WorldWideScience

Sample records for wing leading-edge vortices

  1. Rotational accelerations stabilize leading edge vortices on revolving fly wings

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lentink, D.; Dickinson, M.H.

    2009-01-01

    The aerodynamic performance of hovering insects is largely explained by the presence of a stably attached leading edge vortex (LEV) on top of their wings. Although LEVs have been visualized on real, physically modeled, and simulated insects, the physical mechanisms responsible for their stability

  2. An Experimental Investigation of Leading Edge Vortices and Passage to Stall of Nonslender Delta Wings

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Ol, Michael

    2003-01-01

    .... These measurements were motivated by flow visualization through dye injection. Delta wings of 50 degree and 65 degree leading edge sweep at Reynolds numbers of 8,000 and 14,000, respectively, were studied...

  3. Forewings match the formation of leading-edge vortices and dominate aerodynamic force production in revolving insect wings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Di; Kolomenskiy, Dmitry; Nakata, Toshiyuki; Liu, Hao

    2017-10-20

    In many flying insects, forewings and hindwings are coupled mechanically to achieve flapping flight synchronously while being driven by action of the forewings. How the forewings and hindwings as well as their morphologies contribute to aerodynamic force production and flight control remains unclear yet. Here we demonstrate that the forewings can produce most of the aerodynamic forces even with the hindwings removed through a computational fluid dynamic study of three revolving insect wing models, which are identical to the wing morphologies and Reynolds numbers of hawkmoth (Manduca sexta), bumblebee (Bombus ignitus) and fruitfly (Drosophila melanogaster). We find that the forewing morphologies match the formation of leading-edge vortices (LEV) and are responsible for generating sufficient lift forces at the mean angles of attack and the Reynolds numbers where the three representative insects fly. The LEV formation and pressure loading keep almost unchanged with the hindwing removed, and even lead to some improvement in power factor and aerodynamic efficiency. Moreover, our results indicate that the size and strength of the LEVs can be well quantified with introduction of a conical LEV angle, which varies remarkably with angles of attack and Reynolds numbers but within the forewing region while showing less sensitivity to the wing morphologies. This implies that the forewing morphology very likely plays a dominant role in achieving low-Reynolds number aerodynamic performance in natural flyers as well as in revolving and/or flapping micro air vehicles. © 2017 IOP Publishing Ltd.

  4. Flow over 50º Delta Wings with Different Leading-Edge Radii

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verhaagen, N.G.

    2011-01-01

    The experimental study focuses on the effects of the leading-edge radius on the flow over 50º swept delta wing models. Three models were tested, one model has a sharp leading edge and two other have a semi-circular leading edge of different radius. The vortical flow on and off the surface of the

  5. Effects of Leading-Edge Radius on Aerodynamic Characteristics of 50º Delta Wings

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verhaagen, N.G.

    2010-01-01

    The study focuses on the effects of the leading-edge radius on the flow over 50º swept delta wing models. Three models were tested, one model having a sharp leading edge and the other two having a semi-circular leading edge of different radius. The vortical flow on and off the surface of the models

  6. Leading-edge vortex shedding from rotating wings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kolomenskiy, Dmitry [Centre de Recherches Mathématiques (CRM), Department of Mathematics and Statistics, McGill University, 805 Sherbrooke W., Montreal, QC H3A 0B9 (Canada); Elimelech, Yossef [Faculty of Aerospace Engineering, Technion-Israel Institute of Technology, Haifa 32000 (Israel); Schneider, Kai, E-mail: dkolom@gmail.com [M2P2–CNRS, Université d' Aix-Marseille, 39, rue Frédéric Joliot-Curie, F-13453 Marseille Cedex 13 (France)

    2014-06-01

    This paper presents a numerical investigation of the leading-edge vortices generated by rotating triangular wings at Reynolds number Re = 250. A series of three-dimensional numerical simulations have been carried out using a Fourier pseudo-spectral method with volume penalization. The transition from stable attachment of the leading-edge vortex to periodic vortex shedding is explored, as a function of the wing aspect ratio and the angle of attack. It is found that, in a stable configuration, the spanwise flow in the recirculation bubble past the wing is due to the centrifugal force, incompressibility and viscous stresses. For the flow outside of the bubble, an inviscid model of spanwise flow is presented. (papers)

  7. Probabilistic Structural Health Monitoring of the Orbiter Wing Leading Edge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yap, Keng C.; Macias, Jesus; Kaouk, Mohamed; Gafka, Tammy L.; Kerr, Justin H.

    2011-01-01

    A structural health monitoring (SHM) system can contribute to the risk management of a structure operating under hazardous conditions. An example is the Wing Leading Edge Impact Detection System (WLEIDS) that monitors the debris hazards to the Space Shuttle Orbiter s Reinforced Carbon-Carbon (RCC) panels. Since Return-to-Flight (RTF) after the Columbia accident, WLEIDS was developed and subsequently deployed on board the Orbiter to detect ascent and on-orbit debris impacts, so as to support the assessment of wing leading edge structural integrity prior to Orbiter re-entry. As SHM is inherently an inverse problem, the analyses involved, including those performed for WLEIDS, tend to be associated with significant uncertainty. The use of probabilistic approaches to handle the uncertainty has resulted in the successful implementation of many development and application milestones.

  8. Aerodynamic improvement of a delta wing in combination with leading edge flaps

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tadateru Ishide

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Recently, various studies of micro air vehicle (MAV and unmanned air vehicle (UAV have been reported from wide range points of view. The aim of this study is to research the aerodynamic improvement of delta wing in low Reynold’s number region to develop an applicative these air vehicle. As an attractive tool in delta wing, leading edge flap (LEF is employed to directly modify the strength and structure of vortices originating from the separation point along the leading edge. Various configurations of LEF such as drooping apex flap and upward deflected flap are used in combination to enhance the aerodynamic characteristics in the delta wing. The fluid force measurement by six component load cell and particle image velocimetry (PIV analysis are performed as the experimental method. The relations between the aerodynamic superiority and the vortex behavior around the models are demonstrated.

  9. Effect of leading edge roundness on a delta wing in wing-rock motion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, T. Terry; Malcolm, Gerald N.

    1990-01-01

    The effect of wing leading-edge roundness on wing rock was investigated using flow visualization in a water tunnel. Eighty degree delta wing models were tested on free-to-roll and forced oscillation rigs. The onset of wing rock was delayed by increasing the roundness of the leading edges. The wing rock amplitude and frequency results suggested that damping was increased at lower angles of attack but reduced at higher angles of attack. Vortex lift-off and vortex breakdown, especially during dynamic situations, were strongly affected by the leading edge roundness. Different forms of wing rock motion could be sustained by combinations of vortex breakdown and vortex lift-off. Behaviors of the wing and vortex motions were explained by the influence of leading edge roundness on the separation location, vortex trajectory, and vortex breakdown.

  10. On the leading edge vortex of thin wings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arredondo, Abel; Viola, Ignazio Maria

    2016-11-01

    On thin wings, the sharp leading edge triggers laminar separation followed by reattachment, forming a Leading Edge Vortex (LEV). This flow feature is of paramount importance because, if periodically shed, it leads to large amplitude load fluctuations, while if stably attached to the wing, it can provide lift augmentation. We found that on asymmetric-spinnaker-type yacht sails, the LEV can be stable despite the relatively low sweep (30°). This finding, which was recently predicted numerically by Viola et al., has been confirmed through current flume tests on a 1:115th model scale sail. Forces were measured and Particle Image Velocimetry was performed on four horizontal sail sections at a Reynolds number of 1.7x104. Vortex detection revealed that the LEV becomes progressively larger and more stable towards the highest sections, where its axis has a smaller angle with respect to the freestream velocity. Mapping the sail section on a rotating cylinder through a Joukowski transformation, we quantified the lift augmentation provided by the LEV on each sail section. These results open up new sail design strategies based on the manipulation of the LEV and can be applicable to the wings of unmanned aerial vehicles and underwater vehicles. Project funded by Conacyt.

  11. Leading edge vortex control on a delta wing with dielectric barrier discharge plasma actuators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Lu; Wen, Chih-yung

    2017-06-01

    This paper presents an experimental investigation of the application of dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) plasma actuators on a slender delta wing to control the leading edge vortices (LEVs). The experiments are conducted in a wind tunnel with a Reynolds number of 50 000 based on the chord length. The smoke flow visualization reveals that the DBD plasma actuators at the leading edges significantly modify the vortical flow structure over the delta wing. It is noted that symmetric control at both semi-spans and asymmetric control at a single semi-span leads to opposite effects on the local LEVs. Particle image velocimetry (PIV) indicates that the shear layer is deformed by the actuators. Therefore, both the strength and the shape of the LEV cores are deeply affected. The six-component force measurement shows that the DBD plasma actuators have a limited effect on lift and drag while inducing relatively large moments. This suggests that the DBD plasma actuator is a promising technique for delta wing maneuvering.

  12. The leading-edge vortex of swift-wing shaped delta wings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muir, Rowan; Arredondo-Galeana, Abel; Viola, Ignazio Maria

    2017-11-01

    Recent investigations on the aerodynamics of natural fliers have illuminated the significance of the Leading-Edge Vortex (LEV) for lift generation in a variety of flight conditions. In this investigation, a model non-slender delta shaped wing with a sharp leading-edge is tested at low Reynolds Number, along with a delta wing of the same design, but with a modified trailing edge inspired by the wing of a common swift Apus apus. The effect of the tapering swift wing on LEV development and stability is compared with the flow structure over the un-modified delta wing model through particle image velocimetry. For the first time, a leading-edge vortex system consisting of a dual or triple LEV is recorded on a swift-wing shaped delta wing, where such a system is found across all tested conditions. It is shown that the spanwise location of LEV breakdown is governed by the local chord rather than Reynolds Number or angle of attack. These findings suggest that the trailing-edge geometry of the swift wing alone does not prevent the common swift from generating an LEV system comparable with that of a delta shaped wing. This work received funding from the Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council [EP/M506515/1] and the Consejo Nacional de Ciencia y Tecnología (CONACYT).

  13. Leading-edge flow reattachment and the lateral static stability of low-aspect-ratio rectangular wings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linehan, Thomas; Mohseni, Kamran

    2017-11-01

    The relationship between lateral static stability derivative, Clβ,lift coefficient, CL, and angle of attack was investigated for rectangular wings of aspect ratio A R =0.75 ,1 ,1.5 , and 3 using Stereo-Digital Particle Image Velocimetry (S-DPIV) and direct force and moment measurements. When the product Cl βA R is plotted with respect to CL, the lateral stability curves of each wing collapse to a single line for CL0.7 , the linearity and scaling of Clβwith respect to CL is lost. S-DPIV is used to elucidate the flow physics in this nonlinear regime. At α =10∘ , the leading-edge separation region emerges on the leeward portion of the sideslipped wing by means of vortex shedding. For the A R ≤1.5 wings at α >15∘ , the tip vortex downwash is sufficient to restrict the shedding of leading-edge vorticity thereby sustaining the lift of the leading-edge separation region at high angles of attack. Concurrently, the windward tip vortex grows in size and strength with increasing angle of attack, displacing the leading-edge separation region further toward the leeward wing. This reorganization of lift-generating vorticity results in the initial nonlinearities between Cl β and CL at angles of attack for which CL is still increasing. At angles of attack near that of maximum lift for the A R ≤1 wings, the windward tip vortex lifts off the wing, decreasing the lateral static stability of the wing prior to lift stall. For the A R =3 wing at α >10∘ , nonlinear trends in Cl β versus CL occur due to the spanwise evolution of stalled flow.

  14. Topology optimization of compliant adaptive wing leading edge with composite materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tong Xinxing

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available An approach for designing the compliant adaptive wing leading edge with composite material is proposed based on the topology optimization. Firstly, an equivalent constitutive relationship of laminated glass fiber reinforced epoxy composite plates has been built based on the symmetric laminated plate theory. Then, an optimization objective function of compliant adaptive wing leading edge was used to minimize the least square error (LSE between deformed curve and desired aerodynamics shape. After that, the topology structures of wing leading edge of different glass fiber ply-orientations were obtained by using the solid isotropic material with penalization (SIMP model and sensitivity filtering technique. The desired aerodynamics shape of compliant adaptive wing leading edge was obtained based on the proposed approach. The topology structures of wing leading edge depend on the glass fiber ply-orientation. Finally, the corresponding morphing experiment of compliant wing leading edge with composite materials was implemented, which verified the morphing capability of topology structure and illustrated the feasibility for designing compliant wing leading edge. The present paper lays the basis of ply-orientation optimization for compliant adaptive wing leading edge in unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV field.

  15. The leading-edge vortex of swift wing-shaped delta wings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muir, Rowan Eveline; Arredondo-Galeana, Abel; Viola, Ignazio Maria

    2017-08-01

    Recent investigations on the aerodynamics of natural fliers have illuminated the significance of the leading-edge vortex (LEV) for lift generation in a variety of flight conditions. A well-documented example of an LEV is that generated by aircraft with highly swept, delta-shaped wings. While the wing aerodynamics of a manoeuvring aircraft, a bird gliding and a bird in flapping flight vary significantly, it is believed that this existing knowledge can serve to add understanding to the complex aerodynamics of natural fliers. In this investigation, a model non-slender delta-shaped wing with a sharp leading edge is tested at low Reynolds number, along with a delta wing of the same design, but with a modified trailing edge inspired by the wing of a common swift Apus apus . The effect of the tapering swift wing on LEV development and stability is compared with the flow structure over the unmodified delta wing model through particle image velocimetry. For the first time, a leading-edge vortex system consisting of a dual or triple LEV is recorded on a swift wing-shaped delta wing, where such a system is found across all tested conditions. It is shown that the spanwise location of LEV breakdown is governed by the local chord rather than Reynolds number or angle of attack. These findings suggest that the trailing-edge geometry of the swift wing alone does not prevent the common swift from generating an LEV system comparable with that of a delta-shaped wing.

  16. Development of Advanced High Lift Leading Edge Technology for Laminar Flow Wings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bright, Michelle M.; Korntheuer, Andrea; Komadina, Steve; Lin, John C.

    2013-01-01

    This paper describes the Advanced High Lift Leading Edge (AHLLE) task performed by Northrop Grumman Systems Corporation, Aerospace Systems (NGAS) for the NASA Subsonic Fixed Wing project in an effort to develop enabling high-lift technology for laminar flow wings. Based on a known laminar cruise airfoil that incorporated an NGAS-developed integrated slot design, this effort involved using Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) analysis and quality function deployment (QFD) analysis on several leading edge concepts, and subsequently down-selected to two blown leading-edge concepts for testing. A 7-foot-span AHLLE airfoil model was designed and fabricated at NGAS and then tested at the NGAS 7 x 10 Low Speed Wind Tunnel in Hawthorne, CA. The model configurations tested included: baseline, deflected trailing edge, blown deflected trailing edge, blown leading edge, morphed leading edge, and blown/morphed leading edge. A successful demonstration of high lift leading edge technology was achieved, and the target goals for improved lift were exceeded by 30% with a maximum section lift coefficient (Cl) of 5.2. Maximum incremental section lift coefficients ( Cl) of 3.5 and 3.1 were achieved for a blown drooped (morphed) leading edge concept and a non-drooped leading edge blowing concept, respectively. The most effective AHLLE design yielded an estimated 94% lift improvement over the conventional high lift Krueger flap configurations while providing laminar flow capability on the cruise configuration.

  17. Multiple leading edge vortices of unexpected strength in freely flying hawkmoth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johansson, L Christoffer; Engel, Sophia; Kelber, Almut; Heerenbrink, Marco Klein; Hedenström, Anders

    2013-11-20

    The Leading Edge Vortex (LEV) is a universal mechanism enhancing lift in flying organisms. LEVs, generally illustrated as a single vortex attached to the wing throughout the downstroke, have not been studied quantitatively in freely flying insects. Previous findings are either qualitative or from flappers and tethered insects. We measure the flow above the wing of freely flying hawkmoths and find multiple simultaneous LEVs of varying strength and structure along the wingspan. At the inner wing there is a single, attached LEV, while at mid wing there are multiple LEVs, and towards the wingtip flow separates. At mid wing the LEV circulation is ~40% higher than in the wake, implying that the circulation unrelated to the LEV may reduce lift. The strong and complex LEV suggests relatively high flight power in hawmoths. The variable LEV structure may result in variable force production, influencing flight control in the animals.

  18. Simulating Bird Strike on Aircraft Composite Wing Leading Edge.

    OpenAIRE

    Ericsson, Max

    2012-01-01

    In this master thesis project the possibility to model the response of a wing when subjected to bird strike using finite elements is analyzed. Since this transient event lasts only a few milliseconds the used solution method is explicit time integration. The wing is manufactured using carbon fiber laminate. Carbon fiber laminates have orthotropic material properties with different stiffness in different directions. Accordingly, there are damage mechanisms not considered when using metal that ...

  19. Streamwise counter-rotating vortices generated by triangular leading edge pattern in flat plate boundary layer

    KAUST Repository

    Hasheminejad, S. M.

    2016-01-05

    A series of flow visualizations were conducted to qualitatively study the development of streamwise counter-rotating vortices over a flat plate induced by triangular patterns at the leading edge of a flat plate. The experiments were carried out for a Reynolds number based on the pattern wavelength (λ) of 3080. The results depict the onset, development and breakdown of the vortical structures within the flat plate boundary layer. Moreover, the effect of one spanwise array of holes with diameter of 0.2λ (=3 mm) was examined. This investigation was done on two different flat plates with holes placed at the location x/λ = 2 downstream of the troughs and peaks. The presence of holes after troughs does not show any significant effect on the vortical structures. However, the plate with holes after peaks noticeably delays the vortex breakdown. In this case, the “mushroom-like” vortices move away from the wall and propagate downstream with stable vortical structures. The vortex growth is halted further downstream but start to tilt aside.

  20. Structural Health Monitoring of the Space Shuttle's Wing Leading Edge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madaras, Eric I.; Prosser, William H.; Studor, George; Gorman, Michael R.; Ziola, Steven M.

    2006-03-01

    In a response to the Columbia Accident Investigation Board's recommendations following the loss of the Space Shuttle Columbia in 2003, NASA developed methods to monitor the orbiters while in flight so that on-orbit repairs could be made before reentry if required. One method that NASA investigated was an acoustic based impact detection system. A large array of ground tests successfully demonstrated the capability to detect and localize impact events on the Shuttle's wing structure. Subsequently, a first generation impact sensing system was developed and deployed on the Shuttle Discovery, the first Shuttle scheduled for return to flight.

  1. Shuttle Wing Leading Edge Root Cause NDE Team Findings and Implementation of Quantitative Flash Infrared Thermography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burke, Eric R.

    2009-01-01

    Comparison metrics can be established to reliably and repeatedly establish the health of the joggle region of the Orbiter Wing Leading Edge reinforced carbon carbon (RCC) panels. Using these metrics can greatly reduced the man hours needed to perform, wing leading edge scanning for service induced damage. These time savings have allowed for more thorough inspections to be preformed in the necessary areas with out affecting orbiter flow schedule. Using specialized local inspections allows for a larger margin of safety by allowing for more complete characterizations of panel defects. The presence of the t-seal during thermographic inspection can have adverse masking affects on ability properly characterize defects that exist in the joggle region of the RCC panels. This masking affect dictates the final specialized inspection should be preformed with the t-seal removed. Removal of the t-seal and use of the higher magnification optics has lead to the most effective and repeatable inspection method for characterizing and tracking defects in the wing leading edge. Through this study some inadequacies in the main health monitoring system for the orbiter wing leading edge have been identified and corrected. The use of metrics and local specialized inspection have lead to a greatly increased reliability and repeatable inspection of the shuttle wing leading edge.

  2. Compressibility and Leading-Edge Bluntness Effects for a 65 Deg Delta Wing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luckring, J. M.

    2004-01-01

    A 65 deg. delta wing has been tested in the National Transonic Facility (NTF) at mean aerodynamic chord Reynolds numbers from 6 million to 120 million at subsonic and transonic speeds. The configuration incorporated a systematic variation of the leading edge bluntness. The analysis for this paper is focused on the compressibility and bluntness effects primarily at a Reynolds number of 6 million from this data set. Emphasis is placed upon on the onset and progression of leading-edge vortex separation, and compressibility is shown to promote this separation. Comparisons with recent publications show that compressibility and Reynolds number have opposite effects on blunt leading edge vortex separation

  3. Reynolds Number, Compressibility, and Leading-Edge Bluntness Effects on Delta-Wing Aerodynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luckring, James M.

    2004-01-01

    An overview of Reynolds number, compressibility, and leading edge bluntness effects is presented for a 65 degree delta wing. The results of this study address both attached and vortex-flow aerodynamics and are based upon a unique data set obtained in the NASA-Langley National Transonic Facility (NTF) for i) Reynolds numbers ranging from conventional wind-tunnel to flight values, ii) Mach numbers ranging from subsonic to transonic speeds, and iii) leading-edge bluntness values that span practical slender wing applications. The data were obtained so as to isolate the subject effects and they present many challenges for Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) studies.

  4. Modelling Combined Heat Exchange in the Leading Edge of Perspective Aircraft Wing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kandinsky Roman O.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper gas dynamic numerical modelling of leading edge flow is presented and thermal loading parameters are determined. Numerical modelling of combined radiative and conductive heat transfer of the wing edge is carried out, thermal state of structure is given and the results are analyzed.

  5. Reynolds Number and Leading-Edge Bluntness Effects on a 65 Deg Delta Wing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luckring, J. M.

    2002-01-01

    A 65 deg delta wing has been tested in the National Transonic Facility (NTF) at mean aerodynamic chord Reynolds numbers from 6 million to 120 million at subsonic and transonic speeds. The configuration incorporated systematic variation of the leading edge bluntness. The analysis for this paper is focused on the Reynolds number and bluntness effects at subsonic speeds (M = 0.4) from this data set. The results show significant effects of both these parameters on the onset and progression of leading-edge vortex separation.

  6. Effects of leading-edge flap oscillation on unsteady delta wing flow and rock control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kandil, Osama A.; Salman, Ahmed A.

    1991-01-01

    The isolated and interdisciplinary problems of unsteady fluid dynamics and rigid-body dynamics and control of delta wings with and without leading-edge flap oscillation are considered. For the fluid dynamics problem, the unsteady, compressible, thin-layer Navier-Stokes (NS) equations, which are written relative to a moving frame of reference, are solved along with the unsteady, linearized, Navier-displacement (ND) equations. The NS equations are solved for the flowfield using an implicit finite-volume scheme. The ND equations are solved for the grid deformation, if the leading-edge flaps oscillate, using an ADI scheme. For the dynamics and control problem, the Euler equation of rigid-body rolling motion for a wing and its flaps are solved interactively with the fluid dynamics equations for the wing-rock motion and subsequently for its control. A four-stage Runge-Kutta scheme is used to explicitly integrate the dynamics equation.

  7. Air Forces and Moments on Triangular and Related Wings With Subsonic Leading Edges Oscillating in Supersonic Potential Flow

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Watkins, Charles

    1961-01-01

    This analysis treats the air forces and moments in supersonic potential flow on oscillating triangular wings and a series of sweptback and arrow wings with subsonic leading edges and supersonic trailing edges...

  8. Fracture mechanics analyses of the slip-side joggle regions of wing-leading-edge panels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kyongchan Song

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The Space Shuttle wing-leading edge consists of panels that are made of reinforced carbon-carbon. Coating spallation was observed near the slip-side region of the panels that experience extreme heating. To understand this phenomenon, a root-cause investigation was conducted. As part of that investigation, fracture mechanics analyses of the slip-side joggle regions of the hot panels were conducted. This paper presents an overview of the fracture mechanics analyses.

  9. Fracture Mechanics Analyses of the Slip-Side Joggle Regions of Wing-Leading-Edge Panels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raju, Ivatury S.; Knight, Norman F., Jr.; Song, Kyongchan; Phillips, Dawn R.

    2011-01-01

    The Space Shuttle wing-leading edge consists of panels that are made of reinforced carbon-carbon. Coating spallation was observed near the slip-side region of the panels that experience extreme heating. To understand this phenomenon, a root-cause investigation was conducted. As part of that investigation, fracture mechanics analyses of the slip-side joggle regions of the hot panels were conducted. This paper presents an overview of the fracture mechanics analyses.

  10. Petiolate wings: effects on the leading-edge vortex in flapping flight.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, Nathan; Knowles, Kevin; Bomphrey, Richard J

    2017-02-06

    The wings of many insect species including crane flies and damselflies are petiolate (on stalks), with the wing planform beginning some distance away from the wing hinge, rather than at the hinge. The aerodynamic impact of flapping petiolate wings is relatively unknown, particularly on the formation of the lift-augmenting leading-edge vortex (LEV): a key flow structure exploited by many insects, birds and bats to enhance their lift coefficient. We investigated the aerodynamic implications of petiolation P using particle image velocimetry flow field measurements on an array of rectangular wings of aspect ratio 3 and petiolation values of P = 1-3. The wings were driven using a mechanical device, the 'Flapperatus', to produce highly repeatable insect-like kinematics. The wings maintained a constant Reynolds number of 1400 and dimensionless stroke amplitude Λ * (number of chords traversed by the wingtip) of 6.5 across all test cases. Our results showed that for more petiolate wings the LEV is generally larger, stronger in circulation, and covers a greater area of the wing surface, particularly at the mid-span and inboard locations early in the wing stroke cycle. In each case, the LEV was initially arch-like in form with its outboard end terminating in a focus-sink on the wing surface, before transitioning to become continuous with the tip vortex thereafter. In the second half of the wing stroke, more petiolate wings exhibit a more detached LEV, with detachment initiating at approximately 70% and 50% span for P = 1 and 3, respectively. As a consequence, lift coefficients based on the LEV are higher in the first half of the wing stroke for petiolate wings, but more comparable in the second half. Time-averaged LEV lift coefficients show a general rise with petiolation over the range tested.

  11. Performance Evaluation of Leading Edge Slats on Rigid Wing Sail Catamarans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Chelsea; O'Neill, Charles

    2015-11-01

    Rigid wing sails have created the fastest catamarans in history, however with the addition of a leading edge slat higher lift and faster speeds may be achieved. Slats are currently used on airplane wings to increase lift, but have not been implemented on a rigid wing sail catamaran. Using 3D modeling and computational fluid dynamics software, this research investigates the effect that slats have on the performance of rigid wing sail catamarans. Aerodynamics and hydrodynamics form the basis of the research. The preliminary results show an increase in the coefficient of lift for sail models with slats over sail models without slats, allowing the catamaran to perform at higher speeds. The ability of the slat to rotate has also been identified as a key factor in increasing the benefit of the slat. This work was supported by NSF site award 1358991.

  12. Fracture Mechanics Analyses of the Slip-Side Joggle Regions of Wing-Leading Edge Panels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raju, Ivatury S.; Knight, Norman F., Jr.; Song, Kyongchan; Phillips, Dawn R.

    2010-01-01

    The Space Shuttle Orbiter wing comprises of 22 leading edge panels on each side of the wing. These panels are part of the thermal protection system that protects the Orbiter wings from extreme heating that take place on the reentry in to the earth atmosphere. On some panels that experience extreme heating, liberation of silicon carbon (SiC) coating was observed on the slip side regions of the panels. Global structural and local fracture mechanics analyses were performed on these panels as a part of the root cause investigation of this coating liberation anomaly. The wing-leading-edge reinforced carbon-carbon (RCC) panels, Panel 9, T-seal 10, and Panel 10, are shown in Figure 1 and the progression of the stress analysis models is presented in Figure 2. The global structural analyses showed minimal interaction between adjacent panels and the T-seal that bridges the gap between the panels. A bounding uniform temperature is applied to a representative panel and the resulting stress distribution is examined. For this loading condition, the interlaminar normal stresses showed negligible variation in the chord direction and increased values in the vicinity of the slip-side joggle shoulder. As such, a representative span wise slice on the panel can be taken and the cross section can be analyzed using plane strain analysis.

  13. Bat-inspired integrally actuated membrane wings with leading-edge sensing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buoso, Stefano; Dickinson, Benjamin T; Palacios, Rafael

    2017-12-28

    This paper presents a numerical investigation on the closed-loop performance of a two-dimensional actuated membrane wing with fixed supports. The proposed concept mimics aerodynamic sensing and actuation mechanisms found in bat wings to achieve robust outdoor flight: firstly, variable membrane tension, which is obtained in bats through skeleton articulation, is introduced through a dielectric-elastomer construction; secondly, leading-edge airflow sensing is achieved with bioinspired hair-like sensors. Numerical results from a coupled aero-electromechanical model show that this configuration can allow for the tracking of prescribed lift coefficient signals in the presence of disturbances from atmospheric gusts. In particular, disturbance measurements through the hair sensor (a feedforward control strategy) are seen to provide substantial advantage with respect to a reactive (feedback) control strategy determining a reduction of the oscillations of the lift coefficient.

  14. Generation of Fullspan Leading-Edge 3D Ice Shapes for Swept-Wing Aerodynamic Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camello, Stephanie C.; Lee, Sam; Lum, Christopher; Bragg, Michael B.

    2016-01-01

    The deleterious effect of ice accretion on aircraft is often assessed through dry-air flight and wind tunnel testing with artificial ice shapes. This paper describes a method to create fullspan swept-wing artificial ice shapes from partial span ice segments acquired in the NASA Glenn Icing Reserch Tunnel for aerodynamic wind-tunnel testing. Full-scale ice accretion segments were laser scanned from the Inboard, Midspan, and Outboard wing station models of the 65% scale Common Research Model (CRM65) aircraft configuration. These were interpolated and extrapolated using a weighted averaging method to generate fullspan ice shapes from the root to the tip of the CRM65 wing. The results showed that this interpolation method was able to preserve many of the highly three dimensional features typically found on swept-wing ice accretions. The interpolated fullspan ice shapes were then scaled to fit the leading edge of a 8.9% scale version of the CRM65 wing for aerodynamic wind-tunnel testing. Reduced fidelity versions of the fullspan ice shapes were also created where most of the local three-dimensional features were removed. The fullspan artificial ice shapes and the reduced fidelity versions were manufactured using stereolithography.

  15. Insect Residue Contamination on Wing Leading Edge Surfaces: A Materials Investigation for Mitigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorenzi, Tyler M.; Wohl, Christopher J.; Penner, Ronald K.; Smith, Joseph G.; Siochi, Emilie J.

    2011-01-01

    Flight tests have shown that residue from insect strikes on aircraft wing leading edge surfaces may induce localized transition of laminar to turbulent flow. The highest density of insect populations have been observed between ground level and 153 m during light winds (2.6 -- 5.1 m/s), high humidity, and temperatures from 21 -- 29 C. At a critical residue height, dependent on the airfoil and Reynolds number, boundary layer transition from laminar to turbulent results in increased drag and fuel consumption. Although this represents a minimal increase in fuel burn for conventional transport aircraft, future aircraft designs will rely on maintaining laminar flow across a larger portion of wing surfaces to reduce fuel burn during cruise. Thus, insect residue adhesion mitigation is most critical during takeoff and initial climb to maintain laminar flow in fuel-efficient aircraft configurations. Several exterior treatments investigated to mitigate insect residue buildup (e.g., paper, scrapers, surfactants, flexible surfaces) have shown potential; however, implementation has proven to be impractical. Current research is focused on evaluation of wing leading edge surface coatings that may reduce insect residue adhesion. Initial work under NASA's Environmentally Responsible Aviation Program focused on evaluation of several commercially available products (commercial off-the-shelf, COTS), polymers, and substituted alkoxy silanes that were applied to aluminum (Al) substrates. Surface energies of these coatings were determined from contact angle data and were correlated to residual insect excrescence on coated aluminum substrates using a custom-built "bug gun." Quantification of insect excrescence surface coverage was evaluated by a series of digital photographic image processing techniques.

  16. Goertler vortices in growing boundary layers: The leading edge receptivity problem, linear growth and the nonlinear breakdown stage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Philip

    1989-01-01

    Goertler vortices are thought to be the cause of transition in many fluid flows of practical importance. A review of the different stages of vortex growth is given. In the linear regime, nonparallel effects completely govern this growth, and parallel flow theories do not capture the essential features of the development of the vortices. A detailed comparison between the parallel and nonparallel theories is given and it is shown that at small vortex wavelengths, the parallel flow theories have some validity; otherwise nonparallel effects are dominant. New results for the receptivity problem for Goertler vortices are given; in particular vortices induced by free stream perturbations impinging on the leading edge of the walls are considered. It is found that the most dangerous mode of this type can be isolated and it's neutral curve is determined. This curve agrees very closely with the available experimental data. A discussion of the different regimes of growth of nonlinear vortices is also given. Again it is shown that, unless the vortex wavelength is small, nonparallel effects are dominant. Some new results for nonlinear vortices of 0(1) wavelengths are given and compared to experimental observations.

  17. Development of Streamwise Counter-Rotating Vortices in Flat Plate Boundary Layer Pre-set by Leading Edge Patterns

    KAUST Repository

    Hasheminejad, S.M.

    2017-04-03

    Development of streamwise counter-rotating vortices induced by leading edge patterns with different pattern shape is investigated using hot-wire anemometry in the boundary layer of a flat plate. A triangular, sinusoidal and notched patterns with the same pattern wavelength λ of 15mm and the same pattern amplitude A of 7.5mm were examined for free-stream velocity of 3m/s. The results show a good agreement with earlier studies. The inflection point on the velocity profile downstream of the trough of the patterns at the beginning of the vortex formation indicates that the vortices non-linearly propagate downstream. An additional vortex structure was also observed between the troughs of the notched pattern.

  18. Effect of Impact Location on the Response of Shuttle Wing Leading Edge Panel 9

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyle, Karen H.; Spellman, Regina L.; Hardy, Robin C.; Fasanella, Edwin L.; Jackson, Karen E.

    2005-01-01

    The objective of this paper is to compare the results of several simulations performed to determine the worst-case location for a foam impact on the Space Shuttle wing leading edge. The simulations were performed using the commercial non-linear transient dynamic finite element code, LS-DYNA. These simulations represent the first in a series of parametric studies performed to support the selection of the worst-case impact scenario. Panel 9 was selected for this study to enable comparisons with previous simulations performed during the Columbia Accident Investigation. The projectile for this study is a 5.5-in cube of typical external tank foam weighing 0.23 lb. Seven locations spanning the panel surface were impacted with the foam cube. For each of these cases, the foam was traveling at 1000 ft/s directly aft, along the orbiter X-axis. Results compared from the parametric studies included strains, contact forces, and material energies for various simulations. The results show that the worst case impact location was on the top surface, near the apex.

  19. Fracture Mechanics Analyses of Reinforced Carbon-Carbon Wing-Leading-Edge Panels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raju, Ivatury S.; Phillips, Dawn R.; Knight, Norman F., Jr.; Song, Kyongchan

    2010-01-01

    Fracture mechanics analyses of subsurface defects within the joggle regions of the Space Shuttle wing-leading-edge RCC panels are performed. A 2D plane strain idealized joggle finite element model is developed to study the fracture behavior of the panels for three distinct loading conditions - lift-off and ascent, on-orbit, and entry. For lift-off and ascent, an estimated bounding aerodynamic pressure load is used for the analyses, while for on-orbit and entry, thermo-mechanical analyses are performed using the extreme cold and hot temperatures experienced by the panels. In addition, a best estimate for the material stress-free temperature is used in the thermo-mechanical analyses. In the finite element models, the substrate and coating are modeled separately as two distinct materials. Subsurface defects are introduced at the coating-substrate interface and within the substrate. The objective of the fracture mechanics analyses is to evaluate the defect driving forces, which are characterized by the strain energy release rates, and determine if defects can become unstable for each of the loading conditions.

  20. Unsteady lift and thrust of a 2D flapping thin airfoil in the presence of additional leading edge vortices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alaminos-Quesada, Javier; Fernandez-Feria, Ramon

    2017-11-01

    The effect of leading-edge vortices (LEVs) on the lift, thrust and moment of a two-dimensional heaving and pitching foil is analyzed from the unsteady, linear potential theory. General expressions taking into account the effect of unsteady point vortices interacting with the oscillatory trailing wake are first derived. Then, simplified expressions for the initial stages of the growing LEV on each half-stroke are used to obtain analytical closed expressions for the main contribution of these vortices to the lift, thrust and moment. It is found that, within the linear potential framework and the Brown-Michael model, the LEV contributes to the aerodynamic forces and moment only for combined pitching and heaving motions of the foil, being a relevant contribution for sufficiently large values of the product of the reduced frequency and the amplitude of the heaving and/or pitching motions. The results are compared with available experimental data and numerical simulations. Supported by the Ministerio de Economia y Competitividad of Spain Grants No. DPI2013-40479-P and DPI2016-76151-C2-1-R.

  1. Effect of tip vortices on membrane vibration of flexible wings with different aspect ratios

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Genç Mustafa Serdar

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study, the effect of the aspect ratio on the aerodynamics characteristic of flexible membrane wings with different aspect ratios (AR = 1 and AR = 3 is experimentally investigated at Reynolds number of 25000. Time accurate measurements of membrane deformation using Digital Image Correlation system (DIC is carried out while normal forces of the wing will be measured by helping a load-cell system and flow on the wing was visualized by means of smoke wire technic. The characteristics of high aspect ratio wings are shown to be affected by leading edge separation bubbles at low Reynolds number. It is concluded that the camber of membrane wing excites the separated shear layer and this situation increases the lift coefficient relatively more as compared to rigid wings. In membrane wings with low aspect ratio, unsteadiness included tip vortices and vortex shedding, and the combination of tip vortices and vortex shedding causes complex unsteady deformations of these membrane wings. The characteristic of high aspect ratio wings was shown to be affected by leading edge separation bubbles at low Reynolds numbers whereas the deformations of flexible wing with low aspect ratio affected by tip vortices and leading edge separation bubbles.

  2. Vorticity Transport on a Flexible Wing in Stall Flutter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akkala, James; Buchholz, James; Farnsworth, John; McLaughlin, Thomas

    2014-11-01

    The circulation budget within dynamic stall vortices was investigated on a flexible NACA 0018 wing model of aspect ratio 6 undergoing stall flutter. The wing had an initial angle of attack of 6 degrees, Reynolds number of 1 . 5 ×105 and large-amplitude, primarily torsional, limit cycle oscillations were observed at a reduced frequency of k = πfc / U = 0 . 1 . Phase-locked stereo PIV measurements were obtained at multiple chordwise planes around the 62.5% and 75% spanwise locations to characterize the flow field within thin volumetric regions over the suction surface. Transient surface pressure measurements were used to estimate boundary vorticity flux. Recent analyses on plunging and rotating wings indicates that the magnitude of the pressure-gradient-driven boundary flux of secondary vorticity is a significant fraction of the magnitude of the convective flux from the separated leading-edge shear layer, suggesting that the secondary vorticity plays a significant role in regulating the strength of the primary vortex. This phenomenon is examined in the present case, and the physical mechanisms governing the growth and evolution of the dynamic stall vortices are explored. This work was supported by the Air Force Office of Scientific Research through the Flow Interactions and Control Program monitored by Dr. Douglas Smith, and through the 2014 AFOSR/ASEE Summer Faculty Fellowship Program (JA and JB).

  3. Effects of wing leading-edge radius and Reynolds number on longitudinal aerodynamic characteristics of highly swept wing-body configurations at subsonic speeds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henderson, W. P.

    1976-01-01

    An investigation was conducted in the Langley low turbulence pressure tunnel to determine the effects of wing leading edge radius and Reynolds number on the longitudinal aerodynamic characteristics of a series of highly swept wing-body configurations. The tests were conducted at Mach numbers below 0.30, angles of attack up to 16 deg, and Reynolds numbers per meter from 6.57 million to 43.27 million. The wings under study in this investigation had leading edge sweep angles of 61.7 deg, 64.61 deg, and 67.01 deg in combination with trailing edge sweep angles of 0 deg and 40.6 deg. The leading edge radii of each wing planform could be varied from sharp to nearly round.

  4. Aerodynamic forces and flow structures of the leading edge vortex on a flapping wing considering ground effect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Truong, Tien Van; Yoon, Kwang Joon; Byun, Doyoung; Kim, Min Jun; Park, Hoon Cheol

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this work is to provide an insight into the aerodynamic performance of the beetle during takeoff, which has been estimated in previous investigations. We employed a scaled-up electromechanical model flapping wing to measure the aerodynamic forces and the three-dimensional flow structures on the flapping wing. The ground effect on the unsteady forces and flow structures were also characterized. The dynamically scaled wing model could replicate the general stroke pattern of the beetle's hind wing kinematics during takeoff flight. Two wing kinematic models have been studied to examine the influences of wing kinematics on unsteady aerodynamic forces. In the first model, the angle of attack is asymmetric and varies during the translational motion, which is the flapping motion of the beetle's hind wing. In the second model, the angle of attack is constant during the translational motion. The instantaneous aerodynamic forces were measured for four strokes during the beetle's takeoff by the force sensor attached at the wing base. Flow visualization provided a general picture of the evolution of the three-dimensional leading edge vortex (LEV) on the beetle hind wing model. The LEV is stable during each stroke, and increases radically from the root to the tip, forming a leading-edge spiral vortex. The force measurement results show that the vertical force generated by the hind wing is large enough to lift the beetle. For the beetle hind wing kinematics, the total vertical force production increases 18.4% and 8.6% for the first and second strokes, respectively, due to the ground effect. However, for the model with a constant angle of attack during translation, the vertical force is reduced during the first stroke. During the third and fourth strokes, the ground effect is negligible for both wing kinematic patterns. This finding suggests that the beetle's flapping mechanism induces a ground effect that can efficiently lift its body from the ground during takeoff

  5. Aerodynamic forces and flow structures of the leading edge vortex on a flapping wing considering ground effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Truong, Tien; Byun, Doyoung; Kim, Min Jun; Yoon, Kwang Joon; Park, Hoon Cheol

    2013-09-01

    The aim of this work is to provide an insight into the aerodynamic performance of the beetle during takeoff, which has been estimated in previous investigations. We employed a scaled-up electromechanical model flapping wing to measure the aerodynamic forces and the three-dimensional flow structures on the flapping wing. The ground effect on the unsteady forces and flow structures were also characterized. The dynamically scaled wing model could replicate the general stroke pattern of the beetle's hind wing kinematics during takeoff flight. Two wing kinematic models have been studied to examine the influences of wing kinematics on unsteady aerodynamic forces. In the first model, the angle of attack is asymmetric and varies during the translational motion, which is the flapping motion of the beetle's hind wing. In the second model, the angle of attack is constant during the translational motion. The instantaneous aerodynamic forces were measured for four strokes during the beetle's takeoff by the force sensor attached at the wing base. Flow visualization provided a general picture of the evolution of the three-dimensional leading edge vortex (LEV) on the beetle hind wing model. The LEV is stable during each stroke, and increases radically from the root to the tip, forming a leading-edge spiral vortex. The force measurement results show that the vertical force generated by the hind wing is large enough to lift the beetle. For the beetle hind wing kinematics, the total vertical force production increases 18.4% and 8.6% for the first and second strokes, respectively, due to the ground effect. However, for the model with a constant angle of attack during translation, the vertical force is reduced during the first stroke. During the third and fourth strokes, the ground effect is negligible for both wing kinematic patterns. This finding suggests that the beetle's flapping mechanism induces a ground effect that can efficiently lift its body from the ground during takeoff.

  6. Exploratory study of the effects of wing-leading-edge modifications on the stall/spin behavior of a light general aviation airplane

    Science.gov (United States)

    1979-01-01

    Configurations with full-span and segmented leading-edge flaps and full-span and segmented leading-edge droop were tested. Studies were conducted with wind-tunnel models, with an outdoor radio-controlled model, and with a full-scale airplane. Results show that wing-leading-edge modifications can produce large effects on stall/spin characteristics, particularly on spin resistance. One outboard wing-leading-edge modification tested significantly improved lateral stability at stall, spin resistance, and developed spin characteristics.

  7. The effect of aspect ratio on the leading-edge vortex over an insect-like flapping wing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, Nathan; Knowles, Kevin; Bomphrey, Richard J

    2015-10-09

    Insect wing shapes are diverse and a renowned source of inspiration for the new generation of autonomous flapping vehicles, yet the aerodynamic consequences of varying geometry is not well understood. One of the most defining and aerodynamically significant measures of wing shape is the aspect ratio, defined as the ratio of wing length (R) to mean wing chord (c). We investigated the impact of aspect ratio, AR, on the induced flow field around a flapping wing using a robotic device. Rigid rectangular wings ranging from AR = 1.5 to 7.5 were flapped with insect-like kinematics in air with a constant Reynolds number (Re) of 1400, and a dimensionless stroke amplitude of 6.5c (number of chords traversed by the wingtip). Pseudo-volumetric, ensemble-averaged, flow fields around the wings were captured using particle image velocimetry at 11 instances throughout simulated downstrokes. Results confirmed the presence of a high-lift, separated flow field with a leading-edge vortex (LEV), and revealed that the conical, primary LEV grows in size and strength with increasing AR. In each case, the LEV had an arch-shaped axis with its outboard end originating from a focus-sink singularity on the wing surface near the tip. LEV detachment was observed for AR > 1.5 around mid-stroke at ~70% span, and initiated sooner over higher aspect ratio wings. At AR > 3 the larger, stronger vortex persisted under the wing surface well into the next half-stroke leading to a reduction in lift. Circulatory lift attributable to the LEV increased with AR up to AR = 6. Higher aspect ratios generated proportionally less lift distally because of LEV breakdown, and also less lift closer to the wing root due to the previous LEV's continuing presence under the wing. In nature, insect wings go no higher than AR ~ 5, likely in part due to architectural and physiological constraints but also because of the reducing aerodynamic benefits of high AR wings.

  8. Experimental Investigations on Leading-Edge Vortex Structures for Flow over Non-Slender Delta Wings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jin-Jun, Wang; Wang, Zhang

    2008-01-01

    The dye injection and hydrogen bubble visualization techniques are used to investigate the dual-vortex structure including its development, breakdown and the spatial location of vortex core over nonslender delta wings. It is concluded that the dual-vortex structure can be affected significantly by sweep angle and Reynolds number, and generated only at small angle of attack. The angle between the projection of outer vortex core on delta wing surface and the root chord line has nothing to do with the Reynolds Number and angle of attack, but has simple linear relation with the sweep angle of the model tested. (fundamental areas of phenomenology (including applications))

  9. Wind-tunnel tests on model wing with Fowler flap and specially developed leading-edge slot

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weick, Fred E; Platt, Robert C

    1933-01-01

    An investigation was made in the NACA 7 by 10 foot wind tunnel to find the increase in maximum lift coefficient which could be obtained by providing a model wing with both a Fowler trailing-edge extension flap and a Handley Page type leading-edge slot. A conventional Handley page slot proportioned to operate on the plain wing without a flap gave but a slight increase with the flap; so a special form of slot was developed to work more effectively with the flap. With the best combined arrangement the maximum lift coefficient based on the original area was increased from 3.17, for the Fowler wing, to 3.62. The minimum drag coefficient with both devices retracted was increased in approximately the same proportion. Tests were also made with the special-type slot on the plain wing without the flap. The special slot, used either with or without the Fowler flap, gave definitely higher values of the maximum lift coefficient than the slots of conventional form, with an increase of the same order in the minimum drag coefficient.

  10. A Lifting Surface Theory for Wings Experiencing Leading-Edge Separation

    Science.gov (United States)

    1977-06-30

    the benefits of the Smith-type models for the slender-body problem. Results were also obtained for the arrow wing to demonstrate the use of the...AGAP00I1 ACA-onw ACAnooi) »(.«"■!’. ACA"r)01S AC)Paui6 ACA>� I AGAXQOIB A&AM0ni9 »C,»." i ,’ , ACAI -OO.𔃻 ACAMOO?? AOAMOO: i ACAf’OO

  11. Effects of Wing Leading Edge Penetration with Venting and Exhaust Flow from Wheel Well at Mach 24 in Flight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gnoffo, Peter A.

    2003-01-01

    A baseline solution for CFD Point 1 (Mach 24) in the STS-107 accident investigation was modified to include effects of: (1) holes through the leading edge into a vented cavity; and (2) a scarfed, conical nozzle directed toward the centerline of the vehicle from the forward, inboard corner of the landing gear door. The simulations were generated relatively quickly and early in the investigation because simplifications were made to the leading edge cavity geometry and an existing utility to merge scarfed nozzle grid domains with structured baseline external domains was implemented. These simplifications in the breach simulations enabled: (1) a very quick grid generation procedure; and (2) high fidelity corroboration of jet physics with internal surface impingements ensuing from a breach through the leading edge, fully coupled to the external shock layer flow at flight conditions. These simulations provided early evidence that the flow through a two-inch diameter (or larger) breach enters the cavity with significant retention of external flow directionality. A normal jet directed into the cavity was not an appropriate model for these conditions at CFD Point 1 (Mach 24). The breach diameters were of the same order or larger than the local, external boundary-layer thickness. High impingement heating and pressures on the downstream lip of the breach were computed. It is likely that hole shape would evolve as a slot cut in the direction of the external streamlines. In the case of the six-inch diameter breach the boundary layer is fully ingested. The intent of externally directed jet simulations in the second scenario was to approximately model aerodynamic effects of a relatively large internal wing pressure, fueled by combusting aluminum, which deforms the corner of the landing gear door and directs a jet across the windside surface. These jet interactions, in and of themselves, were not sufficiently large to explain observed aerodynamic behavior.

  12. Experimental Surface Pressure Data Obtained on 65 deg Delta Wing Across Reynolds Number and Mach Number Ranges. Volume 2; Small-Radius Leading Edge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Julio; Luckring, James M.

    1996-01-01

    An experimental wind tunnel test of a 65 deg. delta wing model with interchangeable leading edges was conducted in the Langley National Transonic Facility (NTF). The objective was to investigate the effects of Reynolds and Mach numbers on slender-wing leading-edge vortex flows with four values of wing leading-edge bluntness. Experimentally obtained pressure data are presented without analysis in tabulated and graphical formats across a Reynolds number range of 6 x 10(exp 6) to 84 x 10(exp 6) at a Mach number of 0.85 and across a Mach number range of 0.4 to 0.9 at Reynolds numbers of 6 x 10(exp 6) and 60 x 10(exp 6). Normal-force and pitching-moment coefficient plots for these Reynolds number and Mach number ranges are also presented.

  13. Wind-Tunnel Investigation of Rectangular Air-Duct Entrances in the Leading Edge of an NACA 23018 Wing, Special Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biermann, David; McLellan, Charles H.

    1940-01-01

    A preliminary investigation of a number of duct entrances of rectangular shape installed in the leading edge of a wing was conducted in the NACA 20-foot tunnel to determine the external drag, the available pressure, the critical Mach numbers, and the effect on the maximum lift. The results showed that the most satisfactory entrances, which had practically no effect on the wing characteristics, had their lips approximately in the vertical plane of the leading edge of the wing. This requirement necessitated extending the lips outside the wing contour for all except the small entrances. Full dynamic pressure was found to be available over a fairly wide range of angle of attack. The critical Mach number for a small entrance was calculated to be as high as that for the plain wing but was slightly lower for the larger entrances tested.

  14. Vortical flows over delta wings and numerical prediction of vortex breakdown

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ekaterinaris, J. A.; Schiff, Lewis B.

    1990-01-01

    Navier-Stokes solutions of subsonic vortical flow over a 75 deg sweep delta wing with a sharp leading edge are presented. The sensitivity of the solution to the numerical scheme is examined using both a partially upwind scheme and a scheme with central differencing in all directions. At moderate angles of attack, no vortex breakdown is observed, whereas the higher angle-of-attack cases exhibit breakdown. The effect of numerical grid density is investigated, and solutions that are obtained with various grid densities are compared with experimental data. An embedded grid approach is implemented to enable higher resolution in selected isolated flow regions, such as the leeward-side surface, the leading-edge vortical flow, and the vortex breakdown region.

  15. A Reynolds Number Study of Wing Leading-Edge Effects on a Supersonic Transport Model at Mach 0.3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, M. Susan; Owens, Lewis R., Jr.; Chu, Julio

    1999-01-01

    A representative supersonic transport design was tested in the National Transonic Facility (NTF) in its original configuration with small-radius leading-edge flaps and also with modified large-radius inboard leading-edge flaps. Aerodynamic data were obtained over a range of Reynolds numbers at a Mach number of 0.3 and angles of attack up to 16 deg. Increasing the radius of the inboard leading-edge flap delayed nose-up pitching moment to a higher lift coefficient. Deflecting the large-radius leading-edge flap produced an overall decrease in lift coefficient and delayed nose-up pitching moment to even higher angles of attack as compared with the undeflected large- radius leading-edge flap. At angles of attack corresponding to the maximum untrimmed lift-to-drag ratio, lift and drag coefficients decreased while lift-to-drag ratio increased with increasing Reynolds number. At an angle of attack of 13.5 deg., the pitching-moment coefficient was nearly constant with increasing Reynolds number for both the small-radius leading-edge flap and the deflected large-radius leading-edge flap. However, the pitching moment coefficient increased with increasing Reynolds number for the undeflected large-radius leading-edge flap above a chord Reynolds number of about 35 x 10 (exp 6).

  16. Hypersonic boundary layer in the vicinity of a point of inflection of leading edge on a flat wing in the regime of strong viscous interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dudin, G. N.; Ledovskiy, A. V.

    2013-06-01

    The flow in a spatial hypersonic laminar boundary layer on a planar wing with a point of inflection in the leading edge is considered in the regime of strong viscous-inviscid interaction. The boundary problems are formulated for two cases: self-similar flow near the point of inflection of the leading edge and full three-dimensional (3D) boundary layer on a wing with variable sweep angle. The numerical solution is obtained using the finite-difference method. The results of parametric calculations of influence of a wing shape and the temperature factor on flow characteristics in the boundary layer are presented. The possibility of formation of local regions with high shear stress and heat flux is shown.

  17. Mass and performance optimization of an airplane wing leading edge structure against bird strike using Taguchi-based grey relational analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hassan Pahange

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Collisions between birds and aircraft are one of the most dangerous threats to flight safety. In this study, smoothed particles hydrodynamics (SPH method is used for simulating the bird strike to an airplane wing leading edge structure. In order to verify the model, first, experiment of bird strike to a flat aluminum plate is simulated, and then bird impact on an airplane wing leading edge structure is investigated. After that, considering dimensions of wing internal structural components like ribs, skin and spar as design variables, we try to minimize structural mass and wing skin deformation simultaneously. To do this, bird strike simulations to 18 different wing structures are made based on Taguchi’s L18 factorial design of experiment. Then grey relational analysis is used to minimize structural mass and wing skin deformation due to the bird strike. The analysis of variance (ANOVA is also applied and it is concluded that the most significant parameter for the performance of wing structure against impact is the skin thickness. Finally, a validation simulation is conducted under the optimal condition to show the improvement of performance of the wing structure.

  18. Effects of Canard Planform and Wing-Leading-Edge Modification on Low-Speed Longitudinal Aerodynamic Characteristics of a Canard Airplane Configuration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spencer, Bernard, Jr.

    1961-01-01

    An investigation has been conducted at low subsonic speeds to study the effects of canard planform and wing-leading-edge modification on the longitudinal aerodynamic characteristics of a general research canard airplane configuration. The basic wing of the model had a trapezoidal planform, an aspect ratio of 3.0, a taper ratio of 0.143, and an unswept 80-percent-chord line. Modifications to the wing included addition of full-span and partial-span leading-edge chord-extensions. Two canard planforms were employed in the study; one was a 60 deg sweptback delta planform and the other was a trapezoidal planform similar to that of the basic wing. Modifications to these canards included addition of a full-span leading-edge chord-extension to the trapezoidal planform and a fence to the delta planform. For the basic-wing-trapezoidal-canard configuration, rather abrupt increases in stability occurred at about 12 deg angle of attack. A slight pitch-up tendency occurred for the delta-canard configuration at approximately 8 deg angle of attack. A comparison of the longitudinal control effectiveness for the basic-wing-trapezoidal-canard combination and for the basic-wing-delta-canard combination indicates higher values of control effectiveness at law angles of attack for the trapezoidal canard. The control effectiveness for the delta-canard configuration, however, is seen to hold up for higher canard deflections and to higher angles of attack. Use of a full-span chord-extension deflected approximately 30 deg on the trapezoidal canard greatly improved the control characteristics of this configuration and enabled a sizeable increase in trim lift to be realized.

  19. Breaking down the delta wing vortex: The role of vorticity in the breakdown process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, R. C.; Visser, Kenneth Dale

    1991-01-01

    Experimental x-wire measurements of the flowfield above a 70 degree and 75 degree flat plate delta wing were performed at a Reynolds number of 250,000. Grids were taken normal to the wing at various chordwise locations for angles of attack of 20 degrees and 30 degrees. Axial and azimuthal vorticity distributions were derived from the velocity fields. The dependence of circulation on distance from the vortex core and on chordwise location was also examined. The effects of nondimensionalization in comparison with other experimental data is made. The results indicate that the circulation distribution scales with the local semispan and grows in a nearly linear fashion in the chordwise direction. The spanwise distribution of axial vorticity is severely altered through the breakdown region and the amount of vorticity present appears to reach a maximum immediately preceding breakdown. The axial velocity components with a negative sense, such as that found in the secondary vortex, seem to remain unaffected by changes in wing sweep or angle of attack, in direct contrast to the visible components. In addition, the inclusion of the local wing geometry into a previously derived correlation parameter allows the circulation of growing leading edge vortex flows to be reduced to a single curve.

  20. Wind tunnel investigation of the interaction and breakdown characteristics of slender wing vortices at subsonic, transonic, and supersonic speeds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erickson, Gary E.

    1991-01-01

    The vortex dominated aerodynamic characteristics of a generic 65 degree cropped delta wing model were studied in a wind tunnel at subsonic through supersonic speeds. The lee-side flow fields over the wing-alone configuration and the wing with leading edge extension (LEX) added were observed at M (infinity) equals 0.40 to 1.60 using a laser vapor screen technique. These results were correlated with surface streamline patterns, upper surface static pressure distributions, and six-component forces and moments. The wing-alone exhibited vortex breakdown and asymmetry of the breakdown location at the subsonic and transonic speeds. An earlier onset of vortex breakdown over the wing occurred at transonic speeds due to the interaction of the leading edge vortex with the normal shock wave. The development of a shock wave between the vortex and wing surface caused an early separation of the secondary boundary layer. With the LEX installed, wing vortex breakdown asymmetry did not occur up to the maximum angle of attack in the present test of 24 degrees. The favorable interaction of the LEX vortex with the wing flow field reduced the effects of shock waves on the wing primary and secondary vortical flows. The direct interaction of the wing and LEX vortex cores diminished with increasing Mach number. The maximum attainable vortex-induced pressure signatures were constrained by the vacuum pressure limit at the transonic and supersonic speeds.

  1. On the structure, interaction, and breakdown characteristics of slender wing vortices at subsonic, transonic, and supersonic speeds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erickson, Gary E.; Schreiner, John A.; Rogers, Lawrence W.

    1989-01-01

    Slender wing vortex flows at subsonic, transonic, and supersonic speeds were investigated in a 6 x 6 ft wind tunnel. Test data obtained include off-body and surface flow visualizations, wing upper surface static pressure distributions, and six-component forces and moments. The results reveal the transition from the low-speed classical vortex regime to the transonic regime, beginning at a freestream Mach number of 0.60, where vortices coexist with shock waves. It is shown that the onset of core breakdown and the progression of core breakdown with the angle of attack were sensitive to the Mach number, and that the shock effects at transonic speeds were reduced by the interaction of the wing and the lead-edge extension (LEX) vortices. The vortex strengths and direct interaction of the wing and LEX cores (cores wrapping around each other) were found to diminish at transonic and supersonic speeds.

  2. Static force tests of a sharp leading edge delta-wing model at ambient and cryogenic temperatures with a description of the apparatus employed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilgore, R. A.; Davenport, E. E.

    1976-01-01

    A sharp leading edge delta-wing model was tested through an angle-of-attack range at Mach numbers of 0.75, 0.80, and 0.85 at both ambient and cryogenic temperatures in the Langley 1/3-meter transonic cryogenic tunnel. Total pressure was varied with total temperature in order to hold test Reynolds number constant at a given Mach number. Agreement between the aerodynamic data obtained at ambient and cryogenic temperatures indicates that flows with leading-edge vortex effects are duplicated properly at cryogenic temperatures. The test results demonstrate that accurate aerodynamic data can be obtained by using conventional force-testing techniques if suitable measures are taken to minimize temperature gradients across the balance and to keep the balance at ambient (warm) temperatures during cryogenic operation of the tunnel.

  3. Effects of wing locations on wing rock induced by forebody vortices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ma Baofeng

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Previous studies have shown that asymmetric vortex wakes over slender bodies exhibit a multi-vortex structure with an alternate arrangement along a body axis at high angle of attack. In this investigation, the effects of wing locations along a body axis on wing rock induced by forebody vortices was studied experimentally at a subcritical Reynolds number based on a body diameter. An artificial perturbation was added onto the nose tip to fix the orientations of forebody vortices. Particle image velocimetry was used to identify flow patterns of forebody vortices in static situations, and time histories of wing rock were obtained using a free-to-roll rig. The results show that the wing locations can affect significantly the motion patterns of wing rock owing to the variation of multi-vortex patterns of forebody vortices. As the wing locations make the forebody vortices a two-vortex pattern, the wing body exhibits regularly divergence and fixed-point motion with azimuthal variations of the tip perturbation. If a three-vortex pattern exists over the wing, however, the wing-rock patterns depend on the impact of the highest vortex and newborn vortex. As the three vortices together influence the wing flow, wing-rock patterns exhibit regularly fixed-points and limit-cycled oscillations. With the wing moving backwards, the newborn vortex becomes stronger, and wing-rock patterns become fixed-points, chaotic oscillations, and limit-cycled oscillations. With further backward movement of wings, the vortices are far away from the upper surface of wings, and the motions exhibit divergence, limit-cycled oscillations and fixed-points. For the rearmost location of the wing, the wing body exhibits stochastic oscillations and fixed-points.

  4. Leading-edge vortex solutions with large total pressure losses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murman, Earll M.; Powell, Kenneth G.; Goodsell, Aga M.; Landahl, Marten T.

    1987-01-01

    Computations are presented for a Lambda = 75 deg delta wing in a supersonic freestream under two conditions which lead to leading-edge vortices. For one condition, analysis of the computed vortical flow reveals a closed streamline in the core. From varying computational parameters, it appears that this is due to truncation error of the convective derivatives. For the other condition, comparisons are made with wind-tunnel data, and good agreement is noted for pitot pressure distributions, flow angles on the symmetry plane, and the position of an embedded shock. Many of the aerodynamic parameters are shown to be insensitive to grid spacing.

  5. Studies Conducted of Sodium Carbonate Contaminant Found on the Wing Leading Edge and the Nose Cap of the Space Shuttle Orbiter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobson, Nathan S.; Palou, Jaime J.

    2003-01-01

    In early 2001, three of the space shuttle orbiters were found to have a sodium carbonate contaminant on the wing leading edge and nose cap. These parts are made of a reinforced carbon/carbon material protected by silicon carbide (SiC) and a glass coating. The glass coating is known as Type A and is primarily sodium silicate with particles of SiC. NASA Glenn Research Center's Environmental Durability Branch was asked to determine the chemistry of this deposit formation and assess any possible detrimental effects. At low temperatures, the reverse reaction is favorable. Previous studies of the corrosion of glass show that carbon dioxide in the presence of water does form sodium carbonate on sodium silicate glass (ref. 1). It is quite likely that a similar scenario exists for the orbiter wing leading edge. All three orbiters that formed sodium carbonate were exposed to rain. This formation of sodium carbonate was duplicated in the laboratory. The Type A glass, which coats the wing leading edge and nose cap, was made in a freestanding form and exposed to water in two separate experiments. In one set of experiments, the coating was placed in a petri dish filled with water. As the water evaporated, sodium carbonate formed. In another case, water was slowly dripped on the coating and sodium carbonate formed. The sodium carbonate was detected by chemical analysis and, in some cases, xray diffraction showed a hydrated sodium carbonate. The next step was to examine possible detrimental effects of this sodium carbonate. There are three likely scenarios for the sodium carbonate deposit: (1) it may be removed with a simple rinse, (2) it may remain and flow back into the Type A glass after heating during reentry, or (3) it may remain and flow onto unprotected SiC and/or other parts after heating during reentry. The effect of case 1 is to remove the Na2O constituent from the Type A glass, thus decreasing its effectiveness as a sealant. Even so, overall, it is probably the best

  6. Effects of boundary layer forcing on wing-tip vortices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaw-Ward, Samantha

    The nature of turbulence within wing-tip vortices has been a topic of research for decades, yet accurate measurements of Reynolds stresses within the core are inherently difficult due to the bulk motion wandering caused by initial and boundary conditions in wind tunnels. As a result, characterization of a vortex as laminar or turbulent is inconclusive and highly contradicting. This research uses several experimental techniques to study the effects of broadband turbulence, introduced within the wing boundary layer, on the development of wing-tip vortices. Two rectangular wings with a NACA 0012 profile were fabricated for the use of this research. One wing had a smooth finish and the other rough, introduced by P80 grade sandpaper. Force balance measurements showed a small reduction in wing performance due to surface roughness for both 2D and 3D configurations, although stall characteristics remained relatively unchanged. Seven-hole probes were purpose-built and used to assess the mean velocity profiles of the vortices five chord lengths downstream of the wing at multiple angles of attack. Above an incidence of 4 degrees, the vortices were nearly axisymmetric, and the wing roughness reduced both velocity gradients and peak velocity magnitudes within the vortex. Laser Doppler velocimetry was used to further assess the time-resolved vortex at an incidence of 5 degrees. Evidence of wake shedding frequencies and wing shear layer instabilities at higher frequencies were seen in power spectra within the vortex. Unlike the introduction of freestream turbulence, wing surface roughness did not appear to increase wandering amplitude. A new method for removing the effects of vortex wandering is proposed with the use of carefully selected high-pass filters. The filtered data revealed that the Reynolds stress profiles of the vortex produced by the smooth and rough wing were similar in shape, with a peak occurring away from the vortex centre but inside of the core. Single hot

  7. EFFECT OF SWEEP ANGLE ON THE VORTICAL FLOW OVER DELTA WINGS AT AN ANGLE OF ATTACK OF 10°

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    JAMES BRETT

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available CFD simulations have been used to analyse the vortical flows over sharp edged delta wings with differing sweep angles under subsonic conditions at an angle of attack of 10°. RANS simulations were validated against experimental data for a 65° sweep wing, with a flat cross-section, and the steadiness of the flow field was assessed by comparing the results against unsteady URANS and DES simulations. To assess the effect of sweep angle on the flow field, a range of sweep angles from 65° to 43° were simulated. For moderate sweep wings the primary vortex was observed to detach from the leading edge, undergoing vortex breakdown, and a weaker, replacement, "shadow" vortex was formed. The shadow vortex was observed for sweep angles of 50° and less, and resulted in reduced lift production near the wing tips loss of the stronger primary vortex.

  8. Leading-Edge Vortex lifts swifts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Videler, JJ; Stamhuis, EJ; Povel, GDE

    2004-01-01

    The current understanding of how birds fly must be revised, because birds use their hand-wings in an unconventional way to generate lift and drag. Physical models of a common swift wing in gliding posture with a 60degrees sweep of the sharp hand-wing leading edge were tested in a water tunnel.

  9. Leading Edge Device Aerodynamic Optimization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marius Gabriel COJOCARU

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Leading edge devices are conventionally used as aerodynamic devices that enhance performances during landing and in some cases during takeoff. The need to increase the efficiency of the aircrafts has brought the idea of maintaining as much as possible a laminar flow over the wings. This is possible only when the leading edge of the wings is free from contamination, therefore using the leading edge devices with the additional role of shielding during takeoff. Such a device based on the Krueger flap design is aerodynamically analyzed and optimized. The optimization comprises three steps: first, the positioning of the flap such that the shielding criterion is kept, second, the analysis of the flap size and third, the optimization of the flap shape. The first step is subject of a gradient based optimization process of the position described by two parameters, the position along the line and the deflection angle. For the third step the Adjoint method is used to gain insight on the shape of the Krueger flap that will extend the most the stall limit. All these steps have been numerically performed using Ansys Fluent and the results are presented for the optimized shape in comparison with the baseline configuration.

  10. Breaking down the delta wing vortex: The role of vorticity in the breakdown process. Ph.D. Thesis Final Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Robert C.; Visser, Kenneth D.

    1990-01-01

    Experimental x-wire measurements of the flowfield above a 70 and 75 deg flat plate delta wing were performed at a Reynolds number of 250,000. Grids were taken normal to the wing at various chordwise locations for angles of attack of 20 and 30 deg. Axial and azimuthal vorticity distributions were derived from the velocity fields. The dependence of circulation on distance from the vortex core and on chordwise location was also examined. The effects of nondimensionalization in comparison with other experimental data is made. The results indicate that the circulation distribution scales with the local semispan and grows in a nearly linear fashion in the chordwise direction. The spanwise distribution of axial vorticity is severely altered through the breakdown. The axial vorticity components with a negative sense, such as that found in the secondary vortex, seem to remain unaffected by changes in wind sweep or angle of attack, in direct contrast to the positive components. In addition, the inclusion of the local wing geometry into a previously derived correlation parameter allows the circulation of growing leading edge vortex flows to be reduced into a single curve.

  11. Effects of external influences in subsonic delta wing vortices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Washburn, Anthony E.

    1992-01-01

    An experimental investigation was conducted to examine inconsistencies in reported studies for the vortical flow over highly-swept delta wings. A 76-deg swept delta wing was tested in three facilities with open and closed test sections and different model-support systems. The results obtained include surface oil-flow patterns, off-body laser-light-sheet flow visualization, and aerodynamic load measurements. Parameters such as the wall boundaries and model-support systems can drastically alter the loads. The effect of a high level of free-stream turbulence on the delta-wing flowfield was also examined and found to be significant. The increase in free-stream turbulence caused boundary-layer transition, unsteadiness in the vortex core positions, and altered the loads and moments.

  12. Detection of Subsurface Material Separation in Shuttle Orbiter Slip-Side Joggle Region of the Wing Leading Edge using Infrared Imaging Data from Arc Jet Tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daryabeigi, Kamran; Walker, Sandra P.

    2009-01-01

    The objective of the present study was to determine whether infrared imaging (IR) surface temperature data obtained during arc-jet tests of Space Shuttle Orbiter s reinforced carbon-carbon (RCC) wing leading edge panel slip-side joggle region could be used to detect presence of subsurface material separation, and if so, to determine when separation occurs during the simulated entry profile. Recent thermostructural studies have indicated thermally induced interlaminar normal stress concentrations at the substrate/coating interface in the curved joggle region can result in local subsurface material separation, with the separation predicted to occur during approach to peak heating during reentry. The present study was an attempt to determine experimentally when subsurface material separations occur. A simplified thermal model of a flat RCC panel with subsurface material separation was developed and used to infer general surface temperature trends due to the presence of subsurface material separation. IR data from previously conducted arc-jet tests on three test specimens were analyzed: one without subsurface material separation either pre or post test, one with pre test separation, and one with separation developing during test. The simplified thermal model trend predictions along with comparison of experimental IR data of the three test specimens were used to successfully infer material separation from the arc-jet test data. Furthermore, for the test specimen that had developed subsurface material separation during the arc-jet tests, the initiation of separation appeared to occur during the ramp up to the peak heating condition, where test specimen temperature went from 2500 to 2800 F.

  13. The effect of canard leading edge sweep and dihedral angle on the longitudinal and lateral aerodynamic characteristic of a close-coupled canard-wing configuration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gloss, B. B.

    1974-01-01

    A generalized wind-tunnel model, with canard and wing planforms typical of highly maneuverable aircraft, was tested in the Langley high-speed 7- by 10-foot tunnel at a Mach number of 0.30. The test was conducted in order to determine the effects of canard sweep and canard dihedral on canard-wing interference at high angles of attack. In general, the effect of canard sweep on lift is small up to an angle of attack of 16 deg. However, for angles of attack greater than 16 deg, an increase in the canard sweep results in an increase in lift developed by the canard when the canard is above or in the wing chord plane. This increased lift results in a lift increase for the total configuration for the canard above the wing chord plane. For the canard in the wing chord plane, the increased canard lift is partially lost by increased interference on the wing.

  14. Control of the separated flow around an airfoil using a wavy leading edge inspired by humpback whale flippers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Favier, Julien; Pinelli, Alfredo; Piomelli, Ugo

    2012-01-01

    The influence of spanwise geometrical undulations of the leading edge of an infinite wing is investigated numerically at low Reynolds number, in the context of passive separation control and focusing on the physical mechanisms involved. Inspired by the tubercles of the humpback whale flippers, the wavy leading edge is modeled using a spanwise sinusoidal function whose amplitude and wavelength constitute the parameters of control. A direct numerical simulation is performed on a NACA0020 wing profile in a deep stall configuration ( α=20°), with and without the presence of the leading edge waviness. The complex solid boundaries obtained by varying the sinusoidal shape of the leading edge are modeled using an immersed boundary method (IBM) recently developed by the authors [Pinelli et al., J. Comput. Phys. 229 (2010) 9073-9091]. A particular set of wave parameters is found to change drastically the topology of the separated zone, which becomes dominated by streamwise vortices generated from the sides of the leading edge bumps. A physical analysis is carried out to explain the mechanism leading to the generation of these coherent vortical structures. The role they play in the control of boundary layer separation is also investigated, in the context of the modifications of the hydrodynamic performances which have been put forward in the literature in the last decade.

  15. Compressible dynamic stall vorticity flux control using a dynamic ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    introduced when the leading edge was drooped are explained to be the source of this benefit. Analysis of the peak vorticity flux ... even lead to structural failure of aircraft components. Thus, a wing or a rotor blade, and other ... has developed to avail this benefit safely. The motivation for the present study stems from this goal.

  16. The Flow Field on Hydrofoils with Leading Edge Protuberances

    Science.gov (United States)

    Custodio, Derrick; Henoch, Charles; Johari, Hamid

    2009-11-01

    The exceptional mobility of the humpback whale has been linked to the use of its unique pectoral flippers. Biologists speculate that the flippers leading edge protuberances are a form of passive flow control. Force measurements on 2D hydrofoils with spanwise uniform leading edge protuberances, resembling those seen on the humpback whale flipper, were taken in a water tunnel and have revealed performance modifications when compared to a baseline NACA 63(4)-021 hydrofoil model. Qualitative flow visualization techniques and Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) flow field measurements on the modified hydrofoils have shown that streamwise vortices originating from the shoulders of the protuberances are the likely cause of performance changes. Varying levels of interaction among adjacent streamwise vortices have been observed as a function of angle of attack and chord location. The circulation of these vortices as a function of angle of attack and spatial location was measured and an analysis of the vortex interactions will be presented.

  17. Transonic pressure measurements and comparison of theory to experiment for an arrow-wing configuration. Volume 1: Experimental data report, base configuration and effects of wing twist and leading-edge configuration. [wind tunnel tests, aircraft models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manro, M. E.; Manning, K. J. R.; Hallstaff, T. H.; Rogers, J. T.

    1975-01-01

    A wind tunnel test of an arrow-wing-body configuration consisting of flat and twisted wings, as well as a variety of leading- and trailing-edge control surface deflections, was conducted at Mach numbers from 0.4 to 1.1 to provide an experimental pressure data base for comparison with theoretical methods. Theory-to-experiment comparisons of detailed pressure distributions were made using current state-of-the-art attached and separated flow methods. The purpose of these comparisons was to delineate conditions under which these theories are valid for both flat and twisted wings and to explore the use of empirical methods to correct the theoretical methods where theory is deficient.

  18. An experimental analysis of critical factors involved in the breakdown process of leading edge vortex flows. Ph.D. Thesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Visser, Kenneth D.

    1991-01-01

    Experimental crosswire measurements of the flowfield above a 70 and 75 degree flat plate delta wing were performed at a Reynolds number of 250,000. Survey grids were taken normal to the platform at a series of chordwise locations for angles of attack of 20 and 30 degrees. Axial and azimuthal vorticity distributions were derived from the velocity fields. The dependence of circulation on distance from the vortex core as well as on chordwise location was examined. The effects of nondimensionalization in comparison with other experimental data was made. The circulation distribution scales with the local semispan and grows approximately linearly in the chordwise direction. For regions of the flow outside of the vortex subcore, the circulation at any chordwise station was observed to vary logarithmically with distance from the vortex axis. The circulation was also found to increase linearly with angle of incidence at a given chordwise station. A reduction in the local circulation about the vortex axis occurred at breakdown. The spanwise distribution of axial vorticity was severely altered through the breakdown region and the spanwise distribution of axial vorticity present appeared to reach a maximum immediately preceding breakdown. The local concentration of axial vorticity about the vortex axis was reduced while the magnitude of the azimuthal vorticity decreased throughout the breakdown zone. The axial vorticity components with a negative sense, found in the secondary vortex, remained unaffected by changes in wing sweep or angle of attack, in direct contrast to the positive components. The inclusion of the local wing geometry into a previously derived correlation parameter indicated that the circulation of growing leading edge vortex flows were similar at corresponding radii from the vortex axis. It was concluded that the flow over a delta wing, upstream of the breakdown regions and away from the apex and trailing edge regions, is conical. In addition, the dominating

  19. Investigation of asymmetry of vortex flow over slender delta wings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atashbaz, Ghasem

    Vortex flow, a major area of interest in fluid mechanics, is widespread in nature and in many man-made fluid mechanical devices. It can create havoc as cyclones or tornadoes or have significant implications in the performance of turbo-fluid machines or supersonic vehicles and so forth. Asymmetric vortices can cause a loss of lift and increase in rolling moment which can significantly affect wing stability and control. Up until the early nineties, it was generally believed that vortex asymmetry was the result of vortex interactions due to the close proximity of vortices over slender delta wings. However, some recent studies have thrown considerable doubt on the validity of this hypothesis. As a result, wind tunnel investigations were conducted on a series of nine delta wing planforms with sharp and round leading edges to examine the occurrence of vortex asymmetry at different angles of attack and sideslip. The study included surface oil and laser light sheet flow visualization in addition to surface pressure and hot-wire velocity measurements under static conditions. The effects of incidence, sideslip and sweep angles as well as Reynolds number variations were investigated. In this study, it was found that the effect of apex and leading edge shape played an important role in vortex asymmetry generation at high angle of attack. Vortex asymmetry was not observed over slender sharp leading edge delta wings due to the separation point being fixed at the sharp leading edge. Experimental results for these wings showed that the vortices do not impinge on one another because they do not get any closer beyond a certain value of angle of attack. Thus vortex asymmetry was not generated. However, significant vortex asymmetry was observed for round leading-edged delta wings. Asymmetric separation positions over the round leading edge was the result of laminar/turbulent transition which caused vortex asymmetry on these delta wing configurations. Sideslip angle and vortex

  20. Preparation and Support of a Tap Test on the Leading Edge Surfaces of the Space Shuttle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bohr, Jerry

    2009-01-01

    This slide presentation reports on a Tap test for the leading edge surfaces of the Space Shuttle. A description of the Wing Leading Edge Impact Detection System (WLEIDS) flight system is given, and the rationale and approach for improving the WLEIDS system. The three phases of the strategy of the test project amd the results of the tests are reviewed.

  1. Wake development behind paired wings with tip and root trailing vortices: consequences for animal flight force estimates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horstmann, Jan T; Henningsson, Per; Thomas, Adrian L R; Bomphrey, Richard J

    2014-01-01

    Recent experiments on flapping flight in animals have shown that a variety of unrelated species shed a wake behind left and right wings consisting of both tip and root vortices. Here we present an investigation using Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) of the behaviour and interaction of trailing vortices shed by paired, fixed wings that simplify and mimic the wake of a flying animal with a non-lifting body. We measured flow velocities at five positions downstream of two adjacent NACA 0012 aerofoils and systematically varied aspect ratio, the gap between the wings (corresponding to the width of a non-lifting body), angle of attack, and the Reynolds number. The range of aspect ratios and Reynolds number where chosen to be relevant to natural fliers and swimmers, and insect flight in particular. We show that the wake behind the paired wings deformed as a consequence of the induced flow distribution such that the wingtip vortices convected downwards while the root vortices twist around each other. Vortex interaction and wake deformation became more pronounced further downstream of the wing, so the positioning of PIV measurement planes in experiments on flying animals has an important effect on subsequent force estimates due to rotating induced flow vectors. Wake deformation was most severe behind wings with lower aspect ratios and when the distance between the wings was small, suggesting that animals that match this description constitute high-risk groups in terms of measurement error. Our results, therefore, have significant implications for experimental design where wake measurements are used to estimate forces generated in animal flight. In particular, the downstream distance of the measurement plane should be minimised, notwithstanding the animal welfare constraints when measuring the wake behind flying animals.

  2. Wake development behind paired wings with tip and root trailing vortices: consequences for animal flight force estimates.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan T Horstmann

    Full Text Available Recent experiments on flapping flight in animals have shown that a variety of unrelated species shed a wake behind left and right wings consisting of both tip and root vortices. Here we present an investigation using Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV of the behaviour and interaction of trailing vortices shed by paired, fixed wings that simplify and mimic the wake of a flying animal with a non-lifting body. We measured flow velocities at five positions downstream of two adjacent NACA 0012 aerofoils and systematically varied aspect ratio, the gap between the wings (corresponding to the width of a non-lifting body, angle of attack, and the Reynolds number. The range of aspect ratios and Reynolds number where chosen to be relevant to natural fliers and swimmers, and insect flight in particular. We show that the wake behind the paired wings deformed as a consequence of the induced flow distribution such that the wingtip vortices convected downwards while the root vortices twist around each other. Vortex interaction and wake deformation became more pronounced further downstream of the wing, so the positioning of PIV measurement planes in experiments on flying animals has an important effect on subsequent force estimates due to rotating induced flow vectors. Wake deformation was most severe behind wings with lower aspect ratios and when the distance between the wings was small, suggesting that animals that match this description constitute high-risk groups in terms of measurement error. Our results, therefore, have significant implications for experimental design where wake measurements are used to estimate forces generated in animal flight. In particular, the downstream distance of the measurement plane should be minimised, notwithstanding the animal welfare constraints when measuring the wake behind flying animals.

  3. Leading edge gypsy moth population dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    M. R. Carter; F. W. Ravlin; M. L. McManus

    1991-01-01

    Leading edge gypsy moth populations have been the focus of several intervention programs (MDIPM, AIPM). Knowledge of gypsy moth population dynamics in leading edge area is crucial for effective management. Populations in these areas tend to reach outbreak levels (noticeable defoliation) within three to four years after egg masses are first detected. Pheromone traps...

  4. Experimental examination of vorticity stripping from a wing-tip vortex in free-stream turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghimire, Hari C.; Bailey, Sean C. C.

    2018-03-01

    Time-resolved stereoscopic particle image velocimetry measurements were conducted of a wing-tip vortex decaying in free-stream turbulence. The objective of the research was to experimentally investigate the mechanism causing the increased rate of decay of the vortex in the presence of turbulence. It was observed that the circulation of the vortex core experienced periods of rapid loss and recovery when immersed in free-stream turbulence. These events were not observed when the vortex was in a laminar free stream. A connection was made between these events and distortion of the vortex, coinciding with stripping of core fluid from the vortex core. Specifically, vortex stripping events were connected to asymmetry in the vortex core, and this asymmetry was associated with instances of rapid circulation loss. The increased rate of decay of the vortex in turbulence coincided with the formation of secondary vortical structures which wrapped azimuthally around the primary vortex.

  5. Cavitation on hydrofoils with sinusoidal leading edge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johari, H.

    2015-12-01

    Cavitation characteristics of hydrofoils with sinusoidal leading edge were examined experimentally at a Reynolds number of 7.2 × 105. The hydrofoils had an underlying NACA 634-021 profile and an aspect ratio of 4.3. The sinusoidal leading edge geometries included three amplitudes of 2.5%, 5%, and 12% and two wavelengths of 25% and 50% of the mean chord length. Results revealed that cavitation on the leading edge-modified hydrofoils existed in pockets behind the troughs whereas the baseline hydrofoil produced cavitation along its entire span. Moreover, cavitation on the modified hydrofoils appeared at consistently lower angles of attack than on the baseline hydrofoil.

  6. Effect of controlled spanwise bending on the stability of the leading-edge vortex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharya, Samik; Scofield, Tyler

    2017-11-01

    When an airfoil is accelerated from rest at a high angle of attack, a leading-edge vortex (LEV) forms, which soon gets destabilized and convects downstream. In this work, we control the spanwise bending of a flat plate wing to actively influence the vorticity transfer from the LEV. Our aim is to investigate the effect of spanwise curvature variation on the geometry, growth, and stability of the LEV during the acceleration phase. A 3D printed flat-plate with a chord of 5 cm and span of 15 cm is towed in a small fish tank at different angles of attack greater than 15°. The plate starts from rest and reaches a Reynolds number of 5000 after travelling different multiples and submultiples of chord-length. We carry out dye-flow visualization and measure the circulation build up and the convection velocity of the LEV with the help of particle image velocimetry (PIV). The unsteady loads coming on to the wing is measured with a force sensor. An analytical scheme for computing the load from the measured displacement of the plate is presented and compared with the force sensor data. Preliminary results indicate that controlled curvature variation can influence the formation and stability of an LEV.

  7. Applications of Hydrofoils with Leading Edge Protuberances

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-30

    APPLICATIONS OF HYDROFOILS WITH LEADING EDGE PROTUBERANCES Final Technical Report for Office of Naval Research contract...To) 03/30/2012 Final Technical Report 01-08-2008 to 31-12-2011 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Sa. CONTRACT NUMBER Applications of Hydrofoils with Leading...AVAILABILITY STATEMENT Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. 13. SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES 14. ABSTRACT The leading edge modified hydrofoils

  8. The leading-edge vortex of yacht sails

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arredondo-Galeana, Abel; Viola, Ignazio Maria

    2017-11-01

    We experimentally show, for the first time, that a stable Leading-Edge Vortex (LEV) can be formed on an asymmetric spinnaker, which is a high-lift sail used by yachts to sail downwind. We tested a 3D printed rigid sail in a water flume at a chord-based Reynolds number of ca. 104. We found that on the leeward side of the sail (the suction side), the flow separates at the leading edge reattaching further downstream and forming a stable LEV. The LEV grows in diameter from the root to the tip of the sail, where it merges with the tip vortex. We detected the LEV using the γ criterion, and we verified its stability over time. The lift contribution provided by the LEV was computed solving a complex potential model of each sail section. This analysis indicated that the LEV provides a substantial contribution to the total sail's lift. These findings suggest that the maximum lift of low-aspect-ratio wings with a sharp leading edge, such as spinnakers, can be enhanced by promoting a stable LEV. This work was funded by the Consejo Nacional de Ciencia y Tecnologia (CONACYT).

  9. On the study of wavy leading-edge vanes to achieve low fan interaction noise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tong, Fan; Qiao, Weiyang; Xu, Kunbo; Wang, Liangfeng; Chen, Weijie; Wang, Xunnian

    2018-04-01

    The application of wavy leading-edge vanes to reduce a single-stage axial fan noise is numerically studied. The aerodynamic and acoustic performance of the fan is numerically investigated using a hybrid unsteady Reynolds averaged Navier-Stokes (URANS)/acoustic analogy method (Goldstein equations). First, the hybrid URANS/Goldstein method is developed and successfully validated against experiment results. Next, numerical simulations are performed to investigate the noise reduction effects of the wavy leading-edge vanes. The aerodynamic and acoustic performance is assessed for a fan with vanes equipped with two different wavy leading-edge profiles and compared with the performance of conventional straight leading-edge vanes. Results indicate that a fan with wavy leading-edge vanes produces lower interaction noise than the baseline fan without a significant loss in aerodynamic performance. In fact, it is demonstrated that wavy leading-edge vanes have the potential to lead to both aerodynamic and acoustic improvements. The two different wavy leading-edge profiles are shown to successfully reduce the fan tone sound power level by 1.2 dB and 4.3 dB, respectively. Fan efficiency is also improved by about 1% with one of the tested wavy leading-edge profiles. Large eddy simulation (LES) is also performed for a simplified fan stage model to assess the effects of wavy leading-edge vanes on the broadband fan noise. Results indicate that the overall sound power level of a fan can be reduced by about 4 dB with the larger wavy leading-edge profile. Finally, the noise reduction mechanisms are investigated and analysed. It is found that the wavy leading-edge profiles can induce significant streamwise vorticity around the leading-edge protuberances and reduce pressure fluctuations (especially at locations of wavy leading-edge hills) and unsteady forces on the stator vanes. The underlying mechanism of the reduced pressure fluctuations is also discussed by examining the magnitude

  10. Aerodynamic effects of flexibility in flapping wings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Liang; Huang, Qingfeng; Deng, Xinyan; Sane, Sanjay P.

    2010-01-01

    Recent work on the aerodynamics of flapping flight reveals fundamental differences in the mechanisms of aerodynamic force generation between fixed and flapping wings. When fixed wings translate at high angles of attack, they periodically generate and shed leading and trailing edge vortices as reflected in their fluctuating aerodynamic force traces and associated flow visualization. In contrast, wings flapping at high angles of attack generate stable leading edge vorticity, which persists throughout the duration of the stroke and enhances mean aerodynamic forces. Here, we show that aerodynamic forces can be controlled by altering the trailing edge flexibility of a flapping wing. We used a dynamically scaled mechanical model of flapping flight (Re ≈ 2000) to measure the aerodynamic forces on flapping wings of variable flexural stiffness (EI). For low to medium angles of attack, as flexibility of the wing increases, its ability to generate aerodynamic forces decreases monotonically but its lift-to-drag ratios remain approximately constant. The instantaneous force traces reveal no major differences in the underlying modes of force generation for flexible and rigid wings, but the magnitude of force, the angle of net force vector and centre of pressure all vary systematically with wing flexibility. Even a rudimentary framework of wing veins is sufficient to restore the ability of flexible wings to generate forces at near-rigid values. Thus, the magnitude of force generation can be controlled by modulating the trailing edge flexibility and thereby controlling the magnitude of the leading edge vorticity. To characterize this, we have generated a detailed database of aerodynamic forces as a function of several variables including material properties, kinematics, aerodynamic forces and centre of pressure, which can also be used to help validate computational models of aeroelastic flapping wings. These experiments will also be useful for wing design for small robotic

  11. Aerodynamic effects of flexibility in flapping wings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Liang; Huang, Qingfeng; Deng, Xinyan; Sane, Sanjay P

    2010-03-06

    Recent work on the aerodynamics of flapping flight reveals fundamental differences in the mechanisms of aerodynamic force generation between fixed and flapping wings. When fixed wings translate at high angles of attack, they periodically generate and shed leading and trailing edge vortices as reflected in their fluctuating aerodynamic force traces and associated flow visualization. In contrast, wings flapping at high angles of attack generate stable leading edge vorticity, which persists throughout the duration of the stroke and enhances mean aerodynamic forces. Here, we show that aerodynamic forces can be controlled by altering the trailing edge flexibility of a flapping wing. We used a dynamically scaled mechanical model of flapping flight (Re approximately 2000) to measure the aerodynamic forces on flapping wings of variable flexural stiffness (EI). For low to medium angles of attack, as flexibility of the wing increases, its ability to generate aerodynamic forces decreases monotonically but its lift-to-drag ratios remain approximately constant. The instantaneous force traces reveal no major differences in the underlying modes of force generation for flexible and rigid wings, but the magnitude of force, the angle of net force vector and centre of pressure all vary systematically with wing flexibility. Even a rudimentary framework of wing veins is sufficient to restore the ability of flexible wings to generate forces at near-rigid values. Thus, the magnitude of force generation can be controlled by modulating the trailing edge flexibility and thereby controlling the magnitude of the leading edge vorticity. To characterize this, we have generated a detailed database of aerodynamic forces as a function of several variables including material properties, kinematics, aerodynamic forces and centre of pressure, which can also be used to help validate computational models of aeroelastic flapping wings. These experiments will also be useful for wing design for small

  12. Control of leading edge vortex breakdown by blowing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Visser, K. D.; Iwanski, K. P.; Nelson, R. C.; Ng, T. T.

    1988-01-01

    An investigation into the effects of using a jet of air to control the vortex breakdown position on a 70 degree delta wing is presented. The specific objectives focused on optimizing the blowing positions in terms of maximum lift increments obtained for minimum blowing rates. The tests were conducted at chord Reynolds numbers of 150,000, 200,000, and 250,000 at angles of incidence of 30 and 35 degrees. Visualization and force data is presented to show the effect of the jet on the wing aerodynamic characteristics. The results indicate a jet position located at and aligned parallel to the leading edge to be the optimum. Nearness to the apex and tangency to the upper surface were also crucial factors. The influence of the jet on the leading edge vortex structure was examined using laser Doppler anemometry. Velocity surveys through the vortex showed that at high blowing rates the parallel velocity in the outer swirling region of the vortex increased and the normal velocity decreased. This resulted in a decrease in the swirling angle in the outer region. The peak core velocity was reduced and the vortex breakdown was delayed.

  13. The effect of butterfly-scale inspired patterning on leading-edge vortex growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilroy, Jacob Aaron

    Leading edge vortices (LEVs) are important for generating thrust and lift in flapping flight, and the surface patterning (scales) on butterfly wings is hypothesized to play a role in the vortex formation of the LEV. To simplify this complex flow problem, an experiment was designed to focus on the alteration of 2-D vortex development with a variation in surface patterning. Specifically, the secondary vorticity generated by the LEV interacting at the patterned surface was studied, as well as the subsequent effect on the LEV's growth rate and peak circulation. For this experiment, rapid-prototyped grooves based on the scale geometry of the Monarch butterfly (Danaus plexippus) were created using additive manufacturing and were attached to a flat plate with a chordwise orientation, thus increasing plate surface area. The vortex generated by the grooved plate was then compared to a smooth plate case in an experiment where the plate translated vertically through a 2 x 3 x 5 cubic foot tow tank. The plate was impulsively started in quiescent water and flow fields at Rec = 1416, 2833, and 5667 are examined using Digital Particle Image Velocimetry (DPIV). The maximum vortex formation number is 2.8 and is based on the flat plate travel length and chord length. Flow fields from each case show the generation of a secondary vortex whose interaction with the shear layer and LEV caused different behaviors depending upon the surface type. The vortex development process varied for each Reynolds number and it was found that for the lowest Reynolds number case a significant difference does not exist between surface types, however, for the other two cases the grooves affected the secondary vortex's behavior and the LEV's ability to grow at a rate similar to the smooth plate case.

  14. Time Accurate Euler Calculations of Vortical Flow over a Delta Wing in Rolling Motion

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Fritz, W

    2003-01-01

    .... An important component of the program were the Common Exercises (CE), which promoted the exchange of knowledge between the participating nations and aided the development of computational methods to predict vortical flows...

  15. Multiple inviscid solutions for the flow in a leading- edge vortex

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Noordenburg, M.B.H.; Hoeijmakers, Hendrik Willem Marie

    2000-01-01

    To analyze the flowfield inside the vortex formed at the leading edge of a highly swept wing at an angle of attack, conical similarity solutions of the compressible Euler equations have been obtained and compared to incompressible conical similarity flow solutions. It is shown that, in contrast to

  16. The three-dimensional leading-edge vortex of a "hovering' model hawkmoth

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Berg, C.; Ellington, C.P.

    1997-01-01

    Recent flow visualization experiments with the hawkmoth, Manduca sexta, revealed a small but clear leading-edge vortex and a pronounced three-dimensional flow. Details of this flow pattern were studied with a scaled-up, robotic insect ('the flapper') that accurately mimicked the wing movements of a

  17. Theory, Computation and Experiment on Criticality and Stability of Vortices Separating from Edges

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-08-15

    and Lamb -Oseen model (Assuming Γ = 1, rc = 2 √ νt = 0.5). . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 65 7.8 Range of application...edges is balanced by spanwise vorticity transport , leading to body-relative stable or stationary vortex structures, which can be harnessed for lift...the Polhamus leading-edge suction analogy.55,56 On other configurations like unswept wings, the absence of mechanisms for spanwise transport of shed

  18. Analysis of composite wing structures with a morphing leading edge

    OpenAIRE

    Morishima, Ryoko

    2011-01-01

    One of the main challenges for the civil aviation industry is the reduction of its environmental impact. Over the past years, improvements in performance efficiency have been achieved by simplifying the design of the structural components and using composite materials to reduce the overall weight. These approaches however, are not sufficient to meet the current demanding requirements set for a „greener‟ aircraft. Significant changes in drag reduction and fuel consumption can be obtained by...

  19. Experimental study of flow field distribution over a generic cranked double delta wing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mojtaba Dehghan Manshadi

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The flow fields over a generic cranked double delta wing were investigated. Pressure and velocity distributions were obtained using a Pitot tube and a hot wire anemometer. Two different leading edge shapes, namely “sharp” and “round”, were applied to the wing. The wing had two sweep angles of 55° and 30°. The experiments were conducted in a closed circuit wind tunnel at velocity 20 m/s and angles of attack of 5°–20° with the step of 5°. The Reynolds number of the model was about 2 × 105 according to the root chord. A dual vortex structure was formed above the wing surface. A pressure drop occurred at the vortex core and the root mean square of the measured velocity increased at the core of the vortices, reflecting the instability of the flow in that region. The magnitude of power spectral density increased strongly in spanwise direction and had the maximum value at the vortex core. By increasing the angle of attack, the pressure drop increased and the vortices became wider; the vortices moved inboard along the wing, and away from the surface; the flow separation was initiated from the outer portion of the wing and developed to its inner part. The vortices of the wing of the sharp leading edge were stronger than those of the round one.

  20. Morphological Variations of Leading-Edge Serrations in Owls (Strigiformes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthias Weger

    Full Text Available Owls have developed serrations, comb-like structures, along the leading edge of their wings. Serrations were investigated from a morphological and a mechanical point of view, but were not yet quantitatively compared for different species. Such a comparative investigation of serrations from species of different sizes and activity patterns may provide new information about the function of the serrations.Serrations on complete wings and on tenth primary remiges of seven owl species were investigated. Small, middle-sized, and large owl species were investigated as well as species being more active during the day and owls being more active during the night. Serrations occurred at the outer parts of the wings, predominantly at tenth primary remiges, but also on further wing feathers in most species. Serration tips were oriented away from the feather rachis so that they faced into the air stream during flight. The serrations of nocturnal owl species were higher developed as demonstrated by a larger inclination angle (the angle between the base of the barb and the rachis, a larger tip displacement angle (the angle between the tip of the serration and the base of the serration and a longer length. Putting the measured data into a clustering algorithm yielded dendrograms that suggested a strong influence of activity pattern, but only a weak influence of size on the development of the serrations.Serrations are supposed to be involved in noise reduction during flight and also depend on the aerodynamic properties that in turn depend on body size. Since especially nocturnal owls have to rely on hearing during prey capture, the more pronounced serrations of nocturnal species lend further support to the notion that serrations have an important function in noise reduction. The differences in shape of the serrations investigated indicate that a silent flight requires well-developed serrations.

  1. A Reduced-Complexity Investigation of Blunt Leading-Edge Separation Motivated by UCAV Aerodynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luckring, James M.; Boelens, Okko J.

    2015-01-01

    A reduced complexity investigation for blunt-leading-edge vortical separation has been undertaken. The overall approach is to design the fundamental work in such a way so that it relates to the aerodynamics of a more complex Uninhabited Combat Air Vehicle (UCAV) concept known as SACCON. Some of the challenges associated with both the vehicle-class aerodynamics and the fundamental vortical flows are reviewed, and principles from a hierarchical complexity approach are used to relate flow fundamentals to system-level interests. The work is part of roughly 6-year research program on blunt-leading-edge separation pertinent to UCAVs, and was conducted under the NATO Science and Technology Organization, Applied Vehicle Technology panel.

  2. Turbulent Coherence Measurements on a Leading Edge Slat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moriarty, Patrick J.; Storms, Bruce L.; Ross, James C.; Horne, W. Clifton; Dougherty, Robert P.

    1997-11-01

    Turbulence spectra have been measured downstream of the gap between the leading-edge slat and the main airfoil of a generic transport aircraft wing model. The model consisted of a NACA 63_2-215 Mod. B main element with a half span Fowler flap and a full span LB-546 slat. Velocity-pressure coherence spectra were determined using signals from a hot-wire anemometer probe in the flow and unsteady-pressure transducers on the wing surface. The coherence coefficient was significant only in a narrow bandwidth, of the order of 15 percent of the peak frequency. Coherence coefficient magnitudes were as large as 0.25. Coherence coefficient magnitude and frequency were found to depend on the flow velocity through the slat gap, which increased with (negative) slat deflection angle. Frequencies and relative strengths of coherence peaks were in agreement with those of radiated noise spectra (measured in a separate experiment). The results demonstrate a close connection between velocity fluctuation in the slat wake and pressure fluctuations on both surfaces of the slat and the upper surface of the main airfoil. Further work is planned to investigate a postulated hydrodynamic-acoustic resonance.

  3. Experimental study of the vortex flow behavior on a generic fighter wing at subsonic and transonic speeds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erickson, Gary E.; Rogers, Lawrence W.

    1987-01-01

    A subsonic and transonic investigation of the vortex flow behavior of a generic fighter configuration with 55-deg cropped delta wing has been conducted in order to improve current understanding of vortical motions on a wing with deflected leading edge flap at moderate and high angles-of-attack. The leading edge vortex strength was reduced, and the vortex was flatter and closer to the wing surface, as the Mach number increased. Transonically, at high angles-of-attack, the test data suggested the development of a cross-flow shock wave above the vortex sheet which coexisted with a rear shock wave. Subsonically, a deflected leading edge flap was able to sustain a concentrated vortex on the forward-facing surface.

  4. Owl-inspired leading-edge serrations play a crucial role in aerodynamic force production and sound suppression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, Chen; Ikeda, Teruaki; Nakata, Toshiyuki; Liu, Hao

    2017-07-04

    Owls are widely known for silent flight, achieving remarkably low noise gliding and flapping flights owing to their unique wing morphologies, which are normally characterized by leading-edge serrations, trailing-edge fringes and velvet-like surfaces. How these morphological features affect aerodynamic force production and sound suppression or noise reduction, however, is still not well known. Here we address an integrated study of owl-inspired single feather wing models with and without leading-edge serrations by combining large-eddy simulations (LES) with particle-image velocimetry (PIV) and force measurements in a low-speed wind tunnel. With velocity and pressure spectra analysis, we demonstrate that leading-edge serrations can passively control the laminar-turbulent transition over the upper wing surface, i.e. the suction surface at all angles of attack (0°  sound production. We find that there exists a tradeoff between force production and sound suppression: serrated leading-edges reduce aerodynamic performance at lower AoAs  reduction and aerodynamic performance at higher AoAs  >  15° where owl wings often reach in flight. Our results indicate that the owl-inspired leading-edge serrations may be a useful device for aero-acoustic control in biomimetic rotor designs for wind turbines, aircrafts, multi-rotor drones as well as other fluid machinery.

  5. Measurement of circulation around wing-tip vortices and estimation of lift forces using stereo PIV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asano, Shinichiro; Sato, Haru; Sakakibara, Jun

    2017-11-01

    Applying the flapping flight to the development of an aircraft as Mars space probe and a small aircraft called MAV (Micro Air Vehicle) is considered. This is because Reynolds number assumed as the condition of these aircrafts is low and similar to of insects and small birds flapping on the earth. However, it is difficult to measure the flow around the airfoil in flapping flight directly because of its three-dimensional and unsteady characteristics. Hence, there is an attempt to estimate the flow field and aerodynamics by measuring the wake of the airfoil using PIV, for example the lift estimation method based on a wing-tip vortex. In this study, at the angle of attack including the angle after stall, we measured the wing-tip vortex of a NACA 0015 cross-sectional and rectangular planform airfoil using stereo PIV. The circulation of the wing-tip vortex was calculated from the obtained velocity field, and the lift force was estimated based on Kutta-Joukowski theorem. Then, the validity of this estimation method was examined by comparing the estimated lift force and the force balance data at various angles of attack. The experiment results are going to be presented in the conference.

  6. Roughness Effects on the Formation of a Leading Edge Vortex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elliott, Cassidy; Lang, Amy; Wahidi, Redha; Wilroy, Jacob

    2017-11-01

    Microscopic scales cover the wings of Monarch butterflies, creating a patterned surface that acts as a natural energy capture mechanism. This patterning is thought to delay the growth of the leading edge vortex (LEV) produced by the flapping motion of a wing. Increased skin friction caused by the scales leads to a weaker LEV being shed into the butterfly's wake, lessening drag and increasing flight efficiency. To test how this roughness effects LEV formation, a plate of random roughness was designed in SolidWorks and printed on the Objet 30 Pro 3D printer. A 2x3x5 cubic foot tow tank was used to test the rough plate at Reynold's numbers of 1500, 3000, and 6000 (velocities of 8, 16, and 32 mm/s) at an angle of attack of 45 degrees. Images were captured of the LEV generated when the plate was towed upwards through the particle-seeded flow. These images were used to determine the XY velocity of the particles using a technique called Digital Particle Image Velocimetry (DPIV). Codes written in MATLAB were used to track and measure the strength of the LEV. Circulation values for the randomly-rough plate were then compared to the same values generated in a previous experiment that used a smooth plate and a grooved plate to determine the effect of the patterning on vortex development. Funding for this research project was provided by the National Science Foundation under the Research Experience for Undergraduates (REU) program (REU Supplement CBET 1628600 under CBET 1335848).

  7. On the effects of leading edge vortex generators on an OA209 airfoil

    OpenAIRE

    Heine, Benjamin; Mulleners, Karen; Gardner, Anthony; Mai, Holger

    2009-01-01

    Leading edge vortex generators have been found to significantly increase the aerodynamic performance of an airfoil under dynamic stall conditions. However, the principle of operation of these devices is still unclear. Therefore static wind and water tunnel experiments as well as CFD simulations have been conducted on a rotary aircraft wing profile OA209. A POD analysis applied to the vector fields generated by PIV measurements showed that the vortex generators break larger flow structures...

  8. Unsteady flow over flexible wings at different low Reynolds numbers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Genç Mustafa Serdar

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study, unsteady flow around flexible membrane wing which had aspect ratio of 1 (AR=1 was investigated experimentally at various Reynolds numbers (Re = 25000 and Re = 50000. Smoke-wire technique for flow visualization over the flexible membrane wing was utilized in the experiments. Digital Image Correlation system (DIC was used for measuring deformation of AR = 1 flexible membrane wing. Instantaneous deformation measurements of membrane wing were combined with the flow field measurements. In low aspect ratio flexible membrane wings, unsteadiness includes tip vortices and vortex shedding, and the combination of tip vortices. In these types of wings, complex unsteady deformations occurred due to vortex shedding. The results showed that the increasing angle of attack results in increase of membrane deformation. Moreover, it was concluded that analysis of the instantaneous deformation revealed chordwise and spanwise, modes which were due to the shedding of leading-edge vortices as well as tip vortices. Consequently, vibrational mode decreased and maximum standard deviation location approached to the trailing edge by reason of increasing angle of attack.

  9. Flow structures in end-view plane of slender delta wing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sahin Besir

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Present investigation focuses on unsteady flow structures in end-view planes at the trailing edge of delta wing, X/C=1.0, where consequences of vortex bursting and stall phenomena vary according to angles of attack over the range of 25° ≤ α ≤ 35° and yaw angles, β over the range of 0° ≤ β ≤ 20°. Basic features of counter rotating vortices in end-view planes of delta win with 70° sweep angle, Λ are examined both qualitatively and quantitatively using Rhodamine dye and the PIV system. In the light of present experiments it is seen that with increasing yaw angle, β symmetrical flow structure is disrupted continuously. Dispersed wind-ward side leading edge vortices cover a large part of flow domain, on the other hand, lee-ward side leading edge vortices cover only a small portion of flow domain.

  10. Numerical simulation of incidence and sweep effects on delta wing vortex breakdown

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ekaterinaris, J. A.; Schiff, Lewis B.

    1994-01-01

    The structure of the vortical flowfield over delta wings at high angles of attack was investigated. Three-dimensional Navier-Stokes numerical simulations were carried out to predict the complex leeward-side flowfield characteristics, including leading-edge separation, secondary separation, and vortex breakdown. Flows over a 75- and a 63-deg sweep delta wing with sharp leading edges were investigated and compared with available experimental data. The effect of variation of circumferential grid resolution grid resolution in the vicinity of the wing leading edge on the accuracy of the solutions was addressed. Furthermore, the effect of turbulence modeling on the solutions was investigated. The effects of variation of angle of attack on the computed vortical flow structure for the 75-deg sweep delta wing were examined. At moderate angles of attack no vortex breakdown was observed. When a critical angle of attack was reached, bubble-type vortex breakdown was found. With further increase in angle of attack, a change from bubble-type breakdown to spiral-type vortex breakdown was predicted by the numerical solution. The effects of variation of sweep angle and freestream Mach number were addressed with the solutions on a 63-deg sweep delta wing.

  11. Hovering hummingbird wing aerodynamics during the annual cycle. I. Complete wing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Achache, Yonathan; Sapir, Nir; Elimelech, Yossef

    2017-08-01

    The diverse hummingbird family (Trochilidae) has unique adaptations for nectarivory, among which is the ability to sustain hover-feeding. As hummingbirds mainly feed while hovering, it is crucial to maintain this ability throughout the annual cycle-especially during flight-feather moult, in which wing area is reduced. To quantify the aerodynamic characteristics and flow mechanisms of a hummingbird wing throughout the annual cycle, time-accurate aerodynamic loads and flow field measurements were correlated over a dynamically scaled wing model of Anna's hummingbird ( Calypte anna ). We present measurements recorded over a model of a complete wing to evaluate the baseline aerodynamic characteristics and flow mechanisms. We found that the vorticity concentration that had developed from the wing's leading-edge differs from the attached vorticity structure that was typically found over insects' wings; firstly, it is more elongated along the wing chord, and secondly, it encounters high levels of fluctuations rather than a steady vortex. Lift characteristics resemble those of insects; however, a 20% increase in the lift-to-torque ratio was obtained for the hummingbird wing model. Time-accurate aerodynamic loads were also used to evaluate the time-evolution of the specific power required from the flight muscles, and the overall wingbeat power requirements nicely matched previous studies.

  12. Fluid vortices

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Green, Sheldon I

    1995-01-01

    ... . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Vorticity Kinematics and Dynamics - Physical Principles The Vorticity Equation with Examples . . . . Summary . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Vorticity in Orthogonal...

  13. Turbine Airfoil Leading Edge Film Cooling Bibliography: 1972–1998

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. M. Kercher

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available Film cooling for turbine airfoil leading edges has been a common practice for at least 35 years as turbine inlet gas temperatures and pressures have continually increased along with cooling air temperatures for higher engine cycle efficiency. With substantial engine cycle performance improvements from higher gas temperatures, it has become increasingly necessary to film cool nozzle and rotor blade leading edges since external heat transfer coefficients and thus heat load are the highest in this airfoil region. Optimum cooling air requirements in this harsh environment has prompted a significant number of film cooling investigations and analytical studies reported over the past 25 years from academia, industry and government agencies. Substantial progress has been made in understanding the complex nature of leading edge film cooling from airfoil cascades, simulated airfoil leading edges and environment. This bibliography is a report of the open-literature references available which provide information on the complex aero–thermo interaction of leading edge gaseous film cooling with mainstream flow. From much of this investigative information has come successful operational leading edge film cooling design systems capable of sustaining airfoil leading edge durability in very hostile turbine environments.

  14. Effects of Canard on the Flowfield over a Wing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nayebzadeh, Arash

    2015-11-01

    Surface and flowfield pressure measurements have been done over delta wing/canard configuration in a variety of canard vertical and horizontal locations and angles of attack. The experimental model consisted of wing, canard and a body to accommodate pressure tubing and canard rotation mechanism. All the tests have been performed at subsonic velocities and the effect of canard were analyzed through comparison between surface and flowfield pressure distributions. It was found that vortex flow pattern over the wing is dominated mainly by canard vertical position and in some cases, by merging of canard and wing vortices. In addition, the pressure loss induced by canard vortex on the wing surface moves the wing vortex toward the leading edge. In the mid canard configuration, canard and wing vortices merge at x/c greater than 0.5 and as a result of this phenomenon, abrupt pressure loss induces more stable vortex flow over the wing. It is also shown that canard plays a vital role in vortex break down over the wing.

  15. Potential environmental effects of the leading edge hydrokinetic energy technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-05-01

    The Volpe Center evaluated potential environmental challenges and benefits of the ARPA-E funded research project, Marine Hydrokinetic Energy Harvesting Using Cyber-Physical Systems, led by Brown University. The Leading Edge research team develo...

  16. Investigation of vortex breakdown on a delta wing using Euler and Navier-Stokes equations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agrawal, S.; Barnett, R. M.; Robinson, B. A.

    1991-01-01

    A numerical investigation of leading edge vortex breakdown in a delta wing at high angles of attack is presented. The analysis was restricted to low speed flows on a flat plate wing with sharp leading edges. Both Euler and Navier-Stokes equations were used and the results were compared with experimental data. Predictions of vortex breakdown progression with angle of attack with both Euler and Navier-Stokes equations are shown to be consistent with the experimental data. However, the Navier-Stokes predictions show significant improvements in breakdown location at angles of attack where the vortex breakdown approaches the wing apex. The predicted trajectories of the primary vortex are in very good agreement with the test data, the laminar solutions providing the overall best comparison. The Euler shows a small displacement of the primary vortex, relative to experiment, due to the lack of secondary vortices. The turbulent Navier-Stokes, in general, fall between the Euler and laminar solutions.

  17. Dynamic Stall Characteristics of Drooped Leading Edge Airfoils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sankar, Lakshmi N.; Sahin, Mehmet; Gopal, Naveen

    2000-01-01

    Helicopters in high-speed forward flight usually experience large regions of dynamic stall over the retreating side of the rotor disk. The rapid variations in the lift and pitching moments associated with the stall process can result in vibratory loads, and can cause fatigue and failure of pitch links. In some instances, the large time lag between the aerodynamic forces and the blade motion can trigger stall flutter. A number of techniques for the alleviation of dynamic stall have been proposed and studied by researchers. Passive and active control techniques have both been explored. Passive techniques include the use of high solidity rotors that reduce the lift coefficients of individual blades, leading edge slots and leading edge slats. Active control techniques include steady and unsteady blowing, and dynamically deformable leading edge (DDLE) airfoils. Considerable amount of experimental and numerical data has been collected on the effectiveness of these concepts. One concept that has not received as much attention is the drooped-leading edge airfoil idea. It has been observed in wind tunnel studies and flight tests that drooped leading edge airfoils can have a milder dynamic stall, with a significantly milder load hysteresis. Drooped leading edge airfoils may not, however, be suitable at other conditions, e.g. in hover, or in transonic flow. Work needs to be done on the analysis and design of drooped leading edge airfoils for efficient operation in a variety of flight regimes (hover, dynamic stall, and transonic flow). One concept that is worthy of investigation is the dynamically drooping airfoil, where the leading edge shape is changed roughly once-per-rev to mitigate the dynamic stall.

  18. Leading edge effects on boundary layers behind weak shock waves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deckker, B.E.L.; Singh, D.

    1985-01-01

    This paper discusses experiments carried out in which normal shock waves of strength M s =1.22 and M s =1.30 were made to impinge on plates of three different thicknesses in order to examine the effects of leading edge thickness on the boundary layers growing from the foot of the shock and from the leading edge. The work describes the anomalous growth of these boundary layers on a slender wedge, supported as a cantilever

  19. Symmetric airfoil geometry effects on leading edge noise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gill, James; Zhang, X; Joseph, P

    2013-10-01

    Computational aeroacoustic methods are applied to the modeling of noise due to interactions between gusts and the leading edge of real symmetric airfoils. Single frequency harmonic gusts are interacted with various airfoil geometries at zero angle of attack. The effects of airfoil thickness and leading edge radius on noise are investigated systematically and independently for the first time, at higher frequencies than previously used in computational methods. Increases in both leading edge radius and thickness are found to reduce the predicted noise. This noise reduction effect becomes greater with increasing frequency and Mach number. The dominant noise reduction mechanism for airfoils with real geometry is found to be related to the leading edge stagnation region. It is shown that accurate leading edge noise predictions can be made when assuming an inviscid meanflow, but that it is not valid to assume a uniform meanflow. Analytic flat plate predictions are found to over-predict the noise due to a NACA 0002 airfoil by up to 3 dB at high frequencies. The accuracy of analytic flat plate solutions can be expected to decrease with increasing airfoil thickness, leading edge radius, gust frequency, and Mach number.

  20. The artificially blunted leading edge concept for aerothermodynamic performance enhancement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Anurag

    An innovative aerothermodynamic performance enhancement concept for blunted geometries in hypervelocity flight is described. An Artificially Blunted Leading Edge (ABLE) is sought to be created by the use of a flow-through channel sized to choke at supersonic (in the normal direction) conditions. As a result, a normal shock stands off the channel but the high post-shock pressures have no wall to act on, leading to a reduction in wave drag. The effective blunt body flow structure can be effective at preventing the rise in heat transfer rates at channel entrance lips. In lifting flight, the flow in the channel creates suction at the lip, significantly enhancing lift for non-slender shapes. CFD studies using Reynolds Averaged Navier-Stokes simulations provide proof-of- concept for drag reduction for blunted slender geometries and L/D enhancements for sphere-cones. The ABLE flow mechanism's robustness and its effectiveness at off- design conditions is demonstrated. The computed sphere- cone L/D enhancements are also validated with experimental results from Aeroballistic Range tests. As opposed to straight channels, ABLE variants with curved channels that provide for better volumetric efficiency, reduced viscous drag penalties and better performance were designed and investigated. The channels curve outward and exhaust the flow close to the leading edge. Even while exhausting tangentially, the exhaust-mean flow interactions were shown to enhance or create lift. The force amplification due to such interactions can also be leveraged with the channel flow exhausting nearly normal to the surface. The potential of such thrust vectoring to reduce trim drag and augment directional control in the high-speed regime was demonstrated numerically. To evaluate the concept's effectiveness at improving cd or L/D values without paying any penalties in lift, enclosed volume and peak heating rates, Multidisciplinary Design Optimization techniques are used to characterize the design space

  1. Three-dimensional vortex wake structure of flapping wings in hovering flight.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Bo; Roll, Jesse; Liu, Yun; Troolin, Daniel R; Deng, Xinyan

    2014-02-06

    Flapping wings continuously create and send vortices into their wake, while imparting downward momentum into the surrounding fluid. However, experimental studies concerning the details of the three-dimensional vorticity distribution and evolution in the far wake are limited. In this study, the three-dimensional vortex wake structure in both the near and far field of a dynamically scaled flapping wing was investigated experimentally, using volumetric three-component velocimetry. A single wing, with shape and kinematics similar to those of a fruitfly, was examined. The overall result of the wing action is to create an integrated vortex structure consisting of a tip vortex (TV), trailing-edge shear layer (TESL) and leading-edge vortex. The TESL rolls up into a root vortex (RV) as it is shed from the wing, and together with the TV, contracts radially and stretches tangentially in the downstream wake. The downwash is distributed in an arc-shaped region enclosed by the stretched tangential vorticity of the TVs and the RVs. A closed vortex ring structure is not observed in the current study owing to the lack of well-established starting and stopping vortex structures that smoothly connect the TV and RV. An evaluation of the vorticity transport equation shows that both the TV and the RV undergo vortex stretching while convecting downwards: a three-dimensional phenomenon in rotating flows. It also confirms that convection and secondary tilting and stretching effects dominate the evolution of vorticity.

  2. Flow structure of vortex-wing interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKenna, Christopher K.

    Impingement of a streamwise-oriented vortex upon a fin, tail, blade or wing represents a fundamental class of flow-structure interaction that extends across a range of applications. This interaction can give rise to time-averaged loading, as well as unsteady loading known as buffeting. The loading is sensitive to parameters of the incident vortex as well as the location of vortex impingement on the downstream aerodynamic surface, generically designated as a wing. Particle image velocimetry is employed to determine patterns of velocity, vorticity, swirl ratio, and streamlines on successive cross-flow planes upstream of and along the wing, which lead to volume representations and thereby characterization of the interaction. At locations upstream of the leading edge of the wing, the evolution of the incident vortex is affected by the presence of the wing, and is highly dependent on the spanwise location of vortex impingement. Even at spanwise locations of impingement well outboard of the wing tip, a substantial influence on the structure of the incident vortex at locations significantly upstream of the leading edge of the wing was observed. For spanwise locations close to or intersecting the vortex core, the effects of upstream influence of the wing on the vortex are to: decrease the swirl ratio; increase the streamwise velocity deficit; decrease the streamwise vorticity; increase the azimuthal vorticity; increase the upwash; decrease the downwash; and increase the root-mean-square fluctuations of both streamwise velocity and vorticity. The interrelationship between these effects is addressed, including the rapid attenuation of axial vorticity in presence of an enhanced defect of axial velocity in the central region of the vortex. Moreover, when the incident vortex is aligned with, or inboard of, the tip of the wing, the swirl ratio decreases to values associated with instability of the vortex, giving rise to enhanced values of azimuthal vorticity relative to the

  3. A high-performance, low-cost, leading edge discriminator

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    A high-performance, low-cost, leading edge discriminator has been designed with a timing performance comparable to state-of-the-art, commercially available ... Tata Institute of Fundamental Research, Homi Bhabha Road, Mumbai 400 005, India; Graduate School of Science, Osaka City University, Osaka 558-8585, Japan ...

  4. A high-performance, low-cost, leading edge discriminator

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Therefore our goal was to design a leading edge discriminator with an intrinsic timing capability of better than 1 ... of 50 ps and relatively modest power consumption of 120 mW per channel. For clarity, the circuit diagram of only one out of ... potentiometer (10 kΩ) and a capacitor (200 pf). The RC network causes a delay, in.

  5. Dynamic Impact Tolerance of Shuttle RCC Leading Edge Panels using LS-DYNA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fasanella, Edwin; Jackson, Karen E.; Lyle, Karen H.; Jones, Lisa E.; Hardy, Robin C.; Spellman, Regina L.; Carney, Kelly S.; Melis, Matthew E.; Stockwell, Alan E.

    2008-01-01

    This paper describes a research program conducted to enable accurate prediction of the impact tolerance of the shuttle Orbiter leading-edge wing panels using 'physics-based- codes such as LS-DYNA, a nonlinear, explicit transient dynamic finite element code. The shuttle leading-edge panels are constructed of Reinforced-Carbon-Carbon (RCC) composite material, which issued because of its thermal properties to protect the shuttle during re-entry into the Earth's atmosphere. Accurate predictions of impact damage from insulating foam and other debris strikes that occur during launch required materials characterization of expected debris, including strain-rate effects. First, analytical models of individual foam and RCC materials were validated. Next, analytical models of individual foam cylinders impacting 6-in. x 6-in. RCC flat plates were developed and validated. LS-DYNA pre-test models of the RCC flat plate specimens established the impact velocity of the test for three damage levels: no-detectable damage, non-destructive evaluation (NDE) detectable damage, or visible damage such as a through crack or hole. Finally, the threshold of impact damage for RCC on representative Orbiter wing panels was predicted for both a small through crack and for NDE-detectable damage.

  6. Characterization of Unsteady Flow Structures Near Leading-Edge Slat. Part 1; PIV Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenkins, Luther N.; Khorrami, Mehdi R.; Choudhari, Meelan

    2004-01-01

    A comprehensive computational and experimental study has been performed at the NASA Langley Research Center as part of the Quiet Aircraft Technology (QAT) Program to investigate the unsteady flow near a leading-edge slat of a two-dimensional, high-lift system. This paper focuses on the experimental effort conducted in the NASA Langley Basic Aerodynamics Research Tunnel (BART) where Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) data was acquired in the slat cove and at the slat trailing edge of a three-element, high-lift model at 4, 6, and 8 degrees angle of attack and a freestream Mach Number of 0.17. Instantaneous velocities obtained from PIV images are used to obtain mean and fluctuating components of velocity and vorticity. The data show the recirculation in the cove, reattachment of the shear layer on the slat lower surface, and discrete vortical structures within the shear layer emanating from the slat cusp and slat trailing edge. Detailed measurements are used to examine the shear layer formation at the slat cusp, vortex shedding at the slat trailing edge, and convection of vortical structures through the slat gap. Selected results are discussed and compared with unsteady, Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes (URANS) computations for the same configuration in a companion paper by Khorrami, Choudhari, and Jenkins (2004). The experimental dataset provides essential flow-field information for the validation of near-field inputs to noise prediction tools.

  7. Effects of leading edge tubercles on the flow over a humpback whale flipper

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Heesu; Kim, Jooha; Choi, Haecheon

    2013-11-01

    In the present study, we conduct a laboratory experiment for the effect of tubercles on the hydrodynamic performance of a humpback whale flipper. The shape of the flipper used is the same as that of Miklosovic et al. (2004, 2007), and the Reynolds number considered is 100,000 based on the free-stream velocity and mean chord length. The lift and drag forces on the flipper with and without tubercles are measured by varying the angle of attack, and PIV measurements are conducted in several cross-flow planes at a few different angles of attack. As observed in previous studies, the stall angle is delayed and the maximum lift coefficient is increased. Without tubercles, the cross flow above the flipper does not show large-scale vortical motions except tip vortex. With tubercles, however, strong streamwise vortices having negative streamwise vorticity are observed along the tubercles, but the vortices with positive streamwise vorticity are either relatively weak or unobserved. This result is very different from those found in a two-dimensional wing with tubercles with which strong counter-rotating streamwise vortex pair were observed. Those vortical motions reattach the flow on the flipper and delay the separation. Supported by the NRF Programs (NRF-2011-0028032, NRF-2012K001368).

  8. Experiments on a low aspect ratio wing at low Reynolds numbers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morse, Daniel R.

    At the start of the 21st century much of the focus of aircraft design has been turned to unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) which generally operate at much lower speeds in higher risk areas than manned aircraft. One subset of UAVs are Micro Air Vehicles (MAVs) which usually are no larger than 20cm and rely on non-traditional shapes to generate lift at very low velocities. This purpose of this work is to describe, in detail with experimental methods, the flow field around a low aspect ratio wing operating at low Reynolds numbers and at high angles of attack. Quantitative measurements are obtained by Three Component Time Resolved Particle Image Velocimetry (3C TR PIV) which describe the mean and turbulent flow field. This research focuses on the leading edge separation zone and the vortex shedding process which occurs at the leading edge. Streamwise wing tip vortices which dominate the lift characteristics are described with flow visualization and 3C TR PIV measurements. Turbulent Kinetic Energy (TKE) is described at the leading edge over several angles of attack. Turbulent Reynolds stresses in all three directions are described over the wing span and several Reynolds numbers. Two primary cyclic processes are observed within the flow field; one low frequency oscillation in the separated region and one high frequency event associated with leading edge vortex formation and convection. Two length scales are proposed and are shown to match well with each other, one based on leading edge vortex shedding frequency and convective velocity and the other based on mean vortex separation distance. A new method of rendering velocity frequency content over large data sets is proposed and used to illustrate the different frequencies observed at the leading edge.

  9. Survey of research on unsteady aerodynamic loading of delta wings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashley, H.; Vaneck, T.; Katz, J.; Jarrah, M. A.

    1991-01-01

    For aeronautical applications, there has been recent interest in accurately determining the aerodynamic forces and moments experienced by low-aspect-ratio wings performing transient maneuvers which go to angles of attack as high as 90 deg. Focusing on the delta planform with sharp leading edges, the paper surveys experimental and theoretical investigations dealing with the associated unsteady flow phenomena. For maximum angles above a value between 30 and 40 deg, flow details and airloads are dominated by hysteresis in the 'bursting' instability of intense vortices which emanate from the leading edge. As examples of relevant test results, force and moment histories are presented for a model series with aspect ratios 1, 1.5 and 2. Influences of key parameters are discussed, notably those which measure unsteadiness. Comparisons are given with two theories: a paneling approximation that cannot capture bursting but clarifies other unsteady influences, and a simplified estimation scheme which uses measured bursting data.

  10. Leading-Edge Velocities and Lifted Methane Jet Flame Stability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. Wang

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Current interest exists in understanding reaction-zone dynamics and mechanisms with respect to how they counterpropagate against incoming reactants. Images of flame position and flow-field morphology are presented from flame chemiluminescence and particle image velocimetry (PIV measurements. In the present study, PIV experiments were carried out to measure the methane jet lifted-flame flow-field velocities in the vicinity of the flame leading edge. Specifically, velocity fields within the high-temperature zone were examined in detail, which complements previous studies, whose prime focus is the flow-field upstream of the high-temperature boundary. PIV data is used not only to determine the velocities, but, along with chemiluminescence images, to also indicate the approximate location of the reaction zone (further supported by/through the leading-edge flame velocity distributions. The velocity results indirectly support the concept that the flame is anchored primarily through the mechanism of partially premixed flame propagation.

  11. A mechanism for mitigation of blade-vortex interaction using leading edge blowing flow control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiland, Chris; Vlachos, Pavlos P.

    2009-09-01

    The interaction of a vortical unsteady flow with structures is often encountered in engineering applications. Such flow structure interactions (FSI) can be responsible for generating significant loads and can have many detrimental structural and acoustic side effects, such as structural fatigue, radiated noise and even catastrophic results. Amongst the different types of FSI, the parallel blade-vortex interaction (BVI) is the most common, often encountered in helicopters and propulsors. In this work, we report on the implementation of leading edge blowing (LEB) active flow control for successfully minimizing the parallel BVI. Our results show reduction of the airfoil vibrations up to 38% based on the root-mean-square of the vibration velocity amplitude. This technique is based on displacing an incident vortex using a jet issued from the leading edge of a sharp airfoil effectively increasing the stand-off distance of the vortex from the body. The effectiveness of the method was experimentally analyzed using time-resolved digital particle image velocimetry (TRDPIV) recorded at an 800 Hz rate, which is sufficient to resolve the spatio-temporal dynamics of the flow field and it was combined with simultaneous accelerometer measurements of the airfoil, which was free to oscillate in a direction perpendicular to the freestream. Analysis of the flow field spectra and a Proper Orthogonal Decomposition (POD) of the TRDPIV data of the temporally resolved planar flow fields indicate that the LEB effectively modified the flow field surrounding the airfoil and increased the convecting vortices stand-off distance for over half of the airfoil chord length. It is shown that LEB also causes a redistribution of the flow field spectral energy over a larger range of frequencies.

  12. Leading-edge slat optimization for maximum airfoil lift

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olson, L. E.; Mcgowan, P. R.; Guest, C. J.

    1979-01-01

    A numerical procedure for determining the position (horizontal location, vertical location, and deflection) of a leading edge slat that maximizes the lift of multielement airfoils is presented. The structure of the flow field is calculated by iteratively coupling potential flow and boundary layer analysis. This aerodynamic calculation is combined with a constrained function minimization analysis to determine the position of a leading edge slat so that the suction peak on the nose of the main airfoil is minized. The slat position is constrained by the numerical procedure to ensure an attached boundary layer on the upper surface of the slat and to ensure negligible interaction between the slat wake and the boundary layer on the upper surface of the main airfoil. The highest angle attack at which this optimized slat position can maintain attached flow on the main airfoil defines the optimum slat position for maximum lift. The design method is demonstrated for an airfoil equipped with a leading-edge slat and a trailing edge, single-slotted flap. The theoretical results are compared with experimental data, obtained in the Ames 40 by 80 Foot Wind Tunnel, to verify experimentally the predicted slat position for maximum lift. The experimentally optimized slat position is in good agreement with the theoretical prediction, indicating that the theoretical procedure is a feasible design method.

  13. Active control of noise amplification in the flow over a square leading-edge flat plate utilizing DBD plasma actuator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yadong, HUANG; Benmou, ZHOU

    2018-05-01

    Perturbation is generally considered as the flow noise, and its energy can gain transient growth in the separation bubble. The amplified perturbations may cause unstable Kelvin–Helmohltz vortices which induce the three-dimensional transition. Active control of noise amplification via dielectric barrier discharge plasma actuator in the flow over a square leading-edge flat plate is numerically studied. The actuator is installed near the plate leading-edge where the separation bubble is formed. The maximum energy amplification of perturbations is positively correlated with the separation bubble scale which decreases with the increasing control parameters. As the magnitude of noise amplification is reduced, the laminar-turbulent transition is successfully suppressed.

  14. Leading-edge flow criticality as a governing factor in leading-edge vortex initiation in unsteady airfoil flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramesh, Kiran; Granlund, Kenneth; Ol, Michael V.; Gopalarathnam, Ashok; Edwards, Jack R.

    2018-04-01

    A leading-edge suction parameter (LESP) that is derived from potential flow theory as a measure of suction at the airfoil leading edge is used to study initiation of leading-edge vortex (LEV) formation in this article. The LESP hypothesis is presented, which states that LEV formation in unsteady flows for specified airfoil shape and Reynolds number occurs at a critical constant value of LESP, regardless of motion kinematics. This hypothesis is tested and validated against a large set of data from CFD and experimental studies of flows with LEV formation. The hypothesis is seen to hold except in cases with slow-rate kinematics which evince significant trailing-edge separation (which refers here to separation leading to reversed flow on the aft portion of the upper surface), thereby establishing the envelope of validity. The implication is that the critical LESP value for an airfoil-Reynolds number combination may be calibrated using CFD or experiment for just one motion and then employed to predict LEV initiation for any other (fast-rate) motion. It is also shown that the LESP concept may be used in an inverse mode to generate motion kinematics that would either prevent LEV formation or trigger the same as per aerodynamic requirements.

  15. Pulsed Film Cooling on a Turbine Blade Leading Edge

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-09-01

    2.9) The solution for the temperature response was described by Incropera and DeWitt (1996) among other heat transfer texts. At the surface...ReD = 71000 has a maximum heat transfer coefficient of approximately 77 W/(m2 K) ( Incropera and DeWitt (1996)), which is fairly uniform in the region...transition is expected at approximately 80° from the leading edge ( Incropera and DeWitt (1996)) and roughness is known to have little effect on the

  16. Numerical simulation of the effects of variation of angle of attack and sweep angle on vortex breakdown over delta wings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ekaterinaris, J. A.; Schiff, Lewis B.

    1990-01-01

    In the present investigation of the vortical flowfield structure over delta wings at high angles of attack, three-dimensional Navier-Stokes numerical simulations were conducted to predict the complex leeward flowfield characteristics; these encompass leading-edge separation, secondary separation, and vortex breakdown. Attention is given to the effect on solution accuracy of circumferential grid-resolution variations in the vicinity of the wing leading edge, and well as to the effect of turbulence modeling on the solutions. When a critical angle-of-attack was reached, bubble-type vortex breakdown was found. With further angle-of-attack increase, a change from bubble-type to spiral-type vortex breakdown was predicted by the numerical solution.

  17. Leading edge analysis of transcriptomic changes during pseudorabies virus infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Damarius S. Fleming

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Eight RNA samples taken from the tracheobronchial lymph nodes (TBLN of pigs that were either infected or non-infected with a feral isolate of porcine pseudorabies virus (PRV were used to investigate changes in gene expression related to the pathogen. The RNA was processed into fastq files for each library prior to being analyzed using Illumina Digital Gene Expression Tag Profiling sequences (DGETP which were used as the downstream measure of differential expression. Analyzed tags consisted of 21 base pair sequences taken from time points 1, 3, 6, and 14 days' post infection (dpi that generated 1,927,547 unique tag sequences. Tag sequences were analyzed for differential transcript expression and gene set enrichment analysis (GSEA to uncover transcriptomic changes related to PRV pathology progression. In conjunction with the DGETP and GSEA, the study also incorporated use of leading edge analysis to help link the TBLN transcriptome data to clinical progression of PRV at each of the sampled time points. The purpose of this manuscript is to provide useful background on applying the leading edge analysis to GSEA and expression data to help identify genes considered to be of high biological interest. The data in the form of fastq files has been uploaded to the NCBI Gene Expression Omnibus (GEO (GSE74473 database.

  18. An experimental investigation of the shear-layer and acoustic sources produced by a leading edge slat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkins, Stephen; Richard, Patrick; Hall, Joseph; Turbulence; Flow Noise Laboratory Team

    2013-11-01

    Leading edge slats are a common addition to airfoils as part of a high lift configuration employed during take-off and landing; the unsteady flow caused by these slats is a major contributor to the overal airframe noise. As the next generation of aircraft seeks to reduce these noise concerns, a better understanding of the sources of aeroacoustic noise generation is sought. Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) and simultaneous multipoint measurements of the unsteady surface pressure are used herein to investigate the unsteady flow around a leading edge slat coupled with an airfoil for several different configurations and a range of Reynolds numbers (Re = 156 , 000 to Re = 1 . 2 million based on the wing chord). Shear-layer development off the slat cusp and the related unsteady vortex structures are examined in detail to better establish and understand the mechanisms responsible for the generation of aeroacoustic slat noise. The authors are grateful for the support provided by GARDN.

  19. Leading Edge Asynchronous Propeller (LEAPTech) Distributed Electric Propulsion (DEP) Concept

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The "Semi-Tandem Electric Distributed Wing Zip Aviation Advanced Concept Project" was renamed to LEAPTech DEP to better align with the content of the work. This...

  20. Numerical study of the interaction of the N-wave with the plate leading edge in the supersonic stream

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khotyanovsky, Dmitry; Kudryavtsev, Alexey; Kosinov, Alexander

    2017-10-01

    The results of three-dimensional numerical simulations of the interaction of the plane N-wave propagating at an angle to the free stream in the transverse direction with the sharp and blunted leading edges of the plate in a supersonic flow are presented. Interaction of the N-wave with a weak shock attached to the leading edge of the sharp plate causes corrugation of the shock wave surface that propagates downstream. A steady pressure perturbation is also formed that propagates inside the boundary layer in the transverse direction at an angle close to the Mach angle. This perturbation causes curving of the streamlines in the boundary layer and generation of a quasi-steady vorticity disturbance. In the case of the N-wave impinging on the leading edge of the blunted plate there is a large subsonic zone behind the bow shock where the pronounced oblique directivity of the disturbance transmitted through the shock is declined. Nevertheless, local disturbances of the flow parameters are observed in the boundary layer downstream of the region of the contact of the oblique shocks of the N-wave with the bow shock.

  1. Control of Pitching Airfoil Aerodynamics by Vorticity Flux Modification using Active Bleed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kearney, John; Glezer, Ari

    2014-11-01

    Distributed active bleed driven by pressure differences across a pitching airfoil is used to regulate the vorticity flux over the airfoil's surface and thereby to control aerodynamic loads in wind tunnel experiments. The range of pitch angles is varied beyond the static stall margin of the 2-D VR-7 airfoil at reduced pitching rates up to k = 0.42. Bleed is regulated dynamically using piezoelectric louvers between the model's pressure side near the trailing edge and the suction surface near the leading edge. The time-dependent evolution of vorticity concentrations over the airfoil and in the wake during the pitch cycle is investigated using high-speed PIV and the aerodynamic forces and moments are measured using integrated load cells. The timing of the dynamic stall vorticity flux into the near wake and its effect on the flow field are analyzed in the presence and absence of bleed using proper orthogonal decomposition (POD). It is shown that bleed actuation alters the production, accumulation, and advection of vorticity concentrations near the surface with significant effects on the evolution, and, in particular, the timing of dynamic stall vortices. These changes are manifested by alteration of the lift hysteresis and improvement of pitch stability during the cycle, while maintaining cycle-averaged lift to within 5% of the base flow level with significant implications for improvement of the stability of flexible wings and rotor blades. This work is supported by the Rotorcraft Center (VLRCOE) at Georgia Tech.

  2. The Multipoint Global Shape Optimization of Flying Configuration with Movable Leading Edges Flaps

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adriana NASTASE

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The aerodynamical global optimized (GO shape of flying configuration (FC, at two cruising Mach numbers, can be realized by morphing. Movable leading edge flaps are used for this purpose. The equations of the surfaces of the wing, of the fuselage and of the flaps in stretched position are approximated in form of superpositions of homogeneous polynomes in two variables with free coefficients. These coefficients together with the similarity parameters of the planform of the FC are the free parameters of the global optimization. Two enlarged variational problems with free boundaries occur. The first one consists in the determination of the GO shape of the wing-fuselageFC, with the flaps in retracted position, which must be of minimum drag, at higher cruising Mach number. The second enlarged variational problem consists in the determination of the GO shape of the flaps in stretched position in such a manner that the entire FC shall be of minimum drag at the second lower Mach number. The iterative optimum-optimorum (OO theory of the author is used for the solving of these both enlarged variational problems. The inviscid GO shape of the FC is used only in the first step of iteration and the own developed hybrid solutions for the compressible Navier-Stokes partial-differential equations (PDEs are used for the determination of the friction drag coefficient and up the second step of iteration of OO theory.

  3. Variable Camber Continuous Aerodynamic Control Surfaces and Methods for Active Wing Shaping Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Nhan T. (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    An aerodynamic control apparatus for an air vehicle improves various aerodynamic performance metrics by employing multiple spanwise flap segments that jointly form a continuous or a piecewise continuous trailing edge to minimize drag induced by lift or vortices. At least one of the multiple spanwise flap segments includes a variable camber flap subsystem having multiple chordwise flap segments that may be independently actuated. Some embodiments also employ a continuous leading edge slat system that includes multiple spanwise slat segments, each of which has one or more chordwise slat segment. A method and an apparatus for implementing active control of a wing shape are also described and include the determination of desired lift distribution to determine the improved aerodynamic deflection of the wings. Flap deflections are determined and control signals are generated to actively control the wing shape to approximate the desired deflection.

  4. Numerical simulation of X-wing type biplane flapping wings in 3D using the immersed boundary method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tay, W B; Van Oudheusden, B W; Bijl, H

    2014-01-01

    The numerical simulation of an insect-sized ‘X-wing’ type biplane flapping wing configuration is performed in 3D using an immersed boundary method solver at Reynolds numbers equal to 1000 (1 k) and 5 k, based on the wing's root chord length. This X-wing type flapping configuration draws its inspiration from Delfly, a bio-inspired ornithopter MAV which has two pairs of wings flapping in anti-phase in a biplane configuration. The objective of the present investigation is to assess the aerodynamic performance when the original Delfly flapping wing micro-aerial vehicle (FMAV) is reduced to the size of an insect. Results show that the X-wing configuration gives more than twice the average thrust compared with only flapping the upper pair of wings of the X-wing. However, the X-wing's average thrust is only 40% that of the upper wing flapping at twice the stroke angle. Despite this, the increased stability which results from the smaller lift and moment variation of the X-wing configuration makes it more suited for sharp image capture and recognition. These advantages make the X-wing configuration an attractive alternative design for insect-sized FMAVS compared to the single wing configuration. In the Reynolds number comparison, the vorticity iso-surface plot at a Reynolds number of 5 k revealed smaller, finer vortical structures compared to the simulation at 1 k, due to vortices’ breakup. In comparison, the force output difference is much smaller between Re = 1 k and 5 k. Increasing the body inclination angle generates a uniform leading edge vortex instead of a conical one along the wingspan, giving higher lift. Understanding the force variation as the body inclination angle increases will allow FMAV designers to optimize the thrust and lift ratio for higher efficiency under different operational requirements. Lastly, increasing the spanwise flexibility of the wings increases the thrust slightly but decreases the efficiency. The thrust result is similar

  5. Leading edge embedded fan airfoil concept -- A new powered high lift technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phan, Nhan Huu

    A new powered-lift airfoil concept called Leading Edge Embedded Fan (LEEF) is proposed for Extremely Short Take-Off and Landing (ESTOL) and Vertical Take-Off and Landing (VTOL) applications. The LEEF airfoil concept is a powered-lift airfoil concept capable of generating thrust and very high lift-coefficient at extreme angles-of attack (AoA). It is designed to activate only at the take-off and landing phases, similar to conventional flaps or slats, allowing the aircraft to operate efficiently at cruise in its conventional configuration. The LEEF concept consists of placing a crossflow fan (CFF) along the leading-edge (LE) of the wing, and the housing is designed to alter the airfoil shape between take-off/landing and cruise configurations with ease. The unique rectangular cross section of the crossflow fan allows for its ease of integration into a conventional subsonic wing. This technology is developed for ESTOL aircraft applications and is most effectively applied to General Aviation (GA) aircraft. Another potential area of application for LEEF is tiltrotor aircraft. Unlike existing powered high-lift systems, the LEEF airfoil uses a local high-pressure air source from cross-flow fans, does not require ducting, and is able to be deployed using distributed electric power systems throughout the wing. In addition to distributed lift augmentation, the LEEF system can provide additional thrust during takeoff and landing operation to supplement the primary cruise propulsion system. Two-dimensional (2D) and three-dimensional (3D) Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) simulations of a conventional airfoil/wing using the NACA 63-3-418 section, commonly used in GA, and a LEEF airfoil/wing embedded into the same airfoil section were carried out to evaluate the advantages of and the costs associated with implementing the LEEF concept. Computational results show that significant lift and augmented thrust are available during LEEF operation while requiring only moderate fan power

  6. Leading-edge effects on boundary-layer receptivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gatski, Thomas B.; Kerschen, Edward J.

    1990-01-01

    Numerical calculations are presented for the incompressible flow over a parabolic cylinder. The computational domain extends from a region upstream of the body downstream to the region where the Blasius boundary-layer solution holds. A steady mean flow solution is computed and the results for the scaled surface vorticity, surface pressure and displacement thickness are compared to previous studies. The unsteady problem is then formulated as a perturbation solution starting with and evolving from the mean flow. The response to irrotational time harmonic pulsation of the free-stream is examined. Results for the initial development of the velocity profile and displacement thickness are presented. These calculations will be extended to later times to investigate the initiation of instability waves within the boundary-layer.

  7. Pressure-Velocity Correlations in the Cove of a Leading Edge Slat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkins, Stephen; Richard, Patrick; Hall, Joseph

    2015-11-01

    One of the major sources of aircraft airframe noise is related to the deployment of high-lift devices, such as leading-edge slats, particularly when the aircraft is preparing to land. As the engines are throttled back, the noise produced by the airframe itself is of great concern, as the aircraft is low enough for the noise to impact civilian populations. In order to reduce the aeroacoustic noise sources associated with these high lift devices for the next generation of aircraft an experimental investigation of the correlation between multi-point surface-mounted fluctuating pressures measured via flush-mounted microphones and the simultaneously measured two-component velocity field measured via Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) is studied. The development of the resulting shear-layer within the slat cove is studied for Re =80,000, based on the wing chord. For low Mach number flows in air, the major acoustic source is a dipole acoustic source tied to fluctuating surface pressures on solid boundaries, such as the underside of the slat itself. Regions of high correlations between the pressure and velocity field near the surface will likely indicate a strong acoustic dipole source. In order to study the underlying physical mechanisms and understand their role in the development of aeroacoustic noise, Proper Orthogonal Decomposition (POD) by the method of snapshots is employed on the velocity field. The correlation between low-order reconstructions and the surface-pressure measurements are also studied.

  8. Experimental and Computational Study of the Flow past a Simplified Geometry of an Engine/Pylon/Wing Installation at low velocity/moderate incidence flight conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bury, Yannick; Lucas, Matthieu; Bonnaud, Cyril; Joly, Laurent; ISAE Team; Airbus Team

    2014-11-01

    We study numerically and experimentally the vortices that develop past a model geometry of a wing equipped with pylon-mounted engine at low speed/moderate incidence flight conditions. For such configuration, the presence of the powerplant installation under the wing initiates a complex, unsteady vortical flow field at the nacelle/pylon/wing junctions. Its interaction with the upper wing boundary layer causes a drop of aircraft performances. In order to decipher the underlying physics, this study is initially conducted on a simplified geometry at a Reynolds number of 200000, based on the chord wing and on the freestream velocity. Two configurations of angle of attack and side-slip angle are investigated. This work relies on unsteady Reynolds Averaged Navier Stokes computations, oil flow visualizations and stereoscopic Particle Image Velocimetry measurements. The vortex dynamics thus produced is described in terms of vortex core position, intensity, size and turbulent intensity thanks to a vortex tracking approach. In addition, the analysis of the velocity flow fields obtained from PIV highlights the influence of the longitudinal vortex initiated at the pylon/wing junction on the separation process of the boundary layer near the upper wing leading-edge.

  9. An experimental study of an airfoil with a bio-inspired leading edge device at high angles of attack

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandadzhiev, Boris A.; Lynch, Michael K.; Chamorro, Leonardo P.; Wissa, Aimy A.

    2017-09-01

    Robust and predictable aerodynamic performance of unmanned aerial vehicles at the limits of their design envelope is critical for safety and mission adaptability. Deployable aerodynamic surfaces from the wing leading or trailing edges are often used to extend the aerodynamic envelope (e.g. slats and flaps). Birds have also evolved feathers at the leading edge (LE) of their wings, known as the alula, which enables them to perform high angles of attack maneuvers. In this study, a series of wind tunnel experiments are performed to quantify the effect of various deployment parameters of an alula-like LE device on the aerodynamic performance of a cambered airfoil (S1223) at stall and post stall conditions. The alula relative angle of attack, measured from the mean chord of the airfoil, is varied to modulate tip-vortex strength, while the alula deflection angle is varied to modulate the distance between the tip vortex and the wing surface. Integrated lift force measurements were collected at various alula-inspired device configurations. The effect of the alula-inspired device on the boundary layer velocity profile and turbulence intensity were investigated through hot-wire anemometer measurements. Results show that as alula deflection angle increases, the lift coefficient also increase especially at lower alula relative angles of attack. Moreover, at post stall wing angles of attack, the wake velocity deficit is reduced in the presence of alula device, confirming the mitigation of the wing adverse pressure gradient. The results are in strong agreement with measurements taken on bird wings showing delayed flow reversal and extended range of operational angles of attack. An engineered alula-inspired device has the potential to improve mission adaptability in small unmanned air vehicles during low Reynolds number flight.

  10. Ground effect on the aerodynamics of three-dimensional hovering wings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, H; Lua, K B; Lee, Y J; Lim, T T; Yeo, K S

    2016-10-25

    This paper reports the results of combined experimental and numerical studies on the ground effect on a pair of three-dimensional (3D) hovering wings. Parameters investigated include hovering kinematics, wing shapes, and Reynolds numbers (Re). The results are consistent with the observation by another study (Gao and Lu, 2008 Phys. Fluids, 20 087101) which shows that the cycle-averaged aerodynamic forces generated by two-dimensional (2D) wings in close proximity to the ground can be broadly categorized into three regimes with respect to the ground clearance; force enhancement, force reduction, and force recovery. However, the ground effect on a 3D wing is not as significant as that on a 2D flapping wing reported in (Lu et al 2014 Exp. Fluids, 55 1787); this could be attributed to a weaker wake capture effect on 3D wings. Also, unlike a 2D wing, the leading edge vortex (LEV) remains attached on a 3D wing regardless of ground clearance. For all the wing kinematics considered, the three above-mentioned regimes are closely correlated to a non-monotonic trend in the strength of downwash due to the restriction of root and tip vortex formation, and a positional shift of wake vortices. The root vortices in interaction with the ground induce an up-wash in-between the two wings, causing a strong 'fountain effect' (Maeda and Liu, 2013 J. Biomech. Sci. Eng., 8 344) that may increase the body lift of insects. The present study further shows that changes in wing planform have insignificant influence on the overall trend of ground effect except for a parallel shift in force magnitude, which is caused mainly by the difference in aspect ratio and leading edge pivot point. On the two Reynolds numbers investigated, the results for the low Re case of 100 do not deviate significantly from those of a higher Re = 5000 except for the difference in force magnitudes, since low Reynolds number generates lower downwash, weaker LEV, and lower rotational circulation. Additionally, lower Re

  11. Case Studies of Leading Edge Small Urban High Schools. Relevance Strategic Designs: 4. Boston Arts Academy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shields, Regis Anne; Ireland, Nicole; City, Elizabeth; Derderian, Julie; Miles, Karen Hawley

    2008-01-01

    This report is one of nine detailed case studies of small urban high schools that served as the foundation for the Education Resource Strategies (ERS) report "Strategic Designs: Lessons from Leading Edge Small Urban High Schools." These nine schools were dubbed "Leading Edge Schools" because they stand apart from other high…

  12. Case Studies of Leading Edge Small Urban High Schools. Relevance Strategic Designs: 6. Perspectives Charter School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shields, Regis Anne; Ireland, Nicole; City, Elizabeth; Derderian, Julie; Miles, Karen Hawley

    2008-01-01

    This report is one of nine detailed case studies of small urban high schools that served as the foundation for the Education Resource Strategies (ERS) report "Strategic Designs: Lessons from Leading Edge Small Urban High Schools." These nine schools were dubbed "Leading Edge Schools" because they stand apart from other high…

  13. Unsteady fluid dynamics around a hovering wing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishna, Swathi; Green, Melissa; Mulleners, Karen

    2017-11-01

    The unsteady flow around a hovering flat plate wing has been investigated experimentally using particle image velocimetry and direct force measurements. The measurements are conducted on a wing that rotates symmetrically about the stroke reversal at a reduced frequency of k = 0.32 and Reynolds number of Re = 220 . The Lagrangian finite-time Lyapunov exponent method is used to analyse the unsteady flow fields by identifying dynamically relevant flow features such as the primary leading edge vortex (LEV), secondary vortices, and topological saddles, and their evolution within a flapping cycle. The flow evolution is divided into four stages that are characterised by the LEV (a)emergence, (b)growth, (c)lift-off, and (d)breakdown and decay. Tracking saddle points is shown to be helpful in defining the LEV lift-off which occurs at the maximum stroke velocity. The flow fields are correlated with the aerodynamic forces revealing that the maximum lift and drag are observed just before LEV lift-off. The end of wing rotation in the beginning of the stroke stimulates a change in the direction of the LEV growth and the start of rotation at the end of the stroke triggers the breakdown of the LEV.

  14. Hydrodynamic characteristics for flow around wavy wings with different wave lengths

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mi Jeong Kim

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The present study numerically investigates the effect of the wavy leading edge on hydrodynamic characteristics for the flow of rectangular wings with the low aspect ratio of 1.5. Five different wave lengths at fixed wavy amplitude have been considered. Numerical simulations are performed at a wide range of the angle of attack (0° ≤α ≤ 40° at one Reynolds number of 106. The wavy wings considered in this study did not experience enough lift drop to be defined as the stall, comparing with the smooth wing. However, in the pre-stall region, the wavy wings reveal the considerable loss of the lift, compared to the smooth wing. In the post-stall, the lift coefficients of the smooth wing and the wavy wings are not much different. The pressure coefficient, limiting streamlines and the iso-surface of the spanwise vorticity are also highlighted to examine the effect of the wave length on the flow structures.

  15. A PIV Study of Baseline and Controlled Flow over the Highly Deflected Flap of a Generic Low Aspect Ratio Trapezoidal Wing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tewes, Philipp; Genschow, Konstantin; Little, Jesse; Wygnanski, Israel

    2017-11-01

    A detailed flow survey using PIV was conducted over a highly-deflected flap (55°) of a low-aspect ratio trapezoidal wing. The wing section is a NACA 0012 with 45° sweep at both the leading and trailing edges, an aspect ratio of 1.5 and a taper ratio of 0.27. The main element is equipped with 7 equally spaced fluidic oscillators, covering the inner 60 % of the span, located near the flap hinge. Experiments were carried out at 0° and 8° incidence at a Reynolds number of 1.7 .106 for both baseline and active flow control (AFC) cases. Velocity ISO-surfaces, x-vorticity and streamlines are analyzed / discussed. A flap leading edge vortex governs the baseline flow field for 0°. This vortical structure interacts with the jets emitted by the actuators (Cμ = 1 %). Its development is hampered and the vortex is redirected toward the trailing edge resulting in a CL increase. At 8°, the dominant flap leading edge vortex could not be detected and is believed to have already merged with the tip vortex. AFC attached the flow over the flap and enhanced the lift by up to 20 % while maintaining longitudinal stability. The dominant flow features in the AFC cases are actuator-generated streamwise vortices which appear stronger at 8°. This work was supported by the Office of Naval Research under ONR Grant No. N00014-14-1-0387.

  16. The effects of leading-edge serrations on reducing flow unsteadiness about airfoils, an experimental and analytical investigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwind, R. G.; Allen, H. J.

    1973-01-01

    High frequency surface pressure measurements were obtained from wind-tunnel tests over the Reynolds number range 1.2 times one million to 6.2 times one million on a rectangular wing of NACA 63-009 airfoil section. Measurements were also obtained with a wide selection of leading-edge serrations added to the basic airfoil. Under a two-dimensional laminar bubble very close to the leading edge of the basic airfoil there is a large apatial peak in rms pressure. Frequency analysis of the pressure signals in this region show a large, high-frequency energy peak which is interpreted as an oscillation in size and position of the bubble. The serrations divide the bubble into segments and reduce the peak rms pressures. A low Reynolds number flow visualization test on a hydrofoil in water was also conducted. A von Karman vortex street was found trailing from the rear of the foil. Its frequency is at a much lower Strouhal number than in the high Reynolds number experiment, and is related to the trailing-edge and boundary-layer thicknesses.

  17. Fluid Mechanics of Wing Adaptation for Separation Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandrasekhara, M. S.; Wilder, M. C.; Carr, L. W.; Davis, Sanford S. (Technical Monitor)

    1997-01-01

    The unsteady fluid mechanics associated with use of a dynamically deforming leading edge airfoil for achieving compressible flow separation control has been experimentally studied. Changing the leading edge curvature at rapid rates dramatically alters the flow vorticity dynamics which is responsible for the many effects observed in the flow.

  18. Adaptive computations of flow around a delta wing with vortex breakdown

    Science.gov (United States)

    Modiano, David L.; Murman, Earll M.

    1993-01-01

    An adaptive unstructured mesh solution method for the three-dimensional Euler equations was used to simulate the flow around a sharp edged delta wing. Emphasis was on the breakdown of the leading edge vortex at high angle of attack. Large values of entropy, which indicate vortical regions of the flow, specified the region in which adaptation was performed. The aerodynamic normal force coefficients show excellent agreement with wind tunnel data measured by Jarrah, and demonstrate the importance of adaptation in obtaining an accurate solution. The pitching moment coefficient and the location of vortex breakdown are compared with experimental data measured by Hummel and Srinivasan, showing good agreement in cases in which vortex breakdown is located over the wing.

  19. Simulated airline service experience with laminar-flow control leading-edge systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maddalon, Dal V.; Fisher, David F.; Jennett, Lisa A.; Fischer, Michael C.

    1987-01-01

    The first JetStar leading edge flight test was made November 30, 1983. The JetStar was flown for more than 3 years. The titanium leading edge test articles today remain in virtually the same condition as they were in on that first flight. No degradation of laminar flow performance has occurred as a result of service. The JetStar simulated airline service flights have demonstrated that effective, practical leading edge systems are available for future commercial transports. Specific conclusions based on the results of the simulated airline service test program are summarized.

  20. Separation vortices and pattern formation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Anders Peter; Bohr, Tomas; Schnipper, Teis

    2010-01-01

    In this paper examples are given of the importance of flow separation for fluid patterns at moderate Reynolds numbers—both in the stationary and in the time-dependent domain. In the case of circular hydraulic jumps, it has been shown recently that it is possible to generalise the Prandtl–Kármán–P...... results for the vortex patterns behind a flapping foil in a flowing soap film, which shows the interaction and competition between the vortices shed from the round leading edge (like the von Kármán vortex street) and those created at the sharp trailing edge....

  1. Study of interaction of a pair of longitudinal vortices with a horseshoe vortex around a wing. 2nd Report. Behavior of the interacting flow field controlled passively; Tsubasa mawari no bateikei uzu to tateuzu no kansho ni kansuru kenkyu. 2. Judo seigyosareta nagareba no kyodo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hara, H. [Mitsubishi Heavy Industries, Ltd., Tokyo (Japan); Shizawa, T.; Honami, S. [Science University of Tokyo, Tokyo (Japan). Faculty of Engineering

    1999-12-25

    This paper presents the behavior of a passively controlled horseshoe vortex at the root of NACA0024 wing which is established on a turbulent boundary layer, A pair of vortex generators of half delta wing is installed upstream of the wing. The flow field of the optimally controlled horseshoe vortex both in case of Common Flow Up (CFUC) and Common Flow Down Configuration (CFDC) is carefully investigated by an X-array hot-wire. In case of CFUC, the horseshoe vortex is not shifted from the wing, because the longitudinal vortex is restrained. The interacted vortex presents a circular profile, in a optimally controlled case. In case of CFDC, the interacted vortex that has strong vorticity by the pairing process is shifted away from the wing. Then, the high momentum fluid flow penetrates between the wing and the vortex. (author)

  2. Numerical modeling of the vortex breakdown phenomenon on a delta wing with trailing-edge jet-flap

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kyriakou, Marilena; Missirlis, Dimitrios; Yakinthos, Kyros

    2010-01-01

    The flow development over delta wings is highly complicated since the interaction of the angle of attack with the delta-wing geometry leads to the appearance of a pair of well-organized counter-rotating leading-edge vortical structures. For relatively moderate angles of attack, these vortices remain robust and contribute to the enhancement of the overall lift performance. However, at higher angles of attack the vortices develop instabilities leading to the well-known vortex breakdown phenomenon, resulting in a deterioration of the aerodynamic properties. Thus, delaying vortex breakdown at higher angles of attack, is important and for this reason various techniques have been developed to control the breakdown mechanism. Such a technique is the use of trailing-edge jet-flaps. In the present work, an attempt to model the vortex breakdown together with its control, above a delta wing at high angles of attack, for cases with and without a trailing-edge jet-flap, is presented. To model the turbulent stresses, the low-Reynolds-number stress-omega model was used. The computational results were in good agreement with the available experimental data regarding the prediction of the onset of vortex breakdown and showed that the use of jet-flaps can lead to a significant delay of the breakdown process.

  3. Effects of Leading Edge Defect on the Aerodynamic and Flow Characteristics of an S809 Airfoil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yan; Zheng, Xiaojing; Hu, Ruifeng; Wang, Ping

    Unexpected performance degradation occurs in wind turbine blades due to leading edge defect when suffering from continuous impacts with rain drops, hails, insects, or solid particles during its operation life. To assess this issue, this paper numerically investigates the steady and dynamic stall characteristics of an S809 airfoil with various leading edge defects. More leading edge defect sizes and much closer to practical parameters are investigated in the paper. Numerical computation is conducted using the SST k-ω turbulence model, and the method has been validated by comparison with existed published data. In order to ensure the calculation convergence, the residuals for the continuity equation are set to be less than 10-7 and 10-6 in steady state and dynamic stall cases. The simulations are conducted with the software ANSYS Fluent 13.0. It is found that the characteristics of aerodynamic coefficients and flow fields are sensitive to leading edge defect both in steady and dynamic conditions. For airfoils with the defect thickness of 6%tc, leading edge defect has a relative small influence on the aerodynamics of S809 airfoil. For other investigated defect thicknesses, leading edge defect has much greater influence on the flow field structures, pressure coefficients and aerodynamic characteristics of airfoil at relative small defect lengths. For example, the lift coefficients decrease and drag coefficients increase sharply after the appearance of leading edge defect. However, the aerodynamic characteristics could reach a constant value when the defect length is large enough. The flow field, pressure coefficient distribution and aerodynamic coefficients do not change a lot when the defect lengths reach to 0.5%c,1%c, 2%c and 3%c with defect thicknesses of 6%tc, 12%tc,18%tc and 25%tc, respectively. In addition, the results also show that the critical defect length/thickness ratio is 0.5, beyond which the aerodynamic characteristics nearly remain unchanged. In

  4. Waving Wing Aerodynamics at Low Reynolds Numbers

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    wing. An attached leading edge vortex has been observed by multiple research groups on both mechanical wing flappers (8; 22; 21; 4) and revolving wing...observed by Ellington et al. (8) in their earlier experiments on the mechanical hawkmoth flapper at Re ≈ 10,000. In these experiments the spanwise flow...on mechanical wing flappers at similar Reynolds numbers, Re ≈ 1,000 and 1,400 respectively. Both sets of experiments revealed a stable attached

  5. Compressible dynamic stall vorticity flux control using a dynamic ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    management of its unsteady vorticity using a variable droop leading edge (VDLE) airfoil. Through ... the pressure gradient term for the dynamic stall conditions encountered by a helicopter-rotor retreating blade. Thus ... This paper discusses control of compressible dynamic stall using the novel idea of variable droop leading ...

  6. The Performance of Finite-span Hydrofoils with Humpback Whale-like Leading Edge Protuberances

    Science.gov (United States)

    Custodio, Derrick; Henoch, Charles; Johari, Hamid

    2010-11-01

    The effects of leading edge protuberances on the lift and drag performance of finite-span hydrofoils were examined in a series of water tunnel experiments. The leading edge protuberances are analogous to the tubercles on humpback whale pectoral flippers. The hydrofoils have a rectangular planform and an aspect ratio of 4. The hydrofoil section profile is based on NACA 63(4)-021, and the leading edge has a sinusoidal geometry with constant amplitude and wavelength. The hydrofoil angle of attack was varied up to 30 , and the freestream velocity ranged from 1.8 to 5.4 m/s. Results indicate that the hydrofoils with leading edge protuberances do not stall in the traditional manner. Below 12 lift increased linearly with angle of attack. Beyond this angle, the lift either attained a nearly constant value or increased slowly up to 30 depending on the Reynolds number. Drag increased continuously with the angle of attack, and was not dependent on the Reynolds number. These observations are consistent with our previous infinite span hydrofoil data, and may be explained in terms of the flow modifications created by the leading edge protuberances.

  7. Membrane tension controls adhesion positioning at the leading edge of cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pontes, Bruno; Gole, Laurent; Kosmalska, Anita Joanna; Tam, Zhi Yang; Luo, Weiwei; Kan, Sophie; Viasnoff, Virgile; Roca-Cusachs, Pere; Tucker-Kellogg, Lisa

    2017-01-01

    Cell migration is dependent on adhesion dynamics and actin cytoskeleton remodeling at the leading edge. These events may be physically constrained by the plasma membrane. Here, we show that the mechanical signal produced by an increase in plasma membrane tension triggers the positioning of new rows of adhesions at the leading edge. During protrusion, as membrane tension increases, velocity slows, and the lamellipodium buckles upward in a myosin II–independent manner. The buckling occurs between the front of the lamellipodium, where nascent adhesions are positioned in rows, and the base of the lamellipodium, where a vinculin-dependent clutch couples actin to previously positioned adhesions. As membrane tension decreases, protrusion resumes and buckling disappears, until the next cycle. We propose that the mechanical signal of membrane tension exerts upstream control in mechanotransduction by periodically compressing and relaxing the lamellipodium, leading to the positioning of adhesions at the leading edge of cells. PMID:28687667

  8. Effect of leading-edge porosity on blade-vortex interaction noise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Soogab

    1993-01-01

    The effect of the porous leading-edge of an airfoil on the blade-vortex interaction noise, which dominates far-field acoustic spectrum of the helicopter, is investigated. The thin-layer Navier-Stokes equations are solved with a high-order upwind-biased scheme and a multizonal grid system. The Baldwin-Lomax turbulence model is modified for considering transpiration on the surface. The amplitudes of the propagating acoustic wave in the near-field are calculated directly from the computation. The porosity effect on the surface is modeled. Results show leading-edge transpiration can suppress pressure fluctuations at the leading-edge during BVI, and consequently reduce the amplitude of propagating noise by 30 percent at maximum in the near-field. The effect of porosity factor on the noise level is also investigated.

  9. Leading edge sweep effects in generic three-dimensional sidewall compression scramjet inlets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cozart, Aaron B.; Holland, Scott D.; Trexler, Carl A.; Perkins, John N.

    1992-01-01

    A computational and experimental study of generic 3D sidewall compression inlets is conducted to examine the effects of fore and aft leading edge sweep on the internal shock structure. Inlets with leading edge sweeps of +30 deg and -30 deg with sidewall compression angles of 6 deg were tested in the NASA Langley Mach 4 air tunnel at a geometric contraction ratio of 1.87. The principal difference in performance was determined to be in the mass capture. Spillage was identified as having two components: a pressure induced component and a sweep induced component. It was found that while the direction of the leading edge sweep had a large influence on the spillage, the pressure effects were more important.

  10. Aerodynamic performance enhancement of a flying wing using nanosecond pulsed DBD plasma actuator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Han Menghu

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Experimental investigation of aerodynamic control on a 35° swept flying wing by means of nanosecond dielectric barrier discharge (NS-DBD plasma was carried out at subsonic flow speed of 20–40 m/s, corresponding to Reynolds number of 3.1 × 105–6.2 × 105. In control condition, the plasma actuator was installed symmetrically on the leading edge of the wing. Lift coefficient, drag coefficient, lift-to-drag ratio and pitching moment coefficient were tested with and without control for a range of angles of attack. The tested results indicate that an increase of 14.5% in maximum lift coefficient, a decrease of 34.2% in drag coefficient, an increase of 22.4% in maximum lift-to-drag ratio and an increase of 2° at stall angle of attack could be achieved compared with the baseline case. The effects of pulsed frequency, amplitude and chord Reynolds number were also investigated. And the results revealed that control efficiency demonstrated strong dependence on pulsed frequency. Moreover, the results of pitching moment coefficient indicated that the breakdown of leading edge vortices could be delayed by plasma actuator at low pulsed frequencies.

  11. Wing kinematics and flexibility for optimal manoeuvring and escape

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Jaime Gustav

    Understanding how animals control the dynamic stall vortices in their wake is critical to developing micro-aerial vehicles and autonomous underwater vehicles, not to mention wind turbines, delta wings, and rotor craft that undergo similar dynamic stall processes. Applying this knowledge to biomimetic engineering problems requires progress in three areas: (i) understanding the flow physics of natural swimmers and flyers; (ii) developing flow measurement techniques to resolve this physics; and (iii) deriving low-cost models suitable for studying the vast parameter space observed in nature. This body of work, which consists of five research chapters, focuses on the leading-edge vortex (LEV) that forms on profiles undergoing rapid manoeuvres, delta wings, and similar devices. Lagrangian particle tracking is used throughout this thesis to track the mass and circulation transport in the LEV on manoeuvring profiles. The growth and development of the LEV is studied in relation to: flapping and plunging profile kinematics; spanwise flow from profile sweep and spanwise profile bending; and varying the angle-of-attack gradient along the profile span. Finally, scaling relationships derived from the observations above are used to develop a low-cost model for LEV growth, that is validated on a flat-plate delta wing. Together these results contribute to each of the three topics identified above, as a step towards developing robust, agile biomimetic swimmers and flyers.

  12. Leading edge erosion of coated wind turbine blades: Review of coating life models

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Slot, H.M.; Gelinck, E.R.M.; Rentrop, A.; van der Heide, Emile

    2015-01-01

    Erosion of the leading edge of wind turbine blades by droplet impingement wear, reduces blade aerodynamic efficiency and power output. Eventually, it compromises the integrity of blade surfaces. Elastomeric coatings are currently used for erosion resistance, yet the life of such coatings cannot be

  13. Effect of guide wall on jet impingement cooling in blade leading edge channel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao, Qing-Yang; Chung, Heeyoon; Choi, Seok Min; Cho, Hyung Hee

    2016-01-01

    The characteristics of fluid flow and heat transfer, which are affected by the guide wall in a jet impinged leading edge channel, have been investigated numerically using three-dimensional Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes analysis via the shear stress transport turbulence model and gamma theta transitional turbulence model. A constant wall heat flux condition has been applied to the leading edge surface. The jet-to-surface distance is constant, which is three times that of the jet diameter. The arrangement of the guide wall near the jet hole is set as a variable. Results presented in this study include the Nusselt number contour, velocity vector, streamline with velocity, and local Nusselt number distribution along the central line on the leading edge surface. The average Nusselt number and average pressure loss between jet nozzle and channel exit are calculated to assess the thermal performance. The application of the guide wall is aimed at improving heat transfer uniformity on the leading edge surface. Results indicated that the streamwise guide wall ensures the vertical jet impingement flow intensity and prevents the flow after impingement to reflux into jet flow. Thus, a combined rectangular guide wall benefits the average heat transfer, thermal performance and heat transfer distribution uniformity

  14. Effect of leading-edge geometry on boundary-layer receptivity to freestream sound

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Nay; Reed, Helen L.; Saric, W. S.

    1991-01-01

    The receptivity to freestream sound of the laminar boundary layer over a semi-infinite flat plate with an elliptic leading edge is simulated numerically. The incompressible flow past the flat plate is computed by solving the full Navier-Stokes equations in general curvilinear coordinates. A finite-difference method which is second-order accurate in space and time is used. Spatial and temporal developments of the Tollmien-Schlichting wave in the boundary layer, due to small-amplitude time-harmonic oscillations of the freestream velocity that closely simulate a sound wave travelling parallel to the plate, are observed. The effect of leading-edge curvature is studied by varying the aspect ratio of the ellipse. The boundary layer over the flat plate with a sharper leading edge is found to be less receptive. The relative contribution of the discontinuity in curvature at the ellipse-flat-plate juncture to receptivity is investigated by smoothing the juncture with a polynomial. Continuous curvature leads to less receptivity. A new geometry of the leading edge, a modified super ellipse, which provides continuous curvature at the juncture with the flat plate, is used to study the effect of continuous curvature and inherent pressure gradient on receptivity.

  15. Effects of Fin Leading Edge Sweep on Shock-Shock Interaction at Mach 6

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berry, Scott A.; Nowak, Robert J.

    1996-01-01

    The effects of fin leading edge sweep on peak heating rates due to shock-shock interaction have been experimentally examined in the Langley 20-Inch Mach 6 Tunnel. The shock interaction was produced by the intersection of a planar incident shock (16.8 deg shock angle relative to the freestream, generated by a 9 deg wedge) with the bow shock formed around a O.5-inch diameter cylindrical leading edge fin. Heating distributions along the leading edge stagnation line have been obtained using densely spaced thin film resistive-type sensors. Schlieren images were obtained to illustrate the very complex shock-shock interactions. The fin leading edge sweep angle was varied from 15-degrees swept back to 45-degrees swept forward for a freestream unit Reynolds number of 2 x 10(exp 6)/ft. Two models were utilized during the study, one with 0.025-inch spacing between gage centers, and the other 0.015-inch spacing. Gage spatial resolution on the order of 0.015-in appeared to accurately capture the narrow spike in heating. Peak heating due to shock interaction was maximized when the fin was swept forward 15 deg and 25 deg, both promoting augmentations about 7 times the baseline value. The schlieren images for these cases revealed Type 4 and Type 3 interactions, respectively.

  16. Turbulence Amplification with Incidence at the Leading Edge of a Compressor Cascade

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Garth V. Hobson

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available Detailed measurements, with a two-component laser-Doppler velocimeter and a thermal anemometer were made near the suction surface leading edge of controlled-diffusion airfoils in cascade. The Reynolds number was near 700,000, Mach number equal to 0.25, and freestream turbulence was at 1.5% ahead of the cascade.

  17. Deformation measurement in the wind tunnel for an UAV leading edge with a morphing mechanism

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Radestock, M.; Riemenschneider, J.; Monner, H.P.; Huxdorf, O.; Werter, N.P.M.; De Breuker, R.

    2016-01-01

    In a wind tunnel experiment a morphing wing with span extension and camber morphing was investigated. The considered aircraft is an unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) with a span of 4 m. During the investigations a half wing model was analysed with pressure and structural measurement. The half wing model

  18. Cooling Strategies for Vane Leading Edges in a Syngas Environment Including Effects of Deposition and Turbulence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ames, Forrest [Univ. of North Dakota, Grand Forks, ND (United States); Bons, Jeffrey [Univ. of North Dakota, Grand Forks, ND (United States)

    2014-09-30

    The Department of Energy has goals to move land based gas turbine systems to alternate fuels including coal derived synthetic gas and hydrogen. Coal is the most abundant energy resource in the US and in the world and it is economically advantageous to develop power systems which can use coal. Integrated gasification combined cycles are (IGCC) expected to allow the clean use of coal derived fuels while improving the ability to capture and sequester carbon dioxide. These cycles will need to maintain or increase turbine entry temperatures to develop competitive efficiencies. The use of coal derived syngas introduces a range of potential contaminants into the hot section of the gas turbine including sulfur, iron, calcium, and various alkali metals. Depending on the effectiveness of the gas clean up processes, there exists significant likelihood that the remaining materials will become molten in the combustion process and potentially deposit on downstream turbine surfaces. Past evidence suggests that deposition will be a strong function of increasing temperature. Currently, even with the best gas cleanup processes a small level of particulate matter in the syngas is expected. Consequently, particulate deposition is expected to be an important consideration in the design of turbine components. The leading edge region of first stage vanes most often have higher deposition rates than other areas due to strong fluid acceleration and streamline curvature in the vicinity of the surface. This region remains one of the most difficult areas in a turbine nozzle to cool due to high inlet temperatures and only a small pressure ratio for cooling. The leading edge of a vane often has relatively high heat transfer coefficients and is often cooled using showerhead film cooling arrays. The throat of the first stage nozzle is another area where deposition potentially has a strongly adverse effect on turbine performance as this region meters the turbine inlet flow. Based on roughness

  19. CFD simulations of steady flows over the IAR 65o delta wing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benmeddour, A.; Mebarki, Y.; Huang, X.Z.

    2004-01-01

    Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) studies have been conducted to simulate vortical flows around the IAR 65 o delta wing with a sharp leading edge. The effects of the centerbody on the aerodynamic characteristics of the wing are also investigated. Two flow solvers have been employed to compute steady inviscid flows over with and without centerbody configurations of the wing. These two solvers are an IAR in-house code, FJ3SOLV, and the CFD-FASTRAN commercial software. The computed flow solutions of the two solvers have been compared and correlated against the IAR wind tunnel data, including Pressure Sensitive Paint (PSP) measurements. The major features of the primary vortex have been well captured and overall reasonable accuracy was obtained. In accordance with the experimental observations for the flow conditions considered, the CFD computations revealed no major global effects of the centerbody on the surface pressure distributions of the wing and on the lift coefficient. However, CFD-FASTRAN seems to predict a vortex breakdown, which is neither predicted by FJ3SOLV nor observed in the wind tunnel for the flow conditions considered. (author)

  20. Aerodynamic performance and particle image velocimetery of piezo actuated biomimetic manduca sexta engineered wings towards the design and application of a flapping wing flight vehicle

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeLuca, Anthony M.

    the wing. Th 60° angle stop wing achieved the largest total stroke angle and generated the most lift for the lowest power consumption of the wings tested. 2. Phase averaged stereo Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) data was collected at eight phases through the flap cycle on the 30°, 45°, and 60° angle stop wings. Wings were mounted transverse and parallel to the interrogating laser sheet, and planar velocity intersections at the wing mid-span, one chord below the wing, were compared to one another to verify data fidelity. A Rankine-Froude actuator disk model was adapted to calculate the approximate vertical thrust generated from the total momentum flux through the flapping semi-disk using the velocity field measurements. Three component stereo u, v, and w-velocity contour measurements confirmed the presence of extensive vortical structures in the vicinity of the wing. The leading edge vortex was successfully tracked through the stroke cycle appearing at approximately 25% span, increasing in circulatory strength and translational velocity down the span toward the tip, and dissipating just after 75% span. Thrust calculations showed the vertically mounted wing more accurately represented the vertical forces when compared to its corresponding force balance measurement than the horizontally mounted wing. The mid-span showed the highest vertical velocity profile below the wing; and hence, was the location responsible for the majority of lift production along the span.

  1. ARF1 recruits RAC1 to leading edge in neutrophil chemotaxis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazaki, Yuichi; Onodera, Yasuhito; Higashi, Tsunehito; Horinouchi, Takahiro; Oikawa, Tsukasa; Sabe, Hisataka

    2017-10-02

    The small GTPase ARF1 mediates membrane trafficking mostly from the Golgi, and is essential for the G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR)-mediated chemotaxis of neutrophils. In this process, ARF1 is activated by the guanine nucleotide exchanger GBF1, and is inactivated by the GTPase-activating protein GIT2. Neutrophils generate the Gβγ-PAK1-αPIX-GIT2 linear complex during GPCR-induced chemotaxis, in which αPIX activates RAC1/CDC42, which then employs PAK1. However, it has remained unclear as to why GIT2 is included in this complex. We investigated the association between ARF1 and RAC1/CDC42 during the fMLP-stimulated chemotaxis of HL60 cells. We found that the silencing of GBF1 significantly impaired the recruitment of RAC1 to the leading edges, but not PAK1, αPIX, RAC2, or CDC42. A significant population of RAC1 colocalized with ARF1 at the leading edges in stimulated cells, whereas fMLP activated both ARF1 and ARF5. Consistently, the silencing of ARF1, but not ARF5, impaired the recruitment of RAC1, whereas the silencing of RAC1 did not affect the recruitment of ARF1 to the leading edges. Our results indicated that the activation of ARF1 triggers the plasma membrane recruitment of RAC1 in GPCR-mediated chemotaxis, which is essential for cortical actin remodeling. Thus, membrane remodeling at the leading edges appears to precede actin remodeling in chemotaxis. Together with the fact that GIT2, which inactivates ARF1, is an integral component of the machinery activating RAC1, we proposed a model in which the ARF1-RAC1 linkage enables the regulation of ARF1 by repetitive on/off cycles during GPCR-mediated neutrophil chemotaxis.

  2. Numerical Simulation and Experiment of a Lifting Body with Leading-Edge Rotating Cylinder

    OpenAIRE

    A. Badarudin; C. S. Oon; S. N. Kazi; N. Nik-Ghazali; Y. J. Lee; W. T. Chong

    2013-01-01

    An experimental and simulation flight test has been carried out to evaluate the longitudinal gliding characteristics of a lifting body with blunted half-cone geometry. The novelty here is the lifting body's pitch control mechanism, which consists of a pair of leading-edge rotating cylinders. Flight simulation uses aerodynamic data from computational fluid dynamics supported by wind-tunnel test. Flight test consists of releasing an aluminum lifting body model from a moving vehicle at the appro...

  3. Methodology for heat flux investigation on leading edges using infrared thermography

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Corre, Y.; Gardarein, J.-L.; Dejarnac, Renaud; Gaspar, J.; Gunn, J. P.; Aumeunier, M.-H.; Courtois, X.; Missirlian, M.; Rigollet, F.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 57, č. 1 (2017), č. článku 016009. ISSN 0029-5515 Institutional support: RVO:61389021 Keywords : IR thermography * leading edge * heat flux * limiter Subject RIV: BL - Plasma and Gas Discharge Physics OBOR OECD: Fluids and plasma physics (including surface physics) Impact factor: 3.307, year: 2016 http://iopscience.iop.org/article/10.1088/0029-5515/57/1/016009/meta

  4. Effects of Nose Radius and Aerodynamic Loading on Leading Edge Receptivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammerton, P. W.; Kerschen, E. J.

    1998-01-01

    An analysis is presented of the effects of airfoil thickness and mean aerodynamic loading on boundary-layer receptivity in the leading-edge region. The case of acoustic free-stream disturbances, incident on a thin cambered airfoil with a parabolic leading edge in a low Mach number flow, is considered. An asymptotic analysis based on large Reynolds number is developed, supplemented by numerical results. The airfoil thickness distribution enters the theory through a Strouhal number based on the nose radius of the airfoil, S = (omega)tau(sub n)/U, where omega is the frequency of the acoustic wave and U is the mean flow speed. The influence of mean aerodynamic loading enters through an effective angle-of-attack parameter ti, related to flow around the leading edge from the lower surface to the upper. The variation of the receptivity level is analyzed as a function of S, mu, and characteristics of the free-stream acoustic wave. For an unloaded leading edge, a finite nose radius dramatically reduces the receptivity level compared to that for a flat plate, the amplitude of the instability waves in the boundary layer being decreased by an order of magnitude when S = 0.3. Modest levels of aerodynamic loading are found to further decrease the receptivity level for the upper surface of the airfoil, while an increase in receptivity level occurs for the lower surface. For larger angles of attack close to the critical angle for boundary layer separation, a local rise in the receptivity level occurs for the upper surface, while for the lower surface the receptivity decreases. The effects of aerodynamic loading are more pronounced at larger values of S. Oblique acoustic waves produce much higher receptivity levels than acoustic waves propagating downstream parallel to the airfoil chord.

  5. Velocity and Drag Evolution From the Leading Edge of a Model Mangrove Forest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maza, Maria; Adler, Katherine; Ramos, Diogo; Garcia, Adrian Mikhail; Nepf, Heidi

    2017-11-01

    An experimental study of unidirectional flow through a model mangrove forest measured both velocity and forces on individual trees. The individual trees were 1/12th scale models of mature Rhizophora, including 24 prop roots distributed in a three-dimensional layout. Thirty-two model trees were distributed in a staggered array producing a 2.5 m long forest. The velocity evolved from a boundary layer profile at the forest leading edge to a vertical profile determined by the vertical distribution of frontal area, with significantly higher velocity above the prop roots. Fully developed conditions were reached at the fifth tree row from the leading edge. Within the root zone the velocity was reduced by up to 50% and the TKE was increased by as much as fivefold, relative to the upstream conditions. TKE in the root zone was mainly produced by root and trunk wakes, and it agreed in magnitude with the estimation obtained using the Tanino and Nepf (2008) formulation. Maximum TKE occurred at the top of the roots, where a strong shear region was associated with the change in frontal area. The drag measured on individual trees decreased from the leading edge and reached a constant value at the fifth row and beyond, i.e., in the fully developed region. The drag exhibited a quadratic dependence on velocity, which justified the definition of a quadratic drag coefficient. Once the correct drag length-scale was defined, the measured drag coefficients collapsed to a single function of Reynolds number.

  6. Rapid and dynamic arginylation of the leading edge β-actin is required for cell migration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavlyk, Iuliia; Leu, Nicolae A; Vedula, Pavan; Kurosaka, Satoshi; Kashina, Anna

    2018-04-01

    β-actin plays key roles in cell migration. Our previous work demonstrated that β-actin in migratory non-muscle cells is N-terminally arginylated and that this arginylation is required for normal lamellipodia extension. Here, we examined the function of β-actin arginylation in cell migration. We found that arginylated β-actin is concentrated at the leading edge of lamellipodia and that this enrichment is abolished after serum starvation as well as in contact-inhibited cells in confluent cultures, suggesting that arginylated β-actin at the cell leading edge is coupled to active migration. Arginylated actin levels exhibit dynamic changes in response to cell stimuli, lowered after serum starvation and dramatically elevating within minutes after cell stimulation by readdition of serum or lysophosphatidic acid. These dynamic changes require active translation and are not seen in confluent contact-inhibited cell cultures. Microinjection of arginylated actin antibodies into cells severely and specifically inhibits their migration rates. Together, these data strongly suggest that arginylation of β-actin is a tightly regulated dynamic process that occurs at the leading edge of locomoting cells in response to stimuli and is integral to the signaling network that regulates cell migration. © 2018 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. Compact vortices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bazeia, D.; Losano, L.; Marques, M.A.; Zafalan, I. [Universidade Federal da Paraiba, Departamento de Fisica, Joao Pessoa, PB (Brazil); Menezes, R. [Universidade Federal da Paraiba, Departamento de Ciencias Exatas, Rio Tinto, PB (Brazil); Universidade Federal de Campina Grande, Departamento de Fisica, Campina Grande, PB (Brazil)

    2017-02-15

    We study a family of Maxwell-Higgs models, described by the inclusion of a function of the scalar field that represent generalized magnetic permeability. We search for vortex configurations which obey first-order differential equations that solve the equations of motion. We first deal with the asymptotic behavior of the field configurations, and then implement a numerical study of the solutions, the energy density and the magnetic field. We work with the generalized permeability having distinct profiles, giving rise to new models, and we investigate how the vortices behave, compared with the solutions of the corresponding standard models. In particular, we show how to build compact vortices, that is, vortex solutions with the energy density and magnetic field vanishing outside a compact region of the plane. (orig.)

  8. Numerical and experimental study on the ability of dynamic roughness to alter the development of a leading edge vortex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffin, Christopher D.

    Dynamic stall is an unsteady aerodynamic phenomenon garnering much research interest because it occurs in a variety of applications. For example, dynamic stall is known to occur on helicopter rotor blades, wind turbines, high maneuvering military aircraft, and flapping wings. Dynamic stall occurs when an aerodynamic lifting device, such as an airfoil, wing, or turbomachine blade, undergoes a rapid pitching motion. It also occurs on lifting devices that are impulsively started at high angles of attack. Dynamic stall can "delay" aerodynamic stall to angles of attack that are significantly beyond the static stall angle of attack. During dynamic stall a large leading edge vortex (LEV) is formed, which creates greater fluid acceleration over the wing or airfoil, thus sustaining lift. As this vortex is shed downstream stall eventually occurs and there is an abrupt increase in drag and a large shift in pitching moment. Research has been performed to better understand the mechanisms occurring during dynamic stall in an effort to find ways to best take advantage of the increased lift associated with dynamic stall, but avoid the downfalls that occur once stall is initiated. Few attempts have been made to alter the LEV, and these attempts have used methods associated with laminar boundary layer separation control. Although these methods have shown promise, they suffer from the drawback that they exhaust more energy than is gained by flow control, while also only being effective at certain flight regimes. The research described herein documents the first study on the ability of dynamic roughness to alter the LEV encountered on a rapidly pitching airfoil. Both numerical and experimental studies were performed, including two-dimensional and three-dimensional computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations as well as stereo and planar particle image velocimetry (PIV) experiments. Evidence for the ability of small scale dynamic roughness to alter the development of the LEV was

  9. Numerical investigation on heat transfer in an advanced new leading edge impingement cooling configuration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Lin

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available It is known that the leading edge has the most critical heat transfer area of a gas turbine blade. The highest heat transfer rates on the airfoil can always be found on the stagnation region of the leading edge. In order to further improve the gas turbine thermal efficiency the development of more advanced internal cooling configurations at leading edge is very necessary. As the state of the art leading edge cooling configuration a concave channel with multi inline jets has been widely used in most of the blades. However, this kind of configuration also generates strong spent flow, which shifts the impingement off the stagnation point and weakens the impingement heat transfer. In order to solve this problem a new internal cooling configuration using double swirl chambers in gas turbine leading edge has been developed and introduced in this paper. The double swirl chambers cooling (DSC technology is introduced by the authors and contributes a significant enhancement of heat transfer due to the generation of two anti-rotated swirls. In DSC-cooling, the reattachment of the swirl flows always occurs in the middle of the chamber, which results in a linear impingement effect. Compared with the reference standard impingement cooling configuration this new cooling system provides a much more uniform heat transfer distribution in the chamber axial direction and also provides a much higher heat transfer rate. In this study, the influences of different geometrical parameters e.g. merging ratio of two cylinder channels, the jet inlet hole configurations and radius of blunt protuberances in DSC have been investigated numerically. The results show that in the DSC cooling system the jet inlet hole configurations have large influences on the thermal performance. The rectangular inlet holes, especially those with higher aspect ratios, show much better heat transfer enhancement than the round inlet holes. However, as the price for it the total pressure drop is

  10. Simulated big sagebrush regeneration supports predicted changes at the trailing and leading edges of distribution shifts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlaepfer, Daniel R.; Taylor, Kyle A.; Pennington, Victoria E.; Nelson, Kellen N.; Martin, Trace E.; Rottler, Caitlin M.; Lauenroth, William K.; Bradford, John B.

    2015-01-01

    Many semi-arid plant communities in western North America are dominated by big sagebrush. These ecosystems are being reduced in extent and quality due to economic development, invasive species, and climate change. These pervasive modifications have generated concern about the long-term viability of sagebrush habitat and sagebrush-obligate wildlife species (notably greater sage-grouse), highlighting the need for better understanding of the future big sagebrush distribution, particularly at the species' range margins. These leading and trailing edges of potential climate-driven sagebrush distribution shifts are likely to be areas most sensitive to climate change. We used a process-based regeneration model for big sagebrush, which simulates potential germination and seedling survival in response to climatic and edaphic conditions and tested expectations about current and future regeneration responses at trailing and leading edges that were previously identified using traditional species distribution models. Our results confirmed expectations of increased probability of regeneration at the leading edge and decreased probability of regeneration at the trailing edge below current levels. Our simulations indicated that soil water dynamics at the leading edge became more similar to the typical seasonal ecohydrological conditions observed within the current range of big sagebrush ecosystems. At the trailing edge, an increased winter and spring dryness represented a departure from conditions typically supportive of big sagebrush. Our results highlighted that minimum and maximum daily temperatures as well as soil water recharge and summer dry periods are important constraints for big sagebrush regeneration. Overall, our results confirmed previous predictions, i.e., we see consistent changes in areas identified as trailing and leading edges; however, we also identified potential local refugia within the trailing edge, mostly at sites at higher elevation. Decreasing

  11. Case Studies of Leading Edge Small Urban High Schools. Relevance Strategic Designs: 5. Life Academy of Health and Bioscience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shields, Regis Anne; Ireland, Nicole; City, Elizabeth; Derderian, Julie; Miles, Karen Hawley

    2008-01-01

    This report is one of nine detailed case studies of small urban high schools that served as the foundation for the Education Resource Strategies (ERS) report "Strategic Designs: Lessons from Leading Edge Small Urban High Schools." These nine schools were dubbed "Leading Edge Schools" because they stand apart from other high…

  12. Case Studies of Leading Edge Small Urban High Schools. Relevance Strategic Designs: 8. High Tech High School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shields, Regis Anne; Ireland, Nicole; City, Elizabeth; Derderian, Julie; Miles, Karen Hawley

    2008-01-01

    This report is one of nine detailed case studies of small urban high schools that served as the foundation for the Education Resource Strategies (ERS) report "Strategic Designs: Lessons from Leading Edge Small Urban High Schools." These nine schools were dubbed "Leading Edge Schools" because they stand apart from other high…

  13. Case Studies of Leading Edge Small Urban High Schools. Personalization Strategic Designs: 9. MetWest High School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shields, Regis Anne; Ireland, Nicole; City, Elizabeth; Derderian, Julie; Miles, Karen Hawley

    2008-01-01

    This report is one of nine detailed case studies of small urban high schools that served as the foundation for the Education Resource Strategies (ERS) report "Strategic Designs: Lessons from Leading Edge Small Urban High Schools." These nine schools were dubbed "Leading Edge Schools" because they stand apart from other high…

  14. Case Studies of Leading Edge Small Urban High Schools. Relevance Strategic Designs: 7. TechBoston Academy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shields, Regis Anne; Ireland, Nicole; City, Elizabeth; Derderian, Julie; Miles, Karen Hawley

    2008-01-01

    This report is one of nine detailed case studies of small urban high schools that served as the foundation for the Education Resource Strategies (ERS) report "Strategic Designs: Lessons from Leading Edge Small Urban High Schools." These nine schools were dubbed "Leading Edge Schools" because they stand apart from other high…

  15. Case Studies of Leading Edge Small Urban High Schools. Core Academic Strategic Designs: 3. University Park Campus School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shields, Regis Anne; Ireland, Nicole; City, Elizabeth; Derderian, Julie; Miles, Karen Hawley

    2008-01-01

    This report is one of nine detailed case studies of small urban high schools that served as the foundation for the Education Resource Strategies (ERS) report "Strategic Designs: Lessons from Leading Edge Small Urban High Schools." These nine schools were dubbed "Leading Edge Schools" because they stand apart from other high…

  16. Case Studies of Leading Edge Small Urban High Schools. Core Academic Strategic Designs: 1. Academy of the Pacific Rim

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shields, Regis Anne; Ireland, Nicole; City, Elizabeth; Derderian, Julie; Miles, Karen Hawley

    2008-01-01

    This report is one of nine detailed case studies of small urban high schools that served as the foundation for the Education Resource Strategies (ERS) report "Strategic Designs: Lessons from Leading Edge Small Urban High Schools." These nine schools were dubbed "Leading Edge Schools" because they stand apart from other high…

  17. Case Studies of Leading Edge Small Urban High Schools. Core Academic Strategic Designs: 2. Noble Street Charter High School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shields, Regis Anne; Ireland, Nicole; City, Elizabeth; Derderian, Julie; Miles, Karen Hawley

    2008-01-01

    This report is one of nine detailed case studies of small urban high schools that served as the foundation for the Education Resource Strategies (ERS) report "Strategic Designs: Lessons from Leading Edge Small Urban High Schools." These nine schools were dubbed "Leading Edge Schools" because they stand apart from other high…

  18. An overview of two nonlinear supersonic wing design studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, D. S.; Pittman, J. L.; Wood, R. M.

    1983-01-01

    The progress of two studies which apply nonlinear aerodynamics to supersonic wing design is reviewed. The first study employed a nonlinear potential flow code to design wings for high lift and low drag due to lift by employing a controlled leading-edge expansion in which the crossflow accelerates to supercritical conditions and decelerates through a weak shock. The second study utilized a modified linearized theory code to explore the concept of using 'attainable' leading-edge thrust as a guide for selecting a wing leading-edge shape (planform and radius) for maintaining attached flow and maximizing leading-edge thrust. Experimental and theoretical results obtained during the course of these two studies are discussed.

  19. An analytically-based method for predicting the noise generated by the interaction between turbulence and a serrated leading edge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathews, J. R.; Peake, N.

    2018-05-01

    This paper considers the interaction of turbulence with a serrated leading edge. We investigate the noise produced by an aerofoil moving through a turbulent perturbation to uniform flow by considering the scattered pressure from the leading edge. We model the aerofoil as an infinite half plane with a leading edge serration, and develop an analytical model using a Green's function based upon the work of Howe. This allows us to consider both deterministic eddies and synthetic turbulence interacting with the leading edge. We show that it is possible to reduce the noise by using a serrated leading edge compared with a straight edge, but the optimal noise-reducing choice of serration is hard to predict due to the complex interaction. We also consider the effect of angle of attack, and find that in general the serrations are less effective at higher angles of attack.

  20. Effects of Alternate Leading Edge Cutback on the Space Shuttle Main Engine Low Pressure Fuel Pump

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulder, Andrew; Skelley, Stephen

    2016-01-01

    A higher order cavitation oscillation observed in the SSME low pressure fuel pump has been eliminated in water flow testing of a modified subscale replica of the inducer. The low pressure pump was modified by removing the outboard sections of two opposing blades of the four-bladed inducer, blending the "cutback" regions into the blades at the leading edge and tip, and removing material on the suction sides to decrease the exposed leading edge thickness. The leading edge tips of the cutback blades were moved approximately 25 degrees from their previous locations, thereby increasing one blade to blade spacing, decreasing the second, while simultaneously moving the cutback tips downstream. The test was conducted in MSFC's inducer test loop at scaled operating conditions in degassed and filtered water. In addition to eliminating HOC across the entire scaled operating regime, rotating cavitation was suppressed while the range of both alternate blade and asymmetric cavitation were increased. These latter phenomena, and more significantly, the shifts between these cavitation modes also resulted in significant changes to the head coefficient at low cavitation numbers. Reverse flow was detected at a slightly larger flow coefficient with the cutback inducer and suction capability was reduced by approximately 1 velocity head at and above approximately 90% of the reference flow coefficient. These performance changes along with more intense reverse flow are consistent with poor flow area management and increased incidence in the cutback region. Although the test demonstrated that the inducer modification was successful at eliminating the higher order cavitation across the entire scaled operating regime, different, previously unobserved, cavitation oscillations were introduced and significant performance penalties were imposed.

  1. Compressible Navier-Stokes equations: A study of leading edge effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hariharan, S. I.; Karbhari, P. R.

    1987-01-01

    A computational method is developed that allows numerical calculations of the time dependent compressible Navier-Stokes equations.The current results concern a study of flow past a semi-infinite flat plate.Flow develops from given inflow conditions upstream and passes over the flat plate to leave the computational domain without reflecting at the downstream boundary. Leading edge effects are included in this paper. In addition, specification of a heated region which gets convected with the flow is considered. The time history of this convection is obtained, and it exhibits a wave phenomena.

  2. Heat transfer characteristics of hypersonic waveriders with an emphasis on leading edge effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanmol, Denis O.; Anderson, John D., Jr.

    1992-01-01

    The present analysis of the heat-transfer characteristics of a family of viscous-optimized, 60 m-long waverider hypersonic vehicles gives attention to the transition from laminar to turbulent flow, and to how the transition affects aerodynamic heating distributions over the waverider surface. Two different constant-dynamic-pressure flight trajectories are considered, at 0.2 and 1.0 freestream atmospheres. For Mach numbers below 10, it is found that passive radiative cooling of the surface is sufficient. The degree of leading-edge bluntness required by aerodynamic heating constraints does not significantly degrade the aerodynamic performance of these waveriders.

  3. A Time-Walk Correction Method for PET Detectors Based on Leading Edge Discriminators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Junwei; Schmall, Jeffrey P; Judenhofer, Martin S; Di, Kun; Yang, Yongfeng; Cherry, Simon R

    2017-09-01

    The leading edge timing pick-off technique is the simplest timing extraction method for PET detectors. Due to the inherent time-walk of the leading edge technique, corrections should be made to improve timing resolution, especially for time-of-flight PET. Time-walk correction can be done by utilizing the relationship between the threshold crossing time and the event energy on an event by event basis. In this paper, a time-walk correction method is proposed and evaluated using timing information from two identical detectors both using leading edge discriminators. This differs from other techniques that use an external dedicated reference detector, such as a fast PMT-based detector using constant fraction techniques to pick-off timing information. In our proposed method, one detector was used as reference detector to correct the time-walk of the other detector. Time-walk in the reference detector was minimized by using events within a small energy window (508.5 - 513.5 keV). To validate this method, a coincidence detector pair was assembled using two SensL MicroFB SiPMs and two 2.5 mm × 2.5 mm × 20 mm polished LYSO crystals. Coincidence timing resolutions using different time pick-off techniques were obtained at a bias voltage of 27.5 V and a fixed temperature of 20 °C. The coincidence timing resolution without time-walk correction were 389.0 ± 12.0 ps (425 -650 keV energy window) and 670.2 ± 16.2 ps (250-750 keV energy window). The timing resolution with time-walk correction improved to 367.3 ± 0.5 ps (425 - 650 keV) and 413.7 ± 0.9 ps (250 - 750 keV). For comparison, timing resolutions were 442.8 ± 12.8 ps (425 - 650 keV) and 476.0 ± 13.0 ps (250 - 750 keV) using constant fraction techniques, and 367.3 ± 0.4 ps (425 - 650 keV) and 413.4 ± 0.9 ps (250 - 750 keV) using a reference detector based on the constant fraction technique. These results show that the proposed leading edge based time-walk correction method works well. Timing resolution obtained

  4. Low Reynolds Number Wing Transients in Rotation and Translation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Anya; Schlueter, Kristy

    2012-11-01

    The unsteady aerodynamic forces and flow fields generated by a wing undergoing transient motions in both rotation and translation were investigated. An aspect ratio 2 flat plate wing at a 45 deg angle of attack was driven over 84 deg of rotation (3 chord-lengths of travel at 3/4 span) and 3 and 10 chord-lengths of translation in quiescent water at Reynolds numbers between 2,500 and 15,000. Flow visualization on the rotating wing revealed a leading edge vortex that lifted off of the wing surface, but remained in the vicinity of the wing for the duration of the wing stroke. A second spanwise vortex with strong axial flow was also observed. As the tip vortex grew, the leading edge vortex joined the tip vortex in a loop-like structure over the aft half of the wing. Near the leading edge, spanwise flow in the second vortex became entrained in the tip vortex near the corner of the wing. Unsteady force measurements revealed that lift coefficient increased through the constant-velocity portion of the wing stroke. Forces were compared for variations in wing acceleration and Reynolds number for both rotational and translational motions. The effect of tank blockage was investigated by repeating the experiments on multiple wings, varying the distance between the wing tip and tank wall. U.S. Air Force Research Laboratory, Summer Faculty Fellowship Program.

  5. Conjugate calculation of a film-cooled blade for improvement of the leading edge cooling configuration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Norbert Moritz

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Great efforts are still put into the design process of advanced film-cooling configurations. In particular, the vanes and blades of turbine front stages have to be cooled extensively for a safe operation. The conjugate calculation technique is used for the three-dimensional thermal load prediction of a film-cooled test blade of a modern gas turbine. Thus, it becomes possible to take into account the interaction of internal flows, external flow, and heat transfer without the prescription of heat transfer coefficients. The focus of the investigation is laid on the leading edge part of the blade. The numerical model consists of all internal flow passages and cooling hole rows at the leading edge. Furthermore, the radial gap flow is also part of the model. The comparison with thermal pyrometer measurements shows that with respect to regions with high thermal load a qualitatively and quantitatively good agreement of the conjugate results and the measurements can be found. In particular, the region in the vicinity of the mid-span section is exposed to a higher thermal load, which requires further improvement of the cooling arrangement. Altogether the achieved results demonstrate that the conjugate calculation technique is applicable for reasonable prediction of three-dimensional thermal load of complex cooling configurations for blades.

  6. Two Functionally Distinct Sources of Actin Monomers Supply the Leading Edge of Lamellipodia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric A. Vitriol

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Lamellipodia, the sheet-like protrusions of motile cells, consist of networks of actin filaments (F-actin regulated by the ordered assembly from and disassembly into actin monomers (G-actin. Traditionally, G-actin is thought to exist as a homogeneous pool. Here, we show that there are two functionally and molecularly distinct sources of G-actin that supply lamellipodial actin networks. G-actin originating from the cytosolic pool requires the monomer-binding protein thymosin β4 (Tβ4 for optimal leading-edge localization, is targeted to formins, and is responsible for creating an elevated G/F-actin ratio that promotes membrane protrusion. The second source of G-actin comes from recycled lamellipodia F-actin. Recycling occurs independently of Tβ4 and appears to regulate lamellipodia homeostasis. Tβ4-bound G-actin specifically localizes to the leading edge because it does not interact with Arp2/3-mediated polymerization sites found throughout the lamellipodia. These findings demonstrate that actin networks can be constructed from multiple sources of monomers with discrete spatiotemporal functions.

  7. Experimental investigation of wavy leading edges on rod-aerofoil interaction noise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Weijie; Qiao, Weiyang; Tong, Fan; Wang, Liangfeng; Wang, Xunnian

    2018-05-01

    Experimental studies are performed to investigate the effect of wavy leading edges on rod-aerofoil interaction noise in an open-jet anechoic wind tunnel. NACA 0012 aerofoils with straight and wavy leading edges (denoted by SLE and WLE, respectively) are embedded in the wake of a circular rod. The WLEs are in the form of sinusoidal profiles of amplitude, A, and wavelength, W. Parametric studies of the amplitude and wavelength characteristics are conducted to understand the effect of WLEs on noise reduction. It is observed that the sound power reduction level is sensitive to both the amplitude and wavelength of the WLEs. The WLE with the largest amplitude and smallest wavelength can achieve the most considerable noise reduction effect of up to 4 dB. The influences of rod diameter, d, and free-stream velocity, U0, on the noise reduction effect of the WLEs are also investigated. In addition, a parametric study of the influence of separating rod-aerofoil distance on the acoustic radiation of the SLE case and on the sound power reduction level of the WLE cases is performed. It is found that a critical spacing exists where the acoustic radiation and noise reduction can be divided into two different "modes".

  8. On the effect of leading edge blowing on circulation control airfoil aerodynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mclachlan, B. G.

    1987-01-01

    In the present context the term circulation control is used to denote a method of lift generation that utilizes tangential jet blowing over the upper surface of a rounded trailing edge airfoil to determine the location of the boundary layer separation points, thus setting an effective Kutta condition. At present little information exists on the flow structure generated by circulation control airfoils under leading edge blowing. Consequently, no theoretical methods exist to predict airfoil performance under such conditions. An experimental study of the flow field generated by a two dimensional circulation control airfoil under steady leading and trailing edge blowing was undertaken. The objective was to fundamentally understand the overall flow structure generated and its relation to airfoil performance. Flow visualization was performed to define the overall flow field structure. Measurements of the airfoil forces were also made to provide a correlation of the observed flow field structure to airfoil performance. Preliminary results are presented, specifically on the effect on the flow field structure of leading edge blowing, alone and in conjunction with trailing edge blowing.

  9. Numerical Prediction of the Impact of Non-Uniform Leading Edge Coatings On the Aerodynamic Performance of Compressor Airfoils

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Elmstrom, Michael

    2004-01-01

    A computational fluid dynamic (CFD) investigation is presented that provides predictions of the aerodynamic impact of uniform and non-uniform coatings applied to the leading edge of a compressor airfoil in a cascade. Using a NACA 65(12...

  10. Use of Leading Edge Waves to Increase Lift/Drag Ratio Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — One of the goals of NASA's Fundamental Aeronautics "Subsonic Fixed Wing" project is to reduce fuel burn by 25% 5% by 2018. This corresponds approximately to an...

  11. Characterization and Control of Vortex Breakdown over a Delta Wing at High Angles of Attack

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Mitchell, Anthony

    2000-01-01

    .... The goal of this research is the control of leading-edge vortex breakdown by open-loop, along-the-core blowing near the apex of a delta wing to improve lift and maneuverability at high angles of attack...

  12. Electro-Magnetic Flow Control to Enable Natural Laminar Flow Wings Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This research team has developed a solid-state electromagnetic device that, when embedded along the leading edge of an aircraft wing, can disrupt laminar air flow on...

  13. Electro-Magnetic Flow Control to Enable Natural Laminar Flow Wings

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This research team has developed a solid-state electromagnetic device that, when embedded along the leading edge of an aircraft wing, can disrupt laminar air flow on...

  14. Next-generation science information network for leading-edge applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Urushidani, S. [National Institute of Informatics, 2-1-2 Hitotsubashi Chiyoda-ku, Tokyo 101-8430 (Japan)], E-mail: urushi@nii.ac.jp; Matsukata, J. [National Institute of Informatics, 2-1-2 Hitotsubashi Chiyoda-ku, Tokyo 101-8430 (Japan)

    2008-04-15

    High-speed networks are definitely essential tools for leading-edge applications in many research areas, including nuclear fusion research. This paper describes a number of advanced features in the Japanese next-generation science information network, called SINET3, and gives researchers clues on the uses of advanced high-speed network for their applications. The network services have four categories, multiple layer transfer, enriched virtual private network, enhanced quality-of-service, and bandwidth on demand services, and comprise a versatile service platform. The paper also describes the network architecture and advanced networking capabilities that enable economical service accommodation and flexible network resource assignment as well as effective use of Japan's first 40-Gbps lines.

  15. Cdc42-dependent leading edge coordination is essential for interstitial dendritic cell migration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lammermann, Tim; Renkawitz, Jorg; Wu, Xunwei

    2009-01-01

    proteolysis. Instead, the protrusive flow of the actin cytoskeleton directly drives a basal mode of locomotion that is occasionally supported by actomyosin contractions at the trailing edge to propel the cell's rigid nucleus. We here delete the small GTPase Cdc42 in DCs and find that actin flow and actomyosin......Mature dendritic cells (DCs) moving from the skin to the lymph node are a prototypic example of rapidly migrating amoeboid leukocytes. Interstitial DC migration is directionally guided by chemokines, but independent of specific adhesive interactions with the tissue as well as pericellular...... contraction are still initiated in response to chemotactic cues. Accordingly, the cells are able to polarize and form protrusions. However, in the absence of Cdc42 the protrusions are temporally and spatially dysregulated which leads to impaired leading edge coordination. While this defect still allows...

  16. MHD forced and free convection boundary layer flow near the leading edge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hossain, M.A.; Ahmed, M.

    1988-07-01

    Magnetohydrodynamic forced and free convection flow of an electrically conducting viscous incompressible fluid past a vertical flat plate with uniform heat flux in the presence of a magnetic field acting normal to the plate that moves with the fluid has been studied near the leading edge of the plate. The coupled non-linear equations are solved by the method of superposition for the values of the Prandtl number ranges from 0.01 to 10.0. The velocity and the temperature profiles are presented graphically and the values of the wall shear-stress as well as the heat transfer rate are presented in tabular form showing the effect of the buoyancy force and the applied magnetic field. To show the accuracy of the present method some typical values are compared with the available one. (author). 17 refs, 3 figs, 2 tabs

  17. Next-generation science information network for leading-edge applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Urushidani, S.; Matsukata, J.

    2008-01-01

    High-speed networks are definitely essential tools for leading-edge applications in many research areas, including nuclear fusion research. This paper describes a number of advanced features in the Japanese next-generation science information network, called SINET3, and gives researchers clues on the uses of advanced high-speed network for their applications. The network services have four categories, multiple layer transfer, enriched virtual private network, enhanced quality-of-service, and bandwidth on demand services, and comprise a versatile service platform. The paper also describes the network architecture and advanced networking capabilities that enable economical service accommodation and flexible network resource assignment as well as effective use of Japan's first 40-Gbps lines

  18. Effect of leading edge sweep on shock-shock interference at Mach 8

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glass, Christopher E.; Wieting, Allan R.; Holden, Michael S.

    1989-01-01

    These Mach 8 experimental results are applicable to the details of a shock-shock interference that may occur on an engine inlet of a hypersonic vehicle from a swept forebody shock interacting with a swept cowl leading edge bow shock or from a swept splitter plate shock interacting with a swept fuel injection strut bow shock. Peak surface pressure and heat transfer rate on the cylinder were about 10 and 30 times the undisturbed flow stagnation point value, respectively, for the 0 deg sweep test. A comparison of the 15 deg and 30 deg swept results with the 0 deg swept results shows that peak pressure was reduced about 13 percent and 44 percent, respectively, and peak heat transfer rate was reduced about 7 percent and 27 percent, respectively.

  19. Development of Delta Wing Aerodynamics Research in Universiti Teknologi Malaysia Low Speed Wind Tunnel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shabudin Mat

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents wind tunnel experiment on two delta wing configurations which are differentiated by their leading edge profiles: sharp and round-edged wings. The experiments were performed as a part of the delta wing aerodynamics research development in Universiti Teknologi Malaysia, low speed tunnel (UTM-LST. Steady load balance and flow visualization tests were conducted at Reynolds numbers of 0.5, 1, and 1.5 × 106, respectively. The flow measurement at low Reynolds number was also performed at as low as speed of 5 m/s. During the experiments, laser with smoke flow visualizations test was performed on both wings. The study has identified interesting features of the interrelationship between the conventional leading edge primary vortex and the occurrence and development of the vortex breakdown above the delta wings. The results conclude the vortex characteristics are largely dependent on the Reynolds number, angle of attack, and leading-edge radii of the wing.

  20. α-Crystallin localizes to the leading edges of migrating lens epithelial cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maddala, Rupalatha; Vasantha Rao, P.

    2005-01-01

    α-crystallin (αA and αB) is a major lens protein, which belongs to the small heat-shock family of proteins and binds to various cytoskeletal proteins including actin, vimentin and desmin. In this study, we investigated the cellular localization of αA and αB-crystallins in migrating epithelial cells isolated from porcine lens. Immunofluorescence localization and confocal imaging of αB-crystallin in confluent and in migrating subconfluent cell cultures revealed a distinct pattern of subcellular distribution. While αB-crystallin localization was predominantly cytoplasmic in confluent cultures, it was strongly localized to the leading edges of cell membrane or the lamellipodia in migrating cells. In accordance with this pattern, we found abundant levels of αB-crystallin in membrane fractions compared to cytosolic and nuclear fractions in migrating lens epithelial cells. αA-crystallin, which has 60% sequence identity to αB-crystallin, also exhibited a distribution profile localizing to the leading edge of the cell membrane in migrating lens epithelial cells. Localization of αB-crystallin to the lamellipodia appears to be dependent on phosphorylation of residue serine-59. An inhibitor of p38 MAP kinase (SB202190), but not the ERK kinase inhibitor PD98059, was found to diminish localization of αB-crystallin to the lamellipodia, and this effect was found to be associated with reduced levels of Serine-59 phosphorylated αB-crystallin in SB202190-treated migrating lens epithelial cells. αB-crystallin localization to the lamellipodia was also altered by the treatment with RGD (Arg-Ala-Asp) peptide, dominant negative N17 Rac1 GTPase, cytochalasin D and Src kinase inhibitor (PP2), but not by the Rho kinase inhibitor Y-27632 or the myosin II inhibitor, blebbistatin. Additionally, in migrating lens epithelial cells, αB-crystallin exhibited a clear co-localization with the actin meshwork, β-catenin, WAVE-1, a promoter of actin nucleation, Abi-2, a component of WAVE

  1. RANS Based Methodology for Predicting the Influence of Leading Edge Erosion on Airfoil Performance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Langel, Christopher M. [Univ. of California, Davis, CA (United States). Dept. of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering; Chow, Raymond C. [Univ. of California, Davis, CA (United States). Dept. of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering; van Dam, C. P. [Univ. of California, Davis, CA (United States). Dept. of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering; Maniaci, David Charles [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States). Wind Energy Technologies Dept.

    2017-10-01

    The impact of surface roughness on flows over aerodynamically designed surfaces is of interested in a number of different fields. It has long been known the surface roughness will likely accelerate the laminar- turbulent transition process by creating additional disturbances in the boundary layer. However, there are very few tools available to predict the effects surface roughness will have on boundary layer flow. There are numerous implications of the premature appearance of a turbulent boundary layer. Increases in local skin friction, boundary layer thickness, and turbulent mixing can impact global flow properties compounding the effects of surface roughness. With this motivation, an investigation into the effects of surface roughness on boundary layer transition has been conducted. The effort involved both an extensive experimental campaign, and the development of a high fidelity roughness model implemented in a R ANS solver. Vast a mounts of experimental data was generated at the Texas A&M Oran W. Nicks Low Speed Wind Tunnel for the calibration and validation of the roughness model described in this work, as well as future efforts. The present work focuses on the development of the computational model including a description of the calibration process. The primary methodology presented introduces a scalar field variable and associated transport equation that interacts with a correlation based transition model. The additional equation allows for non-local effects of surface roughness to be accounted for downstream of rough wall sections while maintaining a "local" formulation. The scalar field is determined through a boundary condition function that has been calibrated to flat plate cases with sand grain roughness. The model was initially tested on a NACA 0012 airfoil with roughness strips applied to the leading edge. Further calibration of the roughness model was performed using results from the companion experimental study on a NACA 633 -418 airfoil

  2. Mechanism of Water Droplet Breakup Near the Leading Edge of an Airfoil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vargas, Mario; Sor, Suthyvann; Magarino, Adelaida, Garcia

    2012-01-01

    This work presents results of an experimental study on droplet deformation and breakup near the leading edge of an airfoil. The experiment was conducted in the rotating rig test cell at the Instituto Nacional de Tecnica Aeroespacial (INTA) in Madrid, Spain. The airfoil model was placed at the end of the rotating arm and a monosize droplet generator produced droplets that fell from above, perpendicular to the path of the airfoil. The interaction between the droplets and the airfoil was captured with high speed imaging and allowed observation of droplet deformation and breakup as the droplet approached the airfoil near the stagnation line. Image processing software was used to measure the position of the droplet centroid, equivalent diameter, perimeter, area, and the major and minor axes of an ellipse superimposed over the deforming droplet. The horizontal and vertical displacement of each droplet against time was also measured, and the velocity, acceleration, Weber number, Bond number, Reynolds number, and the drag coefficients were calculated along the path of the droplet to the beginning of breakup. Droplet deformation is defined and studied against main parameters. The high speed imaging allowed observation of the actual mechanism of breakup and identification of the sequence of configurations from the initiation of the breakup to the disintegration of the droplet. Results and comparisons are presented for droplets of diameters in the range of 500 to 1800 microns, and airfoil velocities of 70 and 90 m/sec.

  3. Numerical Predictions of Sonic Boom Signatures for a Straight Line Segmented Leading Edge Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elmiligui, Alaa A.; Wilcox, Floyd J.; Cliff, Susan; Thomas, Scott

    2012-01-01

    A sonic boom wind tunnel test was conducted on a straight-line segmented leading edge (SLSLE) model in the NASA Langley 4- by 4- Foot Unitary Plan Wind Tunnel (UPWT). The purpose of the test was to determine whether accurate sonic boom measurements could be obtained while continuously moving the SLSLE model past a conical pressure probe. Sonic boom signatures were also obtained using the conventional move-pause data acquisition method for comparison. The continuous data acquisition approach allows for accurate signatures approximately 15 times faster than a move-pause technique. These successful results provide an incentive for future testing with greatly increased efficiency using the continuous model translation technique with the single probe to measure sonic boom signatures. Two widely used NASA codes, USM3D (Navier-Stokes) and CART3D-AERO (Euler, adjoint-based adaptive mesh), were used to compute off-body sonic boom pressure signatures of the SLSLE model at several different altitudes below the model at Mach 2.0. The computed pressure signatures compared well with wind tunnel data. The effect of the different altitude for signature extraction was evaluated by extrapolating the near field signatures to the ground and comparing pressure signatures and sonic boom loudness levels.

  4. Drag Coefficient of Water Droplets Approaching the Leading Edge of an Airfoil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vargas, Mario; Sor, Suthyvann; Magarino, Adelaida Garcia

    2013-01-01

    This work presents results of an experimental study on droplet deformation and breakup near the leading edge of an airfoil. The experiment was conducted in the rotating rig test cell at the Instituto Nacional de Tecnica Aeroespacial (INTA) in Madrid, Spain. An airfoil model was placed at the end of the rotating arm and a monosize droplet generator produced droplets that fell from above, perpendicular to the path of the airfoil. The interaction between the droplets and the airfoil was captured with high speed imaging and allowed observation of droplet deformation and breakup as the droplet approached the airfoil near the stagnation line. Image processing software was used to measure the position of the droplet centroid, equivalent diameter, perimeter, area, and the major and minor axes of an ellipse superimposed over the deforming droplet. The horizontal and vertical displacement of each droplet against time was also measured, and the velocity, acceleration, Weber number, Bond number, Reynolds number, and the drag coefficients were calculated along the path of the droplet to the beginning of breakup. Results are presented and discussed for drag coefficients of droplets with diameters in the range of 300 to 1800 micrometers, and airfoil velocities of 50, 70 and 90 meters/second. The effect of droplet oscillation on the drag coefficient is discussed.

  5. CFD study on NACA 4415 airfoil implementing spherical and sinusoidal Tubercle Leading Edge.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S M A Aftab

    Full Text Available The Humpback whale tubercles have been studied for more than a decade. Tubercle Leading Edge (TLE effectively reduces the separation bubble size and helps in delaying stall. They are very effective in case of low Reynolds number flows. The current Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD study is on NACA 4415 airfoil, at a Reynolds number 120,000. Two TLE shapes are tested on NACA 4415 airfoil. The tubercle designs implemented on the airfoil are sinusoidal and spherical. A parametric study is also carried out considering three amplitudes (0.025c, 0.05c and 0.075c, the wavelength (0.25c is fixed. Structured mesh is utilized to generate grid and Transition SST turbulence model is used to capture the flow physics. Results clearly show spherical tubercles outperform sinusoidal tubercles. Furthermore experimental study considering spherical TLE is carried out at Reynolds number 200,000. The experimental results show that spherical TLE improve performance compared to clean airfoil.

  6. Numerical and experimental investigations on unsteady aerodynamics of flapping wings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Meilin

    the flow fields around a series of plunging NACA symmetric airfoils with thickness ratio ranging from 4.0% to 20.0% of the airfoil chord length. The contribution of viscous force to flapping propulsion is accessed and it is found that viscous force becomes thrust producing, instead of drag producing, and plays a non-negligible role in thrust generation for thin airfoils. This is closely related to the variations of the dynamics of the unsteady vortex structures around the plunging airfoils. As nature flyers use complex wing kinematics in flapping flight, kinematics effects on the aerodynamic performance with different airfoil thicknesses are numerically studied by using a series of NACA symmetric airfoils. It is found that the combined plunging and pitching motion can outperform the pure plunging or pitching motion by sophisticatedly adjusting the airfoil gestures during the oscillation stroke. The thin airfoil better manipulates leading edge vortices (LEVs) than the thick airfoil (NACA0030) does in studied cases, and there exists an optimal thickness for large thrust generation with reasonable propulsive efficiency. With the present kinematics and dynamic parameters, relatively low reduced frequency is conducive for thrust production and propulsive efficiency for all tested airfoil thicknesses. In order to obtain the optimal kinematics parameters of flapping flight, a kinematics optimization is then performed. A gradient-based optimization algorithm is coupled with a second-order SD Navier-Stokes solver to search for the optimal kinematics of a certain airfoil undergoing a combined plunging and pitching motion. Then a high-order SD scheme is used to verify the optimization results and reveal the detailed vortex structures associated with the optimal kinematics of the flapping flight. It is found that for the case with maximum propulsive efficiency, there exists no leading edge separation during most of the oscillation cycle. In order to provide constructive

  7. The flow over a 'high' aspect ratio gothic wing at supersonic speeds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narayan, K. Y.

    1975-01-01

    Results are presented of an experimental investigation on a nonconical wing which supports an attached shock wave over a region of the leading edge near the vertex and a detached shock elsewhere. The shock detachment point is determined from planform schlieren photographs of the flow field and discrepancies are shown to exist between this and the one calculated by applying the oblique shock equations normal to the leading edge. On a physical basis, it is argued that the shock detachment has to obey the two-dimensional law normal to the leading edges. From this, and from other measurements on conical wings, it is thought that the planform schlieren technique may not be particularly satisfactory for detecting shock detachment. Surface pressure distributions are presented and are explained in terms of the flow over related delta wings which are identified as a vertex delta wing and a local delta wing.

  8. Tropomyosin Promotes Lamellipodial Persistence by Collaborating with Arp2/3 at the Leading Edge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brayford, Simon; Bryce, Nicole S; Schevzov, Galina; Haynes, Elizabeth M; Bear, James E; Hardeman, Edna C; Gunning, Peter W

    2016-05-23

    At the leading edge of migrating cells, protrusion of the lamellipodium is driven by Arp2/3-mediated polymerization of actin filaments [1]. This dense, branched actin network is promoted and stabilized by cortactin [2, 3]. In order to drive filament turnover, Arp2/3 networks are remodeled by proteins such as GMF, which blocks the actin-Arp2/3 interaction [4, 5], and coronin 1B, which acts by directing SSH1L to the lamellipodium where it activates the actin-severing protein cofilin [6, 7]. It has been shown in vitro that cofilin-mediated severing of Arp2/3 actin networks results in the generation of new pointed ends to which the actin-stabilizing protein tropomyosin (Tpm) can bind [8]. The presence of Tpm in lamellipodia, however, is disputed in the literature [9-19]. Here, we report that the Tpm isoforms 1.8/9 are enriched in the lamellipodium of fibroblasts as detected with a novel isoform-specific monoclonal antibody. RNAi-mediated silencing of Tpm1.8/9 led to an increase of Arp2/3 accumulation at the cell periphery and a decrease in the persistence of lamellipodia and cell motility, a phenotype consistent with cortactin- and coronin 1B-deficient cells [2, 7]. In the absence of coronin 1B or cofilin, Tpm1.8/9 protein levels are reduced while, conversely, inhibition of Arp2/3 with CK666 leads to an increase in Tpm1.8/9 protein. These findings establish a novel regulatory mechanism within the lamellipodium whereby Tpm collaborates with Arp2/3 to promote lamellipodial-based cell migration. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. A numerical and experimental study of the effects of dynamic roughness on laminar leading edge separation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gall, Peter D.

    The aircraft industry, as a whole, has been deeply concerned with improving the aerodynamic efficiency of current and future flight vehicles, particularly in the commercial and military markets. However, of particular interest to the field of aerodynamics is the elusive concept of a workable flow control mechanism. Effective flow control is a concept which if properly applied can increase aerodynamic efficiency. Various concepts and ideas to obtain successful flow control have been studied in an attempt to reap these rewards. Some examples include boundary layer blowing (steady and periodic), suction, and compliant walls for laminar flow control. The overall goal of flow control is to increase performance by increasing lift, reducing drag, and delaying or eliminating leading edge separation. The specific objectives of flow control are to (1) delay or eliminate flow separation, (2) delay boundary layer transition, and (3) and reduce skin friction drag. The purpose of this research is to investigate dynamic roughness as a novel method of flow control technology for external boundary layer flows. As opposed to standard surface roughness, dynamic roughness incorporates small time dependent perturbations to the surface of the airfoil. These surface perturbations are actual humps and/or ridges on the surface of the airfoil that are on the scale of the laminar boundary, and oscillate with an unsteady motion. Research has shown that this can provide a means to modify the instantaneous and mean velocity profile near the wall and favorably control the existing state of the boundary layer. Several flow control parameters were studied including dynamic roughness frequency, amplitude, and geometry. The results of this study have shown, both numerically and experimentally, that dynamic roughness can provide an effective means for eliminating both a short and long laminar separation bubble and possibly prove a viable alternative in effective flow control, hence reaping some of

  10. Data acquisition electronics for gamma ray emission tomography using width-modulated leading-edge discriminators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lage, E; Tapias, G; Villena, J; Desco, M; Vaquero, J J

    2010-01-01

    We present a new high-performance and low-cost approach for implementing radiation detection acquisition systems. The basic elements used are charge-integrating ADCs and a set of components encapsulated in an HDL (hardware definition language) library which makes it possible to implement several acquisition tasks such as time pickoff and coincidence detection using a new and simple trigger technique that we name WMLET (width-modulated leading-edge timing). As proof of concept, a 32-channel hybrid PET/SPECT acquisition system based on these elements was developed and tested. This demonstrator consists of a master module responsible for the generation and distribution of trigger signals, 2 x 16-channel ADC cards (12-bit resolution) for data digitization and a 32-bit digital I/O PCI card for handling data transmission to a personal computer. System characteristics such as linearity, maximum transmission rates or timing resolution in coincidence mode were evaluated with test and real detector signals. Imaging capabilities of the prototype were also evaluated using different detector configurations. The performance tests showed that this implementation is able to handle data rates in excess of 600k events s -1 when acquiring simultaneously 32 channels (96-byte events). ADC channel linearity is >98.5% in energy quantification. Time resolution in PET mode for the tested configurations ranges from 3.64 ns FWHM to 7.88 ns FWHM when signals from LYSO-based detectors are used. The measured energy resolution matched the expected values for the detectors evaluated and single elements of crystal matrices can be neatly separated in the acquired flood histograms.

  11. Data acquisition electronics for gamma ray emission tomography using width-modulated leading-edge discriminators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lage, E.; Tapias, G.; Villena, J.; Desco, M.; Vaquero, J. J.

    2010-08-01

    We present a new high-performance and low-cost approach for implementing radiation detection acquisition systems. The basic elements used are charge-integrating ADCs and a set of components encapsulated in an HDL (hardware definition language) library which makes it possible to implement several acquisition tasks such as time pickoff and coincidence detection using a new and simple trigger technique that we name WMLET (width-modulated leading-edge timing). As proof of concept, a 32-channel hybrid PET/SPECT acquisition system based on these elements was developed and tested. This demonstrator consists of a master module responsible for the generation and distribution of trigger signals, 2 × 16-channel ADC cards (12-bit resolution) for data digitization and a 32-bit digital I/O PCI card for handling data transmission to a personal computer. System characteristics such as linearity, maximum transmission rates or timing resolution in coincidence mode were evaluated with test and real detector signals. Imaging capabilities of the prototype were also evaluated using different detector configurations. The performance tests showed that this implementation is able to handle data rates in excess of 600k events s-1 when acquiring simultaneously 32 channels (96-byte events). ADC channel linearity is >98.5% in energy quantification. Time resolution in PET mode for the tested configurations ranges from 3.64 ns FWHM to 7.88 ns FWHM when signals from LYSO-based detectors are used. The measured energy resolution matched the expected values for the detectors evaluated and single elements of crystal matrices can be neatly separated in the acquired flood histograms.

  12. Data acquisition electronics for gamma ray emission tomography using width-modulated leading-edge discriminators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lage, E; Tapias, G; Villena, J; Desco, M; Vaquero, J J, E-mail: desco@mce.hggm.e [Unidad de Medicina y CirugIa Experimental, Hospital General Universitario Gregorio Maranon, Madrid (Spain)

    2010-08-07

    We present a new high-performance and low-cost approach for implementing radiation detection acquisition systems. The basic elements used are charge-integrating ADCs and a set of components encapsulated in an HDL (hardware definition language) library which makes it possible to implement several acquisition tasks such as time pickoff and coincidence detection using a new and simple trigger technique that we name WMLET (width-modulated leading-edge timing). As proof of concept, a 32-channel hybrid PET/SPECT acquisition system based on these elements was developed and tested. This demonstrator consists of a master module responsible for the generation and distribution of trigger signals, 2 x 16-channel ADC cards (12-bit resolution) for data digitization and a 32-bit digital I/O PCI card for handling data transmission to a personal computer. System characteristics such as linearity, maximum transmission rates or timing resolution in coincidence mode were evaluated with test and real detector signals. Imaging capabilities of the prototype were also evaluated using different detector configurations. The performance tests showed that this implementation is able to handle data rates in excess of 600k events s{sup -1} when acquiring simultaneously 32 channels (96-byte events). ADC channel linearity is >98.5% in energy quantification. Time resolution in PET mode for the tested configurations ranges from 3.64 ns FWHM to 7.88 ns FWHM when signals from LYSO-based detectors are used. The measured energy resolution matched the expected values for the detectors evaluated and single elements of crystal matrices can be neatly separated in the acquired flood histograms.

  13. A Family of Vortices to Study Axisymmetric Vortex Breakdown and Reconnection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Larry A.

    2007-01-01

    A new analytic model describing a family of vortices has been developed to study some of the axisymmetric vortex breakdown and reconnection fluid dynamic processes underlying body-vortex interactions that are frequently manifested in rotorcraft and propeller-driven fixed-wing aircraft wakes. The family of vortices incorporates a wide range of prescribed initial vorticity distributions -- including single or dual-core vorticity distributions. The result is analytical solutions for the vorticity and velocities for each member of the family of vortices. This model is of sufficient generality to further illustrate the dependence of vortex reconnection and breakdown on initial vorticity distribution as was suggested by earlier analytical work. This family of vortices, though laminar in nature, is anticipated to provide valuable insight into the vortical evolution of large-scale rotor and propeller wakes.

  14. Computational wing design studies relating to natural laminar flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waggoner, Edgar G.

    1986-01-01

    Two research studies are described which directly relate to the application of natural laminar flow (NLF) technology to transonic transport-type wing planforms. Each involved using state-of-the-art computational methods to design three-dimensional wing contours which generate significant runs of favorable pressure gradients. The first study supported the Variable Sweep Transition Flight Experiment and involves design of a full-span glove which extends from the leading edge to the spoiler hinge line on the upper surface of an F-14 outer wing panel. A wing was designed computationally for a corporate transport aircraft in the second study. The resulting wing design generated favorable pressure gradients from the leading edge aft to the mid-chord on both upper and lower surfaces at the cruise design point. Detailed descriptions of the computational design approach are presented along with the various constraints imposed on each of the designs.

  15. RESEARCH OF AERODYNAMIC CHARACTERISTICS OF THE MODEL OF MANEUVERABLE AIRCRAFT WITH MECHANIZED LEADING EDGE USING SOFTWARE ANSYS FLUENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. V. Golovnev

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The calculations of the aerodynamic characteristics of the aircraft model having mechanized leading edge are conducted, and then comparing the results with experimental data. It is shown that the use of computational methods for the determination of the aerodynamic characteristics allows to deepen the results of experimental modeling in air tunnels.

  16. "Partners in Science": A Model Cooperative Program Introducing High School Teachers and Students to Leading-Edge Pharmaceutical Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woska, Joseph R., Jr.; Collins, Danielle M.; Canney, Brian J.; Arcario, Erin L.; Reilly, Patricia L.

    2005-01-01

    "Partners in Science" is a cooperative program between Boehringer Ingelheim Pharmaceuticals, Inc. and area high schools in the community surrounding our Connecticut campus. It is a two-phase program that introduces high school students and teachers to the world of drug discovery and leading-edge pharmaceutical research. Phase 1 involves…

  17. The Effect of Leading-Edge Sweep and Surface Inclination on the Hypersonic Flow Field Over a Blunt Flat Plate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Creager, Marcus O.

    1959-01-01

    An investigation of the effects of variation of leading-edge sweep and surface inclination on the flow over blunt flat plates was conducted at Mach numbers of 4 and 5.7 at free-stream Reynolds numbers per inch of 6,600 and 20,000, respectively. Surface pressures were measured on a flat plate blunted by a semicylindrical leading edge over a range of sweep angles from 0 deg to 60 deg and a range of surface inclinations from -10 deg to +10 deg. The surface pressures were predicted within an average error of +/- 8 percent by a combination of blast-wave and boundary-layer theory extended herein to include effects of sweep and surface inclination. This combination applied equally well to similar data of other investigations. The local Reynolds number per inch was found to be lower than the free-stream Reynolds number per inch. The reduction in local Reynolds number was mitigated by increasing the sweep of the leading edge. Boundary-layer thickness and shock-wave shape were changed little by the sweep of the leading edge.

  18. Heat transfer characteristics of hypersonic waveriders with an emphasis on the leading edge effects. M.S. Thesis, 1991

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanmol, Denis O.; Anderson, John D., Jr.

    1992-01-01

    The heat transfer characteristics in surface radiative equilibrium and the aerodynamic performance of blunted hypersonic waveriders are studied along two constant dynamic pressure trajectories for four different Mach numbers. The inviscid leading edge drag was found to be a small (4 to 8 percent) but not negligible fraction of the inviscid drag of the vehicle. Although the viscous drag at the leading edge can be neglected, the presence of the leading edge will influence the transition pattern of the upper and the lower surfaces and therefore affect the viscous drag of the entire vehicle. For an application similar to the National Aerospace Plane (NASP), the present study demonstrates that the waverider remains a valuable concept at high Mach numbers if a state-of-the-art active cooling device is used along the leading edge. At low Mach number (less than 5), the study shows the surface radiative cooling might be sufficient. In all cases, radiative cooling is sufficient for the upper and lower surfaces of the vehicle if ceramic composites are used as thermal protection.

  19. Influence of high-intensity turbulence on laminar boundary layer development on a cylindrical leading edge: Enhancement to eddy diffusivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearson, Juli K.

    The growing demand for increased efficiency in turbine engine designs has sparked a growing interest for research of air flow around curved surfaces. The turbine's operating conditions result in material property constraints, especially in the first stage turbine vanes and blades. These turbine vane components experience extreme loading conditions of both high temperature and high turbulence intensities exiting the combustor. The surface of the turbine blades has cylindrical leading edges that promote stabilizing flow accelerations. These convex surfaces can cause a reduced eddy diffusivity across the boundary layer. This thesis reviews measurements of velocity and turbulence intensities taken just shy of the thirty degrees offset from the stagnation line of a two-dimensional cylindrical leading edge under a wide range of turbulence and flow conditions flow conditions. Flow conditions and velocity measurements were gathered with respect to the distance to the surface. The length of the measurements extended from the surface to beyond the boundary layer's edge. The instrumentation used to collect data was a single wire driven by a constant temperature anemometer bridge. The hot wire is specially modified to measure data near the cylindrical leading edges curved surface. The traversing system allowed the acquisition of high-resolution boundary layer data. The traversing system was installed internally to the cylindrical leading edge to reduce probe blockage.

  20. Objective detection of vortices in massively-separated flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yangzi; Hadjighasem, Alireza; Green, Melissa; Haller, George

    2015-11-01

    We study the formation and shedding of vortices in two vortex-dominated flows around a pitching panel in order to detect coherent structures objectively (i.e., in a frame invariant fashion) in massively-separated flow. We employ a recently developed objective definition and extraction technique for rotationally coherent Lagrangian vortices. This methods renders material vortex boundaries as outermost convex level surfaces of the Lagrangian-Averaged Vorticity Deviation (LAVD), i.e., the trajectory integral of the normed deviation of the vorticity from its spatial mean. We also employ the derivative of the LAVD, the Instantaneous Vorticity Deviation (IVD), to uncover instantaneous Eulerian vortex boundaries in an objective fashion. These Eulerian vortex boundaries, therefore, remain the same in all possible rotating and translating unsteady frames. The multiple methods we use identify and track both leading edge and trailing edge vortices as they form and shed. This helps in describing the relationship between the vortex dynamics and the loss of lift during dynamic stall on a 2D flat plate undergoing a 45 degree pitch-up maneuver. Dr. Jeff Eldredge and his research group at UCLA are gratefully acknowledged for sharing the database of simulation results for the current research. This work was supported by the Air Force Office of Scientific Research under AFOSR Award No. FA9550-14-1.

  1. Trailing vortices from low speed flyers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waldman, Rye; Kudo, Jun; Breuer, Kenneth

    2009-11-01

    The structure and strength of the vortex wake behind a airplane or animal flying with a fixed or flapping wing contains valuable information about the aerodynamic load history. However, the amount of vorticity measured in the trailing vortex is not always in agreement with the known lift generated, and the behavior of these vortices at relatively low Reynolds numbers is also not well-understood. We present the results from a series of wind tunnel PIV experiments conducted behind a low-aspect ratio rectangular wing at a chord-Reynolds numbers of 30,000. In addition to wake PIV measurements measured in the cross-stream (Trefftz) plane, we measure the lift and drag directly using a six-axis force-torque transducer. We discuss how vortex size, shape, strength and position vary in time and downstream location, as well as the challenges associated with the use of PIV wake measurements to accurate determine aerodynamic forces.

  2. Peridotite carbonation at the leading edge of the mantle wedge: OmDP Site BT1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelemen, P. B.; Godard, M.; Johnson, K. T. M.; Okazaki, K.; Manning, C. E.; Urai, J. L.; Michibayashi, K.; Harris, M.; Coggon, J. A.; Teagle, D. A. H.; Phase I Science Party, T. O. D. P.

    2017-12-01

    immobile on a 1-10 m scale during introduction of C, O, lesser Ca, minor Fe, and fluid mobile trace elements (Godard ea AGU 17) during transformation of Mg-silicates to carbonate + quartz. With prior and coeval serpentinization, this implies 80% solid volume expansion compared to unaltered peridotite, in a zone >200 m thick at the leading edge of the mantle wedge.

  3. The role of vortices in animal locomotion in fluids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dvořák R.

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper is to show the significance of vortices in animal locomotion in fluids on two deliberately chosen examples. The first example concerns lift generation by bird and insect wings, the second example briefly mentiones swimming and walking on water. In all the examples, the vortices generated by the moving animal impart the necessary momentum to the surrounding fluid, the reaction to which is the force moving or lifting the animal.

  4. Conjugate Heat Transfer Study at Interior Surface of NGV Leading Edge with Combined Shower Head and Impingement Cooling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arun Kumar Pujari

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A computational study on conjugate heat transfer is carried out to present the behavior of nondimensional temperature and heat transfer coefficient of a Nozzle Guide Vane (NGV leading edge. Reynolds number of both mainstream flow and coolant impinging jets are varied. The NGV has five rows of film cooling holes arranged in shower head manner and four rows of impingement holes arranged in staggered manner. The results are presented by considering materials of different thermal conductivity. The results show that the mainstream flow affects the temperature distribution on the interior side of the vane leading edge for high conductivity material whereas it has negligible effects for low conductivity material. The effect of changing blowing ratio on internal heat transfer coefficient and internal surface temperature is also presented.

  5. Subsonic Investigation of a Leading-Edge Boundary Layer Control Suction System on a High-Speed Civil Transport Configuration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Bryan A.; Applin, Zachary T.; Kemmerly, Guy T.; Coe, Paul L., Jr.; Owens, D. Bruce; Gile, Brenda E.; Parikh, Pradip G.; Smith, Don

    1999-01-01

    A wind tunnel investigation of a leading edge boundary layer control system was conducted on a High Speed Civil Transport (HSCT) configuration in the Langley 14- by 22-Foot Subsonic Tunnel. Data were obtained over a Mach number range of 0.08 to 0.27, with corresponding chord Reynolds numbers of 1.79 x 10(exp 6) to 5.76 x 10(exp 6). Variations in the amount of suction, as well as the size and location of the suction area, were tested with outboard leading edge flaps deflected 0 and 30 deg and trailing-edge flaps deflected 0 and 20 deg. The longitudinal and lateral aerodynamic data are presented without analysis. A complete tabulated data listing is also presented herein.

  6. Solitary magnetohydrodynamic vortices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silaev, I.I.; Skvortsov, A.T.

    1990-01-01

    This paper reports on the analytical description of fluid flow by means of localized vortices which is traditional for hydrodynamics, oceanology, plasma physics. Recently it has been widely applied to different structure turbulence models. Considerable results involved have been presented where it was shown that in magnetohydrodynamics alongside with the well-known kinds of localized vortices (e.g. Hill's vortex), which are characterized by quite a weak decrease of disturbed velocity or magnetic field (as a power of the inverse distance from vortex center), the vortices with screening (or solitary vortices) may exist. All disturbed parameters either exponentially vanish or become identically zero in outer region in the latter case. (In a number of papers numerical simulations of such the vortices are presented). Solutions in a form of solitary vortices are of particular interest due to their uniformity and solitonlike behavior. On the basis of these properties one can believe for such structures to occur in real turbulent flows

  7. Conjugate Heat Transfer Study at Interior Surface of NGV Leading Edge with Combined Shower Head and Impingement Cooling

    OpenAIRE

    Arun Kumar Pujari; B. V. S. S. S. Prasad; N. Sitaram

    2014-01-01

    A computational study on conjugate heat transfer is carried out to present the behavior of nondimensional temperature and heat transfer coefficient of a Nozzle Guide Vane (NGV) leading edge. Reynolds number of both mainstream flow and coolant impinging jets are varied. The NGV has five rows of film cooling holes arranged in shower head manner and four rows of impingement holes arranged in staggered manner. The results are presented by considering materials of different thermal conductivity. T...

  8. Model for adhesion clutch explains biphasic relationship between actin flow and traction at the cell leading edge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craig, Erin M.; Stricker, Jonathan; Gardel, Margaret; Mogilner, Alex

    2015-05-01

    Cell motility relies on the continuous reorganization of a dynamic actin-myosin-adhesion network at the leading edge of the cell, in order to generate protrusion at the leading edge and traction between the cell and its external environment. We analyze experimentally measured spatial distributions of actin flow, traction force, myosin density, and adhesion density in control and pharmacologically perturbed epithelial cells in order to develop a mechanical model of the actin-adhesion-myosin self-organization at the leading edge. A model in which the F-actin network is treated as a viscous gel, and adhesion clutch engagement is strengthened by myosin but weakened by actin flow, can explain the measured molecular distributions and correctly predict the spatial distributions of the actin flow and traction stress. We test the model by comparing its predictions with measurements of the actin flow and traction stress in cells with fast and slow actin polymerization rates. The model predicts how the location of the lamellipodium-lamellum boundary depends on the actin viscosity and adhesion strength. The model further predicts that the location of the lamellipodium-lamellum boundary is not very sensitive to the level of myosin contraction.

  9. A study of the drooped leading edge airfoil. [on wind tunnel models to reduce spin entry after stall

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, J. D., Jr.; Barlow, J. B.

    1979-01-01

    Wind tunnel tests were conducted to examine various aspects of the drooped-leading edge airfoil which reduces the tendency for an airplane to enter a spin after stall occurs. Three baseline models were used for tests of two dimensional models: NACA 0015, 0014.6, and 0014.2. The 14.6% and 14.2% models were derived from NACA 0015 sections by increasing the chord and matching the profiles aft section. Force, balance data (lift, drag, pitching moment) were obtained for each model at a free-steam Reynold's number of 2.66 x 10 to the 6th power/m. In addition, oil flow visualization tests were performed at various angles of attack. An existing NACA 64 sub 1 A211 airfoil was used in a second series of tests. The leading edge flap was segmented in three parts which allowed various baseline/drooped leading edge configurations to be tested. Force balance and flow visualization tests were completer at chord Renolds numbers of 0.44 x 10 to the 6th power, 1.4 x 10 to the 6th power, and 2.11 x 10 to the 6th power. Test results are included.

  10. Measurement of Fuel Concentration Profile at Leading Edge of Lifted Flame with Acetone Laser-Induced Fluorescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirota, Mitsutomo; Sekine, Kazushi; Hashimoto, Kouta; Saiki, Atsushi; Takahashi, Hidemi; Masuya, Goro

    This is a study of the leading-edge characteristics of a methane-air triple flame. Few experiment results are available for physical examination of such characteristics, so further experimental investigations are strongly needed to understand the stability mechanism in a mixture with a steep concentration gradient. To this end, we measured concentration profiles at the leading edge of a flame using acetone laser-induced fluorescence (acetone LIF). The results demonstrated that the lifted height of the flame changed when acetone was added to the mixture and correlated well with increased C2 radical behind the flame edge. However, the OH radical luminous intensity, measured with a spectroscope, did not change with addition of acetone. Moreover, the burning velocity obtained by the Bunsen-burner method remained constant when acetone was added to the mixture. Therefore, acetone had little influence on burning intensity. Acetone LIF can thus be employed to measure the local concentration gradient at the leading edge of a flame. The acetone LIF signals could be corrected to consider the thermal effect by using silicone oil vanishing-plane data. From the corrected acetone LIF data, the width between the lean and rich flammability limits (flammability limit width) in the flow upstream of the flame with a steep concentration gradient was clearly observed and could be quantitatively compared with the recent numerical results.

  11. Materials, Manufacturing, and Test Development of a Composite Fan Blade Leading Edge Subcomponent for Improved Impact Resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Sandi G.; Handschuh, Katherine; Sinnott, Matthew J.; Kohlman, Lee W.; Roberts, Gary D.; Martin, Richard E.; Ruggeri, Charles R.; Pereira, J. Michael

    2015-01-01

    Application of polymer matrix composite materials for jet engine fan blades is becoming attractive as an alternative to metallic blades; particularly for large engines where significant weight savings are recognized on moving to a composite structure. However, the weight benefit of the composite is offset by a reduction of aerodynamic efficiency resulting from a necessary increase in blade thickness; relative to the titanium blades. Blade dimensions are largely driven by resistance to damage on bird strike. Further development of the composite material is necessary to allow composite blade designs to approximate the dimensions of a metallic fan blade. The reduction in thickness over the state of the art composite blades is expected to translate into structural weight reduction, improved aerodynamic efficiency, and therefore reduced fuel consumption. This paper presents test article design, subcomponent blade leading edge fabrication, test method development, and initial results from ballistic impact of a gelatin projectile on the leading edge of composite fan blades. The simplified test article geometry was developed to realistically simulate a blade leading edge while decreasing fabrication complexity. Impact data is presented on baseline composite blades and toughened blades; where a considerable improvement to impact resistance was recorded.

  12. An experimental investigation into the deployment of 3-D, finned wing and shape memory alloy vortex generators in a forced air convection heat pipe fin stack

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aris, M.S.; McGlen, R.; Owen, I.; Sutcliffe, C.J.

    2011-01-01

    wing vortex generators. → The active vortex generators, made from Ti-Ni, protruded into the flow stream at high temperatures and resume a low profile position at a low temperature set point. → By considering wing spacing and the distance from the leading edge of the fin stack, heat transfer enhancements of up to 37%, compared to plane fin stacks, were achieved. → By replacing the fixed delta wings with the active vortex generators, heat transfer enhancements of up to 16% was achieved and the pressure loss associated with flow obstructions was effectively managed.

  13. Measuring flow velocity on frozen and non-frozen slopes of black soil through leading edge method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chao Chen

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Flow velocity is a major parameter related to hillslope hydrodynamics erosion. This study aims to measure flow velocity over frozen and non-frozen slopes through leading edge method before being calibrated with accurate flow velocity to determine the correct coefficient for convenience of flow velocity measurement. Laboratory experiments were conducted on frozen and non-frozen soil slopes with flumes involving four slope gradients of 5°, 10°, 15°, and 20°and three flow rates of 1, 2, and 4 L/min with a flume of 6 m long and 0.1 m wide. The measurements were made with a stopwatch to record the time duration that the water flow ran over the rill segments of 2, 4 and 6 m long. Accurate flow velocity was measured with electrolyte trace method, under pulse boundary condition. The leading edge and accurate flow velocities were used to determine the correction coefficient to convert the former to the latter. Results showed that the correction coefficient on frozen soil slope was 0.81 with a coefficient of determination (R2 of 0.99. The correction coefficient on non-frozen soil slope was 0.79 with R2 of 0.98. A coefficient of 0.8 was applicable to both soil surface conditions. The accurate velocities on the four frozen black soil slopes were approximately 30%, 54%, 71%, and 91% higher than those on non-frozen soil slopes. By contrast, the leading edge flow velocities on the frozen soil slopes were 23%, 54%, 67%, and 84% higher than those on non-frozen soil slopes. The flow velocities on frozen soil slopes increased with flow rate at all four slopes, but they increased from 5 to 15° before getting stabilized. Therefore, rill flow velocity can be effectively measured with leading edge method by multiplying the leading edge velocity with a correction coefficient of 0.80. This study provides a strategy to measure rill flow velocity for studies on soil erosion mechanisms.

  14. AERODYNAMICS OF WING TIP SAILS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MUSHTAK AL-ATABI

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Observers have always been fascinated by soaring birds. An interesting feature of these birds is the existence of few feathers extending from the tip of the wing. In this paper, small lifting surfaces were fitted to the tip of a NACA0012 wing in a fashion similar to that of wing tip feathers. Experimental measurements of induced drag, longitudinal static stability and trailing vortex structure were obtained.The tests showed that adding wing tip surfaces (sails decreased the induced drag factor and increased the longitudinal static stability. Results identified two discrete appositely rotated tip vortices and showed the ability of wing tip surfaces to break them down and to diffuse them.

  15. Necl-5/PVR enhances PDGF-induced attraction of growing microtubules to the plasma membrane of the leading edge of moving NIH3T3 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minami, Akihiro; Mizutani, Kiyohito; Waseda, Masazumi; Kajita, Mihoko; Miyata, Muneaki; Ikeda, Wataru; Takai, Yoshimi

    2010-11-01

    Microtubules (MTs) search for and grow toward the leading edge of moving cells, followed by their stabilization at a specific structure at the rear site of the leading edge. This dynamic re-orientation of MTs is critical to directional cell movement. We previously showed that Necl-5/poliovirus receptor (PVR) interacts with platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) receptor and integrin α(v) β(3) at the leading edge of moving NIH3T3 cells, resulting in an enhancement of their directional movement. We studied here the role of Necl-5 in the PDGF-induced attraction of growing MTs to the leading edge of NIH3T3 cells. Necl-5 enhanced the PDGF-induced growth of MTs and attracted them near to the plasma membrane of the leading edge of NIH3T3 cells in an integrin α(v) β(3) -dependent manner. Furthermore, Necl-5 enhanced the PDGF-induced attraction of the plus-end-tracking proteins (+TIPs), including EB1, CLIP170, an intermediate chain subunit of cytoplasmic dynein, and p150(Glued) , a subunit of dynactin, near to the plasma membrane of the leading edge. Thus, Necl-5 plays a role in the attraction of growing MTs to the plasma membrane of the leading edge of moving cells. © 2010 The Authors. Journal compilation © 2010 by the Molecular Biology Society of Japan/Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  16. A further note on the force discrepancy for wing theory in Euler flow

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    the horseshoe vortices tends to zero, an integral distribution of infinitesimal horseshoe vortices over the vortex sheet is obtained. The contribution to the force on the wing due to the presence of one of the infinitesimal horseshoe vortices in the distribution is focused upon. Most of the algebra in the force calculation is ...

  17. Short revolving wings enable hovering animals to avoid stall and reduce drag

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lentink, David; Kruyt, Jan W.; Heijst, Gertjan F.; Altshuler, Douglas L.

    2014-11-01

    Long and slender wings reduce the drag of airplanes, helicopters, and gliding animals, which operate at low angle of attack (incidence). Remarkably, there is no evidence for such influence of wing aspect ratio on the energetics of hovering animals that operate their wings at much higher incidence. High incidence causes aircraft wings to stall, hovering animals avoid stall by generating an attached vortex along the leading edge of their wings that elevates lift. Hypotheses that explain this capability include the necessity for a short radial distance between the shoulder joint and wing tip, measured in chord lengths, instead of the long tip-to-tip distance that elevates aircraft performance. This stems from how hovering animals revolve their wings around a joint, a condition for which the precise effect of aspect ratio on stall performance is unknown. Here we show that the attachment of the leading edge vortex is determined by wing aspect ratio with respect to the center of rotation-for a suite of aspect ratios that represent both animal and aircraft wings. The vortex remains attached when the local radius is shorter than 4 chord lengths, and separates outboard on more slender wings. Like most other hovering animals, hummingbirds have wing aspect ratios between 3 and 4, much stubbier than helicopters. Our results show this makes their wings robust against flow separation, which reduces drag below values obtained with more slender wings. This revises our understanding of how aspect ratio improves performance at low Reynolds numbers.

  18. The neuronal protein Kidins220 localizes in a raft compartment at the leading edge of motile immature dendritic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riol-Blanco, Lorena; Iglesias, Teresa; Sánchez-Sánchez, Noelia; de la Rosa, Gonzalo; Sánchez-Ruiloba, Lucía; Cabrera-Poch, Noemi; Torres, Ana; Longo, Isabel; García-Bordas, Julio; Longo, Natividad; Tejedor, Alberto; Sánchez-Mateos, Paloma; Rodríguez-Fernández, José Luis

    2004-01-01

    Kidins220, a protein predominantly expressed in neural tissues, is the first physiological substrate for protein kinase D (PKD). We show that Kidins220 is expressed in monocyte-derived and in peripheral blood immature dendritic cells (im DC). Immature DC (im DC) migrate onto extracellular matrices changing cyclically from a highly polarized morphology (monopolar (MP) stage) to a morphologically symmetrical shape (bipolar (BP) stage). Kidins220 was localized on membrane protrusions at the leading edge or on both poles in MP and BP cells, respectively. CD43, CD44, ICAM-3 and DC-SIGN, and signaling molecules PKD, Arp2/3 were found at the leading edge in MP or on both edges in BP cells, showing an intriguing parallelism between morphology and localization of molecular components on the poles of the motile DC. F-actin co-localized and it was necessary for Kidins220 localization on the membrane in MP and BP cells. Kidins220 was also found in a raft compartment. Disruption of rafts with methyl-beta-cyclodextrin induced rounding of the cells, inhibition of motility and lost of Kidins220 polarization. Our results describe for the first time the molecular components of the poles of motile im DC and indicate that a novel neuronal protein may be an important component among these molecules.

  19. Thermal/structural analyses of several hydrogen-cooled leading-edge concepts for hypersonic flight vehicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gladden, Herbert J.; Melis, Matthew E.; Mockler, Theodore T.; Tong, Mike

    1990-01-01

    The aerodynamic heating at high flight Mach numbers, when shock interference heating is included, can be extremely high and can exceed the capability of most conventional metallic and potential ceramic materials available. Numerical analyses of the heat transfer and thermal stresses are performed on three actively cooled leading-edge geometries (models) made of three different materials to address the issue of survivability in a hostile environment. These analyses show a mixture of results from one configuration to the next. Results for each configuration are presented and discussed. Combinations of enhanced internal film coefficients and high material thermal conductivity of copper and tungsten are predicted to maintain the maximum wall temperature for each concept within acceptable operating limits. The exception is the TD nickel material which is predicted to melt for most cases. The wide range of internal impingement film coefficients (based on correlations) for these conditions can lead to a significant uncertainty in expected leading-edge wall temperatures. The equivalent plastic strain, inherent in each configuration which results from the high thermal gradients, indicates a need for further cyclic analysis to determine component life.

  20. Vorticity and vortex dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Wu, Jie-Zhi; Zhou, M-D

    2006-01-01

    The importance of vorticity and vortex dynamics has now been well rec- nized at both fundamental and applied levels of ?uid dynamics, as already anticipatedbyTruesdellhalfcenturyagowhenhewrotethe?rstmonograph onthesubject, The Kinematics of Vorticity(1954);andasalsoevidencedby the appearance of several books on this ?eld in 1990s. The present book is characterizedbythefollowingfeatures: 1. A basic physical guide throughout the book. The material is directed by a basic observation on the splitting and coupling of two fundamental processes in ?uid motion, i.e., shearing (unique to ?uid) and compre- ing/expanding.Thevorticityplaysakeyroleintheformer,andavortex isnothingbuta?uidbodywithhighconcentrationofvorticitycompared to its surrounding ?uid. Thus, the vorticity and vortex dynamics is - cordinglyde?nedasthetheoryofshearingprocessanditscouplingwith compressing/expandingprocess. 2. A description of the vortex evolution following its entire life.Thisbegins from the generation of vorticity to the formation of thi...

  1. Vortices and impurities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tong, David; Wong, Kenny [Department of Applied Mathematics and Theoretical Physics,University of Cambridge, Cambridge (United Kingdom)

    2014-01-17

    We describe the BPS dynamics of vortices in the presence of impurities. We argue that a moduli space of solitons survives the addition of both electric and magnetic impurities. However, dynamics on the moduli space is altered. In the case of electric impurities, the metric remains unchanged but the dynamics is accompanied by a connection term, acting as an effective magnetic field over the moduli space. We give an expression for this connection and compute the vortex-impurity bound states in simple cases. In contrast, magnetic impurities distort the metric on the moduli space. We show that magnetic impurities can be viewed as vortices associated to a second, frozen, gauge group. We provide a D-brane description of the dynamics of vortices in product gauge groups and show how one can take the limit such that a subset of the vortices freeze.

  2. Surface optical vortices

    OpenAIRE

    Lembessis, V. E.; Babiker, M.; Andrews, D L.

    2009-01-01

    It is shown how the total internal reflection of orbital-angular-momentum-endowed light can lead to the generation of evanescent light possessing rotational properties in which the intensity distribution is firmly localized in the vicinity of the surface. The characteristics of these surface optical vortices depend on the form of the incident light and on the dielectric mismatch of the two media. The interference of surface optical vortices is shown to give rise to interesting phenomena, incl...

  3. Hovering hummingbird wing aerodynamics during the annual cycle. II. Implications of wing feather moult

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sapir, Nir; Elimelech, Yossef

    2018-01-01

    Birds usually moult their feathers in a particular sequence which may incur aerodynamic, physiological and behavioural implications. Among birds, hummingbirds are unique species in their sustained hovering flight. Because hummingbirds frequently hover-feed, they must maintain sufficiently high flight capacities even when moulting their flight feathers. A hummingbird wing consists of 10 primary flight feathers whose absence during moult may strongly affect wing performance. Using dynamic similarity rules, we compared time-accurate aerodynamic loads and flow field measurements over several wing geometries that follow the natural feather moult sequence of Calypte anna, a common hummingbird species in western North America. Our results suggest a drop of more than 20% in lift production during the early stages of the moult sequence in which mid-wing flight feathers are moulted. We also found that the wing's ability to generate lift strongly depended on the morphological integrity of the outer primaries and leading-edge. These findings may explain the evolution of wing morphology and moult attributes. Specifically, the high overlap between adjacent wing feathers, especially at the wing tip, and the slow sequential replacement of the wing feathers result in a relatively small reduction in wing surface area during moult with limited aerodynamic implications. We present power and efficiency analyses for hover flight during moult under several plausible scenarios, suggesting that body mass reduction could be a compensatory mechanism that preserves the energetic costs of hover flight. PMID:29515884

  4. Effect of leading- and trailing-edge flaps on clipped delta wings with and without wing camber at supersonic speeds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernandez, Gloria; Wood, Richard M.; Covell, Peter F.

    1994-01-01

    An experimental investigation of the aerodynamic characteristics of thin, moderately swept fighter wings has been conducted to evaluate the effect of camber and twist on the effectiveness of leading- and trailing-edge flaps at supersonic speeds in the Langley Unitary Plan Wind Tunnel. The study geometry consisted of a generic fuselage with camber typical of advanced fighter designs without inlets, canopy, or vertical tail. The model was tested with two wing configurations an uncambered (flat) wing and a cambered and twisted wing. Each wing had an identical clipped delta planform with an inboard leading edge swept back 65 deg and an outboard leading edge swept back 50 deg. The trailing edge was swept forward 25 deg. The leading-edge flaps were deflected 4 deg to 15 deg, and the trailing-edge flaps were deflected from -30 deg to 10 deg. Longitudinal force and moment data were obtained at Mach numbers of 1.60, 1.80, 2.00, and 2.16 for an angle-of-attack range 4 deg to 20 deg at a Reynolds number of 2.16 x 10(exp 6) per foot and for an angle-of-attack range 4 deg to 20 deg at a Reynolds number of 2.0 x 10(exp 6) per foot. Vapor screen, tuft, and oil flow visualization data are also included.

  5. Influence of Initial Vorticity Distribution on Axisymmetric Vortex Breakdown and Reconnection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Larry A.

    2007-01-01

    An analytical treatment has been developed to study some of the axisymmetric vortex breakdown and reconnection fluid dynamic processes underlying body-vortex interactions that are frequently manifested in rotorcraft and propeller-driven fixed-wing aircraft wakes. In particular, the presence of negative vorticity in the inner core of a vortex filament (one example of which is examined in this paper) subsequent to "cutting" by a solid body has a profound influence on the vortex reconnection, leading to analog flow behavior similar to vortex breakdown phenomena described in the literature. Initial vorticity distributions (three specific examples which are examined) without an inner core of negative vorticity do not exhibit vortex breakdown and instead manifest diffusion-like properties while undergoing vortex reconnection. Though this work focuses on laminar vortical flow, this work is anticipated to provide valuable insight into rotary-wing aerodynamics as well as other types of vortical flow phenomena.

  6. Numerical 3D analysis of cloud cavitation shedding frequency on a circular leading edge hydrofoil with a barotropic cavitation model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blume, M.; Skoda, R.

    2015-12-01

    A compressible density-based time-explicit low Mach number consistent viscous flow solver is utilised in combination with a barotropic cavitation model for the analysis of cloud cavitation on a circular leading edge (CLE) hydrofoil. For 5° angle of attack, cloud structure and shedding frequency for different cavitation numbers are compared to experimental data. A strong grid sensitivity is found in particular for high cavitation numbers. On a fine grid, a very good agreement with validation data is achieved even without explicit turbulence model. The neglect of viscous effects as well as a two-dimensional set-up lead to a less realistic prediction of cloud structures and frequencies. Comparative simulations with the Sauer-Schnerr cavitation model and modified pre-factors of the mass transfer terms underestimate the measured shedding frequency.

  7. Visualization of pre-set vortices in boundary layer flow over wavy surface in rectangular channel

    KAUST Repository

    Budiman, Alexander Christantho

    2014-12-04

    Abstract: Smoke-wire flow visualization is used to study the development of pre-set counter-rotating streamwise vortices in boundary layer flow over a wavy surface in a rectangular channel. The formation of the vortices is indicated by the vortical structures on the cross-sectional plane normal to the wavy surface. To obtain uniform spanwise vortex wavelength which will result in uniform vortex size, two types of spanwise disturbances were used: a series of perturbation wires placed prior and normal to the leading edge of the wavy surface, and a jagged pattern in the form of uniform triangles cut at the leading edge. These perturbation wires and jagged pattern induce low-velocity streaks that result in the formation of counter-rotating streamwise vortices that evolve downstream to form the mushroom-like structures on the cross-sectional plane of the flow. The evolution of the most amplified disturbances can be attributed to the formation of these mushroom-like structures. It is also shown that the size of the mushroom-like structures depends on the channel entrance geometry, Reynolds number, and the channel gap.Graphical Abstract: [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  8. Teachers on the Leading Edge: A Place-Based Professional Development Program for K-12 Earth Science Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butler, Robert

    2010-03-01

    Teachers on the Leading Edge (TOTLE) is an Earth Science teacher professional development program featuring Pacific Northwest active continental margin geology. To engage middle-school teachers and students, TOTLE workshops: (1) invite novice learners to geophysical studies of tectonics, earthquakes, and volcanoes; (2) provide access to EarthScope research; and (3) explain geologic hazards as understandable aspects of living on the ``leading edge'' of the North American continent. Fundamental concepts and observations progress from global patterns, to regional context, and then to local applications. For example, earthquakes are concentrated near tectonic plate boundaries such as the Cascadia subduction zone between the Juan de Fuca and North American plates. Earthquake hazards include liquefaction and landslides that are affected by regional and local geology. And relative earthquake hazard maps provide comparisons of hazards on county, city, and neighborhood scales. Inquiry-based field investigation of coastal ghost forests and Cascadia tsunami geology stimulates learning about Cascadia great earthquakes and tsunamis and provides a case study of scientific discovery. Field studies of volcanic mudflow (lahar) deposits from Mt Hood and Mt Rainier highlight volcanic hazards to rapidly increasing populations that live near recently active Cascade volcanoes. We emphasize the importance of infrastructure engineering and emergency preparedness in preventing geologic hazards damage, injuries, and deaths in order to: (1) demonstrate how Geoscience research leads to improved engineering designs that mitigate hazards; (2) align lessons with national and state K-12 science education standards that focus on science, technology, and societal connections; and (3) avoid fatalism and develop a culture of geologic hazards awareness among future citizens of the Pacific Northwest.

  9. Characterization of counter-rotating streamwise vortices in flat rectangular channel with one-sided wavy wall

    KAUST Repository

    Bouremel, Yann

    2016-11-01

    Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) has been used to characterize the evolution of counter-rotating streamwise vortices in a rectangular channel with one sided wavy surface. The vortices were created by a uniform set of saw-tooth carved over the leading edge of a flat plate at the entrance of a flat rectangular channel with one-sided wavy wall. PIV measurements were taken over the spanwise and streamwise planes at different locations and at Reynolds number of 2500. Two other Reynolds numbers of 2885 and 3333 have also been considered for quantification purpose. Pairs of counter-rotating streamwise vortices have been shown experimentally to be centred along the spanwise direction at the saw-tooth valley where the vorticity ωz=0ωz=0. It has also been found that the vorticity ωzωz of the pairs of counter-rotating vortices decreases along the streamwise direction, and increases with the Reynolds number. Moreover, different quantifications of such counter-rotating vortices have been discussed such as their size, boundary layer, velocity profile and vorticity. The current study shows that the mixing due to the wall shear stress of counter-rotating streamwise vortices as well as their averaged viscous dissipation rate of kinetic energy decrease over flat and adverse pressure gradient surfaces while increasing over favourable pressure gradient surfaces. Finally, it was also demonstrated that the main direction of stretching is orientated at around 45° with the main flow direction.

  10. Finiteness of corner vortices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalita, Jiten C.; Biswas, Sougata; Panda, Swapnendu

    2018-04-01

    Till date, the sequence of vortices present in the solid corners of steady internal viscous incompressible flows was thought to be infinite. However, the already existing and most recent geometric theories on incompressible viscous flows that express vortical structures in terms of critical points in bounded domains indicate a strong opposition to this notion of infiniteness. In this study, we endeavor to bridge the gap between the two opposing stream of thoughts by diagnosing the assumptions of the existing theorems on such vortices. We provide our own set of proofs for establishing the finiteness of the sequence of corner vortices by making use of the continuum hypothesis and Kolmogorov scale, which guarantee a nonzero scale for the smallest vortex structure possible in incompressible viscous flows. We point out that the notion of infiniteness resulting from discrete self-similarity of the vortex structures is not physically feasible. Making use of some elementary concepts of mathematical analysis and our own construction of diametric disks, we conclude that the sequence of corner vortices is finite.

  11. Vorticity confinement technique for drag prediction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Povitsky, Alex; Snyder, Troy

    2011-11-01

    This work couples wake-integral drag prediction and vorticity confinement technique (VC) for the improved prediction of drag from CFD simulations. Induced drag computations of a thin wing are shown to be more accurate than the more widespread method of surface pressure integration when compared to theoretical lifting-line value. Furthermore, the VC method improves trailing vortex preservation and counteracts the shift from induced drag to numerical entropy drag with increasing distance of Trefftz plane downstream of the wing. Accurate induced drag prediction via the surface integration of pressure barring a sufficiently refined surface grid and increased computation time. Furthermore, the alternative wake-integral technique for drag prediction suffers from numerical dissipation. VC is shown to control the numerical dissipation with very modest computational overhead. The 2-D research code is used to test specific formulations of the VC body force terms and illustrate the computational efficiency of the method compared to a ``brute force'' reduction in spatial step size. For the 3-D wing simulation, ANSYS FLUENT is employed with the VC body force terms added to the solver with user-defined functions (UDFs). VC is successfully implemented to highly unsteady flows typical for Micro Air Vehicles (MAV) producing oscillative drag force either by natural vortex shedding at high angles of attack or by flapping wing motion.

  12. Fruit fly scale robots can hover longer with flapping wings than with spinning wings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawkes, Elliot W; Lentink, David

    2016-10-01

    Hovering flies generate exceptionally high lift, because their wings generate a stable leading edge vortex. Micro flying robots with a similar wing design can generate similar high lift by either flapping or spinning their wings. While it requires less power to spin a wing, the overall efficiency depends also on the actuator system driving the wing. Here, we present the first holistic analysis to calculate how long a fly-inspired micro robot can hover with flapping versus spinning wings across scales. We integrate aerodynamic data with data-driven scaling laws for actuator, electronics and mechanism performance from fruit fly to hummingbird scales. Our analysis finds that spinning wings driven by rotary actuators are superior for robots with wingspans similar to hummingbirds, yet flapping wings driven by oscillatory actuators are superior at fruit fly scale. This crossover is driven by the reduction in performance of rotary compared with oscillatory actuators at smaller scale. Our calculations emphasize that a systems-level analysis is essential for trading-off flapping versus spinning wings for micro flying robots. © 2016 The Author(s).

  13. Vortices wiggled and dragged

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reichardt, Charles

    2008-01-01

    When a sufficiently strong magnetic field is applied to a superconductor, some of the field can pierce it through the generation of magnetic vortices, each of which contains a quantized amount of magnetic flux. Although the superconducting state of the material outside each vortex is maintained (and destroyed within each vortex), the interaction of vortices with a current passing through the material can cause them to move, dissipating energy and thereby generating a source of electrical resistance. The ability to manipulate an individual superconducting vortex represents a powerful tool for studying the dynamics of vortices and the superconductors that support them. It could also lead to the development of a new class of fluxon-based electronics.

  14. Vortices on hyperbolic surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Manton, Nicholas S; Rink, Norman A

    2010-01-01

    It is shown that Abelian Higgs vortices on a hyperbolic surface M can be constructed geometrically from holomorphic maps f: M → N, where N is also a hyperbolic surface. The fields depend on f and on the metrics of M and N. The vortex centres are the ramification points, where the derivative of f vanishes. The magnitude of the Higgs field measures the extent to which f is locally an isometry. Witten's construction of vortices on the hyperbolic plane is rederived, and new examples of vortices on compact surfaces and on hyperbolic surfaces of revolution are obtained. The interpretation of these solutions as SO(3)-invariant, self-dual SU(2) Yang-Mills fields on R 4 is also given.

  15. Aerodynamic performance of a hovering hawkmoth with flexible wings: a computational approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakata, Toshiyuki; Liu, Hao

    2012-02-22

    Insect wings are deformable structures that change shape passively and dynamically owing to inertial and aerodynamic forces during flight. It is still unclear how the three-dimensional and passive change of wing kinematics owing to inherent wing flexibility contributes to unsteady aerodynamics and energetics in insect flapping flight. Here, we perform a systematic fluid-structure interaction based analysis on the aerodynamic performance of a hovering hawkmoth, Manduca, with an integrated computational model of a hovering insect with rigid and flexible wings. Aerodynamic performance of flapping wings with passive deformation or prescribed deformation is evaluated in terms of aerodynamic force, power and efficiency. Our results reveal that wing flexibility can increase downwash in wake and hence aerodynamic force: first, a dynamic wing bending is observed, which delays the breakdown of leading edge vortex near the wing tip, responsible for augmenting the aerodynamic force-production; second, a combination of the dynamic change of wing bending and twist favourably modifies the wing kinematics in the distal area, which leads to the aerodynamic force enhancement immediately before stroke reversal. Moreover, an increase in hovering efficiency of the flexible wing is achieved as a result of the wing twist. An extensive study of wing stiffness effect on aerodynamic performance is further conducted through a tuning of Young's modulus and thickness, indicating that insect wing structures may be optimized not only in terms of aerodynamic performance but also dependent on many factors, such as the wing strength, the circulation capability of wing veins and the control of wing movements.

  16. Surface optical vortices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lembessis, V. E.; Babiker, M.; Andrews, D. L.

    2009-01-01

    It is shown how the total internal reflection of orbital-angular-momentum-endowed light can lead to the generation of evanescent light possessing rotational properties in which the intensity distribution is firmly localized in the vicinity of the surface. The characteristics of these surface optical vortices depend on the form of the incident light and on the dielectric mismatch of the two media. The interference of surface optical vortices is shown to give rise to interesting phenomena, including pattern rotation akin to a surface optical Ferris wheel. Applications are envisaged to be in atom lithography, optical surface tweezers, and spanners.

  17. Vortex coupling in trailing vortex-wing interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, C.; Wang, Z.; Gursul, I.

    2018-03-01

    The interaction of trailing vortices of an upstream wing with rigid and flexible downstream wings has been investigated experimentally in a wind tunnel, using particle image velocimetry, hot-wire, force, and deformation measurements. Counter-rotating upstream vortices exhibit increased meandering when they are close to the tip of the downstream wing. The upstream vortex forms a pair with the vortex shed from the downstream wing and then exhibits large displacements around the wing tip. This coupled motion of the pair has been found to cause large lift fluctuations on the downstream wing. The meandering of the vortex pair occurs at the natural meandering frequency of the isolated vortex, with a low Strouhal number, and is not affected by the frequency of the large-amplitude wing oscillations if the downstream wing is flexible. The displacement of the leading vortex is larger than that of the trailing vortex; however, it causes highly correlated variations of the core radius, core vorticity, and circulation of the trailing vortex with the coupled meandering motion. In contrast, co-rotating vortices do not exhibit any increased meandering.

  18. Effects of Sweep Angle on the Boundary-Layer Stability Characteristics of an Untapered Wing at Low Speeds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boltz, Frederick W.; Kenyon, George C.; Allen, Clyde Q.

    1960-01-01

    An investigation was conducted in the Ames 12-Foot Low-Turbulence Pressure Tunnel to determine the effects of sweep on the boundary-layer stability characteristics of an untapered variable-sweep wing having an NACA 64(2)A015 section normal to the leading edge. Pressure distribution and transition were measured on the wing at low speeds at sweep angles of 0, 10, 20, 30, 40, and 50 deg. and at angles of attack from -3 to 3 deg. The investigation also included flow-visualization studies on the surface at sweep angles from 0 to 50 deg. and total pressure surveys in the boundary layer at a sweep angle of 30 deg. for angles of attack from -12 to 0 deg. It was found that sweep caused premature transition on the wing under certain conditions. This effect resulted from the formation of vortices in the boundary layer when a critical combination of sweep angle, pressure gradient, and stream Reynolds number was attained. A useful parameter in indicating the combined effect of these flow variables on vortex formation and on beginning transition is the crossflow Reynolds number. The critical values of crossflow Reynolds number for vortex formation found in this investigation range from about 135 to 190 and are in good agreement with those reported in previous investigations. The values of crossflow Reynolds number for beginning transitions were found to be between 190 and 260. For each condition (i.e., development of vortices and initiation of transition at a given location) the lower values in the specified ranges were obtained with a light coating of flow-visualization material on the surface. A method is presented for the rapid computation of crossflow Reynolds number on any swept surface for which the pressure distribution is known. From calculations based on this method, it was found that the maximum values of crossflow Reynolds number are attained under conditions of a strong pressure gradient and at a sweep angle of about 50 deg. Due to the primary dependence on pressure

  19. Review Results on Wing-Body Interference

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frolov Vladimir

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents an overview of results for wing-body interference, obtained by the author for varied wing-body combinations. The lift-curve slopes of the wing-body combinations are considered. In this paper a discrete vortices method (DVM and 2D potential model for cross-flow around fuselage are used. The circular and elliptical cross-sections of the fuselage and flat wings of various forms are considered. Calculations showed that the value of the lift-curve slopes of the wing-body combinations may exceed the same value for an isolated wing. This result confirms an experimental data obtained by other authors earlier. Within a framework of the used mathematical models the investigations to optimize the wing-body combination were carried. The present results of the optimization problem for the wing-body combination allowed to select the optimal geometric characteristics for configuration to maximize the values of the lift-curve slopes of the wing-body combination. It was revealed that maximums of the lift-curve slopes for the optimal mid-wing configuration with elliptical cross-section body had a sufficiently large relative width of the body (more than 30% of the span wing.

  20. Theory of Concentrated Vortices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alekseenko, Sergey; Kuibin, Pavel; Okulov, Valery

    This book presents comprehensive and authoritative coverage of the wide field of concentrated vortices observed in nature and technique. The methods for research of their kinematics and dynamics are considered. Special attention is paid to the flows with helical symmetry. The authors have describ...

  1. Vitality of optical vortices

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Roux, FS

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Optical vortices are always created or annihilated in pairs with opposite topological charges. However, the presence of such a vortex dipole does not directly indicate whether they are associated with a creation or an annihilation event. Here we...

  2. Theory of Concentrated Vortices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alekseenko, Sergey; Kuibin, Pavel; Okulov, Valery

    This book presents comprehensive and authoritative coverage of the wide field of concentrated vortices observed in nature and technique. The methods for research of their kinematics and dynamics are considered. Special attention is paid to the flows with helical symmetry. The authors have described...

  3. Vortices and Jacobian varieties

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Manton, Nicholas S.; M. Romão, Nuno

    2011-01-01

    We investigate the geometry of the moduli space of N-vortices on line bundles over a closed Riemann surface of genus g > 1, in the little explored situation where 1 = 1, the vortex metric typically degenerates as the dissolving limit is approached, the degeneration occurring precisely...

  4. Reconstruction of Propagating Kelvin-Helmholtz Vortices at Mercury's Magnetopause

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sundberg, Torbjoern; Boardsen, Scott A.; Slavin, James A.; Blomberg, Lars G.; Cumnock, Judy A.; Solomon, Sean C.; Anderson, Brian J.; Korth, Haje

    2011-01-01

    A series of quasi-periodic magnetopause crossings were recorded by the MESSENGER spacecraft during its third flyby of Mercury on 29 September 2009, likely caused by a train of propagating Kelvin-Helmholtz (KH) vortices. We here revisit the observations to study the internal structure of the waves. Exploiting MESSENGER s rapid traversal of the magnetopause, we show that the observations permit a reconstruction of the structure of a rolled-up KH vortex directly from the spacecraft s magnetic field measurements. The derived geometry is consistent with all large-scale fluctuations in the magnetic field data, establishes the non-linear nature of the waves, and shows their vortex-like structure. In several of the wave passages, a reduction in magnetic field strength is observed in the middle of the wave, which is characteristic of rolled-up vortices and is related to the increase in magnetic pressure required to balance the centrifugal force on the plasma in the outer regions of a vortex, previously reported in computer simulations. As the KH wave starts to roll up, the reconstructed geometry suggests that the vortices develop two gradual transition regions in the magnetic field, possibly related to the mixing of magnetosheath and magnetospheric plasma, situated at the leading edges from the perspectives of both the magnetosphere and the magnetosheath.

  5. Reconstruction of propagating Kelvin-Helmholtz vortices at Mercury's magnetopause

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sundberg, Torbjörn; Boardsen, Scott A.; Slavin, James A.; Blomberg, Lars G.; Cumnock, Judy A.; Solomon, Sean C.; Anderson, Brian J.; Korth, Haje

    2011-12-01

    A series of quasi-periodic magnetopause crossings were recorded by the MESSENGER spacecraft during its third flyby of Mercury on 29 September 2009, likely caused by a train of propagating Kelvin-Helmholtz (KH) vortices. We here revisit the observations to study the internal structure of the waves. Exploiting MESSENGER's rapid traversal of the magnetopause, we show that the observations permit a reconstruction of the structure of a rolled-up KH vortex directly from the spacecraft's magnetic field measurements. The derived geometry is consistent with all large-scale fluctuations in the magnetic field data, establishes the non-linear nature of the waves, and shows their vortex-like structure. In several of the wave passages, a reduction in magnetic field strength is observed in the middle of the wave, which is characteristic of rolled-up vortices and is related to the increase in magnetic pressure required to balance the centrifugal force on the plasma in the outer regions of a vortex, previously reported in computer simulations. As the KH wave starts to roll up, the reconstructed geometry suggests that the vortices develop two gradual transition regions in the magnetic field, possibly related to the mixing of magnetosheath and magnetospheric plasma, situated at the leading edges from the perspectives of both the magnetosphere and the magnetosheath.

  6. Analysis of vorticity dynamics for hump characteristics of a pump turbine model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Deyou; Gong, Ruzhi; Wang, Hongjie; Han, Lei; Wei, Xianzhu; Qin, Daqing

    2016-01-01

    Conventional parameters based on CFD methodology for the investigation on hump characteristics of a pump turbine cannot reflect the dynamic interaction mechanism between the runner and the fluid. This research presents a dynamic interaction mechanism of a pump turbine operating in the hump region. First, vorticity dynamic parameters were obtained based on the theory of vorticity dynamics. Second, 3-D unsteady flow simulations were performed in a full pump turbine model using the SST k-ω turbulence model, and numerical results have a good agreement with the experiments. Then, analysis was carried out to determine the relation between the vorticity dynamic parameters and hump characteristics. The results indicate that the theory of vorticity dynamics has an advantage in evaluating the dynamic performance of a pump turbine. The energy transfer between the runner and the fluid is through vorticity dynamic parameters-pressure and friction terms, in which the pressure term accounts for the most. Furthermore, vortex generation mainly results from the skin friction. Combining vorticity dynamic analysis with the method of Q-criterion indicates that hump characteristics are related to the reduction of the surface normal pressure work and vortex motion on the suction surfaces close to the leading edges in the runner, and the increase of skin friction work in the stay-guide vanes

  7. Demonstration of an in situ morphing hyperelliptical cambered span wing mechanism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Manzo, Justin; Garcia, Ephrahim

    2010-01-01

    Research on efficient shore bird morphology inspired the hyperelliptical cambered span (HECS) wing, a crescent-shaped, aft-swept wing with vertically oriented wingtips. The wing reduces vorticity-induced circulation loss and outperforms an elliptical baseline when planar. Designed initially as a rigid wing, the HECS wing makes use of morphing to transition from a planar to a furled configuration, similar to that of a continuously curved winglet, in flight. A morphing wing concept mechanism is presented, employing shape memory alloy actuators to create a discretized curvature approximation. The aerodynamics for continuous wing shapes is validated quasi-statically through wind tunnel testing, showing enhanced planar HECS wing lift-to-drag performance over an elliptical wing, with the furled HECS wing showing minimal enhancements beyond this point. Wind tunnel tests of the active morphing wing prove the mechanism capable of overcoming realistic loading, while further testing may be required to establish aerodynamic merits of the HECS wing morphing maneuver

  8. A leading-edge hardware family for diagnostics applications and low-level RF in CERN's ELENA ring

    CERN Document Server

    Angoletta, M E; Jaussi, M; Leiononen, P; Levens, T E; Molendijk, J C; Sanchez-Quesada, J; Simonin, J

    2013-01-01

    The CERN Extra Low ENergy Antiproton (ELENA) Ring is a new synchrotron that will be commissioned in 2016 to further decelerate the antiprotons transferred from the CERN’s Antiproton Decelerator (AD). The requirements for the acquisition and treatment of signals for longitudinal diagnostics are very demanding, owing to the revolution frequency swing as well as to the digital signal processing required. The requirements for the Low-Level Radio-Frequency (LLRF) system are very demanding as well, especially in terms of revolution frequency swing, dynamic range and low noise required by the cavity voltage control and digital signal processing to be performed. Both sets of requirements will be satisfied by using a leading-edge hardware family, developed to cover the LLRF needs of all synchrotrons in the Meyrin site; it will be first deployed in 2014 in the CERN’s PSB and in the medical machine MedAustron. This paper gives an overview of the main building blocks of the hardware family and of th...

  9. Do rapid 'superbug' tests pay off? Balance the costs and benefits of leading-edge technology. Interview by Alan Joch.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, Margie Ann

    2009-02-01

    As hospitals become increasingly sensitive to the health and financial consequences of health care-associated infections (HAIs), a new generation of molecular-based testing technologies promises to significantly shorten the time required to identify "superbugs" and other bacterial infections. The leading-edge techniques promise to reduce costs by helping hospitals quickly determine which patients to isolate because they carry active methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) infections, for example, or which ones to release from prophylactic isolation because they ultimately tested negative for a dangerous infection. But diagnostic speed comes at a price--the costs to perform molecular tests are significantly higher than conventional methods. This challenges hospitals to balance health care expenses with medical efficacy, says molecular testing veteran Margie Morgan, Ph.D., scientific director at Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, Los Angeles. "The rapid methods can be extreme time savers and possibly help a great deal with the isolation of patients. But some of the tests may cost five times what manual methods might be, so there is a price for seeing so much of a reduction in time," she says.

  10. Experimental Observations on the Deformation and Breakup of Water Droplets Near the Leading Edge of an Airfoil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vargas, Mario; Feo, Alex

    2011-01-01

    This work presents the results of an experimental study on droplet deformation and breakup near the leading edge of an airfoil. The experiment was conducted in the rotating rig test cell at the Instituto Nacional de Tecnica Aeroespacial (INTA) in Madrid, Spain. An airfoil model placed at the end of the rotating arm was moved at speeds of 50 to 90 m/sec. A monosize droplet generator was employed to produce droplets that were allowed to fall from above, perpendicular to the path of the airfoil at a given location. High speed imaging was employed to observe the interaction between the droplets and the airfoil. The high speed imaging allowed observation of droplet deformation and breakup as the droplet approached the airfoil near the stagnation line. A tracking software program was used to measure from the high speed movies the horizontal and vertical displacement of the droplet against time. The velocity, acceleration, Weber number, Bond number, Reynolds number, and the drag coefficients were calculated along the path of a given droplet from beginning of deformation to breakup and/or hitting the airfoil. Results are presented for droplets with a diameter of 490 micrometers at airfoil speeds of 50, 60, 70, 80 and 90 m/sec

  11. Partners in Science: A Model Cooperative Program Introducing High School Teachers and Students to Leading-Edge Pharmaceutical Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woska, Joseph R., Jr.; Collins, Danielle M.; Canney, Brian J.; Arcario, Erin L.; Reilly, Patricia L.

    2005-12-01

    Partners in Science is a cooperative program between Boehringer Ingelheim Pharmaceuticals, Inc. and area high schools in the community surrounding our Connecticut campus. It is a two-phase program that introduces high school students and teachers to the world of drug discovery and leading-edge pharmaceutical research. Phase 1 involves a series of lectures, tours, and demonstrations given by scientists within our research and development division (R&D). Phase 2 involves the selection of a small group of participants to intern for the summer in a research laboratory, working side by side with a scientist within R&D. In this manuscript, the specific aims, goals, and development of the Partners in Science program are described, as well as the syllabus/agenda, the logistics surrounding the operation of the program, and our shared personal experiences with students and teachers who have participated. Some of the pitfalls/problems associated with the program will be presented, and finally, the future direction of the program including areas of improvement and expansion are described.

  12. Modeling the Nonlinear, Strain Rate Dependent Deformation of Shuttle Leading Edge Materials with Hydrostatic Stress Effects Included

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldberg, Robert K.; Carney, Kelly S.

    2004-01-01

    An analysis method based on a deformation (as opposed to damage) approach has been developed to model the strain rate dependent, nonlinear deformation of woven ceramic matrix composites, such as the Reinforced Carbon Carbon (RCC) material used on the leading edges of the Space Shuttle. In the developed model, the differences in the tension and compression deformation behaviors have also been accounted for. State variable viscoplastic equations originally developed for metals have been modified to analyze the ceramic matrix composites. To account for the tension/compression asymmetry in the material, the effective stress and effective inelastic strain definitions have been modified. The equations have also been modified to account for the fact that in an orthotropic composite the in-plane shear response is independent of the stiffness in the normal directions. The developed equations have been implemented into LS-DYNA through the use of user defined subroutines (UMATs). Several sample qualitative calculations have been conducted, which demonstrate the ability of the model to qualitatively capture the features of the deformation response present in woven ceramic matrix composites.

  13. Transition over C4 leading edge and measurement of intermittency factor using PDF of hot-wire signal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hazarika, B.K.; Hirsch, C. [Vrije Univ. Brussel, Brussels (Belgium). Dept. of Fluid Mechanics

    1997-07-01

    The variation of intermittency factors in the transition region of a C4 leading edge flat plate is measured at three incidence angles in a low-turbulence free stream. During the determination of intermittency factor, the threshold value of the detector function and the validity of conditional averaging are verified by a method based on the direct application of PDF of the hot-wire output. As the angle of incidence is increased, the transition progressively moves through all the three modes on the suction surface: at zero incidence the bypass transition, at 2 deg incidence the natural transition, and at 4 deg incidence the separated-flow transition occur, respectively. All three modes of transition exhibited the chordwise intermittency factor variation in accordance with Narasinha`s universal intermittency distribution; thus, the method based on spot production rate is applicable to all the three modes of transition. In the transition zone of the attached boundary layers, the conditionally averaged interturbulent profiles are fuller than the Blasius profile, while the conditionally averaged turbulent profiles follow a logarithmic profile with a variable additive parameter.

  14. Effects of Wing-Cuff on NACA 23015 Aerodynamic Performances

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meftah S.M.A

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The main subject of this work is the numerical study control of flow separation on a NACA 23015 airfoil by using wing cuff. This last is a leading edge modification done to the wing. The modification consists of a slight extension of the chord on the outboard section of the wings. Different numerical cases are considered for the baseline and modified airfoil NACA 23015 according at different angle of incidence. The turbulence is modeled by two equations k-epsilon model. The results of this numerical investigation showed several benefits of the wing cuff compared with a conventional airfoil and an agreement is observed between the experimental data and the present study. The most intriguing result of this research is the capability for wing cuff to perform short take-offs and landings.

  15. 3D flow visualization and tomographic particle image velocimetry for vortex breakdown over a non-slender delta wing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, ChengYue; Gao, Qi; Wei, RunJie; Li, Tian; Wang, JinJun

    2016-06-01

    Volumetric measurement for the leading-edge vortex (LEV) breakdown of a delta wing has been conducted by three-dimensional (3D) flow visualization and tomographic particle image velocimetry (TPIV). The 3D flow visualization is employed to show the vortex structures, which was recorded by four cameras with high resolution. 3D dye streaklines of the visualization are reconstructed using a similar way of particle reconstruction in TPIV. Tomographic PIV is carried out at the same time using same cameras with the dye visualization. Q criterion is employed to identify the LEV. Results of tomographic PIV agree well with the reconstructed 3D dye streaklines, which proves the validity of the measurements. The time-averaged flow field based on TPIV is shown and described by sections of velocity and streamwise vorticity. Combining the two measurement methods sheds light on the complex structures of both bubble type and spiral type of breakdown. The breakdown position is recognized by investigating both the streaklines and TPIV velocity fields. Proper orthogonal decomposition is applied to extract a pair of conjugated helical instability modes from TPIV data. Therefore, the dominant frequency of the instability modes is obtained from the corresponding POD coefficients of the modes based on wavelet transform analysis.

  16. Three-dimensional thermal-structural analysis of a swept cowl leading edge subjected to skewed shock-shock interference heating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polesky, Sandra P.; Dechaumphai, Pramote; Glass, Christopher E.; Pandey, Ajay K.

    1990-01-01

    A three-dimensional flux-based thermal analysis method has been developed and its capability is demonstrated by predicting the transient nonlinear temperature response of a swept cowl leading edge subjected to intense three-dimensional aerodynamic heating. The predicted temperature response from the transient thermal analysis is used in a linear elastic structural analysis to determine thermal stresses. Predicted thermal stresses are compared with those obtained from a two-dimensional analysis which represents conditions along the chord where maximum heating occurs. Results indicate a need for a three-dimensional analysis to predict accurately the leading edge thermal stress response.

  17. Effect of flexibility on flapping wing characteristics under forward flight

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhu, Jianyang; Jiang, Lin; Zhou, Chaoying; Wang, Chao

    2014-01-01

    Through two-dimensional numerical simulation and by solving the unsteady incompressible Navier–Stokes (NS) equations, coupled with the structural dynamic equation for the motion of the wing, the effect of flexibility on flapping wing characteristics during forward flight is systematically studied. The flapping wing is considered as a cantilever, which performs the translational and rotational motion at its leading edge, and the other part is passively deformed by the aerodynamic force. The frequency ratio ω* and mass ratio m* are defined and used to characterize the flexibility of the flapping wing. It has been found that an optimal range of the frequency ratio exists in which the flexible wing possesses both a larger propulsive efficiency and lifting efficiency than their rigid counterpart. Also, the flexible wing with the smaller mass ratio may be of benefit to generate thrust, while the larger mass ratio may be of benefit to generate lift. In addition, a stronger leading edge vortex and reattachment vortex are observed around the appropriate flexibility wing’s surface, which therefore leads to better aerodynamic characteristics. (paper)

  18. A new technique for investigating the induced and profile drag coefficients of a smooth wing and a tubercled wing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bolzon Michael

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The induced and profile drag coefficients of a wing are typically determined through a complex experimental technique, such as wake surveying. Such a technique requires measurement of all three orthogonal components of the downstream velocity to find the components of drag, which results in the necessary usage of a sophisticated and costly measurement device, such as multi-hole pressure probe. However, in this paper data is presented which demonstrate that the relative changes in the induced and profile drag coefficients can largely be determined through the sole measurement of the downstream, streamwise velocity. To demonstrate this, the induced and profile drags of two NACA 0021 wings, one with a smooth leading edge and the other wing a tubercled leading edge for comparison, are determined through the measurement of the three orthogonal velocities. The downstream, streamwise velocity distribution of each wing is then constructed and relationships can be determined. The wings were surveyed at 3°, 9°, and 12°. It has been found that the relative magnitude of the profile drag coefficient can be found for all considered angles of attack, while the relative magnitude of the induced drag coefficient can be found at 9° and 12°. These findings produce an innovative, simpler, and more cost effective experimental technique in determining the components of drag of a wing, and reduces the burdensome requirement of a sophisticated measurement device for such an experiment. Further investigation is required to determine the induced drag at 3°.

  19. Vortices and nanostructured superconductors

    CERN Document Server

    2017-01-01

    This book provides expert coverage of modern and novel aspects of the study of vortex matter, dynamics, and pinning in nanostructured and multi-component superconductors. Vortex matter in superconducting materials is a field of enormous beauty and intellectual challenge, which began with the theoretical prediction of vortices by A. Abrikosov (Nobel Laureate). Vortices, vortex dynamics, and pinning are key features in many of today’s human endeavors: from the huge superconducting accelerating magnets and detectors at the Large Hadron Collider at CERN, which opened new windows of knowledge on the universe, to the tiny superconducting transceivers using Rapid Single Flux Quanta, which have opened a revolutionary means of communication. In recent years, two new features have added to the intrinsic beauty and complexity of the subject: nanostructured/nanoengineered superconductors, and the discovery of a range of new materials showing multi-component (multi-gap) superconductivity. In this book, leading researche...

  20. Potential Vorticity in Magnetohydrodynamics

    OpenAIRE

    Webb, G. M.; Mace, R. L.

    2014-01-01

    A version of Noether's second theorem using Lagrange multipliers is used to investigate fluid relabelling symmetries conservation laws in magnetohydrodynamics (MHD). We obtain a new generalized potential vorticity type conservation equation for MHD which takes into account entropy gradients and the ${\\bf J}\\times{\\bf B}$ force on the plasma due to the current ${\\bf J}$ and magnetic induction ${\\bf B}$. This new conservation law for MHD is derived by using Noether's second theorem in conjuncti...

  1. Power reduction and the radial limit of stall delay in revolving wings of different aspect ratio.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kruyt, Jan W; van Heijst, GertJan F; Altshuler, Douglas L; Lentink, David

    2015-04-06

    Airplanes and helicopters use high aspect ratio wings to reduce the power required to fly, but must operate at low angle of attack to prevent flow separation and stall. Animals capable of slow sustained flight, such as hummingbirds, have low aspect ratio wings and flap their wings at high angle of attack without stalling. Instead, they generate an attached vortex along the leading edge of the wing that elevates lift. Previous studies have demonstrated that this vortex and high lift can be reproduced by revolving the animal wing at the same angle of attack. How do flapping and revolving animal wings delay stall and reduce power? It has been hypothesized that stall delay derives from having a short radial distance between the shoulder joint and wing tip, measured in chord lengths. This non-dimensional measure of wing length represents the relative magnitude of inertial forces versus rotational accelerations operating in the boundary layer of revolving and flapping wings. Here we show for a suite of aspect ratios, which represent both animal and aircraft wings, that the attachment of the leading edge vortex on a revolving wing is determined by wing aspect ratio, defined with respect to the centre of revolution. At high angle of attack, the vortex remains attached when the local radius is shorter than four chord lengths and separates outboard on higher aspect ratio wings. This radial stall limit explains why revolving high aspect ratio wings (of helicopters) require less power compared with low aspect ratio wings (of hummingbirds) at low angle of attack and vice versa at high angle of attack. © 2015 The Author(s) Published by the Royal Society. All rights reserved.

  2. The Lived Experiences of Leading Edge Certified Elementary School Teachers Who Use Instructional Technology to Foster Critical Thinking, Collaboration, Creativity, and Communication in Their Classrooms: A Phenomenological Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruddell, Natalie

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this phenomenological study was to describe the perceptions of current and former Leading Edge Certified (LEC) elementary school teachers regarding instructional technology practices that facilitate students' development of critical thinking, collaboration, communication, and creativity (4Cs) in one-to-one computer…

  3. Numerical Investigations of the Influence of Unsteady Vane Trailing Edge Shock Wave on Film Cooling Effectiveness of Rotor Blade Leading Edge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yufeng; Cai, Le; Wang, Songtao; Zhou, Xun

    2018-04-01

    Unsteady numerical simulations of a high-load transonic turbine stage have been carried out to study the influences of vane trailing edge outer-extending shockwave on rotor blade leading edge film cooling performance. The turbine stage used in this paper is composed of a vane section and a rotor one which are both near the root section of a transonic high-load turbine stage. The Mach number is 0.94 at vane outlet, and the relative Mach number is above 1.10 at rotor outlet. Various positions and oblique angles of film cooling holes were investigated in this research. Results show that the cooling efficiency on the blade surface of rotor near leading edge is significantly affected by vane trailing edge outer-extending shockwave in some cases. In the cases that film holes are close to leading edge, cooling performance suffers more from the sweeping vane trailing edge outer-extending shockwave. In addition, coolant flow ejected from oblique film holes is harder to separate from the blade surface of rotor, and can cover more blade area even under the effects of sweeping vane trailing edge shockwave. As a result, oblique film holes can provide better film cooling performance than vertical film holes do near the leading edge on turbine blade which is swept by shockwaves.

  4. Aerodynamic Design of Wing based on Humpback Whale Flipper

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akram, Saif; Baig, Faisal

    2013-11-01

    The tubercles provide a bio-inspired design that has commercial viability for wing-like structures. Wind tunnel tests at low speeds of model humpback flippers with leading-edge tubercles have demonstrated improvements tubercles make, such as a staggering 32% reduction in drag, 8% improvement in lift, and a 40% increase in angle of attack over smooth flippers before stalling. The tubercles on the leading edge act as a passive-flow control device that improves the performance and maneuverability of the flipper. Possible fluid-dynamic mechanisms for improved performance include delay of stall through generation of a vortex and modification of the boundary layer, and increase in effective span by reduction of both spanwise flow and strength of the tip vortex. In the present work, numerical investigation of a 3D wing with scalloped leading edge inspired by the humpback whale flipper is carried out at high subsonic speeds with variation in angle of attack from 0 to 25 degrees. The effect of using different turbulence models is also investigated in order to attain a better understanding of mechanism(s) responsible for improved aerodynamic performance. This new understanding of humpback whale flipper aerodynamics has strong implications for wing design.

  5. Visualization techniques for studying high angle of attack separated vortical flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Robert C.

    1988-01-01

    Flow visualization techniques can provide information on high angle of attack separated flows around slender aircraft configurations that may be unobtainable otherwise. At large angles of attack the flow field is dominated by vortical structures originating on the forebody wing extension, wing and forward control surfaces. Several techniques that are suitable for tracking vortices in subsonic wind tunnels are introduced. A discussion of visualization photographs and quantitative data obtained from visualization studies on vortex trajectory and breakdown position on both static and dynamic wind tunnel models is presented.

  6. Artificial Bird Feathers: An Adaptive Wing with High Lift Capability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hage, W.; Meyer, R.; Bechert, D. W.

    1997-11-01

    In Wind tunnel experiments, the operation of the covering feathers of bird wings has been investigated. At incipient flow separation, local flow reversal lifts the feathers and inhibits the spreading of the separation regime towards the leading edge. This mechanism can be utilized by movable flaps on airfoils. The operation of quasi-steady and of vibrating movable flaps is outlined. These devices are self-actuated, require no energy and do not produce parasitic drag. They are compatible with laminar and turbulent airfoils as well as with various conventional flaps on aircraft wings. Laboratory and flight experiments are shown. Ref: AIAA-Paper 97-1960.

  7. Influence of blade leading edge geometry and upstream blowing on the heat/mass transfer in a turbine cascade

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papa, Marco

    The effect of secondary flows on mass transfer from a simulated gas turbine blade and hubwall is investigated. Measurements performed using naphthalene sublimation provide non-dimensional mass transfer coefficients, in the form of Sherwood numbers, that can be converted to heat transfer coefficients through the use of an analogy. Tests are conducted in a linear cascade composed of five blades having the profile of a first stage rotor blade of a high-pressure turbine aircraft engine. Detailed mass transfer maps on the airfoil and endwall surfaces allow the identification of significant flow features that are in good agreement with existing secondary flow models. These results are well-suited for validation of numerical codes, as they are obtained with an accurate technique that does not suffer from conduction or radiation errors and allows the imposition of precise boundary conditions. The performance of a RANS (Reynolds Averaged Navier-Stokes) numerical code that simulates the flow and heat/mass transfer in the cascade using the SST (Shear Stress Transport) k-o model is evaluated through a comparison with the experimental results. Tests performed with a modified blade leading edge show that the introduction of a fillet at the junction with the endwall reduces the effects of the horseshoe vortex in the first part of the passage, while no measurable changes in mass transfer are observed further downstream. Air injected through a slot located upstream of the cascade simulates the engine wheelspace coolant injection between the stator and the rotor. Local mass transfer data obtained injecting naphthalene-free and naphthalene-saturated air are reduced to derive maps of cooling effectiveness on the blade and endwall. Oil dot tests show the surface flow on the endwall. The surface downstream of the gap is coplanar to the upstream surface in the baseline configuration and is shifted to form a forward and backward facing step to investigate the effects of component

  8. On the applicability of the leading edge method to obtain equivalent doses in OSL dating and dosimetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Woda, C. [Helmholtz Zentrum Muenchen - German Research Center for Environmental Health, Institute of Radiation Protection, D-85764 Neuherberg (Germany)], E-mail: clemens.woda@helmholtz-muenchen.de; Fuchs, M. [Lehrstuhl Geomorphologie, Universitaet Bayreuth, D-95440 Bayreuth (Germany)

    2008-01-15

    The applicability of an objective methodology for dose distribution analysis proposed by Lepper and McKeever [2002. An objective methodology for dose distribution analysis. Radiat. Prot. Dosimetry 101 (1-4), 349-352] to samples, where available material only allows the measurement of a small number of aliquots, is investigated. The basis for the study are artificially and naturally insufficiently bleached samples for which a large number (>90) of aliquots were measured. Smaller sets of aliquots are then randomly drawn from this pool and a Gaussian function fitted to the rising limb of the dose distribution. It is found that when the method is based on a three-parameter fit, it is no longer applicable when the number of aliquots is significantly reduced. The percentage of successful fits for data sets made of only 20 aliquots was on average below 20%. In addition for data sets composed of 40 to 60 aliquots, palaeodoses obtained from fitting spread over a large dose range and showed a strongly asymmetric distribution. A significant improvement could be achieved by fixing the center of the Gaussian function to the mode D{sub E} bin and only fitting a two-parameter function to the data sets. With this approach an 80% change of successful fitting could be achieved even when using dose distributions constructed from only 20 to 30 aliquots. The median of the palaeodose distributions was approximately independent of the number of aliquots used. The modified method is then applied to samples from a sedimentary record in the northern Oman mountain range and the results compared with the method proposed by Fuchs and Lang [2001. OSL dating of coarse-grain fluvial quartz using single-aliquot protocols on sediments from NE Peleponnese, Greece. Quat. Sci. Rev. 20, 783-787]. It is concluded that the leading edge method proposed by Lepper and McKeever can be useful to derive D{sub E}'s from insufficiently bleached sediments even for a small number of aliquots if the Gaussian

  9. Effect of wing planform and canard location and geometry on the longitudinal aerodynamic characteristics of a close-coupled canard wing model at subsonic speeds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gloss, B. B.

    1975-01-01

    A generalized wind-tunnel model with canard and wing planforms typical of highly maneuverable aircraft was tested in the Langley 7- by 10-foot high-speed tunnel at a Mach number of 0.30 to determine the effect of canard location, canard size, wing sweep, and canard strake on canard-wing interference to high angles of attack. The major results of this investigation may be summarized as follows: the high-canard configuration (excluding the canard strake and canard flap), for both the 60 deg and 44 deg swept leading-edge wings, produced the highest maximum lift coefficient and the most linear pitching-moment curves; substantially larger gains in the canard lift and total lift were obtained by adding a strake to the canard located below the wing chord plane rather than by adding a strake to the canard located above the wing chord plane.

  10. Ginzburg-Landau vortices

    CERN Document Server

    Bethuel, Fabrice; Helein, Frederic

    2017-01-01

    This book is concerned with the study in two dimensions of stationary solutions of uɛ of a complex valued Ginzburg-Landau equation involving a small parameter ɛ. Such problems are related to questions occurring in physics, e.g., phase transition phenomena in superconductors and superfluids. The parameter ɛ has a dimension of a length which is usually small.  Thus, it is of great interest to study the asymptotics as ɛ tends to zero. One of the main results asserts that the limit u-star of minimizers uɛ exists. Moreover, u-star is smooth except at a finite number of points called defects or vortices in physics. The number of these defects is exactly the Brouwer degree – or winding number – of the boundary condition. Each singularity has degree one – or as physicists would say, vortices are quantized. The singularities have infinite energy, but after removing the core energy we are lead to a concept of finite renormalized energy.  The location of the singularities is completely determined by minimiz...

  11. Flapping wing aerodynamics: from insects to vertebrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chin, Diana D; Lentink, David

    2016-04-01

    More than a million insects and approximately 11,000 vertebrates utilize flapping wings to fly. However, flapping flight has only been studied in a few of these species, so many challenges remain in understanding this form of locomotion. Five key aerodynamic mechanisms have been identified for insect flight. Among these is the leading edge vortex, which is a convergent solution to avoid stall for insects, bats and birds. The roles of the other mechanisms - added mass, clap and fling, rotational circulation and wing-wake interactions - have not yet been thoroughly studied in the context of vertebrate flight. Further challenges to understanding bat and bird flight are posed by the complex, dynamic wing morphologies of these species and the more turbulent airflow generated by their wings compared with that observed during insect flight. Nevertheless, three dimensionless numbers that combine key flow, morphological and kinematic parameters - the Reynolds number, Rossby number and advance ratio - govern flapping wing aerodynamics for both insects and vertebrates. These numbers can thus be used to organize an integrative framework for studying and comparing animal flapping flight. Here, we provide a roadmap for developing such a framework, highlighting the aerodynamic mechanisms that remain to be quantified and compared across species. Ultimately, incorporating complex flight maneuvers, environmental effects and developmental stages into this framework will also be essential to advancing our understanding of the biomechanics, movement ecology and evolution of animal flight. © 2016. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  12. Effect of canard vertical location, size, and deflection on canard-wing interference at subsonic speeds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gloss, B. B.; Ray, E. J.; Washburn, K. E.

    1978-01-01

    A generalized close-coupled canard-wing configuration was tested in a high speed 7 by 10 foot tunnel at Mach numbers of 0.40, 0.70, and 0.85 over an angle-of-attack range from -4 deg to 24 deg. Studies were made to determine the effects of canard vertical location, size, and deflection and wing leading-edge sweep on the longitudinal characteristics of the basic configuration. The two wings tested had thin symmetrical circular-arc airfoil sections with characteristically sharp leading edges swept at 60 deg and 44 deg. Two balances which allow separation of the canard-forebody contribution from the total forces and moments were used in this study.

  13. Dynamics of vortices in superconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weinan, E.

    1992-01-01

    We study the dynamics of vortices in type-II superconductors from the point of view of time-dependent Ginzburg-Landau equations. We outline a proof of existence, uniqueness and regularity of strong solutions for these equations. We then derive reduced systems of ODEs governing the motion of the vortices in the asymptotic limit of large Ginzburg-Landau parameter

  14. A computational study on the influence of insect wing geometry on bee flight mechanics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeffrey Feaster

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Two-dimensional computational fluid dynamics (CFD is applied to better understand the effects of wing cross-sectional morphology on flow field and force production. This study investigates the influence of wing cross-section on insect scale flapping flight performance, for the first time, using a morphologically representative model of a bee (Bombus pensylvanicus wing. The bee wing cross-section was determined using a micro-computed tomography scanner. The results of the bee wing are compared with flat and elliptical cross-sections, representative of those used in modern literature, to determine the impact of profile variation on aerodynamic performance. The flow field surrounding each cross-section and the resulting forces are resolved using CFD for a flight speed range of 1 to 5 m/s. A significant variation in vortex formation is found when comparing the ellipse and flat plate with the true bee wing. During the upstroke, the bee and approximate wing cross-sections have a much shorter wake structure than the flat plate or ellipse. During the downstroke, the flat plate and elliptical cross-sections generate a single leading edge vortex, while the approximate and bee wings generate numerous, smaller structures that are shed throughout the stroke. Comparing the instantaneous aerodynamic forces on the wing, the ellipse and flat plate sections deviate progressively with velocity from the true bee wing. Based on the present findings, a simplified cross-section of an insect wing can misrepresent the flow field and force production. We present the first aerodynamic study using a true insect wing cross-section and show that the wing corrugation increases the leading edge vortex formation frequency for a given set of kinematics.

  15. A computational study on the influence of insect wing geometry on bee flight mechanics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feaster, Jeffrey; Battaglia, Francine; Bayandor, Javid

    2017-12-15

    Two-dimensional computational fluid dynamics (CFD) is applied to better understand the effects of wing cross-sectional morphology on flow field and force production. This study investigates the influence of wing cross-section on insect scale flapping flight performance, for the first time, using a morphologically representative model of a bee ( Bombus pensylvanicus ) wing. The bee wing cross-section was determined using a micro-computed tomography scanner. The results of the bee wing are compared with flat and elliptical cross-sections, representative of those used in modern literature, to determine the impact of profile variation on aerodynamic performance. The flow field surrounding each cross-section and the resulting forces are resolved using CFD for a flight speed range of 1 to 5 m/s. A significant variation in vortex formation is found when comparing the ellipse and flat plate with the true bee wing. During the upstroke, the bee and approximate wing cross-sections have a much shorter wake structure than the flat plate or ellipse. During the downstroke, the flat plate and elliptical cross-sections generate a single leading edge vortex, while the approximate and bee wings generate numerous, smaller structures that are shed throughout the stroke. Comparing the instantaneous aerodynamic forces on the wing, the ellipse and flat plate sections deviate progressively with velocity from the true bee wing. Based on the present findings, a simplified cross-section of an insect wing can misrepresent the flow field and force production. We present the first aerodynamic study using a true insect wing cross-section and show that the wing corrugation increases the leading edge vortex formation frequency for a given set of kinematics. © 2017. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  16. Potential vorticity in magnetohydrodynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webb, G. M.; Mace, R. L.

    2015-01-01

    A version of Noether's second theorem using Lagrange multipliers is used to investigate fluid relabelling symmetries conservation laws in magnetohydrodynamics (MHD). We obtain a new generalized potential vorticity type conservation equation for MHD which takes into account entropy gradients and the J × B force on the plasma due to the current J and magnetic induction B. This new conservation law for MHD is derived by using Noether's second theorem in conjunction with a class of fluid relabelling symmetries in which the symmetry generator for the Lagrange label transformations is non-parallel to the magnetic field induction in Lagrange label space. This is associated with an Abelian Lie pseudo algebra and a foliated phase space in Lagrange label space. It contains as a special case Ertel's theorem in ideal fluid mechanics. An independent derivation shows that the new conservation law is also valid for more general physical situations.

  17. Numerical and Theoretical Considerations for the Design of the AVT-183 Diamond-Wing Experimental Investigations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boelens, Okko J.; Luckring, James M.; Breitsamter, Christian; Hovelmann, Andreas; Knoth, Florian; Malloy, Donald J.; Deck, Sebatien

    2015-01-01

    A diamond-wing configuration has been developed to isolate and study blunt-leading edge vortex separation with both computations and experiments. The wing has been designed so that the results are relevant to a more complex Uninhabited Combat Air Vehicle concept known as SACCON. The numerical and theoretical development process for this diamond wing is presented, including a view toward planned wind tunnel experiments. This work was conducted under the NATO Science and Technology Organization, Applied Vehicle Technology panel. All information is in the public domain.

  18. Evaluation of Aircraft Wing-Tip Vortex Using PIV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alsayed, Omer A.; Asrar, Waqar; Omar, Ashraf A.

    2010-06-01

    The formation and development of a wing-tip vortex in a near and extended near filed were studied experimentally. Particle image velocimetry was used in a wind tunnel to measure the tip vortex velocity field and hence investigate the flow structure in a wake of aircraft half-wing model. The purpose of this investigation is to evaluate the main features of the lift generated vortices in order to find ways to alleviate hazardous wake vortex encounters for follower airplanes during start and approach such that the increase in airport capacity can be achieved. First the wake structure at successive downstream planes crosswise to the axis of the wake vortices was investigated by measuring parameters such as core radius, maximum tangential velocities, vorticities and circulation distributions. The effect of different angles of attack setting on vortex parameters was examined at one downstream location. In very early stages the vortex sheet evolution makes the tip vortex to move inward and to the suction side of the wing. While the core radius and circulation distributions hardly vary with the downstream distance, noticeable differences for the same vortex parameters at different angles of attack settings were observed. The center of the wing tip vortices scatter in a circle of radius nearly equal to 1% of the mean wing chord and wandering amplitudes shows no direct dependence on the vortex strength but linearly increase with the downstream distance.

  19. Analysis of wake vortices of a medium range twin-propeller military cargo aircraft using statistically designed experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahin, Burhan

    An experimental study was initiated to analyze the trajectories of the streamwise vortices behind the wing tip and flap of a medium range and propeller driven twin-engine military cargo aircraft. The model used for the experimental study was a generic, high wing and half model of a propeller driven aircraft and mounted within Old Dominion University's Low Speed Wind Tunnel where the wind tunnel flow speed was set to constant value of 9 m/sec. The main purpose of the study was to reach regression models for the motion and vorticity strength of both vortices under varying factors such as angle of attack, flap angle, propeller pitch angle and downstream distance. Velocity measurements of the flow fields were accomplished using both Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) and Hotwire Anemometry (HWA) to yield average velocities, turbulence levels, vorticity strengths and Reynolds shear stresses in the wake of the model. The results of measurements showed that the vertical motions, horizontal motions, and vorticity strengths of both vortices as well as the shortest distance between both vortices depend on the aforementioned factors and the interactions of some factors. It can be concluded that propeller pitch angle mainly affects the behaviors of the vortices as much as angle of attack to the extent that their second order terms take place in some of the regression models.

  20. Vortical structures responsible for delayed stall in an idealized humpback whale flipper model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Heesu; Kim, Jooha; Choi, Haecheon

    2016-11-01

    In this study, we investigate how the tubercles on the leading edge of an idealized humpback whale flipper model delay the stall. Oil-surface visualization is performed to see the surface flow pattern on the suction surface, and PIV is conducted in several streamwise and crossflow planes at different attack angles (α). Without tubercles, leading edge separation first occurs near the tip region and progresses inboard with increasing α. With tubercles, however, two types of vortical motions are observed at the mid-span. The first is streamwise vortex arrays which are dominant at α 9° , and these structures appear near the trailing edge. These two types of vortical motions delay flow separation at the peak regions of the mid-span, eliminating the spanwise stall progression and resulting in delayed stall. At α = 16° at which the tubercle model stalls, a large-scale streamwise vortex is originated from flow separation near the root region. This structure delays flow separation at the mid-span, leading to higher lift coefficient. Supported by NRF-2014M3C1B1033848.

  1. On Multiple-Layered Vortices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossow, Vernon J.

    2011-01-01

    As part of an ongoing effort to find ways to make vortex flow fields decompose more quickly, photographs and observations are presented of vortex flow fields that indicate the presence of multiple layers of fluid rotating about a common axis. A survey of the literature indicates that multiple-layered vortices form in waterspouts, tornadoes and lift-generated vortices of aircraft. An explanation for the appearance of multiple-layered structures in vortices is suggested. The observations and data presented are intended to improve the understanding of the formation and persistence of vortex flow fields.

  2. Development of Pre-set Counter-rotating Streamwise Vortices in Wavy Channel

    KAUST Repository

    Budiman, A.C.

    2015-10-23

    Development of counter-rotating streamwise vortices in a rectangular channel with one-sided wavy surface has been experimentally quantified using hot-wire anemometry. The wavy surface has fixed amplitude of 3.75 mm. The counter-rotating vortices are pre-set by means of a sawtooth pattern cut at the leading edge of the wavy surface. Variations of the central streamwise velocity Uc with a channel gap H = 35 mm and 50 mm (corresponding to a Reynolds number from 1600 to 4400) change the instability of the flow which can be distinguished from the velocity contours at a certain spanwise plane. The streamwise velocity contours and turbulence intensity for Reynolds number Re = 3100 and H = 35 mm show the disappearance of the mushroom-like vortices prior to turbulence near the second peak of the wavy surface, while for higher Re, this phenomenon occurs earlier. Under certain conditions, for example, for Re = 4400 and H = 50 mm, the splitting of the vortices can also be observed.

  3. Primordial vorticity and gradient expansion

    CERN Document Server

    Giovannini, Massimo

    2012-01-01

    The evolution equations of the vorticities of the electrons, ions and photons in a pre-decoupling plasma are derived, in a fully inhomogeneous geometry, by combining the general relativistic gradient expansion and the drift approximation within the Adler-Misner-Deser decomposition. The vorticity transfer between the different species is discussed in this novel framework and a set of general conservation laws, connecting the vorticities of the three-component plasma with the magnetic field intensity, is derived. After demonstrating that a source of large-scale vorticity resides in the spatial gradients of the geometry and of the electromagnetic sources, the total vorticity is estimated to lowest order in the spatial gradients and by enforcing the validity of the momentum constraint. By acknowledging the current bounds on the tensor to scalar ratio in the (minimal) tensor extension of the $\\Lambda$CDM paradigm the maximal comoving magnetic field induced by the total vorticity turns out to be, at most, of the or...

  4. Aerodynamic performance of a hovering hawkmoth with flexible wings: a computational approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakata, Toshiyuki; Liu, Hao

    2012-01-01

    Insect wings are deformable structures that change shape passively and dynamically owing to inertial and aerodynamic forces during flight. It is still unclear how the three-dimensional and passive change of wing kinematics owing to inherent wing flexibility contributes to unsteady aerodynamics and energetics in insect flapping flight. Here, we perform a systematic fluid-structure interaction based analysis on the aerodynamic performance of a hovering hawkmoth, Manduca, with an integrated computational model of a hovering insect with rigid and flexible wings. Aerodynamic performance of flapping wings with passive deformation or prescribed deformation is evaluated in terms of aerodynamic force, power and efficiency. Our results reveal that wing flexibility can increase downwash in wake and hence aerodynamic force: first, a dynamic wing bending is observed, which delays the breakdown of leading edge vortex near the wing tip, responsible for augmenting the aerodynamic force-production; second, a combination of the dynamic change of wing bending and twist favourably modifies the wing kinematics in the distal area, which leads to the aerodynamic force enhancement immediately before stroke reversal. Moreover, an increase in hovering efficiency of the flexible wing is achieved as a result of the wing twist. An extensive study of wing stiffness effect on aerodynamic performance is further conducted through a tuning of Young's modulus and thickness, indicating that insect wing structures may be optimized not only in terms of aerodynamic performance but also dependent on many factors, such as the wing strength, the circulation capability of wing veins and the control of wing movements. PMID:21831896

  5. Aeroelasticity of morphing wings using neural networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Natarajan, Anand

    In this dissertation, neural networks are designed to effectively model static non-linear aeroelastic problems in adaptive structures and linear dynamic aeroelastic systems with time varying stiffness. The use of adaptive materials in aircraft wings allows for the change of the contour or the configuration of a wing (morphing) in flight. The use of smart materials, to accomplish these deformations, can imply that the stiffness of the wing with a morphing contour changes as the contour changes. For a rapidly oscillating body in a fluid field, continuously adapting structural parameters may render the wing to behave as a time variant system. Even the internal spars/ribs of the aircraft wing which define the wing stiffness can be made adaptive, that is, their stiffness can be made to vary with time. The immediate effect on the structural dynamics of the wing, is that, the wing motion is governed by a differential equation with time varying coefficients. The study of this concept of a time varying torsional stiffness, made possible by the use of active materials and adaptive spars, in the dynamic aeroelastic behavior of an adaptable airfoil is performed here. Another type of aeroelastic problem of an adaptive structure that is investigated here, is the shape control of an adaptive bump situated on the leading edge of an airfoil. Such a bump is useful in achieving flow separation control for lateral directional maneuverability of the aircraft. Since actuators are being used to create this bump on the wing surface, the energy required to do so needs to be minimized. The adverse pressure drag as a result of this bump needs to be controlled so that the loss in lift over the wing is made minimal. The design of such a "spoiler bump" on the surface of the airfoil is an optimization problem of maximizing pressure drag due to flow separation while minimizing the loss in lift and energy required to deform the bump. One neural network is trained using the CFD code FLUENT to

  6. Study of interaction of a pair of longitudinal vortices with a horseshoe vortex around a wing. 1st Report. Potential for passive controlling by a pair of vortex generators; Tsubasa mawari no bateikei uzu to tateuzu no kansho ni kansuru kenkyu. 1. Ittsui no uzu hasseiki ni yoru judo seigyoho no teian

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hara, H.; Takahashi, M. [Mitsubishi Heavy Industries, Ltd., Tokyo (Japan); Ikeda, K. [Toshiba Corp., Tokyo (Japan); Shizawa, T.; Honami, S. [Science University of Tokyo, Tokyo (Japan). Faculty of Engineering

    1999-12-25

    This paper presents a potential for a passive control of a horseshoe vortex at the root of the wing. NACA0024 wing is established on a turbulent boundary layer. A pair of vortex generators of halt delta wing is installed upstream of the wing. The controlled horseshoe vortex is tested qualitatively by flow visualization technique. Also, the potential for controlling is quantitatively investigated by wall static pressure and total pressure. The horseshoe vortex is remarkably controlled in Common Flow Up Configuration (CFUC) of vortex generators. The distortion of the total pressure contours is diminished by 49% and the vortex is located closer to the wing. In case of Common Flow Down Configuration (CFDC), the mass flow averaged pressure loss is decreased by 29% compared with the case without a pair of vortex generators. (author)

  7. Hyperbolic monopoles from hyperbolic vortices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maldonado, Rafael

    2017-06-01

    Yang-Mills-Higgs monopoles and vortices in hyperbolic space can be constructed from {{SO}}(2) and {{SO}}(3) invariant Yang-Mills instantons, respectively. We use this fact to describe a large class of hyperbolic monopoles directly in terms of hyperbolic vortices embedded into 3 dimensions, yielding a remarkably simple relation between their Higgs fields. The class of monopoles we obtain are fixed relative to a plane in hyperbolic space, in a way which will be made clear by a study of the monopole spectral curve. We will use the correspondence between vortices and monopoles to give new insight into the moduli space of hyperbolic monopoles. Finally, our technique allows an explicit construction of the fields of a hyperbolic monopole invariant under a {Z} action, which we compare to periodic monopoles in Euclidean space.

  8. General aspects of optical vortices

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Roux, FS

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Virtual image Real image Reconstruction Beam +1 order Zeroth order -1 order Hologram CSIR National Laser Centre – p.26/32 Computer generated hologram Compute an artificial amplitude transmission function for an arbitrary phase function: t(x, y) = 12 + 1 2... to generate optical vortices CSIR National Laser Centre – p.2/32 Persistent dark spots Optical vortices CSIR National Laser Centre – p.3/32 Speckle field Amplitude Phase CSIR National Laser Centre – p.4/32 Singular phase function CSIR National Laser Centre – p...

  9. A Rotary Wing System for Micro Air Vehicle Applications. Part 1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valentin BUTOESCU

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available The goal of the paper is to propose a new type of ornithopter that avoids the mechanical difficulties of a flapping system. It uses a modified design of a cycloidal propulsor. The modification regards the special setting of the wings that is intended to help the formation of a stable leading edge vortex (LEV. It is known that the LEV is the main feature that allows the insects to achieve the necessary lift to fly.

  10. Analysis of Kinematics of Flapping Wing UAV Using OptiTrack Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew Ng Rongfa

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available An analysis of the kinematics of a flapping membrane wing using experimental kinematic data is presented. This motion capture technique tracks the positon of the retroreflective marker(s placed on the left wing of a 1.3-m-wingspan ornithopter. The time-varying three-dimensional data of the wing kinematics were recorded for a single frequency. The wing shape data was then plotted on a two-dimensional plane to understand the wing dynamic behaviour of an ornithopter. Specifically, the wing tip path, leading edge bending, wing membrane shape, local twist, stroke angle and wing velocity were analyzed. As the three characteristic angles can be expressed in the Fourier series as a function of time, the kinematics of the wing can be computationally generated for the aerodynamic study of flapping flight through the Fourier coefficients presented. Analysis of the ornithopter wing showed how the ornithopter closely mimics the flight motions of birds despite several physical limitations.

  11. Flow structure on a rotating wing undergoing deceleration to rest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tudball Smith, Daniel; Rockwell, Donald; Sheridan, John

    2013-11-01

    Inspired by the behavior of small biological flyers and micro aerial Vehicles, this study experimentally addresses the flow structure on a low aspect ratio rotating wing at low Reynolds number. The study focuses on a wing decelerating to rest after rotating at constant velocity. The wing was set to a constant 45° angle of attack and, during the initial phase of the motion, accelerated to a constant velocity at its radius of gyration, which resulted in a Reynolds number of 1400 based on the chord length. Stereoscopic PIV was used to construct phase-averaged three-dimensional (volumetric) velocity fields that develop and relax throughout the deceleration and cessation of the wing motion. During gradual deceleration, the flow structure is maintained when normalised by the instantaneous velocity; the distinguishing feature is shedding of a trailing edge vortex that develops due to the deceleration. At higher deceleration rates to rest, the flow structure quickly degrades. Induced flow in the upstream direction along the surface of the wing causes detachment of the previously stable leading edge vortex; simultaneously, a trailing-edge vortex and the reoriented tip vortex form a co-rotating vortex pair, drawing flow downward away from the wing.

  12. The role of wing kinematics of freely flying birds downstream the wake of flapping wings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishnan, Krishnamoorthy; Gurka, Roi

    2016-11-01

    Avian aerodynamics has been a topic of research for centuries. Avian flight features such as flapping, morphing and maneuvering make bird aerodynamics a complex system to study, analyze and understand. Aerodynamic performance of the flapping wings can be quantified by measuring the vortex structures present in the downstream wake. Still, the direct correlation between the flapping wing kinematics and the evolution of wake features need to be established. In this present study, near wake of three bird species (western sandpiper, European starling and American robin) have been measured experimentally. Long duration, time-resolved, particle image velocimetry technique has been used to capture the wake properties. Simultaneously, the bird kinematics have been captured using high speed camera. Wake structures are reconstructed from the collected PIV images for long chord distances downstream. Wake vorticities and circulation are expressed in the wake composites. Comparison of the wake features of the three birds shows similarities and some key differences are also found. Wing tip motions of the birds are extracted for four continuous wing beat cycle to analyze the wing kinematics. Kinematic parameters of all the three birds are compared to each other and similar trends exhibited by all the birds have been observed. A correlation between the wake evolutions with the wing motion is presented. It was found that the wings' motion generates unique flow patterns at the near wake, especially at the transition phases. At these locations, a drastic change in the circulation was observed.

  13. Downstream and soaring interfaces and vortices in 2-D stratified wakes and their impact on transport of contaminants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. D. Chashechkin

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The flow of continuously stratified fluids past obstacles was studied analytically, numerically, and experimentally. The obstacles discussed here include a flat strip, aligned with the flow, inclined or transverse to the flow and a horizontal cylinder. In the flow pattern, transient and attached (lee internal waves, downstream wakes with submerged interfaces and vortices, soaring singular interfaces, soaring vortices and vortex systems are distinguished. New components of laminar flow past a horizontally towed strip are presented. Fine transverse streaky structures on the strip in the downstream wake were visualized. Soaring isolated interfaces, which are internal boundary layers forming inside the downstream attached wave field past bluff bodies were observed. With increasing of the body velocity a vortex pair was formed directly at the leading edge of this interface.

  14. Flow around a corrugated wing over the range of dragonfly flight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Padinjattayil, Sooraj; Agrawal, Amit

    2017-11-01

    The dragonfly flight is very much affected by the corrugations on their wings. A PIV based study is conducted on a rigid corrugated wing for a range of Reynolds number 300-12000 and three different angles of attack (5°-15°) to understand the mechanism of dragonfly flight better. The study revealed that the shape of the corrugation plays a key role in generating vortices. The vortices trapped in the valleys of corrugation dictates the shape of a virtual airfoil around the corrugated wing. A fluid roller bearing effect is created over the virtual airfoil when the trapped vortices merge with each other. A travelling wave produced by the moving virtual boundary around the fluid roller bearings avoids the formation of boundary layer on the virtual surface, thereby leading to high aerodynamic performance. It is found that the lift coefficient increases as the number of vortices increases on the suction surface. Also, it is shown that the partially merged co- rotating vortices give higher lift as compared to fully merged vortices. Further, the virtual airfoil formed around the corrugated wing is compared with a superhydrophobic airfoil which exhibits slip on its surface; several similarities in their flow characteristics are observed. The corrugated airfoil performs superior to the superhydrophobic airfoil in the aerodynamic efficiency due to the virtual slip caused by the travelling wave.

  15. Three-dimensional instability analysis of boundary layers perturbed by streamwise vortices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martín, Juan A.; Paredes, Pedro

    2017-12-01

    A parametric study is presented for the incompressible, zero-pressure-gradient flat-plate boundary layer perturbed by streamwise vortices. The vortices are placed near the leading edge and model the vortices induced by miniature vortex generators (MVGs), which consist in a spanwise-periodic array of small winglet pairs. The introduction of MVGs has been experimentally proved to be a successful passive flow control strategy for delaying laminar-turbulent transition caused by Tollmien-Schlichting (TS) waves. The counter-rotating vortex pairs induce non-modal, transient growth that leads to a streaky boundary layer flow. The initial intensity of the vortices and their wall-normal distances to the plate wall are varied with the aim of finding the most effective location for streak generation and the effect on the instability characteristics of the perturbed flow. The study includes the solution of the three-dimensional, stationary, streaky boundary layer flows by using the boundary region equations, and the three-dimensional instability analysis of the resulting basic flows by using the plane-marching parabolized stability equations. Depending on the initial circulation and positioning of the vortices, planar TS waves are stabilized by the presence of the streaks, resulting in a reduction in the region of instability and shrink of the neutral stability curve. For a fixed maximum streak amplitude below the threshold for secondary instability (SI), the most effective wall-normal distance for the formation of the streaks is found to also offer the most stabilization of TS waves. By setting a maximum streak amplitude above the threshold for SI, sinuous shear layer modes become unstable, as well as another instability mode that is amplified in a narrow region near the vortex inlet position.

  16. Superior Reproducibility of the Leading to Leading Edge and Inner to Inner Edge Methods in the Ultrasound Assessment of Maximum Abdominal Aortic Diameter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borgbjerg, Jens; Bøgsted, Martin; Lindholt, Jes S.

    2018-01-01

    Objectives: Controversy exists regarding optimal caliper placement in ultrasound assessment of maximum abdominal aortic diameter. This study aimed primarily to determine reproducibility of caliper placement in relation to the aortic wall with the three principal methods: leading to leading edge......: Radiologists (n=18) assessed the maximum antero-posterior abdominal aortic diameter by completing repeated caliper placements with the OTO, LTL, and ITI methods on 50 still abdominal aortic images obtained from an AAA screening program. Inter-observer reproducibility was calculated as the limit of agreement...... compared with the OTO method of caliper placement in ultrasound determination of maximum abdominal aortic diameter, and the choice of caliper placement method significantly affects the prevalence of AAAs in screening programs....

  17. Chemoattractant-controlled accumulation of coronin at the leading edge of Dictyostelium cells monitored using a green fluorescent protein-coronin fusion protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerisch, G; Albrecht, R; Heizer, C; Hodgkinson, S; Maniak, M

    1995-11-01

    The highly motile cells of Dictyostelium discoideum rapidly remodel their actin filament system when they change their direction of locomotion either spontaneously or in response to chemoattractant. Coronin is a cytoplasmic actin-associated protein that accumulates at the coritcal sites of moving cells and contributes to the dynamics of the actin system. It is a member of the WD-repeat family of proteins and is known to interact with actin-myosin complexes. In coronin null mutants, cell locomotion is slowed down and cytokinesis is impaired. We have visualized the redistribution of coronin by fluorescence imaging of motile cells that have been transfected with an expression plasmid containing the coding sequence of coronin fused to the sequence encoding the green fluorescent protein (GFP). This coronin-GFP fusion protein (GFP). This coronin-GFP fusion protein transiently accumulates in the front regions of growth-phase cells, reflecting the changing positions of leading edges and the competition between them. During the aggregation stage, local accumulation of coronin-GFP is biased by chemotactic orientation of the cells in gradients of cAMP. The impairment of cell motility in coronin null mutants shows that coronin has an important function at the front region of the cells. The mutant cells are distinguished by the formation of extended particle-free zones at their front regions, from where pseudopods often break out as blebs. Cytochalasin A reduces the size of these zones, indicating that actin filaments prevent entry of the particles. These data demonstrate that coronin is reversibly recruited from the cytoplasm and is incorporated into the actin network of a nascent leading edge, where it participates in the reorganization of the cytoskeleton. Monitoring the dynamics of protein assembly using GFP fusion proteins and fluorescence microscopy promises to be a generally applicable method for studying the dynamics of cytoskeletal proteins in moving and dividing cells.

  18. Lagrangian Vortices in Developing Tropical Cyclones

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-06-25

    Meteorological Society Q. J. R. Meteorol. Soc. (2015) Lagrangian Vortices in Developing Tropical Cyclones these vortices through diabatic vortex stretching or...through horizontal mergers. The Lagrangian structures and their role in the merger of these smaller vorticity anomalies and diabatic activation

  19. Review of vortices in wildland fire

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jason M. Forthofer; Scott L. Goodrick

    2011-01-01

    Vortices are almost always present in the wildland fire environment and can sometimes interact with the fire in unpredictable ways, causing extreme fire behavior and safety concerns. In this paper, the current state of knowledge of the interaction of wildland fire and vortices is examined and reviewed. A basic introduction to vorticity is given, and the two common...

  20. Flow structure and aerodynamic performance of a hovering bristled wing in low Re

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Seunghun; Lahooti, Mohsen; Kim, Daegyoum

    2017-11-01

    Previous studies on a bristled wing have mainly focused on simple kinematics of the wing such as translation or rotation. The aerodynamic performance of a bristled wing in a quasi-steady phase is known to be comparable to that of a smooth wing without a gap because shear layers in the gaps of the bristled wing are sufficiently developed to block the gaps. However, we point out that, in the starting transient phase where the shear layers are not fully developed, the force generation of a bristled wing is not as efficient as that of a quasi-steady state. The performance in the transient phase is important to understand the aerodynamics of a bristled wing in an unsteady motion. In the hovering motion, due to repeated stroke reversals, the formation and development of shear layers inside the gaps is repeated in each stroke. In this study, a bristled wing in hovering is numerically investigated in the low Reynolds number of O(10). We especially focus on the development of shear layers during a stroke reversal and its effect on the overall propulsive performance. Although the aerodynamic force generation is slightly reduced due to the gap vortices, the asymmetric behavior of vortices in a gap between bristles during a stroke reversal makes the bristled wing show higher lift to drag ratio than a smooth wing.

  1. Numerical methods and a computer program for subsonic and supersonic aerodynamic design and analysis of wings with attainable thrust considerations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlson, H. W.; Walkley, K. B.

    1984-01-01

    This paper describes methodology and an associated computer program for the design of wing lifting surfaces with attainable thrust taken into consideration. The approach is based on the determination of an optimum combination of a series of candidate surfaces rather than the more commonly used candidate loadings. Special leading-edge surfaces are selected to provide distributed leading-edge thrust forces which compensate for any failure to achieve the full theoretical leading-edge thrust, and a second series of general candidate surfaces is selected to minimize drag subject to constraints on the lift coefficient and, if desired, on the pitching moment coefficient. A primary purpose of the design approach is the introduction of attainable leading-edge thrust considerations so that relatively mild camber surfaces may be employed in the achievement of aerodynamic efficiencies comparable to those attainable if full theoretical leading-edge thrust could be achieved. The program provides an analysis as well as a design capability and is applicable to both subsonic and supersonic flow.

  2. Effect of canard deflection on close-coupled canard-wing-body aerodynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tu, Eugene L.

    1992-01-01

    The thin-layer Navier-Stokes equations are solved for the flow about a canard-wing-body configuration at transonic Mach numbers of 0.85 and 0.90, angles of attack from -4 to 10 degrees and canard deflection angles from -10 to +10 degrees. Effects of canard deflection on aerodynamic performance, including canard-wing vortex interaction, are investigated. Comparisons with experimental measurements of surface pressures, lift, drag and pitching moments are made to verify the accuracy of the computations. The results of the study show that the deflected canard downwash not only influences the formation of the wing leading-edge vortex, but can cause the formation of an unfavorable vortex on the wing lower surface as well.

  3. Investigation of a Novel Turbulence Model and Using Leading-Edge Slots for Improving the Aerodynamic Performance of Airfoils and Wind Turbines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beyhaghi, Saman

    as compared to the baseline DES. In the second part of this study, the focus is on improving the aerodynamic performance of airfoils and wind turbines in terms of lift and drag coefficients and power generation. One special type of add-on feature for wind turbines and airfoils, i.e., leading-edge slots are investigated through numerical simulation and laboratory experiments. Although similar slots are designed and employed for aircrafts, a special slot with a reversed flow direction is drilled in the leading edge of a sample wind turbine airfoil to study its influence on the aerodynamic performance. The objective is to vary the five main geometrical parameters of slot and characterize the performance improvement of the new design under different operating conditions. A number of Design of Experiment and optimization studies are conducted to determine the most suitable slot configuration to maximize the lift or lift-over-drag ratio. Results indicate that proper sizing and placement of slot can improve the lift coefficient, while it has negligible negative impact on the drag. Some recommendations for future investigation on slot are proposed at the end. The performance of a horizontal axis wind turbine blade equipped with leading-edge slot is also studied, and it is concluded that slotted blades can generate about 10% more power than solid blades, for the two operating conditions investigated. The good agreement between the CFD predictions and experimental data confirms the validity of the model and results.

  4. How lizards fly: A novel type of wing in animals.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Maximilian Dehling

    Full Text Available Flying lizards of the genus Draco are renowned for their gliding ability, using an aerofoil formed by winglike patagial membranes and supported by elongated thoracic ribs. It remains unknown, however, how these lizards manoeuvre during flight. Here, I present the results of a study on the aerial behaviour of Dussumier's Flying Lizard (Draco dussumieri and show that Draco attaches the forelimbs to the leading edge of the patagium while airborne, forming a hitherto unknown type of composite wing. The attachment of the forelimbs to the patagium suggests that that aerofoil is controlled through movements of the forelimbs. One major advantage for the lizards is that the forelimbs retain their complete range of movement and functionality for climbing and running when not used as a part of the wing. These findings not only shed a new light on the flight of Draco but also have implications for the interpretation of gliding performance in fossil species.

  5. Tests of Round and Flat Spoilers on a Tapered Wing in the NACA 19-Foot Pressure Wind Tunnel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wenzinger, Carl J; Bowen, John D

    1941-01-01

    Several arrangements of round and flat spanwise spoilers attached to the upper surface of a tapered wing were tested in the NACA 19-foot pressure wind tunnel to determine the most effective type, location, and size of spoiler necessary to reduce greatly the lift on the wings of large flying boats when moored. The effect of the various spoilers on the lift, the drag, and the pitching-moment characteristics of the tapered wing was measured over a range of angles of attack from zero to maximum lift. The most effective type of spoiler was found to be the flat type with no space between it and the wing surface. The chordwise location of such a spoiler was not critical within the range investigated, from 5 to 20 percent of the wing chord from the leading edge.

  6. Flapping-wing mechanical butterfly on a wheel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godoy-Diana, Ramiro; Thiria, Benjamin; Pradal, Daniel

    2009-11-01

    We examine the propulsive performance of a flapping-wing device turning on a ``merry-go-round'' type base. The two-wing flapper is attached to a mast that is ball-bearing mounted to a central shaft in such a way that the thrust force produced by the wings makes the flapper turn around this shaft. The oscillating lift force produced by the flapping wings is aligned with the mast to avoid vibration of the system. A turning contact allows to power the motor that drives the wings. We measure power consumption and cruising speed as a function of flapping frequency and amplitude as well as wing flexibility. The design of the wings permits to change independently their flexibility in the span-wise and chord-wise directions and PIV measurements in various planes let us examine the vorticity field around the device. A complete study of the effect of wing flexibility on the propulsive performance of the system will be presented at the conference.

  7. Design, Development and Testing of Shape Shifting Wing Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dean Ninian

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available The design and development of morphing (shape shifting aircraft wings—an innovative technology that has the potential to increase the aerodynamic efficiency and reduce noise signatures of aircrafts—was carried out. This research was focused on reducing lift-induced drag at the flaps of the aerofoil and to improve the design to achieve the optimum aerodynamic efficiency. Simulation revealed a 10.8% coefficient of lift increase for the initial morphing wing and 15.4% for the optimized morphing wing as compared to conventional wing design. At angles of attack of 0, 5, 10 and 15 degrees, the optimized wing has an increase in lift-to-drag ratio of 18.3%, 10.5%, 10.6% and 4% respectively when compared with the conventional wing. Simulations also showed that there is a significant improvement on pressure distribution over the lower surface of the morphing wing aerofoil. The increase in flow smoothness and reduction in vortex size reduced pressure drag along the trailing edge of the wing as a result an increase in pressure on the lower surface was experienced. A morphing wing reduced the size of the vortices and therefore the noise levels measured were reduced by up to 50%.

  8. Dynamics of vortices in polariton quantum fluids : From full vortices, to half vortices and vortex pairs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deveaud-Plédran, Benoit

    2012-02-01

    Polariton quantum fluids may be created both spontaneously through a standard phase transition towards a Bose Einstein condensate, or may be resonantly driven with a well-defined speed. Thanks to the photonic component of polaritons, the properties of the quantum fluid may be accessed rather directly with in particular the possibility of detained interferometric studies. Here, I will detail the dynamics of vortices, obtained with a picosecond time resolution, in different configurations, with in particular their phase dynamics. I will show in particular the dynamics the dynamics of spontaneous creation of a vortex, the dissociation of a full vortex into two half vortices as well as the dynamics of the dissociation of a dark soliton line into a street of pairs of vortices. Work done at EPFL by a dream team of Postdocs PhD students and collaborators: K. Lagoudakis, G. Nardin, T. Paraiso, G. Grosso, F. Manni, Y L'eger, M. Portella Oberli, F. Morier-Genoud and the help of our friend theorists V, Savona, M. Vouters and T. Liew.

  9. Passively morphing ornithopter wings constructed using a novel compliant spine: design and testing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wissa, A A; Hubbard Jr, J E; Tummala, Y; Frecker, M I

    2012-01-01

    Ornithopters or flapping wing uncrewed aerial vehicles (UAVs) have potential applications in civil and military sectors. Amongst the UAVs, ornithopters have a unique ability to fly in low Reynolds number flight regimes and also have the agility and maneuverability of rotary wing aircraft. In nature, birds achieve such performance by exploiting various wing kinematics known as gaits. The objective of this work is to improve the steady level flight performance of an ornithopter by implementing a continuous vortex gait using a novel passive compliant spine inserted in the ornithopter’s wings. This paper presents an optimal compliant spine concept for ornithopter applications. A quasi-static design optimization procedure was formulated to design the compliant spine. Finite element analysis was performed on a first generation spine and the spine was fabricated. This prototype was then tested by inserting it into an ornithopter’s wing leading edge spar. The effect of inserting the compliant spine into the wings on the electric power required, the aerodynamic loads and the wing kinematics was studied. The ornithopter with the compliant spines inserted in its wings consumed 45% less power and produced an additional 16% of its weight in mean lift compared to the same ornithopter without the compliant spine. The results indicate that this passive morphing approach is promising for improved steady level flight performance. (paper)

  10. A Vorticity-Magnetic Field Dynamo Instability

    OpenAIRE

    Blackman, Eric G.; Chou, Tom

    1997-01-01

    We generalize the mean field magnetic dynamo to include local evolution of the mean vorticity in addition to the mean magnetic field. The coupled equations exhibit a general mean field dynamo instability that enables the transfer of turbulent energy to the magnetic field and vorticity on larger scales. The growth of the vorticity and magnetic field both require helical turbulence which can be supplied by an underlying global rotation. The dynamo coefficients are derived including the backreac...

  11. Compact Chern–Simons vortices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Bazeia

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available We introduce and investigate new models of the Chern–Simons type in the three-dimensional spacetime, focusing on the existence of compact vortices. The models are controlled by potentials driven by a single real parameter that can be used to change the profile of the vortex solutions as they approach their boundary values. One of the models unveils an interesting new behavior, the tendency to make the vortex compact, as the parameter increases to larger and larger values. We also investigate the behavior of the energy density and calculate the total energy numerically.

  12. Assessing the performance of four leading-edge pXRF devices for trace metal measurement on contaminated soils in industrial and mining context (Wallonia, South Belgium).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vandeuren, Aubry; Pereira, Benoît; Sonnet, Philippe

    2017-04-01

    In many countries, large areas where mining and smelting activities took place in the past now exhibit elevated soil metal concentration levels. In Belgium, as in many European countries, soil assays are performed by aqua regia digestion and ICP measurement which is a cost- and time-expensive protocol. The aim of this study is to assess if this protocol could be approximated or replaced by portable XRF measurement as this method is fast, low cost and can be used in situ. This study first focused on the evaluation of the performance of four leading-edge pXRF devices for measuring metal concentrations in a collection of Belgian soil samples from industrial and mining context and non-contaminated areas. Four soil preparation protocols were then tested with one device, involving (1) measurement on fresh soil, (2) in situ sample drying and sieving, (3) in laboratory sample drying and sieving and (4) in laboratory sample drying, sieving and crushing. The comparison of the pXRF devices showed that the performance of each device varies depending on the element measured. The precision of the XRF measurement and correlation with aqua regia measurement protocol both increased for most of the elements when drying and sieving soil samples. However, for Cu and Pb, the four devices provide good measurement results whatever the sample preparation protocol. Finally, we proved the suitability of pXRF devices on a real-world case study by delineating the extent of Pb soil contamination by in situ pXRF measurement on fresh soil.

  13. EMA: a developmentally regulated cell-surface glycoprotein of CNS neurons that is concentrated at the leading edge of growth cones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumrind, N L; Parkinson, D; Wayne, D B; Heuser, J E; Pearlman, A L

    1992-08-01

    To identify cell-surface molecules that mediate interactions between neurons and their environment during neural development, we used monoclonal antibody techniques to define a developmentally regulated antigen in the central nervous system of the mouse. The antibody we produced (2A1) immunolabels cells throughout the central nervous system; we analyzed its distribution in the developing cerebral cortex, where it is expressed on cells very soon after they complete mitosis and leave the periventricular proliferative zone. Expression continues into adult life. The antibody also labels the epithelium of the choroid plexus and the renal proximal tubules, but does not label neurons of the peripheral nervous system in the dorsal root ganglia. In dissociated cell culture of embryonic cerebral cortex, 2A1 labels the surface of neurons but not glia. Immunolabeling of neurons in tissue culture is particularly prominent on the edge of growth cones, including filopodia and the leading edge of lamellipodia, when observed with either immunofluorescence or freeze-etch immunoelectron microscopy. Immunopurification with 2A1 of a CHAPS-extracted membrane preparation from brains of neonatal mice produces a broad (32-36 kD) electrophoretic band and a less prominent 70 kD band that are sensitive to N-glycosidase but not endoglycosidase H. Thus the 2A1 antibody recognizes a developmentally regulated, neuronal cell surface glycoprotein (or glycoproteins) with complex N-linked oligosaccharide side chains. We have termed the glycoprotein antigen EMA because of its prominence on the edge membrane of growth cones. EMA is similar to the M6 antigen (Lagenaur et al: J. Neurobiol. 23:71-88, 1992) in apparent molecular weight, distribution in tissue sections, and immunoreactivity on Western blots, suggesting that the two antigens are similar or identical. Expression of EMA is a very early manifestation of neuronal differentiation; its distribution on growth cones suggests a role in mediating the

  14. Review of delta wing space shuttle vehicle dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reding, J. P.; Ericsson, L. E.

    1972-01-01

    The unsteady aerodynamics of the delta planform, high cross range, shuttle orbiter were investigated. It has been found that these vehicles are subject to five unsteady flow phenomena that could compromise the flight dynamics. They are: (1) leeside shock induced separation, (2) sudden leading edge stall, (3) vortex burst, (4) bow shock-flap shock interaction, (5) forebody vorticity. Trajectory shaping is seen as the most powerful means of avoiding the detrimental effects of the stall phenomena. However, stall must be fixed or controlled when traversing the stall region. The other phenomena may be controlled by carefully programmed control deflections and some configuration modification. Ways to alter the occurrence of the various flow conditions are explored.

  15. Effect of external jet-flow deflector geometry on OTW aero-acoustic characteristics. [Over-The-Wing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Von Glahn, U.; Groesbeck, D.

    1976-01-01

    The effect of geometry variations in the design of external deflectors for use with OTW configurations was studied at model scale and subsonic jet velocities. Included in the variations were deflector size and angle as well as wing size and flap setting. A conical nozzle (5.2-cm diameter) mounted at 0.1 chord above and downstream of the wing leading edges was used. The data indicate that external deflectors provide satisfactory take-off and approach aerodynamic performance and acoustic characteristics for OTW configurations. These characteristics together with expected good cruise aerodynamics, since external deflectors are storable, may provide optimum OTW design configurations.

  16. Electric Propulsion Concepts for an Inverted Joined Wing Airplane Demonstrator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cezary Galinski

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available One of the airplane design concepts that potentially allows for significantly increased efficiency, but has not yet been investigated thoroughly, is the inverted joined wing configuration, where the upper wing is positioned in front of the lower one. We performed wind tunnel and flight testing of a demonstrator of this concept, first by applying electrical propulsion to simplify wind tunnel testing, and then the same electrical-propulsion demonstrator performed several flights. As the chosen propulsion method proved to be too cumbersome for an intensive flight campaign and significant loss of battery performance was also observed, the electrical propulsion was then replaced by internal combustion propulsion in the second phase, involving longer-duration flight testing. Next we identified and analyzed two potentially beneficial modifications to the design tested: one involved shifting the center of gravity towards the aft, the other involved modifying the thrust vector position, both with the assumption that electric motors can be applied for propulsion. On this basis, the paper finishes with some conclusions concerning a new concept of electrical propulsion for an inverted joined wing design, combining two ideas: hybridization and distribution along the aft wing leading edge.

  17. On trailing vortices: A short review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jacquin, Laurent

    2005-01-01

    This paper reviews some mechanisms involved in the dynamics of vortices in fluid flows. The topic is first introduced by pointing out its importance in aerodynamics. Several basic notions useful to appraise experimental observations are then surveyed, namely: centrifugal instabilities, inertial waves, cooperative instabilities, vortex merger, vortex breakdown and turbulence in vortices. Each topic is illustrated with experimental or numerical results

  18. On generating counter-rotating streamwise vortices

    KAUST Repository

    Winoto, S H

    2015-09-23

    Counter-rotating streamwise vortices are known to enhance the heat transfer rate from a surface and also to improve the aerodynamic performance of an aerofoil. In this paper, some methods to generate such counter-rotating vortices using different methods or physical conditions will be briefly considered and discussed.

  19. Phase space vortices in collisionless plasmas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Guio

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Results on the formation and propagation of electron phase space vortices from laboratory experiments are summarized. The electron phase space vortices were excited in a strongly magnetized Q-machine plasma by applying a pulse to a segment of a waveguide surrounding the plasma. Depending on the temporal variation of the applied pulse, one or more phase space vortices can be excited, and their interaction can be followed in space and time. We were able to demonstrate, for instance, an irreversible coalescence of two such vortices. These results are extended by numerical simulations, showing how electron phase space vortices can also be formed by beam instabilities. Furthermore, a study of ion phase space vortices is performed by numerical simulations. Both codes allow for an externally applied magnetic field in three spatial dimensions. Ion phase space vortices are formed by the nonlinear saturation of the ion-ion two-stream instability, excited by injecting an ion beam at the plasma boundary. By following the evolution of the ion distribution of the velocity perpendicular to the direction of propagation of the injected ion beam, we find a significant ion heating in the direction perpendicular to the magnetic field associated with the ion phase space vortices being formed. The results are relevant, for instance, for the interpretation of observations by instrumented spacecraft in the Earth's ionosphere and magnetosphere.

  20. Stability of two-dimensional vorticity filaments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elhmaidi, D.; Provenzale, A.; Lili, T.; Babiano, A.

    2004-01-01

    We discuss the results of a numerical study on the stability of two-dimensional vorticity filaments around a circular vortex. We illustrate how the stability of the filaments depends on the balance between the strain associated with the far field of the vortex and the local vorticity of the filament, and we discuss an empirical criterion for filament stability

  1. Effect of torsional stiffness and inertia on the dynamics of low aspect ratio flapping wings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Qing; Hu, Jianxin; Liu, Hao

    2014-03-01

    Micro air vehicle-motivated aerodynamics in biological flight has been an important subject in the past decade. Inspired by the novel flapping wing mechanisms in insects, birds and bats, we have carried out a numerical study systematically investigating a three-dimensional flapping rigid wing with passively actuated lateral and rotational motion. Distinguishing it from the limited existing studies, this work performs a systematic examination on the effects of wing aspect ratio (AR = 1.0 to infinity), inertia (density ratio σ = 4-32), torsional stiffness (frequency ratio F = 1.5-10 and infinity) and pivot point (from chord-center to leading edge) on the dynamics response of a low AR rectangular wing under an initial zero speed flow field condition. The simulation results show that the symmetry breakdown of the flapping wing results in a forward/backward motion with a rotational pitching. When the wing reaches its stable periodic state, the induced pitching frequency is identical to its forced flapping frequency. However, depending on various kinematic and dynamic system parameters, (i.e. flapping frequency, density ratio and pitching axis), the lateral induced velocity shows a number of different oscillating frequencies. Furthermore, compared with a one degree of freedom (DoF) wing in the lateral direction only, the propulsion performance of such a two DoF wing relies very much on the magnitude of torsional stiffness adding on the pivot point, as well as its pitching axis. In all cases examined here, thrust force and moment generated by a long span wing is larger than that of a short wing, which is remarkably linked to the strong reverse von Kármán vortex street formed in the wake of a wing.

  2. Theory of concentrated vortices an introduction

    CERN Document Server

    Alekseenko, S V; Okulov, V L

    2007-01-01

    Vortex motion is one of the basic states of a flowing continuum. Intere- ingly, in many cases vorticity is space-localized, generating concentrated vortices. Vortex filaments having extremely diverse dynamics are the most characteristic examples of such vortices. Notable examples, in particular, include such phenomena as self-inducted motion, various instabilities, wave generation, and vortex breakdown. These effects are typically ma- fested as a spiral (or helical) configuration of a vortex axis. Many publications in the field of hydrodynamics are focused on vortex motion and vortex effects. Only a few books are devoted entirely to v- tices, and even fewer to concentrated vortices. This work aims to highlight the key problems of vortex formation and behavior. The experimental - servations of the authors, the impressive visualizations of concentrated vortices (including helical and spiral) and pictures of vortex breakdown primarily motivated the authors to begin this work. Later, the approach based on the hel...

  3. What causes Mars' annular polar vortices?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toigo, A. D.; Waugh, D. W.; Guzewich, S. D.

    2017-01-01

    A distinctive feature of the Martian atmosphere is that the winter polar vortices exhibit annuli of high potential vorticity (PV) with a local minimum near the pole. These annuli are seen in observations, reanalyses, and free-running general circulation model simulations of Mars, but are not generally a feature of Earth's polar vortices, where there is a monotonic increase in magnitude of PV with latitude. The creation and maintenance of the annular polar vortices on Mars are not well understood. Here we use simulations with a Martian general circulation model to the show that annular vortices are related to another distinctive, and possibly unique in the solar system, feature of the Martian atmosphere: the condensation of the predominant atmospheric gas species (CO2) in polar winter regions. The latent heat associated with CO2 condensation leads to destruction of PV in the polar lower atmosphere, inducing the formation of an annular PV structure.

  4. Effect of an end plate on surface pressure distributions of two swept wings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Reza SOLTANI

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available A series of wind tunnel tests was conducted to examine how an end plate affects the pressure distributions of two wings with leading edge (LE sweep angles of 23° and 40°. All the experiments were carried out at a midchord Reynolds number of 8×105, covering an angle of attack (AOA range from −2° to 14°. Static pressure distribution measurements were acquired over the upper surfaces of the wings along three chordwise rows and one spanwise direction at the wing quarter-chord line. The results of the tests confirm that at a particular AOA, increasing the sweep angle causes a noticeable decrease in the upper-surface suction pressure. Furthermore, as the sweep angle increases, the development of a laminar separation bubble near the LEs of the wings takes place at higher AOAs. On the other hand, spanwise pressure measurements show that increasing the wing sweep angle results in forming a stronger vortex on the quarter-chord line which has lower sensitivity to AOA variation and remains substantially attached to the wing surface for higher AOAs than that can be achieved in the case of a lower sweep angle. In addition, data obtained indicate that installing an end plate further reinforces the spanwise flow over the wing surface, thus affecting the pressure distribution.

  5. Flight Testing of Novel Compliant Spines for Passive Wing Morphing on Ornithopters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wissa, Aimy; Guerreiro, Nelson; Grauer, Jared; Altenbuchner, Cornelia; Hubbard, James E., Jr.; Tummala, Yashwanth; Frecker, Mary; Roberts, Richard

    2013-01-01

    Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAVs) are proliferating in both the civil and military markets. Flapping wing UAVs, or ornithopters, have the potential to combine the agility and maneuverability of rotary wing aircraft with excellent performance in low Reynolds number flight regimes. The purpose of this paper is to present new free flight experimental results for an ornithopter equipped with one degree of freedom (1DOF) compliant spines that were designed and optimized in terms of mass, maximum von-Mises stress, and desired wing bending deflections. The spines were inserted in an experimental ornithopter wing spar in order to achieve a set of desired kinematics during the up and down strokes of a flapping cycle. The ornithopter was flown at Wright Patterson Air Force Base in the Air Force Research Laboratory Small Unmanned Air Systems (SUAS) indoor flight facility. Vicon motion tracking cameras were used to track the motion of the vehicle for five different wing configurations. The effect of the presence of the compliant spine on wing kinematics and leading edge spar deflection during flight is presented. Results show that the ornithopter with the compliant spine inserted in its wing reduced the body acceleration during the upstroke which translates into overall lift gains.

  6. Aerodynamic and aeroelastic characteristics of the DARPA Smart Wing Phase II wind tunnel model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanders, Brian P.; Martin, Christopher A.; Cowan, David L.

    2001-06-01

    A wind tunnel demonstration was conducted on a scale model of an unmanned combat air vehicle (UCAV). The model was configured with traditional hinged control surfaces and control surfaces manufactured with embedded shape memory alloys. Control surfaces constructed with SMA wires enable a smooth and continuous deformation in both the spanwise and cordwise directions. This continuous shape results in some unique aerodynamic effects. Additionally, the stiffness distribution of the model was selected to understand the aeroelastic behavior of a wing designed with these control surfaces. The wind tunnel experiments showed that the aerodynamic performance of a wing constructed with these control surfaces is significantly improved. However, care must be taken when aeroelastic effects are considered since the wing will show a more rapid reduction in the roll moment due to increased moment arm about the elastic axis. It is shown, experimentally, that this adverse effect is easily counteracted using leading edge control surfaces.

  7. Vitality of optical vortices (Presentation)

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Roux, FS

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available (negative) vortices C (A) — creation (annihilation) events per unit volume aFS Roux, Opt. Commun. 283, 4855-4858 (2010) – p. 3/11 Conservation of V and T For V = np + nn and T = np − nn:a ∂zV +∇ · JV = 2(C − A) ∂zT +∇ · JT = 0 V — vortex density... T — topological charge density JV — current for the vortex density JT — current for the topological charge density aFS Roux, Opt. Commun. 283, 4855-4858 (2010) – p. 4/11 Vortex line and critical points Vortex location: Re{g(x)} = Im{g(x)} = 0 Vortex line...

  8. Experimental investigation of large-scale vortices in a freely spreading gravity current

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Yeping; Horner-Devine, Alexander R.

    2017-10-01

    A series of laboratory experiments are presented to compare the dynamics of constant-source buoyant gravity currents propagating into laterally confined (channelized) and unconfined (spreading) environments. The plan-form structure of the spreading current and the vertical density and velocity structures on the interface are quantified using the optical thickness method and a combined particle image velocimetry and planar laser-induced fluorescence method, respectively. With lateral boundaries, the buoyant current thickness is approximately constant and Kelvin-Helmholtz instabilities are generated within the shear layer. The buoyant current structure is significantly different in the spreading case. As the current spreads laterally, nonlinear large-scale vortex structures are observed at the interface, which maintain a coherent shape as they propagate away from the source. These structures are continuously generated near the river mouth, have amplitudes close to the buoyant layer thickness, and propagate offshore at speeds approximately equal to the internal wave speed. The observed depth and propagation speed of the instabilities match well with the fastest growing mode predicted by linear stability analysis, but with a shorter wavelength. The spreading flows have much higher vorticity, which is aggregated within the large-scale structures. Secondary instabilities are generated on the leading edge of the braids between the large-scale vortex structures and ultimately break and mix on the lee side of the structures. Analysis of the vortex dynamics shows that lateral stretching intensifies the vorticity in the spreading currents, contributing to higher vorticity within the large-scale structures in the buoyant plume. The large-scale instabilities and vortex structures observed in the present study provide new insights into the origin of internal frontal structures frequently observed in coastal river plumes.

  9. A vorticity budget for the Gulf Stream

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Bras, Isabela; Toole, John

    2017-04-01

    We develop a depth-averaged vorticity budget framework to diagnose the dynamical balance of the Gulf Stream, and apply this framework to observations and the ECCO state estimate (Wunsch and Heimbach 2013) above the thermocline in the subtropical North Atlantic. Using the hydrographic and ADCP data along the WOCE/CLIVAR section A22 and a variety of wind stress data products, we find that the advective vorticity flux out of the western region is on the same order as the wind stress forcing over the eastern portion of the gyre. This is consistent with a large-scale balance between a negative source of vorticity from wind stress forcing and a positive source of vorticity in the western region. Additionally, the form of the vorticity flux indicates that the Gulf Stream has a significant inertial component. In the ECCO state estimate, we diagnose a seasonal cycle in advective vorticity flux across a meridional section associated with seasonal fluctuations in Gulf Stream transport. This vorticity flux is forced by wind stress over the eastern subtropical North Atlantic and balanced by lateral friction with the western boundary. The lateral friction in ECCO is a necessary parameterization of smaller scale processes that occur in the real ocean, and quantifying these remains an open and interesting question. This simplified framework provides a means to interpret large scale ocean dynamics. In our application, it points to wind stress forcing over the subtropical North Altantic as an important regulator of the Gulf Stream and hence the climate system.

  10. POD Analysis of Flow Behind a Four-wing Vortex Generator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosseinali, Mahdi; Wilkins, Stephen; Hall, Joseph

    2015-11-01

    Wing-tip vortices that persist long after the passage of large aircraft are of major concern to aircraft controllers and are responsible for considerable delays between aircraft take-off times. Understanding these vortices is extremely important, with the ultimate goal to reduce or eliminate delays altogether. Simple theoretical models of vortices can be studied experimentally using a four-wing vortex generator. The cross-stream planes are measured with a two-component Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) system, and the resulting vector fields were analyzed with a Proper Orthogonal Decomposition (POD) via the method of snapshots. POD analysis will be employed both before and after removing vortex core meandering to investigate the meandering effect on POD modes for a better understanding of it.

  11. Aerodynamics and Heat Transfer Studies of Parameters Specific to the IGCC-Requirements: Endwall Contouring, Leading Edge and Blade Tip Ejection under Rotating Turbine Conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schobeiri, Meinhard; Han, Je-Chin

    2014-09-30

    This report deals with the specific aerodynamics and heat transfer problematic inherent to high pressure (HP) turbine sections of IGCC-gas turbines. Issues of primary relevance to a turbine stage operating in an IGCC-environment are: (1) decreasing the strength of the secondary flow vortices at the hub and tip regions to reduce (a), the secondary flow losses and (b), the potential for end wall deposition, erosion and corrosion due to secondary flow driven migration of gas flow particles to the hub and tip regions, (2) providing a robust film cooling technology at the hub and that sustains high cooling effectiveness less sensitive to deposition, (3) investigating the impact of blade tip geometry on film cooling effectiveness. The document includes numerical and experimental investigations of above issues. The experimental investigations were performed in the three-stage multi-purpose turbine research facility at the Turbomachinery Performance and Flow Research Laboratory (TPFL), Texas A&M University. For the numerical investigations a commercial Navier-Stokes solver was utilized.

  12. Doppler Velocity Signatures of Idealized Elliptical Vortices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wen-Chau Lee

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Doppler radar observations have revealed a class of atmospheric vortices (tropical cyclones, tornadoes, dust devils that possess elliptical radar reflectivity signatures. One famous example is Typhoon Herb (1996 that maintained its elliptical reflectivity structure over a 40-hour period. Theoretical work and dual-Doppler analyses of observed tropical cyclones have suggested two physical mechanisms that can explain the formation of two types of elliptical vortices observed in nature, namely, the combination of a circular vortex with either a wavenumber two vortex Rossby wave or a deformation field. The characteristics of these two types of elliptical vortices and their corresponding Doppler velocity signatures have not been previously examined.

  13. Tunneling decay of self-gravitating vortices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dupuis, Éric; Gobeil, Yan; Lee, Bum-Hoon; Lee, Wonwoo; MacKenzie, Richard; Paranjape, Manu B.; Yajnik, Urjit A.; Yeom, Dong-han

    2018-01-01

    We investigate tunneling decay of false vortices in the presence of gravity, in which vortices are trapped in the false vacuum of a theory of scalar electrodynamics in three dimensions. The core of the vortex contains magnetic flux in the true vacuum, while outside the vortex is the appropriate topologically nontrivial false vacuum. We numerically obtain vortex solutions which are classically stable; however, they could decay via tunneling. To show this phenomenon, we construct the proper junction conditions in curved spacetime. We find that the tunneling exponent for the vortices is half that for Coleman-de Luccia bubbles and discuss possible future applications.

  14. Experimental Investigation on Aerodynamic Control of a Wing with Distributed Plasma Actuators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Han Menghu; Li Jun; Liang Hua; Zhao Guangyin; Niu Zhongguo

    2015-01-01

    Experimental investigation of active flow control on the aerodynamic performance of a flying wing is conducted. Subsonic wind tunnel tests are performed using a model of a 35° swept flying wing with an nanosecond dielectric barrier discharge (NS-DBD) plasma actuator, which is installed symmetrically on the wing leading edge. The lift and drag coefficient, lift-to-drag ratio and pitching moment coefficient are tested by a six-component force balance for a range of angles of attack. The results indicate that a 44.5% increase in the lift coefficient, a 34.2% decrease in the drag coefficient and a 22.4% increase in the maximum lift-to-drag ratio can be achieved as compared with the baseline case. The effects of several actuation parameters are also investigated, and the results show that control efficiency demonstrates a strong dependence on actuation location and frequency. Furthermore, we highlight the use of distributed plasma actuators at the leading edge to enhance the aerodynamic performance, giving insight into the different mechanism of separation control and vortex control, which shows tremendous potential in practical flow control for a broad range of angles of attack. (paper)

  15. Flow Measurements of a Plunging Wing in Unsteady Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wengel, Jesse; Nathan, Rungun; Cheng, Bo; Eslam-Panah, Azar

    2017-11-01

    Despite the great progress in their design and control, Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAVs) are tremendously troubled while flying in turbulent environments, which are common in the lower atmospheric boundary layer (ABL). A nominally 2D plunging wing was developed and tested in the presence of unsteady wake to investigate the effect of the flow disturbances on vorticity fields. The experiments were conducted in a water channel facility with test section width of 0.76 m, and a water depth of 0.6 m. The unsteady wake in the form of von Kármán Vortex Street was generated by a cylinder located upstream of the plunging wing. The plunge amplitude and frequency of the oscillation were adjusted to bracket the range of Strouhal numbers relevant to the biological locomotion (0.25PIV) was employed to quantitatively study the effect of unsteady wake on the flow measurements of the plunging wing.

  16. Regional eddy vorticity transport and the equilibrium vorticity budgets of a numerical model ocean circulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrison, D. E.; Holland, W. R.

    1981-01-01

    A mean vorticity budget analysis is presented of Holland's (1978) numerical ocean general circulation experiment. The stable budgets are compared with classical circulation theory to emphasize the ways in which the mesoscale motions of the model alter (or leave unaltered) classical vorticity balances. The basinwide meridional transports of vorticity by the mean flow and by the mesoscale flow in the mean are evaluated to establish the role(s) of the mesoscale in the larger scale equilibrium vorticity transports. The vorticity equation for this model fluid system is presented and the budget analysis method is described. Vorticity budgets over the selected regions and on a larger scale are given, and a summary of budget results is provided along with remarks about the utility of this type of analysis.

  17. Volumetric PIV Behind a Flapping Wing in an Incoming Vortex Flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curet, Oscar; Finkel, Cyndee; von Ellenrieder, Karl; Bissell, Daniel

    2013-11-01

    The propulsive surfaces of flying and swimming animals interact with vortices shed by their own bodies or other animals, if they are traveling in groups. The interaction of the propulsive surface with these structured vortices might be fundamental for stability and/or decreasing the cost of transport. In this work, we investigate the wake generated by a flapping wing in an incoming vortex flow. We used a NACA0012 wing model with aspect ratio of 2, and a d-profile cylinder to generated the incoming vortices. The model was tested in a water channel at a Reynolds number of approximately 10,000, which is relevant to many biological swimmers and flyers. The flow structure generated by the flapping wing was measured using three-dimensional Particle Image Velocimetry (3-D PIV). A series of experiments were performed for different Strouhal numbers, St = fL/U, where f is the flapping frequency, L is the amplitude of oscillation, and U is the incoming flow speed. We present the 3-D flow field of the flapping wing in an incoming vortex flow and compare it with the structure of a flapping wing with an undisturbed incoming flow.

  18. Vortices in Bose–Einstein condensates: A review of the ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. Rotating dilute Bose–Einstein condensates (BEC) of alkali atoms offer a test- ing ground for theories of vortices in weakly interacting superfluids. In a rotating super- fluid, quantised vortices, with a vorticity h/m, form above a critical velocity. Such vortices have been generated in BEC of alkali atoms by different ...

  19. Effect of canard location and size on canard-wing interference and aerodynamic center shift related to maneuvering aircraft at transonic speeds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gloss, B. B.

    1974-01-01

    A generalized wind-tunnel model, typical of highly maneuverable aircraft, was tested in the Langley 8-foot transonic pressure tunnel at Mach numbers from 0.70 to 1.20 to determine the effects of canard location and size on canard-wing interference effects and aerodynamic center shift at transonic speeds. The canards had exposed areas of 16.0 and 28.0 percent of the wing reference area and were located in the chord plane of the wing or in a position 18.5 percent of the wing mean geometric chord above or below the wing chord plane. Two different wing planforms were tested, one with leading-edge sweep of 60 deg and the other 44 deg; both wings had the same reference area and span. The results indicated that the largest benefits in lift and drag were obtained with the canard above the wing chord plane for both wings tested. The low canard configuration for the 60 deg swept wing proved to be more stable and produced a more linear pitching-moment curve than the high and coplanar canard configurations for the subsonic test Mach numbers.

  20. Navier-Stokes prediction of a delta wing in roll with vortex breakdown

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaderjian, Neal M.; Schiff, Lewis B.

    1993-01-01

    The three-dimensional, Reynolds-averaged, Navier-Stokes (RANS) equations are used to numerically simulate vortical flow about a 65 degree sweep delta wing. Subsonic turbulent flow computations are presented for this delta wing at 30 degrees angle of attack and static roll angles up to 42 degrees. This work is part of an on going effort to validate the RANS approach for predicting high-incidence vortical flows, with the eventual application to wing rock. The flow is unsteady and includes spiral-type vortex breakdown. The breakdown positions, mean surface pressures, rolling moments, normal forces, and streamwise center-of-pressure locations compare reasonably well with experiment. In some cases, the primary vortex suction peaks are significantly underpredicted due to grid coarseness. Nevertheless, the computations are able to predict the same nonlinear variation of rolling moment with roll angle that appeared in the experiment. This nonlinearity includes regions of local static roll instability, which is attributed to vortex breakdown.

  1. Unsteady Aerodynamic Investigation of the Propeller-Wing Interaction for a Rocket Launched Unmanned Air Vehicle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Q. Zhang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The aerodynamic characteristics of propeller-wing interaction for the rocket launched UAV have been investigated numerically by means of sliding mesh technology. The corresponding forces and moments have been collected for axial wing placements ranging from 0.056 to 0.5D and varied rotating speeds. The slipstream generated by the rotating propeller has little effects on the lift characteristics of the whole UAV. The drag can be seen to remain unchanged as the wing's location moves progressively closer to the propeller until 0.056D away from the propeller, where a nearly 20% increase occurred sharply. The propeller position has a negligible effect on the overall thrust and torque of the propeller. The efficiency affected by the installation angle of the propeller blade has also been analyzed. Based on the pressure cloud and streamlines, the vortices generated by propeller, propeller-wing interaction, and wing tip have also been captured and analyzed.

  2. Three-Dimensional Unsteady Flow Elicited by Finite Wings and Complex Configurations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-01-01

    flow. Anemometric measurements added quantitative magnitudes and spatial verification to the visualized flow structures. The experiments were designed... anemometric measurements were taken at each span location and chordwise at 0.00c(leading edge), 0.17c, 0.33c, 0.50c, 0.67c, 0.83c and 1.00c. " An X...The hot wire recorded the absolute velocity of the flow field during the cyclic motion history of the three wings. The anemometric measurements were

  3. Vortices and vortex lattices in quantum ferrofluids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martin, A M; Marchant, N G; Parker, N G; O’Dell, D H J

    2017-01-01

    The experimental realization of quantum-degenerate Bose gases made of atoms with sizeable magnetic dipole moments has created a new type of fluid, known as a quantum ferrofluid, which combines the extraordinary properties of superfluidity and ferrofluidity. A hallmark of superfluids is that they are constrained to rotate through vortices with quantized circulation. In quantum ferrofluids the long-range dipolar interactions add new ingredients by inducing magnetostriction and instabilities, and also affect the structural properties of vortices and vortex lattices. Here we give a review of the theory of vortices in dipolar Bose–Einstein condensates, exploring the interplay of magnetism with vorticity and contrasting this with the established behaviour in non-dipolar condensates. We cover single vortex solutions, including structure, energy and stability, vortex pairs, including interactions and dynamics, and also vortex lattices. Our discussion is founded on the mean-field theory provided by the dipolar Gross–Pitaevskii equation, ranging from analytic treatments based on the Thomas–Fermi (hydrodynamic) and variational approaches to full numerical simulations. Routes for generating vortices in dipolar condensates are discussed, with particular attention paid to rotating condensates, where surface instabilities drive the nucleation of vortices, and lead to the emergence of rich and varied vortex lattice structures. We also present an outlook, including potential extensions to degenerate Fermi gases, quantum Hall physics, toroidal systems and the Berezinskii–Kosterlitz–Thouless transition. (topical review)

  4. Vortices and vortex lattices in quantum ferrofluids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, A. M.; Marchant, N. G.; O'Dell, D. H. J.; Parker, N. G.

    2017-03-01

    The experimental realization of quantum-degenerate Bose gases made of atoms with sizeable magnetic dipole moments has created a new type of fluid, known as a quantum ferrofluid, which combines the extraordinary properties of superfluidity and ferrofluidity. A hallmark of superfluids is that they are constrained to rotate through vortices with quantized circulation. In quantum ferrofluids the long-range dipolar interactions add new ingredients by inducing magnetostriction and instabilities, and also affect the structural properties of vortices and vortex lattices. Here we give a review of the theory of vortices in dipolar Bose-Einstein condensates, exploring the interplay of magnetism with vorticity and contrasting this with the established behaviour in non-dipolar condensates. We cover single vortex solutions, including structure, energy and stability, vortex pairs, including interactions and dynamics, and also vortex lattices. Our discussion is founded on the mean-field theory provided by the dipolar Gross-Pitaevskii equation, ranging from analytic treatments based on the Thomas-Fermi (hydrodynamic) and variational approaches to full numerical simulations. Routes for generating vortices in dipolar condensates are discussed, with particular attention paid to rotating condensates, where surface instabilities drive the nucleation of vortices, and lead to the emergence of rich and varied vortex lattice structures. We also present an outlook, including potential extensions to degenerate Fermi gases, quantum Hall physics, toroidal systems and the Berezinskii-Kosterlitz-Thouless transition.

  5. Prediction of vortex breakdown on a delta wing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agrawal, S.; Robinson, B. A.; Barnett, R. M.

    1992-01-01

    Recent studies of leading-edge vortex flows with computational fluid dynamics codes using Euler or Navier-Stokes formulations have shown fair agreement with experimental data. These studies have concentrated on simulating the flowfields associated with a sharp-edged flat plate 70 deg delta wing at angles of attack where vortex breakdown or burst is observed over the wing. There are, however, a number of discrepancies between the experimental data and the computed flowfields. The location of vortex breakdown in the computational solutions is seen to differ from the experimental data and to vary with changes in the computational grid and freestream Mach number. There also remain issues as to the validity of steady-state computations for cases which contain regions of unsteady flow, such as in the post-breakdown regions. As a partial response to these questions, a number of laminar Navier-Stokes solutions were examined for the 70 deg delta wing. The computed solutions are compared with an experimental database obtained at low subsonic speeds. The convergence of forces, moments and vortex breakdown locations are also analyzed to determine if the computed flowfields actually reach steady-state conditions.

  6. Analytical modeling and experimental evaluation of a passively morphing ornithopter wing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wissa, Aimy A.

    Ornithopters or flapping wing Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAVs) have potential applications in both civil and military sectors. Amongst all categories of UAVs, ornithopters have a unique ability to fly in low Reynolds number flight regimes and have the agility and maneuverability of rotary wing aircraft. In nature, birds achieve such performance by exploiting various wing kinematics known as gaits. The objective of this work was to improve the steady level flight wing performance of an ornithopter by implementing the Continuous Vortex Gait (CVG) using a novel passive compliant spine. The CVG is a set of bio-inspired kinematics that natural flyers use to produce lift and thrust during steady level flight. A significant contribution of this work was the recognition that the CVG is an avian gait that could be achieved using a passive morphing mechanism. In contrast to rigid-link mechanisms and active approaches, reported by other researchers in the open literature, passive morphing mechanisms require no additional energy expenditure, while introducing minimal weight addition and complexity. During the execution of the CVG, the avian wing wrist is the primary joint responsible for the wing shape changes. Thus a compliant mechanism, called a compliant spine, was fabricated, and integrated in the ornithopter's wing leading edge spar where an avian wrist would normally exist, namely at 37% of the wing half span. Each compliant spine was designed to be flexible in bending during the wing upstroke and stiff in bending during the wing downstroke. Inserting a variable stiffness compliant mechanism in the leading edge (LE) spar of the ornithopter could affect its structural stability. An analytical model was developed to determine the structural stability of the ornithopter LE spar. The model was validated using experimental measurements. The LE spar equations of motion were then reformulated into Mathieu's equation and the LE spar was proven to be structurally stable with a

  7. History of Research on Lift-Generated Vortices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossow, Vernon J.; Olson, Lawrence E. (Technical Monitor)

    1998-01-01

    A theoretical and experimental program on the structure and possible modification of lift-generated vortices shed by subsonic aircraft has been underway at NASA Ames Research Center since the late 1960's. The objectives of the program were to first obtain a better understanding of the hazard posed by the vortex wakes of subsonic transports, and then to develop methods on how to modify or design the wake-generating aircraft in order to make the vortices less hazardous. Some effort was also expended on the development of methods to avoid vortex wakes. The seminar will present a brief history of the research program beginning with the nature of vortex wakes and their relationship to the span loading on the wake-generating wing. Examples will then be presented to show how span-loading changes were used to influence the dynamics of the vortex wakes shed by subsonic transport aircraft. Video tape segments will be shown to illustrate the dynamics of vortex wakes and the flight tests carried out by NASA to find out how configurations developed in wind tunnels would perform on flight vehicles. The presentation will then summarize some recent results obtained in the 80- by 120-Foot Wind Tunnel at NASA Ames Research Center on the vortex wakes that trail from 0.03 scale models of a B-747 and of a DC-10 at downstream distances of 81 ft and 162 ft behind the wake-generating model; i.e., at scale distances of 0.5 and 1.0 mile. Lastly, a proposed vortex avoidance scheme based on the Global Positioning System will be described. All of the material to be presented is publically available in technical journals.

  8. Multi-cell vortices observed in fine-mesh solutions to the incompressible Euler equations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rizzi, A.

    1986-01-01

    Results are presented for a three dimensional flow, containing a vortex sheet shed from a delta wing. The numerical solution indicates that the shearing caused by the trailing edge of the wing set up a torsional wave on the vortex core and produces a structure with multiple cells of vorticity. Although observed in coarse grid solutions too, this effect becomes better resolved with mesh refinement to 614 000 grid volumes. In comparison with a potential solution in which the vortex sheet is fitted as a discontinuity, the results are analyzed for the position of the vortex features captured in the Euler flow field, the accuracy of the pressure field, and for the diffusion of the vortex sheets

  9. Dynamic manipulation of asymmetric forebody vortices to achieve linear control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Richard

    A wind tunnel experiment was performed to further investigate the potential of the dynamic manipulation of forebody vortices as a means of supplementing directional control of fighter aircraft at high angles of attack. Tests were conducted on a 65-deg delta-wing model fitted with a slender, pointed tangent-ogive forebody of circular cross-section and 12.8 deg semi-apex angle. Forward-blowing nozzles located near the apex of the forebody served as the means of manipulating the forebody vortices. As expected, forward blowing was very effective, i.e., little blowing effort was required to cause the forebody vortex on the blown side to assume the 'high' position. However, the magnitudes of yawing moment and side force developed by the slender forebody with blowing do not differ significantly from that of the no-blowing, baseline case. Moreover, blowing above a certain threshold value produced an unexpected reversal, with blowing causing the vortex on the blown side to assume the 'low' position instead and the yawing moment and side force to change sense. The results have shown that the dynamic manipulation scheme is very successful in producing a linear variation of time-average yawing moment with a duty-cycle parameter, even with sideslip, for the aircraft-like model. The results also show that, by switching the vortex pattern rapidly, the linearity can be maintained up to a reduced frequency of at least 0.32, which is expected to be very satisfactory for practical applications. A subsequent water tunnel experiment with the forebody alone was undertaken to conduct off-surface flow visualizations that confirmed the vortex reversal phenomenon. Based on the flow visualization studies, a hypothesis was formed regarding the cause of the reversal phenomenon; it postulates that at the reversal threshold the nozzle flux interrupts the formation of the high forebody vortex on the blowing side and encourages the shear layer to form a replacement vortex that lies close to the

  10. Stability of helical tip vortices in a rotor far wake

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Okulov, Valery; Sørensen, Jens Nørkær

    2007-01-01

    , corresponding to Rankine, Gaussian and Scully vortices, at radial extents ranging from the core radius of a tip vortex to several rotor radii. The analysis shows that the stability of tip vortices largely depends on the radial extent of the hub vorticity as well as on the type of vorticity distribution. As part......As a means of analysing the stability of the wake behind a multi-bladed rotor the stability of a multiplicity of helical vortices embedded in an assigned flow field is addressed. In the model the tip vortices in the far wake are approximated by infinitely long helical vortices with constant pitch...... and radius. The work is a further development of a model developed in Okulov (J. Fluid Mech., vol. 521, p. 319) in which the linear stability of N equally azimuthally spaced helical vortices was considered. In the present work the analysis is extended to include an assigned vorticity field due to root...

  11. Dynamics of quantised vortices in superfluids

    CERN Document Server

    Sonin, Edouard B

    2016-01-01

    A comprehensive overview of the basic principles of vortex dynamics in superfluids, this book addresses the problems of vortex dynamics in all three superfluids available in laboratories (4He, 3He, and BEC of cold atoms) alongside discussions of the elasticity of vortices, forces on vortices, and vortex mass. Beginning with a summary of classical hydrodynamics, the book guides the reader through examinations of vortex dynamics from large scales to the microscopic scale. Topics such as vortex arrays in rotating superfluids, bound states in vortex cores and interaction of vortices with quasiparticles are discussed. The final chapter of the book considers implications of vortex dynamics to superfluid turbulence using simple scaling and symmetry arguments. Written from a unified point of view that avoids complicated mathematical approaches, this text is ideal for students and researchers working with vortex dynamics in superfluids, superconductors, magnetically ordered materials, neutron stars and cosmological mo...

  12. Electrohydrodynamic (EHD) vortices in helical turbulence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kikuchi, H.

    1996-01-01

    The study of large-scale coherent hydrodynamic (HD) vortex generation has been extended to electrified charged dusty vortices to be termed as electrohydrodynamic (EHD) vortices, incorporating helical turbulence in electric and magnetic fields into that in fluid velocity, which are all created by an external DC electric field on the background. A new equation of EHD vortices is introduced on the basis of a set of EHD or electromagnetohydrodynamic (EMHD) equations, including equations of state and a full set of Maxwell's equations by using functional techniques for estimating equations for an ensemble average, turbulent background, and additional random field. In fact, EHD vortices for a charged dusty fluid can be more explosive with larger instabilities than HD vortices. In addition, it is inferred that an external DC electric field could provide the origin of additional self-organization to a coalescence of fluid vortex and electric field lines as a manifestation of a new frozen-in field concept for electric fields when the electric Reynolds number is sufficiently high. This is discussed on the basis of a set of general transport equations for fluid vorticity, magnetic and electric fields that are rederived concisely. In particular, a novel concept of electric field line merging-reconnection is developed in close relation to fluid vortex line merging, indicating a coalescence of fluid vortex breakdown or merging point and electric field line reconnection point, X-type or O-type with possible application to tornadic thunderstorms. In fact, a thundercloud charge distribution so as to provide a coalescence of fluid vortex and electric field lines is quite possible without theoretical inconsistency, and is thought most likely to occur from observations available so far. (orig.)

  13. Energetics and optimum motion of oscillating lifting surfaces. [energy losses of rigid wings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmadi, A. R.; Widnall, S. E.

    1983-01-01

    Low-frequency, unsteady, lifting-line theory is used to characterize the energetics and optimum motion of an unswept rigid wing oscillating harmonically in an inviscid, incompressible flow. The energetics calculations account for the leading edge suction force, the power absorbed in the wing oscillations, and the energy loss rate produced by vortex shedding. Optimization is achieved by minimizing the average energy loss rate in relation to a given thrust, and a unique solution is found in the three dimensional case for low, reduced frequencies. The two-dimensional solution is nonunique, a condition which is examined in terms of the normal modes of the energy loss rate matrix. An invisible mode with a hydrodynamic efficiency of 100 pct is obtained in the two-dimensional case, causing the nonuniqueness of the solution by yielding no fixed positive thrust through perfect unsteady feathering.

  14. Slow light vortices in periodic waveguides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sukhorukov, Andrey A.; Ha, Sangwoo; Desyatnikov, Anton S.

    2009-01-01

    We reveal that the reduction of the group velocity of light in periodic waveguides is generically associated with the presence of vortex energy flows. We show that the energy flows are gradually frozen for slow-light at the Brillouin zone edge, whereas vortices persist for slow-light states having...... non-vanishing phase velocity inside the Brillouin zone. We also demonstrate that presence of vortices can be linked to the absence of slow-light at the zone edge, and present calculations illustrating these general results....

  15. A Comparative Numerical Study on the Performances and Vortical Patterns of Two Bioinspired Oscillatory Mechanisms: Undulating and Pure Heaving

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohsen Ebrahimi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The hydrodynamics and energetics of bioinspired oscillating mechanisms have received significant attentions by engineers and biologists to develop the underwater and air vehicles. Undulating and pure heaving (or plunging motions are two significant mechanisms which are utilized in nature to provide propulsive, maneuvering, and stabilization forces. This study aims to elucidate and compare the propulsive vortical signature and performance of these two important natural mechanisms through a systematic numerical study. Navier-Stokes equations are solved, by a pressure-based finite volume method solver, in an arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian (ALE framework domain containing a 2D NACA0012 foil moving with prescribed kinematics. Some of the important findings are (1 the thrust production of the heaving foil begins at lower St and has a greater growing slope with respect to the St; (2 the undulating mechanism has some limitations to produce high thrust forces; (3 the undulating foil shows a lower power consumption and higher efficiency; (4 changing the Reynolds number (Re in a constant St affects the performance of the oscillations; and (5 there is a distinguishable appearance of leading edge vortices in the wake of the heaving foil without observable ones in the wake of the undulating foil, especially at higher St.

  16. Spatial perturbation of a wing-tip vortex using pulsed span-wise jets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heyes, A. L.; Smith, D. A. R.

    The separation distance required between transport aircraft to avoid wake vortices remains a limiting factor on airport capacity. The dissipation of the wake can be accelerated by perturbing co-operative instabilities between multiple pairs of vortices. This paper presents the results of a preliminary experimental investigation into the use of pulsed span-wise air jets in the wing tip to perturb a single tip vortex in the very near field. Velocity measurements were made using PIV and hot-wire anemometry. The results demonstrate that the vortex position can be modulated at frequencies up to 50 Hz and, as such, the method shows promise for forcing instability in multiple vortex wakes.

  17. Water waves interacting with a current of constant vorticity: estimating the vorticity of the wave field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, Bruno; Seez, William; Abid, Malek; Kharif, Christian; Touboul, Julien

    2017-04-01

    During the last ten years, the topic of water waves interacting with sheared current has drawn a lot of attention, since the interaction of water waves with vorticity was recently found to be significant when modeling the propagation of water waves. In this framework, the configuration involving constantly sheared current (indeed a constant vorticity) is of special interst, since the equations remain tractable. In this framework, it is demonstrated that the flow related to water waves can be described by means of potential theory, since the source term in the vorticity equation is proportionnal to the curvature of the current profile (Nwogu, 2009). In the mean time, the community often wonders if this argument is valid, since the existence of a perfectly linearly sheared current is purely theoretical, and the presence of the vorticity within the wave field can be external (through wave generation mechanisms, for instance). Thus, this work is dedicated to investigate the magnitude of the vorticity related to the wave field, in conditions similar to this analytical case of constant vorticity. This approach is based on the comparison of experimental data, and three models. The first model is linear, supposing a constantly seared current and water waves described by potential theory. The second is fully nonlinear, but still supposing that water waves are potential, and finally, the third model is fully nonlinear, but solves the Euler equations, allowing the existence of vorticity related to the waves. The confrontation of these three approaches with the experimental data will allow to quantify the wave-related vorticity within the total flow, and analyze its importance as a function of nonlinearity and vorticity magnitude. ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS The DGA (Direction Générale de l'Armement, France) is acknowledged for its financial support through the ANR grant N°ANR-13-ASTR-0007.

  18. Improvement of a near wake model for trailing vorticity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pirrung, G R; Hansen, M H; Madsen, H A

    2014-01-01

    A near wake model, originally proposed by Beddoes, is further developed. The purpose of the model is to account for the radially dependent time constants of the fast aerodynamic response and to provide a tip loss correction. It is based on lifting line theory and models the downwash due to roughly the first 90 degrees of rotation. This restriction of the model to the near wake allows for using a computationally efficient indicial function algorithm. The aim of this study is to improve the accuracy of the downwash close to the root and tip of the blade and to decrease the sensitivity of the model to temporal discretization, both regarding numerical stability and quality of the results. The modified near wake model is coupled to an aerodynamics model, which consists of a blade element momentum model with dynamic inflow for the far wake and a 2D shed vorticity model that simulates the unsteady buildup of both lift and circulation in the attached flow region. The near wake model is validated against the test case of a finite wing with constant elliptical bound circulation. An unsteady simulation of the NREL 5 MW rotor shows the functionality of the coupled model

  19. The lateral-directional characteristics of a 74-degree Delta wing employing gothic planform vortex flaps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grantz, A. C.

    1984-01-01

    The low speed lateral/directional characteristics of a generic 74 degree delta wing body configuration employing the latest generation, gothic planform vortex flaps was determined. Longitudinal effects are also presented. The data are compared with theoretical estimates from VORSTAB, an extension of the Quasi vortex lattice Method of Lan which empirically accounts for vortex breakdown effects in the calculation of longitudinal and lateral/directional aerodynamic characteristics. It is indicated that leading edge deflections of 30 and 40 degrees reduce the magnitude of the wing effective dihedral relative to the baseline for a specified angle of attack or lift coefficient. For angles of attack greater than 15 degrees, these flap deflections reduce the configuration directional stability despite improved vertical tail effectiveness. It is shown that asymmetric leading edge deflections are inferior to conventional ailerons in generating rolling moments. VORSTAB calculations provide coarse lateral/directional estimates at low to moderate angles of attack. The theory does not account for vortex flow induced, vertical tail effects.

  20. Receptivity of Hypersonic Boundary Layers to Acoustic and Vortical Disturbances (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balakumar, P.

    2015-01-01

    Boundary-layer receptivity to two-dimensional acoustic and vortical disturbances for hypersonic flows over two-dimensional and axi-symmetric geometries were numerically investigated. The role of bluntness, wall cooling, and pressure gradients on the receptivity and stability were analyzed and compared with the sharp nose cases. It was found that for flows over sharp nose geometries in adiabatic wall conditions the instability waves are generated in the leading-edge region and that the boundary layer is much more receptive to slow acoustic waves as compared to the fast waves. The computations confirmed the stabilizing effect of nose bluntness and the role of the entropy layer in the delay of boundary layer transition. The receptivity coefficients in flows over blunt bodies are orders of magnitude smaller than that for the sharp cone cases. Wall cooling stabilizes the first mode strongly and destabilizes the second mode. However, the receptivity coefficients are also much smaller compared to the adiabatic case. The adverse pressure gradients increased the unstable second mode regions.

  1. Experimental Observations of Ion Phase-Space Vortices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pécseli, Hans; Armstrong, R. J.; Trulsen, J.

    1981-01-01

    Experimental observations of ion phase-space vortices are reported. The ion phase-space vortices form in the region of heated ions behind electrostatic ion acoustic shocks. The results are in qualitative agreement with numerical and analytic studies....

  2. Equilibration of centrifugally unstable vortices: A review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Carnevale, G.F.; Kloosterziel, R.C.; Orlandi, P.

    2016-01-01

    In three-dimensional flow, a vortex can become turbulent and be destroyed through a variety of instabilities. In rotating flow, however, the result of the breakup of a vortex is usually a state comprising several vortices with their axes aligned along the ambient rotation direction. This article is

  3. Numerical simulation of pump-intake vortices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rudolf Pavel

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Pump pre-swirl or uneven flow distribution in front of the pump can induce pump-intake vortices. These phenomena result in blockage of the impeller suction space, deterioration of efficiency, drop of head curve and earlier onset of cavitation. Real problematic case, where head curve drop was documented, is simulated using commercial CFD software. Computational simulation was carried out for three flow rates, which correspond to three operating regimes of the vertical pump. The domain consists of the pump sump, pump itself excluding the impeller and the delivery pipe. One-phase approach is applied, because the vortex cores were not filled with air during observation of the real pump operation. Numerical simulation identified two surface vortices and one bottom vortex. Their position and strength depend on the pump flow rate. Paper presents detail analysis of the flow field on the pump intake, discusses influence of the vortices on pump operation and suggests possible actions that should be taken to suppress the intake vortices.

  4. Evaporation of a packet of quantized vorticity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barenghi, Carlo F.; Samuels, David C.

    2002-01-01

    We study the diffusion of a packet of quantized vorticity initially confined inside a small region. We find that reconnections fragment the packet into a gas of small vortex loops which fly away. The time scale of the process is in order-of-magnitude agreement with recent experiments performed in 3 He-B

  5. Slow-light vortices in periodic waveguides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sukhorukov, Andrey A.; Ha, Sangwoo; Desyatnikov, Anton S.

    2009-01-01

    We reveal that the reduction of the group velocity of light in periodic waveguides is generically associated with the presence of vortex energy flows. We show that the energy flows are gradually frozen for slow-light at the Brillouin zone edge, whereas vortices persist for slow-light states having...

  6. Interaction of plasma vortices with resonant particles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jovanovic, D.; Pécseli, Hans; Juul Rasmussen, J.

    1990-01-01

    Kinetic effects associated with the electron motion along magnetic field lines in low‐beta plasmas are studied. Using the gyrokinetic description of electrons, a kinetic analog of the reduced magnetohydrodynamic equations is derived, and it is shown that in the strongly nonlinear regime they poss...... particles. The evolution equations indicate the possibility of excitation of plasma vortices by electron beams....

  7. Prometheus Induced Vorticity in Saturn's F Ring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutton, Phil J.; Kusmartsev, Feo V.

    2016-11-01

    Saturn's rings are known to show remarkable real time variability in their structure. Many of which can be associated to interactions with nearby moons and moonlets. Possibly the most interesting and dynamic place in the rings, probably in the whole Solar System, is the F ring. A highly disrupted ring with large asymmetries both radially and azimuthally. Numerically non-zero components to the curl of the velocity vector field (vorticity) in the perturbed area of the F ring post encounter are witnessed, significantly above the background vorticity. Within the perturbed area rich distributions of local rotations is seen located in and around the channel edges. The gravitational scattering of ring particles during the encounter causes a significant elevated curl of the vector field above the background F ring vorticity for the first 1-3 orbital periods post encounter. After 3 orbital periods vorticity reverts quite quickly to near background levels. This new found dynamical vortex life of the ring will be of great interest to planet and planetesimals in proto-planetary disks where vortices and turbulence are suspected of having a significant role in their formation and migrations. Additionally, it is found that the immediate channel edges created by the close passage of Prometheus actually show high radial dispersions in the order 20-50 cm/s, up to a maximum of 1 m/s. This is much greater than the value required by Toomre for a disk to be unstable to the growth of axisymmetric oscillations. However, an area a few hundred km away from the edge shows a more promising location for the growth of coherent objects.

  8. Controlled Manipulation of Individual Vortices in a Superconductor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Straver, E.W.J.

    2010-04-05

    We report controlled local manipulation of single vortices by low temperature magnetic force microscope (MFM) in a thin film of superconducting Nb. We are able to position the vortices in arbitrary configurations and to measure the distribution of local depinning forces. This technique opens up new possibilities for the characterization and use of vortices in superconductors.

  9. Study on flow over finite wing with respect to F-22 raptor, Supermarine Spitfire, F-7 BG aircraft wing and analyze its stability performance and experimental values

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Md. Nesar; Alam, Mahbubul

    2017-06-01

    A finite wing is a three-dimensional body, and consequently the flow over the finite wing is three-dimensional; that is, there is a component of flow in the span wise direction. The physical mechanism for generating lift on the wing is the existence of a high pressure on the bottom surface and a low pressure on the top surface. The net imbalance of the pressure distribution creates the lift. As a by-product of this pressure imbalance, the flow near the wing tips tends to curl around the tips, being forced from the high-pressure region just underneath the tips to the low-pressure region on top. This flow around the wing tips is shown in the front view of the wing. As a result, on the top surface of the wing, there is generally a span wise component of flow from the tip toward the wing root, causing the streamlines over the top surface to bend toward the root. On the bottom surface of the wing, there is generally a span wise component of flow from the root toward the tip, causing the streamlines over the bottom surface to bend toward the tip. Clearly, the flow over the finite wing is three-dimensional, and therefore we would expect the overall aerodynamic properties of such a wing to differ from those of its airfoil sections. The tendency for the flow to "leak" around the wing tips has another important effect on the aerodynamics of the wing. This flow establishes a circulatory motion that trails downstream of the wing; that is, a trailing vortex is created at each wing tip. The aerodynamics of finite wings is analyzed using the classical lifting line model. This simple model allows a closed-form solution that captures most of the physical effects applicable to finite wings. The model is based on the horseshoe-shaped vortex that introduces the concept of a vortex wake and wing tip vortices. The downwash induced by the wake creates an induced drag that did not exist in the two-dimensional analysis. Furthermore, as wingspan is reduced, the wing lift slope decreases

  10. Theoretical aerodynamic characteristics of a family of slender wing-tail-body combinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lomax, Harvard; Byrd, Paul F

    1951-01-01

    The aerodynamic characteristics of an airplane configuration composed of a swept-back, nearly constant chord wing and a triangular tail mounted on a cylindrical body are presented. The analysis is based on the assumption that the free-stream Mach number is near unity or that the configuration is slender. The calculations for the tail are made on the assumption that the vortex system trailing back from the wing is either a sheet lying entirely in the plane of the flat tail surface or has completely "rolled up" into two point vortices that lie either in, above, or below the plane of the tail surface.

  11. Instability analysis and drag coefficient prediction on a swept RAE2822 wing with constant lift coefficient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhenrong JING

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Swept wing is widely used in civil aircraft, whose airfoil is chosen, designed and optimized to increase the cruise speed and decrease the drag coefficient. The parameters of swept wing, such as sweep angle and angle of attack, are determined according to the cruise lift coefficient requirement, and the drag coefficient is expected to be predicted accurately, which involves the instability characteristics and transition position of the flow. The pressure coefficient of the RAE2822 wing with given constant lift coefficient is obtained by solving the three-dimensional Navier-Stokes equation numerically, and then the mean flow is calculated by solving the boundary layer (BL equation with spectral method. The cross-flow instability characteristic of boundary layer of swept wing in the windward and leeward is analyzed by linear stability theory (LST, and the transition position is predicted by eN method. The drag coefficient is numerically predicted by introducing a laminar/turbulent indicator. A simple approach to calculate the lift coefficient of swept wing is proposed. It is found that there is a quantitative relationship between the angle of attack and sweep angle when the lift coefficient keeps constant; when the angle of attack is small, the flow on the leeward of the wing is stable. when the angle of attack is larger than 3°, the flow becomes unstable quickly; with the increase of sweep angle or angle of attack the disturbance on the windward becomes more unstable, leading to the moving forward of the transition position to the leading edge of the wing; the drag coefficient has two significant jumping growth due to the successive occurrence of transition in the windward and the leeward; the optimal range of sweep angle for civil aircraft is suggested.

  12. Kinematics and wing shape across flight speed in the bat, Leptonycteris yerbabuenae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rhea Von Busse

    2012-10-01

    The morphology and kinematics of a flying animal determines the resulting aerodynamic lift through the regulation of the speed of the air moving across the wing, the wing area and the lift coefficient. We studied the detailed three-dimensional wingbeat kinematics of the bat, Leptonycteris yerbabuenae, flying in a wind tunnel over a range of flight speeds (0–7 m/s, to determine how factors affecting the lift production vary across flight speed and within wingbeats. We found that the wing area, the angle of attack and the camber, which are determinants of the lift production, decreased with increasing speed. The camber is controlled by multiple mechanisms along the span, including the deflection of the leg relative to the body, the bending of the fifth digit, the deflection of the leading edge flap and the upward bending of the wing tip. All these measures vary throughout the wing beat suggesting active or aeroelastic control. The downstroke Strouhal number, Std, is kept relatively constant, suggesting that favorable flow characteristics are maintained during the downstroke, across the range of speeds studied. The Std is kept constant through changes in the stroke plane, from a strongly inclined stroke plane at low speeds to a more vertical stroke plane at high speeds. The mean angular velocity of the wing correlates with the aerodynamic performance and shows a minimum at the speed of maximum lift to drag ratio, suggesting a simple way to determine the optimal speed from kinematics alone. Taken together our results show the high degree of adjustments that the bats employ to fine tune the aerodynamics of the wings and the correlation between kinematics and aerodynamic performance.

  13. Airfoil Pitch Control Using Trapped Vorticity Concentrations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brzozowski, Daniel; Culp, John; Glezer, Ari

    2007-11-01

    Closed-loop feedback control of the attitude of a free pitching airfoil is effected without moving control surfaces by alternate actuation of nominally-symmetric trapped vorticity concentrations on the suction and pressure surfaces near the trailing edge. The pitching moment is varied with minimal lift and drag penalties over a broad range of angles of attack when the baseline flow is fully attached. Accumulation (trapping) and regulation of vorticity is managed by integrated hybrid actuators (each comprised of a miniature [O(0.01c)] obstruction and a synthetic jet actuator). In the present work, the model is trimmed using a position feedback loop and a servo motor actuator. Once the model is trimmed, the position feedback loop is opened and the servo motor acts like an inner loop control to alter the model's dynamic characteristics. Position control of the model is achieved using a reference model-based outer loop controller.

  14. Comparison of the leading-edge timing walk in pulsed TOF laser range finding with avalanche bipolar junction transistor (BJT) and metal-oxide-semiconductor (MOS) switch based laser diode drivers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hintikka, Mikko; Hallman, Lauri; Kostamovaara, Juha

    2017-12-01

    Timing walk error in pulsed time-of-flight based laser range finding was studied using two different types of laser diode drivers. The study compares avalanche bipolar junction transistor (BJT) and metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistor switch based laser pulse drivers, both producing 1.35 ns current pulse length (full width at half maximum), and investigates how the slowly rising part of the current pulse of the avalanche BJT based driver affects the leading edge timing walk. The walk error was measured to be very similar with both drivers within an input signal dynamic range of 1:10 000 (receiver bandwidth of 700 MHz) but increased rapidly with the avalanche BJT based driver at higher values of dynamic range. The slowly rising part does not exist in the current pulse produced by the metal-oxide-semiconductor (MOS) based laser driver, and thus the MOS based driver can be utilized in a wider dynamic range.

  15. LOCALIZATION OF POINT VORTICES UNDER CURVATURE PERTURBATIONS

    OpenAIRE

    Roberto, Garra

    2013-01-01

    International audience; We discuss the effect of curvature on the dynamics of a two-dimensional inviscid incompressible fluid with initial vorticity concentrated in N small disjoint regions, that is, the classical point vortex system. We recall some results about point vortex dynamics on simply connected surfaces with constant curvature K, that is, plane, spherical, and hyperbolic surfaces. We show that the effect of curvature can be treated as a smooth perturbation to the Green's function of...

  16. Aerodynamics of wing-assisted incline running in birds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tobalske, Bret W; Dial, Kenneth P

    2007-05-01

    Wing-assisted incline running (WAIR) is a form of locomotion in which a bird flaps its wings to aid its hindlimbs in climbing a slope. WAIR is used for escape in ground birds, and the ontogeny of this behavior in precocial birds has been suggested to represent a model analogous to transitional adaptive states during the evolution of powered avian flight. To begin to reveal the aerodynamics of flap-running, we used digital particle image velocimetry (DPIV) and measured air velocity, vorticity, circulation and added mass in the wake of chukar partridge Alectoris chukar as they engaged in WAIR (incline 65-85 degrees; N=7 birds) and ascending flight (85 degrees, N=2). To estimate lift and impulse, we coupled our DPIV data with three-dimensional wing kinematics from a companion study. The ontogeny of lift production was evaluated using three age classes: baby birds incapable of flight [6-8 days post hatching (d.p.h.)] and volant juveniles (25-28 days) and adults (45+ days). All three age classes of birds, including baby birds with partially emerged, symmetrical wing feathers, generated circulation with their wings and exhibited a wake structure that consisted of discrete vortex rings shed once per downstroke. Impulse of the vortex rings during WAIR was directed 45+/-5 degrees relative to horizontal and 21+/-4 degrees relative to the substrate. Absolute values of circulation in vortex cores and induced velocity increased with increasing age. Normalized circulation was similar among all ages in WAIR but 67% greater in adults during flight compared with flap-running. Estimated lift during WAIR was 6.6% of body weight in babies and between 63 and 86% of body weight in juveniles and adults. During flight, average lift was 110% of body weight. Our results reveal for the first time that lift from the wings, rather than wing inertia or profile drag, is primarily responsible for accelerating the body toward the substrate during WAIR, and that partially developed wings, not yet

  17. WINGS Data Release

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moretti, A.; Poggianti, B. M.; Fasano, G.

    2014-01-01

    Context. To effectively investigate galaxy formation and evolution, it is of paramount importance to exploit homogeneous data for large samples of galaxies in different environments. Aims. The WIde-field Nearby Galaxy-cluster Survey (WINGS) project aim is to evaluate physical properties of galaxies...... in a complete sample of low redshift clusters to be used as reference sample for evolutionary studies. The WINGS survey is still ongoing and the original dataset will be enlarged with new observations. This paper presents the entire collection of WINGS measurements obtained so far. Methods. We decided to make......, and on the cluster redshift, reaching on average 90% at V ≲ 21.7. Near-infrared photometric catalogs for 26 (in K) and 19 (in J) clusters are part of the database and the number of sources is 962 344 in K and 628 813 in J. Here again the completeness depends on the data quality, but it is on average higher than 90...

  18. An aerodynamic model for insect flapping wings in forward flight.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Jong-Seob; Chang, Jo Won; Han, Jae-Hung

    2017-03-31

    This paper proposes a semi-empirical quasi-steady aerodynamic model of a flapping wing in forward flight. A total of 147 individual cases, which consisted of advance ratios J of 0 (hovering), 0.125, 0.25, 0.5, 0.75, 1 and  ∞, and angles of attack α of  -5 to 95° at intervals of 5°, were examined to extract the aerodynamic coefficients. The Polhamus leading-edge suction analogy and power functions were then employed to establish the aerodynamic model. In order to preserve the existing level of simplicity, K P and K V , the correction factors of the potential and vortex force models, were rebuilt as functions of J and α. The estimations were nearly identical to direct force/moment measurements which were obtained from both artificial and practical wingbeat motions of a hawkmoth. The model effectively compensated for the influences of J, particularly showing outstanding moment estimation capabilities. With this model, we found that using a lower value of α during the downstroke would be an effective strategy for generating adequate lift in forward flight. The rotational force and moment components had noticeable portions generating both thrust and counteract pitching moment during pronation. In the upstroke phase, the added mass component played a major role in generating thrust in forward flight. The proposed model would be useful for a better understanding of flight stability, control, and the dynamic characteristics of flapping wing flyers, and for designing flapping-wing micro air vehicles.

  19. Elastically Shaped Wing Optimization and Aircraft Concept for Improved Cruise Efficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Nhan; Trinh, Khanh; Reynolds, Kevin; Kless, James; Aftosmis, Michael; Urnes, James, Sr.; Ippolito, Corey

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents the findings of a study conducted tn 2010 by the NASA Innovation Fund Award project entitled "Elastically Shaped Future Air Vehicle Concept". The study presents three themes in support of meeting national and global aviation challenges of reducing fuel burn for present and future aviation systems. The first theme addresses the drag reduction goal through innovative vehicle configurations via non-planar wing optimization. Two wing candidate concepts have been identified from the wing optimization: a drooped wing shape and an inflected wing shape. The drooped wing shape is a truly biologically inspired wing concept that mimics a seagull wing and could achieve about 5% to 6% drag reduction, which is aerodynamically significant. From a practical perspective, this concept would require new radical changes to the current aircraft development capabilities for new vehicles with futuristic-looking wings such as this concept. The inflected wing concepts could achieve between 3% to 4% drag reduction. While the drag reduction benefit may be less, the inflected-wing concept could have a near-term impact since this concept could be developed within the current aircraft development capabilities. The second theme addresses the drag reduction goal through a new concept of elastic wing shaping control. By aeroelastically tailoring the wing shape with active control to maintain optimal aerodynamics, a significant drag reduction benefit could be realized. A significant reduction in fuel burn for long-range cruise from elastic wing shaping control could be realized. To realize the potential of the elastic wing shaping control concept, the third theme emerges that addresses the drag reduction goal through a new aerodynamic control effector called a variable camber continuous trailing edge flap. Conventional aerodynamic control surfaces are discrete independent surfaces that cause geometric discontinuities at the trailing edge region. These discontinuities promote

  20. A Theoretical Study of Leading Edge Noise

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-05-01

    measurements of the noise radiated from a number of different airfoils made as -part of a companion study at Virginia lech . It was concluded that the...giving, at a distance r from the blade, and at an angle 9 to the direction of the unsteady loading, the sound spectrum as Spp(co)=( cocos &4itrcc) 2SLL

  1. Leading Edge Aeronautics Research for NASA Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The LEARN Project explores the creation of novel concepts and processes with the potential to create new capabilities in aeronautics research through awards to the...

  2. Timing discriminator using leading-edge extrapolation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gottschalk, B.

    1983-01-01

    A discriminator circuit to recover timing information from slow-rising pulses by means of an output trailing edge, a fixed time after the starting corner of the input pulse, which is nearly independent of risetime and threshold setting. This apparatus comprises means for comparing pulses with a threshold voltage; a capacitor to be charged at a certain rate when the input signal is one-third threshold voltage, and at a lower rate when the input signal is two-thirds threshold voltage; current-generating means for charging the capacitor; means for comparing voltage capacitor with a bias voltage; a flipflop to be set when the input pulse reaches threshold voltage and reset when capacitor voltage reaches the bias voltage; and a clamping means for discharging the capacitor when the input signal returns below one-third threshold voltage

  3. WHEN COMPASSION GROWS WINGS

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Nicky

    antiretroviral roll-out in full swing, the. WHEN COMPASSION GROWS WINGS. The free time and expertise given by its deeply committed core of professional volunteers. (including pilots) is the lifeblood of the operation. Red Cross Air Mercy Service volunteer, German national Dr Florian Funk, at the AMS Durban base.

  4. Twisted Winged Endoparasitoids

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 9; Issue 10. Twisted Winged Endoparasitoids - An Enigma for Entomologists. Alpana Mazumdar. General Article Volume 9 Issue 10 October 2004 pp 19-24. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link:

  5. Effects of Coupled Rolling and Pitching Oscillations on Transonic Shock-Induced Vortex-Breakdown Flow of a Delta Wing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kandil, Osama A.; Menzies, Margaret A.

    1996-01-01

    Unsteady, transonic vortex-breakdown flow over a 65 deg. sharp edged, cropped-delta wing of zero thickness undergoing forced coupled pitching and rolling oscillations is investigated computationally. The initial condition of the flow is characterized by a transverse terminating shock which induces of the leading edge vortex cores to breakdown. The computational investigation uses the time-accurate solution of the laminar, unsteady, compressible, full Navier-Stokes equations with the implicit, upwind, Roe flux-difference splitting, finite-volume scheme. The main focus is to analyze the effects of coupled motion on the wing response and vortex-breakdown flow by varying oscillation frequency and phase angle while keeping the maximum pitch and roll amplitude equal.

  6. Flow Control and High-Lift Performance for Flying-Wing Unmanned Combat Air Vehicle Configurations by inserting slots

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    U Ali

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The objectives of the present study on Unmanned Combat Air Vehicles (UCAVs are two-fold: first to control the flow by inserting leading-edge and cross-flow slots and analysing the viscous flow development over the outer panels of a flying-wing configuration to maximise the performance of the elevons control surfaces; second to predict high-lift performance particularly the maximum-lift characteristics. This is demonstrated using a variety of inviscid Vortex Lattice Method (VLM and Euler, and viscous CFD Reynolds Averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS methods. The computational results are validated against experiment measured in a wind tunnel. Two flying-wing planforms are considered based around a generic 40˚ edge-aligned configuration. The VLM predicts a linear variation of lift and pitching moment with incidence angle, and substantially under-predicts the induced drag. Results obtained from RANS and Euler agree well with experiment.

  7. Overview of Low-Speed Aerodynamic Tests on a 5.75% Scale Blended-Wing-Body Twin Jet Configuration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vicroy, Dan D.; Dickey, Eric; Princen, Norman; Beyar, Michael D.

    2016-01-01

    The NASA Environmentally Responsible Aviation (ERA) Project sponsored a series of computational and experimental investigations of the propulsion and airframe integration issues associated with Hybrid-Wing-Body (HWB) or Blended-Wing-Body (BWB) configurations. NASA collaborated with Boeing Research and Technology (BR&T) to conduct this research on a new twin-engine Boeing BWB transport configuration. The experimental investigations involved a series of wind tunnel tests with a 5.75-percent scale model conducted in two low-speed wind tunnels. This testing focused on the basic aerodynamics of the configuration and selection of the leading edge Krueger slat position for takeoff and landing. This paper reviews the results and analysis of these low-speed wind tunnel tests.

  8. Vortices in rotating and stratified flows: aspect ratio and sustainability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Le Gal P.

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available In linear stratifications, vortices have a typical flat shape that appears to be not only a compromise between the rotation and the stratification of the background flow through their Coriolis parameter f and buoyancy frequency hbox{$ar{N}$} N̅ , but also involves the buoyancy frequency Nc within the vortices and their Rossby number Ro. We derive an analytical solution for the self-similar ellipsoidal shape of the vortices and the law for their aspect ratio. From this law, we show that long-lived vortices must necessary be either weakly stratified anticyclones or superstratified cyclones (which is less likely to occur. These predictions are experimentally and numerically verified and agree with published measurements for Jovian vortices and ocean meddies. This approach can be applied to a gaussian stratification to give good insights of the shape of vortices in protoplanetary disks and their sustainability.

  9. Vorticity and Λ polarization in baryon rich matter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baznat, Mircea; Gudima, Konstantin; Prokhorov, George; Sorin, Alexander; Teryaev, Oleg; Zakharov, Valentin

    2018-02-01

    The polarization of Λ hyperons due to axial chiral vortical effect is discussed. The effect is proportional to (strange) chemical potential and is pronounced at lower energies in baryon-rich matter. The polarization of ¯ has the same sihn and larger magnitude. The emergence of vortical structures is observed in kinetic QGSM models. The hydrodynamical helicity separation receives the contribution of longitudinal velocity and vorticity implying the quadrupole structure of the latter. The transition from the quark vortical effects to baryons in confined phase may be achieved by exploring the axial charge. At the hadronic level the polarization corresponds to the cores of quantized vortices in pionic superfluid. The chiral vortical effects may be also studied in the frmework of Wigner function establishing the relation to the thermodynamical approach to polarization.

  10. Stability of relative equilibria of three vortices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aref, Hassan

    2009-01-01

    involved. The only comprehensive analysis available in the literature, by Tavantzis and Ting [Phys. Fluids 31, 1392 (1988)], is not easy to follow nor is it very physically intuitive. The symmetry between the three vortices is lost in this analysis. A different analysis is given based on explicit formulas...... for the three eigenvalues determining the stability, including a new formula for the angular velocity of rotation of a collinear relative equilibrium. A graphical representation of the space of vortex circulations is introduced, and the resultants between various polynomials that enter the problem are used...

  11. Funnel-shaped vortical structures in wall turbulence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaftori, D.; Hetsroni, G.; Banerjee, S.

    1994-01-01

    The structure of the turbulent boundary layer in a horizontal open channel was investigated experimentally by means of laser Doppler anemometry (LDA) and by flow visualization synchronized with the LDA. These experiments indicate that the dominant structures in the wall region are large scale streamwise vortices which originate at the wall and grow and expand into the outer flow region. The shape of the vortices is that of an expanding spiral, wound around a funnel which is laid sideways in the direction of flow. Most of the observations of wall turbulence phenomena made over the years, such as quasistreamwise vortices, ejections, and sweeps seem to be part of these funnel-shaped vortices

  12. On the stability of shear-Alfven vortices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jovanovic, D.; Horton, W.

    1993-08-01

    Linear stability of shear-Alfven vortices is studied analytically using the Lyapunov method. Instability is demonstrated for vortices belonging to the drift mode, which is a generalization of the standard Hasegawa-Mima vortex to the case of large parallel phase velocities. In the case of the convective-cell mode, short perpendicular-wavelength perturbations are stable for a broad class of vortices. Eventually, instability of convective-cell vortices may occur on the perpendicular scale comparable with the vortex size, but it is followed by a simultaneous excitation of coherent structures with better localization than the original vortex

  13. Aerodynamics of flapping insect wing in inclined stroke plane hovering with ground effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gowda v, Krishne; Vengadesan, S.

    2014-11-01

    This work presents the time-varying aerodynamic forces and the unsteady flow structures of flapping insect wing in inclined stroke plane hovering with ground effect. Two-dimensional dragonfly model wing is chosen and the incompressible Navier-Stokes equations are solved numerically by using immersed boundary method. The main objective of the present work is to analyze the ground effect on the unsteady forces and vortical structures for the inclined stroke plane motions. We also investigate the influences of kinematics parameters such as Reynolds number (Re), stroke amplitude, wing rotational timing, for various distances between the airfoil and the ground. The effects of aforementioned parameters together with ground effect, on the stroke averaged force coefficients and regimes of force behavior are similar in both normal (horizontal) and inclined stroke plane motions. However, the evolution of the vortex structures which produces the effects are entirely different.

  14. Method for solving an inverse problem of wing type by using a simple panel method; Kanbenna panel ho ni yoru yokugata gyaku mondai no ichikaiho

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ando, J.; Matsumoto, D.; Maita, S.; Nakatake, K. [Kyushu University, Fukuoka (Japan). Faculty of Engineering

    1997-10-01

    This paper describes one method for solving an inverse problem of wing type based on the source and quasi continuous vortex lattice method (SQCM) in designing marine propellers and underwater wings. With the SQCM, vortices and control points are distributed on wing camber according to the QCM, and wing surface is divided into certain number of panels. This is the method to decide vortex intensity and blow-out intensity simultaneously from the condition that vertical speed on the camber and the wing surface is zero, upon having distributed blow-out with certain intensity inside the panel. The method solves the inverse problem with the following process: specific point distribution is so determined that the targeted velocity on the wing surface is satisfied when wing surface pressure distribution and uniform flow velocity are given; and then the panels are so rearranged as in parallel with direction of the flow on the surface of the wing calculated by using these specific points to derive the targeted wing shape. This paper describes the problem solving procedure in great detail. It also introduces examples of numerical calculations. It shows one method for solving the inverse problem in wing type using the SQCM as a simple panel method, whereas its good convergence and stability were verified. Considerations on effects of free surface and expansion of the method into three-dimensional problems will be implemented in the future. 11 refs., 8 figs.

  15. Making Aircraft Vortices Visible to Radar by Spraying Water into the Wake

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shariff, Karim

    2016-01-01

    Aircraft trailing vortices pose a danger to following aircraft during take-off and landing. This necessitates spacing rules, based on aircraft type, to be enforced during approach in IFR (Instrument Flight Regulations) conditions; this can limit airport capacity. To help choose aircraft spacing based on the actual location and strength of the wake, it is proposed that wake vortices can be detected using conventional precipitation and cloud radars. This is enabled by spraying a small quantity water into the wake from near the wing. The vortex strength is revealed by the doppler velocity of the droplets. In the present work, droplet size distributions produced by nozzles used for aerial spraying are considered. Droplet trajectory and evaporation in the flow-field is numerically calculated for a heavy aircraft, followed by an evaluation of radar reflectivity at 6 nautical miles behind the aircraft. Small droplets evaporate away while larger droplets fall out of the wake. In the humid conditions that typically prevail during IFR, a sufficient number of droplets remain in the wake and give good signal-to-noise ratios (SNR). For conditions of average humidity, higher frequency radars combined with spectral processing gives good SNR.

  16. On vortex loops and filaments: three examples of numerical predictions of flows containing vortices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krause, Egon

    2003-01-01

    Vortex motion plays a dominant role in many flow problems. This article aims at demonstrating some of the characteristic features of vortices with the aid of numerical solutions of the governing equations of fluid mechanics, the Navier-Stokes equations. Their discretized forms will first be reviewed briefly. Thereafter three problems of fluid flow involving vortex loops and filaments are discussed. In the first, the time-dependent motion and the mutual interaction of two colliding vortex rings are discussed, predicted in good agreement with experimental observations. The second example shows how vortex rings are generated, move, and interact with each other during the suction stroke in the cylinder of an automotive engine. The numerical results, validated with experimental data, suggest that vortex rings can be used to influence the spreading of the fuel droplets prior to ignition and reduce the fuel consumption. In the third example, it is shown that vortices can also occur in aerodynamic flows over delta wings at angle of attack as well as pipe flows: of particular interest for technical applications of these flows is the situation in which the vortex cores are destroyed, usually referred to as vortex breakdown or bursting. Although reliable breakdown criteria could not be established as yet, the numerical predictions obtained so far are found to agree well with the few experimental data available in the recent literature.

  17. Energy conserving numerical methods for the computation of complex vortical flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allaneau, Yves

    One of the original goals of this thesis was to develop numerical tools to help with the design of micro air vehicles. Micro Air Vehicles (MAVs) are small flying devices of only a few inches in wing span. Some people consider that as their size becomes smaller and smaller, it would be increasingly more difficult to keep all the classical control surfaces such as the rudders, the ailerons and the usual propellers. Over the years, scientists took inspiration from nature. Birds, by flapping and deforming their wings, are capable of accurate attitude control and are able to generate propulsion. However, the biomimicry design has its own limitations and it is difficult to place a hummingbird in a wind tunnel to study precisely the motion of its wings. Our approach was to use numerical methods to tackle this challenging problem. In order to precisely evaluate the lift and drag generated by the wings, one needs to be able to capture with high fidelity the extremely complex vortical flow produced in the wake. This requires a numerical method that is stable yet not too dissipative, so that the vortices do not get diffused in an unphysical way. We solved this problem by developing a new Discontinuous Galerkin scheme that, in addition to conserving mass, momentum and total energy locally, also preserves kinetic energy globally. This property greatly improves the stability of the simulations, especially in the special case p=0 when the approximation polynomials are taken to be piecewise constant (we recover a finite volume scheme). In addition to needing an adequate numerical scheme, a high fidelity solution requires many degrees of freedom in the computations to represent the flow field. The size of the smallest eddies in the flow is given by the Kolmogoroff scale. Capturing these eddies requires a mesh counting in the order of Re³ cells, where Re is the Reynolds number of the flow. We show that under-resolving the system, to a certain extent, is acceptable. However our

  18. Quantum Vortices and Trajectories in Particle Diffraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delis, N.; Efthymiopoulos, C.; Contopoulos, G.

    2012-09-01

    We investigate the phenomenon of the diffraction of charged particles by thin material targets using the method of the de Broglie-Bohm quantum trajectories. The particle wave function can be modeled as a sum of two terms $\\psi=\\psi_{ingoing}+\\psi_{outgoing}$. A thin separator exists between the domains of prevalence of the ingoing and outgoing wavefunction terms. The structure of the quantum-mechanical currents in the neighborhood of the separator implies the formation of an array of \\emph{quantum vortices}. The flow structure around each vortex displays a characteristic pattern called `nodal point - X point complex'. The X point gives rise to stable and unstable manifolds. We find the scaling laws characterizing a nodal point-X point complex by a local perturbation theory around the nodal point. We then analyze the dynamical role of vortices in the emergence of the diffraction pattern. In particular, we demonstrate the abrupt deflections, along the direction of the unstable manifold, of the quantum trajectories approaching an X-point along its stable manifold. Theoretical results are compared to numerical simulations of quantum trajectories. We finally calculate the {\\it times of flight} of particles following quantum trajectories from the source to detectors placed at various scattering angles $\\theta$, and thereby propose an experimental test of the de Broglie - Bohm formalism.

  19. Effects of outer perturbances on dynamics of wake vortices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baranov, N.A.; Belotserkovsky, A.S.; Turchak, L.I.

    2004-01-01

    One of the problems in aircraft flight safety is reduction of the risk related with aircraft encounter with wake vortices generated by other aircraft. An efficient approach to this problem is design of systems providing information on areas of potential danger of wake vortices to pilots in real time. The main components of such a system are a unit for calculations of wake vortices behind aircraft and a unit for calculations of areas of potential danger. A promising way to development of real time algorithms for calculation of wake vortices is the use of vortex methods in CFD based on the hypothesis of quasi-3D flow in the area of wake vorticity. The mathematical model developed by our team calculates positions and intensity of wake vortices past aircraft taking account of such effects as viscous dissipation of vortices, effects of ambient turbulence, wind shear, as well as viscous interaction between wake vortices and the underlying surface. The necessity of including the last factor could be stems from the fact that in the case where wake vortices are in close proximity of the rigid surface, the viscous interaction between the wake vortices and the surface boundary layer results in the boundary layer separation changing the overall intensity and dynamics of the wake vortices. To evaluate the boundaries of the danger areas the authors use an approach based on calculation of additional aerodynamic forces and moments acting on the aircraft encountering wake vortices by means of evaluation of the aircraft additional velocities and angular rates corresponding to distribution of disturbed velocities on the aircraft surface. These criteria could be based on local characteristics of the vorticity areas or on characteristics related to the perturbation effects on the aircraft. The latter characteristics include the actual aerodynamic roll moment, the maximum angular rate or the maximum roll of the aircraft under perturbations in the wake vortices. To estimate the accuracy

  20. Detection of Mesoscale Vortices and Their Role in Subsequent Convection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paulus, M.

    2011-12-01

    Mid-level mesoscale vortices impact warm-season precipitation by initiating and focusing deep convection. Given their significance to forecasting, it is important to understand mesoscale vortices, their frequency, and their impact on subsequent convection in greater detail. This research was a pilot study to identify such vortices using two separate techniques. Vortices were identified through a subjective visual identification technique that relied mostly on composite radar reflectivity and satellite imagery, as well as through an objective algorithm applied to hourly 20-km Rapid Update Cycle model analyses. Vortices arising within organized convection, called mesoscale convective vortices (MCVs), as well as ones forming in the absence of convection (dry vortices) were identified over the central United States during an active period from 1-10 June 2009. Additionally, MCVs were identified that were responsible for triggering subsequent convection. The results from the subjective and objective methods were compared, and vortex characteristics such as duration were analyzed. The objective algorithm detected more vortices than expected, as well as an approximately equal distribution of dry and convective vortices. Approximately two-thirds of the MCVs detected by the algorithm were also detectable by the subjective, visual method. MCVs that triggered new convection accounted for less than half of all cases, while in general MCVs lasted longer than dry vortices. While extension of this research is necessary in order to apply to a more broad range of MCVs, these results demonstrate the potential of the methodology in identifying these vortices, which will potentially lead to a greater understanding of such systems.

  1. Design optimization of deployable wings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaddam, Pradeep

    Morphing technology is an important aspect of UAV design, particularly in regards to deployable systems. The design of such system has an important impact on the vehicle's performance. The primary focus of the present research work was to determine the most optimum deployable wing design from 3 competing designs and develop one of the deployable wing designs to test in the research facility. A Matlab code was developed to optimize 3 deployable wing concepts inflatable, inflatable telescopic and rigid-folding wings based on a sequential optimization strategy. The constraints that were part of the code include the packaging constraints during its stowed state, fixed length of the deployed section and the minimum L/D constraint. This code resulted in determining the optimum weight of all the 3 designs, the most optimum weight design is the inflatable wing design. This is a result of the flexible skin material and also due to no rigid parts in the deployed wing section. Another goal of the research involved developing an inflatable telescopic wing. The prototype was tested in a wind tunnel, while the actual wing was tested in the altitude chamber to determine the deployment speed, input pressure, analyze and predict the deployment sequence and behavior of the wing at such high wind speeds and altitudes ranging from 60,000 ft to 90,000 ft. Results from these tests allowed us to conclude the deployment sequence of the telescopic wing followed from the root to the tip section. The results were used to analyze the deployment time of the wing. As expected the deployment time decreased with an increase in input pressure. The results also show us that as the altitude increases, the deployment speed of the wing also increased. This was demonstrated when the wing was tested at a maximum altitude pressure of 90,000ft, well above the design altitude of 60,000ft.

  2. Low Aspect-Ratio Wings for Wing-Ships

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Filippone, Antonino; Selig, M.

    1998-01-01

    Flying on ground poses technical and aerodynamical challenges. The requirements for compactness, efficiency, manouverability, off-design operation,open new areas of investigations in the fieldof aerodynamic analysis and design. A review ofthe characteristics of low-aspect ratio wings, in- and out...... of ground, is presented. It is shownthat the performance of such wings is generally inferior to that of slender wings, although in ground placement can yield substantial improvements in the aerodynamic efficiency....

  3. Melt pool vorticity in deep penetration laser material welding

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    In the present study, the vorticity of melt motion in the keyhole and weld pool has been evaluated in case of high power CO2 laser beam welding. The circulation of vorticity is obtained as a function of Reynolds number for a given keyhole volume which is linked to Mach number variation. The shear stress and thermal fluxes ...

  4. The vorticity and angular momentum budgets of Asian summer ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    R. Narasimhan (Krishtel eMaging) 1461 1996 Oct 15 13:05:22

    the transportation by the relative and planetary vorticity components exceeds the generation due to stretching. The effective balancing mechanism is provided by vorticity generation due to sub-grid scale processes. The flux convergence of omega and relative momenta over the monsoon domain is effectively balanced by ...

  5. Dynamics of fractional vortices in long Josephson junctions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gaber, Tobias

    2007-01-01

    In this thesis static and dynamic properties of fractional vortices in long Josephson junctions are investigated. Fractional vortices are circulating supercurrents similar to the well-known Josephson fluxons. Yet, they show the distinguishing property of carrying only a fraction of the magnetic flux quantum. Fractional vortices are interesting non-linear objects. They spontaneously appear and are pinned at the phase discontinuity points of so called 0-κ junctions but can be bend or flipped by external forces like bias currents or magnetic fields. 0-κ junctions and fractional vortices are generalizations of the well-known 0-π junctions and semifluxons, where not only phase jumps of pi but arbitrary values denoted by kappa are considered. By using so-called artificial 0-κ junctions that are based on standard Nb-AlO x -Nb technology the classical dynamics of fractional vortices has been investigated experimentally for the very first time. Here, half-integer zero field steps could be observed. These voltage steps on the junction's current-voltage characteristics correspond to the periodic flipping/hopping of fractional vortices. In addition, the oscillatory eigenmodes of fractional vortices were investigated. In contrast to fluxons fractional vortices have an oscillatory eigenmode with a frequency within the plasma gap. Using resonance spectroscopy the dependence of the eigenmode frequency on the flux carried by the vortex and an applied bias current was determined. (orig.)

  6. Vortices in Bose–Einstein condensates: A review of the ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Since the core of a vortex is a fraction of a micrometer in diameter, it cannot be directly imaged optically. The condensate with vortices is allowed to ballistically expand till the size increases by one order before the vortices are imaged. Surface wave spectroscopy and the change in aspect ratio of a rotating cloud are the other ...

  7. Diffused vorticity approach to the oscillations of a rotating Bose ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The collective modes of a rotating Bose-Einstein condensate confined in an attractive quadratic plus quartic trap are investigated. Assuming the presence of a large number of vortices we apply the diffused vorticity approach to the system. We then use the sum rule technique for the calculation of collective frequencies, ...

  8. Direct observation of rectified motion of vortices by Lorentz microscopy

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    We have investigated the vortex dynamics for the `ratchet' operation in a niobium superconductor via a direct imaging of Lorentz microscopy. We directly observe one-directional selective motion of field-gradient-driven vortices along fabricated channels. This results from the rectification of vortices in a spatially asymmetric ...

  9. Direct observation of rectified motion of vortices by Lorentz microscopy

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. We have investigated the vortex dynamics for the 'ratchet' operation in a niobium superconductor via a direct imaging of Lorentz microscopy. We directly observe one-directional selective motion of field-gradient-driven vortices along fabricated channels. This results from the rectification of vortices in a spatially ...

  10. Gyrofluid potential vorticity equation and turbulent equipartion states

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Jens; Juul Rasmussen, Jens; Naulin, Volker

    2015-01-01

    An equation governing potential vorticity in a magnetized plasmas is derived. The equation is analogous to Ertel's theorem. In the long wave-length limit the potential vorticity equals the ratio of the gyro-frequency plus the E × B- and diamagnetic polarization densities to the particle density. ...

  11. On hairpin vortices in a transitional boundary layer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Uruba Václav

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available In the presented paper the results of experiments on transitional boundary layer are presented. The boundary layer was generated on smooth flat wall with zero pressure gradient forming one side of the channel of rectangular cross section. The hairpin vortices, packets of hairpin vortices, turbulent spots and calmed regions were experimentally investigated using time-resolved PIV technique.

  12. Potential vorticity field in the Bay of Bengal during southwest monsoon

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Murty, V.S.N.; Rao, D.P.

    theta), potential vorticity distribution is complex due to wind and freshwater forcings. The beta -effect dominates the potential vorticity field on 26.9 sigma theta isopycnal. The field of potential vorticity closely follows that of circulation...

  13. Forced Rolling Oscillation of a 65 deg-Delta Wing in Transonic Vortex-Breakdown Flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menzies, Margaret A.; Kandil, Osama A.; Kandil, Hamdy A.

    1996-01-01

    Unsteady, transonic, vortex dominated flow over a 65 deg. sharp-edged, cropped-delta wing of zero thickness undergoing forced rolling oscillations is investigated computationally. The wing angle of attack is 20 deg. and the free stream Mach number and Reynolds number are 0.85 and 3.23 x 10(exp 6), respectively. The initial condition of the flow is characterized by a transverse terminating shock which induces vortex breakdown of the leading edge vortex cores. The computational investigation uses the time accurate solution of the laminar, unsteady, compressible, full Navier-Stokes equations with the implicit, upwind, Roe flux difference splitting, finite-volume scheme. While the maximum roll amplitude is kept constant at 4.0 deg., both Reynolds number and roll frequency are varied covering three cases of forced sinusoidal rolling. First, the Reynolds number is held at 3.23 x 10(exp 6) and the wing is forced to oscillate in roll around the axis of geometric symmetry at a reduced frequency of 2(pi). Second, the Reynolds number is reduced to 0.5 x 10(exp 6) to observe the effects of added viscosity on the vortex breakdown. Third, with the Reynolds number held at 0.5 x 10(exp 6), the roll frequency is reduced to 1(pi) to complete the study.

  14. An Experimental Investigation of Flow past a Wing at high Angles of Attack

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalela, Vipul; Mukherjee, Rinku

    2017-11-01

    The aerodynamic characteristics for post-stall angles of attack past a single and/or multiple 3D wing(s) have been studied using a novel `decambering technique' assuming the flow to be steady. It is expected that the location of separation as well as the strength of the separated flow is unsteady. The objective of this work therefore is to investigate flow at high angles of attack considering unsteady behavior. The numerical technique used for this purpose that accounts for loss in camber due to flow separation is termed as `decambering'. Two linear functions are used to define the `decambering' for the steady case, located at the leading edge and anywhere between 50%-80% chord. Wind tunnel experiments are to be conducted to study the unsteady nature of separated flow using flow visualization techniques. An estimation of the unsteady wake will be of paramount importance. It is expected to get an experimental corroboration for the numerical decambering. A NACA 4415 wing section is being tested for a range of Reynolds numbers. It is observed from the preliminary results that the drag becomes more dominant after increasing the Reynolds number from Re = 0.093 ×106 to Re = 0.128 ×106 resulting a gentle decrease in the lift coefficient, Cl.

  15. Morphing Wings: A Study Using High-Fidelity Aerodynamic Shape Optimization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curiale, Nathanael J.

    With the aviation industry under pressure to reduce fuel consumption, morphing wings have the capacity to improve aircraft performance, thereby making a significant contribution to reversing climate change. Through high-fidelity aerodynamic shape optimization, various forms of morphing wings are assessed for a hypothetical regional-class aircraft. The framework used solves the Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes equations and utilizes a gradient-based optimization algorithm. Baseline geometries are developed through multipoint optimization, where the average drag coefficient is minimized over a range of flight conditions with additional dive constraints. Morphing optimizations are then performed, beginning with these baseline shapes. Five distinct types of morphing are investigated and compared. Overall, a theoretical fully adaptable wing produces roughly a 2% improvement in average performance, whereas trailing-edge morphing with a 27-point multipoint baseline results in just over a 1% improvement in average performance. Trailing-edge morphing proves to be more beneficial than leading-edge morphing, upper-surface morphing, and a conventional flap.

  16. Wind tunnel tests for a flapping wing model with a changeable camber using macro-fiber composite actuators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Dae-Kwan; Han, Jae-Hung; Kwon, Ki-Jung

    2009-01-01

    In the present study, a biomimetic flexible flapping wing was developed on a real ornithopter scale by using macro-fiber composite (MFC) actuators. With the actuators, the maximum camber of the wing can be linearly changed from −2.6% to +4.4% of the maximum chord length. Aerodynamic tests were carried out in a low-speed wind tunnel to investigate the aerodynamic characteristics, particularly the camber effect, the chordwise flexibility effect and the unsteady effect. Although the chordwise wing flexibility reduces the effective angle of attack, the maximum lift coefficient can be increased by the MFC actuators up to 24.4% in a static condition. Note also that the mean values of the perpendicular force coefficient rise to a value of considerably more than 3 in an unsteady aerodynamic flow region. Additionally, particle image velocimetry (PIV) tests were performed in static and dynamic test conditions to validate the flexibility and unsteady effects. The static PIV results confirm that the effective angle of attack is reduced by the coupling of the chordwise flexibility and the aerodynamic force, resulting in a delay in the stall phenomena. In contrast to the quasi-steady flow condition of a relatively high advance ratio, the unsteady aerodynamic effect due to a leading edge vortex can be found along the wing span in a low advance ratio region. The overall results show that the chordwise wing flexibility can produce a positive effect on flapping aerodynamic characteristics in quasi-steady and unsteady flow regions; thus, wing flexibility should be considered in the design of efficient flapping wings

  17. Aerodynamic study on wing and tail small UAV without runways

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soetanto, Maria F.; R., Randy; Alfan M., R.; Dzaldi

    2016-06-01

    This paper consists of the design and analysis of the aerodynamics of the profiles of wing and tail of a Small Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV). UAV is a remote-controlled aircraft that can carry cameras, sensors and even weapons on an area that needed aerial photography or aerial video [1]. The aim of this small UAV is for used in situations where manned flight is considered too risky or difficult, such as fire fighting or surveillance, while the term 'small means the design of this UAV has to be relatively small and portable so that peoples are able to carry it during their operations [CASR Part 101.240: it is a UAV which is has a launch mass greater than 100 grams but less than 100 kilograms] [2]. Computational Fluid Dynamic (CFD) method was used to analyze the fluid flow characteristics around the aerofoil's profiles, such as the lift generation for each angle of attack and longitudinal stability caused by vortex generation on trailing edge. Based on the analysis and calculation process, Clark-Y MOD with aspect ratio, AR = 4.28 and taper ratio, λ = 0.65 was chosen as the wing aerofoil and SD 8020 with AR = 4.8 and λ = 0.5 was chosen as the horizontal tail, while SD 8020 with AR = 1.58 and λ = 0.5 was chosen as the vertical tail. The lift and drag forces generated for wing and tail surfaces can be determined from the Fluent 6.3 simulation. Results showed that until angle of attack of 6 degrees, the formation of flow separation is still going on behind the trailing edge, and the stall condition occurs at 14 degrees angle of attack which is characterized by the occurrence of flow separation at leading edge, with a maximum lift coefficient (Cl) obtained = 1.56. The results of flight tests show that this small UAV has successfully maneuvered to fly, such as take off, some acrobatics when cruising and landing smoothly, which means that the calculation and analysis of aerodynamic aerofoil's profile used on the wing and tail of the Small UAV were able to be validated.

  18. Kinematical Compatibility Conditions for Vorticity Across Shock Waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baty, Roy

    2015-11-01

    This work develops the general kinematical compatibility conditions for vorticity across arbitrary shock waves in compressible, inviscid fluids. The vorticity compatibility conditions are derived from the curl of the momentum equation using singular distributions defined on two-dimensional shock wave surfaces embedded in three-dimensional flow fields. The singular distributions are represented as generalized differential operators concentrated on moving shock wave surfaces. The derivation of the compatibility conditions for vorticity requires the application of second-order generalized derivatives and elementary tensor algebra. The well-known vorticity jump conditions across a shock wave are then shown to follow from the general kinematical compatibility conditions for vorticity by expressing the flow field velocity in vectorial components normal and tangential to a shock surface.

  19. Helical vortices: linear stability analysis and nonlinear dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selçuk, C.; Delbende, I.; Rossi, M.

    2018-02-01

    We numerically investigate, within the context of helical symmetry, the dynamics of a regular array of two or three helical vortices with or without a straight central hub vortex. The Navier–Stokes equations are linearised to study the instabilities of such basic states. For vortices with low pitches, an unstable mode is extracted which corresponds to a displacement mode and growth rates are found to compare well with results valid for an infinite row of point vortices or an infinite alley of vortex rings. For larger pitches, the system is stable with respect to helically symmetric perturbations. In the nonlinear regime, we follow the time-evolution of the above basic states when initially perturbed by the dominant instability mode. For two vortices, sequences of overtaking events, leapfrogging and eventually merging are observed. The transition between such behaviours occurs at a critical ratio involving the core size and the vortex-separation distance. Cases with three helical vortices are also presented.

  20. Shape optimisation and performance analysis of flapping wings

    KAUST Repository

    Ghommem, Mehdi

    2012-09-04

    -averaged thrust, while the average aerodynamic power is increased. Furthermore, increasing the number of variables (i.e., providing the wing shape with greater degrees of spatial freedom) is observed to enable superior designs. To gain a better understanding of the reasons for which the obtained optimised shapes produce efficient flapping flights, the wake pattern and its vorticity strength are examined. This work described in this paper should facilitate better guidance for shape design of engineered flying systems.

  1. Monitoring Wake Vortices for More Efficient Airports

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-01-01

    Wake vortices are generated by all aircraft during flight. The larger the aircraft, the stronger the wake, so the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) separates aircraft to ensure wake turbulence has no effect on approaching aircraft. Currently, though, the time between planes is often larger than it needs to be for the wake to dissipate. This unnecessary gap translates into arrival and departure delays, but since the wakes are invisible, the delays are nearly inevitable. If, however, the separation between aircraft can be reduced safely, then airport capacity can be increased without the high cost of additional runways. Scientists are currently studying these patterns to identify and introduce new procedures and technologies that safely increase airport capacity. NASA, always on the cutting edge of aerospace research, has been contributing knowledge and testing to these endeavors.

  2. Vortices and monopoles in a harmonic trap

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tong, David; Turner, Carl [Department of Applied Mathematics and Theoretical Physics, University of Cambridge, Cambridge, CB3 OWA (United Kingdom)

    2015-12-15

    The Ω-deformation is a harmonic trap, penning certain excitations near the origin in a manner consistent with supersymmetry. Here we explore the dynamics of BPS monopoles and vortices in such a trap. We pay particular attention to monopoles in the Higgs phase, when they are confined to a vortex string. Unusually for BPS solitons, the mass of these confined monopoles is quadratic in the topological charges. We compute an index theorem to determine the number of collective coordinates of confined monopoles. Despite being restricted to move on a line, we find that they have a rich dynamics. As the strength of the trap increases, the number of collective coordinates can change, sometimes with constituent monopoles disappearing, sometimes with new ones emerging.

  3. Vortices in nonuniform upper-hybrid field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davydova, T.A.; Vranjes, J.

    1992-01-01

    The equations describing the interaction of an upper-hybrid pump wave with small low-frequency density perturbations are discussed under assumption that the pump is spatially nonuniform. The conditions for the modulational instability are investigated. Instead of a dispersion relation, describing the growth of perturbations in the case of an uniform pump, in our case of nonuniform pump a differential equation is obtained and from its eigenvalues are found the instability criteria. Taking into account the slow-frequency self-interaction terms some localized solutions similar to dipole vortices are found, but described by analytic functions in all space. It is shown that their characteristic size and speed are determined by the pump intensity and its spatial structure. (au)

  4. Dipole vortices in the Great Australian Bight

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cresswell, George R.; Lund-Hansen, Lars C.; Nielsen, Morten Holtegaard

    2015-01-01

    Shipboard measurements from late 2006 made by the Danish Galathea 3 Expedition and satellite sea surface temperature images revealed a chain of cool and warm mushroom' dipole vortices that mixed warm, salty, oxygen-poor waters on and near the continental shelf of the Great Australian Bight (GAB......) with cooler, fresher, oxygen-rich waters offshore. The alternating jets' flowing into the mushrooms were directed mainly northwards and southwards and differed in temperature by only 1.5 degrees C; however, the salinity difference was as much as 0.5, and therefore quite large. The GAB waters were slightly...... denser than the cooler offshore waters. The field of dipoles evolved and distorted, but appeared to drift westwards at 5km day-1 over two weeks, and one new mushroom carried GAB water southwards at 7km day(-1). Other features encountered between Cape Leeuwin and Tasmania included the Leeuwin Current...

  5. Bilinear Relative Equilibria of Identical Point Vortices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aref, H.; Beelen, Peter; Brøns, Morten

    2012-01-01

    , obtained using Sturm’s comparison theorem, is that if p(z) satisfies the ODE for a given q(z) with its imaginary zeros symmetric relative to the x-axis, then it must have at least n−m+2 simple, real zeros. For m=2 this provides a complete characterization of all zeros, and we study this case in some detail....... In particular, we show that, given q(z)=z 2+η 2, where η is real, there is a unique p(z) of degree n, and a unique value of η 2=A n , such that the zeros of q(z) and p(z) form a relative equilibrium of n+2 point vortices. We show that $A_{n} \\approx\\frac{2}{3}n + \\frac{1}{2}$, as n→∞, where the coefficient of n...

  6. Supersonic vortex breakdown over a delta wing in transonic flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kandil, Hamdy A.; Kandil, Osama A.; Liu, C. H.

    1993-01-01

    The effects of freestream Mach number and angle of attack on the leading-edge vortex breakdown due to the terminating shock on a 65-degree, sharp-edged, cropped delta wing are investigated computationally, using the time-accurate solution of the laminar unsteady compressible full Navier-Stokes equations with the implicit upwind flux-difference splitting, finite-volume scheme. A fine O-H grid consisting of 125 x 85 x 84 points in the wrap-around, normal, and axial directions, respectively, is used for all the flow cases. Keeping the Reynolds number fixed at 3.23 x 10 exp 6, the Mach number is varied from 0.85 to 0.9 and the angle of attack is varied from 20 to 24 deg. The results show that, at 20-deg angle of attack, the increase of the Mach number from 0.85 to 0.9 results in moving the location of the terminating shock downstream. The results also show that, at 0.85 Mach number, the increase of the angle of attack from 20 to 24 deg results in moving the location of the terminating shock upstream. The results are in good agreement with the experimental data.

  7. Vortices and hysteresis in a rotating Bose-Einstein condensate with anharmonic confinement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jackson, A.D.; Kavoulakis, G.M.

    2004-01-01

    Vortices; Bose-Einstein condensation; phase diagrams; phase transformation Udgivelsesdato: 4 August......Vortices; Bose-Einstein condensation; phase diagrams; phase transformation Udgivelsesdato: 4 August...

  8. Aeroelastic Wing Shaping Using Distributed Propulsion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Nhan T. (Inventor); Reynolds, Kevin Wayne (Inventor); Ting, Eric B. (Inventor)

    2017-01-01

    An aircraft has wings configured to twist during flight. Inboard and outboard propulsion devices, such as turbofans or other propulsors, are connected to each wing, and are spaced along the wing span. A flight controller independently controls thrust of the inboard and outboard propulsion devices to significantly change flight dynamics, including changing thrust of outboard propulsion devices to twist the wing, and to differentially apply thrust on each wing to change yaw and other aspects of the aircraft during various stages of a flight mission. One or more generators can be positioned upon the wing to provide power for propulsion devices on the same wing, and on an opposite wing.

  9. Butterflies regulate wing temperatures using radiative cooling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Cheng-Chia; Shi, Norman Nan; Ren, Crystal; Pelaez, Julianne; Bernard, Gary D.; Yu, Nanfang; Pierce, Naomi

    2017-09-01

    Butterfly wings are live organs embedded with multiple sensory neurons and, in some species, with pheromoneproducing cells. The proper function of butterfly wings demands a suitable temperature range, but the wings can overheat quickly in the sun due to their small thermal capacity. We developed an infrared technique to map butterfly wing temperatures and discovered that despite the wings' diverse visible colors, regions of wings that contain live cells are the coolest, resulting from the thickness of the wings and scale nanostructures. We also demonstrated that butterflies use behavioral traits to prevent overheating of their wings.

  10. Stiffness of desiccating insect wings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mengesha, T E; Vallance, R R [Department of Mechanical Engineering, The George Washington University, 738 Phillips Hall, 801 22nd St NW, Washington, DC 20052 (United States); Mittal, R, E-mail: vallance@gwu.edu [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Johns Hopkins University, 126 Latrobe Hall, 3400 N Charles Street, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States)

    2011-03-15

    The stiffness of insect wings is typically determined through experimental measurements. Such experiments are performed on wings removed from insects. However, the wings are subject to desiccation which typically leads to an increase in their stiffness. Although this effect of desiccation is well known, a comprehensive study of the rate of change in stiffness of desiccating insect wings would be a significant aid in planning experiments as well as interpreting data from such experiments. This communication presents a comprehensive experimental analysis of the change in mass and stiffness of gradually desiccating forewings of Painted Lady butterflies (Vanessa cardui). Mass and stiffness of the forewings of five butterflies were simultaneously measured every 10 min over a 24 h period. The averaged results show that wing mass declined exponentially by 21.1% over this time period with a time constant of 9.8 h, while wing stiffness increased linearly by 46.2% at a rate of 23.4 {mu}N mm{sup -1} h{sup -1}. For the forewings of a single butterfly, the experiment was performed over a period of 1 week, and the results show that wing mass declined exponentially by 52.2% with a time constant of 30.2 h until it reached a steady-state level of 2.00 mg, while wing stiffness increased exponentially by 90.7% until it reached a steady-state level of 1.70 mN mm{sup -1}. (communication)

  11. Wingtip Vortices and Free Shear Layer Interaction in the Vicinity of Maximum Lift to Drag Ratio Lift Condition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Memon, Muhammad Omar

    Cost-effective air-travel is something everyone wishes for when it comes to booking flights. The continued and projected increase in commercial air travel advocates for energy efficient airplanes, reduced carbon footprint, and a strong need to accommodate more airplanes into airports. All of these needs are directly affected by the magnitudes of drag these aircraft experience and the nature of their wingtip vortex. A large portion of the aerodynamic drag results from the airflow rolling from the higher pressure side of the wing to the lower pressure side, causing the wingtip vortices. The generation of this particular drag is inevitable however, a more fundamental understanding of the phenomenon could result in applications whose benefits extend much beyond the relatively minuscule benefits of commonly-used winglets. Maximizing airport efficiency calls for shorter intervals between takeoffs and landings. Wingtip vortices can be hazardous for following aircraft that may fly directly through the high-velocity swirls causing upsets at vulnerably low speeds and altitudes. The vortex system in the near wake is typically more complex since strong vortices tend to continue developing throughout the near wake region. Several chord lengths distance downstream of a wing, the so-called fully rolled up wing wake evolves into a combination of a discrete wingtip vortex pair and a free shear layer. Lift induced drag is generated as a byproduct of downwash induced by the wingtip vortices. The parasite drag results from a combination of form/pressure drag and the upper and lower surface boundary layers. These parasite effects amalgamate to create the free shear layer in the wake. While the wingtip vortices embody a large portion of the total drag at lifting angles, flow properties in the free shear layer also reveal their contribution to the aerodynamic efficiency of the aircraft. Since aircraft rarely cruise at maximum aerodynamic efficiency, a better understanding of the balance

  12. A study on forces acting on a flapping wing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cetiner O.

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available In order to study the forces acting on a flapping wing, an experimental investigation is performed in steady water flow. In this study, a SD7003 airfoil undergoes combined pitching and plunging motion which simulates the forward flight of small birds. The frequency of pitching motion is equal to the frequency of plunging motion and pitch leads the plunge by a phase angle of 90 degrees. The experiments are conducted at Reynolds numbers of 2500 ≤ Re ≤ 13700 and the vortex formation is recorded using the digital particle image velocimetry (DPIV technique. A prediction of thrust force and efficiency is calculated from the average wake deficit of DPIV data, the near-wake vorticity patterns and time dependent velocity vectors are determined to comment on the thrust and drag indication. Direct force measurements are attempted using a Force/Torque sensor which is capable of measuring forces and moments in three axial directions.

  13. Image simulations of kinked vortices for transmission electron microscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beleggia, Marco; Pozzi, G.; Tonomura, A.

    2010-01-01

    We present an improved model of kinked vortices in high-Tc superconductors suitable for the interpretation of Fresnel or holographic observations carried out with a transmission electron microscope. A kinked vortex is composed of two displaced half-vortices, perpendicular to the film plane...... observations of high-Tc superconducting films, where the Fresnel contrast associated with some vortices showed a dumbbell like appearance. Here, we show that under suitable conditions the JV segment may reveal itself in Fresnel imaging or holographic phase mapping in a transmission electron microscope....

  14. Lidar investigation of wake vortices generated by a landing aircraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smalikho, Igor N.; Banakh, Viktor A.; Falits, Andrey V.

    2017-11-01

    The results of measurements of parameters of aircraft wake vortices by a Stream Line coherent Doppler lidar during the three-day experiment on the airfield of Tolmachevo Airport are presented. We have analyzed spatial dynamics and evolution of the wake vortices generated by aircrafts of various types: from the Airbus A319 passenger aircraft to the heavy Boeing B747-8 cargo aircraft entering the landing at Tolmachevo Airport. It is shown that the Stream Line lidar may well be used to obtain reliable information about the presence and intensity of aircraft wake vortices in the vicinity of the runway.

  15. Superresolution Imaging of Optical Vortices in a Speckle Pattern

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pascucci, Marco; Tessier, Gilles; Emiliani, Valentina; Guillon, Marc

    2016-03-01

    We characterize, experimentally, the intensity minima of a polarized high numerical aperture optical speckle pattern and the topological charges of the associated optical vortices. The negative of a speckle pattern is imprinted in a uniform fluorescent sample by photobleaching. The remaining fluorescence is imaged with superresolution stimulated emission depletion microscopy, which reveals subdiffraction fluorescence confinement at the center of optical vortices. The intensity statistics of saturated negative speckle patterns are predicted and measured. The charge of optical vortices is determined by controlling the handedness of circular polarization, and the creation or annihilation of a vortex pair along propagation is shown.

  16. Vorticity and particle polarization in heavy ion collisions (experimental perspective)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voloshin, Sergei A.

    2018-02-01

    The recent measurements of the global polarization and vector meson spin alignment along the system orbital momentum in heavy ion collisions are briefly reviewed. A possible connection between the global polarization and the chiral anomalous effects is discussed along with possible experimental checks. Future directions, in particular those aimed on the detailed mapping of the vorticity fields, are outlined. The Blast Wave model is used for an estimate of the anisotropic flow effect on the vorticity component along the beam direction. We also point to a possibility of a circular pattern in the vorticity field in asymmetric, e.g. Cu+Au, central collisions.

  17. Vorticity and particle polarization in heavy ion collisions (experimental perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Voloshin Sergei A.

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The recent measurements of the global polarization and vector meson spin alignment along the system orbital momentum in heavy ion collisions are briefly reviewed. A possible connection between the global polarization and the chiral anomalous effects is discussed along with possible experimental checks. Future directions, in particular those aimed on the detailed mapping of the vorticity fields, are outlined. The Blast Wave model is used for an estimate of the anisotropic flow effect on the vorticity component along the beam direction. We also point to a possibility of a circular pattern in the vorticity field in asymmetric, e.g. Cu+Au, central collisions.

  18. Turbulence investigation of the NASA common research model wing tip vortex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Čantrak Đorđe S.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents high-speed stereo particle image velocimetry investigation of the NASA Common Research Model wing tip vortex. A three-percent scaled semi–span model, without nacelle and pylon, was tested in the 32- by 48-inch Indraft tunnel, at the Fluid Mechanics Laboratory at the NASA Ames Research Center. Turbulence investigation of the wing tip vortex is presented. Measurements of the wing-tip vortex were performed in a vertical cross-stream plane three tip-chords downstream of the wing tip trailing edge with a 2 kHz sampling rate. Experimental data are analyzed in the invariant anisotropy maps for three various angles of attack (0°, 2°, and 4° and the same speed generated in the tunnel (V∞ = 50 m/s. This corresponds to a chord Reynolds number 2.68x105, where the chord length of 3” is considered the characteristic length. The region of interest was x = 220 mm and y = 90 mm. The 20 000 particle image velocimetry samples were acquired at each condition. Velocity fields and turbulence statistics are given for all cases, as well as turbulence structure in the light of the invariant theory. Prediction of the wing tip vortices is still a challenge for the computational fluid dynamics codes due to significant pressure and velocity gradients. [Project of the Serbian Ministry of Education, Science and Technological Development, Grant no. TR 35046

  19. Artificial ice using superconducting vortices (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trastoy Quintela, Juan; Malnou, Maxime; Ulysse, Christian; Bernard, Rozenn; Bergeal, Nicolas; Faini, Giancarlo; Lesueur, Jerome; Briatico, Javier; Villegas, Javier E.

    2016-10-01

    We use magnetic flux quanta (superconducting vortices) on artificial energy landscapes (pinning arrays) to create a new type of artificial ice. This vortex ice shows unusual temperature effects that offer new possibilities in the study of ice systems. We have investigated the matching of the flux lattice to pinning arrays that present geometrical frustration. The pinning arrays are fabricated on YBCO films using masked O+ ion irradiation. The details of the magneto-resistance imply that the flux lattice organizes into a vortex ice. The absence of history-dependent effects suggests that the vortex ice is highly ordered. Due to the technique used for the artificial energy landscape fabrication, we have the ability to change the pinning array geometry using temperature as a control knob. In particular we can switch the geometrical frustration on and off, which opens the door to performing a new type of annealing absent in other artificial ice systems. * Work supported by the French ANR "MASTHER", and the Fundación Barrié (Galicia, Spain)

  20. Potential vorticity dynamics for global scale circulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lu, C.; Schubert, W.

    1994-01-01

    One of the most notable advances in extratropical dynamics this decade has been the understanding of large-scale atmospheric and oceanic processes by using potential vorticity dynamics, the so called open-quotes IPV thinking.close quotes This analysis method has also been successfully extended to some tropical atmospheric circulation systems such as hurricanes and the Hadley circulation. The fundamental idea behind such a dynamic system rests with the fact that PV is a tracer-like quantity since it is conserved (in the absence of friction and diabatic heating) following a fluid particle and carries both significant dynamic and thermodynamic information regarding fluid motion. Thus, the prediction and inversion of PV form the most succinct dynamic view of atmospheric and oceanic motions. Furthermore, PV dynamics provides access to many insightful dynamic analyses such as: Propagation of Rossby waves, barotropic and baroclinic instabilities for shear flows, and wave-mean flow interactions. All these features make IPV analysis a very attractive tool for studying geophysical fluid systems

  1. Equivariant Verlinde Formula from Fivebranes and Vortices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gukov, Sergei; Pei, Du

    2017-10-01

    We study complex Chern-Simons theory on a Seifert manifold M 3 by embedding it into string theory. We show that complex Chern-Simons theory on M 3 is equivalent to a topologically twisted supersymmetric theory and its partition function can be naturally regularized by turning on a mass parameter. We find that the dimensional reduction of this theory to 2d gives the low energy dynamics of vortices in four-dimensional gauge theory, the fact apparently overlooked in the vortex literature. We also generalize the relations between (1) the Verlinde algebra, (2) quantum cohomology of the Grassmannian, (3) Chern-Simons theory on {Σ× S^1} and (4) index of a spin c Dirac operator on the moduli space of flat connections to a new set of relations between (1) the "equivariant Verlinde algebra" for a complex group, (2) the equivariant quantum K-theory of the vortex moduli space, (3) complex Chern-Simons theory on {Σ × S^1} and (4) the equivariant index of a spin c Dirac operator on the moduli space of Higgs bundles.

  2. Why superconducting vortices follow to moving hot sport?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sergeev, Andrei; Michael, Reizer

    Recent experiments reported in Nature Comm. 7, 12801, 2016 show that superconducting vortices follow to the moving hot sport created by a focused laser beam, i.e. vortices move from the cold area to the moving hot area. This behavior is opposite to the vortex motion observed in numerous measurements of the vortex Nernst effect, where vortices always move against the temperature gradient. Taking into account that superconducting magnetization currents do not transfer entropy, we analyze the balance of forces acting on a vortex in stationary and dynamic temperature gradients. We show that the dynamic measurements may be described by a single vortex approximation, while in stationary measurements interaction between vortices is critical. Supported by NRC.

  3. Robust Prediction of High Lift Using Surface Vorticity, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — FlightStream has been developed a fast, accurate, aerodynamic prediction code based on vorticity computations on the surface of an aircraft. The code, though still a...

  4. A numerical study of vorticity-enhanced heat transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiaolin; Alben, Silas

    2012-11-01

    The Glezer lab at Georgia Tech has found that vorticity produced by vibrated reeds can improve heat transfer in electronic hardware. Vortices enhance forced convection by boundary layer separation and thermal mixing in the bulk flow. In this work, we simulate the heat transfer process in a 3-dimensional plate-fin heat sink. We propose a simplified model by considering flow and temperature in a 2-D channel, and extend the model to the third dimension using a 1-D heat fin model. We simulate periodically steady-state solutions. We determine how the global Nusselt number is increased, depending on the vortices' strengths and spacings, in the parameter space of Reynolds and Peclet numbers. We find a surprising spatial oscillation of the local Nusselt number due to the vortices. Support from NSF-DMS grant 1022619 is acknowledged.

  5. Length of the intense vorticity structures in isotropic turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghira, Afonso; Silva, Carlos; Elsinga, Gerrit; Lasef Collaboration

    2017-11-01

    The length scale l of the intense vorticity structures or 'worms' of isotropic turbulence is reassessed using new direct numerical simulations (DNS). The new simulations cover a Reynolds number range from 96 Portuguese Foundation for Science and Technology (FST); PRACE.

  6. Comparing the dynamics of skyrmions and superconducting vortices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olson Reichhardt, C. J.; Lin, S. Z.; Ray, D.; Reichhardt, C.

    2014-08-01

    Vortices in type-II superconductors have attracted enormous attention as ideal systems in which to study nonequilibrium collective phenomena, since the self-ordering of the vortices competes with quenched disorder and thermal effects. Dynamic effects found in vortex systems include depinning, nonequilibrium phase transitions, creep, structural order-disorder transitions, and melting. Understanding vortex dynamics is also important for applications of superconductors which require the vortices either to remain pinned or to move in a controlled fashion. Recently, topological defects called skyrmions have been realized experimentally in chiral magnets. Here we highlight similarities and differences between skyrmion dynamics and vortex dynamics. Many of the previous ideas and experimental setups that have been applied to superconducting vortices can also be used to study skyrmions. We also discuss some of the differences between the two systems, such as the potentially large contribution of the Magnus force in the skyrmion system that can dramatically alter the dynamics and transport properties.

  7. Instanton solutions from Abelian sinh-Gordon and Tzitzeica vortices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Contatto, Felipe; Dorigoni, Daniele

    2015-12-01

    We study the Abelian Higgs vortex solutions to the sinh-Gordon equation and the elliptic Tzitzeica equation. Starting from these particular vortices, we construct solutions to the Taubes equation with higher vortex number, on surfaces with conical singularities. We then, analyse more general properties of vortices on such singular surfaces and propose a method to obtain vortices on conifolds from vortices on surfaces of revolution. We apply our method to construct explicit vortex solutions on the Poincaré disk with a conical singularity in the centre, to which we refer as the "hyperbolic cone". We uplift the Abelian sinh-Gordon and Tzitzeica vortex solutions to four dimensions and construct cylindrically symmetric, self-dual Yang-Mills instantons on a non-self-dual (nor anti-self-dual) 4-dimensional Kähler manifold with non-vanishing scalar curvature. The instantons we construct in this way cannot be obtained via a twistorial approach.

  8. Interaction of Ultrasound with Vortices in Type-II Superconductors

    OpenAIRE

    Sonin, E. B.

    1996-01-01

    The theory of the ultrasound propagation in the mixed state of type-II superconductors is suggested which takes into account the Magnus force on vortices, the anti-Magnus force on ions, and diamagnetism of the mixed state. The acoustic Faraday effect (rotation of polarization of the transverse ultrasonic wave propagating along vortices) is shown to be linear in the Magnus force in any regime of the flux flow for wavelengths used in the ultrasound experiments now. Therefore, in contrast to pre...

  9. Simulating living organisms with populations of point vortices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmieder, R.W.

    1995-07-01

    The author has found that time-averaged images of small populations of point vortices can exhibit motions suggestive of the behavior of individual organisms. As an example, the author shows that collections of point vortices confined in a box and subjected to heating can generate patterns that are broadly similar to interspecies defense in certain sea anemones. It is speculated that other simple dynamical systems can be found to produce similar complex organism-like behavior.

  10. Hybrid Manipulation of Streamwise Vorticity in a Diffuser Boundary Layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gissen, Abraham; Vukasinovic, Bojan; Culp, John; Glezer, Ari

    2010-11-01

    The formation of streamwise vorticity concentrations by exploiting the interaction of surface-mounted passive (micro-vanes) and active (synthetic jets) flow control elements with the cross flow is investigated experimentally in a small-scale serpentine duct at high subsonic speeds (up to M = 0.6). Streamwise vortices can be a key element in the mitigation of the adverse effects on pressure recovery and distortion caused by the naturally occurring secondary flows in embedded propulsion systems with complex inlet geometries. Counter rotating and single-sense vortices are formed using conventional passive micro-vanes and active high-power synthetic jet actuators. Interaction of the flow control elements is examined through a hybrid actuation scheme whereby synthetic jet actuation augments the primary vanes' vortices resulting in dynamic enhancement of their strength. It is shown that such sub-boundary layer individual vortices can merge and evolve into duct-scale vortical structures that counteract the inherent secondary flow and mitigates global flow distortion.

  11. Creation and application of surface plasmon vortices (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Chen-Bin

    2016-09-01

    Optical vortices are waves carrying orbital angular momentum and exhibit helical phase fronts. Helical phase front leads to discontinuous azimuthal phase jumps and the number of phase discontinuities (abrupt phase jumps from-pi to pi) within a 2pi range is referred to as the topological charge of an optical vortex. Optical vortices have been applied in trapping and spinning of microparticles, and recently in free-space data transmission. Generation of optical beams carrying orbital angular momentum has received increasing attentions recently, both in the far-field and in the near-field. Near-field vortices are typically generated through the excitation of surface plasmons (SP). However, the intensity patterns of the SP vortices generated thus far, just like the free-space vortex beams, are all azimuthally symmetrical (annular) since mathematically they conform to the Bessel function. In this talk, I will first introduce our recent progress on spatial shaping the near-field spatial patterns of surface plasmon vortices. Moreover, in all past studies, SP vortices were excited by far-field circularly polarized light. This means the functionality of the SP devices were merely converting the far-field spin angular momentum to orbital angular momentum in the near-field. In the second part, I will focus on the creation of surface plasmon vortex using non-angular momentum excitation. In the last part, the application of surface plasmon vortex for particle trapping and rotation will be presented.

  12. Structural Analysis of a Dragonfly Wing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jongerius, S.R.; Lentink, D.

    2010-01-01

    Dragonfly wings are highly corrugated, which increases the stiffness and strength of the wing significantly, and results in a lightweight structure with good aerodynamic performance. How insect wings carry aerodynamic and inertial loads, and how the resonant frequency of the flapping wings is tuned

  13. Effect of outer wing separation on lift and thrust generation in a flapping wing system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mahardika, Nanang; Viet, Nguyen Quoc; Park, Hoon Cheol

    2011-01-01

    We explore the implementation of wing feather separation and lead-lagging motion to a flapping wing. A biomimetic flapping wing system with separated outer wings is designed and demonstrated. The artificial wing feather separation is implemented in the biomimetic wing by dividing the wing into inner and outer wings. The features of flapping, lead-lagging, and outer wing separation of the flapping wing system are captured by a high-speed camera for evaluation. The performance of the flapping wing system with separated outer wings is compared to that of a flapping wing system with closed outer wings in terms of forward force and downward force production. For a low flapping frequency ranging from 2.47 to 3.90 Hz, the proposed biomimetic flapping wing system shows a higher thrust and lift generation capability as demonstrated by a series of experiments. For 1.6 V application (lower frequency operation), the flapping wing system with separated wings could generate about 56% higher forward force and about 61% less downward force compared to that with closed wings, which is enough to demonstrate larger thrust and lift production capability of the separated outer wings. The experiments show that the outer parts of the separated wings are able to deform, resulting in a smaller amount of drag production during the upstroke, while still producing relatively greater lift and thrust during the downstroke.

  14. Flapping Wing Micro Air Vehicle Wing Manufacture and Force Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-03

    manufacturing techniques have been developed by various universities for research on Flapping Wing Micro Air Vehicles. Minimal attention though is given...collected at 2kHz (www.polytec.com/psv3d). A 0.25V band-limited white noise input signal is input to a Bogen HTA -125 High Performance Amplifier, which...manufacturing techniques have been developed by various universities for research on Flapping Wing Micro Air Vehicles. Minimal attention though is given

  15. Quantum information processing with optical vortices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khoury, Antonio Z. [Universidade Federal Fluminense (UFF), Niteroi, RJ (Brazil)

    2012-07-01

    Full text: In this work we discuss several proposals for quantum information processing using the transverse structure of paraxial beams. Different techniques for production and manipulation of optical vortices have been employed and combined with polarization transformations in order to investigate fundamental properties of quantum entanglement as well as to propose new tools for quantum information processing. As an example, we have recently proposed and demonstrated a controlled NOT (CNOT) gate based on a Michelson interferometer in which the photon polarization is the control bit and the first order transverse mode is the target. The device is based on a single lens design for an astigmatic mode converter that transforms the transverse mode of paraxial optical beams. In analogy with Bell's inequality for two-qubit quantum states, we propose an inequality criterion for the non-separability of the spin-orbit degrees of freedom of a laser beam. A definition of separable and non-separable spin-orbit modes is used in consonance with the one presented in Phys. Rev. Lett. 99, 2007. As the usual Bell's inequality can be violated for entangled two-qubit quantum states, we show both theoretically and experimentally that the proposed spin-orbit inequality criterion can be violated for non-separable modes. The inequality is discussed both in the classical and quantum domains. We propose a polarization to orbital angular momentum teleportation scheme using entangled photon pairs generated by spontaneous parametric down conversion. By making a joint detection of the polarization and angular momentum parity of a single photon, we are able to detect all the Bell-states and perform, in principle, perfect teleportation from a discrete to a continuous system using minimal resources. The proposed protocol implementation demands experimental resources that are currently available in quantum optics laboratories. (author)

  16. Complex Convective Thermal Fluxes and Vorticity Structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redondo, Jose M.; Tellez, Jackson; Sotillos, Laura; Lopez Gonzalez-Nieto, Pilar; Sanchez, Jesus M.; Furmanek, Petr; Diez, Margarita

    2015-04-01

    Local Diffusion and the topological structure of vorticity and velocity fields is measured in the transition from a homogeneous linearly stratified fluid to a cellular or layered structure by means of convective cooling and/or heating[1,2]. Patterns arise by setting up a convective flow generated by an array of Thermoelectric devices (Peltier/Seebeck cells) these are controlled by thermal PID generating a buoyant heat flux [2]. The experiments described here investigate high Prandtl number mixing using brine and fresh water in order to form density interfaces and low Prandtl number mixing with temperature gradients. The set of dimensionless parameters define conditions of numeric and small scale laboratory modeling of environmental flows. Fields of velocity, density and their gradients were computed and visualized [3,4]. When convective heating and cooling takes place the combination of internal waves and buoyant turbulence is much more complicated if the Rayleigh and Reynolds numbers are high in order to study entrainment and mixing. Using ESS and selfsimilarity structures in the velocity and vorticity fieds and intermittency [3,5] that forms in the non-homogeneous flow is related to mixing and stiring. The evolution of the mixing fronts are compared and the topological characteristics of the merging of plumes and jets in different configurations presenting detailed comparison of the evolution of RM and RT, Jets and Plumes in overall mixing. The relation between structure functions, fractal analysis and spectral analysis can be very useful to determine the evolution of scales. Experimental and numerical results on the advance of a mixing or nonmixing front occurring at a density interface due to body forces [6]and gravitational acceleration are analyzed considering the fractal and spectral structure of the fronts like in removable plate experiments for Rayleigh-Taylor flows. The evolution of the turbulent mixing layer and its complex configuration is studied

  17. Research of Morphing Wing Efficiency

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Komarov, Valery

    2004-01-01

    This report results from a contract tasking Samara State Aerospace University (SSAU) as follows: The contractor will develop and investigate aerodynamic and structural weight theories associated with morphing wing technology...

  18. Drag Performance of Twist Morphing MAV Wing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ismail N.I.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Morphing wing is one of latest evolution found on MAV wing. However, due to few design problems such as limited MAV wing size and complicated morphing mechanism, the understanding of its aerodynamic behaviour was not fully explored. In fact, the basic drag distribution induced by a morphing MAV wing is still remained unknown. Thus, present work is carried out to compare the drag performance between a twist morphing wing with membrane and rigid MAV wing design. A quasi-static aeroelastic analysis by using the Ansys-Fluid Structure Interaction (FSI method is utilized in current works to predict the drag performance a twist morphing MAV wing design. Based on the drag pattern study, the results exhibits that the morphing wing has a partial similarities in overall drag pattern with the baseline (membrane and rigid wing. However, based CD analysis, it shows that TM wing induced higher CD magnitude (between 25% to 82% higher than to the baseline wing. In fact, TM wing also induced the largest CD increment (about 20% to 27% among the wings. The visualization on vortex structure revealed that TM wing also produce larger tip vortex structure (compared to baseline wings which presume to promote higher induce drag component and subsequently induce its higher CD performance.

  19. DSMC calculations for the delta wing. [Direct Simulation Monte Carlo method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Celenligil, M. Cevdet; Moss, James N.

    1990-01-01

    Results are reported from three-dimensional direct simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) computations, using a variable-hard-sphere molecular model, of hypersonic flow on a delta wing. The body-fitted grid is made up of deformed hexahedral cells divided into six tetrahedral subcells with well defined triangular faces; the simulation is carried out for 9000 time steps using 150,000 molecules. The uniform freestream conditions include M = 20.2, T = 13.32 K, rho = 0.00001729 kg/cu m, and T(wall) = 620 K, corresponding to lambda = 0.00153 m and Re = 14,000. The results are presented in graphs and briefly discussed. It is found that, as the flow expands supersonically around the leading edge, an attached leeside flow develops around the wing, and the near-surface density distribution has a maximum downstream from the stagnation point. Coefficients calculated include C(H) = 0.067, C(DP) = 0.178, C(DF) = 0.110, C(L) = 0.714, and C(D) = 1.089. The calculations required 56 h of CPU time on the NASA Langley Voyager CRAY-2 supercomputer.

  20. Flapping and fixed wing aerodynamics of low Reynolds number flight vehicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viieru, Dragos

    Lately, micro air vehicles (MAVs), with a maximum dimension of 15 cm and nominal flight speed around 10m/s, have attracted interest from scientific and engineering communities due to their potential to perform desirable flight missions and exhibit unconventional aerodynamics, control, and structural characteristics, compared to larger flight vehicles. Since MAVs operate at a Reynolds number of 105 or lower, the lift-to-drag ratio is noticeably lower than the larger manned flight vehicles. The light weight and low flight speed cause MAVs to be sensitive to wind gusts. The MAV's small overall dimensions result in low aspect ratio wings with strong wing tip vortices that further complicate the aerodynamics of such vehicles. In this work, two vehicle concepts are considered, namely, fixed wings with flexible structure aimed at passive shape control, and flapping wings aimed at enhancing aerodynamic performance using unsteady flow fields. A finite volume, pressure-based Navier-Stokes solver along with moving grid algorithms is employed to simulate the flow field. The coupled fluid-structural dynamics of the flexible wing is treated using a hyperelastic finite element structural model, the above-mentioned fluid solver via the moving grid technique, and the geometric conservation law. Three dimensional aerodynamics around a low aspect ratio wing for both rigid and flexible structures and fluid-structure interactions for flexible structures have been investigated. In the Reynolds numbers range of 7x10 4 to 9x104, the flexible wing exhibits self-initiated vibrations even in steady free-stream, and is found to have a similar performance to the identical rigid wing for modest angles of attack. For flapping wings, efforts are made to improve our understanding of the unsteady fluid physics related to the lift generation mechanism at low Reynolds numbers (75 to 1,700). Alternative moving grid algorithms, capable of handling the large movements of the boundaries (characteristic