quaternary glacial material. A search of available literature revealed no economically feasible uranium deposits. A total of 83 uranium anomalies were detected and are discussed briefly. All appear to have cultural, and/or locally unsaturated associations, and none appear to contain significant measured quantities of uranium. Magnetic data appear to be in general agreement with existing structural interpretations of the area. There are local exceptions which suggest some lithologic and/or structural complexities in the basement material

  7. Flood-frequency characteristics of Wisconsin streams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, John F.; Peppler, Marie C.; Danz, Mari E.; Hubbard, Laura E.

    2017-05-22

    Flood-frequency characteristics for 360 gaged sites on unregulated rural streams in Wisconsin are presented for percent annual exceedance probabilities ranging from 0.2 to 50 using a statewide skewness map developed for this report. Equations of the relations between flood-frequency and drainage-basin characteristics were developed by multiple-regression analyses. Flood-frequency characteristics for ungaged sites on unregulated, rural streams can be estimated by use of the equations presented in this report. The State was divided into eight areas of similar physiographic characteristics. The most significant basin characteristics are drainage area, soil saturated hydraulic conductivity, main-channel slope, and several land-use variables. The standard error of prediction for the equation for the 1-percent annual exceedance probability flood ranges from 56 to 70 percent for Wisconsin Streams; these values are larger than results presented in previous reports. The increase in the standard error of prediction is likely due to increased variability of the annual-peak discharges, resulting in increased variability in the magnitude of flood peaks at higher frequencies. For each of the unregulated rural streamflow-gaging stations, a weighted estimate based on the at-site log Pearson type III analysis and the multiple regression results was determined. The weighted estimate generally has a lower uncertainty than either the Log Pearson type III or multiple regression estimates. For regulated streams, a graphical method for estimating flood-frequency characteristics was developed from the relations of discharge and drainage area for selected annual exceedance probabilities. Graphs for the major regulated streams in Wisconsin are presented in the report.

  8. Cytogenetic report of a male breast cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cavalli, L R; Rogatto, S R; Rainho, C A

    1995-01-01

    of chromosome 8 in the characterization of the subtype of ductal breast carcinomas and demonstrate that chromosome 17, which is frequently involved in female breast cancers, is also responsible for the development or progression of primary breast cancers in males.......The cytogenetic findings on G-banding in an infiltrating ductal breast carcinoma in a 69-year-old man are reported. The main abnormalities observed were trisomy of chromosomes 8 and 9 and structural rearrangement in the long arm of chromosome 17 (add(17)(q25)). Our results confirm the trisomy...

  9. [Rectal cancer and Trousseau syndrome. Case report].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sierra-Montenegro, Ernesto; Sierra-Luzuriaga, Gastón; Calle-Loffredo, Daniel; Rodríguez Quinde, Miguel

    2013-01-01

    The Trousseau syndrome, first described in 1865, is the relationship of venous thromboembolisms and cancer. We present a case with rectal cancer and Trousseau syndrome. Female 40 years old, went to the Coloproctology Service for painless bleeding. A computed tomography report showed a tumor of 5 by 6 cm up 5 cm from the anal margin. Ultra-low anterior resection with colonic reservoir and loop ileostomy surgery was performed. The pathology report showed a semidiferenciate adenocarcinoma of the rectum and we established the stage as T3N0M0. Within 72 hours of her operation, she experienced sudden hypotension and painful abdominal distention. A second surgery was done finding necrosis of the colon from the splenic angle until the colonic reservoir with thrombi in the left colic artery, ischemic signs of bilateral fallopian tubes, ovaries, uterus, pelvic floor and the small intestine, 40 cm before ileostomy and ileon. Left hemicolectomy and colostomy was done. She was taken to intensive care where continuous administration of heparin was given; she died within 5 days because of multiorgan failure. The mechanism for this syndrome was unknown but there are several hypotheses, suggesting that hematological cancer patients are at an increased risk of deep vein thrombosis. Pancreatic cancer is the most common presentation with this syndrome (in 50% of cases). We suggested continuing with the standards of prevention of thromboembolism.

  10. Working to Increase Vaccination for Human Papillomavirus: A Survey of Wisconsin Stakeholders, 2015.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mroz, Sarah; Zhang, Xiao; Williams, Mercedes; Conlon, Amy; LoConte, Noelle K

    2017-09-28

    Infection with human papillomavirus (HPV) is common and can progress to various types of cancer. HPV infection can be prevented through vaccination; however, vaccination rates among adolescents are low. The objective of this study was to assess efforts among Wisconsin stakeholders in HPV vaccination and organizational capacity for future collaborative work. We conducted a cross-sectional online survey of 277 stakeholders in HPV vaccination activities, from April 30, 2015, through June 30, 2015. Stakeholders were public health professionals, health care providers, educators, quality improvement professionals, researchers, and advocates identified as engaged in HPV vaccination work. Of the 277 invited stakeholders, 117 (42%) responded to the survey. Findings showed that most current HPV vaccination activities targeted 3 groups: adolescents and parents, clinical and health professionals, and communities and health systems. The main activities directed at these groups were providing printed educational materials, professional education, and media campaigns to raise awareness. Common barriers reported were lack of understanding about the link between HPV and cancer, requests to delay vaccination, difficulty completing the 3-dose vaccine series, and reluctance to discuss sexuality. HPV vaccination rates are far below those of other vaccinations administered to adolescents in Wisconsin. Our study showed that various local efforts were being made to increase HPV vaccination uptake; however, many barriers exist to initiation and completion of the vaccine series. Future interventions should address barriers and employ evidence-based strategies for increasing HPV vaccination rates.

  11. Italian cancer figures, report 2012: Cancer in children and adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    children worldwide (0, 1-4, 5-9, 10- 14 years for paediatric tumours and 15-19 years for adolescents). Incidence trend analyses included cancer registries with three or more years of registration in the 5-year period, using Poisson regression models. Observed survival was computed according to the Kaplan-Meier method. The estimate of expected cases in the next decade was based on observed incidence rates in the most recent period, extended to the Italian estimated population of children and adolescents in the periods 2011-2015 and 2016-2020. The AIEOP database (Modello 1.01) allowed us to compare the number of patients treated and followed-up in specialized centres with expected cases based on AIRTUM estimates. The AIEOP database also provided information regarding health care migration throughout Italian regions and the number of foreign (immigrated) children treated in Italian AIEOP centres. In the period 2003-2008, 31 cancer registries reported 4,473 incident malignant neoplasms, 2,855 in children and 1,618 in adolescents. Cancer incidence rates were 164 cases per million in children aged 14 years or below and 269 cases per million in patients aged 15-19 years. Limited geographical variations emerged. In children (0-14 years) a significant increase in malignant cancer incidence was observed until 1997 (APC: +3.2%), followed by a plateau (APC: -1.1%not statistically significant).Until the late Nineties, a statistically significant increase was also observed in the incidence of all leukaemias in males (APC: +5.7%), lymphoid leukaemias (APC: +5.6%), representing 80% of all leukaemias, Hodgkin and non- Hodgkin lymphomas (APC: +6.3%). A significant decrease emerged for lymphoid leukaemia starting in 1995 (APC: -1.9%), while no substantial change in cancer incidence rates was observed in the last decade of observation for all malignant neoplasms and lymphomas. In addition, no variation emerged for malignant (according to the most recent classification) central nervous system

  12. Residential Energy Efficiency Potential: Wisconsin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilson, Eric J [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2017-11-27

    Energy used by Wisconsin single-family homes that can be saved through cost-effective improvements. Prepared by Eric Wilson and Noel Merket, NREL, and Erin Boyd, U.S. Department of Energy Office of Energy Policy and Systems Analysis.

  13. Wisconsin's fourth forest inventory, 1983.

    Science.gov (United States)

    John S. Jr. Spencer; W. Brad Smith; Jerold T. Hahn; Gerhard K. Raile

    1988-01-01

    The fourth inventory of the timber resource of Wisconsin shows that growing-stock volume increased from 11.2 to 15.5 billion cubic feet between 1968 and 1983, and area of timberland increased from 14.5 to 14.8 million acres. Presented are analysis and statistics on forest area and timber volume, growth, mortality, removals, and projections.

  14. Wisconsin's forest resources in 2001.

    Science.gov (United States)

    John S. Vissage; Gery J. Brand; Manfred E. Mielke

    2003-01-01

    Results of the 2001 annual inventory of Wisconsin show about 15.8 million acres of forest land, more than 21.6 billion cubic feet of live volume on forest land, and nearly 584 million dry tons of all live aboveground tree biomass on timberland. Gypsy moth, forest tent caterpillar, twolined chestnut borer, bronze birch borer, ash yellows, and white pine blister rust...

  15. Educational Attainment in Southeast Wisconsin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Million, Laura; Henken, Rob; Dickman, Anneliese

    2010-01-01

    In metro Milwaukee, as a part of the WIRED Initiative, the Regional Workforce Alliance (RWA)--a collaboration of organizations representing workforce development, economic development and education across southeast Wisconsin--has established the framework for pursuing the local talent dividend goal and a regional strategy for increasing…

  16. Birds of Prey of Wisconsin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamerstrom, Frances

    This copiously illustrated document is designed to be a field quide to birds of prey that are common to Wisconsin, as well as to some that enter the state occasionally. An introduction discusses birds of prey with regard to migration patterns, the relationship between common names and the attitudes of people toward certain birds, and natural signs…

  17. Breast cancer of young women - case report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Slobodnikova, J.

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: Breast cancer is the most common malignancy of the female population, the incidence is increasing mainly statistically between 50. a 60s, 60s and 70s. Recently, however, we meet more often with the occurrence of breast cancer in women in 30 year and significantly between 30 and 40 year. Cases: The following are examples of four young women who had different symptoms who failed primary diagnosis was revalued the importance of sonography and age, did not think the possibility of the presence of cancer. Results: The patients presented were finally correctly diagnosed, treated with a relatively good prognosis. Their diagnosis, however, could be faster and smaller tumors. However, despite the fact that Slovakia has enacted preventive investigation of the breast young women from the 20 to 40th of clinically and sonographically, encountered in practice, often with cases of breast cancer diagnosed late. Conclusion: Case report we highlight the diversity of clinical symptoms and the possibility of imaging diagnostic techniques in the diagnosis of breast disease of young women. We also want to draw attention to some underestimation of clinical symptoms, while revaluation results of sonographic examinations. An important factor is the quality of the ultrasound device and effective consultation and cooperation with other diagnostic departments. (author)

  18. Methylenetetrahydrofolate Reductase Polymorphisms at Familial Bladder Cancer: Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gulay Ceylan

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Bladder cancer is the seventh most common cancer in men in the world, it is the second most seen cancer after lung cancer and the first in urogenital tumours in Turkey. Many molecular epidemiologic studies have been reported to investigate the associations between the MTHFR C677T and A1298C polymorphisms and bladder cancer risk. In this report, a family with transitional bladder cancer have also MTHFR A1298C heterozygosity which supports the association between MTHFR variants and bladder cancer. This %uFB01nding should be further validated by prospective and larger studies with more diverse ethnic groups.

  19. Digital Learning Compass: Distance Education State Almanac 2017. Wisconsin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seaman, Julia E.; Seaman, Jeff

    2017-01-01

    This brief report uses data collected under the U.S. Department of Education's National Center for Educational Statistics (NCES) Integrated Postsecondary Education Data System (IPEDS) Fall Enrollment survey to highlight distance education data in the state of Wisconsin. The sample for this analysis is comprised of all active, degree-granting…

  20. Diet, Physical Activity, and Weight | Cancer Trends Progress Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Cancer Trends Progress Report, first issued in 2001, summarizes our nation's advances against cancer in relation to Healthy People targets set forth by the Department of Health and Human Services.

  1. Tobacco Company Marketing Expenditures | Cancer Trends Progress Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Cancer Trends Progress Report, first issued in 2001, summarizes our nation's advances against cancer in relation to Healthy People targets set forth by the Department of Health and Human Services.

  2. Fruit and Vegetable Consumption | Cancer Trends Progress Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Cancer Trends Progress Report, first issued in 2001, summarizes our nation's advances against cancer in relation to Healthy People targets set forth by the Department of Health and Human Services.

  3. Methodology for Characterizing Trends | Cancer Trends Progress Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Cancer Trends Progress Report, first issued in 2001, summarizes our nation's advances against cancer in relation to Healthy People targets set forth by the Department of Health and Human Services.

  4. UV Exposure and Sun Protective Practices | Cancer Trends Progress Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Cancer Trends Progress Report, first issued in 2001, summarizes our nation's advances against cancer in relation to Healthy People targets set forth by the Department of Health and Human Services.

  5. Smoking Cessation - Prevention Summary Table | Cancer Trends Progress Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Cancer Trends Progress Report, first issued in 2001, summarizes our nation's advances against cancer in relation to Healthy People targets set forth by the Department of Health and Human Services.

  6. Tobacco Policy/Regulatory Factors | Cancer Trends Progress Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Cancer Trends Progress Report, first issued in 2001, summarizes our nation's advances against cancer in relation to Healthy People targets set forth by the Department of Health and Human Services.

  7. Sun-Protective Behavior | Cancer Trends Progress Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Cancer Trends Progress Report, first issued in 2001, summarizes our nation's advances against cancer in relation to Healthy People targets set forth by the Department of Health and Human Services.

  8. Report of incidence and mortality in China cancer registries, 2009

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Rongshou; Zhang, Siwei; Zhao, Ping; Li, Guanglin; Wu, Lingyou; He, Jie

    2013-01-01

    Objective The National Central Cancer Registry (NCCR) collected cancer registration data in 2009 from local cancer registries in 2012, and analyzed to describe cancer incidence and mortality in China. Methods On basis of the criteria of data quality from NCCR, data submitted from 104 registries were checked and evaluated. There were 72 registries’ data qualified and accepted for cancer registry annual report in 2012. Descriptive analysis included incidence and mortality stratified by area (urban/rural), sex, age group and cancer site. The top 10 common cancers in different groups, proportion and cumulative rates were also calculated. Chinese population census in 1982 and Segi’s population were used for age-standardized incidence/mortality rates. Results All 72 cancer registries covered a total of 85,470,522 population (57,489,009 in urban and 27,981,513 in rural areas). The total new cancer incident cases and cancer deaths were 244,366 and 154,310, respectively. The morphology verified cases accounted for 67.23%, and 3.14% of incident cases only had information from death certifications. The crude incidence rate in Chinese cancer registration areas was 285.91/100,000 (males 317.97/100,000, females 253.09/100,000), age-standardized incidence rates by Chinese standard population (ASIRC) and by world standard population (ASIRW) were 146.87/100,000 and 191.72/100,000 with the cumulative incidence rate (0-74 age years old) of 22.08%. The cancer incidence and ASIRC were 303.39/100,000 and 150.31/100,000 in urban areas whereas in rural areas, they were 249.98/100,000 and 139.68/100,000, respectively. The cancer mortality in Chinese cancer registration areas was 180.54/100,000 (224.20/100,000 in males and 135.85/100,000 in females), age-standardized mortality rates by Chinese standard population (ASMRC) and by world standard population (ASMRW) were 85.06/100,000 and 115.65/100,000, and the cumulative incidence rate (0-74 age years old) was 12.94%. The cancer mortality

  9. Demonstration of the Whole-Building Diagnostician for the Federal Building and U.S. Courthouse at Milwaukee, Wisconsin, and for the University of Wisconsin at Madison

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bauman, Nathan N.; Hail, John C.

    2003-12-30

    In an effort to expand the energy savings programs within the State, the Wisconsin Division of Energy obtained funding through the Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP), with additional funding assistance through the Rebuild America Program (RBA) to install the Whole Building Diagnostician (WBD) software program as a test bed project in two of the State’s facilities in Wisconsin. This report discusses the results of this effort.

  10. Cancer incidence in south-east Nigeria: a report from Nnewi Cancer ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: This study is the first population based cancer incidence report from a cancer registry in south-east Nigeria. Objective: To evaluate the incidence of some invasive cancers in southeast Nigeria. Methodology: We collected all new cases of invasive cancers between 1st January and 31st December, 2013.

  11. Sediment yields of Wisconsin streams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hindall, S.M.; Flint, R.F.

    1970-01-01

    Sediment in Wisconsin streams causes economic and engineering problems in water management and reduces the value of water for nearly all uses. Sediment produces problems such as reduced reservoir capacity, navigation hazards, increased cost of water treatment, property damage, temporary loss of farmland, destruction of feeding and nesting grounds of fish, and destruction of wildlife habitat. Sediment in water also reduces the aesthetic value of surface waters and is detrimental to the State's tourist and recreation industry.

  12. US hydropower resource assessment for Wisconsin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Conner, A.M.; Francfort, J.E.

    1996-05-01

    The Department of Energy is developing an estimate of the undeveloped hydropower potential in this country. The Hydropower Evaluation Software is a computer model that was developed by the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory for this purpose. The software measures the undeveloped hydropower resources available in the United States, using uniform criteria for measurement. The software was developed and tested using hydropower information and data provided by the Southwestern Power Administration. It is a menu-driven software program that allows the personal computer user to assign environmental attributes to potential hydropower sites, calculate development suitability factors for each site based on the environmental attributes present, and generate reports based on these suitability factors. This report details the resource assessment results for the State of Wisconsin.

  13. An audit of colorectal cancer histopathology reports in a Tertiary ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: To audit the completeness of histopathologic reports of Colorectal Cancer for prognostic information in a tertiary care hospital in the light of the minimum reporting standards for colorectal cancer resections recently proposed for use in Nigeria. Material and Methods: Twenty–five histopathology reports of colorectal ...

  14. Survival, Smoking, Physical Activity, and Obesity - Life After Cancer Summary Table | Cancer Trends Progress Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Cancer Trends Progress Report, first issued in 2001, summarizes our nation's advances against cancer in relation to Healthy People targets set forth by the Department of Health and Human Services.

  15. Penile Cancer Presenting With Acute Urinary Retantion: Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ercan KAZAN

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Penile cancer is a rare malignancy in our country. Phimosis, , poor hygiene and smoking are major risk factors for penile cancer. Penile cancer in men have a strong correlation with human papilloma virus (HPV infection. Penile cancer is rare in circumcised men, particularly if they are circumcised as newborns. Penile cancer is usually asymptomatic and physical examination is essential for diagnosis. We report a case of penile cancer whose first symptom was acute urinary retention (AUR and review of the literature. [J Contemp Med 2015; 5(2.000: 131-134

  16. Validity of self-reported family history of cancer: A systematic literature review on selected cancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiederling, Jonas; Shams, Ahmad Zia; Haug, Ulrike

    2016-10-01

    Evidence regarding validity of self-reported family history of cancer (FHC) has been reviewed only for breast, colorectal, prostate, ovarian, endometrial and uterine cancer. We aimed to systematically review studies assessing validity of self-reported family history for the remaining cancer sites. We searched the Medline database for relevant studies published by January 2016. We extracted information on the study design and the positive predictive value (PPV) of self-reported FHC, defined as the proportion of reported cancer diagnoses among relatives that was confirmed by a reference standard (as a measure of over-reporting). We also extracted information on sensitivity of self-reported FHC (as a measure of underreporting). Overall, 21 studies were included that provided information on the PPV of self-reported FHC for relevant cancers and four studies also provided information on sensitivity. The PPV was highest (mostly >70%) for pancreatic, lung, thyroid and urinary system cancers and for leukemia and lymphoma, while it was lowest for stomach and liver cancer. Sensitivity was highest (>70%) for pancreatic cancer, lung cancer, brain cancer, melanoma, leukemia and lymphoma. For several cancers, sample sizes were low and the number of studies limited, particularly regarding sensitivity of self-reported FHC. In conclusion, for some cancers (e.g., pancreatic cancer, lung cancer, leukemia, lymphoma) self-reported FHC can be considered sufficiently valid to be useful, for example, in preventive counseling. For several cancers, it is not sufficiently studied or the pattern is inconsistent. This needs to be taken into account when using self-reported information about FHC in clinical practice or epidemiological research. © 2016 UICC.

  17. Italian cancer figures, report 2009: Cancer trend (1998-2005).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-01-01

    the aim of this collaborative project of the Italian Network of Cancer Registries (Airtum; www.registri-tumori.it) was to analyse cancer incidence and mortality trends in Italy with special reference to the period 1998-2005. the study was based on the Airtum database, which collects and checks data from all the Airtum registries. The present study was based on 20 general and 2 specific populationbased cancer registries. Overall, we analysed 818,017 incident cases and 342,444 cancer deaths for the time period 1998-2005. Seventy percent of the analysed population was from the North of Italy, 17% from the Centre, and 13% from the South. A joinpoint analysis was carried out to detect the point in time where the trend changed; trends are described by means of the estimated annual percent change (APC), with appropriate 95% confidence intervals. Crude and standardized incidence and mortality rates were computed for 36 cancer sites, for both sexes, three age-classes (0-49, 50-69 and 70+ years), and three geographic areas (North, Centre, and South of Italy). Specific chapters are devoted to long-term trends (1986-2005), differences among age-groups, and international comparisons. In 1998-2005, cancer mortality for all sites showed a statistically significant decrease among men (APC - 1.7) and women (- 0.8). Mortality significantly decreased in both sexes for stomach cancer, rectum cancer, liver cancer, and Hodgkin lymphoma. Mortality also decreased among men for cancers of the upper aerodigestive tract, oesophagus, lung, prostate, urinary bladder, and leukaemia. Among women mortality decreased for cancers of the colon, bone, breast, and uterus not otherwise specified. An increase in mortality was recorded for lung cancer among women (+1.5) and melanoma among men (+2.6). Incidence for all cancers together (except non-melanoma skin cancers) increased among men (APC +0.3) and remained stable among women. Cancer sites which showed increasing incidence were thyroid and melanoma

  18. Water resources of Wisconsin--Lake Superior basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, H.L.; Skinner, Earl L.

    1974-01-01

    This report describes the physical environment, availability, distribution, movement, quality, and use of water in the upper Wisconsin River basin as an aid in planning and water management. The report presents general information on the basin derived from data obtained from Federal, State, and local agencies, New field data were collected in areas where information was lacking. More detailed studies of problem areas may be required in the future, as water needs and related development increase.

  19. Improving mobility for Wisconsin's elderly : brief.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-01

    By 2035, the number of elderly residents in Wisconsin is expected to nearly double, and one in four drivers on Wisconsin roads will be elderly. According to national statistics, the elderly are more likely to be involved in crashes on a per-mile basi...

  20. Minimum pathology reporting standard for gastro-intestinal cancers ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Aim: To develop and adopt minimum pathology reporting checklists for gastric and colorectal cancers in Nigeria Methods: Three pathologists with special interest in Gastrointestinal (GI) pathology were mandated to develop minimum data to be included in pathology reporting of GI cancers in Nigeria. Their proposals were ...

  1. Tongue cancers during pregnancy: Case reports and review of literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mhallem Gziri, Mina; Han, Sileny N; Van Calsteren, Kristel; Heyns, Liesbeth; Delaere, Pierre; Nuyts, Sandra; Van den Heuvel, Frank; Cheron, Anne-Céline; Fossion, Eric; Van den Weyngaert, Danielle; Lok, Christianne; Amant, Frédéric

    2013-04-01

    Due to its rarity, there is no standard treatment for tongue cancers that concur with pregnancy. Treatment depends on the stage of cancer, gestational age of the pregnancy, and the wish of the mother to maintain the pregnancy. The purpose of this study was to review the literature and to report 5 new cases. Twelve cases of tongue cancer during pregnancy were already reported between 1987 and 2009. We report 5 new cases and first administration of concomitant radiochemotherapy for tongue cancer. Median age of the patients was 29 years, 65% of diagnoses were made after the first trimester of pregnancy. Different treatment modalities are used to treat tongue cancer during pregnancy. We hypothesize that tongue cancer treatment adhering to standard protocols provides the best guarantee to cure the mother. Based on a growing experience and insight taking fetal safety into consideration, the available data suggest that standard treatment is a realistic option. Copyright © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Wisconsin State Briefing Book for low-level radioactive waste management

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1980-11-01

    The Wisconsin State Briefing Book is one of a series of state briefing books on low-level radioactive waste management practices. It has been prepared to assist state and federal agency officials in planning for safe low-level radioactive waste disposal. The report contains a profile of low-level radioactive waste generators in Wisconsin. The profile is the result of a survey of NRC licensees in Wisconsin. The briefing book also contains a comprehensive assessment of low-level radioactive waste management issues and concerns as defined by all major interested parties including industry, government, the media, and interest groups. The assessment was developed through personal communications with representatives of interested parties, and through a review of media sources. Lastly, the briefing book provides demographic and socioeconomic data and a discussion of relevant government agencies and activities, all of which may impact waste management practices in Wisconsin.

  3. Wisconsin State Briefing Book for low-level radioactive waste management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1980-11-01

    The Wisconsin State Briefing Book is one of a series of state briefing books on low-level radioactive waste management practices. It has been prepared to assist state and federal agency officials in planning for safe low-level radioactive waste disposal. The report contains a profile of low-level radioactive waste generators in Wisconsin. The profile is the result of a survey of NRC licensees in Wisconsin. The briefing book also contains a comprehensive assessment of low-level radioactive waste management issues and concerns as defined by all major interested parties including industry, government, the media, and interest groups. The assessment was developed through personal communications with representatives of interested parties, and through a review of media sources. Lastly, the briefing book provides demographic and socioeconomic data and a discussion of relevant government agencies and activities, all of which may impact waste management practices in Wisconsin

  4. Borreliosis in free-ranging black bears from Wisconsin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazmierczak, J J; Amundson, T E; Burgess, E C

    1988-04-01

    Blood, kidney and tick samples were obtained from 18 hunter-killed black bears (Ursus americanus) from three sites in northern Wisconsin. A Borrelia sp., morphologically and antigenically similar to Borrelia burgdorferi, was isolated from the blood of two of the animals, and from the kidney of a third. Ixodes dammini and Dermacentor variabilis were found on the bears. This is the first report of borreliosis in the Ursidae, and of the primary vector of Lyme disease, I. dammini, from this host.

  5. Evaluation of nonpoint-source contamination, Wisconsin: water year 1999

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, John F.; Graczyk, D.J.; Corsi, Steven R.; Wierl, J.A.; Owens, D.W.

    2001-01-01

    The objective of the watershed-management evaluation monitoring program in Wisconsin is to evaluate the effectiveness of best-management practices (BMPs) for controlling nonpoint-source pollution in rural and urban watersheds. This progress report provides a summary of the data collected by the U.S Geological Survey for the program and a discussion of the results from several different detailed analyses conducted within this program.

  6. Renal Metastasis from Primary Cervical Cancer: A Case Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeon, Seong Woo; Kim, See Hyung; Kwon, Sun Young

    2013-01-01

    Metastasis of malignant tumors to the kidney is clinically rare and often discovered by autopsy. Primary lymphoma and lung cancer are known that can metastasize to the kidney. Other malignant tumor metastasis to the kidney is very unusual. Primary cervical cancer metastasis to adjacent pelvic organs and lymph nodes are well known followed by abdominal solid organs such as the liver and adrenal glands. However, reported primary cervical cancer metastasis to the kidney is extremely rare and mostly appeared as bilateral multiple renal masses. We report here on a rare case of unilateral single renal metastasis from primary cervical cancer after concur- rent chemoradiotherapy.

  7. Invasive thymoma associated with lung cancer: report of a case.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimada, T; Terashima, H; Shimizu, T; Hirayama, K

    2001-01-01

    We report herein a case of invasive thymoma simultaneously associated with lung cancer. A 64-year-old man presented with a cough and anterior chest pain, and preoperative examinations revealed an anterior mediastinal tumor as well as lung cancer. The patient underwent a total thymectomy, partial resection of the right lung, left lower lobectomy, and mediastinal lymph node dissection, followed by radiotherapy. Although it is well known that thymomas may be accompanied by nonthymic cancers, invasive thymomas occurring coincidentally with lung cancer are rarely reported in Japan. This case is very interesting in its relation to the oncogenesis of thymomas.

  8. From Mustard Seed to Harvest: Social Studies Education and Teaching about Women in the Global Community. A Report of a Wingspread Conference (Racine, Wisconsin, August 1988).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobus, Doni Kwolek; Rojas, Mary Hill

    Focusing upon the need for gender-balance in global education and the need to develop strategies that affect teaching materials, teacher training, and school curricula, the first section of this report describes how the conference was conceived and planned, lists overall objectives, and notes the general character of the participants. The second…

  9. VULVAR CANCER – A CASE REPORT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Špela Smrkolj

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: Malignant vulvar lesions arise from premalignant vulvar intraepithelial neoplasm (VIN and occur only rarely (3–4 % of all malignancies of the female genital organs, especially in the menopause. They are associated with human papillomavirus infection. If the change is found sufficiently early and if it is properly treated, the prognosis is favourable. Methods and patients: We present a case of a 60-year-old multiparous postmenopausal woman with recurrence of the vulvar cancer. In May 1995 vulvar biopsy revealed VIN III. In February 2006 she was examined at the Oncology Institute because of expansive lesions which covered the entire area of external genitals from clitoris to the anus. On 7th March, 2006 vulvectomy with broad safety margins and right-sided lymphadenectomy were made. Histological di- agnosis revealed a well-differentiated invasive squamous cell carcinoma (FIGO II, grade I; postoperative radiotherapy followed. In February 2007, suspicious lesions reoccurred in the external genital area, the smear was negative. In December 2007 histological diagnosis of recurrent squamous cancer was made. On 7th October, 2008 the patient was admitted to the Department of Gynecology, University Medical Centre, Ljubljana. Abdominal computed tomography showed a widespread vulvar cancer, T4 in appearance, suspicious lymph nodes in the pre-sacral area and suspicious left inguinal lymph node. Metastases to the liver were not confirmed. On 28th October, 2008 total Brunschwig operation was performed (pelvic exenteration of the bladder, uterus, pelvic lymph nodes, rectum and radical vulvectomy with resection of both ramus ossis pubis, anus praeter and transposition of skin-muscle flap (m. rectus abdominis. The interdisciplinary operation, which lasted 9 hours and blood loss was 6 litres, involved gynaecologists, a urologist, a plastic surgeon, and an oncology surgeon. The histological diagnosis of a 27 × 24 cm large preparation was a moderately

  10. Transverse colon cancer with Krukenberg tumor : A case report

    OpenAIRE

    東門, 敦子; 松原, 洋孝; 下地, 英明; 伊佐, 勉; 濱安, 俊吾; 仲地, 厚; 宮里, 浩; 白石, 祐之; 武藤, 良弘; Tomon, Atsuko; Matsubara, Hirotaka; Shimoji, Hideaki; Isa, Tsutomu; Nakachi, Atsushi; Miyazato, Hiroshi

    1999-01-01

    A case of Krukenberg tumor in a 30-year-old woman with transverse colon cancer is reported herein. The patient was found to have bilateral ovarian tumors and abnormal elevation of serum CEA at a community hospital. Subsequently, she was referred to the University Hospital for further work. Diagnostic examinations including US, CT and colonoscopy demonstrated transverse colon cancer and bilateral ovarian tumors. Exploratory laparotomy showed the growth of transverse colon cancer over the perit...

  11. Final progress report on Grant No. DE-FG02-81ER10229, U.S. Department of Energy Reactor Sharing Program at the University of Wisconsin, July 15, 2000 - May 31, 2001

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Agasie, Robert J.

    2001-12-27

    The Reactor Sharing Program makes the facilities of the University of Wisconsin Nuclear Reactor Laboratory available to other educational institutions. Uses include direct instruction, student theses projects, and staff research projects. A list of using institutions and a brief description of use is given.

  12. Breast Cancer During Pregnancy: Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Serden Ay

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available During pregnancy breast cancer is rarely seen. In this case, when the patient was being operated for the right breast cancer which was diagnosed in the first exam, a left breast cancer was also detected in the operation. When the patient analysed retrospectively, lesion in the left breast could not detected because of the lactation period. Consequently,pregnancy patients must be re-examined after the lactation period to avoid any possible mistakes. [Cukurova Med J 2013; 38(3.000: 492-494

  13. Development of a synoptic MRI report for primary rectal cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gagliardi Anna R

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Although magnetic resonance imaging (MRI is an important imaging modality for pre-operative staging and surgical planning of rectal cancer, to date there has been little investigation on the completeness and overall quality of MRI reports. This is important because optimal patient care depends on the quality of the MRI report and clear communication of these reports to treating physicians. Previous work has shown that the use of synoptic pathology reports improves the quality of pathology reports and communication between physicians. Methods The aims of this project are to develop a synoptic MRI report for rectal cancer and determine the enablers and barriers toward the implementation of a synoptic MRI report for rectal cancer in the clinical setting. A three-step Delphi process with an expert panel will extract the key criteria for the MRI report to guide pre-operative chemoradiation and surgical planning following a review of the literature, and a synoptic template will be developed. Furthermore, standardized qualitative research methods will be used to conduct interviews with radiologists to determine the enablers and barriers to the implementation and sustainability of the synoptic MRI report in the clinic setting. Conclusion Synoptic MRI reports for rectal cancer are currently not used in North America and may improve the overall quality of MRI report and communication between physicians. This may, in turn, lead to improved patient care and outcomes for rectal cancer patients.

  14. Survey of case reports of radiation-induced cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshizawa, Y.; Kusama, T.

    1977-01-01

    A survey of the cases reported as radiation-induced cancer in chief organs (the breast, the uterus, the pharynx and larynx, the colon, and the bone) was carried out. The number of the cases which were found by this survey were 10 in the breast, 548 in the uterus, 130 in the pharyns and larynx, 80 in the colon, and 256 in the bone. The most of these cases had received radiation for the purpose of treatment of non-malignant disease. The average latent period were 15.0 years in the cases of breast cancer, 10.1 years in uterus cancer, 27.3 years in pahrynx and larynx cancer, 13.6 years in colon cancer, and 15.5 years in bone cancer. The lowest radiation dose were 1470 rads in the cases of breast cancer, 900 rads in uterus in colon cancer, 4000 rads in pahrynx and larynx cancer, 460 rads in colon cancer, and 2700 rads in bone cancer. Histopathological findings, sex difference, onset age, and others were investigated in each organ. This survey gave many valuable informations for radiation protection and safety

  15. Child Cancer Control. Report on a Working Group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    World Health Organization, Copenhagen (Denmark). Regional Office for Europe.

    This World Health Organization (WHO) report on the proceedings of a Working Group on Child Cancer Control was prepared by the WHO Regional Office for Europe. The working group met in Prague in April 1977 and was comprised of representatives from 14 European countries. Its task was to review existing methods of child cancer control, the efficacy of…

  16. Breast Cancer in Cowden Syndrome: A Case Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jung, Mi Hee

    2009-01-01

    Cowden syndrome is rare condition with characteristic multiple hamartoma and mucocutaneous lesions. It is important for radiologists to be aware of Cowden syndrome because the patients with this disease have an increased risk for the occurrence of breast cancer. We report here on a case of invasive breast cancer in a 36-year-old female patient with Cowden syndrome

  17. National survey of children with special health care needs: Wisconsin-specific data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oftedahl, Elizabeth; Benedict, Ruth; Katcher, Murray L

    2004-01-01

    The National Center for Health Statistics developed and conducted (2000-2002) the National Survey of Children with Special Health Care Needs (CSHCN), a module of the State and Local Area Integrated Telephone Survey (SLAITS). The purpose of this paper is to present the Wisconsin-specific data derived from analysis of the national survey and to make a comparison with the United States as a whole. In Wisconsin, approximately one fifth (21%) of households have CSHCN, and 13.4% of children have a special health care need; US comparison data are 20% and 12.8%, respectively. When examined by type of special need, Wisconsin shows slightly higher proportions of CSHCN in all categories, when compared with U.S. data, with the exception of limitation in activity. Families in Wisconsin with CSHCN are more likely to report being involved with medical decision making and satisfied with services they receive (67%); having a medical home (57%); having adequate insurance; easy use of community-based service systems (81%); and receiving services to make transition to adult life (7.5%). Though Wisconsin has a slightly higher proportion of CSHCN than the United States as a whole, a greater proportion of Wisconsin families receive important services. These measurements allow us to strive for further improvement through coordination of services in the private health care delivery sector with public health programs.

  18. Validity of self-reported fertility-threatening cancer treatments in female young adult cancer survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Samantha C; Knight, Amber; Whitcomb, Brian W; Gorman, Jessica R; Dietz, Andrew C; Irene Su, H

    2017-08-01

    Detailed cancer treatment information is important to fertility and pregnancy care of female young adult cancer survivors. Accuracy of self-report of treatments that impact fertility and pregnancy is unknown. This study assessed agreement between self-report and medical records on receipt of fertility-threatening treatments. A national cohort study of female young adult cancer survivors reported cancer treatments via Web-based questionnaires. Primary cancer treatment records were abstracted. Self-reported exposure to fertility-threatening therapies (alkylating chemotherapy, stem cell transplant, pelvic radiation, hysterectomy, and/or oophorectomy) was compared to medical records. Logistic regression models estimated odds ratios (OR) for characteristics associated with inaccurate self-report of fertility-threatening therapies. The study included 101 survivors (mean age 28.2, SD 6.3). Lymphoma (33%), breast cancer (26%), and gynecologic cancers (10%) were the most common cancers. Accuracy of self-report was 68% for alkylating chemotherapy and 92-97% for radiation, surgery, and transplant. Significant proportions of survivors who were treated with transplant (8/13, 62%), alkylating chemotherapy (18/43, 42%), pelvic radiation (4/13, 31%), or hysterectomy and/or oophorectomy (3/13, 23%) did not report undergoing these therapies. In adjusted analysis, age ≤ 25 at diagnosis (OR 3.4, 95% CI 1.3-8.7) and recurrence (OR 6.0, 95% CI 1.5-24.4) were related to inaccurate self-report. Female young adult cancer survivors have limited recall of fertility-threatening cancer treatment exposures. Reproductive health providers and researchers who need this information may require primary medical records or treatment summaries. Additional patient education regarding treatment-related reproductive risks is needed to facilitate patient engagement in survivorship. Obtaining a cancer treatment summary will help survivors communicate their prior treatment exposures to reproductive

  19. Addressing elderly mobility issues in Wisconsin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-01

    "The aging of baby boomers poses significant challenges to Wisconsins existing transportation infrastructure and specialized transit : programs. From 2010 to 2035, the number of elderly Wisconsinites is projected to grow by 90 percent, an increase...

  20. Predicting Scour of Bedrock in Wisconsin

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-04-01

    This research evaluates the scour potential of rocks supporting Wisconsin DOT bridge foundations. Ten highway bridges were selected for this study, of which seven are supported by shallow foundations, and five were built on sandstone in rivers/stream...

  1. Fuelwood production and sources in Wisconsin, 1981.

    Science.gov (United States)

    James E. Blyth; E. Michael Bailey; W. Brad Smith

    1984-01-01

    Discusses and analyzes the 1981 Wisconsin fuelwood production from roundwood and primary wood-using mill residue. Analyzes production by geographic area, type of producer, species, landowner class, type of land, and tree source.

  2. Toward Timely Data for Cancer Research: Assessment and Reengineering of the Cancer Reporting Process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jabour, Abdulrahman M; Dixon, Brian E; Jones, Josette F; Haggstrom, David A

    2018-03-01

    Cancer registries systematically collect cancer-related data to support cancer surveillance activities. However, cancer data are often unavailable for months to years after diagnosis, limiting its utility. The objective of this study was to identify the barriers to rapid cancer reporting and identify ways to shorten the turnaround time. Certified cancer registrars reporting to the Indiana State Department of Health cancer registry participated in a semistructured interview. Registrars were asked to describe the reporting process, estimate the duration of each step, and identify any barriers that may impact the reporting speed. Qualitative data analysis was performed with the intent of generating recommendations for workflow redesign. The existing and redesigned workflows were simulated for comparison. Barriers to rapid reporting included access to medical records from multiple facilities and the waiting period from diagnosis to treatment. The redesigned workflow focused on facilitating data sharing between registrars and applying a more efficient queuing technique while registrars await the delivery of treatment. The simulation results demonstrated that our recommendations to reduce the waiting period and share information could potentially improve the average reporting speed by 87 days. Knowing the time elapsing at each step within the reporting process helps in prioritizing the needs and estimating the impact of future interventions. Where some previous studies focused on automating some of the cancer reporting activities, we anticipate much shorter reporting by leveraging health information technologies to target this waiting period. ©Abdulrahman M Jabour, Brian E Dixon, Josette F Jones, David A Haggstrom. Originally published in JMIR Cancer (http://cancer.jmir.org), 01.03.2018.

  3. Quality of reporting randomized controlled trials in cancer nursing research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Jia-Wen; Sward, Katherine A; Beck, Susan L; Staggers, Nancy

    2014-01-01

    Results of randomized controlled trials (RCTs) provide high-level evidence for evidence-based practice (EBP). The quality of RCTs has a substantial influence on providing reliable knowledge for EBP. Little is known about the quality of RCT reporting in cancer nursing. The aim of this study was to assess the quality of reporting in published cancer nursing RCTs from 1984 to 2010. A total of 227 RCTs in cancer nursing published in English-language journals and indexed in PubMed or Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature were reviewed using the Jadad scale, key methodologic index (KMI), and the Consolidated Standards of Reporting Trials (CONSORT) checklist to assess the quality of reporting methodological aspects of research and the overall quality of reporting RCTs. Adherence to reporting metrics was relatively low, based on the Jadad score (M = 1.94 out of 5, SD = 1.01), KMI scores (M = 0.84 out of 3, SD = .87), and adherence to CONSORT checklist items (M =16.92 out of 37, SD = 4.03). Only 11 of 37 items in the CONSORT checklist were reported in 80% or more of the studies reviewed. The quality of reporting showed some improvement over time. Adherence to reporting metrics for cancer nursing RCTs was suboptimal, and further efforts are needed to improve both methodology reporting and overall reporting. Journals are encouraged to adopt the CONSORT checklist to influence the quality of RCT reports.

  4. Endometrial cancer in unicornuate uterus: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cobellis, L; Castaldi, M A; Frega, V; Mosca, L; Corvino, F; Cappabianca, S; Colacurci, N

    2015-01-01

    Miillerian anomalies have not been implicated as a significant risk factor for the development of cervical, uterine, and ovarian cancers; in the present literature, there are only a few reports of endometrial cancer arising in patients with Miillerian abnormalities. To the best of the authors' knowledge, this is the first reported case of endometrial cancer arising in a patient with unicornuate uterus. A 69-year-old Caucasian woman underwent clinical examination and office hysteroscopy with endometrial biopsy because of abnormal post-menopausal bleeding. The diagnosis was endometrial cancer in unicornuate uterus, hence the patient underwent total hysterectomy with pelvic lymphadenectomy. Uterine malformations and genetic disorders may cause a delayed diagnosis of gynaecological cancers. Gynaecological examination in asymptomatic patients and differential diagnosis in abnormal uterine bleeding patients should be considered.

  5. Assessing the quality of reporting of observational studies in cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papathanasiou, Afroditi A; Zintzaras, Elias

    2010-01-01

    The vast majority of epidemiological studies in cancer are observational. However, inadequate reporting of the published observational studies (OS) may restrict the generalizability and credibility of study results. The aim of this study was to evaluate the reporting quality of OS concerning cancer. PubMed was searched for systematic reviews (SRs) of OS involving cancer published from January 2008 through February 2009. The citations provided in the SRs were evaluated for their reporting quality according to the STROBE (Strengthening the Reporting of Observational Studies in Epidemiology) statement, a checklist of items that are considered essential for good reporting of OS. The evaluation was focused on 25 methodological items/sub-items. The effect of journals' ranking in quality of reporting was also evaluated. The search identified 244 eligible OS included in seven SRs. Nine items/sub-items were reported by more than 90% of studies and 16 items/sub-items were reported by more than 70%. Some essential methodological aspects of OS (such as matching, absolute risks, missing data and flow diagram) were underreported. Significant differences were found among the seven SRs in the majority of the items. High and lower ranked journals were different only in reporting of results estimates and precision. The quality of reporting in OS in cancer was considered satisfactory, although certain items were underreported. Further improvement of reporting may enhance the validity of observational research.

  6. Uranium miner lung cancer study. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saccomanno, G.

    1986-06-01

    This study on uranium miners was started in 1957 and extended through June 30, 1986. It consisted of the routine screening of sputum from uranium miners of the Colorado Plateau, and collection of surgical and autopsy material from uranium miners who developed lung cancer. The projects resulted in: (1) Proof, for the first time, that cancer takes from 10 to 15 years to develop from the maximum accumulated carcinogenic insult and can be demonstrated through progressive cellular changes of the bronchial tree; (2) Development of a method for preserving, concentrating, and processing sputum samples. This is known as the Saccomanno Technique, and is used worldwide in diagnosing lung cancer; (3) Publication of the 1st and 2nd editions of a full-color textbook entitled ''Diagnostic Pulmonary Cytology;'' (4) Presentation of conclusive data on the effects of cigarette smoking and alpha progeny radiation on uranium miners, and information on safe radiation exposure levels; (5) Development of a brush-wash tube for collecting, concentrating, and preparing bronchial brushings and washings; (6) Development of cytological criteria which has improved sensitivity from 30% to about 60%; (7) Development of criteria for cytologic identification of carcinoma in situ, making it possible to diagnose lung cancer before it can be detected on chest x-ray

  7. 75 FR 56597 - University of Wisconsin; University of Wisconsin Nuclear Reactor Environmental Assessment and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-16

    ... when solid waste is generated from use of the UWNR, it is transferred to the University of Wisconsin.... In the years that solid waste was generated, less than 400 milliCuries of solid waste was transferred...; University of Wisconsin Nuclear Reactor Environmental Assessment and Finding of No Significant Impact The U.S...

  8. Brief report: cognitive flexibility and focused attention in children and adolescents with Asperger syndrome or high-functioning autism as measured on the computerized version of the Wisconsin Card Sorting Test

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kaland, Nils; Smith, Lars; Mortensen, Erik Lykke

    2008-01-01

    ,6) on the computerized version of the Wisconsin Card Sorting Test (WCST). The participants in the AS/HFA group performed less well than the controls on all categories of the WCST, but the differences did not reach conventional statistical significance on most categories of the WCST. On the category failure to maintain...... set, however, the AS/HFA participants performed significantly less well than the controls, suggesting a deficit of focused attention....

  9. Rehabilitation of Delavan Lake, Wisconsin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robertson, Dale M.; Goddard, Gerald L.; Helsel, D.R.; MacKinnon, Kevin L.

    2009-01-01

    A comprehensive rehabilitation plan was developed and implemented to shift Delavan Lake, Wisconsin, from a hypereutrophic to a mesotrophic condition. The plan was threefold: (1) reduce external phosphorus (P) loading by applying Best Management Practices in the watershed, enhance an existing wetland, and short-circuit the inflows through the lake, (2) reduce internal P loading by treating the sediments with alum and removing carp, and (3) rehabilitate the fishery by removing carp and bigmouth buffalo and adding piscivores (biomanipulation). The first and second parts of the plan met with only limited success. With only minor reductions in internal and external P loading, P concentrations in the lake returned to near pre-treatment concentrations. The intensive biomanipulation and resulting trophic cascade (increased piscivores, decreased planktivores, increased large zooplankton populations, and reduced phytoplankton populations) eliminated most of the original problems in the lake (blue-green algal blooms and limited water clarity). However, now there is extensive macrophyte growth and abundant filamentous algae. Without significantly reducing the sources of the problems (high P loading) in Delavan Lake, the increased water clarity may not last. With an improved understanding of the individual components of this rehabilitation program, better future management plans can be developed for Delavan Lake and other lakes and reservoirs with similar eutrophication problems.

  10. Taiwanese adult cancer patients' reports of using complementary therapies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Jui-Hua; Tsay, Shiow-Luan; Sung, Su-Ching

    2010-01-01

    More information is needed by cancer clinicians regarding cancer patients' use of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM). In this qualitative study, in-depth interviews were used to obtain the reports of adult cancer patients regarding their use of CAM. Seven cancer patients (4 women, 3 men) who reported using CAM were recruited by snowball sampling. Content analysis was used to examine the interview transcriptions. Five themes and multiple categories were identified related to CAM use: (1) facing the challenges of cancer (I can't be defeated, need to cooperate with conventional medical treatment, rebuilding my confidence), (2) handling the physical and psychological distress of CAM use (extra loading due to the therapy, uncertainty and fear about the efficacy of CAM, being understood and supported, feeling guilty about being sick, (3) lifestyle disruption (altering social life, changing family living style), (4) having reasons for seeking other therapies (finding a way to cure the disease, boosting my immunity, improving my overall health status, and prolonging life and searching for peace of mind), and (5) unresolved practical concerns about CAM (finding an easy and effective way to practice CAM, needing CAM to be integrated into mainstream health care, and where to get the related information). Adult Taiwanese cancer patients who use CAM do experience burdens secondary to CAM use and prefer that oncology specialists be more informed about CAM. Oncology specialists who know where adult cancer patients could obtain helpful information about CAM would help to decrease the burdens that patients who use CAM experience.

  11. Reduced cancer risk in vegetarians: an analysis of recent reports

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amy Joy Lanou

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Amy Joy Lanou1, Barbara Svenson21Department of Health and Wellness, 2Ramsey Library, University of North Carolina Asheville, Asheville, NC, USAAbstract: This report reviews current evidence regarding the relationship between vegetarian eating patterns and cancer risk. Although plant-based diets including vegetarian and vegan diets are generally considered to be cancer protective, very few studies have directly addressed this question. Most large prospective observational studies show that vegetarian diets are at least modestly cancer protective (10%–12% reduction in overall cancer risk although results for specific cancers are less clear. No long-term randomized clinical trials have been conducted to address this relationship. However, a broad body of evidence links specific plant foods such as fruits and vegetables, plant constituents such as fiber, antioxidants and other phytochemicals, and achieving and maintaining a healthy weight to reduced risk of cancer diagnosis and recurrence. Also, research links the consumption of meat, especially red and processed meats, to increased risk of several types of cancer. Vegetarian and vegan diets increase beneficial plant foods and plant constituents, eliminate the intake of red and processed meat, and aid in achieving and maintaining a healthy weight. The direct and indirect evidence taken together suggests that vegetarian diets are a useful strategy for reducing risk of cancer.Keywords: diet, vegan, prevention

  12. A Survey of Wisconsin Pediatricians' Knowledge and Practices Regarding the Human Papillomavirus Vaccine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rohrbach, Marc R; Wieland, Aaron M

    2017-04-01

    Objective The human papillomavirus (HPV) is common and carries a significant burden of disease. This is increasingly apparent in males with the rising incidence of HPV-related oropharyngeal cancer. Unfortunately, vaccination rates remain poor and are lowest in males. It is unclear if pediatricians are aware of the alarming rise of HPV-mediated head and neck cancers and the disproportionate effect on males. Study Design This investigation used a cross-sectional descriptive survey research design. Setting The survey was developed by investigators in the University of Wisconsin Division of Otolaryngology. Subjects and Methods The survey was distributed to 831 members of the Wisconsin Chapter of the American Academy of Pediatrics. Results A total response rate of 49.6% was achieved. Most supported routine vaccination in both sexes. Females are regarded as being at higher risk of an HPV-related cancer and are more often recommended vaccination. Most providers are unaware of the magnitude of HPV-related oropharyngeal cancer and the greater affliction in males. Conclusions Male vaccination is overwhelmingly supported by Wisconsin pediatricians, yet there is a preponderance toward vaccinating females, who are perceived as having greater risk for HPV-associated disease. This is likely because providers are unaware of the magnitude of HPV-driven oropharyngeal cancer and its predilection for males. A lack of provider awareness, in combination with out-of-date education material for parents, likely contributes to poor vaccination rates in males.

  13. Effect of Cancer Awareness on the Percentage of Reported Oral Cancers in Aden, Yemen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Kahiry, Waiel

    2016-09-01

    From the start of Al-Amal Oncology Unit Foundation in Aden (2007), the awareness programs commenced and continued to widen the campaign on targeted population (male and female) in schools, colleges, mosques, private and government offices, local radio and television broadcasts. This study aimed to measure the impact of cancer awareness vis-à-vis the number of reported cases of cancers in Al-Amal Oncology Unit in Aden using oral cancer as the focus of study. Methods and Resources: This study was conducted retrospectively for three years (2008-2010), using the data from the archives of Al-Amal Oncology Unit in Aden, Yemen. The records of 41 newly registered oral cancers were thoroughly reviewed and analyzed in comparison with the total newly registered cancers over the same period of time. It was found that the percentage of oral cancers during the time of intensified regular awareness activities was not significant after one year; however, there was a significant increase at the end of 2010. Results also show that females showed higher percentage of reported oral cancers after intensified regular awareness activities covering a wider age range. The percentages of operable (early stages) oral cancers were markedly increased after cancer awareness activities were implemented, from 8.3% in 2008 to 60.0% in 2010. Cancer awareness aims to minimize late presentation of the disease and encourages early presentation and detection to improve survival rates. This study concluded that an improved cancer awareness program marked a significant improvement on patients' diagnosis due to earlier presentation and thus improves the chances of survival. Cancer awareness should continue as a regular activity in Aden, Yemen to sustain this improvement so far.

  14. Implementing high-speed rail in Wisconsin peer exchange.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-01-01

    The Wisconsin Department of Transportation Division of Transportation Investment Management hosted : a peer exchange on June 2 -4, 2009 in Milwaukee, Wisconsin. Representatives from four state DOTs and : two freight railroads joined representatives f...

  15. Small invasive colon cancer with systemic metastasis: A case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sakamoto Taku

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Background Recently, especially in Japan, several researchers have suggested that colorectal cancer can develop not only through an adenoma-carcinoma sequence but also from normal mucosa via a de novo pathway, and that these de novo cancers have more aggressive malignant potential. We report a case of aggressive colon cancer resulting in systemic metastasis despite small tumour size. Case Presentation A 35-year-old woman presented at the referring hospital with swelling of the left cervical lymph node. Biopsy of the lymph node revealed metastatic adenocarcinoma; however, CT scan and mammography were unable to identify the site of the primary lesion. She was diagnosed with unknown primary cancer and referred to our hospital for further examination. Immunohistochemical reevaluation showed the cervical lymph node biopsy specimen to be positive for CDX2 and CK20 and negative for CK7 expression, leading us to suspect the presence of a primary colorectal cancer. We performed a total colonoscopy, and detected a small protruding lesion in the transverse colon. The tumour was only 12 mm in diameter, with a central depressed component and a severely thickened stalk, which suggested direct cancer invasion of the deep submucosa. We concluded that this lesion was the site of origin of the metastasis despite the small tumour size, and performed diagnostic endoscopic mucosal resection. The lesion was found to have an intramucosal cancer component, demonstrating that this lesion represented primary colon cancer. The patient was referred to the gastrointestinal oncology division for systemic chemotherapy. Conclusions In this case, immunohistochemical findings strongly suggested the existence of a colorectal cancer. The non-polypoid gross appearance of the tumour suggested that it can originate de novo , thus providing a valuable case in support of the aggressive malignant potential of a de novo colorectal cancer pathway.

  16. Validity of self-reported cancer history in the health examinees (HEXA) study: A comparison of self-report and cancer registry records.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Sooyoung; Shin, Aesun; Song, Daesub; Park, Jae Kyung; Kim, Yeonjung; Choi, Ji-Yeob; Kang, Daehee; Lee, Jong-Koo

    2017-10-01

    To assess the validity of the cohort study participants' self-reported cancer history via data linkage to a cancer registry database. We included 143,965 participants from the Health Examinees (HEXA) study recruited between 2004 and 2013 who gave informed consent for record linkage to the Korean Central Cancer Registry (KCCR). The sensitivity and the positive predictive value of self-reported histories of cancer were calculated and 95% confidence intervals were estimated. A total of 4,860 participants who had at least one record in the KCCR were included in the calculation of sensitivity. In addition, 3,671 participants who reported a cancer history at enrollment were included in the calculation of positive predictive value. The overall sensitivity of self-reported cancer history was 72.0%. Breast cancer history among women showed the highest sensitivity (81.2%), whereas the lowest sensitivity was observed for liver cancer (53.7%) and cervical cancer (52.1%). The overall positive predictive value was 81.9%. The highest positive predictive value was observed for thyroid cancer (96.1%) and prostate cancer (96.1%), and the lowest was observed for cervical cancer (43.7%). The accuracy of self-reported cancer history varied by cancer site and may not be sufficient to ascertain cancer incidence, especially for cervical and bladder cancers. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  17. Synchronous colon and renal cancer - case report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luczynska, E.; Pawlik, T.; Aniol, J.; Chwalibog, A.

    2008-01-01

    Primary cancer may occur synchronously in two different organs. We present an example of pathologically proven, coexistent renal and colony double malignant tumors. A 59 year old man, was admitted to the Institute of Oncology due to left renal lesion, discovered during a routine abdominal ultrasound examination. The CT exam was performed before surgery. The CT scans reveled a second abnormality, presenting irregular shaped and thickened to 20 mm intestinal wall within a patient's large bowel. As a next diagnostic step a CT-colonoscopy was undertaken, which confirmed the presence of an exophytic sigmoid lesion, eccentrically affecting the colonic wall and protruding into the lumen moderately narrowing it, placed about 50 cm from the external rectal sphincter. Patient underwent simultaneous radical left nephrectomy and sigmoidectomy. Both tumors were confirmed in pathologic evaluation, reveling renal clear cell carcinoma (Fuhrman G II) and colonic adenocarcinoma (Astler-Coller B2). Preoperative careful imaging studies reveled neoplastic tumors in two different organs, allowing for radical resection at the same surgical procedure. (author)

  18. Cytogenetic report of a male breast cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cavalli, L R; Rogatto, S R; Rainho, C A

    1995-01-01

    The cytogenetic findings on G-banding in an infiltrating ductal breast carcinoma in a 69-year-old man are reported. The main abnormalities observed were trisomy of chromosomes 8 and 9 and structural rearrangement in the long arm of chromosome 17 (add(17)(q25)). Our results confirm the trisomy...

  19. Quality of pathology reports for advanced ovarian cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Verleye, Leen; Ottevanger, Petronella B; Kristensen, Gunnar B

    2011-01-01

    To assess the quality of surgical pathology reports of advanced stage ovarian, fallopian tube and primary peritoneal cancer. This quality assurance project was performed within the EORTC-GCG 55971/NCIC-CTG OV13 study comparing primary debulking surgery followed by chemotherapy with neoadjuvant...

  20. Retrobulbar Metastasis Of Prostate Cancer: A Case Report | Oranusi ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A case of retrobulbar metastasis of prostate cancer in a 58years old man without lower urinary tract symptoms is reported. He presented with a two months history of protrusion of the right eye, diplopia and pain in the eye. Digital rectal examination revealed a mildly enlarged prostate that was hard in consistency and nodular ...

  1. Breast cancer in pregnancy: case report | Tobe | Pan African Medical ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This case report is about a case of breast cancer in pregnancy at the Brooklyn hospital Center. Our patient`s case highlights some of the inherent causes of fatality in PABC and how to thread the line between the mother`s health and the baby`s safety to ensure a good outcome for both parties.

  2. Self-reported acne is not associated with prostate cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cremers, R.G.H.M.; Aben, K.K.H.; Vermeulen, S.; Heijer, M. den; Oort, I.M. van; Kerkhof, P.C.M. van de; Schalken, J.A.; Kiemeney, L.A.L.M.

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Some studies have suggested an inverse association between acne vulgaris and the acne-related bacterium Propionibacterium acnes and prostate cancer (PCa). Self-reported acne might be an easily obtainable marker to identify men at relatively low risk of PCa and might be incorporated into

  3. Self-reported acne is not associated with prostate cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cremers, R.G.; Aben, K.K.; Verrneulen, S.H.; den Heijer, M.; van Oort, I.M.; van de Kerkhof, P.C.; Schalken, JA; Kiemeney, L.A.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: Some studies have suggested an inverse association between acne vulgaris and the acne-related bacterium Propionibacterium acnes and prostate cancer (PCa). Self-reported acne might be an easily obtainable marker to identify men at relatively low risk of PCa and might be incorporated into

  4. Never too old to fight breast cancer: A case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuradelli, Monica; Masci, Giovanna; Ferraro, Emanuela; Losurdo, Agnese; De Sanctis, Rita; Torrisi, Rosalba; Santoro, Armando

    2018-03-01

    Breast cancer is the most common cancer affecting females worldwide and its lifetime risk increases with age. Human epidermal growth factor receptor gene-2 (HER-2) positive breast cancer represents about 20% of all breast cancers, 1 out of 10 is diagnosed in women over 70 years of age. It tends to be more aggressive and to spread more quickly than other subtypes, but the introduction in clinical practice of new anti-HER-2 agents combined with chemotherapy has significantly improved progression free and overall survival. Elderly patients are frequently undertreated because of concerns about their age, performance status, and comorbidities. Here, we report a case of an octogenarian patient treated with T-DM1 with brilliant results. An 87 years old woman affected with HER-2 positive breast cancer presented progression of disease with lymph node and skin metastases after 3 lines of chemoimmunotherapy. Breast cancer in elderly patient, lymph node, and skin metastases. Chemoimmunotherapy (trastuzumab emtansine). Objective response of the disease and significant clinical benefit. This case clearly suggests that age and comorbidities do not always represent an absolute contraindication to combined treatments.

  5. Divided Wisconsin: Partisan Spatial Electoral Realignment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaniewski, Kazimierz J.; Simmons, James R.

    2016-01-01

    When the Republican and Democratic presidential candidates head into the general election this fall, they will be courting votes from a statewide electorate that has dramatically shifted over time, mirroring the political polarization that is happening across the country. Over the last three decades, Wisconsin's political geography has evolved…

  6. Wisconsin Public Schools at a Glance, 2016

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wisconsin Department of Public Instruction, 2016

    2016-01-01

    "Wisconsin Public Schools at a Glance" provides in a single page document statistical information on the following topics: (1) Total number of public schools (2015-16); (2) Student (2015-16); (3) Attendance & Graduation (2014-15);(4) Staff (2013-14); (5) School Funding; and (6) Student Performance (2014-15). [For the previous report…

  7. The University of Wisconsin OAO operating system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heacox, H. C.; Mcnall, J. F.

    1972-01-01

    The Wisconsin OAO operating system is presented which consists of two parts: a computer program called HARUSPEX, which makes possible reasonably efficient and convenient operation of the package and ground operations equipment which provides real-time status monitoring, commanding and a quick-look at the data.

  8. Genetic Analysis of Termite Colonies in Wisconsin

    Science.gov (United States)

    R.A. Arango; D.A. Marschalek; F. Green III; K.F. Raffa; M.E. Berres

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study was to document current areas of subterranean termite activity in Wisconsin and to evaluate genetic characteristics of these northern, peripheral colonies. Here, amplified fragment-length polymorphism was used to characterize levels of inbreeding, expected heterozygosity, and percent polymorphism within colonies as well as genetic structure...

  9. Stakeholders' Perceptions of Parcelization in Wisconsin's Northwoods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mark G. Rickenbach; Paul H. Gobster

    2003-01-01

    Parcelization, the process by which relatively large forest ownerships become subdivided into smaller ones, is often related to changes in ownership and can bring changes to the use of the land. Landowners, resource professionals, and others interested in Wisconsin's Northwoods were asked their views on parcelization in a series of stakeholder forums. We analyzed...

  10. Sorghum as a forage in Wisconsin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Growing moderate quality forages that meet, but do not exceed, requirements of dairy replacement heifers is not a common practice in Wisconsin; however, this forage management option would have a positive impact on the dairy industry. It is typical for heifers to gain excessive bodyweight when they ...

  11. Unusual manifestations of well-differentiated thyroid cancer: case reports

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jesus, E.M.; Barrenechea, E.A.

    2004-01-01

    Purpose: To present two unusual cases of well-differentiated thyroid carcinomas Methods:Data gathering thru medical records, diagnostic examinations and laboratory results. Well-differentiated thyroid cancer (WDTC) are among the most common type of all thyroid cancers. These case reports were done because of the fact that both cases showed unusual presentations clinically. The first case had a histopathologic report of papillary cancer of the thyroid with some of the typical features of WDTC but within a month's time from the near-total thyroidectomy procedure, there was progression of the neck enlargement, compression symptoms and eventually stridor. I-131 total body scan showed only a small focus of residual neck tissues in the neck with no distant metastasis. Tracheostomy was done and another debulking of the multiple nodules which showed papillary cancer again this time with some anaplastic cells. The second case is a follicular WDTC who also underwent total thyroidectomy after presenting symptoms of soft tissue metastasis at the left buttocks which turned out to be follicular in origin. After total thyroidectomy, I-131 total body scan showed multiple skeleta/soft tissue metastases. These cases are presented to keep in mind that well-differentiated thyroid cancer may not be all the time slow growing and that it should not be taken for granted in terms of treatment. (authors)

  12. Hydrology and water quality of the Forest County Potawatomi Indian Reservation, Wisconsin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lidwin, R.A.; Krohelski, J.T.

    1993-01-01

    This report presents data from a study by the U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Forest County Potawatomi Community of Wisconsin, to document the hydrology and water quality of the Potawatomi Indian Reservation in southern Forest County. Data were collected from October 1981 through September 1987.  

  13. Creating Jobs through Energy Efficiency Using Wisconsin's Successful Focus on Energy Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Akhtar, Masood; Corrigan, Edward; Reitter, Thomas

    2012-03-30

    The purpose of this project was to provide administrative and technical support for the completion of energy efficiency projects that reduce energy intensity and create or save Wisconsin industrial jobs. All projects have been completed. Details in the attached reports include project management, job development, and energy savings for each project.

  14. Wisconsin Youth Risk Behavior and HIV/AIDS Prevention Education: Survey Results, 1991. Bulletin No. 93253.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagener, Judy; Nehls-Lowe, Barbara

    This report contains data from the 1991 Youth Risk Behavior Survey, administered to 1,440 high school students throughout Wisconsin. Included are data on the prevalence of injuries; drug use; sexual behaviors; dietary behaviors; and physical activity. The results revealed that over 80% of students rarely or never wear bicycle helmets and 50%…

  15. Self-reported acne is not associated with prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cremers, Ruben G; Aben, Katja K; Vermeulen, Sita H; den Heijer, Martin; van Oort, Inge M; van de Kerkhof, Peter C; Schalken, Jack A; Kiemeney, Lambertus A

    2014-10-01

    Some studies have suggested an inverse association between acne vulgaris and the acne-related bacterium Propionibacterium acnes and prostate cancer (PCa). Self-reported acne might be an easily obtainable marker to identify men at relatively low risk of PCa and might be incorporated into PCa risk calculators. This study aimed to evaluate the association between self-reported acne and PCa in a large case-referent study. The case group comprised 942 patients with PCa recruited from a population-based cancer registry in 2003 to 2006, 647 of whom met the criteria for aggressive PCa. The referents (n = 2,062) were a random sample of the male general population. All subjects completed a questionnaire on risk factors for cancer, including questions about acne. Odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence interval (CI) were calculated using multivariable logistic regression for PCa and aggressive PCa as separate end points, while adjusting for age and family history of PCa. A history of acne was reported by 320 cases (33.9%) and 739 referents (35.8%). Self-reported acne was significantly associated neither with PCa (adjusted OR = 0.95, 95% CI: 0.80-1.12) nor with aggressive PCa (adjusted OR = 0.97, 95% CI: 0.80-1.18). Self-reported acne is not suitable as a marker to identify men at low risk of aggressive PCa. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Italian cancer figures--Report 2015: The burden of rare cancers in Italy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Busco, Susanna; Buzzoni, Carlotta; Mallone, Sandra; Trama, Annalisa; Castaing, Marine; Bella, Francesca; Amodio, Rosalba; Bizzoco, Sabrina; Cassetti, Tiziana; Cirilli, Claudia; Cusimano, Rosanna; De Angelis, Roberta; Fusco, Mario; Gatta, Gemma; Gennaro, Valerio; Giacomin, Adriano; Giorgi Rossi, Paolo; Mangone, Lucia; Mannino, Salvatore; Rossi, Silvia; Pierannunzio, Daniela; Tavilla, Andrea; Tognazzo, Sandro; Tumino, Rosario; Vicentini, Massimo; Vitale, Maria Francesca; Crocetti, Emanuele; Dal Maso, Luigino

    2016-01-01

    This collaborative study, based on data collected by the network of Italian Cancer Registries (AIRTUM), describes the burden of rare cancers in Italy. Estimated number of new rare cancer cases yearly diagnosed (incidence), proportion of patients alive after diagnosis (survival), and estimated number of people still alive after a new cancer diagnosis (prevalence) are provided for about 200 different cancer entities. Data herein presented were provided by AIRTUM population- based cancer registries (CRs), covering nowadays 52% of the Italian population. This monograph uses the AIRTUM database (January 2015), which includes all malignant cancer cases diagnosed between 1976 and 2010. All cases are coded according to the International Classification of Diseases for Oncology (ICD-O-3). Data underwent standard quality checks (described in the AIRTUM data management protocol) and were checked against rare-cancer specific quality indicators proposed and published by RARECARE and HAEMACARE (www.rarecarenet.eu; www.haemacare.eu). The definition and list of rare cancers proposed by the RARECAREnet "Information Network on Rare Cancers" project were adopted: rare cancers are entities (defined as a combination of topographical and morphological codes of the ICD-O-3) having an incidence rate of less than 6 per 100,000 per year in the European population. This monograph presents 198 rare cancers grouped in 14 major groups. Crude incidence rates were estimated as the number of all new cancers occurring in 2000-2010 divided by the overall population at risk, for males and females (also for gender-specific tumours).The proportion of rare cancers out of the total cancers (rare and common) by site was also calculated. Incidence rates by sex and age are reported. The expected number of new cases in 2015 in Italy was estimated assuming the incidence in Italy to be the same as in the AIRTUM area. One- and 5-year relative survival estimates of cases aged 0-99 years diagnosed between 2000 and

  17. SOLITARY SPLENIC METASTASIS OF COLON CANCER: A CASE REPORT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sh. Hashemzadeh M. Safari

    2004-11-01

    Full Text Available Although splenic metastasis is fairly common in disseminated cancer, solitary splenic metastasis in the absence of diffuse dissemination is rare. We report a case of 44 year-old man who developed isolated splenic metastasis of colon cancer. The patient had undergone right sided hemicolectomy for colon cancer in 1988. In 2001, he underwent reoperation because of local recurrence of tumor in the anastomotic site. The patient was admitted to our hospital on Sep 2003 with abdominal pain. Chest X-ray was normal. Abdominal CT scan showed a large cystic lesion in the spleen. Splenectomy was performed for the patient. The spleen was enlarged, firm and irregular. Histological examination showed metastatic mucinous adenocarcinoma. Based on this case, we recommend that clinicians consider possibility of metastasis in cystic lesions of spleen, especially in patients with a history of a malignant disease.

  18. Creating a perfect storm to increase consumer demand for Wisconsin's Tobacco Quitline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheffer, Megan A; Redmond, Lezli A; Kobinsky, Kate H; Keller, Paula A; McAfee, Tim; Fiore, Michael C

    2010-03-01

    Telephone quitlines are a clinically proven and cost-effective population-wide tobacco-dependence treatment, and this option is now available in all 50 states. Yet, only 1% of the smoking population accesses these services annually. This report describes a series of policy, programmatic, and communication initiatives recently implemented in Wisconsin that resulted in a dramatic increase in consumer demand for the Wisconsin Tobacco Quitline (WTQL). In 2007, the Wisconsin legislature voted to increase the state cigarette excise tax rate by $1.00, from $0.77/pack to $1.77/pack effective January 1, 2008. In preparation for the tax increase, the Wisconsin Tobacco Prevention and Control Program, the University of Wisconsin Center for Tobacco Research and Intervention, which manages the WTQL, and the state's quitline service provider, Free & Clear, Inc., collaborated to enhance quitline knowledge, availability, and services with the goal of increasing consumer demand for services. The enhancements included for the first time, a free 2-week supply of over-the-counter nicotine replacement medication for tobacco users who agreed to receive multi-session quitline counseling. A successful statewide earned media campaign intensified the impact of these activities, which were timed to coincide with temporal smoking-cessation behavioral patterns (i.e., New Year's resolutions). As a result, the WTQL fielded a record 27,000 calls during the first 3 months of 2008, reaching nearly 3% of adult Wisconsin smokers. This experience demonstrates that consumer demand for quitline services can be markedly enhanced through policy and communication initiatives to increase the population reach of this evidence-based treatment. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  19. Imaging mouse cancer models in vivo using reporter transgenes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyons, Scott K; Patrick, P Stephen; Brindle, Kevin M

    2013-08-01

    Imaging mouse models of cancer with reporter transgenes has become a relatively common experimental approach in the laboratory, which allows noninvasive and longitudinal investigation of diverse aspects of tumor biology in vivo. Our goal here is to outline briefly the principles of the relevant imaging modalities, emphasizing particularly their strengths and weaknesses and what the researcher can expect in a practical sense from each of these techniques. Furthermore, we discuss how relatively subtle modifications in the way reporter transgene expression is regulated in the cell underpin the ability of reporter transgenes as a whole to provide readouts on such varied aspects of tumor biology in vivo.

  20. Brasfield and Wisconsin scoring systems have equal value as outcome assessment tools of cystic fibrosis lung disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cleveland, Robert H.; Stamoulis, Catherine; Sawicki, Gregory; Kelliher, Emma; Wood, Christopher; Zurakowski, David; Lee, Edward [Boston Children' s Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Department of Radiology, Boston, MA (United States); Zucker, Evan J. [Tufts Medical School, Boston, MA (United States)

    2014-05-15

    Several imaging-based scoring systems have been used as outcome measures in assessing the severity of cystic fibrosis (CF) lung disease. It has been shown that chest radiography performs equally to computed tomography (CT). There is the opinion that of the two most commonly used chest radiograph (CXR) systems, the Brasfield system is less sensitive and reliable than the Wisconsin system. This report assesses the reproducibility and reliability of the two systems. Thirty patients with CXRs during a 5-year period were randomly selected. One hundred eighty-two studies had data for all CXRs and pulmonary function tests (PFTs), Forced Expiratory Volume in One Second (FEV-1) and Forced Vital Capacity (FVC). PFT values closest to the date of each CXR were recorded. Four radiologists scored each image twice by both the Brasfield and Wisconsin systems. Intra- and inter-rater reliability, correlation with PFTs and direct correlation of the two systems were calculated. Intra-rater agreement: r = 0.86-0.99 Brasfield, r = 0.78-0.96 Wisconsin. Inter-rater agreement: 0.76-0.90 Brasfield, r = 0.74-0.97 Wisconsin. Brasfield vs. FEV-1: r = 0.55, vs. FVC r = 0.61. Wisconsin vs. FEV-1: r = 0.57, vs. FVC r = 0.66. Correlation of the two systems: r = 0.86 (all P < 0.001). The Brasfield and Wisconsin systems performed very similarly providing equally reproducible, robust and reliable measures. (orig.)

  1. Unusual abscesses associated with colon cancer. Report of three cases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okita, Atsushi; Kubo, Yoshiro; Tanada, Minoru; Kurita, Akira; Takashima, Shigemitsu

    2007-01-01

    Three cases of colon cancer accompanied by unusual abscess formation are reported. Case I: A 77-year-old man was diagnosed with a paracolic abscess formation behind the cecum and a swollen appendix by computed tomography (CT) scan. Case II: An 85-year-old woman was diagnosed with an abscess formation of the right iliopsoas muscle, a swollen appendix, and a thickened right colon wall by CT scan. After antibiotic therapy failed, both patients underwent ileocecal resection urgently under suspicion of appendicitis, but cecal cancer around the entrance to the appendix caused secondary appendicitis in both cases. Case III: A 50-year-old woman was diagnosed with sigmoid colon cancer with an abscess formation in the pelvic cavity concomitant with ovarian tumor. A Hartmann procedure was performed, and a pathological examination revealed that a subserosal abscess behind the sigmoid colon cancer perforated the rectum with abscess formation. All cases were definitively diagnosed intraoperatively. The cancer recurred in cases I and III. We emphasize that precise surgical evaluation has an important role in the diagnosis of these complicated diseases. In addition, surgery affords the patient the best chance of recovery, and in these advanced cases radical treatment is recommended as early as possible. (author)

  2. Spontaneous regression of transverse colon cancer: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chida, Keigo; Nakanishi, Kazuaki; Shomura, Hiroki; Homma, Shigenori; Hattori, Atsuo; Kazui, Keizo; Taketomi, Akinobu

    2017-12-01

    Spontaneous regression (SR) of many malignant tumors has been well documented, with an approximate incidence of one per 60,000-100,000 cancer patients. However, SR of colorectal cancer (CRC) is very rare, accounting for less than 2% of such cases. We report a case of SR of transverse colon cancer in an 80-year-old man undergoing outpatient follow-up after surgical treatment of early gastric cancer. Colonoscopy (CS) revealed a Borrmann type II tumor in the transverse colon measuring 30 × 30 mm. Because the patient underwent anticoagulant therapy, we did not perform a biopsy at that time. A second CS was performed 1 week after the initial examination and revealed tumor shrinkage to a diameter of 20 mm and a shift to the Borrmann type III morphology. Biopsy revealed a poorly differentiated adenocarcinoma. One week after the second CS, we performed a partial resection of the transverse colon and D2 lymph node dissection. Histopathology revealed inflammatory cell infiltration and fibrosis from the submucosal to muscularis propria layers in the absence of cancer cells, leading to pathological staging of pStage 0 (T0N0). The patient had an uneventful recovery, and CS performed at 5 months postoperatively revealed the absence of a tumor in the colon and rectum. The patient continues to be followed up as an outpatient at 12 months postoperatively, and no recurrence has been observed.

  3. Patients' reports of barriers to expressing concerns during cancer consultations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandes, Kim; Linn, Annemiek J; Smit, Edith G; van Weert, Julia C M

    2015-03-01

    To identify cancer patients' most influential barriers to expressing concerns during cancer consultations in a new manner by examining patients' reports of perceived barriers and perceived occurrence of barriers in consultations. Two online focus groups (N=16) and an online survey (N=236) were conducted among cancer patients and cancer survivors. The online focus groups and survey were used to examine two elements of patients' barriers, i.e., patients' reports of perceived barriers and perceived occurrence of barriers in consultations. Composite scores of these two elements were calculated to determine influential barriers. Results showed that the most influential barriers were related to providers' behavior (e.g., providers do not explicitly invite patients to express concerns) and the environment where the consultation takes place (e.g., perceived lack of time). The results of this study indicate that influential barriers to expressing concerns are barriers that patients cannot overcome themselves (i.e., they are related to providers' behavior or the environment of the consultation). A collaborative approach between researchers, providers and policy makers is needed to overcome these barriers. The results of this study can be used to develop strategies to overcome barriers to patients expressing concerns. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Fasting and cancer treatment in humans: A case series report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Safdie, Fernando M; Dorff, Tanya; Quinn, David; Fontana, Luigi; Wei, Min; Lee, Changhan; Cohen, Pinchas; Longo, Valter D

    2009-12-31

    Short-term fasting (48 hours) was shown to be effective in protecting normal cells and mice but not cancer cells against high dose chemotherapy, termed Differential Stress Resistance (DSR), but the feasibility and effect of fasting in cancer patients undergoing chemotherapy is unknown. Here we describe 10 cases in which patients diagnosed with a variety of malignancies had voluntarily fasted prior to (48-140 hours) and/or following (5-56 hours) chemotherapy. None of these patients, who received an average of 4 cycles of various chemotherapy drugs in combination with fasting, reported significant side effects caused by the fasting itself other than hunger and lightheadedness. Chemotherapy associated toxicity was graded according to the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events (CTCAE) of the National Cancer Institute (NCI). The six patients who underwent chemotherapy with or without fasting reported a reduction in fatigue, weakness, and gastrointestinal side effects while fasting. In those patients whose cancer progression could be assessed, fasting did not prevent the chemotherapy-induced reduction of tumor volume or tumor markers. Although the 10 cases presented here suggest that fasting in combination with chemotherapy is feasible, safe, and has the potential to ameliorate side effects caused by chemotherapies, they are not meant to establish practice guidelines for patients undergoing chemotherapy. Only controlled-randomized clinical trials will determine the effect of fasting on clinical outcomes including quality of life and therapeutic index.

  5. Occult breast cancer during reduction mammoplasty: case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panizzo, Nicola; D'Aloja, Chiara; Scomersi, Serena; Papa, Giovanni; Bortul, Marina; Arnez, Zoran Marij

    2013-02-05

    Breast carcinoma occurring in routine reduction mammaplasty is rare. In our Breast Unit each patient eligible for any breast surgery is routinely evaluated by preoperative breast imaging. We reported the clinical case of a woman with an infiltrating lobular breast cancer detected during surgical reduction mammaplasty despite a negative preoperative bilateral mammography. The clinical case was discussed at multidisciplinary breast cancer meeting in order to evaluate the different therapeutic options. In conjunction with general surgeons, oncologists, radiologists and radiotherapists, and upon patient's ultimate decision, a conservative tumor approach was chosen: first-level axillary node dissection followed by adjuvant chemotherapy and hormonotherapy. The mean frequency of breast cancer detection during reduction mammaplasty ranges from 0.06% up to 4%. There are many possible treatment choices for these patients ranging from radical mastectomy to more conservative approaches dealing with lumpectomy followed by radiation therapy or chemotherapy and radiation therapy alone. The therapeutical plan must be discussed by a multidisciplinary team and many tumors and patients characteristics should be evaluated in the decision making process. All patients selected for breast aesthetical surgery must be screened, during preoperative workup, for breast cancer. Combination of three diagnostic modalities increases sensitivity and reaches the diagnostic accuracy of 93.2%. The reported case stresses the importance of an oncological approach to breast surgery even in case of planned aesthetical procedures.

  6. Gastric metastasis from small cell lung cancer: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Song; Hu, Xu-Dong; Wang, Su-Zhen; Liu, Ning; Zhao, Wei; Yu, Qing-Xi; Hou, Wen-Hong; Yuan, Shuang-Hu

    2015-02-07

    Small cell lung cancer (SCLC) represents a group of highly malignant tumors that give rise to early and widespread metastases at the time of diagnosis. The preferential metastatic sites are the brain, liver, adrenal glands, bone, and bone marrow. However, metastases of the gastrointestinal system, especially the stomach, are rare; most cases of stomach metastasis are asymptomatic and, as a result, are usually only discovered at autopsy. We report a case of gastric metastasis originating from SCLC. The patient was a 66-year-old man admitted to our hospital due to abdominal pain. He underwent gastroscopy, with the pathological report of the tissue biopsy proving it to be a small cell cancer. Immunohistochemistry was positive for CD56, synaptophysin, and pan-cytokeratin. These results confirmed the diagnosis of gastric metastasis of a neuroendocrine small cell carcinoma from the lung.

  7. Financial Burden in Survivors of Childhood Cancer: A Report From the Childhood Cancer Survivor Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nipp, Ryan D; Kirchhoff, Anne C; Fair, Douglas; Rabin, Julia; Hyland, Kelly A; Kuhlthau, Karen; Perez, Giselle K; Robison, Leslie L; Armstrong, Gregory T; Nathan, Paul C; Oeffinger, Kevin C; Leisenring, Wendy M; Park, Elyse R

    2017-10-20

    Purpose Survivors of childhood cancer may experience financial burden as a result of health care costs, particularly because these patients often require long-term medical care. We sought to evaluate the prevalence of financial burden and identify associations between a higher percentage of income spent on out-of-pocket medical costs (≥ 10% of annual income) and issues related to financial burden (jeopardizing care or changing lifestyle) among survivors of childhood cancer and a sibling comparison group. Methods Between May 2011 and April 2012, we surveyed an age-stratified, random sample of survivors of childhood cancer and a sibling comparison group who were enrolled in the Childhood Cancer Survivor Study. Participants reported their household income, out-of-pocket medical costs, and issues related to financial burden (questions were adapted from national surveys on financial burden). Logistic regression identified associations between participant characteristics, a higher percentage of income spent on out-of-pocket medical costs, and financial burden, adjusting for potential confounders. Results Among 580 survivors of childhood cancer and 173 siblings, survivors of childhood cancer were more likely to have out-of-pocket medical costs ≥ 10% of annual income (10.0% v 2.9%; P financial burden in this population with long-term health care needs.

  8. Diffuse Gastric Cancer During Pregnancy: Report of a Rare Association

    OpenAIRE

    Barbosa, Orivaldo Alves; de Souza, Anna Dorotheia Bezerra; Moura, Mayna Raphaela de Carvalho; Junior, Elson Jose de Almeida; Fontenele, Joao Paulo Uchoa; Chaves, Fabio de Figuereido; Correia, Jose Walter

    2015-01-01

    Gastric cancer during pregnancy is a rare event and difficult to diagnose, as the symptoms can be confused with those of an ordinary pregnancy. We report a case of a 25-year-old patient with a 29-week gestation, with asthenia complaint, vomiting and weight loss. During the investigation of wasting syndrome endoscopy was performed with infiltrative ulcerative lesions in pre-pyloric region with biopsy revealing carcinoma with signet ring, undifferentiated type. It was held on a strict control o...

  9. Accuracy of self-reported reason for colorectal cancer testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eberth, Jan M; Vernon, Sally W; White, Arica; Abotchie, Peter N; Coan, Sharon P

    2010-01-01

    Assessment of accuracy of self-reported reason for colorectal cancer testing has been limited. We examined the accuracy and correlates of self-reported reason (screening or diagnosis) for having a sigmoidoscopy or colonoscopy. Patients who had received at least one sigmoidoscopy or colonoscopy within the past 5 years were recruited from a large multispecialty clinic in Houston, TX, between 2005 and 2007. We calculated concordance, positive predictive value, negative predictive value, sensitivity, and specificity between self-reported reason and the medical record (gold standard). Logistic regression was performed to identify correlates of accurate self-report. Self-reported reason for testing was more accurate when the sigmoidoscopy or colonoscopy was done for screening, rather than diagnosis. In the multivariable analysis for sigmoidoscopy, age was positively associated with accurately reporting reason for testing, whereas having two or more colorectal cancer tests during the study period (compared with only one test) was negatively associated with accuracy. In the multivariable analysis, none of the correlates was statistically associated with colonoscopy although a similar pattern was observed for number of tests. Determining the best way to identify those who have been tested for diagnosis, rather than screening, is an important next step.

  10. The use and reporting of patient-reported outcomes in phase III breast cancer trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brim, Remy L; Pearson, Steven D

    2013-04-01

    Public and government attention to patient-centered research outcomes has been increasing, evidenced by the recent formation of the Patient Centered Outcomes Research Institute. Drug development clinical trials can be made more patient-centered by collecting patient-reported outcome measures that can inform decision making by patients and their health-care providers. Patient-reported outcomes are important to collect in trials of breast cancer therapeutics, which encompass a wide range of treatment regimens and side effects. We sought to determine recent trends in the use of patient-reported outcomes in drug trials for the treatment of breast cancer and evaluate the reporting of these data in study publications. We searched ClinicalTrials.gov for phase III breast cancer drug trials, recording information on start date, primary completion date, primary outcome measure, primary sponsor, stage of cancer, and patient-reported outcome use. To assess the reporting of patient-reported outcome data, Google.com and PubMed.gov were searched for all publications resulting from included trials. We found 236 eligible trials, starting between May 1989 and December 2011. Of these trials, 83 (35%) stipulated patient-reported outcome use. The rate of patient-reported outcome use in recent years has shown no increase over earlier time periods: 37% (1989-2000) versus 36% (2004-2007) versus 30% (2008-2011) (p = 0.8). Trials with sponsorship led by the pharmaceutical industry and trials including patients with locally advanced or metastatic disease had the highest rates of patient-reported outcome use (40/87 (46%) and 44/102 (43%), respectively). Among the 83 trials that collected patient-reported outcome measures, 36 were completed a minimum of 2 years before our analysis; of these 36 studies, 19 (53%) had published patient-reported outcome data. Data were limited to self-reported descriptions of trials listed on the ClinicalTrial.gov database, which is the best compendium of trial

  11. Private drinking water quality in rural Wisconsin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knobeloch, Lynda; Gorski, Patrick; Christenson, Megan; Anderson, Henry

    2013-03-01

    Between July 1, 2007, and December 31, 2010, Wisconsin health departments tested nearly 4,000 rural drinking water supplies for coliform bacteria, nitrate, fluoride, and 13 metals as part of a state-funded program that provides assistance to low-income families. The authors' review of laboratory findings found that 47% of these wells had an exceedance of one or more health-based water quality standards. Test results for iron and coliform bacteria exceeded safe limits in 21% and 18% of these wells, respectively. In addition, 10% of the water samples from these wells were high in nitrate and 11% had an elevated result for aluminum, arsenic, lead, manganese, or strontium. The high percentage of unsafe test results emphasizes the importance of water quality monitoring to the health of nearly one million families including 300,000 Wisconsin children whose drinking water comes from a privately owned well.

  12. Wisconsin Earth and Space Science Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bilbrough, Larry (Technical Monitor); French, George

    2003-01-01

    The Wisconsin Earth and Space Science Education project successfilly met its objectives of creating a comprehensive online portfolio of science education curricular resources and providing a professional development program to increase educator competency with Earth and Space science content and teaching pedagogy. Overall, 97% of participants stated that their experience was either good or excellent. The favorable response of participant reactions to the professional development opportunities highlights the high quality of the professional development opportunity. The enthusiasm generated for using the curricular material in classroom settings was overwhelmingly positive at 92%. This enthusiasm carried over into actual classroom implementation of resources from the curricular portfolio, with 90% using the resources between 1-6 times during the school year. The project has had a positive impact on student learning in Wisconsin. Although direct measurement of student performance is not possible in a project of this kind, nearly 75% of participating teachers stated that they saw an increase in student performance in math and science as a result of using project resources. Additionally, nearly 75% of participants saw an increase in the enthusiasm of students towards math and science. Finally, some evidence exists that the professional development academies and curricular portfolio have been effective in changing educator behavior. More than half of all participants indicated that they have used more hands-on activities as a result of the Wisconsin Earth and Space Science Education project.

  13. Risk of Salivary Gland Cancer After Childhood Cancer: A Report From the Childhood Cancer Survivor Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boukheris, Houda [Radiation Epidemiology Branch, Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland (United States); Stovall, Marilyn [Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Gilbert, Ethel S. [Radiation Epidemiology Branch, Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland (United States); Stratton, Kayla L. [Division of Public Health Sciences, Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, Seattle, Washington (United States); Smith, Susan A.; Weathers, Rita [Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Hammond, Sue [Department of Pathology, Ohio State University School of Medicine, Columbus, Ohio (United States); Mertens, Ann C. [Department of Pediatrics, Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia (United States); Donaldson, Sarah S. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University Medical Center, Stanford, California (United States); Armstrong, Gregory T.; Robison, Leslie L. [Department of Epidemiology and Cancer Control, St. Jude Children' s Research Hospital, Memphis, Tennessee (United States); Neglia, Joseph P. [Department of Pediatrics, University of Minnesota Medical School, Minneapolis, Minnesota (United States); Inskip, Peter D., E-mail: inskippe@mail.nih.gov [Radiation Epidemiology Branch, Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland (United States)

    2013-03-01

    Purpose: To evaluate effects of radiation therapy, chemotherapy, cigarette smoking, and alcohol consumption on the risk of second primary salivary gland cancer (SGC) in the Childhood Cancer Survivor Study (CCSS). Methods and Materials: Standardized incidence ratios (SIR) and excess absolute risks (EAR) of SGC in the CCSS were calculated using incidence rates from Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results population-based cancer registries. Radiation dose to the salivary glands was estimated based on medical records. Poisson regression was used to assess risks with respect to radiation dose, chemotherapy, smoking, and alcohol consumption. Results: During the time period of the study, 23 cases of SGC were diagnosed among 14,135 childhood cancer survivors. The mean age at diagnosis of the first primary cancer was 8.3 years, and the mean age at SGC diagnosis was 24.8 years. The incidence of SGC was 39-fold higher in the cohort than in the general population (SIR = 39.4; 95% CI = 25.4-57.8). The EAR was 9.8 per 100,000 person-years. Risk increased linearly with radiation dose (excess relative risk = 0.36/Gy; 95% CI = 0.06-2.5) and remained elevated after 20 years. There was no significant trend of increasing risk with increasing dose of chemotherapeutic agents, pack-years of cigarette smoking, or alcohol intake. Conclusion: Although the cumulative incidence of SGC was low, childhood cancer survivors treated with radiation experienced significantly increased risk for at least 2 decades after exposure, and risk was positively associated with radiation dose. Results underscore the importance of long-term follow up of childhood cancer survivors for the development of new malignancies.

  14. Risk of Salivary Gland Cancer After Childhood Cancer: A Report From the Childhood Cancer Survivor Study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boukheris, Houda; Stovall, Marilyn; Gilbert, Ethel S.; Stratton, Kayla L.; Smith, Susan A.; Weathers, Rita; Hammond, Sue; Mertens, Ann C.; Donaldson, Sarah S.; Armstrong, Gregory T.; Robison, Leslie L.; Neglia, Joseph P.; Inskip, Peter D.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate effects of radiation therapy, chemotherapy, cigarette smoking, and alcohol consumption on the risk of second primary salivary gland cancer (SGC) in the Childhood Cancer Survivor Study (CCSS). Methods and Materials: Standardized incidence ratios (SIR) and excess absolute risks (EAR) of SGC in the CCSS were calculated using incidence rates from Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results population-based cancer registries. Radiation dose to the salivary glands was estimated based on medical records. Poisson regression was used to assess risks with respect to radiation dose, chemotherapy, smoking, and alcohol consumption. Results: During the time period of the study, 23 cases of SGC were diagnosed among 14,135 childhood cancer survivors. The mean age at diagnosis of the first primary cancer was 8.3 years, and the mean age at SGC diagnosis was 24.8 years. The incidence of SGC was 39-fold higher in the cohort than in the general population (SIR = 39.4; 95% CI = 25.4-57.8). The EAR was 9.8 per 100,000 person-years. Risk increased linearly with radiation dose (excess relative risk = 0.36/Gy; 95% CI = 0.06-2.5) and remained elevated after 20 years. There was no significant trend of increasing risk with increasing dose of chemotherapeutic agents, pack-years of cigarette smoking, or alcohol intake. Conclusion: Although the cumulative incidence of SGC was low, childhood cancer survivors treated with radiation experienced significantly increased risk for at least 2 decades after exposure, and risk was positively associated with radiation dose. Results underscore the importance of long-term follow up of childhood cancer survivors for the development of new malignancies

  15. Locally advanced colon cancer with cutaneous invasion: case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tenreiro, Nádia; Ferreira, Cátia; Silva, Silvia; Marques, Rita; Ribeiro, Artur; Sousa, Paulo Jorge; Luís, Fernando Próspero

    2017-03-01

    Locally advanced colon cancer with direct abdominal wall and skin invasion is an extremely rare finding with most data being derived from case reports, historical autopsy-based or single-center retrospective studies. We present a unique case of a colon cancer with direct cutaneous invasion and colocutaneous fistulization. Eighty-six year old Caucasian female with multiple comorbidities, referred to Surgical Consultation due to ulcerated skin lesion in the abdomen. She had a long-standing large umbilical hernia but with no previous episodes of incarceration or occlusive symptoms. She denied any digestive or constitutional symptoms. Physical examination showed a large non-reducible umbilical hernia, with an associated painless firm mass within the hernia sac and cutaneous ulcerated growth. Colonoscopy revealed transverse colon cancer (endoscopic biopsy of the tumor and skin punch biopsy confirmed adenocarcinoma of the colon). Computed tomography showed a tumoral mass within the umbilical hernia, with cutaneous infiltration and enlarged regional lymph nodes. Rapid local progression led to colocutaneous fistula with total fecal diversion. We performed an extended right hemicolectomy with en bloc excision of the hernia sac and infiltrating cutaneous mass. In the current era of widespread use of screening colonoscopies, initial diagnosis of locally advanced colon cancer is decreasing. However, this unique case presented an opportunity to recall the advantages of multivisceral resections.

  16. The business of optimism. Wisconsin's Midwest Renewable Energy Fair

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Decker, J.

    2006-01-01

    The paper reports on the Wisconsin Midwest Renewable Energy Fair. The renewable energy business is said to be based on sound technology and sustainable development and is being largely embraced with enthusiasm. However, the keynote speaker, James Kunstler, warned that the transition from fossil fuels to renewables will be complicated and messy. The report mentions the views of several speakers but not all shared Kunstler's views. There were more than 100 workshops at the fair. Although big business was well represented, there were also home-made devices on show including a motorcycle powered by electricity. The importance of the fair is probably best judged by the way in which it generates enthusiasm for preserving the planet through the sustainable development of environmentally-friendly technology. (author)

  17. Yoga & Cancer Interventions: A Review of the Clinical Significance of Patient Reported Outcomes for Cancer Survivors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Nicole Culos-Reed

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Limited research suggests yoga may be a viable gentle physical activity option with a variety of health-related quality of life, psychosocial and symptom management benefits. The purpose of this review was to determine the clinical significance of patient-reported outcomes from yoga interventions conducted with cancer survivors. A total of 25 published yoga intervention studies for cancer survivors from 2004–2011 had patient-reported outcomes, including quality of life, psychosocial or symptom measures. Thirteen of these studies met the necessary criteria to assess clinical significance. Clinical significance for each of the outcomes of interest was examined based on 1 standard error of the measurement, 0.5 standard deviation, and relative comparative effect sizes and their respective confidence intervals. This review describes in detail these patient-reported outcomes, how they were obtained, their relative clinical significance and implications for both clinical and research settings. Overall, clinically significant changes in patient-reported outcomes suggest that yoga interventions hold promise for improving cancer survivors' well-being. This research overview provides new directions for examining how clinical significance can provide a unique context for describing changes in patient-reported outcomes from yoga interventions. Researchers are encouraged to employ indices of clinical significance in the interpretation and discussion of results from yoga studies.

  18. Anal metastasis originating from colorectal cancer: Report of two cases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jae Min; Lim, Joon Seok; Choi, Jin Young; Park, Mi Suk; Kim, Myeong Jin [Dept. of Radiology and Research Institute of Radiological Science, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Chung, Taek; Kim, Ho Guen [Dept. of Pathology, Severance Hospital, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-12-15

    Anal metastasis from colorectal cancer rarely occurs, but it severely impairs the patient's quality of life, often requiring wide resection including the anal sphincter with permanent colostomy. This lesion can be misdiagnosed as a perianal fistula or an abscess, and it can be overlooked at the time of surgery because it is not included in the routine surgical extent of low anterior resection. We report two rare cases of anal metastasis from colorectal cancer. In both cases, perianal nodules with an internal solid portion were detected on preoperative rectal magnetic resonance imaging and additional local excisions of the anal lesions were performed during the process of treatment. Anal metastasis was pathologically confirmed by histology and immunohistochemical staining.

  19. Paragonimus westermani infection mimicking recurrent lung cancer: A case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Itoh, Naoya; Tsukahara, Mika; Yamasaki, Hiroshi; Morishima, Yasuyuki; Sugiyama, Hiromu; Kurai, Hanako

    2016-12-01

    Herein, we report a case of Paragonimus westermani infection, which required differentiation from recurrent lung cancer. A 66-year old Japanese man with a history of lung cancer who had undergone a lobectomy was referred to our clinic for treatment of cough, sputum, dyspnea, and a right pulmonary nodule. He had previously eaten seafood he visited China. P. westermani infection was confirmed by the presence of antibody against P. westermani antigen in the patient's serum and eggs in his sputum. Eventually, molecular identification by PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis and sequencing confirmed that the patient was infected with triploid forms of P. westermani. Copyright © 2016 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  20. Self-Reported Constipation in Patients with Advanced Cancer: A Preliminary Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhondali, Wadih; Nguyen, Linh; Palmer, J. Lynn; Kang, Duck-Hee; Hui, David; Bruera, Eduardo

    2013-01-01

    Context Constipation is often inadequately assessed and underdiagnosed in patients with advanced cancer. Many studies use patient-reported constipation as an outcome. Objectives The aim was to compare the accuracy of patient-reported constipation as compared with the modified Rome III (ROME) criteria and to determine the agreement between patient-reported constipation, physician assessment of constipation, and objective assessment of constipation by modified ROME criteria among outpatients with advanced cancer. Methods Patients with advanced cancer attending a supportive care clinic were screened. Constipation was assessed using the modified ROME criteria, patient report (yes or no and rated 0-10; 10 = worst possible symptom), and physician assessments (yes or no and rated 0-10). Results One hundred patients were enrolled and 50 of 100 (50%) patients met the modified ROME criteria for constipation. Disagreement between ROME criteria and the patient report (yes/no) was found in 33 patients (33%), and between ROME criteria and the physician assessment (yes/no) in 39 (39%). The best combination of sensitivity (0.84) and specificity (0.62) was found with scores ≥ 3/10 for patient-reported constipation. Conclusions We found a high frequency of constipation. The limited agreement with modified ROME criteria suggests that a patient’s self-report as yes or no is not useful for clinical practice. Patient self-rating on a 0 to 10 scale (score of three or greater) seems to be the best tool for constipation screening among this population. More research is needed to identify the best way to assess constipation in advanced cancer patients PMID:22835482

  1. Study of the impacts of regulations affecting the acceptance of Integrated Community Energy Systems: public utility, energy facility siting and municipal franchising regulatory programs in Wisconsin. Preliminary background report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feurer, D A; Weaver, C L; Gallagher, K C; Hejna, D; Rielley, K J

    1980-01-01

    The Wisconsin state legislature has designated the Public Service Commission (PSC) as the agency responsible for regulating public utilities, and has prescribed the manner in which such utilities are to be regulated. The PSC consists of three commissioners appointed to staggered six-year terms by the governor and confirmed by the senate. Municipalities are given certain limited regulatory powers over public utilities. They are allowed to determine the quality and character of each kind of product or service to be rendered by any public utility within the municipality; to determine all other terms and conditions upon which a public utility may be permitted to occupy the streets, highways or other public places within the municipality; and may require such additions and extensions to (a public utility's) physical plant within said municipality as shall be reasonable and necessary in the interest of the public, and to designate the location and nature of all such additions and extensions subject to review by the PSC. However, the PSC has original and concurrent jurisdiction with municipalities to require extensions of service and to regulate service. Municipalities may purchase and own public utilities; however, such utilities are subject to regulation by the PSC. Public utility regulatory statutes, energy facility siting programs, and municipal franchising authority are examined to identify how they may impact on the ability of an organization, whether or not it be a regulated utility, to construct and operate an ICES.

  2. Meeting Report of the Fifth International Cancer Epigenetics Conference in Beijing, China, October 2016.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Dan; Herman, James G; Cui, Hengmi; Jen, Jin; Fuks, Francois; Brock, Malcolm V; Ushijima, Toshikazu; Croce, Carlo; Akiyama, Yoshimitsu; Guo, Mingzhou

    2017-07-01

    Fifth International Cancer Epigenetics Conference, Beijing, China, 21-23 October 2016 This meeting reported many new findings in the field of cancer epigenetics, including basic science, translational and clinical studies. In this report, we summarize some of the main advancements and prospects in cancer epigenetics presented at this meeting.

  3. Carcinoma of the tongue in Norway and Wisconsin. I

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vermund, H.

    1982-01-01

    The records of 503 patients with carcinoma of the tongue diagnosed between 1958 and 1972 were reviewed. The preponderance of tongue carcinoma among men was confirmed both in The Norwegian Radium Hospital (NRH) and the University of Wisconsin Hospitals (UW), but it was relatively more frequent among women in NRH and in UW than in southern Europe. More women had on presentation less advanced tumors at NRH than at UW. The incidence of tongue carcinoma in Norway increased steadily with age for both sexes. The sex ratio did not change in Norway such as in England, Canada and the United States. Tumor of the posterior one-third of the tongue was relatively infrequent in women both in NRH and UW, in agreement with reports from other countries. The length of survival was analysed and no significant sex difference was demonstrated. The younger patients had less advanced tumors and a better prognosis. (Auth.)

  4. Laryngeal Amyloidosis Mimicking Glottic Cancer: A Case Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Sun Jin; Kim, Jee Young; Ahn, Kook Jin; Kim, Bum Soo; Park, Young Hak

    2010-01-01

    Amyloidosis is a slowly progressive, benign disease that is characterized by the extracellular deposition of fibrillar proteins in many different tissues and organs throughout the body. Primary amyloidosis can be subdivided into the systemic and localized forms. The localized form is less common than the systemic form and the larynx is the most frequently affected site. The importance of laryngeal amyloidosis lies in its possible confusion with glottic cancer because of the clinical feature. We report here on a case of laryngeal amyloidosis in a 47-year-old man who suffered from progressive dyspnea

  5. Laryngeal Amyloidosis Mimicking Glottic Cancer: A Case Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Sun Jin; Kim, Jee Young; Ahn, Kook Jin; Kim, Bum Soo [The Catholic University of Korea, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Park, Young Hak [St. Mary' s Hospital, College of Medicine, The Catholic University of Korea, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-08-15

    Amyloidosis is a slowly progressive, benign disease that is characterized by the extracellular deposition of fibrillar proteins in many different tissues and organs throughout the body. Primary amyloidosis can be subdivided into the systemic and localized forms. The localized form is less common than the systemic form and the larynx is the most frequently affected site. The importance of laryngeal amyloidosis lies in its possible confusion with glottic cancer because of the clinical feature. We report here on a case of laryngeal amyloidosis in a 47-year-old man who suffered from progressive dyspnea.

  6. Oral cancer diagnosed using PET/CT: A case report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Young Hee; Yang, Byoung Eun; Cho, Young Min [Hallym Univ. College of Medicine, Anyang (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Seong Gon [Sam Anyang General Hospital, Anyang (Korea, Republic of)

    2006-06-15

    PET/CT is a new imaging technology that combines high-quality Position Emission Tomography (PET) and Computed Tomography (CT). This imaging provides simultaneous anatomical and metabolic information. Therefore PET/CT is useful diagnostic modality for early detection og malignant tumor, accurate at aging, decision on therapeutic plan, monitoring response to therapy and rapid detection of recurrence. We report oral and maxillofacial cancers diagnosed by using PET/CT and the usefulness of PET/CT in the evaluation of postoperative recurrence.

  7. Weight and Physical Activity - Prevention Summary Table | Cancer Trends Progress Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Cancer Trends Progress Report, first issued in 2001, summarizes our nation's advances against cancer in relation to Healthy People targets set forth by the Department of Health and Human Services.

  8. Choroidal metastasis from early rectal cancer: Case report and literature review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mitsuyoshi Tei

    2014-01-01

    CONCLUSION: This is the first report of choroidal metastasis from early rectal cancer. We consider it important to enforce systemic chemotherapy in addition to radiotherapy for choroidal metastasis from colorectal cancer.

  9. Navigating the Trends and Most Recent Estimates Table | Cancer Trends Progress Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Cancer Trends Progress Report, first issued in 2001, summarizes our nation's advances against cancer in relation to Healthy People targets set forth by the Department of Health and Human Services.

  10. Smoke-free Workplace Rules and Laws | Cancer Trends Progress Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Cancer Trends Progress Report, first issued in 2001, summarizes our nation's advances against cancer in relation to Healthy People targets set forth by the Department of Health and Human Services.

  11. UV Exposure and Sun-Protective Behavior - Prevention Summary Table | Cancer Trends Progress Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Cancer Trends Progress Report, first issued in 2001, summarizes our nation's advances against cancer in relation to Healthy People targets set forth by the Department of Health and Human Services.

  12. Tobacco Policy/Regulatory Factors - Prevention Summary Table | Cancer Trends Progress Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Cancer Trends Progress Report, first issued in 2001, summarizes our nation's advances against cancer in relation to Healthy People targets set forth by the Department of Health and Human Services.

  13. Mixing zones studies of the waste water discharge from the Consolidated Paper Company into the Wisconsin River at Wisconsin Rapids, Wisconsin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoopes, J. A.; Wu, D. S.; Ganatra, R.

    1973-01-01

    Effluent concentration distributions from the waste water discharge of the Kraft Division Mill, Consolidated Paper Company, into the Wisconsin River at Wisconsin Rapids, Wisconsin, is investigated. Effluent concentrations were determined from measurements of the temperature distribution, using temperature as a tracer. Measurements of the velocity distribution in the vicinity of the outfall were also made. Due to limitations in the extent of the field observations, the analysis and comparison of the measurements is limited to the region within about 300 feet from the outfall. Effects of outfall submergence, of buoyancy and momentum of the effluent and of the pattern and magnitude of river currents on these characteristics are considered.

  14. Archaeological Investigations at a Wisconsin Petroglyph Site

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jack Steinbring

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Preliminary test excavations at the Hensler Petroglyph Site in East Central Wisconsin, U.S.A. have disclosed the remains of aboriginal engravings below Aeolian sediments dated to ca. 15,000 years B.P. The stratified deposits lying adjacent to an engraved panel, containing 35 pecked images, have yielded animal-like cobbles, some covered with red ochre, apparently picked for some esoteric use. The site itself has unusual natural shapes in the rock formation, along with acoustical properties, lightning strikes, a magnetic anomaly, and geographic prominence. Collectively these factors are thought to have attracted the ancient rock artists to the site.

  15. Wisconsin EE Mandates: The Bad News and the Good News.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lane, Jennie; And Others

    1996-01-01

    Examines Wisconsin teachers' perceived competencies in, attitudes toward, and amount of class time devoted to teaching about the environment. Discusses the effects of Wisconsin environmental education mandates concerning preservice preparation in environmental education and K-12 environmental education curriculum plans. Identifies areas where the…

  16. Wisconsin Maternity Leave and Fringe Benefits: Policies, Practices and Problems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerner, Jennifer

    The study examines the economic implications in Wisconsin of the 1972 Equal Employment Opportunity Commission guideline which requires employers to treat maternity leave as a temporary disability. First, the static cost of the maternity leave guideline to employers is estimated for the State of Wisconsin. Second, some examination of the economic…

  17. Final Report - DOE Center for Laser Imaging and Cancer Diagnostics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alfano, Robert R.; Koutcher, Jason A.

    2002-10-31

    This Final Report summarizes the significant progress made by the researchers, students and staff of the Center for Laser Imaging and Cancer Diagnostics (CLICD) from January 1998 through May 2002. During this period, the Center supported several projects. Most projects were proposed initially, some were added subsequently as their relevance and importance to the DOE mission became evident. DOE support has been leveraged to obtain continuing funding for some projects. Leveraged funds come from various sources, including NIH, Army, NSF and the Air Force. The goal of the Center was to develop laser-based instruments for use in the detection and diagnosis of major diseases, with an emphasis on detection and diagnosis of various cancers. Each of the supported projects is a collaborative effort between physicists and laser scientists and the City College of New York and noted physicians, surgeons, pathologists, and biologists located at medical centers in the Metropolitan area. The participating institutions were: City College of New York Institute for Ultrafast Lasers and Spectroscopy, Hackensack University Medical Center, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, and New York Eye and Ear Institute. Each of the projects funded by the Center is grouped into one of four research categories: a) Disease Detection, b) Non-Disease Applications, c) New Diagnostic Tools, and, d) Education, Training, Outreach and Dissemination. The progress achieved by the multidisciplinary teams was reported in 51 publications and 32 presentations at major national conferences. Also, one U.S. patent was obtained and six U.S. patent applications have been filed for innovations resulting from the projects sponsored by the Center.

  18. Water-Quality and Lake-Stage Data for Wisconsin Lakes, Water Year 2006

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rose, W.J.; Garn, H.S.; Goddard, G.L.; Marsh, S.B.; Olson, D.L.; Robertson, Dale M.

    2007-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), in cooperation with local and other agencies, collects data at selected lakes throughout Wisconsin. These data, accumulated over many years, provide a data base for developing an improved understanding of the water quality of lakes. To make these data available to interested parties outside the USGS, the data are published annually in this report series. The locations of water-quality and lake-stage stations in Wisconsin for water year 2006 are shown in figure 1. A water year is the 12-month period from October 1 through September 30. It is designated by the calendar year in which it ends. Thus, the period October 1, 2005 through September 30, 2006 is called 'water year 2006.' The purpose of this report is to provide information about the chemical and physical characteristics of Wisconsin lakes. Data that have been collected at specific lakes, and information to aid in the interpretation of those data, are included in this report. Data collected include measurements of in-lake water quality and lake stage. Time series of Secchi depths, surface total phosphorus and chlorophyll a concentrations collected during non-frozen periods are included for all lakes. Graphs of vertical profiles of temperature, dissolved oxygen, pH, and specific conductance are included for sites where these parameters were measured. Descriptive information for each lake includes: location of the lake, area of the lake's watershed, period for which data are available, revisions to previously published records, and pertinent remarks. Additional data, such as streamflow and water quality in tributary and outlet streams of some of the lakes, are published in another volume: 'Water Resources Data-Wisconsin, 2006.' Water-resources data, including stage and discharge data at most streamflow-gaging stations, are available through the World Wide Web on the Internet. The Wisconsin Water Science Center's home page is at http://wi.water.usgs.gov/. Information on the

  19. Water-quality and Llake-stage data for Wisconsin Lakes, Water Year 2004

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rose, W.J.; Garn, H.S.; Goddard, G.L.; Marsh, S.B.; Olson, D.L.; Robertson, Dale M.

    2005-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), in cooperation with local and other agencies, collects data at selected lakes throughout Wisconsin. These data, accumulated over many years, provide a data base for developing an improved understanding of the water quality of lakes. To make these data available to interested parties outside the USGS, the data are published annually in this report series. The locations of water-quality and lake-stage stations in Wisconsin for water year 2004 are shown in figure 1. A water year is the 12-month period from October 1 through September 30. It is designated by the calendar year in which it ends. Thus, the period October 1, 2003 through September 30, 2004 is called 'water year 2004.' The purpose of this report is to provide information about the chemical and physical characteristics of Wisconsin lakes. Data that have been collected at specific lakes, and information to aid in the interpretation of those data, are included in this report. Data collected include measurements of in-lake water quality and lake stage. Time series of Secchi depths, surface total phosphorus and chlorophyll a concentrations collected during non-frozen periods are included for all lakes. Graphs of vertical profiles of temperature, dissolved oxygen, pH, and specific conductance are included for sites where these parameters were measured. Descriptive information for each lake includes: location of the lake, area of the lake's watershed, period for which data are available, revisions to previously published records, and pertinent remarks. Additional data, such as streamflow and water quality in tributary and outlet streams of some of the lakes, are published in another volume: 'Water Resources Data-Wisconsin, 2004.' Water-resources data, including stage and discharge data at most streamflow-gaging stations, are available throught the World Wide Web on the Internet. The Wisconsin Water Science Center's home page is at http://wi.water.usgs.gov/. Information on the

  20. Water-quality and lake-stage data for Wisconsin lakes, water year 2014

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manteufel, S. Bridgett; Robertson, Dale M.

    2017-05-25

    IntroductionThe U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), in cooperation with local and other agencies, collects data at selected lakes throughout Wisconsin. These data, accumulated over many years, provide a database for developing an improved understanding of the water quality of lakes. To make these data available to interested parties outside the USGS, the data are published annually in this report series. The locations of water-quality and lake-stage stations in Wisconsin for water year 2014 are shown in figure 1. A water year is the 12-month period from October 1 through September 30. It is designated by the calendar year in which it ends. Thus, the periodOctober 1, 2013, through September 30, 2014, is called “water year 2014.”The purpose of this report is to provide information about the chemical and physical characteristics of Wisconsin lakes. Data that have been collected at specific lakes, and information to aid in the interpretation of those data, are included in this report. Data collected include measurements of in-lake water quality and lake stage. Time series of Secchi depths, surface total phosphorus, and chlorophyll a concentrations collected during nonfrozen periods are included for many lakes. Graphs of vertical profiles of temperature, dissolved oxygen, pH, and specific conductance are included for sites where these parameters were measured. Descriptive information for each lake includes the location of the lake, area of the lake’s watershed, period for which data are available, revisions to previously published records, and pertinent remarks. Additional data, such as streamflow and water quality in tributary and outlet streams of some of the lakes, are published online at http://nwis.waterdata.usgs.gov/wi/nwis.Water-resources data, including stage and discharge data at most streamflow-gaging stations, are available online. The Wisconsin Water Science Center’s home page is at https://www.usgs.gov/centers/wisconsin-water-science-center. Information

  1. Water-quality and lake-stage data for Wisconsin lakes, water years 2012–2013

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manteufel, S. Bridgett; Robertson, Dale M.

    2017-05-25

    IntroductionThe U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), in cooperation with local and other agencies, collects data at selected lakes throughout Wisconsin. These data, accumulated over many years, provide a data base for developing an improved understanding of the water quality of lakes. To make these data available to interested parties outside the USGS, the data are published annually in this report series. The locations of water-quality and lake-stage stations in Wisconsin for water year 2012 are shown in figure 1. A water year is the 12-month period from October 1 through September 30. It is designated by the calendar year in which it ends. Thus, the period October 1, 2011 through September 30, 2012, is called “water year 2012.”The purpose of this report is to provide information about the chemical and physical characteristics of Wisconsin lakes. Data that have been collected at specific lakes, and information to aid in the interpretation of those data, are included in this report. Data collected include measurements of in-lake water quality and lake stage. Time series of Secchi depths, surface total phosphorus and chlorophyll a concentrations collected during non-frozen periods are included for all lakes. Graphs of vertical profiles of temperature, dissolved oxygen, pH, and specific conductance are included for sites where these parameters were measured. Descriptive information for each lake includes: location of the lake, area of the lake’s watershed, period for which data are available, revisions to previously published records, and pertinent remarks. Additional data, such as streamflow and water quality in tributary and outlet streams of some of the lakes, are published online at http://nwis.waterdata.usgs.gov/wi/nwis.Water-resources data, including stage and discharge data at most streamflow-gaging stations, are available online. The Wisconsin Water Science Center’s home page is at https://www.usgs.gov/centers/wisconsin-water-science-center. Information on

  2. Report of Incidence and Mortality in China Cancer Registries, 2008

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Wan-qing; Zheng, Rong-shou; Zhang, Si-wei; Li, Ni; Zhao, Ping; Li, Guang-lin; Wu, Liang-you

    2012-01-01

    Objective Annual cancer incidence and mortality in 2008 were provided by National Central Cancer Registry in China, which data were collected from population-based cancer registries in 2011. Methods There were 56 registries submitted their data in 2008. After checking and evaluating the data quality, total 41 registries’ data were accepted and pooled for analysis. Incidence and mortality rates by area (urban or rural areas) were assessed, as well as the age- and sex-specific rates, age-standardized rates, proportions and cumulative rate. Results The coverage population of the 41 registries was 66,138,784 with 52,158,495 in urban areas and 13,980,289 in rural areas. There were 197,833 new cancer cases and 122,136 deaths in cancer with mortality to incidence ratio of 0.62. The morphological verified rate was 69.33%, and 2.23% of cases were identified by death certificate only. The crude cancer incidence rate in all areas was 299.12/100,000 (330.16/100,000 in male and 267.56/100,000 in female) and the age-standardized incidence rates by Chinese standard population (ASIRC) and world standard population (ASIRW) were 148.75/100,000 and 194.99/100,000, respectively. The cumulative incidence rate (0–74 years old) was of 22.27%. The crude incidence rate in urban areas was higher than that in rural areas. However, after adjusted by age, the incidence rate in urban was lower than that in rural. The crude cancer mortality was 184.67/100,000 (228.14/100,000 in male and 140.48/100,000 in female), and the age-standardized mortality rates by Chinese standard population (ASMRC) and by world population were 84.36/100,000 and 114.32/100,000, respectively. The cumulative mortality rate (0–74 years old) was of 12.89%. Age-adjusted mortality rates in urban areas were lower than that in rural areas. The most common cancer sites were lung, stomach, colon-rectum, liver, esophagus, pancreas, brain, lymphoma, breast and cervix which accounted for 75% of all cancer incidence. Lung

  3. Clinical Cancer Advances 2018: Annual Report on Progress Against Cancer From the American Society of Clinical Oncology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heymach, John; Krilov, Lada; Alberg, Anthony; Baxter, Nancy; Chang, Susan Marina; Corcoran, Ryan; Dale, William; DeMichele, Angela; Magid Diefenbach, Catherine S; Dreicer, Robert; Epstein, Andrew S; Gillison, Maura L; Graham, David L; Jones, Joshua; Ko, Andrew H; Lopez, Ana Maria; Maki, Robert G; Rodriguez-Galindo, Carlos; Schilsky, Richard L; Sznol, Mario; Westin, Shannon Neville; Burstein, Harold

    2018-04-01

    A MESSAGE FROM ASCO'S PRESIDENT I remember when ASCO first conceived of publishing an annual report on the most transformative research occurring in cancer care. Thirteen reports later, the progress we have chronicled is remarkable, and this year is no different. The research featured in ASCO's Clinical Cancer Advances 2018 report underscores the impressive gains in our understanding of cancer and in our ability to tailor treatments to tumors' genetic makeup. The ASCO 2018 Advance of the Year, adoptive cell immunotherapy, allows clinicians to genetically reprogram patients' own immune cells to find and attack cancer cells throughout the body. Chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) T-cell therapy-a type of adoptive cell immunotherapy-has led to remarkable results in young patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) and in adults with lymphoma and multiple myeloma. Researchers are also exploring this approach in other types of cancer. This advance would not be possible without robust federal investment in cancer research. The first clinical trial of CAR T-cell therapy in children with ALL was funded, in part, by grants from the National Cancer Institute (NCI), and researchers at the NCI Center for Cancer Research were the first to report on possible CAR T-cell therapy for multiple myeloma. These discoveries follow decades of prior research on immunology and cancer biology, much of which was supported by federal dollars. In fact, many advances that are highlighted in the 2018 Clinical Cancer Advances report were made possible thanks to our nation's support for biomedical research. Funding from the US National Institutes of Health and the NCI helps researchers pursue critical patient care questions and addresses vital, unmet needs that private industry has little incentive to take on. Federally supported cancer research generates the biomedical innovations that fuel the development and availability of new and improved treatments for patients. We need sustained federal

  4. [Report of Cancer Incidence and Mortality in China, 2014].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, W Q; Li, H; Sun, K X; Zheng, R S; Zhang, S W; Zeng, H M; Zou, X N; Gu, X Y; He, J

    2018-01-23

    Objective: The registration data of local cancer registries in 2014 were collected by National Central Cancer Registry (NCCR)in 2017 to estimate the cancer incidence and mortality in China. Methods: The data submitted from 449 registries were checked and evaluated, and the data of 339 registries out of them were qualified and selected for the final analysis. Cancer incidence and mortality were stratified by area, gender, age group and cancer type, and combined with the population data of 2014 to estimate cancer incidence and mortality in China. The age composition of standard population of Chinese census in 2000 and Segi's population were used for age-standardized incidence and mortality in China and worldwide, respectively. Results: Total covered population of 339 cancer registries (129 in urban and 210 in rural) in 2014 were 288 243 347 (144 061 915 in urban and 144 181 432 in rural areas). The mortality verified cases (MV%) were 68.01%. Among them, 2.19% cases were identified through death certifications only (DCO%), and the mortality to incidence ratio was 0.61. There were about 3, 804, 000 new cases diagnosed as malignant cancer and 2, 296, 000 cases dead in 2014 in the whole country. The incidence rate was 278.07/100, 000 (males 301.67/100, 000, females 253.29/100, 000) in China, age-standardized incidence rates by Chinese standard population (ASIRC) and by world standard population were 190.63/100, 000 and 186.53/100, 000, respectively, and the cumulative incidence rate (0-74 age years old) was 21.58%. The cancer incidence and ASIRC in urban areas were 302.13/100, 000 and 196.58/100, 000, respectively, whereas in rural areas, those were 248.94/100, 000 and 182.64/100, 000, respectively. The cancer mortality in China was 167.89/100, 000 (207.24/100, 000 in males and 126.54/100, 000 in females), age-standardized mortality rates by Chinese standard population (ASMRC) and by world standard population were 106.98/100, 000 and 106.09/100, 000, respectively. And

  5. TESTICULAR CANCER WITH DISTANT METASTASES – CASE REPORT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivana Dimkovski

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Testicular cancer is a rare disease of younger men, but the incidence of this disease has increased considerably in the recent years in many western countries. Ninety-five percents of these tumours derive from germinative cells, and more than 70% of patients are diagnosed in stage I disease. Causes of testicular cancer are not well understood. The emergence of this disease is mainly linked to the earliest years of life and events in this period as testicular maldescensus, carcinoma in situ, trauma and genetic predisposition.We present a patient, a soldier, 21 years old. At the time of diagnosis of mixed testicular tumour type, the existence of late, stage IV disease was noted. The patient, despite the existence of visible changes in the testicle and reported subjective symptoms, avoided urological examination for months.Delay in diagnosis of testicular tumours leads to the discovery of the disease in advanced stages when the chances for the treatment of this disease and possible curing are significantly reduced.

  6. Annual report on status of cancer in China, 2011

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Wanqing; Zheng, Rongshou; Zeng, Hongmei; Zhang, Siwei

    2015-01-01

    Objective The National Central Cancer Registry (NCCR) collected population-based cancer registration data in 2011 from all cancer registries. National cancer incidence and mortality were compiled and cancer incident new cases and cancer deaths were estimated. Methods In 2014, there were 234 cancer registries submitted cancer incidence and deaths occurred in 2011. All datasets were checked and evaluated based on the criteria of data quality from NCCR. Total 177 registries’ data were qualified and compiled for cancer statistics in 2011. The pooled data were stratified by area (urban/rural), gender, age group (0, 1-4, 5-9, 10-14…85+) and cancer type. Cancer incident cases and deaths were estimated using age-specific rates and national population in 2011. All incidence and death rates are age-standardized to the 2000 Chinese standard population and Segi’s population expressed per 100,000 persons. Results All 177 cancer registries (77 in urban and 100 in rural areas) covered 175,310,169 populations (98,341,507 in urban and 76,968,662 in rural areas). The morphology verified cases (MV%) accounting for 70.14% and 2.44% of incident cases were identified through death certifications only (DCO%) with mortality to incidence ratio of 0.63. The estimates of new cancer incident cases and cancer deaths were 3,372,175 and 2,113,048 in 2011, respectively. The incidence rate was 250.28/100,000 (males 277.77/100,000, females 221.37/100,000), and the age-standardized incidence rates by Chinese standard population (ASIRC) and by world standard population (ASIRW) were 186.34/100,000 and 182.76/100,000 with the cumulative incidence rate (0-74 years old) of 21.20%. The cancer incidence and ASIRC in urban areas were 261.38/100,000 and 189.89/100,000 compared to 238.60/100,000 and 182.10/100,000 in rural areas, respectively. The cancer mortality was 156.83/100,000 (194.88/100,000 in males and 116.81/100,000 in females), the age-standardized mortality rates by Chinese standard

  7. Analysing data from patient-reported outcome and quality of life endpoints for cancer clinical trials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bottomley, Andrew; Pe, Madeline; Sloan, Jeff

    2016-01-01

    Measures of health-related quality of life (HRQOL) and other patient-reported outcomes generate important data in cancer randomised trials to assist in assessing the risks and benefits of cancer therapies and fostering patient-centred cancer care. However, the various ways these measures are anal......Measures of health-related quality of life (HRQOL) and other patient-reported outcomes generate important data in cancer randomised trials to assist in assessing the risks and benefits of cancer therapies and fostering patient-centred cancer care. However, the various ways these measures...... data in cancer randomised trials. This Personal View discusses the reasons why this project was initiated, the rationale for the planned work, and the expected benefits to cancer research, patient and provider decision making, care delivery, and policy making....

  8. Using NLP to identify cancer cases in imaging reports drawn from radiology information systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patrick, Jon; Asgari, Pooyan; Li, Min; Nguyen, Dung

    2013-01-01

    A Natural Language processing (NLP) classifier has been developed for the Victorian and NSW Cancer Registries with the purpose of automatically identifying cancer reports from imaging services, transmitting them to the Registries and then extracting pertinent cancer information. Large scale trials conducted on over 40,000 reports show the sensitivity for identifying reportable cancer reports is above 98% with a specificity above 96%. Detection of tumour stream, report purpose, and a variety of extracted content is generally above 90% specificity. The differences between report layout and authoring strategies across imaging services appear to require different classifiers to retain this high level of accuracy. Linkage of the imaging data with existing registry records (hospital and pathology reports) to derive stage and recurrence of cancer has commenced and shown very promising results.

  9. Developmental orofacial deficits associated with multimodal cancer therapy: Case report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berkowitz, R.J.; Neuman, P.; Spalding, P.; Novak, L.; Strandjord, S.; Coccia, P.F.

    1989-09-01

    Multimodal cancer therapy for pediatric head and neck tumors may be associated with significant developmental orofacial morbidity. This report details these effects in a child (C.I.) diagnosed at 2.5 years of age with a rhabdomyosarcoma, primary to the left buccinator. This case is of interest as C.I. has an unaffected identical twin (D.I.) for comparative study. Both were assessed by comparing panoramic radiographs and lateral and frontal tracings of cephalometric radiographs obtained at 8.25 years of age. C.I. had multiple dental anomalies which included agenesis, ectopia, crown malformation, and root malformation. Root malformation, ectopia, and agenesis were restricted to the left dentition, whereas crown malformation was noted bilaterally. C.I. had a generalized craniofacial skeletal hypoplasia relative to D.I. in all three planes, growth defects were greater on the side of the tumor, and the mandible was affected more than the nasomaxillary complex.

  10. Primary breast cancer of the vulva: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diniz da Costa, Ana Teresa Minhoto; Coelho, Ana Maria; Lourenço, Alexandre Valentim; Bernardino, Margarida; Ribeirinho, Ana Luisa; Jorge, Carlos Calhaz

    2012-04-01

    The occurrence of primary breast cancer of the vulva is extremely rare (24 cases described in the English-language literature). We report a case of a primary breast carcinoma of the vulva. An 82-year-old woman presented with a nodule of the left labia minor, which was excised. The histologic examination revealed the presence of adenocarcinoma of mammary origin, positive for common breast markers and for estrogen and progesterone receptors. The study for orthotopic breast carcinoma was negative, as well as the study for metastatic disease. The diagnosis of primary breast carcinoma was established. Our patient was then submitted to pelvic and inguinal radiotherapy as well as an aromatase inhibitor (letrozole), and she remained completely asymptomatic. Because of the rarity of this condition, guidelines for therapy are unavailable. The management suggested in the literature is that of primary orthotopic breast neoplasm of a similar stage.

  11. Developmental orofacial deficits associated with multimodal cancer therapy: Case report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berkowitz, R.J.; Neuman, P.; Spalding, P.; Novak, L.; Strandjord, S.; Coccia, P.F.

    1989-01-01

    Multimodal cancer therapy for pediatric head and neck tumors may be associated with significant developmental orofacial morbidity. This report details these effects in a child (C.I.) diagnosed at 2.5 years of age with a rhabdomyosarcoma, primary to the left buccinator. This case is of interest as C.I. has an unaffected identical twin (D.I.) for comparative study. Both were assessed by comparing panoramic radiographs and lateral and frontal tracings of cephalometric radiographs obtained at 8.25 years of age. C.I. had multiple dental anomalies which included agenesis, ectopia, crown malformation, and root malformation. Root malformation, ectopia, and agenesis were restricted to the left dentition, whereas crown malformation was noted bilaterally. C.I. had a generalized craniofacial skeletal hypoplasia relative to D.I. in all three planes, growth defects were greater on the side of the tumor, and the mandible was affected more than the nasomaxillary complex

  12. Wisconsin River at Portage, Wisconsin; Feasibility Study for Flood Control Plant of Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1977-08-01

    natural setting that the late Aldo Leopold , often called the "Father of Wildlife Management," wrote some of his famous works in the still-standing log...Protect endangered or threatened plants and animals and their ha>itats. e. Consider the Aldo Leopold Memorial Reserve. The Wisconsin Department of Natural...standing log cabin he built -- that the late 0 0 Aldo Leopold wrote some of his famous works. He also wrote about this very site and the immediate area

  13. An evaluation of the bedrock aquifer system in northeastern Wisconsin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emmons, P.J.

    1987-01-01

    Ground water is a major source of water in northeastern Wisconsin. The lower Fox River valley, located between Lake Winnebago and Green Bay in northeastern Wisconsin, is the second largest population center in Wisconsin. By 1957, ground-water withdrawals had lowered the potentiometric surface of the aquifer system as much as 440 feet below prepumping levels. With the exception of the city of Green Bay, which converted from ground water to surface water (Lake Michigan) for their municipal water supply in 1957, ground-water withdrawals have continually increased.

  14. Survey of medical radium installations in Wisconsin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tapert, A.C.; Lea, W.L.

    1975-05-01

    A radiation protection survey was performed at 70 medical radium installations in the State of Wisconsin. The requirements of the State's Radiation Protection Code were used as survey criteria. Radiation measurements of radium storage containers, radium capsule leakage tests, and monitoring of work surfaces for contamination were performed. Film badge monitoring data of whole body and extremity doses are presented for 221 individuals at 17 hospitals. Whole body doses during single treatments ranged from 10 to 1360 mrems per individual. The estimate of 500 mrems per treatment was determined as the dose aggregate to hospital personnel. Whole body doses from film badges are compared with analogous TLD doses. Four physicians and six technicians at nine hospitals participated in a study for monitoring the extremities with TLD. Cumulative extremity doses ranged from 28 to 6628 mrems per participant during the study. (U.S.)

  15. Water-quality and lake-stage data for Wisconsin Lakes, water year 2003

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rose, W.J.; Garn, H.S.; Goddard, G.L.; Olson, D.L.; Robertson, Dale M.

    2004-01-01

     The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), in cooperation with local and other agencies, collects data at selected lakes throughout Wisconsin. These data, accumulated over many years, provide a data base for developing an improved understanding of the water quality of lakes. To make these data available to interested parties outside the USGS, the data are published annually in this report series. The locations of water-quality and lake-stage stations in Wisconsin for water year 2003 are shown in figure 1. A water year is the 12-month period from October 1 through September 30. It is designated by the calendar year in which it ends. Thus, the period October 1, 2002 through September 30, 2003 is called "water year 2003."

  16. Water-quality and lake-stage data for Wisconsin lakes, water year 1999

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olson, D.L.; Elder, J.F.; Garn, H.S.; Goddard, G.L.; Mergener, E.A.; Robertson, Dale M.; Rose, W.J.

    2000-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), in cooperation with local and other agencies, collects data at selected lakes throughout Wisconsin. These data, accumulated over many years, provide a data base for developing an improved understanding of the water quality of lakes. To make these data available to interested parties outside the USGS, the data are published annually in this report series. The location of water-quality and lake-stage stations in Wisconsin for water year 1999 are shown in figure 1. A water year is the 12-month period from October 1 through September 30. It is designated by the calendar year in which it ends. Thus, the period October 1, 1998 through September 30, 1999 is called "water year 1999."

  17. Water-quality and lake-stage data for Wisconsin lakes, water year 2001

    Science.gov (United States)

    lead by Rose, W. J.; Elder, J.F.; Garn, H.S.; Goddard, G.L.; Mergener, E.A.; Olson, D.L.; Robertson, Dale M.

    2001-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), in cooperation with local and other agencies, collects data at selected lakes throughout Wisconsin. These data, accumulated over many years, provide a data base for developing an improved understanding of the water quality of lakes. To make these data available to interested parties outside the USGS, the data are published annually in this report series. The locations of water-quality and lake-stage stations in Wisconsin for water year 2001 are shown in figure 1. A water year is the 12-month period from October 1 through September 30. It is designated by the calendar year in which it ends. Thus, the period October 1, 2000 through September 30, 2001 is called "water year 2001."

  18. Water-quality and lake stage data for Wisconsin lakes, water year 2000

    Science.gov (United States)

    ,

    2001-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), in cooperation with local and other agencies, collects data at selected lakes throughout Wisconsin. These data, accumulated over many years, provide a data base for developing an improved understanding of the water quality of lakes. To make these data available to interested parties outside the USGS, the data are published annually in this report series. The locations of water-quality and lake-stage stations in Wisconsin for water year 2000 are shown in figure 1. A water year is the 12-month period from October 1 through September 30. It is designated by the calendar year in which it ends. Thus, the period October 1, 1999 through September 30, 2000 is called "water year 2000."

  19. Abdominal radical trachelectomy for vaginal cancer – A case report

    OpenAIRE

    Mari Matsuoka; Rumiko Yamamoto; Natsuki Tsuji; Koichi Terakawa; Tadayoshi Nagano

    2017-01-01

    Highlights ? Vaginal cancer is most common in elderly woman and very rare in young woman. ? Stage I vaginal cancer is treated with surgery and radiotherapy. ? Vaginal cancer in a young patient was treated by intra-arterial chemotherapy followed by abdominal radical trachelectomy.

  20. Pregnancy and abortion in breast cancer patients: Two case reports ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Breast cancer in pregnancy is by itself not an indication for abortion. We document the case histories of 2 patients with breast cancer (recurrent or advanced) who elected to carry pregnancies to term. Pregnancy concurrent with or subsequent to breast cancer is not associated with a worse prognosis than would be observed ...

  1. Cancer incidence in Morocco: report from Casablanca registry 2005 ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Introduction: Few population-based cancer registries are in place in developing countries. In order to know the burden of cancer in Moroccan population, cancer registry initiative was put in place in the Casablanca district, the biggest city of Morocco. Methods: The data collected covers 3.6 millions inhabitant and included ...

  2. Dashboard report on performance on select quality indicators to cancer care providers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stattin, Pär; Sandin, Fredrik; Sandbäck, Torsten; Damber, Jan-Erik; Franck Lissbrant, Ingela; Robinson, David; Bratt, Ola; Lambe, Mats

    2016-01-01

    Cancer quality registers are attracting increasing attention as important, but still underutilized sources of clinical data. To optimize the use of registers in quality assurance and improvement, data have to be rapidly collected, collated and presented as actionable, at-a-glance information to the reporting departments. This article presents a dashboard performance report on select quality indicators to cancer care providers. Ten quality indicators registered on an individual patient level in the National Prostate Cancer Register of Sweden and recommended by the National Prostate Cancer Guidelines were selected. Data reported to the National Prostate Cancer Register are uploaded within 24 h to the Information Network for Cancer Care platform. Launched in 2014, "What''s Going On, Prostate Cancer" provides rapid, at-a-glance performance feedback to care providers. The indicators include time to report to the National Prostate Cancer Register, waiting times, designated clinical nurse specialist, multidisciplinary conference, adherence to guidelines for diagnostic work-up and treatment, and documentation and outcome of treatment. For each indicator, three performance levels were defined. What's Going On, a dashboard performance report on 10 selected quality indicators to cancer care providers, provides an example of how data in cancer quality registers can be transformed into condensed, at-a-glance information to be used as actionable metrics for quality assurance and improvement.

  3. Bilateral metachronous breast cancer with bilateral recurrences: A case report and literature review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, So Hyun; Sohn, Yu Mee [Dept. of Radiology, Kyung Hee University Hospital, College of Medicine, Kyung Hee University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Eun Kyung [Dept. of Radiology, Research Institute of Radiological Science, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-05-15

    The incidence of bilateral breast cancer has been reported to range from 0.4% to 14%, and it increases gradually as a result of improved early detection capabilities and longer survival times. We report a rare case where the bilateral breast cancers occurred as a metachronous bilateral breast cancer with bilateral recurrences, detected by mammography, and the rapid growth of tumor that manifested as microcalcification and skin thickening within 3 months.

  4. Associations between reporting of cancer alarm symptoms and socioeconomic and demographic determinants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svendsen, Rikke Pilsgaard; Paulsen, Maja S; Larsen, Pia V

    2012-01-01

    was to investigate possible associations between socioeconomic and demographic determinants and reporting of common cancer alarm symptoms. METHODS: A cross-sectional questionnaire survey was performed based on a stratified sample of the Danish general population. A total of 13 777 randomly selected persons aged 20...... analysing the four alarm symptoms of cancer separately most tendencies persisted. CONCLUSIONS: Socioeconomic and demographic determinants are associated with self-reporting of common cancer alarm symptoms....

  5. University of Wisconsin Antarctic Soils Database, Version 1

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The University of Wisconsin Antarctic Soils Database contains data collected by Dr. James G. Bockheim and his colleagues from 1975 through 1987. Data include site...

  6. Childhood Cancer Incidence in India Betweem 2012 and 2014: Report of a Population-based Cancer Registry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Suman; Paul, Dilip Kumar; Anshu, Kumar; Bhakta, Subhajit

    2017-12-15

    To provide an overview of childhood cancer incidence in India between 2012-2014. Secondary data analysis on age-adjusted rates of cancer incidence for children (0-14 years) were collected from the report of the National Cancer Registry Programme in the year 2016. Age-adjusted rates of childhood cancer incidence ranged from 18.5 per million in the state of Nagaland to 235.3 per million in Delhi for boys. The rates were 11.4 per million in East Khasi Hill district and 152.3 per million in Delhi for girls. Leukemia was the most predominant cancer for both boys and girls. Lymphoma was the second most common cancer in boys, and brain tumors in girls. Childhood cancer incidence is increasing in India compared to population-based cancer registry survey of 2009-2011. Cancers are mostly affecting 0-4 years age group, and there is a rising trend of Non-Hodgkin's lymphoma.

  7. An audit comparing the reporting of staging MRI scans for rectal cancer with the London Cancer Alliance (LCA) guidelines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siddiqui, M R S; Shanmuganandan, A P; Rasheed, S; Tekkis, P; Brown, G; Abulafi, A M

    2017-11-01

    This article focuses on the audit and assessment of clinical practice before and after introduction of MRI reporting guidelines. Standardised proforma based reporting may improve quality of MRI reports. Uptake of the use may be facilitated by endorsement from regional and national cancer organisations. This audit was divided into 2 phases. MRI reports issued between April 2014 and June 2014 were included in the first part of our audit. Phase II included MRI reports issued between April 2015 and June 2015. 14 out of 15 hospitals that report MRI scans in the LCA responded to our audit proposal. The completion rate of key MRI metrics/metrics was better in proforma compared to prose reports both before (98% vs 73%; p < 0.05) and after introduction of the guidelines (98% vs 71%; p < 0.05). There was an approximate doubling of proforma reporting after the introduction of guidelines and workshop interventions (39% vs 65%; p < 0.05). Evaluation of locally advanced cancers (tumours extending to or beyond the circumferential resection margin) for beyond TME surgery was reported in 3% of prose reports vs. 42% in proformas. Incorporation of standardised reporting in official guidelines improved the uptake of proforma based reporting. Proforma based reporting captured more MRI reportable items compared to prose summaries, before and after the implementation of guidelines. MRI reporting of advanced cancers for beyond TME surgery falls short of acceptable standards but is more detailed in proforma based reports. Further work to improve completion especially in beyond TME reporting is required. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd, BASO ~ The Association for Cancer Surgery, and the European Society of Surgical Oncology. All rights reserved.

  8. Reporting of Randomized Trials in Common Cancers in the Lay Media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribnikar, Domen; Goldvaser, Hadar; Ocana, Alberto; Templeton, Arnoud J; Seruga, Bostjan; Amir, Eitan

    2018-01-01

    Limited data exist about the role of the lay media in the dissemination of results of randomized controlled trials (RCTs) in common cancers. Completed phase III RCTs evaluating new drugs in common cancers between January 2005 and October 2016 were identified from ClinicalTrials.gov. Lay media reporting was identified by searching LexisNexis Academic. Scientific reporting was defined as presentation at an academic conference or publication in full. Associations between reporting in the lay media before scientific reporting and study design and sponsorship were evaluated using logistic regression. Of 180 RCTs identified, 52% were reported in the lay media and in 27%, lay media reporting occurred before scientific reporting with an increasing trend over time (p = 0.009). Reporting in the lay media before scientific reporting was associated with positive results (OR: 2.10, p = 0.04), targeted therapy compared to chemotherapy (OR: 4.75, p = 0.006), immunotherapy compared to chemotherapy (OR: 7.60, p = 0.02), and prostate cancer compared to breast cancer (OR: 3.25, p = 0.02). Over a quarter of all RCTs in common cancers are reported in the lay media before they are reported scientifically with an increasing proportion over time. Positive trials, studies in prostate cancer, and trials of immunotherapy are associated with early reporting in the lay media. © 2017 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  9. Gene-environment interactions in cancer epidemiology: a National Cancer Institute Think Tank report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hutter, Carolyn M; Mechanic, Leah E; Chatterjee, Nilanjan; Kraft, Peter; Gillanders, Elizabeth M

    2013-11-01

    Cancer risk is determined by a complex interplay of genetic and environmental factors. Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have identified hundreds of common (minor allele frequency [MAF] > 0.05) and less common (0.01 Think Tank" on January 10-11, 2012. The objective of the Think Tank was to facilitate discussions on (1) the state of the science, (2) the goals of G × E interaction studies in cancer epidemiology, and (3) opportunities for developing novel study designs and analysis tools. This report summarizes the Think Tank discussion, with a focus on contemporary approaches to the analysis of G × E interactions. Selecting the appropriate methods requires first identifying the relevant scientific question and rationale, with an important distinction made between analyses aiming to characterize the joint effects of putative or established genetic and environmental factors and analyses aiming to discover novel risk factors or novel interaction effects. Other discussion items include measurement error, statistical power, significance, and replication. Additional designs, exposure assessments, and analytical approaches need to be considered as we move from the current small number of success stories to a fuller understanding of the interplay of genetic and environmental factors. © 2013 WILEY PERIODICALS, INC.

  10. Geographic and racial variation in teen pregnancy rates in Wisconsin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Layde, Molly M; Remington, Patrick L

    2013-08-01

    Despite recent declines in teen birth rates, teenage pregnancy remains an important public health problem in Wisconsin with significant social, economic, and health-related effects. Compare and contrast teen birth rate trends by race, ethnicity, and county in Wisconsin. Teen (ages 15-19 years) birth rates (per 1000 teenage females) in Wisconsin from 2001-2010 were compared by racelethnicity and county of residence using data from the Wisconsin Interactive Statistics on Health. Teen birth rates in Wisconsin have declined by 20% over the past decade, from 35.5/1000 teens in 2001 to 28.3/1000 teens in 2010-a relative decline of 20.3%. However, trends vary by race, with declines among blacks (-33%) and whites (-26%) and increases among American Indians (+21%) and Hispanics (+30%). Minority teen birth rates continue to be 3 to 5 times greater than birth rates among whites. Rates varied even more by county, with an over 14-fold difference between Ozaukee County (7.8/1000) and Menominee County (114.2). Despite recent declines, teen pregnancy continues to be an important public health problem in Wisconsin. Pregnancy prevention programs should be targeted toward the populations and counties with the highest rates.

  11. Pulmonary Blastomycosis in Vilas County, Wisconsin: Weather, Exposures and Symptoms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dennis J. Baumgardner

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Blastomycosis is a serious fungal infection contracted by inhalation of Blastomyces spores from the environment. Case occurrence in dogs in Vilas County, Wisconsin, has been associated with antecedent weather. We aimed to explore the effects of weather on the occurrence of human pulmonary blastomycosis in this area, and update exposure factors and symptoms since last published reports. Methods: Mandatory case reports were reviewed. Chi-square test was used for categorical data of exposures, comparing 1979–1996 (n=101 versus 1997–June 2013 (n=95. Linear regression was used to model local weather data (available 1990–2013; n=126; Southern Oscillation Index (SOI, North Atlantic Oscillation Index (NAOI, and Wisconsin River water discharge (WRD from the adjacent county (all available for 1984–2013; n=174; and case counts of known onset by warm (April–September and cold (October–March 6-month periods. Results: Distribution of pulmonary blastomycosis cases did not vary by season. Environmental exposures for the 1997–June 2013 group (mean age 45, 59% male were: residence(76%, excavation (42% and gardening (31%, all similar to the 1979–1996 group. Fishing (23% vs. 37%; P=0.09 and hunting (15% vs. 26%; P=0.13 exposures were less common in 1997–June 2013, but not significantly different. Overall, 69% of cases recalled some prior soil-disturbing activities. Considering the 6-month warm/cold periods, 19% of variation is explained by a direct relationship with total precipitation from two periods prior (P=0.005. There was no association of case occurrence with SOI, NAOI or WRD. Estimated annual incidence of blastomycosis for 1997–June 2013 was 27/100,000 compared with 44/100,000 for 1984–1996. Several symptoms were significantly less frequent in 2002–June 2013 compared to earlier years. Conclusions: As with dogs, human pulmonary blastomycosis occurrence is partially determined by antecedent precipitation. It is unclear if

  12. Emergence of a new pathogenic Ehrlichia species, Wisconsin and Minnesota, 2009.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pritt, Bobbi S; Sloan, Lynne M; Johnson, Diep K Hoang; Munderloh, Ulrike G; Paskewitz, Susan M; McElroy, Kristina M; McFadden, Jevon D; Binnicker, Matthew J; Neitzel, David F; Liu, Gongping; Nicholson, William L; Nelson, Curtis M; Franson, Joni J; Martin, Scott A; Cunningham, Scott A; Steward, Christopher R; Bogumill, Kay; Bjorgaard, Mary E; Davis, Jeffrey P; McQuiston, Jennifer H; Warshauer, David M; Wilhelm, Mark P; Patel, Robin; Trivedi, Vipul A; Eremeeva, Marina E

    2011-08-04

    Ehrlichiosis is a clinically important, emerging zoonosis. Only Ehrlichia chaffeensis and E. ewingii have been thought to cause ehrlichiosis in humans in the United States. Patients with suspected ehrlichiosis routinely undergo testing to ensure proper diagnosis and to ascertain the cause. We used molecular methods, culturing, and serologic testing to diagnose and ascertain the cause of cases of ehrlichiosis. On testing, four cases of ehrlichiosis in Minnesota or Wisconsin were found not to be from E. chaffeensis or E. ewingii and instead to be caused by a newly discovered ehrlichia species. All patients had fever, malaise, headache, and lymphopenia; three had thrombocytopenia; and two had elevated liver-enzyme levels. All recovered after receiving doxycycline treatment. At least 17 of 697 Ixodes scapularis ticks collected in Minnesota or Wisconsin were positive for the same ehrlichia species on polymerase-chain-reaction testing. Genetic analyses revealed that this new ehrlichia species is closely related to E. muris. We report a new ehrlichia species in Minnesota and Wisconsin and provide supportive clinical, epidemiologic, culture, DNA-sequence, and vector data. Physicians need to be aware of this newly discovered close relative of E. muris to ensure appropriate testing, treatment, and regional surveillance. (Funded by the National Institutes of Health and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.).

  13. Hepatitis B infection reported with cancer chemotherapy: analyzing the US FDA Adverse Event Reporting System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanagawa, Akimasa; Hotta, Yuji; Kataoka, Tomoya; Maeda, Yasuhiro; Kondo, Masahiro; Kawade, Yoshihiro; Ogawa, Yoshihiro; Nishikawa, Ryohei; Tohkin, Masahiro; Kimura, Kazunori

    2018-04-16

    We conducted data mining using the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) Adverse Event Reporting System (FAERS) database on spontaneously reported adverse events to evaluate the association between anticancer drug therapy and hepatitis B infection. Reports of hepatitis B infection were retrieved from the FAERS database. The reporting odds ratio (ROR) was used to estimate the association between hepatitis B infection and various anticancer agents and drug combinations. We detected statistically significant risk signals of hepatitis B for 33 of 64 anticancer agents by ROR (26 cytotoxicity drugs and seven molecular-targeted drugs). We focused on molecular-targeted drugs and assessed the risk of hepatitis B from specific anticancer drug combinations. The frequency of hepatitis B infection was significantly high for drugs such as rituximab, bortezomib, imatinib, and everolimus. The addition of cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin, and fludarabine to drug combinations additively enhanced the frequency of hepatitis B infection. There were no reports on hepatitis B infection associated with trastuzumab or azacitidine monotherapy. However, trastuzumab-containing regimens (e.g., combinations with docetaxel or paclitaxel) were correlated with the incidence of hepatitis B infection, similar to azacitidine monotherapy. Our findings suggest that the concomitant use of anticancer drugs, such as trastuzumab, taxane, and azacitidine, may contribute to the risk of hepatitis B infection. The unique signals detected from the public database might provide clues to eliminate the threat of HBV in oncology. © 2018 The Authors. Cancer Medicine published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. Future opportunities in cancer nanotechnology--NCI strategic workshop report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grodzinski, Piotr; Farrell, Dorothy

    2014-03-01

    There has been significant progress in utilizing nanotechnology in several areas of cancer care, including in vitro diagnostics, imaging, and therapy. The National Cancer Institute, which currently supports an array of research activities in cancer nanotechnology, convened a strategic workshop to explore the most promising directions and areas for future resource investment. The major discussion points as well as the opportunities identified are presented herein. ©2014 AACR

  15. Prostate cancer metastasis to the mandible: case report | Parkins ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Prostate cancer is recognised to be the commonest type of malignancy in the male in many parts of the world. Prostate cancer has a propensity to metastasize to bone, however metastasis to the jaw is uncommon and indeed among metastatic tumours of the jaws which are a rarity, only about 9% originate from a prostatic ...

  16. Accuracy of self-reported tobacco assessments in a head and neck cancer treatment population

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Warren, Graham W.; Arnold, Susanne M.; Valentino, Joseph P.; Gal, Thomas J.; Hyland, Andrew J.; Singh, Anurag K.; Rangnekar, Vivek M.; Cummings, K. Michael; Marshall, James R.; Kudrimoti, Mahesh R.

    2012-01-01

    Prospective analysis was performed of self-reported and biochemically confirmed tobacco use in 50 head and neck cancer patients during treatment. With 93.5% compliance to complete weekly self-report and biochemical confirmatory tests, 29.4% of smokers required biochemical assessment for identification. Accuracy increased by 14.9% with weekly vs. baseline self-reported assessments. Data confirm that head and neck cancer patients misrepresent true tobacco use during treatment.

  17. Understanding Cancer Prognosis

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Cancer Reports, Research, and Literature Cancers by Body Location/System Childhood Cancers Late Effects of Childhood Cancer ... to Z List of Cancers Cancers by Body Location Childhood Cancers Adolescent & Young Adult Cancers Metastatic Cancer ...

  18. Reported behavior of eating anything at anytime and risk of colorectal cancer in women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bao, Ying; Nimptsch, Katharina; Chan, Andrew T; Ng, Kimmie; Meyerhardt, Jeffrey A; Willett, Walter C; Giovannucci, Edward; Fuchs, Charles S

    2012-03-15

    Although numerous studies have assessed the effect of foods and nutrients on colorectal carcinogenesis, few studies have investigated human eating behavior in relation to risk of colorectal cancer. In our study, we assessed whether the reported behavior of eating anything at anytime influenced colorectal cancer risk and related plasma biomarkers. We prospectively followed up 55,540 women in the Nurses' Health Study who were aged 48-73 years, had no history of cancer, ulcerative colitis or diabetes and responded to the item "I eat anything I want, anytime I want" in the 1994 questionnaire. We also analyzed blood samples for 1,994 women, which were collected in 1989-1990. During 12 years of follow-up, 552 colorectal cancer cases were documented. After adjusting for age, smoking, body mass index, physical activity, red and processed meat and other known risk factors for colorectal cancer, women who reported eating anything at anytime experienced an increased risk of colorectal cancer (relative risk = 1.28, 95% confidence interval = 1.06-1.56) compared to those who did not report this behavior. In addition, reporting eating anything at anytime was associated with higher fasting plasma levels of insulin (p = 0.04) and C-peptide (p = 0.05). In conclusion, reports of eating anything at anytime are associated with an increased risk of colorectal cancer in this large prospective cohort study, independent of other potential risk factors for colorectal cancer. Copyright © 2011 UICC.

  19. International Association for the Study of Lung Cancer Computed Tomography Screening Workshop 2011 report

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Field, John K; Smith, Robert A; Aberle, Denise R

    2011-01-01

    national screening programs; (iii) develop guidelines for the clinical work-up of "indeterminate nodules" resulting from CT screening programmers; (iv) guidelines for pathology reporting of nodules from lung cancer CT screening programs; (v) recommendations for surgical and therapeutic interventions...... of suspicious nodules identified through lung cancer CT screening programs; and (vi) integration of smoking cessation practices into future national lung cancer CT screening programs....

  20. A report on mutual projects related to breast cancer nursing between Israel and China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilana Kadmon

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Breast cancer is a major concern in women′s health in the western world, and is now receiving more and more attention also in the East. In China, for example, where the incidence of breast cancer was very low, there has been a rapid increase of the disease since the last few years. This report describes how a collaborative nursing project between the Hadassah Medical Organization and the Tianjin Cancer Institute and Hospital was initiated, planned and implemented.

  1. Cancer incidence in southwest of iran: first report from khuzestan population-based cancer registry, 2002-2009.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talaiezadeh, Abdolhassan; Tabesh, Hamed; Sattari, Alireza; Ebrahimi, Shahram

    2013-01-01

    Cancer incidence rates are increasing particularly in developing countries. It is crucial for policy makers to know basic cancer epidemiology in each region to design comprehensive prevention plans. There have hitherto been no population-based data available for cancer in Khuzestan province. The present report is a first from the regional population-based cancer registry for the period of 2002-2009. Data were collected retrospectively reviewing all new cancer patients whom were registered in Khuzestan province cancer registry during an 8-year period (2002-2009). All cases were coded based on the ICD-O-3 coding system and collected data were computerized using SPSS (Chicago, IL) software, version 11.5. The age standardized incidence rates (ASRs) per 100,000 person-year for all cancers were computed using the indirect method of standardization to the world population. During the 8-year study period, 16,801 new cancer cases were registered. Based on the computed ASRs, the five most frequent malignancies in females were breast (26.4 per 100,000), skin (13.6), colorectal (5.72), stomach (4.31) and bladder(4.07) and in males, the five most frequent were skin (16.0 per 100,000), bladder (10.7),prostate (7.64), stomach (7.17), and colorectal (6.32).The ASR for all malignancies in women was 92.5 per 100,000, and that for men was 87.4. The observed patterns from the analysis of Khuzestan cancer registry data will lead to better understanding of the epidemiology of various malignancies in this part ofthe country and consequently provide a useful guide for authorities to make efficacious decisions and policies about a cancer control program for south-west Iran.

  2. Radiation-associated colon cancer: A case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasaki, Kazuhito; Ishihara, Soichiro; Hata, Keisuke; Kiyomatsu, Tomomichi; Nozawa, Hiroaki; Kawai, Kazushige; Tanaka, Toshiaki; Nishikawa, Takeshi; Otani, Kensuke; Yasuda, Koji; Kaneko, Manabu; Murono, Koji; Abe, Hiroyuki; Morikawa, Teppei; Watanabe, Toshiaki

    2017-06-01

    Radiation-associated colon cancer is a rare clinical entity. We herein describe the case of a patient with radiation-associated colon cancer who had undergone low anterior resection for rectal cancer following preoperative radiotherapy. Certain characteristics of radiation-associated colon cancer are highlighted. The patient was a 48-year-old man who had undergone low anterior resection for rectal cancer following preoperative radiotherapy at a total dose of 50 Gy, at the age of 29 years. When the patient presented at the University of Tokyo Hospital, 19 years after the surgery, he complained of severe anal pain and frequent defecation. Colonoscopy revealed two flat tumors in the sigmoid colon, located 10 cm to the oral side of the anastomosis site, which were diagnosed as well-differentiated adenocarcinomas. In addition, colonoscopy identified five flat polyps near the tumors, which were resected endoscopically. Computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging revealed a mass in the sigmoid colon and no evidence of distant metastasis. Laparoscopic-assisted intersphincteric resection of the rectum and sigmoid colon with diverting ileostomy was performed. There were no specific postoperative complications and the patient was discharged from the hospital on the 20th postoperative day. On pathological examination, the resected rectum and sigmoid colon contained two separate tumors and six flat polyps. The two tumors were diagnosed as well-differentiated adenocarcinomas with invasion of the subserosa and submucosa, respectively. A total of 17 regional lymph nodes without metastasis were resected. The six flat polyps were diagnosed as tubular adenomas. We herein present a case of a radiation-associated colon cancer in a patient who had undergone low anterior resection for rectal cancer following preoperative radiotherapy 19 years prior. Colonoscopic surveillance of radiation-associated colon cancer may be indicated for rectal cancer patients treated with preoperative

  3. YoungStar: We're Turning Five! Five Year Analysis as of July 2015. YoungStar Progress Report 6

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wisconsin Council on Children and Families, 2015

    2015-01-01

    This report is the sixth in a series of Wisconsin Council on Children & Families (WCCF) reports tracking the progress of Wisconsin's YoungStar program, a quality rating and improvement system (QRIS) launched in 2010 to improve the quality of Wisconsin child care programs. YoungStar focuses on children of low-income working families receiving…

  4. Prostate cancer revealed by skin metastasis: A case report in black ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    K. Tengue

    2016-11-23

    Nov 23, 2016 ... Abstract. Introduction: Prostate cancer is the most common male malignancy in Togo. Most patients present with advanced and metastatic disease. Skin metastasis from prostate cancer is very rare and it occurs late and often with a poor prognosis. We report a case in a 52-year-old Togolese man where the ...

  5. Prostate cancer revealed by skin metastasis: A case report in black ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Introduction: Prostate cancer is the most common male malignancy in Togo. Most patients present with advanced and metastatic disease. Skin metastasis from prostate cancer is very rare and it occurs late and often with a poor prognosis. We report a case in a 52-year-old Togolese man where the skin lesions reveal the ...

  6. Non - Tobacco Induced Oral Cancer - A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kayannush K Dadachanji

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Because of the overwhelming evidence for the role of tobacco & alcohol, there is a great interest in the minority of patients who develop oral cancer in the apparent absence of one or both of these risk factors. Lifelong abstainers from both these prevalent social customs are unusual people & little is known about their wider lifestyle. Oral cancer in non - tobacco users is a distinct clinical entity. The individuals tend to be elderly female patients, who may be passive smokers. Potential factors that may contribute to oral cancer development in non - tobacco users include nutritional deficiency, Human Papilloma Viruses Infection, gastro - intestinal reflux disease & lichen planus. Evaluation of these factors, along with the molecular mechanisms that underlie the onset & progress of tumor in this minority of oral cancer patients is a must

  7. Colon cancer metastasis to the thyroid gland: A case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.I. Coelho

    2017-01-01

    Conclusion: A low threshold of suspicion is crucial to make a timely diagnosis of thyroid metastases from colorectal cancer. Treatment is controversial, but, without surgery, the need may arise for tracheostomy.

  8. Quality of patient-reported outcome reporting across cancer randomized controlled trials according to the CONSORT patient-reported outcome extension: A pooled analysis of 557 trials

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Efficace, Fabio; Fayers, Peter; Pusic, Andrea; Cemal, Yeliz; Yanagawa, Jane; Jacobs, Marc; la Sala, Andrea; Cafaro, Valentina; Whale, Katie; Rees, Jonathan; Blazeby, Jane

    2015-01-01

    The main objectives of this study were to identify the number of randomized controlled trials (RCTs) including a patient-reported outcome (PRO) endpoint across a wide range of cancer specialties and to evaluate the completeness of PRO reporting according to the Consolidated Standards of Reporting

  9. Impact of Wisconsin Medicaid Policy Change on Dental Sealant Utilization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okunseri, Christopher; Okunseri, Elaye; Garcia, Raul I; Gonzalez, Cesar; Visotcky, Alexis; Szabo, Aniko

    2018-02-01

    In September 2006, Wisconsin Medicaid changed its policy to allow nondentists to become certified Medicaid providers and to bill for sealants in public health settings. This study examined changes in patterns of dental sealant utilization in first molars of Wisconsin Medicaid enrollees associated with a policy change. The Electronic Data Systems of Medicaid Evaluation and Decision Support for Wisconsin from 2001 to 2009. Retrospective claims data analysis of Wisconsin Dental Medicaid for children aged 6-16 years. A total of 479,847 children followed up for 1,441,300 person-years with 64,546 visits were analyzed. The rate of visits for sealants by dentists increased significantly from 3 percent per year prepolicy to 11 percent per year postpolicy, and that of nondentists increased from 18 percent per year to 20 percent after the policy change, but this was not significant. Non-Hispanic blacks had the lowest visit rates for sealant application by dentists and nondentists pre- and postpolicy periods. The Wisconsin Medicaid policy change was associated with increased rates of visits for dental sealant placement by dentists. The rate of visits with sealant placements by nondentists increased at the same rate pre- and postpolicy change. © Health Research and Educational Trust.

  10. Wisconsin Healthy Birth Outcomes: minority health program challenges and contributions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruz, Evelyn; Guhleman, Patricia; Onheiber, Patrice Mocny

    2008-11-01

    For at least 20 years, the probability that an infant born in Wisconsin would die during the first year of life has been approximately three times greater for infants born to African American women than for those born to White women. Over the same period of time, other states have made improvements in African American infant mortality, whereas Wisconsin's ranking has fallen to last place. Various state and local efforts have been made to address the issue; however, it is only in the last 2 to 3 years that Wisconsin's high rate of African American infant mortality has become an agreed-upon health priority. This article discusses the factors that have converged to bring African American infant mortality to the forefront of Wisconsin public health policy and programs. Particular attention is given to the role of Wisconsin's Minority Health Program in relation to public health leadership and coalition building. Key actions currently underway to implement effective, evidence-based solutions are also described.

  11. Muskellunge growth potential in northern Wisconsin: implications for trophy management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faust, Matthew D.; Isermann, Daniel A.; Luehring, Mark A.; Hansen, Michael J.

    2015-01-01

    The growth potential of Muskellunge Esox masquinongy was evaluated by back-calculating growth histories from cleithra removed from 305 fish collected during 1995–2011 to determine whether it was consistent with trophy management goals in northern Wisconsin. Female Muskellunge had a larger mean asymptotic length (49.8 in) than did males (43.4 in). Minimum ultimate size of female Muskellunge (45.0 in) equaled the 45.0-in minimum length limit, but was less than the 50.0-in minimum length limit used on Wisconsin's trophy waters, while the minimum ultimate size of male Muskellunge (34.0 in) was less than the statewide minimum length limit. Minimum reproductive sizes for both sexes were less than Wisconsin's trophy minimum length limits. Mean growth potential of female Muskellunge in northern Wisconsin appears to be sufficient for meeting trophy management objectives and angler expectations. Muskellunge in northern Wisconsin had similar growth potential to those in Ontario populations, but lower growth potential than Minnesota's populations, perhaps because of genetic and environmental differences.

  12. Inducing of complete necrosis of recurred lung cancer by cryoablation; A case report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Sun Hye; Ham, Soo Youn; Hwang, Sung Ho; Oh, Yu Hwan [Dept. of Radiology, Korea University Anam Hospital, College of Medicine, Korea University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-12-15

    Lung cancer is one of the most commonly diagnosed cancers, and the lungs are a common site of metastasis from extrathoracic malignancies. Surgical resection is the gold standard treatment for lung malignancies. However, some of the patients are poor surgical candidates due to various reasons. Currently, image-guided ablation is used as one of the lung cancer treatment modalities. Cryoablation has been adapted as one of the treatments of lung tumors and a growing body of literature has shown that it is a safe and effective option. We report a case of successful cryoablation for a metastatic lesion from surgically resected primary lung cancer.

  13. Pathology of Rodent Models of Intestinal Cancer: Progress Report and Recommendations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Washington, Mary Kay; Powell, Anne E.; Sullivan, Ruth; Sundberg, John; Wright, Nicholas; Coffey, Robert J.; Dove, William F.

    2013-01-01

    In October 2010, a pathology review of rodent models of intestinal neoplasia was held at The Jackson Laboratory. This review complemented 2 other concurrent events: a workshop on methods of modeling colon cancer in rodents and a conference on current issues in murine and human colon cancer. We summarize the results of the pathology review and the committee’s recommendations for tumor nomenclature. A virtual high-resolution image slide box of these models has been developed. This report discusses significant recent developments in rodent modeling of intestinal neoplasia, including the role of stem cells in cancer and the creation of models of metastatic intestinal cancer. PMID:23415801

  14. Breast cancer metastasizing to the stomach mimicking primary gastric cancer: A case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yim, Kwangil; Ro, Sang Mi; Lee, Jieun

    2017-03-28

    Breast cancer with stomach metastasis rare with an incidence of 1% or less among metastatic breast cancer patients. We experienced a case of breast cancer metastasizing to the stomach in 65-year-old female patient. She experienced dyspepsia and poor oral intake before visiting the clinic. Diffuse infiltration with nodular mucosal thickening of the stomach wall was observed, suggesting advanced gastric cancer based on gross endoscopic finding. Spread of poorly cohesive tumor cells in the gastric mucosa observed upon hematoxylin and eosin stain resembled signet ring cell carcinoma, but diffuse positive staining for GATA3 in immunohistochemical stain allowed for a conclusive diagnosis of breast cancer metastasizing to the stomach. Based on the final diagnosis, systemic chemotherapy was administered instead of primary surgical resection. After 2 cycles of docetaxel administration, she showed a partial response based on abdominal computed tomography scan. This case is an unusual presentation of breast cancer metastasizing to the gastrointestinal tract.

  15. Look local: the value of cancer surveillance and reporting by American Indian clinics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Creswell, Paul D; Strickland, Rick; Stephenson, Laura; Pierce-Hudson, Kimmine; Matloub, Jacqueline; Waukau, Jerry; Adams, Alexandra; Kaur, Judith; Remington, Patrick L

    2013-11-27

    Cancer incidence and mortality rates for American Indians in the Northern Plains region of the United States are among the highest in the nation. Reliable cancer surveillance data are essential to help reduce this burden; however, racial data in state cancer registries are often misclassified, and cases are often underreported. We used a community-based participatory research approach to conduct a retrospective ascertainment of cancer cases in clinic medical records over a 9-year period (1995-2003) and compared the results with the state cancer registry to evaluate missing or racially misclassified cases. Six tribal and/or urban Indian clinics participated in the study. The project team consisted of participating clinics, a state cancer registry, a comprehensive cancer center, an American Indian/Alaska Native Leadership Initiative on Cancer, and a set of diverse organizational partners. Clinic personnel were trained by project staff to accurately identify cancer cases in clinic records. These records were then matched with the state cancer registry to assess misclassification and underreporting. Forty American Indian cases were identified that were either missing or misclassified in the state registry. Adding these cases to the registry increased the number of American Indian cases by 21.3% during the study period (P = .05). Our results indicate that direct reporting of cancer cases by tribal and urban Indian health clinics to a state cancer registry improved the quality of the data available for cancer surveillance. Higher-quality data can advance the efforts of cancer prevention and control stakeholders to address disparities in Native communities.

  16. Prospective Payment System (PPS)-Exempt Cancer Hospital Quality Reporting (PCHQR)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — Prospective Payment System (PPS)-Exempt Cancer Hospital Quality Reporting (PCHQR) Program currently uses one clinical effectiveness measure—External Beam...

  17. The National Cancer Data Base report on recent hospital cancer program progress toward complete American Joint Committee on Cancer/TNM staging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleming, I D; Phillips, J L; Menck, H R; Murphy, G P; Winchester, D P

    1997-12-15

    American Joint Committee on Cancer (AJCC) staging procedures were first published in 1977. Since 1991 the Commission on Cancer (COC) has required AJCC staging of all nonpediatric cancers. The National Cancer Data Base (NCDB) encouraged recording of AJCC staging through analyses of selected aspects of staging completeness. We reviewed the trend toward the adoption of routine AJCC staging by hospitals for the 5-year period 1990-1994. NCDB reports for nearly 2 million stageable cancers diagnosed from 1990 through 1994 were examined with emphasis on the hospital cancer program environment. Staging was complete if the hospital submitted stage codes for > or =90% of stageable cases or absent if stage codes were submitted for <5%. Hospitals were classified by ownership and type of cancer program. Regional staging practices also were reviewed. Overall staging increased from 78% to 88%, with increases for every site except carcinomas of the skin, cancers of the extrahepatic bile ducts and urethra, melanoma of the eyelid, and retinoblastoma The percent of hospitals staging completely increased from 49% to 61%, and the percent not routinely staging decreased from 6% to 3%. Complete staging increased in all hospital categories except For-Profit. The trend toward complete staging was uneven among states and regions. Hospital staging policies were affected by activities of the AJCC, COC, NCDB, clinical protocol procedures, and state policies. The varied completeness of staging at the hospital level by state, region, and type of hospital indicates that the adoption of routine staging is ongoing.

  18. Cost-Effectiveness Analysis of the Residential Provisions of the 2015 IECC for Wisconsin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mendon, Vrushali V. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Zhao, Mingjie [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Taylor, Zachary T. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Poehlman, Eric A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2016-02-15

    The 2015 IECC provides cost-effective savings for residential buildings in Wisconsin. Moving to the 2015 IECC from the 2006 IECC base code is cost-effective for residential buildings in all climate zones in Wisconsin.

  19. Childhood cancer in the surroundings of German nuclear power plants: report of an ongoing epidemiological study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schulze-Rath, R.; Kaatsch, P.; Schmiedel, S.; Spix, C.; Blettner, M.

    2006-01-01

    Epidemiological studies could not show an association between ionising radiation of nuclear power stations in routine operation and the incidence of childhood cancer, yet. The following report presents a case control study conducted by the German Childhood Cancer Registry since autumn 2003. All children in the study region, who were diagnosed with cancer between 1980 and 2003 at an age below five are included. In the first part of the study we investigate whether children with cancer (cases) lived closer to the respective nuclear power stations compared to random children without cancer (controls). In the second part, for a subgroup of cases and controls we conduct computer assisted telephone interviews regarding confounders possibly associated with the exposure of ionising radiation and childhood cancer. Results are expected by the end of 2006. (orig.)

  20. Krukenberg tumors diagnosed during pregnancy simultaneously with advanced gastric cancer; A case report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    You, Myung Won; Jung, Yoon Young; Shin, Jung Hwan; Hong, Young Ok [Eulji Hospital, Eulji University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-06-15

    Krukenberg tumors recognized during pregnancy are rarely reported. The preoperative diagnosis can be challenging because of the confusing morphological features and symptoms during pregnancy. Here, we report a case of a 29-year-old pregnant woman at 29 weeks gestation presenting with bilateral solid ovarian masses, which were later diagnosed as metastatic ovarian cancer originating from advanced gastric cancer. This case suggests that Krukenberg tumors should be considered when bilateral ovarian solid masses are encountered regardless of pregnancy.

  1. Reporting and Handling of Indeterminate Bone Scan Results in the Staging of Prostate Cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Lars J; Strandberg, Jesper; Stenholt, Louise

    2018-01-01

    Bone scintigraphy is key in imaging skeletal metastases in newly diagnosed prostate cancer. Unfortunately, a notable proportion of scans are not readily classified as positive or negative but deemed indeterminate. The extent of reporting of indeterminate bone scans and how such scans are handled...... of prostate cancer was insufficiently reported in clinical trials. In the case of indeterminate scans, most studies provided adequate measures to obtain the final status of the patients....

  2. Breast-like vulvar lesion with concurrent breast cancer: a case report and critical literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perrone, Giuseppe; Altomare, Vittorio; Zagami, Mariagiovanna; Vulcano, Ettore; Muzii, Ludovico; Battista, Cleonice; Rabitti, Carla; Muda, Andrea Onetti

    2009-01-01

    In the current report, we describe an intriguing case of a breast-like cancer lesion located in the vulvar region in a woman lacking a remarkable past medical or family history of breast cancer but with concurrent breast cancer. Consequently, a differential diagnosis between a primary synchronous breast and vulvar cancer or a metastatic breast carcinoma to the vulva is a key point in terms of the clinical approach. In a review of the literature, 39 cases of breast-like cancer lesion have been described: 23 cases of primary infiltrating carcinoma of the vulva and 16 cases of vulvar metastases of breast carcinoma. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of a clinically synchronous vulvar metastasis from an invasive ductal carcinoma. The main diagnostic criteria for differential diagnosis between primary or metastatic breast-like vulvar carcinoma are also discussed.

  3. Metastasis of sigmoid colon cancer in cryptorchid testis: report of a case.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rampa, Mario; Battaglia, Luigi; Caprotti, Andrea; Gazzano, Giacomo; Prestianni, Pierpaolo; Muscarà, Cecilia; Vannelli, Alberto

    2012-01-01

    Isolated testicular metastasis from colorectal cancer is considered an unusual event. In this case report we describe for the first time a metastasis from an adenocarcinoma of the sigmoid colon to a cryptorchid testis. The patient developed a painless testicular nodule three years after the diagnosis of primary sigmoid colon cancer. Recent reports have suggested that the incidence of genitourinary abnormalities in human males has increased over the past 50 years; in particular, cryptorchid testes increase the clinical risk factors for primary or metastatic testicular cancer. In conclusion, there should be awareness of the risk of metastasis of colorectal cancer to the testis in the workup of patients with testicular symptoms. Furthermore, patients with colorectal cancer and cryptorchidism should be managed with a single surgical intervention: when the primary colorectal tumor is removed, the cryptorchid testicle should also be removed to reduce the risk of late metastases.

  4. A preliminary report of breast cancer screening by positron emission mammography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Yayoi; Tasaki, Youichiro; Kuwada, Yukiko; Ozawa, Yukihiko; Inoue, Tomio

    2016-02-01

    Fluorine-18 fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG)-positron emission tomography (PET) and PET/computed tomography (PET/CT) have had a considerable impact on the detection of various malignancies. PET and PET/CT are minimally invasive methods that can provide whole-body imaging at one time. Therefore, an FDG-PET cancer screening program has been widely used in Japan. However, the breast cancer detection rate of FDG-PET cancer screening is relatively low. Therefore, FDG-PET screening is not recommended for breast cancer screening. Positron emission mammography (PEM) is a high-resolution molecular breast imaging technology. PEM can detect small breast cancers that cannot be detected on PET or PET/CT images due to limited spatial resolution. We have performed opportunistic breast cancer screening using PEM since 2011. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report regarding PEM breast cancer screening. This study enrolled 265 women. PEM images were analyzed by agreement of 2 experienced nuclear medicine physicians. The readers were given information from medical interview sheet. US findings were interpreted holistically. The number of participants, patient recall rate, further examination rate, and cancer detection rate by year were calculated. The overall recall rate was 8.3%; the work-up examination rate was 77.3%, and cancer detection rate was 2.3%. The positive predictive value of PEM was 27.3%. Six cancers were found by PEM screening. Five were invasive cancers and one was ductal carcinoma in situ. Histological tumor sizes were reported in three cases: 0.7, 1.2, and 2 cm. PEM screening appears to have potential for breast cancer screening.

  5. The Mini Report: a Practical Tool to Address Lung Cancer Disparities in Rural Communities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mueller-Luckey, Georgia S; Zahnd, Whitney E; Garner, Kyle; Heitkamp, Ruth; Jenkins, Wiley D; Boehler, Michael D; Steward, David E

    2017-06-01

    Community-based participatory research (CBPR) is an effective way to address cancer disparities in medically underserved populations. Our research demonstrates how CBPR principles were used to develop lung cancer and risk factor mini reports for a network of community coalitions in the Illinois Delta Region, a predominately rural region with high lung cancer disparities in southern Illinois. An academic-community partnership, including a community-based medical school, state public health department, and a healthcare system, used CBPR principles to translate epidemiological, behavioral, and demographic data into understandable, comprehensive, yet concise mini reports for each coalition. A cyclical and iterative process was used to draft, revise, and optimize these mini reports to raise awareness about lung cancer disparities in the community and to provide information to help guide the development of interventions that address these disparities. The use of CBPR principles was a successful way to create mini reports about local lung cancer disparities and risk factors that were usable in individual communities. Local coalitions used the mini reports to educate community members at local meetings, to guide strategic planning, and to disseminate information through their respective websites. Additionally, the process of creating these reports built trust among academic-community partners and provided additional avenues of engagement, such as the involvement of an academic partner in the strategic planning process of a local coalition. Using CBPR processes is an effective way to translate epidemiological data into a community-friendly format to address cancer disparities.

  6. [Case report: Muir-Torre syndrome diagnosed from a sebaceoma mimicking an ulcerated breast cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demolin, G; Romain, M; Münschke, A; Vandingenen, T; Blaude, M-A; Van Craynest, M-P

    2016-09-01

    On the basis of a case report, we conducted a search through the literature concerning Muir-Torre syndrome. This syndrome is considered to be a phenotypic variant of Lynch syndrome (or Human Non Polyposis Colorectal Cancer). Muir-Torre syndrome is a familial cancer syndrome defined as the association of an internal malignancy with cutaneous sebaceous tumors. It is a rare disease. In our knowledge, this case is the first reported skin lesion related to Muir-Torre syndrome, located on the breast and mimicking ulcerated breast cancer. Genetic counselling obviously has an important place in the management of this pathology. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  7. Cancer in the gastric remnant after gastric bypass: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khitin, Lev; Roses, Robert E; Birkett, Desmond H

    2003-01-01

    Gastric cancer in the gastric stump after a Bilroth II subtotal gastrectomy is a well-recognized entity. However, gastric cancer in the bypassed gastric remnant after a gastric bypass operation for morbid obesity has not been well described, and only 2 such cases have been reported in the English literature. This case report presents a patient who developed gastric cancer in the defunctionalized, bypassed stomach 22 years after undergoing an open gastric bypass with a Roux-en-Y gastro-jejunostomy for morbid obesity. The problems of monitoring the defunctionalized bypassed stomach after gastric stapling and gastro-jejunostomy are discussed.

  8. Gastric metastasis from invasive lobular breast cancer, mimicking primary gastric cancer: A case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Dae Hoon; Son, Seung-Myoung; Choi, Young Jin

    2018-03-01

    Gastric metastasis from invasive lobular breast cancer is relatively rare, commonly presented among multiple metastases, several years after primary diagnosis of breast cancer. Importantly, gastric cancer that is synchronously presented with lobular breast cancer can be misdiagnosed as primary gastric cancer; therefore, accurate differential diagnosis is required. A 39-year-old woman was visited to our hospital because of right breast mass and progressive dyspepsia. Invasive lobular carcinoma of breast was diagnosed on core needle biopsy. Gastroscopy revealed a diffuse scirrhous mass at the prepyloric antrum and diagnosed as poorly differentiated adenocarcinoma on biopsy. Synchronous double primary breast and gastric cancers were considered. Detailed pathological analysis focused on immunohistochemical studies of selected antibodies, including those of estrogen receptors, gross cystic disease fluid protein-15, and caudal-type homeobox transcription factor 2, were studied. As a result, gastric lesion was diagnosed as metastatic gastric cancer originating from breast. Right breast conserving surgery was performed, and duodenal stent was inserted under endoscopic guidance to relieve the patient's symptoms. Systemic chemotherapy with combined administration of paclitaxel and trastuzumab was initiated. Forty-one months after the diagnosis, the patient is still undergoing the same therapy. No recurrent lesion has been identified in the breast and evidence of a partial remission of gastric wall thickening has been observed on follow-up studies without new metastatic lesions. Clinical suspicion, repeat endoscopic biopsy, and detailed histological analysis, including immunohistochemistry, are necessary for diagnosis of metastatic gastric cancer from the breast.

  9. Gestational Breast Cancer: Report of A Case and Literature Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Filipa Paixão-Barradas

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Gestational or pregnancy-associated breast cancer is defined as breast cancer diagnosed during pregnancy, within the first postpartum year, or during lactation. Breast cancer is one of the most common cancers in nonpregnant and pregnant women. Case presentation: A 29-year-old pregnant woman presented at eight weeks gestational age with a palpable breast nodule. On breast ultrasound evaluation, only probably benign findings were detected. The pregnancy was uneventful until the third trimester when she started to have a severe back pain which became gradually resistant to medical therapy. Therefore, at 33 weeks, she was assisted at an emergency care facility and a highly suspicious breast mass was detected. A core biopsy was performed that revealed an invasive ductal carcinoma grade 3 with lymph node metastasis. After several imaging studies, it was diagnosed as a stage 4 breast cancer with bone, liver, and pulmonary metastasis. At thirty four weeks gestation, the pregnancy was terminated by C-section and she started to receive palliative radiation therapy one week later. She also received several cycles of palliative chemotherapy. Nineteenth months after C-section, progression of the disease was observed and a cerebellar metastasis was found. Unfortunately, two months later, her clinical condition deteriorated and the patient died.Conclusion: Gestational breast cancer represents a clinical situation of utmost important in which the health of both the mother and the fetus should be taken into account. Diagnosis is difficult due to the physiological changes of the mammary glands during pregnancy and lactation, and it usually occurs at an advanced stage.

  10. Of Needles and Haystacks: Building an Accurate Statewide Dropout Early Warning System in Wisconsin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knowles, Jared E.

    2015-01-01

    The state of Wisconsin has one of the highest four year graduation rates in the nation, but deep disparities among student subgroups remain. To address this the state has created the Wisconsin Dropout Early Warning System (DEWS), a predictive model of student dropout risk for students in grades six through nine. The Wisconsin DEWS is in use…

  11. 77 FR 71587 - Wisconsin Public Service Corporation; Notices of Intent To File License Applications, Filing of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-03

    ... Energy Regulatory Commission Wisconsin Public Service Corporation; Notices of Intent To File License.... d. Submitted By: Wisconsin Public Service Corporation. e. Name of Projects: Tomahawk Hydroelectric..., Vice President, Energy Supply Operations, Wisconsin Public Service Corporation, P.O. Box 19001, 700...

  12. 76 FR 48841 - Wisconsin Public Service Corporation; Notice of Application for Amendment of License and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-09

    ... Energy Regulatory Commission Wisconsin Public Service Corporation; Notice of Application for Amendment of..., 2011. d. Applicant: Wisconsin Public Service Corporation. e. Name of Project: High Falls Project. f.... 791a-825r. h. Applicant Contact: James Nuthals, Wisconsin Public Service Corporation, 700 North Adams...

  13. Water-quality assessment of Steiner Branch basin, Lafayette County, Wisconsin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Field, Stephen J.; Lidwin, R.A.

    1982-01-01

    Steiner Branch basin in southwestern Wisconsin has rugged mature topography. Corn is planted in 30 percent of the basin on slopes ranging from 0 to 20 percent. Although contour stripcropping is a recommended practice for these easily eroded soil slopes, few conservation practices are followed to reduce soil losses. Because the stream drains into a manmade lake used for recreation, its water quality is of major concern. The purpose of this report is to assess the magnitude and types of nonpoint discharges that affect the water quality of Steiner Branch.

  14. Introduction to radioactive waste management issues in Wisconsin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1977-01-01

    This brief focused on wastes from commercial production of electricity and various industrial, medical and research applications of radioactive materials. Only traditionally solid wastes are dealt with. It was organized into five parts. Part I presented an introduction to radioactivity - what it is and the biological hazards associated with it. Federal regulation of the management of radioactive wastes was discussed in Part II. Existing state laws and bills currently before the Wisconsin Legislature were described in Part III. Part IV gave background information on specific areas of potential inquiry related to radioactive wastes in Wisconsin. Part V summarized the issues identified in the brief. 2 figures, 7 tables

  15. Biblioteca y Centro de Estudios de la Universidad de Wisconsin - Kenosha - . Wisconsin – (EE.UU.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hellmuth, George

    1978-12-01

    Full Text Available Continuing the line established by these same architects in previous University designs, the Library and Study Hall of the University of Wisconsin is another attempt at creating an exciting atmosphere, particularly conducive to the development of university life. It is to be noted, in this case, the arrangement of the library and study areas around a central common open space, sort of an inner courtyard used as a relaxation and sitting área, where all traffic corridors and promenades from the adjacent faculties come to meet, thus becoming the main reference point for the entire campus. The library with a current capacity for 245,000 volumes and 1,400 reading stalls is designed so it can be eventually enlarged permitting to almost double its book capacity and increasing the reading stalls to more than 2,000.

    Continuando la línea marcada por estos mismos arquitectos en anteriores proyectos de universidades, la biblioteca y el centro de estudios de la Universidad de Wisconsin procura definir atractivos espacios para el desarrollo de la vida universitaria. En este caso destaca la organización de los servicios de biblioteca y estudio en torno a un espacio comunitario central, a modo de plaza interior, destinado a sala de estar y recreo, y en donde confluyen las circulaciones que provienen de los locales adyacentes, convirtiéndolo en el principal punto de referencia del campus universitario. La biblioteca, que actualmente tiene capacidad para 245.000 volúmenes y 1.400 lectores, ha previsto una ampliación que le permitirá casi doblar el número de volúmenes y proporcionar espacio para más de 2.000 lectores.

  16. Intensity-modulated conformal radiotherapy in the anal canal cancer. Report of technological assessment. Updating of the 2006 report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2015-07-01

    As intensity-modulated conformal radiotherapy (IMCR) has already been technologically assessed in 2006 with a positive opinion for some treatments and a negative one for others, and as this technique displays some interesting properties for the treatment of pelvic cancers (optimisation of dose distribution, preservation of sane tissues, reduction of secondary effects during irradiation), this report proposes an assessment of clinical safety and efficiency of IMCR in the treatment of an anal canal cancer. After a discussion of generalities, of histological and epidemiological data, and of knowledge regarding treatment and follow-up of this cancer, the report presents the IMCR technique, some regulatory aspects, and its applications to the considered cancer. The methodology adopted for this assessment is then presented. Based on various studies and clinical results, the IMCR clinical safety and efficiency in the treatment of the anal canal cancer are discussed and assessed. Recommendations produced by different medical professional bodies are reported. Opinion of experts and a synthesis of stakeholders are then proposed

  17. Molecular MR imaging of cancer gene therapy. Ferritin transgene reporter takes the stage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hasegawa, Sumitaka; Furukawa, Takako; Saga, Tsuneo

    2010-01-01

    Molecular imaging using magnetic resonance (MR) imaging has been actively investigated and made rapid progress in the past decade. Applied to cancer gene therapy, the technique's high spatial resolution allows evaluation of gene delivery into target tissues. Because noninvasive monitoring of the duration, location, and magnitude of transgene expression in tumor tissues or cells provides useful information for assessing therapeutic efficacy and optimizing protocols, molecular imaging is expected to become a critical step in the success of cancer gene therapy in the near future. We present a brief overview of the current status of molecular MR imaging, especially in vivo reporter gene imaging using ferritin and other reporters, discuss its application to cancer gene therapy, and present our research of MR imaging detection of electroporation-mediated cancer gene therapy using the ferritin reporter gene. (author)

  18. Erectile Dysfunction in Male Survivors of Childhood Cancer-A Report From the Childhood Cancer Survivor Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ritenour, Chad W M; Seidel, Kristy D; Leisenring, Wendy; Mertens, Ann C; Wasilewski-Masker, Karen; Shnorhavorian, Margarett; Sklar, Charles A; Whitton, John A; Stovall, Marilyn; Constine, Louis S; Armstrong, Gregory T; Robison, Leslie L; Meacham, Lillian R

    2016-06-01

    With survival rates higher than 80%, the number of survivors from pediatric cancer continues to increase. Late effects resulting from cancer and cancer therapy are being characterized, but little information exists on sexual health for men who have survived childhood cancer. To assess erectile dysfunction (ED) in men who survived childhood and adolescent cancers and to identify potential risk factors for ED. In total, 1,622 men and 271 eligible brothers in the Childhood Cancer Survivor Study cohort completed the Male Health Questionnaire, which provided information on sexual practices and sexual function. Combined with demographic, cancer, and treatment information from medical record abstraction, results of the Male Health Questionnaire were analyzed using multivariable modeling. The International Index of Erectile Function was used to identify ED in subjects. International Index of Erectile Function. Survivors (mean age = 37.4 years, SD = 7.3 years) reported significantly lower sexual activity in the year before the survey than the brothers (mean age = 38.8 years, SD = 8.5 years) without cancer. ED was reported by 12.3% (95% CI = 10.4-14.3) of survivors and 4.2% (95% CI = 2.0-7.9) of brothers. Survivors showed significantly higher relative risk (RR) for ED (RR = 2.63, 95% CI = 1.40-4.97). In addition to older age, survivors who were exposed to higher-dose (≥10 Gy) testicular radiation (RR = 3.55, 95% CI = 1.53-8.24), had surgery on the spinal cord or nerves (RR = 2.87, 95% CI = 1.36-6.05), prostate surgery (RR = 6.56, 95% CI = 3.84-11.20), or pelvic surgery (RR = 2.28, 95% CI = 1.04-4.98) were at higher risk for ED. Men who have survived childhood cancer have a greater than 2.6-fold increased risk for ED and certain cancer-specific treatments are associated with increased risk. Attention to sexual health, with its physical and emotional implications, and opportunities for early detection and intervention in these individuals could be important

  19. Case report: Importance of optical diagnosis in early gastric cancer ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Gastric signet ring cell carcinoma (SRCC) is a rare form of highly malignant adenocarcinoma. It is an epithelial malignancy characterized by the histologic appearance of more than 50% of cells as signet ring cells filled with mucin. The incidence of SRCC is rising,[1,2] therefore, the diagnosis of these cancers in the early ...

  20. Breast cancer case using tamoxifen during pregnancy: a case report ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This is a case of 32 years old nulliparous female who was diagnosed in November 2004 as a case of carcinoma of the right breast , luminal A , (Estrogen Receptor positive Progesterone receptor negative, Her 2 negative, Ki67 10 %), poorly differentiated invasive ductal cancer, TNM stage,T2 N0 MO. She had a wide local ...

  1. Glacial Lake Lind, Wisconsin and Minnesota

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, M.D.; Addis, K.L.; Ferber, L.R.; Hemstad, C.B.; Meyer, G.N.; Komai, L.T.

    1999-01-01

    Glacial Lake Lind developed in the pre-late Wisconsinan St. Croix River valley, Minnesota and Wisconsin, and lasted more than 1000 yr during the retreat of the Superior lobe at the end of the Wisconsinan glaciation. Lake Lind sediment consists primarily of red varved silt and clay, but also includes mud-flow deposits, nearshore silt (penecontemporaneously deformed in places), nearshore rippled sand, and deltaic sand. Lake Lind varved red clay is not part of glacial Lake Grantsburg, as suggested by earlier authors, because the red varves are separated from overlying glacial Lake Grantsburg silt and clay by a unit of deltaic and fluvial sand. Furthermore, varve correlations indicate that the base of the red varves is younger to the north, showing that the basin expanded as the Superior lobe retreated and was not a lake basin dammed to the southwest by the advancing Grantsburg sublobe. Varve correlations indicate that the Superior lobe retreated at a rate of about 200 m/yr. Uniform winter-clay thickness throughout most of the varve couplets suggests thermal stratification in the lake with clay trapped in the epilimnion; some clay would exit the lake at the outlet prior to winter freeze. Zones of thicker winter-clay layers, in places associated with mud-flow layers, indicate outlet incision, lake-level fall, and shoreline erosion and resuspension of lake clay. The most likely outlet for glacial Lake Lind was in the southwest part of the lake near the present site of Minneapolis, Minnesota. Nearshore sediment indicates that the lake level of glacial Lake Lind was around 280 m. The elevation of the base of the Lake Lind sediments indicates water depth was 20 to 55 m. Evidence in the southern part of the lake basin suggests that the Superior lobe readvanced at least once during the early stages of glacial Lake Lind. Lake Lind ended not by drainage but by being filled in by prograding deltas and outwash plains composed of sand derived from the retreating Superior lobe. It

  2. Feasibility Study of Economics and Performance of Solar Photovoltaics at the Refuse Hideaway Landfill in Middleton, Wisconsin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salasovich, J.; Mosey, G.

    2011-08-01

    This report presents the results of an assessment of the technical and economic feasibility of deploying a photovoltaics (PV) system on a brownfield site at the Refuse Hideaway Landfill in Middleton, Wisconsin. The site currently has a PV system in place and was assessed for further PV installations. The cost, performance, and site impacts of different PV options were estimated. The economics of the potential systems were analyzed using an electric rate of $0.1333/kWh and incentives offered by the State of Wisconsin and by the serving utility, Madison Gas and Electric. According to the site production calculations, the most cost-effective system in terms of return on investment is the thin-film fixed-tilt technology. The report recommends financing options that could assist in the implementation of such a system.

  3. Do recently diagnosed black breast cancer patients find questions about cancer fatalism acceptable? A preliminary report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheppard, Vanessa B; Davis, Kimberly; Boisvert, Marc; Boisvert, Mare; Jennings, Yvonne; Montalvo, Becky

    2011-03-01

    Socio-cultural factors such as cancer fatalism have been understudied in cancer patients. Women from two cancer centers completed a structured phone survey and an open-ended cognitive interview. Socio-cultural variables of fatalism, hope, and spiritual coping were measured using standardized scales. Older women had significantly higher fatalism scores compared to younger women (p Fatalism rates were low. Ratings of hope and collaborative religious coping were high (m = 20, m = 35, respectively). Qualitative comments confirmed the overall low acceptability of the fatalism measures. Further research is needed to identify measures that are acceptable to newly diagnosed patients.

  4. Non-thyroid cancer in Northern Ukraine in the post-Chernobyl period: Short report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatch, M; Ostroumova, E; Brenner, A; Federenko, Z; Gorokh, Y; Zvinchuk, O; Shpak, V; Tereschenko, V; Tronko, M; Mabuchi, K

    2015-06-01

    The Chernobyl nuclear power plant accident in Ukraine in 1986 led to widespread radioactive releases into the environment - primarily of radioiodines and cesium - heavily affecting the northern portions of the country, with settlement-averaged thyroid doses estimated to range from 10 mGy to more than 10 Gy. The increased risk of thyroid cancer among exposed children and adolescents is well established but the impact of radioactive contamination on the risk of other types of cancer is much less certain. To provide data on a public health issue of major importance, we have analyzed the incidence of non-thyroid cancers during the post-Chernobyl period in a well-defined cohort of 13,203 individuals who were <18 years of age at the time of the accident. The report is based on standardized incidence ratio (SIR) analysis of 43 non-thyroid cancers identified through linkage with the National Cancer Registry of Ukraine for the period 1998 through 2009. We compared the observed and expected number of cases in three cancer groupings: all solid cancers excluding thyroid, leukemia, and lymphoma. Our analyses found no evidence of a statistically significant elevation in cancer risks in this cohort exposed at radiosensitive ages, although the cancer trends, particularly for leukemia (SIR=1.92, 95% confidence interval: 0.69; 4.13), should continue to be monitored. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Understanding Cancer Prognosis

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Using Trusted Resources Cancer Types Adolescents and Young Adults with Cancer Reports, Research, and Literature Cancers by ... Cancers by Body Location Childhood Cancers Adolescent & Young Adult Cancers Metastatic Cancer Recurrent Cancer Research NCI’s Role ...

  6. Understanding Cancer Prognosis

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Information Advance Directives Using Trusted Resources Cancer Types Adolescents and Young Adults with Cancer Reports, Research, and ... of Cancers Cancers by Body Location Childhood Cancers Adolescent & Young Adult Cancers Metastatic Cancer Recurrent Cancer Research ...

  7. 77 FR 19674 - National Cancer Institute; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-02

    ... commercial property such as patentable material, and personal information concerning individuals associated... and evaluate grant applications. Place: Doubletree Hotel Bethesda, 8120 Wisconsin Avenue, Bethesda, MD... Institute Special Emphasis Panel; Innovative Molecular Analysis Technologies for Cancer (R21). Date: June 26...

  8. EARLY RECURRENCE OF WELL-DIFFERENTIATED ENDOMETRIAL CANCER (A CASE REPORT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. E. Levchrnko

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Endometrial cancer is the 6-th most common malignancy in women worldwide, accounting for about 4.8 % of all female cancers. The treatment of recurrent endometrial cancer remains a major challenge. Some endometrial cancer recurrences, for example vaginal stump recurrence, are reported to be effectively treated with surgical resection and radiation therapy. Early recurrence of early-stage well-differentiated endometrial cancer is uncommon. Case report. Herein we report a rare case of recurrent well-differentiated endometrial cancer in a 65-year-old woman. The patient had recurrence 10 months after laparoscopic hysterectomy with bilateral salpingo-oophorectomy. Recurrent endometrial tumor with extension into the rectosigmoid colon, urinary bladder and the right ureter manifested itself clinically with severe pain requiring the use of opioids. The recurrent tumor was removed. Resection of the bladder, left ureter and upper ampular rectum was followed by anastomosis. The patient received multiple cycles of chemotherapy. Conclusion. Compliance with the principles of ablastics during the laparoscopic or laparotomic surgery helps to avoid recurrence in patients with prognostically favorable cancer. In case of recurrence, combined operations are the only possible chance of improving survival of patients with locally advanced or recurrent tumors, which are insensitive to chemoradiotherapy.

  9. NASA Sponsors Cancer Research at Children's Hospital

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998-01-01

    NASA Administrator Dan Goldin (left), during a visit at Children's Hospital of Wisconsin in Milwaukee, Wisconsin, discussed how NASA's special lighting technology may soon treat cancer. Goldin talked with Dr.Harry Whelan (right) and Dr. Kerneth Reichert (center left), both pediatric neurologists with the Hospital and professors at the Medical College of Wisconsin in Milwaukee. Accompanied by Astronaut Mary Ellen Weber, Goldin was shown this innovative treatment, called Photodynamic Therapy, a method used to destroy the tumor without damaging the delicate brain tissue around it. The treatment uses tiny pinhead-size Light Emitting Diodes (LEDs) developed for Space Product Development plant growth experiments.

  10. Does Cancer Therapy Causes Cancer? A Case Report and Mini Review of the Literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikolaos Thomakos

    2010-08-01

    We present an atypical case of endometrial cancer formerly submitted to pelvic irradiation because of cervical carcinoma and we discuss the eventual association of pelvic radiation with a subsequent endometrial carcinoma.

  11. Colon cancer metastasis to the mandibular gingiva with partial occult squamous differentiation: A case report and literature review

    OpenAIRE

    Ren, Quan-Guang; Huang, Tao; Yang, Sheng-Li; Hu, Jian-Li

    2016-01-01

    Metastasis is the primary cause of death among patients with colon cancer. However, the number of available studies regarding oral cavity metastases from colon cancer is currently limited. We herein report an unusual case of a 60-year-old male patient who developed an oral cavity metastasis from colon cancer. A total of 12 clinical case studies reporting colon cancer metastases to the mandibular gingival region were also reviewed, with the aim to elucidate the clinical and pathological charac...

  12. Oral contraceptive use and cancer: final report from the Oxford-Family Planning Association contraceptive study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vessey, Martin; Yeates, David

    2013-12-01

    This analysis provides the final results on cancer incidence in relation to oral contraceptive (OC) use from the Oxford-Family Planning Association (Oxford-FPA) contraceptive study, which closed at the end of 2010. An additional 6 years of observation have been added since our last report and there has been an increase in the numbers of cancers of over 50% at seven of the sites considered. The Oxford-FPA study includes 17032 women aged 25-39 years recruited from 1968 to 1974 at contraceptive clinics in England and Scotland. These women were using OCs, a diaphragm or an intrauterine device. Information about cancer incidence among them has been collected from recruitment until closure of the study. OC use was not related to nonreproductive cancer. Breast cancer findings (1087 cases) were entirely negative; the rate ratio (RR) comparing ever users of OCs with never users was 1.0 [95% confidence interval (CI): 0.9-1.1]. Only two cases of cervical cancer have been added since our last report (total: 61 cases); the RR comparing ever use with never use is now 3.4 (95% CI: 1.6-8.9). The risk of this disease increases sharply with duration of OC use and declines steadily with interval since last OC use. OC use protects against both uterine body cancer (124 cases) and ovarian cancer (143 cases). The RRs comparing ever use with never use were 0.5 (95% CI: 0.3-0.7) and 0.5 (95% CI: 0.4-0.7), respectively. Protection against both these cancers increased with duration of OC use and waned with interval since last use, but an effect was still present 28 or more years after discontinuation. In our study, OC use had no effect on nonreproductive cancers or on breast cancer. The risk of cervical cancer was increased and that of uterine body cancer and ovarian cancer was decreased by OC use. All these effects increased with duration of use and declined with interval since last use. The beneficial effects of OC use on cancer outweighed the adverse effects. These findings should

  13. Health Behaviors and Self-Reported Health Among Cancer Survivors by Sexual Orientation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jabson, Jennifer M; Farmer, Grant W; Bowen, Deborah J

    2015-03-01

    Health behaviors and self-reported health are important for understanding cancer survivor health. However, there is a paucity of published research about how cancer survivors' health behaviors and self-rated health vary by sexual orientation. This study examined cancer survivors' health behaviors and self-reported health by sexual orientation. This study used data from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) from 2001-2010. Self-reported health and cancer-related health behaviors were compared by sexual orientation. Propensity score adjustment was used to account for differences in age, race, education, gender and health insurance status. Of the 602 survivors eligible for the study, 4.3% identified as sexual minorities. Sexual minorities were 2.6 times more likely to report a history of illicit drug use (adjusted odds ratio [aOR]=2.4, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.04, 5.35), and 60% less likely to report their current health status as good (aOR=0.40, 95% CI: 0.18, 0.89), compared to heterosexual cancer survivors. These disparities persisted even after adjustment for socio-demographic characteristics. Our findings suggest that sexual minority cancer survivors may be at greater risk for poorer outcomes after cancer than other survivors. A possible explanation for the observed differences involves minority stress. Future research should test stress as an explanation for these differences. However, using population-methods to achieve this goal requires larger samples of lesbian, gay, and bisexual (LGB) cancer survivors.

  14. LAPAROSCOPIC ANTERIOR PELVIC EXENTERATION FOR STAGE IVa CERVICAL CANCER (A CASE REPORT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. V. Molchanov

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Recently, there has been an increasing use of laparoscopy in the surgical treatment of gynecologic cancer. We aimed to analyze the feasibility of performing laparoscopic pelvic extentaration for stage IVa cervical cancer. Case report. We present the case of a 61-year-old patient diagnosed with stage IVa (T4N0M0 cervical cancer. The examination revealed cervical cancer invading the bladder wall and extending to the mouth of uretersю The patient underwent laparoscopy and bilateral uretherocutaneostomy as the first line treatment. When creatinine and urea blood levels were in the normal range, the patient underwent laparoscopic anterior pelvic exentaration as the second line treatment. After surgery the patient received pelvic external beam radiation therapy. The follow-up period was 6 months. Conclusion. We have shown the feasibility of performing laparoscopic anterior pelvic exenteration for stage IVa cervical cancer complicated by complete obstruction of one kidney and partial obstruction of another kidney

  15. Dragonflies are biocontrol agents in Wisconsin cranberry marshes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dragonflies (Order Odonata) are abundant predators that emerge in large hatch events each summer in Wisconsin cranberry marshes. They seem to be a potential group of biocontrol agents for pest management that may be influenced by the diversity found on the marsh. In fact, our evidence shows that dra...

  16. Southeastern Wisconsin Workplace Communication Project Curriculum Development Guide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frederick, Catherine; Huss-Lederman, Susan; Johnson, Jewelie

    The Southeastern Wisconsin Workplace Communication Project is a workplace English-as-a-Second-Language (ESL) resource and outreach program involving a partnership of businesses and adult educators in a rural area that has experienced an increase in new speakers of English in the manufacturing workforce. The guide provides workplace educators and…

  17. WEAKLY SYNCHRYRONIZED SUBPOPULATION DYNAMICS IN WISCONSIN FROGS AND TOADS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spatial synchrony in population dynamics is a topic of increasing interest in basic and applied ecology. We used data from 18 years of frog and toad calling surveys conducted throughout Wisconsin to determine the level of intraspecific synchrony among survey sites, and the relat...

  18. On Farmers’ Ground: Wisconsin Dairy Farm Nutrient Management Survey Questionnaire

    Science.gov (United States)

    This questionnaire was used during quarterly, face-to-face interviews with the fifty-four Wisconsin dairy farmers who participated in the ‘On Farmers’ Ground’ nutrient management research project. It was designed to systematically and consistently compile information on herd size and composition, l...

  19. Quaternary Glacial Mapping in Western Wisconsin Using Soil Survey Information

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oehlke, Betsy M.; Dolliver, Holly A. S.

    2011-01-01

    The majority of soils in the western Wisconsin have developed from glacial sediments deposited during the Quaternary Period (2.6 million years before present). In many regions, multiple advances and retreats have left a complex landscape of diverse glacial sediments and landforms. The soils that have developed on these deposits reflect the nature…

  20. The Wisconsin experience with incentives for demand-side management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Landgren, D.A.

    1990-01-01

    It has been noted that, within traditional regulatory frameworks for electric utilities, factors exist which discourage demand side management (DSM) and that there is a lack of positive incentives for DSM. Regulatory agencies should therefore make it possible for DSM measures to benefit from the same treatment as supply-side measures. The Wisconsin Public Service Commission (WPSC) has recognized this need and has adopted various measures accordingly. The need for efficiency incentives is described according to the particular experience of Wisconsin Electric concerning their recourse to a DSM incentive and according to new incentive models being tested in collaboration with other electricity suppliers in Wisconsin. The WPSC has concluded that the fact of considering the costs relating to DSM as expenses or capitalizing them within the rate base does not motivate the utility to promote DSM programs. The WPSC has thus decided to experiment with energy efficiency incentives in order to evaluate their eventual impact. The choice of the type of incentive had an objective of starting the process in an area where the lack of experience has created, from the regulatory point of view, a reticence on the part of utilities to engage in DSM programs. The WPSC has designed a variety of incentive models which have been adapted to each utility's own situation. Specific incentive programs developed for three Wisconsin utilities are reviewed

  1. Wisconsin's Infants and Toddlers. Publication #2015-17

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphey, David; Cooper, Mae

    2015-01-01

    Wisconsin's infants and toddlers (defined as children less than three years old) are more than 200,000 in number. Seventy-one percent are white/non-Hispanic, and the largest minority group is Hispanic, at 12 percent. Black, Asian American, and American Indian infants and toddlers make up smaller percentages. To help states target policies related…

  2. 77 FR 16674 - Establishment of the Wisconsin Ledge Viticultural Area

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-22

    .... All of the comments expressed support for the proposed Wisconsin Ledge viticultural area. TTB... label reference on a wine that indicates or implies an origin other than the wine's true place of origin... or other term identified as being viticulturally significant in part 9 of the TTB regulations, at...

  3. Skill Needs and Training Strategies in the Wisconsin Printing Industry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wisconsin Univ., Madison. Center on Wisconsin Strategy.

    A study examined the emerging skill needs in the Wisconsin printing industry, a key industry that provided the largest increase (more than 13,000 new jobs) in manufacturing employment in the state in the past decade. Eighteen interviews were conducted with industry personnel and production managers, union representatives, technical college…

  4. Quality of patient-reported outcome reporting across cancer randomized controlled trials according to the CONSORT patient-reported outcome extension: A pooled analysis of 557 trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Efficace, Fabio; Fayers, Peter; Pusic, Andrea; Cemal, Yeliz; Yanagawa, Jane; Jacobs, Marc; la Sala, Andrea; Cafaro, Valentina; Whale, Katie; Rees, Jonathan; Blazeby, Jane

    2015-09-15

    The main objectives of this study were to identify the number of randomized controlled trials (RCTs) including a patient-reported outcome (PRO) endpoint across a wide range of cancer specialties and to evaluate the completeness of PRO reporting according to the Consolidated Standards of Reporting Trials (CONSORT) PRO extension. RCTs with a PRO endpoint that had been performed across several cancer specialties and published between 2004 and 2013 were considered. Studies were evaluated on the basis of previously defined criteria, including the CONSORT PRO extension and the Cochrane Collaboration's tool for assessing the risk of bias of RCTs. Analyses were also conducted by the type of PRO endpoint (primary vs secondary) and by the cancer disease site. A total of 56,696 potentially eligible records were scrutinized, and 557 RCTs with a PRO evaluation, enrolling 254,677 patients overall, were identified. PROs were most frequently used in RCTs of breast (n = 123), lung (n = 85), and colorectal cancer (n = 66). Overall, PROs were secondary endpoints in 421 RCTs (76%). Four of 6 evaluated CONSORT PRO items were documented in less than 50% of the RCTs. The level of reporting was higher in RCTs with a PRO as a primary endpoint. The presence of a supplementary report was the only statistically significant factor associated with greater completeness of reporting for both RCTs with PROs as primary endpoints (β = .19, P = .001) and RCTs with PROs as secondary endpoints (β = .30, P CONSORT PRO extension is equally important across all cancer specialties. Its use can also contribute to revealing the robust PRO design of some studies, which might be obscured by poor outcome reporting. © 2015 American Cancer Society.

  5. Cancer and birth defects surveillance system for communities around the Savannah River Site. Annual progress report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dunbar, J.B.

    1993-05-01

    This technical report presents the age-adjusted total, and race and sex specific geographic patterns of cancer mortality for South Carolina (SC) counties utilizing the 1953--1987 average annual age-adjusted mortality rates (AAMRs). The mortality information was obtained from the State Cancer Control Map and Data Program produced by the National Cancer Institute , Centers for Disease Control and the American Cancer Society. The AAMRs for selected primary sites are classified as significantly different or not significantly different from the corresponding United States and SC mortality rates. Categories for classification of the rates are determined using 95% confidence intervals. Geographic patterns of significantly high county AAMRs are identified and discussed. Individual county rates are not emphasized. The terminology, mortality rates used throughout this report pertains to the 1953--1987 AAMRS.

  6. Risk factors for pregnancy-associated breast cancer: a report from the Nigerian Breast Cancer Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Ningqi; Ogundiran, Temidayo; Ojengbede, Oladosu; Morhason-Bello, Imran; Zheng, Yonglan; Fackenthal, James; Adebamowo, Clement; Anetor, Imaria; Akinleye, Stella; Olopade, Olufunmilayo I; Huo, Dezheng

    2013-09-01

    Little is known about risk factors for pregnancy-associated breast cancer (PABC), diagnosed during pregnancy or postpartum. We enrolled 1715 premenopausal women from the Nigerian Breast Cancer Study from 1998 to 2011. Based on recency of last pregnancy from diagnosis, breast cancer cases were categorized as (1) PABC diagnosed 2 years or longer postpartum, (2) PABC diagnosed 3 to 5 years postpartum, or (3) non-PABC diagnosed more than 5 years postpartum. Controls were matched to cases on recency of last pregnancy. Multiple logistic regressions were performed comparing cases and controls within each group. Of the 718 cases, 152 (21.2%) had PABC 2 or more years postpartum, and 145 (20.2%) 3 to 5 years postpartum. Although not statistically significant, women with higher parity tend to have an elevated risk of PABC but reduced risk of non-PABC (p for heterogeneity = 0.097). Family history of breast cancer might be a strong predictor particularly for PABC 2 or more years postpartum (odds ratio, 3.28; 95% confidence interval, 1.05-10.3). Compared with non-PABC cases, PABC 2 or more years postpartum cases were more likely to carry BRCA1/2 mutations (P = .03). Parity may have different roles in the development of PABC versus other premenopausal breast cancer in Nigerian women. Prospective mothers with multiple births and a family history of breast cancer may have an elevated risk of breast cancer during their immediate postpartum period. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Audit of Histopathology Reports for Breast Cancer in Aminu Kano ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    BACKGROUND: The usefulness of histopathology reports is a function of the quality of information contained therein. Thus there is need to establish minimum criteria to be met in reporting cases as a quality control mechanism. OBJECTIVE: To audit the quality of histopathology reports of mastectomy specimens received in ...

  8. Data quality in rare cancers registration: the report of the RARECARE data quality study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trama, Annalisa; Marcos-Gragera, Rafael; Sánchez Pérez, Maria Josè; van der Zwan, Jan Maarten; Ardanaz, Eva; Bouchardy, Christine; Melchor, Juan Manuel; Martinez, Carmen; Capocaccia, Riccardo; Vicentini, Massimo; Siesling, Sabine; Gatta, Gemma

    2017-01-21

    Rare cancers represent 22% of all tumors in Europe; however, the quality of the data of rare cancers may not be as good as the quality of data for common cancer. The project surveillance of rare cancers in Europe (RARECARE) had, among others, the objective of assessing rare cancer data quality in population-based cancer registries (CRs). Eight rare cancers were considered: mesothelioma, liver angiosarcoma, sarcomas, tumors of oral cavity, CNS tumors, germ cell tumors, leukemia, and malignant digestive endocrine tumors. We selected data on 18,000 diagnoses and revised, on the basis of the pathologic and clinical reports (but not on pathologic specimens), unspecified morphology and topography codes originally attributed by CR officers and checked the quality of follow-up of long-term survivors of poor prognosis cancers. A total of 38 CRs contributed from 13 European countries. The majority of unspecified morphology and topography cases were confirmed as unspecified. The few unspecified cases that, after the review, changed to a more specific diagnosis increased the incidence of the common cancer histotypes. For example, 11% of the oral cavity epithelial cancers were reclassified from unspecified to more specific diagnoses: 8% were reclassified as squamous cell carcinoma (commoner) and only 1% as adenocarcinoma (rarer). The revision confirmed the majority of long-term survivors revealing a relative high proportion of mesothelioma long-term survivors. The majority of appendix carcinoids changed behavior from malignant to borderline lesions. Our study suggests that the problem of poorly specified morphology and topography cases is mainly one of difficulty in reaching a precise diagnosis. The awareness of the importance of data quality for rare cancers should increase among registrars, pathologists, and clinicians.

  9. Endometrial Cancer with Sarcoidosis in Regional Lymph Nodes: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Satoshi Tamauchi

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Sarcoidosis is a chronic, multisystemic disease commonly affecting the lungs and lymphatic system and is characterized by the formation of noncaseating granulomas. Although several reports are available on cases developing both sarcoidosis and cancer metachronously, cases of simultaneous diagnosis of these diseases have rarely been reported. A 67-year-old woman diagnosed with endometrial cancer had developed systemic lymph node swelling, including bilateral hilar, paraaortic, and a few pelvic lymph nodes, as observed on preoperative imaging. During surgery, frozen sections of a paraaortic lymph node were examined, revealing noncaseating granulomas compatible with sarcoidosis. Next, modified radical hysterectomy, bilateral salpingo-oophorectomy, and pelvic lymphadenectomy were performed. Postoperative pathological analysis revealed endometrioid adenocarcinoma of the uterus, and no metastasis but noncaseating granulomas were detected in the resected lymph nodes. Postoperatively, we identified cutaneous sarcoidosis and uveitis in the presence of a tuberculin-negative test. On the basis of these findings, we diagnosed the patients with endometrial cancer complicated by sarcoidosis. She underwent adjuvant chemotherapy, and at the 1-year follow-up, the lymph node swelling due to sarcoidosis was stable, and no recurrence of the cancer was observed. This turned out to be a case of early endometrial cancer mimicking advanced cancer by sarcoidosis. Histological confirmation and additional examination for sarcoidosis are necessary in cancer patients suspected of sarcoidosis.

  10. Ovarian cancer mimicking recurrence at colorectal anastomosis: report of a case.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Reardon, C M

    2012-02-03

    PURPOSE: The aim of this article is to emphasize the increased risk of developing metachronous ovarian tumors after resection of rectal cancer. METHOD AND RESULTS: We report the case of a postmenopausal female patient who, five years after anterior resection, developed a primary ovarian malignancy that invaded a rectal anastomosis and in so doing mimicked a recurrence of a Dukes A rectal cancer. To our knowledge, such an occurrence has not been described previously in the literature. CONCLUSION: This case illustrates the possible benefits of routine prophylactic oophorectomy at the time of colorectal cancer resection.

  11. Endometrial and cervical metastases leading to the diagnosis of a primary breast cancer: A case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E Chupryna

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Breast cancer can metastasize to a vast array of organs, but in rare cases cancer can form secondary lesions in the uterus and cervix. In our case report we have a 56 years old female with gynaecologic bleeding, bloating, and difficulty in breathing, fatigue, weakness and polyuria. After performing of dilatation and curettage the result was endometrial and cervical metastases which show histopathological and immunohistochemical results suggesting invasive lobular carcinoma of the breast that leads to primary breast cancer. The treatment was estimated on the basis of her status.

  12. Bullous lung diseases as a risk factor for lung cancer: A case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nagorni-Obradović Ljudmila

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. A possible association between lung cancer and bullous lung disease has been suggested and recently supported by the results of genetic studies. Case report. A previously healthy 43-year-old man, smoker, was diagnosed with bullous lung disease at the age of 31 years. He was followed up for 12 years when lung cancer (adenocarcinoma was found at the site. In the meantime, he was treated for recurrent respiratory infections. Conclusion. There is the need for active approach in following up the patients with pulmonary bulla for potential development of lung cancer.

  13. An anisakis larva attached to early gastric cancer: report of a case.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sonoda, Hideto; Yamamoto, Kazuharu; Ozeki, Kazuyuki; Inoye, Humio; Toda, Shuji; Maehara, Yoshihiko

    2015-10-01

    Gastrointestinal anisakidosis is a nematode infection caused by the ingestion of larvae-infected raw or undercooked fish. The Japanese like to eat raw or undercooked fish, so gastric anisakiasis is a common disease in Japan. However, reports of anisakiasis with gastrointestinal cancer are rare. A 63-year-old Japanese male was diagnosed with a small early gastric cancerous lesion associated with gastric anisakiasis. From our experience and based on a review of the literature, the attachment of an anisakis larva to early gastric cancer is not considered accidental.

  14. Pyometra presenting in conjunction with bowel cancer in a post-menopausal women: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soleymani Majd, Hooman; Watermeyer, Sean; Ismail, Lamiese

    2008-07-08

    This case describes a 71 year old, post-menopausal woman who developed vaginal discharge. This complaint ultimately led to the discovery of bowel cancer in conjunction with a large sterile pyometra.The pyometra was not due to genital malignancy. The most likely conclusion is that the pyometra may have arisen as an inflammatory response to the adjacent bowel pathology. This case report highlights the need for clinicians to consider non-gynaecological cancer as a possible cause for otherwise unexplained pyometra.

  15. Pyometra presenting in conjunction with bowel cancer in a post-menopausal women: a case report

    OpenAIRE

    Soleymani majd, Hooman; Watermeyer, Sean; Ismail, Lamiese

    2008-01-01

    This case describes a 71 year old, post-menopausal woman who developed vaginal discharge. This complaint ultimately led to the discovery of bowel cancer in conjunction with a large sterile pyometra. The pyometra was not due to genital malignancy. The most likely conclusion is that the pyometra may have arisen as an inflammatory response to the adjacent bowel pathology. This case report highlights the need for clinicians to consider non-gynaecological cancer as a possible cause for otherwise u...

  16. Superior Vena Cava Syndrome in a Patient with Small-Cell Lung Cancer: A Case Report

    OpenAIRE

    Christina Brzezniak; Bryan Oronsky; Corey A. Carter; Bennett Thilagar; Scott Caroen; Karen Zeman

    2017-01-01

    Superior vena cava (SVC) syndrome, a potential oncologic emergency, is closely associated with malignancy and right-sided lung cancer in particular. A case of SVC syndrome presenting with facial swelling, neck distension, and enlarged veins of the upper chest, which developed over a period of 5 weeks in a 46-year-old patient on a clinical trial with small-cell lung cancer, is reported. Computed tomography scan of the chest revealed slight enlargement of a superior conglomerate mediastinal lym...

  17. Association of chagasic megacolon and cancer of the colon: case report and review of the literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adad Sheila Jorge

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available There are few descriptions of association between chagasic megacolon and colon cancer. We report a case of obstructive abdomen caused by adenocarcinoma of the left colon in chagasic megacolon. A review of the literature revealed 8 cases of this association and, analyzing together the series of findings of cancer in chagasic organomegalies, we found a frequency of 4.8% in megaesophagus and 0.1% in megacolon.

  18. A case report of long term bevacizumab treatment in multiresistant ovarian cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kargo, Anette Stolberg; Adimi, Parvin; Dahl-Steffensen, Karina

    2016-01-01

    Treatment of multiresistant ovarian cancer is palliative and patients have needs for less toxic treatment. Anti-angiogenic treatments have a less toxic profile, and bevacizumab has shown improvement of progression free survival (PFS) in front-line trials. Bevacizumab is generally introduced in co...... in combination with chemotherapy; however this case report will describe the use of single-agent bevacizumab for more than five years (102 cycles) in a patient with relapse of advanced ovarian cancer...

  19. Fatal pneumonitis associated with postoperative intensity-modulated radiotherapy in lung cancer: Case report and review

    OpenAIRE

    HU, YAN; LI, JINGJING; SU, XIAOYAN

    2012-01-01

    Radiation pneumonitis (RP) is the most significant complication of acute treatment-related toxicities in lung cancer. Intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) with inverse planning enables us to achieve the desired dose distribution. However, there are many high-risk procedures associated with lung irradiation, including chemotherapy and surgery. We report a case of fatal treatment-related pneumonitis, where the patient had undergone postoperative IMRT for lung cancer. Following completion of ...

  20. Positron emission tomography/computed tomography data of a tuberculosis mimicking lung cancer: A Case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amine Benjelloun

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available PET/CT is a modern and very valuable tool for detecting primary or secondary lung cancers. However, in countries where tuberculosis is endemic, data must be interpreted with caution because of the frequent tuberculomas. We report here a case of a cancer-like tuberculoma of the lung with paralysis of the left vocal cord, and discuss the PET/CT contribution in tuberculomas as well as the noncancer etiologies of this damage.

  1. Academic Ambitions and Library Development: The American Bureau of Industrial Research and the State Historical Society of Wisconsin, 1904-18. Occasional Paper Number 159.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colson, John Calvin

    Intended to contribute to a better understanding of research library development in the United States, this report describes the history of the development of the library of the State Historical Society of Wisconsin from 1904 to 1918. It is based on records of the relationships between three principals--John R. Commons and Richard T. Ely (members…

  2. Parent illness appraisals, parent adjustment, and parent-reported child quality of life in pediatric cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mullins, Larry L; Cushing, Christopher C; Suorsa, Kristina I; Tackett, Alayna P; Molzon, Elizabeth S; Mayes, Sunnye; McNall-Knapp, Rene; Mullins, Alexandria J; Gamwell, Kaitlyn L; Chaney, John M

    2016-08-01

    Psychosocial distress is a salient construct experienced by families of children with newly diagnosed cancer, but little is known about parental appraisal of the child's illness and the subsequent impact this may have on child and parent functioning. The goal of the present study was to examine the interrelationships among multiple parent illness appraisals, parent adjustment outcomes, and parent-reported child quality of life in parents of children diagnosed with cancer. Parents completed measures of illness appraisal (illness uncertainty and attitude toward illness), parent adjustment (general distress, posttraumatic stress, parenting stress), and child quality of life (general and cancer-related). Path analysis revealed direct effects for parent illness uncertainty and illness attitudes on all 3 measures of parent adjustment. Illness uncertainty, but not illness attitudes, demonstrated a direct effect on parent-reported child general quality of life; parenting stress had direct effects on general and cancer-related quality of life. Exploratory analyses indicated that parent illness uncertainty and illness attitudes conferred indirect effects on parent-reported general and cancer-related quality of life through parenting stress. Negative parent illness appraisals appear to have adverse impacts on parents' psychosocial functioning and have implications for the well-being of their child with cancer.

  3. Periodical Publishing in Wisconsin. Proceedings of the Conference on Periodical Publishing in Wisconsin (Madison, WI, May 11-12, 1978).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danky, James P., Ed.; And Others

    The papers contained in this compilation were drawn from the proceedings of a 1978 conference on periodical publishing in Wisconsin. Papers in the first section of the collection deal with the basics of publishing and cover such topics as selecting articles, starting a new publication, mailing procedures, aesthetics and layout, and printing…

  4. Informed Forces for Environmental Quality, Conference Proceedings (University of Wisconsin, Green Bay, Wisconsin, March 28-29, 1968).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wisconsin Univ., Green Bay.

    To increase understanding of the dimensions of man's impact on his environment and the key issues involved in improving that environment through education and action was the goal of the environmental quality conference held at the University of Wisconsin, Green Bay, on March 28-29, 1968. Contained in this document are the conference…

  5. FIELD CANCERIZATION IN LICHEN PLANUS – AN UNUSUAL CASE REPORT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tamgadge Avinash

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Lichen Planus is a muco-cutaneous disorder affecting females. The oral lesions precede the skin lesions, with malignant potential rate, ranging from 0.3 to 3%. Malignant changes are usually associated with stress and cocarcinogens. Usually, malignant transformation is presented as solitary lesion in the oral cavity, Oral Squamous Cell Carcinoma (OSCC, developing at multiple sites, as a very rare finding in patients of Oral Lichen Planus (OLP. A case of OLP without risk factors and strong history of stress, the Grinspan syndrome with field cancerization is presented in this article

  6. Concurrent Intrathyroidal Thyroid Cancer and Thyroid Cancer in Struma Ovarii: A Case Report and Literature Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Middelbeek, Roeland J W; O'Neill, Brian T; Nishino, Michiya; Pallotta, Johanna A

    2017-05-01

    The presence of differentiated thyroid cancer in mature cystic teratomas in the ovaries is rare, and usually incidentally found on surgical pathology specimens. We present a case of simultaneous intrathyroidal thyroid cancer and thyroid cancer within a struma ovarii, presenting specific diagnostic challenges. A 55-year-old woman had an intrathyroidal, encapsulated 1.2-cm papillary thyroid carcinoma, follicular variant, which was resected. Laboratory studies showed an elevated thyroglobulin level of 35 ng/mL while on suppressive levothyroxine therapy. During preparation for radioactive iodine ablation, thyroglobulin increased dramatically to 3490 ng/mL. A pretreatment whole-body scan showed residual tracer uptake in the thyroid bed and increased radiotracer uptake in the pelvis that raised concern for a pelvic metastasis, given the marked thyroglobulin elevation. After ablation, the posttreatment scan showed intense focal uptake in the pelvis. Single-photon emission computed tomography-computed tomography confirmed that the tracer uptake corresponded to a right adnexal mass. The patient underwent a laparoscopic bilateral salpingo-oophorecotomy with pelvic washings. The final pathology of the right ovary showed papillary thyroid carcinoma arising in a mature cystic teratoma. In addition, there was abundant normal thyroid tissue with colloid surrounding the carcinoma, indicating a source for the dramatic rise in thyroglobulin levels and suggesting that the ovarian papillary thyroid cancer arose within the teratoma and was not metastatic disease. Thyroglobulin measurements have been undetectable for 5 years since surgery and radioiodine treatment. Concurrent intrathyroidal thyroid cancer and differentiated thyroid cancer in struma ovarii are very rare, but can often be distinguished on clinical grounds.

  7. Patient-reported upper extremity outcome measures used in breast cancer survivors: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrington, Shana; Michener, Lori A; Kendig, Tiffany; Miale, Susan; George, Steven Z

    2014-01-01

    (1) To identify English-language published patient-reported upper extremity outcome measures used in breast cancer research and (2) to examine construct validity and responsiveness in patient-reported upper extremity outcome measures used in breast cancer research. PubMed, Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature, and ProQuest MEDLINE databases were searched up to February 5, 2013. Studies were included if a patient-reported upper extremity outcome measure was administered, the participants were diagnosed with breast cancer, and the study was published in English. A total of 865 articles were screened. Fifty-nine full text articles were assessed for eligibility. A total of 46 articles met the initial eligibility criteria for aim 1. Eleven of these articles reported means and SDs for the outcome scores and included a comparison group analysis for aim 2. Construct validity was evaluated by calculating effect sizes for known-group differences in 6 studies using the Disabilities of Arm, Shoulder and Hand (DASH), University of Pennsylvania Shoulder Score, Shoulder Disability Questionnaire-Dutch, and 10 Questions by Wingate. Responsiveness was analyzed comparing a treatment and control group by calculating the coefficient of responsiveness in 5 studies for the DASH and 10 Questions by Wingate. Eight different patient-reported upper extremity outcome measures have been reported in the peer-review literature for women with breast cancer; some that were specifically developed for breast cancer survivors (n=3) and others that were not (n=5). Based on the current evidence, we recommend administering the DASH to assess patient-reported upper extremity function in breast cancer survivors because the DASH has the most consistently large effects sizes for construct validity and responsiveness. Future large studies are needed for more definitive recommendations. Copyright © 2014 American Congress of Rehabilitation Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights

  8. Patient-Reported Shoulder Outcome Measures Utilized in Breast Cancer Survivors: A Systematic Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrington, Shana; Michener, Lori A; Kendig, Tiffany; Miale, Susan; George, Steven Z

    2014-01-01

    Objective 1) To identify English Language published patient-reported upper extremity outcome measures used in breast cancer research and 2) To examine construct validity and responsiveness in patient-reported upper extremity outcome measures used in breast cancer research. Data Sources PubMed, CINAHL and ProQuest MEDLINE® databases were searched up to February 5, 2013. Study Selection Studies were included if a patient-reported upper extremity outcome measure was administered, the participants were diagnosed with breast cancer, and published in English. Data Extraction Eight hundred and sixty-five articles were screened. Fifty-nine full text articles were assessed for eligibility. A total of 46 articles met the initial eligibility criteria for aim 1. Eleven of these articles reported mean and standard deviations for the outcome scores, and included a comparison group analysis for aim 2. Data Synthesis Construct validity was evaluated by calculating effect sizes for known group differences in 6 studies using the Disabilities of Arm, Shoulder and Hand (DASH), Penn Shoulder Score, Shoulder Disability Questionnaire-Dutch, and 10 Questions by Wingate (Wingate). Responsiveness was analyzed comparing a treatment and control group by calculating the coefficient of responsiveness in 5 studies for the DASH and Wingate. Conclusions Eight different patient-reported upper extremity outcome measures have been reported in the peer-review literature for women with breast cancer, some (n=3) were specifically developed for breast cancer survivors and others that were not (n=5). Based on the current evidence we recommend administering the DASH to assess patient-reported upper extremity function in breast cancer survivors because the DASH had most consistently large effects sizes for construct validity and responsiveness. Future large studies are needed for more definitive recommendations. PMID:23932969

  9. Gastric cancer metastasis mimicking primary lung cancer - case report and review of the literature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Escuissato, Dante Luiz; Ledesma, Jorge Alberto; Urban, Linei Augusta Brolini Delle; Liu, Cristhian Bau; Reis Filho, Jorge Sergio; Oliveira Filho, Adilson Gil; Ferri, Mauricio Beller; Hossaka, Marco Aurelio

    2002-01-01

    Gastric cancer frequently presents intraperitoneal spread. Distant metastasis are rare. The authors describe a case of a 47-year-old white man, long-term cigarette smoker, who had a right upper lobe mass seen on plain films and computed tomography of the chest. A gastric adenocarcinoma was concomitantly diagnosed by endoscopic examination. A bronchoscopy guided biopsy showed that the lung mass was in fact a metastasis from gastric adenocarcinoma. In this article, the imaging findings of gastric cancer and the patterns of dissemination to other organs are reviewed. (author)

  10. Systematic Review of Radiation Therapy Toxicity Reporting in Randomized Controlled Trials of Rectal Cancer: A Comparison of Patient-Reported Outcomes and Clinician Toxicity Reporting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gilbert, Alexandra, E-mail: a.gilbert@leeds.ac.uk [Leeds Institute of Cancer & Pathology, University of Leeds, Leeds (United Kingdom); Ziegler, Lucy; Martland, Maisie [Leeds Institute of Cancer & Pathology, University of Leeds, Leeds (United Kingdom); Davidson, Susan [The Christie Hospital, Manchester (United Kingdom); Efficace, Fabio [Italian Group for Adult Hematologic Diseases, Rome (Italy); Sebag-Montefiore, David; Velikova, Galina [Leeds Institute of Cancer & Pathology, University of Leeds, Leeds (United Kingdom)

    2015-07-01

    The use of multimodal treatments for rectal cancer has improved cancer-related outcomes but makes monitoring toxicity challenging. Optimizing future radiation therapy regimens requires collection and publication of detailed toxicity data. This review evaluated the quality of toxicity information provided in randomized controlled trials (RCTs) of radiation therapy in rectal cancer and focused on the difference between clinician-reported and patient-reported toxicity. Medline, EMBASE, and the Cochrane Library were searched (January 1995-July 2013) for RCTs reporting late toxicity in patients treated with regimens including preoperative (chemo)radiation therapy. Data on toxicity measures and information on toxicity reported were extracted using Quantitative Analyses of Normal Tissue Effects in the Clinic recommendations. International Society for Quality of Life Research standards on patient-reported outcomes (PROs) were used to evaluate the quality of patient-reported toxicity. Twenty-one RCT publications met inclusion criteria out of 4144 articles screened. All PRO studies reported higher rates of toxicity symptoms than clinician-reported studies and reported on a wider range and milder symptoms. No clinician-reported study published data on sexual dysfunction. Of the clinician-reported studies, 55% grouped toxicity data related to an organ system together (eg “Bowel”), and 45% presented data only on more-severe (grade ≥3) toxicity. In comparison, all toxicity grades were reported in 79% of PRO publications, and all studies (100%) presented individual symptom toxicity data (eg bowel urgency). However, PRO reporting quality was variable. Only 43% of PRO studies presented baseline data, 28% did not use any psychometrically validated instruments, and only 29% of studies described statistical methods for managing missing data. Analysis of these trials highlights the lack of reporting standards for adverse events and reveals the differences between clinician and

  11. The utility of abbreviated patient-reported outcomes for predicting survival in early stage colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Tina; Speers, Caroline H; Kennecke, Hagen F; Cheung, Winson Y

    2017-05-15

    Patient-reported outcomes (PROs) are increasingly used in clinical settings. Prior research suggests that PROs collected at baseline may be associated with cancer survival, but most of those studies were conducted in patients with breast or lung cancer. The objective of this study was to determine the correlation between prospectively collected PROs and cancer-specific outcomes in patients with early stage colorectal cancer. Patients who had newly diagnosed stage II or III colorectal cancer from 2009 to 2010 and had a consultation at the British Columbia Cancer Agency completed the brief Psychosocial Screen for Cancer (PSSCAN) questionnaire, which collects data on patients' perceived social supports, quality of life (QOL), anxiety and depression, and general health. PROs from the PSSCAN were linked with the Gastrointestinal Cancers Outcomes Database, which contains information on patient and tumor characteristics, treatment details, and cancer outcomes. Cox regression models were constructed for overall survival (OS), and Fine and Gray regression models were developed for disease-specific survival (DSS). In total, 692 patients were included. The median patient age was 67 years (range, 26-95 years), and the majority had colon cancer (61%), were diagnosed with stage III disease (54%), and received chemotherapy (58%). In general, patients felt well supported and reported good overall health and QOL. On multivariate analysis, increased fatigue was associated with worse OS (hazard ratio [HR], 1.99; P = .00007) and DSS (HR, 1.63; P = .03), as was lack of emotional support (OS: HR, 4.36; P = .0003; DSS: HR, 1.92; P = .02). Although most patients described good overall health and QOL and indicated that they were generally well supported, patients who experienced more pronounced fatigue or lacked emotional support had a higher likelihood of worse OS and DSS. These findings suggest that abbreviated PROs can inform and assist clinicians to identify patients who have a worse

  12. Examining the mediating role of cancer-related problems on spirituality and self-rated health among African American cancer survivors: a report from the American Cancer Society's Studies of Cancer Survivors-II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Best, Alicia L; Alcaraz, Kassandra I; McQueen, Amy; Cooper, Dexter L; Warren, Rueben C; Stein, Kevin

    2015-09-01

    African American (AA) cancer survivors report poorer self-rated health (SRH) compared to other racial/ethnic groups. Spirituality is often linked to positive health outcomes, with AAs reporting greater levels of spirituality. This study examined the potential mediating role of cancer-related problems in the relationship between spirituality and SRH among AA cancer survivors compared to non-African American (non-AA) survivors. We analyzed data on 9006 adult cancer survivors from the American Cancer Society's Study of Cancer Survivors-II. Preliminary analyses compared characteristics of AAs and non-AAs and identified significant covariates of SRH. We tested a path model using multi-group structural equation modeling (SEM), and then examined race as a moderator. Of the three domains of spirituality assessed, AAs had higher levels of peace (p spirituality and cancer-related problems on SRH. Specifically, spirituality had significantly stronger associations with cancer-related problems among AAs than non-AAs. Spirituality was positively associated with all four domains of cancer-related problems, but only physical distress was associated with SRH among AAs. The negative effects of physical distress may attenuate the positive effects of spirituality on AA's SRH. Future studies should consider racial/ethnic differences in the determinants and conceptualization of SRH, which is a known predictor of survival. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  13. Coverage of skin cancer and recreational tanning in North American magazines before and after the landmark 2006 International Agency for Research on Cancer report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McWhirter, Jennifer E; Hoffman-Goetz, Laurie

    2015-02-21

    Skin cancer is an increasingly important global public health problem. Mass media is a key source of skin cancer information. We examined how media coverage of skin cancer has changed over time as a consequence of the release of a key public health report from the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) in 2006, which linked ultraviolet (UV) radiation from indoor tanning and skin cancer. A directed content analysis of skin cancer and tanning coverage in 29 popular North American magazines (2001-2012) examined reporting of skin cancer risk factors, UV behaviors, and early detection in article text (n = 761) and images (n = 1267). Chi-square and correlational analyses were used determine whether coverage changed in relation to the 2006 IARC report. The total volume of articles about skin cancer and tanning increased modestly after the IARC report (χ (2) = 4.57, df = 1, p Magazines were more likely to encourage sunscreen use (χ (2) = 11.55, df = 1, p magazines to promote sun avoidance (χ (2) = 6.82, df = 1, p magazine reporting, there is a need for more effective dissemination of public health messages about skin cancer and tanning.

  14. Cancer care. Cancer plan--progress report: must try even harder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coombes, Rebecca

    2004-11-25

    Despite progress in some areas, major obstacle achieving a uniformly good service for cancer patients remain. PCTs' lack of expertise is holding back progress ending delays in diagnosis and treatment. SHAs need to be clearer with PCTs about the importance of meeting national targets.

  15. Self-reported participation and beliefs about bowel cancer screening in New South Wales, Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varlow, Megan; Stacey, Ingrid; Dunlop, Sally; Young, Jane; Kite, James; Dessaix, Anita; McAulay, Claire

    2014-08-01

    To describe self-reported bowel cancer screening participation, beliefs and attitudes in a sample of New South Wales (NSW) adults, and to identify beliefs and demographic factors associated with self-reported bowel cancer screening participation. This study used data from the International Cancer Benchmarking Partnership Module 2, a representative population-based telephone survey. Self-reported participation in and beliefs about bowel cancer screening were measured using the Awareness and Beliefs about Cancer survey of people aged 50 years and over living in NSW, Australia (n=2001). Logistic regression modelling was used to identify explanatory variables associated with bowel cancer screening participation. Half of all women (54.1%, 95% CI: 50.8-57.4%) and two-thirds of men (65.7%, 95% CI: 61.5-69.9%) reported screening for bowel cancer within the previous 5 years. Believing that screening was only necessary when experiencing symptoms was more likely to be endorsed by people aged 65 years and over (25.5%, 95% CI: 22.2-28.7%) rather than younger (50-64 years; 16.7%, 95% CI: 13.8-19.7%), non-English-speaking migrants (35.4%, 95% CI: 26.7-44.1%) versus others (18.6%, 95% CI: 16.4-20.7%), and people in metropolitan (23.3%, 95% CI: 20.4-26.1%) versus non-metropolitan areas (16.4%, 95% CI: 12.8-20%). People who disagreed that screening was only necessary when experiencing symptoms were four times more likely to report screening participation (OR 3.96, 95% CI: 3.11-5.03). Community education about bowel cancer screening is needed to correct misperceptions regarding screening in the absence of symptoms. Tailored strategies for older, migrant and urban communities may be beneficial. SO WHAT? Education strategies that promote the need for screening in the absence of symptoms and correct misconceptions about bowel cancer screening amongst subgroups of the NSW population may improve screening rates and decrease the burden of bowel cancer in NSW.

  16. Integrating patient reported outcomes with clinical cancer registry data: a feasibility study of the electronic Patient-Reported Outcomes From Cancer Survivors (ePOCS) system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashley, Laura; Jones, Helen; Thomas, James; Newsham, Alex; Downing, Amy; Morris, Eva; Brown, Julia; Velikova, Galina; Forman, David; Wright, Penny

    2013-10-25

    Routine measurement of Patient Reported Outcomes (PROs) linked with clinical data across the patient pathway is increasingly important for informing future care planning. The innovative electronic Patient-reported Outcomes from Cancer Survivors (ePOCS) system was developed to integrate PROs, collected online at specified post-diagnostic time-points, with clinical and treatment data in cancer registries. This study tested the technical and clinical feasibility of ePOCS by running the system with a sample of potentially curable breast, colorectal, and prostate cancer patients in their first 15 months post diagnosis. Patients completed questionnaires comprising multiple Patient Reported Outcome Measures (PROMs) via ePOCS within 6 months (T1), and at 9 (T2) and 15 (T3) months, post diagnosis. Feasibility outcomes included system informatics performance, patient recruitment, retention, representativeness and questionnaire completion (response rate), patient feedback, and administration burden involved in running the system. ePOCS ran efficiently with few technical problems. Patient participation was 55.21% (636/1152) overall, although varied by approach mode, and was considerably higher among patients approached face-to-face (61.4%, 490/798) than by telephone (48.8%, 21/43) or letter (41.0%, 125/305). Older and less affluent patients were less likely to join (both Pplanning and for targeting service provision.

  17. Initial Case Reports of Cancer in Naked Mole-rats (Heterocephalus glaber).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delaney, M A; Ward, J M; Walsh, T F; Chinnadurai, S K; Kerns, K; Kinsel, M J; Treuting, P M

    2016-05-01

    Naked mole-rats (NMRs;Heterocephalus glaber) are highly adapted, eusocial rodents renowned for their extreme longevity and resistance to cancer. Because cancer has not been formally described in this species, NMRs have been increasingly utilized as an animal model in aging and cancer research. We previously reported the occurrence of several age-related diseases, including putative pre-neoplastic lesions, in zoo-housed NMR colonies. Here, we report for the first time 2 cases of cancer in zoo-housed NMRs. In Case No. 1, we observed a subcutaneous mass in the axillary region of a 22-year-old male NMR, with histologic, immunohistochemical (pancytokeratin positive, rare p63 immunolabeling, and smooth muscle actin negative), and ultrastructural characteristics of an adenocarcinoma possibly of mammary or salivary origin. In Case No. 2, we observed a densely cellular, poorly demarcated gastric mass of polygonal cells arranged in nests with positive immunolabeling for synaptophysin and chromogranin indicative of a neuroendocrine carcinoma in an approximately 20-year-old male NMR. We also include a brief discussion of other proliferative growths and pre-cancerous lesions diagnosed in 1 zoo colony. Although these case reports do not alter the longstanding observation of cancer resistance, they do raise questions about the scope of cancer resistance and the interpretation of biomedical studies in this model. These reports also highlight the benefit of long-term disease investigations in zoo-housed populations to better understand naturally occurring disease processes in species used as models in biomedical research. © The Author(s) 2016.

  18. The Danish version of the Medication Adherence Report Scale: preliminary validation in cancer pain patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Ramune; Møldrup, Claus; Christrup, Lona Louring

    2009-01-01

    into Danish following the repeated back-translation procedure. Cancer patients for the study were recruited from specialized pain management facilities. Thirty-three patients responded to the DMARS-4, the Danish Barriers Questionnaire II, The Danish version of Patient Perceived Involvement in Care Scale......OBJECTIVE: To examine the psychometric properties of the Danish version of the Medication Adherence Report Scale (DMARS-4) adapted to measure adherence to analgesic regimen among cancer patients. METHODS: The validated English version of the Medication Adherence Report Scale was translated...

  19. Documented quality of care in certified colorectal cancer centers in Germany: German Cancer Society benchmarking report for 2013.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wesselmann, S; Winter, A; Ferencz, J; Seufferlein, T; Post, S

    2014-04-01

    In order to improve the quality of treatment for cancer patients the German Cancer Society (Deutsche Krebsgesellschaft) implemented a certification system for oncological care institutions. The certified colorectal cancer centers present the structures, processes and results of their network in the framework of an auditing procedure. The current benchmarking report by the certified centers reflects the centers' reference results over a period of 3 years. The figures included in the benchmarking report reflect the areas of interdisciplinary collaboration, guideline-compliant treatment, and expertise of the main treatment partners. High percentages were shown for indicators reflecting pretreatment and postoperative case presentations in multidisciplinary team meetings (91.8 % or 98.1 %), psycho-oncologic care (54.8 %) as well as social service counseling (77.1 %). Good quality of the TME rectal specimen and adequate lymph-node retrieval (12 lymph nodes at least) was achieved by 93 % or 96.6 % of the centers. Adjuvant chemotherapy (colon, Union for International Cancer Control [UICC] stage III) or neoadjuvant radiotherapy or chemoradiotherapy (rectum, UICC stages II and III) received 73.7 % or 80 % of relevant patients. Quotas of anastomotic leakage in the colon or rectum were 4.4 % or 7.6 %, whereas postoperative mortality amounted to 2.6 %. The present analysis of the results, together with the centers' statements and the auditors' reports, shows that most of the targets for indicator figures are being better met over the course of time. In addition, however, there is a clear potential for improvement and the centers are verifiably addressing this. A transparent presentation of the quality of care and reflection on and discussion of the results among the treatment partners in the certified network and with the auditors during the certification process may contribute to constant quality improvement in oncological care.

  20. Rectal cancer in patients irradiated for carcinoma of cervix and uterus. Report of five cases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shioya, Takeshi; Hashiguchi, Yojiro; Okura, Yasuo; Sekine, Takeshi

    2000-01-01

    Patients who have received pelvic irradiation are reported to be at increased risk of subsequently developing malignancies of the large bowel. We report five cases of rectal carcinoma, one early cancer and four advanced cancers, that developed following pelvic irradiation for the uterine cervical and corpus cancer. The mean age of the patients was 70 years (range, 67 to 77 years), and the mean interval between irradiation and surgery for rectal cancer was 12.9 years (range, 5 to 25 years). Radiation-induced changes in the remaining bowel were recognized in all five patients, and four of them had symptoms of radiation proctitis. One of the five tumors was histologically diagnosed as well differentiated adenocarcinoma and the other four as moderately differentiated adenocarcinoma. Histopathological examination revealed that all four advanced carcinomas included a deep ulcer covered with necrotic tissue that contained many blood cells on its surface. Three of the four patients with advanced rectal cancer died within 2 years after surgery, indicating a poor prognosis for radiation-induced rectal carcinoma. Long-term follow-up with careful surveillance for colorectal cancer is required in patients who have undergone pelvic irradiation. (author)

  1. Rectal cancer in patients irradiated for carcinoma of cervix and uterus. Report of five cases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shioya, Takeshi; Hashiguchi, Yojiro; Okura, Yasuo; Sekine, Takeshi [Saitama Cancer Center Hospital, Ina (Japan)

    2000-11-01

    Patients who have received pelvic irradiation are reported to be at increased risk of subsequently developing malignancies of the large bowel. We report five cases of rectal carcinoma, one early cancer and four advanced cancers, that developed following pelvic irradiation for the uterine cervical and corpus cancer. The mean age of the patients was 70 years (range, 67 to 77 years), and the mean interval between irradiation and surgery for rectal cancer was 12.9 years (range, 5 to 25 years). Radiation-induced changes in the remaining bowel were recognized in all five patients, and four of them had symptoms of radiation proctitis. One of the five tumors was histologically diagnosed as well differentiated adenocarcinoma and the other four as moderately differentiated adenocarcinoma. Histopathological examination revealed that all four advanced carcinomas included a deep ulcer covered with necrotic tissue that contained many blood cells on its surface. Three of the four patients with advanced rectal cancer died within 2 years after surgery, indicating a poor prognosis for radiation-induced rectal carcinoma. Long-term follow-up with careful surveillance for colorectal cancer is required in patients who have undergone pelvic irradiation. (author)

  2. Role of herbal compounds (PC-SPES) in hormone-refractory prostate cancer: two case reports.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de la Taille, A; Hayek, O R; Burchardt, M; Burchardt, T; Katz, A E

    2000-10-01

    Herbal therapies are unconventional treatments that have been used for several different diseases. PC-SPES is an herbal mixture, composed of eight different herbs (chrysanthemum, isatis, licorice, Ganoderma lucidum, Panax pseudo-ginseng, Rabdosia rubescens, saw palmetto, and scutellaria), which has been used as an alternative in the treatment of prostate cancer. We report two cases of hormone-refractory prostate cancer patients, who showed a favorable response to therapy with this herbal combination, controlling the progression of the disease. We report two cases of biopsy proven prostate cancer patients with metastatic disease, treated with total androgen blockade, progressing to an androgen-independent status. These patients were offered traditional therapies for hormone-resistant prostate cancer, and they chose to take PC-SPES. The follow-up as well as their evolution are described. PC-SPES extract decreased the prostate-specific antigen (PSA) value for both patients from an initial value of 100 and 386 ng/mL to 24 and 114 ng/mL after 1 year and 4 months, respectively, remaining stable until now. No gynecomastia or hot flashes were observed in these patients and the treatment was well tolerated. PC-SPES has shown a strong estrogenic in vitro and in vivo activity as an alternative tool in the management of prostate cancer patients. These cases suggest that PC-SPES might have some potential activity against hormone-independent prostate cancers.

  3. A multidisciplinary clinical treatment of locally advanced rectal cancer complicated with rectovesical fistula: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhan Tiancheng

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Rectal cancer with rectovesical fistula is a rare and difficult to treat entity. Here, we describe a case of rectal cancer with rectovesical fistula successfully managed by multimodality treatment. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first such case report in the literature. Case presentation A 51-year-old Chinese man was diagnosed as having rectal cancer accompanied by rectovesical fistula. He underwent treatment with neoadjuvant radiochemotherapy combined with total pelvic excision and adjuvant chemotherapy, as recommended by a multimodality treatment team. Post-operative pathology confirmed the achievement of pathological complete response. Conclusions This case suggests that a proactive multidisciplinary treatment is needed to achieve complete cure of locally advanced rectal cancer even in the presence of rectovesical fistula.

  4. Use of the Behavioral Assessment System for Children 2nd Edition: Parent Report Scale in pediatric cancer populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolfe-Christensen, Cortney; Mullins, Larry L; Stinnett, Terry A; Carpentier, Melissa Y; Fedele, David A

    2009-12-01

    This study examined the use of the Behavioral Assessment System for Children-2nd Edition: Parent Report Scale (BASC-2; Reynolds & Kamphaus, Behavior assessment system for children, 2004) in a pediatric cancer population. Comparisons of scale scores were made between pediatric cancer participants and controls. Within group comparisons were also made between subtypes of pediatric cancer. Parents of 111 children and adolescents who had experienced pediatric cancer completed the BASC-2 as part of larger studies of parent-child adjustment to cancer. Scores on the BASC-2 for cancer survivors were compared to a matched control group. Results from MANOVA analyses revealed that children with cancer were categorized as evidencing more emotional and cognitive complaints compared to the control children. Notably, no significant within group differences emerged on the subscales with regard to cancer subtype. Although preliminary, these results suggest that the BASC-2 can identify the cognitive and emotional differences between cancer survivors and controls.

  5. Validation of family cancer history data in high-risk families: the influence of cancer site, ethnicity, kinship degree, and multiple family reporters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tehranifar, Parisa; Wu, Hui-Chen; Shriver, Tom; Cloud, Ann J; Terry, Mary Beth

    2015-02-01

    Information on family cancer history (FCH) is often collected for first-degree relatives, but more extensive FCH information is critical for greater accuracy in risk assessment. Using self-reported diagnosis of cancer as the gold standard, we examined differences in the sensitivity and specificity of relative-reported FCH by cancer site, race/ethnicity, language preference, and kinship degree (1,524 individuals from 557 families; average number of relatives per family = 2.7). We evaluated the impact of FCH data collected in 2007-2013 from multiple relatives by comparing mean values and proportions for the number of relatives with any cancer, breast cancer, or ovarian cancer as reported by a single relative and by multiple relatives in the same family. The sensitivity of FCH was lower in Hispanics, Spanish-speaking persons, and third-degree relatives (e.g., for all cancers, sensitivities were 80.7%, 87.4%, and 91.0% for third-, second-, and first-degree relatives, respectively). FCH reported by multiple relatives included a higher number of relatives with cancer than the number reported by a single relative (e.g., mean increase of 1.2 relatives with any cancer), with more relatives diagnosed with any cancer, breast cancer, and ovarian cancer in 52%, 36% and 12% of families, respectively. Collection of FCH data from multiple relatives may provide a more comprehensive picture of FCH and may potentially improve risk assessment and preventive care. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  6. Metachronous mediastinal lymph node metastasis from ascending colon cancer: A case report and literature review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kosuke Toda

    Full Text Available Introduction: Metachronous mediastinal lymph node metastasis without pulmonary metastasis is extremely rare in colorectal cancer, which makes the clinical diagnosis difficult and treatment strategy unclear. Prsentation of case: A case was a 59-year-old man, who had undergone right hemicolectomy for ascending colon cancer 2 years and 8 months previously, presented with enlarged mediastinal lymph nodes. 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG positron emission tomography revealed FDG was accumulated only into the mediastinal lymph nodes. Serum carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA level was within the normal range. Six months later, the size and FDG uptake of the mediastinal lymph nodes had increased. We assumed a possibility that the mediastinal lymph nodes were metastasized from ascending colon cancer and so performed thoracoscopic-assisted resection of the mediastinal lymph nodes. Histopathological analysis revealed the resected lymph nodes were filled with moderately differentiated adenocarcinoma and a diagnosis of mediastinal lymph nodes metastasis from previously-resected ascending colon cancer was made. The patient was postoperatively followed for more than 1 year and 8 months without any sign of recurrence. Discussion: Only 7 cases of metachronous mediastinal lymph node metastasis from colorectal cancer, including our case, have been reported in the English literature. It is difficult to clinically diagnose mediastinal lymph node metastasis. Conclusion: We report a rare case of metachronous mediastinal lymph node metastasis from ascending colon cancer with literature review. If the mediastinal lymph nodes are enlarged after colorectal cancer resection, we need to make a treatment strategy as well as a diagnostic approach considering the possibility of mediastinal lymph node metastasis. Keywords: Colorectal cancer, Mediastinal lymph node metastasis, Surgery

  7. Transanal total mesorectal excision for rectal cancer: a preliminary report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Liang; Chen, Wen-Hao; Luo, Shuang-Ling; Luo, Yan-Xin; Liu, Zhi-Hua; Huang, Mei-Jin; Wang, Jian-Ping

    2016-06-01

    Currently, the majority cases of the novel down-to-up transanal total mesorectal excision (TaTME) were performed in a hybrid approach with conventional laparoscopic assistance because of less operative difficulty. However, although cases are limited, the successes of TaTME in a pure approach (without laparoscopic assistance) indicate that the costly and less mini-invasive hybrid TaTME could be potentially avoided. In the present single institutional, prospective study, we attempted to demonstrate the safety and feasibility of this approach in rectal cancer by evaluating the short-term results of our first 20 TaTME cases. For the majority of cases, we adopted a strategy that laparoscopic assistance was not introduced unless it was required during the planned pure TaTME procedure. A total of 20 patients (12 males and 8 females) were analyzed in this study, including 11 cases (55 %) of pure TaTME and 9 cases (45 %) of hybrid TaTME. Overall, the median operative time was 200 min (range 70-420), along with a median estimated blood loss of 50 ml (range 20-800). Morbidity rate was 20 % (one urethral injury, two urinary retentions, one anastomotic hemorrhage and one mild anastomotic leak). The median number of harvested lymph nodes was 12 (range 1-20). All specimens were intact in mesorectum without positive distal and circumferential resection margins. Among the 15 patients who were preoperatively scheduled to undertake pure TaTME, four patients (26.7 %) required converting to laparoscopic assistance. Moreover, among these 15 patients, the results of the comparative analysis between female and male subgroups favor the former, suggesting easier operation in them. This preliminary study demonstrates that TaTME in rectal cancer is safe and feasible. The strategy of not introducing laparoscopic assistance unless it is required while performing the planned pTaTME should be cautiously explored. Further studies with larger sample size and longer follow-up are warranted.

  8. Bladder Cancer in HIV-infected Adults: An Emerging Issue? Case-Reports and Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chawki, Sylvain; Ploussard, Guillaume; Montlahuc, Claire; Verine, Jérome; Mongiat-Artus, Pierre; Desgrandchamps, François; Molina, Jean-Michel

    2015-01-01

    Non-AIDS-related malignancies now represent a frequent cause of death among HIV-infected patients. Albeit bladder cancer is one of the most common malignancies worldwide, it has been rarely reported among HIV-infected patients. We wished to assess the prevalence and characteristics of bladder cancer in HIV-infected patients. We conducted a single center retrospective study from 1998 to 2013 in a university hospital in Paris. Cases of bladder cancer among HIV-infected patients were identified using the electronic records of the hospital database and of the HIV-infected cohort. Patient characteristics and outcomes were retrieved from patients charts. A systematic review of published cases of bladder cancers in patients with HIV-infection was also performed. During the study period we identified 15 HIV-infected patients (0.2% of the cohort) with a bladder cancer. Patients were mostly men (73%) and smokers (67%), with a median age of 56 years at cancer diagnosis. Bladder cancer was diagnosed a median of 14 years after HIV-infection. Most patients were on ART (86%) with median current and nadir CD4 cell counts of 506 and 195 cells/mm3, respectively. Haematuria (73%) was the most frequent presenting symptom and HPV-associated lesions were seen in 6/10 (60%) patients. Histopathology showed transitional cell carcinoma in 80% and a high proportion of tumors with muscle invasion (47%) and high histologic grade (73%). One-year survival rate was 74.6%. The systematic review identified 13 additional cases of urothelial bladder cancers which shared similar features. Bladder cancers in HIV-infected patients remain rare but may occur in relatively young patients with a low nadir CD4 cell count, have aggressive pathological features and can be fatal.

  9. Understanding Cancer Prognosis

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... with Cancer Reports, Research, and Literature Cancers by Body Location/System Childhood Cancers Late Effects of Childhood ... A to Z List of Cancers Cancers by Body Location Childhood Cancers Adolescent & Young Adult Cancers Metastatic ...

  10. Understanding Cancer Prognosis

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Cancer Kidney (Renal Cell) Cancer Leukemia Liver Cancer Lung Cancer Lymphoma Pancreatic Cancer Prostate Cancer Skin Cancer Thyroid ... 4: Award Negotiation & Issuance Manage Your Award Grants Management Contacts Monitoring Prior Approvals Annual Reporting and Auditing ...

  11. Clinical report of the treatment of locally advanced lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrovich, Z; Mietlowski, W; Ohanian, M; Cox, J

    1977-07-01

    This paper discusses the results of the treatment of 345 patients entered in the Veterans Administration Lung Group Protocol 13L. The study was activated March 1972, and closed for the patient accesion March 1975. All patients had a histological diagnosis of primary lung cancer considered clinically non-resectable or inoperable. Patients were equally randomized into two groups, radiotherapy alone or radiotherapy with chemotherapy. The analysis of the data included: treatment regimen, radiation dose, initial performance status, performance status change, cell type, duration of survival, quality of survival and age. The strongest influence on median survival was the level of radiation dose. The small cell carcinoma patients treated with radiotherapy and chemotherapy showed significant improvement in the median survival (38.2 weeks) over the patients treated with radiotherapy alone (20.6 weeks). The patients treated with radiotherapy and chemotherapy also showed improvement in performance status more frequently than the patients treated with radiotherapy alone. Other parameters of the analysis will be presented.

  12. Ethnicity and Prostate Cancer in Southern Nigeria: A Preliminary Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sapira, Monday K; Eke, Ndubuisi; Nwofor, Alexander Me

    2015-01-01

    The natural history of prostate cancer varies among patients. The aim of this study is to detect any variations in clinical and pathological characteristics of the tumor in patients from different ethnic groups in Southern Nigeria. Consecutive patients who presented with features of prostatic diseases at the Urology Units of University of Port Harcourt Teaching Hospital, Port Harcourt and Nnamdi Azikiwe University Teaching Hospital, Nnewi, were evaluated prospectively with history, physical examination, and relevant investigations using a proforma. Data obtained were collated and analyzed statistically using the Chi-square test and Microsoft Excel. Of 187 patients studied, 169 were analyzed. Eighty-six were Ibos, 31 Ijaws, 25 Ikwerres, and 12 Ogonis. Two were from each Etche, Urhobo, Opobo, and Effik; 4 from Andoni, and 3 Ibibio. Fifty-seven (66.3%) Ibos presented with the disease at higher ages (70-80 years) than 19 (61.3%) Ijaws and 11 (91.7%) Ogonis. These age differences were statistically significant with 95% and 99.9% confidence, respectively. All cases were adenocarcinomas. Clinical features, pattern of serum prostate-specific antigen levels, grades of the tumors, tumor metastases, and complications were similar for all ethnic groups. Although more Ibos had tumors with relatively more aggressive metastatic features, there was no statistical significance. Clinical and pathological features of adenocarcinoma of the prostate in Ibos, Ikwerres, Ijaws, and Ogonis were found to be similar. However, Ibos presented with the disease at older ages than Ijaws and Ogonis.

  13. International Association for the Study of Lung Cancer Computed Tomography Screening Workshop 2011 report

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Field, John K; Smith, Robert A; Aberle, Denise R

    2011-01-01

    , which are summarized in this report. The recommendation from the workshop, and supported by the IASLC Board of Directors, was to set up the Strategic CT Screening Advisory Committee (IASLC-SSAC). The Strategic CT Screening Advisory Committee is currently engaging professional societies and organizations...... who are stakeholders in lung cancer CT screening implementation across the globe, to focus on delivering guidelines and recommendations in six specific areas: (i) identification of high-risk individuals for lung cancer CT screening programs; (ii) develop radiological guidelines for use in developing...... national screening programs; (iii) develop guidelines for the clinical work-up of "indeterminate nodules" resulting from CT screening programmers; (iv) guidelines for pathology reporting of nodules from lung cancer CT screening programs; (v) recommendations for surgical and therapeutic interventions...

  14. Bisphosphonate-related atypical femoral fracture with bone metastasis of breast cancer: case report and review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayashi, Kazunori; Aono, Masanari; Shintani, Kousuke; Kazuki, Kenichi

    2014-03-01

    Intravenous bisphosphonates (BPs) have been used to reduce the frequency of skeletal-related events due to bone metastases of several kinds of cancers. Although many studies on BP-related atypical fractures (BRAFs) due to the use of BP for osteoporosis treatment have been reported, few reports on BRAFs arising as a complication of long-term BP use for bone metastasis of cancer are available. A 62-year-old woman with a history of breast cancer presented with right thigh pain after she had a fall. Radiographs indicated a transverse fracture in the shaft of the right femur. She had been on zoledronate treatment for six years. Based on radiographic and histopathological findings, we concluded that the fracture was not a pathological fracture associated with metastasis but was a complication of long-term BP treatment. Clinical oncologists should consider the possibility of BRAFs in patients on long-term zoledronate treatment for bone metastases.

  15. Radiation, Atherosclerotic Risk Factors, and Stroke Risk in Survivors of Pediatric Cancer: A Report From the Childhood Cancer Survivor Study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mueller, Sabine; Fullerton, Heather J.; Stratton, Kayla; Leisenring, Wendy; Weathers, Rita E.; Stovall, Marilyn; Armstrong, Gregory T.; Goldsby, Robert E.; Packer, Roger J.; Sklar, Charles A.; Bowers, Daniel C.; Robison, Leslie L.; Krull, Kevin R.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: To test the hypotheses that (1) the increased risk of stroke conferred by childhood cranial radiation therapy (CRT) persists into adulthood; and (2) atherosclerotic risk factors further increase the stroke risk in cancer survivors. Methods and Materials: The Childhood Cancer Survivor Study is a multi-institutional retrospective cohort study of 14,358 5-year survivors of childhood cancer and 4023 randomly selected sibling controls with longitudinal follow-up. Age-adjusted incidence rates of self-reported late-occurring (≥5 years after diagnosis) first stroke were calculated. Multivariable Cox proportional hazards models were used to identify independent stroke predictors. Results: During a mean follow-up of 23.3 years, 292 survivors reported a late-occurring stroke. The age-adjusted stroke rate per 100,000 person-years was 77 (95% confidence interval [CI] 62-96), compared with 9.3 (95% CI 4-23) for siblings. Treatment with CRT increased stroke risk in a dose-dependent manner: hazard ratio 5.9 (95% CI 3.5-9.9) for 30-49 Gy CRT and 11.0 (7.4-17.0) for 50+ Gy CRT. The cumulative stroke incidence in survivors treated with 50+ Gy CRT was 1.1% (95% CI 0.4-1.8%) at 10 years after diagnosis and 12% (95% CI 8.9-15.0%) at 30 years. Hypertension increased stroke hazard by 4-fold (95% CI 2.8-5.5) and in black survivors by 16-fold (95% CI 6.9-36.6). Conclusion: Young adult pediatric cancer survivors have an increased stroke risk that is associated with CRT in a dose-dependent manner. Atherosclerotic risk factors enhanced this risk and should be treated aggressively

  16. Geodemographic Features of Human Blastomycosis in Eastern Wisconsin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Megan E. Huber

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Blastomycosis is an endemic fungal infection. In rural northern Wisconsin, blastomycosis cases are associated with certain environmental features including close proximity to waterways. Other studies have associated blastomycosis with particular soil chemicals. However, blastomycosis also occurs in urban and suburban regions. We explored the geodemographic associations of blastomycosis cases in the more urban/suburban landscape of eastern Wisconsin. Methods: We conducted a retrospective study of 193 laboratory-identified blastomycosis cases in a single eastern Wisconsin health system, 2007–2015. Controls were 250 randomly selected cases of community-diagnosed pneumonia from a similar time period. Geographic features of home addresses were explored using Google Maps. Categorical variables were analyzed with chi-square or Fisher’s exact tests and continuous variables by two-sample t-tests. Stepwise regression followed by binary logistic regression was used for multivariable analysis. Results: Compared to pneumonia cases, blastomycosis cases were younger (47.7 vs. 55.3 years and more likely to be male (67.9% vs. 45.6%, nonwhite (23.2% vs. 9.7% and machinists, automobile workers/mechanics or construction workers (32.7% vs. 7.2%; P 0.5 acres (30.4% vs. 14.2%, P = 0.0002, be < 0.25 miles from an automobile repair facility or junkyard (35.9% vs. 19.4%, P = 0.0005, and be < 0.1 miles from a park, forest or farm field (54.9% vs. 39.6%, P = 0.002. Only the latter association remained on multivariable analysis. Conclusions: Eastern Wisconsin blastomycosis case subjects were younger, more often male and more likely to live near parks/forests/fields. Novel associations of blastomycosis cases with machinery- and automobile-related occupations and/or facilities should be further explored.

  17. Analysis of water-level fluctuations in Wisconsin wells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patterson, G.L.; Zaporozec, A.

    1987-01-01

    More than 60 percent of the residents of Wisconsin use ground water as their primary water source. Water supplies presently are abundant, but ground-water levels continually fluctuate in response to natural factors and human-related stresses. A better understanding of the magnitude, duration, and frequency of past fluctuations, and the factors controlling these fluctuations may help anticipate future changes in ground-water levels.

  18. Determining climate change management priorities: A case study from Wisconsin

    Science.gov (United States)

    LeDee, Olivia E.; Ribic, Christine

    2015-01-01

    A burgeoning dialogue exists regarding how to allocate resources to maximize the likelihood of long-term biodiversity conservation within the context of climate change. To make effective decisions in natural resource management, an iterative, collaborative, and learning-based decision process may be more successful than a strictly consultative approach. One important, early step in a decision process is to identify priority species or systems. Although this promotes the conservation of select species or systems, it may inadvertently alter the future of non-target species and systems. We describe a process to screen terrestrial wildlife for potential sensitivity to climate change and then use the results to engage natural resource professionals in a process of identifying priorities for monitoring, research, and adaptation strategy implementation. We demonstrate this approach using a case study from Wisconsin. In Wisconsin, experts identified 23 out of 353 species with sufficient empirical research and management understanding to inform targeted action. Habitat management and management of hydrological conditions were the common strategies for targeted action. Although there may be an interest in adaptation strategy implementation for many species and systems, experts considered existing information inadequate to inform targeted action. According to experts, 40% of the vertebrate species in Wisconsin will require near-term intervention for climate adaptation. These results will inform state-wide conservation planning as well as regional efforts.

  19. Follicular Thyroid Cancer Metastasis to the Urinary Bladder: Report of a Case and Review of the Literature

    OpenAIRE

    Grivas, N.; Housianitis, Z.; Doukas, M.; Stavropoulos, N. E.

    2012-01-01

    Thyroid cancer metastasis to the urinary bladder is a very rear condition. To the authors’ knowledge there have been only 2 cases reported in the literature. Herein a case is reported of a metastatic bladder tumor in a 73-year-old woman with history of thyroid and breast cancer. Gross hematuria was the initial symptom of her metastatic disease. Pathology of the resected mass revealed a follicular thyroid cancer metastasis. This case illustrates that follicular carcinoma of the thyroid may hav...

  20. Ethnicity and prostate cancer in Southern Nigeria: A preliminary report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monday K Sapira

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The natural history of prostate cancer varies among patients. The aim of this study is to detect any variations in clinical and pathological characteristics of the tumor in patients from different ethnic groups in Southern Nigeria. Patients and Methods: Consecutive patients who presented with features of prostatic diseases at the Urology Units of University of Port Harcourt Teaching Hospital, Port Harcourt and Nnamdi Azikiwe University Teaching Hospital, Nnewi, were evaluated prospectively with history, physical examination, and relevant investigations using a proforma. Data obtained were collated and analyzed statistically using the Chi-square test and Microsoft Excel. Results: Of 187 patients studied, 169 were analyzed. Eighty-six were Ibos, 31 Ijaws, 25 Ikwerres, and 12 Ogonis. Two were from each Etche, Urhobo, Opobo, and Effik; 4 from Andoni, and 3 Ibibio. Fifty-seven (66.3% Ibos presented with the disease at higher ages (70–80 years than 19 (61.3% Ijaws and 11 (91.7% Ogonis. These age differences were statistically significant with 95% and 99.9% confidence, respectively. All cases were adenocarcinomas. Clinical features, pattern of serum prostate-specific antigen levels, grades of the tumors, tumor metastases, and complications were similar for all ethnic groups. Although more Ibos had tumors with relatively more aggressive metastatic features, there was no statistical significance. Conclusion: Clinical and pathological features of adenocarcinoma of the prostate in Ibos, Ikwerres, Ijaws, and Ogonis were found to be similar. However, Ibos presented with the disease at older ages than Ijaws and Ogonis.

  1. Case Report: Down-staging locally advanced head and neck cancer ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Case Report: Down-staging locally advanced head and neck cancer in an HIV infected patient in a limited resource setting. L Masamba, D Nkosi, D Kumiponjera. Abstract. No Abstract. Full Text: EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT · DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT · AJOL African Journals ...

  2. Penile metastasis secondary to bladder cancer: A report of two cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Narendra Kumar

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Penile metastasis secondary to primary bladder cancer is a rare entity and represents a challenging problem. The common mode of spread to the penis is by retrograde venous route. The overall outcome is dismal and most patients will die within 1 year even after optimum treatment. Here, we report two such cases.

  3. Pap screening as preventive tool against cervical cancer: a report of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The incidence of cervical cancer in the developed countries has significantly reduced as a result of well-organized and coordinated Pap screening program, which is aimed at detection of pre-invasive lesions that are then promptly treated. We report a 45-year old woman whose immediate elder sister had breast carcinoma, ...

  4. Breast cancer presenting as parotid tumour — first reported case in literature

    OpenAIRE

    Ramesh, Rakesh S.; Manjunath, Suraj; Ustad, Tanveer Hussain; Pais, Saira; Shivakumar, K.

    2010-01-01

    Breast cancer presenting as parotid tumour is very rare. This is the first reported case in which parotid tumour was the presenting complaint of the patient. Since the patient was estrogen and progesterone receptor positive — was put on hormone therapy and responded well.

  5. Patient-reported depression measures in cancer: a meta-review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wakefield, C.E.; Butow, P.N.; Aaronson, N.K.; Hack, T.F.; Hulbert-Williams, N.J.; Jacobsen, P.B.

    2015-01-01

    The patient-reported depression measures that perform best in oncology settings have not yet been identified. We did a meta-review to integrate the findings of reviews of more than 50 depression measures used in adults with, or recovering from, any type of cancer. We searched Medline, PsycINFO,

  6. Self reported stress and risk of breast cancer: prospective cohort study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Naja Hulvej; Zhang, Zuo-Feng; Kristensen, Tage S

    2005-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To assess the relation between self reported intensity and frequency of stress and first time incidence of primary breast cancer. DESIGN: Prospective cohort study with 18 years of follow-up. SETTING: Copenhagen City heart study, Denmark. PARTICIPANTS: The 6689 women participating in th...... be disadvantageous....

  7. Fat necrosis Secondary to Pancreatitis Mimicking Transverse Colon Cancer: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Mirmomen

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available Fat necrosis secondary to pancreatitis can be either mild and self limited or create severe organ damage,but may rarely lead to abdominal opancreatic pseudotumor.We report a case of fat necrosis secondary to pancreatitis which clinically simulates transverse colon cancer.

  8. Self-reported distress in patients with ovarian cancer: is it related to disease status?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ploos van Amstel, F.K.; Ham, M.A.P.C. van; Peters, E.J.; Prins, J.B.; Ottevanger, P.B.

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Patients with epithelial ovarian cancer have a poor prognosis and often undergo intensive treatment. These patients are therefore at risk for experiencing distress and reduced quality of life. The aim of this study was to explore the self-reported distress severity, experienced problems,

  9. The impact of having both cancer and diabetes on patient-reported outcomes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vissers, Pauline A J; Falzon, Louise; van de Poll-Franse, Lonneke V

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE: This systematic review aims to summarize the current literature regarding potential effects of having both cancer and diabetes on patient-reported outcomes (PROs) and to provide directions for future research. METHODS: MEDLINE, The Cochrane Library, CINAHL, and PsycINFO were searched from...

  10. Multicentre evaluation of a novel vaginal dose reporting method in 153 cervical cancer patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Westerveld, Henrike; de Leeuw, Astrid; Kirchheiner, Kathrin; Dankulchai, Pittaya; Oosterveld, Bernard; Oinam, Arun; Hudej, Robert; Swamidas, Jamema; Lindegaard, Jacob; Tanderup, Kari; Pötter, Richard; Kirisits, Christian

    2016-01-01

    Recently, a vaginal dose reporting method for combined EBRT and BT in cervical cancer patients was proposed. The current study was to evaluate vaginal doses with this method in a multicentre setting, wherein different applicators, dose rates and protocols were used. In a subset of patients from the

  11. Complete remission of relapsed cervical cancer through immunochemoradiotherapy: Two case reports and three proposed mechanism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi-Hao Lin

    2016-08-01

    Conclusion: We reported two patients with cervical cancer recurrence after conventional therapy. We combined CCRT and ICRT to augment the host cells' immunosurveillance and reach durable response more than 5 years mimic long-term progression-free survival. These two patients showed promising results.

  12. Changing pediatric cancer care: development and implementation of electronic patient and parent reported outcomes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schepers, S.A.

    2017-01-01

    Being diagnosed with childhood cancer remains an obvious stressful event for the entire family. Early screening and monitoring of patient and parent reported outcomes (PROs) is therefore internationally endorsed. The KLIK method is an online innovative tool (www.hetklikt.nu) to monitor and discuss

  13. Accuracy of Self-Reported Cervical and Breast Cancer Screening by Women with Intellectual Disability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Son, Esther; Parish, Susan L.; Swaine, Jamie G.; Luken, Karen

    2013-01-01

    This study examines the accuracy of self-report of cervical and breast cancer screening by women with intellectual disability ("n" ?=? 155). Data from face-to-face interviews and medical records were analyzed. Total agreement, sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value and negative predictive value were calculated. Total…

  14. Compass 2008 data analysis and reporting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-11-01

    The Compass Annual Report is issued each year to communicate the condition of Wisconsins state highway network : and to demonstrate accountability for maintenance expenditures. The primary audience for this report includes : Maintenance Supervisor...

  15. Compass 2009 data analysis and reporting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-01

    The Compass Reports created in this project are issued annually to provide information on the maintenance condition of Wisconsins highways. The information in these reports is being used to help understand trends and conditions, prioritize resourc...

  16. Compass 2010 data analysis and reporting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-01

    The Compass Reports created in this project are issued annually to provide information on the maintenance condition of : Wisconsins highways. The information in these reports is being used to help understand trends and conditions, : prioritize res...

  17. Cordylobia anthropophaga mastitis mimicking breast cancer: case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ugwu, B T; Nwadiaro, P O

    1999-02-01

    A case of furuncular myiasis of the breast due to infestation by the larva of Cordylobia anthropophaga in a young lady is presented. Some of the physical presentations of Cordylobia anthropophaga mastitis are similar to those of carcinoma of the breast. High index of suspicion in endemic areas, including patients who had visited such areas, the characteristic intense itching of the affected breast, the use of the magnifying hand lens and subsequent extraction of the offending maggots are the invaluable aids to diagnosis and treatment. The ulcer left on the breast after extraction of the maggot should be biopsied and the associated ill defined mass and skin changes must be seen to resolve completely before carcinoma of the breast can be safely ruled out. The various methods of extraction and the preventive measures are highlighted. Though furuncular myiasis has been reported to involve every part of domestic animals, this is the first reported case in literature involving the human breast.

  18. Pulmonary sequestration mimicring lun cancer: A case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adžić-Vukičević Tatjana N.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Pulmonary sequestration is a rare congenital anomaly and most intralobar sequestrations were located in lower lobes. Case report. We reported an unusual 28-yearold female patient with intralobar pulmonary sequestration on the left lower lobe, successfully treated with lobectomy. Computed tomography (CT of the chest with intravenous contrast revealed multiple clustered cystic lesions in the left lower lobe with aberrant artery from descedenting aorta. Additional aortography showed an aberrant artery (3 mm in diameter arising from the abdominal aorta and flowing into the lesion. Conclusion. Standard therapy regimen for pulmonary sequestration includes surgery. CT scan of thorax with intravenous contrast and aortography represent the gold standard for its diagnosis. Tumor-like shadows seen on the chest radiography or CT scans should not be always suspected on malignant lesions.

  19. Quality assessment of prostate cancer reports to the Danish Cancer Registry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ingimarsdóttir, Inga Jóna; Rusch, Ea; Engholm, Gerda

    2016-01-01

    analyzed. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Patients diagnosed with prostate cancer from 1 May to 31 December 1997 and living in eight Danish counties were identified through the DCR. Clinical data was retrieved from hospital records where date of diagnosis, stage at diagnosis and treatment received were registered...... differences concerning the date of diagnosis. However, the DCR information on stage and treatment was found to be inaccurate. Since 2004 the DCR registration process, including staging according to the TNM classification, has been carried out electronically from several registers. Future comparison between...

  20. Angiosarcoma of penis: Case report of an aggressive penile cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vinod Priyadarshi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Angiosarcoma is a very rare mesenchymal tumor of penis. Though extremely unusual, it should be considered in the differential diagnosis in patients presenting with a penile growth or a localized subcutaneous penile lesions as they are very aggressive and there is a high chance of recurrence. One such case is reported here, which was aggressively treated with total penectomy and the patient did not show any recurrence in 2 years of follow-up.

  1. Exacerbation of Dermatomyositis with Recurrence of Rectal Cancer: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuka Nagano

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Dermatomyositis (DM is a rare idiopathic inflammatory myopathy characterized by cutaneous and muscle manifestations. The association between DM and malignancy has been well recognized for many years. The clinical course of paraneoplastic DM may be affected by malignancies, although the cause and effect relationship between exacerbation of DM and cancer progression is uncertain. Herein, we report a 44-year-old woman who presented with progressive DM associated with rectal cancer. After curative resection of rectal cancer, DM symptoms resolved. Three months after surgery, blood test surveillance showed elevation of serum carcinoembryonic antigen levels, although the patient remained asymptomatic. One month later she had a DM flare-up, and multiple lung and liver metastases were found. She immediately underwent cancer chemotherapy with prednisolone therapy for DM. However, her condition deteriorated and she was unable to swallow. Percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy was constructed, allowing alimentation and oral delivery, which made it possible to keep her on chemotherapy. She had remarkable response for unresectable metastases 8 weeks after the administration of chemotherapy. Seven months after onset of recurrence, her condition improved considerably and she had stable disease. Moreover, she can now eat food of soft consistency. Our case provides further support for the clinical importance of cancer chemotherapy for patients who have progressive DM and unresectable rectal cancer.

  2. Latent structure of the Wisconsin Card Sorting Test: a confirmatory factor analytic study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greve, Kevin W; Stickle, Timothy R; Love, Jeffrey M; Bianchini, Kevin J; Stanford, Matthew S

    2005-05-01

    The present study represents the first large scale confirmatory factor analysis of the Wisconsin Card Sorting Test (WCST). The results generally support the three factor solutions reported in the exploratory factor analysis literature. However, only the first factor, which reflects general executive functioning, is statistically sound. The secondary factors, while likely reflecting meaningful cognitive abilities, are less stable except when all subjects complete all 128 cards. It is likely that having two discontinuation rules for the WCST has contributed to the varied factor analytic solutions reported in the literature and early discontinuation may result in some loss of useful information. Continued multivariate research will be necessary to better clarify the processes underlying WCST performance and their relationships to one another.

  3. Tooth agenesis association with self-reported family history of cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Küchler, E C; Lips, A; Tannure, P N; Ho, B; Costa, M C; Granjeiro, J M; Vieira, A R

    2013-02-01

    It has been proposed that tooth agenesis and cancer development share common molecular pathways. We performed a cross-sectional study to investigate the epidemiological and molecular association between tooth agenesis and self-reported family history of cancer. Eighty-two individuals with tooth agenesis and 328 individuals with no birth defect were recruited from the same institution. Tooth agenesis was assessed in permanent teeth and was defined based on the age of the participants and when initial tooth formation should be radiographically visible. We also investigated the role of genes involved in dental development that have been implicated in tumorigenesis, and 14 markers in AXIN2, FGF3, FGF10, and FGFR2 were genotyped. Individuals with tooth agenesis had an increased risk of having a family history of cancer (p = 0.00006; OR = 2.7; 95% C.I., 1.6-4.4). There were associations between AXIN2, FGF3, FGF10, and FGFR2 with tooth agenesis [i.e., individuals who carried the polymorphic allele of FGFR2 (rs1219648) presented higher risk for having premolar agenesis (p = 0.02; OR = 1.8; 95% C.I., 1.1-3.0)]. In conclusion, tooth agenesis was associated with positive self-reported family history of cancer and with variants in AXIN2, FGF3, FGF10, and FGFR2. Prospective studies are needed to confirm if tooth agenesis can be used as a risk marker for cancer.

  4. Radiation-induced rectal cancer originating from a rectocutaneous fistula. Report of a case

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yokoyama, Shozo; Takifuji, Katsunari; Arii, Kazuo; Tanaka, Hajime; Matsuda, Kenji; Higashiguchi, Takashi; Yamaue, Hiroki

    2004-01-01

    This report describes a patient with radiation-induced rectal cancer with an unusual history. A 51-year-old man was admitted in 2000 because of ichorrhea of the skin on the left loin. The patient had received irradiation for a suspicious diagnosis of a malignant tumor in the pelvic cavity in 1975. A subcutaneous abscess in the right loin appeared in 1989, and rectocutaneous fistula was noted in 1992. Moreover, radiation-induced rectal cancer developed in 2000. Plain computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging of the pelvis demonstrated a presacral mass and tumor in the rectum. Finally, we diagnosed the presacral mass to be an abscess attached to the center of the rectal cancer. The rectum was resected by Miles' operation and a colostomy of the sigmoid colon was also performed. Many cases of radiation-induced rectal cancer have been reported. However, this is a rare case of radiation-induced rectal cancer originating from a presacral abscess and rectocutaneous fistula. (author)

  5. Improving cancer treatment with cyclotron produced radionuclides. Progress report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Larson, S.M.; Finn, R.D.

    1993-11-01

    This report describes our continuing long term goal of promoting nuclear medicine applications by improving the scientific basis for tumor diagnosis, treatment and treatment follow-up based on the use of cyclotron produced radiotracers in oncology. The program includes 3 interactive components: Radiochemistry/Cyclotron; Pharmacology; and Immunology. An essential strategy is as follows: novel radionuclides and radiotracers developed in the Radiochemistry/Cyclotron section will be employed in the Pharmacology and Immunology sections during the next year. The development of novel radionuclides and tracers is of course useful in and of itself, but their utility is greatly enhanced by the interaction with the immunology and pharmacology components of the program.

  6. A case series report of cancer patients undergoing group body psychotherapy [version 1; referees: 2 approved

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Astrid Grossert

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Disturbances in bodily wellbeing represent a key source of psychosocial suffering and impairment related to cancer. Therefore, interventions to improve bodily wellbeing in post-treatment cancer patients are of paramount importance. Notably, body psychotherapy (BPT has been shown to improve bodily wellbeing in subjects suffering from a variety of mental disorders. However, how post-treatment cancer patients perceive and subjectively react to group BPT aiming at improving bodily disturbances has, to the best of our knowledge, not yet been described. Methods: We report on six patients undergoing outpatient group BPT that followed oncological treatment for malignant neoplasms. The BPT consisted of six sessions based on a scientific embodiment approach, integrating body-oriented techniques to improve patients’ awareness, perception, acceptance, and expression regarding their body. Results: The BPT was well accepted by all patients. Despite having undergone different types of oncological treatment for different cancer types and locations, all subjects reported having appreciated BPT and improved how they perceived their bodies. However, individual descriptions of improvements showed substantial heterogeneity across subjects. Notably, most patients indicated that sensations, perceptions, and other mental activities related to their own body intensified when proceeding through the group BPT sessions. Conclusion: The findings from this case series encourage and inform future studies examining whether group BPT is efficacious in post-treatment cancer patients and investigating the related mechanisms of action. The observed heterogeneity in individual descriptions of perceived treatment effects point to the need for selecting comprehensive indicators of changes in disturbances of bodily wellbeing as the primary patient-reported outcome in future clinical trials. While increases in mental activities related to their own body are commonly

  7. Symptoms and side effects in chronic non-cancer pain: patient report vs. systematic assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jonsson, T; Christrup, L L; Højsted, J; Villesen, H H; Albjerg, T H; Ravn-Nielsen, L V; Sjøgren, P

    2011-01-01

    relieving distressing symptoms and managing the side effects of analgesics are essential in order to improve quality of life and functional capacity in chronic non-cancer pain patients. A quick, reliable and valid tool for assessing symptoms and side effects is needed in order to optimize treatment. We aimed to investigate the symptoms reported by chronic non-cancer pain patients after open-ended questioning vs. a systematic assessment using a list of symptoms, and to assess whether the patients could distinguish between the symptoms and the side effects induced by analgesics. patients treated with either opioids and/or adjuvant analgesics were asked to report their symptoms spontaneously, followed by a 41-item investigator-developed symptom checklist. A control group also filled in the checklist. a total of 62 patients and 64 controls participated in the study. The numbers of symptoms reported by the patients (9.9 ± 5.9) were significantly higher than those reported by the controls (3.2 ± 3.9) (Pside effects due to analgesics was: (1) Dry mouth (42%); (2) Sweating (34%); (3) Weight gain (29%); (4) Memory deficits (24%); (5) Fatigue (19%); and (6) Concentration deficits (19%). the number of symptoms reported using systematic assessment was eightfold higher than those reported voluntarily. Fatigue, cognitive dysfunction, dry mouth, sweating and weight gain were the most frequently reported. The patients reported the side effects of their analgesics to contribute substantially to the reported symptoms. 2010 The Acta Anaesthesiologica Scandinavica Foundation.

  8. Symptoms and side effects in chronic non-cancer pain: patient report vs. systematic assessment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jonsson, Torsten; Christrup, Lona Louring; Højsted, J

    2011-01-01

    relieving distressing symptoms and managing the side effects of analgesics are essential in order to improve quality of life and functional capacity in chronic non-cancer pain patients. A quick, reliable and valid tool for assessing symptoms and side effects is needed in order to optimize treatment....... We aimed to investigate the symptoms reported by chronic non-cancer pain patients after open-ended questioning vs. a systematic assessment using a list of symptoms, and to assess whether the patients could distinguish between the symptoms and the side effects induced by analgesics....

  9. Symptoms and side effects in chronic non-cancer pain:patient report vs. systematic assessment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jonsson, Torsten; Christrup, Lona Louring; Højsted, Jette

    2011-01-01

    relieving distressing symptoms and managing the side effects of analgesics are essential in order to improve quality of life and functional capacity in chronic non-cancer pain patients. A quick, reliable and valid tool for assessing symptoms and side effects is needed in order to optimize treatment....... We aimed to investigate the symptoms reported by chronic non-cancer pain patients after open-ended questioning vs. a systematic assessment using a list of symptoms, and to assess whether the patients could distinguish between the symptoms and the side effects induced by analgesics....

  10. Final Report DOE Grant# DE-FG02-98ER62592: Second Cancers, Tumor p53, and Archaea Research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lesko, Samuel M. [Northeast Regional Cancer Institute, Scranton, PA (United States)

    2006-01-14

    The Northeast Regional Cancer Institute conducted cancer surveillance in Northeast Pennsylvania using data from the institute's population-based regional cancer registry and the Pennsylvania Cancer Registry. The results of this surveillance have been used to set priorities for research and outreach activities at the Cancer Institute and selected results have been reported to medical professionals at member hospitals and in the community. One consistent observation of this surveillance was that colorectal cancer was unusually common in Northeast Pennsylvania; incidence was approximately 25% higher than the rate published for NCI's Surveillance Epidemiology and End Results (SEER) Program. In addition, death rates form colorectal cancer in several counties in this region were above the 90Th percentile for colorectal cancer mortality in the United States. As a result of these observations, several activities have been developed to increase awareness of colorectal cancer and the value of screening for this cancer in both the lay and medical communities. Funding from this grant also provided support for a population-based study of cancer risk factors, screening practices, and related behaviors. This project continues beyond the termination of the present grant with funding from other sources. This project gathers data from a representative sample of adults residing in a six county area of Northeast Pennsylvania. Analyses conducted to date of the established risk factors for colorectal cancer have not revealed an explanation for the high incidence of this cancer in this population.

  11. Metastasis of cervical cancer to breast: A case report and review of literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ankit Mangla

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Metastasis to the breast from an extra-mammary malignancy has been documented in literature, however cervical cancer metastasis to the breast is very rare. Thirty-eight cases of metastatic deposit to the breast from cervical cancer have been reported in literature. Though most patients present with a breast lump, it is very difficult to clinically distinguish a primary breast malignancy from a metastatic deposit. Histopathology of the tissue, aided with immune-histochemical staining pattern provides a definitive diagnosis. Our patient, a 51-year old woman presented with breast lump and history of post-menopausal bleeding. Upon further workup, the patient was diagnosed with cervical cancer. The mammogram and ultrasound of the breast showed multiple lumps within the breast. Histopathology of the breast mass showed metastatic deposit in the breast from cervical cancer. The patient was treated with radiation therapy to the cervix along with concurrent chemotherapy for local control of pain. After completion of local treatment, she started systemic chemotherapy, however she developed health-care associated pneumonia and subdural hematoma leading to deterioration in her performance status. The patient opted for hospice care and died 2 months later. In this report, we will review the presentation of the 38 cases reported in literature and the imaging and histopathologic findings of metastatic deposits to the breast.

  12. Does physician communication style impact patient report of decision quality for breast cancer treatment?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez, Kathryn A; Resnicow, Ken; Williams, Geoffrey C; Silva, Marlene; Abrahamse, Paul; Shumway, Dean A; Wallner, Lauren P; Katz, Steven J; Hawley, Sarah T

    2016-12-01

    Provider communication that supports patient autonomy has been associated with numerous positive patient outcomes. However, to date, no research has examined the relationship between perceived provider communication style and patient-assessed decision quality in breast cancer. Using a population-based sample of women with localized breast cancer, we assessed patient perceptions of autonomy-supportive communication from their surgeons and medical oncologists, as well as patient-reported decision quality. We used multivariable linear regression to examine the association between autonomy-supportive communication and subjective decision quality for surgery and chemotherapy decisions, controlling for sociodemographic and clinical factors, as well as patient-reported communication preference (non-directive or directive). Among the 1690 women included in the overall sample, patient-reported decision quality scores were positively associated with higher levels of perceived autonomy-supportive communication from surgeons (β=0.30; pcommunication style preference moderated the association between physician communication style received and perceived decision quality. Autonomy-supportive communication by physicians was associated with higher subjective decision quality among women with localized breast cancer. These results support future efforts to design interventions that enhance autonomy-supportive communication. Autonomy-supportive communication by cancer doctors can improve patients' perceived decision quality. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Cancer of unknown primary origin: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elisa De Carlo

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Carcinoma of unknown primary origin (CUP accounts for 2-10% of all malignancies. The apparent absence of the primary tumour, the development of early, uncommon systemic metastases and the resistance to therapy and poor prognosis are hallmarks of this heterogeneous clinical entity and are a challenge for physicians. The diagnostic workup of patients with CUP includes a large amount of histopathological examination, as well as the use of imaging techniques that often fail to identify the primary tumour. Therefore, the optimal workup and treatment for these patients remains to be determined. Molecular diagnostic tools, such as DNA microarray analysis, could help in the search for "lost" CUP origin and guide the further treatment approach. We report the case of a 66-year-old man, with mediastinal lymph nodes metastasis of carcinoma and neurological syndrome with diplopia and balance disorders, in which many exams have been performed without finding the primary tumour.

  14. Snus (nass and oral cancer: A case series report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maryam Alsadat Hashemipour

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Snus (nass is a form of snuff used in a similar manner to American dipping tobacco, but it does not typically result in a need for spitting. Possible hazards associated with this material include malignant and premalignant lesions in the oral cavity and gastrointestinal tract. The use of smokeless tobacco has increased in the Middle East in recent decades, particularly among teenagers and young adults. Therefore, practitioners must be able to recognize malignant and premalignant lesions. Although, an estimated 10-25% of the world′s population uses smokeless tobacco, this practice is virtually unknown in Iran. The aim of this study is to report a series of cases of squamous cell carcinoma and verrucous carcinoma occurring in the users of snus, who referred to the Department of Oral Medicine in Kerman Dental School.

  15. A Flexible Reporter System for Direct Observation and Isolation of Cancer Stem Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Binwu Tang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Many tumors are hierarchically organized with a minority cell population that has stem-like properties and enhanced ability to initiate tumorigenesis and drive therapeutic relapse. These cancer stem cells (CSCs are typically identified by complex combinations of cell-surface markers that differ among tumor types. Here, we developed a flexible lentiviral-based reporter system that allows direct visualization of CSCs based on functional properties. The reporter responds to the core stem cell transcription factors OCT4 and SOX2, with further selectivity and kinetic resolution coming from use of a proteasome-targeting degron. Cancer cells marked by this reporter have the expected properties of self-renewal, generation of heterogeneous offspring, high tumor- and metastasis-initiating activity, and resistance to chemotherapeutics. With this approach, the spatial distribution of CSCs can be assessed in settings that retain microenvironmental and structural cues, and CSC plasticity and response to therapeutics can be monitored in real time.

  16. Current status of discrete data capture in synoptic surgical pathology and cancer reporting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Williams CL

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Christopher L Williams,1 Roger Bjugn,2 Lewis A Hassell1 1Department of Pathology, University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center, Oklahoma City, OK, USA; 2Department of Pathology, Oslo University Hospital, Oslo, Norway Abstract: The current status of synoptic pathology reporting is presented with its historical context. The awareness of additional audiences and users has made the presentation and capture of pathology data, particularly cancer data of broad importance. Current models of adoption in the US, Canada, Norway, and the Netherlands are noted. Significant terms, benefits, and stakeholders key to implementation and advancement of capabilities particularly with regard to capture of discrete data elements are presented. Important barriers to be overcome include fiscal constraints, technologic barriers such as interconnectivity and legacy systems, as well as social and organizational obstacles. Keywords: quality assurance, integrated disease reporting, clarity, completeness, pathology report, cancer registry, biorepository

  17. Deep Learning for Automated Extraction of Primary Sites From Cancer Pathology Reports.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, John X; Yoon, Hong-Jun; Fearn, Paul A; Tourassi, Georgia D

    2018-01-01

    Pathology reports are a primary source of information for cancer registries which process high volumes of free-text reports annually. Information extraction and coding is a manual, labor-intensive process. In this study, we investigated deep learning and a convolutional neural network (CNN), for extracting ICD-O-3 topographic codes from a corpus of breast and lung cancer pathology reports. We performed two experiments, using a CNN and a more conventional term frequency vector approach, to assess the effects of class prevalence and inter-class transfer learning. The experiments were based on a set of 942 pathology reports with human expert annotations as the gold standard. CNN performance was compared against a more conventional term frequency vector space approach. We observed that the deep learning models consistently outperformed the conventional approaches in the class prevalence experiment, resulting in micro- and macro-F score increases of up to 0.132 and 0.226, respectively, when class labels were well populated. Specifically, the best performing CNN achieved a micro-F score of 0.722 over 12 ICD-O-3 topography codes. Transfer learning provided a consistent but modest performance boost for the deep learning methods but trends were contingent on the CNN method and cancer site. These encouraging results demonstrate the potential of deep learning for automated abstraction of pathology reports.

  18. Proxy and patient reports of health-related quality of life in a national cancer survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roydhouse, Jessica K; Gutman, Roee; Keating, Nancy L; Mor, Vincent; Wilson, Ira B

    2018-01-05

    Proxy respondents are frequently used in surveys, including those assessing health-related quality of life (HRQOL). In cancer, most research involving proxies has been undertaken with paired proxy-patient populations, where proxy responses are compared to patient responses for the same individual. In these populations, proxy-patient differences are small and suggest proxy underestimation of patient HRQOL. In practice, however, proxy responses will only be used when patient responses are not available. The difference between proxy and patient reports of patient HRQOL where patients are not able to report for themselves in cancer is not known. The objective of this study was to evaluate the difference between patient and proxy reports of patient HRQOL in a large national cancer survey, and determine if this difference could be mitigated by adjusting for clinical and sociodemographic information about patients. Data were from the Cancer Care Outcomes Research and Surveillance (CanCORS) study. Patients or their proxies were recruited within 3-6 months of diagnosis with lung or colorectal cancer. HRQOL was measured using the SF-12 mental and physical composite scales. Differences of ½ SD (=5 points) were considered clinically significant. The primary independent variable was proxy status. Linear regression models were used to adjust for patient sociodemographic and clinical covariates, including cancer stage, patient age and education, and patient co-morbidities. Of 6471 respondents, 1011 (16%) were proxies. Before adjustment, average proxy-reported scores were lower for both physical (-6.7 points, 95% CI -7.4 to -5.9) and mental (-6 points, 95% CI -6.7 to -5.2) health. Proxy-reported scores remained lower after adjustment (physical: -5.8 points, -6.6 to -5; mental: -5.8 points, -6.6 to 5). Proxy-patient score differences remained clinically and statistically significant, even after adjustment for sociodemographic and clinical variables. Proxy-reported outcome scores

  19. Automated classification of free-text pathology reports for registration of incident cases of cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jouhet, V; Defossez, G; Burgun, A; le Beux, P; Levillain, P; Ingrand, P; Claveau, V

    2012-01-01

    Our study aimed to construct and evaluate functions called "classifiers", produced by supervised machine learning techniques, in order to categorize automatically pathology reports using solely their content. Patients from the Poitou-Charentes Cancer Registry having at least one pathology report and a single non-metastatic invasive neoplasm were included. A descriptor weighting function accounting for the distribution of terms among targeted classes was developed and compared to classic methods based on inverse document frequencies. The classification was performed with support vector machine (SVM) and Naive Bayes classifiers. Two levels of granularity were tested for both the topographical and the morphological axes of the ICD-O3 code. The ability to correctly attribute a precise ICD-O3 code and the ability to attribute the broad category defined by the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) for the multiple primary cancer registration rules were evaluated using F1-measures. 5121 pathology reports produced by 35 pathologists were selected. The best performance was achieved by our class-weighted descriptor, associated with a SVM classifier. Using this method, the pathology reports were properly classified in the IARC categories with F1-measures of 0.967 for both topography and morphology. The ICD-O3 code attribution had lower performance with a 0.715 F1-measure for topography and 0.854 for morphology. These results suggest that free-text pathology reports could be useful as a data source for automated systems in order to identify and notify new cases of cancer. Future work is needed to evaluate the improvement in performance obtained from the use of natural language processing, including the case of multiple tumor description and possible incorporation of other medical documents such as surgical reports.

  20. A case report of male breast cancer in a very young patient: What is changing?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kishino Viviane

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Male breast cancer accounts for 1% of all breast cancer cases, and men tend to be diagnosed at an older age than women (mean age is about 67 years. Several risk factors have been identified, such as genetic and hormonal abnormalities. The present study reported the case of a 25-year-old man who was diagnosed with an advanced invasive ductal carcinoma; however, he did not have any important risk factors. Even though more data is emerging about this disease, more efforts to understand risk factors, treatment options and survival benefits are needed. In this case, we discussed the risk factors as well as the impaired fertility associated with breast cancer therapies.

  1. Relapsed Colon Cancer Patient Presenting With Hematuria 13 Years After Primary Tumor Resection: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-Ho Huang

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available We report a rare case of postoperative colon cancer recurrence who presented with hematuria 13 years after resection of the primary colonic cancer. The patient was 72 years of age and underwent surgical resection of sigmoid colon cancer at another regional hospital in 1994. Since June 2007, this patient has complained of hematuria and bloody stool. On physical examination, tenderness and a hard, indurated mass was palpable in the lower mid-abdomen. Abdominal computed tomography showed a metastatic tumor at the lower midline peritoneum with invasion of the adjacent abdominal wall. Her serum carcinoembryonic antigen level was elevated to 32 ng/dL. Histopathology revealed metastatic colonic adenocarcinoma in the jejunum and abdominal wall.

  2. Durable response using regorafenib in an elderly patient with metastatic colorectal cancer: case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tang R

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Ronald Tang,1 Tatiana Kain,2 June Herman,2 Tara Seery1 1Division of Hematology-Oncology, 2Division of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, University of California, Irvine, Orange, CA, USA Abstract: Regorafenib, an oral multikinase inhibitor, was approved in September 2012 by the US Food and Drug Administration for the treatment of patients with metastatic colorectal cancer. Since this time, however, few case reports outlining real-world usage have been published in the literature. Here, we detail the clinical history of an elderly woman with KRAS wild-type colon cancer who received regorafenib after prior treatment with other agents. We show that by employing dose modification strategies to address adverse events, this patient was able to remain on therapy for 11 months and achieve stable disease. Keywords: regorafenib, metastatic colorectal cancer, oral multikinase inhibitor

  3. Hereditary Diffuse Gastric Cancer: Multidisciplinary Case Report with Review of the Literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rebecca Wilcox

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Hereditary diffuse gastric cancer (HDGC is a rare, inherited cancer syndrome with at least one fourth of HDGC patients having an autosomal dominantly inherited mutation of CDH1 (E-Cadherin. Penetrance is relatively high (70–80% lifetime risk for gastric cancer. It is important for pathologists to recognize the syndrome's phenotype in early gastric lesions: patchy intramucosal signet ring cells often associated with pagetoid spread. Due to the insidious nature of this lesion, surveillance is limited and currently prophylactic gastrectomy is an option chosen by many HDGC patients. We present a case report from a multidisciplinary team of authors with a review of the literature that includes the updated guidelines for CDH1 genetic testing.

  4. Patient-reported symptom distress, and most bothersome issues, before and during cancer treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hong F

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Fangxin Hong,1,2 Traci M Blonquist,1 Barbara Halpenny,3 Donna L Berry,3,4 1Department of Biostatistics and Computational Biology, Dana‑Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, MA, USA;2Department of Biostatistics, Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, MA, USA; 3Department of Nursing and Patient Care Services, The Phyllis F. Cantor Center, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, MA, USA; 4Department of Medicine, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA Introduction: Frequently reported symptoms and treatment side effects may not be the most bothersome issues to patients with cancer. The purpose of this study was to investigate patient-reported symptom distress and bothersome issues among participants with cancer. Methods: Participants completed the Symptom Distress Scale-15 before treatment (T1 and during cancer treatment (T2 and reported up to two most bothersome issues among symptoms rated with moderate-to-severe distress. We compared symptom ratings and perceived bother and explored two approaches predicting patients’ most bothersome issues: worst absolute symptom score or worst change from pretreatment. Results: Significantly, (P≤0.0002 more patients reported moderate-to-severe distress at T2 for eight of 13 symptoms. At T1, 81% of patients reported one and 56% reported multiple symptoms with moderate-to-severe distress, while at T2, 89% reported one and 69% reported multiple symptoms with moderate-to-severe distress. Impact on sexual activity/interest, pain, fatigue, and insomnia were the most prevalent symptoms with moderate-to-severe distress. Fatigue, pain, and insomnia were perceived most often as bothersome. When one symptom was rated moderate-to-severe, predictive accuracy of the absolute score was 46% and 48% (T1 & T2 and 38% with the change score (T2–T1. When two or more symptoms were rated moderate-to-severe, predictive accuracy of the absolute score was 76% and 79% (T1 & T2 and 70% with the change score (T2–T1. Conclusion: More

  5. Electronic patient-reported data capture as a foundation of rapid learning cancer care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abernethy, Amy P; Ahmad, Asif; Zafar, S Yousuf; Wheeler, Jane L; Reese, Jennifer Barsky; Lyerly, H Kim

    2010-06-01

    "Rapid learning healthcare" presents a new infrastructure to support comparative effectiveness research. By leveraging heterogeneous datasets (eg, clinical, administrative, genomic, registry, and research), health information technology, and sophisticated iterative analyses, rapid learning healthcare provides a real-time framework in which clinical studies can evaluate the relative impact of therapeutic approaches on a diverse array of measures. This article describes an effort, at 1 academic medical center, to demonstrate what rapid learning healthcare might look like in operation. The article describes the process of developing and testing the components of this new model of integrated clinical/research function, with the pilot site being an academic oncology clinic and with electronic patient-reported outcomes (ePROs) being the foundational dataset. Steps included: feasibility study of the ePRO system; validation study of ePRO collection across 3 cancers; linking ePRO and other datasets; implementation; stakeholder alignment and buy in, and; demonstration through use cases. Two use cases are presented; participants were metastatic breast cancer (n = 65) and gastrointestinal cancer (n = 113) patients at 2 academic medical centers. (1) Patient-reported symptom data were collected with tablet computers; patients with breast and gastrointestinal cancer indicated high levels of sexual distress, which prompted multidisciplinary response, design of an intervention, and successful application for funding to study the intervention's impact. (2) The system evaluated the longitudinal impact of a psychosocial care program provided to patients with breast cancer. Participants used tablet computers to complete PRO surveys; data indicated significant impact on psychosocial outcomes, notably distress and despair, despite advanced disease. Results return to the clinic, allowing iterative update and evaluation. An ePRO-based rapid learning cancer clinic is feasible, providing

  6. Severe Fournier's gangrene in a patient with rectal cancer: case report and literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshino, Yu; Funahashi, Kimihiko; Okada, Rei; Miura, Yasuyuki; Suzuki, Takayuki; Koda, Takamaru; Yoshida, Kimihiko; Koike, Junichi; Shiokawa, Hiroyuki; Ushigome, Mitsunori; Kaneko, Tomoaki; Nagashima, Yasuo; Goto, Mayu; Kurihara, Akiharu; Kaneko, Hironori

    2016-09-01

    Fournier's gangrene in the setting of rectal cancer is rare. Treatment for Fournier's gangrene associated with rectal cancer is more complex than other cases of Fournier's gangrene. We report on a patient with severe Fournier's gangrene in the setting of locally advanced rectal cancer who was treated with a combined modality therapy. A 65-year-old man presented with general fatigue and anal pain. The medical and surgical histories were unremarkable. A black spot on the perineal skin surrounded by erythema was found on physical examination, suspicious for Fournier's gangrene. Computed tomography scan showed a rectal tumor invading into the bladder (clinically T4bN2M0) and abscess formation with emphysema around the rectum. He was thus diagnosed with locally advanced rectal cancer and Fournier's gangrene with a severity index score of 12 points. We created a diverting loop colostomy of the transverse colon and performed extensive debridement of the perineum and perianal area. Fifty days later, the patient underwent radical total pelvic exenteration with sacrectomy. In addition, reconstruction of the soft tissue defect was performed using the rectus muscle, the gluteus maximus muscle, and the femoral muscle. Histopathological findings of the specimen were as follows: the tumor was a moderately adenocarcinoma with invasion to the bladder and the prostate (T4b), metastases to four resected lymph nodes (N2), and lymphovascular invasion. There were no major postoperative complications, and the patient was discharged 108 days postoperatively. We report a rare case of locally invasive rectal cancer associated with Fournier's gangrene. This case highlights a usual cause of Fournier's gangrene. Physicians should be cognizant not only of the more common condition but also of the rare presentations including those associated with rectal cancer.

  7. Choledochoduodenal fistula presenting with pneumobilia in a patient with gallbladder cancer: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dadzan Elham

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Spontaneous biliary tract fistulas are rare entities. Most of them are associated with long-standing gallstones (especially common bile duct stones, or recurrent biliary tract infections, some with more uncommon diseases such as gallbladder cancer. Some authors believe that back flow from fistulas predisposes patients to gallbladder cancer and some believe that cancer causes necrosis and fistula formation. Gallbladder cancer has a dismal prognosis and 85% of patients are dead within a year of diagnosis. A common complication of gallbladder cancer is obstruction of the common bile duct, which may produce multiple intra-hepatic abscesses in or near the tumor-laden gallbladder. Fistula formation may further complicate the clinical picture. Case presentation We present a case of choledochoduodenal fistula in a 60-year-old diabetic African-American woman with gallbladder cancer. The initial clinical presentation was confusing and complex. Our patient was also found to have a gallbladder fossa abscess that was drained percutaneously as another complicating factor relating to her cancer. She developed myocardial infarction, massive upper gastrointestinal bleeding and respiratory arrest during her stay in hospital. Computed tomography was very helpful in assessing our patient and we discuss how, in a patient with pneumobilia, it can be helpful for detecting fistula, air in bile ducts or to show contractions of the gallbladder. Conclusions We believe this case merits reporting as it shows an entity that is not frequently thought of, is hard to diagnose and can be fatal, as in our patient. Careful evaluation, and computed tomography studies and endoscopic retrograde cholangio-pancreatography are helpful in early diagnosis and finding better management options for these patients.

  8. Qigong program on insomnia and stress in cancer patients: A case series report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Seungmo; Lee, Sangnam; Kwon, Osung; Park, Seonghoon; Seo, Jungchul; Kim, Kyungsoon

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, the interest in Qigong as an alternative therapy has grown following reports of its ability to regulate psychological factors in cancer patients. This is a case series to evaluate the outcome measures of Qigong when used as an adjunct to standard medical care to treat insomnia and stress in cancer patients. The Qigong program was applied to four cancer patients with insomnia, stress, and anxiety. The program consisted of 30-min sessions involving exercise, patting of the 12 meridians, and spontaneous breathing exercises three times a week for a period of 4 weeks. The Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index was measured as the primary outcome, while the Stress Scale, the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory, and the Functional Assessment Cancer Therapy-General determined the secondary outcomes. Insomnia, stress, and anxiety levels were examined weekly, while quality of life was examined on the first visit and the last visit. The Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index and Stress Scale scores were reduced after conduct of the Qigong program. This study could provide a better understanding of Qigong's influence on insomnia and stress in cancer patients. However, a larger controlled trial should be conducted to confirm these findings.

  9. Tumor markers in pancreatic cancer: a European Group on Tumor Markers (EGTM) status report.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Duffy, M J

    2012-02-01

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma is one of the most difficult malignancies to diagnose and treat. The aim of this article is to review how tumor markers can aid the diagnosis and management of patients with this malignancy. The most widely used and best validated marker for pancreatic cancer is CA 19-9. Inadequate sensitivity and specificity limit the use of CA 19-9 in the early diagnosis of pancreatic cancer. In non-jaundiced patients, however, CA 19-9 may complement other diagnostic procedures. In patients with resectable pancreatic cancer, presurgical and postresection CA 19-9 levels correlate with overall survival. In advanced disease, elevated pretreatment levels of CA 19-9 are associated with adverse patient outcome and thus may be combined with other factors for risk stratification. Most, but not all, reports indicate that serial levels of CA 19-9 correlate with response to systemic therapy. Use of CA 19-9 kinetics in conjunction with imaging is therefore recommended in monitoring therapy. Although several potential serum and tissue markers for pancreatic cancer are currently undergoing evaluation, none are sufficiently validated for routine clinical use. CA 19-9 thus remains the serum pancreatic cancer marker against which new markers for this malignancy should be judged.

  10. Comparison of self-reported physical activity in children and adolescents before and during cancer treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Götte, Miriam; Kesting, Sabine; Winter, Corinna; Rosenbaum, Dieter; Boos, Joachim

    2014-06-01

    Physical activities are important for the development of children and increasing evidence suggests beneficial effects of physical activity promotion during cancer treatment as well. The present study aimed at evaluating the current need of exercise interventions in pediatric cancer patients undergoing acute treatment and identifying risk factors for inactivity. Data about self-reported physical activity before and during treatment was collected in a cross-sectional design with the physical activity questionnaire from the German Health Interview and Examination Survey for Children and Adolescents (KiGGS) in a modified cancer specific version. One hundred thirty pediatric cancer patients with various entities were questioned 3.0 ± 1.6 months since diagnosis. Patients' activity levels before diagnosis mainly matched reference values for healthy children in Germany. Reductions during treatment affected all dimensions of daily physical activities and minutes of exercise per week decreased significantly (P physical activities during treatment were identified for bone tumor patients and in-patient stays. Due to the well known importance of physical activity during childhood and the identified risk of inactivity during cancer treatment, supervised exercise interventions should be implemented into acute treatment phase to enhance activity levels and ensure a continuously support by qualified exercise professionals. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Synchronous uterine carcinosarcoma and contralateral breast cancer after tamoxifen therapy: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Ling; Hong, Liangli; Zhang, Guohong; Mai, Ruiqin

    2014-01-01

    Uterine carcinosarcoma (malignant mixed Müllerian tumor, MMMT) is a rare aggressive malignant tumor, which demonstrates both malignant epithelial (carcinoma) and mesenchymal (sarcoma) components. Synchronous uterine carcinosarcoma and contralateral breast cancer in patient received tamoxifen treatment had not been reported. We present a case of uterine carcinosarcoma co-occurrenced with contralateral breast cancer in a 56-year-old nulliparous, obese breast cancer patient, who had been treated with tamoxifen for 5 years. The patient presented with palpable pelvic mass and vaginal bleeding. Histopathological evidence revealed that the tumor was comprised of an admixture of malignant epithelial and mesenchymal components. The epithelial component was endometrioid type adenocarcinoma, while sarcomatous component had heterologous elements including fusiform cell sarcoma and a prominent component of cartilage. The infiltrating ductal carcinoma has been diagnosed on her right breast. The patient died of disease 8 months after diagnosis. Postmenopausal patients, with adjuvant tamoxifen treatment for breast cancer, are at increased risk for the development of uterine carcinosarcoma and less benefit for contralateral breast cancer.

  12. [Prostate cancer diagnosed through the biopsy of the bone metastatic lesion; a case report].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ueda, Yasuo; Higuchii, Yoshihide; Hashimoto, Takahiko; Mitsui, Youzou; Maruyamai, Takuo; Kondou, Nobuyuki; Nojima, Michio; Yamamoto, Shingo; Shincho, Mayumi; Hirota, Seiichi; Shima, Hiroki

    2007-05-01

    An 80-year-old man visited our clinic with the chief complaint of asymptomatic macroscopic hematuria secondary to anticoagulant medicine. Although digital rectal examination was normal, a high serum prostate specific antigen (PSA) level (85.9 ng/ml) led us to perform sextant prostate biopsy, resulting in negative for cancer. Three months later, since the serum PSA increased to 169 ng/ml with high serum carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) and carbohydrate antigen (CA) 19-9 levels. Twelve-core prostate biopsy was performed again, but the result was negative. Pelvic magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) showed a metastatic lesion on the right pubic bone, which was biopsied, and turned out to be poorly differentiated prostate cancer in histology. Maximum androgen blockade failed to control PSA. Finally he died of pneumonia 55 days after the bone biopsy. To our knowledge, there were only two case reports diagnosed as prostate cancer by biopsies of the metastatic lesions in Japanese literature, but none in the English literature. These findings suggest that high serum levels of CEA and CA19-9 in patients with prostate cancer are indications of hormone-refractory prostate cancer resulting in poor prognosis.

  13. Qigong program on insomnia and stress in cancer patients: A case series report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seungmo Kim

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: In recent years, the interest in Qigong as an alternative therapy has grown following reports of its ability to regulate psychological factors in cancer patients. This is a case series to evaluate the outcome measures of Qigong when used as an adjunct to standard medical care to treat insomnia and stress in cancer patients. Patients and methods: The Qigong program was applied to four cancer patients with insomnia, stress, and anxiety. The program consisted of 30-min sessions involving exercise, patting of the 12 meridians, and spontaneous breathing exercises three times a week for a period of 4 weeks. The Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index was measured as the primary outcome, while the Stress Scale, the State–Trait Anxiety Inventory, and the Functional Assessment Cancer Therapy–General determined the secondary outcomes. Insomnia, stress, and anxiety levels were examined weekly, while quality of life was examined on the first visit and the last visit. Results: The Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index and Stress Scale scores were reduced after conduct of the Qigong program. Conclusion: This study could provide a better understanding of Qigong’s influence on insomnia and stress in cancer patients. However, a larger controlled trial should be conducted to confirm these findings.

  14. Concordance of parent proxy report and child self-report of posttraumatic stress in children with cancer and healthy children: influence of parental posttraumatic stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clawson, Ashley H; Jurbergs, Niki; Lindwall, Jennifer; Phipps, Sean

    2013-11-01

    This study examined the relationships between parental posttraumatic stress symptoms (PTSS), child PTSS, and parent-child concordance for child PTSS. Participants were children with cancer (n = 199), and healthy children (n = 108) and their parents. Children self-reported on PTSS and parents completed measures of child and parent PTSS. In the cancer group, child and parent reports of child PTSS were significantly correlated with no mean differences between reporters. In contrast, correlations were non-significant in the control group, and parents reported significantly lower levels of child PTSS than children. Increased parental PTSS was associated with better concordance in the cancer group but not in the control group. In fact, in the cancer group, parent-child concordance was strongest at the highest level of parental PTSS. Parents of children with cancer were found to be accurate reporters of their children's distress, even with high levels of reported personal distress. In contrast, parents of healthy children appear primarily influenced by personal distress when reporting child PTSS. Although multiple informant assessments are always desirable, it appears that utilization of a single informant may be reasonable in the cancer setting when access to informants is limited. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  15. The meaning of self-reported death anxiety in advanced cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tong, Eryn; Deckert, Amy; Gani, Nina; Nissim, Rinat; Rydall, Anne; Hales, Sarah; Rodin, Gary; Lo, Chris

    2016-09-01

    Death anxiety is important but understudied in palliative care. New self-report measurements have been developed, but their interpretation and clinical utility may not be evident. To inform our understanding of death anxiety in patients with advanced cancer by exploring the relationship between this self-reported symptom and its clinical presentation. Participants were part of a psychotherapy trial in advanced cancer. First therapy session transcripts were analyzed using interpretive description in patients reporting low, moderate, and high death anxiety on the Death and Dying Distress Scale (DADDS). A total of 16 participants (10 women and 6 men) with advanced or metastatic cancer were sampled from the Princess Margaret Cancer Centre, Toronto, Canada. Six participants reported low death anxiety scores (Death and Dying Distress Scale: 0-19), five moderate (Death and Dying Distress Scale: 20-50), and five high (Death and Dying Distress Scale: 51-75). The low death anxiety group exhibited psychological readiness for death, or contrastingly, non-reflectiveness about death. The moderate group recognized the imminence of mortality, which impacted treatment decisions and future plans. Prior experience with death was discussed as raising the salience of mortality. The high group felt dominated by powerful emotions and could not make sense of their situation. Their distress was exacerbated by substantial relational concerns. Self-reported death anxiety is affected by the awareness and ability to reflect on mortality. Death and Dying Distress Scale scores may facilitate exploration of this symptom as part of a clinical assessment and may serve to guide treatment approaches. Greater attention to death anxiety is consistent with and recommended by contemporary approaches to palliative care. © The Author(s) 2016.

  16. Assessment of breast cancer disability: agreement between expert assessment and patient reports.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Letellier, Marie-Eve; Mayo, Nancy

    2017-04-01

    To estimate the extent of agreement between health professionals' (ClinRO) and patients' (PRO) ratings on disabilities associated with breast cancer (impairments, activity limitations and participation restrictions). Cross-sectional. Health care professionals measured arm impairments, activity limitations and participation restrictions with the international classification of functioning (ICF) breast cancer core set. Participants filled five outcomes measures targeting health aspects of QOL that were previously mapped to the ICF. Agreement between ClinRO and PRO was estimated with quadratic Kappa. About 245 paired clinician and participant completed the outcomes measures. A total of 60 items mapped to 24 different ICF breast cancer core set codes, which provide 68 analyses for agreement. Impairment was better addressed with PROs (mostly poor and fair level of agreement); Activity limitations, both PROs and self-reported outcomes (SRO) (fair); participation restrictions, PROs (fair). Clinicians usually underestimate the symptoms and impairments of the patients, leading to a greater proportion of poor agreement. PRO's provide valuable information on impairments at the mental function level and pain. ClinRO's provide more valuable information on physically assessed impairments (oedema). Activity limitations and participation restrictions, excluding reporting the difficulty aspect of various life situations, can be either SRO or ObsRO. Implications for rehabilitation Impairments, activity limitation and participation restrictions are common sequelae of breast cancer treatment, which ultimately may affect the person's quality of life and should be investigated early on in the continuum of care. Clinicians should rely on the symptoms' reported by the patient regarding lymphedema and should identify the presence and severity of it. Patients inform best on the severity of pain, fatigue and mental distress experienced during and post-breast cancer treatment as clinicians

  17. Preparing Tomorrow’s Nursing Home Nurses: The Wisconsin-Long Term Care Clinical Scholars Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nolet, Kim; Roberts, Tonya; Gilmore-Bykovskyi, Andrea; Roiland, Rachel; Gullickson, Colleen; Ryther, Brenda; Bowers, Barbara J.

    2014-01-01

    Preparing future nurses to care for the growing population of older adults has become a national priority. The demand for long term care services is expected to double between 2000 and 2040, yet the field remains stigmatized as an undesirable place for highly-skilled nurses to work. Recent efforts to increase student preparation in geriatrics have been shown to improve student attitudes toward working with older adults and increase knowledge, but long term care settings remain unattractive to students. This paper reports on development, implementation and evaluation of The Wisconsin Long Term Care Clinical Scholars Program, a nursing home internship for baccalaureate nursing students. The program couples a paid nursing home work experience with an evidence-based long term care nursing curriculum. The program increased student preparation and interest in working with older adults and in nursing homes, while concurrently increasing the capacity of nursing homes to provide a positive student experience. PMID:25162659

  18. Preparing tomorrow's nursing home nurses: the wisconsin long term care clinical scholars program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nolet, Kim; Roberts, Tonya; Gilmore-Bykovskyi, Andrea; Roiland, Rachel; Gullickson, Colleen; Ryther, Brenda; Bowers, Barbara J

    2015-01-01

    Preparing future nurses to care for the growing population of older adults has become a national priority. The demand for long term care services is expected to double between 2000 and 2040, yet the field remains stigmatized as an undesirable place for highly skilled nurses to work. Recent efforts to increase student preparation in geriatrics have been shown to improve student attitudes toward working with older adults and increase knowledge, but long term care settings remain unattractive to students. This article reports on the development, implementation, and evaluation of The Wisconsin Long Term Care Clinical Scholars Program, a nursing home internship for baccalaureate nursing students. The program couples a paid nursing home work experience with an evidence-based long term care nursing curriculum. The program increased student preparation and interest in working both with older adults and in nursing homes, while increasing the capacity of nursing homes to provide a positive student experience.

  19. Reporting Late Rectal Toxicity in Prostate Cancer Patients Treated With Curative Radiation Treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faria, Sergio L.; Souhami, Luis; Joshua, Bosede; Vuong, Te; Freeman, Carolyn R.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: Long-term rectal toxicity is a concern for patients with prostate cancer treated with curative radiation. However, comparing results of late toxicity may not be straightforward. This article reviews the complexity of reporting long-term side effects by using data for patients treated in our institution with hypofractionated irradiation. Methods and Materials: Seventy-two patients with localized prostate cancer treated with hypofractionated radiotherapy alone to a dose of 66 Gy in 22 fractions were prospectively assessed for late rectal toxicity according to the Common Toxicity Criteria, Version 3, scoring system. Ninety percent of patients had more than 24 months of follow-up. Results are compared with data published in the literature. Results: We found an actuarial incidence of Grade 2 or higher late rectal toxicity of 27% at 30 months and a crude incidence of Grade 2 or higher late rectal toxicity of 18%. This was mostly severe toxicity documented during follow-up. The incidence of Grade 3 rectal toxicity at the last visit was 3% compared with 13% documented at any time during follow-up. Conclusion: Comparison of late toxicity after radiotherapy in patients with prostate cancer must be undertaken with caution because many factors need to be taken into consideration. Because accurate assessment of late toxicity in the evaluation of long-term outcome after radiotherapy in patients with localized prostate cancer is essential, there is a need to develop by consensus guidelines for assessing and reporting late toxicity in this group of patients

  20. Psychogenic fever in a patient with small cell lung cancer: a case report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu, Mengdan; Zhang, Xiaoye; Xu, Zhaoguo; Cui, Guoyuan; Yu, Li; Qi, Xiaoying; Lin, Jia; Liu, Yan

    2015-01-01

    Fever is common in malignant tumors. We report an exceptional case of psychogenic fever in a patient with small cell lung cancer. This is the first case report of psychogenic fever in a patient with small cell lung cancer. A 61-year-old Chinese man diagnosed with small cell carcinoma on June 30, 2012, came to our department with a complaint of fever lasting more than 1 month. He had undergone chemoradiotherapy for lung cancer 6 months previously. After admission, his body temperature fluctuated in the range of 37 °C to 39 °C. Somatic symptoms associated with anxiety were obvious. A 24-item Hamilton Anxiety Scale was used to assess the patient’s condition. A score of 32 confirmed a diagnosis of severe anxiety. After a week of antianxiety treatment, the patient’s temperature returned to normal. Psychogenic fever is common in cancer patients and deserves more attention. Patients with psychogenic fever must be distinguished from patients with infectious fever (including neutropenic fever), and tumor fever. Additionally, antianxiety or antidepression treatment should be provided. A concern is that continual anxiety may adversely affect anticancer therapy

  1. Radiation-associated breast cancer and gonadal hormone exposure: a report from the Childhood Cancer Survivor Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Moskowitz, Chaya S.; Chou, Joanne F.; Sklar, Charles A.; Barnea, Dana; Ronckers, Cécile M.; Friedman, Danielle Novetsky; Neglia, Joseph P.; Turcotte, Lucie; Howell, Rebecca M.; Henderson, Tara O.; Armstrong, Gregory T.; Leisenring, Wendy M.; Robison, Leslie L.; van Leeuwen, Flora E.; Pike, Malcolm C.; Oeffinger, Kevin C.

    2017-01-01

    The relationship between hormone exposure and breast cancer risk in women treated with chest radiotherapy for childhood cancer is uncertain. Participants included 1108 females from the Childhood Cancer Survivor Study who were diagnosed with childhood cancer 1970-1986, treated with chest

  2. Patient accuracy of reporting on hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer-related malignancy in family members

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Katballe, Niels; Juul, Svend; Christensen, M.

    2001-01-01

    including consecutive patients with colorectal cancer. A questionnaire covering the occurrence of malignancy among relatives was completed. RESULTS: A total of 1200 patients with colorectal cancer completed the questionnaire. Fulfilment of Amsterdam criteria I or II according to the patients' reports......BACKGROUND: The cancer family history is important in identifying individuals with hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC). The accuracy of a suspected HNPCC family history reported by patients with colorectal cancer was evaluated. METHODS: This was a prospective population-based study......). CONCLUSION: The present study suggests that family studies on HNPCC are not reliable unless the diagnoses of family members are verified from official sources. If endoscopic screening is offered entirely on the basis of unverified information from patients with colorectal cancer, there is a risk that a large...

  3. Evaluation of nonpoint-source contamination, Wisconsin; selected streamwater-quality data, land-use and best-management practices inventory, and quality assurance and quality control, water year 1993

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corsi, Steven R.; Walker, John F.; Graczyk, D.J.; Greb, S.R.; Owens, D.W.; Rappold, K.F.

    1995-01-01

    The objective of the watershed-management evaluation monitoring program in Wisconsin is to evaluate the effectiveness of the best-management practices (BMPs) for rural streams, urban streams, and urban storm sewers. This report is an annual summary of the data collected for the program and a report of the results from several different special studies conducted within this program.

  4. Understanding Cancer Prognosis

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Directives Using Trusted Resources Cancer Types Adolescents and Young Adults with Cancer Reports, Research, and Literature Cancers by Body Location/System Childhood Cancers Late ...

  5. Understanding Cancer Prognosis

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... with Cancer Reports, Research, and Literature Cancers by Body Location/System Childhood Cancers Late Effects of Childhood Cancer Treatment Pediatric Supportive Care Unusual ...

  6. Heavy metals in wild rice from northern Wisconsin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, J.P.; Chiriboga, E.; Coleman, J.; Waller, D.M.

    2000-01-01

    Wild rice grain samples from various parts of the world have been found to have elevated concentrations of heavy metals, raising concern for potential effects on human health. It was hypothesized that wild rice from north-central Wisconsin could potentially have elevated concentrations of some heavy metals because of possible exposure to these elements from the atmosphere or from water and sediments. In addition, no studies of heavy metals in wild rice from Wisconsin had been performed, and a baseline study was needed for future comparisons. Wild rice plants were collected from four areas in Bayfield, Forest, Langlade, Oneida, Sawyer and Wood Counties in September, 1997 and 1998 and divided into four plant parts for elemental analyses: roots, stems, leaves and seeds. A total of 194 samples from 51 plants were analyzed across the localities, with an average of 49 samples per part depending on the element. Samples were cleaned of soil, wet digested, and analyzed by ICP for Ag, As, Cd, Cr, Cu, Hg, Mg, Pb, Se and Zn. Roots contained the highest concentrations of Ag, As, Cd, Cr, Hg, Pb, and Se. Copper was highest in both roots and seeds, while Zn was highest just in seeds. Magnesium was highest in leaves. Seed baseline ranges for the 10 elements were established using the 95% confidence intervals of the medians. Wild rice plants from northern Wisconsin had normal levels of the nutritional elements Cu, Mg and Zn in the seeds. Silver, Cd, Hg, Cr, and Se were very low in concentration or within normal limits for food plants. Arsenic and Pb, however, were elevated and could pose a problem for human health. The pathway for As, Hg and Pb to the plants could be atmospheric.

  7. Oneida Tribe of Indians of Wisconsin Energy Optimization Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Troge, Michael [Little Bear Development Center, Oneida, WI (United States)

    2014-12-01

    Oneida Nation is located in Northeast Wisconsin. The reservation is approximately 96 square miles (8 miles x 12 miles), or 65,000 acres. The greater Green Bay area is east and adjacent to the reservation. A county line roughly splits the reservation in half; the west half is in Outagamie County and the east half is in Brown County. Land use is predominantly agriculture on the west 2/3 and suburban on the east 1/3 of the reservation. Nearly 5,000 tribally enrolled members live in the reservation with a total population of about 21,000. Tribal ownership is scattered across the reservation and is about 23,000 acres. Currently, the Oneida Tribe of Indians of Wisconsin (OTIW) community members and facilities receive the vast majority of electrical and natural gas services from two of the largest investor-owned utilities in the state, WE Energies and Wisconsin Public Service. All urban and suburban buildings have access to natural gas. About 15% of the population and five Tribal facilities are in rural locations and therefore use propane as a primary heating fuel. Wood and oil are also used as primary or supplemental heat sources for a small percent of the population. Very few renewable energy systems, used to generate electricity and heat, have been installed on the Oneida Reservation. This project was an effort to develop a reasonable renewable energy portfolio that will help Oneida to provide a leadership role in developing a clean energy economy. The Energy Optimization Model (EOM) is an exploration of energy opportunities available to the Tribe and it is intended to provide a decision framework to allow the Tribe to make the wisest choices in energy investment with an organizational desire to establish a renewable portfolio standard (RPS).

  8. Reporting of coronary artery calcification on chest CT studies in breast cancer patients at high risk of cancer therapy related cardiac events

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William J. Phillips

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: The identification of coronary artery calcification (CAC detected coincidentally on chest CT exams could assist in cardiovascular risk assessment but may not be reported consistently on clinical studies. Cardiovascular risk factor stratification is important to predict short term cardiac events during cancer therapy and long term cardiac event free survival in cancer patients. We sought to determine the prevalence of CAC and clinical reporting rates in a cohort of cancer patients at high risk of cancer therapy related cardiac events. Methods: 408 Breast cancer patients who were referred to a cardiac oncology clinic were screened. Inclusion criteria included having had a CT chest and the absence of known coronary disease. Among those screened 263 patients were included in the study. Results: CAC was identified in 70 patients (26%. CAC was reported in 18% of studies. The reporting rates of CAC increased with the extent of coronary calcification (p < 0.01 and increased during the period of the study (p < 0.05. Conclusions: CAC was commonly detected on chest CT studies in this observational study of breast cancer patients at high risk of cardiac oncology events. The presence of CAC was often not reported clinically but reporting rates have increased over time. Recent SCCT/STR guidelines recommend reporting the presence of CAC on routine chest CT scans in recognition of the importance of CAC as a predictor of cardiovascular events. Reporting of CAC on chest CTs may help to further risk stratify breast cancer patients and improve cardiovascular outcomes in this vulnerable population. Keywords: Cardiac oncology, Coronary calcification and chest CT

  9. Conversion disorder as psychogenic nonepileptic seizures in suspected cancer: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jimenez, Xavier F; Sharma, Jennifer S; Dar, Syma A

    2014-01-01

    Psychogenic nonepileptic seizures (PNES), a form of conversion disorder, are paroxysmal episodes resembling epilepsy while lacking electrographic correlation. The phenomenon has rarely been reported in elderly patients and has not been associated with a new-onset medical diagnosis. We present the case of an 81-year-old female with no past psychiatric or traumatic history who developed PNES within the context of a new, suspected cancer. To our knowledge, this is the first such reported case of a suspected cancer (or otherwise medical) diagnosis contributing directly and temporally to the development of PNES. Discussion of involved psychosocial variables follows the vignette, and a brief review of relevant literature is offered. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Analysis of nursing home use and bed supply: Wisconsin, 1983.

    OpenAIRE

    Nyman, J A

    1989-01-01

    This article presents evidence that in 1983 excess demand was a prevailing characteristic of nursing home care markets in Wisconsin, a state with one of the highest bed to elderly population ratios. It further shows that excess demand is the source of at least three types of error in use-based estimates of the determinants of the need for nursing home care. First, if excess demand is present, estimates of the determinants of Medicaid use may simply represent a crowding out of Medicaid patient...

  11. Simulated Performance of the Wisconsin Superconducting Electron Gun

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    R.A. Bosch, K.J. Kleman, R.A. Legg

    2012-07-01

    The Wisconsin superconducting electron gun is modeled with multiparticle tracking simulations using the ASTRA and GPT codes. To specify the construction of the emittance-compensation solenoid, we studied the dependence of the output bunch's emittance upon the solenoid's strength and field errors. We also evaluated the dependence of the output bunch's emittance upon the bunch's initial emittance and the size of the laser spot on the photocathode. The results suggest that a 200-pC bunch with an emittance of about one mm-mrad can be produced for a free-electron laser.

  12. Northern red oak volume growth on four northern Wisconsin habitat types

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michael Demchik; Kevin M. Schwartz; Rory Braun; Eric. Scharenbrock

    2014-01-01

    Northern red oak (Quercus rubra) grows across much of Wisconsin. Using site factors to aid in prediction of volume and basal area increment facilitates management of red oak and other species of interest. Currently, habitat type (Wisconsin Habitat Type Classification System) is often determined when stands are inventoried. If habitat type were...

  13. 78 FR 65875 - Approval and Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans; Wisconsin; Removal of Gasoline...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-04

    ...] Approval and Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans; Wisconsin; Removal of Gasoline Vapor... Administrative Code, Chapter NR 420 Control of Organic Compound Emissions from Petroleum and Gasoline Sources... FROM PETROLEUM AND GASOLINE SOURCES. NR 420.01 as published in the (Wisconsin) Register, February, 1990...

  14. Estimating outside-bark stem volume to any top diameter for ash in Wisconsin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul F. Doruska; Timothy D. Hart

    2010-01-01

    The future of Wisconsin's estimated 742 million ash trees (5 million of which are in urban settings composing 20 percent of Wisconsin's urban forests) is being considered based on the presence of the emerald ash borer. Part of this discussion includes the stem volumes of these ash trees.

  15. Tree seed handling, processing, testing, and storage at Hayward State Nursery, Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon Christians

    2008-01-01

    The Hayward State Nursery, Wisconsin grows more than 40 species from seeds. Up to 6000 bushels of raw unprocessed tree and shrub seeds are collected each year, and all seeds are collected in Wisconsin or adjacent states. All white spruce (Picea glauca) and some white pine seeds (Pinus strobus) are collected from orchards containing...

  16. 75 FR 71108 - Wisconsin Public Service Corporation; Notice of Application for Amendment of License and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-11-22

    ... Energy Regulatory Commission Wisconsin Public Service Corporation; Notice of Application for Amendment of... Filed: June 30, 2010. d. Applicant: Wisconsin Public Service Corporation. e. Name of Project: Tomahawk... the following hydroelectric application has been filed with the Commission and is available for public...

  17. 77 FR 40608 - Wisconsin Electric Power Company; Notice of Petition for Declaratory Order

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-10

    ... accounting treatment of a coal contract buydown; and (2) waiver of the Commission's fuel clause regulation to allow Wisconsin Electric to recoup the cost of the coal contract buydown through Wisconsin Electric's cost-based, Formula Rate Wholesale Sales Tariff. Any person desiring to intervene or to protest this...

  18. 78 FR 48900 - Notice of Inventory Completion: State Historical Society of Wisconsin, Madison, WI

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-12

    .... 3003, of the completion of an inventory of human remains under the control of the State Historical....R50000] Notice of Inventory Completion: State Historical Society of Wisconsin, Madison, WI AGENCY... Wisconsin has completed an inventory of human remains, in consultation with the appropriate Indian tribes or...

  19. 40 CFR 81.30 - Southeastern Wisconsin Intrastate Air Quality Control Region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Quality Control Region. 81.30 Section 81.30 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... Air Quality Control Regions § 81.30 Southeastern Wisconsin Intrastate Air Quality Control Region. The Metropolitan Milwaukee Intrastate Air Quality Control Region (Wisconsin) has been renamed the Southeastern...

  20. 78 FR 44596 - Notice of Inventory Completion: State Historical Society of Wisconsin, Madison, WI

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-24

    ... address in this notice by August 23, 2013. ADDRESSES: Jennifer Kolb, Wisconsin Historical Museum, 30 North Carroll Street, Madison, WI 53703, telephone (608) 261-2461, email Jennifer.Kolb@wisconsinhistory.org... request to Jennifer Kolb, Wisconsin Historical Museum, 30 North Carroll Street, Madison, WI 53703...

  1. Revolution and Counter-Revolution: Network Mobilization to Preserve Public Education in Wisconsin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelley, Carolyn; Mead, Julie

    2017-01-01

    In this article, Kelley and Mead consider changes in the policymaking process in Wisconsin before the election of Governor Walker, in the early years following his election, and in the months preceding passage of the 2015-17 biennial budget. Kelley and Mead argue that in Wisconsin, serious and significant attacks to public education motivated by…

  2. Cancer and birth defects surveillance system for communities around the Savannah River Site. Annual progress report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dunbar, J.B.

    1994-05-01

    The US DOE funded this grant to the Medical University of South Carolina for a cancer and birth defects registry for an initial three year period which was completed as of April 29, 1994. While this Technical Progress Report is prepared principally to document the activities of year 03, it also summarizes the accomplishments of the first two years in order to put into perspective the energy and progress of the program over the entire three year funding cycle.

  3. Imaging findings of endometrial metastasis from colon cancer: A case report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Nara; Park, Sung Bin; Lee, Jong Beum; Park, Hyun Jeong; Kim, Mi Kyung; Hwang, In Gyu; Seok, Ju Won

    2013-01-01

    Metastasis to the uterus is thought to be a very rare condition, and few imaging findings have been reported in the English literature. Here, we describe a case of endometrial metastasis from colon cancer, which was depicted using gray-scale and Doppler ultrasonography, CT and positron emission tomography-CT, to be a smoothly lobulated heterogeneous, predominantly endometrial mass in the uterus with increased vascular flow.

  4. Imaging findings of endometrial metastasis from colon cancer: A case report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Nara; Park, Sung Bin; Lee, Jong Beum; Park, Hyun Jeong; Kim, Mi Kyung; Hwang, In Gyu; Seok, Ju Won [Chung-Ang University Hospital, Chung-Ang University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-10-15

    Metastasis to the uterus is thought to be a very rare condition, and few imaging findings have been reported in the English literature. Here, we describe a case of endometrial metastasis from colon cancer, which was depicted using gray-scale and Doppler ultrasonography, CT and positron emission tomography-CT, to be a smoothly lobulated heterogeneous, predominantly endometrial mass in the uterus with increased vascular flow.

  5. Tuberculosis axillary lymph node coexistent breast cancer in adjuvant treatment: case report

    OpenAIRE

    Bromberg, Silvio Eduardo; do Amaral, Paulo Gustavo Ten?rio

    2015-01-01

    Coexistence of breast cancer and tuberculosis is rare. In most cases, involvement by tuberculosis occurs in axillary lymph nodes. We report a case of a 43-years-old patient who had undergone adenomastectomy and left sentinel lymph node biopsy due to a triple negative ductal carcinoma. At the end of adjuvant treatment, the patient had an atypical lymph node in the left axilla. Lymph node was excised, and after laboratory analysis, the diagnosis was ganglion tuberculosis. The patient underwent ...

  6. Cancer and birth defects surveillance system for communities around the Savannah River Site. Annual progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dunbar, J.B.

    1994-05-01

    The US DOE funded this grant to the Medical University of South Carolina for a cancer and birth defects registry for an initial three year period which was completed as of April 29, 1994. While this Technical Progress Report is prepared principally to document the activities of year 03, it also summarizes the accomplishments of the first two years in order to put into perspective the energy and progress of the program over the entire three year funding cycle

  7. Peritoneal lymphomatosis confounded by prior history of colon cancer: a case report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Yun Gi; Baek, Ji Yeon; Kim, Sun Young; Lee, Dong Hyeon; Park, Weon Seo; Kwon, Youngmee; Kim, Min Ju; Kang, Jeehoon; Lee, Joo Myung

    2011-01-01

    It is well known that carcinomas of the gastrointestinal tract are frequently associated with peritoneal carcinomatosis. In contrast to that entity extensive involvement of the peritoneal cavity with malignant lymphoma is rare. This is the first case reporting coexistence of peritoneal lymphomatosis and a previous history of colon cancer, which is a highly challenging clinical situation. If not aware of this unusual condition medical history, radiologic finding and laboratory data alone can lead to wrong diagnosis as in this case

  8. Splenogonadal fusion and testicular cancer: case report and review of the literature

    OpenAIRE

    Lopes,Roberto Iglesias; Medeiros,Mabel Tatty de; Arap,Marco Antônio; Cocuzza,Marcello; Srougi,Miguel; Hallak,Jorge

    2012-01-01

    A 36 year-old man after tests for assessing male infertility was diagnosed with primary infertility, bilateral cryptorchidism, non-obstructive azoospermia and discontinuous splenogonadal fusion. Carcinoma in situ was found in his left testicle, which was intra-abdominal and associated with splenogonadal fusion. To our knowledge, this is the fourth case of splenogonadal fusion associated with testicular cancer reported. One should always bear in mind the possibility of this association for the...

  9. Splenogonadal fusion and testicular cancer: case report and review of the literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberto Iglesias Lopes

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available A 36 year-old man after tests for assessing male infertility wasdiagnosed with primary infertility, bilateral cryptorchidism, nonobstructive azoospermia and discontinuous splenogonadal fusion.Carcinoma in situ was found in his left testicle, which was intraabdominal and associated with splenogonadal fusion. To ourknowledge, this is the fourth case of splenogonadal fusion associatedwith testicular cancer reported. One should always bear in mind thepossibility of this association for the left cryptorchid testicle.

  10. Increasing the Efficiency on Producing Radiology Reports for Breast Cancer Diagnosis by Means of Structured Reports

    OpenAIRE

    Segrelles Quilis, José Damián; Medina, Rosana; Blanquer Espert, Ignacio; MARTI BONMATI, LUIS

    2017-01-01

    Background: Radiology reports are commonly written on free-text using voice recognition devices. Structured reports (SR) have a high potential but they are usually considered more difficult to fill-in so their adoption in clinical practice leads to a lower efficiency. However, some studies have demonstrated that in some cases, producing SRs may require shorter time than plain-text ones. This work focuses on the definition and demonstration of a methodology to evaluate the productivity of soft...

  11. Assessment of cancer pain in a patient with communication difficulties: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okimasa, Seiji; Saito, Yasufumi; Okuda, Hiroshi; Fukuda, Toshikatsu; Yano, Masatsugu; Okamoto, Yuzo; Ono, Eiji; Ohdan, Hideki

    2016-06-02

    The number of patients who have difficulty with mutual understanding has been increasing recently due to an aging society. This emerging issue needs to be addressed. We report an instructive case of a patient who had communication difficulties due to dementia and sequelae of alcoholic encephalopathy. A 66-year-old man of Mongolian race presented with coronary arteriosclerosis, spinal canal stenosis, transverse colon cancer, and alcoholic encephalopathy. We had been requested to remove wires that had been used for the closure of his chest in a coronary artery bypass grafting procedure. However, on admission, a tortured expression and abdominal distention were observed, along with emaciation. We diagnosed terminal stage cancer, and palliative care was offered. An abdominal computed tomographic scan revealed rectal cancer with stenosis and invasion to the adjacent tissues. A metallic stent was inserted, leading to reduction of the abdominal distention and an improvement of tachycardia. However, the patient's tortured expression was not completely relieved; therefore, an assessment of cancer pain was considered. The Abbey Pain Scale was applied. On the basis of the patient's score, analgesics and an opioid, among other medications, were administered. These led to relief of the patient's tortured expression and reduced his Abbey Pain Scale score. Following this, the patient's vital signs continued to be stable, and he was transferred to the referral institution. Management of cancer pain in elderly patients with mutual understanding difficulties must be performed carefully. In the case of our patient, staff at the referral institution informed us of the patient's latent torture, and we applied the Abbey Pain Scale. There was some confusion and uncertainty regarding clinical management throughout the patient's care; however, his condition eventually stabilized. We believe the application of the Abbey Pain Scale assists in the relief of cancer pain. However, accumulation

  12. Treatment of Cancer and Inflammation With Low-Dose Ionizing Radiation: Three Case Reports.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kojima, Shuji; Tsukimoto, Mitsutoshi; Shimura, Noriko; Koga, Hironobu; Murata, Akishisa; Takara, Tsuyoshi

    2017-01-01

    There is considerable evidence from experimental studies in animals, as well as from clinical reports, that low-dose radiation hormesis is effective for the treatment of cancer and ulcerative colitis. In this study, we present 3 case reports that support the clinical efficacy of low-dose radiation hormesis in patients with these diseases. First, a patient with prostate cancer who had undergone surgical resection showed a subsequent increase in prostate-specific antigen (PSA). His PSA value started decreasing immediately after the start of repeated low-dose X-ray irradiation treatment and remained low thereafter. Second, a patient with prostate cancer with bone metastasis was treated with repeated low-dose X-ray irradiation. His PSA level decreased to nearly normal within 3 months after starting the treatment and remained at the low level after the end of hormesis treatment. His bone metastasis almost completely disappeared. Third, a patient with ulcerative colitis showed a slow initial response to repeated low-dose irradiation treatment using various modalities, including drinking radon-containing water, but within 8 months, his swelling and bleeding had completely disappeared. After 1 year, the number of bowel movements had become normal. Interest in the use of radiation hormesis in clinical practice is increasing, and we hope that these case reports will encourage further clinical investigations.

  13. Anal metastasis of rectal cancer-adenocarcinoma of squamous cells: a case report and literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasaki, Shun; Sugiyama, Masahiko; Nakaji, Yu; Nakanishi, Ryota; Nakashima, Yuichiro; Saeki, Hiroshi; Oki, Eiji; Oda, Yoshinao; Maehara, Yoshihiko

    2017-12-01

    Anal metastasis of colorectal cancer is very rare and is usually associated with a history of anal disease, including anal fistula, fissure, hemorrhoidectomy, and anastomotic injury. We report a case of rectal cancer with a synchronous anal metastasis consisting of adenocarcinoma of squamous cells without a history of anal disease. A 60-year-old woman had a chief complaint of melena. She had a 1.5-cm anal tumor on the perianal skin, and a Bollman type 2 rectal tumor on the Ra portion was found on colonoscopy. Biopsy of both tumors revealed a similar histology of well- to moderately differentiated adenocarcinoma. There was no sign of metastases in lymph nodes or other organs. For the purpose of diagnosis and treatment, transperineal local resection of the anal tumor was performed, and it was histologically identified as adenocarcinoma of squamous cells with no invasion to muscles, lymph ducts, or microvessels. The pathological margin was free. Then, to achieve radical cure, laparoscopic low anterior resection (LAR) with D3 lymphadenectomy was performed. The histological diagnosis of the anal tumor was adenocarcinoma of squamous cells without invasion to muscles, lymph ducts, or vessels. The surgical margin was completely free. Immunohistochemical analysis of both tumors revealed similar staining patterns, and the final diagnosis was rectal cancer with metastasis to the anal skin. The patient received no postoperative therapy, and no recurrences have been observed 12 months after surgery. We expect that our sphincter-preserving surgical strategy provided a good prognosis for the synchronous rectal cancer and anal metastasis. This is a rare report of a case with an anal metastasis of colorectal cancer on perianal squamous cells without a history of anal disease that was resected while preserving anal function.

  14. Bisphosphonate-related osteonecrosis of jaws in advanced stage breast cancer was detected from bone scan: a case report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chirappapha, Prakasit; Thongjood, Thanaporn; Aroonroch, Rangsima

    2017-01-01

    Bisphosphonates (BPs) are indicated to treat skeletal-related events (SREs) for cancer patients with bone metastasis. We report a 79-year-old woman with advanced stage breast cancer with bone metastasis who was prescribed BPs (zoledronate), then developed osteonecrosis of jaw. We provide a brief review of the pathogenesis, diagnosis and treatment of this complication. PMID:28210558

  15. Stroke as a late treatment effect of Hodgkin's disease : A report from the Childhood Cancer Survivor Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bowers, DC; McNeil, DE; Liu, Y; Yasui, Y; Stovall, M; Gurney, JG; Hudson, MM; Donaldson, SS; Packer, RJ; Mitby, PA; Kasper, CE; Robison, LL; Oeffinger, KC

    2005-01-01

    Purpose The objectives of this report are to examine the incidence of and risk factors for stroke among childhood Hodgkin's disease (HD) survivors. Patients and Methods The Childhood Cancer Survivor Study is a multi-institutional cohort study of more than 5-year cancer survivors diagnosed between

  16. Bevacizumab-induced transient sixth nerve palsy in ovarian cancer: A case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Momeni, Mazdak; Veras, Laura; Zakashansky, Konstantin

    2016-03-01

    We report a case of transient sixth nerve palsy after systemic administration of bevacizumab. Two days after systemic administration of bevacizumab in conjunction with gemcitabine and carboplatin in a 67-year-old woman with recurrent primary ovarian cancer, the patient developed sixth nerve palsy. After bevacizumab was stopped, the complete left sixth nerve palsy resolved spontaneously over the course of 3 months. This is the first reported case of bevacizumab-induced cranial sixth nerve palsy in the treatment of gynecologic malignancy. © 2013 Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  17. The Impact of Participation in Online Cancer Communities on Patient Reported Outcomes: Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Eenbergen, Mies C; van de Poll-Franse, Lonneke V; Heine, Peter; Mols, Floortje

    2017-09-28

    In recent years, the question of how patients' participating in online communities affects various patient reported outcomes (PROs) has been investigated in several ways. This study aimed to systematically review all relevant literature identified using key search terms, with regard to, first, changes in PROs for cancer patients who participate in online communities and, second, the characteristics of patients who report such effects. A computerized search of the literature via PubMed (MEDLINE), PsycINFO (5 and 4 stars), Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, and ScienceDirect was performed. Last search was conducted in June 2017. Studies with the following terms were included: (cancer patient) and (support group or health communities) and (online or Internet). A total of 21 studies were included and independently assessed by 2 investigators using an 11-item quality checklist. The methodological quality of the selected studies varied: 12 were of high quality, eight were of adequate quality, and only one was of low quality. Most of the respondents were women (about 80%), most with breast cancer; their mean age was 50 years. The patients who were active in online support groups were mostly younger and more highly educated than the nonusers. The investigated PROs included general well-being (ie, mood and health), anxiety, depression, quality of life, posttraumatic growth, and cancer-related concerns. Only marginal effects-that is, PRO improvements-were found; in most cases they were insignificant, and in some cases they were contradictory. The main shortcoming of this kind of study is the lack of methodological instruments for reliable measurements. Furthermore, some patients who participate in online communities or interact with peers via Internet do not expect to measure changes in their PROs. If cancer survivors want to meet other survivors and share information or get support, online communities can be a trustworthy and reliable platform to facilitate

  18. Understanding Cancer Prognosis

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Cancer Types Adolescents and Young Adults with Cancer Reports, Research, and Literature Cancers by Body Location/System ... The RAS Initiative Cancer Moonshot℠ Immunotherapy Progress Annual Report to the Nation Milestones in Cancer Research and ...

  19. [Gastric Cancer Diagnosed with Metastasis of the Navel(Sister Mary Joseph's Nodule) - A Case Report].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katayama, Tomohiro; Ishii, Takaaki; Tono, Takeshi; Okubo, Yusuke; Shinozaki, Koji; Kawasaki, Yasuhito; Senba, Shuho; Yasuda, Seiji; Otsuru, Minoru

    2016-11-01

    A woman in her 60s was admitted to our hospital with pain and induration of the navel. She was diagnosed with gastric cancer with metastasis to the navel and underwent total gastrectomy and navel extraction. Because disseminated nodules were detected in the Douglas pouch and sigmoid colon, sigmoidectomy was performed to prevent bowel obstruction. The navel tumor was histologically diagnosed as a metastasis of the gastric cancer. One month after surgery, a chest skin tumor, which was also a skin metastasis of the gastric cancer[T4aN3M1(SKI, OTH)H0P1, fStage IV ], was detected, and tumor enucleation was performed. Enucleation was followed by 47 courses of systemic chemotherapy consisting of capecitabine, cisplatin, and trastuzumab. No recurrence or metastasis has been observed via FDG-PET/CT as of 5 years after surgery. Gastric cancer with peritoneal dissemination in addition to navel metastasis has been reported to have an extremely poor prognosis. However, long-term, recurrence-free survival was obtained in this case owing to aggressive surgical resection, followed by persistent systemic chemotherapy.

  20. Double primary malignancies associated with colon cancer in patients with situs inversus totalis: two case reports

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kim Dae

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Situs inversus totalis (SIT is not itself a premalignant condition, however, rare synchronous or metachronous multiple primary malignancies have been reported. Herein we present a case of synchronous transverse and sigmoid colon cancers and a case of metachronous rectosigmoid colon and gastric cancers in patients with SIT. A 66-year-old male with SIT was referred for a two-month history of hematochezia. Synchronous colonic tumors were found on the proximal transverse and sigmoid colon. The patient underwent open total colectomy and was discharged without incident. A 71-year-old female with rectosigmoid colon cancer and SIT underwent laparoscopy-assisted low anterior resection. Fourteen months after the surgery, the patient developed a single hepatic metastasis and underwent hepatic segmentectomy (S6. Forty-six months after laparoscopy-assisted low anterior resection, the patient developed metachronous early gastric cancer on the antrum and underwent radical subtotal gastrectomy with gastroduodenostomy. The patient is doing well without recurrence for 28 months.

  1. Endoscopic hemostasis with endoscopic mucosal resection and multiple synchronous early gastric cancers: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fujihara Shintaro

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Endoscopic hemostasis for severe upper gastrointestinal bleeding due to tumors, such as gastrointestinal stromal tumors and malignant lymphoma, is temporarily effective. However, permanent hemostasis is difficult in many cases because of diffuse bleeding. Case presentation A 60-year-old Japanese woman was admitted to our hospital with hematemesis. Endoscopy revealed multiple gastric polyps and fresh blood in her stomach. One of the gastric polyps, which was associated with oozing bleeding, was found near the anterior wall of the lower gastric body. We initially applied hemostatic forceps and argon plasma coagulation over the tumor surface, but the bleeding persisted. After endoscopic mucosal resection, exposed vessels were seen at the base of the mucosal resection site with oozing bleeding. Coagulation of the bleeding vessels using hemostatic forceps allowed successful completion of the hemostatic procedure. Our patient also had eight synchronous gastric cancer lesions. Histological examination of the resected specimens showed various types of cancer. Conclusion This is a case report of gastric cancer associated with eight gastric cancer lesions, confirmed by histology, in which hemostasis was achieved through endoscopy.

  2. Bolus electron conformal therapy for the treatment of recurrent inflammatory breast cancer: a case report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Michelle M.; Kudchadker, Rajat J.; Kanke, James E.; Zhang, Sean; Perkins, George H.

    2012-01-01

    The treatment of locoregionally recurrent breast cancer in patients who have previously undergone radiation therapy is challenging. Special techniques are often required that both eradicate the disease and minimize the risks of retreatment. We report the case of a patient with an early-stage left breast cancer who developed inflammatory-type recurrence requiring re-irradiation of the chest wall using bolus electron conformal therapy with image-guided treatment delivery. The patient was a 51-year-old woman who had undergone lumpectomy, axillary lymph node dissection, and adjuvant whole-breast radiation therapy for a stage I left breast cancer in June 1998. In March 2009, she presented at our institution with biopsy-proven recurrent inflammatory carcinoma and was aggressively treated with multi-agent chemotherapy followed by mastectomy that left a positive surgical margin. Given the patient's prior irradiation and irregular chest wall anatomy, bolus electron conformal therapy was used to treat her chest wall and draining lymphatics while sparing the underlying soft tissue. The patient still had no evidence of disease 21 months after treatment. Our results indicate that bolus electron conformal therapy is an accessible, effective radiation treatment approach for recurrent breast cancer in patients with irregular chest wall anatomy as a result of surgery. This approach may complement standard techniques used to reduce locoregional recurrence in the postmastectomy setting.

  3. Objectively measured versus self-reported physical activity in children and adolescents with cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Götte, Miriam; Seidel, Corinna Caroline; Kesting, Sabine Verena; Rosenbaum, Dieter; Boos, Joachim

    2017-01-01

    Existing research recognizes low levels of physical activity in pediatric patients with cancer, but much uncertainty exists about their capability to self-reflect physical activity levels. The objective of this study was to compare results of subjective self-reports and objective accelerometers regarding levels of daily walking as well as moderate-to-vigorous physical activities. Results of the objective assessment tool StepWatchTM Activity Monitor and self-reporting with a standardized questionnaire were compared in 28 children and adolescents during cancer treatment. The patients were 13.8±2.8 years of age and 3.4±2.0 months after cancer diagnosis. The Bland-Altman plots indicated a fairly symmetrical under- and over-estimation for daily minutes of walking with the limits of agreement ranging from -100.8 to 87.3 min (d = -6.7 min). Mean difference for moderate-to-vigorous physical activity was almost zero but limits of agreement are ranging from -126.8 to 126.9 min. The comparison for the days with at least 60 min of moderate-to-vigorous physical activity showed a marked difference with 3.0±2.6 self-reported days versus only 0.1±0.4 measured days. These findings suggest that physical activity in pediatric cancer patients should preferably be assessed with objective methods. Greater efforts are needed to implement supervised exercise interventions during treatment incorporating methods to improve self-reflection of physical activity.

  4. Quality of Life in Children With Advanced Cancer: A Report From the PediQUEST Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenberg, Abby R; Orellana, Liliana; Ullrich, Christina; Kang, Tammy; Geyer, J Russell; Feudtner, Chris; Dussel, Veronica; Wolfe, Joanne

    2016-08-01

    Modifiable factors of health-related quality of life (HRQOL) are poorly described among children with advanced cancer. Symptom distress may be an important factor for intervention. We aimed to describe patient-reported HRQOL and its relationship to symptom distress. Prospective, longitudinal data from the multicenter Pediatric Quality of Life and Symptoms Technology study included primarily patient-reported symptom distress and HRQOL, measured at most weekly with the Memorial Symptoms Assessment Scale and Pediatric Quality of Life inventory, respectively. Associations were evaluated using linear mixed-effects models adjusting for sex, age, cancer type, intervention arm, treatment intensity, and time since disease progression. Of 104 enrolled patients, 49% were female, 89% were white, and median age was 12.6 years. Nine hundred and twenty surveys were completed over nine months of follow-up (84% by patients). The median total Pediatric Quality of Life score was 74 (interquartile range 63-87) and was "poor/fair" (e.g., <70) 38% of the time. "Poor/fair" categories were highest in physical (53%) and school (48%) compared to emotional (24%) and social (16%) subscores. Thirteen of 24 symptoms were independently associated with reductions in overall or domain-specific HRQOL. Patients commonly reported distress from two or more symptoms, corresponding to larger HRQOL score reductions. Neither cancer type, time since progression, treatment intensity, sex, nor age was associated with HRQOL scores in multivariable models. Among 25 children completing surveys during the last 12 weeks of life, 11 distressing symptoms were associated with reductions in HRQOL. Symptom distress is strongly associated with HRQOL. Future research should determine whether alleviating distressing symptoms improves HRQOL in children with advanced cancer. Copyright © 2016 American Academy of Hospice and Palliative Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome after Treatment of Metastatic Prostate Cancer with Taxotere: A Case Report and Literature Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Raufi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Prostate cancer is the most common cancer in men. Docetaxel is a common chemotherapeutic agent that has proven its efficacy in the treatment of patients with both castration sensitive and resistant metastatic prostate cancer. We report a case of acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS in a patient with metastatic prostate cancer treated with docetaxel (Taxotere. ARDS is very rare but life threatening complication of docetaxel which requires aggressive supportive care and close monitoring. Better awareness and prompt diagnosis of this treatment related ARDS will improve the effectiveness and outcome of its management.

  6. Review of electronic patient-reported outcomes systems used in cancer clinical care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, Roxanne E; Snyder, Claire F; Abernethy, Amy P; Basch, Ethan; Potosky, Arnold L; Roberts, Aaron C; Loeffler, Deena R; Reeve, Bryce B

    2014-07-01

    The use of electronic patient-reported outcomes (PRO) systems is increasing in cancer clinical care settings. This review comprehensively identifies existing PRO systems and explores how systems differ in the administration of PRO assessments, the integration of information into the clinic workflow and electronic health record (EHR) systems, and the reporting of PRO information. Electronic PRO (e-PRO) systems were identified through a semistructured review of published studies, gray literature, and expert identification. System developers were contacted to provide detailed e-PRO system characteristics and clinical implementation information using a structured review form. A total of 33 unique systems implemented in cancer clinical practice were identified. Of these, 81% provided detailed information about system characteristics. Two system classifications were established: treatment-centered systems designed for patient monitoring during active cancer treatment (n = 8) and patient-centered systems following patients across treatment and survivorship periods (n = 19). There was little consensus on administration, integration, or result reporting between these system types. Patient-centered systems were more likely to provide user-friendly features such as at-home assessments, integration into larger electronic system networks (eg, EHRs), and more robust score reporting options. Well-established systems were more likely to have features that increased assessment flexibility (eg, location, automated reminders) and better clinical integration. The number of e-PRO systems has increased. Systems can be programmed to have numerous features that facilitate integration of PRO assessment and routine monitoring into clinical care. Important barriers to system usability and widespread adoption include assessment flexibility, clinical integration, and high-quality data collection and reporting. Copyright © 2014 by American Society of Clinical Oncology.

  7. Does social disadvantage affect the validity of self-report for cervical cancer screening?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lofters AK

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Aisha K Lofters,1–3 Rahim Moineddin,1,4,5 Stephen W Hwang,3,6 Richard H Glazier1–3,4,51Department of Family and Community Medicine, University of Toronto, Toronto, 2Department of Family and Community Medicine, St Michael's Hospital, Toronto, 3Centre for Research on Inner City Health, The Keenan Research Centre in the Li Ka Shing Knowledge Institute of St Michael's Hospital, Toronto, 4Institute for Clinical Evaluative Sciences, Toronto, 5Dalla Lana School of Public Health, University of Toronto, Toronto, 6Department of Medicine, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON, CanadaObjective: The aim was to review the international literature on the validity of self-report of cervical cancer screening, specifically of studies that made direct comparisons among women with and without social disadvantage, based on race/ethnicity, foreign-born status, language ability, income, or education.Method: The databases of Medline, EBM Reviews, and CINAHL from 1990 to 2011 were searched using relevant search terms. Articles eligible for data extraction documented the prevalence of cervical cancer screening based on both self-report and an objective measure for women both with and without at least one measure of social disadvantage. The report-to-record ratio, the ratio of the proportion of study subjects who report at least one screening test within a particular time frame to the proportion of study subjects who have a record of the same test within that time frame, was calculated for each subgroup.Results: Five studies met the extraction criteria. Subgroups were based on race/ethnicity, education, and income. In all studies, and across all subgroups, report-to-record ratios were greater than one, indicative of pervasive over-reporting.Conclusion: The findings suggest that objective measures should be used by policymakers, researchers, and public-health practitioners in place of self-report to accurately determine cervical cancer screening rates.Keywords: vulnerable

  8. The surgical management of male breast cancer: Time for an easy access national reporting database?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert M.T. Staruch

    2016-08-01

    Discussion: We report a series of seven cases of male breast cancer encountered over three years, evaluating patient demographics as well as treatment and outcomes. In our series patients were managed with mastectomy. New evidence is questioning the role of mastectomy against breast conserving surgery in male patients. Furthermore there is a lack of reporting infrastructure for national data capture of the benefits of surgical modalities. Literature review highlights the varied clinical experience between units that remains reported as podium presentation but not published. The establishment of an online international reporting registry would allow for efficient analysis of surgical outcomes to improve patient care from smaller single centres. This would facilitate large scale meta analysis by larger academic surgical centres.

  9. Curative resection for locally advanced sigmoid colon cancer using neoadjuvant chemotherapy with FOLFOX plus panitumumab: A case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenji Tomizawa

    2017-01-01

    Conclusion: To our knowledge, this is the first report of a successful curative resection in a patient with initially unresectable, locally advanced colorectal cancer who was treated with FOLFOX4 combined with panitumumab.

  10. Post site metastasis of breast cancer after video-assisted thoracic surgery for pulmonary metastasis of breast cancer: A case report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Mee Hyun; Hwang, Ji Young; Hyun, Su Jeong; Lee, Yul; Woo, Ji Young; Yang, Ik; Hong, Hye Sook; Kim, Han Myun [Dept. of Radiology, Kangnam Sacred Heart Hospital, Hallym University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-05-15

    We reported a case of port site metastasis in a 57-year-old patient who underwent video-assisted thoracic surgery (VATS) resection of pulmonary metastasis from breast cancer. Port site metastasis after VATS is very rare in patients with breast cancer. However, when suspicious lesions are detected near the port site in patients who have undergone VATS for pulmonary metastasis, port site metastasis should be considered in the differential diagnosis.

  11. Impact of Androgen Deprivation Therapy on Self-reported Cognitive Function in Men with Prostate Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marzouk, Shireen; Naglie, Gary; Tomlinson, George; Duff Canning, Sarah; Breunis, Henriette; Timilshina, Narhari; Alibhai, Shabbir M H

    2018-02-22

    Although androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) is widely used to treat prostate cancer (PC), its effects on cognitive function are unclear, and no prior report has examined the impact of ADT on self-reported cognitive function. Three groups of men age 50 or older and matched on age and education were enrolled: PC patients starting continuous ADT (n=81), PC patients not receiving ADT (PC controls, n=84), and healthy controls (n=85). Two scales from the Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy-Cognitive Questionnaire (FACT-Cog) version 3 were used to assess self-reported cognitive function. Changes in cognitive scores over time were analyzed using two approaches: multivariable regression and calculation of the proportion of subjects per group with declines of 1-SD or more. Multivariable regression was used to assess predictors of decline in self-reported cognitive function. Relationships between the FACT-Cog and a neuropsychological battery of 15 tests were also examined. The mean age of participants was 69 years (range 50-87) and their mean educational level was 15 years (range 8-24). FACT-Cog scores were similar at baseline across cohorts. Neither analytic approach found ADT use to be associated with changes in self-reported cognitive function on either FACT-Cog scale. Mood and fatigue were correlated with changes in self-reported cognitive function. The relationship between self-reported and objective cognitive measures was weak (maximum Spearman correlation coefficient of 0.14) and only two of 30 correlations were statistically significant. Twelve months of ADT was not associated with self-reported cognitive function in older men with non-metastatic PC. Copyright © 2018 American Urological Association Education and Research, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Triple Negative Breast Cancer in Pregnancy and Postpartum: Two Case Reports in Hispanic Women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruchi Upadhyay

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. Despite studies suggesting that triple negative breast cancer is more often seen in women of African ancestry, we report here two cases of pregnancy associated triple negative breast cancer in Hispanic women. Cases. Case one is a 37-year-old female para 2-0-0-2, who presented with a left breast mass, at 19 weeks of gestation, the biopsy of which reported an invasive ductal carcinoma, found to be triple receptor negative. The patient underwent chemotherapy during the pregnancy and was delivered with a cesarean at 37 weeks for obstetric indication. After delivery, the patient completed her chemotherapy that was followed by radical mastectomy and radiotherapy. Case two is a 28-year-old female para 6-0-1-5, who presented while breast-feeding with signs and symptoms of mastitis, and an engorged and tender right breast, five months postpartum. However, the sonogram revealed a fluid filled cavity. Aspiration and cytology did not reflect an infection and were negative for malignancy. High suspicion and lack of improvement led to biopsy that identified an invasive ductal carcinoma, found to be triple negative. The patient underwent chemotherapy followed by modified radical mastectomy. Conclusions. Triple negative breast cancer, during pregnancy or postpartum, poses a unique challenge and requires a multidisciplinary team to optimize treatment for these women.

  13. The first leg video endoscopic groin lymphadenectomy in vulvar cancer: A case report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naldini, Angelica; Rossitto, Cristiano; Morciano, Andrea; Panico, Giovanni; Campagna, Giuseppe; Paparella, Pierluigi; Scambia, Giovanni

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION The current management of vulvar cancer depends on the extension of disease, and includes primary tumor resection with safety margin as well as inguinofemoral lymph node staging. We report the case of the first leg videoendoscopic inguinal lymphadenectomy performed in a woman with a squamous cell vulvar carcinoma. PRESENTATION OF CASE A 74 years old female referred to our institution complaining of vulvar mass associated with bleeding and swelling from external genitals, vaginal burning sensation and dysuria for 5 months. A vulvar–vaginal examination under narcosis reported a right major labium lesion of 5 cm with an irregular and ulcerated surface, easily bleeding on palpation, involving anteriorly the clitoral region and with a histological finding of a poorly differentiated squamous cell invasive carcinoma of the vulva ulcerating the surface epithelium. We performed, after adequate informed consent, a radical vulvectomy with a standard right inguinofemoral lymphadenectomy and a contralateral simultaneous video endoscopic inguinal lymphadenectomy-Leg procedure. DISCUSSION Our minimally invasive VEIL-Leg approach, performed for the first time in literature in a woman with vulvar cancer, could reduce the presence of high risk factors represented by surgical incision and by procedure-related complications, including wound infection and breakdown, hematoma, cellulitis and hernia formation. CONCLUSION A multicenter prospective randomized study will be helpful to clarify how this procedure could replace the standard laparotomic approach to inguinal lymphadenectomy in the vulvar cancer treatment and staging. PMID:24973526

  14. Cancer of the oral cavity- a growing concern in the Micronesia: a case report from the Marshall Islands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhandary, Sangita; Bhandary, Prahlad

    2003-03-01

    Cancer of the oral cavity is of growing concern worldwide. In the Micronesia, there has been a recent increase in use of betel nut and tobacco chewing in addition to already existing problem of smoking and alcohol drinking. These deleterious habits have further added the risk for development of oral cancers in the Marshall Islands. The oral cancers have good prognosis, which is directly related to the early diagnosis and treatment. Advanced staged cancers need mutilating surgery in addition to radiotherapy and carry high mortality rate. The epidemiology, etiology and recent approaches in the management of oral cavity cancer has been discussed along with a case report of advanced cancer of the floor of the mouth from the Marshall Islands.

  15. Breast cancer in the lower jaw after reconstructive surgery with a pectoralis major myocutaneous flap (PMMC) -- a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nestle-Krämling, C; Kübler, N; Janni, W; Braunstein, S; Budach, W; Bölke, E; Matuschek, C; Depprich, R

    2011-12-02

    For head and neck as well as for oromaxillofacial surgery, the use of the pectoralis major myocutaneous (PMMC) flap is a standard reconstructive technique after radical surgery for cancers in this region. We report to our knowledge for the first development of breast cancer in the PMMC flap in a 79 year old patient, who had undergone several operations in the past for recurring squamous cell carcinoma of the jaw. The occurrence of a secondary malignancy within the donor tissue after flap transfer is rare, but especially in the case of transferred breast tissue and the currently high incidence of breast cancer theoretically possible. Therefore preoperative screening mammography seems advisable to exclude a preexisting breast cancer in female patients undergoing such reconstruction surgery. Therapy for breast cancer under these circumstances is individual and consists of radical tumor resection followed by radiation if applicable and a standard systemic therapeutic regimen on the background of the patients individual prognosis due to the primary cancer.

  16. Evolution of Cancer Registration Combining Online Reporting with Follow-up in the Community: Practices in Guangzhou, China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Huazhang; Lin, Guozhen; Li, Ke; Ding, Haiyuan; Xu, Huan; Li, Yan; Dong, Hang; Song, Shaofang

    2017-05-01

    Background: An efficient registration system with accurate and timely information on cancer incidence and mortality is key to development of policies to prevent and control cancer. A traditional registration system usually needs 3-4 years to collect data and publish a cancer report. However, researchers, policymakers and healthcare professionals need to know the latest cancer registration data quickly. Methods: A computer system has been operating with cases reported online by hospitals and followed up in communities at the Cancer Registry of Guangzhou (CRG) since 2008. The comparability, completeness, accuracy and timeliness of collected data were here evaluated. Results: From 2010 to 2014, 181,194 cancer cases from 1,916,253 medical records of cancer were reported to the CRG online. 53,473 cases were deleted as duplicates (47,906), wrong diagnoses (410) or residents of other places (5,157) during the follow up. Successful final follow-up rates were over 90% for both newly and previously diagnosed cases by general practitioners in community clinics. The CRG coding and classification system follows international standards. The annual trends for all sites by sex were stable from 2010 to 2014. All age-specific incidence rates for childhood cancers were within the limits of the respective international references. The overall M:I ratio for all sites but C44 was 56.7%.,ratios for most sites in Guangzhou being between Hong Kong and Shanghai. A total of 75.7% of the cancer cases reported in 2010–2012 were morphologically verified. Ninety five percent of new cases completed registration within 29.0 months in 2010, reducing to 8.0 months in 2014. Conclusion: The online report system with community follow up at the CRG yields reasonably accurate and close-to-complete data. It takes less time to confirm diagnosis and other information so that reporting annual incidence one year after the close of registration becomes possible. Creative Commons Attribution License

  17. Toward standardizing and reporting colorectal cancer screening indicators on an international level: The International Colorectal Cancer Screening Network

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Benson, Victoria S.; Atkin, Wendy S.; Green, Jane; Nadel, Marion R.; Patnick, Julietta; Smith, Robert A.; Villain, Patricia; Patnick, J.; Atkin, W. S.; Altenhofen, L.; Ancelle-Park, R.; Benson, V. S.; Green, J.; Levin, T. R.; Moss, S. M.; Nadel, M.; Ransohoff, D.; Segnan, N.; Smith, R. A.; Villain, P.; Weller, D.; Koukari, A.; Young, G.; López-Kostner, F.; Antoljak, N.; Suchánek, S.; Zavoral, M.; Holten, I.; Malila, N.; Salines, E.; Brenner, G.; Herszényi, L.; Tulassay, Z.; Rennert, G.; Senore, C.; Zappa, M.; Zorzi, M.; Saito, H.; Leja, M.; Dekker, E.; Jansen, J.; Hol, L.; Kuipers, E.; Kaminski, M. F.; Regula, J.; Sfarti, C.; Trifan, A.; Tang, C.-L.; Hrcka, R.; Binefa, G.; Espinàs, J. A.; Peris, M.; Chen, T. H.; Steele, R.; Pou, G.; Bisges, D.; Dwyer, D.; Groves, C.; Courteau, S.; Kramer, R.; Siegenthaler, K.; Lane, D.; Herrera, C.; Rogers, J.; Rojewski, M.; Wolf, Holly; Sung, J. J.; Ling, K.; Bryant, H.; Rabeneck, L.; Dale, J.; Sware, L.; Yang, H.; Viguier, J.; Von Karsa, L.; Kupcinskas, L.; Deutekom, M.; Törnberg, S.; Austoker, J.; Beral, V.; Monk, C.; Valori, R.; Watson, J.; Kobrin, S.; Pignone, M.; Taplin, S.

    2012-01-01

    The International Colorectal Cancer Screening Network was established in 2003 to promote best practice in the delivery of organized colorectal cancer screening programs. To facilitate evaluation of such programs, we defined a set of universally applicable colorectal cancer screening measures and

  18. Interactive or static reports to guide clinical interpretation of cancer genomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray, Stacy W; Gagan, Jeffrey; Cerami, Ethan; Cronin, Angel M; Uno, Hajime; Oliver, Nelly; Lowenstein, Carol; Lederman, Ruth; Revette, Anna; Suarez, Aaron; Lee, Charlotte; Bryan, Jordan; Sholl, Lynette; Van Allen, Eliezer M

    2018-05-01

    Misinterpretation of complex genomic data presents a major challenge in the implementation of precision oncology. We sought to determine whether interactive genomic reports with embedded clinician education and optimized data visualization improved genomic data interpretation. We conducted a randomized, vignette-based survey study to determine whether exposure to interactive reports for a somatic gene panel, as compared to static reports, improves physicians' genomic comprehension and report-related satisfaction (overall scores calculated across 3 vignettes, range 0-18 and 1-4, respectively, higher score corresponding with improved endpoints). One hundred and five physicians at a tertiary cancer center participated (29% participation rate): 67% medical, 20% pediatric, 7% radiation, and 7% surgical oncology; 37% female. Prior to viewing the case-based vignettes, 34% of the physicians reported difficulty making treatment recommendations based on the standard static report. After vignette/report exposure, physicians' overall comprehension scores did not differ by report type (mean score: interactive 11.6 vs static 10.5, difference = 1.1, 95% CI, -0.3, 2.5, P = .13). However, physicians exposed to the interactive report were more likely to correctly assess sequencing quality (P < .001) and understand when reports needed to be interpreted with caution (eg, low tumor purity; P = .02). Overall satisfaction scores were higher in the interactive group (mean score 2.5 vs 2.1, difference = 0.4, 95% CI, 0.2-0.7, P = .001). Interactive genomic reports may improve physicians' ability to accurately assess genomic data and increase report-related satisfaction. Additional research in users' genomic needs and efforts to integrate interactive reports into electronic health records may facilitate the implementation of precision oncology.

  19. Transverse colon cancer occurring at a colostomy site 35 years after colostomy: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maeda, Chiyo; Hidaka, Eiji; Shimada, Mari; Shimada, Shoji; Nakahara, Kenta; Takayanagi, Daisuke; Takehara, Yusuke; Mukai, Shumpei; Sawada, Naruhiko; Ishida, Fumio; Kudo, Shin-ei

    2015-05-06

    Carcinomas occurring at colostomy sites are rare, and most of these are metachronous colorectal cancers. The median time between colostomy and development of a carcinoma at a colostomy site is 22 years, which exceeds the length of the recommended follow-up period. We report a rare case of a carcinoma of the transverse colon occurring at a colostomy site in a patient without a history of colorectal cancer. An 89-year-old woman presented with a tumor occurring at a colostomy site. Thirty-five years previously, she had undergone a transverse loop colostomy for an iatrogenic colon perforation that occurred during left ureteral lithotomy. Upon physical examination, the patient had a hard nodule measuring 3 cm at the colostomy site. A biopsy of the nodule suggested adenocarcinoma, and the preoperative diagnosis was transverse colon cancer. A laparotomy was performed via a peristomal incision with 5-mm skin margins, and the tumor was covered by a surgical glove to avoid any tumor seeding. The colon was separated from the tumor by 5-cm margins, and the specimen was removed en bloc. An end colostomy was constructed to a new site on the right side of the abdomen. The deficit in the abdominal wall was repaired, and the skin was closed via a purse-string suture. The final diagnosis of the stoma tumor was transverse colon cancer (T2, N0, M0, stage I). One year and five months after surgery, there was no evidence of recurrence. The occurrence of carcinomas at colostomy sites in patients without a history of colorectal cancer is rare. It is important to train ostomates to monitor the stoma for possible tumor recurrence.

  20. [Do media reports and public brochures facilitate informed decision making about cervical cancer prevention?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neumeyer-Gromen, A; Bodemer, N; Müller, S M; Gigerenzer, G

    2011-11-01

    With the introduction and recommendation of the new HPV (human papillomavirus) vaccination in 2007, cervical cancer prevention has evoked large public interest. Is the public able to make informed decisions on the basis of media reports and brochures? To answer this question, an analysis of media coverage of HPV vaccination (Gardasil®) and Pap (Papanicolaou) screening was conducted from 2007-2009, which investigated the minimum requirement of completeness (pros and cons), transparency (absolute numbers), and correctness (references concerning outcome, uncertainty, magnitude) of the information. As a bench mark, facts boxes with concise data on epidemiology, etiology, benefits, harms, and costs were compiled in advance. Although all vaccination reports and brochures covered the impact of prevention, only 41% provided concrete numbers on effectiveness (90/220) and 2% on absolute risk reductions for the cancer surrogate dysplasia (5/220), whereby none of the latter numbers was correct. The prevention potential was correctly presented once. Only 48% (105/220) mentioned pros and cons. With regard to screening, 20% (4/20) provided explicit data on test quality and one expressed these in absolute numbers, while 25% (5/20) reported the prevention potential; all given numbers were correct. Finally, 25% (5/20) mentioned the possibility of false positive results. Minimum requirements were fulfilled by 1/220 vaccination and 1/20 screening reports. At present, informed decision making based on media coverage is hardly possible.