WorldWideScience

Sample records for winning high school

  1. Leaders in high temperature superconductivity commercialization win superconductor industry award

    CERN Multimedia

    2007-01-01

    CERN's Large Hadron Collider curretn leads project head Amalia Ballarino named superconductor industry person of the year 2006. Former high temperature superconductivity program manager at the US Department of energy James Daley wins lifetime achievement award. (1,5 page)

  2. History and Evidence Show School Sports Help Students Win

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowen, Daniel H.; Hitt, Collin

    2016-01-01

    Student participation in school sports has surged over the past half century. The greatest contributor to this increase has been Title IX, which required schools to expand opportunities for girls. Despite the perceived benefits and high levels of support from students and parents, interscholastic athletics constantly come under attack. The fervor…

  3. The Perceptions of Administrators from Quality Award-Winning School Districts and a Comparison of Student Academic Achievement in Quality Award-Winning Districts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jauch, Kevin

    2010-01-01

    This research project served two main purposes. The first was to uncover the perceptions of district administrators from Quality award-winning school districts in regard to the use of the Malcolm Baldrige National Quality Award program as a management framework. This was accomplished by using the Interstate School Leaders Licensure Consortium's…

  4. Mitigation win-win

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moran, Dominic; Lucas, Amanda; Barnes, Andrew

    2013-07-01

    Win-win messages regarding climate change mitigation policies in agriculture tend to oversimplify farmer motivation. Contributions from psychology, cultural evolution and behavioural economics should help to design more effective policy.

  5. Go Slow Whoa Meal Patterns: Cafeteria Staff and Teacher Perceptions of Effectiveness in "Winning with Wellness" Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slawson, Deborah L.; Southerland, Jodi; Lowe, Elizabeth F.; Dalton, William T.; Pfortmiller, Deborah T.; Schetzina, Karen

    2013-01-01

    Background: School-based interventions hold promise for child obesity prevention. Implemented as a part of the "Winning with Wellness" obesity prevention project, the "Go Slow Whoa" meal pattern (GSW) was designed to promote healthier foods in school cafeterias. This investigation determined perceived program effectiveness and…

  6. Teaching Conflict Resolution Skills to Middle and High School Students through Interactive Drama and Role Play

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graves, Kelly N.; Frabutt, James M.; Vigliano, Debra

    2007-01-01

    In response to the rising levels of school conflict, the present study investigated a new approach to conflict resolution for middle and high school students using interactive drama and role play called the Win-Win Resolutions program. The standardized curriculum delivered within the school setting includes strategies for self-control and anger…

  7. Review of "Everyone Wins: How Charter Schools Benefit All New York City Public School Students"

    Science.gov (United States)

    McEwan, Patrick J.

    2009-01-01

    The report examines whether increasing competition from charter schools has a causal effect on the achievement of public school students in New York City, using a three-year longitudinal database of student test scores. As a measure of competition, it considers the percentage of students who left a public school for a charter school in the prior…

  8. A coordinated school health approach to obesity prevention among Appalachian youth: the Winning with Wellness Pilot Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schetzina, Karen E; Dalton, William T; Lowe, Elizabeth F; Azzazy, Nora; VonWerssowetz, Katrina M; Givens, Connie; Pfortmiller, Deborah T; Stern, H Patrick

    2009-01-01

    Childhood obesity has been an increasing problem in the United States, especially in rural areas. Effective prevention approaches are needed. This article describes the development, implementation, effectiveness, feasibility, and sustainability of a school-based obesity prevention pilot project, Winning with Wellness. The program was based on the coordinated school health model and included a community-based participatory research approach aimed at promoting healthy eating and physical activity in a rural Appalachian elementary school. Findings from this preliminary project revealed improvements in nutrition offerings and increased physical activity during the school day. In addition, the program was found to be acceptable to teachers, successfully implemented utilizing both existing and newly developed resources, and sustainable as evidenced in continued practice and expansion to other area schools.

  9. Go Slow Whoa meal patterns: cafeteria staff and teacher perceptions of effectiveness in winning with wellness schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slawson, Deborah L; Southerland, Jodi; Lowe, Elizabeth F; Dalton, William T; Pfortmiller, Deborah T; Schetzina, Karen

    2013-07-01

    School-based interventions hold promise for child obesity prevention. Implemented as a part of the Winning With Wellness obesity prevention project, the "Go Slow Whoa" meal pattern (GSW) was designed to promote healthier foods in school cafeterias. This investigation determined perceived program effectiveness and impact on student's food purchases. A mixed method design was used, including focus groups with cafeteria staff (CS), quantitative analysis of CS and teacher surveys, and pre-post analysis of cafeteria sales. A total of 37 CS and 131 teachers from 7 schools in northeast Tennessee participated. CS recognized the important role of school nutrition services in influencing student choices, yet perceived lack of administrative support for cafeteria-based interventions and minimal interaction with teachers were barriers. CS also believed that students choose less nutritious options due to family influence. Cafeteria sales indicated that changes were made in menu planning and production, yet students' choices improved minimally. Teachers expressed moderate levels of confidence in GSW as influential in children's dietary habits. Successful implementation of school-based nutrition programs requires supportive policies, administrators, and teachers. CS should be included in program implementation efforts and the role of school nutrition services should be maximized. © 2013, American School Health Association.

  10. Should School Boards Discontinue Support for High School Football?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Margolis, Lewis H; Canty, Greg; Halstead, Mark; Lantos, John D

    2017-01-01

    A pediatrician is asked by her local school board to help them decide whether to discontinue their high school football program. She reviews the available evidence on the risks of football and finds it hopelessly contradictory. Some scholars claim that football is clearly more dangerous than other sports. Others suggest that the risks of football are comparable to other sports, such as lacrosse, ice hockey, or soccer. She finds very little data on the long-term sequelae of concussions. She sees claims that good coaching and a school culture that prioritizes the health of athletes over winning can reduce morbidity from sports injuries. In this paper, 3 experts also review the evidence about sports risks and discuss what is known and not known about the science and the ethics of high school football. Copyright © 2017 by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

  11. Project WIN Evaluation Shows Decreased Violence and Improved Conflict Resolution Skills for Middle School Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Laura; Yeomans, Peter; Ferro-Almeida, Susan

    2007-01-01

    We believe the problems of school violence are linked to competition and bullying in school culture. We also believe that by fostering more cooperation and more compassion in school culture, we can reduce school violence. One of the ways to develop school culture is to implement conflict resolution training. In the current study, we introduced…

  12. Changing Schools from the inside out: Small Wins in Hard Times. Third Edition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larson, Robert

    2011-01-01

    At any time, public schools labor under great economic, political, and social pressures that make it difficult to create large-scale, "whole school" change. But current top-down mandates require that schools close achievement gaps while teaching more problem solving, inquiry, and research skills--with fewer resources. Failure to meet test-based…

  13. Which skills and factors better predict winning and losing in high-level men's volleyball?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peña, Javier; Rodríguez-Guerra, Jorge; Buscà, Bernat; Serra, Núria

    2013-09-01

    The aim of this study was to determine which skills and factors better predicted the outcomes of regular season volleyball matches in the Spanish "Superliga" and were significant for obtaining positive results in the game. The study sample consisted of 125 matches played during the 2010-11 Spanish men's first division volleyball championship. Matches were played by 12 teams composed of 148 players from 17 different nations from October 2010 to March 2011. The variables analyzed were the result of the game, team category, home/away court factors, points obtained in the break point phase, number of service errors, number of service aces, number of reception errors, percentage of positive receptions, percentage of perfect receptions, reception efficiency, number of attack errors, number of blocked attacks, attack points, percentage of attack points, attack efficiency, and number of blocks performed by both teams participating in the match. The results showed that the variables of team category, points obtained in the break point phase, number of reception errors, and number of blocked attacks by the opponent were significant predictors of winning or losing the matches. Odds ratios indicated that the odds of winning a volleyball match were 6.7 times greater for the teams belonging to higher rankings and that every additional point in Complex II increased the odds of winning a match by 1.5 times. Every reception and blocked ball error decreased the possibility of winning by 0.6 and 0.7 times, respectively.

  14. An Investigation of High School Seniors' Assertiveness Levels Based on Their Demographic Characteristics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Çam, Ibrahim

    2015-01-01

    High school students who are in the development age or in the last class and have chance to win the university exams or disposal stage of the business life must also have a high level of assertiveness. In this context, the purpose of this research is to compare the assertiveness levels of high school seniors. The study group consists of 312 high…

  15. Early College High Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dessoff, Alan

    2011-01-01

    For at-risk students who stand little chance of going to college, or even finishing high school, a growing number of districts have found a solution: Give them an early start in college while they still are in high school. The early college high school (ECHS) movement that began with funding from the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation 10 years ago…

  16. Teachers, School Boards, and the Power of Money: How the Right Wins at the Local Level

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schirmer, Eleni B.; Apple, Michael W.

    2016-01-01

    This article examines national conservative political advocacy groups' growing interest in local politics, and analyzes how they form alliances and gain political power. Following efforts to restrict collective bargaining for Wisconsin public employees, Kenosha school board members' attempts to legally protect teachers' rights provoked concern…

  17. The Relationship between Teachers' and Principals' Decision-Making Power: Is It a Win-Win Situation or a Zero-Sum Game?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Jianping; Xia, Jiangang

    2012-01-01

    Is the power relationship between public school teachers and principals a win-win situation or a zero-sum game? By applying hierarchical linear modeling to the 1999-2000 nationally representative Schools and Staffing Survey data, we found that both the win-win and zero-sum-game theories had empirical evidence. The decision-making areas…

  18. High School Principals and the High School Journalism Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, Jane W.

    A study asked selected high school principals to respond to statements about the value of high school journalism to the high school student and about the rights and responsibilities of the high school journalist. These responses were then checked against such information as whether or not the high school principal had worked on a high school…

  19. Investing in High School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Daniel G.

    2012-01-01

    Strapped for cash, a Massachusetts high school creates its own venture capital fund to incentivize teachers to create programs that improve student learning. The result has been higher test scores and higher job satisfaction. One important program is credited with helping close the achievement gap at the school, while others have helped ambitious…

  20. high-poverty schools

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    leadership in high-poverty schools? Investigations conducted at six successful ..... (not only motivate) others, to build team spirit and pride, and to seek and explore every possible opportunity, source and ..... The key ingredients of school success appear to'be the principal's passion for upliftment, the teachers' commitment ...

  1. High School Book Fairs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitzgerald, Marianne

    2006-01-01

    Many secondary students have given up the joy of reading. When asked why they don't read for pleasure, students came up with many different reasons, the first being lack of time. High school students are busy with after school jobs, sports, homework, etc. With the growing number of students enrolled in AP classes, not only is there not much time…

  2. Turning High-Poverty Schools into High-Performing Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parrett, William H.; Budge, Kathleen

    2012-01-01

    If some schools can overcome the powerful and pervasive effects of poverty to become high performing, shouldn't any school be able to do the same? Shouldn't we be compelled to learn from those schools? Although schools alone will never systemically eliminate poverty, high-poverty, high-performing (HP/HP) schools take control of what they can to…

  3. Timetabling at High Schools

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Matias

    High school institutions face a number of important planning problems during each schoolyear. This Ph.D. thesis considers two of these planning problems: The High School Timetabling Problem (HSTP) and the Consultation Timetabling Problem (CTP). Furthermore a framework for handling various planning...... problems is considered, known as the Generalized Meeting Planning Problem (GMPP). The view taken on these problems is that they are mathematical optimization problems, where the goal is to _nd the optimal solution (from the set of all feasible solutions). This view allows state-of-the-art methods from....... The second part contains the main scienti_c papers composed during the Ph.D. study. The third part of the thesis also contains scienti_c papers, but these are included as an appendix. In the HSTP, the goal is to obtain a timetable for the forthcoming school-year. A timetable consists of lectures scheduled...

  4. When winning is everything.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malhotra, Deepak; Ku, Gillian; Murnighan, J Keith

    2008-05-01

    In the heat of competition, executives can easily become obsessed with beating their rivals. This adrenaline-fueled emotional state, which the authors call competitive arousal, often leads to bad decisions. Managers can minimize the potential for competitive arousal and the harm it can inflict by avoiding certain types of interaction and targeting the causes of a win-at-all-costs approach to decision making. Through an examination of companies such as Boston Scientific and Paramount, and through research on auctions, the authors identified three principal drivers of competitive arousal: intense rivalry, especially in the form of one-on-one competitions; time pressure, found in auctions and other bidding situations, for example; and being in the spotlight--that is, working in the presence of an audience. Individually, these factors can seriously impair managerial decision making; together, their consequences can be dire, as evidenced by many high-profile business disasters. It's not possible to avoid destructive competitions and bidding wars completely. But managers can help prevent competitive arousal by anticipating potentially harmful competitive dynamics and then restructuring the deal-making process. They can also stop irrational competitive behavior from escalating by addressing the causes of competitive arousal. When rivalry is intense, for instance, managers can limit the roles of those who feel it most. They can reduce time pressure by extending or eliminating arbitrary deadlines. And they can deflect the spotlight by spreading the responsibility for critical competitive decisions among team members. Decision makers will be most successful when they focus on winning contests in which they have a real advantage--and take a step back from those in which winning exacts too high a cost.

  5. WIN Chapters: Milestones and Future Plans

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Castro, P.; Pelegrí, M.

    2015-07-01

    In this paper the WIN Chapters: milestones and future plans are presented. WIN-IAEA has rewarded-in the three last years - to Australia-2014, South-Africa-2013 and Sweden-2012. WIN-Global -specially WiN IAEA- can collaborate a lot with the CTBTO presenting the content of the Treaty on the Non-Proliferation of Nuclear Weapons actually increasing the signatory members in 2015. Historical decisions on NTP are already affecting WiN IAEA. The research reactors or high flux reactors are important in the field of medical applications and other future applications. In Australia women-scientist of OPAL, can become WiN. Between the OPAL applications there is a production of silicon plates to be used in laptops/mobiles. WIN-Europe activities related with the climatic change and with the academic promotion. 2015 is also a very important year due the celebration of 20th Anniversary of WIN-Spain; plans of this Chapter and Conferences of WIN-Global are presented. In addition there are women working in ITER, in some activities in the EU, China, India, Japan, South Korea, USA and Russia both in the academic (R+D) field and into the Industry. (Author)

  6. School Uniforms in Urban Public High Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Draa, Virginia Ann Bendel

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether or not the implementation of a mandatory uniform policy in urban public high schools improved school performance measures at the building level for rates of attendance, graduation, academic proficiency, and student conduct as measured by rates of suspensions and expulsions. Sixty-four secondary…

  7. Fostering Political Understanding Using "The West Wing": Analyzing the Pedagogical Benefits of Film in High School Civics Classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Journell, Wayne; Buchanan, Lisa Brown

    2013-01-01

    This study describes one high school civics teacher's use of film as a way to improve his students' understanding of politics. Using episodes of "The West Wing," an award-winning political drama, over the course of a semester, the teacher was able to create an authentic context for political instruction that allowed his students to practice…

  8. A Win-Win-Win Proposition -- Academia and Industry Working Together for Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cogswell, J.

    2011-12-01

    Both Academia and Industry have a vested interest in building a pipeline of students who are attracted to geoscience as a discipline; who invest in a solid academic geoscience foundation and who move on to fulfilling professional careers. Global society needs geoscientists to find the energy that drives our economic well-being, responsibly and safely; and to solve today's complex environmental concerns. The US Oil and Gas Industry directly employed around 17,300 geologists in 2008(1). As with the rest of the geoscience community, our industry is dealing with a bi-modal age distribution in our workforce, with many eligible to retire in the next five years. Academia and Industry have an urgent, collective, challenge to attract the best and brightest students to study geoscience and to bring promising graduates onboard and up to speed as quickly as possible ExxonMobil accomplishes this rapid acclimation to our industry by focusing on high quality on-boarding, mentoring, and training, as well as diversity in early career assignments. We have implemented a one week on-boarding workshop for our new hires that provides them with comprehensive industry as well as Corporate cultural and infrastructure information. We ensure that our new hires have dedicated mentors who are passionate about petroleum geology, passionate about the petroleum business, and passionate about teaching the next generation of "oil finders." Our new hires attend several "flagship" schools in their first 5 years, which are designed to provide the technical expertise needed in today's petroleum business. Finally, our global operations allow us to provide a rich diversity of early assignments, which enables our early career geoscientists to develop an appreciation of the breadth of our business. There is no sub-discipline of geoscience that is more or less successful transitioning into our business from Academia. The key, which we rely on Academia to provide, is a strong grounding in the fundamentals of

  9. Continuous improvement: A win... win process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lawrence, T.; Wichert, A.

    1993-01-01

    Implementing a continuous improvement (CI) process within PanCanadian's oil and gas production operations might have been a simple assignment if one were not also trying to capture the hearts and imaginations of the people in a changing work environment. Meeting the challenge is resulting in big payoffs to both the organization and its people. The plan used within the Company's Production Division to successfully introduce the CI process is discussed. A brief insight is provided on the process philosophy, with emphasis placed on planning, training and coaching used to launch the process. Also reviewed at length are the impediments to change and the challenges faced when changing an organization's culture. In a CI work environment, the supervisor's traditional role changes from one of monitoring and controlling to one of inspiring, motivating and leading people by communicating a clear vision. Employees at all levels in the work environment are organized into teams and armed with a good working knowledge of the problem solving tools which allow them to pursue and implement improvement initiatives. The outcome of the process is an ongoing 'win-win' situation for both the Company and its people. Employees are gaining more trust, eliminating job irritants and enjoying their work more in a team environment. The Company is winning through increased production, improved safety and reduced operating expenses, thanks to many innovative ideas which the employees have implemented. 4 refs

  10. Green accounts & day high schools

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Michael Søgaard

    1997-01-01

    The arcticle presents the concept of green accounts and describes how it can be used in the daily work and the teaching at day high schools.......The arcticle presents the concept of green accounts and describes how it can be used in the daily work and the teaching at day high schools....

  11. Fluorescence for high school students

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schultheiss, N.G.; Kool, T.W.

    2012-01-01

    In a not obligatory series of lessons for high school students in the Netherlands we discuss the fluorescence aspects of anthracene. These lessons were developed because HiSPARC (High school Project on Astrophysics Research with Cosmics) detection of cosmic rays are available for different secondary

  12. Successful Undergraduate Research: Creating Win-Win-Win

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guswa, A. J.; Rhodes, A. L.

    2003-12-01

    Undergraduate involvement in research has the potential to advance science, enhance education, strengthen the research community, and raise general awareness of the importance and impact of scientific understanding. Rather than being competing objectives, these goals are synergistic. Effective research experiences are those that create win-win-win situations: benefits to the student, benefits to the project, and benefits to the scientific community. When structured appropriately, undergraduate research fits into a learner-centered paradigm that puts emphasis on student learning, rather than instructor teaching. Under such a paradigm the student and professor learn together, constructing knowledge by integrating information with critical-thinking and problem-solving skills, and use this knowledge to address issues in real-life contexts. Creating such a learning environment requires that the professor be vested in the outcome of the research, that the student take a meta-cognitive approach to the project and work at a level appropriate to her abilities, and that the student understand how her contribution fits into the project and the larger field. All of these factors lead to greater independence, confidence, and productivity on the part of the student. By providing undergraduates with these experiences, we introduce not only future scientists but also non-scientists to the excitement of discovery and the value of scientific research. Currently, we involve undergraduates in our research on the hydrology and geochemistry of a tropical montane cloud forest in Monteverde, Costa Rica. At the start of each student's involvement, we provide her with the big picture: our project goals, the relevant social issues, and the importance of watershed research. Each student then articulates her own educational and project objectives. Together, we choose tasks that match her skills and interests with our scholarly work. Specific activities range from literature review to

  13. Continuous improvement: A win-win process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lawrence, T.M.; Wichert, A.

    1992-01-01

    The strategies used within PanCanadian Petroleum Limited's production division to successfully introduce the continuous improvement (CI) process are discussed. Continuous improvement is an operating philosophy and management style which allows all employees to participate in and improve the way an organization performs its day-to-day business. In the CI work environment the supervisor's traditional role changes from one of monitoring and controlling, to one of inspiring, motivating and leading people by communicating a clear vision. Employees at all levels in the work environment are organized into teams and armed with a good working knowledge of the problem-solving tools which allow them to pursue and implement improvement initiatives. The outcome of the process is an ongoing win-win situation for both PanCanadian and its people. Employees are gaining more trust, eliminating job irritants, and enjoying their work in a team environment. The company is benefiting through increased production, improved safety and reduced operating expenses, thanks to the many innovative ideas introduced by employees. 4 refs

  14. High School Library Data Processing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Betty Flora

    1969-03-01

    Full Text Available Planning and operation of an automated high school library system is described which utilizes an IBM 1401 data processing system installed for teaching purposes. Book orfering, shelf listing and circulation have been computerized.

  15. The Importance of Teaching a Win-Win Philosophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brainard, Alan J.

    Most people are raised in a traditional environment which teaches that someone-winning implies that someone-loses. However, psychology and the examples provided in the Watergate scandal demonstrate that such a philosophy is neither productive nor beneficial. A "win-win" philosophy of cooperation, not competition, is needed for…

  16. Authoritative School Climate and High School Dropout Rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Yuane; Konold, Timothy R.; Cornell, Dewey

    2016-01-01

    This study tested the association between school-wide measures of an authoritative school climate and high school dropout rates in a statewide sample of 315 high schools. Regression models at the school level of analysis used teacher and student measures of disciplinary structure, student support, and academic expectations to predict overall high…

  17. Award Winning Science Projects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Showalter, Victor M.; Slesnick, Irwin L.

    This is a collection of reports of student award winning science projects that have appeared in "The Science Teacher." Grade levels 7-12 are represented with projects categorized as follows: biology, chemistry and physics, earth-space science, and miscellaneous. In each section the abstracts are arranged in order of increasing complexity…

  18. Wind Speed and Sea State Dependencies of Air-Sea Gas Transfer: Results From the High Wind Speed Gas Exchange Study (HiWinGS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blomquist, B. W.; Brumer, S. E.; Fairall, C. W.; Huebert, B. J.; Zappa, C. J.; Brooks, I. M.; Yang, M.; Bariteau, L.; Prytherch, J.; Hare, J. E.; Czerski, H.; Matei, A.; Pascal, R. W.

    2017-10-01

    A variety of physical mechanisms are jointly responsible for facilitating air-sea gas transfer through turbulent processes at the atmosphere-ocean interface. The nature and relative importance of these mechanisms evolves with increasing wind speed. Theoretical and modeling approaches are advancing, but the limited quantity of observational data at high wind speeds hinders the assessment of these efforts. The HiWinGS project successfully measured gas transfer coefficients (k660) with coincident wave statistics under conditions with hourly mean wind speeds up to 24 m s-1 and significant wave heights to 8 m. Measurements of k660 for carbon dioxide (CO2) and dimethylsulfide (DMS) show an increasing trend with respect to 10 m neutral wind speed (U10N), following a power law relationship of the form: k660 CO2˜U10N1.68 and k660 dms˜U10N1.33. Among seven high wind speed events, CO2 transfer responded to the intensity of wave breaking, which depended on both wind speed and sea state in a complex manner, with k660 CO2 increasing as the wind sea approaches full development. A similar response is not observed for DMS. These results confirm the importance of breaking waves and bubble injection mechanisms in facilitating CO2 transfer. A modified version of the Coupled Ocean-Atmosphere Response Experiment Gas transfer algorithm (COAREG ver. 3.5), incorporating a sea state-dependent calculation of bubble-mediated transfer, successfully reproduces the mean trend in observed k660 with wind speed for both gases. Significant suppression of gas transfer by large waves was not observed during HiWinGS, in contrast to results from two prior field programs.

  19. Especially for High School Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howell, J. Emory

    1999-09-01

    Secondary School Feature Articles * Authentic Research within the Grasp of High School Students, by Annis Hapkiewicz, p 1212 * JCE Classroom Activity #19: Blueprint Photography by the Cyanotype Process, by Glen D. Lawrence and Stuart Fishelson, p 1216A Author Recognition A new program has been instituted to recognize high school teachers who are authors or coauthors of manuscripts published in the Journal. In May, letters were sent to teachers who wrote articles published in JCE beginning with Volume 74 (1997). If you were an author, you should have received a letter from us in late May or early June stating that your high school principal has been sent a Certificate of High School Author Recognition to be presented to you at a suitable occasion. Because the letters were sent late in the school year, you may not see the certificate until fall, or you may not receive your letter until then if we had only your school address. If you have authored or coauthored an article published in JCE and did not receive a letter, please contact me using the information about the Secondary School Chemistry Editor appearing on the Information Page in this issue. Syllabus Swap In the August issue, this column contained an invitation to exchange high school syllabi. The day after my copy of the August issue arrived, I received an email from a teacher indicating an interest in participating in an exchange. If you are interested, check the August "Especially for High School Chemistry Teachers" column for a brief discussion of the informal exchange program, or contact me. Research Conducted by High School Students In his June 1999 editorial "Learning Is a Do-It-Yourself Activity", p 725, John Moore wrote about the need to engage students actively in the learning process. As I have mentioned in this column previously, research conducted by students is one means of accomplishing this goal. In this issue, p 1212, Annis Hapkiewicz explains how she has drawn her Okemos [Michigan] High School

  20. Video lottery: winning expectancies and arousal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ladouceur, Robert; Sévigny, Serge; Blaszczynski, Alexander; O'Connor, Kieron; Lavoie, Marc E

    2003-06-01

    This study investigates the effects of video lottery players' expectancies of winning on physiological and subjective arousal. Participants were assigned randomly to one of two experimental conditions: high and low winning expectancies. Participants played 100 video lottery games in a laboratory setting while physiological measures were recorded. Level of risk-taking was controlled. Participants were 34 occasional or regular video lottery players. They were assigned randomly into two groups of 17, with nine men and eight women in each group. The low-expectancy group played for fun, therefore expecting to win worthless credits, while the high-expectancy group played for real money. Players' experience, demographic variables and subjective arousal were assessed. Severity of problem gambling was measured with the South Oaks Gambling Screen. In order to measure arousal, the average heart rate was recorded across eight periods. Participants exposed to high as compared to low expectations experienced faster heart rate prior to and during the gambling session. According to self-reports, it is the expectancy of winning money that is exciting, not playing the game. Regardless of the level of risk-taking, expectancy of winning is a cognitive factor influencing levels of arousal. When playing for fun, gambling becomes significantly less stimulating than when playing for money.

  1. Carpet Aids Learning in High Performance Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurd, Frank

    2009-01-01

    The Healthy and High Performance Schools Act of 2002 has set specific federal guidelines for school design, and developed a federal/state partnership program to assist local districts in their school planning. According to the Collaborative for High Performance Schools (CHPS), high-performance schools are, among other things, healthy, comfortable,…

  2. The Opinions of High School Principals about Their Schools' Reputation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aksu, Ali; Orcan, Asli

    2015-01-01

    With a notice that was issued by the Ministry of National Education, all the public high schools were gradually converted into Anatolian High School as of 2010. The aim of this research is to determine the criteria of school reputation of Anatolian High schools and how and to what extent the criteria changed after the notice was issued.…

  3. Participation in Summer School and High School Graduation in the Sun Valley High School District

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trujillo, Gabriel

    2012-01-01

    This study examines the effectiveness of a summer school credit recovery program in the Sun Valley High School District. Using logistic regression I assess the relationship between race, gender, course failure, school of origin and summer school participation for a sample of students that failed one or more classes in their first year of high…

  4. Credentialing high school psychology teachers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weaver, Kenneth A

    2014-09-01

    The National Standards for High School Psychology Curricula (American Psychological Association, 2013b) require a teacher with considerable psychology content knowledge to teach high school psychology courses effectively. In this study, I examined the initial teaching credential requirements for high school psychology teachers in the 50 states plus the District of Columbia. Thirty-four states (the District of Columbia is included as a state) require the social studies credential to teach high school psychology. An analysis of the items on standardized tests used by states to validate the content knowledge required to teach social studies indicates little or no presence of psychology, a reflection of psychology's meager presence in the social studies teacher preparation curricula. Thus, new teachers with the social studies teaching credential are not prepared to teach high school psychology according to the National Standards. Approval of The College, Career, and Civic Life (C3) Framework for Social Studies State Standards: Guidance for Enhancing the Rigor of K-12 Civics, Economics, Geography, and History (National Council for the Social Studies, 2013) presents an opportunity to advocate for establishing a psychology credential in the 34 states. (c) 2014 APA, all rights reserved.

  5. Bullying among High School Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nursel TÜRKMEN, Delia; Halis DOKGÖZ, Mihai; Semra AKGÖZ, Suzana; Bülent EREN, Bogdan Nicolae; Pınar VURAL, Horatiu; Oğuz POLAT, Horatiu

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective: The main aim of this research is to investigate the prevalence of bullying behaviour, its victims and the types of bullying and places of bullying among 14-17 year-old adolescents in a sample of school children in Bursa, Turkey. Methodology: A cross-sectional survey questionnaire was conducted among class 1 and class 2 high school students for identification bullying. Results: Majority (96.7%) of the students were involved in bullying behaviours as aggressors or victims. For a male student, the likelihood of being involved in violent behaviours was detected to be nearly 8.4 times higher when compared with a female student. Conclusion: a multidisciplinary approach involving affected children, their parents, school personnel, media, non-govermental organizations, and security units is required to achieve an effective approach for the prevention of violence targeting children in schools as victims and/or perpetrators. PMID:24371478

  6. Winning hearts and minds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Drulia, M.R.

    1999-01-01

    'The greatest problem in communication is the illusion that it has been accomplished' (George Bernard Shaw). Over the past few decades we have seen major shifts in opinion as to what makes a business successful. The 1950's and 1960's saw a production focus whilst the 1970's and 1980's saw progressive change towards quality and 'customer is king' as key business drivers. A popular view now suggests that the next step change will be towards internal marketing, based on the concept that, in the future, winning employee support will be seen as the single biggest contributor to driving business performances. In summary, to win hearts and minds you must understand the needs of your audience, the intent of your communication activity, adopt a suitable style and match your deeds to your words

  7. 2014 WIN3 Workshop

    CERN Document Server

    Long, Ling; Pries, Rachel; Stange, Katherine

    2016-01-01

    Exploring the interplay between deep theory and intricate computation, this volume is a compilation of research and survey papers in number theory, written by members of the Women In Numbers (WIN) network, principally by the collaborative research groups formed at Women In Numbers 3, a conference at the Banff International Research Station in Banff, Alberta, on April 21-25, 2014. The papers span a wide range of research areas: arithmetic geometry; analytic number theory; algebraic number theory; and applications to coding and cryptography. The WIN conference series began in 2008, with the aim of strengthening the research careers of female number theorists. The series introduced a novel research-mentorship model: women at all career stages, from graduate students to senior members of the community, joined forces to work in focused research groups on cutting-edge projects designed and led by experienced researchers. The goals for Women In Numbers 3 were to establish ambitious new collaborations between women i...

  8. High School Economic Composition and College Persistence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niu, Sunny X.; Tienda, Marta

    2013-01-01

    Using a longitudinal sample of Texas high school seniors of 2002 who enrolled in college within the calendar year of high school graduation, we examine variation in college persistence according to the economic composition of their high schools, which serves as a proxy for unmeasured high school attributes that are conductive to postsecondary…

  9. Catholic High Schools and Rural Academic Achievement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sander, William

    1997-01-01

    A study of national longitudinal data examined effects of rural Catholic high schools on mathematics achievement, high school graduation rates, and the likelihood that high school graduates attend college. Findings indicate that rural Catholic high schools had a positive effect on mathematics test scores and no effect on graduation rates or rates…

  10. Winning with Initiative

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, Matthew J.

    2004-01-01

    A common complaint among high school coaches is the lack of initiative shown by some of their players. Coaches expect a certain level of decision-making and independence, and more so from team captains and senior players. Developing leadership skills is a major benefit to athletes who participate at a competitive level, and taking initiative can…

  11. Chaos at High School

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tamás Meszéna

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available We are faced with chaotic processes in many segments of our life: meteorology, environmental pollution, financial and economic processes, sociology, mechanics, electronics, biology, chemistry. The spreading of high-performance computers and the development of simulation methods made the examination of these processes easily available. Regular, periodic motions (pendulum, harmonic oscillatory motion, bouncing ball, as taught at secondary level, become chaotic even due minor changes. If it is true that the most considerable achievements of twentieth century physics were the theory of relativity, quantum mechanics and chaos theory, then it is presumably time to think about, examine and test how and to what extent chaos can be presented to the students. Here I would like to introduce a 12 lesson long facultative curriculum framework on chaos designed for students aged seventeen. The investigation of chaos phenomenon in this work is based on a freeware, “Dynamics Solver”. This software, with some assistance from the teacher, is suitable for classroom use at secondary level.

  12. The Social Organization of the High School: School-Specific Aspects of School Crime

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ianni, Francis A. J.

    1978-01-01

    Describes a study of three New York high schools (rural, suburban, and urban) that developed a model of high school social organization in order to provide a school-specific focus for examining school violence and crime. (JG)

  13. Block Scheduling in High Schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irmsher, Karen

    1996-01-01

    Block Scheduling has been considered a cure for a lengthy list of educational problems. This report reviews the literature on block schedules and describes some Oregon high schools that have integrated block scheduling. Major disadvantages included resistance to change and requirements that teachers change their teaching strategies. There is…

  14. Rethinking the High School Diploma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finn, Chester E., Jr.; Kahlenberg, Richard D.; Kress, Sandy

    2015-01-01

    As states move to implement the Common Core State Standards, key challenges remain. One is how to make sure a high school diploma acknowledges what students have achieved. Should states adopt a two tiered diploma, in which students who pass internationally aligned Common Core exams at a career- and college-ready level receive an…

  15. Personal, Social and Environmental Risk Factors of Problematic Gambling Among High School Adolescents in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia

    OpenAIRE

    Abdi, Tariku A.; Ruiter, Robert A. C.; Adal, Tamirie A.

    2013-01-01

    Understanding risk factors of problematic gambling is prerequisite to effective intervention design to alleviate the negative consequences of gambling. This study explored the personal, social and environmental risk factors of problematic gambling in four high schools in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia, among students (N?=?422) ranging from 12 to 21?years of age. Results from the cross-sectional survey showed that personal feelings (e.g., self-esteem, false perceptions about winning, drug abuse), socia...

  16. School Violence and the Social Organization of High Schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ianni, Francis A. J.

    One of 52 theoretical papers on school crime and its relation to poverty, this chapter, based on the findings of an indepth study of the social organization of the American high school, provides a new, school-specific way of examining the problem of school crime and violence. The study, which made use of field methodology, addressed two basic…

  17. Especially for High School Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howell, J. Emory

    1999-08-01

    Care to Share? An Informal Syllabus Exchange A recent email message from Thomas Shiland, who teaches at Saratoga Springs Senior High School, noted that the process of revising the high school chemistry syllabus is underway in New York State. He expressed a strong interest in helping construct a chemistry syllabus that represents the best thinking about appropriate content. He wondered if it would be possible to develop a way in which different secondary chemistry syllabi could easily be exchanged. It is likely that readers from other states and countries are involved in a similar process and might also be interested in exchanging syllabi. Many states do not use the term syllabus to describe their guiding curricular document for chemistry but rather refer to it as a framework or as guidelines. In most cases, the document includes a list of key ideas or topics, performance indicators, and the major understandings associated with each key idea. Such documents would be appropriate for exchange among those of you involved in the revision process. If you are interested in arranging an exchange please contact me by email at j.e.howell@usm.edu or by mail at J. E. Howell, Box 5043, USM, Hattiesburg, MS39406-5043, USA. High School Day Information The High School Chemistry Program at the American Chemical Society National Meeting in New Orleans, Louisiana will be held Sunday, August 22, 1999, at the Doubletree Hotel, 300 Canal Street. If you wish to register only for the High School Day activities, which includes a pass to the ACS Exposition, a special registration form is available from Lillie Tucker-Akin, 2800 Reynard Dr., Tupelo, MS38801; sci4me@aol.com; fax: 662/566-7906. Advance registration is 25 and the cost of the High School Luncheon is 12. Register in advance by August 1, 1999, or from 7:45 to 8:30 a.m. at the High School Day table in the conference room area of the Doubletree. The workshop schedule is shown below. Secondary School Feature Articles * Exploring the

  18. Online High School Achievement versus Traditional High School Achievement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blohm, Katherine E.

    2017-01-01

    The following study examined the question of student achievement in online charter schools and how the achievement scores of students at online charter schools compare to achievement scores of students at traditional schools. Arizona has seen explosive growth in charter schools and online charter schools. A study comparing how these two types of…

  19. Concussion Knowledge and Reporting Behavior Differences between High School Athletes at Urban and Suburban High Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallace, Jessica; Covassin, Tracey; Nogle, Sally; Gould, Daniel; Kovan, Jeffrey

    2017-01-01

    Background: We determined differences in knowledge of concussion and reporting behaviors of high school athletes attending urban and suburban high schools, and whether a relationship exists between underreporting and access to an athletic trainer in urban schools. Methods: High school athletes (N = 715) from 14 high schools completed a validated…

  20. Bullying among Turkish High School Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kepenekci, Yasemin Karaman; Cinkir, Sakir

    2006-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of this study was to investigate school bullying among public high school students in Turkey. Method: This study used a survey to examine different aspects of bullying in schools. The participants (N=692) were students chosen from five state high schools in Ankara in the 2000-2001 academic year. A self-administered…

  1. Win-win Imageries in a Soap Bubble World

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ekman, Susanne

    2015-01-01

    This article explores the imagery and notions of personhood underlying the willingness to undertake extreme work among creative knowledge workers. The core argument is that extreme work is informed by pervasive win-win fantasies which can be recognized in a number of current organizational trends...

  2. Especially for High School Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howell, J. Emory

    1999-07-01

    Secondary School Feature Articles * Super Science Connections, by Patricia B. McKean, p 916 * A pHorseshoe, by Roger Plumsky, p 935 National Conferences in Your Part of the Country For the past several months, considerable space in this column has been devoted to forthcoming national conferences and conventions and to highlights of conferences past. For some of us, location is fairly unimportant; but for most of us travel costs and time are both factors to consider when choosing a conference. The community of high school chemistry teachers is favored by the number of national conventions and conferences that are held each year in different locations. In 1999, for example, the spring National Meeting of the American Chemical Society was in Anaheim and the National Science Teachers Association National Convention was in Boston. This summer CHEMED '99 will be held in Fairfield, CT, August 1-5, and the fall National ACS Meeting will be in New Orleans. Teachers from the mid-South especially should consider attending the High School Program at New Orleans, described below by Lillie Tucker Akin, Chairperson of the Division's High School Program Committee. The event will be held on Sunday to minimize conflicts with the beginning of the school year. JCE at CHEMED '99 Stop by the JCE booth at CHEMED '99 in the exhibits area to learn more about the wide array of print and nonprint resources you can use in your classroom and laboratory. Members of the editorial staff will be on hand to talk with you. You are invited to participate in a workshop, "Promoting Active Learning through JCE Activity Sheets and Software", on Monday, August 1, 8:30-10:30. The free hands-on workshop is number WT11 and we encourage you to include it among your choices in the blanks provided on the third page of the registration form. We will also conduct an interactive session to listen to ideas for making the Journal more useful to you. Check the final program for location and time or inquire at the JCE

  3. Sexting by High School Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strassberg, Donald S; Cann, Deanna; Velarde, Valerie

    2017-08-01

    In the last 8 years, several studies have documented that many adolescents acknowledge having exchanged sexually explicit cell phone pictures of themselves, a behavior termed sexting. Differences across studies in how sexting was defined, recruitment strategies, and cohort have resulted in sometimes significant differences in as basic a metric as what percentage of adolescents have sent, received, or forwarded such sexts. The psychosocial and even legal risks associated with sexting by minors are significantly serious that accurate estimates of its prevalence, including over time, are important to ascertain. In the present study, students (N = 656) from a single private high school were surveyed regarding their participation in sexting. Students at this same school were similarly surveyed four years earlier. In this second survey, reported rates of sending (males 15.8%; females 13.6%) and receiving (males 40.5%; females 30.6%) sexually explicit cell phone pictures (revealing genitals or buttocks of either sex or female breasts) were generally similar to those reported at the same school 4 years earlier. Rates of forwarding sexts (males 12.2%; females 7.6%) were much lower than those previously acknowledged at this school. Correlates of sexting in this study were similar to those reported previously. Overall, our findings suggest that sexting by adolescents (with the exception of forwarding) remains a fairly common behavior, despite its risks.

  4. Summerhill Wins in Court!

    Science.gov (United States)

    Readhead, Zoe; Mintz, Jerry

    2000-01-01

    An interview with Summerhill School's head describes how the independent boarding school challenged the British government's demands that it give compulsory lessons. A settlement required the school's philosophy to govern the government's approach to the school; recognized the pupils' voice in evaluations of the school; and acknowledged that…

  5. Educational partnerships - a win win endeavor!

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Munro, R.A.

    1996-01-01

    This paper is largely concerned with the New Brunswick teacher placement project. Groups of teachers have visited Point Lepreau Nuclear Generating Station, where they have learned more about nuclear energy, and have helped to improve public affairs material and exhibits aimed at school children

  6. Indoor Air Quality in High Performance Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    High performance schools are facilities that improve the learning environment while saving energy, resources, and money. The key is understanding the lifetime value of high performance schools and effectively managing priorities, time, and budget.

  7. Crazy-Proofing High School Sports

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tufte, John E.

    2012-01-01

    "Crazy-Proofing High School Sports" examines the often troubling high school sports phenomenon in two parts. Part one focuses on the problems facing educators, students, and parents as they struggle to make high school sports worthwhile. Few if any strategies for improvement in education are effective without first knowing what the real reasons…

  8. How High School Students Select a College.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilmour, Joseph E., Jr.; And Others

    The college selection process used by high school students was studied and a paradigm that describes the process was developed, based on marketing theory concerning consumer behavior. Primarily college freshmen and high school seniors were interviewed, and a few high school juniors and upper-level college students were surveyed to determine…

  9. Teaching Ethics to High School Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pass, Susan; Willingham, Wendy

    2009-01-01

    Working with two teachers and thirty-four high school seniors, the authors developed procedures and assessments to teach ethics in an American high school civics class. This approach requires high school students to discover an agreement or convergence between Kantian ethics and virtue ethics. The authors also created an instrument to measure…

  10. Win–win strategies for high beef quality, consumer satisfaction, and farm efficiency, low environmental impacts and improved animal welfare

    OpenAIRE

    Hocquette, Jean-François; Botreau, Raphaëlle; Legrand, Isabelle; Polkinghorne, Rod; Pethick, David William; Lherm, Michel; Picard, Brigitte; Doreau, Michel; Terlouw, Claudia

    2014-01-01

    Meat quality includes intrinsic qualities (the characteristics of the product itself) and extrinsic qualities (e.g. animal health and welfare, environmental impacts, price). There is still a high level of variability in beef palatability, which induces consumer dissatisfaction. We also observe a general trend towards an increasing importance of healthiness and safety (intrinsic) and environmental issues and animal welfare (extrinsic). Most grading systems describe carcasses using only animal ...

  11. High school seniors by race and SES

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Susan C.

    2015-12-01

    In September, we looked at participation in high school physics by race and ethnicity, and we have provided two different views of physics in high school by socioeconomic status (SES). This month, we consider the proportion of seniors attending schools by race and SES. About half of the Hispanics and almost 45% of the African-Americans among high school seniors in 2013 attended a school where the students were determined to be "worse off" economically than their peers in the local area. The converse is true for Asians and Whites with the vast majority attending schools where students are seen as "better off" than their peers.

  12. Especially for High School Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howell, J. Emory

    2000-02-01

    Secondary School Feature Articles JCE Classroom Activity: #24. The Write Stuff: Using Paper Chromatography to Separate an Ink Mixture, p 176A Teaching Chemistry in the Midwinter Every year, forecasters around the world provide us with long-range predictions of what the seasons will afford us in the coming year. And each year, the weather provides a few surprises that the forecasters did not predict - such as a record amount of snow or record heat indexes, depending on where you live. Although the weatherman didn't predict it, we still must pull out our snow shovels or sun block and take the necessary steps to adapt to the situation. As teachers, we make predictions of teaching and learning goals that we aspire to achieve during a given year, and like the weather, the year brings surprises that aren't in line with our predictions. With that in mind, I would like to offer JCE as the scholastic snow shovel or sun shield you need to jump-start your class and reach the goals you have set. So find a warm (or cool) place, get comfortable, and spend some time with the February issue of JCE. Articles of General Interest in This Issue For readers living where snow falls, Williams's article on page 148 offers some historical background on the use of calcium chloride as a deicer. A diver that depends for its buoyancy upon gas given off by a chemical reaction is described by Derr, Lewis, and Derr in the article beginning on page 171. In her article appearing on pages 249-250, Wang describes a laboratory exercise that makes the mastery of solution preparation skills fun. The students' skill is tested by using the solutions they make to carry out the Briggs-Rauscher oscillating reaction. For high school class applications I recommend use of 3% hydrogen peroxide, described as an option in the article. A well-organized approach to separating an ink mixture, with some possibly new twists, is laid out in the student- and teacher-friendly format of JCE Classroom Activity: #24, pages

  13. Transition from high schools to engineering education

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kolmos, Anette; Holgaard, Jette Egelund; Clausen, Nicolaj Riise

    2017-01-01

    in respectively general high schools and profession-oriented high schools where the technical high schools represent the most common pipeline. The study highlights differences when just entering the study and just before graduation. Findings indicate that students from the profession-oriented high schools assess...... themselves as being better prepared in relation to the conduct of experiments, engineering analysis and tolls, as well as in relation to process competences as design, problem solving and teamwork. The students from the profession-oriented high schools also find themselves better prepared in relation...

  14. The Case for Coherent High Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Paul T.; Maas, Tricia

    2015-01-01

    High school redesign is one of the most elusive reform challenges to date. This paper explains why personalized high schools are hard to get and keep in a traditional school district, and shows how they can be made much more broadly available through changes in policy and philanthropic investments. Drawing from examples of successful and…

  15. Teacher Accountability at High Performing Charter Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguirre, Moises G.

    2016-01-01

    This study will examine the teacher accountability and evaluation policies and practices at three high performing charter schools located in San Diego County, California. Charter schools are exempted from many laws, rules, and regulations that apply to traditional school systems. By examining the teacher accountability systems at high performing…

  16. Especially for High School Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howell, J. Emory

    2000-01-01

    Ideas and Resources in This Issue This issue contains a broad spectrum of topics of potential interest to high school teachers, including chemical safety, history, demonstrations, laboratory activities, electrochemistry, small group learning, and instructional software. In his report on articles published recently in The Science Teacher, Steve Long includes annotated references from that journal, and also from JCE, that provide timely and practical information (pp 21-22). The chemical significance of several anniversaries that will occur in the year 2000 are discussed in an article by Paul Schatz (pp 11-14). Scientists and inventors mentioned include Dumas, Wöhler, Goodyear, Joliot-Curie, Krebs, Pauli, Kjeldahl, and Haworth. Several discoveries are also discussed, including development of the voltaic pile, the use of chlorine to purify water, and the discovery of element 97, berkelium. This is the fourth consecutive year that Schatz has written an anniversaries article (1-3). Although most readers probably do not plan to be teaching in the years 2097-3000, these articles can make a nice addition to your file of readily available historical information for use now in meeting NSES Content Standard G (4). In contrast to the short historical summaries, an in-depth account of the work of Herman Boerhaave is provided by Trinity School (NY) teacher Damon Diemente. You cannot recall having heard of Boerhaave? Diemente explains in detail how Boerhaave's scientific observations, imperfect though they were, contributed significantly to the understanding of temperature and heat by scientists who followed him. Chemical demonstrations attract the interest of most of us, and Kathy Thorsen discusses several that appeared in Chem 13 News during the past year (pp 18-20). Included are demonstrations relating to LeChâtelier's principle, electronegativity, and the synthesis and reactions of carbon monoxide. Ideas for investigating the hydrophobic nature of Magic Sand are given in JCE

  17. Teaching Physics at Chatham High School.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clarke, Gertrude M.

    1980-01-01

    Describes activities in a high school physics course designed to enhance learning. Also describes in detail an advanced course called Nucleonics, and activities in an honors physics course. Discusses changes in school classrooms since the early 1950s. (CS)

  18. Wins, winning and winners: the commercial advertising of lottery gambling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMullan, John L; Miller, Delthia

    2009-09-01

    This study analyzed a sample of 920 lottery ads that were placed or played in Atlantic Canada from January 2005 to December 2006. A content analysis, involving quantitative and qualitative techniques, was conducted to examine the design features, exposure profiles and focal messages of these ads and to explore the connections between lottery advertising and consumer culture. We found that there was an "ethos of winning" in these commercials that provided the embedded words, signs, myths, and symbols surrounding lottery gambling and conveyed a powerful imagery of plentitude and certitude in a world of potential loss where there was little reference to the actual odds of winning. The tangible and emotional qualities in the ads were especially inviting to young people creating a positive orientation to wins, winning and winners, and lottery products that, in turn, reinforced this form of gambling as part of youthful consumption practices. We concluded that enticing people with the prospects of huge jackpots, attractive consumer goods and easy wins, showcasing top prize winners, and providing dubious depictions that winning is life-changing was narrow and misleading and exploited some of the factors associated with at-risk gambling.

  19. If Winning Isn't Everything--How Can It Be the Only Thing?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scherer, Joseph

    1990-01-01

    There is more to a successful school athletic program than a winning record. Winning becomes meaningless when youthful victories subvert personal growth, shallow goals shatter dreams, personality is elevated over principle, and athletics are compromised by economic and social forces. To balance academics and athletics, we must consider our…

  20. Especially for High School Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howell, J. Emory

    1999-10-01

    Writing Across the Curriculum The notion that student learning is enhanced through writing is widely accepted at all educational levels if the product is fairly assessed and the learner is provided with feedback. Finding the time to critically evaluate student papers is difficult at best and competes with time needed to prepare laboratory investigations. A few weeks ago a teacher who has extensive extracurricular responsibilities that include extensive interaction with parents and community members shared with me his frustration in not being able to grade written reports. This teacher is the head football coach at his school, but many readers experience the same difficulties due to a variety of duties. There are no easy or completely satisfying answers to this problem, but this issue contains an account of a successful approach (Writing in Chemistry: An Effective Learning Tool, pp 1399-1403). Although they are based on experience in college courses, several ideas described in the article could be applied in high school chemistry courses. In another article, the author of Precise Writing for a Precise Science (pp 1407-1408) identifies 20 examples of familiar, but incorrect, grammatical constructions and explains how to phrase each one correctly. Chemical Education Research: Improving Chemistry Learning The results from research on how students learn have greatly increased our understanding of cognition in recent years. However, the results are often published in the science education research literature and are not readily accessible to the classroom teacher. Additionally, the research reports are couched in specialized terminology. This issue contains a Viewpoints article (pp 1353-1361) that bridges the gap between research results and classroom application. It was written by two veteran chemical educators, Dudley Herron and Susan Nurrenbern. The shift from behaviorism to constructivism as the dominant theory of learning is described briefly to provide a context

  1. Teaching Geomagnetism in High School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stern, D. P.

    2001-05-01

    Many high school curricula include a one-year course in Earth Sciences, often in the 9th grade (essentially pre-algebra). That is a good time to teach about geomagnetism. Not only are dipole reversals and sea-floor magnetization central to this subject, but this is a good opportunity to introduce students to magnetism and its connection to electric currents. The story of Oersted and Faraday give a fascinating insight into the uneven path of scientific discovery, the magnetic compass and William Gilbert provide a view of the beginnings of the scientific revolution, and even basic concepts of dynamo theory and its connection to solar physics can be included. A resource including all the suitable material now exists on the world-wide web at http://www-spof.gsfc.nasa.gov/earthmag/demagint.htm (home page). A 1-month unit on geomagnetism will be outlined.

  2. Middle School and High School Students Who Stutter: A Qualitative Investigation of School Experiences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cobb, Tiffany R.

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to explore and further understand the ways in which middle school and high school students perceive their school experiences within the school environment. School has an important impact on the social development of children (Milsom, 2006). Learning is not done individually as classrooms are inherently social…

  3. Using Evidence to Create Next Generation High Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Office of Planning, Evaluation and Policy Development, US Department of Education, 2016

    2016-01-01

    Next Generation High Schools are schools that redesign the high school experience to make it more engaging and worthwhile for high school students. In order to create such Next Generation High Schools, schools, districts, and States should utilize evidence-based strategies to transform high schools in ways that engage students and help prepare…

  4. In the winning mood

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marieke de Vries

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The present research aimed to test the role of mood in the Iowa Gambling Task (IGT; Bechara et al., 1994. In the IGT, participants can win or lose money by picking cards from four different decks. They have to learn by experience that two decks are overall advantageous and two decks are overall disadvantageous. Previous studies have shown that at an early stage in this card-game, players begin to display a tendency towards the advantageous decks. Subsequent research suggested that at this stage, people base their decisions on conscious gut feelings (Wagar and Dixon, 2006. Based on empirical evidence for the relation between mood and cognitive processing-styles, we expected and consistently found that, compared to a negative mood state, reported and induced positive mood states increased this early tendency towards advantageous decks. Our results provide support for the idea that a positive mood causes stronger reliance on affective signals in decision-making than a negative mood.

  5. Especially for High School Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howell, J. Emory

    1999-05-01

    assigned as a take-home activity. JCE Classroom Activity #15, "Liver and Onions: DNA Extraction from Animal and Plant Tissues" (p 400A, March 1999) also integrates chemical and biological concepts. The JCE Software videotape HIV-1 Protease: An Enzyme at Work is another useful resource. It can be used in any classroom where kinetics, catalysis, proteins, or enzymes are discussed. Information about JCE Software products can be found in recent issues of the Journal or by accessing JCE Online (http://jchemed.chem.wisc.edu). Because most high school students complete at least one year of biology before enrolling in chemistry, developing the connections between biology and chemistry can be especially productive. Connections between chemistry and biology often seem to be more real to students than do many of the phenomena we cite as applications. For example, students often are not able to make the connection between the excitation of electrons to produce electromagnetic radiation and anything that is personally relevant. The light given off by sodium or mercury vapor lights provides a common example of relating atomic emission to a useful process, but many students do not seem to find that particularly interesting. The need to make a connection between biology and chemistry becomes especially meaningful to students when the chemical change occurs within the human body. As an example, the interaction of emitted electromagnetic radiation with human cells to cause well-tanned skin seems more relevant to a greater number of students than the color of lights in a parking lot. This issue contains an article that describes a useful application of light to kill cancer cells through use of photosensitizers (p 592). The process of photodynamic therapy (PDT) provides another example that could help students make a connection between the emission of electromagnetic radiation and the challenge of killing cancer cells without harming healthy cells. Certainly this example is not a magic

  6. Junior High School Pupils' Perceptions of Air

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    cce

    Azure, J. A.. Department of Science Education. University of Education, Winneba, Ghana. Abstract. The study examined Junior High School (JHS) pupils' ideas of the concept air. The study compared the ideas that pupils from endowed schools have about air with those of their counterparts from un-endowed schools.

  7. A High School Takes on Literacy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gewertz, Catherine

    2010-01-01

    This article features Buckhorn High School in New Market, Alabama, where teachers weave literacy instruction across all content areas--with great results. Literacy is shot through everything at this 1,350-student school. It has been an obsession for a decade, ever since school leaders tested their students and found that one-third of entering…

  8. Switching Schools: Reconsidering the Relationship Between School Mobility and High School Dropout

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gasper, Joseph; DeLuca, Stefanie; Estacion, Angela

    2014-01-01

    Youth who switch schools are more likely to demonstrate a wide array of negative behavioral and educational outcomes, including dropping out of high school. However, whether switching schools actually puts youth at risk for dropout is uncertain, since youth who switch schools are similar to dropouts in their levels of prior school achievement and engagement, which suggests that switching schools may be part of the same long-term developmental process of disengagement that leads to dropping out. Using data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 1997, this study uses propensity score matching to pair youth who switched high schools with similar youth who stayed in the same school. We find that while over half the association between switching schools and dropout is explained by observed characteristics prior to 9th grade, switching schools is still associated with dropout. Moreover, the relationship between switching schools and dropout varies depending on a youth's propensity for switching schools. PMID:25554706

  9. Special Education in High School Redesign

    Science.gov (United States)

    National High School Center, 2011

    2011-01-01

    This annotated bibliography, co-authored by the National High School Center and the National Secondary Transition Technical Assistance Center, identifies articles that address high school redesign as it relates to students with disabilities and special education's role in such initiatives. The articles are organized around the National High School…

  10. Interior design students win two IDEC Student Design Competition awards

    OpenAIRE

    Watson-Bloch, Cathy

    2005-01-01

    Interior Design students in the School of Architecture + Design at Virginia Tech won two of the four awards presented in the 2004-2005 Interior Design Educators Council (IDEC) Student Design Competition. Winners were selected at the International IDEC Conference in Savannah, Ga. with Virginia Tech Interior Design students winning second place and honorable mention.

  11. Demographic Factors Affecting Internet Using Purposes of High School Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilic, Abdullah Faruk; Güzeller, Cem Oktay

    2017-01-01

    This study aimed at determining the impact of demographic factors on the Internet usage purposes of high school students. The population of the study consisted of students between 9th and 12th grades from the Anatolian high schools, science high schools, social sciences high schools, sports high schools and fine arts high schools in Turkey. The…

  12. Win-Win-Win: Reflections from a Work-Integrated Learning Project in a Non-Profit Organization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dale C MacKrell

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper reports on the educational aspects of an information systems work-integrated learning (WIL capstone project for an organization which operates to alleviate homelessness in the Australian non-profit sector. The methodology adopted for the study is Action Design Research (ADR which draws on action research and design research as a means for framing a project's progress. Reflective insights by the project stakeholders, namely, students, academics, and the non-profit client, reveal a curriculum at work through internal features of the organization; personal features of the participants and features of the external environment. Preliminary findings suggest that students in a WIL project for a non-profit are highly engaged, especially when they become aware of the project’s social value. As well, the improvement of professional skills and emotional intelligence by students is more likely in real-life practice settings than in other less authentic WIL activities, equipping graduates for the workforce with both strong disciplinary and generic skills. Win-win-win synergies through project collaboration represent worthwhile outcomes to education, industry and research.

  13. School-Related Factors Affecting High School Seniors' Methamphetamine Use

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanley, Jarrod M.; Lo, Celia C.

    2009-01-01

    Data from the 2005 Monitoring the Future survey were used to examine relationships between school-related factors and high school seniors' lifetime methamphetamine use. The study applied logistic regression techniques to evaluate effects of social bonding variables and social learning variables on likelihood of lifetime methamphetamine use. The…

  14. Attitudes of High School Students towards Geometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Esat Avcı

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available In this research, attitudes of high school students towards geometry were investigated in terms of gender, grade, types of the field and school. Population of research includes students who were studying at high school in five distincs of Mersin in 2013-2014 academical year. Sample of research includes 935 students from twelve high schools. Attitude scale which was developed by Su-Özenir (2008 was used for data collection. For data analysis, mean, standart deviation, t test and ANOVA were used. A meaningful difference between students’ attitudes towards geometry and variance of gender and grade level wasn’t observed, on the other hand a meaningful difference according to field and school type is observed.Key Words:    Attitudes towards geometry, high school geometry lesson, attitude scale

  15. Wade Hampton High School: Leading Like Generals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Principal Leadership, 2012

    2012-01-01

    This article features Wade Hampton High School in Greenville County, South Carolina. Named for Wade Hampton III--a Civil War hero, a US senator, and a governor--Wade Hampton High School celebrated its 50th anniversary in 2010 in a beautiful, modern, state-of-the-art facility built on the original school site in 2007. Although most of the 1,600…

  16. Eastern countries - WIN activity review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stiopol, Mihaela

    1998-01-01

    Women can play this important role in informing people about nuclear energy. WIN is a world-wide association of women working professionally in the fields of nuclear energy and radiation application who want to devote their time to public information. The main goal of the WIN is to establish an objective and effective communication with the public through educational programmes, information exchange and arranging study visits. The membership includes women working in medicine and health care, in regulatory authorities, in industry and as independent researches at Universities. They want to contribute to objectively informing the public by making presentation, discussing and giving information materials on subjects such as; radiation, radioactivity and health effects medical applications nuclear energy nuclear power plants and their safety nuclear and environment uranium mining radiation protection energy sustainable development WIN is also open to men, supporting the goals of WIN. The intention of this paper was to underline the main aspects which reflect WIN activity in some Eastern and Central countries. There are common features and also specific elements for each country. But the goal is the same: to assure an effective and a real information of the public related to the nuclear field

  17. Win at Work! The Everybody Wins Approach to Conflict Resolution

    CERN Document Server

    Katz, Diane

    2010-01-01

    Proven techniques for resolving workplace conflicts. After years of seeing clients struggling and their businesses suffering with destructive conflicts, Diane Katz developed The Working Circle, a step-by-step process that helps everyone in business resolve conflict in a non-confrontational, creative, collaborative way. Win at Work! provides you with a no-nonsense guide based on real-life examples of people at pivotal points in their careers. Filled with practical wisdom, it reveals how you can move around the roadblocks that, if left unattanded, can stop you in your tracks. Win at Work! also h

  18. Leaving School — learning at SEA: Regular high school education alongside polar research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gatti, Susanne

    2010-05-01

    Against the background of unsatisfactory results from the international OECD study PISA (Program for International Student Assessment), Germany is facing a period of intense school reforms. Looking back at a tradition of school culture with too few changes during the last century, quick and radical renewal of the school system is rather unlikely. Furthermore students are increasingly turning away from natural sciences [1]. The AWI aims at providing impulses for major changes in the schooling system and is offering solid science education not only for university students but also for a larger audience. All efforts towards this goal are interconnected within the project SEA (Science & Education @ the AWI). With the school-term of 2002/03 the Alfred-Wegener-Institute for Polar and Marine Research started HIGHSEA (High school of SEA). The program is the most important component of SEA. Each year 22 high school students (grade 10 or 11) are admitted to HIGHSEA spending their last three years of school not at school but at the institute. Four subjects (biology as a major, chemistry, math and English as accessory subjects) are combined and taught fully integrated. Students leave their school for two days each week to study, work and explore all necessary topics at the AWI. All of the curricular necessities of the four subjects have been rearranged in their temporal sequencing thus enabling a conceptual formulation of four major questions to be dealt with in the course of the three-year program [2]. Students are taught by teachers of the cooperation schools as well as by scientists of the AWI. Close links and intense cooperation between both groups are the basis of fundamental changes in teaching and learning climate. We are organizing expeditions for every group of HIGHSEA-students (e. g. to the Arctic or to mid-Atlantic seamounts). For each student expedition we devise a "real" research question. Usually a single working group at the AWI has a special interest in the

  19. Catholic High Schools and Their Finances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bredeweg, Frank H.

    This study presents financial data on Catholic high schools in five enrollment ranges across the country. The two objectives of the study were to acquire general data for national purposes and to develop specific models for managing Catholic high schools. Nine tables of data are available for reference. The first part of this report deals with…

  20. Teaching Information Literacy to High School Freshmen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabol, Elizabeth A.

    2007-01-01

    In this article, the author describes how the tragedy of a fire at Shikellamy High School in Sunbury, Pennsylvania helped her, together with Ellen Boyer, Shikellamy High School Drama/Communication Arts teacher, light a fire under their students. They were able to launch the new Information Literacy curriculum with an 11 period introduction to the…

  1. Defining High School Hazing: Control through Clarity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tokar, Krzysztof; Stewart, Craig

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the extent of hazing that had existed in former high school athletes who were enrolled in introduction to coaching classes in a Northern Rocky Mountain state. A nationally accepted survey was given to 189 college students of whom the majority had participated in high school sports. Results were…

  2. Parallel Processing at the High School Level.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheary, Kathryn Anne

    This study investigated the ability of high school students to cognitively understand and implement parallel processing. Data indicates that most parallel processing is being taught at the university level. Instructional modules on C, Linux, and the parallel processing language, P4, were designed to show that high school students are highly…

  3. Dual Enrollment for High School Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, Linsey; Hughes, Katherine

    2011-01-01

    Dual enrollment programs allow high school students to enroll in college courses and potentially earn college credit. The term concurrent enrollment is sometimes used interchangeably with dual enrollment, and sometimes to refer to a particular model of dual enrollment. In some programs, students earn high school and college credit simultaneously;…

  4. National Standards for High School Psychology Curricula

    Science.gov (United States)

    American Psychologist, 2013

    2013-01-01

    The "National Standards for High School Psychology Curricula" attempts to represent current knowledge in the field of psychology in developmentally appropriate ways. Psychology is a popular high school course, one that can introduce students to scientific ideas and engage students in the learning process. However, it is difficult for even the best…

  5. Astronomy Education Project for Guangdong High Schools

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2016-01-27

    Jan 27, 2016 ... Guangdong province is an active area in China for astronomy education and popularization. The current status and problems of astronomy education in high schools are reviewed. To tackle these problems, an astronomy education project for high school teachers and students was initiated by Guangzhou ...

  6. Midcentury Modern High Schools: Rebooting the Architecture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Havens, Kevin

    2010-01-01

    A high school is more than a building; it's a repository of memories for many community members. High schools built at the turn of the century are not only cultural and civic landmarks, they are also often architectural treasures. When these facilities become outdated, a renovation that preserves the building's aesthetics and character is usually…

  7. High School Student Attitudes about Physical Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rikard, G. Linda; Banville, Dominique

    2006-01-01

    This study examined attitudes of high school students toward fitness and sports activities taught in physical education, and the perceived effectiveness of their physical education curriculum for improving their fitness and skill levels. Students from six high schools and 17 intact physical education classes agreed to participate. Data were…

  8. 4 Key Findings for High Schools from "Looking Forward to High School and College"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allensworth, Elaine M.; Gwynne, Julia A.; Moore, Paul; de La Torre, Marisa

    2014-01-01

    The transition from eighth grade to high school results in a substantial drop in course performance for many students. These declines in performance lead students to fall off-track for obtaining high school and college degrees. By using data on students' middle grade performance, high school staff can set goals for their students to help them meet…

  9. Is Winning Everything?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stuart, Reginald

    2012-01-01

    A student's performance on the basketball court undeniably brings money into the coffers of many schools. At the same time, too many of the athletes, particularly Black student-athletes, are underperforming academically and are at risk of losing their NCAA eligibility and, more importantly, failing in college overall. According to "Keeping Score…

  10. Teaching Bioethics in High Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Araújo, Joana; Gomes, Carlos Costa; Jácomo, António; Pereira, Sandra Martins

    2017-01-01

    Objective: The Bioethics Teaching in Secondary Education (Project BEST) aims to promote the teaching of bioethics in secondary schools. This paper describes the development and implementation of the programme in Portugal. Design: Programme development involved two main tasks: (1) using the learning tools previously developed by the US Northwest…

  11. Especially for High School Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howell, J. Emory

    1998-12-01

    Secondary School Feature Articles * Demonstrations of the Enormity of Avogadro's Number, by Damon Diemente, p 1565. * The Egg in the Bottle Revisited: Air Pressure and Amontons' Law (Charles' Law), by Louis H. Adcock, p 1567 * CD-ROM Spectroscope: A Simple and Inexpensive Tool for Classroom Demonstrations on Chemical Spectroscopy, by Fumitaka Wakabayashi, Kiyohito Hamada, Kozo Sone, p 1569 Environmental Chemistry Resources

  12. The Preparation of Schools for Serious School Violence: An Analysis of New Mexico Public High Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    DiMatteo, Henry

    2012-01-01

    This study surveyed New Mexico high school principals on their current state of preparedness for serious school violence. The researcher surveyed 119 public high schools, receiving a 65% return rate from a 25-question survey. Specifically, this study analyzed the relationships of three predictor variables: prevention, response, and building of…

  13. Shifting Attendance Trajectories from Middle to High School: Influences of School Transitions and Changing School Contexts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benner, Aprile D.; Wang, Yijie

    2014-01-01

    In the current study, we examine patterns of school attendance across middle and high school with a diverse sample of 8,908 students (48% female; 54% Latino, 31% White, 13% African American, 2% Asian American). Attendance declined from middle through high school, but this overall pattern masked important variations. In total, 44% of students…

  14. Analysis of Institutional Competitiveness of Junior High Schools through the Admission Test to High School Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armendáriz, Joyzukey; Tarango, Javier; Machin-Mastromatteo, Juan Daniel

    2018-01-01

    This descriptive and correlational research studies 15,658 students from 335 secondary schools in the state of Chihuahua, Mexico, through the results of the examination of admission to high school education (National High School Admission Test--EXANI I from the National Assessment Center for Education--CENEVAL) on logical-mathematical and verbal…

  15. Split School of High Energy Physics 2015

    CERN Document Server

    2015-01-01

    Split School of High Energy Physics 2015 (SSHEP 2015) was held at the Faculty of Electrical Engineering, Mechanical Engineering and Naval Architecture (FESB), University of Split, from September 14 to September 18, 2015. SSHEP 2015 aimed at master and PhD students who were interested in topics pertaining to High Energy Physics. SSHEP 2015 is the sixth edition of the High Energy Physics School. Previous five editions were held at the Department of Physics, University of Sarajevo, Bosnia and Herzegovina.

  16. Successful Transition to High School. Research Brief

    Science.gov (United States)

    Education Partnerships, Inc., 2012

    2012-01-01

    What steps can be taken to assure that 8th graders make a successful transition to 9th grade? More students fail ninth grade than any other grade level. When middle school students took part in high school transition programs with a variety of different articulation activities, fewer students were retained in ninth grade. Ideally, these transition…

  17. Cultures of Learning in Effective High Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tichnor-Wagner, Ariel; Harrison, Christopher; Cohen-Vogel, Lora

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Research indicates that a culture of learning is a key factor in building high schools that foster academic achievement in all students. Yet less is known about which elements of a culture of learning differentiate schools with higher levels of academic performance. To fill this gap, this comparative case study examined the cultures of…

  18. STEM Applications in Turkish Science High Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colakoglu, Mustafa Hilmi

    2016-01-01

    The idea of establishing Science High Schools in Turkey was discussed in a multilateral project at the beginning of 1963. The Ministry of National Education (MoNE), Ford Foundation, Middle East Technical University (METU), Ankara University, and International Development Agency (AID) participated in this project to establish these schools. In…

  19. Junior High School Tardy Lock Out.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Carolyn A.

    This study describes and evaluates an experimental program for reducing tardiness in a rural junior high school. The subject school housed approximately 1,500 seventh- and eighth-grade students. Under the "Lock Out Program," first-time tardy students were given a one-day work detail in the cafeteria for 15 minutes of their lunch period.…

  20. Technology Leadership in Malaysia's High Performance School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yieng, Wong Ai; Daud, Khadijah Binti

    2017-01-01

    Headmaster as leader of the school also plays a role as a technology leader. This applies to the high performance schools (HPS) headmaster as well. The HPS excel in all aspects of education. In this study, researcher is interested in examining the role of the headmaster as a technology leader through interviews with three headmasters of high…

  1. High School Teachers' Identities: Constructing Civic Selves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obenchain, Kathryn M.; Balkute, Asta; Vaughn, Erin; White, Shannon

    2016-01-01

    Research suggests that teachers play a role in the type of citizenship education implemented in schools. The purpose of this qualitative case study was to explore how two high school teachers understood and enacted their civic identities as a dimension of their teacher identities. Findings suggest that factors contributing to an individual's civic…

  2. Scientific Literacy of High School Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucas, Keith B.; Tulip, David F.

    This investigation was undertaken in order to establish the status of scientific literacy among three groups of secondary school students in four Brisbane, Australia high schools, and to reduce the apparent reticence of science teachers to evaluate students' achievement in the various dimensions of scientific literacy by demonstrating appropriate…

  3. Frances Allen Wins Turing Award

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 12; Issue 8. Frances Allen Wins Turing Award. Priti Shankar. Article-in-a-Box Volume 12 Issue 8 August 2007 pp 5-5. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link: http://www.ias.ac.in/article/fulltext/reso/012/08/0005-0005. Author Affiliations.

  4. Frances Allen Wins Turing Award

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 12; Issue 8. Frances Allen Wins Turing Award. Priti Shankar. Article-in-a-Box Volume 12 Issue 8 August 2007 pp ... Author Affiliations. Priti Shankar1. Department of Computer Science and Automation, Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore 560 012, India ...

  5. High School Prayer Clubs: Can Students Perceive Religious Neutrality?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossow, Lawrence F; Rossow, Nancy D.

    1987-01-01

    Two distinctive populations, 262 high school students and 137 college students, were administered questionnaires to determine whether public high school students could perceive neutrality if school authorities permitted prayer clubs to meet on school premises before or after school. The data indicate that high school students cannot perceive…

  6. Case Studies of Leading Edge Small Urban High Schools. Relevance Strategic Designs: 8. High Tech High School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shields, Regis Anne; Ireland, Nicole; City, Elizabeth; Derderian, Julie; Miles, Karen Hawley

    2008-01-01

    This report is one of nine detailed case studies of small urban high schools that served as the foundation for the Education Resource Strategies (ERS) report "Strategic Designs: Lessons from Leading Edge Small Urban High Schools." These nine schools were dubbed "Leading Edge Schools" because they stand apart from other high…

  7. Future aircraft cabins and design thinking: optimisation vs. win-win scenarios

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Hall

    2013-06-01

    requirements using experiences from the A350 XWB and future cabin design concepts. In particular the paper explores the value of implementing design thinking insights in engineering practice and discusses the relative merits of decisions based on optimisation versus win-win scenarios for aircraft cabin design and wider applications in aerospace environments. The increasing densification of technological opportunities and shifting consumer demand coupled with highly complex systems may ultimately challenge our ability to make decisions based on optimisation balances. From an engineering design perspective optimisation tends to preclude certain strategies that deliver high quality results in consumer scenarios whereas win-win solutions may face challenges in complex technical environments.

  8. Shakespeare on the High School Stage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlusberg, Julian S.

    1981-01-01

    Describes activities involved in the planning and production of Shakespeare's "Othello" in a high school. Outlines methods used to develop strong student motivation and involvement in class and on stage. (JMF)

  9. CERN launches high-school internship programme

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnston, Hamish

    2017-07-01

    The CERN particle-physics lab has hosted 22 high-school students from Hungary in a pilot programme designed to show teenagers how science, technology, engineering and mathematics is used at the particle-physics lab.

  10. Educational discourse: Information technology in high school

    OpenAIRE

    Penkov Boris Victorovich

    2015-01-01

    Educational discourse demonstrates a number of characteristics, which can be analyzed and grouped according to various parameters. The Theme of Online and Blended Learning occupies a critical domain within the educational discourse, including the language of high school. The discourse of senior high school provides sets of stylistic and genre markers for the discourse, such as terminological and professional vocabulary that defines and clarifies concepts and categories within t...

  11. American high school students visit CERN

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2003-01-01

    Fifteen final-year students from Columbus High School, Mississippi, USA visited CERN recently with their physics teacher Ken Wester (left at rear). Mr Wester organized the trip after his participation in the 2002 edition of CERN's High School Teachers programme. The students visited the CMS construction site and the AD antimatter factory during their two-day visit. They are pictured here with Michel Della Negra, CMS spokesman (kneeling), in front of the model of the CMS detector in building 40.

  12. School lunch and snacking patterns among high school students: Associations with school food environment and policies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Story Mary

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Objectives This study examined associations between high school students' lunch patterns and vending machine purchases and the school food environment and policies. Methods A randomly selected sample of 1088 high school students from 20 schools completed surveys about their lunch practices and vending machine purchases. School food policies were assessed by principal and food director surveys. The number of vending machines and their hours of operation were assessed by trained research staff. Results Students at schools with open campus policies during lunchtime were significantly more likely to eat lunch at a fast food restaurant than students at schools with closed campus policies (0.7 days/week vs. 0.2 days/week, p Conclusion School food policies that decrease access to foods high in fats and sugars are associated with less frequent purchase of these items in school among high school students. Schools should examine their food-related policies and decrease access to foods that are low in nutrients and high in fats and sugars.

  13. BMC Ecology image competition 2014: the winning images

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    BMC Ecology showcases the winning entries from its second Ecology Image Competition. More than 300 individual images were submitted from an international array of research scientists, depicting life on every continent on earth. The journal’s Editorial Board and guest judge Caspar Henderson outline why their winning selections demonstrated high levels of technical skill and aesthetic sense in depicting the science of ecology, and we also highlight a small selection of highly commended images that we simply couldn’t let you miss out on. PMID:25178017

  14. Essays on Schools, Crime, and Punishment

    OpenAIRE

    Shollenberger, Tracey Lynn

    2015-01-01

    This dissertation consists of three essays on schools, crime, and punishment. The first essay — stemming from collaborative work with Christopher Jencks, Anthony Braga, and David Deming — uses longitudinal school and arrest records to examine the long-term effects of winning the lottery to attend one's first-choice high school on students' arrest outcomes in the Boston Public Schools. The second essay uses quasi-experimental regression and matching techniques to examine the effect of out-of-...

  15. Who's Teaching What in High School Physics?

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Susan; Tyler, John

    2015-01-01

    During the 2012-13 school year, approximately 27,000 teachers taught at least one physics course in a U.S. high school. About one-third of those teachers have earned a degree in physics or physics education; the vast majority of the others have earned degrees in a variety of other science fields. About 53,000 physics classes were taught, ranging…

  16. WINS. Market Simulation Tool for Facilitating Wind Energy Integration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shahidehpour, Mohammad [Illinois Inst. of Technology, Chicago, IL (United States)

    2012-10-30

    Integrating 20% or more wind energy into the system and transmitting large sums of wind energy over long distances will require a decision making capability that can handle very large scale power systems with tens of thousands of buses and lines. There is a need to explore innovative analytical and implementation solutions for continuing reliable operations with the most economical integration of additional wind energy in power systems. A number of wind integration solution paths involve the adoption of new operating policies, dynamic scheduling of wind power across interties, pooling integration services, and adopting new transmission scheduling practices. Such practices can be examined by the decision tool developed by this project. This project developed a very efficient decision tool called Wind INtegration Simulator (WINS) and applied WINS to facilitate wind energy integration studies. WINS focused on augmenting the existing power utility capabilities to support collaborative planning, analysis, and wind integration project implementations. WINS also had the capability of simulating energy storage facilities so that feasibility studies of integrated wind energy system applications can be performed for systems with high wind energy penetrations. The development of WINS represents a major expansion of a very efficient decision tool called POwer Market Simulator (POMS), which was developed by IIT and has been used extensively for power system studies for decades. Specifically, WINS provides the following superiorities; (1) An integrated framework is included in WINS for the comprehensive modeling of DC transmission configurations, including mono-pole, bi-pole, tri-pole, back-to-back, and multi-terminal connection, as well as AC/DC converter models including current source converters (CSC) and voltage source converters (VSC); (2) An existing shortcoming of traditional decision tools for wind integration is the limited availability of user interface, i.e., decision

  17. Cyberbullying Among Greek High School Adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gkiomisi, Athanasia; Gkrizioti, Maria; Gkiomisi, Athina; Anastasilakis, Dimitrios A; Kardaras, Panagiotis

    2017-05-01

    To investigate the presence of cyberbullying among Greek students and the efficacy of proposed preventive interventions. Three types of high schools (private, experimental and public) with different politics on on-line aggression were enrolled. All students of the aforementioned schools were asked to complete an anonymous questionnaire. Around 62 % of the high school students experienced cyberbullying by electronic means, especially by cell phone, mostly the public school students (p 0.008). The bully was a stranger in more than 40 % of the cases. Over 60 % of the victims had not seeked help but dealt with the attack on their own. Only 20 % of the victims manifested sleep or eating disorders, physical/ psychological symptoms or changes in their social life as a consequence of the cyber-attack. Cyberbullying is a usual phenomenon among high school students. The bully is frequently unacquainted to the victim. Most of the victims are not physically or psychologically affected by the cyber-attack and do not share the event with anyone. There was a slight difference in the response of the students to cyberbullying among the different school politics of on-line aggression.

  18. Superconductors in the High School Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lincoln, James

    2017-01-01

    In this article, we discuss the behavior of high-temperature superconductors and how to demonstrate them safely and effectively in the high school or introductory physics classroom. Included here is a discussion of the most relevant physics topics that can be demonstrated, some safety tips, and a bit of the history of superconductors. In an effort…

  19. Emergency contraception knowledge amongst female high school ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Emergency contraception (EC) is of public health importance for preventing unintended pregnancies and unsafe abortions. Challenged by the high incidence of unplanned pregnancies and unsafe abortions observed among female high school learners who were attending the clinics in Tswaing Sub-district of North West ...

  20. High School Teacher Perceptions of Empowerment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobs, Tricia S.

    2014-01-01

    As the responsibilities of principals become more complex and as accountability becomes more evident in K-12 cultures, it becomes increasingly important that high school principals be trained to empower teachers. This paper examined the research concerning the conditions of the empowerment of teachers. More specifically, it measured high school…

  1. Moving High School Students toward Physical Literacy

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacDonald, Lynn Couturier

    2015-01-01

    This article addresses teaching for skill and knowledge competency in high school based on the National Standards and grade-level outcomes. The outcomes guide teachers away from a curriculum that emphasizes competition through team sports, which appeals to just the highly-skilled and competitive students, toward one that is inclusive of all skill…

  2. Design Tech High School: d.tech

    Science.gov (United States)

    EDUCAUSE, 2015

    2015-01-01

    A Bay Area charter high school, d.tech develops "innovation-ready" students by combining content knowledge with the design thinking process while fostering a sense of autonomy and purpose. The academic model is grounded in self-paced learning through a flex schedule, high standards, and design thinking through a four-year design…

  3. Gait analysis by high school students

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heck, A.; van Dongen, C.

    2008-01-01

    Human walking is a complicated motion. Movement scientists have developed various research methods to study gait. This article describes how a high school student collected and analysed high quality gait data in much the same way that movement scientists do, via the recording and measurement of

  4. Gait Analysis by High School Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heck, Andre; van Dongen, Caroline

    2008-01-01

    Human walking is a complicated motion. Movement scientists have developed various research methods to study gait. This article describes how a high school student collected and analysed high quality gait data in much the same way that movement scientists do, via the recording and measurement of motions with a video analysis tool and via…

  5. Continuing Care in High Schools: A Descriptive Study of Recovery High School Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finch, Andrew J.; Moberg, D. Paul; Krupp, Amanda Lawton

    2014-01-01

    Data from 17 recovery high schools suggest programs are dynamic and vary in enrollment, fiscal stability, governance, staffing, and organizational structure. Schools struggle with enrollment, funding, lack of primary treatment accessibility, academic rigor, and institutional support. Still, for adolescents having received treatment for substance abuse, recovery schools appear to successfully function as continuing care providers reinforcing and sustaining therapeutic benefits gained from treatment. Small size and therapeutic programming allow for a potentially broader continuum of services than currently exists in most of the schools. Recovery schools thus provide a useful design for continuing care warranting further study and policy support. PMID:24591808

  6. After Installation: Ubiquitous Computing and High School Science in Three Experienced, High-Technology Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drayton, Brian; Falk, Joni K.; Stroud, Rena; Hobbs, Kathryn; Hammerman, James

    2010-01-01

    There are few studies of the impact of ubiquitous computing on high school science, and the majority of studies of ubiquitous computing report only on the early stages of implementation. The present study presents data on 3 high schools with carefully elaborated ubiquitous computing systems that have gone through at least one "obsolescence cycle"…

  7. Closing an Old School? Say Good-bye with a Farewell Bash.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krajewski, Robert

    1987-01-01

    To ease the pain of closing two delapidated high schools, the East Chicago (Indiana) City Schools threw a gala alumni farewell party. To organize a similar event, superintendents should galvanize staff, win the school board's support, publicize the event, involve the community, use incentives to boost attendance, encourage creativity, and keep a…

  8. 25 CFR 39.145 - Can a school receive both a small school adjustment and a small high school adjustment?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Can a school receive both a small school adjustment and a small high school adjustment? 39.145 Section 39.145 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR EDUCATION THE INDIAN SCHOOL EQUALIZATION PROGRAM Indian School Equalization Formula Small School...

  9. Developing High School Geoscientists through Summer Internships

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saltzman, J.

    2012-12-01

    High school students in the San Francisco Bay Area have the opportunity to contribute to Earth sciences research during the summer at Stanford University. The School of Earth Sciences hosts about 25 high school students each summer to support ongoing research, through more than just washing glassware. To increase diversity in the geosciences, we select students from diverse backgrounds through an application process which lessens the burden on busy faculty. The students work for 15-20 hours per week under the supervision of graduate students or postdoctoral fellows. The supervisors come to value the interns for a few reasons: not only are they getting some extra help with their research, but they are getting teaching experience in an informal but powerful way and supervising the interns' work over the summer. Another key part of the internship is bringing all of the interns together regularly. Whether it is for career talks, lab tours or field trip, high school students find kindred spirits in the group. Another important reason for weekly gatherings is to introduce the students to the wide field of Earth sciences and the different approaches and paths that scientists take. The summer ends with a culminating event where interns make short informal presentations about their research which give them an opportunity to articulate the big questions they have been helping to answer. Some interns are also invited to present a poster in a session for high school students at the Fall AGU meeting. These experiences of working in the laboratory and communicating about the research are part of the world of Earth sciences that are absent for most youth. The high school internships foster good will between Stanford and the local communities, help develop a more Earth and environmentally knowledgeable public and may have a long-term affect on diversifying the geosciences by exposing more young people to these fields.

  10. Freedom of Expression for High School Journalists: A Case Study of Selected North Carolina Public Schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, Kay D.

    A study examined the freedom of the high school press in North Carolina to determine whether publication guidelines should be in place, and if so, what those guidelines should contain. High school newspaper advisors, high school principals, and high school newspaper editors from large and small, urban and rural, eastern and western high schools…

  11. Mathematics Course-Taking in Rural High Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Rick; Chang, Beng

    2011-01-01

    Using data from the 2005 NAEP High School Transcript Study, this paper examines the mathematics course-taking of rural high school students. Although several studies indicate rural high school students' mathematics achievement is comparable to that of students in non-rural high schools, the mathematics course-taking patterns of rural and non-rural…

  12. Effect of Nanotechnology Instructions on Senior High School Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Chow-Chin; Sung, Chia-Chi

    2011-01-01

    In this research, we cooperate with senior high school teachers to understand current nanotechnology model of senior high school nanotechnology curriculum in Taiwan. Then design senior high school nanotechnology (nano-tech) curriculum to teach 503 senior high school students. After teaching the nano-tech curriculum we use the "Nanotechnology…

  13. Early predictors of high school mathematics achievement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siegler, Robert S; Duncan, Greg J; Davis-Kean, Pamela E; Duckworth, Kathryn; Claessens, Amy; Engel, Mimi; Susperreguy, Maria Ines; Chen, Meichu

    2012-07-01

    Identifying the types of mathematics content knowledge that are most predictive of students' long-term learning is essential for improving both theories of mathematical development and mathematics education. To identify these types of knowledge, we examined long-term predictors of high school students' knowledge of algebra and overall mathematics achievement. Analyses of large, nationally representative, longitudinal data sets from the United States and the United Kingdom revealed that elementary school students' knowledge of fractions and of division uniquely predicts those students' knowledge of algebra and overall mathematics achievement in high school, 5 or 6 years later, even after statistically controlling for other types of mathematical knowledge, general intellectual ability, working memory, and family income and education. Implications of these findings for understanding and improving mathematics learning are discussed.

  14. Winning Strategies: A Case Study of Oyo State Lottery, Nigeria

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    PROF. OLIVER OSUAGWA

    2014-06-01

    Jun 1, 2014 ... 3.1 Simulation of Lottery Strategies. The data used for this research work consisted of the year 2011 lottery winning numbers of the Daily draw type of game as collected from the Oyo State Lottery. Commission. The data was used to simulate the random, low frequency and high frequency game strategies.

  15. Opportunistic Cognitive Relaying: A Win-Win Spectrum Sharing Scheme

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luo Haiyan

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available A cost-effective spectrum sharing architecture is proposed to enable the legacy noncognitive secondary system to coexist with the primary system. Specifically, we suggest to install a few intermediate nodes, namely, the cognitive relays, to conduct the spectrum sensing and coordinate the spectrum access. To achieve the goal of win-win between primary and secondary systems, the cognitive relay may act as a cooperator for both of them, and an Opportunistic Cognitive Relaying (OCR scheme is specially devised. In this scheme, the cognitive relay opportunistically switches among three different working modes, that is, Relay for Primary Link (RPL, Relay for Secondary Link (RSL, or Relay for Neither of the Links (RNL, respectively, based on the channel-dependent observation of both systems. In addition, the transmit power for cognitive relay and secondary transmitter in each mode are optimally determined by maximizing the transmission rate of secondary system while keeping or even reducing the outage probability of primary system. Simulation results validate the efficiency of the proposed spectrum sharing scheme.

  16. Transitions from high school to college.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venezia, Andrea; Jaeger, Laura

    2013-01-01

    The vast majority of high school students aspire to some kind of postsecondary education, yet far too many of them enter college without the basic content knowledge, skills, or habits of mind they need to succeed. Andrea Venezia and Laura Jaeger look at the state of college readiness among high school students, the effectiveness of programs in place to help them transition to college, and efforts to improve those transitions. Students are unprepared for postsecondary coursework for many reasons, the authors write, including differences between what high schools teach and what colleges expect, as well as large disparities between the instruction offered by high schools with high concentrations of students in poverty and that offered by high schools with more advantaged students. The authors also note the importance of noncurricular variables, such as peer influences, parental expectations, and conditions that encourage academic study. Interventions to improve college readiness offer a variety of services, from academic preparation and information about college and financial aid, to psychosocial and behavioral supports, to the development of habits of mind including organizational skills, anticipation, persistence, and resiliency. The authors also discuss more systemic programs, such as Middle College High Schools, and review efforts to allow high school students to take college classes (known as dual enrollment). Evaluations of the effectiveness of these efforts are limited, but the authors report that studies of precollege support programs generally show small impacts, while the more systemic programs show mixed results. Dual-enrollment programs show promise, but the evaluation designs may overstate the results. The Common Core State Standards, a voluntary set of goals and expectations in English and math adopted by most states, offer the potential to improve college and career readiness, the authors write. But that potential will be realized, they add, only if the

  17. An Investigation of the Difference Between Pennsylvania Vocational School and Comprehensive High School Assessment Scores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blust, Ross S.; Hertzog, James F.

    In 1982 vocational schools participated in Pennsylvania's state assessment program, the Educational Quality Assessment (EQA). When EQA data were tabulated, the vocational school scores were low in comparison to the comprehensive high school scores. An analysis of the vocational school and comprehensive high school scores using state assessment…

  18. The relationship between high school students' academic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A descriptive comparative study to determine agriculture students= performance in science as compared to agriculture found superior performance in science than in agriculture. Students= performance in science was highly correlated with performance in agriculture. Students from urban, mission and single schools ...

  19. Project Laboratory in a High School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gluck, Paul

    2010-01-01

    We describe our experience in guiding a physics laboratory in the eleventh grade of a high school, in which regular laboratory classes are replaced by an experimental project carried out throughout the year. Some didactic suggestions and hints are given for those wishing to adopt such an undertaking. Outlines are given for a few of the recent…

  20. Socialism in High School Social Studies Textbooks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neumann, Richard

    2012-01-01

    This article concerns textbook analysis regarding the presentation of socialism in four leading high school social studies books, one in each of the following subjects: United States history, world history, United States government, and economics. Findings indicate that students relying on these texts to gain understanding of socialism and…

  1. AAPT/NSTA High School Physics Examination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, James

    1983-01-01

    Discusses development of the American Association of Physics Teachers and National Science Teachers Association (AAPT/NSTA) high school physics examination. Includes sample examination questions and distribution of topics: mechanics (30 percent), waves/optics/sound (20 percent), heat/kinetic theory (10 percent), electricity/magnetism (25 percent),…

  2. THE SOCIAL MANDATE FOR HIGH SCHOOL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olga L. Lushnikova

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: the problem of formulation of social mandate at the level of primary education is caused by integration, globalisation processes, and introduction of reforms in education. The contemporary society puts forward new requirements to education system which has to meet demands of various social actors, involved in the educational process. Social mandate is a tool of interaction between society and education by which the diverse consumers of educational services can express their educational needs. A student as the main subject of education takes the special place among the consumers of educational services. Clearly defined social mandates ensures quality of education, therefore this article focuses on the attempt of formulating social mandate for the high school on behalf of a learner. Materials and Methods: a theoretical analysis of pedagogical and sociological literature was made in the process of writing the article. Results: the domestic and international experience in elaboration of the social mandate for the high school was explored and summarised. The main targets of social mandate at the level of basic education was analysed. Discussion and Conclusions: the paper describes the specifics of formulation of the social mandate (specific interests, needs, requirements and requests to high school, that high school should work towards to be able to maintain its competitiveness in the modern market society.

  3. Singapore High School Students' Creativity Efficacy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Ai-Girl; Ho, Valerie; Yong, Lim-Chyi

    2007-01-01

    Background: Singapore education adopted nurturing creativity and developing creativity efficacy among their students and children. This study investigated Singapore high school students' creativity efficacy based on the contemporary model of creativity (Amabile, 1983, 1996), self efficacy (Bandura, 1989, 1997) and inclusion education. Aims:…

  4. High School Womens' Studies: A Working Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adler, Iris

    1976-01-01

    Discusses several difficulties in bringing the womens' movement into the high schools, noting a strong resistance to feminism by the students themselves. The authors course began with discussions on what it meant to be a girl, daughter, and female student; focused on women and the media; examined women in other cultures; and finally discussed…

  5. High School Football Injury Surveillance Studies, 1987.

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Athletic Trainers' Association, Inc., Greenville, NC.

    This series of newsletters and fact sheets provides information on the incidence of sport-related injuries in scholastic sports. The following topics are addressed: (1) how the National Athletic Trainers' Association (NATA) measures the number and severity of injuries; (2) facts about NATA; (3) injuries to high school football players; (4)…

  6. Formative Assessment in the High School IMC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, Valerie A.

    2007-01-01

    In this article, the author discusses how she uses formative assessments of information literacy skills in the high school IMC. As a result of informal observation and conversations with individual students--a form of formative assessment itself--the author learned that students were not using indexes to locate relevant information in nonfiction…

  7. Book Folders for High School Readers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fenner, Karen M.

    2005-01-01

    Book folders are an effective way of assessing and encouraging student reading of the high school level. The use of book folders, and how teachers utilize them, and how both reading and information literacy skills are promoted when teachers and library media specialists collaborate on this project are described.

  8. Teaching Strategies for High School Band.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teaching Music, 1999

    1999-01-01

    Provides a strategy, from the book entitled "Strategies for Teaching High School Band," that addresses Standard 8B of the National Standards for Music Education. Explains that students will discover relationships among music, visual art, and architecture of the Classical period. (CMK)

  9. Reading Interests of High School Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diaz-Rubin, C.

    1996-01-01

    Investigates the reading genre preferences of 254 male and female high school students in Pennsylvania. Draws comparisons with similar research done 10 years earlier. Finds a substantial change in reading interests. Notes the top 10 areas of interest are adventure, horror, mysteries, humor, murder, love, fantasy, crime, sports, and movies. (RS)

  10. High School Peer Helping: A Program Evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilgariff, Lisa; Solomon, Mindy; Zanotti, Mary; Chambliss, Catherine

    Peer helpers can act as liaisons to high school guidance departments by identifying problems, making appropriate referrals, and encouraging others to obtain professional help if necessary. An active program can help ensure that in the future students are better prepared to handle conflicts that arise within marriage, career, and family. This study…

  11. Early Predictors of High School Mathematics Achievement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siegler, Robert S.; Duncan, Greg J.; Davis-Kean, Pamela E.; Duckworth, Kathryn; Claessens, Amy; Engel, Mimi; Susperreguy, Maria Ines; Meichu, Chen

    2012-01-01

    Identifying the types of mathematics content knowledge that are most predictive of students' long-term learning is essential for improving both theories of mathematical development and mathematics education. To identify these types of knowledge, we examined long-term predictors of high school students' knowledge of algebra and overall mathematics…

  12. Gender Differences in Online High School Courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lowes, Susan; Lin, Peiyi; Kinghorn, Brian R. C.

    2016-01-01

    Prior research has suggested that there may be differences in the ways that male and female students approach their online courses. Using data for 802 high school students enrolled in 14 online courses, this study explored gender differences in the interrelationships among online behaviors and course performance. The findings show that females…

  13. Developing a Latin Curriculum for High School.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corn, Alan M.

    A guide for teachers developing a high school Latin curriculum provides a rationale, structure, and method for course planning at four difficulty levels. The approach is based on seven subject matter goals and specific instructional objectives for each, which are appended. The goals are: to help students (1) understand simple Latin syntax; (2)…

  14. Online Stock Market Games for High Schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopus, Jane; Placone, Dennis

    2002-01-01

    Identifies a Web site providing information about stock market simulations for high school economics courses. Divides the information into two tables: (1) the structure of online stock market games; and (2) the determination of portfolio values of online stock market games. States that changes and updates are available at Web sites. (JEH)

  15. HUMANITIES IN A JUNIOR HIGH SCHOOL.

    Science.gov (United States)

    KNIGHT, BONNIE M.

    A HUMANITIES COURSE HAS BEEN DEVELOPED FOR ACADEMICALLY ABLE SEVENTH-GRADE STUDENTS IN BRANCIFORTE JUNIOR HIGH SCHOOL IN SANTA CRUZ, CALIFORNIA. IN A TWO-PERIOD DAILY TIME BLOCK, STUDENTS LEARN ENGLISH, LITERATURE, AND LATIN, AND INVESTIGATE TOPICS IN ARCHEOLOGY, CULTURAL ANTHROPOLOGY, LINGUISTICS, PSYCHOLOGY, PHILOSOPHY, GREEK LITERATURE AND…

  16. Planning of high school examinations in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vidal, Rene Victor Valqui; Hansen, Michael Pilegaard

    1995-01-01

    This paper presents a computer based support system used to plan high school examinations in Denmark. We will discuss the methods and techniques used to solve such a complex and large scale combinatorial problem. Decomposition and other heuristic principles have been used extensively to develop...

  17. Examples from Astronomy for High School Physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dieterich, Sergio

    2016-01-01

    A formal course in physics is increasingly becoming a standard requirement in the high school curriculum. With that dissemination comes the challenge of reaching and motivating a population that is more diverse in their academic abilities and intrinsic motivation. The abstract nature of pure physics is often made more accessible when motivated by examples from everyday life, and providing copious mathematical as well as conceptual examples has become standard practice in high school physics textbooks. Astronomy is a naturally captivating subject and astronomical examples are often successful in capturing the curiosity of high school students as well as the general population. This project seeks to diversify the range of pedagogical materials available to the high school physics instructor by compiling and publishing specific examples where an astronomical concept can be used to motivate the physics curriculum. This collection of examples will consist of both short problems suitable for daily homework assignments as well as longer project style activities. Collaborations are encouraged and inquiries should be directed to sdieterich at carnegiescience dot edu.This work is funded by the NSF Astronomy and Astrophysics Postdoctoral Fellowship Program through NSF grant AST-1400680.

  18. Descriptive Chemistry in High School Curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajan, Raj G.

    1983-01-01

    Discusses incorporation of descriptive chemistry and scientific/technical writing at the high school level. After discussing the periodic table, each student prepares a paper discussing the history, atomic data, occurring/extraction/purification, properties, and uses of an element. (JN)

  19. High School Students' Attitudes toward Fitness Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mercier, Kevin; Silverman, Stephen

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the attitudes of high school students toward fitness testing. An instrument containing 18 items and four factors measuring student's attitudes toward fitness testing: cognitive, affect-enjoyment, affect-feelings, and affect-teacher was completed by 524 boys and 675 girls (N = 1199). MANOVA indicated…

  20. Neoliberalism inside Two American High Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cleary, Joseph, Jr.

    2017-01-01

    This article examines "neoliberalism" inside two American public high schools. The work of one leading critical theorist, Mark Olssen, is explained and examined. Particular attention is paid to Olssen's concepts of "homo economicus" and "manipulatable man." It is concluded that Olssen's theories on neoliberalism…

  1. Three Approaches to High School Classroom Music.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Brien, Wanda

    1985-01-01

    Three process-oriented approaches to high school classroom music--the problem-solving approach, the aesthetic criticism approach, and the interrelated fine arts approach--are discussed. These three approaches are recommended for curriculum reform related to the national reports. (RM)

  2. High School Dropout and Teen Childbearing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcotte, Dave E.

    2013-01-01

    Understanding the relationship between high school dropout and teen childbearing is complicated because both are affected by a variety of difficult to control factors. In this paper, I use panel data on aggregate dropout and fertility rates by age for all fifty states to develop insight by instrumenting for dropout using information on state…

  3. Generational Conflict Among High School Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobs, Ruth Harriet

    1971-01-01

    Young teachers have become socialized to new modes in the college youth cultures. They now return to the high schools to provide anticipatory socialization to the college scene for their students and to provide an opposition group to the traditional teachers and community values. (Author)

  4. Substance abuse among Iranian high school students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Momtazi, Saeed; Rawson, Richard

    2010-05-01

    In this study, we reviewed data on drug use among high school students in Iran. Published epidemiological studies in international and domestic journals show that drug use/abuse is a serious mental health problem in Iran. There is cultural support for opium in Iran and also there is cultural tolerance for tobacco smoking, especially as water pipe smoking in Iranian families. Alcohol, opium and cannabis are the most frequently used illicit drugs, but there are new emerging problems with anabolic steroids, ecstasy and stimulant substances, such as crystal methamphetamine. There is a serious drug abuse problem among Iranian high school students. It could be due to role modeling by parents - mainly fathers - and also cultural tolerance of some substances. Early onset of tobacco smoking, with a daily use rate between 4.4 and 12.8% in high school students, is an important risk factor for other drug abuse problems. Use of all types of drugs, except prescription drugs, is more prevalent among boys. Alcohol is the most frequently abused substance, with a lifetime rate of at least 9.9%. Lifetime rates of opiate use - mostly opium - was between 1.2 and 8.6% in different parts of the country. As drug abuse is a frequent problem among Iranian high school students, it is necessary to design and implement drug prevention programs to protect them. Such programs, including life skills training and drug education, have been operating in recent years for Iranian students from kindergarten to the university level.

  5. High School Journalism Experiences Influence Career Choices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dodd, Julie E.; And Others

    1991-01-01

    Describes a study of how University of Florida communications students developed their expectations of a career in communications. Identifies scholastic journalism experience, high school career decisions, personal reading, and a desire to write as common reasons for pursuing communications careers. Suggests areas for further research. (SG)

  6. Freedom of Expression and the High School Press

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reed, Linda

    1975-01-01

    Discusses practical resources available to high school administrators, teachers, and students through the ERIC system concerning freedom of speech for students involved with school-sponsored publications. (Author)

  7. School Start Times for Middle School and High School Students - United States, 2011-12 School Year.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wheaton, Anne G; Ferro, Gabrielle A; Croft, Janet B

    2015-08-07

    Adolescents who do not get enough sleep are more likely to be overweight; not engage in daily physical activity; suffer from depressive symptoms; engage in unhealthy risk behaviors such as drinking, smoking tobacco, and using illicit drugs; and perform poorly in school. However, insufficient sleep is common among high school students, with less than one third of U.S. high school students sleeping at least 8 hours on school nights. In a policy statement published in 2014, the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) urged middle and high schools to modify start times as a means to enable students to get adequate sleep and improve their health, safety, academic performance, and quality of life. AAP recommended that "middle and high schools should aim for a starting time of no earlier than 8:30 a.m.". To assess state-specific distributions of public middle and high school start times and establish a pre-recommendation baseline, CDC and the U.S. Department of Education analyzed data from the 2011-12 Schools and Staffing Survey (SASS). Among an estimated 39,700 public middle, high, and combined schools* in the United States, the average start time was 8:03 a.m. Overall, only 17.7% of these public schools started school at 8:30 a.m. or later. The percentage of schools with 8:30 a.m. or later start times varied greatly by state, ranging from 0% in Hawaii, Mississippi, and Wyoming to more than three quarters of schools in Alaska (76.8%) and North Dakota (78.5%). A school system start time policy of 8:30 a.m. or later provides teenage students the opportunity to achieve the 8.5-9.5 hours of sleep recommended by AAP and the 8-10 hours recommended by the National Sleep Foundation.

  8. Reduction of Social Inequality in High School

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Ulla Højmark

    2014-01-01

    This article explores structures in the learning environment at the classroom level that can contribute to reduction of social inequality in education. It draws on qualitative observation studies of Latino’s in high schools in New York City, USA, by a Danish researcher. The purpose of this article...... is to explore ‘good examples’ from an outsider’s perspective and there by create an empirical and theoretical focus on how school characteristics and structures cross boarders are connected to the reduction of social inequality in education....

  9. European School of High-Energy Physics

    CERN Document Server

    2007-01-01

    The European School of High-Energy Physics is intended to give young experimental and phenomenological physicists an introduction to the theoretical aspects of recent advances in elementary particle physics. These proceedings contain lecture notes on the Standard Model of electroweak interactions, Monte Carlo generators, relativistic heavy-ion physics, the flavour dynamics and CP violation in the Standard Model, cosmology, and high-energy neutrino astronomy with IceCube.

  10. Grades, Coursework, and Student Characteristics in High School Economics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rebeck, Ken; Walstad, William B.

    2015-01-01

    The authors use U.S. public and private high school transcripts to analyze grade distribution patterns in economics courses across student and school characteristics, and compare these grades to those earned in other selected high school courses. Results are reported for the 53 percent of 2009 high school graduates who took a basic economics…

  11. Building a Virtual High School...Click by Click

    Science.gov (United States)

    Podoll, Sue; Randle, Darcy

    2005-01-01

    The Rapid City Academy is the alternative high school program for South Dakota's Rapid City Area Schools, which has an enrollment of about 13,000 K-12 students, with five middle schools feeding two large traditional high schools and the alternative program. A high percentage of students at the academy are considered "at-risk" due to…

  12. Harmfulness of smoking among high school students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iwona Rotter

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The aim of the study was to assess the level of awareness of smoking and non smoking students on harmful impact of nicotine and cigarette smoke on human body. Material and methods: The study was carried out in March 2011 in high schools in Szczecin. Own elaborated questionnaire was used. 288 students from high school, technical college and vocational school were tested. Results: The majority of responders (95,1% claimed that cigarette smoke is harmful both for passive and active smokers. They most often pinpoint the direct cause connected with smoking to pulmonary diseases (264 persons and cancers (240 persons. Almost 90% of students found negative impact of tobacco products on development of fetus of pregnant women. Overwhelming majority of respondents (83,2% feels anxious if it comes to stay in a room filled with smoke. Conclusions: The awareness of high school students on negative influence of smoking on human body is quite satisfactory, but there is still a need for more education in the range of diseases and symptoms connected with smoking.

  13. How African American and Hispanic High School Students in an Urban Charter High School May Benefit from the Early College High School Model of Receiving College Credits?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pitchford-Nicholas, Gloria Jean

    2015-01-01

    The preparedness of students to enter college is an ongoing issue of national concern. The purpose of the study was to conduct a mixed method descriptive case study to answer the question: "How African-American and Hispanic High School Students in an Urban Charter High School may benefit from the Early College High School Model of receiving…

  14. Case Study: International High School at Langley Park

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wassl, Frishtah; Wilkin, Christine; Ward, Maggie

    2017-01-01

    The International High School at Langley Park (IHSLP) opened during the 2015-2016 school year. By the fourth year of operation, the school will be home to 400 English language learners (ELLs) new to the United States. Working in partnership with the Internationals Network for Public Schools, the school is designed around the "HELLO…

  15. The Achilles Heel of Catholic Education: Why Have Catholic Schools Failed to Develop Programs for the Gifted and Talented?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, James R.; Carney, Thomas

    1987-01-01

    Offers data on Catholic schools' inability to win academic competitions. Examines reasons Catholic schools have not emphasized high-level training for gifted and talented students. Contends that ideas such as goal-orientation and self-actualization are appropriate for today's Catholic school. (DMM)

  16. Descriptive study of dental injury incurred by junior high school and high school students during participation in school sports clubs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nonoyama, Toshiya; Shimazaki, Yoshihiro; Nakagaki, Haruo; Tsuge, Shinpei

    2016-12-01

    Students often injure their teeth during participation in school-based sports clubs. This study examined the frequencies and types of dental injuries sustained at school sports clubs and compared the risk of dental injury among different sports. Based on injury statistics from the Japan Sport Council of the junior high schools and high schools in seven prefectures during fiscal year 2006, the risk of dental injury was estimated using a rate ratio (RR) by calculating the ratio of occurrence of dental injury under various circumstances. The RRs of exercise-related dental injury for boys and girls in junior high school were 0.7 (P sports clubs than outside school sports clubs among high school boys. Contact or limited-contact sports had significantly higher risks for dental injuries than did noncontact sports. The results of this study suggest that teachers and administrators at schools should pay attention to the risk of dental injury among students participating in high-risk sports. © 2016 FDI World Dental Federation.

  17. Astrobiology in an Urban New York City High School: John Dewey High School's Space Science Academy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fried, B.; Dash, H. B.

    2010-04-01

    John Dewey High School's participation in NASA's MESDT and DLN projects and other partnerships provide opportunities for our diverse population, focusing particular attention to under-represented and under-served groups in the field of Space Science.

  18. High School Improvement: Indicators of Effectiveness and School-Level Benchmarks

    Science.gov (United States)

    National High School Center, 2012

    2012-01-01

    The National High School Center's "Eight Elements of High School Improvement: A Mapping Framework" provides a cohesive high school improvement framework comprised of eight elements and related indicators of effectiveness. These indicators of effectiveness allow states, districts, and schools to identify strengths and weaknesses of their current…

  19. The Chinese High School Student's Stress in the School and Academic Achievement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yangyang; Lu, Zuhong

    2011-01-01

    In a sample of 466 Chinese high school students, we examined the relationships between Chinese high school students' stress in the school and their academic achievements. Regression mixture modelling identified two different classes of the effects of Chinese high school students' stress on their academic achievements. One class contained 87% of…

  20. Bayesian modeling using WinBUGS

    CERN Document Server

    Ntzoufras, Ioannis

    2009-01-01

    A hands-on introduction to the principles of Bayesian modeling using WinBUGS Bayesian Modeling Using WinBUGS provides an easily accessible introduction to the use of WinBUGS programming techniques in a variety of Bayesian modeling settings. The author provides an accessible treatment of the topic, offering readers a smooth introduction to the principles of Bayesian modeling with detailed guidance on the practical implementation of key principles. The book begins with a basic introduction to Bayesian inference and the WinBUGS software and goes on to cover key topics, including: Markov Chain Monte Carlo algorithms in Bayesian inference Generalized linear models Bayesian hierarchical models Predictive distribution and model checking Bayesian model and variable evaluation Computational notes and screen captures illustrate the use of both WinBUGS as well as R software to apply the discussed techniques. Exercises at the end of each chapter allow readers to test their understanding of the presented concepts and all ...

  1. Winning at litigation through decision analysis creating and executing winning strategies in any litigation or dispute

    CERN Document Server

    Celona, John

    2016-01-01

    This book is the first in-depth guide to applying the philosophy, theory, and methods of decision analysis to creating and executing winning legal strategies. With explanations that progress from introductory to advanced and practice problems at the end of each chapter, this is a book the reader will want to use and refer to for years to come. Practicing decision analysts, operations research and management science students, attorneys and law students will find this book an invaluable addition to their knowledge and skills. John Celona has over three decades of experience in teaching and applying decision analysis. John lectures in the School of Engineering at Stanford University and is on faculty at The Stanford Center for Professional Development, the American Course on Drug Development and Regulatory Sciences, and the Academy of the American Society for Healthcare Risk Management.

  2. School Violence, Substance Use, and Availability of Illegal Drugs on School Property among U.S. High School Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lowry, Richard; Cohen, Lisa R.; Modzeleski, William; Kann, Laura; Collins, Janet L.; Kolbe, Lloyd J.

    1999-01-01

    Investigated whether school violence among high school students related to substance use and availability of illegal drugs at school, examining the associations of tobacco, alcohol, and marijuana and availability of illegal drugs with five school violence indicators. Data from the 1995 Youth Risk Behavior Survey indicated that school violence…

  3. Superconductors in the high school classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lincoln, James

    2017-11-01

    In this article, we discuss the behavior of high-temperature superconductors and how to demonstrate them safely and effectively in the high school or introductory physics classroom. Included here is a discussion of the most relevant physics topics that can be demonstrated, some safety tips, and a bit of the history of superconductors. In an effort to include first-year physics students in the world of modern physics, a topic as engaging as superconductivity should not be missed. It is an opportunity to inspire students to study physics through the myriad of possible applications that high temperature superconductors hold for the future.

  4. The Effect of High School Shootings on Schools and Student Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beland, Louis-Philippe; Kim, Dongwoo

    2016-01-01

    We analyze how fatal shootings in high schools affect schools and students using data from shooting databases, school report cards, and the Common Core of Data. We examine schools' test scores, enrollment, number of teachers, graduation, attendance, and suspension rates at schools that experienced a shooting, employing a difference-in-differences…

  5. Project Synopsis for High School/High Tech

    Science.gov (United States)

    1997-01-01

    To help increase the diversity of workers at NASA centers it is necessary to provide students with disabilities the opportunities to explore careers in high technology. HIGH SCHOOL/HIGH TECH, an enrichment program, pioneered at Goddard Space Flight Center, successfully introduces students with disabilities to high tech careers. This community-based partnership serves as a model for three additional NASA sites-Ames Research Center, Johnson Space Flight Center, and Lewis Research Center. For a three year period beginning August 15, 1995, provide financial and technical support to a local agency in each NASA center area which serves persons with disabilities to enable a High School/High Tech program to develop and stand alone. Each project will develop a basis of cooperation with Ames, Johnson, and Lewis as well as a variety of community groups including the public schools, high tech employers, post-secondary education and training programs, rehabilitation agencies, and community economic development organizations. Throughout the startup period and thereafter, local youths with disabilities will have early exposure to professions in mathematics, science, and technology-related fields. This exposure will be multifaceted to insure adequate opportunity for realistic career exploration so these youths have an opportunity to test their interests and abilities. The exposure will be presented in the most supportive environment that is feasible.

  6. The Effect of High School Shootings on Schools and Student Performance

    OpenAIRE

    Beland, Louis-Philippe; Kim, Dongwoo

    2014-01-01

    We analyze how fatal shootings in high schools affect schools and students using data from shooting databases, school report cards, and the Common Core of Data. We examine schools’ test scores, enrollment, and number of teachers, as well as graduation, attendance, and suspension rates at schools that experienced a shooting, employing a difference-in-differences strategy that uses other high schools in the same district as the comparison group. Our findings suggest that homicidal shootings s...

  7. Living Democracy: How Constitution High School Molds Better Citizens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brasof, Marc

    2009-01-01

    Philadelphia's Constitution High School (CHS) is committed both to the theory of education for democracy, and to its practice, as reflected by a school constitution, student elections, town hall meetings, and active student participation in school government. As its name indicates, CHS is a theme-based high school that focuses on history,…

  8. The Transition to High School: What Matters to Parents?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gardner, Lee Nathan

    2014-01-01

    The transition from middle school to high school continues to challenge students, parents, and schools. Parents are recognized as important influences, but the current literature provides limited information about what matters to parents and what role parents may play in determining the success of students making the transition to high school.…

  9. Virtual Learning Simulations in High School

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thisgaard, Malene Warming; Makransky, Guido

    2017-01-01

    The present study compared the value of using a virtual learning simulation compared to traditional lessons on the topic of evolution, and investigated if the virtual learning simulation could serve as a catalyst for STEM academic and career development, based on social cognitive career theory....... The investigation was conducted using a crossover repeated measures design based on a sample of 128 high school biology/biotech students. The results showed that the virtual learning simulation increased knowledge of evolution significantly, compared to the traditional lesson. No significant differences between......, but not outcome expectations. The findings suggest that virtual learning simulations are at least as efficient in enhancing learning and self-efficacy as traditional lessons, and high schools can thus use them as supplementary educational methods. In addition, the findings indicate that virtual learning...

  10. The High School student’s journey:

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gholamian, Jamshid

    The aim of this paper is to examine the construction of self and other in counseling conversations between students with an ethnic minority background and counselors in 3 high schools in Copenhagen, Denmark. The analysis is based on Russian philosopher Mikhail Bakhtin’s literary theory of Chronot......The aim of this paper is to examine the construction of self and other in counseling conversations between students with an ethnic minority background and counselors in 3 high schools in Copenhagen, Denmark. The analysis is based on Russian philosopher Mikhail Bakhtin’s literary theory...... of threshold, which is marked by a higher degree of intensity in emotions and values. The conclusion is that counselor’s require not only cultural sensitivity, more importantly, they need language based sensitivity....

  11. Premenstrual syndrome (PMS among high school students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Buddhabunyakan N

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Nattapong Buddhabunyakan, Srinaree Kaewrudee, Chompilas Chongsomchai, Sukree Soontrapa, Woraluk Somboonporn, Jen Sothornwit Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Faculty of Medicine, Khon Kaen University, Khon Kaen, Thailand Background: Premenstrual syndrome (PMS is a common health problem among adolescents.Objective: To assess the prevalence of PMS in Thai high school students.Materials and methods: This was a prospective study conducted among menstruating high school students in Khon Kaen, Thailand, from September to December, 2015. Participants were asked to prospectively complete an anonymous questionnaire, which included information about demographic data, menstrual patterns, and symptoms to be recorded on a daily calendar of premenstrual experiences according to the diagnostic criteria proposed by the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists. All of the data were prospectively recorded for 90 consecutive days.Results: Of the 399 participants, 289 (72.4% completed the self-report questionnaire. Eighty-six participants (29.8%; 95% CI, 24.5%–35.4% reported having PMS. The most common somatic and affective symptoms among participants with PMS were breast tenderness (74.4% and angry outbursts (97.7%. There were significant differences between the PMS and non-PMS groups, and PMS was associated with various problems related to educational activities, including lack of concentration and motivation, poor individual work performance, poor collaborative work performance, and low scores. However, there were no significant differences regarding interpersonal relationships between the PMS and non-PMS groups.Conclusions: PMS is a common menstrual disorder among Thai high school students. The most common symptoms reported in this study were angry outbursts and breast tenderness. Keywords: premenstrual symptoms, prevalence, association, high school students

  12. Citizenship Engagement: Responses from High School Students

    OpenAIRE

    Martin, Leisa A.

    2017-01-01

    In the United States, the main mission of social studies education is to prepare students for citizenship. With this in mind, the following study examined 191 high school students’ views on how they demonstrated citizenship. Traditionally with this age group, personally responsible citizenship has been a common form of self-reported citizenship engagement. However, in this study, the students seemed to conceptualize citizenship differently. With the Akwesasne Mohawk students, the European Ame...

  13. Sunbed Use Among Belgrade High School Students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Škiljević Dušan

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The incidence of melanoma has been increasing worldwide. Ultraviolet (UV radiation from the sun and sunbeds are the major risk factors for the development of melanoma and non-melanoma skin cancers. Excessive UV exposure during childhood and adolescence increases the probablity of skin cancer in adulthood. The objective of this study was to analyze the exposure to artificial UV radiation using sunbeds among Belgrade high school students.

  14. Cheerleading Injuries in United States High Schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Currie, Dustin W; Fields, Sarah K; Patterson, Michael J; Comstock, R Dawn

    2016-01-01

    Approximately 400 000 students participate in US high school cheerleading annually, including 123,386 involved in competitive spirit squads. The degree of athleticism and the difficulty of cheerleading skills have increased in recent decades, renewing safety concerns. This study describes the epidemiology of high school cheerleading injuries and compares cheerleading injury rates and patterns relative to other sports. Data collected by the longitudinal, National High School Sports-Related Injury Surveillance Study from 2009/2010 through 2013/2014 were analyzed. Injury rates in cheerleading ranked 18th of 22 sports, with an overall injury rate of 0.71 per 1000 athlete-exposures (AEs). Competition (0.85) and practice (0.76) injury rates were similar, whereas performance rates were lower (0.49). Although 96.8% of injured cheerleaders were girls, the overall injury rate was higher in boys (1.33 vs 0.69, rate ratio [RR]: 1.93, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.30-2.88). Although concussions were the most common cheerleading injury (31.1% of injuries), concussion rates were significantly lower in cheerleading (2.21 per 10,000 athlete-exposures) than all other sports combined (3.78; RR: 0.58, 95% CI: 0.51-0.66) and all other girls' sports (2.70; RR: 0.82, 95% CI: 0.72-0.93). Over half of all injuries occurred during stunts (53.2%). Although safety remains a concern among cheerleaders, overall injury rates are lower than most other high school sports. Although overall injury rates are relatively low, cheerleading injuries may be more severe when they do occur. A detailed knowledge of cheerleading injury patterns relative to other sports is needed to drive targeted, evidence-based prevention efforts. Copyright © 2016 by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

  15. High School, Hemorrhage, and a (Mechanical) Heart:

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ounanian, Kristen

    , “resortification”—the compounding effects of diminishing opportunities in fisheries and the community’s geographic remoteness from much of Cape Cod and larger metropolitan areas. The closure of the local high school, a bellwether of change, emblemized this local transformation. Additionally, corporeal imagery, (e......, in its examination of the mobility of fishing access and residents out of a place, new capital into a place, and the material emblems of a community whose future is in question....

  16. At-risk high school seniors: Science remediation for Georgia's High School Graduation Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carroll, Carolyn M.

    State departments of education have created a system of accountability for the academic achievement of students under the mandate of the No Child Left Behind Act of 2001. The Georgia Department of Education established the Georgia High School Graduation Test (GHSGT) as their method of evaluating the academic achievement of high school students. The GHSGT consist of five sections and students must pass all five sections before students they are eligible to receive a diploma. The purpose of the study was to examine the effects of teacher-lead and computer based remediation for a group of high school seniors who have been unsuccessful in passing the science portion of the GHSGT. The objectives of this study include (a) Identify the most effective method of remediation for at-risk students on the science section of the GHSGT, and (b) evaluate the methods of remediation for at-risk students on the science section of GHSGT available to high school students. The participants of this study were at-risk seniors enrolled in one high school during the 2007-2008 school year. The findings of this research study indicated that at-risk students who participated in both types of remediation, teacher-led and computer-based, scored significantly higher than the computer-based remediation group alone. There was no significant relationship between the test scores and the number of times the students were tested.

  17. Microfluidics for High School Chemistry Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hemling, Melissa; Crooks, John A; Oliver, Piercen M; Brenner, Katie; Gilbertson, Jennifer; Lisensky, George C; Weibel, Douglas B

    2014-01-14

    We present a laboratory experiment that introduces high school chemistry students to microfluidics while teaching fundamental properties of acid-base chemistry. The procedure enables students to create microfluidic systems using nonspecialized equipment that is available in high school classrooms and reagents that are safe, inexpensive, and commercially available. The experiment is designed to ignite creativity and confidence about experimental design in a high school chemistry class. This experiment requires a computer program (e.g., PowerPoint), Shrinky Dink film, a readily available silicone polymer, weak acids, bases, and a colorimetric pH indicator. Over the span of five 45-min class periods, teams of students design and prepare devices in which two different pH solutions mix in a predictable way to create five different pH solutions. Initial device designs are instructive but rarely optimal. During two additional half-class periods, students have the opportunity to use their initial observations to redesign their microfluidic systems to optimize the outcome. The experiment exposes students to cutting-edge science and the design process, and solidifies introductory chemistry concepts including laminar flow, neutralization of weak acids-bases, and polymers.

  18. Forensic Science Curriculum for High School Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burgess, Christiana J.

    Over the last several decades, forensic science---the application of science to civil and criminal legal matters---has become of increasing popularity with the public. The range of disciplines within the field is immense, offering individuals the potential for a unique career, regardless of their specific interests or expertise. In response to this growth, many organizations, both public and private, have recognized the need to create forensic science programs that strive to maintain and enhance the quality of forensic science education. Unfortunately, most of the emphasis placed on developing these materials relates to post-secondary education, and creates a significant lack of forensic science educational materials available in the U.S., especially in Oklahoma. The purpose of this project was to create a high school curriculum that provides the foundation for building a broad, yet comprehensive, overview of the field of forensic science and its associated disciplines. The overall goal was to create and provide course materials to high school teachers in order to increase their knowledge of forensic science such that they are able to teach its disciplines effectively and with accuracy. The Forensic Science Curriculum for High School Students includes sample lesson plans, PowerPoint presentations, and lab activities with step-by-step instructions.

  19. A Study on the Motivation of Mexican High School Students to Attend High School

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosa del Carmen Flores Macías

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Motivation studies have focused on three aspects that are important for their educational implications: relevant variables for assessing motivation to attend school; motivational differences between students with different academic performance, and changes in motivation as they advance in school. Considering these aspects, the present study was developed with these objectives: to develop, and to set up the validity and reliability of a psychometric instrument for investigating how people perceive different motivational variables regarding various school activities typical of the Mexican junior high school; and to find out whether there is a relationship between motivational variables and academic achievement, grade level and gender. The results indicate that academic performance is related to the way motivation is perceived, that students change their perception of motivation during their school life, and that boys and girls differ concerning this only in some respects.

  20. Merits of Undergraduate and High School Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenney, John

    2016-06-01

    When it comes to sports, everyone gets it; you have to play to really understand, experience, and learn what the game is all about. It would be ludicrous to teach basketball by practicing basketball fundamentals in the gym (layups, free throws, jump shots, dribbling, defense), reading about and attending professional basketball games, but never playing in a game. As important as classes and teaching laboratories may be in science education, there is simply no substitute for active engagement in scientific research to show students what science is all about and, perhaps even more importantly, to inspire and motivate them to become scientists or at least appreciate science. It is a widely held misconception that a student cannot really do meaningful, publishable scientific research until he/she is in graduate school. In actual fact, college undergraduates and even high school students can make original and significant scientific research contributions. Astronomical research, in particular, is very well suited to engage the beginning high school or college undergraduate researcher. The night sky’s inherent accessibility and also its inherent grandeur are natural draws for the curious student’s mind. And much can be learned and discovered using small telescopes. In sports, joining a team is a key aspect of the sports experience. Similarly in science, joining a research team and thereby entering a “community of scientific practice” is fundamental and transformational. As important as working with equipment and acquiring data happen to be in scientific research, this is only the beginning of the research process. Student researchers of all ages—particularly high school students and college undergraduates—have much to gain by giving presentations on their research, writing up their results for publication, and going through the peer review process. But this only works if the student researchers are imbedded within the community of practice.

  1. SOCIAL CHARACTERISTICS OF HIGH SCHOOL STUDENTS PLANNING TO PURSUE POST HIGH SCHOOL VOCATIONAL TRAINING. FINAL REPORT NO. 17.

    Science.gov (United States)

    BOWLES, ROY T.; SLOCUM, WALTER L.

    THE CHARACTERISTICS OF STUDENTS PLANNING POST-HIGH SCHOOL BUSINESS EDUCATION, VOCATIONAL EDUCATION, SOME COLLEGE, AND COLLEGE GRADUATION ARE IDENTIFIED. A STRATIFIED RANDOM SAMPLE OF 3,117 JUNIOR AND SENIOR STUDENTS IN 12 HIGH SCHOOLS PROVIDED DATA FOR COMPARING SCHOOL EXPERIENCES AND ATTITUDES TOWARDS SCHOOL, FAMILY BACKGROUND, PEER GROUP…

  2. Case Studies of Leading Edge Small Urban High Schools. Personalization Strategic Designs: 9. MetWest High School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shields, Regis Anne; Ireland, Nicole; City, Elizabeth; Derderian, Julie; Miles, Karen Hawley

    2008-01-01

    This report is one of nine detailed case studies of small urban high schools that served as the foundation for the Education Resource Strategies (ERS) report "Strategic Designs: Lessons from Leading Edge Small Urban High Schools." These nine schools were dubbed "Leading Edge Schools" because they stand apart from other high…

  3. Case Studies of Leading Edge Small Urban High Schools. Core Academic Strategic Designs: 2. Noble Street Charter High School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shields, Regis Anne; Ireland, Nicole; City, Elizabeth; Derderian, Julie; Miles, Karen Hawley

    2008-01-01

    This report is one of nine detailed case studies of small urban high schools that served as the foundation for the Education Resource Strategies (ERS) report "Strategic Designs: Lessons from Leading Edge Small Urban High Schools." These nine schools were dubbed "Leading Edge Schools" because they stand apart from other high…

  4. High School Physics Courses & Enrollments: Results from the 2012-13 Nationwide Survey of High School Physics Teachers. Focus On

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Susan; Tesfaye, Casey Langer

    2014-01-01

    This report examines enrollments in high school physics during the 2012-13 school year. Based on data from the most recent survey (which includes both public and private high schools in the U.S.), it is estimated that 39% of the class of 2013 took high school physics before graduating. During the 2012-13 school year, 1.38 million students were…

  5. Graduation Rates in South Carolina Public High Schools: The Effect of School Size and Socioeconomic Status

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivers, Thomas E., Jr.

    2012-01-01

    This study included a comparison of the graduation rates among high schools in South Carolina closely analyzing school size and socioeconomic status. The purpose for the study was to answer two questions: What patterns and relationships exist between school size and graduation rates at high schools in South Carolina? What patterns and…

  6. Relations between Popularity and Prosocial Behavior in Middle School and High School Chinese Adolescents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Ting; Li, Ling; Niu, Li; Jin, Shenghua; French, Doran C.

    2018-01-01

    The concurrent and longitudinal associations between popularity, likeability, and prosocial behavior were evaluated in this three-year study of middle school and high school Chinese adolescents. The initial sample included 766 middle school (mean age = 13.3 years) and 668 high school participants (mean age = 16.6 years); there were 880 (399 girls)…

  7. High Pressure Reform: Examining Urban Schools' Response to Multiple School Choice Policies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holme, Jennifer Jellison; Carkhum, Rian; Rangel, Virginia Snodgrass

    2013-01-01

    Over the past several decades, policymakers have sought to address the problem of school failure by exposing traditional public schools to competitive market forces. In this analysis, we examine how two traditional public schools in a "high pressure/high choice" urban school cluster in Texas responded to a number of overlapping choice…

  8. Case Studies of Leading Edge Small Urban High Schools. Relevance Strategic Designs: 6. Perspectives Charter School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shields, Regis Anne; Ireland, Nicole; City, Elizabeth; Derderian, Julie; Miles, Karen Hawley

    2008-01-01

    This report is one of nine detailed case studies of small urban high schools that served as the foundation for the Education Resource Strategies (ERS) report "Strategic Designs: Lessons from Leading Edge Small Urban High Schools." These nine schools were dubbed "Leading Edge Schools" because they stand apart from other high…

  9. Female Leadership and School Effectiveness in Junior High Schools in Ghana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agezo, Clement Kwadzo

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this research is to examine female principal leadership practices that are considered crucial in the effectiveness and improvement of schools and school administration in Ghanaian junior high schools. Design/methodology/approach: The study was qualitative and interpretive. Five principals of junior high schools were…

  10. HIGH SCHOOL STUDENTS’ VIEWS ON BLENDED LEARNING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ibrahim Umit YAPICI,

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available In this study, it is aimed to determine the high school students’ views on blended learning. The study was carried out in biology course for the lesson unit of “Classification of Living Things and Biodiversity” with 47 9th grade students attending Nevzat Ayaz Anatolian High School in the second term of the academic year of 2009-2010. The lessons were taught in a way appropriate to the blended learning model both via the Internet and on face-to-face basis. As the online dimension of the blended learning model, Moodle, a Learning Management System (LMS, was used. The application lasted 10 weeks. The scale of learners’ views on blended learning was applied and interviews were held to determine the views. As a result of the analysis of the scale, it was seen that their views were “highly” positive. The interviews held with the students revealed that the blended learning model provided students with various opportunities such as getting prepared for the lessons, reviewing the lessons as many times as wanted, reaching the subject-related materials without being dependent on time and place, testing oneself and communicating with the teacher and other students out of the school. The interviews also revealed that there were various problems though such as lack of Internet connection at home and problems experienced while playing the videos.

  11. Health Literacy among Iranian High School Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khajouei, Reza; Salehi, Fatemeh

    2017-03-01

    We examined the health lit- eracy status of high school students in Kerman, Iran. This descriptive cross-sectional study was conducted at high schools in Kerman. Data concerning 3 dimensions of health literacy (health knowledge, health skills and health be- haviors) were collected from 312 students using an adapted version of a valid and reliable questionnaire developed by the Ministry of Health of China. Data analysis was performed by descriptive statistics and chi-square analysis using SPSS version 22. The average age of the students was 16 ± 3 years and 50% (N = 156) of them were girls. Twenty-nine percent of students gained a health literacy score between 37 and 47 (adequate). A statistically significant relationship was found between health literacy and type of school (p health literacy requiring serious interventions by authorities and policy-makers. Incorporating subjects such as mental health, prevention of addiction, and puberty and sexual health into educational curricula can improve Iranian students' health literacy.

  12. The Treatment of Wealth Distribution by High School Economics Textbooks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neumann, Richard

    2014-01-01

    This article presents findings from an investigation of the treatment of wealth distribution by high school economics textbooks. The eight leading high school economics texts in the United States were examined.

  13. Energy Design Guidelines for High Performance Schools: Tropical Island Climates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2004-11-01

    The Energy Design Guidelines for High Performance Schools--Tropical Island Climates provides school boards, administrators, and design staff with guidance to help them make informed decisions about energy and environmental issues important to school systems and communities. These design guidelines outline high performance principles for the new or retrofit design of your K-12 school in tropical island climates. By incorporating energy improvements into their construction or renovation plans, schools can significantly reduce energy consumption and costs.

  14. Winning a competition predicts dishonest behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schurr, Amos; Ritov, Ilana

    2016-02-16

    Winning a competition engenders subsequent unrelated unethical behavior. Five studies reveal that after a competition has taken place winners behave more dishonestly than competition losers. Studies 1 and 2 demonstrate that winning a competition increases the likelihood of winners to steal money from their counterparts in a subsequent unrelated task. Studies 3a and 3b demonstrate that the effect holds only when winning means performing better than others (i.e., determined in reference to others) but not when success is determined by chance or in reference to a personal goal. Finally, study 4 demonstrates that a possible mechanism underlying the effect is an enhanced sense of entitlement among competition winners.

  15. Success Despite Socioeconomics: A Case Study of a High-Achieving, High-Poverty School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tilley, Thomas Brent; Smith, Samuel J.; Claxton, Russell L.

    2012-01-01

    This case study of a high-achieving, high-poverty school describes the school's leadership, culture, and programs that contributed to its success. Data were collected from two surveys (the School Culture Survey and the Vanderbilt Assessment of Leadership in Education), observations at the school site, and interviews with school personnel. The…

  16. High School Equivalency Testing in Arizona. Forum: Responding to Changes in High School Equivalency Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hart, Sheryl

    2015-01-01

    For decades, the state of Arizona has used the General Educational Development (GED) Test to award the Arizona High School Equivalency (HSE) Diploma, as the GED Test was the only test available, recognized and accepted in the United States as the measure by which adults could demonstrate the educational attainment equivalent to high school…

  17. Big school, small school: (re)testing assumptions about high school size, school engagement and mathematics achievement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, Christopher C; Carolan, Brian V; Baker-Smith, E Christine

    2010-02-01

    In an effort to increase both adolescents' engagement with school and academic achievement, school districts across the United States have created small high schools. However, despite the widespread adoption of size reduction reforms, relatively little is known about the relationship between size, engagement and outcomes in high school. In response, this article employs a composite measure of engagement that combines organizational, sociological, and psychological theories. We use this composite measure with the most recent nationally-representative dataset of tenth graders, Educational Longitudinal Study: 2002, (N = 10,946, 46% female) to better assess a generalizable relationship among school engagement, mathematics achievement and school size with specific focus on cohort size. Findings confirm these measures to be highly related to student engagement. Furthermore, results derived from multilevel regression analysis indicate that, as with school size, moderately sized cohorts or grade-level groups provide the greatest engagement advantage for all students and that there are potentially harmful changes when cohorts grow beyond 400 students. However, it is important to note that each group size affects different students differently, eliminating the ability to prescribe an ideal cohort or school size.

  18. The Case for High-Performance, Healthy Green Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, Leesa

    2011-01-01

    When trying to reach their sustainability goals, schools and school districts often run into obstacles, including financing, training, and implementation tools. Last fall, the U.S. Green Building Council-Georgia (USGBC-Georgia) launched its High Performance, Healthy Schools (HPHS) Program to help Georgia schools overcome those obstacles. By…

  19. Ombud's Corner: fellows and students – a win-win equation

    CERN Multimedia

    Sudeshna Datta-Cockerill

    2014-01-01

    The hundreds of Fellows and students working at CERN bring precious new blood into the Laboratory. At the same time, CERN offers them invaluable work experience that will have a significant impact on their future careers. It is important that we all work together to make this a win-win situation with lasting positive effects for all concerned over the years to come.   Fellows and students are just setting out on a great professional adventure.  Some of them are very young, others are a bit more experienced … and what happens during this early period can have vast consequences on their approach to work and indeed on their overall careers. They all come here with their hard earned skills and a high degree of motivation, ready to make the most out of an internship at CERN. Sometimes, they are called to integrate into well-established units; at other times, they are asked to join complex collaborations. Almost always they have to deal with new information, new cultures, new t...

  20. Economics Course Enrollments in U.S. High Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walstad, William B.; Rebeck, Ken

    2012-01-01

    High school transcript data were used in this study to estimate the percentage of high school graduates who complete an economics course, and to examine course-taking trends in economics from 1982 to 2009. In 2009, 58 percent of high school graduates took an economics course, up from about 45 percent from 1990 to 2005. The increases in economics…

  1. Subsequent Injury Patterns in Girls' High School Sports

    OpenAIRE

    Rauh, Mitchell J; Macera, Caroline A; Ji, Ming; Wiksten, Denise L

    2007-01-01

    Context: Girls' participation in high school sports has increased 79.5% since 1975–1976. The incidence of injury among boys in high school sports has been well documented, but information regarding the incidence, severity, and type of injury among girls in high school sports is limited.

  2. TOCUSO: Test of Conceptual Understanding on High School Optics Topics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akarsu, Bayram

    2012-01-01

    Physics educators around the world often need reliable diagnostic materials to measure students' understanding of physics concept in high school. The purpose of this study is to evaluate a new diagnostic tool on High School Optics concept. Test of Conceptual Understanding on High School Optics (TOCUSO) consists of 25 conceptual items that measures…

  3. Gay Youth in American Public High Schools: Invisible Diversity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reed, Donald B.

    Gay youth enter high school with the knowledge that they are different and with the belief that heterosexuality is normal and that homosexuality is not normal. Also, gay youth enter high school with the belief that honesty and integrity are important personal values. Additionally, the gay youth enter high school without family knowledge of their…

  4. Editors' and Publishers' Handbook for Helping High School Journalism Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dodd, Julie E.

    Noting the benefits of high school journalism training, this guidebook familiarizes commercial newspaper editors and publishers with high school journalism programs and publications and helps them become more involved in such programs. Following a look at the positive influence of high school journalism courses on student performance and…

  5. The contextual effect of school satisfaction on health-risk behaviors in Japanese high school students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takakura, Minoru; Wake, Norie; Kobayashi, Minoru

    2010-11-01

    The importance of school contextual effects on health and well-being among young people is currently recognized. This study examines the contextual effects of school satisfaction as well as the effects of individual-level school satisfaction on health-risk behaviors in Japanese high school students. Self-administered questionnaires were distributed to 3248 students in grades 10 through 12 at 29 public high schools throughout Okinawa, Japan. Using multilevel logistic regression models, the effects of individual- and contextual-level school satisfactions on health-risk behaviors were analyzed. The contextual-level school satisfaction was defined as satisfaction at the school level and was measured using aggregated individual scores. Behaviors studied included current smoking, current drinking, and sexual activity. Approximately 15%, 6%, and 5% of the total individual differences in smoking, drinking, and sexual behaviors, respectively, occurred at the school level. Students with lower school satisfaction were more likely to engage in health-risk behaviors compared with those with higher school satisfaction. After adjustment for individual-level school satisfaction and other covariates, the odds of smoking and drinking increased with decreasing contextual-level school satisfaction. However, the association of contextual school satisfaction with sexual activity did not reach statistical significance. This study showed that individual- and contextual-level school satisfactions affected smoking and drinking behaviors in Japanese high school students. However, no significant association between contextual-level school satisfaction and sexual activity was observed. © 2010, American School Health Association.

  6. Automated External Defibrillators in High Schools: Disparities Persist Despite Legislation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thornton, Matthew D; Cicero, Mark X; McCabe, Megan E; Chen, Lei

    2017-10-31

    Automated external defibrillators (AEDs) have demonstrated increased survival in out-of-hospital cardiac arrest, and their prevalence continues to rise. In 2009, Connecticut passed a legislation requiring all schools to have an AED, barring financial barriers. The objectives of this study were (1) to determine if this legislation was associated with an increase in Connecticut high school AEDs and (2) to detect disparities in the availability of AEDs based on school type, student demographics, and school size. A single researcher conducted a scripted telephone survey of all 54 public and 13 private high schools in New Haven County, Connecticut. A response rate of 100% was achieved. Forty-nine percent of high schools had an AED before the legislation, compared with 88% after (P schools had a higher percentage of AEDs than public schools (69% vs 44%; P = 0.1). Postlegislation, the difference is less (92% vs 87%; P = 0.4). Small schools (schools (40% vs 100%; P Schools with a higher percentage of students with disabilities are also less likely to have an AED (P = 0.005), even when controlling for school size (P = 0.03). State legislation requiring schools to have an AED, if financially feasible, was associated with a significant increase in AED presence among New Haven County high schools. Small high schools and those with a higher percentage of students with disabilities remain less likely to have an AED despite legislation.

  7. Multiwavelength Astronomy Modules for High School Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Christie; Brazas, J.; Lane, S.; York, D. G.

    2014-01-01

    The University of Chicago Multiwavelength Astronomy modules are web-based lessons covering the history, science, tools, and impact of astronomy across the wavebands, from gamma ray to infrared. Each waveband includes four lessons addressing one aspect of its development. The lessons are narrated by a historical docent or practicing scientist who contributed to a scientific discovery or instrument design significant to astronomical progress. The process of building each lesson began with an interview conducted with the scientist, or the consultation of a memoir or oral history transcript for historical docents. The source was then excerpted to develop a lesson and supplemented by archival material from the University of Chicago Library and other archives; NASA media; and participant contributed photographs, light curves, and spectra. Practicing educators also participated in the lesson development and evaluation. In July 2013, the University of Chicago sponsored 9 teachers and 15 students to participate in a STEM education program designed to engage participants as co-learners as they used the Multiwavelength Astronomy lessons in conjunction with talks given by the participating scientists. Teachers also practiced implementation of the resources with students and designed authentic research activities that make use of NASA mission data, which were undertaken as mini-research projects by student teams during the course of the program. This poster will introduce the Multiwavelength Astronomy web modules; highlight educator experiences in their use with high school audiences; and analyze the module development process, framing the benefits to and contributions of each of the stakeholders including practicing astronomers in research and space centers, high school science educators, high school students, University libraries and archives, and the NASA Science Mission Directorate. The development of these resources, and the summer professional development workshops were

  8. European School of High-Energy Physics

    CERN Document Server

    2006-01-01

    The European School of High-Energy Physics is intended to give young experimental physicists an introduction to the theoretical aspects of recent advances in elementary particle physics. These proceedings contain lectures notes on field theory and the Standard Model, quantum chromodynamics, flavour physics and CP violation, experimental aspects of CP violation in K and B decays, relativistic heavy-ion physics, and the scientific programme of the Joint Institute for Nuclear Research. These core scientific topics are complemented by a lecture about the physics of ski jumping.

  9. The physical activity climate in Minnesota middle and high schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samuelson, Anne; Lytle, Leslie; Pasch, Keryn; Farbakhsh, Kian; Moe, Stacey; Sirard, John Ronald

    2010-11-01

    This article describes policies, practices, and facilities that form the physical activity climate in Minneapolis/St. Paul, Minnesota metro area middle and high schools and examines how the physical activity climate varies by school characteristics, including public/private, school location and grade level. Surveys examining school physical activity practices, policies and environment were administered to principals and physical education department heads from 115 middle and high schools participating in the Transdisciplinary Research on Energetics and Cancer-Identifying Determinants of Eating and Activity (TREC-IDEA) study. While some supportive practices were highly prevalent in the schools studied (such as prohibiting substitution of other classes for physical education); other practices were less common (such as providing opportunity for intramural (noncompetitive) sports). Public schools vs. private schools and schools with a larger school enrollment were more likely to have a school climate supportive of physical activity. Although schools reported elements of positive physical activity climates, discrepancies exist by school characteristics. Of note, public schools were more than twice as likely as private schools to have supportive physical activity environments. Establishing more consistent physical activity expectations and funding at the state and national level is necessary to increase regular school physical activity.

  10. Exploring the influence of middle school leaders on middle school girls' interest in high school science course enrollment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kijanka, Lori

    The purpose of this research was to explore middle school leaders' perceptions of the reasons girls' enrollment levels in science courses during high school declines and if the advice given to middle school girls may be perpetuating the diminished enrollment of girls in science courses as they move from middle school to high school. The study explored the contributions of expectancy and role theory using a qualitative method. Data analysis found that cultural influences on middle school girls' career goals emerged as a significant influence on school leaders' perceptions. Instructional methodology and cultural, gendered assumptions of women in science were found as themes in middle school leaders' perceptions that further shaped the advice to girls to enroll in high school science courses. The study provided information that clarified how middle school leaders can maintain the academic pathway for girls in science as well as recommendations for further study.

  11. School Variables as Mediators of Personal and Family Factors on School Violence in Taiwanese Junior High Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ji-Kang; Astor, Ron Avi

    2012-01-01

    Using a nationally representative sample of 3,058 junior high school students in Taiwan, this study examines a model of how personal traits, family factors, and school dynamics influence school violence committed by students against students and teachers. This model proposed that school violence is directly influenced by personal traits,…

  12. The Availability and Utilization of School Library Resources in Some Selected Secondary Schools (High School) in Rivers State

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owate, C. N.; Iroha, Okpa

    2013-01-01

    This study investigates the availability and utilization of school library resources by Secondary School (High School) Students. Eight Selected Secondary Schools in Rivers State, Nigeria were chosen based on their performance in external examinations and geographic locations. In carrying out the research, questionnaires were administered to both…

  13. Total Quality Management (TQM) Practices and School Climate amongst High, Average and Low Performance Secondary Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ismail, Siti Noor

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: This study attempted to determine whether the dimensions of TQM practices are predictors of school climate. It aimed to identify the level of TQM practices and school climate in three different categories of schools, namely high, average and low performance schools. The study also sought to examine which dimensions of TQM practices…

  14. State Strategies to Improve Low-Performing Schools: California's High Priority School Grants Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timar, Thomas; Rodriguez, Gloria; Simon, Virginia Adams; Ferrario, Kim; Kim, Kris

    2006-01-01

    Central to California's school accountability system are programs to engage low-performing schools in improvement efforts. One of these is the High Priority Schools Program (HPSGP), created by Assembly Bill 961 (Chapter 747, "Statutes of 2001") to provide funds to the lowest performing schools in the state. To be eligible for funding,…

  15. School District Wellness Policy Quality and Weight-Related Outcomes among High School Students in Minnesota

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffman, Pamela K.; Davey, Cynthia S.; Larson, Nicole; Grannon, Katherine Y.; Hanson, Carlie; Nanney, Marilyn S.

    2016-01-01

    Weight-related outcomes were examined among high school students in Minnesota public school districts according to the quality of district wellness policies. Wellness policy strength and comprehensiveness were scored using the Wellness School Assessment Tool (WellSAT) for 325 Minnesota public school districts in 2013. The associations between…

  16. Bullying Victimization and Student Engagement in Elementary, Middle, and High Schools: Moderating Role of School Climate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Chunyan; Sharkey, Jill D.; Reed, Lauren A.; Chen, Chun; Dowdy, Erin

    2018-01-01

    Bullying is the most common form of school violence and is associated with a range of negative outcomes, including traumatic responses. This study used hierarchical linear modeling to examine the multilevel moderating effects of school climate and school level (i.e., elementary, middle, and high schools) on the association between bullying…

  17. The Educational Benefits of Attending Higher Performing Schools: Evidence from Chicago High Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allensworth, Elaine M.; Moore, Paul T.; Sartain, Lauren; de la Torre, Marisa

    2017-01-01

    Policymakers are implementing reforms with the assumption that students do better when attending high-achieving schools. In this article, we use longitudinal data from Chicago Public Schools to test that assumption. We find that the effects of attending a higher performing school depend on the school's performance level. At elite public schools…

  18. Drinking and driving among high school students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, A F; Lund, A K; Preusser, D F

    1986-06-01

    A questionnaire survey of high school students conducted in 1983 provided information on their self-reported drinking and driving practices. By age 15 the majority reported drinking alcoholic beverages. By age 17 half or more of the males and one-third of the females reported driving after drinking at least once in the past month. About one-quarter of the students estimated that six or more cans of beer would be required to make someone an unsafe driver. Reported frequency of driving after drinking was associated with less time spent on homework and poorer academic performance, working part time, greater participation in social activities, less perceived parental influence regarding their travel, owning a car, driving high mileage, speeding, and having crashes and violations.

  19. Students' Centennial Reader: Boys and Girls High School.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tominberg, Larry; And Others

    This volume contains a series of stories and related questions about famous graduates of Boys and Girls High School and about some high points in the school's 100 year history. Brief biographical sketches are provided for Shirley Chisholm, Isaac Asimov, and other individuals who graduated from the school. Other readings describe various aspects of…

  20. Attitudes of Turkish High School Students toward Mathematics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yenilmez, Kursat

    2007-01-01

    This study examines high school students' attitudes toward mathematics and analyzes whether there were differences in attitude and its source that could be attributed to gender, class level, type of school, mathematics success, whether the students received preschool education, families' income level, and high school student's place of living.…

  1. A Workshop for High School Students on Naive Set Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wegner, Sven-Ake

    2014-01-01

    In this article we present the prototype of a workshop on naive set theory designed for high school students in or around the seventh year of primary education. Our concept is based on two events which the author organized in 2006 and 2010 for students of elementary school and high school, respectively. The article also includes a practice report…

  2. Mental skills of South African male high school rugby players ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The aim of this study was to establish preliminary South African high school rugby norms for the BMSQ. The sample consisted of 152 male high school rugby players from two schools in the Ethekwini region. Preliminary norms are presented in the form of means and standard deviations. Results are compared with those of ...

  3. Early College High Schools: Model Policy Components. Policy Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zinth, Jennifer

    2016-01-01

    An alarming convergence of factors--diminishing percentages of high school graduates enrolling immediately in postsecondary education, traditionally underserved students comprising a growing proportion of the overall U.S. school population, and projections that more occupations in the future will need education beyond high school--suggest that…

  4. Japanese High Schools: Our New Cross-Town Rivals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pettersen, Larry

    1992-01-01

    Although well intentioned, Oregon's Certificate of Initial Mastery Plan offers no apprenticeship programs for non-college-bound students. In contrast, Japan's Oita Media Technology High School and Hita Rinko High School of Forestry exemplify the nation's longstanding focus on technical education and industry-specific trade schools. The new…

  5. Attitudes toward Physical Education of Female High School Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodson-Smith, Andrea; Dorwart, Catherine E.; Linder, Amy

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the attitudes of female high school students toward PE in selected North Carolina schools. The high schools were conveniently selected to include the Northeast Piedmont urban region of North Carolina. Participants consisted of 102 female students aged 14 to 18 years old who were enrolled in ninth to 12th…

  6. Case Study: North Laurel High School, London, Kentucky.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Southern Regional Education Board, Atlanta, GA.

    When North Laurel High School, London, Kentucky, opened in Fall 1992, students and teachers entered a new facility and a new era of commitment to excellence for all students. In Spring 1993, North Laurel joined the Southern Regional Education Board's High Schools That Work initiative. The new school replaced the general track and raised graduation…

  7. "Higher Expectations" in the Catholic Inner City High School.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harkins, William

    1987-01-01

    Considers the implications of statistics on death and poverty in minority communities for Catholic high schools with large minority populations. Sees hope at the heart of the Catholic high school. Discusses how teachers, school climate, and careful curriculum design can help instill this hope in the students. (DMM)

  8. Examining the Internet Addiction Levels of High School Senior Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aydemir, Hasan

    2018-01-01

    In the present study, the internet addiction status of high school senior students in Yesilyurt county of Malatya was analyzed and examined in terms of gender variable. The study population consisted of 3442 senior students who were studying at 37 high schools in state schools in Yesilyurt County of the city of Malatya in 2016-2017 academic year.…

  9. Sexuality Education in Junior High Schools in Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashimoto, N.; Shinohara, H.; Tashiro, M.; Suzuki, S.; Hirose, H.; Ikeya, H.; Ushitora, K.; Komiya, A.; Watanabe, M.; Motegi, T.; Morioka, M.

    2012-01-01

    This paper aims to determine via responses to three questionnaire surveys how sexuality education programs are conducted at junior high schools in Japan. Study 1 examined the practice of sexuality education in schools, Study 2 investigated junior high school students' (age 12-13 and 14-15 years) knowledge of sexuality, and Study 3 examined…

  10. Prevalence and consequences of substance use among high school ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Prevalence and consequences of substance use among high school and college students in Ethiopia: A review of the literature. ... Further, cannabis was used in selected high schools, and its abuse prevalence was greater in urban private schools, as it was for alcohol and tobacco use. Students who used khat, alcohol or ...

  11. The School Absenteeism among High School Students: Contributing Factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balkis, Murat; Arslan, Gökmen; Duru, Erdinç

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the direct and indirect relationship between student school absenteeism, personal factors (academic self- perception, attitudes towards teacher and school, goal valuation and motivation/ self-regulation), family factors (parents' educational level and income), and academic achievement in structural equation…

  12. Identifying High School Physical Education Physical Activity Patterns after High School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barney, David; Pleban, Francis T.; Wilkinson, Carol; Prusak, Keven A.

    2015-01-01

    National standards for physical education (PE) encompass five principles for the purpose of defining what high school students should recognize and be able to perform as a result of a quality PE program. The expectation is that youth will develop an active, healthy lifestyle into adulthood from activities and skills taught in PE. Researchers from…

  13. Energy Design Guidelines for High Performance Schools: Tropical Island Climates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2004-11-01

    Design guidelines outline high performance principles for the new or retrofit design of K-12 schools in tropical island climates. By incorporating energy improvements into construction or renovation plans, schools can reduce energy consumption and costs.

  14. The Irene L. Chavez Excel Academy: A Win-Win Educational Opportunity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Susan A.

    2017-01-01

    This article discusses the Irene L. Chavez Excel Academy, a remarkable high school for at-risk seniors in San Antonio, Texas. This specialized Northside Independent School for approximately 300 students is housed in a unique circular building on the attractive Holmes High School campus. The academic program, tailored for at-risk seniors, provides…

  15. School context protective factors against peer ethnic discrimination across the high school years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellmore, Amy; Nishina, Adrienne; You, Ji-In; Ma, Ting-Lan

    2012-03-01

    Ethnically diverse high school contexts present unique social opportunities for youth to form interethnic relationships, but they may also subject students to certain social challenges such as peer ethnic discrimination. With a sample of 1,072 high school students (55% girls; 54% Latino, 20% African American, 14% Asian, 12% White) attending 84 high schools, school context factors that protect students' exposure to peer ethnic discrimination across the high school years were investigated with a three-level hierarchical linear model. Each spring for four consecutive years (grades 9-12), self-reported peer ethnic discrimination, interracial climate at school, and perceived school ethnic composition were assessed. At the school level, objective high school ethnic composition data were collected. Peer ethnic discrimination was found to decline slightly across the high school years. Above and beyond this decline, more positive perceptions of the school interracial climate and both objective and perceived numerical ethnic majority status predicted lower levels of peer ethnic discrimination. Taken together, the results highlight the significance of both objective (e.g., ethnic composition) and subjective (e.g., interracial climate) aspects of the school ethnic context to students' high school social experiences.

  16. Conceptual problem solving in high school physics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer L. Docktor

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Problem solving is a critical element of learning physics. However, traditional instruction often emphasizes the quantitative aspects of problem solving such as equations and mathematical procedures rather than qualitative analysis for selecting appropriate concepts and principles. This study describes the development and evaluation of an instructional approach called Conceptual Problem Solving (CPS which guides students to identify principles, justify their use, and plan their solution in writing before solving a problem. The CPS approach was implemented by high school physics teachers at three schools for major theorems and conservation laws in mechanics and CPS-taught classes were compared to control classes taught using traditional problem solving methods. Information about the teachers’ implementation of the approach was gathered from classroom observations and interviews, and the effectiveness of the approach was evaluated from a series of written assessments. Results indicated that teachers found CPS easy to integrate into their curricula, students engaged in classroom discussions and produced problem solutions of a higher quality than before, and students scored higher on conceptual and problem solving measures.

  17. Conceptual problem solving in high school physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Docktor, Jennifer L.; Strand, Natalie E.; Mestre, José P.; Ross, Brian H.

    2015-12-01

    Problem solving is a critical element of learning physics. However, traditional instruction often emphasizes the quantitative aspects of problem solving such as equations and mathematical procedures rather than qualitative analysis for selecting appropriate concepts and principles. This study describes the development and evaluation of an instructional approach called Conceptual Problem Solving (CPS) which guides students to identify principles, justify their use, and plan their solution in writing before solving a problem. The CPS approach was implemented by high school physics teachers at three schools for major theorems and conservation laws in mechanics and CPS-taught classes were compared to control classes taught using traditional problem solving methods. Information about the teachers' implementation of the approach was gathered from classroom observations and interviews, and the effectiveness of the approach was evaluated from a series of written assessments. Results indicated that teachers found CPS easy to integrate into their curricula, students engaged in classroom discussions and produced problem solutions of a higher quality than before, and students scored higher on conceptual and problem solving measures.

  18. Breakfast Composition in Junior High School Students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sheila Devi

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Adolescence is a time of rapid development that requires higher nutrient intake levels than in adulthood. However the habit of skipping breakfast has become very popular among adolescents. Skipping breakfast has negative effects such as difficulty in concentrating, growth impairment and decrease academic performance. Therefore, this study was conducted to identify the breakfast composisition of early adolescents in Jatinangor, Sumedang, Indonesia. Methods: A cross sectional study with non-probability sampling method, was conducted in a junior high school Jatinangor during the month of July 2013. Ninety six participants were included in this study. All the participants underwent an interview about the food intake for breakfast in seven days using eating pattern recall guidelines. Results: Overall, 37% of the respondents skipped breakfast. The mean of total calories among the adolescents who consumed breakfast was 286.06 (187.89 kcal. The amount of carbohydrate, fat and protein consumed was 29.23 (19.93 gram, 13.93 (13.29 gram and 8.78 (6.11 gram accordingly. The main reason for adolescent to skip breakfast was lack of time. Conclusions: Majority of the respondents have their breakfast before they go to school. Overall, the total calories comsumed is sufficient however the amount of protein consumed is low.

  19. Heads Up to High School Sports

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... submit" value="Submit" /> HEADS UP to School Sports Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir To help ... organizations, developed the HEADS UP: Concussion in School Sports initiative and materials. Specific Concussion Information for... Coaches ...

  20. Analysing the Subject of Peace in Award-Winning Children's and Adolescent Novels in Turkey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aslan, Canan; Kepenekci, Yasemin Karaman; Güldenoglu, Bilge Nur Dogan; Karagül, Sedat

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to reveal how the concept of peace is addressed in the national award-winning novels written for secondary school students within the Republic of Turkey. Data for this study was obtained from child and youth literature award organizations, associations and publishers within Turkey. Each group which was researched has…

  1. Building a winning electric utility organization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farha, G.; Silverman, L. [McKinsey & Co., Washington, DC (United States); Keough, K. [McKinsey & Co., Cleveland, OH (United States)

    1996-08-01

    The key factor that will differentiate the winners and losers is the speed with which they build their skills and enhance their performance focus. Setting the {open_quote}right{close_quote} aspirations, then effectively managing the change process, will be critical for winning power companies. Historically, only certain dimensions of organizational performance have been critical to an electric utility`s financial success. As a result, utilities understandably focused on achieving high levels of customer satisfaction and reliability, excellent regulatory relationships, and safe and environmentally acceptable operations. However, as the power industry undergoes fundamental change, obtaining superior organizational performance will become much more crucial and difficult. Given the importance of meeting these organizational challenges head on, the authors believe CEOs can only address them by taking an important step back from day-to-day activities to define what high performance really means in the future competitive world and what steps should be taken to achieve their aspirations. To facilitate this rethink - which senior managers should view as a multiyear process - utilities need to do three things in an iterative way: (1) energize the transformation with the right performance aspirations. (2) Tailor a coherent change program to the company`s unique starting position. (3) Manage the change process to build a skill-based and performance-focused organization.

  2. Teaching Win-Win Better Prepares Students for Subsequent Experiences in Life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brainard, Alan J.

    The psychology of competition and winning, especially in relation to learning and motivation, is discussed. The Personalized System of Instruction (PSI) approach to coursework is proposed as a means of using the winning philosophy in education. Also suggested is the inclusion into coursework design of a form of rhetoric developed by Carl Rogers…

  3. The Winning Alternative: Solving the Dilemma of the Win/Lose Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Dorothy L.

    1986-01-01

    Suggests alternatives in solving the dilemma of the win/lose syndrome for young children participating in sports, games, and other competitive educational activities. Rather than reinforcing the "negative" aspects of competition ("winning is all," lack of participation, elimination), teachers should provide environments that help children to…

  4. High School Dropouts: Issues and Solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lunenburg, Fred C.

    One of the most enduring challenges facing the public school system is decreasing the dropout rate. The highest rate of growth population in the future will be among the groups who are at greatest risk of dropping out of school. This paper outlines what school officials can do to decrease the dropout rate. The suggestions for dropout prevention…

  5. Effects of High School Students' Perceptions of School Life Quality on Their Academic Motivation Levels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akin Kösterelioglu, Meltem; Kösterelioglu, Ilker

    2015-01-01

    This study aims to identify the effects of high school students' perceptions of school life quality on their academic motivation levels. The study was conducted on a sample of high school students (n = 2371) in Amasya Province in the fall semester of 2013-2014 academic year. Study sample was selected with the help of cluster sampling method. Data…

  6. A Study of Democratic School Culture Perceptions of Sport High School Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isikgöz, Enes

    2016-01-01

    In this study; the perceptions of the students studying at sport high schools about democratic school culture were analysed in accordance with different variables. Participants of the research consisted of 216 students studying at Sport High Schools in Sakarya and Batman Provinces of Turkey. The data were collected with the Democratic School…

  7. A Positive Model for Reducing and Preventing School Burnout in High School Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aypay, Ayse

    2017-01-01

    This study aims to develop and test the validity of a model limited to attitude towards the future and subjective well-being for reducing and preventing the school burnout that high school students can experience. The study is designed as a relational screening model conducted over 389 high school students. The data in this study are analyzed…

  8. School-Based Drug Abuse Prevention Programs in High School Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Manoj; Branscum, Paul

    2013-01-01

    Drug abuse, or substance abuse, is a substantial public health problem in the United States, particularly among high school students. The purpose of this article was to review school-based programs implemented in high schools for substance abuse prevention and to suggest recommendations for future interventions. Included were English language…

  9. Adolescent Views of Time Management: Rethinking the School Day in Junior High School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strom, Paris S.; Strom, Robert D.; Sindel-Arrington, Tricia

    2016-01-01

    Junior high school presents a significant increase in time demands both for study and for social relationships. The students (N = 240) in grades 7 and 8 at a junior high school anonymously completed online the Time Management Poll concerning their own use of time and the way their school managed time. The 20 items in the poll allowed them to…

  10. Female High School Principals in Rural Midwestern School Districts: Their Lived Experiences in Leadership

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartling, Ellen M.

    2013-01-01

    This study was explored the leadership experiences of female principals of rural high schools in a Midwestern state. The study sought to describe the leadership styles used by these principals to make changes within their schools. Qualitative methodology was used, and four female rural high school principals were interviewed during a series of…

  11. Norwegian High-School Students Internship Programme

    CERN Multimedia

    2017-01-01

    The High-School Students Internship Programme (HSSIP is a programme developed by the ECO group’s Teacher and Student Programmes section to engage students from a young age with scientific research and innovation. Norway was selected as one out of five countries for the pilot programmes run in 2017. Out of some 150 applications, 10 boys and 14 girls, from Longyearbyen (Svalbard) in the North to Flekkefjord in the South, were invited to participate in the Norwegian programme that took place from 15 October - 28 October. The youngsters were offered an intense two-week internship at CERN, during which they took part in many diverse activities. Accompanied by mentors, the students got a deeper insight into how CERN supports particle physics by working on their own projects and through a variety of visits.

  12. School for Young High Energy Physicists

    CERN Document Server

    Evans, M E

    2003-01-01

    Forty-seven experimental particle physicists attended the 2002 Summer School, held, as usual, at The Cosener's House in Abingdon during September. The weather was glorious allowing a number of tutorials and impromptu seminars to take place in the lovely gardens. The lectures were of a high standard and were delivered and received enthusiastically, providing material for lively discussions in tutorials and elsewhere. The students each gave a ten-minute seminar and the general quality of the talks was impressive and the time keeping excellent. The activities described ranged from front-line physics analysis to preparations for the next generation of machines and detectors, and gave a clear indication of the breadth of particle physics activities in the UK

  13. Associations of Teen Dating Violence Victimization With School Violence and Bullying Among US High School Students*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vivolo-Kantor, Alana M.; Olsen, Emily O’malley; Bacon, Sarah

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Teen dating violence (TDV) negatively impacts health, mental and physical well-being, and school performance. METHODS Data from a nationally representative sample of high school students participating in the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)’s 2013 Youth Risk Behavior Survey (YRBS) are used to demonstrate associations of physical and sexual TDV with school violence-related experiences and behaviors, including bullying victimization. Bivariate and adjusted sex-stratified regressions assessed relationships between TDV and school violence-related experiences and behaviors. RESULTS Compared to students not reporting TDV, those experiencing both physical and sexual TDV were more likely to report carrying a weapon at school, missing school because they felt unsafe, being threatened or injured with a weapon on school property, having a physical fight at school, and being bullied on school property. CONCLUSIONS School-based prevention efforts should target multiple forms of violence. PMID:27374352

  14. School-Based Health Education Programmes, Health-Learning Capacity and Child Oral Health--related Quality of Life

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freeman, Ruth; Gibson, Barry; Humphris, Gerry; Leonard, Helen; Yuan, Siyang; Whelton, Helen

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To use a model of health learning to examine the role of health-learning capacity and the effect of a school-based oral health education intervention (Winning Smiles) on the health outcome, child oral health-related quality of life (COHRQoL). Setting: Primary schools, high social deprivation, Ireland/Northern Ireland. Design: Cluster…

  15. Homeless High School Students in America: Who Counts?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cumming, John M.; Gloeckner, Gene W.

    2012-01-01

    After interviewing homeless high school students, the research team in a Colorado school district discovered that many students had not revealed their true living conditions (homelessness) to anyone in the school district. This research team developed an anonymous survey written around the homeless categories identified in the McKinney-Vento…

  16. Alchemy in Iowa: Arts Education at Harding Junior High School.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vallance, Elizabeth

    1991-01-01

    Case study of an Iowa junior high school describes how the school and community identified their resources and used them to create successful arts education programs from ordinary resources. The article examines four types of commitment that shaped school practice, noting effective teaching practices and administrative policy. (SM)

  17. Are STEM High School Students Entering the STEM Pipeline?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franco, M. Suzanne; Patel, Nimisha H.; Lindsey, Jill

    2012-01-01

    This study compared the career skills and interests for students in two STEM schools to national data. Students completed the KUDER skills assessment and career planning online tools. Results were compared across school, grade level, and sex. The results provided evidence that STEM high school students expressed career intents in predominately…

  18. The anthropometric match between high school learners and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: A South African study illustrated that the school computer chair was the least ergonomic aspect of a school computer workstation and this may explain why computer usage was the only predictor of cervical pain among high school students (Smith et al. 2007). An alarming percentage of South African learners ...

  19. High School Harvest: Combining Food Service Training and Institutional Procurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conner, David; Estrin, Hans; Becot, Florence

    2014-01-01

    This article discusses High School Harvest (HSH), an Extension educator-led project in five Vermont schools to provide students with job training and food system education and to provide lightly processed produce to school lunch programs. One hundred and twenty-one students participated, logging 8,752 hours growing, harvesting, and processing…

  20. High-Tech School Bus Teaches Students on the Road

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katims, Lauren

    2011-01-01

    Last year, kindergarten through high school students in the rural Hector, Arkansas, School District barely had the technology resources that keep kids interested in math and science. This year, they potentially have the most advanced resources in the country--before they even step into the classroom. One school bus in Arkansas' Pope County has…

  1. Plate Waste and Attitudes among High School Lunch Program Participants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haas, Jessica; Cunningham-Sabo, Leslie; Auld, Garry

    2014-01-01

    Purpose/Objectives: The purpose of this study was to determine: (1) What foods high school students participating in the National School Lunch Program (NSLP) are discarding the most? (2) How much of these foods they are discarding? and (3) What are their perceptions towards school lunch? Methods: Researchers measured plate waste at two high…

  2. Comal County, Texas: Preparing for Life after High School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walter, Frank

    2018-01-01

    Comal County, Texas, may be rural but its students face many of the same challenges as students in urban districts. Communities In Schools of South Central Texas works with the local school district to identify student needs and provide critical supports to help young people prepare for life after high school.

  3. Teacher Performance Trajectories in High- and Lower-Poverty Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Zeyu; Özek, Umut; Hansen, Michael

    2015-01-01

    This study explores whether teacher performance trajectory over time differs by school-poverty settings. Focusing on elementary school mathematics teachers in North Carolina and Florida, we find no systematic relationship between school student poverty rates and teacher performance trajectories. In both high- (=60% free/reduced-price lunch [FRPL])…

  4. Junior High School Pupils' Perceptions of Air | Azure | African ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The study examined Junior High School (JHS) pupils' ideas of the concept air. The study compared the ideas that pupils from endowed schools have about air with those of their counterparts from un-endowed schools. The study also sought to find out the misconceptions pupils have about air and the implications these ...

  5. TAP High School Symposium: Lessons Learned from Principals and Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnett, Joshua H.

    2014-01-01

    Since the 1999-2000 school year, TAP: The System for Teacher and Student Advancement (TAP) has been implemented in hundreds of schools across the nation and demonstrated an ability to raise student achievement, improve the quality of instruction and increase the ability of high-need schools to recruit, retain and support effective teachers. The…

  6. Strategic Designs: Lessons from Leading Edge Small Urban High Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shields, Regis Anne; Miles, Karen Hawley

    2008-01-01

    Education Resource Strategies (ERS) works with school and district leaders to help them more strategically use resources--people, time, and money--to improve student performance. They have found that many school districts begin creating small high schools without a clear sense of how much they will spend or how to ensure that small schools…

  7. Inclusive STEM High School Design: 10 Critical Components

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peters-Burton, Erin E.; Lynch, Sharon J.; Behrend, Tara S.; Means, Barbara B.

    2014-01-01

    Historically, the mission of science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) schools emphasized providing gifted and talented students with advanced STEM coursework. However, a newer type of STEM school is emerging in the United States: inclusive STEM high schools (ISHSs). ISHSs have open enrollment and are focused on preparing…

  8. Advisors' Perceptions of a Rural High School Student Advisory Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welsh, Jody Lynn

    2012-01-01

    The problem addressed in this study was the transition from middle school to high school, a source of difficulty for many students. Student advisory programs have been implemented in many secondary schools as one solution to this problem. While research supports the use of advisory programs, little research exists regarding the effectiveness of…

  9. Characteristics of school-sanctioned sports: participation and attrition in Wisconsin public high schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landis, Matthew J; Peppard, Paul P; Remington, Patrick L

    2007-09-01

    Successful approaches are needed to decrease the burden of obesity on America's youth. Researchers often look to the high school interscholastic sports experience as a promising area for intervention. The purpose of this paper is to examine trends in participation over the course of a 4-year educational period. Two research questions are posed in this study: (1) how does participation in interscholastic sports change over the high school interscholastic sports experience, and (2) how do gender and school size influence these patterns? To answer these questions, a panel study is used to prospectively follow 412 Wisconsin public high schools from freshman year (2000-2001) to senior year (2003-2004). Participation prevalence (percent participation) in freshman year and risk of attrition (defined as a reduction in prevalence) from freshman to senior year are reported for sport, gender, and school size characteristics. Overall sports participation is greatest in smaller schools versus larger schools for both females (36% versus 20%) and males (38% versus 25%). Most high school sports exhibit declines in participation, including those sports with the highest prevalence of freshman participation. Compared to sports participants attending large schools, participants attending small schools have a lower risk of attrition from freshman to senior year. However, female attrition is much higher than male attrition in small schools, whereas this difference is not as apparent in large schools. The results of this research suggest school size and gender play important roles in initial and sustained involvement during high school. Despite the potential immediate and long-term benefits of high school interscholastic sports participation, there is limited research that prospectively examines patterns of participation through high school. Expanding the use of this measurement approach may effectively promote physical activity as youth grow into adults.

  10. Improving working equine welfare in 'hard-win' situations, where gains are difficult, expensive or marginal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pritchard, Joy; Upjohn, Melissa; Hirson, Tamsin

    2018-01-01

    Brooke is a non-government organisation with working equine welfare programmes across Africa, Asia and Latin America. In 2014, staff from ten country programmes were asked to identify 'no-win' situations (subsequently reframed as 'hard-wins')-where improving equine welfare is proving difficult, expensive and/or marginal-in order to inform strategic decisions on how to approach, manage and mitigate for such situations. The Delphi-type consultation process had three phases. Round 1 posed five questions in the form of a workshop, survey and semi-structured interviews. Round 2 re-presented key themes and sense-checked initial conclusions. Round 3 reviewed the nature and prevalence of hard-win situations at an international meeting of all participants. Reasons given for hard-win situations included: no economic or social benefit from caring for working animals; poor resource availability; lack of empathy for working equids or their owners among wider stakeholders; deep-seated social issues, such as addiction or illegal working; areas with a high animal turnover or migratory human population; lack of community cooperation or cohesion; unsafe areas where welfare interventions cannot be adequately supported. Participants estimated the prevalence of hard-win situations as 40-70% of their work. They suggested some current ways of working that may be contributing to the problem, and opportunities to tackle hard-wins more effectively. Respondents agreed that if equine welfare improvements are to span generations of animals, interventions cannot rely on relatively simple, technical knowledge-transfer strategies and quick-wins alone. Programmes need to be more flexible and iterative and less risk-averse in their approaches to embedding good equine welfare practices in all relevant actors. Consultation recommendations informed development of Brooke's new global strategy, a revised organisational structure and redefinition of roles and responsibilities to streamline ways to

  11. The Mathematics of High School Physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanderakis, Nikos

    2016-10-01

    In the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries, mathematicians and physical philosophers managed to study, via mathematics, various physical systems of the sublunar world through idealized and simplified models of these systems, constructed with the help of geometry. By analyzing these models, they were able to formulate new concepts, laws and theories of physics and then through models again, to apply these concepts and theories to new physical phenomena and check the results by means of experiment. Students' difficulties with the mathematics of high school physics are well known. Science education research attributes them to inadequately deep understanding of mathematics and mainly to inadequate understanding of the meaning of symbolic mathematical expressions. There seem to be, however, more causes of these difficulties. One of them, not independent from the previous ones, is the complex meaning of the algebraic concepts used in school physics (e.g. variables, parameters, functions), as well as the complexities added by physics itself (e.g. that equations' symbols represent magnitudes with empirical meaning and units instead of pure numbers). Another source of difficulties is that the theories and laws of physics are often applied, via mathematics, to simplified, and idealized physical models of the world and not to the world itself. This concerns not only the applications of basic theories but also all authentic end-of-the-chapter problems. Hence, students have to understand and participate in a complex interplay between physics concepts and theories, physical and mathematical models, and the real world, often without being aware that they are working with models and not directly with the real world.

  12. High School Physics Students' Personal Epistemologies and School Science Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alpaslan, Muhammet Mustafa; Yalvac, Bugrahan; Loving, Cathleen

    2017-11-01

    This case study explores students' physics-related personal epistemologies in school science practices. The school science practices of nine eleventh grade students in a physics class were audio-taped over 6 weeks. The students were also interviewed to find out their ideas on the nature of scientific knowledge after each activity. Analysis of transcripts yielded several epistemological resources that students activated in their school science practice. The findings show that there is inconsistency between students' definitions of scientific theories and their epistemological judgments. Analysis revealed that students used several epistemological resources to decide on the accuracy of their data including accuracy via following the right procedure and accuracy via what the others find. Traditional, formulation-based, physics instruction might have led students to activate naive epistemological resources that prevent them to participate in the practice of science in ways that are more meaningful. Implications for future studies are presented.

  13. Faking or Convincing: Why Do Some Advertising Campaigns Win Creativity Awards?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raoul V. Kübler

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Since the Sarbanes-Oxley Act was passed in 2002, it has become commonplace in the advertising industry to use creativity-award-show prizes instead of gross income figures to attract new customers. Therefore, achieving a top creativity ranking and winning creativity awards have become high priorities in the advertising industry. Agencies and marketers have always wondered what elements in the advertising creation process would lead to the winning of creativity awards. Although this debate has been dominated by pure speculation about the success of different routines, approaches and strategies in winning creativity awards, for the first time our study delivers an empirical insight into the key drivers of creativity award success. We investigate what strategies and which elements of an advertising campaign are truly likely to lead to winning the maximum number of creativity awards. Using a sample of 108 campaigns, we identify factors that influence campaign success at international advertising award shows. We identify innovativeness and the integration of multiple channels as the key drivers of creativity award success. In contrast to industry beliefs, meaningful or personally connecting approaches do not seem to generate a significant benefit in terms of winning creativity awards. Finally, our data suggest that the use of so-called “fake campaigns” to win more creativity awards does not prove to be effective.

  14. LEARNING STRATEGIES IN HIGH SCHOOL STUDENTS - DIFFERENCES WITH RESPECT TO AGE AND TYPE OF SECONDARY SCHOOL

    OpenAIRE

    Lejla Muratović

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the level of development of learning strategies in high school students with respect to the age of students and type of high school they attend. We tried to answer the question of whether the years spent in school educate students to strategic approach to learning. The study sample consisted of students of the first and third grade students from three high schools in Tuzla, which are: Gymnasium "Mesa Selimović”, Secondary Commercial School an...

  15. Nuclear science experiments in high schools

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lowenthal, G.C.

    1990-01-01

    This paper comments on the importance of nuclear science experiments and demonstrations to science education in secondary schools. It claims that radiation protection is incompletly realised unless supported by some knowledge about ionizing radiations. The negative influence of the NHMRC Code of Practice on school experiments involving ionizing radiation is also outlined. The authors offer some suggestions for a new edition of the Code with a positive approach to nuclear science experiments in schools. 7 refs., 4 figs

  16. Winning at Pocker and Games of Chance Winning at Pocker and Games of Chance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anita Flanders Rebelo

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available It's the modern consumer mind - compete to eat, save to the grave, throw to the wind to win! Never the game that's im portant - it's the beer , the fag. . . and if you're broke it's just the "odds" to turn you on. "Socrates didn't play dice games. He drank a lot. And when he was drunk he would go watch the game and give advice. It was because of bad advice that he was eventually sentenced to death. . . Back then it was more fun. Nobody knew anything about odds. It was just put down your money, you toss the dice, you laugh, you take another drink." - to Cassidy,it's knowing the odds that's put everybody on pot. Rack Cassidy's Winning at Poker and Games of Chance lampoons the illogic logic of modern "instructed" man. It is a disturbingly funny caricature of a nonsensical consumer's mind trying to ratio nalize the game of life, and what comes out is "hash" - not meat and potatoes. The book is high philosophical slapstick comedy ila Charlie Chaplin on paper in today's scene. To Cassidy, consumer thinking has made intellectual nitwits of us. We're always ex plaining in detail about what we don't have the slightest real understanding of, but we go on and on like automats spitting out words and words which in the long run make no sense to our__ selves and much less to the other poor broken down human calculat ing machines - especially when we try to give logic to our il/logical vices and fears.

  17. A win-win marginal rent analysis for operator and consumer under battery leasing mode in China electric vehicle market

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Zhe; Ouyang Minggao

    2011-01-01

    Recently battery leasing has been introduced into the market by automobile manufacturers and power suppliers due to its potential to reduce the purchase cost of electric vehicles (EVs). However, the profit prospect of battery leasing is still uncertain. This paper takes the views of both the operators and consumers and calculates the 'win-win' marginal rent, which not only ensures the profitability of operators, but also allows consumers a lower expenditure than using Internal combustion engine vehicles (ICVs) and EVs with embedded batteries. Battery cost, vehicle weight, gasoline and electricity price, and the discount rate have impacts on the rent. Battery cost plays a dominant role and a battery cost >5 Yen /W h fails to enable the survival of battery leasing to all types of EVs. Battery leasing would be more competitive when focusing on heavier EVs. At least one of the three thresholds is required for the existence of rent pricing range for a 1000 kg EV: gasoline retail price >6 Yen /L, electricity price <0.6 Yen /kW h, or the discount rate <7%. Typically, the feasible battery rent range is 0.34-0.38 Yen /W h/year for a 1000 kg EV under the present battery cost 2 Yen /W h and China current gasoline and electricity prices. - Highlights: → Rent pricing for EV battery leasing must obey win-win rule for BLO and consumers. → Rent is affected by battery cost, vehicle weight, energy price and discount rate. → Battery cost plays dominant role for the BLO survival as described in '5-3-2' Law. → Heavier EVs are more suitable for battery leasing when battery cost is high. → The profitability of BLO is sensitive to the price of gasoline and electricity.

  18. "Border Sexualities, Border Families in Schools": Queering Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, John

    2012-01-01

    This essay reviews Maria Pallotta-Chiarolli's (2010) Lambda Award-winning monograph "Border Sexualities, Border Families in Schools", in which queer and mestizage pedagogies frame a groundbreaking and highly accessible exploration of the issues that sexual border dwellers experience. Her particular focus areas are bisexual "sexually fluid"…

  19. A Study of School Size among Alabama’s Public High Schools

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ronald A. Lindahl

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship between the size of Alabama’s public high schools, selected school quality and financial indicators, and their students’ performance on standardized exams. When the socioeconomic level of the student bodies is held constant, the size of high schools in Alabama has relatively little relationship with 11th grade student (both regular and special education performance on the reading and math portions of the Alabama High School Graduation Exam (AHSGE. High schools’ average daily attendance rates and pupil-to-computer (and computer with Internet connections ratios do not vary in accordance with school size. Higher percentages of highly qualified teachers are found in Alabama’s largest high schools. There was very little difference in the percentage of teachers with a master’s degree or above across school size categories. Very little difference exists across size categories in regard to mean expenditures per pupil (range = $7,322 to $7,829. However, districts of the large high schools exert over twice the effort of those with small high schools (3.2 mills to 1.5 mills and approximately 50 percent greater local effort than the districts of the medium-size high schools.

  20. Instructional Outreach to High Schools: Should You Be Doing It?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenneth J Burhanna

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Academic librarians have recognized the need for and the benefits of instructional outreach to high schools, but faced with budgetary challenges, increasing workloads, and other pressures, librarians sometimes struggle to determine if and how they can work with high schools. This paper will seek to provide practical direction in considering these questions. Using the library high school outreach program at Kent State University Informed Transitions as a sample case, this paper will share observations, discuss practical considerations, and offer recommendations that will serve to guide academic librarians in determining what role they can play in providing instructional outreach to local high schools.

  1. Extreme Consumption Drinking Gaming and Prepartying among High School Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomaso, Cara C.; Zamboanga, Byron L.; Haas, Amie L.; Kenney, Shannon R.; Ham, Lindsay S.; Borsari, Brian

    2016-01-01

    Drinking games and prepartying (i.e., drinking before going to a social gathering/event) have emerged as high-risk drinking behaviors in high school students. The present study examines the current prepartying behaviors of high school students who report current participation in extreme-consumption games (e.g., chugging) with those who do not.…

  2. The School Counselor Leading (Social) Entrepreneurship within High Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuervo, Gemma; Alvarez, Isabel

    2016-01-01

    This article aims to determine the role that should exercise a School Counselor in social entrepreneurship education programs. To achieve this objective, first, we have analyzed the main approaches of these programs that are being carried out currently in Europe, which has allowed getting a concrete and contextualized idea about the status of the…

  3. A photovoice study of school belongingness among high school students in Norway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lieblein, Vaiva Sunniva Deraas; Warne, Maria; Huot, Suzanne; Laliberte Rudman, Debbie; Raanaas, Ruth Kjærsti

    2018-12-01

    Although high school graduation is important for living conditions and health throughout life, many students do not complete. In Norway's northern most county, Finnmark, up to 45% of students do not complete high school. Contrary to prior research that has primarily focused on causes for dropout, this study's aim was to deepen understanding of factors that support high school attendance. A strengths-based participatory approach using photovoice addressed attendance factors as perceived by seven participating students from one high school in Finnmark. Qualitative content analysis of data generated through group dialogue about participant-generated photos and individual interviews identified six factors important for students' school attendance: a supportive school environment, a good learning environment, recuperation and recreation, family and friends, goals and ambitions, and place attachment. Related aspects of a supportive environment and belongingness, where school staff made important contributions to promoting a positive environment, were essential.

  4. America's war on drugs: who's winning

    OpenAIRE

    Diaz, Mary Lu Anna.

    1995-01-01

    Recently, Congress, the literary community, and the public at large have come to reconsider the war on drugs. There are many opinions regarding alternatives to this pseudo war or new measures to be taken in the war effort, but the ongoing effort itself has escaped evaluation (to determine if the United States is winning this campaign). The intent of this thesis, then, is to explore the objectives of the war on drugs, and to determine if America is winning. This work concludes that the current...

  5. How to win friends and influence people

    CERN Document Server

    Carnegie, Dale

    2010-01-01

    For more than sixty years the rock-solid, time-tested advice in this book has carried thousands of now famous people up the ladder of success in their business and personal lives. With more than fifteen million copies sold, How to Win Friends and Influence People is one of the best known motivational books in history, with proven advice for achieving success in life. You’ll learn: three fundamental techniques in handling people; six ways to make people like you; twelve ways to win people to you way of thinking; nine ways to change people without arousing resentment; and much, much more!

  6. BMC Ecology image competition: the winning images

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    BMC Ecology announces the winning entries in its inaugural Ecology Image Competition, open to anyone affiliated with a research institute. The competition, which received more than 200 entries from international researchers at all career levels and a wide variety of scientific disciplines, was looking for striking visual interpretations of ecological processes. In this Editorial, our academic Section Editors and guest judge Dr Yan Wong explain what they found most appealing about their chosen winning entries, and highlight a few of the outstanding images that didn’t quite make it to the top prize. PMID:23517630

  7. SigWinR; the SigWin-detector updated and ported to R.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Leeuw, Wim C; Rauwerda, Han; Inda, Márcia A; Bruning, Oskar; Breit, Timo M

    2009-10-06

    Our SigWin-detector discovers significantly enriched windows of (genomic) elements in any sequence of values (genes or other genomic elements in a DNA sequence) in a fast and reproducible way. However, since it is grid based, only (life) scientists with access to the grid can use this tool. Therefore and on request, we have developed the SigWinR package which makes the SigWin-detector available to a much wider audience. At the same time, we have introduced several improvements to its algorithm as well as its functionality, based on the feedback of SigWin-detector end users. To allow usage of the SigWin-detector on a desktop computer, we have rewritten it as a package for R: SigWinR. R is a free and widely used multi platform software environment for statistical computing and graphics. The package can be installed and used on all platforms for which R is available. The improvements involve: a visualization of the input-sequence values supporting the interpretation of Ridgeograms; a visualization allowing for an easy interpretation of enriched or depleted regions in the sequence using windows of pre-defined size; an option that allows the analysis of circular sequences, which results in rectangular Ridgeograms; an application to identify regions of co-altered gene expression (ROCAGEs) with a real-life biological use-case; adaptation of the algorithm to allow analysis of non-regularly sampled data using a constant window size in physical space without resampling the data. To achieve this, support for analysis of windows with an even number of elements was added. By porting the SigWin-detector as an R package, SigWinR, improving its algorithm and functionality combined with adequate performance, we have made SigWin-detector more useful as well as more easily accessible to scientists without a grid infrastructure.

  8. SigWinR; the SigWin-detector updated and ported to R

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Breit Timo M

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Our SigWin-detector discovers significantly enriched windows of (genomic elements in any sequence of values (genes or other genomic elements in a DNA sequence in a fast and reproducible way. However, since it is grid based, only (life scientists with access to the grid can use this tool. Therefore and on request, we have developed the SigWinR package which makes the SigWin-detector available to a much wider audience. At the same time, we have introduced several improvements to its algorithm as well as its functionality, based on the feedback of SigWin-detector end users. Findings To allow usage of the SigWin-detector on a desktop computer, we have rewritten it as a package for R: SigWinR. R is a free and widely used multi platform software environment for statistical computing and graphics. The package can be installed and used on all platforms for which R is available. The improvements involve: a visualization of the input-sequence values supporting the interpretation of Ridgeograms; a visualization allowing for an easy interpretation of enriched or depleted regions in the sequence using windows of pre-defined size; an option that allows the analysis of circular sequences, which results in rectangular Ridgeograms; an application to identify regions of co-altered gene expression (ROCAGEs with a real-life biological use-case; adaptation of the algorithm to allow analysis of non-regularly sampled data using a constant window size in physical space without resampling the data. To achieve this, support for analysis of windows with an even number of elements was added. Conclusion By porting the SigWin-detector as an R package, SigWinR, improving its algorithm and functionality combined with adequate performance, we have made SigWin-detector more useful as well as more easily accessible to scientists without a grid infrastructure.

  9. Assessment of Secondhand Smoke Exposure at School among U.S. Middle and High School Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olufajo, Olubode Ademola; Agaku, Israel Terungwa

    2015-01-01

    To obtain nationally representative estimates of the prevalence of secondhand smoke (SHS) exposure at U.S. schools, we assessed the prevalence and correlates of SHS exposure at school among U.S. middle and high school students using data from the 2011 National Youth Tobacco Survey comprising of 18,866 students spread across all the U.S. states.…

  10. The Nature, Causes and Effects of School Violence in South African High Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ncontsa, Vusumzi Nelson; Shumba, Almon

    2013-01-01

    We sought to investigate the nature, causes and effects of school violence in four South African high schools. A purposive sample of five principals, 80 learners and 20 educators was selected from the four schools used in the study. A sequential mixed method approach was used in this study; both questionnaires and interviews were used. The design…

  11. Those Kids, Our Schools: Race and Reform in an American High School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffin, Shayla Reese

    2015-01-01

    In "Those Kids, Our Schools," Shayla Reese Griffin examines patterns of racial interaction in a large, integrated high school and makes a powerful case for the frank conversations that educators could and should be having about race in schools. Over three years, Griffin observed students, teachers, and administrators in a…

  12. A Descriptive Analysis of the Perspectives of Neville High School's Teachers Regarding the School's Renovation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dawson, Christella G. B.; Parker, D. Randall

    It has been suggested since the early 80's that America's public schools are not meeting the needs of America's citizenry and that the schools are in need of repair. This paper describes a study conducted at Neville High School (Louisiana) in 1996-1997 and designed to examine the effects of facility renovation on faculty morale. Data collection…

  13. Excellence in Urban High Schools: An Emerging District/School Perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Robert K.; And Others

    This report presents the preliminary findings of the District/Secondary School Study. The study had two purposes: (1) to identify ways of managing urban high schools to produce excellence, and (2) to recommend policy-relevant guidance to existing school and district administrators. The study design focused on the testing of two specific theories…

  14. Who Will Win the Toss?

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    To make sure that you get Hilbert's question right, let us take an example. Suppose we get a geometry question at school. For example, is the sum of the angles in a 300-sided regular polygon equal to 43640 degrees? It is not obvious whether this statement is true or false. Hilbert's question is whether one can write a.

  15. Preparing Teachers for High-Poverty Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Samuel; Duffy, Gerald G.; Rohr, Jean; Gasparello, Robert; Mercier, Sue

    2005-01-01

    A partnership between the University of North Carolina and Hunter Elementary School in Greensboro attempts to close the achievement gap for low-income students and simultaneously the gap between the skills teachers should possess and the quality of training they receive. The partnership follows the professional development school (PDS) model and…

  16. Arkansas' High School Dropouts: Voluntary and Involuntary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snowden, Max; Peel, Evelyn

    This report is concerned with students who either dropped out or were dismissed from grades 9 through 12 during 1983-84 in 14 school systems in Arkansas. It is intended for use by state government, the State Department of Education, state and local policymakers, school administrators and staffs, parents, and young people. The data presented in…

  17. Year-Round High School Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mussatti, David J.

    The author surveys the status of and issues surrounding year-round programs in secondary schools in order to provide background for deciding which school calendar is the most effective educationally, financially, and socially. The best programs and those discontinued are listed, as are the dates of the most important developments in year-round…

  18. Teachers' Attitudes towards Inclusion in High Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyle, Christopher; Topping, Keith; Jindal-Snape, Divya

    2013-01-01

    This study investigated the attitudes of secondary teachers to inclusion in schools. Three hundred and ninety-one teaching and management-level staff from 19 mainstream and 6 special schools in one local authority in Scotland completed a survey. Overall, teaching staff were pro-inclusion, conditional on adequate support and resources. There was a…

  19. EARTHTIME: Teaching geochronology to high school students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bookhagen, Britta; Buchwaldt, Robert; McLean, Noah; Rioux, Matthew; Bowring, Samuel

    2010-05-01

    The authors taught an educational module developed as part of the EARTHTIME (www.earth-time.org) outreach initiative to 215 high school students from a Massachusetts (USA) High School as part of an "out-of-school" field trip. The workshop focuses on uranium-lead (U-Pb) dating of zircons and its application to solving a geological problem. The theme of our 2.5-hour module is the timing of the K-T boundary and a discussion of how geochronology can be used to evaluate the two main hypotheses for the cause of the concurrent extinction—the Chicxlub impact and the massive eruption of the Deccan Traps. Activities are divided into three parts: In the first part, the instructors lead hands-on activities demonstrating how rock samples are processed to isolate minerals by their physical properties. Students use different techniques, such as magnetic separation, density separation using non-toxic heavy liquids, and mineral identification with a microscope. We cover all the steps from sampling an outcrop to determining a final age. Students also discuss geologic features relevant to the K-T boundary problem and get the chance to examine basalts, impact melts and meteorites. In the second part, we use a curriculum developed for and available on the EARTHTIME website (http://www.earth-time.org/Lesson_Plan.pdf). The curriculum teaches the science behind uranium-lead dating using tables, graphs, and a geochronology kit. In this module, the students start by exploring the concepts of half-life and exponential decay and graphically solving the isotopic decay equation. Manipulating groups of double-sided chips labeled with U and Pb isotopes reinforces the concept that an age determination depends on the Pb/U ratio, not the absolute number of atoms present. Next, the technique's accuracy despite loss of parent and daughter atoms during analysis, as well as the use of isotopic ratios rather than absolute abundances, is explained with an activity on isotope dilution. Here the students

  20. School lunches in Japan: their contribution to healthier nutrient intake among elementary-school and junior high-school children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asakura, Keiko; Sasaki, Satoshi

    2017-06-01

    The role of school lunches in diet quality has not been well studied. Here, we aimed to determine the contribution of school lunches to overall nutrient intake in Japanese schoolchildren. The study was conducted nationwide under a cross-sectional design. A non-consecutive, three-day diet record was performed on two school days and a non-school day separately. The prevalence of inadequate nutrient intake was estimated for intakes on one of the school days and the non-school day, and for daily habitual intake estimated by the best-power method. The relationship between food intake and nutrient intake adequacy was examined. Fourteen elementary and thirteen junior high schools in Japan. Elementary-school children (n 629) and junior high-school children (n 281). Intakes between the school and non-school days were significantly different for ≥60 % of nutrients. Almost all inadequacies were more prevalent on the non-school day. Regarding habitual intake, a high prevalence of inadequacy was observed for fat (29·9-47·7 %), dietary fibre (18·1-76·1 %) and salt (97·0-100 %). Inadequate habitual intake of vitamins and minerals (except Na) was infrequent in elementary-school children, but was observed in junior high-school children, particularly boys. School lunches appear to improve total diet quality, particularly intake of most vitamins and minerals in Japanese children. However, excess intakes of fat and salt and insufficient intake of dietary fibre were major problems in this population. The contribution of school lunches to improving the intakes of these three nutrients was considered insufficient.

  1. Winning the sustainable development debate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ritch, John; Cornish, Emma

    2002-01-01

    on a vast scale Access to energy - and in particular, electricity - will be critical if the world is to achieve these human goals. Access to clean electricity - and on a vast scale - will be necessary if the world is to meet the twin challenges of human need and environmental security. Anti-nuclear forces, which have held sway in the Kyoto process thus far, argue that nuclear energy is a dying technology and assert passionately that it has no place in tomorrow's sustainable development agenda. These ideologically driven arguments ignore underlying realities both as to what is feasible and what is actually occurring. Today, nuclear power plants are operational in countries comprising 64% of the world's population, and new power reactors are in the planning or construction stage in countries representing no less than 50% of the world's population. Among the latter are the world's two largest developing countries, China and India, which alone represent 40% of humankind and about half the developing world. With active nuclear reactor construction under way as we speak, these leading nations have already made nuclear power a part of their sustainable development strategies for the 21st century. Winning the sustainable development debate - This presentation will share information materials about sustainable development. It will describe the work of the World Nuclear Association Sustainable Development Strategy Group, its preparations for the World Summit on Sustainable Development, and how participants to PIME can get involved. (author)

  2. Educational Management Organizations as High Reliability Organizations: A Study of Victory's Philadelphia High School Reform Work

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, David E.

    2013-01-01

    This executive position paper proposes recommendations for designing reform models between public and private sectors dedicated to improving school reform work in low performing urban high schools. It reviews scholarly research about for-profit educational management organizations, high reliability organizations, American high school reform, and…

  3. Sexual Harassment, Bullying, and School Outcomes for High School Girls and Boys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gruber, James; Fineran, Susan

    2016-01-01

    A comparison of the impact of bullying and sexual harassment on five school outcomes was conducted on a sample of high school students. Results revealed that sexual harassment was a stronger predictor than bullying of all school outcomes for both sexes, but especially for girls. This study suggests that sexual harassment, which activates sexist and heterosexist stereotypes, erodes school engagement, alienates students from teachers, and adversely affects academic achievement, to a greater degree than bullying does. © The Author(s) 2015.

  4. Modeling high school timetabling with bitvectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demirović, Emir; Musliu, Nysret

    2017-01-01

    High school timetabling (HSTT) is a well known and wide spread problem. The problem consists of coordinating resources (e.g. teachers, rooms), times, and events (e.g. lectures) with respect to various constraints. Unfortunately, HSTT is hard to solve and just finding a feasible solution for simple variants of HSTT has been proven to be NP-complete. We propose a new modeling approach for HSTT using bitvectors in which constraint costs of the general HSTT can be calculated using bit operations. This model allows efficient computation of constraint costs making it useful when implementing HSTT algorithms. Additionally, it can be used to solve HSTT with satisfiability modulo theory (SMT) solvers that support bitvectors. We evaluate the performance for our bitvector modeling approach and compare it to the leading engine KHE when developing local search algorithms such as hill climbing and simulated annealing. The experimental results show that our approach is useful for this problem. Furthermore, experimental results using SMT are given on instances from the ITC 2011 benchmark repository.

  5. Cardiopulmonary resuscitation training in Washington state public high schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reder, Sheri; Quan, Linda

    2003-03-01

    To determine the best approaches for increasing cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) training opportunities for public high school students, we conducted a statewide survey of all 310 public high schools in Washington State. The findings describe CPR student training currently provided by high schools, barriers to providing, and strategies to increase CPR training of high school students. The response rate was 89% (276 schools) from a combination of mail and telephone surveys; 35% (n=97) reported that they did not provide any CPR student training. Of the 132 schools that provided CPR student training, 23% trained less than 10% of their students, and 39% trained more than 90% of their students. The majority of public high schools, 70%, did not have any teacher trained to teach CPR or had only one teacher with such training. Yet 80% of schools felt that CPR training is best provided in school settings. Schools perceived the greatest benefit of CPR training as providing students with the skill to save a life (43%). The most frequently identified barriers were logistical: limited time to teach the curriculum (24%), lack of funds (16%), and instructor scheduling difficulties (17%). Less than 5% of respondents voiced any opposition to CPR training, and that opposition was for logistical reasons. To increase CPR training, the single best strategies suggested were: increase funding, provide time in the curriculum, have more certified instructors, and make CPR student training a requirement.

  6. An Application to WIN/ISIS Database on Local Network

    OpenAIRE

    Robert Lechien; Mohamed Salem Ghonem - Translator

    2005-01-01

    A Translated Article containing an application to how WIN/ISIS database work on local network. It starts with main definitions, and how to install WIN/ISIS on PC, and how to install it on the local network server.

  7. Engaging High School Youth in Paleobiology Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saltzman, J.; Heim, N. A.; Payne, J.

    2013-12-01

    The chasm between classroom science and scientific research is bridged by the History of Life Internships at Stanford University. Nineteen interns recorded more than 25,500 linear body size measurements of fossil echinoderms and ostracods spanning more than 11,000 species. The interns were selected from a large pool of applicants, and well-established relationships with local teachers at schools serving underrepresented groups in STEM fields were leveraged to ensure a diverse mix of applicants. The lead investigator has been hosting interns in his research group for seven years, in the process measuring over 36,000 foraminfera species as well as representatives from many other fossil groups. We (faculty member, researcher, and educators) all find this very valuable to engage youth in novel research projects. We are able to create an environment where high school students can make genuine contributions to jmportant and unsolved scientific problems, not only through data collection but also through original data analysis. Science often involves long intervals of data collection, which can be tedious, and big questions often require big datasets. Body size evolution is ideally suited to this type of program, as the data collection process requires substantial person-power but not deep technical expertise or expensive equipment. Students are therefore able to engage in the full scientific process, posing previously unanswered questions regarding the evolution of animal size, compiling relevant data, and then analyzing the data in order to test their hypotheses. Some of the projects students developed were truly creative and fun to see come together. Communicating is a critical step in science yet is often lost in the science classroom. The interns submitted seven abstracts to this meeting for the youth session entitled Bright STaRS based on their research projects. To round out the experience, students also learn about the broad field of earth sciences through

  8. Question Paper Investigation about Health Behavior of High School Students

    OpenAIRE

    丸岡, 里香

    2006-01-01

    This investigation did what I made clear about the present conditions of a well action about health of subjectivity of a high school student, living habit, eating habits with a purpose. It is 1〜3 grader man and woman who attend school to the public high school of the coeducation in Hokkaido, and is the student who was able to get consent to investigation cooperation. As a result, about 90% things which thought that a high school student was well as oneself were, but about 90% things which fel...

  9. Snooze or Lose: High School Start Times and Academic Achievement

    OpenAIRE

    Groen, Jeffrey A.; Pabilonia, Sabrina Wulff

    2017-01-01

    Many U.S. high schools start classes before 8:00 A.M., yet research on circadian rhythms suggests that students' biological clocks shift to later in the day as they enter adolescence. Some school districts have moved to later start times for high schools based on the prospect that this would increase students' sleep and academic achievement. This paper examines the effect of high school start times on student learning. We use longitudinal data from the Child Development Supplement to the Pane...

  10. School and community predictors of smoking: a longitudinal study of Canadian high schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lovato, Chris; Watts, Allison; Brown, K Stephen; Lee, Derrick; Sabiston, Catherine; Nykiforuk, Candace; Eyles, John; Manske, Steve; Campbell, H Sharon; Thompson, Mary

    2013-02-01

    We identified the most effective mix of school-based policies, programs, and regional environments associated with low school smoking rates in a cohort of Canadian high schools over time. We collected a comprehensive set of student, school, and community data from a national cohort of 51 high schools in 2004 and 2007. Hierarchical linear modeling was used to predict school and community characteristics associated with school smoking prevalence. Between 2004 and 2007, smoking prevalence decreased from 13.3% to 10.7% in cohort schools. Predictors of lower school smoking prevalence included both school characteristics related to prevention programming and community characteristics, including higher cigarette prices, a greater proportion of immigrants, higher education levels, and lower median household income. Effective approaches to reduce adolescent smoking will require interventions that focus on multiple factors. In particular, prevention programming and high pricing for cigarettes sold near schools may contribute to lower school smoking rates, and these factors are amenable to change. A sustained focus on smoking prevention is needed to maintain low levels of adolescent smoking.

  11. High School Students' Recommendations to Improve School Food Environments: Insights From a Critical Stakeholder Group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asada, Yuka; Hughes, Alejandro G; Read, Margaret; Schwartz, Marlene B; Chriqui, Jamie F

    2017-11-01

    The Healthy, Hunger-Free Kids Act of 2010 (HHFKA) directed the US Department of Agriculture (USDA) to revise school meal standards. Students are most affected by efforts to improve the school food environment; yet, few studies directly include students. This study examined high school students' experiences of school meal reform to gain insight into implementation recommendations. We conducted 5 focus groups with high school students (N = 15) from high schools across 9 states. We also conducted follow-up interviews to further explore personal experiences. Focus groups and interview transcripts were coded and organized in Atlas.ti v7 by analysts, following principles of constant comparative analysis. Students reported overall positive perceptions of the revised school meal standards and supported continued efforts to improve the food environment. Recommendations to improve the food environment included engaging students, focusing on the quality and palatability of meal items, moving toward scratch-cooking, and addressing cafeteria infrastructure. Students' recommendations point to opportunities where school districts, as well as local, state, and federal organizations can work to improve the school food environment. Their insights are directly relevant to USDA's recently released Local School Wellness Policy final rule, of which school meal standards are one provision. © 2017, American School Health Association.

  12. THE CAUSES OF ABSENTEEISM OF HIGH SCHOOL STUDENTS

    OpenAIRE

    Gürbüz Ocak; İjlal Ocak; Emine A. Baysal

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to find out the causes of high school students’ absenteeism. Survey method was used. The population was comprised of 531 students in the public high schools. The data was collected with "The Scale of Absenteeism Causes" developed by the researchers. Cronbach Alpha was calculated as α=0.936. Findings show the causes of students' absenteeism aren't related to school, students themselves and their parent, however, student absenteeism causes partly psychological reaso...

  13. Geography in an Urban Age: Trials of High School Geography Project Materials in New Zealand Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renner, John; Slater, Frances

    1974-01-01

    The High School Geography Project was used and evaluated by 15-year old students in New Zealand. The program, highly innovative in approaches in teaching Geography, is found to be highly adapted to Australian needs in Geography instruction. (JR)

  14. Defeating ISIS by Winning the War of Ideas

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-03-17

    United States tell if it is winning the war of ideas? Robert Reilly, author of Assessing the War of Ideas during War, explains that the winning the war...AU/ACSC/2017 AIR COMMAND AND STAFF COLLEGE AIR UNIVERSITY DEFEATING ISIS BY WINNING THE WAR OF IDEAS by Lt Col Lyson Siame...Approved for public release: distribution unlimited. Defeating ISIS by Winning the War of Ideas 2 Disclaimer The views expressed in this academic

  15. Psychological traits regarding competitiveness are related to the incidence of anterior cruciate ligament injury in high school female athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kosaka, Masahiro; Nakase, Junsuke; Numata, Hitoaki; Oshima, Takeshi; Takata, Yasushi; Moriyama, Shigenori; Oda, Takumi; Shima, Yosuke; Kitaoka, Katsuhiko; Tsuchiya, Hiroyuki

    2016-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship between psychological competitive ability and the incidence of noncontact ACL injuries among high school female athletes. A three-year prospective cohort study was conducted using 300 15-year-old high school female athletes with no previous injuries or symptoms in their lower limbs (106 handball players and 194 basketball players). At baseline, their psychological competitive abilities were assessed using a self-administered questionnaire-the Diagnostic Inventory of Psychological Competitive Ability (DIPCA.3). After the baseline examination was performed at high school entry, all players were prospectively followed for 36months to document any subsequent incidence of ACL injury, according to their coaches. An unpaired t-test with Welch's correction was performed to compare the differences in the psychological competitive abilities between the injured and uninjured players. Of the 300 players, 25 (8.3%) experienced a noncontact ACL injury during the three-year observation period. The injured players had significantly higher total DIPCA.3 scores for psychological competitive ability than the uninjured players (169.9±18.8 vs. 159.2±21.6, P=.036). Additionally, the injured players had significantly higher scores than the uninjured players in the following categories: aggressiveness, volition for self-realization, volition for winning, judgment, and cooperation. However, no significant differences were observed in patience, self-control, ability to relax, concentration, confidence, decision, and predictive ability. High psychological competitive ability was associated with the incidence of noncontact ACL injuries in high school female athletes. Level II (prospective cohort study). Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Examining Leisure Boredom in High School Students in Turkey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akgul, Merve Beyza

    2015-01-01

    High school students who do not have leisure skills are more likely to be bored during leisure time. The aim of the study is to examine leisure boredom of high school students based on some variables (gender and income), and to investigate the relationship between leisure boredom, the presence/absence of anti-social behavior and the frequency at…

  17. Financial Literacy of High School Students: Evidence from Germany

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erner, Carsten; Goedde-Menke, Michael; Oberste, Michael

    2016-01-01

    After graduating high school, underage individuals soon face ever more complex and important financial decisions. Pivotal to the development of improved financial literacy programs is a comprehensive examination of financial literacy levels and potentially related factors. The authors conducted a survey among German high school students and found…

  18. Absolute Value Inequalities: High School Students' Solutions and Misconceptions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almog, Nava; Ilany, Bat-Sheva

    2012-01-01

    Inequalities are one of the foundational subjects in high school math curricula, but there is a lack of academic research into how students learn certain types of inequalities. This article fills part of the research gap by presenting the findings of a study that examined high school students' methods of approaching absolute value inequalities,…

  19. CERN High School Teachers Training Programme meets DG

    CERN Multimedia

    Brice, Maximilien

    2014-01-01

    CERN's DG Rolf Heuer met with the participants of the High School Teachers Training Programme on 23 July 2014 for a Q&A Session. Following the interaction, he met with the HST Working Group collaborating on a lesson plan for teaching SESAME in high schools.

  20. Collaborative Composing in High School String Chamber Music Ensembles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hopkins, Michael T.

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine collaborative composing in high school string chamber music ensembles. Research questions included the following: (a) How do high school string instrumentalists in chamber music ensembles use verbal and musical forms of communication to collaboratively compose a piece of music? (b) How do selected variables…

  1. High School Students' Representations and Understandings of Electric Fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Ying; Brizuela, Bárbara M.

    2016-01-01

    This study investigates the representations and understandings of electric fields expressed by Chinese high school students 15 to 16 years old who have not received high school level physics instruction. The physics education research literature has reported students' conceptions of electric fields post-instruction as indicated by students'…

  2. High School Psychology: A Coming of Age Story

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keith, Kenneth D.; Hammer, Elizabeth Yost; Blair-Broeker, Charles T.; Ernst, Randal M.

    2013-01-01

    Although institutional recognition of high school psychology is fairly recent, psychology and psychological subject matters have a history dating to at least the 1830s. By the middle of the twentieth century, high school psychology courses existed in nearly all U.S. states, and enrollments grew throughout the second half of the century. However,…

  3. The Family Liaison Position in High-Poverty, Urban Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dretzke, Beverly J.; Rickers, Susan R.

    2016-01-01

    This study examined the roles and responsibilities of family liaisons working in urban schools with enrollments characterized by high poverty, high mobility, and ethnic diversity. Results indicated that the major responsibilities of the liaisons were creating a trusting and welcoming environment, facilitating parent involvement in the school,…

  4. Effective Instructional Management: Perceptions and Recommendations from High School Administrators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knechtel, Troy

    2010-01-01

    The two overarching research questions of this study are: What are the perceptions of high school administrators regarding the effectiveness of their current approach to instructional management? What recommendations do high school administrators have for effective strategies for instructional management? To answer these questions, a qualitative…

  5. Building a Framework for Engineering Design Experiences in High School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denson, Cameron D.; Lammi, Matthew

    2014-01-01

    In this article, Denson and Lammi put forth a conceptual framework that will help promote the successful infusion of engineering design experiences into high school settings. When considering a conceptual framework of engineering design in high school settings, it is important to consider the complex issue at hand. For the purposes of this…

  6. High school students' perception of computer laboratory learning ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study focused on senior high school students' perception of their computer laboratory learning environment and how the use of computers affects their learning in urban and community senior high schools. Data was obtained with the Computer Laboratory Environment Inventory questionnaire, administered to 278 ...

  7. Determination of Healthy Lifestyle Behaviors of High School Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Çelebi, Evrim; Gündogdu, Cemal; Kizilkaya, Aysel

    2017-01-01

    Healthy lifestyle behaviors can be defined as all the behaviors believed and applied by individuals to be healthy, maintain health and be protected from diseases. This study aims to determine the healthy lifestyle behaviors of high school students studying at the high schools in the Province of Elazig, Turkey. The study population of this…

  8. Using problem-solving instruction to overcome high school ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    kofi.mereku

    African Journal of Educational Studies in Mathematics and Sciences Vol. 13, 2017. 33. Using problem-solving instruction to overcome high school chemistry students' difficulties with stoichiometric problems. S. 1Mandina & C. E. 2Ochonogor. Abstract. The study sought to find out the difficulties encountered by high school ...

  9. Using problem-solving instruction to overcome high school ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Using problem-solving instruction to overcome high school chemistry students' difficulties with stoichiometric problems. ... African Journal of Educational Studies in Mathematics and Sciences ... The study sought to find out the difficulties encountered by high school chemistry students when solving stoichiometric problems.

  10. Using problem-solving instruction to overcome high school ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    kofi.mereku

    S. 1Mandina & C. E. 2Ochonogor. Abstract. The study sought to find out the difficulties encountered by high school chemistry students when solving stoichiometric problems. The study adopted a quasi-experimental design. 525participants drawn from 8 highs schools in a local education district in Zimbabwe participated in ...

  11. The University of Pennsylvania's Partnership with University City High School

    Science.gov (United States)

    LaLond Wyant, Alison

    2013-01-01

    This dissertation examined the form and function of the partnership between the University of Pennsylvania (Penn) and its neighboring public high school, University City High School (UCHS), throughout fiscal year 2012, as well as key stakeholders' perceptions of the partnership during that time period. Penn's status as an internationally renowned,…

  12. Fears and Related Anxieties in Chinese High School Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Huijun; Prevatt, Frances

    2008-01-01

    Chinese students from different high school settings face unique academic and emotional challenges. They are in a very vulnerable position due to high parent and teacher expectations and pressure to succeed in college entrance examinations and honour the family and the school. They are also vulnerable due to possible inappropriate parenting…

  13. High School in Switzerland Blends Work with Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffman, Nancy

    2015-01-01

    The Swiss model of high school matches students with career employment, jobs, and education. The system offers lessons to how the U.S. might create partnerships between business and education and also make high school more interesting and engaging for students.

  14. Sexual behaviour of Cape Town high-school students | Flisher ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objectives. To document prevalence rates for selected aspects of sexual behaviour among Cape Town high-school students and to conduct a survival analysis of age at first intercourse. Design. Cross-sectional survey. Setting. State high schools in Cape Town. Subjects. A multistage cluster sample of 2 740 grade 8 and 11 ...

  15. High School Predictors of a Career in Medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuchs, Travis T.; Sadler, Philip M.; Sonnert, Gerhard

    2015-01-01

    While there is no dearth of high school students who are interested in becoming physicians, racial/ethnic disparities still exist in the medical profession. This retrospective cohort study examined the influences on students' desire, at the end of high school, for a medical career, and, in particular, how these influences differed by…

  16. An XML format for benchmarks in High School Timetabling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Post, Gerhard F.; Ahmadi, Samad; Daskalaki, Sophia; Kingston, Jeffrey H.; Kyngas, Jari; Nurmi, Cimmo; Ranson, David

    2012-01-01

    The High School Timetabling Problem is amongst the most widely used timetabling problems. This problem has varying structures in different high schools even within the same country or educational system. Due to lack of standard benchmarks and data formats this problem has been studied less than

  17. An XML format for benchmarks in high school timetabling II

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Post, Gerhard F.; Kingston, Jeffrey H.; Ahmadi, Samad; Daskalaki, Sophia; Gogos, Christos; Kyngas, Jari; Nurmi, Cimmo; Santos, Haroldo; Rorije, Ben; Schaerf, Andrea

    2010-01-01

    We present the progress on the benchmarking project for high school timetabling that was introduced at PATAT 2008. In particular, we announce the High School Timetabling Archive HSTT2010 with 15 instances from 7 countries and an evaluator capable of checking the syntax of instances and evaluating

  18. Drug Testing of High School Student Athletes after Vernonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pittman, Andrew T.; Slough, Mark R.

    1996-01-01

    Addresses the Fourth Amendment constitutional challenges facing high school student-athlete drug testing programs and applies the findings in the U.S. Supreme Court decision in the "Vernonia versus Acton" case, the first drug-testing case involving high school student athletes to be decided by the Court, by recommending 12 safeguards…

  19. GREEK AND LATIN IN THE HIGH SCHOOLS, ANOTHER PROPOSAL.

    Science.gov (United States)

    ANDERSSON, THEODORE

    UNLESS TEACHERS OF CLASSICAL LANGUAGES ARE WILLING OR ABLE TO TEACH READING, AS DISTINCT FROM DECIPHERING AND TRANSLATING, CLASSICAL LANGUAGES IN HIGH SCHOOLS ARE DOOMED. TWO OTHER PROPOSALS THE PROFESSION SHOULD ACT UPON ARE THAT THE REASONABLE MINIMUM FOR THE HIGH SCHOOL STUDY OF GREEK AND/OR LATIN SHOULD BE 4 YEARS AND THAT EXPERIMENTATION…

  20. Health complaints of high school students in the Northern Province ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Erna Kinsey

    The article reports on a study of the health complaints of high school students in the Northern Province of South Africa, taboo themes in their families, and the relationship between the two. Five hundred and twenty-nine (529) high school students filled in a self-rating questionnaire designed to identify their health complaints ...

  1. tanzanian high school students' attitude towards five university

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    hi-tech

    2000-03-01

    Mar 1, 2000 ... Objective: To determine the attitude of high school students majoring in Physics, Chemistry and Biology (PCB) towards Medicine, Pharmacy, Dentistry, Veterinary Medicine and. Nursing as professions at university. Design: A cross sectional study of a representative sample of high school students using a.

  2. Senior High School Female Students' Interest in Physics as a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study investigated whether Ghanaian Senior High School female science students would prefer to study physics at the university or not and the reasons for their choice. Two hundred and one final year female students in four Senior High Schools offering biology, chemistry and physics in the Cape Coast Metropolis of ...

  3. High school students\\' attitudes, practices and knowledge of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study assessed the knowledge, attitudes and practices of contraception and sexual awareness amongst high school pupils in rural KwaZulu-Natal. Two hundred males and 200 females from five high schools in the Jozini district completed confidential, self-administered questionnaires in isiZulu. South African Family ...

  4. Physical Activity Levels in Portuguese High School Physical Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marmeleira, Jose Francisco Filipe; Aldeias, Nuno Micael Carrasqueira; da Graca, Pedro Miguel dos Santos Medeira

    2012-01-01

    The main aim of this study was to evaluate the physical activity (PA) levels of high school Portuguese students during physical education (PE) and investigate the association of PA levels with students' goal orientation and intrinsic motivation. Forty-six students from three high schools participated. Heart rate telemetry and pedometry were used…

  5. Profiles of Change: Lessons for Improving High School Physical Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doolittle, Sarah

    2014-01-01

    This feature has told stories of high school physical educators who have refused to accept the status quo of high school physical education programs. They have identified problems, initiated innovations in their own classes, implemented changes beyond their classes, and moved toward institutionalizing improvements throughout their programs and…

  6. Understanding How Domestic Violence Affects Behavior in High School Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frank, Malika

    2011-01-01

    This paper will provide the reader with an understanding of how domestic violence affects the behavior of high school students. The presentation is designed to provide the reader with a working definition of domestic violence, the rate of occurrence and its effects on high school students. Additionally the paper will summarize the negative effects…

  7. Examining Gender Inequality in a High School Engineering Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riegle-Crumb, Catherine; Moore, Chelsea

    2013-01-01

    This paper examines gender inequality within the context of an upper-level high school engineering course recently offered in Texas. Data was collected from six high schools that serve students from a variety of backgrounds. Among the almost two hundred students who enrolled in this challenge-based engineering course, females constituted a clear…

  8. Analyzing High School Students' Reasoning about Electromagnetic Induction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jelicic, Katarina; Planinic, Maja; Planinsic, Gorazd

    2017-01-01

    Electromagnetic induction is an important, yet complex, physics topic that is a part of Croatian high school curriculum. Nine Croatian high school students of different abilities in physics were interviewed using six demonstration experiments from electromagnetism (three of them concerned the topic of electromagnetic induction). Students were…

  9. Epidemiology of soccer-related injuries among male high school ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Soccer in Rwandan high schools can expose players to the risk of injury warranting prevention programmes. The aim of this study was to determine the type, causes, severity and management of injuries among high school soccer players in Rwanda, in order to obtain baseline data for injury prevention programmes.

  10. Bringing NMR and IR Spectroscopy to High Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonjour, Jessica L.; Hass, Alisa L.; Pollock, David W.; Huebner, Aaron; Frost, John A.

    2017-01-01

    Development of benchtop, portable Fourier transform nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and infrared (IR) spectrometers has opened up opportunities for creating university-high school partnerships that provide high school students with hands-on experience with NMR and IR instruments. With recent changes to the international baccalaureate chemistry…

  11. Skin infections among US high school athletes: A national survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashack, Kurt A; Burton, Kyle A; Johnson, Teresa R; Currie, Dustin W; Comstock, R Dawn; Dellavalle, Robert P

    2016-04-01

    Skin infections have long been a reported problem among high school athletes, particularly wrestlers. There has yet to be a national study describing the epidemiology of skin infections across multiple high school sports. We sought to report the epidemiology of skin infections among US high school athletes. High school sports-related skin infections resulting in time loss were reported by a convenience sample of US high schools from 2009/2010 through 2013/2014 via High School Reporting Information Online. During the study, 474 skin infections were reported among 20,858,781 athlete exposures, a rate of 2.27 per 100,000 athlete exposures. The largest number of skin infections occurred in wrestling (73.6%) followed by football (17.9%). The most common infections were bacterial (60.6%) and tinea (28.4%) infections. Body parts most often affected were the head/face (25.3%) followed by the forearm (12.7%). The study included only high schools with National Athletic Trainers' Association-affiliated athletic trainers, which may limit generalizability. However, using athletic trainers as data reporters improved data quality. Skin infections are an important subset of high school sports-related adverse events. An understanding of the epidemiology of sports-related skin infections should promote awareness and drive evidence-based prevention efforts. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  12. An Evaluation of the Private High School Curriculum in Turkey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aslan, Dolgun

    2016-01-01

    This study aims at evaluating curricula of private high schools in line with opinions of teachers working at the related high schools, and identifying any related problems. Screening model is used as a quantitative research method in the study. The "element-based curriculum evaluation model" is taken as basis for evaluation of the…

  13. Self-Concept and Achievement Motivation of High School Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawrence, A. S. Arul; Vimala, A.

    2013-01-01

    The present study "Self-concept and Achievement Motivation of High School Students" was investigated to find the relationship between Self-concept and Achievement Motivation of High School Students. Data for the study were collected using Self-concept Questionnaire developed by Raj Kumar Saraswath (1984) and Achievement Motive Test (ACMT)…

  14. High School Puente Program. What Works Clearinghouse Intervention Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    What Works Clearinghouse, 2012

    2012-01-01

    The "High School Puente Program" aims to help disadvantaged students graduate from high school, become college eligible, and enroll in four-year colleges and universities. Interdisciplinary in approach, the program has three components: writing, counseling, and mentoring. Students in the ninth and tenth grades receive rigorous writing…

  15. Predictors of Behavior Factors of High School Students against Recycling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cimen, Osman; Yilmaz, Mehmet

    2016-01-01

    This study aims to determine the variables that predict high school students' recycling behaviors. The study was designed as survey model. The study's sample consists of 203 students at a high school in Ankara. A recycling behavior scale developed by the researchers was used as a data collection tool. The scale has 3 dimensions: recycling…

  16. Tanzanian High School students' attitude towards five University ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: To determine the attitude of high school students majoring in Physics, Chemistry and Biology (PCB) towards Medicine, Pharmacy, Dentistry, Veterinary Medicine and Nursing as professions at university. Design: A cross sectional study of a representative sample of high school students using a pretested attitudinal ...

  17. GIS Adoption among Senior High School Geography Teachers in Taiwan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lay, Jinn-Guey; Chen, Yu-Wen; Chi, Yu-Lin

    2013-01-01

    This article explores the adoption of geographic information system (GIS) knowledge and skills through in-service training for high school geography teachers in Taiwan. Through statistical analysis of primary data collected from a census of Taiwan's high school geography teachers, it explores what motivates these teachers to undertake GIS…

  18. Diversity in High Schools and Diversity Management: A Qualitative Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ordu, Aydan

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of the present study is to present the diversities in high schools and opinions of teachers about management of these diversities. The sample of the study is from nine teachers working at the official high schools in the center of Denizli in Turkey. In this qualitative study, the data are collected with a semi-structured interview form…

  19. Family Influences on Dropout Behavior in One California High School.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rumberger, Russell W.; And Others

    1990-01-01

    Investigated how family processes influence high school student dropout behavior. Used a sample of 114 dropouts from 1 California high school, 48 of whom were matched to similarly profiled continuing students. Identified factors that explain students' dropout decisions: permissive parenting, negative parental reactions to grades, excessive…

  20. Multi-Cultural Expedition into Mindfulness among High School Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owen, Jonathan; Kalavala, Prathyusha

    2012-01-01

    In this article, the authors explain their experience in helping high school students deal with stress. Many international college students know first-hand that striving for academic success can be stressful, and American high school students are no exception. A recent study reported the percentage of students reporting good or above-average high…

  1. Analysis of Listening Preferences of High School and College Musicians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gregory, Dianne

    1994-01-01

    Reports on a study of music listening preferences among undergraduate college music majors, high school musicians in performance groups, and sixth-grade students in eight U.S. sites. Finds instrumental biases among high school and college musicians' preferences for relatively unfamiliar classical music. (CFR)

  2. Relationship between High School Students' Facebook Addiction and Loneliness Status

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karakose, Turgut; Yirci, Ramazan; Uygun, Harun; Ozdemir, Tuncay Yavuz

    2016-01-01

    This study was conducted in order to analyze the relation between high school students' Facebook addiction and loneliness levels. The study was conducted with the relational screening model. The sample of the study consists of 712 randomly selected high school students. The data was collected using the Bergen Facebook Addiction Scale (BFAS) to…

  3. Tabu search techniques for large high-school timetabling problems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A. Schaerf

    1996-01-01

    textabstractThe high-school timetabling problem regards the weekly scheduling for all the lectures of a high school. The problem consists in assigning lectures to periods in such a way that no teacher (or class) is involved in more than one lecture at a time, and other side constraints are

  4. Desk Top Graffiti in an English High School Classroom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanfiorenzo, Norberto R.

    Psychologists and sociologists recognize the importance of graffiti, yet there is a lack of information on the content of high school desk top graffiti. To study desk top graffiti, a 9th and 10th grade English classroom located in an inner city high school in the southeastern United States was found in which graffiti was written on nearly 90% of…

  5. Intertextuality in Chinese High School Students' Essay Writing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liddicoat, Anthony J.; Scrimgeour, Andrew; Chen, Toni

    2008-01-01

    This paper investigates the intertextual practices developed for writing in Chinese of high school students in Taiwan. On the basis of texts written by Chinese high school students, we investigate these practices within their own cultural context to develop an understanding of intertextual practices into which Chinese learners are socialised. We…

  6. Professional Identities of Vocational High School Students and Extracurricular Activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altan, Bilge Aslan; Altintas, Havva Ozge

    2017-01-01

    Vocational high schools are one of the controversial topics, and also the hardly touched fields in educational field. Students' profiles of vocational schools, their visions, and professional identity developments are not frequently reflected in the literature. Therefore, the main aim of the study is to research whether vocational high school…

  7. Effects of Problem Based Economics on High School Economics Instruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finkelstein, Neal; Hanson, Thomas

    2011-01-01

    The primary purpose of this study is to assess student-level impacts of a problem-based instructional approach to high school economics. The curriculum approach examined here was designed to increase class participation and content knowledge for high school students who are learning economics. This study tests the effectiveness of Problem Based…

  8. The Coverage of the Holocaust in High School History Textbooks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindquist, David

    2009-01-01

    The Holocaust is now a regular part of high school history curricula throughout the United States and, as a result, coverage of the Holocaust has become a standard feature of high school textbooks. As with any major event, it is important for textbooks to provide a rigorously accurate and valid historical account. In dealing with the Holocaust,…

  9. The Effect of Minimum Wage Rates on High School Completion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warren, John Robert; Hamrock, Caitlin

    2010-01-01

    Does increasing the minimum wage reduce the high school completion rate? Previous research has suffered from (1. narrow time horizons, (2. potentially inadequate measures of states' high school completion rates, and (3. potentially inadequate measures of minimum wage rates. Overcoming each of these limitations, we analyze the impact of changes in…

  10. Alberta High School, College Elevate Learning with Rare Joint Venture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearson, George

    2012-01-01

    The refusal by a group of parents in Olds, Alberta, in 2003 to accept a provincial grant to renovate their high school set in motion a remarkable collaboration that spawned an innovative learning campus for an entire community and beyond. The new Olds High School, which opened in 2010, is part of a new Community Learning Campus (CLC), a joint…

  11. Adolescent alcohol use in rural South African high schools | Onya ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: To examine psychosocial correlates of lifetime alcohol use among adolescents in rural South African high schools. Method: Questionnaires were administered to 1600 students from 20 randomly selected high schools in the Mankweng district within Limpopo province. Self-report data on alcohol use, demographic, ...

  12. Organ and tissue donation: what do high school students know?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcela Cristina de Lemos

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: To know the opinion of senior high school students in publicand private schools on the process of donating and transplanting organsand tissues, and their desire to be donors. Methods: A descriptive crosssectionalstudy, conducted from 2004 to 2005, on the opinion/knowledgeof senior high school students in public and private schools in the VilaMariana region of the city of São Paulo, on the process of organ and tissuedonation and transplantation. The convenience sample was made up of140 (81% students from two private schools and 167 (51% studentsfrom a public school. The project was approved by the Research EthicsCommittee of the UNIFESP. Results: Data showed that 163 (53.1%students believe that donation is by presumed consent and 147 (47.9%that consider that it occurs by informed consent. Of the public schoolstudents, 120 (71.9% believe that transplants are public and free ofcharge in Brazil versus 94 (67.1% of the students from private schools.Students know that donations may be made by living or dead donors(121 - 86.4% private schools versus 113 – 67.7% public school. Wehighlight that 22 (15.7% of the private school students and 16 (9.6%of those from the public school believe that the commerce of organs isallowed in Brazil. As to intentions of being a donor, 108 (77.1% of theprivate school students declared themselves organ and tissue donorsversus 106 (63.5% from the public school, and 63 (59.4% from thepublic versus 61 (56.5% from the private schools have already informedtheir families. Conclusion: There was no difference in knowledge andopinion among the students from the public and private schools as toaspects regarding donation and transplantation.

  13. Availability of Automated External Defibrillators in Public High Schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Michelle J; Loccoh, Emefah C; Goble, Monica M; Yu, Sunkyung; Duquette, Deb; Davis, Matthew M; Odetola, Folafoluwa O; Russell, Mark W

    2016-05-01

    To assess automated external defibrillator (AED) distribution and cardiac emergency preparedness in Michigan secondary schools and investigate for association with school sociodemographic characteristics. Surveys were sent via electronic mail to representatives from all public high schools in 30 randomly selected Michigan counties, stratified by population. Association of AED-related factors with school sociodemographic characteristics were evaluated using Wilcoxon rank sum test and χ(2) test, as appropriate. Of 188 schools, 133 (71%) responded to the survey and all had AEDs. Larger student population was associated with fewer AEDs per 100 students (P schools. Schools with >20% students from racial minority groups had significantly fewer AEDs available per 100 students than schools with less racial diversity (P = .03). Schools with more students eligible for free and reduced lunch were less likely to have a cardiac emergency response plan (P = .02) and demonstrated less frequent AED maintenance (P = .03). Although AEDs are available at public high schools across Michigan, the number of AEDs per student varies inversely with minority student population and school size. Unequal distribution of AEDs and lack of cardiac emergency preparedness may contribute to outcomes of sudden cardiac arrest among youth. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Approaches to School Leadership in Inclusive STEM High Schools: A Cross-Case Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ford, Michael Robert

    Inclusive STEM-focused high schools (ISHSs) are a relatively new phenomenon in the landscape of public education. This study of four exemplar ISHSs (identified by experts in STEM education as highly successfully in preparing students underrepresented in STEM for STEM majors in college and future STEM careers) provides a rich description of the approach to ISHS school leadership by identifying various internal and external leadership factors influencing school leadership. This study examined an existing data set that included site visits to four ISHSs along with pre- and post-visit data, and a cross-case analysis focused on the leadership contributions of ISHS leaders and their larger community. This study found that the ISHSs expanded the concept of school leadership to include leadership both within and outside the school. In addition, school leaders needed autonomy to innovate and respond to their schools' needs. This included autonomy in hiring new teachers, autonomy from school district influence, and autonomy from restrictive teachers' union regulation and policies. Finally, ISHSs needed to continually invest in increasing their schools' capacities. This included investing in teacher professionalization, providing pathways for school leadership, collaborating with business and industry, and identifying the best student supports. A product of this study was a proposition for characterizing school leadership in an ISHS. This proposition may offer valuable insight, implications, and information for states and schools districts that may be planning or improving STEM education programs.

  15. A win-win strategy for ecological restoration and biodiversity conservation in Southern China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Shixiong; Shang, Di; Yue, Hui; Ma, Hua

    2017-04-01

    Environmental degradation and poverty are linked, and must be tackled together. Doing so requires a win-win strategy that both restores the environment and ensures a sustainable livelihood for those who are affected by the restoration project. To understand the importance of combining ecological restoration and biodiversity conservation objectives with a consideration of the livelihoods of residents, we examined a successful project in ecologically fragile Changting County, Fujian Province, China. We attribute the project’s success to the development of a win-win strategy that sustainably improved resident livelihoods, in contrast with traditional strategies that focus exclusively on establishing forests and grassland. To develop this win-win strategy, we performed long-term monitoring (since 1984) under a program designed to permit ecological restoration and biodiversity conservation in the county. For our analysis, we chose a range of natural and socioeconomic indicators that could affect the ecological restoration; we then used a contribution model to identify the relative influence of each social, economic, or environmental factor on the dependent variables (vegetation cover, soil erosion, number of plant species). The results showed that by improving livelihoods and mitigating poverty in the long term, the project also reduced damage to the environment by local residents. Our calculations suggest that accounting for socioeconomic factors played a key role in the successful ecological conservation. This win-win path to escaping the poverty trap during ecological restoration provides an example that can be followed by restoration projects elsewhere in the world with suitable modifications to account for unique local conditions.

  16. Win-win strategies in directing low-carbon resilient development path

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Masui, Toshihiko; Kainuma, Mikiko

    2015-01-01

    This section explores big win-win strategies in directing low carbon resilient development path. There are lots of “leapfrog” development possibilities in developing countries, which go directly from a status of under-development through to efficient and environmentally benign lifestyle. To achieve low carbon resilient paths, not only technology development but also institutional and behavioral changes are required. Science-policy nexus is also discussed.

  17. A longitudinal study of school belonging and academic motivation across high school.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neel, Cari Gillen-O'; Fuligni, Andrew

    2013-01-01

    This longitudinal study examined how school belonging changes over the years of high school, and how it is associated with academic achievement and motivation. Students from Latin American, Asian, and European backgrounds participated (N = 572; age span = 13.94-19.15 years). In ninth grade, girls' school belonging was higher than boys'. Over the course of high school, however, girls' school belonging declined, whereas boys' remained stable. Within-person longitudinal analyses indicated that years in which students had higher school belonging were also years in which they felt that school was more enjoyable and more useful, above and beyond their actual level of achievement. Results highlight the importance of belonging for maintaining students' academic engagement during the teenage years. © 2012 The Authors. Child Development © 2012 Society for Research in Child Development, Inc.

  18. Demographic Factors Affecting Internet Using Purposes of High School Students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdullah Faruk Kılıç

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed at determining the impact of demographic factors on the Internet usage purposes of high school students. The population of the study consisted of students between 9th and 12th grades from the Anatolian high schools, science high schools, social sciences high schools, sports high schools and fine arts high schools in Turkey. The sample was chosen through the stratified and cluster sampling procedure. The students were chosen randomly depending on the regions of their school attendance. The sample for this research numbered 3170 students. The research was conducted in the second term of the 2014-2015 academic year. The data were obtained through online forms and the bases of participation are honesty, sincerity, and volunteerism. The data collection tool is a questionnaire and a demographic information form prepared by the researchers. Chi-square Automatic Interaction Detector (CHAID analysis was conducted through SPSS in order to determine the demographic factors affecting the purposes of internet usage among high school students. The results of this research show that 9th grade students in Turkey mostly use the Internet to do homework while students from other grades mostly use the Internet for social networking. The male students use the Internet for playing video games more frequently in comparison with female students. Also, socioeconomic status affects the purpose of Internet usage. Hence it is suggested that teachers talking to male students might use the examples of computers and games and with female students they might relate the topics to social media.

  19. Service Delivery for High School Students with High Incidence Disabilities: Issues and Challenges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schultz, Edward; Simpson, Cynthia; Owen, Jane C.; McIntyre, Christina Janise

    2015-01-01

    High schools throughout this country are as heterogeneous as the students they serve in size, location, tax base, student make-up, and teacher quality. However, they must all follow the mandates of NCLB and IDEA. While these policies affect all schools, high schools continue to face many challenges implementing these laws effectively for students…

  20. 25 CFR 39.144 - What is the small high school adjustment?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false What is the small high school adjustment? 39.144 Section... EQUALIZATION PROGRAM Indian School Equalization Formula Small School Adjustment § 39.144 What is the small high school adjustment? (a) The small high school adjustment is a WSU adjustment given to a small high school...

  1. High School Graduation Rates:Alternative Methods and Implications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing Miao

    2004-10-01

    Full Text Available The No Child Left Behind Act has brought great attention to the high school graduation rate as one of the mandatory accountability measures for public school systems. However, there is no consensus on how to calculate the high school graduation rate given the lack of longitudinal databases that track individual students. This study reviews literature on and practices in reporting high school graduation rates, compares graduation rate estimates yielded from alternative methods, and estimates discrepancies between alternative results at national, state, and state ethnic group levels. Despite the graduation rate method used, results indicate that high school graduation rates in the U.S. have been declining in recent years and that graduation rates for black and Hispanic students lag substantially behind those of white students. As to graduation rate method preferred, this study found no evidence that the conceptually more complex methods yield more accurate or valid graduation rate estimates than the simpler methods.

  2. Improved Middle Grades Schools for Improved High School Readiness: Ten Best Practices in the Middle Grades

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bottoms, Gene; Timberlake, Allison

    2012-01-01

    In 2009, the Southern Regional Education Board (SREB) Committee to Improve High School Graduation Rates and Achievement, led by then-Governor Sonny Perdue of Georgia, released a report of 10 key recommendations for ensuring more students graduate from high school, and they graduate ready for college and careers. Among these 10 recommendations was…

  3. Structuring Opportunity: The Role of School Context in Shaping High School Students' Occupational Aspirations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowan-Kenyon, Heather T.; Perna, Laura W.; Swan, Amy K.

    2011-01-01

    This study explores the occupational aspirations of high school students planning to attend college by drawing on a multilayered model of college enrollment, social cognitive career theory, and multiple descriptive case studies of 15 high schools. Students' occupational aspirations and their understanding of the education required to achieve these…

  4. Spotlight on Schools. AMAL Aleph Arts and Sciences Technological High School, Petach Tikva.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenfeld, Dina

    1998-01-01

    Israel's AMAL Aleph High School combines advanced technology with regular high school academic studies. This article describes how one English-as-a-Second-Language teacher joined a project to develop an online English student magazine for the Center for Educational Technology Internet site, then used to the project to improve students' English…

  5. An Examination of the Job Training and Job Experiences of High School Students as They Exit School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrews, Wilbur Drew

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this investigation was (a) to determine the level of satisfaction that exiting high school students felt regarding the job preparation and training they received in high school, (b) gather data on work experiences during high school, (c) gather data on job training experiences during high school, and (d) gather data on students…

  6. Place Attachment and Place Disruption: The Perceptions of Selected Adults and High School Students on a Rural School District Reorganization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wieland, Regi Leann

    2001-01-01

    Interviews with adult residents and high school students in two rural Kansas communities that had consolidated their high schools found that adults in the community that lost its high school had more negative reactions and feelings of loss than adults in the community that retained its high school. Student reactions were generally positive.…

  7. High school sports programs differentially impact participation by sex

    OpenAIRE

    Drake, Keith M.; Longacre, Meghan R.; MacKenzie, Todd; Titus, Linda J.; Beach, Michael L.; Rundle, Andrew G.; Dalton, Madeline A.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Among numerous health benefits, sports participation has been shown to reduce the risk of overweight and obesity in children and adolescents. Schools represent an ideal environment for increasing sports participation, but it is unclear how access and choice influence participation and whether characteristics of the school sports program differentially influence boys' and girls' participation. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the characteristics of high school athletic pro...

  8. Sleep disorders in high school and pre-university students

    OpenAIRE

    Rocha, Célia R.S.; Rossini, Sueli; Reimão, Rubens

    2010-01-01

    Adolescence is a period in which youngsters have to make choices such as applying for university. The selection process is competitive, and it brings distress and anxiety, risk factors for the appearance of sleep disorders. OBJECTIVE: To verify the occurrence of sleep disorders in third-year high school and pre-university students. METHOD: This cross-sectional descriptive study comprised a sample of 529 students (M=241, F=288) from three public schools, four private schools and two pre-univer...

  9. High School Sport Specialization Patterns of Current Division I Athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Post, Eric G; Thein-Nissenbaum, Jill M; Stiffler, Mikel R; Brooks, M Alison; Bell, David R; Sanfilippo, Jennifer L; Trigsted, Stephanie M; Heiderscheit, Bryan C; McGuine, Timothy A

    Sport specialization is a strategy to acquire superior sport performance in 1 sport but is associated with increased injury risk. Currently, the degree of high school specialization among Division I athletes is unknown. College athletes will display increased rates of specialization as they progress through their high school careers. Descriptive epidemiological study. Level 4. Three hundred forty-three athletes (115 female) representing 9 sports from a Midwest Division I University completed a previously utilized sport specialization questionnaire regarding sport participation patterns for each grade of high school. McNemar and chi-square tests were used to investigate associations of grade, sport, and sex with prevalence of sport specialization category (low, moderate, high) (a priori P ≤ 0.05). Specialization increased throughout high school, with 16.9% (n = 58) and 41.1% (n = 141) of athletes highly specialized in 9th and 12th grades, respectively. Football athletes were less likely to be highly specialized than nonfootball athletes for each year of high school ( P grade level ( P > 0.23). The majority of Division I athletes were not classified as highly specialized throughout high school, but the prevalence of high specialization increased as athletes progressed through high school. Nonfootball athletes were more likely to be highly specialized than football athletes at each grade level. Most athletes who are recruited to participate in collegiate athletics will eventually specialize in their sport, but it does not appear that early specialization is necessary to become a Division I athlete. Athletes should be counseled regarding safe participation in sport during high school to minimize injury and maximize performance.

  10. High School Sport Specialization Patterns of Current Division I Athletes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Post, Eric G.; Thein-Nissenbaum, Jill M.; Stiffler, Mikel R.; Brooks, M. Alison; Bell, David R.; Sanfilippo, Jennifer L.; Trigsted, Stephanie M.; Heiderscheit, Bryan C.; McGuine, Timothy A.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Sport specialization is a strategy to acquire superior sport performance in 1 sport but is associated with increased injury risk. Currently, the degree of high school specialization among Division I athletes is unknown. Hypothesis: College athletes will display increased rates of specialization as they progress through their high school careers. Study Design: Descriptive epidemiological study. Level of Evidence: Level 4. Methods: Three hundred forty-three athletes (115 female) representing 9 sports from a Midwest Division I University completed a previously utilized sport specialization questionnaire regarding sport participation patterns for each grade of high school. McNemar and chi-square tests were used to investigate associations of grade, sport, and sex with prevalence of sport specialization category (low, moderate, high) (a priori P ≤ 0.05). Results: Specialization increased throughout high school, with 16.9% (n = 58) and 41.1% (n = 141) of athletes highly specialized in 9th and 12th grades, respectively. Football athletes were less likely to be highly specialized than nonfootball athletes for each year of high school (P 0.23). Conclusion: The majority of Division I athletes were not classified as highly specialized throughout high school, but the prevalence of high specialization increased as athletes progressed through high school. Nonfootball athletes were more likely to be highly specialized than football athletes at each grade level. Clinical Relevance: Most athletes who are recruited to participate in collegiate athletics will eventually specialize in their sport, but it does not appear that early specialization is necessary to become a Division I athlete. Athletes should be counseled regarding safe participation in sport during high school to minimize injury and maximize performance. PMID:27807260

  11. Short Sleep Duration Among Middle School and High School Students - United States, 2015.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wheaton, Anne G; Jones, Sherry Everett; Cooper, Adina C; Croft, Janet B

    2018-01-26

    Insufficient sleep among children and adolescents is associated with increased risk for obesity, diabetes, injuries, poor mental health, attention and behavior problems, and poor academic performance (1-4). The American Academy of Sleep Medicine has recommended that, for optimal health, children aged 6-12 years should regularly sleep 9-12 hours per 24 hours and teens aged 13-18 years should sleep 8-10 hours per 24 hours (1). CDC analyzed data from the 2015 national, state, and large urban school district Youth Risk Behavior Surveys (YRBSs) to determine the prevalence of short sleep duration (teens aged 13-18 years) on school nights among middle school and high school students in the United States. In nine states that conducted the middle school YRBS and included a question about sleep duration in their questionnaire, the prevalence of short sleep duration among middle school students was 57.8%, with state-level estimates ranging from 50.2% (New Mexico) to 64.7% (Kentucky). The prevalence of short sleep duration among high school students in the national YRBS was 72.7%. State-level estimates of short sleep duration for the 30 states that conducted the high school YRBS and included a question about sleep duration in their questionnaire ranged from 61.8% (South Dakota) to 82.5% (West Virginia). The large percentage of middle school and high school students who do not get enough sleep on school nights suggests a need for promoting sleep health in schools and at home and delaying school start times to permit students adequate time for sleep.

  12. Teaching Innovation in High School Technology Classes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Geoffrey A.; Skaggs, Paul; West, Richard E.

    2013-01-01

    Innovation is central to modern industry. It can and should be taught in schools. Not only does providing students a background in innovation benefit them later in life and industry, but it also promotes and further develops their critical thinking and collaboration skills. Despite the need for innovation, many have struggled with how to teach it.…

  13. Longitudinal Predictors of High School Completion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barry, Melissa; Reschly, Amy L.

    2012-01-01

    This longitudinal study examined predictors of dropout assessed in elementary school. Student demographic data, achievement, attendance, and ratings of behavior from the Behavior Assessment System for Children were used to predict dropout and completion. Two models, which varied on student sex and race, predicted dropout at rates ranging from 75%…

  14. Consumer Education in Texas High Schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNeal, James U.

    The study sought to determine a statewide status profile of consumer education in Texas public secondary schools and to obtain an attitudinal profile of Texas secondary teachers and administrators regarding consumer education. An introductory chapter traces the historical development of consumerism and consumer education. Two different sets of 10…

  15. Upper High School Students' Understanding of Electromagnetism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saglam, Murat; Millar, Robin

    2006-01-01

    Although electromagnetism is an important component of upper secondary school physics syllabuses in many countries, there has been relatively little research on students' understanding of the topic. A written test consisting of 16 diagnostic questions was developed and used to survey the understanding of electromagnetism of upper secondary school…

  16. Alternative High School: A Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buchanan, Kristen M.

    2014-01-01

    Many educators across the nation are struggling to teach and inspire students who are susceptible to school drop-out. These specific students are commonly dealing with poor parental involvement, low socioeconomic status, substance abuse issues, teenage pregnancy, behavioral infractions, and/ or mental health issues, which can affect them socially,…

  17. Iraqi Refugee High School Students' Academic Adjustment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bang, Hyeyoung

    2017-01-01

    Many Iraqi refugee students in the United States suffer from posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) as well as acculturation stresses. These stresses often create challenges for their integration into U.S. schools. The project explored risk factors such as the length of educational gaps in transit, PTSD, and separation and marginalization…

  18. Crowd Hysteria in a Junior High School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldberg, Evelyn L.

    1973-01-01

    This study describes the events and people involved in one particular case of crowd hysteria occurring in a group of limited age range and environmental exposure and investigages differences between the hysterical group and controls on sociologic, psychologic, demographic, health, and school history variables. (Author)

  19. High School Astronomical Research at the Army and Navy Academy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyce, Pat; Boyce, Grady

    2016-06-01

    Establishment of a high school astronomy and research program is a difficult task to accomplish in an environment of state mandated high school educational curricula and the task saturation for many teachers today created by their class room and administrative requirements. This environment is most challenging for public schools. The astronomy program we will describe seems to be better suited at least at the present time for private or specialized schools. We will outline how a broad astronomy program was developed over two years at the Army and Navy Academy (ANA), a private boarding school in Carlsbad, California. Starting with no astronomy program in 2013, the Academy now has an astronomy club, a University of California a-g certified two semester high school course, and a college accredited astronomy research seminar with over 20 published high school authors.At ANA the development followed this path: finding a strong proponent at the school who can make actionable decisions; building interest and perceived value to other staff and faculty members; establishing an astronomy club to generate student interest and future student leaders; and designing the a-g certified high school course including the course length, structure and balance of teaching elements. Building on these foundations, the college level astronomy research seminar was then added to provide an avenue for inspired students to undertake actual research and publication of their work in scientific journals in their free time for college credit.Creating a sustainable program with supporting infrastructure comes next. Success with the three foundation steps builds confidence in the program with faculty and staff. Published, tangible successes highlight the value and enable advanced placement and scholarship opportunities for graduates. These successes build enthusiasm. The further keys to sustainability include addressing course credit, instructor compensation and rewards, and integration into the

  20. Promoting an equitable and supportive school climate in high schools: the role of school organizational health and staff burnout.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bottiani, Jessika H; Bradshaw, Catherine P; Mendelson, Tamar

    2014-12-01

    In response to persistent racial disparities in academic and behavioral outcomes between Black and White students, equitable school climate has drawn attention as a potential target for school reform. This study examined differences in Black and White students' experiences of school climate and explored whether indicators of school organizational health and staff burnout moderated differences in students' school experiences by race. Utilizing hierarchical linear modeling with a sample of 18,397 Black students (n=6228) and White students (n=12,169) and 2391 school staff in 53 schools, we found a consistent pattern of racial inequalities, such that Black students reported less positive experiences than White students across three indicators of school climate (caring γ=-0.08, pschool organizational health and student-reported school climate (e.g., staff affiliation and student-perceived equity, γ=0.07, pschool organizational health indicators were more strongly associated with positive perceptions of school climate among White students than Black students, translating into greater racial disparities in perceived school climate at schools with greater organizational health (e.g., supportive leadership by race on student-perceived engagement, γ=-0.03, p=.042). We also found negative associations between staff-reported burnout and students' experience of equity, such that the racial gap was smaller in schools with high ratings of burnout (γ=0.04, p=.002). These findings have implications for educators and education researchers interested in promoting school social contexts that equitably support student engagement and success. Copyright © 2014 Society for the Study of School Psychology. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. LEARNING STRATEGIES IN HIGH SCHOOL STUDENTS - DIFFERENCES WITH RESPECT TO AGE AND TYPE OF SECONDARY SCHOOL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lejla Muratović

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to determine the level of development of learning strategies in high school students with respect to the age of students and type of high school they attend. We tried to answer the question of whether the years spent in school educate students to strategic approach to learning. The study sample consisted of students of the first and third grade students from three high schools in Tuzla, which are: Gymnasium "Mesa Selimović”, Secondary Commercial School and students of apprenticeships from the Mixed Secondary Technical School, a total of 731 students. Instruments used in this research are Scaler Learning Strategies (SUS from 2009, by Nenad Suzić. The results showed that 85% of students while learning do not to use any strategy, and that first-grade students had a significantly higher level of development of learning strategies in relation to students of the third grade. This data is not encouraging and tells us that schools put little work into educating students to strategic approach to learning. The study found that answers of students with regard to the type of high school differ significantly on the general score of the SUS-scaler and all its subtests. Based on the arithmetic mean heights, it was found that students of apprenticeships achieved significantly lower values on the general score of the SUS-scaler compared to students of Gymnasium and Secondary Commercial School.

  2. Epidemiology of Injuries in High School Football: Does School Size Matter?

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Harold; Campbell, Stephen; Herzog, Makenzie; Popoli, David; Reisner, Andrew; Polikandriotis, John

    2015-08-01

    More than 1 million US high school students play football. Our objective was to compare the high school football injury profiles by school enrollment size during the 2013-2014 season. Injury data were prospectively gathered on 1806 student athletes while participating in football practice or games by certified athletic trainers as standard of care for 20 high schools in the Atlanta Metropolitan area divided into small (football season. Smaller schools had a higher overall injury rate (79.9 injuries per 10,000 athletic exposures vs. 46.4 injuries per 10,000 athletic exposures; P injuries (14.3% vs. 10.3%; P = .009 and 3.5% vs. 1.5%; P = .006, respectively) while larger schools have more hip/upper leg injuries (13.3% vs. 9.9%; P = .021). Lastly, smaller schools had a higher concussion distribution for offensive lineman (30.6% vs. 13.4%; P = .006) and a lower rate for defensive backs/safeties (9.2% vs. 25.4%; P = .008). This study is the first to compare and show unique injury profiles for different high school sizes. An understanding of school specific injury patterns can help drive targeted preventative measures.

  3. The association between higher body mass index and poor school performance in high school students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tonetti, L; Fabbri, M; Filardi, M; Martoni, M; Natale, V

    2016-12-01

    This study aimed to examine the association between body mass index (BMI) and school performance in high school students by controlling for relevant mediators such as sleep quality, sleep duration and socioeconomic status. Thirty-seven high school students (mean age: 18.16 ± 0.44 years) attending the same school type, i.e. 'liceo scientifico' (science-based high school), were enrolled. Students' self-reported weight and height were used to calculate BMI. Participants wore an actigraph to objectively assess the quality and duration of sleep. School performance was assessed through the actual grade obtained at the final school-leaving exam, in which higher grades indicate higher performance. BMI, get-up time, mean motor activity, wake after sleep onset and number of awakenings were negatively correlated with the grade, while sleep efficiency was positively correlated. When performing a multiple regression analysis, BMI proved the only significant (negative) predictor of grade. When controlling for sleep quality, sleep duration and socioeconomic status, a higher BMI is associated with a poorer school performance in high school students. © 2015 World Obesity Federation.

  4. Sports-related injuries among high school athletes--United States, 2005-06 school year.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-09-29

    Participation in high school sports helps promote a physically active lifestyle. High school sports participation has grown from an estimated 4 million participants during the 1971-72 school year to an estimated 7.2 million in 2005-06. However, despite the documented health benefits of increased physical activity (e.g., weight management, improved self-esteem, and increased strength, endurance, and flexibility), those who participate in athletics are at risk for sports-related injuries. High school athletes account for an estimated 2 million injuries, 500,000 doctor visits, and 30,000 hospitalizations annually. To date, the study of these injuries has been limited by inabilities to calculate injury rates, compare results among groups, and generalize findings from small, nonrepresentative samples. During the 2005-06 school year, researchers at a children's hospital in Ohio used an Internet-based data-collection tool to pilot an injury surveillance system among athletes from a representative national sample of U.S. high schools. This report summarizes the findings of that study, which indicated that participation in high school sports resulted in an estimated 1.4 million injuries at a rate of 2.4 injuries per 1,000 athlete exposures (i.e., practices or competitions). Surveillance of exposure-based injury rates in a nationally representative sample of high school athletes and analysis of injury patterns can help guide activities aimed at reducing these injuries.

  5. Secondhand Smoke Exposure in a Rural High School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kiyoung; Hahn, Ellen J.; Riker, Carol A.; Hoehne, Amber; White, Ashleigh; Greenwell, Devin; Thompson, Dyshel

    2007-01-01

    Although federal law requires all public schools to be smoke free, lack of compliance with the smoke-free policy is commonly reported. The aims of this study were to describe the indoor fine-particle (PM[subscript 2.5]) air pollution in a rural high school and surrounding public venues. This cross-sectional, nonexperimental study was conducted in…

  6. Antibiotic Misuse among High School Students in Calabar Nigeria ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Five hundred and sixty high school students from five secondary schools in Calabar, Nigeria were studied for antibiotic usage. Questionnaires where administered to determine the following parameters: Knowledge of antibiotics, types of infections for which antibiotics were taken, sources of prescription and procurement of ...

  7. Health complaints of high school students in the Northern Province ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Erna Kinsey

    Department of Medical Psychology, University of Vienna Medical School, Vienna, Austria. * To whom correspondence should be addressed. The article reports on a study of the health complaints of high school students in the Northern Province of South Africa, taboo themes in their families, and the relationship between the ...

  8. No Child Left Behind and High School Astronomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krumenaker, Larry

    2009-01-01

    Astronomy was a required subject in the first American secondary level schools, the academies of the 18th century. When these were supplanted a century later by public high schools, astronomy still was often required, subsumed into courses of Natural Philosophy. Reasons given at that time to support astronomy as a part of general education include…

  9. Types of Bullying in the Senior High Schools in Ghana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antiri, Kwasi Otopa

    2016-01-01

    The main objective of the study was to examine the types of bullying that were taking place in the senior high schools in Ghana. A multi-stage sampling procedure, comprising purposive, simple random and snowball sampling technique, was used in the selection of the sample. A total of 354 respondents were drawn six schools in Ashanti, Central and…

  10. Employment Status among Parenting Teenage Mothers Enrolled in High School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Matthew Lee; Wilson, Kelly L.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Many programs emphasize subsequent pregnancy prevention and high school graduation among teenage mothers; however, less is known about their ability to increase financial earnings from employment opportunities while concurrently enrolled in school. This study evaluates factors influencing employment status among teenage mothers after…

  11. Alternative High School Students: Prevalence and Correlates of Overweight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubik, Martha Y.; Davey, Cynthia; Fulkerson, Jayne A.; Sirard, John; Story, Mary; Arcan, Chrisa

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To determine prevalence and correlates of overweight among adolescents attending alternative high schools (AHS). Methods: AHS students (n=145) from 6 schools completed surveys and anthropometric measures. Cross-sectional associations were assessed using mixed model multivariate logistic regression. Results: Among students, 42% were…

  12. Charleston/Stonewall Jackson High Schools' Honors English Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanawha County Schools, Charleston, WV.

    In the 1984-85 school year, the 3-year Honors English course was initiated at Stonewall Jackson and Charleston High Schools in Kanawha County, West Virginia. Focusing on its humanities approach to language arts instruction, this curriculum guide outlines a sequential, thematic program designed to provide students with an historical background of…

  13. High School Food Courts: A New Evolution in Student Dining.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beach, George

    2000-01-01

    Discusses how traditional high school cafeterias have changed in recent years into food courts and dining areas usually found in shopping malls. Areas examined include food court design, traffic patterns, safety and after-hours usage, and kitchens and serving areas. How one school district turned its food court system into a successful…

  14. High School Graduates: The Influence of Academics and Attendance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardnett, Sharon G.

    2013-01-01

    Public awareness of the severity of the high school completion problem in terms of its educational, social, psychological, and economic impacts has grown in recent years. Using ex post facto data, this non-experimental, correlational study was designed to determine whether there are differences in academic performance and school attendance between…

  15. Commonplace Intersections within a High School Mathematics Leadership Institute

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sack, Jacqueline J.

    2008-01-01

    This narrative inquiry weaves Schwab's commonplaces of curriculum and Clandinin, Pushor, and Murray Orr's narrative commonplaces through stories of conflict between a professional developer and 30 high school lead teachers. In her role as manager of a mathematics leadership institute situated between two urban public school districts and a…

  16. Students' performance on the Ghanaian junior high school ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    kofi.mereku

    This study investigated Effutu Municipality Junior High School (JHS) 2 students' performance on the ... the performance of the students, particularly in public schools, who are not reaching proficiency. Keywords ... education about the nature of the Ghanaian curriculum and provision of education as a whole in this country.

  17. Feature Writing in High School Newspapers and Yearbooks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valentine, Fern, Ed.

    Intended for use by high school journalism instructors and school newspaper and yearbook sponsors, this booklet contains articles dealing with various elements of feature story writing. The first article describes the development of a set of criteria by the Journalism Education Association (JEA) for teachers to use in evaluating feature stories,…

  18. Student Assistance Program Sandia High School 1985-86 Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyce-Prather, Margaret; Shainline, Michael

    This document presents data from the second year of the Student Assistance Program, a counseling program to help students who may be abusing drugs or alcohol, implemented at Sandia High School in the Albuquerque (New Mexico) Public School system. Data are included from the program's monthly records sheets, from parent involvement questionnaires,…

  19. High School Principals as Leaders: Styles and Sources of Power

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brinia, Vasiliki; Papantoniou, Eva

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to present the characteristics of leadership (style adopted, sources of power exercised and factors affecting leadership) of high school principals in Greece. Design/Methodology/Approach: In total, 235 school principals were surveyed using questionnaires. These questionnaires assessed how often they adopted…

  20. Diversity, Community, and Pluralism in Jewish Community Day High Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kress, Jeffrey S.

    2016-01-01

    Students in "community" (nondenominational) Jewish high schools represent a diversity of denominational affiliations, including those who affiliate with more than one denomination and those that affiliate with none. These schools strive to create communities in which students with varying Jewish beliefs and practices are, at the very…

  1. Frequency of Guns in the Households of High School Seniors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coker, Ann L.; Bush, Heather M.; Follingstad, Diane R.; Brancato, Candace J.

    2017-01-01

    Background: In 2013, President Obama lifted the federal ban on gun violence research. The current study provides one of the first reports to estimate household gun ownership as reported by youth. Methods: In this cohort study of 3,006 high school seniors from 24 schools, we examined the frequency of household guns ownership. Results: About 65%…

  2. What Does GPA in an Urban High School Actually Mean?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steward, Robbie J.; Hill, Martin F.; Neil, Douglas M.; Pritchett, Tiffany; Wabaunsee, Ah-Sha-Ni

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this researcher-school collaborative study was to examine factors which might be intervenable by urban high school counselors in assisting at-risk students. There were two primary objectives. The first was to examine the degree to which urban adolescents' academic competence predicts cumulative grade point average (GPA). The second…

  3. Student Achievement Data Systems in High and Low Performing Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stachowiak, Jeannie E.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine if there was a difference in how high and low performing elementary school districts use and analyze data to differentiate instruction, make changes to district/grade level curriculum, determine professional development needs, determine teacher effectiveness, and determine the use of school district…

  4. Teaching Media Studies as High School Social Science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuggle, C. A.; Sneed, Don; Wulfemeyer, K. Tim

    2000-01-01

    Finds that a large majority of high school social science teachers in two of the nation's largest school districts believe that: students should be taught how to be informed media consumers; the social science curriculum is the appropriate place for that instruction; and while they feel qualified to teach about the media, they have received little…

  5. Tabu search techniques for large high-school timetabling problems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schaerf, A. [Universita di Roma, Rome (Italy)

    1996-12-31

    The high-school timetabling problem consists in assigning all the lectures of a high school to the time periods in such a way that no teacher (or class) is involved in more than one lecture at a time and other side constraints are satisfied. The problem is NP-complete and is usually tackled using heuristic methods. This paper describes a solution algorithm (and its implementation) based on Tabu Search. The algorithm interleaves different types of moves and makes use of an adaptive relaxation of the hard constraints. The implementation of the algorithm has been successfully experimented in some large high schools with various kinds of side constraints.

  6. Athletic Directors' Barriers to Hiring Athletic Trainers in High Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazerolle, Stephanie M.; Raso, Samantha R.; Pagnotta, Kelly D.; Stearns, Rebecca L.; Casa, Douglas J.

    2015-01-01

    Context In its best-practices recommendation, the Inter-Association Task Force for Preventing Sudden Death in Secondary School Athletics Programs urged all high schools to have a certified athletic trainer (AT) on staff. Despite the recommendation, many high schools lack the medical services of an AT. Objective To examine the barriers that athletic directors (ADs) face in hiring ATs in public high schools and in providing medical coverage for their student-athletes. Design Qualitative study. Setting Semistructured telephone interviews. Patients or Other Participants Twenty full-time public high school ADs (17 men, 3 women) from various geographical regions of the United States (6 North, 4 South, 4 Midwest, 6 West) participated. Data saturation guided the total number of participants. Data Collection and Analysis We completed telephone interviews guided by a semistructured questionnaire with all participants. Interviews were recorded and transcribed verbatim. Multiple-analyst triangulation and peer review were included as steps to establish data credibility. We analyzed the data using the principles of the general inductive approach. Results We identified 3 themes. Lack of power represented the inability of an AD to hire an AT, which was perceived to be a responsibility of the superintendent and school board. Budget concerns pertained to the funding allocated to specific resources within a school, which often did not include an AT. Nonbudget concerns represented rural locations without clinics or hospitals nearby; misconceptions about the role of an AT, which led to the belief that first-aid–trained coaches are appropriate medical providers; and community support from local clinics, hospitals, and volunteers. Conclusions Many ADs would prefer to employ ATs in their schools; however, they perceive that they are bound by the hiring and budgeting decisions of superintendents and school boards. Public school systems are experiencing the consequences of national budget

  7. Athletic Directors' Barriers to Hiring Athletic Trainers in High Schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazerolle, Stephanie M; Raso, Samantha R; Pagnotta, Kelly D; Stearns, Rebecca L; Casa, Douglas J

    2015-10-01

    In its best-practices recommendation, the Inter-Association Task Force for Preventing Sudden Death in Secondary School Athletics Programs urged all high schools to have a certified athletic trainer (AT) on staff. Despite the recommendation, many high schools lack the medical services of an AT. To examine the barriers that athletic directors (ADs) face in hiring ATs in public high schools and in providing medical coverage for their student-athletes. Qualitative study. Semistructured telephone interviews. Twenty full-time public high school ADs (17 men, 3 women) from various geographical regions of the United States (6 North, 4 South, 4 Midwest, 6 West) participated. Data saturation guided the total number of participants. We completed telephone interviews guided by a semistructured questionnaire with all participants. Interviews were recorded and transcribed verbatim. Multiple-analyst triangulation and peer review were included as steps to establish data credibility. We analyzed the data using the principles of the general inductive approach. We identified 3 themes. Lack of power represented the inability of an AD to hire an AT, which was perceived to be a responsibility of the superintendent and school board. Budget concerns pertained to the funding allocated to specific resources within a school, which often did not include an AT. Nonbudget concerns represented rural locations without clinics or hospitals nearby; misconceptions about the role of an AT, which led to the belief that first-aid-trained coaches are appropriate medical providers; and community support from local clinics, hospitals, and volunteers. Many ADs would prefer to employ ATs in their schools; however, they perceive that they are bound by the hiring and budgeting decisions of superintendents and school boards. Public school systems are experiencing the consequences of national budget cuts and often do not have the freedom to hire ATs when other school staff are being laid off.

  8. Measuring school climate in high schools: a focus on safety, engagement, and the environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradshaw, Catherine P; Waasdorp, Tracy E; Debnam, Katrina J; Johnson, Sarah Lindstrom

    2014-09-01

    School climate has been linked to multiple student behavioral, academic, health, and social-emotional outcomes. The US Department of Education (USDOE) developed a 3-factor model of school climate comprised of safety, engagement, and environment. This article examines the factor structure and measurement invariance of the USDOE model. Drawing upon 2 consecutive waves of data from over 25,000 high school students (46% minority), a series of exploratory and confirmatory factor analyses examined the fit of the Maryland Safe and Supportive Schools Climate Survey with the USDOE model. The results indicated adequate model fit with the theorized 3-factor model of school climate, which included 13 subdomains: safety (perceived safety, bullying and aggression, and drug use); engagement (connection to teachers, student connectedness, academic engagement, school connectedness, equity, and parent engagement); environment (rules and consequences, physical comfort, and support, disorder). We also found consistent measurement invariance with regard to student sex, grade level, and ethnicity. School-level interclass correlation coefficients ranged from 0.04 to .10 for the scales. Findings supported the USDOE 3-factor model of school climate and suggest measurement invariance and high internal consistency of the 3 scales and 13 subdomains. These results suggest the 56-item measure may be a potentially efficient, yet comprehensive measure of school climate. © 2014, American School Health Association.

  9. Winning public and political support for nuclear

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McFadden, D.J.

    2006-01-01

    The nuclear industry is entering an historic battle for the hearts and minds of Canadians as government decides on nuclear new build. Recent polls indicate that public support is rising for nuclear power. However, the support could be eroded by negative events or intense lobbying by anti-nuclear groups. The nuclear industry must deal with concerns raised about nuclear power, such as cost, safety, reliability and waste. The nuclear industry should build upon the positive movement in public support. The industry must go to Canadians with a credible message which responds effectively to public concerns. It must be remembered that winning public support will be essential to winning and maintaining political support. (author)

  10. Winning fights induces hyperaggression via the action of the biogenic amine octopamine in crickets.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan Rillich

    Full Text Available Winning an agonistic interaction against a conspecific is known to heighten aggressiveness, but the underlying events and mechanism are poorly understood. We quantified the effect of experiencing successive wins on aggression in adult male crickets (Gryllus bimaculatus by staging knockout tournaments and investigated its dependence on biogenic amines by treatment with amine receptor antagonists. For an inter-fight interval of 5 min, fights between winners escalated to higher levels of aggression and lasted significantly longer than the preceding round. This winner effect is transient, and no longer evident for an inter-fight interval of 20 min, indicating that it does not result from selecting individuals that were hyper-aggressive from the outset. A winner effect was also evident in crickets that experienced wins without physical exertion, or that engaged in fights that were interrupted before a win was experienced. Finally, the winner effect was abolished by prior treatment with epinastine, a highly selective octopamine receptor blocker, but not by propranolol, a ß-adrenergic receptor antagonist, nor by yohimbine, an insect tyramine receptor blocker nor by fluphenazine an insect dopamine-receptor blocker. Taken together our study in the cricket indicates that the physical exertion of fighting, together with some rewarding aspect of the actual winning experience, leads to a transient increase in aggressive motivation via activation of the octopaminergic system, the invertebrate equivalent to the adrenergic system of vertebrates.

  11. Sports-Related Emergency Preparedness in Oregon High Schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Samuel T; Norcross, Marc F; Bovbjerg, Viktor E; Hoffman, Mark A; Chang, Eunwook; Koester, Michael C

    Best practice recommendations for sports-related emergency preparation include implementation of venue-specific emergency action plans (EAPs), access to early defibrillation, and first responders-specifically coaches-trained in cardiopulmonary resuscitation and automated external defibrillator (AED) use. The objective was to determine whether high schools had implemented these 3 recommendations and whether schools with a certified athletic trainer (AT) were more likely to have done so. Schools with an AT were more likely to have implemented the recommendations. Cross-sectional study. Level 4. All Oregon School Activities Association member school athletic directors were invited to complete a survey on sports-related emergency preparedness and AT availability at their school. Chi-square and Fisher exact tests were used to analyze the associations between emergency preparedness and AT availability. In total, 108 respondents (37% response rate) completed the survey. Exactly half reported having an AT available. Only 11% (95% CI, 6%-19%) of the schools had implemented all 3 recommendations, 29% (95% CI, 21%-39%) had implemented 2, 32% (95% CI, 24%-42%) had implemented 1, and 27% (95% CI, 19%-36%) had not implemented any of the recommendations. AT availability was associated with implementation of the recommendations (χ 2 = 10.3, P = 0.02), and the proportion of schools with ATs increased with the number of recommendations implemented (χ 2 = 9.3, P Schools with an AT were more likely to implement venue-specific EAPs (52% vs 24%, P schools were inadequately prepared for sports-related emergencies. Schools with an AT were more likely to implement some, but not all, of the recommendations. Policy changes may be needed to improve implementation. Most Oregon high schools need to do more to prepare for sports-related emergencies. The results provide evidence for sports medicine professionals and administrators to inform policy changes that ensure the safety of athletes.

  12. Correlation Among Students’ Family Background, Academic Performance in Junior High School, and Senior High School Tracking in Taiwan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ming-Fu Huang

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available There were numerous previous studies on educational tracking. However, most of the data adopted in these studies were collected a decade ago, involving sample population 20-64 years of age. Among them, many elderly samples had undergone senior high school tracking in the early years. The present study used the data of students and parents from the 3rd wave (2005 of the Taiwan Education Panel Survey (TEPS. A path analysis was conducted to investigate the inequality of opportunities involved in the influence of student family background on educational tracking at the senior high school stage. The results show: although the overall percentage of junior high school graduates entering advanced levels was approximately 100% and almost all students of different family backgrounds entered advanced levels, the most crucial factor among those affecting educational tracking of senior high school stage was students’ academic performance during junior high school. Students with higher family socioeconomic status and fewer siblings showed better academic performance in junior high schools, and consequently had higher possibilities of entering public senior high schools leading to a more promising future. This indicates that though the inequality in the quantity of opportunities approached 0, the inequality in the quality of opportunities still remained, which fails to support the hypothesis of the maximally maintained inequality of educational opportunity (MMI; however, the result supports the hypothesis of the effectively maintained inequality of educational opportunity (EMI.

  13. From chaos to control: winning the war.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wojciak, P J

    1994-08-01

    This article illustrates how a small manufacturing facility in the Midwest undertook the process of an MRP II implementation and ultimately gained class A status at a true make-or-break time in its history. The control that was gained throughout the entire process has helped create a winning environment and will continue to strengthen our position as we move toward world-class excellence.

  14. How winning changes motivation in multiphase competitions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Szu-Chi; Etkin, Jordan; Jin, Liyin

    2017-06-01

    What drives motivation in multiphase competitions? Adopting a dynamic approach, this research examines how temporary standing-being ahead of (vs. behind) one's opponent-in a multiphase competition shapes subsequent motivation. Six competitions conducted in the lab and in the field demonstrate that the impact of being ahead on contestants' motivation depends on when (i.e., in which phase of the competition) contestants learn they are in the lead. In the early phase, contestants are concerned about whether they can win; being ahead increases motivation by making winning seem more attainable. In the later phase, however, contestants are instead driven by how much additional effort they believe they need to invest; being ahead decreases motivation by reducing contestants' estimate of the remaining effort needed to win. Temporary standing thus has divergent effects on motivation in multiphase competitions, driven by a shift in contestants' main concern from the early to the later phase and thus the meaning they derive from being ahead of their opponent. By leveraging insights gained from approaching individuals' self-regulation as a dynamic process, this research advances understanding of how motivation evolves in a unique interdependent self-regulatory context. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2017 APA, all rights reserved).

  15. The High School Transcript Study: The 2000 High School Transcript Study User's Guide and Technical Report. NCES 2005-483

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roey, Stephen; Caldwell, Nancy; Rust, Keith; Hicks, Lloyd; Lee, Janice; Perkins, Robert; Blumstein, Eyal; Brown, Janis

    2005-01-01

    This technical report documents the procedures used to collect and summarize data from the 2000 High School Transcript Study (HSTS 2000). Chapters in the report detail the sampling of schools and students (chapters 2 and 3), data collection procedures (chapter 4), data processing procedures (chapter 5), and weighting procedures (chapter 6).…

  16. School Expenditures and Academic Achievement Differences between High-ELL-Performing and Low-ELL-Performing High Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiménez-Castellanos, Oscar Hugo; García, David

    2017-01-01

    English Language Learners (ELLs) are one of the fastest-growing K-12 populations across the nation. Educating secondary ELLs poses a unique challenge to U.S. schools. For instance, ELLs tend to experience high rates of poverty and attend segregated, underfunded, and unsafe schools. With the "League of United Latin American Citizens vs.…

  17. The Chinese Program at St. Louis University High School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, August

    1977-01-01

    Chinese courses at the St. Louis University High School teach language, culture and calligraphy. Daily classes feature language labs, slides, filmstrips and movies. Statements from students testify that the language is useful and not difficult to learn. (CHK)

  18. Implementation of Industrial Work Practice management at vocational high school

    Science.gov (United States)

    Widodo, Joko; Samsudi, Sunyoto

    2017-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop a management model of entrepreneurship-based Industrial Work Practice (Prakerin) at Vocational High School. This research was planned for three years under Research and Development design. The respondents were public and private Vocational High Schools in Semarang, Salatiga and District of Demak, Central Java, Indonesia. Data were collected through interviews, questionnaires, observation, and documentation. The data were analyzed qualitatively and quantitatively. Preliminary study shows that the implementation of Industrial Work Practice at Vocational High School, which has been carried out, was only to prepare the graduates to become an employee of the industry instead of entrepreneur. Further study is needed to develop a management model of entrepreneurship-based Industrial Work Practice at Vocational High School.

  19. Using Student Autobiographies to Teach Personality in High School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, John

    1973-01-01

    A project involving the use of student autobiographies for a high school course on the psychology of personality is described as appropriate to students interested in learning about themselves. (Author/KM)

  20. Interpersonal relationship of high schools' teachers and teachers profile

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Telli, Sibel; Cakiroglu, Jale; den Brok, Perry

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to examine associations between Turkish high school students' perceptions of their teachers' interpersonal behavior and drawn attention to the relationship between students' affective outcomes and teachers' interpersonal behavior. The Questionnaire on Teacher Interaction

  1. Jane Austen in the High School Classroom (Open to Suggestion).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fritzer, Penelope

    1996-01-01

    Argues that Jane Austen's novels lend themselves to the high school curriculum, and that students will discover a leisurely, rural world in which the concerns of the young people are often similar to theirs. (SR)

  2. BIA Wingate High School WWTF, Fort Wingate, NM: NN0020958

    Science.gov (United States)

    NPDES Permit and Fact Sheet explaining EPA's action under the Clean Water Act to issue NPDES Permit No. NN0020958 to Bureau of Indian Affairs (BIA) Wingate High School Wastewater Treatment Lagoon, Fort Wingate, NM.

  3. Codes of Ethics and the High School Newspaper: Part One.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hager, Marilyn

    1978-01-01

    Deals with two types of ethical problems encountered by journalists, including high school journalists: deciding whether to accept gifts and favors from advertisers and news sources, and deciding what types of language would be offensive to readers. (GT)

  4. Factors Associated with Dysphonia in High School Cheerleaders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Shari L.; And Others

    1988-01-01

    Questionnaire responses from 146 high school cheerleaders indicated that acute, cheering-related dysphonia may be preceded or accompanied by a set of clinical signs that could be incorporated easily into a screening protocol for prospective cheerleaders. (Author/DB)

  5. Animal Welfare Groups Press for Limits on High School Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    BioScience, 1979

    1979-01-01

    Discussions from the conference on "The Use of Animals in High School Biology Classes" are highlighted in this article. The list of science fair rules, which resulted from the conference, is included. (SA)

  6. What Books Are High School Students Really Reading for Pleasure?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brautigam, Heidi; Hart, Carol Ann; Swindle, Stephenie

    2002-01-01

    Provides three teachers' perspectives on students' reading choices. Discusses reading choices of high school students. Outlines teacher strategies of discovering what books students enjoy and how to help them enjoy others. (PM)

  7. DASH - Youth Risk Behavior Surveillance System (YRBSS): High School

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — 1991-2015. High School Dataset. The Youth Risk Behavior Surveillance System (YRBSS) monitors six categories of priority health behaviors among youth and young...

  8. Bruce Randolph High School: A Case Study of an Urban School Becoming Successful for Multilingual Learners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Alan; Mitchell, Kara; Dray, Barbara; Keenan, Tracy

    2012-01-01

    Working in a research collaborative between Denver Public Schools and the University of Colorado Denver, the authors selected Bruce Randolph High School (BRHS) as a case study because of its growth on state academic achievement tests and because of its multilingual learners. After a difficult beginning, BRHS has established an inclusive culture of…

  9. School Violence, Social Support and Psychological Health among Taiwanese Junior High School Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ji-Kang; Wei, Hsi-Sheng

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: This paper examines how peer social support mediates the association between school victimization and student psychological health among junior-high students in an Asian context (Taiwan), and further examines how gender and ethnicity differ in the interrelationships of school violence, peer social support and psychological health.…

  10. Humor in High School and the Role of Teacher Leaders in School Public Relations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kosiczky, Bonnie; Mullen, Carol A.

    2013-01-01

    How can public schools improve public relations strategies, particularly in communications between teachers and students? The purposes of this study were to investigate teacher leaders' perceptions of the use of humor in the high school classroom and discover how humor might bridge instruction to student learning and strengthen teacher-student…

  11. Out of School and Off Track: The Overuse of Suspensions in American Middle and High Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Losen, Daniel J.; Martinez, Tia Elena

    2013-01-01

    In this first of a kind breakdown of data from over 26,000 U.S. middle and high schools, the authors estimate that well over two million students were suspended during the 2009-2010 academic year. This means that one out of every nine secondary school students was suspended at least once during that year. As other studies demonstrate, the vast…

  12. School Improvement in High-Capacity Schools: Educational Leadership and Living-Systems Ontology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Coral; Sackney, Larry

    2016-01-01

    Although school improvement continues to present as an unresolved educational problem, the required changes are relatively straightforward. Essentially, schools need to be retooled with students' experiences and high-quality instruction at the center of the design. In this article, we present the findings of research into the leadership of…

  13. Multilevel Examination of Burnout among High School Staff: Importance of Staff and School Factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Brennan, Lindsey; Pas, Elise; Bradshaw, Catherine

    2017-01-01

    Previous studies have linked teacher burnout with job performance, satisfaction, and retention; however, there has been limited exploration of potential individual and school contextual factors that may influence burnout. The current study examined high school staff members' reports of burnout as they relate to staff demographics and perceptions…

  14. Distributed Leadership an Instrument for School Improvement: The Study of Public Senior High Schools in Ghana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dampson, Dandy George; Havor, Felicia Mensah; Laryea, Prince

    2018-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to investigate the influence of distributed leadership in Public Senior High Schools (SHS) with regard to school improvement. Using the Explanatory Sequential Mixed-Method design, 92 teachers and 4 head masters and 4 assistant head masters were randomly and census sampled. Three research questions were formulated and…

  15. School Socioeconomic Classification, Funding, and the New Jersey High School Proficiency Assessment (HSPA)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bao, D. H.; Romeo, George C.; Harvey, Roberta

    2010-01-01

    This study examines the relationship between educational effectiveness, as measured by the New Jersey High School Proficiency Assessment (HSPA), and funding of school districts based on socioeconomic classification. Results indicate there is a strong relationship between performance in HSPA, socioeconomic classification, and the different sources…

  16. Associations of Teen Dating Violence Victimization with School Violence and Bullying among US High School Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vivolo-Kantor, Alana M.; Olsen, Emily O'Malley; Bacon, Sarah

    2016-01-01

    Background: Teen dating violence (TDV) negatively impacts health, mental and physical well-being, and school performance. Methods: Data from a nationally representative sample of high school students participating in the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)'s 2013 Youth Risk Behavior Survey (YRBS) are used to demonstrate associations…

  17. Friendship Networks and Social, School and Psychological Adjustment in Chinese Junior High School Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Mowei; Chen, Xinyin

    2003-01-01

    Examines friendship networks and their associations with social, academic and psychological adjustment in Chinese high school students. It was found that friendship group members had higher scores on social and school competence and lower scores on learning problems and loneliness, suggesting that friendship networks might represent a phenomenon…

  18. High School Students with Intellectual Disabilities in the School and Workplace: Multiple Perspectives on Inclusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, Sheila M.; Gallagher, Tiffany L.

    2013-01-01

    Data collected from seven urban high schools in Ontario capture multiple voices in relation to inclusive practices in secondary schools and transitions into the workplace. Twenty-one students with intellectual disabilities (ID), 91 teachers, 67 educational assistants, 7 job coaches, 22 parents, 43 peers and 19 community employers completed surveys…

  19. School-Wide Positive Behavior Support: Effects on Pennsylvania High School Achievement, Discipline, and Climate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox, Jon David

    2013-01-01

    Teachers and administrators are faced with managing the behaviors of students while preparing for the high stakes testing associated with the No Child Left Behind Act. One program that has demonstrated positive results at the elementary and middle school level is the school-wide positive behavior support model (SWPBS). Limited research is…

  20. The National School Lunch and Competitive Food Offerings and Purchasing Behaviors of High School Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snelling, Anastasia M.; Korba, Casey; Burkey, Alyvia

    2007-01-01

    Background: Across the nation, schools have become actively involved in developing obesity prevention strategies both in classrooms and in cafeterias. We sought to determine the type of foods being offered during lunch in the cafeteria of 3 public high schools in 1 county and if this reflects the purchasing patterns of students. By labeling foods…