WorldWideScience

Sample records for wireless head acceleration

  1. Enabling multimode wireless access networks using remote radio heads

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kardaras, Georgios; Soler, José; Dittmann, Lars

    2012-01-01

    the advantages of using distributed base station architectures to provide multimode capabilities. In particular, it focuses on the radio unit, commonly known in industry as remote radio head. Multimode radio units capable of operating according to different wireless standards (WCDMA, LTE and WiMAX) can be proven....... © 2012 ICST Institute for Computer Science, Social Informatics and Telecommunications Engineering....

  2. ENERGY EFFICIENT CLUSTER HEAD SELECTION IN MOBILE WIRELESS SENSOR NETWORKS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MUHAMMAD ARSHAD

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available In the era of New Generation Networks (NWGN many emerging and future enable technologies accomplish the requirements of ubiquitous communication networks. Wireless Sensor Networks (WSNs is a vital category of these stateof-the-art technologies, the enormous concerns of these networks are energy efficient and well-organized data aggregation. Cluster based routing in WSNs is an immense solution to enhance the energy efficiency of the nodes and resourceful data gathering. Many studies on network lifetime and data aggregation have been proposed by the Low Energy Adaptive Clustering Hierarchy (LEACH scheme that allows the role of the cluster head rotated among the sensor nodes and attempts to distribute the energy usage through all the nodes. The lifetime of WSNs will be affected by the cluster head (CH selection; this is because a CH consumes more power than a regular (non-CH node. In this research study, an energy efficient cluster head selection in Mobile Wireless Sensor Networks is proposed, analysed and validated on the basis of residual energy and randomized selection of the node, who is not assigned as a cluster head in previous round. Moreover, the proposed approach shows the significant improvements when compared with LEACH and A Novel Application Specific Network Protocol for Wireless Sensor Networks (Hybrid Multi-hop LEACH protocols in terms of energy consumption of sensor nodes, enhanced network lifetime and efficient data gathering due to less energy consumption during data transmission.

  3. Automatic annotation of head velocity and acceleration in Anvil

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jongejan, Bart

    2012-01-01

    We describe an automatic face tracker plugin for the ANVIL annotation tool. The face tracker produces data for velocity and for acceleration in two dimensions. We compare the annotations generated by the face tracking algorithm with independently made manual annotations for head movements....... The annotations are a useful supplement to manual annotations and may help human annotators to quickly and reliably determine onset of head movements and to suggest which kind of head movement is taking place....

  4. Sex and age differences in head acceleration during purposeful soccer heading.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caccese, Jaclyn B; Buckley, Thomas A; Tierney, Ryan T; Rose, William C; Glutting, Joseph J; Kaminski, Thomas W

    2018-01-01

    Differences in head-neck segment mass, purposeful heading technique, and cervical strength and stiffness may contribute to differences in head accelerations across sex and age. The purpose of this study was to compare head acceleration across sex and age (youth [12-14 years old], high school and collegiate) during purposeful soccer heading. One-hundred soccer players (42 male, 58 female, 17.1 ± 3.5 years, 168.5 ± 20.3 cm, 61.5 ± 13.7 kg) completed 12 controlled soccer headers at an initial ball velocity of 11.2 m/s. Linear and rotational accelerations were measured using a triaxial accelerometer and gyroscope and were transformed to the head centre-of-mass. A MANOVA revealed a significant multivariate main effect for sex (Pillai's Trace = .165, F(2,91) = 11.868, p accelerations were higher in females (40.9 ± 13.3 g; 3279 ± 1065 rad/s 2 ) than males (27.6 ± 8.5 g, 2219 ± 823 rad/s 2 ). These data suggest that under controlled soccer heading conditions, females may be exposed to higher head accelerations than males.

  5. Balanced Cluster Head Selection Based on Modified k-Means in a Distributed Wireless Sensor Network

    OpenAIRE

    Periyasamy, Sasikumar; Khara, Sibaram; Thangavelu, Shankar

    2016-01-01

    A major problem with Wireless Sensor Networks (WSNs) is the maximization of effective network lifetime through minimization of energy usage in the network nodes. A modified k-means (Mk-means) algorithm for clustering was proposed which includes three cluster heads (simultaneously chosen) for each cluster. These cluster heads (CHs) use a load sharing mechanism to rotate as the active cluster head, which conserves residual energy of the nodes, thereby extending network lifetime. Moreover, it re...

  6. Neck forces and moments and head accelerations in side impact.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoganandan, Narayan; Pintar, Frank A; Maiman, Dennis J; Philippens, Mat; Wismans, Jac

    2009-03-01

    Although side-impact sled studies have investigated chest, abdomen, and pelvic injury mechanics, determination of head accelerations and the associated neck forces and moments is very limited. The purpose of the present study was therefore to determine the temporal forces and moments at the upper neck region and head angular accelerations and angular velocities using postmortem human subjects (PMHS). Anthropometric data and X-rays were obtained, and the specimens were positioned upright on a custom-designed seat, rigidly fixed to the platform of the sled. PMHS were seated facing forward with the Frankfort plane horizontal, and legs were stretched parallel to the mid-sagittal plane. The normal curvature and alignment of the dorsal spine were maintained without initial torso rotation. A pyramid-shaped nine-accelerometer package was secured to the parietal-temporal region of the head. The test matrix consisted of groups A and B, representing the fully restrained torso condition, and groups C and D, representing the three-point belt-restrained torso condition. The change in velocity was 12.4 m/s for groups A and C, 17.9 m/s for group B, and 8.7 m/s for group D tests. Two specimens were tested in each group. Injuries were scored based on the Abbreviated Injury Scale. The head mass, center of gravity, and moment of inertia were determined for each specimen. Head accelerations and upper neck forces and moments were determined before head contact. Neck forces and moments and head angular accelerations and angular velocities are presented on a specimen-by-specimen basis. In addition, a summary of peak magnitudes of biomechanical data is provided because of their potential in serving as injury reference values characterizing head-neck biomechanics in side impacts. Though no skull fractures occurred, AIS 0 to 3 neck traumas were dependent on the impact velocity and restraint condition. Because specimen-specific head center of gravity and mass moment of inertia were determined

  7. Dual-head wireless powered video capsule based on new type of receiving coils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Gang; Yan, Guozheng; Xu, Wenming; Kuang, Shuai

    2015-05-01

    Wireless capsule endoscopy (WCE) has been a great breakthrough in visually detecting the pathological changes of gastrointestinal (GI) wall, but the limit of viewing angle and power by batteries still hinder the wide application of WCE. In order to address these shortcomings, a dual-head video capsule system based on new type of receiving coils is presented. First, the dual-head video capsule system is designed, which could capture images of the whole GI tract in two channels, transforming the images into NTSC videos at a frame rate of 30 f s(-1) and transmitting the signals outside the body. Second, the wireless power transmission platform with new type of receiving coils is established to provide at least 108 mW of continuous, stable energy for the capsule. Then a prototype was fabricated and applied in animal experiments. The designed dual-head video capsule system is proved to be feasible and a potential solution for future clinical application.

  8. Predicting brain acceleration during heading of soccer ball

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taha, Zahari; Hasnun Arif Hassan, Mohd; Azri Aris, Mohd; Anuar, Zulfika

    2013-12-01

    There has been a long debate whether purposeful heading could cause harm to the brain. Studies have shown that repetitive heading could lead to degeneration of brain cells, which is similarly found in patients with mild traumatic brain injury. A two-degree of freedom linear mathematical model was developed to study the impact of soccer ball to the brain during ball-to-head impact in soccer. From the model, the acceleration of the brain upon impact can be obtained. The model is a mass-spring-damper system, in which the skull is modelled as a mass and the neck is modelled as a spring-damper system. The brain is a mass with suspension characteristics that are also defined by a spring and a damper. The model was validated by experiment, in which a ball was dropped from different heights onto an instrumented dummy skull. The validation shows that the results obtained from the model are in a good agreement with the brain acceleration measured from the experiment. This findings show that a simple linear mathematical model can be useful in giving a preliminary insight on what human brain endures during a ball-to-head impact.

  9. Fuzzy Logic Method for Enhancement Fault-Tolerant of Cluster Head in Wireless Sensor Networks Clustering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farnaz Pakdeland

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Wireless sensor network is comprised of several sensor nodes. The retaining factors influence the network operation. In the clustering structure the cluster head failure can cause loss of information.The aim of this paper is to increase tolerance error in the cluster head node. At first, paying attention to the producing balance in the density of the cluster cause to postpone the death time of the cluster head node and lessen the collision due to the lack of the energy balance in clusters. The innovation in this stage is formed by using two fuzzy logic systems. One in the phase of evaluation of the cluster head chance, and the other in the phase of producing balance and the nodes migration to the qualified clusters to increase balance, Then the focus is on recognizing and repairing the cluster head fault.

  10. Wireless Performance of a Fully Passive Neurorecording Microsystem Embedded in Dispersive Human Head Phantom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwerdt, Helen N.; Chae, Junseok; Miranda, Felix A.

    2012-01-01

    This paper reports the wireless performance of a biocompatible fully passive microsystem implanted in phantom media simulating the dispersive dielectric properties of the human head, for potential application in recording cortical neuropotentials. Fully passive wireless operation is achieved by means of backscattering electromagnetic (EM) waves carrying 3rd order harmonic mixing products (2f(sub 0) plus or minus f(sub m)=4.4-4.9 GHZ) containing targeted neuropotential signals (fm approximately equal to 1-1000 Hz). The microsystem is enclosed in 4 micrometer thick parylene-C for biocompatibility and has a footprint of 4 millimeters x 12 millimeters x 500 micrometers. Preliminary testing of the microsystem implanted in the lossy biological simulating media results in signal-to-noise ratio's (SNR) near 22 (SNR approximately equal to 38 in free space) for millivolt level neuropotentials, demonstrating the potential for fully passive wireless microsystems in implantable medical applications.

  11. Head and Tibial Acceleration as a Function of Stride Frequency and Visual Feedback during Running.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Busa, Michael A; Lim, Jongil; van Emmerik, Richard E A; Hamill, Joseph

    2016-01-01

    Individuals regulate the transmission of shock to the head during running at different stride frequencies although the consequences of this on head-gaze stability remain unclear. The purpose of this study was to examine if providing individuals with visual feedback of their head-gaze orientation impacts tibial and head accelerations, shock attenuation and head-gaze motion during preferred speed running at different stride frequencies. Fifteen strides from twelve recreational runners running on a treadmill at their preferred speed were collected during five stride frequencies (preferred, ±10% and ±20% of preferred) in two visual task conditions (with and without real-time visual feedback of head-gaze orientation). The main outcome measures were tibial and head peak accelerations assessed in the time and frequency domains, shock attenuation from tibia to head, and the magnitude and velocity of head-gaze motion. Decreasing stride frequency resulted in greater vertical accelerations of the tibia (pacceleration was only observed for the slowest stride frequency condition. Visual feedback resulted in reduced head acceleration magnitude (pacceleration within a wide range of stride frequencies; only at a stride frequency 20% below preferred did head acceleration increase. Furthermore, impact accelerations of the head and tibia appear to be solely a function of stride frequency as no differences were observed between feedback conditions. Increased visual task demands through head gaze feedback resulted in reductions in head accelerations in the active portion of stance and increased head-gaze stability.

  12. Energy efficient distributed cluster head scheduling scheme for two tiered wireless sensor network

    OpenAIRE

    G. Kannan; T. Sree Renga Raja

    2015-01-01

    Wireless Sensor Network (WSN) provides a significant contribution in the emerging fields such as ambient intelligence and ubiquitous computing. In WSN, optimization and load balancing of network resources are critical concern to provide the intelligence for long duration. Since clustering the sensor nodes can significantly enhance overall system scalability and energy efficiency this paper presents a distributed cluster head scheduling (DCHS) algorithm to achieve the network longevity in WSN....

  13. Wireless acceleration sensor of moving elements for condition monitoring of mechanisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinitsin, Vladimir V.; Shestakov, Aleksandr L.

    2017-09-01

    Comprehensive analysis of the angular and linear accelerations of moving elements (shafts, gears) allows an increase in the quality of the condition monitoring of mechanisms. However, existing tools and methods measure either linear or angular acceleration with postprocessing. This paper suggests a new construction design of an angular acceleration sensor for moving elements. The sensor is mounted on a moving element and, among other things, the data transfer and electric power supply are carried out wirelessly. In addition, the authors introduce a method for processing the received information which makes it possible to divide the measured acceleration into the angular and linear components. The design has been validated by the results of laboratory tests of an experimental model of the sensor. The study has shown that this method provides a definite separation of the measured acceleration into linear and angular components, even in noise. This research contributes an advance in the range of methods and tools for condition monitoring of mechanisms.

  14. Electromagnetic and thermal effects of IR-UWB wireless implant systems on the human head.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thotahewa, Kasun M S; Redouté, Jean-Michel; Yuce, Mehmet R

    2013-01-01

    The usage of implanted wireless transmitting devices inside the human body has become widely popular in recent years. Applications such as multi-channel neural recording systems require high data rates in the wireless transmission link. Because of the inherent advantages provided by Impulse-Radio Ultra Wide Band (IR-UWB) such as high data rate capability, low power consumption and small form factor, there has been an increased research interest in using IR-UWB for bio-medical implant applications. Hence it has become imperative to analyze the electromagnetic effects caused by the use of IR-UWB when it is operated in or near the human body. This paper reports the electromagnetic effects of head implantable transmitting devices operating based on Impulse Radio Ultra Wide Band (IR-UWB) wireless technology. Simulations illustrate the performance of an implantable UWB antenna tuned to operate at 4 GHz with an -10 dB bandwidth of approximately 1 GHz when it is implanted in a human head model. Specific Absorption Rate (SAR), Specific Absorption (SA) and temperature increase are analyzed to compare the compliance of the transmitting device with international safety regulations.

  15. Accelerated fractionation in advanced head and neck cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olmi, P.; Cellai, E.; Chiavacci, A.; Fablai, C.

    1990-01-01

    From 1975 to 1985, 161 patients affected by head and neck cancer (58 oropharynx, 67 oral cavity, 36 paranasal sinuses) were treated with radiotherapy using an accelerated fractionation (AF) schedule at the University and Hospital Radiotherapy Departments of Florence. Five-year actuarial local control and survival was 38% for the oropharynx, 18% and 20% for the oral cavity, and 38% and 31% for the paranasal sinuses. Results were analysed according to T and N stage as well. Severe late sequelae were evaluated in 53 patients without local disease and with a minimum follow-up of one year: 8 patients developed osteonecrosis; there were 3 cases of trismus, 2 cases of laryngeal oedema, one case of blindness and one case of opththalmitis. (author). 19 refs.; 2 figs.; 9 tabs

  16. Accelerated fractionation in advanced head and neck cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Olmi, P.; Cellai, E. (Florence University (Italy). Department of Radiotherapy); Chiavacci, A.; Fablai, C. (Florence Hospital (Italy). Department of Radiotherapy)

    1990-03-01

    From 1975 to 1985, 161 patients affected by head and neck cancer (58 oropharynx, 67 oral cavity, 36 paranasal sinuses) were treated with radiotherapy using an accelerated fractionation (AF) schedule at the University and Hospital Radiotherapy Departments of Florence. Five-year actuarial local control and survival was 38% for the oropharynx, 18% and 20% for the oral cavity, and 38% and 31% for the paranasal sinuses. Results were analysed according to T and N stage as well. Severe late sequelae were evaluated in 53 patients without local disease and with a minimum follow-up of one year: 8 patients developed osteonecrosis; there were 3 cases of trismus, 2 cases of laryngeal oedema, one case of blindness and one case of opththalmitis. (author). 19 refs.; 2 figs.; 9 tabs.

  17. Similar head impact acceleration measured using instrumented ear patches in a junior rugby union team during matches in comparison with other sports.

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Doug A; Hume, Patria A; Gissane, Conor; Clark, Trevor N

    2016-07-01

    OBJECTIVE Direct impact with the head and the inertial loading of the head have been postulated as major mechanisms of head-related injuries, such as concussion. METHODS This descriptive observational study was conducted to quantify the head impact acceleration characteristics in under-9-year-old junior rugby union players in New Zealand. The impact magnitude, frequency, and location were collected with a wireless head impact sensor that was worn by 14 junior rugby players who participated in 4 matches. RESULTS A total of 721 impacts > 10g were recorded. The median (interquartile range [IQR]) number of impacts per player was 46 (IQR 37-58), resulting in 10 (IQR 4-18) impacts to the head per player per match. The median impact magnitudes recorded were 15g (IQR 12g-21g) for linear acceleration and 2296 rad/sec(2) (IQR 1352-4152 rad/sec(2)) for rotational acceleration. CONCLUSIONS There were 121 impacts (16.8%) above the rotational injury risk limit and 1 (0.1%) impact above the linear injury risk limit. The acceleration magnitude and number of head impacts in junior rugby union players were higher than those previously reported in similar age-group sports participants. The median linear acceleration for the under-9-year-old rugby players were similar to 7- to 8-year-old American football players, but lower than 9- to 12-year-old youth American football players. The median rotational accelerations measured were higher than the median and 95th percentiles in youth, high school, and collegiate American football players.

  18. Leakage pattern of linear accelerator treatment heads from multiple vendors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lonski, P.R.; Taylor, M.L.; Franich, R.D.; Harty, P.; Clements, N.; Kron, T.

    2011-01-01

    Full text: Patient life expectancy post-radiotherapy is becoming longer. Therefore, secondary cancers caused by radiotherapy treatment have more time to develop. Increasing attention is being given to out-of-field dose resulting from scatter and accelerator head leakage. Dose leakage from equivalent positions on Varian600C, Varian21-X, Siemens Primus and Elekta Synergy-II linacs were measured with TLD 1 00 H dosimeter chips and compared. Treatment parameters such as field size and beam energy were altered. Leakage doses are presented as a percentage of the dose to isocentre (5 Gy). Results illustrate significant variations in leakage dose between linac models where no model emits consistently lower amounts of radiation leakage for all treatment parameters. Results are shown below. Leakage through the collimator assembly in different units is varying as a function of location and unit design by more than a factor of 10. Differences are more pronounced in comparing Varian or Elekta models, which are fitted with an additional collimator separate from the MLC leaves, to the Siemens model, which uses MLC leaves as its only secondary collimator. Further measurements are currently being taken at the patient plane with a directional detector system to determine the spatial distribution of high leakage sources.

  19. Energy efficient distributed cluster head scheduling scheme for two tiered wireless sensor network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Kannan

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Wireless Sensor Network (WSN provides a significant contribution in the emerging fields such as ambient intelligence and ubiquitous computing. In WSN, optimization and load balancing of network resources are critical concern to provide the intelligence for long duration. Since clustering the sensor nodes can significantly enhance overall system scalability and energy efficiency this paper presents a distributed cluster head scheduling (DCHS algorithm to achieve the network longevity in WSN. The major novelty of this work is that the network is divided into primary and secondary tiers based on received signal strength indication of sensor nodes from the base station. The proposed DCHS supports for two tier WSN architecture and gives suggestion to elect the cluster head nodes and gateway nodes for both primary and secondary tiers. The DCHS mechanism satisfies an ideal distribution of the cluster head among the sensor nodes and avoids frequent selection of cluster head, based on Received Signal Strength Indication (RSSI and residual energy level of the sensor nodes. Since the RSSI is the key parameter for this paper, the practical experiment was conducted to measure RSSI value by using MSP430F149 processor and CC2500 transceiver. The measured RSSI values were given input to the event based simulator to test the DCHS mechanism. The real time experimental study validated the proposed scheme for various scenarios.

  20. Rotational acceleration during head impact resulting from different judo throwing techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murayama, Haruo; Hitosugi, Masahito; Motozawa, Yasuki; Ogino, Masahiro; Koyama, Katsuhiro

    2014-01-01

    Most severe head injuries in judo are reported as acute subdural hematoma. It is thus necessary to examine the rotational acceleration of the head to clarify the mechanism of head injuries. We determined the rotational acceleration of the head when the subject is thrown by judo techniques. One Japanese male judo expert threw an anthropomorphic test device using two throwing techniques, Osoto-gari and Ouchi-gari. Rotational and translational head accelerations were measured with and without an under-mat. For Osoto-gari, peak resultant rotational acceleration ranged from 4,284.2 rad/s(2) to 5,525.9 rad/s(2) and peak resultant translational acceleration ranged from 64.3 g to 87.2 g; for Ouchi-gari, the accelerations respectively ranged from 1,708.0 rad/s(2) to 2,104.1 rad/s(2) and from 120.2 g to 149.4 g. The resultant rotational acceleration did not decrease with installation of an under-mat for both Ouchi-gari and Osoto-gari. We found that head contact with the tatami could result in the peak values of translational and rotational accelerations, respectively. In general, because kinematics of the body strongly affects translational and rotational accelerations of the head, both accelerations should be measured to analyze the underlying mechanism of head injury. As a primary preventative measure, throwing techniques should be restricted to participants demonstrating ability in ukemi techniques to avoid head contact with the tatami.

  1. Head impacts in a junior rugby league team measured with a wireless head impact sensor: an exploratory analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Doug; Hume, Patria; Gissane, Conor; Clark, Trevor

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVE The aim of this study was to investigate the frequency, magnitude, and distribution of head impacts sustained by players in a junior rugby league over a season of matches. METHODS The authors performed a prospective cohort analysis of impact magnitude, frequency, and distribution on data collected with instrumented XPatches worn behind the ear of players in an "under-11" junior rugby league team (players under 11 years old). RESULTS A total of 1977 impacts were recorded. Over the course of the study, players sustained an average of 116 impacts (average of 13 impacts per player per match). The measured linear acceleration ranged from 10g to 123g (mean 22g, median 16g, and 95th percentile 57g). The rotational acceleration ranged from 89 rad/sec 2 to 22,928 rad/sec 2 (mean 4041 rad/sec 2 , median 2773 rad/sec 2 , and 95th percentile 11,384 rad/sec 2 ). CONCLUSIONS The level of impact severity based on the magnitude of impacts for linear and rotational accelerations recorded was similar to the impacts reported in studies of American junior and high school football, collegiate football, and youth ice hockey players, but the players in the rugby league cohort were younger, had less body mass, and played at a slower speed than the American players. Junior rugby league players are required to tackle the player to the ground and use a different tackle technique than that used in American football, likely increasing the rotational accelerations recorded at the head.

  2. Analytical network process based optimum cluster head selection in wireless sensor network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farman, Haleem; Javed, Huma; Jan, Bilal; Ahmad, Jamil; Ali, Shaukat; Khalil, Falak Naz; Khan, Murad

    2017-01-01

    Wireless Sensor Networks (WSNs) are becoming ubiquitous in everyday life due to their applications in weather forecasting, surveillance, implantable sensors for health monitoring and other plethora of applications. WSN is equipped with hundreds and thousands of small sensor nodes. As the size of a sensor node decreases, critical issues such as limited energy, computation time and limited memory become even more highlighted. In such a case, network lifetime mainly depends on efficient use of available resources. Organizing nearby nodes into clusters make it convenient to efficiently manage each cluster as well as the overall network. In this paper, we extend our previous work of grid-based hybrid network deployment approach, in which merge and split technique has been proposed to construct network topology. Constructing topology through our proposed technique, in this paper we have used analytical network process (ANP) model for cluster head selection in WSN. Five distinct parameters: distance from nodes (DistNode), residual energy level (REL), distance from centroid (DistCent), number of times the node has been selected as cluster head (TCH) and merged node (MN) are considered for CH selection. The problem of CH selection based on these parameters is tackled as a multi criteria decision system, for which ANP method is used for optimum cluster head selection. Main contribution of this work is to check the applicability of ANP model for cluster head selection in WSN. In addition, sensitivity analysis is carried out to check the stability of alternatives (available candidate nodes) and their ranking for different scenarios. The simulation results show that the proposed method outperforms existing energy efficient clustering protocols in terms of optimum CH selection and minimizing CH reselection process that results in extending overall network lifetime. This paper analyzes that ANP method used for CH selection with better understanding of the dependencies of

  3. Cluster Head Selection in a Homogeneous Wireless Sensor Network Ensuring Full Connectivity with Minimum Isolated Nodes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tapan Kumar Jain

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The research work proposes a cluster head selection algorithm for a wireless sensor network. A node can be a cluster head if it is connected to at least one unique neighbor node where the unique neighbor is the one that is not connected to any other node. If there is no connected unique node then the CH is selected on the basis of residual energy and the number of neighbor nodes. With the increase in number of clusters, the processing energy of the network increases; hence, this algorithm proposes minimum number of clusters which further leads to increased network lifetime. The major novel contribution of the proposed work is an algorithm that ensures a completely connected network with minimum number of isolated nodes. An isolated node will remain only if it is not within the transmission range of any other node. With the maximum connectivity, the coverage of the network is automatically maximized. The superiority of the proposed design is verified by simulation results done in MATLAB, where it clearly depicts that the total numbers of rounds before the network dies out are maximum compared to other existing protocols.

  4. Profiling of translational and rotational head accelerations in youth BMX with and without neck brace.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurst, Howard T; Rylands, Lee; Atkins, Stephen; Enright, Kevin; Roberts, Simon J

    2018-03-01

    To investigate the influence of BMX helmets and neck braces on translational and rotational accelerations in youth riders. Mixed model, repeated measure and correlation. Twenty three competitive youth BMX riders classified by age group (6-9 years, 10-13 years and 14-18 years) completed 6 laps of an indoor BMX track at race pace, 3 laps without a neck brace (NB) and 3 without brace (WB). A triaxial accelerometer with gyroscope was placed behind the right ear to determine the mean number of accelerations, translational and rotational, of the head between conditions and by age group. Significant reductions by condition (p=0.02) and by age (p=0.04) were found for the number of accelerations, though no interactions (condition×age) were revealed. Significant increases by age (p=0.01) were revealed for translational accelerations, whilst significant increases by condition (p=0.02) were found for rotational accelerations. In addition, significant correlations were revealed between relative helmet mass and age (r=0.83; p=0.001) and relative helmet mass and number of accelerations (r=0.46; p=0.03). Accelerations at the head decreased with increased age, possibly due to the influence of greater stabilising musculature. Additionally, neck braces also significantly reduced the number of accelerations. However, the magnitude of accelerations may be influenced by riding dynamics. Therefore, the use of neck braces combined with strength work to develop neck strength, could aid in the reduction of head accelerations in youth BMX riders. Copyright © 2017 Sports Medicine Australia. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Classifying head movements in video-recorded conversations based on movement velocity, acceleration and jerk

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jongejan, Bart; Paggio, Patrizia; Navarretta, Costanza

    2017-01-01

    This paper is about the automatic annotation of head movements in videos of face-to-face conversations. Manual annotation of gestures is resource consuming, and modelling gesture behaviours in different types of communicative settings requires many types of annotated data. Therefore, developing...... methods for automatic annotation is crucial. We present an approach where an SVM classifier learns to classify head movements based on measurements of velocity, acceleration, and the third derivative of position with respect to time, jerk. Consequently, annotations of head movements are added to new video...

  6. Head linear and rotational accelerations and craniocervical loads in lateral impact

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yoganandan, N.; Pintar, F.A.; Maiman, D.; Phillippens, M.M.G.M.; Wismans, J.S.H.M.

    2006-01-01

    The objective of the study was to determine lateral impact-induced three-dimensional temporal head center of gravity linear and angular accelerations, and craniocervical forces and moments from post mortem human subject (PMHS) sled tests and compare with the European side impact dummy, ES-II,

  7. Radiobiological modeling of interplay between accelerated repopulation and altered fractionation schedules in head and neck cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcu Loredana

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Head and neck cancer represents a challenge for radiation oncologists due to accelerated repopulation of cancer cells during treatment. This study aims to simulate, using Monte Carlo methods, the response of a virtual head and neck tumor to both conventional and altered fractionation schedules in radiotherapy when accelerated repopulation is considered. Although clinical trials are indispensable for evaluation of novel therapeutic techniques, they are time-consuming processes which involve many complex and variable factors for success. Models can overcome some of the limitations encountered by trials as they are able to simulate in less complex environment tumor cell kinetics and dynamics, interaction processes between cells and ionizing radiation and their outcome. Conventional, hyperfractionated and accelerated treatment schedules have been implemented in a previously developed tumor growth model which also incorporates tumor repopulation during treatment. This study focuses on the influence of three main treatment-related parameters, dose per fraction, inter fraction interval and length of treatment gap and gap timing based on RTOG trial data on head and neck cancer, on tumor control. The model has shown that conventionally fractionated radiotherapy is not able to eradicate the stem population of the tumor. Therefore, new techniques such as hyperfractionated/ accelerated radiotherapy schedules should be employed. Furthermore, the correct selection of schedule-related parameters (dose per fraction, time between fractions, treatment gap scheduling is crucial in overcoming accelerated repopulation. Modeling of treatment regimens and their input parameters can offer better understanding of the radiobiological interactions and also treatment outcome.

  8. Interactions between head motion and coil sensitivity in accelerated fMRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faraji-Dana, Z; Tam, F; Chen, J J; Graham, S J

    2016-09-01

    Parallel imaging is widely adopted to accelerate functional MRI (fMRI) data acquisition, through various strategies that involve multi-channel receiver coils. However, the non-uniform spatial sensitivity of multi-channel receiver coils may introduce unwanted artifacts when head motion occurs during the few-minute long fMRI scans. Although prospective correction provides a promising solution for alleviating the head motion artifacts in fMRI, the relative position of the fixed multi-channel receiver coils moves in the moving reference frame, potentially resulting in artifactual signal. We used numerical simulations to investigate this effect on fMRI using two parallel imaging schemes: sensitivity encoding (SENSE) and generalized autocalibrating partially parallel acquisitions (GRAPPA) with acceleration factors 2 and 4, towards characterizing the regime over which parallel-imaging fMRI with prospective motion correction will benefit from updating coil sensitivities to reflect relative positional change between the head and the receiver coil. Moreover, six subjects were scanned with acceleration factors 2 and 4 while performing a simple finger-tapping task with and without overt head motion. Updating coil sensitivities showed significant positive impact on standard deviation and activation maps in presence of overt head motion compared to that obtained with no overt head motion. The parallel imaging fMRI with updated coil sensitivity maps were compared to that with the coil sensitivity maps acquired at the reference position. Head motion in relation to a fixed multi-channel coil can adversely affect the quality of parallel imaging fMRI data; and updating coil sensitivity map can mitigate this effect. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. The development of a method to measure head acceleration and motion in high-impact crashes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olvey, Stephen E; Knox, Ted; Cohn, Kelly A

    2004-03-01

    To establish a mechanism to obtain precise measurements of the accelerations of the head in the high-speed racing environment and during crash impacts. The long-term goal is to apply this system to the assessment of head injury in automobile racing drivers and then in participants in other helmeted sports. A multidisciplinary team conceptualized, designed, and successfully tested a triaxial accelerometer system capable of measuring head acceleration and motion in high-impact crashes. The system has been implemented successfully in the professional racing environment. Accurate and reproducible data have been obtained from the accelerometer system in tests on manikins and cadavers and in actual racing events. The system has been implemented in two professional racing series in 2003. Information gained from the accelerometer system is currently being entered into a database. Eventually, the data should aid in the development of improved cockpit head protection in racing cars. Improved helmet design not only in motor sports but also in other helmeted sports should benefit from the data collected. These data will also aid the development of improved head injury protection in military aircraft and passenger vehicles. Although there has been a significant decrease in the overall rate of injury during the past 25 years, head injury remains a serious safety concern in motor sports and the greatest cause of death. Sports-related head injuries are also of great concern because repeated mild head injury has become an important health issue with potential long-term disability. True human tolerance to brain injury has yet to be established. Our scientific knowledge of brain injury is currently based on results derived from manikin, cadaver, and human volunteer testing, along with animal and computer models. The racing environment represents a venue to ethically measure and evaluate the forces involved in human brain injury.

  10. A Wireless Swing Angle Measurement Scheme Using Attitude Heading Reference System Sensing Units Based on Microelectromechanical Devices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bingtuan Gao

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Feasible real-time swing angle measurement is significant to improve the efficiency and safety of industrial crane systems. This paper presents a wireless microelectromechanical system (MEMS-based swing angle measurement system. The system consists of two attitude heading reference system (AHRS sensing units with a wireless communication function, which are mounted on the hook (or payload and the jib (or base of the crane, respectively. With a combination of a three-axis accelerometer, a three-axis gyroscope and a three-axis magnetometer, the standard extended Kalman filter (EKF is used to estimate the desired orientation of the payload and the base. Wireless ZigBee communication is employed to transmit the orientation of the payload to the sensing unit mounted on the base, which measures the orientation of the base. Because several physical parameters from the payload to the base can be acquired from the original crane control system, the swing angles of the payload can be calculated based on the two measured orientation parameters together with the known physical parameters. Experiments were performed to show the feasibility and effectiveness of the proposed swing angle measurement system.

  11. Head rotational acceleration characteristics influence behavioral and diffusion tensor imaging outcomes following concussion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stemper, Brian D; Shah, Alok S; Pintar, Frank A; McCrea, Michael; Kurpad, Shekar N; Glavaski-Joksimovic, Aleksandra; Olsen, Christopher; Budde, Matthew D

    2015-05-01

    A majority of traumatic brain injuries (TBI) in motor vehicle crashes and sporting environments are mild and caused by high-rate acceleration of the head. For injuries caused by rotational acceleration, both magnitude and duration of the acceleration pulse were shown to influence injury outcomes. This study incorporated a unique rodent model of rotational acceleration-induced mild TBI (mTBI) to quantify independent effects of magnitude and duration on behavioral and neuroimaging outcomes. Ninety-two Sprague-Dawley rats were exposed to head rotational acceleration at peak magnitudes of 214 or 350 krad/s(2) and acceleration pulse durations of 1.6 or 3.4 ms in a full factorial design. Rats underwent a series of behavioral tests including the Composite Neuroscore (CN), Elevated Plus Maze (EPM), and Morris Water Maze (MWM). Ex vivo diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) of the fixed brains was conducted to assess the effects of rotational injury on brain microstructure as revealed by the parameter fractional anisotropy (FA). While the injury did not cause significant locomotor or cognitive deficits measured with the CN and MWM, respectively, a main effect of duration was consistently observed for the EPM. Increased duration caused significantly greater activity and exploratory behaviors measured as open arm time and number of arm changes. DTI demonstrated significant effects of both magnitude and duration, with the FA of the amygdala related to both the magnitude and duration. Increased duration also caused FA changes at the interface of gray and white matter. Collectively, the findings demonstrate that the consequences of rotational acceleration mTBI were more closely associated with duration of the rotational acceleration impulse, which is often neglected as an independent factor, and highlight the need for animal models of TBI with strong biomechanical foundations to associate behavioral outcomes with brain microstructure.

  12. FRCA: a fuzzy relevance-based cluster head selection algorithm for wireless mobile ad-hoc sensor networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Chongdeuk; Jeong, Taegwon

    2011-01-01

    Clustering is an important mechanism that efficiently provides information for mobile nodes and improves the processing capacity of routing, bandwidth allocation, and resource management and sharing. Clustering algorithms can be based on such criteria as the battery power of nodes, mobility, network size, distance, speed and direction. Above all, in order to achieve good clustering performance, overhead should be minimized, allowing mobile nodes to join and leave without perturbing the membership of the cluster while preserving current cluster structure as much as possible. This paper proposes a Fuzzy Relevance-based Cluster head selection Algorithm (FRCA) to solve problems found in existing wireless mobile ad hoc sensor networks, such as the node distribution found in dynamic properties due to mobility and flat structures and disturbance of the cluster formation. The proposed mechanism uses fuzzy relevance to select the cluster head for clustering in wireless mobile ad hoc sensor networks. In the simulation implemented on the NS-2 simulator, the proposed FRCA is compared with algorithms such as the Cluster-based Routing Protocol (CBRP), the Weighted-based Adaptive Clustering Algorithm (WACA), and the Scenario-based Clustering Algorithm for Mobile ad hoc networks (SCAM). The simulation results showed that the proposed FRCA achieves better performance than that of the other existing mechanisms.

  13. Tripping Elicits Earlier and Larger Deviations in Linear Head Acceleration Compared to Slipping

    OpenAIRE

    Arena, Sara L.; Davis, Julian L.; Grant, J. Wallace; Madigan, Michael L.

    2016-01-01

    Slipping and tripping contribute to a large number of falls and fall-related injuries. While the vestibular system is known to contribute to balance and fall prevention, it is unclear whether it contributes to detecting slip or trip onset. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of slipping and tripping on head acceleration during walking. This information would help determine whether individuals with vestibular dysfunction are likely to be at a greater risk of fal...

  14. Head and Trunk Acceleration During Intermediate Transport on Medical Utility Vehicles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tucker, W Steven; Swartz, Erik E; Hornor, Stephen D

    2016-01-01

    To compare head and trunk acceleration during transport on 2 medical utility vehicles. Within subject. Controlled laboratory. Nineteen male volunteers (21.8 ± 1.4 years, 176.5 ± 5.5 cm, 90.3 ± 16.1 kg). Participants were secured to a spineboard and stretcher on the Husqvarna HUV 4421DXL ambulance (HUV) and modified John Deere Gator TH (Gator) and driven over synthetic field turf transitioning to concrete slab (interval 1) and concrete slab transitioning to natural grass (interval 2). Three-dimensional (x, y, and z) accelerometers recorded head and trunk acceleration. At each data point, acceleration of the trunk was subtracted from the acceleration of the head and the peak acceleration difference was determined. Independent variables were vehicle (HUV, Gator) and interval (interval 1, interval 2). The average peak acceleration differences in 3 directions (x, y, z) were analyzed using a 2-factor within analysis of variance (P ≤ 0.05). For x, Gator in interval 2 (28.34 ± 7.45 m/s/s) was greater than HUV in interval 2 (21.87 ± 6.28 m/s/s), and HUV (11.05 ± 3.29 m/s/s) and Gator (12.56 ± 4.32 m/s/s) in interval 1. The HUV in interval 2 was greater than HUV and Gator in interval 1. For z, Gator in interval 2 (22.12 ± 4.8 m/s/s) was greater than HUV in interval 2 (15.21 ± 2.84 m/s/s), and HUV (9.51 ± 3.01 m/s/s) and Gator (12.5 ± 3.78 m/s/s) in interval 1. The HUV in interval 2 was greater than HUV and Gator in interval 1. Gator in interval 1 was greater than HUV in interval 1. Varying head and trunk accelerations exist in healthy spine-boarded participants during transport on medical utility vehicles dependent on surface and vehicle type. Intermediate transport vehicles vary in their ability to mitigate perturbations conveyed to the patient from the terrain travelled over.

  15. Dynamics of particles accelerated by head-on collisions of two magnetized plasma shocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeuchi, Satoshi

    2018-02-01

    A kinetic model of the head-on collision of two magnetized plasma shocks is analyzed theoretically and in numerical calculations. When two plasmas with anti-parallel magnetic fields collide, they generate magnetic reconnection and form a motional electric field at the front of the collision region. This field accelerates the particles sandwiched between both shock fronts to extremely high energy. As they accelerate, the particles are bent by the transverse magnetic field crossing the magnetic neutral sheet, and their energy gains are reduced. In the numerical calculations, the dynamics of many test particles were modeled through the relativistic equations of motion. The attainable energy gain was obtained by multiplying three parameters: the propagation speed of the shock, the magnitude of the magnetic field, and the acceleration time of the test particle. This mechanism for generating high-energy particles is applicable over a wide range of spatial scales, from laboratory to interstellar plasmas.

  16. Accelerated Life Structural Benchmark Testing for a Stirling Convertor Heater Head

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krause, David L.; Kantzos, Pete T.

    2006-01-01

    For proposed long-duration NASA Space Science missions, the Department of Energy, Lockheed Martin, Infinia Corporation, and NASA Glenn Research Center are developing a high-efficiency, 110-watt Stirling Radioisotope Generator (SRG110). A structurally significant limit state for the SRG110 heater head component is creep deformation induced at high material temperature and low stress level. Conventional investigations of creep behavior adequately rely on experimental results from uniaxial creep specimens, and a wealth of creep data is available for the Inconel 718 material of construction. However, the specified atypical thin heater head material is fine-grained with a heat treatment that limits precipitate growth, and little creep property data for this microstructure is available in the literature. In addition, the geometry and loading conditions apply a multiaxial stress state on the component, far from the conditions of uniaxial testing. For these reasons, an extensive experimental investigation is ongoing to aid in accurately assessing the durability of the SRG110 heater head. This investigation supplements uniaxial creep testing with pneumatic testing of heater head-like pressure vessels at design temperature with stress levels ranging from approximately the design stress to several times that. This paper presents experimental results, post-test microstructural analyses, and conclusions for four higher-stress, accelerated life tests. Analysts are using these results to calibrate deterministic and probabilistic analytical creep models of the SRG110 heater head

  17. Quantitative Relationship between Axonal Injury and Mechanical Response in a Rodent Head Impact Acceleration Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yan; Kallakuri, Srinivasu; Zhou, Runzhou; Cavanaugh, John M.

    2011-01-01

    Abstract A modified Marmarou impact acceleration model was developed to study the mechanical responses induced by this model and their correlation to traumatic axonal injury (TAI). Traumatic brain injury (TBI) was induced in 31 anesthetized male Sprague-Dawley rats (392±13 g) by a custom-made 450-g impactor from heights of 1.25 m or 2.25 m. An accelerometer and angular rate sensor measured the linear and angular responses of the head, while the impact event was captured by a high-speed video camera. TAI distribution along the rostro-caudal direction, as well as across the left and right hemispheres, was determined using β-amyloid precursor protein (β-APP) immunocytochemistry, and detailed TAI injury maps were constructed for the entire corpus callosum. Peak linear acceleration 1.25 m and 2.25 m impacts were 666±165 g and 907±501 g, respectively. Peak angular velocities were 95±24 rad/sec and 124±48 rad/sec, respectively. Compared to the 2.25-m group, the observed TAI counts in the 1.25-m impact group were significantly lower. Average linear acceleration, peak angular velocity, average angular acceleration, and surface righting time were also significantly different between the two groups. A positive correlation was observed between normalized total TAI counts and average linear acceleration (R2=0.612, pacceleration response of the rat head during impact, not necessarily the drop height. PMID:21895482

  18. Charging Wireless Sensor Networks with Mobile Charger and Infrastructure Pivot Cluster Heads

    OpenAIRE

    Har, Dongsoo

    2017-01-01

    Wireless rechargeable sensor networks (WRSNs) consisting of sensor nodes with batteries have been at the forefront of sensing and communication technologies in the last few years. Sensor networks with different missions are being massively rolled out, particularly in the internet-of-things commercial market. To ensure sustainable operation of WRSNs, charging in a timely fashion is very important, since lack of energy of even a single sensor node could result in serious outcomes. With the larg...

  19. Angular Impact Mitigation system for bicycle helmets to reduce head acceleration and risk of traumatic brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Kirk; Dau, Nathan; Feist, Florian; Deck, Caroline; Willinger, Rémy; Madey, Steven M; Bottlang, Michael

    2013-10-01

    Angular acceleration of the head is a known cause of traumatic brain injury (TBI), but contemporary bicycle helmets lack dedicated mechanisms to mitigate angular acceleration. A novel Angular Impact Mitigation (AIM) system for bicycle helmets has been developed that employs an elastically suspended aluminum honeycomb liner to absorb linear acceleration in normal impacts as well as angular acceleration in oblique impacts. This study tested bicycle helmets with and without AIM technology to comparatively assess impact mitigation. Normal impact tests were performed to measure linear head acceleration. Oblique impact tests were performed to measure angular head acceleration and neck loading. Furthermore, acceleration histories of oblique impacts were analyzed in a computational head model to predict the resulting risk of TBI in the form of concussion and diffuse axonal injury (DAI). Compared to standard helmets, AIM helmets resulted in a 14% reduction in peak linear acceleration (pbicycle helmet, and may enhance prevention of bicycle-related TBI. Further research is required. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. DCE: A Distributed Energy-Efficient Clustering Protocol for Wireless Sensor Network Based on Double-Phase Cluster-Head Election.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Ruisong; Yang, Wei; Wang, Yipeng; You, Kaiming

    2017-05-01

    Clustering is an effective technique used to reduce energy consumption and extend the lifetime of wireless sensor network (WSN). The characteristic of energy heterogeneity of WSNs should be considered when designing clustering protocols. We propose and evaluate a novel distributed energy-efficient clustering protocol called DCE for heterogeneous wireless sensor networks, based on a Double-phase Cluster-head Election scheme. In DCE, the procedure of cluster head election is divided into two phases. In the first phase, tentative cluster heads are elected with the probabilities which are decided by the relative levels of initial and residual energy. Then, in the second phase, the tentative cluster heads are replaced by their cluster members to form the final set of cluster heads if any member in their cluster has more residual energy. Employing two phases for cluster-head election ensures that the nodes with more energy have a higher chance to be cluster heads. Energy consumption is well-distributed in the proposed protocol, and the simulation results show that DCE achieves longer stability periods than other typical clustering protocols in heterogeneous scenarios.

  1. Instrumented mouthguard acceleration analyses for head impacts in amateur rugby union players over a season of matches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Doug; Hume, Patria A; Brughelli, Matt; Gissane, Conor

    2015-03-01

    Direct impacts with the head (linear acceleration or pressure) and inertial loading of the head (rotational acceleration or strain) have been postulated as the 2 major mechanisms of head-related injuries such as concussion. Although data are accumulating for soccer and American football, there are no published data for nonhelmeted collision sports such as rugby union. To quantify head impacts via instrumented mouthguard acceleration analyses for rugby union players over a season of matches. Descriptive epidemiology study. Data on impact magnitude and frequency were collected with molded instrumented mouthguards worn by 38 premier amateur senior rugby players participating in the 2013 domestic season of matches. A total of 20,687 impacts >10g (range, 10.0-164.9g) were recorded over the duration of the study. The mean ± SD number of impacts per player over the duration of the season of matches was 564 ± 618, resulting in a mean ± SD of 95 ± 133 impacts to the head per player, per match over the duration of the season of matches. The impact magnitudes for linear accelerations were skewed to the lower values (Sp = 3.7 ± 0.02; P rugby union players over a season of matches, measured via instrumented mouthguard accelerations, were higher than for most sports previously reported. Mean linear acceleration measured over a season of matches was similar to the mean linear accelerations previously reported for youth, high school, and collegiate American football players but lower than that for female youth soccer players. Mean rotational acceleration measured over a season of matches was similar to mean rotational accelerations for youth, high school, and collegiate American football players but less than those for female youth soccer players, concussed American collegiate players, collegiate American football players, and professional American football players. © 2014 The Author(s).

  2. Brain injury prediction: assessing the combined probability of concussion using linear and rotational head acceleration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowson, Steven; Duma, Stefan M

    2013-05-01

    Recent research has suggested possible long term effects due to repetitive concussions, highlighting the importance of developing methods to accurately quantify concussion risk. This study introduces a new injury metric, the combined probability of concussion, which computes the overall risk of concussion based on the peak linear and rotational accelerations experienced by the head during impact. The combined probability of concussion is unique in that it determines the likelihood of sustaining a concussion for a given impact, regardless of whether the injury would be reported or not. The risk curve was derived from data collected from instrumented football players (63,011 impacts including 37 concussions), which was adjusted to account for the underreporting of concussion. The predictive capability of this new metric is compared to that of single biomechanical parameters. The capabilities of these parameters to accurately predict concussion incidence were evaluated using two separate datasets: the Head Impact Telemetry System (HITS) data and National Football League (NFL) data collected from impact reconstructions using dummies (58 impacts including 25 concussions). Receiver operating characteristic curves were generated, and all parameters were significantly better at predicting injury than random guessing. The combined probability of concussion had the greatest area under the curve for all datasets. In the HITS dataset, the combined probability of concussion and linear acceleration were significantly better predictors of concussion than rotational acceleration alone, but not different from each other. In the NFL dataset, there were no significant differences between parameters. The combined probability of concussion is a valuable method to assess concussion risk in a laboratory setting for evaluating product safety.

  3. ACCELERATING COLUMN FOR SEPARATION OF ETHANOL FROM FACTIONS OF INTERMEDIATE AND HEAD IMPURITIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. V. Agafonov

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Summary. Nowadays purification of ethanol from the head and intermediate impurities is done with the selection of fractions of fusel alcohol and fusel oil from the distillation column and head and intermediate fractions impurities from condenser Epuration column operating accord-ing to the hydro-selection method. Due to this the fraction contains at least 13% ethyl alcohol, resulting in a reduced yield of the final product. Distillation of these fractions in the known acceleration columns requires increased consumption of heating steam for 6-8 kg / dal and increasing installation metal content. In this paper we investigate the process of distillation fraction from the condenser of Epura-tion column, fusel alcohol from the distillation column and subfusel liquid layer from the decanter, which is fed on a plate of supply of new accelerating column (AC, which operates on Epuration technology with the supply of hydro-selection water on the top plate and has in its composition concentration, boiling and stripping parts, a dephlagmator, a condenser, a boiler. Material balance equations of the column were obtained and ethyl alcohol concentration on its plates were determined by them. Having converted the material balance equations, we determined the dependences for the impurities ratio being drawn from the accelerating column with the Luther flows and ethyl alcohol fraction. Then we received the equation for determining the proportion of impurities taken from the column condenser with fraction. These calculations proved that the studied impurities are almost completely selected with this faction, ethyl alcohol content of it being 0.14% of the hourly output.

  4. An externally head-mounted wireless neural recording device for laboratory animal research and possible human clinical use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Ming; Li, Hao; Bull, Christopher; Borton, David A; Aceros, Juan; Larson, Lawrence; Nurmikko, Arto V

    2013-01-01

    In this paper we present a new type of head-mounted wireless neural recording device in a highly compact package, dedicated for untethered laboratory animal research and designed for future mobile human clinical use. The device, which takes its input from an array of intracortical microelectrode arrays (MEA) has ninety-seven broadband parallel neural recording channels and was integrated on to two custom designed printed circuit boards. These house several low power, custom integrated circuits, including a preamplifier ASIC, a controller ASIC, plus two SAR ADCs, a 3-axis accelerometer, a 48MHz clock source, and a Manchester encoder. Another ultralow power RF chip supports an OOK transmitter with the center frequency tunable from 3GHz to 4GHz, mounted on a separate low loss dielectric board together with a 3V LDO, with output fed to a UWB chip antenna. The IC boards were interconnected and packaged in a polyether ether ketone (PEEK) enclosure which is compatible with both animal and human use (e.g. sterilizable). The entire system consumes 17mA from a 1.2Ahr 3.6V Li-SOCl2 1/2AA battery, which operates the device for more than 2 days. The overall system includes a custom RF receiver electronics which are designed to directly interface with any number of commercial (or custom) neural signal processors for multi-channel broadband neural recording. Bench-top measurements and in vivo testing of the device in rhesus macaques are presented to demonstrate the performance of the wireless neural interface.

  5. An investigation of accelerator head scatter and output factor in air

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ding, George X.

    2004-01-01

    Our purpose in this study was to investigate whether the Monte Carlo simulation can accurately predict output factors in air. Secondary goals were to study the head scatter components and investigate the collimator exchange effect. The Monte Carlo code, BEAMnrc, was used in the study. Photon beams of 6 and 18 MV were from a Varian Clinac 2100EX accelerator and the measurements were performed using an ionization chamber in a mini-phantom. The Monte Carlo calculated in air output factors was within 1% of measured values. The simulation provided information of the origin and the magnitude of the collimator exchange effect. It was shown that the collimator backscatter to the beam monitor chamber played a significant role in the beam output factors. However the magnitude of the scattered dose contributions from the collimator at the isocenter is negligible. The maximum scattered dose contribution from the collimators was about 0.15% and 0.4% of the total dose at the isocenter for a 6 and 18 MV beam, respectively. The scattered dose contributions from the flattening filter at the isocenter were about 0.9-3% and 0.2-6% of the total dose for field sizes of 4x4 cm 2 -40x40 cm 2 for the 6 and 18 MV beam, respectively. The study suggests that measurements of head scatter factors be done at large depth well beyond the depth of electron contamination. The insight information may have some implications for developing generalized empirical models to calculate the head scatter

  6. Accelerated superfractionated radiotherapy with concomitant boost for locally advanced head-and-neck squamous cell carcinomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morris, Monica M.; Schmidt-Ullrich, Rupert K.; DiNardo, L.; Manning, Matthew A.; Silverman, L.; Clay, L.; Johnson, Christopher R.; Amir, Cyrus

    2002-01-01

    Purpose: A growing body of evidence supports the efficacy of accelerated superfractionated radiotherapy with concomitant boost for advanced head-and-neck carcinomas. This study represents a single-institution experience, performed to identify the factors influencing tumor control, survival, and toxicity. Methods and Materials: Between 1988 and 1999, 133 patients with primary squamous cell head-and-neck carcinoma underwent accelerated superfractionated radiotherapy using a concomitant boost. The concomitant boost in this regimen was delivered using reduced fields delivered 3 times weekly in a twice-daily schedule during the final phase. The total radiation dose ranged from 64.8 Gy to 76.5 Gy (mean 71.1). Patients were evaluated in follow-up for local control and late toxicity. Multivariate analysis of treatment and patient parameters was performed to evaluate their influence on toxicity, local control, and overall survival. Results: With a mean follow-up of 37 months, the actuarial overall survival rate for the entire group at 5 years was 24% and the local control rate was 57%. The tumor volume was the most significant predictor of local control, such that each 1-cm 3 increase in volume was associated with a 1% decrease in local control. For patients with tumor volumes ≤30 cm 3 vs. >30 cm 3 , the 5-year disease-specific survival rate was 52% and 27% (p = 0.004) and locoregional control rate was 76% and 26% (p<0.001), respectively. Seventy-six patients with a minimum of 12 months and median of 39 months toxicity follow-up were studied for late effects. None of these patients experienced Grade 4 or 5 toxicity. The actuarial rate of significant toxicity (Grade III or greater) was 32% at 5 years. Of the toxicities observed, xerostomia (19%) was the most common. Multivariate analysis revealed N stage and dose as independent predictors of Grade 3 effects. Conclusion: The locoregional control and survival for patients in this institutional experience compare favorably to

  7. Strategies for mitigating the ionization-induced beam head erosion problem in an electron-beam-driven plasma wakefield accelerator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. An

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Strategies for mitigating ionization-induced beam head erosion in an electron-beam-driven plasma wakefield accelerator (PWFA are explored when the plasma and the wake are both formed by the transverse electric field of the beam itself. Beam head erosion can occur in a preformed plasma because of a lack of focusing force from the wake at the rising edge (head of the beam due to the finite inertia of the electrons. When the plasma is produced by field ionization from the space charge field of the beam, the head erosion is significantly exacerbated due to the gradual recession (in the beam frame of the 100% ionization contour. Beam particles in front of the ionization front cannot be focused (guided causing them to expand as in vacuum. When they expand, the location of the ionization front recedes such that even more beam particles are completely unguided. Eventually this process terminates the wake formation prematurely, i.e., well before the beam is depleted of its energy. Ionization-induced head erosion can be mitigated by controlling the beam parameters (emittance, charge, and energy and/or the plasma conditions. In this paper we explore how the latter can be optimized so as to extend the beam propagation distance and thereby increase the energy gain. In particular we show that, by using a combination of the alkali atoms of the lowest practical ionization potential (Cs for plasma formation and a precursor laser pulse to generate a narrow plasma filament in front of the beam, the head erosion rate can be dramatically reduced. Simulation results show that in the upcoming “two-bunch PWFA experiments” on the FACET facility at SLAC national accelerator laboratory the energy gain of the trailing beam can be up to 10 times larger for the given parameters when employing these techniques. Comparison of the effect of beam head erosion in preformed and ionization produced plasmas is also presented.

  8. Energy generation for an ad hoc wireless sensor network-based monitoring system using animal head movement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    S. Nadimi, Esmaeil; Blanes-Vidal, Victoria; Jørgensen, Rasmus Nyholm

    2011-01-01

    The supply of energy to electronics is an imperative constraining factor to be considered during the design process of mobile ad hoc wireless sensor networks (MANETs). This influence is especially important when the MANET is deployed unattended or the wireless modules within the MANET are not eas......The supply of energy to electronics is an imperative constraining factor to be considered during the design process of mobile ad hoc wireless sensor networks (MANETs). This influence is especially important when the MANET is deployed unattended or the wireless modules within the MANET...... are not easily accessible. Therefore, exploring novel sources of energy generation rather than operating electronics only on limited power supplies such as batteries is a major challenge. Monitoring free-ranging animal behavior is an application in which the entities (animals) within the MANET are not readily...

  9. Split-course accelerated therapy in head and neck cancer: an analysis of toxicity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Delaney, Geoffrey P.; Fisher, Richard J.; Smee, Robert I.; Hook, Carolyn; Barton, Michael B.

    1995-01-01

    Purpose: To retrospectively assess a protocol of split-course accelerated radiation therapy (SCAT) for selected head and neck cancers. Methods and Materials: SCAT consisted of 1.8 Gy per fraction administered twice daily with a minimum gap between fractions of 6 h. The treatment protocol prescribed an initial 16 fractions followed by a planned 5 to 12 day break, and then a further 20 to 22 fractions for a total dose ranging from 64.8 to 72 Gy delivered in 5 to 6 weeks. Results: Twenty-eight patients received SCAT for histologically confirmed head and neck cancer between January 1987 and August 1991. All patients were followed up until December 1, 1993. The mean potential follow-up time was 4.2 years (range: 2.9-6.2 years). All patients completed the treatment protocol. Thirteen tumors were laryngeal in origin, eight hypopharyngeal, four paranasal sinus, and three oropharyngeal. There were no Stage I, three Stage II, nine Stage III, and 12 Stage IV tumors. Four tumors were not staged (two paranasal sinus cancers and two surgical recurrences). Early and late toxicities were moderate to severe. Confluent mucositis was experienced by 27 of the 28 patients (96%). One patient required a prolonged midtreatment break of 24 days. Nine patients (32%) required narcotic analgesia for pain relief. Eleven patients (39%) required hospitalization for nasogastric feeding or pain control. The median length of hospital stay was 14 days (range 7-98 days). The actuarial rate of severe late toxicity at 3 years was 47% (standard error (SE) = 13%). A complete tumor response was achieved in 86% of patients. The actuarial local control rate at 3 years was 43% (SE = 11%) and the actuarial survival rate at 3 years was 25% (SE = 8%). Conclusion: Given the encouraging complete response rate and local control for such advanced tumors, SCAT for locoregionally advanced tumors merits further investigation. However, because of the significant late toxicity observed, the total dose, interfraction

  10. Long-term results of accelerated radiation treatment for advanced head and neck cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lamb, D.S.; Morum, P.E.; Denham, J.W.; Gray, A.J.

    1998-01-01

    Background and purpose: This report presents long-term follow-up data from a prospective but unrandomized trial of a continuous 3.5-week course of accelerated radiation treatment (ART) used as primary treatment for patients with loco-regionally advanced head and neck cancer. Materials and methods: Ninety-three patients in three centres in New Zealand and Australia were treated with ART (59.40 Gy in 33 fractions over 24-25 days). Their disease originated from three anatomical regions (oral cavity, 35 patients; pharynx, 31 patients; larynx, 27 patients). Seventy-nine of these patients had stage III or IV cancers. Results: Follow-up ranged from 68 to 203 months (median 139 months). Loco-regional (LR) failure occurred in 52 patients leading to a 10-year actuarial expectation of LR control of 38%. The actuarial expectation of LR control at 10 years was highly dependent on stage and for stage III, IVA and IVB patients it was 57±8.1%, 32±1.7% and 7±0.5%, respectively. Multivariate analysis could not confirm an independent impact of primary site or histological differentiation on LR failure. Two patients died of acute toxicity of treatment and six patients developed grade 3/4 late complications affecting soft tissues only, yielding an actuarial expectation of complications of this severity at 5 years of 9%. No cases of osteoradionecrosis or myelitis were observed. Conclusion: This ART, which has proved easy to use at a number of large and small centres, has produced encouraging long-term LR control at a cost of limited soft tissue morbidity. (Copyright (c) 1998 Elsevier Science B.V., Amsterdam. All rights reserved.)

  11. Effect of abdominal vibroacoustic stimulation on sound and acceleration levels at the head of the fetal sheep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abrams, R M; Peters, A J; Gerhardt, K J

    1997-08-01

    To measure the vibratory response of the fetal head and abdominal wall in sheep during vibroacoustic stimulation. A piezoresistive accelerometer was attached to the skulls of seven sheep fetuses (128-134 days' gestational age), and a miniature hydrophone was attached to the skin overlying the fetal temporal bone. During fetal preparation and vibroacoustic stimulation procedures, ewes were anesthetized and supine. Vibroacoustic stimulation of the maternal abdomen was produced by each of two clinical devices that differed in spectral content, and an electric toothbrush. The approximate fundamental frequencies (f0) and first overtones (f1), as determined by both recordings of intrauterine sound pressure level and fetal head acceleration, were as follows: fetal acoustic stimulator, 75 and 150 Hz; electronic larynx, 150 and 300 Hz; and electric toothbrush, 25 and 50 Hz, respectively. At fundamental frequencies and first overtones, the ranges of fetal head accelerations (expressed in 1/12-octave bands) were as follows: fetal acoustic stimulator, 10-53 and 25-224 mm/sec2; electronic larynx, 10-53 and 18-114 mm/sec2; and electric toothbrush, 33-792 and 8-116 mm/sec2, respectively. Sound pressure levels exceeded 110 dB in all cases. High sound pressure levels in the uterus were proportional to fetal head vibration levels. Vibroacoustic stimulation of the surface of the abdomen of pregnant sheep is accompanied by both acoustic and vibratory exposure of the fetus.

  12. Vestibuloocular reflex dynamics during high-frequency and high-acceleration rotations of the head on body in rhesus monkey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huterer, Marko; Cullen, Kathleen E

    2002-07-01

    For frequencies >10 Hz, the vestibuloocular reflex (VOR) has been primarily investigated during passive rotations of the head on the body in humans. These prior studies suggest that eye movements lag head movements, as predicted by a 7-ms delay in the VOR reflex pathways. However, Minor and colleagues recently applied whole-body rotations of frequencies unity (1.1 at 5 Hz vs. 1.2 at 25 Hz), and phase lag increased only slightly with frequency (from 2 degrees at 5 Hz to 11 degrees at 25 Hz, a marked contrast to the 63 degrees lag at 25 Hz predicted by a 7-ms VOR latency). Furthermore, VOR response dynamics were comparable in darkness and when viewing a target and did not vary with peak velocity. Although monkeys offered less resistance to the initial cycles of applied head motion, the gain and phase of the VOR did not vary for early versus late cycles, suggesting that an efference copy of the motor command to the neck musculature did not alter VOR response dynamics. In addition, VOR dynamics were also probed by applying transient head perturbations with much greater accelerations (peak acceleration >15,000 degrees /s(2)) than have been previously employed. The VOR latency was between 5 and 6 ms, and mean gain was close to unity for two of the three animals tested. A simple linear model well described the VOR responses elicited by sinusoidal and transient head on body rotations. We conclude that the VOR is compensatory over a wide frequency range in monkeys and has similar response dynamics during passive rotation of the head on body as during passive rotation of the whole body in space.

  13. Variations in tumour oxygen tension (pO2) during accelerated radiotherapy of head and neck carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guichard, M.; Eschwege, F.; Luboinski, B.; Wibault, P.; Weeger, P.; Lusinchi, A.; Lartigau, E.

    1998-01-01

    The study was performed to assess the effect of accelerated radiotherapy on oxygenation of primary tumours and metastatic nodes in patients with advanced head and neck tumours. In 14 patients with head and neck tumour, oxygen tension (pO 2 ) was evaluated in normal tissues and tumours (primary tumour or metastatic neck node) before (0 Gy) and after 2 weeks (32 Gy) of accelerated radiotherapy (70 Gy in 3.5 weeks, with three daily fractions). Radiotherapy was combined with carbogen breathing in 5 patients. pO 2 was measured using a polarographic technique. For pooled normal tissues, median pO 2 was 38 mmHg before treatment and 46 mmHg after 2 weeks. For tumours, very low values ( 2 12 mmHg before treatment versus 26 mmHg after 2 weeks, P 2 was 44 mmHg at 2 weeks, compared with 13.5 mmHg before treatment (P=0.05). Very low pO 2 values, corresponding to tumour hypoxia, were found in the tumours (primary and metastatic neck nodes) prior to accelerated treatment. During the first 2 weeks of accelerated treatment, an increase in median pO 2 was found in nine of the 14 tumours, together with a decrease in the frequency of very low values. (Copyright (c) 1998 Elsevier Science B.V., Amsterdam. All rights reserved.)

  14. Variations in tumour oxygen tension (pO{sub 2}) during accelerated radiotherapy of head and neck carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guichard, M. [Laboratory of Radiobiology, Institut Gustave Roussy, 94800 Villejuif (France); Eschwege, F. [Department of Radiotherapy, Institut Gustave Roussy, 94800 Villejuif (France); Luboinski, B. [Department of Head and Neck Surgery, Institut Gustave Roussy, 94800 Villejuif (France); Wibault, P. [Department of Radiotherapy, Institut Gustave Roussy, 94800 Villejuif (France); Weeger, P. [Department of Head and Neck Surgery, Institut Gustave Roussy, 94800 Villejuif (France); Lusinchi, A.; Lartigau, E. [Department of Radiotherapy, Institut Gustave Roussy, 94800 Villejuif (France)

    1998-05-01

    The study was performed to assess the effect of accelerated radiotherapy on oxygenation of primary tumours and metastatic nodes in patients with advanced head and neck tumours. In 14 patients with head and neck tumour, oxygen tension (pO{sub 2}) was evaluated in normal tissues and tumours (primary tumour or metastatic neck node) before (0 Gy) and after 2 weeks (32 Gy) of accelerated radiotherapy (70 Gy in 3.5 weeks, with three daily fractions). Radiotherapy was combined with carbogen breathing in 5 patients. pO{sub 2} was measured using a polarographic technique. For pooled normal tissues, median pO{sub 2} was 38 mmHg before treatment and 46 mmHg after 2 weeks. For tumours, very low values (<2 mmHg) represented 20% of the recorded values before treatment and 10% after 2 weeks. The relative increase in tumour oxygenation was more pronounced for primary tumours (median pO{sub 2} 12 mmHg before treatment versus 26 mmHg after 2 weeks, P<0.05) than for metastatic nodes (respectively, 20 and 27 mmHg P=0.1). For the 5 patients who breathed carbogen during accelerated radiotherapy, the median pO{sub 2} was 44 mmHg at 2 weeks, compared with 13.5 mmHg before treatment (P=0.05). Very low pO{sub 2} values, corresponding to tumour hypoxia, were found in the tumours (primary and metastatic neck nodes) prior to accelerated treatment. During the first 2 weeks of accelerated treatment, an increase in median pO{sub 2} was found in nine of the 14 tumours, together with a decrease in the frequency of very low values. (Copyright (c) 1998 Elsevier Science B.V., Amsterdam. All rights reserved.)

  15. Walking speed, cadence and step length are selected to optimize the stability of head and pelvis accelerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latt, Mark D; Menz, Hylton B; Fung, Victor S; Lord, Stephen R

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the hypothesis that an individual's preferred or usual walking speed, step length and cadence optimize the stability of head and pelvic accelerations in vertical (V), anterior-posterior (AP) and medio-lateral (ML) planes when walking. Acceleration patterns of the head and pelvis were recorded in ten healthy young adults as they walked on a level surface in three separate experiments: (1) walking at five different speeds, ranging from very slow to very fast; (2) walking in time to a metronome set at five different cadences, ranging from 33 to 167% of subjects' usual cadence; and (3) walking at five different step lengths varying from very short to very long while keeping in time with a metronome set at cadences 67, 100 and 125% of usual cadence. The results indicated that acceleration patterns in the V and AP planes were most stable when subjects walked at their usual cadence and step length. In the ML plane, stability was suboptimal, but still adequate, with the usual cadence and step length. The findings suggest that healthy young people walk in a manner that maximizes V and AP stability while maintaining adequate, though suboptimal ML stability.

  16. Phase I-II Study of Short-course Accelerated Radiotherapy (SHARON) for Palliation in Head and Neck Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farina, Eleonora; Capuccini, Jenny; Macchia, Gabriella; Caravatta, Luciana; Nguyen, Nam P; Cammelli, Silvia; Farioli, Andrea; Zanirato Rambaldi, Giuseppe; Cilla, Savino; Wondemagegnhu, Tigeneh; Uddin, A F M Kamal; Sumon, Mostafà Aziz; Genovesi, Domenico; Buwenge, Milly; Cellini, Francesco; Valentini, Vincenzo; Deodato, Francesco; Morganti, Alessio G

    2018-04-01

    To determine the maximum tolerated dose (MTD) of a short-course accelerated radiotherapy and its feasibility for symptomatic palliation of advanced head and neck cancer or head and neck metastases from any primary site. A phase I trial in four dose-escalation steps was planned: total dose ranged between 14 and 20 Gy in a total of four fractions administered twice a day. The dose-limiting toxicity (DLT) was determined as grade 3 or more toxicity occurring during treatment. The MTD obtained was used to plan a phase II trial. A total of 48 patients were treated. In the phase I trial, the 20 Gy dose level was determined to be the MTD. In the phase II trial, the palliative response rate was 82.7%, with a median duration of palliation of 3 months. Short-course accelerated radiotherapy was well tolerated and effective for palliation. These findings may help design future prospective randomized studies. Copyright© 2018, International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. George J. Delinasios), All rights reserved.

  17. Hyperfractionated or accelerated radiotherapy in head and neck cancer: a meta-analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bourhis, J.; Overgaard, Jens; Audry, H.

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Several trials have studied the role of unconventional fractionated radiotherapy in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma, but the effect of such treatment on survival is not clear. The aim of this meta-analysis was to assess whether this type of radiotherapy could improve survival...

  18. Neck Flexion Induces Larger Deformation of the Brain Than Extension at a Rotational Acceleration, Closed Head Trauma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hans-Arne Hansson

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A closed head trauma induces incompletely characterized temporary movement and deformation of the brain, contributing to the primary traumatic brain injury. We used the pressure patterns recorded with light-operated miniature sensors in anaesthetized adult rabbits exposed to a sagittal plane rotational acceleration of the head, lasting 1 ms, as a measure of brain deformation. Two exposure levels were used and scaled to correspond to force levels reported to cause mild and moderate diffuse injury in an adult man, respectively. Flexion induced transient, strong, extended, and predominantly negative pressures while extension generated a short positive pressure peak followed by a minor negative peak. Low level flexion caused as strong, extended negative pressures as did high level extension. Time differences were demonstrated between the deformation of the cerebrum, brainstem, and cerebellum. Available X-ray and MRI techniques do not have as high time resolution as pressure recordings in demonstrating complex, sequential compression and stretching of the brain during a trauma. The exposure to flexion caused more protracted and extensive deformation of the brain than extension, in agreement with a published histopathological report. The severity and extent of the brain deformation generated at a head trauma thus related to the direction at equal force.

  19. A whole body vibration perception map and associated acceleration loads at the lower leg, hip and head.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sonza, Anelise; Völkel, Nina; Zaro, Milton A; Achaval, Matilde; Hennig, Ewald M

    2015-07-01

    Whole-body vibration (WBV) training has become popular in recent years. However, WBV may be harmful to the human body. The goal of this study was to determine the acceleration magnitudes at different body segments for different frequencies of WBV. Additionally, vibration sensation ratings by subjects served to create perception vibration magnitude and discomfort maps of the human body. In the first of two experiments, 65 young adults mean (± SD) age range of 23 (± 3.0) years, participated in WBV severity perception ratings, based on a Borg scale. Measurements were performed at 12 different frequencies, two intensities (3 and 5 mm amplitudes) of rotational mode WBV. On a separate day, a second experiment (n = 40) included vertical accelerometry of the head, hip and lower leg with the same WBV settings. The highest lower limb vibration magnitude perception based on the Borg scale was extremely intense for the frequencies between 21 and 25 Hz; somewhat hard for the trunk region (11-25 Hz) and fairly light for the head (13-25 Hz). The highest vertical accelerations were found at a frequency of 23 Hz at the tibia, 9 Hz at the hip and 13 Hz at the head. At 5 mm amplitude, 61.5% of the subjects reported discomfort in the foot region (21-25 Hz), 46.2% for the lower back (17, 19 and 21 Hz) and 23% for the abdominal region (9-13 Hz). The range of 3-7 Hz represents the safest frequency range with magnitudes less than 1 g(*)sec for all studied regions. Copyright © 2015 IPEM. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Accelerators

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2001-01-01

    The talk summarizes the principles of particle acceleration and addresses problems related to storage rings like LEP and LHC. Special emphasis will be given to orbit stability, long term stability of the particle motion, collective effects and synchrotron radiation.

  1. Minimized Bolus-Type Wireless Sensor Node with a Built-In Three-Axis Acceleration Meter for Monitoring a Cow's Rumen Conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nogami, Hirofumi; Arai, Shozo; Okada, Hironao; Zhan, Lan; Itoh, Toshihiro

    2017-03-27

    Monitoring rumen conditions in cows is important because a dysfunctional rumen system may cause death. Sub-acute ruminal acidosis (SARA) is a typical disease in cows, and is characterized by repeated periods of low ruminal pH. SARA is regarded as a trigger for rumen atony, rumenitis, and abomasal displacement, which may cause death. In previous studies, rumen conditions were evaluated by wireless sensor nodes with pH measurement capability. The primary advantage of the pH sensor is its ability to continuously measure ruminal pH. However, these sensor nodes have short lifetimes since they are limited by the finite volume of the internal liquid of the reference electrode. Mimicking rumen atony, we attempt to evaluate the rumen condition using wireless sensor nodes with three-axis accelerometers. The theoretical life span of such sensor nodes depends mainly on the transmission frequency of acceleration data and the size of the battery, and the proposed sensor nodes are 30.0 mm in diameter and 70.0 mm in length and have a life span of over 600 days. Using the sensor nodes, we compare the rumen motility of the force transducer measurement with the three-axis accelerometer data. As a result, we can detect discriminative movement of rumen atony.

  2. Split Course Hyperfractionated Accelerated Radio-Chemotherapy (SCHARC) for patients with advanced head and neck cancer: Influence of protocol deviations and hemoglobin on overall survival, a retrospective analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Stadler, Peter; Putnik, Kurt; Kreimeyer, Thore; Sprague, Lisa D; Koelbl, Oliver; Schäfer, Christof

    2006-01-01

    Abstract Background The advantage of hyperfractionated accelerated radiation therapy for advanced head and neck cancer has been reported. Furthermore, randomized trials and meta-analyses have confirmed the survival benefit of additional chemotherapy to radiotherapy. We retrospectively analyzed the efficiency and toxicity of the Regensburg standard therapy protocol "SCHARC" and the overall survival of our patients. Methods From 1997 to 2004, 64 patients suffering from advanced head and neck ca...

  3. Smart (simultaneous modulated accelerated radiation therapy) boost: a new accelerated fractionation schedule for the treatment of head and neck cancer with intensity modulated radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Butler, E. Brian; Teh, Bin S.; Grant, Walter H.; Uhl, Barry M.; Kuppersmith, Ronald B.; Chiu, J. Kam; Donovan, Donald T.; Woo, Shiao Y.

    1999-01-01

    Purpose: To report the initial experience in the definitive treatment of head and neck carcinomas using SMART (Simultaneous Modulated Accelerated Radiation Therapy) boost technique. Radiation was delivered via IMRT (Intensity Modulated Radiotherapy). The following parameters were evaluated: acute toxicity, initial tumor response, clinical feasibility, dosimetry and cost. Methods and Materials: Between January 1996 and December 1997, 20 patients with primary head and neck carcinomas were treated with SMART boost technique. The treatment fields encompassed two simultaneous targets. The primary target included palpable and visible disease sites. The secondary target included regions at risk for microscopic disease. Daily fractions of 2.4 Gy and 2 Gy were prescribed and delivered to the primary and secondary targets to a total dose of 60 Gy and 50 Gy, respectively. Lower neck nodes were treated with a single conventional anterior portal. This fractionation schedule was completed in 5 weeks with 5 daily fractions weekly. Toxicity was evaluated by RTOG acute toxicity grading criteria, evidence of infection at immobilization screw sites, subjective salivary function, weight loss, and the need for treatment split. Mean follow-up was 15.2 months. Initial tumor response was assessed by clinical and radiographical examinations. Clinical feasibility was evaluated by the criteria: time to treat patient, immobilization, and treatment planning and QA time. In dosimetry, we evaluated the mean doses of both targets and normal tissues and percent targets' volume below goal. To evaluate cost, Medicare allowable charge for SMART boost was compared to those of conventional fractionated and accelerated radiotherapy. Results: Acute toxicity: None of the patients had a screw site infection and all patients healed well after completion of radiotherapy. Sixteen of 20 patients (80%) completed the treatment within 40 days without any split. Sixteen patients (80%) had RTOG Grade 3 mucositis

  4. Increasing Student’s Character Values by Utilizing Combination of Team Accelerated Instruction (TAI and Numbered Heads Together (NHT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ita Nuryana

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available This research aims to obtain empirical evidence of the effectiveness of combining Team Accelerated Instruction (TAI and Numbered Heads Together (NHT learning strategies in teaching Investments to improve students’ discipline, creativity, diligence, and participation. Population was students who enrolled in Intermediate Financial Accounting 2 course in Economics Education Department; Economics Faculty of Universitas Negeri Semarang The sample of the research consists of 48 students. Data were collected by using observations, interviews, and documentation. The stages of the research include planning, implementation, monitoring and evaluation, analysis, and reflection. Findings show that the combination of TAI and NHT does not improve students’ learning outcomes even thought it manages to increase students’ pre-test score in learning Investments as well as their participation in classroom.

  5. Accounting for the fringe magnetic field from the bending magnet in a Monte Carlo accelerator treatment head simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Shea, Tuathan P; Foley, Mark J; Faddegon, Bruce A

    2011-06-01

    Monte Carlo (MC) simulation can be used for accurate electron beam treatment planning and modeling. Measurement of large electron fields, with the applicator removed and secondary collimator wide open, has been shown to provide accurate simulation parameters, including asymmetry in the measured dose, for the full range of clinical field sizes and patient positions. Recently, disassembly of the treatment head of a linear accelerator has been used to refine the simulation of the electron beam, setting tightly measured constraints on source and geometry parameters used in simulation. The simulation did not explicitly include the known deflection of the electron beam by a fringe magnetic field from the bending magnet, which extended into the treatment head. Instead, the secondary scattering foil and monitor chamber were unrealistically laterally offset to account for the beam deflection. This work is focused on accounting for this fringe magnetic field in treatment head simulation. The magnetic field below the exit window of a Siemens Oncor linear accelerator was measured with a Tesla-meter from 0 to 12 cm from the exit window and 1-3 cm off-axis. Treatment head simulation was performed with the EGSnrc/BEAMnrc code, modified to incorporate the effect of the magnetic field on charged particle transport. Simulations were used to analyze the sensitivity of dose profiles to various sources of asymmetry in the treatment head. This included the lateral spot offset and beam angle at the exit window, the fringe magnetic field and independent lateral offsets of the secondary scattering foil and electron monitor chamber. Simulation parameters were selected within the limits imposed by measurement uncertainties. Calculated dose distributions were then compared with those measured in water. The magnetic field was a maximum at the exit window, increasing from 0.006 T at 6 MeV to 0.020 T at 21 MeV and dropping to approximately 5% of the maximum at the secondary scattering foil. It

  6. Development of a Compact Rectenna for Wireless Powering of a Head-Mountable Deep Brain Stimulation Device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosain, M D Kamal; Kouzani, Abbas Z; Tye, Susannah J; Abulseoud, Osama A; Amiet, Andrew; Galehdar, Amir; Kaynak, Akif; Berk, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Design of a rectangular spiral planar inverted-F antenna (PIFA) at 915 MHz for wireless power transmission applications is proposed. The antenna and rectifying circuitry form a rectenna, which can produce dc power from a distant radio frequency energy transmitter. The generated dc power is used to operate a low-power deep brain stimulation pulse generator. The proposed antenna has the dimensions of 10 mm [Formula: see text]12.5 mm [Formula: see text]1.5 mm and resonance frequency of 915 MHz with a measured bandwidth of 15 MHz at return loss of [Formula: see text]. A dielectric substrate of FR-4 of [Formula: see text] and [Formula: see text] with thickness of 1.5 mm is used for both antenna and rectifier circuit simulation and fabrication because of its availability and low cost. An L-section impedance matching circuit is used between the PIFA and voltage doubler rectifier. The impedance matching circuit also works as a low-pass filter for elimination of higher order harmonics. Maximum dc voltage at the rectenna output is 7.5 V in free space and this rectenna can drive a deep brain stimulation pulse generator at a distance of 30 cm from a radio frequency energy transmitter, which transmits power of 26.77 dBm.

  7. IAEA-HypoX. A randomized multicenter study of the hypoxic radiosensitizer nimorazole concomitant with accelerated radiotherapy in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Metwally, Mohamed Ahmed Hassan; Ali, Rubina; Kuddu, Maire

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE: To test the hypothesis that radiotherapy (RT) of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) can be improved by hypoxic modification using nimorazole (NIM) in association with accelerated fractionation. MATERIALS AND METHODS: The protocol was activated in March 2012 as an international...

  8. A framework for experimental determination of localised vertical pedestrian forces on full-scale structures using wireless attitude and heading reference systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bocian, M.; Brownjohn, J. M. W.; Racic, V.; Hester, D.; Quattrone, A.; Monnickendam, R.

    2016-08-01

    A major weakness among loading models for pedestrians walking on flexible structures proposed in recent years is the various uncorroborated assumptions made in their development. This applies to spatio-temporal characteristics of pedestrian loading and the nature of multi-object interactions. To alleviate this problem, a framework for the determination of localised pedestrian forces on full-scale structures is presented using a wireless attitude and heading reference systems (AHRS). An AHRS comprises a triad of tri-axial accelerometers, gyroscopes and magnetometers managed by a dedicated data processing unit, allowing motion in three-dimensional space to be reconstructed. A pedestrian loading model based on a single point inertial measurement from an AHRS is derived and shown to perform well against benchmark data collected on an instrumented treadmill. Unlike other models, the current model does not take any predefined form nor does it require any extrapolations as to the timing and amplitude of pedestrian loading. In order to assess correctly the influence of the moving pedestrian on behaviour of a structure, an algorithm for tracking the point of application of pedestrian force is developed based on data from a single AHRS attached to a foot. A set of controlled walking tests with a single pedestrian is conducted on a real footbridge for validation purposes. A remarkably good match between the measured and simulated bridge response is found, indeed confirming applicability of the proposed framework.

  9. Monitoring Activity for Recognition of Illness in Experimentally Infected Weaned Piglets Using Received Signal Strength Indication ZigBee-based Wireless Acceleration Sensor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sonia Tabasum Ahmed

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In this experiment, we proposed and implemented a disease forecasting system using a received signal strength indication ZigBee-based wireless network with a 3-axis acceleration sensor to detect illness at an early stage by monitoring movement of experimentally infected weaned piglets. Twenty seven piglets were divided into control, Salmonella enteritidis (SE infection, and Escherichia coli (EC infection group, and their movements were monitored for five days using wireless sensor nodes on their backs. Data generated showed the 3-axis movement of piglets (X-axis: left and right direction, Y-axis: anteroposterior direction, and Z-axis: up and down direction at five different time periods. Piglets in both infected groups had lower weight gain and feed intake, as well as higher feed conversion ratios than the control group (p<0.05. Infection with SE and EC resulted in reduced body temperature of the piglets at day 2, 4, and 5 (p<0.05. The early morning X-axis movement did not differ between groups; however, the Y-axis movement was higher in the EC group (day 1 and 2, and the Z-axis movement was higher in the EC (day 1 and SE group (day 4 during different experimental periods (p<0.05. The morning X and Y-axis movement did not differ between treatment groups. However, the Z-axis movement was higher in both infected groups at day 1 and lower at day 4 compared to the control (p<0.05. The midday X-axis movement was significantly lower in both infected groups (day 4 and 5 compared to the control (p<0.05, whereas the Y-axis movement did not differ. The Z-axis movement was highest in the SE group at day 1 and 2 and lower at day 4 and 5 (p<0.05. Evening X-axis movement was highest in the control group throughout the experimental period. During day 1 and 2, the Z-axis movement was higher in both of the infected groups; whereas it was lower in the SE group during day 3 and 4 (p<0.05. During day 1 and 2, the night X-axis movement was lower and the Z

  10. Prospective randomized trial to compare accelerated (six fractions a week radiotherapy against concurrent chemoradiotherapy (using conventional fractionation in locally advanced head and neck cancers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manoj Gupta

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Concurrent chemoradiation (CCRT is currently considered to be the standard of care in locally advanced head and neck cancer. The optimum radiotherapy schedule for best local control and acceptable toxicity is not yet clear. We aimed at shortening of treatment time by using accelerated radiation, thereby comparing the disease response, loco-regional tumor control and tolerability of accelerated radiation (six fractions per week against CCRT in locally advanced head and neck cancer. Materials and Methods: We conducted the prospective randomized study for a period of 2 years from June 2011 to May 2013 in 133 untreated patients of histologically confirmed squamous cell carcinoma of head and neck. Study group (66 patients received accelerated radiotherapy with 6 fractions per week (66Gy/33#/5½ weeks. Control group (67 patients received CCRT with 5 fractions per week radiation (66 Gy/33#/6½ weeks along with intravenous cisplatin 30 mg/m 2 weekly. Tumor control, survival, acute and late toxicities were assessed. Results: Median overall treatment time was 38 days and 45 days in the accelerated radiotherapy and concurrent chemoradiation arm, respectively. At a median follow up of 12 months, 41 patients (62.1% in the accelerated radiotherapy arm and 47 patients (70.1% in the CCRT arm were disease free (P = 0.402. Local disease control was comparable in both the arms. Acute toxicities were significantly higher in the CCRT arm as compared with accelerated radiotherapy arm. There was no difference in late toxicities between the two arms. Conclusion: We can achieve, same or near to the same local control, with lower toxicities with accelerated six fractions per week radiation compared with CCRT especially for Indian population.

  11. Expression of S100A6 in Rat Hippocampus after Traumatic Brain Injury Due to Lateral Head Acceleration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bo Fang

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available In a rat model of traumatic brain injury (TBI, we investigated changes in cognitive function and S100A6 expression in the hippocampus. TBI-associated changes in this protein have not previously been reported. Rat S100A6 was studied via immunohistochemical staining, Western blot, and reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR after either lateral head acceleration or sham. Reduced levels of S100A6 protein and mRNA were observed 1 h after TBI, followed by gradual increases over 6, 12, 24, and 72 h, and then a return to sham level at 14 day. Morris water maze (MWM test was used to evaluate animal spatial cognition. TBI- and sham-rats showed an apparent learning curve, expressed as escape latency. Although TBI-rats displayed a relatively poorer cognitive ability than sham-rats, the disparity was not significant early post-injury. Marked cognitive deficits in TBI-rats were observed at 72 h post-injury compared with sham animals. TBI-rats showed decreased times in platform crossing in the daily MWM test; the performance at 72 h post-injury was the worst. In conclusion, a reduction in S100A6 may be one of the early events that lead to secondary cognitive decline after TBI, and its subsequent elevation is tightly linked with cognitive improvement. S100A6 may play important roles in neuronal degeneration and regeneration in TBI.

  12. Development of an ultrasmall C-band linear accelerator guide for a four-dimensional image-guided radiotherapy system with a gimbaled x-ray head.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamino, Yuichiro; Miura, Sadao; Kokubo, Masaki; Yamashita, Ichiro; Hirai, Etsuro; Hiraoka, Masahiro; Ishikawa, Junzo

    2007-05-01

    We are developing a four-dimensional image-guided radiotherapy system with a gimbaled x-ray head. It is capable of pursuing irradiation and delivering irradiation precisely with the help of an agile moving x-ray head on the gimbals. Requirements for the accelerator guide were established, system design was developed, and detailed design was conducted. An accelerator guide was manufactured and basic beam performance and leakage radiation from the accelerator guide were evaluated at a low pulse repetition rate. The accelerator guide including the electron gun is 38 cm long and weighs about 10 kg. The length of the accelerating structure is 24.4 cm. The accelerating structure is a standing wave type and is composed of the axial-coupled injector section and the side-coupled acceleration cavity section. The injector section is composed of one prebuncher cavity, one buncher cavity, one side-coupled half cavity, and two axial coupling cavities. The acceleration cavity section is composed of eight side-coupled nose reentrant cavities and eight coupling cavities. The electron gun is a diode-type gun with a cerium hexaboride (CeB6) direct heating cathode. The accelerator guide can be operated without any magnetic focusing device. Output beam current was 75 mA with a transmission efficiency of 58%, and the average energy was 5.24 MeV. Beam energy was distributed from 4.95 to 5.6 MeV. The beam profile, measured 88 mm from the beam output hole on the axis of the accelerator guide, was 0.7 mm X 0.9 mm full width at half maximum (FWHM) width. The beam loading line was 5.925 (MeV)-Ib (mA) X 0.00808 (MeV/mA), where Ib is output beam current. The maximum radiation leakage of the accelerator guide at 100 cm from the axis of the accelerator guide was calculated as 0.33 cGy/min at the rated x-ray output of 500 cGy/min from the measured value. This leakage requires no radiation shielding for the accelerator guide itself per IEC 60601-2-1.

  13. Wireless Access

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    First page Back Continue Last page Overview Graphics. Wireless Access. Wireless connect to the Base station. Easy and Convenient access. Costlier as compared to the wired technology. Reliability challenges. We see it as a complementary technology to the DSL.

  14. Accelerated radiotherapy with delayed concomitant boost in locally advanced squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    MacKenzie, Robert; Balogh, Judith; Choo, Richard; Franssen, Edmee

    1999-01-01

    Purpose: To determine the toxicity, maximum tolerated dose (MTD), and clinical effectiveness of a 5-week course of accelerated radiotherapy with delayed concomitant boost in locally advanced squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck (SCCHN). Methods and Materials: Thirty-five patients with untreated T3T4NM0 or TN2 (> 3 cm) N3M0 SCC of the oral cavity, oropharynx, hypopharynx, or larynx were entered in the study between January 1994 and October 1997. The initial target volume was treated with conventional daily fractions. A small field boost covering gross disease was added as a second daily fraction during the last 2 weeks of the 5-week schedule, using a minimum interfraction interval of 6 h. The study was initiated using 180-cGy fractions to deliver a total dose of 63 Gy over 33-35 days. A classical dose escalation strategy was planned to increase the delivered dose in steps using minimum cohorts of three patients, up to a maximum of 70 Gy in 200-cGy fractions. Results: In the dose escalation study, 4 patients were entered at level 1 (63 Gy), 9 at level 2 (65 Gy), and 8 at level 3 (67 Gy). One patient was withdrawn at level 2 because of unstable angina, and 1 at level 3 because of uncontrolled diabetes. One patient at level 3 failed to complete treatment because of radiation toxicity. RTOG Grade 3 mucositis, dermatitis, or pharyngitis was documented in 1 (25%), 5 (63%), and 7 (100%) evaluable patients at levels 1, 2, and 3, respectively. Grade 4 reactions were documented in 1 patient at each level. One patient at level 3 died 5 weeks post-treatment of unknown causes. Two additional patients at level 3 died of progressive disease and RT toxicity. Sixty-five Gy (level 2) was chosen as the MTD. In the MTD study, 14 additional patients were entered at level 2, providing a total of 22 evaluable patients with a median follow-up of 21 months (range 12-41 months). Grade 3 mucositis, dermatitis, or pharyngitis were documented in 11 (50%), 8 (36%), and 6 (27%) patients

  15. Wireless virtualization

    CERN Document Server

    Wen, Heming; Le-Ngoc, Tho

    2013-01-01

    This SpringerBriefs is an overview of the emerging field of wireless access and mobile network virtualization. It provides a clear and relevant picture of the current virtualization trends in wireless technologies by summarizing and comparing different architectures, techniques and technologies applicable to a future virtualized wireless network infrastructure. The readers are exposed to a short walkthrough of the future Internet initiative and network virtualization technologies in order to understand the potential role of wireless virtualization in the broader context of next-generation ubiq

  16. A meta-analysis of hyperfractionated and accelerated radiotherapy and combined chemotherapy and radiotherapy regimens in unresected locally advanced squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Budach V

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Former meta-analyses have shown a survival benefit for the addition of chemotherapy (CHX to radiotherapy (RT and to some extent also for the use of hyperfractionated radiation therapy (HFRT and accelerated radiation therapy (AFRT in locally advanced squamous cell carcinoma (SCC of the head and neck. However, the publication of new studies and the fact that many older studies that were included in these former meta-analyses used obsolete radiation doses, CHX schedules or study designs prompted us to carry out a new analysis using strict inclusion criteria. Methods Randomised trials testing curatively intended RT (≥60 Gy in >4 weeks/>50 Gy in Results Thirty-two trials with a total of 10 225 patients were included into the meta-analysis. An overall survival benefit of 12.0 months was observed for the addition of simultaneous CHX to either CFRT or HFRT/AFRT (p Conclusion RT combined with simultaneous 5-FU, cisplatin, carboplatin, and mitomycin C as single drug or combinations of 5-FU with one of the other drugs results in a large survival advantage irrespective the employed radiation schedule. If radiation therapy is used as single modality, hyperfractionation leads to a significant improvement of overall survival. Accelerated radiation therapy alone, especially when given as split course radiation schedule or extremely accelerated treatments with decreased total dose, does not increase overall survival.

  17. Applying DTI white matter orientations to finite element head models to examine diffuse TBI under high rotational accelerations.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Colgan, Niall C

    2010-12-01

    The in-vivo mechanical response of neural tissue during impact loading of the head is simulated using geometrically accurate finite element (FE) head models. However, current FE models do not account for the anisotropic elastic material behaviour of brain tissue. In soft biological tissue, there is a correlation between internal microscopic structure and macroscopic mechanical properties. Therefore, constitutive equations are important for the numerical analysis of the soft biological tissues. By exploiting diffusion tensor techniques the anisotropic orientation of neural tissue is incorporated into a non-linear viscoelastic material model for brain tissue and implemented in an explicit FE analysis. The viscoelastic material parameters are derived from published data and the viscoelastic model is used to describe the mechanical response of brain tissue. The model is formulated in terms of a large strain viscoelastic framework and considers non-linear viscous deformations in combination with non-linear elastic behaviour. The constitutive model was applied in the University College Dublin brain trauma model (UCDBTM) (i.e. three-dimensional finite element head model) to predict the mechanical response of the intra-cranial contents due to rotational injury.

  18. Wireless Internet

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    el Zarki, M.; Heijenk, Geert; Lee, Kenneth S.; Bidgoli, H.

    This chapter addresses the topic of wireless Internet, the extension of the wireline Internet architecture to the wireless domain. As such the chapter introduces the reader to the dominant characteristics of the Internet, from its structure to the protocols that control the forwarding of data and

  19. Quality assurance audit in an Australasian phase III trial of accelerated radiotherapy for head and neck cancer (TROG 91.01)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hamilton, C.; Denham, J.; Steigler, A. [Newcastle Mater Misericordiae Hospital, NSW (Australia). Department of Radiation Oncology; Poulsen, M. [Queensland Radium Institute Mater Centre, South Brisbane, QLD (Australia); Walker, Q. [Royal Brisbane Hospital, Herston, QLD (Australia). Queensland Radium Institute; Krawitz, H. [Auckland Hospital, Auckland, (New Zealand); Hindley, A. [Royal Preston Hospital, Fullwood, Preston, (United Kingdom). Lancashire and Lakeland Radiotherapy Unit; Spry, N. [Geelong Hospital, Geelong, VIC (Australia). Department of Radiation Oncology; Peters, L. [Peter MacCallum Institute, Melbourne, VIC (Australia); Lamb, D. [Wellington Hospital, Wellington, (New Zealand). Department of Radiation Oncology

    1999-05-01

    The Trans-Tasman Radiation Oncology Group (TROG) initiated a randomized trial, testing accelerated (twice daily) radiotherapy against conventional radiotherapy for stage II and stage IV squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck in 1991. In 1996, the Trial Management Committee arranged for a technical audit of 76 cases from 11 institutions, conducted by investigators from interstate institutions. A 10% unacceptable protocol violation rate was detected, which compares favourably with initial Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) experience in the late 1970s. Infrastructural deficits with poor quality of documentation, incomplete retrieval of films and document return have been demonstrated in some cases. The Trans-Tasman Radiation Oncology Group is actively pursuing procedural and resourcing issues in order to redress this and is actively expanding its Quality Assurance (QA) Programme with an intercentre dosimetry study. Ultimately, comprehensive clinical and technical QA site visits are planned. Copyright (1999) Blackwell Science Pty Ltd 15 refs., 4 tabs.

  20. Quality assurance audit in an Australasian phase III trial of accelerated radiotherapy for head and neck cancer (TROG 91.01)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hamilton, C.; Denham, J.; Steigler, A.; Walker, Q.; Hindley, A.; Lamb, D.

    1999-01-01

    The Trans-Tasman Radiation Oncology Group (TROG) initiated a randomized trial, testing accelerated (twice daily) radiotherapy against conventional radiotherapy for stage II and stage IV squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck in 1991. In 1996, the Trial Management Committee arranged for a technical audit of 76 cases from 11 institutions, conducted by investigators from interstate institutions. A 10% unacceptable protocol violation rate was detected, which compares favourably with initial Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) experience in the late 1970s. Infrastructural deficits with poor quality of documentation, incomplete retrieval of films and document return have been demonstrated in some cases. The Trans-Tasman Radiation Oncology Group is actively pursuing procedural and resourcing issues in order to redress this and is actively expanding its Quality Assurance (QA) Programme with an intercentre dosimetry study. Ultimately, comprehensive clinical and technical QA site visits are planned. Copyright (1999) Blackwell Science Pty Ltd

  1. Concurrent hyperfractionated accelerated radiotherapy with 5-FU and once weekly cisplatin in locally advanced head and neck cancer. The 10-year results of a prospective phase II trial

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Budach, V.; Boehmer, D.; Badakhshi, H.; Jahn, U.; Stromberger, C.; Becker, E.T.; Wernecke, K.D.

    2014-01-01

    In this study, the acute toxicity and long-term outcome of a hyperfractionated accelerated chemoradiation regimen with cisplatin/5-fluorouracil (5-FU) in patients with locally advanced squamous cell carcinomas of head and neck were evaluated. From 2000-2002, 38 patients with stage III (5.3 %) and stage IV (94.7 %) head and neck cancer were enrolled in a phase II study. Patients received hyperfractionated-accelerated radiotherapy with 72 Gy in 15 fractions of 2 Gy followed by 1.4 Gy twice daily with concurrent, continuous infusion 5-FU of 600 mg/m 2 on days 1-5 and 6 cycles of weekly cisplatin (30 mg/m 2 ). Acute toxicities (CTCAEv2.0), locoregional control (LRC), metastases-free (MFS), and overall survival (OS) were analyzed and exploratively compared with the ARO 95-06 trial. Median follow-up was 11.4 years (95 % CI 8.6-14.2) and mean dose 71.6 Gy. Of the patients, 82 % had 6 (n = 15) or 5 (n = 16) cycles of cisplatin, 5 and 2 patients received 4 and 3 cycles, respectively. Grade 3 anemia, leukopenia, and thrombocytopenia were observed in 15.8, 15.8, and 2.6 %, respectively. Grade 3 mucositis in 50 %, grade 3 and 4 dysphagia in 55 and 13 %. The 2-, 5-, and 10-year LRC was 65, 53.6, and 48.2 %, the MFS was 77.5, 66.7, and 57.2 % and the OS 59.6, 29.2, and 15 %, respectively. Chemoradiation with 5-FU and cisplatin seems feasible and superior in terms of LRC and OS to the ARO 95-06C-HART arm at 2 years. However, this did not persist at the 5- and 10-year follow-ups. (orig.) [de

  2. Overhead traveling crane vibration research using experimental wireless measuring system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomasz HANISZEWSKI

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper contains an operations and constructions description of theexperimental wireless measuring system for measuring accelerations in bridge cranes,based on PHIDGET 1056 sensors. Developed experimental research and measuringmethodology allows the use of the proposed wireless system on other cranesconstructions. The paper also shows examples of the results of vibration measurementsand FFT spectra, obtained on the basis of accelerations measurements.

  3. Validation of the total dysphagia risk score (TDRS) in head and neck cancer patients in a conventional and a partially accelerated radiotherapy scheme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nevens, Daan; Deschuymer, Sarah; Langendijk, Johannes A; Daisne, Jean-François; Duprez, Fréderic; De Neve, Wilfried; Nuyts, Sandra

    2016-02-01

    A risk model, the total dysphagia risk score (TDRS), was developed to predict which patients are most at risk to develop grade ⩾2 dysphagia at 6 months following radiotherapy (RT) for head and neck cancer. The purpose of this study was to validate this model at 6 months and to investigate the power at earlier and later time-points. A second aim was to see if this model can be used in a partially accelerated RT regimen. 164 patients from 3 different centres treated with RT between 2008 and 2014 were included in the current study. Both physician-scored dysphagia and QoL data were prospectively obtained. The TDRS of all patients was correlated with the physician-scored dysphagia and the QoL data. To validate this prediction model, we tested the validity in terms of calibration and discrimination. Partial acceleration had no influence on the TDRS. Regarding physician-scored dysphagia, there was a significant correlation with dysphagia grade ⩾2 at 1, 3, 6 and 9 months. The area-under-the-curve at 1 month was 0.85; at 3 months 0.80; at 6 months 0.85; at 9 months 0.86 and 0.79 at 12 months. Regarding QoL, TDRS correlates with PEG-tube usage at 6 and 12 months. We found significant correlations between TDRS and dysphagia grade ⩾2 and PEG-tube usage. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Topology Optimisation of Wireless Sensor Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thike Aye Min

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Wireless sensor networks are widely used in a variety of fields including industrial environments. In case of a clustered network the location of cluster head affects the reliability of the network operation. Finding of the optimum location of the cluster head, therefore, is critical for the design of a network. This paper discusses the optimisation approach, based on the brute force algorithm, in the context of topology optimisation of a cluster structure centralised wireless sensor network. Two examples are given to verify the approach that demonstrate the implementation of the brute force algorithm to find an optimum location of the cluster head.

  5. A phase I study of dose-escalated chemoradiation with accelerated intensity modulated radiotherapy in locally advanced head and neck cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guerrero Urbano, Teresa; Clark, Catharine H.; Hansen, Vibeke N.; Adams, Elizabeth J.; A'Hern, Roger; Miles, Elizabeth A.; McNair, Helen; Bidmead, Margaret; Warrington, Alan P.; Dearnaley, David P.; Harrington, Kevin J.; Nutting, Christopher M.

    2007-01-01

    Background and purpose: Intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) allows the delivery of higher and more homogeneous radiation dose to head and neck tumours. This study aims to determine the safety of dose-escalated chemo-IMRT for larynx preservation in locally advanced head and neck cancer. Methods: Patients with T2-4, N1-3, M0 squamous cell carcinoma of the larynx or hypopharynx were treated with a simultaneous-boost IMRT. Two radiation dose levels (DL) were tested: In DL 1, 63 Gy/28F was delivered to primary tumour and involved nodes and 51.8 Gy/28F to elective nodes. In DL 2, the doses were 67.2 Gy/28F and 56 Gy/28F, respectively, representing a 9% dose escalation for the primary. All patients received 2 cycles of neoadjuvant cisplatin and 5-fluorouracil, and concomitant cisplatin. Acute (NCICTCv.2.0) and late toxicity (RTOG and modified LENTSOM) were collected. Results: Thirty patients were entered, 15 in each dose level. All patients completed the treatment schedule. In DL 1, the incidences of acute G3 toxicities were 27% (pain), 20% (radiation dermatitis), 0% (xerostomia) and 67% required gastrostomy tubes. For DL 2 the corresponding incidences were 40%, 20%, 7%, and 87%. G3 dysphagia and pain persisted longer in DL 2. With regard to mucositis, a prolonged healing time for DL 2 was found, with prevalence of G2 of 58% in week 10. No acute grade 4 toxicity was observed. At 6 months, 1 patient in DL 2 had G3 late toxicity (dysphagia). No dose limiting toxicity was found. Complete response rates were 80% in DL 1, and 87% in DL 2. Conclusion: Moderately accelerated chemo-IMRT is safe and feasible with good compliance and acceptable acute toxicity. Dose escalation was possible without a significant difference in acute toxicity. Longer follow-up is required to determine the incidence of late radiation toxicities, and tumour control rates

  6. Feasibility Study of Moderately Accelerated Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy Plus Concurrent Weekly Cisplatin After Induction Chemotherapy in Locally Advanced Head-and Neck Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morganti, Alessio G.; Mignogna, Samantha; Deodato, Francesco; Massaccesi, Mariangela; Cilla, Savino; Calista, Franco; Serafini, Giovanni; Digesu, Cinzia; Macchia, Gabriella; Picardi, Vincenzo; Caravatta, Luciana; Di Lullo, Liberato; Giglio, Gianfranco; Sallustio, Giuseppina; Piermattei, Angelo

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the feasibility and efficacy of moderately accelerated intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) along with weekly cisplatin, after induction chemotherapy, in patients with locally advanced unresectable head and neck cancer (HNC). Methods and Materials: Patients with Stage III or IV locally advanced HNC, without progressive disease after three courses of induction chemotherapy, received concurrent chemo-IMRT (weekly cisplatin 30 mg/m 2 plus simultaneous integrated boost IMRT). A total of 67.5 Gy in 30 fractions were delivered to primary tumor and involved nodes, 60 Gy in 30 fractions to high-risk nodal areas, and 55.5 Gy in 30 fractions to low-risk nodal areas. Results: In all, 36 patients (median age, 56 years) with International Union Against Cancer (UICC) Stage III (n = 5) and IV (n = 31) were included. Of the 36 patients, 17 had received CF (cisplatin and 5-fluorouracil (CF) and 19 had received docetaxel cisplatin and 5-fluorouracil (DCF). During concurrent chemoradiation, 11 of 36 patients (30.5%) experienced Grade III mucositis (CF, 47%; DCF, 15%; p < 0.04). Grade III pharyngeal-esophageal toxicity was observed in 5 of 19 patients (26.3%; CF, 0.0%; DCF, 26.3%; p = 0.02). Two patients died of complications (5.5%). After chemoradiation, the complete response rate was 63.8%. Two-year local control was 88.7%. Two-year progression free survival and overall survival were 74.5% and 60.9%, respectively. Conclusions: In our experience, a moderately accelerated chemo-IMRT was feasible after induction chemotherapy. However, a noteworthy early death rate of 5.5% was observed. Intensive supportive care strategies should be defined to better manage radiation-induced toxic effects. Longer follow-up is required to determine the incidence of late radiation toxicities and tumor control rates.

  7. Split Course Hyperfractionated Accelerated Radio-Chemotherapy (SCHARC for patients with advanced head and neck cancer: Influence of protocol deviations and hemoglobin on overall survival, a retrospective analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sprague Lisa D

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The advantage of hyperfractionated accelerated radiation therapy for advanced head and neck cancer has been reported. Furthermore, randomized trials and meta-analyses have confirmed the survival benefit of additional chemotherapy to radiotherapy. We retrospectively analyzed the efficiency and toxicity of the Regensburg standard therapy protocol "SCHARC" and the overall survival of our patients. Methods From 1997 to 2004, 64 patients suffering from advanced head and neck cancer (88 % stage IV, 12 % stage III were assigned to receive the SCHARC protocol. Around half of the patients were diagnosed with oro-hypopharynx carcinoma (52 %, one third with tongue and floor of mouth tumors (29 % and one fifth (19 % suffered from H & N cancer at other sites. The schedule consisted of one therapy block with 30 Gy in 20 fractions over a two week period with concomitant chemotherapy (d 1–5: 20 mg/m2/d DDP + 750–1000 mg/m2/d 5FU (cont. infusion. This therapy block was repeated after a fortnight break up to a cumulative dose of 60 Gy and followed by a boost up to 70 Gy (69–70.5 Gy. All patients assigned to this scheme were included in the survival evaluation. Results Forty patients (63 % received both radiation and chemotherapy according to the protocol. The mean follow up was 2.3 years (829 d and the median follow up was 1.9 years (678 d, respectively. The analysis of survival revealed an estimated 3 year overall survival rate of 57 %. No patient died of complications, 52 patients (80 % had acute grade 2–3 mucositis, and 33 patients (58 % suffered from acute grade 3 skin toxicity. Leucopenia was no major problem (mean nadir 3.4 g/nl, no patient 10.5 g/dl and for patients who completed the protocol. Conclusion The SCHARC protocol was effective in patients diagnosed with advanced head and neck cancer. It led to long-term disease control and survival in about 50 % of the patients with significant but acceptable toxicity. Most patients

  8. Split Course Hyperfractionated Accelerated Radio-Chemotherapy (SCHARC) for patients with advanced head and neck cancer: Influence of protocol deviations and hemoglobin on overall survival, a retrospective analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stadler, Peter; Putnik, Kurt; Kreimeyer, Thore; Sprague, Lisa D; Koelbl, Oliver; Schäfer, Christof

    2006-01-01

    The advantage of hyperfractionated accelerated radiation therapy for advanced head and neck cancer has been reported. Furthermore, randomized trials and meta-analyses have confirmed the survival benefit of additional chemotherapy to radiotherapy. We retrospectively analyzed the efficiency and toxicity of the Regensburg standard therapy protocol 'SCHARC' and the overall survival of our patients. From 1997 to 2004, 64 patients suffering from advanced head and neck cancer (88 % stage IV, 12 % stage III) were assigned to receive the SCHARC protocol. Around half of the patients were diagnosed with oro-hypopharynx carcinoma (52 %), one third with tongue and floor of mouth tumors (29 %) and one fifth (19 %) suffered from H & N cancer at other sites. The schedule consisted of one therapy block with 30 Gy in 20 fractions over a two week period with concomitant chemotherapy (d 1–5: 20 mg/m 2 /d DDP + 750–1000 mg/m 2 /d 5FU (cont. infusion). This therapy block was repeated after a fortnight break up to a cumulative dose of 60 Gy and followed by a boost up to 70 Gy (69–70.5 Gy). All patients assigned to this scheme were included in the survival evaluation. Forty patients (63 %) received both radiation and chemotherapy according to the protocol. The mean follow up was 2.3 years (829 d) and the median follow up was 1.9 years (678 d), respectively. The analysis of survival revealed an estimated 3 year overall survival rate of 57 %. No patient died of complications, 52 patients (80 %) had acute grade 2–3 mucositis, and 33 patients (58 %) suffered from acute grade 3 skin toxicity. Leucopenia was no major problem (mean nadir 3.4 g/nl, no patient < 1.0 g/nl) and the mean hemoglobin value decreased from 13.2 to 10.5 g/dl. Univariate analysis of survival showed a better outcome for patients with a hemoglobin nadir >10.5 g/dl and for patients who completed the protocol. The SCHARC protocol was effective in patients diagnosed with advanced head and neck cancer. It led

  9. Split course hyperfractionated accelerated radio-chemotherapy (SCHARC) for patients with advanced head and neck cancer: influence of protocol deviations and hemoglobin on overall survival, a retrospective analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stadler, Peter; Putnik, Kurt; Kreimeyer, Thore; Sprague, Lisa D; Koelbl, Oliver; Schäfer, Christof

    2006-12-07

    The advantage of hyperfractionated accelerated radiation therapy for advanced head and neck cancer has been reported. Furthermore, randomized trials and meta-analyses have confirmed the survival benefit of additional chemotherapy to radiotherapy. We retrospectively analyzed the efficiency and toxicity of the Regensburg standard therapy protocol "SCHARC" and the overall survival of our patients. From 1997 to 2004, 64 patients suffering from advanced head and neck cancer (88 % stage IV, 12 % stage III) were assigned to receive the SCHARC protocol. Around half of the patients were diagnosed with oro-hypopharynx carcinoma (52 %), one third with tongue and floor of mouth tumors (29 %) and one fifth (19 %) suffered from H & N cancer at other sites. The schedule consisted of one therapy block with 30 Gy in 20 fractions over a two week period with concomitant chemotherapy (d 1-5: 20 mg/m2/d DDP + 750-1000 mg/m2/d 5FU (cont. infusion). This therapy block was repeated after a fortnight break up to a cumulative dose of 60 Gy and followed by a boost up to 70 Gy (69-70.5 Gy). All patients assigned to this scheme were included in the survival evaluation. Forty patients (63 %) received both radiation and chemotherapy according to the protocol. The mean follow up was 2.3 years (829 d) and the median follow up was 1.9 years (678 d), respectively. The analysis of survival revealed an estimated 3 year overall survival rate of 57 %. No patient died of complications, 52 patients (80 %) had acute grade 2-3 mucositis, and 33 patients (58 %) suffered from acute grade 3 skin toxicity. Leucopenia was no major problem (mean nadir 3.4 g/nl, no patient hemoglobin value decreased from 13.2 to 10.5 g/dl. Univariate analysis of survival showed a better outcome for patients with a hemoglobin nadir >10.5 g/dl and for patients who completed the protocol. The SCHARC protocol was effective in patients diagnosed with advanced head and neck cancer. It led to long-term disease control and survival in

  10. Correlating cumulative sub-concussive head impacts in football with player performance - biomed 2009.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowson, Steven; Goforth, Mike W; Dietter, Dave; Brolinson, P Gunnar; Duma, Stefanan M

    2009-01-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the effect of cumulative sub-concussive head impacts on football player performance. The helmets of three Virginia Tech football players were instrumented with a six accelerometer sensor capable of measuring head acceleration. Helmets were instrumented for every game during the 2006 and 2007 football seasons. Each time the head was impacted during a game, the sensor recorded the impact and wirelessly transmitted the data to a sideline computer. Furthermore, the coaching staff at Virginia Tech reviewed post-game film and evaluated each player's performance based on strict criteria. Players were awarded positive points for good plays and negative points for bad plays. Their performance scores were then normalized to a per play basis. Correlations of player performance with cumulative peak linear acceleration and cumulative head injury criterion (HIC) were evaluated. No consistent head acceleration-based measure showed a strong correlation with significance. In addition, relationship trends varied on a position basis. There are many factors other than head impacts that can affect a player's performance and more research is needed to further quantify such effects.

  11. Effect of Die Head Temperature at Compounding Stage on the Degradation of Linear Low Density Polyethylene/Plastic Film Waste Blends after Accelerated Weathering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. M. Al-Salem

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Accelerated weathering test was performed on blends of linear low density polyethylene (LLDPE and plastic film waste constituting the following percentages of polyolefin polymers (wt.%: LLDPE (46%, low density polyethylene (LDPE, 51%, high density polyethylene (HDPE, 1%, and polypropylene (PP, 2%. Compounded blends were evaluated for their mechanical and physical (optical properties. The impact of photodegradation on the formulated blends was studied, and loss of mechanical integrity was apparent with respect to both the exposure duration to weathering and waste content. The effect of processing conditions, namely, the die head temperature (DHT of the blown-film assembly used, was investigated in this work. It was witnessed that surpassing the melting point of the blends constituting polymers did not always result in a synergistic behaviour between polymers. This was suspected to be due to the loss of amorphous region that polyolefin polymers get subjected to with UV exposure under weathering conditions and the effect of the plastic waste constituents. The total change in colour (ΔE did not change with respect to DHT or waste content due to rapid change degradation on the material’s surface. Haze (% and light transmission (% decreased with the increase in waste content which was attributed to lack of miscibility between constituting polymers.

  12. A PET system based on 2-18FDG production with a low energy electrostatic proton accelerator and a dual headed PET scanner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandell, A; Ohlsson, T; Erlandsson, K; Hellborg, R; Strand, S E

    1992-01-01

    We have developed a comparatively inexpensive PET system, based on a rotating scanner with two scintillation camera heads, and a nearby low energy electrostatic proton accelerator for production of short-lived radionuclides. Using a 6 MeV proton beam of 5 microA, and by optimization of the target geometry for the 18O(p,n)18F reaction, 750 MBq of 2-18FDG can be obtained. The PET scanner shows a spatial resolution of 6 mm (FWHM) and a sensitivity of 80 s-1kBq-1ml-1 (3 kcps/microCi/ml). Various corrections are included in the imaging process, to compensate for spatial and temporal response variations in the detector system. Both filtered backprojection and iterative reconstruction methods are employed. Clinical studies have been performed with acquisition times of 30-40 min. The system will be used for clinical experimental research with short- as well as long-lived positron emitters. Also the possibility of true 3D reconstruction is under evaluation.

  13. Wireless communication for hearing aid system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nour, Baqer

    This thesis focuses on the wireless coupling between hearing aids close to a human head. Hearing aids constitute devices withadvanced technology and the wireless communication enables the introduction of a range of completely new functionalities. Such devices are small and the available power...... the ear-to-ear wireless communication channel by understanding the mechanisms that control the propagations of the signals and the losses. The second objective isto investigate the properties of magneto-dielectric materials and their potential in antenna miniaturization. There are three approaches...

  14. Helical tomotherapy for head and neck squamous cell carcinoma: Dosimetric comparison with linear accelerator-based step-and-shoot IMRT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Murthy Vedang

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Linear Accelerator-based Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy (IMRT, either as step-and shoot (SS or in dynamic mode, is now considered routine in the definitive management of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC. Helical TomoTherapy (HT is a new platform to deliver IMRT. This study aims to compare step-and-shoot Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy (SS IMRT with dynamic Helical TomoTherapy (HT dosimetrically in patients with head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC. Materials and Methods: Twelve patients with HNSCC, previously treated with SS IMRT, were re-planned on HT using the same CT dataset. Plans were compared for target coverage and organs-at-risk (OARs sparing. Sparing of parotids was assessed after stratifying for side (contralateral vs. ipsilateral and site of disease (laryngopharynx vs. oropharynx. Normal tissue complication probabilities (NTCP were also compared for the parotid glands. Results: All HT plans showed improvement in target coverage and homogeneity, and reduction in OAR doses as compared to SS IMRT plans. For PTV 66, the mean V 99 improved by 14.65% ( P = 0.02. Dose Homogeneity (D 10-90 was significantly better in the HT plans (mean 2.07Gy as compared to 4.5Gy in the SS IMRT plans, P = 0.02. HT resulted in an average reduction of mean parotid dose of 12.66Gy and 18.28Gy for the contralateral and ipsilateral glands ( P = 0.003 respectively. This translated into a 24.09% and 35.22% reduction in Normal Tissue Complication Probability (NTCP for the contralateral and ipsilateral parotids respectively ( P < 0.01. Site of disease (laryngopharynx vs. oropharynx did not have any significant impact on parotid sparing between SS IMRT and HT. The maximum dose to the spinal cord showed a mean reduction of 12.07Gy in HT plans ( P = 0.02. Conclusion: Helical Tomotherapy achieved better target coverage with improved OAR sparing as compared to SS IMRT. The significant reduction in mean parotid doses translated

  15. Final Results of a Randomized Phase 2 Trial Investigating the Addition of Cetuximab to Induction Chemotherapy and Accelerated or Hyperfractionated Chemoradiation for Locoregionally Advanced Head and Neck Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seiwert, Tanguy Y., E-mail: tseiwert@medicine.bsd.uchicago.edu [Departments of Medicine, University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois (United States); Melotek, James M. [Department of Radiation and Cellular Oncology, University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois (United States); Blair, Elizabeth A. [Department of Otolaryngology, University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois (United States); Stenson, Kerstin M. [Department of Otolaryngology, Rush University, Chicago, Illinois (United States); Salama, Joseph K. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Witt, Mary Ellyn [Department of Radiation and Cellular Oncology, University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois (United States); Brisson, Ryan J.; Chawla, Apoorva; Dekker, Allison [Departments of Medicine, University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois (United States); Lingen, Mark W. [Department of Pathology, University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois (United States); Kocherginsky, Masha [Department of Public Health Sciences, University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois (United States); Villaflor, Victoria M. [Departments of Medicine, University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois (United States); Cohen, Ezra E.W. [Moores Cancer Center, University of California, San Diego, San Diego, California (United States); Haraf, Daniel J. [Department of Radiation and Cellular Oncology, University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois (United States); Vokes, Everett E. [Departments of Medicine, University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois (United States)

    2016-09-01

    Purpose: The role of cetuximab in the treatment of locoregionally advanced head and neck squamous cell cancer (LA-HNSCC) remains poorly defined. In this phase 2 randomized study, we investigated the addition of cetuximab to both induction chemotherapy (IC) and hyperfractionated or accelerated chemoradiation. Methods and Materials: Patients with LA-HNSCC were randomized to receive 2 cycles of weekly IC (cetuximab, paclitaxel, carboplatin) and either Cetux-FHX (concurrent cetuximab, 5-fluorouracil, hydroxyurea, and 1.5 Gy twice-daily radiation therapy every other week to 75 Gy) or Cetux-PX (cetuximab, cisplatin, and accelerated radiation therapy with delayed concomitant boost to 72 Gy in 42 fractions). The primary endpoint was progression-free survival (PFS), with superiority compared with historical control achieved if either arm had 2-year PFS ≥70%. Results: 110 patients were randomly assigned to either Cetux-FHX (n=57) or Cetux-PX (n=53). The overall response rate to IC was 91%. Severe toxicity on IC was limited to rash (23% grade ≥3) and myelosuppression (38% grade ≥3 neutropenia). The 2-year rates of PFS for both Cetux-FHX (82.5%) and Cetux-PX (84.9%) were significantly higher than for historical control (P<.001). The 2-year overall survival (OS) was 91.2% for Cetux-FHX and 94.3% for Cetux-PX. With a median follow-up time of 72 months, there were no significant differences in PFS (P=.35) or OS (P=.15) between the treatment arms. The late outcomes for the entire cohort included 5-year PFS, OS, locoregional failure, and distant metastasis rates of 74.1%, 80.3%, 15.7%, and 7.4%, respectively. The 5-year PFS and OS were 84.4% and 91.3%, respectively, among human papillomavirus (HPV)-positive patients and 65.9% and 72.5%, respectively, among HPV-negative patients. Conclusions: The addition of cetuximab to IC and chemoradiation was tolerable and produced long-term control of LA-HNSCC, particularly among poor-prognosis HPV-negative patients. Further

  16. Final Results of a Randomized Phase 2 Trial Investigating the Addition of Cetuximab to Induction Chemotherapy and Accelerated or Hyperfractionated Chemoradiation for Locoregionally Advanced Head and Neck Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seiwert, Tanguy Y.; Melotek, James M.; Blair, Elizabeth A.; Stenson, Kerstin M.; Salama, Joseph K.; Witt, Mary Ellyn; Brisson, Ryan J.; Chawla, Apoorva; Dekker, Allison; Lingen, Mark W.; Kocherginsky, Masha; Villaflor, Victoria M.; Cohen, Ezra E.W.; Haraf, Daniel J.; Vokes, Everett E.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The role of cetuximab in the treatment of locoregionally advanced head and neck squamous cell cancer (LA-HNSCC) remains poorly defined. In this phase 2 randomized study, we investigated the addition of cetuximab to both induction chemotherapy (IC) and hyperfractionated or accelerated chemoradiation. Methods and Materials: Patients with LA-HNSCC were randomized to receive 2 cycles of weekly IC (cetuximab, paclitaxel, carboplatin) and either Cetux-FHX (concurrent cetuximab, 5-fluorouracil, hydroxyurea, and 1.5 Gy twice-daily radiation therapy every other week to 75 Gy) or Cetux-PX (cetuximab, cisplatin, and accelerated radiation therapy with delayed concomitant boost to 72 Gy in 42 fractions). The primary endpoint was progression-free survival (PFS), with superiority compared with historical control achieved if either arm had 2-year PFS ≥70%. Results: 110 patients were randomly assigned to either Cetux-FHX (n=57) or Cetux-PX (n=53). The overall response rate to IC was 91%. Severe toxicity on IC was limited to rash (23% grade ≥3) and myelosuppression (38% grade ≥3 neutropenia). The 2-year rates of PFS for both Cetux-FHX (82.5%) and Cetux-PX (84.9%) were significantly higher than for historical control (P<.001). The 2-year overall survival (OS) was 91.2% for Cetux-FHX and 94.3% for Cetux-PX. With a median follow-up time of 72 months, there were no significant differences in PFS (P=.35) or OS (P=.15) between the treatment arms. The late outcomes for the entire cohort included 5-year PFS, OS, locoregional failure, and distant metastasis rates of 74.1%, 80.3%, 15.7%, and 7.4%, respectively. The 5-year PFS and OS were 84.4% and 91.3%, respectively, among human papillomavirus (HPV)-positive patients and 65.9% and 72.5%, respectively, among HPV-negative patients. Conclusions: The addition of cetuximab to IC and chemoradiation was tolerable and produced long-term control of LA-HNSCC, particularly among poor-prognosis HPV-negative patients. Further

  17. Concurrent hyperfractionated accelerated radiotherapy with 5-FU and once weekly cisplatin in locally advanced head and neck cancer. The 10-year results of a prospective phase II trial

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Budach, V.; Boehmer, D.; Badakhshi, H.; Jahn, U.; Stromberger, C. [Campus Virchow Klinikum, Charite Universitaetsmedizin Berlin, Department for Radiooncology, Clinic for Radiooncology, Berlin (Germany); Becker, E.T. [Charite Universitaetsmedizin, Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Berlin (Germany); Wernecke, K.D. [Sostana Statistics GmbH, Charite Universitaetsmedizin Berlin, Berlin (Germany)

    2014-03-15

    In this study, the acute toxicity and long-term outcome of a hyperfractionated accelerated chemoradiation regimen with cisplatin/5-fluorouracil (5-FU) in patients with locally advanced squamous cell carcinomas of head and neck were evaluated. From 2000-2002, 38 patients with stage III (5.3 %) and stage IV (94.7 %) head and neck cancer were enrolled in a phase II study. Patients received hyperfractionated-accelerated radiotherapy with 72 Gy in 15 fractions of 2 Gy followed by 1.4 Gy twice daily with concurrent, continuous infusion 5-FU of 600 mg/m{sup 2} on days 1-5 and 6 cycles of weekly cisplatin (30 mg/m{sup 2}). Acute toxicities (CTCAEv2.0), locoregional control (LRC), metastases-free (MFS), and overall survival (OS) were analyzed and exploratively compared with the ARO 95-06 trial. Median follow-up was 11.4 years (95 % CI 8.6-14.2) and mean dose 71.6 Gy. Of the patients, 82 % had 6 (n = 15) or 5 (n = 16) cycles of cisplatin, 5 and 2 patients received 4 and 3 cycles, respectively. Grade 3 anemia, leukopenia, and thrombocytopenia were observed in 15.8, 15.8, and 2.6 %, respectively. Grade 3 mucositis in 50 %, grade 3 and 4 dysphagia in 55 and 13 %. The 2-, 5-, and 10-year LRC was 65, 53.6, and 48.2 %, the MFS was 77.5, 66.7, and 57.2 % and the OS 59.6, 29.2, and 15 %, respectively. Chemoradiation with 5-FU and cisplatin seems feasible and superior in terms of LRC and OS to the ARO 95-06C-HART arm at 2 years. However, this did not persist at the 5- and 10-year follow-ups. (orig.) [German] Untersuchung der Akuttoxizitaet und des Langzeitueberlebens einer hyperfraktioniert-akzelerierten simultanen Radiochemotherapie mit Cisplatin/5-Fluorouracil (5-FU) bei Patienten mit lokal fortgeschrittenen Kopf-Hals-Tumoren. Von 2000 bis 2002 wurden 38 Patienten mit Plattenepithelkarzinomen der Kopf-Hals-Region im Stadium III (5,3 %) und IV (94,7 %) eingeschlossen. Es erfolgte eine simultane hyperfraktionierte akzelerierte Radiochemotherapie mit 72 Gy in 15 Fraktionen a 2 Gy

  18. Two-year results from a Swedish study on conventional versus accelerated radiotherapy in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma - The ARTSCAN study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zackrisson, Bjoern; Nilsson, Per; Kjellen, Elisabeth; Johansson, Karl-Axel; Modig, Hans; Brun, Eva; Nyman, Jan; Friesland, Signe; Reizenstein, Johan; Sjoedin, Helena; Ekberg, Lars; Loeden, Britta; Mercke, Claes; Fernberg, Jan-Olof; Franzen, Lars; Ask, Anders; Persson, Essie; Wickart-Johansson, Gun; Lewin, Freddi; Wittgren, Lena

    2011-01-01

    Background and purpose: Studies on accelerated fractionation (AF) in head and neck cancer have shown increased local control and survival compared with conventional fractionation (CF), while others have been non-conclusive. In 1998 a national Swedish group decided to perform a randomised controlled clinical study of AF. Materials and methods: Patients with verified squamous cell carcinoma of the oral cavity, oropharynx, larynx (except glottic T1-T2, N0) and hypopharynx were included. Patients with prior chemotherapy or surgery were excluded. Patients were randomised to either CF (2 Gy/day, 5 days/week for 7 weeks, total dose 68 Gy) or to AF (1.1 Gy + 2.0 Gy/day, 5 days/week for 4.5 weeks, total dose 68 Gy). An extensive quality assurance protocol was followed throughout the study. The primary end point was loco-regional tumour control (LRC) at two years after treatment. Results: The study was closed in 2006 when 750 patients had been randomised. Eighty-three percent of the patients had stages III-IV disease. Forty eight percent had oropharyngeal, 21% laryngeal, 17% hypopharyngeal and 14% oral cancers. There were no significant differences regarding overall survival (OS) or LRC between the two regimens. The OS at two years was 68% for AF and 67% for CF. The corresponding figures for LRC were 71% and 67%, respectively. There was a trend towards improved LRC for oral cancers treated (p = 0.07) and for large tumours (T3-T4) (p = 0.07) treated with AF. The AF group had significantly worse acute reactions, while there was no significant increase in late effects. Conclusion: Overall the AF regimen did not prove to be more efficacious than CF. However, the trend towards improved results in AF for oral cancers needs to be further investigated.

  19. Patterns of Recurrence in Electively Irradiated Lymph Node Regions After Definitive Accelerated Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy for Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bosch, Sven van den, E-mail: sven.vandenbosch@radboudumc.nl; Dijkema, Tim; Verhoef, Lia C.G.; Zwijnenburg, Ellen M.; Janssens, Geert O.; Kaanders, Johannes H.A.M.

    2016-03-15

    Purpose: To provide a comprehensive risk assessment on the patterns of recurrence in electively irradiated lymph node regions after definitive radiation therapy for head and neck cancer. Methods and Materials: Two hundred sixty-four patients with stage cT2-4N0-2M0 squamous cell carcinoma of the oropharynx, larynx, or hypopharynx treated with accelerated intensity modulated radiation therapy between 2008 and 2012 were included. On the radiation therapy planning computed tomography (CT) scans from all patients, 1166 lymph nodes (short-axis diameter ≥5 mm) localized in the elective volume were identified and delineated. The exact sites of regional recurrences were reconstructed and projected on the initial radiation therapy planning CT scan by performing coregistration with diagnostic imaging of the recurrence. Results: The actuarial rate of recurrence in electively irradiated lymph node regions at 2 years was 5.1% (95% confidence interval 2.4%-7.8%). Volumetric analysis showed an increased risk of recurrence with increasing nodal volume. Receiver operating characteristic analysis demonstrated that the summed long- and short-axis diameter is a good alternative for laborious volume calculations, using ≥17 mm as cut-off (hazard ratio 17.8; 95% confidence interval 5.7-55.1; P<.001). Conclusions: An important risk factor was identified that can help clinicians in the pretreatment risk assessment of borderline-sized lymph nodes. Not overtly pathologic nodes with a summed diameter ≥17 mm may require a higher than elective radiation therapy dose. For low-risk elective regions (all nodes <17 mm), the safety of dose de-escalation below the traditional 45 to 50 Gy should be investigated.

  20. Intensified hyperfractionated accelerated radiotherapy limits the additional benefit of simultaneous chemotherapy--results of a multicentric randomized German trial in advanced head-and-neck cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Staar, Susanne; Rudat, Volker; Stuetzer, Hartmut; Dietz, Andreas; Volling, Peter; Schroeder, Michael; Flentje, Michael; Eckel, Hans Edmund; Mueller, Rolf-Peter

    2001-01-01

    Purpose: To demonstrate the efficacy of radiochemotherapy (RCT) as the first choice of treatment for advanced unresectable head-and-neck cancer. To prove an expected benefit of simultaneously given chemotherapy, a two-arm randomized study with hyperfractionated accelerated radiochemotherapy (HF-ACC-RCT) vs. hyperfractionated accelerated radiotherapy (HF-ACC-RT) was initiated. The primary endpoint was 1-year survival with local control (SLC). Methods and Materials: Patients with Stage III and IV (UICC) unresectable oro- and hypopharyngeal carcinomas were randomized for HF-ACC-RCT with 2 cycles of 5-FU (600 mg/m 2 /day)/carboplatinum (70 mg/m 2 ) on days 1-5 and 29-33 (arm A) or HF-ACC-RT alone (arm B). In both arms, there was a second randomization for testing the effect of prophylactically given G-CSF (263 μg, days 15-19) on mucosal toxicity. Total RT dose in both arms was 69.9 Gy in 38 days, with a concomitant boost regimen (weeks 1-3: 1.8 Gy/day, weeks 4 and 5: b.i.d. RT with 1.8 Gy/1.5 Gy). Between July 1995 and May 1999, 263 patients were randomized (median age 56 years; 96% Stage IV tumors, 4% Stage III tumors). Results: This analysis is based on 240 patients: 113 patients with RCT and 127 patients with RT, qualified for protocol and starting treatment. There were 178 oropharyngeal and 62 hypopharyngeal carcinomas. Treatment was tolerable in both arms, with a higher mucosal toxicity after RCT. Restaging showed comparable nonsignificant different CR + PR rates of 92.4% after RCT and 87.9% after RT (p=0.29). After a median observed time of 22.3 months, l- and 2-year local-regional control (LRC) rates were 69% and 51% after RCT and 58% and 45% after RT (p=0.14). There was a significantly better 1-year SLC after RCT (58%) compared with RT (44%, p=0.05). Patients with oropharyngeal carcinomas showed significantly better SLC after RCT (60%) vs. RT (40%, p=0.01); the smaller group of hypopharyngeal carcinomas had no statistical benefit of RCT (p=0.84). For both

  1. Household wireless electroencephalogram hat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szu, Harold; Hsu, Charles; Moon, Gyu; Yamakawa, Takeshi; Tran, Binh

    2012-06-01

    We applied Compressive Sensing to design an affordable, convenient Brain Machine Interface (BMI) measuring the high spatial density, and real-time process of Electroencephalogram (EEG) brainwaves by a Smartphone. It is useful for therapeutic and mental health monitoring, learning disability biofeedback, handicap interfaces, and war gaming. Its spec is adequate for a biomedical laboratory, without the cables hanging over the head and tethered to a fixed computer terminal. Our improved the intrinsic signal to noise ratio (SNR) by using the non-uniform placement of the measuring electrodes to create the proximity of measurement to the source effect. We computing a spatiotemporal average the larger magnitude of EEG data centers in 0.3 second taking on tethered laboratory data, using fuzzy logic, and computing the inside brainwave sources, by Independent Component Analysis (ICA). Consequently, we can overlay them together by non-uniform electrode distribution enhancing the signal noise ratio and therefore the degree of sparseness by threshold. We overcame the conflicting requirements between a high spatial electrode density and precise temporal resolution (beyond Event Related Potential (ERP) P300 brainwave at 0.3 sec), and Smartphone wireless bottleneck of spatiotemporal throughput rate. Our main contribution in this paper is the quality and the speed of iterative compressed image recovery algorithm based on a Block Sparse Code (Baranuick et al, IEEE/IT 2008). As a result, we achieved real-time wireless dynamic measurement of EEG brainwaves, matching well with traditionally tethered high density EEG.

  2. Wireless Biological Electronic Sensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Yue

    2017-10-09

    The development of wireless biological electronic sensors could open up significant advances for both fundamental studies and practical applications in a variety of areas, including medical diagnosis, environmental monitoring, and defense applications. One of the major challenges in the development of wireless bioelectronic sensors is the successful integration of biosensing units and wireless signal transducers. In recent years, there are a few types of wireless communication systems that have been integrated with biosensing systems to construct wireless bioelectronic sensors. To successfully construct wireless biological electronic sensors, there are several interesting questions: What types of biosensing transducers can be used in wireless bioelectronic sensors? What types of wireless systems can be integrated with biosensing transducers to construct wireless bioelectronic sensors? How are the electrical sensing signals generated and transmitted? This review will highlight the early attempts to address these questions in the development of wireless biological electronic sensors.

  3. A Wireless Sensor Enabled by Wireless Power

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Da-Sheng; Liu, Yu-Hong; Lin, Chii-Ruey

    2012-01-01

    Through harvesting energy by wireless charging and delivering data by wireless communication, this study proposes the concept of a wireless sensor enabled by wireless power (WPWS) and reports the fabrication of a prototype for functional tests. One WPWS node consists of wireless power module and sensor module with different chip-type sensors. Its main feature is the dual antenna structure. Following RFID system architecture, a power harvesting antenna was designed to gather power from a standard reader working in the 915 MHz band. Referring to the Modbus protocol, the other wireless communication antenna was integrated on a node to send sensor data in parallel. The dual antenna structure integrates both the advantages of an RFID system and a wireless sensor. Using a standard UHF RFID reader, WPWS can be enabled in a distributed area with a diameter up to 4 m. Working status is similar to that of a passive tag, except that a tag can only be queried statically, while the WPWS can send dynamic data from the sensors. The function is the same as a wireless sensor node. Different WPWSs equipped with temperature and humidity, optical and airflow velocity sensors are tested in this study. All sensors can send back detection data within 8 s. The accuracy is within 8% deviation compared with laboratory equipment. A wireless sensor network enabled by wireless power should be a totally wireless sensor network using WPWS. However, distributed WPWSs only can form a star topology, the simplest topology for constructing a sensor network. Because of shielding effects, it is difficult to apply other complex topologies. Despite this limitation, WPWS still can be used to extend sensor network applications in hazardous environments. Further research is needed to improve WPWS to realize a totally wireless sensor network. PMID:23443370

  4. A Wireless Sensor Enabled by Wireless Power

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Da-Sheng Lee

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Through harvesting energy by wireless charging and delivering data by wireless communication, this study proposes the concept of a wireless sensor enabled by wireless power (WPWS and reports the fabrication of a prototype for functional tests. One WPWS node consists of wireless power module and sensor module with different chip-type sensors. Its main feature is the dual antenna structure. Following RFID system architecture, a power harvesting antenna was designed to gather power from a standard reader working in the 915 MHz band. Referring to the Modbus protocol, the other wireless communication antenna was integrated on a node to send sensor data in parallel. The dual antenna structure integrates both the advantages of an RFID system and a wireless sensor. Using a standard UHF RFID reader, WPWS can be enabled in a distributed area with a diameter up to 4 m. Working status is similar to that of a passive tag, except that a tag can only be queried statically, while the WPWS can send dynamic data from the sensors. The function is the same as a wireless sensor node. Different WPWSs equipped with temperature and humidity, optical and airflow velocity sensors are tested in this study. All sensors can send back detection data within 8 s. The accuracy is within 8% deviation compared with laboratory equipment. A wireless sensor network enabled by wireless power should be a totally wireless sensor network using WPWS. However, distributed WPWSs only can form a star topology, the simplest topology for constructing a sensor network. Because of shielding effects, it is difficult to apply other complex topologies. Despite this limitation, WPWS still can be used to extend sensor network applications in hazardous environments. Further research is needed to improve WPWS to realize a totally wireless sensor network.

  5. A wireless sensor enabled by wireless power.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Da-Sheng; Liu, Yu-Hong; Lin, Chii-Ruey

    2012-11-22

    Through harvesting energy by wireless charging and delivering data by wireless communication, this study proposes the concept of a wireless sensor enabled by wireless power (WPWS) and reports the fabrication of a prototype for functional tests. One WPWS node consists of wireless power module and sensor module with different chip-type sensors. Its main feature is the dual antenna structure. Following RFID system architecture, a power harvesting antenna was designed to gather power from a standard reader working in the 915 MHz band. Referring to the Modbus protocol, the other wireless communication antenna was integrated on a node to send sensor data in parallel. The dual antenna structure integrates both the advantages of an RFID system and a wireless sensor. Using a standard UHF RFID reader, WPWS can be enabled in a distributed area with a diameter up to 4 m. Working status is similar to that of a passive tag, except that a tag can only be queried statically, while the WPWS can send dynamic data from the sensors. The function is the same as a wireless sensor node. Different WPWSs equipped with temperature and humidity, optical and airflow velocity sensors are tested in this study. All sensors can send back detection data within 8 s. The accuracy is within 8% deviation compared with laboratory equipment. A wireless sensor network enabled by wireless power should be a totally wireless sensor network using WPWS. However, distributed WPWSs only can form a star topology, the simplest topology for constructing a sensor network. Because of shielding effects, it is difficult to apply other complex topologies. Despite this limitation, WPWS still can be used to extend sensor network applications in hazardous environments. Further research is needed to improve WPWS to realize a totally wireless sensor network.

  6. Adaptive Wireless Transceiver Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Many wireless technologies are already available for sensor applications. It is inevitable that many non-interoperable wireless technologies between 400 MHz and 5.8...

  7. A Medical Wireless Measurement System for Hip Prosthesis Loosening Detection Based on Vibration Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sebastian Sauer

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Vibration analysis is a promising approach in order to detect early hip prosthesis loosening, with the potential to extend the range of diagnostic tools currently available in clinical routine. Ongoing research efforts and developments in the area of multi-functional implants, which integrate sensors, wireless power supply, communication and signal processing, provide means to obtain valuable in vivo information otherwise not available. In the current work a medical wireless measurement system is presented, which is integrated in the femoral head of a hip prosthesis. The passive miniaturized system includes a 3-axis acceleration sensor and signal pre-processing based on a lock-in amplifier circuit. Bidirectional data communication and power supply is reached through inductive coupling with an operating frequency of 125 kHz in accordance with the ISO 18000-2 protocol standard. The system allows the acquisition of the acceleration frequency response of the femur-prosthesis system between 500 to 2500 Hz. Applied laboratory measurements with system prototypes on artificial bones and integrated prostheses demonstrate the feasibility of the measurement system approach, clearly showing differences in the vibration behavior due to an implant loosening. In addition a possibility to evaluate the non-linear mechanic system behavior is presented.

  8. Wireless Communication Technologies

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    First page Back Continue Last page Overview Graphics. Wireless Communication Technologies. Since 1999, the wireless LAN has experienced a tremendous growth. Reasons: Adoption of industry standards. Interoperability testing. The progress of wireless equipments to higher data rates. Rapid decrease in product ...

  9. Validation of the total dysphagia risk score (TDRS) in head and neck cancer patients in a conventional and a partially accelerated radiotherapy scheme

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nevens, Daan; Deschuymer, Sarah; Langendijk, Johannes A.; Daisne, Jean -Francois; Duprez, Frederic; De Neve, Wilfried; Nuyts, Sandra

    Background and purpose: A risk model, the total dysphagia risk score (TDRS), was developed to predict which patients are most at risk to develop grade >= 2 dysphagia at 6 months following radiotherapy (RT) for head and neck cancer. The purpose of this study was to validate this model at 6 months and

  10. Factors associated with acute and late dysphagia in the DAHANCA 6 & 7 randomized trial with accelerated radiotherapy for head and neck cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mortensen, Hanna Rahbek; Overgaard, Jens; Jensen, Kenneth

    2013-01-01

    Dysphagia is a common and debilitating side effect in head and neck radiotherapy (RT). Prognostic factors are numerous and their interrelationship not well understood. The aim of this study was to establish a multivariate prognostic model for acute and late dysphagia after RT, based on information...

  11. Feedback Control of a Hovercraft over a Wireless Link

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-01-01

    ABSTRACT Title of thesis : FEEDBACK CONTROL OF A HOVERCRAFT OVER A WIRELESS LINK Zachary Kulis, Master of Science, 2006 Dissertation directed by...to agree nicely. FEEDBACK CONTROL OF A HOVERCRAFT OVER A WIRELESS LINK by Zachary Kulis Thesis submitted to the Faculty of the Graduate School of the...stable position and heading tracking control law for a surface vessel. In this thesis , we explore nonlinear control of a hovercraft over a Bluetooth

  12. CCNA Wireless Study Guide

    CERN Document Server

    Lammle, Todd

    2010-01-01

    A complete guide to the CCNA Wireless exam by leading networking authority Todd Lammle. The CCNA Wireless certification is the most respected entry-level certification in this rapidly growing field. Todd Lammle is the undisputed authority on networking, and this book focuses exclusively on the skills covered in this Cisco certification exam. The CCNA Wireless Study Guide joins the popular Sybex study guide family and helps network administrators advance their careers with a highly desirable certification.: The CCNA Wireless certification is the most respected entry-level wireless certification

  13. Intersegmental Eye-Head-Body Interactions during Complex Whole Body Movements

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Laßberg, Christoph; Beykirch, Karl A.; Mohler, Betty J.; Bülthoff, Heinrich H.

    2014-01-01

    Using state-of-the-art technology, interactions of eye, head and intersegmental body movements were analyzed for the first time during multiple twisting somersaults of high-level gymnasts. With this aim, we used a unique combination of a 16-channel infrared kinemetric system; a three-dimensional video kinemetric system; wireless electromyography; and a specialized wireless sport-video-oculography system, which was able to capture and calculate precise oculomotor data under conditions of rapid multiaxial acceleration. All data were synchronized and integrated in a multimodal software tool for three-dimensional analysis. During specific phases of the recorded movements, a previously unknown eye-head-body interaction was observed. The phenomenon was marked by a prolonged and complete suppression of gaze-stabilizing eye movements, in favor of a tight coupling with the head, spine and joint movements of the gymnasts. Potential reasons for these observations are discussed with regard to earlier findings and integrated within a functional model. PMID:24763143

  14. Effect of Die Head Temperature at Compounding Stage on the Degradation of Linear Low Density Polyethylene/Plastic Film Waste Blends after Accelerated Weathering

    OpenAIRE

    S. M. Al-Salem; N. M. Al-Dousari; G. Joseph Abraham; M. Aromin D’Souza; O. A. Al-Qabandi; W. Al-Zakri

    2016-01-01

    Accelerated weathering test was performed on blends of linear low density polyethylene (LLDPE) and plastic film waste constituting the following percentages of polyolefin polymers (wt.%): LLDPE (46%), low density polyethylene (LDPE, 51%), high density polyethylene (HDPE, 1%), and polypropylene (PP, 2%). Compounded blends were evaluated for their mechanical and physical (optical) properties. The impact of photodegradation on the formulated blends was studied, and loss of mechanical integrity w...

  15. Long-Term Outcome and Morbidity After Treatment With Accelerated Radiotherapy and Weekly Cisplatin for Locally Advanced Head-and-Neck Cancer: Results of a Multidisciplinary Late Morbidity Clinic

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ruetten, Heidi, E-mail: h.rutten@rther.umcn.nl [Department of Radiation Oncology, Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Nijmegen (Netherlands); Pop, Lucas A.M.; Janssens, Geert O.R.J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Nijmegen (Netherlands); Takes, Robert P. [Department of Otorhinolaryngology and Head and Neck Surgery, Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Nijmegen (Netherlands); Knuijt, Simone [Department of Rehabilitation/Speech Pathology, Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Nijmegen (Netherlands); Rooijakkers, Antoinette F. [Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Nijmegen (Netherlands); Berg, Manon van den [Department of Gastroenterology-Dietetics, Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Nijmegen (Netherlands); Merkx, Matthias A. [Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Nijmegen (Netherlands); Herpen, Carla M.L. van [Department of Medical Oncology, Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Nijmegen (Netherlands); Kaanders, Johannes H.A.M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Nijmegen (Netherlands)

    2011-11-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the long-term outcome and morbidity after intensified treatment for locally advanced head-and-neck cancer. Methods and Materials: Between May 2003 and December 2007, 77 patients with Stage III to IV head-and-neck cancer were treated with curative intent. Treatment consisted of accelerated radiotherapy to a dose of 68 Gy and concurrent cisplatin. Long-term survivors were invited to a multidisciplinary outpatient clinic for a comprehensive assessment of late morbidity with special emphasis on dysphagia, including radiological evaluation of swallowing function in all patients. Results: Compliance with the treatment protocol was high, with 87% of the patients receiving at least five cycles of cisplatin and all but 1 patient completing the radiotherapy as planned. The 5-year actuarial disease-free survival and overall survival rates were 40% and 47%, respectively. Locoregional recurrence-free survival at 5 years was 61%. The 5-year actuarial rates of overall late Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG)/European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC) Grade 3 and Grade 4 toxicity were 52% and 25% respectively. Radiologic evaluation after a median follow-up of 44 months demonstrated impaired swallowing in 57% of the patients, including 23% with silent aspiration. Subjective assessment using a systematic scoring system indicated normalcy of diet in only 15.6% of the patients. Conclusion: This regimen of accelerated radiotherapy with weekly cisplatin produced favorable tumor control rates and survival rates while compliance was high. However, comprehensive assessment by a multidisciplinary team of medical and paramedical specialists revealed significant long-term morbidity in the majority of the patients, with dysphagia being a major concern.

  16. Wireless physical layer security

    OpenAIRE

    Poor, H. Vincent; Schaefer, Rafael F.

    2016-01-01

    Security is a very important issue in the design and use of wireless networks. Traditional methods of providing security in such networks are impractical for some emerging types of wireless networks due to the light computational abilities of some wireless devices [such as radio-frequency identification (RFID) tags, certain sensors, etc.] or to the very large scale or loose organizational structure of some networks. Physical layer security has the potential to address these concerns by taking...

  17. SU-E-T-360: End-To-End Dosimetric Testing of a Versa HD Linear Accelerator with the Agility Head Modeled in Pinnacle3

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saenz, D; Narayanasamy, G; Cruz, W; Papanikolaou, N; Stathakis, S [University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio, San Antonio, TX (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: The Versa HD incorporates a variety of upgrades, primarily including the Agility head. The distinct dosimetric properties of the head from its predecessors combined with flattening-filter-free (FFF) beams require a new investigation of modeling in planning systems and verification of modeling accuracy. Methods: A model was created in Pinnacle{sup 3} v9.8 with commissioned beam data. Leaf transmission was modeled as <0.5% with maximum leaf speed of 3 cm/s. Photon spectra were tuned for FFF beams, for which profiles were modeled with arbitrary profiles rather than with cones. For verification, a variety of plans with varied parameters were devised, and point dose measurements were compared to calculated values. A phantom of several plastic water and Styrofoam slabs was scanned and imported into Pinnacle{sup 3}. Beams of different field sizes, SSD, wedges, and gantry angles were created. All available photon energies (6 MV, 10 MV, 18 MV, 6 FFF, 10 FFF) as well four clinical electron energies (6, 9, 12, and 15 MeV) were investigated. The plans were verified at a calculation point (8 cm deep for photons, variable for electrons) by measurement with a PTW Semiflex ionization chamber. In addition, IMRT testing was performed with three standard plans (step and shoot IMRT, small and large field VMAT plans). The plans were delivered on the Delta4 IMRT QA phantom (ScandiDos, Uppsala, Sweden). Results: Homogeneous point dose measurement agreed within 2% for all photon and electron beams. Open field photon measurements along the central axis at 100 cm SSD passed within 1%. Gamma passing rates were >99.5% for all plans with a 3%/3mm tolerance criteria. The IMRT QA results for the first 23 patients yielded gamma passing rates of 97.4±2.3%. Conclusion: The end-to-end testing ensured confidence in the ability of Pinnacle{sup 3} to model photon and electron beams with the Agility head.

  18. Wireless security in mobile health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osunmuyiwa, Olufolabi; Ulusoy, Ali Hakan

    2012-12-01

    Mobile health (m-health) is an extremely broad term that embraces mobile communication in the health sector and data packaging. The four broad categories of wireless networks are wireless personal area network, wireless metropolitan area network, wireless wide area network, and wireless local area network. Wireless local area network is the most notable of the wireless networking tools obtainable in the health sector. Transfer of delicate and critical information on radio frequencies should be secure, and the right to use must be meticulous. This article covers the business opportunities in m-health, threats faced by wireless networks in hospitals, and methods of mitigating these threats.

  19. Wireless Emulation Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Wireless Emulation Laboratory (WEL) is a researchtest bed used to investigate fundamental issues in networkscience. It is a research infrastructure that emulates...

  20. Adaptive Wireless Transceiver Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Wireless technologies are an increasingly attractive means for spatial data, input, manipulation, and distribution. Mobitrum is proposing an innovative Adaptive...

  1. Head Lice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Head lice are parasitic wingless insects. They live on people's heads and feed on their blood. An adult louse ... Children ages 3-11 and their families get head lice most often. Personal hygiene has nothing to ...

  2. A new type of intelligent wireless sensing network for health monitoring of large-size structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lei, Ying; Liu, Ch.; Wu, D. T.; Tang, Y. L.; Wang, J. X.; Wu, L. J.; Jiang, X. D.

    2009-07-01

    In recent years, some innovative wireless sensing systems have been proposed. However, more exploration and research on wireless sensing systems are required before wireless systems can substitute for the traditional wire-based systems. In this paper, a new type of intelligent wireless sensing network is proposed for the heath monitoring of large-size structures. Hardware design of the new wireless sensing units is first studied. The wireless sensing unit mainly consists of functional modules of: sensing interface, signal conditioning, signal digitization, computational core, wireless communication and battery management. Then, software architecture of the unit is introduced. The sensing network has a two-level cluster-tree architecture with Zigbee communication protocol. Important issues such as power saving and fault tolerance are considered in the designs of the new wireless sensing units and sensing network. Each cluster head in the network is characterized by its computational capabilities that can be used to implement the computational methodologies of structural health monitoring; making the wireless sensing units and sensing network have "intelligent" characteristics. Primary tests on the measurement data collected by the wireless system are performed. The distributed computational capacity of the intelligent sensing network is also demonstrated. It is shown that the new type of intelligent wireless sensing network provides an efficient tool for structural health monitoring of large-size structures.

  3. 9 April 2013 - Minister for Universities and Science United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland D. Willetts in the ATLAS experimental cavern with ATLAS Collaboration Spokesperson D. Charlton and in the LHC tunnel at Point 1 with Beams Department Head P. Collier. Director for Accelerators and Technology S. Myers, Editor at the Communication Group K. Kahle and Beams Department Engineer R. Veness present.

    CERN Multimedia

    Jean-Claude Gadmer

    2013-01-01

    9 April 2013 - Minister for Universities and Science United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland D. Willetts in the ATLAS experimental cavern with ATLAS Collaboration Spokesperson D. Charlton and in the LHC tunnel at Point 1 with Beams Department Head P. Collier. Director for Accelerators and Technology S. Myers, Editor at the Communication Group K. Kahle and Beams Department Engineer R. Veness present.

  4. Wireless mobile Internet security

    CERN Document Server

    Rhee, Man Young

    2013-01-01

      The mobile industry for wireless cellular services has grown at a rapid pace over the past decade. Similarly, Internet service technology has also made dramatic growth through the World Wide Web with a wire line infrastructure. Realization for complete wired/wireless mobile Internet technologies will become the future objectives for convergence of these technologies thr

  5. Wireless Augmented Reality Prototype (WARP)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devereaux, A. S.

    1999-01-01

    Initiated in January, 1997, under NASA's Office of Life and Microgravity Sciences and Applications, the Wireless Augmented Reality Prototype (WARP) is a means to leverage recent advances in communications, displays, imaging sensors, biosensors, voice recognition and microelectronics to develop a hands-free, tetherless system capable of real-time personal display and control of computer system resources. Using WARP, an astronaut may efficiently operate and monitor any computer-controllable activity inside or outside the vehicle or station. The WARP concept is a lightweight, unobtrusive heads-up display with a wireless wearable control unit. Connectivity to the external system is achieved through a high-rate radio link from the WARP personal unit to a base station unit installed into any system PC. The radio link has been specially engineered to operate within the high- interference, high-multipath environment of a space shuttle or space station module. Through this virtual terminal, the astronaut will be able to view and manipulate imagery, text or video, using voice commands to control the terminal operations. WARP's hands-free access to computer-based instruction texts, diagrams and checklists replaces juggling manuals and clipboards, and tetherless computer system access allows free motion throughout a cabin while monitoring and operating equipment.

  6. High Fidelity Simulations of Large-Scale Wireless Networks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Onunkwo, Uzoma [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Benz, Zachary [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2015-11-01

    The worldwide proliferation of wireless connected devices continues to accelerate. There are 10s of billions of wireless links across the planet with an additional explosion of new wireless usage anticipated as the Internet of Things develops. Wireless technologies do not only provide convenience for mobile applications, but are also extremely cost-effective to deploy. Thus, this trend towards wireless connectivity will only continue and Sandia must develop the necessary simulation technology to proactively analyze the associated emerging vulnerabilities. Wireless networks are marked by mobility and proximity-based connectivity. The de facto standard for exploratory studies of wireless networks is discrete event simulations (DES). However, the simulation of large-scale wireless networks is extremely difficult due to prohibitively large turnaround time. A path forward is to expedite simulations with parallel discrete event simulation (PDES) techniques. The mobility and distance-based connectivity associated with wireless simulations, however, typically doom PDES and fail to scale (e.g., OPNET and ns-3 simulators). We propose a PDES-based tool aimed at reducing the communication overhead between processors. The proposed solution will use light-weight processes to dynamically distribute computation workload while mitigating communication overhead associated with synchronizations. This work is vital to the analytics and validation capabilities of simulation and emulation at Sandia. We have years of experience in Sandia’s simulation and emulation projects (e.g., MINIMEGA and FIREWHEEL). Sandia’s current highly-regarded capabilities in large-scale emulations have focused on wired networks, where two assumptions prevent scalable wireless studies: (a) the connections between objects are mostly static and (b) the nodes have fixed locations.

  7. Recording of dairy cows behaviour with wireless accelerometers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mol, de R.M.; Bleumer, E.J.B.; Hogewerf, P.H.; Ipema, A.H.

    2009-01-01

    The daily behaviour of dairy cows reflects the health and well-being status. The behaviour can be monitored with accelerometers (used as a tilt sensor to measure the angle) in a wireless sensor network. The angle of a leg reflects the lying or standing behaviour, the angle of the head might reflect

  8. Enhanced SWEET protocol for energy efficient wireless sensor networks

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Dludla, AG

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available SWEET routing protocol is one of the many pro- tocols developed for cluster formation and routing in wireless sensor networks. The SWEET protocol is a decentralized clus- tering protocol, it uses timers and interim updated cluster head estimation...

  9. Security for multihop wireless networks

    CERN Document Server

    Khan, Shafiullah

    2014-01-01

    Security for Multihop Wireless Networks provides broad coverage of the security issues facing multihop wireless networks. Presenting the work of a different group of expert contributors in each chapter, it explores security in mobile ad hoc networks, wireless sensor networks, wireless mesh networks, and personal area networks.Detailing technologies and processes that can help you secure your wireless networks, the book covers cryptographic coprocessors, encryption, authentication, key management, attacks and countermeasures, secure routing, secure medium access control, intrusion detection, ep

  10. The wireless internet explained

    CERN Document Server

    Rhoton, John

    2001-01-01

    The Wireless Internet Explained covers the full spectrum of wireless technologies from a wide range of vendors, including initiatives by Microsoft and Compaq. The Wireless Internet Explained takes a practical look at wireless technology. Rhoton explains the concepts behind the physics, and provides an overview that clarifies the convoluted set of standards heaped together under the umbrella of wireless. It then expands on these technical foundations to give a panorama of the increasingly crowded landscape of wireless product offerings. When it comes to actual implementation the book gives abundant down-to-earth advice on topics ranging from the selection and deployment of mobile devices to the extremely sensitive subject of security.Written by an expert on Internet messaging, the author of Digital Press''s successful Programmer''s Guide to Internet Mail and X.400 and SMTP: Battle of the E-mail Protocols, The Wireless Internet Explained describes and evaluates the current state of the fast-growing and crucial...

  11. Wireless rechargeable sensor networks

    CERN Document Server

    Yang, Yuanyuan

    2015-01-01

    This SpringerBrief provides a concise guide to applying wireless energy transfer techniques in traditional battery-powered sensor networks. It examines the benefits and challenges of wireless power including efficiency and reliability. The authors build a wireless rechargeable sensor networks from scratch and aim to provide perpetual network operation. Chapters cover a wide range of topics from the collection of energy information and recharge scheduling to joint design with typical sensing applications such as data gathering. Problems are approached using a natural combination of probability

  12. Wireless network pricing

    CERN Document Server

    Huang, Jianwei

    2013-01-01

    Today's wireless communications and networking practices are tightly coupled with economic considerations, to the extent that it is almost impossible to make a sound technology choice without understanding the corresponding economic implications. This book aims at providing a foundational introduction on how microeconomics, and pricing theory in particular, can help us to understand and build better wireless networks. The book can be used as lecture notes for a course in the field of network economics, or a reference book for wireless engineers and applied economists to understand how pricing

  13. Wireless mesh networks

    CERN Document Server

    Held, Gilbert

    2005-01-01

    Wireless mesh networking is a new technology that has the potential to revolutionize how we access the Internet and communicate with co-workers and friends. Wireless Mesh Networks examines the concept and explores its advantages over existing technologies. This book explores existing and future applications, and examines how some of the networking protocols operate.The text offers a detailed analysis of the significant problems affecting wireless mesh networking, including network scale issues, security, and radio frequency interference, and suggests actual and potential solutions for each pro

  14. Optical and wireless technologies

    CERN Document Server

    Tiwari, Manish; Singh, Ghanshyam; Minzioni, Paolo

    2018-01-01

    This book presents selected papers from 1st International Conference on Optical and Wireless Technologies, providing insights into the analytical, experimental, and developmental aspects of systems, techniques, and devices in these spheres. It explores the combined use of various optical and wireless technologies in next-generation networking applications, and discusses the latest developments in applications such as photonics, high-speed communication systems and networks, visible light communication, nanophotonics, and wireless and multiple-input-multiple-output (MIMO) systems. The book will serve as a valuable reference resource for academics and researchers across the globe.

  15. Aggressive simultaneous radiochemotherapy with cisplatin and paclitaxel in combination with accelerated hyperfractionated radiotherapy in locally advanced head and neck tumors. Results of a phase I-II trial

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuhnt, T.; Pigorsch, S.; Pelz, T.; Haensgen, G.; Dunst, J. [Dept. of Radiotherapy, Martin Luther Univ., Halle (Germany); Becker, A. [Dept. of Radiotherapy, Martin Luther Univ., Halle (Germany); Dept. of Radiotherapy, Municipial Hospital, Dessau (Germany); Bloching, M.; Passmann, M. [Dept. of Head and Neck Surgery, Martin Luther Univ., Halle (Germany); Lotterer, E. [Dept. of Internal Medicine I, Martin Luther Univ., Halle (Germany)

    2003-10-01

    We have tested a very aggressive combination protocol with cisplatin and escalated paclitaxel in combination with accelerated hyperfractionated radiotherapy to assess the maximum tolerated dose (MTD), dose-limiting toxicity (DLT), overall toxicity, and response rate. Patients and Methods: The trial recruited 24 patients (21 males, three females, mean age 57 years) treated at our department from 1998 through 2001. Irradiation was administered in daily doses of 2 Gy up to 30 Gy followed by 1.4 Gy twice daily up to 70.6 Gy to the primary tumor and involved nodes and 51 Gy to the clinically negative regional nodes. The chemotherapy schedule included cisplatin in a fixed dose of 20 mg/m{sup 2} on days 1-5 and 29-33 and paclitaxel at increasing dose levels of 20, 25, 30 mg/m{sup 2} twice weekly over the whole treatment time. Patients were recruited in cohorts of three to six, and the MTD was reached if two out of six patients in one cohort developed DLT. DLT was defined as any grade 4 toxicity or any grade 3 toxicity requiring treatment interruption or unplanned hospitalization or any grade 3 neurotoxicity. We recruited mainly patients with large tumors for this protocol; all patients were stage IV, and the mean tumor volume (primary + metastases) amounted to 72 {+-} 61 cm{sup 3}. The mean follow-up was 30 months (range 4-39 months). Results: One early death (peritonitis and sepsis a t day 10) occurred, and 23 patients were evaluable for acute toxicity and response. The MTD of paclitaxel was reached at the third dose level (30 mg/m{sup 2} paclitaxel twice weekly). The DLT was severe mucositis grade 3 (n = 1) and skin erythema grade 4 (n = 2). After determining the MTD, another 14 patients were treated at the recommended dose level of paclitaxel with 25 mg/m{sup 2} twice weekly. In summary, 13/23 patients (57%) developed grade 3 and 10/23 (43%) grade 2 mucositis. Two patients (9%) had grade 4, five (22%) grade 3, and 16 (69%) grade 2 dermatitis. One patient died at day 30

  16. Can Accelerators Accelerate Learning?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santos, A. C. F.; Fonseca, P.; Coelho, L. F. S.

    2009-01-01

    The 'Young Talented' education program developed by the Brazilian State Funding Agency (FAPERJ)[1] makes it possible for high-schools students from public high schools to perform activities in scientific laboratories. In the Atomic and Molecular Physics Laboratory at Federal University of Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ), the students are confronted with modern research tools like the 1.7 MV ion accelerator. Being a user-friendly machine, the accelerator is easily manageable by the students, who can perform simple hands-on activities, stimulating interest in physics, and getting the students close to modern laboratory techniques.

  17. 76 FR 27745 - Wireless Innovation for Transportation; Request for Information

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-12

    ... technologies that result in accelerated benefits to the American people. Overall, the fund will support basic... benefits to both passenger, fleet and freight transportation systems. The WIN for Transportation program... wireless ``fast lanes'' for multi-modal transportation applications such as real-time safety inspections...

  18. Heads Up

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Form Controls Cancel Submit Search the CDC HEADS UP Note: Javascript is disabled or is not supported ... please visit this page: About CDC.gov . HEADS UP Brain Injury Basics What Is a Concussion? Concussion ...

  19. Wireless capsule endoscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iddan, Gavriel; Meron, Gavriel; Glukhovsky, Arkady; Swain, Paul

    2000-05-01

    We have developed a new type of endoscopy, which for the first time allows painless endoscopic imaging of the whole of the small bowel. This procedure involves a wireless capsule endoscope and we describe here its successful testing in humans.

  20. Green heterogeneous wireless networks

    CERN Document Server

    Ismail, Muhammad; Nee, Hans-Peter; Qaraqe, Khalid A; Serpedin, Erchin

    2016-01-01

    This book focuses on the emerging research topic "green (energy efficient) wireless networks" which has drawn huge attention recently from both academia and industry. This topic is highly motivated due to important environmental, financial, and quality-of-experience (QoE) considerations. Specifically, the high energy consumption of the wireless networks manifests in approximately 2% of all CO2 emissions worldwide. This book presents the authors’ visions and solutions for deployment of energy efficient (green) heterogeneous wireless communication networks. The book consists of three major parts. The first part provides an introduction to the "green networks" concept, the second part targets the green multi-homing resource allocation problem, and the third chapter presents a novel deployment of device-to-device (D2D) communications and its successful integration in Heterogeneous Networks (HetNets). The book is novel in that it specifically targets green networking in a heterogeneous wireless medium, which re...

  1. Wireless radio a history

    CERN Document Server

    Coe, Lewis

    2006-01-01

    ""Informative...recommended""--Choice; ""interesting...a good read...well worth reading""--Contact Magazine. This history first looks at Marconi's wireless communications system and then explores its many applications, including marine radio, cellular telephones, police and military uses, television and radar. Radio collecting is also discussed, and brief biographies are provided for the major figures in the development and use of the wireless.

  2. Wireless Networks Security

    OpenAIRE

    Jenko, Marko

    2016-01-01

    In this thesis we deal with security, penetration testing and different types of attacks on wireless networks. We theoretically familiarize with the field of wireless networks, security mechanisms and the most used security standards. Then we systematically overview the field of penetration testing. We divide the penetration testing on types and different methodologies. We explain the tasks of the provider and the subscriber in penetration testing. Description of the process of conducting the...

  3. Wireless Networks: New Meaning to Ubiquitous Computing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drew, Wilfred, Jr.

    2003-01-01

    Discusses the use of wireless technology in academic libraries. Topics include wireless networks; standards (IEEE 802.11); wired versus wireless; why libraries implement wireless technology; wireless local area networks (WLANs); WLAN security; examples of wireless use at Indiana State University and Morrisville College (New York); and useful…

  4. Fatal collision? Are wireless headsets a risk in treating patients?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sage, Cindy; Hardell, Lennart

    2018-02-05

    Wireless-enabled headsets that connect to the internet can provide remote transcribing of patient examination notes. Audio and video can be captured and transmitted by wireless signals sent from the computer screen in the frame of the glasses. But using wireless glass-type devices can expose the user to a specific absorption rates (SAR) of 1.11-1.46 W/kg of radiofrequency radiation. That RF intensity is as high as or higher than RF emissions of some cell phones. Prolonged use of cell phones used ipsilaterally at the head has been associated with statistically significant increased risk of glioma and acoustic neuroma. Using wireless glasses for extended periods to teach, to perform surgery, or conduct patient exams will expose the medical professional to similar RF exposures which may impair brain performance, cognition and judgment, concentration and attention and increase the risk for brain tumors. The quality of medical care may be compromised by extended use of wireless-embedded devices in health care settings. Both medical professionals and their patients should know the risks of such devices and have a choice about allowing their use during patient exams. Transmission of sensitive patient data over wireless networks may increase the risk of hacking and security breaches leading to losses of private patient medical and financial data that are strictly protected under HIPPA health information privacy laws.

  5. Energy Aware Clustering Algorithms for Wireless Sensor Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rakhshan, Noushin; Rafsanjani, Marjan Kuchaki; Liu, Chenglian

    2011-09-01

    The sensor nodes deployed in wireless sensor networks (WSNs) are extremely power constrained, so maximizing the lifetime of the entire networks is mainly considered in the design. In wireless sensor networks, hierarchical network structures have the advantage of providing scalable and energy efficient solutions. In this paper, we investigate different clustering algorithms for WSNs and also compare these clustering algorithms based on metrics such as clustering distribution, cluster's load balancing, Cluster Head's (CH) selection strategy, CH's role rotation, node mobility, clusters overlapping, intra-cluster communications, reliability, security and location awareness.

  6. Acceleration Mechanisms

    OpenAIRE

    Melrose, D. B.

    2009-01-01

    Glossary I. Background and context of the subject II. Stochastic acceleration III. Resonant scattering IV. Diffusive shock acceleration V. DSA at multiple shocks VI. Applications of DSA VII. Acceleration by parallel electric fields VIII. Other acceleration mechanisms IX. Future directions X. Appendix: Quasilinear equations XI. Bibliography

  7. A new clinical guideline from the Royal College of Paediatrics and Child Health with a national awareness campaign accelerates brain tumor diagnosis in UK children--"HeadSmart: Be Brain Tumour Aware".

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-03-01

    A national survey in 2006 identified that UK referral practice for pediatric CNS tumors ranked poorly in international comparisons, which led to new National Health Service (NHS) Evidence accredited referral guidelines published in 2008 by the Royal College of Paediatrics and Child Health and a campaign to raise awareness of early features of CNS tumors and the need for timely imaging. The "HeadSmart: Be Brain Tumour Aware" campaign was launched in June 2011 across the UK as a quality improvement strategy directed at reducing the total diagnostic interval (TDI) from a pre-campaign (2006) median of 14 (mean, 35.4) weeks to a target of 5 weeks in order to equal the best reported internationally. Professional and public awareness was measured by questionnaire surveys. TDI was collected by clinical champions in 18 regional children's cancer centers and the public campaign was coordinated by a national charity, working with a network of community champions. The guidelines and campaign raised awareness among pediatricians and were associated with reduction in TDI to a median of 6.7 (mean, 21.3) weeks by May 2013. This change in referral practice was most pronounced in the time from first medical contact to CNS imaging, for which the median was reduced from 3.3 to 1.4 weeks between January 2011 and May 2013 (P = .009). This strategy to accelerate brain tumor diagnosis by the NHS using a public and professional awareness campaign is a "world first" in pediatric cancer and is being emulated internationally and acknowledged by a series of NHS and charity awards for excellence. © Crown copyright 2015.

  8. OPTICAL WIRELESS COMMUNICATION SYSTEM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    JOSHUA L.Y. CHIENG

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The growing demand of bandwidth in this modern internet age has been testing the existing telecommunication infrastructures around the world. With broadband speeds moving towards the region of Gbps and Tbps, many researches have begun on the development of using optical wireless technology as feasible and future methods to the current wireless technology. Unlike the existing radio frequency wireless applications, optical wireless uses electromagnetic spectrums that are unlicensed and free. With that, this project aim to understand and gain better understanding of optical wireless communication system by building an experimental and simulated model. The quality of service and system performance will be investigated and reviewed. This project employs laser diode as the propagation medium and successfully transferred audio signals as far as 15 meters. On its quality of service, results of the project model reveal that the bit error rate increases, signal-to-noise ratio and quality factor decreases as the link distance between the transmitter and receiver increases. OptiSystem was used to build the simulated model and MATLAB was used to assist signal-to-noise ratio calculations. By comparing the simulated and experimental receiver’s power output, the experimental model’s efficiency is at 66.3%. Other than the system’s performance, challenges and factors affecting the system have been investigated and discussed. Such challenges include beam divergence, misalignment and particle absorption.

  9. A Wireless MEMS-Based Inclinometer Sensor Node for Structural Health Monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ha, Dae Woong; Park, Hyo Seon; Choi, Se Woon; Kim, Yousok

    2013-01-01

    This paper proposes a wireless inclinometer sensor node for structural health monitoring (SHM) that can be applied to civil engineering and building structures subjected to various loadings. The inclinometer used in this study employs a method for calculating the tilt based on the difference between the static acceleration and the acceleration due to gravity, using a micro-electro-mechanical system (MEMS)-based accelerometer. A wireless sensor node was developed through which tilt measurement data are wirelessly transmitted to a monitoring server. This node consists of a slave node that uses a short-distance wireless communication system (RF 2.4 GHz) and a master node that uses a long-distance telecommunication system (code division multiple access—CDMA). The communication distance limitation, which is recognized as an important issue in wireless monitoring systems, has been resolved via these two wireless communication components. The reliability of the proposed wireless inclinometer sensor node was verified experimentally by comparing the values measured by the inclinometer and subsequently transferred to the monitoring server via wired and wireless transfer methods to permit a performance evaluation of the wireless communication sensor nodes. The experimental results indicated that the two systems (wired and wireless transfer systems) yielded almost identical values at a tilt angle greater than 1°, and a uniform difference was observed at a tilt angle less than 0.42° (approximately 0.0032° corresponding to 0.76% of the tilt angle, 0.42°) regardless of the tilt size. This result was deemed to be within the allowable range of measurement error in SHM. Thus, the wireless transfer system proposed in this study was experimentally verified for practical application in a structural health monitoring system. PMID:24287533

  10. EXPERIMENTAL PERFORMANCE ANALYSIS OF WIRELESS ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ABSTRACT. Wireless networking is currently being deployed for various applications. However, the application of wireless networking in healthcare remains a challenge mainly because of security and reliability concerns. This paper presents experimental results of performance analysis of a wireless network for healthcare ...

  11. Fiber wireless networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nirmalathas, A.; Bakaul, M.; Lim, C.; Novak, D.; Waterhouse, R.

    2005-11-01

    Broadband wireless networks based on a number of new frequency windows at higher microwave and millimeter-wave frequencies have been actively pursued to provide ultra-high bandwidth services over a wireless networks. These networks will have a large number of antenna base-stations with high throughput. Significant reductions in antenna base-station complexity can be achieved if most of the signal routing and switching functions centralized at a central office in the network. In such a network, fiber feed networks can be effectively deployed to provide high bandwidth interconnections between multiple antenna base-stations and the central office. With wavelength division multiplexing, efficient optical fiber feed network architectures could be realised to provide interconnection to a large number of antenna base-stations. In this paper, we present an over view of our recent research into system technologies for fiber wireless networks.

  12. Wireless physical layer security

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poor, H. Vincent; Schaefer, Rafael F.

    2017-01-01

    Security in wireless networks has traditionally been considered to be an issue to be addressed separately from the physical radio transmission aspects of wireless systems. However, with the emergence of new networking architectures that are not amenable to traditional methods of secure communication such as data encryption, there has been an increase in interest in the potential of the physical properties of the radio channel itself to provide communications security. Information theory provides a natural framework for the study of this issue, and there has been considerable recent research devoted to using this framework to develop a greater understanding of the fundamental ability of the so-called physical layer to provide security in wireless networks. Moreover, this approach is also suggestive in many cases of coding techniques that can approach fundamental limits in practice and of techniques for other security tasks such as authentication. This paper provides an overview of these developments.

  13. Portable wireless power transmission system for video capsule endoscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhiwei, Jia; Guozheng, Yan; Bingquan, Zhu

    2014-10-01

    Wireless power transmission is considered a practical way of overcoming the power shortage of wireless capsule endoscopy (VCE). However, most patients cannot tolerate the long hours of lying in a fixed transmitting coil during diagnosis. To develop a portable wireless power transmission system for VCE, a compact transmitting coil and a portable inverter circuit driven by rechargeable batteries are proposed. The couple coils, optimized considering the stability and safety conditions, are 28 turns of transmitting coil and six strands of receiving coil. The driven circuit is designed according to the portable principle. Experiments show that the integrated system could continuously supply power to a dual-head VCE for more than 8 h at a frame rate of 30 frames per second with resolution of 320 × 240. The portable VCE exhibits potential for clinical applications, but requires further improvement and tests.

  14. Terabit Wireless Communication Challenges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwu, Shian U.

    2012-01-01

    This presentation briefly discusses a research effort on Terabit Wireless communication systems for possible space applications. Recently, terahertz (THz) technology (300-3000 GHz frequency) has attracted a great deal of interest from academia and industry. This is due to a number of interesting features of THz waves, including the nearly unlimited bandwidths available, and the non-ionizing radiation nature which does not damage human tissues and DNA with minimum health threat. Also, as millimeter-wave communication systems mature, the focus of research is, naturally, moving to the THz range. Many scientists regard THz as the last great frontier of the electromagnetic spectrum, but finding new applications outside the traditional niches of radio astronomy, Earth and planetary remote sensing, and molecular spectroscopy particularly in biomedical imaging and wireless communications has been relatively slow. Radiologists find this area of study so attractive because t-rays are non-ionizing, which suggests no harm is done to tissue or DNA. They also offer the possibility of performing spectroscopic measurements over a very wide frequency range, and can even capture signatures from liquids and solids. According to Shannon theory, the broad bandwidth of the THz frequency bands can be used for terabit-per-second (Tb/s) wireless communication systems. This enables several new applications, such as cell phones with 360 degrees autostereoscopic displays, optic-fiber replacement, and wireless Tb/s file transferring. Although THz technology could satisfy the demand for an extremely high data rate, a number of technical challenges need to be overcome before its development. This presentation provides an overview the state-of-the- art in THz wireless communication and the technical challenges for an emerging application in Terabit wireless systems. The main issue for THz wave propagation is the high atmospheric attenuation, which is dominated by water vapor absorption in the THz

  15. Wireless communications algorithmic techniques

    CERN Document Server

    Vitetta, Giorgio; Colavolpe, Giulio; Pancaldi, Fabrizio; Martin, Philippa A

    2013-01-01

    This book introduces the theoretical elements at the basis of various classes of algorithms commonly employed in the physical layer (and, in part, in MAC layer) of wireless communications systems. It focuses on single user systems, so ignoring multiple access techniques. Moreover, emphasis is put on single-input single-output (SISO) systems, although some relevant topics about multiple-input multiple-output (MIMO) systems are also illustrated.Comprehensive wireless specific guide to algorithmic techniquesProvides a detailed analysis of channel equalization and channel coding for wi

  16. Pervasive wireless environments

    CERN Document Server

    Yang, Jie; Trappe, Wade; Cheng, Jerry

    2014-01-01

    This Springer Brief provides a new approach to prevent user spoofing by using the physical properties associated with wireless transmissions to detect the presence of user spoofing. The most common method, applying cryptographic authentication, requires additional management and computational power that cannot be deployed consistently. The authors present the new approach by offering a summary of the recent research and exploring the benefits and potential challenges of this method. This brief discusses the feasibility of launching user spoofing attacks and their impact on the wireless and sen

  17. Wireless optical telecommunications

    CERN Document Server

    Bouchet, Olivier

    2013-01-01

    Wireless optical communication refers to communication based on the unguided propagation of optical waves. The past 30 years have seen significant improvements in this technique - a wireless communication solution for the current millennium - that offers an alternative to radio systems; a technique that could gain attractiveness due to recent concerns regarding the potential effects of radiofrequency waves on human health.The aim of this book is to look at the free space optics that are already used for the exchange of current information; its many benefits, such as incorporating chan

  18. Wireless telecommunication systems

    CERN Document Server

    Terré, Michel; Vivier, Emmanuelle

    2013-01-01

    Wireless telecommunication systems generate a huge amount of interest. In the last two decades, these systems have experienced at least three major technological leaps, and it has become impossible to imagine how society was organized without them. In this book, we propose a macroscopic approach on wireless systems, and aim at answering key questions about power, data rates, multiple access, cellular engineering and access networks architectures.We present a series of solved problems, whose objective is to establish the main elements of a global link budget in several radiocommunicati

  19. Data converters for wireless standards

    CERN Document Server

    Shi, Chunlei

    2002-01-01

    Wireless communication is witnessing tremendous growth with proliferation of different standards covering wide, local and personal area networks (WAN, LAN and PAN). The trends call for designs that allow 1) smooth migration to future generations of wireless standards with higher data rates for multimedia applications, 2) convergence of wireless services allowing access to different standards from the same wireless device, 3) inter-continental roaming. This requires designs that work across multiple wireless standards, can easily be reused, achieve maximum hardware share at a minimum power consumption levels particularly for mobile battery-operated devices.

  20. 75 FR 8400 - In the Matter of Certain Wireless Communications System Server Software, Wireless Handheld...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-02-24

    ... Communications System Server Software, Wireless Handheld Devices and Battery Packs; Notice of Investigation... within the United States after importation of certain wireless communications system server software... certain wireless communications system server software, wireless handheld devices or battery packs that...

  1. 75 FR 43206 - In the Matter of Certain Wireless Communications System Server Software, Wireless Handheld...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-23

    ... INTERNATIONAL TRADE COMMISSION [Investigation No. 337-TA-706] In the Matter of Certain Wireless Communications System Server Software, Wireless Handheld Devices and Battery Packs: Notice of Commission... United States after importation of certain wireless communications system server software, wireless...

  2. Cooperative Proxy Caching for Wireless Base Stations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James Z. Wang

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper proposes a mobile cache model to facilitate the cooperative proxy caching in wireless base stations. This mobile cache model uses a network cache line to record the caching state information about a web document for effective data search and cache space management. Based on the proposed mobile cache model, a P2P cooperative proxy caching scheme is proposed to use a self-configured and self-managed virtual proxy graph (VPG, independent of the underlying wireless network structure and adaptive to the network and geographic environment changes, to achieve efficient data search, data cache and date replication. Based on demand, the aggregate effect of data caching, searching and replicating actions by individual proxy servers automatically migrates the cached web documents closer to the interested clients. In addition, a cache line migration (CLM strategy is proposed to flow and replicate the heads of network cache lines of web documents associated with a moving mobile host to the new base station during the mobile host handoff. These replicated cache line heads provide direct links to the cached web documents accessed by the moving mobile hosts in the previous base station, thus improving the mobile web caching performance. Performance studies have shown that the proposed P2P cooperative proxy caching schemes significantly outperform existing caching schemes.

  3. Resource management in wireless networking

    CERN Document Server

    Cardei, Mihaela; Du, Ding-Zhu

    2005-01-01

    This is the first book that provides readers with a deep technical overview of recent advances in resource management for wireless networks at different layers of the protocol stack. The subject is explored in various wireless networks, such as ad hoc wireless networks, 3G/4G cellular, IEEE 802.11, and Bluetooth personal area networks.Survey chapters give an excellent introduction to key topics in resource management for wireless networks, while experts will be satisfied by the technical depth of the knowledge imparted in chapters exploring hot research topics.The subject area discussed in this book is very relevant today, considering the recent remarkable growth of wireless networking and the convergence of wireless personal communications, internet technologies and real-time multimedia.This volume is a very good companion for practitioners working on implementing solutions for multimedia and Quality of Service - sensitive applications over wireless networks.Written for:Researchers, faculty members, students...

  4. Laser accelerators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Willis, W.J.

    1977-01-01

    A brief discussion is given on the feasibility of using lasers to accelerate particle beams. A rough theory of operation is developed, and numerical results are obtained for an example equivalent to the Fermilab Accelerator

  5. Wireless Distributed Antenna MIMO

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2015-01-01

    The present disclosure relates to system applications of multicore optical fibers. One embodiment relates to a base transceiver station for a wireless telecommunication system comprising a plurality of antenna units arranged in a MIMO configuration and adapted for transmission and/or reception...

  6. Networking wireless sensors

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Krishnamachari, Bhaskar

    2005-01-01

    ... by networking techniques across multiple layers. The topics covered include network deployment, localization, time synchronization, wireless radio characteristics, medium-access, topology control, routing, data-centric techniques, and transport protocols. Ideal for researchers and designers seeking to create new algorithms and protocols and enginee...

  7. Wireless Remote Control System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adrian Tigauan

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the design of a wireless remote control system based on the ZigBee communication protocol. Gathering data from sensors or performing control tasks through wireless communication is advantageous in situations in which the use of cables is impractical. An Atmega328 microcontroller (from slave device is used for gathering data from the sensors and transmitting it to a coordinator device with the help of the XBee modules. The ZigBee standard is suitable for low-cost, low-data-rate and low-power wireless networks implementations. The XBee-PRO module, designed to meet ZigBee standards, requires minimal power for reliable data exchange between devices over a distance of up to 1600m outdoors. A key component of the ZigBee protocol is the ability to support networking and this can be used in a wireless remote control system. This system may be employed e.g. to control temperature and humidity (SHT11 sensor and light intensity (TSL230 sensor levels inside a commercial greenhouse.

  8. Subsurface Wireless Sensor Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niemeier, J. J.; Davies, J. L.; Kruger, A.

    2008-12-01

    Conventional thinking holds that underground- and underwater radio communication is not possible, except at very low frequencies employing very long antennas and high transmit power. However, researchers at The University of Iowa have demonstrated that using inexpensive, low-power radios, it is in fact possible to achieve reliable underground radio communication over distances of several meters. This allows for creating underground wireless sensor networks. A proof-of-concept network was established at The University of Iowa, where nodes that measure soil moisture content are buried over a 20×20 m area (up to 1 m deep). The nodes organize themselves into a wireless sensor network, reconfigure routes as radio link quality waxes and wanes, cooperate in routing data packets to a surface base station, and so on. In an agricultural research setting, an advantage of such buried wireless sensor networks is that, if nodes were buried deep enough, they may be left in place during agricultural field work. Power consumption is an important issue in wireless sensor networks. This is especially true in a buried network where battery replacement is a major undertaking. The focus of continuing research is developing methods of inductively recharging buried sensor batteries.

  9. Insecurity of Wireless Networks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sheldon, Frederick T [ORNL; Weber, John Mark [Dynetics, Inc.; Yoo, Seong-Moo [University of Alabama, Huntsville; Pan, W. David [University of Alabama, Huntsville

    2012-01-01

    Wireless is a powerful core technology enabling our global digital infrastructure. Wi-Fi networks are susceptible to attacks on Wired Equivalency Privacy, Wi-Fi Protected Access (WPA), and WPA2. These attack signatures can be profiled into a system that defends against such attacks on the basis of their inherent characteristics. Wi-Fi is the standard protocol for wireless networks used extensively in US critical infrastructures. Since the Wired Equivalency Privacy (WEP) security protocol was broken, the Wi-Fi Protected Access (WPA) protocol has been considered the secure alternative compatible with hardware developed for WEP. However, in November 2008, researchers developed an attack on WPA, allowing forgery of Address Resolution Protocol (ARP) packets. Subsequent enhancements have enabled ARP poisoning, cryptosystem denial of service, and man-in-the-middle attacks. Open source systems and methods (OSSM) have long been used to secure networks against such attacks. This article reviews OSSMs and the results of experimental attacks on WPA. These experiments re-created current attacks in a laboratory setting, recording both wired and wireless traffic. The article discusses methods of intrusion detection and prevention in the context of cyber physical protection of critical Internet infrastructure. The basis for this research is a specialized (and undoubtedly incomplete) taxonomy of Wi-Fi attacks and their adaptations to existing countermeasures and protocol revisions. Ultimately, this article aims to provide a clearer picture of how and why wireless protection protocols and encryption must achieve a more scientific basis for detecting and preventing such attacks.

  10. Wireless networked music performance

    CERN Document Server

    Gabrielli, Leonardo

    2016-01-01

    This book presents a comprehensive overview of the state of the art in Networked Music Performance (NMP) and a historical survey of computer music networking. It introduces current technical trends in NMP and technical issues yet to be addressed. It also lists wireless communication protocols and compares these to the requirements of NMP. Practical use cases and advancements are also discussed.

  11. Maximizing lifetime of wireless sensor networks using genetic approach

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wagh, Sanjeev; Prasad, Ramjee

    2014-01-01

    the cluster head intelligently using auction data of node i.e. its local battery power, topology strength and external battery support. The network lifetime is the centre focus of the research paper which explores intelligently selection of cluster head using auction based approach. The multi......The wireless sensor networks are designed to install the smart network applications or network for emergency solutions, where human interaction is not possible. The nodes in wireless sensor networks have to self organize as per the users requirements through monitoring environments. As the sensor...... nodes are deployed in an inaccessible location for particular mission, it is difficult to exchange or recharge the nodes battery. Hence the important issues to design the sensor network for maximum time duration of network and also for low power operation of the nodes. The proposal is to select...

  12. Randomized Phase III Trial to Test Accelerated Versus Standard Fractionation in Combination With Concurrent Cisplatin for Head and Neck Carcinomas in the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group 0129 Trial: Long-Term Report of Efficacy and Toxicity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen-Tan, Phuc Felix; Zhang, Qiang; Ang, K. Kian; Weber, Randal S.; Rosenthal, David I.; Soulieres, Denis; Kim, Harold; Silverman, Craig; Raben, Adam; Galloway, Thomas J.; Fortin, André; Gore, Elizabeth; Westra, William H.; Chung, Christine H.; Jordan, Richard C.; Gillison, Maura L.; List, Marcie; Le, Quynh-Thu

    2014-01-01

    Purpose We tested the efficacy and toxicity of cisplatin plus accelerated fractionation with a concomitant boost (AFX-C) versus standard fractionation (SFX) in locally advanced head and neck carcinoma (LA-HNC). Patients and Methods Patients had stage III to IV carcinoma of the oral cavity, oropharynx, hypopharynx, or larynx. Radiation therapy schedules were 70 Gy in 35 fractions over 7 weeks (SFX) or 72 Gy in 42 fractions over 6 weeks (AFX-C). Cisplatin doses were 100 mg/m2 once every 3 weeks for two (AFX-C) or three (SFX) cycles. Toxicities were scored by using National Cancer Institute Common Toxicity Criteria 2.0 and the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group/European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer criteria. Overall survival (OS) and progression-free survival (PFS) rates were estimated by using the Kaplan-Meier method and were compared by using the one-sided log-rank test. Locoregional failure (LRF) and distant metastasis (DM) rates were estimated by using the cumulative incidence method and Gray's test. Results In all, 721 of 743 patients were analyzable (361, SFX; 360, AFX-C). At a median follow-up of 7.9 years (range, 0.3 to 10.1 years) for 355 surviving patients, no differences were observed in OS (hazard ratio [HR], 0.96; 95% CI, 0.79 to 1.18; P = .37; 8-year survival, 48% v 48%), PFS (HR, 1.02; 95% CI, 0.84 to 1.24; P = .52; 8-year estimate, 42% v 41%), LRF (HR, 1.08; 95% CI, 0.84 to 1.38; P = .78; 8-year estimate, 37% v 39%), or DM (HR, 0.83; 95% CI, 0.56 to 1.24; P = .16; 8-year estimate, 15% v 13%). For oropharyngeal cancer, p16-positive patients had better OS than p16-negative patients (HR, 0.30; 95% CI, 0.21 to 0.42; P patients with LA-HNC. Long-term high survival rates in p16-positive patients with oropharyngeal cancer support the ongoing efforts to explore deintensification. PMID:25366680

  13. NASA Bluetooth Wireless Communications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Robert D.

    2007-01-01

    NASA has been interested in wireless communications for many years, especially when the crew size of the International Space Station (ISS) was reduced to two members. NASA began a study to find ways to improve crew efficiency to make sure the ISS could be maintained with limited crew capacity and still be a valuable research testbed in Low-Earth Orbit (LEO). Currently the ISS audio system requires astronauts to be tethered to the audio system, specifically a device called the Audio Terminal Unit (ATU). Wireless communications would remove the tether and allow astronauts to freely float from experiment to experiment without having to worry about moving and reconnecting the associated cabling or finding the space equivalent of an extension cord. A wireless communication system would also improve safety and reduce system susceptibility to Electromagnetic Interference (EMI). Safety would be improved because a crewmember could quickly escape a fire while maintaining communications with the ground and other crewmembers at any location. In addition, it would allow the crew to overcome the volume limitations of the ISS ATU. This is especially important to the Portable Breathing Apparatus (PBA). The next generation of space vehicles and habitats also demand wireless attention. Orion will carry up to six crewmembers in a relatively small cabin. Yet, wireless could become a driving factor to reduce launch weight and increase habitable volume. Six crewmembers, each tethered to a panel, could result in a wiring mess even in nominal operations. In addition to Orion, research is being conducted to determine if Bluetooth is appropriate for Lunar Habitat applications.

  14. A Low Energy Intelligent Clustering Protocol for Wireless Sensor Network

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li, Qiao; Cui, Lingguo; Zhang, Baihai

    2010-01-01

    LEACH (low-energy adaptive clustering hierarchy) is a well-known self-organizing, adaptive clustering protocol of wireless sensor networks. However it has some shortcomings when it faces such problems as the cluster construction and energy management. In this paper, LEICP (low energy intelligent...... to the residual energy and positions of nodes. In every round the node called auxiliary cluster-head calculates the position of the clusterhead using Bacterial Foraging Optimization Algorithm (BFOA). After aggregating the data received, the cluster-head node decides whether to choose another cluster...

  15. Head Injuries

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... numbness in the arms or legs. Loss of consciousness. Seizures. What causes a head injury? There are ... Aid and Injury Prevention Crisis Situations Pets and Animals myhealthfinder Food and Nutrition Healthy Food Choices Weight ...

  16. Head Lice

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Head lice cannot jump or fly. Only the direct contact with an infested person or their contaminated ... the complex world of health care and making…Sports and Exercise at Every AgeRead Article >>Exercise and ...

  17. The Lure of Wireless Encryption

    CERN Multimedia

    Computer Security Team

    2013-01-01

    Following our article entitled “Jekyll or Hyde? Better browse securely” in the last issue of the Bulletin, some people wondered why the CERN wireless network is not encrypted…   There are many arguments why it is not. The simplest is usability: the communication and management of the corresponding access keys would be challenging given the sheer number of wireless devices the CERN network hosts. Keys would quickly become public, e.g. at conferences, and might be shared, written on whiteboards, etc. Then there are all the devices which cannot be easily configured to use encryption protocols - a fact which would create plenty of calls to the CERN Service Desk… But our main argument is that wireless encryption is DECEPTIVE. Wireless encryption is deceptive as it only protects the wireless network against unauthorised access (and the CERN network already has other means to protect against that). Wireless encryption however, does not really help you. You ...

  18. Efficient Cluster Head Selection Algorithm for MANET

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khalid Hussain

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In mobile ad hoc network (MANET cluster head selection is considered a gigantic challenge. In wireless sensor network LEACH protocol can be used to select cluster head on the bases of energy, but it is still a dispute in mobil ad hoc networks and especially when nodes are itinerant. In this paper we proposed an efficient cluster head selection algorithm (ECHSA, for selection of the cluster head efficiently in Mobile ad hoc networks. We evaluate our proposed algorithm through simulation in OMNet++ as well as on test bed; we experience the result according to our assumption. For further evaluation we also compare our proposed protocol with several other protocols like LEACH-C and consequences show perfection.

  19. Matching theory for wireless networks

    CERN Document Server

    Han, Zhu; Saad, Walid

    2017-01-01

    This book provides the fundamental knowledge of the classical matching theory problems. It builds up the bridge between the matching theory and the 5G wireless communication resource allocation problems. The potentials and challenges of implementing the semi-distributive matching theory framework into the wireless resource allocations are analyzed both theoretically and through implementation examples. Academics, researchers, engineers, and so on, who are interested in efficient distributive wireless resource allocation solutions, will find this book to be an exceptional resource. .

  20. Wireless Communication Enhancement Methods for Mobile Robots in Radiation Environments

    CERN Document Server

    Nattanmai Parasuraman, Ramviyas; Ferre, Manuel

    In hostile environments such as in scientific facilities where ionising radiation is a dominant hazard, reducing human interventions by increasing robotic operations are desirable. CERN, the European Organization for Nuclear Research, has around 50 km of underground scientific facilities, where wireless mobile robots could help in the operation of the accelerator complex, e.g. in conducting remote inspections and radiation surveys in different areas. The main challenges to be considered here are not only that the robots should be able to go over long distances and operate for relatively long periods, but also the underground tunnel environment, the possible presence of electromagnetic fields, radiation effects, and the fact that the robots shall in no way interrupt the operation of the accelerators. Having a reliable and robust wireless communication system is essential for successful execution of such robotic missions and to avoid situations of manual recovery of the robots in the event that the robot runs ...

  1. Laser accelerator

    OpenAIRE

    Vigil, Ricardo

    2014-01-01

    Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited In 1979,W. B. Colson and S. K. Ride proposed a new kind of electron accelerator using a uniform magnetic field in combination with a circularly-polarized laser field. A key concept is to couple the oscillating electric field to the electron’s motion so that acceleration is sustained. This dissertation investigates the performance of the proposed laser accelerator using modern high powered lasers and mag-netic fields that are significan...

  2. An Assessment of Emerging Wireless Broadband Technologies

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Fountanas, Leonidas

    2001-01-01

    ... technologies in providing broadband services today, emerging wireless broadband technologies are expected to significantly increase their market share over the next years, Deploying a wireless network...

  3. Wireless Sensor Portal Technology Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Recognizing the needs and challenges facing NASA Earth Science for data input, manipulation and distribution, Mobitrum is proposing a ? Wireless Sensor Portal...

  4. Adaptive Wireless Transceiver, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Wireless technologies are an increasingly attractive means for spatial data, input, manipulation, and distribution. Mobitrum is proposing an innovative Adaptive...

  5. Smart Home Wireless Sensor Nodes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lynggaard, Per

    Smart homes are further development of intelligent buildings and home automation, where context awareness and autonomous behaviour are added. They are based on a combination of the Internet and emerging technologies like wireless sensor nodes. These wireless sensor nodes are challenging because....... This paper introduces an approach that considerably lowers the wireless sensor node power consumption and the amount of transmitted sensor events. It uses smart objects that include artificial intelligence to efficiently process the sensor event on location and thereby saves the costly wireless...

  6. Some Challenges in Wireless Security

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Banerjee, Suman

    2007-01-01

    Wireless communication technologies provide users with significant flexibility and portability and hence is being widely adopted as a preferred mode of communication in many military and civilian applications...

  7. Smart Home Wireless Sensor Nodes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lynggaard, Per

    . This paper introduces an approach that considerably lowers the wireless sensor node power consumption and the amount of transmitted sensor events. It uses smart objects that include artificial intelligence to efficiently process the sensor event on location and thereby saves the costly wireless......Smart homes are further development of intelligent buildings and home automation, where context awareness and autonomous behaviour are added. They are based on a combination of the Internet and emerging technologies like wireless sensor nodes. These wireless sensor nodes are challenging because...

  8. Cognitive wireless networks

    CERN Document Server

    Feng, Zhiyong; Zhang, Ping

    2015-01-01

    This brief examines the current research in cognitive wireless networks (CWNs). Along with a review of challenges in CWNs, this brief presents novel theoretical studies and architecture models for CWNs, advances in the cognitive information awareness and delivery, and intelligent resource management technologies. The brief presents the motivations and concepts of CWNs, including theoretical studies of temporal and geographic distribution entropy as well as cognitive information metrics. A new architecture model of CWNs is proposed with theoretical, functional and deployment architectures suppo

  9. Electrostatic accelerators

    CERN Document Server

    Hinterberger, F

    2006-01-01

    The principle of electrostatic accelerators is presented. We consider Cockcroft– Walton, Van de Graaff and Tandem Van de Graaff accelerators. We resume high voltage generators such as cascade generators, Van de Graaff band generators, Pelletron generators, Laddertron generators and Dynamitron generators. The speci c features of accelerating tubes, ion optics and methods of voltage stabilization are described. We discuss the characteristic beam properties and the variety of possible beams. We sketch possible applications and the progress in the development of electrostatic accelerators.

  10. Accelerator development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1975-01-01

    Because the use of accelerated heavy ions would provide many opportunities for new and important studies in nuclear physics and nuclear chemistry, as well as other disciplines, both the Chemistry and Physics Divisions are supporting the development of a heavy-ion accelerator. The design of greatest current interest includes a tandem accelerator with a terminal voltage of approximately 25 MV injecting into a linear accelerator with rf superconducting resonators. This combined accelerator facility would be capable of accelerating ions of masses ranging over the entire periodic table to an energy corresponding to approximately 10 MeV/nucleon. This approach, as compared to other concepts, has the advantages of lower construction costs, lower operating power, 100 percent duty factor, and high beam quality (good energy resolution, good timing resolution, small beam size, and small beam divergence). The included sections describe the concept of the proposed heavy-ion accelerator, and the development program aiming at: (1) investigation of the individual questions concerning the superconducting accelerating resonators; (2) construction and testing of prototype accelerator systems; and (3) search for economical solutions to engineering problems. (U.S.)

  11. Hyperfractionated accelerated radiation therapy plus cetuximab plus cisplatin chemotherapy in locally advanced inoperable squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck. Final 5-year results of a phase II study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuhnt, Thomas [University of Leipzig, Department of Imaging and Radiation Medicine, Clinic of Radiooncology, Leipzig (Germany); Schreiber, Andreas [Private Praxis for Radio Oncology Dresden, Dresden (Germany); Pirnasch, Anett [University of Rostock, Department of Radiation Oncology, Rostock (Germany); Hautmann, Matthias G. [University of Regensburg, Department of Radiotherapy, Regensburg (Germany); Hass, Peter [Otto von Guericke University of Magdeburg, Department of Radiotherapy, Magdeburg (Germany); Sieker, Frank P. [Martin Luther University of Halle-Wittenberg, Department of Radiotherapy, Halle (Saale) (Germany); Engenhart-Cabillic, Rita [Philipps University Marburg, Department of Radiotherapy, Marburg (Germany); Richter, Michael [Coordination Centre for Clinical Trials Halle, Halle (Saale) (Germany); Dellas, Kathrin; Dunst, Juergen [University of Kiel, Department of Radiation Oncology, Kiel (Germany)

    2017-09-15

    Cetuximab (CET) is a potent inhibitor of the epidermal growth factor receptor and has been shown to have activity in squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck (SCCHN). We conducted a single-arm phase II trial of a combination therapy comprising cisplatin (CIS), CET and hyperfractionated accelerated radiotherapy (HART). Patients with UICC stage III or IVA/B, M0 SCCHN were enrolled and treated with an initial dose of CET (400 mg/m{sup 2}) and then with a weekly dosage of 250 mg/m{sup 2} during HART. HART was started with a prescribed dosage of 2.0 Gy per day for 3 weeks, followed by 1.4 Gy twice daily to a total dose of 70.6 Gy to the gross tumour volume. CIS (40 mg/m{sup 2}) was administered weekly (days 1, 8, 15, 22, 29 and 36). The primary objective of the phase II study was to determine the 2-year progression-free survival (PFS). Between November 2007 and November 2010, a total of 74 patients were enrolled in the study, of whom 65 were evaluable (83% were men). Median age was 56 years (range 37-69 years). An Oropharyngeal primary tumour was diagnosed in 49%, T4a,b in 65% and N2/3 in 96% of the patients. Of these patients, 85% were smokers or ex-smokers. Complete remission (CR) was observed in 23 patients (35%). The most common toxicity grade was ≥3, including mucositis (58%) and dysphagia (52%). The 2- and 5-year overall survival rates were 64 and 41%, the 2- and 5-year PFS rates were 45 and 32%, and the 2- and 5-year locoregional control rates were 47 and 33%, respectively. The combination of weekly CIS with HART plus CET is a feasible regimen for these unfavourable smoking-induced cancers. However, the parallel US study (RTOG 0522) showed no advantage of the enhanced triple therapy compared to chemoradiotherapy alone. (orig.) [German] Cetuximab (CET) ist ein potenter Inhibitor des epidermalen Wachstumsfaktor-Rezeptors, der schon bei Plattenepithelkarzinomen des Kopf-Hals-Bereichs (SCCHN) Wirkung gezeigt hat. Wir fuehrten eine prospektive, einarmige Phase

  12. Stephen Myers - More collaboration for accelerators

    CERN Multimedia

    2009-01-01

    Stephen Myers has been appointed Director of Accelerators and Technology. His highest priority is to get the LHC running this year, but beyond that he also has the difficult task of balancing resources between non-LHC physics, new projects and consolidation of the existing accelerators. Stephen Myers, previous head of the Accelerator and Beams (AB) Department, will now oversee all the accelerator and technology activities at CERN, including the Beams, Technology and Engineering departments, in the re-established position of Director of Accelerators and Technology. "There are several good reasons to have a single person responsible for the CERN accelerators and technology," said Myers. "Most importantly, this will allow closer collaboration between the three departments and provide the structure for possible redeployment of resources. There will, of course, be regular meetings between the heads of department and myself, and if proble...

  13. From early wireless to Everest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, A

    1998-01-01

    Medical information has been transmitted using wireless technologies for almost 80 years. A "wired wireless" electronic stethoscope was developed by the U.S. Army Signal Corps in the early 1920's, for potential use in ship-to-shore transmission of cardiac sounds. [Winters SR. Diagnosis by wireless. Scientific American June 11, 1921, p. 465] Today, wireless is used in a wide range of medical applications and at sites from transoceanic air flights to offshore oil platforms to Mt. Everest. 'Wireless LANs' are often used in medical environments. Typically, nurses and physicians in a hospital or clinic use hand-held "wireless thin client" pen computers that exchange patient information and images with the hospital server. Numerous companies, such as Fujitsu (article below) and Cruise Technologies (www.cruisetech.com) manufacture handheld pen-entry computers. One company, LXE, integrates radio-frequency (RF) enhanced hand-held computers specifically designed for production use within a wireless LAN (www.lxe.com). Other companies (Proxim, Symbol, and others) supply the wireless RF LAN infrastructure for the enterprise. Unfortunately, there have been problems with widespread deployment of wireless LANs. Perhaps the biggest impediment has been the lack of standards. Although an international standard (IEEE 802.11) was adopted in 1997, most wireless LAN products still are not compatible with the equipment of competing companies. A problem with the current standard for LAN adapters is that throughput is limited to 3 Mbps--compared to at least 10 Mbps, and often 100 Mbps, in a hard-wired Ethernet LAN. An II Mbps standard is due out in the next year or so, but it will be at least 2 years before standards-compliant products are available. This story profiles some of the ways that wireless is being used to overcome gaps in terrestrial and within-enterprise communication.

  14. LIBO accelerates

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    The prototype module of LIBO, a linear accelerator project designed for cancer therapy, has passed its first proton-beam acceleration test. In parallel a new version - LIBO-30 - is being developed, which promises to open up even more interesting avenues.

  15. Accelerating Value Creation with Accelerators

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jonsson, Eythor Ivar

    2015-01-01

    accelerator programs. Microsoft runs accelerators in seven different countries. Accelerators have grown out of the infancy stage and are now an accepted approach to develop new ventures based on cutting-edge technology like the internet of things, mobile technology, big data and virtual reality. It is also...... and developing the best business ideas and support the due diligence process. Even universities are noticing that the learning experience of the action learning approach is an effective way to develop capabilities and change cultures. Accelerators related to what has historically been associated...... have the same purpose as businesses: To create customers....

  16. Induction accelerators

    CERN Document Server

    Takayama, Ken

    2011-01-01

    A broad class of accelerators rests on the induction principle whereby the accelerating electrical fields are generated by time-varying magnetic fluxes. Particularly suitable for the transport of bright and high-intensity beams of electrons, protons or heavy ions in any geometry (linear or circular) the research and development of induction accelerators is a thriving subfield of accelerator physics. This text is the first comprehensive account of both the fundamentals and the state of the art about the modern conceptual design and implementation of such devices. Accordingly, the first part of the book is devoted to the essential features of and key technologies used for induction accelerators at a level suitable for postgraduate students and newcomers to the field. Subsequent chapters deal with more specialized and advanced topics.

  17. Accelerating Inspire

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2266999

    2017-01-01

    CERN has been involved in the dissemination of scientific results since its early days and has continuously updated the distribution channels. Currently, Inspire hosts catalogues of articles, authors, institutions, conferences, jobs, experiments, journals and more. Successful orientation among this amount of data requires comprehensive linking between the content. Inspire has lacked a system for linking experiments and articles together based on which accelerator they were conducted at. The purpose of this project has been to create such a system. Records for 156 accelerators were created and all 2913 experiments on Inspire were given corresponding MARC tags. Records of 18404 accelerator physics related bibliographic entries were also tagged with corresponding accelerator tags. Finally, as a part of the endeavour to broaden CERN's presence on Wikipedia, existing Wikipedia articles of accelerators were updated with short descriptions and links to Inspire. In total, 86 Wikipedia articles were updated. This repo...

  18. Green Wireless Power Transfer Networks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Liu, Q.; Golinnski, M.; Pawelczak, P.; Warnier, M.

    2016-01-01

    wireless power transfer network (WPTN) aims to support devices with cable-less energy on-demand. Unfortunately, wireless power transfer itself-especially through radio frequency radiation rectification-is fairly inefficient due to decaying power with distance, antenna polarization, etc.

  19. Wireless Networks: a brief introduction

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    First page Back Continue Last page Overview Graphics. Wireless Networks: a brief introduction. Wireless communication: What? Why? How many types? What is cell? Is it different from fixed landline structure? 1G systems: FDMA/FDD and Analog FM [voice comm]. (Introduced in 1983 in Chicago by AMPS). 2G systems: 3 ...

  20. An Analysis Of Wireless Security

    OpenAIRE

    Salendra Prasad

    2017-01-01

    The WLAN security includes Wired Equivalent Primary WEP and WI-FI protected Access WPA. Today WEP is regarded as very poor security standard. WEP was regarded as very old security standard and has many security issues which users need to be addressed. In this Paper we will discuss Wireless Security and ways to improve on wireless security.

  1. Head Tilt

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... bones in the neck. Children with Klippel-Feil syndrome may have a short, broad neck, low hairline, and very restricted neck movement. Torticollis ... surgery may be necessary. To treat Klippel-Feil syndrome, a specialist may recommend ... to ease head and neck pain. Your pediatrician can refer you to a ...

  2. Head lice

    OpenAIRE

    Burgess, Ian F

    2011-01-01

    Head lice can only be diagnosed by finding live lice, as eggs take 7 days to hatch, and may appear viable for weeks after death of the egg. Infestation may be more likely in school children, with risks increased in children with more siblings, longer hair, or of lower socioeconomic group.

  3. Is HEADS in our heads?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boisen, Kirsten A; Hertz, Pernille Grarup; Blix, Charlotte

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Outpatient clinic visits are a window of opportunity to address health risk behaviors and promote a healthier lifestyle among young people. The HEADS (Home, Education, Eating, Activities, Drugs [i.e. substance use including tobacco, alcohol, and illegal drugs], Sexuality [including...... contraception], Safety, Self-harm) interview is a feasible way of exploring health risk behaviors and resilience. OBJECTIVE: The purpose of this study was to evaluate how often HEADS topics were addressed according to young patients and staff in pediatric and adult outpatient clinics. METHODS: We conducted...

  4. FMIT accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Armstrong, D.D.

    1983-01-01

    A 35-MeV 100-mA cw linear accelerator is being designed by Los Alamos for use in the Fusion Materials Irradiation Test (FMIT) Facility. Essential to this program is the design, construction, and evaluation of performance of the accelerator's injector, low-energy beam transport, and radio-frequency quadrupole sections before they are shipped to the facility site. The installation and testing of some of these sections have begun as well as the testing of the rf, noninterceptive beam diagnostics, computer control, dc power, and vacuum systems. An overview of the accelerator systems and the performance to date is given

  5. Energy Aware Cluster Based Routing Scheme For Wireless Sensor Network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roy Sohini

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Wireless Sensor Network (WSN has emerged as an important supplement to the modern wireless communication systems due to its wide range of applications. The recent researches are facing the various challenges of the sensor network more gracefully. However, energy efficiency has still remained a matter of concern for the researches. Meeting the countless security needs, timely data delivery and taking a quick action, efficient route selection and multi-path routing etc. can only be achieved at the cost of energy. Hierarchical routing is more useful in this regard. The proposed algorithm Energy Aware Cluster Based Routing Scheme (EACBRS aims at conserving energy with the help of hierarchical routing by calculating the optimum number of cluster heads for the network, selecting energy-efficient route to the sink and by offering congestion control. Simulation results prove that EACBRS performs better than existing hierarchical routing algorithms like Distributed Energy-Efficient Clustering (DEEC algorithm for heterogeneous wireless sensor networks and Energy Efficient Heterogeneous Clustered scheme for Wireless Sensor Network (EEHC.

  6. Wireless Headset Communication System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lau, Wilfred K.; Swanson, Richard; Christensen, Kurt K.

    1995-01-01

    System combines features of pagers, walkie-talkies, and cordless telephones. Wireless headset communication system uses digital modulation on spread spectrum to avoid interference among units. Consists of base station, 4 radio/antenna modules, and as many as 16 remote units with headsets. Base station serves as network controller, audio-mixing network, and interface to such outside services as computers, telephone networks, and other base stations. Developed for use at Kennedy Space Center, system also useful in industrial maintenance, emergency operations, construction, and airport operations. Also, digital capabilities exploited; by adding bar-code readers for use in taking inventories.

  7. Investigating wireless power transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    St John, Stuart A.

    2017-09-01

    Understanding Physics is a great end in itself, but is also crucial to keep pace with developments in modern technology. Wireless power transfer, known to many only as a means to charge electric toothbrushes, will soon be commonplace in charging phones, electric cars and implanted medical devices. This article outlines how to produce and use a simple set of equipment to both demonstrate and investigate this phenomenon. It presents some initial findings and aims to encourage Physics educators and their students to conduct further research, pushing the bounds of their understanding.

  8. Dynamic wireless sensor networks

    CERN Document Server

    Oteafy, Sharief M A

    2014-01-01

    In this title, the authors leap into a novel paradigm of scalability and cost-effectiveness, on the basis of resource reuse. In a world with much abundance of wirelessly accessible devices, WSN deployments should capitalize on the resources already available in the region of deployment, and only augment it with the components required to meet new application requirements. However, if the required resources already exist in that region, WSN deployment converges to an assignment and scheduling scheme to accommodate for the new application given the existing resources. Such resources are polled

  9. Wired or Wireless Internet?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gimpel, Gregory

    2010-01-01

    This paper finds that network externalities play a minimal role in the choice of internet access technology. Potential adopters of mobile laptop internet view broadband technology as a black box, the technological details of which donot matter. The study uses qualitative techniques to explore how...... the speed of technological obsolescence, market share dominance, and the black boxing of technology influence consumer intention to adopt WiMax and 3G wireless internet for their laptop computers. The results, implications for industry, and areas for further research are discussed....

  10. Wireless installation standard

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lim, Hwang Bin

    2007-12-01

    This is divided six parts which are radio regulation law on securing of radio resource, use of radio resource, protection of radio resource, radio regulation enforcement ordinance with securing, distribution and assignment of radio regulation, radio regulation enforcement regulation on utility of radio resource and technical qualification examination, a wireless installation regulation of technique standard and safety facility standard, radio regulation such as certification regulation of information communicative machines and regulation of radio station on compliance of signal security, radio equipment in radio station, standard frequency station and emergency communication.

  11. Investigation of head response to blast loading.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lockhart, Philip; Cronin, Duane; Williams, Kevin; Ouellet, Simon

    2011-02-01

    Head injury resulting from blast loading, specifically mild traumatic brain injury, has been identified as a possible and important blast-related injury for soldiers in modern conflict zones. A study was undertaken to evaluate head response to blast loading scenarios using an explicit finite element numerical model and to comment on the potential for head injury. The blast loading and simplified human body numerical models were validated using impulse, peak acceleration and the Head Injury Criterion from experimental blast test data. A study was then undertaken to evaluate head response at varying distances and orientations from the explosive. The accelerations and injury metrics for the head increased with decreasing distance to the explosive, as expected, but were also significant at intermediate distances from the explosive for larger charge sizes and intermediate heights of burst. Varying lateral position with constant standoff did not have a significant effect on the head kinematic response. The head injury criteria considered were exceeded in close proximity to the explosive (blast loading, aggressive loading is predicted at small standoff distances and confirmed by the resulting head kinematics.

  12. Performance Analysis of Cluster Formation in Wireless Sensor Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edgar Romo Montiel

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Clustered-based wireless sensor networks have been extensively used in the literature in order to achieve considerable energy consumption reductions. However, two aspects of such systems have been largely overlooked. Namely, the transmission probability used during the cluster formation phase and the way in which cluster heads are selected. Both of these issues have an important impact on the performance of the system. For the former, it is common to consider that sensor nodes in a clustered-based Wireless Sensor Network (WSN use a fixed transmission probability to send control data in order to build the clusters. However, due to the highly variable conditions experienced by these networks, a fixed transmission probability may lead to extra energy consumption. In view of this, three different transmission probability strategies are studied: optimal, fixed and adaptive. In this context, we also investigate cluster head selection schemes, specifically, we consider two intelligent schemes based on the fuzzy C-means and k-medoids algorithms and a random selection with no intelligence. We show that the use of intelligent schemes greatly improves the performance of the system, but their use entails higher complexity and selection delay. The main performance metrics considered in this work are energy consumption, successful transmission probability and cluster formation latency. As an additional feature of this work, we study the effect of errors in the wireless channel and the impact on the performance of the system under the different transmission probability schemes.

  13. Performance Analysis of Cluster Formation in Wireless Sensor Networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montiel, Edgar Romo; Rivero-Angeles, Mario E; Rubino, Gerardo; Molina-Lozano, Heron; Menchaca-Mendez, Rolando; Menchaca-Mendez, Ricardo

    2017-12-13

    Clustered-based wireless sensor networks have been extensively used in the literature in order to achieve considerable energy consumption reductions. However, two aspects of such systems have been largely overlooked. Namely, the transmission probability used during the cluster formation phase and the way in which cluster heads are selected. Both of these issues have an important impact on the performance of the system. For the former, it is common to consider that sensor nodes in a clustered-based Wireless Sensor Network (WSN) use a fixed transmission probability to send control data in order to build the clusters. However, due to the highly variable conditions experienced by these networks, a fixed transmission probability may lead to extra energy consumption. In view of this, three different transmission probability strategies are studied: optimal, fixed and adaptive. In this context, we also investigate cluster head selection schemes, specifically, we consider two intelligent schemes based on the fuzzy C-means and k-medoids algorithms and a random selection with no intelligence. We show that the use of intelligent schemes greatly improves the performance of the system, but their use entails higher complexity and selection delay. The main performance metrics considered in this work are energy consumption, successful transmission probability and cluster formation latency. As an additional feature of this work, we study the effect of errors in the wireless channel and the impact on the performance of the system under the different transmission probability schemes.

  14. Horizontal Accelerator

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Horizontal Accelerator (HA) Facility is a versatile research tool available for use on projects requiring simulation of the crash environment. The HA Facility is...

  15. A Comparative Study of Wireless Sensor Networks and Their Routing Protocols

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Subhajit Pal

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Recent developments in the area of micro-sensor devices have accelerated advances in the sensor networks field leading to many new protocols specifically designed for wireless sensor networks (WSNs. Wireless sensor networks with hundreds to thousands of sensor nodes can gather information from an unattended location and transmit the gathered data to a particular user, depending on the application. These sensor nodes have some constraints due to their limited energy, storage capacity and computing power. Data are routed from one node to other using different routing protocols. There are a number of routing protocols for wireless sensor networks. In this review article, we discuss the architecture of wireless sensor networks. Further, we categorize the routing protocols according to some key factors and summarize their mode of operation. Finally, we provide a comparative study on these various protocols.

  16. A comparative study of wireless sensor networks and their routing protocols.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharyya, Debnath; Kim, Tai-hoon; Pal, Subhajit

    2010-01-01

    Recent developments in the area of micro-sensor devices have accelerated advances in the sensor networks field leading to many new protocols specifically designed for wireless sensor networks (WSNs). Wireless sensor networks with hundreds to thousands of sensor nodes can gather information from an unattended location and transmit the gathered data to a particular user, depending on the application. These sensor nodes have some constraints due to their limited energy, storage capacity and computing power. Data are routed from one node to other using different routing protocols. There are a number of routing protocols for wireless sensor networks. In this review article, we discuss the architecture of wireless sensor networks. Further, we categorize the routing protocols according to some key factors and summarize their mode of operation. Finally, we provide a comparative study on these various protocols.

  17. Wireless network security theories and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Chen, Lei; Zhang, Zihong

    2013-01-01

    Wireless Network Security Theories and Applications discusses the relevant security technologies, vulnerabilities, and potential threats, and introduces the corresponding security standards and protocols, as well as provides solutions to security concerns. Authors of each chapter in this book, mostly top researchers in relevant research fields in the U.S. and China, presented their research findings and results about the security of the following types of wireless networks: Wireless Cellular Networks, Wireless Local Area Networks (WLANs), Wireless Metropolitan Area Networks (WMANs), Bluetooth

  18. Biomonitoring with Wireless Communications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Budinger, Thomas F.

    2003-03-01

    This review is divided into three sections: technologies for monitoring physiological parameters; biosensors for chemical assays and wireless communications technologies including image transmissions. Applications range from monitoring high risk patients for heart, respiratory activity and falls to sensing levels of physical activity in military, rescue, and sports personnel. The range of measurements include, heart rate, pulse wave form, respiratory rate, blood oxygen, tissue pCO2, exhaled carbon dioxide and physical activity. Other feasible measurements will employ miniature chemical laboratories on silicon or plastic chips. The measurements can be extended to clinical chemical assays ranging from common blood assays to protein or specialized protein measurements (e.g., troponin, creatine, and cytokines such as TNF and IL6). Though the feasibility of using wireless technology to communicate vital signs has been demonstrated 32 years ago (1) it has been only recently that practical and portable devices and communications net works have become generally available for inexpensive deployment of comfortable and affordable devices and systems.

  19. Structural processing for wireless communications

    CERN Document Server

    Lu, Jianhua; Ge, Ning

    2015-01-01

    This brief presents an alternative viewpoint on processing technology for wireless communications based on recent research advances. As a lever in emerging processing technology, the structure perspective addresses the complexity and uncertainty issues found in current wireless applications. Likewise, this brief aims at providing a new prospective to the development of communication technology and information science, while stimulating new theories and technologies for wireless systems with ever-increasing complexity. Readers of this brief may range from graduate students to researchers in related fields.

  20. Radio Relays Improve Wireless Products

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-01-01

    Signal Hill, California-based XCOM Wireless Inc. developed radio frequency micromachine (RF MEMS) relays with a Phase II Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) contract through NASA?s Jet Propulsion Laboratory. In order to improve satellite communication systems, XCOM produced wireless RF MEMS relays and tunable capacitors that use metal-to-metal contact and have the potential to outperform most semiconductor technologies while using less power. These relays are used in high-frequency test equipment and instrumentation, where increased speed can mean significant cost savings. Applications now also include mainstream wireless applications and greatly improved tactical radios.

  1. Wireless Communications in Smart Grid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bojkovic, Zoran; Bakmaz, Bojan

    Communication networks play a crucial role in smart grid, as the intelligence of this complex system is built based on information exchange across the power grid. Wireless communications and networking are among the most economical ways to build the essential part of the scalable communication infrastructure for smart grid. In particular, wireless networks will be deployed widely in the smart grid for automatic meter reading, remote system and customer site monitoring, as well as equipment fault diagnosing. With an increasing interest from both the academic and industrial communities, this chapter systematically investigates recent advances in wireless communication technology for the smart grid.

  2. Wireless home networking for dummies

    CERN Document Server

    Briere, Danny; Ferris, Edward

    2010-01-01

    The perennial bestseller shows you how share your files and Internet connection across a wireless network. Fully updated for Windows 7 and Mac OS X Snow Leopard, this new edition of this bestseller returns with all the latest in wireless standards and security. This fun and friendly guide shows you how to integrate your iPhone, iPod touch, smartphone, or gaming system into your home network. Veteran authors escort you through the various financial and logisitical considerations that you need to take into account before building a wireless network at home.: Covers the basics of planning, instal

  3. Microwave materials for wireless applications

    CERN Document Server

    Cruickshank, David B

    2011-01-01

    This practical resource offers you an in-depth, up-to-date understanding of the use of microwave magnetic materials for cutting-edge wireless applications. The book discusses device applications used in wireless infrastructure base stations, point-to-point radio links, and a range of more specialized microwave systems. You find detailed discussions on the attributes of each family of magnetic materials with respect to specific wireless applications. Moreover, the book addresses two of the hottest topics in the field today - insertion loss and intermodulation. This comprehensive reference also

  4. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Professions Site Index A-Z Computed Tomography (CT) - Head Computed tomography (CT) of the head uses special ... the Head? What is CT Scanning of the Head? Computed tomography, more commonly known as a CT ...

  5. Porcine head response to blast

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jay eShridharani

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Recent studies have shown an increase in the frequency of traumatic brain injuries related to blast exposure. However, the mechanisms that cause blast neurotrauma are unknown. Blast neurotrauma research using computational models has been one method to elucidate that response of the brain in blast, and to identify possible mechanical correlates of injury. However, model validation against experimental data is required to ensure that the model output is representative of in vivo biomechanical response. This study exposed porcine subjects to primary blast overpressures generated using a compressed-gas shock tube. Shock tube blasts were directed to the unprotected head of each animal while the lungs and thorax were protected using ballistic protective vests similar to those employed in theater. The test conditions ranged from 110-740 kPa peak incident overpressure with scaled durations from 1.3-6.9 ms and correspond approximately with a 50% injury risk for brain bleeding and apnea in a ferret model scaled to porcine exposure. The bulk head acceleration and the pressure at the surface of the head and in the cranial cavity were measured. Immediately after the blast, 5 of the 20 animals tested were apneic. Three subjects recovered without intervention within thirty seconds and the remaining two recovered within 8 minutes following bagging and administration of the respiratory stimulant doxapram. Gross examination of the brain revealed no indication of bleeding. Intracranial pressures ranged from 80-685 kPa as a result of the blast and were notably lower than the shock tube reflected pressures of 300-2830 kPa, indicating pressure attenuation by the skull up to a factor of 8.4. Peak head accelerations were measured from 385-3845 G’s and were well correlated with peak incident overpressure (R2=0.90. One standard deviation corridors for the surface pressure, intracranial pressure, and head acceleration are presented to provide experimental data for

  6. Wireless device monitoring methods, wireless device monitoring systems, and articles of manufacture

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCown, Steven H [Rigby, ID; Derr, Kurt W [Idaho Falls, ID; Rohde, Kenneth W [Idaho Falls, ID

    2012-05-08

    Wireless device monitoring methods, wireless device monitoring systems, and articles of manufacture are described. According to one embodiment, a wireless device monitoring method includes accessing device configuration information of a wireless device present at a secure area, wherein the device configuration information comprises information regarding a configuration of the wireless device, accessing stored information corresponding to the wireless device, wherein the stored information comprises information regarding the configuration of the wireless device, comparing the device configuration information with the stored information, and indicating the wireless device as one of authorized and unauthorized for presence at the secure area using the comparing.

  7. Accelerator microanalysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tuniz, C.

    1997-01-01

    Particle accelerators have been developed more than sixty years ago to investigate nuclear and atomic phenomena. A major shift toward applications of accelerators in the study of materials structure and composition in inter-disciplinary projects has been witnessed in the last two decades. The Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation (ANSTO) has developed advanced research programs based on the use of particle and photon beams. Atmospheric pollution problems are investigated at the 3 MV Van de Graff accelerator using ion beam analysis techniques to detect toxic elements in aerosol particles. High temperature superconductor and semiconductor materials are characterised using the recoil of iodine and other heavy ions produced at ANTARES, the 10-MV Tandem accelerator. A heavy-ion microprobe is presently being developed at ANTARES to map elemental concentrations of specific elements with micro-size resolution. An Accelerator mass Spectrometry (AMS) system has been developed at ANSTO for the ultra-sensitive detection of Carbon-14, Iodine-129 and other long-lived radioisotopes. This AMS spectrometer is a key instrument for climate change studies and international safeguards. ANSTO is also managing the Australian Synchrotron Research program based on facilities developed at the Photon Factory (Japan) and at the Advanced Photon Source (USA). Advanced projects in biology, materials chemistry, structural condensed matter and other disciplines are being promoted by a consortium involving Australian universities and research institutions. This paper will review recent advances in the use of particle accelerators, with a particular emphasis on applications developed at ANSTO and related to problems of international concern, such as global environmental change, public health and nuclear proliferation

  8. Advanced Wireless Integrated Navy Network

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Stutzman, Warren; Habayeb, Rick

    2005-01-01

    Quarterly progress report No. I on AWINN hardware and software configurations of smart, wideband, multi-function antennas, secure configurable platform, close-in command and control for Sea Basing visualization of wireless...

  9. Wireless Damage Location Sensing System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodard, Stanley E. (Inventor); Taylor, Bryant Douglas (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    A wireless damage location sensing system uses a geometric-patterned wireless sensor that resonates in the presence of a time-varying magnetic field to generate a harmonic response that will experience a change when the sensor experiences a change in its geometric pattern. The sensing system also includes a magnetic field response recorder for wirelessly transmitting the time-varying magnetic field and for wirelessly detecting the harmonic response. The sensing system compares the actual harmonic response to a plurality of predetermined harmonic responses. Each predetermined harmonic response is associated with a severing of the sensor at a corresponding known location thereof so that a match between the actual harmonic response and one of the predetermined harmonic responses defines the known location of the severing that is associated therewith.

  10. Introduction to wireless sensor networks

    CERN Document Server

    Forster, Anna

    2016-01-01

    Explores real-world wireless sensor network development, deployment, and applications. The book begins with an introduction to wireless sensor networks and their fundamental concepts. Hardware components, operating systems, protocols, and algorithms that make up the anatomy of a sensor node are described in chapter two. Properties of wireless communications, medium access protocols, wireless links, and link estimation protocols are described in chapter three and chapter four. Routing basics and metrics, clustering techniques, time synchronization and localization protocols, as well as sensing techniques are introduced in chapter five to nine. The concluding chapter summarizes the learnt methods and shows how to use them to deploy real-world sensor networks in a structured way.

  11. Bray Head

    OpenAIRE

    Brocas, Samuel Frederick (Irish cityscape painter, watercolorist, and draftsman, 1792-1847)

    2008-01-01

    'A number of Martello towers were built around the coast of Ireland, especially along the east, from Millmount (Drogheda), to Bray, around Dublin Bay but also around Cork Harbour on the south coast. On the east coast, concentrated mainly around Dublin Bay, the towers were in line of sight of each other, providing the ability to communicate with one another, or warn of any incoming attacks.' (en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Martello_Tower#Ireland) 'Bray Head (Irish: Ceann Bre) is a hill and headland, of...

  12. Goniometer head

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dzhazairov-Kakhramanov, V.; Berger, V.D.; Kadyrzhanov, K.K.; Zarifov, R.A.

    1994-01-01

    The goniometer head is an electromechanical instrument that performs the independent transfer of a testing sample on three coordinate axes (X, Y, Z) within limits of ±8 mm and independent rotation relative of these directions. The instrument comprises a sample holder, bellows component and three electrometer drives. The sample holder rotates around the axes X and Y, and is installed on the central arm which rotates around axis Z. One characteristic of this instrument is its independence which allows its use in any camera for researches in the field of radiation physics. 2 figs

  13. Wireless cortical implantable systems

    CERN Document Server

    Majidzadeh Bafar, Vahid

    2013-01-01

    Wireless Cortical Implantable Systems examines the design for data acquisition and transmission in cortical implants. The first part of the book covers existing system-level cortical implants, as well as future devices. The authors discuss the major constraints in terms of microelectronic integration. The second part of the book focuses on system-level as well as circuit and system level solutions to the development of ultra low-power and low-noise microelectronics for cortical implants. Existing solutions are presented and novel methods and solutions proposed. The third part of the book focuses on the usage of digital impulse radio ultra wide-band transmission as an efficient method to transmit cortically neural recorded data at high data-rate to the outside world. Original architectural and circuit and system solutions are discussed.

  14. Wireless Ad Hoc Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hong-Chuan Yang

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available We study the energy-efficient configuration of multihop paths with automatic repeat request (ARQ mechanism in wireless ad hoc networks. We adopt a cross-layer design approach and take both the quality of each radio hop and the battery capacity of each transmitting node into consideration. Under certain constraints on the maximum tolerable transmission delay and the required packet delivery ratio, we solve optimization problems to jointly schedule the transmitting power of each transmitting node and the retransmission limit over each hop. Numerical results demonstrate that the path configuration methods can either significantly reduce the average energy consumption per packet delivery or considerably extend the average lifetime of the multihop route.

  15. Wireless Josephson amplifier

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Narla, A.; Sliwa, K. M.; Hatridge, M.; Shankar, S.; Frunzio, L.; Schoelkopf, R. J.; Devoret, M. H.

    2014-01-01

    Josephson junction parametric amplifiers are playing a crucial role in the readout chain in superconducting quantum information experiments. However, their integration with current 3D cavity implementations poses the problem of transitioning between waveguide, coax cables, and planar circuits. Moreover, Josephson amplifiers require auxiliary microwave components, like directional couplers and/or hybrids, that are sources of spurious losses and impedance mismatches that limit measurement efficiency and amplifier tunability. We have developed a wireless architecture for these parametric amplifiers that eliminates superfluous microwave components and interconnects. This greatly simplifies their assembly and integration into experiments. We present an experimental realization of such a device operating in the 9–11 GHz band with about 100 MHz of amplitude gain-bandwidth product, on par with devices mounted in conventional sample holders. The simpler impedance environment presented to the amplifier also results in increased amplifier tunability.

  16. A Game Theoretic Optimization Method for Energy Efficient Global Connectivity in Hybrid Wireless Sensor Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    JongHyup Lee

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available For practical deployment of wireless sensor networks (WSN, WSNs construct clusters, where a sensor node communicates with other nodes in its cluster, and a cluster head support connectivity between the sensor nodes and a sink node. In hybrid WSNs, cluster heads have cellular network interfaces for global connectivity. However, when WSNs are active and the load of cellular networks is high, the optimal assignment of cluster heads to base stations becomes critical. Therefore, in this paper, we propose a game theoretic model to find the optimal assignment of base stations for hybrid WSNs. Since the communication and energy cost is different according to cellular systems, we devise two game models for TDMA/FDMA and CDMA systems employing power prices to adapt to the varying efficiency of recent wireless technologies. The proposed model is defined on the assumptions of the ideal sensing field, but our evaluation shows that the proposed model is more adaptive and energy efficient than local selections.

  17. Secure positioning in wireless networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Capkun, Srdjan; Hubaux, Jean-Pierre

    2006-01-01

    So far, the problem of positioning in wireless networks has been studied mainly in a non-adversarial settings. In this work, we analyze the resistance of positioning techniques to position and distance spoofing attacks. We propose a mechanism for secure positioning of wireless devices, that we call...... Verifiable Multilateration. We then show how this mechanism can be used to secure positioning in sensor networks. We analyze our system through simulations....

  18. Wireless Communications in Reverberant Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    solutions exist which can be tailored to meet the needs nearly any wireless application. Some notable current solutions include USRPs [27] and GNURadio ...tailored to meet the needs nearly any wireless application. Some notable current solutions include USRPs [27] and GNURadio [28]. For this effort, the WARPv3...en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List of software-defined radios [27] “Ettus research.” [Online]. Available: http://www.ettus.com [28] “ Gnuradio .” [Online]. Available: http

  19. WIRELESS MINE WIDE TELECOMMUNICATIONS TECHNOLOGY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zvi H. Meiksin

    2002-04-01

    Two industrial prototype units for through-the-earth wireless communication were constructed and tested. Preparation for a temporary installation in NIOSH's Lake Lynn mine for the through-the-earth and the in-mine system were completed. Progress was made in the programming of the in-mine system to provide data communication. Work has begun to implement a wireless interface between equipment controllers and our in-mine system.

  20. WIRELESS MINE WIDE TELECOMMUNICATIONS TECHNOLOGY

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zvi H. Meiksin

    2002-01-01

    Two industrial prototype units for through-the-earth wireless communication were constructed and tested. Preparation for a temporary installation in NIOSH's Lake Lynn mine for the through-the-earth and the in-mine system were completed. Progress was made in the programming of the in-mine system to provide data communication. Work has begun to implement a wireless interface between equipment controllers and our in-mine system

  1. Accelerator operations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1979-01-01

    Operations of the SuperHILAC, the Bevatron/Bevalac, and the 184-inch Synchrocyclotron during the period from October 1977 to September 1978 are discussed. These include ion source development, accelerator facilities, the Heavy Ion Spectrometer System, and Bevelac biomedical operations

  2. Acceleration grid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hemmerich, J.; Kupschus, P.; Fraenkle, H.

    1983-01-01

    The acceleration grid is used in nuclear fusion technique as an ion beam grid. It consists of perforated plates at different potentials situated behind one another in the axial movement direction of their through holes. In order to prevent interference in the perforated hole area due to thermal expansion, the perforated plates are fixed with elastic springiness (plate fields) at their edges. (DG) [de

  3. Accelerators course

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva HR-RFA; Métral, E

    2006-01-01

    1a) Introduction and motivation 1b) History and accelerator types 2) Transverse beam dynamics 3a) Longitudinal beam dynamics 3b) Figure of merit of a synchrotron/collider 3c) Beam control 4) Main limiting factors 5) Technical challenges

  4. Accelerator operations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1980-01-01

    This section is concerned with the operation of both the tandem-linac system and the Dynamitron, two accelerators that are used for entirely different research. Developmental activities associated with the tandem and the Dynamitron are also treated here, but developmental activities associated with the superconducting linac are covered separately because this work is a program of technology development in its own right

  5. Accelerator update

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1995-01-01

    When the Accelerator Conference, combined International High Energy and US Particle versions, held in Dallas in May, was initially scheduled, progress nearby for the US Superconducting Supercollider was high on the preliminary agenda. With the SSC voted down by Congress in October 1993, this was no longer the case. However the content of the meeting, in terms of both its deep implications for ambitious new projects and the breadth of its scope, showed that the worldwide particle accelerator field is far from being moribund. A traditional feature of such accelerator conferences is the multiplicity of parallel sessions. No one person can attend all sessions, so that delegates can follow completely different paths and emerge with totally different impressions. Despite this overload, and despite the SSC cancellation, the general picture is one of encouraging progress over a wide range of major new projects throughout the world. At the same time, spinoff from, and applications of, accelerators and accelerator technology are becoming increasingly important. Centrestage is now CERN's LHC proton-proton collider, where a test string of superconducting magnets is operating over long periods at the nominal LHC field of 8.36 tesla or more. The assignment of the underground areas in the existing 27- kilometre LEP tunnel is now quasidefinitive (see page 3). For CERN's existing big machine, the LEP electron-positron collider, ongoing work concentrates on boosting performance using improved optics and bunch trains. But the main objective is the LEP2 scheme using superconducting accelerating cavities to boost the beam energy (see page 6). After some initial teething problems, production and operation of these cavities appears to have been mastered, at least under test conditions. A highlight at CERN last year was the first run with lead ions (December 1994, page 15). Handling these heavy particles with systems originally designed for protons calls for ingenuity. The SPS

  6. Development of a High-Sensitivity Wireless Accelerometer for Structural Health Monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Li; Fu, Yuguang; Chow, Raymond; Spencer, Billie F.; Park, Jong Woong; Mechitov, Kirill

    2018-01-01

    Structural health monitoring (SHM) is playing an increasingly important role in ensuring the safety of structures. A shift of SHM research away from traditional wired methods toward the use of wireless smart sensors (WSS) has been motivated by the attractive features of wireless smart sensor networks (WSSN). The progress achieved in Micro Electro-Mechanical System (MEMS) technologies and wireless data transmission, has extended the effectiveness and range of applicability of WSSNs. One of the most common sensors employed in SHM strategies is the accelerometer; however, most accelerometers in WSS nodes have inadequate resolution for measurement of the typical accelerations found in many SHM applications. In this study, a high-resolution and low-noise tri-axial digital MEMS accelerometer is incorporated in a next-generation WSS platform, the Xnode. In addition to meeting the acceleration sensing demands of large-scale civil infrastructure applications, this new WSS node provides powerful hardware and a robust software framework to enable edge computing that can deliver actionable information. Hardware and software integration challenges are presented, and the associate resolutions are discussed. The performance of the wireless accelerometer is demonstrated experimentally through comparison with high-sensitivity wired accelerometers. This new high-sensitivity wireless accelerometer will extend the use of WSSN to a broader class of SHM applications. PMID:29342102

  7. Development of a High-Sensitivity Wireless Accelerometer for Structural Health Monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Li; Fu, Yuguang; Chow, Raymond; Spencer, Billie F; Park, Jong Woong; Mechitov, Kirill

    2018-01-17

    Structural health monitoring (SHM) is playing an increasingly important role in ensuring the safety of structures. A shift of SHM research away from traditional wired methods toward the use of wireless smart sensors (WSS) has been motivated by the attractive features of wireless smart sensor networks (WSSN). The progress achieved in Micro Electro-Mechanical System (MEMS) technologies and wireless data transmission, has extended the effectiveness and range of applicability of WSSNs. One of the most common sensors employed in SHM strategies is the accelerometer; however, most accelerometers in WSS nodes have inadequate resolution for measurement of the typical accelerations found in many SHM applications. In this study, a high-resolution and low-noise tri-axial digital MEMS accelerometer is incorporated in a next-generation WSS platform, the Xnode. In addition to meeting the acceleration sensing demands of large-scale civil infrastructure applications, this new WSS node provides powerful hardware and a robust software framework to enable edge computing that can deliver actionable information. Hardware and software integration challenges are presented, and the associate resolutions are discussed. The performance of the wireless accelerometer is demonstrated experimentally through comparison with high-sensitivity wired accelerometers. This new high-sensitivity wireless accelerometer will extend the use of WSSN to a broader class of SHM applications.

  8. HEAD MOVEMENT DURING WALKING IN THE CAT

    Science.gov (United States)

    ZUBAIR, HUMZA N.; BELOOZEROVA, IRINA N.; SUN, HAI; MARLINSKI, VLADIMIR

    2016-01-01

    Knowledge of how the head moves during locomotion is essential for understanding how locomotion is controlled by sensory systems of the head. We have analyzed head movements of the cat walking along a straight flat pathway in the darkness and light. We found that cats' head left-right translations, and roll and yaw rotations oscillated once per stride, while fore-aft and vertical translations, and pitch rotations oscillated twice. The head reached its highest vertical positions during second half of each forelimb swing, following maxima of the shoulder/trunk by 20–90°. Nose-up rotation followed head upward translation by another 40–90° delay. The peak-to-peak amplitude of vertical translation was ~1.5 cm and amplitude of pitch rotation was ~3°. Amplitudes of lateral translation and roll rotation were ~1 cm and 1.5–3°, respectively. Overall, cats' heads were neutral in roll and 10–30° nose-down, maintaining horizontal semicircular canals and utriculi within 10° of the earth horizontal. The head longitudinal velocity was 0.5–1 m/s, maximal upward and downward linear velocities were ~0.05 and ~0.1 m/s, respectively, and maximal lateral velocity was ~0.05 m/s. Maximal velocities of head pitch rotation were 20–50 °/s. During walking in light, cats stood 0.3–0.5 cm taller and held their head 0.5–2 cm higher than in darkness. Forward acceleration was 25–100% higher and peak-to-peak amplitude of head pitch oscillations was ~20 °/s larger. We concluded that, during walking, the head of the cat is held actively. Reflexes appear to play only a partial role in determining head movement, and vision might further diminish their role. PMID:27339731

  9. Accelerated treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barkley, H T

    1985-05-01

    In the first third of this century, the prevailing concept was that malignant cells had a brief period of sensitivity and radiation treatments were ideally given in overall times of 2 weeks or less. Following the Second World War, routine treatment times were extended to 5 to 8 weeks to avoid severe acute normal tissue reactions and achieve higher tumor doses. In reaction to these prolonged overall times, a series of large-fraction, shortened-overall-time clinical experiments were attempted, with disastrous normal tissue effects and poor tumor control. More recently, attempts to accelerate treatment have been accomplished by utilizing multiple fractions per day or semicontinuous irradiation. Unfortunately, the majority of these attempts have been forced by the occurrence of unacceptable normal tissue reactions to significantly reduce total dose or introduce lengthy splits in treatment. These results suggest that in our current state of knowledge accelerated schedules be reserved for use in the treatment of rapidly proliferating neoplasms or for palliation.

  10. Therapeutic electrical stimulation of injured peripheral nerve tissue using implantable thin-film wireless nerve stimulators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacEwan, Matthew R; Gamble, Paul; Stephen, Manu; Ray, Wilson Z

    2018-02-09

    OBJECTIVE Electrical stimulation of peripheral nerve tissue has been shown to accelerate axonal regeneration. Yet existing methods of applying electrical stimulation to injured peripheral nerves have presented significant barriers to clinical translation. In this study, the authors examined the use of a novel implantable wireless nerve stimulator capable of simultaneously delivering therapeutic electrical stimulation of injured peripheral nerve tissue and providing postoperative serial assessment of functional recovery. METHODS Flexible wireless stimulators were fabricated and implanted into Lewis rats. Thin-film implants were used to deliver brief electrical stimulation (1 hour, 20 Hz) to sciatic nerves after nerve crush or nerve transection-and-repair injuries. RESULTS Electrical stimulation of injured nerves via implanted wireless stimulators significantly improved functional recovery. Brief electrical stimulation was observed to increase the rate of functional recovery after both nerve crush and nerve transection-and-repair injuries. Wireless stimulators successfully facilitated therapeutic stimulation of peripheral nerve tissue and serial assessment of nerve recovery. CONCLUSIONS Implantable wireless stimulators can deliver therapeutic electrical stimulation to injured peripheral nerve tissue. Implantable wireless nerve stimulators might represent a novel means of facilitating therapeutic electrical stimulation in both intraoperative and postoperative settings.

  11. Application of AN Automated Wireless Structural Monitoring System for Long-Span Suspension Bridges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurata, M.; Lynch, J. P.; van der Linden, G. W.; Hipley, P.; Sheng, L.-H.

    2011-06-01

    This paper describes an automated wireless structural monitoring system installed at the New Carquinez Bridge (NCB). The designed system utilizes a dense network of wireless sensors installed in the bridge but remotely controlled by a hierarchically designed cyber-environment. The early efforts have included performance verification of a dense network of wireless sensors installed on the bridge and the establishment of a cellular gateway to the system for remote access from the internet. Acceleration of the main bridge span was the primary focus of the initial field deployment of the wireless monitoring system. An additional focus of the study is on ensuring wireless sensors can survive for long periods without human intervention. Toward this end, the life-expectancy of the wireless sensors has been enhanced by embedding efficient power management schemes in the sensors while integrating solar panels for power harvesting. The dynamic characteristics of the NCB under daily traffic and wind loads were extracted from the vibration response of the bridge deck and towers. These results have been compared to a high-fidelity finite element model of the bridge.

  12. Wireless inclinometer acquisition system for reducing swing movement control module experiment of hook model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Yan; Ou, Jinping; Zhang, Chunwei; Li, Luyu

    2008-03-01

    Large Scale Heavy Derrick Lay Barge is very important for sea work. Under intense wind and wave load, the hook on the Barge will vibrate so large that in some cases it can not work. Through installing the Tuned Mass Damper(TMD) on the hook, the vibration will be reduced to a certain range to meet the demand on sea work, which is also important for increasing the efficiency of sea work. To design the suitable TMD for the hook, the dynamical parameters should be specified beforehand. Generally, the related dynamical parameters such as inclinometer and acceleration are measured by wire sensors. But due to the restriction of the actual condition, the wire sensors are very hard to implement. Recently, the wireless sensors have been presented to overcome the shortcomings of wire ones. It is more suitable and also convenient to utilize wireless sensors to acquire the useful data of large scale heavy derrick lay barge. In this paper, the hook reducing swing movement control module is designed for large scale heavy derrick lay barge. Secondly, wireless inclinometer sensor system is integrated using the technique of MEMS, sensing and wireless communication. Finally, the hook reducing swing movement control module is validated by the developed wireless inclinometer data acquisition system. The wireless inclinometer sensor can be used not only in swing monitoring for large scale heavy derrick lay barge's Hook, but also in vibration monitoring for TV tower, large crane. In general, it has great application foreground.

  13. Traffic Profiling in Wireless Sensor Networks

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Kirykos, Georgios

    2006-01-01

    .... Wireless sensor networks pose unique challenges and limitations to the traditional schemes, which are used in the other wireless networks for security protection, and are due mainly to the increased...

  14. CMOS circuits for passive wireless microsystems

    CERN Document Server

    Yuan, Fei

    2011-01-01

    Here is a comprehensive examination of CMOS circuits for passive wireless microsystems. Covers design challenges, fundamental issues of ultra-low power wireless communications, radio-frequency power harvesting, and advanced design techniques, and more.

  15. Wireless Sensor Portal Technology, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Mobitrum Corporation has demonstrated the feasibility in the Phase I of " A Wireless Sensor Portal Technology" and proposes a Phase II effort to develop a wireless...

  16. Kali Linux wireless penetration testing beginner's guide

    CERN Document Server

    Ramachandran, Vivek

    2015-01-01

    If you are a security professional, pentester, or anyone interested in getting to grips with wireless penetration testing, this is the book for you. Some familiarity with Kali Linux and wireless concepts is beneficial.

  17. Laser Accelerator

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-09-01

    Photocathode emitters eject electrons from the cathode by the photoelectric effect. A drive laser source shines light energy onto a metal or...synchronized so that the electrons ejected via the photoelectric effect are properly accelerated. 15 Figure 2.4: Cross-section of a triple spoke cavity, from...2.3: Available Pulsed Magnets at PFF LANL. SP = Short Pulse. MP = Mid-Pulse, after [19] Cell No. Magnet Pulse Duration (ms) Bore (mm) 1 50 T SP 25 24

  18. Conventional radiotherapy treatments (direct planning) of head and neck with photon X10 planning system (cms) and Siemens Primus accelerator: proposed protocol planning, difficulties encountered, tricks practical and possible amendments to the class solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saez, F.; Benito, M. A.; Saez, M.

    2011-01-01

    In this paper we propose a protocol for the systematic planning process for a planner and an Accelerator XiO Primus. This protocol includes the creation of ancillary volumes for better dosimetric evaluation and design fields. Are some practical tips and cases arise in which you can change the Class Solution home. We compare this treatment with 10 turns without turning table with other tables. Finally, we show the advantages of this method from the radiobiological point of view to the bone, the main body of this type of risk treatments.

  19. Accelerating networks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, David M D; Onnela, Jukka-Pekka; Johnson, Neil F

    2007-01-01

    Evolving out-of-equilibrium networks have been under intense scrutiny recently. In many real-world settings the number of links added per new node is not constant but depends on the time at which the node is introduced in the system. This simple idea gives rise to the concept of accelerating networks, for which we review an existing definition and-after finding it somewhat constrictive-offer a new definition. The new definition provided here views network acceleration as a time dependent property of a given system as opposed to being a property of the specific algorithm applied to grow the network. The definition also covers both unweighted and weighted networks. As time-stamped network data becomes increasingly available, the proposed measures may be easily applied to such empirical datasets. As a simple case study we apply the concepts to study the evolution of three different instances of Wikipedia, namely, those in English, German, and Japanese, and find that the networks undergo different acceleration regimes in their evolution

  20. STUDY & SURVEY ON WIRELESS CHARGING & TECHNOLOGY

    OpenAIRE

    Harshal Sharma*

    2016-01-01

    In the modern world, we have often heard a word- wireless charging technology. Actually what is it all about? So this paper is giving you the whole package about wireless charging technology. Wireless charging is a technology through which power is transmitted through an air gap to the electrical devices for the motive of replenishment of energy. At present wireless charging techniques and development of commercial products have provided a promise to address the energy bottleneck of portable ...

  1. A Forensic Readiness Model for Wireless Networks

    OpenAIRE

    Ngobeni, Sipho; Venter, Hein; Burke, Ivan

    2010-01-01

    International audience; Over the past decade, wireless mobile communications technology based on IEEE 802.11 wireless local area networks (WLANs) has been adopted worldwide on a massive scale. However, as the number of wireless users has soared, so has the possibility of cyber crime, where criminals deliberately and actively break into WLANs with the intent to cause harm or access sensitive information. WLAN digital forensics is seen not only as a response to cyber crime in wireless environme...

  2. Security Threats on Wireless Sensor Network Protocols

    OpenAIRE

    H. Gorine; M. Ramadan Elmezughi

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we investigate security issues and challenges facing researchers in wireless sensor networks and countermeasures to resolve them. The broadcast nature of wireless communication makes Wireless Sensor Networks prone to various attacks. Due to resources limitation constraint in terms of limited energy, computation power and memory, security in wireless sensor networks creates different challenges than wired network security. We will discuss several attempts at addressing the issue...

  3. Proposal of Wireless Traffic Control Schemes for Wireless LANs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiraguri, Takefumi; Ichikawa, Takeo; Iizuka, Masataka; Kubota, Shuji

    This paper proposes two traffic control schemes to support the communication quality of multimedia streaming services such as VoIP and audio/video over IEEE 802.11 wireless LAN systems. The main features of the proposed scheme are bandwidth control for each flow of the multimedia streaming service and load balancing between access points (APs) of the wireless LAN by using information of data link, network and transport layers. The proposed schemes are implemented on a Linux machine which is called the wireless traffic controller (WTC). The WTC connects a high capacity backbone network and an access network to which the APs are attached. We evaluated the performance of the proposed WTC and confirmed that the communication quality of the multimedia streaming would be greatly improved by using this technique.

  4. Techniques for Wireless Applications

    KAUST Repository

    Gaaloul, Fakhreddine

    2012-05-01

    Switching techniques have been first proposed as a spacial diversity techniques. These techniques have been shown to reduce considerably the processing load while letting multi-antenna systems achieve a specific target performance. In this thesis, we take a different look at the switching schemes by implementing them for different other wireless applications. More specifically, this thesis consists of three main parts, where the first part considers a multiuser environment and an adaptive scheduling algorithm based on the switching with post-selection scheme for statistically independent but non-identically distributed channel conditions. The performance of this switched based scheduler is investigated and a multitude of performance metrics are presented. In a second part, we propose and analyze the performance of three switched-based algorithms for interference reduction in the downlink of over-loaded femtocells. For instance, performance metrics are derived in closed-form and these metrics are used to compare these three proposed schemes. Finally in a third part, a switch based opportunistic channel access scheme is proposed for a cognitive radio system and its performance is analyzed in terms of two new proposed metrics namely the average cognitive radio access and the waiting time duration.

  5. Wireless capsule endo bronchoscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baratz DM

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available No abstract available. Article truncated at 150 words. Case Presentation History of Present Illness A 67 year-old man presents 10 days after swallowing a capsule endoscopy camera that was never retrieved. The wireless capsule was swallowed asymptomatically for evaluation of heme positive stools after negative upper and lower endoscopies. Patient noted that the evening after swallowing the camera he developed mild shortness of breath and cough. The cough and shortness of breath were persistent and worsened while lying down and when moving positions. He denied prior issues with swallowing or aspiration. Review of Systems Negative other than what is noted above. PMH, SH, and FH Past medical history: coronary artery disease, peripheral vascular disease, hyperlipidemia Surgical history: femoral-popliteal bypass, previous shoulder and back surgery Social history: 1 pack/day of cigarettes for 50 years, prior alcohol usage but not current, no illicit drugs Family history: no pulmonary diseases Physical Exam Vital signs: temperature 36.7º C, heart rate 86 beats per minute ...

  6. Advanced Wireless Sensor Nodes - MSFC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varnavas, Kosta; Richeson, Jeff

    2017-01-01

    NASA field center Marshall Space Flight Center (Huntsville, AL), has invested in advanced wireless sensor technology development. Developments for a wireless microcontroller back-end were primarily focused on the commercial Synapse Wireless family of devices. These devices have many useful features for NASA applications, good characteristics and the ability to be programmed Over-The-Air (OTA). The effort has focused on two widely used sensor types, mechanical strain gauges and thermal sensors. Mechanical strain gauges are used extensively in NASA structural testing and even on vehicle instrumentation systems. Additionally, thermal monitoring with many types of sensors is extensively used. These thermal sensors include thermocouples of all types, resistive temperature devices (RTDs), diodes and other thermal sensor types. The wireless thermal board will accommodate all of these types of sensor inputs to an analog front end. The analog front end on each of the sensors interfaces to the Synapse wireless microcontroller, based on the Atmel Atmega128 device. Once the analog sensor output data is digitized by the onboard analog to digital converter (A/D), the data is available for analysis, computation or transmission. Various hardware features allow custom embedded software to manage battery power to enhance battery life. This technology development fits nicely into using numerous additional sensor front ends, including some of the low-cost printed circuit board capacitive moisture content sensors currently being developed at Auburn University.

  7. WIRELESS FIDELITY (Wi-Fi) BROADBAND NETWORK ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ES Obe

    categorized into two types: fixed and mobile wireless. The broadband fixed wireless network technologies .... 3.0 WIRELESS FIDELITYF (Wi-Fi). NETWORK IMPLEMENTATION. A Wi-Fi enabled device such as a PC, game .... Amateur radio, video senders, and cordless phones, can cause significant additional interference.

  8. WirelessHART modeling and performance evaluation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Remke, Anne Katharina Ingrid; Wu, Xian

    2013-01-01

    In process industries wired supervisory and control networks are more and more replaced by wireless systems. Wireless communication inevitably introduces time delays and message losses, which may degrade the system reliability and performance. WirelessHART, as the first international standard for

  9. Implementation of an iPhone wireless accelerometer application for the quantification of reflex response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    LeMoyne, Robert; Mastroianni, Timothy; Grundfest, Warren; Nishikawa, Kiisa

    2013-01-01

    The patellar tendon reflex represents an inherent aspect of the standard neurological evaluation. The features of the reflex response provide initial perspective regarding the status of the nervous system. An iPhone wireless accelerometer application integrated with a potential energy impact pendulum attached to a reflex hammer has been successfully developed, tested, and evaluated for quantifying the patellar tendon reflex. The iPhone functions as a wireless accelerometer platform. The wide coverage range of the iPhone enables the quantification of reflex response samples in rural and remote settings. The iPhone has the capacity to transmit the reflex response acceleration waveform by wireless transmission through email. Automated post-processing of the acceleration waveform provides feature extraction of the maximum acceleration of the reflex response ascertained after evoking the patellar tendon reflex. The iPhone wireless accelerometer application demonstrated the utility of the smartphone as a biomedical device, while providing accurate and consistent quantification of the reflex response.

  10. Advanced concepts for acceleration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keefe, D.

    1986-07-01

    Selected examples of advanced accelerator concepts are reviewed. Such plasma accelerators as plasma beat wave accelerator, plasma wake field accelerator, and plasma grating accelerator are discussed particularly as examples of concepts for accelerating relativistic electrons or positrons. Also covered are the pulsed electron-beam, pulsed laser accelerator, inverse Cherenkov accelerator, inverse free-electron laser, switched radial-line accelerators, and two-beam accelerator. Advanced concepts for ion acceleration discussed include the electron ring accelerator, excitation of waves on intense electron beams, and two-wave combinations

  11. Accelerators and the Accelerator Community

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Malamud, Ernest; Sessler, Andrew

    2008-06-01

    In this paper, standing back--looking from afar--and adopting a historical perspective, the field of accelerator science is examined. How it grew, what are the forces that made it what it is, where it is now, and what it is likely to be in the future are the subjects explored. Clearly, a great deal of personal opinion is invoked in this process.

  12. Energy Efficient Routing in Wireless Sensor Networks Through Balanced Clustering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christos Douligeris

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The wide utilization of Wireless Sensor Networks (WSNs is obstructed by the severely limited energy constraints of the individual sensor nodes. This is the reason why a large part of the research in WSNs focuses on the development of energy efficient routing protocols. In this paper, a new protocol called Equalized Cluster Head Election Routing Protocol (ECHERP, which pursues energy conservation through balanced clustering, is proposed. ECHERP models the network as a linear system and, using the Gaussian elimination algorithm, calculates the combinations of nodes that can be chosen as cluster heads in order to extend the network lifetime. The performance evaluation of ECHERP is carried out through simulation tests, which evince the effectiveness of this protocol in terms of network energy efficiency when compared against other well-known protocols.

  13. Simulation Analysis of Wireless Power Transmission System for Biomedical Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Zhao; Wei, Zhiqiang; Chi, Haokun; Yin, Bo; Cong, Yanping

    2018-03-01

    In recent years, more and more implantable medical devices have been used in the medical field. Some of these devices, such as brain pacemakers, require long-term power support. The WPT(wireless power transmission) technology which is more convenient and economical than replacing the battery by surgery, has become the first choice of many patients. In this paper, we design a WPT system that can be used in implantable medical devices, simulate the transmission efficiency of the system in the air and in the head model, and simulate the SAR value when the system working in the head model. The results show that when implantation depth of the secondary coil is 3 mm, the efficiency of the system can reach 45%, and the maximum average SAR value is 2.19 W / kg, slightly higher than the standard of IEEE.

  14. Head circumference (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Head circumference is a measurement of the circumference of the child's head at its largest area, above the eyebrows and ears and around the back of the head. During routine check-ups, the distance is measured ...

  15. Abnormal Head Position

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Frequently Asked Questions Español Condiciones Chinese Conditions Abnormal Head Position En Español Read in Chinese What is an abnormal head posture? An abnormal or compensatory head posture occurs ...

  16. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... of the Head? What is CT Scanning of the Head? Computed tomography, more commonly known as a ... of page What are some common uses of the procedure? CT scanning of the head is typically ...

  17. Head Impacts in Hockey and Youth Football: Biomechanical Response and Helmet Padding Characteristics

    OpenAIRE

    MacAlister, Anna Margaret

    2014-01-01

    The research presented herein is a combination of work done in two distinct subcategories of sport related head injury research. The body of work is aimed at increasing the understanding of head impact biomechanics across a broad spectrum of impact scenarios as well as the ability of helmets to affect head impact biomechanics over time. The first study utilizes in situ testing of controlled impacts of an instrumented head form to more fully characterize head accelerations resulting from impac...

  18. Unilateral otolith centrifugation by head tilt

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Winters, S.M.; Bos, J.E.; Klis, S.F.L.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: To test for otolith asymmetries, several studies described horizontal translation of the body and head en bloc during fast vertical axis rotation. This stimulus causes one otolithic organ to rotate on-axis, and the other to experience centripetal acceleration. OBJECTIVE: To test a new,

  19. Wireless device monitoring systems and monitoring devices, and associated methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCown, Steven H; Derr, Kurt W; Rohde, Kenneth W

    2014-05-27

    Wireless device monitoring systems and monitoring devices include a communications module for receiving wireless communications of a wireless device. Processing circuitry is coupled with the communications module and configured to process the wireless communications to determine whether the wireless device is authorized or unauthorized to be present at the monitored area based on identification information of the wireless device. Methods of monitoring for the presence and identity of wireless devices are also provided.

  20. Impact of wireless link quality across communication layers

    OpenAIRE

    Zhou, J.

    2010-01-01

    Nowadays, wireless networks are used in most of the applications with radio technologies being used in all kinds of wireless networks. In all wireless links, the transmitted packets can be lost. How to identify the quality of a certain wireless link and achieve the best delivery performance over a certain wireless network is an open issue. In this thesis, the performance of wireless mesh network, wireless sensor network and cellular network have been investigated by the method of measurements...

  1. Accelerator neutrinos

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Autiero, D.; Declais, Y.

    2005-01-01

    In the last years neutrino physics was shaken by many important experimental results bringing solid proofs in favor of neutrino oscillations. The goal of the present and future generation of experiments at accelerators is to complete the comprehension of neutrino mixing and of the pattern of neutrino masses, perform precise measurements of all these parameters and investigate CP violation in the neutrino sector. Most of these goals will be achieved with the study of ν μ → ν e oscillations, which are mainly ruled by the still unknown mixing angle Θ 13 . A multi-step experimental strategy has to be attempted, depending on the magnitude of Θ 13 . (authors)

  2. Ring accelerators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gisler, G.; Faehl, R.

    1983-01-01

    We present two-dimensional simulations in (r-z) and r-theta) cylinderical geometries of imploding-liner-driven accelerators of rings of charged particles. We address issues of azimuthal and longitudinal stability of the rings. We discuss self-trapping designs in which beam injection and extraction is aided by means of external cusp fields. Our simulations are done with the 2-1/2-D particle-in-cell plasma simulation code CLINER, which combines collisionless, electromagnetic PIC capabilities with a quasi-MHD finite element package

  3. accelerating cavity

    CERN Multimedia

    On the inside of the cavity there is a layer of niobium. Operating at 4.2 degrees above absolute zero, the niobium is superconducting and carries an accelerating field of 6 million volts per metre with negligible losses. Each cavity has a surface of 6 m2. The niobium layer is only 1.2 microns thick, ten times thinner than a hair. Such a large area had never been coated to such a high accuracy. A speck of dust could ruin the performance of the whole cavity so the work had to be done in an extremely clean environment.

  4. An Enhanced PSO-Based Clustering Energy Optimization Algorithm for Wireless Sensor Network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Vimalarani

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Wireless Sensor Network (WSN is a network which formed with a maximum number of sensor nodes which are positioned in an application environment to monitor the physical entities in a target area, for example, temperature monitoring environment, water level, monitoring pressure, and health care, and various military applications. Mostly sensor nodes are equipped with self-supported battery power through which they can perform adequate operations and communication among neighboring nodes. Maximizing the lifetime of the Wireless Sensor networks, energy conservation measures are essential for improving the performance of WSNs. This paper proposes an Enhanced PSO-Based Clustering Energy Optimization (EPSO-CEO algorithm for Wireless Sensor Network in which clustering and clustering head selection are done by using Particle Swarm Optimization (PSO algorithm with respect to minimizing the power consumption in WSN. The performance metrics are evaluated and results are compared with competitive clustering algorithm to validate the reduction in energy consumption.

  5. An Enhanced PSO-Based Clustering Energy Optimization Algorithm for Wireless Sensor Network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vimalarani, C; Subramanian, R; Sivanandam, S N

    2016-01-01

    Wireless Sensor Network (WSN) is a network which formed with a maximum number of sensor nodes which are positioned in an application environment to monitor the physical entities in a target area, for example, temperature monitoring environment, water level, monitoring pressure, and health care, and various military applications. Mostly sensor nodes are equipped with self-supported battery power through which they can perform adequate operations and communication among neighboring nodes. Maximizing the lifetime of the Wireless Sensor networks, energy conservation measures are essential for improving the performance of WSNs. This paper proposes an Enhanced PSO-Based Clustering Energy Optimization (EPSO-CEO) algorithm for Wireless Sensor Network in which clustering and clustering head selection are done by using Particle Swarm Optimization (PSO) algorithm with respect to minimizing the power consumption in WSN. The performance metrics are evaluated and results are compared with competitive clustering algorithm to validate the reduction in energy consumption.

  6. Optimization of wireless sensor networks based on chicken swarm optimization algorithm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qingxi; Zhu, Lihua

    2017-05-01

    In order to reduce the energy consumption of wireless sensor network and improve the survival time of network, the clustering routing protocol of wireless sensor networks based on chicken swarm optimization algorithm was proposed. On the basis of LEACH agreement, it was improved and perfected that the points on the cluster and the selection of cluster head using the chicken group optimization algorithm, and update the location of chicken which fall into the local optimum by Levy flight, enhance population diversity, ensure the global search capability of the algorithm. The new protocol avoided the die of partial node of intensive using by making balanced use of the network nodes, improved the survival time of wireless sensor network. The simulation experiments proved that the protocol is better than LEACH protocol on energy consumption, also is better than that of clustering routing protocol based on particle swarm optimization algorithm.

  7. The influence of epidermal growth factor receptor and tumor differentiation on the response to accelerated radiotherapy of squamous cell carcinomas of the head and neck in the randomized DAHANCA 6 and 7 study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eriksen, Jesper Grau; Steiniche, Torben; Overgaard, Jens

    2005-01-01

    to the repopulation taking place during radiotherapy. The aim of the current study was to address the influence of EGFr and histopathological differentiation when the overall treatment time of radiotherapy was moderately reduced. PATIENTS AND METHODS: Eight hundred and three patients with representative pretreatment...... in multivariable analyses. CONCLUSIONS: Moderately accelerated fractionation is superior to conventional treatment in HNSCC but the response is heterogeneous and may be predicted by high expression of EGFr and well/moderate tumor differentiation....... radiotherapy, than carcinomas with low EGFr, using locoregional control as endpoint and a similar pattern was seen, stratifying by well/moderate vs. poor tumor differentiation. Therefore, a combined parameter was constructed showing a more prominent separation of response: tumors with high EGFr and well...

  8. Efficacy of intensified hyperfractionated and accelerated radiotherapy and concurrent chemotherapy with carboplatin and 5-fluorouracil: Updated results of a randomized multicentric trial in advanced head-and-neck cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Semrau, Robert; Mueller, Rolf-Peter; Stuetzer, Hartmut; Staar, Susanne; Schroeder, Ursula; Guntinas-Lichius, Orlando; Kocher, Martin; Eich, Hans Theodor; Dietz, Andreas; Flentje, Michael; Rudat, Volker; Volling, Peter; Schroeder, Michael; Eckel, Hans Edmund

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: To prove an expected benefit of concurrent radiochemotherapy (RCT), a two-arm randomized multicentric study was performed. In a subgroup analysis the influence of pretherapeutical hemoglobin level (p-Hb) on survival under locoregional control (SLC) was tested. Patients and Methods: The study included primarily untreated Stage III/IV (International Union Against Cancer [UICC]) oropharyngeal and hypopharyngeal carcinomas. Patients were randomized to receive either hyperfractionated (hf) and accelerated (acc) RCT with two cycles 5-fluorouracil (600 mg/m 2 /day) and carboplatin (70 mg/m 2 /day) on Days 1-5 and 29-33 or hf-acc radiotherapy (RT) alone. Total RT dose in both arms was 69.9 Gy in 38 days in concomitant boost technique. Results: After a median follow-up time of 57 months, SLC is significantly better in RCT than in RT (p = 0.01), with median SLC of 17 months and 11 months, respectively. Also overall survival (OS) shows a benefit for RCT (p 0.016), with a median survival of 23 months for RCT and 16 months for RT. However, the benefit in SLC and OS is not seen in hypopharyngeal carcinomas. In a multivariate analysis of oropharyngeal cancer patients, p-Hb levels lower than 12.7 g/dL resulted in lower SLC compared with higher p-Hb levels up to 13.8 g/dL. P-Hb levels >13.8 g/dL did not further improve SLC. Conclusions: Hyperfractionated-accelerated RCT is superior to hf-acc RT in oropharyngeal carcinomas. P-Hb levels >13.8 g/dL do not further improve SLC

  9. Head Impact Laboratory (HIL)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The HIL uses testing devices to evaluate vehicle interior energy attenuating (EA) technologies for mitigating head injuries resulting from head impacts during mine/...

  10. Wireless Augmented Reality Communication System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devereaux, Ann (Inventor); Jedrey, Thomas (Inventor); Agan, Martin (Inventor)

    2017-01-01

    A portable unit is for video communication to select a user name in a user name network. A transceiver wirelessly accesses a communication network through a wireless connection to a general purpose node coupled to the communication network. A user interface can receive user input to log on to a user name network through the communication network. The user name network has a plurality of user names, at least one of the plurality of user names is associated with a remote portable unit, logged on to the user name network and available for video communication.

  11. OFDM systems for wireless communications

    CERN Document Server

    Narasimhamurthy, Adarsh

    2010-01-01

    Orthogonal Frequency Division Multiplexing (OFDM) systems are widely used in the standards for digital audio/video broadcasting, WiFi and WiMax. Being a frequency-domain approach to communications, OFDM has important advantages in dealing with the frequency-selective nature of high data rate wireless communication channels. As the needs for operating with higher data rates become more pressing, OFDM systems have emerged as an effective physical-layer solution.This short monograph is intended as a tutorial which highlights the deleterious aspects of the wireless channel and presents why OFDM is

  12. Embracing interference in wireless systems

    CERN Document Server

    Gollakota, Shyamnath

    2014-01-01

    The wireless medium is a shared resource. If nearby devices transmit at thesame time, their signals interfere, resulting in a collision. In traditionalnetworks, collisions cause the loss of the transmitted information. For thisreason, wireless networks have been designed with the assumption thatinterference is intrinsically harmful and must be avoided.This book, a revised version of the author's award-winning Ph.D.dissertation, takes an alternate approach: Instead of viewing interferenceas an inherently counterproductive phenomenon that should to be avoided, wedesign practical systems that tra

  13. The Wireless Nursing Call System

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Casper Bruun

    2006-01-01

    This paper discusses a research project in which social scientists were involved both as analysts and supporters during a pilot with a new wireless nursing call system. The case thus exemplifies an attempt to participate in developing dependable health care systems and offers insight into the cha......This paper discusses a research project in which social scientists were involved both as analysts and supporters during a pilot with a new wireless nursing call system. The case thus exemplifies an attempt to participate in developing dependable health care systems and offers insight...

  14. Artificial intelligence in wireless communications

    CERN Document Server

    Rondeau, Thomas W

    2009-01-01

    This cutting-edge resource offers practical overview of cognitive radio, a paradigm for wireless communications in which a network or a wireless node changes its transmission or reception parameters. The alteration of parameters is based on the active monitoring of several factors in the external and internal radio environment. This book offers a detailed description of cognitive radio and its individual parts. Practitioners learn how the basic processing elements and their capabilities are implemented as modular components. Moreover, the book explains how each component can be developed and t

  15. Emerging wireless networks concepts, techniques and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Makaya, Christian

    2011-01-01

    An authoritative collection of research papers and surveys, Emerging Wireless Networks: Concepts, Techniques, and Applications explores recent developments in next-generation wireless networks (NGWNs) and mobile broadband networks technologies, including 4G (LTE, WiMAX), 3G (UMTS, HSPA), WiFi, mobile ad hoc networks, mesh networks, and wireless sensor networks. Focusing on improving the performance of wireless networks and provisioning better quality of service and quality of experience for users, it reports on the standards of different emerging wireless networks, applications, and service fr

  16. Principles of wireless access and localization

    CERN Document Server

    Pahlavan, Kaveh

    2013-01-01

    A comprehensive, encompassing and accessible text examining a wide range of key Wireless Networking and Localization technologies This book provides a unified treatment of issues related to all wireless access and wireless localization techniques.  The book reflects principles of design and deployment of infrastructure for wireless access and localization for wide, local, and personal networking.   Description of wireless access methods includes design and deployment of traditional TDMA and CDMA technologies and emerging Long Term Evolution (LTE) techniques for wide area cellular networks, the

  17. Efficient Wireless Charger Deployment for Wireless Rechargeable Sensor Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jehn-Ruey Jiang

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available A wireless rechargeable sensor network (WRSN consists of sensor nodes that can harvest energy emitted from wireless chargers for refilling their batteries so that the WRSN can operate sustainably. This paper assumes wireless chargers are equipped with directional antennas, and are deployed on grid points of a fixed height to propose two heuristic algorithms solving the following wireless charger deployment optimization (WCDO problem: how to deploy as few as possible chargers to make the WRSN sustainable. Both algorithms model the charging space of chargers as a cone and calculate charging efficiency according power regression expressions complying with the Friis transmission equation. The two algorithms are the greedy cone covering (GCC algorithm and the adaptive cone covering (ACC algorithm. The GCC (respectively, ACC algorithm greedily (respectively, adaptively generates candidate cones to cover as many as possible sensor nodes. Both algorithms then greedily select the fewest number of candidate cones, each of which corresponds to the deployment of a charger, to have approximate solutions to the WCDO problem. We perform experiments, conduct simulations and do analyses for the algorithms to compare them in terms of the time complexity, the number of chargers deployed, and the execution time.

  18. Wireless Ways: Business and Personal Applications of Wireless Technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Joe

    2001-01-01

    Describes the Art Technology Group (ATG), an electronic business and customer management company, and the work they have done with wireless technology. Highlights include designing virtual offices and supporting the resulting virtual community; the mobility it allows; problems with bandwidth; and display issues. (LRW)

  19. Introduction to Ultra Wideband for Wireless Communications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nikookar, Homayoun; Prasad, Ramjee

    Ultra Wideband (UWB) Technology is the cutting edge technology for wireless communications with a wide range of applications. In Introduction to Ultra Wideband for Wireless Communications UWB principles and technologies for wireless communications are explained clearly. Key issues such as UWB...... wireless channels, interference, signal processing as well as applications and standardization activities are addressed. Introduction to Ultra Wideband for Wireless Communications provides easy-to-understand material to (graduate) students and researchers working in the field of commercial UWB wireless...... communications. Due to tutorial nature of the book it can also be adopted as a textbook on the subject in the Telecommunications Engineering curriculum. Problems at the end of each chapter extend the reader's understanding of the subject. Introduction to Ultra Wideband for Wireless Communications will aslo...

  20. Acceleration induced water removal from ear canals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Hosung; Averett, Katelee; Jung, Sunghwan

    2017-11-01

    Children and adults commonly experience having water trapped in the ear canals after swimming. To remove the water, individuals will shake their head sideways. Since a child's ear canal has a smaller diameter, it requires more acceleration of the head to remove the trapped water. In this study, we theoretically and experimentally investigated the acceleration required to break the surface meniscus of the water in artificial ear canals and hydrophobic-coated glass tubes. In experiments, ear canal models were 3D-printed from a CT-scanned human head. Also, glass tubes were coated with silane to match the hydrophobicity in ear canals. Then, using a linear stage, we measured the acceleration values required to forcefully eject the water from the artificial ear canals and glass tubes. A theoretical model was developed to predict the critical acceleration at a given tube diameter and water volume by using a modified Rayleigh-Taylor instability. Furthermore, this research can shed light on the potential of long-term brain injury and damage by shaking the head to push the water out of the ear canal. This research was supported by National Science Foundation Grant CBET-1604424.

  1. Wireless Power for Mobile Devices

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Waffenschmidt, E.

    2011-01-01

    Wireless power transfer allows a convenient, easy to use battery charging of mobile phones and other mobile devices. No hassle with cables and plugs, just place the device on a pad and that’s it. Such asystem even has the potential to become a standard charging solution. Where are the limits for

  2. Socially Aware Heterogeneous Wireless Networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kosmides, Pavlos; Adamopoulou, Evgenia; Demestichas, Konstantinos; Theologou, Michael; Anagnostou, Miltiades; Rouskas, Angelos

    2015-06-11

    The development of smart cities has been the epicentre of many researchers' efforts during the past decade. One of the key requirements for smart city networks is mobility and this is the reason stable, reliable and high-quality wireless communications are needed in order to connect people and devices. Most research efforts so far, have used different kinds of wireless and sensor networks, making interoperability rather difficult to accomplish in smart cities. One common solution proposed in the recent literature is the use of software defined networks (SDNs), in order to enhance interoperability among the various heterogeneous wireless networks. In addition, SDNs can take advantage of the data retrieved from available sensors and use them as part of the intelligent decision making process contacted during the resource allocation procedure. In this paper, we propose an architecture combining heterogeneous wireless networks with social networks using SDNs. Specifically, we exploit the information retrieved from location based social networks regarding users' locations and we attempt to predict areas that will be crowded by using specially-designed machine learning techniques. By recognizing possible crowded areas, we can provide mobile operators with recommendations about areas requiring datacell activation or deactivation.

  3. Underwater optical wireless communication network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnon, Shlomi

    2010-01-01

    The growing need for underwater observation and subsea monitoring systems has stimulated considerable interest in advancing the enabling technologies of underwater wireless communication and underwater sensor networks. This communication technology is expected to play an important role in investigating climate change, in monitoring biological, biogeochemical, evolutionary, and ecological changes in the sea, ocean, and lake environments, and in helping to control and maintain oil production facilities and harbors using unmanned underwater vehicles (UUVs), submarines, ships, buoys, and divers. However, the present technology of underwater acoustic communication cannot provide the high data rate required to investigate and monitor these environments and facilities. Optical wireless communication has been proposed as the best alternative to meet this challenge. Models are presented for three kinds of optical wireless communication links: (a) a line-of-sight link, (b) a modulating retroreflector link, and (c) a reflective link, all of which can provide the required data rate. We analyze the link performance based on these models. From the analysis, it is clear that as the water absorption increases, the communication performance decreases dramatically for the three link types. However, by using the scattered light it was possible to mitigate this decrease in some cases. It is concluded from the analysis that a high-data-rate underwater optical wireless network is a feasible solution for emerging applications such as UUV-to-UUV links and networks of sensors, and extended ranges in these applications could be achieved by applying a multi-hop concept.

  4. Data centric wireless sensor networks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dulman, S.O.; Havinga, Paul J.M.

    2005-01-01

    The vision of wirteless sensing systems requires the development of devices and technologies that can be pervasive without being intrusive. The basic component of such a smart environment will be a small node with sensing and wireless communications capabilities, able to organize itself flexibly

  5. Wireless Crew Communication Feasibility Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Archer, Ronald D.; Romero, Andy; Juge, David

    2016-01-01

    Ongoing discussions with crew currently onboard the ISS as well as the crew debriefs from completed ISS missions indicate that issues associated with the lack of wireless crew communication results in increased crew task completion times and lower productivity, creates cable management issues, and increases crew frustration.

  6. Deployable Wireless Camera Penetrators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badescu, Mircea; Jones, Jack; Sherrit, Stewart; Wu, Jiunn Jeng

    2008-01-01

    A lightweight, low-power camera dart has been designed and tested for context imaging of sampling sites and ground surveys from an aerobot or an orbiting spacecraft in a microgravity environment. The camera penetrators also can be used to image any line-of-sight surface, such as cliff walls, that is difficult to access. Tethered cameras to inspect the surfaces of planetary bodies use both power and signal transmission lines to operate. A tether adds the possibility of inadvertently anchoring the aerobot, and requires some form of station-keeping capability of the aerobot if extended examination time is required. The new camera penetrators are deployed without a tether, weigh less than 30 grams, and are disposable. They are designed to drop from any altitude with the boost in transmitting power currently demonstrated at approximately 100-m line-of-sight. The penetrators also can be deployed to monitor lander or rover operations from a distance, and can be used for surface surveys or for context information gathering from a touch-and-go sampling site. Thanks to wireless operation, the complexity of the sampling or survey mechanisms may be reduced. The penetrators may be battery powered for short-duration missions, or have solar panels for longer or intermittent duration missions. The imaging device is embedded in the penetrator, which is dropped or projected at the surface of a study site at 90 to the surface. Mirrors can be used in the design to image the ground or the horizon. Some of the camera features were tested using commercial "nanny" or "spy" camera components with the charge-coupled device (CCD) looking at a direction parallel to the ground. Figure 1 shows components of one camera that weighs less than 8 g and occupies a volume of 11 cm3. This camera could transmit a standard television signal, including sound, up to 100 m. Figure 2 shows the CAD models of a version of the penetrator. A low-volume array of such penetrator cameras could be deployed from an

  7. Design and Development of Energy Efficient Routing Protocol for Wireless Sensor Networks using Fuzzy Logic

    OpenAIRE

    K. Nattar Kannan; B. Paramasivan

    2014-01-01

    Wireless Sensor Networks (WSNs) is a emerging technology of real time embedded systems for a variety of applications. In general, WSNs has great challenges in the factor of limited computation, energy and memory resources. Clustering techniques play a vital role in WSNs to increase the network lifetime and also made energy efficiency. Existing clustering approaches like LEACH uses neighboring information of the nodes for selecting cluster heads and other nodes spent more energy for transmitti...

  8. Cooperative wireless network control based health and activity monitoring system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prakash, R; Ganesh, A Balaji; Girish, Siva V

    2016-10-01

    A real-time cooperative communication based wireless network is presented for monitoring health and activity of an end-user in their environment. The cooperative communication offers better energy consumption and also an opportunity to aware the current location of a user non-intrusively. The link between mobile sensor node and relay node is dynamically established by using Received Signal Strength Indicator (RSSI) and Link Quality Indicator (LQI) based on adaptive relay selection scheme. The study proposes a Linear Acceleration based Transmission Power Decision Control (LA-TPDC) algorithm to further enhance the energy efficiency of cooperative communication. Further, the occurrences of false alarms are carefully prevented by introducing three stages of sequential warning system. The real-time experiments are carried-out by using the nodes, namely mobile sensor node, relay nodes and a destination node which are indigenously developed by using a CC430 microcontroller integrated with an in-built transceiver at 868 MHz. The wireless node performance characteristics, such as energy consumption, Signal-Noise ratio (SNR), Bit Error Rate (BER), Packet Delivery Ratio (PDR) and transmission offset are evaluated for all the participated nodes. The experimental results observed that the proposed linear acceleration based transmission power decision control algorithm almost doubles the battery life time than energy efficient conventional cooperative communication.

  9. Head and neck cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vogl, S.E.

    1988-01-01

    This book contains 10 chapters. Some of the titles are: Combined Surgical Resection and Irradiation for Head and Neck Cancers; Analysis of Radiation Therapy Oncology Group Head and Neck Database: Identification of Prognostic Factors and the Re-evaluation of American Joint Committee Stages; Combined Modality Approach to Head and Neck Cancer; Induction Combination Chemotherapy of Regionally Advanced Head and Neck Cancer; and Outcome after Complete Remission to Induction Chemotherapy in Head and Neck Cancer

  10. Wireless and mobile systems in telemedicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reza Safdari

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: It is necessary to deploy mobile and wireless systems in healthcare, because they have many benefits for healthcare systems. The objectives of this article were introducing various systems, applications, and standards of the wireless and mobile telemedicine. Material and Methods: This review study was conducted in 2010. To conduct the study, published articles in the years 2005 to 2012, in English with an emphasis on wireless and mobile technologies in health were studied. Search was done with key words include telemedicine, wireless health systems, health and telecommunications technology in databases including Pubmed, Science Direct, Google Scholar, Web of Sciences, Proquest. The collected data were analyzed. Results: Telemedicine system in the ambulance, telemedicine systems in space, telecardiology systems, EEG system, ultrasound system are some types of wireless and mobile systems in telemedicine. PDA-based mobile and wireless telemedicine application, based PDA drug application, and patient tracking application are some of wireless and mobile applications of telemedicine. The most important standards of wireless and mobile telemedicine are HL7, DICOM, SNOMed, and ICD-9-CM. Conclusion: There are many challenges in the wireless and mobile systems in telemedicine, despite the many benefits. Slow speed in sending pictures and video, lack of attention to the privacy in the design of these systems, environmental variables and the number of users during the day are some of these challenges. It is recommended to consider these challenges during the planning and designing of wireless and mobile systems in telemedicine.

  11. EDITORIAL: Laser and plasma accelerators Laser and plasma accelerators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bingham, Robert

    2009-02-01

    by Chen et al where the driver, instead of being a laser, is a whistler wave known as the magnetowave plasma accelerator. The application to electron--positron plasmas that are found around pulsars is studied in the paper by Shukla, and to muon acceleration by Peano et al. Electron wakefield experiments are now concentrating on control and optimisation of high-quality beams that can be used as drivers for novel radiation sources. Studies by Thomas et al show that filamentation has a deleterious effect on the production of high quality mono-energetic electron beams and is caused by non-optimal choice of focusing geometry and/or electron density. It is crucial to match the focusing with the right plasma parameters and new types of plasma channels are being developed, such as the magnetically controlled plasma waveguide reported by Froula et al. The magnetic field provides a pressure profile shaping the channel to match the guiding conditions of the incident laser, resulting in predicted electron energies of 3GeV. In the forced laser-wakefield experiment Fang et al show that pump depletion reduces or inhibits the acceleration of electrons. One of the earlier laser acceleration concepts known as the beat wave may be revived due to the work by Kalmykov et al who report on all-optical control of nonlinear focusing of laser beams, allowing for stable propagation over several Rayleigh lengths with pre-injected electrons accelerated beyond 100 MeV. With the increasing number of petawatt lasers, attention is being focused on different acceleration regimes such as stochastic acceleration by counterpropagating laser pulses, the relativistic mirror, or the snow-plough effect leading to single-step acceleration reported by Mendonca. During wakefield acceleration the leading edge of the pulse undergoes frequency downshifting and head erosion as the laser energy is transferred to the wake while the trailing edge of the laser pulse undergoes frequency up-shift. This is commonly known

  12. Respiratory effects of transient axial acceleration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loring, S H; Lee, H T; Butler, J P

    2001-06-01

    Whereas gravity has an inspiratory effect in upright subjects, transient upward acceleration is reported to have an expiratory effect. To explore the respiratory effects of transient axial accelerations, we measured axial acceleration at the head and transrespiratory pressure or airflow in five subjects as they were dropped or lifted on a platform. For the first 100 ms, upward acceleration caused a decrease in mouth pressure and inspiratory flow, and downward acceleration caused the opposite. We also simulated these experimental observations by using a computational model of a passive respiratory system based on anatomical data and normal respiratory characteristics. After 100 ms, respiratory airflow in our subjects became highly variable, no longer varying with acceleration. Electromyograms of thoracic and abdominal respiratory muscles showed bursts of activity beginning 40-125 ms after acceleration, suggesting reflex responses responsible for subsequent flow variability. We conclude that, in relaxed subjects, transient upward axial acceleration causes inspiratory airflow and downward acceleration causes expiratory airflow, but that after ~100 ms, reflex activation of respiratory musculature largely determines airflow.

  13. Head Impact Biomechanics in Women's College Soccer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lynall, Robert C; Clark, Michael D; Grand, Erin E; Stucker, Jaclyn C; Littleton, Ashley C; Aguilar, Alain J; Petschauer, Meredith A; Teel, Elizabeth F; Mihalik, Jason P

    2016-09-01

    There are limited nonlaboratory soccer head impact biomechanics data. This is surprising given soccer's global popularity. Epidemiological data suggest that female college soccer players are at a greater concussion injury risk than their male counterparts. Therefore, the purposes of our study were to quantify head impact frequency and magnitude during women's soccer practices and games in the National Collegiate Athletic Association and to characterize these data across event type, playing position, year on the team, and segment of game (first and second halves). Head impact biomechanics were collected from female college soccer players (n = 22; mean ± SD age = 19.1 ± 0.1 yr, height = 168.0 ± 3.5 cm, mass = 63.7 ± 6.0 kg). We employed a helmetless head impact measurement device (X2 Biosystems xPatch) before each competition and practice across a single season. Peak linear and rotational accelerations were categorized based on impact magnitude and subsequently analyzed using appropriate nonparametric analyses. Overall, women's college soccer players experience approximately seven impacts per 90 min of game play. The overwhelming majority (~90%) of all head impacts were categorized into our mildest linear acceleration impact classification (10g-20g). Interestingly, a higher percentage of practice impacts in the 20g-40g range compared with games (11% vs 7%) was observed. Head impact biomechanics studies have provided valuable insights into understanding collision sports and for informing evidence-based rule and policy changes. These have included changing the football kickoff, ice hockey body checking ages, and head-to-head hits in both sports. Given soccer's global popularity, and the growing public concern for the potential long-term neurological implications of collision and contact sports, studying soccer has the potential to impact many athletes and the sports medicine professionals caring for them.

  14. Residual energy level based clustering routing protocol for wireless sensor networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Xu; Zhong, Fangming; Chen, Zhikui; Yang, Deli

    2015-12-01

    The wireless sensor networks, which nodes prone to premature death, with unbalanced energy consumption and a short life time, influenced the promotion and application of this technology in internet of things in agriculture. This paper proposes a clustering routing protocol based on the residual energy level (RELCP). RELCP includes three stages: the selection of cluster head, establishment of cluster and data transmission. RELCP considers the remaining energy level and distance to base station, while election of cluster head nodes and data transmitting. Simulation results demonstrate that the protocol can efficiently balance the energy dissipation of all nodes, and prolong the network lifetime.

  15. Energy-efficient digital and wireless IC design for wireless smart sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Jun; Huang, Xiongchuan; Wang, Chao; Tae-Hyoung Kim, Tony; Lian, Yong

    2017-10-01

    Wireless smart sensing is now widely used in various applications such as health monitoring and structural monitoring. In conventional wireless sensor nodes, significant power is consumed in wirelessly transmitting the raw data. Smart sensing adds local intelligence to the sensor node and reduces the amount of wireless data transmission via on-node digital signal processing. While the total power consumption is reduced compared to conventional wireless sensing, the power consumption of the digital processing becomes as dominant as wireless data transmission. This paper reviews the state-of-the-art energy-efficient digital and wireless IC design techniques for reducing the power consumption of the wireless smart sensor node to prolong battery life and enable self-powered applications.

  16. NFC like wireless technology for monitoring purposes in scientific/industrial facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Badillo, I.; Eguiraun, M.; Jugo, J.

    2012-01-01

    Wireless technologies are becoming more and more used in large industrial and scientific facilities like particle accelerators for facilitating the monitoring and indeed sensing in these kind of large environments. Cabled equipment means little flexibility in placement and is very expensive in both money and effort whenever reorganization or new installation is needed. So, when cabling is not really needed for performance reasons wireless monitoring and control is a good option, due to the speed of implementation. There are several wireless flavors to choose, as Bluetooth, Zigbee, WiFi, etc. depending on the requirements of each specific application. In this work a wireless monitoring system for EPICS (Experimental and Industrial Control System) is presented. The desired control system variables are acquired over the network and published in a mobile device, allowing the operator to check process variables everywhere the signal spreads. In this approach, a Python based server will be continuously getting EPICS Process Variables via Channel Access protocol and sending them through a WiFi standard 802.11 network using ICE middle-ware. ICE is a tool-kit oriented to build distributed applications. Finally, the mobile device will read the data and show it to the operator. The security of the communication can be improved by means of a weak wireless signal, following the same idea as in Near Field Communication (NFC), but for more large distances. With this approach, local monitoring and control applications, as for example a vacuum control system for several pumps, are currently implemented. (authors)

  17. Biomechanics of Heading a Soccer Ball: Implications for Player Safety

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charles F. Babbs

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available To better understand the risk and safety of heading a soccer ball, the author created a set of simple mathematical models based upon Newton�s second law of motion to describe the physics of heading. These models describe the player, the ball, the flight of the ball before impact, the motion of the head and ball during impact, and the effects of all of these upon the intensity and the duration of acceleration of the head. The calculated head accelerations were compared to those during presumably safe daily activities of jumping, dancing, and head nodding and also were related to established criteria for serious head injury from the motor vehicle crash literature. The results suggest heading is usually safe but occasionally dangerous, depending on key characteristics of both the player and the ball. Safety is greatly improved when players head the ball with greater effective body mass, which is determined by a player�s size, strength, and technique. Smaller youth players, because of their lesser body mass, are more at risk of potentially dangerous headers than are adults, even when using current youth size balls. Lower ball inflation pressure reduces risk of dangerous head accelerations. Lower pressure balls also have greater “touch” and “playability”, measured in terms of contact time and contact area between foot and ball during a kick. Focus on teaching proper technique, the re-design of age-appropriate balls for young players with reduced weight and inflation pressure, and avoidance of head contact with fast, rising balls kicked at close range can substantially reduce risk of subtle brain injury in players who head soccer balls.

  18. Evaluation of a laboratory model of human head impact biomechanics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernandez, Fidel; Shull, Peter B; Camarillo, David B

    2015-09-18

    This work describes methodology for evaluating laboratory models of head impact biomechanics. Using this methodology, we investigated: how closely does twin-wire drop testing model head rotation in American football impacts? Head rotation is believed to cause mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI) but helmet safety standards only model head translations believed to cause severe TBI. It is unknown whether laboratory head impact models in safety standards, like twin-wire drop testing, reproduce six degree-of-freedom (6DOF) head impact biomechanics that may cause mTBI. We compared 6DOF measurements of 421 American football head impacts to twin-wire drop tests at impact sites and velocities weighted to represent typical field exposure. The highest rotational velocities produced by drop testing were the 74th percentile of non-injury field impacts. For a given translational acceleration level, drop testing underestimated field rotational acceleration by 46% and rotational velocity by 72%. Primary rotational acceleration frequencies were much larger in drop tests (~100 Hz) than field impacts (~10 Hz). Drop testing was physically unable to produce acceleration directions common in field impacts. Initial conditions of a single field impact were highly resolved in stereo high-speed video and reconstructed in a drop test. Reconstruction results reflected aggregate trends of lower amplitude rotational velocity and higher frequency rotational acceleration in drop testing, apparently due to twin-wire constraints and the absence of a neck. These results suggest twin-wire drop testing is limited in modeling head rotation during impact, and motivate continued evaluation of head impact models to ensure helmets are tested under conditions that may cause mTBI. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Adaptive Naive Bayes classification for wireless sensor networks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zwartjes, G.J.

    2017-01-01

    Wireless Sensor Networks are tiny devices equipped with sensors and wireless communication. These devices observe environments and communicatie about these observations. Machine Learning techniques are of interest for Wireless Sensor Network applications since they can reduce the amount of needed

  20. Unilateral otolith centrifugation by head tilt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winters, Stephanie M; Bos, Jelte E; Klis, Sjaak F L

    2014-01-01

    To test for otolith asymmetries, several studies described horizontal translation of the body and head en bloc during fast vertical axis rotation. This stimulus causes one otolithic organ to rotate on-axis, and the other to experience centripetal acceleration. To test a new, more simple method of unilateral stimulation with head tilt and the body remaining on axis. During stationary and during 360 deg/s rotation, 12 healthy blindfolded subjects had their heads tilted 30 degrees sideways, positioning one otolithic organ on the axis of rotation after the other. The haptic subjective vertical (SV) was recorded several times by means of a manually adjustable rod. It was found that during stationary the SV tilted about 4 degrees on average in the direction of the head. During rotation, the SV tilted about 9 degrees on average. We therefore estimate the effect of eccentric otolith rotation to be 5 degrees on average. Tilt of the subjective vertical induced by head tilt during on-axis body rotation can provide a relatively uncomplicated alternative to test unilateral otolithic function as compared to body and head translation during rotation. Moreover, unlike eccentric rotation of the entire body, somatosensory cues are minimized by keeping the body fixed on axis and by subtracting the effect of head tilt per se.

  1. Performance Analysis of IIUM Wireless Campus Network

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Latif, Suhaimi Abd; Masud, Mosharrof H; Anwar, Farhat

    2013-01-01

    International Islamic University Malaysia (IIUM) is one of the leading universities in the world in terms of quality of education that has been achieved due to providing numerous facilities including wireless services to every enrolled student. The quality of this wireless service is controlled and monitored by Information Technology Division (ITD), an ISO standardized organization under the university. This paper aims to investigate the constraints of wireless campus network of IIUM. It evaluates the performance of the IIUM wireless campus network in terms of delay, throughput and jitter. QualNet 5.2 simulator tool has employed to measure these performances of IIUM wireless campus network. The observation from the simulation result could be one of the influencing factors in improving wireless services for ITD and further improvement

  2. Introductory survey for wireless infrared communications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Munsif Ali Jatoi

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Wireless infrared communications can be defined as the propagation of light waves in free space using infrared radiation whose range is 400–700 nm. This range corresponds to frequencies of hundreds of terahertz, which is high for higher data rate applications. Wireless infrared is applied for higher data rates applications such as wireless computing, wireless video and wireless multimedia communication applications. Introduced by Gfeller, this field has grown with different link configurations, improved transmitter efficiency, increased receiver responsivity and various multiple access techniques for improved quality. Errors are caused because of background light, which causes degradation overall system performance. Error correction techniques are used to remove the errors caused during transmission. This study provides a brief account on field theory used for error correction in wireless infrared systems. The results are produced in terms of bit error rate and signal-to-noise ratio for various bit lengths to show the ability of encoding and decoding algorithms.

  3. Wireless Network Penetration Testing and Security Auditing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Shao-Long

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available IEEE802.11 wireless wireless networks have security issues that are vulnerable to a variety of attacks. Due to using radio to transport data, attackers can bypass firewalls, sniff sensitive information, intercept packets and send malicious packets. Security auditing and penetration testing is expected to ensure wireless networks security. The contributions of this work are analyzed the vulnerability and types of attacks pertaining to IEEE 802.11 WLAN, performed well known attacks in a laboratory environment to conduct penetration tests to confirm whether our wireless network is hackable or not. WAIDPS is configured as auditing tool to view wireless attacks, such as WEP/WPA/WPA2 cracking, rouge access points, denial of service attack. WAIDPS is designed to detect wireless intrusion with additional features. Penetration testing and auditing will mitigate the risk and threatening to protect WALN.

  4. Wireless Technology Application to Nuclear Power Plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Jeong Kweon; Jeong, See Chae; Jeong, Ki Hoon; Oh, Do Young; Kim, Jae Hack

    2009-01-01

    Wireless technologies are getting widely used in various industrial processes for equipment condition monitoring, process measurement and other applications. In case of Nuclear Power Plant (NPP), it is required to review applicability of the wireless technologies for maintaining plant reliability, preventing equipment failure, and reducing operation and maintenance costs. Remote sensors, mobile technology and two-way radio communication may satisfy these needs. The application of the state of the art wireless technologies in NPPs has been restricted because of the vulnerability for the Electromagnetic Interference and Radio Frequency Interference (EMI/RFI) and cyber security. It is expected that the wireless technologies can be applied to the nuclear industry after resolving these issues which most of the developers and vendors are aware of. This paper presents an overview and information on general wireless deployment in nuclear facilities for future application. It also introduces typical wireless plant monitoring system application in the existing NPPs

  5. mm-Wave Hybrid Photonic Wireless Links for Ultra-High Speed Wireless Transmissions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rommel, Simon; Vegas Olmos, Juan José; Tafur Monroy, Idelfonso

    Hybrid photonic-wireless transmission schemes in the mm-wave frequency range are promising candidates to enable the multi-gigabit per second data communications required from wireless and mobile networks of the 5th and future generations. Large FCC spectrum allocations for wireless transmission...

  6. Application and promotion of wireless charging technology

    OpenAIRE

    Yan, Kaijun

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this thesis is to study wireless charging technology and analyze the application and promotion of each technology. This technology is based on Faraday’s electromagnetic in 1830s. It is not a new technology but it is developing high speed nowadays. This thesis introduces four mainstream types of wireless charging technology and three main-stream standards, and analyzes their features and development status. Wireless charging technology has been applied to some products, suc...

  7. Computer-Based Wireless Advertising Communication System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anwar Al-Mofleh

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we developed a computer based wireless advertising communication system (CBWACS that enables the user to advertise whatever he wants from his own office to the screen in front of the customer via wireless communication system. This system consists of two PIC microcontrollers, transmitter, receiver, LCD, serial cable and antenna. The main advantages of the system are: the wireless structure and the system is less susceptible to noise and other interferences because it uses digital communication techniques.

  8. Application opportunities in wireless communications. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abbott, R.E.; Blevins, R.P.; Olmstead, C.

    1998-07-01

    This report presents the results of examinations of wireless technologies and applications that may offer potential to utilities. Five different wireless technology areas are reviewed. Three areas--Communication Networks, Monitored Security Services, and Home Automation--potentially represent new business ventures for utilities. Two areas--Automatic Vehicle Location and Automated Field-Force Management--represent wireless applications with potential for reduced operating costs and improved customer relations

  9. Design and security of small wireless network

    OpenAIRE

    Žižka, Ladislav

    2012-01-01

    This thesis deals with design and security of small wireless network. Main goal of the thesis is home network design and choice of optimal solution of wireless security. The thesis has four parts. The first part describes computer networks and network components in theory. Next part deals with network design, choosing of network components and setting of them. It also describes some functionalities of alternative firmware DD-WRT. The third part presents common wireless security and network an...

  10. Feasibility and Applications of a Wireless Firewall

    OpenAIRE

    Wilhelm, Matthias

    2016-01-01

    Most of today’s wireless communication devices operate on unlicensed bands with uncoordinated spectrum access, with the consequence that RF interference and collisions are impairing the overall performance of wireless networks. In the classical design of network protocols, both packets in a collision are considered lost, such that channel access mechanisms attempt to avoid collisions proactively. However, with the current proliferation of wireless applications, e.g., WLANs, car-to-car network...

  11. CERNois wins prestigious accelerator award

    CERN Multimedia

    Katarina Anthony

    2011-01-01

    During the 2nd International Particle Accelerator Conference, CERN’s Rogelio Tomás García became the first Spaniard to receive the Frank Sacherer Prize for his work in particle beam optics.   Rogelio Tomás García at the 2nd International Particle Accelerator Conference. The Frank Sacherer Prize is awarded to physicists who have made a “significant, original contribution to the accelerator field" early on in their career. This year the prize was given to Rogelio Tomás García who, at only 35 years of age, has made important contributions to the optics design, optics measurement, and correction techniques applied at both the LHC and Brookhaven’s RHIC. “Tomás has had a vital impact on CERN’s beam optics studies and has made very impressive achievements in the field of beam optics,” says Oliver Brüning, Head of the Accelerators and Beam Physics...

  12. Biomedical Wireless Ambulatory Crew Monitor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chmiel, Alan; Humphreys, Brad

    2009-01-01

    A compact, ambulatory biometric data acquisition system has been developed for space and commercial terrestrial use. BioWATCH (Bio medical Wireless and Ambulatory Telemetry for Crew Health) acquires signals from biomedical sensors using acquisition modules attached to a common data and power bus. Several slots allow the user to configure the unit by inserting sensor-specific modules. The data are then sent real-time from the unit over any commercially implemented wireless network including 802.11b/g, WCDMA, 3G. This system has a distributed computing hierarchy and has a common data controller on each sensor module. This allows for the modularity of the device along with the tailored ability to control the cards using a relatively small master processor. The distributed nature of this system affords the modularity, size, and power consumption that betters the current state of the art in medical ambulatory data acquisition. A new company was created to market this technology.

  13. Wireless Augmented Reality Communication System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devereaux, Ann (Inventor); Jedrey, Thomas (Inventor); Agan, Martin (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    The system of the present invention is a highly integrated radio communication system with a multimedia co-processor which allows true two-way multimedia (video, audio, data) access as well as real-time biomedical monitoring in a pager-sized portable access unit. The system is integrated in a network structure including one or more general purpose nodes for providing a wireless-to-wired interface. The network architecture allows video, audio and data (including biomedical data) streams to be connected directly to external users and devices. The portable access units may also be mated to various non-personal devices such as cameras or environmental sensors for providing a method for setting up wireless sensor nets from which reported data may be accessed through the portable access unit. The reported data may alternatively be automatically logged at a remote computer for access and viewing through a portable access unit, including the user's own.

  14. Propagation Engineering in Wireless Communications

    CERN Document Server

    Ghasemi, Abdollah; Ghasemi, Farshid

    2012-01-01

    Wireless communications has seen explosive growth in recent decades, in a realm that is both broad and rapidly expanding to include satellite services, navigational aids, remote sensing, telemetering, audio and video broadcasting, high-speed data communications, mobile radio systems and much more. Propagation Engineering in Wireless Communications deals with the basic principles of radiowaves propagation for frequency bands used in radio-communications, offering descriptions of new achievements and newly developed propagation models. The book bridges the gap between theoretical calculations and approaches, and applied procedures needed for advanced radio links design. The primary objective of this two-volume set is to demonstrate the fundamentals, and to introduce propagation phenomena and mechanisms that engineers are likely to encounter in the design and evaluation of radio links of a given type and operating frequency. Volume one covers basic principles, along with tropospheric and ionospheric propagation,...

  15. Mobility needs and wireless solutions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Saugstrup, Dan; Henten, Anders

    The main purpose of this report is to spell out a methodological approach to the analysis of user needs with respect to mobility. Furthermore, this methodological approach is used in an exemplary analysis of the relationship between user needs and technology solutions offered by different wireless...... technologies. The report is based on a research approach, emphasizing important aspects in relation to developing more user oriented mobile services and applications in a heterogeneous network environment. As a staring point, Scandinavian research within the field of social science concerning mobility...... is described and discussed. Furthermore different wireless technologies are briefly described and discussed in relation to possible transmission capacities and coverage areas. In addition to this, a preliminary framework regarding the implications of mobility on the use and development of mobile services...

  16. Passive Wireless SAW Humidity Sensors, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This proposal describes the preliminary development of passive wireless surface acoustic wave (SAW) based humidity sensors for NASA application to distributed...

  17. Distributed medium access control in wireless networks

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Ping

    2013-01-01

    This brief investigates distributed medium access control (MAC) with QoS provisioning for both single- and multi-hop wireless networks including wireless local area networks (WLANs), wireless ad hoc networks, and wireless mesh networks. For WLANs, an efficient MAC scheme and a call admission control algorithm are presented to provide guaranteed QoS for voice traffic and, at the same time, increase the voice capacity significantly compared with the current WLAN standard. In addition, a novel token-based scheduling scheme is proposed to provide great flexibility and facility to the network servi

  18. EEM{sup TM} wireless supervision

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bilic, H. [Ericsson-Nikola Tesla d.d. Zagreb (Croatia)

    2000-07-01

    By adding the GSM network to the communication level of Energy Management systems, energy operating centres (EOC) can offer wireless access to the supervised equipment. Furthermore EOC can profit from rapid service development in the GSM networks. With implementation of GPRS to the GSM network EOC can instantly offer wireless access to external IP based networks such as Internet and corporate Intranets. The author describes architecture and key characteristic of Ericsson EnergyMaster{sup TM} (EEM{sup TM}) system for Energy Management, how and where to implement wireless supervision, wireless access to IP addresses and also how to implement new services provided by the GSM network. (orig.)

  19. Wireless SAW Interrogator and Sensor System Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Wireless, passive, Surface Acoustic Wave (SAW), Orthogonal Frequency Coded (OFC) temperature sensors, operating in a multi-sensor environment, developed at the...

  20. Wireless 3D Chocolate Printer

    OpenAIRE

    FROILAN G. DESTREZA; FRANCIS CARLO V. SOLLESTRE; MARJORIE V. VASQUEZ; FRANCIS B. MENDOZA

    2014-01-01

    This study is for the BSHRM Students of Batangas State University (BatStateU) ARASOF for the researchers believe that the Wireless 3D Chocolate Printer would be helpful in their degree program especially on making creative, artistic, personalized and decorative chocolate designs. The researchers used the Prototyping model as procedural method for the successful development and implementation of the hardware and software. This method has five phases which are the following: quick plan, quick d...

  1. Inkjet printed wireless smart bandage

    KAUST Repository

    Farooqui, Muhammad Fahad

    2016-12-19

    Chronic wounds affect millions of patients around the world and requires a major portion of health care budget for treatment. In this article, we present an unprecedented low cost continuous wireless monitoring system, realized through inkjet printing on a standard bandage strip, which can send early warnings as well as record long term wound progression data. The smart bandage can communicate upto a distance of 60 m when worn on the body.

  2. Linear Accelerator (LINAC)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Linear Accelerator A linear accelerator (LINAC) customizes high energy x-rays or ... ensured? What is this equipment used for? A linear accelerator (LINAC) is the device most commonly used ...

  3. Smartphone Household Wireless Electroencephalogram Hat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harold Szu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Rudimentary brain machine interface has existed for the gaming industry. Here, we propose a wireless, real-time, and smartphone-based electroencephalogram (EEG system for homecare applications. The system uses high-density dry electrodes and compressive sensing strategies to overcome conflicting requirements between spatial electrode density, temporal resolution, and spatiotemporal throughput rate. Spatial sparseness is addressed by close proximity between active electrodes and desired source locations and using an adaptive selection of N active among 10N passive electrodes to form m-organized random linear combinations of readouts, m≪N≪10N. Temporal sparseness is addressed via parallel frame differences in hardware. During the design phase, we took tethered laboratory EEG dataset and applied fuzzy logic to compute (a spatiotemporal average of larger magnitude EEG data centers in 0.3 second intervals and (b inside brainwave sources by Independent Component Analysis blind deconvolution without knowing the impulse response function. Our main contributions are the fidelity of quality wireless EEG data compared to original tethered data and the speed of compressive image recovery. We have compared our recovery of ill-posed inverse data against results using Block Sparse Code. Future work includes development of strategies to filter unwanted artifact from high-density EEGs (i.e., facial muscle-related events and wireless environmental electromagnetic interferences.

  4. Head Impact Magnitude in American High School Football.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Julianne D; Guskiewicz, Kevin M; Mihalik, Jason P; Blackburn, J Troy; Siegmund, Gunter P; Marshall, Stephen W

    2016-08-01

    To describe determinants of head impact magnitudes between various play aspects in high school football. Thirty-two high school American football players wore Head Impact Telemetry System instrumented helmets to capture head impact magnitude (linear acceleration, rotational acceleration, and Head Impact Technology severity profile [HITsp]). We captured and analyzed video from 13 games (n = 3888 viewable head impacts) to determine the following play aspects: quarter, impact cause, play type, closing distance, double head impact, player's stance, player's action, direction of gaze, athletic readiness, level of anticipation, player stationary, ball possession, receiving ball, and snapping ball. We conducted random intercepts general linear mixed models to assess the differences in head impact magnitude between play aspects (α = 0.05). The following aspects resulted in greater head impact magnitude: impacts during the second quarter (HITsp: P = .03); contact with another player (linear, rotational, HITsp: P football. Rule or coaching changes that reduce collisions after long closing distances, especially when combined with the 3-point stance or when a player is being struck in the head, should be considered. Copyright © 2016 by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

  5. Head and face reconstruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/002980.htm Head and face reconstruction To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Head and face reconstruction is surgery to repair or ...

  6. Head CT scan

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... CT; Cranial CT; CT scan - skull; CT scan - head; CT scan - orbits; CT scan - sinuses; Computed tomography - ... Head CT is done in the hospital or radiology center. You lie on a narrow table that ...

  7. Head Lice: Diagnosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... CDC Cancel Submit Search The CDC Parasites - Lice - Head Lice Note: Javascript is disabled or is not ... please visit this page: About CDC.gov . Lice Head Lice General Information Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs) Treatment ...

  8. Head and Neck Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Head and neck cancer includes cancers of the mouth, nose, sinuses, salivary glands, throat, and lymph nodes ... swallowing A change or hoarseness in the voice Head and neck cancers are twice as common in ...

  9. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... the limitations of CT Scanning of the Head? What is CT Scanning of the Head? Computed tomography, ... than regular radiographs (x-rays). top of page What are some common uses of the procedure? CT ...

  10. Head injury - first aid

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... medlineplus.gov/ency/article/000028.htm Head injury - first aid To use the sharing features on this page, ... a concussion can range from mild to severe. First Aid Learning to recognize a serious head injury and ...

  11. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... for Brain Tumors Radiation Therapy for Head and Neck Cancer Others American Stroke Association National Stroke Association ... Computer Tomography (CT) Safety During Pregnancy Head and Neck Cancer X-ray, Interventional Radiology and Nuclear Medicine ...

  12. Acceleration of clinician hand movements during spinal manipulative therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gelley, Geoffrey M; Passmore, Steven R; MacNeil, Brian J

    2015-04-01

    This study used an observational design to examine the kinematics of spinal manipulative therapy (SMT) by determining the acceleration characteristics of the manipulative input at the cervical, thoracic, and lumbar spinal regions. Studies of SMT have been restricted to measuring the forces that result from the manipulative input. Several studies have indicated the rate of force development is a key parameter of clinically delivered SMT. Despite this, the movement strategies employed during SMT, including acceleration, have not been directly measured. Participants (n = 29) were recruited from a private practice chiropractic clinic. A wireless accelerometer attached to the clinician's hand was used to characterize the thrust phase of the SMT treatments. Significant differences were found across each spinal region for acceleration amplitude parameters (p acceleration during SMT (p acceleration properties of clinically delivered SMT. Consistent with that reported for SMT forces, acceleration amplitudes varied significantly across spinal regions with relatively little differences in acceleration latencies. Notably, acceleration amplitudes and latencies were not associated with each other within spinal regions. These findings indicate that changes in acceleration amplitude, rather than latency, are used to tailor SMT to individuals. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Perfusion of the Head CT Angiography (CTA) Stroke Brain Tumors Computer Tomography (CT) Safety During Pregnancy Head and Neck Cancer X-ray, Interventional Radiology and Nuclear Medicine Radiation Safety Images related to Computed Tomography (CT) - Head Videos related to Computed Tomography ( ...

  14. Axis of eye rotation changes with head-pitch orientation during head impulses about earth-vertical.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Migliaccio, Americo A; Schubert, Michael C; Clendaniel, Richard A; Carey, John P; Della Santina, Charles C; Minor, Lloyd B; Zee, David S

    2006-06-01

    The goal of this study was to assess how the axis of head rotation, Listing's law, and eye position influence the axis of eye rotation during brief, rapid head rotations. We specifically asked how the axis of eye rotation during the initial angular vestibuloocular reflex (VOR) changed when the pitch orientation of the head relative to Earth-vertical was varied, but the initial position of the eye in the orbit and the orientation of Listing's plane with respect to the head were fixed. We measured three-dimensional eye and head rotation axes in eight normal humans using the search coil technique during head-and-trunk (whole-body) and head-on-trunk (head-only) "impulses" about an Earth-vertical axis. The head was initially oriented at one of five pitch angles (30 degrees nose down, 15 degrees nose down, 0 degrees, 15 degrees nose up, 30 degrees nose up). The fixation target was always aligned with the nasooccipital axis. Whole-body impulses were passive, unpredictable, manual, rotations with peak-amplitude of approximately 20 degrees , peak-velocity of approximately 80 degrees /s, and peak-acceleration of approximately 1000 degrees /s2. Head-only impulses were also passive, unpredictable, manual, rotations with peak-amplitude of approximately 20 degrees , peak-velocity of approximately 150 degrees /s, and peak-acceleration of approximately 3000 degrees /s2. During whole-body impulses, the axis of eye rotation tilted in the same direction, and by an amount proportional (0.51 +/- 0.09), to the starting pitch head orientation (P rotation could be predicted from vectorial summation of the gains (eye velocity/head velocity) obtained for rotations about the pure yaw and roll head axes. Thus, even when the orientation of Listing's plane and eye position in the orbit are fixed, the axis of eye rotation during the VOR reflects a compromise between the requirements of Listing's law and a perfectly compensatory VOR.

  15. An Implementation of Error Minimization Position Estimate in Wireless Inertial Measurement Unit using Modification ZUPT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adytia Darmawan

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Position estimation using WIMU (Wireless Inertial Measurement Unit is one of emerging technology in the field of indoor positioning systems. WIMU can detect movement and does not depend on GPS signals. The position is then estimated using a modified ZUPT (Zero Velocity Update method that was using Filter Magnitude Acceleration (FMA, Variance Magnitude Acceleration (VMA and Angular Rate (AR estimation. Performance of this method was justified on a six-legged robot navigation system. Experimental result shows that the combination of VMA-AR gives the best position estimation.

  16. High Speed Wireless Signal Generation and Demodulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Caballero Jambrina, Antonio; Sambaraju, Rakesh; Zibar, Darko

    We present the experimental demonstration of high speed wireless generation, up to 40 Gb/s, in the 75-110 GHz wireless band. All-optical OFDM and photonic up-conversion are used for generation and single side-band modulation with digital coherent detection for demodulation....

  17. The Invention of the Wireless Communication Engine

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Kooij, B.J.G.

    2017-01-01

    Wireless technology, taken for granted today, was once an innovative wonder that would forever change how the world communicates. Developed by Guglielmo Marconi in the latter half of the nineteenth century, wireless telegraphy combined advancements made by Samuel Morse, William Cooke, Charles

  18. Home and School Technology: Wired versus Wireless.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Horn, Royal

    2001-01-01

    Presents results of informal research on smart homes and appliances, structured home wiring, whole-house audio/video distribution, hybrid cable, and wireless networks. Computer network wiring is tricky to install unless all-in-one jacketed cable is used. Wireless phones help installers avoid pre-wiring problems in homes and schools. (MLH)

  19. A guide to wireless networking by light

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haas, Harald; Chen, Cheng; O'Brien, Dominic

    2017-09-01

    The lack of wireless spectrum in the radio frequency bands has led to a rapid growth in research in wireless networking using light, known as LiFi (light fidelity). In this paper an overview of the subsystems, challenges and techniques required to achieve this is presented.

  20. Enabling technologies for wireless e-business

    CERN Document Server

    Kou, Weidong

    2006-01-01

    Provides a coverage of the technologies needed to make wireless e-business effective. This book offers an introduction for both self-study and taught e-business classes or commercial training in e-business and wireless technologies. It explains both industry standards and relevant academic research.

  1. International Conference on Mobile and Wireless Technology

    CERN Document Server

    Wattanapongsakorn, Naruemon; Joukov, Nikolai

    2016-01-01

    This book presents the peer-reviewed contributions of ICMWT2016, an international conference devoted to mobile and wireless technology. Researchers and professionals from academia and industry met to discuss the cutting-edge developments in the field. The book includes papers on mobile and wireless networks, the increasingly important security issues, data management, as well as the latest developments in mobile software development.

  2. Topological properties of random wireless networks

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Wireless networks in which the node locations are random are best modelled as random geometric graphs (RGGs). In addition to their extensive application in the modelling of wireless networks, RGGs find many new applications and are being studied in their own right. In this paper we first provide a brief introduction to the ...

  3. Kali Linux wireless penetration testing essentials

    CERN Document Server

    Alamanni, Marco

    2015-01-01

    This book is targeted at information security professionals, penetration testers and network/system administrators who want to get started with wireless penetration testing. No prior experience with Kali Linux and wireless penetration testing is required, but familiarity with Linux and basic networking concepts is recommended.

  4. Industrial wireless networking with resource constraint devices

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Das, Kallol

    2015-01-01

    During the last decade, wireless technologies have revolutionized the industrial automation sector by enabling wireless sensing and actuation for industrial applications. Most of these recently developed industrial standards are built on top of IEEE802.15.4 interface, which uses 2.4GHz frequency

  5. Challenging Aspects of Terahertz Terabit Wireless Communications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yu, Xianbin; Galili, Michael; Jepsen, Peter Uhd

    The increasing demand on fast wireless communications, e.g. huge data file transferring and mobile broadband access, has driven wireless communication systems into a path towards Terabit era. Terahertz (THz) technology is promising due to its unique features, such as unlimited bandwidth available...

  6. Interference mitigation techniques in wireless communications ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Co-Channel Interference, Intersymbol interference and fading are major impairment to the high-capacity transmission in power- and band-limited wireless communication channel. This paper presents an overview of interference mitigation techniques in wireless communications systems. Linear filtering, equalization, and ...

  7. Voice over IP in Wireless Heterogeneous Networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fathi, Hanane; Chakraborty, Shyam; Prasad, Ramjee

    The convergence of different types of traffic has preceded the convergence of systems and services in a wireless heterogeneous network. Voice and data traffic are usually treated separate in both 2G and 2.5G wireless networks. With advances in packet switching technology and especially with the d...... and to the discruption caused by the user mobility during the session. Voice over IP in Wireless Hetetrogeneous Networks thus investigates and proposes cross-layer techniques for realizing time-efficient control mechanisms for VoIP: signaling, mobility and security.......The convergence of different types of traffic has preceded the convergence of systems and services in a wireless heterogeneous network. Voice and data traffic are usually treated separate in both 2G and 2.5G wireless networks. With advances in packet switching technology and especially...... with the deployment of wireless heterogeneous systems, both speech and data traffic are carrried over wireless links by the same IP-based packet-switched infrastructure. However, this combination faces some challenges due to the inherent properties of the wireless network. The requirements for good quality Vo...

  8. European Research towards Future Wireless Communications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frederiksen, Flemming Bjerge; Prasad, Ramjee; Pedersen, Gert Frølund

    2005-01-01

    This paper presents an overview of four on-going European research projects in the field of mobile and wireless communications leading to the next generations of wireless communications. The projects started in 2004. They investigate requirements and definition of access technology, network...... architecture, antennas and propagation, security, services, applications and socio-economic impact....

  9. Technical Challenges Hindering Development of Robust Wireless ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    PROF. OLIVER OSUAGWA

    2015-12-01

    Dec 1, 2015 ... quality. Digital audio broadcasting is also quite popular everywhere. Wireless communications. Network operators have made significant investments in ... distributed control systems, with remote devices, sensors, and actuators linked together via wireless communication channels. Such networks are ...

  10. Tripling the capacity of wireless communications using electromagnetic polarization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrews, M R; Mitra, P P; deCarvalho, R

    2001-01-18

    Wireless communications are a fundamental part of modern information infrastructure. But wireless bandwidth is costly, prompting a close examination of the data channels available using electromagnetic waves. Classically, radio communications have relied on one channel per frequency, although it is well understood that the two polarization states of planar waves allow two distinct information channels; techniques such as 'polarization diversity' already take advantage of this. Recent work has shown that environments with scattering, such as urban areas or indoors, also possess independent spatial channels that can be used to enhance capacity greatly. In either case, the relevant signal processing techniques come under the heading of 'multiple-input/multiple-output' communications, because multiple antennae are required to access the polarization or spatial channels. Here we show that, in a scattering environment, an extra factor of three in channel capacity can be obtained, relative to the conventional limit using dual-polarized radio signals. The extra capacity arises because there are six distinguishable electric and magnetic states of polarization at a given point, rather than two as is usually assumed.

  11. 4G antennas for wireless eyewear devices and related SAR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cihangir, Aykut; Whittow, Will; Panagamuwa, Chinthana; Jacquemod, Gilles; Gianesello, Frédéric; Luxey, Cyril

    2015-11-01

    In this paper, we first present a feasibility study to design 4G antennas (700-960 MHz and 1.7-2.7 GHz) for eyewear devices. Those eyewear devices should be connected to the last generation cellular networks, Wireless Local Area Networks or wireless hotspots. Three coupling element type antennas with their matching networks are evaluated in terms of reflection coefficient and total radiation efficiency when the eyewear is placed on the user's head. We also present Specific Absorption Rate (SAR) simulations when the eyewear is positioned over a homogeneous SAM phantom and over a heterogeneous VH (Visible Human) phantom: the SAR levels are compared to international limit values. In a second step, we present experimental results obtained with 3D printed eyewear and coupling elements etched on a classical PCB substrate where the matching circuits are optimized close to the feeding point of the coupling element. Simulated and measured values are in very good agreement: 7 to 16% and 9 to 35% total efficiency are respectively obtained for the low- and high-frequency bands. However, simulated SAR values are somewhat higher than authorized levels with preoccupant high electromagnetic field distribution close to the eye of the user.

  12. Head, Neck, and Oral Cancer

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... out more. Oral, Head and Neck Pathology Oral, Head and Neck Pathology Close to 49,750 Americans ... out more. Oral, Head and Neck Pathology Oral, Head and Neck Pathology Close to 49,750 Americans ...

  13. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Site Index A-Z Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) - Head Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the head uses ... of the Head? What is MRI of the Head? Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a noninvasive medical ...

  14. CT Perfusion of the Head

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Site Index A-Z CT Perfusion of the Head Computed tomography (CT) perfusion of the head uses ... the Head? What is CT Perfusion of the Head? Computed tomography (CT) perfusion imaging shows which areas ...

  15. Head, Neck, and Oral Cancer

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Head and Neck Pathology Oral, Head and Neck Pathology Close to 49,750 Americans will be diagnosed ... Head and Neck Pathology Oral, Head and Neck Pathology Close to 49,750 Americans will be diagnosed ...

  16. A wearable, wireless gaze tracker with integrated selection command source for human-computer interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rantanen, Ville; Vanhala, Toni; Tuisku, Outi; Niemenlehto, Pekka-Henrik; Verho, Jarmo; Surakka, Veikko; Juhola, Martti; Lekkala, Jukka

    2011-09-01

    A light-weight, wearable, wireless gaze tracker with integrated selection command source for human-computer interaction is introduced. The prototype system combines head-mounted, video-based gaze tracking with capacitive facial movement detection that enable multimodal interaction by gaze pointing and making selections with facial gestures. The system is targeted mainly to disabled people with limited mobility over their hands. The hardware was made wireless to remove the need to take off the device when moving away from the computer, and to allow future use in more mobile contexts. The algorithms responsible for determining the eye and head orientations to map gaze direction to on-screen coordinates are presented together with the one to detect movements from the measured capacitance signal. Point-and-click experiments were conducted to assess the performance of the multimodal system. The results show decent performance in laboratory and office conditions. The overall point-and-click accuracy in the multimodal experiments is comparable to the errors in previous research on head-mounted, single modality gaze tracking that does not compensate for changes in head orientation.

  17. A Decentralized Fuzzy C-Means-Based Energy-Efficient Routing Protocol for Wireless Sensor Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Osama Moh’d Alia

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Energy conservation in wireless sensor networks (WSNs is a vital consideration when designing wireless networking protocols. In this paper, we propose a Decentralized Fuzzy Clustering Protocol, named DCFP, which minimizes total network energy dissipation to promote maximum network lifetime. The process of constructing the infrastructure for a given WSN is performed only once at the beginning of the protocol at a base station, which remains unchanged throughout the network’s lifetime. In this initial construction step, a fuzzy C-means algorithm is adopted to allocate sensor nodes into their most appropriate clusters. Subsequently, the protocol runs its rounds where each round is divided into a CH-Election phase and a Data Transmission phase. In the CH-Election phase, the election of new cluster heads is done locally in each cluster where a new multicriteria objective function is proposed to enhance the quality of elected cluster heads. In the Data Transmission phase, the sensing and data transmission from each sensor node to their respective cluster head is performed and cluster heads in turn aggregate and send the sensed data to the base station. Simulation results demonstrate that the proposed protocol improves network lifetime, data delivery, and energy consumption compared to other well-known energy-efficient protocols.

  18. A decentralized fuzzy C-means-based energy-efficient routing protocol for wireless sensor networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alia, Osama Moh'd

    2014-01-01

    Energy conservation in wireless sensor networks (WSNs) is a vital consideration when designing wireless networking protocols. In this paper, we propose a Decentralized Fuzzy Clustering Protocol, named DCFP, which minimizes total network energy dissipation to promote maximum network lifetime. The process of constructing the infrastructure for a given WSN is performed only once at the beginning of the protocol at a base station, which remains unchanged throughout the network's lifetime. In this initial construction step, a fuzzy C-means algorithm is adopted to allocate sensor nodes into their most appropriate clusters. Subsequently, the protocol runs its rounds where each round is divided into a CH-Election phase and a Data Transmission phase. In the CH-Election phase, the election of new cluster heads is done locally in each cluster where a new multicriteria objective function is proposed to enhance the quality of elected cluster heads. In the Data Transmission phase, the sensing and data transmission from each sensor node to their respective cluster head is performed and cluster heads in turn aggregate and send the sensed data to the base station. Simulation results demonstrate that the proposed protocol improves network lifetime, data delivery, and energy consumption compared to other well-known energy-efficient protocols.

  19. An Improved Wireless Battery Charging System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Woo-Seok Lee

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a direct wireless battery charging system. The output current of the series-series compensated wireless power transfer (SS-WPT system is used as a current source, and the output voltage of AC-DC converter controls the current source. Therefore, the proposed wireless battery charging system needs no battery charging circuit to carry out charging profiles, and can solve space constraints and thermal problems in many battery applications. In addition, the proposed wireless battery charging system can implement easily most other charging profiles. In this paper, the proposed wireless battery charging system is implemented and the feasibility is verified experimentally according to constant-current constant-voltage charging profile or multi-step current charging profile.

  20. Filtering and control of wireless networked systems

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, Dan; Yu, Li

    2017-01-01

    This self-contained book, written by leading experts, offers a cutting-edge, in-depth overview of the filtering and control of wireless networked systems. It addresses the energy constraint and filter/controller gain variation problems, and presents both the centralized and the distributed solutions. The first two chapters provide an introduction to networked control systems and basic information on system analysis. Chapters (3–6) then discuss the centralized filtering of wireless networked systems, presenting different approaches to deal with energy efficiency and filter/controller gain variation problems. The next part (chapters 7–10) explores the distributed filtering of wireless networked systems, addressing the main problems of energy constraint and filter gain variation. The final part (chapters 11–14) focuses on the distributed control of wireless networked systems. wireless networked systems for communication and control applications, the bo...

  1. Voice Quality Estimation in Wireless Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petr Zach

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This article deals with the impact of Wireless (Wi-Fi networks on the perceived quality of voice services. The Quality of Service (QoS metrics must be monitored in the computer network during the voice data transmission to ensure proper voice service quality the end-user has paid for, especially in the wireless networks. In addition to the QoS, research area called Quality of Experience (QoE provides metrics and methods for quality evaluation from the end-user’s perspective. This article focuses on a QoE estimation of Voice over IP (VoIP calls in the wireless networks using network simulator. Results contribute to voice quality estimation based on characteristics of the wireless network and location of a wireless client.

  2. Mobility-aware Hybrid Synchronization for Wireless Sensor Network

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dnyaneshwar, Mantri; Prasad, Neeli R.; Prasad, Ramjee

    2015-01-01

    Random mobility of node causes the frequent changes in the network dynamics causing the increased cost in terms of energy and bandwidth. It needs the additional efforts to synchronize the activities of nodes during data collection and transmission in Wireless Sensor Networks (WSNs). A key challenge...... in maintaining the effective data collection and transmission is to schedule and synchronize the activities of the nodes with the global clock. This paper proposes the Mobility-aware Hybrid Synchronization Algorithm (MHS) which works on the formation of cluster based on spanning tree mechanism (SPT). Nodes used...... for formation of the network have random mobility and heterogeneous in terms of energy with static sink. The nodes in the cluster and cluster heads in the network are synchronized with the notion of global time scale. In the initial stage, the algorithm establishes the hierarchical structure of the network...

  3. Future accelerator technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sessler, A.M.

    1986-05-01

    A general discussion is presented of the acceleration of particles. Upon this foundation is built a categorization scheme into which all accelerators can be placed. Special attention is devoted to accelerators which employ a wake-field mechanism and a restricting theorem is examined. It is shown how the theorem may be circumvented. Comments are made on various acceleration schemes

  4. Piezoelectric particle accelerator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kemp, Mark A.; Jongewaard, Erik N.; Haase, Andrew A.; Franzi, Matthew

    2017-08-29

    A particle accelerator is provided that includes a piezoelectric accelerator element, where the piezoelectric accelerator element includes a hollow cylindrical shape, and an input transducer, where the input transducer is disposed to provide an input signal to the piezoelectric accelerator element, where the input signal induces a mechanical excitation of the piezoelectric accelerator element, where the mechanical excitation is capable of generating a piezoelectric electric field proximal to an axis of the cylindrical shape, where the piezoelectric accelerator is configured to accelerate a charged particle longitudinally along the axis of the cylindrical shape according to the piezoelectric electric field.

  5. Advanced Signal Processing for Wireless Multimedia Communications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaodong Wang

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available There is at present a worldwide effort to develop next-generation wireless communication systems. It is envisioned that many of the future wireless systems will incorporate considerable signal-processing intelligence in order to provide advanced services such as multimedia transmission. In general, wireless channels can be very hostile media through which to communicate, due to substantial physical impediments, primarily radio-frequency interference and time-arying nature of the channel. The need of providing universal wireless access at high data-rate (which is the aim of many merging wireless applications presents a major technical challenge, and meeting this challenge necessitates the development of advanced signal processing techniques for multiple-access communications in non-stationary interference-rich environments. In this paper, we present some key advanced signal processing methodologies that have been developed in recent years for interference suppression in wireless networks. We will focus primarily on the problem of jointly suppressing multiple-access interference (MAI and intersymbol interference (ISI, which are the limiting sources of interference for the high data-rate wireless systems being proposed for many emerging application areas, such as wireless multimedia. We first present a signal subspace approach to blind joint suppression of MAI and ISI. We then discuss a powerful iterative technique for joint interference suppression and decoding, so-called Turbo multiuser detection, that is especially useful for wireless multimedia packet communications. We also discuss space-time processing methods that employ multiple antennas for interference rejection and signal enhancement. Finally, we touch briefly on the problems of suppressing narrowband interference and impulsive ambient noise, two other sources of radio-frequency interference present in wireless multimedia networks.

  6. Neutron fluence produced in medical accelerators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Castro, R.C.; Silva, A.X. da; Crispim, V.R.

    2004-01-01

    Radiotherapy with photon and electron beams still represents the most diffused technique to control and treat tumour diseases. To increase the treatment efficiency, accelerators of higher energy are used, the increase of electron and photon energy is joined with generation of undesired fast neutron that contaminated the therapeutic beam and give a non-negligible contribution to the patient dose. In this work we have simulated with the MCNP4B code the produced neutron spectra in the interaction between the beam and the head to the accelerator and estimating the equivalent dose for neutrons by x-ray dose for aims far from the targets. (author)

  7. Impact of wireless link quality across communication layers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhou, J.

    2010-01-01

    Nowadays, wireless networks are used in most of the applications with radio technologies being used in all kinds of wireless networks. In all wireless links, the transmitted packets can be lost. How to identify the quality of a certain wireless link and achieve the best delivery performance over a

  8. Capacity Limit, Link Scheduling and Power Control in Wireless Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Shan

    2013-01-01

    The rapid advancement of wireless technology has instigated the broad deployment of wireless networks. Different types of networks have been developed, including wireless sensor networks, mobile ad hoc networks, wireless local area networks, and cellular networks. These networks have different structures and applications, and require different…

  9. Wireless Luminescence Integrated Sensors (WLIS)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simpson, M.L.; Sayler, G.S. (Univ. Tennessee)

    2003-11-10

    The goal of this project was the development of a family of wireless, single-chip, luminescence-sensing devices to solve a number of difficult distributed measurement problems in areas ranging from environmental monitoring and assessment to high-throughput screening of combinatorial chemistry libraries. These wireless luminescence integrated sensors (WLIS) consist of a microluminometer, wireless data transmitter, and RF power input circuit all realized in a standard integrated circuit (IC) process with genetically engineered, whole-cell, bioluminescent bioreporters encapsulated and deposited on the IC. The end product is a family of compact, low-power, rugged, low-cost sensors. As part of this program they developed an integrated photodiode/signal-processing scheme with an rms noise level of 175 electrons/second for a 13-minute integration time, and a quantum efficiency of 66% at the 490-nm bioluminescent wavelength. this performance provided a detection limit of < 1000 photons/second. Although sol-gel has previously been used to encapsulate yeast cells, the reaction conditions necessary for polymerization (primarily low pH) have beforehand proven too harsh for bacterial cell immobilizations. Utilizing sonication methods, they have were able to initiate polymerization under pH conditions conductive to cell survival. both a toluene bioreporter (Pseudomonas putida TVA8) and a naphthalene bioreporter (Pseudomonas fluorescens HK44) were successfully encapsulated in sol-gel and shown to produce a fairly significant bioluminescent response. In addition to the previously developed naphthalene- and toluene-sensitive bioreporters, they developed a yeast-based xenoestrogen reporter. This technology has been licensed by Micro Systems Technologies, a startup company in Dayton, Ohio for applications in environmental containments monitoring, and for detecting weapons of mass destruction (i.e. homeland security).

  10. A Hybrid Structure for Data Aggregation in Wireless Sensor Network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hedieh Sajedi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, wireless sensor networks have been used for various applications such as environmental monitoring, military and medical applications. A wireless sensor network uses a large number of sensor nodes that continuously collect and send data from a specific region to a base station. Data from sensors are collected from the study area in the common scenario of sensor networks. Afterward, sensed data is sent to the base station. However, neighboring sensors often lead to redundancy of data. Transmission of redundant data to the base station consumes energy and produces traffic, because process is run in a large network. Data aggregation was proposed in order to reduce redundancy in data transformation and traffic. The most popular communication protocol in this field is cluster based data aggregation. Clustering causes energy balance, but sometimes energy consumption is not efficient due to the long distance between cluster heads and base station. In another communication protocol, which is based on a tree construction, because of the short distance between the sensors, energy consumption is low. In this data aggregation approach, since each sensor node is considered as one of the vertices of a tree, the depth of tree is usually high. In this paper, an efficient hierarchical hybrid approach for data aggregation is presented. It reduces energy consumption based on clustering and minimum spanning tree. The benefit of combining clustering and tree structure is reducing the disadvantages of previous structures. The proposed method firstly employs clustering algorithm and then a minimum spanning tree is constructed based on cluster heads. Our proposed method was compared to LEACH which is a well-known data aggregation method in terms of energy consumption and the amount of energy remaining in each sensor network lifetime. Simulation results indicate that our proposed method is more efficient than LEACH algorithm considering energy

  11. Cluster-based Dynamic Energy Management for Collaborative Target Tracking in Wireless Sensor Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dao-Wei Bi

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available A primary criterion of wireless sensor network is energy efficiency. Focused onthe energy problem of target tracking in wireless sensor networks, this paper proposes acluster-based dynamic energy management mechanism. Target tracking problem isformulated by the multi-sensor detection model as well as energy consumption model. Adistributed adaptive clustering approach is investigated to form a reasonable routingframework which has uniform cluster head distribution. Dijkstra’s algorithm is utilized toobtain optimal intra-cluster routing. Target position is predicted by particle filter. Thepredicted target position is adopted to estimate the idle interval of sensor nodes. Hence,dynamic awakening approach is exploited to prolong sleep time of sensor nodes so that theoperation energy consumption of wireless sensor network can be reduced. The sensornodes around the target wake up on time and act as sensing candidates. With the candidatesensor nodes and predicted target position, the optimal sensor node selection is considered.Binary particle swarm optimization is proposed to minimize the total energy consumptionduring collaborative sensing and data reporting. Experimental results verify that theproposed clustering approach establishes a low-energy communication structure while theenergy efficiency of wireless sensor networks is enhanced by cluster-based dynamic energymanagement.

  12. Foundations of wireless and electronics

    CERN Document Server

    Scroggie, M G

    1984-01-01

    Foundations of Wireless and Electronics, 10th Edition covers the cathode-ray and microwave tubes; modern pulse methods; f.m. detectors; basic processes of transmission; and reception, computers, and non-sinusoidal signal amplification. The book starts by giving a general overview of a complete electronic system, electricity and circuits, capacitance, and inductance. The text also discusses alternating currents (a.c.), including the frequency and phase of a.c.; the capacitance and inductance in a.c. circuits; and the capacitance and inductance in a series. Diodes, triode, transistor equivalent

  13. Wireless power transfer via radiowaves

    CERN Document Server

    Shinohara , Naoki

    2014-01-01

    Recent advances in Wireless Power Transmission (WPT) technologies have enabled various engineering applications with potential product implementation. WPT can be utilized to charge batteries in various pieces of equipment without the need for a wired connection. Energy can be harvested from ambient RF and microwave radiation and 1 million kW microwaves can be transmitted from space to the ground.This book covers all the theory and technologies of WPT, such as microwave generators with semi-conductors and microwave tubes, antennas, phased arrays, beam efficiency, and rectifiers (rectenna). The

  14. WMSA for wireless communication applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vats, Monika; Agarwal, Alok, E-mail: alokagarwal26@yahoo.com; Kumar, Ravindra [Dept. of Electronics & Electrical Engineering, Lingaya’s University Faridabad (India)

    2016-03-09

    Modified rectangular compact microstrip patch antenna having finite ground plane is proposed in this paper. Wideband Microstrip Antenna (WMSA) is achieved by corner cut and inserting air gaps inside the edges of the radiating patch having finite ground plane. The obtained impedance bandwidth for 10 dB return loss for the operating frequency f{sub 0} = 2.09 GHz is 28.7 % (600 MHz), which is very high as compared to the bandwidth obtained for the conventional microstrip antenna. Compactness with wide bandwidth of this antenna is practically useful for the wireless communication systems.

  15. The development of display device for radioactive information using wireless communication

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Jung Taek; Park, Won Man; Lee, Bong Jae; Lim, Yoo Chung

    1998-06-01

    The improvement in the nuclear industry makes that it is important to protect personnel and equipment form radiation, because they have many chance to treat radioactive material. The head office on a prevention and an emergency measure for a radioactive release is necessary. In this study, display device for radioactive information using wireless communication has been developed to display a radioactivity using radio frequency modem. Therefore, the unlocated head office can be operated in a portable environment using a notebook PC or a compact display device. Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, which runs a research reactor, HANARO, needs the head office on a prevention and an emergency measure for a radioactive release. The display device for radioactive information using wireless communication to be developed in this study, can be used to the head office as a display device not to pay additional cost. This study has developed the display device for radioactive information using wireless communication, Remote Radiation Display System(RRDS), which transmits every 10 second a radioactive information to be displayed to RMT(Radiation Monitoring Terminal) of Radiation Monitoring System in HANARO. In this study, first, a configuration of hardware and software in HANARO RMS has been reviewed. Second, a RS-2322C serial communication program to transmit a radioactive information in HARARO RMS to RRDS using radio frequency modem has been developed. Finally, a RS-2322C serial communication program to receive a radioactive information in HANARO RMS from RRDS using radio frequency modem and GUI program to display the received information to RRDS has been developed. (author). 19 refs., 3 tabs., 25 figs

  16. Partnership Opportunities with AFRC for Wireless Systems Flight Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hang, Richard

    2015-01-01

    The presentation will overview the flight test capabilities at NASA Armstrong Flight Research Center (AFRC), to open up partnership collaboration opportunities for Wireless Community to conduct flight testing of aerospace wireless technologies. Also, it will brief the current activities on wireless sensor system at AFRC through SBIR (Small Business Innovation Research) proposals, and it will show the current areas of interest on wireless technologies that AFRC would like collaborate with Wireless Community to further and testing.

  17. Distributed wireless quantum communication networks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu Xu-Tao; Xu Jin; Zhang Zai-Chen

    2013-01-01

    The distributed wireless quantum communication network (DWQCN) has a distributed network topology and transmits information by quantum states. In this paper, we present the concept of the DWQCN and propose a system scheme to transfer quantum states in the DWQCN. The system scheme for transmitting information between any two nodes in the DWQCN includes a routing protocol and a scheme for transferring quantum states. The routing protocol is on-demand and the routing metric is selected based on the number of entangled particle pairs. After setting up a route, quantum teleportation and entanglement swapping are used for transferring quantum states. Entanglement swapping is achieved along with the process of routing set up and the acknowledgment packet transmission. The measurement results of each entanglement swapping are piggybacked with route reply packets or acknowledgment packets. After entanglement swapping, a direct quantum link between source and destination is set up and quantum states are transferred by quantum teleportation. Adopting this scheme, the measurement results of entanglement swapping do not need to be transmitted specially, which decreases the wireless transmission cost and transmission delay. (general)

  18. Coherently Enhanced Wireless Power Transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krasnok, Alex; Baranov, Denis G.; Generalov, Andrey; Li, Sergey; Alù, Andrea

    2018-04-01

    Extraction of electromagnetic energy by an antenna from impinging external radiation is at the basis of wireless communications and wireless power transfer (WPT). The maximum of transferred energy is ensured when the antenna is conjugately matched, i.e., when it is resonant and it has an equal coupling with free space and its load. This condition, however, can be easily affected by changes in the environment, preventing optimal operation of a WPT system. Here, we introduce the concept of coherently enhanced WPT that allows us to bypass this difficulty and achieve dynamic control of power transfer. The approach relies on coherent excitation of the waveguide connected to the antenna load with a backward propagating signal of specific amplitude and phase. This signal creates a suitable interference pattern at the load resulting in a modification of the local wave impedance, which in turn enables conjugate matching and a largely increased amount of extracted energy. We develop a simple theoretical model describing this concept, demonstrate it with full-wave numerical simulations for the canonical example of a dipole antenna, and verify experimentally in both near-field and far-field regimes.

  19. Simulation of Wireless Digital Communication Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Mohammed

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available Due to the explosive demands for high speed wireless services, suchas wireless Internet, email and cellular video conferencing, digitalwireless communications has become one of the most exciting researchtopics in electrical and electronic engineering field. The never-endingdemand for such personal and multimedia services, however, demandstechnologies operating at higher data rates and broader bandwidths. Inaddition, the complexity of wireless communication and signalprocessing systems has grown considerably during the past decade.Therefore, powerful computer­aided techniques are required for theprocess of modeling, designing, analyzing and evaluating theperformance of digital wireless communication systems. In this paper wediscuss the basic propagation mechanisms affecting the performance ofwireless communication systems, and present a simple, powerful andefficient way to simulate digital wireless communication systems usingMatlab. The simulated results are compared with the theoreticalanalysis to validate the simulator. The simulator is useful inevaluating the performance of wireless multimedia services and theassociated signal processing structures and algorithms for current andnext generation wireless mobile communication systems.

  20. Application for Measurement in Wireless Sensor Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miroslav MAHDAL

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper deals with wireless sensor networks, which are based on IEEE 802.15.4 standard. The development kit from Jennic company was used for wireless measuring of values and for creation of sensor network. For this purposes the sensor boards with wireless modules with marking JN5139 were used. These boards provide sensors (sensor of temperature, relative humidity and light sensor but also another interface, which helps to develop applications. Modules are programmed in Integrated Development Environment (IDE, which integrates C function library and C++ compiler and linker. The visualization application was created for monitoring of wireless sensor network. There is the possibility of local and wireless measurement. For creation of this application the SCADA/HMI system, Control Web 5 was used. This SCADA/HMI system enables to communicate with all wireless modules through base station (network's coordinator. The application also enables initialisation and network setting the any wireless module communicating with the base station. The advantage is the remote configuration and control of network. The application also enables the gathering, converting, viewing and archiving of incoming data from particular modules.

  1. Head Injuries in Soccer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myrick, Karen M

    2016-07-01

    Soccer is currently the most popular and fastest growing sport worldwide, with approximately 265 million registered soccer players existing around the world. The popularity of the sport, coupled with the high incidence of 18.8-21.5 head injuries per 1,000 player hours reported, make it essential that clinicians, coaches, and the athletes, have a solid understanding of head injuries. The successful rehabilitation of athletes with head injuries relies upon early and accurate identification strategies and implementation of appropriate return to play measures across all areas in the continuum of care. Soccer is a frequently played sport, and head injuries are common. Therefore, it is imperative that clinicians, coaches, and the athletes themselves have a solid understanding of head injury prevention, diagnosis, and treatment options. The purpose of this article was to provide rehabilitation nurses with current information regarding frequently occurring head injuries in the widespread sport of soccer. © 2015 Association of Rehabilitation Nurses.

  2. Advance of accelerator technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kamitubo, Hiromichi

    1987-08-01

    At first, accelerators were developed for the research on atomic nuclei, but as the research on the components of natural world advanced, they were made larger so as to reach higher energy, and developed so that diverse particles can be accelerated. The energy attainable with accelerators has increased to ten times in six years. To the advance of accelerators, the development of acceleration principle due to new idea or the development of the technology related to accelerators accompanied without exception. In particular, as accelerators became large scale, and their construction requires large amount of money, attention is paid to the technical development required for the construction of new accelerators as the extending effect which brings forth the technical innovation in the society. In this paper, the technical advance which is common to accelerators is outlined. As the components indispensable to accelerators, there are charged particle generators, accelerating electric field generators, vaccumizing facilities, control system, diagnostic system and so on. As to new accelerating principles, the materialization of collision type rings and beam cooling is worthy of special mention. The research on computer-aided accelerators and the techniques of accelerating electric field generation, vaccumizing, electromagnets, ion sources and others are reported. (Kako, I.).

  3. Network Coded Cooperative Communication in a Real-Time Wireless Hospital Sensor Network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prakash, R; Balaji Ganesh, A; Sivabalan, Somu

    2017-05-01

    The paper presents a network coded cooperative communication (NC-CC) enabled wireless hospital sensor network architecture for monitoring health as well as postural activities of a patient. A wearable device, referred as a smartband is interfaced with pulse rate, body temperature sensors and an accelerometer along with wireless protocol services, such as Bluetooth and Radio-Frequency transceiver and Wi-Fi. The energy efficiency of wearable device is improved by embedding a linear acceleration based transmission duty cycling algorithm (NC-DRDC). The real-time demonstration is carried-out in a hospital environment to evaluate the performance characteristics, such as power spectral density, energy consumption, signal to noise ratio, packet delivery ratio and transmission offset. The resource sharing and energy efficiency features of network coding technique are improved by proposing an algorithm referred as network coding based dynamic retransmit/rebroadcast decision control (LA-TDC). From the experimental results, it is observed that the proposed LA-TDC algorithm reduces network traffic and end-to-end delay by an average of 27.8% and 21.6%, respectively than traditional network coded wireless transmission. The wireless architecture is deployed in a hospital environment and results are then successfully validated.

  4. Head and Neck

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Højgaard, Liselotte; Berthelsen, Anne Kiil; Loft, Annika

    2014-01-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET)/computed tomography with FDG of the head and neck region is mainly used for the diagnosis of head and neck cancer, for staging, treatment evaluation, relapse, and planning of surgery and radio therapy. This article is a practical guide of imaging techniques......, including a detailed protocol for FDG PET in head and neck imaging, physiologic findings, and pitfalls in selected case stories....

  5. Bottom head assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fife, A.B.

    1998-01-01

    A bottom head dome assembly is described which includes, in one embodiment, a bottom head dome and a liner configured to be positioned proximate the bottom head dome. The bottom head dome has a plurality of openings extending there through. The liner also has a plurality of openings extending there through, and each liner opening aligns with a respective bottom head dome opening. A seal is formed, such as by welding, between the liner and the bottom head dome to resist entry of water between the liner and the bottom head dome at the edge of the liner. In the one embodiment, a plurality of stub tubes are secured to the liner. Each stub tube has a bore extending there through, and each stub tube bore is coaxially aligned with a respective liner opening. A seat portion is formed by each liner opening for receiving a portion of the respective stub tube. The assembly also includes a plurality of support shims positioned between the bottom head dome and the liner for supporting the liner. In one embodiment, each support shim includes a support stub having a bore there through, and each support stub bore aligns with a respective bottom head dome opening. 2 figs

  6. 2014 CERN Accelerator Schools: Plasma Wake Acceleration

    CERN Multimedia

    2014-01-01

    A specialised school on Plasma Wake Acceleration will be held at CERN, Switzerland from 23-29 November, 2014.   This course will be of interest to staff and students in accelerator laboratories, university departments and companies working in or having an interest in the field of new acceleration techniques. Following introductory lectures on plasma and laser physics, the course will cover the different components of a plasma wake accelerator and plasma beam systems. An overview of the experimental studies, diagnostic tools and state of the art wake acceleration facilities, both present and planned, will complement the theoretical part. Topical seminars and a visit of CERN will complete the programme. Further information can be found at: http://cas.web.cern.ch/cas/PlasmaWake2014/CERN-advert.html http://indico.cern.ch/event/285444/

  7. Implanted Antennas in Medical Wireless Communications

    CERN Document Server

    Rahmat-Samii, Yahya; Balanis, Constantine

    2006-01-01

    Implanted Antennas in Medical Wireless Communications summarizes the results of recent research activities on the subject of implanted antennas for medical wireless communication systems. It is anticipated that in the near future sophisticated medical devices will be implanted inside the human body for medical telemetry and telemedicine. To establish effective and efficient wireless links with these devices, it is pivotal to give special attention to antenna designs that are low profile, small, safe, and cost effective. In this book, authors Yahya Rahmat-Samii and Jaehoon Kim demonstrate how a

  8. EM threat analysis for wireless systems.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burkholder, R. J. (Ohio State University Electroscience Laboratory); Mariano, Robert J.; Schniter, P. (Ohio State University Electroscience Laboratory); Gupta, I. J. (Ohio State University Electroscience Laboratory)

    2006-06-01

    Modern digital radio systems are complex and must be carefully designed, especially when expected to operate in harsh propagation environments. The ability to accurately predict the effects of propagation on wireless radio performance could lead to more efficient radio designs as well as the ability to perform vulnerability analyses before and after system deployment. In this report, the authors--experts in electromagnetic (EM) modeling and wireless communication theory--describe the construction of a simulation environment that is capable of quantifying the effects of wireless propagation on the performance of digital communication.

  9. Note: Design and development of wireless controlled aerosol sampling network for large scale aerosol dispersion experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gopalakrishnan, V.; Subramanian, V.; Baskaran, R.; Venkatraman, B. [Radiation Impact Assessment Section, Radiological Safety Division, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam 603 102 (India)

    2015-07-15

    Wireless based custom built aerosol sampling network is designed, developed, and implemented for environmental aerosol sampling. These aerosol sampling systems are used in field measurement campaign, in which sodium aerosol dispersion experiments have been conducted as a part of environmental impact studies related to sodium cooled fast reactor. The sampling network contains 40 aerosol sampling units and each contains custom built sampling head and the wireless control networking designed with Programmable System on Chip (PSoC™) and Xbee Pro RF modules. The base station control is designed using graphical programming language LabView. The sampling network is programmed to operate in a preset time and the running status of the samplers in the network is visualized from the base station. The system is developed in such a way that it can be used for any other environment sampling system deployed in wide area and uneven terrain where manual operation is difficult due to the requirement of simultaneous operation and status logging.

  10. Note: Design and development of wireless controlled aerosol sampling network for large scale aerosol dispersion experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gopalakrishnan, V.; Subramanian, V.; Baskaran, R.; Venkatraman, B.

    2015-07-01

    Wireless based custom built aerosol sampling network is designed, developed, and implemented for environmental aerosol sampling. These aerosol sampling systems are used in field measurement campaign, in which sodium aerosol dispersion experiments have been conducted as a part of environmental impact studies related to sodium cooled fast reactor. The sampling network contains 40 aerosol sampling units and each contains custom built sampling head and the wireless control networking designed with Programmable System on Chip (PSoC™) and Xbee Pro RF modules. The base station control is designed using graphical programming language LabView. The sampling network is programmed to operate in a preset time and the running status of the samplers in the network is visualized from the base station. The system is developed in such a way that it can be used for any other environment sampling system deployed in wide area and uneven terrain where manual operation is difficult due to the requirement of simultaneous operation and status logging.

  11. Head-Centric Body-Channel Propagation Paths Characterization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ruaro, Andrea; Thaysen, Jesper; Jakobsen, Kaj Bjarne

    2015-01-01

    Wearable devices are experiencing a strong momentum. This leads to an ever increasing demand to ensure a stable link between the different nodes or sensor placed around the human body. In this sense, Body-Coupled Communication (BCC) has a high potential to support the development of Wireless Body......Area Networks (WBAN). This work characterizes, by mean of experiments, the intra-body propagation channels when a pair of differential electrodes is applied on a human head. This is necessary in order to investigate opportunities and drawbacks for a multitude of applications, e.g., binaural hearing instruments...

  12. High brightness electron accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sheffield, R.L.; Carlsten, B.E.; Young, L.M.

    1994-01-01

    A compact high brightness linear accelerator is provided for use, e.g., in a free electron laser. The accelerator has a first plurality of accelerating cavities having end walls with four coupling slots for accelerating electrons to high velocities in the absence of quadrupole fields. A second plurality of cavities receives the high velocity electrons for further acceleration, where each of the second cavities has end walls with two coupling slots for acceleration in the absence of dipole fields. The accelerator also includes a first cavity with an extended length to provide for phase matching the electron beam along the accelerating cavities. A solenoid is provided about the photocathode that emits the electrons, where the solenoid is configured to provide a substantially uniform magnetic field over the photocathode surface to minimize emittance of the electrons as the electrons enter the first cavity. 5 figs

  13. New methods of acceleration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ivanov, I.N.; Sarantsev, V.P.

    1976-01-01

    The most perspective methods of the collective acceleration of particles are considered, namely, acceleration of ions in direct electron beams and electron rings. Several models of particle acceleration by means of electron beams are described. Experimental data on the acceleration of differently charged ions show that the ion energy increases with the charge. Time-of-flight measurements show that during acceleration the ion bunch is located behind the beam front. The injection of electrons into an electron-ring accelerator and the electron acceleration are considered in detail. The most dangerous effects are described, which restrict the number of particles captured in the electron-ring accelerator. Several mechanisms are considered for retaining the cross-sectional dimensions of the moving ring

  14. San Francisco Accelerator Conference

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Southworth, Brian

    1991-01-01

    'Where are today's challenges in accelerator physics?' was the theme of the open session at the San Francisco meeting, the largest ever gathering of accelerator physicists and engineers

  15. Angular Accelerating White Light

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Dudley, Angela L

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available angular acceleration during propagation which is achieved by superpositions of Bessel beams with non-canonical phase functions. They demonstrate these angular accelerating fields by modulating the phase and amplitude of a supercontinuum source with the use...

  16. Improved plasma accelerator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, D. Y.

    1971-01-01

    Converging, coaxial accelerator electrode configuration operates in vacuum as plasma gun. Plasma forms by periodic injections of high pressure gas that is ionized by electrical discharges. Deflagration mode of discharge provides acceleration, and converging contours of plasma gun provide focusing.

  17. Unified accelerator libraries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malitsky, Nikolay; Talman, Richard

    1997-01-01

    A 'Universal Accelerator Libraries' (UAL) environment is described. Its purpose is to facilitate program modularity and inter-program and inter-process communication among heterogeneous programs. The goal ultimately is to facilitate model-based control of accelerators

  18. Mounted Combat System Crew Shock Loading: Head and Neck Injury Potential Evaluation

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    LaFiandra, Michael E; Zywiol, Harry

    2007-01-01

    ...) ride motion simulator (RMS) was used to simulate the effects of gun firing shock on a Hybrid III instrumented anthropometric test device capable of measuring neck force and torque and head acceleration...

  19. A software program for the head impulse testing device (HITD).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bohler, A; Mandala, M; Ramat, S

    2010-01-01

    The vestibulo-ocular reflex (VOR) uses head angular acceleration information transduced by the semicircular canals in the inner ear in order to drive eye movements that compensate for head rotations, and thus stabilize the visual scene on the retina. Peripheral and central vestibular pathologies may impair the function of the VOR, so that compensation becomes incomplete, making clear vision during head movement impossible. Powerful adaptive mechanisms quickly allow the central nervous system to use residual vestibular information or information provided through other senses to supplement the deficient VOR. Such recovery makes the clinical diagnosis difficult to classical testing techniques, yet the head impulse test allows to reveal vestibular deficits even in adapted patients. A compensatory saccade at the end of the head movement is the clinical sign of a vestibular deficit, and may be spotted by the experienced clinician. Here we describe the rationale and the software program driving a new computerized technique for reliably assessing vestibular function at different head angular accelerations, based on evaluating the ability of the patient in reading a character on the screen while the head is being rotated.

  20. MEQALAC rf accelerating structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keane, J.; Brodowski, J.

    1981-01-01

    A prototype MEQALAC capable of replacing the Cockcroft Walton pre-injector at BNL is being fabricated. Ten milliamperes of H - beam supplied from a source sitting at a potential of -40 kilovolt is to be accelerated to 750 keV. This energy gain is provided by a 200 Megahertz accelerating system rather than the normal dc acceleration. Substantial size and cost reduction would be realized by such a system over conventional pre-accelerator systems

  1. Spin and Maximal Acceleration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giorgio Papini

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available We study the spin current tensor of a Dirac particle at accelerations close to the upper limit introduced by Caianiello. Continual interchange between particle spin and angular momentum is possible only when the acceleration is time-dependent. This represents a stringent limit on the effect that maximal acceleration may have on spin physics in astrophysical applications. We also investigate some dynamical consequences of maximal acceleration.

  2. Applications of particle accelerators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barbalat, O.

    1994-01-01

    Particle accelerators are now widely used in a variety of applications for scientific research, applied physics, medicine, industrial processing, while possible utilisation in power engineering is envisaged. Earlier presentations of this subject, given at previous CERN Accelerator School sessions have been updated with papers contributed to the first European Conference on Accelerators in Applied Research and Technology (ECAART) held in September 1989 in Frankfurt and to the Second European Particle Accelerator Conference in Nice in June 1990. (orig.)

  3. Superconducting accelerator technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grunder, H.A.; Hartline, B.K.

    1986-01-01

    Modern and future accelerators for high energy and nuclear physics rely increasingly on superconducting components to achieve the required magnetic fields and accelerating fields. This paper presents a practical overview of the phenomenon of superconductivity, and describes the design issues and solutions associated with superconducting magnets and superconducting rf acceleration structures. Further development and application of superconducting components promises increased accelerator performance at reduced electric power cost

  4. Head Injuries in Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pennington, Nicole

    2010-01-01

    School nurses play a crucial role in injury prevention and initial treatment when injuries occur at school. The role of school nurses includes being knowledgeable about the management of head injuries, including assessment and initial treatment. The school nurse must be familiar with the outcomes of a head injury and know when further evaluation…

  5. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Computed tomography (CT) of the head uses special x-ray equipment to help assess head injuries, severe headaches, ... is a diagnostic medical test that, like traditional x-rays, produces multiple images or pictures of the inside ...

  6. Structural health monitoring using wireless sensor networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sreevallabhan, K.; Nikhil Chand, B.; Ramasamy, Sudha

    2017-11-01

    Monitoring and analysing health of large structures like bridges, dams, buildings and heavy machinery is important for safety, economical, operational, making prior protective measures, and repair and maintenance point of view. In recent years there is growing demand for such larger structures which in turn make people focus more on safety. By using Microelectromechanical Systems (MEMS) Accelerometer we can perform Structural Health Monitoring by studying the dynamic response through measure of ambient vibrations and strong motion of such structures. By using Wireless Sensor Networks (WSN) we can embed these sensors in wireless networks which helps us to transmit data wirelessly thus we can measure the data wirelessly at any remote location. This in turn reduces heavy wiring which is a cost effective as well as time consuming process to lay those wires. In this paper we developed WSN based MEMS-accelerometer for Structural to test the results in the railway bridge near VIT University, Vellore campus.

  7. Cross-Layer Wireless Resource Allocation

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Berry, Randall A; Yeh, Edmund M

    2005-01-01

    .... This bit pipe is a simple abstraction of the underlying physical and data link layers. There is growing awareness that this simple bit-pipe view is inadequate, particularly in the context of modern wireless data networks...

  8. Low-Power Wireless Sensor Network Infrastructures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Morten Tranberg

    Advancements in wireless communication and electronics improving form factor and hardware capabilities has expanded the applicability of wireless sensor networks. Despite these advancements, devices are still limited in terms of energy which creates the need for duty-cycling and low-power protocols...... peripherals need to by duty-cycled and the low-power wireless radios are severely influenced by the environmental effects causing bursty and unreliable wireless channels. This dissertation presents a communication stack providing services for low-power communication, secure communication, data collection...... channel. Second, secure communication is implemented with an efficient secure group communication suite including a low-overhead group key distribution scheme, distributing group keys according to the needs of the sensor nodes. Third, data collection is implemented with selective transmission which saves...

  9. VT Wireless Internet Service Providers 2007

    Data.gov (United States)

    Vermont Center for Geographic Information — (Link to Metadata) The VT Wireless Internet Service Provider (ISP) dataset (WISP2007) includes polygons depicting the extent of Vermont's WISP broadband system as of...

  10. Dynamic Wireless Power Transfer - Grid Impacts Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Markel, Tony; Meintz, Andrew; Gonder, Jeff

    2015-12-04

    This presentation discusses the current status of analysis of the electricity grid impacts of a dynamic wireless power transfer system deployed to the Atlanta region on select high traffic roadway segments.

  11. Advanced Wireless Integrated Navy Network - AWINN

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Stutzman, Warren; Habayeb, Rick

    2005-01-01

    Quarterly progress report No. 2 on AWINN hardware and software configurations of smart, wideband, multi-function antennas, secure configurable platform, close-in command and control for Sea Basing visualization of wireless...

  12. Advanced Wireless Integrated Navy Network (AWINN)

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Stutzman, Warren; Habayeb, Rick

    2005-01-01

    Quarterly progress report No. 4 on AWINN hardware and software configurations of smart, wideband, multi-function antennas, secure configurable platform, close-in command and control for Sea Basing visualization of wireless...

  13. Advanced Wireless Integrated Navy Network (AWINN)

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Slutzman, Warren; Habayeb, Rick

    2006-01-01

    Quarterly progress report No. 5 on AWINN hardware and software configurations of smart, wideband, multi-function antennas, secure configurable platform, close-in command and control for Sea Basing visualization of wireless...

  14. Advanced Wireless Integrated Navy Network - AWINN

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Stutzman, Warren; Habayeb, Rick

    2005-01-01

    Quarterly progress report No. 3 on AWINN hardware and software configurations of smart, wideband, multi-function antennas, secure configurable platform, close-in command and control for Sea Basing visualization of wireless...

  15. Configuration of Wireless Cooperative/Sensor Networks

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Shafiee, Hamid R; Maham, B; Vazifehdan, J

    2008-01-01

    .... When employing more than one antenna at each node of a wireless network is not applicable, cooperation diversity protocols exploit the inherent spatial diversity of relay channels by allowing mobile...

  16. Wireless Sensing Opportunities for Aerospace Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William Wilson

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Wireless sensors and sensor networks is an emerging technology area with many applications within the aerospace industry. Integrated vehicle health monitoring (IVHM of aerospace vehicles is needed to ensure the safety of the crew and the vehicle, yet often high costs, weight, size and other constraints prevent the incorporation of instrumentation onto spacecraft. This paper presents a few of the areas such as IVHM, where new wireless sensing technology is needed on both existing vehicles as well as future spacecraft. From ground tests to inflatable structures to the International Space Station, many applications could receive benefits from small, low power, wireless sensors. This paper also highlights some of the challenges that need to overcome when implementing wireless sensor networks for aerospace vehicles.

  17. Secure Wireless Military Healthcare Telemedicine Enterprise

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Lucas, Kenneth W

    2005-01-01

    ... wireless PDA devices, and miniature computers, to existing DoD legacy and developing healthcare information systems, clinical repositories, and knowledge base systems for application at the point of care...

  18. The art of wireless sensor networks

    CERN Document Server

    2014-01-01

    During the last one and a half decades, wireless sensor networks have witnessed significant growth and tremendous development in both academia and industry.   “The Art of Wireless Sensor Networks: Volume 1: Fundamentals” focuses on the fundamentals concepts in the design, analysis, and implementation of wireless sensor networks. It covers the various layers of the lifecycle of this type of network from the physical layer up to the application layer. Its rationale is that the first volume covers contemporary design issues, tools, and protocols for radio-based two-dimensional terrestrial sensor networks. All the book chapters in this volume include up-to-date research work spanning various classic facets of the physical properties and functional behavior of wireless sensor networks, including physical layer, medium access control, data routing, topology management, mobility management, localization, task management, data management, data gathering, security, middleware, sensor technology, standards, and ...

  19. Energy Harvesting Wireless Strain Networks, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Prime Research LC (PPLC) and Virginia Tech (VT) propose to develop an energy harvesting wireless strain node technology that utilizes single-crystal piezoelectric...

  20. Optical Coherent Receiver Enables THz Wireless Bridge

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yu, Xianbin; Liu, Kexin; Zhang, Hangkai

    2016-01-01

    We experimentally demonstrated a 45 Gbit/s 400 GHz photonic wireless communication system enabled by an optical coherent receiver, which has a high potential in fast recovery of high data rate connections, for example, in disaster....

  1. An open source, wireless capable miniature microscope system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liberti, William A., III; Perkins, L. Nathan; Leman, Daniel P.; Gardner, Timothy J.

    2017-08-01

    Objective. Fluorescence imaging through head-mounted microscopes in freely behaving animals is becoming a standard method to study neural circuit function. Flexible, open-source designs are needed to spur evolution of the method. Approach. We describe a miniature microscope for single-photon fluorescence imaging in freely behaving animals. The device is made from 3D printed parts and off-the-shelf components. These microscopes weigh less than 1.8 g, can be configured to image a variety of fluorophores, and can be used wirelessly or in conjunction with active commutators. Microscope control software, based in Swift for macOS, provides low-latency image processing capabilities for closed-loop, or BMI, experiments. Main results. Miniature microscopes were deployed in the songbird premotor region HVC (used as a proper name), in singing zebra finches. Individual neurons yield temporally precise patterns of calcium activity that are consistent over repeated renditions of song. Several cells were tracked over timescales of weeks and months, providing an opportunity to study learning related changes in HVC. Significance. 3D printed miniature microscopes, composed completely of consumer grade components, are a cost-effective, modular option for head-mounting imaging. These easily constructed and customizable tools provide access to cell-type specific neural ensembles over timescales of weeks.

  2. Angular Acceleration without Torque?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaufman, Richard D.

    2012-01-01

    Hardly. Just as Robert Johns qualitatively describes angular acceleration by an internal force in his article "Acceleration Without Force?" here we will extend the discussion to consider angular acceleration by an internal torque. As we will see, this internal torque is due to an internal force acting at a distance from an instantaneous center.

  3. Acceleration: It's Elementary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willis, Mariam

    2012-01-01

    Acceleration is one tool for providing high-ability students the opportunity to learn something new every day. Some people talk about acceleration as taking a student out of step. In actuality, what one is doing is putting a student in step with the right curriculum. Whole-grade acceleration, also called grade-skipping, usually happens between…

  4. The CERN Accelerator School

    CERN Multimedia

    2016-01-01

    Introduction to accelerator physics The CERN Accelerator School: Introduction to Accelerator Physics, which should have taken place in Istanbul, Turkey, later this year has now been relocated to Budapest, Hungary.  Further details regarding the new hotel and dates will be made available as soon as possible on a new Indico site at the end of May.

  5. Accelerators and Dinosaurs

    CERN Document Server

    Turner, Michael Stanley

    2003-01-01

    Using naturally occuring particles on which to research might have made accelerators become extinct. But in fact, results from astrophysics have made accelerator physics even more important. Not only are accelerators used in hospitals but they are also being used to understand nature's inner workings by searching for Higgs bosons, CP violation, neutrino mass and dark matter (2 pages)

  6. Wireless Crankarm Dynamometer for Cycling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caetano Decian LAZZARI

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available This report describes a new crankarm dynamometer designed to evaluate the strength produced by cyclists in real conditions. The dynamometer was designed to be fitted on a conventional crankset while data were transmitted via wireless communication channels available on a BluetoothTM module. Some 3D solid models were created in the SolidsWorks2010TM development environment to analyze the static and dynamic characteristics, by using the finite elements technique. Each crankset arm was used as a load cell based on strain gages configured as two Wheatstone bridges. The signals were conditioned on a printed circuit board attached directly to the structure. As a result, the load cell shows a maximum nonlinearity error between 2.1 % and 2.8 %. Some tests were performed on a cycling trainer, allowing to evaluate the system's functionality and to determine the involved forces in the crankset.

  7. Integrated Passive And Wireless Sensor

    KAUST Repository

    Li, Bodong

    2015-04-30

    A passive and wireless sensor is provided for sensing at least one of magnetic field, temperature or humidity. The sensor can provide only one of the sensing functions, individually or any combination of them simultaneously. It can be used for various applications where magnetic field changes, temperature and/or humidity need to be measured. In one or more embodiments, a surface acoustic wave (SAW) sensor is provided that can measure one or more of a magnetic field (or current that generates the magnetic field), temperature and humidity. In one or more embodiments, a magnetoimpedence (MI) sensor (for example a thin film giant magnetoimpedance (GMI) sensor), a thermally sensitive (for example a Lithium Niobite (LiNbO.sub.3)) substrate, and a humidity sensitive film (for example a hydrogel film) can be used as sensing elements.

  8. Propagation engineering in wireless communications

    CERN Document Server

    Ghasemi, Abdollah; Ghasemi, Farshid

    2016-01-01

    This book covers the basic principles for understanding radio wave propagation for common frequency bands used in radio-communications. This includes achievements and developments in propagation models for wireless communication. This book is intended to bridge the gap between the theoretical calculations and approaches to the applied procedures needed for radio links design in a proper manner. The authors emphasize propagation engineering by giving fundamental information and explain the use of basic principles together with technical achievements. This new edition includes additional information on radio wave propagation in guided media and technical issues for fiber optics cable networks with several examples and problems. This book also includes a solution manual - with 90 solved examples distributed throughout the chapters - and 158 problems including practical values and assumptions.

  9. Modulation Schemes for Wireless Access

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Vejrazka

    2000-12-01

    Full Text Available Four modulation schemes, namely minimum shift keying (MSK, Gaussianminimum shift keying (GMSK, multiamplitude minimum shift keying(MAMSK and π/4 differential quadrature phase shift keying (π/4-QPSKare described and their applicability to wireless access is discussedin the paper. Low complexity receiver structures based on differentialdetection are analysed to estimate the performance of the modulationschemes in the additive Gaussian noise and the Rayleigh and Riceenvelope fast fading channel. The bandwidth efficiency is calculated toevaluate the modulation schemes. The results show that the MAMSK schemegives the greatest bandwidth efficiency, but its performance in theRayleigh channel is rather poor. In contrast, the MSK scheme is lessbandwidth efficient, but it is more resistant to Rayleigh fading. Theperformance of π/4-QPSK signal is considerably improved by appropriateprefiltering.

  10. Reliability of Wireless Sensor Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dâmaso, Antônio; Rosa, Nelson; Maciel, Paulo

    2014-01-01

    Wireless Sensor Networks (WSNs) consist of hundreds or thousands of sensor nodes with limited processing, storage, and battery capabilities. There are several strategies to reduce the power consumption of WSN nodes (by increasing the network lifetime) and increase the reliability of the network (by improving the WSN Quality of Service). However, there is an inherent conflict between power consumption and reliability: an increase in reliability usually leads to an increase in power consumption. For example, routing algorithms can send the same packet though different paths (multipath strategy), which it is important for reliability, but they significantly increase the WSN power consumption. In this context, this paper proposes a model for evaluating the reliability of WSNs considering the battery level as a key factor. Moreover, this model is based on routing algorithms used by WSNs. In order to evaluate the proposed models, three scenarios were considered to show the impact of the power consumption on the reliability of WSNs. PMID:25157553

  11. Environmental and Physiological Factors Affect Football Head Impact Biomechanics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mihalik, Jason P; Sumrall, Adam Z; Yeargin, Susan W; Guskiewicz, Kevin M; King, Kevin B; Trulock, Scott C; Shields, Edgar W

    2017-10-01

    Recent anecdotal trends suggest a disproportionate number of head injuries in collegiate football players occur during preseason football camp. In warmer climates, this season also represents the highest risk for heat-related illness among collegiate football players. Because concussion and heat illnesses share many common symptoms, we need 1) to understand if environmental conditions, body temperature, and hydration status affect head impact biomechanics; and 2) to determine if an in-helmet thermistor could provide a valid measure of gastrointestinal temperature. A prospective cohort of 18 Division I college football players (age, 21.1 ± 1.4 yr; height, 187.7 ± 6.6 cm; mass, 114.5 ± 23.4 kg). Data were collected during one control and three experimental sessions. During each session, the Head Impact Telemetry System recorded head impact biomechanics (linear acceleration, rotational acceleration, and severity profile) and in-helmet temperature. A wet bulb globe device recorded environmental conditions, and CorTemp™ Ingestible Core Body Temperature Sensors recorded gastrointestinal temperature. Our findings suggest that linear acceleration (P = 0.57), rotational acceleration (P = 0.16), and Head Impact Technology severity profile (P = 0.33) are not influenced by environmental or physiological conditions. We did not find any single or combination of predictors for impact severity. Rotational acceleration was approaching significance between our early experimental sessions when compared with our control session. More research should be conducted to better understand if rotational accelerations are a component of impact magnitudes that are affected due to changes in environmental conditions, body temperature, and hydration status.

  12. EE-MRP: Energy-Efficient Multistage Routing Protocol for Wireless Sensor Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Kamran Khan

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Wireless sensor networks (WSNs have captivated substantial attention from both industrial and academic research in the last few years. The major factor behind the research efforts in that field is their vast range of applications which include surveillance systems, military operations, health care, environment event monitoring, and human safety. However, sensor nodes are low potential and energy constrained devices; therefore, energy-efficient routing protocol is the foremost concern. In this paper, an energy-efficient routing protocol for wireless sensor networks is proposed. Our protocol consists of a routing algorithm for the transmission of data, cluster head selection algorithm, and a scheme for the formation of clusters. On the basis of energy analysis of the existing routing protocols, a multistage data transmission mechanism is proposed. An efficient cluster head selection algorithm is adopted and unnecessary frequency of reclustering is exterminated. Static clustering is used for efficient selection of cluster heads. The performance and energy efficiency of our proposed routing protocol are assessed by the comparison of the existing routing protocols on a simulation platform. On the basis of simulation results, it is observed that our proposed routing protocol (EE-MRP has performed well in terms of overall network lifetime, throughput, and energy efficiency.

  13. Cluster-based Data Gathering in Long-Strip Wireless Sensor Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    FANG, W.

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available This paper investigates a special class of wireless sensor networks that are different from traditional ones in that the sensor nodes in this class of networks are deployed along narrowly elongated geographical areas and form a long-strip topology. According to hardware capabilities of current sensor nodes, a cluster-based protocol for reliable and efficient data gathering in long-strip wireless sensor networks (LSWSN is proposed. A well-distributed cluster-based architecture is first formed in the whole network through contention-based cluster head election. Cluster heads are responsible for coordination among the nodes within their clusters and aggregation of their sensory data, as well as transmission the data to the sink node on behalf of their own clusters. The intra-cluster coordination is based on the traditional TDMA schedule, in which the inter-cluster interference caused by the border nodes is solved by the multi-channel communication technique. The cluster reporting is based on the CSMA contention, in which a connected overlay network is formed by relay nodes to forward the data from the cluster heads through multi-hops to the sink node. The relay nodes are non-uniformly deployed to resolve the energy-hole problem which is extremely serious in the LSWSN. Extensive simulation results illuminate the distinguished performance of the proposed protocol.

  14. Mining Behavioral Groups in Large Wireless LANs

    OpenAIRE

    Hsu, Wei-jen; Dutta, Debojyoti; Helmy, Ahmed

    2006-01-01

    One vision of future wireless networks is that they will be deeply integrated and embedded in our lives and will involve the use of personalized mobile devices. User behavior in such networks is bound to affect the network performance. It is imperative to study and characterize the fundamental structure of wireless user behavior in order to model, manage, leverage and design efficient mobile networks. It is also important to make such study as realistic as possible, based on extensive measure...

  15. WIRELESS PHYSICAL LAYER SECURITY: PART 1

    OpenAIRE

    Saad , Walid; ZHOU , XIANGYUN; Debbah , Mérouane; Poor , H. Vincent

    2015-01-01

    This is an editorial; International audience; The ongoing paradigm shift from classical centralized wireless technologies toward distributed large-scale networks such as the Internet of Things has introduced new security challenges that cannot be fully handled via traditional cryptgraphic means. In such emerging wireless environments , devices have limited capabilities and are not controlled by a central control center; thus, the implementation of computationally expensive cryptographic techn...

  16. BackTrack testing wireless network security

    CERN Document Server

    Cardwell, Kevin

    2013-01-01

    Written in an easy-to-follow step-by-step format, you will be able to get started in next to no time with minimal effort and zero fuss.BackTrack: Testing Wireless Network Security is for anyone who has an interest in security and who wants to know more about wireless networks.All you need is some experience with networks and computers and you will be ready to go.

  17. Wireless communications networks for the smart grid

    CERN Document Server

    Ho, Quang-Dung; Rajalingham, Gowdemy; Le-Ngoc, Tho

    2014-01-01

    This brief presents a comprehensive review of the network architecture and communication technologies of the smart grid communication network (SGCN). It then studies the strengths, weaknesses and applications of two promising wireless mesh routing protocols that could be used to implement the SGCN. Packet transmission reliability, latency and robustness of these two protocols are evaluated and compared by simulations in various practical SGCN scenarios. Finally, technical challenges and open research opportunities of the SGCN are addressed. Wireless Communications Networks for Smart Grid provi

  18. Probabilistic Bandwidth Assignment in Wireless Sensor Networks

    OpenAIRE

    Khan , Dawood; Nefzi , Bilel; Santinelli , Luca; Song , Ye-Qiong

    2012-01-01

    International audience; With this paper we offer an insight in designing and analyzing wireless sensor networks in a versatile manner. Our framework applies probabilistic and component-based design principles for the wireless sensor network modeling and consequently analysis; while maintaining flexibility and accuracy. In particular, we address the problem of allocating and reconfiguring the available bandwidth. The framework has been successfully implemented in IEEE 802.15.4 using an Admissi...

  19. Fading and interference mitigation in wireless communications

    CERN Document Server

    Panic, Stefan; Anastasov, Jelena; Spalevic, Petar

    2013-01-01

    The rapid advancement of various wireless communication system services has created the need to analyze the possibility of their performance improvement. Introducing the basic principles of digital communications performance analysis and its mathematical formalization, Fading and Interference Mitigation in Wireless Communications will help you stay up to date with recent developments in the performance analysis of space diversity reception over fading channels in the presence of cochannel interference.The book presents a unified method for computing the performance of digital communication sys

  20. Wireless Security Within Hastily Formed Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-09-01

    Layer 3, creates an IPSec tunnel , much like a VPN , to protect the wireless point to point link as shown above independent of the wireless...2006) say the two most popular VPN implementations, IPSec (IP Security) and SSL (Secure Sockets Layer), each have their own strengths and weaknesses...Protocol (L2TP) Layer 3 (Network Layer) • Point-to-Point Tunneling Protocol (PPTP) • IP Security ( IPSec ) Layer 7 (Applications Layer) • Secure

  1. Wireless sensor data acquisition on remote locations

    OpenAIRE

    Apat, Mark

    2010-01-01

    Systems for remote wireless acquisition of sensor data are an important field of technology which combines knowledge from computer science and electronics. Development of such systems is facilitated by wireless standards like ZigBee which improve and simplify such a development. This diploma thesis describes the design and realization of a ZigBee standard based system and the corresponding application for data acquisition and control of remote sensors. The system is capable of acquiring va...

  2. Auction design for the wireless spectrum market

    CERN Document Server

    Lin, Peng; Zhang, Qian

    2014-01-01

    This Brief introduces the wireless spectrum market and discusses the current research for spectrum auctions. It covers the unique properties of spectrum auction, such as interference relationship, reusability, divisibility, composite effect and marginal effect, while also proposing how to build economic incentives into the network architecture and protocols in order to optimize the efficiency of wireless systems.Three scenarios for designing new auctions are demonstrated. First, a truthful double auction scheme for spectrum trading considering both the heterogeneous propagation properties of c

  3. Introduction to Ultra Wideband for Wireless Communications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nikookar, Homayoun; Prasad, Ramjee

    communications. Due to tutorial nature of the book it can also be adopted as a textbook on the subject in the Telecommunications Engineering curriculum. Problems at the end of each chapter extend the reader's understanding of the subject. Introduction to Ultra Wideband for Wireless Communications will aslo...... be useful for practicing engineers from industry who deal with the wireless systems that are designed and analyzed with the UWB technique....

  4. An energy-efficient and secure hybrid algorithm for wireless sensor networks using a mobile data collector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dayananda, Karanam Ravichandran; Straub, Jeremy

    2017-05-01

    This paper proposes a new hybrid algorithm for security, which incorporates both distributed and hierarchal approaches. It uses a mobile data collector (MDC) to collect information in order to save energy of sensor nodes in a wireless sensor network (WSN) as, in most networks, these sensor nodes have limited energy. Wireless sensor networks are prone to security problems because, among other things, it is possible to use a rogue sensor node to eavesdrop on or alter the information being transmitted. To prevent this, this paper introduces a security algorithm for MDC-based WSNs. A key use of this algorithm is to protect the confidentiality of the information sent by the sensor nodes. The sensor nodes are deployed in a random fashion and form group structures called clusters. Each cluster has a cluster head. The cluster head collects data from the other nodes using the time-division multiple access protocol. The sensor nodes send their data to the cluster head for transmission to the base station node for further processing. The MDC acts as an intermediate node between the cluster head and base station. The MDC, using its dynamic acyclic graph path, collects the data from the cluster head and sends it to base station. This approach is useful for applications including warfighting, intelligent building and medicine. To assess the proposed system, the paper presents a comparison of its performance with other approaches and algorithms that can be used for similar purposes.

  5. Trunnion-Head Stresses in THA: Are Big Heads Trouble?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavernia, Carlos J; Iacobelli, David A; Villa, Jesus M; Jones, Kinzy; Gonzalez, Jose L; Jones, William Kinzy

    2015-06-01

    The effects of large heads on stresses at the THA trunnion-head junction and their impact on tribocorrosion/metal ion release remain controversial. A 12/14 3D-model of a stem with different head sizes was investigated. Material properties of titanium were assigned to the trunnion and cobalt-chrome/alumina to the heads. A load simulating walking single-leg stand phase was applied to the head. A total contact head-trunnion interface was assumed. The area underneath the junction underwent significant elevations in stresses as head size increased from 28- to 40-mm. Maximum principal stress doubled between 28 and 40-mm heads, regardless of head material. Stress levels had a direct correlation to head diameter. Stress increases observed using increasingly larger heads will probably contribute to head-trunnion tribocorrosion and ion release. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Wireless motion sensor network for monitoring motion in a process, wireless sensor node, reasoning node, and feedback and/or actuation node for such wireless motion sensor network

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Havinga, Paul J.M.; Marin Perianu, Raluca; Marin Perianu, Mihai

    2010-01-01

    Wireless motion sensor network for monitoring motion in a process comprising at least one wireless sensor node for measuring at least one physical quantity related to motion or orientation, feature extraction means for deriving a feature for the measured quantities, a wireless transmitter connected

  7. Head-Impact-Measurement Devices: A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Connor, Kathryn L; Rowson, Steven; Duma, Stefan M; Broglio, Steven P

    2017-03-01

    With an estimated 3.8 million sport- and recreation-related concussions occurring annually, targeted prevention and diagnostic methods are needed. Biomechanical analysis of head impacts may provide quantitative information that can inform both prevention and diagnostic strategies. To assess available head-impact devices and their clinical utility. We performed a systematic search of the electronic database PubMed for peer-reviewed publications, using the following phrases: accelerometer and concussion, head impact telemetry, head impacts and concussion and sensor, head impacts and sensor, impact sensor and concussion, linear acceleration and concussion, rotational acceleration and concussion, and xpatch concussion. In addition to the literature review, a Google search for head impact monitor and concussion monitor yielded 15 more devices. Included studies were performed in vivo, used commercially available devices, and focused on sport-related concussion. One author reviewed the title and abstract of each study for inclusion and exclusion criteria and then reviewed each full-text article to confirm inclusion criteria. Controversial articles were reviewed by all authors to reach consensus. In total, 61 peer-reviewed articles involving 4 head-impact devices were included. Participants in boxing, football, ice hockey, soccer, or snow sports ranged in age from 6 to 24 years; 18% (n = 11) of the studies included female athletes. The Head Impact Telemetry System was the most widely used device (n = 53). Fourteen additional commercially available devices were presented. Measurements collected by impact monitors provided real-time data to estimate player exposure but did not have the requisite sensitivity to concussion. Proper interpretation of previously reported head-impact kinematics across age, sport, and position may inform future research and enable staff clinicians working on the sidelines to monitor athletes. However, head-impact-monitoring systems have limited

  8. How to model wireless mesh networks topology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanni, M L; Hashim, A A; Anwar, F; Ali, S; Ahmed, G S M

    2013-01-01

    The specification of network connectivity model or topology is the beginning of design and analysis in Computer Network researches. Wireless Mesh Networks is an autonomic network that is dynamically self-organised, self-configured while the mesh nodes establish automatic connectivity with the adjacent nodes in the relay network of wireless backbone routers. Researches in Wireless Mesh Networks range from node deployment to internetworking issues with sensor, Internet and cellular networks. These researches require modelling of relationships and interactions among nodes including technical characteristics of the links while satisfying the architectural requirements of the physical network. However, the existing topology generators model geographic topologies which constitute different architectures, thus may not be suitable in Wireless Mesh Networks scenarios. The existing methods of topology generation are explored, analysed and parameters for their characterisation are identified. Furthermore, an algorithm for the design of Wireless Mesh Networks topology based on square grid model is proposed in this paper. The performance of the topology generated is also evaluated. This research is particularly important in the generation of a close-to-real topology for ensuring relevance of design to the intended network and validity of results obtained in Wireless Mesh Networks researches

  9. Supporting Adaptation of Wireless Communication Protocols

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    LACHHMAN DAS DHOMEJA

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Pervasive devices such as mobile phones and PDAs (Personal Digital Assistants come with different wireless communication capabilities, for example, WiFi (Wireless Fidelity, Bluetooth, IrDA (Infrared, etc. In order for pervasive devices to interact with each other, they need to have matching (alike communication capabilities, otherwise such heterogeneous devices would not be able to interact with each other. In this paper we address this issue and propose a system that makes devices with heterogeneous wireless communication capabilities communicate with each other. The proposed system supports adaptation of wireless communication protocols through a proxy, which sits between a client and a server, and supports adaptation of wireless communication protocols. Its functionality involves intercepting a request made by a client with a different wireless communication capability (e.g. Bluetooth from what the server has (e.g. WiFi, connecting to the server and then sending results back to the client. We have tested the system by implementing a messaging service application and running it on the system. The proxy supports all Bluetooth protocols, i.e. OBEX (Object Exchange, L2CAP (Logical Link Control and Adaptation Protocol, RFCOM (Radio Frequency Communication and WiFi protocol and can run on (J2MW (Java 2 Micro Edition enabled mobile phones which support both Bluetooth and WiFi capabilities

  10. Supporting Adaptation of Wireless Communication Protocols

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dhomeja, L.D.; Soomro, I.A.; Malkani, Y.A.

    2016-01-01

    Pervasive devices such as mobile phones and PDAs (Personal Digital Assistants) come with different wireless communication capabilities, for example, WiFi (Wireless Fidelity), Bluetooth, IrDA (Infrared), etc. In order for pervasive devices to interact with each other, they need to have matching (alike) communication capabilities, otherwise such heterogeneous devices would not be able to interact with each other. In this paper we address this issue and propose a system that makes devices with heterogeneous wireless communication capabilities communicate with each other. The proposed system supports adaptation of wireless communication protocols through a proxy, which sits between a client and a server, and supports adaptation of wireless communication protocols. Its functionality involves intercepting a request made by a client with a different wireless communication capability (e.g. Bluetooth) from what the server has (e.g. WiFi), connecting to the server and then sending results back to the client. We have tested the system by implementing a messaging service application and running it on the system. The proxy supports all Bluetooth protocols, i.e. OBEX (Object Exchange), L2CAP (Logical Link Control and Adaptation Protocol), RFCOM (Radio Frequency Communication) and WiFi protocol and can run on (J2MW (Java 2 Micro Edition) enabled mobile phones which support both Bluetooth and WiFi capabilities. (author)

  11. Proxy SDN Controller for Wireless Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Won-Suk Kim

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Management of wireless networks as well as wired networks by using software-defined networking (SDN has been highlighted continually. However, control features of a wireless network differ from those of a wired network in several aspects. In this study, we identify the various inefficient points when controlling and managing wireless networks by using SDN and propose SDN-based control architecture called Proxcon to resolve these problems. Proxcon introduces the concept of a proxy SDN controller (PSC for the wireless network control, and the PSC entrusted with the role of a main controller performs control operations and provides the latest network state for a network administrator. To address the control inefficiency, Proxcon supports offloaded SDN operations for controlling wireless networks by utilizing the PSC, such as local control by each PSC, hybrid control utilizing the PSC and the main controller, and locally cooperative control utilizing the PSCs. The proposed architecture and the newly supported control operations can enhance scalability and response time when the logically centralized control plane responds to the various wireless network events. Through actual experiments, we verified that the proposed architecture could address the various control issues such as scalability, response time, and control overhead.

  12. Growth of wireless technology in healthcare institutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riha, Chris

    2006-01-01

    As wireless technologies evolve and interoperate, the practical application for healthcare providers and organizations grows exponentially. By providing increased access to patient data, decision-making tools (e.g., computer aided decision systems such as ECG analysis programs), error reduction systems (i.e., pharmaceutical error prevention software), the benefits of wireless technology can be immense. However, as with all technological innovations, wireless systems must be carefully planned and managed. As the wireless spectrum becomes more crowded with both complementary and competing systems, bandwidth utilization and the potential for interference grows greatly. Clinical engineering personnel need to be actively involved in the management of wireless system management within a healthcare facility to avoid interference problems that could disrupt patient care, especially as the deployment of wireless systems expands. Additionally, public exposure to RF energy in a healthcare setting may need to be monitored and evaluated as the utilization of this energy spectrum continues to grow. All manufacturers of RF emitting devices are required to list the specific absorption rate of their specific device. However, there is no monitoring of the cumulative effect of multiple devices and systems. As of press time, this has not been an issue. But it is something to consider as we continue to find useful applications for this technology.

  13. Analysis and Testing of Mobile Wireless Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alena, Richard; Evenson, Darin; Rundquist, Victor; Clancy, Daniel (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Wireless networks are being used to connect mobile computing elements in more applications as the technology matures. There are now many products (such as 802.11 and 802.11b) which ran in the ISM frequency band and comply with wireless network standards. They are being used increasingly to link mobile Intranet into Wired networks. Standard methods of analyzing and testing their performance and compatibility are needed to determine the limits of the technology. This paper presents analytical and experimental methods of determining network throughput, range and coverage, and interference sources. Both radio frequency (BE) domain and network domain analysis have been applied to determine wireless network throughput and range in the outdoor environment- Comparison of field test data taken under optimal conditions, with performance predicted from RF analysis, yielded quantitative results applicable to future designs. Layering multiple wireless network- sooners can increase performance. Wireless network components can be set to different radio frequency-hopping sequences or spreading functions, allowing more than one sooner to coexist. Therefore, we ran multiple 802.11-compliant systems concurrently in the same geographical area to determine interference effects and scalability, The results can be used to design of more robust networks which have multiple layers of wireless data communication paths and provide increased throughput overall.

  14. Airborne wireless communication systems, airborne communication methods, and communication methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deaton, Juan D [Menan, ID; Schmitt, Michael J [Idaho Falls, ID; Jones, Warren F [Idaho Falls, ID

    2011-12-13

    An airborne wireless communication system includes circuitry configured to access information describing a configuration of a terrestrial wireless communication base station that has become disabled. The terrestrial base station is configured to implement wireless communication between wireless devices located within a geographical area and a network when the terrestrial base station is not disabled. The circuitry is further configured, based on the information, to configure the airborne station to have the configuration of the terrestrial base station. An airborne communication method includes answering a 911 call from a terrestrial cellular wireless phone using an airborne wireless communication system.

  15. Concussion in professional football: comparison with boxing head impacts--part 10.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viano, David C; Casson, Ira R; Pellman, Elliot J; Bir, Cynthia A; Zhang, Liying; Sherman, Donald C; Boitano, Marilyn A

    2005-12-01

    This study addresses impact biomechanics from boxing punches causing translational and rotational head acceleration. Olympic boxers threw four different punches at an instrumented Hybrid III dummy and responses were compared with laboratory-reconstructed NFL concussions. Eleven Olympic boxers weighing 51 to 130 kg (112-285 lb) delivered 78 blows to the head of the Hybrid III dummy, including hooks, uppercuts and straight punches to the forehead and jaw. Instrumentation included translational and rotational head acceleration and neck loads in the dummy. Biaxial acceleration was measured in the boxer's hand to determine punch force. High-speed video recorded each blow. Hybrid III head responses and finite element (FE) brain modeling were compared to similarly determined responses from reconstructed NFL concussions. The hook produced the highest change in hand velocity (11.0 +/- 3.4 m/s) and greatest punch force (4405 +/- 2318 N) with average neck load of 855 +/- 537 N. It caused head translational and rotational accelerations of 71.2 +/- 32.2 g and 9306 +/- 4485 r/s. These levels are consistent with those causing concussion in NFL impacts. However, the head injury criterion (HIC) for boxing punches was lower than for NFL concussions because of shorter duration acceleration. Boxers deliver punches with proportionately more rotational than translational acceleration than in football concussion. Boxing punches have a 65 mm effective radius from the head cg, which is almost double the 34 mm in football. A smaller radius in football prevents the helmets from sliding off each other in a tackle. Olympic boxers deliver punches with high impact velocity but lower HIC and translational acceleration than in football impacts because of a lower effective punch mass. They cause proportionately more rotational acceleration than in football. Modeling shows that the greatest strain is in the midbrain late in the exposure, after the primary impact acceleration in boxing and football.

  16. The Accelerator Reliability Forum

    CERN Document Server

    Lüdeke, Andreas; Giachino, R

    2014-01-01

    A high reliability is a very important goal for most particle accelerators. The biennial Accelerator Reliability Workshop covers topics related to the design and operation of particle accelerators with a high reliability. In order to optimize the over-all reliability of an accelerator one needs to gather information on the reliability of many different subsystems. While a biennial workshop can serve as a platform for the exchange of such information, the authors aimed to provide a further channel to allow for a more timely communication: the Particle Accelerator Reliability Forum [1]. This contribution will describe the forum and advertise it’s usage in the community.

  17. Increasing Reliability with Wireless Instrumentation Systems from Space Shuttle to 'Fly-By-Wireless'

    Science.gov (United States)

    Studor, George

    2004-01-01

    This slide presentation discusses some of the requirements to allow for "Fly by Wireless". Included in the discussion are: a review of new technologies by decades starting with the 1930's and going through the current decade, structural health monitoring, the requisite system designs, and the vision of flying by wireless.

  18. Industrial Application of Accelerators

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2017-01-01

    At CERN, we are very familiar with large, high energy particle accelerators. However, in the world outside CERN, there are more than 35000 accelerators which are used for applications ranging from treating cancer, through making better electronics to removing harmful micro-organisms from food and water. These are responsible for around $0.5T of commerce each year. Almost all are less than 20 MeV and most use accelerator types that are somewhat different from what is at CERN. These lectures will describe some of the most common applications, some of the newer applications in development and the accelerator technology used for them. It will also show examples of where technology developed for particle physics is now being studied for these applications. Rob Edgecock is a Professor of Accelerator Science, with a particular interest in the medical applications of accelerators. He works jointly for the STFC Rutherford Appleton Laboratory and the International Institute for Accelerator Applications at the Univer...

  19. Industrial Application of Accelerators

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2017-01-01

    At CERN, we are very familiar with large, high energy particle accelerators. However, in the world outside CERN, there are more than 35000 accelerators which are used for applications ranging from treating cancer, through making better electronics to removing harmful micro-organisms from food and water. These are responsible for around $0.5T of commerce each year. Almost all are less than 20 MeV and most use accelerator types that are somewhat different from what is at CERN. These lectures will describe some of the most common applications, some of the newer applications in development and the accelerator technology used for them. It will also show examples of where technology developed for particle physics is now being studied for these applications. Rob Edgecock is a Professor of Accelerator Science, with a particular interest in the medical applications of accelerators. He works jointly for the STFC Rutherford Appleton Laboratory and the International Institute for Accelerator Applications at the Uni...

  20. Accelerators for energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inoue, Makoto

    2000-01-01

    A particle accelerator is a device to consume energy but not to produce it. Then, the titled accelerator seems to mean an accelerator for using devices related to nuclear energy. For an accelerator combined to nuclear fissionable fuel, neutron sources are D-T type, (gamma, n) reaction using electron beam type spallation type, and so forth. At viewpoints of powers of incident beam and formed neutron, a spallation type source using high energy proton is told to be effective but others have some advantages by investigation on easy operability, easy construction, combustion with target, energy and directivity of neutron, and so forth. Here were discussed on an accelerator for research on accelerator driven energy system by dividing its researching steps, and on kind, energy, beam intensity, and so forth of an accelerator suitable for it. And, space electric charge effect at beam propagation direction controlled by beam intensity of cyclotron was also commented. (G.K.)

  1. Hybrid Swarm Intelligence Energy Efficient Clustered Routing Algorithm for Wireless Sensor Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajeev Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Currently, wireless sensor networks (WSNs are used in many applications, namely, environment monitoring, disaster management, industrial automation, and medical electronics. Sensor nodes carry many limitations like low battery life, small memory space, and limited computing capability. To create a wireless sensor network more energy efficient, swarm intelligence technique has been applied to resolve many optimization issues in WSNs. In many existing clustering techniques an artificial bee colony (ABC algorithm is utilized to collect information from the field periodically. Nevertheless, in the event based applications, an ant colony optimization (ACO is a good solution to enhance the network lifespan. In this paper, we combine both algorithms (i.e., ABC and ACO and propose a new hybrid ABCACO algorithm to solve a Nondeterministic Polynomial (NP hard and finite problem of WSNs. ABCACO algorithm is divided into three main parts: (i selection of optimal number of subregions and further subregion parts, (ii cluster head selection using ABC algorithm, and (iii efficient data transmission using ACO algorithm. We use a hierarchical clustering technique for data transmission; the data is transmitted from member nodes to the subcluster heads and then from subcluster heads to the elected cluster heads based on some threshold value. Cluster heads use an ACO algorithm to discover the best route for data transmission to the base station (BS. The proposed approach is very useful in designing the framework for forest fire detection and monitoring. The simulation results show that the ABCACO algorithm enhances the stability period by 60% and also improves the goodput by 31% against LEACH and WSNCABC, respectively.

  2. Head and Neck Cancer Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Head and Neck Cancer Treatment Head and neck cancer ... there any new developments in treating my disease? Head and neck cancer overview The way a particular ...

  3. American Head and Neck Society

    Science.gov (United States)

    American Head & Neck Society Mission Statement: Advance Education, Research, and Quality of Care for the head and neck oncology patient. American Head & Neck Society | AHNS The mission of the AHNS is to ...

  4. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... MRI of the Head? What is MRI of the Head? Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a noninvasive ... of page What are some common uses of the procedure? MR imaging of the head is performed ...

  5. Head injuries in sport.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cantu, R C

    1996-12-01

    Injuries to the head and neck are the most frequent catastrophic sports injury, and head injuries are the most common direct athletic cause of death. Although direct compressive forces may injure the brain, neural tissue is particularly susceptible to injury from shearing stresses, which are most likely to occur when rotational forces are applied to the head. The most common athletic head injury is concussion, which may very widely in severity. Intracranial haemorrhage is the leading cause of head injury death in sports, making rapid initial assessment and appropriate follow up mandatory after a head injury. Diffuse cerebral swelling is another serious condition that may be found in the child or adolescent athlete, and the second impact syndrome is a major concern in adult athletes. Many head injuries in athletes are the result of improper playing techniques and can be reduced by teaching proper skills and enforcing safety promoting rules. Improved conditioning (particularly of the neck), protective headgear, and careful medical supervision of athletes will also minimise this type of injury.

  6. Intrusion detection and monitoring for wireless networks.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thomas, Eric D.; Van Randwyk, Jamie A.; Lee, Erik J.; Stephano, Amanda (Indiana University); Tabriz, Parisa (University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign); Pelon, Kristen (Cedarville University); McCoy, Damon (University of Colorado, Boulder); Lodato, Mark (Lafayette College); Hemingway, Franklin (University of New Mexico); Custer, Ryan P.; Averin, Dimitry (Polytechnic University); Franklin, Jason (Carnegie Mellon University); Kilman, Dominique Marie

    2005-11-01

    Wireless computer networks are increasing exponentially around the world. They are being implemented in both the unlicensed radio frequency (RF) spectrum (IEEE 802.11a/b/g) and the licensed spectrum (e.g., Firetide [1] and Motorola Canopy [2]). Wireless networks operating in the unlicensed spectrum are by far the most popular wireless computer networks in existence. The open (i.e., proprietary) nature of the IEEE 802.11 protocols and the availability of ''free'' RF spectrum have encouraged many producers of enterprise and common off-the-shelf (COTS) computer networking equipment to jump into the wireless arena. Competition between these companies has driven down the price of 802.11 wireless networking equipment and has improved user experiences with such equipment. The end result has been an increased adoption of the equipment by businesses and consumers, the establishment of the Wi-Fi Alliance [3], and widespread use of the Alliance's ''Wi-Fi'' moniker to describe these networks. Consumers use 802.11 equipment at home to reduce the burden of running wires in existing construction, facilitate the sharing of broadband Internet services with roommates or neighbors, and increase their range of ''connectedness''. Private businesses and government entities (at all levels) are deploying wireless networks to reduce wiring costs, increase employee mobility, enable non-employees to access the Internet, and create an added revenue stream to their existing business models (coffee houses, airports, hotels, etc.). Municipalities (Philadelphia; San Francisco; Grand Haven, MI) are deploying wireless networks so they can bring broadband Internet access to places lacking such access; offer limited-speed broadband access to impoverished communities; offer broadband in places, such as marinas and state parks, that are passed over by traditional broadband providers; and provide themselves with higher quality, more

  7. Towards Controlling Latency in Wireless Networks

    KAUST Repository

    Bouacida, Nader

    2017-04-24

    Wireless networks are undergoing an unprecedented revolution in the last decade. With the explosion of delay-sensitive applications in the Internet (i.e., online gaming and VoIP), latency becomes a major issue for the development of wireless technology. Taking advantage of the significant decline in memory prices, industrialists equip the network devices with larger buffering capacities to improve the network throughput by limiting packets drops. Over-buffering results in increasing the time that packets spend in the queues and, thus, introducing more latency in networks. This phenomenon is known as “bufferbloat”. While throughput is the dominant performance metric, latency also has a huge impact on user experience not only for real-time applications but also for common applications like web browsing, which is sensitive to latencies in order of hundreds of milliseconds. Concerns have arisen about designing sophisticated queue management schemes to mitigate the effects of such phenomenon. My thesis research aims to solve bufferbloat problem in both traditional half-duplex and cutting-edge full-duplex wireless systems by reducing delay while maximizing wireless links utilization and fairness. Our work shed lights on buffer management algorithms behavior in wireless networks and their ability to reduce latency resulting from excessive queuing delays inside oversized static network buffers without a significant loss in other network metrics. First of all, we address the problem of buffer management in wireless full-duplex networks by using Wireless Queue Management (WQM), which is an active queue management technique for wireless networks. Our solution is based on Relay Full-Duplex MAC (RFD-MAC), an asynchronous media access control protocol designed for relay full-duplexing. Compared to the default case, our solution reduces the end-to-end delay by two orders of magnitude while achieving similar throughput in most of the cases. In the second part of this thesis

  8. A Novel Cluster Head Selection Algorithm Based on Fuzzy Clustering and Particle Swarm Optimization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ni, Qingjian; Pan, Qianqian; Du, Huimin; Cao, Cen; Zhai, Yuqing

    2017-01-01

    An important objective of wireless sensor network is to prolong the network life cycle, and topology control is of great significance for extending the network life cycle. Based on previous work, for cluster head selection in hierarchical topology control, we propose a solution based on fuzzy clustering preprocessing and particle swarm optimization. More specifically, first, fuzzy clustering algorithm is used to initial clustering for sensor nodes according to geographical locations, where a sensor node belongs to a cluster with a determined probability, and the number of initial clusters is analyzed and discussed. Furthermore, the fitness function is designed considering both the energy consumption and distance factors of wireless sensor network. Finally, the cluster head nodes in hierarchical topology are determined based on the improved particle swarm optimization. Experimental results show that, compared with traditional methods, the proposed method achieved the purpose of reducing the mortality rate of nodes and extending the network life cycle.

  9. Presentations of the PTAC wireless, telecommunications and e-business technology conference

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2003-07-01

    This conference was attended by experts in the telecommunications industry who demonstrated how the petroleum industry can reduce costs and improve profitability through innovative wireless, telecommunications and e-business technology solutions. The conference was divided into two main sessions, featuring field operation presentations and head office presentations. Current technologies and success stories and challenges were presented for exploration, drilling, completions and production operations. The conference featured 16 presentations, of which 12 have been indexed separately for inclusion in this database. refs., tabs., figs.

  10. An Intrusion Detection System Based on Multi-Level Clustering for Hierarchical Wireless Sensor Networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butun, Ismail; Ra, In-Ho; Sankar, Ravi

    2015-11-17

    In this work, an intrusion detection system (IDS) framework based on multi-level clustering for hierarchical wireless sensor networks is proposed. The framework employs two types of intrusion detection approaches: (1) "downward-IDS (D-IDS)" to detect the abnormal behavior (intrusion) of the subordinate (member) nodes; and (2) "upward-IDS (U-IDS)" to detect the abnormal behavior of the cluster heads. By using analytical calculations, the optimum parameters for the D-IDS (number of maximum hops) and U-IDS (monitoring group size) of the framework are evaluated and presented.

  11. An Intrusion Detection System Based on Multi-Level Clustering for Hierarchical Wireless Sensor Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ismail Butun

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available In this work, an intrusion detection system (IDS framework based on multi-level clustering for hierarchical wireless sensor networks is proposed. The framework employs two types of intrusion detection approaches: (1 “downward-IDS (D-IDS” to detect the abnormal behavior (intrusion of the subordinate (member nodes; and (2 “upward-IDS (U-IDS” to detect the abnormal behavior of the cluster heads. By using analytical calculations, the optimum parameters for the D-IDS (number of maximum hops and U-IDS (monitoring group size of the framework are evaluated and presented.

  12. Femoral head avascular necrosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chrysikopoulos, H.; Sartoris, D.J.; Resnick, D.L.; Ashburn, W.; Pretorius, T.

    1988-01-01

    MR imaging has been shown to be more sensitive and specific than planar scintigraphy for avascular necrosis (AVN) of the femoral head. However, experience with single photon emission CT (SPECT) is limited. The authors retrospectively compared 1.5-T MR imaging with SPECT in 14 patients with suspected femoral head AVN. Agreement between MR imaging and SPECT was present in 24 femurs, 14 normal and ten with AVN. MR imaging showed changes of AVN in the remaining four femoral heads. Of these, one was normal and the other three inconclusive for AVN by SPECT. The authors conclude that MR imaging is superior to SPECT for the evaluation of AVN of the hip

  13. Monitoring System for Slope Stability under Rainfall by using MEMS Acceleration Sensor IC tags

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murakami, S; Dairaku, A; Komine, H; Saito, O; Sakai, N; Isizawa, T; Maruyama, I

    2013-01-01

    Real-time warning system for slope failure under rainfall is available to disaster prevention and mitigation. Monitoring of multi-point and wireless measurements is effective because it is difficult to conclude the most dangerous part in a slope. The purpose of this study is to propose a method of monitoring system with multi-point and wireless measurements for a slope stability using MEMS acceleration sensor IC tags. MEMS acceleration sensor IC tag is an acceleration sensor microminiaturized by a technology of Micro Electro Mechanical Systems on board IC tag. Especially, low cost of the sensor will yield to the realization of the system. In order to investigate the applicability of the proposed system, a large-scale model test of artificial slope subjected to rainfall has been performed. MEMS acceleration sensor IC tags has been located on the slope and ground acceleration caused by forced vibration has been measured until the model slope collapses. The experimental results show that the MEMS acceleration sensor IC tag is comfortably available under rainfall, the characteristics of ground accelerations varies with changing the condition of the slope subjected to rainfall, and the proposed method can be applied to a real-time monitoring system for slope failure under rainfall.

  14. OIT Wireless Telemetry for Industrial Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Manges, WW

    2002-09-03

    The need for advanced wireless technology has been identified in the National Research Council publication (1) ''Manufacturing Process Controls for the Industries of the Future as a Critical Technology for the Future''. The deployment challenges to be overcome in order for wireless to be a viable option include: (1) eliminating interference (assuring reliable communications); (2) easing the deployment of intelligent, wireless sensors; (3) developing reliable networks (robust architectures); (4) developing remote power (long-lasting and reliable); and (5) developing standardized communication protocols. This project demonstrated the feasibility of robust wireless sensor networks that could meet these requirements for the harsh environments common to the DOE/OIT Industries of the Future. It resulted in a wireless test bed that was demonstrated in a paper mill and a steel plant. The test bed illustrated key protocols and components that would be required in a real-life, wireless network. The technologies for low power connectivity developed and demonstrated at the plant eased fears that the radios would interfere with existing control equipment. The same direct sequence, spread spectrum (DSSS) technology that helped assure the reliability of the connection also demonstrated that wireless communication was feasible in these plants without boosting the transmitted power to dangerous levels. Our experience and research have indicated that two key parameters are of ultimate importance: (1) reliability and (2) inter-system compatibility. Reliability is the key to immediate acceptance among industrial users. The importance cannot be overstated, because users will not tolerate an unreliable information network. A longer term issue that is at least as important as the reliability of a single system is the inter-system compatibility between these wireless sensor networks and other wireless systems that are part of our industries. In the long run, the

  15. Comparative analyses of bicyclists and motorcyclists in vehicle collisions focusing on head impact responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xinghua; Peng, Yong; Yi, Shengen

    2017-11-01

    To investigate the differences of the head impact responses between bicyclists and motorcyclists in vehicle collisions. A series of vehicle-bicycle and vehicle-motorcycle lateral impact simulations on four vehicle types at seven vehicle speeds (30, 35, 40, 45, 50, 55 and 60 km/h) and three two-wheeler moving speeds (5, 7.5 and 10 km/h for bicycle, 10, 12.5 and 15 km/h for motorcycle) were established based on PC-Crash software. To further comprehensively explore the differences, additional impact scenes with other initial conditions, such as impact angle (0, π/3, 2π/3 and π) and impact position (left, middle and right part of vehicle front-end), also were supplemented. And then, extensive comparisons were accomplished with regard to average head peak linear acceleration, average head impact speed, average head peak angular acceleration, average head peak angular speed and head injury severity. The results showed there were prominent differences of kinematics and body postures for bicyclists and motorcyclists even under same impact conditions. The variations of bicyclist head impact responses with the changing of impact conditions were a far cry from that of motorcyclists. The average head peak linear acceleration, average head impact speed and average head peak angular acceleration values were higher for motorcyclists than for bicyclists in most cases, while the bicyclists received greater average head peak angular speed values. And the head injuries of motorcyclists worsened faster with increased vehicle speed. The results may provide even deeper understanding of two-wheeler safety and contribute to improve the public health affected by road traffic accidents.

  16. Particle-accelerator decommissioning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Opelka, J.H.; Mundis, R.L.; Marmer, G.J.; Peterson, J.M.; Siskind, B.; Kikta, M.J.

    1979-12-01

    Generic considerations involved in decommissioning particle accelerators are examined. There are presently several hundred accelerators operating in the United States that can produce material containing nonnegligible residual radioactivity. Residual radioactivity after final shutdown is generally short-lived induced activity and is localized in hot spots around the beam line. The decommissioning options addressed are mothballing, entombment, dismantlement with interim storage, and dismantlement with disposal. The recycle of components or entire accelerators following dismantlement is a definite possibility and has occurred in the past. Accelerator components can be recycled either immediately at accelerator shutdown or following a period of storage, depending on the nature of induced activation. Considerations of cost, radioactive waste, and radiological health are presented for four prototypic accelerators. Prototypes considered range from small accelerators having minimal amounts of radioactive mmaterial to a very large accelerator having massive components containing nonnegligible amounts of induced activation. Archival information on past decommissionings is presented, and recommendations concerning regulations and accelerator design that will aid in the decommissioning of an accelerator are given

  17. NASA Lunar Base Wireless System Propagation Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwu, Shian U.; Upanavage, Matthew; Sham, Catherine C.

    2007-01-01

    There have been many radio wave propagation studies using both experimental and theoretical techniques over the recent years. However, most of studies have been in support of commercial cellular phone wireless applications. The signal frequencies are mostly at the commercial cellular and Personal Communications Service bands. The antenna configurations are mostly one on a high tower and one near the ground to simulate communications between a cellular base station and a mobile unit. There are great interests in wireless communication and sensor systems for NASA lunar missions because of the emerging importance of establishing permanent lunar human exploration bases. Because of the specific lunar terrain geometries and RF frequencies of interest to the NASA missions, much of the published literature for the commercial cellular and PCS bands of 900 and 1800 MHz may not be directly applicable to the lunar base wireless system and environment. There are various communication and sensor configurations required to support all elements of a lunar base. For example, the communications between astronauts, between astronauts and the lunar vehicles, between lunar vehicles and satellites on the lunar orbits. There are also various wireless sensor systems among scientific, experimental sensors and data collection ground stations. This presentation illustrates the propagation analysis of the lunar wireless communication and sensor systems taking into account the three dimensional terrain multipath effects. It is observed that the propagation characteristics are significantly affected by the presence of the lunar terrain. The obtained results indicate the lunar surface material, terrain geometry and antenna location are the important factors affecting the propagation characteristics of the lunar wireless systems. The path loss can be much more severe than the free space propagation and is greatly affected by the antenna height, surface material and operating frequency. The

  18. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... used to detect: bleeding, brain injury and skull fractures in patients with head injuries. bleeding caused by ... be asked to remove hearing aids and removable dental work. Women will be asked to remove bras ...

  19. TCGA head Neck

    Science.gov (United States)

    Investigators with The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) Research Network have discovered genomic differences – with potentially important clinical implications – in head and neck cancers caused by infection with the human papillomavirus (HPV).

  20. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... microphone. top of page How does the procedure work? In many ways CT scanning works very much ... head CT scanning. Manufacturers of intravenous contrast indicate mothers should not breastfeed their babies for 24-48 ...