WorldWideScience

Sample records for winter design temperature

  1. Winter to winter recurrence of atmospheric circulation anomalies over East Asia and its impact on winter surface air temperature anomalies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Xia; Yang, Guang

    2017-01-01

    The persistence of atmospheric circulation anomalies over East Asia shows a winter to winter recurrence (WTWR) phenomenon. Seasonal variations in sea level pressure anomalies and surface wind anomalies display significantly different characteristics between WTWR and non-WTWR years. The WTWR years are characterized by the recurrence of both a strong (weak) anomalous Siberian High and an East Asian winter monsoon over two successive winters without persistence through the intervening summer. However, anomalies during the non-WTWR years have the opposite sign between the current and ensuing winters. The WTWR of circulation anomalies contributes to that of surface air temperature anomalies (SATAs), which is useful information for improving seasonal and interannual climate predictions over East Asia and China. In the positive (negative) WTWR years, SATAs are cooler (warmer) over East Asia in two successive winters, but the signs of the SATAs are opposite in the preceding and subsequent winters during the non-WTWR years.

  2. Warmed Winter Water Temperatures Alter Reproduction in Two Fish Species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Firkus, Tyler; Rahel, Frank J; Bergman, Harold L; Cherrington, Brian D

    2018-02-01

    We examined the spawning success of Fathead Minnows (Pimephales promelas) and Johnny Darters (Etheostoma nigrum) exposed to elevated winter water temperatures typical of streams characterized by anthropogenic thermal inputs. When Fathead Minnows were exposed to temperature treatments of 12, 16, or 20 °C during the winter, spawning occurred at 16 and 20 °C but not 12 °C. Eggs were deposited over 9 weeks before winter spawning ceased. Fathead Minnows from the three winter temperature treatments were then exposed to a simulated spring transition. Spawning occurred at all three temperature treatments during the spring, but fish from the 16° and 20 °C treatment had delayed egg production indicating a latent effect of warm winter temperatures on spring spawning. mRNA analysis of the egg yolk protein vitellogenin showed elevated expression in female Fathead Minnows at 16 and 20 °C during winter spawning that decreased after winter spawning ceased, whereas Fathead Minnows at 12 °C maintained comparatively low expression during winter. Johnny Darters were exposed to 4 °C to represent winter temperatures in the absence of thermal inputs, and 12, 16, and 20 °C to represent varying degrees of winter thermal pollution. Johnny Darters spawned during winter at 12, 16, and 20 °C but not at 4 °C. Johnny Darters at 4 °C subsequently spawned following a simulated spring period while those at 12, 16, and 20 °C did not. Our results indicate elevated winter water temperatures common in effluent-dominated streams can promote out-of-season spawning and that vitellogenin expression is a useful indicator of spawning readiness for fish exposed to elevated winter temperatures.

  3. Warmed Winter Water Temperatures Alter Reproduction in Two Fish Species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Firkus, Tyler; Rahel, Frank J.; Bergman, Harold L.; Cherrington, Brian D.

    2018-02-01

    We examined the spawning success of Fathead Minnows ( Pimephales promelas) and Johnny Darters ( Etheostoma nigrum) exposed to elevated winter water temperatures typical of streams characterized by anthropogenic thermal inputs. When Fathead Minnows were exposed to temperature treatments of 12, 16, or 20 °C during the winter, spawning occurred at 16 and 20 °C but not 12 °C. Eggs were deposited over 9 weeks before winter spawning ceased. Fathead Minnows from the three winter temperature treatments were then exposed to a simulated spring transition. Spawning occurred at all three temperature treatments during the spring, but fish from the 16° and 20 °C treatment had delayed egg production indicating a latent effect of warm winter temperatures on spring spawning. mRNA analysis of the egg yolk protein vitellogenin showed elevated expression in female Fathead Minnows at 16 and 20 °C during winter spawning that decreased after winter spawning ceased, whereas Fathead Minnows at 12 °C maintained comparatively low expression during winter. Johnny Darters were exposed to 4 °C to represent winter temperatures in the absence of thermal inputs, and 12, 16, and 20 °C to represent varying degrees of winter thermal pollution. Johnny Darters spawned during winter at 12, 16, and 20 °C but not at 4 °C. Johnny Darters at 4 °C subsequently spawned following a simulated spring period while those at 12, 16, and 20 °C did not. Our results indicate elevated winter water temperatures common in effluent-dominated streams can promote out-of-season spawning and that vitellogenin expression is a useful indicator of spawning readiness for fish exposed to elevated winter temperatures.

  4. Comparison of winter temperature profiles in asphalt and concrete pavements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-06-01

    The objectives of this research were to 1) determine which pavement type, asphalt or concrete, has : higher surface temperatures in winter and 2) compare the subsurface temperatures under asphalt and : concrete pavements to determine the pavement typ...

  5. Temperature-associated dynamics of songbird winter distributions and abundances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butler, J Russell; MacMynowski, Dena P; Laurent, Chad; Root, Terry L

    2007-12-01

    Using Christmas Bird Count data, we analyze the annual spatio-temporal abundances of six passerine species in the upper Great Plains, US (1960-1990). This study provides new insight into how global warming could cause separation of species within present-day communities. We find that winter relative abundances of similarly-sized songbirds are differentially affected by ambient winter temperature. As such, average annual winter temperature fluctuations (i.e., severity of winter) are significantly (P < 0.05) correlated with the relative abundances of three species while the other three are not. Our conditional probability-of-occurrence analysis indicates that the abundances of the three temperature-associated species declined markedly below -4 degrees C while the abundances of the other three species fluctuated little from 8 degrees C to -16 degrees C. We conclude that even in colder climates i) the winter distributions of some, but not all, songbirds are directly or indirectly limited by temperature; and ii) these birds have dynamic abundances that can quickly respond to temperature changes.

  6. Mangrove species' responses to winter air temperature extremes in China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Luzhen; Wang, Wenqing; Li, Qingshun Q.; Zhang, Yihui; Yang, Shengchang; Osland, Michael J.; Huang, Jinliang; Peng, Congjiao

    2017-01-01

    The global distribution and diversity of mangrove forests is greatly influenced by the frequency and intensity of winter air temperature extremes. However, our understanding of how different mangrove species respond to winter temperature extremes has been lacking because extreme freezing and chilling events are, by definition, relatively uncommon and also difficult to replicate experimentally. In this study, we investigated species-specific variation in mangrove responses to winter temperature extremes in China. In 10 sites that span a latitudinal gradient, we quantified species-specific damage and recovery following a chilling event, for mangrove species within and outside of their natural range (i.e., native and non-native species, respectively). To characterize plant stress, we measured tree defoliation and chlorophyll fluorescence approximately one month following the chilling event. To quantify recovery, we measured chlorophyll fluorescence approximately nine months after the chilling event. Our results show high variation in the geographic- and species-specific responses of mangroves to winter temperature extremes. While many species were sensitive to the chilling temperatures (e.g., Bruguiera sexangula and species in the Sonneratia and Rhizophora genera), the temperatures during this event were not cold enough to affect certain species (e.g., Kandelia obovata, Aegiceras corniculatum, Avicennia marina, and Bruguiera gymnorrhiza). As expected, non-native species were less tolerant of winter temperature extremes than native species. Interestingly, tidal inundation modulated the effects of chilling. In comparison with other temperature-controlled mangrove range limits across the world, the mangrove range limit in China is unique due to the combination of the following three factors: (1) Mangrove species diversity is comparatively high; (2) winter air temperature extremes, rather than means, are particularly intense and play an important ecological

  7. Variability of Winter Air Temperature in Mid-Latitude Europe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otterman, J.; Ardizzone, J.; Atlas, R.; Bungato, D.; Cierniewski, J.; Jusem, J. C.; Przybylak, R.; Schubert, S.; Starr, D.; Walczewski, J.

    2002-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to report extreme winter/early-spring air temperature (hereinafter temperature) anomalies in mid-latitude Europe, and to discuss the underlying forcing to these interannual fluctuations. Warm advection from the North Atlantic in late winter controls the surface-air temperature, as indicated by the substantial correlation between the speed of the surface southwesterlies over the eastern North Atlantic (quantified by a specific Index Ina) and the 2-meter level air temperatures (hereinafter Ts) over Europe, 45-60 deg N, in winter. In mid-March and subsequently, the correlation drops drastically (quite often it is negative). This change in the relationship between Ts and Ina marks a transition in the control of the surface-air temperature: absorption of insolation replaces the warm advection as the dominant control. This forcing by maritime-air advection in winter was demonstrated in a previous publication, and is re-examined here in conjunction with extreme fluctuations of temperatures in Europe. We analyze here the interannual variability at its extreme by comparing warm-winter/early-spring of 1989/90 with the opposite scenario in 1995/96. For these two December-to-March periods the differences in the monthly mean temperature in Warsaw and Torun, Poland, range above 10 C. Short-term (shorter than a month) fluctuations of the temperature are likewise very strong. We conduct pentad-by-pentad analysis of the surface-maximum air temperature (hereinafter Tmax), in a selected location, examining the dependence on Ina. The increased cloudiness and higher amounts of total precipitable water, corollary effects to the warm low-level advection. in the 1989/90 winter, enhance the positive temperature anomalies. The analysis of the ocean surface winds is based on the Special Sensor Microwave/Imager (SSM/I) dataset; ascent rates, and over land wind data are from the European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF); maps of 2-m temperature, cloud

  8. Evaluation of winter temperatures on apple budbreak using grafted twigs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernando José Hawerroth

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Temperature is the main climate factor related to induction, maintenance and dormancy release in apple (Malus domestica Borkh.. The inadequate chilling exposure in apples causes budbreak problems, resulting in decrease in yield potential. Thus, the knowledge of physiological principles and environmental factors determining the dormancy phenomenon, especially winter temperature effects, it is necessary for the efficient selection of cultivars in a productive region. In addition, it is indispensable to adapt the orchard management aiming to decrease the problems caused by lack chilling during winter. The objective of this study was to evaluate the influence of different thermal conditions during the dormancy period on budbreak of apple cultivars. One-year-old twigs of 'Castel Gala' and 'Royal Gala' cultivars, grafted on M7 rootstock, were submitted to temperatures of 5, 10 and 15ºC for different exposure periods (168; 336; 672; 1,008 and 1,344 hours. After treatments execution, the plants were kept in a greenhouse at 25ºC. Budbreak was quantified when accumulated 3,444; 6,888; 10,332; 13,776; 17,220 and 20,664 GDHºC after temperature treatments. The cultivars responded differently to temperature effect during the winter period. The temperature of 15ºC during winter shows a greater effectiveness on 'Castel Gala' apple budbreak while in the 'Royal Gala' apples the temperatures of 5 and 10ºC show better performance. 'Castel Gala' cultivar (low chilling requirement may supply its physiological necessities, may be capable to budburst, even when subjected to higher temperatures in relation to 'Royal Gala' apples (high chilling requirement.

  9. Toward enabling winter occupations: testing a winter coat designed for older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Stephanie L; Boger, Jennifer N; Mihailidis, Alex

    2011-02-01

    Previous research indicates that older adults have difficulties using winter clothing, which contributes to their risk of isolation during winter. Research has also shown that a winter coat that requires less flexibility, strength, and dexterity would help support this population. This pilot study evaluated the measured and perceived effectiveness of a winter coat prototype that had a funnel sleeve design. Eight older adults trialed three coats (the participant's own coat, a coat fitted with sleeve gripper, and the prototype coat), which were evaluated though shoulder range of motion measurements and by the participant completing a survey. Less shoulder range of motion was used to put on the prototype coat. Survey findings support range of motion data that Sleeve Gripper has limited utility. A funnel sleeve design may require less range of motion at the shoulder compared to other coats.

  10. Seasonal prediction skill of winter temperature over North India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiwari, P. R.; Kar, S. C.; Mohanty, U. C.; Dey, S.; Kumari, S.; Sinha, P.

    2016-04-01

    The climatology, amplitude error, phase error, and mean square skill score (MSSS) of temperature predictions from five different state-of-the-art general circulation models (GCMs) have been examined for the winter (December-January-February) seasons over North India. In this region, temperature variability affects the phenological development processes of wheat crops and the grain yield. The GCM forecasts of temperature for a whole season issued in November from various organizations are compared with observed gridded temperature data obtained from the India Meteorological Department (IMD) for the period 1982-2009. The MSSS indicates that the models have skills of varying degrees. Predictions of maximum and minimum temperature obtained from the National Centers for Environmental Prediction (NCEP) climate forecast system model (NCEP_CFSv2) are compared with station level observations from the Snow and Avalanche Study Establishment (SASE). It has been found that when the model temperatures are corrected to account the bias in the model and actual orography, the predictions are able to delineate the observed trend compared to the trend without orography correction.

  11. NAO influence on extreme winter temperatures in Madrid (Spain)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prieto, L.; Garcia, R.; Hernandez, E.; Teso, T. del [Dept. Fisica de la Tierra II, Fac. CC. Fisicas, Univ. Complutense de Madrid (Spain); Diaz, J. [Centro Universitario de Salud Publica, Univ. Autonoma de Madrid (Spain)

    2002-12-01

    Extremely cold days (ECDs), with minimum temperatures lower than -4.6 C, have been analysed for Madrid. This threshold corresponds to the 5th percentile of the period 1963-1999. Adopting a case analysis approach, five synoptic patterns have been identified that produce these extremely low temperatures. Three of them are associated with cold air flows over the Iberian Peninsula, and the other two with a lack of significant circulation over the region. A non-linear association with the North Atlantic oscillation (NAO) has been identified using log-linear models. The NAO positive phase leads to an increase in the winter frequency of those synoptic patterns associated with stagnant air flow over Iberia, while those characterised by cold, northern flows do not appear to be similarly influenced. (orig.)

  12. Specifics of soil temperature under winter oilseed rape canopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krčmářová, Jana; Středa, Tomáš; Pokorný, Radovan

    2014-09-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the course of soil temperature under the winter oilseed rape canopy and to determine relationships between soil temperature, air temperature and partly soil moisture. In addition, the aim was to describe the dependence by means of regression equations usable for pests and pathogens prediction, crop development, and yields models. The measurement of soil and near the ground air temperatures was performed at the experimental field Žabiče (South Moravia, the Czech Republic). The course of temperature was determined under or in the winter oilseed rape canopy during spring growth season in the course of four years (2010 - 2012 and 2014). In all years, the standard varieties (Petrol, Sherpa) were grown, in 2014 the semi-dwarf variety PX104 was added. Automatic soil sensors were positioned at three depths (0.05, 0.10 and 0.20 m) under soil surface, air temperature sensors in 0.05 m above soil surfaces. The course of soil temperature differs significantly between standard (Sherpa and Petrol) and semi-dwarf (PX104) varieties. Results of the cross correlation analysis showed, that the best interrelationships between air and soil temperature were achieved in 2 hours delay for the soil temperature in 0.05 m, 4 hour delay for 0.10 m and 7 hour delay for 0.20 m for standard varieties. For semi-dwarf variety, this delay reached 6 hour for the soil temperature in 0.05 m, 7 hour delay for 0.10 m and 11 hour for 0.20 m. After the time correction, the determination coefficient (R2) reached values from 0.67 to 0.95 for 0.05 m, 0.50 to 0.84 for 0.10 m in variety Sherpa during all experimental years. For variety PX104 this coefficient reached values from 0.51 to 0.72 in 0.05 m depth and from 0.39 to 0.67 in 0.10 m depth in the year 2014. The determination coefficient in the 0.20 m depth was lower for both varieties; its values were from 0.15 to 0.65 in variety Sherpa. In variety PX104 the values of R2 from 0.23 to 0.57 were determined. When using

  13. High temperature pipeline design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Greenslade, J.G. [Colt Engineering, Calgary, AB (Canada). Pipelines Dept.; Nixon, J.F. [Nixon Geotech Ltd., Calgary, AB (Canada); Dyck, D.W. [Stress Tech Engineering Inc., Calgary, AB (Canada)

    2004-07-01

    It is impractical to transport bitumen and heavy oil by pipelines at ambient temperature unless diluents are added to reduce the viscosity. A diluted bitumen pipeline is commonly referred to as a dilbit pipeline. The diluent routinely used is natural gas condensate. Since natural gas condensate is limited in supply, it must be recovered and reused at high cost. This paper presented an alternative to the use of diluent to reduce the viscosity of heavy oil or bitumen. The following two basic design issues for a hot bitumen (hotbit) pipeline were presented: (1) modelling the restart problem, and, (2) establishing the maximum practical operating temperature. The transient behaviour during restart of a high temperature pipeline carrying viscous fluids was modelled using the concept of flow capacity. Although the design conditions were hypothetical, they could be encountered in the Athabasca oilsands. It was shown that environmental disturbances occur when the fluid is cooled during shut down because the ground temperature near the pipeline rises. This can change growing conditions, even near deeply buried insulated pipelines. Axial thermal loads also constrain the design and operation of a buried pipeline as higher operating temperatures are considered. As such, strain based design provides the opportunity to design for higher operating temperature than allowable stress based design methods. Expansion loops can partially relieve the thermal stress at a given temperature. As the design temperature increase, there is a point at which above grade pipelines become attractive options, although the materials and welding procedures must be suitable for low temperature service. 3 refs., 1 tab., 10 figs.

  14. Sustainable winter cities: Future directions for planning, policy and design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pressman, Norman E. P.

    Attempts to generate a "climate-responsive" northern urban form are part of a relatively recent phenomenon and field of investigation. In conjunction with the international "winter cities" movement, the need has been established for explicit, systematic inquiry directed toward national and local action to improve the comfort and lifestyles of all northern inhabitants. It is important to recognize that winter-induced discomforts exist and that they must be acknowledged in planning theory and practice. For northern cities to function more satisfactorily, the negative impacts of winter must be reduced while its beneficial characteristics are enhanced. While not all summer activities can or should be abandoned during winter, proper micro-climatic control is essential if human life is to be retained outside. The outdoor season should be extended since so much indoor isolation occurs. The main principles to be incorporated in exemplary "winter city" design should be contact with nature, year-round usability, user participation, cultural continuity, and the creation of comfortable micro-climatic conditions throughout much of the city's open spaces. All valuable sources of inspiration must be harnessed in the attempt to mediate between organic regionalism and internationalism, on the one hand, and romanticism and pragmatic realism, on the other. Creating optimum conditions for human well-being, habitation, work and intellectual development in each of the four seasons is vital under harsh environments. Adopting a climate-sensitive approach to planning policy and urban design can render everyday life less stressful, especially during the lengthy winter periods found in many northern latitude and high altitude settings.

  15. Hillslope runoff temperatures and their influence on winter stream temperature for a coastal forested catchment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leach, J. A.; Moore, R. D.; McKenzie, J. M.

    2013-12-01

    Stream temperature dynamics during winter have been understudied compared to summer thermal regimes, but the winter season thermal regime can be critical for fish growth and development in coastal catchments. Our previous research revealed that the advective energy input associated with hillslope runoff overwhelms the effects of energy exchanges at the stream surface in a forested headwater catchment, and that the temperature of hillslope runoff varies substantially in space and time. The objective of this study was to examine the dominant controls on the spatiotemporal variability of hillslope runoff temperatures as a basis for developing a process-based stream temperature predictive model. Field work was conducted at a forested headwater catchment located in the rain-on-snow zone near Vancouver, British Columbia, during the winters of 2011/12 and 2012/13. Detailed hydrologic and meteorologic field measurements were made, including hourly subsurface temperature and water table fluctuations at the foot of 40 separate hillslopes with different topographic and geomorphic settings. Data were analysed using both statistical models and by applying the SUTRA numerical groundwater model for physically based simulations of subsurface heat transport. Vertical heat conduction is less important than heat advection associated with lateral flow from upslope on controlling the temperature of runoff discharging into the stream. In addition, hillslope form and shape appear to influence timing of water delivery, and thus heat transport, from hillslope to stream. The SUTRA results, with and without the presence of transient snow cover, highlight that transient snow cover has a detectable cooling influence on subsurface temperatures. These results demonstrate that hillslope runoff processes and snow dynamics must be considered when predicting the influence of climate and land cover changes on winter stream temperatures in coastal headwater catchments.

  16. Operational forecasting of daily temperatures in the Valencia Region. Part II: minimum temperatures in winter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez, I.; Estrela, M.

    2009-09-01

    Extreme temperature events have a great impact on human society. Knowledge of minimum temperatures during winter is very useful for both the general public and organisations whose workers have to operate in the open, e.g. railways, roadways, tourism, etc. Moreover, winter minimum temperatures are considered a parameter of interest and concern since persistent cold-waves can affect areas as diverse as public health, energy consumption, etc. Thus, an accurate forecasting of these temperatures could help to predict cold-wave conditions and permit the implementation of strategies aimed at minimizing the negative effects that low temperatures have on human health. The aim of this work is to evaluate the skill of the RAMS model in determining daily minimum temperatures during winter over the Valencia Region. For this, we have used the real-time configuration of this model currently running at the CEAM Foundation. To carry out the model verification process, we have analysed not only the global behaviour of the model for the whole Valencia Region, but also its behaviour for the individual stations distributed within this area. The study has been performed for the winter forecast period from 1 December 2007 - 31 March 2008. The results obtained are encouraging and indicate a good agreement between the observed and simulated minimum temperatures. Moreover, the model captures quite well the temperatures in the extreme cold episodes. Acknowledgement. This work was supported by "GRACCIE" (CSD2007-00067, Programa Consolider-Ingenio 2010), by the Spanish Ministerio de Educación y Ciencia, contract number CGL2005-03386/CLI, and by the Regional Government of Valencia Conselleria de Sanitat, contract "Simulación de las olas de calor e invasiones de frío y su regionalización en la Comunidad Valenciana" ("Heat wave and cold invasion simulation and their regionalization at Valencia Region"). The CEAM Foundation is supported by the Generalitat Valenciana and BANCAIXA (Valencia

  17. Winter soil warming exacerbates the impacts of spring low temperature stress on wheat

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li, Xiangnan; Jiang, D.; Liu, Fulai

    2016-01-01

    The increase in global mean air temperature is likely to affect the soil temperatures in agricultural areas. This study aims to study the effects of winter soil warming on the responses of wheat to low temperature stress in spring. Wheat plants were grown under either normal or increased soil...... temperature by 2.5 °C for 82 days in winter. The physiological and yield responses of the plants to a 2-day low temperature stress (4/2 °C in the day/night) at jointing stage were investigated. After exposing to low spring temperature, the plants that had experienced winter soil warming showed lower leaf...... and root water potential, lower oxygen scavenging capacity and poor photosynthetic performance as compared with the plants grown under normal soil temperature during winter. WL plants had significantly lower sugar content in shoot than the CL plants, which might have contributed to their higher...

  18. Upper lethal temperatures in three cold-tolerant insects are higher in winter than in summer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vu, Henry M; Duman, John G

    2017-08-01

    Upper lethal temperatures (ULTs) of cold-adapted insect species in winter have not been previously examined. We anticipated that as the lower lethal temperatures (LLTs) decreased (by 20-30°C) with the onset of winter, the ULTs would also decrease accordingly. Consequently, given the recent increases in winter freeze-thaw cycles and warmer winters due to climate change, it became of interest to determine whether ambient temperatures during thaws were approaching ULTs during the cold seasons. However, beetle Dendroides canadensis (Coleoptera: Pyrochroidae) larvae had higher 24 and 48 h ULT 50 (the temperature at which 50% mortality occurred) in winter than in summer. The 24 and 48 h ULT 50 for D. canadensis in winter were 40.9 and 38.7°C, respectively. For D. canadensis in summer, the 24 and 48 h ULT 50 were 36.7 and 36.4°C. During the transition periods of spring and autumn, the 24 h ULT 50 was 37.3 and 38.5°C, respectively. While D. canadensis in winter had a 24 h LT 50 range between LLT and ULT of 64°C, the summer range was only 41°C. Additionally, larvae of the beetle Cucujus clavipes clavipes (Coleoptera: Cucujidae) and the cranefly Tipula trivittata (Diptera: Tipulidae) also had higher ULTs in winter than in summer. This unexpected phenomenon of increased temperature survivorship at both lower and higher temperatures in the winter compared with that in the summer has not been previously documented. With the decreased high temperature tolerance as the season progresses from winter to summer, it was observed that environmental temperatures are closest to upper lethal temperatures in spring. © 2017. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  19. European seasonal mortality and influenza incidence due to winter temperature variability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodó, X.; Ballester, J.; Robine, J. M.; Herrmann, F. R.

    2017-12-01

    Recent studies have vividly emphasized the lack of consensus on the degree of vulnerability (sensu IPCC) of European societies to current and future winter temperatures. Here we consider several climate factors, influenza incidence and daily numbers of deaths to characterize the relationship between winter temperature and mortality in a very large ensemble of European regions representing more than 400 million people. Analyses highlight the strong association between the year-to-year fluctuations in winter mean temperature and mortality, with higher seasonal cases during harsh winters, in all of the countries except the United Kingdom, the Netherlands and Belgium. This spatial distribution contrasts with the well-documented latitudinal orientation of the dependency between daily temperature and mortality within the season. A theoretical framework is proposed to reconcile the apparent contradictions between recent studies, offering an interpretation to regional differences in the vulnerability to daily, seasonal and long-term winter temperature variability. Despite the lack of a strong year-to-year association between winter mean values in some countries, it can be concluded that warmer winters will contribute to the decrease in winter mortality everywhere in Europe. More information in Ballester J, et al. (2016) Nature Climate Change 6, 927-930, doi:10.1038/NCLIMATE3070.

  20. The responses of microbial temperature relationships to seasonal change and winter warming in a temperate grassland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birgander, Johanna; Olsson, Pål Axel; Rousk, Johannes

    2018-01-18

    Microorganisms dominate the decomposition of organic matter and their activities are strongly influenced by temperature. As the carbon (C) flux from soil to the atmosphere due to microbial activity is substantial, understanding temperature relationships of microbial processes is critical. It has been shown that microbial temperature relationships in soil correlate with the climate, and microorganisms in field experiments become more warm-tolerant in response to chronic warming. It is also known that microbial temperature relationships reflect the seasons in aquatic ecosystems, but to date this has not been investigated in soil. Although climate change predictions suggest that temperatures will be mostly affected during winter in temperate ecosystems, no assessments exist of the responses of microbial temperature relationships to winter warming. We investigated the responses of the temperature relationships of bacterial growth, fungal growth, and respiration in a temperate grassland to seasonal change, and to 2 years' winter warming. The warming treatments increased winter soil temperatures by 5-6°C, corresponding to 3°C warming of the mean annual temperature. Microbial temperature relationships and temperature sensitivities (Q 10 ) could be accurately established, but did not respond to winter warming or to seasonal temperature change, despite significant shifts in the microbial community structure. The lack of response to winter warming that we demonstrate, and the strong response to chronic warming treatments previously shown, together suggest that it is the peak annual soil temperature that influences the microbial temperature relationships, and that temperatures during colder seasons will have little impact. Thus, mean annual temperatures are poor predictors for microbial temperature relationships. Instead, the intensity of summer heat-spells in temperate systems is likely to shape the microbial temperature relationships that govern the soil-atmosphere C

  1. Impact of the Dominant Large-scale Teleconnections on Winter Temperature Variability over East Asia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Young-Kwon; Kim, Hae-Dong

    2013-01-01

    Monthly mean geopotential height for the past 33 DJF seasons archived in Modern Era Retrospective analysis for Research and Applications reanalysis is decomposed into the large-scale teleconnection patterns to explain their impacts on winter temperature variability over East Asia. Following Arctic Oscillation (AO) that explains the largest variance, East Atlantic/West Russia (EA/WR), West Pacific (WP) and El Nino-Southern Oscillation (ENSO) are identified as the first four leading modes that significantly explain East Asian winter temperature variation. While the northern part of East Asia north of 50N is prevailed by AO and EA/WR impacts, temperature in the midlatitudes (30N-50N), which include Mongolia, northeastern China, Shandong area, Korea, and Japan, is influenced by combined effect of the four leading teleconnections. ENSO impact on average over 33 winters is relatively weaker than the impact of the other three teleconnections. WP impact, which has received less attention than ENSO in earlier studies, characterizes winter temperatures over Korea, Japan, and central to southern China region south of 30N mainly by advective process from the Pacific. Upper level wave activity fluxes reveal that, for the AO case, the height and circulation anomalies affecting midlatitude East Asian winter temperature is mainly located at higher latitudes north of East Asia. Distribution of the fluxes also explains that the stationary wave train associated with EA/WR propagates southeastward from the western Russia, affecting the East Asian winter temperature. Investigation on the impact of each teleconnection for the selected years reveals that the most dominant teleconnection over East Asia is not the same at all years, indicating a great deal of interannual variability. Comparison in temperature anomaly distributions between observation and temperature anomaly constructed using the combined effect of four leading teleconnections clearly show a reasonable consistency between

  2. Winter feeding activity of the common starfish (Asterias rubens L.): The role of temperature and shading

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agüera, Antonio; Trommelen, Michel; Burrows, Frances; Jansen, Jeroen M.; Schellekens, Tim; Smaal, Aad

    2012-08-01

    In the Wadden Sea common starfish is an important predator of mussel beds which in turn are relevant ecological and economic resource. To improve the management of mussel seedbeds, knowledge is required on over winter predation, a factor affecting mussel survival. The aim of this study was to assess the importance of A. rubens feeding activity during winter and how it relates with changes in temperature. Feeding activity of starfish was monitored during a full winter. The potential impact of temperature change on starfish-mussel seed interactions during winter was analysed. The factor shading was included, as changes in light intensity appear to be a primary governing factor for the timing of feeding activity. The results showed that temperature limits feeding rate and feeding activity of starfish during winter. However, starfish feeding rate exhibited very high sensitivity to temperature changes. Light intensity affected both feeding rate and feeding activity. It is concluded that starfish may not be an important factor destabilising seedbeds during a mean winter, but its importance may grow along with the increasing temperature due to climate change.

  3. Adaptive temperature regulation in the little bird in winter: predictions from a stochastic dynamic programming model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brodin, Anders; Nilsson, Jan-Åke; Nord, Andreas

    2017-09-01

    Several species of small birds are resident in boreal forests where environmental temperatures can be -20 to -30 °C, or even lower, in winter. As winter days are short, and food is scarce, winter survival is a challenge for small endothermic animals. A bird of this size will have to gain almost 10% of its lean body mass in fat every day to sustain overnight metabolism. Birds such as parids (titmice and chickadees) can use facultative hypothermia, a process in which body temperature is actively down-regulated to a specific level, to reduce heat loss and thus save energy. During cold winter nights, these birds may decrease body temperature from the normal from 42 ° down to 35 °C, or even lower in some species. However, birds are unable to move in this deep hypothermic state, making it a risky strategy if predators are around. Why, then, do small northern birds enter a potentially dangerous physiological state for a relatively small reduction in energy expenditure? We used stochastic dynamic programming to investigate this. Our model suggests that the use of nocturnal hypothermia at night is paramount in these biomes, as it would increase winter survival for a small northern bird by 58% over a winter of 100 days. Our model also explains the phenomenon known as winter fattening, and its relationship to thermoregulation, in northern birds.

  4. Surface Temperatures on Titan During Northern Winter and Spring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jennings, D. E.; Cottini, V.; Nixon, C. A.; Achterberg, R. K.; Flasar, F. M.; Kunde ,V. G.; Romani, P. N.; Samuelson, R. E.; Mamoutkine, A.; Gorius, N. J. P.; hide

    2016-01-01

    Meridional brightness temperatures were measured on the surface of Titan during the 2004-2014 portion of the Cassini mission by the Composite Infrared Spectrometer. Temperatures mapped from pole to pole during five two year periods show a marked seasonal dependence. The surface temperature near the south pole over this time decreased by 2 K from 91.7 plus or minus 0.3 to 89.7 plus or minus 0.5 K while at the north pole the temperature increased by 1 K from 90.7 plus or minus 0.5 to 91.5 plus or minus 0.2 K. The latitude of maximum temperature moved from 19 S to 16 N, tracking the subsolar latitude. As the latitude changed, the maximum temperature remained constant at 93.65 plus or minus 0.15 K. In 2010 our temperatures repeated the north-south symmetry seen by Voyager one Titan year earlier in 1980. Early in the mission, temperatures at all latitudes had agreed with GCM predictions, but by 2014 temperatures in the north were lower than modeled by 1 K. The temperature rise in the north may be delayed by cooling of sea surfaces and moist ground brought on by seasonal methane precipitation and evaporation.

  5. SURFACE TEMPERATURES ON TITAN DURING NORTHERN WINTER AND SPRING

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jennings, D. E.; Cottini, V.; Nixon, C. A.; Achterberg, R. K.; Flasar, F. M.; Kunde, V. G.; Romani, P. N.; Samuelson, R. E. [Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Mamoutkine, A. [ADNET Systems, Inc., Bethesda, MD 20817 (United States); Gorius, N. J. P. [The Catholic University of America, Washington, DC 20064 (United States); Coustenis, A. [Laboratoire d’Etudes Spatiales et d’Instrumentation en Astrophysique (LESIA), Observatoire de Paris, CNRS, UPMC Univ. Paris 06, Univ. Paris-Diderot, 5, place Jules Janssen, F-92195 Meudon Cedex (France); Tokano, T., E-mail: donald.e.jennings@nasa.gov [Universität zu Köln, Albertus-Magnus-Platz, D-50923 Köln (Germany)

    2016-01-01

    Meridional brightness temperatures were measured on the surface of Titan during the 2004–2014 portion of the Cassini mission by the Composite Infrared Spectrometer. Temperatures mapped from pole to pole during five two-year periods show a marked seasonal dependence. The surface temperature near the south pole over this time decreased by 2 K from 91.7 ± 0.3 to 89.7 ± 0.5 K while at the north pole the temperature increased by 1 K from 90.7 ± 0.5 to 91.5 ± 0.2 K. The latitude of maximum temperature moved from 19 S to 16 N, tracking the sub-solar latitude. As the latitude changed, the maximum temperature remained constant at 93.65 ± 0.15 K. In 2010 our temperatures repeated the north–south symmetry seen by Voyager one Titan year earlier in 1980. Early in the mission, temperatures at all latitudes had agreed with GCM predictions, but by 2014 temperatures in the north were lower than modeled by 1 K. The temperature rise in the north may be delayed by cooling of sea surfaces and moist ground brought on by seasonal methane precipitation and evaporation.

  6. Body temperature responses to handling stress in wintering Black-capped Chickadees (Poecile atricapillus L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewden, Agnès; Nord, Andreas; Petit, Magali; Vézina, François

    2017-10-01

    Body temperature variation in response to acute stress is typically characterized by peripheral vasoconstriction and a concomitant increase in core body temperature (stress-induced hyperthermia). It is poorly understood how this response differs between species and within individuals of the same species, and how it is affected by the environment. We therefore investigated stress-induced body temperature changes in a non-model species, the Black-capped Chickadee, in two environmental conditions: outdoors in low ambient temperature (mean: -6.6°C), and indoors, in milder ambient temperature close to thermoneutrality (mean: 18.7°C). Our results show that the change in body temperature in response to the same handling stressor differs in these conditions. In cold environments, we noted a significant decrease in core body temperature (-2.9°C), whereas the response in mild indoor conditions was weak and non-significant (-0.6°C). Heat loss in outdoor birds was exacerbated when birds were handled for longer time. This may highlight the role of behavioral thermoregulation and heat substitution from activity to body temperature maintenance in harsh condition. Importantly, our work also indicates that changes in the physical properties of the bird during handling (conductive cooling from cold hands, decreased insulation from compression of plumage and prevention of ptiloerection) may have large consequences for thermoregulation. This might explain why females, the smaller sex, lost more heat than males in the experiment. Because physiological and physical changes during handling may carry over to affect predation risk and maintenance of energy balance during short winter days, we advice caution when designing experimental protocols entailing prolonged handling of small birds in cold conditions. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Use of objective analysis to estimate winter temperature and ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    characterized by mild temperatures and deep snow pack. The middle climatic zone has snow climate similar to that of continental snow climate and is characterized by very low temperature and shallow snow pack. The weather on various regions/road axes of Himalaya is monitored by various obser- vatories in each of the ...

  8. Winter temperature conditions (1670-2010) reconstructed from varved sediments, western Canadian High Arctic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amann, Benjamin; Lamoureux, Scott F.; Boreux, Maxime P.

    2017-09-01

    Advances in paleoclimatology from the Arctic have provided insights into long-term climate conditions. However, while past annual and summer temperature have received considerable research attention, comparatively little is known about winter paleoclimate. Arctic winter is of special interest as it is the season with the highest sensitivity to climate change, and because it differs substantially from summer and annual measures. Therefore, information about past changes in winter climate is key to improve our knowledge of past forced climate variability and to reduce uncertainty in climate projections. In this context, Arctic lakes with snowmelt-fed catchments are excellent potential winter climate archives. They respond strongly to snowmelt-induced runoff, and indirectly to winter temperature and snowfall conditions. To date, only a few well-calibrated lake sediment records exist, which appear to reflect site-specific responses with differing reconstructions. This limits the possibility to resolve large-scale winter climate change prior the instrumental period. Here, we present a well-calibrated quantitative temperature and snowfall record for the extended winter season (November through March; NDJFM) from Chevalier Bay (Melville Island, NWT, Canadian Arctic) back to CE 1670. The coastal embayment has a large catchment influenced by nival terrestrial processes, which leads to high sedimentation rates and annual sedimentary structures (varves). Using detailed microstratigraphic analysis from two sediment cores and supported by μ-XRF data, we separated the nival sedimentary units (spring snowmelt) from the rainfall units (summer) and identified subaqueous slumps. Statistical correlation analysis between the proxy data and monthly climate variables reveals that the thickness of the nival units can be used to predict winter temperature (r = 0.71, pc climate research such as data-model comparisons and proxy-data assimilation in climate model simulations.

  9. The impact of atmospheric ammonia and temperature on growth and nitrogen metabolism of winter wheat

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Clement, J.M A M; Loorbach, J; Meijer, J; van Hasselt, P.R; Stulen, G

    The effect of atmospheric ammonia in combination with low and moderate growth temperature on growth and nitrogen metabolism of winter wheat plants (Triticum aestivum L. cv. Urban) was investigated. Plants were exposed to 0, 1000 and 2000 nl l(-1) NH3 for 1 week at moderate day/night temperatures

  10. Nutrient losses from Fall and Winter-applied manure: Effects of timing and soil temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soil temperature is a major environmental factor that affects both the infiltration of meltwater and precipitation, and nutrient cycling. The objectives of this study were to determine nutrient losses in runoff and leachate from fall and winter-applied dairy manure based on the soil temperature at t...

  11. Crop growth and nitrogen turnover under increased temperatures and low autumn and winter light intensity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Ingrid Kaag; Lægdsmand, Mette; Olesen, Jørgen E

    2010-01-01

    a soil cover of winter wheat or a ryegrass catch crop would be able to take up the extra N mineralized during autumn and winter under the low light conditions in Northern Europe, both at current average temperatures (T0) and at 4 °C (T+4) and 8 °C (T+8) above average. The crops were grown in pots...... pots in November, December and February. Reference pots with bare soil were included. N mineralization clearly increased with higher temperatures with, respectively, 22% and 80% more N mineralized in bare soil at T+4 and T+8 than at T0 after 136 days. The ryegrass catch crop emptied the soil......The rise in mean annual temperatures under the projected climate change will affect both soil organic matter turnover and cropping patterns in agriculture. Nitrogen (N) mineralization may be higher during autumn and winter and may increase the risk of nitrate leaching. Our study tested whether...

  12. Winter temperature affects the prevalence of ticks in an Arctic seabird.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sébastien Descamps

    Full Text Available The Arctic is rapidly warming and host-parasite relationships may be modified by such environmental changes. Here, I showed that the average winter temperature in Svalbard, Arctic Norway, explained almost 90% of the average prevalence of ticks in an Arctic seabird, the Brünnich's guillemot Uria lomvia. An increase of 1°C in the average winter temperature at the nesting colony site was associated with a 5% increase in the number of birds infected by these ectoparasites in the subsequent breeding season. Guillemots were generally infested by only a few ticks (≤5 and I found no direct effect of tick presence on their body condition and breeding success. However, the strong effect of average winter temperature described here clearly indicates that tick-seabird relationships in the Arctic may be strongly affected by ongoing climate warming.

  13. Surface layer temperature inversion in the Arabian Sea during winter

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Pankajakshan, T.; Ghosh, A.K.

    picture of the actual inversion phenomena occurring in this area. Figure 1 illustrates the procedure adopted in finding the inversion stations. If the temperature difference (Del T) obtained from (T U –T L ) is greater than 0.2°C, then the station... is more or less consistent. Figure 3-A shows the frequency distribution of temperature difference of the inversion layer (Del T). Figure 3-B shows the frequency distribution of the thickness of the inversion layers in meters (Di). Del T is distributed over...

  14. Use of objective analysis to estimate winter temperature and ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    improved physical realism in this technique. 4. Conclusion. Barnes objective analysis has been used to inter- polate irregularly distributed station observations to the specific locations. In addition to the station interpolations, corrections based on temperature- elevation and precipitation-elevation have been employed.

  15. The minimum temperatures in the winter 2006/07 in Slovenian frost hollows and cold basins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matej Ogrin

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available The members of Slovenian Meteorological Forum, Department of Geography at University of Ljubljana and Slovenian Forestry Institute started to measure temperatures in Slovenian frost hollows and cold basins in 2004. The measurements, which improved during the period 2004.2006, continued also in the winter 2006.2007, all together, in more than 30 frost hollows and cold basins Alpine, Dinaridic and even Submediterranean areas. Although the winter 2006/2007 was very mild, minimum temperatures in frost hollow Hribarice fell below -35°C.

  16. Intensity, frequency and spatial configuration of winter temperature inversions in the closed La Brevine valley, Switzerland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vitasse, Yann; Klein, Geoffrey; Kirchner, James W.; Rebetez, Martine

    2017-11-01

    Some of the world's valleys are famous for having particularly cold microclimates. The La Brevine valley, in the Swiss Jura Mountains, holds the record for the lowest temperature ever measured in an inhabited location in Switzerland. We studied cold air pools (CAPs) in this valley during the winter of 2014-2015 using 44 temperature data loggers distributed between 1033 and 1293 m asl. Our goals were to (i) describe the climatic conditions under which CAPs form in the valley, (ii) examine the spatial configuration and the temperature structure of the CAPs and (iii) quantify how often temperature inversions occur in winter using long-term series of temperature from the valley floor. Our results show that CAPs occurred every second night, on average, during the winter of 2014-2015 and were typically formed under cloudless, windless and high-pressure conditions. Strong temperature inversions up to 28 °C were detected between the valley floor and the surrounding hills. The spatial temperature structure of the CAPs varies among the different inversion days, with the upper boundary of the cold pool generally situated at about 1150 m asl. Although mean temperatures have increased in this area over the period 1960-2015 in connection with climate change, the occurrences of extreme cold temperatures did not decrease in winter and are highly correlated with the North Atlantic Oscillation and the East Atlantic indices. This suggests that CAPs in sheltered valleys are largely decoupled from the free atmosphere temperature and will likely continue to occur in the next decades under warmer conditions.

  17. Variability of Diurnal Temperature Range During Winter Over Western Himalaya: Range- and Altitude-Wise Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shekhar, M. S.; Devi, Usha; Dash, S. K.; Singh, G. P.; Singh, Amreek

    2018-04-01

    The current trends in diurnal temperature range, maximum temperature, minimum temperature, mean temperature, and sun shine hours over different ranges and altitudes of Western Himalaya during winter have been studied. Analysis of 25 years of data shows an increasing trend in diurnal temperature range over all the ranges and altitudes of Western Himalaya during winter, thereby confirming regional warming of the region due to present climate change and global warming. Statistical studies show significant increasing trend in maximum temperature over all the ranges and altitudes of Western Himalaya. Minimum temperature shows significant decreasing trend over Pir Panjal and Shamshawari range and significant increasing trend over higher altitude of Western Himalaya. Similarly, sunshine hours show significant decreasing trend over Karakoram range. There exists strong positive correlation between diurnal temperature range and maximum temperature for all the ranges and altitudes of Western Himalaya. Strong negative correlation exists between diurnal temperature range and minimum temperature over Shamshawari and Great Himalaya range and lower altitude of Western Himalaya. Sunshine hours show strong positive correlation with diurnal temperature range over Pir Panjal and Great Himalaya range and lower and higher altitudes.

  18. Development of frost tolerance in winter wheat as modulated by differential root and shoot temperature

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Windt, C.W.; van Hasselt, P.R

    Winter wheat plants (Triticum aestivum L. cv. Urban), grown in nutrient solution, were exposed to differential shoot/root temperatures (i.e., 4/4, 4/20, 20/4 and 20/20 degrees C) for six weeks. Leaves grown at 4 degrees C showed an increase in frost tolerance from - 4 degrees C down to -11 degrees

  19. Temperature does not dictate the wintering distributions of European dabbling duck species

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dalby, Lars; Fox, Anthony David; Petersen, Ib Krag

    2013-01-01

    To predict future changes in wintering dabbling duck (Anas sp.) distributions in response to climate change, it is necessary to understand their response to temperature at a continental scale. Food accessibility, competition and thermoregulatory costs are likely to play a major role in determining...

  20. Soil temperature regulates phosphorus loss from lysimeters following fall and winter-applied manure application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Applying manure in the fall and winter increases the potential that some portion of the nutrients will be lost prior to crop uptake in the spring. In order to minimize the risk of nutrient loss, recommendations are often based on soil temperature, since biological activity has been shown to decrease...

  1. Temperature and light dependent modifications of chlorophyll fluorescence kinetics in spruce needles during winter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolhàr-Nordenkampf, H R; Lechner, E G

    1988-11-01

    Prompt chlorophyll a fluorescence kinetics at room temperature were measured from intact spruce needles. The fluorescence signal was recorded after varying light pretreatments. During the winter, induction curves showed characteristic changes in both the initial peak of fluorescence FV/FP (FP-FO/FP) and the steady state level Fdr (FP-FT/FP). Winter stress induced decreases in both values which showed close correlation to the light and temperature pre-history of the plants. In February changes in fluorescence induction indicative of a restoration of photosynthesis were detected and these corresponded to a rise of temperature above zero in combination with low light levels. In March increasing light intensity combined with chilling temperatures induced again decreases of both values of chlorophyll fluorescence induction suggesting the occurrence of photoinhibition.

  2. Survival of rapidly fluctuating natural low winter temperatures by High Arctic soil invertebrates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Convey, Peter; Abbandonato, Holly; Bergan, Frode

    2015-01-01

    The extreme polar environment creates challenges for its resident invertebrate communities and the stress tolerance of some of these animals has been examined over many years. However, although it is well appreciated that standard air temperature records often fail to describe accurately conditions...... experienced at microhabitat level, few studies have explicitly set out to link field conditions experienced by natural multispecies communities with the more detailed laboratory ecophysiological studies of a small number of 'representative' species. This is particularly the case during winter, when snow cover...... microhabitats. To assess survival of natural High Arctic soil invertebrate communities contained in soil and vegetation cores to natural winter temperature variations, the overwintering temperatures they experienced were manipulated by deploying cores in locations with varying snow accumulation: No Snow...

  3. The impacts of temperature anomalies and political orientation on perceived winter warming

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCright, Aaron M.; Dunlap, Riley E.; Xiao, Chenyang

    2014-12-01

    Although perceptions of common weather phenomena moderately align with instrumental measurements of such phenomena, the evidence that weather or climatic conditions influence beliefs about anthropogenic climate change is mixed. This study addresses both foci, which are important to scholars who investigate human-environment interactions and observers who expect greater exposure to weather or climate extremes to translate into stronger support for climate change adaptive measures and mitigative policies. We analyse the extent to which state-level winter temperature anomalies influence the likelihood of perceiving local winter temperatures to be warmer than usual and attributing these warmer temperatures mainly to global warming. We show that actual temperature anomalies influence perceived warming but not attribution of such warmer-than-usual winter temperatures to global warming. Rather, the latter is influenced more by perceived scientific agreement; beliefs about the current onset, human cause, threat and seriousness of global warming; and political orientation. This is not surprising given the politicization of climate science and political polarization on climate change beliefs in recent years. These results suggest that personal experience with weather or climate variability may help cultivate support for adaptive measures, but it may not increase support for mitigation policies.

  4. Performance of PV-Trombe wall in winter correlated with south facade design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun, Wei; Ji, Jie; Luo, Chenglong; He, Wei

    2011-01-01

    PV-Trombe wall (PVTW) is a novel version of Trombe-wall. Photovoltaic cells on the cover glazing of the PVTW can convert solar radiation into electricity and heat simultaneously. A window on the south facade can also introduce solar heat into the room in the winter season. Experiment has been conducted to study the temperature field of a building with both southern facing window and the PVTW. A dynamic numerical model is developed for the simulation of the whole building system. The temperature of the indoor air is found to be vertically stratified from the measurement. The nodal model is adopted to calculate the temperature profile in the room. The simulation results are in good agreement with the experimental data. The different south facade designs affect the thermal efficiency of the PVTW significantly from the numerical simulation. With a southern facing window, the thermal efficiency of the PVTW is reduced by 27% relatively. The increase of PV coverage on the glazing can reduce the thermal efficiency of the TW by up to 17%. By taking account of electric conversion, the total efficiency of solar utilization is reduced by 5% at most while the glazing is fully covered with PV cells. The electric conversion efficiency of the PVTW achieves 11.6%, and is slightly affected by south facade designs.

  5. Survival of rapidly fluctuating natural low winter temperatures by High Arctic soil invertebrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Convey, Peter; Abbandonato, Holly; Bergan, Frode; Beumer, Larissa Teresa; Biersma, Elisabeth Machteld; Bråthen, Vegard Sandøy; D'Imperio, Ludovica; Jensen, Christina Kjellerup; Nilsen, Solveig; Paquin, Karolina; Stenkewitz, Ute; Svoen, Mildrid Elvik; Winkler, Judith; Müller, Eike; Coulson, Stephen James

    2015-12-01

    The extreme polar environment creates challenges for its resident invertebrate communities and the stress tolerance of some of these animals has been examined over many years. However, although it is well appreciated that standard air temperature records often fail to describe accurately conditions experienced at microhabitat level, few studies have explicitly set out to link field conditions experienced by natural multispecies communities with the more detailed laboratory ecophysiological studies of a small number of 'representative' species. This is particularly the case during winter, when snow cover may insulate terrestrial habitats from extreme air temperature fluctuations. Further, climate projections suggest large changes in precipitation will occur in the polar regions, with the greatest changes expected during the winter period and, hence, implications for the insulation of overwintering microhabitats. To assess survival of natural High Arctic soil invertebrate communities contained in soil and vegetation cores to natural winter temperature variations, the overwintering temperatures they experienced were manipulated by deploying cores in locations with varying snow accumulation: No Snow, Shallow Snow (30 cm) and Deep Snow (120 cm). Air temperatures during the winter period fluctuated frequently between +3 and -24 °C, and the No Snow soil temperatures reflected this variation closely, with the extreme minimum being slightly lower. Under 30 cm of snow, soil temperatures varied less and did not decrease below -12 °C. Those under deep snow were even more stable and did not decline below -2 °C. Despite these striking differences in winter thermal regimes, there were no clear differences in survival of the invertebrate fauna between treatments, including oribatid, prostigmatid and mesostigmatid mites, Araneae, Collembola, Nematocera larvae or Coleoptera. This indicates widespread tolerance, previously undocumented for the Araneae, Nematocera or Coleoptera, of

  6. The winter trends in air temperature and atmospheric precipitation in the Moldova Region (Romania

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Machidon Ovidiu-Miron

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The study is a comparative analysis of the characteristics of air temperature and atmospheric precipitations in winter seasons from the WMO reference periods (1961 - 1990, 1981 – 2010 compared with last 7 years (2010 – 2016. There is a continuous increase of air temperature in winter, from −2,0°C between 1961-1990, to −1,1°C between 2010-2016, so a heating of 0,9°C. In the last 7 years (2010-2016 the average number of frosty nights (nights with minimum temperature of ≤ −10°C was reduced by 18% compared to the period 1961-1990 and by 3% compared to the period 1981-2010. In the same period (2010 – 2016, the rainfall were higher in winter, respectively by 17% than during 1961-1990 and by 22% than during 1981-2010. There is an increase of torrential character of precipitation, more pronounced in the southern region of Moldova.

  7. The seesaw effect of winter temperature change on the recruitment of cotton bollworms Helicoverpa armigera through mismatched phenology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reddy, Gadi V P; Shi, Peijian; Hui, Cang; Cheng, Xiaofei; Ouyang, Fang; Ge, Feng

    2015-12-01

    Knowing how climate change affects the population dynamics of insect pests is critical for the future of integrated pest management. Rising winter temperatures from global warming can drive increases in outbreaks of some agricultural pests. In contrast, here we propose an alternative hypothesis that both extremely cold and warm winters can mismatch the timing between the eclosion of overwintering pests and the flowering of key host plants. As host plants normally need higher effective cumulative temperatures for flowering than insects need for eclosion, changes in flowering time will be less dramatic than changes in eclosion time, leading to a mismatch of phenology on either side of the optimal winter temperature. We term this the "seesaw effect." Using a long-term dataset of the Old World cotton bollworm Helicoverpa armigera (Hübner) (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae) in northern China, we tested this seesaw hypothesis by running a generalized additive model for the effects of the third generation moth in the preceding year, the winter air temperature, the number of winter days below a critical temperature and cumulative precipitation during winter on the demography of the overwintering moth. Results confirmed the existence of the seesaw effect of winter temperature change on overwintering populations. Pest management should therefore consider the indirect effect of changing crop phenology (whether due to greenhouse cultivation or to climate change) on pest outbreaks. As arthropods from mid- and high latitudes are actually living in a cooler thermal environment than their physiological optimum in contrast to species from lower latitudes, the effects of rising winter temperatures on the population dynamics of arthropods in the different latitudinal zones should be considered separately. The seesaw effect makes it more difficult to predict the average long-term population dynamics of insect pests at high latitudes due to the potential sharp changes in annual growth rates

  8. Spatial and temporal variation in daily temperature indices in summer and winter seasons over India (1969-2012)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Naresh; Jaswal, A. K.; Mohapatra, M.; Kore, P. A.

    2017-08-01

    Spatial and temporal variations in summer and winter extreme temperature indices are studied by using daily maximum and minimum temperatures data from 227 surface meteorological stations well distributed over India for the period 1969-2012. For this purpose, time series for six extreme temperature indices namely, hot days (HD), very hot days (VHD), extremely hot days (EHD), cold nights (CN), very cold nights (VCN), and extremely cold nights (ECN) are calculated for all the stations. In addition, time series for mean extreme temperature indices of summer and winter seasons are also analyzed. Study reveals high variability in spatial distribution of threshold temperatures of extreme temperature indices over the country. In general, increasing trends are observed in summer hot days indices and decreasing trends in winter cold night indices over most parts of the country. The results obtained in this study indicate warming in summer maximum and winter minimum temperatures over India. Averaged over India, trends in summer hot days indices HD, VHD, and EHD are significantly increasing (+1.0, +0.64, and +0.32 days/decade, respectively) and winter cold night indices CN, VCN, and ECN are significantly decreasing (-0.93, -0.47, and -0.15 days/decade, respectively). Also, it is observed that the impact of extreme temperature is higher along the west coast for summer and east coast for winter.

  9. Germination of Winter Annual Grass Weeds under a Range of Temperatures and Water Potentials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Scherner, Ananda; Melander, Bo; Jensen, Peter Kryger

    2017-01-01

    Silky windgrass and annual bluegrass are among the most troublesome weeds in northern European winter crops, while problems with rattail fescue have been especially linked to direct-drilling practices. This study investigated the germination patterns of silky windgrass, annual bluegrass, and ratt......Silky windgrass and annual bluegrass are among the most troublesome weeds in northern European winter crops, while problems with rattail fescue have been especially linked to direct-drilling practices. This study investigated the germination patterns of silky windgrass, annual bluegrass......, and rattail fescue in multiple water potentials and temperature regimes. Temperature and water potential effects were similar between silky windgrass and rattail fescue, but differed from annual bluegrass. The three grass weeds were able to germinate under low water potential (−1.0 MPa), although water...... potentials ≤−0.25 MPa strongly delayed their germination. Silky windgrass and rattail fescue seeds were able to germinate at 1 C, while the minimum temperature for annual bluegrass germination was 5 C. Germination of silky windgrass and rattail fescue was very similar across temperature and water potentials...

  10. Oral temperatures of the elderly in nursing homes in summer and winter in relation to activities of daily living

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, K.; Tanaka, Masatoshi; Motohashi, Yutaka; Maeda, Akira

    This study was conducted to clarify the seasonal difference in body temperature in summer and winter, and to document the thermal environment of the elderly living in nursing homes. The subjects were 57 healthy elderly people aged >=63 years living in two nursing homes in Japan. One of the homes was characterized by subjects with low levels of activities of daily living (ADL). Oral temperatures were measured in the morning and afternoon, with simultaneous recording of ambient temperature and relative humidity. Oral temperatures in summer were higher than in winter, with statistically significant differences (Pchanges in ambient temperature.

  11. Combined effects of elevated temperature and CO2 enhance threat from low temperature hazard to winter wheat growth in North China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Kaiyan; Zhou, Guangsheng; Lv, Xiaomin; Guo, Jianping; Ren, Sanxue

    2018-03-12

    We examined the growth and yield of winter wheat (Triticum aestivum) in response to the predicted elevated CO 2 concentration and temperature to determine the mechanism of the combined impacts in North China Plain. An elevated treatment (CO 2 : 600 μmol mol -1 , temperature: +2.5~3.0 °C, ECTI) and a control treatment (ambient CO 2 and temperature, CK) were conducted in open-top chambers from October 2013 to June 2016. Post-winter growth stages of winter wheat largely advanced and shifted to a cooler period of nature season under combined impact of elevated CO 2 and temperature during the entire growing season. The mean temperature and accumulated photosynthetic active radiations (PAR) over the post-winter growing period in ECTI decreased by 0.8-1.5 °C and 10-13%, respectively compared with that in CK, negatively impacted winter wheat growth. As a result, winter wheat in ECTI suffered from low temperature hazards during critical period of floret development and anthesis and grain number per ear was reduced by 10-31% in the three years. Although 1000-kernel weight in ECTI increased by 8-9% mainly due to elevated CO 2 , increasing CO 2 concentration from 400 to 600 μmol mol -1 throughout the growth stage was not able to offset the adverse effect of warming on winter wheat growth and yield.

  12. Long-term changes of South China Sea surface temperatures in winter and summer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Young-Gyu; Choi, Ara

    2017-07-01

    Utilizing available atmospheric and oceanographic reanalysis data sets, the long-term trend in South China Sea (SCS) sea surface temperature (SST) between 1950 and 2008 and the governing processes are investigated. Both winter and summer SST increased by comparable amounts, but the warming patterns and the governing processes were different. Strong warming in winter occurred in a deep central area, and during summer in the southern region. In winter the net heat flux into the sea increased, contributing to the warming. The spatial pattern of the heat flux, however, was different from that of the warming. Heat flux increased over the coastal area where warming was weaker, but decreased over the deeper area where warming was stronger. The northeasterly monsoon wind weakened lowering the shoreward Ekman transport and the sea surface height gradient. The cyclonic gyre which transports cold northern water to the south weakened, thereby warming the ocean. The effect was manifested more strongly along the southward western boundary current inducing warming in the deep central part. In summer however, the net surface heat flux decreased and could not contribute to the warming. Over the southern part of the SCS, the weakening of the southwesterly summer monsoon reduced southeastward Ekman transport, which is parallel to the mean SST gradient. Southeastward cold advection due to Ekman transport was reduced, thereby warming the surface near the southeastern boundary of the SCS. Upwelling southeast of Vietnam was also weakened, raising the SST east of Vietnam contributing to the southern summer warming secondarily. The weakening of the winds in each season was the ultimate cause of the warming, but the responses of the ocean that lead to the warming were different in winter and summer.

  13. Winter temperatures over the Korean Peninsula and East Asia: development of a new index and its application to seasonal forecast

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Seon Tae; Sohn, Soo-Jin; Kug, Jong-Seong

    2017-09-01

    This study proposes a new index for monitoring and predicting winter temperatures of the Korean Peninsula based on the dominant atmospheric winter teleconnection patterns. The utilization of this index is further extended to the East Asian Winter Monsoon (EAWM) index because the new index is found to well represent the main feature of the EAWM circulation. Among the teleconnection patterns, the East Atlantic (EA) and Western Pacific (WP) patterns are found to be most strongly correlated with winter temperatures via their partial association with changes in sea level pressure (SLP) around the Korean Peninsula, i.e., the EA and WP patterns are associated with SLP variation over the Siberian High region and the Kuroshio extension region to the east of Japan, respectively. On the basis of this relationship, the two regions representing the northwest-to-southeast SLP gradients are determined to define the new index. It is found that the new index can represent the Korean winter temperatures consistently well regardless of their considerable decadal changes. When compared with the existing SLP-based EAWM indices, the new index shows the best performance in delineating winter air temperatures, not only in the Korean Peninsula but also in the entire East Asian region. We also assess the prediction skill of the new index with seasonal coupled forecast models of the APEC Climate Center of Korea and its capability to predict winter temperatures. This assessment shows that the new index has potential for operationally predicting and monitoring winter temperatures in Korea and the whole of East Asia.

  14. Applicability research on passive design of residential buildings in hot summer and cold winter zone in China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hui; Wang, Huihui; Zhou, Xuan

    2017-04-01

    Passive design has long been a concern as an effective way of building energy efficiency. However, different urban climate characteristics determine the time-effectiveness of passive design. According to the climate characteristics of hot summer and cold winter zone in China, this research chose five cities, Shanghai, Wuhan, Chongqing, Nanjing and Changsha, to analyze their residential building energy consumption and thermal environment conditions. Based on Weather Tool calculation and analysis, the purpose of this research is to put forward the concept of Suitable Degree (SD), namely the applicability of the passive design. In addition, five cities’ SD of passive design technology had been analyzed from aspect of ventilation, temperature, solar radiation and envelope, then passive design strategies and methods of five cities’ residential building were discussed.

  15. Minimum indoor temperature threshold recommendations for English homes in winter - A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jevons, R; Carmichael, C; Crossley, A; Bone, A

    2016-07-01

    To identify and assess the available evidence on the impacts of cold indoor temperature thresholds on human health and make evidence-based recommendations for English homes. Systematic literature review. A systematic search of peer-reviewed published literature from the UK and countries with similar climates, and grading of the evidence using the National Institute of Health (NIH) framework was followed by a discussion with experts and formulation of recommendations. Twenty papers were included. Studies were included if they were conducted outside England but were from countries considered to have similar climates. Studies included two small randomised controlled trials, two cohort studies and one case control study; other studies were cross-sectional, largely laboratory-based studies. Health effects in the general population start to occur at around 18 °C. Effects in older people are more profound than in younger adults. Older people are less able to perceive low temperatures. Although evidence was limited, a strong argument for setting thresholds remains. The effects observed on the general population and the effects on those more vulnerable makes a case for a recommended minimum temperature for all. Health messages should be clear and simple, allowing informed choices to be made. A threshold of 18 °C was considered the evidence based and practical minimum temperature at which a home should be kept during winter in England. There is limited evidence available on minimum temperature thresholds for homes. However a recommendation of at least 18 °C for the whole population with nuancing of messages for those more vulnerable to the effects of cold can be made from the results of the retrieved studies. Heating homes to at least 18 °C (65 °F) in winter poses minimal risk to the health of a sedentary person, wearing suitable clothing. Copyright © 2016 The Royal Society for Public Health. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Temperature and resource availability may interactively affect over-wintering success of juvenile fish in a changing climate.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jakob Brodersen

    Full Text Available The predicted global warming may affect freshwater systems at several organizational levels, from organism to ecosystem. Specifically, in temperate regions, the projected increase of winter temperatures may have important effects on the over-winter biology of a range of organisms and especially for fish and other ectothermic animals. However, temperature effects on organisms may be directed strongly by resource availability. Here, we investigated whether over-winter loss of biomass and lipid content of juvenile roach (Rutilus rutilus was affected by the physiologically relatively small (2-5 °C changes of winter temperatures predicted by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC, under both natural and experimental conditions. This was investigated in combination with the effects of food availability. Finally, we explored the potential for a correlation between lake temperature and resource levels for planktivorous fish, i.e., zooplankton biomass, during five consecutive winters in a south Swedish lake. We show that small increases in temperature (+2 °C affected fish biomass loss in both presence and absence of food, but negatively and positively respectively. Temperature alone explained only a minor part of the variation when food availability was not taken into account. In contrast to other studies, lipid analyses of experimental fish suggest that critical somatic condition rather than critical lipid content determined starvation induced mortality. Our results illustrate the importance of considering not only changes in temperature when predicting organism response to climate change but also food-web interactions, such as resource availability and predation. However, as exemplified by our finding that zooplankton over-winter biomass in the lake was not related to over-winter temperature, this may not be a straightforward task.

  17. Temperature and resource availability may interactively affect over-wintering success of juvenile fish in a changing climate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brodersen, Jakob; Rodriguez-Gil, José Luis; Jönsson, Mikael; Hansson, Lars-Anders; Brönmark, Christer; Nilsson, P Anders; Nicolle, Alice; Berglund, Olof

    2011-01-01

    The predicted global warming may affect freshwater systems at several organizational levels, from organism to ecosystem. Specifically, in temperate regions, the projected increase of winter temperatures may have important effects on the over-winter biology of a range of organisms and especially for fish and other ectothermic animals. However, temperature effects on organisms may be directed strongly by resource availability. Here, we investigated whether over-winter loss of biomass and lipid content of juvenile roach (Rutilus rutilus) was affected by the physiologically relatively small (2-5 °C) changes of winter temperatures predicted by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC), under both natural and experimental conditions. This was investigated in combination with the effects of food availability. Finally, we explored the potential for a correlation between lake temperature and resource levels for planktivorous fish, i.e., zooplankton biomass, during five consecutive winters in a south Swedish lake. We show that small increases in temperature (+2 °C) affected fish biomass loss in both presence and absence of food, but negatively and positively respectively. Temperature alone explained only a minor part of the variation when food availability was not taken into account. In contrast to other studies, lipid analyses of experimental fish suggest that critical somatic condition rather than critical lipid content determined starvation induced mortality. Our results illustrate the importance of considering not only changes in temperature when predicting organism response to climate change but also food-web interactions, such as resource availability and predation. However, as exemplified by our finding that zooplankton over-winter biomass in the lake was not related to over-winter temperature, this may not be a straightforward task.

  18. The 10-30-day intraseasonal variation of the East Asian winter monsoon: The temperature mode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Suxiang; Sun, Qingfei; Huang, Qian; Chu, Peng

    2016-09-01

    East Asia is known for its monsoon characteristics, but little research has been performed on the intraseasonal time scale of the East Asian winter monsoon (EAWM). In this paper, the extended reanalysis (ERA)-Interim sub-daily data are used to study the surface air temperature intraseasonal oscillation (ISO) of the EAWM. The results show that the air temperature (2-m level) of the EAWM has a dominant period of 10-30 days. Lake Baikal and south China are the centers of the air temperature ISO. An anomalous low frequency (10-30-day filtered) anticyclone corresponds to the intraseasonal cold air. The 10-30-day filtered cold air spreads from Novaya Zemlya to Lake Baikal and even to South China. The ISO of the Arctic Oscillation (AO) index influences the temperature of the EAWM by stimulating Rossby waves in middle latitude, causing meridional circulation, and eventually leads to the temperature ISO of the EAWM. RegCM4 has good performance for the simulation of the air temperature ISO. The simulated results indicate that the plateau is responsible for the southward propagation of the intraseasonal anticyclone. The anticyclone could not reach South China when there was no plateau in western China and its upper reaches.

  19. SHORT-TERM EXPOSURE TO ATMOSPHERIC AMMONIA DOES NOT AFFECT LOW-TEMPERATURE HARDENING OF WINTER-WHEAT

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    CLEMENT, JMAM; VENEMA, JH; VANHASSELT, PR

    1995-01-01

    The effect of atmospheric NH3 on low-temperature hardening of winter wheat (Triticum aestivum L. cv. Urban) was investigated. Growth and photosynthesis were stimulated by ammonia exposure. After a 14 d exposure at moderate temperatures (day/night 18.5/16 degrees C) total nitrogen content was

  20. 49 CFR 195.102 - Design temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Design temperature. 195.102 Section 195.102... PIPELINE Design Requirements § 195.102 Design temperature. (a) Material for components of the system must be chosen for the temperature environment in which the components will be used so that the pipeline...

  1. Characterization of three related low-temperature-regulated cDNAs from winter Brassica napus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weretilnyk, E; Orr, W; White, T C; Iu, B; Singh, J

    1993-01-01

    A cDNA clone, pBN115, encoding a low-temperature-regulated transcript in winter Brassica napus has been isolated. Northern blot analyses show that levels of transcripts hybridizing to pBN115 increase within 24 h of exposure of B. napus to low temperature, peak at 3 d, and then remain at an elevated level for the duration of the cold treatment (up to 10 weeks). Transferring plants from 2 degrees C to room temperature results in the loss of detectable transcripts hybridizing to pBN115 within 1 d. The transcript was not detected in RNA isolated from roots of cold-acclimated B. napus. Results of in vivo labeling of nascent RNA in leaf discs of B. napus with thiouridine suggest that regulation of expression may be transcriptional, at least at the onset of cold temperature. Although drought stress leads to a slight increase in transcript level at room temperature, neither a brief exposure to elevated temperatures nor exogenous application of abscisic acid resulted in the appearance of the transcript represented by pBN115. Furthermore, transcripts hybridizing to pBN115 were present at the same levels whether the plants were acclimated in the light or dark. Hybridization experiments show that pBN115 hybridizes strongly to cold-regulated transcripts in Arabidopsis thaliana, Descurania sophia, and spring B. napus, all of which are cruciferous plants capable of cold acclimation. No hybridizing transcript could be detected in cold-acclimated Spinacea oleracea, winter Secale cereale, or cold-grown Nicotiana tabacum. DNA sequence analysis of pBN115 reveals a single open reading frame that potentially encodes a protein of 14.8 kD. This size closely approximates that of a polypeptide produced by in vitro transcription/translation experiments. Two additional cDNA clones, pBN19 and pBN26, with divergent 5'-and 3'-untranslated regions, were also isolated and found to encode similar, but not identical, polypeptides. PMID:7904076

  2. Quantitative Estimation of the Impact of European Teleconnections on Interannual Variation of East Asian Winter Temperature and Monsoon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Young-Kwon; Kim, Hae-Dong

    2014-01-01

    The impact of European teleconnections including the East AtlanticWest Russia (EA-WR), the Scandinavia (SCA), and the East Atlantic (EA) on East Asian winter temperature variability was quantified and compared with the combined effect of the Arctic Oscillation (AO), the Western Pacific (WP), and the El-Nino Southern Oscillation (ENSO), which are originated in the Northern Hemispheric high-latitudes or the Pacific. Three European teleconnections explained 22-25 percent of the total monthly upper-tropospheric height variance over Eurasia. Regression analysis revealed warming by EA-WR and EA and cooling by SCA over mid-latitude East Asia during their positive phase and vice versa. Temperature anomalies were largely explained by the advective temperature change process at the lower troposphere. The average spatial correlation over East Asia (90-180E, 10-80N) for the last 34 winters between observed and reconstructed temperature comprised of AO, WP and ENSO effect (AWE) was approximately 0.55, and adding the European teleconnection components (ESE) to the reconstructed temperature improved the correlation up to approximately 0.64. Lower level atmospheric structure demonstrated that approximately five of the last 34 winters were significantly better explained by ESE than AWE to determine East Asian seasonal winter temperatures. We also compared the impact between EA-WR and AO on the 1) East Asian winter monsoon, 2) cold surge, and 3) the Siberian high. These three were strongly coupled, and their spatial features and interannual variation were somewhat better explained by EA-WR than AO. Results suggest that the EA-WR impact must be treated more importantly than previously thought for a better understanding of East Asian winter temperature and monsoon variability.

  3. Temperature and Relative Humidity Vertical Profiles within Planetary Boundary Layer in Winter Urban Airshed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bendl, Jan; Hovorka, Jan

    2017-12-01

    The planetary boundary layer is a dynamic system with turbulent flow where horizontal and vertical air mixing depends mainly on the weather conditions and geomorphology. Normally, air temperature from the Earth surface decreases with height but inversion situation may occur, mainly during winter. Pollutant dispersion is poor during inversions so air pollutant concentration can quickly rise, especially in urban closed valleys. Air pollution was evaluated by WHO as a human carcinogen (mostly by polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons) and health effects are obvious. Knowledge about inversion layer height is important for estimation of the pollution impact and it can give us also information about the air pollution sources. Temperature and relative humidity vertical profiles complement ground measurements. Ground measurements were conducted to characterize comprehensively urban airshed in Svermov, residential district of the city of Kladno, about 30 km NW of Prague, from the 2nd Feb. to the 3rd of March 2016. The Svermov is an air pollution hot-spot for long time benzo[a]pyrene (B[a]P) limit exceedances, reaching the highest B[a]P annual concentration in Bohemia - west part of the Czech Republic. Since the Svermov sits in a shallow valley, frequent vertical temperature inversion in winter and low emission heights of pollution sources prevent pollutant dispersal off the valley. Such orography is common to numerous small settlements in the Czech Republic. Ground measurements at the sports field in the Svermov were complemented by temperature and humidity vertical profiles acquired by a Vaisala radiosonde positioned at tethered He-filled balloon. Total number of 53 series of vertical profiles up to the height of 300 m was conducted. Meteorology parameters were acquired with 4 Hz frequency. The measurements confirmed frequent early-morning and night formation of temperature inversion within boundary layer up to the height of 50 m. This rather shallow inversion had significant

  4. The Effect of Freezing Temperatures on Microdochium majus and M. nivale Seedling Blight of Winter Wheat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ian M. Haigh

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Exposure to pre-emergent freezing temperatures significantly delayed the rate of seedling emergence (P<0.05 from an infected and a non-infected winter wheat cv. Equinox seed lot, but significant effects for timing of freezing and duration of freezing on final emergence were only seen for the Microdochium-infested seed lot. Freezing temperatures of −5∘C at post-emergence caused most disease on emerged seedlings. Duration of freezing (12 hours or 24 hours had little effect on disease index but exposure to pre-emergent freezing for 24 hours significantly delayed rate of seedling emergence and reduced final emergence from the infected seed lot. In plate experiments, the calculated base temperature for growth of M. nivale and M. majus was −6.3∘C and −2.2∘C, respectively. These are the first set of experiments to demonstrate the effects of pre-emergent and post-emergent freezing on the severity of Microdochium seedling blight.

  5. Cardiovascular, respiratory and metabolic responses to temperature and hypoxia of the winter frog Rana catesbeiana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rocha P.L.

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of the present study was to determine the effects of hypoxia and temperature on the cardiovascular and respiratory systems and plasma glucose levels of the winter bullfrog Rana catesbeiana. Body temperature was maintained at 10, 15, 25 and 35oC for measurements of breathing frequency, heart rate, arterial blood pressure, metabolic rate, plasma glucose levels, blood gases and acid-base status. Reducing body temperature from 35 to 10oC decreased (P<0.001 heart rate (bpm from 64.0 ± 3.1 (N = 5 to 12.5 ± 2.5 (N = 6 and blood pressure (mmHg (P<0.05 from 41.9 ± 2.1 (N = 5 to 33.1 ± 2.1 (N = 6, whereas no significant changes were observed under hypoxia. Hypoxia-induced changes in breathing frequency and acid-base status were proportional to body temperature, being pronounced at 25oC, less so at 15oC, and absent at 10oC. Hypoxia at 35oC was lethal. Under normoxia, plasma glucose concentration (mg/dl decreased (P<0.01 from 53.0 ± 3.4 (N = 6 to 35.9 ± 1.7 (N = 6 at body temperatures of 35 and 10oC, respectively. Hypoxia had no significant effect on plasma glucose concentration at 10 and 15oC, but at 25oC there was a significant increase under conditions of 3% inspired O2. The arterial PO2 and pH values were similar to those reported in previous studies on non-estivating Rana catesbeiana, but PaCO2 (37.5 ± 1.9 mmHg, N = 5 was 3-fold higher, indicating increased plasma bicarbonate levels. The estivating bullfrog may be exposed not only to low temperatures but also to hypoxia. These animals show temperature-dependent responses that may be beneficial since during low body temperatures the sensitivity of most physiological systems to hypoxia is reduced

  6. Short-term cropland responses to temperature extreme events during late winter

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Simon, G.; Alberti, G.; Delle Vedove, G.; Peressotti, A.; Zaldei, A.; Miglietta, F.

    2013-08-01

    In recent years, several studies have focused on terrestrial ecosystem response to extreme events. Most of this research has been conducted in natural ecosystems, but few have considered agroecosystems. In this study, we investigated the impact of a manipulated warmer or cooler late winter/early spring on the carbon budget and final harvest of a soybean crop (Glycine max (L.) Merr.). Soil temperature was altered by manipulating soil albedo by covering the soil surface with a layer of inert silica gravel. We tested three treatments - cooling (Co), warming (W), mix (M) - and control (C). An automated system continuously measured soil heterotrophic respiration (Rh), soil temperature profiles, and soil water content across the entire year in each plot. Phenological phases were periodically assessed and final harvest was measured in each plot. Results showed that treatments had only a transient effect on daily Rh rates, which did not result in a total annual carbon budget significantly different from control, even though cooling showed a significant reduction in final harvest. We also observed anticipation in emergence in both W and M treatments and a delay in emergence for Co. Moreover, plant density and growth increased in W and M and decreased in Co. In conclusion, from the results of our experiment we can assert that an increase in the frequency of both heat and cold waves is unlikely to have large effects on the overall annual carbon balance of irrigated croplands.

  7. Two leading modes of the interannual variability in South American surface air temperature during austral winter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yanjie; Li, Jianping; Kucharski, Fred; Feng, Jin; Zhao, Sen; Zheng, Jiayu

    2017-11-01

    The first two empirical orthogonal function (EOF) modes of the surface air temperature (SAT) interannual variability in the South American (SA) continent have been revealed in several previous studies. This presentation focuses on winter season and furtherly investigates the detailed advection and cloud-radiation processes and teleconnections from tropical sea surface temperature anomalies (SSTA) combining statistical analysis with Rossby wave dynamics and modelling experiments. The EOF1, featured with the anomalous center in the central part, is related to the tropical eastern Pacific SSTA, which may impact on the SA SAT variability through the Walker circulation and a regional Hadley cell. The anomalous center is largely attributed to low-level advection transported by the Hadley cell. The EOF2, as a fluctuation between anomalies in the southeast Brazil and the southern tip, is related to the SSTA surrounding the Maritime Continent, which may generate a barotropic wave train propagating to the SA continent. This wave train can strengthen high latitude westerly flow transporting warm advection to the southern tip, and generate southeast anomalous flow transporting cold advection to the southeast Brazil. Meanwhile, the cloud-radiation processes are also involved to enhance the advection-induced SAT anomalies in both areas.

  8. Short-term cropland responses to temperature extreme events during late winter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. De Simon

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, several studies have focused on terrestrial ecosystem response to extreme events. Most of this research has been conducted in natural ecosystems, but few have considered agroecosystems. In this study, we investigated the impact of a manipulated warmer or cooler late winter/early spring on the carbon budget and final harvest of a soybean crop (Glycine max (L. Merr.. Soil temperature was altered by manipulating soil albedo by covering the soil surface with a layer of inert silica gravel. We tested three treatments – cooling (Co, warming (W, mix (M – and control (C. An automated system continuously measured soil heterotrophic respiration (Rh, soil temperature profiles, and soil water content across the entire year in each plot. Phenological phases were periodically assessed and final harvest was measured in each plot. Results showed that treatments had only a transient effect on daily Rh rates, which did not result in a total annual carbon budget significantly different from control, even though cooling showed a significant reduction in final harvest. We also observed anticipation in emergence in both W and M treatments and a delay in emergence for Co. Moreover, plant density and growth increased in W and M and decreased in Co. In conclusion, from the results of our experiment we can assert that an increase in the frequency of both heat and cold waves is unlikely to have large effects on the overall annual carbon balance of irrigated croplands.

  9. Modeling winter moth Operophtera brumata egg phenology: nonlinear effects of temperature and developmental stage on developmental rate

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Salis, Lucia; Lof, Marjolein; Van Asch, M.; Visser, Marcel E.

    2016-01-01

    Understanding the relationship between an insect's developmental rate and temperature is crucial to forecast insect phenology under climate change. In the winter moth Operophtera brumata timing of egg-hatching has severe fitness consequences on growth and reproduction as egg-hatching has to match

  10. Southern Hemisphere humpback whales wintering off Central America: insights from water temperature into the longest mammalian migration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasmussen, Kristin; Palacios, Daniel M; Calambokidis, John; Saborío, Marco T; Dalla Rosa, Luciano; Secchi, Eduardo R; Steiger, Gretchen H; Allen, Judith M; Stone, Gregory S

    2007-06-22

    We report on a wintering area off the Pacific coast of Central America for humpback whales (Megaptera novaeangliae) migrating from feeding areas off Antarctica. We document seven individuals, including a mother/calf pair, that made this migration (approx. 8300km), the longest movement undertaken by any mammal. Whales were observed as far north as 11 degrees N off Costa Rica, in an area also used by a boreal population during the opposite winter season, resulting in unique spatial overlap between Northern and Southern Hemisphere populations. The occurrence of such a northerly wintering area is coincident with the development of an equatorial tongue of cold water in the eastern South Pacific, a pattern that is repeated in the eastern South Atlantic. A survey of location and water temperature at the wintering areas worldwide indicates that they are found in warm waters (21.1-28.3 degrees C), irrespective of latitude. We contend that while availability of suitable reproductive habitat in the wintering areas is important at the fine scale, water temperature influences whale distribution at the basin scale. Calf development in warm water may lead to larger adult size and increased reproductive success, a strategy that supports the energy conservation hypothesis as a reason for migration.

  11. The high Arctic in extreme winters: vortex, temperature, and MLS and ACE-FTS trace gas evolution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. L. Manney

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available The first three Arctic winters of the ACE mission represented two extremes of winter variability: Stratospheric sudden warmings (SSWs in 2004 and 2006 were among the strongest, most prolonged on record; 2005 was a record cold winter. Canadian Arctic Atmospheric Chemistry Experiment (ACE Validation Campaigns were conducted at Eureka (80° N, 86° W during each of these winters. New satellite measurements from ACE-Fourier Transform Spectrometer (ACE-FTS, Sounding of the Atmosphere using Broadband Emission Radiometry (SABER, and Aura Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS, along with meteorological analyses and Eureka lidar temperatures, are used to detail the meteorology in these winters, to demonstrate its influence on transport, and to provide a context for interpretation of ACE-FTS and validation campaign observations. During the 2004 and 2006 SSWs, the vortex broke down throughout the stratosphere, reformed quickly in the upper stratosphere, and remained weak in the middle and lower stratosphere. The stratopause reformed at very high altitude, near 75 km. ACE measurements covered both vortex and extra-vortex conditions in each winter, except in late-February through mid-March 2004 and 2006, when the strong, pole-centered vortex that reformed after the SSWs resulted in ACE sampling only inside the vortex in the middle through upper stratosphere. The 2004 and 2006 Eureka campaigns were during the recovery from the SSWs, with the redeveloping vortex over Eureka. 2005 was the coldest winter on record in the lower stratosphere, but with an early final warming in mid-March. The vortex was over Eureka at the start of the 2005 campaign, but moved away as it broke up. Disparate temperature profile structure and vortex evolution resulted in much lower (higher temperatures in the upper (lower stratosphere in 2004 and 2006 than in 2005. Satellite temperatures agree well with lidar data up to 50–60 km, and ACE-FTS, MLS and SABER show good agreement in high

  12. Control of glycerol production by rainbow smelt (Osmerus mordax) to provide freeze resistance and allow foraging at low winter temperatures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Driedzic, William R; Ewart, K Vanya

    2004-11-01

    The rainbow smelt (Osmerus mordax) is a small anadromous fish that actively feeds under the ice at temperatures as low as the freeze point of seawater. Freezing is avoided through the production of both non-colligative antifreeze protein (AFP) and glycerol that acts in a colligative manner. Glycerol is constantly lost across the gills and skin, thus glycerol production must continue on a sustained basis at low winter temperatures. AFP begins to accumulate in early fall while water temperatures are still high. Glycerol production is triggered when water temperatures decrease to about 5 degrees C. Glycerol levels rapidly increase with carbon flow from dihydroxyacetone phosphate (DHAP) to glycerol 3-phosphate (G3P) to glycerol. Glucose/glycogen serves as the initial carbon source for glycerol accumulation with amino acids contributing thereafter. The period of glycerol accumulation is associated with increases in GPDH mRNA and PEPCK mRNA followed by elevations in protein synthesis and enzyme activities. Plasma glycerol levels may reach in excess of 500 mM in winter. The high freeze resistance allows rainbow smelt to invade water of low temperature and forage for food. The lower the temperature, the higher the glycerol must be, and the higher the glycerol the greater the loss to the environment through diffusion. During the winter, rainbow smelt feed upon protein rich invertebrates with glycerol production being fueled in part by dietary amino acids via the gluconeogenic pathway. At winter temperatures, glycerol is quantitatively more important than AFP in providing freeze resistance of blood; however, the importance of AFPs to other tissues is yet to be assessed. Glycerol levels rapidly plummet in the spring when water temperature is still close to 0 degrees C. During this period, freeze resistance must be provided by AFP alone. Overall, the phenomenon of glycerol production by rainbow smelt reveals an elegant connection of biochemistry to ecology that allows this

  13. Lowering Temperature is the Trigger for Glycogen Build-Up and Winter Fasting in Crucian Carp (Carassius carassius).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varis, Joonas; Haverinen, Jaakko; Vornanen, Matti

    2016-02-01

    Seasonal changes in physiology of vertebrate animals are triggered by environmental cues including temperature, day-length and oxygen availability. Crucian carp (Carassius carassius) tolerate prolonged anoxia in winter by using several physiological adaptations that are seasonally activated. This study examines which environmental cues are required to trigger physiological adjustments for winter dormancy in crucian carp. To this end, crucian carp were exposed to changing environmental factors under laboratory conditions: effects of declining water temperature, shortening day-length and reduced oxygen availability, separately and in different combinations, were examined on glycogen content and enzyme activities involved in feeding (alkaline phosphatase, AP) and glycogen metabolism (glycogen synthase, GyS; glycogen phosphorylase, GP). Lowering temperature induced a fall in activity of AP and a rise in glycogen content and rate of glycogen synthesis. Relative mass of the liver, and glycogen concentration of liver, muscle and brain increased with lowering temperature. Similarly activity of GyS in muscle and expression of GyS transcripts in brain were up-regulated by lowering temperature. Shortened day-length and oxygen availability had practically no effects on measured variables. We conclude that lowering temperature is the main trigger in preparation for winter anoxia in crucian carp.

  14. Potential energy expenditure by litter-roosting bats associated with temperature under leaf litter during winter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roger W. Perry

    2013-01-01

    In temperate portions of North America, some bats that remain active during winter undergo short periods of hibernation below leaf litter on the forest floor during episodes of below-freezing weather. These winter roosts may provide above-freezing conditions, but the thermal conditions under leaf litter are unclear. Further, little is known of the relationship between...

  15. Simulation of over-winter soil water and soil temperature with SHAW and RZ-SHAW

    Science.gov (United States)

    Correct simulation of over-winter condition is important for the growth of winter crops and for initial growth of spring crops. RZ-SHAW (RZWQM-SHAW) is a newly developed model by coupling the Root Zone Water Quality Model (RZWQM) and the Simultaneous Heat and Water (SHAW) model. The objective of thi...

  16. Factors affecting process temperature and biogas production in small-scale rural biogas digesters in winter in northern Vietnam

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cuong, Pham Hung; Vu, C.C.; Sommer, Sven G.

    2014-01-01

    This study investigated the main factors influencing digester temperature and methods to reduce heat losses during the cold season in the subtropics. Four composite digesters (two insulated and two uninsulated) were buried underground to measure their internal temperature (°C) at a depth of 140 cm...... and the influent chemical composition was measured monthly during the whole experimental period. Seasonal variations in air temperature significantly affected the temperature in the soil, mixing tank and digester. Consequently, biogas production, which is temperature dependent, was influenced by the season....... The main factors determining the internal temperature in the digesters were insulation with Styrofoam, air temperature and temperature of slurry in the mixing tank. Biogas production is low due to the cold climate conditions in winter in Northern Vietnam, but the study proved that storing slurry...

  17. School design and internal temperatures in schools in Peshawar and northern area

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mary Hancock, M.

    2005-01-01

    This paper reports on an investigation of temperatures achieved through the school year in a range of schools in Peshawar and Gilgit. Strategies were investigated to improve thermal comfort in small government schools in Peshawar where design considerations are driven by the problems of summer overheating. More recent work measuring temperatures in schools in the Northern Areas, where cold winter conditions are foremost in design considerations, is also reviewed. (author)

  18. Evaluation of air temperature distribution using thermal image under conditions of nocturnal radiative cooling in winter season over Shikoku area

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kurose, Y.; Hayashi, Y.

    1993-01-01

    Using the thermal images offered by the infra-red thermometer and the LANDSAT, the air temperature distribution over mountainous regions were estimated under conditions of nocturnal radiative cooling in the winter season. The thermal image analyses by using an infra-red thermometer and the micrometeological observation were carried out around Zentsuji Kagawa prefecture. At the same time, the thermal image analyses were carried out by using the LANDSAT data. The LANDSAT data were taken on Dec. 7, 1984 and Dec. 5, 1989. The scenes covered the west part of Shikoku, southwest of Japan.The results were summarized as follows:Values of the surface temperature of trees, which were measured by an infra-red thermometer, were almost equal to the air temperature. On the other hand, DN values detected by LANDSAT over forest area were closely related with air temperature observed by AMeDAS. Therefore, it is possible to evaluate instantaneously a spatial distribution of the nocturnal air temperature from thermal image.The LANDSAT detect a surface temperature over Shikoku area only at 21:30. When radiative cooling was dominant, the thermal belt and the cold air lake were already formed on the mountain slopes at 21:30. Therfore, it is possible to estimate the characteristic of nocturnal temperature distribution by using LANDSAT data.It became clear that the temperature distribution estimated by thermal images offered by the infra-red thermometer and the LANDSAT was useful for the evaluation of rational land use for winter crops

  19. Winter temperature, salinity, oxygen, nutrients and isotopes data sampled by aircraft, April 2003 (NODC Accession 0059129)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Winter sampling was performed in the eastern area of the Shelf-Basin Interactions Project using aircraft. Flights began on 1 April 2003 and finished on 15 April....

  20. Age-Dependent Developmental Response to Temperature: An Examination of the Rarely Tested Phenomenon in Two Species (Gypsy Moth (Lymantria dispar and Winter Moth (Operophtera brumata

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David R. Gray

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available The pervading paradigm in insect phenology models is that the response to a given temperature does not vary within a life stage. The developmental rate functions that have been developed for general use, or for specific insects, have for the most part been temperature-dependent but not age-dependent, except where age is an ordinal variable designating the larval instar. Age dependence, where age is a continuous variable, is not often reported (or investigated, and is rarely included in phenology models. I provide a short review of the seldom-investigated phenomenon of age dependence in developmental response to temperature, and compare the derivation of the winter moth egg phenology model by Salis et al. to the derivation of another egg phenology model with age-dependent responses to temperature I discuss some probable reasons for the discrepancies (acknowledged by Salis et al. between modelled and observed developmental rates of the winter moth, and discuss the contribution that geographically robust phenology models can make to estimates of species distributions.

  1. Factors Affecting Process Temperature and Biogas Production in Small-scale Rural Biogas Digesters in Winter in Northern Vietnam

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. H. Pham

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available This study investigated the main factors influencing digester temperature and methods to reduce heat losses during the cold season in the subtropics. Four composite digesters (two insulated and two uninsulated were buried underground to measure their internal temperature (°C at a depth of 140 cm and 180 cm, biogas production and methane (CH4 concentration in biogas from August to February. In parallel the temperature of the air (100 cm above ground, in the slurry mixing tank and in the soil (10, 100, 140, and 180 cm depth was measured by thermocouple. The influent amount was measured daily and the influent chemical composition was measured monthly during the whole experimental period. Seasonal variations in air temperature significantly affected the temperature in the soil, mixing tank and digester. Consequently, biogas production, which is temperature dependent, was influenced by the season. The main factors determining the internal temperature in the digesters were insulation with Styrofoam, air temperature and temperature of slurry in the mixing tank. Biogas production is low due to the cold climate conditions in winter in Northern Vietnam, but the study proved that storing slurry in the mixing tank until its temperature peak at around 14:00 h will increase the temperature in the digester and thus increase potential biogas production. Algorithms are provided linking digester temperature to the temperature of slurry in the mixing tank.

  2. Designing an accurate system for temperature measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kochan Orest

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The method of compensation of changes in temperature field along the legs of inhomogeneous thermocouple, which measures a temperature of an object, is considered in this paper. This compensation is achieved by stabilization of the temperature field along the thermocouple. Such stabilization does not allow the error due to acquired thermoelectric inhomogeneity to manifest itself. There is also proposed the design of the furnace to stabilize temperature field along the legs of the thermocouple which measures the temperature of an object. This furnace is not integrated with the thermocouple mentioned above, therefore it is possible to replace this thermocouple with a new one when it get its legs considerably inhomogeneous.. There is designed the two loop measuring system with the ability of error correction which can use simultaneously a usual thermocouple as well as a thermocouple with controlled profile of temperature field. The latter can be used as a reference sensor for the former.

  3. How Do Trees Know When to Flower? Predicting Reproductive Phenology of Douglas-fir with Changing Winter and Spring Temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prevey, J.; St Clair, B.; Harrington, C.

    2016-12-01

    Flowering at the right time is one of the primary ways that plants are adapted to their environment. Trees that flower too early risk cold damage to vulnerable new tissues and those that flower too late miss peak resources or may mistime flowering to coincide with other trees, altering outcrossing rates and gene flow. Past observations indicate that temperature cues over winter and spring influence the timing of flowering in many tree species. Understanding these cues is important for predicting how flowering phenology of trees will change with a changing climate.We developed predictive models of flowering for Douglas-fir, an abundant and commercially important tree in the Pacific Northwest. We assembled over 10,000 flowering observations of trees from 11 sites across western Oregon and Washington. We modeled the dates of flowering using hourly temperature data; our models of flowering were adapted from previous models of vegetative budburst and height growth initiation developed for Douglas-fir. Preliminary results show that both chilling (cold) and forcing (warm) temperatures over winter and spring are important determinants of flowering time for Douglas-fir. This suggests that as spring temperatures warm in the future, Douglas-fir across the Pacific Northwest will flower earlier, unless plants experience insufficient chilling over winter, in which case it is possible that Douglas-fir may flower later than in the past, or not flower at all. At one site, Douglas-fir genotypes from different geographic regions flowered in the same order from year to year, indicating that both temperature and heredity influence flowering. Knowledge of the environmental and genetic cues that drive the timing of flowering can help predict how changes in temperature under various climate models could change flowering time across sites. These models may also indicate the geographic areas where future climate could enhance or reduce flowering of Douglas-fir in the future.

  4. Photosynthetic functions of cembran pines and dwarf pines during winter at timberline as regulated by different temperatures, snowcover and light.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehner, Gabriele; Lütz, Cornelius

    2003-02-01

    Trees at timberline in the high Alps are exposed to a variety of climatic conditions. Most climatic stresses occur during winter and spring, when frost, occasionally low snow cover, and high irradiation interact. In this study, we follow reactions of photosynthesis from high winter to spring in two dominating tree species of the alpine timberline, which may indicate the status of stress response to a changing environment. The results indicate a level of physiological stability in trees, which are important for stabilising natural high mountain ecosystems. Trees of Pinus cembra and of Pinus mugo were selected at altitudes between 1850 m a.s.l. and 1950 m a.s.l. near innsbruck, Austria. At six sampling times from January to May, fast chlorophyll fluorescence was measured in the field and twigs were collected for further investigation in the laboratory. The following measurements were taken: photosynthetic oxygen formation, needle chlorophyll and carotenoid determination, and kinetic studies of the xanthophyll cycle. In general, both tree species showed similar results in most parameters studied. P. mugo seems to have some advantages if winter precipitation is high, when, because of its growth habitus, most needles will be snow covered. Primary photochemistry (trapping per reaction centre) in PS II does not change with sampling dates despite the fact that temperature and light are changing. However, first events in electron transport and whole needle photosynthesis are strongly affected by light and temperature conditions during the days before sampling. The kinetics of the xanthophyll cycle indicate not only light, but also strong temperature effects. P. mugo photosynthesis seems to have a higher stability under changing weather. Both tree species are well prepared to start with photosynthesis in winter, if favourable conditions, like foehn events, occur.

  5. Winter frost resistance of Pinus cembra measured in situ at the alpine timberline as affected by temperature conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buchner, Othmar; Neuner, Gilbert

    2011-11-01

    Winter frost resistance (WFR), midwinter frost hardening and frost dehardening potential of Pinus cembra L. were determined in situ by means of a novel low-temperature freezing system at the alpine timberline ecotone (1950 m a.s.l., Mt Patscherkofel, Innsbruck, Austria). In situ liquid nitrogen (LN₂)-quenching experiments should check whether maximum WFR of P. cembra belonging to the frost hardiest conifer group, being classified in US Department of Agriculture climatic zone 1, suffices to survive dipping into LN₂ (-196 °C). Viability was assessed in a field re-growth test. Maximum in situ WFR (LT₅₀) of leaves was cembra was higher than that obtained on detached twigs, as reported earlier. In situ LN₂-quenching experiments were lethal in all cases even when twigs of P. cembra were exposed to an in situ frost hardening treatment (12 days at -20 °C followed by 3 days at -50 °C) to induce maximum WFR. Temperature treatments applied in the field significantly affected the actual WFR. In January a frost hardening treatment (21 days at -20 °C) led to a significant increase of WFR (buds: -62 °C to cembra was not at its specific maximum WFR. In contrast, simulated warm spells in late winter led to premature frost dehardening (buds: -32.6 °C to -10.2 °C; leaves: -32.7 to -16.4 °C) followed by significantly earlier bud swelling and burst in late winter. Strikingly, both temperature treatments, either increased air temperature (+10.1 °C) or increased soil temperature (+6.5 °C), were similarly effective. This high readiness to frost harden and deharden in winter in the field must be considered to be of great significance for future winter survival of P. cembra. Determination of WFR in field re-growth tests appears to be a valuable tool for critically judging estimates of WFR obtained on detached twigs in an ecological context.

  6. Planetary waves in ozone and temperature in the Northern Hemisphere winters of 2002/2003 and early 2005

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Belova

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Temperature and ozone data from the sub-millimetre radiometer (SMR installed aboard the Odin satellite have been examined to study the relationship between temperature and ozone concentration in the lower and upper stratosphere in winter time. The retrieved ozone and temperature profiles have been considered between the range of 24–46 km during the Northern Hemisphere (NH winter of December 2002 to March 2003 and January to March 2005. A comparison between the ozone mixing ratio and temperature fields has been made for the zonal means, wavenumber one variations and 5-day planetary waves. The amplitude values in temperature variations are ~5 K in the wavenumber one and 0.5–1 K in the 5-day wave. In ozone mixing ratio, the amplitudes reach ~0.5 ppmv in the wavenumber one and 0.05–0.1 ppmv in the 5-day wave. Several stratospheric warming events were observed during the NH winters of 2002/2003 and early 2005. Along with these warming events, amplification of the amplitude has been detected in wavenumber one (up to 30 K in temperature and 1.25 ppmv in ozone and partly in the 5-day perturbation (up to 2 K in temperature and 0.2 ppmv in ozone. In general, the results show the expected in-phase behavior between the temperature and ozone fields in the lower stratosphere due to dynamic effects, and an out-of-phase pattern in the upper stratosphere, which is expected as a result of photochemical effects. However, these relationships are not valid for zonal means and wavenumber one components when the wave amplitudes are changing dramatically during the strongest stratospheric warming event (at the end of December 2002/beginning of January 2003. Also, for several shorter intervals, the 5-day perturbations in ozone and temperature are not well-correlated at lower heights, particularly when conditions change rapidly. Odin's basic observation schedule provides stratosphere mode data every third day and to validate the reliability of the 5-day waves

  7. Temperatures below leaf litter during winter prescribed burns: implications for litter-roosting bats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roger W. Perry; Virginia L. McDaniel

    2015-01-01

    Some bat species, including eastern red bats (Lasiurus borealis), roost for short periods beneath leaf litter on the forest floor during winter in the south-eastern USA, a region subjected to frequent fire. The variability in fuel consumption, the heterogeneous nature of burns, and the effects of litter and duff moisture on forest-floor...

  8. Biochemical and Physicochemical Background of Mammalian Androgen Activity in Winter Wheat Exposed to Low Temperature

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Janeczko, A.; Biesaga-Koscielniak, J.; Dziurka, M.; Filek, M.; Hura, K.; Jurczyk, B.; Kula, M.; Oklešťková, Jana; Novák, Ondřej; Rudolphi-Skórska, E.; Skoczowski, A.

    2018-01-01

    Roč. 37, č. 1 (2018), s. 199-219 ISSN 0721-7595 Institutional support: RVO:61389030 Keywords : Androstenedione * Frost resistance * Langmuir analysis * Phytohormones * Soluble sugars * Winter wheat Subject RIV: EF - Botanics OBOR OECD: Plant sciences, botany Impact factor: 2.073, year: 2016

  9. Winter feeding activity of the common starfish (Asterias rubens L.): The role of temperature and shading

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Agüera García, A.; Trommelen, M.A.; Burrows, F.; Jansen, J.M.; Schellekens, T.; Smaal, A.C.

    2012-01-01

    In the Wadden Sea common starfish is an important predator of mussel beds which in turn are relevant ecological and economic resource. To improve the management of mussel seedbeds, knowledge is required on over winter predation, a factor affecting mussel survival. The aim of this study was to assess

  10. Soil temperature regulates nitrogen loss from lysimeters following fall and winter manure application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Many producers practice fall and winter manure spreading for economic and practical reasons. In order to minimize the risk of nitrogen loss between application and crop uptake in the spring, university extension publications and industry professionals often make recommendations based on soil tempera...

  11. Daily thermal fluctuations to a range of subzero temperatures enhance cold hardiness of winter-acclimated turtles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiebler, James M; Kumar, Manisha; Muir, Timothy J

    2017-12-01

    Although seasonal increases in cold hardiness are well documented for temperate and polar ectotherms, relatively little is known about supplemental increases in cold hardiness during winter. Because many animals are exposed to considerable thermal variation in winter, they may benefit from a quick enhancement of cold tolerance prior to extreme low temperature. Hatchling painted turtles (Chrysemys picta) overwintering in their natal nests experience substantial thermal variation in winter, and recently, it was found that brief subzero chilling of winter-acclimated hatchlings decreases subsequent chilling-induced mortality, increases blood concentrations of glucose and lactate, and protects the brain from cryoinjury. Here, we further characterize that phenomenon, termed 'cold conditioning', by exposing winter-acclimated hatchling turtles to -3.5, -7.0, or -10.5 °C gradually or repeatedly via daily thermal fluctuations over the course of 5 days and assessing their survival of a subsequent cold shock to a discriminating temperature of -12.7 °C. To better understand the physiological response to cold conditioning, we measured changes in glucose and lactate concentrations in the liver, blood, and brain. Cold conditioning significantly increased cold-shock survival, from 9% in reference turtles up to 74% in cold-conditioned turtles, and ecologically relevant daily thermal fluctuations were at least as effective at conferring cryoprotection as was gradual cold conditioning. Cold conditioning increased glucose concentrations, up to 25 μmol g -1 , and lactate concentrations, up to 30 μmol g -1 , in the liver, blood, and brain. Turtles that were cold conditioned with daily thermal fluctuations accumulated more glucose in the liver, blood, and brain, and had lower brain lactate, than those gradually cold conditioned. Given the thermal variation to which hatchling painted turtles are exposed in winter, we suggest that the supplemental protection conferred by cold

  12. Effect of Low Temperature and Wheat Winter-Hardiness on Survival of Puccinia striiformis f. sp. tritici under Controlled Conditions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lijie Ma

    Full Text Available Wheat stripe rust, caused by Puccinia striiformis f. sp. tritici (Pst, is one of the most important diseases of wheat worldwide. Understanding the survival of Pst during the overwintering period is critical for predicting Pst epidemics in the spring. Real-time quantitative PCR (qPCR methods quantifying Pst DNA and RNA (cDNA were developed and compared for the ability to quantify viable Pst in leaf tissues. Both qPCR of DNA and RNA can provide reliable measurement of viable Pst in plant tissues prior to the late sporulation stage for which qPCR of DNA gave a much higher estimate of fungal biomass than qPCR of RNA. The percentage of Pst biomass that was viable in detached and attached leaves under low temperatures decreased over time. Pst survived longer on attached leaves than on detached leaves. The survival of Pst in cultivars with strong winter-hardiness at 0°C and -5°C was greater than those with weak winter-hardiness. However, such differences in Pst survival among cultivars were negligible at -10, -15 and -20°C. Results indicated that Pst mycelia inside green leaves can also be killed by low temperatures rather than through death of green leaves under low temperatures. The relationship of Pst survival in attached leaves with temperature and winter-hardiness was well described by logistic models. Further field evaluation is necessary to assess whether inclusion of other factors such as moisture and snow cover could improve the model performance in predicting Pst overwintering potential, and hence the epidemic in spring.

  13. Foot Temperatures and Toe Blood Flow during a 12 km Winter Hike and Guard Duty

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Mekjavic, Igor B; Kocjan, Nina; Vrhovec, Miro; Golja, Petra; House, Carol; Eiken, Ola

    2005-01-01

    .... During the 3-week study, the trails were covered with snow. Peripheral vasodilatation, presumably as a result of the elevated core temperature, maintained average skin temperature constant during the 12 km hike, and increased toe temperature...

  14. Multiproxy summer and winter surface air temperature field reconstructions for southern South America covering the past centuries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neukom, R.; Grosjean, M.; Wanner, H. [University of Bern, Oeschger Centre for Climate Change Research (OCCR), Bern (Switzerland); University of Bern, Institute of Geography, Climatology and Meteorology, Bern (Switzerland); Luterbacher, J. [Justus Liebig University of Giessen, Department of Geography, Climatology, Climate Dynamics and Climate Change, Giessen (Germany); Villalba, R.; Morales, M.; Srur, A. [CONICET, Instituto Argentino de Nivologia, Glaciologia y Ciencias Ambientales (IANIGLA), Mendoza (Argentina); Kuettel, M. [University of Bern, Oeschger Centre for Climate Change Research (OCCR), Bern (Switzerland); University of Bern, Institute of Geography, Climatology and Meteorology, Bern (Switzerland); University of Washington, Department of Earth and Space Sciences, Seattle (United States); Frank, D. [Swiss Federal Research Institute WSL, Birmensdorf (Switzerland); Jones, P.D. [University of East Anglia, Climatic Research Unit, School of Environmental Sciences, Norwich (United Kingdom); Aravena, J.-C. [Centro de Estudios Cuaternarios de Fuego Patagonia y Antartica (CEQUA), Punta Arenas (Chile); Black, D.E. [Stony Brook University, School of Marine and Atmospheric Sciences, Stony Brook (United States); Christie, D.A.; Urrutia, R. [Universidad Austral de Chile Valdivia, Laboratorio de Dendrocronologia, Facultad de Ciencias Forestales y Recursos Naturales, Valdivia (Chile); D' Arrigo, R. [Earth Institute at Columbia University, Tree-Ring Laboratory, Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory, Palisades, NY (United States); Lara, A. [Universidad Austral de Chile Valdivia, Laboratorio de Dendrocronologia, Facultad de Ciencias Forestales y Recursos Naturales, Valdivia (Chile); Nucleo Cientifico Milenio FORECOS, Fundacion FORECOS, Valdivia (Chile); Soliz-Gamboa, C. [Utrecht Univ., Inst. of Environmental Biology, Utrecht (Netherlands); Gunten, L. von [Univ. of Bern (Switzerland); Univ. of Massachusetts, Climate System Research Center, Amherst (United States)

    2011-07-15

    We statistically reconstruct austral summer (winter) surface air temperature fields back to ad 900 (1706) using 22 (20) annually resolved predictors from natural and human archives from southern South America (SSA). This represents the first regional-scale climate field reconstruction for parts of the Southern Hemisphere at this high temporal resolution. We apply three different reconstruction techniques: multivariate principal component regression, composite plus scaling, and regularized expectation maximization. There is generally good agreement between the results of the three methods on interannual and decadal timescales. The field reconstructions allow us to describe differences and similarities in the temperature evolution of different sub-regions of SSA. The reconstructed SSA mean summer temperatures between 900 and 1350 are mostly above the 1901-1995 climatology. After 1350, we reconstruct a sharp transition to colder conditions, which last until approximately 1700. The summers in the eighteenth century are relatively warm with a subsequent cold relapse peaking around 1850. In the twentieth century, summer temperatures reach conditions similar to earlier warm periods. The winter temperatures in the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries were mostly below the twentieth century average. The uncertainties of our reconstructions are generally largest in the eastern lowlands of SSA, where the coverage with proxy data is poorest. Verifications with independent summer temperature proxies and instrumental measurements suggest that the interannual and multi-decadal variations of SSA temperatures are well captured by our reconstructions. This new dataset can be used for data/model comparison and data assimilation as well as for detection and attribution studies at sub-continental scales. (orig.)

  15. Winter to Spring Transition in Europe 48-45 degrees N: From Temperature Control by Advection to Control by Insolation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otterman, J.; Ardizzone, J.; Atlas, R.; Hu, H.; Jusem, J. C.; Starr, D.

    1999-01-01

    As established in previous studies, and analyzed further herein for the years 1988-1998, warm advection from the North Atlantic is the predominant control of the surface-air temperature in northern-latitude Europe in late winter. This thesis is supported by the substantial correlation Cti between the speed of the southwesterly surface winds over the eastern North Atlantic, as quantified by a specific Index Ina, and the 2-meter level temperature Ts over central Europe (48-54 deg N; 5-25 deg E), for January, February and early March. In mid-March and subsequently, the correlation Cti drops drastically (quite often it is negative). The change in the relationship between Ts and Ina marks a transition in the control of the surface-air temperature. As (a) the sun rises higher in the sky, (b) the snows melt (the surface absorptivity can increase by a factor of 3.0), (c) the ocean-surface winds weaken, and (d) the temperature difference between land and ocean (which we analyze) becomes small, absorption of insolation replaces the warm advection as the dominant control of the continental temperature. We define the onset of spring by this transition, which evaluated for the period of our study occurs at pentad 16 (Julian Date 76, that is, March 16). The control by insolation means that the surface is cooler under cloudy conditions than under clear skies. This control produces a much smaller interannual variability of the surface temperature and of the lapse rate than prevailing in winter, when the control is by advection. Regional climatic data would be of greatest value for agriculture and forestry if compiled for well-defined seasons. For continental northern latitudes, analysis presented here of factors controlling the surface temperature appears an appropriate tool for this task.

  16. Sodium immersible high temperature microphone design description

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gavin, A.P.; Anderson, T.T.; Janicek, J.J.

    1975-02-01

    Argonne National Laboratory has developed a rugged high-temperature (HT) microphone for use as a sodium-immersed acoustic monitor in Liquid Metal Fast Breeder Reactors (LMFBRs). Microphones of this design have been extensively tested in room temperature water, in air up to 1200 0 F, and in sodium up to 1200 0 F. They have been successfully installed and employed as acoustic monitors in several operating liquid metal systems. The design, construction sequence, calibration, and testing of these microphones are described. 6 references. (U.S.)

  17. Variation in the distribution of wintering anchovy Engraulis japonicus and its relationship with water temperature in the central and southern Yellow Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niu, Mingxiang; Wang, Jun

    2017-09-01

    In the present study, we investigated a shift in the spatial distribution of wintering anchovy ( Engraulis japonicus) and its relationship with water temperature, using data collected by bottom trawl surveys and remote sensing in the central and southern Yellow Sea, during 2000-2015. Our results indicate that the latitudinal distribution of wintering anchovy varied between years, but there was no consistent pattern in the direction of change (north or south). Wintering anchovy did not move northward with increasing water temperature. However, the latitudinal distribution of wintering anchovy correlated well with 10°C and 11°C isotherms. The results of both a one-step and a two-step generalized additive model indicated that water temperature was associated with both presence and biomass of wintering anchovy. This paper is the first to systematically examine the relationship between anchovy distribution and water temperature using a variety of techniques. All the findings confirm the impact of water temperature on wintering anchovy distribution, which has important implications for the continued management of the anchovy resource and the enhancement of marine fishery resources in the Yellow Sea, especially as the climate changes. However water temperature only partly explains the species distribution of anchovy, and stock characteristics also affect fishery distribution. Therefore, other factors should be considered in future research.

  18. Winter stream temperature in the rain-on-snow zone of the Pacific Northwest: influences of hillslope runoff and transient snow cover

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. A. Leach

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Stream temperature dynamics during winter are less well studied than summer thermal regimes, but the winter season thermal regime can be critical for fish growth and development in coastal catchments. The winter thermal regimes of Pacific Northwest headwater streams, which provide vital winter habitat for salmonids and their food sources, may be particularly sensitive to changes in climate because they can remain ice-free throughout the year and are often located in rain-on-snow zones. This study examined winter stream temperature patterns and controls in small headwater catchments within the rain-on-snow zone at the Malcolm Knapp Research Forest, near Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada. Two hypotheses were addressed by this study: (1 winter stream temperatures are primarily controlled by advective fluxes associated with runoff processes and (2 stream temperatures should be depressed during rain-on-snow events, compared to rain-on-bare-ground events, due to the cooling effect of rain passing through the snowpack prior to infiltrating the soil or being delivered to the stream as saturation-excess overland flow. A reach-scale energy budget analysis of two winter seasons revealed that the advective energy input associated with hillslope runoff overwhelms vertical energy exchanges (net radiation, sensible and latent heat fluxes, bed heat conduction, and stream friction and hyporheic energy fluxes during rain and rain-on-snow events. Historical stream temperature data and modelled snowpack dynamics were used to explore the influence of transient snow cover on stream temperature over 13 winters. When snow was not present, daily stream temperature during winter rain events tended to increase with increasing air temperature. However, when snow was present, stream temperature was capped at about 5 °C, regardless of air temperature. The stream energy budget modelling and historical analysis support both of our hypotheses. A key implication is that

  19. Cold priming drives the sub-cellular antioxidant systems to protect photosynthetic electron transport against subsequent low temperature stress in winter wheat

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li, Xiangnan; Cai, Jian; Liu, Fulai

    2014-01-01

    Low temperature seriously depresses the growth of wheat through inhibition of photosynthesis, while earlier cold priming may enhance the tolerance of plants to subsequent low temperature stress. Here, winter wheat plants were firstly cold primed (5.2°C lower temperature than the ambient temperatu...

  20. Regional-scale winter-spring temperature variability and chilling damage dynamics over the past two centuries in southeastern China

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duan, Jianping; Zhang, Qi-Bin; Lv, Lixin; Zhang, Chao [Institute of Botany, Chinese Academy of Sciences, State Key Laboratory of Vegetation and Environmental Change, Beijing (China)

    2012-08-15

    Winter-spring cold extreme is a kind of serious natural disaster for southeastern China. As such events are recorded in discrete documents, long and continuous records are required to understand their characteristics and driving forces. Here we report a regional-scale winter-spring (January-April) temperature reconstruction based on a tree-ring network of pine trees (Pinus massoniana) from five sampling sites over a large spatial scale (25-29 N, 111-115 E) in southeastern China. The regional tree-ring chronology explains 48.6% of the instrumental temperature variance during the period 1957-2008. The reconstruction shows six relatively warm intervals (i.e., {proportional_to}1849-1855, {proportional_to}1871-1888, {proportional_to}1909-1920, {proportional_to}1939-1944, {proportional_to}1958-1968, 1997-2007) and five cold intervals (i.e., {proportional_to}1860-1870, {proportional_to}1893-1908, {proportional_to}1925-1934, {proportional_to}1945-1957, {proportional_to}1982-1996) during 1849-2008. The last decade and the 1930s were the warmest and coldest decades, respectively, in the past 160 years. The composite analysis of 500-hPa geopotential height fields reveals that distinctly different circulation patterns occurred in the instrumental and pre-instrumental periods. The winter-spring cold extremes in southeastern China are associated with Ural-High ridge pattern for the instrumental period (1957-2008), whereas the cold extremes in pre-instrumental period (1871-1956) are associated with North circulation pattern. (orig.)

  1. Habitat quality affects stress responses and survival in a bird wintering under extremely low ambient temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cīrule, Dina; Krama, Tatjana; Krams, Ronalds; Elferts, Didzis; Kaasik, Ants; Rantala, Markus J.; Mierauskas, Pranas; Luoto, Severi; Krams, Indrikis A.

    2017-12-01

    Animals normally respond to stressful environmental stimuli by releasing glucocorticoid hormones. We investigated whether baseline corticosterone (CORT), handling-induced corticosterone concentration(s), and body condition indices of members of willow tit ( Poecile montanus) groups differed while wintering in old growth forests and managed young forests in mild weather conditions and during cold spells. Willow tits spend the winter season in non-kin groups in which dominant individuals typically claim their priority to access resources, while subordinate individuals may experience greater levels of stress and higher mortality, especially during cold spells. We captured birds to measure baseline CORT and levels of handling-induced CORT secretion after 20 min of capture. Willow tits in the young forests had higher baseline CORT and a smaller increase in CORT in response to capture than individuals in the old forests. Baseline CORT was higher in females and juvenile birds compared to adult males, whereas handling-induced CORT secretion did not differ between birds of different ages. During cold spells, baseline CORT of willow tits increased and handling-induced CORT secretion decreased, especially in birds in young forests. Willow tits' survival was higher in the old forests, with dominant individuals surviving better than subordinates. Our results show that changes in CORT secretion reflect responses to habitat quality and climate harshness, indicating young managed coniferous forests as a suboptimal habitat for the willow tit.

  2. Design and quantification of an extreme winter storm scenario for emergency preparedness and planning exercises in California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dettinger, M.D.; Martin, Ralph F.; Hughes, M.; Das, T.; Neiman, P.; Cox, D.; Estes, G.; Reynolds, D.; Hartman, R.; Cayan, D.; Jones, L.

    2012-01-01

    The USGS Multihazards Project is working with numerous agencies to evaluate and plan for hazards and damages that could be caused by extreme winter storms impacting California. Atmospheric and hydrological aspects of a hypothetical storm scenario have been quantified as a basis for estimation of human, infrastructure, economic, and environmental impacts for emergency-preparedness and flood-planning exercises. In order to ensure scientific defensibility and necessary levels of detail in the scenario description, selected historical storm episodes were concatentated to describe a rapid arrival of several major storms over the state, yielding precipitation totals and runoff rates beyond those occurring during the individual historical storms. This concatenation allowed the scenario designers to avoid arbitrary scalings and is based on historical occasions from the 19th and 20th Centuries when storms have stalled over the state and when extreme storms have arrived in rapid succession. Dynamically consistent, hourly precipitation, temperatures, barometric pressures (for consideration of storm surges and coastal erosion), and winds over California were developed for the so-called ARkStorm scenario by downscaling the concatenated global records of the historical storm sequences onto 6- and 2-km grids using a regional weather model of January 1969 and February 1986 storm conditions. The weather model outputs were then used to force a hydrologic model to simulate ARkStorm runoff, to better understand resulting flooding risks. Methods used to build this scenario can be applied to other emergency, nonemergency and non-California applications. ?? 2011 The Author(s).

  3. Winter temperatures in the second half of the sixteenth century in the central area of the Iberian Peninsula

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Bullón

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper studies the winter temperatures of the second part of the sixteenth century in the central area of the Iberian Peninsula. A large number of historical documents that are stored in many different Spanish archives were consulted in order to carry out this research. The data was first arranged and weighted according to the intensity and significance of the meteorological phenomena described and, subsequently, these values were assigned an ordinal index ranging from +4 to −4. The statistical treatment applied is based on the reconstruction of temperatures equivalent to this ordinal index, expressed as anomalies of the 1961–1990 period, belonging to a reference station located at the approximate geographical center of the area under study. The results show winter thermal conditions different from current ones that, for the most part, stay below the reference average and that occurred with a wide range of variability. The influence that thermal conditions had on the evolution of some environmental aspects are considered based on the forest exploitation problem information and on the wine harvest production.

  4. Seasonal migration, vertical activity and winter temperature experience of Greenland halibut Reinhardtius hippoglossoides (Walbaum) in West Greenland waters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boje, Jesper; Neuenfeldt, Stefan; Sparrevohn, Claus Reedtz

    2014-01-01

    little is known about its behavior and habitat characteristics. We tagged adult Greenland halibut in the waters off Ilulissat with electronic data storage tags that collected information on depth, temperature, and time. Although clear differences between individuals in migration and vertical behavior...... were present, we discovered a consistent seasonal migration from the relatively shallow-water Disko Bay area into the deep waters of the Ilulissat Icefjord, where the fish resided in the winter months before returning to Disko Bay. Vertical activity was pronounced at both locations, with fish covering...... resident in Disko Bay (mean range 2.6°C) than when resident in the ice fjord (mean range 1.4°C). Using the tagged halibut as a 'live tool,' we show that parts of the ice fjord are hundreds of meters deeper than previously thought. We also document the first seawater temperature measurements made beneath...

  5. Cropland responses to extreme winter temperature events: results from a manipulation experiment in north-eastern Italy

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Simon, G.; Alberti, G.; Delle Vedove, G.; Peressotti, A.; Zaldei, A.; Miglietta, F.

    2012-04-01

    In the last years, several studies has focused on terrestrial ecosystem response to climate warming. Most of them have been conducted on natural ecosystems (forests or grasslands), but few have considered intensively managed ecosystems such as croplands despite of their global extension. In particular, extreme events, such as temperature changes outside the growing season (winter) when soil is not covered by plants, can have a strong impact on soil respiration, residues decomposition, yield and overall net biome production (NBP). In this study, we investigated the response of soil respiration (total and heterotrophic), aboveground NPP, yield and NBP on a soybean crop (Glycine max (L.) Merr.) due to a manipulated warmer or cooler winter. The experiment was carried out in Beano (46°00' N 13°01'E, Italy). Soil albedo and soil temperature were manipulated by covering soil surface during late winter with a layer of inert ceramized silica gravel. We tested three treatments with three replicates each: cooling (Co; white gravel), warming (W; black gravel), mix (M; black and white 4:1 gravel) and control (C; bare soil). An automated soil respiration system measured continuously total soil CO2 efflux across all the year and heterotrophic respiration after sowing in root exclusion subplots. Additionally, soil temperature profiles (0, 2.5, 5 and 10 cm depth), soil water content (between 5 and 10 cm depth) were monitored in each plot. After sowing, soybean phenological phases were periodically assessed and final yield was measured in each plot. Results showed a significant change in upper soil temperature between gravel application and canopy closure (maximum of + 5.8 °C and - 6.8 °C in the warming and cooling treatments, respectively). However, warming had only a transient effect on soil respiration (increase) before sowing. Thereafter, as soon as fresh organic matter availability decreased, soil respiration rate decreased and annual budget was not significantly different

  6. Accounting for anthropic energy flux of traffic in winter urban road surface temperature simulations with the TEB model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khalifa, A.; Marchetti, M.; Bouilloud, L.; Martin, E.; Bues, M.; Chancibaut, K.

    2016-02-01

    Snowfall forecasts help winter maintenance of road networks, ensure better coordination between services, cost control, and a reduction in environmental impacts caused by an inappropriate use of de-icers. In order to determine the possible accumulation of snow on pavements, forecasting the road surface temperature (RST) is mandatory. Weather outstations are used along these networks to identify changes in pavement status, and to make forecasts by analyzing the data they provide. Physical numerical models provide such forecasts, and require an accurate description of the infrastructure along with meteorological parameters. The objective of this study was to build a reliable urban RST forecast with a detailed integration of traffic in the Town Energy Balance (TEB) numerical model for winter maintenance. The study first consisted in generating a physical and consistent description of traffic in the model with two approaches to evaluate traffic incidence on RST. Experiments were then conducted to measure the effect of traffic on RST increase with respect to non-circulated areas. These field data were then used for comparison with the forecast provided by this traffic-implemented TEB version.

  7. Accounting for anthropic energy flux of traffic in winter urban road surface temperature simulations with TEB model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khalifa, A.; Marchetti, M.; Bouilloud, L.; Martin, E.; Bues, M.; Chancibaut, K.

    2015-06-01

    A forecast of the snowfall helps winter coordination operating services, reducing the cost of the maintenance actions, and the environmental impacts caused by an inappropriate use of de-icing. In order to determine the possible accumulation of snow on pavement, the forecast of the road surface temperature (RST) is mandatory. Physical numerical models provide such forecast, and do need an accurate description of the infrastructure along with meteorological parameters. The objective of this study was to build a reliable urban RST forecast with a detailed integration of traffic in the Town Energy Balance (TEB) numerical model for winter maintenance. The study first consisted in generating a physical and consistent description of traffic in the model with all the energy interactions, with two approaches to evaluate the traffic incidence on RST. Experiments were then conducted to measure the traffic effect on RST increase with respect to non circulated areas. These field data were then used for comparison with forecast provided by this traffic-implemented TEB version.

  8. Simulation of emergence of winter wheat in response to soil temperature, water potential and planting depth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seedling emergence is a critical stage in the establishment of dryland wheat. Soil temperature, soil water potential and planting depth are important factors influencing emergence. These factors have considerable spatio-temporal variation making it difficult to predict the timing and percentage of w...

  9. Responses of wintering geese to the designation of goose foraging areas in The Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koffijberg, K; Schekkerman, H.; van der Jeugd, H.P.; Hornman, M.; van Winden, E.

    2017-01-01

    The Netherlands is important for wintering migratory herbivorous geese, numbers of which have rapidly increased, leading to conflict with agriculture. In 2005/2006, a new goose management policy aimed to limit compensation payments to farmers by concentrating foraging geese in 80 000 ha of

  10. Time variations of the effects of circulation variability modes on European temperature and precipitation in winter

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Beranová, Romana; Huth, Radan

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 28, č. 2 (2008), s. 139-158 ISSN 0899-8418 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA205/05/2282; GA AV ČR IAA300420506 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z30420517 Keywords : temperature * precipitation * modes of variability * time variations * Euro-Atlantic sector Subject RIV: DG - Athmosphere Sciences, Meteorology Impact factor: 1.971, year: 2008

  11. Impacts of interactive dust and its direct radiative forcing on interannual variations of temperature and precipitation in winter over East Asia: Impacts of Dust on IAVs of Temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lou, Sijia [Scripps Institution of Oceanography, University of California, San Diego, La Jolla California USA; Atmospheric Science and Global Change Division, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland Washington USA; Russell, Lynn M. [Scripps Institution of Oceanography, University of California, San Diego, La Jolla California USA; Yang, Yang [Scripps Institution of Oceanography, University of California, San Diego, La Jolla California USA; Atmospheric Science and Global Change Division, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland Washington USA; Liu, Ying [Atmospheric Science and Global Change Division, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland Washington USA; Singh, Balwinder [Atmospheric Science and Global Change Division, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland Washington USA; Ghan, Steven J. [Atmospheric Science and Global Change Division, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland Washington USA

    2017-08-24

    We used 150-year pre-industrial simulations of the Community Earth System Model (CESM) to quantify the impacts of interactively-modeled dust emissions on the interannual variations of temperature and precipitation over East Asia during the East Asian Winter Monsoon (EAWM) season. The simulated December-January-February dust column burden and dust optical depth are lower over northern China in the strongest EAWM years than those of the weakest years, with regional mean values lower by 38.3% and 37.2%, respectively. The decrease in dust over the dust source regions (the Taklamakan and Gobi Deserts) and the downwind region (such as the North China Plain) leads to an increase in direct radiative forcing (RF) both at the surface and top of atmosphere by up to 1.5 and 0.75 W m-2, respectively. The effects of EAWM-related variations in surface winds, precipitation and their effects on dust emissions and wet removal contribute about 67% to the total dust-induced variations of direct RF at the surface and partly offset the cooling that occurs with the EAWM strengthening by heating the surface. The variations of surface air temperature induced by the changes in wind and dust emissions increase by 0.4-0.6 K over eastern coastal China, northeastern China, and Japan, which weakens the impact of EAWM on surface air temperature by 3–18% in these regions. The warming results from the combined effects of changes in direct RF and easterly wind anomalies that bring warm air from the ocean to these regions. Moreover, the feedback of the changes in wind on dust emissions weakens the variations of the sea level pressure gradient on the Siberian High while enhancing the Maritime Continent Low. Therefore, cold air is prevented from being transported from Siberia, Kazakhstan, western and central China to the western Pacific Ocean and decreases surface air temperature by 0.6 K and 2 K over central China and the Tibetan Plateau, respectively. Over eastern coastal China, the variations of

  12. Elevation of antibiotic resistance genes at cold temperatures: implications for winter storage of sludge and biosolids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, J H; Novak, J T; Knocke, W R; Pruden, A

    2014-12-01

    Prior research suggests that cold temperatures may stimulate the proliferation of certain antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs) and gene transfer elements during storage of biosolids. This could have important implications on cold weather storage of biosolids, as often required in northern climates until a time suitable for land application. In this study, levels of an integron-associated gene (intI1) and an ARG (sul1) were monitored in biosolids subject to storage at 4, 10 and 20°C. Both intI1 and sul1 were observed to increase during short-term storage (gene transfer of integron-associated ARGs and that biosolids storage conditions should be considered prior to land application. Wastewater treatment plants have been identified as the hot spots for the proliferation and dissemination of antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs) and antibiotic resistant bacteria (ARB) to the environment through discharge of treated effluent to water bodies as well as application of biosolids to land. Identifying critical control points within the treatment process may aid in the development of solutions for the reduction of ARGs and ARB and curbing the spread of antibiotic resistance. This study found increases in ARGs during biosolids storage and identifies changes in operational protocols that could help reduce ARG loading to the environment when biosolids are land-applied. © 2014 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  13. Internal hive temperature as a means of monitoring honey bee colony health in a migratory beekeeping operation before and during winter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Internal temperatures of honey bee hives kept at different sites in North Dakota were monitored before and during winter to evaluate the effects of treatment, in the form of exposure to commercial pollination, and location on colony health. In October, hives exposed to commercial pollination durin...

  14. Recent Intensified Winter Coldness in the Mid-High Latitudes of Eurasia and Its Relationship with Daily Extreme Low Temperature Variability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chuhan Lu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Observational records in recent decades show a large-scale decrease in the cold-season temperature variance in the Northern Hemisphere midlatitudes under continuous global warming. However, severe low temperature events in winter frequently occurred in midlatitude Eurasia (MEA in the last decade. Here, we define a new coldness intensity (CI index for the near-surface based on the amplitude of daily anomalously cold temperatures in winter to demonstrate the CI of the variability of low temperature extremes. The results show that a sign-consistent mode dominates the CI variation in MEA, with a marked intensification during the last decade via empirical orthogonal function (EOF analysis. This leading mode is significantly related to the frequency of winter extreme events. The associated circulations are characterized by a remarkable anomalous anticyclone in Northwest Eurasia, which induced substantial cold advection in MEA. The widespread intensified CI in MEA is closely linked with strong surface anticyclones and synoptic blocking in the mid-high latitudes (25°E–85°E. Coincidently, positive phase shifts of the first two leading modes of the extratropical circulation, which feature similar blocking-like anomalies in the northwestern Eurasian subarctic, jointly play an important role in the recent frequency of severe winters.

  15. Evaluation of air-soil temperature relationships simulated by land surface models during winter across the permafrost region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wenli; Rinke, Annette; Moore, John C.; Ji, Duoying; Cui, Xuefeng; Peng, Shushi; Lawrence, David M.; McGuire, A. David; Burke, Eleanor J.; Chen, Xiaodong; Delire, Christine; Koven, Charles; MacDougall, Andrew; Saito, Kazuyuki; Zhang, Wenxin; Alkama, Ramdane; Bohn, Theodore J.; Ciais, Philippe; Decharme, Bertrand; Gouttevin, Isabelle; Hajima, Tomohiro; Krinner, Gerhard; Lettenmaier, Dennis P.; Miller, Paul A.; Smith, Benjamin; Sueyoshi, Tetsuo

    2016-01-01

     A realistic simulation of snow cover and its thermal properties are important for accurate modelling of permafrost. We analyze simulated relationships between air and near-surface (20 cm) soil temperatures in the Northern Hemisphere permafrost region during winter, with a particular focus on snow insulation effects in nine land surface models and compare them with observations from 268 Russian stations. There are large across-model differences as expressed by simulated differences between near-surface soil and air temperatures, (ΔT), of 3 to 14 K, in the gradients between soil and air temperatures (0.13 to 0.96°C/°C), and in the relationship between ΔT and snow depth. The observed relationship between ΔT and snow depth can be used as a metric to evaluate the effects of each model's representation of snow insulation, and hence guide improvements to the model’s conceptual structure and process parameterizations. Models with better performance apply multi-layer snow schemes and consider complex snow processes. Some models show poor performance in representing snow insulation due to underestimation of snow depth and/or overestimation of snow conductivity. Generally, models identified as most acceptable with respect to snow insulation simulate reasonable areas of near-surface permafrost (12–16 million km2). However, there is not a simple relationship between the quality of the snow insulation in the acceptable models and the simulated area of Northern Hemisphere near-surface permafrost, likely because several other factors such as differences in the treatment of soil organic matter, soil hydrology, surface energy calculations, and vegetation also provide important controls on simulated permafrost distribution.

  16. Road structural elements temperature trends diagnostics using sensory system of own design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dudak, Juraj; Gaspar, Gabriel; Sedivy, Stefan; Pepucha, Lubomir; Florkova, Zuzana

    2017-09-01

    A considerable funds is spent for the roads maintenance in large areas during the winter. The road maintenance is significantly affected by the temperature change of the road structure. In remote locations may occur a situation, when it is not clear whether the sanding is actually needed because the lack of information on road conditions. In these cases, the actual road conditions are investigated by a personal inspection or by sending out a gritting vehicle. Here, however, is a risk of unnecessary trip the sanding vehicle. This situation is economically and environmentally unfavorable. The proposed system solves the problem of measuring the temperature profile of the road and the utilization of the predictive model to determine the future development trend of temperature. The system was technically designed as a set of sensors to monitor environmental values such as the temperature of the road, ambient temperature, relative air humidity, solar radiation and atmospheric pressure at the measuring point. An important part of the proposal is prediction model which based on the inputs from sensors and historical measurements can, with some probability, predict temperature trends at the measuring point. The proposed system addresses the economic and environmental aspects of winter road maintenance.

  17. Comparison of the Impact of the Arctic Oscillation and East Atlantic - West Russia Teleconnection on Interannual Variation in East Asian Winter Temperatures and Monsoon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Young-Kwon; Kim, Hae-Dong

    2014-01-01

    The large-scale impacts of the Arctic Oscillation (AO) and the East Atlantic/West Russia (EA/WR) teleconnection on the East Asian winter climate anomalies are compared for the past 34 winters focusing on 1) interannual monthly to seasonal temperature variability, 2) East Asian winter monsoon (EAWM), and 3) the Siberian high (SH) and cold surge. Regression analysis reveals warming by AO and EA/WR over mid-latitude East Asia during their positive phase and vice versa. The EA/WR impact is found to be comparable to the AO impact in affecting the East Asian temperature and monsoon. For example, warm (cold) months over mid-latitude East Asia during the positive (negative) AO are clearly seen when the AO and EA/WR are in the same phase. Near zero correlation is found between temperature and the AO phase when both teleconnections are in an opposite phase. The well-known negative relationship between SH and the AO phase is observed significantly more often when the AO is in the same phase with the EA/WR. Also, the indices of EAWM, cold surge, and SH are found to be more highly negative-correlated with the EA/WR rather than with the AO. The advective temperature change and associated circulation demonstrate that the anomalous large-scale field including the SH over the mid-latitude Asian inland is better represented by the EA/WR, influencing the East Asian winter climates. These results suggest that the impact of EA/WR should be considered more important than previously thought for a better understanding of East Asian winter temperature and monsoon variability.

  18. Autumn-winter minimum temperature changes in the southern Sikhote-Alin mountain range of northeastern Asia since 1529 AD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ukhvatkina, Olga N.; Omelko, Alexander M.; Zhmerenetsky, Alexander A.; Petrenko, Tatyana Y.

    2018-01-01

    The aim of our research was to reconstruct climatic parameters (for the first time for the Sikhote-Alin mountain range) and to compare them with global climate fluctuations. As a result, we have found that one of the most important limiting factors for the study area is the minimum temperatures of the previous autumn-winter season (August-December), and this finding perfectly conforms to that in other territories. We reconstructed the previous August-December minimum temperature for 485 years, from 1529 to 2014. We found 12 cold periods (1535-1540, 1550-1555, 1643-1649, 1659-1667, 1675-1689, 1722-1735, 1791-1803, 1807-1818, 1822-1827, 1836-1852, 1868-1887, 1911-1925) and seven warm periods (1560-1585, 1600-1610, 1614-1618, 1738-1743, 1756-1759, 1776-1781, 1944-2014). These periods correlate well with reconstructed data for the Northern Hemisphere and the neighboring territories of China and Japan. Our reconstruction has 3-, 9-, 20-, and 200-year periods, which may be in line with high-frequency fluctuations in El Niño-Southern Oscillation (ENSO), the short-term solar cycle, Pacific Decadal Oscillation (PDO) fluctuations, and the 200-year solar activity cycle, respectively. We suppose that the temperature of the North Pacific, expressed by the PDO may make a major contribution to regional climate variations. We also assume that the regional climatic response to solar activity becomes apparent in the temperature changes in the northern part of Pacific Ocean and corresponds to cold periods during the solar minimum. These comparisons show that our climatic reconstruction based on tree ring chronology for this area may potentially provide a proxy record for long-term, large-scale past temperature patterns for northeastern Asia. The reconstruction reflects the global traits and local variations in the climatic processes of the southern territory of the Russian Far East for more than the past 450 years.

  19. Accuracy of Modelled Stratospheric Temperatures in the Winter Arctic Vortex from Infra Red Montgolfier Long Duration Balloon Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pommereau, J.-P.; Garnier, A.; Knudson, B. M.; Letrenne, G.; Durand, M.; Cseresnjes, M.; Nunes-Pinharanda, M.; Denis, L.; Newman, P. A.; Einaudi, Franco (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The temperature of the stratosphere has been measured in the Arctic vortex every 9-10 minutes along the trajectory of four Infra Red Montgolfier long duration balloons flown for 7 to 22 days during the winters of 1997 and 1999. From a number of comparisons to independent sensors, the accuracy of the measurements is demonstrated to be plus or minus 0.5 K during nighttime and at altitude below 28 km (10 hPa). The performances of the analyses of global meteorological models, European Center for Medium Range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF) 31 and 50 levels, United Kingdom Meteorological Office (UKMO), Data Assimilation Office (DAO), National Climatic Prediction Center (NCEP) and NCEP/NCAR reanalysis, used in photochemical simulations of ozone destruction and interpretation of satellite data, are evaluated by comparison to this large (3500 data points) and homogeneous experimental data set. Most of models, except ECMWF31 in 1999, do show a smal1 average warm bias of between 0 and 1.6 K, with deviations particularly large, up to 20 K at high altitude (5hPa) in stratospheric warming conditions in 1999. Particularly wrong was ECMWF 31 levels near its top level at 10 hPa in 1999 where temperature 25 K colder than the real atmosphere were reported. The average dispersion between models and measurements varies from plus or minus 1.0 to plus or minus 3.0 K depending on the model and the year. It is shown to be the result of three contributions. The largest is a long wave modulation likely caused by the displacement of the temperature field in the analyses compared to real atmosphere. The second is the overestimation of the vertical gradient of temperature particularly in warming conditions, which explains the increase of dispersion from 1997 to 1999. Unexpectedly, the third and smallest (plus or minus 0.6-0.7 K) is the contribution of meso and subgrid scale vertical and horizontal features associated to the vertical propagation of orographic or gravity waves. Compared to other

  20. Temperature decrease in the extratropics of South America in response to a tropical forcing during the austral winter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mueller, G.V. [Centro de Investigaciones Cientificas y Transferencia de Tecnologia a la Produccion (CICYTTP-CONICET), Diamante, Entre Rios (Argentina)

    2010-07-01

    This paper focuses on the dynamic mechanisms that create favorable conditions for the occurrence of frosts that affect large areas of Argentina and are denominated generalized frosts (GF). The hemispheric teleconnection patterns linked to extreme cold events affecting central and northeastern Argentina during winter are identified. The objective is to determine whether the conditions found in previous studies for the composite of winters with extreme (maximum and minimum) frequency of GF occurrence respond to typical characteristics of the austral winter or they are inherent to those particular winters. Taking the mean winter as basic state in the 1961-1990 period, a series of numerical experiments are run using a primitive equation model in which waves are excited with a thermal forcing. The positions of the thermal forcing are chosen according to observed convection anomalies in a basic state given by the austral winters with extreme frequency of GF occurrence. The wave trains excited by anomalous convection situated in specific regions may propagate across the Pacific Ocean and reach South America with the appropriate phase, creating the local favorable conditions for the occurrence of GF. However, the anomalous convection is, by itself, not sufficient since the response also depends on the basic state configuration. This is proved by placing the forcing over the region of significant anomalous convection for maximum and minimum frequency of GF occurrence and the response was very different in comparison to the mean winter. It is concluded that the conditions for a greater GF frequency of occurrence are inherent to these particular winters, so that such conditions are not present in the average winter. (orig.)

  1. 2012/13 abnormal cold winter in Japan associated with Large-scale Atmospheric Circulation and Local Sea Surface Temperature over the Sea of Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ando, Y.; Ogi, M.; Tachibana, Y.

    2013-12-01

    On Japan, wintertime cold wave has social, economic, psychological and political impacts because of the lack of atomic power stations in the era of post Fukushima world. The colder winter is the more electricity is needed. Wintertime weather of Japan and its prediction has come under the world spotlight. The winter of 2012/13 in Japan was abnormally cold, and such a cold winter has persisted for 3 years. Wintertime climate of Japan is governed by some dominant modes of the large-scale atmospheric circulations. Yasunaka and Hanawa (2008) demonstrated that the two dominant modes - Arctic Oscillation (AO) and Western Pacific (WP) pattern - account for about 65% of the interannual variation of the wintertime mean surface air temperature of Japan. A negative AO brings about cold winter in Japan. In addition, a negative WP also brings about cold winter in Japan. Looking back to the winter of 2012/13, both the negative AO and negative WP continued from October through December. If the previous studies were correct, it would have been extremely very cold from October through December. In fact, in December, in accordance with previous studies, it was colder than normal. Contrary to the expectation, in October and November, it was, however, warmer than normal. This discrepancy signifies that an additional hidden circumstance that heats Japan overwhelms these large-scale atmospheric circulations that cool Japan. In this study, we therefore seek an additional cause of wintertime climate of Japan particularly focusing 2012 as well as the AO and WP. We found that anomalously warm oceanic temperature surrounding Japan overwhelmed influences of the AO or WP. Unlike the inland climate, the island climate can be strongly influenced by surrounding ocean temperature, suggesting that large-scale atmospheric patterns alone do not determine the climate of islands. (a) Time series of a 5-day running mean AO index (blue) as defined by Ogi et al., (2004), who called it the SVNAM index. For

  2. Design and Construction of a Temperature and Pressure Data ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In this work, a temperature and pressure monitor is designed. The system takes in temperature and pressure readings from the temperature sensor (LM35) and the pressure sensor (MPX4115A) respectively. The temperature and pressure readings are processed by a microcontroller (PIC16F877A) and displayed on an LCD ...

  3. Training Early Career Scientists in Flight Instrument Design Through Experiential Learning: NASA Goddard's Planetary Science Winter School.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bleacher, L. V.; Lakew, B.; Bracken, J.; Brown, T.; Rivera, R.

    2017-01-01

    The NASA Goddard Planetary Science Winter School (PSWS) is a Goddard Space Flight Center-sponsored training program, managed by Goddard's Solar System Exploration Division (SSED), for Goddard-based postdoctoral fellows and early career planetary scientists. Currently in its third year, the PSWS is an experiential training program for scientists interested in participating on future planetary science instrument teams. Inspired by the NASA Planetary Science Summer School, Goddard's PSWS is unique in that participants learn the flight instrument lifecycle by designing a planetary flight instrument under actual consideration by Goddard for proposal and development. They work alongside the instrument Principal Investigator (PI) and engineers in Goddard's Instrument Design Laboratory (IDL; idc.nasa.gov), to develop a science traceability matrix and design the instrument, culminating in a conceptual design and presentation to the PI, the IDL team and Goddard management. By shadowing and working alongside IDL discipline engineers, participants experience firsthand the science and cost constraints, trade-offs, and teamwork that are required for optimal instrument design. Each PSWS is collaboratively designed with representatives from SSED, IDL, and the instrument PI, to ensure value added for all stakeholders. The pilot PSWS was held in early 2015, with a second implementation in early 2016. Feedback from past participants was used to design the 2017 PSWS, which is underway as of the writing of this abstract.

  4. Sensitivity of the sea ice concentration over the Kara-Barents Sea in autumn to the winter temperature variability over East Asia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, K. H.; Chang, E. C.

    2017-12-01

    In this study, we performed sensitivity experiments by utilizing the Global/Regional Integrated Model system with different conditions of the sea ice concentration over the Kara-Barents (KB) Sea in autumn, which can affect winter temperature variability over East Asia. Prescribed sea ice conditions are 1) climatological autumn sea ice concentration obtained from 1982 to 2016, 2) reduced autumn sea ice concentration by 50% of the climatology, and 3) increased autumn sea ice concentration by 50% of climatology. Differently prescribed sea ice concentration changes surface albedo, which affects surface heat fluxes and near-surface air temperature. The reduced (increased) sea ice concentration over the KB sea increases (decreases) near-surface air temperature that leads the lower (higher) sea level pressure in autumn. These patterns are maintained from autumn to winter season. Furthermore, it is shown that the different sea ice concentration over the KB sea has remote effects on the sea level pressure patterns over the East Asian region. The lower (higher) sea level pressure over the KB sea by the locally decreased (increased) ice concentration is related to the higher (lower) pressure pattern over the Siberian region, which induces strengthened (weakened) cold advection over the East Asian region. From these sensitivity experiments it is clarified that the decreased (increased) sea ice concentration over the KB sea in autumn can lead the colder (warmer) surface air temperature over East Asia in winter.

  5. Partial least regression approach to forecast the East Asian winter monsoon using Eurasian snow cover and sea surface temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Lulu; Wu, Zhiwei; Zhang, Renhe; Yang, Xin

    2017-06-01

    Seasonal prediction of the East Asian (EA) winter monsoon (EAWM) is of great significance yet a challenging issue. In this study, three statistical seasonal prediction models for the EAWM are established using three leading modes of the Eurasian snow cover (ESC), the first leading mode of sea surface temperature (SST) and the four leading modes of the combination of the ESC and SST in preceding autumn, respectively. These leading modes are identified by the partial-least square (PLS) regression. The first PLS (PLS1) mode for the ESC features significantly anomalous snow cover in Siberia and Tibetan Plateau regions. The ESC second PLS (PLS2) mode corresponds to large areas of snow cover anomalies in the central Siberia, whereas the third PLS (PLS3) mode a meridional seesaw pattern of ESC. The SST PLS1 mode basically exhibits an El Niño-Southern Oscillation developing phase in equatorial eastern Pacific and significant SST anomalies in North Atlantic. A strong EAWM tends to emerge in a La Niña year concurrent with cold SST anomalies in the North Atlantic, and vice versa. After a 35-year training period (1967-2001), three PLS seasonal prediction models are constructed and the 11-year hindcast is performed for the period of 2002-2012, respectively. The PLS model based on combination of the autumn ESC and SST exhibits the best hindcast skill among the three models, its correlation coefficient between the observation and the hindcast reaching 0.86. This indicates that this physical-based PLS model may provide another practical tool for the EAWM. In addition, the relative contribution of the ESC and SST is also examined by assessing the hindcast skills of the other two PLS models constructed solely by the ESC or SST. Possible physical mechanisms are also discussed.

  6. Linear and nonlinear winter atmospheric responses to extreme phases of low frequency Pacific sea surface temperature variability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Dandan; Wu, Qigang; Hu, Aixue; Yao, Yonghong; Liu, Shizuo; Schroeder, Steven R.; Yang, Fucheng

    2018-02-01

    This study examines Northern Hemisphere winter (DJFM) atmospheric responses to opposite strong phases of interdecadal (low frequency, LF) Pacific sea surface temperature (SST) forcing, which resembles El Niño-Southern Oscillation (ENSO) on a longer time scale, in observations and GFDL and CAM4 model simulations. Over the Pacific-North America (PNA) sector, linear observed responses of 500-hPa height (Z500) anomalies resemble the PNA teleconnection pattern, but show a PNA-like nonlinear response because of a westward Z500 shift in the negative (LF-) relative to the positive LF (LF+) phase. Significant extratropical linear responses include a North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO)-like Z500 anomaly, a dipole-like Z500 anomaly over northern Eurasia associated with warming over mid-high latitude Eurasia, and a Southern Annular anomaly pattern associated with warming in southern land areas. Significant nonlinear Z500 responses also include a NAO-like anomaly pattern. Models forced by LF+ and LF- SST anomalies reproduce many aspects of observed linear and nonlinear responses over the Pacific-North America sector, and linear responses over southern land, but not in the North Atlantic-European sector and Eurasia. Both models simulate PNA-like linear responses in the North Pacific-North America region similar to observed, but show larger PNA-like LF+ responses, resulting in a PNA nonlinear response. The nonlinear PNA responses result from both nonlinear western tropical Pacific rainfall changes and extratropical transient eddy feedbacks. With LF tropical Pacific forcing only (LFTP+ and LFTP-, climatological SST elsewhere), CAM4 simulates a significant NAO response to LFTP-, including a linear negative and nonlinear positive NAO response.

  7. Temperature, light and nitrate sensing coordinate Arabidopsis seed dormancy cycling, resulting in winter and summer annual phenotypes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Footitt, Steven; Huang, Ziyue; Clay, Heather A; Mead, Andrew; Finch-Savage, William E

    2013-01-01

    Seeds use environmental cues to sense the seasons and their surroundings to initiate the life cycle of the plant. The dormancy cycling underlying this process is extensively described, but the molecular mechanism is largely unknown. To address this we selected a range of representative genes from published array experiments in the laboratory, and investigated their expression patterns in seeds of Arabidopsis ecotypes with contrasting life cycles over an annual dormancy cycle in the field. We show how mechanisms identified in the laboratory are coordinated in response to the soil environment to determine the dormancy cycles that result in winter and summer annual phenotypes. Our results are consistent with a seed-specific response to seasonal temperature patterns (temporal sensing) involving the gene DELAY OF GERMINATION 1 (DOG1) that indicates the correct season, and concurrent temporally driven co-opted mechanisms that sense spatial signals, i.e. nitrate, via CBL-INTERACTING PROTEIN KINASE 23 (CIPK23) phosphorylation of the NITRATE TRANSPORTER 1 (NRT1.1), and light, via PHYTOCHROME A (PHYA). In both ecotypes studied, when all three genes have low expression there is enhanced GIBBERELLIN 3 BETA-HYDROXYLASE 1 (GA3ox1) expression, exhumed seeds have the potential to germinate in the laboratory, and the initiation of seedling emergence occurs following soil disturbance (exposure to light) in the field. Unlike DOG1, the expression of MOTHER of FLOWERING TIME (MFT) has an opposite thermal response in seeds of the two ecotypes, indicating a role in determining their different dormancy cycling phenotypes. PMID:23590427

  8. The effect of light and nutrient availability on growth, nitrogen, and pigment contents of Saccharina latissima (Phaeophyceae) grown in outdoor tanks, under natural variation of sunlight and temperature, during autumn and early winter in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boderskov, Teis; Schmedes, Peter; Bruhn, Annette

    2016-01-01

    counterbalance the loss of biomass, and increase the absolute harvestable amount of protein and pigments. The hypothesis was tested in a land-based, factorial-designed, pilot-scale experiment using whole algae individuals exposed to naturally relevant high or low availability of nutrients and light....... The experiment was conducted during fall/early winter in Grenaa, Denmark, in outdoor tanks, exposed to ambient light and temperature variations. With high nutrient availability, the absolute harvestable amounts of nitrogen, fucoxanthin, and chlorophyll a increased by 50.1–60.1, 21.7–53.7, and 47...

  9. Advanced alloy design technique: High temperature cobalt base superalloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dreshfield, R. L.; Freche, J. C.; Sandrock, G. D.

    1972-01-01

    Advanced alloy design technique was developed for treating alloys that will have extended life in service at high temperature and intermediate temperatures. Process stabilizes microstructure of the alloy by designing it so that compound identified with embrittlement is eliminated or minimized. Design process is being used to develop both nickel and cobalt-base superalloys.

  10. Measured winter and spring-time indoor temperatures in UK homes over the period 1969–2010: A review and synthesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vadodaria, K.; Loveday, D.L.; Haines, V.

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents a review and synthesis of average winter and spring-time indoor temperatures in UK homes measured over the period 1969–2010. Analysis of measured temperatures in a sample of solid wall dwellings in the UK, conducted as part of the CALEBRE research project, is included. The review suggests that, for periods when occupation was likely, there has been little or no increase in winter and spring-time average living room temperatures over the last 40 years, with average recorded living room temperatures having been historically lower than the WHO-recommended value of 21 °C. Correspondingly, for periods of likely occupation, average bedroom temperatures appear to have increased. Compared with non-domestic buildings, there have been fewer investigations of domestic thermal comfort, either in the UK or elsewhere, and hence the paper also calls for further detailed investigations of domestic indoor temperatures during occupied hours together with thermal comfort evaluations in order to better understand domestic thermal environments. Based on suggestions from the limited range of studies available to date, living room temperatures may need to be maintained within the range 20–22 °C for thermal satisfaction, though this requires confirmation through further research. The study also emphasises that improving the energy efficiency of homes should be the primary means to effect any increases in indoor temperatures that are deemed essential. Considerations for future policy are discussed. - Highlights: • We review indoor temperatures measured in UK homes during 1960-2010. • We present analysis of temperature recorded by our study in 20 UK homes. • Little or no increase observed in living room temperatures for the last 40 years. • Occupied bedroom temperatures appear to have increased. • Living room temperatures have been historically lower than the WHO guidelines

  11. Winter Weather

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Education Centers Harwood Training Grants Videos E-Tools Winter Storms Plan. Equip. Train To prevent injuries, illnesses and Fatalities during winter storms. This page requires that javascript be enabled ...

  12. Winter MVC

    OpenAIRE

    Castellón Gadea, Pasqual

    2013-01-01

    Winter MVC és un framework de presentació basat en Spring MVC que simplifica la metodologia de configuracions. Winter MVC es un framework de presentación basado en Spring MVC que simplifica la metodología de configuraciones. Winter MVC is a presentation framework that simplifies Spring MVC configuration methodology.

  13. Recent advances in design procedures for high temperature plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-01-01

    Thirteen papers cover several aspects of design for high temperature plant. These include design codes, computerized structural analysis and mechanical properties of materials at high temperatures. Seven papers are relevant for fast reactors and these are indexed separately. These cover shakedown design, design codes for thin shells subjected to cyclic thermal loading, the inelastic behaviour of stainless steels and creep and crack propagation in reactor structures under stresses caused by thermal cycling loading. (author)

  14. Structural analysis for elevated temperature design of the LMFBR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Griffin, D.S.

    1976-02-01

    In the structural design of LMFBR components for elevated temperature service it is necessary to take account of the time-dependent, creep behavior of materials. The accommodation of creep to assure design reliability has required (1) development of new design limits and criteria, (2) development of more detailed representations of material behavior, and (3) application of the most advanced analysis techniques. These developments are summarized and examples are given to illustrate the current state of technology in elevated temperature design

  15. Sensitivity of crop yield and N losses in winter wheat to changes in mean and variability of temperature and precipitation in Denmark using the FASSET model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Patil, Raveendra Hanumantagoud; Lægdsmand, Mette; Olesen, Jørgen Eivind

    2012-01-01

    Sensitivity of wheat yield and soil nitrogen (N) losses to stepwise changes in means and variances of climatic variables were determined using the FASSET model. The LARS-WG was used to generate climate scenarios using observed climate data (1961–90) from two sites in Denmark, which differed...... in climate and soil conditions. Scenarios involved changes to (i) mean temperature alone, (ii) mean and variability of temperature, (iii) winter and summer precipitation amounts and (iv) duration of dry and wet series. The model predicted lower grain yield and N uptake in response to increases in mean...... temperatures, caused by early maturity, with little change in variability. This, however, increased soil mineral N causing increased N losses. On sandy loam, larger temperature variability lowered grain yields and increased N losses coupled with higher variability at all the mean temperature ranges. On coarse...

  16. On the differences between early and middle winter atmospheric responses to sea surface temperature anomalies in the northwest Atlantic

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peng, S.; Mysak, L.A.; Derome, J.; Ritchie, H.; Dugas, B.

    1994-01-01

    Using an atmospheric global spectral model at RPN with T42 horizontal resolution, we have shown that the winter atmosphere in the mid-latitude is capable of reacting to the SST anomalies prescribed in the northwest Atlantic with two different responses. The nature of the response is determined by the climatological conditions of the winter system. Experiments are conducted using either the perpetual November or January conditions, with or without the SST anomalies prescribed. Six 50-day integrations, with positive (or negative) SST anomalies prescribed, initialized from independent November analyses and similarly, four runs initialized from January analyses, have been examined in comparison with their control runs

  17. Winter is coming: Diapause in the subtropical swallowtail butterfly Euryades corethrus (Lepidoptera, Papilionidae) is triggered by the shortening of day length and reinforced by low temperatures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caporale, Andressa; Romanowski, Helena Piccoli; Mega, Nicolás Oliveira

    2017-04-01

    Diapause is modulated by genetic responses to some environmental cues. The most common stimulus to trigger diapause is photoperiod, but temperature and humidity can also be important. Subtropical grasslands insects are overexposed to seasonality and can use diapause as strategy to overcome harsh conditions, avoiding freezing winter temperatures and drought summer conditions. Here, we investigate if photoperiod, temperature, and humidity can induce and terminate dormancy using the model Euryades corethrus, a butterfly from Pampa that diapause as pupae. We hypothesize that photoperiod, temperature, and humidity can induce dormancy; to test the hypothesis, individuals from a stock population were subjected to experiments controlling these three factors. Photoperiod and temperature interactions were also tested. To evaluate if the removal of the harsh factor that induced diapause trigger diapause termination, 50% of dormant pupae in each experiment were exposed to amenable conditions. The results indicated that diapause is mainly induced by short photophases, while temperature and humidity separately do not increase dormancy frequency. Short photoperiods and low temperatures interact with each other, increasing dormancy in experimental populations. The evidences suggest that diapause is trigger by short-day lengths and boosted by low temperatures as winter approaches. The incidence of obligatory summer diapause was not supported, but the occurrence of dormant pupae in high-temperature treatments suggests that high temperatures produce facultative diapause. Regarding diapause termination, the softening of harsh conditions that induced diapause was not sufficient to reverse the dormancy state, suggesting that diapause termination is more complex than previously thought, probably involving internal clocks. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Late holocene primary productivity and sea surface temperature variations in the northeastern Arabian Sea: Implications for winter monsoon variability.

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Boll, A; Luckge, A; Munz, P.; Forke, S.; Schulz, H.; Ramaswamy, V.; Rixen, T.; Gaye, B.; Emeis, K.-C.

    Pakistan are indicated from 400 B.C. to 250 A.D. by reduced productivity and relatively high SST. At about 250 A.D., the intensity of the winter monsoon increased off Pakistan as indicated by a trend to lower SST. We infer that monsoon conditions were...

  19. Regulation of the membrane structure by brassinosteroids and progesterone in winter wheat seedlings exposed to low temperature

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Filek, M.; Rudolphi-Skórska, E.; Sieprawska, A.; Kvasnica, Miroslav; Janeczko, A.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 128, DEC (2017), s. 37-45 ISSN 0039-128X R&D Projects: GA ČR GJ15-08202Y Institutional support: RVO:61389030 Keywords : 24-Epibrassinolide * 24-Epicastasterone * Galactolipids * Phospholipids * Progesterone * Seedlings * Winter wheat Subject RIV: CC - Organic Chemistry OBOR OECD: Organic chemistry Impact factor: 2.282, year: 2016

  20. Brittle Materials Design, High Temperature Gas Turbine

    Science.gov (United States)

    1976-10-01

    temperature (659»10). A g: -^up of 31.2. 7 gm/cm3 density injection molded Sig ^ test bars, maoe using the best current nitriding cycle and an...2150oF) % Nitrided Phase Composition a Si^N^ Ratio % a % |3 % Si ß Sig ^ 0 Hours 19.2 1 1 98 1.0 24 Hours 60.8 62 15 23 4.13 72...Paul F. Jahn, Vice President, Broadway and Main Street, Graniteville, Massachusetts 01829 Garrett Corporation Mr. H. R. Schelp, 9851 Sepulveda

  1. A Design Exercise on Temperature Measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, J. C.

    2013-01-01

    A design exercise in chemical engineering is described which is concerned with thermocouples. Physics is the relevant discipline, a point that was made to the students doing the exercise, and accordingly an account of the exercise for the guidance of teachers and lecturers is presented as a contribution to "Physics Education."

  2. Brittle Materials Design, High Temperature Gas Turbine

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-03-01

    aspect which calls out "rules of thumb" of ceramic design comprising such items as: generous radii, no sharp corners, crown fitting diameters, etc. The...early work on this approach was spent on mold development.(2,3) Two types of molds were selected for evaluation. Ont. ype was a silica- zirconia ceramic

  3. Design of temperature monitoring system based on CAN bus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Li

    2017-10-01

    The remote temperature monitoring system based on the Controller Area Network (CAN) bus is designed to collect the multi-node remote temperature. By using the STM32F103 as main controller and multiple DS18B20s as temperature sensors, the system achieves a master-slave node data acquisition and transmission based on the CAN bus protocol. And making use of the serial port communication technology to communicate with the host computer, the system achieves the function of remote temperature storage, historical data show and the temperature waveform display.

  4. Increasing persistent haze in Beijing: potential impacts of weakening East Asian winter monsoons associated with northwestern Pacific sea surface temperature trends

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pei, Lin; Yan, Zhongwei; Sun, Zhaobin; Miao, Shiguang; Yao, Yao

    2018-03-01

    Over the past decades, Beijing, the capital city of China, has encountered increasingly frequent persistent haze events (PHE). While the increased pollutant emissions are considered as the most important reason, changes in regional atmospheric circulations associated with large-scale climate warming also play a role. In this study, we find a significant positive trend of PHE in Beijing for the winters from 1980 to 2016 based on updated daily observations. This trend is closely related to an increasing frequency of extreme anomalous southerly episodes in North China, a weakened East Asian trough in the mid-troposphere and a northward shift of the East Asian jet stream in the upper troposphere. These conditions together depict a weakened East Asian winter monsoon (EAWM) system, which is then found to be associated with an anomalous warm, high-pressure system in the middle-lower troposphere over the northwestern Pacific. A practical EAWM index is defined as the seasonal meridional wind anomaly at 850 hPa in winter over North China. Over the period 1900-2016, this EAWM index is positively correlated with the sea surface temperature anomalies over the northwestern Pacific, which indicates a wavy positive trend, with an enhanced positive phase since the mid-1980s. Our results suggest an observation-based mechanism linking the increase in PHE in Beijing with large-scale climatic warming through changes in the typical regional atmospheric circulation.

  5. The engineering approach to winter sports

    CERN Document Server

    Cheli, Federico; Maldifassi, Stefano; Melzi, Stefano; Sabbioni, Edoardo

    2016-01-01

    The Engineering Approach to Winter Sports presents the state-of-the-art research in the field of winter sports in a harmonized and comprehensive way for a diverse audience of engineers, equipment and facilities designers, and materials scientists. The book examines the physics and chemistry of snow and ice with particular focus on the interaction (friction) between sports equipment and snow/ice, how it is influenced by environmental factors, such as temperature and pressure, as well as by contaminants and how it can be modified through the use of ski waxes or the microtextures of blades or ski soles. The authors also cover, in turn, the different disciplines in winter sports:  skiing (both alpine and cross country), skating and jumping, bob sledding and skeleton, hockey and curling, with attention given to both equipment design and on the simulation of gesture and  track optimization.

  6. Electronic Modeling and Design for Extreme Temperatures Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — We are developing CAD tools, models and methodologies for electronics design for circuit operation in extreme environments with focus on very low temperatures...

  7. Design and development of gas turbine high temperature reactor 300

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kunitomi, Kazuhiko; Katanishi, Shoji; Takada, Shoji; Yan, Xing; Takizuka, Takakazu

    2003-01-01

    JAERI (Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute) has been designing a Japan's original gas turbine high temperature reactor, GTHTR300 (Gas Turbine High Temperature Reactor 300). The greatly simplified design based on salient features of the HTGR (High Temperature Gas-cooled reactor) with a closed helium gas turbine enables the GTHTR300 a high efficient and economically competitive reactor to be deployed in early 2010s. Also, the GTHTR300 fully taking advantage of various experiences accumulated in design, construction and operation of the HTTR (High Temperature Engineering Test Reactor) and fossil gas turbine systems reduces technological development concerning a reactor system and electric generation system. Original features of this system are core design with two-year refueling interval, conventional steel material usage for a reactor pressure vessel, innovative plant flow scheme and horizontally installed gas turbine unit. Due to these salient features, the capital cost of the GTHTR300 is less than a target cost of 200 thousands Yen/kWe, and the electric generation cost is close to a target cost of 4 Yen/kWh. This paper describes the original design features focusing on reactor core design, fuel design, in-core structure design and reactor pressure vessel design except PCU design. Also, R and D for developing the power conversion unit is briefly described. The present study is entrusted from the Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology of Japan. (author)

  8. Spintronic Memristor Based Temperature Sensor Design with CMOS Current Reference

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-01

    studied. BJT transistor is usually favored by designers. The most popular method is utilizing the difference between base-emitter voltages of a...substrate BJT transistor to detect temperature changes [18][20]. To make up the non-perfect linearity of BJT transistor , many curvature correction...the traditional temperature sensors, the key components for temperature detection are p-n junction diode [25] or transistor [17], which have been well

  9. Effect of Sowing Quantity on Soil Temperature and Yield of Winter Wheat under Straw Strip Mulching in Arid Region of Northwest China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lan, Xuemei; Chai, Yuwei; Li, Rui; Li, Bowen; Cheng, Hongbo; Chang, Lei; Chai, Shouxi

    2018-01-01

    In order to explore the characteristics and relationship between soil temperature and yield of winter wheat, under different sowing quantities conditions of straw mulching conventional drilling in Northwest China, this study took Lantian 26 as material, under the whole corn mulching conventional drilling in Changhe town and Pingxiang town, setting up 3 different seeding quantities of 270 kg/ha (SSMC1), 324 kg/ha (SSMC2) and 405 kg/ha (SSMC3), to study the difference of soil temperature during the growth period of winter wheat and its correlation with yield components. Results showed: the average soil temperature of 0∼25cm in two ecological zones in the whole growth period have a significant change with the increase of sowing quantities; too much seeding had a sharp drop in soil temperature; the highest temperature of SSMC in Changhe town was the middle quantity of SSMC 2; the highest temperature of SSMC in Pingxiang town was the lowest sowing quantity of SSMC1. Diurnal variation of soil temperature at all growth stages showed: with the increase of SSMC, in the morning it increased with the increase of soil depth, noon and evening reducing with the depth of the soil. The average soil temperature of SSMC2 was higher than that of in all the two ecological zones in the whole growth period of SSMC.The maximum day temperature difference of each treatment was at noon. With the increase of SSMC, the yield increase varied with two ecological zones. SSMC of the local conventional sowing quantity of 270kg/ha SSMC1 yield was the highest in Changhe Town. SSMC of the middle sowing quantity SSMC2 of 324kg/ha yield was the highest in Pingxiang town. The difference of grain number per spike was the main cause of yield difference among these 3 treatments. Correlation analysis showed: the correlation among the yield and yield components, growth index and soil temperature varied with different ecological zones; thousand kernel weight and grain number per ear (.964** and.891**) had a

  10. Thermocouple design for measuring temperatures of small insects

    Science.gov (United States)

    A.A. Hanson; R.C. Venette

    2013-01-01

    Contact thermocouples often are used to measure surface body temperature changes of insects during cold exposure. However, small temperature changes of minute insects can be difficult to detect, particularly during the measurement of supercooling points. We developed two thermocouple designs, which use 0.51 mm diameter or 0.127 mm diameter copper-constantan wires, to...

  11. Winter is losing its cool

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, S.

    2017-12-01

    Winter seasons have significant societal impacts across all sectors ranging from direct human health to ecosystems, transportation, and recreation. This study quantifies the severity of winter and its spatial-temporal variations using a newly developed winter severity index and daily temperature, snowfall and snow depth. The winter severity and the number of extreme winter days are decreasing across the global terrestrial areas during 1901-2015 except the southeast United States and isolated regions in the Southern Hemisphere. These changes are dominated by winter warming, while the changes in daily snowfall and snow depth played a secondary role. The simulations of multiple CMIP5 climate models can well capture the spatial and temporal variations of the observed changes in winter severity and extremes during 1951-2005. The models are consistent in projecting a future milder winter under various scenarios. The winter severity is projected to decrease 60-80% in the middle-latitude Northern Hemisphere under the business-as-usual scenario. The winter arrives later, ends earlier and the length of winter season will be notably shorter. The changes in harsh winter in the polar regions are weak, mainly because the warming leads to more snowfall in the high latitudes.

  12. Design for ASIC reliability for low-temperature applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yuan; Mojaradi, Mohammad; Westergard, Lynett; Billman, Curtis; Cozy, Scott; Burke, Gary; Kolawa, Elizabeth

    2005-01-01

    In this paper, we present a methodology to design for reliability for low temperature applications without requiring process improvement. The developed hot carrier aging lifetime projection model takes into account both the transistor substrate current profile and temperature profile to determine the minimum transistor size needed in order to meet reliability requirements. The methodology is applicable for automotive, military, and space applications, where there can be varying temperature ranges. A case study utilizing this methodology is given to design for reliability into a custom application-specific integrated circuit (ASIC) for a Mars exploration mission.

  13. Inter-Relationship Between Subtropical Pacific Sea Surface Temperature, Arctic Sea Ice Concentration, and the North Atlantic Oscillation in Recent Summers and Winters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Young-Kwon; Cullather, Richard I.; Nowicki, Sophie M.; Kim, Kyu-Myong

    2017-01-01

    The inter-relationship between subtropical western-central Pacific sea surface temperatures (STWCPSST), sea ice concentration in the Beaufort Sea (SICBS), and the North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO) are investigated for the last 37 summers and winters (1980-2016). Lag-correlation of the STWCPSST×(-1) in spring with the NAO phase and SICBS in summer increases over the last two decades, reaching r = 0.4-0.5 with significance at 5 percent, while winter has strong correlations in approximately 1985-2005. Observational analysis and the atmospheric general circulation model experiments both suggest that STWCPSST warming acts to increase the Arctic geopotential height and temperature in the following season. This atmospheric response extends to Greenland, providing favorable conditions for developing the negative phase of the NAO. SIC and surface albedo tend to decrease over the Beaufort Sea in summer, linked to the positive surface net shortwave flux. Energy balance considering radiative and turbulent fluxes reveal that available energy that can heat surface is larger over the Arctic and Greenland and smaller over the south of Greenland, in response to the STWCPSST warming in spring. XXXX Arctic & Atlantic: Positive upper-level height/T anomaly over the Arctic and Greenland, and a negative anomaly over the central-eastern Atlantic, resembling the (-) phase of the NAO. Pacific: The negative height/T anomaly over the mid-latitudes, along with the positive anomaly over the STWCP, where 1degC warming above climatology is prescribed. Discussion: It is likely that the Arctic gets warm and the NAO is in the negative phase in response to the STWCP warming. But, there are other factors (e.g., internal variability) that contribute to determination of the NAO phase: not always the negative phase of the NAO in the event of STWCP warming (e.g.: recent winters and near neutral NAO in 2017 summer).

  14. Access to warm drinking water prevents rumen temperature drop without affecting in situ NDF disappearance in grazing winter range cows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ingestion of large quantities of cold water or frozen forage may result in changes in temperature of ruminal contents. Rumen microorganisms may be sensitive to temperature changes in the ruminal environment. Therefore, this study was conducted to assess the variability in ruminal temperature and e...

  15. Design and Development of a PC- Based temperature monitoring ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The design of the work involves a circuit that measures the surrounding temperature using appropriate sensors and the sensor output is then converted to digital signals after due processing and conditioning of the signals. There is also an interface circuit configured to make it compatible with the PC hardware. This design ...

  16. Design of PID temperature control system based on STM32

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jianxin; Li, Hailin; Ma, Kai; Xue, Liang; Han, Bianhua; Dong, Yuemeng; Tan, Yue; Gu, Chengru

    2018-03-01

    A rapid and high-accuracy temperature control system was designed using proportional-integral-derivative (PID) control algorithm with STM32 as micro-controller unit (MCU). The temperature control system can be applied in the fields which have high requirements on the response speed and accuracy of temperature control. The temperature acquisition circuit in system adopted Pt1000 resistance thermometer as temperature sensor. Through this acquisition circuit, the monitoring actual temperature signal could be converted into voltage signal and transmitted into MCU. A TLP521-1 photoelectric coupler was matched with BD237 power transistor to drive the thermoelectric cooler (TEC) in FTA951 module. The effective electric power of TEC was controlled by the pulse width modulation (PWM) signals which generated by MCU. The PWM signal parameters could be adjusted timely by PID algorithm according to the difference between monitoring actual temperature and set temperature. The upper computer was used to input the set temperature and monitor the system running state via serial port. The application experiment results show that the temperature control system is featured by simple structure, rapid response speed, good stability and high temperature control accuracy with the error less than ±0.5°C.

  17. High-Temperature Gas-Cooled Test Reactor Point Design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sterbentz, James William [Idaho National Laboratory; Bayless, Paul David [Idaho National Laboratory; Nelson, Lee Orville [Idaho National Laboratory; Gougar, Hans David [Idaho National Laboratory; Kinsey, James Carl [Idaho National Laboratory; Strydom, Gerhard [Idaho National Laboratory; Kumar, Akansha [Idaho National Laboratory

    2016-04-01

    A point design has been developed for a 200 MW high-temperature gas-cooled test reactor. The point design concept uses standard prismatic blocks and 15.5% enriched UCO fuel. Reactor physics and thermal-hydraulics simulations have been performed to characterize the capabilities of the design. In addition to the technical data, overviews are provided on the technological readiness level, licensing approach and costs.

  18. Design and Implementation of High Precision Temperature Measurement Unit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Xianzhen; Yu, Weiyu; Zhang, Zhijian; Liu, Hancheng

    2018-03-01

    Large-scale neutrino detector requires calibration of photomultiplier tubes (PMT) and electronic system in the detector, performed by plotting the calibration source with a group of designated coordinates in the acrylic sphere. Where the calibration source positioning is based on the principle of ultrasonic ranging, the transmission speed of ultrasonic in liquid scintillator of acrylic sphere is related to temperature. This paper presents a temperature measurement unit based on STM32L031 and single-line bus digital temperature sensor TSic506. The measurement data of the temperature measurement unit can help the ultrasonic ranging to be more accurate. The test results show that the temperature measurement error is within ±0.1°C, which satisfies the requirement of calibration source positioning. Take energy-saving measures, with 3.7V/50mAH lithium battery-powered, the temperature measurement unit can work continuously more than 24 hours.

  19. Structural analysis technology for high-temperature design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Greenstreet, W.L.

    1977-01-01

    Results from an ongoing program devoted to the development of verified high-temperature structural design technology applicable to nuclear reactor systems are described. The major aspects addressed by the program are (1) deformation behavior; (2) failure associated with creep rupture, brittle fracture, fatigue, creep-fatigue interactions, and crack propagation; and (3) the establishment of appropriate design criteria. This paper discusses information developed in the deformation behavior category. The material considered is type 304 stainless steel, and the temperatures range to 1100 0 F (593 0 C). In essence, the paper considers the ingredients necessary for predicting relatively high-temperature inelastic deformation behavior of engineering structures under time-varying temperature and load conditions and gives some examples. These examples illustrate the utility and acceptability of the computational methods identified and developed for prediting essential features of complex inelastic behaviors. Conditions and responses that can be encountered under nuclear reactor service conditions and invoked in the examples. (Auth.)

  20. Heat experiment design to estimate temperature dependent thermal properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Romanovski, M

    2008-01-01

    Experimental conditions are studied to optimize transient experiments for estimating temperature dependent thermal conductivity and volumetric heat capacity. A mathematical model of a specimen is the one-dimensional heat equation with boundary conditions of the second kind. Thermal properties are assumed to vary nonlinearly with temperature. Experimental conditions refer to the thermal loading scheme, sampling times and sensor location. A numerical model of experimental configurations is studied to elicit the optimal conditions. The numerical solution of the design problem is formulated on a regularization scheme with a stabilizer minimization without a regularization parameter. An explicit design criterion is used to reveal the optimal sensor location, heating duration and flux magnitude. Results obtained indicate that even the strongly nonlinear experimental design problem admits the aggregation of its solution and has a strictly defined optimal measurement scheme. Additional region of temperature measurements with allowable identification error is revealed.

  1. Design of temperature detection device for drum of belt conveyor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Li; He, Rongjun

    2018-03-01

    For difficult wiring and big measuring error existed in the traditional temperature detection method for drum of belt conveyor, a temperature detection device for drum of belt conveyor based on Radio Frequency(RF) communication is designed. In the device, detection terminal can collect temperature data through tire pressure sensor chip SP370 which integrates temperature detection and RF emission. The receiving terminal which is composed of RF receiver chip and microcontroller receives the temperature data and sends it to Controller Area Network(CAN) bus. The test results show that the device meets requirements of field application with measuring error ±3.73 ° and single button battery can provide continuous current for the detection terminal over 1.5 years.

  2. Application of change-point analysis to determine winter sleep patterns of the raccoon dog (Nyctereutes procyonoides from body temperature recordings and a multi-faceted dietary and behavioral study of wintering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mustonen Anne-Mari

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A multi-faceted approach was used to investigate the wintertime ecophysiology and behavioral patterns of the raccoon dog, Nyctereutes procyonoides, a suitable model for winter sleep studies. By utilizing GPS tracking, activity sensors, body temperature (Tb recordings, change-point analysis (CPA, home range, habitat and dietary analyses, as well as fatty acid signatures (FAS, the impact of the species on wintertime food webs was assessed. The timing of passive bouts was determined with multiple methods and compared to Tb data analyzed by CPA. Results Raccoon dogs displayed wintertime mobility, and the home range sizes determined by GPS were similar or larger than previous estimates by radio tracking. The preferred habitats were gardens, shores, deciduous forests, and sparsely forested areas. Fields had close to neutral preference; roads and railroads were utilized as travel routes. Raccoon dogs participated actively in the food web and gained benefit from human activity. Mammals, plants, birds, and discarded fish comprised the most important dietary classes, and the consumption of fish could be detected in FAS. Ambient temperature was an important external factor influencing Tb and activity. The timing of passive periods approximated by behavioral data and by CPA shared 91% similarity. Conclusions Passive periods can be determined with CPA from Tb recordings without the previously used time-consuming and expensive methods. It would be possible to recruit more animals by using the simple methods of data loggers and ear tags. Hunting could be used as a tool to return the ear-tagged individuals allowing the economical extension of follow-up studies. The Tb and CPA methods could be applied to other northern carnivores.

  3. The temperature challenges on cardiac performance in winter-quiescent and migration-stage eels Anguilla anguilla

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Methling, C.; Steffensen, J. F.; Skov, Peter Vilhelm

    2012-01-01

    °C-acclimated, which suggests that at low temperatures, eels secure cardiac output by heart enlargement. Inhibition of specific sarcolemmal Ca 2 + channels by selective drug treatment revealed that, depending on temperature, L-type channels is the major entry site, but also that reverse-mode Na +/Ca......The present study was undertaken to examine cardiac responses to some of the temperature challenges that eels encounter in their natural environment. The contractile properties of ventricular muscle was studied on electrically paced tissue strips after long term acclimation at 0 °C, 10 °C, or 20 °C...

  4. Design study on gas turbine high temperature reactor (GTHTR300)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kunitomi, Kazuhiko; Katanishi, Shoji; Takada, Shoji; Takizuka, Takakazu; Nakata, Tetsuo; Yan, Xing; Takei, Masanobu; Kosugiyama, Shinichi; Shiozawa, Shusaku

    2002-01-01

    Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI) has been conducting the design study of an original design concept of gas turbine high temperature reactor, the GTHTR300 (Gas Turbine High Temperature Reactor 300). The GTHTR300 is a greatly simplified HTGR-GT plant that leads to substantially reduced technical and cost requirements for earlier technology deployment. Also, it is expected to be an efficient and economically competitive reactor in 2010s due to newly proposed design features such as core design with two-year refueling interval, conventional steel material usage for a reactor pressure vessel, innovative plant flow scheme and horizontally installed gas turbine unit. This paper describes the original design features focusing on reactor core design, fuel design, in-core structure design and reactor pressure vessel design. In addition, a preliminary cost evaluation proved that the capital cost of the GTHTR300 is less than a target cost of 200 thousands Yen/kWe. The present study is entrusted from the Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology of Japan. (author)

  5. Ring-widths of the above tree-line shrub Rhododendron reveal the change of minimum winter temperature over the past 211 years in Southwestern China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bi, Yingfeng; Xu, Jianchu; Yang, Jinchao; Li, Zongshan; Gebrekirstos, Aster; Liang, Eryuan; Zhang, Shibao; Yang, Yang; Yang, Yongping; Yang, Xuefei

    2017-06-01

    Changes in minimum winter temperature (MWT) and their potential effects on plant growth and development have been gaining increased scientific attention. To better understand these changes across long temporal scales, the present study used dendroclimatological techniques to assess variations in MWT in Southwestern China. Using data from Rhododendron species distributed in areas above the tree-line, a regional composite chronology was generated for a 341-year period. Based on the significant negative correlation between MWT values and ring-width, the most reliable parts of this chronological data were then used to reconstruct MWT values for the past 211 years. This reconstructed MWT series showed decadal to multi-decadal fluctuations. Three distinct cold periods prevailed during 1823-1858, 1882-1891 and 1922-1965, while four warm intervals occurred in 1800-1822, 1858-1881, 1892-1921 and 1966-2011. Our reconstructed MWT reveals a warming trend over the most recent eight decades, which is in agreement with instrumental observations. However, the MWT values and rate of warming over the past seven decades did not exceed those found in the reconstructed temperature data for the past 211 years. Spatial correlations reveal that the MWT in Southwest China is strongly associated with regional temperatures in the Eastern and Central Himalaya, Northern China, and the Indian Peninsula. Larger scale climate oscillations of the Western Pacific and Northern Indian Ocean as well as the North Atlantic Oscillation probably influenced the region's temperature in the past.

  6. Alternative designs of high-temperature superconducting synchronous generators

    OpenAIRE

    Goddard, K. F.; Lukasik, B.; Sykulski, J. K.

    2010-01-01

    This paper discusses the different possible designs of both cored and coreless superconducting synchronous generators using high-temperature superconducting (HTS) tapes, with particular reference to demonstrators built at the University of Southampton using BiSCCO conductors. An overview of the electromagnetic, thermal, and mechanical issues is provided, the advantages and drawbacks of particular designs are highlighted, the need for compromises is explained, and practical solutions are offer...

  7. Reactor core design of Gas Turbine High Temperature Reactor 300

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kunitomi, Kazuhiko; Katanishi, Shoji; Takada, Shoji; Yan Xing; Tsuji, Nobumasa

    2004-01-01

    Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI) has been designing Japan's original gas turbine high temperature reactor, Gas Turbine High Temperature Reactor 300 (GTHTR300). The greatly simplified design based on salient features of the High Temperature Gas-cooled Reactor (HTGR) with a closed helium gas turbine enables the GTHTR300 a highly efficient and economically competitive reactor to be deployed in early 2010s. Also, the GTHTR300 fully taking advantage of various experiences accumulated in design, construction and operation of the High Temperature Engineering Test Reactor (HTTR) and existing fossil fired gas turbine systems reduces technological development concerning a reactor system and electric generation system. Original design features of this system are the reactor core design based on a newly proposed refueling scheme named sandwich shuffling, conventional steel material usage for a reactor pressure vessel (RPV), an innovative coolant flow scheme and a horizontally installed gas turbine unit. The GTHTR300 can be continuously operated without the refueling for 2 years. Due to these salient features, the capital cost of the GTHTR300 is less than a target cost of 200,000 yen (1667 US$)/kW e, and the electric generation cost is close to a target cost of 4 yen (3.3 US cents)/kW h. This paper describes the original design features focusing on the reactor core design and the in-core structure design, including the innovative coolant flow scheme for cooling the RPV. The present study is entrusted from the Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology of Japan

  8. Junction Temperature Aware Energy Efficient Router Design on FPGA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thind, Vandana; Sharma, Shivani; Minwer, M H

    2015-01-01

    Energy, Power and efficiency are very much related to each other. To make any system efficient, Power consumed by it must be minimized or we can say that power dissipation should be less. In our research we tried to make a energy efficient router design on FPGA by varying junction temperature...

  9. Simplified Analysis Methods for Primary Load Designs at Elevated Temperatures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carter, Peter [Stress Engineering Services Inc.; Jetter, Robert I [Consultant; Sham, Sam [ORNL

    2011-01-01

    The use of simplified (reference stress) analysis methods is discussed and illustrated for primary load high temperature design. Elastic methods are the basis of the ASME Section III, Subsection NH primary load design procedure. There are practical drawbacks with this approach, particularly for complex geometries and temperature gradients. The paper describes an approach which addresses these difficulties through the use of temperature-dependent elastic-perfectly plastic analysis. Correction factors are defined to address difficulties traditionally associated with discontinuity stresses, inelastic strain concentrations and multiaxiality. A procedure is identified to provide insight into how this approach could be implemented but clearly there is additional work to be done to define and clarify the procedural steps to bring it to the point where it could be adapted into code language.

  10. Winter Wonderlands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coy, Mary

    2011-01-01

    Listening to people complain about the hardships of winter and the dreariness of the nearly constant gray sky prompted the author to help her sixth graders recognize and appreciate the beauty that surrounds them for nearly five months of the year in western New York. The author opines that if students could see things more artistically, the winter…

  11. Designing high-temperature steels via surface science and thermodynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gross, Cameron T.; Jiang, Zilin; Mathai, Allan; Chung, Yip-Wah

    2016-06-01

    Electricity in many countries such as the US and China is produced by burning fossil fuels in steam-turbine-driven power plants. The efficiency of these power plants can be improved by increasing the operating temperature of the steam generator. In this work, we adopted a combined surface science and computational thermodynamics approach to the design of high-temperature, corrosion-resistant steels for this application. The result is a low-carbon ferritic steel with nanosized transition metal monocarbide precipitates that are thermally stable, as verified by atom probe tomography. High-temperature Vickers hardness measurements demonstrated that these steels maintain their strength for extended periods at 700 °C. We hypothesize that the improved strength of these steels is derived from the semi-coherent interfaces of these thermally stable, nanosized precipitates exerting drag forces on impinging dislocations, thus maintaining strength at elevated temperatures.

  12. Titan's Emergence from Winter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flasar, F. Michael; Achterberg, Richard; Jennings, Donald; Schinder, Paul

    2011-01-01

    We summarize the changes in Titans thermal structure derived from Cassini CIRS and radio-occultation data during the transition from winter to early spring. Titan's surface, and middle atmosphere show noticeable seasonal change, whereas that in most of the troposphere is mated. This can be understood in terms of the relatively small radiative relaxation time in the middle atmosphere and much larger time scale in the troposphere. The surface exhibits seasonal change because the heat capacity in an annual skin depth is much smaller than that in the lowest scale height of the troposphere. Surface temperatures rise 1 K at raid and high latitudes in the winter northern hemisphere and cool in the southern hemisphere. Changes in in the middle atmosphere are more complicated. Temperatures in the middle stratosphere (approximately 1 mbar) increase by a few kelvin at mid northern latitudes, but those at high latitudes first increase as that region moves out of winter shadow, and then decrease. This probably results from the combined effect of increased solar heating as the suit moves higher in the sky and the decreased adiabatic warming as the sinking motions associated with the cross-equatorial meridional cell weaken. Consistent with this interpretation, the warm temperatures observed higher up at the winter polar stratopause cool significantly.

  13. A sandwich-designed temperature-gradient incubator for studies of microbial temperature responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elsgaard, Lars; Jørgensen, Leif Wagner

    2002-03-01

    A temperature-gradient incubator (TGI) is described, which produces a thermal gradient over 34 aluminium modules (15x30x5 cm) intersected by 2-mm layers of partly insulating graphite foil (SigraFlex Universal). The new, sandwich-designed TGI has 30 rows of six replicate sample wells for incubation of 28-ml test tubes. An electric plate heats one end of the TGI, and the other end is cooled by thermoelectric Peltier elements in combination with a liquid cooling system. The TGI is equipped with 24 calibrated Pt-100 temperature sensors and insulated by polyurethane plates. A PC-operated SCADA (Supervisory Control And Data Acquisition) software (Genesis 4.20) is applied for temperature control using three advanced control loops. The precision of the TGI temperature measurements was better than +/-0.12 degrees C, and for a 0-40 degrees C gradient, the temperature at the six replicate sample wells varied less than +/-0.04 degrees C. Temperatures measured in incubated water samples closely matched the TGI temperatures, which showed a linear relationship to the sample row number. During operation for 8 days with a gradient of 0-40 degrees C, the temperature at the cold end was stable within +/-0.02 degrees C, while the temperatures at the middle and the warm end were stable within +/-0.08 degrees C (n=2370). Using the new TGI, it was shown that the fine-scale (1 degrees C) temperature dependence of S(o) oxidation rates in agricultural soil (0-29 degrees C) could be described by the Arrhenius relationship. The apparent activation energy (E(a)) for S(o) oxidation was 79 kJ mol(-1), which corresponded to a temperature coefficient (Q(10)) of 3.1. These data demonstrated that oxidation of S(o) in soil is strongly temperature-dependent. In conclusion, the new TGI allowed a detailed study of microbial temperature responses as it produced a precise, stable, and certifiable temperature gradient by the new and combined use of sandwich-design, thermoelectric cooling, and advanced

  14. Dynamics of low-temperature acclimation in temperate and boreal conifer foliage in a mild winter climate

    Science.gov (United States)

    G. Richard Strimbeck; Trygve D. Kjellsen; Paul G. Schaberg; Paula F. Murakami

    2008-01-01

    To provide baseline data for physiological studies of extreme low-temperature (LT) tolerance in boreal conifers, we profiled LT stress responses, liquid nitrogen (LN2)-quench tolerance, and sugar concentrations in foliage of boreal-temperate species pairs in the genera Abies, Picea and Pinus, growing in an...

  15. Canopy temperature depression at grain filling correlates to winter wheat yield in the U.S. southern high plains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wheat breeding has improved drought tolerance over the years. However, our knowledge on drought tolerance in relation to the canopy temperature (CT) and grain yield is limited. A three-season wheat field study ending 2012, 2015, and 2016 was conducted at Bushland, Texas to investigate the relationsh...

  16. Embedded DAQ System Design for Temperature and Humidity Measurement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tarique Rafique Memon

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available In this work, we have proposed a cost effective DAQ (Data Acquisition system design useful for local industries by using user friendly LABVIEW (Laboratory Virtual Instrumentation Electronic Workbench. The proposed system can measure and control different industrial parameters which can be presented in graphical icon format. The system design is proposed for 8-channels, whereas tested and recorded for two parameters i.e. temperature and RH (Relative Humidity. Both parameters are set as per upper and lower limits and controlled using relays. Embedded system is developed using standard microcontroller to acquire and process the analog data and plug-in for further processing using serial interface with PC using LABVIEW. The designed system is capable of monitoring and recording the corresponding linkage between temperature and humidity in industrial unit's and indicates the abnormalities within the process and control those abnormalities through relays

  17. Applying dynamic mold temperature control to cosmetic package design

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hsiao Shih-Wen

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Owing to the fashion trend and the market needs, this study developed the eco-cushion compact. Through the product design and the advanced process technology, many issues have improved, for instance, the inconvenience of transportation, the lack of multiuse capability, the increase of costs, and the low yield rate. The eco-cushion compact developed in this study was high quality, low cost, and meets the requirements of the eco market. The study aimed at developing a reusable container. Dynamic mold temperature control was introduced in the injection modeling process. The innovation in the product was its multi-functional formula invention, eco-product design, one-piece powder case design, and multifunctional design in the big powder case, mold flow and development of dynamic mold temperature control. Finally, through 3D drawing and modeling, and computer assistance for mold flow and verification to develop and produce models. During the manufacturing process, in order to solve the problems of tightness and warping, development and manufacture of dynamic mold temperature control were introduced. This decreased the injection cycle and residual stress, and deformation of the products has reduced to less than 0.2 mm, and the air tightness increased. In addition, air leakage was less than 2% and the injection cycle decreased to at least 10%. The results of the study can be extended and applied on the future design on cosmetic package and an alternative can be proposed to solve the problems of air tightness and warping. In this study, dynamic mold temperature control is considered as a design with high price-performance ratio, which can be adopted on industrial application for practical benefit and improvement.

  18. Fitting of satellite and in-situ ocean surface temperatures Results for polymode during the winter of 1977-1978

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maul, G. A.; Bravo, N. J.

    1983-01-01

    For the period considered, December 1977 through February 1978, bivariate Gaussian discriminant function cloud identification revealed that more than 93 percent of the 8-km resolution GOES infrared pixels were cloud contaminated. Cloud-free in-situ calibration points were distributed in nonrandom groups; this resulted in systematic errors when using least squares techniques. Surfaces and regression lines were least squares fitted between satellite and in-situ data; use was also made of differences and ratios. The best results were achieved with a regression in the form of the infrared radiative transfer equation; but this was no better than + or - 0.9 K. Because of extensive cloudiness, the linear regressions were seldom useful, and temperature ratios with + or - 1.3 K experimental errors best represent the applicability of GEOS data to sea surface temperatures.

  19. Mathematical modelling of steam generator and design of temperature regulator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bogdanovic, S.S. [EE Institute Nikola Tesla, Belgrade (Yugoslavia)

    1999-07-01

    The paper considers mathematical modelling of once-through power station boiler and numerical algorithm for simulation of the model. Fast and numerically stable algorithm based on the linearisation of model equations and on the simultaneous solving of differential and algebraic equations is proposed. The paper also presents the design of steam temperature regulator by using the method of projective controls. Dynamic behaviour of the system closed with optimal linear quadratic regulator is taken as the reference system. The desired proprieties of the reference system are retained and solutions for superheated steam temperature regulator are determined. (author)

  20. The forcing of southwestern Asia teleconnections by low-frequency sea surface temperature variability during boreal winter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoell, Andrew; Funk, Christopher C.; Mathew Barlow,

    2015-01-01

    Southwestern Asia, defined here as the domain bounded by 20°–40°N and 40°–70°E, which includes the nations of Iraq, Iran, Afghanistan, and Pakistan, is a water-stressed and semiarid region that receives roughly 75% of its annual rainfall during November–April. The November–April climate of southwestern Asia is strongly influenced by tropical Indo-Pacific variability on intraseasonal and interannual time scales, much of which can be attributed to sea surface temperature (SST) variations. The influences of lower-frequency SST variability on southwestern Asia climate during November–April Pacific decadal SST (PDSST) variability and the long-term trend in SST (LTSST) is examined. The U.S. Climate Variability and Predictability Program (CLIVAR) Drought Working Group forced global atmospheric climate models with PDSST and LTSST patterns, identified using empirical orthogonal functions, to show the steady atmospheric response to these modes of decadal to multidecadal SST variability. During November–April, LTSST forces an anticyclone over southwestern Asia, which results in reduced precipitation and increases in surface temperature. The precipitation and tropospheric circulation influences of LTSST are corroborated by independent observed precipitation and circulation datasets during 1901–2004. The decadal variations of southwestern Asia precipitation may be forced by PDSST variability, with two of the three models indicating that the cold phase of PDSST forces an anticyclone and precipitation reductions. However, there are intermodel circulation variations to PDSST that influence subregional precipitation patterns over the Middle East, southwestern Asia, and subtropical Asia. Changes in wintertime temperature and precipitation over southwestern Asia forced by LTSST and PDSST imply important changes to the land surface hydrology during the spring and summer.

  1. Classification guide: Sochi 2014 Paralympic Winter Games

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    The Sochi 2014 Paralympic Winter Games classification guide is designed to provide National Paralympic Committees (NPCs) and International Federations (IFs) with information about the classification policies and procedures that will apply to the Sochi 2014 Paralympic Winter Games.

  2. Note: Improved heater design for high-temperature hollow cathodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonald, M S; Gallimore, A D; Goebel, D M

    2017-02-01

    We present an improved heater design for thermionic cathodes using a rhenium filament encased in a boron nitride ceramic sleeve. This heater is relatively simple to fabricate, yet has been successfully used to reliably and repeatably light a lanthanum hexaboride (LaB6) hollow cathode based on a previously published design without noticeable filament degradation over hundreds of hours of operation. The high decomposition temperature of boron nitride (2800 C for inert environments) and melting point for rhenium (3180 C) make this heater especially attractive for use with LaB6, which may require operating temperatures upwards of 1700 C. While boron nitride decomposes in air above 1000 C, the heater was used only at vacuum with an inert gas discharge, and no degradation was observed. Limitations of current state of the art cathode heaters are also discussed and compared with the rhenium-boron nitride combination.

  3. Thermohydraulic design of saturated temperature capsule for IASCC irradiation test

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ide, Hiroshi; Matsui, Yoshinori; Itabashi, Yukio

    2002-10-01

    An advanced water chemistry controlled irradiation research device is being developed in JAERI, to perform irradiation tests for irradiation assisted stress corrosion cracking (IASCC) research concerned with aging of LWR. This device enables the irradiation tests under the water chemistry condition and the temperature, which simulate the conditions for BWR core internals. The advanced water chemistry controlled irradiation research device is composed of saturated temperature capsule inserted into the JMTR core and the water chemistry control unit installed in the reactor building. Regarding the saturated temperature capsule, the Thermohydraulic design of capsule structure was done, aimed at controlling the specimen's temperature, feeding water velocity on specimen's surface to the environment of BWR nearer. As the result of adopting the new capsule structure based on the design study, it was found out that feeding water velocity at the surface of specimen's is increased to about 10 times as much as before, and nuclear heat generated in the capsule components can be removed safely even in the abnormal event such as the case of loss of feeding water. (author)

  4. Thermohydraulic design of saturated temperature capsule for IASCC irradiation test

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ide, Hiroshi; Matsui, Yoshinori; Itabashi, Yukio [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Oarai, Ibaraki (Japan). Oarai Research Establishment] [and others

    2002-10-01

    An advanced water chemistry controlled irradiation research device is being developed in JAERI, to perform irradiation tests for irradiation assisted stress corrosion cracking (IASCC) research concerned with aging of LWR. This device enables the irradiation tests under the water chemistry condition and the temperature, which simulate the conditions for BWR core internals. The advanced water chemistry controlled irradiation research device is composed of saturated temperature capsule inserted into the JMTR core and the water chemistry control unit installed in the reactor building. Regarding the saturated temperature capsule, the Thermohydraulic design of capsule structure was done, aimed at controlling the specimen's temperature, feeding water velocity on specimen's surface to the environment of BWR nearer. As the result of adopting the new capsule structure based on the design study, it was found out that feeding water velocity at the surface of specimen's is increased to about 10 times as much as before, and nuclear heat generated in the capsule components can be removed safely even in the abnormal event such as the case of loss of feeding water. (author)

  5. Development of very high temperature reactor design technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Won Jae; Noh, Jan Man

    2012-04-01

    or an efficient production of nuclear hydrogen, the VHTR (Very High Temperature Gas-cooled Reactor) of 950 .deg. C outlet temperature and the interfacing system for the hydrogen production are required. We have developed various evaluation technologies for the performance and safety of VHTR through the accomplishment of this project. First, to evaluate the performance of VHTR, a series of analyses has been performed such as core characteristics at 950 .deg. C, applicability of cooled-vessel, intermediate loop system and high temperature structural integrity. Through the analyses of major accidents such as HPCC and LPCC and the analysis of the risk/performance-informed method, VHTR safety evaluation has been also performed. In addition, various design analysis codes have been developed for a nuclear design, system loop design, system performance analysis, fission product/tritium transport analysis, core thermo-fluid analysis, system layout analysis, graphite structure seismic analysis and hydrogen exposion analysis, and they are being verified and validated through a lot of international collaborations

  6. Operation and design selection of high temperature superconducting magnetic bearings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Werfel, F N; Floegel-Delor, U; Riedel, T; Rothfeld, R; Wippich, D; Goebel, B

    2004-01-01

    Axial and radial high temperature superconducting (HTS) magnetic bearings are evaluated by their parameters. Journal bearings possess advantages over thrust bearings. High magnetic gradients in a multi-pole permanent magnet (PM) configuration, the surrounding melt textured YBCO stator and adequate designs are the key features for increasing the overall bearing stiffness. The gap distance between rotor and stator determines the specific forces and has a strong impact on the PM rotor design. We report on the designing, building and measuring of a 200 mm prototype 100 kg HTS bearing with an encapsulated and thermally insulated melt textured YBCO ring stator. The encapsulation requires a magnetically large-gap (4-5 mm) operation but reduces the cryogenic effort substantially. The bearing requires 3 l of LN 2 for cooling down, and about 0.2 l LN 2 h -1 under operation. This is a dramatic improvement of the efficiency and in the practical usage of HTS magnetic bearings

  7. Microstructural design of magnesium alloys for elevated temperature performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bryan, Zachary Lee

    Magnesium alloys are promising for automotive and aerospace applications requiring lightweight structural metals due to their high specific strength. Weight reductions through material substitution significantly improve fuel efficiency and reduce greenhouse gas emissions. Challenges to widespread integration of Mg alloys primarily result from their limited ductility and elevated temperature strength. This research presents a microstructurally-driven systems design approach to Mg alloy development for elevated temperature applications. The alloy properties that were targeted included creep resistance, elevated temperature strength, room temperature ductility, and material cost. To enable microstructural predictions during the design process, computational thermodynamics was utilized with a newly developed atomic mobility database for HCP-Mg. The mobilities for Mg self-diffusion, as well as Al, Ag, Sn, and Zn solute diffusion in HCP-Mg were optimized from available diffusion literature using DICTRA. The optimized mobility database was then validated using experimental diffusion couples. To limit dislocation creep mechanisms in the first design iteration, a microstructure consisting of Al solutes in solid solution and a fine dispersion of Mg2Sn precipitates was targeted. The development of strength and diffusion models informed by thermodynamic predictions of phase equilibria led to the selection of an optimum Mg-1.9at%Sn-1.5at%Al (TA) alloy for elevated temperature performance. This alloy was cast, solution treated based upon DICTRA homogenization simulations, and then aged. While the tensile and creep properties were competitive with conventional Mg alloys, the TA mechanical performance was ultimately limited because of abnormal grain growth that occurred during solution treatment and the basal Mg2Sn particle morphology. For the second design iteration, insoluble Mg2Si intermetallic particles were added to the TA alloy to provide enhanced grain boundary pinning

  8. Study for optimizing the design of optical temperature sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Panpan; Sun, Zhen; Shi, Ruixin; Liu, Guofeng; Fu, Zuoling; Wei, Yanling

    2017-12-01

    The correlations between temperature sensitivity (relative sensitivity Sr and absolute sensitivity Sa) and thermally coupled level gaps (ΔE) are vital but less-studied for potential applications in scientific research, industrial production, clinical medicine, and so on. We take YbPO4:Ln3+ (Ln = Tm3+, Ho3+, and Er3+) up-conversion phosphors as a case to study the relationships between temperature sensitivity (Sr, Sa) and ΔE. The results of various discussions, including the experimental data of temperature sensitivity based on YbPO4:Ln3+ (Ln = Tm3+, Ho3+, and Er3+) and theoretical derivation from original formulas, show that Sr and ΔE are linearly positive correlation, which is invalid for Sa. Noticeably, YbPO4:Tm3+ nanoparticles display intense near infrared red emission within the biological window, leading to great potential application in biological sensing and biological imaging. All the research studies would benefit the design of optical temperature sensing.

  9. Design of high temperature Engineering Test Reactor (HTTR)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saito, Shinzo; Tanaka, Toshiyuki; Sudo, Yukio

    1994-09-01

    Construction of High Temperature Engineering Test Reactor (HTTR) is now underway to establish and upgrade basic technologies for HTGRs and to conduct innovative basic research at high temperatures. The HTTR is a graphite-moderated and helium gas-cooled reactor with 30 MW in thermal output and outlet coolant temperature of 850degC for rated operation and 950degC for high temperature test operation. It is planned to conduct various irradiation tests for fuels and materials, safety demonstration tests and nuclear heat application tests. JAERI received construction permit of HTTR reactor facility in February 1990 after 22 months of safety review. This report summarizes evaluation of nuclear and thermal-hydraulic characteristics, design outline of major systems and components, and also includes relating R and D result and safety evaluation. Criteria for judgment, selection of postulated events, major analytical conditions for anticipated operational occurrences and accidents, computer codes used in safety analysis and evaluation of each event are presented in the safety evaluation. (author)

  10. Autumn–winter minimum temperature changes in the southern Sikhote-Alin mountain range of northeastern Asia since 1529 AD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. N. Ukhvatkina

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of our research was to reconstruct climatic parameters (for the first time for the Sikhote-Alin mountain range and to compare them with global climate fluctuations. As a result, we have found that one of the most important limiting factors for the study area is the minimum temperatures of the previous autumn–winter season (August–December, and this finding perfectly conforms to that in other territories. We reconstructed the previous August–December minimum temperature for 485 years, from 1529 to 2014. We found 12 cold periods (1535–1540, 1550–1555, 1643–1649, 1659–1667, 1675–1689, 1722–1735, 1791–1803, 1807–1818, 1822–1827, 1836–1852, 1868–1887, 1911–1925 and seven warm periods (1560–1585, 1600–1610, 1614–1618, 1738–1743, 1756–1759, 1776–1781, 1944–2014. These periods correlate well with reconstructed data for the Northern Hemisphere and the neighboring territories of China and Japan. Our reconstruction has 3-, 9-, 20-, and 200-year periods, which may be in line with high-frequency fluctuations in El Niño–Southern Oscillation (ENSO, the short-term solar cycle, Pacific Decadal Oscillation (PDO fluctuations, and the 200-year solar activity cycle, respectively. We suppose that the temperature of the North Pacific, expressed by the PDO may make a major contribution to regional climate variations. We also assume that the regional climatic response to solar activity becomes apparent in the temperature changes in the northern part of Pacific Ocean and corresponds to cold periods during the solar minimum. These comparisons show that our climatic reconstruction based on tree ring chronology for this area may potentially provide a proxy record for long-term, large-scale past temperature patterns for northeastern Asia. The reconstruction reflects the global traits and local variations in the climatic processes of the southern territory of the Russian Far East for more than the past 450 years.

  11. Design and Control of High Temperature PEM Fuel Cell System

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andreasen, Søren Juhl

    demands for this. A 1kW fuel cell stack with optimized  ow plates was heated in 5 minutes using the introduction of an electrical air pre-heater. Using pure hydrogen in compressed form is problematic due to the very small density of hydrogen, even at high pressures. Hydrogen is a very energy e-cient gas...... enables the use of designing cathode air cooled stacks greatly simplifying the fuel cell system and lowering the parasitic losses. Furthermore, the fuel impurity tolerance is signicantly improved because of the higher temperatures, and much higher concentrations of CO can be endured without performance...... or life time losses. In order to evaluate the performance of using HTPEM fuel cells for electricity production in electrical applications, a 400 W fuel cell system is initially designed using a cathode air cooled 30 cell HTPEM stack. The stack runs on pure hydrogen in a deadend anode configuration...

  12. Considerations for weldment design for elevated temperature applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wei, B.C.

    1976-01-01

    Because of the scarcity of data and because of the metallurgical and structural complexity of the weldments, current design practice does not generally take detailed account of the behaviour of the weldments, either in terms of criteria limits or in terms of deformation behaviour of weldments into structural analyses. Rather, careful consideration is given to the type and location of welds, to weld materials and to examination of welds; and reliance is placed on the factor of safety used in deriving stress limits from base metal properties to guard against failure of welds. In some cases, such as the K-stress indices factors given in Section III of the ASME code for piping and piping components, determination of these constants are based, in part, on fatigue tests of welded pipe joints. Experience has shown that this approach is adequate at subcreep temperatures where design stress limits are, for the most part, intended to prevent gross inelastic deformation

  13. Design and management of public health outreach using interoperable mobile multimedia: an analysis of a national winter weather preparedness campaign

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cesar Bandera

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Office of Public Health Preparedness and Response (OPHPR in the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention conducts outreach for public preparedness for natural and manmade incidents. In 2011, OPHPR conducted a nationwide mobile public health (m-Health campaign that pushed brief videos on preparing for severe winter weather onto cell phones, with the objective of evaluating the interoperability of multimedia m-Health outreach with diverse cell phones (including handsets without Internet capability, carriers, and user preferences. Methods Existing OPHPR outreach material on winter weather preparedness was converted into mobile-ready multimedia using mobile marketing best practices to improve audiovisual quality and relevance. Middleware complying with opt-in requirements was developed to push nine bi-weekly multimedia broadcasts onto subscribers’ cell phones, and OPHPR promoted the campaign on its web site and to subscribers on its govdelivery.com notification platform. Multimedia, text, and voice messaging activity to/from the middleware was logged and analyzed. Results Adapting existing media into mobile video was straightforward using open source and commercial software, including web pages, PDF documents, and public service announcements. The middleware successfully delivered all outreach videos to all participants (a total of 504 videos regardless of the participant’s device. 54 % of videos were viewed on cell phones, 32 % on computers, and 14 % were retrieved by search engine web crawlers. 21 % of participating cell phones did not have Internet access, yet still received and displayed all videos. The time from media push to media viewing on cell phones was half that of push to viewing on computers. Conclusions Video delivered through multimedia messaging can be as interoperable as text messages, while providing much richer information. This may be the only multimedia mechanism available to outreach campaigns

  14. Understanding influences and decisions of households with children with asthma regarding temperature and humidity in the home in winter: a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tod, Angela Mary; Nelson, Peter; Cronin de Chavez, Anna; Homer, Catherine; Powell-Hoyland, Vanessa; Stocks, Amanda

    2016-01-06

    This study aimed to understand the influences and decisions of households with children with asthma regarding keeping warm and well at home in winter. Community settings in Rotherham and Doncaster, South Yorkshire, UK. Individuals from 35 families and 25 health, education and social care staff underwent interview. 5 group interviews were held, 1 with parents (n=20) and 4 with staff (n=25). This qualitative study incorporated in-depth, semistructured individual and group interviews, framework analysis and social marketing segmentation techniques. The research identifies a range of psychological and contextual influences on parents that may inadvertently place a child with asthma at risk of cold, damp and worsening health in a home. Parents have to balance a range of factors to manage fluctuating temperatures, damp conditions and mould. Participants were constantly assessing their family's needs against the resources available to them. Influences, barriers and needs interacted in ways that meant they made 'trade-offs' that drove their behaviour regarding the temperature and humidity of the home, including partial self-disconnection from their energy supply. Evidence was also seen of parents lacking knowledge and understanding while working their way through conflicting and confusing information or advice from a range of professionals including health, social care and housing. Pressure on parents was increased when they had to provide help and support for extended family and friends. The findings illustrate how and why a child with asthma may be at risk of a cold home. A 'trade-off model' has been developed as an output of the research to explain the competing demands on families. Messages emerge about the importance of tailored advice and information to families vulnerable to cold-related harm. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  15. Status of design code work for metallic high temperature components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bieniussa, K.; Seehafer, H.J.; Over, H.H.; Hughes, P.

    1984-01-01

    The mechanical components of high temperature gas-cooled reactors, HTGR, are exposed to temperatures up to about 1000 deg. C and this in a more or less corrosive gas environment. Under these conditions metallic structural materials show a time-dependent structural behavior. Furthermore changes in the structure of the material and loss of material in the surface can result. The structural material of the components will be stressed originating from load-controlled quantities, for example pressure or dead weight, and/or deformation-controlled quantities, for example thermal expansion or temperature distribution, and thus it can suffer rowing permanent strains and deformations and an exhaustion of the material (damage) both followed by failure. To avoid a failure of the components the design requires the consideration of the following structural failure modes: ductile rupture due to short-term loadings; creep rupture due to long-term loadings; reep-fatigue failure due to cyclic loadings excessive strains due to incremental deformation or creep ratcheting; loss of function due to excessive deformations; loss of stability due to short-term loadings; loss of stability due to long-term loadings; environmentally caused material failure (excessive corrosion); fast fracture due to instable crack growth

  16. WINTER SAECULUM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emil Mihalina

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Accumulated imbalances in the economy and on the markets cause specific financial market dynamics that have formed characteristic patterns kept throughout long financial history. In 2008 Authors presented their expectations of key macroeconomic and selected asset class markets developments for period ahead based on Saeculum theory. Use of term Secular describes a specific valuation environment during prolonged period. If valuations as well as selected macro variables are considered as a tool for understanding business cycles then market cycles become much more obvious and easily understandable. Therefore over the long run, certain asset classes do better in terms of risk reward profile than others. Further on, there is no need for frequent portfolio rebalancing and timing of specific investment positions within a particular asset class market. Current stage in cycle development suggests a need for reassessment of trends and prevailing phenomena due to cyclical nture of long lasting Saeculums. Paper reviews developments in recognizable patterns of selected metrics in current Winter Saeculum dominated with prevailing forces of delivering, deflation and decrease in velocity of money.

  17. Temperatura do solo em função do preparo do solo e do manejo da cobertura de inverno Soil temperature as affected by soil tillage and management of winter cover crops

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Eduardo Angeli Furlani

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Com o objetivo de avaliar o efeito do preparo do solo e do manejo da cobertura de inverno (consórcio aveia-preta + nabo forrageiro sobre a temperatura do solo, realizou-se um experimento em um Nitossolo em Botucatu-SP no outono/inverno de 2000. Utilizou-se um delineamento em blocos casualizados em esquema fatorial 3 x 3 (três preparos e três manejos. O preparo do solo constou de: preparo convencional, preparo conservacionista com escarificação e plantio direto, e o manejo da cobertura: consórcio dessecado, rolado e triturado. Foram avaliados a temperatura do solo (termopares a 5 cm de profundidade, de hora em hora, aos 7, 14, 30, 45 e 60 dias após a emergência das plantas do consórcio; o teor de água do solo na profundidade de 10 cm, nas mesmas épocas; e a cobertura do solo (massa seca e índice de cobertura, imediatamente após aplicação dos tratamentos. O sistema plantio direto apresentou temperaturas do solo menores que as do preparo convencional, até o 14º dia após emergência (DAE das plantas. A partir do 30° DAE das plantas, a temperatura não foi mais influenciada pelos tratamentos, devido à cobertura do consórcio e ocorrência de boa disponibilidade de água no solo. Os manejos da cobertura com rolo-faca, triturador e herbicida não influenciaram a temperatura do solo. A temperatura do solo não interferiu no crescimento e desenvolvimento das culturas de cobertura.To evaluate the effect of soil tillage and management of winter cover crops (black oat + radish intercrop on the soil temperature, an experiment was conducted in a Nitossol (Alfisol in Botucatu, state of São Paulo, Brazil, in the 2000 fall/winter season. A design in randomized blocks was used in a 3 x 3 factorial scheme (three tillage and three cover crop managements. Soil tillage consisted of: conventional tillage, conservation tillage with chiseling, and no-tillage. The cover crops managements included plant killing with post-emergence herbicide, rolling

  18. A Neutron Streak Camera Designed for ICF Fuel Ion Temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jiabin; Liao, Hua; Chen, Ming

    2007-11-01

    A neutron streak camera was designed for inertial confinement fusion (ICF) fuel ion temperature diagnostic. It is made of a 1 cm thick x8 cm diam piece of 3% benzophenone quenched plastic scintillator with about a 190 ps FWHM and a streak tube (55ps time resolution) with large-area photocathode (φ30 mm) showed no slit. The electron beam from the photocathode is focused into a little spot (φ1mm). Then the spot is scanned directly and multiplied by an internal microchannel plate. This greatly improves the sensitivity of the tube. The neutron streak camera combines the advangtages of scintillation detector (with high neutron detection efficiency) and of streak camera (with fast time response). The whole detection system time resolution is 300ps and can record neutron time of flight signals from ICF implosion target with yields of 10^7 DT neutron per shot.

  19. Design and Modelling of Small Scale Low Temperature Power Cycles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wronski, Jorrit

    he work presented in this report contributes to the state of the art within design and modelling of small scale low temperature power cycles. The study is divided into three main parts: (i) fluid property evaluation, (ii) expansion device investigations and (iii) heat exchanger performance...... times and below 10−7 away from the phase boundaries.Regarding expansion devices for small scale organic Rankine cycle (ORC) systems,this work focussed on reciprocating machines. A prototype of a reciprocating expander with a swept volume of 736 cm3 was tested and modelled. he model was written in object......-oriented Modelica code and was included in the thermo Cycle framework for small scale ORC systems. Special attention was paid to the valve system and a control method for variable expansion ratios was introduced based on a cogeneration scenario. Admission control based on evaporator and condenser conditions...

  20. Design of stirling engine operating at low temperature difference

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sedlák Josef

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available There are many sources of free energy available in the form of heat that is often simply wasted. The aim of this paper is to design and build a low temperature differential Stirling engine that would be powered exclusively from heat sources such as waste hot water or focused solar rays. A prototype is limited to a low temperature differential modification because of a choice of ABSplus plastic as a construction material for its key parts. The paper is divided into two parts. The first part covers a brief history of Stirling engine and its applications nowadays. Moreover, it describes basic principles of its operation that are supplemented by thermodynamic relations. Furthermore, an analysis of applied Fused Deposition Modelling has been done since the parts with more complex geometry had been manufactured using this additive technology. The second (experimental part covers 4 essential steps of a rapid prototyping method - Computer Aided Design of the 3D model of Stirling engine using parametric modeller Autodesk Inventor, production of its components using 3D printer uPrint, assembly and final testing. Special attention was devoted to last two steps of the process since the surfaces of the printed parts were sandpapered and sprayed. Parts, where an ABS plus plastic would have impeded the correct function, had been manufactured from aluminium and brass by cutting operations. Remaining parts had been bought in a hardware store as it would be uneconomical and unreasonable to manufacture them. Last two chapters of the paper describe final testing, mention the problems that appeared during its production and propose new approaches that could be used in the future to improve the project.

  1. Winter Weather: Frostbite

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Safety During Fire Cleanup Wildfires PSAs Related Links Winter Weather About Winter Weather Before a Storm Prepare Your Home Prepare Your Car Winter Weather Checklists During a Storm Indoor Safety During ...

  2. Design considerations for CRBRP heat transport system piping operating at elevated temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pollono, L.P.; Mello, R.M.

    1979-01-01

    The heat transport system sodium piping for the Clinch River Breeder Reactor Plant (CRBRP) within the reactor containment building must withstand high temperatures for long periods of time. Each phase of the mechanical design process of the piping system is influenced by elevated temperature considerations which include material thermal creep effects, ratchetting caused by rapid temperature transients and stress relaxation, and material degradation effects. The structural design philosophy taken to design the CRBRP piping operating in a high temperature environment is described. The resulting design of the heat transport system piping is presented along with a discussion of special features that resulted from the elevated temperature considerations

  3. Design for an improved temperature intregration concept in greenhouse cultivation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Körner, O.; Challa, H.

    2003-01-01

    The ability of crops to tolerate temperature deviations from the average set point could play an important role in energy saving greenhouse climate regimes. This principle is used in the so called temperature integration procedure, which is based on empirical knowledge and uses fixed maximum and

  4. design and analysis of a multipoint temperature datalogger

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user

    Fig 3 shows the format of temperature reading compilation in the memory card retrieved after a typical monitoring period. Column 1 represents the time periods, in this case the serial numbers actually represents interval of 30 secs. At every 30 secs. a new temperature is measured, recorded and stored in the memory card.

  5. Design of multifunctional temperature controller for NPP ventilation system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xiao Xipeng; He Li; Yin Xiaolong; Gong Jianjun

    2014-01-01

    Based on full study on the original analog temperature controller of ventilation system in nuclear power plant, for the interface definition fixation, parameters preset as well as multiple output combination of the temperature controller circuit, a digital temperature circuit based on the front-end input conditioning module + multi channel ADC+STM32 architecture is proposed. The hardware structure and software process are described in details. The sampling data processing, phase-cut voltage output as well as control principle are focused, and some part of software program is presented. The experimental results show that the temperature controller can stably and reliably control the temperature of ventilation system and display digital parameters, and it can completely replace and upgrade the original analog controller. (authors)

  6. Winter precipitation effect in a mid-latitude temperature-limited environment: the case of common juniper at high elevation in the Alps

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pellizzari, Elena; Pividori, Mario; Carrer, Marco

    2014-01-01

    Common juniper (Juniperus communis L.) is by far the most widespread conifer in the world. However, tree-ring research dealing with this species is still scarce, mainly due to the difficulty in crossdating associated with the irregular stem shape with strip-bark growth form in older individuals and the high number of missing and wedging rings. Given that many different species of the same genus have been successfully used in tree-ring investigations and proved to be reliable climate proxies, this study aims to (i) test the possibility to successfully apply dendrochronological techniques on common juniper growing above the treeline and (ii) verify the climate sensitivity of the species with special regard to winter precipitation, a climatic factor that generally does not affect tree-ring growth in all Alpine high-elevation tree species. Almost 90 samples have been collected in three sites in the central and eastern Alps, all between 2100 and 2400 m in elevation. Despite cross-dating difficulties, we were able to build a reliable chronology for each site, each spanning over 200 years. Climate-growth relationships computed over the last century highlight that juniper growth is mainly controlled by the amount of winter precipitation. The high variability of the climate-growth associations among sites, corresponds well to the low spatial dependence of this meteorological factor. Fairly long chronologies and the presence of a significant precipitation signal open up the possibility to reconstruct past winter precipitation. (letter)

  7. Design, Qualification and Integration Testing of the High-Temperature Resistance Temperature Device for Stirling Power System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Jack; Hill, Dennis H.; Elisii, Remo; White, Jonathan R.; Lewandowski, Edward J.; Oriti, Salvatore M.

    2015-01-01

    The Advanced Stirling Radioisotope Generator (ASRG), developed from 2006 to 2013 under the joint sponsorship of the United States Department of Energy (DOE) and National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) to provide a high-efficiency power system for future deep space missions, employed Sunpower Incorporated's Advanced Stirling Convertors (ASCs) with operating temperature up to 840 C. High-temperature operation was made possible by advanced heater head materials developed to increase reliability and thermal-to-mechanical conversion efficiency. During a mission, it is desirable to monitor the Stirling hot-end temperature as a measure of convertor health status and assist in making appropriate operating parameter adjustments to maintain the desired hot-end temperature as the radioisotope fuel decays. To facilitate these operations, a Resistance Temperature Device (RTD) that is capable of high-temperature, continuous long-life service was designed, developed and qualified for use in the ASRG. A thermal bridge was also implemented to reduce the RTD temperature exposure while still allowing an accurate projection of the ASC hot-end temperature. NASA integrated two flight-design RTDs on the ASCs and assembled into the high-fidelity Engineering Unit, the ASRG EU2, at Glenn Research Center (GRC) for extended operation and system characterization. This paper presents the design implementation and qualification of the RTD, and its performance characteristics and calibration in the ASRG EU2 testing.

  8. Electronic Modeling and Design for Extreme Temperatures Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — We propose to develop electronics for operation at temperatures that range from -230oC to +130oC. This new technology will minimize the requirements for external...

  9. Electronic Modeling and Design for Extreme Temperatures, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — We propose to develop electronics for operation at temperatures that range from -230oC to +130oC. This new technology will minimize the requirements for external...

  10. Opto-mechanical subsystem with temperature compensation through isothemal design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodwin, F. E. (Inventor)

    1977-01-01

    An opto-mechanical subsystem for supporting a laser structure which minimizes changes in the alignment of the laser optics in response to temperature variations is described. Both optical and mechanical structural components of the system are formed of the same material, preferably beryllium, which is selected for high mechanical strength and good thermal conducting qualities. All mechanical and optical components are mounted and assembled to provide thorough thermal coupling throughout the subsystem to prevent the development of temperature gradients.

  11. The Design of Temperature and Humidity Chamber Monitor and Controller

    OpenAIRE

    Tibebu, Simachew

    2016-01-01

    The temperature and humidity chamber, (climate chamber) is a device located at the Technobothnia Education and Research Center that simulates different climate conditions. The simulated environment is used to test the capabilities of electrical equipment in different temperature and humidity conditions. The climate chamber, among other things houses a dedicated computer, the control PC, and a control software running in it which together are responsible for running and control-ling these simu...

  12. Winter Weather Emergencies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Severe winter weather can lead to health and safety challenges. You may have to cope with Cold related health ... Although there are no guarantees of safety during winter weather emergencies, you can take actions to protect ...

  13. Winter maintenance performance measure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    The Winter Performance Index is a method of quantifying winter storm events and the DOTs response to them. : It is a valuable tool for evaluating the States maintenance practices, performing post-storm analysis, training : maintenance personnel...

  14. Winter weather demand considerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-04-01

    Winter weather has varied effects on travel behavior. Using 418 survey responses from the Northern Virginia : commuting area of Washington, D.C. and binary logit models, this study examines travel related changes under : different types of winter wea...

  15. Predicting low-temperature cracking in asphalt pavements : [research brief].

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-01

    In Wisconsin's winter climate, low temperatures can cause asphalt pavements to contract and crack, reducing their ride quality and service lives. To help engineers more accurately determine how well certain pavement designs will fare in such conditio...

  16. Winter fuels report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1995-02-17

    The Winter Fuels Report is intended to provide consise, timely information to the industry, the press, policymakers, consumers, analysts, and State and local governments on the following topics: Distillate fuel oil net production, imports and stocks on a US level and for all Petroleum Administration for Defense Districts (PADD) and product supplied on a US level; Natural gas supply and disposition and underground storage for the US and consumption for all PADD`s as well as selected National average prices; Residential and wholesale pricing data for heating oil and propane for those States participating in the joint Energy Information Administration (EIA)/State Heating Oil and Propane Program; Crude oil and petroleum price comparisons for the US and selected cities; and A 6-10 Day and 30-Day outlook for temperature and precipitation and US total heating degree days by city.

  17. Winter fuels report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-01-01

    The Winter Fuels Report is intended to provide concise, timely information to the industry, the press, policymakers, consumers, analysts, and State and local governments on the following topics: distillate fuel oil net production, imports and stocks on a US level and for all Petroleum Administration for Defense Districts (PADD) and product supplied on a US level; propane net production, imports and stocks on a US level and for PADD's I, II, and III; natural gas supply and disposition and underground storage for the US and consumption for all PADD's, as well as selected National average prices; residential and wholesale pricing data for heating oil and propane for those States participating in the joint Energy Information Administration (EIA)/State Heating Oil and Propane Program; crude oil and petroleum price comparisons for the US and selected cities; and a 6-10 day, 30-Day, and 90-Day outlook for temperature and precipitation and US total heating degree-days by city

  18. Design and fabrication of an automated temperature programmed ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    A completely automated temperature-programmed reaction (TPR) system for carrying out gas-solid catalytic reactions under atmospheric flow conditions is fabricated to study CO and hydrocarbon oxidation, and NO reduction. The system consists of an all-stainless steel UHV system, quadrupole mass spectrometer SX200 ...

  19. Design and fabrication of an automated temperature programmed ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    Abstract. A completely automated temperature-programmed reaction (TPR) system for carrying out gas–solid catalytic reactions under atmospheric flow conditions is fabricated to study CO and hydrocarbon oxidation, and NO reduction. The system consists of an all-stainless steel UHV system, quadrupole mass.

  20. Animals in Winter. Young Discovery Library Series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Sairigne, Catherine

    This book is written for children 5 through 10. Part of a series designed to develop their curiosity, fascinate them and educate them, this volume introduces the habits of a variety of animals during the winter. Topics include: (1) surviving during winter, including concepts such as migration, hibernation, and skin color change; (2) changing…

  1. 36 CFR 1002.19 - Winter activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Winter activities. 1002.19... RECREATION § 1002.19 Winter activities. (a) Skiing, snowshoeing, ice skating, sledding, innertubing.... (c) Failure to abide by area designations or activity restrictions established under this section is...

  2. 36 CFR 2.19 - Winter activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Winter activities. 2.19... RESOURCE PROTECTION, PUBLIC USE AND RECREATION § 2.19 Winter activities. (a) Skiing, snowshoeing, ice... designations or activity restrictions established under this section is prohibited. ...

  3. Robust design of microelectronics assemblies against mechanical shock, temperature and moisture effects of temperature, moisture and mechanical driving forces

    CERN Document Server

    Wong, E-H

    2015-01-01

    Robust Design of Microelectronics Assemblies Against Mechanical Shock, Temperature and Moisture discusses how the reliability of packaging components is a prime concern to electronics manufacturers. The text presents a thorough review of this important field of research, providing users with a practical guide that discusses theoretical aspects, experimental results, and modeling techniques. The authors use their extensive experience to produce detailed chapters covering temperature, moisture, and mechanical shock induced failure, adhesive interconnects, and viscoelasticity. Useful progr

  4. Design and evaluation of an inexpensive radiation shield for monitoring surface air temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zachary A. Holden; Anna E. Klene; Robert F. Keefe; Gretchen G. Moisen

    2013-01-01

    Inexpensive temperature sensors are widely used in agricultural and forestry research. This paper describes a low-cost (~3 USD) radiation shield (radshield) designed for monitoring surface air temperatures in harsh outdoor environments. We compared the performance of the radshield paired with low-cost temperature sensors at three sites in western Montana to several...

  5. Winter-to-winter variations in indoor radon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mose, D.G.; Mushrush, G.W.; Kline, S.W.

    1989-01-01

    Indoor radon concentrations in northern Virginia and central Maryland show a strong dependence on weather. Winter tends to be associated with higher than average indoor radon, and summer with lower than average. However, compared to the winter of 1986-1987, the winter of 1987-1988 was warmer and drier. Consequently, winter-to-winter indoor radon decreased by about 25%. This winter-to-winter decrease is unexpectedly large, and simulates winter-to-summer variations that have been reported

  6. Design optimizations of IFMIF High Flux Test Module towards uniform specimen temperature distribution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Y.; Arbeiter, F.; Heinzel, V.; Ihli, Th.; Moeslang, A.; Slobodchuk, V.; Stratmanns, E.

    2010-01-01

    The test specimen temperature control, together with optimized irradiation and reliability, is the central task of the HFTM design. The temperatures of the specimens should be kept at prescribed levels with acceptable temperature spreads. This paper concerns the design optimizations on HFTM through thermo-hydraulic simulations. Single-parametric studies were carried out for the effects of spacers, cooling channel/insulation gap deformation, multi-channels, insulation gap size, channel-rib contact resistance, etc. It is found that the temperature of the specimens and walls is generally sensitive to the above-mentioned parameters. These parameters therefore need to be considered during the optimization design, accounting also for the manufacture and operation tolerances. Simulation results on latest updated HFTM design are also presented. The results show that the current HFTM design could meet thermal management requirements in general. Further optimizations should be made individually for different target specimen temperatures.

  7. Elevated temperature weldment behavior as related to nuclear design criteria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    King, R.T.; Canonico, D.A.; Brinkman, C.R.

    1975-01-01

    Factors affecting the physical and mechanical properties of weldments are reviewed. Data are presented that show wide variability in the properties of weld metal and heat-affected zones both within a given weldment and from weldment to weldment. The weld metal or heat-affected zone may be stronger or weaker, and more or less ductile than the base metal joined. This implies that current design rules, which are presumed to have well-known safety factors based on the properties of base metals, may have other actual safety factors in welded construction, due to the differences between weld metal and base metal properties. Suggestions for obtaining further data that can subsequently be used to improve confidence in design rules or to change design rules for nuclear application are presented

  8. Design of Water Temperature Control System Based on Single Chip Microcomputer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Hanhong; Yan, Qiyan

    2017-12-01

    In this paper, we mainly introduce a multi-function water temperature controller designed with 51 single-chip microcomputer. This controller has automatic and manual water, set the water temperature, real-time display of water and temperature and alarm function, and has a simple structure, high reliability, low cost. The current water temperature controller on the market basically use bimetal temperature control, temperature control accuracy is low, poor reliability, a single function. With the development of microelectronics technology, monolithic microprocessor function is increasing, the price is low, in all aspects of widely used. In the water temperature controller in the application of single-chip, with a simple design, high reliability, easy to expand the advantages of the function. Is based on the appeal background, so this paper focuses on the temperature controller in the intelligent control of the discussion.

  9. Estimating winter survival of winter wheat by simulations of plant frost tolerance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bergjord Olsen, A.K.; Persson, T.; Wit, de A.; Nkurunziza, L.; Sindhøj, E.; Eckersten, H.

    2018-01-01

    Based on soil temperature, snow depth and the grown cultivar's maximum attainable level of frost tolerance (LT50c), the FROSTOL model simulates development of frost tolerance (LT50) and winter damage, thereby enabling risk calculations for winter wheat survival. To explore the accuracy of this

  10. Applications of American design codes for elevated temperature environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Severud, L.K.

    1980-03-01

    A brief summary of the ASME Code rules of Case N-47 is presented. An overview of the typical procedure used to demonstrate Code compliance is provided. Application experience and some examples of detailed inelastic analysis and simplified-approximate methods are given. Recent developments and future trends in design criteria and ASME Code rules are also presented

  11. Low-Cost Wireless Temperature Measurement: Design, Manufacture, and Testing of a PCB-Based Wireless Passive Temperature Sensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Dan; Yang, Yong; Hong, Yingping; Liang, Ting; Yao, Zong; Chen, Xiaoyong; Xiong, Jijun

    2018-02-10

    Low-cost wireless temperature measurement has significant value in the food industry, logistics, agriculture, portable medical equipment, intelligent wireless health monitoring, and many areas in everyday life. A wireless passive temperature sensor based on PCB (Printed Circuit Board) materials is reported in this paper. The advantages of the sensor include simple mechanical structure, convenient processing, low-cost, and easiness in integration. The temperature-sensitive structure of the sensor is a dielectric-loaded resonant cavity, consisting of the PCB substrate. The sensitive structure also integrates a patch antenna for the transmission of temperature signals. The temperature sensing mechanism of the sensor is the dielectric constant of the PCB substrate changes with temperature, which causes the resonant frequency variation of the resonator. Then the temperature can be measured by detecting the changes in the sensor's working frequency. The PCB-based wireless passive temperature sensor prototype is prepared through theoretical design, parameter analysis, software simulation, and experimental testing. The high- and low-temperature sensing performance of the sensor is tested, respectively. The resonant frequency decreases from 2.434 GHz to 2.379 GHz as the temperature increases from -40 °C to 125 °C. The fitting curve proves that the experimental data have good linearity. Three repetitive tests proved that the sensor possess well repeatability. The average sensitivity is 347.45 KHz / ℃ from repetitive measurements conducted three times. This study demonstrates the feasibility of the PCB-based wireless passive sensor, which provides a low-cost temperature sensing solution for everyday life, modern agriculture, thriving intelligent health devices, and so on, and also enriches PCB product lines and applications.

  12. Elevated temperature design of KALIMER reactor internals accounting for creep and stress-rupture effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koo, Gyeong Hoi; Yoo, Bong

    2000-01-01

    In most LMFBR (Liquid Metal Fast Breed Reactor) design, the operating temperature is very high and the time-dependent creep and stress-rupture effects become so important in reactor structural design. Therefore, unlike with conventional PWR, the normal operating conditions can be basically dominant design loading because the hold time at elevated temperature condition is so long and enough to result in severe total creep ratcheting strains during total service lifetime. In this paper, elevated temperature design of the conceptually designed baffle annulus regions of KALIMER (Korea Advanced Liquid Metal Reactor) reactor internal structures is carried out for normal operating conditions which have the operating temperature 530 deg. C and the total service lifetime of 30 years. For the elevated temperature design of reactor internal structures, the ASME Code Case N-201-4 is used. Using this code, the time-dependent stress limits, the accumulated total inelastic strain during service lifetime, and the creep-fatigue damages are evaluated with the calculation results by the elastic analysis under conservative assumptions. The application procedures of elevated temperature design of the reactor internal structures using ASME code case N-201-4 with the elastic analysis method are described step by step in detail. This paper will be useful guide for actual application of elevated temperature design of various reactor types accounting for creep and stress-rupture effects. (author)

  13. Impact of warm winters on microbial growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birgander, Johanna; Rousk, Johannes; Axel Olsson, Pål

    2014-05-01

    Growth of soil bacteria has an asymmetrical response to higher temperature with a gradual increase with increasing temperatures until an optimum after which a steep decline occurs. In laboratory studies it has been shown that by exposing a soil bacterial community to a temperature above the community's optimum temperature for two months, the bacterial community grows warm-adapted, and the optimum temperature of bacterial growth shifts towards higher temperatures. This result suggests a change in the intrinsic temperature dependence of bacterial growth, as temperature influenced the bacterial growth even though all other factors were kept constant. An intrinsic temperature dependence could be explained by either a change in the bacterial community composition, exchanging less tolerant bacteria towards more tolerant ones, or it could be due to adaptation within the bacteria present. No matter what the shift in temperature tolerance is due to, the shift could have ecosystem scale implications, as winters in northern Europe are getting warmer. To address the question of how microbes and plants are affected by warmer winters, a winter-warming experiment was established in a South Swedish grassland. Results suggest a positive response in microbial growth rate in plots where winter soil temperatures were around 6 °C above ambient. Both bacterial and fungal growth (leucine incorporation, and acetate into ergosterol incorporation, respectively) appeared stimulated, and there are two candidate explanations for these results. Either (i) warming directly influence microbial communities by modulating their temperature adaptation, or (ii) warming indirectly affected the microbial communities via temperature induced changes in bacterial growth conditions. The first explanation is in accordance with what has been shown in laboratory conditions (explained above), where the differences in the intrinsic temperature relationships were examined. To test this explanation the

  14. Irradiations at low temperatures. 1. part: devices designs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Conte, R.R.

    1969-01-01

    After an attempt to sort out the irradiation devices, the different refrigeration systems used: stored liquid or refrigerators, are presented. Some financial aspects of these two systems are discussed. For a long run, 1000 hr per year (100 hr for He) the refrigerator become less expensive than stored liquid devices. Some ideas about the principal criterions in the device design are discussed. Finally a few elements making easier the calculation of the different parts of a cryostat are given. (author) [fr

  15. Applying dynamic mold temperature control to cosmetic package design

    OpenAIRE

    Hsiao Shih-Wen; Yen Chih-Huang; Lee Chu-Hsuan

    2017-01-01

    Owing to the fashion trend and the market needs, this study developed the eco-cushion compact. Through the product design and the advanced process technology, many issues have improved, for instance, the inconvenience of transportation, the lack of multiuse capability, the increase of costs, and the low yield rate. The eco-cushion compact developed in this study was high quality, low cost, and meets the requirements of the eco market. The study aimed at developing a reusable container. Dynami...

  16. A sandwich-designed temperature-gradient incubator for studies of microbial temperature responses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Elsgaard, Lars; Jørgensen, Leif Wagner

    2002-01-01

    of 28-ml test tubes. An electric plate heats one end of the TGI end and the other end is cooled by thermoelectric Peltier elements in combination with a liquid cooling system. The TGI is equipped with 24 calibrated Pt-100 temperature sensors and insulated by polyurethane plates. A PC-operated SCADA...

  17. A scoping nucleonics study for fusion high-temperature blanket designs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheng, E.T.; Wong, C.P.C.

    1983-01-01

    A scoping study was performed to explore tritium breeding and energy-temperature splits in various blanket concepts for high-temperature process heat. Temperature limits for the lithium materials necessitate two blanket zones. One delivers heat at moderate temperatures ( 0 C) and breeds tritium. The other is a nonbreeding zone that produces heat at high temperatures. It is found that a system where all blanket modules breed tritium delivers more high-temperature heat than one where only some of the blanket modules produce tritium. Of those considered, a design where the high-temperature zone is placed between two breeding zones produces the highest fraction of high-temperature heat. When liquid lithium, Li 7 Pb 2 and Li 2 O tritium breeding materials are employed with two breeding zones, a tritium breeding ratio of 1.1 can be achieved while delivering 30 to 40% of the blanket heat at high temperature

  18. Design and construction of a two-temperature preference behavioral assay for undergraduate neuroscience laboratories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniels, Richard L; McKemy, David D

    2010-01-01

    Behavioral assays in the undergraduate neuroscience laboratory are useful for illustrating a variety of physiological concepts. An example is homeostatic temperature regulation (thermoregulation). Many model organisms, from flies to mice, regulate internal temperatures in part by moving to suitable climates (thermotaxis). A particularly reliable method of quantifying temperature-dependent thermotactic behaviors is the two-temperature preference behavioral assay. In this preparation, an organism is free to move between two temperature-controlled surfaces, thus revealing its preferred thermal environment. Here we present the design and construction of a two-temperature preference assay chamber. The device uses Peltier-based thermoelectric modules (TECs) for heating and cooling, and is capable of precision control of temperatures from -5ºC to 60ºC. Our approach can be easily adapted for use in a variety of physiological and behavioral assays that require precise temperature control over a wide range of temperatures.

  19. Preconceptual design of hyfire. A fusion driven high temperature electrolysis plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Varljen, T.C.; Chi, J.W.H.; Karbowski, J.S.

    1983-01-01

    Brookhaven National Laboratory has been engaged in a scoping study to investigate the potential merits of coupling a fusion reactor with a high temperature blanket to a high temperature electrolysis (HTE) process to produce hydrogen and oxygen. Westinghouse is assisting this study in the areas of systems design integration, plasma engineering, balance of plant design and electrolyzer technology. The aim of the work done in the past year has been to focus on a reference design point for the plant, which has been designated HYFIRE. In prior work, the STARFIRE commercial tokamak fusion reactor was directly used as the fusion driver. This report describes a new design obtained by scaling the basic STARFIRE design to permit the achievement of a blanket power of 6000 MWt. The high temperature blanket design employs a thermally insulated refractory oxide region which provides high temperature (>1000 deg. C) steam at moderate pressures to high temperature electrolysis units. The electrolysis process selected is based on the high temperature, solid electrolyte fuel cell technology developed by Westinghouse. An initial process design and plant layout has been completed; component cost and plant economics studies are now underway to develop estimates of hydrogen production costs and to determine the sensitivity of this cost to changes in major design parameters. (author)

  20. Design Strategies for Optically-Accessible, High-Temperature, High-Pressure Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    S. F. Rice; R. R. Steeper; C. A. LaJeunesse; R. G. Hanush; J. D. Aiken

    2000-02-01

    The authors have developed two optical cell designs for high-pressure and high-temperature fluid research: one for flow systems, and the other for larger batch systems. The flow system design uses spring washers to balance the unequal thermal expansions of the reactor and the window materials. A typical design calculation is presented showing the relationship between system pressure, operating temperature, and torque applied to the window-retaining nut. The second design employs a different strategy more appropriate for larger windows. This design uses two seals: one for the window that benefits from system pressure, and a second one that relies on knife-edge, metal-to-metal contact.

  1. Rational design of temperature swing adsorption cycles for post-combustion CO2 capture

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Joss, Lisa; Gazzani, Matteo; Mazzotti, Marco

    2017-01-01

    The design of temperature swing adsorption (TSA) cycles aimed at recovering the heavy product at high purity is investigated by model-based design and applied to the capture of CO2 from flue gases. This model based design strategy and an extensive parametric analysis enables gaining an understanding

  2. Off-design performance analysis of Kalina cycle for low temperature geothermal source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Hang; Hu, Dongshuai; Wang, Mingkun; Dai, Yiping

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • The off-design performance analysis of Kalina cycle is conducted. • The off-design models are established. • The genetic algorithm is used in the design phase. • The sliding pressure control strategy is applied. - Abstract: Low temperature geothermal sources with brilliant prospects have attracted more and more people’s attention. Kalina cycle system using ammonia water as working fluid could exploit geothermal energy effectively. In this paper, the quantitative analysis of off-design performance of Kalina cycle for the low temperature geothermal source is conducted. The off-design models including turbine, pump and heat exchangers are established preliminarily. Genetic algorithm is used to maximize the net power output and determine the thermodynamic parameters in the design phase. The sliding pressure control strategy applied widely in existing Rankine cycle power plants is adopted to response to the variations of geothermal source mass flow rate ratio (70–120%), geothermal source temperature (116–128 °C) and heat sink temperature (0–35 °C). In the off-design research scopes, the guidance for pump rotational speed adjustment is listed to provide some reference for off-design operation of geothermal power plants. The required adjustment rate of pump rotational speed is more sensitive to per unit geothermal source temperature than per unit heat sink temperature. Influence of the heat sink variation is greater than that of the geothermal source variation on the ranges of net power output and thermal efficiency.

  3. Summary of the experimental multi-purpose very high temperature gas cooled reactor design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1984-12-01

    The report presents the design of Multi-purpose Very High Temperature Gas Cooled Reactor (the Experimental VHTR) based on the second stage of detailed design which was completed on March 1984, in the from of ''An application of reactor construction permit Appendix 8''. The Experimental VHTR is designed to satisfy with the design specification for the reactor thermal output 50 MW and reactor outlet temperature 950 0 C. The adequacy of the design is also checked by the safety analysis. The planning of plant system and safety is summarized such as safety design requirements and conformance with them, seismic design and plant arrangement. Concerning with the system of the Experimental VHTR the design basis, design data and components are described in the order. (author)

  4. Ambient Temperature Based Thermal Aware Energy Efficient ROM Design on FPGA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Saini, Rishita; Bansal, Neha; Bansal, Meenakshi

    2015-01-01

    Thermal aware design is currently gaining importance in VLSI research domain. In this work, we are going to design thermal aware energy efficient ROM on Virtex-5 FPGA. Ambient Temperature, airflow, and heat sink profile play a significant role in thermal aware hardware design life cycle. Ambient...... temperature is a temperature of surroundings. Airflow is measured in Linear Feet per Minute (LFM). Medium profile and high profile are two different heat sink profile available in XPower analyzer.When frequency goes from 4.0GHz to 1.0GHz, there is 21.8% reduction in clock power, 75% reduction in I/O Power, 35...

  5. Winter refuge for Aedes aegypti and Ae. albopictus mosquitoes in Hanoi during Winter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsunoda, Takashi; Cuong, Tran Chi; Dong, Tran Duc; Yen, Nguyen Thi; Le, Nguyen Hoang; Phong, Tran Vu; Minakawa, Noboru

    2014-01-01

    Dengue occurs throughout the year in Hanoi, Vietnam, despite winter low temperatures density drastically decreased in winter. Aedes aegypti preferred concrete tanks and this preference increased in winter. Even in winter, the lowest water temperature found in concrete tanks was >14°C, exceeding the developmental zero point of Ae. aegypti. Although jars, drums and concrete tanks were the dominant containers previously (1994-97) in Hanoi, currently the percentage of residences with concrete tanks was still high while jars and drums were quite low. Our study showed that concrete tanks with broken lids allowing mosquitoes access were important winter refuge for Ae. aegypti. We also indicate a concern about concrete tanks serving as foci for Ae. aegypti to expand their distribution in cooler regions.

  6. Design of high precision temperature control system for TO packaged LD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Enji; Luo, Baoke; Zhuang, Bin; He, Zhengquan

    2017-10-01

    Temperature is an important factor affecting the performance of TO package LD. In order to ensure the safe and stable operation of LD, a temperature control circuit for LD based on PID technology is designed. The MAX1978 and an external PID circuit are used to form a control circuit that drives the thermoelectric cooler (TEC) to achieve control of temperature and the external load can be changed. The system circuit has low power consumption, high integration and high precision,and the circuit can achieve precise control of the LD temperature. Experiment results show that the circuit can achieve effective and stable control of the laser temperature.

  7. High temperature structural design and R and Ds for heat transport system components of FBR 'Monju'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sumikawa, Masaharu; Nakagawa, Yukio; Fukuda, Yoshio; Sukegawa, Masayuki; Ishizaki, Tairo.

    1980-01-01

    The machines and equipments of cooling system for the fast breeder prototype reactor ''Monju'' are operated in creep temperature region, and the upper limit temperature to apply the domestic structural design standard for nuclear machines and equipment is exceeded, therefore the guideline for high temperature structural design is being drawn up, reflecting the results of recent research and development, by the Power Reactor and Nuclear Fuel Development Corp. and others. In order to obtain the basic data for the purpose, the tests on the high temperature characteristics of main structural members and structural elements were carried out, and eight kinds of the inelastic structural analysis program ''HI-EPIC'' series were developed, thus the fundamental technologies of structural desigh in non-linear region were established. Also in the non-linear region, enormous physical quantities must be evaluated, and in the design method based on real elastic analysis, many design diagrams must be employed, therefore for the purpose of improving the reliability of evaluation, the automatic evaluation program ''HI-TEP'' was developed, and preparation has been made for the design of actual machines. The high temperature structural design in ''Monju'', the development of inelastic structural analysis program and high temperature structural analysis evaluation program, and the development of high temperature structures and materials are described. (Kako, I.)

  8. Analysis and evaluation system for elevated temperature design of pressure vessels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hayakawa, Teiji; Sayawaki, Masaaki; Nishitani, Masahiro; Mii, Tatsuo; Murasawa, Kanji

    1977-01-01

    In pressure vessel technology, intensive efforts have recently been made to develop the elevated temperature design methods. Much of the impetus of these efforts has been provided mainly by the results of the Liquid Metal Fast Breeder Reactor (LMFBR) and more recently, of the High Temperature Gas-cooled Reactor (HTGR) Programs. The pressure vessels and associated components in these new type nuclear power plants must operate for long periods at elevated temperature where creep effects are significant and then must be designed by rigorous analysis for high reliability and safety. To carry out such an elevated temperature designing, numbers of highly developed analysis and evaluation techniques, which are so complicated as to be impossible by manual work, are indispensable. Under these circumstances, the authors have made the following approaches in the study: (1) Study into basic concepts and the associated techniques in elevated temperature design. (2) Systematization (Analysis System) of the procedure for loads and stress analyses. (3) Development of post-processor, ''POST-1592'', for strength evaluation based on ASME Code Case 1592-7. By linking the POST-1592 together with the Analysis System, an analysis and evaluation system is developed for an elevated temperature design of pressure vessels. Consequently, designing of elevated temperature vessels by detailed analysis and evaluation has easily and effectively become feasible by applying this software system. (auth.)

  9. On the design and implementation of a novel impedance chamber based variable temperature regulator at liquid helium temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagendran, R.; Thirumurugan, N.; Chinnasamy, N.; Janawadkar, M. P.; Sundar, C. S.

    2010-04-01

    A novel variable temperature regulator (VTR) based on the use of a fine impedance capillary to control the flow rate of cold helium gas into the VTR chamber is described. The capillary has a diameter of just 200 μm and the flow rate of cold helium gas through the capillary can be effectively controlled to the desired value by heating the capillary to a preset temperature and by controlling the pressure in the VTR chamber to a preset pressure using automated control circuits. Excellent temperature stability (about ±1 mK at 10 K and ±2 mK at 100 K) has been demonstrated in this setup with uniform rates of heating or cooling by an optimal choice of parameters. Compared to the more conventional VTR designs based on the use of mechanical long stem valves in the liquid helium reservoir to control the flow rate of liquid helium into the VTR chamber, and the use of a needle valve at the top of the cryostat to control the exchange gas pressure in the thermal isolation chamber, the present design enables temperature stability at any user desired temperature to be attained with uniform rates of cooling/heating with minimum consumption of liquid helium. The VTR has been successfully incorporated in the high field superconducting quantum interference device magnetometer setup developed in-house. It can also be incorporated in any low temperature physical property measurement system in which the temperature has to be varied in a controlled manner from 4.2 to 300 K and vice versa with uniform rates of heating and cooling.

  10. Coming to grips with nuclear winter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scherr, S.J.

    1985-01-01

    This editorial examines the politics related to the concept of nuclear winter which is a term used to describe temperature changes brought on by the injection of smoke into the atmosphere by the massive fires set off by nuclear explosions. The climate change alone could cause crop failures and lead to massive starvation. The author suggests that the prospect of a nuclear winter should be a deterrent to any nuclear exchange

  11. Development of capsule design support subprograms for 3-dimensional temperature calculation using FEM Code NISA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tobita, Masahiro; Matsui, Yoshinori [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Oarai, Ibaraki (Japan). Oarai Research Establishment

    2003-03-01

    Prediction of irradiation temperature is one of the important issues in the design of the capsule for irradiation test. Many kinds of capsules with complex structure have been designed for recent irradiation requests, and three-dimensional (3D) temperature calculation becomes inevitable for the evaluation of irradiation temperature. For such 3D calculation, however, many works are usually needed for input data preparation, and a lot of time and resources are necessary for parametric studies in the design. To improve such situation, JAERI introduced 3D-FEM (finite element method) code NISA (Numerically Integrated elements for System Analysis) and developed several subprograms, which enabled to support input preparation works in the capsule design. The 3D temperature calculation of the capsule are able to carried out in much easier way by the help of the subprograms, and specific features in the irradiation tests such as non-uniform gamma heating in the capsule, becomes to be considered. (author)

  12. High Temperature Gas-Cooled Test Reactor Point Design: Summary Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sterbentz, James William [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Bayless, Paul David [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Nelson, Lee Orville [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Gougar, Hans David [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Strydom, Gerhard [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2016-01-01

    A point design has been developed for a 200-MW high-temperature gas-cooled test reactor. The point design concept uses standard prismatic blocks and 15.5% enriched uranium oxycarbide fuel. Reactor physics and thermal-hydraulics simulations have been performed to characterize the capabilities of the design. In addition to the technical data, overviews are provided on the technology readiness level, licensing approach, and costs of the test reactor point design.

  13. High Temperature Gas-Cooled Test Reactor Point Design: Summary Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sterbentz, James William [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Bayless, Paul David [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Nelson, Lee Orville [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Gougar, Hans David [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Kinsey, J. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Strydom, Gerhard [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2016-03-01

    A point design has been developed for a 200-MW high-temperature gas-cooled test reactor. The point design concept uses standard prismatic blocks and 15.5% enriched uranium oxycarbide fuel. Reactor physics and thermal-hydraulics simulations have been performed to characterize the capabilities of the design. In addition to the technical data, overviews are provided on the technology readiness level, licensing approach, and costs of the test reactor point design.

  14. Freeze-drying process design by manometric temperature measurement: design of a smart freeze-dryer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Xiaolin Charlie; Nail, Steven L; Pikal, Michael J

    2005-04-01

    To develop a procedure based on manometric temperature measurement (MTM) and an expert system for good practices in freeze drying that will allow development of an optimized freeze-drying process during a single laboratory freeze-drying experiment. Freeze drying was performed with a FTS Dura-Stop/Dura-Top freeze dryer with the manometric temperature measurement software installed. Five percent solutions of glycine, sucrose, or mannitol with 2 ml to 4 ml fill in 5 ml vials were used, with all vials loaded on one shelf. Details of freezing, optimization of chamber pressure, target product temperature, and some aspects of secondary drying are determined by the expert system algorithms. MTM measurements were used to select the optimum shelf temperature, to determine drying end points, and to evaluate residual moisture content in real-time. MTM measurements were made at 1 hour or half-hour intervals during primary drying and secondary drying, with a data collection frequency of 4 points per second. The improved MTM equations were fit to pressure-time data generated by the MTM procedure using Microcal Origin software to obtain product temperature and dry layer resistance. Using heat and mass transfer theory, the MTM results were used to evaluate mass and heat transfer rates and to estimate the shelf temperature required to maintain the target product temperature. MTM product dry layer resistance is accurate until about two-thirds of total primary drying time is over, and the MTM product temperature is normally accurate almost to the end of primary drying provided that effective thermal shielding is used in the freeze-drying process. The primary drying times can be accurately estimated from mass transfer rates calculated very early in the run, and we find the target product temperature can be achieved and maintained with only a few adjustments of shelf temperature. The freeze-dryer overload conditions can be estimated by calculation of heat/mass flow at the target product

  15. High Temperature Electrolysis Pressurized Experiment Design, Operation, and Results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    J.E. O' Brien; X. Zhang; G.K. Housley; K. DeWall; L. Moore-McAteer

    2012-09-01

    A new facility has been developed at the Idaho National Laboratory for pressurized testing of solid oxide electrolysis stacks. Pressurized operation is envisioned for large-scale hydrogen production plants, yielding higher overall efficiencies when the hydrogen product is to be delivered at elevated pressure for tank storage or pipelines. Pressurized operation also supports higher mass flow rates of the process gases with smaller components. The test stand can accommodate planar cells with dimensions up to 8.5 cm x 8.5 cm and stacks of up to 25 cells. It is also suitable for testing other cell and stack geometries including tubular cells. The pressure boundary for these tests is a water-cooled spool-piece pressure vessel designed for operation up to 5 MPa. Pressurized operation of a ten-cell internally manifolded solid oxide electrolysis stack has been successfully demonstrated up 1.5 MPa. The stack is internally manifolded and operates in cross-flow with an inverted-U flow pattern. Feed-throughs for gas inlets/outlets, power, and instrumentation are all located in the bottom flange. The entire spool piece, with the exception of the bottom flange, can be lifted to allow access to the internal furnace and test fixture. Lifting is accomplished with a motorized threaded drive mechanism attached to a rigid structural frame. Stack mechanical compression is accomplished using springs that are located inside of the pressure boundary, but outside of the hot zone. Initial stack heatup and performance characterization occurs at ambient pressure followed by lowering and sealing of the pressure vessel and subsequent pressurization. Pressure equalization between the anode and cathode sides of the cells and the stack surroundings is ensured by combining all of the process gases downstream of the stack. Steady pressure is maintained by means of a backpressure regulator and a digital pressure controller. A full description of the pressurized test apparatus is provided in this

  16. Thermal and structural design aspects of high-temperature blankets for fusion synfuel production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Powell, J.R.; Fillo, J.A.; Reich, M.

    1981-01-01

    The most promising process, high temperature electrolysis (HTE) of steam at temperatures of greater than or equal to 1000 0 C is examined. In HTE, a large fraction (up to approx. 50%) of the energy input to split water to hydrogen and oxygen comes from thermal energy. For the projected operating conditions achieved by high temperature fusion blankets, overall efficiencies for hydrogen production should be on the order of 60%. The design, thermal-hydraulics, and materials for such blankets are discussed

  17. Uneven temperature effect evaluation in high-power IGBT inverter legs and relative test platform design

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Luo, Haoze; Li, Wuhua; He, Xiangning

    2017-01-01

    This paper presents a high-power IGBT testing platform for uneven temperature conditions and its design criteria. Considering the influence of layout parasitic parameters on the measurement results, commutation rules and independent junction temperature control, a universal high-power switching c...

  18. Study of the Army Helicopter Design Hover Criterion Using Temperature and Pressure Altitude

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-09-01

    Words) Ambient temperature and altitude are used to determine design points for helicopters. In this paper, pressure altitude is used to...Ground Effect; Pressure Altitude, Design Points, ACMES: Advanced Climate Modeling and Environmental Simulations 1. Abstract Ambient temperature and...of ambient air. Both compressibility and air density determine the amount of work that a rotor has to accomplish in order to propel a rotorcraft

  19. Construction Of A Piezoelectric-Based Resonance Ceramic Pressure Sensor Designed For High-Temperature Applications

    OpenAIRE

    Belavič Darko; Bradeško Andraž; Zarnik Marina Santo; Rojac Tadej

    2015-01-01

    In this work the design aspects of a piezoelectric-based resonance ceramic pressure sensor made using low-temperature co-fired ceramic (LTCC) technology and designed for high-temperature applications is presented. The basic pressure-sensor structure consists of a circular, edge-clamped, deformable diaphragm that is bonded to a ring, which is part of the rigid ceramic structure. The resonance pressure sensor has an additional element – a piezoelectric actuator – for stimulating oscillation of ...

  20. Research Activities on Development of Piping Design Methodology of High Temperature Reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huh, Nam-Su [Seoul National Univ. of Science and Technology, Seoul(Korea, Republic of); Won, Min-Gu [Sungkyukwan Univ., Suwon (Korea, Republic of); Oh, Young-Jin [KEPCO Engineering and Construction Co. Inc., Gimcheon (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Hyeog-Yeon; Kim, Yoo-Gon [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon(Korea, Republic of)

    2016-10-15

    A SFR is operated at high temperature and low pressure compared with commercial pressurized water reactor (PWR), and such an operating condition leads to time-dependent damages such as creep rupture, excessive creep deformation, creep-fatigue interaction and creep crack growth. Thus, high temperature design and structural integrity assessment methodology should be developed considering such failure mechanisms. In terms of design of mechanical components of SFR, ASME B and PV Code, Sec. III, Div. 5 and RCC-MRx provide high temperature design and assessment procedures for nuclear structural components operated at high temperature, and a Leak-Before-Break (LBB) assessment procedure for high temperature piping is also provided in RCC-MRx, A16. Three web-based evaluation programs based on the current high temperature codes were developed for structural components of high temperature reactors. Moreover, for the detailed LBB analyses of high temperature piping, new engineering methods for predicting creep C*-integral and creep COD rate based either on GE/EPRI or on reference stress concepts were proposed. Finally, the numerical methods based on Garofalo's model and RCC-MRx have been developed, and they have been implemented into ABAQUS. The predictions based on both models were compared with the experimental results, and it has been revealed that the predictions from Garafalo's model gave somewhat successful results to describe the deformation behavior of Gr. 91 at elevated temperatures.

  1. Winter fuels report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1995-01-13

    The Winter Fuels Report is intended to provide concise, timely information to the industry, the press, policymakers, consumers, analysts, and State and local governments on the following topics: distillate fuel oil net production, imports and stocks on a US level and for all Petroleum Administration for Defense Districts (PADD) and product supplied on a US level; propane net production, imports and stocks on a US level and for PADD`s I, II, and III; natural gas supply and disposition and underground storage for the US and consumption for all PADD`s, as well as selected National average prices; residential and wholesale pricing data for heating oil and propane for those States participating in the joint Energy Information Administration (EIA)/State Heating Oil and Propane Program; crude oil and petroleum price comparisons for the US and selected cities; and a 6-10 day, 30-Day, and 90-Day outlook for temperature and precipitation and US total heating degree-days by city.

  2. The PLC-based Industrial Temperature Control System: Design and Implementation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Fanjie

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Targeting at the problem of slow response and low accuracy of the automatic temperature control system for material processing and boiler heating, a new design method is proposed to work with the PLC-based temperature control system, where the box temperature control may be achieved through the fan and the heating plate. The hardware design and software design of the system are analyzed in detail. In this paper, a combination of the traditional PID control and the more popular fuzzy control is taken as the control program to achieve the overall design of the control algorithm. Followed by the simulation in the MATLAB software, the designed system is highlighted by its the characteristics of impressive stability, precision and robustness.

  3. Design of laser diode driver with constant current and temperature control system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ming-cai; Yang, Kai-yong; Wang, Zhi-guo; Fan, Zhen-fang

    2017-10-01

    A laser Diode (LD) driver with constant current and temperature control system is designed according to the LD working characteristics. We deeply researched the protection circuit and temperature control circuit based on thermos-electric cooler(TEC) cooling circuit and PID algorithm. The driver could realize constant current output and achieve stable temperature control of LD. Real-time feedback control method was adopted in the temperature control system to make LD work on its best temperature point. The output power variety and output wavelength shift of LD caused by current and temperature instability were decreased. Furthermore, the driving current and working temperature is adjustable according to specific requirements. The experiment result showed that the developed LD driver meets the characteristics of LD.

  4. Winters fuels report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-01-01

    The outlook for distillate fuel oil this winter is for increased demand and a return to normal inventory patterns, assuming a resumption of normal, cooler weather than last winter. With industrial production expected to grow slightly from last winter's pace, overall consumption is projected to increase 3 percent from last winter, to 3.4 million barrels per day during the heating season (October 1, 1995-March 31, 1996). Much of the supply win come from stock drawdowns and refinery production. Estimates for the winter are from the Energy Information Administration's (EIA) 4th Quarter 1995 Short-Tenn Energy Outlook (STEO) Mid-World Oil Price Case forecast. Inventories in place on September 30, 1995, of 132 million barrels were 9 percent below the unusually high year-earlier level. Inventories of high-sulfur distillate fuel oil, the principal type used for heating, were 13 percent lower than a year earlier. Supply problems are not anticipated because refinery production and the ready availability of imports should be adequate to meet demand. Residential heating off prices are expected to be somewhat higher than last winter's, as the effects of lower crude oil prices are offset by lower distillate inventories. Heating oil is forecast to average $0.92 per gallon, the highest price since the winter of 1992-93. Diesel fuel (including tax) is predicted to be slightly higher than last year at $1.13 per gallon. This article focuses on the winter assessment for distillate fuel oil, how well last year's STEO winter outlook compared to actual events, and expectations for the coming winter. Additional analyses include regional low-sulfur and high-sulfur distillate supply, demand, and prices, and recent trends in distillate fuel oil inventories

  5. Over-wintering Daphnia: uncoupling the effects of temperature and food on offspring size and filtering screen morphology in D. galeata

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Macháček, Jiří; Seďa, Jaromír

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 35, č. 5 (2013), s. 1069-1079 ISSN 0142-7873 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA206/09/1325 Institutional support: RVO:60077344 Keywords : Daphnia size * filtering screens * phenotypic plasticity * embryonic induction * temperature effect Subject RIV: DA - Hydrology ; Limnology Impact factor: 2.263, year: 2013

  6. Reduction of net primary productivity in southern China caused by abnormal low-temperature freezing in winter of 2008 detected by a remote sensing-driven ecosystem model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ju, W.; Liu, Y.; Zhou, Y.; Zhu, G.

    2011-12-01

    Terrestrial carbon cycle is an important determinant of global climate change and affected by various factors, including climate, CO2 concentration, atmospheric nitrogen deposition and human activities. Extreme weather events can significantly regulate short-term even long-term carbon exchanges between terrestrial ecosystems and the atmosphere. During the period from the middle January to the middle February 2008, Southern China was seriously hit by abnormal low-temperature freezing, which caused serous damages to forests and crops. However, the reduction of net primary productivity (NPP) of terrestrial ecosystems caused by this extremely abnormal weather event has not been quantitatively investigated. In this study, the Boreal Ecosystem Productivity Simulator (BEPS) model was employed to assess the reduction of NPP in Southern China caused by the abnormal low-temperature freezing. Prior to the regional simulation, the BEPS model was validated using measured NPP in different ecosystems, demonstrating the ability of this model to simulate NPP reliably in China. Then, it was forced using meteorological data interpolated from observations of weather stations and leaf area index inversed from MODIS reflectance data to simulate national wide NPP at a 500 m resolution for the period from 2003 to 2008. The departures of NPP in 2008 from the means during 2003-2007 were used as the indicator of NPP reduction caused by the low-temperature freezing. It was found out that NPP in 2008 decreased significantly in forests of Southern China, especially in Guangdong, Fujian, Zhejiang, Guangxi, Jiangxi, and Hunan Provinces, in which the low-temperature freeing was more serious. The annul reduction of NPP was above 150 g C/m^2/yr in these areas. Key words: Net Primary Productivity, low-temperature freezing, BEPS model, MODIS Correspondence author: Weimin Ju Email:juweimin@nju.edu.cn

  7. High-Temperature Air-Cooled Power Electronics Thermal Design: Annual Progress Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Waye, Scot [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2016-08-01

    Power electronics that use high-temperature devices pose a challenge for thermal management. With the devices running at higher temperatures and having a smaller footprint, the heat fluxes increase from previous power electronic designs. This project overview presents an approach to examine and design thermal management strategies through cooling technologies to keep devices within temperature limits, dissipate the heat generated by the devices and protect electrical interconnects and other components for inverter, converter, and charger applications. This analysis, validation, and demonstration intends to take a multi-scale approach over the device, module, and system levels to reduce size, weight, and cost.

  8. Design of matrix irradiation system for external tissue phototherapy with temperature control

    Science.gov (United States)

    López S., F. Yonadab; Stolik Isakina, Suren; de La Rosa Vázquez, José Manuel

    2013-11-01

    This paper presents the design and development of a matrix irradiation system for studies and application of dermatological phototherapies with temperature control. The developed system has a power control to irradiate the target tissue with an adequate power density. Also, the irradiation time it is automated. Temperature infrared sensor is used in the irradiated sample to control the temperature. The temperature control allows the study of photodynamic therapy effects in synergy with the thermotherapy effects in the treatment of different diseases in external tissue.

  9. Structural Designing of a MEMS Capacitive Accelerometer for Low Temperature Coefficient and High Linearity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Jiangbo; Zhou, Wu; Yu, Huijun; He, Xiaoping; Peng, Peng

    2018-02-22

    The low temperature coefficient and high linearity of the input-output characteristics are both required for high-performance microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) capacitive accelerometers. In this work, a structural designing of a bulk MEMS capacitive accelerometer is developed for both low temperature coefficient and high linearity. Firstly, the contrary effect of the wide-narrow gaps ratio (WNGR) on the temperature coefficient of the scale factor (TCSF) and linearity error is discussed. Secondly, the ability of an improved structure that can avoid the contrary effect is illustrated. The improved structure is proposed in our previous work for reducing the temperature coefficient of bias (TCB) and TCSF. Within the improved structure, both the TCSF and linearity error decrease with increasing WNGR. Then, the precise designing of the improved structure is developed for achieving lower TCB, TCSF, and linearity error. Finally, the precise structural designing is experimentally verified.

  10. Design of the steam reformer for the HTR-10 high temperature process heat application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ju Huaiming; Xu Yuanhui; Jia Haijun

    2000-01-01

    The 10 MW High Temperature Reactor Test Module (HTR-10) is being constructed now and planned to be operational in 2000. One of the objectives is to develop the high temperature process heat application. The methane steam reformer is one of the key-facilities for the nuclear process heat application system. The paper describes the conceptual design of the HTR-10 Steam Reformer with He heating, and the design optimization computer code. It can be used to perform sensitivity analysis for parameters, and to improve the design. Principal parameters and construction features of the HTR-10 reformer heated by He are introduced. (author)

  11. Design of a high-temperature superconductor current lead for electric utility SMES

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Niemann, R.C.; Cha, Y.S.; Hull, J.R.; Rey, C.M.; Dixon, K.D.

    1995-01-01

    Current leads that rely on high-temperature superconductors (HTSs) to deliver power to devices operating at liquid helium temperature have the potential to reduce refrigeration requirements to levels significantly below those achievable with conventional leads. The design of HTS current leads suitable for use in near-term superconducting magnetic energy storage (SMES) is in progress. The SMES system has an 0.5 MWh energy capacity and a discharge power of 30 MW. Lead-design considerations include safety and reliability, electrical and thermal performance, structural integrity, manufacturability, and cost. Available details of the design, including materials, configuration, and performance predictions, are presented

  12. Klaus Winter (1930 - 2015)

    CERN Multimedia

    2015-01-01

    We learned with great sadness that Klaus Winter passed away on 9 February 2015, after a long illness.   Klaus was born in 1930 in Hamburg, where he obtained his diploma in physics in 1955. From 1955 to 1958 he held a scholarship at the Collège de France, where he received his doctorate in nuclear physics under the guidance of Francis Perrin. Klaus joined CERN in 1958, where he first participated in experiments on π+ and K0 decay properties at the PS, and later became the spokesperson of the CHOV Collaboration at the ISR. Starting in 1976, his work focused on experiments with the SPS neutrino beam. In 1984 he joined Ugo Amaldi to head the CHARM experiment, designed for detailed studies of the neutral current interactions of high-energy neutrinos, which had been discovered in 1973 using the Gargamelle bubble chamber at the PS. The unique feature of the detector was its target calorimeter, which used large Carrara marble plates as an absorber material. From 1984 to 1991, Klau...

  13. Winter wheat quality monitoring and forecasting system based on remote sensing and environmental factors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haiyang, Yu; Yanmei, Liu; Guijun, Yang; Xiaodong, Yang; Chenwei, Nie; Dong, Ren

    2014-01-01

    To achieve dynamic winter wheat quality monitoring and forecasting in larger scale regions, the objective of this study was to design and develop a winter wheat quality monitoring and forecasting system by using a remote sensing index and environmental factors. The winter wheat quality trend was forecasted before the harvest and quality was monitored after the harvest, respectively. The traditional quality-vegetation index from remote sensing monitoring and forecasting models were improved. Combining with latitude information, the vegetation index was used to estimate agronomy parameters which were related with winter wheat quality in the early stages for forecasting the quality trend. A combination of rainfall in May, temperature in May, illumination at later May, the soil available nitrogen content and other environmental factors established the quality monitoring model. Compared with a simple quality-vegetation index, the remote sensing monitoring and forecasting model used in this system get greatly improved accuracy. Winter wheat quality was monitored and forecasted based on the above models, and this system was completed based on WebGIS technology. Finally, in 2010 the operation process of winter wheat quality monitoring system was presented in Beijing, the monitoring and forecasting results was outputted as thematic maps

  14. Variability in winter climate and winter extremes reduces population growth of an alpine butterfly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roland, Jens; Matter, Stephen F

    2013-01-01

    We examined the long-term, 15-year pattern of population change in a network of 21 Rocky Mountain populations of Parnassius smintheus butterflies in response to climatic variation. We found that winter values of the broadscale climate variable, the Pacific Decadal Oscillation (PDO) index, were a strong predictor of annual population growth, much more so than were endogenous biotic factors related to population density. The relationship between PDO and population growth was nonlinear. Populations declined in years with extreme winter PDO values, when there were either extremely warm or extremely cold sea surface temperatures in the eastern Pacific relative to that in the western Pacific. Results suggest that more variable winters, and more frequent extremely cold or warm winters, will result in more frequent decline of these populations, a pattern exacerbated by the trend for increasingly variable winters seen over the past century.

  15. Safety design philosophy of gas turbine high temperature reactor (GTHTR300)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Katanishi, Shoji; Kunitomi, Kazuhiko

    2003-01-01

    Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI) has been developing design studies of the Gas Turbine High Temperature Reactor (GTHTR300). The original safety design philosophy has also been discussed and fixed for the GTHTR300 based on the experience of the High Temperature Engineering Test Reactor (HTTR) of JAERI which is the first High Temperature Gas-cooled Reactor (HTGR) in Japan. One of the unique feature of the safety philosophy of the GTHTR300 is that a depressurization accident induced by a large pipe break is postulated as a design basis accident in order to show the high level of safety characteristics, though its probability of occurrence is lower than the probability range of design basis accident. Another feature of safety design is to adopt a double confinement that is one of the original concepts for the GTHTR300. By using a double confinement, a feasibility of safety design without containment vessel was clarified even in case of the depressurization accident. The safety design philosophies for passive cooling system, reactor shutdown system, and so on were determined. The methodology for the safety evaluation, such as safety criteria and selection of events to be evaluated by using estimation of probability of occurrence, were also discussed and determined. This article describes the safety design philosophy and some results of preliminary evaluations which were conducted in order to clarify the feasibility of original safety design of the GTHTR300. The present study is entrusted from Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology of Japan. (author)

  16. Optimized Design of the SGA-WZ Strapdown Airborne Gravimeter Temperature Control System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juliang Cao

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The temperature control system is one of the most important subsystems of the strapdown airborne gravimeter. Because the quartz flexible accelerometer based on springy support technology is the core sensor in the strapdown airborne gravimeter and the magnet steel in the electromagnetic force equilibrium circuits of the quartz flexible accelerometer is greatly affected by temperature, in order to guarantee the temperature control precision and minimize the effect of temperature on the gravimeter, the SGA-WZ temperature control system adopts a three-level control method. Based on the design experience of the SGA-WZ-01, the SGA-WZ-02 temperature control system came out with a further optimized design. In 1st level temperature control, thermoelectric cooler is used to conquer temperature change caused by hot weather. The experiments show that the optimized stability of 1st level temperature control is about 0.1 °C and the max cool down capability is about 10 °C. The temperature field is analyzed in the 2nd and 3rd level temperature control using the finite element analysis software ANSYS. The 2nd and 3rd level temperature control optimization scheme is based on the foundation of heat analysis. The experimental results show that static accuracy of SGA-WZ-02 reaches 0.21 mGal/24 h, with internal accuracy being 0.743 mGal/4.8 km and external accuracy being 0.37 mGal/4.8 km compared with the result of the GT-2A, whose internal precision is superior to 1 mGal/4.8 km and all of them are better than those in SGA-WZ-01.

  17. Behavior of zonal mean aerosol extinction ratio and its relationship with zonal mean temperature during the winter 1978-1979 stratospheric warming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, P.-H.; Mccormick, M. P.

    1985-01-01

    The behavior of the zonal mean aerosol extinction ratio in the lower stratosphere near 75 deg N and its relationship with the zonal mean temperature during the January-February 1979 stratospheric sudden warming have been investigated based on the satellite sensor SAM II (Stratospheric Aerosol Measurement) and auxiliary meteorological measurements. The results indicate that distinct changes in the zonal mean aerosol extinction ratio occurred during this stratospheric sudden warming. It is also found that horizontal eddy transport due to planetary waves may have played a significant role in determining the distribution of the zonal mean aerosol extinction ratio.

  18. The influence of sowing period and seeding norm on autumn vegetation, winter hardiness and yield of winter cereal crops

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Potapova G. N.

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available the winter wheat and triticale in the middle part of the Ural Mountains haven’t been seeded before. The technology of winter crop cultivation should be improved due to the production of new varieties of winter rye. Winter hardiness and yield of winter rye are higher in comparison with winter triticale and especially with winter wheat. The sowing period and the seeding rate influence the amount of yield and winter hardiness. The winter hardiness of winter cereals and the yield of the rye variety Iset sowed on August 25 and the yield of the triticale variety Bashkir short-stalked and wheat Kazanskaya 560 sowed on August 15 were higher. It is important to sow winter grain in local conditions in the second half of August. The sowing this period allows to provide plants with the necessary amount of positive temperatures (450–500 °C. This helps the plants to form 3–4 shoots of tillering and a mass of 10 dry plants reaching 3–5 grams. The winter grain crops in the middle part of the Ural Mountains should be sown with seeding rates of 6 and 7 million of sprouting grains per 1 ha, and the seeds must be cultivated with fungicidal preparation before seeding.

  19. Analysis and preliminary design of optical sensors for propulsion control. [temperature sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    James, K. A.; Quick, W. H.; Strahan, V. H.

    1979-01-01

    A fiber-optic sensor concept screening study was performed. Twenty sensor subsystems were identified and evaluated. Two concepts selected for further study were the Fabry-Perot fiber-optic temperature sensor and the pulse-width-modulated phosphorescent temperature sensor. Various designs suitable for a Fabry-Perot temperature sensor to be used as a remote fiber-optic transducer were investigated. As a result, a particular design was selected and constructed. Tests on this device show that spectral peaks are produced from visible white light, and the change in wavelength of the spectral peaks produced by a change in temperature is consistent with theory and is 36 nm/C for the first order peak. A literature search to determine a suitable phosphor for implementing the pulse-width-modulated fiber optic temperature sensor was conducted. This search indicated that such a device could be made to function for temperatures up to approximately 200 C. Materials like ZnCdS and ZnSe activated with copper will be particularly applicable to temperature sensing in the cryogenic to room temperature region. While this sensing concept is probably not applicable to jet engines, the simplicity and potential reliability make the concept highly desirable for other applications.

  20. Employment and winter construction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Ernst Jan de Place; Larsen, Jacob Norvig

    2011-01-01

    Reduced seasonal building activity in the construction sector is often assumed to be related to hard winter conditions for building activities and poor working conditions for construction workers, resulting in higher costs and poor quality of building products, particularly in the northern...... hemisphere. Can climatic conditions alone explain the sizeable difference in reduction in building activity in the construction sector in European countries in the winter months, or are other factors such as technology, economic cycles and schemes for financial compensation influential as well? What...... possibilities exist for reducing seasonal variation in employment? In addition to a literature review related to winter construction, European and national employment and meteorological data were studied. Finally, ministerial acts, ministerial orders or other public policy documents related to winter...

  1. Deer Wintering Areas

    Data.gov (United States)

    Vermont Center for Geographic Information — Deer winter habitat is critical to the long term survival of white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus) in Vermont. Being near the northern extreme of the...

  2. Winter Bottom Trawl Survey

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The standardized NEFSC Winter Bottom Trawl Survey was initiated in 1992 and covered offshore areas from the Mid-Atlantic to Georges Bank. Inshore strata were covered...

  3. Safety design philosophy of gas turbine high temperature reactor (GTHTR300)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Katanishi, Shoji; Kunitomi, Kazuhiko

    2003-01-01

    Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute has been developing design studies of the Gas Turbine High Temperature Reactor (GTHTR300). The original safety design philosophy has also been discussed and fixed for the GTHTR300. One of the unique feature of the safety philosophy of the GTHTR300 is that a depressurization accident is postulated as a design basis accident in order to show the high level of safety characteristics, though its probability of occurrence is much lower than the probability range of design basis accident. Another feature of safety design is to adopt a double confinement that is one of the original concepts for the GTHTR300. By using a double confinement, a feasibility of safety design without containment vessel was clarified even in case of a depressurization accident. This article describes the safety design philosophy and some results of preliminary evaluations which were conducted in order to clarify the feasibility of original safety design of the GTHTR300. (author)

  4. Current Status of the Elevated Temperature Structure Design Codes for VHTR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Jong-Bum; Kim, Seok-Hoon; Park, Keun-Bae; Lee, Won-Jae

    2006-01-01

    An elevated temperature structure design and analysis is one of the key issues in the VHTR (Very High Temperature Reactor) project to achieve an economic production of hydrogen which will be an essential energy source for the near future. Since the operating temperature of a VHTR is above 850 .deg. C, the existing code and standards are insufficient for a high temperature structure design. Thus the issues concerning a material selection and behaviors are being studied for the main structural components of a VHTR in leading countries such as US, France, UK, and Japan. In this study, the current status of the ASME code, French RCC-MR, UK R5, and Japanese code were investigated and the necessary R and D items were discussed

  5. The design of multi temperature and humidity monitoring system for incubator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Junyu; Xu, Peng; Peng, Zitao; Qiang, Haonan; Shen, Xiaoyan

    2017-01-01

    Currently, there is only one monitor of the temperature and humidity in an incubator, which may cause inaccurate or unreliable data, and even endanger the life safety of the baby. In order to solve this problem,we designed a multi-point temperature and humidity monitoring system for incubators. The system uses the STC12C5A60S2 microcontrollers as the sender core chip which is connected to four AM2321 temperature and humidity sensors. We select STM32F103ZET6 core development board as the receiving end,cooperating with Zigbee wireless transmitting and receiving module to realize data acquisition and transmission. This design can realize remote real-time observation data on the computer by communicating with PC via Ethernet. Prototype tests show that the system can effectively collect and display the information of temperature and humidity of multiple incubators at the same time and there are four monitors in each incubator.

  6. Winter season mortality: will climate warming bring benefits?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinney, Patrick L.; Schwartz, Joel; Pascal, Mathilde; Petkova, Elisaveta; Le Tertre, Alain; Medina, Sylvia; Vautard, Robert

    2015-06-01

    Extreme heat events are associated with spikes in mortality, yet death rates are on average highest during the coldest months of the year. Under the assumption that most winter excess mortality is due to cold temperature, many previous studies have concluded that winter mortality will substantially decline in a warming climate. We analyzed whether and to what extent cold temperatures are associated with excess winter mortality across multiple cities and over multiple years within individual cities, using daily temperature and mortality data from 36 US cities (1985-2006) and 3 French cities (1971-2007). Comparing across cities, we found that excess winter mortality did not depend on seasonal temperature range, and was no lower in warmer vs. colder cities, suggesting that temperature is not a key driver of winter excess mortality. Using regression models within monthly strata, we found that variability in daily mortality within cities was not strongly influenced by winter temperature. Finally we found that inadequate control for seasonality in analyses of the effects of cold temperatures led to spuriously large assumed cold effects, and erroneous attribution of winter mortality to cold temperatures. Our findings suggest that reductions in cold-related mortality under warming climate may be much smaller than some have assumed. This should be of interest to researchers and policy makers concerned with projecting future health effects of climate change and developing relevant adaptation strategies.

  7. Seasonal Carbonate Chemistry Covariation with Temperature, Oxygen, and Salinity in a Fjord Estuary: Implications for the Design of Ocean Acidification Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reum, Jonathan C. P.; Alin, Simone R.; Feely, Richard A.; Newton, Jan; Warner, Mark; McElhany, Paul

    2014-01-01

    Carbonate chemistry variability is often poorly characterized in coastal regions and patterns of covariation with other biologically important variables such as temperature, oxygen concentration, and salinity are rarely evaluated. This absence of information hampers the design and interpretation of ocean acidification experiments that aim to characterize biological responses to future pCO2 levels relative to contemporary conditions. Here, we analyzed a large carbonate chemistry data set from Puget Sound, a fjord estuary on the U.S. west coast, and included measurements from three seasons (winter, summer, and fall). pCO2 exceeded the 2008–2011 mean atmospheric level (392 µatm) at all depths and seasons sampled except for the near-surface waters (aragonite were widespread (Ωar<1). We show that pCO2 values were relatively uniform throughout the water column and across regions in winter, enriched in subsurface waters in summer, and in the fall some values exceeded 2500 µatm in near-surface waters. Carbonate chemistry covaried to differing levels with temperature and oxygen depending primarily on season and secondarily on region. Salinity, which varied little (27 to 31), was weakly correlated with carbonate chemistry. We illustrate potential high-frequency changes in carbonate chemistry, temperature, and oxygen conditions experienced simultaneously by organisms in Puget Sound that undergo diel vertical migrations under present-day conditions. We used simple calculations to estimate future pCO2 and Ωar values experienced by diel vertical migrators based on an increase in atmospheric CO2. Given the potential for non-linear interactions between pCO2 and other abiotic variables on physiological and ecological processes, our results provide a basis for identifying control conditions in ocean acidification experiments for this region, but also highlight the wide range of carbonate chemistry conditions organisms may currently experience in this and similar coastal

  8. Severe European winters in a secular perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoy, Andreas; Hänsel, Stephanie

    2017-04-01

    Temperature conditions during the winter time are substantially shaped by a strong year-to-year variability. European winters since the late 1980s - compared to previous decades and centuries - were mainly characterised by a high temperature level, including recent record-warm winters. Yet, comparably cold winters and severe cold spells still occur nowadays, like recently observed from 2009 to 2013 and in early 2017. Central England experienced its second coldest December since start of observations more than 350 years ago in 2010, and some of the lowest temperatures ever measured in northern Europe (below -50 °C in Lapland) were recorded in January 1999. Analysing thermal characteristics and spatial distribution of severe (historical) winters - using early instrumental data - helps expanding and consolidating our knowledge of past weather extremes. This contribution presents efforts towards this direction. We focus on a) compiling and assessing a very long-term instrumental, spatially widespread and well-distributed, high-quality meteorological data set to b) investigate very cold winter temperatures in Europe from early measurements until today. In a first step, we analyse the longest available time series of monthly temperature averages within Europe. Our dataset extends from the Nordic countries up to the Mediterranean and from the British Isles up to Russia. We utilise as much as possible homogenised times series in order to ensure reliable results. Homogenised data derive from the NORDHOM (Scandinavia) and HISTALP (greater alpine region) datasets or were obtained from national weather services and universities. Other (not specifically homogenised) data were derived from the ECA&D dataset or national institutions. The employed time series often start already during the 18th century, with Paris & Central England being the longest datasets (from 1659). In a second step, daily temperature averages are involved. Only some of those series are homogenised, but

  9. Design and modelling of a novel compact power cycle for low temperature heat sources

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wronski, Jorrit; Skovrup, Morten Juel; Elmegaard, Brian

    2012-01-01

    Power cycles for the efficient use of low temperature heat sources experience increasing attention. This paper describes an alternative cycle design that offers potential advantages in terms of heat source exploitation. A concept for a reciprocating expander is presented that performs both, work...... calculation results for use with a steady state cycle evaluation. An organic Rankine cycle model is developed and used for a comparison. The performance of the expander itself and the different requirements regarding heat source and temperature levels are studied....

  10. Temperature reduction in attic and ceiling via insulation of several passive roof designs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ong, K.S., E-mail: Ong.Kok.Seng@eng.monash.edu.m [Monash University Sunway Campus, Jalan Lagoon Selatan, 46150 Bandar Sunway (Malaysia)

    2011-06-15

    Research highlights: {yields} Six passive roof designs were tested simultaneously outdoors. {yields} Roof, attic and ceiling temperatures were determined. {yields} Solar collector roof design provided the coolest attic and ceiling. {yields} Placing insulation under roof is preferred to above ceiling. -- Abstract: High ambient temperatures coupled with high humidity lead to uncomfortable conditions that are non-conducive for human comfort and productivity. Heat transmission through the roof could be reduced by providing insulation in the attic under the roof or above the ceiling. A roof solar collector could provide both ventilation and cooling in the attic. Several laboratory sized units of passive roof designs were constructed and tested side-by-side under outdoor conditions to obtain temperature data of the roof, attic and ceiling in order to compare their performances.

  11. Temperature reduction in attic and ceiling via insulation of several passive roof designs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ong, K.S.

    2011-01-01

    Research highlights: → Six passive roof designs were tested simultaneously outdoors. → Roof, attic and ceiling temperatures were determined. → Solar collector roof design provided the coolest attic and ceiling. → Placing insulation under roof is preferred to above ceiling. -- Abstract: High ambient temperatures coupled with high humidity lead to uncomfortable conditions that are non-conducive for human comfort and productivity. Heat transmission through the roof could be reduced by providing insulation in the attic under the roof or above the ceiling. A roof solar collector could provide both ventilation and cooling in the attic. Several laboratory sized units of passive roof designs were constructed and tested side-by-side under outdoor conditions to obtain temperature data of the roof, attic and ceiling in order to compare their performances.

  12. Design rule for fatigue of welded joints in elevated-temperature nuclear components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    O'Connor, D.G.; Corum, J.M.

    1986-01-01

    Elevated-temperature weldment fatigue failures have occurred in several operating liquid-metal reactor plants. Yet, ASME Code Case N-47, which governs the design of such plants in the United States, does not currently address the Code Subgroup on Elevated Temperature Design recently proposed a fatigue strength reduction factor for austenitic and ferritic steel weldments. The factor is based on a variety of weld metal and weldment fatigue data generated in the United States, Europe, and Japan. This paper describes the factor and its bases, and it presents the results of confirmatory fatigue tests conducted at Oak Ridge National Laboratory on 316 stainless steel tubes with axial and circumferential welds of 16-8-2 filler metal. These test results confirm the suitability of the design factor, and they support the premise that the metallurgical notch effect produced by yield strength variations across a weldment is largely responsible for the observed elevated-temperature fatigue strength reduction

  13. Shape Design of Unsteady Forced Heat-convection Fields to Control Temperature Distribution History

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katamine, Eiji; Okada, Naoya

    2017-11-01

    This paper presents a numerical solution to shape design of unsteady forced heat-convection fields to control temperature to a prescribed distribution. The square error integral between the actual temperature distributions and the prescribed temperature distributions on the prescribed sub-domains during the specified period of time is used as the objective functional. Shape gradient of the shape design problem is derived theoretically using the Lagrange multiplier method, adjoint variable method, and the formulae of the material derivative. Reshaping is carried out by the traction method proposed as an approach to solving shape optimization problems. Numerical analyses program for the shape design is developed based on FreeFem++, and the validity of proposed method is confirmed by results of 2D numerical analyses.

  14. High-temperature turbine technology program. Turbine subsystem design report: Low-Btu gas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Horner, M.W.

    1980-12-01

    The objective of the US Department of Energy High-Temperature Turbine Technology (DOE-HTTT) program is to bring to technology readiness a high-temperature (2600/sup 0/F to 3000/sup 0/F firing temperature) turbine within a 6- to 10-year duration, Phase II has addressed the performance of component design and technology testing in critical areas to confirm the design concepts identified in the earlier Phase I program. Based on the testing and support studies completed under Phase II, this report describes the updated turbine subsystem design for a coal-derived gas fuel (low-Btu gas) operation at 2600/sup 0/F turbine firing temperature. A commercial IGCC plant configuration would contain four gas turbines. These gas turbines utilize an existing axial flow compressor from the GE product line MS6001 machine. A complete description of the Primary Reference Design-Overall Plant Design Description has been developed and has been documented. Trends in overall plant performance improvement at higher pressure ratio and higher firing temperature are shown. It should be noted that the effect of pressure ratio on efficiency is significally enhanced at higher firing temperatures. It is shown that any improvement in overall plant thermal efficiency reflects about the same level of gain in Cost of Electricity (COE). The IGCC concepts are shown to be competitive in both performance and cost at current and near-term gas turbine firing temperatures of 1985/sup 0/F to 2100/sup 0/F. The savings that can be accumulated over a thirty-year plant life for a water-cooled gas turbine in an IGCC plant as compared to a state-of-the-art coal-fired steam plant are estimated. A total of $500 million over the life of a 1000 MW plant is projected. Also, this IGCC power plant has significant environmental advantages over equivalent coal-fired steam power plants.

  15. Application of Combined Sustained and Cyclic Loading Test Results to Alloy 617 Elevated Temperature Design Criteria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Yanli [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Jetter, Robert I [Global Egineering and Technology, LLC, Coral Gables, FL (United States); Sham, Sam [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2014-08-25

    Alloy 617 is a reference structural material for very high temperature components of advanced-gas cooled reactors with outlet temperatures in the range of 900-950°C . In order for designers to be able to use Alloy 617 for these high temperature components, Alloy 617 has to be approved for use in Section III (the nuclear section) of the American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code. A plan has been developed to submit a draft code for Alloy 617 to ASME Section III by 2015. However, the current rules in Subsection NH for the evaluation of strain limits and creep-fatigue damage using simplified methods based on elastic analysis have been deemed inappropriate for Alloy 617 at temperatures above 1200°F (650°C). The rationale for this exclusion is that at higher temperatures it is not feasible to decouple plasticity and creep deformation, which is the basis for the current simplified rules. This temperature, 1200 °F, is well below the temperature range of interest for this material in High Temperature Gas Cooled Reactor (HTGR) applications. The only current alternative is, thus, a full inelastic analysis which requires sophisticated material models which have been formulated but not yet verified. To address this issue, proposed code rules have been developed which are based on the use of elastic-perfectly plastic (EPP) analysis methods and which are expected to be applicable to very high temperatures.

  16. Design and Application of a High-Temperature Linear Ion Trap Reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Li-Xue; Liu, Qing-Yu; Li, Xiao-Na; He, Sheng-Gui

    2018-01-01

    A high-temperature linear ion trap reactor with hexapole design was homemade to study ion-molecule reactions at variable temperatures. The highest temperature for the trapped ions is up to 773 K, which is much higher than those in available reports. The reaction between V2O6 - cluster anions and CO at different temperatures was investigated to evaluate the performance of this reactor. The apparent activation energy was determined to be 0.10 ± 0.02 eV, which is consistent with the barrier of 0.12 eV calculated by density functional theory. This indicates that the current experimental apparatus is prospective to study ion-molecule reactions at variable temperatures, and more kinetic details can be obtained to have a better understanding of chemical reactions that have overall barriers. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  17. Nuclear design of the high-temperature engineering test reactor (HTTR)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamashita, Kiyonobu; Shindo, Ryuichi; Murata, Isao; Maruyama, So; Fujimoto, Nozomu; Takeda, Takeshi

    1996-01-01

    The high-temperature engineering test reactor has been designed whose outlet gas temperature is 950 C. That is the highest temperature in the world for a block-type high-temperature gas-cooled reactor. The power distribution in the core was optimized by changing the uranium enrichment to maintain the fuel temperature at less than the limit (1,600 C). Deviation from the optimized distribution due to the burnup of fissile materials was avoided by flattening time-dependent changes in local reactivities. Flattening was achieved by optimizing the specifications of the burnable poisons. Control rod destruction of the optimized power distribution was avoided by limiting the depth of insertion. The insertion depth of the control rods is limited by reducing the excess reactivity of the whole core by the burnable poisons to the minimum value necessary for operations

  18. Rational design of temperature-sensitive alleles using computational structure prediction.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher S Poultney

    Full Text Available Temperature-sensitive (ts mutations are mutations that exhibit a mutant phenotype at high or low temperatures and a wild-type phenotype at normal temperature. Temperature-sensitive mutants are valuable tools for geneticists, particularly in the study of essential genes. However, finding ts mutations typically relies on generating and screening many thousands of mutations, which is an expensive and labor-intensive process. Here we describe an in silico method that uses Rosetta and machine learning techniques to predict a highly accurate "top 5" list of ts mutations given the structure of a protein of interest. Rosetta is a protein structure prediction and design code, used here to model and score how proteins accommodate point mutations with side-chain and backbone movements. We show that integrating Rosetta relax-derived features with sequence-based features results in accurate temperature-sensitive mutation predictions.

  19. Warehouse multipoint temperature and humidity monitoring system design based on Kingview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ou, Yanghui; Wang, Xifu; Liu, Jingyun

    2017-04-01

    Storage is the key link of modern logistics. Warehouse environment monitoring is an important part of storage safety management. To meet the storage requirements of different materials, guarantee their quality in the greatest extent, which has great significance. In the warehouse environment monitoring, the most important parameters are air temperature and relative humidity. In this paper, a design of warehouse multipoint temperature and humidity monitoring system based on King view, which realizes the multipoint temperature and humidity data real-time acquisition, monitoring and storage in warehouse by using temperature and humidity sensor. Also, this paper will take the bulk grain warehouse as an example and based on the data collected in real-time monitoring, giving the corresponding expert advice that combined with the corresponding algorithm, providing theoretical guidance to control the temperature and humidity in grain warehouse.

  20. Status of Preconceptual Design of the Advanced High-Temperature Reactor (AHTR)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ingersoll, D.T.

    2004-07-29

    A new reactor plant concept is presented that combines the benefits of ceramic-coated, high-temperature particle fuel with those of clean, high-temperature, low-pressure molten salt coolant. The Advanced High-Temperature Reactor (AHTR) concept is a collaboration of Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Sandia National Laboratories, and the University of California at Berkeley. The purpose of the concept is to provide an advanced design capable of satisfying the top-level functional requirements of the U.S. Department of Energy Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP), while also providing a technology base that is sufficiently robust to allow future development paths to higher temperatures and larger outputs with highly competitive economics. This report summarizes the status of the AHTR preconceptual design. It captures the results from an intense effort over a period of 3 months to (1) screen and examine potential feasibility concerns with the concept; (2) refine the conceptual design of major systems; and (3) identify research, development, and technology requirements to fully mature the AHTR design. Several analyses were performed and are presented to quantify the AHTR performance expectations and to assist in the selection of several design parameters. The AHTR, like other NGNP reactor concepts, uses coated particle fuel in a graphite matrix. But unlike the other NGNP concepts, the AHTR uses molten salt rather than helium as the primary system coolant. The considerable previous experience with molten salts in nuclear environments is discussed, and the status of high-temperature materials is reviewed. The large thermal inertia of the system, the excellent heat transfer and fission product retention characteristics of molten salt, and the low-pressure operation of the primary system provide significant safety attributes for the AHTR. Compared with helium coolant, a molten salt cooled reactor will have significantly lower fuel temperatures (150-200-C lower) for the

  1. Design optimization for main control room temperature and humidity control of digital nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Yujuan; Mao Hongwei; Liu Dongbo; Chen Donglei

    2014-01-01

    The main control room (MCR) temperature and humidity control system of nuclear power plant has major capacity lag and some interference factors. In order to meet the human factor requirements of MCR's operators and the control panels' environmental requirements, the improved temperature and humidity control scheme was designed based on the provided temperature cascade control system and the humidity cascade control system. In order to overcome the PID controller's shortcoming heavily depending on the accurate mathematical model, an intelligent PID parameter setting method was provided with the improved particle swarm optimization (PSO) algorithm. (authors)

  2. Design, fabrication and characterisation of a microfluidic time-temperature indicator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmitt, P.; Wedrich, K.; Müller, L.; Mehner, H.; Hoffmann, M.

    2017-11-01

    This paper describes a concept for a passive microfluidic time-temperature indicator (TTI) intended for intelligent food packaging. A microfluidic system is presented that makes use of the temperature-dependent flow of suitable food ingredients in a microcapillary. Based on the creeping distance inside the capillary, the time-temperature integral can be determined. A demonstrator of the microsystem has been designed, fabricated and characterised using liquid sugar alcohols as indicator fluids. To enable a first wireless read-out of the passive TTI, the sensor was read out using a commercial RFID equipment, and capacitive measurements have been carried out.

  3. Selection of design basis event for modular high temperature gas-cooled reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sato, Hiroyuki; Nakagawa, Shigeaki; Ohashi, Hirofumi

    2016-06-01

    Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA) has been investigating safety requirements and basic approach of safety guidelines for modular High Temperature Gas-cooled Reactor (HTGR) aiming to increase internarial contribution for nuclear safety by developing an international HTGR safety standard under International Atomic Energy Agency. In this study, we investigate a deterministic approach to select design basis events utilizing information obtained from probabilistic approach. In addition, selections of design basis events are conducted for commercial HTGR designed by JAEA. As a result, an approach for selecting design basis event considering multiple failures of safety systems is established which has not been considered as design basis in the safety guideline for existing nuclear facility. Furthermore, selection of design basis events for commercial HTGR has completed. This report provides an approach and procedure for selecting design basis events of modular HTGR as well as selected events for the commercial HTGR, GTHTR300. (author)

  4. Graphite structural design code for the High Temperature Engineering Test Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-02-01

    The reactor internal structures of the High Temperature Engineering Test Reactor (HTTR) are made up of mainly graphite components. The characteristics of graphite are quite different in stress-strain behavior from metals, since the ductility of graphite is significantly less than metals. Therefore, the design codes provided for metal components can not be applied directly to graphite components. The graphite structural design code for the HTTR was drafted by JAERI and reviewed by specialists outside JAERI. The design code is established mainly on the basis of JAERI's research data and by reference to the fundamental concepts of the domestic design codes for metal components. In this design code, the graphite components are categorized into the core components and core support components and the stress limits are specified separately to meet the safety requirements to each. This report presents the graphite structural design code for the HTTR which is utlized for the present design of the HTTR. (author)

  5. The design of an embedded system for controlling humidity and temperature room

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dwi Teguh, R.; Didik Eko, S.; Laksono, Pringgo D.; Jamaluddin, Anif

    2016-11-01

    The aim of the system is to design an embedded system for maintenance confortable room. The confortable room was design by controlling temperature (on range 18 - 34 °C) and humidity (on range 40% - 70%.) of room condition. Temperature and humidity of room were maintained using four variable such as lamp for warm, water pump for distributing water vapour, a fan for air circullation and an exhaust-fan for air cleaner. The system was constucted both hardware (humidity sensor, microcontroller, pump, lamp, fan) and software (arduino IDE). The result shows that the system was perfectly performed to control room condition.

  6. Safety design of the experimental multi-purpose high-temperature gas cooled reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mitake, Susumu; Yamada, M.; Morimoto, T.

    1979-01-01

    Studies have been made on methods to implement a proper safety design for the experimental multi-purpose high-temperature gas-cooled reactor. The experimental reactor is an advanced reactor, because it not only is a helium gas-cooled reactor, but also has an objective to achieve a very high reactor outlet gas temperature (1,000 0 C). In addition, it is planned to perform various tests during operation of the experimental reactor. In Japan, safety design method have been established for application to light water reactor nuclear power plants, and the related criteria and regulations are fairly well defined. Accordingly, the design of the experimental high-temperature gas-cooled reactor is required to be based on the light water reactor safety design method, even though the experimental reactor is of a different type and purpose. In another word, it is required to design the experimental reactor to conform to the currently established safety design criteria and regulations, as well as satisfy the requirements for performance of the experimental reactor. In recent years, the Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute and the Fuji Electric Co., Ltd. have performed a series of studies for the safety design of the experimental reactor and the results are summarized in this paper. (author)

  7. Nuclear design for high temperature gas cooled reactor (GTHTR300C) using MOX fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mouri, Tomoaki; Kunitomi, Kazuhiko

    2008-01-01

    A design study of the hydrogen cogeneration high temperature gas cooled reactor (GTHTR300C) that can produce both electricity and hydrogen has been carried out in Japan Atomic Energy Agency. The GTHTR300C is the system with thermal power of 600MW and reactor outlet temperature of 950degC, which is expected to supply the hydrogen to fuel cell vehicles after 2020s. In future, the full deployment of fast reactor cycle without natural uranium will demand the use of Mixed-Oxide (MOX) fuels in the GTHTR300C. Therefore, a nuclear design was performed to confirm the feasibility of the reactor core using MOX fuels. The designed reactor core has high performance and meets safety requirements. In this paper, the outline of the GTHTR300C and the nuclear design of the reactor core using MOX fuels are described. (author)

  8. Design and analysis of push pipe joint under internal pressure and temperature loading

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abid, M.; Alam, K.

    2005-01-01

    Pipe joints flanged or welded are commonly used in industry for different applications ranging from sewerage to the high pressure and temperature applications. However, with the rapidly changing technological trends, for optimized space such as for heat exchanger applications, pipe joint design needs special consideration, especially for the internal pipe where no flanged/bolted joint due to space constraint can be used. In addition, where joint opening/closing is the requirement for maintenance or other functional purposes, it becomes inevitable to use some special design. In this paper, a push joint proposed is designed, analyzed, optimized and tested for safe stress and operating conditions. An experimental test rig is designed and tests are performed for internal pressure and temperature separately and joint's behaviour is analyzed in detail for any leaks. FEA results are compared and verified with the mathematical results. Based on the experimental observations, the joint is safe as no leaks are observed. (author)

  9. Design of an experimental set up for convective drying: experimental studies at different drying temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohan, V. P. Chandra; Talukdar, Prabal

    2013-01-01

    An experimental setup is designed to investigate the convective drying of moist object experimentally. All the design data, components of setup, materials and specifications are presented. Transient moisture content of a rectangular shaped potato slice (4 × 2 × 2 cm) is measured at different air temperatures of 40, 50, 60 and 70 °C with an air velocity of 2 m/s. Two different drying rate periods are observed. Results are compared with available results from literature.

  10. Extreme temperature robust optical sensor designs and fault-tolerant signal processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riza, Nabeel Agha [Oviedo, FL; Perez, Frank [Tujunga, CA

    2012-01-17

    Silicon Carbide (SiC) probe designs for extreme temperature and pressure sensing uses a single crystal SiC optical chip encased in a sintered SiC material probe. The SiC chip may be protected for high temperature only use or exposed for both temperature and pressure sensing. Hybrid signal processing techniques allow fault-tolerant extreme temperature sensing. Wavelength peak-to-peak (or null-to-null) collective spectrum spread measurement to detect wavelength peak/null shift measurement forms a coarse-fine temperature measurement using broadband spectrum monitoring. The SiC probe frontend acts as a stable emissivity Black-body radiator and monitoring the shift in radiation spectrum enables a pyrometer. This application combines all-SiC pyrometry with thick SiC etalon laser interferometry within a free-spectral range to form a coarse-fine temperature measurement sensor. RF notch filtering techniques improve the sensitivity of the temperature measurement where fine spectral shift or spectrum measurements are needed to deduce temperature.

  11. Design study of the experimental multi-purpose high temperature gas-cooled reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsunoda, Ryokichi

    1981-01-01

    In this paper, the design study carried out since 1973 is outlined. The basic conceptual design was performed in fiscal 1973. In this design, concept was established on the total system of the experimental high temperature gas-cooled reactor including heat-utilizing system. The first conceptual design was carried out in fiscal 1974. The range of design was limited to the experimental reactor and its direct heat-removing system. The part 2 of the first conceptual design was performed in fiscal 1975, and the system design concerning the plant characteristics was made. The part 1 of the adjustment design was carried out in fiscal 1976, and the subject was the adjustment design of plant systems. The part 2 was performed in fiscal 1977, and the characteristics of plant control system were analyzed. In fiscal 1978, the analysis of flow characteristics in the core was made. The integrated system design was carried out in fiscal 1979, and the design of the total plant system except heat-utilizing system was started again. The part 1 of the detailed design was performed in fiscal 1980, and in addition, the possibility of increasing power output was examined. The construction cost of the experimental reactor plant estimated in 1979 was far higher than that in 1973. (Kako, I.)

  12. Winter Community Structure Changes in Frazil Ice and Open Water in Riverine Systems

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    White, K

    2004-01-01

    ...) that examined dissolved oxygen (DO) levels and changes in river microbiology during winter, periods of low water temperature, and periods of ice-cover, with the objective of providing guidance for winter water-quality modeling...

  13. Design of a low temperature district heating network with supply recirculation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li, Hongwei; Dalla Rosa, Alessandro; Svendsen, Svend

    2010-01-01

    The focus on continuing improving building energy efficiency and reducing building energy consumption brings the key impetus for the development of the new generation district heating (DH) system. In the new generation DH network, the supply and return temperature are designed low in order to sig...... calculates the heat loss in the twin pipe as that in the single pipe. The influence of this simplification on the supply/return water temperature prediction was analyzed by solving the coupled differential energy equations.......The focus on continuing improving building energy efficiency and reducing building energy consumption brings the key impetus for the development of the new generation district heating (DH) system. In the new generation DH network, the supply and return temperature are designed low in order...... to significantly reduce the network heat loss. Meanwhile, the low network operational temperature can make a better utilization of renewable energy and further improve the CHP plant efficiency. Though the designed return temperature is low, it may increase considerably when the heating load becomes low and the by...

  14. Modeling winter moth Operophtera brumata egg phenology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Salis, Lucia; Lof, Marjolein; Asch, van Margriet; Visser, Marcel E.

    2016-01-01

    Understanding the relationship between an insect's developmental rate and temperature is crucial to forecast insect phenology under climate change. In the winter moth Operophtera brumata timing of egg-hatching has severe fitness consequences on growth and reproduction as egg-hatching has to match

  15. Parametric analysis of a high temperature packed bed thermal storage design for a solar gas turbine

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Klein, P

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available , conductive and radiative heat transfer mechanisms and is validated against high temperature experimental data from a laboratory scale test facility. The validated model is further utilised to conduct a parametric design study of a nominal six hour TES (1:55MW...

  16. Automatic performance estimation of conceptual temperature control system design for rapid development of real system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jang, Yu Jin

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents an automatic performance estimation scheme of conceptual temperature control system with multi-heater configuration prior to constructing the physical system for achieving rapid validation of the conceptual design. An appropriate low-order discrete-time model, which will be used in the controller design, is constructed after determining several basic factors including the geometric shape of controlled object and heaters, material properties, heater arrangement, etc. The proposed temperature controller, which adopts the multivariable GPC (generalized predictive control) scheme with scale factors, is then constructed automatically based on the above model. The performance of the conceptual temperature control system is evaluated by using a FEM (finite element method) simulation combined with the controller.

  17. The nuclear winter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Velikhow, Y.P.

    1986-01-01

    Nuclear winter is an example of possible secondary effects, and if we speak of secondary we are thinking of small-scale second-order effects, but a nuclear winter is not a second-order effect. If you calculate the amount of heat produced by a nuclear explosion, it is a very small amount which does not have any chance of changing the Earth's climate, but a nuclear explosion drives or stars some new mechanism - the mechanism of nuclear winter - after 100 megatons of dust are transferred to the upper atmosphere. Another example of such amplification is radioactive fall-out, especially long-life radioactive fall-out after the possible elimination of the nuclear power industry, nuclear storage and distribution of storage waste around the globe. This is a very powerful amplification mechanism

  18. Licensing topical report: interpretation of general design criteria for high-temperature gas-cooled reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Orvis, D.D.; Raabe, P.H.

    1980-01-01

    This Licensing Topical Report presents a set of General Design Criteria (GDC) which is proposed for applicability to licensing of graphite-moderated, high-temperature gas-cooled reactors (HTGRs). Modifications as necessary to reflect HTGR characteristics and design practices have been made to the GDC derived for applicability to light-water-cooled reactors and presented in Appendix A of Part 50, Title 10, Code of Federal Regulations, including the Introduction, Definitions, and Criteria. It is concluded that the proposed set of GDC affords a better basis for design and licensing of HTGRs

  19. DESIGN OF A COMPACT HEAT EXCHANGER FOR HEAT RECUPERATION FROM A HIGH TEMPERATURE ELECTROLYSIS SYSTEM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    G. K. Housley; J.E. O' Brien; G.L. Hawkes

    2008-11-01

    Design details of a compact heat exchanger and supporting hardware for heat recuperation in a high-temperature electrolysis application are presented. The recuperative heat exchanger uses a vacuum-brazed plate-fin design and operates between 300 and 800°C. It includes corrugated inserts for enhancement of heat transfer coefficients and extended heat transfer surface area. Two recuperative heat exchangers are required per each four-stack electrolysis module. The heat exchangers are mated to a base manifold unit that distributes the inlet and outlet flows to and from the four electrolysis stacks. Results of heat exchanger design calculations and assembly details are also presented.

  20. Fundamental conceptual design of the experimental multi-purpose high-temperature gas-cooled reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shimokawa, Junichi; Yasuno, Takehiko; Yasukawa, Shigeru; Mitake, Susumu; Miyamoto, Yoshiaki

    1975-06-01

    The fundamental conceptual design of the experimental multi-purpose very high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (experimental VHTR of thermal output 50 MW with reactor outlet-gas temperature 1,000 0 C) has been carried out to provide the operation modes of the system consisting of the reactor and the heat-utilization system, including characteristics and performance of the components and safety of the plant system. For the heat-utilization system of the plant, heat distribution, temperature condition, cooling system constitution, and the containment facility are specified. For the operation of plant, testing capability of the reactor and controlability of the system are taken into consideration. Detail design is made of the fuel element, reactor core, reactivity control and pressure vessel, and also the heat exchanger, steam reformer, steam generator, helium circulator, helium-gas turbine, and helium-gas purification, fuel handling, and engineered safety systems. Emphasis is placed on providing the increase of the reactor outlet-gas temperature. Fuel element design is directed to the prismatic graphite blocks of hexagonal cross-section accommodating the hollow or tubular fuel pins sheathed in graphite sleeve. The reactor core is composed of 73 fuel columns in 7 stages, concerning the reference design MK-II. Orificing is made in the upper portion of core; one orifice for every 7 fuel columns. Average core power density is 2.5 watts/cm 3 . Fuel temperature is kept below 1,300 0 C in rated power. The main components, i.e. pressure vessel, reformer, gas turbine and intermediate heat exchanger are designed in detail; the IHX is of a double-shell and helically-wound tube coils, the reformer is of a byonet tube type, and the turbine-compressor unit is of an axial flow type (turbine in 6 stages and compressor in 16 stages). (auth.)

  1. Inferring the temperature dependence of population parameters: the effects of experimental design and inference algorithm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palamara, Gian Marco; Childs, Dylan Z; Clements, Christopher F; Petchey, Owen L; Plebani, Marco; Smith, Matthew J

    2014-12-01

    Understanding and quantifying the temperature dependence of population parameters, such as intrinsic growth rate and carrying capacity, is critical for predicting the ecological responses to environmental change. Many studies provide empirical estimates of such temperature dependencies, but a thorough investigation of the methods used to infer them has not been performed yet. We created artificial population time series using a stochastic logistic model parameterized with the Arrhenius equation, so that activation energy drives the temperature dependence of population parameters. We simulated different experimental designs and used different inference methods, varying the likelihood functions and other aspects of the parameter estimation methods. Finally, we applied the best performing inference methods to real data for the species Paramecium caudatum. The relative error of the estimates of activation energy varied between 5% and 30%. The fraction of habitat sampled played the most important role in determining the relative error; sampling at least 1% of the habitat kept it below 50%. We found that methods that simultaneously use all time series data (direct methods) and methods that estimate population parameters separately for each temperature (indirect methods) are complementary. Indirect methods provide a clearer insight into the shape of the functional form describing the temperature dependence of population parameters; direct methods enable a more accurate estimation of the parameters of such functional forms. Using both methods, we found that growth rate and carrying capacity of Paramecium caudatum scale with temperature according to different activation energies. Our study shows how careful choice of experimental design and inference methods can increase the accuracy of the inferred relationships between temperature and population parameters. The comparison of estimation methods provided here can increase the accuracy of model predictions, with important

  2. High Temperature Heat Exchanger Design and Fabrication for Systems with Large Pressure Differentials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chordia, Lalit [Thar Energy, LLC, Pittsburgh, PA (United States); Portnoff, Marc A. [Thar Energy, LLC, Pittsburgh, PA (United States); Green, Ed [Thar Energy, LLC, Pittsburgh, PA (United States)

    2017-03-31

    The project’s main purpose was to design, build and test a compact heat exchanger for supercritical carbon dioxide (sCO2) power cycle recuperators. The compact recuperator is required to operate at high temperature and high pressure differentials, 169 bar (~2,500 psi), between streams of sCO2. Additional project tasks included building a hot air-to-sCO2 Heater heat exchanger (HX) and design, build and operate a test loop to characterize the recuperator and heater heat exchangers. A novel counter-current microtube recuperator was built to meet the high temperature high differential pressure criteria and tested. The compact HX design also incorporated a number of features that optimize material use, improved reliability and reduced cost. The air-to-sCO2 Heater HX utilized a cross flow, counter-current, micro-tubular design. This compact HX design was incorporated into the test loop and exceeded design expectations. The test loop design to characterize the prototype Brayton power cycle HXs was assembled, commissioned and operated during the program. Both the prototype recuperator and Heater HXs were characterized. Measured results for the recuperator confirmed the predictions of the heat transfer models developed during the project. Heater HX data analysis is ongoing.

  3. Elevated Temperature Primary Load Design Method Using Pseudo Elastic-Perfectly Plastic Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carter, Peter [Stress Engineering Services Inc.; Sham, Sam [ORNL; Jetter, Robert I [Consultant

    2012-01-01

    A new primary load design method for elevated temperature service has been developed. Codification of the procedure in an ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code, Section III Code Case is being pursued. The proposed primary load design method is intended to provide the same margins on creep rupture, yielding and creep deformation for a component or structure that are implicit in the allowable stress data. It provides a methodology that does not require stress classification and is also applicable to a full range of temperature above and below the creep regime. Use of elastic-perfectly plastic analysis based on allowable stress with corrections for constraint, steady state stress and creep ductility is described. This approach is intended to ensure that traditional primary stresses are the basis for design, taking into account ductility limits to stress re-distribution and multiaxial rupture criteria.

  4. The approaches of safety design and safety evaluation at HTTR (High Temperature Engineering Test Reactor)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iigaki, Kazuhiko; Saikusa, Akio; Sawahata, Hiroaki; Shinozaki, Masayuki; Tochio, Daisuke; Honma, Fumitaka; Tachibana, Yukio; Iyoku, Tatsuo; Kawasaki, Kozo; Baba, Osamu

    2006-06-01

    Gas Cooled Reactor has long history of nuclear development, and High Temperature Gas Cooled Reactor (HTGR) has been expected that it can be supply high temperature energy to chemical industry and to power generation from the points of view of the safety, the efficiency, the environment and the economy. The HTGR design is tried to installed passive safety equipment. The current licensing review guideline was made for a Low Water Reactor (LWR) on safety evaluation therefore if it would be directly utilized in the HTGR it needs the special consideration for the HTGR. This paper describes that investigation result of the safety design and the safety evaluation traditions for the HTGR, comparison the safety design and safety evaluation feature for the HTGT with it's the LWR, and reflection for next HTGR based on HTTR operational experiment. (author)

  5. Winter Irrigation Effects in Cotton Fields in Arid Inland Irrigated Areas in the North of the Tarim Basin, China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pengnian Yang

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Winter irrigation is one of the water and salt management practices widely adopted in arid irrigated areas in the Tarim Basin located in the Xinjiang Uygur Autonomous Region in the People’s Republic of China. A winter irrigation study was carried out from November 2013 to March 2014 in Korla City. A cotton field was divided into 18 plots with a size of 3 m × 3 m and five winter irrigation treatments (1200 m3/ha, 1800 m3/ha, 2400 m3/ha, 3000 m3/ha, and 3600 m3/ha and one non-irrigation as a control were designed. The results showed that the higher winter irrigation volumes allowed the significant short-term difference after the irrigation in the fields with the higher soil moisture content. Therefore, the soil moisture in the next sowing season could be maintained at the level which was slightly lower than field capacity and four times that in the non-irrigation treatment. The desalination effect of winter irrigation increased with the increase of water irrigation volume, but its efficiency decreased with the increase of water irrigation volume. The desalination effect was characterized by short-term desalination, long-term salt accumulation, and the time-dependent gradually decreasing trend. During the winter irrigation period, air temperature was the most important external influencing factor of the soil temperature. During the period of the decrease in winter temperatures from December to January, soil temperature in the 5-cm depth showed no significant difference in all the treatments and the control. However, during the period of rising temperatures from January to March, soil temperature in the control increased significantly, faster than that in all treatments. Under the same irrigation volume, the temperature difference between the upper soil layer and the lower soil layer increased during the temperature drop period and decreased during the temperature rise period. In this paper, we proposed the proper winter irrigation volume of 1800

  6. Consideration of hot channel factors in design for providing operating margins on coolant channel outlet temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sharma, V.K.; Surendar, C.; Bapat, C.N.

    1994-01-01

    The Indian Pressurized Heavy Water Reactors (IPHWR) are horizontal pressure tube reactors using natural uranium oxide fuel in the form of short (495 mm) clusters. The fuel clusters in the Zr-Nb pressure tubes are cooled by high pressure, high temperature and subcooled circulating heavy water. Coolant flow distribution to individual channels is designed to match the power distribution so as to obtain uniform coolant outlet temperature. However, during operation, the coolant outlet temperature in individual channels deviate from their nominal value due to: tolerances in process design; effects of grid frequency on the pump speed; deviation in channel powers from the nominal values due to on-power fuelling and movement of reactivity devices, and so on. Thus an operating margin, between the highest permissible and nominal coolant outlet temperatures, is required taking into account various hot channel factors that contribute to higher coolant outlet temperatures. The paper discusses the methodology adopted to assess various hot channel factors which would provide optimum operating margins while ensuring sub-cooling. (author)

  7. Design Guideline for New Generation of High-Temperature Guarded Hot Plate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, J.; Hameury, J.; Failleau, G.; Blahut, A.; Vachova, T.; Strnad, R.; Krause, M.; Rafeld, E.; Hammerschmidt, U.

    2018-02-01

    This paper complements the existing measurement standards and literature for high-temperature guarded hot plates (HTGHPs) by addressing specific issues relating to thermal conductivity measurement of technical insulation at high temperatures. The examples given are focused on the designs of HTGHPs for measuring thin thermal insulation. The sensitivity studies have been carried out on major influencing factors that affect the thermal conductivity measurements using HTGHPs, e.g., the uncertainty of temperature measurements, plate flatness and center-guard gap design and imbalance. A new configuration of center-guard gap with triangular shape cross section has been optimized to obtain the same thermal resistance as a 2 mm wide gap with rectangular shape cross section that has been used in the HTGHPs at NPL and LNE. Recommendations have been made on the selections of heater plate materials, high-temperature high-emissivity coatings and miniature temperature sensors. For the first time, thermal stress analysis method has been applied to the field of HTGHPs, in order to estimate the effect of differential thermal expansion on the flatness of thin rigid specimens during thermal conductivity tests in a GHP.

  8. Design of a self-tuning regulator for temperature control of a polymerization reactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasanthi, D; Pranavamoorthy, B; Pappa, N

    2012-01-01

    The temperature control of a polymerization reactor described by Chylla and Haase, a control engineering benchmark problem, is used to illustrate the potential of adaptive control design by employing a self-tuning regulator concept. In the benchmark scenario, the operation of the reactor must be guaranteed under various disturbing influences, e.g., changing ambient temperatures or impurity of the monomer. The conventional cascade control provides a robust operation, but often lacks in control performance concerning the required strict temperature tolerances. The self-tuning control concept presented in this contribution solves the problem. This design calculates a trajectory for the cooling jacket temperature in order to follow a predefined trajectory of the reactor temperature. The reaction heat and the heat transfer coefficient in the energy balance are estimated online by using an unscented Kalman filter (UKF). Two simple physically motivated relations are employed, which allow the non-delayed estimation of both quantities. Simulation results under model uncertainties show the effectiveness of the self-tuning control concept. Copyright © 2011 ISA. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. DESIGN SAFETY FEATURES OF THE BNL HIGH-TEMPERATURE COMBUSTION FACILITY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    GINSBERG,T.; CICCARELLI,G.; BOCCIO,J.

    2000-06-11

    The Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) High-Temperature Combustion Facility (HTCF) was used to perform hydrogen deflagration and detonation experiments at temperatures to 650 K. Safety features that were designed to ensure safe and reliable operation of the experimental program are described. Deflagration and detonation experiments have been conducted using mixtures of hydrogen, air, and steam. Detonation cell size measurements were made as a function of mixture composition and thermodynamic gas conditions. Deflagration-to-detonation transition experiments were also conducted. Results of the experimental program are presented, and implications with respect to hydrogen safety are discussed.

  10. A Study of the Operation of Especially Designed Photosensitive Gaseous Detectors at Cryogenic Temperatures

    CERN Document Server

    Periale, L; Lund-Jensen, B; Pavlopoulos, P; Peskov, Vladimir; Picchi, P; Pietropaolo, F

    2006-01-01

    In some experiments and applications there is need for large-area photosensitive detectors to operate at cryogenic temperatures. Nowadays, vacuum PMs are usually used for this purpose. We have developed special designs of planar photosensitive gaseous detectors able to operate at cryogenic temperatures. Such detectors are much cheaper PMs and are almost insensitive to magnetic fields. Results of systematic measurements of their quantum efficiencies, the maximum achievable gains and long-term stabilities will be presented. The successful operation of these detectors open realistic possibilities in replacing PMs by photosensitive gaseous detectors in some applications dealing with cryogenic liquids; for example in experiments using noble liquid TPCs or noble liquid scintillating calorimeters.

  11. Secondary heat exchanger design and comparison for advanced high temperature reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sabharwall, P.; Kim, E. S.; Siahpush, A.; McKellar, M.; Patterson, M.

    2012-01-01

    Next generation nuclear reactors such as the advanced high temperature reactor (AHTR) are designed to increase energy efficiency in the production of electricity and provide high temperature heat for industrial processes. The efficient transfer of energy for industrial applications depends on the ability to incorporate effective heat exchangers between the nuclear heat transport system and the industrial process heat transport system. This study considers two different types of heat exchangers - helical coiled heat exchanger and printed circuit heat exchanger - as possible options for the AHTR secondary heat exchangers with distributed load analysis and comparison. Comparison is provided for all different cases along with challenges and recommendations. (authors)

  12. Regional stratospheric warmings in the Pacific-Western Canada (PWC sector during winter 2004/2005: implications for temperatures, winds, chemical constituents and the characterization of the Polar vortex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. H. Manson

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available The vortex during winter 2004/2005 was interesting for several reasons. It has been described as "cold" stratospherically, with relatively strong westerly winds. Losses of ozone until the final warming in March were considerable, and comparable to the cold 1999–2000 winter. There were also modest warming events, indicated by peaks in 10 hPa zonal mean temperatures at high latitudes, near 1 January and 1 February. Events associated with a significant regional stratospheric warming in the Pacific-Western Canada (PWC sector then began and peaked toward the end of February, providing strong longitudinal variations in dynamical characteristics (Chshyolkova et al., 2007; hereafter C07. The associated disturbed vortex of 25 February was displaced from the pole and either elongated (upper or split into two cyclonic centres (lower.

    Observations from Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS on Aura are used here to study the thermal characteristics of the stratosphere in the Canadian-US (253° E and Scandinavian-Europe (16° E sectors. Undisturbed high latitude stratopause (55 km zonal mean temperatures during the mid-winter (December–February reached 270 K, warmer than empirical-models such as CIRA-86, suggesting that seasonal polar warming due to dynamical influences affects the high altitude stratosphere as well as the mesosphere. There were also significant stratopause differences between Scandinavia and Canada during the warming events of 1 January and 1 February, with higher temperatures near 275 K at 16° E. During the 25 February "PWC" event a warming occurred at low and middle stratospheric heights (10–30 km: 220 K at 253° E and the stratopause cooled; while over Scandinavia-Europe the stratosphere below ~30 km was relatively cold at 195 K and the stratopause became even warmer (>295 K and lower (~45 km. The zonal winds followed the associated temperature gradients so that the vertical and latitudinal gradients of the winds differed strongly

  13. A high-temperature fusion blanket design for thermochemical hydrogen production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maya, I.; Battagalia, J.; Cheng, E.

    1983-01-01

    This paper presents the conceptual design of a technically viable fusion blanket having the capability to supply high-temperature process heat for the production of hydrogen via a modification of the General Atomic sulfur-iodine thermochemical water splitting cycle. To avoid the necessity of an expensive catalyst, and to allow the use of higher pressures and thus obtain a more compact, less expensive chemical plant, process heat temperatures above 1000 0 C are preferred. The present blanket supplies 30% of its energy at 1250 0 C by flowing 50 atm helium across nonstress-bearing blocks of silicon carbide. The remaining 70% of the blanket energy is delivered at 700 0 C by a separate helium circuit cooling the Li 17 Pb 83 tritium breeder contained in Nb-1Zr tubes. The design attains a tritium breeding ratio of 1.1, and the two-coolant stream arrangement greatly reduces the tritium activity in the high-temperature loop. The swelling-tolerant pressure-containing Inconel 718 structure is maintained below 500 0 C by careful thermal hydraulics design and coolant channel routing. Only state-of-the-art materials are employed in the mechanical design and special attention has been afforded to the concerns of materials compatibility and irradiation-induced changes in material properties

  14. A technigue exploitation about anti-slide tire polyploid on ice-snow road in winter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiaojie, Qi; Qiang, Wang; Zhao, Yang; Yunlong, Wang; Guotian, Wang; Degang, Lv

    2017-04-01

    Present studies focus on improving anti-slide property of tyes on ice-snow road by changing material modification of tyre tread and designing groove. However, the basic reason causing starting slide, long braking distance, turning slide slip and so on of tyres used in winter is that tyre tread materials are unitary and homogenous rubber composite which can’t coordinate driving demands of tyres in winter under muti-work condition, and can’t exert their best property when starting, braking and sliding slip. In order to improve comprehensive anti-slide property of tyres, this paper discusses about changing structure, shape and distribution proportion among haploid materials of tyre tread rubber. Polyploid bubber tyre tread technique based on artificial neural network which is in favor of starting, braking and anti-slide slip is optimized and combined. Friction feature and anti-slide mechanism on ice-snow road of polyploid rubber tyre tread are studied using testing technique of low-temperature cabin and computer simulation. A set high anti-slide theories and realizing method systems of polyploid rubber composite formed from basic theory, models and technique method are developped which will be applied into solving anti-slide problem of winter tyres, provide theory instruction for studies on high anti-slide winter tyres, and promote development of application and usage safety of winter tyres.

  15. Stratospheric influence on Northern Hemisphere winter climate variability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ouzeau, Gaelle; Douville, Herve; Saint Martin, David

    2010-05-01

    Despite significant improvements in observing and data assimilation systems, long-range dynamical forecasting remains a difficult challenge for the climate modelling community. The skill of operational seasonal forecasting systems is particularly poor in the northern extratropics where seas surface temperature (SST) has a weaker influence than in the Tropics. It is therefore relevant to look for additional potential sources of long-range climate predictability in the stratosphere using ensembles of global atmospheric simulations. Besides a control experiment where the ARPEGE-Climat model is only driven by SST, parallel simulations have been performed in which an additional control on climate variability has been accounted for through the nudging of the northern extratropical stratosphere towards the ERA40 reanalysis. Though idealized, this original experiment design allows us to compare the relative contribution of the lower and upper boundary forcings on the simulated tropospheric variability. Results show that the stratospheric nudging improves the climatology and interannual variability of the mid-latitude troposphere, especially in winter in the Northern Hemisphere. Major impacts are found in particular on the simulation of the Arctic and North Atlantic oscillations (AO and NAO). Case studies were carried out for the 1976-1977 and 1988-1989 winters, corresponding to extreme phases of the AO. Results confirm the robustness of the positive impact of the nudging, especially for winter 1976-1977 corresponding to relatively weak SST anomalies in the tropical Pacific. A sensitivity study to the model resolution shows that a well-resolved stratosphere is not necessary for the nudging to be efficient. Besides seasonal mean results, analysis of the day-to-day variability in winter allowed us to better understand the stratospheric polar vortex influence on the tropospheric circulation in the Northern Hemisphere mid-latitudes.

  16. Base profile design for high-performance operation of bipolar transistors at liquid-nitrogen temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stork, J.M.C.; Harame, D.L.; Meyerson, B.S.; Nguyen, T.N.

    1989-01-01

    The base profile requirements of Si bipolar junction transistors (BJT's) high-performance operation at liquid-nitrogen temperature are examined. Measurements of thin epitaxial-base polysilicon-emitter n-p-n transistors with increasing base doping show the effects of bandgap narrowing, mobility changes, and carrier freezeout. At room temperature the collector current at low injection is proportional to the integrated base charge, independent of the impurity distribution. At temperatures below 150 Κ, however, minority injection is dominated by the peak base doping because of the greater effectiveness of bandgap narrowing. When the peak doping in the base approaches 10 19 cm -3 , the bandgap difference between emitter and base is sufficiently small that the current gain no longer monotonically decreases with lower temperature but instead shows a maximum as low as 180 Κ. The device design window appears limited at the low-current end by increased base-emitter leakage due to tunneling and by resistance control at the high-current end. Using the measured dc characteristics, circuit delay calculations are made to estimate the performance of an ECL ring oscillator at room and liquid-nitrogen temperatures. It is shown that if the base doping can be raised to 10 19 cm -3 while keeping the base thickness constant, the minimum delay at liquid nitrogen can approach the delay of optimized devices at room temperature

  17. Design and Fabrication of a Piezoresistive Pressure Sensor for Ultra High Temperature Environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao, L B; Zhao, Y L; Jiang, Z D

    2006-01-01

    In order to solve the pressure measurement problem in the harsh environment, a piezoresistive pressure sensor has been developed, which can be used under high temperature above 200 deg. C and is able to endure instantaneous ultra high temperature (2000deg. C, duration≤2s) impact. Based on the MEMS (Micro Electro-Mechanical System) and integrated circuit technology, the piezoresistive pressure sensor's sensitive element was fabricated and constituted by silicon substrate, a thin buried silicon dioxide layer, four p-type resistors in the measuring circuit layer by boron ion implantation and photolithography, the top SiO2 layer by oxidation, stress matching Si3N4 layer, and a Ti-Pt-Au beam lead layer for connecting p-type resistors by sputtering. In order to decrease the leak-current influence to sensor in high temperature above 200deg. C, the buried SiO2 layer with the thickness 367 nm was fabricated by the SIMOX (Separation by Implantation of Oxygen) technology, which was instead of p-n junction to isolate the upper measuring circuit layer from Si substrate. In order to endure instantaneous ultra high temperature impact, the mechanical structure with cantilever and diaphragm and transmitting beam was designed. By laser welding and high temperature packaging technology, the high temperature piezoresistive pressure sensor was fabricated with range of 120MPa. After the thermal compensation, the sensor's thermal zero drift k 0 and thermal sensitivity drift k s were easy to be less than 3x10 -4 FS/deg. C. The experimental results show that the developed piezoresistive pressure sensor has good performances under high temperature and is able to endure instantaneous ultra high temperature impact, which meets the requirements of modern industry, such as aviation, oil, engine, etc

  18. Nearshore hydrography off Visakhapatnam, East coast of India, during winter

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Rao, B.P.; RameshBabu, V.

    Based on hydrographic data and time series data of currents and temperature, the nearshore hydrographic structure during winter (November, 1981) has been studied to examine the possibility of discharging industrial effluents into the nearby sea...

  19. Conceptual design of a low-temperature radiation-hard tracker detector

    CERN Document Server

    Niinikoski, T O; Perea-Solano, B

    2003-01-01

    Silicon sensors have about ten times improved radiation hardness around 130 K temperature, compared with the state-of-art sensors close to room temperature. This is based on the Lazarus effect studied by the RD39 Collaboration of CERN. Other benefits of low temperatures will also be discussed. We shall describe the conceptual design of low-mass detector modules cooled using two-phase flow of argon in miniature cooling pipes integrated in the module structure between the sensors and the readout hybrid circuit. The main engineering features of the cooling system and mechanical support structures are discussed, as well as the benefits arising from the operation of the tracker under cryogenic vacuum. 4 Refs.

  20. Design and assembly of a torsion pendulum for the measurement of internal friction at low temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    San Juan, J. M.; Gallego, I.; No, M. L.

    2001-01-01

    In this work we describe the assembly, operation and specifications of an inverted torsion pendulum designed to measure internal friction at low temperatures (from 4.2 K to 500 K). The high precision mechanics allow us to obtain internal friction spectra with low levels of noise from amplitudes as small as 2x10''7. The inertia components of the pendulum have been built with specific materials, so that the resonance frequency of the pendulum can be changed within two orders of magnitude (0.1-10Hz). In addition, the sample can be in situ deformed at any temperature and can be inserted into the pendulum at liquid nitrogen temperature. The operation of the pendulum, all the control p recesses and data acquisition are completely automated. (Author) 4 refs

  1. Design of a low temperature translation balance for the measurement of paramagnetic and diamagnetic susceptibilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mowry, G.S.

    1979-05-01

    A modified Foex and Forrer Translation Balance has been designed for measuring the paramagnetic and diamagnetic properties of materials over the temperature range 77-300/sup 0/K. The systems' temperature range can eventually be extended to 4.2/sup 0/K. The apparatus incorporates a vertical Dewar of Standard variety in addition to a horizontal Dewar for cooling the sample holder and adjacent horizontal supports. The design also allows for the placement of a thermocouple junction in direct contact with a sample. The balance sensitivity, defined as the change in displacement per unit applied force, is 0.0044 cm/dyne. The precision of the balance is +- .5% with an accuracy of 1.5%.

  2. Thermal clothing to reduce heart failure morbidity during winter: a randomised controlled trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, Ian; Beevers, Andrea; Fraser, John F; Platts, David

    2017-01-01

    Objective To examine whether providing thermal clothing improved the health of patients with heart failure during winter. Design Parallel group randomised controlled trial. Setting Large public hospital in Brisbane during winter 2016. Participants 91 patients with systolic or diastolic heart failure who were over 50 years old. Intervention 47 patients were randomised to receive thermal clothes (socks, top and hat) and 44 received usual care. Patients could not be blinded to their randomised group. All patients’ data were available for the primary outcome which was collected blind to randomised group. Main outcome measures The primary outcome was the mean number of days in hospital during winter. Secondary outcomes included quality of life and sleep, and blood tests were collected for cardiovascular risk factors. Participants completed clothing diaries in midwinter which were used to estimate their overall clothing insulation using the ‘clo’. Monitors inside the participants’ homes recorded indoor temperatures throughout winter. Results The mean number of days in hospital during winter was 4.2 in the usual care group and 3.0 in the thermal clothing group (mean difference –1.2 days, 95% CI –4.8 to 2.5 days). Most participants (85%) in the thermal clothing group reported using the thermals. There was an increase in overall clothing insulation at night in the thermal clothing group (mean difference 0.13 clo, 95% CI 0.03 to 0.23). Most participants in both groups did not wear sufficient clothing (defined as a clo below 1) and regularly experienced indoor temperatures below 18°C during midwinter. Conclusions There was no clear statistical improvement in health in the thermal clothing group. Efforts to improve health during winter may need to focus on passive interventions such as home insulation rather than interventions that target behaviour change. Trial registration number ACTRN12615001023549; Results. PMID:28993390

  3. Communicating Certainty About Nuclear Winter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robock, A.

    2013-12-01

    I have been spending much of my time in the past several years trying to warn the world about the continuing danger of nuclear weapons, and that the solution is a rapid reduction in the nuclear arsenal. I feel that a scientist who discovers dangers to society has an ethical duty to issue a warning, even if the danger is so scary that it is hard for people to deal with. The debate about nuclear winter in the 1980s helped to end the nuclear arms race, but the planet still has enough nuclear weapons, even after reductions planned for 2017 under the New START treaty, to produce nuclear winter, with temperatures plunging below freezing in the summer in major agricultural regions, threatening the food supply for most of the planet. New research by myself, Brian Toon, Mike Mills, and colleagues over the past six years has found that a nuclear war between any two countries, such as India and Pakistan, using 50 atom bombs each of the size dropped on Hiroshima could produce climate change unprecedented in recorded human history, and a world food crisis because of the agricultural effects. This is much less than 1% of the current global arsenal. Communicating certainty - what we know for sure - has been much more effective than communicating uncertainty. The limited success I have had has come from persistence and serendipity. The first step was to do the science. We have published peer-reviewed articles in major journals, including Science, Nature, Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, Journal of Geophysical Research, Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics, Physics Today, and Climatic Change. But policymakers do not read these journals. Through fairly convoluted circumstances, which will be described in this talk, we were able to get papers published in Scientific American and the Bulletin of Atomic Scientists. I have also published several encyclopedia articles on the subject. As a Lead Author of Chapter 8 (Radiative Forcing) of the recently published Fifth Assessment

  4. Conceptual Design for a High-Temperature Gas Loop Test Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    James B. Kesseli

    2006-08-01

    This report documents an early-stage conceptual design for a high-temperature gas test loop. The objectives accomplished by the study include, (1) investigation of existing gas test loops to determine ther capabilities and how the proposed system might best complement them, (2) development of a preliminary test plan to help identify the performance characteristics required of the test unit, (3) development of test loop requirements, (4) development of a conceptual design including process flow sheet, mechanical layout, and equipment specifications and costs, and (5) development of a preliminary test loop safety plan.

  5. Future needs for inelastic analysis in design of high-temperature nuclear plant components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Corum, J.M.

    1980-01-01

    The role that inelastic analyses play in the design of high-temperature nuclear plant components is described. The design methodology, which explicitly accounts for nonlinear material deformation and time-dependent failure modes, requires a significant level of realism in the prediction of structural response. Thus, material deformation and failure modeling are, along with computational procedures, key parts of the methodology. Each of these is briefly discussed along with validation by comparisons with benchmark structural tests, and problem areas and needs are discussed for each

  6. Heat exchanger design considerations for high temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McDonald, C.F.; Vrable, D.L.; Van Hagan, T.H.; King, J.H.; Spring, A.H.

    1980-02-01

    Various aspects of the high-temperature heat exchanger conceptual designs for the gas turbine (HTGR-GT) and process heat (HTGR-PH) plants are discussed. Topics include technology background, heat exchanger types, surface geometry, thermal sizing, performance, material selection, mechanical design, fabrication, and the systems-related impact of installation and integration of the units in the prestressed concrete reactor vessel. The impact of future technology developments, such as the utilization of nonmetallic materials and advanced heat exchanger surface geometries and methods of construction, is also discussed

  7. Design of Cold-Formed Steel Screw Connections with Gypsum Sheathing at Ambient and Elevated Temperatures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Chen

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Load-bearing cold-formed steel (CFS walls sheathed with double layers of gypsum plasterboard on both sides have demonstrated good fire resistance and attracted increasing interest for use in mid-rise CFS structures. As the main connection method, screw connections between CFS and gypsum sheathing play an important role in both the structural design and fire resistance of this wall system. However, studies on the mechanical behavior of screw connections with double-layer gypsum sheathing are still limited. In this study, 200 monotonic tests of screw connections with single- or double-layer gypsum sheathing at both ambient and elevated temperatures were conducted. The failure of screw connections with double-layer gypsum sheathing in shear was different from that of single-layer gypsum sheathing connections at ambient temperature, and it could be described as the breaking of the loaded sheathing edge combined with significant screw tilting and the loaded sheathing edge flexing fracture. However, the screw tilting and flexing fracture of the loaded sheathing edge gradually disappear at elevated temperatures. In addition, the influence of the loaded edge distance, double-layer sheathing and elevated temperatures is discussed in detail with clear conclusions. A unified design formula for the shear strength of screw connections with gypsum sheathing is proposed for ambient and elevated temperatures with adequate accuracy. A simplified load–displacement model with the post-peak branch is developed to evaluate the load–displacement response of screw connections with gypsum sheathing at ambient and elevated temperatures.

  8. Material Control and Accounting Design Considerations for High-Temperature Gas Reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trond Bjornard; John Hockert

    2011-08-01

    The subject of this report is domestic safeguards and security by design (2SBD) for high-temperature gas reactors, focusing on material control and accountability (MC&A). The motivation for the report is to provide 2SBD support to the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) project, which was launched by Congress in 2005. This introductory section will provide some background on the NGNP project and an overview of the 2SBD concept. The remaining chapters focus specifically on design aspects of the candidate high-temperature gas reactors (HTGRs) relevant to MC&A, Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) requirements, and proposed MC&A approaches for the two major HTGR reactor types: pebble bed and prismatic. Of the prismatic type, two candidates are under consideration: (1) GA's GT-MHR (Gas Turbine-Modular Helium Reactor), and (2) the Modular High-Temperature Reactor (M-HTR), a derivative of Areva's Antares reactor. The future of the pebble-bed modular reactor (PBMR) for NGNP is uncertain, as the PBMR consortium partners (Westinghouse, PBMR [Pty] and The Shaw Group) were unable to agree on the path forward for NGNP during 2010. However, during the technology assessment of the conceptual design phase (Phase 1) of the NGNP project, AREVA provided design information and technology assessment of their pebble bed fueled plant design called the HTR-Module concept. AREVA does not intend to pursue this design for NGNP, preferring instead a modular reactor based on the prismatic Antares concept. Since MC&A relevant design information is available for both pebble concepts, the pebble-bed HTGRs considered in this report are: (1) Westinghouse PBMR; and (2) AREVA HTR-Module. The DOE Office of Nuclear Energy (DOE-NE) sponsors the Fuel Cycle Research and Development program (FCR&D), which contains an element specifically focused on the domestic (or state) aspects of SBD. This Material Protection, Control and Accountancy Technology (MPACT) program supports the present work

  9. Design and experimental characterization of a 350 W High Temperature PEM fuel cell stack

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicola Zuliani

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available High Temperature Proton Exchange Membrane (HT PEM fuel cell based on polybenzimidazole (PBI polymer and phosphoric acid, can be operated at temperature between 120 °C and 180 °C. Reactants humidification is not required and CO content up to 2% in the fuel can be tolerated, affecting only marginally performance. This is what makes HT PEM very attractive, as low quality reformed hydrogen can be used and water management problems are avoided. Till nowadays, from experimental point of view, only few studies relate to the development and characterization of high temperature stacks. The aim of this work is to present the main design features and the performance curves of a 25 cells HT PEM stack based on PBI and phosphoric acid membranes. Performance curves refer to the stack operating with two type of fuels: pure hydrogen and a gas mixture simulating a typical steam reformer output. The stack voltage distribution analysis and the stack temperature distribution analysis suggest that cathode air could be used as coolant leading to a better thermal management. This could simplify stack design and system BOP, thus increasing system performance.

  10. Analysis of current mirror circuits designed with line tunnel FET devices at different temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martino, M. D. V.; Martino, J. A.; Agopian, P. G. D.; Vandooren, A.; Rooyackers, R.; Simoen, E.; Claeys, C.

    2017-05-01

    The goal of this work is to study the performance of current mirror circuits designed with line tunnel field effect transistor (TFET) devices and compare the suitability of this technology with alternatives such as point TFETs and FinFETs. Experimental results have been obtained at room and high temperatures and the analyses focused on parameters such as the magnitude of the on-state current and the sensitivity of the current transfer ratio to channel dimensions mismatch and to the temperature. Line TFETs exhibited higher on-state current than point TFETs, in spite of a higher susceptibility to the channel length. When band-to-band tunneling prevails for both input and output transistors, the current transfer ratio with line TFETs presented a nearly linear dependence on the temperature due to bandgap narrowing. This way, a general equation of the current transfer ratio for circuits designed with the three highlighted technologies is proposed. Globally, it was observed that, unless a very low sensitivity to channel length mismatch is required, line TFET devices are a very suitable alternative for current mirror circuits, since this technology provides much higher on-state currents than point TFETs, and at the same time it is much less sensitive to temperature variations than FinFET transistors.

  11. HIGH COOLING WATER TEMPERATURE EFFECTS ON DESIGN AND OPERATIONAL SAFETY OF NPPS IN THE GULF REGION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    BYUNG KOO KIM

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The Arabian Gulf region has one of the highest ocean temperatures, reaching above 35 degrees and ambient temperatures over 50 degrees in the summer. Two nuclear power plants (NPP are being introduced in the region for the first time, one at Bushehr (1,000 MWe PWR plant from Russia, and a much larger one at Barakah (4X1,400 MWe PWR from Korea. Both plants take seawater from the Gulf for condenser cooling, having to modify the secondary/tertiary side cooling systems design by increasing the heat transfer surface area from the country of origin. This paper analyses the secondary side of a typical PWR plant operating under the Rankine cycle with a simplified thermal-hydraulic model. Parametric study of ocean cooling temperatures is conducted to estimate thermal efficiency variations and its associated design changes for the secondary side. Operational safety is reviewed to deliver rated power output with acceptable safety margins in line with technical specifications, mainly in the auxiliary systems together with the cooling water temperature. Impact on the Gulf seawater as the ultimate heat sink is considered negligible, affecting only the adjacent water near the NPP site, when compared to the solar radiation on the sea surface.

  12. Plasma oxidation as a tool to design oxide films at low temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schennach, R.; Grady, T.; Naugle, D.G.; Parga, J.R.; McWhinney, H.; Cocke, D.L.

    2001-01-01

    Interfacial oxidation, an established approach to produce surface thin films for catalysts, corrosion, ware protective coatings and electronic structures is currently performed by thermal, anodic, and plasma methods. Fundamental physical-chemical models that can allow film design, particularly on alloys are lacking and plasma oxidation is the least studied of these methods. In this work, plasma oxidation of three CuZr alloys (CuZr 2 , CuZr, and Cu 51 Zr 14 ) has been studied using x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and depth profiling methods. The dependence of the resulting oxide film on alloy composition and sample temperature during plasma oxidation is investigated. In contrast to thermal and electrochemical oxidation which lead to the formation of a zirconium oxide film, plasma oxidation leads to the formation of a copper oxide or metallic copper overlayer depending on temperature and copper concentration in the bulk. It is shown that plasma oxidation can be used to design oxide films at room temperature, which require high temperatures using thermal oxidation and are not achievable by anodic oxidation

  13. Design analysis and development of a high temperature actuaror for gas turbine blade tip clearance control

    OpenAIRE

    Coşkun, Mustafa Bulut; Coskun, Mustafa Bulut

    2011-01-01

    During a typical startup cycle industrial gas turbine blades experience rapid radial thermal expansion while bulky shroud structure with larger thermal inertia requires much longer period to reach its operating temperature. Turbine designers have to leave a safe radial distance in order to prevent contact of blades to the surrounding annular casing. However, when thermal steady state in the turbine stage is achieved, shroud and casing grow and excessive amount of blade-shroud clearance remain...

  14. Simplified sensor design for temperature-strain discrimination using Fiber Bragg Gratings embedded in laminated composites

    OpenAIRE

    Rodríguez Cobo, Luis; Marques, A. T.; López Higuera, José Miguel; Santos, J. L.; Frazão, O.

    2013-01-01

    Several easy-to-manufacture designs based on a pair of Fiber Bragg Gratings structure embedded in Carbon Fiber Reinforced Plastic (CFRP) have been explored. These smart composites can be used for strain and temperature discrimination. A Finite Elements Analysis and Matlab software were used to study the mechanical responses and its optical behaviors. The results exhibited different sensitivity and using a matrix method it is possible to compensate the thermal drift in a real application keepi...

  15. Simplified sensor design for temperature-strain discrimination using fiber Bragg gratings embedded in laminated composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez-Cobo, L.; Marques, A. T.; Lopez-Higuera, J. M.; Santos, J. L.; Frazão, O.

    2013-05-01

    Several easy-to-manufacture designs based on a pair of Fiber Bragg Gratings structure embedded in Carbon Fiber Reinforced Plastic (CFRP) have been explored. These smart composites can be used for strain and temperature discrimination. A Finite Elements Analysis and Matlab software were used to study the mechanical responses and its optical behaviors. The results exhibited different sensitivity and using a matrix method it is possible to compensate the thermal drift in a real application keeping a simple manufacture process.

  16. Design, development and implementation of the IR signaling techniques for monitoring ambient and body temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baqai, A.

    2014-01-01

    Healthcare systems such as hospitals, homecare, telemedicine, and physical rehabilitation are expected to be revolutionized by WBAN (Wireless Body Area Networks). This research work aims to investigate, design, optimize, and demonstrate the applications of IR (Infra-Red) communication systems in WBAN. It is aimed to establish a prototype WBAN system capable of measuring Ambient and Body Temperature using LM35 as temperature sensor and transmitting and receiving the data using optical signals. The corresponding technical challenges that have to be faced are also discussed in this paper. Investigations are carried out to efficiently design the hardware using low-cost and low power optical transceivers. The experimental results reveal the successful transmission and reception of Ambient and Body Temperatures over short ranges i.e. up to 3-4 meters. A simple IR transceiver with an LED (Light Emitting Diodes), TV remote control IC and Arduino microcontroller is designed to perform the transmission with sufficient accuracy and ease. Experiments are also performed to avoid interference from other sources like AC and TV remote control signals by implementing IR tags. (author)

  17. Electrochemical cell and electrode designs for high-temperature/high-pressure kinetic measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagy, Z.; Yonco, R.M.

    1987-05-01

    Many corrosion processes of interest to the nuclear power industry occur in high-temperature/high-pressure aqueous systems. The investigation of the kinetics of the appropriate electrode reactions is a serious experimental challenge, partially because of the high temperatures and pressures and partially because many of these reactions are very rapid, requiring fast relaxation measurements. An electrochemical measuring system is described which is suitable for measurements of the kinetics of fast electrode reactions at temperatures extending to at least 300 0 C and pressures to at least 10 MPa (100 atmospheres). The system includes solution preparation and handling equipment, the electrochemical cell, and several electrode designs. One of the new designs is a coaxial working electrode-counter electrode assembly; this electrode can be used with very fast-rising pulses, and it provides a well defined, repeatedly-polishable working surface. Low-impedance reference electrodes are also described, based on electrode concepts responding to the pH or the redox potential of the test solution. Additionally, a novel, long-life primary reference electrode design is reported, based on a modification of the external, pressure-balanced Ag/AgCl reference electrode

  18. Editorial - The winter Atomiades

    CERN Multimedia

    Staff Association

    2011-01-01

    As we wrote in our previous editorial, the Staff Association gives direct support to sports events, such as the Atomiades, a section of the Association of Sports Communities of European Research Institutes, which brings together sportsmen and women from 38 European research centres in 13 countries (Austria, Belgium, Czech Republic, United Kingdom, Finland, France, Germany, Hungary, Italy, Luxemburg, the Netherlands, Russia, and Switzerland). The summer Atomiades take place between the months of June and September every three years. Thirteen such events have taken place since 1973, the last one in June 2009 in Berlin. As far as the winter Atomiades are concerned, also organized every three years, and alternating with the summer Atomiades, there have been eleven since 1981, the last one at the end of January this year in neighbouring France. The following article tells the wonderful adventure of the CERN staff who took part in this event. A positive outcome for CERN skiers at the winter Atomiades The 11t...

  19. Design and Evaluation of a Pressure and Temperature Monitoring System for Pressure Ulcer Prevention

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farve Daneshvar Fard

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Pressure ulcers are tissue damages resulting from blood flow restriction, which occurs when the tissue is exposed to high pressure for a long period of time. These painful sores are common in patients and elderly, who spend extended periods of time in bed or wheelchair. In this study, a continuous pressure and temperature monitoring system was developed for pressure ulcer prevention. Materials and Methods The monitoring system consists of 64 pressure and 64 temperature sensors on a 40×50 cm2 sheet. Pressure and temperature data and the corresponding maps were displayed on a computer in real-time. Risk assessment could be performed by monitoring and recording absolute pressure and temperature values, as well as deviations over time. Furthermore, a posture detection procedure was proposed for sitting posture identification. Information about the patient’s movement history may help caregivers make informed decisions about the patient’s repositioning and ulcer prevention strategies. Results Steady temporal behaviour of the designed system and repeatability of the measurements were evaluated using several particular tests. The results illustrated that the system could be utilized for continuous monitoring of interface pressure and temperature for pressure ulcer prevention. Furthermore, the proposed method for detecting sitting posture was verified using a statistical analysis. Conclusion A continuous time pressure and temperature monitoring system was presented in this study. This system may be suited for pressure ulcer prevention given its feasibility for simultaneous monitoring of pressure and temperature and alarming options. Furthermore, a method for detecting different sitting postures was proposed and verified. Pressure ulcers in wheelchair-bound patients may be prevented using this sitting posture detection method.

  20. Seasonal carbonate chemistry covariation with temperature, oxygen, and salinity in a fjord estuary: implications for the design of ocean acidification experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reum, Jonathan C P; Alin, Simone R; Feely, Richard A; Newton, Jan; Warner, Mark; McElhany, Paul

    2014-01-01

    Carbonate chemistry variability is often poorly characterized in coastal regions and patterns of covariation with other biologically important variables such as temperature, oxygen concentration, and salinity are rarely evaluated. This absence of information hampers the design and interpretation of ocean acidification experiments that aim to characterize biological responses to future pCO2 levels relative to contemporary conditions. Here, we analyzed a large carbonate chemistry data set from Puget Sound, a fjord estuary on the U.S. west coast, and included measurements from three seasons (winter, summer, and fall). pCO2 exceeded the 2008-2011 mean atmospheric level (392 µatm) at all depths and seasons sampled except for the near-surface waters (Salinity, which varied little (27 to 31), was weakly correlated with carbonate chemistry. We illustrate potential high-frequency changes in carbonate chemistry, temperature, and oxygen conditions experienced simultaneously by organisms in Puget Sound that undergo diel vertical migrations under present-day conditions. We used simple calculations to estimate future pCO2 and Ωar values experienced by diel vertical migrators based on an increase in atmospheric CO2. Given the potential for non-linear interactions between pCO2 and other abiotic variables on physiological and ecological processes, our results provide a basis for identifying control conditions in ocean acidification experiments for this region, but also highlight the wide range of carbonate chemistry conditions organisms may currently experience in this and similar coastal ecosystems.

  1. PUMP DESIGN AND COMPUTATIONAL FLUID DYNAMIC ANALYSIS FOR HIGH TEMPERATURE SULFURIC ACID TRANSFER SYSTEM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    JUNG-SIK CHOI

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available In this study, we proposed a newly designed sulfuric acid transfer system for the sulfur-iodine (SI thermochemical cycle. The proposed sulfuric acid transfer system was evaluated using a computational fluid dynamics (CFD analysis for investigating thermodynamic/hydrodynamic characteristics and material properties. This analysis was conducted to obtain reliable continuous operation parameters; in particular, a thermal analysis was performed on the bellows box and bellows at amplitudes and various frequencies (0.1, 0.5, and 1.0 Hz. However, the high temperatures and strongly corrosive operating conditions of the current sulfuric acid system present challenges with respect to the structural materials of the transfer system. To resolve this issue, we designed a novel transfer system using polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE, Teflon® as a bellows material for the transfer of sulfuric acid. We also carried out a CFD analysis of the design. The CFD results indicated that the maximum applicable temperature of PTFE is about 533 K (260 °C, even though its melting point is around 600 K. This result implies that the PTFE is a potential material for the sulfuric acid transfer system. The CFD simulations also confirmed that the sulfuric acid transfer system was designed properly for this particular investigation.

  2. Design and manufacture of ceramic heat pipes for high temperature applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meisel, Peter; Jobst, Matthias; Lippmann, Wolfgang; Hurtado, Antonio

    2015-01-01

    Heat exchangers based on ceramic heat pipes were designed for use under highly abrasive and corrosive atmospheres at temperatures in the range of 800–1200 °C for high-temperature power-engineering applications. The presented heat pipes are gravity assisted and based on a multi-layer concept comprising a ceramic cladding and an inner metal tube that contains sodium as the working fluid. Hermetical encapsulation of the working fluid was achieved by electron-beam welding of the inner metal tube. Subsequently, closure of the surrounding ceramic tube was performed by laser brazing technology using a glass solder. Temperature resistance and functionality of the manufactured ceramic thermosyphons could be confirmed experimentally in a hot combustion gas atmosphere at temperatures up to 1100 °C. The ceramic tubes used had an outer diameter of 22 mm and a total length of 770 mm. The measured axial heat transfer of the ceramic gravity assisted heat pipes at the stationary operating point with cold/hot gas temperature of 100 °C/900 °C was 400 W. The result of the calculation using the created mathematical model amounted to 459 W. - Highlights: • Heat-pipe design consists of a ceramic shell and an inner metallic tube. • Laser brazing technology is suitable to seal ceramic heat-pipes. • Thermal characteristic of double wall thermosyphon was modelled using FEM code. • Experimental investigations demonstrated functionality of double wall thermosyphons

  3. Impacts of +2 °C global warming on winter tourism demand in Europe

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Damm, Andrea; Greuell, Wouter; Landgren, Oskar; Prettenthaler, Franz

    2017-01-01

    Increasing temperatures and snow scarce winter seasons challenge the winter tourism industry. In this study the impacts of +2 °C global warming on winter tourism demand in Europe's ski tourism related NUTS-3 regions are quantified. Using time series regression models, the relationship between

  4. A perspective on the design of high-temperature boiler components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perrin, I.J.; Fishburn, J.D.

    2008-01-01

    Boiler pressure parts are designed to formalize codes such as the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code. These codes employ a 'design-by-rule' approach, which is based on a combination of sound structural mechanics and boiler design and operating experience. These codes have served the industry well, but the need for a number of enhancements has been highlighted by the widespread use of creep strength-enhanced steels, the advent of ultrasupercritical boilers constructed from nickel-based alloys, and the cyclic duty required for some plants. The need for these enhancements is discussed to explain their origin and key challenges that must be tackled to provide robust design methods for the future. In particular, the use of reference stress concepts and design-by-analysis are discussed to highlight some practical issues. Weldments are identified as a particular concern because they are often a life-limiting feature, and since existing code rules do not adequately consider the high-temperature creep failure modes that can arise as a function of geometry, loading and material combination. Associated with the behavior of welds, multiaxial creep rupture is also identified as a topic that requires further study. The discussion illustrates the multidisciplinary nature of design and need for the materials and structural mechanics communities to work together. This should optimize the use of advanced, expensive alloys and reduce component wall thickness, facilitating pressure part manufacture and enhancing operational flexibility without compromising safety

  5. Nist Microwave Blackbody: The Design, Testing, and Verification of a Conical Brightness Temperature Source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houtz, Derek Anderson

    Microwave radiometers allow remote sensing of earth and atmospheric temperatures from space, anytime, anywhere, through clouds, and in the dark. Data from microwave radiometers are high-impact operational inputs to weather forecasts, and are used to provide a vast array of climate data products including land and sea surface temperatures, soil moisture, ocean salinity, cloud precipitation and moisture height profiles, and even wind speed and direction, to name a few. Space-borne microwave radiometers have a major weakness when it comes to long-term climate trends due to their lack of traceability. Because there is no standard, or absolute reference, for microwave brightness temperature, nationally or internationally, individual instruments must each rely on their own internal calibration source to set an absolute reference to the fundamental unit of Kelvin. This causes each subsequent instrument to have a calibration offset and there is no 'true' reference. The work introduced in this thesis addresses this vacancy by proposing and introducing a NIST microwave brightness temperature source that may act as the primary reference. The NIST standard will allow pre-launch calibration of radiometers across a broad range of remote sensing pertinent frequencies between 18 GHz and 220 GHz. The blackbody will be capable of reaching temperatures ranging between liquid nitrogen boiling at approximately 77 K and warm-target temperature of 350 K. The brightness temperature of the source has associated standard uncertainty ranging as a function of frequency between 0.084 K and 0.111 K. The standard can be transferred to the calibration source in the instrument, providing traceability of all subsequent measurements back to the primary standard. The development of the NIST standard source involved predicting and measuring its brightness temperature, and minimizing the associated uncertainty of this quantity. Uniform and constant physical temperature along with well characterized and

  6. temperature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Polt

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available In-situ X-ray diffraction was applied to isotactic polypropylene with a high volume fraction of α-phase (α-iPP while it has been compressed at temperatures below and above its glass transition temperature Tg. The diffraction patterns were evaluated by the Multi-reflection X-ray Profile Analysis (MXPA method, revealing microstructural parameters such as the density of dislocations and the size of coherently scattering domains (CSD-size. A significant difference in the development of the dislocation density was found compared to compression at temperatures above Tg, pointing at a different plastic deformation mechanism at these temperatures. Based on the individual evolutions of the dislocation density and CSD-size observed as a function of compressive strain, suggestions for the deformation mechanisms occurring below and above Tg are made.

  7. Cold start dynamics and temperature sliding observer design of an automotive SOFC APU

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Po-Hsu; Hong, Che-Wun

    This paper presents a dynamic model for studying the cold start dynamics and observer design of an auxiliary power unit (APU) for automotive applications. The APU is embedded with a solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) stack which is a quiet and pollutant-free electric generator; however, it suffers from slow start problem from ambient conditions. The SOFC APU system equips with an after-burner to accelerate the start-up transient in this research. The combustion chamber burns the residual fuel (and air) left from the SOFC to raise the exhaust temperature to preheat the SOFC stack through an energy recovery unit. Since thermal effect is the dominant factor that influences the SOFC transient and steady performance, a nonlinear real-time sliding observer for stack temperature was implemented into the system dynamics to monitor the temperature variation for future controller design. The simulation results show that a 100 W APU system in this research takes about 2 min (in theory) for start-up without considering the thermal limitation of the cell fracture.

  8. The Temperature Profile for The Innovative Design of the Perforated Fin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hisham Al-Saddy

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The development of the perforated fin had proposed in many studies to enhance the heat transfer from electronic pieces. This paper presents a novel derivative method to find the temperature distribution of the new design (inclined perforated of the pin fin. Perforated with rectangular section and different angles of inclination was considered. Signum Function is used for modeling the variable heat transfer area. Set of parameters to handle the conduction and convection area were calculated. Degenerate Hypergeometric Equation (DHE was used for modeling the Complex energy differential equation and then solved by Kummer’s series. In the validation process, Ansys 16.0-Steady State Thermal was used. Two geometric models were considered. The big reliability of the presented model comes from the high agreement of the validation results about (0.25%. The results show the increase of the inclination leads to the enhancement of the temperature difference and heat transfer ratio. Improved of Heat transfer ratio is ranging from 13% to 50%. Article History: Received June 12th 2016; Received in revised form August 6th 2016; Accepted August 24th 2016; Available online How to Cite This Article: Jasim, H.H and Soylemez, M.S. (2016. The temperature profile for the innovative design of the perforated fin. Int. Journal of Renewable Energy Development, 5(3, 259-266 http://dx.doi.org/10.14710/ijred.5.3.259-266

  9. A New Experimental Design to Study the Kinetics of Solid Dissolution into Liquids at Elevated Temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Huijun; White, Jesse F.; Sichen, Du

    2018-04-01

    A new method was developed to study the dissolution of a solid cylinder in a liquid under forced convection at elevated temperature. In the new design, a rotating cylinder was placed concentrically in a crucible fabricated by boring four holes into a blank material for creating an internal volume with a quatrefoil profile. A strong flow in the radial direction in the liquid was created, which was evidently shown by computational fluid dynamic (CFD) calculations and experiments at both room temperature and elevated temperature. The new setup was able to freeze the sample as it was at experimental temperature, particularly the interface between the solid and the liquid. This freezing was necessary to obtain reliable information for understanding the reaction mechanism. This was exemplified by the study of dissolution of a refractory in liquid slag. The absence of flow in the radial direction in the traditional setup using a symmetrical cylinder was also discussed. The differences in the findings by past investigators using the symmetrical cylinder are most likely due to the extent of misalignment of the cylinder in the containment vessel.

  10. Design of a ceramic heat exchanger for high temperature applications using simulation techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mello, Paulo Eduardo Batista de; Donato, Gustavo Henrique Bolognesi [Departamento de Engenharia Mecanica. Centro Universitario da FEI, Sao Bernardo do Campo, SP (Brazil)], e-mails: pmello@fei.edu.br, gdonato@fei.edu.br

    2010-07-01

    There is a potential demand for heat exchangers capable of supporting working temperatures well above 900 deg C. Many different studies in the literature consider these components as critical for the implementation of externally fired gas turbines (EFGT) and externally fired combined cycles (EFCC). It is common sense that ceramics are the only alternative for the construction of these heat exchangers, but most part of the literature about heat exchangers usually considers only metallic materials for its construction. Consequently, the design of ceramic heat exchangers is not trivial and represents an actual technical challenge. In addition, different heat transfer modes are present simultaneously and structural integrity considerations also become highly important due to the thermal stresses originated from high temperature gradients combined to the brittle fracture behavior of engineering ceramics. As a step in this direction, the present work presents the design of a ceramic heat exchanger using CFD and finite element structural simulations. The heat exchanger designed presents small dimensions in order to make it easier to construct a prototype and test it in the future. (author)

  11. Fabrication of computationally designed scaffolds by low temperature 3D printing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castilho, Miguel; Dias, Marta; Gbureck, Uwe; Groll, Jürgen; Fernandes, Paulo; Pires, Inês; Gouveia, Barbara; Rodrigues, Jorge; Vorndran, Elke

    2013-09-01

    The development of artificial bone substitutes that mimic the properties of bone and simultaneously promote the desired tissue regeneration is a current issue in bone tissue engineering research. An approach to create scaffolds with such characteristics is based on the combination of novel design and additive manufacturing processes. The objective of this work is to characterize the microstructural and the mechanical properties of scaffolds developed by coupling both topology optimization and a low temperature 3D printing process. The scaffold design was obtained using a topology optimization approach to maximize the permeability with constraints on the mechanical properties. This procedure was studied to be suitable for the fabrication of a cage prototype for tibial tuberosity advancement application, which is one of the most recent and promising techniques to treat cruciate ligament rupture in dogs. The microstructural and mechanical properties of the scaffolds manufactured by reacting α/β-tricalcium phosphate with diluted phosphoric acid were then assessed experimentally and the scaffolds strength reliability was determined. The results demonstrate that the low temperature 3D printing process is a reliable option to create synthetic scaffolds with tailored properties, and when coupled with topology optimization design it can be a powerful tool for the fabrication of patient-specific bone implants.

  12. Autumn Weather and Winter Increase in Cerebrovascular Disease Mortality

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    McDonagh, R

    2016-11-01

    Mortality from cerebrovascular disease increases in winter but the cause is unclear. Ireland’s oceanic climate means that it infrequently experiences extremes of weather. We examined how weather patterns relate to stroke mortality in Ireland. Seasonal data for Sunshine (% of average), Rainfall (% of average) and Temperature (degrees Celsius above average) were collected for autumn (September-November) and winter (December-February) using official Irish Meteorological Office data. National cerebrovascular mortality data was obtained from Quarterly Vital Statistics. Excess winter deaths were calculated by subtracting (nadir) 3rd quarter mortality data from subsequent 1st quarter data. Data for 12 years were analysed, 2002-2014. Mean winter mortality excess was 24.7%. Winter mortality correlated with temperature (r=.60, p=0.04). Rise in winter mortality correlated strongly with the weather in the preceding autumn (Rainfall: r=-0.19 p=0.53, Temperature: r=-0.60, p=0.03, Sunshine, r=0.58, p=0.04). Winter cerebrovascular disease mortality appears higher following cool, sunny autum

  13. Aerodynamic heating and surface temperatures on vehicles for computer-aided design studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dejarnette, F. R.; Kania, L. A.; Chitty, A.

    1983-01-01

    A computer subprogram has been developed to calculate aerodynamic and radiative heating rates and to determine surface temperatures by integrating the heating rates along the trajectory of a vehicle. Convective heating rates are calculated by applying the axisymmetric analogue to inviscid surface streamlines and using relatively simple techniques to calculate laminar, transitional, or turbulent heating rates. Options are provided for the selection of gas model, transition criterion, turbulent heating method, Reynolds Analogy factor, and entropy-layer swallowing effects. Heating rates are compared to experimental data, and the time history of surface temperatures are given for a high-speed trajectory. The computer subprogram is developed for preliminary design and mission analysis where parametric studies are needed at all speeds.

  14. Evaluation of weldment creep and fatigue strength-reduction factors for elevated-temperature design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Corum, J.M.

    1989-01-01

    New explicit weldment strength criteria in the form of creep and fatigue strength-reduction factors were recently introduced into the American Society of Mechanical Engineers Code Case N-47, which governs the design of elevated-temperature nuclear plants components in the United States. This paper provides some of the background and logic for these factors and their use, and it describes the results of a series of long-term, confirmatory, creep-rupture and fatigue tests of simple welded structures. The structures (welded plates and tubes) were made of 316 stainless steel base metal and 16-8-2 weld filler metal. Overall, the results provide further substantiation of the validity of the strength-reduction factor approach for ensuring adequate life in elevated-temperature nuclear component weldments. 16 refs., 7 figs

  15. Safeguards-by-Design: Guidance for High Temperature Gas Reactors (HTGRs) With Pebble Fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Philip Casey Durst; Mark Schanfein

    2012-08-01

    The following is a guidance document from a series prepared for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA), under the Next Generation Safeguards Initiative (NGSI), to assist facility designers and operators in implementing international Safeguards-by-Design (SBD). SBD has two main objectives: (1) to avoid costly and time consuming redesign work or retrofits of new nuclear fuel cycle facilities and (2) to make the implementation of international safeguards more effective and efficient at such facilities. In the long term, the attainment of these goals would save industry and the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) time, money, and resources and be mutually beneficial. This particular safeguards guidance document focuses on pebble fuel high temperature gas reactors (HTGR). The purpose of the IAEA safeguards system is to provide credible assurance to the international community that nuclear material and other specified items are not diverted from peaceful nuclear uses. The safeguards system consists of the IAEA’s statutory authority to establish safeguards; safeguards rights and obligations in safeguards agreements and additional protocols; and technical measures implemented pursuant to those agreements. Of foremost importance is the international safeguards agreement between the country and the IAEA, concluded pursuant to the Treaty on the Non-Proliferation of Nuclear Weapons (NPT). According to a 1992 IAEA Board of Governors decision, countries must: notify the IAEA of a decision to construct a new nuclear facility as soon as such decision is taken; provide design information on such facilities as the designs develop; and provide detailed design information based on construction plans at least 180 days prior to the start of construction, and on "as-built" designs at least 180 days before the first receipt of nuclear material. Ultimately, the design information will be captured in an IAEA Design Information

  16. Design and proof of concept of an innovative very high temperature ceramic solar absorber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leray, Cédric; Ferriere, Alain; Toutant, Adrien; Olalde, Gabriel; Peroy, Jean-Yves; Chéreau, Patrick; Ferrato, Marc

    2017-06-01

    Hybrid solar gas-turbine (HSGT) is an attractive technology to foster market penetration of CSP. HSGT offers some major advantages like for example high solar-to-electric conversion efficiency, reduced water requirement and low capital cost. A very high temperature solar receiver is needed when elevated solar share is claimed. A few research works, as reported by Karni et al. [8] and by Buck et al. [1], have been dedicated to solar receiver technologies able to deliver pressurized air at temperature above 750°C. The present work focuses on research aiming at developing an efficient and reliable solar absorber able to provide pressurized air at temperature up to 1000°C and more. A surface absorber technology is selected and a modular design of receiver is proposed in which each absorber module is made of BOOSTEC® SiC ceramic (silicon carbide) as bulk material with straight air channels inside. Early stage experimental works done at CNRS/PROMES on lab-scale absorbers showed that the thermo-mechanical behavior of this material is a critical issue, resulting in elevated probability of failure under severe conditions like large temperature gradient or steep variation of solar flux density in situations of cloud covering. This paper reports on recent progress made at CNRS/PROMES to address this critical issue. The design of the absorber has been revised and optimized according to thermo-mechanical numerical simulations, and an experimental proof of concept has been done on a pilot-scale absorber module at Themis solar tower facility.

  17. Optimal Experimental Design of Borehole Locations for Bayesian Inference of Past Ice Sheet Surface Temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, A. D.; Huan, X.; Heimbach, P.; Marzouk, Y.

    2017-12-01

    Borehole data are essential for calibrating ice sheet models. However, field expeditions for acquiring borehole data are often time-consuming, expensive, and dangerous. It is thus essential to plan the best sampling locations that maximize the value of data while minimizing costs and risks. We present an uncertainty quantification (UQ) workflow based on rigorous probability framework to achieve these objectives. First, we employ an optimal experimental design (OED) procedure to compute borehole locations that yield the highest expected information gain. We take into account practical considerations of location accessibility (e.g., proximity to research sites, terrain, and ice velocity may affect feasibility of drilling) and robustness (e.g., real-time constraints such as weather may force researchers to drill at sub-optimal locations near those originally planned), by incorporating a penalty reflecting accessibility as well as sensitivity to deviations from the optimal locations. Next, we extract vertical temperature profiles from these boreholes and formulate a Bayesian inverse problem to reconstruct past surface temperatures. Using a model of temperature advection/diffusion, the top boundary condition (corresponding to surface temperatures) is calibrated via efficient Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC). The overall procedure can then be iterated to choose new optimal borehole locations for the next expeditions.Through this work, we demonstrate powerful UQ methods for designing experiments, calibrating models, making predictions, and assessing sensitivity--all performed under an uncertain environment. We develop a theoretical framework as well as practical software within an intuitive workflow, and illustrate their usefulness for combining data and models for environmental and climate research.

  18. Winter chilling speeds spring development of temperate butterflies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stålhandske, Sandra; Gotthard, Karl; Leimar, Olof

    2017-07-01

    Understanding and predicting phenology has become more important with ongoing climate change and has brought about great research efforts in the recent decades. The majority of studies examining spring phenology of insects have focussed on the effects of spring temperatures alone. Here we use citizen-collected observation data to show that winter cold duration, in addition to spring temperature, can affect the spring emergence of butterflies. Using spatial mixed models, we disentangle the effects of climate variables and reveal impacts of both spring and winter conditions for five butterfly species that overwinter as pupae across the UK, with data from 1976 to 2013 and one butterfly species in Sweden, with data from 2001 to 2013. Warmer springs lead to earlier emergence in all species and milder winters lead to statistically significant delays in three of the five investigated species. We also find that the delaying effect of winter warmth has become more pronounced in the last decade, during which time winter durations have become shorter. For one of the studied species, Anthocharis cardamines (orange tip butterfly), we also make use of parameters determined from previous experiments on pupal development to model the spring phenology. Using daily temperatures in the UK and Sweden, we show that recent variation in spring temperature corresponds to 10-15 day changes in emergence time over UK and Sweden, whereas variation in winter duration corresponds to 20 days variation in the south of the UK versus only 3 days in the south of Sweden. In summary, we show that short winters delay phenology. The effect is most prominent in areas with particularly mild winters, emphasising the importance of winter for the response of ectothermic animals to climate change. With climate change, these effects may become even stronger and apply also at higher latitudes. © 2017 The Authors. Journal of Animal Ecology © 2017 British Ecological Society.

  19. Helium circulator design concepts for the modular high temperature gas-cooled reactor (MHTGR) plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McDonald, C.F.; Nichols, M.K.; Kaufman, J.S.

    1988-01-01

    Two helium circulators are featured in the Modular High-Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor (MHTGR) power plant - (1) the main circulator, which facilitates the transfer of reactor thermal energy to the steam generator, and (2) a small shutdown cooling circulator that enables rapid cooling of the reactor system to be realized. The 3170 kW(e) main circulator has an axial flow compressor, the impeller being very similar to the unit in the Fort St. Vrain (FSV) plant. The 164 kW(e) shutdown cooling circulator, the design of which is controlled by depressurized conditions, has a radial flow compressor. Both machines are vertically oriented, have submerged electric motor drives, and embody rotors that are supported on active magnetic bearings. As outlined in this paper, both machines have been conservatively designed based on established practice. The circulators have features and characteristics that have evolved from actual plant operating experience. With a major goal of high reliability, emphasis has been placed on design simplicity, and both machines are readily accessible for inspection, repair, and replacement, if necessary. In this paper, conceptual design aspects of both machines are discussed, together with the significant technology bases. As appropriate for a plant that will see service well into the 21st century, new and emerging technologies have been factored into the design. Examples of this are the inclusion of active magnetic bearings, and an automated circulator condition monitoring system. (author). 18 refs, 20 figs, 13 tabs

  20. Recommended practices in elevated temperature design: A compendium of breeder reactor experiences (1970-1986): An overview

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wei, B.C.; Cooper, W.L. Jr.; Dhalla, A.K.

    1987-09-01

    Significant experiences have been accumulated in the establishment of design methods and criteria applicable to the design of Liquid Metal Fast Breeder Reactor (LMFBR) components. The Subcommittee of the Elevated Temperature Design under the Pressure Vessel Research Council (PVRC) has undertaken to collect, on an international basis, design experience gained, and the lessons learned, to provide guidelines for next generation advanced reactor designs. This paper shall present an overview and describe the highlights of the work

  1. Nuclear Winter: The implications for civil defense

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chester, C.V.; Perry, A.M.; Hobbs, B.F.

    1987-01-01

    ''Nuclear Winter'' is the term given to hypothesized cooling in the northern hemisphere following a nuclear war due to injection of smoke from burning cities into the atmosphere. The voluminous literature on this subject produced since the original paper in 1983 by Turco, Toon, Ackerman, Pollack, and Sagen (TTAPS) has been reviewed. The widespread use of 3-dimensional global circulation models have resulted in reduced estimates of cooling; 15 to 25 0 C for a summer war and a few degrees for a winter war. More serious may be the possibility of suppression of convective precipitation by the altered temperature profiles in the atmosphere. However, very large uncertainties remain in input parameters, the models, and the results of calculations. We believe the state of knowledge about nuclear winter is sufficiently developed to conclude: Neither cold nor drought are likely to be direct threats to human survival for populations with the wherewithal to survive normal January temperatures; The principal threat from nuclear winter is to food production, and could present problems to third parties without food reserves; and Loss of a crop year is neither a new nor unexpected threat from nuclear war to the US and the Soviet Union. Both have at least a year's food reserve at all times. Both face formidable organizational problems in distributing their reserves in a war-damaged environment. The consequences of nuclear winter could be expected to fall more heavily on the Soviet Union than the US due to its higher latitude and less productive agriculture. This may be especially true if disturbances of rainfall amounts and distribution persist for more than a year. 6 refs

  2. Nuclear Winter: Implications for civil defense

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chester, C.V.; Perry, A.M.; Hobbs, B.F.

    1988-05-01

    ''Nuclear Winter'' is the term given to the cooling hypothesized to occur in the Northern Hemisphere following a nuclear war as the result of the injection of smoke from burning cities into the atmosphere. The voluminous literature on this subject produced since the paper was published in 1983 by Turco, Toon, Ackerman, Pollack, and Sagen (TTAPS) has been reviewed. Three-dimensional global circulation models have resulted in reduced estimates of cooling---15 to 25/degree/C for a summer war and a few degrees for a winter war. More serious may be the possibility of suppression of convective precipitation by the altered temperature profiles in the atmosphere. However, very large uncertainties remain in input parameters, the models, and the results of calculations. We believe the state of knowledge about nuclear winter is sufficiently developed to conclude: Neither cold nor drought is likely to be a direct threat to human survival for populations with the wherewithal to survive normal January temperatures. The principal threat from nuclear winter is to food production, and this could present problems to third parties who are without food reserves. Loss of a crop year is neither a new nor an unexpected threat from nuclear war to the United States and the Soviet Union. Both have at least a year's food reserve at all times. Both face formidable organizational problems in distributing their reserves in a war-damaged environment. The consequences of nuclear winter could be expected to fall more heavily on the Soviet Union than the United States due to its higher latitude and less productive agriculture. This may be especially true if disturbances of rainfall amounts and distribution persist for more than a year.

  3. Conceptual design study of high temperature gas-cooled reactor for plutonium incineration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goto, Minoru

    2013-01-01

    JAEA has started a conceptual design study of a Pu burner HTGR, which is called CBHTR (Clean Burn High Temperature gas-cooled Reactor). CBHTR’s fuel is TRISO-coated fuel particle with PuO 2 -YSZ (Yttria- Stabilized Zirconia) kernel, which increase proliferation resistance, safety of geological disposal, and Pu incineration. CBHTR can decrease Puf ratio from 60% to 20% with 520 GWd/t. In the future, 15% of electricity capacity is employed by 7 of CBHTRs and 59 of U-HTRs. JAEA has a R and D plan of manufacturing technology of TRISO-coated fuel with PuO 2 -YSZ kernel

  4. Marine assemblages respond rapidly to winter climate variability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morley, James W; Batt, Ryan D; Pinsky, Malin L

    2017-07-01

    Even species within the same assemblage have varied responses to climate change, and there is a poor understanding for why some taxa are more sensitive to climate than others. In addition, multiple mechanisms can drive species' responses, and responses may be specific to certain life stages or times of year. To test how marine species respond to climate variability, we analyzed 73 diverse taxa off the southeast US coast in 26 years of scientific trawl survey data and determined how changes in distribution and biomass relate to temperature. We found that winter temperatures were particularly useful for explaining interannual variation in species' distribution and biomass, although the direction and magnitude of the response varied among species from strongly negative, to little response, to strongly positive. Across species, the response to winter temperature varied greatly, with much of this variation being explained by thermal preference. A separate analysis of annual commercial fishery landings revealed that winter temperatures may also impact several important fisheries in the southeast United States. Based on the life stages of the species surveyed, winter temperature appears to act through overwinter mortality of juveniles or as a cue for migration timing. We predict that this assemblage will be responsive to projected increases in temperature and that winter temperature may be broadly important for species relationships with climate on a global scale. © The Authors Global Change Biology Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. Design, syntheses, and properties of tunable, dual-stimuli (temperature and pH) responsive copolymers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manokruang, Kiattikhun

    Stimuli responsive polymers are of great interest in biorelated applications ranging from actuators, microfluidics, delivery systems and tissue scaffolds. The specifications of an appropriate polymer system that shows a response to one or more external stimuli vary from application to application, depending on desired functionality. In most cases, the response to an environmental change is desired to be sharp and fast, such as for microfluidics and actuators, while the stability of the collapsed structure is also typically required, such as in tissue scaffolds and in stimulated delivery systems. In addition, the onset of the stimulus response varies depending on application. Thus, a general design strategy for polymer systems to meet specific applications' needs can be a big challenge. This dissertation describes the design, syntheses, and aqueous phase behavior of two polymer classes that show a sharp solution phase transition in different manners: The first polymer class is in the form of a segmented/blocky copolymer and its solution phase separation is designed to occur via micellization, while the second polymer class is designed as an alternating copolymer and it exhibits a first order LCST phase behavior. Copolymers of methyl methacrylate (MMA) and methacrylic acid (MAA), poly(MMA-co-MAA)s, were prepared to have a segmented blocky comonomer distribution along the chain backbone, with sequences composed predominantly of MMA or MAA units. Turbidity (cloud point) measurements were employed to investigate the phase behavior of these copolymers in aqueous solution. The solutions showed sharp solubility transitions upon pH change, and the pH-onsets of the copolymers' transition showed a systematic dependence on the copolymers' MAA content and an almost-linear dependence on the polymer concentration. A strong hysteresis was observed when lowering versus increasing pH, indicating a stable collapsed structure. Dynamic light scattering demonstrated almost monodispersed

  6. Measured Performance of a Low Temperature Air Source Heat Pump

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, R. K. [Johnson Research LLC, Pueblo West, CO (United States)

    2013-09-01

    A 4-ton Low Temperature Heat Pump (LTHP) manufactured by Hallowell International was installed in a residence near New Haven, Connecticut and monitored over two winters of operation. After attending to some significant service issues, the heat pump operated as designed. This report should be considered a review of the dual compressor 'boosted heat pump' technology. The Low Temperature Heat Pumpsystem operates with four increasing levels of capacity (heat output) as the outdoor temperature drops. The system was shown to select capacity correctly, supplying the appropriate amount of heat to the house across the full range of outdoor temperatures. The system's Coefficient of Performance (Seasonal COP, or SCOP) over two entire winters was calculated, based on measured data, to be 3.29over the first winter and 2.68 over the second winter. A second seasonal efficiency calculation by a different method yielded a SCOP of 2.78 for the first winter and 2.83 for the second winter. This second seasonal efficiency calculation was determined by comparing measured heat pump energy use to the in situ energy use with resistance heat alone. This method is the ratio of the slopes of thedaily energy use load lines.

  7. Decontamination and winter conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quenild, C.; Tveten, U.

    1984-12-01

    The report deals with two decontamonation experiments under winter conditions. A snow-covered parking lot was contaminated, and the snow was subsequently removed using standard snow-moving equipment. The snow left behind was collected and the content of contaminant was determined. A non-radioactive contaminant was used. A decontamination factor exceeding 100 was obtained. Although the eksperimental conditions were close to ideal, it is reason to believe that extremely efficient removal of deposited materials on a snow surface is achivable. In another investigation, run-off from agricultural surface, contaminated while covered with snow, was measured A lycimeter was used in this experiment. A stable layer of ice and snow was allowed to form before contamination. The run-off water was collected at each thaw period until all snow and ice was gone. Cs-134 was used as contaminant. Roughly 30% of the Cs-134 with which the area was contaminated ran off with the melt water. Following a reactor accident situation, this would have given a corresponding reduction in the long term doses. Both of these experiments show that consequence calculation assumptions, as they are currently applied to large accident assessment, tend to overestimate the consequences resulting from accidents taking place under winter conditions

  8. Winter School Les Houches

    CERN Document Server

    Lannoo, Michel; Bastard, Gérald; Voos, Michel; Boccara, Nino

    1986-01-01

    The Winter School held in Les Houches on March 12-21, 1985 was devoted to Semiconductor Heterojunctions and Superlattices, a topic which is recognized as being now one of the most interesting and active fields in semiconductor physics. In fact, following the pioneering work of Esaki and Tsu in 1970, the study of these two-dimensional semiconductor heterostructures has developed rapidly, both from the point of view of basic physics and of applications. For instance, modulation-doped heterojunctions are nowadays currently used to investigate the quantum Hall effect and to make very fast transistors. This book contains the lectures presented at this Winter School, showing in particular that many aspects of semiconductor heterojunctions and super­ lattices were treated, extending from the fabrication of these two-dimensional systems to their basic properties and applications in micro-and opto-electron­ ics. Among the subjects which were covered, one can quote as examples: molecular beam epitaxy and metallorgani...

  9. Core and Refueling Design Studies for the Advanced High Temperature Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holcomb, David Eugene [ORNL; Ilas, Dan [ORNL; Varma, Venugopal Koikal [ORNL; Cisneros, Anselmo T [ORNL; Kelly, Ryan P [ORNL; Gehin, Jess C [ORNL

    2011-09-01

    The Advanced High Temperature Reactor (AHTR) is a design concept for a central generating station type [3400 MW(t)] fluoride-salt-cooled high-temperature reactor (FHR). The overall goal of the AHTR development program is to demonstrate the technical feasibility of FHRs as low-cost, large-size power producers while maintaining full passive safety. This report presents the current status of ongoing design studies of the core, in-vessel structures, and refueling options for the AHTR. The AHTR design remains at the notional level of maturity as important material, structural, neutronic, and hydraulic issues remain to be addressed. The present design space exploration, however, indicates that reasonable options exist for the AHTR core, primary heat transport path, and fuel cycle provided that materials and systems technologies develop as anticipated. An illustration of the current AHTR core, reactor vessel, and nearby structures is shown in Fig. ES1. The AHTR core design concept is based upon 252 hexagonal, plate fuel assemblies configured to form a roughly cylindrical core. The core has a fueled height of 5.5 m with 25 cm of reflector above and below the core. The fuel assembly hexagons are {approx}45 cm across the flats. Each fuel assembly contains 18 plates that are 23.9 cm wide and 2.55 cm thick. The reactor vessel has an exterior diameter of 10.48 m and a height of 17.7 m. A row of replaceable graphite reflector prismatic blocks surrounds the core radially. A more complete reactor configuration description is provided in Section 2 of this report. The AHTR core design space exploration was performed under a set of constraints. Only low enrichment (<20%) uranium fuel was considered. The coated particle fuel and matrix materials were derived from those being developed and demonstrated under the Department of Energy Office of Nuclear Energy (DOE-NE) advanced gas reactor program. The coated particle volumetric packing fraction was restricted to at most 40%. The pressure

  10. Design, Test and Demonstration of Saturable Reactor High-Temperature Superconductor Fault Current Limiters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Darmann, Frank [Zenergy Power, Inc., Burlingame, CA (United States); Lombaerde, Robert [Zenergy Power, Inc., Burlingame, CA (United States); Moriconi, Franco [Zenergy Power, Inc., Burlingame, CA (United States); Nelson, Albert [Zenergy Power, Inc., Burlingame, CA (United States)

    2012-03-01

    Zenergy Power has successfully designed, built, tested, and installed in the US electrical grid a saturable reactor Fault Current Limiter. Beginning in 2007, first as SC Power Systems and from 2008 as Zenergy Power, Inc., ZP used DOE matching grant and ARRA funds to help refine the design of the saturated reactor fault current limiter. ZP ultimately perfected the design of the saturated reactor FCL to the point that ZP could reliably design a suitable FCL for most utility applications. Beginning with a very basic FCL design using 1G HTS for a coil housed in a LN2 cryostat for the DC bias magnet, the technology progressed to a commercial system that was offered for sale internationally. Substantial progress was made in two areas. First, the cryogenics cooling system progressed from a sub-cooled liquid nitrogen container housing the HTS coils to cryostats utilizing dry conduction cooling and reaching temperatures down to less than 20 degrees K. Large, round cryostats with warm bore diameters of 1.7 meters enabled the design of large tanks to hold the AC components. Second, the design of the AC part of the FCL was refined from a six legged spider design to a more compact and lighter design with better fault current limiting capability. Further refinement of the flux path and core shape led to an efficient saturated reactor design requiring less Ampere-turns to saturate the core. In conclusion, the development of the saturable reactor FCL led to a more efficient design not requiring HTS magnets and their associated peripheral equipment, which yielded a more economical product in line with the electric utility industry expectations. The original goal for the DOE funding of the ZP project Design, Test and Demonstration of Saturable Reactor High-Temperature Superconductor Fault Current Limiters was to stimulate the HTS wire industry with, first 1G, then 2G, HTS wire applications. Over the approximately 5 years of ZP's product development program, the amount of HTS

  11. Winter chemistry of North Slope lakes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chambers, M. K.; White, D. M.; Lilly, M. R.; Hinzman, L. D.; Hilton, K. M.; Busey, R.

    2006-12-01

    Lakes are important water resources on the North Slope of Alaska. Oilfield exploration and production requires water for facility use as well as transportation. Ice road construction requires winter extraction of fresh water. Since most North Slope lakes are relatively shallow, the quantity and quality of the water remaining under the ice by the end of the winter are important environmental management issues. Currently permits are based on the presence of overwintering fish populations and their sensitivity to low oxygen. Sampling during the winter of 2004 2005 sheds light on the winter chemistry of several pumped lakes and one unpumped lake on the North Slope. Dissolved oxygen, conductivity, pH, and temperature profiles were taken along with ice thickness and water depth measurements. Water samples were extracted and analyzed for Na, Ca, K, Mg, Fe, DOC, and alkalinity in the laboratory. Lake properties, rather than pumping activities, were the best predictors of oxygen depletion, with the highest levels of dissolved oxygen maintained in the lake with the least dissolved constituents. As would be expected, specific conductance increased with depth in the lake while dissolved oxygen decreased with depth. Dissolved oxygen and specific conductance data suggested that the lakes began to refresh in May. The summarized data provides a view of North Slope lake chemistry trends, while continued studies investigate the chemical impacts of pumping North Slope lakes through continued sampling and modeling efforts.

  12. Design criteria for prestressed concrete pressure vessels for high temperature reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schimmelpfennig, K.

    1991-01-01

    This paper summarizes the work on design criteria for concrete structures of Prestressed Concrete Reactor Vessels (PCRVs), which has been carried out since 1984 by a couple of competent institutions. After some basic considerations on the safety demands on PCRVs, especially their Prestressed Concrete Structure (PCS), and the consequences for an elevated level of quality to be ensured by the design criteria, an impression is given, first, by what means a higher quality standard is gained with respect to selection of materials and specification of material data in comparison to the usual building industry and what kind of criteria on this behalf should be fixed in a PCRV code. As a further quality increasing feature, the specific demands on design analysis as practised according to the present state of science and as to be treated within a code are discussed. This concerns analyses for steady state and transient temperatures as well as stress and strain analyses for service and ultimate load conditions. It is outlined to what degree calculation models should be detailed, which includes statements about admissible idealizations. As a central topic the question is discussed in what way the ultimate load capacity has to be evaluated, thereby presenting results of some investigations pointing out the conditions under which the design is determined by the different kinds of ultimate load conditions. Finally, some reflections on the demands on monitoring the PCS behaviour during its lifetime and on several questions still to be answered in this field are expressed. (orig.)

  13. Design Issues for Using Magnetic Materials in Radiation Environments at Elevated Temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowman, Cheryl L.

    2013-01-01

    One of the challenges of designing motors and alternators for use in nuclear powered space missions is accounting for the effects of radiation. Terrestrial reactor power plants use distance and shielding to minimize radiation damage but space missions must economize volume and mass. Past studies have shown that sufficiently high radiation levels can affect the magnetic response of hard and soft magnetic materials. Theoretical models explaining the radiation-induced degradation have been proposed but not verified. This paper reviews the literature and explains the cumulative effects of temperature, magnetic-load, and radiation-level on the magnetic properties of component materials. Magnetic property degradation is very specific to alloy choice and processing history, since magnetic properties are very much entwined with specific chemistry and microstructural features. However, there is basic theoretical as well as supportive experimental evidence that the negative impact to magnetic properties will be minimal if the bulk temperature of the material is less than fifty percent of the Curie temperature, the radiation flux is low, and the demagnetization field is small. Keywords: Magnets, Permanent Magnets, Power Converters, Nuclear Electric Power Generation, Radiation Tolerance.

  14. Design and construction of a guarded hot plate apparatus operating down to liquid nitrogen temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Manfeng; Zhang, Hua; Ju, Yonglin

    2012-07-01

    A double-sided guarded hot plate apparatus (GHP) is specifically designed, fabricated, and constructed for the measurement of thermal conductivities of insulation specimens operated down to liquid nitrogen temperature (-196 °C), at different controlled pressures from 0.005 Pa to 0.105 MPa. The specimens placed in this apparatus are 300 mm in diameter at various thicknesses ranging from 4 mm to 40 mm. The apparatus is different from traditional GHP in terms of structure, supporting and heating method. The details of the design and construction of the hot plate, the cold plates, the suspensions, the clampings, and the vacuum chamber of the system are presented. The measurement methods of the temperatures, the input power, the meter area, and the thickness of the specimens are given. The apparatus is calibrated with teflon plates as sample and the maximum deviation from the published data is about 6% for thermal conductivity. The uncertainties for the measurement are also discussed in this paper.

  15. Fluoride Salt-Cooled High-Temperature Demonstration Reactor Point Design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qualls, A. L. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Brown, Nicholas R. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Betzler, Benjamin R. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Carbajo, Juan [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Hale, Richard Edward [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Harrison, Thomas J. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Powers, Jeffrey J. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Robb, Kevin R. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Terrell, Jerry W. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Wysocki, Aaron J. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2016-02-01

    The fluoride salt-cooled high-temperature reactor (FHR) demonstration reactor (DR) is a concept for a salt-cooled reactor with 100 megawatts of thermal output (MWt). It would use tristructural-isotropic (TRISO) particle fuel within prismatic graphite blocks. FLiBe (2 LiF-BeF2) is the reference primary coolant. The FHR DR is designed to be small, simple, and affordable. Development of the FHR DR is a necessary intermediate step to enable near-term commercial FHRs. Lower risk technologies are purposely included in the initial FHR DR design to ensure that the reactor can be built, licensed, and operated within an acceptable budget and schedule. These technologies include TRISO particle fuel, replaceable core structural material, the use of that same material for the primary and intermediate loops, and tube-and-shell primary-to-intermediate heat exchangers. Several preconceptual and conceptual design efforts that have been conducted on FHR concepts bear a significant influence on the FHR DR design. Specific designs include the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) advanced high-temperature reactor (AHTR) with 3400/1500 MWt/megawatts of electric output (MWe), as well as a 125 MWt small modular AHTR (SmAHTR) from ORNL. Other important examples are the Mk1 pebble bed FHR (PB-FHR) concept from the University of California, Berkeley (UCB), and an FHR test reactor design developed at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT). The MIT FHR test reactor is based on a prismatic fuel platform and is directly relevant to the present FHR DR design effort. These FHR concepts are based on reasonable assumptions for credible commercial prototypes. The FHR DR concept also directly benefits from the operating experience of the Molten Salt Reactor Experiment (MSRE), as well as the detailed design efforts for a large molten salt reactor concept and its breeder variant, the Molten Salt Breeder Reactor. The FHR DR technology is most representative of the 3400 MWt AHTR

  16. DESIGN CHARACTERISTICS OF THE IDAHO NATIONAL LABORATORY HIGH-[TEMPERATURE GAS-COOLED TEST REACTOR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sterbentz, James; Bayless, Paul; Strydom, Gerhard; Kumar, Akansha; Gougar, Hans

    2016-11-01

    A point design for a graphite-moderated, high-temperature, gas-cooled test reactor (HTG TR) has been developed by Idaho National Laboratory (INL) as part of a United States (U.S.) Department of Energy (DOE) initiative to explore and potentially expand the existing U.S. test reactor capabilities. This paper provides a summary of the design and its main attributes. The 200 MW HTG TR is a thermal-neutron spectrum reactor composed of hexagonal prismatic fuel and graphite reflector blocks. Twelve fuel columns (96 fuel blocks total and 6.34 m active core height) are arranged in two hexagonal rings to form a relatively compact, high-power density, annular core sandwiched between inner, outer, top, and bottom graphite reflectors. The HTG-TR is designed to operate at 7 MPa with a coolant inlet/outlet temperature of 325°C/650°C, and utilizes TRISO particle fuel from the DOE AGR Program with 425 ?m uranium oxycarbide (UCO) kernels and an enrichment of 15.5 wt% 235U. The primary mission of the HTG TR is material irradiation and therefore the core has been specifically designed and optimized to provide the highest possible thermal and fast neutron fluxes. The highest thermal neutron flux (3.90E+14 n/cm2s) occurs in the outer reflector, and the maximum fast flux levels (1.17E+14 n/cm2s) are produced in the central reflector column where most of the graphite has been removed. Due to high core temperatures under accident conditions, all the irradiation test facilities have been located in the inner and outer reflectors where fast flux levels decline. The core features a large number of irradiation positions with large test volumes and long test lengths, ideal for thermal neutron irradiation of large test articles. The total available test volume is more than 1100 liters. Up to four test loop facilities can be accommodated with pressure tube boundaries to isolate test articles and test fluids (e.g., liquid metal, liquid salt, light water) from the helium primary coolant system.

  17. Measurements for winter road maintenance

    OpenAIRE

    Riehm, Mats

    2012-01-01

    Winter road maintenance activities are crucial for maintaining the accessibility and traffic safety of the road network at northerly latitudes during winter. Common winter road maintenance activities include snow ploughing and the use of anti-icing agents (e.g. road salt, NaCl). Since the local weather is decisive in creating an increased risk of slippery conditions, understanding the link between local weather and conditions at the road surface is critically important. Sensors are commonly i...

  18. Novel psychrotolerant picocyanobacteria isolated from Chesapeake Bay in the winter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Yongle; Jiao, Nianzhi; Chen, Feng

    2015-08-01

    Picocyanobacteria are major primary producers in the ocean, especially in the tropical or subtropical oceans or during warm seasons. Many "warm" picocyanobacterial species have been isolated and characterized. However, picocyanobacteria in cold environments or cold seasons are much less studied. In general, little is known about the taxonomy and ecophysiology of picocyanobacteria living in the winter. In this study, 17 strains of picocyanobacteria were isolated from Chesapeake Bay, a temperate estuarine ecosystem, during the winter months. These winter isolates belong to five distinct phylogenetic lineages, and are distinct from the picocyanobacteria previously isolated from the warm seasons. The vast majority of the winter isolates were closely related to picocyanobacteria isolated from other cold environments like Arctic or subalpine waters. The winter picocyanobacterial isolates were able to maintain slow growth or prolonged dormancy at 4°C. Interestingly, the phycoerythrin-rich strains outperformed the phycocyanin-rich strains at cold temperature. In addition, winter picocyanobacteria changed their morphology when cultivated at 4°C. The close phylogenetic relationship between the winter picocyanobacteria and the picocyanobacteria living in high latitude cold regions indicates that low temperature locations select specific ecotypes of picocyanobacteria. © 2015 Phycological Society of America.

  19. Optimal design of high temperature metalized thin-film polymer capacitors: A combined numerical and experimental method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhuo; Li, Qi; Trinh, Wei; Lu, Qianli; Cho, Heejin; Wang, Qing; Chen, Lei

    2017-07-01

    The objective of this paper is to design and optimize the high temperature metalized thin-film polymer capacitor by a combined computational and experimental method. A finite-element based thermal model is developed to incorporate Joule heating and anisotropic heat conduction arising from anisotropic geometric structures of the capacitor. The anisotropic thermal conductivity and temperature dependent electrical conductivity required by the thermal model are measured from the experiments. The polymer represented by thermally crosslinking benzocyclobutene (BCB) in the presence of boron nitride nanosheets (BNNSs) is selected for high temperature capacitor design based on the results of highest internal temperature (HIT) and the time to achieve thermal equilibrium. The c-BCB/BNNS-based capacitor aiming at the operating temperature of 250 °C is geometrically optimized with respect to its shape and volume. "Safe line" plot is also presented to reveal the influence of the cooling strength on capacitor geometry design.

  20. Design study of power conversion system for the gas turbine high temperature reactor (GTHTR300)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takada, Shoji; Takizuka, Takakazu; Kunitomi, Kazuhiko; Yan, Xing; Katanishi, Shoji; Kosugiyama, Shinichi; Miyoshi, Yasuyuki

    2002-01-01

    A design study of the power conversion system for the Gas Turbine High Temperature Reactor (GTHTR300) was carried out. The study aimed at reducing the total mass of main system components, which simplified system configuration by selecting the non-inter-cooled cycle, and improvement of the performance of power conversion components to enhance economics. The 3-dimensional aerodynamic design of the turbine and compressor achieved high polytropic efficiencies of 93 and 90%, respectively, while reducing the differential thrust of the turbo-compressor to 10 kN as well as keeping a high surge margin of 30% for the compressor, which made it possible to attain a high power conversion efficiency of 45.8%. A horizontal turbo-machine layout, in which the turbo-compressor and generator rotors were connected by a diaphragm-coupling, was proposed to lessen the load requirements for magnetic bearings. The turbo-machine rotor, which passed over critical speeds of bending mode, fulfilled the standard limit of vibration amplitude of 75 μm at the rated rotational speed by optimizing the stiffness of the magnetic bearings. The main focus of the heat exchanger design was size and mass minimization, while fulfilling the target temperature efficiency of 95%. The plate-fin type recuperator employed an off-set fin arrangement, having a square cross section of 1.2 mm x 1.2 mm. The pre-cooler employed helical-coil tubes with low lateral fins. The present study is entrusted from the Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology of Japan. (author)

  1. Quantifying Subsidence in the 1999-2000 Arctic Winter Vortex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenblatt, Jeffery B.; Jost, Hans-juerg; Loewenstein, Max; Podolske, James R.; Bui, T. Paul; Elkins, James W.; Moore, Fred L.; Ray, Eric A.; Sen, Bhaswar; Margitan, James J.; hide

    2000-01-01

    Quantifying the subsidence of the polar winter stratospheric vortex is essential to the analysis of ozone depletion, as chemical destruction often occurs against a large, altitude-dependent background ozone concentration. Using N2O measurements made during SOLVE on a variety of platforms (ER-2, in-situ balloon and remote balloon), the 1999-2000 Arctic winter subsidence is determined from N2O-potential temperature correlations along several N2O isopleths. The subsidence rates are compared to those determined in other winters, and comparison is also made with results from the SLIMCAT stratospheric chemical transport model.

  2. Designing Nanoscale Precipitates in Novel Cobalt-based Superalloys to Improve Creep Resistance and Operating Temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dunand, David C. [Northwestern Univ., Evanston, IL (United States); Seidman, David N. [Northwestern Univ., Evanston, IL (United States); Wolverton, Christopher [Northwestern Univ., Evanston, IL (United States); Saal, James E. [Northwestern Univ., Evanston, IL (United States); Bocchini, Peter J. [Northwestern Univ., Evanston, IL (United States); Sauza, Daniel J. [Northwestern Univ., Evanston, IL (United States)

    2014-10-01

    High-temperature structural alloys for aerospace and energy applications have long been dominated by Ni-base superalloys, whose strength and creep resistance can be attributed to microstructures consisting of a large volume fraction of ordered (L12) γ'-precipitates embedded in a disordered’(f.c.c.) γ-matrix. These alloys exhibit excellent mechanical behavior and thermal stability, but after decades of incremental improvement are nearing the theoretical limit of their operating temperatures. Conventional Co-base superalloys are solid-solution or carbide strengthened; although they see industrial use, these alloys are restricted to lower-stress applications because the absence of an ordered intermetallic phase places an upper limit on their mechanical performance. In 2006, a γ+γ' microstructure with ordered precipitates analogous to (L12) Ni3Al was first identified in the Co-Al-W ternary system, allowing, for the first time, the development of Co-base alloys with the potential to meet or even exceed the elevated-temperature performance of their Ni-base counterparts. The potential design space for these alloys is complex: the most advanced Ni-base superalloys may contain as many as 8-10 minor alloying additions, each with a specified purpose such as raising the γ' solvus temperature or improving creep strength. Our work has focused on assessing the effects of alloying additions on microstructure and mechanical behavior of γ'-strengthened Co-base alloys in an effort to lay the foundations for understanding this emerging alloy system. Investigation of the size, morphology, and composition of γ' and other relevant phases is investigated utilizing scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and 3-D picosecond ultraviolet local electrode atom probe tomography (APT). Microhardness, compressive yield stress at ambient and elevated temperatures, and compressive high-temperature creep measurements are employed to

  3. Measured Performance of a Low Temperature Air Source Heat Pump

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    R.K. Johnson

    2013-09-01

    A 4-ton Low Temperature Heat Pump (LTHP) manufactured by Hallowell International was installed in a residence near New Haven, Connecticut and monitored over two winters of operation. After attending to some significant service issues, the heat pump operated as designed. This report should be considered a review of the dual compressor “boosted heat pump” technology. The Low Temperature Heat Pump system operates with four increasing levels of capacity (heat output) as the outdoor temperature drops.

  4. Winter fuels report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1990-11-29

    The Winter Fuels Report is intended to provide concise, timely information to the industry, the press, policymakers, consumers, analysts, and state and local governments on the following topics: distillate fuel oil net production, imports and stocks for all PADD's and product supplied on a US level; propane net product supplied on a US level; propane net production, imports and stocks for Petroleum Administration for Defense Districts (PADD) I, II, and III; natural gas supply and disposition and underground storage for the United States and consumption for all PADD's; residential and wholesale pricing data for propane and heating oil for those states participating in the joint Energy Information Administration (EIA)/State Heating Oil and Propane Program; crude oil and petroleum price comparisons for the United States and selected cities; and US total heating degree-days by city. 27 figs, 12 tabs.

  5. Stamena winter wheat variety

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mišić Todor

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Stamena is a winter wheat variety developed at the Institute of Field and Vegetable Crops in Novi Sad, Yugoslavia. It was released by the Federal Commission for varietals Approval in 1999. Stamena was developed by crossing genetically divergent and highly productive parents Lasta and Rodna (Breeders: T. Mišić. N. Mladenov, Z. Jerković and R. Jevtić. Spike is white, smooth, awn less, medium compact with 18-21 spike lets. The grain is vitreous and dark red (Triticum aestivum L. ssp. vulgar e var. lutescens. Stamena is a medium early variety, 1 day earlier than Partizanka and 3 days earlier than Jugoslavija (Table 4. It has excellent resistance to winterkilling, as in very winter hardy Partizanka. The average stem height is 78 cm, with a good resistance to lodging. Stamena has field resistance to leaf rust (Pucce, recondita tritict, horizontal resistance, which is the type of resistance that modern wheat breeding is interested in. The resistance to stem rust (Pucce, graminis tritict is good and to powdery mildew (Erysiphegraminis tritici very good. The 1000 grain mass is about 32 g and volume grain mass 81.3 kg/hi. (Table 2. Stamena is classified in the subgroup A-l. It has excellent milling and baking quality and it belong to the 1st technological group (quality enhancer. The quantity of dry gluten is about 9%. The variety Stamena is a very productive, with the genetic potential for grain above 11 t/ha suitable for growing on fertile and less fertile soils. It has started to be grown commercially in 2000.

  6. Synergistic Computational and Microstructural Design of Next- Generation High-Temperature Austenitic Stainless Steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karaman, Ibrahim [Texas A& M Engineering Experiment Station, College Station, TX (United States); Arroyave, Raymundo [Texas A& M Engineering Experiment Station, College Station, TX (United States)

    2015-07-31

    The purpose of this project was to: 1) study deformation twinning, its evolution, thermal stability, and the contribution on mechanical response of the new advanced stainless steels, especially at elevated temperatures; 2) study alumina-scale formation on the surface, as an alternative for conventional chromium oxide, that shows better oxidation resistance, through alloy design; and 3) design new generation of high temperature stainless steels that form alumina scale and have thermally stable nano-twins. The work involved few baseline alloys for investigating the twin formation under tensile loading, thermal stability of these twins, and the role of deformation twins on the mechanical response of the alloys. These baseline alloys included Hadfield Steel (Fe-13Mn-1C), 316, 316L and 316N stainless steels. Another baseline alloy was studied for alumina-scale formation investigations. Hadfield steel showed twinning but undesired second phases formed at higher temperatures. 316N stainless steel did not show signs of deformation twinning. Conventional 316 stainless steel demonstrated extensive deformation twinning at room temperature. Investigations on this alloy, both in single crystalline and polycrystalline forms, showed that deformation twins evolve in a hierarchical manner, consisting of micron–sized bundles of nano-twins. The width of nano-twins stays almost constant as the extent of strain increases, but the width and number of the bundles increase with increasing strain. A systematic thermomechanical cycling study showed that the twins were stable at temperatures as high as 900°C, after the dislocations are annealed out. Using such cycles, volume fraction of the thermally stable deformation twins were increased up to 40% in 316 stainless steel. Using computational thermodynamics and kinetics calculations, we designed two generations of advanced austenitic stainless steels. In the first generation, Alloy 1, which had been proposed as an alumina

  7. Design, crystal growth, and physical properties of low-temperature thermoelectric materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuccillo, Michael K.

    Thermoelectric materials serve as the foundation for two important modern technologies, namely 1) solid-state cooling, which enables small-area refrigeration without vibrations or moving parts, and 2) thermoelectric power generation, which has important implications for waste heat recovery and improved sources of alternative energy. Although the overall field of thermoelectrics research has been active for decades, and several consumer and industrial products have already been commercialized, the design and synthesis of new thermoelectrics that outperform long-standing state of the art materials has proven extremely challenging. This is particularly true for low-temperature refrigeration applications, which is the focus of this work; however, scientific advances in this area generally support power generation as well. In order to achieve more efficient materials for virtually all thermoelectric applications, improved materials design principles must be developed and synthetic procedures must be better understood. We aim to contribute to these goals by studying two classes of materials, namely 1) the tetradymites Bi2TeSe 2 and Bi2Te2Se, which are close relatives of state of the art thermoelectric cooling materials, and 2) Kondo insulating (-like) FeSb2 and FeSi, which possess anomalously enhanced low-temperature thermoelectric properties that arise from exotic electronic and magnetic properties. The organization of this dissertation is as follows: Chapter 1 is a brief perspective on solid-state chemistry. Chapter 2 presents experimental methods for synthesizing and characterizing thermoelectric materials. In Chapter 3, two original research projects are discussed: first, work on the tetradymite Bi2TeSe2 doped with Sb to achieve an n- to p-type transition, and second, the tetradymite Bi2Te2Se with chemical defects through two different methods. Chapter 4 gives the magnetic and transport properties of FeSb 2--RuSb2 alloys, a family of compounds exemplifying what we

  8. The design status of the United States Department of Energy modular high temperature gas cooled reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mills, Raymond R. Jr.

    1990-01-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy's Modular High Temperature Gas Cooled Reactor (MHTGR) is being designed using a systems engineering approach referred to as the integrated approach. The top level requirement for the plant is that it provides safe, reliable, economical energy. The safety requirements are established by the U.S. Licensing Authorities, principally the Nuclear Regulatory Commission. The reliability and economic requirements associated with the top level functions have been established in close coordination and cooperation with the electrical utilities and other potential users, and the nuclear supply industry. The integrated approach uses functional analysis to define the functions and sub-functions for the plant and to identify quantitatively how the various functions must be fulfilled. The top four functions associated with the MHTGR are: maintain safe plant operation; maintain plant protection; maintain control of radionuclide release; maintain emergency preparedness. In addition to meeting all U.S. Regulatory Requirements this advanced reactor concept is being designed to meet the following requirements: do not require sheltering or evacuating of anyone outside the plant boundary of 425 meters as a result of normal or abnormal plant operation; do not require operator action in order to accomplish the above sheltering and evacuation objectives and the design must be insensitive to operator errors; utilize inherent characteristics of materials to develop passive safety features; provide very long times for corrective actions following the initiation of an abnormal event before plant damage would be incurred

  9. Examination of design options for 35 Ah ambient temperature Li-TiS sub 2 cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, D. H.; Rao, S. S.; Yen, S. P. S.; Somoano, R. B.

    1986-01-01

    The Jet Propulsion Laboratory is actively engaged in the development of ambient temperature rechargable lithium cells for future NASA geosynchronous Earth orbit (GEO) missions. To achieve these ambitious goals, Li-TiS2, Li-MoS3, and Li-V6O13 systems were examined in detail. Among these three, the Li-TiS2 system has shown the longest life cycle and highest rate capability. Experimental Li-TiS2 batteries (10.5 V, 0.4 Ah) developed in-house have completed eight simulated and accelerated GEO seasons successfully. Inview of the encouraging results, the design options were examined for a scaled-up Li-TiS2 cell. It is hoped that the results of these studies will provide guidelines for prioritizing the research efforts and guiding the selection of optimized materials. Designs for 35 Ah Li-TiS2 cell were examined because present day geosynchronous satellites are powered by batteries of 35 Ah capacity. A computer program was developed to evaluate the influence of various design parameters on the specific energy and the rate capability of the cells.

  10. Cold truths: how winter drives responses of terrestrial organisms to climate change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Caroline M; Henry, Hugh A L; Sinclair, Brent J

    2015-02-01

    Winter is a key driver of individual performance, community composition, and ecological interactions in terrestrial habitats. Although climate change research tends to focus on performance in the growing season, climate change is also modifying winter conditions rapidly. Changes to winter temperatures, the variability of winter conditions, and winter snow cover can interact to induce cold injury, alter energy and water balance, advance or retard phenology, and modify community interactions. Species vary in their susceptibility to these winter drivers, hampering efforts to predict biological responses to climate change. Existing frameworks for predicting the impacts of climate change do not incorporate the complexity of organismal responses to winter. Here, we synthesise organismal responses to winter climate change, and use this synthesis to build a framework to predict exposure and sensitivity to negative impacts. This framework can be used to estimate the vulnerability of species to winter climate change. We describe the importance of relationships between winter conditions and performance during the growing season in determining fitness, and demonstrate how summer and winter processes are linked. Incorporating winter into current models will require concerted effort from theoreticians and empiricists, and the expansion of current growing-season studies to incorporate winter. © 2014 The Authors. Biological Reviews © 2014 Cambridge Philosophical Society.

  11. Stay Warm in Winter (A Minute of Health with CDC)

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2015-02-26

    Hypothermia occurs when the core body temperature is less than 95 degrees. This podcast discusses strategies to prevent hypothermia due to frigid winters temperatures.  Created: 2/26/2015 by MMWR.   Date Released: 2/26/2015.

  12. Stay Warm in Winter (A Cup of Health with CDC)

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2015-02-26

    When frigid winter temperatures hit the U.S., the risk for unhealthy exposure to cold increases substantially. In this podcast, Dr. Jonathan Meiman discusses the dangers of exposure to extremely cold temperatures.  Created: 2/26/2015 by MMWR.   Date Released: 2/26/2015.

  13. Analysis and design of greenhouse temperature control using adaptive neuro-fuzzy inference system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Doaa M. Atia

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available The greenhouse is a complicated nonlinear system, which provides the plants with appropriate environmental conditions for growing. This paper presents a design of a control system for a greenhouse using geothermal energy as a power source for heating system. The greenhouse climate control problem is to create a favourable environment for the crop in order to reach predetermined results for high yield, high quality and low costs. Four controller techniques; PI control, fuzzy logic control, artificial neural network control and adaptive neuro-fuzzy control are used to adjust the greenhouse indoor temperature at the required value. MATLAB/SIMULINK is used to simulate the different types of controller techniques. Finally a comparative study between different control strategies is carried out.

  14. Lessons Learned from the Node 1 Temperature and Humidity Control Subsystem Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, David E.

    2010-01-01

    Node 1 flew to the International Space Station (ISS) on Flight 2A during December 1998. To date the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) has learned a lot of lessons from this module based on its history of approximately two years of acceptance testing on the ground and currently its twelve years on-orbit. This paper will provide an overview of the ISS Environmental Control and Life Support (ECLS) design of the Node 1 Temperature and Humidity Control (THC) subsystem and it will document some of the lessons that have been learned to date for this subsystem and it will document some of the lessons that have been learned to date for these subsystems based on problems prelaunch, problems encountered on-orbit, and operational problems/concerns. It is hoped that documenting these lessons learned from ISS will help in preventing them in future Programs. 1

  15. Design and application of a low-temperature Peltier-cooling microscope stage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, C C; Walsh, A J; Nguyen, H M; Overcashier, D E; Koning-Bastiaan, H; Bailey, R C; Nail, S L

    1996-01-01

    A light microscopy system has been designed for freezing and lyophilization studies of protein pharmaceuticals. The system consists of a cascade of four Peltier thermoelectric modules in the lyophilization cell to freeze samples to -60 degrees C, controllers to regulate temperature and pressure conditions, and a video camera to record the events under study. Specific demonstration of the system was conducted using recombinant CD4-IgG and human growth hormone (hGH) as model proteins. Observations of recrystallization during warming of frozen CD4-IgG solution and lyophilization of hGH solution are discussed. These examples demonstrate that the system is a useful tool for the fundamental understanding of freezing and lyophilization of protein pharmaceuticals.

  16. Digital Information Platform Design of Fuel Element Engineering For High Temperature Gas-cooled Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Du Yuwei

    2014-01-01

    This product line provide fuel element for high temperature gas-cooled reactor nuclear power plant which is being constructed in Shidao bay in Shandong province. Its annual productive capacity is thirty ten thousands fuel elements whose shape is spherical . Compared with pressurized water fuel , this line has the feature of high radiation .In order to reduce harm to operators, the comprehensive information platform is designed , which can realize integration of automation and management for plant. This platform include two nets, automation net using field bus technique and information net using Ethernet technique ,which realize collection ,control, storage and publish of information.By means of construction, automatization and informatization of product line can reach high level. (author)

  17. Conceptual design of a high temperature water-cooled divertor for a fusion power reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Giancarli, L.; Bonal, J.P.; Puma, A. Li; Michel, B.; Sardain, P.; Salavy, J.F.

    2005-01-01

    This paper presents the conceptual design of a water-cooled divertor target using EUROFER as structural material, water coolant pressure and outlet temperature, respectively, of 15.5 MPa and 325 o C, and W-alloy monoblocks as armour. Assuming an advanced interface, formed by a thermal barrier in the pipe front part and a compliance layer between W and steel, this concept is able to withstand an incident surface heat flux of 15 MW/m 2 . Both thermal barrier and compliance layer are made of carbon-based materials. The main issues are the manufacturing process of the steel/W interface, and the behaviour under irradiation of graphite materials

  18. Temperature Switch PCR (TSP: Robust assay design for reliable amplification and genotyping of SNPs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mather Diane E

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Many research and diagnostic applications rely upon the assay of individual single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs. Thus, methods to improve the speed and efficiency for single-marker SNP genotyping are highly desirable. Here, we describe the method of temperature-switch PCR (TSP, a biphasic four-primer PCR system with a universal primer design that permits amplification of the target locus in the first phase of thermal cycling before switching to the detection of the alleles. TSP can simplify assay design for a range of commonly used single-marker SNP genotyping methods, and reduce the requirement for individual assay optimization and operator expertise in the deployment of SNP assays. Results We demonstrate the utility of TSP for the rapid construction of robust and convenient endpoint SNP genotyping assays based on allele-specific PCR and high resolution melt analysis by generating a total of 11,232 data points. The TSP assays were performed under standardised reaction conditions, requiring minimal optimization of individual assays. High genotyping accuracy was verified by 100% concordance of TSP genotypes in a blinded study with an independent genotyping method. Conclusion Theoretically, TSP can be directly incorporated into the design of assays for most current single-marker SNP genotyping methods. TSP provides several technological advances for single-marker SNP genotyping including simplified assay design and development, increased assay specificity and genotyping accuracy, and opportunities for assay automation. By reducing the requirement for operator expertise, TSP provides opportunities to deploy a wider range of single-marker SNP genotyping methods in the laboratory. TSP has broad applications and can be deployed in any animal and plant species.

  19. Optimal Cross Hedging Winter Canola

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Seon-Woong; Brorsen, B. Wade; Yoon, Byung-Sam

    2014-01-01

    Winter canola in the southern Great Plains has shown large price fluctuations and there have been questions about which futures market could be used to reduce price risk. Our results indicate that the optimal futures contract to cross hedge winter canola is soybean oil futures.

  20. Design of a Low Cost Smart Dryer Temperature Measurement System for Tea Factories

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Utpal SARMA

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the design of a low cost smart dryer temperature measurement system for Tea Factories using K-type Thermocouple implementing linearization polynomial. The thermo emf is amplified by an instrumentation amplifier having high CMRR (106 dB and high input impedance (1012 Ohm. The analog signal is converted to digital form with the help of an SPI compatible 12-bit ADC. Data acquisition and transmission is done with an 8- bit microcontroller. As the dependence of thermo emf on temperature is not linear hence it is fitted with a polynomial. NIST data for K-type TC is taken as a standard for this fitting. The error with linear fit and polynomial fit is also presented. The digital data is corrected according to the polynomial and sent to a PC located at a remote control room for monitoring and data logging via RS232C communication. The performance of the entire system is discussed in the paper.

  1. Study on high temperature design methodology of heat-resistant materials for GEN-IV systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ryu, Woo Seog; Kim, D. W.; Kim, S. H.; Kim, W. G.; Kim, J. H.; Park, D. G.; Yoon, J. H.; Lee, H. Y.; Hing, J. H

    2005-08-15

    Analysis of the existing high temperature design and assessment codes such as US(ASME-NH,Draft Code Case for Alloy 617), France(RCC-MR), UK(R5), Japan(BDS/DDS/FDS) for Gen IV reactor structure has been carried out. In addition the scope and fields for research and development is needed in the future have been defined. For assessing the high temperature creep cracks, time dependent fracture mechanics (TDFM) parameters of the C and Ct were analyzed. The creep propagation data were obtained from the creep crack growth tests for type 316LN stainless steels, and creep crack growth testing machine for Gen-IV system up to 950 .deg. C was set up. Damage mechanism and causes for creep-fatigue were investigated. The difference between prediction creep-fatigue life and experimental life were investigated. Material properties for analysis creep-fatigue damage were recommended. The assessment procedure (Draft) on creep-fatigue crack initiation has been developed based on the technical appendix A16 of French RCC-MR code. Ultrasonic wave signal against creep ruptured specimens of type 316LN stainless steel was obtained. It was identified that creep damage can be evaluated by ultrasonic method. The NDT techniques evaluated include Barkhausen noise, magnetic hysteresis parameters, positron annihilation, X-ray diffraction and small angle neutron scattering. Experimental procedure and evaluation method of material integrity were developed through the fracture toughness test of Cr-Mo steel.

  2. Development of rules for design at elevated temperatures (the RAMSES-group)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schaller, K.H.; Jakubowicz, H.; Petrequin, P.; Roche, R.; Weisz, M.

    1977-01-01

    The design of structures of liquid-metal-cooled fast breeder reactors of the pool-type in France has to correspond to the national regulations and takes into account the rules adopted by other countries, essentially the U.S. ASME-CODE Ill and the CODE CASE 1592 for elevated temperatures. The existing rules need complements or modifications for the following reasons: the materials employed are not covered exactly by the specifications; the properties given are not necessarily equivalent; the simplified rules (normally on the base of an elastic calculation) are often penalizing as are not valid for the type of loads considered (an example are the ratcheting rules); the use of some rules, for example the creep-fatigue interaction tends to overestimate the safety-coefficients really obtained (long tensile-hold-time followed by a transient in compression is the best example for the austenitic-type steels); the environmental effects are excluded. The French Atomic Energy Commission has founded, for the reasons mentioned above, a working group, the RAMSES-GROUP (Regles d'Analyse Mecanique des Structures), in order to codify the information needed, taking into account the experience obtained in more than ten years of fast-reactor operation. The group, including experts of three departments (DMECN, DEMT, DRNR) has adopted a number of recommendations; projects of recommendations and basic experimental work are on going. The final scope is to obtain a coherent network of rules for the design of structures in the elevated-temperature range. The already adopted recommendations codify the characteristics of the materials mainly employed in the primary system ready for use in finite element computer programs and the procedures to follow for analysis. As inelastic stress-and strain-evaluations have become possible economically by use of programs of the CEASEMT-SYSTEM, the problem of simplified rules based on elastic computations can be very often avoided

  3. The incidence of torpor in winter and summer in the Angolan free ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The incidence of torpor during summer and winter in response to cold exposure in Mops condylurus was studied in a subtropical environment. Body temperature changes under natural roosting conditions during winter and summer were monitored using bats fitted with temperature-sensitive radio transmitters.

  4. Photovoltaic optimizer boost converters: Temperature influence and electro-thermal design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Graditi, G.; Adinolfi, G.; Tina, G.M.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • The influence of temperature on DC–DC converter devices properties is considered. • An electro-thermal design method for PV power optimizer converters is proposed. • The electro-thermal design method proposed is applied to DR boost and SR boost. • Efficiency results of the designed SR converter and DR converters are presented. - Abstract: Objective: Photovoltaic (PV) systems can operate in presence of not uniform working conditions caused by continuously changing temperature and irradiance values and mismatching and shadowing phenomena. The more the PV system works in these conditions, the more its energy performances are negatively affected. Distributed Maximum Power Point Tracking (DMPPT) converters are now increasingly used to overcome this problem and to improve PV applications efficiency. A DMPPT system consists in a DC–DC converters equipped with a suitable controller dedicated to the Maximum Power Point Tracking (MPPT) of a single PV module. It is arranged either inside the junction-box or in a separate box close to the PV generator. Many power optimizers are now commercially available. In spite of different adopted DC–DC converter topologies, the shared interests of DMPPT systems designers are the high efficiency and reliability values. It is worth noting that to obtain so high performances converters, electronic components have to be carefully selected between the whole commercial availability and appropriately matched together. In this scenario, an electro-thermal design methodology is proposed and a reliability study by means of the Military Handbook 217F is carried out. Method: The developed DMPPT converters design method is constituted by many steps. In fact, beginning from installation site, PV generators and load data, this process selects power optimizers commercially available devices and it verifies their electro-thermal behavior to the aim to identify a set of suitable components for DMPPT applications. Repeating this

  5. Fusion energy for alternate applications: the design of a high temperature falling bed as a long-lived blanket

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harkness, S.D.; Stevens, H.C.; Hall, M.M.; Gohar, M.Y.A.; de Paz, J.F.

    1979-01-01

    The high temperature falling bed conceptual design work has consisted of a coordinated effort in neutronics, materials science, thermal hydraulics and mechanical design. The neutronics work has been based on a one-dimensional transport analysis and has been used to scope the implication of blanket dimensions, breeding materials, ceramic pebble material and coolant choice on both tritium breeding capabilities and energy deposition into the high temperature region of the blanket. The materials science effort has concentrated on defining the selection of a particular ceramic material. The thermal hydraulic analysis has been concerned with sizing the heat transfer system and defining the temperature gradients in the high temperature blanket. The mechanical design work has evaluated how such a system might be constructed from the point of view of maintainability and structural support

  6. Effects of design parameters and puff topography on heating coil temperature and mainstream aerosols in electronic cigarettes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Tongke; Shu, Shi; Guo, Qiuju; Zhu, Yifang

    2016-06-01

    Emissions from electronic cigarettes (ECs) may contribute to both indoor and outdoor air pollution and the number of users is increasing rapidly. ECs operate based on the evaporation of e-liquid by a high-temperature heating coil. Both puff topography and design parameters can affect this evaporation process. In this study, both mainstream aerosols and heating coil temperature were measured concurrently to study the effects of design parameters and puff topography. The heating coil temperatures and mainstream aerosols varied over a wide range across different brands and within same brand. The peak heating coil temperature and the count median diameter (CMD) of EC aerosols increased with a longer puff duration and a lower puff flow rate. The particle number concentration was positively associated with the puff duration and puff flow rate. These results provide a better understanding of how EC emissions are affected by design parameters and puff topography and emphasize the urgent need to better regulate EC products.

  7. Design of an optical thermal sensor for proton exchange membrane fuel cell temperature measurement using phosphor thermometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inman, Kristopher; Wang, Xia; Sangeorzan, Brian

    Internal temperatures in a proton exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cell govern the ionic conductivities of the polymer electrolyte, influence the reaction rate at the electrodes, and control the water vapor pressure inside the cell. It is vital to fully understand thermal behavior in a PEM fuel cell if performance and durability are to be optimized. The objective of this research was to design, construct, and implement thermal sensors based on the principles of the lifetime-decay method of phosphor thermometry to measure temperatures inside a PEM fuel cell. Five sensors were designed and calibrated with a maximum uncertainty of ±0.6 °C. Using these sensors, surface temperatures were measured on the cathode gas diffusion layer of a 25 cm 2 PEM fuel cell. The test results demonstrate the utility of the optical temperature sensor design and provide insight into the thermal behavior found in a PEM fuel cell.

  8. Concept Design for a High Temperature Helium Brayton Cycle with Interstage Heating and Cooling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wright, Steven A. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Vernon, Milton E. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Pickard, Paul S. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2013-12-01

    The primary metric for the viability of these next generation nuclear power plants will be the cost of generated electricity. One important component in achieving these objectives is the development of power conversion technologies that maximize the electrical power output of these advanced reactors for a given thermal power. More efficient power conversion systems can directly reduce the cost of nuclear generated electricity and therefore advanced power conversion cycle research is an important area of investigation for the Generation IV Program. Brayton cycles using inert or other gas working fluids, have the potential to take advantage of the higher outlet temperature range of Generation IV systems and allow substantial increases in nuclear power conversion efficiency, and potentially reductions in power conversion system capital costs compared to the steam Rankine cycle used in current light water reactors. For the Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR), Helium Brayton cycles which can operate in the 900 to 950 C range have been the focus of power conversion research. Previous Generation IV studies examined several options for He Brayton cycles that could increase efficiency with acceptable capital cost implications. At these high outlet temperatures, Interstage Heating and Cooling (IHC) was shown to provide significant efficiency improvement (a few to 12%) but required increased system complexity and therefore had potential for increased costs. These scoping studies identified the potential for increased efficiency, but a more detailed analysis of the turbomachinery and heat exchanger sizes and costs was needed to determine whether this approach could be cost effective. The purpose of this study is to examine the turbomachinery and heat exchanger implications of interstage heating and cooling configurations. In general, this analysis illustrates that these engineering considerations introduce new constraints to the design of IHC systems that may require

  9. Computer-Aided Design of Materials for use under High Temperature Operating Condition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rajagopal, K. R.; Rao, I. J.

    2010-01-31

    The procedures in place for producing materials in order to optimize their performance with respect to creep characteristics, oxidation resistance, elevation of melting point, thermal and electrical conductivity and other thermal and electrical properties are essentially trial and error experimentation that tend to be tremendously time consuming and expensive. A computational approach has been developed that can replace the trial and error procedures in order that one can efficiently design and engineer materials based on the application in question can lead to enhanced performance of the material, significant decrease in costs and cut down the time necessary to produce such materials. The work has relevance to the design and manufacture of turbine blades operating at high operating temperature, development of armor and missiles heads; corrosion resistant tanks and containers, better conductors of electricity, and the numerous other applications that are envisaged for specially structured nanocrystalline solids. A robust thermodynamic framework is developed within which the computational approach is developed. The procedure takes into account microstructural features such as the dislocation density, lattice mismatch, stacking faults, volume fractions of inclusions, interfacial area, etc. A robust model for single crystal superalloys that takes into account the microstructure of the alloy within the context of a continuum model is developed. Having developed the model, we then implement in a computational scheme using the software ABAQUS/STANDARD. The results of the simulation are compared against experimental data in realistic geometries.

  10. Design and application for a high-temperature nuclear heat source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quade, R.N.

    1980-01-01

    Recent actions by OPEC have sharply increased interest in the United States in synfuels, with coal being the logical choice for the carbon source. Two coal liquefaction processes, direct and indirect, have been examined. Each can produce about 50% more output when coupled to an HTGR for process heat. The nuclear reactor designed for process heat has a power output of 842MW(t), a core outlet temperature of 950 0 C (1742 0 F), and an intermediate helium loop to separate the heat source from the process heat exchangers. Steam-methane reforming is the reference process. As part of the development of a nuclear process heat system, a computer code, Process Heat Reactor Evaluation and Design, is being developed. This code models both the reactor plant and a steam reforming plant. When complete, the program will have the capability to calculate an overall mass and heat balance, size the plant components, and estimate the plant cost for a wide variety of independent variables. (author)

  11. Design and manufacture of ultra-high temperature ceramics with oriented strengthening and toughening phases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acosta, Manuel

    The Horizontal Dip-Spin Casting (HDSC) Process, a newly designed method for the fabrication of ceramic composites, affords alignment of a reinforcing high aspect ratio phase while attaining curvature in the specimen. In this process, highly loaded aqueous ceramic suspensions (>50 vol. %) are produced with a minimum amount of polymer (˜1-5 vol. %). During forming, cylindrical foam molds are dipped in the suspension and rotated uniaxially to produce the alignment of the reinforcing phase. Rheological studies using suspensions containing alumina powder and alumina powder/carbon-whiskers, the model material systems for the process design, revealed that suspensions containing Polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) as a viscosity modifier follow a yield-pseudoplastic flow behavior. Green bodies have been fabricated with C-whiskers content <30 vol. % and considerable alignment of the strengthening phase has been achieved. Monolithic alumina green bodies fabricated from suspensions containing 2.6 and 5.1 vol. % polymer carrier can be machined and sintered. The same principals of fabrication have been applied to ZrB2 ultrahigh-temperature ceramic composites (UHTCCs). ZrB2 green bodies were produced after careful selection of polymer, dispersant and mold material to demonstrate the applicability of HDSC to UHTCCs.

  12. Preliminary Demonstration Reactor Point Design for the Fluoride Salt-Cooled High-Temperature Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qualls, A. L. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Betzler, Benjamin R. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Brown, Nicholas R. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Carbajo, Juan [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Greenwood, Michael Scott [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Hale, Richard Edward [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Harrison, Thomas J. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Powers, Jeffrey J. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Robb, Kevin R. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Terrell, Jerry W. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2015-12-01

    Development of the Fluoride Salt-Cooled High-Temperature Reactor (FHR) Demonstration Reactor (DR) is a necessary intermediate step to enable commercial FHR deployment through disruptive and rapid technology development and demonstration. The FHR DR will utilize known, mature technology to close remaining gaps to commercial viability. Lower risk technologies are included in the initial FHR DR design to ensure that the reactor can be built, licensed, and operated within an acceptable budget and schedule. These technologies include tristructural-isotropic (TRISO) particle fuel, replaceable core structural material, the use of that same material for the primary and intermediate loops, and tube-and-shell heat exchangers. This report provides an update on the development of the FHR DR. At this writing, the core neutronics and thermal hydraulics have been developed and analyzed. The mechanical design details are still under development and are described to their current level of fidelity. It is anticipated that the FHR DR can be operational within 10 years because of the use of low-risk, near-term technology options.

  13. Winter fuels report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1990-10-04

    The Winter Fuels Report is intended to provide concise, timely information to the industry, the press, policymakers, consumers, analysts, and state and local governments on the following topics: distillate fuel oil net production, imports and stocks for all PADD's and product supplied on a US level; propane net production, imports and stocks for Petroleum Administration for Defense Districts (PADD) I, II, and III; natural gas supply and disposition, underground storage, and consumption for all PADD's; residential and wholesale pricing data for propane and heating oil for those states participating in the joint Energy Information Administration (EIA)/State Heating Oil and Propane Program; crude oil price comparisons for the United States and selected cities; and US total heating degree-days by city. This report will be published weekly by the EIA starting the first week in October 1990 and will continue until the first week in April 1991. The data will also be available electronically after 5:00 p.m. on Thursday during the heating season through the EIA Electronic Publication System (EPUB). 12 tabs.

  14. Design of a low-temperature plasma (LTP) probe with adjustable output temperature and variable beam diameter for the direct detection of organic molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Jarquín, Sandra; Winkler, Robert

    2013-03-15

    The direct detection of organic molecules by mass spectrometry requires ionization methods which are compatible with ambient conditions. A relatively new strategy is the use of a free low-temperature plasma beam for ionization. The objective is to design a safe and adjustable plasma beam to enable optimal ionization and desorption parameters for specific molecules. A plasma probe based on a dielectric barrier discharge was designed, where the plasma is guided through an internal second tube. This setup permits different beam diameter settings and the control of the plasma temperature. The ionization and desorption of pure organic compounds, as well as their direct detection from roasted coffee beans, were tested. The presented plasma probe provides improved safety with respect to arcing, ozone generation and electric shock, compared with conventional designs. The functionality of previously reported devices is expanded. A defined plasma diameter can be set by choosing the appropriate insert, while the input voltage controls the plasma temperature. The variation of measurement parameters enables the optimized direct detection of target compounds from roasted coffee beans, such as caffeine, guaiacol and vanillin. The presented low-temperature plasma probe allows the fine-tuning of ionization and desorption parameters, according to the target molecules. Possible applications include: (1) The ambient ionization and desorption of organic compounds with different volatility and (2) The direct analysis of food products such as roasted coffee beans. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  15. Addressing challenges for youths with mobility devices in winter conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morales, Ernesto; Lindsay, Sally; Edwards, Geoffrey; Howell, Lori; Vincent, Claude; Yantzi, Nicole; Gauthier, Véronique

    2018-01-01

    Winter-related research about the experience of navigating in the urban context has mostly focused on the elderly population with physical disabilities. The aim of this project was to explore potential design solutions to enhance young people's mobility devices and the built environment to improve accessibility and participation in winter. A multi-method qualitative design process included the following steps: (1) in-depth interviews; (2) photo elicitation; (3) individual co-design sessions; and (4) group co-design sessions (i.e., focus group). The participants were 13 youths (nine males and four females), aged 12-21, who used a wheelchair (12 power chair users and one manual wheelchair), for some with their parents, others without their parents, according to the parents' willingness to participate or not in the study (n = 13). The first two authors conducted group co-design sessions with mechanical engineers and therapists/clinicians in two Canadian cities to discuss the feasibility of the designs. Results (findings): The youths and their parents reported different winter-related challenges and proposed specific design solutions to enhance their participation and inclusion in winter activities. Seven of these designs were presented at two group co-design sessions of therapists/clinicians and engineers. Two designs were found to be feasible: (1) a traction device for wheelchairs in snow and (2) a mat made of rollers to clean snow and dirt from tires. The results of this research highlight the frustrations and challenges youths who use wheelchairs encounter in winter and a need for new solutions to ensure greater accessibility in winter. Therapists/clinicians and designers should address winter-related accessibility problems in areas with abundant snow. Implications for Rehabilitation Several studies show that current urban contexts do not necessarily respond accurately to the needs of individuals with limited mobility. Winter-related research about the

  16. Air conditioning design temperature - a new proposal; Temperatura de projeto para condicionamento de ar - uma nova proposta

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Camargo, Jose R.; Cardoso, Sebastiao [Universidade de Taubate, SP (Brazil). Dept. de Engenharia Mecanica]. E-mails: rui@engenh.mec.unitau.br; cardoso@prppg.unitau.br; Travelho, Jeronimo S. [Instituto Nacional de Pesquisas Espaciais (INPE), Sao Jose dos Campos, SP (Brazil)]. E-mail: jeff@lac.inpe.br

    2000-07-01

    ABNT - Associacao Brasileira de Normas Tecnicas (Brazilian Association for Technical Standards) - establishes, in NBR-6401, Table 1 (Interior Design Conditions), the dry-bulb summer temperature and the relative humidity to be used in air conditioning design. In thermal comfort plant for residences, hotels, offices and schools these values are, respectively, 23 deg C to 25 deg C and 40% to 60% rh. These data are in accordance with what is recommended by ASHRAE, which was established as a model for North America. This paper presents a new proposal to air conditioning design temperature that takes into consideration Brazilian climatological conditions. The method, named 'effective temperature distribution', compares the maximum recommended effective temperature for each region with dry-bulb temperatures and effective temperatures plotted in a single diagram. This diagram may be used in energetic planning to minimize the use of electric energy for air conditioning. It concludes that the method allows an accuracy analysis about both the temperature levels and the periods of utilization of the air conditioning systems. (author)

  17. Winter Safety Tips for Older Adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winter Safety Tips for Older Adults Expert Information from Healthcare Professionals Who Specialize in the Care of ... thick clothing. Think about getting your thermals! –Essential winter wears: hats, gloves or preferably mittens, winter coat, ...

  18. Essential Outdoor Sun Safety Tips for Winter

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Vitamin D Essential Outdoor Sun Safety Tips for Winter Winter sports enthusiasts are at increased risk for overexposure ... associated with sun exposure. "It's easy to associate winter with frostbite and windburn, but most people are ...

  19. Are cold winters in Europe associated with low solar activity?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lockwood, M; Harrison, R G; Woollings, T; Solanki, S K

    2010-01-01

    Solar activity during the current sunspot minimum has fallen to levels unknown since the start of the 20th century. The Maunder minimum (about 1650-1700) was a prolonged episode of low solar activity which coincided with more severe winters in the United Kingdom and continental Europe. Motivated by recent relatively cold winters in the UK, we investigate the possible connection with solar activity. We identify regionally anomalous cold winters by detrending the Central England temperature (CET) record using reconstructions of the northern hemisphere mean temperature. We show that cold winter excursions from the hemispheric trend occur more commonly in the UK during low solar activity, consistent with the solar influence on the occurrence of persistent blocking events in the eastern Atlantic. We stress that this is a regional and seasonal effect relating to European winters and not a global effect. Average solar activity has declined rapidly since 1985 and cosmogenic isotopes suggest an 8% chance of a return to Maunder minimum conditions within the next 50 years (Lockwood 2010 Proc. R. Soc. A 466 303-29): the results presented here indicate that, despite hemispheric warming, the UK and Europe could experience more cold winters than during recent decades.

  20. Computational and Experimental Design of Fe-Based Superalloys for Elevated-Temperature Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liaw, Peter K. [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States); Fine, Morris E. [Northwestern Univ., Evanston, IL (United States); Ghosh, Gautam [Northwestern Univ., Evanston, IL (United States); Asta, Mark D. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States); Liu, Chain T. [Auburn Univ., AL (United States); Sun, Zhiqian [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States); Huang, Shenyan [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States); Teng, Zhenke [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States); Wang, Gongyao [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States)

    2012-04-13

    Analogous to nickel-based superalloys, Fe-based superalloys, which are strengthened by coherent B2- type precipitates are proposed for elevated-temperature applications. During the period of this project, a series of ferritic superalloys have been designed and fabricated by methods of vacuum-arc melting and vacuum-induction melting. Nano-scale precipitates were characterized by atom-probe tomography, ultrasmall- angle X-ray scattering, and transmission-electron microscopy. A duplex distribution of precipitates was found. It seems that ferritic superalloys are susceptible to brittle fracture. Systematic endeavors have been devoted to understanding and resolving the problem. Factors, such as hot rolling, precipitate volume fractions, alloy compositions, precipitate sizes and inter-particle spacings, and hyperfine cooling precipitates, have been investigated. In order to understand the underlying relationship between the microstructure and creep behavior of ferric alloys at elevated temperatures, in-situ neutron studies have been carried out. Based on the current result, it seems that the major role of β' with a 16%-volume fraction in strengthening ferritic alloys is not load sharing but interactions with dislocations. The oxidation behavior of one ferritic alloy, FBB8 (Fe-6.5Al-10Ni-10Cr-3.4Mo-0.25Zr-0.005B, weight percent), was studied in dry air. It is found that it possesses superior oxidation resistance at 1,023 and 1,123 K, compared with other creep-resistant ferritic steels [T91 (modified 9Cr-1Mo, weight percent) and P92 (9Cr-1.8W-0.5Mo, weight percent)]. At the same time, the calculation of the interfacial energies between the -iron and B2-type intermetallics (CoAl, FeAl, and NiAl) has been conducted.

  1. Design of a temperature measurement and feedback control system based on an improved magnetic nanoparticle thermometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Zhongzhou; Sun, Yi; Liu, Jie; Su, Rijian; Yang, Ming; Li, Nana; Gan, Yong; Ye, Na

    2018-04-01

    Magnetic fluid hyperthermia, as a novel cancer treatment, requires precise temperature control at 315 K-319 K (42 °C-46 °C). However, the traditional temperature measurement method cannot obtain the real-time temperature in vivo, resulting in a lack of temperature feedback during the heating process. In this study, the feasibility of temperature measurement and feedback control using magnetic nanoparticles is proposed and demonstrated. This technique could be applied in hyperthermia. Specifically, the triangular-wave temperature measurement method is improved by reconstructing the original magnetization response of magnetic nanoparticles based on a digital phase-sensitive detection algorithm. The standard deviation of the temperature in the magnetic nanoparticle thermometer is about 0.1256 K. In experiments, the temperature fluctuation of the temperature measurement and feedback control system using magnetic nanoparticles is less than 0.5 K at the expected temperature of 315 K. This shows the feasibility of the temperature measurement method for temperature control. The method provides a new solution for temperature measurement and feedback control in hyperthermia.

  2. Micro controller based design of digital transmitters for temperature measurements in reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nassar, M.A.M.

    2011-01-01

    Temperature transmitter is one of the most important transmitters in the nuclear reactor it is used for RTD (resistance temperature detector) signal conditioning. It has built-in current excitation, instrumentation amplifier, linearization and current output circuitry which amplifies the RTD signal and gives linearization to it. It is a part of a system to get temperature and monitoring it. This system is very cost and complicated. In this work a digital system is implemented by using micro controller techniques that replaces the existing system, one chip (PIC16f877) is used to build a digital system, which is more accurate and give more performance and low costs . RTD is the sensing element of temperature, its resistance increases with temperature. There are many types of transmitters in the reactor such as temperature, pressure, level and flow but temperature one is chosen because of temperature is one of the most important parameters in process control.

  3. Winter/Summer Monsoon Experiment

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Winter/Summer Monsoon Experiment (MONEX) was conducted during the First Global GARP (Global Atmospheric Research Program) Experiment (FGGE). An international...

  4. [Design of a miniaturized blood temperature-varying system based on computer distributed control].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Qiang; Zhou, Zhaoying; Peng, Jiegang; Zhu, Junhua

    2007-10-01

    Blood temperature-varying has been widely applied in clinical practice such as extracorporeal circulation for whole-body perfusion hyperthermia (WBPH), body rewarming and blood temperature-varying in organ transplantation. This paper reports a novel DCS (Computer distributed control)-based blood temperature-varying system which includes therapy management function and whose hardware and software can be extended easily. Simulation results illustrate that this system provides precise temperature control with good performance in various operation conditions.

  5. NS Pudarka: A new winter wheat cultivar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hristov Nikola

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The high-yielding, medium late winter wheat cultivar NS Pudarka was developed by crossing genetic divergent parents: line NMNH-07 and cv. NS 40S and Simonida. In cultivar NS Pudarka genes responsible for high yield potential, very good technological quality, resistance to lodging, low temperature and diseases, were successfully combined. It was registered by Ministry of agriculture, forestry and water management of Serbia Republic in 2013. This cultivar has wide adaptability and stability of yield that enable growing in different environments with optimal agricultural practice. On the base of technological quality this cultivar belongs to the second quality class, A2 farinograph subgroup and second technological group.

  6. Air temperature determination inside residual heat removal pump room of Angra-1 nuclear power plant after a design basic accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Siniscalchi, Marcio Rezende

    2005-01-01

    This work develops heat transfer theoretical models for determination of air temperature inside the Residual Heat Removal Pump Room of Angra 1 Nuclear Power Plant after a Design Basis Accident without forced ventilation. Two models had been developed. The differential equations are solved by analytical methods. A software in FORTRAN language are developed for simulations of temperature inside rooms for different geometries and materials. (author)

  7. Numerical study on optimal Stirling engine regenerator matrix designs taking into account the effects of matrix temperature oscillations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Stig Kildegård; Carlsen, Henrik; Thomsen, Per Grove

    2006-01-01

    A new regenerator matrix design that improves the efficiency of a Stirling engine has been developed in a numerical study of the existing SM5 Stirling engine. A new, detailed, one-dimensional Stirling engine model that delivers results in good agreement with experimental data was used for mapping...... the per- formance of the engine, for mapping the effects of regenerator matrix temperature oscillations, and for optimising the regenerator design. The regenerator matrix temperatures were found to oscillate in two modes. The first mode was oscillation of a nearly linear axial matrix temperature profile...... and efficiency of the engine. A new regenerator with three differently designed matrix sections that amplified the first mode of oscillation and reduced the second improved the e?ciency of the engine from the current 32.9 to 33.2% with a 3% decrease in power output. An efficiency of 33.0% was achievable...

  8. Analyzing the dynamics of brain circuits with temperature: design and implementation of a miniature thermoelectric device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aronov, Dmitriy; Fee, Michale S

    2011-04-15

    Traditional lesion or inactivation methods are useful for determining if a given brain area is involved in the generation of a behavior, but not for determining if circuit dynamics in that area control the timing of the behavior. In contrast, localized mild cooling or heating of a brain area alters the speed of neuronal and circuit dynamics and can reveal the role of that area in the control of timing. It has been shown that miniaturized solid-state heat pumps based on the Peltier effect can be useful for analyzing brain dynamics in small freely behaving animals (Long and Fee, 2008). Here we present a theoretical analysis of these devices and a procedure for optimizing their design. We describe the construction and implementation of one device for cooling surface brain areas, such as cortex, and another device for cooling deep brain regions. We also present measurements of the magnitude and localization of the brain temperature changes produced by these two devices. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Effects of temperature on development, survival and reproduction of insects: Experimental design, data analysis and modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacques Regniere; James Powell; Barbara Bentz; Vincent Nealis

    2012-01-01

    The developmental response of insects to temperature is important in understanding the ecology of insect life histories. Temperature-dependent phenology models permit examination of the impacts of temperature on the geographical distributions, population dynamics and management of insects. The measurement of insect developmental, survival and reproductive responses to...

  10. The meaning of nuclear winter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Geiger, H.J.

    1987-01-01

    In this paper the author reviews the history and origins of the basic ideas underlying nuclear winter; and findings and predictions of several groups regarding this topic. The author reviews some of the further developments and scientific analyses regarding nuclear winter since the initial announcements of 1983, touching on some of the revisions and controversies and trying to indicate the current status of the field

  11. Numerical study on optimal Stirling engine regenerator matrix designs taking into account the effects of matrix temperature oscillations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andersen, Stig Kildegard; Carlsen, Henrik; Thomsen, Per Grove

    2006-01-01

    A new regenerator matrix design that improves the efficiency of a Stirling engine has been developed in a numerical study of the existing SM5 Stirling engine. A new, detailed, one-dimensional Stirling engine model that delivers results in good agreement with experimental data was used for mapping the performance of the engine, for mapping the effects of regenerator matrix temperature oscillations, and for optimising the regenerator design. The regenerator matrix temperatures were found to oscillate in two modes. The first mode was oscillation of a nearly linear axial matrix temperature profile while the second mode bended the ends of the axial matrix temperature profile when gas flowed into the regenerator with a temperature significantly different from the matrix temperature. The first mode of oscillation improved the efficiency of the engine but the second mode reduced both the work output and efficiency of the engine. A new regenerator with three differently designed matrix sections that amplified the first mode of oscillation and reduced the second improved the efficiency of the engine from the current 32.9 to 33.2% with a 3% decrease in power output. An efficiency of 33.0% was achievable with uniform regenerator matrix properties

  12. Winter Weather Response Guide

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-01

    The Texas Department of Transportation (TxDOT) has been given statutory authority for the : planning, design, construction, operation, and maintenance of the State Highway System. With : few new highways being constructed, the operation and maintenan...

  13. Design and fabrication of sintered Nd-Fe-B magnets with a low temperature coefficient of intrinsic coercivity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cui X.G.

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available To decrease the temperature coefficients of sintered Nd-Fe-B magnets, the influencing factors on temperature coefficients, especially the reversible temperature coefficient β of intrinsic coercivity Hcj, were analyzed. The results showed that the absolute value of β decreased with increasing Hcj and also the ratio of microstructure parameter c to Neff, indicating that the increase of magnetocrystalline anisotropy field HA and c/Neff can effectively decrease the absolute value of β. On the basis of this analysis, a sintered Nd-Fe-B magnet with a low temperature coefficient of Hcj was fabricated through composition design, and the value of β was only -0.385%/ºC in the temperature interval of 20-150ºC.

  14. Design and preliminary analysis of in-vessel core catcher made of high-temperature ceramics material in PWR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu Hong; Ma Li; Wang Junrong; Zhou Zhiwei

    2011-01-01

    In order to protect the interior wall of pressure vessel from melting, as an additional way to external reactor vessel cooling (ERVC), a kind of in-vessel core catcher (IVCC) made of high-temperature ceramics material was designed. Through the high-temperature and thermal-resistance characteristic of IVCC, the distributing of heat flux was optimized. The results show that the downward average heat flux from melt in ceramic layer reduces obviously and the interior wall of pressure vessel doesn't melt, keeping its integrity perfectly. Increasing of upward heat flux from metallic layer makes the upper plenum structure's temperature ascend, but the temperature doesn't exceed its melting point. In conclusion, the results indicate the potential feasibility of IVCC made of high-temperature ceramics material. (authors)

  15. Creep-Fatigue Life Design with Various Stress and Temperature Conditions on the Basis of Lethargy Coefficient

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Jung Eun; Yang, Sung Mo; Han, Jae Hee; Yu, Hyo Sun

    2011-01-01

    High temperature and stress are encounted in power plants and vehicle engines. Therefore, determination of the creep-fatigue life of a material is necessary prior to fabricating equipment. In this study, life design was determined on the basis of the lethargy coefficient for different temperatures, stress and rupture times. SP-Creep test data was compared with computed data. The SP-Creep test was performed to obtain the rupture time for X20CrMoV121 steel. The integration life equation was considered for three cases with various load, temperature and load-temperature. First, the lethargy coefficient was calculated by using the obtained rupture stress and the rupture time that were determined by carrying out the SP-Creep test. Next, life was predicted on the basis of the temperature condition. Finally, it was observed that life decreases considerably due to the coupling effect that results when fatigue and creep occur simultaneously

  16. An explication of the Graphite Structural Design Code of core components for the High Temperature Engineering Test Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iyoku, Tatsuo; Ishihara, Masahiro; Toyota, Junji; Shiozawa, Shusaku

    1991-05-01

    The integrity evaluation of the core graphite components for the High Temperature Engineering Test Reactor (HTTR) will be carried out based upon the Graphite Structural Design Code for core components. In the application of this design code, it is necessary to make clear the basic concept to evaluate the integrity of core components of HTTR. Therefore, considering the detailed design of core graphite structures such as fuel graphite blocks, etc. of HTTR, this report explicates the design code in detail about the concepts of stress and fatigue limits, integrity evaluation method of oxidized graphite components and thermal irradiation stress analysis method etc. (author)

  17. Design and feasibility of high temperature nanoparticle fluid filter in hybrid thermal/photovoltaic concentrating solar power

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeJarnette, Drew; Brekke, Nick; Tunkara, Ebrima; Hari, Parameswar; Roberts, Kenneth; Otanicar, Todd

    2015-09-01

    A nanoparticle fluid filter used with concentrating hybrid solar/thermal collector design is presented. Nanoparticle fluid filters could be situated on any given concentrating system with appropriate customized engineering. This work shows the design in the context of a trough concentration system. Geometric design and physical placement in the optical path was modeled using SolTrace. It was found that a design can be made that blocks 0% of the traced rays. The nanoparticle fluid filter is tunable for different concentrating systems using various PV cells or operating at varying temperatures.

  18. A basic design of a double cladding fuel rod to control the irradiation temperature of nuclear fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sohn, Jae Min; Oh, Jong Myung; Park, Sung Jae; Choi, Myung Hwan; Cho, Man Soon; Kang, Young Hwan; Kim, Bong Goo

    2008-01-01

    An instrumented capsule for a nuclear fuel irradiation test (hereinafter referred to as 'instrumented fuel capsule') has been developed to measure fuel characteristics, such as a fuel centre and surface temperature, the internal pressure of a fuel rod, a fuel pellet elongation and neutron flux, during an irradiation test at HANARO. And six types of dual instrumented fuel rods, which allow for two characteristics to be measured simultaneously in one fuel rod, have been developed to enhance the efficiency of an irradiation test during an instrumented fuel capsule at HANARO. In the future, nuclear fuel irradiation tests under a high temperature condition are expected from users. To prepare for this request, we have continued developing the technologies for high temperature nuclear fuel irradiation tests at HANARO. The purpose of this paper is to control the control the temperature of nuclear fuels during an irradiation test at HANARO. Therefore, we basically designed a double cladding fuel rod and an instrumented fuel capsule basically. The basic design of a double cladding rod was based on out-pile tests using mockups and the thermal analyses using some relevant codes. This paper presents the design and fabrication of the double cladding fuel rod mockups, the results of the out-pile tests, the results of the temperature calculation and the basic design of a double cladding fuel rod and an instrumented fuel capsule

  19. Design of automatic control system of temperature in radon chamber controlled by air-condition based on 485 BUS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Man Zaigang; Wang Renbo; Zhang Xiongjie; Zhu Zhifu; Tang Bin

    2009-01-01

    Radon chamber can be widely used in various radon measurement instruments for calibration, testing and radon environment experiment. According to requisition, radon chamber temperature should be controllable from +10 degree C to +30 degree C, and the temperature control accuracy of the system reaches ±1 degree C. The design of automatic temperature controlled by air-condition based on 485 BUS is introduced. The software and hardware techniques of how the ATMEL89S52 micro controller controls air-condition and communicates with computer are elaborated on. (authors)

  20. Unusually cold and dry winters increase mortality in Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Cunrui; Chu, Cordia; Wang, Xiaoming; Barnett, Adrian G

    2015-01-01

    Seasonal patterns in mortality have been recognised for decades, with a marked excess of deaths in winter, yet our understanding of the causes of this phenomenon is not yet complete. Research has shown that low and high temperatures are associated with increased mortality independently of season; however, the impact of unseasonal weather on mortality has been less studied. In this study, we aimed to determine if unseasonal patterns in weather were associated with unseasonal patterns in mortality. We obtained daily temperature, humidity and mortality data from 1988 to 2009 for five major Australian cities with a range of climates. We split the seasonal patterns in temperature, humidity and mortality into their stationary and non-stationary parts. A stationary seasonal pattern is consistent from year-to-year, and a non-stationary pattern varies from year-to-year. We used Poisson regression to investigate associations between unseasonal weather and an unusual number of deaths. We found that deaths rates in Australia were 20-30% higher in winter than summer. The seasonal pattern of mortality was non-stationary, with much larger peaks in some winters. Winters that were colder or drier than a typical winter had significantly increased death risks in most cities. Conversely summers that were warmer or more humid than average showed no increase in death risks. Better understanding the occurrence and cause of seasonal variations in mortality will help with disease prevention and save lives. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Lessons learned from the design and operation of steam generators for high temperature gas-cooled reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-11-01

    This report presents a brief description of operating experiences related to steam generators used in high temperature gas-cooled production and test reactor systems. The descriptions were obtained from a review of published reports and papers concerning such experiences. Design philosophies applied to steam generator advanced conceptual designs are also addressed. Highlights of the important lessons learned that may be applicable to the New Production Reactor-Modular High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor (NPR-MHTGR) steam generator are presented. 19 refs., 1 tab

  2. Control room conceptual design of nuclear power plant with multiple modular high temperature gas-cooled reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jia Qianqian; Qu Ronghong; Zhang Liangju

    2014-01-01

    A conceptual design of the control room layout for the nuclear power plant with multiple modular high temperature gas-cooled reactors has been developed. The modular high temperature gas-cooled reactors may need to be grouped to produce as much energy as a utility demands to realize the economic efficiency. There are many differences between the multi-modular plant and the current NPPs in the control room. These differences may include the staffing level, the human-machine interface design, the operation mode, etc. The potential challenges of the human factor engineering (HFE) in the control room of the multi-modular plant are analyzed, including the operation workload of the multi-modular tasks, how to help the crew to keep situation awareness of all modules, and how to support team work, the control of shared system between modules, etc. A concept design of control room for the multi-modular plant is presented based on the design aspect of HTR-PM (High temperature gas-cooled reactor pebble bed module). HFE issues are considered in the conceptual design of control room for the multi-modular plant and some design strategies are presented. As a novel conceptual design, verifications and validations are needed, and focus of further work is sketch out. (author)

  3. Design of a reactor inlet temperature controller for EBR-2 using state feedback

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vilim, R.B.; Planchon, H.P.

    1990-01-01

    A new reactor inlet temperature controller for pool type liquid-metal reactors has been developed and will be tested in EBR-II. The controller makes use of modern control techniques to take into account stratification and mixing in the cold pool during normal operation. Secondary flowrate is varied so that the reactor inlet temperature tracks a setpoint while reactor outlet temperature, primary flowrate and secondary cold leg temperature are treated as exogenous disturbances and are free to vary. A disturbance rejection technique minimizes the effect of these disturbances on inlet temperature. A linear quadratic regulator improves inlet temperature response. Tests in EBR-II will provide experimental data for assessing the performance improvements that modern control can produce over the existing EBR-II analog inlet temperature controller. 10 refs., 8 figs

  4. Relation Between Frost-Resistance of Winter Grains, Their Respiration Rate and Water – Soluble Carbohydrates Content in Autumn - Spring Period

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pomortsev A.V.

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available The content of water-soluble carbohydrates and respiration rate in the crown tissue of winter wheat, rye and triticale in autumn – winter – spring were studied. In the period and of winter significant differences were revealed between winter crops in the rate of respiration and content of carbohydrates. Respiration of wheat in mid-March increased over February to 33%, and the content of carbohydrates during this period decreased by 10%. Despite the increase in environment temperature by mid-March of winter rye and triticale showed not increase, but rather decrease in the rate of respiration. A higher level of plant resistance of winter rye and triticale to low temperatures, as compared to winter wheat is associated with carbohydrate status and higher stability of respiration process in winter rye and triticale in response to temperature rise in end of winter.

  5. Effect of winter cold duration on spring phenology of the orange tip butterfly, Anthocharis cardamines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stålhandske, Sandra; Lehmann, Philipp; Pruisscher, Peter; Leimar, Olof

    2015-12-01

    The effect of spring temperature on spring phenology is well understood in a wide range of taxa. However, studies on how winter conditions may affect spring phenology are underrepresented. Previous work on Anthocharis cardamines (orange tip butterfly) has shown population-specific reaction norms of spring development in relation to spring temperature and a speeding up of post-winter development with longer winter durations. In this experiment, we examined the effects of a greater and ecologically relevant range of winter durations on post-winter pupal development of A. cardamines of two populations from the United Kingdom and two from Sweden. By analyzing pupal weight loss and metabolic rate, we were able to separate the overall post-winter pupal development into diapause duration and post-diapause development. We found differences in the duration of cold needed to break diapause among populations, with the southern UK population requiring a shorter duration than the other populations. We also found that the overall post-winter pupal development time, following removal from winter cold, was negatively related to cold duration, through a combined effect of cold duration on diapause duration and on post-diapause development time. Longer cold durations also lead to higher population synchrony in hatching. For current winter durations in the field, the A. cardamines population of southern UK could have a reduced development rate and lower synchrony in emergence because of short winters. With future climate change, this might become an issue also for other populations. Differences in winter conditions in the field among these four populations are large enough to have driven local adaptation of characteristics controlling spring phenology in response to winter duration. The observed phenology of these populations depends on a combination of winter and spring temperatures; thus, both must be taken into account for accurate predictions of phenology.

  6. Resilience of roof-top Plant-Microbial Fuel Cells during Dutch winter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Helder, Marjolein; Strik, David P.B.T.B.; Timmers, Ruud A.; Raes, Sanne M.T.; Hamelers, Hubertus V.M.; Buisman, Cees J.N.

    2013-01-01

    The Plant-Microbial Fuel Cell (P-MFC) is in theory a technology that could produce sustainable electricity continuously. We operated two designs of the P-MFC under natural roof-top conditions in the Netherlands for 221 days, including winter, to test its resilience. Current and power densities are not stable under outdoor conditions. Highest obtained power density was 88 mW m −2 , which is lower than was achieved under lab-conditions (440 mW m −2 ). Cathode potential was in our case dependent on solar radiation, due to algae growth, making the power output dependent on a diurnal cycle. The anode potential of the P-MFC is influenced by temperature, leading to a decrease in electricity production during low temperature periods and no electricity production during frost periods. Due to freezing of the roots, plants did not survive winter and therefore did not regrow in spring. In order to make a sustainable, stable and weather independent electricity production system of the P-MFC attention should be paid to improving cathode stability and cold insulation of anode and cathode. Only when power output of the Plant-Microbial Fuel Cell can be increased under outdoor conditions and plant-vitality can be sustained over winter, it can be a promising sustainable electricity technology for the future. -- Highlights: ► Plant-Microbial Fuel Cells (P-MFCs) produce sustainable electricity under outdoor conditions. ► During frost periods no electricity is produced in P-MFCs. ► Cathodes limit performance of P-MFCs under outdoor conditions. ► Spartina anglica in P-MFCs does not survive on a roof-top during Dutch winter. ► The P-MFC needs optimization of power output to be a promising sustainable electricity technology

  7. Design of shell-and-tube heat exchangers when the fouling depends on local temperature and velocity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Butterworth, D. [HTFS, Hyprotech, Didcot (United Kingdom)

    2002-07-01

    Shell-and-tube heat exchangers are normally designed on the basis of a uniform and constant fouling resistance that is specified in advance by the exchanger user. The design process is then one of determining the best exchanger that will achieve the thermal duty within the specified pressure drop constraints. It has been shown in previous papers [Designing shell-and-tube heat exchangers with velocity-dependant fouling, 34th US national Heat Transfer Conference, 20-22 August 2000, Pittsburg, PA; Designing shell-and-tube heat exchangers with velocity-dependant fouling, 2nd Int. Conf. on Petroleum and Gas Phase Behavior and Fouling, 27-31 August 2000, Copenhagen] that this approach can be extended to the design of exchangers where the design fouling resistance depends on velocity. The current paper briefly reviews the main findings of the previous papers and goes on to treat the case where the fouling depends also on the local temperatures. The Ebert-Panchal [Analysis of Exxon crude-oil, slip-stream coking data, Engineering Foundation Conference on Fouling Mitigation of Heat Exchangers, 18-23 June 1995, California] form of fouling rate equation is used to evaluate this fouling dependence. When allowing for temperature effects, it becomes difficult to divorce the design from the way the exchanger will be operated up to the point when the design fouling is achieved. However, rational ways of separating the design from the operation are proposed. (author)

  8. Irradiations at low temperatures. 1. part: devices designs; Les irradiations aux basses temperatures. Premiere partie: conception des dispositifs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Conte, R.R. [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Fontenay-aux-Roses (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1969-07-01

    After an attempt to sort out the irradiation devices, the different refrigeration systems used: stored liquid or refrigerators, are presented. Some financial aspects of these two systems are discussed. For a long run, 1000 hr per year (100 hr for He) the refrigerator become less expensive than stored liquid devices. Some ideas about the principal criterions in the device design are discussed. Finally a few elements making easier the calculation of the different parts of a cryostat are given. (author) [French] Apres un essai de classification des dispositifs d'irradiation, on presente les divers modes de refrigeration: liquides stockes ou refrigerateurs. On discute quelques aspects financiers des deux principes. Il apparait que pour des durees de fonctionnement d'environ 1 000 heures par an les refrigerateurs deviennent plus rentables (-100 heures pour He). On classe ensuite quelques idees sur les principaux criteres de conception des dispositifs. Enfin on donne quelques elements facilitant le calcul des differentes parties d'un cryostat. (auteur)

  9. Design of Temperature Compensation Module of the Industrial Robot Wrist Force Sensor Based on Multivariate Regression Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuan Chuanlai

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper takes software method to compensate temperature against the drift problem of piezoresistive waist force sensor. The compensation algorithm is modeled through using the PLS method. And compensation module is designed based on multiple regression method. According to the simulation results, the system designed meet the basic phenomenon for drift correction. Finally, the actual data is used to validate this algorithm.

  10. Over-winter ecology of Oncorhynchus nerka in the Sawtooth Valley Lakes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steinhart, G.B.; Wurtsbaugh, W.A.

    1996-01-01

    Included in this section of the report on limnology of Lakes in the Snake River Plain are descriptions of winter limnological conditions and kokanee growth characteristics from 1993 to 1995. The winter is usually a very harsh period for animals, and little is know about the over-winter ecology os sockeye salmon. They are active a temperatures below 4 F. The chapter discusses methods and results. 14 figs, 4 tabs

  11. Over-winter ecology of Oncorhynchus nerka in the Sawtooth Valley Lakes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steinhart, G.B.; Wurtsbaugh, W.A.

    1996-05-01

    Included in this section of the report on limnology of Lakes in the Snake River Plain are descriptions of winter limnological conditions and kokanee growth characteristics from 1993 to 1995. The winter is usually a very harsh period for animals, and little is know about the over-winter ecology os sockeye salmon. They are active a temperatures below 4 F. The chapter discusses methods and results. 14 figs, 4 tabs.

  12. Beyond arctic and alpine: the influence of winter climate on temperate ecosystems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ladwig, Laura M; Ratajczak, Zak R; Ocheltree, Troy W; Hafich, Katya A; Churchill, Amber C; Frey, Sarah J K; Fuss, Colin B; Kazanski, Clare E; Muñoz, Juan D; Petrie, Matthew D; Reinmann, Andrew B; Smith, Jane G

    2016-02-01

    Winter climate is expected to change under future climate scenarios, yet the majority of winter ecology research is focused in cold-climate ecosystems. In many temperate systems, it is unclear how winter climate relates to biotic responses during the growing season. The objective of this study was to examine how winter weather relates to plant and animal communities in a variety of terrestrial ecosystems ranging from warm deserts to alpine tundra. Specifically, we examined the association between winter weather and plant phenology, plant species richness, consumer abundance, and consumer richness in 11 terrestrial ecosystems associated with the U.S. Long-Term Ecological Research (LTER) Network. To varying degrees, winter precipitation and temperature were correlated with all biotic response variables. Bud break was tightly aligned with end of winter temperatures. For half the sites, winter weather was a better predictor of plant species richness than growing season weather. Warmer winters were correlated with lower consumer abundances in both temperate and alpine systems. Our findings suggest winter weather may have a strong influence on biotic activity during the growing season and should be considered in future studies investigating the effects of climate change on both alpine and temperate systems.

  13. Reference core design Mark-III of the experimental multi-purpose, high-temperature, gas-cooled reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shindo, Ryuiti; Watanabe, Takashi; Ishiguro, Okikazu; Kuroki, Syuzi

    1977-10-01

    The reactivity control system is one of the important items in reactor design, but it is much restricted by structural design of fuel element and pressure vessel in the experimental multi-purpose, high-temperature reactor. Preceding the first conceptual design of the reactor, therefore, the reactivity control system composed of control rod, burnable poison and reserve shutdown system in Mark-II design was re-studied, and several improvements were indicated. (1) The diameter of control rods must be as large as possible because it is impossible to increase the number of control rods. (2) The accuracy in estimation of the reactivity to be compensated with control rods is important because of the mutual interference of pair control rods with the twin configuration in a fuel element. (3) The improvement of core performance in burnup is accompanied by the reduction of design margin for control rods. (4) Increase of the reactivity to be compensated with the burnable poison leads to increase of the core reactivity recovery with burnup, and the assertion of the decrease for recovery of reactivity leads to increase of the temperature dependency of reactivity compensated with control rods. (5) Reduction of reactivity to be compensated with control rods is thus limited by cancellation of the effects in the reactivity recovery and the reactivity temperature dependency. (6) The reserve shutdown system can be designed with margin under the condition of excluding the reactivity of burnup from that to be compensated. (auth.)

  14. Performance study of desiccant coated heat exchanger air conditioning system in winter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ge, T.S.; Dai, Y.J.; Wang, R.Z.

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Performance of desiccant coated heat exchanger AC system is predicted. • Effects of main operation parameters and climatic conditions are discussed. • Regeneration temperature of 30 °C is recommended under simulation condition. • Higher ambient humidity ratio results in increased humidity ratio of supply air. • Temperature of ambient air has neglectable effect on supply air. - Abstract: Conventional air source heat pump system faces several challenges when adopted in winter season. Solid desiccant air conditioning system can provide humidification and heating power simultaneously and can be driven by low grade thermal energy; it provides a good alternative for air source heat pump systems. However, conventional solid desiccant air conditioning system adopts desiccant wheel with high cost as core component, which hinders the development of such system. Recently, desiccant coated heat exchanger (DCHE) with low initial cost and high efficiency was developed and this paper aims to investigate performance of DCHE air conditioning system adopted in Shanghai winter season. Performance of the system is predicted by a developed mathematical model where supply air states, mass of humidification and coefficient of performance (COP) are adopted as performance indices to evaluate the feasibility and energy utilization ratio of the system. Effects of regeneration water temperature on system performance are analyzed. It is found that under the simulation condition, relatively low regeneration temperature (such as 20 °C) cannot meet the designed standard and relatively high regeneration temperature (such as 40 °C) provides too much extra heating power, thus moderate regeneration temperature around 30 °C is recommended. Meanwhile, switch time is a crucial operation parameter for the system to obtain satisfied supply air, switch time from 40 s to 80 s and from 70 s to 240 s are recommended for transient and average supply air states, respectively. Both

  15. Improved Design of Radiation Hardened, Wide-Temperature Analog and Mixed-Signal Electronics, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — NASA space exploration projects require avionic systems, components, and controllers that are capable of operating in the extreme temperature and radiation...

  16. A basic design of a double cladding fuel rod to control the irradiation temperature of nuclear fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sohn, Jae Min; Oh, Jong Myung; Park, Sung Jae; Choi, Myung Hwan; Cho, Man Soon; Kang, Young Hwan; Kim, Bong Goo

    2008-01-01

    An instrumented capsule for a nuclear fuel irradiation test(hereinafter referred to as 'instrumented fuel capsule') has been developed to measure fuel characteristics, such as a fuel center and surface temperature, the internal pressure of a fuel rod, a fuel pellet elongation and neutron flux, during an irradiation test at HANARO. And six types of dual instrumented fuel rods, which allow for two characteristics to be measured simultaneously in one fuel rod, have been developed to enhance the efficiency of an irradiation test using an instrumented fuel capsule at HANARO. In the future, nuclear fuel irradiation tests under a high temperature condition are expected from users. To prepare for this request, we have continued developing the technologies for high temperature nuclear fuel irradiation tests at HANARO. The purpose of this paper is to control the temperature of nuclear fuels during an irradiation test at HANARO. Therefore we basically designed a double cladding rod was based on out pile tests using mockups and the thermal analyses using some relevant codes. This paper presents the design and fabrication of the double cladding fuel rod mockups, the results of the out pile tests, the results of the temperature calculation and the basic design of a double cladding fuel rod and an instrumented fuel capsule

  17. Quality loss in packed rose flowers due to Botrytis cinerea infection as related to temperature regimes and packaging design

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sman, van der R.G.M.; Evelo, R.G.; Wilkinson, E.C.; Doorn, van W.G.

    1996-01-01

    The effects of package design and temperature treatment (cooling and rewarming) on the quality of rose flowers (cv. Sweet Promise) packed in five types of boxes were investigated, with special regard to fungus (Botrytis cinerea) infection. A significant increase of B. cinerea spotting was observed

  18. Bottom-Up Design of a Copper-Ruthenium Nanoparticulate Catalyst for Low-Temperature Ammonia Oxidation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chakraborty, Debasish; Damsgaard, Christian Danvad; Silva, Hugo José Lopes

    2017-01-01

    A novel nanoparticulate catalyst of copper (Cu) and ruthenium (Ru) was designed for low-temperature ammonia oxidation at near-stoichiometric mixtures using a bottom-up approach. A synergistic effect of the two metals was found. An optimum CuRu catalyst presents a reaction rate threefold higher than...

  19. Design of temperature compensating unit for the circulator in 6 MW 4.6 GHz LHCD system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peng, Chengyao, E-mail: pengcy@ipp.cas.cn [Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei, Anhui 230031 (China); University of Science and Techonlogy of China, Hefei, Anhui 230027 (China); Shan, Jiafang; Zhao, Lianmin; Cheng, Min; Jia, Hua; Liu, Fukun [Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei, Anhui 230031 (China)

    2016-11-15

    Highlights: • Circulator in 6 MW 4.6 GHz LHCD system to protect the klystron is described. • “TCU” is proposed to compensate for the high-power induced temperature drift of the circulator. • Both algorithm and hardware architecture are described. - Abstract: The lower hybrid current drive (LHCD) system is an important part of the Experimental Advanced Superconducting Tokamak (EAST). As the main RF power amplifier, the klystron in the LHCD system is protected by a high power circulator. The temperature of the ferrites in the circulator drifts under high-power condition, which degrades the microwave performance of the circulator and even damages the klystron. In this paper, a design of Temperature Compensating Unit (TCU) is presented and eventually implemented to compensate for the high-power induced temperature drift. Experiments show that the TCU can lead to the high-power steady-state operation of the circulator.

  20. Calculation of Temperature in Sliding Joint Designed as a Part of Foundation Structure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cajka Radim

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available In case of expected horizontal deformation of subsoil or foundation structure it is possible to use rheological asphalt sliding joint to eliminate internal forces caused with friction. Material characteristics of asphalt are temperature sensitive. In science literature it is possible to find data with temperatures expected in footing bottom, however it was decided to complement this information with temperatures measured in-situ in foundation slab for super-computer building in campus of VŠB-Technical University of Ostrava. In the paper measured and calculated temperatures are compared for the first days after concreting the foundation structure. Besides the temperature of environment also significant influence of heat of cement hydration are taken into account.

  1. Design of DC-contact RF MEMS switch with temperature stability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Junfeng Sun

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available In order to improve the temperature stability of DC-contact RF MEMS switch, a thermal buckle-beam structure is implemented. The stability of the switch pull-in voltage versus temperature is not only improved, but also the impact of stress and stress gradient on the drive voltage is suppressed. Test results show that the switch pull-in voltage is less sensitive to temperature between -20 °C and 100 °C. The variable rate of pull-in voltage to temperature is about -120 mV/°C. The RF performance of the switch is stable, and the isolation is almost independent of temperature. After being annealed at 280 °C for 12 hours, our switch samples, which are suitable for packaging, have less than 1.5% change in the rate of pull-in voltage.

  2. Winter survival of Scots pine seedlings under different snow conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domisch, Timo; Martz, Françoise; Repo, Tapani; Rautio, Pasi

    2018-04-01

    Future climate scenarios predict increased air temperatures and precipitation, particularly at high latitudes, and especially so during winter. Soil temperatures, however, are more difficult to predict, since they depend strongly on the fate of the insulating snow cover. 'Rain-on-snow' events and warm spells during winter can lead to thaw-freeze cycles, compacted snow and ice encasement, as well as local flooding. These adverse conditions could counteract the otherwise positive effects of climatic changes on forest seedling growth. In order to study the effects of different winter and snow conditions on young Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L.) seedlings, we conducted a laboratory experiment in which 80 1-year-old Scots pine seedlings were distributed between four winter treatments in dasotrons: ambient snow cover (SNOW), compressed snow and ice encasement (ICE), flooded and frozen soil (FLOOD) and no snow (NO SNOW). During the winter treatment period and a 1.5-month simulated spring/early summer phase, we monitored the needle, stem and root biomass of the seedlings, and determined their starch and soluble sugar concentrations. In addition, we assessed the stress experienced by the seedlings by measuring chlorophyll fluorescence, electric impedance and photosynthesis of the previous-year needles. Compared with the SNOW treatment, carbohydrate concentrations were lower in the FLOOD and NO SNOW treatments where the seedlings had almost died before the end of the experiment, presumably due to frost desiccation of aboveground parts during the winter treatments. The seedlings of the ICE treatment showed dead needles and stems only above the snow and ice cover. The results emphasize the importance of an insulating and protecting snow cover for small forest tree seedlings, and that future winters with changed snow patterns might affect the survival of tree seedlings and thus forest productivity.

  3. Experimental winter warming modifies thermal performance and primes acorn ants for warm weather

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    MacLean, Heidi J.; Penick, Clint A.; Dunn, Robert Roberdeau

    2017-01-01

    outcomes through a variety of mechanisms including resource acquisition and predator escape. As a consequence, locomotor performance, and its impacts on fitness, may be strongly affected by winter warming in winter-active species. Here we use the acorn ant, Temnothorax curvispinosus, to explore how thermal...... performance (temperature-driven plasticity) in running speed is influenced by experimental winter warming of 3–5 °C above ambient in a field setting. We used running speed as a measure of performance as it is a common locomotor trait that influences acquisition of nest sites and food in acorn ants...... temperatures for ants that experienced warmer winters compared with those that experienced cooler winters. Our results provide evidence that overwintering temperatures can substantially influence organismal performance, and suggest that we cannot ignore overwintering effects when forecasting organismal...

  4. Performance of Chlorella sorokiniana under simulated extreme winter conditions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cuaresma, M.; Buffing, M.F.; Janssen, M.G.J.; Lobato, C.V.; Wijffels, R.H.

    2012-01-01

    High annual microalgae productivities can only be achieved if solar light is efficiently used through the different seasons. During winter the productivity is low because of the light and temperature conditions. The productivity and photosynthetic efficiency of Chlorella sorokiniana were assessed

  5. Design data needs modular high-temperature gas-cooled reactor. Revision 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1987-03-01

    The Design Data Needs (DDNs) provide summary statements for program management, of the designer`s need for experimental data to confirm or validate assumptions made in the design. These assumptions were developed using the Integrated Approach and are tabulated in the Functional Analysis Report. These assumptions were also necessary in the analyses or trade studies (A/TS) to develop selections of hardware design or design requirements. Each DDN includes statements providing traceability to the function and the associated assumption that requires the need.

  6. High Temperature Electrolysis 4 kW Experiment Design, Operation, and Results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    J.E. O' Brien; X. Zhang; K. DeWall; L. Moore-McAteer; G. Tao

    2012-09-01

    This report provides results of long-term stack testing completed in the new high-temperature steam electrolysis multi-kW test facility recently developed at INL. The report includes detailed descriptions of the piping layout, steam generation and delivery system, test fixture, heat recuperation system, hot zone, instrumentation, and operating conditions. This facility has provided a demonstration of high-temperature steam electrolysis operation at the 4 kW scale with advanced cell and stack technology. This successful large-scale demonstration of high-temperature steam electrolysis will help to advance the technology toward near-term commercialization.

  7. Design of infrared multilayer diffractive optical elements with low temperature sensibility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Hongfang; Xue, Changxi

    2018-01-01

    An optimal method was presented to prevent the decrease of diffraction efficiency when the infrared diffractive optical elements working in a wide temperature range. The method can lower the cost of thermal infrared diffractive lenses by decreasing the microstructure height and volume of multilayer diffractive optical elements (MLDOEs). The diffraction efficiency of the results was compared to the previous methods with wavelengths between long wave infrared and middle wave infrared. Those comparisons show the better temperature stability of MLDOEs when the elements working in a wide temperature range.

  8. Winter Weather Tips: Understanding Alerts and Staying Safe this Season | Poster

    Science.gov (United States)

    By Jenna Seiss and Kylie Tomlin, Guest Writers, and Ashley DeVine, Staff Writer Maryland residents face the possibility of dangerous winter weather each year—from icy conditions to frigid temperatures. You may be familiar with the different types of winter weather alerts issued by the National Weather Service (NWS), but do you know what each alert means?  

  9. Influence of Honey Bee Genotype and Wintering Method on Wintering Performance of Varroa destructor (Parasitiformes: Varroidae)-Infected Honey Bee (Hymenoptera: Apidae) Colonies in a Northern Climate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahreini, Rassol; Currie, Robert W

    2015-08-01

    The objective of this study was to assess the effectiveness of a cooperative breeding program designed to enhance winter survival of honey bees (Apis mellifera L.) when exposed to high levels of varroa (Varroa destructor Anderson and Trueman) in outdoor-wintered and indoor-wintered colonies. Half of the colonies from selected and unselected stocks were randomly assigned to be treated with late autumn oxalic acid treatment or to be left untreated. Colonies were then randomly assigned to be wintered either indoors (n = 37) or outdoors (n = 40). Late autumn treatment with oxalic acid did not improve wintering performance. However, genotype of bees affected colony survival and the proportion of commercially viable colonies in spring, as indicated by greater rates of colony survival and commercially viable colonies for selected stock (43% survived and 33% were viable) in comparison to unselected stock (19% survived and 9% were viable) across all treatment groups. Indoor wintering improved spring bee population score, proportion of colonies surviving, and proportion of commercially viable colonies relative to outdoor wintering (73% of selected stock and 41% of unselected stock survived during indoor wintering). Selected stock showed better "tolerance" to varroa as the selected stock also maintained higher bee populations relative to unselected stock. However, there was no evidence of "resistance" in selected colonies (reduced mite densities). Collectively, this experiment showed that breeding can improve tolerance to varroa and this can help minimize colony loss through winter and improve colony wintering performance. Overall, colony wintering success of both genotypes of bees was better when colonies were wintered indoors than when colonies were wintered outdoors. © The Authors 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Entomological Society of America. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  10. Design and Room-Temperature Operation of GaAs/AlGaAs Multiple Quantum Well Nanowire Lasers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saxena, Dhruv; Jiang, Nian; Yuan, Xiaoming; Mokkapati, Sudha; Guo, Yanan; Tan, Hark Hoe; Jagadish, Chennupati

    2016-08-10

    We present the design and room-temperature lasing characteristics of single nanowires containing coaxial GaAs/AlGaAs multiple quantum well (MQW) active regions. The TE01 mode, which has a doughnut-shaped intensity profile and is polarized predominantly in-plane to the MQWs, is predicted to lase in these nanowire heterostructures and is thus chosen for the cavity design. Through gain and loss calculations, we determine the nanowire dimensions required to minimize loss for the TE01 mode and determine the optimal thickness and number of QWs for minimizing the threshold sheet carrier density. In particular, we show that there is a limit to the minimum and maximum number of QWs that are required for room-temperature lasing. Based on our design, we grew nanowires of a suitable diameter containing eight uniform coaxial GaAs/AlGaAs MQWs. Lasing was observed at room temperature from optically pumped single nanowires and was verified to be from TE01 mode by polarization measurements. The GaAs MQW nanowire lasers have a threshold fluence that is a factor of 2 lower than that previously demonstrated for room-temperature GaAs nanowire lasers.

  11. Analysis and Design of the Adsorbent Sample Temperature Control in the Volumetric Isotherm System

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Croft, David

    1997-01-01

    .... is discussed as well as modifications to the apparatus to reduce errors. Investigators found that errors in temperature measurement and/or control may affect vapor-phase and adsorbed-phase concentrations in a complex but predictable manner...

  12. Spectral design of temperature-invariant narrow bandpass filters for the mid-infrared

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stolberg-Rohr, Thomine Kirstine; Hawkins, Gary J.

    2015-01-01

    The ability of narrow bandpass filters to discriminatewavelengths between closely-separated gas absorption lines is crucial inmany areas of infrared spectroscopy. As improvements to the sensitivity ofinfrared detectors enables operation in uncontrolled high-temperature environments, this imposes ...

  13. High Temperature Properties of Alloys Being Considered for Design of a Concentric Canister Launcher

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Rosen, Robert

    1998-01-01

    This report describes a study to determine the high temperature mechanical properties of several titanium alloys and to compare them with properties of AISI 316L stainless steel and ASTM A387 structural steel...

  14. Improved Design of Radiation Hardened, Wide-Temperature Analog and Mixed-Signal Electronics, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — NASA space exploration missions require the electronics for avionic systems, components, and controllers that are capable of operating in the extreme temperature and...

  15. Design of a variable-temperature scanning tunneling microscope to study reaction intermediates in heterogeneous catalysis

    OpenAIRE

    Longwitz, Sarah R.; Brune, Harald

    2005-01-01

    Catalytic processes and in particular heterogeneous catalysis are vital for todays industry. However, many industrial catalytic processes require high temperatures and pressures to work efficiently. This stands in contrast to biological catalysts, which function under ambient temperatures and atmospheric pressures and excel in catalytic activity and selectivity. We may learn something from nature by studying the size-dependent reactivity of small metal particles resembling the active centers ...

  16. Hibernation in an antarctic fish: on ice for winter.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamish A Campbell

    Full Text Available Active metabolic suppression in anticipation of winter conditions has been demonstrated in species of mammals, birds, reptiles and amphibians, but not fish. This is because the reduction in metabolic rate in fish is directly proportional to the decrease in water temperature and they appear to be incapable of further suppressing their metabolic rate independently of temperature. However, the Antarctic fish (Notothenia coriiceps is unusual because it undergoes winter metabolic suppression irrespective of water temperature. We assessed the seasonal ecological strategy by monitoring swimming activity, growth, feeding and heart rate (f(H in N. coriiceps as they free-ranged within sub-zero waters. The metabolic rate of wild fish was extrapolated from f(H recordings, from oxygen consumption calibrations established in the laboratory prior to fish release. Throughout the summer months N. coriiceps spent a considerable proportion of its time foraging, resulting in a growth rate (G(w of 0.18 +/- 0.2% day(-1. In contrast, during winter much of the time was spent sedentary within a refuge and fish showed a net loss in G(w (-0.05 +/- 0.05% day(-1. Whilst inactive during winter, N. coriiceps displayed a very low f(H, reduced sensory and motor capabilities, and standard metabolic rate was one third lower than in summer. In a similar manner to other hibernating species, dormancy was interrupted with periodic arousals. These arousals, which lasted a few hours, occurred every 4-12 days. During arousal activity, f(H and metabolism increased to summer levels. This endogenous suppression and activation of metabolic processes, independent of body temperature, demonstrates that N. coriiceps were effectively 'putting themselves on ice' during winter months until food resources improved. This study demonstrates that at least some fish species can enter a dormant state similar to hibernation that is not temperature driven and presumably provides seasonal energetic

  17. Precision Sound Velocity Profiles in the Ocean - Volume 5: Sound speed and temperature of Bermuda Waters in Autumn and Winter from October 1964 to March 1966 (NODC Accession 7000472)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — A collection of high-resolution, precision simultaneous sound speed and temperature profiles to 2200 m depth, and their envelopes for each station is presented for...

  18. Design and fabrication of a system simultaneously available under high pressure, high magnetic field and low temperature for neutron scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawano, Shinji; Fukui, Susumu; Onodera, Akifumi; Amita, Fujitsugu; Matsumoto, Kiyoshi; Ohtomo, Akitoshi; Moriai, Atsushi; Katano, Susumu.

    1997-01-01

    We have designed and developed a system for neutron scattering experiments simultaneously available under high pressure, high magnetic field and low temperatures. The system consists of a clamp-type high pressure cell whose targeting pressure is about 2.5GPa, a superconducting magnet achievable to 5T vertically, and a variable-temperature insertion in which the cell is placed and liquid helium is transfered through a needle valve from the liquid helium reservoir. The results of a performance test is reported. (author)

  19. Study on nuclear analysis method for high temperature gas-cooled reactor and its nuclear design (Thesis)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goto, Minoru

    2015-03-01

    An appropriate configuration of fuel and reactivity control equipment in a nuclear reactor core, which allows the design of the nuclear reactor core for low cost and high performance, is performed by nuclear design with high accuracy. The accuracy of nuclear design depends on a nuclear data library and a nuclear analysis method. Additionally, it is one of the most important issues for the nuclear design of a High Temperature Gas-cooled Reactor (HTGR) that an insertion depth of control rods into the reactor core should be retained shallow by reducing excess reactivity with a different method to keep fuel temperature below its limitation thorough a burn-up period. In this study, using experimental data of the High Temperature engineering Test Reactor (HTTR), which is a Japan's HTGR with 30 MW of thermal power, the following issues were investigated: applicability of nuclear data libraries to nuclear analysis for HTGRs; applicability of the improved nuclear analysis method for HTGRs; and effectiveness of a rod-type burnable poison on HTGR reactivity control. A nuclear design of a small-sized HTGR with 50 MW of thermal power (HTR50S) was performed using these results. In the nuclear design of the HTR50S, we challenged to decrease the kinds of the fuel enrichments and to increase the power density compared with the HTTR. As a result, the nuclear design was completed successfully by reducing the kinds of the fuel enrichment to only three from twelve of the HTTR and increasing the power density by 1.4 times as much as that of the HTTR. (author)

  20. Integrated solar water-heater and solar water cooler performance during winter time

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shaikh, N.U.; Siddiqui, M.A

    2012-01-01

    Solar powered water heater and water cooler is an important contribution for the reduction of fossil fuel consumptions and harmful emissions to the environment. This study aims to harness the available solar potential of Pakistan and provide an option fulfilling the domestic hot and cold water demands during winter and summer seasons respectively. The system was designed for the tap-water temperature of 65 degree C (149 degree F) and the chilled drinking-water temperature of 14 degree C (57 degree F) that are the recommended temperatures by World Health Organization (WHO). The solar water heater serves one of the facilities of the Department of Mechanical Engineering at NED University of Engineering and Technology whereas, the solar water cooler will provide drinking water to approximately 50 people including both faculty and students. A pair of single glazed flat plate solar collector was installed to convert solar radiations to heat. Hot water storage and supply system was carefully designed and fabricated to obtain the designed tap-water temperature. Vapour-absorption refrigeration system was designed to chill drinking water. Intensity of solar radiations falling on the solar collector, water temperatures at the inlet and outlet of the solar collectors and the tap water temperature were measured and analyzed at different hours of the day and at different days of the month. The results show that the installed solar collector system has potential to feed hot water of temperatures ranging from 65 degree C (149 degree F) to 70 Degree C (158 degree F), that is the required hot water temperature to operate a vapour absorption chilled water production system. (author)