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Sample records for winter crown rot

  1. Evaluating host resistance to Macrophomina crown rot in strawberry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macrophomina crown rot, caused by the soilborne fungus Macrophomina phaseolina, is an emerging pathogen in California strawberry production. When established, the pathogen can cause extensive plant decline and mortality. Host resistance will be a critical tool for managing this disease and guiding ...

  2. Genetic variation between Phytophthora cactorum isolates differing in their ability to cause crown rot in strawberry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eikemo, Håvard; Klemsdal, Sonja S; Riisberg, Ingvild; Bonants, Peter; Stensvand, Arne; Tronsmo, Anne M

    2004-03-01

    Analysis of 44 isolates of Phytophthora cactorum, isolated from strawberry and other hosts, by AFLP showed that the crown rot pathotype is different from leather rot isolates and from P. cactorum isolated from other hosts. 16 of 23 crown rot isolates, including isolates from Europe, Japan, Australia, and New Zealand, were identical in an analysis based on 96 polymorphic bands from seven primer combinations. Leather rot isolates of strawberry could not be distinguished from isolates from other hosts. The pathogenicity test of all 44 isolates on strawberry plants mostly gave unambiguous results, except for three American isolates, which seemed to have reduced aggressiveness compared to the crown rot isolates. These isolates also differed in the AFLP analysis. Comparing information on the origin of the isolates with results from the pathogenicity test, showed that isolates from strawberry fruits or petioles could be either leather rot or crown rot pathotypes. None of the isolates from hosts other than strawberry caused crown rot symptoms in strawberry.

  3. Genetic variation between Phytophthora cactorum isolates differing in their ability to cause crown rot in strawberry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eikemo, H.; Klemsdal, S.S.; Riisberg, I.; Bonants, P.J.M.; Stensvand, A.; Tronsmo, A.M.

    2004-01-01

    Analysis of 44 isolates of Phytophthora cactorum, isolated from strawberry and other hosts, by AFLP showed that the crown rot pathotype is different from leather rot isolates and from P. cactorum isolated from other hosts. 16 of 23 crown rot isolates, including isolates from Europe, Japan,

  4. Genetic variation between Phytophthora cactorum isolates differing in their ability to cause crown rot in strawberry

    OpenAIRE

    Eikemo, H.; Klemsdal, S.S.; Riisberg, I.; Bonants, P.J.M.; Stensvand, A.; Tronsmo, A.M.

    2004-01-01

    Analysis of 44 isolates of Phytophthora cactorum, isolated from strawberry and other hosts, by AFLP showed that the crown rot pathotype is different from leather rot isolates and from P. cactorum isolated from other hosts. 16 of 23 crown rot isolates, including isolates from Europe, Japan, Australia, and New Zealand, were identical in an analysis based on 96 polymorphic bands from seven primer combinations. Leather rot isolates of strawberry could not be distinguished from isolates from other...

  5. First report of Fusarium redolens causing crown rot of wheat (Triticum spp.) in Turkey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fusarium crown rot, caused by a complex of Fusarium spp., is a yield-limiting disease of wheat world-wide, especially in dry Mediterranean climates. In order to identify Fusarium species associated with crown rot of wheat, a survey was conducted in summer 2013 in the major wheat growing regions of T...

  6. Distribution and prevalence of crown rot pathogens affecting wheat crops in southern Chile

    OpenAIRE

    Ernesto Moya-Elizondo; Nolberto Arismendi; María Paz Castro; Herman Doussoulin

    2015-01-01

    Crown rot pathogens are associated with higher losses for wheat crop farmers, but information about the distribution and prevalence of these pathogens in Chile is inadequate. Distribution and prevalence of wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) crown rot pathogens were examined in a survey of 48 commercial fields from December 2011 to February 2012 in southern Chile. These fields were located between Collipulli (37°56'00" S; 72°26'39" W) and Purranque (40°50'30" S; 73°22'03" W). Severity of crown rot d...

  7. Crown sheath rot of rice: host-range and varietal resistance to Gaeumannomyces graminis var. graminis

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    Cecília do Nascimento Peixoto

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Several gramineous plants occurring in rice fields show symptoms of crown sheath rot of rice, caused by Gaeumannomyces graminis var. graminis (Ggg, under natural conditions of infection. The pathogenicity of the Ggg-a 01 isolate, collected from rice, was tested on seven grass species and eight cereals, under greenhouse conditions, in order to get information on host-range and resistance of rice genotypes to crown sheath rot. The inoculation tests showed that the rice isolate was pathogenic to weeds such as Echinochloa crusgalli, Pennisetum setosum, Brachiaria sp., Digitaria horizontalis, Brachiaria plantaginea, Eleusine indica and Cenchrus echinatus, and that these species are potential hosts to the pathogen. Winter cereals such as wheat, oat, rye, barley and triticale, as well as sorghum, maize and millet, presented different degrees of susceptibility to the Ggg-a isolate. Significant differences were observed in relation to lesion height and production of hyphopodia and perithecia on culms. Perithecia were not observed on millet, sorghum, southern sandbur and maize. The resistance of 58 upland rice genotypes was tested, and the SCIA16 and SCIA08 genotypes presented lesion height significantly smaller, being considered resistant, when compared to the highly susceptible CNAS10351 genotype.

  8. Distribution and prevalence of crown rot pathogens affecting wheat crops in southern Chile

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    Ernesto Moya-Elizondo

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Crown rot pathogens are associated with higher losses for wheat crop farmers, but information about the distribution and prevalence of these pathogens in Chile is inadequate. Distribution and prevalence of wheat (Triticum aestivum L. crown rot pathogens were examined in a survey of 48 commercial fields from December 2011 to February 2012 in southern Chile. These fields were located between Collipulli (37°56'00" S; 72°26'39" W and Purranque (40°50'30" S; 73°22'03" W. Severity of crown rot disease was determined through visual assessment of the first internode of 20 tillers obtained from each field. Incidence of crown rot pathogens per field was determined by plating the 20 tillers on Petri plates with 20% potato dextrose agar amended with lactic acid (aPDA medium. Resulting fungal colonies from monoxenic culture were identified by morphological or molecular-assisted identification. Severity of crown rot varied between 11.3% and 80% for individual fields. Culture plate analysis showed 72.2% of stems were infected with some fungus. Fusarium avenaceum, F. graminearum, and F. culmorum, pathogens associated with Fusarium crown rot disease were isolated from 13.5% of tillers. Gaeumannomyces graminis, causal agent of take-all disease in cereals, was isolated from 11.1% of culms. Phaeosphaeria sp., an endophyte and possibly a non-pathogenic fungus, was isolated from 13.9% of tillers. Pathogenic fungi such as Rhizoctonia spp. and Microdochium nivale, other saprophyte, and several unidentified non-sporulating fungi were isolated at frequencies lower than 3% of the total. Fusarium crown rot and take-all were the most prevalent and distributed crown rot diseases present in wheat crops in southern Chile.

  9. Involvement of phenolic compounds in the susceptibility of bananas to crown rot. A review

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    Lassois, L.

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Crown rot of bananas, caused by a fungal parasitic complex, is one of the main quality defects of exported bananas. Major variations in the susceptibility of bananas to crown rot have been observed in different production zones. The physiological state of the banana fruit at harvest is said to influence its response to pathogenic attack and thus to modulate its susceptibility to crown rot. The susceptibility of bananas to this disease, however, appears to be influenced by many pre-harvest factors, although the underlying defense mechanisms have not been clearly identified. A recent report based on molecular analyses suggests that phenolic compounds might be involved in the different variations in the susceptibility of bananas to crown rot. Results of other earlier studies point to an involvement of phenolic compounds in the defensive reactions of banana plants against various pathogens. The present paper reviews the current state of knowledge on the variations in the susceptibility of bananas to crown rot and takes stock of what is known about phenolic compounds in relation to their potential involvement in the defense mechanisms of the banana plant.

  10. Suppression of crown and root rot of wheat by the rhizobacterium Paenibacillus polymyxa

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    Lamia LOUNACI

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available A seedling bioassay was developed for screening a wheat root-associated rhizobacterial strain of Paenibacillus polymyxa for ability to suppress crown and root rot pathogens of wheat. The primary aim was to evaluate the ability of P. polymyxa to suppress Fusarium graminearum, F. culmorum, F. verticillioides and Microdochium nivale, the fungal pathogens responsible for Fusarium crown and root rot and head blight of wheat in Algeria. Bioassays conducted under controlled conditions indicated that seed treatments with P. polymyxa strain SGK2 significantly reduced disease symptoms caused by all four fungal pathogens. Plant growth promotion (increased shoot and root dry weights, however, depended on the pathogen tested. Our results indicate that seed treatments with a biocontrol agent could be an additional strategy for management of wheat crown and root rot pathogens.

  11. Phytophthora Root and Crown Rot on Apples in Bulgaria

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    Mariana Nakova

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Phytophthora is a genus of Oomycota responsible for some of the most serious diseases with great economic impact (Judelson and Blanco, 2005. While 54 species were found in the 20th century (Erwin and Ribeiro, 1996 another 51-54 new species have been identified(Brasier, 2008 since the year 2000. They are spread worldwide and have broad range of host plants – fruit trees, citrus, forest and park species. Phytophthora can cause serious damages in orchards and nurseries of apples, cherries, etc. In Bulgaria they have been found first on young apples and cherries (1998-1999 in Plovdiv region (Nakova, 2003. Surveys have been done for discovering disease symptoms in Plovdiv and Kjustendil regions. Isolates have been obtained from infected plant material (roots and stem bases applying baiting bioassay (green apples, variety Granny Smith and/or PARP 10 selective media. Phytophthora strains were identified based on standard morphology methods – types of colonies on PDA, CMA, V 8, type and size of sporangia, oogonia and antheridia, andoospores. Cardial temperatures for their growth were tested on CMA and PDA.For molecular studies, DNA was extracted from mycelium using the DNA extraction kit.DNA was amplified using universal primers ITS 6 and ITS 4. Amplification products concentrations were estimated by comparison with the standard DNA. Sequencing was done at the Scottish Crop Research Institute (SCRI, Dundee, Scotland. Phytophthora root and crown rot symptoms first appear in early spring. Infected trees show bud break delay, have small chlorotic leaves, and branches die all of a sudden. Later symptoms are found in August-September. Leaves of the infected trees show reddish discoloration and drop down. Both symptoms are connected with lesions (wet, necrotic in appearance at stem bases of the trees.Disease spread was 2-3% in most gardens, only in an apple orchard in Bjaga (Plovdiv region it was up to 8-10%. Morphologically, the isolates acquired from

  12. Rhizoctonia crown and root rot resistance evaluation of Beta PIs in Fort Collins, CO, 2014

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thirty-six sugar beet (Beta vulgaris subsp. vulgaris) germplasm from the USDA-Agricultural Research Service pre-breeding program at Fort Collins, Colorado were screened for resistance to Rhizoctonia crown and root rot (RCRR) at the Colorado State University ARDEC facility in Fort Collins, CO. There...

  13. Fungi associated with fruit crown rot in organic banana (Musa spp. L. in Piura, Peru

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    René Aguilar Anccota

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available The department of Piura is the principal banana-producing zone in Peru, sharing 87% of exportations. In this zone, one of the most important postharvest diseases is crown rot. The economic loses attributed to this disease are estimated to be between 25 and 30% of organic bananas exported. The objective of this study was to identify the causal agents associated with this disease. Samples taken refrigerated fruit from the areas of Querecotillo, Salitral and Mallares were taken and selected after the fact. Thielaviopsis paradoxa, Lasiodiplodia theobromae, Colletotrichum musae and Fusarium verticilloides. In order to demonstrate the pathogenicity of the isolated species, inoculations were given in the area of the crown of the fruit on healthy bananas. These fungi caused symptoms of infection in different proportions, concluding that crown rot is a disease with a complex etiology.

  14. Catecholamine biosynthesis pathway potentially involved in banana defense mechanisms to crown rot disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lassois, L; De Clerck, C; Frettinger, P; De Lapeyre De Bellaire, L; Lepoivre, P; Haïssam Jijakli, M

    2011-01-01

    Variations in Cavendish bananas susceptibility to crown rot disease have been observed (Lassois et al., 2010a), but the molecular mechanisms underlying these quantitative host-pathogen relationships were still unknown. The present study was designed to compare gene expression between bananas (Musa acuminata, AAA, 'Grande-Naine') showing a high post-harvest susceptibility (S+) and bananas showing a low post-harvest susceptibility (S-) to crown rot disease. This comparison was performed between crowns (S+ and S-) collected one hour before standardized artificial inoculations with Colletotrichum musae. Fruit susceptibility was evaluated through lesion size on the crown 13 days later. Gene expression comparisons were performed with the cDNA-AFLP technique (Lassois et al., 2009). This revealed that a gene showing a strong homology with a dopamine-beta-monooxygenase (DoH) is differently expressed between S+ and S (Lassois et al., 2011). Furthermore, semi-quantitative real-time RT-PCR analyses between S+ and S- were applied to confirm the differential expression results for DoH obtained by cDNA-AFLP. Two biological replicates were tested. These semi-quantitative analyses were performed not only on tissues collected one hour before C. musae inoculation but also on crown tissues collected 13 days after inoculation. The real-time RT-PCR confirmed that DoH was upregulated in the S tissues collected at harvest, just before C. musae inoculation. This gene was also highly upregulated in the S- tissues collected 13 days after crown inoculation. Similar results were obtained for both biological replicates. Our results suggest that catecholamine's could play a role in banana defense mechanisms to crown rot disease.

  15. Etiology and Population Genetics of Colletotrichum spp. Causing Crown and Fruit Rot of Strawberry.

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    Ureña-Padilla, A R; Mackenzie, S J; Bowen, B W; Legard, D E

    2002-11-01

    ABSTRACT Isolates of Colletotrichum spp. from diseased strawberry fruit and crowns were evaluated to determine their genetic diversity and the etiology of the diseases. Isolates were identified to species using polymerase chain reaction primers for a ribosomal internal transcribed spacer region and their pathogenicity was evaluated in bioassays. Isolates were scored for variation at 40 putative genetic loci with random amplified polymorphic DNA and microsatellite markers. Only C. acutatum was recovered from diseased fruit. Nearly all isolates from crowns were C. gloeosporioides. In crown bioassays, only isolates of C. gloeosporioides from strawberry caused collapse and death of plants. A dendrogram generated from the genetic analysis identified several primary lineages. One lineage included isolates of C. acutatum from fruit and was characterized by low diversity. Another lineage included isolates of C. gloeosporioides from crowns and was highly polymorphic. The isolates from strawberry formed distinctive clusters separate from citrus isolates. Evaluation of linkage disequilibrium among polymorphic loci in isolates of C. gloeosporioides from crowns revealed a low level of disequilibrium as would be expected in sexually recombining populations. These results suggest that epidemics of crown rot are caused by Glomerella cingulata (anamorph C. gloeosporioides) and that epidemics of fruit rot are caused by C. acutatum.

  16. Stem base rot of winter wheat by Fusarium spp. - causes and effects

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    Małgorzata Narkiewicz-Jodko

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the work was to determine the influence of weather conditions and a degree of weed infestation on the incidence of stem bases rot (Fusarium spp. of winter wheat cultivars as well as their yield. The winter wheat cultivars (Kobra, Korweta, Mikon, Zyta were investigated (2000-2002 in the field where the following herbicides: Apyros 75 WG + Atpolan, Affinity 50,75 WG, Attribut 70 WG were applied. It has been shown the occurrence of stem base rot (Fusarium spp. depended mainly on weather conditions. The application of the herbicides improved the plant health. The stem base rot on winter wheat was caused by Fusarium spp., specially F. culmorum. The decrease in winter wheat yield depended on weather conditions, weed infestation and the occurrence of stem base rot (Fusarium spp..

  17. Wilt, crown, and root rot of common rose mallow (Hibiscus moscheutos) caused by a novel Fusarium sp

    Science.gov (United States)

    A new crown and root rot disease of landscape plantings of the malvaceous ornamental common rose mallow (Hibiscus moscheutos) was first detected in Washington State in 2012. The main objectives of this study were to complete Koch's postulates, document the disease sypmtoms photographically, and iden...

  18. USDA-ARS germplasm evaluated for resistance to Rhizoctonia crown and root rot in Fort Collins, CO, 2014

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thirty-six sugar beet (Beta vulgaris subsp. vulgaris) germplasm from the USDA-Agricultural Research Service pre-breeding program at Fort Collins, Colorado were screened for resistance to Rhizoctonia crown and root rot (RCRR) at the Colorado State University ARDEC facility in Fort Collins, CO. There...

  19. Sugar beet breeding lines evaluated for resistance to Rhizoctonia crown and root rot in Fort Collins, CO, 2015

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thirty-nine beet sugar beet breeding lines (Beta vulgaris subsp. vulgaris) from the USDA-Agricultural Research Service breeding program at Fort Collins, CO, were screened for resistance to Rhizoctonia crown and root rot (Rcrr) at the Colorado State University ARDEC facility in Fort Collins, CO. The...

  20. Detection of bacterial soft-rot of crown imperial caused by Pectobacterium carotovorum subsp. carotovorum using specific PCR primers

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    E. Mahmoudi

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Pectobacterium is one of the major destructive causal agent in most crop plants throughout the world. During a survey in spring of 2005 in the rangeland of Kermanshah and Isfahan, provinces of Iran, samples of bulbs and stems of crown imperial with brown spot and soft rot were collected. Eight strains of pectolytic Erwinia were isolated and purified from these samples. Phenotypic tests indicated that the strains were gram-negative, facultative anaerobic, rod shaped, motile with peritrichous flagella. They were oxidase negative, catalase positive and also able to macerate potato slices. Pathogenicity of all the strains were confirmed on corn, philodendron and crown imperial by inoculation of these crops with a bacterial suspension and reisolation of the strain from symptomatic tissues. A pair of specific PCR primers was used to detect these bacterial strains. The primer set (EXPCCF/EXPCCR amplified a single fragment of the expected size (0.55 kb from genomic DNA of all strains used in this study. In nested PCR, the primer set (INPCCR/INPCCF amplified the expected single fragment (0.4 kb from the PCR product of first PCR amplification. On the basis of the biochemical and phenotypic characteristics and PCR amplification by the specific PCR primers, these strains were identified as Pectobacterium carotovorum subsp. carotovorum. This is the first report of occurrence of crown imperial bacterial soft-rot in Iran.

  1. Co-inoculation with rhizobia and AMF inhibited soybean red crown rot: from field study to plant defense-related gene expression analysis.

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    Xiang Gao

    Full Text Available Soybean red crown rot is a major soil-borne disease all over the world, which severely affects soybean production. Efficient and sustainable methods are strongly desired to control the soil-borne diseases.We firstly investigated the disease incidence and index of soybean red crown rot under different phosphorus (P additions in field and found that the natural inoculation of rhizobia and arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF could affect soybean red crown rot, particularly without P addition. Further studies in sand culture experiments showed that inoculation with rhizobia or AMF significantly decreased severity and incidence of soybean red crown rot, especially for co-inoculation with rhizobia and AMF at low P. The root colony forming unit (CFU decreased over 50% when inoculated by rhizobia and/or AMF at low P. However, P addition only enhanced CFU when inoculated with AMF. Furthermore, root exudates of soybean inoculated with rhizobia and/or AMF significantly inhibited pathogen growth and reproduction. Quantitative RT-PCR results indicated that the transcripts of the most tested pathogen defense-related (PR genes in roots were significantly increased by rhizobium and/or AMF inoculation. Among them, PR2, PR3, PR4 and PR10 reached the highest level with co-inoculation of rhizobium and AMF.Our results indicated that inoculation with rhizobia and AMF could directly inhibit pathogen growth and reproduction, and activate the plant overall defense system through increasing PR gene expressions. Combined with optimal P fertilization, inoculation with rhizobia and AMF could be considered as an efficient method to control soybean red crown rot in acid soils.

  2. Root interactions in a maize/soybean intercropping system control soybean soil-borne disease, red crown rot.

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    Xiang Gao

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Within-field multiple crop species intercropping is well documented and used for disease control, but the underlying mechanisms are still unclear. As roots are the primary organ for perceiving signals in the soil from neighboring plants, root behavior may play an important role in soil-borne disease control. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In two years of field experiments, maize/soybean intercropping suppressed the occurrence of soybean red crown rot, a severe soil-borne disease caused by Cylindrocladium parasiticum (C. parasiticum. The suppressive effects decreased with increasing distance between intercropped plants under both low P and high P supply, suggesting that root interactions play a significant role independent of nutrient status. Further detailed quantitative studies revealed that the diversity and intensity of root interactions altered the expression of important soybean PR genes, as well as, the activity of corresponding enzymes in both P treatments. Furthermore, 5 phenolic acids were detected in root exudates of maize/soybean intercropped plants. Among these phenolic acids, cinnamic acid was released in significantly greater concentrations when intercropped maize with soybean compared to either crop grown in monoculture, and this spike in cinnamic acid was found dramatically constrain C. parasiticum growth in vitro. CONCLUSIONS: To the best of our knowledge, this study is the first report to demonstrate that intercropping with maize can promote resistance in soybean to red crown rot in a root-dependent manner. This supports the point that intercropping may be an efficient ecological strategy to control soil-borne plant disease and should be incorporated in sustainable agricultural management practices.

  3. Indicators of climate change effects: Relationships between crown transparency and butt rot in silver fir (Abies alba Mill.) in Middle Italy

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Aprile, Fabrizio; Tapper, Nigel

    2014-05-01

    Climatic analysis conducted on the trends and changes in temperature and rainfall during the 20th century in the Tuscan Apennine Alps (Middle Italy) have highlighted the possibility that these changes have a significant impact on the growth and/or health conditions or stress in silver fir (Abies alba Mill.). In this framework, identification of appropriate indicators to verify relationships between stress symptoms, which are frequently caused by climate adverse conditions, and pathological phenomena is a necessary step functional to the identification of climatic-environmental impacts on forests. The presence of butt rot pathology - a complex disease that causes rotting of the trunk internally - in silver fir is known the time as well as its severity. Nonetheless, very little research on the potential effects of changing climate conditions on the diffusion and intensity of butt rot seems available; thus, effects of climate change seem to be not excluded nor verified. No research or studies that quantify distribution and incidence or, especially, relationships of butt rot with adverse climatic and/or environmental factors were found. However, climatic alterations can have an impact on the intensity and spread of serious disease complexes and therefore it is of great importance to investigate the relationships between climate changing conditions, diffusion and incidence of butt rot in silver fir forests for their conservation and the management of species and biodiversity associated. As butt rot unlikely could be directly related to climate variables, crown transparency has been used as a proxy for tree growth, where climate variability is assumed to be the main driver of silver fir growth and stress. Actually, crown transparency is considered to be a main factor associated to tree growth, and healthier trees are assumed to grow faster than less-healthy trees. Thus, theoretically denser crowns would correspond to faster growing and healthier trees and indicate better

  4. Combination of UV-C treatment and Metschnikowia pulcherrimas for controlling Alternaria rot in postharvest winter jujube fruit.

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    Guo, Dongqi; Zhu, Lixia; Hou, Xujie

    2015-01-01

    The potential of using antagonistic yeast Metschnikowia pulcherrimas alone or in combination with ultraviolet-C (UV-C) treatment for controlling Alternaria rot of winter jujube, and its effects on postharvest quality of fruit was investigated. The results showed that spore germination of Alternaria alternata was significantly inhibited by each of the 3 doses (1, 5, and 10 kJ m(-2) ) in vitro. In vivo, UV-C treatment (5 kJ m(-2) ) or antagonist yeast was capable of reducing the percentage of infected wounds and lesion diameter in artificially inoculated jujube fruits, however, in fruit treated with combination of UV-C treatment and M. pulcherrima, the percentage of infected wounds and lesion diameter was only 16.0% and 0.60 cm, respectively. The decay incidence on winter jujube fruits treated with the combination of UV-C treatment and M. pulcherrima was 23% after storage at 0 ± 1 °C for 45 d followed by 22 °C for 7 d. None of the treatments impaired quality parameters of jujube fruit. Thus, the combination of UV-C radiation and M. pulcherrima could be an alternative to synthetic fungicides for controlling postharvest Alternaria rot of winter jujube. © 2014 Institute of Food Technologists®

  5. Organic amendments conditions on the control of Fusarium crown and root rot of asparagus caused by three Fusarium spp.

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    Ana I. Borrego-Benjumea

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Fusarium oxysporum (Fo, F. proliferatum (Fp and F. solani (Fs are causal agents associated with roots of asparagus affected by crown and root rot, a disease inflicting serious losses worldwide. The propagule viability of Fusarium spp. was determined on substrate artificially infested with Fo5, Fp3 or Fs2 isolates, amended with either poultry manure (PM, its pellet (PPM, or olive residue compost (ORC and, thereafter, incubated at 30 or 35°C for different periods. Inoculum viability was significantly affected by these organic amendments (OAs in combination with temperature and incubation period. The greatest reduction in viability of Fo5 and Fs2 occurred with PPM and loss of viability achieved was higher at 35°C than at 30ºC, and longer incubation period (45 days. However, the viability of Fp3 did not decrease greatly in most of the treatments, as compared to the infested and un-amended control, when incubated at 30ºC. After incubation, seedlings of asparagus `Grande´ were transplanted into pots containing substrates infested with the different species of Fusarium. After three months in greenhouse, symptoms severity in roots showed highly significant decreases, but Fp3 caused lower severity than Fo5 and Fs2. Severity reduction was particularly high at 30ºC (by 15 days incubation for Fs2 and by 30-45 days for Fo5, after PPM treatment, as well as PM-2% for Fo5 and Fs2 incubated during 30 and 45 days at both temperatures, and with ORC (15-30 days incubation. Moreover, assessment of plants fresh weight showed significantly high increases in Fo5 and Fs2, with some rates of the three OAs tested, depending on incubation period and temperature.

  6. Organic amendments conditions on the control of Fusarium crown and root rot of asparagus caused by three Fusarium spp

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    Borrego-Benjumea, A.I.; Melero-Vara, J.M.; Basallote-Ureba, M.J.

    2015-07-01

    Fusarium oxysporum (Fo), F. proliferatum (Fp) and F. solani (Fs) are causal agents associated with roots of asparagus affected by crown and root rot, a disease inflicting serious losses worldwide. The propagule viability of Fusarium spp. was determined on substrate artificially infested with Fo5, Fp3 or Fs2 isolates, amended with either poultry manure (PM), its pellet (PPM), or olive residue compost (ORC) and, thereafter, incubated at 30 or 35°C for different periods. Inoculum viability was significantly affected by these organic amendments (OAs) in combination with temperature and incubation period. The greatest reduction in viability of Fo5 and Fs2 occurred with PPM and loss of viability achieved was higher at 35°C than at 30ºC, and longer incubation period (45 days). However, the viability of Fp3 did not decrease greatly in most of the treatments, as compared to the infested and un-amended control, when incubated at 30ºC. After incubation, seedlings of asparagus Grande´ were transplanted into pots containing substrates infested with the different species of Fusarium. After three months in greenhouse, symptoms severity in roots showed highly significant decreases, but Fp3 caused lower severity than Fo5 and Fs2. Severity reduction was particularly high at 30ºC (by 15 days incubation for Fs2 and by 30-45 days for Fo5), after PPM treatment, as well as PM-2% for Fo5 and Fs2 incubated during 30 and 45 days at both temperatures, and with ORC (15-30 days incubation). Moreover, assessment of plants fresh weight showed significantly high increases in Fo5 and Fs2, with some rates of the three OAs tested, depending on incubat. (Author)

  7. Managing Phytophthora crown and root rot on tomato by pre-plant treatments with biocontrol agents, resistance inducers, organic and mineral fertilizers under nursery conditions

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    Giovanna GILARDI

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Five trials were carried out under greenhouse conditions to test the efficacy of spray programmes based on biocontrol agents, phosphite-based fertilizers and a chemical inducer of resistance (acibenzolar-S-methyl, phosethyl-Al to control crown and root rot of tomato incited by Phytophthora nicotianae. The best disease control, under high disease pressure resulting from artificial inoculation, was obtained with three pre-plant leaf sprays at 7 d intervals with acibenzolar-S-methyl and with two mineral phosphite-based fertilizers. The disease reduction achieved was similar to that obtained with a single application of azoxystrobin and metalaxyl-M. Phosetyl-Al and the biocontrol agents Glomus spp. + Bacillus megaterium + Trichoderma, B. subtilis QST713, B. velezensis IT45 and the mixture T. asperellum ICC012 + T. gamsii ICC080 provided a partial disease control. Brassica carinata pellets did not control the disease.

  8. Effect of climate on the distribution of Fusarium spp. causing crown rot of wheat in the Pacific Northwest of the United States.

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    Poole, Grant J; Smiley, Richard W; Walker, Carl; Huggins, David; Rupp, Richard; Abatzoglou, John; Garland-Campbell, Kimberly; Paulitz, Timothy C

    2013-11-01

    Fusarium crown rot (FCR) is one of the most widespread root and crown diseases of wheat in the Pacific Northwest (PNW) of the United States. Our objectives were to characterize crown rot severity and distribution throughout the PNW by conducting a survey of 210 fields covering the diverse dryland wheat-producing areas of Washington and Oregon and to utilize a factor analysis statistical approach to determine the effects of climate and geography on species distribution and disease severity. Climatic variables were based on 30-year averages and 2008 and 2009 separately (the 2 years of the survey). Mean annual temperature, mean temperature in the coldest month, mean temperature in the warmest month, mean annual precipitation, snowfall, elevation, soil type, and cropping intensity were highly intercorrelated. The factor analysis of the climate variables resulted in the development of two latent factors that could be used as predictor variables in logistic regression models for the presence or absence of Fusarium spp. and of FCR disease scores. Isolates of Fusarium spp. were recovered from 99% of 105 fields sampled in 2008 and 97% of fields in 2009. There were differences between years for responses of FCR and nodes scores, and isolations of Fusarium pseudograminearum with more significant results in 2008, due to warmer drier weather. Results of the factor analysis showed that the distribution of F. pseudograminearum occurred in a greater frequency in areas of the PNW at lower elevations with lower moisture and higher temperatures in 2008, whereas F. culmorum occurred in greater frequency in areas at higher elevations with moderate to high moisture and cooler temperatures consistently across both years. Disease scores increased with increasing levels of factors 1 (primarily temperature) and 2 (primarily precipitation). Both the frequency of pathogen species and disease scores were influenced by the year, indicating that soilborne pathogens are responsive to short

  9. Modeling the Habitat of the Red-Crowned Crane (Grus japonensis Wintering in Cheorwon-Gun to Support Decision Making

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ho Gul Kim

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Cheorwon-gun is an important wintering area for the red-crowned crane (Grus japonensis. Although eco-tourism has been recently proposed as a means to stimulate the local economy, it may have adverse effects on the crane. We believe a science-based conservation plan is needed to mitigate these negative effects. To this end, our study had three objectives: (1 to analyze the red-crowned crane habitat and its suitability in Cheorwon-gun, using field surveys and habitat modeling; (2 to check the feasibility of alternative habitat patches across demilitarized zones (DMZs; and (3 to propose a conceptual diagram that minimizes habitat loss during development activities. We aim to quantify habitat suitability, the farmland area needed to support existing crane populations in wintertime, disturbance caused by human activities, and vehicular spatial patterns. These data could be used in spatial planning. The framework of this study and the process of making a conceptual diagram could be applied to other areas where there is a conflict between development and habitat conservation.

  10. Characterization of Fusarium isolates from asparagus fields in southwestern Ontario and influence of soil organic amendments on Fusarium crown and root rot.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borrego-Benjumea, Ana; Basallote-Ureba, María J; Melero-Vara, José M; Abbasi, Pervaiz A

    2014-04-01

    Fusarium crown and root rot (FCRR) of asparagus has a complex etiology with several soilborne Fusarium spp. as causal agents. Ninety-three Fusarium isolates, obtained from plant and soil samples collected from commercial asparagus fields in southwestern Ontario with a history of FCRR, were identified as Fusarium oxysporum (65.5%), F. proliferatum (18.3%), F. solani (6.4%), F. acuminatum (6.4%), and F. redolens (3.2%) based on morphological or cultural characteristics and polymerase chain reaction (PCR) analysis with species-specific primers. The intersimple-sequence repeat PCR analysis of the field isolates revealed considerable variability among the isolates belonging to different Fusarium spp. In the in vitro pathogenicity screening tests, 50% of the field isolates were pathogenic to asparagus, and 22% of the isolates caused the most severe symptoms on asparagus. The management of FCRR with soil organic amendments of pelleted poultry manure (PPM), olive residue compost, and fish emulsion was evaluated in a greenhouse using three asparagus cultivars of different susceptibility in soils infested with two of the pathogenic isolates (F. oxysporum Fo-1.5 and F. solani Fs-1.12). Lower FCRR symptom severity and higher plant weights were observed for most treatments on 'Jersey Giant' and 'Grande' but not on 'Mary Washington'. On all three cultivars, 1% PPM consistently reduced FCRR severity by 42 to 96% and increased plant weights by 77 to 152% compared with the Fusarium control treatment. Populations of Fusarium and total bacteria were enumerated after 1, 3, 7, and 14 days of soil amendment. In amended soils, the population of Fusarium spp. gradually decreased while the population of total culturable bacteria increased. These results indicate that soil organic amendments, especially PPM, can decrease disease severity and promote plant growth, possibly by decreasing pathogen population and enhancing bacterial activity in the soil.

  11. Histological analysis and 3D reconstruction of winter cereal crowns recovering from freezing: a unique response in oat (Avena sativa L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Livingston, David P; Henson, Cynthia A; Tuong, Tan D; Wise, Mitchell L; Tallury, Shyamalrau P; Duke, Stanley H

    2013-01-01

    The crown is the below ground portion of the stem of a grass which contains meristematic cells that give rise to new shoots and roots following winter. To better understand mechanisms of survival from freezing, a histological analysis was performed on rye, wheat, barley and oat plants that had been frozen, thawed and allowed to resume growth under controlled conditions. Extensive tissue disruption and abnormal cell structure was noticed in the center of the crown of all 4 species with relatively normal cells on the outside edge of the crown. A unique visual response was found in oat in the shape of a ring of cells that stained red with Safranin. A tetrazolium analysis indicated that tissues immediately inside this ring were dead and those outside were alive. Fluorescence microscopy revealed that the barrier fluoresced with excitation between 405 and 445 nm. Three dimensional reconstruction of a cross sectional series of images indicated that the red staining cells took on a somewhat spherical shape with regions of no staining where roots entered the crown. Characterizing changes in plants recovering from freezing will help determine the genetic basis for mechanisms involved in this important aspect of winter hardiness.

  12. Root rots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kathryn Robbins; Philip M. Wargo

    1989-01-01

    Root rots of central hardwoods are diseases caused by fungi that infect and decay woody roots and sometimes also invade the butt portion of the tree. By killing and decaying roots, root rotting fungi reduce growth, decrease tree vigor, and cause windthrow and death. The most common root diseases of central hardwoods are Armillaria root rot, lnonotus root rot, and...

  13. Establishing the breeding provenance of a temperate-wintering North American passerine, the Golden-crowned Sparrow, using light-level geolocation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nathaniel E Seavy

    Full Text Available The migratory biology and connectivity of passerines remains poorly known, even for those that move primarily within the temperate zone. We used light-level geolocators to describe the migratory geography of a North American temperate migrant passerine. From February to March of 2010, we attached geolocator tags to 33 Golden-crowned Sparrows (Zonotrichia atricapilla wintering on the central coast of California, USA, and recovered four tags the following winter (October to December 2010. We used a bayesian state-space model to estimate the most likely breeding locations. All four birds spent the breeding season on the coast of the Gulf of Alaska. These locations spanned approximately 1200 kilometers, and none of the individuals bred in the same location. Speed of migration was nearly twice as fast during spring than fall. The return rate of birds tagged the previous season (33% was similar to that of control birds (39%, but comparing return rates was complicated because 7 of 11 returning birds had lost their tags. For birds that we recaptured before spring migration, we found no significant difference in mass change between tagged and control birds. Our results provide insight into the previously-unknown breeding provenance of a wintering population of Golden-crowned Sparrows and provide more evidence of the contributions that light-level geolocation can make to our understanding of the migratory geography of small passerines.

  14. Relationships among alfalfa resistance to Sclerotinia crown and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Sclerotinia crown and stem rot (SCSR) of alfalfa caused by Sclerotinia trifoliorum is one of the main constraints for efficient alfalfa cultivation in temperate climate all over the world. The resistance of 200 alfalfa accessions to Sclerotinia crown and stem rot was evaluated during 2010 to 2011 in the field nursery established in ...

  15. Interaction of Rhizoctonia solani and Rhizopus stolonifer Causing Root Rot of Sugar Beet

    Science.gov (United States)

    In recent years, growers in Michigan and other sugar beet production areas of the United States have reported increasing incidence of root rot with little or no crown or foliar symptoms in sugar beet with Rhizoctonia crown and root rot. In addition, Rhizoctonia-resistant beets have been reported wit...

  16. Effects of short-term fasting on stress physiology, body condition, and locomotor activity in wintering male white-crowned sparrows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krause, Jesse S; Pérez, Jonathan H; Meddle, Simone L; Wingfield, John C

    2017-08-01

    For wild free-living animals the availability of food resources can be greatly affected by environmental perturbations such as weather events. In response to environmental perturbations, animals activate the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis to adjust physiology and behavior. The literature asserts that during weather events food intake declines leading to changes in HPA axis activity, as measured by both baseline and stress-induced glucocorticoid concentrations. Here we investigated how body condition, locomotor activity, and stress physiology were affected by varying lengths of a fast (1, 2, 6, and 24h; similar to that experienced by free-living birds) compared to when food was provided ad libitum in captive wintering male white-crowned sparrows, Zonotrichia leucophrys gambelii, exposed to a short day photoperiod. Baseline corticosterone concentrations were increased for all fasting durations but were highest in 6 and 24h fasted birds. Stress-induced corticosterone was elevated in 1h fasted birds with a trend for the 2h of fast; no other differences were found. Baseline corticosterone concentrations were negatively related to both total fat scores and body mass. All birds lost body mass regardless of fast length but birds fasted for 24h lost the most. Fat scores declined in the 6 and 24h groups, and no measureable changes were detected in pectoralis muscle profile. Locomotor activity was increased over the entire period in which food was removed regardless of fasting duration. Together this suggests that reduced food availability is responsible, at least in part, for the rapid elevation both baseline corticosterone under any duration of fast and stress-induced concentrations during short-term fasts. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Dental crowns

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... than metal crowns Match the color of other teeth May be a good choice if you have a metal allergy Porcelain fused to metal crowns: Are made from porcelain covering a metal crown Metal makes the crown stronger Porcelain part is more prone to fracture than crowns made of all porcelain After the ...

  18. Proteome Analysis of Cold Response in Spring and Winter Wheat (Triticum aestivum) Crowns Reveals Similarities in Stress Adaptation and Differences in Regulatory Processes between the Growth Habits

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kosová, K.; Vítámvás, P.; Planchon, S.; Renaut, J.; Vaňková, Radomíra; Prášil, I.T.

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 12, č. 11 (2013), s. 4830-4845 ISSN 1535-3893 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA522/09/2058 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50380511 Keywords : 2D-DIGE analysis * cold stress * spring and winter growth habit Subject RIV: ED - Physiology Impact factor: 5.001, year: 2013

  19. Etiology of phomopsis root rot in soybean

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valéria Cecília Ghissi

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available In a survey of damages caused by soybean root rot to crops in the south of Brazil for several years, a root rot caused by Phomopsis sp has been found with increasing frequency. The primary symptoms are seen when the main root is cut longitudinally, including the death of the wood which shows white coloration and well-defined black lines that do not have a defined format. Thus, based on similarity, it has been called geographic root rot due to its aspect resembling irregular lines that separate regions on a map. In isolations, colonies and alpha spores of Phomopsis have prevailed. Pathogenicity test was done by means of inoculation in the crown of plants cultivated in a growth chamber. The geographic symptoms were reproduced in plants and the fungus Phomopsis sp. was reisolated. In soybean stems naturally infected with pod and stem blight, geographic symptoms caused by Phomopsis phaseoli are found. To the known symptoms on stems, pods and grains, that of root rot caused by P. phaseoli is now added.

  20. Crown rust control on oats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frey, K.J.; Browning, J.A.; Simons, M.D.

    1976-01-01

    Attempts have been made to test the relative effectiveness of EMS treatment for inducing tolerance to crown rust among oat strains Clintland-60 of different ploidy levels. One strain of diploid and one of tetraploid oats were treated with EMS. These two strains are as susceptible to damage from crown rust as are cultivars of hexaploid oats. Multiline cultivars of oats have been shown to provide adequate protection from economic loss due to crown-rust disease in Iowa. Since 1968, eleven multiline cultivars of oats have been released from the Iowa station for use in commercial production in the midwestern USA. During the past two winter seasons, the effectiveness of multiline oat cultivars against crown-rust disease has been researched in Texas, USA, which has a ''long rust season'' of about four months, not an Iowa ''short rust season''. The protection against crown rust afforded by the multiline cultivars appeared equally good in Texas and Iowa. The seasonal productions of crown-rust spores relative to completely resistant and susceptible checks were nearly identical in both environments. Fifteen new isolines of oats have been developed for use in multiline varieties, with seed supplies sufficiently large for immediate use

  1. Dinar-crown banknotes

    OpenAIRE

    Pantelić Svetlana

    2017-01-01

    Dinar-crown banknotes were: ½ dinars (i.e. 2 crowns), 1 dinar (i.e. 4 crowns), 5 dinars (i.e. 20 crowns), 10 dinars (i.e. 40 crowns), 20 dinars (i.e. 80 crowns), 100 dinars (i.e. 400 crowns), and 1000 dinars (i.e. 4000 crowns). The ½- and 1-dinar banknotes are assumed to have been issued in 1919, whereas the other five banknotes, according to one source, were released into circulation on 21.02.1920. Pursuant to the regulations, the replacement of the nostrified crown banknotes by the new crow...

  2. Armillaria root rot

    Science.gov (United States)

    First described on grapevines in California in the 1880s, Armillaria root rot occurs in all major grape-growing regions of the state. The causal fungus, Armillaria mellea, infects woody grapevine roots and the base of the trunk (the root collar), resulting in a slow decline and eventual death of the...

  3. Butt Rot of Southern Hardwoods

    Science.gov (United States)

    F. I. McCracken

    1977-01-01

    Butt rot is the most serious cause of cull throughout the South, and affects all hardwood species. Defined as any decay at the base of a living tree, butt rot accounts for the loss of millions of board feet of southern hardwood timber annually. In one study of loess and alluvial hardwood sites in the Midsouth, butt rot was found in 40 percent of the trees being...

  4. Disease notes - Bacterial root rot

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bacterial root rot initiated by lactic acid bacteria, particularly Leuconostoc, occurs every year in Idaho sugarbeet fields. Hot fall weather seems to make the problem worse. Although Leuconostoc initiates the rot, other bacteria and yeast frequently invade the tissue as well. The acetic acid bac...

  5. Dinar-crown banknotes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pantelić Svetlana

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Dinar-crown banknotes were: ½ dinars (i.e. 2 crowns, 1 dinar (i.e. 4 crowns, 5 dinars (i.e. 20 crowns, 10 dinars (i.e. 40 crowns, 20 dinars (i.e. 80 crowns, 100 dinars (i.e. 400 crowns, and 1000 dinars (i.e. 4000 crowns. The ½- and 1-dinar banknotes are assumed to have been issued in 1919, whereas the other five banknotes, according to one source, were released into circulation on 21.02.1920. Pursuant to the regulations, the replacement of the nostrified crown banknotes by the new crown- dinar banknotes started on 3 February 1920 in Serbia and Montenegro and on 16 February 1920 in other parts of the country. All seven denominations of the dinar-crown banknotes were being withdrawn from circulation throughout a lengthy period of time from 21 February 1921 until May 1934. The first to be withdrawn were the 20-dinar banknotes, from 1 February to 30 April 1921, then the 5-dinar banknotes, from 20 July to 20 November 1922, and the 10-dinar banknotes, from 10 February to 10 June 1924. The 100-dinar (400-crown and 1000-dinar (4000-crown banknotes remained in circulation the longest. The withdrawal of the 100- and 1000-dinar banknotes started in 1929 and lasted until 25 May 1934. The 1924 rulebook on minting coins of ½, 1 and 2 dinars precisely defines their withdrawal from circulation and replacement by minted coins within one year after the last batch of minted coins gets released into circulation. However, in 1927 the decree of the Minister of Finance prescribed that the remaining paper banknotes be withdrawn from circulation on 30 September 1927 by being replaced by the metal coins of the same denominations.

  6. Winter Weather

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Education Centers Harwood Training Grants Videos E-Tools Winter Storms Plan. Equip. Train To prevent injuries, illnesses and Fatalities during winter storms. This page requires that javascript be enabled ...

  7. Winter MVC

    OpenAIRE

    Castellón Gadea, Pasqual

    2013-01-01

    Winter MVC és un framework de presentació basat en Spring MVC que simplifica la metodologia de configuracions. Winter MVC es un framework de presentación basado en Spring MVC que simplifica la metodología de configuraciones. Winter MVC is a presentation framework that simplifies Spring MVC configuration methodology.

  8. Crowns and Crypts

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The product was isolated to be dibenzo-. 18-Crown-6. Many other crowns were ... fashion with their lone pairs pointing inward towards the metal atom. The bonding M-O is largely ... Macrocycles, though extremely effective as polydentate ligands, are not essential for the production of stable alkali complexes; additional ...

  9. Crown Fire Potential

    Data.gov (United States)

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — Crown fire potential was modeled using FlamMap, an interagency fire behavior mapping and analysis program that computes potential fire behavior characteristics. The...

  10. Canker Rots in Southern Hardwoods

    Science.gov (United States)

    F.I. McCracken

    1978-01-01

    Canker-rot fungi cause serious degrade and cull in southern hardwoods, especially the red oaks. Heartwood decay is the most serious form of damage, but the fungi also kill the cambium and decay the sapwood for as much as 3 feet (.91 m) above and below the entrance point into the tree. The ability of these fungi to kill the cambium and cause cankers distinguishes them...

  11. Fusarium basal rot in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Visser, de C.L.M.; Broek, van den R.C.F.M.; Brink, van den L.

    2006-01-01

    Fusarium basal rot of onion, caused by Fusarium oxysporum f.sp. cepae, is a steadily increasing problem in The Netherlands. Financial losses for Dutch farmers confronted with Fusarium basal rot is substantial, due to yield reduction and high storage costs. This paper describes the development and

  12. Crowns and Crypts

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    biologically occurring natural compounds they are expected to provide insight into the biological phenomena occurring in living systems. For example, the mechanism of the sodium pump occurring across a cell membrane could be understood using the formation of the alkali metal-crown complex mecha- nism as a model.

  13. Crowns and Crypts

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 6; Issue 6. Crowns and Crypts - A Fascinating Group of Multidentate Macrocyclic Ligands. Debasis Bandyopadhyay. General Article Volume 6 Issue 6 June 2001 pp 71-79. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link:

  14. Winter Wonderlands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coy, Mary

    2011-01-01

    Listening to people complain about the hardships of winter and the dreariness of the nearly constant gray sky prompted the author to help her sixth graders recognize and appreciate the beauty that surrounds them for nearly five months of the year in western New York. The author opines that if students could see things more artistically, the winter…

  15. Crown lengthening procedures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    AA. Khoshkhonejad

    1994-06-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays, due to recent developments and researches in dental science, it is possible to preserve and restore previously extracted cases such as teeth with extensive caries, fractured or less appropriate cases for crown coverage as well as teeth with external perforation caused by restorative pins. In order to restore the teeth with preservation of periodontium, we should know thoroughly physiological aspects of periodontium and protection of Biologic Width which is formed by epithelial and supracrestal connective tissue connections. Considering biologic width is one of the principal rules of teeth restoration, otherwise we may destruct periodontal tissues. Several factors are involved in placing a restoration and one of the most important ones is where the restoration margin is terminated. Many studies have been conducted on the possible effects of restoration margin on the gingiva and due to the results of these studies it was concluded that restoration margin should be finished supragingivally. However, when we have to end the restoration under Gingival Crest, First a healthy gingival sulcus is required. Also, we should not invade the biological width. Since a normal biologic with is reported 2 mm and sound tooth tissue should be placed at least 2 mm coronal to the epithelial tissue, the distance between sound tooth tissue and crown margin should be at least 4mm. Thus, performing crown lengthening is essential to increase the clinical crown length. Basically, two objectives are considered: 1 restorative 2 esthetic (gummy smile Surgical procedure includes gingivectomy and flap procedure. Orthodontic procedure involves orthodontic extrusion or force eruption technique which is controlled vertical movements of teeth into occlusion. Besides, this procedure can also used to extrude teeth defects from the gingival tissue. By crown lengthening, tooth extraction is not required and furthermore, adjacent teeth preparation for placing a fixed

  16. Water relations in untreated and modified wood under brown-rot and white-rot decay

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thybring, Emil Engelund

    2017-01-01

    from several literature sources, the water relations of untreated and modified wood decayed by brown-rot and white-rot fungi are examined. The aim is to investigate to what extent observations and assumptions regarding brown-rot and white-rot decay can explain changes in water relations observed during...... and after decay. Although the available experimental data for modified wood is scarce, it indicates that brown-rot and white-rot decay of non-resistant modified wood occurs by similar degradation mechanisms with similar effects on water relations as for untreated wood. From simplistic, mathematical...... modelling, it is shown that changes in water relations during decay can be partly explained by accompanying changes in chemical composition and void volume....

  17. Pseudomonads associated with midrib rot and soft rot of butterhead lettuce and endive.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cottyn, B; Vanhouteghem, K; Heyrman, J; Bleyaert, P; Van Vaerenbergh, J; De Vos, P; Höfte, M; Maes, M

    2005-01-01

    During the past ten years, bacterial soft rot and midrib rot of glasshouse-grown butterhead lettuce (Lactuca sativa L. var. capitata) and field-grown endive (Cichorium endivia L.) has become increasingly common in the region of Flanders, Belgium. Severe losses and reduced market quality caused by bacterial rot represent an important economical threat for the production sector. Symptoms of midrib rot are a brownish rot along the midrib of one or more inner leaves, often accompanied by soft rot of the leaf blade. Twenty-five symptomatic lettuce and endive samples were collected from commercial growers at different locations in Flanders. Isolations of dominant bacterial colony types on dilution plates from macerated diseased tissue extracts yielded 282 isolates. All isolates were characterized by colony morphology and fluorescence on pseudomonas agar F medium, oxidase reaction, and soft rot ability on detached chicory leaves. Whole-cell fatty acid methyl esters profile analyses identified the majority of isolates (85%) as belonging to the Gammaproteobacteria, which included members of the family Enterobacteriaceae (14%) and of the genera Pseudomonas (73%), Stenotrophomonas (9%), and Acinetobacter (3%). Predominant bacteria were a diverse group of fluorescent Pseudomonas species. They were further differentiated based on the non-host hypersensitive reaction on tobacco and the ability to rot potato slices into 4 phenotypic groups: HR-/P- (57 isolates), HR-/P+ (54 isolates), HR+/P (16 isolates) and HR+/P+ (35 isolates). Artificial inoculation of suspensions of HR-, pectolytic fluorescent pseudomonads in the leaf midrib of lettuce plants produced various symptoms of soft rot, but they did not readily cause symptoms upon spray inoculation. Fluorescent pseudomonads with phenotype HR+ were consistently isolated from typical dark midrib rot symptoms, and selected isolates reproduced the typical midrib rot symptoms when spray-inoculated onto healthy lettuce plants.

  18. Changes in cation concentrations in red spruce wood decayed by brown rot and white rot fungi

    Science.gov (United States)

    A. Ostrofsky; J. Jellison; K.T. Smith; W.C. Shortle

    1997-01-01

    Red spruce (Picea rubens Sarg.) wood blocks were incubated in modified soil block jars and inoculated with one of nine white rot or brown rot basidiomycetes. Concentrations of calcium, magnesium, potassium, iron, and aluminum were determined using inductively coupled plasma emission spectroscopy in wood incubated 0, 1.5, 4, and 8 months after...

  19. Crowned dens syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Norma Belfiore

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Microcrystalline deposition in peri-odontoid articular structures is mainly responsible for acute or chronic cervical pain and is known as “crowned dens syndrome”.Materials and methods We described two cases of acute cervical pain associated with onset of fever and peripheral acute monoarthritis. Cervical computed tomography (CT scan showed linear calcification of the retrodens ligament and calcium pyrophosphate dehydrate (CPPD crystals were found in synovial fluid of inflamed joints. Both patients were treated with anti-inflammatory drugs and colchicine.Discussion Calcium depositions around the odontoid process of the axis can be occasionally detected by radiological studies. They are frequently asymptomatic but sometimes can be associated with severe neurological abnormalities, fever and acute neck pain. CPPD crystals are usually deposited in joints and bursae but occasionally can disrupt these anatomical confines and deposit in periarticular tissues, sometimes forming large masses confused with tumours.Conclusions Acute onset of cervical neck pain associated with elevation of inflammatory indicators and/or signs of cervical myelopathy should suggest CT scans searching for microcrystal depositions in the peryodonthoid tissue. Differential diagnosis of fever of unknown origin (FUO should include crowned dens syndrome specially in the elderly after exclusion of several endocrine or metabolic disorders, infection diseases (meningitis, arthritis (psoriatic arthritis and ankylosing spondylitis and tumours (chordoma, meningioma, osteoblastoma.

  20. Effect of the planting material on the incidence of dry rot in Colocasia esculenta (L. Schott and Xanthosoma spp.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ernesto Espinosa

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available The cocoyam (Xanthosoma spp. and Colocasia esculenta is a monocot plant with vegetative propagation. This work was developed with the aim of determining the effect of the planting material type on the incidence of dry rot in two cultivars of Colocasia and Xanthosoma genera. Primary and secondary rhizomes, crowns of primary rhizomes and in vitro plants were used. The plantation was maintained for twelve months and the plants were characterized morphologically in the growing stage. Besides, it was determined the incidence of dry rot per treatment at growing and harvest stage. Finally, the yield was determined. When in vitro plants were used the percentage of incidence and intensity of the damage of dry rot was less in both cultivars. The yield in primary rhizomes and overall was significantly higher. The results indicated the superiority of in vitro plants as initial plantation material over the traditional seed used in taro culture. Furthermore, it allows the designing a seed production program by biotechnological methods. Key words: clone, cocoyam, dry rot, in vitro plants.

  1. Foot Rot of Ulluco Caused by Pythium aphanidermatum

    OpenAIRE

    Keisuke, TOMIOKA; Toyozo, SATO; Tateo, NAKANISHI; National Agricultural Research Center for Western Region; National Institute of Agrobiological Sciences; National Agricultural Research Center for Western Region

    2002-01-01

    Severe rot of stem bases caused by Pythium aphanidermatum was found on ulluco (Ullucus tuberosus) grown in Kagawa Prefecture, Japan, in September 1999. The name "foot rot of ulluco" is proposed for this new disease.

  2. WINTER SAECULUM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emil Mihalina

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Accumulated imbalances in the economy and on the markets cause specific financial market dynamics that have formed characteristic patterns kept throughout long financial history. In 2008 Authors presented their expectations of key macroeconomic and selected asset class markets developments for period ahead based on Saeculum theory. Use of term Secular describes a specific valuation environment during prolonged period. If valuations as well as selected macro variables are considered as a tool for understanding business cycles then market cycles become much more obvious and easily understandable. Therefore over the long run, certain asset classes do better in terms of risk reward profile than others. Further on, there is no need for frequent portfolio rebalancing and timing of specific investment positions within a particular asset class market. Current stage in cycle development suggests a need for reassessment of trends and prevailing phenomena due to cyclical nture of long lasting Saeculums. Paper reviews developments in recognizable patterns of selected metrics in current Winter Saeculum dominated with prevailing forces of delivering, deflation and decrease in velocity of money.

  3. Ready to crown

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    McReynolds, David

    2017-04-01

    When multiple teeth or localised segments of the mouth require crowns, the restorative interventions involved can be psychologically and physically demanding for the operator, patient and dental technician alike.1,2 It is important that all parties involved in restorations of this nature hold a shared understanding of the expected outcome of treatment, with a realistic, common end goal in mind right from the very beginning. Such clarity of thought and communication is key to avoiding biological, mechanical and aesthetic failures in the planning and execution of advanced restorative treatments. Biomechanically stable and aesthetically pleasing provisional restorations are an essential aspect of treatment, which allow teeth to be prepared and provisionalised over multiple appointments within the comfort zone of the operator and patient.3

  4. Winter Weather: Frostbite

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Safety During Fire Cleanup Wildfires PSAs Related Links Winter Weather About Winter Weather Before a Storm Prepare Your Home Prepare Your Car Winter Weather Checklists During a Storm Indoor Safety During ...

  5. Extensive sampling of basidiomycete genomes demonstrates inadequacy of the white-rot/brown-rot paradigm for wood decay fungi

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robert Riley; Asaf A. Salamov; Daren W. Brown; Laszlo G. Nagy; Dimitrios Floudas; Benjamin W. Held; Anthony Levasseur; Vincent Lombard; Emmanuelle Morin; Robert Otillar; Erika A. Lindquist; Hui Sun; Kurt M. LaButti; Jeremy Schmutz; Dina Jabbour; Hong Luo; Scott E. Baker; Antonio G. Pisabarro; Jonathan D. Walton; Robert A. Blanchette; Bernard Henrissat; Francis Martin; Daniel Cullen; David S. Hibbett; Igor V. Grigoriev

    2014-01-01

    Basidiomycota (basidiomycetes) make up 32% of the described fungi and include most wood-decaying species, as well as pathogens and mutualistic symbionts. Wood-decaying basidiomycetes have typically been classified as either white rot or brown rot, based on the ability (in white rot only) to degrade lignin along with cellulose and hemicellulose. Prior genomic...

  6. Response of the Andean diversity panel to root rot in a root rot nursery in Puerto Rico

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Andean Diversity Panel (ADP) was evaluated under low-fertility and root rot conditions in two trials conducted in 2013 and 2015 in Isabela, Puerto Rico. About 246 ADP lines were evaluated in the root rot nursery with root rot and stem diseases caused predominantly by Fusarium solani, which cause...

  7. Extensive sampling of basidiomycete genomes demonstrates inadequacy of the white rot/brown rot paradigm for wood decay fungi

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basidiomycota (basidiomycetes) make up 32% of the described fungi and include most wood decaying species, as well as pathogens and mutualistic symbionts. Wood-decaying basidiomycetes have typically been classified as either white rot or brown rot, based on the ability (in white rot only) to degrade ...

  8. Changes in Molecular Size Distribution of Cellulose during Attack by White Rot and Brown Rot Fungi

    OpenAIRE

    Kleman-Leyer, Karen; Agosin, Eduardo; Conner, Anthony H.; Kirk, T. Kent

    1992-01-01

    The kinetics of cotton cellulose depolymerization by the brown rot fungus Postia placenta and the white rot fungus Phanerochaete chrysosporium were investigated with solid-state cultures. The degree of polymerization (DP; the average number of glucosyl residues per cellulose molecule) of cellulose removed from soil-block cultures during degradation by P. placenta was first determined viscosimetrically. Changes in molecular size distribution of cellulose attacked by either fungus were then det...

  9. Studies on storage rot of cocoyam

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    uc network

    Department of Botany, University of Nigeria, Nsukka, Nigeria, were employed for this study. These were fungal organisms which had earlier been established as the major rot pathogens of cocoyam corms during storage. Pathogenicity assessment studies of fungal organisms: To assess the potency of the fungal organisms.

  10. Laminated Root Rot of Western Conifers

    Science.gov (United States)

    E.E. Nelson; N.E. Martin; R.E. Williams

    1981-01-01

    Laminated root rot is caused by the native fungus Phellinus weirii (Murr.) Gilb. It occurs throughout the Northwestern United States and in southern British Columbia, Canada. The disease has also been reported in Japan and Manchuria. In the United States, the pathogen is most destructive in pure Douglas-fir stands west of the crest of the Cascade Range in Washington...

  11. Postharvest Rhizopus rot on sugar beet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhizopus species have been reported as a minor post-harvest rot on sugar beet, particularly under temperatures above 5 deg C. In 2010, Rhizopus was isolated from beets collected from Michigan storage piles in February at a low frequency. However, recent evidence from Michigan has found a high incide...

  12. Overdenture dengan Pegangan Telescopic Crown

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pambudi Santoso

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Kaitan presisi merupakan alat retensi mekanis yang menghubungkan antara satu atau lebih pegangan gigi tiruan, yang bertujuan untuk menambah retensi dan/atau stabilisasi. Kaitan presisi dapat digunakan secara luas pada gigi tiruan cekat, gigi tiruan sebagian lepasan, overdenture, implant untuk retensi overdenture, dan protesa maksilo fasial. Overdenture dengan kaitan presisi dapat membantu dalam pembagian beban kunyah, meminimalkan trauma pada gigi pegangan dan jaringan lunak, meminimalkan resorbsi tulang, dan meningkatkan estetik dan pengucapan suara. Salah satu jenis dari kaitan presisi adalah telescopic crown, terdiri dari 2 macam mahkota, yaitu mahkota primer yang melekat secara permanen pada gigi penyangga, dan mahkota sekunder yang melekat pada gigi tiruan. Tujuan pemaparan kasus ini adalah untuk memberikan informasi tentang rehabilitasi pasien edentulous sebagian rahang atas dengan telescopic crown..  Pasien wanita berusia 45 tahun datang ke klinik prostodonsia RSGM Prof.Soedomo dengan keluhan ingin dibuatkan gigi tiruan. Pasien kehilangan gigi 11 12 15 16 17 21 22 24 25 26 dan 27 yang diindikasikan untuk pembuatan overdenture gigi tiruan sebagian lepasan (GTS kerangka logam dengan pegangan telescopic crown pada gigi 13 dan 14 dengan sistem parallel-sided crown. Tahap-tahap pembuatan telescopic crown yaitu mencetak model study dengan catatan gigit pendahuluan. Perawatan saluran dilakukan pada akar gigi 13, dilanjutkan pemasangan pasak fiber serta rewalling dinding bukal. Gigi 13 dan 14 dilakukan preparasi mahkota penuh, dilanjutkan dengan pencetakan model kerja untuk coping primer dan kerangka logam dengan metode double impression. Coping primer disementasi pada gigi penyangga, dilanjutkan pasang coba coping sekunder beserta kerangka logam. Selanjutnya dilakukan pencatatan gigit, pencetakan model kerja, penyusunan gigi dan pasang coba penyusunan gigi pada pasien. Prosedur dilanjutkan dengan proses di laboratorium, serta insersi pada

  13. marker UBC#116 linked to Fusarium crown and root rot resistance ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Administrator

    2011-09-19

    Sep 19, 2011 ... observed in the southern part of Japan in 1965. In 1994, the disease was reported in Korea (Lee et al., 1994). The disease is often referred to as ..... bacteria isolated from recycled substrates of soilless crops. Phytol. Mediterranea, 49: 163-171. Menzies JG, Koch C, Seywerd F (1990). Additions to the host ...

  14. Calonectria spp. causing leaf spot, crown and root rot of ornamental plants in Tunisia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lombard, L.; Polizzi, G.; Guarnaccia, V.; Vitale, A.; Crous, P.W.

    2011-01-01

    Calonectria spp. are important pathogens of ornamental plants in nurseries, especially in the Northern Hemisphere. They are commonly associated with a wide range of disease symptoms of roots, leaves and shoots. During a recent survey in Tunisia, a number of Calonectria spp. were isolated from

  15. Calonectria spp. causing leaf spot, crown and root rot of ornamental plants in Tunisia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lombard, L.; Polizzi, G.; Guarnaccia, V.; Vitale, A.; Crous, P.W.

    2012-01-01

    Calonectria spp. are important pathogens of ornamental plants in nurseries, especially in the Northern Hemisphere. They are commonly associated with a wide range of disease symptoms of roots, leaves and shoots. During a recent survey in Tunisia, a number of Calonectria spp. were isolated from

  16. Wheat crown and root rotting fungi in Moghan area, Northwest of Iran

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    PRECIOUS

    2009-11-16

    Nov 16, 2009 ... E-mail: bhajieghrari@uma.ac.ir. Tel: +989143186861. Fax: +984527463417. ... In addition to B. sorokiniana, Fusarium culmorum, Fusarium Pseudograminearum and Gaeumannomyces/Phiallophora complex are the most ..... Ulrich K, Augustine C, Werner A (2000). Identification and characterization of a ...

  17. The importance of potassium in resistance to crown rot disease in alfalfa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nitrogen, phosphate, and potassium (potash, K2O) are the three most important nutrients in alfalfa growth and development. Nitrogen fertilization is not required because alfalfa has a high rate of biological nitrogen fixation. Phosphorus and potassium are frequently applied as fertilizer, but potass...

  18. Temporal Occurrence and Niche Preferences of Phytophthora spp. Causing Brown Rot of Citrus in the Central Valley of California.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hao, Wei; Miles, Timothy D; Martin, Frank N; Browne, Gregory T; Förster, Helga; Adaskaveg, James E

    2018-03-01

    Brown rot of citrus fruit is caused by several species of Phytophthora and is currently of serious concern for the California citrus industry. Two species, Phytophthora syringae and P. hibernalis, are quarantine pathogens in China, a major export market for California citrus. To maintain trade and estimate the risk of exporting a quarantine pathogen, the distribution and frequency of Phytophthora spp. causing brown rot of orange in major growing areas of California was investigated. Symptomatic fruit were collected from navel (winter to late spring) and Valencia (late spring to summer) orange orchards from 2013 to 2015. Species identification of isolates was based on morphological characteristics, random amplified polymorphic DNA banding patterns, and sequencing of the internal transcribed spacer and the partial cox2/spacer/cox1 regions from axenic cultures, or directly on DNA from fruit tissue using a multiplex TaqMan quantitative polymerase chain reaction assay. In winter samplings, the incidence of P. syringae based on the number of fruit with Phytophthora spp. detection ranged from 73.6 to 96.1% for the two counties surveyed. The remaining isolates were identified as P. citrophthora. In late spring or summer, only P. citrophthora was recovered. P. hibernalis and P. nicotianae were not detected in any fruit with brown rot symptoms. These results indicate that P. syringae is currently an important brown rot pathogen of citrus fruit in California during the cooler seasons of the year. In winter 2016 and 2017, P. syringae was recovered by pear baiting at a high incidence from leaf litter and from a small number of rhizosphere soil or root samples but not from living leaves on the tree. In contrast, P. citrophthora was rarely found in leaf litter but was commonly detected in the rhizosphere. Thus, leaf litter is a major inoculum source for P. syringae and this species occupies a distinct ecological niche.

  19. Soft rot erwiniae: from genes to genomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toth, Ian K; Bell, Kenneth S; Holeva, Maria C; Birch, Paul R J

    2003-01-01

    SUMMARY The soft rot erwiniae, Erwinia carotovora ssp. atroseptica (Eca), E. carotovora ssp. carotovora (Ecc) and E. chrysanthemi (Ech) are major bacterial pathogens of potato and other crops world-wide. We currently understand much about how these bacteria attack plants and protect themselves against plant defences. However, the processes underlying the establishment of infection, differences in host range and their ability to survive when not causing disease, largely remain a mystery. This review will focus on our current knowledge of pathogenesis in these organisms and discuss how modern genomic approaches, including complete genome sequencing of Eca and Ech, may open the door to a new understanding of the potential subtlety and complexity of soft rot erwiniae and their interactions with plants. The soft rot erwiniae are members of the Enterobacteriaceae, along with other plant pathogens such as Erwinia amylovora and human pathogens such as Escherichia coli, Salmonella spp. and Yersinia spp. Although the genus name Erwinia is most often used to describe the group, an alternative genus name Pectobacterium was recently proposed for the soft rot species. Ech mainly affects crops and other plants in tropical and subtropical regions and has a wide host range that includes potato and the important model host African violet (Saintpaulia ionantha). Ecc affects crops and other plants in subtropical and temperate regions and has probably the widest host range, which also includes potato. Eca, on the other hand, has a host range limited almost exclusively to potato in temperate regions only. Disease symptoms: Soft rot erwiniae cause general tissue maceration, termed soft rot disease, through the production of plant cell wall degrading enzymes. Environmental factors such as temperature, low oxygen concentration and free water play an essential role in disease development. On potato, and possibly other plants, disease symptoms may differ, e.g. blackleg disease is associated

  20. Isolation of laccase gene-specific sequences from white rot and brown rot fungi by PCR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D`Souza, T.M.; Boominathan, K.; Reddy, C.A. [Michigan State Univ., East Lansing, MI (United States)

    1996-10-01

    Degenerate primers corresponding to the consensus sequences of the copper-binding regions in the N-terminal domains of known basidiomycete laccases were used to isolate laccase gene-specific sequences from strains representing nine genera of wood rot fungi. All except three gave the expected PCR product of about 200 bp. Computer searches of the databases identified the sequences of each of the PCR product of about 200 bp. Computer searches of the databases identified the sequence of each of the PCR products analyzed as a laccase gene sequence, suggesting the specificity of the primers. PCR products of the white rot fungi Ganoderma lucidum, Phlebia brevispora, and Trametes versicolor showed 65 to 74% nucleotide sequence similarity to each other; the similarity in deduced amino acid sequences was 83 to 91%. The PCR products of Lentinula edodes and Lentinus tigrinus, on the other hand, showed relatively low nucleotide and amino acid similarities (58 to 64 and 62 to 81%, respectively); however, these similarities were still much higher than when compared with the corresponding regions in the laccases of the ascomycete fungi Aspergillus nidulans and Neurospora crassa. A few of the white rot fungi, as well as Gloeophyllum trabeum, a brown rot fungus, gave a 144-bp PCR fragment which had a nucleotide sequence similarity of 60 to 71%. Demonstration of laccase activity in G. trabeum and several other brown rot fungi was of particular interest because these organisms were not previously shown to produce laccases. 36 refs., 6 figs., 2 tabs.

  1. MANAGEMENT OF ROOT ROT IN AVOCADO TREES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SIMONE RODRIGUES DA SILVA

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Root rot (Phytophthora cinnamomi Rands is one of the most restrictive factors to avocado growing in main producing regions worldwide. In Brazil, scientific reports on the effectiveness of control methods are scarce. The objective of this study was to evaluate the efficiency of gypsum applications and dolomitic limestone to the soil and potassium phosphite sprays in controlling this disease in ‘Hass’ avocado, grown without irrigation. The application of dolomitic limestone or gypsum alone is not effective to recover plants affected by root rot. The application of potassium phosphite, combined or not with dolomitic lime or gypsum enables the partial recovery ‘Hass’ avocado plants affected by the disease.

  2. MANAGEMENT OF ROOT ROT IN AVOCADO TREES

    OpenAIRE

    SILVA, SIMONE RODRIGUES DA; CANTUARIAS-AVILÉS, TATIANA; BREMER NETO, HORST; MOURÃO FILHO, FRANCISCO DE ASSIS ALVES; MEDINA, RICARDO BORDIGNON

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Root rot (Phytophthora cinnamomi Rands) is one of the most restrictive factors to avocado growing in main producing regions worldwide. In Brazil, scientific reports on the effectiveness of control methods are scarce. The objective of this study was to evaluate the efficiency of gypsum applications and dolomitic limestone to the soil and potassium phosphite sprays in controlling this disease in ‘Hass’ avocado, grown without irrigation. The application of dolomitic limestone or gypsum...

  3. Sheath rot of rice in Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naeimi, S; Okhovvat, S M; Hedjaroude, G A; Khosravi, V

    2003-01-01

    Sheath rot of rice occurs in most rice-growing regions of the world. It usually causes yield losses from 20 to 85%. Sheath rot was reported from Iran in 1993. Year after year, the number of diseased plants increased in the Northern Iran. In summer of 2001, these symptoms were observed in most fields: lesions occur on the upper leaf sheaths, especially the flag leaf sheath. As the disease progresses, lesions enlarge and coalesce and may cover most of the leaf sheath. Panicle may fail to completely or at all. Brown or partially brown not filled or partially filled grain is also associated with infection of the panicle. A whitish powdery growth may be found inside affected sheaths. Infected plants were collected and trasferred to laboratory. Small pieces of diseased tissues were washed under tap water for one hour. Then tissues were placed on WA and incubated at 25 degrees C. These isolates were purified and identified as: Sarocladium oryzae, Fusarium udum, F. semitectum, F. avenaceum, F. flocciferum, F. graminearum, Bipolaris oryzae, Alternaria padwickii, Rhizoctonia solani, Paecilomyces sp., Nigrospora sp. and Trichoderma sp. This is the first report of F. udum in Iran. Also this is the first report that rice is the host for F. semitectum, F. avenaceum and F. flocciferum in Iran. Pathogenicity tests were conducted in glass house. Following species were found to be associated with sheath rot of rice: S. oryzae, F. graminearum, F. udum, F. avenaceum, B. oryzae, A. padwickii. This is the first report in the world that F. udum and A. padwickii are the causal agents of the sheath rot on rice plants.

  4. Stand tending and root rot in Norway spruce stands - economical effects caused by root rot at different thinning regimes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johansson, Mats

    1997-01-01

    This report is divided into three parts: 1) a literature study describing the most common fungi causing rot in wood and descriptions of various strategies to reduce economic loss from root rot, 2) a check of a model describing the development of butt rot in pure Norway spruce plantations in southern Sweden, and 3) simulated economic effects of root rot in stands with various stand tending. The rot model was used to estimate future rot frequencies in the economic calculations. In order to avoid overestimations of rot frequencies, the calculations were also executed when assuming slower growth of rot than shown in the model. When analysing the economical effects of rot, the following three thinning programmes were used: Program 1: thinning at the ages of 30- and 45 years. Final felling at the ages 50-, 55-, 60-, 65-, and 70 years. Program 2: thinning at the ages of 40- and 60- years. Final felling at the ages 65 and 75 years. Program 3: thinning at the ages of 30-, 40-, 55-, and 70 years. Final felling at the ages 80 and 90 years. With an interest rate of 3%, programme 2 (final felling at the age of 65 years) had the highest value at present. This result was valid when presuming butt rot in the stand as well as when presuming no butt rot in the stand. There was a small difference between the value at present in programme 1 (final felling at the age of 60 years) and in programme 3 (final felling at the age of 80 years). When presuming butt rot in the stand, the value at present in programme 3 decreased somewhat more in comparison to the value at present in programme 1. Compared to no butt rot in the stand, the optimal final felling time appeared five to ten years earlier when assuming butt rot in the stand. Stand tending programme 1 and an interest rate of 3% were used. Interest rates 2 and 4% did not indicate shorter rotation. The calculated optimal time of final felling appeared at the same stand age whether assuming rot preset or not. The results in this study

  5. Basal Root Rot, a new Disease of Teak (Tectona grandis in Malaysia caused by Phellinus noxius

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohd Farid, A.

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Basal root rot of teak was first reported from Sabak Bernam, Selangor making this the first report of the disease on teak in Peninsular Malaysia. The fungus found associated with the disease was Phellinus noxious. The disease aggressively killed its host irrespective of the host health status. Bark depression at the root collar which was visible from a distance was the characteristic symptom and the main indicator in identifying the disease in the plantation since above ground symptoms of the canopy could not be differentiated from crowns of healthy trees. However, although above ground symptoms were not easily discernible, the disease was already advanced and the trees mostly beyond treatment; 3.4 % of the trees in the plantation were affected and the disease occurred both on solitary trees and in patches. Below ground, infected trees had rotted root systems, mainly below and around the collar region with brown discolored wood and irregular golden-brown honeycomb-like pockets of fungal hyphae in the wood. Pathogenicity tests showed that the fungus produced symptoms similar to those observed in the plantation and killed two year-old teak plants. The disease killed all the inoculated hosts within three months, irrespective of wounded or unwounded treatments.

  6. Wave Forces on Crown Walls

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Jan; Burcharth, H. F.

    1993-01-01

    This paper presents some of the results from a large parametric laboratory study including more than 200 long-duration model tests. The study addresses both the wave forces imposed on the breakwater crown wall as well as the performance of the structure in reducing the wave overtopping. The testing...... programme includes variations of the sea state parameters and of the geometrical configuration of the breakwater and crown wall. Basic relations between forces/overtopping and the varied parameters are examined and preliminary design guidelines for structures within the tested range of variations...

  7. Winter Weather Emergencies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Severe winter weather can lead to health and safety challenges. You may have to cope with Cold related health ... Although there are no guarantees of safety during winter weather emergencies, you can take actions to protect ...

  8. Winter maintenance performance measure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    The Winter Performance Index is a method of quantifying winter storm events and the DOTs response to them. : It is a valuable tool for evaluating the States maintenance practices, performing post-storm analysis, training : maintenance personnel...

  9. Winter weather demand considerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-04-01

    Winter weather has varied effects on travel behavior. Using 418 survey responses from the Northern Virginia : commuting area of Washington, D.C. and binary logit models, this study examines travel related changes under : different types of winter wea...

  10. Original Article. In vitro evaluation of potato genotypes for resistance against bacterial soft rot (Pectobacterium carotovorum – a new tool for studying disease resistance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Azadmanesh Sima

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available In vitro screening techniques were used to evaluate 46 genotypes of Iranian potato collection for resistance to bacterial soft rot caused by Pectobacterium carotovorum subsp. carotovorum (Pcc. One month old in vitro rooted potato plantlets were inoculated by two inoculation techniques under in vitro conditions: 1 sterile toothpicks dipped into bacterial suspension and pressed into the crown of plantlets and 2 the freshly cut crown of plantlets were dipped into bacterial suspension of 108 cfu ∙ ml-1 for 10 min. Typical soft rot disease symptoms, including the percentage of wilted leaves were recorded on inoculated plantlets 3, 6, 9, 12 and 15 days post-inoculation. The potato genotypes which were examined responded differently to Pcc and varying levels of resistance were observed. Potato genotype AG showed the highest level of resistance. Results obtained from in vitro screening were then verified by classical tuber slice assay. The verifications were conducted using five representative cultivars: Milva, Ramus, Picaso, Marfona and Agria which responded similarly to both in vitro and classical evaluation systems. Similar results obtained from these tests indicated that the in vitro screening technique developed in this study could provide a simple and rapid whole plant assay in selecting resistant potato genotypes against bacterial soft rot.

  11. Extensive sampling of basidiomycete genomes demonstrates inadequacy of the white rot/ brown rot paradigm for wood decay fungi

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Riley, Robert; Salamov, Asaf; Brown, Daren W.; Nagy, Laszlo G.; Floudas, Dimitris; Held, Benjamin; Levasseur, Anthony; Lombard, Vincent; Morin, Emmanuelle; Otillar, Robert; Lindquist, Erika; Sun, Hui; LaButti, Kurt; Schmutz, Jeremy; Jabbour, Dina; Luo, Hong; Baker, Scott E.; Pisabarro, Antonio; Walton, Jonathan D.; Blanchette, Robert; Henrissat, Bernard; Martin, Francis; Cullen, Dan; Hibbett, David; Grigoriev, Igor V.

    2014-03-14

    Basidiomycota (basidiomycetes) make up 32percent of the described fungi and include most wood decaying species, as well as pathogens and mutualistic symbionts. Wood-decaying basidiomycetes have typically been classified as either white rot or brown rot, based on the ability (in white rot only) to degrade lignin along with cellulose and hemicellulose. Prior genomic comparisons suggested that the two decay modes can be distinguished based on the presence or absence of ligninolytic class II peroxidases (PODs), as well as the abundance of enzymes acting directly on crystalline cellulose (reduced in brown rot). To assess the generality of the white rot/brown rot classification paradigm we compared the genomes of 33 basidiomycetes, including four newly sequenced wood decayers, and performed phylogenetically-informed Principal Components Analysis (PCA) of a broad range of gene families encoding plant biomass-degrading enzymes. The newly sequenced Botryobasidium botryosum and Jaapia argillacea genomes lack PODs, but possess diverse enzymes acting on crystalline cellulose, and they group close to the model white rot species Phanerochaete chrysosporium in the PCA. Furthermore, laboratory assays showed that both B. botryosum and J. argillacea can degrade all polymeric components of woody plant cell walls, a characteristic of white rot. We also found expansions in reducing polyketide synthase genes specific to the brown rot fungi. Our results suggest a continuum rather than a dichotomy between the white rot and brown rot modes of wood decay. A more nuanced categorization of rot types is needed, based on an improved understanding of the genomics and biochemistry of wood decay.

  12. Earth Pressure on Tunnel Crown

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Lars

    Two different analyses have been carried out in order to find the vertical earth pressure, or overburden pressure, at the crown of a tunnel going through a dike. Firstly, a hand calculation is performed using a simple dispersion of the stresses over depth. Secondly, the finite‐element program...

  13. Winter-to-winter variations in indoor radon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mose, D.G.; Mushrush, G.W.; Kline, S.W.

    1989-01-01

    Indoor radon concentrations in northern Virginia and central Maryland show a strong dependence on weather. Winter tends to be associated with higher than average indoor radon, and summer with lower than average. However, compared to the winter of 1986-1987, the winter of 1987-1988 was warmer and drier. Consequently, winter-to-winter indoor radon decreased by about 25%. This winter-to-winter decrease is unexpectedly large, and simulates winter-to-summer variations that have been reported

  14. Removal of failed crown and bridge

    OpenAIRE

    Sharma, Ashu; Rahul, G.R.; Poduval, Soorya T.; Shetty, Karunakar

    2012-01-01

    Crown and bridge have life span of many years but they fail for a number of reasons. Over the years, many devices have been designed to remove crowns and bridges from abutment teeth. While the removal of temporary crowns and bridges is usually very straightforward, the removal of a definitive cast crown with unknown cement is more challenging. Removal is often by destructive means. There are a number of circumstances, however, in which conservative disassembly would aid the practitioner in co...

  15. Calcium addition at the Hubbard Brook Experimental Forest reduced winter injury to red spruce in a high-injury year

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gary J. Hawley; Paul G. Schaberg; Christopher Eagar; Catherine H. Borer

    2006-01-01

    Laboratory experiments have verified that acid-deposition-induced calcium (Ca) leaching reduces the foliar cold tolerance of red spruce (Picea rubens Sarg.) current-year foliage, increasing the risk of winter injury and crown deterioration. However, to date no studies have shown that ambient losses in soil Ca have resulted in increased winter injury...

  16. Equations to convert compacted crown ratio to uncompacted crown ratio for trees in the Interior West

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chris Toney; Matthew C. Reeves

    2009-01-01

    Crown ratio is the proportion of total tree length supporting live foliage. Inventory programs of the US Forest Service generally define crown ratio in terms of compacted or uncompacted measurements. Measurement of compacted crown ratio (CCR) involves envisioning the transfer of lower branches of trees with asymmetric crowns to fill holes in the upper portion of the...

  17. Improvement of resistance to Fusarium root rot through gene ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Fusarium root rot (FRR), caused by Fusarium solani f.sp. , is one of the most serious root rot diseases of common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) throughout the world. Yield losses of up to 84% have been attributed to the disease. Development and deployment of resistant materials is the most feasible approach to managing ...

  18. ( Azadirachta Indica ) Leaf Extracts on the Rot Fungus ( Fusarium ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The storage lifespan of kola nuts is challenged by the problem of decay of nuts in storage as a result of the attack by the rot fungus (Fusarium spp). The effect of the neem leaf (Azadirachta indica) extracts on the rot fungus was investigated in order to aid extended kola nuts storage. The aqueous and ethanolic leaf extracts of ...

  19. Resistance to charcoal rot identified in ancestral soybean germplasm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charcoal rot, caused by the fungal pathogen Macrophomina phaseolina, is an economically important disease on soybean and other crops including maize, sorghum, and sunflowers. Without effective cultural or chemical options to control charcoal rot in soybean, finding sources of genetic resistance is o...

  20. RESISTANCE TO POST-HARVEST MICROBIAL ROT IN YAM ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ACSS

    Rot from microbial infection of healthy yam tubers reduces their table quality and renders them unappealing to consumers. A study was carried out at Bimbilla in the Nanumba North District of Ghana to evaluate possible interactions of yam genotypes and storage methods for controlling internal rot in yam. Four local varieties.

  1. Impact of management strategies in the basal rot, charcoal rots epidemiology and Phaseolus vulgaris L. yield.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ulacio Osorio Dilcia

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available The effect of chemical, physical, biologycal and cultural strategies individually or combinated were evaluated in the epidemiology of the basal rot (Sclerotium rolfsii, charcoal rot (Macrophomina phaseolina and the Phaseolus vulgaris cv Tacarigua yield at Barinas state from Venezuela. In the experiment, Tebuconazole (Teb was applicated at seed (1 L/Ton and at soil, a los 30 y 60 days after of the sow (1 L/ha; Trichoderma harzianum (Tri was applicated at seed (15 g for each 1.5 k and to 15, 30, 45 y 60 days after of the sow (30 g/10 L of water. On the other hand, soil was solarizated (Sol during 15 days and calcium nitrate (Ca (60 g/10 L of water was applicated each 15 days until 60 days of growth of cultivated plants. Basal rot was registered as far as 42 days after of the sow, showing less of 5.3% in Teb y the combination SolTeb. The hightest incidence of this disease was observed in the treatment Tri with 28.5%, being highter that control (14.5%. Last to 42 days predominated the charcoal rot in the rest of the plants for a total of 100% of incidente in everything the treatments. Nevertheless, Teb showed the hightest yield with 555 k/ha, being different estatistically at treatment TriCa, which showed the lowest yield with 31 k/ha, however, the roots not formed nodules nitrogen uptake in these replications with the fungicide and Ca. It is concluded that S. rolfsii was sensible at action of some of the treatments; but not M. phaseolina; nevertheless, the plants were capables to produce seeds health apparently in treatments in which observed less severity of charcoal rot.

  2. Diagnostic of dry rot in living trees

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schaetzler, H.P.

    1978-01-01

    The γ-desorption method has been used in the early diagnosis of dry rot in trees. The attenuation of a 60 keV γ-beam ( 241 Am) has been measured on eleven healthy spruce disks. It is seen that early diagnostic of rotten trees is limited by natural density variation of the wood itself, but for a 95% confidence level that the wood is diseased, a tree must have an average of less than 0.59 g./cm 3 . (Auth/C.F.)

  3. Medical Council of India : the rot within.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandya, Sunil K

    2009-01-01

    The Medical Council of India is a statutory national agency charged with several responsibilities. Sadly, it is plagued by inefficiency, arbitrariness and lack of transparency. It has been functioning for some years as the fiefdom of one person--Dr Ketan Desai. He has been re-elected president of the council despite strictures against him by the High Court of New Delhi. This essay provides data that may help the reader identify the rot within the Council. Permitted optimism, we may hope that this essay and similar observations by others will prompt a change for the better. At present such optimism is not justified.

  4. EXTRACELLULAR POLYSACCHARIDES OF POTATO RING ROT PATHOGEN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shafikova Т.N.

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Many bacteria, including phytopathogenic ones produce extracellular polysaccharides or exopolysaccharides which are universal molecules. Causal agent of potato ring rot, Clavibacter michiganensis subspecies sepedonicus, secretes exopolysaccharides which role in pathogenesis is poorly investigated. The aim of our research is to ascertain the composition and structure of Clavibacter michiganensis subspecies sepedonicus exopolysaccharides. Exopolysaccharides of Clavibacter michiganensis subspecies sepedonicus are determined to consist of 4-6 anionic and neutral components which have molecular weights from 700 kDa. Glucose is a major monomer of polysaccharides and arabinose, rhamnose and mannose are minor monomers. Glucose is present in α-Dglucopyranose and β-D-glucopyranose configurations. Calcium is determined to be a component of exopolysaccharides. Components of exopolysaccharides of potato ring rot pathogen are probably capableto associate via calcium ions and other ionic interactions that may result in a change of their physiological activity. Further studies of Clavibacter michiganensis subspecies sepedonicus exopolysaccharides composition and structure can serve a base for the synthesis of their chemical analogues with elicitor action.

  5. Crown structure of Picea omorika trees in the plantation

    OpenAIRE

    Krstić M.; Stavretović N.; Isajev V.; Bjelanović I.

    2012-01-01

    The study was carried out in Serbian spruce (Picea omorika Panč/Purkynĕ) plantations in the western Serbia. The paper presents results of the analysis of crown development. The following elements were analyzed: total tree height, height of the crown base, absolute and relative crown length, maximal crown diameter, coefficient of crown spreading and degree of crown girth. We discuss approaches to the modeling of tree crown growth and development, growing under favorable environmental and...

  6. Winters fuels report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-01-01

    The outlook for distillate fuel oil this winter is for increased demand and a return to normal inventory patterns, assuming a resumption of normal, cooler weather than last winter. With industrial production expected to grow slightly from last winter's pace, overall consumption is projected to increase 3 percent from last winter, to 3.4 million barrels per day during the heating season (October 1, 1995-March 31, 1996). Much of the supply win come from stock drawdowns and refinery production. Estimates for the winter are from the Energy Information Administration's (EIA) 4th Quarter 1995 Short-Tenn Energy Outlook (STEO) Mid-World Oil Price Case forecast. Inventories in place on September 30, 1995, of 132 million barrels were 9 percent below the unusually high year-earlier level. Inventories of high-sulfur distillate fuel oil, the principal type used for heating, were 13 percent lower than a year earlier. Supply problems are not anticipated because refinery production and the ready availability of imports should be adequate to meet demand. Residential heating off prices are expected to be somewhat higher than last winter's, as the effects of lower crude oil prices are offset by lower distillate inventories. Heating oil is forecast to average $0.92 per gallon, the highest price since the winter of 1992-93. Diesel fuel (including tax) is predicted to be slightly higher than last year at $1.13 per gallon. This article focuses on the winter assessment for distillate fuel oil, how well last year's STEO winter outlook compared to actual events, and expectations for the coming winter. Additional analyses include regional low-sulfur and high-sulfur distillate supply, demand, and prices, and recent trends in distillate fuel oil inventories

  7. Root rot diseases of sugar beet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacobsen Barry J.

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Root rot diseases of sugar beet caused by Rhizoctonia solani (AG 2-2 IIIB and AG 2-2 IV, R. crocorum, Aphanomyces cochlioides, Phoma betae, Macrophomina phaeseolina, Fusarium oxysporum f.sp. radicis-betae, Pythium aphanidermatum Phytophthora drechsleri, Rhizopus stolonifer, R. arrhizus and Sclerotium rolfsii cause significant losses wherever sugar beets are grown. However, not all these soil-borne pathogens have been reported in all sugar beet production areas. Losses include reduced harvestable tonnage and reduced white sugar recovery. Many of these pathogens also cause post harvest losses in storage piles. Control for diseases caused by these pathogens include disease resistant cultivars, avoidance of stresses, cultural practices such as water management and the use of fungicides.

  8. Energy balance associated with the degradation of lignocellulosic material by white-rot and brown-rot fungi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Derrien, Delphine; Bédu, Hélène; Buée, Marc; Kohler, Annegret; Goodell, Barry; Gelhaye, Eric

    2017-04-01

    Forest soils cover about 30% of terrestrial area and comprise between 50 and 80% of the global stock of soil organic carbon (SOC). The major precursor for this forest SOC is lignocellulosic material, which is made of polysaccharides and lignin. Lignin has traditionally been considered as a recalcitrant polymer that hinders access to the much more labile structural polysaccharides. This view appears to be partly incorrect from a microbiology perspective yet, as substrate alteration depends on the metabolic potential of decomposers. In forest ecosystems the wood-rotting Basidiomycota fungi have developed two different strategies to attack the structure of lignin and gain access to structural polysaccharides. White-rot fungi degrade all components of plant cell walls, including lignin, using enzymatic systems. Brown-rot fungi do not remove lignin. They generate oxygen-derived free radicals, such as the hydroxyl radical produced by the Fenton reaction, that disrupt the lignin polymer and depolymerize polysaccharides which then diffuse out to where the enzymes are located The objective of this study was to develop a model to investigate whether the lignin relative persistence could be related to the energetic advantage of brown-rot degradative pathway in comparison to white-rot degradative pathway. The model simulates the changes in substrate composition over time, and determines the energy gained from the conversion of the lost substrate into CO2. The energy cost for the production of enzymes involved in substrate alteration is assessed using information derived from genome and secretome analysis. For brown-rot fungus specifically, the energy cost related to the production of OH radicals is also included. The model was run, using data from the literature on populous wood degradation by Trametes versicolor, a white-rot fungus, and Gloeophyllum trabeum, a brown-rot fungus. It demonstrates that the brown-rot fungus (Gloeophyllum trabeum) was more efficient than the white-rot

  9. Pericoronal radiolucency associated with incomplete crown

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nah, Kyung Soo

    2013-01-01

    The author experienced 8 cases of pericoronal radiolucency involving an incomplete tooth crown that had not developed to form the cemento-enamel junction, and the underdeveloped crown sometimes appeared to be floating within the radiolucency radiographically. The first impression was that these cystic lesions had odontogenic keratocysts, but half of them turned out to be dentigerous cysts histopathologically. There has been no report concerning odontogenic cysts involving an incompletely developed crown. The purpose of this paper is to report that dentigerous cysts may develop before the completion of the cemento-enamel junction of a developing crown.

  10. Pericoronal radiolucency associated with incomplete crown

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nah, Kyung Soo [Dept. of Oral and Maxillofacial Radiology, School of Dentistry, Pusan National University, Yangsan (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-12-15

    The author experienced 8 cases of pericoronal radiolucency involving an incomplete tooth crown that had not developed to form the cemento-enamel junction, and the underdeveloped crown sometimes appeared to be floating within the radiolucency radiographically. The first impression was that these cystic lesions had odontogenic keratocysts, but half of them turned out to be dentigerous cysts histopathologically. There has been no report concerning odontogenic cysts involving an incompletely developed crown. The purpose of this paper is to report that dentigerous cysts may develop before the completion of the cemento-enamel junction of a developing crown.

  11. Fracture resistance of various temporary crown materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yilmaz, Asude; Baydaş, Seyfettin

    2007-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the fracture resistance of various provisional crown materials using an in vitro model test system. In the present study polycarbonate crowns, prefabricated by the manufacturer (3M Polycarbonate Crown), and the temporary crowns, fabricated in the dental laboratory environment, were fabricated using bis-acryl composite (Protemp II), autopolymerizing PMMA resin (BISICO Temp S), and heat-polymerized PMMA resin (Major C&B-V Dentine). All temporary crowns were stored in distilled water for 24 hours at room temperature prior to testing. The crowns were seated on metal dies, fabricated from Cr-Co alloy (AZ Dental, Konstanz, Germany), and then tested using the indenter of a Hounsfield testing machine (Hounsfield Tensometer, Hounsfield Test Equipment, Raydon, England). The tip of the indenter was located at a position one-third of the way down the inciso-palatine surface at 135 masculine. The data were statistically analyzed for differences using one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) and the Tukey HSD test (P crowns were significantly different from the BISICO Temp S, Protemp II, and Major C&B-V Dentine (P crowns may be preferable to the other types of temporary crowns used in this study.

  12. All-ceramic crowns: bonding or cementing?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pospiech, Peter

    2002-12-01

    Despite the wide variety of all-ceramic systems available today, the majority of dental practitioners hesitate to recommend and insert all-ceramic crowns. This article regards the nature of the ceramic materials, the principles of bonding and adhesion, and the clinical problems of the acid-etch technique for crowns. Advantages and disadvantages are discussed, and the influences of different factors on the strength of all-ceramic crowns are presented. Finally, the conclusion is drawn that conventional cementing of all-ceramic crowns is possible when the specific properties of the ceramics are taken into consideration.

  13. Salmonella SdiA recognizes N-acyl homoserine lactone signals from Pectobacterium carotovorum in vitro, but not in a bacterial soft rot.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noel, J T; Joy, J; Smith, J N; Fatica, M; Schneider, K R; Ahmer, B M M; Teplitski, M

    2010-03-01

    Genomes of Salmonella enterica isolates, including those linked to outbreaks of produce-associated gastroenteritis, contain sdiA, which encodes a receptor of N-acyl homoserine lactones (AHL). AHL are the quorum-sensing signals used by bacteria to coordinately regulate gene expression within -their populations. Because S. enterica does not produce its own AHL, SdiA is hypothesized to function in the interspecies cross-talk with AHL-producing bacteria. Under laboratory conditions, S. enterica responded to AHL from phytobacteria by upregulating expression of srgE. AHL-dependent expression of srgE required a functional sdiA. Essentially, no sdiA-dependent resolution of the srgE recombinase-based (RIVET) reporter was observed inside a soft rot formed on a tomato by an AHL-producing strain of Pectobacterium carotovorum. The results of the control experiments suggest that sdiA is not expressed inside tomato, pepper, green onion, or carrot affected by the soft rot, and the lack of sdiA expression in planta prevents Salmonella spp. from responding to AHL. Despite its inability to detect and respond to AHL during colonization of soft rots, S. enterica reached higher final cell numbers inside a tomato soft rot compared with its growth in intact tomato fruit. The synergistic effect was the strongest under the conditions that are typical for the Florida fall/winter production season.

  14. Comparative Assessment of Pathogenicity of Storage Rot Causing ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    L)Schott) corms were assessed for their potency in causing rot of the corms during storage. The isolates were Sclerotium rolfsii Sacc., Botryodiplodia theobromae Pat., Fusarium solanii (Mart) Sac., Fusarium SP. and Rhizopus stolonifer (Ehren ...

  15. Incorporating crown dimensions into stem height and basal area for ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Four crown dimensions (crown diameter, crown projection area, crown length and crown ratio) were each incorporated into nonlinear individual tree total height and basal area increment models for African white wood (Triplochiton scleroxylon K. Schum). The basic height/basal area growth model was formulated as a ...

  16. Equations for predicting uncompacted crown ratio based on compacted crown ratio and tree attributes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vicente J. Monleon; David Azuma; Donald. Gedney

    2004-01-01

    Equations to predict uncompacted crown ratio as a function of compacted crown ratio, tree diameter, and tree height are developed for the main tree species in Oregon, Washington, and California using data from the Forest Health Monitoring Program, USDA Forest Service. The uncompacted crown ratio was modeled with a logistic function and fitted using weighted, nonlinear...

  17. Erwinia carotovora extracellular proteases : characterization and role in soft rot

    OpenAIRE

    Kyöstiö, Sirkka R. M.

    1990-01-01

    Erwinia carotovora subsp. carotovora (Ecc) strain EC14, a Gram-negative bacterium, causes soft rot on several crops, including potato. Maceration of potato tuber tissue is caused by secreted pectolytic enzymes. Other cell-degrading enzymes may also have roles in pathogenesis, including cellulases, phospholipases, and protease(s). The objectives of this research were to (1) characterize Ecc extracellular protease (Prt) and (2) elucidate its role in potato soft rot. A gene enc...

  18. Association of Pectolytic Fluorescent PSeudomonas with Postharvest Rots of Onion

    OpenAIRE

    H.H. El-Hendawy

    2004-01-01

    Five isolates of pectolytic fluorescent pseudomonads were obtained from a rotted onion bulb and identified as Pseudomonas marginalis. At both 4 and 25oC, all isolates caused soft rot to detached plant parts of onion and to carrot, celery, cucumber, pepper, spinach, tomato and turnip (but not garlic). They did not however cause any symptoms in living plants of these same species. These results suggest that the onion isolates are a postharvest pathogen which is not destructive in th...

  19. Quantifying the legacy of foliar winter injury on woody aboveground carbon sequestration of red spruce trees

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexandra M. Kosiba; Paul G. Schaberg; Gary J. Hawley; Christopher F. Hansen

    2013-01-01

    Red spruce (Picea rubens Sarg.) decline has been quantitatively attributed to foliar winter injury caused by freezing damage. The results of this injury include foliar mortality, crown deterioration, and negative carbon (C) balances that can lead to tree health declines and eventual mortality. In 2003, a severe region-wide event damaged over 90% of...

  20. Comparative studies on thermochemical characterization of corn stover pretreated by white-rot and brown-rot fungi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Yelin; Yang, Xuewei; Yu, Hongbo; Zhang, Xiaoyu; Ma, Fuying

    2011-09-28

    The effects of white-rot and brown-rot fungal pretreatment on the chemical composition and thermochemical conversion of corn stover were investigated. Fungus-pretreated corn stover was analyzed by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction analysis to characterize the changes in chemical composition. Differences in thermochemical conversion of corn stover after fungal pretreatment were investigated using thermogravimetric and pyrolysis analysis. The results indicated that the white-rot fungus Irpex lacteus CD2 has great lignin-degrading ability, whereas the brown-rot fungus Fomitopsis sp. IMER2 preferentially degrades the amorphous regions of the cellulose. The biopretreatment favors thermal decomposition of corn stover. The weight loss of IMER2-treated acid detergent fiber became greater, and the oil yield increased from 32.7 to 50.8%. After CD2 biopretreatment, 58% weight loss of acid detergent lignin was achieved and the oil yield increased from 16.8 to 26.8%.

  1. Employment and winter construction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Ernst Jan de Place; Larsen, Jacob Norvig

    2011-01-01

    Reduced seasonal building activity in the construction sector is often assumed to be related to hard winter conditions for building activities and poor working conditions for construction workers, resulting in higher costs and poor quality of building products, particularly in the northern...... hemisphere. Can climatic conditions alone explain the sizeable difference in reduction in building activity in the construction sector in European countries in the winter months, or are other factors such as technology, economic cycles and schemes for financial compensation influential as well? What...... possibilities exist for reducing seasonal variation in employment? In addition to a literature review related to winter construction, European and national employment and meteorological data were studied. Finally, ministerial acts, ministerial orders or other public policy documents related to winter...

  2. Deer Wintering Areas

    Data.gov (United States)

    Vermont Center for Geographic Information — Deer winter habitat is critical to the long term survival of white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus) in Vermont. Being near the northern extreme of the...

  3. Winter Bottom Trawl Survey

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The standardized NEFSC Winter Bottom Trawl Survey was initiated in 1992 and covered offshore areas from the Mid-Atlantic to Georges Bank. Inshore strata were covered...

  4. Conifer root and butt rot caused by Heterobasidion annosum (Fr.) Bref. s.l.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asiegbu, Fred O; Adomas, Aleksandra; Stenlid, Jan

    2005-07-01

    ). Disease symptoms: symptoms (e.g. exhudation of resin, crown deterioration) due to Heterobasidion root rot in living trees are not particularly characteristic and in most cases cannot be distinguished from those caused by other root pathogens. Heterobasidion annosum s.l. is a white rot fungus. Initial growth in wood causes a stain that varies in colour depending on host tree species. Incipient decay is normally pale yellow and it develops into a light brown decay to become a white pocket rot with black flecks in its advanced stage. silvicultural methods (e.g. stump removal), chemicals (urea, borates) and biological control agent (Phlebiopsis gigantea, marketed as PG Suspension(R) in the UK, PG IBL(R) in Poland and Rotstop(R) in Fennoscandia) are commonly used approaches for minimizing the disease spread.

  5. QTLs for Resistance to Major Rice Diseases Exacerbated by Global Warming: Brown Spot, Bacterial Seedling Rot, and Bacterial Grain Rot

    OpenAIRE

    Mizobuchi, Ritsuko; Fukuoka, Shuichi; Tsushima, Seiya; Yano, Masahiro; Sato, Hiroyuki

    2016-01-01

    In rice (Oryza sativa L.), damage from diseases such as brown spot, caused by Bipolaris oryzae, and bacterial seedling rot and bacterial grain rot, caused by Burkholderia glumae, has increased under global warming because the optimal temperature ranges for growth of these pathogens are relatively high (around 30??C). Therefore, the need for cultivars carrying genes for resistance to these diseases is increasing to ensure sustainable rice production. In contrast to the situation for other impo...

  6. FRACTURE-RESISTANT MONOLITHIC DENTAL CROWNS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yu; Mai, Zhisong; Barani, Amir; Bush, Mark; Lawn, Brian

    2016-01-01

    Objective To quantify the splitting resistance of monolithic zirconia, lithium disilicate and nanoparticle-composite dental crowns. Methods Fracture experiments were conducted on anatomically-correct monolithic crown structures cemented to standard dental composite dies, by axial loading of a hard sphere placed between the cusps. The structures were observed in situ during fracture testing, and critical loads to split the structures were measured. Extended finite element modeling (XFEM), with provision for step-by-step extension of embedded cracks, was employed to simulate full failure evolution. Results Experimental measurements and XFEM predictions were self consistent within data scatter. In conjunction with a fracture mechanics equation for critical splitting load, the data were used to predict load-sustaining capacity for crowns on actual dentin substrates and for loading with a sphere of different size. Stages of crack propagation within the crown and support substrate were quantified. Zirconia crowns showed the highest fracture loads, lithium disilicate intermediate, and dental nanocomposite lowest. Dental nanocomposite crowns have comparable fracture resistance to natural enamel. Significance The results confirm that monolithic crowns are able to sustain high bite forces. The analysis indicates what material and geometrical properties are important in optimizing crown performance and longevity. PMID:26792623

  7. Fracture-resistant monolithic dental crowns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yu; Mai, Zhisong; Barani, Amir; Bush, Mark; Lawn, Brian

    2016-03-01

    To quantify the splitting resistance of monolithic zirconia, lithium disilicate and nanoparticle-composite dental crowns. Fracture experiments were conducted on anatomically-correct monolithic crown structures cemented to standard dental composite dies, by axial loading of a hard sphere placed between the cusps. The structures were observed in situ during fracture testing, and critical loads to split the structures were measured. Extended finite element modeling (XFEM), with provision for step-by-step extension of embedded cracks, was employed to simulate full failure evolution. Experimental measurements and XFEM predictions were self-consistent within data scatter. In conjunction with a fracture mechanics equation for critical splitting load, the data were used to predict load-sustaining capacity for crowns on actual dentin substrates and for loading with a sphere of different size. Stages of crack propagation within the crown and support substrate were quantified. Zirconia crowns showed the highest fracture loads, lithium disilicate intermediate, and dental nanocomposite lowest. Dental nanocomposite crowns have comparable fracture resistance to natural enamel. The results confirm that monolithic crowns are able to sustain high bite forces. The analysis indicates what material and geometrical properties are important in optimizing crown performance and longevity. Copyright © 2015 Academy of Dental Materials. All rights reserved.

  8. QTLs for Resistance to Major Rice Diseases Exacerbated by Global Warming: Brown Spot, Bacterial Seedling Rot, and Bacterial Grain Rot.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mizobuchi, Ritsuko; Fukuoka, Shuichi; Tsushima, Seiya; Yano, Masahiro; Sato, Hiroyuki

    2016-12-01

    In rice (Oryza sativa L.), damage from diseases such as brown spot, caused by Bipolaris oryzae, and bacterial seedling rot and bacterial grain rot, caused by Burkholderia glumae, has increased under global warming because the optimal temperature ranges for growth of these pathogens are relatively high (around 30 °C). Therefore, the need for cultivars carrying genes for resistance to these diseases is increasing to ensure sustainable rice production. In contrast to the situation for other important rice diseases such as blast and bacterial blight, no genes for complete resistance to brown spot, bacterial seedling rot or bacterial grain rot have yet been discovered. Thus, rice breeders have to use partial resistance, which is largely influenced by environmental conditions. Recent progress in molecular genetics and improvement of evaluation methods for disease resistance have facilitated detection of quantitative trait loci (QTLs) associated with resistance. In this review, we summarize the results of worldwide screening for cultivars with resistance to brown spot, bacterial seedling rot and bacterial grain rot and we discuss the identification of QTLs conferring resistance to these diseases in order to provide useful information for rice breeding programs.

  9. Fracture resistance of zirconia-composite veneered crowns in comparison with zirconia-porcelain crowns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alsadon, Omar; Patrick, David; Johnson, Anthony; Pollington, Sarah; Wood, Duncan

    2017-05-31

    The objectives were to evaluate the fracture resistance and stress concentration in zirconia/composite veneered crowns in comparison to zirconia/porcelain crowns using occlusal fracture resistance and by stress analysis using finite element analysis method. Zirconia substructures were divided into two groups based on the veneering material. A static load was applied occlusally using a ball indenter and the load to fracture was recorded in Newtons (N). The same crown design was used to create 3D crown models and evaluated using FEA. The zirconia/composite crowns subjected to static occlusal load showed comparable results to the zirconia/porcelain crowns. Zirconia/composite crowns showed higher stress on the zirconia substructure at 63.6 and 50.9 MPa on the zirconia substructure veneered with porcelain. In conclusion, zirconia/composite crowns withstood high occlusal loads similar to zirconia/porcelain crowns with no significant difference. However, the zirconia/composite crowns showed higher stress values than the zirconia/porcelain crowns at the zirconia substructure.

  10. Comparison of internal fit between implant abutments and cast metal crowns vs laser-sintered crowns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiliçarslan, Mehmet Ali; Özkan, Pelin; Uludag, Bülent; Mumcu, Emre

    2014-07-01

    A common problem related to cemented single crowns is the internal misfit, which may cause inadequate retention, especially when seated on the implant abutment. The aim of this study was to compare the internal fit of Co-Cr crowns using a traditional lost-wax casting technique from laser-sintered Co-Cr alloy crowns. Twelve metallic crowns per each technique were fabricated. The effect of the thickness of cement, originated internal gap was evaluated. Crowns were cemented on the implant abutments with resin cement, and the internal fit of crowns was measured at five areas with an optical microscope. The data were analyzed, and the means were compared with a t-test (pcrowns obtained through the lost wax method (min. 65.50 ± 9.54 μm and max. 313.46 ± 48.12 μm). The fit of the metal crown likely varies with the fabrication technique. The use of techniques that enable the adjustment of crown parameters, such as the laser sintering technique, maintains the desired fit between casting and implant abutments. This study investigated which technique affects the internal fit of cemented implant-supported crowns, comparing the use of lost wax casting and laser-sintered metal dental alloys. The results of this study indicate that the use of laser-sintered crowns can improve for crown accuracy.

  11. Metabolic changes in Avena sativa crowns recovering from freezing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henson, Cynthia A; Duke, Stanley H; Livingston, David P

    2014-01-01

    Extensive research has been conducted on cold acclimation and freezing tolerance of fall-sown cereal plants due to their economic importance; however, little has been reported on the biochemical changes occurring over time after the freezing conditions are replaced by conditions favorable for recovery and growth such as would occur during spring. In this study, GC-MS was used to detect metabolic changes in the overwintering crown tissue of oat (Avena sativa L.) during a fourteen day time-course after freezing. Metabolomic analysis revealed increases in most amino acids, particularly proline, 5-oxoproline and arginine, which increased greatly in crowns that were frozen compared to controls and correlated very significantly with days after freezing. In contrast, sugar and sugar related metabolites were little changed by freezing, except sucrose and fructose which decreased dramatically. In frozen tissue all TCA cycle metabolites, especially citrate and malate, decreased in relation to unfrozen tissue. Alterations in some amino acid pools after freezing were similar to those observed in cold acclimation whereas most changes in sugar pools after freezing were not. These similarities and differences suggest that there are common as well as unique genetic mechanisms between these two environmental conditions that are crucial to the winter survival of plants.

  12. Lava zirconia crowns and bridges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suttor, D

    2004-01-01

    Ceramic restorations--suitable for the anterior as well as the posterior region, simultaneously satisfying the demand for high strength, longevity, and esthetics--are an increasingly important field for the dental professional. Because of its outstanding mechanical properties and esthetics with a proven track record in other industrial areas, zirconium oxide (zirconia) is emerging in the dental industry. As the manufacturing method of choice, CAD/CAM is important for the dental laboratory; however, in the final analysis, the primary focus will be on the material properties and the clinical performance of the result of the CAD/CAM process--in this case, zirconia crowns and bridges. This is especially true since some concepts do not require the acquisition of a CAD/CAM system at all.

  13. Symptomology and etiology of a new disease, yellow stunt, and root rot of standing milkvetch caused by Embellisia sp. in Northern China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yan Zhong; Nan, Zhi Biao

    2007-06-01

    An Embellisia sp. has been established as the cause of a new disease of the herbaceous perennial forage legume, 'standing milkvetch' (Astragalus adsurgens Pall.) in Northern China, which severely reduces plant density and degrades A. adsurgens stands. The disease was common at an experimental location in Gansu Province where it was recognized by the occurrence of stunted plants with reddish-brown stems and yellow and necrotic leaf blades. An Embellisia sp. was isolated from symptomatic stem, leaf blade, petiole, and root tissues at varying frequencies of up to 90%. Single-spore isolates grew very slowly on PCA, PDA, V-8 and, wheat hay decoction agar. Pathogenicity was confirmed by inoculation of seeds, dipping 2-day-old pre-germinated seedlings in inoculum and spraying inoculum on 6-month-old plants. Symptoms on test plants included yellow leaf lesions, brown lesions on stems and petioles, stunted side-shoots with yellow, small, distorted and necrotic leaves, shoot blight, bud death, crown rot, root rot, and plant death. The disease is named as 'yellow stunt and root rot' of A. adsurgens to distinguish it from diseases caused by other known pathogens. Embellisia sp. is also pathogenic to A. sinicus but not to 11 other tested plant species.

  14. Fracture resistance of different primary anterior esthetic crowns

    OpenAIRE

    Al Shobber, Manar Zaki; Alkhadra, Thamer A.

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: Investigate and compare fracture resistance of four commercially available esthetic crowns. Methods: Sixty-four anterior crowns were used: NuSmile Primary crowns (NuSmile, Houston, Tex. USA) (16); Preveneered Cheng Crowns, (Orthodontic Technologies Inc., Houston, TX) (16); NuSmile ZR (NuSmile, Houston, Tex. USA); and Cheng Crowns zirconia (Orthodontic Technologies Inc., Houston, TX). Crowns were mounted and cemented on a negative replica and placed under servo hydraulic mechanical...

  15. Relation Between Frost-Resistance of Winter Grains, Their Respiration Rate and Water – Soluble Carbohydrates Content in Autumn - Spring Period

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pomortsev A.V.

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available The content of water-soluble carbohydrates and respiration rate in the crown tissue of winter wheat, rye and triticale in autumn – winter – spring were studied. In the period and of winter significant differences were revealed between winter crops in the rate of respiration and content of carbohydrates. Respiration of wheat in mid-March increased over February to 33%, and the content of carbohydrates during this period decreased by 10%. Despite the increase in environment temperature by mid-March of winter rye and triticale showed not increase, but rather decrease in the rate of respiration. A higher level of plant resistance of winter rye and triticale to low temperatures, as compared to winter wheat is associated with carbohydrate status and higher stability of respiration process in winter rye and triticale in response to temperature rise in end of winter.

  16. Marginal Strength of Collarless Metal Ceramic Crown

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sikka Swati

    2010-01-01

    fracture strength at margins of metal ceramic crowns cemented to metal tooth analogs. Crowns evaluated with different marginal configurations, shoulder and shoulder bevel with 0 mm, 0.5 mm, 1 mm, and 1.5 mm, were selected. Methods. Maxillary right canine typhodont tooth was prepared to receive a metal ceramic crown with shoulder margin. This was duplicated to get 20 metal teeth analogs. Then the same tooth was reprepared to get shoulder bevel configuration. These crowns were then cemented onmetal teeth analogs and tested for fracture strength atmargin on an Instron testing machine. A progressive compressive load was applied using 6.3 mm diameter rod with crosshead speed of 2.5 mm per minute. Statisticaly analysis was performed with ANOVA, Student's “t” test and “f” test. Results. The fracture strength of collarless metal ceramic crowns under study exceeded the normal biting force. Therefore it can be suggested that collarless metal ceramic crowns with shoulder or shoulder bevel margins up to 1.5 mm framework reduction may be indicated for anteriormetal ceramic restorations. Significance. k Collarless metal ceramic crowns have proved to be successful for anterior fixed restorations. Hence, it may be subjected to more clinical trials.

  17. Colorimetric values of esthetic stainless steel crowns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosoya, Yumiko; Omachi, Koichi; Staninec, Michal

    2002-01-01

    The colorimetric values of two different kinds of esthetic stainless steel crowns were measured and compared with the colorimetric values of primary anterior teeth in Japanese children. The colorimetric values of resin composite-faced stainless steel crowns (Kinder Krown) and epoxy-coated stainless steel crowns (White Steel Crown) were measured with a color difference meter. The Commission Internationale de Eclairage L*, a*, b*, and delta E*ab values and Munsell value, chroma, and hue were calculated. The data were compared with previously reported colorimetric values of Japanese primary anterior teeth measured with the same color difference meter used in this study. Compared to Japanese primary anterior teeth, Kinder Krown Pedo I and Pedo II showed much higher L* values and lower hue; on the other hand, White Steel Crown showed much higher L*, a*, b* values, much higher value and chroma, and much lower hue. Color analysis revealed that the colors of the White Steel Crown and Kinder Krown Pedo I were substantially different from the color of Japanese primary anterior teeth. The color difference between Pedo II crowns and Japanese primary anterior teeth was relatively high, but the color of Pedo II might be acceptable for clinical use.

  18. Retention and surface changes of zirconia primary crowns with secondary crowns of different materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turp, Işıl; Bozdağ, Ergün; Sünbüloğlu, Emin; Kahruman, Cem; Yusufoğlu, Ibrahim; Bayraktar, Gülsen

    2014-11-01

    To evaluate zirconia as a substitute for gold alloy in primary crowns facing secondary crowns manufactured with different materials, in terms of long-term retention force changes, wear, and phase transformation was aimed. A total of 12 groups, each containing six samples, consisting of gold alloy primary crown-electroformed gold secondary crowns (AA), zirconia primary crown-electroformed gold secondary crowns (ZA) and zirconia primary crown-casted non-precious alloy secondary crowns (ZC) with conus angles of 0°, 2°, 4°, and 6° were evaluated. Samples were subjected to 10,000 insertion-separation cycles in artificial saliva and retention force was measured. X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscope analysis were performed on the sample surfaces. The highest retention forces were obtained from ZC-0° group (72.09-71.26 N) and the lowest were obtained from ZA-4° (12.73-19.44 N) and ZA-6° (5.36-19.73 N) groups in the beginning and after 10,000 cycles, respectively. Retention force increased as the conus angle decreased. The monoclinic phase ratio of the zirconia primary crowns decreased after the experiments. No wear was observed in zirconia primary crowns except for the ZC-0° and ZC-2° groups. The use of zirconia primary crowns resulted in a less excursive retention force. A more predictable and less excursive retention force can be obtained using a hard and rigid primary crown material like zirconia. Despite a lack of knowledge about the aging of zirconia without a veneer layer in the oral environment, zirconia primary crowns are more advantageous in terms of retention force development and wear.

  19. The nuclear winter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Velikhow, Y.P.

    1986-01-01

    Nuclear winter is an example of possible secondary effects, and if we speak of secondary we are thinking of small-scale second-order effects, but a nuclear winter is not a second-order effect. If you calculate the amount of heat produced by a nuclear explosion, it is a very small amount which does not have any chance of changing the Earth's climate, but a nuclear explosion drives or stars some new mechanism - the mechanism of nuclear winter - after 100 megatons of dust are transferred to the upper atmosphere. Another example of such amplification is radioactive fall-out, especially long-life radioactive fall-out after the possible elimination of the nuclear power industry, nuclear storage and distribution of storage waste around the globe. This is a very powerful amplification mechanism

  20. ROTS: An R package for reproducibility-optimized statistical testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suomi, Tomi; Seyednasrollah, Fatemeh; Jaakkola, Maria K; Faux, Thomas; Elo, Laura L

    2017-05-01

    Differential expression analysis is one of the most common types of analyses performed on various biological data (e.g. RNA-seq or mass spectrometry proteomics). It is the process that detects features, such as genes or proteins, showing statistically significant differences between the sample groups under comparison. A major challenge in the analysis is the choice of an appropriate test statistic, as different statistics have been shown to perform well in different datasets. To this end, the reproducibility-optimized test statistic (ROTS) adjusts a modified t-statistic according to the inherent properties of the data and provides a ranking of the features based on their statistical evidence for differential expression between two groups. ROTS has already been successfully applied in a range of different studies from transcriptomics to proteomics, showing competitive performance against other state-of-the-art methods. To promote its widespread use, we introduce here a Bioconductor R package for performing ROTS analysis conveniently on different types of omics data. To illustrate the benefits of ROTS in various applications, we present three case studies, involving proteomics and RNA-seq data from public repositories, including both bulk and single cell data. The package is freely available from Bioconductor (https://www.bioconductor.org/packages/ROTS).

  1. Internal fit evaluation of crowns prepared using a new dental crown fabrication technique: laser-sintered Co-Cr crowns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ucar, Yurdanur; Akova, Tolga; Akyil, Musa S; Brantley, William A

    2009-10-01

    Difficulties encountered during casting of base metal dental alloys limit their use. Application of these alloys might be enhanced if new techniques are used. The purpose of this study was to compare the internal fit of laser-sintered Co-Cr alloy crowns with base metal restorations prepared from another Co-Cr alloy and a Ni-Cr alloy using conventional casting techniques. Internal fit of laser-sintered Co-Cr crowns was compared with the fit of conventionally cast Ni-Cr and Co-Cr alloy crowns. Twelve crown-shaped specimens were prepared on a stainless steel die representing a prepared maxillary right central incisor for each group. Fit of crowns was evaluated using 2 different techniques: (1) weighing the light-body addition silicone that simulated a cement material, and (2) measuring the internal gap width on a die for longitudinally sectioned specimens. One-way ANOVA followed by Tukey multiple comparison test was used for statistical analysis (alpha=.05). Significantly higher mean (SD) light-body silicone weights (Pcrowns. However, no significant difference was found among the 3 alloy groups evaluated for the internal gap width of sectioned crown specimens.

  2. Persistence of Gliocephalotrichum spp. causing fruit rot of rambutan (Nephelium lappaceum L.) in Puerto Rico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Worldwide, fruit rot of rambutan is an important problem that limits the storage, marketing and long-distance transportation of the fruit. A complex of pathogens has been reported to cause fruit rot of rambutan and significant post-harvest economic losses. During 2009 and 2011 rambutan fruit rot was...

  3. First report of Fusarium proliferatum causing dry rot in Michigan commercial potato (Solanum tuberosum) production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fusarium dry rot of potato is a postharvest disease caused by several Fusarium spp. and is of worldwide importance. Thirteen Fusarium spp. have been implicated in fungal dry rots of potatoes worldwide. Among them, 11 species have been reported causing potato dry rot of seed tubers in the northern Un...

  4. Fusarium spp. causing dry rot of seed potato tubers in Michigan and their sensitivity to fungicides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fusarium dry rot of potato (Solanum tuberosum L.) is a postharvest disease that can be caused by several Fusarium spp. A survey was conducted to establish the composition of Fusarium species causing dry rot of seed tubers in Michigan. A total of 370 dry rot symptomatic tubers were collected in 2009 ...

  5. Occurrence of wood-and root- rot basidiomycetes on trees in Bayero ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Several death and decays or rots of tropical trees are as result of infection caused by wood and root rot 'parasitic basidiomycetes. In the present study, survey of parasitic homobasidiomycetes causing wood and root rot on woody trees in Bayero University, Kano (two campuses) was carried out between April – September ...

  6. Fracture resistance of zirconia-composite veneered crowns in comparison with zirconia-porcelain crowns.

    OpenAIRE

    Alsadon, O.; Patrick, D.; Johnson, A.; Pollington, S.; Wood, D.

    2017-01-01

    The objectives were to evaluate the fracture resistance and stress concentration in zirconia/composite veneered crowns in comparison to zirconia/porcelain crowns using occlusal fracture resistance and by stress analysis using finite element analysis method. Zirconia substructures were divided into two groups based on the veneering material. A static load was applied occlusally using a ball indenter and the load to fracture was recorded in Newtons (N). The same crown design was used to create ...

  7. Titan's Emergence from Winter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flasar, F. Michael; Achterberg, Richard; Jennings, Donald; Schinder, Paul

    2011-01-01

    We summarize the changes in Titans thermal structure derived from Cassini CIRS and radio-occultation data during the transition from winter to early spring. Titan's surface, and middle atmosphere show noticeable seasonal change, whereas that in most of the troposphere is mated. This can be understood in terms of the relatively small radiative relaxation time in the middle atmosphere and much larger time scale in the troposphere. The surface exhibits seasonal change because the heat capacity in an annual skin depth is much smaller than that in the lowest scale height of the troposphere. Surface temperatures rise 1 K at raid and high latitudes in the winter northern hemisphere and cool in the southern hemisphere. Changes in in the middle atmosphere are more complicated. Temperatures in the middle stratosphere (approximately 1 mbar) increase by a few kelvin at mid northern latitudes, but those at high latitudes first increase as that region moves out of winter shadow, and then decrease. This probably results from the combined effect of increased solar heating as the suit moves higher in the sky and the decreased adiabatic warming as the sinking motions associated with the cross-equatorial meridional cell weaken. Consistent with this interpretation, the warm temperatures observed higher up at the winter polar stratopause cool significantly.

  8. Activity relationships for aromatic crown ethers

    CERN Document Server

    Wilson, M J

    1998-01-01

    This thesis involves an investigation of aromatic crown ethers and a study of their binding constants for alkali metals. The study was motivated by the current needs of the semiconductor industry to improve the scavenging of mobile ions from fabricated circuits. A number of aromatic crown ethers have been sulphonated in an attempt to improve their water solubility and cation binding activity. These materials have been extensively studied and their binding activity determined. In collaboration with a molecular modelling study, the effect of ionisable sulphonate groups on the macrocycles' behaviour has been investigated. The broader issue of the effect of substituents in aromatic crown ethers has also been studied with the preparation of a wide range of substituted crown ethers. The cation binding activity of these materials has been found to bear a simple relationship to the electron withdrawing nature of the aromatic substituents. This relationship can be accurately monitored using electronic charge densities...

  9. Methods for evaluating crown area profiles of forest stands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubrasich, Michael E.; Hann, D.W.; Tappeiner, J. C.

    1997-01-01

    Canopy architectures of five structurally complex forest stands and three structurally simple forest stands in southwest Oregon and the Willamette Valley, Oregon, were evaluated and quantified through crown area profiles. Mixed conifer and mixed conifer hardwood stands across a range of sites were sampled for crown widths and heights. Crown width and shape equations were derived and used to quantify the stand crown area at incremental heights above the forest floor. Crown area profiles describe the spatial arrangement of aboveground forest vegetation and the total pore spaces between crowns. Plot by plot profiles were combined to produce vertical and horizontal displays of the stand crown area distribution. In complex stands, the forest space was moderately occupied by crowns from the forest floor up to heights over 30 m, producing uniform distributions of between-crown porosity. The structurally complex stands had between-crown porosity values of 70% to 90% for more than 23 vertical metres of canopy, and they had total between-crown porosities of 86% to 91%. The structurally simple stands had between-crown porosity values of 70% to 90% for less than 8 vertical metres of canopy, and they had total between-crown porosities of 69% to 85%. Variances in crown area indicate that variation in horizontal crown area (within heights) was larger in complex stands than in simple stands, but vertical crown areas (between heights) varied less in complex stands. The study provides a basis for discriminating between canopy architectures and for quantifying the porosity of forest canopies.

  10. Experimental and numerical modeling of shrub crown fire initiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watcharapong Tachajapong; Jesse Lozano; Shakar Mahalingam; Xiangyang Zhou; David Weise

    2009-01-01

    The transition of fire from dry surface fuels to wet shrub crown fuels was studied using laboratory experiments and a simple physical model to gain a better understanding of the transition process. In the experiments, we investigated the effects of varying vertical distances between surface and crown fuels (crown base height), and of the wind speed on crown fire...

  11. Long-term clinical performance of esthetic primary molar crowns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ram, Diana; Fuks, Anna B; Eidelman, Eliecer

    2003-01-01

    The aim of the study was to report the long-term clinical performance of esthetic primary molar crowns and compare them to that of stainless steel crowns (SSC). Twenty crowns (10 conventional and 10 esthetic) placed in 10 children who had participated in a previously reported study, were assessed again after 4 years. The crowns were evaluated clinically and radiographically according to the following parameters: gingival health, marginal extension, crown adequacy, proper occlusion, proximal contact, chipping of the facing (for esthetic crowns only), and cement removal. At the 4 year evaluation, all the esthetic crowns showed chipping of the facing. No difference was found for marginal extension, occlusion, crown adequacy and periodontal health between SSCs and the esthetic crowns. After 4 years, all the esthetic crowns presented chipping of the facing and, consequently, a very poor esthetic appearance.

  12. An investigation of crown fuel bulk density effects on the dynamics of crown fire initiation in shrublands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watcharapong Tachajapong; Jesse Lozano; Shankar Mahalingam; Xiangyang Zhou; David R. Weise

    2008-01-01

    Crown fire initiation is studied by using a simple experimental and detailed physical modeling based on Large Eddy Simulation (LES). Experiments conducted thus far reveal that crown fuel ignition via surface fire occurs when the crown base is within the continuous flame region and does not occur when the crown base is located in the hot plume gas region of the surface...

  13. Extraction separation of lithium isotopes with crown-ethers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsivadze, A.Yu.; Demin, S.V.; Levkin, A.V.; Zhilov, V.I.; Nikol'skij, S.F.; Knyazev, D.A.

    1990-01-01

    By the method of extraction chromatography lithium isotope separation coefficients are measured during chemical isotope exchange between lithium aquocomplex and its complex in chloroform with crown-ethers: benzo-15-crown-5, 15crown-5, dicyclohexano-18-crown-6 and dibenzo-18-crown-6. Lithium perchlorate and trichloroacetate are the salts extracted. Values of 6 Li/ 7 Li isotope separation are 1.0032-1.020

  14. Comparison of the fracture strengths of metal-ceramic crowns and three ceromer crowns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ku, Chul-Whoi; Park, Sang-Won; Yang, Hong-So

    2002-08-01

    The fracture strength of a number of new ceromer systems for the fabrication of anterior fixed partial dentures is unknown. The purpose of this study was to compare the fracture strengths of metal-ceramic crowns and 3 types of ceromer crowns in a simulated anterior tooth preparation. A resin maxillary central incisor analog was prepared with a 5-degree convergence angle and a 90-degree, 1-mm shoulder. The incisal edge was reduced by 2 mm, and the axiogingival and axioincisal line angles were rounded. A mold of this tooth was made with vinyl polysiloxane impression material. Ten wax patterns were made from the mold and cast in a nickel-chromium alloy for the fabrication of metal dies, from which 10 metal-ceramic crowns were fabricated. Ten crowns for each of 3 ceromer systems (Artglass, Sculpture, and Targis) were fabricated from the same metal die. Each crown group was prepared, polymerized, air-particle abraded, and finished in accordance with the specific manufacturer's instructions. All 4 types of finished crowns were luted to the dies and embedded in polymethyl methacrylate resin blocks. Their fracture resistance was tested in a universal testing machine. The load was directed at the incisolingual line angle, at 130 degrees to the long axis of each specimen, until catastrophic failure occurred. A 7-mm-diameter rod was used to load the artificial crowns, with the center of the rod in contact with the crown surfaces. Analysis of variance and Tukey's multiple comparisons test (Pceromer crowns (1317 vs 602 N, respectively) (Pceromer crowns tested, although significantly lower than the values for metal-ceramic crowns, still exceeded normal occlusal forces.

  15. Editorial - The winter Atomiades

    CERN Multimedia

    Staff Association

    2011-01-01

    As we wrote in our previous editorial, the Staff Association gives direct support to sports events, such as the Atomiades, a section of the Association of Sports Communities of European Research Institutes, which brings together sportsmen and women from 38 European research centres in 13 countries (Austria, Belgium, Czech Republic, United Kingdom, Finland, France, Germany, Hungary, Italy, Luxemburg, the Netherlands, Russia, and Switzerland). The summer Atomiades take place between the months of June and September every three years. Thirteen such events have taken place since 1973, the last one in June 2009 in Berlin. As far as the winter Atomiades are concerned, also organized every three years, and alternating with the summer Atomiades, there have been eleven since 1981, the last one at the end of January this year in neighbouring France. The following article tells the wonderful adventure of the CERN staff who took part in this event. A positive outcome for CERN skiers at the winter Atomiades The 11t...

  16. Winter is losing its cool

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, S.

    2017-12-01

    Winter seasons have significant societal impacts across all sectors ranging from direct human health to ecosystems, transportation, and recreation. This study quantifies the severity of winter and its spatial-temporal variations using a newly developed winter severity index and daily temperature, snowfall and snow depth. The winter severity and the number of extreme winter days are decreasing across the global terrestrial areas during 1901-2015 except the southeast United States and isolated regions in the Southern Hemisphere. These changes are dominated by winter warming, while the changes in daily snowfall and snow depth played a secondary role. The simulations of multiple CMIP5 climate models can well capture the spatial and temporal variations of the observed changes in winter severity and extremes during 1951-2005. The models are consistent in projecting a future milder winter under various scenarios. The winter severity is projected to decrease 60-80% in the middle-latitude Northern Hemisphere under the business-as-usual scenario. The winter arrives later, ends earlier and the length of winter season will be notably shorter. The changes in harsh winter in the polar regions are weak, mainly because the warming leads to more snowfall in the high latitudes.

  17. Urban Crowns: crown analysis software to assist in quantifying urban tree benefits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthew F. Winn; Sang-Mook Lee Bradley; Philip A. Araman

    2010-01-01

    UrbanCrowns is a Microsoft® Windows®-based computer program developed by the U.S. Forest Service Southern Research Station. The software assists urban forestry professionals, arborists, and community volunteers in assessing and monitoring the crown characteristics of urban trees (both deciduous and coniferous) using a single side-view digital photograph. Program output...

  18. Registration of SR98 sugar beet germplasm with resistances to Rhizoctonia seedling and crown and root rot diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugar beet (Beta vulgaris L.) germplasms SR98 (PI 655951) and SR98/2 (659754) are being released as potential pollinators or populations from which to select pollinators for hybrid seed production, and were developed by the USDA-ARS, at East Lansing, MI, in cooperation with the Beet Sugar Developmen...

  19. in vitro technique for selecting onion for white rot disease

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ACSS

    and Simmonds, D.H. 2003. Partial resistance to white mold in a transgenic soybean line. Crop Science 43: 92-95. Coventry, E., Noble, R., Mead, A. and Whipps,. J.M. 2005. Suppression of Allium white rot. (Sclerotium cepivorum) in different soils using vegetable wastes. European Journal of Plant Pathology 111: 101-112.

  20. Evaluation of common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris) response to charcoal rot

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charcoal rot in common beans (Phaseolus vulgaris L.), caused by Macrophomina phaseolina (Tassi) Gold. (Mph), is an endemic disease in the prevailing hot and dry conditions in southern Puerto Rico. This study evaluated the 120 bean genotypes that compose the BASE 120 panel under screenhouse conditio...

  1. improvement of resistance to fusarium root rot through gene

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Prof. Adipala Ekwamu

    PhD. Thesis. University of KwaZulu-Natal, Pietmeritzburg,. South Africa. Navarro, F., Sass, M.E. and Nienhuis, J. 2003. Identification and mapping bean root rot resistance in an 'Eagle x Puebla 152' population. Annual Report of the Bean. Improvement Cooperative 47:83–84. Park, S.J. and Tu, J.C. 1994. Genetic segregation.

  2. Biodegrading effects of some rot fungi on Pinus caribaea wood

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2008-05-16

    May 16, 2008 ... degradation was peculiar with each fungus. Wood decay varied along the tree bole but was not related to height above the ground. The results indicated that biodegradation by rot fungi differs in intensity according to the fungus species and this suggested that preservative impregnation and retention may.

  3. Physiological studies of Sclerotium rolfsii Sacc. causing collar rot of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In vitro studies were conducted on the effect of temperature, pH levels, carbon, nitrogen and amino acids on the mycelial growth and biomass production of Sclerotium rofsii Sacc. causing collar rot of mint. The results reveal that the growth of S. rolfsii was maximum at 30°C which was reduced significantly below 20°C and ...

  4. Botanicals to Control Soft Rot Bacteria of Potato

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. M. Rahman

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Extracts from eleven different plant species such as jute (Corchorus capsularis L., cheerota (Swertia chiraita Ham., chatim (Alstonia scholaris L., mander (Erythrina variegata, bael (Aegle marmelos L., marigold (Tagetes erecta, onion (Allium cepa, garlic (Allium sativum L., neem (Azadiracta indica, lime (Citrus aurantifolia, and turmeric (Curcuma longa L. were tested for antibacterial activity against potato soft rot bacteria, E. carotovora subsp. carotovora (Ecc P-138, under in vitro and storage conditions. Previously, Ecc P-138 was identified as the most aggressive soft rot bacterium in Bangladeshi potatoes. Of the 11 different plant extracts, only extracts from dried jute leaves and cheerota significantly inhibited growth of Ecc P-138 in vitro. Finally, both plant extracts were tested to control the soft rot disease of potato tuber under storage conditions. In a 22-week storage condition, the treated potatoes were significantly more protected against the soft rot infection than those of untreated samples in terms of infection rate and weight loss. The jute leaf extracts showed more pronounced inhibitory effects on Ecc-138 growth both in in vitro and storage experiments.

  5. Huanglongbing increases Diplodia Stem End Rot in Citrus sinensis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huanglongbing (HLB), one of the most devastating diseases of citrus is caused by the a-Proteobacteria Candidatus Liberibacter. Diplodia natalensis Pole-Evans is a fungal pathogen which has been known to cause a postharvest stem-end rot of citrus, the pathogen infects citrus fruit under the calyx, an...

  6. Fungi associated with base rot disease of aloe vera (Aloe ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2008-12-17

    Dec 17, 2008 ... Fungi associated with base rot disease of Aloe vera (syn. Aloe barbadensis) were investigated in Niger. Delta Area of Nigeria. Fungi and their percentage frequency were Aspergillus verocosa 28.03%,. Fusarium oxysporium 24.24%, Plectosphaerella cucumerina 16.67%, Mammeria ehinobotryoides 15.91 ...

  7. Inflorescence rot disease of date palm is caused by Fusarium ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Zulfiqar-Ali

    2012-05-01

    May 1, 2012 ... inflorescence rot disease in southern part of Iraq is Fusarium proliferatum. Pathogenecity test confirmed the ... Key words: Fusarium proliferatum, ITS1, ITS4, pathogenecity, PCR, isolates, phylogeny. INTRODUCTION ..... ITS rRNA Region for Identification of Fusarium spp. from Ocular. Sources. Investigative ...

  8. Advancing our understanding of charcoal rot in soybeans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charcoal rot (Macrophomina phaseolina (Tassi) Goid ) of soybean [Glycine max (L.) Merr.], is an important but commonly misidentified disease, and very few summary articles exist on this pathosystem. Research conducted over the last 10 years has improved our understanding of the environment conducive...

  9. Production and optimization of ligninolytic enzymes by white rot ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The present study deals with production of ligninolytic enzymes from an indigenous white rot fungus Schizophyllum commune IBL-06 by using banana stalk as substrate through the process of solid state fermentation. The production process was further improved by optimizing a number of physical parameters such as ...

  10. Fungi associated with base rot disease of aloe vera ( Aloe ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Fungi associated with base rot disease of Aloe vera (syn. Aloe barbadensis) were investigated in Niger Delta Area of Nigeria. Fungi and their percentage frequency were Aspergillus verocosa 28.03%, Fusarium oxysporium 24.24%, Plectosphaerella cucumerina 16.67%, Mammeria ehinobotryoides 15.91% and Torula ...

  11. Inflorescence rot disease of date palm caused by Fusarium ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Date palm is one of the important income sources for many farmers in different parts of several countries, including Iraq, Iran, Saudi Arabia, North Africa etc. Inflorescence rot is a serious disease of date palm which limits its yield. The identification of the causal organism is a key step to tackling this disease, and such studies ...

  12. Root rots of common and tepary beans in Puerto Rico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Root rots are a disease complex affecting common bean and can be severe in bean growing areas in the tropics and subtropics. The presence of several pathogens makes it difficult to breed for resistance because of the synergistic effect of the pathogens in the host and the interaction of soil factors...

  13. Detecting cotton boll rot with an electronic nose

    Science.gov (United States)

    South Carolina Boll Rot is an emerging disease of cotton, Gossypium hirsutum L., caused by the opportunistic bacteria, Pantoea agglomerans (Ewing and Fife). Unlike typical fungal diseases, bolls infected with P. agglomerans continue to appear normal externally, complicating early and rapid detectio...

  14. Factors contributing to bacterial bulb rots of onion

    Science.gov (United States)

    The incidence of bacterial rots of onion bulbs is increasing and has become a serious problem for growers. This increase is likely due to a combination of factors, such as high bacterial populations in soils and irrigation water, heavy rains flooding production fields, higher temperatures, etc. It m...

  15. Evaluation of antagonistic fungi against charcoal rot of sunflower ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user

    Results showed reduction in disease incidence of charcoal rot on sunflower cultivar G-66 with antagonist, A. flavus (100%) followed by A. niger (64.86%) P. capsulatum (63.79%) and T. viride (31.89%) over control. Decrease in disease incidence over control was 100% where seed was treated with combination of A. niger ...

  16. OXIDATION OF PERSISTANT ENVIRONMENTAL POLLUTANTS BY A WHITE ROT FUNGUS

    Science.gov (United States)

    The white rot fungus Phanerochaete chrysosporium degraded DDT [1,1,-bis(4-chlorophenyl)-2,2,2-trichloroethane], 3,4,3',4'-tetrachlorobiphenyl, 2,4,5,2',-4',5'-hexachlorobiphenyl, 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin, lindane (1,2,3,4,5,6-hexachlorocylohexane), and benzo[a]pyrene t...

  17. Corm Rot and Yellows of Gladiolus and Its Biomanagement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Khan

    2005-08-01

    Full Text Available A corm dressing containing Trichoderma harzianum (T014 and Pseudomonas fluorescens (PS07 cultured on a bagasse-soil-molasses mixture was tested for its efficacy against corm rot and yellows caused by Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. gladioli on the gladiolus (Gladiolus psittacinus L. cv. White Prosperity (WP, King Lear (KL, Friendship (FR, Her Majesty (HM and American Beauty (AB in a pot culture experiment. The effectiveness of the biocontrol agents was compared with that of the fungicide carbendazim (200 ppm. All cultivars were susceptible to the pathogenic fungus and developed the characteristic symptoms of corm rot and yellows. Cultivars HM and AB were highly susceptible, scoring 2.9–3.2 on a corm rot and yellows scale (0–5 scale; compared with 1.5–2.9 for the other cultivars. Fungal infection reduced plant growth and flowering significantly, with a 15–28% decrease in the number of florets/spike. Application of carbendazim, T. harzianum (P=0.001 and P. fluorescens (P=0.05 decreased the corm rot and yellows scores and the soil population of the pathogen, and increased plant growth and flowering. The greatest improvement in the flower variables of infected plants was recorded with P. fluorescens (+18–31% over control. The soil population of the bioagents increased significantly over time, both in the presence and in the absence of the pathogenic fungus, but more in its absence.

  18. Calonectria species associated with cutting rot of Eucalyptus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lombard, L.; Zhou, X.D.; Crous, P.W.; Wingfield, B.D.; Wingfield, M.J.

    2010-01-01

    Decline in the productivity of Eucalyptus hybrid cutting production in the Guangdong Province of China is linked to cutting rot associated with several Calonectria spp. The aim of this study was to identify these fungi using morphological and DNA sequence comparisons. Two previously undescribed

  19. Management of Potato Soft Rot by Gamma Irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abd El-Ghany, H.; Moussa, Z.; Abd El-Rahman, A.F.; Salem, E.A.

    2017-01-01

    This investigation aims to apply a safe practice to minimize potato losses due to soft rot disease of tubers kept under ambient temperature. In this regard, gamma irradiation was used to extend keeping quality through its effect on soft rot bacteria. Eight bacterial isolates were recovered on Logan’s medium from kitchen kept tubers with symptoms of soft rot disease. Five isolates were found pathogenic and tentatively identified as Pectobacterium atrosepticum and Pectobacterium carotovorum sub sp. brasiliense on the basis of the usual bacteriological methods. A molecular method using 16SrDNA sequence analysis for verification of the identity of two isolates was made. The two bacterial isolates, Pectobacterium atrosepticum and Pectobacterium carotovorum sub sp. brasiliense, were irradiated by different doses of gamma rays. Complete inhibition occurred at doses 2.5 and 2.0 KGy for high densities (Approximately 4.0x10 9 CFU/ml) of P. atrosepticum and P. carotovorum sub sp. brasiliense, respectively. The D10 value of gamma irradiation was 0.24 KGy for P. atrosepticum and 0.20 KGy for P. carotovorum subsp. brasiliense. Irradiation of artificially infected tubers with soft rot bacteria using the two mentioned D10 doses for the two bacterial species increased the shelf life of tubers kept under ambient temperature. The internal chemical quality of tubers was shown to be improved by keeping the tubers under ambient temperature after irradiation by the two D10 doses 0.24 and 0.20 KGy

  20. Antagonistic Effect of Native Bacillus Isolates against Black Root Rot ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Faba bean (Vicia faba L.) is one of the most important pulse crops grown in eastern Africa. Black root rot (Fusarium solani) is known to cause great yield losses in faba bean, especially in the highlands of Ethiopia. The objective of this study was to evaluate the biological control ability of native Bacillus species on the basis of ...

  1. Autochthonous white rot fungi from the tropical forest: Potential of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Autochthonous white rot fungi from the tropical forest: Potential of Cuban strains for dyes and textile industrial effluents decolourisation. MI Sánchez-López, SF Vanhulle, V Mertens, G Guerra, SH Figueroa, C Decock, A Corbisier, MJ Penninckx ...

  2. The influence of root rot incidence on cassava genotype on ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    28 panelists were asked to indicate their degree of preference for the colour, odour and taste of each gari sample by choosing the appropriate category in the hedonic scale. The results were compared with the tuberous root rot incidence and severity of genotypes in the field. All experiments were repeated and the data ...

  3. Restoring crown fractures by direct composite layering using transparent strip crowns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eden, Ece; Taviloğlu, Engin

    2016-04-01

    Traumatic dental injuries are mostly seen at childhood and adolescence. The most common fracture in permanent anterior teeth is crown fracture. Esthetic and easy rehabilitation of these anterior teeth is possible using layering techniques and direct composite resin restorations. Shape, color and surface texture are the most important factors in restoring crown fractures esthetically. This article illustrates how to perform an esthetic composite resin restoration of crown fractures using strip crowns. The technique suggests using a strip crown as a mold for direct resin composite restoration. This provides a cost-effective treatment with operator friendly approach where most outstanding advantage is the minimum chair-side time with a single visit that is very important for young trauma patients. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. Root rot of sugarbeet in the Vojvodina Province

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stojšin Vera B.

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Large changes introduced in the sugar beet production technology in the Vojvodina Province over last 40 years resulted in changes in the etiology and harmfulness of different agents of sugar beet root diseases. Improvements in cultivation practices reduced the harmfulness of some diseases while increased the harmfulness of others. Some disease agents became obsolete, but others gained importance. New agents of root diseases were found. The most frequent damages, persisting over long periods of time were caused by seedling damping-off, Fusarium root rot, charcoal root rot, parasitic (Rhizomania and non-parasitic root bearding. The parasitic damping-off caused by several fungal species but most frequently by Phoma betae occurred at the time when multigerm seeds were used in combination with extensive cultural practices. The agents of seedling diseases completely lost their significance as the consequence of switching to fungicide - treated monogerm seeds, earlier planting and improved soil tillage. In the period of intensive use of agricultural chemicals, seedling damping-off occurred frequently due to the phytotoxic action of chemicals (insecticides, herbicides and mineral fertilizers. In some years, frosts caused damping- off of sugar beet seedlings on a large scale in the Vojvodina Province. Poor sugar beet germination and emergence were frequently due to spring droughts. Sometimes they were due to strong winds. The occurrence of Fusarium root rot and charcoal root rot intensified on poor soils. Fusariosis symptoms were exhibited as plant wilting and different forms of root rot. In recent years root tip rot has occurred frequently in the first part of the growing season causing necrosis and dying of plants. Lateral roots tended to proliferate from the healthy tissue, giving the root a bearded appearance similar to Rhizomania. Fusarium oxysporum was the most frequent agent of this fusariosis. F. graminearum, F. equiseti, F. solani have also been

  5. Indications & predisposing factors of crown lengthening surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arghavan Amini-Behbahani

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Since crown lengthening surgery could be accompanied by stress, pain and discomfort, knowledge about its predisposing factors could reduce the demands for such surgery.The aim of this study was to identify the most important indications of crown lengthening surgery in order to present new ideas to clinicians on how to reduce the need for this surgery. Methods: This cross-sectional study was done on 470 patients (aged 12-89 years referred for crown lengthening surgery. The patients' demographic data and their reasons for surgery, the teeth restoration condition and its type, condition of the opposite tooth, type of fractured cusp (posterior teeth, root canal therapy condition and quality, and size of existing intracanal posts were recorded in a data sheet. Data were analyzed by using SPSS software.The chi-square and fisher exact test were used for statistical analysis. The significant difference was p<0.05. Results: The most frequent indication in men and women was dental caries followed by tooth fracture.The second upper premolars and first lower molars needed crown lengthening surgery more often, respectively. Conclusions: Since dental caries and fracture are the most important factors that predispose teeth to crown lengthening surgery, controlling caries with a regular recall sequence can reduce the need for such surgery, especially in the elderly.

  6. Control of lettuce bottom rot by isolates of Trichoderma spp

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zayame Vegette Pinto

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Bottom rot, caused by Rhizoctonia solani AG 1-IB, is an important disease affecting lettuce in Brazil, where its biological control with Trichoderma was not developed yet. The present study was carried out with the aim of selecting Trichoderma isolates to be used in the control of lettuce bottom rot. Forty-six Trichoderma isolates, obtained with baits containing mycelia of the pathogen, were evaluated in experiments carried out in vitro and in vivo in a greenhouse in two steps. In the laboratory, the isolates were evaluated for their capabilities of parasitizing and producing toxic metabolic substances that could inhibit the pathogen mycelial growth. In the first step of the in vivo experiments, the number and the dry weight of lettuce seedlings of the cultivar White Boston were evaluated. In the second step, 12 isolates that were efficient in the first step and showed rapid growth and abundant sporulation in the laboratory were tested for their capability of controlling bottom rot in two repeated experiments, and had their species identified. The majority of the isolates of Trichoderma spp. (76% showed high capacity for parasitism and 50% of them produced toxic metabolites capable of inhibiting 60-100% of R. solani AG1-IB mycelial growth. Twenty-four isolates increased the number and 23 isolates increased the dry weight of lettuce seedlings inoculated with the pathogen in the first step of the in vivo experiments.In both experiments of the second step, two isolates of T. virens, IBLF 04 and IBLF 50, reduced the severity of bottom rot and increased the number and the dry weight of lettuce seedlings inoculated with R. solani AG1-IB. These isolates had shown a high capacity for parasitism and production of toxic metabolic substances, indicating that the in vitro and in vivo steps employed in the present study were efficient in selecting antagonists to be used for the control of lettuce bottom rot.

  7. Crown ether derivatives of EDTA: Pt. 6

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Zhongqun; Qin Shengying; Chen Shaojin; Tan Lin

    1988-01-01

    EDTA-diaminodibenzo-18-crown-6 (cis- and trans-) condensation polymer is a new compound of crown ether derivatives of EDTA. In this paper the adsorption behaviors of U(IV) and U(VI) on this polymer from chloride solutions and effects of hydrochloric acid concentrations, salting-out agents and organic solvents on distribution coefficient (K d ) of uranium are investigated. Adsorption mechanism of uranyl ion (UO 2 2+ ) on this polymer was studied with IR spectra and by means of the adsorption behaviors of compounds of similar structure. Experimental results show that both polyether section and carboxyl groups in EDTA-diaminodibenzo-18-crown-6 take part in complexation with uranyl ion and synergistic effect appeared

  8. Clinical Evaluation and Parental Satisfaction with Pediatric Zirconia Anterior Crowns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holsinger, Daniel M; Wells, Martha H; Scarbecz, Mark; Donaldson, Martin

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the clinical success of and parental satisfaction with anterior pediatric zirconia crowns. A retrospective analysis of maxillary anterior pediatric zirconia crowns was performed. Crowns were evaluated for retention, gingival health, color match, contour, marginal integrity, and opposing tooth wear. Parental satisfaction regarding the esthetics of the crowns and parental perception of the impact of treatment on the child's appearance and oral health were evaluated by questionnaire. Fifty-seven crowns were evaluated in 18 children. Eight teeth were lost to exfoliation, three were extracted due to pathology, and two crowns debonded, leaving 44 available for examination. The average crown age at time of examination was 20.8 months. Sixteen crowns (36 percent) displayed gingival inflammation and color mismatch. No recurrent caries or opposing tooth wear was noted. Parents reported high satisfaction with the color, size, and shape of the crowns. The majority of parents reported that crowns improved the appearance and oral health of their child (78 percent and 83 percent, respectively). Eight-nine percent of parents reported that they would highly recommend these crowns. Zirconia crowns are clinically acceptable restorations in the primary maxillary anterior dentition. Parental satisfaction with zirconia crowns is high.

  9. Decontamination and winter conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quenild, C.; Tveten, U.

    1984-12-01

    The report deals with two decontamonation experiments under winter conditions. A snow-covered parking lot was contaminated, and the snow was subsequently removed using standard snow-moving equipment. The snow left behind was collected and the content of contaminant was determined. A non-radioactive contaminant was used. A decontamination factor exceeding 100 was obtained. Although the eksperimental conditions were close to ideal, it is reason to believe that extremely efficient removal of deposited materials on a snow surface is achivable. In another investigation, run-off from agricultural surface, contaminated while covered with snow, was measured A lycimeter was used in this experiment. A stable layer of ice and snow was allowed to form before contamination. The run-off water was collected at each thaw period until all snow and ice was gone. Cs-134 was used as contaminant. Roughly 30% of the Cs-134 with which the area was contaminated ran off with the melt water. Following a reactor accident situation, this would have given a corresponding reduction in the long term doses. Both of these experiments show that consequence calculation assumptions, as they are currently applied to large accident assessment, tend to overestimate the consequences resulting from accidents taking place under winter conditions

  10. Winter School Les Houches

    CERN Document Server

    Lannoo, Michel; Bastard, Gérald; Voos, Michel; Boccara, Nino

    1986-01-01

    The Winter School held in Les Houches on March 12-21, 1985 was devoted to Semiconductor Heterojunctions and Superlattices, a topic which is recognized as being now one of the most interesting and active fields in semiconductor physics. In fact, following the pioneering work of Esaki and Tsu in 1970, the study of these two-dimensional semiconductor heterostructures has developed rapidly, both from the point of view of basic physics and of applications. For instance, modulation-doped heterojunctions are nowadays currently used to investigate the quantum Hall effect and to make very fast transistors. This book contains the lectures presented at this Winter School, showing in particular that many aspects of semiconductor heterojunctions and super­ lattices were treated, extending from the fabrication of these two-dimensional systems to their basic properties and applications in micro-and opto-electron­ ics. Among the subjects which were covered, one can quote as examples: molecular beam epitaxy and metallorgani...

  11. 21 CFR 872.3770 - Temporary crown and bridge resin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3770 Temporary crown and bridge resin. (a... polymethylmethacrylate, intended to make a temporary prosthesis, such as a crown or bridge, for use until a permanent...

  12. Relative Clinical Success of Bis-Acryl Composite Provisional Crowns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozmacs, Carla; Baumann, Vanessa; Bunz, Oskar; Piwowarczyk, Andree

    2018-01-01

    The high demands on the clinical performance of a single-tooth provisional restoration necessitate that said performance be examined. The authors evaluated 24 teeth evaluated. Two test groups received bis-acrylic composite for provisional crowns (n = 12) and a single-unit, self-supporting, malleable, light-curing composite crown (n = 12). Final crowns (n = 24) served as paired controls. Evaluation of clinical success was measured using previously selected subcategories of FDI criteria. Statistical analysis was performed using McNemar's Test (α = 0.05). The null hypothesis of no improvement of the definitive crown relative to the provisionals was rejected at the 5% significance level (McNemar's P value provisional crowns, 75% received a clinically insufficient valuation, while only 8% of the definitive crowns did. The authors concluded that, independent of the manufacturing process, a bis-acrylic composite provisional crown cannot serve as a replacement for a conventionally manufactured definitive crown.

  13. The molecular genetics of crown gall tumorigenesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hooykaas, P.J.J.; Schilperoort, R.A.

    1984-01-01

    The phytopathogenic bacteria Agrobacterium tumefaciens and A. rhizogenes are the causative agents of the widespread plant diseases ''crown gall'' and ''hairy root'' respectively. It is now well established that virulent strains of these bacterial species transfer a piece of bacterial DNA into plant cells, thereby transforming these into tumor cells. In research much attention has been paid to the agrobacteria for several reasons. First is the desire to develop a system for the genetic engineering of plant cells based on the natural system for gene transfer between Agrobacterium species and plant cells. Second, there is a striking resemblance between the etiology of animal cancers and the plant cancer crown gall that was recognized as early as in 1927. This led to basic studies on the process of plant tumor induction and on the recovery of plant cells from the tumorous state. A third important interest lies in crown gall as a disease that is the cause of economically important losses in agriculture an horticulture in Europe, North America, and Austrailia. Research has been aimed at finding means to prevent crown gall and to cure plants of this disease

  14. 21 CFR 872.3330 - Preformed crown.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Preformed crown. 872.3330 Section 872.3330 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL... device also may be intended for use as a functional restoration for a badly decayed deciduous (baby...

  15. Measurements for winter road maintenance

    OpenAIRE

    Riehm, Mats

    2012-01-01

    Winter road maintenance activities are crucial for maintaining the accessibility and traffic safety of the road network at northerly latitudes during winter. Common winter road maintenance activities include snow ploughing and the use of anti-icing agents (e.g. road salt, NaCl). Since the local weather is decisive in creating an increased risk of slippery conditions, understanding the link between local weather and conditions at the road surface is critically important. Sensors are commonly i...

  16. Internal adaptation of cast titanium crowns

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sicknan Soares da Rocha

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available As the adaptation of titanium crowns obtained by Rematitan Plus investment, specific for titanium, is not recognized to be suitable, this study evaluated the effect of the concentration of the specific liquid and the temperature of the mold of investments on the internal misfit of crowns cast on commercially pure titanium. Individual dies of epoxy resin were obtained, representing teeth prepared for full-crown restoration with a 6-degree axial surface convergence angle and shoulder (1.0 mm. For the waxing of each crown, a ring-shaped stainless steel matrix (8.0mm internal diameter; 7.5 mm height was adapted above the individual dies of epoxy resin. The Rematian Plus investment was mixed according to the manufacturer's instructions using two different concentrations of the specific liquid: 100%, 75%. Casting was performed in a Discovery Plasma Ar-arc vacuum-pressure casting machine with molds at temperatures of 430ºC, 515ºC and 600ºC. The crowns were cleaned individually in a solution (1% HF + 13% HNO3 for 10 min using a ultrasonic cleaner, with no internal adaptations, and luted with zinc phosphate cement under a 5 kg static load. The crown and die assemblies were embedded in resin and sectioned longitudinally. The area occupied by cement was observed using stereoscopic lens (10X and measured by the Leica Qwin image analysis system (mm². The data for each experimental condition (n=8 were analyzed by Kruskal-Wallis non-parametric test (á=0.05. The results showed that liquid dilution and the increase in mold temperature did not significantly influence the levels of internal fit of the cast titanium crowns. The lowest means (±SD of internal misfit were obtained for the 430ºC/100%: (7.25 mm² ±1.59 and 600ºC/100% (8.8 mm² ±2.25 groups, which presented statistically similar levels of internal misfit.

  17. Selective crystallization of cations with crown ethers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heffels, Dennis Egidius

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this work was to study the selectivity and preferences of the incorporation of differently sized cations in the cavities of various crown ethers and the characterization of the resulting compounds. The coordination preferences of crown ethers with different cavities have long been known, and the impact of other effects on the structure formation have increasingly become the focus of attention. In this work a comparative overview of the coordination preferences depending on various factors was undertaken. The focus was mainly on the variation of the cavity of the crown ether in the presence of differently sized cations. In addition, the effects of the solvent and differently coordinating anions have been investigated. Within the framework of this work, basic coordination preferences could be detected with rare earth nitrates, which are affected particularly by the choice of the solvent. The formation of different types of structures could be controlled by varying the conditions such that the incorporation of the cation in the cavity of the crown ether was influenced and the formation of a particular type of structure can be influenced partly by the choice of solvent. In this case no direct preferences for the incorporation into the cavity of the crown ether in relation to the cation size were observed for rare earth cations. However, the coordination of the crown ether leads in each case - for lanthanides - to rather high coordination numbers. A total of five new rare earth complexes and two structural variants could be observed with crown ethers. In the study of the selectivity of the incorporation into the cavity, known structures were also reproduced and further structures were characterized but the crystal structures not entirely solved. With the use of monovalent cations such as potassium, lithium or silver a total of nine new compounds could be synthesized, while no clear preferences for the incorporation of certain cations were detected. The

  18. Fusarium rot of onion and possible use of bioproduct

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Klokočar-Šmit Zlata

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Several species of Fusarium are causal agents of onion rot in field and storage. Most prevalent are F. oxysporum f. sp. cepae and F. solani, and recently F. proliferatum, a toxigenic species. Most frequently isolated fungi in our field experiments were F. solani and F. proliferatum with different pathogenicity. Certain differences in antagonistic activity of Trichoderma asperellum on different isolates of F. proliferatum and F. solani have been found in in vitro study in dual culture, expressed as a slower inhibition of growth of the former, and faster of the latter pathogen. Antagonistic abilities of species from genus Trichoderma (T. asperellum are important, and have already been exploited in formulated biocontrol products in organic and conventional production, in order to prevent soil borne pathogens inducing fusarium wilt and rot. The importance of preventing onion infection by Fusarium spp., possible mycotoxin producers, has been underlined.

  19. Association of Pectolytic Fluorescent PSeudomonas with Postharvest Rots of Onion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H.H. El-Hendawy

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available Five isolates of pectolytic fluorescent pseudomonads were obtained from a rotted onion bulb and identified as Pseudomonas marginalis. At both 4 and 25oC, all isolates caused soft rot to detached plant parts of onion and to carrot, celery, cucumber, pepper, spinach, tomato and turnip (but not garlic. They did not however cause any symptoms in living plants of these same species. These results suggest that the onion isolates are a postharvest pathogen which is not destructive in the field but becomes a threat to fresh vegetables stored at low-temperature. Analysis of cellulosolytic and pectic enzymes revealed that pectic lyases, but not polygalacturonases, pectin methyl esterases and cellulases were produced in culture by each isolate.

  20. Increased delignification by white rot fungi after pressure refining Miscanthus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Paul W; Charlton, Adam; Hale, Mike D C

    2015-01-01

    Pressure refining, a pulp making process to separate fibres of lignocellulosic materials, deposits lignin granules on the surface of the fibres that could enable increased access to lignin degrading enzymes. Three different white rot fungi were grown on pressure refined (at 6 bar and 8 bar) and milled Miscanthus. Growth after 28 days showed highest biomass losses on milled Miscanthus compared to pressure refined Miscanthus. Ceriporiopsis subvermispora caused a significantly higher proportion of lignin removal when grown on 6 bar pressure refined Miscanthus compared to growth on 8 bar pressure refined Miscanthus and milled Miscanthus. RM22b followed a similar trend but Phlebiopsis gigantea SPLog6 did not. Conversely, C. subvermispora growing on pressure refined Miscanthus revealed that the proportion of cellulose increased. These results show that two of the three white rot fungi used in this study showed higher delignification on pressure refined Miscanthus than milled Miscanthus. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. The post-harvest fruit rots of tomato (Lycopersicum esculentum) in Nigeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fajola, A O

    1979-01-01

    A survey of the post-harvest fruit rot diseases of tomato was conducted in five states of Nigeria. During severe infections, the diseases could cause 25% loss at harvest and 34% loss of the remaining product in transit, storage and market stalls; thus giving an overall loss of about 50% of the product. Two types of rots, soft and dry were recognised. The soft rot was found to account for about 85% and the dry rot about 15% of the overall loss. Erwinia carotovora, Rhizopus oryzae, R. stolonifer, Fusarium equiseti, F. nivale and F. oxysporum were established as the soft rot pathogens; while Aspergillus aculeatus, A. flavus, Cladosporium tenuissimum, Corynespora cassiicola, Curvularia lunata, Penicillium expansum P. multicolor and Rhizoctonia solani were established as the dry rot pathogens of tomato fruits in Nigeria.

  2. Biological Control of White Rot in Garlic Using Burkholderia pyrrocinia CAB08106-4

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kwang Seop Han

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available White rot caused by Sclerotium cepivorum was reported to be severe soil-born disease on garlic. Disease progress of white rot of garlic (Allium sativum L. was investigated during the growing season of 2009 to 2011 at Taean and Seosan areas. The white rot disease on bulb began to occur from late April and peaked in late May. The antifungal bacteria, Burkholderia pyrrocinia CAB08106-4 was tested in field bioassay for suppression of white rot disease. As a result of the nucleotide sequence of the gene 16S rRNA, CAB008106-4 strain used in this study has been identified as B. pyrrocinia. B. pyrrocinia CAB080106-4 isolate suppressed the white rot with 69.6% control efficacy in field test. These results suggested that B. pyrrocinia CAB08106-4 isolate could be an effective biological control agent against white rot of garlic.

  3. Removal of phenanthrene in contaminated soil by combination of alfalfa, white-rot fungus, and earthworms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Shuguang; Zeng, Defang

    2017-03-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the removal of phenanthrene by combination of alfalfa, white-rot fungus, and earthworms in soil. A 60-day experiment was conducted. Inoculation with earthworms and/or white-rot fungus increased alfalfa biomass and phenanthrene accumulation in alfalfa. However, inoculations of alfalfa and white-rot fungus can significantly decrease the accumulation of phenanthrene in earthworms. The removal rates for phenanthrene in soil were 33, 48, 66, 74, 85, and 93% under treatments control, only earthworms, only alfalfa, earthworms + alfalfa, alfalfa + white-rot fungus, and alfalfa + earthworms + white-rot fungus, respectively. The present study demonstrated that the combination of alfalfa, earthworms, and white-rot fungus is an effective way to remove phenanthrene in the soil. The removal is mainly via stimulating both microbial development and soil enzyme activity.

  4. Two-body wear comparison of zirconia crown, gold crown, and enamel against zirconia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, Min-Seok; Oh, Sang-Yeob; Cho, Sung-Am

    2015-07-01

    Full zirconia crowns have recently been used for dental restorations because of their mechanical properties. However, there is little information about their wear characteristics against enamel, gold, and full zirconia crowns. The purpose of this study was to compare the wear rate of enamel, gold crowns, and zirconia crowns against zirconia blocks using an in vitro wear test. Upper specimens were divided into three groups: 10 enamels (group 1), 10 gold crowns (group 2, Type III gold), and 10 zirconia crowns (group 3, Prettau(®)Zirkon 9H, Zirkonzahn, Italy). Each of these specimens was wear tested against a zirconia block (40×30×3mm(3)) as a lower specimen (30 total zirconia blocks). Each specimen of the groups was abraded against the zirconia block for 600 cycles at 1Hz with 15mm front-to-back movement on an abrading machine. Moreover, the load applied during the abrading test was 50N, and the test was performed in a normal saline emulsion for 10min. Three-dimensional images were taken before and after the test, and the statistical analysis was performed using the Krushal-Wallis test and Mann-Whitney test (p=0.05). The mean volume loss of group 1 was 0.47mm(3), while that of group 2 and group 3 was 0.01mm(3). The wear volume loss of enamels against zirconia was higher than that of gold and zirconia crowns. Moreover, according to this result, zirconia crowns are not recommended for heavy bruxers. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Fungal hydroquinones contribute to brown rot of wood

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melissa R. Suzuki; Christopher G. Hunt; Carl J. Houtman; Zachary D. Dalebroux; Kenneth E. Hammel

    2006-01-01

    The fungi that cause brown rot of wood initiate lignocellulose breakdown with an extracellular Fenton system in which Fe2+ and H2O2 react to produce hydroxyl radicals (•OH), which then oxidize and cleave the wood holocellulose. One such fungus, Gloeophyllum trabeum, drives Fenton chemistry on defined media by reducing Fe3+ and O2 with two extracellular hydroquinones,...

  6. Trichoderma spp. decrease Fusarium root rot in common bean

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hudson Teixeira

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The effectiveness of six Trichoderma-based commercial products (TCP in controlling Fusarium root rot (FRR in common bean was assessed under field conditions. Three TCP, used for seed treatment or applied in the furrow, increased seedling emergence as much as the fungicide fludioxonil. FRR incidence was not affected, but all TCP and fludioxonil reduced the disease severity, compared to control. Application of Trichoderma-based products was as effective as that of fludioxonil in FRR management.

  7. Winter fuels report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1990-11-29

    The Winter Fuels Report is intended to provide concise, timely information to the industry, the press, policymakers, consumers, analysts, and state and local governments on the following topics: distillate fuel oil net production, imports and stocks for all PADD's and product supplied on a US level; propane net product supplied on a US level; propane net production, imports and stocks for Petroleum Administration for Defense Districts (PADD) I, II, and III; natural gas supply and disposition and underground storage for the United States and consumption for all PADD's; residential and wholesale pricing data for propane and heating oil for those states participating in the joint Energy Information Administration (EIA)/State Heating Oil and Propane Program; crude oil and petroleum price comparisons for the United States and selected cities; and US total heating degree-days by city. 27 figs, 12 tabs.

  8. Winter fuels report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1995-02-17

    The Winter Fuels Report is intended to provide consise, timely information to the industry, the press, policymakers, consumers, analysts, and State and local governments on the following topics: Distillate fuel oil net production, imports and stocks on a US level and for all Petroleum Administration for Defense Districts (PADD) and product supplied on a US level; Natural gas supply and disposition and underground storage for the US and consumption for all PADD`s as well as selected National average prices; Residential and wholesale pricing data for heating oil and propane for those States participating in the joint Energy Information Administration (EIA)/State Heating Oil and Propane Program; Crude oil and petroleum price comparisons for the US and selected cities; and A 6-10 Day and 30-Day outlook for temperature and precipitation and US total heating degree days by city.

  9. Winter fuels report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-01-01

    The Winter Fuels Report is intended to provide concise, timely information to the industry, the press, policymakers, consumers, analysts, and State and local governments on the following topics: distillate fuel oil net production, imports and stocks on a US level and for all Petroleum Administration for Defense Districts (PADD) and product supplied on a US level; propane net production, imports and stocks on a US level and for PADD's I, II, and III; natural gas supply and disposition and underground storage for the US and consumption for all PADD's, as well as selected National average prices; residential and wholesale pricing data for heating oil and propane for those States participating in the joint Energy Information Administration (EIA)/State Heating Oil and Propane Program; crude oil and petroleum price comparisons for the US and selected cities; and a 6-10 day, 30-Day, and 90-Day outlook for temperature and precipitation and US total heating degree-days by city

  10. Fatigue resistance of CAD/CAM resin composite molar crowns.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Shembish, F.A.; Tong, H.; Kaizer, M.; Janal, M.N.; Thompson, V.P.; Opdam, N.J.M.; Zhang, Y.

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To demonstrate the fatigue behavior of CAD/CAM resin composite molar crowns using a mouth-motion step-stress fatigue test. Monolithic leucite-reinforced glass-ceramic crowns were used as a reference. METHODS: Fully anatomically shaped monolithic resin composite molar crowns (Lava

  11. Digital photography for urban street tree crown conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neil A. Clark; Sang-Mook Lee; William A. Bechtold; Gregory A. Reams

    2006-01-01

    Crown variables such as height, diameter, live crown ratio, dieback, transparency, and density are all collected as part of the overall crown assessment (USDA 2004). Transparency and density are related to the amount of foliage and thus the photosynthetic potential of the tree. These measurements are both currently based on visual estimates and have been shown to be...

  12. Evaluation of sampling strategies to estimate crown biomass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishna P Poudel; Hailemariam Temesgen; Andrew N Gray

    2015-01-01

    Depending on tree and site characteristics crown biomass accounts for a significant portion of the total aboveground biomass in the tree. Crown biomass estimation is useful for different purposes including evaluating the economic feasibility of crown utilization for energy production or forest products, fuel load assessments and fire management strategies, and wildfire...

  13. Crown dilacerations - Two case reports | Rao | Nigerian Dental Journal

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Crown dilaceration is a relatively abnormal clinical finding when compared to root dilacerations. The incidence of crown dilacerations is stated to be as low as 3%. This report presents two cases of crown dilacerations in two different locations. A brief review of the literature pertinent to the condition, and the clinical and ...

  14. Stamena winter wheat variety

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mišić Todor

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Stamena is a winter wheat variety developed at the Institute of Field and Vegetable Crops in Novi Sad, Yugoslavia. It was released by the Federal Commission for varietals Approval in 1999. Stamena was developed by crossing genetically divergent and highly productive parents Lasta and Rodna (Breeders: T. Mišić. N. Mladenov, Z. Jerković and R. Jevtić. Spike is white, smooth, awn less, medium compact with 18-21 spike lets. The grain is vitreous and dark red (Triticum aestivum L. ssp. vulgar e var. lutescens. Stamena is a medium early variety, 1 day earlier than Partizanka and 3 days earlier than Jugoslavija (Table 4. It has excellent resistance to winterkilling, as in very winter hardy Partizanka. The average stem height is 78 cm, with a good resistance to lodging. Stamena has field resistance to leaf rust (Pucce, recondita tritict, horizontal resistance, which is the type of resistance that modern wheat breeding is interested in. The resistance to stem rust (Pucce, graminis tritict is good and to powdery mildew (Erysiphegraminis tritici very good. The 1000 grain mass is about 32 g and volume grain mass 81.3 kg/hi. (Table 2. Stamena is classified in the subgroup A-l. It has excellent milling and baking quality and it belong to the 1st technological group (quality enhancer. The quantity of dry gluten is about 9%. The variety Stamena is a very productive, with the genetic potential for grain above 11 t/ha suitable for growing on fertile and less fertile soils. It has started to be grown commercially in 2000.

  15. The presence and survival of soft rot (Erwinia) in flower bulb production systems

    OpenAIRE

    Doorn, van, J.; Vreeburg, P.J.M.; Leeuwen, van, P.J.; Dees, R.H.L.

    2011-01-01

    Soft rot is causing increasing damage in the flower bulb industry. Bulbous ornamentals such as Hyacinthus, Dahlia, Iris, Muscari, Freesia and Zantedeschia can be infected. Soft rot in flower bulbs is mainly caused by Dickeya spp. (Dickeya spp.) and Erwinia carotovora subsp. carotovora (Pectobacterium carotovorum spp. carotovorum).To identify and detect these soft rot bacterial species in several bulbous ornamentals, standard PCR methods were used. During the last four years, research was dire...

  16. Cellulose Degradation by Cellulose-Clearing and Non-Cellulose-Clearing Brown-Rot Fungi

    OpenAIRE

    Highley, Terry L.

    1980-01-01

    Cellulose degradation by four cellulose-clearing brown-rot fungi in the Coniophoraceae—Coniophora prasinoides, C. puteana, Leucogyrophana arizonica, and L. olivascens—is compared with that of a non-cellulose-clearing brown-rot fungus, Poria placenta. The cellulose- and the non-cellulose-clearing brown-rot fungi apparently employ similar mechanisms to depolymerize cellulose; most likely a nonenzymatic mechanism is involved.

  17. Fungi associated with storage rots of cocoyams (Colocasia spp.) in Nsukka, Nigeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ugwuanyi, J O; Obeta, J A

    1996-04-01

    Cocoyam (Colocasia spp.) corms and cormels showing spoilage symptoms were collected from many stores in Nsukka locality and examined for rot and associated fungal pathogens. Aspergillus niger, Botryodiplodia theobromae, Corticium rolfsii, Geotrichum candidum, Fusarium oxysporum, and F. solani were recovered from rotten cocoyams. The representative isolates of these species caused cocoyam rot in pathogenicity tests. The rot due to A. niger, B. theobromae and C. rolfsii was extensive resulting in complete maceration of cocoyam tissue. Potassium sorbate (0.1 mg/ml) protected cocoyams from fungal rot with the exception of C. rolfsii.

  18. Optimal Cross Hedging Winter Canola

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Seon-Woong; Brorsen, B. Wade; Yoon, Byung-Sam

    2014-01-01

    Winter canola in the southern Great Plains has shown large price fluctuations and there have been questions about which futures market could be used to reduce price risk. Our results indicate that the optimal futures contract to cross hedge winter canola is soybean oil futures.

  19. Proton-Ionizable Crown Ethers. A Short Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-05-30

    Triazole’Subcyclic Unit 14. Proton-Ionizable Crown Ethers Containing Sulfonamide Groups 15. Miscellaneous Proton-Ionizable Crown Ethers 1. INTRODUCTION. ""Since...the diaza dinitrile crown. Subsequent hydrolysis produced the diacid 33 (Procedure E). 27 Monoaza-crowns 35-38 (Figure V, Table 5) were obtained by the...followed by hydrolysis of the cetidi to f the acid.3o Complextion by th~eam crownsJ hasJ boon extensively castudieon and transportat es of thos ecaions have

  20. Dentin-bonded all-ceramic crowns: current status.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burke, F J; Qualtrough, A J; Hale, R W

    1998-04-01

    Dentin-bonded all-ceramic crowns employ contemporary techniques to lute the crown to the tooth using a resin luting material and dentin-bonding system. The advantages of these crowns are that they provide good esthetics and fracture resistance and can be used in cases of substantial tooth loss. Their principal disadvantages are that the luting procedure is more time-consuming and that these crowns should not be used where margins are subgingival. Dentin-bonded all-ceramic crowns may be a useful addition to the dentist's armamentarium, but long-term clinical studies are needed to fully assess their performance.

  1. Fracture resistance of monolithic zirconia molar crowns with reduced thickness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, Keisuke; Harada, Akio; Inagaki, Ryoichi; Kanno, Taro; Niwano, Yoshimi; Milleding, Percy; Örtengren, Ulf

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to analyze the relationship between fracture load of monolithic zirconia crowns and axial/occlusal thickness and to evaluate the fracture resistance of monolithic zirconia crowns with reduced thickness in comparison with that of monolithic lithium disilicate crowns with regular thickness. Monolithic zirconia crowns (Lava Plus Zirconia, 3M/ESPE) with specified axial/occlusal thicknesses and lithium disilicate crowns (IPS e.max press, Ivoclar/Vivadent) with regular thickness were fabricated using a dental CAD/CAM system and a press technique, respectively. The crowns cemented onto dies were loaded until fracture. Based on measurements of the crown thickness made by micro-CT and the fracture load, multiple regression analysis was performed. It was revealed that the occlusal thickness significantly affected the fracture load (p zirconia crowns, the fracture load of the zirconia crowns with the occlusal thickness of 0.5 mm (5558 ± 522 N) was significantly higher than that of lithium disilicate crowns with an occlusal thickness of 1.5 mm (3147 ± 409 N). Within the limitations of the present study, it is suggested that monolithic zirconia crown with chamfer width of 0.5 mm and occlusal thickness of 0.5 mm can be used in the molar region in terms of fracture resistance.

  2. ANALYSIS OF THE RADIOMETRIC RESPONSE OF ORANGE TREE CROWN IN HYPERSPECTRAL UAV IMAGES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. N. Imai

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available High spatial resolution remote sensing images acquired by drones are highly relevant data source in many applications. However, strong variations of radiometric values are difficult to correct in hyperspectral images. Honkavaara et al. (2013 presented a radiometric block adjustment method in which hyperspectral images taken from remotely piloted aerial systems – RPAS were processed both geometrically and radiometrically to produce a georeferenced mosaic in which the standard Reflectance Factor for the nadir is represented. The plants crowns in permanent cultivation show complex variations since the density of shadows and the irradiance of the surface vary due to the geometry of illumination and the geometry of the arrangement of branches and leaves. An evaluation of the radiometric quality of the mosaic of an orange plantation produced using images captured by a hyperspectral imager based on a tunable Fabry-Pérot interferometer and applying the radiometric block adjustment method, was performed. A high-resolution UAV based hyperspectral survey was carried out in an orange-producing farm located in Santa Cruz do Rio Pardo, state of São Paulo, Brazil. A set of 25 narrow spectral bands with 2.5 cm of GSD images were acquired. Trend analysis was applied to the values of a sample of transects extracted from plants appearing in the mosaic. The results of these trend analysis on the pixels distributed along transects on orange tree crown showed the reflectance factor presented a slightly trend, but the coefficients of the polynomials are very small, so the quality of mosaic is good enough for many applications.

  3. Analysis of the Radiometric Response of Orange Tree Crown in Hyperspectral Uav Images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imai, N. N.; Moriya, E. A. S.; Honkavaara, E.; Miyoshi, G. T.; de Moraes, M. V. A.; Tommaselli, A. M. G.; Näsi, R.

    2017-10-01

    High spatial resolution remote sensing images acquired by drones are highly relevant data source in many applications. However, strong variations of radiometric values are difficult to correct in hyperspectral images. Honkavaara et al. (2013) presented a radiometric block adjustment method in which hyperspectral images taken from remotely piloted aerial systems - RPAS were processed both geometrically and radiometrically to produce a georeferenced mosaic in which the standard Reflectance Factor for the nadir is represented. The plants crowns in permanent cultivation show complex variations since the density of shadows and the irradiance of the surface vary due to the geometry of illumination and the geometry of the arrangement of branches and leaves. An evaluation of the radiometric quality of the mosaic of an orange plantation produced using images captured by a hyperspectral imager based on a tunable Fabry-Pérot interferometer and applying the radiometric block adjustment method, was performed. A high-resolution UAV based hyperspectral survey was carried out in an orange-producing farm located in Santa Cruz do Rio Pardo, state of São Paulo, Brazil. A set of 25 narrow spectral bands with 2.5 cm of GSD images were acquired. Trend analysis was applied to the values of a sample of transects extracted from plants appearing in the mosaic. The results of these trend analysis on the pixels distributed along transects on orange tree crown showed the reflectance factor presented a slightly trend, but the coefficients of the polynomials are very small, so the quality of mosaic is good enough for many applications.

  4. Cerec anterior crowns: restorative options with monolithic ceramic materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reich, Sven; Fiedlar, Kurt

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this article is to discuss the different types of monolithic ceramic crowns that can be placed on anterior teeth with existing shoulder preparations. Anterior crowns were indicated for the teeth 12 to 22 in the present case. The patient, a 65-year-old male, had received all-ceramic crowns 20 years earlier, which had started to develop cracks and palatal fractures over the last few years. The patient's teeth were prepared and four sets of crowns were fabricated using different monolithic ceramic materials: IPS e.max CAD, Cerec Blocs C In, VITABLOCS Real Life, and ENAMIC. Both shade characterization and crystallization firing were performed on the monolithic lithium disilicate glass ceramic crowns. The silicate ceramic crowns received glaze firing alone. The crowns made of hybrid ceramic (ENAMIC) were treated with a polymer sealant.

  5. Crown structure of Picea omorika trees in the plantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krstić M.

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The study was carried out in Serbian spruce (Picea omorika Panč/Purkynĕ plantations in the western Serbia. The paper presents results of the analysis of crown development. The following elements were analyzed: total tree height, height of the crown base, absolute and relative crown length, maximal crown diameter, coefficient of crown spreading and degree of crown girth. We discuss approaches to the modeling of tree crown growth and development, growing under favorable environmental and stand conditions, without anomalies in development. In order to establish the relationship between analyzed factors, regression analyses were applied. Data fitting was by the analytic method, by the implementation of Prodan’s functions of growth, linear and parabolic function. Received models can be used for the simulation of various growth and developing processes in forest.

  6. TRANSFORMATIONS OF BENZO-15-CROWN-5, [3.3]DIBENZO-18-CROWN-6 AND [4.4]DIBENZO-24-CROWN-8 IN AQUEOUS SOLUTIONS OF NITRIC ACID

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. M. Pluzhnik-Gladyr

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Peculiarities of benzo-15-crown-5 (I, [3.3]dibenzo-18-crown-6 (II, and [4.4]diben zo-24-crown-8 (III nitration by the dilute nitric acid and the mixture HCl-HNO3(4:1, «aqua regia» at room temperature are discussed. It was revealed that the «reactivity» of studied crown ethers (symbatically/antisymbatic to their hydrophili ci ty/lipophilicity is variated as follows: I>> III> II.

  7. Winter fuels report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1990-10-04

    The Winter Fuels Report is intended to provide concise, timely information to the industry, the press, policymakers, consumers, analysts, and state and local governments on the following topics: distillate fuel oil net production, imports and stocks for all PADD's and product supplied on a US level; propane net production, imports and stocks for Petroleum Administration for Defense Districts (PADD) I, II, and III; natural gas supply and disposition, underground storage, and consumption for all PADD's; residential and wholesale pricing data for propane and heating oil for those states participating in the joint Energy Information Administration (EIA)/State Heating Oil and Propane Program; crude oil price comparisons for the United States and selected cities; and US total heating degree-days by city. This report will be published weekly by the EIA starting the first week in October 1990 and will continue until the first week in April 1991. The data will also be available electronically after 5:00 p.m. on Thursday during the heating season through the EIA Electronic Publication System (EPUB). 12 tabs.

  8. Klaus Winter (1930 - 2015)

    CERN Multimedia

    2015-01-01

    We learned with great sadness that Klaus Winter passed away on 9 February 2015, after a long illness.   Klaus was born in 1930 in Hamburg, where he obtained his diploma in physics in 1955. From 1955 to 1958 he held a scholarship at the Collège de France, where he received his doctorate in nuclear physics under the guidance of Francis Perrin. Klaus joined CERN in 1958, where he first participated in experiments on π+ and K0 decay properties at the PS, and later became the spokesperson of the CHOV Collaboration at the ISR. Starting in 1976, his work focused on experiments with the SPS neutrino beam. In 1984 he joined Ugo Amaldi to head the CHARM experiment, designed for detailed studies of the neutral current interactions of high-energy neutrinos, which had been discovered in 1973 using the Gargamelle bubble chamber at the PS. The unique feature of the detector was its target calorimeter, which used large Carrara marble plates as an absorber material. From 1984 to 1991, Klau...

  9. Winter fuels report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1995-01-13

    The Winter Fuels Report is intended to provide concise, timely information to the industry, the press, policymakers, consumers, analysts, and State and local governments on the following topics: distillate fuel oil net production, imports and stocks on a US level and for all Petroleum Administration for Defense Districts (PADD) and product supplied on a US level; propane net production, imports and stocks on a US level and for PADD`s I, II, and III; natural gas supply and disposition and underground storage for the US and consumption for all PADD`s, as well as selected National average prices; residential and wholesale pricing data for heating oil and propane for those States participating in the joint Energy Information Administration (EIA)/State Heating Oil and Propane Program; crude oil and petroleum price comparisons for the US and selected cities; and a 6-10 day, 30-Day, and 90-Day outlook for temperature and precipitation and US total heating degree-days by city.

  10. Antagonist wear by polished zirconia crowns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartkamp, Oliver; Lohbauer, Ulrich; Reich, Sven

    The aim of this in vivo study was to measure antagonist wear caused by polished monolithic posterior zirconia crowns over a 24-month period using the intraoral digital impression (IDI) technique. Thirteen zirconia crowns were placed in nine patients. The crowns and adjacent teeth were captured using an intraoral scanner (Lava C.O.S.). The corresponding antagonist teeth and the respective neighboring teeth were also scanned. Scanning was performed immediately after the restoration (baseline) as well as 12 and 24 months after crown placement. Geomagic Qualify software was used to superimpose the follow-up data sets onto the corresponding baseline data set, identify wear sites, and measure maximum vertical height loss in each individual wear site. Overall antagonist wear was then determined as the mean of wear rates measured in all of the individual antagonist units. In addition, wear rates in enamel and ceramic antagonists were analyzed as part of the scope of this study. The maximum mean wear with standard deviation (SD) in the overall sample with a total of nine patients, 13 antagonist units, and 98 evaluable wear sites was 86 ± 23 µm at 12 months, and 103 ± 39 µm at 24 months. The maximum mean wear in the enamel antagonist subgroup was 87 ± 41 µm at 12 months, and 115 ± 71 µm at 24 months; and in the ceramic antagonist subgroup 107 ± 22 µm at 12 months, and 120 ± 27 µm at 24 months. The wear rates determined in this study are comparable to those of existing studies. The IDI technique of wear analysis can be carried out in a practical manner and produces useful results.

  11. Winter Safety Tips for Older Adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winter Safety Tips for Older Adults Expert Information from Healthcare Professionals Who Specialize in the Care of ... thick clothing. Think about getting your thermals! –Essential winter wears: hats, gloves or preferably mittens, winter coat, ...

  12. Essential Outdoor Sun Safety Tips for Winter

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Vitamin D Essential Outdoor Sun Safety Tips for Winter Winter sports enthusiasts are at increased risk for overexposure ... associated with sun exposure. "It's easy to associate winter with frostbite and windburn, but most people are ...

  13. Characterizing butt-rot fungi on USA-affiliated islands in the western Pacific

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phil Cannon; Ned B. Klopfenstein; Robert L. Schlub; Mee-Sook Kim; Yuko Ota; Norio Sahashi; Roland J. Quitugua; John W. Hanna; Amy L. Ross-Davis; J. D. Sweeney

    2014-01-01

    Ganoderma and Phellinus are genera that commonly cause tree butt-rot on USA-affiliated islands of the western Pacific. These fungal genera can be quite prevalent, especially in older mangrove stands. Although the majority of infections caused by these fungi lead to severe rotting of the heartwood, they typically do not directly kill the living tissues of the sapwood,...

  14. The persistence of Gliocephalotrichum bulbilium and G. simplex causing fruit rot of rambutan in Puerto Rico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fruit rot of rambutan (Nephelium lappaceum L.) is a pre and post-harvest disease problem that affects fruit quality. Significant post-harvest losses have occurred worldwide and several pathogens have been identified in Malaysia, Costa Rica, Hawaii, Thailand, and Puerto Rico. In 2011, fruit rot was o...

  15. First report of Calonectria hongkongensis causing fruit rot of rambutan (Nephelium lappaceum L.)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fruit rot is a major pre- and post-harvest disease problem in rambutan orchards. In 2011, fruit rot was observed at the USDA-TARS orchards in Mayaguez, Puerto Rico. Infected fruit were collected and tissue sections (1 mm2) were superficially sterilized with 70% ethanol and 0.5% sodium hypochlorite. ...

  16. First report of Colletotrichum fructicola and C. queenslandicum causing fruit rot of rambutan (Nephelium lappaceum L.)

    Science.gov (United States)

    In rambutan production, fruit rot is the main pre- and post-harvest disease of concern. In a 2008-2013 fruit disease survey, fruit rot was observed in eight orchards in Puerto Rico. Infected fruit were collected and 1 mm2 tissue sections were surface disinfested with 70% ethanol followed by 0.5% sod...

  17. Preparation and Characterization of Novolak Phenol Formaldehyde Resin from Liquefied Brown-Rotted Wood

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gai-Yun Li; Chung-Yun Hse; Te-Fu Qin

    2012-01-01

    The brown-rotted wood was liquefied in phenol with phosphoric acid as catalyst and the resulting liquefied products were condensed with formaldehyde to yield novolak liquefied wood-based phenol formaldehyde resin (LWPF). The results showed that brown-rotted wood could be more easily liquefied than sound wood in phenol. The residue content of liquefied wood decreased...

  18. Enzymatic oxalic acid regulation correlated with wood degradation in four brown-rot fungi

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anne Christine Steenkjær Hastrup; Frederick Green III; Patricia K. Lebow; Bo Jensen

    2012-01-01

    Oxalic acid is a key component in the initiation of brown-rot decay and it has been suggested that it plays multiple roles during the degradation process. Oxalic acid is accumulated to varying degrees among brown-rot fungi; however, details on active regulation are scarce. The accumulation of oxalic acid was measured in this study from wood degraded by the four brown-...

  19. Effect of irradiation and insect pest control on rots and sensory ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The coffee bean weevil, Araecerus fasciculatus Degeer (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) is associated with rots in stored yam tubers. The current study was designed to assess the effect of irradiation and other insect pest control strategies on rots and sensory quality of stored yams. 450 tubers each of two varieties of white yam ...

  20. Antifungal Effects Of Botanical Leaf Extracts On Tuber Rots Of Yam ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The fungicidal effects of dry and fresh leaf extracts of Axardirachta indica (L) and Ocimum grattissimum on the rot of yam tubers were investigated. Fusaruim oxysporium, Rhjzopus stolonifer, Botryodiplodia theobromae and Aspergillus Niger (root pathogens) were isolated from the rotted yam. Both dry and fresh leaf extracts ...

  1. Biocontrol of charcoal-rot of sorghum by actinomycetes isolated from ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    use

    2011-12-12

    Dec 12, 2011 ... Streptomyces but with different species in BLAST analysis. This study indicates that the selected actinomycetes have the potential for PGP and control of charcoal-rot disease in sorghum. Key words: Antagonistic actinomycetes, biocontrol, charcoal-rot, Macrophomina phaseolina. INTRODUCTION.

  2. Potassium and Phosphorus effects on disease severity of charcoal rot of soybean

    Science.gov (United States)

    The effects of potassium (K) and phosphorus (P) fertilizers on charcoal rot of soybean [Glycine max (L.) Merr.] are unknown. Therefore, the severity of charcoal rot was studied at five levels of K (0, 37, 75, 111 and 149 kg K ha-1) and a level that was equal to the recommended fertilizer applicatio...

  3. Potassium and phosphorus have no effects on severity of charcoal rot of soybean

    Science.gov (United States)

    The effects of potassium (K) and phosphorus (P) fertilizers on charcoal rot of soybean [Glycine max (L.) Merr.] are unknown. Therefore, the severity of charcoal rot was studied at five levels of K (0, 37, 75, 111 and 149 kg K ha-1) and a level that was equal to the recommended fertilizer applicatio...

  4. Studies on the epidemiology of spear rot in oil palm (Elaeis guineensis Jacq.) in Suriname

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lande, van de H.L.

    1993-01-01

    The epidemiology of spear rot, an infectious disease of unknown etiology, was studied over 10 years at three government-owned oil palm plantations in Suriname. As with other and similar diseases, amarelecimento fatal in Brazil and pudrición del cogollo in Latin America, which too show rot

  5. First Report of Calonectria hongkongensis Causing Fruit Rot of Rambutan (Nephelium lappaceum)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Serrato-Diaz, L.M.; Latoni-Brailowsky, E.I.; Rivera-Vargas, L.I.; Goenaga, R.J.; Crous, P.W.; French-Monar, R.D.

    2013-01-01

    Fruit rot of rambutan is a pre- and post-harvest disease problem of rambutan orchards. In 2011, fruit rot was observed at USDA-ARS orchards in Mayaguez, Puerto Rico. Infected fruit were collected and 1 mm2 tissue sections were surface disinfested with 70% ethanol followed by 0.5% sodium

  6. Potential of bulb-associated bacteria for biocontrol of hyacinth soft rot caused by Dickeya zeae

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jafra, S.; Przysowa, J.; Gwizdek-Wisniewska, A.; Wolf, van der J.M.

    2009-01-01

    Dickeya zeae is a pectinolytic bacterium responsible for soft rot disease in flower bulb crops. In this study, the possibility of controlling soft rot disease in hyacinth by using antagonistic bacteria isolated from hyacinth bulbs was explored. Bacterial isolates with potential for biocontrol were

  7. The presence and survival of soft rot (Erwinia) in flower bulb production systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Doorn, van J.; Vreeburg, P.J.M.; Leeuwen, van P.J.; Dees, R.H.L.

    2011-01-01

    Soft rot is causing increasing damage in the flower bulb industry. Bulbous ornamentals such as Hyacinthus, Dahlia, Iris, Muscari, Freesia and Zantedeschia can be infected. Soft rot in flower bulbs is mainly caused by Dickeya spp. (Dickeya spp.) and Erwinia carotovora subsp. carotovora

  8. Fungicide rotation schemes for managing Phytophthora fruit rot of watermelon across southeastern United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Southeastern states produce about 50% of the watermelons in the United States (U.S.) where conditions are optimal for development of Phytophthora fruit rot prevail. Phytophthora fruit rot significantly limits watermelon production by causing serious yield losses to growers before and after harvest. ...

  9. Conversion of sorghum stover into animal feed with white-rot fungi ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Treatment of crop residues with some species of white-rot fungi can enhance the nutritive value. After the fungal treatment of sorghum (Sorghum bicolor) stover with two white-rot fungi in a solid state fermentation, the chemical composition and in vitro digestibility of the resultant substrate was determined. The results show a ...

  10. Conversion of sorghum stover into animal feed with white-rot fungi ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2010-03-15

    Mar 15, 2010 ... white-rot fungi: Pleurotus ostreatus and Pleurotus ... the fungal treatment of sorghum (Sorghum bicolor) stover with two white-rot fungi in a solid state ..... Rumen degradation and In vitro gas production parameters in some browse forages, grasses and maize stover from Kenya. J. Food Agric. Environ.

  11. The effect of long term storage on bacterial soft rot resistance in potato

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bacterial soft rot is a serious disease in potato (Solanum tuberosum L.), causing rapid tuber tissue maceration and, consequently, marketable yield loss. Soft rot bacteria, especially Pectobacterium carotovorum subsp. carotovorum (Pbc), are favored by moist conditions, which are prevalent in large p...

  12. Copper tolerance of brown-rot fungi : time course of oxalic acid production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frederick Green; Carol A. Clausen

    2003-01-01

    The increase in the use of non-arsenical copper-based wood preservatives in response to environmental concerns has been accompanied by interest in copper-tolerant decay fungi. Oxalic acid production by brown-rot fungi has been proposed as one mechanism of copper tolerance. Fifteen brown-rot fungi representing the genera Postia, Wolfiporia, Meruliporia, Gloeophyllum,...

  13. Fungicides reduce Rhododendron root rot and mortality caused by Phytophthora cinnamomi, but not by P. plurivora

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhododendron root rot, caused by several Phytophthora species, can cause devastating losses in nursery-grown plants. Most research on chemical control of root rot has focused on Phytophthora cinnamomi. However, it is unknown whether treatments recommended for P. cinnamomi are also effective for othe...

  14. Nonchemical, cultural management strategies to suppress phytophthora root rot in northern highbush blueberry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phytophthora cinnamomi causes root rot of highbush blueberry and decreases plant growth, yield, and profitability for growers. Fungicides can suppress root rot, but cannot be used in certified organic production systems and fungicide resistance may develop. Alternative, non-chemical, cultural manag...

  15. Resistance to post-harvest microbial rot in yam: Integration of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Post-harvest microbial rot is an important disease that causes severe losses in yam (Dioscorea spp.) storage. Rot from microbial infection of healthy yam tubers reduces their table quality and renders them unappealing to consumers. A study was carried out at Bimbilla in the Nanumba North District of Ghana to evaluate ...

  16. An Investigation Into the Integrity of Fit of Provisional Crowns Using Current Proprietary Temporary Crown Materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Philip D; Georgakis, Georgios; Niggli, Jason

    2016-06-01

    Three methods of direct provisional crown construction were investigated for accuracy of marginal fit. A modified proprietary crown coping was compared to Bis GMA and isobutyl methacrylate resin provisional crowns with margins modified by using a flowable composite and 'bead on' isobutyl methacrylate respectively. Measurement was at 50x magnification at seven sites over the fit surface. Data was analyzed using SPSS version 13.0.1 and measurement compared using the Mann Whitney test set at a significance level of 0.05. Reliability was checked using the Bland Altman test. Statistical significant differences were found between the three groups. The order of best fit was Bis-GMA and flowable composite > isobutyl methacrylate with 'bead on' margins > Bis-GMA modified implant temporary coping. The clinical significance is that the Bis GMA and flowable composite combination can be used with equal confidence to traditional methods of temporarisation.

  17. First report of in-vitro fludioxonil-resistant isolates of Fusarium spp. causing potato dry rot in Michigan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fusarium dry rot of potato (Solanum tuberosum) is a postharvest disease caused by several Fusarium species and is of worldwide importance. Measures for controlling dry rot in storage are limited. Dry rot has been managed primarily by reducing tuber bruising, providing conditions for rapid wound heal...

  18. Moniliophthora roreri, causal agent of cacao frosty pod rot.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailey, Bryan A; Evans, Harry C; Phillips-Mora, Wilbert; Ali, Shahin S; Meinhardt, Lyndel W

    2017-12-01

    Taxonomy: Moniliophthora roreri (Cif.) H.C. Evans et al. ; Phylum Basidiomycota; Class Agaricomycetes; Order Agaricales; Family Marasmiaceae; Genus Moniliophthora. Biology: Moniliophthora roreri attacks Theobroma and Herrania species causing frosty pod rot. Theobroma cacao (cacao) is the host of major economic concern. Moniliophthora roreri is a hemibiotroph with a long biotrophic phase (45-90 days). Spore masses, of apparent asexual origin, are produced on the pod surface after initiation of the necrotrophic phase. Spores are spread by wind, rain and human activity. Symptoms of the biotrophic phase can include necrotic flecks and, in some cases, pod malformation, but pods otherwise remain asymptomatic. Relationship to Moniliophthora perniciosa: Moniliophthora roreri and Moniliophthora perniciosa, causal agent of witches' broom disease of cacao, are closely related. Their genomes are similar, including many of the genes they carry which are considered to be important in the disease process. Moniliophthora perniciosa, also a hemibiotroph, has a typical basidiomycete lifestyle and morphology, forming clamp connections and producing mushrooms. Basidiospores infect meristematic tissues including flower cushions, stem tips and pods. Moniliophthora roreri does not form clamp connections or mushrooms and infects pods only. Both pathogens are limited to the Western Hemisphere and are a threat to cacao production around the world. Agronomic importance: Disease losses caused by frosty pod rot can reach 90% and result in field abandonment. Moniliophthora roreri remains in the invasive phase in the Western Hemisphere, not having reached Brazil, some islands within the Caribbean and a few specific regions within otherwise invaded countries. The disease can be managed by a combination of cultural (for example, maintenance of tree height and removal of infected pods) and chemical methods. These methods benefit from regional application, but can be cost prohibitive. Breeding for

  19. Retention behavior of double-crown attachments with zirconia primary and secondary crowns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwindling, Franz Sebastian; Stober, Thomas; Rustemeier, Rainer; Schmitter, Marc; Rues, Stefan

    2016-05-01

    To investigate whether adequate retention of zirconia conical crown (CC) attachments can be achieved, and to investigate their long-term retention. Sixteen individual zirconia primary crowns were produced with convergence angles of 1° or 2° (eight of each). After determination of the convergence angles of the primary crowns, monolithic zirconia secondary crowns were manufactured. To evaluate the retention behavior of all-zirconia CC, the crowns were fitted with forces from F=12.5-100 N. Force magnitudes during the loosening process (L) were then measured. L/F ratios were recorded and the coefficient of friction (μ0) was calculated. Long-term retention was tested with up to 50,000 cycles of denture integration at a speed of 30 mms(-1) and a fitting force magnitude of 53 N. Even when primary crowns were manufactured with the utmost care, the real convergence angles were greater than the nominal angles of the standardized burs (1° and 2°) by 0.28° (SD 0.11°). Without mechanical aging, mean L/F was 0.632 (SD 0.038) for 1° samples and 0.526 (SD 0.022) for 2° samples, indicative of high retentive forces of up to 63.2% of the fitting forces. When all the test results were used, best-fitting curves gave μ0=0.117 for new samples and μ0=0.126 for samples after 50,000 integration cycles. When the correct milling and sintering parameters are chosen, the retention behavior of zirconia CCs is adequate and stable. This innovative type of attachment is appealing because of the beneficial properties of zirconia and the efficient CAD/CAM-based manufacture. Copyright © 2016 Academy of Dental Materials. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Perfect Undetectable Acoustic Device from Fabry-Pérot Resonances

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Huanyang; Zhou, Yangyang; Zhou, Mengying; Xu, Lin; Liu, Qing Huo

    2018-02-01

    Transformation acoustics is a method to design novel acoustic devices, while the complexity of the material parameters hinders its progress. In this paper, we analytically present a three-dimensional perfect undetectable acoustic device from Fabry-Pérot resonances and confirm its functionality from Mie theory. Such a mechanism goes beyond the traditional transformation acoustics. In addition, such a reduced version can be realized by holey-structured metamaterials. Our theory paves a way to the implementation of three-dimensional transformation acoustic devices.

  1. Bacteriophages of Soft Rot Enterobacteriaceae-a minireview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czajkowski, Robert

    2016-01-01

    Soft rot Enterobacteriaceae (Pectobacterium spp. and Dickeya spp., formerly pectinolytic Erwinia spp.) are ubiquitous necrotrophic bacterial pathogens that infect a large number of different plant species worldwide, including economically important crops. Despite the fact that these bacteria have been studied for more than 50 years, little is known of their corresponding predators: bacteriophages, both lytic and lysogenic. The aim of this minireview is to critically summarize recent ecological, biological and molecular research on bacteriophages infecting Pectobacterium spp. and Dickeya spp. with the main focus on current and future perspectives in that field. © FEMS 2015. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  2. Serpula lacrymans, The Dry Rot Fungus and Tolerance Towards Copper-Based Wood Preservatives

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hastrup, Anne Christine Steenkjær; Jensen, Bo; Clausen, Carol

    2005-01-01

    -rot fungi is thought to be due in part to oxalic acid production and accumulation. Oxalic acid has been implicated in copper tolerance by the formation of copper oxalate crystals. Twelve isolates of the dry rot fungus, S. lacrymans and four other brown rot species were evaluated for weight loss on wood......Serpula lacrymans (Wulfen : Fries) Schröter, the dry rot fungus, is considered the most (Wulfen : Fries) Schröterthe dry rot fungus, is considered the most economically important wood decay fungus in temperate regions of the world i.e. northern Europe, Japan and Australia. Previously copper based...... wood preservatives were the most commonly used preservatives for pressure treatment of wood for building constructions. Because of a suspicion about tolerance toward copper components, a soil block test was undertaken to clarify the effect of two copper based preservatives, copper citrate and ACQ...

  3. Winter/Summer Monsoon Experiment

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Winter/Summer Monsoon Experiment (MONEX) was conducted during the First Global GARP (Global Atmospheric Research Program) Experiment (FGGE). An international...

  4. The meaning of nuclear winter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Geiger, H.J.

    1987-01-01

    In this paper the author reviews the history and origins of the basic ideas underlying nuclear winter; and findings and predictions of several groups regarding this topic. The author reviews some of the further developments and scientific analyses regarding nuclear winter since the initial announcements of 1983, touching on some of the revisions and controversies and trying to indicate the current status of the field

  5. Role of Rot in bacterial autolysis regulation of Staphylococcus aureus NCTC8325.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Xinmin; Xia, Rui; He, Nianan; Fang, Yuting

    2013-09-01

    Autolysis is an important process in cell wall turnover in Staphylococcus aureus, performed by several peptidoglycan hydrolases or so-called autolysins and controlled by many regulators. Rot is a global regulator that regulates numerous virulence genes, including genes encoding lipase, hemolysins, proteases and genes related to cell surface adhesion. The aim of our study was to determine whether Rot has the ability to regulate autolysis. We compared Triton-X-100-induced autolysis of S. aureus NCTC8325 and its rot knock-out mutant. We found that the rot mutant showed increased autolysis rates. By examining the transcript level of several autolysins and some known regulators responsible for regulating autolysis using real-time RT-PCR assays, we found that transcription of two autolysins (lytM, lytN) and one regulatory operon (lrgAB) was changed in the rot mutant. An in vitro approach was undertaken to determine which of these genes are directly controlled by Rot. Rot proteins were overproduced in Escherichia coli and purified. Gel mobility shift DNA binding assays were used and showed that in-vitro-purified Rot can directly bind to the promoter region of lytM, lytN, lrgA and lytS. We also tested biofilm formation of the rot mutant, and it showed enhancement in biofilm formation. Taken together, our results reveal that Rot affects autolysis by directly regulating autolysins LytM and LytN, and, via a regulatory system, LrgAB. Copyright © 2013 Institut Pasteur. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  6. [Comparison of the clinical effects of selective laser melting deposition basal crowns and cobalt chromium alloy base crowns].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jing-min; Wang, Wei-qian; Ma, Jing-yuan

    2014-06-01

    To evaluate the clinical effects of selective laser melting (SLM) deposition basal crowns and cobalt chromium alloy casting base crowns. One hundred and sixty eight patients treated with either SLM deposition basal crowns (110 teeth) or cobalt chromium alloy casting basal crowns (110 teeth) were followed-up for 1 month, 6 months, 12 months and 24 months. The revised standard of American Public Health Association was used to evaluate the clinical effect of restoration, including the color of porcelain crowns, gingival inflammation, gingival margin discoloration, and crack or fracture. Data analysis was conducted with SPSS 20 software package for Student's t test and Chi-square test. Six cases were lost to follow-up. The patients who were treated with SLM deposition basal crowns (104 teeth) and cobalt chromium alloy casting base crowns (101 teeth) completed the study. Patients were more satisfied with SLM deposition cobalt chromium alloy porcelain crowns. There was 1 prosthesis with poor marginal fit after 24 months of restoration in SLM crowns. There were 6 prostheses with edge coloring and 8 with poor marginal fit in cobalt chromium alloy casting base crowns, which was significantly different between the 2 groups(P<0.05). The SLM deposition copings results in smaller edge coloring and better marginal fit than those of cobalt-chrome copings. Patients are pleased with short-term clinical results.

  7. Fracture resistance of implant- supported monolithic crowns cemented to zirconia hybrid-abutments: zirconia-based crowns vs. lithium disilicate crowns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elshiyab, Shareen H; Nawafleh, Noor; Öchsner, Andreas; George, Roy

    2018-02-01

    The aim of this in vitro study was to investigate the fracture resistance under chewing simulation of implant-supported posterior restorations (crowns cemented to hybrid-abutments) made of different all-ceramic materials. Monolithic zirconia (MZr) and monolithic lithium disilicate (MLD) crowns for mandibular first molar were fabricated using computer-aided design/computer-aided manufacturing technology and then cemented to zirconia hybrid-abutments (Ti-based). Each group was divided into two subgroups (n=10): (A) control group, crowns were subjected to single load to fracture; (B) test group, crowns underwent chewing simulation using multiple loads for 1.2 million cycles at 1.2 Hz with simultaneous thermocycling between 5℃ and 55℃. Data was statistically analyzed with one-way ANOVA and a Post-Hoc test. All tested crowns survived chewing simulation resulting in 100% survival rate. However, wear facets were observed on all the crowns at the occlusal contact point. Fracture load of monolithic lithium disilicate crowns was statistically significantly lower than that of monolithic zirconia crowns. Also, fracture load was significantly reduced in both of the all-ceramic materials after exposure to chewing simulation and thermocycling. Crowns of all test groups exhibited cohesive fracture within the monolithic crown structure only, and no abutment fractures or screw loosening were observed. When supported by implants, monolithic zirconia restorations cemented to hybrid abutments withstand masticatory forces. Also, fatigue loading accompanied by simultaneous thermocycling significantly reduces the strength of both of the all-ceramic materials. Moreover, further research is needed to define potentials, limits, and long-term serviceability of the materials and hybrid abutments.

  8. Basal ganglia - thalamus and the crowning enigma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marianela eGarcia-Munoz

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available When Hubel (1982 referred to layer 1 of primary visual cortex as …a ‘crowning mystery’ to keep area-17 physiologists busy for years to come... he could have been talking about any cortical area. In the 80’s and 90’s there were no methods to examine this neuropile on the surface of the cortex: a tangled web of axons and dendrites from a variety of different places with unknown specificities and doubtful connections to the cortical output neurons some hundreds of microns below. Recently, three changes have made the crowning enigma less of an impossible mission: the clear presence of neurons in layer 1 (L1, the active conduction of voltage along apical dendrites and optogenetic methods that might allow us to look at one source of input at a time. For all of those reasons alone, it seems it is time to take seriously the function of L1. The functional properties of this layer will need to wait for more experiments but already L1 cells are GAD67 positive, i.e., inhibitory! They could reverse the sign of the thalamic glutamate (GLU input for the entire cortex. It is at least possible that in the near future normal activity of individual sources of L1 could be detected using genetic tools. We are at the outset of important times in the exploration of thalamic functions and perhaps the solution to the crowning enigma is within sight. Our review looks forward to that solution from the solid basis of the anatomy of the basal ganglia output to motor thalamus. We will focus on L1, its afferents, intrinsic neurons and its influence on responses of pyramidal neurons in layers 2/3 and 5. Since L1 is present in the whole cortex we will provide a general overview considering evidence mainly from the somatosensory cortex before focusing on motor cortex.

  9. Characterization of Microsolvated Crown Ethers from Broadband Rotational Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez, Cristobal; Schnell, Melanie; Blanco, Susana; Lopez, Juan Carlos

    2016-06-01

    Since they were first synthetized, crown ethers have been extensively used in organometallic chemistry due to their unparalleled binding selectivity with alkali metal cations. From a structural point of view, crown ethers are heterocycles containing oxygen and/or other heteroatoms, although the most common ones are formed from ethylene oxide unit. Crown ethers are conventionally seen as being hydrophilic inside and hydrophobic outside when the structures found for the metal cation complexes are considered. However, crown ethers are extremely flexible and in isolation may present a variety of stable conformations so that their structure may be easily adapted in presence of a strong ligand as an alkali metal cation minimize the energy of the resulting complex. Water can be considered a soft ligand which interacts with crown ethers through moderate hydrogen bonds. It is thus interesting to investigate which conformers are selected by water to form complexes, the preferred interaction sites and the possible conformational changes due to the presence of one or more water molecules. Previous studies identified microsolvated crown ethers but in all cases with a chromophore group attached to the structure. Here we present a broadband rotational spectroscopy study of microsolvated crown ethers produced in a pulsed molecular jet expansion. Several 1:1 and 1:2 crown ether:water aggregates are presented for 12-crown-4, 15-crown-5 and 18-crown-6. Unambiguous identification of the structures has been achieved using isotopic substitution within the water unit. The subtle changes induced in the structures of the crown ether monomer upon complexation and the hydrogen-bonding network that hold them together will be also discussed. F. Gámez, B. Martínez-Haya, S. Blanco,J. C. López and J. L. Alonso, Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys. 2014, 14 12912-12918 V. A. Shubert, C.W. Müller and T. Zwier, J. Phys. Chem. A 2009, 113 8067-8079

  10. Zirconia crowns - the new standard for single-visit dentistry?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiedhahn, Klaus; Fritzsche, Günter; Wiedhahn, Claudine; Schenk, Olaf

    2016-01-01

    Zirconia crowns combine the advantages of metal restorations, such as minimally invasive tooth preparation and ease of cementation, with those of full ceramic crowns, such as low thermal conductivity and tooth color. With the introduction of a high-speed sintering procedure, it is possible to produce and cement zirconia crowns and small monolithic bridges in a Cerec Single Visit procedure. This new procedure is compared to established chairside methods.

  11. Fracture resistance of monolithic zirconia molar crowns with reduced thickness

    OpenAIRE

    Nakamura, Keisuke; Harada, A.; Inagaki, R.; Kanno, Taro; Niwano, Y.; Milleding, Percy; Ørtengren, Ulf Thore

    2015-01-01

    This is the accepted manuscript version. Published version is available at Acta Odontologica Scandinavica Objectives. The purpose of the present study was to analyze the relationship between fracture load of monolithic zirconia crowns and axial/occlusal thickness, and to evaluate the fracture resistance of monolithic zirconia crowns with reduced thickness in comparison with that of monolithic lithium disilicate crowns with regular thickness. Materials and methods. Monolithic zi...

  12. Fatigue resistance of CAD/CAM resin composite molar crowns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shembish, Fatma A; Tong, Hui; Kaizer, Marina; Janal, Malvin N; Thompson, Van P; Opdam, Niek J; Zhang, Yu

    2016-04-01

    To demonstrate the fatigue behavior of CAD/CAM resin composite molar crowns using a mouth-motion step-stress fatigue test. Monolithic leucite-reinforced glass-ceramic crowns were used as a reference. Fully anatomically shaped monolithic resin composite molar crowns (Lava Ultimate, n=24) and leucite reinforced glass-ceramic crowns (IPS Empress CAD, n=24) were fabricated using CAD/CAM systems. Crowns were cemented on aged dentin-like resin composite tooth replicas (Filtek Z100) with resin-based cements (RelyX Ultimate for Lava Ultimate or Multilink Automix for IPS Empress). Three step-stress profiles (aggressive, moderate and mild) were employed for the accelerated sliding-contact mouth-motion fatigue test. Twenty one crowns from each group were randomly distributed among these three profiles (1:2:4). Failure was designated as chip-off or bulk fracture. Optical and electron microscopes were used to examine the occlusal surface and subsurface damages, as well as the material microstructures. The resin composite crowns showed only minor occlusal damage during mouth-motion step-stress fatigue loading up to 1700N. Cross-sectional views revealed contact-induced cone cracks in all specimens, and flexural radial cracks in 2 crowns. Both cone and radial cracks were relatively small compared to the crown thickness. Extending these cracks to the threshold for catastrophic failure would require much higher indentation loads or more loading cycles. In contrast, all of the glass-ceramic crowns fractured, starting at loads of approximately 450N. Monolithic CAD/CAM resin composite crowns endure, with only superficial damage, fatigue loads 3-4 times higher than those causing catastrophic failure in glass-ceramic CAD crowns. Copyright © 2015 Academy of Dental Materials. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Clinically relevant fracture testing of all-ceramic crowns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Øilo, Marit; Kvam, Ketil; Tibballs, John E; Gjerdet, Nils Roar

    2013-08-01

    Fracture strength measured in vitro indicates that most all-ceramic crowns should be able to withstand mastication forces. Nevertheless, fractures are one of the major clinical problems with all-ceramic restorations. Furthermore, the fracture mode of all-ceramic crowns observed in clinical use differs from that found in conventional fracture strength tests. The aim of the present study was to develop and investigate a method that simulates clinical fracture behavior in vitro. 30 crowns with alumina cores were made to fit a cylindrical model with a molar-like preparation design. These crowns were randomly allocated to 3 tests groups (n=10). The crowns in group 1 were cemented to abutment models of epoxy and subsequently fractured by occlusal loading without contact damage. The crowns in group 2 were fractured by cementation with expanding cement. The crowns in group 3 were cemented on an abutment model of epoxy split almost in two and fractured by increasing the diameter of the model in the bucco-lingual direction. The fractured crowns were analyzed by fractographic methods and compared to a reference group of 10 crowns fractured in clinical use. The fracture modes of all the in vitro crowns were similar to clinical fracture modes. The fracture modes in group 1 were most closely matched to the clinical fractures. These crowns also fractured at clinically relevant loads. Laboratory tests that induce a distortion of the abutment model during occlusal loading without occlusal contact damage can simulate clinical fractures of all-ceramic crowns. Copyright © 2013 Academy of Dental Materials. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Fatigue Resistance of CAD/CAM Resin Composite Molar Crowns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shembish, Fatma A.; Tong, Hui; Kaizer, Marina; Janal, Malvin N.; Thompson, Van P.; Opdam, Niek J.; Zhang, Yu

    2016-01-01

    Objective To demonstrate the fatigue behavior of CAD/CAM resin composite molar crowns using a mouth-motion step-stress fatigue test. Monolithic leucite-reinforced glass-ceramic crowns were used as a reference. Methods Fully anatomically shaped monolithic resin composite molar crowns (Lava Ultimate, n = 24) and leucite reinforced glass-ceramic crowns (IPS Empress CAD, n = 24) were fabricated using CAD/CAM systems. Crowns were cemented on aged dentin-like resin composite tooth replicas (Filtek Z100) with resin-based cements (RelyX Ultimate for Lava Ultimate or Multilink Automix for IPS Empress). Three step-stress profiles (aggressive, moderate and mild) were employed for the accelerated sliding-contact mouth-motion fatigue test. Twenty one crowns from each group were randomly distributed among these three profiles (1:2:4). Failure was designated as chip-off or bulk fracture. Optical and electronic microscopes were used to examine the occlusal surface and subsurface damages, as well as the material microstructures. Results The resin composite crowns showed only minor occlusal damage during mouth-motion step-stress fatigue loading up to 1700 N. Cross-sectional views revealed contact-induced cone cracks in all specimens, and flexural radial cracks in 2 crowns. Both cone and radial cracks were relatively small compared to the crown thickness. Extending these cracks to the threshold for catastrophic failure would require much higher indentation loads or more loading cycles. In contrast, all of the glass-ceramic crowns fractured, starting at loads of approximately 450 N. Significance Monolithic CAD/CAM resin composite crowns endure, with only superficial damage, fatigue loads 3 – 4 times higher than those causing catastrophic failure in glass-ceramic CAD crowns. PMID:26777092

  15. Pediatric Preformed Metal Crowns - An Update

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sangameshwar Sajjanshetty

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Stainless Steel crowns (SSC were introduced in 1947 by the Rocky Mountain Company and popularized by Humphrey in 1950. Prefabricated SSC can be adapted to individual primary teeth and cemented in place to provide a definitive restoration. The SSC is extremely durable, relatively inexpensive, subject to minimal technique sensitivity during placement, and offers the advantage of full coronal coverage. SSC are often used to restore primary and permanent teeth in children and adolescents where intracoronal restorations would otherwise fail. This article brings the update of this definitive restoration.

  16. Crown and bridge cements: clinical applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bunek, Sabiha S; Powers, John M

    2012-12-01

    Cement selection can be confusing because factors such as substrate, the type of restoration, and patient needs must be considered. Some substrates require additional treatment before cementation. This article describes the most commonly used traditional crown and bridge cements (GI and RMGI) used for metal and metal-ceramic restorations, and resin cements used for all-ceramic restorations. Advantages, disadvantages, indications, and contraindications of cements have been reviewed. Recommended uses of cements for metal, ceramic, and laboratory composite restorations have been presented. General guidelines for surface treatment ot silica- and zirconia-based restorations when using resin cements have been discussed.

  17. Efficient xylose fermentation by the brown rot fungus Neolentinus lepideus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okamoto, Kenji; Kanawaku, Ryuichi; Masumoto, Masaru; Yanase, Hideshi

    2012-02-10

    The efficient production of bioethanol on an industrial scale requires the use of renewable lignocellulosic biomass as a starting material. A limiting factor in developing efficient processes is identifying microorganisms that are able to effectively ferment xylose, the major pentose sugar found in hemicellulose, and break down carbohydrate polymers without pre-treatment steps. Here, a basidiomycete brown rot fungus was isolated as a new biocatalyst with unprecedented fermentability, as it was capable of converting not only the 6-carbon sugars constituting cellulose, but also the major 5-carbon sugar xylose in hemicelluloses, to ethanol. The fungus was identified as Neolentinus lepideus and was capable of assimilating and fermenting xylose to ethanol in yields of 0.30, 0.33, and 0.34 g of ethanol per g of xylose consumed under aerobic, oxygen-limited, and anaerobic conditions, respectively. A small amount of xylitol was detected as the major by-product of xylose metabolism. N. lepideus produced ethanol from glucose, mannose, galactose, cellobiose, maltose, and lactose with yields ranging from 0.34 to 0.38 g ethanol per g sugar consumed, and also exhibited relatively favorable conversion of non-pretreated starch, xylan, and wheat bran. These results suggest that N. lepideus is a promising candidate for cost-effective and environmentally friendly ethanol production from lignocellulosic biomass. To our knowledge, this is the first report on efficient ethanol fermentation from various carbohydrates, including xylose, by a naturally occurring brown rot fungus. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Sclerotinia Rot on Basil Caused by Sclerotinia sclerotiorum in Korea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soo Sang Hahm

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available During growing season of 2011 to 2013, Sclerotinia rot symptoms consistently have been observed on basil in Yesan-gun, Chungcheongnam-do in Korea. The typical symptom formed initially brownish spot on leaf and stem, and then advancing margins, wilting the whole plant and blighting, eventually died. On the surface of diseased lesions was observed cottony, white, dense mat of mycelial growth, and sclerotia (30–100 µm diameter formed on stem and leaf. Morphological and cultural characteristic on potato dextrose agar, color of colony was white and colorless chocolate, sclerotium of irregular shape of the oval was black and 5–50 µm diameter in size. In pathogenicity test, necrosis and wilt of the inoculated stem were observed in all plants and the pathogen was reisolated from stems. On the basis of mycological characteristics, pathogenicity, and internal transcribed spacer rDNA sequence analysis, this fungus was identified as Sclerotinia sclerotiorum. This is the first report of Sclerotinia rot on basil caused by S. sclerotiorum in Korea.

  19. Posterior preveneered stainless steel crowns: clinical performance after three years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Connell, Anne C; Kratunova, Evelina; Leith, Rona

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the clinical performance of posterior preveneered stainless steel crowns after three years. NuSmile crowns and Kinder Krowns were randomly allocated on paired molars using a split-mouth design. Variables such as fracture, wear, gingival health, and esthetics were recorded. (Pcrowns in 14 children. After three years, 53 percent of crowns were fracture free compared to 81 percent at one year. There was minimal esthetic impact for most fractures due to the location of the veneer fracture, but five crowns had extensive fracture. No difference was reported in the clinical performance between the two crown types. Fracture was more likely to occur where the adjacent tooth was missing. Parents reported a satisfaction rating of 8.3 out of 10. Clinical performance of both crown types was similar and successful for three years. Facing fracture occurred in 47 percent of crowns but had minimal impact on the esthetic value or parental satisfaction in the majority of cases. These crowns offer an esthetic alternative to the traditional stainless steel crown, but parents should be alerted to the possibility of veneer loss over time.

  20. Adhesive Cementation Promotes Higher Fatigue Resistance to Zirconia Crowns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campos, F; Valandro, L F; Feitosa, S A; Kleverlaan, C J; Feilzer, A J; de Jager, N; Bottino, M A

    The aim of this study was to investigate the influence of the cementation strategy on the fatigue resistance of zirconia crowns. The null hypothesis was that the cementation strategy would not affect the fatigue resistance of the crowns. Seventy-five simplified molar tooth crown preparations were machined in glass fiber-filled epoxy resin. Zirconia crowns were designed (thickness=0.7 mm), milled by computer-aided design/computer-aided manufacturing, and sintered, as recommended. Crowns were cemented onto the resin preparations using five cementation strategies (n=15): ZP, luting with zinc phosphate cement; PN, luting with Panavia F resin cement; AL, air particle abrasion with alumina particles (125 μm) as the crown inner surface pretreatment + Panavia F; CJ, tribochemical silica coating as crown inner surface pretreatment + Panavia F; and GL, application of a thin layer of porcelain glaze followed by etching with hydrofluoric acid and silanization as crown inner surface pretreatment + Panavia F. Resin cement was activated for 30 seconds for each surface. Specimens were tested until fracture in a stepwise stress fatigue test (10,000 cycles in each step, 600 to 1400 N, frequency of 1.4 Hz). The mode of failure was analyzed by stereomicroscopy and scanning electron microscopy. Data were analyzed by Kaplan-Meier and Mantel-Cox (log rank) tests and a pairwise comparison (pzirconia layer. Finite element analysis showed the different stress distribution for the two models. Adhesive cementation of zirconia crowns improves fatigue resistance.

  1. Relation of Crown Width to Tree Diameter In Some Upland Hardwood Stands of Southern Illinois

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leon S. Minckler; Samuel F. Gingrich

    1970-01-01

    Crown width-d.b.h. relationships in well stocked, uneven-aged stands of oak and hickory were similar to those for open-grown trees and were independent of site, crown class, and species. The irregular crowns of forest grown trees interface and overlap, however, and measuring crown extensions to the branch tips tended to overestimate effective crown area

  2. Effect of Environment and Sugar Beet Genotype on Root Rot Development and Pathogen Profile During Storage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liebe, Sebastian; Varrelmann, Mark

    2016-01-01

    Storage rots represent an economically important factor impairing the storability of sugar beet by increasing sucrose losses and invert sugar content. Understanding the development of disease management strategies, knowledge about major storage pathogens, and factors influencing their occurrence is crucial. In comprehensive storage trials conducted under controlled conditions, the effects of environment and genotype on rot development and associated quality changes were investigated. Prevalent species involved in rot development were identified by a newly developed microarray. The strongest effect on rot development was assigned to environment factors followed by genotypic effects. Despite large variation in rot severity (sample range 0 to 84%), the spectrum of microorganisms colonizing sugar beet remained fairly constant across all treatments with dominant species belonging to the fungal genera Botrytis, Fusarium, and Penicillium. The intensity of microbial tissue necrotization was strongly correlated with sucrose losses (R² = 0.79 to 0.91) and invert sugar accumulation (R² = 0.91 to 0.95). A storage rot resistance bioassay was developed that could successfully reproduce the genotype ranking observed in storage trials. Quantification of fungal biomass indicates that genetic resistance is based on a quantitative mechanism. Further work is required to understand the large environmental influence on rot development in sugar beet.

  3. Simultaneous Detection of Brown Rot- and Soft Rot-Causing Bacterial Pathogens from Potato Tubers Through Multiplex PCR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ranjan, R K; Singh, Dinesh; Baranwal, V K

    2016-11-01

    Ralstonia solanacearum (Smith) Yabuuchi et al. and Erwinia carotovora subsp. carotovora (Jones) Bergey et al. (Pectobacterium carotovorum subsp. carotovorum) are the two major bacterial pathogens of potato causing brown rot (wilt) and soft rot diseases, respectively, in the field and during storage. Reliable and early detection of these pathogens are keys to avoid occurrence of these diseases in potato crops and reduce yield loss. In the present study, multiplex polymerase chain reaction (PCR) protocol was developed for simultaneous detection of R. solanacearum and E. carotovora subsp. carotovora from potato tubers. A set of oligos targeting the pectatelyase (pel) gene of E. carotovora subsp. carotovora and the universal primers based on 16S r RNA gene of R. solanacearum were used. The standardized multiplex PCR protocol could detect R. solanacearum and E. carotovora subsp. carotovora up to 0.01 and 1.0 ng of genomic DNA, respectively. The protocol was further validated on 96 stored potato tuber samples, collected from different potato-growing states of India, viz. Uttarakhand, Odisha, Meghalaya and Delhi. 53.1 % tuber samples were positive for R. solanacearum, and 15.1 % of samples were positive for E. carotovora subsp. carotovora, and both the pathogens were positive in 26.0 % samples when BIO-PCR was used. This method offers sensitive, specific, reliable and fast detection of two major bacterial pathogens from potato tubers simultaneously, particularly pathogen-free seed certification in large scale.

  4. The mitochondrial genome of Moniliophthora roreri, the frosty pod rot pathogen of cacao.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, Gustavo G L; Cabrera, Odalys G; Tiburcio, Ricardo A; Medrano, Francisco J; Carazzolle, Marcelo F; Thomazella, Daniela P T; Schuster, Stephen C; Carlson, John E; Guiltinan, Mark J; Bailey, Bryan A; Mieczkowski, Piotr; Pereira, Gonçalo A G; Meinhardt, Lyndel W

    2012-05-01

    In this study, we report the sequence of the mitochondrial (mt) genome of the Basidiomycete fungus Moniliophthora roreri, which is the etiologic agent of frosty pod rot of cacao (Theobroma cacao L.). We also compare it to the mtDNA from the closely-related species Moniliophthora perniciosa, which causes witches' broom disease of cacao. The 94 Kb mtDNA genome of M. roreri has a circular topology and codes for the typical 14 mt genes involved in oxidative phosphorylation. It also codes for both rRNA genes, a ribosomal protein subunit, 13 intronic open reading frames (ORFs), and a full complement of 27 tRNA genes. The conserved genes of M. roreri mtDNA are completely syntenic with homologous genes of the 109 Kb mtDNA of M. perniciosa. As in M. perniciosa, M. roreri mtDNA contains a high number of hypothetical ORFs (28), a remarkable feature that make Moniliophthoras the largest reservoir of hypothetical ORFs among sequenced fungal mtDNA. Additionally, the mt genome of M. roreri has three free invertron-like linear mt plasmids, one of which is very similar to that previously described as integrated into the main M. perniciosa mtDNA molecule. Moniliophthora roreri mtDNA also has a region of suspected plasmid origin containing 15 hypothetical ORFs distributed in both strands. One of these ORFs is similar to an ORF in the mtDNA gene encoding DNA polymerase in Pleurotus ostreatus. The comparison to M. perniciosa showed that the 15 Kb difference in mtDNA sizes is mainly attributed to a lower abundance of repetitive regions in M. roreri (5.8 Kb vs 20.7 Kb). The most notable differences between M. roreri and M. perniciosa mtDNA are attributed to repeats and regions of plasmid origin. These elements might have contributed to the rapid evolution of mtDNA. Since M. roreri is the second species of the genus Moniliophthora whose mtDNA genome has been sequenced, the data presented here contribute valuable information for understanding the evolution of fungal mt genomes among

  5. Armillaria root rot -- rev. revised edition. Information leaflet No. LFC 14E

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lachance, D.

    1996-11-01

    Armillaria root rot is a disease of the roots of plants and is caused by a fungus belonging to the genus `Armillaria spp.`. Most tree species in both the temperate and tropical zones can be affected by this disease; however, the damage is most notable and probably greatest in plantations. Armillaria root rot can be controlled, albeit with difficulty. This document looks at armillaria root rot and looks at the following points: Hosts and extent of the disease; the pathogens; symptoms and signs; infection and development; control; prevention; compromise solution; and, bibliography.

  6. Neofusicoccum luteum associated with leaf necrosis and fruit rot of olives in New South Wales, Australia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Sergeeva

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Neofusicoccum luteum is reported for the first time from olives (Olea europaea, causing fruit rot and leaf necrosis. Affected fruits initially became brown with pycnidia developing on the surface, later drying out and becoming mummified. The fungus was shown to be pathogenic on both fruits and leaves. The association of Botryosphaeriaceae with rotting olive fruits in Mediterranean regions and in New South Wales, Australia indicates that these fungi play a significant role in fruit rots of olives and deserve greater attention.

  7. Control of Ralstonia Solanacearum The Causal Agent of Brown Rot in Potato Using Essential Oils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salem, E.A.

    2011-01-01

    Five essential oils, namely peppermint (Mentha piperita L.), caraway (Carium carvum L.), fennel (Foeniculum vulgare Mill.), lemongrass (Cymbopogon citratus Staph.) and thyme (Thymus vulgaris), were used separately against Ralstonia solanacearum; the causal agent of brown rot in potato. The most two effective oils (peppermint and thyme) were used in vitro and in vivo after testing their effects on potato tubers buds germination. Peppermint inhibited buds germination but thyme have no effects on buds germination. In vivo, the control of brown rot using thyme oil in glass house experiment reduced the percentage of brown rot infection to 30.6% and reduced the severity of disease from 5 to 3.

  8. Crowns cemented on crown preparations lacking geometric resistance form. Part II: effect of cement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Proussaefs, Periklis

    2004-03-01

    This study evaluated the effect of different cements on resistance to dislodgment of crowns cemented on preparations lacking geometric resistance form. A preparation that offered no geometric resistance form, with 20 degrees total occlusal convergence (TOC), 0.9 mm wide shoulder finish line, and a 2.5 mm axial wall height was created on an ivorine tooth using a milling machine. Ten metal test specimen die replicas and 10 standardized metal crowns with recipient sites for the application of external forces through a universal testing machine were fabricated. The crowns were cemented on the dies under 5 and 10 kg external loads, the marginal openings measured, loaded to dislodgment, and cleaned of cement. The process was repeated using zinc oxide and eugenol (ZOE), zinc phosphate (ZPh), resin modified glass ionomer (RMGI), and composite resin (CR) cements. Marginal openings under 5 kg cementation loads were 74.63 (+/-15.04) for ZOE, 75.98 (+/-18.20) microm for ZPh, 98.58 (+/-22.62) microm for RMGI, and 105.82 (+/-20.07) microm for CR cements respectively; under 10 kg cementation loads they were 57.62 (+/-15.86) microm, 59.55 (+/-15.41) microm, 95.00 (+/-19.52) microm, 101.30 (+/-12.52) microm respectively. Oblique dislodgment forces, measured with a Universal testing machine, were 40.18 (+/- 6.76) N for ZOE, 215.65 (+/-45.79) N for ZPh, 165.43 (+/-19.53) N for RMGI, and 181.54 (+/-30.75) N for CR respectively when crowns were cemented under 5 kg loads. The corresponding values for 10 kg loads were 38.62 (+/-4.19), 274.86 (+/-54.22), 139.70 (+/-21.71), and 160.40 (+/-21.21) respectively. Only zinc phosphate cement produced statistically enhanced resistance when crowns were cemented under 10 kg force (p value = 0.035). Under the conditions of the present study only crowns cemented with zinc phosphate displayed increased resistance to dislodgment on preparations lacking resistance form.

  9. Usurpation of a Crowned Lapwing Vanellus coronatus nest by ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    I report an instance of usurpation of a Crowned Lapwing Vanellus coronatus nest by a pair of African Wattled Lapwings Vanellus senegalensis. The nest, which originally contained a single Crowned Lapwing egg, eventually contained an additional three Wattled Lapwing eggs, before it was predated. Although parents of ...

  10. Short clinical crowns (SCC) – treatment considerations and techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahul, G. R.; Poduval, Soorya T.; Shetty, Karunakar

    2012-01-01

    When the clinical crowns of teeth are dimensionally inadequate, esthetically and biologically acceptable restoration of these dental units is difficult. Often an acceptable restoration cannot be accomplished without first surgically increasing the length of the existing clinical crowns; therefore, successful management requires an understanding of both the dental and periodontal parameters of treatment. The complications presented by teeth with short clinical crowns demand a comprehensive treatment plan and proper sequencing of therapy to ensure a satisfactory result. Visualization of the desired result is a prerequisite of successful therapy. This review examines the periodontal and restorative factors related to restoring teeth with short clinical crowns. Modes of therapy are usually combined to meet the biologic, restorative, and esthetic requirements imposed by short clinical crowns. In this study various methods for treating short clinical crowns are reviewed, the role that restoration margin location play in the maintenance of periodontal and dental symbiosis and the effects of violation of the supracrestal gingivae by improper full-coverage restorations has also been discussed. Key words:Short clinical crown, surgical crown lengthening, forced eruption, diagnostic wax up, alveoloplasty, gingivectomy. PMID:24558561

  11. Evaluation of wild Juglans species for crown gall resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paradox, the most widely used rootstock in CA walnut production, is highly susceptible to the causal agent of crown gall (CG) Agrobacterium tumefaciens. The bacterial pathogen induces the formation of large tumors around the crown of the tree resulting in a reduction in both vigor and yield. If left...

  12. Gloss and Surface Roughness of Anterior Pediatric Zirconia Crowns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theriot, Adrien L; Frey, Gary N; Ontiveros, Joe C; Badger, Gary

    2017-09-15

    The purpose of this study was to determine gloss and surface roughness (Ra) of pediatric anterior zirconia crowns. Gloss of labial and lingual surfaces of pediatric anterior zirconia crowns from three manufacturers was measured on 20 specimens using a small area gloss meter on each. Ra (μm) was measured using a contact-type surface profilometer. Data were evaluated by analysis of variance and pair-wise comparison at the 0.05 level of significance. There were statistically significant interactions between surface location and crown type for both gloss and Ra scores. NuSmile had higher mean gloss scores and lower mean Ra scores than both Kinder Krowns and EZCrowns. Kinder Krowns showed lower mean gloss scores and higher Ra scores than other crown groups. Among all crowns, there was a trend of higher mean gloss paired with lower mean surface roughness, and lower mean gloss paired with higher mean Ra. Hand smoothed followed by mechanically polished zirconia crowns (NuSmile) displayed the highest mean gloss and lowest mean Ra compared to hybrid polishedglazed zirconia crowns (Kinder Krowns, EZCrowns). Of the hybrid polished-glazed zirconia crowns, Kinder Krowns displayed the lowest mean gloss and highest mean Ra.

  13. Re/crowning the Jowo Śākyamuni

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Warner, Cameron

    2011-01-01

    of ritual observance and visions received.  In 1409, Tsongkhapa Lozang Drakpa  (1357-1419) crowned the Jowo, changing his doctrinal and iconographic representations.  I connect the controversy surrounding Tsongkhapa's decision to re/crown the Jowo in 1409 to the significance placed on authenticity...

  14. Evaluation of Vertical Marginal Adaptation of Provisional Crowns by ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: To investigate and compare the degree of vertical marginal discrepancy of four provisional crown materials by digital microscope. Materials and Methods: A total of 100 provisional crowns were fabricated on standardized resin dies by direct technique of provisional fabrication, using four different provisional ...

  15. Short clinical crowns (SCC) - treatment considerations and techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Ashu; Rahul, G R; Poduval, Soorya T; Shetty, Karunakar

    2012-10-01

    When the clinical crowns of teeth are dimensionally inadequate, esthetically and biologically acceptable restoration of these dental units is difficult. Often an acceptable restoration cannot be accomplished without first surgically increasing the length of the existing clinical crowns; therefore, successful management requires an understanding of both the dental and periodontal parameters of treatment. The complications presented by teeth with short clinical crowns demand a comprehensive treatment plan and proper sequencing of therapy to ensure a satisfactory result. Visualization of the desired result is a prerequisite of successful therapy. This review examines the periodontal and restorative factors related to restoring teeth with short clinical crowns. Modes of therapy are usually combined to meet the biologic, restorative, and esthetic requirements imposed by short clinical crowns. In this study various methods for treating short clinical crowns are reviewed, the role that restoration margin location play in the maintenance of periodontal and dental symbiosis and the effects of violation of the supracrestal gingivae by improper full-coverage restorations has also been discussed. Key words:Short clinical crown, surgical crown lengthening, forced eruption, diagnostic wax up, alveoloplasty, gingivectomy.

  16. Spectrophotometric evaluation of crown fragment a year after ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Crown fracture is the most common type of fracture and frequently affects the anterior teeth. Crown fractures have been treated in several ways depending on the location and kind of fracture. This case emphasizes reattachment of fractured fragments using fiber-reinforced post. Also this case report underlines ...

  17. Crown ratio models for tropical rainforests species in Oban division ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Crown ratio (CR) is a characteristic used to describe the crown size, which is an important element of forest growth and yield. It is often used as an important predictor variable for tree-level growth equations. It indicates tree vigour and is an important habitat variable. It is often estimated using allometry. Modified versions of ...

  18. Plasmonic coaxial Fabry-Pérot nanocavity color filter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Si, G. Y.; Leong, E. S. P.; Danner, A. J.; Teng, J. H.

    2010-08-01

    Plamonic coaxial structures have drawn considerable attetion recently because of their unique properties. They exhibit different mechanisms of extraordinary optical transmission observed from subwavelength holes and they can support localized Fabry-Pérot plasmon modes. In this work, we experimentally demonstrate color filters based on coaxial structures fabricated in optically thick metallic films. Using nanogaps with different apertures from 160 nm down to only 40 nm, we show varying color outputs when the annular aperture arrays are illuminated with a broadband light source. Effective color-filter function is demonstrated in the optical regime. Different color outputs are observed and optical spectra are measured. In such structures, it is the propagating mode playing an important role rather than the evanescent. Resonances depend strongly on ring apertures, enabling devices with tunability of output colors using simple geometry control.

  19. Calorimetric study of binding of some disaccharides with crown ethers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davydova, Olga I.; Lebedeva, Nataliya Sh.; Parfenyuk, Elena V.

    2004-01-01

    Isothermal titration calorimetry has been applied to the determination of the thermodynamic parameters of binding of β-lactose, α,α-trehalose and sucrose with 15-crown-5 and 18-crown-6 in water at 298.15 K. The formation of 1:1 molecular associates has been found for the systems studied except 18-crown-6 and β-lactose. The associates are preferentially or completely entropy stabilized. The most stable associate is formed between α,α-trehalose and 18-crown-6. The obtained values of thermodynamic parameters of binding are discussed from the point of view of solute-solvent interactions as well as conformational and structural peculiarities of the disaccharides (DS) and crown ethers (CE)

  20. [Clinical evaluation of zirconia crowns for single posterior teeth].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yuanhua; Meng, Xiangfeng; Yu, Qing

    2014-06-01

    To observe and evaluate the clinical performance of zirconia crowns made by CEREC inLab computer aided design/computer aided manufacturing(CAD/CAM) for posterior teeth. A total of 242 patients were implanted with zirconia crowns fabricated by CEREC inLab CAD/CAM. The crowns were evaluated by Modified US Public Health Service criteria at baseline, 6, 12, 24, and 36 months. The chi-square test was used to analyze the survival rate. All but five crowns were evaluated by an independent evaluator at baseline, 6, 12, 24, and 36 months. The survival rate declined with time. The A score percentage was above 85% at 36 months. The single zirconia crowns fabricated by CEREC inLab CAD/CAM demonstrate satisfactory clinical performance during a short period.

  1. Structural Study of Mismatched Disila-Crown Ether Complexes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kirsten Reuter

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Mismatched complexes of the alkali metals cations Li+ and Na+ were synthesized from 1,2-disila[18]crown-6 (1 and 2 and of K+ from 1,2,4,5-tetrasila[18]crown-6 (4. In these alkali metal complexes, not all crown ether O atoms participate in the coordination, which depicts the coordination ability of the C-, Si/C-, and Si-bonded O atoms. Furthermore, the inverse case—the coordination of the large Ba2+ ion by the relatively small ligand 1,2-disila[15]crown-5—was investigated, yielding the dinuclear complex 5. This structure represents a first outlook on sandwich complexes based on hybrid crown ethers.

  2. Habitat-dependent changes in vigilance behaviour of Red-crowned Crane influenced by wildlife tourism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Donglai; Liu, Yu; Sun, Xinghai; Lloyd, Huw; Zhu, Shuyu; Zhang, Shuyan; Wan, Dongmei; Zhang, Zhengwang

    2017-11-30

    The Endangered Red-crowned Crane (Grus japonensis) is one of the most culturally iconic and sought-after species by wildlife tourists. Here we investigate how the presence of tourists influence the vigilance behaviour of cranes foraging in Suaeda salsa salt marshes and S. salsa/Phragmites australis mosaic habitat in the Yellow River Delta, China. We found that both the frequency and duration of crane vigilance significantly increased in the presence of wildlife tourists. Increased frequency in crane vigilance only occurred in the much taller S. salsa/P. australis mosaic vegetation whereas the duration of vigilance showed no significant difference between the two habitats. Crane vigilance declined with increasing distance from wildlife tourists in the two habitats, with a minimum distance of disturbance triggering a high degree of vigilance by cranes identified at 300 m. The presence of wildlife tourists may represent a form of disturbance to foraging cranes but is habitat dependent. Taller P. australis vegetation serves primarily as a visual obstruction for cranes, causing them to increase the frequency of vigilance behaviour. Our findings have important implications for the conservation of the migratory red-crowned crane population that winters in the Yellow River Delta and can help inform visitor management.

  3. Triaquachlorido(18-crown-6barium chloride

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Min-Min Zhao

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available In the title compound, [BaCl(C12H24O6(H2O3]Cl, the BaII atom, the coordinating and free Cl− anions, one coordinating water molecule and two O atoms of an 18-crown-6 molecule lie on a mirror plane. The environment of the ten-coordinate Ba2+ ion is defined by one Cl atom, three water molecules and six O atoms from the macrocyclic ether. The macrocycle adopts a conformation with an approximate D3d symmetry. In the crystal, O—H...Cl hydrogen bonds link the complex cations and Cl− anions into a two-dimensional network parallel to (010. An intramolecular O—H...Cl hydrogen bond is also present.

  4. Gingival pigmentation beneath a metallic crown

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakai, T.; Hirayasu, R.; Sakai, H.; Hashimoto, N.

    1988-01-01

    Light and electron microscopic studies and energy dispersive X-ray analysis disclosed that the essential cause of gingival discoloration following the placement of a metallic crown, was marked deposition of melanin pigment. Deposition of melanin pigment was observed in epithelial cells, on basement membranes, and in fibroblasts, macrophages and among intercellular ground substance of the proprial layer. Brown or dark brown colored granules were observed in the deep portion of the proprial layer. Some metallic elements as silver and sulfur were detected. It was presumed that these materials were dental metals accidentally implanted in gingival tissues during the therapeutic procedure. The deposition of melanin pigment closely corresponded with mucosal tissue where these materials were present in the deep portion of the proprial layer. These findings suggested that these materials influenced the physiological metabolism of melanin and induced its pathological deposition in the proprial tissue. (author)

  5. EL CROWN HALL. CONTEXTO Y PROYECTO / The Crown Hall. Context and project

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Santatecla Fayós

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available RESUMEN El artículo enmarca el edificio del Crown Hall en el contexto docente y arquitectónico de Mies van der Rohe. Revisa sus inicios en la Bauhaus con su primera intervención en un espacio docente para la Bauhaus de Berlín en 1932, así como su marcha a Estados Unidos, los planteamientos arquitectónicos del campus del IIT y el proyecto del Crown Hall. El texto incide en el estudio del proceso proyectual del Crown Hall analizando la evolución de su concepción arquitectónica a través de las diferentes versiones del proyecto. Se constata la transición desde los primeros planteamientos arquitectónicos de los edificios del campus del IIT proyectados por Mies hacia el planteamiento del gran espacio unitario del Crown Hall. Este proyecto se puede entender desde la creciente importancia de la estructura, la claridad constructiva y el manejo del acero y vidrio como únicos materiales de la imagen del edificio y el carácter flexible y unitario del espacio. Finalmente se hace referencia al concepto del “espacio universal” en la arquitectura de Mies, como un concepto abstracto que supera los de flexibilidad de uso o unidad espacial, insinuando, a modo de reflexión, las principales variables que definirían el espacio universal miesiano. SUMMARY The article showcases the Crown Hall building in the educational and architectural context of Mies van der Rohe. It reviews his beginnings in the Bauhaus with his first intervention in an educational space for the Bauhaus of Berlin in 1932, as well as his sojourn to the United States, and the architectural approaches to the IIT campus and the Crown Hall project. The text touches on the study of the planning process for the Crown Hall, analysing the evolution of its architectural conception, through the different versions of the project. The article covers the transition from the first architectural approaches for the IIT campus buildings, planned by Mies, to the approach of the large unitary space

  6. IDRC Bulletin — Winter 2017

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    2018-01-16

    Jan 16, 2018 ... In this issue, read the research results from our Safe and Inclusive Cities program and don't forget that the Joint Canada-Israel Health Research Program 2018 call is now open. IDRC Bulletin logo IDRC Bulletin — Winter 2017. Featured this month. View of Port-au-Prince in Haiti, March 30, 2016. Safe and ...

  7. Learning through a Winter's Tale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vidotto, Kristie

    2010-01-01

    In this article, the author shares her experience during the final semester of Year 11 Theatre Studies when she performed a monologue about Hermione from "The Winter's Tale". This experience was extremely significant to her because it nearly made her lose faith in one of the most important parts of her life, drama. She believes this…

  8. Winter School on Coding Theory

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 8; Issue 8. Winter School on Coding Theory. Information and Announcements Volume 8 Issue 8 August 2003 pp 111-111. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link: http://www.ias.ac.in/article/fulltext/reso/008/08/0111-0111. Resonance ...

  9. Nuclear Winter: The Continuing Debate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-03-23

    prospect of human annihilation. Speculation about the environmental results of a ’long darkness’ were considered by Paul Ehrlich .10 The term nuclear winter...Washington D.C., 1983 The Cold and the Dark: The World after Nuclear War, by Paul Ehrlich , et al. New York: Norton, 1984. (QH545 N83 C66 1983k Caldicott

  10. CHARACTERIZATION OF WOOD DECAY BY ROT FUNGI USING COLORIMETRY AND INFRARED SPECTROSCOPY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mírian de Almeida Costa

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Wood samples of marupá (Simarouba amara and andiroba (Carapa guianenis were submitted to Trametes versicolor (white rot and Gloeophylum trabeum (brown rot fungi attack. Colorimetry was used to determine the color of the wood before and after wood decaying fungi. To evaluate the changes in chemical compounds levels in the wood samples, the diffuse reflectance medium infrared spectroscopy was used. Both wood were non resistant against white rot fungus, while with brown rot attack andiroba was resistant and marupá was not. After Gloeophyllum trabeum attack both woods changed to a darken color, and after Trametes versicolor attack andiroba changed to a lighter color and marupá darkened slightly, The analysis showed a reduction in the peak intensity of cellulose, hemicellulose and lignin, for both species, after Trametes versicolor attack and a reduction in the peak intensity of cellulose after Gloeophyllum trabeum attack.

  11. Efficacy of four plant extracts in the control of root rot disease of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Garcinia cola) and neem (Azadirachta indica) extracts in the control of root rot of cowpea caused by Pythium aphanidermatum was carried out in vitro and in the field (in vivo). They were evaluated for their antifungal activity over P.

  12. Biodegradation of hazardous waste using white rot fungus: Project planning and concept development document

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luey, J.; Brouns, T.M.; Elliott, M.L.

    1990-11-01

    The white rot fungus Phanerochaete chrysosporium has been shown to effectively degrade pollutants such as trichlorophenol, polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), dioxins and other halogenated aromatic compounds. These refractory organic compounds and many others have been identified in the tank waste, groundwater and soil of various US Department of Energy (DOE) sites. The treatment of these refractory organic compounds has been identified as a high priority for DOE's Research, Development, Demonstration, Testing, and Evaluation (RDDT ampersand E) waste treatment programs. Unlike many bacteria, the white rot fungus P. chrysosporium is capable of degrading these types of refractory organics and may be valuable for the treatment of wastes containing multiple pollutants. The objectives of this project are to identify DOE waste problems amenable to white rot fungus treatment and to develop and demonstrate white rot fungus treatment process for these hazardous organic compounds. 32 refs., 6 figs., 7 tabs

  13. First Report of Postharvest Gray Mold Rot on Carrot Caused by Botrytis cinerea in Korea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Md. Aktaruzzaman

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available In February 2014, gray mold rotting symptoms were observed in carrots in cold storage at Gangneung, Gangwon province, Korea. The typical symptom of gray mold rot showed abundant blackish gray mycelia and conidia was observed on the infected root. The pathogen was isolated from infected root and cultured on PDA for further fungal morphological observation and confirming its pathogenicity according to Koch’s postulates. Results of morphological data, pathogenicity test and rDNA internal transcribed spacer (ITS 1 and 4 sequence showed that the postharvest gray mold rot of carrot was caused by Botyrtis cinerea. This is the first report of postharvest gray mold rot on carrot in Korea.

  14. [Comparison of adaptation of crowns of different lithium disilicate glass-ceramic].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Kemeng; Ai, Hongjun; Yi, Zhe

    2016-05-01

    To evaluate the adaptation of different lithium disilicate glass-ceramic crown and whether different fabrication processes affect the adaptation of crowns. Thirty epoxy dies crowns were divided into 3 groups. They were cemented to domestic lithium disilicate glass-ceramic crowns in Group A, to IPS e.max CAD crowns in Group B and to IPS e.max Press crowns in Group C respectively. All crowns were cut by cutting machine. A confocal laser scanning microscope was used to measure the gap between crown tissue surface and die. There were significant differences in the three groups of measurement points(Pcrowns appeared to have clinically acceptable fit.

  15. Zwalczanie zgnilizny powodowanej przez grzyby z rodzaju Penicillium [Control of Penicillium apple rot

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Borecka

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Control of Pezicula spp. fungi reduced Penicillium apple rot. The Penicillium apple rot process began slowly under the modified atmosphere of 5% CO2 and 3% O2. The lower concentration of Benlate – 0.05% did not influence this fungicide's effectiveness, The lower concentration– 0.05% of Topsin M decreased the effectiveness of this fungicide. The resistant strains of Penicillium spp. to benzimidazole fungicides under laboratory conditions were obtained.

  16. Molecular diagnosis of Phytophthora cinnamomi associated with root rot in avocado producing areas of Ecuador

    OpenAIRE

    Diana Elizabeth Toapanta-Gallegos; Luis Eduardo Morillo-Velastegui; William Fernando Viera-Arroyo

    2017-01-01

    One of the most damaging diseases in cultivation of avocado (Persea americana Mill.) is root rot associated with Phytophthora cinnamomi Rands. This disease causes progressive wilt and even death of the tree. The objective of this study was to identify the presence of P. cinnamomi in two productive areas of avocado in Ecuador using the molecular technique PCR-RFLP. Tree root samples were obtained with root rot symptoms in the production areas,...

  17. Thermal control of some post-harvest rot pathogens of Irish potato (solanum tuberosum l.)

    OpenAIRE

    Salami Olusola Abiodun; Popoola Omololu Olumide

    2007-01-01

    Thermal control effect on the incidence of some post-harvest rot pathogens of Solanum tuberosum (potato) was investigated in this study. Three cultivars of potato tuber whose local names are, Patiska, Mai Bawondoya and Nicola were used for the study. Five pathogenic fungi viz: Botryodiplodia theobromae, Fusarium redolens, Fusarium oxysporum, Penicillium sp. and Rhizopus oryzae associated with post harvest storage rot of root-tubers, were isolated from diseased potatoes. Among the three specie...

  18. First Report of Sclerotium Rot on Cymbidium Orchids Caused by Sclerotium rolfsii in Korea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Seong-Chan; Lee, Jung-Sup; Soh, Jae-Woo; Kim, Su

    2012-01-01

    Sclerotium rot was found on Cymbidium orchids at Seosan-si, Chungcheongnam-do, Korea, in July, 2010. Symptoms occurred on low leaves, which turned yellowish, after which the entire plant wilted. Severely infected plants were blighted and eventually died. White mycelial mats and sclerotia appeared on pseudobulbs. Based on the mycological characteristics and pathogenicity, the causal fungus was identified as Sclerotium rolfsii. This is the first report of new Sclerotium rot on Cymbidium spp. caused by S. rolfsii in Korea. PMID:23323053

  19. Identification of Quorum Quenching Bacteria and Its Biocontrol Potential Against Soft Rot Disease Bacteria, Dickeya Dadantii

    OpenAIRE

    Khoiri, Syaiful; Damayanti, Tri Asmira; Giyanto, Giyanto

    2017-01-01

    Dickeya dadantii is one of newly found bacteria causing soft rot on orchids in Indonesia. Infected plants showed severe rot rapidly only in few days. An effort to control the bacteria was conducted by utilizing selected quorum quenching (QQ) inducer bacteria which produce AHL-lactonase by aiiA gene. The aims of this research were to screen and identify of quorum quenching bacteria, and also assayed their biocontrol potential ability against D. dadantii in laboratory. The screening of QQ bacte...

  20. No Reported Species, Botrytis aclada Causing Gray Mold Neck Rot Disease on Onion Bulbs in Korea

    OpenAIRE

    Hwang, Sun–Kyoung; Lee, Seung–Yeol; Back, Chang–Gi; Kang, In–Kyu; Lee, Hyang–Burm; Jung, Hee-Young; Ohga, Shoji; Oga, Shoji

    2016-01-01

    Gray mold neck rot was observed on onion bulbs (Allium cepa L.) in low–temperature warehouses in Changnyeong–gun, Korea. The causative pathogen was isolated from rotted onion bulb lesions and identified as Botrytis aclada based on morphological and culture characteristics, the sequences of three nuclear genes (G3PDH, HSP60, and RPB2), and polymerase chain reaction–restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR–RFLP) for Botrytis spp. identification. Although onion gray mold disease caused by B...

  1. First Report of Postharvest Gray Mold Rot on Carrot Caused by Botrytis cinerea in Korea

    OpenAIRE

    Md. Aktaruzzaman; Joon-Young Kim; Sheng-Jun Xu; Byung-Sup Kim

    2014-01-01

    In February 2014, gray mold rotting symptoms were observed in carrots in cold storage at Gangneung, Gangwon province, Korea. The typical symptom of gray mold rot showed abundant blackish gray mycelia and conidia was observed on the infected root. The pathogen was isolated from infected root and cultured on PDA for further fungal morphological observation and confirming its pathogenicity according to Koch’s postulates. Results of morphological data, pathogenicity test and rDNA internal transcr...

  2. Effectiveness of Neutral Electrolyzed Water on Incidence of Fungal Rot on Tomato Fruits ( Solanum lycopersicum L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vásquez-López, Alfonso; Villarreal-Barajas, Tania; Rodríguez-Ortiz, Gerardo

    2016-10-01

    We assessed the effect of neutral electrolyzed water (NEW) on the incidence of rot on tomato ( Solanum lycopersicum L.) fruits inoculated with Fusarium oxysporum , Galactomyces geotrichum , and Alternaria sp. at sites with lesions. The inoculated fruits were treated with NEW at 10, 30, and 60 mg liter -1 active chlorine, with copper oxychloride fungicide, and with sterile distilled water (control) for 3, 5, and 10 min. In the experiment with F. oxysporum , 50 to 80% of the control fruits and 50 to 60% of the fruits treated with the fungicide exhibited symptoms of rot at the inoculated sites. The lowest incidence recorded was 30% for fruits treated with NEW at 60 mg liter -1 active chlorine with an immersion time of 5 min. In the experiment with G. geotrichum , incidence of rot on control fruits was 70 to 90%, and for treatment with fungicide rot incidence was 50 to 90%. NEW at 60 mg liter -1 active chlorine significantly reduced incidence of symptomatic fruit: only 30% of the inoculated fruits washed for 5 min had damage from rot. In the experiment with Alternaria sp., 60 to 90% of the fruits in the control group and 60 to 70% of the fruits in the fungicide group were symptomatic. The lowest incidence was recorded for the treatment in which the fruits were submerged in NEW with 60 mg liter -1 active chlorine for 3 min. In this group, 40 to 50% of the fruits exhibited symptoms of rot. These results were obtained 8 days after inoculation. NEW, with 60 mg liter -1 active chlorine, significantly reduced incidence of rot symptoms on fruits inoculated with one of the experimental fungi relative to the control (P ≤ 0.05). NEW at 60 mg liter -1 is effective in the control of fungal rot in tomatoes.

  3. Zwalczanie zgnilizny powodowanej przez grzyby z rodzaju Penicillium [Control of Penicillium apple rot

    OpenAIRE

    H. Borecka

    2015-01-01

    Control of Pezicula spp. fungi reduced Penicillium apple rot. The Penicillium apple rot process began slowly under the modified atmosphere of 5% CO2 and 3% O2. The lower concentration of Benlate – 0.05% did not influence this fungicide's effectiveness, The lower concentration– 0.05% of Topsin M decreased the effectiveness of this fungicide. The resistant strains of Penicillium spp. to benzimidazole fungicides under laboratory conditions were obtained.

  4. Fracture strength of lithium disilicate crowns compared to polymer-infiltrated ceramic-network and zirconia reinforced lithium silicate crowns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sieper, Kim; Wille, Sebastian; Kern, Matthias

    2017-10-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the fracture strength of crowns made from current CAD/CAM materials. In addition the influence of crown thickness and chewing simulation on the fracture strength was evaluated. Crowns were fabricated from lithium disilicate, zirconia reinforced lithium silicate (ZLS-ceramic) and a polymer-infiltrated ceramic-network (PICN) with an occlusal thickness of 1.0mm or 1.5mm, respectively (n=16). Crowns were cemented on composite dies. Subgroups of eight specimens were loaded with 5kg in a chewing simulator for 1,200,000 cycles with thermal cycling. Finally, all specimens were loaded until fracture in a universal testing machine. Three-way ANOVA was used to detect statistical interaction. Differences regarding the materials were tested with two-way ANOVA, following one-way ANOVA and a post-hoc Tukey's-Test. All crowns survived the chewing simulation. The material had a significant influence on the fracture resistance (p≤0.05). Lithium disilicate achieved the highest values of fracture strength in almost all groups followed by ZLS-ceramic. PICN achieved the lowest values of fracture strength. Chewing simulation increased the fracture strength of thick lithium disilicate crown significantly. Greater occlusal thickness of all crown materials resulted in higher crown fracture strength before chewing simulation. After chewing simulation occlusal thickness of lithium disilicate and PICN crowns had no significant influence on the fracture strength. All crowns revealed fracture strength above the clinically expected loading forces. Therefore the durability of the tested CAD/CAM materials seems promising also in an occlusal thickness of 1.0mm. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Winter movement dynamics of black brant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindberg, Mark S.; Ward, David H.; Tibbitts, T. Lee; Roser, John

    2007-01-01

    Although North American geese are managed based on their breeding distributions, the dynamics of those breeding populations may be affected by events that occur during the winter. Birth rates of capital breeding geese may be influenced by wintering conditions, mortality may be influenced by timing of migration and wintering distribution, and immigration and emigration among breeding populations may depend on winter movement and timing of pair formation. We examined factors affecting movements of black brant (Branta bernicla nigricans) among their primary wintering sites in Mexico and southern California, USA, (Mar 1998–Mar 2000) using capture–recapture models. Although brant exhibited high probability (>0.85) of monthly and annual fidelity to the wintering sites we sampled, we observed movements among all wintering sites. Movement probabilities both within and among winters were negatively related to distance between sites. We observed a higher probability both of southward movement between winters (Mar to Dec) and northward movement between months within winters. Between-winter movements were probably most strongly affected by spatial and temporal variation in habitat quality as we saw movement patterns consistent with contrasting environmental conditions (e.g., La Niña and El Niño southern oscillation cycles). Month-to-month movements were related to migration patterns and may also have been affected by differences in habitat conditions among sites. Patterns of winter movements indicate that a network of wintering sites may be necessary for effective conservation of brant.

  6. Wintering ecology of adult North American ospreys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Washburn, Brian E.; Martell, Mark S.; Bierregaard, Richard O.; Henny, Charles J.; Dorr, Brian S.; Olexa, Thomas J.

    2014-01-01

    North American Ospreys (Pandion haliaetus) typically migrate long distances to their wintering grounds in the tropics. Beyond the general distribution of their wintering range (i.e., the Caribbean, South America, and Central America), very little is known about the wintering ecology of these birds. We used satellite telemetry to determine the duration of wintering period, to examine the characteristics of wintering areas used by Ospreys, and to quantify space use and activity patterns of wintering Ospreys. Adult Ospreys migrated to wintering sites and exhibited high wintering site fidelity among years. Overall, Ospreys wintered on river systems (50.6%) more than on lakes (19.0%), and use of coastal areas was (30.4%) intermediate. Ospreys remained on their wintering grounds for an average of 154 d for males and 167 d for females. Locations of wintering Ospreys obtained via GPS-capable satellite telemetry suggest these birds move infrequently and their movements are very localized (i.e., 2 and 1.4 km2, respectively. Overall, our findings suggest wintering adult North American Ospreys are very sedentary, demonstrating a pattern of limited daily movements and high fidelity to a few select locations (presumably roosts). We suggest this wintering strategy might be effective for reducing the risk of mortality and maximizing energy conservation.

  7. Root rot diseases of sugarbeet (Beta vulgaris L as affected by defloliation intensity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karadimos Dimitros A.

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this work was to study the effect of sugar beet re-growth after water stress defoliation on root rots of three cultivars (Europa, Rival Corsica, which were spring sown in Thessaly, central Greece, for two growing seasons (2003-04. At the beginning of July, sugar beets were subjected to water deficit with irrigation withholding. A month later, three defoliation levels (control - C, moderate - MD, severe - SD and irrigation were applied. Thus, sugar beets were forced to re-grow and three harvests (15, 30 and 40 days after defoliation - DAD were conducted. Rotted roots per hectare were counted and pathogens were identified. Data were analyzed as a four-factor randomized complete block design with years, defoliation levels, sampling times and cultivars as main factors. The number of rotted roots was increased with the defoliation level and was significantly higher for SD sugar beets (3748 roots ha–1. No significant differences were found between C and MD treatments (1543 and 2116 roots ha–1, respectively. Rival was the most susceptible cultivar to root rots. Sugar beets were more susceptible to rotting 15 and 40 DAD (2778 and 2998 roots ha–1. The causal agents of root rots were the fungi, Fusarium spp., Rhizopus stolonifer, Macrophomina phaseolina and Rhizoctonia solani.

  8. Soft rot decay capabilities and interactions of fungi and bacteria from fumigated utility poles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, C.J.K.; Worrall, J.J. (State Univ. of New York, Syracuse, NY (United States). Coll. of Environmental Science and Forestry)

    1992-11-01

    The objectives were to (1) identify microfungi and bacterial associates isolated from fumigated southern pine poles from EPRI project RP 1471-72, (2) study the soft-rot capabilities of predominant fungi, and (3) study interactions among microorganisms in relation to wood decay. Methods for identification followed standard techniques using morphological and physiological criteria. Soft-rot by microfungi alone and with bacteria was determined as weight loss and anatomical examination of wood blocks using light microscopy and limited electron microscopy. Acinetobacter calcoaceticus was the predominant bacterium. Twenty-one species of microfungi were identified including four new species. A book entitled IDENTIFICATION MANUAL FOR FUNGI FROM UTILITY POLES IN THE EASTERN UNITED STATES was published. An improved soft-rot test was devised. Fifty-one of 84 species (60%) of microfungi from poles tested were soft-rot positive; that is much greater than previously reported. Three types of anatomical damage of wood of pine or birch caused by soft-rot fungi were described. Interaction tests showed that, in some cases, there was a strong synergism between bacteria and fungi in causing weight loss, but results were inconsistent. Although soft rot is often most apparent under conditions of very high moisture, intermediate moisture levels appear to be optimal, as with basidiomycete decayers.

  9. Soft rot decay capabilities and interactions of fungi and bacteria from fumigated utility poles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, C.J.K.; Worrall, J.J.

    1992-11-01

    The objectives were to (1) identify microfungi and bacterial associates isolated from fumigated southern pine poles from EPRI project RP 1471-72, (2) study the soft-rot capabilities of predominant fungi, and (3) study interactions among microorganisms in relation to wood decay. Methods for identification followed standard techniques using morphological and physiological criteria. Soft-rot by microfungi alone and with bacteria was determined as weight loss and anatomical examination of wood blocks using light microscopy and limited electron microscopy. Acinetobacter calcoaceticus was the predominant bacterium. Twenty-one species of microfungi were identified including four new species. A book entitled IDENTIFICATION MANUAL FOR FUNGI FROM UTILITY POLES IN THE EASTERN UNITED STATES was published. An improved soft-rot test was devised. Fifty-one of 84 species (60%) of microfungi from poles tested were soft-rot positive; that is much greater than previously reported. Three types of anatomical damage of wood of pine or birch caused by soft-rot fungi were described. Interaction tests showed that, in some cases, there was a strong synergism between bacteria and fungi in causing weight loss, but results were inconsistent. Although soft rot is often most apparent under conditions of very high moisture, intermediate moisture levels appear to be optimal, as with basidiomycete decayers

  10. Guided tooth preparation for a pediatric zirconia crown.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Ju-Hyoung

    2018-03-01

    Unesthetic primary incisors can produce negative self-perceptions in preschool-aged children. In recent years, because of increased esthetic demands, prefabricated zirconia crowns have become increasingly popular. However, zirconia crowns cannot be crimped, and the clinician must prepare the teeth to fit the zirconia crowns. Therefore, extended preparation and fitting times are necessary, especially for inexperienced practitioners. A 1- to 2-millimeter subgingival feather margin also is required. Gingival hemorrhage after subgingival preparation compromises the retention of zirconia crowns. In this clinical report, the author presents a step-by-step description of the clinical and laboratory procedures for restoring a discolored traumatized incisor with a zirconia crown. The author used a polyvinyl siloxane occlusal registration material as an impression material and made 2 identical casts. The author fabricated 3 reduction guides after prospective tooth preparation on the casts. The author rapidly prepared the discolored incisor with the reduction guides and ultrasonic burs. A zirconia crown provided an optimal esthetic result and gingival health. Because the reduction guides provided a visibility intraorally, fast tooth reduction, less trial placement, and passive adaptation of the crown were successful. Because the ultrasonic burs prevented gingival injuries, hemorrhage control was not necessary. The presented technique reduced the patient's discomfort and total chair time. Therefore, this alternative technique is helpful for inexperienced practitioners. Copyright © 2018 American Dental Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Review of Alberta Crown Crude Oil Marketing Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crandall, G. R.; Kromm, R. B.

    1999-01-01

    This report contains an independent evaluation of the operations of the private marketing agents that are currently marketing the Alberta Crown's share of royalty crude oil. The evaluation includes a review of pricing performance, working relationship, current issues and the overall performance of the marketing arrangements during the fiscal years of 1997 and 1998. Overall, the outsourcing of sales of Crown production to agents is judged to be successful. For example, it has been noted that agents are becoming more aggressive in maintaining and increasing their margins. On the other hand, the increased level of aggressiveness in marketing, while tending to maximize Crown revenues, is also creating a potential conflict on how margins should be shared between the Crown and its agents. Also, there has been evidence of some management issues between the agents and the Crown concerning the extent to which the Crown should share in any increased value which the agent generates by increased third party marketing activities. These differences need to be addressed in order to maintain the strong performance of the marketing program. The consultants also recommend additional guidelines on risk management issues that more clearly define the Crown's risk tolerance. 2 tabs., 4 figs

  12. Marginal Assessment of Crowns by the Aid of Parallel Radiography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farnaz Fattahi

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Marginal adaptation is the most critical item in long-term prognosis of single crowns. This study aimed to assess the marginal quality as well asthe discrepancies in marginal integrity of some PFM single crowns of posterior teeth by employing parallel radiography in Shiraz Dental School, Shiraz, Iran. Methods: In this descriptive study, parallel radiographies were taken from 200 fabricated PFM single crowns of posterior teeth after cementation and before discharging the patient. To calculate the magnification of the images, a metallic sphere with the thickness of 4 mm was placed in the direction of the crown margin on the occlusal surface. Thereafter, the horizontal and vertical space between the crown margins, the margin of preparations and also the vertical space between the crown margin and the bone crest were measured by using digital radiological software. Results: Analysis of data by descriptive statistics revealed that 75.5% and 60% of the cases had more than the acceptable space (50µm in the vertical (130±20µm and horizontal (90±15µm dimensions, respectively. Moreover, 85% of patients were found to have either horizontal or vertical gap. In 77% of cases, the margins of crowns invaded the biologic width in the mesial and 70% in distal surfaces. Conclusion: Parallel radiography can be expedient in the stage of framework try-in to yield some important information that cannot be obtained by routine clinical evaluations and may improve the treatment prognosis

  13. The repair of preveneered posterior stainless steel crowns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yilmaz, Yucel; Gurbuz, Taskin; Eyuboglu, Ozge; Belduz, Nihal

    2008-01-01

    This study's purposes were to determine the shear bond strength (SBS) for and to perform dye penetration (microleakage) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) evaluations of preveneered posterior stainless steel crowns (SSCs) that were repaired using 2 different materials. Twenty-two crowns were used. They were stored in artificial saliva for 30 days and then thermocycled. A force was applied on the crowns' occlusal surfaces until the original veneer material appeared to be fractured. The fracture types and S8S values were recorded. The crowns were then repaired using Panavia opaque cement and Tetric Flow or Monoopaque and Tetric Flow. Twenty of the repaired crowns were subjected to dye penetration and SBS tests, and the remaining 2 were evaluated using SEM. Statistical analysis revealed no statistically significant differences in the results of either the S8S or the dye penetration test (P = .58 and P = 38, respectively). A statistically significant difference was found between original and repaired crowns regarding fracture extent (P = .02), but not failure type (P = .08). SEM evaluation showed that there was no observable gap at the interface of the original or repaired materials and the stainless steel base. Preveneered posterior stainless steel crowns may be repaired using either repair material types tested here.

  14. Clinical assessment of enamel wear caused by monolithic zirconia crowns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stober, T; Bermejo, J L; Schwindling, F S; Schmitter, M

    2016-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to measure enamel wear caused by antagonistic monolithic zirconia crowns and to compare this with enamel wear caused by contralateral natural antagonists. Twenty monolithic zirconia full molar crowns were placed in 20 patients. Patients with high activity of the masseter muscle at night (bruxism) were excluded. For analysis of wear, vinylpolysiloxane impressions were prepared after crown incorporation and at 6-, 12-, and 24-month follow-up. Wear of the occlusal contact areas of the crowns, of their natural antagonists, and of two contralateral natural antagonists (control teeth) was measured by use of plaster replicas and a 3D laser-scanning device. Differences of wear between the zirconia crown antagonists and the control teeth were investigated by means of two-sided paired Student's t-tests and linear regression analysis. After 2 years, mean vertical loss was 46 μm for enamel opposed to zirconia, 19-26 μm for contralateral control teeth and 14 μm for zirconia crowns. Maximum vertical loss was 151 μm for enamel opposed to zirconia, 75-115 μm for control teeth and 60 μm for zirconia crowns. Statistical analysis revealed significant differences between wear of enamel by zirconia-opposed teeth and by control teeth. Gender, which significantly affected wear, was identified as a possible confounder. Monolithic zirconia crowns generated more wear of opposed enamel than did natural teeth. Because of the greater wear caused by other dental ceramics, the use of monolithic zirconia crowns may be justified. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. Retention of cast crown copings cemented to implant abutments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dudley, J E; Richards, L C; Abbott, J R

    2008-12-01

    The cementation of crowns to dental implant abutments is an accepted form of crown retention that requires consideration of the properties of available cements within the applied clinical context. Dental luting agents are exposed to a number of stressors that may reduce crown retention in vivo, not the least of which is occlusal loading. This study investigated the influence of compressive cyclic loading on the physical retention of cast crown copings cemented to implant abutments. Cast crown copings were cemented to Straumann synOcta titanium implant abutments with three different readily used and available cements. Specimens were placed in a humidifier, thermocycled and subjected to one of four quantities of compressive cyclic loading. The uniaxial tensile force required to remove the cast crown copings was then recorded. The mean retention values for crown copings cemented with Panavia-F cement were statistically significantly greater than both KetacCem and TempBond non-eugenol cements at each compressive cyclic loading quantity. KetacCem and TempBond non-eugenol cements produced relatively low mean retention values that were not statistically significantly different at each quantity of compressive cyclic loading. Compressive cyclic loading had a statistically significant effect on Panavia-F specimens alone, but increased loading quantities produced no further statistically significant difference in mean retention. Within the limitations of the current in vitro conditions employed in this study, the retention of cast crown copings cemented to Straumann synOcta implant abutments with a resin, glass ionomer and temporary cement was significantly affected by cement type but not compressive cyclic loading. Resin cement is the cement of choice for the definitive non-retrievable cementation of cast crown copings to Straumann synOcta implant abutments out of the three cements tested.

  16. Survival Predictions of Ceramic Crowns Using Statistical Fracture Mechanics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nasrin, S; Katsube, N; Seghi, R R; Rokhlin, S I

    2017-05-01

    This work establishes a survival probability methodology for interface-initiated fatigue failures of monolithic ceramic crowns under simulated masticatory loading. A complete 3-dimensional (3D) finite element analysis model of a minimally reduced molar crown was developed using commercially available hardware and software. Estimates of material surface flaw distributions and fatigue parameters for 3 reinforced glass-ceramics (fluormica [FM], leucite [LR], and lithium disilicate [LD]) and a dense sintered yttrium-stabilized zirconia (YZ) were obtained from the literature and incorporated into the model. Utilizing the proposed fracture mechanics-based model, crown survival probability as a function of loading cycles was obtained from simulations performed on the 4 ceramic materials utilizing identical crown geometries and loading conditions. The weaker ceramic materials (FM and LR) resulted in lower survival rates than the more recently developed higher-strength ceramic materials (LD and YZ). The simulated 10-y survival rate of crowns fabricated from YZ was only slightly better than those fabricated from LD. In addition, 2 of the model crown systems (FM and LD) were expanded to determine regional-dependent failure probabilities. This analysis predicted that the LD-based crowns were more likely to fail from fractures initiating from margin areas, whereas the FM-based crowns showed a slightly higher probability of failure from fractures initiating from the occlusal table below the contact areas. These 2 predicted fracture initiation locations have some agreement with reported fractographic analyses of failed crowns. In this model, we considered the maximum tensile stress tangential to the interfacial surface, as opposed to the more universally reported maximum principal stress, because it more directly impacts crack propagation. While the accuracy of these predictions needs to be experimentally verified, the model can provide a fundamental understanding of the

  17. Preventive and conservative prosthodontic treatment using overdenture and Richmond crown

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jevin Stivie Cialy

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Prosthodontic treatment aims to restore the chewing function (rehabilitation and to prevent tooth decay and bone resorption (preventive and conservative. As an example, treatment by overdenture and Richmond crown. Overdenture is a partial or complete removable denture covered and supported by one or more teeth, the tooth roots and/or dental implants. Richmond crown is fixed denture by post and crown system, in which the post part goes into the root canal and its crown covers the entire of original tooth crown surface. By retaining the original teeth and/or roots, it could improve the stability and retention of the denture, and defend proprioseptic of teeth and vertical dimensions. To provide information about preventive prosthodontic treatment and prevention by using overdenture and Richmond crown. Case Report: A 50 year old woman only has 44 teeth on the mandible which is indicated for the overdenture construction and loss teeth 13, 14, 17 and 27 on the maxilla with deep caries in teeth 22 which is indicated for a removable partial denture (RPDs construction by Richmond crown gear 22. On an early stage study, printing models is done. Then treatment of the root canal on teeth 22 and 44, followed by root canal preparation, core construction (cast post and Richmond crown on tooth 22 and bareroot preparation on tooth 44 for overdenture construction. The procedure followed by printing, recording bite to insertion. Choosing treatment either overdenture or Richmond crown is very important because it could mantain remain original teeth, thus it can help to improve the retention and stabilization.

  18. Classification guide: Sochi 2014 Paralympic Winter Games

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    The Sochi 2014 Paralympic Winter Games classification guide is designed to provide National Paralympic Committees (NPCs) and International Federations (IFs) with information about the classification policies and procedures that will apply to the Sochi 2014 Paralympic Winter Games.

  19. Lanthanide crown ether complexes of p-sulfonatocalix[5]arene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalgarno, Scott J; Hardie, Michaele J; Warren, John E; Raston, Colin L

    2004-08-21

    Two types of arrays are formed in water involving aza-crown ethers, p-sulfonatocalix[5]arene and europium(III) ions. One is a co-ordination polymer connecting calixarenes, sodium ions and lanthanide ions based on "ferris wheel" moieties incorporating aza-18-crown-6 and sodium ions. The second structure is a host-guest arrangement with di-protonated diaza-18-crown-6 in the cavity of the calixarenes as part of secondary coordination spheres of aquated europium(iii) ions.

  20. Unique case of a geminated supernumerary tooth with trifid crown

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ather, Amber; Ather, Hunaiza; Sheth, Sanket Milan; Muliya, Vidya Saraswathi [Manipal College of Dental Sciences, Manipal (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-09-15

    Gemination, a relatively uncommon dental anomaly, is characterized by its peculiar representation as a tooth with a bifid crown and a common root and root canal. It usually occurs in primary dentition. To come across gemination in a supernumerary tooth is a rare phenomenon. The purpose of this paper is to present a unique case of hyperdontia wherein gemination in an impacted supernumerary tooth resulted in a trifid crown unlike the usual bifid crown. The role of conventional radiographs as well as computed tomography, to accurately determine the morphology and spatial location, and to arrive at a diagnosis, is also emphasized in this paper.

  1. Reduction of HCCI combustion noise through piston crown design

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Troels Dyhr; Schramm, Jesper

    2010-01-01

    Seven shapes of piston crowns have been evaluated for their ability to reduce HCCI knock and transmission of combustion noise to the engine. The performance of each piston crown was evaluated with measurements of cylinder pressure, engine vibration and acoustic sound pressure measured one meter....... The largest and most consistent reduction in noise level was however achieved with a diesel bowl type piston. The increased surface area as well as the larger crevice volumes of the experimental piston crowns generally resulted in lower IMEP than the flat piston. While the crevice volumes can be reduced...... reduction as well as heat losses....

  2. Morphoanatomy and histochemistry analyses of cassava roots do not discriminate resistant from susceptible genotypes to soft root rot

    OpenAIRE

    SILVA, Jonny Lucio Sousa; MOURA, Elisa Ferreira; ILKIU-BORGES, Fernanda; GALVÃO, Jessivaldo Rodrigues; FARIAS-NETO, João Tomé de; SILVA, Gisele Barata da; RÊGO, Marcela Cristiane Ferreira; CUNHA, Roberto Lisboa

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Cassava is an important culture in Brazil and in the North of the country, and soft root rot has affected root production. The aim of this work was to identify root morphoanatomic and histochemical characters associated with root rot resistance. In areas with no occurrence of the disease, nine cassava genotypes were tested, four of which were resistant, and five were susceptible to root rot. Root harvest was carried out twelve months after sowing, and thickness of suber, suber and co...

  3. Proteins Involved in Distinct Phases of Cold Hardening Process in Frost Resistant Winter Barley (Hordeum vulgare L. cv Luxor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Radovan Hynek

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Winter barley is an economically important cereal crop grown in higher latitudes and altitudes where low temperatures represent an important environmental constraint limiting crop productivity. In this study changes in proteome of leaves and crowns in a frost tolerant winter barley cv. Luxor in relation to short and long term periods of cold followed by a brief frost treatment were studied in order to disclose proteins responsible for the cold hardening process in distinct plant tissues. The mentioned changes have been monitored using two dimensional difference gel electrophoresis (2D-DIGE with subsequent peptide-mapping protein identification. Regarding approximately 600–700 distinct protein spots detected on 2D gels, there has been found at least a two-fold change after exposure to low temperatures in about 10% of proteins in leaves and 13% of proteins in crowns. Protein and nitrogen metabolic processes have been influenced by low temperature to a similar extent in both tissues while catabolism, carbohydrate metabolism and proteins involved in stress response have been more affected in crowns than in leaves. The range of changes in protein abundance was generally higher in leaves and chloroplast proteins were frequently affected which suggests a priority to protect photosynthetic apparatus. Overall, our data proved existence of slightly different response strategies to low temperature stress in crowns and leaves, i.e., tissues with different biological role. Moreover, there have been found several proteins with large increase in accumulation, e.g., 33 kDa oxygen evolving protein of photosystem II in leaves and “enhanced disease susceptibility 1” in crowns; these proteins might have potential to indicate an enhanced level of frost tolerance in barley.

  4. Leadership in American Indian Communities: Winter Lessons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metoyer, Cheryl A.

    2010-01-01

    Winter lessons, or stories told in the winter, were one of the ways in which tribal elders instructed and directed young men and women in the proper ways to assume leadership responsibilities. Winter lessons stressed the appropriate relationship between the leader and the community. The intent was to remember the power and purpose of that…

  5. Retention force of secondary crowns to copings after temporary cementation: the effect of crown material and luting agent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mundt, Torsten; Heinemann, Friedhelm; Golecki, Gudrun; Schwahn, Christian; Biffar, Reiner

    2010-12-01

    Tooth-implant supported restorations can be temporarily cemented if the natural abutments are protected by permanently cemented copings. This in vitro study investigated the retention forces of pure titanium crowns to milled titanium alloy copings and of cobalt-chromium crowns to copings made of electroplated gold after cementation with different luting agents. Five specimens per group were cemented with acrylic-urethane cement (inner crown surface preisolated with petroleum jelly) and provisional zinc oxide cement. The retention was measured using a universal testing machine and a dental device for crown removal. The differences between groups were compared using analysis of variance. The pull-off forces for the cobalt-chromium secondary crowns cemented on gold copings using zinc oxide cement were significantly higher (mean=144.5 N) than the other crown-cement combinations (32.2-54.4 N), which showed no significant differences in the retention force. The impulse number and magnitude of the dental device was usually low and showed no substantial differences between the crown-cement combinations. It can be concluded that the results of the clinical removal method for prostheses differ from the results of the pull-off test. The question which luting agent is the better choice for retrievable restorations remains unanswered without further clinical and laboratory studies.

  6. The chaperone ClpX stimulates expression of Staphylococcus aureus protein A by rot dependent and independent pathways

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jelsbak, Lotte; Ingmer, Hanne; Valihrach, Lukás

    2010-01-01

    at pinpointing the role of ClpX in Rot synthesis revealed that ClpX is required for translation of Rot. Interestingly, translation of the spa mRNA was, like the rot mRNA, enhanced by ClpX. These data demonstrate that ClpX performs dual roles in regulating Protein A expression, as ClpX stimulates transcription...... of spa by enhancing translation of Rot, and that ClpX additionally is required for full translation of the spa mRNA. The current findings emphasize that ClpX has a central role in fine-tuning virulence regulation in S. aureus....

  7. Winter to winter recurrence of atmospheric circulation anomalies over East Asia and its impact on winter surface air temperature anomalies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Xia; Yang, Guang

    2017-01-01

    The persistence of atmospheric circulation anomalies over East Asia shows a winter to winter recurrence (WTWR) phenomenon. Seasonal variations in sea level pressure anomalies and surface wind anomalies display significantly different characteristics between WTWR and non-WTWR years. The WTWR years are characterized by the recurrence of both a strong (weak) anomalous Siberian High and an East Asian winter monsoon over two successive winters without persistence through the intervening summer. However, anomalies during the non-WTWR years have the opposite sign between the current and ensuing winters. The WTWR of circulation anomalies contributes to that of surface air temperature anomalies (SATAs), which is useful information for improving seasonal and interannual climate predictions over East Asia and China. In the positive (negative) WTWR years, SATAs are cooler (warmer) over East Asia in two successive winters, but the signs of the SATAs are opposite in the preceding and subsequent winters during the non-WTWR years.

  8. The energetic characterization of pineapple crown leaves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braga, R M; Queiroga, T S; Calixto, G Q; Almeida, H N; Melo, D M A; Melo, M A F; Freitas, J C O; Curbelo, F D S

    2015-12-01

    Energetic characterization of biomass allows for assessing its energy potential for application in different conversion processes into energy. The objective of this study is to physicochemically characterize pineapple crown leaves (PC) for their application in energy conversion processes. PC was characterized according to ASTM E871-82, E1755-01, and E873-82 for determination of moisture, ash, and volatile matter, respectively; the fixed carbon was calculated by difference. Higher heating value was determined by ASTM E711-87 and ash chemical composition was determined by XRF. The thermogravimetric and FTIR analyses were performed to evaluate the thermal decomposition and identify the main functional groups of biomass. PC has potential for application in thermochemical processes, showing high volatile matter (89.5%), bulk density (420.8 kg/m(3)), and higher heating value (18.9 MJ/kg). The results show its energy potential justifying application of this agricultural waste into energy conversion processes, implementing sustainability in the production, and reducing the environmental liabilities caused by its disposal.

  9. Enhanced bioprocessing of lignocellulose: Wood-rot fungal saccharification and fermentation of corn fiber to ethanol

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shrestha, Prachand

    This research aims at developing a biorefinery platform to convert corn-ethanol coproduct, corn fiber, into fermentable sugars at a lower temperature with minimal use of chemicals. White-rot (Phanerochaete chrysosporium), brown-rot (Gloeophyllum trabeum) and soft-rot (Trichoderma reesei) fungi were used in this research to biologically break down cellulosic and hemicellulosic components of corn fiber into fermentable sugars. Laboratory-scale simultaneous saccharification and fermentation (SSF) process proceeded by in-situ cellulolytic enzyme induction enhanced overall enzymatic hydrolysis of hemi/cellulose from corn fiber into simple sugars (mono-, di-, tri-saccharides). The yeast fermentation of hydrolyzate yielded 7.1, 8.6 and 4.1 g ethanol per 100 g corn fiber when saccharified with the white-, brown-, and soft-rot fungi, respectively. The highest corn-to-ethanol yield (8.6 g ethanol/100 g corn fiber) was equivalent to 42 % of the theoretical ethanol yield from starch and cellulose in corn fiber. Cellulase, xylanase and amylase activities of these fungi were also investigated over a week long solid-substrate fermentation of corn fiber. G. trabeum had the highest activities for starch (160 mg glucose/mg protein.min) and on day three of solid-substrate fermentation. P. chrysosporium had the highest activity for xylan (119 mg xylose/mg protein.min) on day five and carboxymethyl cellulose (35 mg glucose/mg protein.min) on day three of solid-substrate fermentation. T. reesei showed the highest activity for Sigma cell 20 (54.8 mg glucose/mg protein.min) on day 5 of solid-substrate fermentation. The effect of different pretreatments on SSF of corn fiber by fungal processes was examined. Corn fiber was treated at 30 °C for 2 h with alkali [2% NaOH (w/w)], alkaline peroxide [2% NaOH (w/w) and 1% H2O 2 (w/w)], and by steaming at 100 °C for 2 h. Mild pretreatment resulted in improved ethanol yields for brown- and soft-rot SSF, while white-rot and Spezyme CP SSFs showed

  10. [Esthetic evaluation of Cerec 3D anterior crowns].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jian; Feng, Hai-lan; Wei, Xiu-xia; Xing, Yan-xi; Jia, Lu; Zhou, Yong-sheng

    2012-03-27

    To observe the short-term effect of clinical application of Cerec 3D anterior crowns. A total of 16 patients were restored with 31 Cerec 3D anterior crowns. All restorations were stained before cementation. The evaluation started 1 week after luting. The restorations were examined in accordance with the modified US Public Health Service (USPHS) criteria at baseline and every 6 - 12 months. The observation period of 31 Cerec 3D anterior crowns varied from 8 to 33 months. The mean observation period was 22 months. All restorations scored A or B by modified USPHS standard. And 22 out of 31 restorations scored A for all criteria while 8 restorations scored B in color matching. Slight differences of translucency and chroma could be observed. Between baseline and follow-up examinations, insignificant shift from A-to B-rating occurred. Cerec 3D anterior crowns may achieve favorable short-term esthetic effects.

  11. Synthesis of Crown Ethers Containing a Rubicene Moiety

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mario Smet

    2000-03-01

    Full Text Available A symmetrically disubstituted derivative of the highly fluorescing and photostable rubicene was incorporated in a macrocycle using high dilution conditions and a hydroxyrubicene was functionalized with a modified aminobenzo-15-crown-5.

  12. Probing supramolecular complexation of cetylpyridinium chloride with crown ethers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saha, Subhadeep; Roy, Mahendra Nath

    2017-11-01

    Supramolecular complexations of cetylpyridinium chloride with three comparable cavity dimension based crown ethers, namely, dibenzo-18-crown-6, 18-crown-6 and dicyclohexano-18-crown-6 have been explored and adequately compared in acetonitrile with the help of conductivity in a series of temperatures to reveal the stoichiometry of the three host-guest complexes. Programme based mathematical treatment of the conductivity data affords association constants for complexations from which the thermodynamic parameters were derived for better comprehension about the process. The interactions at molecular level have been explained and decisively discussed by means of FT-IR and 1H NMR spectroscopic studies that demonstrate H-bond type interactions as the primarily force of attraction for the investigated supramolecular complexations.

  13. Luminescent Lariat Aza-Crown Ether Carboxylic Acid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Burkhard König

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Lariat ethers are interesting recognition motifs in supramolecular chemistry. The synthesis of a luminescent lariat aza-crown ether with a carboxyl group appended by azide-alkyne (Huisgen cycloaddition is presented.

  14. Sentencing dangerous offenders: policy and practice in the Crown Court

    OpenAIRE

    Henham, R

    2001-01-01

    Analysis of Crown Courts' use of protective sentencing powers under s.80(2)(b), s.85, and s.109 of 2000 Act and whether preference for s.85 reflects fundamental flaw in leaving determination of "dangerousness" to judiciary.

  15. Fractal approach to computer-analytical modelling of tree crown

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berezovskaya, F.S.; Karev, G.P.; Kisliuk, O.F.; Khlebopros, R.G.; Tcelniker, Yu.L.

    1993-09-01

    In this paper we discuss three approaches to the modeling of a tree crown development. These approaches are experimental (i.e. regressive), theoretical (i.e. analytical) and simulation (i.e. computer) modeling. The common assumption of these is that a tree can be regarded as one of the fractal objects which is the collection of semi-similar objects and combines the properties of two- and three-dimensional bodies. We show that a fractal measure of crown can be used as the link between the mathematical models of crown growth and light propagation through canopy. The computer approach gives the possibility to visualize a crown development and to calibrate the model on experimental data. In the paper different stages of the above-mentioned approaches are described. The experimental data for spruce, the description of computer system for modeling and the variant of computer model are presented. (author). 9 refs, 4 figs

  16. Differences in crystalline cellulose modification due to degradation by brown and white rot fungi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hastrup, Anne Christine Steenkjær; Howell, Caitlin; Larsen, Flemming Hofmann; Sathitsuksanoh, Noppadon; Goodell, Barry; Jellison, Jody

    2012-10-01

    Wood-decaying basidiomycetes are some of the most effective bioconverters of lignocellulose in nature, however the way they alter wood crystalline cellulose on a molecular level is still not well understood. To address this, we examined and compared changes in wood undergoing decay by two species of brown rot fungi, Gloeophyllum trabeum and Meruliporia incrassata, and two species of white rot fungi, Irpex lacteus and Pycnoporus sanguineus, using X-ray diffraction (XRD) and (13)C solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. The overall percent crystallinity in wood undergoing decay by M. incrassata, G. trabeum, and I. lacteus appeared to decrease according to the stage of decay, while in wood decayed by P. sanguineus the crystallinity was found to increase during some stages of degradation. This result is suggested to be potentially due to the different decay strategies employed by these fungi. The average spacing between the 200 cellulose crystal planes was significantly decreased in wood degraded by brown rot, whereas changes observed in wood degraded by the two white rot fungi examined varied according to the selectivity for lignin. The conclusions were supported by a quantitative analysis of the structural components in the wood before and during decay confirming the distinct differences observed for brown and white rot fungi. The results from this study were consistent with differences in degradation methods previously reported among fungal species, specifically more non-enzymatic degradation in brown rot versus more enzymatic degradation in white rot. Copyright © 2012 The British Mycological Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Interactions of Salmonella enterica Serovar Typhimurium and Pectobacterium carotovorum within a Tomato Soft Rot.

    Science.gov (United States)

    George, Andrée S; Cox, Clayton E; Desai, Prerak; Porwolik, Steffen; Chu, Weiping; de Moraes, Marcos H; McClelland, Michael; Brandl, Maria T; Teplitski, Max

    2018-03-01

    Salmonella spp. are remarkably adaptable pathogens, and this adaptability allows these bacteria to thrive in a variety of environments and hosts. The mechanisms with which these pathogens establish within a niche amid the native microbiota remain poorly understood. Here, we aimed to uncover the mechanisms that enable Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium strain ATCC 14028 to benefit from the degradation of plant tissue by a soft rot plant pathogen, Pectobacterium carotovorum The hypothesis that in the soft rot, the liberation of starch (not utilized by P. carotovorum ) makes this polymer available to Salmonella spp., thus allowing it to colonize soft rots, was tested first and proven null. To identify the functions involved in Salmonella soft rot colonization, we carried out transposon insertion sequencing coupled with the phenotypic characterization of the mutants. The data indicate that Salmonella spp. experience a metabolic shift in response to the changes in the environment brought on by Pectobacterium spp. and likely coordinated by the csrBC small regulatory RNA. While csrBC and flhD appear to be of importance in the soft rot, the global two-component system encoded by barA sirA (which controls csrBC and flhDC under laboratory conditions) does not appear to be necessary for the observed phenotype. Motility and the synthesis of nucleotides and amino acids play critical roles in the growth of Salmonella spp. in the soft rot. IMPORTANCE Outbreaks of produce-associated illness continue to be a food safety concern. Earlier studies demonstrated that the presence of phytopathogens on produce was a significant risk factor associated with increased Salmonella carriage on fruits and vegetables. Here, we genetically characterize some of the requirements for interactions between Salmonella and phytobacteria that allow Salmonella spp. to establish a niche within an alternate host (tomato). Pathways necessary for nucleotide synthesis, amino acid synthesis, and motility

  18. Resistance mechanisms to toxin-mediated charcoal rot infection in maturity group III soybean: role of seed phenol lignin soflavones sugars and seed minerals in charcoal rot resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charcoal rot is a disease caused by the fungus Macrophomina phaseolina (Tassi) Goid, and thought to infect the plants through roots by a toxin-mediated mechanism, resulting in yield loss and poor seed quality, especially under drought conditions. The mechanism by which this infection occurs is not y...

  19. Development of post-fire crown damage mortality thresholds in ponderosa pine

    Science.gov (United States)

    James F. Fowler; Carolyn Hull Sieg; Joel McMillin; Kurt K. Allen; Jose F. Negron; Linda L. Wadleigh; John A. Anhold; Ken E. Gibson

    2010-01-01

    Previous research has shown that crown scorch volume and crown consumption volume are the major predictors of post-fire mortality in ponderosa pine. In this study, we use piecewise logistic regression models of crown scorch data from 6633 trees in five wildfires from the Intermountain West to locate a mortality threshold at 88% scorch by volume for trees with no crown...

  20. Crown profile equations for stand-grown western hemlock trees in northwestern Oregon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    David D. Marshall; Gregory P. Johnson; David W. Hann

    2003-01-01

    Crown profile equations were developed for stand-grown western hemlock(Tsuga heterophylla (Raf.) Sarg.) in northwest Oregon. The profile model uses a segmented approach, dividing the crown into an upper and lower portion at the point of the largest crown width (LCW). The model explains about 86% of the variation in crown width when LCW is known but...

  1. Root-Crown Relations of Young Sugar Maple and Yellow Birch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carl H. Tubbs

    1977-01-01

    Young forest-grown sugar maple and yellow birch (1 to 6 inches d.b.h.) crowns were mapped and roots excavated. Crown dimensions were compared. Sugar maple roots usually terminated within a few feet of the crown perimeter. Yellow birch roots frequently terminated well outside crown perimeters and roots of birch were more irregularly distributed than those of maple....

  2. Adhesively luted, metal-free composite crowns after five years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehmann, Franziska; Spiegl, Katrin; Eickemeyer, Grit; Rammelsberg, Peter

    2009-12-01

    The effect of location and preparation design of abutment teeth and of preparation design on the survival and complication rate of metal-free, adhesively luted composite crowns (Artglass, Heraeus Kulzer) and their clinical performance was investigated in this controlled, randomized, prospective clinical study. After randomization, 114 single crowns (68 posterior, 46 anterior) were prepared either with a 0.5 mm chamfer finishing line or with a 0.5 mm shoulder combined with occlusal reduction of at least 1.5 mm. Buildups were made with a composite material, using the corresponding dentin adhesive. Crowns were manufactured on stone dies and intraorally adhesively luted with resin cement. Follow-up examinations were conducted after 1 month and 1, 2, 3, and 5 years. Documentation included failures and complications, occlusal contacts, plaque accumulation and patients' rating of esthetics and functionality. After 5 years, data for 83 single crowns had been obtained. Within an observation period of 5 years, 18 complications occurred, including 13 major failures which resulted in replacement of the crowns, and 5 minor complications which could be repaired. All loosened crowns (n = 2) were successfully re-cemented. The Cox Regression did not reveal any effect of location or preparation design on complication rate. Calculation of the Kaplan-Meier survival curve on the basis of major failures indicated a probability of survival of 96% after 3 years and 88.5% after 5 years. Four Artglass crowns had no contact in static occlusion after 5 years and plaque accumulation was significantly higher than for control teeth. esthetic and functional evaluation by patients revealed that acceptance was high. Metal-free composite crowns may be recommended for long-term temporary use. However, the complication rate and the increased plaque accumulation restrict the indication for permanent restorations.

  3. Failure Probability of Three Designs of Zirconia Crowns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramos, Gabriela Freitas; Monteiro, Evelyn Barbosa; Bottino, Marco Antonio; Zhang, Yu; Marques de Melo, Renata

    2015-01-01

    This study used a two-parameter Weibull analysis for evaluation of the lifespan of fully or partially porcelain-/glaze-veneered zirconia crowns after fatigue test. A sample of 60 first molars were selected and prepared for full-coverage crowns with three different designs (n = 20): traditional (crowns with zirconia framework covered with feldspathic porcelain), modified (crowns partially covered with veneering porcelain), and monolithic (full-contour zirconia crowns). All specimens were treated with a glaze layer. Specimens were subjected to mechanical cycling (100 N, 3 Hz) with a piston with a hemispherical tip (Ø = 6 mm) until the specimens failed or up to 2 × 10⁶ cycles. Every 500,000 cycles, the fatigue tests were interrupted and stereomicroscopy (10×) was used to inspect the specimens for damage. The authors performed Weibull analysis of interval data to calculate the number of failures in each interval. The types and numbers of failures according to the groups were: cracking (13 traditional, 6 modified) and chipping (4 traditional) of the feldspathic porcelain, followed by delamination (1 traditional) at the veneer/core interface and debonding (2 monolithic) at the cementation interface. Weibull parameters (β, scale; η, shape), with a two-sided confidence interval of 95%, were: traditional-1.25 and 0.9 × 10⁶ cycles; modified-0.58 and 11.7 × 10⁶ cycles; and monolithic-1.05 and 16.5 × 10⁶ cycles. Traditional crowns showed greater susceptibility to fatigue, the modified group presented higher propensity to early failures, and the monolithic group showed no susceptibility to fatigue. The modified and monolithic groups presented the highest number of crowns with no failures after the fatigue test. The three crown designs presented significantly different behaviors under fatigue. The modified and monolithic groups presented less probability of failure after 2 × 10⁶ cycles.

  4. Slow cooling protocol improves fatigue life of zirconia crowns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paula, Vitor G; Lorenzoni, Fabio C; Bonfante, Estevam A; Silva, Nelson R F A; Thompson, Van P; Bonfante, Gerson

    2015-02-01

    To compare the fatigue life and damage modes of zirconia crowns fabricated with and without framework design modification when porcelain veneered using a fast or slow cooling protocol. Composite resin replicas of a first molar full crown preparation were fabricated. Zirconia copings were milled as conventional (0.5mm even thickness, Zr-C, n=20,) or modified (lingual margin of 1.0mm thickness, 2.0mm height connected to two proximal struts of 3.5mm height, Zr-M, n=20). These groups were subdivided (n=10 each) according to the veneer cooling protocol employed: fast cooling (Zr-CFast and Zr-MFast) and slow cooling (Zr-CSlow and Zr-MSlow). Crowns were cemented and fatigued for 10(6) cycles in water. The number of cycles to failure was recorded and used to determine the interval databased 2-parameter probability Weibull distribution parameter Beta (β) and characteristic life value Eta (η). 2-parameter Weibull calculation presented β=5.53 and β=4.38 for Zr-MFast and Zr-CFast, respectively. Slow cooled crowns did not fail by completion of 10(6) cycles, thereby Weibayes calculation was applied. Increased fatigue life was observed for slow cooled crowns compared to fast cooled ones. Groups Zr-MFast and Zr-MSlow presented no statistical difference. Porcelain cohesive fractures were mainly observed in fast cooled groups. Slow cooled crowns presented in some instances inner cone cracks not reaching the zirconia/veneer interface. Improved fatigue life in tandem with the absence of porcelain fractures were observed in slow cooled crowns, regardless of framework design. Crowns fast cooled chiefly failed by porcelain cohesive fractures. Copyright © 2014 Academy of Dental Materials. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Surgical crown lengthening: a periodontal and restorative interdisciplinary approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parwani, Simran R; Parwani, Rajkumar N

    2014-01-01

    Surgical crown lengthening helps to provide an adequate retention form for proper tooth preparation, thus enabling dentists to create esthetically pleasing and healthy restorations. Long-term stability requires accurate diagnosis and development of a comprehensive treatment plan in each case. This sequence of events stresses the importance of communication between the restorative dentist and the periodontist. This article presents 2 cases that involve surgical crown lengthening (including mucoperiosteal flap and ostectomy) for the restoration of teeth.

  6. Mechanical performance of implant-supported posterior crowns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Kok, Paul; Kleverlaan, Cornelis J; de Jager, Niek; Kuijs, Ruud; Feilzer, Albert J

    2015-07-01

    The fracture of implant-supported restorations, especially of the veneering layer, is a common problem in dentistry. Monolithic ceramic or resin restorations might help solve this problem. The purpose of this in vitro study was to obtain additional insight into the risk of fracture of implant-supported restorations. Identical crowns (n=10) of 10 different ceramic and composite resin materials were cemented on conventional abutments on implant replicas embedded in polymethyl methacrylate blocks. The specimens were subjected to compressive load in a universal testing machine to record initial load to failure (ILF). Additionally, the flexural strength (FS), compressive strength (CS), and elastic modulus (E) of the investigated materials were determined. These results were used in a finite element analysis model of a composite resin and a lithium disilicate crown. Anatomic contour zirconia (Lava Plus) crowns had the highest ILF (6065 N), followed by lithium disilicate (IPS e.max) (2788 N) and the composite resin materials (Protemp 4, Majesty Flow, Telio CAD, Estenia C&B, Lava Ultimate, VITA Enamic) (2386 to 1935 N). Veneered zirconia (Lava) crowns showed the lowest ILF (1477 N). The highest FS, CS, and E were found for Lava Plus and IPS e.max. No direct relationship was found between ILF and the FS, CS, or E. The finite element analysis showed stresses that did not exceed the FS or CS of IPS e.max. The surface roughness of these crowns might have caused initial failure at relatively low stresses. In this laboratory study, monolithic implant-supported crowns showed a higher ILF than conventional veneered ceramic crowns. Monolithic ceramic restorations might perform better than composite resin crowns. Copyright © 2015 Editorial Council for the Journal of Prosthetic Dentistry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Failure probability of three designs of zirconia crowns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramos, G. Freitas; Monteiro, E. Barbosa Carmona; Bottino, M.A.; Zhang, Y.; de Melo, R. Marques

    2015-01-01

    Objectives This study utilized a 2-parameter Weibull analysis for evaluation of lifetime of fully or partially porcelain-/glaze-veneered zirconia crowns after fatigue test. Methods Sixty first molars were selected and prepared for full-coverage crowns with three different designs(n = 20): Traditional –crowns with zirconia framework covered with feldspathic porcelain; Modified– crowns partially covered with veneering porcelain; and Monolithic–full-contour zirconia crowns. All specimens were treated with a glaze layer. Specimens were subjected to mechanical cycling (100N, 3Hz) with a piston with hemispherical tip (Ø=6 mm) until the specimens failed or up to 2×106 cycles. Every 500,000 cycles intervals, the fatigue tests were interrupted, and stereomicroscopy (10 X) was used to inspect the specimens for damage. We performed Weibull analysis of interval data to calculate the number of failures in each interval. Results The types and number of failures according to the groups were: cracking (Traditional-13, Modified-6) and chipping (Traditional-4) of the feldspathic porcelain, followed by delamination (Traditional-1) at the veneer/core interface and debonding (Monollithic-2) at the cementation interface. Weibull parameters (beta, scale; and eta, shape), with a two-sided confidence interval of 95%, were: Traditional – 1.25 and 0.9 × 106cycles; Modified– 0.58 and 11.7 × 106 cycles; and Monolithic – 1.05 and 16.5 × 106 cycles. Traditional crowns showed greater susceptibility to fatigue, the Modified group presented higher propensity to early failures, and the Monolithic group showed no susceptibility to fatigue. The Modified and Monolithic groups presented the highest number of crowns with no failures after the fatigue test. Conclusions The three crown designs presented significantly different behaviors under fatigue. The Modified and the Monolithic groups presented less probability to failure after 2×106cycles. PMID:26509988

  8. Variation in crown light utilization characteristics among tropical canopy trees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitajima, Kaoru; Mulkey, Stephen S; Wright, S Joseph

    2005-02-01

    Light extinction through crowns of canopy trees determines light availability at lower levels within forests. The goal of this paper is the exploration of foliage distribution and light extinction in crowns of five canopy tree species in relation to their shoot architecture, leaf traits (mean leaf angle, life span, photosynthetic characteristics) and successional status (from pioneers to persistent). Light extinction was examined at three hierarchical levels of foliage organization, the whole crown, the outermost canopy and the individual shoots, in a tropical moist forest with direct canopy access with a tower crane. Photon flux density and cumulative leaf area index (LAI) were measured at intervals of 0.25-1 m along multiple vertical transects through three to five mature tree crowns of each species to estimate light extinction coefficients (K). Cecropia longipes, a pioneer species with the shortest leaf life span, had crown LAI <0.5. Among the remaining four species, crown LAI ranged from 2 to 8, and species with orthotropic terminal shoots exhibited lower light extinction coefficients (0.35) than those with plagiotropic shoots (0.53-0.80). Within each type, later successional species exhibited greater maximum LAI and total light extinction. A dense layer of leaves at the outermost crown of a late successional species resulted in an average light extinction of 61% within 0.5 m from the surface. In late successional species, leaf position within individual shoots does not predict the light availability at the individual leaf surface, which may explain their slow decline of photosynthetic capacity with leaf age and weak differentiation of sun and shade leaves. Later-successional tree crowns, especially those with orthotropic branches, exhibit lower light extinction coefficients, but greater total LAI and total light extinction, which contribute to their efficient use of light and competitive dominance.

  9. Microsomal transformation of organophosphorus pesticides by white rot fungi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jauregui, Juan; Valderrama, Brenda; Albores, Arnulfo; Vazquez-Duhalt, Rafael

    2003-12-01

    The enzymatic mechanism for the transformation of organophosphorus pesticides (OPPs) by different white-rot fungi strains was studied. With the exception of Ganoderma applanatum 8168, all strains from a collection of 17 different fungi cultures were able to deplete parathion. Three strains showing the highest activities were selected for further studies: Bjerkandera adusta 8258, Pleurotus ostreatus 7989 and Phanerochaete chrysosporium 3641. These strains depleted 50 to 96% of terbufos, azinphos-methyl, phosmet and tribufos after four-days exposure to the pesticides. In order to identify the cellular localization of the transformation activity, the extracellular and microsomal fractions of Pleuronts ostreatus 7989 were evaluated in vitro. While the activities of ligninolytic enzymes (lignin peroxidase, manganese peroxidase and laccase) were detected in the extracellular fraction, no enzymatic modification of any of the five pesticides tested could be found, suggesting the intracellular origin of the transformation activity. In accordance with this observation the microsomal fraction was found able to transform three OPPs with the following rates: 10 micromol mg prot(-1) h(-1) for phosmet, 5.7 micromol mg prot(-1) h(-1) for terbufos, and 2.2 micromol mg prot(-1) h(-1) for azinphos-methyl. The products from these reactions and from the transformation of trichlorfon and malathion, were identified by mass-spectrometry. These results, supported by specific inhibition experiments and the stringent requirement for NADPH during the in vitro assays suggest the involvement of a cytochrome P450.

  10. Solubilization and Mineralization of Lignin by White Rot Fungi

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyle, C. David; Kropp, Bradley R.; Reid, Ian D.

    1992-01-01

    The white rot fungi Lentinula edodes, Phanerochaete chrysosporium, Pleurotus sajor-caju, Flammulina velutipes, and Schizophyllum commune were grown in liquid media containing 14C-lignin-labelled wood, and the formation of water-soluble 14C-labelled products and 14CO2, the growth of the fungi, and the activities of extracellular lignin peroxidase, manganese peroxidase, and laccase were measured. Conditions that affect the rate of lignin degradation were imposed, and both long-term (0- to 16-day) and short-term (0- to 72-h) effects on the production of the two types of product and on the activities of the enzymes were monitored. The production of 14CO2-labelled products from the aqueous ones was also investigated. The short-term studies showed that the different conditions had different effects on the production of the two products and on the activities of the enzymes. Nitrogen sources inhibited the production of both products by all species when differences in growth could be discounted. Medium pH and manganese affected lignin degradation by the different species differently. With P. chrysosporium, the results were consistent, with lignin peroxidase playing a role in lignin solubilization and manganese peroxidase being important in subsequent CO2 production. PMID:16348781

  11. Association mapping in sunflower for sclerotinia head rot resistance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fusari Corina M

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Sclerotinia Head Rot (SHR is one of the most damaging diseases of sunflower in Europe, Argentina, and USA, causing average yield reductions of 10 to 20 %, but leading to total production loss under favorable environmental conditions for the pathogen. Association Mapping (AM is a promising choice for Quantitative Trait Locus (QTL mapping, as it detects relationships between phenotypic variation and gene polymorphisms in existing germplasm without development of mapping populations. This article reports the identification of QTL for resistance to SHR based on candidate gene AM. Results A collection of 94 sunflower inbred lines were tested for SHR under field conditions using assisted inoculation with the fungal pathogen Sclerotinia sclerotiorum. Given that no biological mechanisms or biochemical pathways have been clearly identified for SHR, 43 candidate genes were selected based on previous transcript profiling studies in sunflower and Brassica napus infected with S. sclerotiorum. Associations among SHR incidence and haplotype polymorphisms in 16 candidate genes were tested using Mixed Linear Models (MLM that account for population structure and kinship relationships. This approach allowed detection of a significant association between the candidate gene HaRIC_B and SHR incidence (P  Conclusions These results suggest that AM will be useful in dissecting other complex traits in sunflower, thus providing a valuable tool to assist in crop breeding.

  12. Biodegradation of pentachlorophenol by the white rot fungus Phanerochaete chrysosporium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mileski, G.J.; Bumpus, J.A.; Jurek, M.A.; Aust, S.D.

    1988-01-01

    Extensive biodegradation of pentachlorophenol (PCP) by the white rot fungus Phanerochaete chrysosporium was demonstrated by the disappearance and mineralization of [ 14 C]PCP in nutrient nitrogen-limited culture. Mass balance analyses demonstrated the formation of water-soluble metabolites of [ 14 C]PCP during degradation. Involvement of the lignin-degrading system of this fungus was suggested by the fact that the time of onset, time course, and eventual decline in the rate of PCP mineralization were similar to those observed for [ 14 C]lignin degradation. Also, a purified ligninase was shown to be able to catalyze the initial oxidation of PCP. Although biodegradation of PCP was decreased in nutrient nitrogen-sufficient (i.e., nonligninolytic) cultures of P. chrysosporium, substantial biodegradation of PCP did occur, suggesting that in addition to the lignin-degrading system, another degradation system may also be responsible for some of the PCP degradation observed. Toxicity studies showed that PCP concentrations above 4 mg/liter (15 μM) prevented growth when fungal cultures were identified by inoculation with spores. The lethal effects of PCP could, however, be the circumvented by allowing the fungus to establish a mycelial mat before adding PCP. With this procedure, the fungus was able to grow and mineralize [ 14 C]PCP at concentrations as high as 500 mg/liter (1.9 mM)

  13. Identification of some saffron corm rot fungi and their control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayatollah Saeedizadeh

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available In order to isolation and identification of causal agents of corm rot and their control, the sampling was done from corms in farms of Bushroueye, southern Khorasan province. After culturing of sections of infected corms, the fungi, Penicillium digitatum, Aspergillus niger, and Rhizopus stolonifer were isolated and identified. For their control test, four concentrations of Pseudomonas fluorescens CHAO, Trichoderma harzianum Bi, and four concentrations of fungicides, cupper oxichlorore and benomil,were used with four replications. The control effect of antagonists and fungicides were determined by measurement of diameter of pathogens colony on medium. The results showed that the maximum of control of antagonistic fungus were obtained in concentrations of 1×107 and 1×108, and in the case of antagonistic bacterium wereshown in concentrations of 1×109 and 1×1010. The fungicides had maximum control in concentrations of 3×10-3 and 4×10-3. In general, among of the treatments, T. harzianumwas most effective to reducing the growth of pathogenic fungi.

  14. Fracture load of different crown systems on zirconia implant abutments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albrecht, T; Kirsten, A; Kappert, H F; Fischer, H

    2011-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the fracture load of single zirconia abutment restorations using different veneering techniques and materials. The abutment restorations were divided into 6 groups with 20 samples each: test abutments (control group A), lithium disilicate ceramic crowns bonded on incisor abutments (group B), leucite ceramic crowns bonded on incisor abutments (group C), premolar abutments directly veneered with a fluor apatite ceramic (group D (layered) and group E (pressed)) and premolar abutments bonded with lithium disilicate ceramic crowns (group F). The fracture load of the restorations was evaluated using a universal testing machine. Half of each group was artificially aged (chewing simulation and thermocycling) before evaluating the fracture load with the exception of the test abutments. The fracture load of the test abutments was 705 ± 43N. Incisor abutments bonded with lithium disilicate or leucite ceramic crowns (groups B and C) showed fracture loads of about 580N. Premolar restorations directly veneered with fluor apatite ceramic (groups D and E) showed fracture loads of about 850N. Premolar restorations bonded with lithium disilicate ceramic crowns (group F) showed fracture loads of about 1850N. The artificial ageing showed no significant influence on the strength of the examined restorations. All ceramic crowns made of lithium disilicate glass-ceramic, adhesively bonded to premolar abutments showed the highest fracture loads in this study. However, all tested groups can withstand physiological bite forces. Copyright © 2010 Academy of Dental Materials. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Consequences of crown shortening canine teeth in Greenland sled dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kortegaard, H E; Anthony Knudsen, T; Dahl, S; Agger, J F G; Eriksen, T

    2015-04-01

    To evaluate the consequences of crown shortening, focusing on the prevalence of pulp exposure and periapical pathology in Greenland sled dogs that had had their canine crowns shortened at an early age. Five cadaver heads and 54 sled dogs underwent an oral examination for dental fractures and pulp exposure of canines. All canines were radiographed and evaluated for periapical pathology. The prevalence of canine pulp exposure in 12 (5 heads and 7 dogs) crown shortened dogs was 91 · 7%, and 21 · 3% in 47 not-crown shortened dogs. A significant (P canines in the crown shortened group compared to the not-crown shortened group was seen with a relative risk of 4 · 3 on a dog basis and a relative risk of 12 · 2 on a tooth basis. In dogs with pulp exposure of canines (n = 51) the prevalence of periapical pathology was 82 · 4%, but only 0 · 8% in dogs without pulp exposure (n = 133) resulting in a significant (relative risk, 109 · 5; P < 0 · 001) risk of periapical pathology in teeth with pulp exposure compared to teeth without pulp exposure. The high risk of periapical pathology observed in teeth with pulp exposure confirms that these teeth should not be neglected in affected dogs. © 2015 British Small Animal Veterinary Association.

  16. Antimicrobial efficacy of chemical disinfectants on contaminated full metal crowns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orsi, Iara Augusta; Villabona, Camilo Andrés; Kameoka, Eliana; Ferreira, Marly Christiènne C G; Ito, Izabel Yoko; Saravia, Marta Estela

    2010-01-01

    Prosthetic restorations that have been tried in the patient's mouth are potential sources of infection. In order to avoid cross-infection, protocols for infection control should be established in dental office and laboratory. This study evaluated the antimicrobial efficacy of disinfectants on full metal crowns contaminated with microorganisms. Full crowns cast in a Ni-Cr alloy were assigned to one control group (n=6) and 5 experimental groups (n=18). The crowns were placed in flat-bottom glass balloons and were autoclaved. A microbial suspension of each type of strain - S. aureus, P. aeruginosa, S. mutans, E. faecalis and C. albicans- was aseptically added to each experimental group, the crowns being allowed for contamination during 30 min. The contaminated specimens were placed into recipients with the chemical disinfectants (1% and 2% sodium hypochlorite and 2% glutaraldehyde) for 5, 10 and 15 min. Thereafter, the crowns were placed into tubes containing different broths and incubated at 35ºC. The control specimens were contaminated, immersed in distilled water for 20 min and cultured in Thioglycollate broth at 35ºC. Microbial growth assay was performed by qualitative visual examination after 48 h, 7 and 12 days. Microbial growth was noticed only in the control group. In the experimental groups, turbidity of the broths was not observed, regardless of the strains and immersion intervals, thus indicating absence of microbial growth. In conclusion, all chemical disinfectants were effective in preventing microbial growth onto full metal crowns.

  17. Consequences of crown shortening canine teeth in Greenland sled dogs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kortegaard, H E; Anthony Knudsen, T; Dahl, S

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To evaluate the consequences of crown shortening, focusing on the prevalence of pulp exposure and periapical pathology in Greenland sled dogs that had had their canine crowns shortened at an early age. METHODS: Five cadaver heads and 54 sled dogs underwent an oral examination for dental...... fractures and pulp exposure of canines. All canines were radiographed and evaluated for periapical pathology. RESULTS: The prevalence of canine pulp exposure in 12 (5 heads and 7 dogs) crown shortened dogs was 91 · 7%, and 21 · 3% in 47 not-crown shortened dogs. A significant (P ... exposure of the canines in the crown shortened group compared to the not-crown shortened group was seen with a relative risk of 4 · 3 on a dog basis and a relative risk of 12 · 2 on a tooth basis. In dogs with pulp exposure of canines (n = 51) the prevalence of periapical pathology was 82 · 4%, but only 0...

  18. Fracture resistance and failure modes of CEREC endo-crowns and conventional post and core-supported CEREC crowns

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chia-Yu Chang

    2009-09-01

    Conclusion: The bonded ceramic endo-crowns showed a significantly higher fracture resistance than the classic reinforced and designed group and, therefore, offer a feasible alternative for severely damaged teeth.

  19. Communicating Certainty About Nuclear Winter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robock, A.

    2013-12-01

    I have been spending much of my time in the past several years trying to warn the world about the continuing danger of nuclear weapons, and that the solution is a rapid reduction in the nuclear arsenal. I feel that a scientist who discovers dangers to society has an ethical duty to issue a warning, even if the danger is so scary that it is hard for people to deal with. The debate about nuclear winter in the 1980s helped to end the nuclear arms race, but the planet still has enough nuclear weapons, even after reductions planned for 2017 under the New START treaty, to produce nuclear winter, with temperatures plunging below freezing in the summer in major agricultural regions, threatening the food supply for most of the planet. New research by myself, Brian Toon, Mike Mills, and colleagues over the past six years has found that a nuclear war between any two countries, such as India and Pakistan, using 50 atom bombs each of the size dropped on Hiroshima could produce climate change unprecedented in recorded human history, and a world food crisis because of the agricultural effects. This is much less than 1% of the current global arsenal. Communicating certainty - what we know for sure - has been much more effective than communicating uncertainty. The limited success I have had has come from persistence and serendipity. The first step was to do the science. We have published peer-reviewed articles in major journals, including Science, Nature, Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, Journal of Geophysical Research, Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics, Physics Today, and Climatic Change. But policymakers do not read these journals. Through fairly convoluted circumstances, which will be described in this talk, we were able to get papers published in Scientific American and the Bulletin of Atomic Scientists. I have also published several encyclopedia articles on the subject. As a Lead Author of Chapter 8 (Radiative Forcing) of the recently published Fifth Assessment

  20. Developmental and Metabolic Plasticity of White-Skinned Grape Berries in Response to Botrytis cinerea during Noble Rot1[OPEN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, Thomas S.; Vicente, Ariel R.; Doyle, Carolyn L.; Ye, Zirou; Allen, Greg; Heymann, Hildegarde

    2015-01-01

    Noble rot results from exceptional infections of ripe grape (Vitis vinifera) berries by Botrytis cinerea. Unlike bunch rot, noble rot promotes favorable changes in grape berries and the accumulation of secondary metabolites that enhance wine grape composition. Noble rot-infected berries of cv Sémillon, a white-skinned variety, were collected over 3 years from a commercial vineyard at the same time that fruit were harvested for botrytized wine production. Using an integrated transcriptomics and metabolomics approach, we demonstrate that noble rot alters the metabolism of cv Sémillon berries by inducing biotic and abiotic stress responses as well as ripening processes. During noble rot, B. cinerea induced the expression of key regulators of ripening-associated pathways, some of which are distinctive to the normal ripening of red-skinned cultivars. Enhancement of phenylpropanoid metabolism, characterized by a restricted flux in white-skinned berries, was a common outcome of noble rot and red-skinned berry ripening. Transcript and metabolite analyses together with enzymatic assays determined that the biosynthesis of anthocyanins is a consistent hallmark of noble rot in cv Sémillon berries. The biosynthesis of terpenes and fatty acid aroma precursors also increased during noble rot. We finally characterized the impact of noble rot in botrytized wines. Altogether, the results of this work demonstrated that noble rot causes a major reprogramming of berry development and metabolism. This desirable interaction between a fruit and a fungus stimulates pathways otherwise inactive in white-skinned berries, leading to a greater accumulation of compounds involved in the unique flavor and aroma of botrytized wines. PMID:26450706

  1. Developmental and Metabolic Plasticity of White-Skinned Grape Berries in Response to Botrytis cinerea during Noble Rot.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanco-Ulate, Barbara; Amrine, Katherine C H; Collins, Thomas S; Rivero, Rosa M; Vicente, Ariel R; Morales-Cruz, Abraham; Doyle, Carolyn L; Ye, Zirou; Allen, Greg; Heymann, Hildegarde; Ebeler, Susan E; Cantu, Dario

    2015-12-01

    Noble rot results from exceptional infections of ripe grape (Vitis vinifera) berries by Botrytis cinerea. Unlike bunch rot, noble rot promotes favorable changes in grape berries and the accumulation of secondary metabolites that enhance wine grape composition. Noble rot-infected berries of cv Sémillon, a white-skinned variety, were collected over 3 years from a commercial vineyard at the same time that fruit were harvested for botrytized wine production. Using an integrated transcriptomics and metabolomics approach, we demonstrate that noble rot alters the metabolism of cv Sémillon berries by inducing biotic and abiotic stress responses as well as ripening processes. During noble rot, B. cinerea induced the expression of key regulators of ripening-associated pathways, some of which are distinctive to the normal ripening of red-skinned cultivars. Enhancement of phenylpropanoid metabolism, characterized by a restricted flux in white-skinned berries, was a common outcome of noble rot and red-skinned berry ripening. Transcript and metabolite analyses together with enzymatic assays determined that the biosynthesis of anthocyanins is a consistent hallmark of noble rot in cv Sémillon berries. The biosynthesis of terpenes and fatty acid aroma precursors also increased during noble rot. We finally characterized the impact of noble rot in botrytized wines. Altogether, the results of this work demonstrated that noble rot causes a major reprogramming of berry development and metabolism. This desirable interaction between a fruit and a fungus stimulates pathways otherwise inactive in white-skinned berries, leading to a greater accumulation of compounds involved in the unique flavor and aroma of botrytized wines. © 2015 American Society of Plant Biologists. All Rights Reserved.

  2. Suitability of Secondary PEEK Telescopic Crowns on Zirconia Primary Crowns: The Influence of Fabrication Method and Taper

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susanne Merk

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available This study investigates the retention load (RL between ZrO2 primary crowns and secondary polyetheretherketone (PEEK crowns made by different fabrication methods with three different tapers. Standardized primary ZrO2 crowns were fabricated with three different tapers: 0°, 1°, and 2° (n = 10/group. Ten secondary crowns were fabricated (i milled from breCam BioHPP blanks (PM; (ii pressed from industrially fabricated PEEK pellets (PP (BioHPP Pellet; or (iii pressed from granular PEEK (PG (BioHPP Granulat. One calibrated operator adjusted all crowns. In total, the RL of 90 secondary crowns were measured in pull-off tests at 50 mm/min, and each specimen was tested 20 times. Two- and one-way ANOVAs followed by a Scheffé’s post-hoc test were used for data analysis (p < 0.05. Within crowns with a 0° taper, the PP group showed significantly higher retention load values compared with the other groups. Among the 1° taper, the PM group presented significantly lower retention loads than the PP group. However, the pressing type had no impact on the results. Within the 2° taper, the fabrication method had no influence on the RL. Within the PM group, the 2° taper showed significantly higher retention load compared with the 1° taper. The taper with 0° was in the same range value as the 1° and 2° tapers. No impact of the taper on the retention value was observed between the PP groups. Within the PG groups, the 0° taper presented significantly lower RL than the 1° taper, whereas the 2° taper showed no differences. The fabrication method of the secondary PEEK crowns and taper angles showed no consistent effect within all tested groups.

  3. Sour rot-damaged grapes are sources of wine spoilage yeasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barata, André; González, Sara; Malfeito-Ferreira, Manuel; Querol, Amparo; Loureiro, Virgílio

    2008-11-01

    Yeast species of sound and sour rot-damaged grapes were analysed during fermentation and grape ripening in the vineyard, using general and selective culture media. During 2003 and 2004 vintages, microvinifications were carried out with sound grapes to which different amounts of grapes with sour rot were added. The wine spoilage species Zygosaccharomyces bailii was only recovered during fermentations with sour rot, reaching 5.00 log CFU mL(-1) (2003) and 2.48 log CFU mL(-1) (2004) at the end of fermentation. The study of yeast populations during the sour rot ripening process (2005 vintage) showed that the veraison-damaged grapes always exhibited higher total yeast counts and a much greater diversity of species. From a total of 22 ascomycetous species, 17 were present only in damaged grapes. The most frequent species were Issatchenkia occidentalis and Zygoascus hellenicus. The spoilage species Z. bailii and Zygosaccharomyces bisporus were consistently isolated exclusively from damaged grapes. This work demonstrates that one of the most dangerous wine spoilage species, Z. bailii, is strongly associated with sour rot grapes and survives during fermentation with Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The use of selective media provides a more accurate characterization of grape contamination species.

  4. Occurrence of Root Rot and Vascular Wilt Diseases in Roselle (Hibiscus sabdariffa L.) in Upper Egypt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassan, Naglaa; Shimizu, Masafumi

    2014-01-01

    Roselle (Hibiscus sabdariffa L.) family Malvaceae is an important crop used in food, cosmetics and pharmaceutics industries. Roselle is cultivated mainly in Upper Egypt (Qena and Aswan governorates) producing 94% of total production. Root rot disease of roselle is one of the most important diseases that attack both seedlings and adult plants causing serious losses in crop productivity and quality. The main objective of the present study is to identify and characterize pathogens associated with root rot and wilt symptoms of roselle in Qena, Upper Egypt and evaluate their pathogenicity under greenhouse and field condition. Fusarium oxysporum, Macrophomina phaseolina, Fusarium solani, Fusarium equiseti and Fusarium semitectum were isolated from the natural root rot diseases in roselle. All isolated fungi were morphologically characterized and varied in their pathogenic potentialities. They could attack roselle plants causing damping-off and root rot/wilt diseases in different pathogenicity tests. The highest pathogenicity was caused by F. oxysporum and M. phaseolina followed by F. solani. The least pathogenic fungi were F. equiseti followed by F. semitectum. It obviously noted that Baladi roselle cultivar was more susceptible to infection with all tested fungi than Sobhia 17 under greenhouse and field conditions. This is the first report of fungal pathogens causing root rot and vascular wilt in roselle in Upper Egypt. PMID:24808737

  5. PHOTOSYNTHETIC RESPONSES OF Eucalyptus nitens Maiden AT INITIAL STAGES OF ROOT-ROT INFECTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luciasih Agustini

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Root-rots are known to be latent diseases that may be present in plants for an extended period without any noticeable expression of symptoms above ground. Photosynthetic responses of Eucalyptus nitens saplings artificially inoculated with the root-rot pathogen, Armillaria luteobubalina were examined to characterize the initial stages of root-rot infection. This paper studies three photosynthetic parameters, i.e. photosystem II yield (Fv/Fm, chlorophyll content and photosynthetic capacity (Amax for two strains of A. luteobubalina over a seven-month period. Root systems were either wounded or left intact before inoculation. A significant difference was observed in the Fv/Fm ratio between the uninoculated control and inoculated saplings. Photosystem II yield was considered the most sensitive parameter for the early detection of root-rot disease. Chlorophyll content and Amax decreased for all trees, including controls, during the period of the experiment, and most likely reflected host responses to seasonal change rather than treatment effects. Fungal re-isolations from symptomatic roots of inoculated trees confirmed the presence of A. luteobubalina. Findings from this preliminary trial indicated that there were detectable physiological changes associated with early infection of root-rot. However, to detect more widespread physiological changes an experiment of longer duration is needed.

  6. Phenotypic and genotypic characteristics of Iranian soft rot bacteria isolates from different hosts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rasool REZAEI

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available During 2005–2006, 42 soft rot bacterial strains were isolated from the infected tubers of potato, roots of carrot, sugar beet and turnip, and the leaves of lettuce and cabbage with soft rot symptoms in Iran. The isolates were rod-shaped, motile with peritrichous flagella, gram negative, facultative anaerobe, oxidase and urease negative and they rotted potato tuber slices. Of the 42 isolates, 20 were identified as Pectobacterium carotovorum subsp. carotovorum (Pcc, 6 as P. carotovorum subsp. odoriferum (Pco, 4 as P. betavasculorum (Pb and 12 strains as Dickeya dadantii (Dda. PCR amplification of fingerprints of repetitive bacterial DNA elements using the REP, ERIC and BOX primers differentiated the soft rot bacteria to the species and subspecieslevel. Strains of Pcc and Dda were phenotypically and genotypically highly variable, but Pb and Pco strains had low variability. REP-PCR was found to be a promising genotypic tool for the rapid and reliable speciation and typing of soft rot bacteria.

  7. Fracture load of monolithic CAD/CAM lithium disilicate ceramic crowns and veneered zirconia crowns as a posterior implant restoration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jee Hwan; Lee, Su-Jeong; Park, Jun Sub; Ryu, Jae Jun

    2013-02-01

    To compare the fracture load and failure mode of the monolithic lithium disilicate crown (e.max group) and 2 types of veneered zirconia crowns, hand layer (ZV group) and heat pressed (ZP group), as a posterior implant-supported restoration. A total of 24 all-ceramic crowns for molar tooth were fabricated using the computer-aided design/computer-assisted manufacture (CAD/CAM) system. The e.max group crowns and zirconia copings for ZV and ZP groups were fabricated using a Cerec milling unit. The ZV group was fabricated using a hand-layer veneering method, and the ZP group using a heat-pressing method. All crowns were luted to the abutments, which were connected to implant fixtures, using resin cement. Fracture load was measured using the universal testing machine, and the fracture surface was evaluated by scanning electron microscopy. The ZP group showed significantly higher fracture load (5229.3 N) compared with the e.max group (3852.1 N) and ZV group (3100.3 N). All fractures in the ZV group occurred in the veneered layer. Monolithic CAD/CAM lithium disilicate crowns are applicable to posterior implant-supported restorations because the fracture load was higher than the average occlusal force.

  8. Crown fracture: Failure load, stress distribution, and fractographic analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campos, Roberto E; Soares, Paulo V; Versluis, Antheunis; de O Júnior, Osmir Batista; Ambrosano, Gláucia M B; Nunes, Isabella Ferola

    2015-09-01

    The outcomes from load-to-failure tests may not be applicable to clinical situations. The purpose of this study was to critically evaluate the efficacy of load-to-failure tests in the investigation of the fracture load and pattern of metal-free crowns. Four groups were formed from 128 bovine roots restored with metal posts, resin cores, and feldspathic, leucite, or lithium disilicate ceramic systems or polymer crowns. Each group was divided into 4 (n=8) according to the cement: zinc phosphate, self-adhesive resin, autopolymerizing resin, and glass ionomer. Mean fracture loads from compressive tests were submitted to ANOVA and Tukey HSD test. Finite element and fractographic analyses were performed and associated with the fracture load and pattern. Significantly higher fracture load values were obtained for the lithium disilicate ceramic, but finite element and fractographic analyses showed that the cement effect could not be determined. The finite element analysis showed the cement likely affected the fracture pattern, confirmed that stresses in the cements were little affected by the crown materials, and found that the stressed conditions were lowest in the lithium disilicate compared with other crowns for all cement combinations. The stressed conditions in the crowns depended more on the adhesive properties than on the elastic modulus of the cement materials. The level of the stressed condition in the crowns at the occlusal surface was about the same or higher than along their cement interface, consistent with the fractography, which indicated fractures starting at the load point. Higher stress levels in the crowns corresponded with a lower number of catastrophic fractures, and higher stresses in the cements seemed to reduce the number of catastrophic fracture patterns. The highest stressed conditions occurred along the occlusal surface for crown materials with a low elastic modulus or in combination with adhesive cements. The method used was not appropriate

  9. Winter therapy for the accelerators

    CERN Document Server

    Corinne Pralavorio

    2016-01-01

    Hundreds of people are hard at work during the year-end technical stop as all the accelerators are undergoing maintenance, renovation and upgrade operations in parallel.   The new beam absorber on its way to Point 2 before being lowered into the LHC tunnel for installation. The accelerator teams didn’t waste any time before starting their annual winter rejuvenation programme over the winter. At the end of November, as the LHC ion run was beginning, work got under way on the PS Booster, where operation had already stopped. On 14 December, once the whole complex had been shut down, the technical teams turned their attention to the other injectors and the LHC. The year-end technical stop (YETS) provides an opportunity to carry out maintenance work on equipment and repair any damage as well as to upgrade the machines for the upcoming runs. Numerous work projects are carried out simultaneously, so good coordination is crucial. Marzia Bernardini's team in the Enginee...

  10. Characterizing forest root‐ and butt‐rot fungi in Yap, Palau, Pohnpei, Kosrae, Guam and Saipan [Chapter III

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phil Cannon; Ned B. Klopfenstein; Mee-Sook Kim; Yuko Ota; Norio Sahashi; Robert L. Schlub; Roger Brown; Sara M. Ashiglar; Amy L. Ross-Davis; John W. Hanna

    2014-01-01

    Ganoderma and Phellinus are two common fungal genera causing butt-rot on trees growing on USA-affiliated islands of the western Pacific. Although these fungi can be quite prevalent, especially in some older mangrove stands, it appears that the majority of infections caused by these fungi leads to severe rotting of the heartwood but do not kill the living...

  11. Degradation of lipophilic wood extractive constituents in Pinus sylvestris by the white-rot fungi Bjerkandera sp. and Trametes versicolor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dorado, J.; Beek, van T.A.; Claassen, F.W.; Sierra-Alvarez, R.

    2001-01-01

    The white-rot fungi Trametes versicolor and Bjerkandera spp. are among the most frequent decomposers of angiosperm wood in forest ecosystems and in wood products in service. Wood extractives have a major impact on wood properties and wood utilization. This work evaluated the ability of two white-rot

  12. Formation of dry gram-negative bacteria biocontrol products and small pilot tests against potato dry rot

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pseudomonas fluorescens strains S11:P:12, P22:Y:05, and S22:T:04 reduce important potato maladies in storage including dry rot, late blight, pink rot, and sprouting. Experiments were conducted to identify methods for producing a dried, efficacious biological control product from one or more of these...

  13. Detection, identification and differentiation of Pectobacterium and Dickeya species causing potato blackleg and tuber soft rot: a review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Czajkowski, R.L.; Pérombelon, M.C.M.; Jafra, S.; Lojkowska, E.; Potrykus, M.; Wolf, van der J.M.; Sledz, W.

    2015-01-01

    The soft rot Enterobacteriaceae (SRE) Pectobacterium and Dickeya species (formerly classified as pectinolytic Erwinia spp.) cause important diseases on potato and other arable and horticultural crops. They may affect the growing potato plant causing blackleg and are responsible for tuber soft rot in

  14. Multiplex detection and identification of bacterial pathogens causing potato blackleg and soft rot in Europe, using padlock probes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Slawiak, M.; Doorn, van R.; Szemes, M.; Speksnijder, A.G.C.L.; Waleron, M.; Wolf, van der J.M.; Lojkowska, E.; Schoen, C.D.

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this study was to develop a multiplex detection and identification protocol for bacterial soft rot coliforms, namely Pectobacterium wasabiae (Pw), Pectobacterium atrosepticum (Pba) and Dickeya spp., responsible for potato blackleg and tuber soft rot. The procedures were derived from

  15. rDNA-based characterization of a new binucleate Rhizoctonia spp. causing root rot on kale in Brazil

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuramae, E.E.; Buzeto, A.L.; Nakatani, A.K.; Souza, N.L.

    2007-01-01

    In this paper we present the first report of the occurrence of a binucleate Rhizoctonia spp. causing hypocotyl and root rot in kale in Brazil. Rhizoctonia spp. were isolated from kale (Brassica oleracea var. acephala) with symptoms of hypocotyl and root rot. The isolates, characterized as binucleate

  16. Screening preharvest/postharvest strategies to prevent fruit rot decay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vorstermans, B; Creemers, P

    2007-01-01

    In fruit growing preharvest sprayings in the orchard are mainly applied to protect fruit from decaying. Next to multisite fungicides (captan, thiram, tolylfluanid) the most commonly used products recognized for the Belgium market are Bellis (pyraclostrobin & boscalid) and the combination of Topsin M (thiophanate-methyl) and Frugico (diethofencarb). In general the spraying schedule varies depending on weather conditions (infection risk), preharvest interval of available fungicides, fruitgrower and cultivar of pome fruit (apple/pear). Facing the climatological conditions before picking the residue loading on the fruit surface can differ enormously. Also wet (pre)grading is considered to decrease the product residue resulting to fruits which are less protected before entering the cold storage room. In this context a partially replacement of the preharvest treatments by one postharvest application could offer a reliable alternative to the PPP reduction program (Plant Protection Products) in the orchard. A standardized application method by dipping or drenching will cover the fruits homogenically resulting in a rationalized fungicide use compared to the preharvest sprayings in the orchard. For the Belgium market Philabuster (imazalil & pyrimethanil) is registered for postharvest treatments since for this product a proper solution for the waste water of postharvest uses was developed to protect surface waters (Funds technology). Philabuster provides an advanced mould control towards fruit rot pathogens Gloeosporium spp., Botrytis cinerea and Penicillium spp. In this context several trials were set up to evaluate the biological efficacy of Philabuster alone or in combination with preharvest sprayings in the orchard. In concrete different preharvest spraying schedules were applied in the last six weeks before harvest on apple and pear facing parameters as rational fungicide use, antifungal effectiveness and cost price. The purpose was to select the optimal combination in

  17. Molecular Basis of Resistance to Fusarium Ear Rot in Maize

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandra Lanubile

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available The impact of climate change has been identified as an emerging issue for food security and safety, and the increased incidence of mycotoxin contamination in maize over the last two decades is considered a potential emerging hazard. Disease control by chemical and agronomic approaches is often ineffective and increases the cost of production; for this reason the exploitation of genetic resistance is the most sustainable method for reducing contamination. The review focuses on the significant advances that have been made in the development of transcriptomic, genetic and genomic information for maize, Fusarium verticillioides molds, and their interactions, over recent years. Findings from transcriptomic studies have been used to outline a specific model for the intracellular signaling cascade occurring in maize cells against F. verticillioides infection. Several recognition receptors, such as receptor-like kinases and R genes, are involved in pathogen perception, and trigger down-stream signaling networks mediated by mitogen-associated protein kinases. These signals could be orchestrated primarily by hormones, including salicylic acid, auxin, abscisic acid, ethylene, and jasmonic acid, in association with calcium signaling, targeting multiple transcription factors that in turn promote the down-stream activation of defensive response genes, such as those related to detoxification processes, phenylpropanoid, and oxylipin metabolic pathways. At the genetic and genomic levels, several quantitative trait loci (QTL and single-nucleotide polymorphism markers for resistance to Fusarium ear rot deriving from QTL mapping and genome-wide association studies are described, indicating the complexity of this polygenic trait. All these findings will contribute to identifying candidate genes for resistance and to applying genomic technologies for selecting resistant maize genotypes and speeding up a strategy of breeding to contrast disease, through plants

  18. Molecular diagnosis of Phytophthora cinnamomi associated with root rot in avocado producing areas of Ecuador

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diana Elizabeth Toapanta-Gallegos

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available One of the most damaging diseases in cultivation of avocado (Persea americana Mill. is root rot associated with Phytophthora cinnamomi Rands. This disease causes progressive wilt and even death of the tree. The objective of this study was to identify the presence of P. cinnamomi in two productive areas of avocado in Ecuador using the molecular technique PCR-RFLP. Tree root samples were obtained with root rot symptoms in the production areas, from which 10 isolates were morphologically identified with Phytophthora spp. infection. To distinguish among the various Phytophthora species, a molecular analysis was performed using molecular markers in the ITSregion of the ribosomal DNA (rDNA. The ITSdigestion fragment obtained by PCR with the Ta qI enzyme confirmed the presence of Phytophthora cinnamomi in the isolated samples, and its association with root rot in the sampled production areas.

  19. Survey of root rot diseases of sugar bett in Central Greece

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karadimos Dimitros A.

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available An extensive survey was conducted during the summer and autumn of 2004 in sugar beet fields in the area of Larissa, Thessaly region, with plants showing symptoms of root rot diseases. The aim of the monitoring was to identify the causal agents of root rot diseases. In total, 76 sugar beet fields were surveyed and 5-10 diseased roots were examined from each field. Isolations, carried out on PDA, showed that two main fungal pathogens causing root rot were Rhizoctonia solani and Phytophthora cryptogea. The former was isolated in 46% of the fields and the latter in 38% of the fields. In addition, Rhizopus stolonifer, Fusarium spp., Scerotium rolfsii and Rhizoctonia violacea were isolated in 14%, 7%, 4% and 1% of the fields respectively. In most of the surveyed fields only one pathogen species was isolated and only in a few of them more than one fungal species was identified.

  20. Ceramometal crowns and bridges. Focus on failures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, A M; Kurzeja, R; Gamberg, M G

    1985-10-01

    There are numerous factors that can have an adverse or beneficial effect upon the esthetic appearance of a ceramometal restoration. Some of these factors are beyond the influence of the dentist unless he or she is aware of them. As knowledgable practicing dentists, they have the ability to prescribe for their patients in such a manner as to achieve greater success and, in turn, greater patient acceptance and recognition. These are the rewards of a successful crown and bridge practice, and the ceramometal restoration is the basic state of the art prosthesis in present use. Knowing how to take a shade under the proper lighting conditions is generally well taught as part of the dental school curriculum, but the knowledge that shade guides are manufactured with built in idiosyncrasies of color variations from guide to guide is an enlightening experience. O'Brien of the Department of Dental Materials at the University of Michigan School of Dentistry clearly demonstrated the variabilities of color intensities between porcelain manufacturers. Laboratory technicians have been frustrated by the inconsistency of shades of porcelains from one lot number to another. It is now more fully understood that fluorescence is an important factor in patient satisfaction, as patients observe and have their restorations seen under differing lighting conditions. The type of alloy used in the ceramometal combination can have an effect upon the esthetic result. The wider use of silver-palladium alloys requires that the porcelain employed be of a nongreening nature, or else the final glazed prosthesis will give off a greenish cast. The ability of the opaque to block out the metal substructure while blending with the gingival and incisal shades eliminates the graying out, which can be esthetically objectionable to the patient. However, one of the most important considerations in aesthetic ceramometal restorations is the correct anatomy, placement, and harmonious blending with the oral and

  1. Using the Resistograph®to distinguish different types of wood rot on living silver fir in Molise (Italy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lasserre B

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available he study was performed in two silver-fir forests (Abies alba Mill. located in Alto Molise, Province of Isernia: Collemeluccio, near Pescolanciano and Abeti Soprani near Capracotta. The aim of this work was to distinguish different types of wood rot on living silver fir individuals by using the Resistograph® (IML-RESI E400, a device that allows to estimate the variation of wood density by measuring the resistance to micro-perforation. The occurrence of different types of wood rot (white rot and brown rot in living trees was pointed out and discriminated by the device. In the detected deteriorated zones, fungal pathogens and decomposers were isolated and identified, causing either white (Phellinus hartigii, Ganoderma adspersum, Heterobasidion abietinum and Armillaria ostoyae or brown rot (Fomitopsis pinicola.

  2. Combined effects of biocontrol agents and soil amendments on soil microbial populations, plant growth and incidence of charcoal rot of cowpea and wilt of cumin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vijeta SINGH

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Field experiments were conducted for 2 years to determine the effectiveness of combined use of two biocontrol agents, Bacillus firmus and Aspergillus versicolor for control of Macrophomina phaseolina induced charcoal rot of cowpea and Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. cumini induced wilt of cumin. The lowest level of plant mortality (3‒4% due to charcoal rot of cowpea was recorded when bacterium coated seeds were sown in radish compost amended soil compared to the non-amended soil (13.8‒20.5%, but this was not significantly better than some other treatments. Cowpea roots from B. firmus coated seeds had better nodulation than any of the individual A. versicolor treatments. Although B. firmus coated seeds + A. versicolor + farmyard manure resulted in maximum nodulation this was not significantly different to B. firmus seed coating. Root colonization by the combined biocontrol agent treatments was better than the individual biocontrol agent treatments. Combining A. versicolor with farmyard manure supported the maximum populations of total fungi and actinomycetes. In both winter seasons, the lowest incidence of wilt (1.0‒5.2% on cumin was recorded when A. versicolor was amended with neem compost compared to the non-amended soil (5.7‒10.5%. Maximum colonization of A. versicolor on roots was observed in B. firmus + A. versicolor + farmyard manure amended plots. During both years, the treatment combination of A. versicolor in neem compost amended plots resulted in maximum populations of fungi, bacteria and A. versicolor in the soil, which was greater than in the non-amended soil. Significant increases in disease control were not recorded after single or repeated delivery of A. versicolor. These results suggest that combining B. firmus as seed coatings with A. versicolor as soil applications gives improved control of M. phaseolina and Fusarium induced diseases on legume and seed spice crops in arid soils.

  3. Direct composite restoration of permanent anterior teeth uncomplicated crown fractures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashley Evans Nicholas

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available An uncomplicated crown fracture is a fracture that involves only the tooth enamel or the dentin and tooth enamel without any damage or exposure to the pulp. Crown fracture of the anterior teeth usually caused by traumatic forces such as falls, accidents, violence, or sports activities. Traumatic injuries of the oral region frequently involve the anterior teeth, especially maxillary incisors due to the anatomic factors which may affect the functional and aesthetical values of the teeth. The objective of this literature study was to know more about uncomplicated crown fracture of the anterior teeth and its restoration. This research was a literature study performed by researching, highlighting various interesting facts and compiling the relevant published journals. The most common and ideal direct restoration of the anterior teeth was the composite resin restoration. The anterior teeth restoration was considered to be a complex and challenging case to solves due to the fact that besides reconstructing the tooth and regaining the function, the aesthetical aspect was also becoming the main objectives. The permanent anterior teeth uncomplicated crown fracture was the most common case of tooth fractures which was mainly caused by traumatic injuries such as falls, accidents, excessive forces, violence, and also sports activities. Dental injuries of the anterior teeth also affected the aesthetical properties and the function of the tooth. Composite resin restoration was able to performed directly on the permanent anterior teeth uncomplicated crown fracture.

  4. The use of stainless steel crowns: a systematic literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seale, N Sue; Randall, Ros

    2015-01-01

    The purpose was to review the published literature on stainless steel crowns (SSCs) from 2002 to the present as an update to an earlier review published in 2002. Included were published papers on clinical studies, case series, and laboratory testing on SSCs (including esthetic SSCs and the Hall technique) in peer-reviewed journals. Study quality and strength of evidence presented were assessed for papers reporting clinical results for SSCs as a primary study outcome using a list of weighting criteria. Sixty-one papers fulfilled the inclusion criteria (24 papers on 22 clinical studies, three case reports, 21 reviews and surveys, and 13 laboratory testing reports on SSCs and esthetic preformed metal crowns for primary and permanent molar teeth). Ten clinical studies achieved weighting scores ranging from 68 percent to 26 percent, with the two highest scoring studies (68 percent and 63 percent) considered good quality. Within the confines of the studies reviewed, primary molar esthetic crowns and SSCs had superior clinical performance as restoratives for posterior primary teeth, and the Hall technique was shown to have validity. No clinical studies were available on zirconia crowns. Further well-designed prospective studies on primary molar esthetic crowns and the Hall technique are needed.

  5. Crown sealing and buckling instability during water entry of spheres

    KAUST Repository

    Marston, J. O.

    2016-04-05

    We present new observations from an experimental investigation of the classical problem of the crown splash and sealing phenomena observed during the impact of spheres onto quiescent liquid pools. In the experiments, a 6 m tall vacuum chamber was used to provide the required ambient conditions from atmospheric pressure down to of an atmosphere, whilst high-speed videography was exploited to focus primarily on the above-surface crown formation and ensuing dynamics, paying particular attention to the moments just prior to the surface seal. In doing so, we have observed a buckling-type azimuthal instability of the crown. This instability is characterised by vertical striations along the crown, between which thin films form that are more susceptible to the air flow and thus are drawn into the closing cavity, where they atomize to form a fine spray within the cavity. To elucidate to the primary mechanisms and forces at play, we varied the sphere diameter, liquid properties and ambient pressure. Furthermore, a comparison between the entry of room-temperature spheres, where the contact line pins around the equator, and Leidenfrost spheres (i.e. an immersed superheated sphere encompassed by a vapour layer), where there is no contact line, indicates that the buckling instability appears in all crown sealing events, but is intensified by the presence of a pinned contact line. © 2016 Cambridge University Press.

  6. Effect of cements on fracture resistance of monolithic zirconia crowns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, Keisuke; Mouhat, Mathieu; Nergård, John Magnus; Lægreid, Solveig Jenssen; Kanno, Taro; Milleding, Percy; Örtengren, Ulf

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Objectives The present study investigated the effect of cements on fracture resistance of monolithic zirconia crowns in relation to their compressive strength. Materials and methods Four different cements were tested: zinc phosphate cement (ZPC), glass-ionomer cement (GIC), self-adhesive resin-based cement (SRC) and resin-based cement (RC). RC was used in both dual cure mode (RC-D) and chemical cure mode (RC-C). First, the compressive strength of each cement was tested according to a standard (ISO 9917-1:2004). Second, load-to-failure test was performed to analyze the crown fracture resistance. CAD/CAM-produced monolithic zirconia crowns with a minimal thickness of 0.5 mm were prepared and cemented to dies with each cement. The crown–die samples were loaded until fracture. Results The compressive strength of SRC, RC-D and RC-C was significantly higher than those of ZPC and GIC (p crown between the groups. Conclusion The values achieved in the load-to-failure test suggest that monolithic zirconia crowns with a minimal thickness of 0.5 mm may have good resistance against fracture regardless of types of cements. PMID:27335900

  7. Museum security and the Thomas Crown Affair.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Michaud, E. C. (Nuclear Engineering Division)

    2010-01-01

    Over the years, I've daydreamed about stealing a Vermeer, a Picasso, or Rembrandt. It tickles me, as much as watching the reboot of The Thomas Crown Affair. Why is it, do you suppose, so much fun to think about stealing a world renowned piece off the wall of a major metropolitan museum? Is it the romantic thoughts of getting away with it, walking past infrared detectors, and pressure sensors ala Indiana Jones with the sack of sand to remove the idol without triggering the security system? Is it the idea of snatching items with such fantastic prices, where the romance of possessing an item of such value is less intoxicating than selling it to a private collector for it to never be seen again? I suspect others share my daydreams as they watch theater or hear of a brazen daylight heist at museums around the world, or from private collections. Though when reality sets in, the mind of the security professional kicks in. How could one do it, why would one do it, what should you do once it's done? The main issue a thief confronts when acquiring unique goods is how to process or fence them. They become very difficult to sell because they are one-of-a-kind, easy to identify, and could lead to the people involved with the theft. The whole issue of museum security takes up an ironic twist when one considers the secretive British street artist 'Banksy'. Banksy has made a name for himself by brazenly putting up interesting pieces of art in broad daylight (though many critics don't consider his work to be art) on building walls, rooftops, or even museums. I bring him up for a interesting take on what may become a trend in museum security. In March of 2005, Banksy snuck a piece of his called 'Vandalized Oil Painting' into the Brooklyn Museum's Great Historical Painting Wing, plus 3 other pieces into major museums in New York. Within several days, 2 paintings had been torn down, but 2 stayed up much longer. In his home country of the UK, a

  8. Model of Fabry-Pérot-type electromagnetic modes of a cylindrical nanowire

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bordo, Vladimir

    2010-01-01

    The rigorous theory of normal electromagnetic modes of a cylindrical nanowire of finite length is developed. The exact integral equation which determines the solution of Maxwell's equations obeying the boundary conditions at the whole nanowire surface is derived. The nanowire normal (Fabry......-Pérot) modes are defined as non-trivial solutions of the source-free equation. The approach is considered in more detail for elongated nanowires whose length is much larger than their diameter. The resonance condition obtained for a single-mode nanowire resembles the formula for the Fabry-Pérot resonator...

  9. Functional Genomics of Lignocellulose Degradation in the Basidiomycete White Rot Schizophyllum commune

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ohm, Robin A. [Joint Genome Inst., Walnut Creek, CA (United States); Tegelaar, Martin [Utrecht Univ. (Netherlands); Henrissat, Bernard [Univ. of Marseille (France); Brewer, Heather M. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Purvine, Samuel O. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Baker, Scott [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Wosten, Han A. B. [Utrecht Univ. (Netherlands); Grigoriev, Igor V. [Joint Genome Inst., Walnut Creek, CA (United States); Lugones, Luis G. [Utrecht Univ. (Netherlands)

    2013-03-01

    White and brown rot fungi are among the most important wood decayers in nature. Although more than 50 genomes of Basidiomycete white and brown rots have been sequenced by the Joint Genome Institute, there is still a lot to learn about how these fungi degrade the tough polymers present in wood. In particular, very little is known about how these fungi regulate the expression of genes involved in lignocellulose degradation. Here, we used transcriptomics, proteomics, and promoter analysis in an effort to gain insight into the process of lignocellulose degradation.

  10. New record of Phytophthora root and stem rot of Lavandula angustifolia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leszek B. Orlikowski

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Phytophthora cinnamomi was isolated from rotted root and stem parts of lavender as well as from soil taken from containers with diseased plants. Additionally Botrytis cinerea, Fusarium spp. and Sclerotinia sclerotiorum were often isolated from diseased tissues. P. cinnamomi colonised leaves and stem parts of 4 lavender species in laboratory trials and caused stem rot of plants in greenhouse experiments. Cardinal temperature for in vitro growth were about 7,5 and 32°C with optimum 25-27,5°C. The species colonised stem tissues at temperature ranged from 10° to 32°C.

  11. Characterisation of Alternaria species-groups associated with core rot of apples in South Africa

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Serdani, M.; Kang, J.C.; Andersen, Birgitte

    2002-01-01

    Alternaria core rot of red apple cultivars is a serious post-harvest disease in South Africa. Thirty isolates of Alternaria spp. previously isolated from apple, together with reference isolates of A. alternata and A. infectoria, were characterised and grouped according to their sporulation patterns...... the other species-groups, as all isolates had a distinction of 35 base pair insertions and 6 base pair deletions in the ITS regions. The results obtained in the present study showed that the major pathogens associated with core rot disease of Top Red apples in South Africa belong to the A. tenuissima...

  12. Control of Root-rot Diseases of Phaseolus vulgaris Using Gliotoxin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aliaa, R. E.

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Effect of the antifungal antibiotic gliotoxin on root-rot diseases caused by Fusarium solani and its influence on population of fungal flora in soil were investigated. Bean seeds were treated with different concentrations of gliotoxin before sowing. The results obtained from the green house application of bioagent indicated that soaking seeds in different concentrations of gliotoxin from 1µg/mL to 15µg/mL (for 60 minutes significantly reduced the percentage of damping off and root rot as compared with control (pathogen only. Also 10µg/mL of gliotoxin was significantly decreased the population of fungal flora as compared with control.

  13. Fracture Strength After Fatigue Loading of Lithium Disilicate Pressed Zirconia Crowns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, So-Yeun; Choi, Jae-Won; Ju, Sung-Won; Ahn, Jin-Soo; Yoon, Mi-Jung; Huh, Jung-Bo

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the fracture resistance of fatigued lithium disilicate pressed zirconia crowns versus other ceramic crowns. Lithium disilicate pressed zirconia, fluorapatite pressed zirconia, monolithic lithium disilicate, and monolithic zirconia crowns were fabricated. Cyclic and static loadings were applied to the mesiobuccal cusp tip after thermocycling and fracture strengths were recorded. Fatigued lithium disilicate pressed zirconia crowns were found to have a fracture resistance of 9,117.81 ± 727.04 N, compared with 9,240.61 ± 887.21 N for monolithic zirconia crowns, 3,030.18 ± 1,505.83 N for fluorapatite pressed zirconia crowns, and 4,173.94 ± 877.46 N for monolithic lithium disilicate crowns (P = .001). This in vitro study shows that fatigued lithium disilicate pressed zirconia and monolithic zirconia crowns have better fracture resistance than fluorapatite pressed zirconia and monolithic lithium disilicate crowns.

  14. Modeling the spatial distribution of forest crown biomass and effects on fire behavior with FUEL3D and WFDS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russell A. Parsons; William Mell; Peter McCauley

    2010-01-01

    Crown fire poses challenges to fire managers and can endanger fire fighters. Understanding of how fire interacts with tree crowns is essential to informed decisions about crown fire. Current operational crown fire predictions in the United States assume homogeneous crown fuels. While a new class of research fire models, which model fire behavior with computational...

  15. Chipping Resistance of Graded Zirconia Ceramics for Dental Crowns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Y.; Chai, H.; Lee, J.J.-W.; Lawn, B.R.

    2012-01-01

    A serious drawback of veneering porcelains is a pronounced susceptibility to chipping. Glass-infiltrated dense zirconia structures can now be produced with esthetic quality, making them an attractive alternative. In this study, we examined the hypothesis that such infiltrated structures are much more chip-resistant than conventional porcelains, and at least as chip-resistant as non-infiltrated zirconia. A sharp indenter was used to produce chips in flat and anatomically correct glass-infiltrated zirconia crown materials, and critical loads were measured as a function of distance from the specimen edge (flat) or side wall (crown). Control data were obtained on zirconia specimens without infiltration and on crowns veneered with porcelains. The results confirmed that the resistance to chipping in graded zirconia is more than 4 times higher than that of porcelain-veneered zirconia and is at least as high as that of non-veneered zirconia. PMID:22232142

  16. Microleakage of core materials for complete cast gold crowns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tjan, A H; Chiu, J

    1989-06-01

    This study evaluated the microleakage patterns of complete cast-gold crowns cemented onto teeth rebuilt with pin-retained cores made from cast gold, amalgam, composite resin, and silver-reinforced glass ionomer by using three different cements (zinc phosphate, glass ionomer, and resin cement). Crowns cemented onto unrebuilt tooth preparations with zinc phosphate cement served as controls. The cemented specimens were thermocycled between 4 degrees and 50 degrees C in waterbaths. They were then embedded in epoxy resin and sectioned. The extent of marginal microleakage was evaluated with a stereomicroscope and scored. The findings indicated that the type of luting agent used appeared to affect microleakage more than the core material. No significant differences in the degree of microleakage were found under crowns cemented onto teeth rebuilt with the four core materials when cemented with the same luting cement.

  17. A zirconia implant-crown system: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohal, Ralf J; Klaus, Gerold

    2004-04-01

    Exposed metal crown margins in the porcelain-fused-to-metal technique might be an esthetic problem. Therefore, all-ceramic crown systems are used for restoring teeth and dental implants. In addition, the gray color of a titanium implant might hamper the esthetic appearance of the entire reconstruction in cases of thin peri-implant soft tissue or tissue retraction. To further improve the esthetic aspect of dental implants, efforts are undertaken to develop implant systems fabricated out of tooth-colored materials that are biocompatible and able to withstand masticatory forces. One such material may be zirconia. The present article presents a case in which an all-ceramic custom-made zirconia implant-crown system was used for the replacement of a single tooth.

  18. Retention of crowns cemented on implant abutments with temporary cements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagasawa, Yuko; Hibino, Yasushi; Nakajima, Hiroshi

    2014-01-01

    This study was to examine the retentive force of crowns to implant abutments with commercial temporary cements. Six different temporary cements were investigated. Cast crowns were cemented to the abutments using each cement and their retentive forces to abutments were determined 7 or 28 days after cementing (n=10). The retentive force of the cements to abutments varied widely among the products [27-109 N (7-day), 18-80 N (28-days)]. The retentive force of all the cements was not reduced as the time elapsed, except for two products tested. The polycarboxylate cements and paste-mixing type eugenol-free cements revealed comparable retentive force after 28 days of storage. The powder-liquid type cements showed a positive correlation (pcement between the retentive force and compressive strength. Mechanical strength of temporary cements could not be a prominent predicting factor for retention of the crowns on the abutments.

  19. AB INITIO INVESTIGATION OF 12-CROWN-4 AND BENZO-12-CROWN-4 COMPLEXES WITH Li+, Na+, K+, Zn2+, Cd2+, AND Hg2+

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yahmin Yahmin

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available The structure and binding energies of 12-crown-4 and benzo-12-crown-4 complexes with Li+, Na+, K+, Zn2+, Cd2+, and Hg2+were investigated with ab initio calculations using Hartree-Fock approximation and second-order perturbation theory. The basis set used in this study is lanl2mb. The structure optimization of cation-crown ether complexes was evaluated at HF/lanl2mb level of theory and interaction energy of the corresponding complexes was calculated at MP2/lanl2mb level of theory (MP2/lanl2mb//HF/lanl2mb. Interactions of the crown ethers and the cations were discussed in term of the structure parameter of crown ether. The binding energies of the complexes show that all complex formed from transition metal cations is more stable than the complexes formed from alkali metal cations.   Keywords: 12-crown-4, benzo-12-crown-4, alkali metals, transition metals

  20. Uniform versus asymmetric shading mediates crown recession in conifers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amanda L Schoonmaker

    Full Text Available In this study we explore the impact of asymmetrical vs. uniform crown shading on the mortality and growth of upper and lower branches within tree crowns, for two conifer species: shade intolerant lodgepole pine (Pinus contorta and shade tolerant white spruce (Picea glauca. We also explore xylem hydraulics, foliar nutrition, and carbohydrate status as drivers for growth and expansion of the lower and upper branches in various types of shading. This study was conducted over a two-year period across 10 regenerating forest sites dominated by lodgepole pine and white spruce, in the lower foothills of Alberta, Canada. Trees were assigned to one of four shading treatments: (1, complete uniform shading of the entire tree, (2 light asymmetric shading where the lower 1/4-1/3 of the tree crown was shaded, (3 heavy asymmetric shading as in (2 except with greater light reduction and (4 control in which no artificial shading occurred and most of the entire crown was exposed to full light. Asymmetrical shading of only the lower crown had a larger negative impact on the bud expansion and growth than did uniform shading, and the effect was stronger in pine relative to spruce. In addition, lower branches in pine also had lower carbon reserves, and reduced xylem-area specific conductivity compared to spruce. For both species, but particularly the pine, the needles of lower branches tended to store less C than upper branches in the asymmetric shade, which could suggest a movement of reserves away from the lower branches. The implications of these findings correspond with the inherent shade tolerance and self-pruning behavior of these conifers and supports a carbon based mechanism for branch mortality--mediated by an asymmetry in light exposure of the crown.

  1. Provisional crown failures in dental school predoctoral clinics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyde, Jeffrey D; Bader, James A; Shugars, Daniel A

    2007-11-01

    Following a preliminary study indicating that at least 10 percent of single-unit crown temporary restorations failed in patients who received treatment by predoctoral students, a comprehensive examination of provisional crown failure was initiated to identify strategies to reduce the failure rate. For all provisionalized, natural tooth, single-unit crown preparations in University of North Carolina School of Dentistry predoctoral clinics for one year (N=1008), we noted tooth type, type of crown, student level, faculty coverage experience, treatment clinic, temporary material and luting agent, and retreatment (failure) of the provisional restoration. For failures, we also noted the stage of crown preparation at failure and the time since initial placement of the temporary. We analyzed these data using simple cross-tabs and logistic regression on need for retreatment (alpha =0.05). The failure rate was 18.75 percent (N=189). The median time to failure was twelve days; the 25(th) and 75(th) percentiles were six and twenty-six days. Significant risk factors, in order of odds ratio estimates, were molar tooth, second- or third-year student, and inexperienced faculty. Most provisional failures occurred during the final preparation phase of treatment. Provisional restoration failure is more frequent than was initially suspected from preliminary studies. Strategies for institutional intervention to reduce provisional restoration failure include greater attention to evaluating provisional crowns placed by inexperienced students (sophomores and juniors) and placing more emphasis on the retentiveness of provisional restorations reused following the final impression. Review of provisional evaluation procedures is also indicated for faculty who do not routinely supervise these procedures.

  2. 33 CFR 100.109 - Winter Harbor Lobster Boat Race, Winter Harbor, ME.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Winter Harbor Lobster Boat Race, Winter Harbor, ME. 100.109 Section 100.109 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY REGATTAS AND MARINE PARADES SAFETY OF LIFE ON NAVIGABLE WATERS § 100.109 Winter Harbor...

  3. Immediate esthetic crown with a facet of the extracted element.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Giacomo, Giovanni de Almeida Prado; Magalhães, Amanda; Ajzen, Sergio

    2014-07-01

    The present report describes a case of implant loading with an immediate temporary crown. The buccal crown surface was removed from the extracted tooth to obtain an aesthetically satisfactory result. After periodontal treatment, tooth 21 appeared proclined and showed Grade 3 mobility, indicating the need for its extraction. The remaining bone was imaged using computed tomography, and virtual surgical planning was performed using these results. The implant was immediately loaded postextraction into the fresh alveolus without a graft and flap procedure. The temporary tooth, which was manufactured using the extracted buccal surface, was a simple, fast, and low cost procedure that produced an excellent esthetic outcome.

  4. Displacement of Monolithic Rubble-Mound Breakwater Crown-Walls

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nørgaard, Jørgen Harck; Andersen, Lars Vabbersgaard; Andersen, Thomas Lykke

    2012-01-01

    of the accumulated sliding distance of crown-wall superstructures, which is in contrast to findings from previous similar studies on caisson breakwaters. The calculated sliding distance is approximately three times larger than the measured one when using the original one-dimensional model suggested in previous...... studies on caisson breakwaters, but correction terms are suggested in the present paper to obtain almost equal measured and estimated displacements. This is of great practical importance since many existing rubble-mound crown-walls are subjected to increasing wave loads due to rising sea water level from...

  5. Animals in Winter. Young Discovery Library Series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Sairigne, Catherine

    This book is written for children 5 through 10. Part of a series designed to develop their curiosity, fascinate them and educate them, this volume introduces the habits of a variety of animals during the winter. Topics include: (1) surviving during winter, including concepts such as migration, hibernation, and skin color change; (2) changing…

  6. How to Have a Healthy Winter | Poster

    Science.gov (United States)

    Without a doubt, winter is here. Between the icy weather and the recent hustle and bustle of the holidays, everyone is at an increased risk of getting sick. With that in mind, Occupational Health Services has a few simple tips for staying healthy this winter.

  7. Belichten Zantedeschia in winter biedt perspectief

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leeuwen, van P.J.; Trompert, J.P.T.

    2011-01-01

    Zantedeschia produceert in de Nederlandse winter geen bloemen. In de praktijk wordt met assimilatiebelichting wel bloei in de winter verkregen met de cultivar 'Crystal Blush'. Onderzoek door PPO laat zien welke hoeveelheid licht nodig is en dat ook gekleurde Zantedeschia's van een goede kwaliteit

  8. Nuclear Winter: Scientists in the Political Arena

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badash, Lawrence

    2001-03-01

    The nuclear winter phenomenon is used to illustrate the many paths by which scientific advice reaches decision makers in the United States government. Because the Reagan administration was hostile to the strategic policy that the scientific discovery seemed to demand, the leading proponent of nuclear winter, Carl Sagan, used his formidable talent for popularization to reach a larger audience.

  9. 43 CFR 423.37 - Winter activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Winter activities. 423.37 Section 423.37 Public Lands: Interior Regulations Relating to Public Lands BUREAU OF RECLAMATION, DEPARTMENT OF THE....37 Winter activities. (a) You must not tow persons on skis, sleds, or other sliding devices with a...

  10. 36 CFR 1002.19 - Winter activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Winter activities. 1002.19... RECREATION § 1002.19 Winter activities. (a) Skiing, snowshoeing, ice skating, sledding, innertubing.... (c) Failure to abide by area designations or activity restrictions established under this section is...

  11. 36 CFR 2.19 - Winter activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Winter activities. 2.19... RESOURCE PROTECTION, PUBLIC USE AND RECREATION § 2.19 Winter activities. (a) Skiing, snowshoeing, ice... designations or activity restrictions established under this section is prohibited. ...

  12. Chapter 7: Migration and winter ecology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deborah M. Finch; Jeffrey F. Kelly; Jean-Luc E. Cartron

    2000-01-01

    The willow flycatcher (Empidonax traillii) is a Neotropical migrant that breeds in North America, but winters in Central and northern South America. Little specific information is known about migration and wintering ecology of the southwestern willow flycatcher (E. t. extimus) (Yong and Finch 1997). Our report applies principally...

  13. Interim Report 'Winter smog and traffic'.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bloemen, H.; Blom, T.; Bogaard, van den C.; Boluyt, N.; Bree, van L.; Brunekreef, B.; Hoek, G.; Zee, van der S.

    1994-01-01

    This report presents a halfway score of the research project "Winter smog and Traffic", one of the themes of the research programme "Air Pollution and Health". A state of the art is presented of the health effects associated with exposure to winter smog and of the toxicological effects caused by the

  14. Evaluation of retention of cemented laser-sintered crowns on unmodified straight narrow implant abutments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilicarslan, Mehmet Ali; Ozkan, Pelin

    2013-01-01

    A common problem with cemented crowns is inadequate retention at the crown-abutment interface. The aim of this study was to compare the retention of new laser-sintered cobalt-chromium alloy crowns to the retention of cobalt-chromium alloy crowns fabricated with a traditional casting technique with and without an alloy primer. Twenty-four metallic crowns per casting technique were fabricated, and surface roughness values were recorded with a profilometer. Alloy primer was applied to half the specimens, and all crowns were luted with resin cement. After 24 hours, specimens were subjected to tensile force application with a universal testing machine. The effect of the cement amount was evaluated with an analytic balance. The results were compared using the Kruskal-Wallis multiple-comparison test. The Spearman correlation was used to determine correlations between crown retention and cement weight. The laser-sintered crowns (2.72 μm) were rougher than conventionally cast crowns. The mean load to failure values were as follows: 455.10 ± 192.69 Ncm for conventional crowns, 565.52 ± 112.87 Ncm for conventional crowns with alloy primer, 534.78 ± 130.15 Ncm for laser-sintered crowns, and 678.60 ± 212.83 Ncm for laser-sintered crowns with alloy primer. Laser-sintered crowns (10.10 ± 2.15 mg) showed a significant difference in terms of cement weight compared with cast crowns. In addition, negative correlations were found for retention and cement weight between all groups, except for the laser-sintered group without alloy primer. Retentive forces were significantly higher for laser-sintered crowns than for conventionally cast crowns. An increase in the surface roughness and the application of alloy primers led to an increase in the adhesive bonding of resin cements to metal alloys. It was concluded that a reduction in cement weight improved retention.

  15. In vitro fracture resistance of three commercially available zirconia crowns for primary molars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Townsend, Janice A; Knoell, Patrick; Yu, Qingzhao; Zhang, Jian-Feng; Wang, Yapin; Zhu, Han; Beattie, Sean; Xu, Xiaoming

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to measure the fracture resistance of primary mandibular first molar zirconia crowns from three different manufacturers-EZ Pedo (EZP), NuSmile (NSZ), and Kinder Krowns (KK)-and compare it with the thickness of the zirconia crowns and the measured fracture resistance of preveneered stainless steel crowns (SSCs). The thickness of 20 zirconia crowns from three manufacturers were measured. The mean force required to fracture the crowns was determined. Preveneered NuSmile (NSW) SSCs were tested as a control. EZP crowns were significantly thicker in three of the six measured locations. The force required to fracture the EZP crown was significantly higher than that required for NSZ and KK. There was a positive correlation between fracture resistance and crown thickness in the mesial, distal, mesioocclusal, and distoocclusal dimensions. None of the zirconia crowns proved to be as resistant to fracture as the preveneered SSCs. Statistically significant differences were found among the forces required to fracture zirconia crowns by three different manufacturers. The increase in force correlated with crown thickness. The forces required to fracture the preveneered stainless steel crowns were greater than the forces required to fracture all manufacturers' zirconia crowns.

  16. Genotype-dependent Burst of Transposable Element Expression in Crowns of Hexaploid Wheat (Triticum aestivum L. during Cold Acclimation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Debbie Laudencia-Chingcuanco

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The expression of 1,613 transposable elements (TEs represented in the Affymetrix Wheat Genome Chip was examined during cold treatment in crowns of four hexaploid wheat genotypes that vary in tolerance to cold and in flowering time. The TE expression profiles showed a constant level of expression throughout the experiment in three of the genotypes. In winter Norstar, the most cold-hardy of the four genotypes, a subset of the TEs showed a burst of expression after vernalization saturation was achieved. About 47% of the TEs were expressed, and both Class I (retrotransposons and Class II (DNA transposons types were well represented. Gypsy and Copia were the most represented among the retrotransposons while CACTA and Mariner were the most represented DNA transposons. The data suggests that the Vrn-A1 region plays a role in the stage-specific induction of TE expression in this genotype.

  17. Changes in retention force with electroplated copings on conical crowns: a comparison of gold and zirconia primary crowns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayer, Stefan; Kraus, Dominik; Keilig, Ludger; Gölz, Lina; Stark, Helmut; Enkling, Norbert

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the wear behavior of conical crowns with electroplated gold copings that are used to connect implants and teeth to a removable denture. Gold alloy and zirconium dioxide ceramic crowns were compared. Fifteen crowns each were milled for two groups: gold alloy and zirconium dioxide. Each specimen had a 2-degree taper. The electroplated coping was established by direct electroforming. The retentive forces and the correlating distance during insertion and separation were measured after 10,000 wear cycles were applied. The wear testing was separated into a start phase, an initial wear phase, and the long-term wear period. The retention force value and the force-distance integral of the first 0.3 mm of each cycle were calculated. The changes in retention force and integral did not differ significantly between both groups in the start and the initial wear phase. No differences were seen in force development during the long-term wear period. Only the force-distance integral showed a significant difference: the median values of the gold crowns increased slightly, and they decreased slightly for the zirconia crowns. The median force values never fell below 6 N for gold and 4 N for zirconia. Within the limitations of this study, the tested conical crowns showed clinically acceptable retentive properties. As with other retentive elements for dentures, the specimens tested showed the greatest amount of change in retentive forces during the first 2,000 cycles. The development of retention force in both groups was not significantly different. However, the zirconia specimens showed reduced variability, which is preferable in clinical practice.

  18. Short-Read Sequencing for Genomic Analysis of the Brown Rot Fungus Fibroporia radiculosa

    Science.gov (United States)

    J. D. Tang; A. D. Perkins; T. S. Sonstegard; S. G. Schroeder; S. C. Burgess; S. V. Diehl

    2012-01-01

    The feasibility of short-read sequencing for genomic analysis was demonstrated for Fibroporia radiculosa, a copper-tolerant fungus that causes brown rot decay of wood. The effect of read quality on genomic assembly was assessed by filtering Illumina GAIIx reads from a single run of a paired-end library (75-nucleotide read length and 300-bp fragment...

  19. Distribution of cranberry fruit-rotting fungi in new jersey and evidence for nonspecific host resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stiles, C M; Oudemans, P V

    1999-03-01

    ABSTRACT A survey was conducted over a 3-year period to determine the frequencies and distributions of fruit-rotting fungi in New Jersey cranberry beds. In the first 2 years of the study, Physalospora vaccinii and Glomerella cingulata were the most prevalent and widespread field-rotting fungi. In the third year, the frequency of G. cingulata declined markedly. Other species such as Coleophoma empetri, Phyllosticta vaccinii, and Phomopsis vaccinii were isolated at high frequencies from a limited number of locations. Storage-rotting fungi including Allantophomopsis cytisporea and A. lycopodina were isolated at low frequencies, but were widely distributed within the growing region. On sound fruit, a somewhat different profile emerged. Fungi such as Phyllosticta elongata, Alternaria spp., and Physalospora vaccinii were commonly isolated. In comparisons among different cranberry cultivars, no differences in the fungal profiles were seen. This was interpreted to indicate that if differences in fruit-rot resistance exist, they are likely to be general forms of resistance rather than fungal species-specific mechanisms.

  20. Modification of wheat straw lignin by solid state fermentation with white-rot fungi

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dinis, M.J.; Bezerra, R.M.F.; Nunes, F.; Dias, A.A.; Guedes, C.; Ferreira, L.M.M.; Cone, J.W.; Marques, G.S.M.; Barros, A.R.N.; Rodrigues, M.A.M.

    2009-01-01

    The potential of crude enzyme extracts, obtained from solid state cultivation of four white-rot fungi (Trametes versicolor, Bjerkandera adusta, Ganoderma applanatum and Phlebia rufa), was exploited to modify wheat straw cell wall. At different fermentation times, manganese-dependent peroxidase

  1. A single dominant Ganoderma species is responsible for root rot of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Ganoderma root rot is the most serious disease affecting commercially planted Acacia mangium in plantations in Indonesia. Numerous Ganoderma spp. have been recorded from diseased trees of this species and to a lesser extent Eucalyptus, causing confusion regarding the primary cause of the disease. In this study, a ...

  2. Differential stress-induced regulation of two quinone reductases in the brown rot Basidiomycete Gloeophyllum trabeum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roni Cohen; Melissa R. Suzuki; Kenneth E. Hammel

    2004-01-01

    Quinone reductases (QRDs) have two important functions in the basidiomycete Gloeophyllum trabeum, which causes brown rot of wood. First, a QRD is required to generate biodegradative hydroxyl radicals via redox cycling between two G. trabeum extracellular metabolites, 2,5-dimethoxyhydroquinone (2,5-DMHQ) and 2,5-dimethoxy-1,4-benzoquinone (2,5- DMBQ). Second, because 2,...

  3. Processive endoglucanase active in crystalline cellulose hydrolysis by the brown rot Basidiomycete Gloeophyllum trabeum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roni Cohen; Melissa R. Suzuki; Kenneth E. Hammel

    2005-01-01

    Brown rot basidiomycetes have long been thought to lack the processive cellulases that release soluble sugars from crystalline cellulose. On the other hand, these fungi remove all of the cellulose, both crystalline and amorphous, from wood when they degrade it. To resolve this discrepancy, we grew Gloeophyllum trabeum on microcrystalline cellulose (Avicel) and purified...

  4. Decolorization of textile dyes and their effluents using white rot fungi ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Reactive dyes are important chemical pollutants from textile industries .The two species of white rot fungi were evaluated for their ability to decolorize Blue CA, Black B133, Corazol Violet SR. Trametes hirsuta and Pleurotus florida displayed the greatest extent of decolorization. Laccase is the ligneolytic enzyme from these ...

  5. First report of Gliocephalotrichum bulbilium and G. simplex causing fruit rot of rambutan in Puerto Rico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Worldwide, significant post-harvest disease losses of rambutan (Nephelium lappaceum L.) have been reported and several pathogens have been associated with fruit rot. Even though rambutan was introduced to Puerto Rico in 1927, it was not until 1998 that commercial farms were established in the wester...

  6. Chemical compositions, infrared spectroscopy, and X-ray diffractometry study on brown-rotted woods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gai-Yun Li; Luo-Hua Huang; Chung Hse; Te-Fu Qin

    2011-01-01

    The effect of brown-rot decay on the chemical composition and crystallinity of Masson pine was studied by exposing it to Wolfiporia cocos (Schwein.) Ryvarden and Gilbn. for durations of up to 15 weeks in the field. The holocellulose content, α-cellulose content, and wood crystallinity decreased slowly in the initial stage, followed by a significant reduction...

  7. Cylindrocarpon root rot: multi-gene analysis reveals novel species within the Ilyonectria radicicola species complex

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cabral, A.; Groenewald, J.Z.; Rego, C.; Oliveira, H.; Crous, P.W.

    2012-01-01

    Ilyonectria radicicola and its Cylindrocarpon-like anamorph represent a species complex that is commonly associated with root rot disease symptoms on a range of hosts. During the course of this study, several species could be distinguished from I. radicicola sensu stricto based on morphological and

  8. The role of chemical transport in the brown-rot decay resistance of modified wood

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samuel Zelinka; R. Ringman; A. Pilgard; E. E. Thybring; Joseph Jakes; K. Richter

    2016-01-01

    Chemical modification of wood increases decay resistance but the exact mechanisms remain poorly understood. Recently, Ringman and coauthors examined established theories addressing why modified wood has increased decay resistance and concluded that the most probable cause of inhibition and/or delay of initiation of brown-rot decay is lowering the equilibrium moisture...

  9. Significant levels of extracellular reactive oxygen species produced by brown rot basidiomycetes on cellulose

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roni Cohen; Kenneth A. Jensen; Carl J. Houtman; Kenneth E. Hammel

    2002-01-01

    It is often proposed that brown rot basidiomycetes use extracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) to accomplish the initial depolymerization of cellulose in wood, but little evidence has been presented to show that the fungi produce these oxidants in physiologically relevant quantities. We used [14C]phenethyl polyacrylate as a radical trap to estimate extracellular...

  10. Dry Rot of Raphia hookeri and its Effect on Proximate Composition ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Prof. Ogunji

    for planting. Proximate analyses of the healthy and infected mesocarps of the fruit was carried out using the methods described by the Association of Official Analytical ... composition of R. hookeri fruits, there is therefore the need to study the effect of the dry rot disease ..... Trace heavy metal contents of some spices and.

  11. Organics and mineral fertilizers and biological control on the incidence of stalk rot and corn yield

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena Blume

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The expansion of area under maize (Zea mays L. and the use of no tillage have favored the incidence of stalk rot on this crop. The study aimed to evaluate the organic fertilizers and the treatment of corn seeds with Trichoderma spp. on the production of dry matter (DM of shoot, incidence of stalk rot and corn yield. The experiment consisted in a factorial with split-plot in strips, on the randomized block design with four replicates, and the fertilization treatments (pig slurry; swine deep bedding; cattle slurry; mineral fertilizer; control treatment were applied to the plots and the seeds treatment (with and without Trichoderma spp. in the subplots. At the flowering stage, three corn plants per subplot were collected for the assessment of DM production. At physiological maturity stage, the incidence of stalk rot was assessed, and the ears of corn harvested for productivity assessment. The organic and mineral fertilizers increased the production of DM and productivity of corn. Trichoderma spp. increased the production of DM of corn, but had no reflection on productivity. The incidence of stalk rot in corn was higher in treatments with organic and mineral fertilization. Organic fertilizers increase dry matter production of shoot and corn yield, and Trichoderma spp. provides an increase in dry matter production of shoot.

  12. Distribution of Rhizoctonia Bare Patch and Root Rot in Eastern Washington and Relation to Climatic Variables

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhizoctonia is a fungus that attacks the roots of wheat and barley, causing a root rot and bare patch in the dryland wheat cropping area of the inland Pacific Northwest. Over the last 7 years, we have been investigating the distribution of this pathogen, using molecular methods based on extracting a...

  13. Mechanism of antibacterial activity of the white-rot fungus Hypholoma fasciculare colonizing wood

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Boer, W.; Folman, L.B.; Klein Gunnewiek, P.J.A.; Svensson, T.; Bastviken, D.; Oberg, G.; Del Rio, J.C.; Boddy, L.

    2010-01-01

    In a previous study it was shown that the number of wood-inhabiting bacteria was drastically reduced after colonization of beech (Fagus sylvatica) wood blocks by the white-rot fungus Hypholoma fasciculare, or sulfur tuft (Folman et al. 2008). Here we report on the mechanisms of this fungal-induced

  14. Serpula lacrymans, the dry rot fungus and tolerance towards copper-based wood preservatives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anne Christine Steenkjaer Hastrup; Frederick Green; Carol Clausen; Bo Jensen

    2005-01-01

    Serpula lacrymans (Wulfen : Fries) Schröter, the dry rot fungus, is considered the most economically important wood decay fungus in temperate regions of the world i.e. northern Europe, Japan and Australia. Previously copper based wood preservatives were the most commonly used preservatives for pressure treatment of wood for building constructions. Because of a...

  15. Root rot peas in the Netherlands : fungal pathogens, inoculum potential and soil receptivity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oyarzun, P.J.

    1994-01-01

    Fungi associated to pea (Pisum sativum L.) root rot were studied. Fusarium and Oomycetes were most common. Fusarium solani f. sp. pisi, Fsp, was widely distributed and the most frequent

  16. Post Harvest Control of Tomato Fruit Rot Caused by Fusarium solani ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Fusarium Solani is an important rot-causing organism of tomato fruit in storage. Alcohol and water extracts of bark, rootand leaves of the neem plant (Azadirachta indica) were tested against the pathogen both in vitro and in vivo. The alcoholextract of different parts, especially the bark of the plant, gave the highest growth ...

  17. First report of anthracnose fruit rot of blueberry caused by Colletotrichum fioriniae in New Jersey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anthracnose fruit rot is the most important disease of blueberry in New Jersey. Most fungicide applications in New Jersey and other blueberry growing regions is for the control of this disease. The causal agent of this disease has been reported to be Colletotrichum acutatum and other species in the ...

  18. HORMONAL ACTIVITIES OF NOVEL BROMINATED FLAME RETARDANTS AND THEIR BIODEGRADATION BY WHITE ROT FUNGI

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Ezechiáš, Martin; Svobodová, Kateřina; Cajthaml, Tomáš

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 11, č. 3 (2012), s. 233-233 ISSN 1843-3707. [Environmental Microbiology and Biotechnology. 10.04.2012-12.04.2012, Bologna] R&D Projects: GA TA ČR TA01020804 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50200510 Keywords : white rot fungi Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology

  19. Interaction between N-fertilizer and water availability on borer-rot complex in sugarcane

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luiz Eduardo da Rocha Pannuti

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to evaluate the effects of nitrogen availability in fertigation and rainfed management, as well as their interactions with the incidence of and damage caused by D. saccharalis and red rot in sugarcane. The experiment consisted of four treatments (0 and 150 kg ha–1 of N-fertilizer with irrigation; 0 and 150 kg ha–1 of N-fertilizer in rainfed management in a randomized complete block design with four replications. The evaluated parameters were the number of holes and internodes with red rot per meter of cultivation, stalk yield and sugar content. In the laboratory (T = 25 ± 2 °C; R.H. = 70 ± 10%: 12:12-L:D, we evaluated the attractiveness and consumption of fragments of stalks from the different treatments for fourth instar larvae through choice and no-choice tests in a randomized complete block design with ten replications. Nitrogen fertilization via irrigation has favorable effects on borer-rot complex and leads to higher gains in stalk and sugar yields when compared to rainfed management. The increments of stalk and sugar yields due to nitrogen fertilization compensates for the increase in borer-rot complex infestation. In laboratory tests, D. saccharalis larvae were similarly attracted to all treatments regardless of the doses of N-fertilizer or the water regimes evaluated. However, fragments of sugarcane stalks produced with nitrogen fertilization were consumed more by D. saccharalis in both water regimes.

  20. Draft genome sequence of a monokaryotic model brown-rot fungus Postia (Rhodonia) placenta SB12

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jill Gaskell; Phil Kersten; Luis F. Larrondo; Paulo Canessa; Diego Martinez; David Hibbett; Monika Schmoll; Christian P. Kubicek; Angel T. Martinez; Jagjit Yadav; Emma Master; Jon Karl Magnuson; Debbie Yaver; Randy Berka; Kathleen Lail; Cindy Chen; Kurt LaButti; Matt Nolan; Anna Lipzen; Andrea Aerts; Robert Riley; Kerrie Barry; Bernard Henrissat; Robert Blanchette; Igor V. Grigoriev; Dan Cullen

    2017-01-01

    We report the genome of Postia (Rhodonia) placenta MAD-SB12, a homokaryotic wood decay fungus (Basidiomycota, Polyporales). Intensively studied as a representative brown rot decayer, the gene complement is consistent with the rapid depolymerization of cellulose but not lignin.

  1. Biological pretreatment of corn stover with white-rot fungus for improved enzymatic hydrolysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biological pretreatment of lignocellulosic biomass by white-rot fungus can represent a low-cost and eco-friendly alternative to harsh physical, chemical or physico-chemical pretreatment methods to facilitate enzymatic hydrolysis. However, fungal pretreatment can cause carbohydrate loss and it is, th...

  2. Control of yam tuber rot with leaf extracts of Xylopia aethiopica and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    JOHN

    orthiophenylphenate, borax, captan, thiobendazole, benomyl, bleach (sodium hypochlorite) have been found to significantly reduce storage rot in yam (Booth, 1974;. Noon, 1978,). Other control methods involve the use of microorganism such as Trichoderma viride and Bacillus subtilis (Okigbo and Ikediugwu, 2000; Okigbo, ...

  3. Biodiversity of Fusarium species causing ear rot of maize in Germany

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Görtz, A.; Oerke, E.C.; Steiner, U.; Waalwijk, C.; Vries, de P.M.; Dehne, H.W.

    2008-01-01

    In Germany, maize is one of the most important agriculture commodities, a major component in animal feed as well as an essential substrate producing biogas. Maize car rot poses a major impact worldwide as it is caused by several Fusarium spp., most of which have the ability to produce mycotoxins.

  4. Localizing gene regulation reveals a staggered wood decay mechanism for the brown rot fungus Postia placenta

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiwei Zhang; Gerald N. Presley; Kenneth E. Hammel; Jae-San Ryu; Jon R. Menke; Melania Figueroa; Dehong Hu; Galya Orr; Jonathan S. Schilling

    2016-01-01

    Wood-degrading brown rot fungi are essential recyclers of plant biomass in forest ecosystems. Their efficient cellulolytic systems, which have potential biotechnological applications, apparently depend on a combination of two mechanisms: lignocellulose oxidation (LOX) by reactive oxygen species (ROS) and polysaccharide hydrolysis by a limited set of glycoside...

  5. Lignin degrading system of white-rot fungi and its exploitation for dye decolorization

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Shah, V.; Nerud, František

    2002-01-01

    Roč. 48, - (2002), s. 857-870 ISSN 0008-4166 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA526/01/0915 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5020903 Keywords : lignin degradation * white-rot fungi * laccase Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology Impact factor: 1.080, year: 2002

  6. Irpex lacteus, a white-rot fungus with biotechnological potential — review

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Novotný, Čeněk; Cajthaml, Tomáš; Svobodová, Kateřina; Šušla, Martin; Šašek, Václav

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 5, č. 5 (2009), s. 375-390 ISSN 0015-5632 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAAX00200901 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50200510 Keywords : White-rot fungi * degradation * irpex lacteus Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology Impact factor: 0.978, year: 2009

  7. Effect of Charcoal Rot on Selected Putative Drought Resistant Soybean Genotypes and Yield.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charcoal rot (CR), caused by the fungus Macrophomina phaseolina (Tassi) Goid. is a pervasive disease of economic significance on soybeans ([(Glycine max (L.) Merr.) that is exacerbated when plants are under stress, especially under heat and drought condition. Thus, the objective of this research was...

  8. Potato brown rot incidence and severity under different management and amendment regimes in different soil types

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Messiha, N.A.S.; Bruggen, van A.H.C.; Diepeningen, van A.D.; Vos, de O.J.; Termorshuizen, A.J.; Tjou-Tam-Sin, N.N.A.; Janse, J.D.

    2007-01-01

    Ralstonia solanacearum race 3 biovar 2, the causative agent of potato brown rot (bacterial wilt), is an economically important disease in tropical, subtropical and temperate regions of the world. In view of previous reports on suppression of the disease by organic amendments, and the expansion of

  9. Armillaria root rot in the Canadian prairie provinces. Information report No. -X-329

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mallet, K.I.

    1992-01-01

    Armillaria root rot is one of the most important diseases of forest trees in the prairie provinces of Canada. Information on symptoms, detection, and damage caused by the disease is given. The Armillaria species in the prairie provinces, their geographic distribution and host range is discussed. Means of spread and control of the disease are described.

  10. Armillaria root rot of tea in Kenya : characterization of the pathogen and approaches to disease management

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Otieno, W.

    2002-01-01

    The rare occurrence of basidiomata and rhizomorphs constrains diagnosis of Armillaria root rot and identification of Armillaria species in Africa. This has had a negative impact on taxonomic research on the genus Armillaria in the continent, where the

  11. FOOT ROT DISEASE IDENTIFICATION FOR VELLAIKODI VARIETY OF BETELVINE PLANTS USING DIGITAL IMAGE PROCESSING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Vijayakumar

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Betelvine plants are infected variety of diseases in the complete plantation without any premature warning of the diseases. The aim of this paper is to detection of foot rot disease in the vellaikodi variety of betelvine plants using digital image processing techniques. The digital images of the uninfected or normal betelvine leaves and the digital images of the infected in foot rot diseased betelvine leaves at different stages are collected from different Betelvine plants using a high resolution digital camera and collected betelvine images are stored with JPEG format. The digital images of the betelvine leaves analyses are done using the image processing toolbox in MATLAB which gives the normal patterns of the digital images. Using RGB encoding process, the RGB components of the betelvine leaves are separated. The mean and median values for all sample leaves are computed and calculated values are stored in the system. The mean and median values of test leaves are computed and compared with the stored values. As the result of this comparison, it is identified whether test leaves are affected by foot rot disease or not. Finally this analysis helps to recognize the foot rot disease can be identified before it spreads to entire crop.

  12. Improving ruminal degradability of oil palm fronds using white rot fungi

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rahman, M.M.; Lourenco, M.; Hassim, H.A.; Baars, J.J.P.; Sonnenberg, A.S.M.; Cone, J.W.; Boever, de J.L.; Fievez, V.

    2011-01-01

    The use of oil palm fronds (OPF) in livestock production is limited as up to 0.20 of their dry biomass is lignin. White rot fungi (WRF) are very effective basidiomycetes for biological pre-treatment as they degrade lignin extensively. Ten WRF were screened for their potential to increase OPF

  13. Bioremoval of humic acid from water by white rot fungi: exploring the removal mechanisms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zahmatkesh, M.; Spanjers, H.L.F.M.; Toran, M. J.; Blánquez, P.; van Lier, J.B.

    2016-01-01

    © 2016, The Author(s).Twelve white rot fungi (WRF) strains were screened on agar plates for their ability to bleach humic acid (HA). Four fungal strains were selected and tested in liquid media for removal of HA. Bioremediation was investigated by HA color removal and changes in the concentration

  14. Phytophthora megakarya, a causal agent of black pod rot in Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    In most parts of the world where Theobroma cacao is grown, Phytophthora palmivora is the major concern for causing black pod rot (BPR). Phytophthora megakarya, on the other hand, occurs only in Africa, but represents a major threat to cacao production, the countries of West Africa being the largest ...

  15. Host resistance to Botrytis bunch rot in Vitis spp. and its correlation with Botrytis leaf spot

    Science.gov (United States)

    Botrytis cinerea, the causal agent of Botrytis bunch rot, is the number one postharvest disease of fresh grapes in the U.S. Fungicide applications are used to manage the disease, but resistant isolates are common and postharvest losses occur annually. Host resistance is needed for long-term manageme...

  16. Genome Sequence of the Banana Pathogen Dickeya zeae Strain MS1, Which Causes Bacterial Soft Rot.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jing-Xin; Lin, Bi-Run; Shen, Hui-Fang; Pu, Xiao-Ming

    2013-06-13

    We report a draft genome sequence of Dickeya zeae strain MS1, which is the causative agent of banana soft rot in China, and we show several of its specific properties compared with those of other D. zeae strains. Genome sequencing provides a tool for understanding the genomic determination of the pathogenicity and phylogeny placement of this pathogen.

  17. Genome Sequence of the Banana Pathogen Dickeya zeae Strain MS1, Which Causes Bacterial Soft Rot

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Jing-Xin; Lin, Bi-Run; Shen, Hui-Fang; Pu, Xiao-Ming

    2013-01-01

    We report a draft genome sequence of Dickeya zeae strain MS1, which is the causative agent of banana soft rot in China, and we show several of its specific properties compared with those of other D.?zeae strains. Genome sequencing provides a tool for understanding the genomic determination of the pathogenicity and phylogeny placement of this pathogen.

  18. Creating prescription maps from satellite imagery for site-specific management of cotton root rot

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cotton root rot is a century-old cotton disease that can now be controlled with Topguard Terra Fungicide. However, as this disease tends to occur in the same general areas within fields year after year, site-specific treatment can be more effective and economical. The objective of this study was to ...

  19. Plectosphaerella species associated with root and collar rots of horticultural crops in southern Italy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Carlucci, A.; Raimondo, M.L.; Santos, J.; Phillips, A.J.L.

    2012-01-01

    Plectosphaerella cucumerina, most frequently encountered in its Plectosporium state, is well known as a pathogen of several plant species causing fruit, root and collar rot, and collapse. It is considered to pose a serious threat to melon (Cucumis melo) production in Italy. In the present study, an

  20. Evaluation of rhizobacterial indicators of tobacco black root rot suppressiveness in farmers' fields

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kyselková, Martina; Almario, J.; Kopecký, J.; Ságová-Marečková, M.; Haurat, J.; Muller, D.; Grundmann, G.L.; Moënne-Loccoz, Y.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 6, č. 4 (2014), s. 346-353 ISSN 1758-2229 Institutional support: RVO:60077344 Keywords : rhizobacterial indicators * tobacco black root rot suppressiveness * farmers' fields Subject RIV: EH - Ecology, Behaviour Impact factor: 3.293, year: 2014

  1. Phylogenetic, morphological and pathogenic characterization of Alternaria species associated with fruit rots of blueberry in California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fruit rot caused by Alternaria spp. is one of the most important factors affecting the postharvest quality and shelf life of blueberry fruits. Alternaria spp. isolates were collected from decayed fruits of blueberry in the Central Valley of California during 2012 and 2013. The aims of this study wer...

  2. Evaluation of watermelon varieties for tolerance to powdery mildew and Phytophthora fruit rot, 2014

    Science.gov (United States)

    This experiment was conducted at the U.S. Vegetable Laboratory farm in Charleston, SC. The soil was Yonges loamy fine sand. This study was undertaken to determine the performance of seeded and seedless commercial watermelon varieties for tolerance to powdery mildew (PM) and Phytophthora fruit rot as...

  3. Mechanisms of qualitative and quantitative resistance to Aphanomyces root rot in alfalfa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aphanomyces root rot (ARR), caused by Aphanomyces euteiches, is one of the most important diseases of alfalfa (Medicago sativa) in the United States. Two races of the pathogen are currently recognized. Most modern alfalfa cultivars have high levels of resistance to race 1 but few cultivars have resi...

  4. First report of truncatella angustata causing postharvest rot on ‘topaz’ apples in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wenneker, M.; Pham, K.T.K.; Boekhoudt, L.C.; Boer, de F.A.; Leeuwen, van P.J.; Hollinger, T.C.; Thomma, B.P.H.J.

    2017-01-01

    In the Netherlands, about 30% of the organic apple (Malus domestica Borkh.) production consists of apple scab resistant cultivars, such as Topaz and Santana. However, organic ‘Topaz’ apples show a high incidence of fungal rot after storage. Hot-water treatment (HWT) of freshly harvested apple

  5. Genome-wide association analysis of ear rot resistance caused by Fusarium verticillioides in maize.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Jong, Guilherme; Pamplona, Andrezza Kellen Alves; Von Pinho, Renzo Garcia; Balestre, Marcio

    2017-12-06

    The identification of causal regions associated with resistance to Fusarium verticillioides can be useful to understand resistance mechanisms and further be used in breeding programs. In this study, a genome-wide association study (GWAS) was conducted to identify candidate markers associated with resistance to the ear rot caused by the fungus F. verticillioides. A total of 242 maize inbred lines were genotyped with 23,153 DArT-seq markers. A total of 12 DArTs were associated with ear rot resistance. Some DArTs were localized close to genes with functions directly related to ear rot resistance, such as a gene responsible for the innate immune response that belongs to the class of NBS-LRR receptors. Some markers were also found to be closely associated with genes that synthesize transcription factors (nactf11 and nactf61), genes responsible for the oxidation-reduction process and peroxidase activity. These results are encouraging since some candidate markers can present functional relationship with ear rot resistance in maize. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Biodegradation of pentachlorophenol by the white rot fungus Phanerochaete chrysosporium (1988)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Extensive biodegradation of pentachlorophenol (PCP) by the white rot fungus Phanerochaete chrysosporium was demonstrated by the disappearance and mineralization of [14C]PCP in nutrient nitrogen-limited culture. Mass balance analyses demonstrated the formation of water-soluble met...

  7. Draft genome sequence of the white-rot fungus Obba rivulosa 3A-2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otto Miettinen; Robert Riley; Kerrie Barry; Daniel Cullen; Ronald P. de Vries; Matthieu Hainaut; Annele Hatakka; Bernard Henrissat; Kristiina Hilden; Rita Kuo; Kurt LaButti; Anna Lipzen; Miia R. Makela; Laura Sandor; Joseph W. Spatafora; Igor V. Grigoriev; David S. Hibbett

    2016-01-01

    We report here the first genome sequence of the white-rot fungus Obba rivulsa (Polyporales, Basidiomycota), a polypore known for its lignin-decomposing ability. The genome is based on the homokaryon 3A-2 originating in Finland. The genome is typical in size and carbohydrate active enzyme (CAZy) content for wood-decomposing basidiomycetes.

  8. Identification of markers associated with race-specific resistance to Aphanomyces root rot in alfalfa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aphanomyces root rot, caused by Aphanomyces euteiches, is one of the most important diseases of alfalfa in the United States. Two races of the pathogen are recognized and although most cultivars are resistant to race 1, fewer have resistance to race 2, the predominant race in North America. Molecula...

  9. A Highly Diastereoselective Oxidant Contributes to Ligninolysis by the White Rot Basidiomycete Ceriporiopsis subvermispora

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniel J. Yelle; Alexander N. Kapich; Carl J. Houtman; Fachuang Lu; Vitaliy I. Timokhin; Raymond C. Fort Jr.; John Ralph; Kenneth E. Hammel

    2014-01-01

    The white rot basidiomycete Ceriporiopsis subvermispora delignifies wood selectively and has potential biotechnological applications. Its ability to remove lignin before the substrate porosity has increased enough to admit enzymes suggests that small diffusible oxidants contribute to delignification. A key question is whether these unidentified...

  10. Biobleaching of oxygen delignified kraft pulp by several white rot fungal strains.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Moreira, M.T.; Feijoo, G.; Sierra-Alvarez, R.; Lema, J.; Field, J.A.

    1997-01-01

    Twenty-five white rot fungal strains were tested for their ability to bleach Eucalyptus globulus oxygen delignified kraft pulp (OKP). Under nitrogen-limited culture conditions, eight outstanding biobleaching strains were identified that increased the brightness of OKP by more than 10 ISO units

  11. Control of potato soft rot caused by Pectobacterium carotovorum and Pectobacterium atrosepticum by Moroccan actinobacteria isolates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baz, M; Lahbabi, D; Samri, S; Val, F; Hamelin, G; Madore, I; Bouarab, K; Beaulieu, C; Ennaji, M M; Barakate, Mustapha

    2012-01-01

    Pectobacterium carotovorum and Pectobacterium atrosepticum are dreadful causal agents of potato soft rot. Actually, there are no efficient bactericides used to protect potato against Pectobacterium spp. Biological control using actinobacteria could be an interesting approach to manage this disease. Thus, two hundred actinobacteria isolated from Moroccan habitats were tested for their ability to inhibit in vitro 4 environmental Pectobacterium strains and the two reference strains (P. carotovorum CFBP 5890 and P. atrosepticum CFBP 5889). Eight percent of these isolates were active against at least one of the tested pathogens and only 2% exhibited an antimicrobial activity against all tested Pectobacterium strains. Four bioactive isolates having the greatest pathogen inhibitory capabilities and classified as belonging to the genus Streptomyces species through 16S rDNA analysis were subsequently tested for their ability to reduce in vivo soft rot symptoms on potato slices of Bintje, Yukon Gold, Russet and Norland cultivars caused by the two pathogens P. carotovorum and P. atrosepticum. This test was carried out by using biomass inoculums and culture filtrate of the isolates as treatment. Among these, strain Streptomyces sp. OE7, reduced by 65-94% symptom severity caused by the two pathogens on potato slices. Streptomyces OE7 showed a potential for controlling soft rot on potato slices and could be useful in an integrated control program against potato soft rot pathogens in the objective to reduce treatments with chemical compounds.

  12. Pectobacterium carotovorum. subsp. brasiliense is a causal agent of bacterial leaf rot of tobacco in China

    Science.gov (United States)

    A new leaf rot disease of tobacco was found in fields of the Shaowu region, Fujian Province of China in 2015. A typical symptom was necrosis along the main or lateral veins of tobacco leaves, eventually causing wilting and death of the leaves, while the necrosis spread no further than the epidermis ...

  13. Draft Genome Sequence of a Virulent Pectobacterium carotovorum subsp. brasiliense Isolate Causing Soft Rot of Cucumber.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onkendi, Edward M; Ramesh, Aadi Moolam; Kwenda, Stanford; Naidoo, Sanushka; Moleleki, Lucy

    2016-01-07

    Pectobacterium carotovorum subsp. brasiliense causes soft rot and blackleg diseases on potatoes, ornamentals, and other crops of economic importance. Here, we report a draft genome sequence of a highly virulent P. carotovorum subsp. brasiliense strain, PcbHPI01, isolated from a cucumber in South Africa. Copyright © 2016 Onkendi et al.

  14. Root Rot Disease of Five Fruit Tree Seedlings in the Nursery ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The incidence of root rot disease in the nursery of Chrysophyllum albidun Dacryodes edulis, persea Americana, Irvingia gabonensis and Annona muricala was assessed. Ten fungal pathogen were isolated using serial dilution and pathogenicity tests were carried out on the 5 fruit trees with the 10 isolated fungi. The 5 fruit ...

  15. Stenotrophomonas maltophilia: a new potential biocontrol agent of Ralstonia solanacearum, causal agent of potato brown rot

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Messiha, N.A.S.; Diepeningen, van A.D.; Farag, N.S.; Abdallah, S.A.; Janse, J.D.; Bruggen, van A.H.C.

    2007-01-01

    Stenotrophomonas maltophilia was isolated from the rhizosphere of eggplant in the Nile Delta of Egypt, and its antagonistic potential against Ralstonia solanacearum race 3 biovar 2, the causal agent of potato brown rot, was in vitro evaluated on KB agar medium and in vivo on potato plants. In vitro,

  16. Comparing methods for inducing root rot of Rhododendron with Phytophthora cinnamomi and P. plurivora

    Science.gov (United States)

    Root rot, caused by Phytophthora cinnamomi and P. plurivora in containerized Rhododendron, can cause significant losses in the nursery industry. Studies commonly use a 48 h flooding event to stimulate root infection. While flooding rarely occurs in container nurseries, plants may sit in a shallow pu...

  17. Site-specific management of cotton root rot using historical remote sensing imagery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cotton root rot can now be effectively controlled with Topguard Terra Fungicide, but site-specific application of the fungicide can greatly reduce treatment cost as only portions of the field are infested with the disease. The overall goal of this three-year project was to demonstrate how to use his...

  18. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon degradation by the white rot fungus Bjerkandera sp. strain BOS55

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kotterman, M.

    1998-01-01

    Outline of this thesis
    In this thesis the conditions for optimal PAH oxidation by the white rot fungus Bjerkandera sp. strain BOS55 were evaluated. In Chapter 2, culture conditions like aeration and cosubstrate concentrations,

  19. First report of frosty pod rot caused by Moniliophthora roreri on cacao in Bolivia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frosty pod rot (FPR) is a devastating cacao disease caused by the basidiomycete Moniliophthora roreri (Aime and Phillips-Mora, 2005). The disease is confined to 13 countries in Central and South America and constitutes a permanent threat for cacao cultivation worldwide. In July 2012, FPR was detect...

  20. Evaluation of Gliocladium species for control of Botrytis corm rot of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Botrytis corm rot (Botrytis gladiolorum) is one of the most important and destructive diseases of gladiolus and poses a major constraint in production of flowers and corms all over the world. An In vivo experiment was conducted to determine the efficacy, antagonistic potential and disease reduction capacity of four ...