WorldWideScience

Sample records for wing static pressures

  1. Water cooled static pressure probe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lagen, Nicholas T. (Inventor); Eves, John W. (Inventor); Reece, Garland D. (Inventor); Geissinger, Steve L. (Inventor)

    1991-01-01

    An improved static pressure probe containing a water cooling mechanism is disclosed. This probe has a hollow interior containing a central coolant tube and multiple individual pressure measurement tubes connected to holes placed on the exterior. Coolant from the central tube symmetrically immerses the interior of the probe, allowing it to sustain high temperature (in the region of 2500 F) supersonic jet flow indefinitely, while still recording accurate pressure data. The coolant exits the probe body by way of a reservoir attached to the aft of the probe. The pressure measurement tubes are joined to a single, larger manifold in the reservoir. This manifold is attached to a pressure transducer that records the average static pressure.

  2. Static Aeroelastic Effects of Formation Flight for Slender Unswept Wings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanson, Curtis E.

    2009-01-01

    The static aeroelastic equilibrium equations for slender, straight wings are modified to incorporate the effects of aerodynamically-coupled formation flight. A system of equations is developed by applying trim constraints and is solved for component lift distribution, trim angle-of-attack, and trim aileron deflection. The trim values are then used to calculate the elastic twist distribution of the wing box. This system of equations is applied to a formation of two gliders in trimmed flight. Structural and aerodynamic properties are assumed for the gliders, and solutions are calculated for flexible and rigid wings in solo and formation flight. It is shown for a sample application of two gliders in formation flight, that formation disturbances produce greater twist in the wingtip immersed in the vortex than for either the opposing wingtip or the wings of a similar airplane in solo flight. Changes in the lift distribution, resulting from wing twist, increase the performance benefits of formation flight. A flexible wing in formation flight will require greater aileron deflection to achieve roll trim than a rigid wing.

  3. Surface pressure model for simple delta wings at high angles of attack

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    A new aerodynamic modelling approach is proposed for the longitudinal static characteristics of a simple delta wing. It captures the static variation of normal force and pitching moment characteristics throughout the angle of attack range. The pressure model is based on parametrizing the surface pressure distribution on a ...

  4. Supersonic flow over a pitching delta wing using surface pressure measurements and numerical simulations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mostafa HADIDOOLABI

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Experimental and numerical methods were applied to investigating high subsonic and supersonic flows over a 60° swept delta wing in fixed state and pitching oscillation. Static pressure coefficient distributions over the wing leeward surface and the hysteresis loops of pressure coefficient versus angle of attack at the sensor locations were obtained by wind tunnel tests. Similar results were obtained by numerical simulations which agreed well with the experiments. Flow structure around the wing was also demonstrated by the numerical simulation. Effects of Mach number and angle of attack on pressure distribution curves in static tests were investigated. Effects of various oscillation parameters including Mach number, mean angle of attack, pitching amplitude and frequency on hysteresis loops were investigated in dynamic tests and the associated physical mechanisms were discussed. Vortex breakdown phenomenon over the wing was identified at high angles of attack using the pressure coefficient curves and hysteresis loops, and its effects on the flow features were discussed.

  5. Martian Atmospheric Pressure Static Charge Elimination Tool

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johansen, Michael R.

    2014-01-01

    A Martian pressure static charge elimination tool is currently in development in the Electrostatics and Surface Physics Laboratory (ESPL) at NASA's Kennedy Space Center. In standard Earth atmosphere conditions, static charge can be neutralized from an insulating surface using air ionizers. These air ionizers generate ions through corona breakdown. The Martian atmosphere is 7 Torr of mostly carbon dioxide, which makes it inherently difficult to use similar methods as those used for standard atmosphere static elimination tools. An initial prototype has been developed to show feasibility of static charge elimination at low pressure, using corona discharge. A needle point and thin wire loop are used as the corona generating electrodes. A photo of the test apparatus is shown below. Positive and negative high voltage pulses are sent to the needle point. This creates positive and negative ions that can be used for static charge neutralization. In a preliminary test, a floating metal plate was charged to approximately 600 volts under Martian atmospheric conditions. The static elimination tool was enabled and the voltage on the metal plate dropped rapidly to -100 volts. This test data is displayed below. Optimization is necessary to improve the electrostatic balance of the static elimination tool.

  6. Effect of an end plate on surface pressure distributions of two swept wings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Reza SOLTANI

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available A series of wind tunnel tests was conducted to examine how an end plate affects the pressure distributions of two wings with leading edge (LE sweep angles of 23° and 40°. All the experiments were carried out at a midchord Reynolds number of 8×105, covering an angle of attack (AOA range from −2° to 14°. Static pressure distribution measurements were acquired over the upper surfaces of the wings along three chordwise rows and one spanwise direction at the wing quarter-chord line. The results of the tests confirm that at a particular AOA, increasing the sweep angle causes a noticeable decrease in the upper-surface suction pressure. Furthermore, as the sweep angle increases, the development of a laminar separation bubble near the LEs of the wings takes place at higher AOAs. On the other hand, spanwise pressure measurements show that increasing the wing sweep angle results in forming a stronger vortex on the quarter-chord line which has lower sensitivity to AOA variation and remains substantially attached to the wing surface for higher AOAs than that can be achieved in the case of a lower sweep angle. In addition, data obtained indicate that installing an end plate further reinforces the spanwise flow over the wing surface, thus affecting the pressure distribution.

  7. 30 CFR 18.67 - Static-pressure tests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Static-pressure tests. 18.67 Section 18.67....67 Static-pressure tests. Static-pressure tests shall be conducted by the applicant on each enclosure... pressure to be applied shall be 150 pounds per square inch (gage) or one and one-half times the maximum...

  8. 14 CFR 29.1325 - Static pressure and pressure altimeter systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Static pressure and pressure altimeter...: Installation § 29.1325 Static pressure and pressure altimeter systems. (a) Each instrument with static air case.... (c) Each static pressure port must be designed and located in such manner that the correlation...

  9. Static Aeroelastic Scaling and Analysis of a Sub-Scale Flexible Wing Wind Tunnel Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ting, Eric; Lebofsky, Sonia; Nguyen, Nhan; Trinh, Khanh

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents an approach to the development of a scaled wind tunnel model for static aeroelastic similarity with a full-scale wing model. The full-scale aircraft model is based on the NASA Generic Transport Model (GTM) with flexible wing structures referred to as the Elastically Shaped Aircraft Concept (ESAC). The baseline stiffness of the ESAC wing represents a conventionally stiff wing model. Static aeroelastic scaling is conducted on the stiff wing configuration to develop the wind tunnel model, but additional tailoring is also conducted such that the wind tunnel model achieves a 10% wing tip deflection at the wind tunnel test condition. An aeroelastic scaling procedure and analysis is conducted, and a sub-scale flexible wind tunnel model based on the full-scale's undeformed jig-shape is developed. Optimization of the flexible wind tunnel model's undeflected twist along the span, or pre-twist or wash-out, is then conducted for the design test condition. The resulting wind tunnel model is an aeroelastic model designed for the wind tunnel test condition.

  10. Longitudinal static stability requirements for wing in ground effect vehicle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Yang

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The issue of the longitudinal stability of a WIG vehicle has been a very critical design factor since the first experimental WIG vehicle has been built. A series of studies had been performed and focused on the longitudinal stability analysis. However, most studies focused on the longitudinal stability of WIG vehicle in cruise phase, and less is available on the longitudinal static stability requirement of WIG vehicle when hydrodynamics are considered: WIG vehicle usually take off from water. The present work focuses on stability requirement for longitudinal motion from taking off to landing. The model of dynamics for a WIG vehicle was developed taking into account the aerodynamic, hydrostatic and hydrodynamic forces, and then was analyzed. Following with the longitudinal static stability analysis, effect of hydrofoil was discussed. Locations of CG, aerodynamic center in pitch, aerodynamic center in height and hydrodynamic center in heave were illustrated for a stabilized WIG vehicle. The present work will further improve the longitudinal static stability theory for WIG vehicle.

  11. 14 CFR 33.64 - Pressurized engine static parts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Pressurized engine static parts. 33.64... engine static parts. (a) Strength. The applicant must establish by test, validated analysis, or a combination of both, that all static parts subject to significant gas or liquid pressure loads for a...

  12. 14 CFR 25.1325 - Static pressure systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... atmosphere through an appropriate piping system. (b) Each static port must be designed and located in such manner that the static pressure system performance is least affected by airflow variation, or by moisture... and true ambient atmospheric static pressure is not changed when the airplane is exposed to the...

  13. 14 CFR 27.1325 - Static pressure systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... foreign matter does not seriously affect its accuracy. (b) Each static pressure port must be designed and... ambient atmospheric static pressure is not altered when the rotorcraft encounters icing conditions. An... reading of the altimeter when on the primary static system by more than 50 feet, a correction card must be...

  14. 30 CFR 7.307 - Static pressure test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Static pressure test. 7.307 Section 7.307... pressure test. (a) Test procedure. (1) The enclosure shall be internally pressurized to a minimum of 150 psig and the pressure maintained for a minimum of 10 seconds. (2) Following the pressure hold, the...

  15. Static winging of the scapula caused by osteochondroma in adults: a case series

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Orth Patrick

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Although palsy of the long thoracic nerve is the classical pathogenesis of winging scapula, it may also be caused by osteochondroma. This rare etiopathology has previously been described in pediatric patients, but it is seldom observed in adults. Case presentation We describe three cases of static scapular winging with pain on movement. Case 1 is a Caucasian woman aged 35 years with a wing-like prominence of the medial margin of her right scapula due to an osteochondroma originating from the ventral omoplate. Histopathological evaluation after surgical resection confirmed the diagnosis. The postoperative course was unremarkable without signs of recurrence on examination at 2 years. Case 2 is a Caucasian woman aged 39 years with painful scapula alata and neuralgic pain projected along the left ribcage caused by an osteochondroma of the left scapula with contact to the 2nd and 3rd rib. Following surgical resection, the neuropathic pain continued, demanding neurolysis of the 3rd and 4th intercostal nerve after 8 months. The patient was free of symptoms 2 years after neurolysis. Case 3 is a Caucasian woman aged 48 years with scapular winging due to a large exostosis of the left ventral scapular surface with a broad cartilaginous cap and a large pseudobursa. Following exclusion of malignancy by an incisional biopsy, exostosis and pseudobursa were resected. The patient had an unremarkable postoperative course without signs of recurrence 1 year postoperatively. Based on these cases, we developed an algorithm for the diagnostic evaluation and therapeutic management of scapula alata due to osteochondroma. Conclusions Orthopedic surgeons should be aware of this uncommon condition in the differential diagnosis of winged scapula not only in children, but also in adult patients.

  16. Leading-edge flow reattachment and the lateral static stability of low-aspect-ratio rectangular wings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linehan, Thomas; Mohseni, Kamran

    2017-11-01

    The relationship between lateral static stability derivative, Clβ,lift coefficient, CL, and angle of attack was investigated for rectangular wings of aspect ratio A R =0.75 ,1 ,1.5 , and 3 using Stereo-Digital Particle Image Velocimetry (S-DPIV) and direct force and moment measurements. When the product Cl βA R is plotted with respect to CL, the lateral stability curves of each wing collapse to a single line for CL0.7 , the linearity and scaling of Clβwith respect to CL is lost. S-DPIV is used to elucidate the flow physics in this nonlinear regime. At α =10∘ , the leading-edge separation region emerges on the leeward portion of the sideslipped wing by means of vortex shedding. For the A R ≤1.5 wings at α >15∘ , the tip vortex downwash is sufficient to restrict the shedding of leading-edge vorticity thereby sustaining the lift of the leading-edge separation region at high angles of attack. Concurrently, the windward tip vortex grows in size and strength with increasing angle of attack, displacing the leading-edge separation region further toward the leeward wing. This reorganization of lift-generating vorticity results in the initial nonlinearities between Cl β and CL at angles of attack for which CL is still increasing. At angles of attack near that of maximum lift for the A R ≤1 wings, the windward tip vortex lifts off the wing, decreasing the lateral static stability of the wing prior to lift stall. For the A R =3 wing at α >10∘ , nonlinear trends in Cl β versus CL occur due to the spanwise evolution of stalled flow.

  17. Terapascal static pressure generation with ultrahigh yield strength nanodiamond.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubrovinskaia, Natalia; Dubrovinsky, Leonid; Solopova, Natalia A; Abakumov, Artem; Turner, Stuart; Hanfland, Michael; Bykova, Elena; Bykov, Maxim; Prescher, Clemens; Prakapenka, Vitali B; Petitgirard, Sylvain; Chuvashova, Irina; Gasharova, Biliana; Mathis, Yves-Laurent; Ershov, Petr; Snigireva, Irina; Snigirev, Anatoly

    2016-07-01

    Studies of materials' properties at high and ultrahigh pressures lead to discoveries of unique physical and chemical phenomena and a deeper understanding of matter. In high-pressure research, an achievable static pressure limit is imposed by the strength of available strong materials and design of high-pressure devices. Using a high-pressure and high-temperature technique, we synthesized optically transparent microballs of bulk nanocrystalline diamond, which were found to have an exceptional yield strength (~460 GPa at a confining pressure of ~70 GPa) due to the unique microstructure of bulk nanocrystalline diamond. We used the nanodiamond balls in a double-stage diamond anvil cell high-pressure device that allowed us to generate static pressures beyond 1 TPa, as demonstrated by synchrotron x-ray diffraction. Outstanding mechanical properties (strain-dependent elasticity, very high hardness, and unprecedented yield strength) make the nanodiamond balls a unique device for ultrahigh static pressure generation. Structurally isotropic, homogeneous, and made of a low-Z material, they are promising in the field of x-ray optical applications.

  18. Static Pressure Measurements of a Low Power Arcjet

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-12-01

    AFIT/GA/ENY/91D-6 AD-A243 898 DTICS EL E CT E JAN 0 3 1992 j STATIC PRESSURE MEASUREMENTS OF A LOW POWER ARCJET THESIS Kevin P. Talley, Captain...SUBTITLE 5. FUNDING NUMBERS STATIC PRESSURE MEASUREMVENTS OF A LOW POWER ARCJET 6. AUTHOR(S) Kevin P. Talley, Captain, USAF 7. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION...deliver 30 kW were on the drawing board and power available on commercial communications satellites had become large enough that low power arcjet thrusters

  19. Static cerebrovascular pressure autoregulation remains intact during deep hypothermia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goswami, Dheeraj; McLeod, Katherine; Leonard, Samantha; Kibler, Kathleen; Easley, Ronald Blaine; Fraser, Charles D; Andropoulos, Dean; Brady, Ken

    2017-09-01

    Clinical studies measuring cerebral blood flow in infants during deep hypothermia have demonstrated diminished cerebrovascular pressure autoregulation. The coexistence of hypotension in these cohorts confounds the conclusion that deep hypothermia impairs cerebrovascular pressure autoregulation. We sought to compare the lower limit of autoregulation and the static rate of autoregulation between normothermic and hypothermic piglets. Twenty anesthetized neonatal piglets (5-7 days old; 10 normothermic and 10 hypothermic to 20°C) had continuous measurements of cortical red cell flux using laser Doppler flowmetry, while hemorrhagic hypotension was induced without cardiopulmonary bypass. Lower limit of autoregulation was determined for each subject using piecewise regression and SRoR was determined above and below each lower limit of autoregulation as (%change cerebrovascular resistance/%change cerebral perfusion pressure). The estimated difference in lower limit of autoregulation was 1.4 mm Hg (lower in the hypothermic piglets; 95% C.I. -10 to 14 mm Hg; P=0.6). The median lower limit of autoregulation in the normothermic group was 39 mm Hg [IQR 38-51] vs 35 mm Hg [31-50] in the hypothermic group. Intact steady-state pressure autoregulation was defined as static rate of autoregulation >0.5 and was demonstrated in all normothermic subjects (static rate of autoregulation=0.72 [0.65-0.87]) and in 9/10 of the hypothermic subjects (static rate of autoregulation=0.65 [0.52-0.87]). This difference in static rate of autoregulation of 0.06 (95% C.I. -0.3 to 0.1) was not significant (P=0.4). Intact steady-state cerebrovascular pressure autoregulation is demonstrated in a swine model of profound hypothermia. Lower limit of autoregulation and static rate of autoregulation were similar in hypothermic and normothermic subjects. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. The extended surface forces apparatus. IV. Precision static pressure control

    OpenAIRE

    Schurtenberger E; Heuberger M

    2011-01-01

    We report on design and performance of an extended surface forces apparatus (eSFA) built into a pressurized system. The aim of this instrument is to provide control over static pressure and temperature to facilitate direct surface force experiments in equilibrium with fluids at different loci of their phase diagram. We built an autoclave that can bear a miniature eSFA. To avoid mechanical or electrical feedtroughs the miniature apparatus uses an external surface coarse approach stage under am...

  1. On the static buckling of an externally pressurized finite circular ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The static buckling behaviour of an imperfect finite cylindrical shell, stressed by either a lateral or hydrostatic pressure, is here investigated by assuming that the imperfection can be regarded as the first term in the Fourier sine series expansion .The buckling modes are assumed to be in the shape of the imperfection which is ...

  2. Static pressure and temperature coefficients of working standard microphones

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barrera Figueroa, Salvador; Cutanda Henriquez, Vicente; Torras Rosell, Antoni

    2016-01-01

    The sensitivity of measurement microphones is affected by changes in the environmental conditions, mainly temperature and static pressure. This rate of change has been the object of previous studies focused on Laboratory Standard microphones. The literature describes frequency dependent values fo...

  3. Static Aeroelastic and Longitudinal Trim Model of Flexible Wing Aircraft Using Finite-Element Vortex-Lattice Coupled Solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ting, Eric; Nguyen, Nhan; Trinh, Khanh

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents a static aeroelastic model and longitudinal trim model for the analysis of a flexible wing transport aircraft. The static aeroelastic model is built using a structural model based on finite-element modeling and coupled to an aerodynamic model that uses vortex-lattice solution. An automatic geometry generation tool is used to close the loop between the structural and aerodynamic models. The aeroelastic model is extended for the development of a three degree-of-freedom longitudinal trim model for an aircraft with flexible wings. The resulting flexible aircraft longitudinal trim model is used to simultaneously compute the static aeroelastic shape for the aircraft model and the longitudinal state inputs to maintain an aircraft trim state. The framework is applied to an aircraft model based on the NASA Generic Transport Model (GTM) with wing structures allowed to flexibly deformed referred to as the Elastically Shaped Aircraft Concept (ESAC). The ESAC wing mass and stiffness properties are based on a baseline "stiff" values representative of current generation transport aircraft.

  4. Simulation of static pressure reset control in comfort ventilation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Koulani, Chrysanthi Sofia; Prunescu, Remus Mihail; Hviid, Christian Anker

    2014-01-01

    management system. In this way the operation of central plant equipment is adjusted in real time according to the actual pressure demand; this control scheme can be implemented by the static pressure reset (SPR) method. The SPR control method ensures that at least one damper remains fully opened; thus...... of the art is represented by the method of trim and respond based on pressure alarms. This study investigates the operation of the SPR control method of trim and respond based on pressure alarms in a CO2 demand application where large air volumes are provided to three classrooms. The investigation was based...... effectively establish the pressure conditions that satisfy the pressure demand under high airflows. In short the algorithm must be tuned to the application beforehand or, preferably, actively learn to perform from continuous feedback before it presents a real plug-and-play solution....

  5. Determination of pressure and load characteristics of flexible revolving wings by means of tomographic PIV

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van de Meerendonk, R.; Perçin, M.; van Oudheusden, B.W.

    2016-01-01

    This study explores the flow field and fluid-dynamic loads generated by revolving low-aspect-ratio wings. The pressure field and load characteristics are successfully reconstructed from the phase-locked tomographic measurements in three independently measured volumes along the span of the wing. The

  6. Study on Computer Numerical Simulation of Driving Static Pressure Pile

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Ji; Xueyi, Yu

    The method to study soil compaction effect caused by driving static pressure pile was proposed with the holes expansion principle analysis. It uses FEM (finite element method) computer numerical simulation to research holes expansion commonly. The expansion of holes radius changes from a0 to 2a0 corresponding to original one from zero to R. Comparing with conclusions obtained from other theories, FEM computer numerical simulation is valid for the analysis of holes expansion. Comparing with the traditional holes expansion principle, it expands the application scope and can be extended to analyze other cross-section forms of holes.

  7. The extended surface forces apparatus. IV. Precision static pressure control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schurtenberger, E; Heuberger, M

    2011-10-01

    We report on design and performance of an extended surface forces apparatus (eSFA) built into a pressurized system. The aim of this instrument is to provide control over static pressure and temperature to facilitate direct surface force experiments in equilibrium with fluids at different loci of their phase diagram. We built an autoclave that can bear a miniature eSFA. To avoid mechanical or electrical feedtroughs the miniature apparatus uses an external surface coarse approach stage under ambient conditions. The surface separation is thus pre-adjusted to approximately ~3 μm before sliding the apparatus into the autoclave. Inside the autoclave, the surface separation can be further controlled with a magnetic drive at sub-Ångstrom precision over a 14 μm range. The autoclave pressure can then be set and maintained between 20 mbar and 170 bars with few mbar precision. The autoclave is connected to a specially designed pressurization system to precondition the fluids. The temperature can be controlled between -20 and 60 °C with few mK precision. We demonstrate the operation of the instrument in the case of gaseous or liquid carbon dioxide. Thanks to a consequent decoupling of the eSFA mechanical loop from the autoclave structure, the obtained measurement stability and reproducibility, at elevated pressures, is comparable to the one established for the conventional eSFA, operated under ambient conditions.

  8. The extended surface forces apparatus. IV. Precision static pressure control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schurtenberger, E.; Heuberger, M.

    2011-10-01

    We report on design and performance of an extended surface forces apparatus (eSFA) built into a pressurized system. The aim of this instrument is to provide control over static pressure and temperature to facilitate direct surface force experiments in equilibrium with fluids at different loci of their phase diagram. We built an autoclave that can bear a miniature eSFA. To avoid mechanical or electrical feedtroughs the miniature apparatus uses an external surface coarse approach stage under ambient conditions. The surface separation is thus pre-adjusted to approximately ˜3 μm before sliding the apparatus into the autoclave. Inside the autoclave, the surface separation can be further controlled with a magnetic drive at sub-Ångstrom precision over a 14 μm range. The autoclave pressure can then be set and maintained between 20 mbar and 170 bars with few mbar precision. The autoclave is connected to a specially designed pressurization system to precondition the fluids. The temperature can be controlled between -20 and 60 °C with few mK precision. We demonstrate the operation of the instrument in the case of gaseous or liquid carbon dioxide. Thanks to a consequent decoupling of the eSFA mechanical loop from the autoclave structure, the obtained measurement stability and reproducibility, at elevated pressures, is comparable to the one established for the conventional eSFA, operated under ambient conditions.

  9. Correction of static pressure on a research aircraft in accelerated flight using differential pressure measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. R. Rodi

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available A method is described that estimates the error in the static pressure measurement on an aircraft from differential pressure measurements on the hemispherical surface of a Rosemount model 858AJ air velocity probe mounted on a boom ahead of the aircraft. The theoretical predictions for how the pressure should vary over the surface of the hemisphere, involving an unknown sensitivity parameter, leads to a set of equations that can be solved for the unknowns – angle of attack, angle of sideslip, dynamic pressure and the error in static pressure – if the sensitivity factor can be determined. The sensitivity factor was determined on the University of Wyoming King Air research aircraft by comparisons with the error measured with a carefully designed sonde towed on connecting tubing behind the aircraft – a trailing cone – and the result was shown to have a precision of about ±10 Pa over a wide range of conditions, including various altitudes, power settings, and gear and flap extensions. Under accelerated flight conditions, geometric altitude data from a combined Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS and inertial measurement unit (IMU system are used to estimate acceleration effects on the error, and the algorithm is shown to predict corrections to a precision of better than ±20 Pa under those conditions. Some limiting factors affecting the precision of static pressure measurement on a research aircraft are discussed.

  10. Experimental measurements of static pressure and pressure drop in a duct enclosing a seven wire-wrapped rod bundle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Graca, M.C.; Ballve, H.; Fernandez y Fernandez, E.; Carajilescov, P.

    1981-01-01

    The friction factor and the static pressure distributions, in the axial and transversal directions, in the wall of the hexagonal duct, enclosing a seven wire-wrapped rod bundle, were experimentally measured, using an air opened loop. The Reynolds numbers are the range 10 3 - 5x10 4 . The friction factors are compared to existing correlations. The static pressure distributions show that the static pressure is not hydrostatic in the cross section of the flow. (Author) [pt

  11. Measuring static seated pressure distributions and risk for skin pressure ulceration in ice sledge hockey players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darrah, Shaun D; Dicianno, Brad E; Berthold, Justin; McCoy, Andrew; Haas, Matthew; Cooper, Rory A

    2016-01-01

    To determine whether sledge hockey players with physical disability have higher average seated pressures compared to non-disabled controls. Fifteen age-matched controls without physical disability and 15 experimental participants with physical disability were studied using a pressure mapping device to determine risk for skin pressure ulceration and the impact of cushioning and knee angle positioning on seated pressure distributions. Regardless of participant group, cushioning, or knee angle, average seated pressures exceeded clinically acceptable seated pressures. Controls had significantly higher average seated pressures than the disability group when knees were flexed, both with the cushion (p = 0.013) and without (p = 0.015). Knee extension showed significantly lower average pressures in controls, both with the cushion (p hockey players utilize positioning with larger knee flexion angles. Implications for Rehabilitation Ice sledge hockey is a fast growing adaptive sport. Adaptive sports have been associated with several positive improvements in overall health and quality of life, though may be putting players at risk for skin ulceration. Measured static seated pressure in sledges greatly exceeds current clinically accepted clinical guidelines. With modern improvements in wheelchair pressure relief/cushioning there are potential methods for improvement of elevated seated pressure in ice hockey sledges.

  12. A static pressure reset control system with a new type of flow damper for use in low pressure ventilation systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Terkildsen, Søren; Svendsen, Svend

    2012-01-01

    The control strategy for mechanical ventilation systems has significant impact on the performance of the system, in terms of energy consumption and correct air distribution. This paper presents a static pressure reset control system employing a new type of flow damper with lower pressure loss...... shows that the droplet shaped damper resulted in an airflow of 234 L/s at 30 Pa pressure loss, more than twice the airflow past a flat-plate damper at the same pressure loss (114 L/s). Also the droplet shaped damper could operate precisely down to 5 Pa pressure loss. The programmed control algorithm...... significant fan power saving compared to a fixed static pressure control. A maximum static pressure of 15 Pa is a reduction of more than 50% compared to flat-plate dampers that required at least 30 Pa to operate precisely; this is expected to yield fan energy savings in practice....

  13. Comparison of pressure perception of static and dynamic two point ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: The study was carried out to compare the perception of Static and Dynamic two point discrimination sensibility in the index finger and investigate the influence of some demographic characteristics such as age, gender and limb dominance on two point discrimination sensibility. Methods: One hundred and ...

  14. Combined Differential and Static Pressure Sensor based on a Double-Bridged Structure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Casper; Jespersen, S.T.; Krog, J.P.

    2005-01-01

    A combined differential and static silicon microelectromechanical system pressure sensor based on a double piezoresistive Wheatstone bridge structure is presented. The developed sensor has a conventional (inner) bridge on a micromachined diaphragm and a secondary (outer) bridge on the chip...

  15. Effect of revised high-heeled shoes on foot pressure and static balance during standing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bae, Young-Hyeon; Ko, Mansoo; Park, Young-Soul; Lee, Suk-Min

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of revised high-heeled shoes on the foot pressure ratio and static balance during standing. [Subjects and Methods] A single-subject design was used, 15 healthy women wearing revised high-heeled shoes and general high-heeled shoes in a random order. The foot pressure ratio and static balance scores during standing were measured using a SpaceBalance 3D system. [Results] Forefoot and rearfoot pressures were significantly different between the 2 types of high-heeled shoes. Under the 3 conditions tested, the static balance score was higher for the revised high-heeled shoes than for the general high-heeled shoes, but this difference was not statistically significant. [Conclusion] Revised high-heeled shoes are preferable to general high-heeled shoes, as they result in normalization of normalized foot pressure and a positive effect on static balance. PMID:25995572

  16. Pressure and velocity profiles in a static mechanical hemilarynx model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alipour, Fariborz; Scherer, Ronald C.

    2002-12-01

    This study examined pressure and velocity profiles in a hemilarynx mechanical model of phonation. The glottal section had parallel walls and was fabricated from hard plastic. Twelve pressure taps were created in the vocal fold surface and connected to a differential pressure transducer through a pressure switch. The glottal gap was measured with feeler gauges and the uniform glottal duct was verified by use of a laser system. Eight pressure transducers were placed in the flat wall opposite the vocal fold. Hot-wire anemometry was used to obtain velocity profiles upstream and downstream of the glottis. The results indicate that the pressure distribution on the vocal fold surface was consistent with pressure change along a parallel duct, whereas the pressures on the opposite flat wall typically were lower (by 8%-40% of the transglottal pressure just past mid-glottis). The upstream velocity profiles were symmetric regardless of the constriction shape and size. The jet flow downstream of the glottis was turbulent even for laminar upstream conditions. The front of the jet was consistently approximately 1.5 mm from the flat wall for glottal gaps of 0.4, 0.8 and 1.2 mm. The turbulence intensity also remained approximately at the same location of about 4 mm from the flat wall for the two larger gaps.

  17. A static pressure reset control system with a new type of flow damper for use in low pressure ventilation systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Terkildsen, Søren; Svendsen, Svend

    2012-01-01

    The control strategy for mechanical ventilation systems has significant impact on the performance of the system, in terms of energy consumption and correct air distribution. This paper presents a static pressure reset control system employing a new type of flow damper with lower pressure loss...... for use in low pressure ventilation systems. The flow damper has a droplet shape that minimizes turbulence generation and the resulting pressure loss. The performance of the damper was examined by making measurements of pressure loss and airflow. These were used to determine the required pressure loss...... for operation and the airflow accuracy. Results were compared to similar tests carried out with conventional flat plate dampers. A static pressure reset control algorithm was programmed and analyzed on a test system consisting of three dampers, representing three office rooms. The comparison of the dampers...

  18. Maximum static inspiratory and expiratory pressures with different lung volumes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johnson Monique M

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Maximum pressures developed by the respiratory muscles can indicate the health of the respiratory system, help to determine maximum respiratory flow rates, and contribute to respiratory power development. Past measurements of maximum pressures have been found to be inadequate for inclusion in some exercise models involving respiration. Methods Maximum inspiratory and expiratory airway pressures were measured over a range of lung volumes in 29 female and 19 male adults. A commercial bell spirometry system was programmed to occlude airflow at nine target lung volumes ranging from 10% to 90% of vital capacity. Results In women, maximum expiratory pressure increased with volume from 39 to 61 cmH2O and maximum inspiratory pressure decreased with volume from 66 to 28 cmH2O. In men, maximum expiratory pressure increased with volume from 63 to 97 cmH2O and maximum inspiratory pressure decreased with volume from 97 to 39 cmH2O. Equations describing pressures for both sexes are: Pe/Pmax = 0.1426 Ln( %VC + 0.3402 R2 = 0.95 Pi/Pmax = 0.234 Ln(100 - %VC - 0.0828 R2 = 0.96 Conclusion These results were found to be consistent with values and trends obtained by other authors. Regression equations may be suitable for respiratory mechanics models.

  19. Tolerance of Artemia to static and shock pressure loading

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitzmaurice, B. C.; Appleby-Thomas, G. J.; Painter, J. D.; Ono, F.; McMillan, P. F.; Hazael, R.; Meersman, F.

    2017-10-01

    Hydrostatic and hydrodynamic pressure loading has been applied to unicellular organisms for a number of years due to interest from food technology and extremophile communities. There is also an emerging interest in the response of multicellular organisms to high pressure conditions. Artemia salina is one such organism. Previous experiments have shown a marked difference in the hatching rate of these organisms after exposure to different magnitudes of pressure, with hydrostatic tests showing hatching rates at pressures up to several GPa, compared to dynamic loading that resulted in comparatively low survival rates at lower pressure magnitudes. In order to begin to investigate the origin of this difference, the work presented here has focussed on the response of Artemia salina to (quasi) one-dimensional shock loading. Such experiments were carried out using the plate-impact technique in order to create a planar shock front. Artemia cysts were investigated in this manner along with freshly hatched larvae (nauplii). The nauplii and cysts were observed post-shock using optical microscopy to detect motility or hatching, respectively. Hatching rates of 18% were recorded at pressures reaching 1.5 GPa, as determined with the aid of numerical models. Subjecting Artemia to quasi-one-dimensional shock loading offers a way to more thoroughly explore the shock pressure ranges these organisms can survive.

  20. Analysis of unswept and swept wing chordwise pressure data from an oscillating NACA 0012 airfoil experiment. Volume 1: Technical Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    St.hilaire, A. O.; Carta, F. O.

    1983-01-01

    The unsteady chordwise force response on the airfoil surface was investigated and its sensitivity to the various system parameters was examined. A further examination of unsteady aerodynamic data on a tunnel spanning wing (both swept and unswept), obtained in a wind tunnel, was performed. The main body of this data analysis was carried out by analyzing the propagation speed of pressure disturbances along the chord and by studying the behavior of the unsteady part of the chordwise pressure distribution at various points of the airfoil pitching cycle. It was found that Mach number effects dominate the approach to and the inception of both static and dynamic stall. The stall angle decreases as the Mach number increases. However, sweep dominates the load behavior within the stall regime. Large phase differences between unswept and swept responses, that do not exist at low lift coefficient, appear once the stall boundary is penetrated. It was also found that reduced frequency is not a reliable indicator of the unsteady aerodynamic response in the high angle of attack regime.

  1. Static calculation of the rotor unloading automatic machine for a high-pressure centrifugal pump

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martsynkovskyy, V. A.; Deineka, A.; Korczak, A.; Peczkis, G.

    2017-08-01

    The article presents static calculation of an automatic machine for unloading of rotor axial forces in a high-pressure and high-speed pump. Analysis of the rotor displacement influence to values of mass flow rate and pressure in the unloading chamber of the unloading system is given. The main geometric parameters of the system are obtained.

  2. INITIAL ASSESSMENT OF SURFACE PRESSURE CHARACTERISTICS OF TWO ROTARY WING UAV DESIGNS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Henry E.; Wong, Oliver D.; Watkins, A. Neal; Noonan, Kevin W.; Reis, Deane G.; Malovrh, Brendon D.; Ingram, Joanne L.

    2006-01-01

    This paper presents results of an experimental investigation of two rotary-wing UAV designs. The primary goal of the investigation was to provide a set of interactional aerodynamic data for an emerging class of rotorcraft. The present paper provides an overview of the test and an introduction to the test articles, and instrumentation. Sample data in the form of fixed system pressure coefficient response to changes in configuration attitude and flight condition for both rotor off and on conditions are presented. The presence of the rotor is seen to greatly affect the magnitude of the response. Pressure coefficients were measured using both conventional pressure taps and via pressure sensitive paint. Comparisons between the two methods are presented and demonstrate that the pressure sensitive paint is a promising method; however, further work on the technique is required.

  3. Measurements in Flight of the Pressure Distribution on the Right Wing of a Pursuit-Type Airplane at Several Values of Mach Number

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clousing, Lawrence A; Turner, William N; Rolls, L Stewart

    1946-01-01

    Pressure-distribution measurements were made on the right wing of a pursuit-type airplane at values of Mach number up to 0.80. The results showed that a considerable portion of the lift was carried by components of the airplane other than the wings, and that the proportion of lift carried by the wings may vary considerably with Mach number, thus changing the bending moment at the wing root whether or not there is a shift in the lateral position of the center of pressure. It was also shown that the center of pressure does not necessarily move outward at high Mach numbers, even though the wing-thickness ratio decreases toward the wing tip. The wing pitching-moment coefficient increased sharply in a negative direction at a Mach lift-curve slope increased with Mach number up to values of above the critical value. Pressures inside the wing were small and negative.

  4. Variable camber wing based on pneumatic artificial muscles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Weilong; Liu, Libo; Chen, Yijin; Leng, Jinsong

    2009-07-01

    As a novel bionic actuator, pneumatic artificial muscle has high power to weight ratio. In this paper, a variable camber wing with the pneumatic artificial muscle is developed. Firstly, the experimental setup to measure the static output force of pneumatic artificial muscle is designed. The relationship between the static output force and the air pressure is investigated. Experimental result shows the static output force of pneumatic artificial muscle decreases nonlinearly with increasing contraction ratio. Secondly, the finite element model of the variable camber wing is developed. Numerical results show that the tip displacement of the trailing-edge increases linearly with increasing external load and limited with the maximum static output force of pneumatic artificial muscles. Finally, the variable camber wing model is manufactured to validate the variable camber concept. Experimental result shows that the wing camber increases with increasing air pressure and that it compare very well with the FEM result.

  5. DEFLAGRATION RATES OF SECONDARY EXPLOSIVES UNDER STATIC MPA - GPA PRESSURE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zaug, J; Young, C; Long, G; Maienschein, J; Glascoe, E; Hansen, D; Wardell, J; Black, C; Sykora, G

    2009-07-30

    We provide measurements of the chemical reaction propagation rate (RPR) as a function of pressure using diamond anvil cell (DAC) and strand burner technologies. Materials investigated include HMX and RDX crystalline powders, LX-04 (85% HMX and 15% Viton A), and Composition B (63% RDX, 36% TNT, 1% wax). The anomalous correspondence between crystal structure, including in some instances isostructural phase transitions, on pressure dependent RPRs of HMX and RDX are correlated to confocal micro-Raman spectroscopic results. The contrast between DAC GPa and strand burner MPa regime measurements yield insight into explosive material burn phenomena. Here we highlight pressure dependent physicochemical mechanisms that appear to affect the deflagration rate of precompressed energetic materials.

  6. Blood pressure response to low level static contractions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fallentin, Nils; Jørgensen, Kurt

    1992-01-01

    muscles at forces corresponding to 10% and 40% MVC. Mean value for endurance time at 10% MVC was significantly longer for flexion [111.3 (SD 56.1) min] than for extension [18.1 (SD 7.5) min;n = 7]. At 40% MVC the difference in mean endurance time disappeared [2.3 (SD 0.7) min for elbow flexion and 2.3 (SD...... the circulation to the muscles was arrested just prior to the cessation of the contraction, blood pressure only partly recovered and remained elevated for as long as the occlusion persisted, indicating the level of pressure-raising muscle chemoreflexes. Based on blood pressure recordings obtained during...

  7. Development of the PRSEUS Multi-Bay Pressure Box for a Hybrid Wing Body Vehicle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jegley, Dawn C.; Velicki, Alexander

    2015-01-01

    NASA has created the Environmentally Responsible Aviation Project to explore and document the feasibility, benefits, and technical risk of advanced vehicle configurations and enabling technologies that will reduce the impact of aviation on the environment. A critical aspect of this pursuit is the development of a lighter, more robust airframe that will enable the introduction of unconventional aircraft configurations that have higher lift-to-drag ratios, reduced drag, and lower community noise. Although such novel configurations like the Hybrid Wing Body (HWB) offer better aerodynamic performance as compared to traditional tube-and-wing aircraft, their blended wing shapes also pose significant new design challenges. Developing an improved structural concept that is capable of meeting the structural weight fraction allocated for these non-circular pressurized cabins is the primary obstacle in implementing large lifting-body designs. To address this challenge, researchers at NASA and The Boeing Company are working together to advance new structural concepts like the Pultruded Rod Stitched Efficient Unitized Structure (PRSEUS), which is an integrally stiffened panel design that is stitched together and designed to maintain residual load-carrying capabilities under a variety of damage scenarios. The large-scale multi-bay fuselage test article described in this paper is the final specimen in a building-block test program that was conceived to demonstrate the feasibility of meeting the structural weight goals established for the HWB pressure cabin.

  8. Static charged spheres with anisotropic pressure in general relativity

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    (= (1 2) 浇), 灾, being respectively the energy densities of matter and electrostatic fields, radial and transverse fluid pressures whereas ¯ denotes the eigenvalue of the conformal Weyl tensor and interpreted as the energy density of the free gravitational field], we have recast Einstein's field equations into a form easy to ...

  9. 14 CFR 23.1325 - Static pressure system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... connections must be so vented that the influence of airplane speed, the opening and closing of windows... error. The system error, in indicated pressure altitude, at sea-level, with a standard atmosphere, excluding instrument calibration error, may not exceed ±30 feet per 100 knot speed for the appropriate...

  10. Surface pressure model for simple delta wings at high angles of attack

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    R. Narasimhan (Krishtel eMaging) 1461 1996 Oct 15 13:05:22

    characteristics. Flight mechanics analysis is primarily concerned with the aerodynamic data composed ... static data are the limiting case of unsteady flow pattern as time tends to infinity (or at least a few times the .... as the qualitative changes in the surface pressure model are independently confirmed by Roos. & Kegelman ...

  11. Tests of Round and Flat Spoilers on a Tapered Wing in the NACA 19-Foot Pressure Wind Tunnel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wenzinger, Carl J; Bowen, John D

    1941-01-01

    Several arrangements of round and flat spanwise spoilers attached to the upper surface of a tapered wing were tested in the NACA 19-foot pressure wind tunnel to determine the most effective type, location, and size of spoiler necessary to reduce greatly the lift on the wings of large flying boats when moored. The effect of the various spoilers on the lift, the drag, and the pitching-moment characteristics of the tapered wing was measured over a range of angles of attack from zero to maximum lift. The most effective type of spoiler was found to be the flat type with no space between it and the wing surface. The chordwise location of such a spoiler was not critical within the range investigated, from 5 to 20 percent of the wing chord from the leading edge.

  12. Static characteristic analysis and experimental research of aerostatic thrust bearing with annular elastic uniform pressure plate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hao Dong

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available In this article, an aerostatic thrust bearing with annular elastic uniform pressure plate structure was designed. In order to obtain a relationship between bearing capacity and stiffness of aerostatic thrust bearing designed in this article, first, the stress field mechanics model of the gas thrust bearing was established in the static. Second, deformation control equations of the elastic uniform pressure plate and gas lubrication Reynolds equation were established according to the flow continuity principle. Here, finite element mesh of gas flow field was woven using the technology of grid overlapping and grid stitching. Then, gas–solid coupling control equations were solved using the numerical method. Gas film pressure distribution and gas static bearing capacity of thrust bearing were analyzed. Function relationship between bearing capacity and the stiffness and the thickness of gas film was obtained. Finally, the results of theory analysis and experiment were compared. The results of the comparison can be listed as, under the effect of gas pressure, orifice area and the equilibrium pressure groove depth are changed due to elastic deformation of the elastic uniform pressure plate. The static stiffness of aerostatic thrust bearing with elastic equilibrium pressure groove increased by 30% than the static stiffness of aerostatic thrust bearing with rigid equilibrium pressure groove. The maximum carrying capacity occurred in the gas film thickness of 3.5 µm. The maximum static stiffness appeared in the gas film thickness of 5.5 µm. It can be seen from the comparison results of experiments and theoretical analysis that data results of gas film thickness and the bearing capacity are the same. The feasibility of the theoretical analysis method is validated.

  13. Impact of the duct static pressure reset control strategy on the energy consumption by the HVAC system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Walaszczyk Juliusz

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This article addresses different duct static pressure control strategies which could be implemented in variable air volume air-conditioning systems (VAV. Two pressure reset control strategies are compared to the commonly used control solution based on the “Constant static pressure” method. First pressure reset control strategy, known as PID Control, uses signals from VAV boxes controllers to reset duct static pressure in a way that one of the VAV dampers is maintained almost entirely open. Second strategy decreases static pressure setpoint until an adjustable number of pressure requests occur. As a response to the certain amount of requests, static pressure setpoint is increased. This strategy is called Trim & Respond. Both static pressure reset control strategies described in this paper are considered to have more significant potential for energy savings than the “Constant static pressure” method. In order to validate this potential, several simulations for different control strategies were carried out and the obtained results are compared and analysed. The theoretical limit of the energy savings - set of the optimal control actions, was estimated with Nelder-Mead algorithm and also presented in this article. General description of the static pressure control strategies "Constant static pressure", PID Control and Trim & Respond is given.

  14. Pneumatic artificial muscle and its application on driving variable trailing-edge camber wing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Weilong; Liu, Libo; Chen, Yijin; Liu, Yanju; Leng, Jinsong

    2010-04-01

    As a novel bionic actuator, pneumatic artificial muscle has high power to weight ratio. In this paper, the experimental setup to measure the static output force of pneumatic artificial muscle was designed and the relationship between the static output force and the air pressure was investigated. Experimental result shows the static output force of pneumatic artificial muscle decreases nonlinearly with increasing contraction ratio. A variable camber wing based on the pneumatic artificial muscle was developed and the variable camber wing model was manufactured to validate the variable camber concept. Wind tunnel tests were conducted in the low speed wind tunnel. Experimental result shows that the wing camber increases with increasing air pressure.

  15. Development of temperature stable charge based piezoelectric composite quasi-static pressure sensors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ende, D.A. van den; Groen, W.A.; Zwaag, S. van der

    2010-01-01

    In this work piezoelectric composite charge based sensors are developed, aimed at quasi-static pressure sensor or switch type applications. The use of piezoelectric composite materials allows for manufacturing robust devices which can easily be integrated with conventional polymer processing.

  16. Pressure-Distribution Measurements of a Model of a Davis Wing Section with Fowler Flap Submitted by Consolidated Aircraft Corporation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbott, Ira H

    1942-01-01

    Wing pressure distribution diagrams for several angles of attack and flap deflections of 0 degrees, 20 degrees, and 40 degrees are presented. The normal force coefficients agree with lift coefficients obtained in previous test of the same model, except for the maximum lifts with flap deflection. Pressure distribution measurements were made at Reynolds Number of about 6,000,000.

  17. Hybrid Wing-Body Pressurized Fuselage and Bulkhead, Design and Optimization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukhopadhyay, Vivek

    2013-01-01

    The structural weight reduction of a pressurized Hybrid Wing-Body (HWB) fuselage is a serious challenge. Hence, research and development are presently being continued at NASA under the Environmentally Responsible Aviation (ERA) and Subsonic Fixed Wing (SFW) projects in collaboration with the Boeing Company, Huntington Beach and Air Force Research Laboratory (AFRL). In this paper, a structural analysis of the HWB fuselage and bulkhead panels is presented, with the objectives of design improvement and structural weight reduction. First, orthotropic plate theories for sizing, and equivalent plate analysis with appropriate simplification are considered. Then parametric finite-element analysis of a fuselage section and bulkhead are conducted using advanced stitched composite structural concepts, which are presently being developed at Boeing for pressurized HWB flight vehicles. With this advanced stiffened-shell design, structural weights are computed and compared to the thick sandwich, vaulted-ribbed-shell, and multi-bubble stiffened-shell structural concepts that had been studied previously. The analytical and numerical results are discussed to assess the overall weight/strength advantages.

  18. Boundary layer transition determination for periodic and static flows using phase-averaged pressure data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gardner, A. D.; Richter, K.

    2015-06-01

    A method of boundary layer transition measurement is presented for wind tunnel models instrumented with surface pressure taps. The measurement relies on taking a number of theoretically identical measurements at different times and then analysing the standard deviation of the pressures. Due to the slight unsteady movement of the transition position, a peak in the standard deviation of pressure is found at the transition position, and this is correlated with measurements of the transition position with an infrared camera and hot-film anemometers. In contrast to microphone measurements, it is shown that the transition detection works for data which have been low-pass filtered with a cut-off of 1 Hz. The application to static and dynamic transition measurements on static and periodically pitching helicopter rotor blade airfoils at Mach 0.3-0.5 is demonstrated.

  19. In-flight total forces, moments and static aeroelastic characteristics of an oblique-wing research airplane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curry, R. E.; Sim, A. G.

    1984-01-01

    A low-speed flight investigation has provided total force and moment coefficients and aeroelastic effects for the AD-1 oblique-wing research airplane. The results were interpreted and compared with predictions that were based on wind tunnel data. An assessment has been made of the aeroelastic wing bending design criteria. Lateral-directional trim requirements caused by asymmetry were determined. At angles of attack near stall, flow visualization indicated viscous flow separation and spanwise vortex flow. These effects were also apparent in the force and moment data.

  20. Influence of increased static pressure in MHD-channel of hypervelocity wind tunnel on its characteristics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alfyorov, V.I.; Rudakova, A.P.; Rukavets, V.P.; Shcherbakov, G.I. [Central Aerohydrodynamic Institute (TsAGI), Zhukovsky (Russian Federation)

    1995-12-31

    One of the main weaknesses of available MHD gas acceleration wind tunnels which restricts their application for simulating vehicle re-entry flights and reproducing scramjet combustion chamber conditions is a relatively low static pressure in the channel (P{approximately}0.1 to 0.2 Atm). The possibility of increasing this pressure and the influence of the increased pressure on the MHD-accelerator characteristics are the subject of the present paper. It is shown that the main challenge is the necessity of increasing the total Lorentz force proportionally to the channel gas density at electrode current density not resulting in heat and electrical breakdown and the development of the side walls and interelectrode insulators designed for higher heat fluxes, q {approximately} 5 to 10 kw/cm{sup 2}. Some possible wall design versions are suggested. The influence of increased pressure is investigated using the Faraday - type MED channel at static pressures in the MHD channel from 0.2 to 1.0 Atm and total accelerating current I = 300 to 1,100 Amps when B=2.5T. Forty five electrodes are used in the MHD channel at maximum current density of 50 A/cm{sup 2}. The channel flow is calculated by applying the model of a gas in thermodynamic equilibrium. The influence of the increased pressure on electrodynamic (accelerator electrode voltages and currents, Hall voltage and current) and gasdynamic (distributions of static pressure, temperature, velocity, Mach numbers, etc., along the channel length) characteristics is evaluated. Some recommendations on the development of MHD channels for hypersonic wind tunnels designed for high pressure are suggested.

  1. Prevention of pressure ulcers with a static air support surface: A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serraes, Brecht; van Leen, Martin; Schols, Jos; Van Hecke, Ann; Verhaeghe, Sofie; Beeckman, Dimitri

    2018-03-05

    The aims of this study were to identify, assess, and summarise available evidence about the effectiveness of static air mattress overlays to prevent pressure ulcers. The primary outcome was the incidence of pressure ulcers. Secondary outcomes included costs and patient comfort. This study was a systematic review. Six electronic databases were consulted: Cochrane Library, EMBASE, PubMed (Medline), CINAHL (EBSCOhost interface), Science direct, and Web of Science. In addition, a hand search through reviews, conference proceedings, and the reference lists of the included studies was performed to identify additional studies. Potential studies were reviewed and assessed by 2 independent authors based on the title and abstract. Decisions regarding inclusion or exclusion of the studies were based on a consensus between the authors. Studies were included if the following criteria were met: reporting an original study; the outcome was the incidence of pressure ulcer categories I to IV when using a static air mattress overlay and/or in comparison with other pressure-redistribution device(s); and studies published in English, French, and Dutch. No limitation was set on study setting, design, and date of publication. The methodological quality assessment was evaluated using the Critical Appraisal Skills Program Tool. Results were reported in a descriptive way to reflect the exploratory nature of the review. The searches included 13 studies: randomised controlled trials (n = 11) and cohort studies (n = 2). The mean pressure ulcer incidence figures found in the different settings were, respectively, 7.8% pressure ulcers of categories II to IV in nursing homes, 9.06% pressure ulcers of categories I to IV in intensive care settings, and 12% pressure ulcers of categories I to IV in orthopaedic wards. Seven comparative studies reported a lower incidence in the groups of patients on a static air mattress overlay. Three studies reported a statistical (P < .1) lower

  2. Molecular Mechanisms for High Hydrostatic Pressure-Induced Wing Mutagenesis in Drosophila melanogaster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hua; Wang, Kai; Xiao, Guanjun; Ma, Junfeng; Wang, Bingying; Shen, Sile; Fu, Xueqi; Zou, Guangtian; Zou, Bo

    2015-10-08

    Although High hydrostatic pressure (HHP) as an important physical and chemical tool has been increasingly applied to research of organism, the response mechanisms of organism to HHP have not been elucidated clearly thus far. To identify mutagenic mechanisms of HHP on organisms, here, we treated Drosophila melanogaster (D. melanogaster) eggs with HHP. Approximately 75% of the surviving flies showed significant morphological abnormalities from the egg to the adult stages compared with control flies (p melanogaster induced by HHP were used to investigate the mutagenic mechanisms of HHP on organism. Thus 285 differentially expressed genes associated with wing mutations were identified using Affymetrix Drosophila Genome Array 2.0 and verified with RT-PCR. We also compared wing development-related central genes in the mutant flies with control flies using DNA sequencing to show two point mutations in the vestigial (vg) gene. This study revealed the mutagenic mechanisms of HHP-induced mutagenesis in D. melanogaster and provided a new model for the study of evolution on organisms.

  3. Optical measurements on hydrogen at ultrahigh static pressures. Summary report for NRIP W233

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mills, R.L.; Liebenberg, D.H.

    1979-02-01

    The results of a two-year New Research Initiatives Program (NRIP) aimed at developing apparatus and techniques for studying hydrogen and other gases under ultrahigh static pressure in diamond--anvil cells are summarized. The following goals were achieved: A facility was established in which precision optical measurements can be made; special diamond cells for use at low temperatures were built; procedures were devised for loading cells with gases at high density; preliminary visual, x-ray, and spectral studies on various gases at pressures up to 50 kbar were conducted; and having demonstrated the feasibility of NRIP, other sponsorship on a continuing basis was obtained

  4. Variable Sweep Transition Flight Experiment (VSTFE)-Parametric Pressure Distribution Boundary Layer Stability Study and Wing Glove Design Task

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rozendaal, Rodger A.

    1986-01-01

    The Variable Sweep Transition Flight Experiment (VSTFE) was initiated to establish a boundary-layer transition data base for laminar flow wing design. For this experiment, full-span upper-surface gloves will be fitted to a variable sweep F-14 aircraft. The results of two initial tasks are documented: a parametric pressure distribution/boundary-layer stability study and the design of an upper-surface glove for Mach 0.8. The first task was conducted to provide a data base from which wing-glove pressure distributions could be selected for glove designs. Boundary-layer stability analyses were conducted on a set of pressure distributions for various wing sweep angles, Mach numbers, and Reynolds number in the range of those anticipated for the flight-test program. The design procedure for the Mach 0.8 glove is described, and boundary-layer stability calculations and pressure distributions are presented both at design and off-design conditions. Also included is the analysis of the clean-up glove (smoothed basic wing) that will be flight-tested initially and the analysis of a Mach 0.7 glove designed at the NASA Langley Research Center.

  5. Effect of static mixer geometry on flow mixing and pressure drop in marine scr applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Park Taewha

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Flow mixing and pressure drop characteristics for marine selective catalytic reduction applications were investigated numerically to develop an efficient static mixer. Two different mixers, line- and swirl-type, were considered. The effect of vane angles on the relative intensity, uniformity index, and pressure drop was investigated in a swirl-type mixer; these parameters are dramatically affected by the mixer geometry. The presence of a mixer, regardless of the mixer type, led to an improvement of approximately 20% in the mixing performance behind the mixer in comparison to not having a mixer. In particular, there was a tradeoff relationship between the uniformity and the pressure drop. Con­sidering the mixing performance and the pressure drop, the swirl-type mixer was more suitable than the line-type mixer in this study.

  6. Effect of static mixer geometry on flow mixing and pressure drop in marine scr applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Taewha; Sung, Yonmo; Kim, Taekyung; Lee, Inwon; Choi, Gyungmin; Kim, Duckjool

    2014-03-01

    Flow mixing and pressure drop characteristics for marine selective catalytic reduction applications were investigated numerically to develop an efficient static mixer. Two different mixers, line- and swirl-type, were considered. The effect of vane angles on the relative intensity, uniformity index, and pressure drop was investigated in a swirl-type mixer; these parameters are dramatically affected by the mixer geometry. The presence of a mixer, regardless of the mixer type, led to an improvement of approximately 20% in the mixing performance behind the mixer in comparison to not having a mixer. In particular, there was a tradeoff relationship between the uniformity and the pressure drop. Con­sidering the mixing performance and the pressure drop, the swirl-type mixer was more suitable than the line-type mixer in this study.

  7. Effect of static mixer geometry on flow mixing and pressure drop in marine SCR applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taewha Park

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Flow mixing and pressure drop characteristics for marine selective catalytic reduction applications were investigated numerically to develop an efficient static mixer. Two different mixers, line- and swirl-type, were considered. The effect of vane angles on the relative intensity, uniformity index, and pressure drop was investigated in a swirl-type mixer; these parameters are dramatically affected by the mixer geometry. The presence of a mixer, regardless of the mixer type, led to an improvement of approximately 20% in the mixing performance behind the mixer in comparison to not having a mixer. In particular, there was a tradeoff relationship between the uniformity and the pressure drop. Considering the mixing performance and the pressure drop, the swirl-type mixer was more suitable than the line-type mixer in this study.

  8. Static Stability and Control of Canard Configurations at Mach Numbers from 0.70 to 2.22 - Triangular Wing and Canard with Twin Vertical Tails

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, Victor L.

    1961-01-01

    The static aerodynamic characteristics of a canard airplane configuration having twin vertical stabilizing surfaces are presented. The model consisted of a wing and canard both of triangular plan form and aspect ratio 2 mounted on a Sears-Haack body of fineness ratio 12.5 and two swept and tapered wing-mounted vertical tails of aspect ratio 1.35. Data are presented for Mach numbers from 0.70 to 2.22 and for angles of attack from -6 to +18 deg. at 0 and 5 deg. sideslip. Tests were made with the canard off and with the canard on. Nominal canard deflection angles ranged from 0 to 10 deg. The Reynolds number was 3.68 x 10(exp 6) based on the wing mean aerodynamic chord. Selected portions of the data obtained in this investigation are compared with previously published results for the same model having a single vertical tail instead of twin vertical tails. Without the canard, the directional stability at supersonic Mach numbers and high angles of attack was improved slightly by replacing the single tail with twin tails. However, at a Mach number of 0.70, the directional stability of the twin-tail model deteriorated rapidly with increasing angle of attack above 10 deg. and fell considerably below the level for the single-tail model. At subsonic speeds the directional stability of the twin-tail model with the canard was comparable to that for the single-tail model and at supersonic speed it was considerably greater at high angles of attack. Unlike the single-tail model, the twin-tail model at 50 sideslip exhibited an unstable break in the variation of pitching-moment coefficient with lift coefficient near 10 deg. angle of attack for 0.70 Mach number.

  9. THE EFFECTS OF SWIRL GENERATOR HAVING WINGS WITH HOLES ON HEAT TRANSFER AND PRESSURE DROP IN TUBE HEAT EXCHANGER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zeki ARGUNHAN

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available This paper examines the effect of turbulance creators on heat transfer and pressure drop used in concentric heat exchanger experimentaly. Heat exchanger has an inlet tube with 60 mm in diameter. The angle of swirl generators wings is 55º with each wing which has single, double, three and four holes. Swirl generators is designed to easily set to heat exchanger entrance. Air is passing through inner tube of heat exhanger as hot fluid and water is passing outer of inner tube as cool fluid.

  10. Box-wing model approach for solar radiation pressure modelling in a multi-GNSS scenario

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tobias, Guillermo; Jesús García, Adrián

    2016-04-01

    The solar radiation pressure force is the largest orbital perturbation after the gravitational effects and the major error source affecting GNSS satellites. A wide range of approaches have been developed over the years for the modelling of this non gravitational effect as part of the orbit determination process. These approaches are commonly divided into empirical, semi-analytical and analytical, where their main difference relies on the amount of knowledge of a-priori physical information about the properties of the satellites (materials and geometry) and their attitude. It has been shown in the past that the pre-launch analytical models fail to achieve the desired accuracy mainly due to difficulties in the extrapolation of the in-orbit optical and thermic properties, the perturbations in the nominal attitude law and the aging of the satellite's surfaces, whereas empirical models' accuracies strongly depend on the amount of tracking data used for deriving the models, and whose performances are reduced as the area to mass ratio of the GNSS satellites increases, as it happens for the upcoming constellations such as BeiDou and Galileo. This paper proposes to use basic box-wing model for Galileo complemented with empirical parameters, based on the limited available information about the Galileo satellite's geometry. The satellite is modelled as a box, representing the satellite bus, and a wing representing the solar panel. The performance of the model will be assessed for GPS, GLONASS and Galileo constellations. The results of the proposed approach have been analyzed over a one year period. In order to assess the results two different SRP models have been used. Firstly, the proposed box-wing model and secondly, the new CODE empirical model, ECOM2. The orbit performances of both models are assessed using Satellite Laser Ranging (SLR) measurements, together with the evaluation of the orbit prediction accuracy. This comparison shows the advantages and disadvantages of

  11. Effect of High-Lift Devices on the Static-Lateral-Stability Derivatives of a 45 deg Sweptback Wing of Aspect Ratio 4.0 and Taper Ratio 0.6 in Combination With A Body

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Lichtenstein, Jacob

    1952-01-01

    An investigation has been made in the Langley stability tunnel to determine the effect of high-lift devices on the low-speed static-lateral-stability derivatives of a 45 deg sweptback wing of aspect ratio 4.0 and taper ratio 0.6...

  12. Static Air Support Surfaces to Prevent Pressure Injuries: A Multicenter Cohort Study in Belgian Nursing Homes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serraes, Brecht; Beeckman, Dimitri

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the incidence and risk factors for developing pressure injuries (PIs) in patients placed on a static air support surfaces: mattress overlay, heel wedge, and seat cushion. Multicenter cohort study. The sample comprised 176 residents; their mean age was 87 (SD = 6.76) years; their mean Braden Scale score was 14 (SD = 2.54). The study was performed on a convenience sample of 6 nursing homes in Belgium. Data were collected on 23 care units. The primary outcome measure, cumulative PI incidence (category [stage] II-IV) over a 30-day observation period, was calculated. Pressure injury occurrence was defined according to the 2014 European and US National Pressure Injury Advisory panels, Pan Pacific Pressure Injury Alliance classification system. The PI incidence for category (stage) II-IV was 5.1%. Six residents (3.4%) developed a category II PI, and 3 (1.7%) developed a category III PI; no category IV ulcers occurred. No significant risk factors for category II-IV PIs were identified using multivariate logistic regression. Time of sitting in a chair was found to be a risk factor for development of nonblanchable erythema (category I PI) (odds ratio = 21.608; 95% confidence interval [CI], 20.510-22.812; P = .013). The median time to develop a category II-IV PI was 16 days (interquartile range = 2-26). The interrater reliability between the observations of the researcher and nurses on-site was almost perfect (0.86; 95% CI, 0.81-0.91). We found a low incidence of PIs when using a static air overlay mattress for patients at risk in a nursing home population. Static air support surfaces, alongside patient-tailored patient repositioning protocols, should be considered to prevent PIs in this patient population.

  13. Measurements of peripherical static pressure and pressure drop in a rod bundle with helical wire wrap spacers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ballve, H.; Graca, M.C.; Fernandez y Fernandez, E.; Carajilescov, P.

    1981-07-01

    The fuel element of a LMFBR nuclear reactor consists of a wire wrapped rod bundle with triangular array with the coolant flowing parallel to the rods. Using this type of element with seven rods conected to an air open loop. The hydrodinamics behavior of the flow for p/d = 1.20 and l/d = 15.0, was simulated. Several measurements were performed in order to obtain the static pressure distribution at the walls of the hexagonal duct, for Reynolds number from 4.4x10 3 to 48.49x10 3 and for different axial and transverse positions, in a wire wrap lead. The axial pressure drop was obtained and determined the friction factor dependence with the Reynolds number. From the obtained results, it was observed the non-dependency of the non-dimensionalized axial and transverse local static pressure distribution at the wall of the hexagonal duct, with the Reynolds number. The obtained friction factor is compared to the results of previous works. (Author) [pt

  14. Muscle tissue oxygenation, pressure, electrical, and mechanical responses during dynamic and static voluntary contractions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vedsted, Pernille; Blangsted, Anne Katrine; Søgaard, Karen

    2006-01-01

    Dynamic muscle contractions have been shown to cause greater energy turnover and fatigue than static contractions performed at a corresponding force level. Therefore, we hypothesized that: (1) electro- (EMG) and mechanomyography (MMG), intramuscular pressure (IMP), and reduction in muscle oxygen...... similar in spite of major differences in the MMG and EMG responses of the muscle during contraction periods. This may relate to the surprisingly lower IMP in DYN than IST....... tension (rTO(2)) would be larger during dynamic (DYN) than intermittent static (IST) low force contractions; and that (2) oxygen tension would remain lower in the resting periods subsequent to DYN as compared to those following IST. Eight subjects performed elbow flexions with identical time...

  15. Hybrid Wing-Body (HWB) Pressurized Fuselage Modeling, Analysis, and Design for Weight Reduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukhopadhyay, Vivek

    2012-01-01

    This paper describes the interim progress for an in-house study that is directed toward innovative structural analysis and design of next-generation advanced aircraft concepts, such as the Hybrid Wing-Body (HWB) and the Advanced Mobility Concept-X flight vehicles, for structural weight reduction and associated performance enhancement. Unlike the conventional, skin-stringer-frame construction for a cylindrical fuselage, the box-type pressurized fuselage panels in the HWB undergo significant deformation of the outer aerodynamic surfaces, which must be minimized without significant structural weight penalty. Simple beam and orthotropic plate theory is first considered for sizing, analytical verification, and possible equivalent-plate analysis with appropriate simplification. By designing advanced composite stiffened-shell configurations, significant weight reduction may be possible compared with the sandwich and ribbed-shell structural concepts that have been studied previously. The study involves independent analysis of the advanced composite structural concepts that are presently being developed by The Boeing Company for pressurized HWB flight vehicles. High-fidelity parametric finite-element models of test coupons, panels, and multibay fuselage sections, were developed for conducting design studies and identifying critical areas of potential failure. Interim results are discussed to assess the overall weight/strength advantages.

  16. Variation with Mach Number of Static and Total Pressures Through Various Screens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adler, Alfred A

    1946-01-01

    Tests were conducted in the Langley 24-inch highspeed tunnel to ascertain the static-pressure and total-pressure losses through screens ranging in mesh from 3 to 12 wires per inch and in wire diameter from 0.023 to 0.041 inch. Data were obtained from a Mach number of approximately 0.20 up to the maximum (choking) Mach number obtainable for each screen. The results of this investigation indicate that the pressure losses increase with increasing Mach number until the choking Mach number, which can be computed, is reached. Since choking imposes a restriction on the mass rate of flow and maximum losses are incurred at this condition, great care must be taken in selecting the screen mesh and wire dimmeter for an installation so that the choking Mach number is

  17. Hydrogen equilibrium pressure measurements in the Li-N-H system by static manometric method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ananda, N.S.; Jat, R.A.; Sawant, S.G.; Parida, S.C.; Singh, Z.; Venugopal, V.

    2010-01-01

    Light weight hydrogen storage materials are very promising in terms of their high gravimetric hydrogen storage capacity and low cost. One such reported system is the Li-N-H system with a theoretical hydrogen capacity of 11.5 wt% according to the following equilibrium reactions; (1) Li 3 N+H 2 → Li 2 NH + LiH and (2) Li 2 NH+H 2 → LiNH 2 + LiH. The enthalpy of reaction (1) is -165 kJ/mole of H 2 whereas that of reaction (2) is -45 kJ/mole of H 2 . Hence, the second reaction is of utmost importance for low temperature release of hydrogen with a capacity of 6.5 wt%. The equilibrium hydrogen pressures of the above two reactions have been reported by pressure-composition isotherm studies at a pressure range of 3-15 atm., in which the mid-point of the sloping plateau of P-C isotherm is considered as the equilibrium pressure. This method may not yield the true equilibrium pressure. Hence, in this study, we have carried out measurements of equilibrium pressure using a static manometric method where we have considered reaction (2) only

  18. Intramuscular pressure and EMG relate during static contractions but dissociate with movement and fatigue

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sjøgaard, Gisela; Jensen, Bente R.; Hargens, Allan R.

    2004-01-01

    Intramuscular pressure (IMP) and electromyography (EMG) mirror muscle force in the nonfatigued muscle during static contractions. The present study explores whether the constant IMP-EMG relationship with increased force may be extended to dynamic contractions and to fatigued muscle. IMP and EMG...... with speed of abduction. In the nonfatigued supraspinatus muscle, a linear relationship was found between IMP and EMG; in contrast, during fatigue and recovery, significant timewise changes of the IMP-to-EMG ratio occurred. The results indicate that IMP should be included along with EMG when mechanical load...... sharing between muscles is evaluated during dynamic and fatiguing contractions....

  19. Enhancing Heat Transfer of Drag-Reducing Surfactant Solution by an HEV Static Mixer with Low Pressure Drop

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haifeng Shi

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available A novel high-efficiency vortex (HEV static mixer was used to locally enhance the heat transfer coefficient of a drag-reducing fluid, Ethoquad O/12 (EO12 (3 mM with sodium salicylate (NaSal (5 mM. Significant enhancement of heat transfer coefficients was observed. The Nusselt numbers were three to five times those of normal drag-reducing flow without mixer and were close to those of water at high Reynolds number with only modest energy penalty. In contrast, a Helix static mixer increased Nusselt number slightly with very high pressure loss. A performance number was used for comparisons among the HEV static mixer, the Helix static mixer, and water without mixer. The HEV static mixer had a performance number comparable to that of water. The enhanced heat transfer by the HEV static mixer resulted from streamwise vortices generated by the inclined tabs, which increased the convective heat transfer in the radial direction.

  20. The Effect of Uniaxial Static Pressure on the Behaviour of the Aluminum Acceptor Impurity in Silicon

    CERN Document Server

    Mamedov, T N; Andrianov, D G; Herlach, D; Gorelkin, V N; Gritsaj, K I; Zhukov, V A; Stoikov, A V; Zimmermann, U

    2004-01-01

    The results on the effect of uniaxial static pressure on the behaviour of aluminum shallow acceptors in silicon are presented. Impurity atoms of _{\\mu}A1 in silicon crystals with phosphorus impurity (1.6\\cdot 10^{13} cm^{-3} for the first sample and 1.9\\cdot 10^{13} cm^{-3} for the second sample) were created by implantation of negative muons. The polarization of muons was studied in a magnetic field of 2.5 kGs transverse to the direction of the muon spin in the temperature range 10-300 K. Orientations of the chosen crystal axis ([111] for the first sample, [100] for the second one), magnetic field, and the muon polarization were reciprocally perpendicular. It was found that uniaxial pressure applied along the chosen crystal axes changes both the absolute value and the temperature dependence of the acceptor center magnetic moment relaxation rate.

  1. Static forces variation and pressure distribution in laryngoscopy performed by straight and curved blades.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cecchini, S; Silvestri, S; Carassiti, M; Agro, F E

    2009-01-01

    A theoretical analysis of the forces acting on the laryngoscope during the lifting of the epiglottis is carried out by applying the basic principles of statics. The static model of a laryngoscope equipped with a straight and a curved blade and the forces variation, as a function of the introduction angle and of tissue reaction application point, are described. The pharyngeal tissues and epiglottis pressure distribution on the blade is obtained, with a 1mm(2) resolution, by measurements performed in-vitro on a simulation mannequin, using straight and curved blades. The straight blade requires more effort than the curved one to obtain the same visualization of vocal cords, however forces exerted by using a laryngoscope with a curved blade do not vary linearly with the application point of tissue reaction. Average intensity of the tissue reaction has been found in the order of 32+/-11 N. Pressure distribution is maximally concentrated on the tip of curved blades (0.5 MPa on 5mm axial length), whereas it is more dispersed on straight blades (0.2 MPa on 10mm axial length). The inclination of the handle also influences the effort of the operator: for both blades, from 0 rad to 1.57 rad, the lifting force shows a total variation of about 13% of the top value, the transversal forces vary less than 6% of the top value.

  2. Pressure prediction model based on artificial neural network optimized by genetic algorithm and its application in quasi-static calibration of piezoelectric high-pressure sensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Tingwei; Kong, Deren; Jiang, Jian; Shang, Fei; Chen, Jing

    2016-12-01

    This paper applies back propagation neural network (BPNN) optimized by genetic algorithm (GA) for the prediction of pressure generated by a drop-weight device and the quasi-static calibration of piezoelectric high-pressure sensors for the measurement of propellant powder gas pressure. The method can effectively overcome the slow convergence and local minimum problems of BPNN. Based on test data of quasi-static comparison calibration method, a mathematical model between each parameter of drop-weight device and peak pressure and pulse width was established, through which the practical quasi-static calibration without continuously using expensive reference sensors could be realized. Compared with multiple linear regression method, the GA-BPNN model has higher prediction accuracy and stability. The percentages of prediction error of peak pressure and pulse width are less than 0.7% and 0.3%, respectively.

  3. Modeling and testing of static pressure within an optical fiber cable spool using distributed fiber Bragg gratings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Chengju; Ren, Liyong; Qu, Enshi; Tang, Feng; Liang, Quan

    2012-11-01

    Based on the force analysis, we establish a theoretical model to study the static pressure distribution of the fiber cable spool for the fiber optic guided missile (FOG-M). Simulations indicate that for each fiber layer in the fiber cable spool, the applied static pressure on it asymptotically converges as the number of fiber layers increases. Using the distributed fiber Bragg grating (FBG) sensing technique, the static pressure of fiber cable layers in the spool on the cable winding device was measured. Experiments show that the Bragg wavelength of FBG in every layer varies very quickly at the beginning and then becomes gently as the subsequent fiber cable was twisted onto the spool layer by layer. Theoretical simulations agree qualitatively with experimental results. This technology provides us a real-time method to monitor the pressure within the fiber cable layer during the cable winding process.

  4. Aerosols generated by releases of pressurized powders and solutions in static air

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sutter, S.L.

    1983-08-01

    Safety assessments and environmental impact statements for nuclear fuel cycle facilities require an estimate of potential airborne releases caused by accidents. Aerosols generated by accidents are being investigated by Pacific Northwest Laboratory to develop the source terms for these releases. An upper boundary accidental release event would be a pressurized release of powder or liquid in static air. Experiments were run using various source sizes and pressures and measuring the mass airborne and the particle size distribution of aerosols produced by these pressurized releases. Two powder and two liquid sources were used: TiO/sub 2/ and depleted uranium dioxide (DUO); and aqueous uranine (sodium fluorescein) and uranyl nitrate solutions. Results of the experiments showed that pressurization level and source size were significant variables for the airborne powder releases. For this experimental configuration, the liquid releases were a function of pressure, but volume did not appear to be a significant variable. During the experiments 100 g and 350 g of DUO (1 ..mu..m dia) and TiO/sub 2/ (1.7 ..mu..m dia) powders and 100 cm/sup 3/ and 350 cm/sup 3/ of uranine and uranyl nitrate solutions were released at pressures ranging from 50 to 500 psig. The average of the largest fractions of powder airborne was about 24%. The maximum amount of liquid source airborne was significantly less, about 0.15%. The median aerodynamic equivalent diameters (AED) for collected airborne powders ranged from 5 to 19 ..mu..m; liquids ranged from 2 to 29 ..mu..m. All of the releases produced a significant fraction of respirable particles of 10 ..mu..m and less. 12 references, 10 figures, 23 tables.

  5. Pressure relief, cold foam or static air? A single center, prospective, controlled randomized clinical trial in a Dutch nursing home.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Leen, Martin; Hovius, Steven; Neyens, Jacques; Halfens, Ruud; Schols, Jos

    2011-02-01

    At present, the evidence regarding the type of mattress that is the best for preventing pressure ulcers is not convincing. In a single center, prospective, controlled trial we compared a static air overlay mattress (no electric pump needed) on top of a cold foam mattress with a cold foam mattress alone on pressure ulcer incidence in nursing home residents. 83 Patients were included in the study with a score lower than 12 points on the Norton scale and no pressure ulcer at the start of the study. 42 Patients received a cold foam mattress and 41 patients received a static air overlay on top of that cold foam mattress. Out of bed we standardized the pressure reduction in sitting position by using a static air cushion in both groups. Patients were checked weekly in both groups for pressure ulcers. Only when there were signs of developing a pressure ulcer grade 2 or higher, repositioning by our nursing home pressure ulcer protocol (PU protocol) was put into practice. Seven patients (17.1%) on a cold foam mattress and two (4.8%) on a static air mattress developed a pressure ulcer grade 2 or more. There was no difference regarding pressure ulcer incidence between patients with a high risk (Norton 5-8) and patients with a medium risk (Norton 9-12). In 5 out of 7 patients who developed a pressure ulcer on a foam mattress the ulcers showed no healing using our PU protocol. In the static air group all pressure ulcers healed by regular treatment according to our PU protocol. In this study, static air overlay mattresses provided a better prevention than cold foam mattresses alone (4.8% versus 17.1%). The Norton scores of the patients in both groups did not change during the 6 month trial period. Our decision to use repositioning only when there were signs of a pressure ulcer seems to be acceptable when a static air overlay is in position. However, the score of 17.1% development (incidence) of pressure ulcers in the foam group may stress the need of repositioning when using only

  6. Static force tests of a sharp leading edge delta-wing model at ambient and cryogenic temperatures with a description of the apparatus employed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilgore, R. A.; Davenport, E. E.

    1976-01-01

    A sharp leading edge delta-wing model was tested through an angle-of-attack range at Mach numbers of 0.75, 0.80, and 0.85 at both ambient and cryogenic temperatures in the Langley 1/3-meter transonic cryogenic tunnel. Total pressure was varied with total temperature in order to hold test Reynolds number constant at a given Mach number. Agreement between the aerodynamic data obtained at ambient and cryogenic temperatures indicates that flows with leading-edge vortex effects are duplicated properly at cryogenic temperatures. The test results demonstrate that accurate aerodynamic data can be obtained by using conventional force-testing techniques if suitable measures are taken to minimize temperature gradients across the balance and to keep the balance at ambient (warm) temperatures during cryogenic operation of the tunnel.

  7. Transonic pressure measurements and comparison of theory to experiment for an arrow-wing configuration. Volume 1: Experimental data report, base configuration and effects of wing twist and leading-edge configuration. [wind tunnel tests, aircraft models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manro, M. E.; Manning, K. J. R.; Hallstaff, T. H.; Rogers, J. T.

    1975-01-01

    A wind tunnel test of an arrow-wing-body configuration consisting of flat and twisted wings, as well as a variety of leading- and trailing-edge control surface deflections, was conducted at Mach numbers from 0.4 to 1.1 to provide an experimental pressure data base for comparison with theoretical methods. Theory-to-experiment comparisons of detailed pressure distributions were made using current state-of-the-art attached and separated flow methods. The purpose of these comparisons was to delineate conditions under which these theories are valid for both flat and twisted wings and to explore the use of empirical methods to correct the theoretical methods where theory is deficient.

  8. Pressure measurements on a forward-swept wing-canard configuration

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Lombardi, G

    1994-03-01

    Full Text Available In a previous analysis of the effect of a fore sweep in the subsonic and transonic regimes it was found that the flow on a forward-swept wing separates first in the root region, suggesting that the inclusion of an aerodynamic device such as a...

  9. Efcient Computation of Buffer Capacities for Cyclo-Static Real-Time Systems with Back-Pressure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wiggers, M.H.; Bekooij, Marco; Bekooij, Marco Jan Gerrit; Jansen, P.G.; Smit, Gerardus Johannes Maria

    2006-01-01

    A key step in the design of cyclo-static real-time systems is the determination of buffer capacities. In our multiprocessor system, we apply back-pressure, which means that tasks wait for space in output buffers. Consequently buffer capacities affect the throughput. This requires the derivation of

  10. Effect of Design Static Pressure Level on Energy Efficiency at Low Energy District Heating Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tol, Hakan; Svendsen, Svend

    2012-01-01

    Low-Energy District Heating (DH) systems with low-temperature operations, such as 55 °C in terms of supply and 25 °C in terms of return, were considered to be the 4th generation of the DH systems for the low-energy future with energy efficiencies focused to be achieved at newly built and existing...... buildings by the Danish building regulations. Therefore focus has been given to reduce the heat demand of the consumer site with integration of low-energy buildings, to be considered for new settlements and with renovation of existing buildings to low-energy class. The reduction of heat demand increases...... the ratio of heat loss from the DH network in comparison to the heat supplied to the district. In our former studies, the low-energy DH system was optimized with the aim of reducing the heat loss from the low-energy DH network in a certain limit of static pressure level of 10 bara. Thus, in this present...

  11. Experimental static aerodynamic forces and moments at high subsonic speeds on a missile model during simulated launching from the midsemispan location of a 45 degree sweptback wing-fuselage-pylon combination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alford, William J; King, Thomas, Jr

    1957-01-01

    An investigation was made at high subsonic speeds in the Langley high-speed 7- by 10-foot tunnel to determine the static aerodynamic forces and moments on a missile model during simulated launching from the midsemispan location of a 45 degree sweptback wing-fuselage-pylon combination. The results indicated significant variations in all the aerodynamic components with changes in chordwise location of the missile. Increasing the angle of attack caused increases in the induced effects on the missile model because of the wing-fuselage-pylon combination. Increasing the Mach number had little effect on the variations of the missile aerodynamic characteristics with angle of attack except that nonlinearities were incurred at smaller angles of attack for the higher Mach numbers. The effects of finite wing thickness on the missile characteristics, at zero angle of attack, increase with increasing Mach number. The effects of the pylon on the missile characteristics were to causeincreases in the rolling-moment variation with angle of attack and a negative displacement of the pitching-moment curves at zero angle of attack. The effects of skewing the missile in the lateral direction relative to and sideslipping the missile with the wing-fuselage-pylon combination were to cause additional increments in side force at zero angle of attack. For the missile yawing moments the effects of changes in skew or sideslip angles were qualitatively as would be expected from consideration of the isolated missile characteristics, although there existed differences in theyawing-moment magnitudes.

  12. Surface pressure model for simple delta wings at high angles of attack

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    R. Narasimhan (Krishtel eMaging) 1461 1996 Oct 15 13:05:22

    Understanding this aids in the development of simple model structures in agreement with the changes in the flow behaviour. Second, small amplitude unsteady aerodynamic characteristics are directly related to the static characteristics. Flight mechanics analysis is primarily concerned with the aerodynamic data composed ...

  13. An improved quasi-steady aerodynamic model for insect wings that considers movement of the center of pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Jong-Seob; Kim, Joong-Kwan; Chang, Jo Won; Han, Jae-Hung

    2015-07-30

    A quasi-steady aerodynamic model in consideration of the center of pressure (C.P.) was developed for insect flight. A dynamically scaled-up robotic hawkmoth wing was used to obtain the translational lift, drag, moment and rotational force coefficients. The translational force coefficients were curve-fitted with respect to the angles of attack such that two coefficients in the Polhamus leading-edge suction analogy model were obtained. The rotational force coefficient was also compared to that derived by the standard Kutta-Joukowski theory. In order to build the accurate pitching moment model, the locations of the C.Ps. and its movements depending on the pitching velocity were investigated in detail. We found that the aerodynamic moment model became suitable when the rotational force component was assumed to act on the half-chord. This implies that the approximation borrowed from the conventional airfoil concept, i.e., the 'C.P. at the quarter-chord' may lead to an incorrect moment prediction. In the validation process, the model showed excellent time-course force and moment estimations in comparison with the robotic wing measurement results. A fully nonlinear multibody flight dynamic simulation was conducted to check the effect of the traveling C.P. on the overall flight dynamics. This clearly showed the importance of an accurate aerodynamic moment model.

  14. Wind tunnel investigation of the interaction and breakdown characteristics of slender wing vortices at subsonic, transonic, and supersonic speeds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erickson, Gary E.

    1991-01-01

    The vortex dominated aerodynamic characteristics of a generic 65 degree cropped delta wing model were studied in a wind tunnel at subsonic through supersonic speeds. The lee-side flow fields over the wing-alone configuration and the wing with leading edge extension (LEX) added were observed at M (infinity) equals 0.40 to 1.60 using a laser vapor screen technique. These results were correlated with surface streamline patterns, upper surface static pressure distributions, and six-component forces and moments. The wing-alone exhibited vortex breakdown and asymmetry of the breakdown location at the subsonic and transonic speeds. An earlier onset of vortex breakdown over the wing occurred at transonic speeds due to the interaction of the leading edge vortex with the normal shock wave. The development of a shock wave between the vortex and wing surface caused an early separation of the secondary boundary layer. With the LEX installed, wing vortex breakdown asymmetry did not occur up to the maximum angle of attack in the present test of 24 degrees. The favorable interaction of the LEX vortex with the wing flow field reduced the effects of shock waves on the wing primary and secondary vortical flows. The direct interaction of the wing and LEX vortex cores diminished with increasing Mach number. The maximum attainable vortex-induced pressure signatures were constrained by the vacuum pressure limit at the transonic and supersonic speeds.

  15. Static pressure accelerates ox-LDL-induced cholesterol accumulation via SREBP-1-mediated caveolin-1 downregulation in cultured vascular smooth muscle cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luo, Di-xian, E-mail: luodixian_2@163.com [Department of Pharmacology, School of Pharmaceutics, Central South University, Changsha 410083, Hunan (China); Institute of Pharmacy and Pharmacology, College of Science and Technology, University of South China, Hengyang 421001, Hunan (China); First People' s Hospital of Chenzhou City, Chenzhou 423000, Hunan (China); Xia, Cheng-lai [Institute of Pharmacy and Pharmacology, College of Science and Technology, University of South China, Hengyang 421001, Hunan (China); Department of Pharmacy, Third Affiliated Hospital Medical College of Guangzhou, Guangzhou 510150, Guangdong (China); Li, Jun-mu [Institute of Pharmacy and Pharmacology, College of Science and Technology, University of South China, Hengyang 421001, Hunan (China); Xiong, Yan [Department of Pharmacology, School of Pharmaceutics, Central South University, Changsha 410083, Hunan (China); Yuan, Hao-yu [Institute of Pharmacy and Pharmacology, College of Science and Technology, University of South China, Hengyang 421001, Hunan (China); Lusong Center for Disease Control and Prevention, Zhuzhou 412000, Hunan (China); TANG, Zhen-Wang; Zeng, Yixin [Institute of Pharmacy and Pharmacology, College of Science and Technology, University of South China, Hengyang 421001, Hunan (China); Liao, Duan-fang, E-mail: dfliao66@yahoo.com.cn [Institute of Pharmacy and Pharmacology, College of Science and Technology, University of South China, Hengyang 421001, Hunan (China); Department of Traditional Chinese Diagnostics, School of Pharmacy, Hunan University of Chinese Medicine, Changsha 420108, Hunan (China)

    2010-12-03

    Research highlights: {yields} Vertical static pressure accelerates ox-LDL-induced cholesterol accumulation in cultured vascular smooth muscle cells. {yields} Static pressure induces SREBP-1 activation. {yields} Static pressure downregulates the expressions of caveolin-1 by activating SREBP-1. {yields} Static pressure also downregulates the transcription of ABCA1 by activating SREBP-1. {yields} Static pressure increases ox-LDL-induced cholesterol accumulation by SREBP-1-mediated caveolin-1 downregulation in vascular smooth muscle cells cultured in vitro. -- Abstract: Objective: To investigate the effect of static pressure on cholesterol accumulation in vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) and its mechanism. Methods: Rat-derived VSMC cell line A10 treated with 50 mg/L ox-LDL and different static pressures (0, 60, 90, 120, 150, 180 mm Hg) in a custom-made pressure incubator for 48 h. Intracellular lipid droplets and lipid levels were assayed by oil red O staining and HPLC; The mRNA levels of caveolin-1 and ABCA1, the protein levels of caveolin-1 SREBP-1 and mature SREBP-1 were respectively detected by RT-PCR or western blot. ALLN, an inhibitor of SREBP metabolism, was used to elevate SREBP-1 protein level in VSMCs treated with static pressure. Results: Static pressures significantly not only increase intracellular lipid droplets in VSMCs, but also elevate cellular lipid content in a pressure-dependent manner. Intracellular free cholesterol (FC), cholesterol ester (CE), total cholesterol (TC) were respectively increased from 60.5 {+-} 2.8 mg/g, 31.8 {+-} 0.7 mg/g, 92.3 {+-} 2.1 mg/g at atmosphere pressure (ATM, 0 mm Hg) to 150.8 {+-} 9.4 mg/g, 235.9 {+-} 3.0 mg/g, 386.7 {+-} 6.4 mg/g at 180 mm Hg. At the same time, static pressures decrease the mRNA and protein levels of caveolin-1, and induce the activation and nuclear translocation of SREBP-1. ALLN increases the protein level of mature SREBP-1 and decreases caveolin-1 expression, so that cellular lipid levels were

  16. Static pressure accelerates ox-LDL-induced cholesterol accumulation via SREBP-1-mediated caveolin-1 downregulation in cultured vascular smooth muscle cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luo, Di-xian; Xia, Cheng-lai; Li, Jun-mu; Xiong, Yan; Yuan, Hao-yu; TANG, Zhen-Wang; Zeng, Yixin; Liao, Duan-fang

    2010-01-01

    Research highlights: → Vertical static pressure accelerates ox-LDL-induced cholesterol accumulation in cultured vascular smooth muscle cells. → Static pressure induces SREBP-1 activation. → Static pressure downregulates the expressions of caveolin-1 by activating SREBP-1. → Static pressure also downregulates the transcription of ABCA1 by activating SREBP-1. → Static pressure increases ox-LDL-induced cholesterol accumulation by SREBP-1-mediated caveolin-1 downregulation in vascular smooth muscle cells cultured in vitro. -- Abstract: Objective: To investigate the effect of static pressure on cholesterol accumulation in vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) and its mechanism. Methods: Rat-derived VSMC cell line A10 treated with 50 mg/L ox-LDL and different static pressures (0, 60, 90, 120, 150, 180 mm Hg) in a custom-made pressure incubator for 48 h. Intracellular lipid droplets and lipid levels were assayed by oil red O staining and HPLC; The mRNA levels of caveolin-1 and ABCA1, the protein levels of caveolin-1 SREBP-1 and mature SREBP-1 were respectively detected by RT-PCR or western blot. ALLN, an inhibitor of SREBP metabolism, was used to elevate SREBP-1 protein level in VSMCs treated with static pressure. Results: Static pressures significantly not only increase intracellular lipid droplets in VSMCs, but also elevate cellular lipid content in a pressure-dependent manner. Intracellular free cholesterol (FC), cholesterol ester (CE), total cholesterol (TC) were respectively increased from 60.5 ± 2.8 mg/g, 31.8 ± 0.7 mg/g, 92.3 ± 2.1 mg/g at atmosphere pressure (ATM, 0 mm Hg) to 150.8 ± 9.4 mg/g, 235.9 ± 3.0 mg/g, 386.7 ± 6.4 mg/g at 180 mm Hg. At the same time, static pressures decrease the mRNA and protein levels of caveolin-1, and induce the activation and nuclear translocation of SREBP-1. ALLN increases the protein level of mature SREBP-1 and decreases caveolin-1 expression, so that cellular lipid levels were upregulated. Conclusion: Static

  17. Real-Time Wing-Vortex and Pressure Distribution Estimation on Wings Via Displacements and Strains in Unsteady and Transitional Flight Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-09-07

    LES ) flow solver coupled with a linear elastic membrane wing model. The focus of the study was to evaluate the effect of aeroelastic cambering on...inverse problem that is not solvable, consider a rectangular membrane made of isotropic material, with Poisson coefficient ν = 0, and subjected to a

  18. A static analytical apparatus for vapour pressures and (vapour + liquid) phase equilibrium measurements with an internal stirrer and view windows

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guo, Hao; Gong, Maoqiong; Dong, Xueqiang; Wu, Jianfeng

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • A new static analytical apparatus for vapour pressures and VLE data was designed. • The {R600a + R245fa} system was selected as a verification system. • Correlation of VLE data was made using PRvdWs and PRHVNRTL model. • Good agreement can be found with the literature data. - Abstract: A new static analytical apparatus for reliable vapour pressures and (vapour + liquid) equilibrium data of small-scale cell (≈150 mL) with internal stirrer and view windows was designed. In this work, the compositions of the phases were analyzed by a gas chromatograph connected on-line with TCD detectors. The operating pressure ranges from (0 to 3000) kPa, and the operating temperature range from (293 to 400) K. Phase equilibrium data for previously reported systems were first measured to test the credibility of the newly developed apparatus. The test included vapour pressure of 1,1,1,3,3-pentafluoropropane (R245fa) and isobutane (R600a), VLE of the (R600a + R245fa) system from T = (293.150 to 343.880) K. The measured VLE data are regressed with thermodynamic models using Peng–Robinson EoS with two different models, viz. the van der Waals mixing rule, and the Huron–Vidal mixing rule utilising the non-random two-liquid activity coefficient model. Thermodynamic consistency testing is also performed for the newly measured experimental data

  19. Aeroelasticity of morphing wings using neural networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Natarajan, Anand

    In this dissertation, neural networks are designed to effectively model static non-linear aeroelastic problems in adaptive structures and linear dynamic aeroelastic systems with time varying stiffness. The use of adaptive materials in aircraft wings allows for the change of the contour or the configuration of a wing (morphing) in flight. The use of smart materials, to accomplish these deformations, can imply that the stiffness of the wing with a morphing contour changes as the contour changes. For a rapidly oscillating body in a fluid field, continuously adapting structural parameters may render the wing to behave as a time variant system. Even the internal spars/ribs of the aircraft wing which define the wing stiffness can be made adaptive, that is, their stiffness can be made to vary with time. The immediate effect on the structural dynamics of the wing, is that, the wing motion is governed by a differential equation with time varying coefficients. The study of this concept of a time varying torsional stiffness, made possible by the use of active materials and adaptive spars, in the dynamic aeroelastic behavior of an adaptable airfoil is performed here. Another type of aeroelastic problem of an adaptive structure that is investigated here, is the shape control of an adaptive bump situated on the leading edge of an airfoil. Such a bump is useful in achieving flow separation control for lateral directional maneuverability of the aircraft. Since actuators are being used to create this bump on the wing surface, the energy required to do so needs to be minimized. The adverse pressure drag as a result of this bump needs to be controlled so that the loss in lift over the wing is made minimal. The design of such a "spoiler bump" on the surface of the airfoil is an optimization problem of maximizing pressure drag due to flow separation while minimizing the loss in lift and energy required to deform the bump. One neural network is trained using the CFD code FLUENT to

  20. Experimental Surface Pressure Data Obtained on 65 deg Delta Wing Across Reynolds Number and Mach Number Ranges. Volume 2; Small-Radius Leading Edge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Julio; Luckring, James M.

    1996-01-01

    An experimental wind tunnel test of a 65 deg. delta wing model with interchangeable leading edges was conducted in the Langley National Transonic Facility (NTF). The objective was to investigate the effects of Reynolds and Mach numbers on slender-wing leading-edge vortex flows with four values of wing leading-edge bluntness. Experimentally obtained pressure data are presented without analysis in tabulated and graphical formats across a Reynolds number range of 6 x 10(exp 6) to 84 x 10(exp 6) at a Mach number of 0.85 and across a Mach number range of 0.4 to 0.9 at Reynolds numbers of 6 x 10(exp 6) and 60 x 10(exp 6). Normal-force and pitching-moment coefficient plots for these Reynolds number and Mach number ranges are also presented.

  1. Stress regularity in quasi-static perfect plasticity with a pressure dependent yield criterion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babadjian, Jean-François; Mora, Maria Giovanna

    2018-04-01

    This work is devoted to establishing a regularity result for the stress tensor in quasi-static planar isotropic linearly elastic - perfectly plastic materials obeying a Drucker-Prager or Mohr-Coulomb yield criterion. Under suitable assumptions on the data, it is proved that the stress tensor has a spatial gradient that is locally squared integrable. As a corollary, the usual measure theoretical flow rule is expressed in a strong form using the quasi-continuous representative of the stress.

  2. Performance study of winglets on tapered wing with curved trailing edge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ara, Ismat; Ali, Mohammad; Islam, Md. Quamrul; Haque, M. Nazmul

    2017-06-01

    Induced drag is the result of wingtip vortex produced from generating lift by finite wing. It is one of the main drags that an aircraft wing encounters during flight. It hampers aircraft performance by increasing fuel consumption and reducing endurance, range and speed. Winglets are used to reduce the induced drag. They weakens wingtip vortex and thus reduces induced drag. This paper represents the experimental investigation to reduce induced drag using winglet at the wingtip. A model of tapered wing with curved trailing edge (without winglet) as well as two similar wings with blended winglet and double blended winglet are prepared using NACA 4412 aerofoil in equal span and surface area. All the models are tested in a closed circuit subsonic wind tunnel at air speed of 108 km/h (0.09 Mach). Reynolds number of the flow is 2.28 × 105 on the basis of average chord length of the wings. The point surface static pressures at different angles of attack from -4° to 24° are measured for each of the wing and winglet combinations through different pressure tapings by using a multi-tube water manometer. From the static pressure distribution, lift coefficient, drag coefficient and lift to drag ratio of all models are calculated. From the analysis of calculated values, it is found that both winglets are able to minimize induced drag; however, the tapered curved trailing edge span with blended winglet provides better aerodynamic performance.

  3. Navier-Stokes prediction of a delta wing in roll with vortex breakdown

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaderjian, Neal M.; Schiff, Lewis B.

    1993-01-01

    The three-dimensional, Reynolds-averaged, Navier-Stokes (RANS) equations are used to numerically simulate vortical flow about a 65 degree sweep delta wing. Subsonic turbulent flow computations are presented for this delta wing at 30 degrees angle of attack and static roll angles up to 42 degrees. This work is part of an on going effort to validate the RANS approach for predicting high-incidence vortical flows, with the eventual application to wing rock. The flow is unsteady and includes spiral-type vortex breakdown. The breakdown positions, mean surface pressures, rolling moments, normal forces, and streamwise center-of-pressure locations compare reasonably well with experiment. In some cases, the primary vortex suction peaks are significantly underpredicted due to grid coarseness. Nevertheless, the computations are able to predict the same nonlinear variation of rolling moment with roll angle that appeared in the experiment. This nonlinearity includes regions of local static roll instability, which is attributed to vortex breakdown.

  4. Analysis of Fluctuating Static Pressure Measurements in a Large High Reynolds Number Transonic Cryogenic Wind Tunnel. Ph.D. Thesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Igoe, William B.

    1991-01-01

    Dynamic measurements of fluctuating static pressure levels were made using flush mounted high frequency response pressure transducers at eleven locations in the circuit of the National Transonic Facility (NTF) over the complete operating range of this wind tunnel. Measurements were made at test section Mach numbers from 0.2 to 1.2, at pressure from 1 to 8.6 atmospheres and at temperatures from ambient to -250 F, resulting in dynamic flow disturbance measurements at the highest Reynolds numbers available in a transonic ground test facility. Tests were also made independently at variable Mach number, variable Reynolds number, and variable drivepower, each time keeping the other two variables constant thus allowing for the first time, a distinct separation of these three important variables. A description of the NTF emphasizing its flow quality features, details on the calibration of the instrumentation, results of measurements with the test section slots covered, downstream choke, effects of liquid nitrogen injection and gaseous nitrogen venting, comparisons between air and nitrogen, isolation of the effects of Mach number, Reynolds number, and fan drive power, and identification of the sources of significant flow disturbances is included. The results indicate that primary sources of flow disturbance in the NTF may be edge-tones generated by test section sidewall re-entry flaps and the venting of nitrogen gas from the return leg of the tunnel circuit between turns 3 and 4 in the cryogenic mode of operation. The tests to isolate the effects of Mach number, Reynolds number, and drive power indicate that Mach number effects predominate. A comparison with other transonic wind tunnels shows that the NTF has low levels of test section fluctuating static pressure especially in the high subsonic Mach number range from 0.7 to 0.9.

  5. AERODYNAMICS OF WING TIP SAILS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MUSHTAK AL-ATABI

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Observers have always been fascinated by soaring birds. An interesting feature of these birds is the existence of few feathers extending from the tip of the wing. In this paper, small lifting surfaces were fitted to the tip of a NACA0012 wing in a fashion similar to that of wing tip feathers. Experimental measurements of induced drag, longitudinal static stability and trailing vortex structure were obtained.The tests showed that adding wing tip surfaces (sails decreased the induced drag factor and increased the longitudinal static stability. Results identified two discrete appositely rotated tip vortices and showed the ability of wing tip surfaces to break them down and to diffuse them.

  6. A calculation and uncertainty evaluation method for the effective area of a piston rod used in quasi-static pressure calibration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Tingwei; Kong, Deren; Shang, Fei; Chen, Jing

    2018-04-01

    This paper describes the merits and demerits of different sensors for measuring propellant gas pressure, the applicable range of the frequently used dynamic pressure calibration methods, and the working principle of absolute quasi-static pressure calibration based on the drop-weight device. The main factors affecting the accuracy of pressure calibration are analyzed from two aspects of the force sensor and the piston area. To calculate the effective area of the piston rod and evaluate the uncertainty between the force sensor and the corresponding peak pressure in the absolute quasi-static pressure calibration process, a method for solving these problems based on the least squares principle is proposed. According to the relevant quasi-static pressure calibration experimental data, the least squares fitting model between the peak force and the peak pressure, and the effective area of the piston rod and its measurement uncertainty, are obtained. The fitting model is tested by an additional group of experiments, and the peak pressure obtained by the existing high-precision comparison calibration method is taken as the reference value. The test results show that the peak pressure obtained by the least squares fitting model is closer to the reference value than the one directly calculated by the cross-sectional area of the piston rod. When the peak pressure is higher than 150 MPa, the percentage difference is less than 0.71%, which can meet the requirements of practical application.

  7. Distribution of static pressure of seeds in a shallow model silo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horabik, Józef; Molenda, Marek

    2017-04-01

    The influence of the filling method, the seed size and the aspect ratio on the radial distribution of the vertical pressure on the floor of a shallow model silo and radial distribution of tangent stress within the material was investigated. Three filling methods were applied: central, circumferential and distributed. Seeds of five varieties were used: horse bean, field pea, wheat, vetch, and rapeseed. Vertical pressure on the floor of a shallow bin was found to be influenced by the filling method and the seed size and aspect ratio. A significant dip of vertical pressure in the middle radial location was observed in all tests, except two: central and circumferential filling of rapeseed. Wall friction was mobilized in the highest degree in the case of the central filling, while the lowest was mobilization of friction in the case of the circumferential filling.

  8. Static internal pressure capacity of Hanford Single-Shell Waste Tanks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Julyk, L.J.

    1994-01-01

    Underground single-shell waste storage tanks located at the Hanford Site in Richland, Washington, generate gaseous mixtures that could be ignited, challenging the structural integrity of the tanks. The structural capacity of the single-shell tanks to internal pressure is estimated through nonlinear finite-element structural analyses of the reinforced concrete tank. To determine their internal pressure capacity, designs for both the million-gallon and the half-million-gallon tank are evaluated on the basis of gross structural instability

  9. Mechanical properties of reactor pressure vessel steels studied by static and dynamic torsion tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Munier, A.; Maamouri, M.; Schaller, R.; Mercier, O.

    1993-01-01

    Internal friction measurements and torsional plastic deformation tests have been performed in reactor pressure vessel steels (unirradiated, irradiated and irradiated/annealed specimens). The results of these experiments have been interpreted with help of transmission electron microscopy observations (conventional and in situ). It is shown how the interactions between screw dislocations and obstacles (Peierls valleys, impurities and precipitates) could explain the low temperature hardening and the irradiation embrittlement of ferritic steels. In addition, it appears that the nondestructive internal friction technique could be used advantageously to follow the evolution of the material properties under irradiation, as for instance the irradiation embrittlement of the reactor pressure vessel steels. (orig.)

  10. Static internal pressure capacity of Hanford Single-Shell Waste Tanks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Julyk, L.J.

    1994-07-19

    Underground single-shell waste storage tanks located at the Hanford Site in Richland, Washington, generate gaseous mixtures that could be ignited, challenging the structural integrity of the tanks. The structural capacity of the single-shell tanks to internal pressure is estimated through nonlinear finite-element structural analyses of the reinforced concrete tank. To determine their internal pressure capacity, designs for both the million-gallon and the half-million-gallon tank are evaluated on the basis of gross structural instability.

  11. New Static Apparatus and Vapor Pressure of Reference Materials: Naphthalene, Benzoic Acid, Benzophenone, and Ferrocene

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Monte, M.J.S.; Santos, L.M.N.F.; Fulem, Michal; Fonseca, J.M.S.; Sousa, C.A.D.

    2006-01-01

    Roč. 51, - (2006), s. 757-766 ISSN 0021-9568 Grant - others:FCT(PT) POCTI/QUI/43144/2001; FEDER(PT) SFRH/ BPD /18065/2004 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100521 Keywords : vapor pressure * reference substance * thermochemistry * construction Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 1.642, year: 2006

  12. Selection and static calibration of the Marsh J1678 pressure gauge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oxendine, Charles R.; Smith, Howard W.

    1993-01-01

    During the experimental testing of the ultralight, it was determined that a pressure gauge would be required to monitor the simulated flight loads. After analyzing several factors, which are indicated in the discussion section of this report, the Marsh J1678 pressure gauge appeared to be the prominent candidate for the task. However, prior to the final selection, the Marsh pressure gauge was calibrated twice by two different techniques. As a result of the calibration, the Marsh gauge was selected as the appropriate measuring device during the structural testing of the ultralight. Although, there are commerical pressure gauges available on the market that would have proven to be more efficient and accurate. However, in order to obtain these characteristics in a gauge, one has to pay the price on the price tag, and this value is an exponential function of the degree of accuracy efficiency, precision, and many other features that may be designed into the gauge. After analyzing the extent of precision and accuracy that would be required, a more expensive gauge wouldn't have proven to be a financial benefit towards the outcome of the experiment.

  13. Experimental and simulation-based investigations of marine diesel engine performance against static back pressure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sapra, H.D.; Godjevac, M.; Visser, K.; Stapersma, D.; Dijkstra, Chris

    2017-01-01

    After-treatment technologies are adopted in automobiles and ships to meet strict emission regulations, which increase exhaust back pressure. Furthermore, underwater exhaust systems are employed on board ships to save space, and reduce noise and pollution on working decks. However, water at

  14. The determination of static pressures in contact zones between hard and soft bodies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kanval, J.

    1997-10-01

    This thesis describes the development of a measuring device for the measurement of detailed contours of pressure between hard and soft surfaces, surfaces which vary from being small to relatively large. The techniques are based on the mathematical reconstruction of pressures on the contact patch on one side of the surface using experimental measurements of strain on the reverse side. The work has been geared towards a 'force-plate' made up of a closely-grouped nest of individual beams bending under the loading. The work in this thesis deals with the simple structure of one such simply supported beam. The work on one beam highlights significant difficulties in reconstructing profiles of pressures along one side of a beam in 'reverse calculation' using the distribution of strain on the underside. These difficulties are mathematical rather than physical in nature, the mathematical process of reverse calculation being an inverse problem. Considerable efforts in obtaining a regularisation method appropriate to the beam problem have proved successful in reconstructing actual loads in the form of known noise-roughened theoretical test loadings and experimental loadings. The mathematical problem of reconstruction is an inverse one for which a method has been developed based on the non-negativeness of the pressure distribution and the consequent convexity of the bending moment along the beam and on the known value of the total load. The problem is formulated as a Fredholm integral equation of the first kind for the pressure distribution and this is expressed as a convex combination of appropriate basis functions, the coefficients of which are determined from a constrained least-square problem. Suitable basis functions are Bernstein polynomials and B-splines. The method has been shown to be a regularisation one related to the projection methods for Inverse problems and because of convexity the method is successful with noise. The problem of determining the number of basis

  15. Flutter Sensitivity to Boundary Layer Thickness, Structural Damping, and Static Pressure Differential for a Shuttle Tile Overlay Repair Concept

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Robert C.; Bartels, Robert E.

    2009-01-01

    This paper examines the aeroelastic stability of an on-orbit installable Space Shuttle patch panel. CFD flutter solutions were obtained for thick and thin boundary layers at a free stream Mach number of 2.0 and several Mach numbers near sonic speed. The effect of structural damping on these flutter solutions was also examined, and the effect of structural nonlinearities associated with in-plane forces in the panel was considered on the worst case linear flutter solution. The results of the study indicated that adequate flutter margins exist for the panel at the Mach numbers examined. The addition of structural damping improved flutter margins as did the inclusion of nonlinear effects associated with a static pressure difference across the panel.

  16. Influence of static pressure and shear rate on hemolysis of red blood cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasuda, T; Funakubo, A; Miyawaki, F; Kawamura, T; Higami, T; Fukui, Y

    2001-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of multiple mechanical forces in hemolysis. Specific attention is focused on the effects of shear and pressure. An experimental apparatus consisting of a rotational viscometer, compression chamber, and heat exchanger was prepared to apply multiple mechanical forces to a blood sample. The rotational viscometer, in which bovine blood was subjected to shear rates of 0, 500, 1,000, and 1,500 s(-1), was set in the compression chamber and pressurized with an air compressor at 0, 200, 400, and 600 mm Hg. The blood temperature was maintained at 21 degrees C and 28 degrees C. Free hemoglobin at 600 mm Hg was observed to be approximately four times higher than at 0 mm Hg for a shear rate of 1,500 s(-1) (p dynamics analysis, flow visualization, and computational fluid dynamics.

  17. Drag Performance of Twist Morphing MAV Wing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ismail N.I.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Morphing wing is one of latest evolution found on MAV wing. However, due to few design problems such as limited MAV wing size and complicated morphing mechanism, the understanding of its aerodynamic behaviour was not fully explored. In fact, the basic drag distribution induced by a morphing MAV wing is still remained unknown. Thus, present work is carried out to compare the drag performance between a twist morphing wing with membrane and rigid MAV wing design. A quasi-static aeroelastic analysis by using the Ansys-Fluid Structure Interaction (FSI method is utilized in current works to predict the drag performance a twist morphing MAV wing design. Based on the drag pattern study, the results exhibits that the morphing wing has a partial similarities in overall drag pattern with the baseline (membrane and rigid wing. However, based CD analysis, it shows that TM wing induced higher CD magnitude (between 25% to 82% higher than to the baseline wing. In fact, TM wing also induced the largest CD increment (about 20% to 27% among the wings. The visualization on vortex structure revealed that TM wing also produce larger tip vortex structure (compared to baseline wings which presume to promote higher induce drag component and subsequently induce its higher CD performance.

  18. Pressure relief with visco-elastic foam or with combined static air overlay? A prospective, crossover randomized clinical trial in a dutch nursing home.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Leen, Martin; Hovius, Steven; Halfens, Ruud; Neyens, Jacques; Schols, Jos

    2013-10-01

    Evidence of the best mattress for preventing pressure ulcers is not conclusive. In a single center, prospective, crossover trial on pressure ulcer incidence in nursing home residents, a static air overlay mattress, without a pump, on top of a visco-elastic foam mattress was compared with a visco-elastic foam mattress alone. The study was performed using a randomized crossover design. Forty-one patients with a score of 19 or lower on the Braden scale, but with no pressure ulcer at the start, were divided into 2 groups; 21 patients received a visco-elastic foam mattress (control group) and 20 patients a static air overlay on top of a visco-elastic foam mattress (intervention group) for a period of 6 months. In the second (crossover) period of 6 months, 19 patients participated in each group. Patients were checked weekly and, only when signs of development of a pressure ulcer were present was treatment altered to reposition patients according to the nursing home pressure ulcer protocol. No statistically significant differences were noted between the 2 groups with regard to age, gender, or Braden scale score. Of 41 patients, 3 died and were unable to participate in the crossover period, 8 patients (22.2%) developed a category 2 or higher pressure ulcer on a visco-elastic foam mattress (control group) and 2 (5.2%) on a static air mattress (intervention group)(P = 0.087). There was a difference regarding pressure ulcer incidence between patients with a very low Braden score between 6 and 12, and patients with a mean score between 13-19. Out of 8 patients, in the 2(25%) who developed a pressure ulcer on a foam mattress, the ulcers showed no signs of healing. In the static air group all pressure ulcers healed by normal treatment according to a standardized pressure ulcer treatment protocol. In this small study, static air overlay mattresses provided a better prevention than visco-elastic foam mattresses alone (5.2% vs 22.2%). The Braden scores of the patients in both

  19. The Effect of Work Boots on Knee Mechanics and the Center of Pressure at the Knee During Static Kneeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tennant, Liana; Kingston, David; Chong, Helen; Acker, Stacey

    2015-10-01

    Occupational kneeling is associated with an increased risk for the development of knee osteoarthritis. Previous work studying occupational kneeling has neglected to account for the fact that in many industrial settings, workers are required to wear steel-toe work boots. Thus, the purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of work boot wear on the center of pressure location of the ground reaction force, knee joint angle, and magnitude of the ground reaction force in a kneeling posture. Fifteen healthy males were fit with 3D motion capture markers and knelt statically over a force plate embedded in the floor. Using the tibial tuberosity as the point of reference, the center of pressure in shod condition was shifted significantly medially (on average 0.009 m [P = .005]) compared with the barefoot condition. The knee was significantly less internally rotated (shod: -12.5° vs. barefoot: -17.4° [P = .009]) and the anterior/posterior shear force was significantly greater in the shod condition (shod: 6.0% body weight vs. barefoot: 1.5% body weight [P = .002]). Therefore, wearing work boots alters the kneeling posture compared with barefoot kneeling, potentially loading different surfaces of the knee, as well as altering knee joint moments.

  20. Effect of noisy galvanic vestibular stimulation on center of pressure sway of static standing posture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inukai, Yasuto; Otsuru, Naofumi; Masaki, Mitsuhiro; Saito, Kei; Miyaguchi, Shota; Kojima, Sho; Onishi, Hideaki

    The vestibular system is involved in the control of standing balance. Galvanic vestibular stimulation (GVS) is a noninvasive technique that can stimulate the vestibular system. In recent years, noisy GVS (nGVS) using noise current stimulation has been attempted, but it has not been clarified whether it affects postural sway in open-eye standing. The purpose of this study was to clarify the influence of nGVS on the center of pressure (COP) sway measurement in open-eye standing postural control and identify the responders of nGVS. nGVS (0.1-640 Hz) was delivered at 0.4 and 1.0 mA over the bipolar mastoid. COP sway root mean square area, sway path length, medio-lateral (ML) mean velocity, and antero-posterior (AP) mean velocity before and during nGVS in an open-eye standing posture was measured. nGVS at 0.4 and 1.0 mA significantly reduced sway path length, mean velocity. The stimulation effect of nGVS was also large in subjects with a long sway path. For subjects with high COP sway of Baseline, nGVS was effective even with stimulation for a short duration (5 s). These findings suggest that nGVS improves postural sway in an open-eye standing posture among young subjects. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Design optimization of deployable wings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaddam, Pradeep

    Morphing technology is an important aspect of UAV design, particularly in regards to deployable systems. The design of such system has an important impact on the vehicle's performance. The primary focus of the present research work was to determine the most optimum deployable wing design from 3 competing designs and develop one of the deployable wing designs to test in the research facility. A Matlab code was developed to optimize 3 deployable wing concepts inflatable, inflatable telescopic and rigid-folding wings based on a sequential optimization strategy. The constraints that were part of the code include the packaging constraints during its stowed state, fixed length of the deployed section and the minimum L/D constraint. This code resulted in determining the optimum weight of all the 3 designs, the most optimum weight design is the inflatable wing design. This is a result of the flexible skin material and also due to no rigid parts in the deployed wing section. Another goal of the research involved developing an inflatable telescopic wing. The prototype was tested in a wind tunnel, while the actual wing was tested in the altitude chamber to determine the deployment speed, input pressure, analyze and predict the deployment sequence and behavior of the wing at such high wind speeds and altitudes ranging from 60,000 ft to 90,000 ft. Results from these tests allowed us to conclude the deployment sequence of the telescopic wing followed from the root to the tip section. The results were used to analyze the deployment time of the wing. As expected the deployment time decreased with an increase in input pressure. The results also show us that as the altitude increases, the deployment speed of the wing also increased. This was demonstrated when the wing was tested at a maximum altitude pressure of 90,000ft, well above the design altitude of 60,000ft.

  2. An in vitro study comparing a peripherally inserted central catheter to a conventional central venous catheter: no difference in static and dynamic pressure transmission

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gregg Bethene L

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Early goal directed therapy improves survival in patients with septic shock. Central venous pressure (CVP monitoring is essential to guide adequate resuscitation. Use of peripherally inserted central catheters (PICC is increasing, but little data exists comparing a PICC to a conventional CVP catheter. We studied the accuracy of a novel PICC to transmit static and dynamic pressures in vitro. Methods We designed a device to generate controlled pressures via a column of water allowing simultaneous measurements from a PICC and a standard triple lumen catheter. Digital transducers were used to obtain all pressure readings. Measurements of static pressures over a physiologic range were recorded using 5Fr and 6Fr dual lumen PICCs. Additionally, random repetitive pressure pulses were applied to the column of water to simulate physiologic intravascular pressure variations. The resultant PICC and control waveforms were recorded simultaneously. Results Six-hundred thirty measurements were made using the 5 Fr and 6 Fr PICCs. The average bias determined by Bland-Altman plot was 0.043 mmHg for 5 Fr PICC and 0.023 mmHg for 6 Fr PICC with a difference range of 1.0 to -1.0. The correlation coefficient for both catheters was 1.0 (p-value Conclusion In vitro, no static or dynamic pressure differences were found between the PICC and a conventional CVP catheter. Clinical studies are required to assess whether the novel PICC has bedside equivalence to conventional catheters when measuring central venous pressures.

  3. Study of interaction of a pair of longitudinal vortices with a horseshoe vortex around a wing. 1st Report. Potential for passive controlling by a pair of vortex generators; Tsubasa mawari no bateikei uzu to tateuzu no kansho ni kansuru kenkyu. 1. Ittsui no uzu hasseiki ni yoru judo seigyoho no teian

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hara, H.; Takahashi, M. [Mitsubishi Heavy Industries, Ltd., Tokyo (Japan); Ikeda, K. [Toshiba Corp., Tokyo (Japan); Shizawa, T.; Honami, S. [Science University of Tokyo, Tokyo (Japan). Faculty of Engineering

    1999-12-25

    This paper presents a potential for a passive control of a horseshoe vortex at the root of the wing. NACA0024 wing is established on a turbulent boundary layer. A pair of vortex generators of halt delta wing is installed upstream of the wing. The controlled horseshoe vortex is tested qualitatively by flow visualization technique. Also, the potential for controlling is quantitatively investigated by wall static pressure and total pressure. The horseshoe vortex is remarkably controlled in Common Flow Up Configuration (CFUC) of vortex generators. The distortion of the total pressure contours is diminished by 49% and the vortex is located closer to the wing. In case of Common Flow Down Configuration (CFDC), the mass flow averaged pressure loss is decreased by 29% compared with the case without a pair of vortex generators. (author)

  4. Hydrostatic pressure effects on the static magnetism in Eu(Fe0.925Co0.075)2As2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, W T; Sun, J-P; Ye, G Z; Xiao, Y; Su, Y; Schmalzl, K; Nandi, S; Bukowski, Z; Guguchia, Z; Feng, E; Fu, Z; Cheng, J-G

    2017-06-14

    EuFe 2 As 2 -based iron pnictides are quite interesting compounds, due to the two magnetic sublattices in them and the tunability to superconductors by chemical doping or application of external pressure. The effects of hydrostatic pressure on the static magnetism in Eu(Fe 0.925 Co 0.075 ) 2 As 2 are investigated by complementary electrical resistivity, ac magnetic susceptibility and single-crystal neutron diffraction measurements. A specific pressure-temperature (P-T) phase diagram of Eu(Fe 0.925 Co 0.075 ) 2 As 2 is established. The structural phase transition, as well as the spin-density-wave order of Fe sublattice, is suppressed gradually with increasing pressure and disappears completely above 2.0 GPa. In contrast, the magnetic order of Eu sublattice persists over the whole investigated pressure range up to 14 GPa, yet displaying a non-monotonic variation with pressure. With the increase of the hydrostatic pressure, the magnetic state of Eu evolves from the canted antiferromagnetic structure in the ground state, via a pure ferromagnetic structure under the intermediate pressure, finally to an "unconfirmed" antiferromagnetic structure under the high pressure. The strong ferromagnetism of Eu coexists with the pressure-induced superconductivity around 2 GPa. Comparisons between the P-T phase diagrams of Eu(Fe 0.925 Co 0.075 ) 2 As 2 and the parent compound EuFe 2 As 2 were also made.

  5. Investigation of asymmetry of vortex flow over slender delta wings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atashbaz, Ghasem

    Vortex flow, a major area of interest in fluid mechanics, is widespread in nature and in many man-made fluid mechanical devices. It can create havoc as cyclones or tornadoes or have significant implications in the performance of turbo-fluid machines or supersonic vehicles and so forth. Asymmetric vortices can cause a loss of lift and increase in rolling moment which can significantly affect wing stability and control. Up until the early nineties, it was generally believed that vortex asymmetry was the result of vortex interactions due to the close proximity of vortices over slender delta wings. However, some recent studies have thrown considerable doubt on the validity of this hypothesis. As a result, wind tunnel investigations were conducted on a series of nine delta wing planforms with sharp and round leading edges to examine the occurrence of vortex asymmetry at different angles of attack and sideslip. The study included surface oil and laser light sheet flow visualization in addition to surface pressure and hot-wire velocity measurements under static conditions. The effects of incidence, sideslip and sweep angles as well as Reynolds number variations were investigated. In this study, it was found that the effect of apex and leading edge shape played an important role in vortex asymmetry generation at high angle of attack. Vortex asymmetry was not observed over slender sharp leading edge delta wings due to the separation point being fixed at the sharp leading edge. Experimental results for these wings showed that the vortices do not impinge on one another because they do not get any closer beyond a certain value of angle of attack. Thus vortex asymmetry was not generated. However, significant vortex asymmetry was observed for round leading-edged delta wings. Asymmetric separation positions over the round leading edge was the result of laminar/turbulent transition which caused vortex asymmetry on these delta wing configurations. Sideslip angle and vortex

  6. On the structure, interaction, and breakdown characteristics of slender wing vortices at subsonic, transonic, and supersonic speeds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erickson, Gary E.; Schreiner, John A.; Rogers, Lawrence W.

    1989-01-01

    Slender wing vortex flows at subsonic, transonic, and supersonic speeds were investigated in a 6 x 6 ft wind tunnel. Test data obtained include off-body and surface flow visualizations, wing upper surface static pressure distributions, and six-component forces and moments. The results reveal the transition from the low-speed classical vortex regime to the transonic regime, beginning at a freestream Mach number of 0.60, where vortices coexist with shock waves. It is shown that the onset of core breakdown and the progression of core breakdown with the angle of attack were sensitive to the Mach number, and that the shock effects at transonic speeds were reduced by the interaction of the wing and the lead-edge extension (LEX) vortices. The vortex strengths and direct interaction of the wing and LEX cores (cores wrapping around each other) were found to diminish at transonic and supersonic speeds.

  7. Artificial insect wings of diverse morphology for flapping-wing micro air vehicles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shang, J K; Finio, B M; Wood, R J; Combes, S A

    2009-01-01

    The development of flapping-wing micro air vehicles (MAVs) demands a systematic exploration of the available design space to identify ways in which the unsteady mechanisms governing flapping-wing flight can best be utilized for producing optimal thrust or maneuverability. Mimicking the wing kinematics of biological flight requires examining the potential effects of wing morphology on flight performance, as wings may be specially adapted for flapping flight. For example, insect wings passively deform during flight, leading to instantaneous and potentially unpredictable changes in aerodynamic behavior. Previous studies have postulated various explanations for insect wing complexity, but there lacks a systematic approach for experimentally examining the functional significance of components of wing morphology, and for determining whether or not natural design principles can or should be used for MAVs. In this work, a novel fabrication process to create centimeter-scale wings of great complexity is introduced; via this process, a wing can be fabricated with a large range of desired mechanical and geometric characteristics. We demonstrate the versatility of the process through the creation of planar, insect-like wings with biomimetic venation patterns that approximate the mechanical properties of their natural counterparts under static loads. This process will provide a platform for studies investigating the effects of wing morphology on flight dynamics, which may lead to the design of highly maneuverable and efficient MAVs and insight into the functional morphology of natural wings.

  8. Flat feet, happy feet? Comparison of the dynamic plantar pressure distribution and static medial foot geometry between Malawian and Dutch adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stolwijk, Niki M; Duysens, Jacques; Louwerens, Jan Willem K; van de Ven, Yvonne Hm; Keijsers, Noël Lw

    2013-01-01

    In contrast to western countries, foot complaints are rare in Africa. This is remarkable, as many African adults walk many hours each day, often barefoot or with worn-out shoes. The reason why Africans can withstand such loading without developing foot complaints might be related to the way the foot is loaded. Therefore, static foot geometry and dynamic plantar pressure distribution of 77 adults from Malawi were compared to 77 adults from the Netherlands. None of the subjects had a history of foot complaints. The plantar pressure pattern as well as the Arch Index (AI) and the trajectory of the center of pressure during the stance phase were calculated and compared between both groups. Standardized pictures were taken from the feet to assess the height of the Medial Longitudinal Arch (MLA). We found that Malawian adults: (1) loaded the midfoot for a longer and the forefoot for a shorter period during roll off, (2) had significantly lower plantar pressures under the heel and a part of the forefoot, and (3) had a larger AI and a lower MLA compared to the Dutch. These findings demonstrate that differences in static foot geometry, foot loading, and roll off technique exist between the two groups. The advantage of the foot loading pattern as shown by the Malawian group is that the plantar pressure is distributed more equally over the foot. This might prevent foot complaints.

  9. Influence of Mach number and static pressure on plasma flow control of supersonic and rarefied flows around a sharp flat plate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coumar, Sandra; Lago, Viviana

    2017-06-01

    This paper presents an experimental investigation, carried out at the Icare Laboratory by the FAST team, focusing on plasma flow control in supersonic and rarefied regime. The study analyzes how the Mach number as well as the ambient pressure modify the repercussions of the plasma actuator on the shock wave. It follows previous experiments performed in the MARHy (ex-SR3) wind tunnel with a Mach 2 flow interacting with a sharp flat plate, where modifications induced by a plasma actuator were observed. The flat plate was equipped with a plasma actuator composed of two aluminum electrodes. The upstream one was biased with a negative DC potential and thus, created a glow discharge type plasma. Experimental measurements showed that the boundary layer thickness and the shock wave angle increased when the discharge was ignited. The current work was performed with two nozzles generating Mach 4 flows but at two different static pressures: 8 and 71 Pa. These nozzles were chosen to study independently the impact of the Mach number and the impact of the pressure on the flow behavior. In the range of the discharge current considered in this experimental work, it was observed that the shock wave angle increased with the discharge current of +15% for the Mach 2 flow but the increase rate doubled to +28% for the Mach 4 flow at the same static pressure, showing that the discharge effect is even more significant when boosting the flow speed. When studying the effect of the discharge on the Mach 4 flow at higher static pressure, it was observed that the topology of the plasma changed drastically and the increase in the shock wave angle with the discharge current of +21 %.

  10. Effects of wing locations on wing rock induced by forebody vortices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ma Baofeng

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Previous studies have shown that asymmetric vortex wakes over slender bodies exhibit a multi-vortex structure with an alternate arrangement along a body axis at high angle of attack. In this investigation, the effects of wing locations along a body axis on wing rock induced by forebody vortices was studied experimentally at a subcritical Reynolds number based on a body diameter. An artificial perturbation was added onto the nose tip to fix the orientations of forebody vortices. Particle image velocimetry was used to identify flow patterns of forebody vortices in static situations, and time histories of wing rock were obtained using a free-to-roll rig. The results show that the wing locations can affect significantly the motion patterns of wing rock owing to the variation of multi-vortex patterns of forebody vortices. As the wing locations make the forebody vortices a two-vortex pattern, the wing body exhibits regularly divergence and fixed-point motion with azimuthal variations of the tip perturbation. If a three-vortex pattern exists over the wing, however, the wing-rock patterns depend on the impact of the highest vortex and newborn vortex. As the three vortices together influence the wing flow, wing-rock patterns exhibit regularly fixed-points and limit-cycled oscillations. With the wing moving backwards, the newborn vortex becomes stronger, and wing-rock patterns become fixed-points, chaotic oscillations, and limit-cycled oscillations. With further backward movement of wings, the vortices are far away from the upper surface of wings, and the motions exhibit divergence, limit-cycled oscillations and fixed-points. For the rearmost location of the wing, the wing body exhibits stochastic oscillations and fixed-points.

  11. Illustration of airfoil shape effect on forward-swept wing divergence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bland, S. R.

    1980-01-01

    A static aeroelastic analysis is presented of the divergence of untapered wings with conventional and supercritical airfoil sections at sweep angles of zero and -15 deg. One bending and one torsion mode were employed for a uniform rectangular cantilevered beam with the elastic axis at midchord, and calculations were based on a two-dimensional differential equations formulation in the structural coordinate system and in simple strip theory. A minimum divergence speed in the transonic range is obtained which is associated with the rearward shift of the aerodynamic center, and a 17% difference in minimum divergence dynamic pressure is found between a supercritical and a conventional wing. It is noted that although the strip method employed allows the assessment of the sensitivity of airfoil shapes to divergence, three-dimensional transonic aerodynamic methods should be used to predict wing divergence characteristics.

  12. Demonstration of an in situ morphing hyperelliptical cambered span wing mechanism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Manzo, Justin; Garcia, Ephrahim

    2010-01-01

    Research on efficient shore bird morphology inspired the hyperelliptical cambered span (HECS) wing, a crescent-shaped, aft-swept wing with vertically oriented wingtips. The wing reduces vorticity-induced circulation loss and outperforms an elliptical baseline when planar. Designed initially as a rigid wing, the HECS wing makes use of morphing to transition from a planar to a furled configuration, similar to that of a continuously curved winglet, in flight. A morphing wing concept mechanism is presented, employing shape memory alloy actuators to create a discretized curvature approximation. The aerodynamics for continuous wing shapes is validated quasi-statically through wind tunnel testing, showing enhanced planar HECS wing lift-to-drag performance over an elliptical wing, with the furled HECS wing showing minimal enhancements beyond this point. Wind tunnel tests of the active morphing wing prove the mechanism capable of overcoming realistic loading, while further testing may be required to establish aerodynamic merits of the HECS wing morphing maneuver

  13. Effect of shoes with rounded soft soles in the anterior-posterior direction on the center of pressure during static standing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demura, Tomohiro; Demura, Shin-ichi; Uchiyama, Masanobu; Kitabayashi, Tamotsu; Takahashi, Kenji

    2015-06-01

    Shoes with curved rocker bottom soles may induce an unstable standing posture. This study was aimed to mainly examine the effect of such shoes on the center of pressure (COP) during static standing. Ten healthy young male adults had their COP measured during static standing with four types of shoe conditions (Stretch Walker(®): SW (shoes with curved rocker bottom soles), Masai Barefoot Technology®: MBT (similar to SW in form and material), more conventionally soled shoes with a typical toe-spring: MCS, and bare feet: BF) for 60s. The mean path length and mean velocity of Y (front-back) axis were significantly greater when wearing the MBT than when wearing the SW, and when wearing the SW than when BF or when wearing the MCS. In addition, mean velocity of X (left-right) axis, area surrounding root mean square, root mean square, and root mean square of Y-axis were significantly greater when wearing the MBT than when wearing the SW, MCS, or when BF. In conclusion, when wearing the MBT or SW with rounded sole, static standing posture becomes unstable because of their characteristics as compared with wearing MCS or when BF, but the MBT has a larger sway in the front-back direction than the SW. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. On the propagation of a quasi-static disturbance in a heterogeneous, deformable, and porous medium with pressure-dependent properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vasco, D.W.

    2011-10-01

    Using an asymptotic technique, valid when the medium properties are smoothly-varying, I derive a semi-analytic expression for the propagation velocity of a quasi-static disturbance traveling within a nonlinear-elastic porous medium. The phase, a function related to the propagation time, depends upon the properties of the medium, including the pressure-sensitivities of the medium parameters, and on pressure and displacement amplitude changes. Thus, the propagation velocity of a disturbance depends upon its amplitude, as might be expected for a nonlinear process. As a check, the expression for the phase function is evaluated for a poroelastic medium, when the material properties do not depend upon the fluid pressure. In that case, the travel time estimates agree with conventional analytic estimates, and with values calculated using a numerical simulator. For a medium with pressure-dependent permeability I find general agreement between the semi-analytic estimates and estimates from a numerical simulation. In this case the pressure amplitude changes are obtained from the numerical simulator.

  15. 3D Model Studies on the Effect of Bed and Powder Type Upon Radial Static Pressure and Powder Distribution in Metallurgical Shaft Furnaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Panic B.

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The flow of gases in metallurgical shaft furnaces has a decisive influence on the course and process efficiency. Radial changes in porosity of the bed cause uneven flow of gas along the radius of the reactor, which sometimes is deliberate and intentional. However, holdup of solid particles in descending packed beds of metallurgical shaft furnaces can lead to unintentional changes in porosity of the bed along the radial reactor. Unintentional changes in porosity often disrupt the flow of gas causing poor performance of the furnace. Such disruptions of flow may occur in the blast furnace due to high level of powder content in gas caused by large amount of coal dust/powder insufflated as fuel substitute. The paper describes the model test results of radial distribution of static pressure and powder hold up within metallurgical reactor. The measurements were carried out with the use of 3D physical model of two-phase flow gas-powder in the moving (descending packed bed. Sinter or blast furnace pellets were used as packed bed while carbon powder or iron powder were used as the powder. Wide diversity within both static pressure distribution and powder distribution along the radius of the reactor were observed once the change in the type of powder occurred.

  16. Time-frequency analysis of Hilbert spectrum of pressure fluctuation time series in a Kenics Static Mixer based on empirical mode decomposition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huibo Meng

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available The turbulent flow in a Kenics Static Mixer (KSM was intensified under the mutual-coupling effect between the twisted leaves and the tube-wall. In order to understand the intrinsic features of turbulent flow in KSM, the Hilbert-Huang Transform based on Empirical Mode Decomposition were first introduced to describe the time-frequency features of the pressure fluctuation. The Hilbert spectra of pressure fluctuation time series were quantitatively evaluated under different Reynolds numbers, and different radial and axial positions, respectively. The experimental results showed that: the fluctuation frequencies of pressure signals in a KSM were mainly distributed below 40 Hz, and more than 68% of the energy of signals is concentrated within 10 Hz. Compared with the other IMFs, the pressure component of C6 in the range of 7.82~15.63 Hz has the maximum fluctuation energy ratio. As the flow rate increases, the energy of fluctuation of fluid micelles and the proportion of low-frequency energy increases. The pressure fluctuation with higher energy ratio of low frequency (0~10 Hz had lower amplitudes at r/R=0.3 because of the core of forced vortex. Nevertheless, the effect of the free vortex was that the pressure fluctuation with lower energy ratio of low frequency had higher amplitudes at r/R=0.8. The higher amplitudes of pressure fluctuation at cross sections of CS3 (z=420 mm and CS5 (z=620 mm proved that the transitions between the adjacent mixing element had better mixing performance.

  17. Evaluation of unsteady aerodynamic forces and pressure in wings and turbines at low Reynolds number by combining particle image velocimetry and proper orthogonal decomposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villegas Vaquero, Arturo

    Aerodynamic unsteady forces in stationary and rotating wings are analyzed in this dissertation by using a combination of time-resolved particle image velocimetry (TR-PIV) and proper orthogonal decomposition (POD) techniques. Recent progress in experimental measurements has demonstrated the use of TR-PIV to calculate forces by applying the integral conservation of momentum equation in its different forms. However, a more accurate and robust method is needed for unsteady forces calculations. With this in mind, a modified pressure Poisson method is developed and applied in this work, showing its superior behavior compared to other methodologies described in the past. The independence of the calculated forces shows the robustness and stability of the method. Whereas force calculations have been recently considered, the role of flow structures in force fluctuations has not been revealed yet and it is the main focus of this study. To elucidate these relations, a hybrid PIV-POD analysis is applied to reconstruct the velocity field from the most energetic modes of the flow. A model describing the vortex-force relations is proposed in terms of lift and drag variations during the vortex shedding process. A spectral analysis of the calculated forces suggests symmetric periodic lift, drag and circulation variations at the shedding frequency. Moreover, lift, drag and circulation signals are in phase, which supports lift-circulation proportionality. However, non-symmetric drag fluctuations are found at double the shedding frequency within a shedding cycle. For instance, when a positive or negative circulation vortex detaches, different values in the maximum and minimum drag are obtained. The data and physical relations obtained in this work such as main frequencies, vortex-force fluctuations and behavior of reduced-order models can aid in the development of CFD applications at low Re. The methodology described can be applied to any moving or stationary wing at different Reynolds

  18. Development of reverse osmosis seawater desalination system utilizing static pressure of deep sea and employing spiral-type membrane module; Supairarugata maku mojuru wo mochiita shinkai seiatsuto riyo gyakushintoho kaisui tansuika shisutemu no kaihatsu

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Noda, H. [Hachinohe Inst. of Tech., Aomori (Japan). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering; Tagawa, K.; TOkunaga, Y.; Miyatake, O. [Kyushu Univ., Fukuoka (Japan). Dept. of Chemical Systems and Engineering; Sasaki, M. [Kyushu Univ., Fukuoka (Japan). Dept. of Chemical Systems and Engineering; Ebara Corp., Tokyo (Japan)

    1999-09-10

    The reverse osmosis (RO) technique employed in desalination systems requires the pumping up of seawater above its osmosis pressure mechanically. Development of a desalination system utilizing the high static pressure of the deep sea is investigated. Experiments of seawater desalination were carried out in the East-China-sea using a device in which a spiral-type RO membrane module was installed. It is proven that fresh drinking water can be obtained from seawater utilizing the static pressure of the deep sea, without the use of electric power. A numerical analysis was conducted to predict the amount of fresh water produced. Analytical results show sufficient agreement with experimental results. (author)

  19. The StenTec gauge for measuring static intra-access pressure ratio (P(Ia Ratio) ) of fistulas and grafts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ash, Stephen R; Dhamija, Rajiv; Zaroura, Mohamad Y; Hentschel, Dirk M

    2012-07-01

    The StenTec™ Gauge provides a method to determine the static intra-access pressure ratio (P(Ia Ratio) ) within a fistula or graft. The StenTec Gauge estimates the peak systolic pressure within the fistula or graft by measurement of the distance that the blood-air interface progresses into the tubing of the fistula needle, after the needle is inserted "dry" into the fistula or graft and before the cap is removed from the tubing. The peak systolic pressure is graphically compared with the systolic arterial blood pressure of the patient, to determine P(Ia Ratio) . For best accuracy, the StenTec Gauge should be chosen that best matches the internal volume of the fistula needle tubing (2.3-2.6 ml for 12-inch tubing and 3.6 ml for 16-inch tubing) and the approximate elevation of the city in which it is used (0-1000, 1000-3000, and 3000-6000 feet above sea level). In this article, we explain the rationale for this method of surveillance, evidence for accuracy of the StenTec Gauge, and the correlation of changes in the P(Ia Ratio) to the development of stenosis in a fistula or graft. © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Cost effectiveness of an air-inflated static overlay for pressure ulcer prevention: a randomized, controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vermette, Sophie; Reeves, Isabelle; Lemaire, Jacques

    2012-08-01

     Numerous pressure-relieving surfaces of varying costs are available for the prevention of pressure ulcers. There is insufficient evidence to draw conclusions regarding the efficacy or merits of using more expensive technologies. The purpose of this unblinded, randomized, prospective study was to compare the clinical and the cost effectiveness of an inflated overlay with rented, pressure-relieving surfaces for the prevention of pressure ulcers. Patients in a 257-bed acute care facility were included if they had a Braden score of ≤ 14, had no skin lesion(s), were ≥ 18 years, weighed pressure ulcers and comfort; Fisher's exact and chi- squared tests were used to assess categorical data, and unpaired t-test and Mann-Whitney statistic tests were used to compare continuous variables. Comparative cost of support surface use was determined at the end of the study. In the control group, 50 patients used an MSO and 5 patients used an LALDM; in the experimental group, 55 patients used an ISO. No significant difference in pressure ulcer incidence was found between the control (n = 6) and experimental groups (n = 2) (11% versus 4%, respectively; P = 0.2706), and there was no significant difference in comfort (90% versus 85%; P = 0.7129). However, a significant difference was noted in total cost ($13,606 CAD versus $3,364 CAD, P ≤ 0.001); the ISO was less expensive. The use of an ISO offers a cost-effective option for the prevention of pressure ulcers in a moderate to very high-risk population. .

  1. Aerodynamic effects of flexibility in flapping wings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Liang; Huang, Qingfeng; Deng, Xinyan; Sane, Sanjay P.

    2010-01-01

    Recent work on the aerodynamics of flapping flight reveals fundamental differences in the mechanisms of aerodynamic force generation between fixed and flapping wings. When fixed wings translate at high angles of attack, they periodically generate and shed leading and trailing edge vortices as reflected in their fluctuating aerodynamic force traces and associated flow visualization. In contrast, wings flapping at high angles of attack generate stable leading edge vorticity, which persists throughout the duration of the stroke and enhances mean aerodynamic forces. Here, we show that aerodynamic forces can be controlled by altering the trailing edge flexibility of a flapping wing. We used a dynamically scaled mechanical model of flapping flight (Re ≈ 2000) to measure the aerodynamic forces on flapping wings of variable flexural stiffness (EI). For low to medium angles of attack, as flexibility of the wing increases, its ability to generate aerodynamic forces decreases monotonically but its lift-to-drag ratios remain approximately constant. The instantaneous force traces reveal no major differences in the underlying modes of force generation for flexible and rigid wings, but the magnitude of force, the angle of net force vector and centre of pressure all vary systematically with wing flexibility. Even a rudimentary framework of wing veins is sufficient to restore the ability of flexible wings to generate forces at near-rigid values. Thus, the magnitude of force generation can be controlled by modulating the trailing edge flexibility and thereby controlling the magnitude of the leading edge vorticity. To characterize this, we have generated a detailed database of aerodynamic forces as a function of several variables including material properties, kinematics, aerodynamic forces and centre of pressure, which can also be used to help validate computational models of aeroelastic flapping wings. These experiments will also be useful for wing design for small robotic

  2. Aerodynamic effects of flexibility in flapping wings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Liang; Huang, Qingfeng; Deng, Xinyan; Sane, Sanjay P

    2010-03-06

    Recent work on the aerodynamics of flapping flight reveals fundamental differences in the mechanisms of aerodynamic force generation between fixed and flapping wings. When fixed wings translate at high angles of attack, they periodically generate and shed leading and trailing edge vortices as reflected in their fluctuating aerodynamic force traces and associated flow visualization. In contrast, wings flapping at high angles of attack generate stable leading edge vorticity, which persists throughout the duration of the stroke and enhances mean aerodynamic forces. Here, we show that aerodynamic forces can be controlled by altering the trailing edge flexibility of a flapping wing. We used a dynamically scaled mechanical model of flapping flight (Re approximately 2000) to measure the aerodynamic forces on flapping wings of variable flexural stiffness (EI). For low to medium angles of attack, as flexibility of the wing increases, its ability to generate aerodynamic forces decreases monotonically but its lift-to-drag ratios remain approximately constant. The instantaneous force traces reveal no major differences in the underlying modes of force generation for flexible and rigid wings, but the magnitude of force, the angle of net force vector and centre of pressure all vary systematically with wing flexibility. Even a rudimentary framework of wing veins is sufficient to restore the ability of flexible wings to generate forces at near-rigid values. Thus, the magnitude of force generation can be controlled by modulating the trailing edge flexibility and thereby controlling the magnitude of the leading edge vorticity. To characterize this, we have generated a detailed database of aerodynamic forces as a function of several variables including material properties, kinematics, aerodynamic forces and centre of pressure, which can also be used to help validate computational models of aeroelastic flapping wings. These experiments will also be useful for wing design for small

  3. THE EFFECTS OF DIFFERENT TRUNK INCLINATIONS ON BILATERAL TRUNK MUSCULAR ACTIVITIES, CENTRE OF PRESSURE AND FORCE EXERTIONS IN STATIC PUSHING POSTURES.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanjaya, Kadek Heri; Lee, Soomin; Sriwarno, Andar Bagus; Shimomura, Yoshihito; Katsuura, Tetsuo

    2014-06-01

    In order to reconcile contradictory results from previous studies on manual pushing, a study was conducted to examine the effect of trunk inclination on muscular activities, centre of pressure (COP) and force exertion during static pushing. Ten subjects pushed at 0 degrees, 15 degrees, 30 degrees, and 45 degrees body inclinations in parallel and staggered feet stances. Wall and ground force plates measured pushing force, wall COP, vertical ground reaction force (GRF) and ground COP. Electromyogram data were recorded at 10 trunk muscle sites. Pushing force was found to increase with body inclination. GRF peaked at 15 degrees and reached its lowest level at the 45 degrees inclination. The lowest wall force plate standard deviation of COP displacement was found at the 30 degrees inclination. The lowest low back muscular activity was found at the 15 degrees and 30 degrees inclinations. Based on force exertion, muscular load, and stability, the 30 degrees body inclination was found to be the best posture for static pushing. This study also showed asymmetry in muscular activity and force exertion which has been received less attention in manual pushing studies. These findings will require further study.

  4. Transmitted fresh water flow rate of reverse osmosis desalination system utilizing the static pressure head. Formulation of numerical results and comparison with experimental results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miyatake, Osamu; Tagawa, Kotaro; Noda, Hidehiko [Kyushu University, Fukuoka (Japan)

    1999-08-01

    Based on the authors' previous numerical results of a reverse osmosis desalination system for seawater or brackish water utilizing the static pressure head of seawater in a deep-sea region or brackish water in a vertical pit, a dimensionless expression is formulated to predict the transmitted fresh water flow rate from the geometry and the submerged depth of the device, the pure water permeability and the solute permeability of membrane, and the physical properties properties of seawater or brackish water. The derived expression is compared with experimental results obtained by field experiments carried out in the Sea of Japan and the East China with fair agreement and thus confirmed the applicability and usefulness of the expression. (author)

  5. Investigation of the vapor pressure p of zinc bromide or zinc chloride solutions with methanol by static method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Safarov, Javid T.

    2006-01-01

    Vapor pressures p of ZnBr 2 + CH 3 OH and ZnCl 2 + CH 3 OH solutions at T (298.15 to 323.15) K were measured, activity of solvent a s and osmotic φ coefficients have been evaluated. The experiments were carried out for the ZnBr 2 + CH 3 OH solutions in the molality range m = (0.19972 to 11.05142) mol . kg -1 and for the ZnCl 2 + CH 3 OH solutions in the molality range m (0.42094 to 8.25534) mol . kg -1 . The Antoine equation for the empirical description of the experimental vapor pressure results and the Pitzer-Mayorga model with inclusion of ionic strength dependence of the third virial coefficient for the description of calculated osmotic coefficients were used. The parameters of Pitzer-Mayorga model were used for evaluation of activity coefficients

  6. Round-robin pretest analyses of a 1:6-scale reinforced concrete containment model subject to static internal pressurization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clauss, D.B.

    1987-05-01

    Analyses of a 1:6-scale reinforced concrete containment model that will be tested to failure at Sandia National Laboratories in the spring of 1987 were conducted by the following organizations in the United States and Europe: Sandia National Laboratories (USA), Argonne National Laboratory (USA), Electric Power Research Institute (USA), Commissariat a L'Energie Atomique (France), HM Nuclear Installations Inspectorate (UK), Comitato Nazionale per la ricerca e per lo sviluppo dell'Energia Nucleare e delle Energie Alternative (Italy), UK Atomic Energy Authority, Safety and Reliability Directorate (UK), Gesellschaft fuer Reaktorsicherheit (FRG), Brookhaven National Laboratory (USA), and Central Electricity Generating Board (UK). Each organization was supplied with a standard information package, which included construction drawings and actual material properties for most of the materials used in the model. Each organization worked independently using their own analytical methods. This report includes descriptions of the various analytical approaches and pretest predictions submitted by each organization. Significant milestones that occur with increasing pressure, such as damage to the concrete (cracking and crushing) and yielding of the steel components, and the failure pressure (capacity) and failure mechanism are described. Analytical predictions for pressure histories of strain in the liner and rebar and displacements are compared at locations where experimental results will be available after the test. Thus, these predictions can be compared to one another and to experimental results after the test

  7. Experimental Investigation of Aeroelastic Deformation of Slender Wings at Supersonic Speeds Using a Video Model Deformation Measurement Technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erickson, Gary E.

    2013-01-01

    A video-based photogrammetric model deformation system was established as a dedicated optical measurement technique at supersonic speeds in the NASA Langley Research Center Unitary Plan Wind Tunnel. This system was used to measure the wing twist due to aerodynamic loads of two supersonic commercial transport airplane models with identical outer mold lines but different aeroelastic properties. One model featured wings with deflectable leading- and trailing-edge flaps and internal channels to accommodate static pressure tube instrumentation. The wings of the second model were of single-piece construction without flaps or internal channels. The testing was performed at Mach numbers from 1.6 to 2.7, unit Reynolds numbers of 1.0 million to 5.0 million, and angles of attack from -4 degrees to +10 degrees. The video model deformation system quantified the wing aeroelastic response to changes in the Mach number, Reynolds number concurrent with dynamic pressure, and angle of attack and effectively captured the differences in the wing twist characteristics between the two test articles.

  8. Simultaneous monitoring of static and dynamic intracranial pressure parameters from two separate sensors in patients with cerebral bleeds: comparison of findings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eide Per

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We recently reported that in an experimental setting the zero pressure level of solid intracranial pressure (ICP sensors can be altered by electrostatics discharges. Changes in the zero pressure level would alter the ICP level (mean ICP; whether spontaneous changes in mean ICP happen in clinical settings is not known. This can be addressed by comparing the ICP parameters level and waveform of simultaneous ICP signals. To this end, we retrieved our recordings in patients with cerebral bleeds wherein the ICP had been recorded simultaneously from two different sensors. Materials and Methods: During a time period of 10 years, 17 patients with cerebral bleeds were monitored with two ICP sensors simultaneously; sensor 1 was always a solid sensor while Sensor 2 was a solid -, a fluid - or an air-pouch sensor. The simultaneous signals were analyzed with automatic identification of the cardiac induced ICP waves. The output was determined in consecutive 6-s time windows, both with regard to the static parameter mean ICP and the dynamic parameters (mean wave amplitude, MWA, and mean wave rise time, MWRT. Differences in mean ICP, MWA and MWRT between the two sensors were determined. Transfer functions between the sensors were determined to evaluate how sensors reproduce the ICP waveform. Results Comparing findings in two solid sensors disclosed major differences in mean ICP in 2 of 5 patients (40%, despite marginal differences in MWA, MWRT, and linear phase magnitude and phase. Qualitative assessment of trend plots of mean ICP and MWA revealed shifts and drifts of mean ICP in the clinical setting. The transfer function analysis comparing the solid sensor with either the fluid or air-pouch sensors revealed more variable transfer function magnitude and greater differences in the ICP waveform derived indices. Conclusions Simultaneous monitoring of ICP using two solid sensors may show marked differences in static ICP but close to identity

  9. The Realization and Study of Optical Wings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Artusio-Glimpse, Alexandra Brae

    Consider the airfoil: a carefully designed structure capable of stable lift in a uniform air flow. It so happens that air pressure and radiation (light) pressure are similar phenomena because each transfer momentum to flow-disturbing objects. This, then, begs the question: does an optical analogue to the airfoil exist? Though an exceedingly small effect, scientists harness radiation pressure in a wide gamut of applications from micromanipulation of single biological particles to the propulsion of large spacecrafts called solar sails. We introduce a cambered, refractive rod that is subjected to optical forces analogous to those seen in aerodynamics, and I call this analogue the optical wing. Flight characteristics of optical wings are determined by wing shape and material in a uniform radiation field. Theory predicts the lift force and axial torque are functions of the wing's angle of attack with stable and unstable orientations. These structures can operate as intensity-dependent, parametrically driven oscillators. In two-dimensions, the wings exhibit bistability when analyzed in an accelerating frame. In three-dimensions, the motion of axially symmetric spinning hemispherical wings is analogous to a spinning top. Experiments on semi-buoyant wings in water found semicylindrically shaped, refractive microparticles traversed a laser beam and rotated to an illumination-dependent stable orientation. Preliminary tests aid in the development of a calibrated force measurement experiment to directly evaluate the optical forces and torque on these samples. A foundational study of the optical wing, this work contributes to future advancements of flight-by-light.

  10. Characteristics of the Foot Static Alignment and the Plantar Pressure Associated with Fifth Metatarsal Stress Fracture History in Male Soccer Players: a Case-Control Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuda, Sho; Fukubayashi, Toru; Hirose, Norikazu

    2017-12-01

    There is a large amount of information regarding risk factors for fifth metatarsal stress fractures; however, there are few studies involving large numbers of subjects. This study aimed to compare the static foot alignment and distribution of foot pressure of athletes with and without a history of fifth metatarsal stress fractures. The study participants comprised 335 collegiate male soccer players. Twenty-nine with a history of fifth metatarsal stress fractures were in the fracture group and 306 were in the control group (with subgroups as follows: 30 in the fracture foot group and 28 in the non-fracture group). We measured the foot length, arch height, weight-bearing leg-heel alignment, non-weight-bearing leg-heel alignment, forefoot angle relative to the rearfoot, forefoot angle relative to the horizontal axis, and foot pressure. The non-weight-bearing leg-heel alignment was significantly smaller and the forefoot angle relative to the rearfoot was significantly greater in the fracture foot group than in the control foot group (P = 0.049 and P = 0.038, respectively). With regard to plantar pressure, there were no significant differences among the groups. Midfield players had significantly higher rates of fifth metatarsal stress fracture in their histories, whereas defenders had significantly lower rates (chi-square = 13.2, P stress fractures according to the type of foot (kicking foot vs. pivoting foot) or the severity of ankle sprain. Playing the midfield position and having an everted rearfoot and inverted forefoot alignment were associated with fifth metatarsal stress fractures. This information may be helpful for preventing fifth metatarsal stress fracture recurrence. More detailed load evaluations and a prospective study are needed in the future.

  11. Adaptation effects in static postural control by providing simultaneous visual feedback of center of pressure and center of gravity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeda, Kenta; Mani, Hiroki; Hasegawa, Naoya; Sato, Yuki; Tanaka, Shintaro; Maejima, Hiroshi; Asaka, Tadayoshi

    2017-07-19

    The benefit of visual feedback of the center of pressure (COP) on quiet standing is still debatable. This study aimed to investigate the adaptation effects of visual feedback training using both the COP and center of gravity (COG) during quiet standing. Thirty-four healthy young adults were divided into three groups randomly (COP + COG, COP, and control groups). A force plate was used to calculate the coordinates of the COP in the anteroposterior (COP AP ) and mediolateral (COP ML ) directions. A motion analysis system was used to calculate the coordinates of the center of mass (COM) in both directions (COM AP and COM ML ). The coordinates of the COG in the AP direction (COG AP ) were obtained from the force plate signals. Augmented visual feedback was presented on a screen in the form of fluctuation circles in the vertical direction that moved upward as the COP AP and/or COG AP moved forward and vice versa. The COP + COG group received the real-time COP AP and COG AP feedback simultaneously, whereas the COP group received the real-time COP AP feedback only. The control group received no visual feedback. In the training session, the COP + COG group was required to maintain an even distance between the COP AP and COG AP and reduce the COG AP fluctuation, whereas the COP group was required to reduce the COP AP fluctuation while standing on a foam pad. In test sessions, participants were instructed to keep their standing posture as quiet as possible on the foam pad before (pre-session) and after (post-session) the training sessions. In the post-session, the velocity and root mean square of COM AP in the COP + COG group were lower than those in the control group. In addition, the absolute value of the sum of the COP - COM distances in the COP + COG group was lower than that in the COP group. Furthermore, positive correlations were found between the COM AP velocity and COP - COM parameters. The results suggest that the novel visual feedback

  12. Respiratory monitoring system based on the nasal pressure technique for the analysis of sleep breathing disorders: Reduction of static and dynamic errors, and comparisons with thermistors and pneumotachographs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alves de Mesquita, Jayme; Lopes de Melo, Pedro

    2004-03-01

    Thermally sensitive devices—thermistors—have usually been used to monitor sleep-breathing disorders. However, because of their long time constant, these devices are not able to provide a good characterization of fast events, like hypopneas. Nasal pressure recording technique (NPR) has recently been suggested to quantify airflow during sleep. It is claimed that the short time constants of the devices used to implement this technique would allow an accurate analysis of fast abnormal respiratory events. However, these devices present errors associated with nonlinearities and acoustic resonance that could reduce the diagnostic value of the NPR. Moreover, in spite of the high scientific and clinical potential, there is no detailed description of a complete instrumentation system to implement this promising technique in sleep studies. In this context, the purpose of this work was twofold: (1) describe the development of a flexible NPR device and (2) evaluate the performance of this device when compared to pneumotachographs (PNTs) and thermistors. After the design details are described, the system static accuracy is evaluated by a comparative analysis with a PNT. This analysis revealed a significant reduction (psleep-breathing disorders.

  13. Effects of Canard on the Flowfield over a Wing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nayebzadeh, Arash

    2015-11-01

    Surface and flowfield pressure measurements have been done over delta wing/canard configuration in a variety of canard vertical and horizontal locations and angles of attack. The experimental model consisted of wing, canard and a body to accommodate pressure tubing and canard rotation mechanism. All the tests have been performed at subsonic velocities and the effect of canard were analyzed through comparison between surface and flowfield pressure distributions. It was found that vortex flow pattern over the wing is dominated mainly by canard vertical position and in some cases, by merging of canard and wing vortices. In addition, the pressure loss induced by canard vortex on the wing surface moves the wing vortex toward the leading edge. In the mid canard configuration, canard and wing vortices merge at x/c greater than 0.5 and as a result of this phenomenon, abrupt pressure loss induces more stable vortex flow over the wing. It is also shown that canard plays a vital role in vortex break down over the wing.

  14. Basic Equations in Statics and Kinetics of Protein Polymerization and the Mechanism of the Formation and Dissociation of Amyloid Fibrils Revealed by Pressure Perturbation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tachibana, Hideki

    2015-01-01

    Studies of the pressure-dissociation of several amyloid or amyloid-like fibrils have shown that the fibril state is considerably voluminous. Quantitative characterization of the protein fibrillation reaction with respect to volumetric parameters is necessary to elucidate mechanisms of amyloid fibrillation in molecular terms such as protein cavity and hydration. Here we discuss, firstly, basic equations in statics and kinetics of protein polymerization as employed to obtain thermodynamic, volumetric, and kinetic parameters. Equilibrium treatment of the reactions with the scheme such as one-step polymerization, linear-association polymerization, or nucleation-dependent polymerization, and kinetic treatment of seeded linear-polymerization or spontaneous nucleation-elongation polymerization are described. In particular we will detail kinetics of the dissociation of fibrils which have been produced under the linear-association mechanism and therefore the length-distribution of which conforms to a geometric sequence in the degree of polymerization with a common ratio r, which is less than, and usually very close to, unity. In this case, an observed macroscopic rate of dissociation is shown to be a product of the microscopic elementary dissociation rate constant and a factor (1-r), extremely reduced compared with the intrinsic elementary rate. Secondly, we discuss protein conformational states in fibrillogenesis with molecular and volumetric observations reported, such as the unfolded state responsible for the association with seeds and the extension of amyloid fibrils, the transition state in which protein cavity formation and dehydration occur to intermediate levels, and the fibril state in which they occur to final respective levels which, in some cases, depend on the maturity of the fibril.

  15. Axial static mixer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandrock, H.E.

    1982-05-06

    Static axial mixing apparatus includes a plurality of channels, forming flow paths of different dimensions. The axial mixer includes a flow adjusting device for adjustable selective control of flow resistance of various flow paths in order to provide substantially identical flows through the various channels, thereby reducing nonuniform coating of interior surfaces of the channels. The flow adjusting device may include diaphragm valves, and may further include a pressure regulating system therefor.

  16. Residual strength and crack propagation tests on C-130 airplane center wings with service-imposed fatigue damage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snider, H. L.; Reeder, F. L.; Dirkin, W. J.

    1972-01-01

    Fourteen C-130 airplane center wings, each containing service-imposed fatigue damage resulting from 4000 to 13,000 accumulated flight hours, were tested to determine their fatigue crack propagation and static residual strength characteristics. Eight wings were subjected to a two-step constant amplitude fatigue test prior to static testing. Cracks up to 30 inches long were generated in these tests. Residual static strengths of these wings ranged from 56 to 87 percent of limit load. The remaining six wings containing cracks up to 4 inches long were statically tested as received from field service. Residual static strengths of these wings ranged from 98 to 117 percent of limit load. Damage-tolerant structural design features such as fastener holes, stringers, doublers around door cutouts, and spanwise panel splices proved to be effective in retarding crack propagation.

  17. Normal-Force and Hinge-Moment Characteristics at Transonic Speeds of Flap-Type Ailerons at Three Spanwise Locations on a 4-Percent-Thick Sweptback-Wing-Body Model and Pressure-Distribution Measurements on an Inboard Aileron

    Science.gov (United States)

    Runckel, Jack F.; Hieser, Gerald

    1961-01-01

    An investigation has been conducted at the Langley 16-foot transonic tunnel to determine the loading characteristics of flap-type ailerons located at inboard, midspan, and outboard positions on a 45 deg. sweptback-wing-body combination. Aileron normal-force and hinge-moment data have been obtained at Mach numbers from 0.80 t o 1.03, at angles of attack up to about 27 deg., and at aileron deflections between approximately -15 deg. and 15 deg. Results of the investigation indicate that the loading over the ailerons was established by the wing-flow characteristics, and the loading shapes were irregular in the transonic speed range. The spanwise location of the aileron had little effect on the values of the slope of the curves of hinge-moment coefficient against aileron deflection, but the inboard aileron had the greatest value of the slope of the curves of hinge-moment coefficient against angle of attack and the outboard aileron had the least. Hinge-moment and aileron normal-force data taken with strain-gage instrumentation are compared with data obtained with pressure measurements.

  18. Effect of winglets on a first-generation jet transport wing. 5: Stability characteristics of a full-span wing with a generalized fuselage at high subsonic speeds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobs, P. F.

    1978-01-01

    The effects of winglets on the static aerodynamic stability characteristics of a KC-135A jet transport model at high subsonic speeds are presented. The investigation was conducted in the Langley 8 foot transonic pressure tunnel using 0.035-scale wing panels mounted on a generalized research fuselage. Data were taken over a Mach number range from 0.50 to 0.95 at angles of attack ranging from -12 deg to 20 deg and sideslip angles of 0 deg, 5 deg, and -5 deg. The model was tested at two Reynolds number ranges to achieve a wide angle of attack range and to determine the effect of Reynolds number on stability. Results indicate that adding the winglets to the basic wing configuration produces small increases in both lateral and longitudinal aerodynamic stability and that the model stability increases slightly with Reynolds number. The winglets do increase the wing bending moments slightly, but the buffet onset characteristics of the model are not affected by the winglets.

  19. Static Material Strength Determined Using a DAC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cynn, H; Evans, W; Klepeis, J P; Lipp, M; Liermann, P; Yang, W

    2009-06-04

    By measuring sample thickness and pressure gradient using x-ray absorption and x-ray diffraction, respectively, the accurate static yield strengths of Ta and Fe were determined at high pressure. This improved method has several advantages over other similar methods to quantitatively determine static material strength.

  20. Morphing wing system integration with wind tunnel testing =

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guezguez, Mohamed Sadok

    Preserving the environment is a major challenge for today's aviation industry. Within this context, the CRIAQ MDO 505 project started, where a multidisciplinary approach was used to improve aircraft fuel efficiency. This international project took place between several Canadian and Italian teams. Industrial teams are Bombardier Aerospace, Thales Canada and Alenia Aermacchi. The academic partners are from Ecole de Technologie Superieure, Ecole Polytechnique de Montreal and Naples University. Teams from 'CIRA' and IAR-NRC research institutes had, also, contributed on this project. The main objective of this project is to improve the aerodynamic performance of a morphing wing prototype by reducing the drag. This drag reduction is achieved by delaying the flow transition (from laminar to turbulent) by performing shape optimization of the flexible upper skin according to different flight conditions. Four linear axes, each one actuated by a 'BLDC' motor, are used to morph the skin. The skin displacements are calculated by 'CFD' numerical simulation based on flow parameters which are Mach number, the angle of attack and aileron's angle of deflection. The wing is also equipped with 32 pressure sensors to experimentally detect the transition during aerodynamic testing in the subsonic wind tunnel at the IAR-NRC in Ottawa. The first part of the work is dedicated to establishing the necessary fieldbus communications between the control system and the wing. The 'CANopen' protocol is implemented to ensure real time communication between the 'BLDC' drives and the real-time controller. The MODBUS TCP protocol is used to control the aileron drive. The second part consists of implementing the skin control position loop based on the LVDTs feedback, as well as developing an automated calibration procedure for skin displacement values. Two 'sets' of wind tunnel tests were carried out to, experimentally, investigate the morphing wing controller effect; these tests also offered the

  1. Aeroelastic Tailoring of Transport Wings Including Transonic Flutter Constraints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanford, Bret K.; Wieseman, Carol D.; Jutte, Christine V.

    2015-01-01

    Several minimum-mass optimization problems are solved to evaluate the effectiveness of a variety of novel tailoring schemes for subsonic transport wings. Aeroelastic stress and panel buckling constraints are imposed across several trimmed static maneuver loads, in addition to a transonic flutter margin constraint, captured with aerodynamic influence coefficient-based tools. Tailoring with metallic thickness variations, functionally graded materials, balanced or unbalanced composite laminates, curvilinear tow steering, and distributed trailing edge control effectors are all found to provide reductions in structural wing mass with varying degrees of success. The question as to whether this wing mass reduction will offset the increased manufacturing cost is left unresolved for each case.

  2. Morphing Wing: Experimental Boundary Layer Transition Determination and Wing Vibrations Measurements and Analysis =

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tondji Chendjou, Yvan Wilfried

    This Master's thesis is written within the framework of the multidisciplinary international research project CRIAQ MDO-505. This global project consists of the design, manufacture and testing of a morphing wing box capable of changing the shape of the flexible upper skin of a wing using an actuator system installed inside the wing. This changing of the shape generates a delay in the occurrence of the laminar to turbulent transition area, which results in an improvement of the aerodynamic performances of the morphed wing. This thesis is focused on the technologies used to gather the pressure data during the wind tunnel tests, as well as on the post processing methodologies used to characterize the wing airflow. The vibration measurements of the wing and their real-time graphical representation are also presented. The vibration data acquisition system is detailed, and the vibration data analysis confirms the predictions of the flutter analysis performed on the wing prior to wind tunnel testing at the IAR-NRC. The pressure data was collected using 32 highly-sensitive piezoelectric sensors for sensing the pressure fluctuations up to 10 KHz. These sensors were installed along two wing chords, and were further connected to a National Instrument PXI real-time acquisition system. The acquired pressure data was high-pass filtered, analyzed and visualized using Fast Fourier Transform (FFT) and Standard Deviation (SD) approaches to quantify the pressure fluctuations in the wing airflow, as these allow the detection of the laminar to turbulent transition area. Around 30% of the cases tested in the IAR-NRC wind tunnel were optimized for drag reduction by the morphing wing procedure. The obtained pressure measurements results were compared with results obtained by infrared thermography visualization, and were used to validate the numerical simulations. Two analog accelerometers able to sense dynamic accelerations up to +/-16g were installed in both the wing and the aileron boxes

  3. Wind Tunnel Investigation of Passive Vortex Control and Vortex-Tail Interactions on a Slender Wing at Subsonic and Transonic Speeds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erickson, Gary E.

    2013-01-01

    A wind tunnel experiment was conducted in the NASA Langley 8-Foot Transonic Pressure Tunnel to determine the effects of passive porosity on vortex flow interactions about a slender wing configuration at subsonic and transonic speeds. Flow-through porosity was applied in several arrangements to a leading-edge extension, or LEX, mounted to a 65-degree cropped delta wing as a longitudinal instability mitigation technique. Test data were obtained with LEX on and off in the presence of a centerline vertical tail and twin, wing-mounted vertical fins to quantify the sensitivity of the aerodynamics to tail placement and orientation. A close-coupled canard was tested as an alternative to the LEX as a passive flow control device. Wing upper surface static pressure distributions and six-component forces and moments were obtained at Mach numbers of 0.50, 0.85, and 1.20, unit Reynolds number of 2.5 million, angles of attack up to approximately 30 degrees, and angles of sideslip to +/-8 degrees. The off-surface flow field was visualized in cross planes on selected configurations using a laser vapor screen flow visualization technique. Tunnel-to-tunnel data comparisons and a Reynolds number sensitivity assessment were also performed. 15.

  4. Design, Development and Testing of Shape Shifting Wing Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dean Ninian

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available The design and development of morphing (shape shifting aircraft wings—an innovative technology that has the potential to increase the aerodynamic efficiency and reduce noise signatures of aircrafts—was carried out. This research was focused on reducing lift-induced drag at the flaps of the aerofoil and to improve the design to achieve the optimum aerodynamic efficiency. Simulation revealed a 10.8% coefficient of lift increase for the initial morphing wing and 15.4% for the optimized morphing wing as compared to conventional wing design. At angles of attack of 0, 5, 10 and 15 degrees, the optimized wing has an increase in lift-to-drag ratio of 18.3%, 10.5%, 10.6% and 4% respectively when compared with the conventional wing. Simulations also showed that there is a significant improvement on pressure distribution over the lower surface of the morphing wing aerofoil. The increase in flow smoothness and reduction in vortex size reduced pressure drag along the trailing edge of the wing as a result an increase in pressure on the lower surface was experienced. A morphing wing reduced the size of the vortices and therefore the noise levels measured were reduced by up to 50%.

  5. Computational wing design studies relating to natural laminar flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waggoner, Edgar G.

    1986-01-01

    Two research studies are described which directly relate to the application of natural laminar flow (NLF) technology to transonic transport-type wing planforms. Each involved using state-of-the-art computational methods to design three-dimensional wing contours which generate significant runs of favorable pressure gradients. The first study supported the Variable Sweep Transition Flight Experiment and involves design of a full-span glove which extends from the leading edge to the spoiler hinge line on the upper surface of an F-14 outer wing panel. A wing was designed computationally for a corporate transport aircraft in the second study. The resulting wing design generated favorable pressure gradients from the leading edge aft to the mid-chord on both upper and lower surfaces at the cruise design point. Detailed descriptions of the computational design approach are presented along with the various constraints imposed on each of the designs.

  6. Application of Artificial Neural Network to Predict Static Loads on an Aircraft Rib

    OpenAIRE

    Amali , Ramin; Cooper , Samson; Noroozi , Siamak

    2014-01-01

    Part 13: AI Applications - Mobile Applications; International audience; Aircraft wing structures are subjected to different types of loads such as static and dynamic loads throughout their life span. A methodology was developed to predict the static load applied on a wing rib without load cells using Artificial Neural Network (ANN). In conjunction with the finite element modelling of the rib, a classic two layer feed-forward networks were created and trained on MATLAB using the back-propagati...

  7. Application of SMP composite in designing a morphing wing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Kai; Yin, Weilong; Liu, Yanju; Leng, Jinsong

    2008-11-01

    A new concept of a morphing wing based on shape memory polymer (SMP) and its reinforced composite is proposed in this paper. SMP used in this study is a thermoset styrene-based resin in contrast to normal thermoplastic SMP. In our design, the wing winded on the airframe can be deployed during heating, which provides main lift for a morphing aircraft to realize stable flight. Aerodynamic characteristics of the deployed morphing wing are calculated by using CFD software. The static deformation of the wing under the air loads is also analyzed by using the finite element method. The results show that the used SMP material can provide enough strength and stiffness for the application.

  8. Static Aeroelastic Analysis of Flexible Wings via NASTRAN, Part I.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-12-01

    recommended steps in designing and testing a NASTRAN module are: 1. Recognition of the Need. In designing a new DMAP sequence or running an extensive DMAP ...operate without the module then that course of action is recommended. In con- sidering a DMAP to solve his problem the user might compare MSC NASTRAN to...COSMIC NASTRAN . The MSC version contains many more modules and might have the proper DMAP modules where the COSMIC version did not. 2. Development of

  9. Static Aeroelastic Optimization of Composite Wings with Variable Stiffness Laminates

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dillinger, J.K.S.

    2014-01-01

    The application of composite material in load carrying structural components of an aircraft is rapidly gaining momentum. While part of the reason for this can certainly be attributed to an increasing confidence of designers in the new material as a result of growing experience, two other crucial

  10. Computational Optimization of a Natural Laminar Flow Experimental Wing Glove

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartshom, Fletcher

    2012-01-01

    Computational optimization of a natural laminar flow experimental wing glove that is mounted on a business jet is presented and discussed. The process of designing a laminar flow wing glove starts with creating a two-dimensional optimized airfoil and then lofting it into a three-dimensional wing glove section. The airfoil design process does not consider the three dimensional flow effects such as cross flow due wing sweep as well as engine and body interference. Therefore, once an initial glove geometry is created from the airfoil, the three dimensional wing glove has to be optimized to ensure that the desired extent of laminar flow is maintained over the entire glove. TRANAIR, a non-linear full potential solver with a coupled boundary layer code was used as the main tool in the design and optimization process of the three-dimensional glove shape. The optimization process uses the Class-Shape-Transformation method to perturb the geometry with geometric constraints that allow for a 2-in clearance from the main wing. The three-dimensional glove shape was optimized with the objective of having a spanwise uniform pressure distribution that matches the optimized two-dimensional pressure distribution as closely as possible. Results show that with the appropriate inputs, the optimizer is able to match the two dimensional pressure distributions practically across the entire span of the wing glove. This allows for the experiment to have a much higher probability of having a large extent of natural laminar flow in flight.

  11. Static and Transient Cavitation Threshold Measurements for Mercury

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moraga, F.; Taleyarkhan, R.P.

    1999-11-14

    Transient and static cavitation thresholds for mercury as a function of the cover gas (helium or air), and pressure are reported. Both static and transient cavitation onset pressure thresholds increase linearly with cover gas pressure. Additionally, the cavitation thresholds as a function of dissolved gases were also measured and are reported.

  12. Aeroelastic Analysis of SUGAR Truss-Braced Wing Wind-Tunnel Model Using FUN3D and a Nonlinear Structural Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartels, Robert E.; Scott, Robert C.; Allen, Timothy J.; Sexton, Bradley W.

    2015-01-01

    Considerable attention has been given in recent years to the design of highly flexible aircraft. The results of numerous studies demonstrate the significant performance benefits of strut-braced wing (SBW) and trussbraced wing (TBW) configurations. Critical aspects of the TBW configuration are its larger aspect ratio, wing span and thinner wings. These aspects increase the importance of considering fluid/structure and control system coupling. This paper presents high-fidelity Navier-Stokes simulations of the dynamic response of the flexible Boeing Subsonic Ultra Green Aircraft Research (SUGAR) truss-braced wing wind-tunnel model. The latest version of the SUGAR TBW finite element model (FEM), v.20, is used in the present simulations. Limit cycle oscillations (LCOs) of the TBW wing/strut/nacelle are simulated at angle-of-attack (AoA) values of -1, 0 and +1 degree. The modal data derived from nonlinear static aeroelastic MSC.Nastran solutions are used at AoAs of -1 and +1 degrees. The LCO amplitude is observed to be dependent on AoA. LCO amplitudes at -1 degree are larger than those at +1 degree. The LCO amplitude at zero degrees is larger than either -1 or +1 degrees. These results correlate well with both wind-tunnel data and the behavior observed in previous studies using linear aerodynamics. The LCO onset at zero degrees AoA has also been computed using unloaded v.20 FEM modes. While the v.20 model increases the dynamic pressure at which LCO onset is observed, it is found that the LCO onset at and above Mach 0.82 is much different than that produced by an earlier version of the FEM, v. 19.

  13. Do hummingbirds use a different mechanism than insects to flip and twist their wings?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Jialei; Luo, Haoxiang; Hedrick, Tyson

    2014-11-01

    Hovering hummingbirds flap their wings in an almost horizontal stroke plane and flip the wings to invert the angle of attack after stroke reversal, a strategy also utilized by many hovering insects such as fruit flies. However, unlike insects whose wing actuation mechanism is only located at the base, hummingbirds have a vertebrate musculoskeletal system and their wings contain bones and muscles and thus, they may be capable of both actively flipping and twisting their wings. To investigate this issue, we constructed a hummingbird wing model and study its pitching dynamics. The wing kinematics are reconstructed from high-speed imaging data, and the inertial torques are calculated in a rotating frame of reference using mass distribution data measured from dissections of hummingbird wings. Pressure data from a previous CFD study of the same wing kinematics are used to calculate the aerodynamic torque. The results show that like insect wings, the hummingbird wing pitching is driven by its own inertia during reversal, and the aerodynamic torque is responsible for wing twist during mid-stroke. In conclusion, our study suggests that their wing dynamics are very similar even though their actuation systems are entirely different. This research was supported by the NSF.

  14. Design and flight performance of hybrid underwater glider with controllable wings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yanhui Wang

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Hybrid underwater glider combines motion modes of traditional autonomous underwater glider and those of autonomous underwater vehicles. Different motion modes need different flight performance, including flight efficiency, static stability, and maneuverability. Conventional hybrid underwater glider with fixed wings can’t achieve optimal flight performance in one flight mission demanding various motion modes. In this article, controllable wings for hybrid underwater glider Petrel II are designed. Angle of attack, sweep angle, and aspect ratio of controllable wings can be changed to adapt to different motion modes. Kinematics and dynamics models of Petrel II are established based on multibody theory. Motion simulations of Petrel II with different wing configurations are conducted in three motion modes, including glide motion, spiral motion, and horizontal turning motion. The simulation results show the impact of wing parameters on flight performance. Field trials demonstrate that the controllable wings can improve the flight performance.

  15. Experimental Investigation of a Wing-in-Ground Effect Craft

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Mobassher Tofa

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The aerodynamic characteristics of the wing-in-ground effect (WIG craft model that has a noble configuration of a compound wing was experimentally investigated and Universiti Teknologi Malaysia (UTM wind tunnel with and without endplates. Lift and drag forces, pitching moment coefficients, and the centre of pressure were measured with respect to the ground clearance and the wing angle of attack. The ground effect and the existence of the endplates increase the wing lift-to-drag ratio at low ground clearance. The results of this research work show new proposed design of the WIG craft with compound wing and endplates, which can clearly increase the aerodynamic efficiency without compromising the longitudinal stability. The use of WIG craft is representing an ambitious technology that will help in reducing time, effort, and money of the conventional marine transportation in the future.

  16. Experimental investigation of a wing-in-ground effect craft.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tofa, M Mobassher; Maimun, Adi; Ahmed, Yasser M; Jamei, Saeed; Priyanto, Agoes; Rahimuddin

    2014-01-01

    The aerodynamic characteristics of the wing-in-ground effect (WIG) craft model that has a noble configuration of a compound wing was experimentally investigated and Universiti Teknologi Malaysia (UTM) wind tunnel with and without endplates. Lift and drag forces, pitching moment coefficients, and the centre of pressure were measured with respect to the ground clearance and the wing angle of attack. The ground effect and the existence of the endplates increase the wing lift-to-drag ratio at low ground clearance. The results of this research work show new proposed design of the WIG craft with compound wing and endplates, which can clearly increase the aerodynamic efficiency without compromising the longitudinal stability. The use of WIG craft is representing an ambitious technology that will help in reducing time, effort, and money of the conventional marine transportation in the future.

  17. Experimental Investigation of a Wing-in-Ground Effect Craft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tofa, M. Mobassher; Ahmed, Yasser M.; Jamei, Saeed; Priyanto, Agoes; Rahimuddin

    2014-01-01

    The aerodynamic characteristics of the wing-in-ground effect (WIG) craft model that has a noble configuration of a compound wing was experimentally investigated and Universiti Teknologi Malaysia (UTM) wind tunnel with and without endplates. Lift and drag forces, pitching moment coefficients, and the centre of pressure were measured with respect to the ground clearance and the wing angle of attack. The ground effect and the existence of the endplates increase the wing lift-to-drag ratio at low ground clearance. The results of this research work show new proposed design of the WIG craft with compound wing and endplates, which can clearly increase the aerodynamic efficiency without compromising the longitudinal stability. The use of WIG craft is representing an ambitious technology that will help in reducing time, effort, and money of the conventional marine transportation in the future. PMID:24701170

  18. A model for roll stall and the inherent stability modes of low aspect ratio wings at low Reynolds numbers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shields, Matt

    The development of Micro Aerial Vehicles has been hindered by the poor understanding of the aerodynamic loading and stability and control properties of the low Reynolds number regime in which the inherent low aspect ratio (LAR) wings operate. This thesis experimentally evaluates the static and damping aerodynamic stability derivatives to provide a complete aerodynamic model for canonical flat plate wings of aspect ratios near unity at Reynolds numbers under 1 x 105. This permits the complete functionality of the aerodynamic forces and moments to be expressed and the equations of motion to solved, thereby identifying the inherent stability properties of the wing. This provides a basis for characterizing the stability of full vehicles. The influence of the tip vortices during sideslip perturbations is found to induce a loading condition referred to as roll stall, a significant roll moment created by the spanwise induced velocity asymmetry related to the displacement of the vortex cores relative to the wing. Roll stall is manifested by a linearly increasing roll moment with low to moderate angles of attack and a subsequent stall event similar to a lift polar; this behavior is not experienced by conventional (high aspect ratio) wings. The resulting large magnitude of the roll stability derivative, Cl,beta and lack of roll damping, Cl ,rho, create significant modal responses of the lateral state variables; a linear model used to evaluate these modes is shown to accurately reflect the solution obtained by numerically integrating the nonlinear equations. An unstable Dutch roll mode dominates the behavior of the wing for small perturbations from equilibrium, and in the presence of angle of attack oscillations a previously unconsidered coupled mode, referred to as roll resonance, is seen develop and drive the bank angle? away from equilibrium. Roll resonance requires a linear time variant (LTV) model to capture the behavior of the bank angle, which is attributed to the

  19. Evaluation of the IGSCC(Intergranular Stress Corrosion Cracking) resistance of inconel alloys by static potential method in high temperature and high pressure environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maeng, Wan Young; Nam, Tae Woon

    1997-01-01

    Inconel alloys which have good high temperature mechanical properties and corrosion resistance have been used extensively as steam generator tube of nuclear power plants. There have been some reports on the intergranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC) failure problems in steam generator tubes of nuclear reactors. In order to evaluate the effects of heat treatment and composition on the IGSCC behavior of inconel alloys in simulated nuclear reactor environment, four different specimens (inconel 600 MA, 600 TT, 690 MA and 690 TT) were prepared and tested by eletrochemical method. Static potential tests for stressed C-ring type inconel specimens were carried out in 10% NaOH solution at 300 deg C (75 atm). It was found that IGSCC was initiated in inconel 600 MA specimen, but the other three specimens were not cracked. Based on the gradients of corrosion current density of the four specimens as a function of test time, thermally treated alloys show better IGSCC resistance than mull-annealed alloys, and inconel 690 TT has better passivation characteristic than inconel 600 MA. Inconel 690 TT shows clear periodic passivation that indicates good SCC resistance. The good IGSCC resistance of inconel 690 TT is due to periodic passivation characteristics of surface layer. (author)

  20. Temporal variation of wing geometry in Aedes albopictus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paloma Oliveira Vidal

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Although native to the tropical and subtropical areas of Southeast Asia, Aedes albopictus is now found on five continents, primarily due to its great capacity to adapt to different environments. This species is considered a secondary vector of dengue virus in several countries. Wing geometric morphometrics is widely used to furnish morphological markers for the characterisation and identification of species of medical importance and for the assessment of population dynamics. In this work, we investigated the metric differentiation of the wings of Ae. albopictus samples collected over a four-year period (2007-2010 in São Paulo, Brazil. Wing size significantly decreased during this period for both sexes and the wing shape also changed over time, with the wing shapes of males showing greater differences after 2008 and those of females differing more after 2009. Given that the wings play sex-specific roles, these findings suggest that the males and females could be affected by differential evolutionary pressures. Consistent with this hypothesis, a sexually dimorphic pattern was detected and quantified: the females were larger than the males (with respect to the mean and had a distinct wing shape, regardless of allometric effects. In conclusion, wing alterations, particularly those involving shape, are a sensitive indicator of microevolutionary processes in this species.

  1. Temporal variation of wing geometry in Aedes albopictus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vidal, Paloma Oliveira; Carvalho, Eneas; Suesdek, Lincoln

    2012-12-01

    Although native to the tropical and subtropical areas of Southeast Asia, Aedes albopictus is now found on five continents, primarily due to its great capacity to adapt to different environments. This species is considered a secondary vector of dengue virus in several countries. Wing geometric morphometrics is widely used to furnish morphological markers for the characterisation and identification of species of medical importance and for the assessment of population dynamics. In this work, we investigated the metric differentiation of the wings of Ae. albopictus samples collected over a four-year period (2007-2010) in São Paulo, Brazil. Wing size significantly decreased during this period for both sexes and the wing shape also changed over time, with the wing shapes of males showing greater differences after 2008 and those of females differing more after 2009. Given that the wings play sex-specific roles, these findings suggest that the males and females could be affected by differential evolutionary pressures. Consistent with this hypothesis, a sexually dimorphic pattern was detected and quantified: the females were larger than the males (with respect to the mean) and had a distinct wing shape, regardless of allometric effects. In conclusion, wing alterations, particularly those involving shape, are a sensitive indicator of microevolutionary processes in this species.

  2. WINGS Data Release

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moretti, A.; Poggianti, B. M.; Fasano, G.

    2014-01-01

    Context. To effectively investigate galaxy formation and evolution, it is of paramount importance to exploit homogeneous data for large samples of galaxies in different environments. Aims. The WIde-field Nearby Galaxy-cluster Survey (WINGS) project aim is to evaluate physical properties of galaxies...... in a complete sample of low redshift clusters to be used as reference sample for evolutionary studies. The WINGS survey is still ongoing and the original dataset will be enlarged with new observations. This paper presents the entire collection of WINGS measurements obtained so far. Methods. We decided to make......, and on the cluster redshift, reaching on average 90% at V ≲ 21.7. Near-infrared photometric catalogs for 26 (in K) and 19 (in J) clusters are part of the database and the number of sources is 962 344 in K and 628 813 in J. Here again the completeness depends on the data quality, but it is on average higher than 90...

  3. Statics of deformable solids

    CERN Document Server

    Bisplinghoff, Raymond L; Pian, Theodore HH

    2014-01-01

    Profusely illustrated exposition of fundamentals of solid mechanics and principles of mechanics, statics, and simple statically indeterminate systems. Covers strain and stress in three-dimensional solids, elementary elasticity, energy principles in solid continuum, and more. 1965 edition.

  4. 3D Simulation of a Loss of Vacuum Accident (LOVA in ITER (International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor: Evaluation of Static Pressure, Mach Number, and Friction Velocity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean-François Ciparisse

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available ITER (International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor is a magnetically confined plasma nuclear reactor. Inside it, due to plasma disruptions, the formation of neutron-activated powders, which are essentially made out of tungsten and beryllium, occurs. As many windows for diagnostics are present on the reactor, which operates at very low pressure, a LOVA (Loss of Vacuum Accident could be possible and may lead to dust mobilisation and a toxic and radioactive fallout inside the plant. This study is aimed at reproducing numerically the first seconds of a LOVA in ITER, in order to get information about the dust resuspension risk. This work has been carried out by means of a CFD (Computational Fluid Dynamics simulation of the beginning of the pressurisation transient inside the whole Tokamak. It has been found that the pressurization transient is extremely slow, and that the friction speed on the walls is very high, and therefore a high mobilization risk of the dust is expected on the entire internal surface of the reactor. It has been observed that a LOVA in a real-scale reactor is more severe than the one reproduced in reduced-scale facilities, as STARDUST-U, because the speeds are higher, and the dust resuspension capacity of the flow is greater.

  5. Study on flow over finite wing with respect to F-22 raptor, Supermarine Spitfire, F-7 BG aircraft wing and analyze its stability performance and experimental values

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Md. Nesar; Alam, Mahbubul

    2017-06-01

    A finite wing is a three-dimensional body, and consequently the flow over the finite wing is three-dimensional; that is, there is a component of flow in the span wise direction. The physical mechanism for generating lift on the wing is the existence of a high pressure on the bottom surface and a low pressure on the top surface. The net imbalance of the pressure distribution creates the lift. As a by-product of this pressure imbalance, the flow near the wing tips tends to curl around the tips, being forced from the high-pressure region just underneath the tips to the low-pressure region on top. This flow around the wing tips is shown in the front view of the wing. As a result, on the top surface of the wing, there is generally a span wise component of flow from the tip toward the wing root, causing the streamlines over the top surface to bend toward the root. On the bottom surface of the wing, there is generally a span wise component of flow from the root toward the tip, causing the streamlines over the bottom surface to bend toward the tip. Clearly, the flow over the finite wing is three-dimensional, and therefore we would expect the overall aerodynamic properties of such a wing to differ from those of its airfoil sections. The tendency for the flow to "leak" around the wing tips has another important effect on the aerodynamics of the wing. This flow establishes a circulatory motion that trails downstream of the wing; that is, a trailing vortex is created at each wing tip. The aerodynamics of finite wings is analyzed using the classical lifting line model. This simple model allows a closed-form solution that captures most of the physical effects applicable to finite wings. The model is based on the horseshoe-shaped vortex that introduces the concept of a vortex wake and wing tip vortices. The downwash induced by the wake creates an induced drag that did not exist in the two-dimensional analysis. Furthermore, as wingspan is reduced, the wing lift slope decreases

  6. Feedback tracking control for dynamic morphing of piezocomposite actuated flexible wings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiaoming; Zhou, Wenya; Wu, Zhigang

    2018-03-01

    Aerodynamic properties of flexible wings can be improved via shape morphing using piezocomposite materials. Dynamic shape control of flexible wings is investigated in this study by considering the interactions between structural dynamics, unsteady aerodynamics and piezo-actuations. A novel antisymmetric angle-ply bimorph configuration of piezocomposite actuators is presented to realize coupled bending-torsional shape control. The active aeroelastic model is derived using finite element method and Theodorsen unsteady aerodynamic loads. A time-varying linear quadratic Gaussian (LQG) tracking control system is designed to enhance aerodynamic lift with pre-defined trajectories. Proof-of-concept simulations of static and dynamic shape control are presented for a scaled high-aspect-ratio wing model. Vibrations of the wing and fluctuations in aerodynamic forces are caused by using the static voltages directly in dynamic shape control. The lift response has tracked the trajectories well with favorable dynamic morphing performance via feedback tracking control.

  7. Gust response analysis and wind tunnel test for a high-aspect ratio wing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liu Yi

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available A theoretical nonlinear aeroelastic response analysis for a flexible high-aspect ratio wing excited by harmonic gust load is presented along with a companion wind tunnel test. A multidisciplinary coupled numerical calculation is developed to simulate the flexible model wing undergoing gust load in the time domain via discrete nonlinear finite element structural dynamic analysis and nonplanar unsteady vortex lattice aerodynamic computation. A dynamic perturbation analysis about a nonlinear static equilibrium is also used to determine the small perturbation flutter boundary. A novel noncontact 3-D camera measurement analysis system is firstly used in the wind tunnel test to obtain the spatial large deformation and responses. The responses of the flexible wing under different static equilibrium states and frequency gust loads are discussed. The fair to good quantitative agreements between the theoretical and experimental results demonstrate that the presented analysis method is an acceptable way to predict the geometrically nonlinear gust response for flexible wings.

  8. The Hydraulic Mechanism of the Unfolding of Hind Wings in Dorcus titanus platymelus (Order: Coleoptera

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiyu Sun

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available In most beetles, the hind wings are thin and fragile; when at rest, they are held over the back of the beetle. When the hind wing unfolds, it provides the necessary aerodynamic forces for flight. In this paper, we investigate the hydraulic mechanism of the unfolding process of the hind wings in Dorcus titanus platymelus (Oder: Coleoptera. The wing unfolding process of Dorcus titanus platymelus was examined using high speed camera sequences (400 frames/s, and the hydraulic pressure in the veins was measured with a biological pressure sensor and dynamic signal acquisition and analysis (DSA during the expansion process. We found that the total time for the release of hydraulic pressure during wing folding is longer than the time required for unfolding. The pressure is proportional to the length of the wings and the body mass of the beetle. A retinal camera was used to investigate the fluid direction. We found that the peak pressures correspond to two main cross-folding joint expansions in the hind wing. These observations strongly suggest that blood pressure facilitates the extension of hind wings during unfolding.

  9. WHEN COMPASSION GROWS WINGS

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Nicky

    antiretroviral roll-out in full swing, the. WHEN COMPASSION GROWS WINGS. The free time and expertise given by its deeply committed core of professional volunteers. (including pilots) is the lifeblood of the operation. Red Cross Air Mercy Service volunteer, German national Dr Florian Funk, at the AMS Durban base.

  10. Twisted Winged Endoparasitoids

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 9; Issue 10. Twisted Winged Endoparasitoids - An Enigma for Entomologists. Alpana Mazumdar. General Article Volume 9 Issue 10 October 2004 pp 19-24. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link:

  11. High Speed and High Angle of Attack Aerodynamic Characteristics of Winged Space Vehicle

    OpenAIRE

    INATANI, Yoshifumi

    1987-01-01

    Static aerodynamic characteristics of winged space vehicle is investigated through a series of wind tunnel testing. This report includes a summary of the test results and associated considerations. The tests were conducted and supported by Working Group for Winged Space Vehicle of Institute of Space and Astronautical Science (ISAS). Attention has been concentrated on both longitudinal and lateral/directional, high angle of attack flight capability at high speed flight condition of the vehicle...

  12. Investigation of two pitot-static tubes at supersonic speeds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasel, Lowell E; Coletti, Donald E

    1948-01-01

    The results of tests at a Mach number of 1.94 of an ogives-nose cylindrical pitot-static tube and similar tests at Mach numbers of 1.93 and 1.62 of a service pitot-static tube to determine body static pressures and indicated Mach numbers are presented and discussed. The radial pressure distribution on the cylindrical bodies is compared with that calculated by an approximate theory.

  13. Wing shape allometry and aerodynamics in calopterygid damselflies: a comparative approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Outomuro, David; Adams, Dean C; Johansson, Frank

    2013-06-07

    Wing size and shape have important aerodynamic implications on flight performance. We explored how wing size was related to wing shape in territorial males of 37 taxa of the damselfly family Calopterygidae. Wing coloration was also included in the analyses because it is sexually and naturally selected and has been shown to be related to wing shape. We studied wing shape using both the non-dimensional radius of the second moment of wing area (RSM) and geometric morphometrics. Lower values of the RSM result in less energetically demanding flight and wider ranges of flight speed. We also re-analyzed previously published data on other damselflies and dragonflies. The RSM showed a hump-shaped relationship with wing size. However, after correcting for phylogeny using independent contrast, this pattern changed to a negative linear relationship. The basal genus of the study family, Hetaerina, was mainly driving that change. The obtained patterns were specific for the study family and differed from other damselflies and dragonflies. The relationship between the RSM and wing shape measured by geometric morphometrics was linear, but relatively small changes along the RSM axis can result in large changes in wing shape. Our results also showed that wing coloration may have some effect on RSM. We found that RSM showed a complex relationship with size in calopterygid damselflies, probably as a result of other selection pressures besides wing size per se. Wing coloration and specific behavior (e.g. courtship) are potential candidates for explaining the complexity. Univariate measures of wing shape such as RSM are more intuitive but lack the high resolution of other multivariate techniques such as geometric morphometrics. We suggest that the relationship between wing shape and size are taxa-specific and differ among closely-related insect groups.

  14. Numerical Analysis of the Influence of Fibre Orientations in a two-layered Biomimetic Flapping Wing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rayhan Saiaf Bin

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available A numerical study was carried out to investigate the effects of fibre orientation angles in an adopted biomimetic flapping wing having two-layered Carbon/Epoxy Composite T300/5208. The purpose of this paper is to understand how different orientation angles with different combinations affect the stresses of a flapping-wing. One flapping cycle was divided into twelve segments and both maximum stress and deformation were calculated for all the segments. The results revealed that, the maximum stress was produced in [0/-45] combination, where the least was found for [45/0]. For all the simulated wings, deformation was found less than 1.8 mm. ANSYS DesignModeler and Static Structural was used to design and perform structural analysis. The findings are helpful in answering why insect wings are so impeccable, thus providing a possibility of improving the design of flapping-wing aerial vehicles.

  15. Static Analysis Numerical Algorithms

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-04-01

    STATIC ANALYSIS OF NUMERICAL ALGORITHMS KESTREL TECHNOLOGY, LLC APRIL 2016 FINAL TECHNICAL REPORT APPROVED FOR PUBLIC RELEASE; DISTRIBUTION...3. DATES COVERED (From - To) NOV 2013 – NOV 2015 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE STATIC ANALYSIS OF NUMERICAL ALGORITHMS 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER FA8750-14-C...and Honeywell Aerospace Advanced Technology to combine model-based development of complex avionics control software with static analysis of the

  16. Static electromagnetic frequency changers

    CERN Document Server

    Rozhanskii, L L

    1963-01-01

    Static Electromagnetic Frequency Changers is about the theory, design, construction, and applications of static electromagnetic frequency changers, devices that used for multiplication or division of alternating current frequency. It is originally published in the Russian language. This book is organized into five chapters. The first three chapters introduce the readers to the principles of operation, the construction, and the potential applications of static electromagnetic frequency changers and to the principles of their design. The two concluding chapters use some hitherto unpublished work

  17. Dynamics and control of robotic aircraft with articulated wings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paranjape, Aditya Avinash

    , and compare the steady state performance of rigid and flexible-winged aircraft. We present an intuitive but very useful notion, called the effective dihedral, which allows us to extend some of the stability and performance results derived for rigid aircraft to flexible aircraft. In the process, we identify the extent of flexibility needed to induce substantial performance benefits, and conversely the extent to which results derived for rigid aircraft apply to a flexible aircraft. We demonstrate, interestingly enough, that wing flexibility actually causes a deterioration in the maximum achievable turn rate when the sideslip is regulated. We also present experimental results which help demonstrate the capability of wing dihedral for control and for executing maneuvers such as slow, rapid descent and perching. Open loop as well as closed loop experiments are performed to demonstrate (a) the effectiveness of symmetric dihedral for flight path angle control, (b) yaw control using asymmetric dihedral, and (c) the elements of perching. Using a simple order of magnitude analysis, we derive conditions under which the wing is structurally statically stable, as well as conditions under which there exists time scale separation between the bending and twisting dynamics. We show that the time scale separation depends on the geometry of the wing cross section, the Poisson's ratio of the wing material, the flight speed and the aspect ratio of the wing. We design independent control laws for bending and twisting. A key contribution of this thesis is the formulation of a partial differential equation (PDE) boundary control problem for wing deformation. PDE-backstepping is used to derive tracking and exponentially stabilizing boundary control laws for wing twist which ensure that a weighted integral of the wing twist (net lift or the rolling moment) tracks the desired time-varying reference input. We show that a control law which only ensures tracking of a weighted integral improves the

  18. Low Aspect-Ratio Wings for Wing-Ships

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Filippone, Antonino; Selig, M.

    1998-01-01

    Flying on ground poses technical and aerodynamical challenges. The requirements for compactness, efficiency, manouverability, off-design operation,open new areas of investigations in the fieldof aerodynamic analysis and design. A review ofthe characteristics of low-aspect ratio wings, in- and out...... of ground, is presented. It is shownthat the performance of such wings is generally inferior to that of slender wings, although in ground placement can yield substantial improvements in the aerodynamic efficiency....

  19. Morphing Wing-Tip Open Loop Controller and its Validation During Wind Tunnel Tests at the IAR-NRC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed Sadok GUEZGUEZ

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available In this project, a wing tip of a real aircraft was designed and manufactured. This wing tip was composed of a wing and an aileron. The wing was equipped with a composite skin on its upper surface. This skin changed its shape (morphed by use of 4 electrical in-house developed actuators and 32 pressure sensors. These pressure sensors measure the pressures, and further the loads on the wing upper surface. Thus, the upper surface of the wing was morphed using these actuators with the aim to improve the aerodynamic performances of the wing-tip. Two types of ailerons were designed and manufactured: one aileron is rigid (non-morphed and one morphing aileron. This morphing aileron can change its shape also for the aerodynamic performances improvement. The morphing wing-tip internal structure is designed and manufactured, and is presented firstly in the paper. Then, the modern communication and control hardware are presented for the entire morphing wing tip equipped with actuators and sensors having the aim to morph the wing. The calibration procedure of the wing tip is further presented, followed by the open loop controller results obtained during wind tunnel tests. Various methodologies of open loop control are presented in this paper, and results obtained were obtained and validated experimentally through wind tunnel tests.

  20. Wing Tip Drag Reduction at Nominal Take-Off Mach Number: An Approach to Local Active Flow Control with a Highly Robust Actuator System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthias Bauer

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper discusses wind tunnel test results aimed at advancing active flow control technology to increase the aerodynamic efficiency of an aircraft during take-off. A model of the outer section of a representative civil airliner wing was equipped with two-stage fluidic actuators between the slat edge and wing tip, where mechanical high-lift devices fail to integrate. The experiments were conducted at a nominal take-off Mach number of M = 0.2. At this incidence velocity, separation on the wing section, accompanied by increased drag, is triggered by the strong slat edge vortex at high angles of attack. On the basis of global force measurements and local static pressure data, the effect of pulsed blowing on the complex flow is evaluated, considering various momentum coefficients and spanwise distributions of the actuation effort. It is shown that through local intensification of forcing, a momentum coefficient of less than c μ = 0.6 % suffices to offset the stall by 2.4°, increase the maximum lift by more than 10% and reduce the drag by 37% compared to the uncontrolled flow.

  1. Prediction of Wing Downwash Using CFD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammed MAHDI

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Wing downwash study and estimation of downwash effect on the tail plane is an important task during the aircraft design process, although a lot of papers and works has been done, but the experimental work is the most important, the progress in CFD simulation has reached to the point it is able to reduce the number of runs in the wind tunnel. In this work CFD has been utilized to calculate the downwash angle and downwash gradient with respect to the angle of attack over a high aspect ratio of a typical UAV. The results of the simulation shall be used in the estimation and calculation of the longitudinal static stability analysis of the UAV.

  2. Passively morphing ornithopter wings constructed using a novel compliant spine: design and testing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wissa, A A; Hubbard Jr, J E; Tummala, Y; Frecker, M I

    2012-01-01

    Ornithopters or flapping wing uncrewed aerial vehicles (UAVs) have potential applications in civil and military sectors. Amongst the UAVs, ornithopters have a unique ability to fly in low Reynolds number flight regimes and also have the agility and maneuverability of rotary wing aircraft. In nature, birds achieve such performance by exploiting various wing kinematics known as gaits. The objective of this work is to improve the steady level flight performance of an ornithopter by implementing a continuous vortex gait using a novel passive compliant spine inserted in the ornithopter’s wings. This paper presents an optimal compliant spine concept for ornithopter applications. A quasi-static design optimization procedure was formulated to design the compliant spine. Finite element analysis was performed on a first generation spine and the spine was fabricated. This prototype was then tested by inserting it into an ornithopter’s wing leading edge spar. The effect of inserting the compliant spine into the wings on the electric power required, the aerodynamic loads and the wing kinematics was studied. The ornithopter with the compliant spines inserted in its wings consumed 45% less power and produced an additional 16% of its weight in mean lift compared to the same ornithopter without the compliant spine. The results indicate that this passive morphing approach is promising for improved steady level flight performance. (paper)

  3. Computational Aerodynamic Analysis of a Micro-CT Based Bio-Realistic Fruit Fly Wing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandt, Joshua; Doig, Graham; Tsafnat, Naomi

    2015-01-01

    The aerodynamic features of a bio-realistic 3D fruit fly wing in steady state (snapshot) flight conditions were analyzed numerically. The wing geometry was created from high resolution micro-computed tomography (micro-CT) of the fruit fly Drosophila virilis. Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) analyses of the wing were conducted at ultra-low Reynolds numbers ranging from 71 to 200, and at angles of attack ranging from -10° to +30°. It was found that in the 3D bio-realistc model, the corrugations of the wing created localized circulation regions in the flow field, most notably at higher angles of attack near the wing tip. Analyses of a simplified flat wing geometry showed higher lift to drag performance values for any given angle of attack at these Reynolds numbers, though very similar performance is noted at -10°. Results have indicated that the simplified flat wing can successfully be used to approximate high-level properties such as aerodynamic coefficients and overall performance trends as well as large flow-field structures. However, local pressure peaks and near-wing flow features induced by the corrugations are unable to be replicated by the simple wing. We therefore recommend that accurate 3D bio-realistic geometries be used when modelling insect wings where such information is useful. PMID:25954946

  4. Shock/shock interactions between bodies and wings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gaoxiang XIANG

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available This paper examines the Shock/Shock Interactions (SSI between the body and wing of aircraft in supersonic flows. The body is simplified to a flat wedge and the wing is assumed to be a sharp wing. The theoretical spatial dimension reduction method, which transforms the 3D problem into a 2D one, is used to analyze the SSI between the body and wing. The temperature and pressure behind the Mach stem induced by the wing and body are obtained, and the wave configurations in the corner are determined. Numerical validations are conducted by solving the inviscid Euler equations in 3D with a Non-oscillatory and Non-free-parameters Dissipative (NND finite difference scheme. Good agreements between the theoretical and numerical results are obtained. Additionally, the effects of the wedge angle and sweep angle on wave configurations and flow field are considered numerically and theoretically. The influences of wedge angle are significant, whereas the effects of sweep angle on wave configurations are negligible. This paper provides useful information for the design and thermal protection of aircraft in supersonic and hypersonic flows. Keywords: Body and wing, Flow field, Hypersonic flow, Shock/shock interaction, Wave configurations

  5. Wing-pitching mechanism of hovering Ruby-throated hummingbirds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Jialei; Luo, Haoxiang; Hedrick, Tyson L

    2015-01-19

    In hovering flight, hummingbirds reverse the angle of attack of their wings through pitch reversal in order to generate aerodynamic lift during both downstroke and upstroke. In addition, the wings may pitch during translation to further enhance lift production. It is not yet clear whether these pitching motions are caused by the wing inertia or actuated through the musculoskeletal system. Here we perform a computational analysis of the pitching dynamics by incorporating the realistic wing kinematics to determine the inertial effects. The aerodynamic effect is also included using the pressure data from a previous three-dimensional computational fluid dynamics simulation of a hovering hummingbird. The results show that like many insects, pitch reversal of the hummingbird is, to a large degree, caused by the wing inertia. However, actuation power input at the root is needed in the beginning of pronation to initiate a fast pitch reversal and also in mid-downstroke to enable a nose-up pitching motion for lift enhancement. The muscles on the wing may not necessarily be activated for pitching of the distal section. Finally, power analysis of the flapping motion shows that there is no requirement for substantial elastic energy storage or energy absorption at the shoulder joint.

  6. Wing-pitching mechanism of hovering Ruby-throated hummingbirds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song, Jialei; Luo, Haoxiang; Hedrick, Tyson L

    2015-01-01

    In hovering flight, hummingbirds reverse the angle of attack of their wings through pitch reversal in order to generate aerodynamic lift during both downstroke and upstroke. In addition, the wings may pitch during translation to further enhance lift production. It is not yet clear whether these pitching motions are caused by the wing inertia or actuated through the musculoskeletal system. Here we perform a computational analysis of the pitching dynamics by incorporating the realistic wing kinematics to determine the inertial effects. The aerodynamic effect is also included using the pressure data from a previous three-dimensional computational fluid dynamics simulation of a hovering hummingbird. The results show that like many insects, pitch reversal of the hummingbird is, to a large degree, caused by the wing inertia. However, actuation power input at the root is needed in the beginning of pronation to initiate a fast pitch reversal and also in mid-downstroke to enable a nose-up pitching motion for lift enhancement. The muscles on the wing may not necessarily be activated for pitching of the distal section. Finally, power analysis of the flapping motion shows that there is no requirement for substantial elastic energy storage or energy absorption at the shoulder joint. (paper)

  7. Aeroelastic Wing Shaping Using Distributed Propulsion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Nhan T. (Inventor); Reynolds, Kevin Wayne (Inventor); Ting, Eric B. (Inventor)

    2017-01-01

    An aircraft has wings configured to twist during flight. Inboard and outboard propulsion devices, such as turbofans or other propulsors, are connected to each wing, and are spaced along the wing span. A flight controller independently controls thrust of the inboard and outboard propulsion devices to significantly change flight dynamics, including changing thrust of outboard propulsion devices to twist the wing, and to differentially apply thrust on each wing to change yaw and other aspects of the aircraft during various stages of a flight mission. One or more generators can be positioned upon the wing to provide power for propulsion devices on the same wing, and on an opposite wing.

  8. Butterflies regulate wing temperatures using radiative cooling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Cheng-Chia; Shi, Norman Nan; Ren, Crystal; Pelaez, Julianne; Bernard, Gary D.; Yu, Nanfang; Pierce, Naomi

    2017-09-01

    Butterfly wings are live organs embedded with multiple sensory neurons and, in some species, with pheromoneproducing cells. The proper function of butterfly wings demands a suitable temperature range, but the wings can overheat quickly in the sun due to their small thermal capacity. We developed an infrared technique to map butterfly wing temperatures and discovered that despite the wings' diverse visible colors, regions of wings that contain live cells are the coolest, resulting from the thickness of the wings and scale nanostructures. We also demonstrated that butterflies use behavioral traits to prevent overheating of their wings.

  9. Stiffness of desiccating insect wings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mengesha, T E; Vallance, R R [Department of Mechanical Engineering, The George Washington University, 738 Phillips Hall, 801 22nd St NW, Washington, DC 20052 (United States); Mittal, R, E-mail: vallance@gwu.edu [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Johns Hopkins University, 126 Latrobe Hall, 3400 N Charles Street, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States)

    2011-03-15

    The stiffness of insect wings is typically determined through experimental measurements. Such experiments are performed on wings removed from insects. However, the wings are subject to desiccation which typically leads to an increase in their stiffness. Although this effect of desiccation is well known, a comprehensive study of the rate of change in stiffness of desiccating insect wings would be a significant aid in planning experiments as well as interpreting data from such experiments. This communication presents a comprehensive experimental analysis of the change in mass and stiffness of gradually desiccating forewings of Painted Lady butterflies (Vanessa cardui). Mass and stiffness of the forewings of five butterflies were simultaneously measured every 10 min over a 24 h period. The averaged results show that wing mass declined exponentially by 21.1% over this time period with a time constant of 9.8 h, while wing stiffness increased linearly by 46.2% at a rate of 23.4 {mu}N mm{sup -1} h{sup -1}. For the forewings of a single butterfly, the experiment was performed over a period of 1 week, and the results show that wing mass declined exponentially by 52.2% with a time constant of 30.2 h until it reached a steady-state level of 2.00 mg, while wing stiffness increased exponentially by 90.7% until it reached a steady-state level of 1.70 mN mm{sup -1}. (communication)

  10. A new technique for investigating the induced and profile drag coefficients of a smooth wing and a tubercled wing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bolzon Michael

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The induced and profile drag coefficients of a wing are typically determined through a complex experimental technique, such as wake surveying. Such a technique requires measurement of all three orthogonal components of the downstream velocity to find the components of drag, which results in the necessary usage of a sophisticated and costly measurement device, such as multi-hole pressure probe. However, in this paper data is presented which demonstrate that the relative changes in the induced and profile drag coefficients can largely be determined through the sole measurement of the downstream, streamwise velocity. To demonstrate this, the induced and profile drags of two NACA 0021 wings, one with a smooth leading edge and the other wing a tubercled leading edge for comparison, are determined through the measurement of the three orthogonal velocities. The downstream, streamwise velocity distribution of each wing is then constructed and relationships can be determined. The wings were surveyed at 3°, 9°, and 12°. It has been found that the relative magnitude of the profile drag coefficient can be found for all considered angles of attack, while the relative magnitude of the induced drag coefficient can be found at 9° and 12°. These findings produce an innovative, simpler, and more cost effective experimental technique in determining the components of drag of a wing, and reduces the burdensome requirement of a sophisticated measurement device for such an experiment. Further investigation is required to determine the induced drag at 3°.

  11. Design, realization and structural testing of a compliant adaptable wing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Molinari, G; Arrieta, A F; Ermanni, P; Quack, M; Morari, M

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents the design, optimization, realization and testing of a novel wing morphing concept, based on distributed compliance structures, and actuated by piezoelectric elements. The adaptive wing features ribs with a selectively compliant inner structure, numerically optimized to achieve aerodynamically efficient shape changes while simultaneously withstanding aeroelastic loads. The static and dynamic aeroelastic behavior of the wing, and the effect of activating the actuators, is assessed by means of coupled 3D aerodynamic and structural simulations. To demonstrate the capabilities of the proposed morphing concept and optimization procedure, the wings of a model airplane are designed and manufactured according to the presented approach. The goal is to replace conventional ailerons, thus to achieve controllability in roll purely by morphing. The mechanical properties of the manufactured components are characterized experimentally, and used to create a refined and correlated finite element model. The overall stiffness, strength, and actuation capabilities are experimentally tested and successfully compared with the numerical prediction. To counteract the nonlinear hysteretic behavior of the piezoelectric actuators, a closed-loop controller is implemented, and its capability of accurately achieving the desired shape adaptation is evaluated experimentally. Using the correlated finite element model, the aeroelastic behavior of the manufactured wing is simulated, showing that the morphing concept can provide sufficient roll authority to allow controllability of the flight. The additional degrees of freedom offered by morphing can be also used to vary the plane lift coefficient, similarly to conventional flaps. The efficiency improvements offered by this technique are evaluated numerically, and compared to the performance of a rigid wing. (paper)

  12. Design of a hybrid rocket / inflatable wing UAV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sudduth, Cory

    This paper discusses the design challenges and development of a UAV that transitions from a rocket, which allows the aircraft to reach a target altitude rapidly, and then deploys an inflatable wing from an enclosed shell in midflight to allow for loitering and surveillance. The wing deployment and transition is tested in static and dynamic environments, while the performance and stability of both the aircraft mode and rocket mode are examined analytically. An in-depth discussion of key components, including the design, analysis and testing, is also included. Designing an UAV that transitions from a high velocity rocket, to a slow velocity UAV provides many difficult and unique design challenges. For example, the incorporation of deployable wing technology into a full UAV system results in many design constraints. In this particular design inflatable wings are used to generate lift during aircraft mode, and the stabilizing fins for the main wing also acted as the fins for the vehicle during its rocket phase. This required the balancing of the two different vehicle configurations to ensure that the aircraft would be able to fly stably in both modes, and transition between them without catastrophic failure. Significant research, and testing went into the finding the best method of storing the inflatable wing, as well as finding the required inflation rate to minimize unsteady aerodynamic affects. Design work was also invested in the development of an inflation system, as it had to be highly reliable, and yet very light weight for use in this small UAV. This paper discusses how these design challenges were overcome, the development and testing of individual sub-components and how they are incorporated into the overall vehicle. The analysis that went into this UAV, as well as methods used to optimize the design in order to minimize weight and maximize the aircraft performance and loitering time is also discussed.

  13. C-130: Results of center wing residual strength and crack propagation test program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reeder, F. L.; Dirkin, W. J.; Snider, H. L.

    1971-01-01

    Fourteen C-130 airplane center wings which had experienced from approximately 4,000 to 13,000 hours of flight service and its associated fatigue damage were tested to destruction, seven in upbending and seven in downbending. Six wings were tested directly for static residual strength in the fatigue-damaged condition as received from field service. The other eight wings were tested in crack propagation cyclic testing at a prescribed stress level for a maximum of 10,000 cycles. Then the stress level was reduced and testing was continued up to a maximum of 20,000 total cycles. Cyclic testing was performed with constant-amplitude stresses at a stress ratio of +0.1. Maximum cyclic skin stresses were approximately 18,000 psi. At the conclusion of cyclic testing, a static test to destruction was conducted to determine the residual strength of each fatigue-damaged specimen.

  14. Design and Construction of Strain Gauge Interface Pressure ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Design and Construction of Strain Gauge Interface Pressure Transducer for Measurement of Static and Dynamic Interface Pressure Applied by Pressure Garments and its Relationship to Deep Vein Thrombosis.

  15. Dynamic control of a bistable wing under aerodynamic loading

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bilgen, Onur; Arrieta, Andres F; Friswell, Michael I; Hagedorn, Peter

    2013-01-01

    The aerodynamic evaluation of a dynamic control technique applied to a bistable unsymmetrical cross-ply composite plate with surface bonded piezoelectric actuators is presented. The plate is clamped on one end to form a low-aspect-ratio wing. A previously proposed dynamic control method, utilizing bending resonance in different stable equilibrium positions, is used to induce snap-through between the two equilibrium states. Compared to quasi-static actuation, driving the bistable plate near resonance using surface bonded piezoelectric materials requires, theoretically, a lower peak excitation voltage to achieve snap-through. First, a set of extensive wind tunnel experiments are conducted on the passive bistable wing to understand the change in the dynamic behavior under various aerodynamic conditions. The passive wing demonstrated sufficient bending stiffness to sustain its shape under aerodynamic loading while preserving the desired bistable behavior. Next, by the use of the resonant control technique, the plate is turned into an effectively monostable structure, or alternatively, both stable equilibrium positions can be reached actively from the other stable equilibrium. Dynamic forward and reverse snap-through is demonstrated in the wind tunnel which shows both the effectiveness of the piezoelectric actuation as well as the load carrying capability of both states of the bistable wing. (paper)

  16. Real-time monitoring system of composite aircraft wings utilizing Fibre Bragg Grating sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vorathin, E.; Hafizi, Z. M.; Che Ghani, S. A.; Lim, K. S.

    2016-10-01

    Embedment of Fibre Bragg Grating (FBG) sensor in composite aircraft wings leads to the advancement of structural condition monitoring. The monitored aircraft wings have the capability to give real-time response under critical loading circumstances. The main objective of this paper is to develop a real-time FBG monitoring system for composite aircraft wings to view real-time changes when the structure undergoes some static loadings and dynamic impact. The implementation of matched edge filter FBG interrogation system to convert wavelength variations to strain readings shows that the structure is able to response instantly in real-time when undergoing few loadings and dynamic impact. This smart monitoring system is capable of updating the changes instantly in real-time and shows the weight induced on the composite aircraft wings instantly without any error. It also has a good agreement with acoustic emission (AE) sensor in the dynamic test.

  17. Observing the Forces Involved in Static Friction under Static Situations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaplan, Daniel

    2013-01-01

    Static friction is an important concept in introductory physics. Later in the year students apply their understanding of static friction under more complex conditions of static equilibrium. Traditional lab demonstrations in this case involve exceeding of the maximum level of static friction, resulting in the "onset of motion." (Contains…

  18. Experimental and computational study of transonic flow about swept wings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertelrud, A.; Bergmann, M. Y.; Coakley, T. J.

    1980-01-01

    An experimental investigation of NACA 0010 and 10% circular arc wing models, swept at 45 deg, spanning a channel, and at zero angle of attack is described. Measurements include chordwise and spanwise surface pressure distributions and oil-flow patterns for a range of transonic Mach numbers and Reynolds numbers. Calculations using a new three-dimensional Navier-Stokes code and a two-equation turbulence model are included for the circular-arc wing flow. Reasonable agreement between measurements and computations is obtained.

  19. Structural Analysis of a Dragonfly Wing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jongerius, S.R.; Lentink, D.

    2010-01-01

    Dragonfly wings are highly corrugated, which increases the stiffness and strength of the wing significantly, and results in a lightweight structure with good aerodynamic performance. How insect wings carry aerodynamic and inertial loads, and how the resonant frequency of the flapping wings is tuned

  20. Effect of outer wing separation on lift and thrust generation in a flapping wing system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mahardika, Nanang; Viet, Nguyen Quoc; Park, Hoon Cheol

    2011-01-01

    We explore the implementation of wing feather separation and lead-lagging motion to a flapping wing. A biomimetic flapping wing system with separated outer wings is designed and demonstrated. The artificial wing feather separation is implemented in the biomimetic wing by dividing the wing into inner and outer wings. The features of flapping, lead-lagging, and outer wing separation of the flapping wing system are captured by a high-speed camera for evaluation. The performance of the flapping wing system with separated outer wings is compared to that of a flapping wing system with closed outer wings in terms of forward force and downward force production. For a low flapping frequency ranging from 2.47 to 3.90 Hz, the proposed biomimetic flapping wing system shows a higher thrust and lift generation capability as demonstrated by a series of experiments. For 1.6 V application (lower frequency operation), the flapping wing system with separated wings could generate about 56% higher forward force and about 61% less downward force compared to that with closed wings, which is enough to demonstrate larger thrust and lift production capability of the separated outer wings. The experiments show that the outer parts of the separated wings are able to deform, resulting in a smaller amount of drag production during the upstroke, while still producing relatively greater lift and thrust during the downstroke.

  1. Aerodynamic Characteristics of Low-Aspect-Ratio Wings in Close Proximity to the Ground

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fink, Marvin P.; Lastinger, James L.

    1961-01-01

    A wind-tunnel investigation has been conducted to determine the effect of ground proximity on the aerodynamic characteristics of thick highly cambered rectangular wings with aspect ratios of 1. 2, 4, and 6. The results showed that, for these aspect ratios, as the ground war, approached all wings experienced increases in lift-curve slope and reductions in induced drag which resulted in increases in lift-drag ratio. Although an increase in lift-curve slope was obtained for all aspect ratios as the ground was approached, the lift coefficient at an angle of attack of 0 deg for any given aspect ratio remained nearly constant. The experimental results were in general agreement with Wieselsberger's ground-effect theory (NACA Technical Memorandum 77). As the wings approached the ground, there was an increase in static longitudinal stability at positive angles of attack. When operating in ground effect, all the wings had stability of height at positive angles of attack and instability of height at negative angles of attack. Wing-tip fairings on the wings with aspect ratios of 1 and 2 produced small increases in lift-drag ratio in ground effect. End plates extending only below the chord plane on the wing with an aspect ratio of 1 provided increases in lift coefficient and in lift-drag ratio in ground effect.

  2. HIRENASD Experimental Data, Static Cp Plots and Data files

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Tecplot (ascii) and matlab files are posted here for the Static pressure coefficient data sets. To download all of the data in either tecplot format or matlab...

  3. Flapping Wing Micro Air Vehicle Wing Manufacture and Force Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-03

    manufacturing techniques have been developed by various universities for research on Flapping Wing Micro Air Vehicles. Minimal attention though is given...collected at 2kHz (www.polytec.com/psv3d). A 0.25V band-limited white noise input signal is input to a Bogen HTA -125 High Performance Amplifier, which...manufacturing techniques have been developed by various universities for research on Flapping Wing Micro Air Vehicles. Minimal attention though is given

  4. LAMINAR MIXING IN SMX STATIC MIXERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MUSHTAK AL-ATABI

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper experimentally examines the performance of a commercial static mixer (SMX. Experiments were carried out to obtain the pressure drop across different numbers of mixing elements (4, 8, 12 and 16. The quality of mixing was visually assessed using flow visualization techniques. Experiments were performed for Reynolds number between 50 and 3000 (based on the unobstructed pipe diameter. The presence of the mixing elements in the flow stream promotes a non-laminar, turbulent-like flow which considerably enhances the mixing. Addition of more mixing elements triggered mixing in the flow at lower Reynolds numbers but this was achieved at the expense of higher pressure drop. This work represents the first stage of an on going work to develop correlations to assess the mixing quality and pressure loss in the SMX static mixers.

  5. Airplane wing deformation and flight flutter detection method by using three-dimensional speckle image correlation technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Jun; Yu, Zhijing; Wang, Tao; Zhuge, Jingchang; Ji, Yue; Xue, Bin

    2017-06-01

    Airplane wing deformation is an important element of aerodynamic characteristics, structure design, and fatigue analysis for aircraft manufacturing, as well as a main test content of certification regarding flutter for airplanes. This paper presents a novel real-time detection method for wing deformation and flight flutter detection by using three-dimensional speckle image correlation technology. Speckle patterns whose positions are determined through the vibration characteristic of the aircraft are coated on the wing; then the speckle patterns are imaged by CCD cameras which are mounted inside the aircraft cabin. In order to reduce the computation, a matching technique based on Geodetic Systems Incorporated coded points combined with the classical epipolar constraint is proposed, and a displacement vector map for the aircraft wing can be obtained through comparing the coordinates of speckle points before and after deformation. Finally, verification experiments containing static and dynamic tests by using an aircraft wing model demonstrate the accuracy and effectiveness of the proposed method.

  6. Aeroelastic Flutter of Subsonic Aircraft Wing Section with Control Surface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aeroelastic Flutter of Subsonic Aircraft Wing Section with Control Surface

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Aeroelastic flutter in aircraft mechanisms is unavoidable, essentially in the wing and control surface. In this work a three degree-of-freedom aeroelastic wing section with trailing edge flap is modeled numerically and theoretically. FLUENT code based on the steady finite volume is used for the prediction of the steady aerodynamic characteristics (lift, drag, pitching moment, velocity, and pressure distribution as well as the Duhamel formulation is used to model the aerodynamic loads theoretically. The system response (pitch, flap pitch and plunge was determined by integration the governing equations using MATLAB with a standard Runge–Kutta algorithm in conjunction with Henon’s method. The results are compared with previous experimental data. The results show that the aerodynamic loads and wing-flap system response are increased when increasing the flow speed. On the other hand the aeroelastic response led up to limit cycle oscillation when the flow equals or more than flutter speed.

  7. Research of Morphing Wing Efficiency

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Komarov, Valery

    2004-01-01

    This report results from a contract tasking Samara State Aerospace University (SSAU) as follows: The contractor will develop and investigate aerodynamic and structural weight theories associated with morphing wing technology...

  8. Energy conversion statics

    CERN Document Server

    Messerle, H K; Declaris, Nicholas

    2013-01-01

    Energy Conversion Statics deals with equilibrium situations and processes linking equilibrium states. A development of the basic theory of energy conversion statics and its applications is presented. In the applications the emphasis is on processes involving electrical energy. The text commences by introducing the general concept of energy with a survey of primary and secondary energy forms, their availability, and use. The second chapter presents the basic laws of energy conversion. Four postulates defining the overall range of applicability of the general theory are set out, demonstrating th

  9. Static Transition Compression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Damian, Daniel; Danvy, Olivier

    2001-01-01

    Starting from an operational specification of a translation from a structured to an unstructured imperative language, we point out how a compositional and context-insensitive translation gives rise to static chains of jumps. Taking an inspiration from the notion of continuation, we state a new...... compositional and context-sensitive specification that provably gives rise to no static chains of jumps, no redundant labels, and no unused labels. It is defined with one inference rule per syntactic construct and operates in linear time and space on the size of the source program (indeed it operates in one...

  10. Experimental study of flow field distribution over a generic cranked double delta wing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mojtaba Dehghan Manshadi

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The flow fields over a generic cranked double delta wing were investigated. Pressure and velocity distributions were obtained using a Pitot tube and a hot wire anemometer. Two different leading edge shapes, namely “sharp” and “round”, were applied to the wing. The wing had two sweep angles of 55° and 30°. The experiments were conducted in a closed circuit wind tunnel at velocity 20 m/s and angles of attack of 5°–20° with the step of 5°. The Reynolds number of the model was about 2 × 105 according to the root chord. A dual vortex structure was formed above the wing surface. A pressure drop occurred at the vortex core and the root mean square of the measured velocity increased at the core of the vortices, reflecting the instability of the flow in that region. The magnitude of power spectral density increased strongly in spanwise direction and had the maximum value at the vortex core. By increasing the angle of attack, the pressure drop increased and the vortices became wider; the vortices moved inboard along the wing, and away from the surface; the flow separation was initiated from the outer portion of the wing and developed to its inner part. The vortices of the wing of the sharp leading edge were stronger than those of the round one.

  11. Gust Load Alleviation with Robust Control for a Flexible Wing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiang Liu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Traditional methods for gust alleviation of aircraft are mostly proposed based on a specific flight condition. In this paper, robust control laws are designed for a large flexible wing with uncertainty in Mach number and dynamic pressure. To accurately describe the aeroelastic model over a large flight envelope, a nonlinear parameter-varying model is developed which is a function of both Mach number and dynamic pressure. Then a linear fractional transformation is established accordingly and a modified model order reduction technique is applied to reduce the size of the uncertainty block. The developed model, in which the statistic nature of the gust is considered by using the Dryden power spectral density function, enables the use of μ-synthesis procedures for controller design. The simulations show that the μ controller can always effectively reduce the wing root shear force and bending moment at a given range of Mach number and dynamic pressure.

  12. Static response of deformable microchannels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christov, Ivan C.; Sidhore, Tanmay C.

    2017-11-01

    Microfluidic channels manufactured from PDMS are a key component of lab-on-a-chip devices. Experimentally, rectangular microchannels are found to deform into a non-rectangular cross-section due to fluid-structure interactions. Deformation affects the flow profile, which results in a nonlinear relationship between the volumetric flow rate and the pressure drop. We develop a framework, within the lubrication approximation (l >> w >> h), to self-consistently derive flow rate-pressure drop relations. Emphasis is placed on handling different types of elastic response: from pure plate-bending, to half-space deformation, to membrane stretching. The ``simplest'' model (Stokes flow in a 3D rectangular channel capped with a linearly elastic Kirchhoff-Love plate) agrees well with recent experiments. We also simulate the static response of such microfluidic channels under laminar flow conditions using ANSYSWorkbench. Simulations are calibrated using experimental flow rate-pressure drop data from the literature. The simulations provide highly resolved deformation profiles, which are difficult to measure experimentally. By comparing simulations, experiments and our theoretical models, we show good agreement in many flow/deformation regimes, without any fitting parameters.

  13. Static analysis for blinding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Christoffer Rosenkilde; Nielson, Hanne Riis

    2006-01-01

    operation blinding. In this paper we study the theoretical foundations for one of the successful approaches to validating cryptographic protocols and we extend it to handle the blinding primitive. Our static analysis approach is based on Flow Logic; this gives us a clean separation between the specification...

  14. Static Transition Compression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Danvy, Olivier; Damian, Daniel

    2001-01-01

    Starting from an operational specification of a translation from a structured to an unstructured imperative language, we point out how a compositional and context-insensitive translation gives rise to static chains of jumps. Taking an inspiration from the notion of continuation, we state a new co...

  15. Why Static Clings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naab, Laurie; Henry, David

    2009-01-01

    Using Wiggins and McTighe's (1998) concept of Big Ideas, the authors planned and designed an electricity investigation to address common student misconceptions about static electricity. With Styrofoam plates and transparent tape, elementary students investigated many properties of electrically charged and uncharged objects in a 5E learning cycle…

  16. Explosions and static electricity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jonassen, Niels M

    1995-01-01

    The paper deals with the problem of electrostatic discharges as causes of ignition of vapor/gas and dust/gas mixtures. A series of examples of static-caused explosions will be discussed. The concepts of explosion limits, the incendiveness of various discharge types and safe voltages are explained...

  17. Unsteady Aerodynamic Investigation of the Propeller-Wing Interaction for a Rocket Launched Unmanned Air Vehicle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Q. Zhang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The aerodynamic characteristics of propeller-wing interaction for the rocket launched UAV have been investigated numerically by means of sliding mesh technology. The corresponding forces and moments have been collected for axial wing placements ranging from 0.056 to 0.5D and varied rotating speeds. The slipstream generated by the rotating propeller has little effects on the lift characteristics of the whole UAV. The drag can be seen to remain unchanged as the wing's location moves progressively closer to the propeller until 0.056D away from the propeller, where a nearly 20% increase occurred sharply. The propeller position has a negligible effect on the overall thrust and torque of the propeller. The efficiency affected by the installation angle of the propeller blade has also been analyzed. Based on the pressure cloud and streamlines, the vortices generated by propeller, propeller-wing interaction, and wing tip have also been captured and analyzed.

  18. The flow over a 'high' aspect ratio gothic wing at supersonic speeds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narayan, K. Y.

    1975-01-01

    Results are presented of an experimental investigation on a nonconical wing which supports an attached shock wave over a region of the leading edge near the vertex and a detached shock elsewhere. The shock detachment point is determined from planform schlieren photographs of the flow field and discrepancies are shown to exist between this and the one calculated by applying the oblique shock equations normal to the leading edge. On a physical basis, it is argued that the shock detachment has to obey the two-dimensional law normal to the leading edges. From this, and from other measurements on conical wings, it is thought that the planform schlieren technique may not be particularly satisfactory for detecting shock detachment. Surface pressure distributions are presented and are explained in terms of the flow over related delta wings which are identified as a vertex delta wing and a local delta wing.

  19. Finite element analysis of high aspect ratio wind tunnel wing model: A parametric study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosly, N. A.; Harmin, M. Y.

    2017-12-01

    Procedure for designing the wind tunnel model of a high aspect ratio (HAR) wing containing geometric nonlinearities is described in this paper. The design process begins with identification of basic features of the HAR wing as well as its design constraints. This enables the design space to be narrowed down and consequently, brings ease of convergence towards the design solution. Parametric studies in terms of the spar thickness, the span length and the store diameter are performed using finite element analysis for both undeformed and deformed cases, which respectively demonstrate the linear and nonlinear conditions. Two main criteria are accounted for in the selection of the wing design: the static deflections due to gravitational loading should be within the allowable margin of the size of the wind tunnel test section and the flutter speed of the wing should be much below the maximum speed of the wind tunnel. The findings show that the wing experiences a stiffness hardening effect under the nonlinear static solution and the presence of the store enables significant reduction in linear flutter speed.

  20. Interactive flutter analysis and parametric study for conceptual wing design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukhopadhyay, Vivek

    1995-01-01

    An interactive computer program was developed for wing flutter analysis in the conceptual design stage. The objective was to estimate the flutter instability boundary of a flexible cantilever wing, when well defined structural and aerodynamic data are not available, and then study the effect of change in Mach number, dynamic pressure, torsional frequency, sweep, mass ratio, aspect ratio, taper ratio, center of gravity, and pitch inertia, to guide the development of the concept. The software was developed on MathCad (trademark) platform for Macintosh, with integrated documentation, graphics, database and symbolic mathematics. The analysis method was based on nondimensional parametric plots of two primary flutter parameters, namely Regier number and Flutter number, with normalization factors based on torsional stiffness, sweep, mass ratio, aspect ratio, center of gravity location and pitch inertia radius of gyration. The plots were compiled in a Vaught Corporation report from a vast database of past experiments and wind tunnel tests. The computer program was utilized for flutter analysis of the outer wing of a Blended Wing Body concept, proposed by McDonnell Douglas Corporation. Using a set of assumed data, preliminary flutter boundary and flutter dynamic pressure variation with altitude, Mach number and torsional stiffness were determined.

  1. Analysis of a Hybrid Wing Body Center Section Test Article

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Hsi-Yung T.; Shaw, Peter; Przekop, Adam

    2013-01-01

    The hybrid wing body center section test article is an all-composite structure made of crown, floor, keel, bulkhead, and rib panels utilizing the Pultruded Rod Stitched Efficient Unitized Structure (PRSEUS) design concept. The primary goal of this test article is to prove that PRSEUS components are capable of carrying combined loads that are representative of a hybrid wing body pressure cabin design regime. This paper summarizes the analytical approach, analysis results, and failure predictions of the test article. A global finite element model of composite panels, metallic fittings, mechanical fasteners, and the Combined Loads Test System (COLTS) test fixture was used to conduct linear structural strength and stability analyses to validate the specimen under the most critical combination of bending and pressure loading conditions found in the hybrid wing body pressure cabin. Local detail analyses were also performed at locations with high stress concentrations, at Tee-cap noodle interfaces with surrounding laminates, and at fastener locations with high bearing/bypass loads. Failure predictions for different composite and metallic failure modes were made, and nonlinear analyses were also performed to study the structural response of the test article under combined bending and pressure loading. This large-scale specimen test will be conducted at the COLTS facility at the NASA Langley Research Center.

  2. Effect of winglets on a first-generation jet transport wing. 6: Stability characteristics for a full-span model at subsonic speeds. [conducted in Langley 8 foot transonic pressure tunnel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flechner, S. G.

    1979-01-01

    A wind tunnel investigation to identify changes in stability and control characteristics of a model KC-135A due to the addition of winglets is presented. Static longitudinal and lateral-directional aerodynamic characteristics were determined for the model with and without winglets. Variations in the aerodynamic characteristics at various Mach numbers, angles of attack, and angles of slidslip are discussed. The effect of the winglets on the drag and lift coefficients are evaluated and the low speed and high speed characteristics of the model are reported.

  3. Static and dynamic stresses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tishin, A.M.; Spichkin, Yu.I.; Bohr, Jakob

    1999-01-01

    to the appearance of anomalies in elastic constants, as well as to additional damping of sound oscillations in the lanthanide materials. The importance of understanding the nature of magnetoelastic interactions and related effects arises from the scientific desire to gather a better knowledge of magnetism, as well......In this chapter we shall consider the properties of lanthanide metals, their alloys and compounds which can be studied using static and alternating mechanical stresses. The main attention will be paid to the effects related to magnetoelastic interactions. These interactions in magnetic materials...... can display themselves in static magnetostriction deformations (this effect is not considered here) and in the changing of the magnetic state under mechanical stress. The latter causes variation of the magnetic phase transition temperatures, magnetization and magnetic structures, and leads...

  4. A Structural Design Concept for a Multi-Shell Blended Wing Body with Laminar Flow Control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Majeed Bishara

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Static and fatigue analyses are presented for a new blended wing body (BWB fuselage concept considering laminar flow control (LFC by boundary layer suction in order to reduce the aerodynamic drag. BWB aircraft design concepts profit from a structurally beneficial distribution of lift and weight and allow a better utilization of interior space over conventional layouts. A structurally efficient design concept for the pressurized BWB cabin is a vaulted layout that is, however, aerodynamically disadvantageous. A suitable remedy is a multi-shell design concept with a separate outer skin. The synergetic combination of such a multi-shell BWB fuselage with a LFC via perforation of the outer skin to attain a drag reduction appears promising. In this work, two relevant structural design aspects are considered. First, a numerical model for a ribbed double-shell design of a fuselage segment is analyzed. Second, fatigue aspects of the perforation in the outer skin are investigated. A design making use of controlled fiber orientation is proposed for the perforated skin. The fatigue behavior is compared to perforation methods with conventional fiber topologies and to configurations without perforations.

  5. Waterproof and translucent wings at the same time: problems and solutions in butterflies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez Goodwyn, Pablo; Maezono, Yasunori; Hosoda, Naoe; Fujisaki, Kenji

    2009-07-01

    Although the colour of butterflies attracts the most attention, the waterproofing properties of their wings are also extremely interesting. Most butterfly wings are considered “super-hydrophobic” because the contact angle (CA) with a water drop exceeds 150°. Usually, butterfly wings are covered with strongly overlapping scales; however, in the case of transparent or translucent wings, scale cover is reduced; thus, the hydrophobicity could be affected. Here, we present a comparative analysis of wing hydrophobicity and its dependence on morphology for two species with translucent wings Parantica sita (Nymphalidae) and Parnassius glacialis (Papilionidae). These species have very different life histories: P. sita lives for up to 6 months as an adult and migrates over long distance, whereas P. glacialis lives for less than 1 month and does not migrate. We measured the water CA and analysed wing morphology with scanning electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy. P. sita has super-hydrophobic wing surfaces, with CA > 160°, whereas P. glacialis did not (CA = 100-135°). Specialised scales were found on the translucent portions of P. sita wings. These scales were ovoid and much thinner than common scales, erect at about 30°, and leaving up to 80% of the wing surface uncovered. The underlying bare wing surface had a remarkable pattern of ridges and knobs. P. glacialis also had over 80% of the wing surface uncovered, but the scales were either setae-like or spade-like. The bare surface of the wing had an irregular wavy smooth pattern. We suggest a mode of action that allows this super-hydrophobic effect with an incompletely covered wing surface. The scales bend, but do not collapse, under the pressure of a water droplet, and the elastic recovery of the structure at the borders of the droplet allows a high apparent CA. Thus, P. sita can be translucent without losing its waterproof properties. This characteristic is likely necessary for the long life and migration

  6. Static electromagnetic field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Accioly, A.J.; Vaidya, A.N.; Som, M.M.

    1983-01-01

    The problem of static electromagnetic field admitting a time-like and two space-like Killing vectors is completely solved. The solutions contain plane-symmetric solution as a special case. The solutions can be transformed into solutions describing the gravitational field of a charge line-mass by suitably introducing weyl's canonical coordinates. Further, these solutions are true generalizations of Kasner solutions. (Author) [pt

  7. Microprocessor controlled static converter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefan Szabo

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper wants to demonstrate a way of implementing a microcontroller into an DC motor speed control loop. The static power converter is a fully controlled rectifier bridge, using standard SCR's. The bridge's control signals are supplied by the microcontroller and are phase-angle or burst types. The automation loop contains a software PI-style regulator. All the experimental results shows that this aproach is flexibile enough to be used on a large scale.

  8. Conceptual Study of Rotary-Wing Microrobotics

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Chabak, Kelson D

    2008-01-01

    This thesis presents a novel rotary-wing micro-electro-mechanical systems (MEMS) robot design. Two MEMS wing designs were designed, fabricated and tested including one that possesses features conducive to insect level aerodynamics...

  9. Aerodynamic control with passively pitching wings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gravish, Nick; Wood, Robert

    Flapping wings may pitch passively under aerodynamic and inertial loads. Such passive pitching is observed in flapping wing insect and robot flight. The effect of passive wing pitch on the control dynamics of flapping wing flight are unexplored. Here we demonstrate in simulation and experiment the critical role wing pitching plays in yaw control of a flapping wing robot. We study yaw torque generation by a flapping wing allowed to passively rotate in the pitch axis through a rotational spring. Yaw torque is generated through alternating fast and slow upstroke and and downstroke. Yaw torque sensitively depends on both the rotational spring force law and spring stiffness, and at a critical spring stiffness a bifurcation in the yaw torque control relationship occurs. Simulation and experiment reveal the dynamics of this bifurcation and demonstrate that anomalous yaw torque from passively pitching wings is the result of aerodynamic and inertial coupling between the pitching and stroke-plane dynamics.

  10. Effects of wing leading-edge radius and Reynolds number on longitudinal aerodynamic characteristics of highly swept wing-body configurations at subsonic speeds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henderson, W. P.

    1976-01-01

    An investigation was conducted in the Langley low turbulence pressure tunnel to determine the effects of wing leading edge radius and Reynolds number on the longitudinal aerodynamic characteristics of a series of highly swept wing-body configurations. The tests were conducted at Mach numbers below 0.30, angles of attack up to 16 deg, and Reynolds numbers per meter from 6.57 million to 43.27 million. The wings under study in this investigation had leading edge sweep angles of 61.7 deg, 64.61 deg, and 67.01 deg in combination with trailing edge sweep angles of 0 deg and 40.6 deg. The leading edge radii of each wing planform could be varied from sharp to nearly round.

  11. PEBBLES Simulation of Static Friction and New Static Friction Benchmark

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cogliati, Joshua J.; Ougouag, Abderrafi M.

    2010-01-01

    Pebble bed reactors contain large numbers of spherical fuel elements arranged randomly. Determining the motion and location of these fuel elements is required for calculating certain parameters of pebble bed reactor operation. This paper documents the PEBBLES static friction model. This model uses a three dimensional differential static friction approximation extended from the two dimensional Cundall and Strack model. The derivation of determining the rotational transformation of pebble to pebble static friction force is provided. A new implementation for a differential rotation method for pebble to container static friction force has been created. Previous published methods are insufficient for pebble bed reactor geometries. A new analytical static friction benchmark is documented that can be used to verify key static friction simulation parameters. This benchmark is based on determining the exact pebble to pebble and pebble to container static friction coefficients required to maintain a stable five sphere pyramid.

  12. Waving Wing Aerodynamics at Low Reynolds Numbers

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    wing. An attached leading edge vortex has been observed by multiple research groups on both mechanical wing flappers (8; 22; 21; 4) and revolving wing...observed by Ellington et al. (8) in their earlier experiments on the mechanical hawkmoth flapper at Re ≈ 10,000. In these experiments the spanwise flow...on mechanical wing flappers at similar Reynolds numbers, Re ≈ 1,000 and 1,400 respectively. Both sets of experiments revealed a stable attached

  13. Effect of a Finite Trailing Edge Thickness on the Drag of Rectangular and Delta Wings at Supersonic Speeds

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Klunker, E

    1952-01-01

    The effect of a finite trailing-edge thickness on the pressure drag of rectangular and delta wings with truncated diamond-shaped airfoil sections with a given thickness ratio is studied for supersonic...

  14. Vortex Breakdown over Slender Delta Wings (Eclatement tourbillonnaire sur les ailes delta effil es)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-11-01

    taps See Fig. 1. Pressure taps Number of pressure taps and thermocouple 57 taps on 65° delta wing, 3 taps on canter body of 55° diamond and...Sedra Walton, Scott Thompson, Paul Olsen, Andrew Arena, Todd Graves, Thomas Quast, Kenneth Cheung, Deborah Grismer, David Williams, Alain Pelletier

  15. Wing-vortex interaction: unraveling the flowfield of a hovering rotor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhagwat, Mahendra J.; Caradonna, Francis X.; Ramasamy, Manikandan

    2015-01-01

    This paper focuses on one of the most prominent flow features of the hovering rotor wake, the close interaction of the tip vortex with a following blade. Such vortex interactions are fundamental determinants of rotor performance, loads, and noise. Yet, they are not completely understood, largely due to the lack of sufficiently comprehensive experimental data. The present study aims to perform such comprehensive measurements, not on hovering helicopter rotors (which hugely magnifies test complexity) but using fixed-wing models in controlled wind tunnel tests. The experiments were designed to measure, in considerable detail, the aerodynamic loading resulting from a vortex interacting with a semi-span wing, as well as the wake resulting from that interaction. The goal of the present study is to answer fundamental questions such as (a) the influence of a vortex passing below a wing on the lift, drag, tip vortex, and the wake of that wing and (b) the strength of the forming tip vortex and its relation to the wing loading and/or the tip loading. This paper presents detailed wing surface pressure measurements that result from the interaction of the wing with an interacting vortex trailing from an upstream wing. The data show large lift distribution changes for a range of wing-vortex interactions including the effects of close encounter with the vortex core. Significant asymmetry in the vortex-induced lift loading was observed, with the increase in wing sectional lift outboard of the interacting vortex (closer to the tip) being much smaller than the corresponding decrease inboard of the vortex.

  16. The Static Baryon Potential

    CERN Document Server

    Alexandrou, C; Tsapalis, A; Forcrand, Ph. de

    2002-01-01

    Using state of the art lattice techniques we investigate the static baryon potential. We employ the multi-hit procedure for the time links and a variational approach to determine the ground state with sufficient accuracy that, for distances up to $\\sim 1.2$ fm, we can distinguish the $Y$- and $\\Delta$- Ans\\"atze for the baryonic Wilson area law. Our analysis shows that the $\\Delta$-Ansatz is favoured. This result is also supported by the gauge-invariant nucleon wave function which we measure for the first time.

  17. Wing area, wing growth and wing loading of common sandpipers Actitis hypoleucos

    OpenAIRE

    Yalden, Derek; Yalden, D. W.

    2012-01-01

    This study investigates the changes in wing length, area and loading in Common Sandpipers as chicks grow, and as adults add extra mass (during egg-laying or before migration). Common Sandpiper chicks weigh about 17 g and have "hands" that are about 35 mm long at one week old, when the primaries are just emerging from their sheaths. They grow steadily to reach about 40 g, with hands about 85 mm long, at 19 days, when they are just about fledging. Their wings have roughly adult chord width at t...

  18. How Do Wings Generate Lift?

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Newton's second law of motion. Hence if a wing can generate lift equal to its weight (total weight of the vehicle) it can balance the gravitational pull and can maintain level flight. The equations for fluid flow that are equivalent to the second law are the well- known Navier–Stokes (N–S) equations [1]. These equations have.

  19. Werner helicase wings DNA binding

    OpenAIRE

    Hoadley, Kelly A.; Keck, James L.

    2010-01-01

    In this issue of Structure, Kitano et al. describe the structure of the DNA-bound winged-helix domain from the Werner helicase. This structure of a RecQ/DNA complex offers insights into the DNA unwinding mechanisms of RecQ family helicases.

  20. On Wings: Aerodynamics of Eagles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Millson, David

    2000-01-01

    The Aerodynamics Wing Curriculum is a high school program that combines basic physics, aerodynamics, pre-engineering, 3D visualization, computer-assisted drafting, computer-assisted manufacturing, production, reengineering, and success in a 15-hour, 3-week classroom module. (JOW)

  1. Material and Thickness Grading for Aeroelastic Tailoring of the Common Research Model Wing Box

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanford, Bret K.; Jutte, Christine V.

    2014-01-01

    This work quantifies the potential aeroelastic benefits of tailoring a full-scale wing box structure using tailored thickness distributions, material distributions, or both simultaneously. These tailoring schemes are considered for the wing skins, the spars, and the ribs. Material grading utilizes a spatially-continuous blend of two metals: Al and Al+SiC. Thicknesses and material fraction variables are specified at the 4 corners of the wing box, and a bilinear interpolation is used to compute these parameters for the interior of the planform. Pareto fronts detailing the conflict between static aeroelastic stresses and dynamic flutter boundaries are computed with a genetic algorithm. In some cases, a true material grading is found to be superior to a single-material structure.

  2. Wind tunnel tests for a flapping wing model with a changeable camber using macro-fiber composite actuators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Dae-Kwan; Han, Jae-Hung; Kwon, Ki-Jung

    2009-01-01

    In the present study, a biomimetic flexible flapping wing was developed on a real ornithopter scale by using macro-fiber composite (MFC) actuators. With the actuators, the maximum camber of the wing can be linearly changed from −2.6% to +4.4% of the maximum chord length. Aerodynamic tests were carried out in a low-speed wind tunnel to investigate the aerodynamic characteristics, particularly the camber effect, the chordwise flexibility effect and the unsteady effect. Although the chordwise wing flexibility reduces the effective angle of attack, the maximum lift coefficient can be increased by the MFC actuators up to 24.4% in a static condition. Note also that the mean values of the perpendicular force coefficient rise to a value of considerably more than 3 in an unsteady aerodynamic flow region. Additionally, particle image velocimetry (PIV) tests were performed in static and dynamic test conditions to validate the flexibility and unsteady effects. The static PIV results confirm that the effective angle of attack is reduced by the coupling of the chordwise flexibility and the aerodynamic force, resulting in a delay in the stall phenomena. In contrast to the quasi-steady flow condition of a relatively high advance ratio, the unsteady aerodynamic effect due to a leading edge vortex can be found along the wing span in a low advance ratio region. The overall results show that the chordwise wing flexibility can produce a positive effect on flapping aerodynamic characteristics in quasi-steady and unsteady flow regions; thus, wing flexibility should be considered in the design of efficient flapping wings

  3. Review Results on Wing-Body Interference

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frolov Vladimir

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents an overview of results for wing-body interference, obtained by the author for varied wing-body combinations. The lift-curve slopes of the wing-body combinations are considered. In this paper a discrete vortices method (DVM and 2D potential model for cross-flow around fuselage are used. The circular and elliptical cross-sections of the fuselage and flat wings of various forms are considered. Calculations showed that the value of the lift-curve slopes of the wing-body combinations may exceed the same value for an isolated wing. This result confirms an experimental data obtained by other authors earlier. Within a framework of the used mathematical models the investigations to optimize the wing-body combination were carried. The present results of the optimization problem for the wing-body combination allowed to select the optimal geometric characteristics for configuration to maximize the values of the lift-curve slopes of the wing-body combination. It was revealed that maximums of the lift-curve slopes for the optimal mid-wing configuration with elliptical cross-section body had a sufficiently large relative width of the body (more than 30% of the span wing.

  4. Aeroelastic Optimization Design for High-Aspect-Ratio Wings with Large Deformation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Changchuan Xie

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a framework of aeroelastic optimization design for high-aspect-ratio wing with large deformation. A highly flexible wing model for wind tunnel test is optimized subjected to multiple aeroelastic constraints. Static aeroelastic analysis is carried out for the beamlike wing model, using a geometrically nonlinear beam formulation coupled with the nonplanar vortex lattice method. The flutter solutions are obtained using the P-K method based on the static equilibrium configuration. The corresponding unsteady aerodynamic forces are calculated by nonplanar doublet-lattice method. This paper obtains linear and nonlinear aeroelastic optimum results, respectively, by the ISIGHT optimization platform. In this optimization problem, parameters of beam cross section are chosen as the design variables to satisfy the displacement, flutter, and strength requirements, while minimizing wing weight. The results indicate that it is necessary to consider geometrical nonlinearity in aeroelastic optimization design. In addition, optimization strategies are explored to simplify the complex optimization process and reduce the computing time. Different criterion values are selected and studied for judging the effects of the simplified method on the computing time and the accuracy of results. In this way, the computing time is reduced by more than 30% on the premise of ensuring the accuracy.

  5. Blended-Wing-Body Low-Speed Flight Dynamics: Summary of Ground Tests and Sample Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vicroy, Dan D.

    2009-01-01

    A series of low-speed wind tunnel tests of a Blended-Wing-Body tri-jet configuration to evaluate the low-speed static and dynamic stability and control characteristics over the full envelope of angle of attack and sideslip are summarized. These data were collected for use in simulation studies of the edge-of-the-envelope and potential out-of-control flight characteristics. Some selected results with lessons learned are presented.

  6. Hydrodynamic characteristics for flow around wavy wings with different wave lengths

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mi Jeong Kim

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The present study numerically investigates the effect of the wavy leading edge on hydrodynamic characteristics for the flow of rectangular wings with the low aspect ratio of 1.5. Five different wave lengths at fixed wavy amplitude have been considered. Numerical simulations are performed at a wide range of the angle of attack (0° ≤α ≤ 40° at one Reynolds number of 106. The wavy wings considered in this study did not experience enough lift drop to be defined as the stall, comparing with the smooth wing. However, in the pre-stall region, the wavy wings reveal the considerable loss of the lift, compared to the smooth wing. In the post-stall, the lift coefficients of the smooth wing and the wavy wings are not much different. The pressure coefficient, limiting streamlines and the iso-surface of the spanwise vorticity are also highlighted to examine the effect of the wave length on the flow structures.

  7. Exploring the Role of Habitat on the Wettability of Cicada Wings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Junho; Dana, Catherine E; Hong, Sungmin; Román, Jessica K; Jo, Kyoo Dong; Hong, Je Won; Nguyen, Jonah; Cropek, Donald M; Alleyne, Marianne; Miljkovic, Nenad

    2017-08-16

    Evolutionary pressure has pushed many extant species to develop micro/nanostructures that can significantly affect wettability and enable functionalities such as droplet jumping, self-cleaning, antifogging, antimicrobial, and antireflectivity. In particular, significant effort is underway to understand the insect wing surface structure to establish rational design tools for the development of novel engineered materials. Most studies, however, have focused on superhydrophobic wings obtained from a single insect species, in particular, the Psaltoda claripennis cicada. Here, we investigate the relationship between the spatially dependent wing wettability, topology, and droplet jumping behavior of multiple cicada species and their habitat, lifecycle, and interspecies relatedness. We focus on cicada wings of four different species: Neotibicen pruinosus, N. tibicen, Megatibicen dorsatus, and Magicicada septendecim and take a comparative approach. Using spatially resolved microgoniometry, scanning electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy, and high speed optical microscopy, we show that within cicada species, the wettability of wings is spatially homogeneous across wing cells. All four species were shown to have truncated conical pillars with widely varying length scales ranging from 50 to 400 nm in height. Comparison of the wettability revealed three cicada species with wings that are superhydrophobic (>150°) with low contact angle hysteresis (water shedding behavior but also enables the development of rational design tools for the manufacture of artificial surfaces for energy and water applications.

  8. Low-speed wind tunnel investigation of a semispan STOL jet transport wing body with an upper surface blown jet flap

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phelps, A. E., III; Letko, W.; Henderson, R. L.

    1973-01-01

    An investigation of the static longitudinal aerodynamic characteristics of a semispan STOL jet transport wing-body with an upper-surface blown jet flap for lift augmentation was conducted in a low-speed wind tunnel having a 12-ft octagonal test section. The semispan swept wing had an aspect ratio of 3.92 (7.84 for the full span) and had two simulated turbofan engines mounted ahead of and above the wing in a siamese pod equipped with an exhaust deflector. The purpose of the deflector was to spread the engine exhaust into a jet sheet attached to the upper surface of the wing so that it would turn downward over the flap and provide lift augmentation. The wing also had optional boundary-layer control provided by air blowing through a thin slot over a full-span plain trailing-edge flap.

  9. Variational approach for static mirror structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuznetsov, E. A. [P.N. Lebedev Physical Institute RAS, 53 Leninsky Ave., 119991 Moscow (Russian Federation); Space Research Institute RAS, 84/32 Profsoyuznaya str., 117997 Moscow (Russian Federation); L.D. Landau Institute for Theoretical Physics RAS, 2 Kosygin str., 119334 Moscow (Russian Federation); Passot, T.; Sulem, P. L. [UNS, CNRS, Observatoire de la Côte d' Azur, CS 34229, 06304 Nice Cedex 4 (France); Ruban, V. P. [L.D. Landau Institute for Theoretical Physics RAS, 2 Kosygin str., 119334 Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2015-04-15

    Anisotropic static plasma equilibria where the parallel and perpendicular pressures are only functions of the amplitude of the local magnetic field are shown to be amenable to a variational principle with a free energy density given by the parallel tension. This approach is used to demonstrate that two-dimensional small-amplitude static magnetic holes constructed from a Grad-Shafranov type equation slightly below the (subcritical) mirror instability threshold identify with lump solitons of KPII equation, but turn out to be unstable. Differently, large-amplitude magnetic structures, which are stable as they realize a minimum of the free energy, are computed using a gradient method within two-dimensional numerical simulations where the regularizing effect of finite Larmor radius corrections is retained. Interestingly, these structures transform from stripes to bubbles when the angle of the magnetic field with the coordinate plane is increased.

  10. Static electricity: A literature review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crow, Rita M.

    1991-11-01

    The major concern with static electricity is its discharging in a flammable atmosphere which can explode and cause a fire. Textile materials can have their electrical resistivity decreased by the addition of antistatic finishes, imbedding conductive particles into the fibres or by adding metal fibers to the yarns. The test methods used in the studies of static electricity include measuring the static properties of materials, of clothed persons, and of the ignition energy of flammable gases. Surveys have shown that there is sparse evidence for fires definitively being caused by static electricity. However, the 'worst-case' philosophy has been adopted and a static electricity safety code is described, including correct grounding procedures and the wearing of anti-static clothing and footwear.

  11. Static Validation of XSL Transformations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Anders; Olesen, Mads Østerby; Schwartzbach, Michael Ignatieff

    2007-01-01

    no static guarantees that, under the assumption that the input is valid relative to the input schema, the output of the transformation is valid relative to the output schema. We present a validation technique for XSLT based on the XML graph formalism introduced in the static analysis of JWIG Web services...... and XACT XML transformations. Being able to provide static guarantees, we can detect a large class of errors in an XSLT stylesheet at the time it is written instead of later when it has been deployed, and thereby provide benefits similar to those of static type checkers for modern programming languages...

  12. Static Analysis Using the Cloud

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rahul Kumar

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we describe our experience of using Microsoft Azure cloud computing platform for static analysis. We start by extending Static Driver Verifier to operate in the Microsoft Azure cloud with significant improvements in performance and scalability. We present our results of using SDV on single drivers and driver suites using various configurations of the cloud relative to a local machine. Finally, we describe the Static Module Verifier platform, a highly extensible and configurable platform for static analysis of generic modules, where we have integrated support for verification using a cloud services provider (Microsoft Azure in this case.

  13. Design and wind tunnel tests of winglets on a DC-10 wing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilkey, R. D.

    1979-01-01

    Results are presented of a wind tunnel test utilizing a 4.7 percent scale semi-span model in the Langley Research Center 8-foot transonic pressure wind tunnel to establish the cruise drag improvement potential of winglets as applied to the DC-10 wide body transport aircraft. Winglets were investigated on both the DC-10 Series 10 (domestic) and 30/40 (intercontinental) configurations and compared with the Series 30/40 configuration. The results of the investigation confirm that for the DC-10 winglets provide approximately twice the cruise drag reduction of wing-tip extensions for about the same increase in bending moment at the wing fuselage juncture. Furthermore, the winglet configurations achieved drag improvements which were in close agreement to analytical estimates. It was observed that relatively small changes in wing-winglet tailoring effected large improvements in drag and visual flow characteristics. All final winglet configurations exhibited visual flow characteristics on the wing and winglets

  14. Integration effects of pylon geometry on a high-wing transport airplane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlson, John R.; Lamb, Milton

    1989-01-01

    An investigation was conducted in the Langley 16-Foot Transonic Tunnel to determine the installation effects of a series of pylons that had differing cross-sectional shapes on the pressure distributions and aerodynamic characteristics of a 1/24-scale high wing transport. The tests were conducted at Mach numbers at 0.70 and 0.80 at angles of attack from -3 degrees to 4 degrees with the pylons tested at various toe angles between 5 degrees inboard and 5 degrees outboard. Results of this study indicate that the installed drag was lowest for the pylons with a compression pylon type design which kept the flow under the wing in the pylon/wing junction comparable to the clean wing velocities.

  15. Effect of canard deflection on close-coupled canard-wing-body aerodynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tu, Eugene L.

    1992-01-01

    The thin-layer Navier-Stokes equations are solved for the flow about a canard-wing-body configuration at transonic Mach numbers of 0.85 and 0.90, angles of attack from -4 to 10 degrees and canard deflection angles from -10 to +10 degrees. Effects of canard deflection on aerodynamic performance, including canard-wing vortex interaction, are investigated. Comparisons with experimental measurements of surface pressures, lift, drag and pitching moments are made to verify the accuracy of the computations. The results of the study show that the deflected canard downwash not only influences the formation of the wing leading-edge vortex, but can cause the formation of an unfavorable vortex on the wing lower surface as well.

  16. Vorticity Transport on a Flexible Wing in Stall Flutter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akkala, James; Buchholz, James; Farnsworth, John; McLaughlin, Thomas

    2014-11-01

    The circulation budget within dynamic stall vortices was investigated on a flexible NACA 0018 wing model of aspect ratio 6 undergoing stall flutter. The wing had an initial angle of attack of 6 degrees, Reynolds number of 1 . 5 ×105 and large-amplitude, primarily torsional, limit cycle oscillations were observed at a reduced frequency of k = πfc / U = 0 . 1 . Phase-locked stereo PIV measurements were obtained at multiple chordwise planes around the 62.5% and 75% spanwise locations to characterize the flow field within thin volumetric regions over the suction surface. Transient surface pressure measurements were used to estimate boundary vorticity flux. Recent analyses on plunging and rotating wings indicates that the magnitude of the pressure-gradient-driven boundary flux of secondary vorticity is a significant fraction of the magnitude of the convective flux from the separated leading-edge shear layer, suggesting that the secondary vorticity plays a significant role in regulating the strength of the primary vortex. This phenomenon is examined in the present case, and the physical mechanisms governing the growth and evolution of the dynamic stall vortices are explored. This work was supported by the Air Force Office of Scientific Research through the Flow Interactions and Control Program monitored by Dr. Douglas Smith, and through the 2014 AFOSR/ASEE Summer Faculty Fellowship Program (JA and JB).

  17. A Drosophila wing spot test

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ayaki, Toshikazu; Yoshikawa, Isao; Niikawa, Norio; Hoshi, Masaharu.

    1986-01-01

    A Drosophila wing spot test system was used to investigate the effects of low doses of X-rays, gamma rays, and both 2.3 and 14.1 MeV neutrons on somatic chromosome mutation (SCM) induction. The incidence of SCM was significantly increased with any type of radiation, with evident linear dose-response relationship within the range of 3 to 20 cGy. It was estimated that relative biological effectiveness value for SCM induction of 2.3 MeV neutrons to X-rays and gamma rays is much higher than that of 14.1 MeV neutrons to those photons (2.4 vs 8.0). The Drosophila wing spot test system seems to become a promising in vivo experimental method for higher animals in terms of the lack of necessity for a marvelously large number of materials required in conventional test system. (Namekawa, K.)

  18. Design and verification of a smart wing for an extreme-agility micro-air-vehicle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wickramasinghe, Viresh; Chen, Yong; Martinez, Marcias; Kernaghan, Robert; Wong, Franklin

    2011-01-01

    A special class of fixed-wing micro-air-vehicle (MAV) is currently being designed to fly and hover to provide range superiority as well as being able to hover through a flight maneuver known as prop-hanging to accomplish a variety of surveillance missions. The hover maneuver requires roll control of the wing through differential aileron deflection but a conventional system contributes significantly to the gross weight and complexity of a MAV. Therefore, it is advantageous to use smart structure approaches with active materials to design a lightweight, robust wing for the MAV. The proposed smart wing consists of an active trailing edge flap integrated with bimorph actuators with piezoceramic fibers. Actuation is enhanced by preloading the bimorph actuators with a compressive axial load. The preload is exerted on the actuators through a passive latex or electroactive polymer (EAP) skin that wraps around the airfoil. An EAP skin would further enhance the actuation by providing an electrostatic effect of the dielectric polymer to increase the deflection. Analytical modeling as well as finite element analysis show that the proposed concept could achieve the target bi-directional deflection of 30° in typical flight conditions. Several bimorph actuators were manufactured and an experimental setup was designed to measure the static and dynamic deflections. The experimental results validated the analytical technique and finite element models, which have been further used to predict the performance of the smart wing design for a MAV

  19. Design and verification of a smart wing for an extreme-agility micro-air-vehicle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wickramasinghe, Viresh; Chen, Yong; Martinez, Marcias; Wong, Franklin; Kernaghan, Robert

    2011-12-01

    A special class of fixed-wing micro-air-vehicle (MAV) is currently being designed to fly and hover to provide range superiority as well as being able to hover through a flight maneuver known as prop-hanging to accomplish a variety of surveillance missions. The hover maneuver requires roll control of the wing through differential aileron deflection but a conventional system contributes significantly to the gross weight and complexity of a MAV. Therefore, it is advantageous to use smart structure approaches with active materials to design a lightweight, robust wing for the MAV. The proposed smart wing consists of an active trailing edge flap integrated with bimorph actuators with piezoceramic fibers. Actuation is enhanced by preloading the bimorph actuators with a compressive axial load. The preload is exerted on the actuators through a passive latex or electroactive polymer (EAP) skin that wraps around the airfoil. An EAP skin would further enhance the actuation by providing an electrostatic effect of the dielectric polymer to increase the deflection. Analytical modeling as well as finite element analysis show that the proposed concept could achieve the target bi-directional deflection of 30° in typical flight conditions. Several bimorph actuators were manufactured and an experimental setup was designed to measure the static and dynamic deflections. The experimental results validated the analytical technique and finite element models, which have been further used to predict the performance of the smart wing design for a MAV.

  20. Flight Loads Prediction of High Aspect Ratio Wing Aircraft Using Multibody Dynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michele Castellani

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A framework based on multibody dynamics has been developed for the static and dynamic aeroelastic analyses of flexible high aspect ratio wing aircraft subject to structural geometric nonlinearities. Multibody dynamics allows kinematic nonlinearities and nonlinear relationships in the forces definition and is an efficient and promising methodology to model high aspect ratio wings, which are known to be prone to structural nonlinear effects because of the high deflections in flight. The multibody dynamics framework developed employs quasi-steady aerodynamics strip theory and discretizes the wing as a series of rigid bodies interconnected by beam elements, representative of the stiffness distribution, which can undergo arbitrarily large displacements and rotations. The method is applied to a flexible high aspect ratio wing commercial aircraft and both trim and gust response analyses are performed in order to calculate flight loads. These results are then compared to those obtained with the standard linear aeroelastic approach provided by the Finite Element Solver Nastran. Nonlinear effects come into play mainly because of the need of taking into account the large deflections of the wing for flight loads computation and of considering the aerodynamic forces as follower forces.

  1. Internal Structural Design of the Common Research Model Wing Box for Aeroelastic Tailoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jutte, Christine V.; Stanford, Bret K.; Wieseman, Carol D.

    2015-01-01

    This work explores the use of alternative internal structural designs within a full-scale wing box structure for aeroelastic tailoring, with a focus on curvilinear spars, ribs, and stringers. The baseline wing model is a fully-populated, cantilevered wing box structure of the Common Research Model (CRM). Metrics of interest include the wing weight, the onset of dynamic flutter, and the static aeroelastic stresses. Twelve parametric studies alter the number of internal structural members along with their location, orientation, and curvature. Additional evaluation metrics are considered to identify design trends that lead to lighter-weight, aeroelastically stable wing designs. The best designs of the individual studies are compared and discussed, with a focus on weight reduction and flutter resistance. The largest weight reductions were obtained by removing the inner spar, and performance was maintained by shifting stringers forward and/or using curvilinear ribs: 5.6% weight reduction, a 13.9% improvement in flutter speed, but a 3.0% increase in stress levels. Flutter resistance was also maintained using straight-rotated ribs although the design had a 4.2% lower flutter speed than the curved ribs of similar weight and stress levels were higher. For some configurations, the differences between curved and straight ribs were smaller, which provides motivation for future optimization-based studies to fully exploit the trade-offs.

  2. Low-speed static and dynamic force tests of a generic supersonic cruise fighter configuration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hahne, David E.

    1989-01-01

    Static and dynamic force tests of a generic fighter configuration designed for sustained supersonic flight were conducted in the Langley 30- by 60-foot tunnel. The baseline configuration had a 65 deg arrow wing, twin wing mounted vertical tails and a canard. Results showed that control was available up to C sub L,max (maximum lift coefficient) from aerodynamic controls about all axes but control in the pitch and yaw axes decreased rapidly in the post-stall angle-of-attack region. The baseline configuration showed stable lateral-directional characteristics at low angles of attack but directional stability occurred near alpha = 25 deg as the wing shielded the vertical tails. The configuration showed positive effective dihedral throughout the test angle-of-attack range. Forced oscillation tests indicated that the baseline configuration had stable damping characteristics about the lateral-directional axes.

  3. Cardiovascular responses to static exercise in distance runners and weight lifters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Longhurst, J. C.; Kelly, A. R.; Gonyea, W. J.; Mitchell, J. H.

    1980-01-01

    Three groups of athletes including long-distance runners, competitive and amateur weight lifters, and age- and sex-matched control subjects have been studied by hemodynamic and echocardiographic methods in order to determine the effect of the training programs on the cardiovascular response to static exercise. Blood pressure, heart rate, and double product data at rest and at fatigue suggest that competitive endurance (dynamic exercise) training alters the cardiovascular response to static exercise. In contrast to endurance exercise, weight lifting (static exercise) training does not alter the cardiovascular response to static exercise: weight lifters responded to static exercise in a manner very similar to that of the control subjects.

  4. Static Aeroelastic Deformation Effects in Preliminary Wind-tunnel Tests of Silent Supersonic Technology Demonstrator

    OpenAIRE

    Makino, Yoshikazu; Ohira, Keisuke; Makimoto, Takuya; Mitomo, Toshiteru; 牧野, 好和; 大平, 啓介; 牧本, 卓也; 三友, 俊輝

    2011-01-01

    Effects of static aeroelastic deformation of a wind-tunnel test model on the aerodynamic characteristics are discussed in wind-tunnel tests in the preliminary design phase of the silent supersonic technology demonstrator (S3TD). The static aeroelastic deformation of the main wing is estimated for JAXA 2m x 2m transonic wind-tunnel and 1m x 1m supersonic wind-tunnel by a finite element method (FEM) structural analysis in which its structural model is tuned with the model deformation calibratio...

  5. Fluid Statics and Archimedes

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    stationary fluid only normal stress (pressure) is present and tangential stresses are absent. In this article we ... delayed the discovery of the principle by a few centuries! Archimedes formulated his laws on buoyancy ... stress in the study of mechanics of solids and fluids (see Boxl). Just as temperature and density, stress can ...

  6. The costae presenting in high-temperature-induced vestigial wings ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Most of the wings have defects in the wing blade and partially formed wing margin, which are the result of autonomous cell death in the ... [Yang D. 2007 The costae presenting in high-temperature-induced vestigial wings of Drosophila: implications for anterior wing margin formation. J. Genet. .... The relevant gene(s) may be.

  7. New compliant strain gauges for self-sensing dynamic deformation of flapping wings on miniature air vehicles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wissman, James; Perez-Rosado, Ariel; Edgerton, Alex; Levi, Benjamin M; Karakas, Zeynep N; Kujawski, Mark; Philipps, Alyssa; Papavizas, Nicholas; Fallon, Danielle; Bruck, Hugh A; Smela, Elisabeth

    2013-01-01

    Over the past several years there has been an increasing interest in the development of miniature air vehicles (MAVs) with flapping wings. To allow these MAVs to adjust to changes in wind direction and to maximize their efficiency, it is desirable to monitor the deformation of the wing during flight. This paper presents a step in this direction, demonstrating the measurement of strain on the surface of the wing using minimally invasive compliant piezoresistive sensors. The strain gauges consisted of latex mixed with electrically conducting exfoliated graphite, and they were applied by spray coating. To calibrate the gauges, both static and dynamic testing up to 10 Hz were performed using cantilever structures. In tension the static sensitivity was a linear 0.4 Ω με −1 and the gauge factor was 28; in compression, the gauge factor was −5. Although sensitivities in tension and compression differed by a factor of almost six, this was not reflected in the dynamic data, which followed the strain reversibly with little distortion. There was no attenuation with frequency, indicating a sufficiently small time constant for this application. The gauges were thin, compliant, and light enough to measure, without interference, deformations due to shape changes of the flexible wing associated with generating lift and thrust. During flapping the resistance closely tracked the generated thrust, measured on a test stand, with both signals tracing figure-8 loops as a function of wing position throughout each cycle. (paper)

  8. New compliant strain gauges for self-sensing dynamic deformation of flapping wings on miniature air vehicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wissman, James; Perez-Rosado, Ariel; Edgerton, Alex; Levi, Benjamin M.; Karakas, Zeynep N.; Kujawski, Mark; Philipps, Alyssa; Papavizas, Nicholas; Fallon, Danielle; Bruck, Hugh A.; Smela, Elisabeth

    2013-08-01

    Over the past several years there has been an increasing interest in the development of miniature air vehicles (MAVs) with flapping wings. To allow these MAVs to adjust to changes in wind direction and to maximize their efficiency, it is desirable to monitor the deformation of the wing during flight. This paper presents a step in this direction, demonstrating the measurement of strain on the surface of the wing using minimally invasive compliant piezoresistive sensors. The strain gauges consisted of latex mixed with electrically conducting exfoliated graphite, and they were applied by spray coating. To calibrate the gauges, both static and dynamic testing up to 10 Hz were performed using cantilever structures. In tension the static sensitivity was a linear 0.4 Ω μɛ-1 and the gauge factor was 28; in compression, the gauge factor was -5. Although sensitivities in tension and compression differed by a factor of almost six, this was not reflected in the dynamic data, which followed the strain reversibly with little distortion. There was no attenuation with frequency, indicating a sufficiently small time constant for this application. The gauges were thin, compliant, and light enough to measure, without interference, deformations due to shape changes of the flexible wing associated with generating lift and thrust. During flapping the resistance closely tracked the generated thrust, measured on a test stand, with both signals tracing figure-8 loops as a function of wing position throughout each cycle.

  9. Statics and Mechanics of Structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krenk, Steen; Høgsberg, Jan Becker

    The statics and mechanics of structures form a core aspect of civil engineering. This book provides an introduction to the subject, starting from classic hand-calculation types of analysis and gradually advancing to a systematic form suitable for computer implementation. It starts with statically...

  10. Conformable Pressurized Structures : Design and Analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Geuskens, F.J.J.M.M.

    2012-01-01

    There are many applications where volume needs to be pressurised within a geometrical space for which conventional pressure vessels do not provide suitable solutions. Applications are for example found in pressure cabins for Blended Wing Body Aircraft and conformable pressure vessels for an

  11. Role of wing morphing in thrust generation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehdi Ghommem

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we investigate the role of morphing on flight dynamics of two birds by simulating the flow over rigid and morphing wings that have the characteristics of two different birds, namely the Giant Petrel and Dove Prion. The simulation of a flapping rigid wing shows that the root of the wing should be placed at a specific angle of attack in order to generate enough lift to balance the weight of the bird. However, in this case the generated thrust is either very small, or even negative, depending on the wing shape. Further, results show that morphing of the wing enables a significant increase in the thrust and propulsive efficiency. This indicates that the birds actually utilize some sort of active wing twisting and bending to produce enough thrust. This study should facilitate better guidance for the design of flapping air vehicles.

  12. Analysis of bat wings for morphing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leylek, Emily A.; Manzo, Justin E.; Garcia, Ephrahim

    2008-03-01

    The morphing of wings from three different bat species is studied using an extension of the Weissinger method. To understand how camber affects performance factors such as lift and lift to drag ratio, XFOIL is used to study thin (3% thickness to chord ratio) airfoils at a low Reynolds number of 100,000. The maximum camber of 9% yielded the largest lift coefficient, and a mid-range camber of 7% yielded the largest lift to drag ratio. Correlations between bat wing morphology and flight characteristics are covered, and the three bat wing planforms chosen represent various combinations of morphological components and different flight modes. The wings are studied using the extended Weissinger method in an "unmorphed" configuration using a thin, symmetric airfoil across the span of the wing through angles of attack of 0°-15°. The wings are then run in the Weissinger method at angles of attack of -2° to 12° in a "morphed" configuration modeled after bat wings seen in flight, where the camber of the airfoils comprising the wings is varied along the span and a twist distribution along the span is introduced. The morphed wing configurations increase the lift coefficient over 1000% from the unmorphed configuration and increase the lift to drag ratio over 175%. The results of the three different species correlate well with their flight in nature.

  13. Veins improve fracture toughness of insect wings.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan-Henning Dirks

    Full Text Available During the lifetime of a flying insect, its wings are subjected to mechanical forces and deformations for millions of cycles. Defects in the micrometre thin membranes or veins may reduce the insect's flight performance. How do insects prevent crack related material failure in their wings and what role does the characteristic vein pattern play? Fracture toughness is a parameter, which characterises a material's resistance to crack propagation. Our results show that, compared to other body parts, the hind wing membrane of the migratory locust S. gregaria itself is not exceptionally tough (1.04±0.25 MPa√m. However, the cross veins increase the wing's toughness by 50% by acting as barriers to crack propagation. Using fracture mechanics, we show that the morphological spacing of most wing veins matches the critical crack length of the material (1132 µm. This finding directly demonstrates how the biomechanical properties and the morphology of locust wings are functionally correlated in locusts, providing a mechanically 'optimal' solution with high toughness and low weight. The vein pattern found in insect wings thus might inspire the design of more durable and lightweight artificial 'venous' wings for micro-air-vehicles. Using the vein spacing as indicator, our approach might also provide a basis to estimate the wing properties of endangered or extinct insect species.

  14. Quad-thopter: Tailless Flapping Wing Robot with 4 Pairs of Wings

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Wagter, C.; Karasek, M.; de Croon, G.C.H.E.; J.-M. Moschetta G. Hattenberger, H. de Plinval

    2017-01-01

    We present a novel design of a tailless flapping wing Micro Air Vehicle (MAV), which uses four independently driven pairs of flapping wings in order to fly and perform agile maneuvers. The wing pairs are arranged such that differential thrust generates the desired roll and pitch moments, similar to

  15. Aeroelastic Tailoring of a Plate Wing with Functionally Graded Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunning, Peter D.; Stanford, Bret K.; Kim, H. Alicia; Jutte, Christine V.

    2014-01-01

    This work explores the use of functionally graded materials for the aeroelastic tailoring of a metallic cantilevered plate-like wing. Pareto trade-off curves between dynamic stability (flutter) and static aeroelastic stresses are obtained for a variety of grading strategies. A key comparison is between the effectiveness of material grading, geometric grading (i.e., plate thickness variations), and using both simultaneously. The introduction of material grading does, in some cases, improve the aeroelastic performance. This improvement, and the physical mechanism upon which it is based, depends on numerous factors: the two sets of metallic material parameters used for grading, the sweep of the plate, the aspect ratio of the plate, and whether the material is graded continuously or discretely.

  16. transmitted fresh water flow rate of reverse osmosis desalination system utilizing the static pressure head-formulation of numerical results and comparison with experimental results; Seiatsuto wo riyo suru gyakushintohodatsuen shisutemu no tansuisuikaryuryo-suchikaisekikekka no shikika oyobi shikkenkekka tono hikaku

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miyatake, O.; Tagawa, K.; Noda, H. [Kyushu University, Fukuoka (Japan)

    1999-07-10

    Based on the author's precious numerical results of a reverse osmosis desalination system for seawater or brackish water utilizing the static pressure head of seawater in a deep-sea region or brackish water in a vertical pit, a dimensionless expression is formulated to predict the transmitted fresh water flow rate from the geometry and the submerged depth of the device, the pure water permeability and the solute permeability of membrane, and the physical properties of seawater or brackish water. The derived expression is compared with experimental results obtained by field experiments carried out in the Sea of Japan and the East China Sea with fair agreement and thus confirmed the applicability and usefulness of the expression. (author)

  17. Method for solving an inverse problem of wing type by using a simple panel method; Kanbenna panel ho ni yoru yokugata gyaku mondai no ichikaiho

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ando, J.; Matsumoto, D.; Maita, S.; Nakatake, K. [Kyushu University, Fukuoka (Japan). Faculty of Engineering

    1997-10-01

    This paper describes one method for solving an inverse problem of wing type based on the source and quasi continuous vortex lattice method (SQCM) in designing marine propellers and underwater wings. With the SQCM, vortices and control points are distributed on wing camber according to the QCM, and wing surface is divided into certain number of panels. This is the method to decide vortex intensity and blow-out intensity simultaneously from the condition that vertical speed on the camber and the wing surface is zero, upon having distributed blow-out with certain intensity inside the panel. The method solves the inverse problem with the following process: specific point distribution is so determined that the targeted velocity on the wing surface is satisfied when wing surface pressure distribution and uniform flow velocity are given; and then the panels are so rearranged as in parallel with direction of the flow on the surface of the wing calculated by using these specific points to derive the targeted wing shape. This paper describes the problem solving procedure in great detail. It also introduces examples of numerical calculations. It shows one method for solving the inverse problem in wing type using the SQCM as a simple panel method, whereas its good convergence and stability were verified. Considerations on effects of free surface and expansion of the method into three-dimensional problems will be implemented in the future. 11 refs., 8 figs.

  18. Effect of canard location and size on canard-wing interference and aerodynamic center shift related to maneuvering aircraft at transonic speeds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gloss, B. B.

    1974-01-01

    A generalized wind-tunnel model, typical of highly maneuverable aircraft, was tested in the Langley 8-foot transonic pressure tunnel at Mach numbers from 0.70 to 1.20 to determine the effects of canard location and size on canard-wing interference effects and aerodynamic center shift at transonic speeds. The canards had exposed areas of 16.0 and 28.0 percent of the wing reference area and were located in the chord plane of the wing or in a position 18.5 percent of the wing mean geometric chord above or below the wing chord plane. Two different wing planforms were tested, one with leading-edge sweep of 60 deg and the other 44 deg; both wings had the same reference area and span. The results indicated that the largest benefits in lift and drag were obtained with the canard above the wing chord plane for both wings tested. The low canard configuration for the 60 deg swept wing proved to be more stable and produced a more linear pitching-moment curve than the high and coplanar canard configurations for the subsonic test Mach numbers.

  19. Adaptive wing : Investigations of passive wing technologies for loads reduction in the cleansky smart fixed wing aircraft (SFWA) project

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kruger, W.R.; Dillinger, J; De Breuker, R.; Reyes, M.; Haydn, K.

    2016-01-01

    In the work package “Adaptive Wing” in the Clean-Sky “Smart Fixed Wing Aircraft” (SFWA) project, design processes and solutions for aircraft wings have been created, giving optimal response with respect to loads, comfort and performance by the introduction of passive and active concepts. Central

  20. Modeling and Closed Loop Flight Testing of a Fixed Wing Micro Air Vehicle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harikumar Kandath

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the nonlinear six degrees of freedom dynamic modeling of a fixed wing micro air vehicle. The static derivatives of the micro air vehicle are obtained through the wind tunnel testing. The propeller effects on the lift, drag, pitching moment and side force are quantified through wind tunnel testing. The dynamic derivatives are obtained through empirical relations available in the literature. The trim conditions are computed for a straight and constant altitude flight condition. The linearized longitudinal and lateral state space models are obtained about trim conditions. The variations in short period mode, phugoid mode, Dutch roll mode, roll subsidence mode and spiral mode with respect to different trim operating conditions is presented. A stabilizing static output feedback controller is designed using the obtained model. Successful closed loop flight trials are conducted with the static output feedback controller.

  1. Reduced arterial diameter during static exercise in humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olesen, H L; Mitchell, J H; Friedman, D B

    1995-01-01

    for the radial and dorsalis pedis artery was 22 +/- 3 and 28 +/- 3% lower during handgrip than the relation during rest, respectively. After one-leg knee extension both arteries reached 30 +/- 4% lower values. This study demonstrated arterial constriction in the resting limbs within the first 30 s of static......In eight subjects luminal diameter of the resting limb radial and dorsalis pedis arteries was determined by high-resolution ultrasound (20 MHz). This measurement was followed during rest and during 2 min of static handgrip or of one-leg knee extension at 30% of maximal voluntary contraction...... of another limb. Static exercise increased heart rate and mean arterial pressure, which were largest during one-leg knee extension. After exercise heart rate and mean arterial pressure returned to the resting level. No changes were recorded in arterial carbon dioxide tension, and the rate of perceived...

  2. Latitudinal gradient effect on the wing geometry of Auca coctei (Guérin(Lepidoptera, Nymphalidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María-José Sanzana

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Latitudinal gradient effect on the wing geometry of Auca coctei (Guérin (Lepidoptera, Nymphalidae. When the environmental conditions change locally, the organisms and populations may also change in response to the selection pressure, so that the development of individuals may become affected in different degrees. There have been only a few studies in which the patterns of wing morphology variation have been looked into along a latitudinal gradient by means of geometric morphometrics. The aim of this work was to assess the morphologic differentiation of wing among butterfly populations of the species Auca coctei. For this purpose, 9 sampling locations were used which are representative of the distribution range of the butterfly and cover a wide latitudinal range in Chile. The wing morphology was studied in a total of 202 specimens of A. coctei (150 males and 52 females, based on digitization of 17 morphologic landmarks. The results show variation of wing shape in both sexes; however, for the centroid size there was significant variation only in females. Females show smaller centroid size at higher latitudes, therefore in this study the Bergmann reverse rule is confirmed for females of A. coctei. Our study extends morphologic projections with latitude, suggesting that wing variation is an environmental response from diverse origins and may influence different characteristics of the life history of a butterfly.

  3. Nonlinear Large Deflection Theory with Modified Aeroelastic Lifting Line Aerodynamics for a High Aspect Ratio Flexible Wing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Nhan; Ting, Eric; Chaparro, Daniel

    2017-01-01

    This paper investigates the effect of nonlinear large deflection bending on the aerodynamic performance of a high aspect ratio flexible wing. A set of nonlinear static aeroelastic equations are derived for the large bending deflection of a high aspect ratio wing structure. An analysis is conducted to compare the nonlinear bending theory with the linear bending theory. The results show that the nonlinear bending theory is length-preserving whereas the linear bending theory causes a non-physical effect of lengthening the wing structure under the no axial load condition. A modified lifting line theory is developed to compute the lift and drag coefficients of a wing structure undergoing a large bending deflection. The lift and drag coefficients are more accurately estimated by the nonlinear bending theory due to its length-preserving property. The nonlinear bending theory yields lower lift and span efficiency than the linear bending theory. A coupled aerodynamic-nonlinear finite element model is developed to implement the nonlinear bending theory for a Common Research Model (CRM) flexible wing wind tunnel model to be tested in the University of Washington Aeronautical Laboratory (UWAL). The structural stiffness of the model is designed to give about 10% wing tip deflection which is large enough that could cause the nonlinear deflection effect to become significant. The computational results show that the nonlinear bending theory yields slightly less lift than the linear bending theory for this wind tunnel model. As a result, the linear bending theory is deemed adequate for the CRM wind tunnel model.

  4. Adaptive pressure-controlled cellular structures for shape morphing I: design and analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luo, Quantian; Tong, Liyong

    2013-01-01

    This work investigates adaptive bio-inspired pressure cellular structures for shape morphing. Optimum designs for cellular structures with void and pressure cells are proposed and then structural analyses are conducted. In the present design, a unit cell is comprised of straight and curved walls. When compressed air is pumped into a pressure cell, the curved walls deform in bending due to the pressure difference in two adjacent cells that leads to overall structural deformation in extension. One-dimensional actuation strain up to 35% can be theoretically achieved. In part I, we present basic design concepts and cellular mechanics. Unlike conventional structural analysis for cellular structures, a statically indeterminate unit cell is considered and novel analytical formulations are derived for the present pressurized cellular structures in linear and nonlinear analyses. In part II, we will present experimental testing and finite element analysis to demonstrate the feasibility of the present pressurized cellular actuators for morphing wings and to validate the present cellular mechanics formulations. (paper)

  5. Qualitative skeletal correlates of wing shape in extant birds (Aves: Neoaves).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hieronymus, Tobin L

    2015-02-27

    Among living fliers (birds, bats, and insects), birds display relatively high aspect ratios, a dimensionless shape variable that distinguishes long and narrow vs. short and broad wings. Increasing aspect ratio results in a functional tradeoff between low induced drag (efficient cruise) and increased wing inertia (difficult takeoff). Given the wide scope of its functional effects, the pattern of aspect ratio evolution is an important factor that contributes to the substantial ecological and phylogenetic diversity of living birds. However, because the feathers that define the wingtip (and hence wingspan and aspect ratio) often do not fossilize, resolution in the pattern of avian wing shape evolution is obscured by missing information. Here I use a comparative approach to investigate the relationship between skeletal proxies of flight feather attachment and wing shape. An accessory lobe of the internal index process of digit II-1, a bony correlate of distal primary attachment, shows weak but statistically significant relationships to aspect ratio and mass independent of other skeletal morphology. The dorsal phalangeal fossae of digit II-1, which house distal primaries VIII and IX, also show a trend of increased prominence with higher aspect ratio. Quill knobs on the ulna are examined concurrently, but do not show consistent signal with respect to wing shape. Although quill knobs are cited as skeletal correlates of flight performance in birds, their relationship to wing shape is inconsistent among extant taxa, and may reflect diverging selection pressures acting on a conserved architecture. In contrast, correlates of distal primary feather attachment on the major digit show convergent responses to increasing aspect ratio. In light of the diversity of musculoskeletal and integumentary mophology that underlies wing shape in different avian clades, it is unlikely that a single skeletal feature will show consistent predictive power across Neoaves. Confident inference of

  6. Measurement of Static Characteristics Pneumatic Motors with Elastic Working Elements

    OpenAIRE

    Kamil FOJTÁŠEK; Lukáš DVOŘÁK

    2012-01-01

    Into a category of pneumatic motors with elastic working parts belong air bellows, diaphragm motors and fluid muscles. All three types of these motors have some elastic part usually made of rubber. This part is deformed under the pressure of a compressed air or a mass load resulting in a final working effect. This paper deals with measuring of static characteristics of these motors.

  7. The Crest Wing Wave Energy Device

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kofoed, Jens Peter; Antonishen, Michael Patrick

    This report presents the results of a continuation of an experimental study of the wave energy converting abilities of the Crest Wing wave energy converter (WEC), in the following referred to as ‘Phase 2'. The Crest Wing is a WEC that uses its movement in matching the shape of an oncoming wave...

  8. Veins Improve Fracture Toughness of Insect Wings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dirks, Jan-Henning; Taylor, David

    2012-01-01

    During the lifetime of a flying insect, its wings are subjected to mechanical forces and deformations for millions of cycles. Defects in the micrometre thin membranes or veins may reduce the insect’s flight performance. How do insects prevent crack related material failure in their wings and what role does the characteristic vein pattern play? Fracture toughness is a parameter, which characterises a material’s resistance to crack propagation. Our results show that, compared to other body parts, the hind wing membrane of the migratory locust S. gregaria itself is not exceptionally tough (1.04±0.25 MPa√m). However, the cross veins increase the wing’s toughness by 50% by acting as barriers to crack propagation. Using fracture mechanics, we show that the morphological spacing of most wing veins matches the critical crack length of the material (1132 µm). This finding directly demonstrates how the biomechanical properties and the morphology of locust wings are functionally correlated in locusts, providing a mechanically ‘optimal’ solution with high toughness and low weight. The vein pattern found in insect wings thus might inspire the design of more durable and lightweight artificial ‘venous’ wings for micro-air-vehicles. Using the vein spacing as indicator, our approach might also provide a basis to estimate the wing properties of endangered or extinct insect species. PMID:22927966

  9. Effect of leading edge roundness on a delta wing in wing-rock motion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, T. Terry; Malcolm, Gerald N.

    1990-01-01

    The effect of wing leading-edge roundness on wing rock was investigated using flow visualization in a water tunnel. Eighty degree delta wing models were tested on free-to-roll and forced oscillation rigs. The onset of wing rock was delayed by increasing the roundness of the leading edges. The wing rock amplitude and frequency results suggested that damping was increased at lower angles of attack but reduced at higher angles of attack. Vortex lift-off and vortex breakdown, especially during dynamic situations, were strongly affected by the leading edge roundness. Different forms of wing rock motion could be sustained by combinations of vortex breakdown and vortex lift-off. Behaviors of the wing and vortex motions were explained by the influence of leading edge roundness on the separation location, vortex trajectory, and vortex breakdown.

  10. Statics of Historic Masonry Constructions

    CERN Document Server

    Como, Mario

    2013-01-01

    Masonry constructions are the great majority of the buildings in Europe’s historic centres and the most important monuments in its architectural heritage. Given the age of much of these constructions, the demand for safety assessments and restoration projects is pressing and constant. This book aims to help fill this demand presenting a comprehensive new statics of masonry constructions. The book, result of thirty years of research and professional experience, gives the fundamentals of statics of the masonry solid, then applied to the study of statics of arches, piers and vaults. Further, combining engineering and architecture and through an interdisciplinary approach, the book investigates the statical behaviour of many historic monuments, as the Pantheon, the Colosseum,  the domes of S. Maria del Fiore in Florence and of St. Peter in Rome, the Tower of Pisa, the Gothic Cathedrals and the Masonry Buildings under seismic actions.

  11. Statics and mechanics of structures

    CERN Document Server

    Krenk, Steen

    2013-01-01

    The statics and mechanics of structures form a core aspect of civil engineering. This book provides an introduction to the subject, starting from classic hand-calculation types of analysis and gradually advancing to a systematic form suitable for computer implementation. It starts with statically determinate structures in the form of trusses, beams and frames. Instability is discussed in the form of the column problem - both the ideal column and the imperfect column used in actual column design. The theory of statically indeterminate structures is then introduced, and the force and deformation methods are explained and illustrated. An important aspect of the book’s approach is the systematic development of the theory in a form suitable for computer implementation using finite elements. This development is supported by two small computer programs, MiniTruss and MiniFrame, which permit static analysis of trusses and frames, as well as linearized stability analysis. The book’s final section presents related ...

  12. Design of flapping wings for application to single active degree of freedom micro air vehicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Kelvin Thomas

    This dissertation covers an experimental program to understand how wing compliance influences the performance of flapping micro air vehicle wings. The focus is the design of a membraned flapping wing for a single active degree of freedom mechanism, looking to maximize thrust performance in hover conditions. The optimization approach is unique in that experiments were the chosen engine as opposed to a computation model; this is because of the complexity involved in hover-mode flapping aerodynamics. The flapping mechanism and manufacturing process for fabricating the wings were carefully developed. The uncertainty in the thrust measurement was identified and reduced by implementing precision machining and repeatable techniques for fabrication. This resulted in a reduction of the manufacturing coefficient of variation from 16.8% to 2.6%. Optimization was then conducted for a single objective (Maximize thrust), using a three parameter design space, finding the highest thrust performance in wings with high aspect ratio; then, a multi-objective optimization was conducted with two objectives (Thrust and Power) and a four parameter space. The research then shifted focus to identifying the stiffness and deformation characteristics of high performance wing designs. Static stiffness measurements with a simple line load suggested that high chordwise stiffness or lower spanwise stiffness would be favorable for aerodynamic performance. To explore more components of the deformation, a full-field imaging technique was used and a uniform load was substituted to engage with the membrane. It was found that there is a range of torsional compliance where the wing is most efficient especially at higher flapping frequencies. The final component of the study was the dynamic deformation measurement. The two system, four camera digital image correlation setup uses stroboscopic measurement to capture the wing deformation. The phase shift between the twist and stroke, and the tip deflection

  13. Static and Dynamic Traversable Wormholes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adamiak, Jaroslaw P.

    2008-09-01

    The aim of this work is to discuss the effects found in static and dynamic wormholes that occur as a solution of Einstein equations in general relativity. The ground is prepared by presentation of faster than light effects, then the focus is narrowed to Morris-Thorne framework for a static spherically symmetric wormhole. Two types of dynamic worm-holes, evolving and rotating, are considered.

  14. Static Decoupling in fault detection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Niemann, Hans Henrik

    1998-01-01

    An algebraic approach is given for a design of a static residual weighting factor in connection with fault detection. A complete parameterization is given of the weighting factor which will minimize a given performance index......An algebraic approach is given for a design of a static residual weighting factor in connection with fault detection. A complete parameterization is given of the weighting factor which will minimize a given performance index...

  15. Wind-Tunnel Investigation of Rectangular Air-Duct Entrances in the Leading Edge of an NACA 23018 Wing, Special Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biermann, David; McLellan, Charles H.

    1940-01-01

    A preliminary investigation of a number of duct entrances of rectangular shape installed in the leading edge of a wing was conducted in the NACA 20-foot tunnel to determine the external drag, the available pressure, the critical Mach numbers, and the effect on the maximum lift. The results showed that the most satisfactory entrances, which had practically no effect on the wing characteristics, had their lips approximately in the vertical plane of the leading edge of the wing. This requirement necessitated extending the lips outside the wing contour for all except the small entrances. Full dynamic pressure was found to be available over a fairly wide range of angle of attack. The critical Mach number for a small entrance was calculated to be as high as that for the plain wing but was slightly lower for the larger entrances tested.

  16. Aeroelasticity Benchmark Assessment: Subsonic Fixed Wing Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Florance, Jennifer P.; Chwalowski, Pawel; Wieseman, Carol D.

    2010-01-01

    The fundamental technical challenge in computational aeroelasticity is the accurate prediction of unsteady aerodynamic phenomena and the effect on the aeroelastic response of a vehicle. Currently, a benchmarking standard for use in validating the accuracy of computational aeroelasticity codes does not exist. Many aeroelastic data sets have been obtained in wind-tunnel and flight testing throughout the world; however, none have been globally presented or accepted as an ideal data set. There are numerous reasons for this. One reason is that often, such aeroelastic data sets focus on the aeroelastic phenomena alone (flutter, for example) and do not contain associated information such as unsteady pressures and time-correlated structural dynamic deflections. Other available data sets focus solely on the unsteady pressures and do not address the aeroelastic phenomena. Other discrepancies can include omission of relevant data, such as flutter frequency and / or the acquisition of only qualitative deflection data. In addition to these content deficiencies, all of the available data sets present both experimental and computational technical challenges. Experimental issues include facility influences, nonlinearities beyond those being modeled, and data processing. From the computational perspective, technical challenges include modeling geometric complexities, coupling between the flow and the structure, grid issues, and boundary conditions. The Aeroelasticity Benchmark Assessment task seeks to examine the existing potential experimental data sets and ultimately choose the one that is viewed as the most suitable for computational benchmarking. An initial computational evaluation of that configuration will then be performed using the Langley-developed computational fluid dynamics (CFD) software FUN3D1 as part of its code validation process. In addition to the benchmarking activity, this task also includes an examination of future research directions. Researchers within the

  17. Combined, nonlinear aerodynamic and structural method for the aeroelastic design of a three-dimensional wing in supersonic flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pittman, J. L.; Giles, G. L.

    1986-01-01

    An iterative procedure for the static aeroelastic design of a flexible wing at supersonic speeds has been developed. The procedure combines a nonlinear, full-potential solver (NCOREL) with an equivalent plate structural analysis method. The NCOREL method yields significantly improved aerodynamic estimates compared to linear theory. The equivalent plate structural analysis method demonstrates an order of magnitude reduction in computer memory and execution time compared to finite-element methods. A highly swept wing is analyzed at high lift using this aeroelastic procedure. The results indicate that the wing deforms favorably due to aerodynamic loading and, consequently, that the inviscid drag levels do not vary at the required lift coefficient although the angle of attack varies significantly. A sensitivity analysis of the type required for optimization studies was also performed with the aeroelastic design procedure.

  18. Hovering hummingbird wing aerodynamics during the annual cycle. II. Implications of wing feather moult

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sapir, Nir; Elimelech, Yossef

    2018-01-01

    Birds usually moult their feathers in a particular sequence which may incur aerodynamic, physiological and behavioural implications. Among birds, hummingbirds are unique species in their sustained hovering flight. Because hummingbirds frequently hover-feed, they must maintain sufficiently high flight capacities even when moulting their flight feathers. A hummingbird wing consists of 10 primary flight feathers whose absence during moult may strongly affect wing performance. Using dynamic similarity rules, we compared time-accurate aerodynamic loads and flow field measurements over several wing geometries that follow the natural feather moult sequence of Calypte anna, a common hummingbird species in western North America. Our results suggest a drop of more than 20% in lift production during the early stages of the moult sequence in which mid-wing flight feathers are moulted. We also found that the wing's ability to generate lift strongly depended on the morphological integrity of the outer primaries and leading-edge. These findings may explain the evolution of wing morphology and moult attributes. Specifically, the high overlap between adjacent wing feathers, especially at the wing tip, and the slow sequential replacement of the wing feathers result in a relatively small reduction in wing surface area during moult with limited aerodynamic implications. We present power and efficiency analyses for hover flight during moult under several plausible scenarios, suggesting that body mass reduction could be a compensatory mechanism that preserves the energetic costs of hover flight. PMID:29515884

  19. Aerodynamic Tests on a Static California Sea Lion Flipper

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulkarni, Aditya A.; Leftwich, Megan C.

    2017-11-01

    Unlike most biological swimmers that use BCF swimming, the California sea lion relies on its foreflippers for thrust production. This unique swimming style, which lacks a characteristic oscillation frequency, allows the sea lion to leave less traceable wake while also producing high amounts of thrust. While the swimming energetics of the animal have been studied, almost nothing is known about the fluid dynamics of the system. To overcome this lack of basic understanding, a three-dimensional model of the flipper was developed using structured light-based scanners. Cross sections of the flipper model resemble the shape of the airfoils typically found in wings with thickness ratios, 11% - 37%. Wind tunnel testing conducted on static flipper revealed that positive lift was being generated at negative angles of attack. This is hypothesized to help the sea lions considerably in perform tight maneuvers with a small turning radius. The wake structure downstream of the flipper was captured using Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV).

  20. Semi-automated quantitative Drosophila wings measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loh, Sheng Yang Michael; Ogawa, Yoshitaka; Kawana, Sara; Tamura, Koichiro; Lee, Hwee Kuan

    2017-06-28

    Drosophila melanogaster is an important organism used in many fields of biological research such as genetics and developmental biology. Drosophila wings have been widely used to study the genetics of development, morphometrics and evolution. Therefore there is much interest in quantifying wing structures of Drosophila. Advancement in technology has increased the ease in which images of Drosophila can be acquired. However such studies have been limited by the slow and tedious process of acquiring phenotypic data. We have developed a system that automatically detects and measures key points and vein segments on a Drosophila wing. Key points are detected by performing image transformations and template matching on Drosophila wing images while vein segments are detected using an Active Contour algorithm. The accuracy of our key point detection was compared against key point annotations of users. We also performed key point detection using different training data sets of Drosophila wing images. We compared our software with an existing automated image analysis system for Drosophila wings and showed that our system performs better than the state of the art. Vein segments were manually measured and compared against the measurements obtained from our system. Our system was able to detect specific key points and vein segments from Drosophila wing images with high accuracy.

  1. NASA Fixed Wing Project Propulsion Research and Technology Development Activities to Reduce Thrust Specific Energy Consumption

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hathaway, Michael D.; DelRasario, Ruben; Madavan, Nateri K.

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents an overview of the propulsion research and technology portfolio of NASA Fundamental Aeronautics Program Fixed Wing Project. The research is aimed at significantly reducing the thrust specific fuel/energy consumption of notional advanced fixed wing aircraft (by 60 % relative to a baseline Boeing 737-800 aircraft with CFM56-7B engines) in the 2030-2035 time frame. The research investments described herein are aimed at improving propulsive efficiency through higher bypass ratio fans, improving thermal efficiency through compact high overall pressure ratio gas generators, and exploring the potential benefits of boundary layer ingestion propulsion and hybrid gas-electric propulsion concepts.

  2. Measurement and evaluation of static characteristics of rotary hydraulic motor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hružík, Lumír; Vašina, Martin; Bureček, Adam

    2014-03-01

    The paper describes experimental equipment for measurement of static characteristics of rotary hydraulic motor. It is possible to measure flow, pressure, temperature, speed and torque by means of this equipment. It deals with measurement of static characteristics of a gear rotary hydraulic motor. Mineral oil is used as hydraulic liquid in this case. Flow, torque and speed characteristics are evaluated from measured parameters. Measured mechanical-hydraulic, flow and total efficiencies of the rotary hydraulic motor are adduced in the paper. It is possible to diagnose technical conditions of the hydraulic motor (eventually to recommend its exchange) from the experimental measurements.

  3. Novel Control Effectors for Truss Braced Wing

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Edward V.; Kapania, Rakesh K.; Joshi, Shiv

    2015-01-01

    At cruise flight conditions very high aspect ratio/low sweep truss braced wings (TBW) may be subject to design requirements that distinguish them from more highly swept cantilevered wings. High aspect ratio, short chord length and relative thinness of the airfoil sections all contribute to relatively low wing torsional stiffness. This may lead to aeroelastic issues such as aileron reversal and low flutter margins. In order to counteract these issues, high aspect ratio/low sweep wings may need to carry additional high speed control effectors to operate when outboard ailerons are in reversal and/or must carry additional structural weight to enhance torsional stiffness. The novel control effector evaluated in this study is a variable sweep raked wing tip with an aileron control surface. Forward sweep of the tip allows the aileron to align closely with the torsional axis of the wing and operate in a conventional fashion. Aft sweep of the tip creates a large moment arm from the aileron to the wing torsional axis greatly enhancing aileron reversal. The novelty comes from using this enhanced and controllable aileron reversal effect to provide roll control authority by acting as a servo tab and providing roll control through intentional twist of the wing. In this case the reduced torsional stiffness of the wing becomes an advantage to be exploited. The study results show that the novel control effector concept does provide roll control as described, but only for a restricted class of TBW aircraft configurations. For the configuration studied (long range, dual aisle, Mach 0.85 cruise) the novel control effector provides significant benefits including up to 12% reduction in fuel burn.

  4. Static Aeroelastic Analysis with an Inviscid Cartesian Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez, David L.; Aftosmis, Michael J.; Nemec, Marian; Smith, Stephen C.

    2014-01-01

    An embedded-boundary, Cartesian-mesh flow solver is coupled with a three degree-of-freedom structural model to perform static, aeroelastic analysis of complex aircraft geometries. The approach solves a nonlinear, aerostructural system of equations using a loosely-coupled strategy. An open-source, 3-D discrete-geometry engine is utilized to deform a triangulated surface geometry according to the shape predicted by the structural model under the computed aerodynamic loads. The deformation scheme is capable of modeling large deflections and is applicable to the design of modern, very-flexible transport wings. The coupling interface is modular so that aerodynamic or structural analysis methods can be easily swapped or enhanced. After verifying the structural model with comparisons to Euler beam theory, two applications of the analysis method are presented as validation. The first is a relatively stiff, transport wing model which was a subject of a recent workshop on aeroelasticity. The second is a very flexible model recently tested in a low speed wind tunnel. Both cases show that the aeroelastic analysis method produces results in excellent agreement with experimental data.

  5. Pegasus Rocket Wing and PHYSX Glove Undergoes Stress Loads Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    1997-01-01

    The Pegasus Hypersonic Experiment (PHYSX) Project's Pegasus rocket wing with attached PHYSX glove rests after load-tests at Scaled Composites, Inc., in Mojave, California, in January 1997. Technicians slowly filled water bags beneath the wing, to create the pressure, or 'wing-loading,' required to determine whether the wing could withstand its design limit for stress. The wing sits in a wooden triangular frame which serves as the test-rig, mounted to the floor atop the waterbags. Pegasus is an air-launched space booster produced by Orbital Sciences Corporation and Hercules Aerospace Company (initially; later, Alliant Tech Systems) to provide small satellite users with a cost-effective, flexible, and reliable method for placing payloads into low earth orbit. Pegasus has been used to launch a number of satellites and the PHYSX experiment. That experiment consisted of a smooth glove installed on the first-stage delta wing of the Pegasus. The glove was used to gather data at speeds of up to Mach 8 and at altitudes approaching 200,000 feet. The flight took place on October 22, 1998. The PHYSX experiment focused on determining where boundary-layer transition occurs on the glove and on identifying the flow mechanism causing transition over the glove. Data from this flight-research effort included temperature, heat transfer, pressure measurements, airflow, and trajectory reconstruction. Hypersonic flight-research programs are an approach to validate design methods for hypersonic vehicles (those that fly more than five times the speed of sound, or Mach 5). Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, provided overall management of the glove experiment, glove design, and buildup. Dryden also was responsible for conducting the flight tests. Langley Research Center, Hampton, Virginia, was responsible for the design of the aerodynamic glove as well as development of sensor and instrumentation systems for the glove. Other participating NASA centers included Ames Research

  6. Nonlinear Structures Optimization for Flexible Flapping Wing MAVs

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-02-01

    nonlinear optimization, flapping wing, fluid structure interaction, micro -air vehicles, flexible wing, flapping mechanism 16. SECURITY... Structures Optimization for Flexible Flapping Wing Micro -Air Vehicles” was funded with Chief Scientist Innovative Research funds. This project was divided...predict a 10% resisting load to the model, and Python Scripting to wrap around everything. 2 Building the Model in Abaqus CAE The flapping wing

  7. Generic Wing-Body Aerodynamics Data Base

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holst, Terry L.; Olsen, Thomas H.; Kwak, Dochan (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The wing-body aerodynamics data base consists of a series of CFD (Computational Fluid Dynamics) simulations about a generic wing body configuration consisting of a ogive-circular-cylinder fuselage and a simple symmetric wing mid-mounted on the fuselage. Solutions have been obtained for Nonlinear Potential (P), Euler (E) and Navier-Stokes (N) solvers over a range of subsonic and transonic Mach numbers and angles of attack. In addition, each solution has been computed on a series of grids, coarse, medium and fine to permit an assessment of grid refinement errors.

  8. Unemployment and Right-Wing Extremist Crime

    OpenAIRE

    Falk, Armin; Zweimüller, Josef

    2005-01-01

    Right-wing extremism is a serious problem in many societies. A prominent hypothesis states that unemployment plays a crucial role for the occurrence of right-wing extremist crime. In this paper we empirically test this hypothesis. We use a previously not used data set which includes all officially recorded right-wing criminal acts in Germany. These data are recorded by the German Federal Criminal Police Office on a monthly and state level basis. Our main finding is that there is in fact a sig...

  9. Wind-tunnel investigation of a Fowler flap and spoiler for an advanced general aviation wing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paulson, J. W., Jr.

    1976-01-01

    The wing was tested without fuselage or empennage and was fitted with approximately three-quarter span Fowler flaps and half span spoilers. The spoilers were hinged at the 70 percent chord point and vented when the flaps were deflected. Static longitudinal and lateral aerodynamic data were obtained over an angle of attack range of -8 deg to 22 deg for various flap deflections and positions, spoiler geometries, and vent lip geometries. Lateral characteristics indicate that the spoilers are generally adequate for lateral control. In general, the spoiler effectiveness increases with increasing angle of attack, increases with increasing flap deflections, and is influenced by vent lip geometry. In addition, the data show that some two-dimensional effects on spoiler effectiveness are reduced in the three-dimensional case. Results also indicate significant increase in lift coefficient as the Fowler flaps are deflected; when the flap was fully deflected, the maximum wing lift coefficient was increased about 96 percent.

  10. Statics of historic masonry constructions

    CERN Document Server

    Como, Mario

    2017-01-01

    Masonry constructions are the great majority of the buildings in Europe’s historic centres and the most important monuments of its architectural heritage. Given the age of these constructions, the demand for safety assessments and restoration projects is pressing and constant; still within the broad studies in the subject it is not yet recognised, in particular within the seismic area, a unitary approach to deal with Masonry structures. This successful book contributes to clarify the issues with a rigorous approach offering a comprehensive new Statics of Masonry Constructions. This third edition has been driven by some recent developments of the research in the field, and it gives the fundamentals of Statics with an original and rigorous mathematical formulation, further in-depth inquired in this new version. With many refinements and improvements, the book investigates the static behaviour of many historic monuments, such as the Gothic Cathedrals, the Mycenaean Tholoi, the Pantheon, the Colosseum, the dome...

  11. Numerical study of aerodynamic characteristics of FSW aircraft with different wing positions under supersonic condition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lei Juanmian

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available This paper investigates the influence of forward-swept wing (FSW positions on the aerodynamic characteristics of aircraft under supersonic condition (Ma = 1.5. The numerical method based on Reynolds-averaged Navier–Stokes (RANS equations, Spalart–Allmaras (S–A turbulence model and implicit algorithm is utilized to simulate the flow field of the aircraft. The aerodynamic parameters and flow field structures of the horizontal tail and the whole aircraft are presented. The results demonstrate that the spanwise flow of FSW flows from the wingtip to the wing root, generating an upper wing surface vortex and a trailing edge vortex nearby the wing root. The vortexes generated by FSW have a strong downwash effect on the tail. The lower the vertical position of FSW, the stronger the downwash effect on tail. Therefore, the effective angle of attack of tail becomes smaller. In addition, the lift coefficient, drag coefficient and lift–drag ratio of tail decrease, and the center of pressure of tail moves backward gradually. For the whole aircraft, the lower the vertical position of FSW, the smaller lift, drag and center of pressure coefficients of aircraft. The closer the FSW moves towards tail, the bigger pitching moment and center of pressure coefficients of the whole aircraft, but the lift and drag characteristics of the horizontal tail and the whole aircraft are basically unchanged. The results have potential application for the design of new concept aircraft.

  12. A Static Aeroelastic Analysis of a Flexible Wing Mini Unmanned Aerial Vehicle

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-03-27

    sponsoring organization AFRL/ RBCA for the opportunity to work on this fascinating project. I would also like to thank the developers of the Nighthawk, Ap...SPONSORING / MONITORING AGENCY NAME(S) AND ADDRESS(ES) Dr. Mark Mears, AFRL/ RBCA 2210 8th St, Bldg 146, Rm 305, Wright-Patterson AFB, OH 45433

  13. FijiWings: an open source toolkit for semiautomated morphometric analysis of insect wings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobens, Alexander C; Dobens, Leonard L

    2013-08-07

    Development requires coordination between cell proliferation and cell growth to pattern the proper size of tissues, organs, and whole organisms. The Drosophila wing has landmark features, such as the location of veins patterned by cell groups and trichome structures produced by individual cells, that are useful to examine the genetic contributions to both tissue and cell size. Wing size and trichome density have been measured manually, which is tedious and error prone, and although image processing and pattern-recognition software can quantify features in micrographs, this approach has not been applied to insect wings. Here we present FijiWings, a set of macros designed to perform semiautomated morphophometric analysis of a wing photomicrograph. FijiWings uses plug-ins installed in the Fiji version of ImageJ to detect and count trichomes and measure wing area either to calculate trichome density of a defined region selected by the user or generate a heat map of overall trichome densities. For high-throughput screens we have developed a macro that directs a trainable segmentation plug-in to detect wing vein locations either to measure trichome density in specific intervein regions or produce a heat map of relative intervein areas. We use wing GAL4 drivers and UAS-regulated transgenes to confirm the ability of these tools to detect changes in overall tissue growth and individual cell size. FijiWings is freely available and will be of interest to a broad community of fly geneticists studying both the effect of gene function on wing patterning and the evolution of wing morphology.

  14. Statics and Mechanics of Structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krenk, Steen; Høgsberg, Jan Becker

    The statics and mechanics of structures form a core aspect of civil engineering. This book provides an introduction to the subject, starting from classic hand-calculation types of analysis and gradually advancing to a systematic form suitable for computer implementation. It starts with statically...... of trusses and frames, as well as linearized stability analysis. The book’s final section presents related strength of materials subjects in greater detail; these include stress and strain, failure criteria, and normal and shear stresses in general beam flexure and in beam torsion....

  15. Flapping and fixed wing aerodynamics of low Reynolds number flight vehicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viieru, Dragos

    Lately, micro air vehicles (MAVs), with a maximum dimension of 15 cm and nominal flight speed around 10m/s, have attracted interest from scientific and engineering communities due to their potential to perform desirable flight missions and exhibit unconventional aerodynamics, control, and structural characteristics, compared to larger flight vehicles. Since MAVs operate at a Reynolds number of 105 or lower, the lift-to-drag ratio is noticeably lower than the larger manned flight vehicles. The light weight and low flight speed cause MAVs to be sensitive to wind gusts. The MAV's small overall dimensions result in low aspect ratio wings with strong wing tip vortices that further complicate the aerodynamics of such vehicles. In this work, two vehicle concepts are considered, namely, fixed wings with flexible structure aimed at passive shape control, and flapping wings aimed at enhancing aerodynamic performance using unsteady flow fields. A finite volume, pressure-based Navier-Stokes solver along with moving grid algorithms is employed to simulate the flow field. The coupled fluid-structural dynamics of the flexible wing is treated using a hyperelastic finite element structural model, the above-mentioned fluid solver via the moving grid technique, and the geometric conservation law. Three dimensional aerodynamics around a low aspect ratio wing for both rigid and flexible structures and fluid-structure interactions for flexible structures have been investigated. In the Reynolds numbers range of 7x10 4 to 9x104, the flexible wing exhibits self-initiated vibrations even in steady free-stream, and is found to have a similar performance to the identical rigid wing for modest angles of attack. For flapping wings, efforts are made to improve our understanding of the unsteady fluid physics related to the lift generation mechanism at low Reynolds numbers (75 to 1,700). Alternative moving grid algorithms, capable of handling the large movements of the boundaries (characteristic

  16. Geometrical Nonlinear Aeroelastic Stability Analysis of a Composite High-Aspect-Ratio Wing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chang Chuan Xie

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available A composite high-aspect-ratio wing of a high-altitude long-endurance (HALE aircraft was modeled with FEM by MSC/NASTRAN, and the nonlinear static equilibrium state is calculated under design load with follower force effect, but without load redistribution. Assuming the little vibration amplitude of the wing around the static equilibrium state, the system is linearized and the natural frequencies and mode shapes of the deformed structure are obtained. Planar doublet lattice method is used to calculate unsteady aerodynamics in frequency domain ignoring the bending effect of the deflected wing. And then, the aeroelastic stability analysis of the system under a given load condition is successively carried out. Comparing with the linear results, the nonlinear displacement of the wing tip is higher. The results indicate that the critical nonlinear flutter is of the flap/chordwise bending type because of the chordwise bending having quite a large torsion component, with low critical speed and slowly growing damping, which dose not appear in the linear analysis. Furthermore, it is shown that the variation of the nonlinear flutter speed depends on the scale of the load and on the chordwise bending frequency. The research work indicates that, for the very flexible HALE aircraft, the nonlinear aeroelastic stability is very important, and should be considered in the design progress. Using present FEM software as the structure solver (e.g. MSC/NASTRAN, and the unsteady aerodynamic code, the nonlinear aeroelastic stability margin of a complex system other than a simple beam model can be determined.

  17. Instability analysis and drag coefficient prediction on a swept RAE2822 wing with constant lift coefficient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhenrong JING

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Swept wing is widely used in civil aircraft, whose airfoil is chosen, designed and optimized to increase the cruise speed and decrease the drag coefficient. The parameters of swept wing, such as sweep angle and angle of attack, are determined according to the cruise lift coefficient requirement, and the drag coefficient is expected to be predicted accurately, which involves the instability characteristics and transition position of the flow. The pressure coefficient of the RAE2822 wing with given constant lift coefficient is obtained by solving the three-dimensional Navier-Stokes equation numerically, and then the mean flow is calculated by solving the boundary layer (BL equation with spectral method. The cross-flow instability characteristic of boundary layer of swept wing in the windward and leeward is analyzed by linear stability theory (LST, and the transition position is predicted by eN method. The drag coefficient is numerically predicted by introducing a laminar/turbulent indicator. A simple approach to calculate the lift coefficient of swept wing is proposed. It is found that there is a quantitative relationship between the angle of attack and sweep angle when the lift coefficient keeps constant; when the angle of attack is small, the flow on the leeward of the wing is stable. when the angle of attack is larger than 3°, the flow becomes unstable quickly; with the increase of sweep angle or angle of attack the disturbance on the windward becomes more unstable, leading to the moving forward of the transition position to the leading edge of the wing; the drag coefficient has two significant jumping growth due to the successive occurrence of transition in the windward and the leeward; the optimal range of sweep angle for civil aircraft is suggested.

  18. A wing design methodology for low-boom low-drag supersonic business jet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le, Daniel B.

    2009-12-01

    The arguably most critical hindrance to the successful development of a commercial supersonic aircraft is the impact of the sonic boom signature. The sonic boom signature of a supersonic aircraft is predicted using sonic boom theory, which formulates a relationship between the complex three-dimensional geometry of the aircraft to the pressure distribution and decomposes the geometry in terms of simple geometrical components. The supersonic aircraft design process is typically based on boom minimization theory. This theory provides a theoretical equivalent area distribution which should be matched by the conceptual design in order to achieve the pre-determined sonic boom signature. The difference between the target equivalent area distribution and the actual equivalent area distribution is referred to here as the gap distribution. The primary intent of this dissertation is to provide the designer with a systematic and structured approach to designing the aircraft wings with limited changes to the baseline concept while achieving critical design goals. The design process can be easily overwhelmed and may be difficult to evaluate their effectiveness. The wing design is decoupled into two separate processes, one focused on the planform design and the other on the camber design. Moreover, this design methodology supplements the designer by allowing trade studies to be conducted between important design parameters and objectives. The wing planform design methodology incorporates a continuous gradient-based optimization scheme to supplement the design process. This is not meant to substitute the vast amount of knowledge and design decisions that are needed for a successful design. Instead, the numerical optimization helps the designer to refine creative concepts. Last, this dissertation integrates a risk mitigation scheme throughout the wing design process. The design methodology implements minimal design changes to the wing geometry white achieving the target design goal

  19. Common Noctule Bats Are Sexually Dimorphic in Migratory Behaviour and Body Size but Not Wing Shape.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Teague O'Mara

    Full Text Available Within the large order of bats, sexual size dimorphism measured by forearm length and body mass is often female-biased. Several studies have explained this through the effects on load carrying during pregnancy, intrasexual competition, as well as the fecundity and thermoregulation advantages of increased female body size. We hypothesized that wing shape should differ along with size and be under variable selection pressure in a species where there are large differences in flight behaviour. We tested whether load carrying, sex differential migration, or reproductive advantages of large females affect size and wing shape dimorphism in the common noctule (Nyctalus noctula, in which females are typically larger than males and only females migrate long distances each year. We tested for univariate and multivariate size and shape dimorphism using data sets derived from wing photos and biometric data collected during pre-migratory spring captures in Switzerland. Females had forearms that are on average 1% longer than males and are 1% heavier than males after emerging from hibernation, but we found no sex differences in other size, shape, or other functional characters in any wing parameters during this pre-migratory period. Female-biased size dimorphism without wing shape differences indicates that reproductive advantages of big mothers are most likely responsible for sexual dimorphism in this species, not load compensation or shape differences favouring aerodynamic efficiency during pregnancy or migration. Despite large behavioural and ecological sex differences, morphology associated with a specialized feeding niche may limit potential dimorphism in narrow-winged bats such as common noctules and the dramatic differences in migratory behaviour may then be accomplished through plasticity in wing kinematics.

  20. Leg blood flow during static exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilbom, A; Persson, J

    1982-01-01

    Leg blood flow was studied with the constant infusion dye technique during static exercise of the thigh muscles (quadriceps) and during hand-grips at 15 and 25-30% of MVC. Blood flow and oxygen uptake in the leg increased in quadriceps exercise and reached their highest values (around 1.21/min and 165 ml/min respectively) at 25-30% of MVC, whereas leg vascular resistance decreased. Regional circulatory adaptations and the oxygen uptake - leg blood flow relationship were in close agreement with the responses found in dynamic leg exercise. In view of the marked rise in intramuscular pressure previously observed during quadriceps contractions, a restriction of blood flow and an increased vascular resistance had been expected. Involuntary activation of leg muscles other than the quadriceps may explain the finding. Contractions of the contralateral quadriceps induced a slight increase in leg blood flow, whereas hand-grips had no influence on blood flow or vascular resistance in the leg. The distribution of the cardiac output during static contractions is discussed, and it is concluded that during hand-grips the increase in blood flow is predominantly distributed to the upper part of the body.

  1. Static current profile control and RFP confinement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scheffel, Jan; Mirza, Ahmed A.; Schnack, Dalton D.

    2013-01-01

    Static current profile control (CPC) is shown numerically to substantially enhance plasma confinement in the reversed-field pinch (RFP). By suitable application of an auxiliary electric field and adjustment of its internal location, width and amplitude, strongly decreased levels of dynamo fluctuations are obtained. The simulations are performed using a fully non-linear, resistive magnetohydrodynamic model, including the effects of ohmic heating as well as parallel and perpendicular heat conduction along stochastic field lines. The importance of controlling the parallel current profile in the core plasma to minimize the effects of tearing modes on confinement is thus confirmed. A near three-fold increase in energy confinement is found and poloidal plasma beta increases by 30% from 0.20 to 0.27. The edge heat flux is reduced to a third of that of the conventional RFP. The high-confinement phase is interrupted here by a crash, characterized by a rapid decrease in confinement. A detailed study of the crash phase is carried out by the standard Δ′ theory and a fully resistive linearized time-spectral method; the generalized weighted residual method. The analysis suggests that the instability is caused by pressure-driven, resistive g-modes. Inclusion of anisotropic thermal conduction reduces the linear growth rates. As compared with our earlier numerical studies of CPC in the RFP, employing feedback control, the present static control scheme should be more easily implemented experimentally. (paper)

  2. The leading-edge vortex of swift-wing shaped delta wings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muir, Rowan; Arredondo-Galeana, Abel; Viola, Ignazio Maria

    2017-11-01

    Recent investigations on the aerodynamics of natural fliers have illuminated the significance of the Leading-Edge Vortex (LEV) for lift generation in a variety of flight conditions. In this investigation, a model non-slender delta shaped wing with a sharp leading-edge is tested at low Reynolds Number, along with a delta wing of the same design, but with a modified trailing edge inspired by the wing of a common swift Apus apus. The effect of the tapering swift wing on LEV development and stability is compared with the flow structure over the un-modified delta wing model through particle image velocimetry. For the first time, a leading-edge vortex system consisting of a dual or triple LEV is recorded on a swift-wing shaped delta wing, where such a system is found across all tested conditions. It is shown that the spanwise location of LEV breakdown is governed by the local chord rather than Reynolds Number or angle of attack. These findings suggest that the trailing-edge geometry of the swift wing alone does not prevent the common swift from generating an LEV system comparable with that of a delta shaped wing. This work received funding from the Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council [EP/M506515/1] and the Consejo Nacional de Ciencia y Tecnología (CONACYT).

  3. Fruit fly scale robots can hover longer with flapping wings than with spinning wings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawkes, Elliot W; Lentink, David

    2016-10-01

    Hovering flies generate exceptionally high lift, because their wings generate a stable leading edge vortex. Micro flying robots with a similar wing design can generate similar high lift by either flapping or spinning their wings. While it requires less power to spin a wing, the overall efficiency depends also on the actuator system driving the wing. Here, we present the first holistic analysis to calculate how long a fly-inspired micro robot can hover with flapping versus spinning wings across scales. We integrate aerodynamic data with data-driven scaling laws for actuator, electronics and mechanism performance from fruit fly to hummingbird scales. Our analysis finds that spinning wings driven by rotary actuators are superior for robots with wingspans similar to hummingbirds, yet flapping wings driven by oscillatory actuators are superior at fruit fly scale. This crossover is driven by the reduction in performance of rotary compared with oscillatory actuators at smaller scale. Our calculations emphasize that a systems-level analysis is essential for trading-off flapping versus spinning wings for micro flying robots. © 2016 The Author(s).

  4. Flow Modulation and Force Control of Flapping Wings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-10-29

    tested on a flapping wing model in the oil tank. Robotic flapper equipped with DC motors drove the wing model, and the imbedded servo motor could flap...the overall wake structure on the hovering wings. Totally, two volumetric flow measurements were performed on two mechanical flappers with different...wing kinematics but similar wing geometry. On the flappers with small stroke angle and passive rotation, the general vortex wake structure

  5. Wind Tunnel Test of a Risk-Reduction Wing/Fuselage Model to Examine Juncture-Flow Phenomena

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kegerise, Michael A.; Neuhart, Dan H.

    2016-01-01

    A wing/fuselage wind-tunnel model was tested in the Langley 14- by 22-foot Subsonic Wind Tunnel in preparation for a highly-instrumented Juncture Flow Experiment to be conducted in the same facility. This test, which was sponsored by the NASA Transformational Tool and Technologies Project, is part of a comprehensive set of experimental and computational research activities to develop revolutionary, physics-based aeronautics analysis and design capability. The objectives of this particular test were to examine the surface and off-body flow on a generic wing/body combination to: 1) choose a final wing for a future, highly instrumented model, 2) use the results to facilitate unsteady pressure sensor placement on the model, 3) determine the area to be surveyed with an embedded laser-doppler velocimetry (LDV) system, 4) investigate the primary juncture corner- flow separation region using particle image velocimetry (PIV) to see if the particle seeding is adequately entrained and to examine the structure in the separated region, and 5) to determine the similarity of observed flow features with those predicted by computational fluid dynamics (CFD). This report documents the results of the above experiment that specifically address the first three goals. Multiple wing configurations were tested at a chord Reynolds number of 2.4 million. Flow patterns on the surface of the wings and in the region of the wing/fuselage juncture were examined using oil- flow visualization and infrared thermography. A limited number of unsteady pressure sensors on the fuselage around the wing leading and trailing edges were used to identify any dynamic effects of the horseshoe vortex on the flow field. The area of separated flow in the wing/fuselage juncture near the wing trailing edge was observed for all wing configurations at various angles of attack. All of the test objectives were met. The staff of the 14- by 22-foot Subsonic Wind Tunnel provided outstanding support and delivered

  6. Left-Wing Extremism: The Current Threat

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karl A. Seger

    2001-04-30

    Left-wing extremism is ''alive and well'' both in the US and internationally. Although the current domestic terrorist threat within the U. S. is focused on right-wing extremists, left-wing extremists are also active and have several objectives. Leftist extremists also pose an espionage threat to U.S. interests. While the threat to the U.S. government from leftist extremists has decreased in the past decade, it has not disappeared. There are individuals and organizations within the U.S. who maintain the same ideology that resulted in the growth of left-wing terrorism in this country in the 1970s and 1980s. Some of the leaders from that era are still communicating from Cuba with their followers in the U.S., and new leaders and groups are emerging.

  7. A galactic microquasar mimicking winged radio galaxies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martí, Josep; Luque-Escamilla, Pedro L; Bosch-Ramon, Valentí; Paredes, Josep M

    2017-11-24

    A subclass of extragalactic radio sources known as winged radio galaxies has puzzled astronomers for many years. The wing features are detected at radio wavelengths as low-surface-brightness radio lobes that are clearly misaligned with respect to the main lobe axis. Different models compete to account for these peculiar structures. Here, we report observational evidence that the parsec-scale radio jets in the Galactic microquasar GRS 1758-258 give rise to a Z-shaped radio emission strongly reminiscent of the X and Z-shaped morphologies found in winged radio galaxies. This is the first time that such extended emission features are observed in a microquasar, providing a new analogy for its extragalactic relatives. From our observations, we can clearly favour the hydrodynamic backflow interpretation against other possible wing formation scenarios. Assuming that physical processes are similar, we can extrapolate this conclusion and suggest that this mechanism could also be at work in many extragalactic cases.

  8. Flow structure of vortex-wing interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKenna, Christopher K.

    Impingement of a streamwise-oriented vortex upon a fin, tail, blade or wing represents a fundamental class of flow-structure interaction that extends across a range of applications. This interaction can give rise to time-averaged loading, as well as unsteady loading known as buffeting. The loading is sensitive to parameters of the incident vortex as well as the location of vortex impingement on the downstream aerodynamic surface, generically designated as a wing. Particle image velocimetry is employed to determine patterns of velocity, vorticity, swirl ratio, and streamlines on successive cross-flow planes upstream of and along the wing, which lead to volume representations and thereby characterization of the interaction. At locations upstream of the leading edge of the wing, the evolution of the incident vortex is affected by the presence of the wing, and is highly dependent on the spanwise location of vortex impingement. Even at spanwise locations of impingement well outboard of the wing tip, a substantial influence on the structure of the incident vortex at locations significantly upstream of the leading edge of the wing was observed. For spanwise locations close to or intersecting the vortex core, the effects of upstream influence of the wing on the vortex are to: decrease the swirl ratio; increase the streamwise velocity deficit; decrease the streamwise vorticity; increase the azimuthal vorticity; increase the upwash; decrease the downwash; and increase the root-mean-square fluctuations of both streamwise velocity and vorticity. The interrelationship between these effects is addressed, including the rapid attenuation of axial vorticity in presence of an enhanced defect of axial velocity in the central region of the vortex. Moreover, when the incident vortex is aligned with, or inboard of, the tip of the wing, the swirl ratio decreases to values associated with instability of the vortex, giving rise to enhanced values of azimuthal vorticity relative to the

  9. A New Static and Fatigue Compression Test Method for Composites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bech, Jakob Ilsted; Goutianos, Stergios; Løgstrup Andersen, Tom

    2011-01-01

    A new test method to determine the compressive properties of composite materials under both static and fatigue loading was developed. The novel fixture is based on the concept of transmitting the load by a fixed ratio of end-to-shear loading. The end-to-shear load ratio is kept fixed during...... the test through a mechanical mechanism, which automatically maintains the gripping pressure. The combined loading method has proven very efficient in static loading and is used in the new fixture which is specially designed for fatigue testing. Optimum gripping (shear loading) and alignment of the test...... coupon are achieved throughout the fatigue life. The fatigue strength obtained is more reliable because bending of the specimen due to poor gripping and alignment is minimised. The application of the new fixture to static and fatigue compression is demonstrated by using unidirectional carbon...

  10. The effect of winglets on the static aerodynamic stability characteristics of a representative second generation jet transport model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobs, P. F.; Flechner, S. G.

    1976-01-01

    A baseline wing and a version of the same wing fitted with winglets were tested. The longitudinal aerodynamic characteristics were determined through an angle-of-attack range from -1 deg to 10 deg at an angle of sideslip of 0 deg for Mach numbers of 0.750, 0.800, and 0.825. The lateral aerodynamic characteristics were determined through the same angle-of-attack range at fixed sideslip angles of 2.5 deg and 5 deg. Both configurations were investigated at Reynolds numbers of 13,000,000, per meter (4,000,000 per foot) and approximately 20,000,000 per meter (6,000,000 per foot). The winglet configuration showed slight increases over the baseline wing in static longitudinal and lateral aerodynamic stability throughout the test Mach number range for a model design lift coefficient of 0.53. Reynolds number variation had very little effect on stability.

  11. The hydraulic mechanism in the hind wing veins of Cybister japonicus Sharp (order: Coleoptera

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiyu Sun

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The diving beetles (Dytiscidae, Coleoptera are families of water beetles. When they see light, they fly to the light source directly from the water. Their hind wings are thin and fragile under the protection of their elytra (forewings. When the beetle is at rest the hind wings are folded over the abdomen of the beetle and when in flight they unfold to provide the necessary aerodynamic forces. In this paper, the unfolding process of the hind wing of Cybister japonicus Sharp (order: Coleoptera was investigated. The motion characteristics of the blood in the veins of the structure system show that the veins have microfluidic control over the hydraulic mechanism of the unfolding process. A model is established, and the hind wing extending process is simulated. The blood flow and pressure changes are discussed. The driving mechanism for hydraulic control of the folding and unfolding actions of beetle hind wings is put forward. This can assist the design of new deployable micro air vehicles and bioinspired deployable systems.

  12. The hydraulic mechanism in the hind wing veins of Cybister japonicus Sharp (order: Coleoptera).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Jiyu; Wu, Wei; Ling, Mingze; Bhushan, Bharat; Tong, Jin

    2016-01-01

    The diving beetles (Dytiscidae, Coleoptera) are families of water beetles. When they see light, they fly to the light source directly from the water. Their hind wings are thin and fragile under the protection of their elytra (forewings). When the beetle is at rest the hind wings are folded over the abdomen of the beetle and when in flight they unfold to provide the necessary aerodynamic forces. In this paper, the unfolding process of the hind wing of Cybister japonicus Sharp (order: Coleoptera) was investigated. The motion characteristics of the blood in the veins of the structure system show that the veins have microfluidic control over the hydraulic mechanism of the unfolding process. A model is established, and the hind wing extending process is simulated. The blood flow and pressure changes are discussed. The driving mechanism for hydraulic control of the folding and unfolding actions of beetle hind wings is put forward. This can assist the design of new deployable micro air vehicles and bioinspired deployable systems.

  13. Turbulence investigation of the NASA common research model wing tip vortex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Čantrak Đorđe S.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents high-speed stereo particle image velocimetry investigation of the NASA Common Research Model wing tip vortex. A three-percent scaled semi–span model, without nacelle and pylon, was tested in the 32- by 48-inch Indraft tunnel, at the Fluid Mechanics Laboratory at the NASA Ames Research Center. Turbulence investigation of the wing tip vortex is presented. Measurements of the wing-tip vortex were performed in a vertical cross-stream plane three tip-chords downstream of the wing tip trailing edge with a 2 kHz sampling rate. Experimental data are analyzed in the invariant anisotropy maps for three various angles of attack (0°, 2°, and 4° and the same speed generated in the tunnel (V∞ = 50 m/s. This corresponds to a chord Reynolds number 2.68x105, where the chord length of 3” is considered the characteristic length. The region of interest was x = 220 mm and y = 90 mm. The 20 000 particle image velocimetry samples were acquired at each condition. Velocity fields and turbulence statistics are given for all cases, as well as turbulence structure in the light of the invariant theory. Prediction of the wing tip vortices is still a challenge for the computational fluid dynamics codes due to significant pressure and velocity gradients. [Project of the Serbian Ministry of Education, Science and Technological Development, Grant no. TR 35046

  14. Static Analysis for Dynamic XML

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Aske Simon; Møller, Anders; Schwartzbach, Michael Ignatieff

    2002-01-01

    We describe the summary graph lattice for dataflow analysis of programs that dynamically construct XML documents. Summary graphs have successfully been used to provide static guarantees in the JWIG language for programming interactive Web services. In particular, the JWIG compiler is able to check...

  15. Some Static Properties of Slinky

    OpenAIRE

    Eskandari-asl, Amir

    2018-01-01

    In this paper we use a simple discrete model for Slinky to explore some of its static properties. We derive some relations for vertically and U-shaped suspended Slinkies, based on which, some demonstrations are proposed that can be simply done in freshmen physics classes.

  16. Static Analysis of Dynamic Languages

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Magnus

    with static type systems, such as Java and C# , but the same features are rarely available for dynamic languages such as JavaScript. The aim of this thesis is to investigate techniques for improving the tool- support for dynamic programming languages without imposing any artificial restrictions...

  17. Static Verification for Code Contracts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fähndrich, Manuel

    The Code Contracts project [3] at Microsoft Research enables programmers on the .NET platform to author specifications in existing languages such as C# and VisualBasic. To take advantage of these specifications, we provide tools for documentation generation, runtime contract checking, and static contract verification.

  18. Static Analysis for Systems Biology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielson, Flemming; Nielson, Hanne Riis; Rosa, D. Schuch da

    2004-01-01

    This paper shows how static analysis techniques can help understanding biological systems. Based on a simple example we illustrate the outcome of performing three different analyses extracting information of increasing precision. We conclude by reporting on the potential impact and exploitation o...... of these techniques in systems biology....

  19. Static Correctness of Hierarchical Procedures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schwartzbach, Michael Ignatieff

    1990-01-01

    A system of hierarchical, fully recursive types in a truly imperative language allows program fragments written for small types to be reused for all larger types. To exploit this property to enable type-safe hierarchical procedures, it is necessary to impose a static requirement on procedure calls...

  20. The leading-edge vortex of swift wing-shaped delta wings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muir, Rowan Eveline; Arredondo-Galeana, Abel; Viola, Ignazio Maria

    2017-08-01

    Recent investigations on the aerodynamics of natural fliers have illuminated the significance of the leading-edge vortex (LEV) for lift generation in a variety of flight conditions. A well-documented example of an LEV is that generated by aircraft with highly swept, delta-shaped wings. While the wing aerodynamics of a manoeuvring aircraft, a bird gliding and a bird in flapping flight vary significantly, it is believed that this existing knowledge can serve to add understanding to the complex aerodynamics of natural fliers. In this investigation, a model non-slender delta-shaped wing with a sharp leading edge is tested at low Reynolds number, along with a delta wing of the same design, but with a modified trailing edge inspired by the wing of a common swift Apus apus . The effect of the tapering swift wing on LEV development and stability is compared with the flow structure over the unmodified delta wing model through particle image velocimetry. For the first time, a leading-edge vortex system consisting of a dual or triple LEV is recorded on a swift wing-shaped delta wing, where such a system is found across all tested conditions. It is shown that the spanwise location of LEV breakdown is governed by the local chord rather than Reynolds number or angle of attack. These findings suggest that the trailing-edge geometry of the swift wing alone does not prevent the common swift from generating an LEV system comparable with that of a delta-shaped wing.

  1. Wind tunnel tests of an 0.019-scale space shuttle integrated vehicle -2A configuration (model 14-OTS) in the NASA Ames 8 X 7 foot unitary wind tunnel, volume 2. [cold jet gas plumes and pressure distribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardin, R. B.; Burrows, R. R.

    1975-01-01

    The purpose of the test was to determine the effects of cold jet gas plumes on (1) the integrated vehicle longitudinal and lateral-directional force data, (2) exposed wing hinge moment, (3) wing pressure distributions, (4) orbiter MPS external pressure distributions, and (5) model base pressures. An investigation was undertaken to determine the similarity between solid and gaseous plumes; fluorescent oil flow visualization studies were also conducted. Plotted wing pressure data is tabulated.

  2. Comparison of hemodynamic responses to static and dynamic exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bezucha, G R; Lenser, M C; Hanson, P G; Nagle, F J

    1982-12-01

    Eight healthy male adults (25-34 yr) were studied to compare hemodynamic responses to static exercise (30% MVC in leg extension), static-dynamic exercise (one-arm cranking, 66 and 79% VO2 max-arm), and dynamic exercise (two-leg cycling, 58 and 82% VOmax-legs). Leg extension (LE) strength was measured by a spring scale. Cranking and cycling were performed on a Quinton bicycle ergometer. VO2 was measured using an automated open-circuit system. Heart rate (HR) was monitored from a CM-5 ECG lead, and arterial pressure (Pa) was measured from an indwelling brachial artery catheter. Cardiac output (Q) was measured using a CO2-rebreathing procedure. Total peripheral resistance (TPR) was calculated using the mean arterial pressure (Pa) as the systemic pressure gradient. In 30% LE, a significant (P less than 0.05) Pa increase occurred (pressor response) mediated primarily by an increase in Q. One-arm cranking and two-leg cycling at similar relative VO2 demands resulted in nearly identical increases in Pa due to different contributions of Q and TPR. Q and the arteriovenous O2 difference varied as a function of VO2 regardless of the mode of exercise (static or dynamic). On the other hand, the HR response, which accounted for increased Q in the exercises containing a static component, and Pa varied with mode of exercise. Any generalized scheme of cardiovascular control during exercise must account for the potential influence of dynamic and static components of the exercise.

  3. Longitudinal aerodynamic characteristics of a wing-winglet model designed at M = 0.8, C sub L = 0.4 using linear aerodynamic theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuhlman, J. M.

    1983-01-01

    Wind tunnel test results have been presented herein for a subsonic transport type wing fitted with winglets. Wind planform was chosen to be representative of wings used on current jet transport aircraft, while wing and winglet camber surfaces were designed using two different linear aerodynamic design methods. The purpose of the wind tunnel investigation was to determine the effectiveness of these linear aerodynamic design computer codes in designing a non-planar transport configuration which would cruise efficiently. The design lift coefficient was chosen to be 0.4, at a design Mach number of 0.8. Force and limited pressure data were obtained for the basic wing, and for the wing fitted with the two different winglet designs, at Mach numbers of 0.60, 0.70, 0.75 and 0.80 over an angle of attack range of -2 to +6 degrees, at zero sideslip. The data have been presented without analysis to expedite publication.

  4. Hovering hummingbird wing aerodynamics during the annual cycle. I. Complete wing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Achache, Yonathan; Sapir, Nir; Elimelech, Yossef

    2017-08-01

    The diverse hummingbird family (Trochilidae) has unique adaptations for nectarivory, among which is the ability to sustain hover-feeding. As hummingbirds mainly feed while hovering, it is crucial to maintain this ability throughout the annual cycle-especially during flight-feather moult, in which wing area is reduced. To quantify the aerodynamic characteristics and flow mechanisms of a hummingbird wing throughout the annual cycle, time-accurate aerodynamic loads and flow field measurements were correlated over a dynamically scaled wing model of Anna's hummingbird ( Calypte anna ). We present measurements recorded over a model of a complete wing to evaluate the baseline aerodynamic characteristics and flow mechanisms. We found that the vorticity concentration that had developed from the wing's leading-edge differs from the attached vorticity structure that was typically found over insects' wings; firstly, it is more elongated along the wing chord, and secondly, it encounters high levels of fluctuations rather than a steady vortex. Lift characteristics resemble those of insects; however, a 20% increase in the lift-to-torque ratio was obtained for the hummingbird wing model. Time-accurate aerodynamic loads were also used to evaluate the time-evolution of the specific power required from the flight muscles, and the overall wingbeat power requirements nicely matched previous studies.

  5. Hybrid Wing Body Model Identification Using Forced-Oscillation Water Tunnel Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Patrick C.; Vicroy, Dan D.; Kramer, Brian; Kerho, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Static and dynamic testing of the NASA 0.7 percent scale Hybrid Wing Body (HWB) configuration was conducted in the Rolling Hills Research Corporation water tunnel to investigate aerodynamic behavior over a large range of angle-of-attack and to develop models that can predict aircraft response in nonlinear unsteady flight regimes. This paper reports primarily on the longitudinal axis results. Flow visualization tests were also performed. These tests provide additional static data and new dynamic data that complement tests conducted at NASA Langley 14- by 22-Foot Subsonic Tunnel. HWB was developed to support the NASA Environmentally Responsible Aviation Project goals of lower noise, emissions, and fuel burn. This study also supports the NASA Aviation Safety Program efforts to model and control advanced transport configurations in loss-of-control conditions.

  6. CFD simulations of steady flows over the IAR 65o delta wing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benmeddour, A.; Mebarki, Y.; Huang, X.Z.

    2004-01-01

    Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) studies have been conducted to simulate vortical flows around the IAR 65 o delta wing with a sharp leading edge. The effects of the centerbody on the aerodynamic characteristics of the wing are also investigated. Two flow solvers have been employed to compute steady inviscid flows over with and without centerbody configurations of the wing. These two solvers are an IAR in-house code, FJ3SOLV, and the CFD-FASTRAN commercial software. The computed flow solutions of the two solvers have been compared and correlated against the IAR wind tunnel data, including Pressure Sensitive Paint (PSP) measurements. The major features of the primary vortex have been well captured and overall reasonable accuracy was obtained. In accordance with the experimental observations for the flow conditions considered, the CFD computations revealed no major global effects of the centerbody on the surface pressure distributions of the wing and on the lift coefficient. However, CFD-FASTRAN seems to predict a vortex breakdown, which is neither predicted by FJ3SOLV nor observed in the wind tunnel for the flow conditions considered. (author)

  7. Static versus dynamic respiratory mechanics for setting the ventilator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lichtwarck-Aschoff, M; Kessler, V; Sjöstrand, U H; Hedlund, A; Mols, G; Rubertsson, S; Markström, A M; Guttmann, J

    2000-10-01

    The lower inflection point (LIP) of the inspiratory limb of a static pressure-volume (PV) loop is assumed to indicate the pressure at which most lung units are recruited. The LIP is determined by a static manoeuvre with a PV-history that is different from the PV-history of the actual ventilation. In nine surfactant-deficient piglets, information to allow setting PEEP and VT was obtained, both from the PV-curve and also during ongoing ventilation from the dynamic compliance relationship. According to LIP, PEEP was set at 20 (95% confidence interval 17-22) cm H2O. Volume-dependent dynamic compliance suggested a PEEP reduction (to 15 (13-18) cm H2O). Pulmonary gas exchange remained satisfactory and this change resulted in reduced mechanical stress on the respiratory system, indirectly indicated by volume-dependent compliance being consistently great during the entire inspiration.

  8. The effects of wing flexibility on the flight performance and stability of flapping wing micro air vehicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bluman, James Edward

    Insect wings are flexible. However, the influence of wing flexibility on the flight dynamics of insects and flapping wing micro air vehicles is unknown. Most studies in the literature consider rigid wings and conclude that the hover equilibrium is unstable. This dissertation shows that a flapping wing flyer with flexible wings exhibits stable natural modes of the open loop system in hover, never reported before. The free-flight insect flight dynamics is modeled for both flexible and rigid wings. Wing mass and inertia are included in the nonlinear equations of motion. The flapping wing aerodynamics are modeled using a quasi-steady model, a well-validated two dimensional Navier Stokes model, and a coupled, two dimensional Navier Stokes - Euler Bernoulli beam model that accurately models the fluid-structure interaction of flexible wings. Hover equilibrium is systematically and efficiently determined with a coupled quasi-steady and Navier-Stokes equation trimmer. The power and stability are reported at hover while parametrically varying the pitch axis location for rigid wings and the structural stiffness for flexible wings. The results indicate that the rigid wings possess an unstable oscillatory mode mainly due to their pitch sensitivity to horizontal velocity perturbations. The flexible wings stabilize this mode primarily by adjusting their wing shape in the presence of perturbations. The wing's response to perturbations generates significantly more horizontal velocity damping and pitch rate damping than in rigid wings. Furthermore, the flexible wings experience substantially less wing wake interaction, which, for rigid wings, is destabilizing. The power required to hover a fruit fly with actively rotating rigid wings varies between 16.9 and 34.2 W/kg. The optimal power occurs when the pitch axis is located at 30% chord, similar to some biological observations. Flexible wings require 23.1 to 38.5 W/kg. However, flexible wings exhibit more stable system dynamics and

  9. Statics of historic masonry constructions

    CERN Document Server

    Como, Mario

    2016-01-01

    This successful book, which is now appearing in its second edition, presents a comprehensive new Statics of Masonry Constructions. Masonry constructions are the great majority of the buildings in Europe’s historic centres and the most important monuments in its architectural heritage. Given the age of these constructions, the demand for safety assessments and restoration projects is pressing and constant. The book you hold in hands contributes to fill this demand. The second edition integrates the original text of the first edition with new developments, widening and revisions, due to recent research studies achievements. The result is a book that gives a complete picture of the behaviour of the Masonry Constructions. First of all, it gives the fundamentals of its Statics, based on the no-tension assumption, and then it develops the Limit Analysis for the Masonry Constructions. In this framework, through an interdisciplinary approach combining Engineering and Architecture, the book also investigates the sta...

  10. Size scaling of static friction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braun, O M; Manini, Nicola; Tosatti, Erio

    2013-02-22

    Sliding friction across a thin soft lubricant film typically occurs by stick slip, the lubricant fully solidifying at stick, yielding and flowing at slip. The static friction force per unit area preceding slip is known from molecular dynamics (MD) simulations to decrease with increasing contact area. That makes the large-size fate of stick slip unclear and unknown; its possible vanishing is important as it would herald smooth sliding with a dramatic drop of kinetic friction at large size. Here we formulate a scaling law of the static friction force, which for a soft lubricant is predicted to decrease as f(m)+Δf/A(γ) for increasing contact area A, with γ>0. Our main finding is that the value of f(m), controlling the survival of stick slip at large size, can be evaluated by simulations of comparably small size. MD simulations of soft lubricant sliding are presented, which verify this theory.

  11. Measurement of Static Characteristics Pneumatic Motors with Elastic Working Elements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kamil FOJTÁŠEK

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Into a category of pneumatic motors with elastic working parts belong air bellows, diaphragm motors and fluid muscles. All three types of these motors have some elastic part usually made of rubber. This part is deformed under the pressure of a compressed air or a mass load resulting in a final working effect. This paper deals with measuring of static characteristics of these motors.

  12. Static and kinetic friction of granite at high normal stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byerlee, J.D.

    1970-01-01

    Frictional sliding on ground surfaces of granite, angle of sliding planes 30?? and 45??, was investigated as a function of confining pressure. Over the normal stress range of 2-12 kb, the static frictional shear stress ??s follows the relationship ??s = 0??5 + 0?? ??n and the kinetic frictional shear stress ??k was calculated to be ??k = 0??25 + 0??47 ??n. ?? 1970.

  13. Aeroelastic Analysis of a Flexible Wing Wind Tunnel Model with Variable Camber Continuous Trailing Edge Flap Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Nhan; Ting, Eric; Lebofsky, Sonia

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents data analysis of a flexible wing wind tunnel model with a variable camber continuous trailing edge flap (VCCTEF) design for drag minimization tested at the University of Washington Aeronautical Laboratory (UWAL). The wind tunnel test was designed to explore the relative merit of the VCCTEF concept for improved cruise efficiency through the use of low-cost aeroelastic model test techniques. The flexible wing model is a 10%-scale model of a typical transport wing and is constructed of woven fabric composites and foam core. The wing structural stiffness in bending is tailored to be half of the stiffness of a Boeing 757-era transport wing while the torsional stiffness is about the same. This stiffness reduction results in a wing tip deflection of about 10% of the wing semi-span. The VCCTEF is a multi-segment flap design having three chordwise camber segments and five spanwise flap sections for a total of 15 individual flap elements. The three chordwise camber segments can be positioned appropriately to create a desired trailing edge camber. Elastomeric material is used to cover the gaps in between the spanwise flap sections, thereby creating a continuous trailing edge. Wind tunnel data analysis conducted previously shows that the VCCTEF can achieve a drag reduction of up to 6.31% and an improvement in the lift-to-drag ratio (L=D) of up to 4.85%. A method for estimating the bending and torsional stiffnesses of the flexible wingUWAL wind tunnel model from static load test data is presented. The resulting estimation indicates that the stiffness of the flexible wing is significantly stiffer in torsion than in bending by as much as 9 to 1. The lift prediction for the flexible wing is computed by a coupled aerodynamic-structural model. The coupled model is developed by coupling a conceptual aerodynamic tool Vorlax with a finite-element model of the flexible wing via an automated geometry deformation tool. Based on the comparison of the lift curve slope

  14. Static Analysis of Mobile Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-02-01

    and not allowed, to do. The second issue was that a fully static analysis was never a realistic possibility, because Java , the programming langauge...not justified by the test data). This idea came to define the project: use dynamic analyiss to guess the correct properties a program points of interest...scale to large programs it had to handle essentially all of the features of Java and could also be used as a general-purpose analysis engine. The

  15. Static and Dynamic Membrane Structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergiu Ivanov

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available While originally P systems were defined to contain multiset rewriting rules, it turned out that considering different types of rules may produce important results, such as increasing the computational power of the rules. This paper focuses on factoring out the concept of a membrane structure out of various P system models with the goal of providing useful formalisations. Both static and dynamic membrane structures are considered.

  16. Correlation and spectral measurements of fluctuating pressures and velocities in annular turbulent flow. [PWR; BWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilson, R.J.; Jones, B.G.; Roy, R.P.

    1980-02-01

    An experimental study of the fluctuating velocity field, the fluctuating static wall pressure and the in-stream fluctuating static pressure in an annular turbulent air flow system with a radius ratio of 4.314 has been conducted. The study included direct measurements of the mean velocity profile, turbulent velocity field; fluctuating static wall pressure and in-stream fluctuating static pressure from which the statistical values of the turbulent intensity levels, power spectral densities of the turbulent quantities, the cross-correlation between the fluctuating static wall pressure and the fluctuating static pressure in the core region of the flow and the cross-correlation between the fluctuating static wall pressure and the fluctuating velocity field in the core region of the flow were obtained.

  17. Homotheties of cylindrically symmetric static spacetimes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qadir, A.; Ziad, M.; Sharif, M.

    1998-08-01

    In this note we consider the homotheties of cylindrically symmetric static spacetimes. We find that we can provide a complete list of all metrics that admit non-trivial homothetic motions and are cylindrically symmetric static. (author)

  18. Three Inexpensive Static-Electricity Demonstrations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gore, Gordon R.; Gregg, William R.

    1992-01-01

    Describes demonstrations to (1) construct an inexpensive static electricity detector; (2) obtain an abundant supply of either negative or positive charge using household items; and (3) create static electricity using a Tesla coil or Van de Graaff generator. (MDH)

  19. [Wing 1 radiation survey and contamination report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olsen, K.

    1991-01-01

    We have completed the 5480.11 survey for Wing 1. All area(s)/item(s) requested by the 5480.11 committee have been thoroughly surveyed and documented. Decontamination/disposal of contaminated items has been accomplished. The wing 1 survey was started on 8/13/90 and completed 9/18/90. However, the follow-up surveys were not completed until 2/18/91. We received the final set of smear samples for wing 1 on 1/13/91. A total of 5,495 smears were taken from wing 1 and total of 465 smears were taken during the follow-up surveys. There were a total 122 items found to have fixed contamination and 4 items with smearable contamination in excess of the limits specified in DOE ORDER 5480.11 (AR 3-7). The following area(s)/item(s) were not included in the 5480.11 survey: Hallways, Access panels, Men's and women's change rooms, Janitor closets, Wall lockers and item(s) stored in wing 1 hallways and room 1116. If our contract is renewed, we will include those areas in our survey according to your request of April 15, 1991

  20. Flapping wing aerodynamics: from insects to vertebrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chin, Diana D; Lentink, David

    2016-04-01

    More than a million insects and approximately 11,000 vertebrates utilize flapping wings to fly. However, flapping flight has only been studied in a few of these species, so many challenges remain in understanding this form of locomotion. Five key aerodynamic mechanisms have been identified for insect flight. Among these is the leading edge vortex, which is a convergent solution to avoid stall for insects, bats and birds. The roles of the other mechanisms - added mass, clap and fling, rotational circulation and wing-wake interactions - have not yet been thoroughly studied in the context of vertebrate flight. Further challenges to understanding bat and bird flight are posed by the complex, dynamic wing morphologies of these species and the more turbulent airflow generated by their wings compared with that observed during insect flight. Nevertheless, three dimensionless numbers that combine key flow, morphological and kinematic parameters - the Reynolds number, Rossby number and advance ratio - govern flapping wing aerodynamics for both insects and vertebrates. These numbers can thus be used to organize an integrative framework for studying and comparing animal flapping flight. Here, we provide a roadmap for developing such a framework, highlighting the aerodynamic mechanisms that remain to be quantified and compared across species. Ultimately, incorporating complex flight maneuvers, environmental effects and developmental stages into this framework will also be essential to advancing our understanding of the biomechanics, movement ecology and evolution of animal flight. © 2016. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  1. Static pressure and temperature coefficients of laboratory standard microphones

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Knud

    1996-01-01

    The sensitivity of condenser measurement microphones depends on the environmental conditions due to the changes in the acoustic properties of the enclosed air between diaphragm and back-electrode and in the cavity behind the backelectrode. A theoretical investigation has been performed based...... on an extended lumped parameter representation of the mechanical and acoustical elements of the microphone, assuming the velocity distribution of the diaphragm to follow the zero-order Bessel function. The extension involves the frequency dependency of the dynamic diaphragm mass and stiffness as well as a first...

  2. The static pressure and temperature coefficients of laboratory standard microphones

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Knud

    1999-01-01

    The sensitivity of condenser measurement microphones depends on the environmental conditions due to the changes in the acoustic properties of the air enclosed between diaphragm and backelectrode and in the cavity behind the backelectrode. A theoretical investigation has been performed based...... on an extended lumped parameter representation of the mechanical and acoustic elements of the microphone. The extension involves the frequency dependency of the dynamic diaphragm mass and stiffness as well as a first-order approximation of resonances in the back cavity. It was found that each coefficient...

  3. 30 CFR 7.104 - Internal static pressure test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ..., AND APPROVAL OF MINING PRODUCTS TESTING BY APPLICANT OR THIRD PARTY Diesel Power Packages Intended for Use in Areas of Underground Coal Mines Where Permissible Electric Equipment is Required § 7.104...

  4. Static charged spheres with anisotropic pressure in general relativity

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    relativity. *. J KRISHNA RAO*, M ANNAPURNA and M M TRIVEDI. Department of Mathematics, Bhavnagar University, Bhavnagar 364 002, India. /nobr>. Department of Mathematics, Vasavi Engineering College, Hyderabad 500 031, India. £. Address for correspondence: 302, Surya Enclave, Asif Nagar, Mehdipatnam, ...

  5. Principle of bio-inspired insect wing rotational hinge design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fei, Fan

    A principle for designing and fabricating bio-inspired miniature artificial insect flapping wing using flexure rotational hinge design is presented. A systematic approach of selecting rotational hinge stiffness value is proposed. Based on the understanding of flapping wing aerodynamics, a dynamic simulation is constructed using the established quasi-steady model and the wing design. Simulations were performed to gain insight on how different parameters affect the wing rotational response. Based on system resonance a model to predict the optimal rotational hinge stiffness based on given wing parameter and flapping wing kinematic is proposed. By varying different wing parameters, the proposed method is shown to be applicable to a wide range of wing designs with different sizes and shapes. With the selected hinge stiffness value, aspects of the rotational joint design is discussed and an integrated wing-hinge structure design using laminated carbon fiber and polymer film is presented. Manufacturing process of such composite structure is developed to achieve high accuracy and repeatability. The yielded hinge stiffness is verified by measurements. To validate the proposed model, flapping wing experiments were conducted. A flapping actuation set up is built using DC motor and a controller is implemented on a microcontroller to track desired wing stroke kinematic. Wing stroke and rotation kinematic were extracted using a high speed camera and the lift generation is evaluated. A total of 49 flapping experiments were presented, experimental data shows good correlation with the model's prediction. With the wing rotational hinge stiffness designed so that the rotational resonant frequency is twice as the stroke frequency, the resulting wing rotation generates near optimal lift. With further simulation, the proposed model shows low sensitivity to wing parameter variation. As a result, giving a design parameter of a flapping wing robot platform, the proposed principle can

  6. Gliding swifts attain laminar flow over rough wings.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Lentink

    Full Text Available Swifts are among the most aerodynamically refined gliding birds. However, the overlapping vanes and protruding shafts of their primary feathers make swift wings remarkably rough for their size. Wing roughness height is 1-2% of chord length on the upper surface--10,000 times rougher than sailplane wings. Sailplanes depend on extreme wing smoothness to increase the area of laminar flow on the wing surface and minimize drag for extended glides. To understand why the swift does not rely on smooth wings, we used a stethoscope to map laminar flow over preserved wings in a low-turbulence wind tunnel. By combining laminar area, lift, and drag measurements, we show that average area of laminar flow on swift wings is 69% (n = 3; std 13% of their total area during glides that maximize flight distance and duration--similar to high-performance sailplanes. Our aerodynamic analysis indicates that swifts attain laminar flow over their rough wings because their wing size is comparable to the distance the air travels (after a roughness-induced perturbation before it transitions from laminar to turbulent. To interpret the function of swift wing roughness, we simulated its effect on smooth model wings using physical models. This manipulation shows that laminar flow is reduced and drag increased at high speeds. At the speeds at which swifts cruise, however, swift-like roughness prolongs laminar flow and reduces drag. This feature gives small birds with rudimentary wings an edge during the evolution of glide performance.

  7. 30 CFR 18.26 - Static electricity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Static electricity. 18.26 Section 18.26 Mineral... § 18.26 Static electricity. Nonmetallic rotating parts, such as belts and fans, shall be provided with a means to prevent an accumulation of static electricity. ...

  8. A Pedagogical Model of Static Friction

    OpenAIRE

    Pickett, Galen T.

    2015-01-01

    While dry Coulombic friction is an elementary topic in any standard introductory course in mechanics, the critical distinction between the kinetic and static friction forces is something that is both hard to teach and to learn. In this paper, I describe a geometric model of static friction that may help introductory students to both understand and apply the Coulomb static friction approximation.

  9. Wind-tunnel investigation of aerodynamic efficiency of three planar elliptical wings with curvature of quarter-chord line

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mineck, Raymond E.; Vijgen, Paul M. H. W.

    1993-01-01

    Three planar, untwisted wings with the same elliptical chord distribution but with different curvatures of the quarter-chord line were tested in the Langley 8-Foot Transonic Pressure Tunnel (8-ft TPT) and the Langley 7- by 10-Foot High-Speed Tunnel (7 x 10 HST). A fourth wing with a rectangular planform and the same projected area and span was also tested. Force and moment measurements from the 8-ft TPT tests are presented for Mach numbers from 0.3 to 0.5 and angles of attack from -4 degrees to 7 degrees. Sketches of the oil-flow patterns on the upper surfaces of the wings and some force and moment measurements from the 7 x 10 HST tests are presented at a Mach number of 0.5. Increasing the curvature of the quarter-chord line makes the angle of zero lift more negative but has little effect on the drag coefficient at zero lift. The changes in lift-curve slope and in the Oswald efficiency factor with the change in curvature of the quarter-chord line (wingtip location) indicate that the elliptical wing with the unswept quarter-chord line has the lowest lifting efficiency and the elliptical wing with the unswept trailing edge has the highest lifting efficiency; the crescent-shaped planform wing has an efficiency in between.

  10. Design, Development and Tests in Real Time of Control Methodologies for a Morphing Wing in Wind Tunnel =

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tchatchueng Kammegne, Michel Joel

    In order to leave a cleaner environmental space to future generations, the international community has been mobilized to find green solutions that are effective and feasible in all sectors. The CRIAQ MDO505 project was initiated to test the morphing wingtip (wing and aileron) technology as one of these possible solutions. The main objectives of this project are: the design and manufacturing of a morphing wing prototype, the extension and control of the laminar region over the extrados, and to compare the effects of morphing and rigid aileron in terms of lift, drag and pressure distributions. The advantage of the extension of the laminar region over a wing is the drag reduction that results by delaying the transition towards its trailing edge. The location of the transition region depends on the flight case and it is controlled, for a morphing wing, via the actuators positions and displacements. Therefore, this thesis work focuses on the control of the actuators positions and displacements. This thesis presents essentially the modeling, instrumentation and wind tunnel testing results. Three series of wind tunnel tests with different values of aileron deflection angle, angle of attack and Mach number have been performed in the subsonic wind tunnel of the IAR-NRC. The used wing airfoil consisted of stringers, ribs, spars and a flexible upper surface mad of composite materials (glass fiber carbon), a rigid aileron and flexible aileron. The aileron was able to move between +/-6 degrees. The demonstrator's span measures 1.5 m and its chord measures 1.5 m. Structural analyses have been performed to determine the plies orientation, and the number of fiberglass layers for the flexible skin. These analyses allowed also to determine the actuator's forces to push and pull the wing upper surface. The 2D XFoil and 3D solvers Fluent were used to find the optimized airfoil and the optimal location of the transition for each flight case. Based on the analyses done by the

  11. How Do Wings Generate Lift?

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    form of Kutta condition, as compared. Further, this simple theory predicts that the centre of pressure for a flat plate is at a distance of quarter chord from the .... the application of the principle to practical problems. Uniform pres- sure on the boundary ABCD gives zero force and hence on the inner surface formed by the cylinder ...

  12. Numerical and Experimental Validation of the Optimization Methodologies for a Wing-Tip Structure Equipped with Conventional and Morphing Ailerons =

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koreanschi, Andreea

    the CRIAQ MDO 505 project for convergence speed by introducing a two-step cross-over function. Structural constraints were introduced in the algorithm at each aero-structural optimization interaction, allowing a better manipulation of the algorithm and giving it more capabilities of morphing combinations. The CRIAQ MDO 505 project envisioned a morphing aileron concept for the morphing upper surface wing. For this morphing aileron concept, two optimization methods were developed. The methods used the already developed genetic algorithm and each method had a different design concept. The first method was based on the morphing upper surface concept, using actuation points to achieve the desired shape. The second method was based on the hinge rotation concept of the conventional aileron but applied at multiple nodes along the aileron camber to achieve the desired shape. Both methods were constrained by manufacturing and aerodynamic requirements. The purpose of the morphing aileron methods was to obtain an aileron shape with a smoother pressure distribution gradient during deflection than the conventional aileron. The aerodynamic optimization results were used for the structural optimization and design of the wing, particularly the flexible composite skin. Due to the structural changes performed on the initial wing-tip structure, an aeroelastic behaviour analysis, more specific on flutter phenomenon, was performed. The analyses were done to ensure the structural integrity of the wing-tip demonstrator during wind tunnel tests. Three wind tunnel tests were performed for the CRIAQ MDO 505 wing-tip demonstrator at the IAR-NRC subsonic wind tunnel facility in Ottawa. The first two tests were performed for the wing-tip equipped with conventional aileron. The purpose of these tests was to validate the control system designed for the morphing upper surface, the numerical optimization and aerodynamic analysis and to evaluate the optimization efficiency on the boundary layer

  13. Slot Nozzle Effects for Reduced Sonic Boom on a Generic Supersonic Wing Section

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caster, Raymond S.

    2010-01-01

    NASA has conducted research programs to reduce or eliminate the operational restrictions of supersonic aircraft over populated areas. Restrictions are due to the disturbance from the sonic boom, caused by the coalescence of shock waves formed off the aircraft. Results from two-dimensional computational fluid dynamic (CFD) analyses (performed on a baseline Mach 2.0 nozzle in a simulated Mach 2.2 flow) indicate that over-expanded and under-expanded operation of the nozzle has an effect on the N-wave boom signature. Analyses demonstrate the feasibility of reducing the magnitude of the sonic boom N-wave by controlling the nozzle plume interaction with the nozzle boat tail shock structure. This work was extended to study the impact of integrating a high aspect ratio exhaust nozzle or long slot nozzle on the trailing edge of a supersonic wing. The nozzle is operated in a highly under-expanded condition, creating a large exhaust plume and a shock at the trailing edge of the wing. This shock interacts with and suppresses the expansion wave caused by the wing, a major contributor to the sonic boom signature. The goal was to reduce the near field pressures caused by the expansion using a slot nozzle located at the wing trailing edge. Results from CFD analysis on a simulated wing cross-section and a slot nozzle indicate potential reductions in sonic boom signature compared to a baseline wing with no propulsion or trailing edge exhaust. Future studies could investigate if this effect could be useful on a supersonic aircraft for main propulsion, auxiliary propulsion, or flow control.

  14. Comparison of wing geometry data and genetic data for assessing the population structure of Aedes aegypti.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vidal, Paloma Oliveira; Suesdek, Lincoln

    2012-04-01

    Aedes aegypti is the most important vector of dengue viruses in tropical and subtropical regions. Because vaccines are still under development, dengue prevention depends primarily on vector control. Population genetics is a common approach in research involving Ae. aegypti. In the context of medical entomology, wing morphometric analysis has been proposed as a strong and low-cost complementary tool for investigating population structure. Therefore, we comparatively evaluated the genetic and phenotypic variability of population samples of Ae. aegypti from four sampling sites in the metropolitan area of São Paulo city, Brazil. The distances between the sites ranged from 7.1 to 50 km. This area, where knowledge on the population genetics of this mosquito is incipient, was chosen due to the thousands of dengue cases registered yearly. The analysed loci were polymorphic, and they revealed population structure (global F(ST)=0.062; p<0.05) and low levels of gene flow (Nm=0.47) between the four locations. Principal component and discriminant analyses of wing shape variables (18 landmarks) demonstrated that wing polymorphisms were only slightly more common between populations than within populations. Whereas microsatellites allowed for geographic differentiation, wing geometry failed to distinguish the samples. These data suggest that microevolution in this species may affect genetic and morphological characters to different degrees. In this case, wing shape was not validated as a marker for assessing population structure. According to the interpretation of a previous report, the wing shape of Ae. aegypti does not vary significantly because it is stabilised by selective pressure. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. The role of wing kinematics of freely flying birds downstream the wake of flapping wings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishnan, Krishnamoorthy; Gurka, Roi

    2016-11-01

    Avian aerodynamics has been a topic of research for centuries. Avian flight features such as flapping, morphing and maneuvering make bird aerodynamics a complex system to study, analyze and understand. Aerodynamic performance of the flapping wings can be quantified by measuring the vortex structures present in the downstream wake. Still, the direct correlation between the flapping wing kinematics and the evolution of wake features need to be established. In this present study, near wake of three bird species (western sandpiper, European starling and American robin) have been measured experimentally. Long duration, time-resolved, particle image velocimetry technique has been used to capture the wake properties. Simultaneously, the bird kinematics have been captured using high speed camera. Wake structures are reconstructed from the collected PIV images for long chord distances downstream. Wake vorticities and circulation are expressed in the wake composites. Comparison of the wake features of the three birds shows similarities and some key differences are also found. Wing tip motions of the birds are extracted for four continuous wing beat cycle to analyze the wing kinematics. Kinematic parameters of all the three birds are compared to each other and similar trends exhibited by all the birds have been observed. A correlation between the wake evolutions with the wing motion is presented. It was found that the wings' motion generates unique flow patterns at the near wake, especially at the transition phases. At these locations, a drastic change in the circulation was observed.

  16. Investigating the Force Production of Functionally-Graded Flexible Wings in Flapping Wing Flight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mudbhari, Durlav; Erdogan, Malcolm; He, Kai; Bateman, Daniel; Lipkis, Rory; Moored, Keith

    2015-11-01

    Birds, insects and bats oscillate their wings to propel themselves over long distances and to maneuver with unprecedented agility. A key element to achieve their impressive aerodynamic performance is the flexibility of their wings. Numerous studies have shown that homogeneously flexible wings can enhance force production, propulsive efficiency and lift efficiency. Yet, animal wings are not homogenously flexible, but instead have varying material properties. The aim of this study is to characterize the force production and energetics of functionally-graded flexible wings. A partially-flexible wing composed of a rigid section and a flexible section is used as a first-order model of functionally-graded materials. The flexion occurs in the spanwise direction and it is affected by the spanwise flexion ratio, that is, the ratio of the length of the rigid section compared to the total span length. By varying the flexion ratio as well as the material properties of the flexible section, the study aims to examine the force production and energetics of flapping flight with functionally-graded flexible wings. Supported by the Office of Naval Research under Program Director Dr. Bob Brizzolara, MURI grant number N00014-14-1-0533.

  17. Aeroelastic Analysis of Modern Complex Wings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kapania, Rakesh K.; Bhardwaj, Manoj K.; Reichenbach, Eric; Guruswamy, Guru P.

    1996-01-01

    A process is presented by which aeroelastic analysis is performed by using an advanced computational fluid dynamics (CFD) code coupled with an advanced computational structural dynamics (CSD) code. The process is demonstrated on an F/A-18 Stabilator using NASTD (an in-house McDonnell Douglas Aerospace East CFD code) coupled with NASTRAN. The process is also demonstrated on an aeroelastic research wing (ARW-2) using ENSAERO (an in-house NASA Ames Research Center CFD code) coupled with a finite element wing-box structures code. Good results have been obtained for the F/A-18 Stabilator while results for the ARW-2 supercritical wing are still being obtained.

  18. Active Twist Control for a Compliant Wing Structure, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Blended wing body (BWB) aircraft provide an aerodynamically superior solution over traditional tube-and-wing designs for a number of mission profiles. These...

  19. Fixed-Wing Micro Air Vehicles with Hovering Capabilities

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Bataille, Boris; Poinsot, Damien; Thipyopas, Chinnapat; Moschetta, Jean-Marc

    2007-01-01

    Fixed-wing micro air vehicles (MAV) are very attractive for outdoor surveillance missions since they generally offer better payload and endurance capabilities than rotorcraft or flapping-wing vehicles of equal size...

  20. Nonlinear Analysis and Preliminary Testing Results of a Hybrid Wing Body Center Section Test Article

    Science.gov (United States)

    Przekop, Adam; Jegley, Dawn C.; Rouse, Marshall; Lovejoy, Andrew E.; Wu, Hsi-Yung T.

    2015-01-01

    A large test article was recently designed, analyzed, fabricated, and successfully tested up to the representative design ultimate loads to demonstrate that stiffened composite panels with through-the-thickness reinforcement are a viable option for the next generation large transport category aircraft, including non-conventional configurations such as the hybrid wing body. This paper focuses on finite element analysis and test data correlation of the hybrid wing body center section test article under mechanical, pressure and combined load conditions. Good agreement between predictive nonlinear finite element analysis and test data is found. Results indicate that a geometrically nonlinear analysis is needed to accurately capture the behavior of the non-circular pressurized and highly-stressed structure when the design approach permits local buckling.

  1. Nonlinear Dynamics of Wind Turbine Wings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Jesper Winther

    Wind turbines with a nominal effect of 5MW with a rotor diameter of up to 126m are produced today. With the increasing size wind turbines also become more and more optimized with respect to structural dimensions and material usage, without increasing the stiffness proportionally. Consequently......, large wind turbines become increasingly flexible and dynamically sensitive. This project focuses on the structural analysis of highly flexible wind turbine wings, and the aerodynamic loading of wind turbine wings under large changes in flow field due to elastic deformations and changing wind conditions....

  2. Stability and transition on swept wings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stuckert, Greg; Herbert, Thorwald; Esfahanian, Vahid

    1993-01-01

    This paper describes the extension and application of the Parabolized Stability Equations (PSE) to the stability and transition of the supersonic three-dimensional laminar boundary layer on a swept wing. The problem formulation uses a general coordinate transformation for arbitrary curvilinear body-fitted computational grids. Some testing using these coordinates is briefly described to help validate the software used for the investigation. The disturbance amplitude ratios as a function of chord position for supersonic (Mach 1.5) boundary layers on untapered, untwisted wings of different sweep angles are then presented and compared with those obtained from local parallel analyses.

  3. Damage Considerations of a Flexible Micro Air Vehicle Wing Using 3-D Laser Vibrometry

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Mendoza, Jr, Leo L

    2007-01-01

    .... The flexible micro air vehicle wing studied was based on a University of Florida micro air vehicle wing design and was examined using measurements from the Polytec 400-3D Scanning Vibrometer. Comparisons of the wing?s natural frequencies and displacements were made between the wing?s undamaged and damaged states.

  4. Integrated multi-disciplinary design of a sailplane wing

    OpenAIRE

    Strauch, Gregory J.

    1985-01-01

    The objective of this research is to investigate the techniques and payoffs of integrated aircraft design. Lifting line theory and beam theory are used for the analysis of the aerodynamics and the structures of a composite sailplane wing. The wing is described by 33 - 34 design variables which involve the planform geometry, the twist distribution, and thicknesses of the spar caps, spar webs, and the skin at various stations along the wing. The wing design must satisfy 30 â ...

  5. Computational Fluid Dynamic Simulation (CFD and Experimental Study on Wing-external Store Aerodynamic Interference

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tholudin Mat Lazim

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available The main objective of the present work is to study the effect of an external store to a subsonic fighter aircraft. Generally most modern fighter aircraft is designed with an external store installation. In this project a subsonic fighter aircraft model has been manufactured using a computer numerical control machine for the purpose of studying the effect of the external store aerodynamic interference on the flow around the aircraft wing. A computational fluid dynamic (CFD and wind tunnel testing experiments have been carried out to ensure the aerodynamic characteristic of the model then certified the aircraft will not facing any difficulties in stability and controllability. In the CFD experiment, commercial CFD code is used to simulate the interference and aerodynamic characteristics of the model. Subsequently, the model together with an external store was tested in a low speed wind tunnel with test section sized 0.45 m×0.45 m. Result in the two-dimensional pressure distribution obtained by both experiments are comparable. There is only 12% deviation in pressure distribution found in wind tunnel testing compared to the result predicted by the CFD. The result shows that the effect of the external storage is only significant at the lower surface of the wing and almost negligible at the upper surface of the wing. Aerodynamic interference is due to the external storage were mostly evidence on a lower surface of the wing and almost negligible on the upper surface at low angle of attack. In addition, the area of influence on the wing surface by store interference increased as the airspeed increase. 

  6. Flow Field Analysis of Fully Coupled Computations of a Flexible Wing undergoing Stall Flutter

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    instantaneously measure the wing deformation . Clearly, these sensors rely upon the structural deformation for determining the extent of the defor...Torsion Figure 3. Modal structural model containing both bending and torsional modes. which can be simplified to Cµ = U2j A j U2∞Are f (6) since the...orthogonal decomposition (POD) was used on the pressure in the flow field.? Because the mesh is deforming due to the fluid-structure coupling and the

  7. Hybrid Wing Body Multi-Bay Test Article Analysis and Assembly Final Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velicki, Alexander; Hoffman, Krishna; Linton, Kim A.; Baraja, Jaime; Wu, Hsi-Yung T.; Thrash, Patrick

    2017-01-01

    This report summarizes work performed by The Boeing Company, through its Boeing Research & Technology organization located in Huntington Beach, California, under the Environmentally Responsible Aviation (ERA) project. The report documents work performed to structurally analyze and assemble a large-scale Multi-bay Box (MBB) Test Article capable of withstanding bending and internal pressure loadings representative of a Hybrid Wing Body (HWB) aircraft. The work included fabrication of tooling elements for use in the fabrication and assembly of the test article.

  8. STATIC ANALYSIS OF LEAF SPRING

    OpenAIRE

    E VENUGOPAL GOUD; G HARINATH GOWD

    2012-01-01

    Leaf springs are special kind of springs used in automobile suspension systems. The advantage of leaf spring over helical spring is that the ends of the spring may be guided along a definite path as it deflects to act as a structural member in addition to energy absorbing device. The main function of leaf spring is not only tosupport vertical load but also to isolate road induced vibrations. It is subjected to millions of load cycles leading to fatigue failure. Static analysis determines the ...

  9. Static Validation of Security Protocols

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bodei, Chiara; Buchholtz, Mikael; Degano, P.

    2005-01-01

    We methodically expand protocol narrations into terms of a process algebra in order to specify some of the checks that need to be made in a protocol. We then apply static analysis technology to develop an automatic validation procedure for protocols. Finally, we demonstrate that these techniques ...... suffice to identify several authentication flaws in symmetric and asymmetric key protocols such as Needham-Schroeder symmetric key, Otway-Rees, Yahalom, Andrew secure RPC, Needham-Schroeder asymmetric key, and Beller-Chang-Yacobi MSR...

  10. Vortex Lattice Simulations of Attached and Separated Flows around Flapping Wings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Lambert

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Flapping flight is an increasingly popular area of research, with applications to micro-unmanned air vehicles and animal flight biomechanics. Fast, but accurate methods for predicting the aerodynamic loads acting on flapping wings are of interest for designing such aircraft and optimizing thrust production. In this work, the unsteady vortex lattice method is used in conjunction with three load estimation techniques in order to predict the aerodynamic lift and drag time histories produced by flapping rectangular wings. The load estimation approaches are the Katz, Joukowski and simplified Leishman–Beddoes techniques. The simulations’ predictions are compared to experimental measurements from wind tunnel tests of a flapping and pitching wing. Three types of kinematics are investigated, pitch-leading, pure flapping and pitch lagging. It is found that pitch-leading tests can be simulated quite accurately using either the Katz or Joukowski approaches as no measurable flow separation occurs. For the pure flapping tests, the Katz and Joukowski techniques are accurate as long as the static pitch angle is greater than zero. For zero or negative static pitch angles, these methods underestimate the amplitude of the drag. The Leishman–Beddoes approach yields better drag amplitudes, but can introduce a constant negative drag offset. Finally, for the pitch-lagging tests the Leishman–Beddoes technique is again more representative of the experimental results, as long as flow separation is not too extensive. Considering the complexity of the phenomena involved, in the vast majority of cases, the lift time history is predicted with reasonable accuracy. The drag (or thrust time history is more challenging.

  11. Use of wing morphometry for the discrimination of some Cerceris ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    use

    2011-12-14

    Dec 14, 2011 ... Figure 12. Thin spline plate graphics for the species belonging to the genus Cerceris. Figure 13. Fore wing landmarks of the significant wing characteristics in the honeybee Apis mellifera. Linnaeus. stated as the traditional wing morphometry that enables the practical discrimination of the honeybee (Apis sp ...

  12. How swifts control their glide performance with morphing wings

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lentink, D.; Muller, U. K.; Stamhuis, E. J.; de Kat, R.; van Gestel, W.; Veldhuis, L. L. M.; Henningsson, P.; Hedenstrom, A.; Videler, J. J.

    2007-01-01

    Gliding birds continually change the shape and size of their wings(1-6), presumably to exploit the profound effect of wing morphology on aerodynamic performance(7-9). That birds should adjust wing sweep to suit glide speed has been predicted qualitatively by analytical glide models(2,10), which

  13. Study of design parameters of flapping-wings

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wang, Q.; Goosen, J.F.L.; Van Keulen, F.

    2014-01-01

    As one of the most important components of a flapping-wing micro air vehicle (FWMAV), the design of an energy-efficient flapping-wing has been a research interest recently. Research on insect flight from different perspectives has been carried out, mainly with regard to wing morphology, flapping

  14. Low Reynolds Number Wing Transients in Rotation and Translation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Anya; Schlueter, Kristy

    2012-11-01

    The unsteady aerodynamic forces and flow fields generated by a wing undergoing transient motions in both rotation and translation were investigated. An aspect ratio 2 flat plate wing at a 45 deg angle of attack was driven over 84 deg of rotation (3 chord-lengths of travel at 3/4 span) and 3 and 10 chord-lengths of translation in quiescent water at Reynolds numbers between 2,500 and 15,000. Flow visualization on the rotating wing revealed a leading edge vortex that lifted off of the wing surface, but remained in the vicinity of the wing for the duration of the wing stroke. A second spanwise vortex with strong axial flow was also observed. As the tip vortex grew, the leading edge vortex joined the tip vortex in a loop-like structure over the aft half of the wing. Near the leading edge, spanwise flow in the second vortex became entrained in the tip vortex near the corner of the wing. Unsteady force measurements revealed that lift coefficient increased through the constant-velocity portion of the wing stroke. Forces were compared for variations in wing acceleration and Reynolds number for both rotational and translational motions. The effect of tank blockage was investigated by repeating the experiments on multiple wings, varying the distance between the wing tip and tank wall. U.S. Air Force Research Laboratory, Summer Faculty Fellowship Program.

  15. Static Balance in Patients with Vestibular Impairments: A Preliminary Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hossein Talebi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Aims. Vestibular system is indicated as one of the most important sensors responsible for static and dynamic postural control. In this study, we evaluated static balance in patients with unilateral vestibular impairments. Materials and Methods. We compared static balance control using Kistler force plate platform between 10 patients with unilateral vestibular impairments and 20 normal counterparts in the same sex ratio and age limits (50±7. We evaluated excursion and velocity of center of pressure (COP and path length in anteroposterior (AP and mediolateral (ML planes with eyes open and with eyes closed. Results. There was no significant difference between COP excursions in ML and AP planes between both groups with eyes open and eyes closed (p value > 0.05. In contrast, the difference between velocity and path length of COP in the mentioned planes was significant between both groups with eyes open and eyes closed (p value < 0.05. Conclusions. The present study showed the static instability and balance of patients with vestibular impairments indicated by the abnormal characteristics of body balance.

  16. Static Mixer for Heat Transfer Enhancement for Mold Cooling Application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becerra, Rodolfo; Barbosa, Raul; Lee, Kye-Hwan; Park, Younggil

    Injection molding is the process by which a material is melted in a barrel and then it is injected through a nozzle in the mold cavity. When it cools down, the material solidifies into the shape of the cavity. Typical injection mold has cooling channels to maintain constant mold temperature during injection molding process. Even and constant temperature throughout the mold are very critical for a part quality and productivity. Conformal cooling improves the quality and productivity of injection molding process through the implementation of cooling channels that ``conform'' to the shape of the molded part. Recent years, the use of conformal cooling increases with advance of 3D printing technology such as Selective Laser Melting (SLM). Although it maximizes cooling, material and dimension limitations make SLM methods highly expensive. An alternative is the addition of static mixers in the molds with integrated cooling channels. A static mixer is a motionless mixing device that enhances heat transfer by producing improved flow mixing in the pipeline. In this study, the performance of the cooling channels will be evaluated with and without static mixers, by measuring temperature, pressure drop, and flow rate. The following question is addressed: Can a static mixer effectively enhance heat transfer for mold cooling application processes? This will provide insight on the development of design methods and guidelines that can be used to increase cooling efficiency at a lower cost.

  17. Air Base Wing and Air Mobility Wing Consolidating on AMC-LED Joint Bases: A Delphi Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-06-13

    AIR BASE WING AND AIR MOBILITY WING CONSOLIDATION ON AMC-LED JOINT BASES: A DELPHI STUDY GRADUATE RESEARCH PAPER Mason E. MacGarvey... DELPHI STUDY GRADUATE RESEARCH PAPER Presented to the Faculty Graduate School of Engineering Management Air Force Institute of Technology...iv AIR BASE WING AND AIR MOBILITY WING CONSOLIDATION ON AMC-LED JOINT BASES: A DELPHI STUDY Mason E. MacGarvey, BS, MBA

  18. Hubble expansion in static spacetime

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rossler, Otto E.; Froehlich, Dieter; Movassagh, Ramis; Moore, Anthony

    2007-01-01

    A recently proposed mechanism for light-path expansion in a static spacetime is based on the moving-lenses paradigm. Since the latter is valid independently of whether space expands or not, a static universe can be used to better see the implications. The moving-lenses paradigm is related to the paradigm of dynamical friction. If this is correct, a Hubble-like law is implicit. It is described quantitatively. A bent in the Hubble-like line is predictably implied. The main underlying assumption is Price's Principle (PI 3 ). If the theory is sound, the greatest remaining problem in cosmology becomes the origin of hydrogen. Since Blandford's jet production mechanism for quasars is too weak, a generalized Hawking radiation hidden in the walls of cosmic voids is invoked. A second prediction is empirical: slow pattern changes in the cosmic microwave background. A third is ultra-high redshifts for Giacconi quasars. Bruno's eternal universe in the spirit of Augustine becomes a bit less outlandish

  19. Static respiratory muscle work during immersion with positive and negative respiratory loading.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, N A; Morrison, J B

    1999-10-01

    Upright immersion imposes a pressure imbalance across the thorax. This study examined the effects of air-delivery pressure on inspiratory muscle work during upright immersion. Eight subjects performed respiratory pressure-volume relaxation maneuvers while seated in air (control) and during immersion. Hydrostatic, respiratory elastic (lung and chest wall), and resultant static respiratory muscle work components were computed. During immersion, the effects of four air-delivery pressures were evaluated: mouth pressure (uncompensated); the pressure at the lung centroid (PL,c); and at PL,c +/-0.98 kPa. When breathing at pressures less than the PL,c, subjects generally defended an expiratory reserve volume (ERV) greater than the immersed relaxation volume, minus residual volume, resulting in additional inspiratory muscle work. The resultant static inspiratory muscle work, computed over a 1-liter tidal volume above the ERV, increased from 0.23 J. l(-1), when subjects were breathing at PL,c, to 0.83 J. l(-1) at PL,c -0.98 kPa (P work was minimal. When breathing at PL,c +0.98 kPa, subjects adopted an ERV less than the immersed relaxation volume, minus residual volume, resulting in 0.36 J. l(-1) of expiratory muscle work. Thus static inspiratory muscle work varied with respiratory loading, whereas PL,c air supply minimized this work during upright immersion, restoring lung-tissue, chest-wall, and static muscle work to levels obtained in the control state.

  20. Machine Learning for Flapping Wing Flight Control

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Goedhart, Menno; van Kampen, E.; Armanini, S.F.; de Visser, C.C.; Chu, Q.

    2018-01-01

    Flight control of Flapping Wing Micro Air Vehicles is challenging, because of their complex dynamics and variability due to manufacturing inconsistencies. Machine Learning algorithms can be used to tackle these challenges. A Policy Gradient algorithm is used to tune the gains of a

  1. Migration on Wings Aerodynamics and Energetics

    CERN Document Server

    Kantha, Lakshmi

    2012-01-01

    This book is an effort to explore the technical aspects associated with bird flight and migration on wings. After a short introduction on the birds migration, the book reviews the aerodynamics and Energetics of Flight and presents the calculation of the Migration Range. In addition, the authors explains aerodynamics of the formation flight and finally introduces great flight diagrams.

  2. Oblique-Flying-Wing Supersonic Transport Airplane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Der Velden, Alexander J. M.

    1992-01-01

    Oblique-flying-wing supersonic airplane proposed as possible alternative to B747B (or equivalent). Tranports passengers and cargo as fast as twice speed of sound at same cost as current subsonic transports. Flies at same holding speeds as present supersonic transports but requires only half takeoff distance.

  3. Chemical evaluation of winged beans ( Psophocarpus ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Chemical evaluation of winged beans ( Psophocarpus Tetragonolobus ), Pitanga cherries ( Eugenia uniflora) and orchid fruit ( Orchid fruit myristic a) ... The acid value ranged between 0.71 and 2.82 mg/KOH/g while iodine value ranged between 91.15 and 144.57. The refractive index ranged between 1.465 and 1.474 in all ...

  4. ``Schooling'' of wing pairs in flapping flight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramananarivo, Sophie; Zhang, Jun; Ristroph, Leif; AML, Courant Collaboration; Physics NYU Collaboration

    2015-11-01

    The experimental setup implements two independent flapping wings swimming in tandem. Both are driven with the same prescribed vertical heaving motion, but the horizontal motion is free, which means that the swimmers can take up any relative position and forward speed. Experiments show however clearly coordinated motions, where the pair of wings `crystallize' into specific stable arrangements. The follower wing locks into the path of the leader, adopting its speed, and with a separation distance that takes on one of several discrete values. By systematically varying the kinematics and wing size, we show that the set of stable spacings is dictated by the wavelength of the periodic wake structure. The forces maintaining the pair cohesion are characterized by applying an external force to the follower to perturb it away from the `stable wells'. These results show that hydrodynamics alone is sufficient to induce cohesive and coordinated collective locomotion through a fluid, and we discuss the hypothesis that fish schools and bird flocks also represent stable modes of motion.

  5. Aerodynamic comparison of a butterfly-like flapping wing-body model and a revolving-wing model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Kosuke; Yoshino, Masato

    2017-06-01

    The aerodynamic performance of flapping- and revolving-wing models is investigated by numerical simulations based on an immersed boundary-lattice Boltzmann method. As wing models, we use (i) a butterfly-like model with a body and flapping-rectangular wings and (ii) a revolving-wing model with the same wings as the flapping case. Firstly, we calculate aerodynamic performance factors such as the lift force, the power, and the power loading of the two models for Reynolds numbers in the range of 50-1000. For the flapping-wing model, the power loading is maximal for the maximum angle of attack of 90°, a flapping amplitude of roughly 45°, and a phase shift between the flapping angle and the angle of attack of roughly 90°. For the revolving-wing model, the power loading peaks for an angle of attack of roughly 45°. In addition, we examine the ground effect on the aerodynamic performance of the revolving-wing model. Secondly, we compare the aerodynamic performance of the flapping- and revolving-wing models at their respective maximal power loadings. It is found that the revolving-wing model is more efficient than the flapping-wing model both when the body of the latter is fixed and where it can move freely. Finally, we discuss the relative agilities of the flapping- and revolving-wing models.

  6. Paleozoic Nymphal Wing Pads Support Dual Model of Insect Wing Origins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prokop, Jakub; Pecharová, Martina; Nel, André; Hörnschemeyer, Thomas; Krzemińska, Ewa; Krzemiński, Wiesław; Engel, Michael S

    2017-01-23

    The appearance of wings in insects, early in their evolution [1], has been one of the more critical innovations contributing to their extraordinary diversity. Despite the conspicuousness and importance of wings, the origin of these structures has been difficult to resolve and represented one of the "abominable mysteries" in evolutionary biology [2]. More than a century of debate has boiled the matter down to two competing alternatives-one of wings representing an extension of the thoracic notum, the other stating that they are appendicular derivations from the lateral body wall. Recently, a dual model has been supported by genomic and developmental data [3-6], representing an amalgamation of elements from both the notal and pleural hypotheses. Here, we reveal crucial information from the wing pad joints of Carboniferous palaeodictyopteran insect nymphs using classical and high-tech techniques. These nymphs had three pairs of wing pads that were medially articulated to the thorax but also broadly contiguous with the notum anteriorly and posteriorly (details unobservable in modern insects), supporting their overall origin from the thoracic notum as well as the expected medial, pleural series of axillary sclerites. Our study provides support for the formation of the insect wing from the thoracic notum as well as the already known pleural elements of the arthropodan leg. These results support the unique, dual model for insect wing origins and the convergent reduction of notal fusion in more derived clades, presumably due to wing rotation during development, and they help to bring resolution to this long-standing debate. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Computational Design and Analysis of a Transonic Natural Laminar Flow Wing for a Wind Tunnel Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lynde, Michelle N.; Campbell, Richard L.

    2017-01-01

    A natural laminar flow (NLF) wind tunnel model has been designed and analyzed for a wind tunnel test in the National Transonic Facility (NTF) at the NASA Langley Research Center. The NLF design method is built into the CDISC design module and uses a Navier-Stokes flow solver, a boundary layer profile solver, and stability analysis and transition prediction software. The NLF design method alters the pressure distribution to support laminar flow on the upper surface of wings with high sweep and flight Reynolds numbers. The method addresses transition due to attachment line contamination/transition, Gortler vortices, and crossflow and Tollmien-Schlichting modal instabilities. The design method is applied to the wing of the Common Research Model (CRM) at transonic flight conditions. Computational analysis predicts significant extents of laminar flow on the wing upper surface, which results in drag savings. A 5.2 percent scale semispan model of the CRM NLF wing will be built and tested in the NTF. This test will aim to validate the NLF design method, as well as characterize the laminar flow testing capabilities in the wind tunnel facility.

  8. Physiological and psychological indices of fatigue during static contractions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilbom, A; Gamberale, F; Persson, J; Annwall, G

    1983-01-01

    The development of fatigue and the relationship between psychological and physiological indices of fatigue were studied in a group of 18 male subjects during static contractions. Exercise was performed as a static elbow flexion at 25% MVC. Heart rate (HR), intraarterial blood pressure (BP) and surface EMG [mean amplitude (MA) and central frequency (CF)] were studied during contractions sustained until exhaustion. The amount of effort expended (relative to total exhaustion) and the rating of perceived pain were recorded following contractions interrupted after 20, 30 . . . 80, and 100% of endurance time. HR, BP and EMG amplitude responses were similar to those previously recorded. The decline in CF occurred in two phases, possibly related to a change in motor unit recruitment after the initial 70% of endurance time. The subjects overestimated the amount of effort expended and thus underestimated their endurance capacity. The best correlation between perceived effort and physiological responses was obtained using blood pressure data, whereas changes in EMG data did not parallel the psychological responses. It is concluded that the perception of effort during a static contraction is produced through a complex process, in which several influences of peripheral and central origin are integrated.

  9. Cardiovascular response to combined dynamic and static exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilbom, A; Persson, J

    1981-06-01

    The cardiovascular response to combined static handgrip at 20% MVC and dynamic leg exercise was studied in young male subjects. Cardiac output increased by 2.3 liters/min (30%) at isolated handgrip and by 1.0 liter/min (7%) when handgrip was added to dynamic exercise at 100 W. In spite of an increased arterial blood pressure, leg blood flow was unaffected by handgrip, both when it was performed isolated and in combination with dynamic exercise. Temperature measurements in mixed venous blood and subcutaneous tissue indicated an increased blood flow to peripheral circulatory areas. During combinations of handgrip and dynamic exercise at different levels of VO2, heart rate response to handgrip was progressively less marked as maximal oxygen uptake was approached. Therefore a vagal withdrawal seems to be the most important heart rate-increasing mechanism during combined exercise. Systolic blood pressure response to handgrip was still preserved at 25 and 45% of max VO2. At 95% of max VO2, the blood pressure response to handgrip was abolished, probably due to a competitive utilization of the same blood pressure-raising mechanism in dynamic and static exercise.

  10. The Predictive Validity of the Static-99, Static-99R, and Static-2002/R: Which One to Use?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reeves, Sophie G; Ogloff, James R P; Simmons, Melanie

    2017-06-01

    The use of Static tools (Static-99, Static-99R, Static-2002, and Static-2002R) in risk decision making involving sexual offenders is widespread internationally. This study compared the predictive accuracy and incremental validity of four Static risk measures in a sample of 621 Australian sexual offenders. Results indicated that approximately 45% of the sample recidivated (with 18.8% committing sexual offenses). All of the Static measures investigated yielded moderate predictive validity for sexual recidivism, which was comparable with other Australian and overseas studies. Area under the curve (AUC) values for the four measures across the 5-, 10-, and 15-year intervals ranged from .67 to .69. All of the Static measures discriminated quite well between low-risk and high-risk sexual offenders but less well for the moderate risk categories. When pitted together, none of the tools accounted for additional variance in sexual recidivism, above and beyond what the other measures accounted for. The overall results provide support for the use of Static measures as a component of risk assessment and decision making with Australian sexual offending populations. The limitations of this study and recommendations for further research are also discussed.

  11. Multiple cues for winged morph production in an aphid metacommunity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohsen Mehrparvar

    Full Text Available Environmental factors can lead individuals down different developmental pathways giving rise to distinct phenotypes (phenotypic plasticity. The production of winged or unwinged morphs in aphids is an example of two alternative developmental pathways. Dispersal is paramount in aphids that often have a metapopulation structure, where local subpopulations frequently go extinct, such as the specialized aphids on tansy (Tanacetum vulgare. We conducted various experiments to further understand the cues involved in the production of winged dispersal morphs by the two dominant species of the tansy aphid metacommunity, Metopeurum fuscoviride and Macrosiphoniella tanacetaria. We found that the ant-tended M. fuscoviride produced winged individuals predominantly at the beginning of the season while the untended M. tanacetaria produced winged individuals throughout the season. Winged mothers of both species produced winged offspring, although in both species winged offspring were mainly produced by unwinged females. Crowding and the presence of predators, effects already known to influence wing production in other aphid species, increased the percentage of winged offspring in M. tanacetaria, but not in M. fuscoviride. We find there are also other factors (i.e. temporal effects inducing the production of winged offspring for natural aphid populations. Our results show that the responses of each aphid species are due to multiple wing induction cues.

  12. The biomechanical origin of extreme wing allometry in hummingbirds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skandalis, Dimitri A; Segre, Paolo S; Bahlman, Joseph W; Groom, Derrick J E; Welch, Kenneth C; Witt, Christopher C; McGuire, Jimmy A; Dudley, Robert; Lentink, David; Altshuler, Douglas L

    2017-10-19

    Flying animals of different masses vary widely in body proportions, but the functional implications of this variation are often unclear. We address this ambiguity by developing an integrative allometric approach, which we apply here to hummingbirds to examine how the physical environment, wing morphology and stroke kinematics have contributed to the evolution of their highly specialised flight. Surprisingly, hummingbirds maintain constant wing velocity despite an order of magnitude variation in body weight; increased weight is supported solely through disproportionate increases in wing area. Conversely, wing velocity increases with body weight within species, compensating for lower relative wing area in larger individuals. By comparing inter- and intraspecific allometries, we find that the extreme wing area allometry of hummingbirds is likely an adaptation to maintain constant burst flight capacity and induced power requirements with increasing weight. Selection for relatively large wings simultaneously maximises aerial performance and minimises flight costs, which are essential elements of humming bird life history.

  13. Statistical mechanics framework for static granular matter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henkes, Silke; Chakraborty, Bulbul

    2009-06-01

    The physical properties of granular materials have been extensively studied in recent years. So far, however, there exists no theoretical framework which can explain the observations in a unified manner beyond the phenomenological jamming diagram. This work focuses on the case of static granular matter, where we have constructed a statistical ensemble which mirrors equilibrium statistical mechanics. This ensemble, which is based on the conservation properties of the stress tensor, is distinct from the original Edwards ensemble and applies to packings of deformable grains. We combine it with a field theoretical analysis of the packings, where the field is the Airy stress function derived from the force and torque balance conditions. In this framework, Point J characterized by a diverging stiffness of the pressure fluctuations. Separately, we present a phenomenological mean-field theory of the jamming transition, which incorporates the mean contact number as a variable. We link both approaches in the context of the marginal rigidity picture proposed by Wyart and others.

  14. Static and dynamic thyroid scintigraphy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mahlstedt, J.

    1986-01-01

    Static images as isolated investigation in thyroid diagnosis mainly provides morphologic information, and therefore sonography is largely applied for this purpose. 99m Tc-pertechnetate scans or 123 I-scans are indicated in cases of malpositions and serve to clarify lesions of unknown dignity. Additionally 201 Tl-chloride is suited for examinations with regard to metabolically active thyroid tissue, whereby differential diagnostic laboratory tests must be carried out to exclude parathyroid adenoma. Dynamic thyroid scans before and after regulation tests (suppression, stimulation) reflect the physiological correlation between the iodine avidity of the thyroid, the peripheral thyroid hormone concentrations and the hypophyseal regulation in the TRH-test. The main application of this procedure is the clarification of thyroid autonomy, i.e. indication, detection, quantification or exclusion of thyroid autonomy. For the treatment of immunogenic thyrotoxicosis, dynamic thyroid scintigraphy provides important information about the onset of remission, thus permitting to end thyreostatic therapy. (orig.) [de

  15. Statics learning from engineering examples

    CERN Document Server

    Emri, Igor

    2016-01-01

    This textbook introduces and explains the basic concepts on which statics is based utilizing real engineering examples. The authors emphasize the learning process by showing a real problem, analyzing it, simplifying it, and developing a way to solve it. This feature teaches students intuitive thinking in solving real engineering problems using the fundamentals of Newton’s laws. This book also: · Stresses representation of physical reality in ways that allow students to solve problems and obtain meaningful results · Emphasizes identification of important features of the structure that should be included in a model and which features may be omitted · Facilitates students' understanding and mastery of the "flow of thinking" practiced by professional engineers.

  16. Static Behaviour of Bucket Foundations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Kim André

    theory is proposed. The proposed expression applies to plane strain as well as axis-symmetric stress conditions for foundations with smooth or rough bases. A thorough experimental investigation of the static behaviour of bucket foundations subjected to combined loading is carried out. Laboratory tests...... as well as large-scale tests on bucket foundations subjected to low vertical load are performed during this work. Numerical simulations of the tests performed are carried out using the Mohr Coulomb material model and the commercial finite element code ABAQUS. Based on the present work, the finite element...... method is concluded to be a superior method in estimating the post peak behaviour as well as the combined capacity of bucket foundations in relation to the offshore wind turbine problem....

  17. Design verification and fabrication of active control systems for the DAST ARW-2 high aspect ratio wing, part 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mcgehee, C. R.

    1986-01-01

    A study was conducted under Drones for Aerodynamic and Structural Testing (DAST) program to accomplish the final design and hardware fabrication for four active control systems compatible with and ready for installation in the NASA Aeroelastic Research Wing No. 2 (ARW-2) and Firebee II drone flight test vehicle. The wing structure was designed so that Active Control Systems (ACS) are required in the normal flight envelope by integrating control system design with aerodynamics and structure technologies. The DAST ARW-2 configuration uses flutter suppression, relaxed static stability, and gust and maneuver load alleviation ACS systems, and an automatic flight control system. Performance goals and criteria were applied to individual systems and the systems collectively to assure that vehicle stability margins, flutter margins, flying qualities and load reductions are achieved.

  18. Static and dynamic effective stress coefficient of chalk

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alam, M. Monzurul; Fabricius, Ida Lykke; Christensen, Helle Foged

    2012-01-01

    Deformation of a hydrocarbon reservoir can ideally be used to estimate the effective stress acting on it. The effective stress in the subsurface is the difference between the stress due to the weight of the sediment and a fraction (effective stress coefficient) of the pore pressure. The effective...... stress coefficient is thus relevant for studying reservoir deformation and for evaluating 4D seismic for the correct pore pressure prediction. The static effective stress coefficient n is estimated from mechanical tests and is highly relevant for effective stress prediction because it is directly related...... with differential stress (overburden stress-pore pressure). For Valhall reservoir chalk with 40% porosity, α ranges between 0.98 and 0.85 and decreases by 10% if the differential stress is increased by 25 MPa. In contrast, for chalk with 15% porosity from the same reservoir, α ranges between 0.85 and 0...

  19. Pulsed Current Static Electrical Contact Experiment

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Jones, Harry N; Neri, Jesse M; Boyer, Craig N; Cooper, Khershed P; Meger, Robert A

    2006-01-01

    Railguns involve both static and sliding electrical contacts, which must transmit the large transient electrical currents necessary to impart high forces onto a projectile for acceleration to hypervelocity...

  20. Wings as impellers: honey bees co-opt flight system to induce nest ventilation and disperse pheromones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peters, Jacob M; Gravish, Nick; Combes, Stacey A

    2017-06-15

    Honey bees ( Apis mellifera ) are remarkable fliers that regularly carry heavy loads of nectar and pollen, supported by a flight system - the wings, thorax and flight muscles - that one might assume is optimized for aerial locomotion. However, honey bees also use this system to perform other crucial tasks that are unrelated to flight. When ventilating the nest, bees grip the surface of the comb or nest entrance and fan their wings to drive airflow through the nest, and a similar wing-fanning behavior is used to disperse volatile pheromones from the Nasonov gland. In order to understand how the physical demands of these impeller-like behaviors differ from those of flight, we quantified the flapping kinematics and compared the frequency, amplitude and stroke plane angle during these non-flight behaviors with values reported for hovering honey bees. We also used a particle-based flow visualization technique to determine the direction and speed of airflow generated by a bee performing Nasonov scenting behavior. We found that ventilatory fanning behavior is kinematically distinct from both flight and scenting behavior. Both impeller-like behaviors drive flow parallel to the surface to which the bees are clinging, at typical speeds of just under 1 m s -1 We observed that the wings of fanning and scenting bees frequently contact the ground during the ventral stroke reversal, which may lead to wing wear. Finally, we observed that bees performing Nasonov scenting behavior sometimes display 'clap-and-fling' motions, in which the wings contact each other during the dorsal stroke reversal and fling apart at the start of the downstroke. We conclude that the wings and flight motor of honey bees comprise a multifunctional system, which may be subject to competing selective pressures because of its frequent use as both a propeller and an impeller. © 2017. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  1. Aerodynamic characteristics of wings designed with a combined-theory method to cruise at a Mach number of 4.5

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mack, Robert J.

    1988-01-01

    A wind-tunnel study was conducted to determine the capability of a method combining linear theory and shock-expansion theory to design optimum camber surfaces for wings that will fly at high-supersonic/low-hypersonic speeds. Three force models (a flat-plate reference wing and two cambered and twisted wings) were used to obtain aerodynamic lift, drag, and pitching-moment data. A fourth pressure-orifice model was used to obtain surface-pressure data. All four wing models had the same planform, airfoil section, and centerbody area distribution. The design Mach number was 4.5, but data were also obtained at Mach numbers of 3.5 and 4.0. Results of these tests indicated that the use of airfoil thickness as a theoretical optimum, camber-surface design constraint did not improve the aerodynamic efficiency or performance of a wing as compared with a wing that was designed with a zero-thickness airfoil (linear-theory) constraint.

  2. Distribution and predictors of wing shape and size variability in three sister species of solitary bees.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simon Dellicour

    Full Text Available Morphological traits can be highly variable over time in a particular geographical area. Different selective pressures shape those traits, which is crucial in evolutionary biology. Among these traits, insect wing morphometry has already been widely used to describe phenotypic variability at the inter-specific level. On the contrary, fewer studies have focused on intra-specific wing morphometric variability. Yet, such investigations are relevant to study potential convergences of variation that could highlight micro-evolutionary processes. The recent sampling and sequencing of three solitary bees of the genus Melitta across their entire species range provides an excellent opportunity to jointly analyse genetic and morphometric variability. In the present study, we first aim to analyse the spatial distribution of the wing shape and centroid size (used as a proxy for body size variability. Secondly, we aim to test different potential predictors of this variability at both the intra- and inter-population levels, which includes genetic variability, but also geographic locations and distances, elevation, annual mean temperature and precipitation. The comparison of spatial distribution of intra-population morphometric diversity does not reveal any convergent pattern between species, thus undermining the assumption of a potential local and selective adaptation at the population level. Regarding intra-specific wing shape differentiation, our results reveal that some tested predictors, such as geographic and genetic distances, are associated with a significant correlation for some species. However, none of these predictors are systematically identified for the three species as an important factor that could explain the intra-specific morphometric variability. As a conclusion, for the three solitary bee species and at the scale of this study, our results clearly tend to discard the assumption of the existence of a common pattern of intra-specific signal

  3. Distribution and predictors of wing shape and size variability in three sister species of solitary bees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dellicour, Simon; Gerard, Maxence; Prunier, Jérôme G; Dewulf, Alexandre; Kuhlmann, Michael; Michez, Denis

    2017-01-01

    Morphological traits can be highly variable over time in a particular geographical area. Different selective pressures shape those traits, which is crucial in evolutionary biology. Among these traits, insect wing morphometry has already been widely used to describe phenotypic variability at the inter-specific level. On the contrary, fewer studies have focused on intra-specific wing morphometric variability. Yet, such investigations are relevant to study potential convergences of variation that could highlight micro-evolutionary processes. The recent sampling and sequencing of three solitary bees of the genus Melitta across their entire species range provides an excellent opportunity to jointly analyse genetic and morphometric variability. In the present study, we first aim to analyse the spatial distribution of the wing shape and centroid size (used as a proxy for body size) variability. Secondly, we aim to test different potential predictors of this variability at both the intra- and inter-population levels, which includes genetic variability, but also geographic locations and distances, elevation, annual mean temperature and precipitation. The comparison of spatial distribution of intra-population morphometric diversity does not reveal any convergent pattern between species, thus undermining the assumption of a potential local and selective adaptation at the population level. Regarding intra-specific wing shape differentiation, our results reveal that some tested predictors, such as geographic and genetic distances, are associated with a significant correlation for some species. However, none of these predictors are systematically identified for the three species as an important factor that could explain the intra-specific morphometric variability. As a conclusion, for the three solitary bee species and at the scale of this study, our results clearly tend to discard the assumption of the existence of a common pattern of intra-specific signal/structure within the

  4. An experimental investigation into the deployment of 3-D, finned wing and shape memory alloy vortex generators in a forced air convection heat pipe fin stack

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aris, M.S.; McGlen, R.; Owen, I.; Sutcliffe, C.J.

    2011-01-01

    Forced air convection heat pipe cooling systems play an essential role in the thermal management of electronic and power electronic devices such as microprocessors and IGBT's (Integrated Gate Bipolar Transistors). With increasing heat dissipation from these devices, novel methods of improving the thermal performance of fin stacks attached to the heat pipe condenser section are required. The current work investigates the use of a wing type surface protrusions in the form of 3-D delta wing tabs adhered to the fin surface, thin wings punched-out of the fin material and TiNi shape memory alloy delta wings which changed their angles of attack based on the fin surface temperature. The longitudinal vortices generated from the wing designs induce secondary mixing of the cooler free stream air entering the fin stack with the warmer fluid close to the fin surfaces. The change in angle of the attack of the active delta wings provide heat transfer enhancement while managing flow pressure losses across the fin stack. A heat transfer enhancement of 37% compared to a plain fin stack was obtained from the 3-D tabs in a staggered arrangement. The punched-out delta wings in the staggered and inline arrangements provided enhancements of 30% and 26% respectively. Enhancements from the active delta wings were lower at 16%. However, as these devices reduce the pressure drop through the fin stack by approximately 19% in the de-activate position, over the activated position, a reduction in fan operating cost may be achieved for systems operating with inlet air temperatures below the maximum inlet temperature specification for the device. CFD analysis was also carried out to provide additional detail of the local heat transfer enhancement effects. The CFD results corresponded well with previously published reports and were consistent with the experimental findings. - Highlights: → Heat transfer enhancements of heat pipe fin stacks was successfully achieved using fixed and active delta

  5. Numerical investigation of unsteady vortex breakdown past 80°/65° double-delta wing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liu Jian

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available An improved delayed detached eddy simulation (IDDES method based on the k-ω-SST (shear stress transport turbulence model was applied to predict the unsteady vortex breakdown past an 80°/65° double-delta wing (DDW, where the angles of attack (AOAs range from 30° to 40°. Firstly, the IDDES model and the relative numerical methods were validated by simulating the massively separated flow around an NACA0021 straight wing at the AOA of 60°. The fluctuation properties of the lift and pressure coefficients were analyzed and compared with the available measurements. For the DDW case, the computations were compared with such measurements as the mean lift, drag, pitching moment, pressure coefficients and breakdown locations. Furthermore, the unsteady properties were investigated in detail, such as the frequencies of force and moments, pressure fluctuation on the upper surface, typical vortex breakdown patterns at three moments, and the distributions of kinetic turbulence energy at a stream wise section. Two dominated modes are observed, in which their Strouhal numbers are 1.0 at the AOAs of 30°, 32° and 34° and 0.7 at the AOAs of 36°, 38° and 40°. The breakdown vortex always moves upstream and downstream and its types change alternatively. Furthermore, the vortex can be identified as breakdown or not through the mean pressure, root mean square of pressure, or even through correlation analysis.

  6. Results from a test of a 2/3-scale V-22 rotor and wing in the 40- by 80-Foot Wind Tunnel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Felker, Fort F.

    1991-01-01

    A test of a 0.658-scale V-22 rotor and wing was conducted in the 40- by 80-Foot Wind Tunnel at Ames Research Center. The principal objectives of the test were to measure the wing download in hover for a variety of test configurations, and rotor performance in forward flight. Also, a limited amount of data on rotor performance in vertical climb were acquired. This paper presents the results from the test with predictions from appropriate analytical methods. A new method for presenting and interpreting wing surface pressure data in hover is described, and this method shows that the wing flap can produce substantial lift loads in hover. The rotor performance in vertical climb was underpredicted by CAMRAD/JA and by the free wake analysis EHPIC. A simple momentum theory is presented which provides good predictions of rotor performance in forward flight.

  7. A Neural Network Controller New Methodology for the ATR-42 Morphing Wing Actuation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdallah Ben MOSBAH

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available A morphing wing model is used to improve aircraft performance. To obtain the desired airfoils, electrical actuators are used, which are installed inside of the wing to morph its upper surface in order to obtain its desired shape. In order to achieve this objective, a robust position controller is needed. In this research, a design and test validation of a controller based on neural networks is presented. This controller was composed by a position controller and a current controller to manage the current consumed by the electrical actuators to obtain its desired displacement. The model was tested and validated using simulation and experimental tests. The results obtained with the proposed controller were compared to the results given by the PID controller. Wind tunnel tests were conducted in the Price-Païdoussis Wind Tunnel at the LARCASE laboratory in order to calculate the pressure coefficient distribution on an ATR-42 morphing wing model for different flow conditions. The pressure coefficients obtained experimentally were compared with their numerical values given by XFoil software.

  8. Motor starting a Brayton cycle power conversion system using a static inverter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curreri, J. S.; Edkin, R. A.; Kruchowy, R.

    1973-01-01

    The power conversion module of a 2- to 15-kWe Brayton engine was motor started using a three-phase, 400-hertz static inverter as the power source. Motor-static tests were conducted for initial gas loop pressures of 10, 14, and 17 N/sq cm (15, 20, and 25 psia) over a range of initial turbine inlet temperatures from 366 to 550 K (200 to 530 F). The data are presented to show the effects of temperature and pressure on the motor-start characteristics of the rotating unit. Electrical characteristics during motoring are also discussed.

  9. The optimal design of UAV wing structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Długosz, Adam; Klimek, Wiktor

    2018-01-01

    The paper presents an optimal design of UAV wing, made of composite materials. The aim of the optimization is to improve strength and stiffness together with reduction of the weight of the structure. Three different types of functionals, which depend on stress, stiffness and the total mass are defined. The paper presents an application of the in-house implementation of the evolutionary multi-objective algorithm in optimization of the UAV wing structure. Values of the functionals are calculated on the basis of results obtained from numerical simulations. Numerical FEM model, consisting of different composite materials is created. Adequacy of the numerical model is verified by results obtained from the experiment, performed on a tensile testing machine. Examples of multi-objective optimization by means of Pareto-optimal set of solutions are presented.

  10. Adjoint-based optimization for flapping wings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Min; Wei, Mingjun

    2012-11-01

    Adjoint-based methods show great potential in flow control and optimization of complex problems with high- or infinite-dimensional control space. It is attractive to solve an adjoint problem to understand the complex effects from multiple control parameters to a few performance indicators of the flight of birds or insects. However, the traditional approach to formulate the adjoint problem becomes either impossible or too complex when arbitrary moving boundary (e.g. flapping wings) and its perturbation is considered. Here, we use non-cylindrical calculus to define the perturbation. So that, a simple adjoint system can be derived directly in the inertial coordinate. The approach is first applied to the optimization of cylinder oscillation and later to flapping wings. Supported by AFOSR.

  11. Quantifying the dynamic wing morphing of hovering hummingbird.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maeda, Masateru; Nakata, Toshiyuki; Kitamura, Ikuo; Tanaka, Hiroto; Liu, Hao

    2017-09-01

    Animal wings are lightweight and flexible; hence, during flapping flight their shapes change. It has been known that such dynamic wing morphing reduces aerodynamic cost in insects, but the consequences in vertebrate flyers, particularly birds, are not well understood. We have developed a method to reconstruct a three-dimensional wing model of a bird from the wing outline and the feather shafts (rachides). The morphological and kinematic parameters can be obtained using the wing model, and the numerical or mechanical simulations may also be carried out. To test the effectiveness of the method, we recorded the hovering flight of a hummingbird ( Amazilia amazilia ) using high-speed cameras and reconstructed the right wing. The wing shape varied substantially within a stroke cycle. Specifically, the maximum and minimum wing areas differed by 18%, presumably due to feather sliding; the wing was bent near the wrist joint, towards the upward direction and opposite to the stroke direction; positive upward camber and the 'washout' twist (monotonic decrease in the angle of incidence from the proximal to distal wing) were observed during both half-strokes; the spanwise distribution of the twist was uniform during downstroke, but an abrupt increase near the wrist joint was found during upstroke.

  12. Optimization of aerodynamic efficiency for twist morphing MAV wing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N.I. Ismail

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Twist morphing (TM is a practical control technique in micro air vehicle (MAV flight. However, TM wing has a lower aerodynamic efficiency (CL/CD compared to membrane and rigid wing. This is due to massive drag penalty created on TM wing, which had overwhelmed the successive increase in its lift generation. Therefore, further CL/CDmax optimization on TM wing is needed to obtain the optimal condition for the morphing wing configuration. In this paper, two-way fluid–structure interaction (FSI simulation and wind tunnel testing method are used to solve and study the basic wing aerodynamic performance over (non-optimal TM, membrane and rigid wings. Then, a multifidelity data metamodel based design optimization (MBDO process is adopted based on the Ansys-DesignXplorer frameworks. In the adaptive MBDO process, Kriging metamodel is used to construct the final multifidelity CL/CD responses by utilizing 23 multi-fidelity sample points from the FSI simulation and experimental data. The optimization results show that the optimal TM wing configuration is able to produce better CL/CDmax magnitude by at least 2% than the non-optimal TM wings. The flow structure formation reveals that low TV strength on the optimal TM wing induces low CD generation which in turn improves its overall CL/CDmax performance.

  13. Logistics Supply of the Distributed Air Wing

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-09-01

    Event Graph The Consumption Process first instantiates the variables . The model follows a conveyor belt pattern, whereby after processing an event...to any part of the world. A capstone project, conducted by the system engineering curriculum, proposed to distribute the air assets from the aircraft...SUBJECT TERMS distributed air wing, logistics, supply, unmanned air systems , cargo UAS, unmanned systems , discrete event simulation, vehicle routing

  14. CFD Analysis of UAV Flying Wing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vasile PRISACARIU

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Numerical methods for solving equations describing the evolution of 3D fluid experienced a significant development closely related to the progress of information systems. Today, especially in the field of fluid mechanics, numerical simulations allow the study of gas-thermodynamic confirmed by experimental techniques in wind tunnel conditions and actual flight tests for modeling complex aircraft. The article shows a case of numerical analysis of the lifting surface on the UAV type flying wing.

  15. Topology Optimization of an Aircraft Wing

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-06-11

    can combine the advantages of a variable stiffness design with- out the use of actuators. Curved beams, which couple torsion and bending , counteract... torsional deflection, control natural frequency, exploit coupling of bending and tor- sion to control flutter, reduce thickness to chord ratios due to...disregarded any bending or torsional effects caused by displacement of the wing, and was thus not considered. Therefore, the initial design analysis

  16. Combined particle-image velocimetry and force analysis of the three-dimensional fluid-structure interaction of a natural owl wing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winzen, A; Roidl, B; Schröder, W

    2016-04-01

    Low-speed aerodynamics has gained increasing interest due to its relevance for the design process of small flying air vehicles. These small aircraft operate at similar aerodynamic conditions as, e.g. birds which therefore can serve as role models of how to overcome the well-known problems of low Reynolds number flight. The flight of the barn owl is characterized by a very low flight velocity in conjunction with a low noise emission and a high level of maneuverability at stable flight conditions. To investigate the complex three-dimensional flow field and the corresponding local structural deformation in combination with their influence on the resulting aerodynamic forces, time-resolved stereoscopic particle-image velocimetry and force and moment measurements are performed on a prepared natural barn owl wing. Several spanwise positions are measured via PIV in a range of angles of attack [Formula: see text] 6° and Reynolds numbers 40 000 [Formula: see text] 120 000 based on the chord length. Additionally, the resulting forces and moments are recorded for -10° ≤ α ≤ 15° at the same Reynolds numbers. Depending on the spanwise position, the angle of attack, and the Reynolds number, the flow field on the wing's pressure side is characterized by either a region of flow separation, causing large-scale vortical structures which lead to a time-dependent deflection of the flexible wing structure or wing regions showing no instantaneous deflection but a reduction of the time-averaged mean wing curvature. Based on the force measurements the three-dimensional fluid-structure interaction is assumed to considerably impact the aerodynamic forces acting on the wing leading to a strong mechanical loading of the interface between the wing and body. These time-depending loads which result from the flexibility of the wing should be taken into consideration for the design of future small flying air vehicles using flexible wing structures.

  17. Tracing the evolution of avian wing digits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Xing; Mackem, Susan

    2013-06-17

    It is widely accepted that birds are a subgroup of dinosaurs, but there is an apparent conflict: modern birds have been thought to possess only the middle three fingers (digits II-III-IV) of an idealized five-digit tetrapod hand based on embryological data, but their Mesozoic tetanuran dinosaur ancestors are considered to have the first three digits (I-II-III) based on fossil evidence. How could such an evolutionary quirk arise? Various hypotheses have been proposed to resolve this paradox. Adding to the confusion, some recent developmental studies support a I-II-III designation for avian wing digits whereas some recent paleontological data are consistent with a II-III-IV identification of the Mesozoic tetanuran digits. A comprehensive analysis of both paleontological and developmental data suggests that the evolution of the avian wing digits may have been driven by homeotic transformations of digit identity, which are more likely to have occurred in a partial and piecemeal manner. Additionally, recent genetic studies in mouse models showing plausible mechanisms for central digit loss invite consideration of new alternative possibilities (I-II-IV or I-III-IV) for the homologies of avian wing digits. While much progress has been made, some advances point to the complexity of the problem and a final resolution to this ongoing debate demands additional work from both paleontological and developmental perspectives, which will surely yield new insights on mechanisms of evolutionary adaptation. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Unsteady fluid dynamics around a hovering wing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishna, Swathi; Green, Melissa; Mulleners, Karen

    2017-11-01

    The unsteady flow around a hovering flat plate wing has been investigated experimentally using particle image velocimetry and direct force measurements. The measurements are conducted on a wing that rotates symmetrically about the stroke reversal at a reduced frequency of k = 0.32 and Reynolds number of Re = 220 . The Lagrangian finite-time Lyapunov exponent method is used to analyse the unsteady flow fields by identifying dynamically relevant flow features such as the primary leading edge vortex (LEV), secondary vortices, and topological saddles, and their evolution within a flapping cycle. The flow evolution is divided into four stages that are characterised by the LEV (a)emergence, (b)growth, (c)lift-off, and (d)breakdown and decay. Tracking saddle points is shown to be helpful in defining the LEV lift-off which occurs at the maximum stroke velocity. The flow fields are correlated with the aerodynamic forces revealing that the maximum lift and drag are observed just before LEV lift-off. The end of wing rotation in the beginning of the stroke stimulates a change in the direction of the LEV growth and the start of rotation at the end of the stroke triggers the breakdown of the LEV.

  19. Static domain wall in braneworld gravity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abdalla, M.C.B.; Carlesso, P.F. [UNESP, Universidade Estadual Paulista, Instituto de Fisica Teiorica, Rua Dr. Bento Teobaldo Ferraz 271, Bloco II, Barra-Funda, Caixa Postal 70532-2, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Hoff da Silva, J.M. [UNESP, Universidade Estadual Paulista, Departamento de Fisica e Quimica, Guaratingueta, SP (Brazil)

    2014-01-15

    In this paper we consider a static domain wall inside a 3-brane. Different from the standard achievement obtained in General Relativity, the analysis performed here gives a consistency condition for the existence of static domain walls in a braneworld gravitational scenario. Also the behavior of the domain wall's gravitational field in the newtonian limit is shown. (orig.)

  20. Static multiplicities in heterogeneous azeotropic distillation sequences

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Esbjerg, Klavs; Andersen, Torben Ravn; Jørgensen, Sten Bay

    1998-01-01

    different static behavior. The method of Petlyuk and Avet'yan (1971), Bekiaris et al. (1993), which assumes infinite reflux and infinite number of stages, is extended to and applied on heterogeneous azeotropic distillation sequences. The predictions are substantiated through simulations. The static sequence...

  1. Automatic incrementalization of Prolog based static analyses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eichberg, Michael; Kahl, Matthias; Saha, Diptikalyan

    2007-01-01

    Modem development environments integrate various static analyses into the build process. Analyses that analyze the whole project whenever the project changes are impractical in this context. We present an approach to automatic incrementalization of analyses that are specified as tabled logic...... incrementalizing a broad range of static analyses....

  2. Static balance and developmental coordination disorder

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Geuze, RH

    2003-01-01

    The development of static balance is a basic characteristic of normal motor development. Most of the developmental motor tests include a measure of static balance. Children with a developmental coordination disorder (DCD) often fail this item. Twenty-four children at risk for DCD with balance

  3. Optimal Static Range Reporting in One Dimension

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alstrup, Stephen; Brodal, Gerth Stølting; Rauhe, Theis

    2001-01-01

    We consider static one dimensional range searching problems. These problems are to build static data structures for an integer set S \\subseteq U, where U = \\{0,1,\\dots,2^w-1\\}, which support various queries for integer intervals of U. For the query of reporting all integers in S contained within...

  4. Static Complexity Analysis of Higher Order Programs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Avery, James Emil; Kristiansen, Lars; Moyen, Jean-Yves

    2009-01-01

    The overall goal of the research presented in this paper is to find^Mautomatic methods for static complexity analysis of higher order^Mprograms.......The overall goal of the research presented in this paper is to find^Mautomatic methods for static complexity analysis of higher order^Mprograms....

  5. Flap Gap Oscillatory Blowing on 2D and 2.5D Wing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cătălin NAE

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Here we present preliminary results obtained in developing an active flow control system for highlift systems at advanced TRL level. The work is based on theoretical and experimental workperformed in AVERT EU FP6 project where the oscillatory flap gap blowing system was designedand tested on a INCAS F15 2D wing model. Pressure data and global loads have been recorded fora complex evaluation of the basic flow control mechanism. In 2.5D test cases this work has beenextended so that the proposed system may be selected as a mature technology in the JTI Clean Sky,Smart Fixed Wing Aircraft ITD. For this goal, new experimental setup was used and also updatedelectronics for the blowing system have been introduces. This was complemented by a newextension for the data acquisition system and visualization tools. Finally global correlations forbasic lift increments have been compared with the reference 2D case and analysed with respect tothe system efficiency.

  6. Prediction of transonic flutter for a supercritical wing by modified strip analysis and comparison with experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yates, E. C., Jr.; Wynne, E. C.; Farmer, M. G.; Desmarais, R. N.

    1981-01-01

    Use of a supercritical airfoil can adversely affect wing flutter speeds in the transonic range. As adequate theories for three dimensional unsteady transonic flow are not yet available, the modified strip analysis was used to predict the transonic flutter boundary for the supercritical wing. The steady state spanwise distributions of section lift curve slope and aerodynamic center, required as input for the flutter calculations, were obtained from pressure distributions. The calculated flutter boundary is in agreement with experiment in the subsonic range. In the transonic range, a transonic bucket is calculated which closely resembles the experimental one with regard to both shape and depth, but it occurs at about 0.04 Mach number lower than the experimental one.

  7. Ultrafiltration performance of tubular membrane modules fitted with turbulent promoter. Twisted tape and static mixer; Ranryu sokushintai wo sobishita kangata gengai roka tokusei. Twist tape to static mixer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sugimoto, T.; Kobayashi, H.; Ishikawa, T.; Kamiya, T. [Kogakuin University, Tokyo (Japan); Niitsu, T.; Inoue, H. [Soka University, Tokyo (Japan)

    1996-01-20

    The permeate flux of a membrane module fitted with a twisted tape or static mixer was 4-7.7 times higher than that of a membrane module without any turbulent promoter. Use of a twisted tape or static mixer shortened separation time. The energy consumption per unit mass of permeate due to pressure drop in the membrane module with twisted tape or static mixer was 2-3 times higher than that in the membrane module without turbulent promoter. The permeate flux solved by introducing the value of mass transfer coefficient into the osmotic pressure model coincided well with experimental results, where the mass transfer coefficient was obtained by simulating experimental formula of heat transfer in a pipe fitted with a twisted tape or static mixer into a mass transfer correlation by the heat transfer-mass transfer analogy. The mass transfer coefficient in a membrane module with twisted tape or static mixer increased to about 4 to 8 times that of a membrane module without turbulent promoter. 7 refs., 10 figs.

  8. Static and quasi-static behavior of an adaptive system to compensate path errors for smart fiber placement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perner, M.; Monner, H. P.; Krombholz, C.; Kruse, F. F.

    2015-04-01

    Smart fiber placement is an ambitious topic in current research for automated manufacturing of large-scale composite structures, e.g. wing covers. Adaptive systems get in focus to obtain a high degree of observability and controllability of the manufacturing process. In particular, vibrational issues and material failure have to be studied to significantly increase the production rate with no loss in accuracy of the fiber layup. As one contribution, an adaptive system has been developed to be integrated into the fiber placement head. It decouples the compaction roller from disturbances caused by misalignments, varying components' behavior over a large work area and acceleration changes during operation. Therefore, the smart system axially adapts the position of the compaction roller in case of disturbances. This paper investigates the behavior of the system to compensate quasi-static deviations from the desired path. In particular, the compensation efficiency of a constant offset, a linear drift with constant gradient and a single-curved drift is studied. Thus, the test bed with measurement devices and scenarios is explained. Based on the knowledge obtained by the experimental data, the paper concludes with a discussion of the proposed approach for its use under operating conditions and further implementation.

  9. Generating static perfect-fluid solutions of Einstein's equations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quevedo, Hernando; Toktarbay, Saken

    2015-05-01

    We present a method for generating exact interior solutions of Einstein's equations in the case of static and axially symmetric perfect-fluid spacetimes. The method is based upon a transformation that involves the metric functions as well as the density and pressure of the seed solution. In the limiting vacuum case, it reduces to the Zipoy-Voorhees transformation that can be used to generate metrics with multipole moments. All the metric functions of the new solution can be calculated explicitly from the seed solution in a simple manner. The physical properties of the resulting new solutions are shown to be completely different from those of the seed solution.

  10. Static Modeling for Commercial Braided Pneumatic Muscle Actuators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun Zhong

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available An enhanced model is proposed to describe static property of commercial braided pneumatic muscle actuators by including several important influencing factors. Elasticity of elastomer tube is considered and Ogden strain energy function is employed to describe its strain energy density. During pressurized process, small deformation of fiber occurs and is calculated using force balancing principle. Frictional forces within muscles are studied, which consist of friction within braid and that between bladder and braid. Isobaric experiments are performed and results verify the validity of the model.

  11. Validation of NESTLE against static reactor benchmark problems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mosteller, R.D.

    1996-01-01

    The NESTLE advanced modal code was developed at North Carolina State University with support from Los Alamos National Laboratory and Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. It recently has been benchmarked successfully against measured data from pressurized water reactors (PWRs). However, NESTLE's geometric capabilities are very flexible, and it can be applied to a variety of other types of reactors. This study presents comparisons of NESTLE results with those from other codes for static benchmark problems for PWRs, boiling water reactors (BWRs), high-temperature gas-cooled reactors (HTGRs) and CANDU heavy- water reactors (HWRs)

  12. Validation of NESTLE against static reactor benchmark problems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mosteller, R.D.

    1996-01-01

    The NESTLE advanced nodal code was developed at North Carolina State University with support from Los Alamos National Laboratory and Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. It recently has been benchmarked successfully against measured data from pressurized water reactors (PWRs). However, NESTLE's geometric capabilities are very flexible, and it can be applied to a variety of other types of reactors. This study presents comparisons of NESTLE results with those from other codes for static benchmark problems for PWRs, boiling water reactors (BWRs), high-temperature gas-cooled reactors (HTGRs), and Canada deuterium uranium (CANDU) heavy-water reactors (HWRs)

  13. Wing geometry of Triatoma sordida (Hemiptera: Reduviidae) populations from Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vendrami, Daniel Pagotto; Obara, Marcos Takashi; Gurgel-Gonçalves, Rodrigo; Ceretti-Junior, Walter; Marrelli, Mauro Toledo

    2017-04-01

    Triatoma sordida has a widespread distribution in Argentina, Bolivia, Brazil, Paraguay, and Uruguay and is frequently found in peridomestic environments. We investigated size and shape variability of T. sordida wings across Brazil. Field-collected adults from twelve populations were studied. For each individual female, seven landmarks on the right wing were digitalized. Shape variables derived from Procrustes superimposition were used in Principal Component Analysis (PCA). Wing size and shape variations among populations was explored by means of ANOVA. Wing centroid size was significantly different among T. sordida populations; specimens from Bahia (East) were larger than those of Mato Grosso do Sul (West). PCA based on wing shape variables showed low wing shape variability. These results reinforce previous data showing low genetic variability among T. sordida populations from Brazil. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Measurement of shape and deformation of insect wing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Duo; Wei, Zhen; Wang, Zeyu; Zhou, Changqiu

    2018-01-01

    To measure the shape and deformation of an insect wing, a scanning setup adopting laser triangulation and image matching was developed. Only one industry camera with two light sources was employed to scan the transparent insect wings. 3D shape and point to point full field deformation of the wings could be obtained even when the wingspan is less than 3 mm. The venation and corrugation could be significantly identified from the results. The deformation of the wing under pin loading could be seen clearly from the results as well. Calibration shows that the shape and deformation measurement accuracies are no lower than 0.01 mm. Laser triangulation and image matching were combined dexterously to adapt wings' complex shape, size, and transparency. It is suitable for insect flight research or flapping wing micro-air vehicle development.

  15. Static Balance in Patients with Vestibular Impairments: A Preliminary Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talebi, Hossein; Karimi, Mohammad Taghi; Abtahi, Seyed Hamid Reza; Fereshtenejad, Niloofar

    2016-01-01

    Aims. Vestibular system is indicated as one of the most important sensors responsible for static and dynamic postural control. In this study, we evaluated static balance in patients with unilateral vestibular impairments. Materials and Methods. We compared static balance control using Kistler force plate platform between 10 patients with unilateral vestibular impairments and 20 normal counterparts in the same sex ratio and age limits (50 ± 7). We evaluated excursion and velocity of center of pressure (COP) and path length in anteroposterior (AP) and mediolateral (ML) planes with eyes open and with eyes closed. Results. There was no significant difference between COP excursions in ML and AP planes between both groups with eyes open and eyes closed (p value > 0.05). In contrast, the difference between velocity and path length of COP in the mentioned planes was significant between both groups with eyes open and eyes closed (p value balance of patients with vestibular impairments indicated by the abnormal characteristics of body balance.

  16. Extraction of indium from sulphate solutions with D2EHPA solutions using static mixers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nacevski, N.; Poposka, F.; Nikov, B.

    1995-01-01

    The possible use of static mixers as a reactor for the extraction of indium from sulphate solutions was investigated. The experimental work was focused on ''Kenics'' type static mixers, since these were found simplest and cheapest among a variety of models, and yet yielded acceptable preliminary results with low pressure drop along the reactor. A series of experiments was carried out in a stirred continuous flow reactor to compare the results. It was found that under certain (different) conditions both reactors perform satisfactorily. The energy consumption of a static mixer is of the same order of magnitude as that of a stirred vessel. The most significant achievement of the experimental work is establishing that the residence time in a static mixer is about two orders of magnitude less than that in a stirred reactor. (orig.)

  17. On the nature of the static friction, kinetic friction and creep

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Persson, B. N. J.; Albohr, O.; Mancosu, F.

    2003-01-01

    In this paper, we discuss the nature of the static and kinetic friction, and of (thermally activated) creep.We focus on boundary lubrication at high confining pressure (∼1GPa), as is typical for hard solids, where one or at most two layers of confined molecules separates the sliding surfaces. We......, the system exhibits a very small static friction, and a (low velocity) kinetic friction which increases with increasing sliding velocity. On the other hand, if the springs are soft enough, strong elastic instabilities occur during sliding, resulting in a large static friction force Fs, and a kinetic friction...... force Fk equal to the static friction force at low sliding velocities. In this case rapid slip events occur at the interface, characterized by velocities much higher and independent of the drive velocity v. In the MD simulations we observe that, for incommensurate systems (at low temperature), only when...

  18. Free vibration analysis of dragonfly wings using finite element method

    OpenAIRE

    M Darvizeh; A Darvizeh; H Rajabi; A Rezaei

    2016-01-01

    In the present work, investigations on the microstructure and mechanicalproperties of the dragonfly wing are carried out and numerical modelingbased on Finite Element Method (FEM) is developed to predict Flightcharacteristics of dragonfly wings. Vibrational behavior of wings typestructures is immensely important in analysis, design and manufacturing ofsimilar engineering structures. For this purpose natural frequencies andmode shapes are calculated. In addition, the kind of deformation in eac...

  19. Static mechanical properties of buffer material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takaji, Kazuhiko; Suzuki, Hideaki

    1999-11-01

    The buffer material is expected to maintain its low water permeability, self-sealing properties, radionuclides adsorption and retardation properties, thermal conductivity, chemical buffering properties, overpack supporting properties, stress buffering properties, etc. over a long period of time. Natural clay is mentioned as a material that can relatively satisfy above. Among the kinds of natural clay, bentonite when compacted is superior because (i) it has exceptionally low water permeability and properties to control the movement of water in buffer, (ii) it fills void spaces in the buffer and fractures in the host rock as it swells upon water uptake, (iii) it has the ability to exchange cations and to adsorb cationic radioelements. In order to confirm these functions for the purpose of safety assessment, it is necessary to evaluate buffer properties through laboratory tests and engineering-scale tests, and to make assessments based on the ranges in the data obtained. This report describes the procedures, test conditions, results and examinations on the buffer material of unconfined compression tests, one-dimensional consolidation tests, consolidated-undrained triaxial compression tests and consolidated-undrained triaxial creep tests that aim at getting hold of static mechanical properties. We can get hold of the relationship between the dry density and tensile stress etc. by Brazilian tests, between the dry density and unconfined compressive strength etc. by unconfined compression tests, between the consolidation stress and void ratio etc. by one-dimensional consolidation tests, the stress pass of each effective confining pressure etc. by consolidated-undrained triaxial compression tests and the axial strain rate with time of each axial stress etc. by consolidated-undrained triaxial creep tests. (author)

  20. Investigation and design of a C-Wing passenger aircraft

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karan BIKKANNAVAR

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available A novel nonplanar wing concept called C-Wing is studied and implemented on a commercial aircraft to reduce induced drag which has a significant effect on fuel consumption. A preliminary sizing method which employs an optimization algorithm is utilized. The Airbus A320 aircraft is used as a reference aircraft to evaluate design parameters and to investigate the C-Wing design potential beyond current wing tip designs. An increase in aspect ratio due to wing area reduction at 36m span results in a reduction of required fuel mass by 16%. Also take-off mass savings were obtained for the aircraft with C-Wing configuration. The effect of a variations of height to span ratio (h/b of C-Wings on induced drag factor k, is formulated from a vortex lattice method and literature based equations. Finally the DOC costing methods used by the Association of European Airlines (AEA was applied to the existing A320 aircraft and to the C-Wing configuration obtaining a reduction of 6% in Direct Operating Costs (DOC for the novel concept resulted. From overall outcomes, the C-Wing concept suggests interesting aerodynamic efficiency and stability benefits.

  1. Improvement of the aerodynamic performance by wing flexibility and elytra–hind wing interaction of a beetle during forward flight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le, Tuyen Quang; Truong, Tien Van; Park, Soo Hyung; Quang Truong, Tri; Ko, Jin Hwan; Park, Hoon Cheol; Byun, Doyoung

    2013-01-01

    In this work, the aerodynamic performance of beetle wing in free-forward flight was explored by a three-dimensional computational fluid dynamics (CFDs) simulation with measured wing kinematics. It is shown from the CFD results that twist and camber variation, which represent the wing flexibility, are most important when determining the aerodynamic performance. Twisting wing significantly increased the mean lift and camber variation enhanced the mean thrust while the required power was lower than the case when neither was considered. Thus, in a comparison of the power economy among rigid, twisting and flexible models, the flexible model showed the best performance. When the positive effect of wing interaction was added to that of wing flexibility, we found that the elytron created enough lift to support its weight, and the total lift (48.4 mN) generated from the simulation exceeded the gravity force of the beetle (47.5 mN) during forward flight. PMID:23740486

  2. Critical cerebral perfusion pressure at high intracranial pressure measured by induced cerebrovascular and intracranial pressure reactivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bragin, Denis E; Statom, Gloria L; Yonas, Howard; Dai, Xingping; Nemoto, Edwin M

    2014-12-01

    intracranial pressure or cerebral blood flow (induced intracranial pressure reactivity = -0.03 ± 0.07 and induced cerebrovascular reactivity = -0.02 ± 0.09), reflecting intact autoregulation. Decreasing cerebral perfusion pressure to 50 mm Hg by increasing intracranial pressure increased induced intracranial pressure reactivity and induced cerebrovascular reactivity to 0.24 ± 0.09 and 0.31 ± 0.13, respectively, reflecting impaired autoregulation (p pressure of 30 mm Hg (0.71 ± 0.08, p pressure of 50 mm Hg was accurately determined by induced intracranial pressure reactivity and induced cerebrovascular reactivity, whereas the static method failed.

  3. CFD modeling of two immiscible fluids mixing in a commercial scale static mixer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Abdolkarimi

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available A Computational Fluid Dynamics model based on the Eulerian formulation for multiphase flow was developed to model the mixing hydrodynamics of two immiscible fluids in a commercial scale static mixer. The two immiscible liquids were condensate and caustic solutions and were considered as two phases that are interpenetrating each other. The aim of this study was to develop a comprehensive Computational Fluid Dynamics model for predicting the impact of hydrodynamic parameters such as length, diameter and the arrangement of the corrugated plates of a static mixer on the degree of mixing and the pressure drop of the mixture. The model has been evaluated by comparing predictions of the degree of mixing and the mixture pressure drop with the same data available for the static mixer of the desulfurization plant of the Kharg petrochemical company. It has been shown that the predictions of the developed model are well adapted to the experimental data.

  4. Folding wings like a cockroach: a review of transverse wing folding ensign wasps (Hymenoptera: Evaniidae: Afrevania and Trissevania.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    István Mikó

    Full Text Available We revise two relatively rare ensign wasp genera, whose species are restricted to Sub-Saharan Africa: Afrevania and Trissevania. Afrevania longipetiolata sp. nov., Trissevania heatherae sp. nov., T. hugoi sp. nov., T. mrimaensis sp. nov. and T. slideri sp. nov. are described, males and females of T. anemotis and Afrevania leroyi are redescribed, and an identification key for Trissevaniini is provided. We argue that Trissevania mrimaensis sp. nov. and T. heatherae sp. nov. populations are vulnerable, given their limited distributions and threats from mining activities in Kenya. We hypothesize that these taxa together comprise a monophyletic lineage, Trissevaniini, tr. nov., the members of which share the ability to fold their fore wings along two intersecting fold lines. Although wing folding of this type has been described for the hind wing of some insects four-plane wing folding of the fore wing has never been documented. The wing folding mechanism and the pattern of wing folds of Trissevaniini is shared only with some cockroach species (Blattodea. It is an interesting coincidence that all evaniids are predators of cockroach eggs. The major wing fold lines of Trissevaniini likely are not homologous to any known longitudinal anatomical structures on the wings of other Evaniidae. Members of the new tribe share the presence of a coupling mechanism between the fore wing and the mesosoma that is composed of a setal patch on the mesosoma and the retinaculum of the fore wing. While the setal patch is an evolutionary novelty, the retinaculum, which originally evolved to facilitate fore and hind wing coupling in Hymenoptera, exemplifies morphological exaptation. We also refine and clarify the Semantic Phenotype approach used in previous taxonomic revisions and explore the consequences of merging new with existing data. The way that semantic statements are formulated can evolve in parallel, alongside improvements to the ontologies themselves.

  5. Basal Complex and Basal Venation of Odonata Wings: Structural Diversity and Potential Role in the Wing Deformation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H Rajabi

    Full Text Available Dragonflies and damselflies, belonging to the order Odonata, are known to be excellent fliers with versatile flight capabilities. The ability to fly over a wide range of speeds, high manoeuvrability and great agility are a few characteristics of their flight. The architecture of the wings and their structural elements have been found to play a major role in this regard. However, the precise influence of individual wing components on the flight performance of these insects remains unknown. The design of the wing basis (so called basal complex and the venation of this part are responsible for particular deformability and specific shape of the wing blade. However, the wing bases are rather different in representatives of different odonate groups. This presumably reflects the dimensions of the wings on one hand, and different flight characteristics on the other hand. In this article, we develop the first three-dimensional (3D finite element (FE models of the proximal part of the wings of typical representatives of five dragonflies and damselflies families. Using a combination of the basic material properties of insect cuticle, a linear elastic material model and a nonlinear geometric analysis, we simulate the mechanical behaviour of the wing bases. The results reveal that although both the basal venation and the basal complex influence the structural stiffness of the wings, it is only the latter which significantly affects their deformation patterns. The use of numerical simulations enabled us to address the role of various wing components such as the arculus, discoidal cell and triangle on the camber formation in flight. Our study further provides a detailed representation of the stress concentration in the models. The numerical analysis presented in this study is not only of importance for understanding structure-function relationship of insect wings, but also might help to improve the design of the wings for biomimetic micro-air vehicles (MAVs.

  6. Cantilever Wings for Modern Aircraft: Some Aspects of Cantilever Wing Construction with Special Reference to Weight and Torsional Stiffness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stieger, H J

    1929-01-01

    In the foregoing remarks I have made an attempt to touch on some of the structural problems met with in cantilever wings, and dealt rather fully with a certain type of single-spar construction. The experimental test wing was a first attempt to demonstrate the principles of this departure from orthodox methods. The result was a wing both torsionally stiff and of light weight - lighter than a corresponding biplane construction.

  7. Evolution of Coextruded Structures in Static Mixers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sollogoub, C.; Guinault, A.; Pedros, M.

    2007-04-01

    Coextrusion allows to combine two thermoplastics in different ways, creating structures with different cross-sectional geometries (side-by-side structure or concentric ring structure). We use static mixers after the feedblock, in order to homogenise these initial structures and obtain different blend morphologies. The control of these morphologies is of prime importance in order to predict the final properties of the polymer blends. The aim of this paper is to study the evolution of some initial coextruded structures in different static mixers. Different static mixers, with adjustable number of mixing elements, are tested. The experimental observations are confronted with numerical simulation results.

  8. Static phantom wormholes of finite size

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cataldo, Mauricio; Orellana, Fabian

    2017-09-01

    In this paper we derive new static phantom traversable wormholes by assuming a shape function with a quadratic dependence on the radial coordinate r . We mainly focus our study on wormholes sustained by exotic matter with positive energy density (as seen by any static observer) and a variable equation of state pr/ρ wormhole spacetimes extending to infinity, we show that a quadratic shape function allows us to construct static spacetimes of finite size, composed of a phantom wormhole connected to an anisotropic spherically symmetric distribution of dark energy. The wormhole part of the full spacetime does not fulfill the dominant energy condition, while the dark energy part does.

  9. Static anisotropic solutions in f(T) theory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Daouda, M.H.; Rodrigues, Manuel E. [Universidade Federal do Espirito Santo, Centro de Ciencias Exatas, Departamento de Fisica, Av. Fernando Ferrari s/n, Campus de Goiabeiras, CEP29075-910, Vitoria, ES (Brazil); Houndjo, M.J.S. [Universidade Federal da Bahia, Instituto de Fisica, Salvador, BA (Brazil)

    2012-02-15

    In previous work, we undertook to study static and anisotropic content in f(T) theory and obtained new spherically symmetric solutions considering a constant torsion and some particular conditions for the pressure. In this paper, still in the framework of f(T) theory, new spherically symmetric solutions are obtained, first considering the general case of an isotropic fluid and later the anisotropic content case in which the generalized conditions for the matter content are considered such that the energy density, the radial and tangential pressures depend on the algebraic f(T) and its derivative f{sub T} (T). Moreover, we obtain the algebraic function f(T) through the reconstruction method for two cases and also study a polytropic model for the stellar structure. (orig.)

  10. Experiments on Metamaterials with Negative Effective Static Compressibility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jingyuan Qu

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The volume of ordinary materials decreases in response to a pressure increase exerted by a surrounding gas or liquid, i.e., the material volume compressibility is positive. Recently, poroelastic metamaterial architectures have been suggested theoretically that allow for an unusual negative effective static volume compressibility—which appears to be forbidden for reasons of energy conservation at first sight. The challenge in the three-dimensional (3D fabrication of these blueprints lies in the necessary many hollow 3D crosses sealed by thin membranes, which we realize in this work by using 3D laser microlithography combined with a serendipitous mechanism. By using optical-microscopy cross-correlation analysis, we determine an extraordinarily large negative metamaterial effective volume compressibility of κ_{eff}=-0.8%  bar^{-1}=-80  GPa^{-1} under pressure control.

  11. Biomechanics of smart wings in a bat robot: morphing wings using SMA actuators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Colorado, J; Barrientos, A; Rossi, C; Breuer, K S

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents the design of a bat-like micro aerial vehicle with actuated morphing wings. NiTi shape memory alloys (SMAs) acting as artificial biceps and triceps muscles are used for mimicking the morphing wing mechanism of the bat flight apparatus. Our objective is twofold. Firstly, we have implemented a control architecture that allows an accurate and fast SMA actuation. This control makes use of the electrical resistance measurements of SMAs to adjust morphing wing motions. Secondly, the feasibility of using SMA actuation technology is evaluated for the application at hand. To this purpose, experiments are conducted to analyze the control performance in terms of nominal and overloaded operation modes of the SMAs. This analysis includes: (i) inertial forces regarding the stretchable wing membrane and aerodynamic loads, and (ii) uncertainties due to impact of airflow conditions over the resistance–motion relationship of SMAs. With the proposed control, morphing actuation speed can be increased up to 2.5 Hz, being sufficient to generate lift forces at a cruising speed of 5 m s −1 . (paper)

  12. Biomechanics of smart wings in a bat robot: morphing wings using SMA actuators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colorado, J; Barrientos, A; Rossi, C; Bahlman, J W; Breuer, K S

    2012-09-01

    This paper presents the design of a bat-like micro aerial vehicle with actuated morphing wings. NiTi shape memory alloys (SMAs) acting as artificial biceps and triceps muscles are used for mimicking the morphing wing mechanism of the bat flight apparatus. Our objective is twofold. Firstly, we have implemented a control architecture that allows an accurate and fast SMA actuation. This control makes use of the electrical resistance measurements of SMAs to adjust morphing wing motions. Secondly, the feasibility of using SMA actuation technology is evaluated for the application at hand. To this purpose, experiments are conducted to analyze the control performance in terms of nominal and overloaded operation modes of the SMAs. This analysis includes: (i) inertial forces regarding the stretchable wing membrane and aerodynamic loads, and (ii) uncertainties due to impact of airflow conditions over the resistance-motion relationship of SMAs. With the proposed control, morphing actuation speed can be increased up to 2.5 Hz, being sufficient to generate lift forces at a cruising speed of 5 m s(-1).

  13. A parametric wing design study for a modern laminar flow wing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koegler, J. A., Jr.

    1979-01-01

    The results of a parametric wing design study using a modern laminar flow airfoil designed to exhibit desirable stall characteristics while maintaining high cruise performance are presented. It was found that little is sacrificed in cruise performance when satisfying the stall margin requirements if a taper ratio of 0.65 or greater is used.

  14. Relationship between functional assessments and exercise-related changes during static balance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clifton, Daniel R; Harrison, Blain C; Hertel, Jay; Hart, Joseph M

    2013-04-01

    The Functional Movement Screen (FMS) is currently used for injury risk prediction, although researchers have not studied its relationships to injury risk factors. The purpose of this study was to compare FMS scores at rest to changes in static balance after exercise. Second, we examined FMS scores pre and post exercise. Twenty-five participants performed center of pressure (COP) measures and FMS testing. An acclimatization session for the FMS occurred on day 1, whereas day 2 involved COP measures for static balance and FMS testing before and after a 36-minute exercise protocol. Center of pressure standard deviations in the frontal (COPML-SD) and sagittal (COPAP-SD) planes, center of pressure velocity (COP-Velocity), center of pressure area (COP-Area), and FMS scores were recorded. No significant correlations occurred between preexercise FMS scores and change in COP measures. Preexercise hurdle step scores related to preexercise COPML-SD (p = -0.46), COPAP-SD (p = -0.43), and COP-Area (p = -0.50). Preexercise in-line lunge scores related to postexercise COPAP-SD (p = -0.44) and COP-Velocity (p = -0.39), whereas preexercise active straight leg raise (ASLR) scores related to postexercise COPML-SD (p = -0.46). Functional Movement Screen scores were not related to changes in static balance after exercise and may therefore not be useful to predict who will experience greater static balance deficits after exercise. Additionally, FMS scores did not differ before and after exercise. Clinicians aiming to identify injury risk from a general static balance standpoint may find the hurdle step, in-line lunge, and ASLR useful. Clinicians aiming to identify injury risk from a change in static balance standpoint may need to explore other screening tools.

  15. SUPERDENSE MASSIVE GALAXIES IN WINGS LOCAL CLUSTERS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Valentinuzzi, T.; D'Onofrio, M.; Fritz, J.; Poggianti, B. M.; Bettoni, D.; Fasano, G.; Moretti, A.; Omizzolo, A.; Varela, J.; Cava, A.; Couch, W. J.; Dressler, A.; Moles, M.; Kjaergaard, P.; Vanzella, E.

    2010-01-01

    Massive quiescent galaxies at z > 1 have been found to have small physical sizes, and hence to be superdense. Several mechanisms, including minor mergers, have been proposed for increasing galaxy sizes from high- to low-z. We search for superdense massive galaxies in the WIde-field Nearby Galaxy-cluster Survey (WINGS) of X-ray selected galaxy clusters at 0.04 10 M sun , are mostly S0 galaxies, have a median effective radius (R e ) = 1.61 ± 0.29 kpc, a median Sersic index (n) = 3.0 ± 0.6, and very old stellar populations with a median mass-weighted age of 12.1 ± 1.3 Gyr. We calculate a number density of 2.9 x 10 -2 Mpc -3 for superdense galaxies in local clusters, and a hard lower limit of 1.3 x 10 -5 Mpc -3 in the whole comoving volume between z = 0.04 and z = 0.07. We find a relation between mass, effective radius, and luminosity-weighted age in our cluster galaxies, which can mimic the claimed evolution of the radius with redshift, if not properly taken into account. We compare our data with spectroscopic high-z surveys and find that-when stellar masses are considered-there is consistency with the local WINGS galaxy sizes out to z ∼ 2, while a discrepancy of a factor of 3 exists with the only spectroscopic z > 2 study. In contrast, there is strong evidence for a large evolution in radius for the most massive galaxies with M * > 4 x 10 11 M sun compared to similarly massive galaxies in WINGS, i.e., the brightest cluster galaxies.

  16. Analysis of Horizontal Accuracy for Large Scale Rural Mapping Using Rotary Wing UAV Image

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hidayat, Husnul; Muljo Sukojo, Bangun

    2017-12-01

    In order to fulfil the need of large scale map for rural mapping, Indonesian government is now looking for alternatives of geospatial data sources. With newly developed technology, nowadays rotary wing UAV can be used to acquire very high resolution aerial imagery quickly with low cost. This research assesses the horizontal accuracy of rural mapping in 1:2000 scale using orthophoto derived from rotary wing UAV image data. The test site of this research is Kebonwaris village, Pandaan, East Java which has an area of approximately 167 hectares. Image data was taken with approximately 80% overlap each other and processed using Structure from Motion approach. Twelve GCPs coordinates were measured using differential GPS observations for georeferencing purpose. For accuracy assessment, 22 test points were established and their coordinates were measured using static differential GPS observations. The results show that the mean absolute horizontal errors are 0.071 m and 0.142 m for easting and northing respectively and the Root Mean Square Errors are 0.088 m and 0.169 m for easting and northing respectively. These RMSE values represents horizontal RMSE 0.190 m. According to Peraturan Kepala BIG No. 15 Tahun 2014, this RMSE value represents the 0.289 m horizontal accuracy based on CE90 criterion. Therefore, with this level of accuracy the UAV image data can be used to make a class 1 base map in 1:2500 scale or class 2 base map in 1:1000 scale.

  17. Etude de la stabilite d'un avion BWB (Blended Wing Body) de 200 passagers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Legros, Clement

    The Blended Wing Body (BWB) is a type of innovative aircraft, based on the flying wing concept. This new type of airplane shows several advantages compared to the conventional airplanes : economy of fuel, reduction of the weight of the structure, reduction of the noise and less impact on the environment, increased payload capacity. However, this kind of aircraft has a lack of stability due to the absence of vertical tail. Several studies of stability were already realized on reduced size models of BWB, but there is no study on a 200 passengers BWB. That's why, the main objective of this present study is to integrate the engines and theirs pylons into the existing conceptual design of the BWB to analyze of their impact on its static and dynamic stability over the flight envelope. The conception of the BWB was realized with the platform of design CEASIOM. The airplane, the engines and theirs pylons were obtained in the geometrical module AcBuilder of CEASIOM. The various aerodynamic coefficients are calculated thanks to Tornado program. These coefficients allow realizing the calculations of stability, in particular with the longitudinal and lateral matrices of stability. Afterward, the BWB flight envelope is created based on aeronautical data of a similar airplane, the Airbus A320. From this flight envelope, we get back several thousand possible points of flight. The last step is to check the static and dynamic stability, using the longitudinal and lateral matrices of stability and the Flying Qualities Requirements, for every point of flight. To validate our study of stability, the already existing studies of stability of the Boeing 747 will be used and compared with our model.

  18. Effects of boundary layer forcing on wing-tip vortices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaw-Ward, Samantha

    The nature of turbulence within wing-tip vortices has been a topic of research for decades, yet accurate measurements of Reynolds stresses within the core are inherently difficult due to the bulk motion wandering caused by initial and boundary conditions in wind tunnels. As a result, characterization of a vortex as laminar or turbulent is inconclusive and highly contradicting. This research uses several experimental techniques to study the effects of broadband turbulence, introduced within the wing boundary layer, on the development of wing-tip vortices. Two rectangular wings with a NACA 0012 profile were fabricated for the use of this research. One wing had a smooth finish and the other rough, introduced by P80 grade sandpaper. Force balance measurements showed a small reduction in wing performance due to surface roughness for both 2D and 3D configurations, although stall characteristics remained relatively unchanged. Seven-hole probes were purpose-built and used to assess the mean velocity profiles of the vortices five chord lengths downstream of the wing at multiple angles of attack. Above an incidence of 4 degrees, the vortices were nearly axisymmetric, and the wing roughness reduced both velocity gradients and peak velocity magnitudes within the vortex. Laser Doppler velocimetry was used to further assess the time-resolved vortex at an incidence of 5 degrees. Evidence of wake shedding frequencies and wing shear layer instabilities at higher frequencies were seen in power spectra within the vortex. Unlike the introduction of freestream turbulence, wing surface roughness did not appear to increase wandering amplitude. A new method for removing the effects of vortex wandering is proposed with the use of carefully selected high-pass filters. The filtered data revealed that the Reynolds stress profiles of the vortex produced by the smooth and rough wing were similar in shape, with a peak occurring away from the vortex centre but inside of the core. Single hot

  19. Folding in and out: passive morphing in flapping wings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stowers, Amanda K; Lentink, David

    2015-03-25

    We present a new mechanism for passive wing morphing of flapping wings inspired by bat and bird wing morphology. The mechanism consists of an unactuated hand wing connected to the arm wing with a wrist joint. Flapping motion generates centrifugal accelerations in the hand wing, forcing it to unfold passively. Using a robotic model in hover, we made kinematic measurements of unfolding kinematics as functions of the non-dimensional wingspan fold ratio (2-2.5) and flapping frequency (5-17 Hz) using stereo high-speed cameras. We find that the wings unfold passively within one to two flaps and remain unfolded with only small amplitude oscillations. To better understand the passive dynamics, we constructed a computer model of the unfolding process based on rigid body dynamics, contact models, and aerodynamic correlations. This model predicts the measured passive unfolding within about one flap and shows that unfolding is driven by centrifugal acceleration induced by flapping. The simulations also predict that relative unfolding time only weakly depends on flapping frequency and can be reduced to less than half a wingbeat by increasing flapping amplitude. Subsequent dimensional analysis shows that the time required to unfold passively is of the same order of magnitude as the flapping period. This suggests that centrifugal acceleration can drive passive unfolding within approximately one wingbeat in small and large wings. Finally, we show experimentally that passive unfolding wings can withstand impact with a branch, by first folding and then unfolding passively. This mechanism enables flapping robots to squeeze through clutter without sophisticated control. Passive unfolding also provides a new avenue in morphing wing design that makes future flapping morphing wings possibly more energy efficient and light-weight. Simultaneously these results point to possible inertia driven, and therefore metabolically efficient, control strategies in bats and birds to morph or recover

  20. Efficient Computation of Buffer Capacities for Cyclo-Static Dataflow Graphs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wiggers, M.H.; Bekooij, Marco Jan Gerrit; Bekooij, Marco J.G.; Smit, Gerardus Johannes Maria

    A key step in the design of cyclo-static real-time systems is the determination of buffer capacities. In our multi-processor system, we apply back-pressure, which means that tasks wait for space in output buffers. Consequently buffer capacities affect the throughput. This requires the derivation of