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Sample records for wing 7th scott

  1. 7th IAASS Conference

    CERN Document Server

    Rongier, Isabelle

    2015-01-01

    The 7th IAASS Conference, “Space Safety is No Accident” is an invitation to reflect and exchange information on a number of topics in space safety and sustainability of national and international interest. The conference is also a forum to promote mutual understanding, trust and the widest possible international cooperation in such matters. The once exclusive “club” of nations with autonomous sub-orbital and orbital space access capabilities is becoming crowded with fresh and ambitious new entrants. New commercial spaceports are starting operations and others are being built. In the manned spaceflight arena a commercial market is becoming a tangible reality with suborbital spaceflights and government use of commercial services for cargo and crew transportation to orbit. Besides the national ambitions in space, the international cooperation both civil and commercial is also gaining momentum. In the meantime robotic space exploration will accelerate and with it the need to internationally better regulat...

  2. 7th Higgs Hunting 2016

    CERN Document Server

    2016-01-01

    A subject of major importance in fundamental physics is the investigation of the origin of Electroweak Symmetry Breaking. The mechanism of mass generation through the spontaneous breaking of a gauge symmetry is called the Brout-Englert-Higgs mechanism and is associated with the appearance of a physical scalar boson. The discovery announced at CERN on 4th July 2012 by the ATLAS and CMS Collaborations of a boson at a mass close to 125 GeV/c2, compatible with this scalar boson of the Standard Model, the so-called Higgs boson, mainly in γγ, ZZ and WW decay modes, with compatible evidence also found at Fermilab in the bb mode, changed the landscape. This important discovery was acknowledged as decisive for the attribution of the 2013 Nobel Prize in Physics awarded jointly to François Englert and Peter Higgs . This 7th workshop of the "Higgs Hunting" series organized in Paris on August 31 - September 2, 2016 will discuss the developments of LHC run 2 analyses, detailed studies of the new boson and possible de...

  3. 7th International Fermi Symposium

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-10-01

    especially encourage guest investigators worldwide to participate in this symposium to share results and to learn about upcoming opportunities. This meeting will focus on the new scientific investigations and results enabled by Fermi, the mission and instrument characteristics, future opportunities, coordinated observations and analysis techniques. In particular, we also encourage discussion of future prospects/science with Fermi in preparation for the upcoming NASA senior review. Details on the 7th International Fermi Symposium can be found here: https://events.mpe.mpg.de/Fermi2017

  4. 7th Young Researcher Meeting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2017-01-01

    Young Researcher Meeting, Torino 2016 F Agostini, C Antolini, A Avella, G Cattani, R Cuccaro, A Cultrera, M Di Stefano, G Fragione, L Lolli, M Migliaccio, L Pagnanini, E Pessana, F Piacentini, D Pietrobon, E Pusceddu, R Romeo, M Serra, E Simonetto, F Stellato Preface The Young Researcher Meeting (www.yrmr.it) has been established as a forum for students, postdoctoral fellows and young researchers determined to play a proactive role in the scientific progress. Since 2009 we run itinerant yearly meetings to discuss the most recent developments and achievements in Physics, as we are firmly convinced that sharing expertise and experience is the foundation of the research activity. One of the main purposes of the conference is actually to create an international network of young researchers, both experimentalists and theoreticians, and fruitful collaborations across the different branches of Physics. The format we chose is an informal meeting primarily aimed at students and researchers at the beginning of their scientific career, who are encouraged to present their work in brief presentations able to provide genuine engagement of the audience and cross-pollination of ideas. The 7 th edition of the Young Researcher Meeting was held at the Istituto Nazionale di Ricerca Metrologica (INRiM) in Turin, the Italian National Metrology Institute responsible for the national standards of the International System of Units. The conference took place from Monday 24 th to Wednesday 26 th October 2016. This edition gathered 120 participants belonging to universities and research centres from all over the world. The plenary talk sessions covered several areas of pure and applied Physics, and they were complemented by an extremely rich and interactive poster session, which was also extended to the coffee breaks. The programme included a “poster and wine” session on the first evening, a guided tour at the Turin Astrophysical Observatory and a very enjoyable and friendly conference

  5. Scott S Snyder

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Pramana – Journal of Physics. Scott S Snyder. Articles written in Pramana – Journal of Physics. Volume 62 Issue 3 March 2004 pp 565-568 Experimental Particle Physics. Prospects for Higgs search at DØ · Scott S Snyder DØ Collaboration · More Details Abstract Fulltext PDF. The status of the Higgs search ...

  6. 7th International Meshing Roundtable '98

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eldred, T.J.

    1998-10-01

    The goal of the 7th International Meshing Roundtable is to bring together researchers and developers from industry, academia, and government labs in a stimulating, open environment for the exchange of technical information related to the meshing process. In the past, the Roundtable has enjoyed significant participation from each of these groups from a wide variety of countries.

  7. 7th International Conference of Political Economy

    OpenAIRE

    BEKEN, Gülçin

    2016-01-01

    Abstract. In this study, the 7th International Conference of Political Economy in İstanbul was evaluated. This year it  was organized by Marmara University Faculty of Economics and Batman University Faculty of Economics and Administrative Sciences with the cooperation of their international supporters all over the world. These conference series are said to be successful to bring all the scholars, academicians, students, and volunteers who are interested in political economy. Starting from 200...

  8. Citation for Scott Doney

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glover, David M.; Doney, Scott

    “A man of genius makes no mistakes. His errors are volitional and are the portals of discovery. James Joyce, Ulysses (1922). ”After collaborating with Scott Doney for the past 14 years I know what Joyce meant. When working with someone as bright as Scott it inevitably happens that you just don't understand. And because we're trained skeptics the question immediately arises, ”has our friend and colleague made a mistake?“ But we're wrong; we just didn't see the portal through which people like Scott had already proceeded. Certainly this is what we reserve these awards of ‘outstandingness’ for; those whose insight lead through the portals of discovery”.

  9. 7th International Workshop on Natural Computing

    CERN Document Server

    Hagiya, Masami

    2015-01-01

    This book highlights recent advances in natural computing, including biology and its theory, bio-inspired computing, computational aesthetics, computational models and theories, computing with natural media, philosophy of natural computing and educational technology. It presents extended versions of the best papers selected from the symposium “7th International Workshop on Natural Computing” (IWNC7), held in Tokyo, Japan, in 2013. The target audience is not limited to researchers working in natural computing but also those active in biological engineering, fine/media art design, aesthetics and philosophy.

  10. 7th Ambient Assisted Living Congress

    CERN Document Server

    Klausing, Helmut

    2015-01-01

    In this book, leading authors in the field discuss developments of Ambient Assisted Living. The contributions have been chosen and invited at the 7th AAL congress, Berlin. It presents new technological developments which support the autonomy and independence of individuals with special needs. As the technological innovation raises also social issues, the book addresses micro and macro economical aspects of assistive systems and puts an additional emphasis on the ethical and legal discussion. The presentation is supported by real world examples and applications.

  11. Metric Scott analysis

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Ben Yaacov, I.; Doucha, Michal; Nies, A.; Tsankov, T.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 318, October (2017), s. 46-87 ISSN 0001-8708 Institutional support: RVO:67985840 Keywords : continuous logic * infinitary logic * Scott sentence Subject RIV: BA - General Mathematics OBOR OECD: Pure mathematics Impact factor: 1.373, year: 2016 http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0001870816309896?via%3Dihub

  12. 7th IEEE International Conference Intelligent Systems

    CERN Document Server

    Atanassov, KT; Doukovska, L; Hadjiski, M; Jotsov, V; Kacprzyk, J; Kasabov, N; Sotirov, S; Szmidt, E; Zadrożny, S; Filev, D; Jabłkowski, J; Kacprzyk, J; Krawczak, M; Popchev, I; Rutkowski, L; Sgurev, V; Sotirova, E; Szynkarczyk, P

    2015-01-01

    This two volume set of books constitutes the proceedings of the 2014  7th IEEE International Conference Intelligent Systems (IS), or IEEE IS’2014 for short, held on September 24‐26, 2014 in Warsaw, Poland. Moreover, it contains some selected papers from the collocated IWIFSGN'2014-Thirteenth International Workshop on Intuitionistic Fuzzy Sets and Generalized Nets.The conference was organized by the Systems Research Institute, Polish Academy of Sciences, Department IV of Engineering Sciences, Polish Academy of Sciences, and Industrial Institute of Automation and Measurements - PIAP.The papers included in the two proceedings volumes have been subject to a thorough review process by three highly qualified peer reviewers.Comments and suggestions from them have considerable helped improve the quality of the papers but also the division of the volumes into parts, and assignment of the papers to the best suited parts.  

  13. 7th Workshop on Complex Networks

    CERN Document Server

    Gonçalves, Bruno; Menezes, Ronaldo; Sinatra, Roberta

    2016-01-01

    The last decades have seen the emergence of Complex Networks as the language with which a wide range of complex phenomena in fields as diverse as Physics, Computer Science, and Medicine (to name just a few) can be properly described and understood. This book provides a view of the state of the art in this dynamic field and covers topics ranging from network controllability, social structure, online behavior, recommendation systems, and network structure. This book includes the peer-reviewed list of works presented at the 7th Workshop on Complex Networks CompleNet 2016 which was hosted by the Université de Bourgogne, France, from March 23-25, 2016. The 28 carefully reviewed and selected contributions in this book address many topics related to complex networks and have been organized in seven major groups: (1) Theory of Complex Networks, (2) Multilayer networks, (3) Controllability of networks, (4) Algorithms for networks, (5) Community detection, (6) Dynamics and spreading phenomena on networks, (7) Applicat...

  14. In retrospect. 7th workshop RCA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knappik, Reinhard

    2013-01-01

    The 7th Workshop RCA with 27 lectures and 12 poster presentation took place on 10 and 11 June 2013 in Dresden-Rossendorf. The traditional German event brought over 90 participants together from Germany, Austria, France, Switzerland and the Netherlands. This time the workshop put forward a special subject for the first time ('Obstacles and pitfalls when characterising waste packages'). A remarkable range of contributions was presented, which demonstrated the diversity and the problems of this subject matter. Medium to low radioactive waste and their final disposal was discussed. Other topics were the upcoming approval of recycling materials according to paragraph 29 StrlSchV as well as those from NORM (Naturally Occurring Radioactive Materials) regarding radionuclide analytics, the range of matrices to be processed and the practical problems this causes. Although the radiological feature was the central focus, other material aspects were dealt with, above all the approval of recycling materials when nuclear power plants are dismantled, but also in research institutes, which is demanding more and more attention. The lectures by Jessica Riemer (GSI Darmstadt) on the topic 'Waste material management of a research centre with heavy ion accelerators' and Elvira Mesalic (TU Munich) on 'Determining the activity inventory of bituminized old wastes' as well as the poster by Sina Brockmann on the 'Locally resolved analysis or uranium species using a couple systems of CLSM and LIFS' were awarded prizes for being outstanding presentations. (orig.)

  15. 7th european metallurgical conference EMC 2013

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Srećko R. Stopić

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available From June 23 – 26, 2013, the GDMB Society for Mining, Metallurgy, Resource and Environmental Technology organized 7th European Metallurgical Conference (EMC 2013 in Weimar, Germany. The previous European metallurgical conferences were organized by  the GDMB in Friedrichshafen (2001, Hanover (2003, Leipzig (2005, Duesseldorf (2007, Innsbruck (2009, and Duesseldorf (2011. The GDMB is a non-profit organization from Clausthal, Germany,,focused on combining science with practical experience in metallurgy, mining, materials engineering, mineral processing, recycling and refining of metals, and  manufacturing of semi- and finishing products. The European Metallurgical conference EMC is one of the most well-known conferences worldwide in the field of non-ferrous metallurgy and is attended regularly by decision makers from industry and universities. The scientific program contained 6 plenary lectures and more than 130 presentations. An extensive poster exhibition was held, during which the authors had an opportunity to introduce their posters to the entire plenum as a part of a brief presentation., The € 500 worth “Poster Award EMC 2011 was awarded to Christoph Pichler from the Montan-University in Leoben, Austria. Not only the most important European countries were represented here, but also more than one third of the lecturers were from countries outside Europe (Canada, Japan, China, USA, South Africa, Australia. The origin of the participants reflects the aim of the organizers: to make this conference a worldwide platform for the scientific exchange of experience and information. The scientific presentations of the conference are presented in Proceedings: Vol. 1: Copper, Precious Metals, Waste effluents Treatment/ Biohydrometallurgical applications; Process Metallurgy, Bridging Non-Ferrous and Ferrous Metallurgy; Vol. 2: Lead and Zinc, Light metals, Sustainable technologies, Sustainable of non-ferrous metals production, Process Control

  16. European Commission - 7th Framework Programme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fiorini, G.L.; Vasile, A.

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → Core safety optimisation through a set of reactivity feedback coefficients allowing to cope with accidental transients. → Reactor optimisation by exploring innovative options for intermediate circuits and steam generators. → Reactor behaviour under accidental conditions including severe accidents to improve the robustness. → Waste management options having both characteristics of efficiency and economics viability. → Promoting European young human resources skills on sodium fast reactors by means of dedicated workshops and doctoral dissertations. - Abstract: Fast Reactors have a unique capability as sustainable energy source; the closed fuel cycle allows significantly improving the usage of natural resources and the minimisation of volume and heat load of high-level waste. Among the fast reactor systems, the sodium-cooled fast reactor has the most comprehensive technological basis, thanks to the experience gained internationally from operating experimental, prototype and commercial size reactors. The paper summarizes the key characteristics of the four years large Collaborative Project on European Sodium Fast Reactor (CP ESFR - 2009-2012); the CP ESFR follows the 6th FP project named 'Roadmap for a European Innovative SOdium cooled FAst Reactor - EISOFAR' further identifying, organizing and implementing a significant part of the needed R and D effort. The CP ESFR merges the contribution of 25 European partners; it is performed under the aegis of the 7th FP under the Area - Advanced Nuclear Systems with a refund from the European Commission of 5.8 M Euro (11.55 M Euro total budget). It is a key component of the European Sustainable Nuclear Energy Technology Platform (SNE TP) and its Strategic Research Agenda (SRA). The inputs for the project are the key research goals for fourth generation of European sodium cooled fast reactors which can be summarized as follows: an improved safety with in particular the achievement of a robust architecture

  17. Highlights from the 7th European Meeting on Molecular Diagnostics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dr. A.J.C. van den Brule, van den; Drs A.J.M. Loonen; Dr. R. Schuurman

    2012-01-01

    This report presents the highlights of the 7th European Meeting on Molecular Diagnostics held in Scheveningen, The Hague, The Netherlands, 12-14 October 2011. The areas covered included molecular diagnostics applications in medical microbiology, virology, pathology, hemato-oncology,clinical genetics

  18. Proceedings of the 7th simulation science symposium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2004-07-01

    The 7th Simulation Science Symposium was held October 16-17, 2003 at National Institute for Fusion Science, aiming at creating interactions between diversified research areas in the Simulation Science. Researchers from a variety of fields presented recent results and stimulating cross-cutting discussions have been made. (author)

  19. Concept Mapping Improves Metacomprehension Accuracy among 7th Graders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redford, Joshua S.; Thiede, Keith W.; Wiley, Jennifer; Griffin, Thomas D.

    2012-01-01

    Two experiments explored concept map construction as a useful intervention to improve metacomprehension accuracy among 7th grade students. In the first experiment, metacomprehension was marginally better for a concept mapping group than for a rereading group. In the second experiment, metacomprehension accuracy was significantly greater for a…

  20. Blanco White and Walter Scott Blanco white y Walter Scott

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernando DURÁN LÓPEZ

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The first edition of Ivanhoe; a romance. By the author of Waverley was published in Edinburgh in 1820. From the beginning of year 1823, José María Blanco White translated several excerpts from Ivanhoe in the numbers 1-3 of the magazine Variedades, owned by the publisher Rudolph Ackermann. in these articles and other later writings, the translator praised Scott as a model for a new way of painting history in a narrative. This paper studies his ideas on Scott’s historical novel, as well as his translation technique, compared with that of José Joaquín de Mora. En 1820 se publicó en Edimburgo la primera edición de Ivanhoe; a romance. By the author of Waverley. Desde comienzos de 1823, en los tres primeros números de su revista Variedades, promovida por el editor Rudolph Ackermann, José María Blanco White tradujo varios fragmentos de Ivanhoe entre grandes elogios. Asimismo, Blanco White tomó a Scott como modelo de referencia de una nueva manera de pintar la historia por medio de la novela en otros varios escritos críticos de años posteriores. El artículo estudia las ideas de Blanco White acerca de la novela histórica de Scott y su técnica como traductor, comparada con la de José Joaquín Mora.

  1. Collaborations Between Scott and Skidmore

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alicia Robinson

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available This essay examines the collaboration between architect and designer George Gilbert Scott and metalworker Francis Skidmore. It compares their metalwork screens at the cathedrals of Hereford, Lichfield, and Salisbury—projects which sometimes overlapped and were all completed in the relatively short time span between 1861 and 1870—within the wider context of Skidmore’s career. While Scott was lauded in his lifetime and has been much studied since, Skidmore has not often been written about, despite having achieved an impressive scale and pace of work in British cathedrals, parish churches, and town halls. This essay therefore shines particular light on Skidmore’s work as designer and maker, and particularly the high profile commissions for these great cathedrals, restored and enhanced with the aesthetics and ambition of the Victorian era.

  2. 7th Annual CMMI Technology Conference Volume 3 Thursday Presentations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-11-15

    Banking, Insurance • Assessed at CMM level 4, Certified to ISO 9001, 27001 . Currently under compliance review of SoX, processes aligned to CMMI level 3...and ISO 9001-2000, Mr. Mark Scott, Harris Corporation Formal Process Definition with Industry Standards, Mr. Chris Armstrong, Armstrong Process...implementation of CMMI, agile software development methods, ISO and six-sigma. She is the author of Change on Demand: The Science of Turbo Charging Change in

  3. Scott Brothers Windows and Doors Information Sheet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott Brothers Windows and Doors (the Company) is located in Bridgeville, Pennsylvania. The settlement involves renovation activities conducted at property constructed prior to 1978, located in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania.

  4. 7th WACBE World Congress on Bioengineering 2015

    CERN Document Server

    Lim, Chwee

    2015-01-01

    This volume publishes the proceedings of the WACBE World Congress on Bioengineering 2015 (WACBE 2015), which was be held in Singapore, from 6 to 8 July 2015. The World Association for Chinese Biomedical Engineers (WACBE) organizes this World Congress biannually. Our past congresses have brought together many biomedical engineers from over the world to share their experiences and views on the future development of biomedical engineering. The 7th WACBE World Congress on Bioengineering 2015 in Singapore continued to offer such a networking platform for all biomedical engineers. Hosted by the Biomedical Engineering Society (Singapore) and the Department of Biomedical Engineering, National University of Singapore, the congress covered all related areas in bioengineering.

  5. 7th iTi Conference in Turbulence

    CERN Document Server

    Talamelli, Alessandro; Oberlack, Martin; Peinke, Joachim

    2017-01-01

    This volume collects the edited and reviewed contribution presented in the 7th iTi Conference in Bertinoro, covering fundamental and applied aspects in turbulence. In the spirit of the iTi conference, the volume is produced after the conference so that the authors had the opportunity to incorporate comments and discussions raised during the meeting. In the present book, the contributions have been structured according to the topics: I Theory II Wall bounded flows III Pipe flow IV Modelling V Experiments VII Miscellaneous topics.

  6. State prisons are covered by ADA, 7th Circuit rules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1997-07-25

    Prison inmate [name removed] sued the Indiana Department of Corrections, claiming it violated the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) by denying him access to education programs, the library, and the dining hall because he is blind. The 7th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals rejected the district court's decision to dismiss the case based on the grounds that the ADA does not apply to prison inmates. The court held that the Department of Corrections cannot exclude an inmate with a disability from prison programs unless the accommodation caused an undue burden on the system.

  7. Knudsen effects in a Scott effect experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wells, C. W.; Wood, L. T.; Hildebrandt, A. F.

    1973-01-01

    A thermal torque sometimes observed in Scott effect measurements has been studied experimentally and an explanation for the thermal torque proposed. The magnitude of the thermal torque can be comparable to the Scott torque depending on geometrical and thermal anisotropies. The thermal torque is predicted to decrease with application of an axial magnetic field.

  8. The 7 th framework program of the EU

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gonzalez, E. M.; Serrano, J. A.

    2007-01-01

    The framework Program is the principal community initiative for fostering and supporting R and D in the European Union. its main goal is to improve competitiveness by fundamentally financing research, technological development, demonstration and innovation activities through transnational collaboration between research institutes and firms belong to both the European Union countries and States affiliated as third countries. In addition, it provides financial support to enhancement and coordination of European research infrastructures, promotion and training of research personnel, basic research and, particularly as of the current 7th Framework Program, coordination of national R and D programs and impllementation of European technology platforms (PTEs), which have been conveived to promote strategic research agendas in key sectors with the cooperation of all the involved players. In the wake of the PTEs, different national platforms have been implemented at the national level which are very active in different sectors. (Authors)

  9. 7th China Conference on Wireless Sensor Networks

    CERN Document Server

    Cui, Li; Guo, Zhongwen

    2014-01-01

    Advanced Technologies in Ad Hoc and Sensor Networks collects selected papers from the 7th China Conference on Wireless Sensor Networks (CWSN2013) held in Qingdao, October 17-19, 2013. The book features state-of-the-art studies on Sensor Networks in China with the theme of “Advances in wireless sensor networks of China”. The selected works can help promote development of sensor network technology towards interconnectivity, resource sharing, flexibility and high efficiency. Researchers and engineers in the field of sensor networks can benefit from the book. Xue Wang is a professor at Tsinghua University; Li Cui is a professor at Institute of Computing Technology, Chinese Academy of Sciences; Zhongwen Guo is a professor at Ocean University of China.

  10. 7th Workshop on Cyclostationary Systems And Their Applications

    CERN Document Server

    Leskow, Jacek; Napolitano, Antonio; Zimroz, Radoslaw; Wylomanska, Agnieszka; Dudek, Anna

    2015-01-01

    This book reports on the latest advances in the analysis of non-stationary signals, with special emphasis on cyclostationary systems. It includes cutting-edge contributions presented at the 7th Workshop on “Cyclostationary Systems and Their Applications,” which was held in Gródek nad Dunajcem, Poland, in February 2014. The book covers both the theoretical properties of cyclostationary models and processes, including estimation problems for systems exhibiting cyclostationary properties, and several applications of cyclostationary systems, including case studies on gears and bearings, and methods for implementing cyclostationary processes for damage assessment in condition-based maintenance operations. It addresses the needs of students, researchers and professionals in the broad fields of engineering, mathematics and physics, with a special focus on those studying or working with nonstationary and/or cyclostationary processes.  

  11. 7th ECCOMAS Thematic Conference on Smart Structures and Materials

    CERN Document Server

    Soares, Carlos

    2017-01-01

    This work was compiled with expanded and reviewed contributions from the 7th ECCOMAS Thematic Conference on Smart Structures and Materials, that was held from 3 to 6 June 2015 at Ponta Delgada, Azores, Portugal. The Conference provided a comprehensive forum for discussing the current state of the art in the field as well as generating inspiration for future ideas specifically on a multidisciplinary level. The scope of the Conference included topics related to the following areas: Fundamentals of smart materials and structures; Modeling/formulation and characterization of smart actuators, sensors and smart material systems; Trends and developments in diverse areas such as material science including composite materials, intelligent hydrogels, interfacial phenomena, phase boundaries and boundary layers of phase boundaries, control, micro- and nano-systems, electronics, etc. to be considered for smart systems; Comparative evaluation of different smart actuators and sensors; Analysis of structural concepts and des...

  12. Abnormal increase of cosmic ray on August 7th, 1972

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kodama, Masahiro; Murakami, Kazuaki; Wada, Masami

    1974-01-01

    The abnormal increase of cosmic ray on Aug. 7th particularly the dependence of its starting time on local time was studied. Cosmic ray increased twice before and after the greatest Forbush decrease in history on August 4th and 7th, 1972. This study is a trial to estimate the anisotropic flow of solar cosmic ray from the time difference time at different places. Further, the past instance of 23 ground-level events were statistically restudied, and the relationship between the time of generation of solar cosmic ray and the time of transmission to the earth was investigated. A list is given regarding the solar cosmic ray of more than 10 9 eV which occurred since the observation had started. The list shows definite three groups. Attention is paid to the transmission time of F type which is considered to have the most simplest transmission mechanism. The dispersion of the transmission time is large regarding flare-starting time and peak wave intensity time, but is small regarding solar wave-starting time, but the dependence on the longitude is systematic. After all, cosmic ray is accelerated after 10 minutes since solar electric wave has started, and arrives at the earth most early in the case of a flare occurred at the root of garden force line toward the earth. In conclusion, the method of studying the difference of the starting time of abnormal increase according to local time may be an effective means for examining in the characteristics of anisotropic flow of solar cosmic ray. (Iwakiri, K.)

  13. Genetics Home Reference: Aarskog-Scott syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... A characteristic of X-linked inheritance is that fathers cannot pass X-linked traits to their sons. Evidence suggests that Aarskog-Scott syndrome is inherited in an autosomal dominant or autosomal recessive pattern in some families, although ...

  14. 7th Italian Forum on Ambient Assisted Living

    CERN Document Server

    Marletta, Vincenzo; Monteriù, Andrea; Siciliano, Pietro

    2017-01-01

    This book documents the state of the art in the field of ambient assisted living (AAL), highlighting the impressive potential of novel methodologies and technologies to enhance well-being and promote active ageing. The coverage is wide ranging, with sections on assistive devices, elderly people monitoring, home rehabilitation, ICT solutions for AAL, living with chronic conditions, robotic assistance for the elderly, sensing technologies for AAL, and smart housing. The book comprises a selection of the best papers presented at the 7th Italian Forum on Ambient Assisted Living (ForitAAL 2016), which was held in Pisa, Italy, in June 2016 and brought together end users, technology teams, and policy makers to develop a consensus on how to improve provision for elderly and impaired people. Readers will find that the expert contributions offer clear insights into the ways in which the most recent exciti ng advances may be expected to assist in addressing the needs of the elderly and those with chronic conditions.

  15. 7th World Congress on Engineering Asset Management

    CERN Document Server

    Choi, Byeongkuen; Ma, Lin; Mathew, Joseph

    2015-01-01

    These proceedings comprise 60 refereed papers of the Seventh World Congress on Engineering Asset Management (WCEAM) that was held in Deajeon City, Korea from 8-9 October 2012. The material is a compilation of state-of-the-art papers in the field covering a comprehensive range of subjects that are equally relevant to business managers and engineering professionals alike. Proceedings of the 7th World Congress on Engineering Asset Management (WCEAM 2012): Towards Integration and Interoperability in EAM covers a wide range of topics in the discipline of engineering asset management, including: ·         strategic asset management ·         condition monitoring and diagnostics ·         integrated intelligent maintenance ·         sensors and devices ·         information quality & management; ·         sustainability in asset management ·         asset performance and knowledge management ·         data mining and AI techniques in asset m...

  16. 7th International Conference on Genetic and Evolutionary Computing

    CERN Document Server

    Krömer, Pavel; Snášel, Václav

    2014-01-01

    Genetic and Evolutionary Computing This volume of Advances in Intelligent Systems and Computing contains accepted papers presented at ICGEC 2013, the 7th International Conference on Genetic and Evolutionary Computing. The conference this year was technically co-sponsored by The Waseda University in Japan, Kaohsiung University of Applied Science in Taiwan, and VSB-Technical University of Ostrava. ICGEC 2013 was held in Prague, Czech Republic. Prague is one of the most beautiful cities in the world whose magical atmosphere has been shaped over ten centuries. Places of the greatest tourist interest are on the Royal Route running from the Powder Tower through Celetna Street to Old Town Square, then across Charles Bridge through the Lesser Town up to the Hradcany Castle. One should not miss the Jewish Town, and the National Gallery with its fine collection of Czech Gothic art, collection of old European art, and a beautiful collection of French art. The conference was intended as an international forum for the res...

  17. Proceedings of 7th short conference on neutron radiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hiraoka, Eiichi; Katsurayama, Kousuke; Tsujimoto, Tadashi

    1986-10-01

    The first short period conference on neutron radiography was held in 1970, and now the 7th meeting was held. The works to develop neutron radiography in Japan are as active as those in western countries, and the research is in progress by using neutrons from reactors, radioisotopes and accelerators in order to achieve the technology of high standard. In this conference, 26 papers and six comments were presented, and the themes covered the equipment for radiography, the practical application, and the related research. The second World Conference on Neutron Radiography will be held in Paris in June, 1986, and the further promotion of the spread of neutron radiography can be expected. The proceedings of the conference is published with the hope that joint effort and information exchange are further enhanced in coming years to develop the neutron radiography in Japan. The neutron radiography using the Kinki University reactor, the Rikkyo Triga-2 reactor, the Musashi reactor, the Kyoto research reactor, a 3MV Van de Graaff accelerator in Toyota, a subcompact cyclotron in Sumitomo, a baby cyclotron-dual collimator in National Space Development Agency and so on, Cf-252 based thermal neutron radiography, CT with Sb-124/Be neutrons, pulse power neutron source, imaging converters, neutron radiographic image processing, computed tomography using neutron television systems and others are reported. (Kako, I.)

  18. Profile of mathematics anxiety of 7th graders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Udil, Patrisius Afrisno; Kusmayadi, Tri Atmojo; Riyadi

    2017-08-01

    Mathematics anxiety is one of the important factors affect students mathematics achievement. This present research investigates profile of students' mathematics anxiety. This research focuses on analysis and description of students' mathematics anxiety level generally and its dominant domain and aspect. Qualitative research with case study strategy was used in this research. Subject in this research involved 15 students of 7th grade chosen with purposive sampling. Data in this research were students' mathematics anxiety scale result, interview record, and observation result during both mathematics learning activity and test. They were asked to complete mathematics anxiety scale before interviewed and observed. The results show that generally students' mathematics anxiety was identified in the moderate level. In addition, students' mathematics anxiety during mathematics test was identified in the high level, but it was in the moderate level during mathematics learning process. Based on the anxiety domain, students have a high mathematics anxiety on cognitive domain, while it was in the moderate level for psychological and physiological domains. On the other hand, it was identified in low level for psychological domain during mathematics learning process. Therefore, it can be concluded that students have serious and high anxiety regarding mathematics on the cognitive domain and mathematics test aspect.

  19. ASK Talks with W. Scott Cameron

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cameron, W. Scott

    2002-01-01

    This paper presents an interview with Scott Cameron who is the Capital Systems Manager for the Food and Beverage Global Business Unit of Procter and Gamble. He has been managing capital projects and mentoring other project managers for the past 20 years at Procter and Gamble within its Beauty Care, Health Care, Food and Beverage, and Fabric and Home Care Businesses. Scott also has been an Academy Sharing Knowledge (ASK) feature writer since Volume One.

  20. 7th IGRSM International Remote Sensing & GIS Conference and Exhibition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shariff, Abdul Rashid Mohamed

    2014-06-01

    IGRSM This proceedings consists of the peer-reviewed papers from the 7th IGRSM International Conference and Exhibition on Remote Sensing & GIS (IGRSM 2014), which was held on 21-22 April 2014 at Berjaya Times Square Hotel, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia. The conference, with the theme Geospatial Innovation for Nation Building was aimed at disseminating knowledge, and sharing expertise and experiences in geospatial sciences in all aspects of applications. It also aimed to build linkages between local and international professionals in this field with industries. Highlights of the conference included: Officiation by Y B Datuk Dr Abu Bakar bin Mohamad Diah, Deputy Minister of Minister of Science, Technology & Innovation Keynote presentations by: Associate Professor Dr Francis Harvey, Chair of the Geographic Information Science Commission at the International Geographical Union (IGU) and Director of U-Spatial, University of Minnesota, US: The Next Age of Discovery and a Future in a Post-GIS World. Professor Dr Naoshi Kondo, Bio-Sensing Engineering, University of Kyoto, Japan: Mobile Fruit Grading Machine for Precision Agriculture. Datuk Ir Hj Ahmad Jamalluddin bin Shaaban, Director-General, National Hydraulic Research Institute of Malaysia (NAHRIM), Malaysia: Remote Sensing & GIS in Climate Change Analyses. Oral and poster presentations from 69 speakers, from both Malaysia (35) and abroad (34), covering areas of water resources management, urban sprawl & social mobility, agriculture, land use/cover mapping, infrastructure planning, disaster management, technology trends, environmental monitoring, atmospheric/temperature monitoring, and space applications for the environment. Post-conference workshops on: Space Applications for Environment (SAFE), which was be organised by the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA) Global Positioning System (GPS) Receiver Evaluation Using GPS Simulation, which was be organised by the Science & Technology Research Institute for Defence

  1. 7th International k0-Users' Workshop

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borut Smodis

    2018-01-01

    Complete text of publication follows. The k 0 method of neutron activation analysis (k 0 -NAA) has become a well-established analytical tool for elemental analysis of various samples since its introduction in mid-1970s. To strengthen its development, applications and use, a series of regular workshops dedicated to this particular analytical method has been introduced twenty-five years ago, held in Astene, Belgium (1992); Ljubljana, Slovenia (1996); Bruges, Belgium (2001); Funchal, Portugal (2005); Belo Horizonte, Brazil (2009) and Budapest, Hungary (2013). The 7th k 0 -Users' Workshop was held at Hotel Novotel Montreal Centre, Canada, 3-8 September 2017. The meeting was organized by Polytechnique Montreal in cooperation with the International Atomic Energy Agency. Twenty-seven participants from 16 different countries (Australia, Austria, Belgium, Brazil, Canada, Czech Republic, Egypt, Germany, Hungary, Italy, Jamaica, Peru, Slovenia, the Netherlands, Turkey, Vietnam) from all five continents discussed the latest developments and applications of k 0 -NAA. Thirty-three papers were presented in the following sessions: Fundamentals of k 0 -NAA, Nuclear Data, Neutron Flux Parameters, k 0 -NAA Methodology, Validation of k 0 -NAA, Facilities, Automatization, and k 0 -NAA Methodology and PGAA. The talks included presentations by two Keynote Speakers and one Honorary Speaker. During the workshop, scientific visits were paid to the SLOWPOKE NAA Laboratory and Thermal Hydraulics Laboratory of the Polytechnique Montreal. The upcoming 12 papers in this issue of the Journal of Radioanalytical and Nuclear Chemistry were selected to be published from the workshop. The next, 8th k 0 -Users' Workshop is expected to be held in Ljubljana, Slovenia in 2021.

  2. PREFACE: 7th EEIGM International Conference on Advanced Materials Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joffe, Roberts

    2013-12-01

    The 7th EEIGM Conference on Advanced Materials Research (AMR 2013) was held at Luleå University of Technology on the 21-22 March 2013 in Luleå, SWEDEN. This conference is intended as a meeting place for researchers involved in the EEIGM programme, in the 'Erasmus Mundus' Advanced Materials Science and Engineering Master programme (AMASE) and the 'Erasmus Mundus' Doctoral Programme in Materials Science and Engineering (DocMASE). This is great opportunity to present their on-going research in the various fields of Materials Science and Engineering, exchange ideas, strengthen co-operation as well as establish new contacts. More than 60 participants representing six countries attended the meeting, in total 26 oral talks and 19 posters were presented during two days. This issue of IOP Conference Series: Materials Science and Engineering presents a selection of articles from EEIGM-7 conference. Following tradition from previous EEIGM conferences, it represents the interdisciplinary nature of Materials Science and Engineering. The papers presented in this issue deal not only with basic research but also with applied problems of materials science. The presented topics include theoretical and experimental investigations on polymer composite materials (synthetic and bio-based), metallic materials and ceramics, as well as nano-materials of different kind. Special thanks should be directed to the senior staff of Division of Materials Science at LTU who agreed to review submitted papers and thus ensured high scientific level of content of this collection of papers. The following colleagues participated in the review process: Professor Lennart Walström, Professor Roberts Joffe, Professor Janis Varna, Associate Professor Marta-Lena Antti, Dr Esa Vuorinen, Professor Aji Mathew, Professor Alexander Soldatov, Dr Andrejs Purpurs, Dr Yvonne Aitomäki, Dr Robert Pederson. Roberts Joffe October 2013, Luleå Conference photograph EEIGM7 conference participants, 22 March 2013 The PDF

  3. Avian Wings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Tianshu; Kuykendoll, K.; Rhew, R.; Jones, S.

    2004-01-01

    This paper describes the avian wing geometry (Seagull, Merganser, Teal and Owl) extracted from non-contact surface measurements using a three-dimensional laser scanner. The geometric quantities, including the camber line and thickness distribution of airfoil, wing planform, chord distribution, and twist distribution, are given in convenient analytical expressions. Thus, the avian wing surfaces can be generated and the wing kinematics can be simulated. The aerodynamic characteristics of avian airfoils in steady inviscid flows are briefly discussed. The avian wing kinematics is recovered from videos of three level-flying birds (Crane, Seagull and Goose) based on a two-jointed arm model. A flapping seagull wing in the 3D physical space is re-constructed from the extracted wing geometry and kinematics.

  4. Association of Grade Configuration with School Climate for 7th and 8th Grade Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malone, Marisa; Cornell, Dewey; Shukla, Kathan

    2017-01-01

    Educational authorities have questioned whether middle schools provide the best school climate for 7th and 8th grade students, and proposed that other grade configurations such as K-8th grade schools may provide a better learning environment. The purpose of this study was to compare 7th and 8th grade students' perceptions of 4 key features of…

  5. Sir Charles Scott Sherrington (1857–1952)

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Twentieth century bore witness to remarkable scientists whohave advanced our understanding of the brain. Among them,Sir Charles Scott Sherrington's ideas about the way in whichthe central nervous system operates has continuing relevanceeven today. He received honorary doctorates from twentytwouniversities and ...

  6. Thinking Visually: An Interview with Scott Bennett.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gamble, Harriet

    2002-01-01

    Presents an interview with Scott Bennett, an artist of abstract art and traditional craft. Focuses on issues such as the role of art in his life, how his art has developed over time, and his process of creating his works of art. Includes directions for a glazing project. (CMK)

  7. Generalization of the Moszkovski-Scott method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balbutsev, E.B.

    1976-01-01

    A constant separation parameter is proposed to be used in the Moszkovski-Scott method for solving the Bethe-Goldstone equation. After such a modification one can apply the method to odd states of relative motion, not only to even ones. Some essential inaccuracies of the original method are eliminated, as well

  8. Interview met professor Joan Wallach Scott

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bijl, Greetje; Tijhoff, Esmeralda

    2012-01-01

    Joan Scott, professor at the School of Social Science in the Institute for Avanced Study in Princeton, New Jersey (USA), was the keynote speaker at the conference 'Uitsluitend emancipatie' in de Beurs van Berlage in Amsterdam in October 2012. An interview on gender, history, feminism and her book

  9. Reframing Michael Scott: Exploring Inappropriate Workplace Communication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaefer, Zachary A.

    2010-01-01

    Individuals who work in professional settings interact with others who may exhibit a variety of cultural beliefs and decision-making approaches. Page (2007) argues that cognitive diversity (i.e., how people approach and attempt to solve problems) is a vital asset in effective organizations. Michael Scott, who portrays the inept main character on…

  10. Sir Charles Scott Sherrington (1857–1952)

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2016-08-26

    Aug 26, 2016 ... Twentieth century bore witness to remarkable scientists whohave advanced our understanding of the brain. Among them,Sir Charles Scott Sherrington's ideas about the way in whichthe central nervous system operates has continuing relevanceeven today. He received honorary doctorates from ...

  11. Astronaut Scott Parazynski during egress training

    Science.gov (United States)

    1994-01-01

    Astronaut Scott E. Parazynski looks at fellow STS-66 mission specialist Joseph R. Tanner, (foreground) during a rehearsal of procedures to be followed during the launch and entry phases of their scheduled November 1994 flight. This rehearsal, held in the crew compartment trainer (CCT) of JSC's Shuttle mockup and integration laboratory, was followed by a training session on emergency egress procedures.

  12. A Fixed-Wing Aircraft Simulation Tool for Improving the efficiency of DoD Acquisition

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-10-05

    simulation tool , CREATETM-AV Helios [12-14], a high fidelity rotary wing vehicle simulation tool , and CREATETM-AV DaVinci [15-16], a conceptual through...05/2015 Oct 2008-Sep 2015 A Fixed-Wing Aircraft Simulation Tool for Improving the Efficiency of DoD Acquisition Scott A. Morton and David R...multi-disciplinary fixed-wing virtual aircraft simulation tool incorporating aerodynamics, structural dynamics, kinematics, and kinetics. Kestrel allows

  13. Contributions to the 7th International Conference on plasma surface interactions in controlled fusion devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-01-01

    The report contains three papers presented in the 7th International Conference on plasma surface interactions in controlled fusion devices held in Princeton (USA) 5-9 May 1986, all referred to the FT Tokamak

  14. STS-100 Crew Interview: Scott Parazynski

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-01-01

    STS-100 Mission Specialist Scott Parazynski is seen being interviewed. He answers questions about his inspiration to become an astronaut and his career path. He gives details on the mission's goals and significance, the rendezvous and docking of Endeavour with the International Space Station (ISS), the mission's spacewalks, and installation and capabilities of the Space Station robotic arm, UHF antenna, and Rafaello Logistics Module. Parazynski then discusses his views about space exploration as it becomes an international collaboration.

  15. Generative complexity of Gray-Scott model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adamatzky, Andrew

    2018-03-01

    In the Gray-Scott reaction-diffusion system one reactant is constantly fed in the system, another reactant is reproduced by consuming the supplied reactant and also converted to an inert product. The rate of feeding one reactant in the system and the rate of removing another reactant from the system determine configurations of concentration profiles: stripes, spots, waves. We calculate the generative complexity-a morphological complexity of concentration profiles grown from a point-wise perturbation of the medium-of the Gray-Scott system for a range of the feeding and removal rates. The morphological complexity is evaluated using Shannon entropy, Simpson diversity, approximation of Lempel-Ziv complexity, and expressivity (Shannon entropy divided by space-filling). We analyse behaviour of the systems with highest values of the generative morphological complexity and show that the Gray-Scott systems expressing highest levels of the complexity are composed of the wave-fragments (similar to wave-fragments in sub-excitable media) and travelling localisations (similar to quasi-dissipative solitons and gliders in Conway's Game of Life).

  16. STS-106 Crew Interviews: Scott D. Altman

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000-01-01

    Live footage of a preflight interview with Pilot Scott D. Altman is seen. The interview addresses many different questions including why Altman became a pilot, the events that led to his interest, his career path through the Navy, and then finally, his selection by NASA as an astronaut. Other interesting information discussed in this one-on-one interview was his work on the movie set of "Top Gun," the highlights of his Navy career, and possible shorter time frame turnarounds for missions. Altman also mentions the scheduled docking with the new International Space Station (ISS) after the arrival of the Zvezda Service Module.

  17. STS-105 Crew Interview: Scott Horowitz

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-01-01

    STS-105 Commander Scott Horowitz is seen during a prelaunch interview. He answers questions about his inspiration to become an astronaut, his career path, training for the mission, and his role in the mission's activities. He gives details on the mission's goals, which include the transfer of supplies from the Discovery Orbiter to the International Space Station (ISS) and the change-over of the Expedition 2 and Expedition 3 crews (the resident crews of ISS). Horowitz discusses the importance of the ISS in the future of human spaceflight.

  18. STS-82 Pilot Scott Horowitz at SLF

    Science.gov (United States)

    1997-01-01

    STS-82 Pilot Scott J. 'Doc' Horowitz flashes a wide grin for photographers after he lands his T-38 jet at KSCs Shuttle Landing Facility. Horowitz and the other six members of the STS-82 crew came from their home base at Johnson Space Center in Houston, TX, to spend the last few days before launch at KSC. STS-82 is scheduled for liftoff on Feb. 11 during a 65-minute launch window which opens at 3:56 a.m. EST. The 10-day flight aboard the Space Shuttle Discovery will be the second Hubble Space Telescope servicing mission.

  19. STS-103 Crew Interviews: Scott Kelly

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999-01-01

    Live footage of a preflight interview with Pilot Scott J. Kelly is seen. The interview addresses many different questions including why Kelly became an astronaut, the events that led to his interest, any role models that he had, and his inspiration. Other interesting information that this one-on-one interview discusses is an explanation of the why this required mission to service the Hubble Space Telescope must take place at such an early date, replacement of the gyroscopes, transistors, and computers. Also discussed are the Chandra X Ray Astrophysics Facility, and a brief touch on Kelly's responsibility during any of the given four space walks scheduled for this mission.

  20. Assessment of an Engineering Technology Outreach Program for 4th-7th Grade Girls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dell, Elizabeth M.; Christman, Jeanne; Garrick, Robert D.

    2011-01-01

    This paper describes a workshop led by female Engineering Technology students, with support from female faculty, to provide an introduction to Engineering Technology to 4th-7th grade girls through a series of interactive laboratory experiments. This outreach program was developed to improve attitudes towards science and engineering in middle…

  1. Physical activity levels and motor skills of 5 th to 7 th grade students ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The physical activity (PA) and motor skill levels (MS) (flexibility, balance, speed, sit-up, hand grip strength, standing long jump) were determined for 5th to 7th grade students from central schools in Nigde Province, Turkey according to age and gender and to investigate the relationships. PAL was determined by means of ...

  2. The Contribution of Morphological Knowledge to 7th Grade Students' Reading Comprehension Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mokhtari, Kouider; Neel, Joanna; Matatall, Abbey; Richards, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    In this study, we examined the role of morphology, an important yet largely understudied source of difficulty, in reading ability among 7th grade students in one junior high school in the southwestern United States. We sought to find out how much variance in reading ability is accounted for by these students' morphological knowledge, and whether…

  3. Editorial: Papers from the 7th International Conference on Dendrochronology - Cultural Diversity, Environmental Variability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Margaret S. Devall; Elaine K. Sutherland

    2008-01-01

    The 7th International Conference on Dendrochronology - Cultural Diversity, Environmental Variability was held in Beijing, China from 11 to 17 June 2006. The conference was organized and hosted by the Institute of Botany, Chinese Academy of Sciences (IB_CAS) in conjunction with the International Union of Forest Research Organizations (IUFRO) Working Group 5.01.07 (Tree-...

  4. 7th Class Students' Opinions on Sun, Earth and Moon System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aydin, Suleyman

    2017-01-01

    This study is conducted to detect the students' perceptions on Sun, Moon and Earth (SME) system and define the 7th grade students' attitudes on the subject. In the study, since it was aimed to detect and evaluate the students' perceptions on some basic astronomical concepts without changing the natural conditions, a descriptive approach was…

  5. Proceedings of 7th Symposium of the Croatian Radiation Protection Association

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barisic, D; Grahek, Z; Krajcar Bronic, I; Miljanic, S

    2008-07-01

    The 7th symposium of the Croatian Radiation Protection Association discussed the following topics: general topics; radiation dosimetry and instrumentation; biological effects of radiation; radiation protection in medicine; radioecology and radon. For each subject many investigations, experiments, examples and results are presented. International character of this symposium shows importance of these topics not only in region but world wide.

  6. Proceedings of 7th Symposium of the Croatian Radiation Protection Association

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barisic, D.; Grahek, Z.; Krajcar Bronic, I.; Miljanic, S.

    2008-01-01

    The 7th symposium of the Croatian Radiation Protection Association discussed the following topics: general topics; radiation dosimetry and instrumentation; biological effects of radiation; radiation protection in medicine; radioecology and radon. For each subject many investigations, experiments, examples and results are presented. International character of this symposium shows importance of these topics not only in region but world wide

  7. STS-101 Crew Interview / Scott Horowitz

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000-01-01

    Live footage of a preflight interview with Pilot Scott J. Horowitz is seen. The interview addresses many different questions including why Horowitz became an astronaut, the events that led to his interest, any role models that he had, and his inspiration. Other interesting information that this one-on-one interview discusses is the reaction and reasons for the splitting-up of the objectives for STS-101 with STS-106. Horowitz also mentions the scheduled space-walk, docking with the International Space Station (ISS), the new glass cockpit of Atlantis, the repairs of equipment and change of the batteries. Horowitz also discusses his responsibilities during the space-walk, and docking of the spacecraft. He stresses that he will have an added challenge during the space-walk, his inability to see where he needs to place the Extravehicular Activities (EVA) crew.

  8. Mission Specialist Scott Parazynski arrives at KSC

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998-01-01

    STS-95 Mission Specialist Scott E. Parazynski notes the time on his watch upon his late arrival aboard a T-38 jet at the Shuttle Landing Facility. Parazynski's first plane experienced problems at the stop at Tyndall AFB and he had to wait for another jet and pilot to finish the flight to KSC. He joined other crewmembers Mission Commander Curtis L. Brown Jr., Pilot Steven W. Lindsey, Mission Specialist Stephen K. Robinson, Payload Specialist John H. Glenn Jr., senator from Ohio, Mission Specialist Pedro Duque, with the European Space Agency (ESA), and Payload Specialist Chiaki Mukai, with the National Space Development Agency of Japan (NASDA), for final pre-launch preparations. STS-95 is expected to launch at 2 p.m. EST on Oct. 29, last 8 days, 21 hours and 49 minutes, and land at 11:49 a.m. EST on Nov. 7.

  9. Modeling of Teaching 5th-7th-Grade Boys Physical Exercises

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Т. Г. Абдулхалікова

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The research objective is to determine the effectiveness of orthogonal variants of teaching 5th-7th graders physical exercises. Materials and methods. The participants in the research were boys of the 5th grade (n = 32, 6th grade (n = 40, 7th grade (n = 52. To achieve the tasks set, the research used the following methods: analysis of scientific and methodological literature; pedagogical testing, pedagogical observation, timing of educational tasks; pedagogical experiment, medical and biological research methods; methods of mathematical statistics, methods of mathematical experiment planning. In order to achieve the objective set, the research has studied the effect of different variants of the educational process structure, namely: the number of repetitions (х1 and rest intervals (х2 when learning the technique of performing physical exercises. The research has conducted a complete factor experiment of type 22. According to the experiment plan, the 5th-7th graders were divided into training groups. In total, there were 12 experimental groups organized. Research results. The analysis of the regression equations shows that the teaching of physical exercises to the 5th-7th-grade boys is mostly influenced by rest intervals between repetitions (х2. The number of repetitions (х1 has somewhat less influence. The interaction of these factors is insignificant when teaching physical exercises and becomes much more influential only when teaching a switch leg pull-over exercise (х1х2. Conclusions. To increase the effectiveness of teaching 5th-7th graders physical exercises, it is necessary to shorten rest intervals between repetition to 60 s and to reduce the number of repetitions to six. When teaching boys the switch leg pull-over exercise, rest intervals should be increased to 120 s and the number of repetitions — to twelve.

  10. Listening in the Silences for Fred Newton Scott

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mastrangelo, Lisa

    2009-01-01

    As part of her recent sabbatical, the author proposed going to the University of Michigan Bentley Archives to do research on Fred Newton Scott, founder and chair of the Department of Rhetoric and teacher from 1889 to 1926 at the University of Michigan. Scott ran the only graduate program in rhetoric and composition in the country between those…

  11. Philip Glass, Scott Walker ja Sigur Ros! / Immo Mihkelson

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Mihkelson, Immo, 1959-

    2007-01-01

    Pimedate Ööde 11. filmifestivali muusikafilme - Austraalia "Glass: Philipi portree 12 osas" (rež. Scott Hicks), Islandi "Sigur Ros kodus" (rež. Dean DeBois), Suurbritannia "Scott Walker: 30 Century Man" (rež. Stephen Kijak)

  12. World health day - 7th april, 2004 "road safety is no accident"

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S C Saxena

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available In 1948, the First World Health Assembly called for the creation of a "World Health Day". Since 1950, World Health Day has been celebrated on the 7th of April of each year. The objective of World Health Day is to raise global awareness of a specific health theme to highlight a priority area of concern for the World Health Organization (WHO. The Day serves as a launch for a long-term advocacy program for which activities will be undertaken and resources provided well beyond 7th April. To Celebrate the theme of this year "Road Safety is No accident", on 7th April 2004 around the globle, hundreds of organizations hosted events to help raise awareness about road traffic injuries, their grave consequences and enormous casts to society. They also contributed to spreading the message that such injuries can be prevented. In 1948, the First World Health Assembly called for the creation of a "World Health Day". Since 1950, World Health Day has been celebrated on the 7th of April of each year. The objective of World Health Day is to raise global awareness of a specific health theme to highlight a priority area of concern for the World Health Organization (WHO. The Day serves as a launch for a long-term advocacy program for which activities will be undertaken and resources provided well beyond 7th April. To Celebrate the theme of this year "Road Safety is No accident", on 7th April 2004 around the globle, hundreds of organizations hosted events to help raise awareness about road traffic injuries, their grave consequences and enormous casts to society. They also contributed to spreading the message that such injuries can be prevented. The accident is defined as unexpected, unplanned event envolving injury, disability or death. The accidents occur in almost all countries. The most alarming fact is that accidents kill more young trained adults between 15-24 years of age group of males, mainly among two wheelers. All sorts of accidents kill more than 5 million

  13. World health day - 7th april, 2004 "road safety is no accident"

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S C Saxena

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available In 1948, the First World Health Assembly called for the creation of a "World Health Day". Since 1950, World Health Day has been celebrated on the 7th of April of each year. The objective of World Health Day is to raise global awareness of a specific health theme to highlight a priority area of concern for the World Health Organization (WHO. The Day serves as a launch for a long-term advocacy program for which activities will be undertaken and resources provided well beyond 7th April.To Celebrate the theme of this year "Road Safety is No accident", on 7th April 2004 around the globle, hundreds of organizations hosted events to help raise awareness about road traffic injuries, their grave consequences and enormous casts to society. They alsocontributed to spreading the message that such injuries can be prevented.In 1948, the First World Health Assembly called for the creation of a "World Health Day". Since 1950, World Health Day has been celebrated on the 7th of April of each year. The objective of World Health Day is to raise global awareness of a specific health theme to highlight a priority area of concern for the World Health Organization (WHO. The Day serves as a launch for a long-term advocacy program for which activities will be undertaken and resources provided well beyond 7th April.To Celebrate the theme of this year "Road Safety is No accident", on 7th April 2004 around the globle, hundreds of organizations hosted events to help raise awareness about road traffic injuries, their grave consequences and enormous casts to society. They alsocontributed to spreading the message that such injuries can be prevented.t '            ■The accident is defined as unexpected, unplanned event envolving injury, disability or death. The accidents occur in almost all countries. The most alarming fact is that accidents kill more young trained adults between 15-24 years of age group of males, mainly among two wheelers. All sorts of accidents

  14. [Review of WHO Expert Committee on Leprosy 8th report, --comparison to 7th report].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitajima, Shinichi; En, Junichiro; Kitajima, Shiori; Barua, Sumana; Goto, Masamichi

    2014-03-01

    In 2012 the WHO Expert Committee on Leprosy published its 8th report, 14 years after the publication of its 7th report in 1998. This report, the first since the leprosy reduction goal was met in 2000, highlights key points such as improvements in the quality of various services available to patients and the efforts of individuals and societies, in addition to medical progress in diagnosis and treatment. This review will mainly describe the changes made since the 7th report. Some of the main modifications are the deletion of single lesion paucibacillary type, elongated treatment of patients with high bacterial indices, the introduction of promising new drugs, and a shift from reducing the statistical number of patients to a new target for disability prevention.

  15. Multi-locus variable number tandem repeat analysis of 7th pandemic Vibrio cholerae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lam Connie

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Seven pandemics of cholera have been recorded since 1817, with the current and ongoing pandemic affecting almost every continent. Cholera remains endemic in developing countries and is still a significant public health issue. In this study we use multilocus variable number of tandem repeats (VNTRs analysis (MLVA to discriminate between isolates of the 7th pandemic clone of Vibrio cholerae. Results MLVA of six VNTRs selected from previously published data distinguished 66 V. cholerae isolates collected between 1961–1999 into 60 unique MLVA profiles. Only 4 MLVA profiles consisted of more than 2 isolates. The discriminatory power was 0.995. Phylogenetic analysis showed that, except for the closely related profiles, the relationships derived from MLVA profiles were in conflict with that inferred from Single Nucleotide Polymorphism (SNP typing. The six SNP groups share consensus VNTR patterns and two SNP groups contained isolates which differed by only one VNTR locus. Conclusions MLVA is highly discriminatory in differentiating 7th pandemic V. cholerae isolates and MLVA data was most useful in resolving the genetic relationships among isolates within groups previously defined by SNPs. Thus MLVA is best used in conjunction with SNP typing in order to best determine the evolutionary relationships among the 7th pandemic V. cholerae isolates and for longer term epidemiological typing.

  16. STS-87 Mission Specialist Winston E. Scott suits up

    Science.gov (United States)

    1997-01-01

    STS-87 Mission Specialist Winston Scott dons his launch and entry suit with the assistance of a suit technician in the Operations and Checkout Building. This is Scotts second space flight. He and the five other crew members will depart shortly for Launch Pad 39B, where the Space Shuttle Columbia awaits liftoff on a 16-day mission to perform microgravity and solar research. Scott is scheduled to perform an extravehicular activity spacewalk with Mission Specialist Takao Doi, Ph.D., of the National Space Development Agency of Japan, during STS-87. He also performed a spacewalk on STS-72.

  17. Relativistic Scott correction in self-generated magnetic fields

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Erdos, Laszlo; Fournais, Søren; Solovej, Jan Philip

    2012-01-01

    /3}$ and it is unchanged by including the self-generated magnetic field. We prove the first correction term to this energy, the so-called Scott correction of the form $S(\\alpha Z) Z^2$. The current paper extends the result of \\cite{SSS} on the Scott correction for relativistic molecules to include a self......-generated magnetic field. Furthermore, we show that the corresponding Scott correction function $S$, first identified in \\cite{SSS}, is unchanged by including a magnetic field. We also prove new Lieb-Thirring inequalities for the relativistic kinetic energy with magnetic fields....

  18. The Effects of Using Diorama on 7th Grade Students' Academic Achievement and Science Learning Skills

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aslan Efe, Hulya

    2017-01-01

    This study aims to investigate the effects of using diorama on 7th grade students' academic achievement and science learning skills in "human being and environment relation" unit. The participants were 49 (E:25, C:24) 7th grade students studying during 2015-16 academic year in Diyarbakir, Turkey. An achievement test and "science…

  19. The Factor Structure of Coordination Abilities Development in 5th-7th Grade Boys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    В. В. Приходько

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The objective is to determine the structure of coordination abilities development in 5th-7th grade boys. Materials and methods. The participants in the study were boys of the 5th grade (n=21, 6th grade (n=20, and 7th grade (n=19. The paper used analysis and generalization of the scientific and methodological literature data, general scientific methods of theoretical level, namely: analogy, analysis, synthesis, abstracting, induction, as well as general scientific methods of empirical level: observation, testing, experiment. To evaluate of the motor preparedness, the results of motor tests, height and body weight were recorded. The materials of the study were processed in the statistical analysis program IBM SPSS 20. Factor analysis was carried out using a model of the principal components with the rotation method: Variamax with Kaiser normalization. Results. Analysis of the similarities shows that the most informative in the structure of the 5th grade boys’ motor preparedness are Test 9 “Static Equilibrium Evaluation by E. Ya. Bondarevsky’s Method” (,999, Test 2 “Standing Long Jump (cm” (,998, Test 10 “Dynamic Equilibrium Evaluation by Bess Method” (,916; for the 6th grade boys such are Test 9 “Static Equilibrium Evaluation by E. Ya. Bondarevsky’s Method” (1.0, Test 2 “Standing Long Jump (cm” (,999, Test 5 “Sit-Up for 30 sec.” (,968, Test 10 “Dynamic Equilibrium Evaluation by Bess Method” (,918; for the 7th grade boys such are Test 2 “Standing Long Jump (cm” (,994, Test 9 “Static Equilibrium Evaluation by E. Ya. Bondarevsky’s Method” (,987, Test 10 “Dynamic Equilibrium Evaluation by Bess Method” (,945. Conclusions. The most informative in the structure of 5th-7th grade boys’ coordination abilities is vestibular tolerance. For pedagogical control of 5th-7th grade boys’ motor preparedness the following can be recommended: Test 2 “Standing Long Jump (cm”, Test 9 “Static Equilibrium

  20. Astronauts Armstrong and Scott arrive at Hickam Field, Hawaii

    Science.gov (United States)

    1966-01-01

    Astronauts Neil A. Armstrong (center), command pilot, and David R. Scott, pilot, arrive at Hickam Field, Hawaii on their way from Naha, Okinawa, to Cape Kennedy, Florida. Astronaut Walter M. Schirra Jr. is at extreme left.

  1. Astronauts Armstrong and Scott during photo session outside KSC

    Science.gov (United States)

    1966-01-01

    Astronauts Neil A. Armstrong (left), command pilot, and David R. Scott, pilot, the Gemini 8 prime crew, during a photo session outside the Kennedy Space Center (KSC) Mission Control Center. They are standing in front of a radar dish.

  2. Comparative Analysis of Indicators of Coordination Abilities Development in 5th-7th Graders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    В. В. Приходько

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The objective of the research is to determine the regularities of coordination abilities development in 5th-7th-grade boys.  Materials and methods. The participants in the research were boys of the 5th grade (n = 21, 6th grade (n = 20, 7th grade (n = 19. To achieve the tasks outlined, the research used the following methods: analysis of scientific and methodological literature; pedagogical testing, pedagogical observation, methods of mathematical statistics. Research results. The 5th-6th-grade boys show a statistically significant difference between their results in the following tests: “Standing long jump (cm” (p < 0.002; “Six standing accuracy ball handlings to a partner from a 7 m distance using one of the techniques learned” (p < 0.049; “Rhythmic hand tapping” (p < 0.044; “Rhythmic movements of upper and lower limbs” (p < 0.042 (p < 0.05; “Height (cm”; “Body weight (kg”. The 6th-7th-grade boys — “30 m running (s”; “Standing long jump (cm”; “Sit-ups in 30 seconds”; “Evaluation of static equilibrium by E. Ya. Bondarevsky’s method”; “Evaluation of dynamic equilibrium by the BESS method”; “Rhythmic hand tapping”; “Rhythmic movements of upper and lower limbs”; “Shuttle run (4 × 9 m”; “Tossing rings over a peg”. The 5th-7th-grade boys — “Standing long jump (cm”; “Pull-ups (number of times”; “Evaluation of the ability to differentiate movement speed (accuracy in reproduction of running speed, 90% of maximum”; “Evaluation of static equilibrium by E. Ya. Bondarevsky’s method”; “Evaluation of dynamic equilibrium by the BESS method”; “Rhythmic hand tapping”; “Shuttle run (4 × 9 m”; “Height (cm”; “Body weight (kg”. Conclusions. The research has observed a positive dynamics of the results in the following group of tests: “Standing long jump” by 8.4%, “Rhythmic hand tapping and rhythmic movements of upper and lower

  3. IAEA International Database on Irradiated Nuclear Graphite Properties. 7th meeting of the Technical Steering Committee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Humbert, D.; Wickham, A.J.

    2005-06-01

    This report summarizes the Consultant Meeting '7th Meeting of the Technical Steering Committee for the International Database on Irradiated Nuclear Graphite Properties' held on 16-17 March 2005 at the IAEA Headquarters, Vienna, Austria. The purposes of the meeting were to review the matters and actions identified in the previous meeting, undertake a review of the current status of the database and to make recommendations for actions for the next year. The purposes of the meeting were fully met. This report contains the current status of the identified actions as well as a summary of the recommendations on enhancements to the database. (author)

  4. 'HTA for Crisis': sharing experiences during the 7th EBHC Symposium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wladysiuk, Magdalena; Tabor, Anna; Godman, Brian

    2013-02-01

    The Central and Eastern European Society of Technology Assessment in Health Care was founded in Krakow, Poland in 2003. On October 8th and 9th, the 7th symposium took place titled 'HTA for Crisis'. This meeting was attended by over 250 decision makers, evidence-based specialists, healthcare managers, commercial company personnel and experts. The symposium was principally divided into four main themes: insurance in times of crisis; importance of pricing of health services in times of crisis; managing welfare benefits in times of crisis and Health Technology Assessment in crisis-laden countries. The symposium finished by debating potential ways forward for healthcare systems in times of crisis.

  5. The 7th Japan-Taiwan joint meeting on neutron and X-ray scattering. Proceedings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2016-03-01

    The 7th Japan-Taiwan joint meeting on neutron and X-ray scattering in Kumatori is held bilaterally in Japan and Taiwan. This meeting provides the recent outstanding results in the fields of fundamental polymer and biological sciences and their applications as well. In the fields of the X-ray and/or neutron scattering, the methodological progress expands the research fields and gives us new scientific insights. This meeting invites the researchers developing new methodologies, such as dynamics measurement utilizing nuclear Bragg resonance, subunit-kinetics measurement with deuteration-assisted small-angle neutron scattering and so on. (J.P.N.)

  6. Papers presented at the 7th status report of the Reprocessing and Waste Treatment Project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-10-01

    The report contains all lectures on the present state of the R+D work which were delivered on the occasion of the 7th seminar on the present state of the Reprocessing and Waste Treatment Project in the Karlsruhe Nuclear Research Centre on 15/16 March 1988. The project is aimed at improving methods for nuclear waste disposal with regard to the German reprocessing plant for light-water reactor fuels currently under construction in Wackersdorf. The individual contributions were separately adapted for the INIS and EDB data banks. (RB) [de

  7. Scapular winging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mozolova, D.

    2013-01-01

    We present the case of a boy who, up to the age of 16, was an active football and floorball player. In the recent 2 years, he experienced increasing muscle weakness and knee pain. Examinations revealed osteoid osteoma of the distal femur and proximal tibia bilaterally and a lesion of the right medial meniscus. The neurological exam revealed no pathology and EMG revealed the myopathic picture. At our first examination, small, cranially displaced scapulae looking like wings and exhibiting atypical movements were apparent (see movie). Genetic analysis confirmed facioscapulohumeral muscle dystrophy (FSHMD). Facial and particularly humeroscapular muscles are affected in this condition. Bulbar, extra ocular and respiratory muscles are spared. The genetic defect is a deletion in the subtelomeric region of the 4-th chromosome (4q35) resulting in 1-10 instead of the 11-150 D4Z4 tandem repeats. Inheritance is autosomal dominant and thus carries a 50% risk for the offspring of affected subjects. (author)

  8. Stepping It Up: Walking Behaviors in Children Transitioning from 5th to 7th Grade

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharon E. Taverno Ross

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to (1 describe children’s walking behaviors in 5th to 7th grade and change over time and (2 examine associations between walking behaviors and Walk Score®. Participants consisted of n = 586 students from the Transitions and Activity Changes in Kids (TRACK Study. Children reported any walking behavior (e.g., exercise and transportation over the past five days. Walk Score was calculated based on children’s home address. Descriptive statistics summarized walking behaviors by gender and time, and repeated measure mixed models examined the relationship between walking behaviors and Walk Score. Approximately 46.8% and 19.2% of 5th grade children reported walking for exercise and transportation, respectively, and these percentages declined through 7th grade. Girls reported higher levels of total walking behavior and walking for exercise than boys (p < 0.001. Girls with a higher Walk Score had 63% higher odds of reporting walking for transportation than girls with a lower Walk Score (OR = 1.63, 95% CI = 1.02, 2.62. Walking behaviors among children were infrequent with significant declines over time, and of the nine associations examined with Walk Score, only one was significant. Efforts should prioritize frequent walking behavior and community design to increase children’s physical activity.

  9. Morphometric variations of the 7th cervical vertebrae of Zulu, White, and Colored South Africans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kibii, Job M; Pan, Rualing; Tobias, Phillip V

    2010-05-01

    The 7th cervical vertebrae of 240 cadavers of South African Zulu, White, and Colored population groups were examined to determine morphometric variation. White and Colored females had statistically significant narrower cervical anteroposterior diameters than their male counterparts, whereas no statistically significant difference between sexes of the Zulu population group was observed in this variable. In addition, although Zulu and Colored females had statistically significant narrower cervical transverse diameters than their male counterparts, there was no statistically significant variation between South African white males and females in this respect. The findings indicate that sexual dimorphism is more apparent in the vertebral centrum, across the three population groups, where males had significantly larger dimensions in centrum anteroposterior diameter, height, and width than their female counterparts. The study further reveals that sexual dimorphism is more apparent when one compares aspects of the 7th cervical vertebra between sexes within the same population group. Overall, the dimensions of the various variates of the vertebra are substantially smaller in women than in men. The smaller dimensions, particularly of the centrum, may be the result of lower skeletal mass in women and render them more vulnerable to fractures resulting from compression forces. 2010 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  10. Movement Coordination: Factor Structure of Development in 5th-7th Grade Girls

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. Ivashchenko

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available The study objective is to determine the structure of coordination abilities development in 5th-7th grade girls. Materials and methods. The participants in the study were 5th grade girls (n = 20, 6th grade girls (n = 23, 7th grade girls (n = 19. The study used the following methods: analysis and collation of scientific and methodological literature, general scientific methods of theoretical level, such as analogy, analysis, synthesis, abstraction, induction, as well as general scientific methods of empirical level: observation, testing, experiment. To evaluate motor preparedness, the study recorded the results of motor tests, body height and weight. The IBM SPSS 20 statistical analysis software was used to process the study materials. A factor analysis was performed, for which the study used principal component analysis with the rotation method: Variamax with Kaiser Normalization. Results. The analysis of similarities shows that the most informative tests in the structure of motor preparedness of the 5th grade girls are the following: test 11 “Evaluation of the ability for vestibular (statokinetic stability. Running with turns” (.884, test 9 “Static equilibrium evaluation by E. Ya. Bondarevsky’s method” (.826, test 6 “Evaluation of the sense of movement speed in sprinting” (.824; of the 6th grade girls — test 11 “Evaluation of the ability for vestibular (statokinetic stability. Running with turns” (0.884, test 9 “Static equilibrium evaluation by E. Ya. Bondarevsky’s method” (.826, test 6 “Evaluation of the sense of movement speed in sprinting” (.824; of the 7th grade girls — test 8 “Evaluation of the ability to differentiate movement speed (reproduction accuracy of running speed at 90% intensity of maximum” (.902, test 11 “Evaluation of the ability for vestibular (statokinetic stability. Running with turns” (.900, test 1 “30 m running (s” (.869. Conclusions. In the structure of

  11. Advances in High-Throughput Speed, Low-Latency Communication for Embedded Instrumentation (7th Annual SFAF Meeting, 2012)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jordan, Scott

    2012-06-01

    Scott Jordan on "Advances in high-throughput speed, low-latency communication for embedded instrumentation" at the 2012 Sequencing, Finishing, Analysis in the Future Meeting held June 5-7, 2012 in Santa Fe, New Mexico.

  12. Condition of physical health of pupils of the 7th-8th classes of the comprehensive school

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Margarita Mameshina

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: to investigate the level of physical health of pupils of the 7th-8th classes. Material & Methods: pupils of the 7th-8th classes of the comprehensive school No. 150 of Kharkov participated in the research. The following methods were used: theoretical analysis and generalization of scientific literature, method of express-assessment of physical health, mathematical statistics. Results: the comparative analysis of the obtained data in age aspect and on gender sign is carried out; the general assessment of the level of physical health of pupils of the 7th-8th classes is defined. Conclusions: the insignificant prevalence of indicators of the separate components of health of boys over the data of girls and, generally, the reliable improvement of indicators of pupils with age are established; the "average" level of physical health of pupils of the 7th classes and "below the average" level of pupils of the 8th classes are determined.

  13. 7th International Conference in Methodologies and Intelligent Systems for Technology Enhanced Learning

    CERN Document Server

    Gennari, Rosella; Mascio, Tania; Rodríguez, Sara; Prieta, Fernando; Ramos, Carlos; Silveira, Ricardo

    2017-01-01

    This book presents the outcomes of the 7th International Conference in Methodologies and Intelligent Systems for Technology Enhanced Learning (MIS4TEL'17), hosted by the Polytechnic of Porto, Portugal from 21 to 23 June 2017. Expanding on the topics of the previous conferences, it provided an open forum for discussing intelligent systems for technology enhanced learning (TEL) and their roots in novel learning theories, empirical methodologies for their design or evaluation, stand-alone and web-based solutions, and makerspaces. It also fostered entrepreneurship and business startup ideas, bringing together researchers and developers from industry, education and the academic world to report on the latest scientific research, technical advances and methodologies.

  14. 7th International Workshop on Parallel Tools for High Performance Computing

    CERN Document Server

    Gracia, José; Nagel, Wolfgang; Resch, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Current advances in High Performance Computing (HPC) increasingly impact efficient software development workflows. Programmers for HPC applications need to consider trends such as increased core counts, multiple levels of parallelism, reduced memory per core, and I/O system challenges in order to derive well performing and highly scalable codes. At the same time, the increasing complexity adds further sources of program defects. While novel programming paradigms and advanced system libraries provide solutions for some of these challenges, appropriate supporting tools are indispensable. Such tools aid application developers in debugging, performance analysis, or code optimization and therefore make a major contribution to the development of robust and efficient parallel software. This book introduces a selection of the tools presented and discussed at the 7th International Parallel Tools Workshop, held in Dresden, Germany, September 3-4, 2013.  

  15. Proceedings of the 7th Italian conference on general relativity and gravitational physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bruzzo, U.; Cianci, R.; Massa, E.

    1987-01-01

    The 7th Italian Conference on General Relativity and Gravitational Physics was held in Rapallo (Genoa), from September 3 to 6, 1986, under the auspices of the International Society on General Relativity and Gravitation. Like the previous conferences of this series, it brought together physicists, mathematicians, and astronomers interested in various aspects of relativity, field theory, astrophysics, and cosmology. The scientific program included two types of sessions: invited lectures and workshops for presenting contributed papers. All these have been grouped into four main sections. The divisions are the following: A: General Relativity; B: Field Theory, Supergravity, and Strings; C: Relativistic Astrophysics and Cosmology; D: Experimental and Observational Relativity. This book presents the papers discussed in the meetings on the above mentioned subjects

  16. Proceedings of the 7th US/German Workshop on Salt Repository Research, Design, and Operation.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hansen, Francis D. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Steininger, Walter [Karisruhe Inst. of Technology (Germany); Bollingerfehr, Willhelm [DBE TECHNOLOGY GmbH (Germany)

    2017-01-01

    The 7th US/German Workshop on Salt Repository Research, Design, and Operation was held in Washington, DC on September 7-9, 2016. Over fifty participants representing governmental agencies, internationally recognized salt research groups, universities, and private companies helped advance the technical basis for salt disposal of radioactive waste. Representatives from several United States federal agencies were able to attend, including the Department of Energy´s Office of Environmental Management and Office of Nuclear Energy, the Environmental Protection Agency, the Nuclear Regulatory Commission, and the Nuclear Waste Technical Review Board. A similar representation from the German ministries showcased the covenant established in a Memorandum of Understanding executed between the United States and Germany in 2011. The US/German workshops´ results and activities also contribute significantly to the Nuclear Energy Agency Salt Club repository research agenda.

  17. 7th International Conference on Physics of Liquid Matter : Modern Problems

    CERN Document Server

    Chalyi, Alexander

    2018-01-01

    This book presents a collection of selected lectures discussing current problems in molecular physics and reviews the main cutting-edge advances in condensed and soft matter physics. It offers deep insights and a powerful basis for scientists and engineers to study complicated problems in physics, chemistry, biology, and medicine. The unification of experimental, theoretical, and computational methods allows milestone results to be achieved in areas such as ionic and ionic-electronic liquids, magnetic liquid systems, liquid systems with nanoparticles, structural phase transitions and critical phenomena, and small-angle neutron and X-ray scattering in liquids and liquid systems.   The lectures selected for this book were held at the 7th International Conference “Physics of Liquid Matter: Modern Problems” (PLMMP-2016), 27–31 May in Kiev, Ukraine.

  18. 7th International Conference on Robotics in Education (RiE)

    CERN Document Server

    Lepuschitz, Wilfried; Koppensteiner, Gottfried; Balogh, Richard

    2017-01-01

    This proceedings volume showcases the latest achievements in research and development in Educational Robotics presented at the 7th International Conference on Robotics in Education (RiE) held in Vienna, Austria, during April 14-15, 2016. The book offers a range of methodologies for teaching robotics and presents various educational robotics curricula. It includes dedicated chapters for the design and analysis of learning environments as well as evaluation means for measuring the impact of robotics on the students’ learning success. Moreover, the book presents interesting programming approaches as well as new applications, the latest tools, systems and components for using robotics. The presented applications cover the whole educative range, from elementary school to high school, college, university and beyond, for continuing education and possibly outreach and workforce development. The book provides a framework involving two complementary kinds of contributions: on the one hand on technical aspects and on ...

  19. Wave-splitting in the bistable Gray-Scott model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, K.E.; Mazin, W.; Mosekilde, Erik

    1996-01-01

    The Gray-Scott model describes a chemical reaction in which an activator species grows autocatalytically on a continuously fed substrate. For certain feed rates and activator life times the model shows the coexistence of two homogeneous steady states. The blue state, where the activator concentra......The Gray-Scott model describes a chemical reaction in which an activator species grows autocatalytically on a continuously fed substrate. For certain feed rates and activator life times the model shows the coexistence of two homogeneous steady states. The blue state, where the activator...

  20. Theorizing Steampunk in Scott Westerfeld's YA Series Leviathan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mielke, Tammy L.; LaHaie, Jeanne M.

    2015-01-01

    In this article, we offer an explanation of steampunk and theorize the genre and its functions within Scott Westerfeld's YA series Leviathan. In order to do so, we examine the "cogs" of the genre machine and its use of nostalgic longing for a revised past/future to rebel against present day cultural norms. Critics note that steampunk…

  1. Walter Dill Scott and the Student Personnel Movement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biddix, J. Patrick; Schwartz, Robert A.

    2012-01-01

    Walter Dill Scott (1869-1955), tenth president of Northwestern University and pioneer of industrial psychology, is an essential architect of student personnel work. This study of his accomplishments, drawing on records from the Northwestern University archives, tells a story about the people he influenced and his involvement in codifying what was…

  2. Scott Morgan Johnson Middle School: Personalization Leads to Unlimited Success

    Science.gov (United States)

    Principal Leadership, 2013

    2013-01-01

    The well-known lyrics may be "The Eyes of Texas Are Upon You," but at Scott Morgan Johnson Middle School in McKinney, TX, it's definitely the "eye of the tiger" that sets the bar for Tiger PRIDE (perseverance, respect, integrity, determination, and excellence). This article describes how those ideals have been infused…

  3. 2015-2016 Expense report for Scott Gilmore | IDRC - International ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    2015-07-13

    2015-2016 Expense report for Scott Gilmore. Total travel expenses: CA$31.46. Download expense report. July 13, 2015 to July 14, 2015. CA$31.46. What we do · Funding · Resources · About IDRC. Knowledge. Innovation. Solutions. Careers · Contact Us · Site map. Sign up now for IDRC news and views sent directly to ...

  4. Nursery Pest Management of Phytolyma lata Walker (Scott) Attack ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The establishment of plantations of Milicia excelsa has been constrained by the gall-forming psyllid Phytolyma lata Walker (Scott) that causes extensive damage to young plants. We present findings of an experiment aimed at preventing Phytolyma attack on Milicia seedlings in the nursery using chemical control and ...

  5. Astronauts Scott and Armstrong undergoe water egress training

    Science.gov (United States)

    1966-01-01

    Astronauts Neil A. Armstrong (on left), command pilot, and David R. Scott, pilot of the Gemini 8 prime crew, use a boilerplate model of a Gemini spacecraft during water egress training in the Gulf of Mexico. Three Manned Spacecraft Center swimmers assist in the training exercise.

  6. PEOPLE IN PHYSICS: Interview with Scott Durow, Software Engineer, Oxford

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burton, Conducted by Paul

    1998-05-01

    Scott Durow was educated at Bootham School, York. He studied Physics, Mathematics and Chemistry to A-level and went on to Nottingham University to read Medical Physics. After graduating from Nottingham he embarked on his present career as a Software Engineer based in Oxford. He is a musician in his spare time, as a member of a band and playing the French horn.

  7. Scott Fitzgerald: famous writer, alcoholism and probable epilepsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariana M. Wolski

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Scott Fitzgerald, a world-renowned American writer, suffered from various health problems, particularly alcohol dependence, and died suddenly at the age of 44. According to descriptions in A Moveable Feast, by Ernest Hemingway, Fitzgerald had episodes resembling complex partial seizures, raising the possibility of temporal lobe epilepsy.

  8. Astronaut Scott Parazynski in hatch of CCT during training

    Science.gov (United States)

    1994-01-01

    Astronaut Scott E. Parazynski, STS-66 mission specialist, poses near the hatchway of the crew compartment trainer (CCT) (out of frame) in JSC's Shuttle mockup and integration laboratory. Crew members were about to begin a rehearsal of procedures to be followed during the launch and entry phases of their flight. That rehearsal was followed by a training session on emergency egress procedures.

  9. In vitro Comparative Evaluation of Tensile Bond Strength of 6(th), 7(th) and 8(th) Generation Dentin Bonding Agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamble, Suresh S; Kandasamy, Baburajan; Thillaigovindan, Ranjani; Goyal, Nitin Kumar; Talukdar, Pratim; Seal, Mukut

    2015-05-01

    Newer dentin bonding agents were developed to improve the quality of composite restoration and to reduce time consumption in its application. The aim of the present study was to evaluate tensile bond strength of 6(th), 7(th) and 8(th) generation bonding agents by in vitro method. Selected 60 permanent teeth were assigned into 20 in each group (Group I: 6(th) generation bonding agent-Adper SE plus 3M ESPE, Group II: 7(th) generation bonding agent-G-Bond GC Corp Japan and Group III: 8(th) generation dentin adhesives-FuturaBond, DC, Voco, Germany). With high-speed diamond disc, coronal dentin was exposed, and selected dentin bonding agents were applied, followed by composite restoration. All samples were saved in saline for 24 h and tensile bond strength testing was done using a universal testing machine. The obtained data were tabulated and statistically analyzed using ANOVA test. The tensile bond strength readings for 6(th) generation bonding agent was 32.2465, for 7(th) generation was 31.6734, and for 8(th)-generation dentine bonding agent was 34.74431. The highest tensile bond strength was seen in 8(th) generation bonding agent compared to 6(th) and 7(th) generation bonding agents. From the present study it can be conclude that 8(th) generation dentine adhesive (Futura DC, Voco, Germany) resulted in highest tensile bond strength compared to 6(th) (Adper SE plus, 3M ESPE) and 7(th) generation (G-Bond) dentin bonding agents.

  10. Peculiarities of Motor Abilities Development in 7th-8th-Graders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ю. В. Мороз

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The pupose of the research is to define the peculiarities of motor abilities development in children of middle-school age. Research methods: theoretical analysis and collation of scientific and methodological literature; pedagogical testing; methods of mathematical statistics. To determine the effectiveness of realization of the developmental task of the physical education process at the beginning of the school year (in October 2014 and in March 2015, we tested the level of development of physical qualities in the 7th- and 8th-graders, 25 and 25 graders respectively, 13 of which in each class were boys and 12 — girls. Research results. The analysis of the materials shows that during the school year, the boys of the 7th grade showed reliably increased performance in standing long jumps (speed and strength qualities — 1.97%, raising the body from the lying position (strength — 26.46%, bent suspension (strength — 13.45%. The indicators have insignificantly (unreliably increased in the shuttle run 3×10 m (agility — 6.09%, and in body bending from the sitting position (flexibility — 6.25%. The girls showed reliably increased performance in the level of readiness: flexibility — 12%, strength — 12.09%, speed-strength qualities — 5.27%, agility — 7.77%. The analysis of the materials shows that during the school year the 8th-graders (boys reliably increased their physical readiness in speed-strength qualities — 0.8%, strength — 15.7%. The indicators of agility increased unreliably — 2.7%, as well as those of flexibility — 8%. The 8th‑graders (girls reliably improved their indicators in standing long jumps — 2.1%, in bent suspension — 18.8%, raising the body from the lying position in 30 seconds — 17.4%, body bending from the sitting position — 12 5%. The indicators agility improved unreliably — 3.4%. Conclusions. The data obtained are important in solving the pedagogical problems of schoolers’ physical education

  11. In retrospect. 7th workshop RCA; Nachlese. 7. Workshop RCA. Conference report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Knappik, Reinhard [Verein fuer Kernverfahrenstechnik und Analytik Rossendorf e.V. (VKTA), Dresden-Rossendorf (Germany). Programmausschuss Workshop RCA

    2013-08-15

    The 7th Workshop RCA with 27 lectures and 12 poster presentation took place on 10 and 11 June 2013 in Dresden-Rossendorf. The traditional German event brought over 90 participants together from Germany, Austria, France, Switzerland and the Netherlands. This time the workshop put forward a special subject for the first time ('Obstacles and pitfalls when characterising waste packages'). A remarkable range of contributions was presented, which demonstrated the diversity and the problems of this subject matter. Medium to low radioactive waste and their final disposal was discussed. Other topics were the upcoming approval of recycling materials according to paragraph 29 StrlSchV as well as those from NORM (Naturally Occurring Radioactive Materials) regarding radionuclide analytics, the range of matrices to be processed and the practical problems this causes. Although the radiological feature was the central focus, other material aspects were dealt with, above all the approval of recycling materials when nuclear power plants are dismantled, but also in research institutes, which is demanding more and more attention. The lectures by Jessica Riemer (GSI Darmstadt) on the topic 'Waste material management of a research centre with heavy ion accelerators' and Elvira Mesalic (TU Munich) on 'Determining the activity inventory of bituminized old wastes' as well as the poster by Sina Brockmann on the 'Locally resolved analysis or uranium species using a couple systems of CLSM and LIFS' were awarded prizes for being outstanding presentations. (orig.)

  12. Summary report of the 7th reduced-moderation water reactor workshop

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akie, Hiroshi; Nabeshima, Kunihiko; Uchikawa, Sadao

    2005-08-01

    As a research on the future innovative water reactor, the development of Reduced-Moderation Water Reactors (RMWRs) has been performed in Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI). The workshop on RMWRs is aiming at information exchange between JAERI and other organizations such as universities, laboratories, utilities and vendors, and has been held every year since 1998. The 7th workshop was held on March 5, 2004 under the joint auspices of JAERI and North Kanto branch of Atomic Energy Society of Japan. The program of the workshop was composed of 5 lectures and an overall discussion time. The workshop started with the lecture by JAERI on the status and future program of PMWR research and development, followed by the two presentations by JAERI and Japan Nuclear Cycle Development Institute, respectively, on the investigation and evaluation of water cooled reactor in Feasibility Study Program on Commercialized Fast Reactor Systems. The lectures were also made on the Japan's nuclear fuel cycle and scenarios for RMWRs deployment by JAERI, and on the next generation reactor development activity by Hitachi, Ltd. The main subjects of the overall discussion time were Na cooled fast reactor, deployment effects of RMWRs and the future plan of the RMWR research and development. This report includes the original papers presented at the workshop and summaries of the questions and answers for each lecture, as well as of the discussion time. In addition in the Appendices, there are included presentation handouts of each lecture, program of the workshop and the participants list. (author)

  13. 7th International Conference on Embedded and Multimedia Computing (EMC-12)

    CERN Document Server

    Jeong, Young-Sik; Park, Sang; Chen, Hsing-Chung; Embedded and Multimedia Computing Technology and Service

    2012-01-01

    The 7th International Conference on Embedded and Multimedia Computing (EMC-12), will be held in Gwangju, Korea on September 6 - 8, 2012. EMC-12 will be the most comprehensive conference focused on the various aspects of advances in Embedded and Multimedia (EM) Computing. EMC-12 will provide an opportunity for academic and industry professionals to discuss the latest issues and progress in the area of EM. In addition, the conference will publish high quality papers which are closely related to the various theories and practical applications in EM. Furthermore, we expect that the conference and its publications will be a trigger for further related research and technology improvements in this important subject. The EMC-12 is the next event, in a series of highly successful International Conference on Embedded and Multimedia Computing, previously held as EMC 2011 (China, Aug. 2011), EMC 2010 (Philippines, Aug. 2010), EM-Com 2009 (Korea, Dec. 2009), UMC-08 (Australia, Oct. 2008), ESO-08(China, Dec. 2008), UMS-08 ...

  14. European commission - 7th framework programme. The collaborative project on European sodium fast reactor (CP ESFR)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fiorini, G.L.

    2009-01-01

    The paper summarizes the key characteristics of the four years large Collaborative Project on European Sodium Fast Reactor (CP ESFR - 2009-2012); the CP ESFR follows the 6th FP project named 'Roadmap for a European Innovative SOdium cooled FAst Reactor - EISOFAR' further identifying, organizing and implementing a significant part of the needed R and D effort. The CP ESFR merges the contribution of 25 european partners; it will be realized under the aegis of the 7th FP under the Area - Advanced Nuclear Systems with a refund from the European Commission of 5.8 M euro (11.55 M euro total budget). It will be a key component of the European Sustainable Nuclear Energy Technology Platform (SNE TP) and its Strategic Research Agenda (SRA). The inputs for the project are the key research goals for fourth generation of European sodium cooled fast reactors which can be summarized as follow: an improved safety with in particular the achievement of a robust architecture vis a vis of abnormal situations and the robustness of the safety demonstrations; the guarantee of a financial risk comparable to that of the other means of energy production; a flexible and robust management of the nuclear materials and especially the waste reduction through the Minor Actinides burning. (author)

  15. 2017 The 7th International Conference on Computer Engineering and Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    This conference proceeding is a collection of the papers accepted by the CENet 2017 - the 7th International Conference on Computer Engineering and Networks held on Shanghai from 22-23 July, 2017. This proceeding contains the five parts: Part I focuses on Machine learning (21 papers); Part II Wireless communication (21 papers); Part III Information theory (21 papers), Part IV Cloud science (14 papers) and Part V Data analysis (21 papers). Each part can be used as an excellent reference by industry practitioners, university faculty, and undergraduate as well as graduate students who need to build a knowledge base of the most current advances and state-of-practice in the topics covered by this conference proceedings. This will enable them to produce, maintain, and manage systems with high levels of trustworthiness and complexity Thanks go to the authors for their hard work and dedication as well as the reviewers for ensuring the selection of only the highest quality papers; their efforts made this proceedings possible.

  16. The 7th questionnaire report of safety control in nuclear medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2005-01-01

    The questionnaire has been done every three years from 1986 for the ultimate purpose of safe medical examinations and this 7th one was performed for the objective period of April 1, 2001-March 31, 2004. Subjects were 1,275 nuclear medicine facilities and answers were obtained in 77.2%. Questionnaire concerned the personnel involved in nuclear medical examinations (qualifications/medical doctor, pharmacist and radiology technologist and others), instruments (an additional investigation in the present period was conducted on PET/CT with cyclotron and automatic synthesis equipment and on SPECT/CT), accidents experienced, matters possibly leading to accident, improvement in safety control, serious trouble and breakage of the instrument, requests for the instrument manufacturers and so on. Results were: qualified radiology technologists amounted to 70% and doctors, 20%; personnel number for tests in vitro tended decreased; SPECT-camera with 2 detectors increased and with 1, obviously decreased; PET and related equipments greatly increased; check rate for imaging instruments was about 80%; gamma cameras were used over their maximum time limits recommended by manufacturers; actual accidents at examination increased but were not serious; improvements of instruments for safety sensor and of operation to avoid errors were required; mind for preventing accident was improved; many requests for the manufacturers were proposed. (author)

  17. PREFACE: Proceedings of the 7th International LISA Symposium, Barcelona, Spain, 16-20 June 2008

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lobo, Alberto; Sopuerta, Carlos F.

    2009-07-01

    In June 2006 the LISA International Science Team (LIST) accepted the bid presented by the Institut d'Estudis Espacials de Catalunya (IEEC) to host the 7th International LISA Symposium. This was during its 11th meeting at the University of Maryland, just before the 6th edition of the Symposium started in NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center. The 7th International LISA Symposium took place at the city of Barcelona, Spain, from 16-20 June 2008, in the premises of CosmoCaixa, a modern Science Museum located in the hills near Tibidabo. Almost 240 delegates registered for the event, a record breaking figure compared to previous editions of the Symposium. Many of the most renowned world experts in LISA, Gravitational Wave Science, and Astronomy, as well as Engineers, attended LISA 7 and produced state-of-the-art presentations, while everybody benefited from the opportunity to have live discussions during the week in a friendly environment. The programme included 31 invited plenary lectures in the mornings, and 8 parallel sessions in the afternoons. These were classified into 7 major areas of research: LISA Technology, LISA PathFinder, LISA PathFinder Data Analysis, LISA Data Analysis, Gravitational Wave sources, Cosmology and Fundamental Physics with LISA and Other Gravitational Wave Detectors. 138 abstracts for communications were received, of which a selection was made by the session convenors which would fit time constraints. Up to 63 posters completed the scientific programme. More details on the programme, including some of the talks, can be found at the Symposium website: http://www.ice.cat/research/LISA_Symposium. There was however a remarkable add-on: Professor Clifford Will delivered a startling presentation to the general public, who completely filled the Auditori—the main Conference Room, 320 seats—and were invited to ask questions to the speaker who had boldly guided them through the daunting world of Black Holes, Waves of Gravity, and other Warped Ideas of

  18. Consensus report from the 7th International Forum for Liver Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Merkle, Elmar M.; Zech, Christoph J. [University Hospital Basel, Clinic of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, Basel (Switzerland); Bartolozzi, Carlo [University of Pisa, Department of Radiology, Pisa (Italy); Bashir, Mustafa R. [Duke University Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Durham, NC (United States); Ba-Ssalamah, Ahmed [Medical University of Vienna, Department of General and Pediatric Radiology, Vienna (Austria); Huppertz, Alexander [Imaging Science Institute Charite, Berlin (Germany); Lee, Jeong Min [Seoul National University Hospital, Department of Radiology, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Ricke, Jens [Otto-von-Guericke Universitaet Magdeburg, Department of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, Magdeburg (Germany); Sakamoto, Michiie [Keio University School of Medicine, Department of Pathology, Tokyo (Japan); Sirlin, Claude B. [University of California, Liver Imaging Group, Department of Radiology, San Diego, California (United States); Ye, Sheng-Long [Fudan University, Department of Hepatic Oncology, Zhongshan Hospital, Shanghai (China); Zeng, Mengsu [Fudan University, Radiologic Diagnostic Department, Zhongshan Hospital, Shanghai (China)

    2016-03-15

    Liver-specific MRI is a fast-growing field, with technological and protocol advancements providing more robust imaging and allowing a greater depth of information per examination. This article reports the evidence for, and expert thinking on, current challenges in liver-specific MRI, as discussed at the 7th International Forum for Liver MRI, which was held in Shanghai, China, in October 2013. Topics discussed included the role of gadoxetic acid-enhanced MRI in the differentiation of focal nodular hyperplasia from hepatocellular adenoma and small hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) from small intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma (in patients with chronic liver disease), the differentiation of low-grade dysplastic nodule (DN) from pre-malignant high-grade DN and early HCC, and treatment planning and assessment of treatment response for patients with HCC and colorectal liver metastasis. Optimization of the gadoxetic acid-enhanced MRI protocol to gain robust arterial and hepatobiliary phase images was also discussed. Gadoxetic acid-enhanced MRI demonstrates added value for the detection and characterization of focal liver lesions and shows promise in a number of new indications, including regional liver functional assessment and patient monitoring after therapy; however, more data are needed in some areas, and further developments are needed to translate cutting-edge techniques into clinical practice. (orig.)

  19. Selected papers from the 7th International Conference on Biomimetics, Artificial Muscles and Nano-bio (BAMN2013)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahinpoor, Mohsen; Oh, Ilkwon

    2014-07-01

    The 7th International Congress on Biomimetics, Artificial Muscles and Nano-Bio was held on the magnificent and beautiful Jeju Island in Korea on 26-30 August 2013. In June 2007, the volcanic island and lava tube cave systems were designated as UNESCO World Natural Heritage Sites for their natural beauty and unique geographical values. The aim of the congress was to offer high-level lectures, extensive discussions and communications covering the state-of-the-art on biomimetics, artificial muscles, and nano-bio technologies providing an overview of their potential applications in the industrial, biomedical, scientific and robotic fields. This conference provided a necessary platform for an ongoing dialogue between researchers from different areas (chemistry, physics, biology, medicine, engineering, robotics, etc) within biomimetics, artificial muscle and nano-bio technologies. This special issue of Smart Materials and Structures is devoted to a selected number of research papers that were presented at BAMN2013. Of the 400 or so papers and over 220 posters presented at this international congress, 15 papers were finally received, reviewed and accepted for this special issue, following the regular peer review procedures of the journal. The special issue covers polymeric artificial muscles, electroactive polymers, multifunctional nanocomposites, and their applications. In particular, electromechanical performance and other characteristics of ionic polymer-metal composites (IPMCs) fabricated with various commercially available ion exchange membranes are discussed. Additionally, the control of free-edge interlaminar stresses in composite laminates using piezoelectric actuators is elaborated on. Further, the electrode effects of a cellulose-based electroactive paper energy harvester are described. Next, a flexible tactile-feedback touch screen using transparent ferroelectric polymer film vibrators is discussed. A broad coverage of bio-applications of IPMC transducers is

  20. 77 FR 7182 - Scott W. Houghton, M.D.; Decision and Order

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-10

    ... DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE Drug Enforcement Administration [Docket No. 12-09] Scott W. Houghton, M.D... CFR 0.100(b), I order that DEA Certificate of Registration BH8796077, issued to Scott W. Houghton, M.D., be, and it hereby is, revoked. I further order that any pending application of Scott W. Houghton, M.D...

  1. The Effects of Animation Supported 5E Model on Teaching "Indicative and Subjunctive Moods" in 7th Grade Turkish Lesson

    Science.gov (United States)

    Özcan, Mehmet Fatih; Kiliç, Latife Kirbasoglu

    2017-01-01

    This study is to investigate the effects of animated 5E method on the success, attitude and opinions towards the course in teaching of "subjunctive and indicative moods" subject of 7th grade Turkish course. The study was conducted with 60 seventh grade students of a state-run secondary school in Palandöken district of Erzurum during the…

  2. Comparison of the 6th and 7th editions of the UICC-AJCC TNM classification for esophageal cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    K. Talsma (Koen); P. van Hagen (Pieter); B.A. Grotenhuis (Brechtje); E.W. Steyerberg (Ewout); H.W. Tilanus (Hugo); J.J.B. van Lanschot (Jan); B.P.L. Wijnhoven (Bas)

    2012-01-01

    textabstractBackground. The new 7th edition of the Union for International Cancer Control-American Joint Committee on Cancer (UICC-AJCC) tumor, node, metastasis (TNM) staging system is the ratification of data-driven recommendations from the Worldwide Esophageal Cancer Collaboration database.

  3. Research in environmental impacts of peaceful uses of nuclear energy in the 7th five-year plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horacek, P.

    1982-01-01

    The most complete information so far is presented in tabular form on research programs of organizations in the Czechoslovak Socialist Republic which in the 7th five year plan deal with the environmental impact of peaceful uses of nuclear energy. (author)

  4. Proceedings of the 42nd basic science seminar. (The 7th workshop on neutron crystallography in biology)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Niimura, Nobuo

    1996-02-01

    42nd advanced science seminar (the 7th workshop on neutron crystallography in biology) was held on October, 25-26, 1995 at Tokai. Forty three participants from university, research institute and private company took part in the workshop and there were 17 lectures given. The proceedings collect the figures and tables which the speakers used in their lectures. (author)

  5. 7th annual congress of the Swiss Society of Nuclear Medicine (SGNM/SSMN). Main topic: imaging in oncology. Abstracts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2006-01-01

    Program chart and compiled abstracts of the 7th annual congress of the Swiss Society of Nuclear Medicine (SGNM/SSMN). Session headers are: imaging in oncology: PET-CT; oncology: therapy; imaging in oncology: treatment response; oncology: peptides; oncology: basic scinence; imaging in oncology: bone and soft tissue tumors; instrumentation; oncology: imaging. (uke)

  6. The Aegean in the Early 7th Millennium BC: Maritime Networks and Colonization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horejs, B; Milić, B; Ostmann, F; Thanheiser, U; Weninger, B; Galik, A

    The process of Near Eastern neolithization and its westward expansion from the core zone in the Levant and upper Mesopotamia has been broadly discussed in recent decades, and many models have been developed to describe the spread of early farming in terms of its timing, structure, geography and sociocultural impact. Until now, based on recent intensive investigations in northwestern and western Anatolia, the discussion has mainly centred on the importance of Anatolian inland routes for the westward spread of neolithization. This contribution focuses on the potential impact of east Mediterranean and Aegean maritime networks on the spread of the Neolithic lifestyle to the western edge of the Anatolian subcontinent in the earliest phases of sedentism. Employing the longue durée model and the concept of 'social memory', we will discuss the arrival of new groups via established maritime routes. The existence of maritime networks prior to the spread of farming is already indicated by the high mobility of Epipalaeolithic/Mesolithic groups exploring the Aegean and east Mediterranean seas, and reaching, for example, the Cyclades and Cyprus. Successful navigation by these early mobile groups across the open sea is attested by the distribution of Melian obsidian. The potential existence of an additional Pre-Pottery Neolithic (PPN) obsidian network that operated between Cappadocia/Cilicia and Cyprus further hints at the importance of maritime coastal trade. Since both the coastal and the high seas networks were apparently already well established in this early period, we may further assume appropriate knowledge of geographic routes, navigational technology and other aspects of successful seafaring. This Mesolithic/PPN maritime know-how package appears to have been used by later groups, in the early 7th millennium calBC, exploring the centre of the Anatolian Aegean coast, and in time establishing some of the first permanent settlements in that region. In the present paper, we

  7. PREFACE: 7th International Conference on Applications of Physics in Financial Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takayasu, M.; Watanabe, T.; Ikeda, Y.; Takayasu, H.

    2010-04-01

    This volume contains contributed papers from the 7th international conference on 'Applications of Physics in Financial Analysis (APFA)' held at Tokyo on 1-5 March 2009. The conference was organized jointly by Tokyo Institute of Technology and Hitotsubashi University with support from the Research Institute of Economy, Trade, and Industry (RIETI), Physical Society of Japan, Japanese Economic Association, Information Processing Society of Japan, Japanese Society for Artificial Intelligence, and Japan Association for Evolutionary Economics. The first APFA conference (APFA1) was held in 1999 at Dublin, followed by APFA2 at Liege in 2000, APFA3 at London in 2001, APFA4 at Warsaw in 2003, APFA5 at Torino in 2006, and APFA6 at Lisbon in 2007. The 7th APFA conference, which is the first meeting held outside Europe, was attended by 223 researchers in physics and economics from 23 countries world-wide. In keeping with past APFA conferences, we paid special attention to issues in financial markets, which turned out to be very timely. The conference was held in March 2009, in the middle of the global financial crisis that originally started in the US and spread quickly to every corner of the world. The topic of the conference is 'New Approaches to the Analysis of Large Scale Business and Economic data'. The rapid development of information and communication technology has enabled financial/non-financial firms to keep detailed records of their business activities in the form of, for example, tick-by-tick data in financial markets, point-of-sale (POS) data on individual household's purchasing activity, and interfirm network data describing relationships among firms in terms of suppliers/customers transactions and ownerships. This growth in the scope and amount of business data available to researchers has led to a far-reaching expansion in research possibilities. Researchers not only in social sciences but also in physics, mathematics, and information sciences have recently

  8. PREFACE: 7th International Conference on Modern Practice in Stress and Vibration Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dulieu-Barton, J. M.

    2009-07-01

    The proceedings contain the papers presented at the 7th International Conference on Modern Practice in Stress and Vibration Analysis. The collection of papers represents the range of activities that are carried out to understand the functionality of engineering systems and structures through stress/strain based evaluation and dynamic response. The scope is broad and covers theoretical studies, modelling and experimental evaluations. Many of the papers cover integration techniques and approaches to better understanding of system performance and failure. All of the papers have been peer reviewed by at least two experts and represent the state of the art of research in this area. The conference is the seventh in the series, following on from previous conferences in Bath, Glasgow, Nottingham, Dublin, Sheffield and Liverpool. Although based in the British Isles the conference has a truly international flavour with offerings from 22 countries. The conference is organised by the Institute of Physics Applied Mechanics Group (formerly the Stress and Vibration Group). It incorporates activities associated with the British Society for Strain Measurement including the Measurements Lecture, the EMex Exhibition and the Young Stress Analyst Competition. The organising committee is grateful for the support of all of the authors, the scientific committee and keynote speakers who played a significant role in the review process, to John Edwards who was instrumental in managing the paper review and submission process, Dawn Stewart and Claire Garland of the Institute of Physics for organising the conference, social programme and registration and Biana Gale of the British Society for Strain Measurement for organising the Exhibition. The organising committee is also grateful to the sponsors of the conference for their kind support and to the co-sponsors for distributing information on the conference. Professor Janice M Dulieu-Barton Professor of Experimental Mechanics University of

  9. 7th Patras workshop on axions, WIMPs and WISPs (PATRAS 2011). Proceedings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zioutas, Konstantin; Schumann, Marc (eds.)

    2011-12-15

    The year 2011 was an exciting period to work on the ''dark side'' of the Universe. Several experimental claims of the direct detection of WIMP dark matter were challenged by the restrictive limits of several others. Dedicated experiments searching for axions, another well motivated dark matter candidate, and for axion-like particles continued to improve their limits and got an additional boost by puzzling astrophysical observations and new developments in theory. The LHC collected an unexpectedly large amount of data and started to produce results at an amazing speed. And finally, this year's Nobel price of physics was awarded to the observation of the accelerating expansion of the Universe, an effect which might be related to dark energy, whose nature remain among the biggest mysteries in physics. These exciting topics and many more important aspects of particle- and astroparticle physics were discussed between experimentalists and theorists at the 7th Patras Workshop on Axions, WIMPs, and WISPs. The workshop took place from June 27 - July 1, 2011, in the Royal Myconian and Myconian Imperial Resorts Hotels on the Greek island of Mykonos. As in the previous years, it was a very fruitful and lively meeting in an inspiring and open atmosphere, which allowed for many open and constructive discussions also on controversial topics. The scientific exchange, the beautiful scenery of the island, the venue itself, the food, an excursion to the ancient ruins of Delos, and finally an amazing conference dinner made this meeting really unique. The ''spirit'' of the workshop and its atmosphere cannot be brought to paper, but many of its scientific highlights are collected in these proceedings. We are looking forward to the 8th Patras Workshop, which will be held in Chicago (USA) July 18-22, 2012. It will be organized jointly by our US colleagues Andrei Afanasev (JLAB), Oliver Baker (Yale), and William Wester (FNAL).

  10. 7th International Workshop on Microbeam Probes of Cellular Radiation Response

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brenner, David J.

    2009-07-21

    The extended abstracts that follow present a summary of the Proceedings of the 7th International Workshop: Microbeam Probes of Cellular Radiation Response, held at Columbia University’s Kellogg Center in New York City on March 15–17, 2006. These International Workshops on Microbeam Probes of Cellular Radiation Response have been held regularly since 1993 (1–5). Since the first workshop, there has been a rapid growth (see Fig. 1) in the number of centers developing microbeams for radiobiological research, and worldwide there are currently about 30 microbeams in operation or under development. Single-cell/single-particle microbeam systems can deliver beams of different ionizing radiations with a spatial resolution of a few micrometers down to a few tenths of a micrometer. Microbeams can be used to addressquestions relating to the effects of low doses of radiation (a single radiation track traversing a cell or group of cells), to probe subcellular targets (e.g. nucleus or cytoplasm), and to address questions regarding the propagation of information about DNA damage (for example, the radiation-induced bystander effect). Much of the recent research using microbeams has been to study low-dose effects and ‘‘non-targeted’’ responses such as bystander effects, genomic instability and adaptive responses. This Workshop provided a forum to assess the current state of microbeam technology and current biological applications and to discuss future directions for development, both technological and biological. Over 100 participants reviewed the current state of microbeam research worldwide and reported on new technological developments in the fields of both physics and biology.

  11. PREFACE: 7th International Conference on Cooling & Heating Technologies (ICCHT 2014)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-09-01

    The Kyoto protocol has initiated a pledge from almost all developing and developed countries to be committed to reducing CO2 emissions. Development of new renewable energy technologies are also of interest in this conference. Greenhouse gases have contributed to global warming and other man-made disasters. Cooling and Heating communities also have responsibilities towards the commitment of reducing the greenhouse gas emissions. In addition, depleting natural resources also act as a threat to the Cooling and Heating industries, causing them to develop highly efficient equipment and innovative technologies. The 1st International Conference on Cooling & Heating Technologies was held in Hanoi Vietnam (Jan. 2005). Whereas the 2nd, 3rd, 4th and 5th ICCHT conferences were held in Dalian, China (Jul. 2006), Tokyo, Japan (Jul. 2007), Jinhae, Korea (Oct. 2008) and Bandung, Indonesia (Dec. 2010) respectively. The 6th International Conference on Cooling & Heating Technologies (ICCTH2012) was held in Xi'an in China on November 9-12, 2012. It is our pleasure to welcome you to the 7th International Conference on Cooling & Heating Technologies (ICCTH2014) on 4th - 6th November 2014 at the Grand Dorsett Subang Hotel, Subang Jaya, Selangor Darul Ehsan, Malaysia The Theme of the Conference is ''Sustainability and Innovation in Heating & Cooling Technologies''. The sub-themes are:- • CO2 Reduction and Low Carbon Technologies • HVAC System and Natural Ventilation • Energy & Alternative Energy • Computational Fluid Dynamics • Low Temperature & Refrigeration Engineering In conjunction with the Conference, an Exhibition will be organized as an integral part of the Conference. Project experiences, product solutions, new applications and state-of-the art information will be highlighted.

  12. PREFACE: The 7th International Seminar on Geometry, Continua and Microstructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burton, David A.

    2007-04-01

    It gives me great pleasure to present the proceedings of the 7th International Seminar on Geometry, Continua and Microstructures (GCM 7). The conference took place on 25-27 September 2006 at Lancaster University and the local organisers were Robin Tucker, Tim Walton, myself and Jonathan Gratus of the Lancaster University Mathematical Physics Group. Modern field theories of mechanically and electrically responsive continua have a wealth of interesting applications in physics. Such theories provide effective macroscopic models of complex systems, such as living tissue and material with dynamical defects, that capture macroscopic consequences of microscopic phenomena. GCM is an interdisciplinary conference series, initiated by the Eringen medallist Gérard A Maugin, that brings together physicists and applied mathematicians who have interests in continuum mechanics and differential geometry and who aim to develop new and powerful methods for analysing the behaviour of complex mechanical systems. The earlier conferences in the series were held in Paris, Madrid, Mannheim, Turin, Sinaia and Belgrade. This volume addresses a variety of topics including the physics of saturated porous media, the relationship between growth in living tissue and molecular transport, the mechanics of polymer bonds, the macroscopic properties of damaged elastomers, the mechanics of carbon nanotubes, the geometry of balance systems in Continuum Thermodynamics and wave propagation in the material manifold. I would like to warmly thank the rest of the organising committee and the conference participants for making GCM 7 an enjoyable and rewarding occasion. Photographs may be found at http://www.lancs.ac.uk/depts/spc/conf/gcm7/wss/index.htm David A Burton Editor

  13. Myocardial perfusion SPECT 2015 in Germany. Results of the 7th survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindner, Oliver; Burchert, Wolfgang; Schäfer, Wolfgang; Hacker, Marcus

    2017-02-14

    The working group Cardiovascular Nuclear Medicine of the German Society of Nuclear Medicine presents the results of the 7th survey of myocardial perfusion SPECT (MPS) of the reporting year 2015. 268 questionnaires (173 practices [PR], 67 hospitals [HO], 28 university hospitals [UH]) were evaluated. Results of the last survey from 2012 are set in squared brackets. MPS of 121 939 [105 941] patients were reported. 98 % [95 %] of all MPS were performed with Tc-99m radiopharmaceuticals and 2 % [5 %] with Tl-201. 78 % [79 %] of all patients were studied in PR, 14 % [15 %] in HO, and 8 % [6 %] in UH. A pharmacological stress test was performed in 43 % [39 %] (22 % [24 %] adenosine, 20 % [9 %] regadenoson, 1 % [6 %] dipyridamole or dobutamine). Attenuation correction was applied in 25 % [2009: 10 %] of MPS. Gated SPECT was performed in 78 % [70 %] of all rest MPS, in 80 % [73 %] of all stress and in 76 % [67 %] of all stress and rest MPS. 53 % [33 %] of all nuclear medicine departments performed MPS scoring by default, whereas 24 % [41 %] did not apply any quantification. 31 % [26 %] of all departments noticed an increase in their counted MPS and 29 % [29 %] no changes. Data from 89 departments which participated in all surveys showed an increase in MPS count of 11.1 % (PR: 12.2 %, HO: 4.8 %, UH: 18.4 %). 70 % [60 %] of the MPS were requested by ambulatory care cardiologists. The 2015 MPS survey reveals a high-grade adherence of routine MPS practice to current guidelines. The positive trend in MPS performance and number of MPS already observed in 2012 continues. Educational training remains necessary in the field of SPECT scoring.

  14. 7th Patras workshop on axions, WIMPs and WISPs (PATRAS 2011). Proceedings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zioutas, Konstantin; Schumann, Marc

    2011-12-01

    The year 2011 was an exciting period to work on the ''dark side'' of the Universe. Several experimental claims of the direct detection of WIMP dark matter were challenged by the restrictive limits of several others. Dedicated experiments searching for axions, another well motivated dark matter candidate, and for axion-like particles continued to improve their limits and got an additional boost by puzzling astrophysical observations and new developments in theory. The LHC collected an unexpectedly large amount of data and started to produce results at an amazing speed. And finally, this year's Nobel price of physics was awarded to the observation of the accelerating expansion of the Universe, an effect which might be related to dark energy, whose nature remain among the biggest mysteries in physics. These exciting topics and many more important aspects of particle- and astroparticle physics were discussed between experimentalists and theorists at the 7th Patras Workshop on Axions, WIMPs, and WISPs. The workshop took place from June 27 - July 1, 2011, in the Royal Myconian and Myconian Imperial Resorts Hotels on the Greek island of Mykonos. As in the previous years, it was a very fruitful and lively meeting in an inspiring and open atmosphere, which allowed for many open and constructive discussions also on controversial topics. The scientific exchange, the beautiful scenery of the island, the venue itself, the food, an excursion to the ancient ruins of Delos, and finally an amazing conference dinner made this meeting really unique. The ''spirit'' of the workshop and its atmosphere cannot be brought to paper, but many of its scientific highlights are collected in these proceedings. We are looking forward to the 8th Patras Workshop, which will be held in Chicago (USA) July 18-22, 2012. It will be organized jointly by our US colleagues Andrei Afanasev (JLAB), Oliver Baker (Yale), and William Wester (FNAL).

  15. John Scott Haldane: The father of oxygen therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K C Sekhar

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available John Scott Haldane was a versatile genius who solved several problems of great practical significance. His ability to look beyond the laboratory and investigate theory added crucial findings in the field of respiratory physiology. His work on high altitude physiology, diving physiology, oxygen therapy, and carbon monoxide poisoning led to a sea change in clinical medicine and improved safety and reduced mortality and morbidity in many high risk situations.

  16. Cerebrovascular disease associated with Aarskog-Scott syndrome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DiLuna, Michael L.; Amankulor, Nduka M.; Gunel, Murat [Yale University School of Medicine, Department of Neurosurgery, New Haven, CT (United States); Johnson, Michele H. [Yale University School of Medicine, Department of Diagnostic Radiology, New Haven, CT (United States)

    2007-05-15

    Faciogenital dysplasia, also known as Aarskog-Scott syndrome (AAS), is an X-linked dominant congenital disorder characterized by multiple facial, musculoskeletal, dental, neurological and urogenital abnormalities, ocular manifestations, congenital heart defects, low IQ and behavioral problems. Here we describe an unusual presentation of dysplastic carotid artery, basilar artery malformation or occlusion and posterior circulation aneurysm in a 13-year-old male with AAS. (orig.)

  17. Cerebrovascular disease associated with Aarskog-Scott syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DiLuna, Michael L.; Amankulor, Nduka M.; Gunel, Murat; Johnson, Michele H.

    2007-01-01

    Faciogenital dysplasia, also known as Aarskog-Scott syndrome (AAS), is an X-linked dominant congenital disorder characterized by multiple facial, musculoskeletal, dental, neurological and urogenital abnormalities, ocular manifestations, congenital heart defects, low IQ and behavioral problems. Here we describe an unusual presentation of dysplastic carotid artery, basilar artery malformation or occlusion and posterior circulation aneurysm in a 13-year-old male with AAS. (orig.)

  18. STS-82 Pilot Scott Horowitz arrives for TCDT

    Science.gov (United States)

    1997-01-01

    STS-82 Pilot Scott J. 'Doc' Horowitz arrives at KSCs Shuttle Landing Facility in a T-38 jet from Houston, TX. Horowitz and the other six crew members are at KSC to participate in the Terminal Countdown Demonstration Test (TCDT), a dress rehearsal for launch. The crew aboard the Space Shuttle Discovery on STS-82 will conduct the second Hubble Space Telescope servicing mission. The 10-day flight is targeted for a Feb. 11 liftoff.

  19. STS-90 Pilot Scott Altman in white room before launch

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998-01-01

    STS-90 Pilot Scott Altman is assisted by NASA and USA closeout crew members immediately preceding launch for the nearly 17-day Neurolab mission. Investigations during the Neurolab mission will focus on the effects of microgravity on the nervous system. Linnehan and six fellow crew members will shortly enter the orbiter at KSC's Launch Pad 39B, where the Space Shuttle Columbia will lift off during a launch window that opens at 2:19 p.m. EDT, April 17.

  20. Aldred scott warthin: Pathologist and teacher par excellence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vineeth G Nair

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Born in 1866, Aldred Scott Warthin was a pathologist and teacher of great repute. Even though many know him from his eponyms, the true value of his achievements, and how far he was ahead of his peers, is known to but a few modern day medical students. It was in fact, based on his work, that Henry Lynch came up with his theories on the genetic nature of cancer. He died in 1931 leaving a lot of work unfinished.

  1. On Scott-Phillips' General Account of Communication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Planer, Ronald J

    2017-12-01

    The purpose of this paper is to critically engage with a recent attempt by Thom Scott-Phillips to offer a general account of communication. As a general account, it is intended to apply equally well to both non-human and human interactions which are prima facie communicative in character. However, so far, Scott-Phillips has provided little detail regarding how his account is supposed to apply to the latter set of cases. After presenting what I take to be the most plausible way of filling in those details, I argue that his account would appear to be too narrow: it (minimally) fails to capture a range of human interactions which strike us as instances of communication. To wit, these are cases in which some but not all of the information an act is designed to convey to a reactor actually reaches that reactor. An alternative account incorporating Scott-Phillips' main insights is then sketched, and it is suggested that this account, or something like it, would accommodate the full range of non-human and human interactions that are intuitively communicative.

  2. Selected papers from the 7th International Conference on Microtechnologies in Medicine and Biology (MMB 2013)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Ellis; Takayama, Shuichi

    2014-03-01

    In this special section of Journal of Micromechanics and Microengineering are a collection of the best microengineering papers presented at the 7th International Conference on Microtechnologies in Medicine and Biology (MMB 2013) which took place in the seaside town of Marina del Rey, California, USA on 10-12 April, 2013. During the 3-day conference, participants enjoyed talks from 6 invited keynote speakers and 125 flash oral/poster presentations. The MMB conference is a biennial meeting with the primary purpose of fostering interactions between biologists and medical researchers, clinicians, chemists, physicists and engineers to enhance and strengthen the potential microtechnologies that will revolutionize the fields of medicine and biological sciences. The conference possesses a unique format where all poster presenters provide a brief 60 s oral presentation highlighting their research. This format was devised to provide training and exposure for young researchers, especially PhD students and postdocs, in the field and stimulate interdisciplinary exchanges. Therefore, MMB provides an intimate intellectual venue the facilitate discussions and collaborations to advance new research tools and technologies for medicine and biological sciences. The MMB conference series was co-founded by Professor David Beebe (University of Wisconsin—Madison) and Professor André Dittmar (University of Lyon) and was the first international meeting to provide a forum focusing on emerging applications of microtechnologies to unmet needs in medicine and biology. The series was held for the first time in 2000, in Lyon, France and followed by Madison, USA (2002), Oahu Island in Hawaii, USA (2005), Okinawa, Japan (2006), Québec City, Canada (2009), Lucerne, Switzerland (2011), and Marina del Rey, USA (2013). The next conference will be held in Seoul, Korea in 2015. This collection of articles highlights recent progress in microtechnologies with medical and biological applications. We are

  3. Effectiveness of Motor Skills Development in 5th-7th Grade Girls at Different Modes of Physical Exercises

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olga Ivashchenko

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The objective is to determine the influence of the physical exercises modes on effectiveness of motor skills development in 5th-7th grade girls.  Materials and methods. The study involved 5th grade girls (n = 28, 6th grade girls (n = 28 and 7th grade girls (n = 24. To solve the tasks set, the study relied on general scientific and special research methods, methods of mathematical experiment-planning. Studying the influence of different variants of the educational process structure, namely: the number of repetitions (x1 and the rest intervals (x2 on acquisition of the technique of physical exercises performance, provided for achieving the objective. A full 22 type factorial experiment was conducted. The 5th-7th graders were divided into training groups according to the experiment plan. In total, there were twelve experimental groups organized, four in each class. Results. The analysis of the regression equations shows that the rest interval between repetitions (x2 has the greatest influence on teaching 5th-7th grade girls physical exercises, with the number of repetitions (x1 being of somewhat less significant influence. The relation between these factors (x1x2 has a considerable weight in teaching to “rope climb in two or three sets” and to do a “pullover mount with a swing of one and a push-off with the other leg”. Conclusions. To increase the effectiveness of teaching 5th-7th grade girls physical exercises, the number of repetitions in throwing exercises should be increased to twelve times, and the rest interval reduced to 60 seconds. In the 7th grade, the number of repetitions should be reduced to six times, and the rest interval – to 60 seconds. The rest intervals in the exercises: “pullover mount with a swing of one and a push-off with the other leg” and “rope climbing in two or three sets”, should be reduced to 60 seconds and the number of repetitions – to six.

  4. Results of 6th Review Meeting and Perspective of the 7th Review Meeting of the Convention on Nuclear Safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Sukho; Kim, Manwoong; You, Jeongwon; Lee, Youngeal

    2017-01-01

    This paper highlighted the objective and role of the Convention on Nuclear Safety organized by the IAEA. The Convention provides Member States to demonstrate and share how to maintain and improve the level of nuclear safety. The results of the 6 th review meeting were implemented for safety improvements and to prepare for 7 th national report. Seven and a half months before the 7 th Review Meeting, the National Report has submitted on steps and measures taken to implement Convention obligations. The Contracting Parties reviewed each other’s reports, and exchanged written questions, written answers and comments. The discussions in the Country Group sessions were generally good with a lively and frank exchange of information. The Country Groups noted the significant measures taken by Contracting Parties to improve nuclear safety and identified a number of good practices to be shared with all Contracting Parties.

  5. 7th International Workshop on Application of Lasers in Atomic Nuclei Research “Nuclear Ground and Isometric State Properties”

    CERN Document Server

    Błaszczak, Z; Marinova, K; LASER 2006

    2007-01-01

    7th International Workshop on Application of Lasers in Atomic Nuclei Research, LASER 2004, held in Poznan, Poland, May 29-June 01, 2006 Researchers and PhD students interested in recent results in the nuclear structure investigation by laser spectroscopy, the progress of the experimental technique and the future developments in the field will find this volume indispensable. Reprinted from Hyperfine Interactions (HYPE) Volume ???

  6. *Abstracts - 7th IN-CAM Research Symposium, Evaluating CAM Practices: Effectiveness, Integration, Economics & Safety - November 2012.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boon, Heather; Verhoef, Marja J

    2012-10-23

    Abstract The following are abstracts of oral and poster presentations given at the 7th IN-CAM Research Symposium - Evaluating CAM Practices: Effectiveness, Integration, Economics & Safety, and the 4th HomeoNet Research Forum, a pre-Symposium event. The IN-CAM Research Symposium was held November 2 to 4, 2012 at the Leslie Dan Faculty of Pharmacy, University of Toronto, in Toronto, Ontario, Canada. For more information, please visit: www.incamresearch.ca.

  7. PREFACE: 7th International Conference on 3D Radiation Dosimetry (IC3DDose)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thwaites, David; Baldock, Clive

    2013-06-01

    IC3DDose 2013, the 7th International Conference on 3D Radiation Dosimetry held in Sydney, Australia from 4-8 November 2012, grew out of the DosGel series, which began as DosGel99, the 1st International Workshop on Radiation Therapy Gel Dosimetry in Lexington, Kentucky. Since 1999 subsequent DoSGel conferences were held in Brisbane, Australia (2001), Ghent, Belgium (2004), Sherbrooke, Canada (2006) and Crete, Greece (2008). In 2010 the conference was held on Hilton Head Island, South Carolina and underwent a name-change to IC3DDose. The aim of the first workshop was to bring together individuals, both researchers and users, with an interest in 3D radiation dosimetry techniques, with a mix of presentations from basic science to clinical applications, which has remained an objective for all of the meetings. One rationale of DosGel99 was stated as supporting the increasing clinical implementation of gel dosimetry, as the technique appeared, at that time, to be leaving the laboratories of gel dosimetry enthusiasts and entering clinical practice. Clearly by labelling the first workshop as the 1st, there was a vision of a continuing series, which has been fulfilled. On the other hand, the expectation of widespread clinical use of gel dosimetry has perhaps not been what was hoped for and anticipated. Nevertheless the rapidly increasing demand for advanced high-precision 3D radiotherapy technology and techniques has continued apace. The need for practical and accurate 3D dosimetry methods for development and quality assurance has only increased. By the 6th meeting, held in South Carolina in 2010, the Conference Scientific Committee recognised the wider developments in 3D systems and methods and decided to widen the scope, whilst keeping the same span from basic science to applications. This was signalled by a change of name from 'Dosgel' to 'IC3DDose', a name that has continued to this latest conference. The conference objectives were: to enhance the quality and accuracy of

  8. STS-82 Pilot Scott J. 'Doc' Horowitz Suit Up

    Science.gov (United States)

    1997-01-01

    STS-82 Pilot Scott J. 'Doc' Horowitz puts on a glove of his launch and entry suit with assistance from a suit technician in the Operations and Checkout Building. This is Horowitz''';s second space flight. He and the six other crew members will depart shortly for Launch Pad 39A, where the Space Shuttle Discovery awaits liftoff on a 10-day mission to service the orbiting Hubble Space Telescope (HST). This will be the second HST servicing mission. Four back-to-back spacewalks are planned.

  9. STS-90 Pilot Scott Altman arrives at KSC for TCDT

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998-01-01

    STS-90 Pilot Scott Altman poses in the cockpit of his T-38 jet trainer aircraft after arriving at the KSC Shuttle Landing Facility along with other members of the crew from NASAs Johnson Space Center to begin Terminal Countdown Demonstration Test (TCDT) activities. The TCDT is held at KSC prior to each Space Shuttle flight to provide crews with the opportunity to participate in simulated countdown activities. Columbia is targeted for launch of STS-90 on April 16 at 2:19 p.m. EST and will be the second mission of 1998. The mission is scheduled to last nearly 17 days.

  10. Proceedings of the Seventh International Conference on Educational Data Mining (EDM) (7th, London, United Kingdom, July 4-7, 2014)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stamper, John, Ed.; Pardos, Zachary, Ed.; Mavrikis, Manolis, Ed.; McLaren, Bruce M., Ed.

    2014-01-01

    The 7th International Conference on Education Data Mining held on July 4th-7th, 2014, at the Institute of Education, London, UK is the leading international forum for high-quality research that mines large data sets in order to answer educational research questions that shed light on the learning process. These data sets may come from the traces…

  11. Butterfly wing colours : scale beads make white pierid wings brighter

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stavenga, DG; Stowe, S; Siebke, K; Zeil, J; Arikawa, K

    2004-01-01

    The wing-scale morphologies of the pierid butterflies Pieris rapae (small white) and Delias nigrina (common jezabel), and the heliconine Heliconius melpomene are compared and related to the wing-reflectance spectra. Light scattering at the wing scales determines the wing reflectance, but when the

  12. PREFACE: Proceedings of the 7th Liquid Matter Conference (Lund, Sweden, 27 June 1 July 2008)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahl, Gerhard; Sciortino, Francesco; Ullner, Magnus

    2008-12-01

    (Utrecht) and to Professor Peter Pusey (Edinburgh) for their seminal studies of colloidal matter. In addition to plenary speeches by the two recipients of the Liquid Matter Prize, the scientific program consisted of ten plenary lectures, 108 symposia talks, 23 of which were keynote lectures, and 458 poster contributions. This special issue of Journal of Physics: Condensed Matter contains 47 of the oral communications. The conference was held in the buildings of Lund University and the Student Union facing the University Square in the heart of Lund. The organizers gratefully acknowledge the substantial financial support offered by the Nobel Foundation and by the Swedish Research Council. The success of the conference owes a great debt of gratitude to the members of the Local Organizing Committee and all the people who helped them tirelessly (and very efficiently) to make the conference run smoothly and to the members of the International Program Committee, who were deeply involved in the planning of the conference. During the conference dinner our colleague Lennart Piculell gave a singing performance, which included a song dedicated to the two winners of the Liquid Matter Prize, entitled Hard-Breaking Gel, whose lyrics are printed below. Finally, the Board of the Liquids Section of the European Physical Society decided that the 8th Liquid Matter Conference will be held in Vienna (Austria) 6-10 September 2011. Hard-Breaking Gel New lyrics by Lennart Piculell to the melody of Heartbreak Hotel, created in June 2008 for the 7th Liquid Matter Conference, dedicated to Henk Lekkerkerker and Peter Pusey. Well, since my baby left me, I found a new place to be! It's downtown Lund, in a narrow street, Where hundreds of cool people meet! There I don't feel lonely, No, I don't feel lonely - So, if you feel lonely, you should try! It's all about liquid matter: Liquids flow, and soft bodies swell! Your mind is blown, and your blood will boil To a hard-breaking gel. And you won't be lonely

  13. Usage of Metaphors in Turkish Language Textbooks Used at 6th, 7th and 8th Grades

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Esra Karakas

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available The word “Metaphor”, which is equivalent to the terms “istiare” in Arabic or “eğretileme, transfer of idioms” in Turkish, consists of two parts. “Meta” means “later” or “with” whereas “phora” means transfer or conveyance of word. In the recent years metaphor has been the subject and focuses of several studies, and is used to express a concept or situation with another concept or situation. Starting from 1980s, researchers have studied metaphor and concurrently they examined usage of language. It is now been believed that using metaphors is appropriate in order to be able to understand any phenomenon. Metaphor can be used in encouraging learning and improving creative thinking; it can also provide hints for in-the-class methods, techniques and situations. In this context, metaphors are also essential components for Turkish language textbooks. The purpose of this study is to detect the uses of metaphor in Turkish language textbooks of 6th, 7th and 8th grade students. For this purpose the Turkish language textbooks of 6th, 7th and 8th grade students prepared by the Ministry of National Education (MEB were examined with “content analysis method. Considering that metaphors are effective in learning and improving creative thinking, the importance of using metaphors in textbooks is beyond discussion. The data collected throughout this study show that the metaphors detected in 7th and 8th grade Turkish language textbooks are less in number compared to those found in 6th grade Turkish language textbooks. Another important conclusion is that distribution of metaphors among units is not even. The conclusion of the study is that Turkish language textbooks are not prepared in a sensitive and choosy manner with this respect.

  14. Understanding motivation of visitors at dark tourism sites : Case study of August 7th Memorial Park, Kenya

    OpenAIRE

    Gaya, Esther

    2013-01-01

    Recently, the fascination of death and disaster has influenced the tourism scene and today, millions of visitors from all over the world travel to sites of death and disaster. This study aims to identify what motivates tourists to visit sites of death and disaster in order to understand better visitor behavior at such sites and specifically the August 7th Memorial Park, Kenya; which was the site of a 1998 terrorist bomb attack that caused the deaths of 218 people and injured thousands more. ...

  15. Mission Specialist Scott Parazynski arrives late at KSC

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998-01-01

    The T-38 jet aircraft arrives at the Shuttle Landing Facility carrying STS-95 Mission Specialist Scott E. Parazynski (second seat). The pilot is astronaut Kent Rominger. Parazynski's first plane experienced problems at the stop at Tyndall AFB and he had to wait for another jet and pilot to finish the flight to KSC. He joined other crewmembers Mission Commander Curtis L. Brown Jr., Pilot Steven W. Lindsey, Mission Specialist Stephen K. Robinson, Payload Specialist John H. Glenn Jr., senator from Ohio, Mission Specialist Pedro Duque, with the European Space Agency (ESA), and Payload Specialist Chiaki Mukai, with the National Space Development Agency of Japan (NASDA), for final pre-launch preparations. STS-95 is expected to launch at 2 p.m. EST on Oct. 29, last 8 days, 21 hours and 49 minutes, and land at 11:49 a.m. EST on Nov. 7.

  16. STS-90 Pilot Scott Altman is suited up for launch

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998-01-01

    STS-90 Pilot Scott Altman is assisted during suit-up activities by Lockheed Suit Technician Valerie McNeil from Johnson Space Center in KSC's Operations and Checkout Building. Altman and the rest of the STS-90 crew will shortly depart for Launch Pad 39B, where the Space Shuttle Columbia awaits a second liftoff attempt at 2:19 p.m. EDT. His first trip into space, Altman is participating in a life sciences research flight that will focus on the most complex and least understood part of the human body - - the nervous system. Neurolab will examine the effects of spaceflight on the brain, spinal cord, peripheral nerves and sensory organs in the human body.

  17. Mission Specialist Scott Parazynski checks his flight suit

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998-01-01

    STS-95 Mission Specialist Scott E. Parazynski gets help with his flight suit in the Operations and Checkout Building from a suit technician George Brittingham. The final fitting takes place prior to the crew walkout and transport to Launch Pad 39B. Targeted for launch at 2 p.m. EST on Oct. 29, the mission is expected to last 8 days, 21 hours and 49 minutes, and return to KSC at 11:49 a.m. EST on Nov. 7. The STS-95 mission includes research payloads such as the Spartan solar-observing deployable spacecraft, the Hubble Space Telescope Orbital Systems Test Platform, the International Extreme Ultraviolet Hitchhiker, as well as the SPACEHAB single module with experiments on space flight and the aging process.

  18. The Great Kanto earthquake and F. Scott Fitzgerald

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawakatsu, Hitoshi; Bina, Craig R.

    How many recall the following striking sentence from The Great Gatsby by F. Scott Fitzgerald, which appears on the second page of the novel, where Fitzgerald first introduces Gatsby? “If personality is an unbroken series of successful gestures, then there was something gorgeous about him, some heightened sensitivity to the promises of life, as if he were related to one of those intricate machines that register earthquakes ten thousand miles away.”This line may have failed to focus our attention when we first read the book in our younger days. Now, however, as a Japanese seismologist and an American geophysicist (and student of Japanese culture), we would be greatly remiss for failing to take greater note of this statement. Indeed, as The Great Gatsby was published in 1925, it occurred to us that the earthquake Fitzgerald might have been thinking of was the Great Kanto earthquake, which occurred on September 1, 1923 and devastated the Tokyo metropolitan area.

  19. 78 FR 77791 - Dakota, Minnesota & Eastern Railroad Corporation-Abandonment Exemption-in Scott County, Iowa

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-24

    ... DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION Surface Transportation Board [Docket No. AB 337 (Sub-No. 7X)] Dakota, Minnesota & Eastern Railroad Corporation--Abandonment Exemption--in Scott County, Iowa Dakota, Minnesota... as Blackhawk Spur, between milepost 0.33+/- and milepost 0.99 +/- in Scott County, Iowa (the Line...

  20. An estimating function approach to inference for inhomogeneous Neyman-Scott processes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Waagepetersen, Rasmus Plenge

    “This paper is concerned with inference for a certain class of inhomogeneous Neyman-Scott point processes depending on spatial covariates. Regression parameter estimates obtained from a simple estimating function are shown to be asymptotically normal when the “mother” intensity for the Neyman-Scott...

  1. 78 FR 5854 - Application of Scott Air, LLC for Certificate Authority

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-28

    ... DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION Office of the Secretary Application of Scott Air, LLC for Certificate Authority AGENCY: Department of Transportation. ACTION: Notice of order to show cause (Order 2013-1-12... to show cause why it should not issue an order finding Scott Air, LLC fit, willing, and able, and...

  2. 78 FR 60929 - Notice of Public Meeting of the Fort Scott Council

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-02

    .... Such requests must be stated prominently at the beginning of the comments. The Trust will make... PRESIDIO TRUST Notice of Public Meeting of the Fort Scott Council AGENCY: The Presidio Trust... Scott Council (Council) will be held from 10 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. on Thursday, October 17, 2013. The...

  3. W. Richard Scott, Institutions and Organizations: Ideas, Interests, and Identities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jakobsen, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Book review of: W. Richard Scott: Institutions and Organizations: Ideas, Interests, and Identities. 4th edition. Thousand Oaks, CA: SAGE Publications, 2014. xiii, 345 pp.......Book review of: W. Richard Scott: Institutions and Organizations: Ideas, Interests, and Identities. 4th edition. Thousand Oaks, CA: SAGE Publications, 2014. xiii, 345 pp....

  4. Executive dysfunctions as part of the behavioural phenotype of Aarskog-Scott syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Egger, J.I.M.; Verhoeven, W.M.A.; Janssen, G.T.L.; Aken, L. van; Hoogeboom, A.J.M.

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Aarskog syndrome (AAS) also called Aarskog-Scott syndrome faciodigitogenital syndrome or faciogenital dysplasia is a genetically heterogeneous developmental disorder, first described in 1970 by the Norwegian pediatrician Dagfin Aarskog and further delineated by Scott in 1971. It is a

  5. Records of auroral candidates and sunspots in Rikkokushi, chronicles of ancient Japan from early 7th century to 887

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayakawa, Hisashi; Iwahashi, Kiyomi; Tamazawa, Harufumi; Ebihara, Yusuke; Kawamura, Akito Davis; Isobe, Hiroaki; Namiki, Katsuko; Shibata, Kazunari

    2017-12-01

    We present the results of the surveys on sunspots and auroral candidates in Rikkokushi, Japanese official histories from the early 7th century to 887, to review the solar and auroral activities. In total, we found one sunspot record and 13 auroral candidates in Rikkokushi. We then examine the records of the sunspots and auroral candidates, compare the auroral candidates with the lunar phase to estimate their reliability, and compare the records of the sunspots and auroral candidates with the contemporary total solar irradiance reconstructed from radioisotope data. We also identify the locations of the observational sites to review possible equatorward expansion of the auroral oval. These discussions suggest a major gap in auroral candidates from the late 7th to early 9th centuries, which includes the candidate of the grand minimum reconstructed from the radioisotope data, a similar tendency as the distributions of sunspot records in contemporary China, and a relatively high magnetic latitude of observational sites with a higher potential for observing aurorae more frequently than at present.

  6. The proceedings of the 14th national symposium on atomic physics and nuclear physics and the 7th annual meeting on modern physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2002-01-01

    It is the proceedings of the 14th national symposium on atomic physics and nuclear physics and the 7th annual meeting on modern physics. 27 theses are collected in these proceedings. Many of them are related with nuclear physics

  7. Comparison of the 7(th) and proposed 8(th) editions of the AJCC/UICC TNM staging system for non-small cell lung cancer undergoing radical surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Ying; Chen, Ming; Yu, Xinmin

    2016-09-19

    The present study aims to compare the 7(th) and the proposed 8(th) edition of the AJCC/UICC TNM staging system for NSCLC in a cohort of patients from a single institution. A total of 408 patients with NSCLC who underwent radical surgery were analyzed retrospectively. Survivals were analyzed using the Kaplan -Meier method and were compared using the log-rank test. Multivariate analysis was performed by the Cox proportional hazard model. The Akaike information criterion (AIC) and C-index were applied to compare the two prognostic systems with different numbers of stages. The 7(th) AJCC T categories, the proposed 8(th) AJCC T categories, N categories, visceral pleural invasion, and vessel invasion were found to have statistically significant associations with disease-free survival (DFS) on univariate analysis. In the 7(th) edition staging system as well as in the proposed 8(th) edition, T categories, N categories, and pleural invasion were independent factors for DFS on multivariate analysis. The AIC value was smaller for the 8(th) edition compared to the 7(th) edition staging system. The C-index value was larger for the 8(th) edition compared to the 7(th) edition staging system. Based on the data from our single center, the proposed 8(th) AJCC T classification seems to be superior to the 7(th) AJCC T classification in terms of DFS for patients with NSCLC underwent radical surgery.

  8. Heroes for the past and present: a century of remembering Amundsen and Scott.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Peder

    2011-12-01

    In 1911-1912 Roald Amundsen and Robert Falcon Scott led rival parties in a race to the geographic South Pole. While both parties reached the Pole--Amundsen first--Scott's men died on the return journey. Amundsen became a Norwegian icon through his record-setting travels; Scott became a symbol of courage and devotion to science. The memory of each was invoked at various points during the twentieth century in the context of contemporary Antarctic events. Scott's status as a scientific figure was central to the Scott Polar Research Institute, while Amundsen's lack of scientific legacy became a way for British polar explorers to differentiate themselves from Norwegian contemporaries during the interwar years. After 1945 Scott and Amundsen were again invoked as exemplars of national polar achievement, even as the rise of large-scale science on the continent overshadowed past British and Norwegian achievements. In the present Amundsen and Scott remain wedded to particular values, focused respectively on national achievement and sacrifice in the name of science, while their race has become secondary. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Behaviour of Human Hemodynamics under Microcavity –a Proposal for the 7th German Parabolic Flight Campaign

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vladimir Blazek

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available All astronauts often feel uncomfortable during first encounter microgravity because of fluid shifts from the lower extremities to the head caused by weightlessness. Parabolic flights offer a great possibility for research of this phenomenon under “zero gravity”. With a combination of the optoelectronic sensor concepts PPG and PPGI and an ultrasound device it should be possible to measure all relevant parameters for description and further explanation of rapid fluid shifts along the body axis in humans during parabolic flights. A research team of the RWTH Aachen University and the Charité University Berlin will participate in the 7th German Parabolic Flight Campaign in September 2005 and perform the experiments under micro gravitation. A combination of used non-invasive strategies will reveal new insights into the human hemodynamics under microgravity conditions. The optoelectronic part of this interdisciplinary research experiment, details from the measuring setup, data collecting and post processing will be discussed.

  10. A compositional study of a museum jewellery collection (7th-1st BC) by means of a portable XRF spectrometer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karydas, A.G.; Kotzamani, D.; Bernard, R.; Barrandon, J.N.; Zarkadas, Ch.

    2004-01-01

    Within the framework of the project 'Jewelmed' (ICA3-1999-10020), the chemical composition of 34 gold and four silver jewels was examined. These jewels belong to the Benaki museum's collection in Athens, Greece and are dating from the 7th to the 1st century BC. The compositional analysis of the jewels was performed by means of a 'home-made' portable X-ray fluorescence (XRF) spectrometer. The XRF results have shown that the gold jewels can be categorized in two groups, which include artifacts made by native and by high purity gold, respectively. For the silver jewels the results have provided interesting information regarding the manufacturing technology, the authenticity of the jewels and the raw materials used. The potential and the limitations of the XRF technique, applied in the chemical analysis of archaeological metal artifacts, are also discussed

  11. Overview and research agenda arising from the 7th World Workshop on Oral Health and Disease in AIDS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tappuni, A R; Shiboski, C

    2016-04-01

    The Research Agenda generated by the 7th World Workshop on Oral Health and Disease in AIDS (WW7) is delivered in this paper. Panels of international experts presided over nine workshops that constituted the conference held in November 2014 in Hyderabad, India. The main goal of the Workshop was to bring together clinician and scientists interested in the subject to debate with world-wide perspectives current issues related to the oral manifestations in HIV/AIDS. The workshops were structured around three themes; basic science, clinical/translational science and social science and were attended by 135 participants from 31 countries. The research questions debated at the workshops are presented in nine consensus papers published in this issue and are summarised in this paper along with an outline of the identified research needs in the field. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. A social way to experience a scientific event: Twitter use at the 7th European Public Health Conference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bert, Fabrizio; Zeegers Paget, Dineke; Scaioli, Giacomo

    2016-03-01

    Many studies have analysed Twitter's use by attendees of scientific meetings and the characteristics of conference-related messages and most active attendees. Despite these previous reports, to date no studies have described the use of Twitter during Public Health conferences. For this reason, we decided to perform an analysis of Twitter's use during the 7th European Public Health (EPH) Conference (Glasgow, November 2014). All the tweets published from 21 July to 2 December 2014 and including the hashtag #ephglasgow were retrieved and much information (author, date, retweets, favourites, mentions, presence of pictures and/or external links, content type and topics) was analysed. A total of 1066 tweets with the hashtag #ephglasgow were retrieved; 86.3% of these were tweeted during the conference. A total of 209 single accounts tweeted, pictures were present in 29.7% tweets while external links were published in 13.8%. Conference speakers were mentioned in around 30% of tweets. Almost 60% of the tweets had a session-related content. Considering only the session-related tweets, one-third had as the main topic 'Health inequalities and migrant and ethnic minority health', while 20% were 'Health policy and health economics' oriented. The results of this study have demonstrated a massive use of Twitter by conference attendees during the 7th EPH conference, and that conference attendees are willing to share quotes and impressions particularly about conference-related topics. It is mandatory for conference organisers to promote online discussion and knowledge dissemination during conferences, especially in the public health field. © 2015 the Nordic Societies of Public Health.

  13. Professor John Scott, folate and neural tube defects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffbrand, A Victor

    2014-02-01

    John Scott (1940-2013) was born in Dublin where he was to spend the rest of his career, both as an undergraduate and subsequently Professor of Biochemistry and Nutrition at Trinity College. His research with the talented group of scientists and clinicians that he led has had a substantial impact on our understanding of folate metabolism, mechanisms of its catabolism and deficiency. His research established the leading theory of folate involvement with vitamin B12 in the pathogenesis of vitamin B12 neuropathy. He helped to establish the normal daily intake of folate and the increased requirements needed either in food or as a supplement before and during pregnancy to prevent neural tube defects. He also suggested a dietary supplement of vitamin B12 before and during pregnancy to reduce the risk of neural tube defects. It would be an appropriate epitaph if fortification of food with folic acid became mandatory in the UK and Ireland, as it is in over 70 other countries. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. STS-103 Pilot Scott Kelly during TCDT activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999-01-01

    STS-103 Pilot Scott J. Kelly is ready to take his turn at driving a small armored personnel carrier that is part of emergency egress training during Terminal Countdown Demonstration Test (TCDT) activities. Behind him (left) is Mission Specialist Jean-Frangois Clervoy of France, who is with the European Space Agency. At right is Mission Specialist Steven L. Smith. The tracked vehicle could be used by the crew in the event of an emergency at the pad during which the crew must make a quick exit from the area. The TCDT also provides simulated countdown exercises and opportunities to inspect the mission payloads in the orbiter's payload bay. STS-103 is a 'call-up' mission due to the need to replace and repair portions of the Hubble Space Telescope. Although Hubble is operating normally and conducting its scientific observations, only three of its six gyroscopes are working properly. Four EVA's are planned to make the necessary repairs and replacements on the telescope. The other STS-103 crew members are Commander Curtis L. Brown Jr. and Mission Specialists C. Michael Foale (Ph.D.), John M. Grunsfeld (Ph.D.), and Claude Nicollier of Switzerland, who also is with the European Space Agency. The mission is targeted for launch Dec. 6 at 2:37 a.m. EST.

  15. Aurora 7 the Mercury space flight of M. Scott Carpenter

    CERN Document Server

    Burgess, Colin

    2016-01-01

    TO A NATION enthralled by the heroic exploits of the Mercury astronauts, the launch of Lt. Cmdr. Scott Carpenter on NASA’s second orbital space flight was a renewed cause for pride, jubilation and celebration. Within hours, that excitement had given way to stunned disbelief and anxiety as shaken broadcasters began preparing the American public for the very real possibility that an American astronaut and his spacecraft may have been lost at sea. In fact, it had been a very close call. Completely out of fuel and forced to manually guide Aurora 7 through the frightening inferno of re-entry, Carpenter brought the Mercury spacecraft down to a safe splashdown in the ocean. In doing so, he controversially overshot the intended landing zone. Despite his efforts, Carpenter’s performance on the MA-7 mission was later derided by powerful figures within NASA. He would never fly into space again. Taking temporary leave of NASA, Carpenter participated in the U.S. Navy’s pioneering Sealab program. For a record 30 days...

  16. Ron Scott d/b/a White Dog Painting Information Sheet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ron Scott d/b/a White Dog Painting (the Company) is located in Kansas City, Missouri. The settlement involves renovation activities conducted at property constructed prior to 1978, located in Kansas City, Missouri.

  17. Marion duPont Scott Equine Medical Center uses innovative lameness treatment

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Kate

    2009-01-01

    Virginia Tech's Marion duPont Scott Equine Medical Center is now offering an equine lameness therapy that prevents further degeneration of the affected joint and offers a longer-lasting benefit than traditional steroid treatment.

  18. Eesti tervishoid on tõesti hea. Aitäh, USA! / Scott Abel

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Abel, Scott

    2010-01-01

    Ameeriklane Scott Abel kirjutab, et president Barack Obama tervishoiureform mõjutab arstiabi ka Eestis. Vastukaja artiklile: Turay, Abdul. Kindla individualismi traditsioon // Postimees (2010) 30. märts, lk. 12

  19. An Overview of Justice in Sir Walter Scott Waverley Novels: The Heart of Mid-Lothian

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Enrique García Díaz

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Although Sir Walter Scott is a well-known writer most of his readers know that he became an advocate in 1792, when he was admitted to the bar. Since then Scott and other advocates walked the floor at Parliament House (home of the Faculty of Advocates and the Court of Session waiting to be hired. Scott’s own experiences as a fledgling advocate are echoed in those of Alain Fairford in his novel Redgauntlet (Scott 1824, which provides a vivid picture of Parliament House in the eighteenth century. During his life, Scott combined extensive writing and editing issues with his daily work as Clerk of Session and Sheriff-Depute of Selkirkshire. Walter Scott was not unaware of Justice and Law and The Heart of Mid-Lothian is the novel in which he introduces to the reader the Scottish Legal System during the eighteenth century. However, there are few more examples that I will explain. Aunque Sir Walter Scott es un conocido escritor, la mayoría de sus lectores saben que en 1792 se hizo abogado, cuando fue admitido en el colegio de abogados. Desde entonces Scott y otros abogados rondaron el Parlamento con la esperanza de ser contratados. Las propias experiencias de Scott como un abogado novel se reflejan en las de Alain Fairford en su novela Redgauntlet (Scott 1824, lo que ofrece una vívida imagen del Parlamento (sede de la facultad de Derecho y Tribunal Supremo en el siglo XVIII. Durante su vida, Scott compaginó una profusa actividad como escritor y editor con su trabajo diario como juez en Selkirk. Walter Scott conocía la justicia y el derecho y El corazón de Mid-Lothian es la novela en la presenta al lector el régimen jurídico de Escocia durante el siglo XVIII. Sin embargo, se explicarán algunos otros ejemplos. DOWNLOAD THIS PAPER FROM SSRN: http://ssrn.com/abstract=2543538

  20. EDITORIAL: Proceedings of the 7th International LISA Symposium, Barcelona, Spain, 16-20 June 2008 Proceedings of the 7th International LISA Symposium, Barcelona, Spain, 16-20 June 2008

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lobo, Alberto; Sopuerta, Carlos F.

    2009-05-01

    In June 2006 the LISA International Science Team (LIST) accepted the bid presented by the Institut d'Estudis Espacials de Catalunya (IEEC) to host the 7th International LISA Symposium. This was during its 11th meeting at the University of Maryland, just before the 6th edition of the symposium started at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center. The 7th International LISA Symposium took place in the city of Barcelona, Spain, 16-20 June, 2008, in the premises of CosmoCaixa, a modern science museum located in the hills near Tibidabo. Almost 240 delegates registered for the event, a record breaking figure compared to previous editions of the symposium. Many of the most renowned world experts in LISA, gravitational wave science, and astronomy, as well as engineers, attended LISA #7 and produced state of the art presentations, while everybody benefited from the opportunity to have live discussions during the week in a friendly environment. The programme included 31 invited plenary lectures in the mornings, and eight parallel sessions in the afternoons. These were classified into seven major areas of research: LISA Technology, LISA PathFinder, LISA PathFinder Data Analysis, LISA Data Analysis, Gravitational Wave Sources, Cosmology and Fundamental Physics with LISA and Other Gravitational Wave Detectors. Abstracts for 138 communications were received, from which a selection was made by the session convenors which would fit time constraints. Up to 63 posters completed the scientific programme. More details on the programme, including some of the talks, can be found at the symposium website:http://www.ice.cat/research/LISA_Symposium. There was, however, a remarkable add-on: Professor Clifford Will delivered a startling presentation to the general public, who completely filled the Auditori—the main conference room, 320 seats—and were invited to ask questions to the speaker who boldly guided them through the daunting world of Black Holes, Waves of Gravity, and other Warped Ideas

  1. Investigation of the Development of 7th Grade Students’ Skills to Define, Construct and Classify Polygons with Cabri Geometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmet Yanık

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the study is to investigate the development of 7th Grade students’ skills to define, construct and classify polygons in geometry course with Cabri Geometry II Plus software geometry, an example of dynamic geometry software. The study used qualitative and quantitative research methods in accordance with the research objectives and focus, so it was designed as a mixed method research. The participants of the study were 21 7th Grade students, 11 girls and 10 boys, who were attending a secondary school in Eskişehir city center during 2012-2013 school year. As a source of qualitative data, four students in this class were selected for the interview. The data were collected with “Polygon Identification and Classification Scale”, one group pre-test and post-test in order to determine the level of development and significance level of the gender variable, and Cabri Geometry worksheets developed by the researchers. The quantitative data were analyzed with SPSS Statistics 20. Also, t-test and Wilcoxon test were used in data analysis. The data obtained from the interviews were analyzed through descriptive analysis. The qualitative data showed that the mean of correct answers given by the students to the questions in the Polygon Identification and Classification Scale was higher in the post-test than the pre-test. The ttest results for the pre-test and post-test mean scores and the results of the paired samples test showed a significant difference in favor of the post-test. There was no significant difference based on the gender variable. On the other hand, the data obtained from the interviews were coded under five different themes. The activities about the concept of formation showed that incorrect formations caused incorrect generalizations about the shapes. The study found that, as a result of the teaching practice in the study, hierarchical relations among polygons were expressed correctly. Finally, after the practice, the

  2. The Effectiveness of Cooperative Learning Methods on 7th Level “The Structure of Matter and Properties” Unit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yasemin KOÇ

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this research are to determine the effectiveness of Student Teams-Achievement Division (STAD and Reading-Writing-Application (RWA methods of cooperative learning model on academic achievement at the unit of 7th Level “The Structure of Matter and Properties” and students’ views related to methods. The sample of this research are 102 students from two different secondary school in Ağrı. As data collecting tools, Pre-Knowledge Test (PKT, Academic Achievement Test (AAT and Scale Methods Views (SMV is used. For the analysis of the obtained data, one-way variance analysis (ANOVA was used for pre- test and analysis covariance (ANCOVA for academic achievement test because of significant differences in the groups’ pre- test. Descriptive statistics for students’ views about methods are used. It was found that RWA and STAD have similar effects on students’ academic achievement and students instructed with these techniques are more successful than students instructed with teacher centered instruction.

  3. Adherence and delivery: Implementation quality and program outcomes for the 7th grade keepin’ it REAL program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pettigrew, Jonathan; Graham, John W.; Miller-Day, Michelle; Hecht, Michael L.; Krieger, Janice L.; Shin, Young Ju

    2014-01-01

    Poor implementation quality (IQ) is known to reduce program effects making it important to consider IQ for evaluation and dissemination of prevention programs. However, less is known about the ways specific implementation variables relate to outcomes. In this study, two versions of the keepin’ it REAL, 7th grade drug prevention intervention were implemented in 78 classrooms in 25 schools in rural districts in Pennsylvania and Ohio. IQ was measured through observational coding of 276 videos. IQ variables included adherence to the curriculum, teacher engagement (attentiveness, enthusiasm, seriousness, clarity, positivity), student engagement (attention, participation), and a global rating of teacher delivery quality. Factor analysis showed that teacher engagement, student engagement, and delivery quality formed one factor, which was labeled delivery. A second factor was adherence to the curriculum. Self-report student surveys measured substance use, norms (beliefs about prevalence and acceptability of use), and efficacy (beliefs about one’s ability to refuse substance offers) at two waves (pretest, immediate posttest). Mixed model regression analysis which accounted for missing data and controlled for pretest levels examined implementation quality’s effects on individual level outcomes, statistically controlling for cluster level effects. Results show that when implemented well, students show positive outcomes compared to students receiving a poorly implemented program. Delivery significantly influenced substance use and norms, but not efficacy. Adherence marginally significantly predicted use and significantly predicted norms, but not efficacy. Findings underscore the importance of comprehensively measuring and accounting for IQ, particularly delivery, when evaluating prevention interventions. PMID:24442403

  4. Results of 7th regular inspection of No.1 plant in Oi Power Station, Kansai Electric Power Co., Inc

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-01-01

    The 7th regular inspection of No.1 plant in Oi Power Station was carried out from December 25, 1987 to July 15, 1988. The parallel operation was resumed on June 23, 1988, 182 days after the start of the inspection. The facilities to be inspected were the reactor proper, reactor cooling system, measurement and control system, fuel facilities, radiation control facilities, waste facilities, reactor containment installation and emergency power generation system. On these facilities to be inspected, the appearance, disassembling, leak, function, performance and other inspections were carried out, and as the results, a part of the fitting of a water chamber partition cover for a steam generator broke off, significant signals were observed in 936 heating tubes of steam generators, 72 bolts for fixing the blade of a primary coolant pump were damaged, and leak was found in two fuel assemblies. The works related to this regular inspection were accomplished within the range of allowable radiation dose based on the relevant laws. The main reconstruction works carried out during the period of this regular inspection were the use of the fuel containing gadolinia, the removal of a thermometer bypass piping and the repair of defective steam generator tubes. (K.I.)

  5. 7th Expert meeting radiation protection. International developments, waste management, challenges for the radiation protection in aging nuclear installations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2010-01-01

    The proceedings of the 7th Expert meeting on radiation protection include contributions to the following topics: nuclear power and public opinion, IAEA safety standards, ISOE - information system on occupational exposure, European harmonization of the radiation protection education, WANO - challenges and results, CTBTO's global radiation measurement network, state of final radioactive waste disposal in Germany and worldwide, radioactive waste management and disposal in French NPPs, preparedness for final waste disposal in Schacht Konrad, actualization of the transport study Konrad, transport of NPPs' operational radioactive waste and waste from decommissioned reactor demolition to the final repository Konrad, qualification of radioactive waste casks for the final repository Konrad, radioactive waste disposal management concept in Switzerland, aging management and radiation protection, decontamination as effective measure for dose rate reduction - long-term and sustainable dose rate reduction by primary circuit decontamination, system and component decontamination for individual and collective dose reduction - practical examples, radiation protection map - electronic assistance for work planning, EPR dismantling already today? radiation protection register 2002-2010 - knowledge based on a decade of radiation monitoring, actual information on radiation protection in medicine, mobile telecommunication - actual research results.

  6. Summary and consensus in 7th International Conference on acoustic neuroma: An update for the management of sporadic acoustic neuromas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hao Wu

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Sporadic vestibular schwannoma (acoustic neuroma is a benign tumor arising from cochleovestibular nerve. Nowadays, various specialties and medical centers are treating this disease, and the multidisciplinary collaboration is the trend. In an effort to promote a uniform standard for reporting clinical results, even for treatment indications, the mainly controversies were posed and discussed during the 7th International Conference on acoustic neuroma, and the agreement was summarized by the Committee of this conference. The main symptoms grading and tumor stage should note its name of classification for making them comparable. The goal of the modern managements for vestibular schwannoma is to improve the quality of life with lower mortality, lower morbidity and better neurological function preservation. The experience of surgical team and their preference might be a major factor for the outcome. Because of lacking of long-term follow-up large data after radiotherapy, and with the development of microsurgery, radiotherapy is now less recommended except for recurrent cases or elderly patients. Keywords: Sporadic acoustic neuroma, Vestibular schwannoma, Management, Symptoms grading, Tumor stage, Microsurgery, Radiotherapy

  7. The USCACA hosted symposiums at the 7th CACA annual meeting and the 15th CSCO annual meeting in Beijing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Michael; Yang, Wancai; Qian, Pascal; Yan, Li

    2012-11-01

    In September 2012, the US Chinese Anti-Cancer Association (USCACA) hosted two symposiums in Beijing. The USCACA hosted the first joint session at the 7th annual meetings of the Chinese Anti-Cancer Association (CACA), themed on "Collaboration between the US and China in Cancer Research." Six experts from the United States and China presented their latest work on basic and translational cancer research. During this symposium, 5 young Chinese scholars, returnees after their training in the United States, were honored the"AFCR-USCACA Scholarships Award." The USCACA hosted a second symposium during the 15th annual meeting of the Chinese Society of Clinical Oncology (CSCO), focused on the "US-China Collaboration in Cancer Drug Clinical Development." An international delegation of oncology experts presented the innovative clinical trial strategies and discussed the biomarkers for cancer early detection and clinical trials, targeted therapy, and new drug development. The Oncology Drug Clinical Development and Safety Evaluation Committee was also launched to promote an innovative environment and to provide a collaborative platform for anti-cancer drug development in China.

  8. Flexible wings in flapping flight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moret, Lionel; Thiria, Benjamin; Zhang, Jun

    2007-11-01

    We study the effect of passive pitching and flexible deflection of wings on the forward flapping flight. The wings are flapped vertically in water and are allowed to move freely horizontally. The forward speed is chosen by the flapping wing itself by balance of drag and thrust. We show, that by allowing the wing to passively pitch or by adding a flexible extension at its trailing edge, the forward speed is significantly increased. Detailed measurements of wing deflection and passive pitching, together with flow visualization, are used to explain our observations. The advantage of having a wing with finite rigidity/flexibility is discussed as we compare the current results with our biological inspirations such as birds and fish.

  9. Studying the Ability of 7th Grade Students to Define the Circle and Its Elements in the Context of Mathematical Language

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akarsu, Esra; Yilmaz, Süha

    2015-01-01

    In this study, it was aimed to study the mathematical language skills that the 7th grade students use in defining the circle and its elements. In the study, the mathematical language skills of students that they use in defining the circle and its elements in a scenario were compared to the mathematical language skills they use in defining them…

  10. Use of Jigsaw Technique to Teach the Unit "Science within Time" in Secondary 7th Grade Social Sciences Course and Students' Views on This Technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yapici, Hakki

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study is to apply the jigsaw technique in Social Sciences teaching and to unroll the effects of this technique on learning. The unit "Science within Time" in the secondary 7th grade Social Sciences text book was chosen for the research. It is aimed to compare the jigsaw technique with the traditional teaching method in…

  11. The semantic web : research and applications : 7th extended semantic web conference, ESWC 2010, Heraklion, Crete, Greece, May 30 - June 3, 2010 : proceedings

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aroyo, L.M.; Antoniou, G.; Hyvönen, E.; Teije, ten A.; Stuckenschmidt, H.; Cabral, L.; Tudorache, T.

    2010-01-01

    Preface. This volume contains papers from the technical program of the 7th Extended Semantic Web Conference (ESWC 2010), held from May 30 to June 3, 2010, in Heraklion, Greece. ESWC 2010 presented the latest results in research and applications of Semantic Web technologies. ESWC 2010 built on the

  12. [A development of Byzantine Christian charities during the 4(th)-7(th) centuries and the birth of the hospital].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nam, Sung Hyun

    2015-04-01

    This study aims to examine the beginning and the development of Christian Charities during the 4(th)-6(th) centuries which would eventually result in the birth of the hospital in modern sense in the first half of the 7(th) century. For this purpose, I looked carefully into various primary sources concerning the early Christian institutions for the poor and the sick. Above all, it's proper to note that the first xenodocheion where hospitality was combined with a systematic caring, is concerned with the Trinitarian debate of the 4(th) century. In 356, Eustathios, one of the leaders of homoiousios group, established xenodocheion to care for the sick and the lepers in Sebaste of Armenia, whereas his opponent Aetios, doctor and leader of the heteroousios party, was reckoned to have combined the medical treatment with his clerical activities. Then, Basil of Caesarea, disciple of Eustathios of Sebaste, also founded in 372 a magnificent benevolent complex named 'Basileias' after its founder. I scrupulously analysed several contemporary materials mentioning the charitable institution of Caesarea which was called alternatively katagogia, ptochotropheion, xenodocheion. John Chrysostome also founded several nosokomeia in Constantinople at the end of the 4(th) century and the beginning of the 5(th) century. Apparently, the contemporary sources mention that doctors existed for these Charities, but there is no sufficient proof that these 'Christian Hospitals,' Basileias or nosokomeia of Constantinople were hospitals in modern sense. Imperial constitutions began to mention ptochotropheion, xenodocheion and orphanotropheion since the second half of the 5(th) century and then some Justinian laws evoked nosokomium, brephotrophia, gerontocomia. These laws reveal that 'Christian Hospitals' were well clarified and deeply rooted in Byzantine society already in these periods. And then, new benevolent institutions emerged in the 6(th) century: nosokomeia for a specific class and

  13. EU-funded malaria research under the 6th and 7th Framework Programmes for research and technological development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holtel, Andreas; Troye-Blomberg, Marita; Penas-Jimenez, Inmaculada

    2011-01-14

    While malaria research has traditionally been strong in Europe, targeted and sustained support for cooperative malaria research at EU level, namely through the EU's 6th and 7th Framework Programmes for research and technological development, FP6 (2002-2006) and FP7 (2007-2013), has boosted both impact and visibility of European malaria research. Most of the European malaria research community is now organized under a number of comprehensive and complementary research networks and projects, assembled around four key areas: (1) fundamental research on the malaria parasite and the disease, (2) development of new malaria drugs, (3) research and development of a malaria vaccine, and (4) research to control the malaria-transmitting mosquito vector. Considerable efforts were undertaken to ensure adequate participation of research groups from disease-endemic countries, in particular from Africa, with the long-term aim to strengthen cooperative links and research capacities in these countries. The concept of organizing European research through major strategic projects to form a "European Research Area" (ERA) was originally developed in the preparation of FP6, and ERA formation has now turned into a major EU policy objective explicitly inscribed into the Lisbon Treaty. EU-funded malaria research may serve as a showcase to demonstrate how ERA formation can successfully be implemented in a given area of science when several surrounding parameters converge to support implementation of this strategic concept: timely coincidence of political stimuli, responsive programming, a clearly defined--and well confined--area of research, and the readiness of the targeted research community who is well familiar with transnational cooperation at EU level. Major EU-funded malaria projects have evolved into thematic and organizational platforms that can collaborate with other global players. Europe may thus contribute more, and better, to addressing the global research agenda for malaria.

  14. Balancing acts: A mixed methods study of the figured world of African American 7th graders in urban science classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cleveland-Solomon, Tanya E.

    What beliefs and cultural models do youth who are underrepresented in science have about the domain of science and about themselves as science learners? What do they imagine is possible for them in relation to science both now and in the future? In other words, what constitutes their figured world of science? This dissertation study, using a mixed methods design, offers new perspectives on the ways that underrepresented youth's unexamined assumptions or cultural models and resources may shape their identities and motivation to learn science. Through analyses of survey and interview data, I found that urban African American youths' social context, gender, racial identity, and perceptions of the science they had in school influenced their motivation to learn science. Analyses of short-term classroom observations and interviews suggested that students had competing cultural models that they used in their constructions of identities as science learners, which they espoused and adopted in relation to how well they leveraged the science-related cultural resources available to them. Results from this study suggested that these 7th graders would benefit from access to more expansive cultural models through access to individuals with scientific capital as a way to allow them to create fruitful identities as science learners. If we want to ensure that students from groups that are underrepresented in science not only have better outcomes, but aspire to and enter the science career pipeline, we must also begin to support them in their negotiations of competing cultural models that limit their ability to adopt science-learner identities in their classrooms. This study endeavored to understand the particular cultural models and motivational beliefs that drive students to act, and what types of individuals they imagine scientists and science workers to be. This study also examined how cultural models and resources influence identity negotiation, specifically the roles youths

  15. Aeroelastic Wing Shaping Using Distributed Propulsion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Nhan T. (Inventor); Reynolds, Kevin Wayne (Inventor); Ting, Eric B. (Inventor)

    2017-01-01

    An aircraft has wings configured to twist during flight. Inboard and outboard propulsion devices, such as turbofans or other propulsors, are connected to each wing, and are spaced along the wing span. A flight controller independently controls thrust of the inboard and outboard propulsion devices to significantly change flight dynamics, including changing thrust of outboard propulsion devices to twist the wing, and to differentially apply thrust on each wing to change yaw and other aspects of the aircraft during various stages of a flight mission. One or more generators can be positioned upon the wing to provide power for propulsion devices on the same wing, and on an opposite wing.

  16. Butterflies regulate wing temperatures using radiative cooling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Cheng-Chia; Shi, Norman Nan; Ren, Crystal; Pelaez, Julianne; Bernard, Gary D.; Yu, Nanfang; Pierce, Naomi

    2017-09-01

    Butterfly wings are live organs embedded with multiple sensory neurons and, in some species, with pheromoneproducing cells. The proper function of butterfly wings demands a suitable temperature range, but the wings can overheat quickly in the sun due to their small thermal capacity. We developed an infrared technique to map butterfly wing temperatures and discovered that despite the wings' diverse visible colors, regions of wings that contain live cells are the coolest, resulting from the thickness of the wings and scale nanostructures. We also demonstrated that butterflies use behavioral traits to prevent overheating of their wings.

  17. Stiffness of desiccating insect wings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mengesha, T E; Vallance, R R; Mittal, R

    2011-01-01

    The stiffness of insect wings is typically determined through experimental measurements. Such experiments are performed on wings removed from insects. However, the wings are subject to desiccation which typically leads to an increase in their stiffness. Although this effect of desiccation is well known, a comprehensive study of the rate of change in stiffness of desiccating insect wings would be a significant aid in planning experiments as well as interpreting data from such experiments. This communication presents a comprehensive experimental analysis of the change in mass and stiffness of gradually desiccating forewings of Painted Lady butterflies (Vanessa cardui). Mass and stiffness of the forewings of five butterflies were simultaneously measured every 10 min over a 24 h period. The averaged results show that wing mass declined exponentially by 21.1% over this time period with a time constant of 9.8 h, while wing stiffness increased linearly by 46.2% at a rate of 23.4 μN mm -1 h -1 . For the forewings of a single butterfly, the experiment was performed over a period of 1 week, and the results show that wing mass declined exponentially by 52.2% with a time constant of 30.2 h until it reached a steady-state level of 2.00 mg, while wing stiffness increased exponentially by 90.7% until it reached a steady-state level of 1.70 mN mm -1 . (communication)

  18. Stiffness of desiccating insect wings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mengesha, T E; Vallance, R R [Department of Mechanical Engineering, The George Washington University, 738 Phillips Hall, 801 22nd St NW, Washington, DC 20052 (United States); Mittal, R, E-mail: vallance@gwu.edu [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Johns Hopkins University, 126 Latrobe Hall, 3400 N Charles Street, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States)

    2011-03-15

    The stiffness of insect wings is typically determined through experimental measurements. Such experiments are performed on wings removed from insects. However, the wings are subject to desiccation which typically leads to an increase in their stiffness. Although this effect of desiccation is well known, a comprehensive study of the rate of change in stiffness of desiccating insect wings would be a significant aid in planning experiments as well as interpreting data from such experiments. This communication presents a comprehensive experimental analysis of the change in mass and stiffness of gradually desiccating forewings of Painted Lady butterflies (Vanessa cardui). Mass and stiffness of the forewings of five butterflies were simultaneously measured every 10 min over a 24 h period. The averaged results show that wing mass declined exponentially by 21.1% over this time period with a time constant of 9.8 h, while wing stiffness increased linearly by 46.2% at a rate of 23.4 {mu}N mm{sup -1} h{sup -1}. For the forewings of a single butterfly, the experiment was performed over a period of 1 week, and the results show that wing mass declined exponentially by 52.2% with a time constant of 30.2 h until it reached a steady-state level of 2.00 mg, while wing stiffness increased exponentially by 90.7% until it reached a steady-state level of 1.70 mN mm{sup -1}. (communication)

  19. Beetle wings are inflatable origami

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Rui; Ren, Jing; Ge, Siqin; Hu, David

    2015-11-01

    Beetles keep their wings folded and protected under a hard shell. In times of danger, they must unfold them rapidly in order for them to fly to escape. Moreover, they must do so across a range of body mass, from 1 mg to 10 grams. How can they unfold their wings so quickly? We use high-speed videography to record wing unfolding times, which we relate to the geometry of the network of blood vessels in the wing. Larger beetles have longer unfolding times. Modeling of the flow of blood through the veins successfully accounts for the wing unfolding speed of large beetles. However, smaller beetles have anomalously short unfolding times, suggesting they have lower blood viscosity or higher driving pressure. The use of hydraulics to unfold complex objects may have implications in the design of micro-flying air vehicles.

  20. AERODYNAMICS OF WING TIP SAILS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MUSHTAK AL-ATABI

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Observers have always been fascinated by soaring birds. An interesting feature of these birds is the existence of few feathers extending from the tip of the wing. In this paper, small lifting surfaces were fitted to the tip of a NACA0012 wing in a fashion similar to that of wing tip feathers. Experimental measurements of induced drag, longitudinal static stability and trailing vortex structure were obtained.The tests showed that adding wing tip surfaces (sails decreased the induced drag factor and increased the longitudinal static stability. Results identified two discrete appositely rotated tip vortices and showed the ability of wing tip surfaces to break them down and to diffuse them.

  1. Under the Radar: The First Woman in Radio Astronomy, Ruby Payne-Scott

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller Goss, W.

    2012-05-01

    Under the Radar, the First Woman in Radio Astronomy, Ruby Payne-Scott W. Miller Goss, NRAO Socorro NM Ruby Payne-Scott (1912-1981) was an eminent Australian scientist who made major contributions to the WWII radar effort (CSIR) from 1941 to 1945. In late 1945, she pioneered radio astronomy efforts at Dover Heights in Sydney, Australia at a beautiful cliff top overlooking the Tasman Sea. Again at Dover Heights, Payne-Scott carried out the first interferometry in radio astronomy using an Australian Army radar antenna as a radio telescope at sun-rise, 26 January 1946. She continued these ground breaking activities until 1951. Ruby Payne-Scott played a major role in discovering and elucidating the properties of Type III bursts from the sun, the most common of the five classes of transient phenomena from the solar corona. These bursts are one of the most intensively studied forms of radio emission in all of astronomy. She is also one of the inventors of aperture synthesis in radio astronomy. I examine her career at the University of Sydney and her conflicts with the CSIR hierarchy concerning the rights of women in the work place, specifically equal wages and the lack of permanent status for married women. I also explore her membership in the Communist Party of Australia as well as her partially released Australian Scientific Intelligence Organization file. Payne-Scott’s role as a major participant in the flourishing radio astronomy research of the post war era remains a remarkable story. She had a number of strong collaborations with the pioneers of early radio astronomy in Australia: Pawsey, Mills, Christiansen, Bolton and Little. I am currently working on a popular version of the Payne-Scott story; “Making Waves, The Story of Ruby Payne-Scott: Australian Pioneer Radio Astronomer” will be published in 2013 by Springer in the Astronomers’ Universe Series.

  2. The influence of the Scott effect on the determination of q0

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kruszewski, A.; Semeniuk, I.

    1975-01-01

    The statistical model for taking into account the Scott effect was constructed. The suggestion that clusters with exceptionally bright first-ranked cluster member possess fainter than average second and third-ranked galaxies is not substantiated by raw observational data. The first-ranked galaxies are brighter and less cluster richness dependent than expected from the statistical model. The bias due to the Scott effect may increase q 0 by up to 0.5 but with proper care it should be possible to take it into account even without employing complicated statistical models. (author)

  3. Alloy characterization of a 7th Century BC archeological bronze vase — Overcoming patina constraints using Monte Carlo simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Manso, M. [Laboratório de Instrumentação, Engenharia Biomédica e Fisica da Radiação (LIBPhys-UNL), Departamento de Fisica, Faculdade de Ciências e Tecnologias, Universidade Nova de Lisboa, 2829-516 Monte da Caparica (Portugal); Faculdade de Belas-Artes da Universidade de Lisboa, Largo da Academia Nacional de Belas-Artes, 1249-058 Lisboa (Portugal); Schiavon, N. [Hercules Laboratory, University of Évora, Palácio do Vimioso,Largo Marquês de Marialva 8, 7000-809 Évora Portugal (Portugal); Queralt, I. [Laboratory of X-ray Analytical Applications, Institute of Earth Sciences Jaume Almera, CSIC, Solé Sabaris s/n, 08028 Barcelona (Spain); Arruda, A.M. [Centro de Arqueologia da Universidade de Lisboa (UNIARQ), Alameda da Universidade, 1600-214 Lisboa (Portugal); Sampaio, J.M. [BioISI — Biosystems & Integrative Sciences Institute, Faculdade de Ciências da Universidade de Lisboa (Portugal); Brunetti, A., E-mail: brunetti@uniss.it [Department of Political Science and Communication, University of Sassari, Via Piandanna 2, 07100 Sassari (Italy)

    2015-05-01

    In this work we evaluate the composition of a bronze alloy using X-ray fluorescence spectrometry (XRF) and Monte Carlo (MC) simulations. For this purpose, a 7th Century BC archeological vase from the SW Iberian Peninsula, displaying a well formed corrosion patina was analyzed by means of a portable X-ray fluorescence spectrometer. Realistic MC simulations of the experimental setup were performed with the XRMC code package which is based on an intensive use of variance-reduction techniques and uses XRAYLIB a constantly updated X-ray library of atomic data. A single layer model was applied for simulating XRF of polished/pristine bronze whereas a two-or-three-layer model was developed for bronze covered respectively by a corrosion patina alone or coupled with a superficial soil derived crust. These simulations took into account corrosion (cerussite (PbCO{sub 3}), cuprite (Cu{sub 2}O), malachite (Cu{sub 2}CO{sub 3}(OH){sub 2}), litharge (PbO)) and soil derived products (goethite (FeO(OH)) and quartz (SiO{sub 2})) identified by means of X-ray diffraction and Raman micro analytical techniques. Results confirm previous research indicating that the XRF/Monte Carlo protocol is well suited when a two-layered model is considered, whereas in areas where the patina + soil derived products' crust is too thick, X-rays from the alloy substrate are not able to exit the sample. Quantitative results based on MC simulations indicate that the vase is made of a lead–bronze alloy: Mn (0.2%), Fe (1.0%), Cu (81.8%), As (0.5%), Ag (0.6%), Sn (8.0%) and Pb (8.0%). - Highlights: • We study an archeological bronze vase with patina corrosion using XRF spectrometry. • The experimental setup is modeled using Monte Carlo (MC) simulations. • Combining MC simulations with XRF it is possible to derive concentrations. • We demonstrated that this is possible without removing the patina.

  4. Standards of specialized diabetes care. Edited by Dedov I.I., Shestakova M.V. (7th edition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivan Ivanovich Dedov

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available We are glad to present the 7th Edition of Standards of Diabetes Care. These evidence-based guidelines were designed to standardize and facilitate diabetes care in all regions of the Russian Federation. The Standards are updated on the regular basis to incorporate new data and relevant recommendations from national and international clinical societies, including World Health Organization Guidelines (WHO, 2011, 2013, International Diabetes Federation (IDF, 2011, 2012, 2013, American Diabetes Association (ADA, 2012, 2015, American Association of Clinical Endocrinologists (AACE, 2013, International Society for Pediatric and Adolescent Diabetes (ISPAD, 2014 and Russian Association of Endocrinologists (RAE, 2011, 2012. Current edition of the “Standards” also integrates results of completed randomized clinical trials (ADVANCE, ACCORD, VADT, UKPDS, etc., as well as findings from the national studies of diabetes mellitus (DM, conducted in close partnership with a number of Russian hospitals.Latest data indicates that prevalence of DM increased during the last decade more than two-fold, reaching some 387 million patients by the end of 2014. According to the current estimation by the International Diabetes Federation, 592 million patients will be suffering from DM by 2035. These observations resulted in the UN Resolution 61/225 passed on 20.12.2006 that encouraged all Member States “to develop national policies for the prevention, treatment and care of diabetes”.Like many other countries, Russian Federation experiences a sharp rise in the prevalence of DM. According to Russian State Diabetes Register, there are at least 4.1 million patients with DM in this country. However, the epidemiological survey conducted by the Federal Endocrinology Research Centre during 2002-2010 suggests that actual prevalence is 3 to 4 times greater than the officially recognized and, by this estimate, amounts to 9-10 million persons, comprising 7% of the national

  5. Standards of specialized diabetes care. Edited by Dedov I.I., Shestakova M.V. (7th edition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivan Ivanovich Dedov

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available We are glad to present the 7th Edition of Standards of Diabetes Care. These evidence-based guidelines were designed to standardize and facilitate diabetes care in all regions of the Russian Federation. The Standards are updated on the regular basis to incorporate new data and relevant recommendations from national and international clinical societies, including World Health Organization Guidelines (WHO, 2011, 2013, International Diabetes Federation (IDF, 2011, 2012, 2013, American Diabetes Association (ADA, 2012, 2015, American Association of Clinical Endocrinologists (AACE, 2013, International Society for Pediatric and Adolescent Diabetes (ISPAD, 2014 and Russian Association of Endocrinologists (RAE, 2011, 2012. Current edition of the ?Standards? also integrates results of completed randomized clinical trials (ADVANCE, ACCORD, VADT, UKPDS, etc., as well as findings from the national studies of diabetes mellitus (DM, conducted in close partnership with a number of Russian hospitals. Latest data indicates that prevalence of DM increased during the last decade more than two-fold, reaching some 387 million patients by the end of 2014. According to the current estimation by the International Diabetes Federation, 592 million patients will be suffering from DM by 2035. These observations resulted in the UN Resolution 61/225 passed on 20.12.2006 that encouraged all Member States "to develop national policies for the prevention, treatment and care of diabetes". Like many other countries, Russian Federation experiences a sharp rise in the prevalence of DM. According to Russian State Diabetes Register, there are at least 4.1 million patients with DM in this country. However, the epidemiological survey conducted by the Federal Endocrinology Research Centre during 2002-2010 suggests that actual prevalence is 3 to 4 times greater than the officially recognized and, by this estimate, amounts to 9-10 million persons, comprising 7% of the national population

  6. Structural Analysis of a Dragonfly Wing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jongerius, S.R.; Lentink, D.

    2010-01-01

    Dragonfly wings are highly corrugated, which increases the stiffness and strength of the wing significantly, and results in a lightweight structure with good aerodynamic performance. How insect wings carry aerodynamic and inertial loads, and how the resonant frequency of the flapping wings is tuned

  7. Mechanisms of Wing Beat Sound in Flapping Wings of Beetles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, John

    2017-11-01

    While the aerodynamic aspects of insect flight have received recent attention, the mechanisms of sound production by flapping wings is not well understood. Though the harmonic structure of wing beat frequency modulation has been reported with respect to biological implications, few studies have rigorously quantified it with respect directionality, phase coupling and vortex tip scattering. Moreover, the acoustic detection and classification of invasive species is both of practical as well scientific interest. In this study, the acoustics of the tethered flight of the Coconut Rhinoceros Beetle (Oryctes rhinoceros) is investigated with four element microphone array in conjunction with complementary optical sensors and high speed video. The different experimental methods for wing beat determination are compared in both the time and frequency domain. Flow visualization is used to examine the vortex and sound generation due to the torsional mode of the wing rotation. Results are compared with related experimental studies of the Oriental Flower Beetle. USDA, State of Hawaii.

  8. Effect of outer wing separation on lift and thrust generation in a flapping wing system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mahardika, Nanang; Viet, Nguyen Quoc; Park, Hoon Cheol

    2011-01-01

    We explore the implementation of wing feather separation and lead-lagging motion to a flapping wing. A biomimetic flapping wing system with separated outer wings is designed and demonstrated. The artificial wing feather separation is implemented in the biomimetic wing by dividing the wing into inner and outer wings. The features of flapping, lead-lagging, and outer wing separation of the flapping wing system are captured by a high-speed camera for evaluation. The performance of the flapping wing system with separated outer wings is compared to that of a flapping wing system with closed outer wings in terms of forward force and downward force production. For a low flapping frequency ranging from 2.47 to 3.90 Hz, the proposed biomimetic flapping wing system shows a higher thrust and lift generation capability as demonstrated by a series of experiments. For 1.6 V application (lower frequency operation), the flapping wing system with separated wings could generate about 56% higher forward force and about 61% less downward force compared to that with closed wings, which is enough to demonstrate larger thrust and lift production capability of the separated outer wings. The experiments show that the outer parts of the separated wings are able to deform, resulting in a smaller amount of drag production during the upstroke, while still producing relatively greater lift and thrust during the downstroke.

  9. The Equine Distal Limb. An Atlas of Clinical Anatomy and Comparative Imaging (7th impression, J-M. Denoix : book review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Gottschalk

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Originally published in 2000, this 7th impression is testimony to the ongoing relevance of a classical reference 11 years after its original publication. The book is authored by Jean-Marie Denoix who is well known in South Africa, having been the main speaker at an annual SAEVA congress. He is internationally recognised as a leading equine anatomist and diagnostic imager.

  10. 1{sup st} workshop proceedings of the collaborative project ''Crystalline rock retention processes'' (7th EC FP CP CROCK)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rabung, Thomas; Molinero, Jorge; Garcia, David; Montoya, Vanessa (eds.)

    2012-07-01

    The EURATOM 7th EC Framework Program Collaborative Project Crystalline ROCK retention processes (CROCK) started in January 2011 and extends over 2 and a half years. The key driver for initiation the CP CROCK, identified by national Waste Management Organizations, is the undesired high uncertainty and the associated conservatism with respect to the radionuclide transport in the crystalline host-rock far-field around geological disposal of high-level radioactive wastes.

  11. Coretta Scott King Award Winner Javaka Steptoe Stands Tall "In Daddy's Arms."

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peck, Jackie; Hendershot, Judy

    1999-01-01

    Offers an interview with artist and author Javaka Steptoe, winner of the Coretta Scott King award for his book "In Daddy's Arms I Am Tall: African Americans Celebrating Fathers." Discusses his background in the arts, the variety of media he uses, how he begins thinking about his illustrations, his work with children's art, and aspects of his work.…

  12. Random attractors for stochastic lattice reversible Gray-Scott systems with additive noise

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongyan Li

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available In this article, we prove the existence of a random attractor of the stochastic three-component reversible Gray-Scott system on infinite lattice with additive noise. We use a transformation of addition involved with Ornstein-Uhlenbeck process, for proving the pullback absorbing property and the pullback asymptotic compactness of the reaction diffusion system with cubic nonlinearity.

  13. The Pleasures and Lessons of Academic Mythbusting: An Interview with Scott Lilienfeld

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zinn, Tracy E.

    2010-01-01

    Scott O. Lilienfeld is a professor of psychology at Emory University, in Atlanta, Georgia. Dr. Lilienfeld is founder and editor of the journal, "Scientific Review of Mental Health Practice," and is past president of the Society for a Science of Clinical Psychology. He has been a member of 11 journal editorial boards, including the…

  14. "I Have a Dream, Too!": The American Dream in Coretta Scott King Award-Winning Books

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parsons, Linda T.; Castleman, Michele

    2011-01-01

    The Coretta Scott King (CSK) Award, instituted in 1969 and recognized as an official award by the American Library Association (ALA) in 1982, is conferred annually to an African American author and an illustrator for their outstanding contributions to literature about the Black experience for children and young adults. A partial impetus for the…

  15. James Edward Scott: The Leadership Journey of a Senior-Level African American Student Affairs Officer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willis, Salatha T.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine, understand, and describe the life, leadership, and influence of Dr. James Edward Scott on higher education and more specifically student affairs; as one of the most well-known and respected African American male chief student affairs officers in the late 20th and early 21st centuries. Using a qualitative…

  16. Scott Foresman-Addison Wesley Elementary Mathematics. What Works Clearinghouse Intervention Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    What Works Clearinghouse, 2010

    2010-01-01

    "Scott Foresman-Addison Wesley Elementary Mathematics" is a core curriculum for students at all ability levels in prekindergarten through grade 6. The program supports students' understanding of key math concepts and skills and covers a range of mathematical content across grades. The What Works Clearinghouse (WWC) reviewed 12 studies on…

  17. Scott Foresman-Addison Wesley Elementary Mathematics. What Works Clearinghouse Intervention Report. Updated

    Science.gov (United States)

    What Works Clearinghouse, 2013

    2013-01-01

    "Scott Foresman-Addison Wesley Elementary Mathematics" is a core mathematics curriculum for students in prekindergarten through grade 6. The program aims to improve students' understanding of key math concepts through problem-solving instruction, hands-on activities, and math problems that involve reading and writing. The curriculum…

  18. An estimating function approach to inference for inhomogeneous Neyman-Scott processes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Waagepetersen, Rasmus

    2007-01-01

    This article is concerned with inference for a certain class of inhomogeneous Neyman-Scott point processes depending on spatial covariates. Regression parameter estimates obtained from a simple estimating function are shown to be asymptotically normal when the "mother" intensity for the Neyman-Sc...

  19. The Paradoxical World of The Great Gatsby by F. Scott Fitzgerald

    OpenAIRE

    ŠANDEROVÁ, Milada

    2015-01-01

    In The Great Gatsby F. Scott Fitzgerald created a world of fundamental contradictions. Whether talking about the way the whole society works, the immense differences among social classes, the characters, or the tension between attributes of a particular character. Therefore, the goal of this bachelor thesis is to analyse the world of this novel as the world built on paradoxes.

  20. Finality regained: A co-algebraic study of Scott-sets and Multisets

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    D'Agostino, G.; Visser, A.

    1999-01-01

    In this paper we study iterated circular multisets in a coalgebraic frame- work. We will produce two essentially different universes of such sets. The unisets of the first universe will be shown to be precisely the sets of the Scott universe. The unisets of the second universe will be precisely

  1. 78 FR 3479 - Notice of Public Meeting of Fort Scott Council

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-16

    ... submitted on cards that will be provided at the meeting, via mail to Laurie Fox, Presidio Trust, 103... stated prominently at the beginning of the comments. The Trust will make available for public inspection... PRESIDIO TRUST Notice of Public Meeting of Fort Scott Council AGENCY: The Presidio Trust. ACTION...

  2. 76 FR 71611 - Notice of Establishment of the Fort Winfield Scott Advisory Committee

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-18

    ... (``Committee''). The Committee will advise the Executive Director of the Presidio Trust on matters pertaining... of once every three months. Nominations: The Presidio Trust will consider nominations of all... PRESIDIO TRUST Notice of Establishment of the Fort Winfield Scott Advisory Committee AGENCY: The...

  3. Distinguishing different types of inhomogeneity in Neyman-Scott point processes

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Mrkvička, Tomáš

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 16, č. 2 (2014), s. 385-395 ISSN 1387-5841 Institutional support: RVO:60077344 Keywords : clustering * growing clusters * inhomogeneous cluster centers * inhomogeneous point process * location dependent scaling * Neyman-Scott point process Subject RIV: BA - General Mathematics Impact factor: 0.913, year: 2014

  4. Marion duPont Scott Equine Medical Center offers new treatment for lameness

    OpenAIRE

    Musick, Marjorie

    2006-01-01

    The Virginia-Maryland Regional College of Veterinary Medicine's Marion duPont Scott Equine Medical Center has begun offering a new therapy for treating lameness associated with osteoarthritis and cartilage damage in horses, a problem that affects all segments of the equine industry.

  5. 2015-2016 Travel and Hospitality Expense Reports for Scott Gilmore ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Ruxandra Staicu

    Purpose: Board meetings. Date(s):. 2015-07-13 to 2015-07-14. Destination(s):. Ottawa. Airfare: Other. Transportation: $31.46. Accommodation: Meals and. Incidentals: Other: Total: $31.46. Comments: 2015-2016 Travel and Hospitality Expense. Reports for Scott Gilmore, Governor.

  6. Modernity in Two Great American Writers' Vision: Ernest Miller Hemingway and Scott Fitzgerald

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keshmiri, Fahimeh; Darzikola, Shahla Sorkhabi

    2016-01-01

    Scott Fitzgerald and Ernest Hemingway, American memorable novelists have had philosophic ideas about modernity. In fact their idea about existential interests of American, and the effects of American system on society, is mirrored in their creative works. All through his early works, Fitzgerald echoes the existential center of his era. Obviously,…

  7. Conservation assessment for the Siskiyou Mountains salamander and Scott Bar salamander in northern California.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vinikour, W. S.; LaGory, K. E.; Adduci, J. J.; Environmental Science Division

    2006-10-20

    The purpose of this conservation assessment is to summarize existing knowledge regarding the biology and ecology of the Siskiyou Mountains salamander and Scott Bar salamander, identify threats to the two species, and identify conservation considerations to aid federal management for persistence of the species. The conservation assessment will serve as the basis for a conservation strategy for the species.

  8. Start-up of a cold loop in a VVER-440, the 7th AER benchmark calculation with HEXTRAN-SMABRE-PORFLO

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hovi, Ville; Taivassalo, Veikko; Haemaelaeinen, Anitta; Raety, Hanna; Syrjaelahti, Elina

    2017-01-01

    The 7 th dynamic AER benchmark is the first in which three-dimensional thermal hydraulics codes are supposed to be applied. The aim is to get a more precise core inlet temperature profile than the sector temperatures available typically with system codes. The benchmark consists of a start-up of the sixth, isolated loop in a VVER-440 plant. The isolated loop initially contains cold water without boric acid and the start-up leads to a somewhat asymmetrical core power increase due to feedbacks in the core. In this study, the 7 th AER benchmark is calculated with the three-dimensional nodal reactor dynamics code HEXTRAN-SMABRE coupled with the porous computational fluid dynamics code PORFLO. These three codes are developed at VTT. A novel two-way coupled simulation of the 7 th AER benchmark was performed successfully demonstrating the feasibility and advantages of the new reactor analysis framework. The modelling issues for this benchmark are reported and some evaluation against the previously reported comparisons between the system codes is provided.

  9. Research of Morphing Wing Efficiency

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Komarov, Valery

    2004-01-01

    This report results from a contract tasking Samara State Aerospace University (SSAU) as follows: The contractor will develop and investigate aerodynamic and structural weight theories associated with morphing wing technology...

  10. Changing Configurations of Adult Education in Transitional Times. Conference Proceedings of the Triennial European Research Conference of the European Society for Research on the Education of Adults (ESREA) (7th, Berlin, Germany, September 4-7, 2013)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Käpplinger, Bernd, Ed.; Lichte, Nina, Ed.; Haberzeth, Erik, Ed.; Kulmus, Claudia, Ed.

    2014-01-01

    This book assembles over 50 papers from the 7th Triennial European Research Conference of the European Society for Research on the Education of Adults (ESREA), which was held from the 4th to the 7th of September 2013 at Humboldt-University in Berlin. The title of the conference was "Changing Configurations of Adult Education in Transitional…

  11. Combined Quantification of the Global Proteome, Phosphoproteome, and Proteolytic Cleavage to Characterize Altered Platelet Functions in the Human Scott Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solari, Fiorella A; Mattheij, Nadine J A; Burkhart, Julia M; Swieringa, Frauke; Collins, Peter W; Cosemans, Judith M E M; Sickmann, Albert; Heemskerk, Johan W M; Zahedi, René P

    2016-10-01

    The Scott syndrome is a very rare and likely underdiagnosed bleeding disorder associated with mutations in the gene encoding anoctamin-6. Platelets from Scott patients are impaired in various Ca 2+ -dependent responses, including phosphatidylserine exposure, integrin closure, intracellular protein cleavage, and cytoskeleton-dependent morphological changes. Given the central role of anoctamin-6 in the platelet procoagulant response, we used quantitative proteomics to understand the underlying molecular mechanisms and the complex phenotypic changes in Scott platelets compared with control platelets. Therefore, we applied an iTRAQ-based multi-pronged strategy to quantify changes in (1) the global proteome, (2) the phosphoproteome, and (3) proteolytic events between resting and stimulated Scott and control platelets. Our data indicate a limited number of proteins with decreased (70) or increased (64) expression in Scott platelets, among those we confirmed the absence of anoctamin-6 and the strong up-regulation of aquaporin-1 by parallel reaction monitoring. The quantification of 1566 phosphopeptides revealed major differences between Scott and control platelets after stimulation with thrombin/convulxin or ionomycin. In Scott platelets, phosphorylation levels of proteins regulating cytoskeletal or signaling events were increased. Finally, we quantified 1596 N-terminal peptides in activated Scott and control platelets, 180 of which we identified as calpain-regulated, whereas a distinct set of 23 neo-N termini was caspase-regulated. In Scott platelets, calpain-induced cleavage of cytoskeleton-linked and signaling proteins was downregulated, in accordance with an increased phosphorylation state. Thus, multipronged proteomic profiling of Scott platelets provides detailed insight into their protection against detrimental Ca 2+ -dependent changes that are normally associated with phosphatidylserine exposure. © 2016 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular

  12. Drag Performance of Twist Morphing MAV Wing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ismail N.I.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Morphing wing is one of latest evolution found on MAV wing. However, due to few design problems such as limited MAV wing size and complicated morphing mechanism, the understanding of its aerodynamic behaviour was not fully explored. In fact, the basic drag distribution induced by a morphing MAV wing is still remained unknown. Thus, present work is carried out to compare the drag performance between a twist morphing wing with membrane and rigid MAV wing design. A quasi-static aeroelastic analysis by using the Ansys-Fluid Structure Interaction (FSI method is utilized in current works to predict the drag performance a twist morphing MAV wing design. Based on the drag pattern study, the results exhibits that the morphing wing has a partial similarities in overall drag pattern with the baseline (membrane and rigid wing. However, based CD analysis, it shows that TM wing induced higher CD magnitude (between 25% to 82% higher than to the baseline wing. In fact, TM wing also induced the largest CD increment (about 20% to 27% among the wings. The visualization on vortex structure revealed that TM wing also produce larger tip vortex structure (compared to baseline wings which presume to promote higher induce drag component and subsequently induce its higher CD performance.

  13. WINGS Data Release

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moretti, A.; Poggianti, B. M.; Fasano, G.

    2014-01-01

    . We provide the scientific community with the entire set of wide-field images. Furthermore, the published database contains photometry of 759 024 objects and surface brightness analysis for 42 275 and 41 463 galaxies in the V and B band, respectively. The completeness depends on the image quality......, and on the cluster redshift, reaching on average 90% at V ≲ 21.7. Near-infrared photometric catalogs for 26 (in K) and 19 (in J) clusters are part of the database and the number of sources is 962 344 in K and 628 813 in J. Here again the completeness depends on the data quality, but it is on average higher than 90......Context. To effectively investigate galaxy formation and evolution, it is of paramount importance to exploit homogeneous data for large samples of galaxies in different environments. Aims. The WIde-field Nearby Galaxy-cluster Survey (WINGS) project aim is to evaluate physical properties of galaxies...

  14. Evaluating safety of concrete gravity dam on weak rock: Scott Dam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goodman, R.E.; Ahlgren, C.S.

    2000-01-01

    Scott Dam is owned and operated by Pacific Gas and Electric Co. (PG and E) as part of the Potter Valley Project. Although it is an unimpressive concrete gravity dam [233 m (765 ft) long with maximum water surface 33.4 m (110 ft) above tail water], the dam has unusually complex and weak foundation rocks; thick condition caused design changes during construction, numerous subsequent special investigations, and several corrections and additions. A main stumbling block to clarification of the dam safety issue for Scott Dam has always been difficulty in characterizing the foundation material. This paper discusses an approach to this problem as well s how the safety of the dam was subsequently confirmed. Following a comprehensive program of research, investigations, and analysis from 1991 to 1997

  15. SCOTT: A time and amplitude digitizer ASIC for PMT signal processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferry, S.; Guilloux, F.; Anvar, S.; Chateau, F.; Delagnes, E.; Gautard, V.; Louis, F.; Monmarthe, E.; Le Provost, H.; Russo, S.; Schuller, J.-P.; Stolarczyk, Th.; Vallage, B.; Zonca, E.; KM3NeT Consortium

    2013-10-01

    SCOTT is an ASIC designed for the readout electronics of photomultiplier tubes developed for KM3NeT, the cubic-kilometer scale neutrino telescope in Mediterranean Sea. To digitize the PMT signals, the multi-time-over-threshold technique is used with up to 16 adjustable thresholds. Digital outputs of discriminators feed a circular sampling memory and a “first in first out” digital memory. A specific study has shown that five specifically chosen thresholds are suited to reach the required timing accuracy. A dedicated method based on the duration of the signal over a given threshold allows an equivalent timing precision at any charge. To verify that the KM3NeT requirements are fulfilled, this method is applied on PMT signals digitized by SCOTT.

  16. Universos ficcionais: o romanesco em Walter Scott e José de Alencar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcos Roberto Flamínio Peres

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Tamanha é a força do romanesco em Walter Scott que ele foi capaz de dar origem a duas linhas de força críticas antagônicas: uma tendendo a situá-lo dentro do conjunto da literatura ocidental, reatualizando arquétipos ancestrais (Frye; outra considerando-o a quintessência do romance histórico por representar momentos cruciais por que passava a sociedade capitalista entre os séculos XVIII e XIX (Lukács. À luz desse pano de fundo teórico contrastivo, este artigo busca analisar Waverley (1814, obra mais influente de Scott, em comparação com As minas de prata (1865-1866, romance mais ambicioso de José de Alencar e que lança mão de estratégias narrativas similares.

  17. Fort Scott Lake Cultural Resource Study. Part 1. Archaeological and Geomorphological Inventory and Evaluation at the Proposed Fort Scott Lake Project, Southeast Kansas

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-01-01

    elm (Ulmus americana). Other common components of the forest are winged elm (Ulmus alata), sycamore (Platanus occidentalis), and butternut hickory...large Woodland assemblage from the Slippery Rock site (14BO26) and site 14BO3 (Bradley and Harder 1974) was interpreted by the original investigators

  18. Proceedings of the joint meeting of ultrafast pulse high intensity laser research collaboration and JAEA-KPSI 7th symposium on advanced photon research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2007-03-01

    The Joint Meeting of Ultrafast Pulse High Intensity Laser Research Collaboration and JAEA-KPSI 7th Symposium on Advanced Photon Research was jointly held at Kansai Photon Research Institute, Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA-KPSI) in Kizu, Kyoto on May 10-12, 2006. This report consists of contributed papers for the speeches and poster presentations including joint research and cooperative research performed in FY2004 and FY2005 with Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI). The 47 of the presented papers are indexed individually. (J.P.N.)

  19. Fullerene derivative-doped zinc oxide nanofilm as the cathode of inverted polymer solar cells with low-bandgap polymer (PTB7-Th) for high performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Sih-Hao; Jhuo, Hong-Jyun; Cheng, Yu-Shan; Chen, Show-An

    2013-09-14

    Modification of a ZnO cathode by doping it with a hydroxyl-containing derivative - giving a ZnO-C60 cathode - provides a fullerene-derivative-rich surface and enhanced electron conduction. Inverted polymer solar cells with the ZnO-C60 cathode display markedly improved power conversion efficiency compared to those with a pristine ZnO cathode, especially when the active layer includes the low-bandgap polymer PTB7-Th. Copyright © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  20. Proceedings of the 7th International Meeting on Nuclear Reactor Thermal-Hydraulics NURETH-7. Volume 3, Sessions 12-16

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Block, R.C.; Feiner, F. [comps.] [American Nuclear Society, La Grange Park, IL (United States)

    1995-09-01

    This document, Volume 3, includes papers presented at the 7th International Meeting on Nuclear Reactor Thermal-Hydraulics (NURETH-7) September 10--15, 1995 at Saratoga Springs, N.Y. The following subjects are discussed: Progress in analytical and experimental work on the fundamentals of nuclear thermal-hydraulics, the development of advanced mathematical and numerical methods, ad the application of advancements in the field in the development of novel reactor concepts. Also combined issues of thermal-hydraulics and reactor/power-plant safety, core neutronics and/or radiation. Selected abstracts have been indexed separately for inclusion in the Energy Science and Technology Database.

  1. Proceedings of the 7th International Meeting on Nuclear Reactor Thermal-Hydraulics NURETH-7. Volume 2, Sessions 6-11

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Block, R.C.; Feiner, F. [comps.] [American Nuclear Society, La Grange Park, IL (United States)

    1995-09-01

    This document, Volume 2, includes papers presented at the 7th International Meeting on Nuclear Reactor Thermal-Hydraulics (NURETH-7) September 10--15, 1995 at Saratoga Springs, N.Y. The following subjects are discussed: Progress in analytical and experimental work on the fundamentals of nuclear thermal-hydraulics, the development of advanced mathematical and numerical methods, and the application of advancements in the field in the development of novel reactor concepts. Also combined issues of thermal-hydraulics and reactor/power-plant safety, core neutronics and/or radiation. Selected papers are indexed separately for inclusion in the Energy Science and Technology Database.

  2. Proceedings of the 7th International Meeting on Nuclear Reactor Thermal-Hydraulics NURETH-7. Volume 1, Sessions 1-5

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Block, R.C.; Feiner, F.

    1995-09-01

    This document, Volume 1, includes papers presented at the 7th International Meeting on Nuclear Reactor Thermal-Hydraulics (NURETH-7) September 10--15, 1995 at Saratoga Springs, N.Y. The following subjects are discussed: Progress in analytical and experimental work on the fundamentals of nuclear thermal-hydraulics, the development of advanced mathematical and numerical methods, and the application of advancements in the field in the development of novel reactor concepts. Also combined issues of thermal-hydraulics and reactor/power-plant safety, core neutronics and/or radiation. Selected papers are indexed separately for inclusion in the Energy Science and Technology Database

  3. Blessing of dimensionality if forecasting house price growth rate in the 9 census divisions of the US: 7th Triennial Conference 2009

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Das, Sonali

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available stream_source_info Das3_2009.pdf.txt stream_content_type text/plain stream_size 11099 Content-Encoding UTF-8 stream_name Das3_2009.pdf.txt Content-Type text/plain; charset=UTF-8 Motivation Models Data Results..., Pretoria 3University of Johannesburg, Johannesburg 7th Triennial, Kolkata, 2009 Das, Gupta and Kabundi Motivation Models Data Results Conclusion Main question Background Outline 1 Motivation 2 Models 3 Data 4 Results 5 Conclusion 2 / 24...

  4. Proceedings of the 7th International Meeting on Nuclear Reactor Thermal-Hydraulics NURETH-7. Volume 1, Sessions 1-5

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Block, R.C.; Feiner, F. [comps.] [American Nuclear Society, La Grange Park, IL (United States)

    1995-09-01

    This document, Volume 1, includes papers presented at the 7th International Meeting on Nuclear Reactor Thermal-Hydraulics (NURETH-7) September 10--15, 1995 at Saratoga Springs, N.Y. The following subjects are discussed: Progress in analytical and experimental work on the fundamentals of nuclear thermal-hydraulics, the development of advanced mathematical and numerical methods, and the application of advancements in the field in the development of novel reactor concepts. Also combined issues of thermal-hydraulics and reactor/power-plant safety, core neutronics and/or radiation. Selected papers are indexed separately for inclusion in the Energy Science and Technology Database.

  5. Rapport de frais de 2015-2016 pour Scott Gilmore | CRDI - Centre ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Accueil · À propos du CRDI · Obligation de rendre compte · Transparence · Déplacements et accueil. Rapport de frais de 2015-2016 pour Scott Gilmore. Total des frais de déplacement : CAD$31.46. Télécharger la version PDF de ce rapport. 13 juillet 2015 au 14 juillet 2015. CAD$31.46. Ce que nous faisons · Financement ...

  6. 2015-2016 Rapports sur les frais de voyage et d'accueil pour Scott ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Ruxandra Staicu

    Réunion du Conseil des gouverneurs. Date(s):. 2015-07-13 à 2015-07-14. Destination(s):. Ottawa. Billet d'avion: Frais de transport au sol ou autrement: 31.46 $. Frais de logement: Repas et frais divers: Autre frais: Total: 31.46 $. Commentaires: 2015-2016 Rapports sur les frais de voyage et d'accueil pour Scott Gilmore, ...

  7. Reliability and validity of the Salford-Scott Nursing Values Questionnaire in Turkish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulusoy, Hatice; Güler, Güngör; Yıldırım, Gülay; Demir, Ecem

    2018-02-01

    Developing professional values among nursing students is important because values are a significant predictor of the quality care that will be provided, the clients' recognition, and consequently the nurses' job satisfaction. The literature analysis showed that there is only one validated tool available in Turkish that examines both the personal and the professional values of nursing students. The aim of this study was to assess the reliability and validity of the Salford-Scott Nursing Values Questionnaire in Turkish. This study was a Turkish linguistic and cultural adaptation of a research tool. Participants and research context: The sample of this study consisted of 627 undergraduate nursing students from different geographical areas of Turkey. Two questionnaires were used for data collection: a socio-demographic form and the Salford-Scott Nursing Values Questionnaire. For the Salford-Scott Nursing Values Questionnaire, construct validity was examined using factor analyses. Ethical considerations: The study was approved by the Cumhuriyet University Faculty of Medicine Research Ethics Board. Students were informed that participation in the study was entirely voluntary and anonymous. Item content validity index ranged from 0.66 to 1.0, and the total content validity index was 0.94. The Kaiser-Meyer-Olkin measure of sampling was 0.870, and Bartlett's test of sphericity was statistically significant (x 2 = 3108.714, p < 0.001). Construct validity was examined using factor analyses and the six factors were identified. Cronbach's alpha was used to assess the internal consistency reliability and the value of 0.834 was obtained. Our analyses showed that the Turkish version of Salford-Scott Nursing Values Questionnaire has high validity and reliability.

  8. Exploring cell apoptosis and senescence to understand and treat cancer: an interview with Scott Lowe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Scott W. Lowe is currently principal investigator at the Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center. After beginning his studies in chemical engineering, he decided to take another path and became fascinated by biochemistry, genetics and molecular biology, which ultimately led to an interest in human disease, particularly cancer. During his PhD at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT, Scott had the opportunity to benefit from the exceptional mentorship of Earl Ruley, David Housman and Tyler Jacks, and contributed to elucidating how the p53 (TP53 tumor suppressor gene limits oncogenic transformation and modulates the cytotoxic response to conventional chemotherapy. This important work earned him a fellowship from the Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory, which helped to launch his independent career. Scott is now a leading scientist in the cancer field and his work has helped to shed light on mechanisms of cell apoptosis and senescence to better understand and treat cancer. In this interview, he talks about this incredible scientific journey.

  9. Exploring cell apoptosis and senescence to understand and treat cancer: an interview with Scott Lowe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lowe, Scott; Cifra, Alessandra

    2015-11-01

    Scott W. Lowe is currently principal investigator at the Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center. After beginning his studies in chemical engineering, he decided to take another path and became fascinated by biochemistry, genetics and molecular biology, which ultimately led to an interest in human disease, particularly cancer. During his PhD at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), Scott had the opportunity to benefit from the exceptional mentorship of Earl Ruley, David Housman and Tyler Jacks, and contributed to elucidating how the p53 (TP53) tumor suppressor gene limits oncogenic transformation and modulates the cytotoxic response to conventional chemotherapy. This important work earned him a fellowship from the Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory, which helped to launch his independent career. Scott is now a leading scientist in the cancer field and his work has helped to shed light on mechanisms of cell apoptosis and senescence to better understand and treat cancer. In this interview, he talks about this incredible scientific journey. © 2015. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  10. Conceptual Study of Rotary-Wing Microrobotics

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Chabak, Kelson D

    2008-01-01

    This thesis presents a novel rotary-wing micro-electro-mechanical systems (MEMS) robot design. Two MEMS wing designs were designed, fabricated and tested including one that possesses features conducive to insect level aerodynamics...

  11. First record of the Calanoid Copepod Pseudodiaptomus serricaudatus (Scott, T. 1894), (Copepoda: Calanoida: Pseudodiaptomidae) in the equatorial Indian ocean.

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Rebello, V.; Narvekar, J.; Gadi, P.; Venenkar, A.; Gauns, M.; PrasannaKumar, S.

    , Pondicherry University, Port Blair, Andaman 3Happy Home Apartment, Near Canara Bank, Fatorda, Margao, Goa-403602 Abstract Pseudodiaptomus serricaudatus (Scott, T. 1894), a planktonic copepod belonging to the family Pseudodiaptomidae, though has...

  12. Low Aspect-Ratio Wings for Wing-Ships

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Filippone, Antonino; Selig, M.

    1998-01-01

    Flying on ground poses technical and aerodynamical challenges. The requirements for compactness, efficiency, manouverability, off-design operation,open new areas of investigations in the fieldof aerodynamic analysis and design. A review ofthe characteristics of low-aspect ratio wings, in- and out...

  13. The validation of science virtual test to assess 7th grade students’ critical thinking on matter and heat topic (SVT-MH)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sya’bandari, Y.; Firman, H.; Rusyati, L.

    2018-05-01

    The method used in this research was descriptive research for profiling the validation of SVT-MH to measure students’ critical thinking on matter and heat topic in junior high school. The subject is junior high school students of 7th grade (13 years old) while science teacher and expert as the validators. The instruments that used as a tool to obtain the data are rubric expert judgment (content, media, education) and rubric of readability test. There are four steps to validate SVT-MH in 7th grade Junior High School. These steps are analysis of core competence and basic competence based on Curriculum 2013, expert judgment (content, media, education), readability test and trial test (limited and larger trial test). The instrument validation resulted 30 items that represent 8 elements and 21 sub-elements to measure students’ critical thinking based on Inch in matter and heat topic. The alpha Cronbach (α) is 0.642 which means that the instrument is sufficient to measure students’ critical thinking matter and heat topic.

  14. Diagnostic performance of 64-section CT using CT gastrography in preoperative T staging of gastric cancer according to 7th edition of AJCC cancer staging manual

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Jin Woong; Shin, Sang Soo; Heo, Suk Hee; Lim, Hyo Soon; Jeong, Yong Yeon; Kang, Heoung Keun; Choi, Yoo Duk; Park, Young Kyu; Park, Chang Hwan

    2012-01-01

    To evaluate the accuracy of 64-section multidetector CT with CT gastrography for determining the depth of mural invasion in patients with gastric cancer according to the 7th edition of the AJCC cancer staging manual. A total of 127 patients with gastric cancer and who had undergone both esophago-gastro-duodenoscopy and 64-section CT were included in this study. Two radiologists independently reviewed the preoperative CT images with respect to the detectability and T-staging of the gastric cancers. The sensitivity, specificity, accuracy and overall accuracy of each reviewer for the T staging of gastric cancer were calculated. Overall, gastric cancer was detected in 123 (96.9%) of the 127 cancers on the CT images. Reviewer 1 correctly staged 98 gastric cancers, and reviewer 2 correctly classified 105 gastric cancers. The overall diagnostic accuracy of the T staging was 77.2% (98/127) for reviewer 1 and 82.7% (105/127) for reviewer 2. 64-section CT using CT gastrography showed a reasonable diagnostic performance for determining the T staging in patients with gastric cancer according to the 7th edition of the AJCC cancer staging manual. (orig.)

  15. NDE Conference on Civil Engineering : a joint conference of the 7th Structural Materials Technology Conference (SMT) and the 6th International Symposium on Nondestructive Testing in Civil Engineering (NDT-CE)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-01-01

    The 2006 NDE conference on Civil Engineering was held in St. Louis, MO on August 14 18, 2006. The conference combined the 7th Structural Materials Technology Conference (SMT) along with the 6th International Symposium on Nondestructive Testing in...

  16. The team from ALICE DAQ (Data acquisition) involved in the 7th ALICE data challenge. First row: Sylvain Chapeland, Ulrich Fuchs, Pierre Vande Vyvre, Franco Carena Second row: Wisla Carena, Irina MAKHLYUEVA , Roberto Divia

    CERN Multimedia

    Claudia Marcelloni

    2007-01-01

    The team from ALICE DAQ (Data acquisition) involved in the 7th ALICE data challenge. First row: Sylvain Chapeland, Ulrich Fuchs, Pierre Vande Vyvre, Franco Carena Second row: Wisla Carena, Irina MAKHLYUEVA , Roberto Divia

  17. Her Excellency Mrs Sarah Gillett Her Majesty's Ambassador to the Swiss Confederation United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland on the occasion of the Antony Gormley sculpture unveiling ceremony Wednesday 7th December 2011

    CERN Document Server

    Maximilien Brice

    2011-01-01

    Her Excellency Mrs Sarah Gillett Her Majesty's Ambassador to the Swiss Confederation United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland on the occasion of the Antony Gormley sculpture unveiling ceremony Wednesday 7th December 2011

  18. Wings: Women Entrepreneurs Take Flight.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldwin, Fred D.

    1997-01-01

    Women's Initiative Networking Groups (WINGS) provides low- and moderate-income women in Appalachian Kentucky with training in business skills, contacts, and other resources they need to succeed as entrepreneurs. The women form informal networks to share business know-how and support for small business startup and operations. The program plans to…

  19. Comparison of Values in 5th, 6th, 7th and 8th Grade Primary Education Music Class Students'? Workbooks According to Rokeach?s and Akbas's Value Classifications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Çakirer, H. Serdar

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the present study is to compare the values in the songs of 5th, 6th, 7th and 8th grade primary education music classes students? workbooks according to the value categorizations proposed by Rockeach and Akbas and which values among the categories mentioned are taught to the students in the 5th, 6th, 7th and 8th grade primary education…

  20. Michael Scott

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ersin Hussein

    2015-04-01

    While Michael has contributed significantly to the field of classics and ancient history by publishing extensively, he has also enjoyed great success in engaging wider audiences with the ancient world. He regularly talks in schools around the country, writes books intended for the popular market as well as articles for national and international newspapers and magazines. Michael's experience in writing and presenting a range of programmes intended for TV and radio audiences has made him a household name. He has written and presented programmes for the National Geographic, History Channel, Nova, and the BBC including Delphi: bellybutton of the ancient world (BBC4; Guilty Pleasures: luxury in the ancient and medieval words (BBC4; Jesus: rise to power (Natural Geographic; Ancient Discoveries (History Channel; Who were the Greeks? (BBC2; The Mystery of the X Tombs (BBC2/Nova; The Greatest Show on Earth (BBC4, in conjunction with the Open University. He has also presented a radio series for BBC Radio 4, Spin the Globe. Michael's most recent programme, Roman Britain from the Air, was aired on ITV in December 2014. In this interview, I talk to him about his engagement with other disciplines within the humanities, his forthcoming book project, and his experiences writing and presenting TV and radio documentaries.

  1. Review Results on Wing-Body Interference

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frolov Vladimir

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents an overview of results for wing-body interference, obtained by the author for varied wing-body combinations. The lift-curve slopes of the wing-body combinations are considered. In this paper a discrete vortices method (DVM and 2D potential model for cross-flow around fuselage are used. The circular and elliptical cross-sections of the fuselage and flat wings of various forms are considered. Calculations showed that the value of the lift-curve slopes of the wing-body combinations may exceed the same value for an isolated wing. This result confirms an experimental data obtained by other authors earlier. Within a framework of the used mathematical models the investigations to optimize the wing-body combination were carried. The present results of the optimization problem for the wing-body combination allowed to select the optimal geometric characteristics for configuration to maximize the values of the lift-curve slopes of the wing-body combination. It was revealed that maximums of the lift-curve slopes for the optimal mid-wing configuration with elliptical cross-section body had a sufficiently large relative width of the body (more than 30% of the span wing.

  2. THE POSITION OF INTEREST IN SPORTS AND RECREATION OF 7th GRADE ELEMENTARY SCHOOL STUDENTS IN THE FACTOR ANALYSIS OF DIFFERENT INTEREST

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vladimir Milošević

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Personal interests carry a great potential and are usually a drive to act. Therefore they usually point towards the activity of an individual in his interest area. An insight into the position of the interest in sports and recreation among other interests can be obtained by inspecting the interests of 7th grade elementary school students from Sremska Mitrovica and Jagodina. The sample consisted of 736 7th grade elementary school students of both genders. A non-experimental study of the students’ interests was done using a questionnaire that consisted of 5 interest indicators: job preference, self-estimation of affinity, use of free time, direct self-estimation of interests and reaction to key words-stimuli. Each indicator had 30 items that asses 30 interests. A t test was used to inspect the level of interest in sports and recreation. Also, factor analysis was done for each indicator separately. The reason for this approach is that there is no real confirmation that these 5 indicators are well suited for assessing the interests of young persons in the time we live in. Students’ interest in sports and recreation is about 4 on the scale of 1 to 5, on each of the indicators. The data shows that the interest of 7th grade elementary school students in sports and recreation is closely linked to interest in military, these two interests belong to the same factor regardless of the way the interests are assessed, that is, they belong to the same factor on each of the 5 indicators. The interest in adventure belongs to the same factor as the interest in sports and recreation on 4 out of 5 indicators, and interest in humor, interest in travel and hedonistic interest on 3 out of 5 indicators. These results might indicate that the motives for engaging in sports and recreation are unstable, because this composition of relatedness of the interests can be interpreted as the factor of fun. If that is so, these findings alert to the importance of building a

  3. AFM study of structure influence on butterfly wings coloration

    OpenAIRE

    Dallaeva, Dinara; Tománek, Pavel

    2012-01-01

    This study describes the structural coloration of the butterfly Vanessa Atalanta wings and shows how the atomic force microscopy (AFM) can be applied to the study of wings morphology and wings surface behavior under the temperature. The role of the wings morphology in colors was investigated. Different colors of wings have different topology and can be identified by them. AFM in semi-contact mode was used to study the wings surface. The wing surface area, which is close to the butterfly body,...

  4. European and Americas Committees for Treatment and Research in Multiple Sclerosis (ECTRIMS/ACTRIMS) - 7th Joint Triennial Congress (October 25-28, 2017 - Paris, France).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Díaz, N

    2017-10-01

    The 7th Triennial Joint conference of the European Committee for Treatment and Research in Multiple Sclerosis (ECTRIMS) and Americas Committee for Treatment and Research in Multiple Sclerosis (ACTRIMS) was held in Paris, France. The meeting brought together attendees from a wide range of disciplines involved in multiple sclerosis (MS) research to explore an extensive program of teaching courses, plenary lectures, oral and poster sessions from approximately 2,000 abstracts submitted, and hot topic and young investigator presentations. These presentations covered topics including diagnostics, therapeutics and biomarkers, as well as a special section for MS nurses. Industry-sponsored symposia were also held. The report from this conference covers the latest developments in MS treatments.

  5. International recognition for ageing research: John Scott Award-2014 to Leonard Hayflick and Paul Moorhead

    OpenAIRE

    Rattan, Suresh

    2014-01-01

    It is with great pleasure and pride that we share the news of the award of the 2014 “City of Philadelphia John Scott Award”, to Dr. Leonard Hayflick and Dr. Paul Moorhead, for their research on ageing. The press release announcing the award states that: “from the first awarded in 1822, the Award is the oldest scientific award in the United States and, as a legacy to Benjamin Franklin, they are in the historic company of past winners who include Marie Curie, Thomas Edison, Jonas Salk, Irving L...

  6. A phyt osociological classification of the vegetation of the Jack Scott Nature Reserve*

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. J. Coetzee

    1974-12-01

    Full Text Available The vegetation of the Jack Scott Nature Reserve in the Central Bankenveld Veld Type is classified chiefly by the Braun-Blanquet Table Method. Habitat features, physiognomy, total floristic composition, differentiating species, woody plants and prominent grasses and forbs are presented for each community. Characterizing habitat features, in order of importance for the communities, are: exposure, soil texture, geology, slope, aspect, degree of rockiness and previous ploughing. The classification correlates well with the major physiographic and climatic variation in the Reserve and generally does not cut across main physiognomic types. The communities are potentially homogeneous management units.

  7. Magic neutrino mass matrix and the Bjorken-Harrison-Scott parameterization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lam, C.S.

    2006-01-01

    Observed neutrino mixing can be described by a tribimaximal MNS matrix. The resulting neutrino mass matrix in the basis of a diagonal charged lepton mass matrix is both 2-3 symmetric and magic. By a magic matrix, I mean one whose row sums and column sums are all identical. I study what happens if 2-3 symmetry is broken but the magic symmetry is kept intact. In that case, the mixing matrix is parameterized by a single complex parameter U e3 , in a form discussed recently by Bjorken, Harrison, and Scott

  8. Mafic Materials in Scott Crater? A Test for Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, Bonnie L.

    2007-01-01

    Clementine 750 nm and multispectral ratio data, along with Lunar Orbiter and radar data, were used to study the crater Scott in the lunar south polar region. The multispectral data provide evidence for mafic materials, impact melts, anorthositic materials, and a small pyroclastic deposit. High-resolution radar data and Lunar Orbiter photography for this area show differences in color and surface texture that correspond with the locations of the hypothesized mafic and anorthositic areas on the crater floor. This region provides a test case for the upcoming Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter. Verification of the existence of a mafic deposit at this location is relevant to future lunar resource utilization planning.

  9. An assessment of the complications of the Brantley Scott artificial sphincter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heathcote, P S; Galloway, N T; Lewis, D C; Stephenson, T P

    1987-08-01

    A Brantley Scott artificial sphincter has been inserted into 95 patients since 1981; more than half of the patients had lower urinary tract neuropathy and most of the others post-TUR incontinence. The main problem with the device has been cuff failure (12), which should be resolved by the new "dipped" cuffs. The major surgical complication has been erosion (10), usually associated with infection. Twenty-four patients had variable degrees of incontinence but the artificial sphincter remains the cornerstone of continence control when other methods have failed or are inappropriate.

  10. A Drosophila wing spot test

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ayaki, Toshikazu; Yoshikawa, Isao; Niikawa, Norio; Hoshi, Masaharu.

    1986-01-01

    A Drosophila wing spot test system was used to investigate the effects of low doses of X-rays, gamma rays, and both 2.3 and 14.1 MeV neutrons on somatic chromosome mutation (SCM) induction. The incidence of SCM was significantly increased with any type of radiation, with evident linear dose-response relationship within the range of 3 to 20 cGy. It was estimated that relative biological effectiveness value for SCM induction of 2.3 MeV neutrons to X-rays and gamma rays is much higher than that of 14.1 MeV neutrons to those photons (2.4 vs 8.0). The Drosophila wing spot test system seems to become a promising in vivo experimental method for higher animals in terms of the lack of necessity for a marvelously large number of materials required in conventional test system. (Namekawa, K.)

  11. Effects of wing locations on wing rock induced by forebody vortices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ma Baofeng

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Previous studies have shown that asymmetric vortex wakes over slender bodies exhibit a multi-vortex structure with an alternate arrangement along a body axis at high angle of attack. In this investigation, the effects of wing locations along a body axis on wing rock induced by forebody vortices was studied experimentally at a subcritical Reynolds number based on a body diameter. An artificial perturbation was added onto the nose tip to fix the orientations of forebody vortices. Particle image velocimetry was used to identify flow patterns of forebody vortices in static situations, and time histories of wing rock were obtained using a free-to-roll rig. The results show that the wing locations can affect significantly the motion patterns of wing rock owing to the variation of multi-vortex patterns of forebody vortices. As the wing locations make the forebody vortices a two-vortex pattern, the wing body exhibits regularly divergence and fixed-point motion with azimuthal variations of the tip perturbation. If a three-vortex pattern exists over the wing, however, the wing-rock patterns depend on the impact of the highest vortex and newborn vortex. As the three vortices together influence the wing flow, wing-rock patterns exhibit regularly fixed-points and limit-cycled oscillations. With the wing moving backwards, the newborn vortex becomes stronger, and wing-rock patterns become fixed-points, chaotic oscillations, and limit-cycled oscillations. With further backward movement of wings, the vortices are far away from the upper surface of wings, and the motions exhibit divergence, limit-cycled oscillations and fixed-points. For the rearmost location of the wing, the wing body exhibits stochastic oscillations and fixed-points.

  12. Artificial insect wings of diverse morphology for flapping-wing micro air vehicles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shang, J K; Finio, B M; Wood, R J; Combes, S A

    2009-01-01

    The development of flapping-wing micro air vehicles (MAVs) demands a systematic exploration of the available design space to identify ways in which the unsteady mechanisms governing flapping-wing flight can best be utilized for producing optimal thrust or maneuverability. Mimicking the wing kinematics of biological flight requires examining the potential effects of wing morphology on flight performance, as wings may be specially adapted for flapping flight. For example, insect wings passively deform during flight, leading to instantaneous and potentially unpredictable changes in aerodynamic behavior. Previous studies have postulated various explanations for insect wing complexity, but there lacks a systematic approach for experimentally examining the functional significance of components of wing morphology, and for determining whether or not natural design principles can or should be used for MAVs. In this work, a novel fabrication process to create centimeter-scale wings of great complexity is introduced; via this process, a wing can be fabricated with a large range of desired mechanical and geometric characteristics. We demonstrate the versatility of the process through the creation of planar, insect-like wings with biomimetic venation patterns that approximate the mechanical properties of their natural counterparts under static loads. This process will provide a platform for studies investigating the effects of wing morphology on flight dynamics, which may lead to the design of highly maneuverable and efficient MAVs and insight into the functional morphology of natural wings.

  13. Scott Redford: A New Approach to the Permeability of Political Symbolism in Rum Seljuk Turkey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philip Bockholt

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available As his work transcends what is seen as iconography, from a strictly art history perspective, the choice of Scott Redford for portrayal in this rubric may seem surprising. However, regarding the applicability of iconographical approaches to the wider domain of cultural studies, precisely his adaptation of art history methods, which integrate disparate source material in a quest for meaning, sparked the interest of this issue of META. For most scholars in the field of Islamic history, researching premodern times normally involves reading narrative sources, that is, chronicles. Despite the so-called "documentary turn" taking place in Mamluk and Ottoman Syria, scholars of the Middle East lack the vast array of archival material that is available to their colleagues working on Medieval Europe. Thus, taking into account other types of material generally neglected by historians might be useful (more in the tradition of archaeologists and art historians who do include material culture in general. This article discusses Scott Redford's approach to combining written sources, epigraphy, and archaeological findings of the Seljuks of Rum in 13th century Anatolia in order to gain more insight into the iconography of power in a remote Islamic past.

  14. Making waves the story of Ruby Payne-Scott : Australian pioneer radio astronomer

    CERN Document Server

    Goss, M

    2013-01-01

    This book is an abbreviated, partly re-written version of "Under the Radar - The First Woman in Radio Astronomy: Ruby Payne-Scott." It addresses a general readership interested in historical and sociological aspects of astronomy and presents the biography of Ruby Payne-Scott (1912 – 1981). As the first female radio astronomer (and one of the first people in the world to consider radio astronomy), she made classic contributions to solar radio physics. She also played a major role in the design of the Australian government's Council for Scientific and Industrial Research radars, which were in turn of vital importance in the Southwest Pacific Theatre in World War II. These radars were used by military personnel from Australia, the United States and New Zealand. From a sociological perspective, her career offers many examples of the perils of being a female academic in the first half of the 20th century. Written in an engaging style and complemented by many historical photographs, this book offers fascinating...

  15. Role of wing morphing in thrust generation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehdi Ghommem

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we investigate the role of morphing on flight dynamics of two birds by simulating the flow over rigid and morphing wings that have the characteristics of two different birds, namely the Giant Petrel and Dove Prion. The simulation of a flapping rigid wing shows that the root of the wing should be placed at a specific angle of attack in order to generate enough lift to balance the weight of the bird. However, in this case the generated thrust is either very small, or even negative, depending on the wing shape. Further, results show that morphing of the wing enables a significant increase in the thrust and propulsive efficiency. This indicates that the birds actually utilize some sort of active wing twisting and bending to produce enough thrust. This study should facilitate better guidance for the design of flapping air vehicles.

  16. La Emulsión de Scott en la Cultura Hispanoamericana.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alfredo Jácome Roca

    2005-06-01

    Varios de los empresarios que fueron pioneros en la industria farmacéutica contaron con algún aceite de hígado de bacalao entre sus primeros productos. En 1876, dos químicos que incursionaron en la industria, llamados Alfred B. Scott y Samuel W. Bowne, empezaron a comerciar en Nueva York la nueva Emulsión de Scott. La fórmula original incluía el aceite de hígado de bacalao –traído de Noruega en grandes cantidades– y los hipofosfitos de lima y soda. No obstante la buena fama que rodeaba sus ingredientes, la comercialización incluyó la propaganda masiva con afirmaciones ciertamente exageradas, que se aprovechaban de la credulidad del público y de la ausencia de mecanismos regulatorios. Se utilizaba tanto el humor como el temor de los parroquianos en postales, almanaques, avisos, que mostraban niños rosados y cachetones. Estos dibujos –y las botellas mismas– hacen actualmente las delicias de los coleccionistas y el negocio de los anticuarios. Una litografía aparecida en 1895 afirma que «la Emulsión de Scott genera vitalidad, carnes, fuerza y la promesa de salud para las personas de todas las edades». Otra estrategia –que aún en tiempos modernos se usa para productos populares– era la de los testimonios de personas que atestiguaban la bondad de la emulsión en su caso concreto. Un aviso que apareció en 1900 en el Greensburg Morning Tribune daba información detallada sobre la escrófula o enfermedad de las linfadenopatías y sobre la consunción, como a la sazón se llamaba a la tuberculosis. «La gente afectada con escrófula a menudo desarrolla consunción; los síntomas más prominentes de la escrófula son la anemia, la secreción de los oídos, las erupciones descamativas, el crecimiento y drenaje de las glándulas del cuello, que pronostican la pronta aparición de la consunción. Todo esto se puede interrumpir, prevenir la consunción y recuperar la salud con el uso precoz de… la Emulsión de Scott». Las niñas que declinaban

  17. Problem of Vortex Turbulence behind Wings (II),

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-09-23

    these winglets would give a resultant aerodynamic force directed towards the front which would decrease the wing drag. Such winglets will affect the...Fig. 30 Whitcomb winglets Pig. 31 Set of winglets for wake dissipation Surfaces on wing tips, winglets (Fig. 30), proposed by Whitcomb to diminish...anyway - to decrease the induced drag of the wing by putting some winglets at a certain angle in different planes, as shown in Fig. 31. The total

  18. 7th International Geostatistics Congress

    CERN Document Server

    Deutsch, Clayton

    2005-01-01

    The conference proceedings consist of approximately 120 technical papers presented at the Seventh International Geostatistics Congress held in Banff, Alberta, Canada in 2004. All the papers were reviewed by an international panel of leading geostatisticians. The five major sections are: theory, mining, petroleum, environmental and other applications. The first section showcases new and innovative ideas in the theoretical development of geostatistics as a whole; these ideas will have large impact on (1) the directions of future geostatistical research, and (2) the conventional approaches to heterogeneity modelling in a wide range of natural resource industries. The next four sections are focused on applications and innovations relating to the use of geostatistics in specific industries. Historically, mining, petroleum and environmental industries have embraced the use of geostatistics for uncertainty characterization, so these three industries are identified as major application areas. The last section is open...

  19. Veins improve fracture toughness of insect wings.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan-Henning Dirks

    Full Text Available During the lifetime of a flying insect, its wings are subjected to mechanical forces and deformations for millions of cycles. Defects in the micrometre thin membranes or veins may reduce the insect's flight performance. How do insects prevent crack related material failure in their wings and what role does the characteristic vein pattern play? Fracture toughness is a parameter, which characterises a material's resistance to crack propagation. Our results show that, compared to other body parts, the hind wing membrane of the migratory locust S. gregaria itself is not exceptionally tough (1.04±0.25 MPa√m. However, the cross veins increase the wing's toughness by 50% by acting as barriers to crack propagation. Using fracture mechanics, we show that the morphological spacing of most wing veins matches the critical crack length of the material (1132 µm. This finding directly demonstrates how the biomechanical properties and the morphology of locust wings are functionally correlated in locusts, providing a mechanically 'optimal' solution with high toughness and low weight. The vein pattern found in insect wings thus might inspire the design of more durable and lightweight artificial 'venous' wings for micro-air-vehicles. Using the vein spacing as indicator, our approach might also provide a basis to estimate the wing properties of endangered or extinct insect species.

  20. Subtractive Structural Modification of Morpho Butterfly Wings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Qingchen; He, Jiaqing; Ni, Mengtian; Song, Chengyi; Zhou, Lingye; Hu, Hang; Zhang, Ruoxi; Luo, Zhen; Wang, Ge; Tao, Peng; Deng, Tao; Shang, Wen

    2015-11-11

    Different from studies of butterfly wings through additive modification, this work for the first time studies the property change of butterfly wings through subtractive modification using oxygen plasma etching. The controlled modification of butterfly wings through such subtractive process results in gradual change of the optical properties, and helps the further understanding of structural optimization through natural evolution. The brilliant color of Morpho butterfly wings is originated from the hierarchical nanostructure on the wing scales. Such nanoarchitecture has attracted a lot of research effort, including the study of its optical properties, its potential use in sensing and infrared imaging, and also the use of such structure as template for the fabrication of high-performance photocatalytic materials. The controlled subtractive processes provide a new path to modify such nanoarchitecture and its optical property. Distinct from previous studies on the optical property of the Morpho wing structure, this study provides additional experimental evidence for the origination of the optical property of the natural butterfly wing scales. The study also offers a facile approach to generate new 3D nanostructures using butterfly wings as the templates and may lead to simpler structure models for large-scale man-made structures than those offered by original butterfly wings. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  1. Analysis of bat wings for morphing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leylek, Emily A.; Manzo, Justin E.; Garcia, Ephrahim

    2008-03-01

    The morphing of wings from three different bat species is studied using an extension of the Weissinger method. To understand how camber affects performance factors such as lift and lift to drag ratio, XFOIL is used to study thin (3% thickness to chord ratio) airfoils at a low Reynolds number of 100,000. The maximum camber of 9% yielded the largest lift coefficient, and a mid-range camber of 7% yielded the largest lift to drag ratio. Correlations between bat wing morphology and flight characteristics are covered, and the three bat wing planforms chosen represent various combinations of morphological components and different flight modes. The wings are studied using the extended Weissinger method in an "unmorphed" configuration using a thin, symmetric airfoil across the span of the wing through angles of attack of 0°-15°. The wings are then run in the Weissinger method at angles of attack of -2° to 12° in a "morphed" configuration modeled after bat wings seen in flight, where the camber of the airfoils comprising the wings is varied along the span and a twist distribution along the span is introduced. The morphed wing configurations increase the lift coefficient over 1000% from the unmorphed configuration and increase the lift to drag ratio over 175%. The results of the three different species correlate well with their flight in nature.

  2. Quad-thopter: Tailless Flapping Wing Robot with 4 Pairs of Wings

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Wagter, C.; Karasek, M.; de Croon, G.C.H.E.; J.-M. Moschetta G. Hattenberger, H. de Plinval

    2017-01-01

    We present a novel design of a tailless flapping wing Micro Air Vehicle (MAV), which uses four independently driven pairs of flapping wings in order to fly and perform agile maneuvers. The wing pairs are arranged such that differential thrust generates the desired roll and pitch moments, similar to

  3. STS-87 Mission Specialists Scott and Doi with EVA coordinator Laws participate in the CEIT for their

    Science.gov (United States)

    1997-01-01

    Participating in the Crew Equipment Integration Test (CEIT) at Kennedy Space Center are STS-87 crew members, assisted by Glenda Laws, extravehicular activity (EVA) coordinator, Johnson Space Center, at left. Next to Laws is Mission Specialist Takao Doi, Ph.D., of the National Space Development Agency of Japan, who is looking on as Mission Specialist Winston Scott gets a hands-on look at some of the equipment. The STS-87 mission will be the fourth United States Microgravity Payload and flight of the Spartan-201 deployable satellite. During the mission, scheduled for a Nov. 19 liftoff from KSC, Dr. Doi and Scott will both perform spacewalks.

  4. Application of the AJCC 7th edition carcinoma of the eyelid staging system: a medical center pathology based, 15-year review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Crawford CM

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Courtney Crawford1, Colby Fernelius2, Paula Young1, Stephen Groo2, Darryl Ainbinder21Blanchfield Army Hospital, Fort Campbell, KY, USA; 2Madigan Army Medical Center, Fort Lewis, WA, USAContext: The purpose of this study was to conduct a quality improvement (QI, applied practical review of the American Joint Committee on Cancer (AJCC 7th edition, Carcinoma of the Eyelid staging system. AJCC utilizes a primary tumor, lymph node, metastasis (pTNM cancer staging approach.Objective: We wanted to determine if the AJCC pTNM carcinoma staging system identified patients with highly aggressive carcinoma of the eyelid. We also wanted to determine if there were any unexpected issues in its practical application. Design: We conducted a 15-year, consecutive, retrospective review of all cases of excisional biopsy for carcinoma of the eyelid. We reviewed the original histopathology slides and complete pathology records for each case.Results: Over a 15-year review period, 52 cases of excisional biopsy for carcinoma of the eyelid were identified. The average age of the study population was 72 years. Nodular well-differentiated basal cell carcinoma (BCC was the predominant histology for 85% of cases. Morpheaform/metatypical BCC was the next dominant at 9%. Squamous cell carcinoma and sebaceous carcinoma followed at 4% and 2%, respectively. We were able to assign clear staging to 50 of the 52 cases with the available pathology data. The stage results were as follows: stage 1A 72%, stage 1B 22%, stage II 4%, stage III 2%, with no cases of stage IV metastatic disease.Conclusions: The 7th edition AJCC Carcinoma of the Eyelid chapter proved to be a practical tool for carcinoma staging of the eyelid. The largest tumor dimension remains an effective predictive factor. High-grade pathologic prognostic factors such as tumor necrosis or perineural spread had a 100% association with a final stage of II or greater. Concordance and compliance was 100% for the recommended site

  5. Quantitative-genetic analysis of wing form and bilateral asymmetry ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    lines; Procrustes analysis; wing shape; wing size. ... Models of stochastic gene expression pre- dict that intrinsic noise ... Quantitative parameters of wing size and shape asymmetries ..... the residuals of a regression on centroid size produced.

  6. Adaptive wing : Investigations of passive wing technologies for loads reduction in the cleansky smart fixed wing aircraft (SFWA) project

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kruger, W.R.; Dillinger, J; De Breuker, R.; Reyes, M.; Haydn, K.

    2016-01-01

    In the work package “Adaptive Wing” in the Clean-Sky “Smart Fixed Wing Aircraft” (SFWA) project, design processes and solutions for aircraft wings have been created, giving optimal response with respect to loads, comfort and performance by the introduction of passive and active concepts. Central

  7. Novel four-wing and eight-wing attractors using coupled chaotic Lorenz systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grassi, Giuseppe

    2008-01-01

    This paper presents the problem of generating four-wing (eight-wing) chaotic attractors. The adopted method consists in suitably coupling two (three) identical Lorenz systems. In analogy with the original Lorenz system, where the two wings of the butterfly attractor are located around the two equilibria with the unstable pair of complex-conjugate eigenvalues, this paper shows that the four wings (eight wings) of these novel attractors are located around the four (eight) equilibria with two (three) pairs of unstable complex-conjugate eigenvalues. (general)

  8. The Content Analysis, Material Presentation, and Readability of Curriculum 2013 Science Textbook for 1st Semester of Junior High School 7th Grade

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Endik Deni Nugroho

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Based on the early observation by researchers of the two Science textbooks 7thGrade about biological material, 1stand 2ndsemester of curriculum 2013, there were errors in the material presentation and legibility. This study aimed to compare and find the contents suitability of the book based on standard of competence and basic competences, readability, materials presentation and supporting material in the science textbook VII grade, 1st and 2nd semester and measured student legibility. This study used a qualitative descriptive approach by using document analysis. The data resources were obtained by using purposive, the data collection was triangulation, data analysis was inductive/qualitative and the results emphasized the meaning. This research results showed that the Integrated Sciences and Sciences textbook 1st and 2nd semester meet the standards of the core competencies and basic competence on the syllabus curriculum 2013 and also meet the books standart. The results of the analysis conducted in misstatement concept and principles and material llustration in the Integrated Science textbook 1st semester were found 5 misstatement concept, for the presentation of the principles and material illustration was found no error. In the book Integrated Sciences there was no delivery errors concept, principle, and material illustration. Science textbook 1st semester found 8 concepts misstatements and 8 illustration material misstatements. In general, Integrated Sciences and Sciences textbooks 1st and 2nd semester are illegibility so not appropriate for students.

  9. Colorectal cancer and the 7th revision of the TNM staging system: review of changes and suggestions for uniform pathologic reporting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obrocea, F L; Sajin, Maria; Marinescu, Elena Cristina; Stoica, D

    2011-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is a neoplastic disease with a continuously growing incidence in Romania and throughout the world. Although the surgery remains the first line treatment for most of the cases, newly discovered targeted molecular therapies - effective for some patients, but with various side effects and significant financial burden for the national health systems - requires not only stratification of patients in prognostic groups but also evaluation of some non-anatomic factors with major impact on the prognosis and therapeutic strategy. The AJCC/UICC TNM staging system, in his 7th revision, effective for cases diagnosed on or after January 1, 2010, responds to these needs. On the other hand, the role of the pathologist is increasing in terms of workload and amount of information to be included in the pathology report in order to deliver a personalized diagnosis. There are concerns worldwide regarding relevance, validity and completeness of pathologic reporting of CRC in the absence of a uniform reporting format. Therefore, suggestions for a standardized pathology report of CRC are made, based on TNM 7 and recent, up-to-date conclusive published data.

  10. Nutrition Education in Secondary Education (7th to 11th grades Through the Crosscutting Topic “Education for Health” From an Useful-For-Life Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Francisco Quirós-Rojas

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper provides the results of a research study conducted to determine how science teachers from four schools of the San José Regional Branch of the Costa Rican Ministry of Public Education undertake the nutrition topic at their schools; and, at the same time, find out about their interest in approaching nutrition as an useful-for-life issue, through the crosscutting topic “Education for Health.” In addition, this study intended to identify the perceptions of students about good nutrition in favor of healthy a lifestyle. Based on the nature of the work, the study followed a naturalistic paradigm towards a dominant qualitative approach, in a community-based type of study.  Questionnaires and interviews were used as research instruments; the sample included 6 science teachers and 60 students of ninth grade.   The information was analyzed and triangulated. The results indicated that teachers apply the useful-for-life approach in nutrition education, empirically; innovative activities are not widely used; and there is a need to strengthen knowledge regarding the use of crosscutting topics in the curriculum. In addition, this study reported that students are aware of—but do not implement—good daily life actions to change bad eating habits and favor preventive health.  This research project puts forward teaching strategies to be applied in secondary education (7th to 11th grades to approach nutrition from this perspective.

  11. Suicidal ideation among students of the 7th, 8th, and 9th grades in the State of Lara, Venezuela: the Global School Health Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Granero, Ricardo; Poni, Esteban; Poni, Carolin

    2008-12-01

    Suicidal behavior among adolescents is not a well-explored public health problem. Health policy decision-making on suicidal behavior needs reliable information on the prevalence of suicidal ideation (SI) and its associated risk factors to produce health promotion and prevention programs. The Global School Health Survey is a self-administered survey done on a random probabilistic sample among students of the 7th, 8th, and 9th grades in the Lara State, Venezuela, school period 2003 to 2004. Point prevalence of SI and associated factors were included and the odds (OR) of having SI was calculated given selected factors. Two-thousand seventy (2070) respondents, of which 13.5 % reported having SI in the last 12 months, and in females more than males (14.6% vs. 11.7%). The OR for SI, according to an associated risk factor, were among (a) females: age > or = 14 years (2.2), worries (3.42), loneliness (8.8), ever had sexual intercourse (5.58), alcohol (8.43) and (b) males: having only one or non close friends (3.69), alcohol (12.36), ever had sexual intercourse (2.73). Behavioral risk factors are relatively new in the field of surveillance systems; therefore, results on SI should be cautiously taken into consideration and a wide discussion should be encouraged as we learn how to best use the results for health promotion and disease prevention.

  12. The abandonment of the Hispano-Roman street plan: changes in the road network and sanitation infrastructure between 2nd and 7th centuries AD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manuel D. Ruiz-Bueno

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available The transformation of the classical civitas into the city of Late Antiquity was a long-term process within which saw a profound change in the traditional street plan. A critical analysis of the available sources, especially those of archaeological interest, has allowed us to study the evolution of both the Hispano-Roman street plan and the sanitation infrastructure between the 2nd & 7th centuries AD. The need to examine this process on a scale that exceeds the purely local geographical setting has led us to carry out a study where we have analysed different phenomena: the partial or total occupation of a number of porticos and roads; the replacement of stone pavements with earth, which also made the level of the road surface higher, and the slow but progressive neglect of the sewerage system. In contrast to the traditional view, we believe that the abandonment of the Hispano-Roman street plan was a process in which the authorities played a key role.

  13. Scott Correction for Large Atoms and Molecules in a Self-Generated Magnetic Field

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Erdös, Laszlo; Fournais, Søren; Solovej, Jan Philip

    2012-01-01

    constant. We show that, in the simultaneous limit $Z\\to\\infty$, $\\al\\to 0$ such that $\\kappa =Z\\al^2$ is fixed, the ground state energy of the system is given by a two term expansion $c_1Z^{7/3} + c_2(\\kappa) Z^2 + o(Z^2)$. The leading term is given by the non-magnetic Thomas-Fermi theory. Our result shows......We consider a large neutral molecule with total nuclear charge $Z$ in non-relativistic quantum mechanics with a self-generated classical electromagnetic field. To ensure stability, we assume that $Z\\al^2\\le \\kappa_0$ for a sufficiently small $\\kappa_0$, where $\\al$ denotes the fine structure...... that the magnetic field affects only the second (so-called Scott) term in the expansion....

  14. Further developments of the Neyman-Scott clustered point process for modeling rainfall

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cowpertwait, Paul S. P.

    1991-07-01

    This paper provides some useful results for modeling rainfall. It extends work on the Neyman-Scott cluster model for simulating rainfall time series. Several important properties have previously been found for the model, for example, the expectation and variance of the amount of rain captured in an arbitrary time interval (Rodriguez-Iturbe et al., 1987a), In this paper additional properties are derived, such as the probability of an arbitrary interval of any chosen length being dry. In applications this is a desirable property to have, and is often used for fitting stochastic rainfall models to field data. The model is currently being used in rainfall time series research directed toward improving sewage systems in the United Kingdom. To illustrate the model's performance an example is given, where the model is fitted to 10 years of hourly data taken from Blackpool, England.

  15. Nonlinear Dynamics of Wind Turbine Wings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Jesper Winther

    , large wind turbines become increasingly flexible and dynamically sensitive. This project focuses on the structural analysis of highly flexible wind turbine wings, and the aerodynamic loading of wind turbine wings under large changes in flow field due to elastic deformations and changing wind conditions....

  16. PREFACE: Proceedings of the 7th Edoardo Amaldi Conference on Gravitational Waves (Amaldi7), Sydney Convention and Exhibition Centre, Darling Harbour, Sydney, Australia, 8 14 July 2007

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Susan M.; McClelland, David E.

    2008-07-01

    18 Scientific Organising Committee, GWIC and the Local Organising Committee for all their hard work in putting together these very successful combined conferences, which attracted 520 participants. Many of the practical aspects of the organisation were handled by the event management company Conexion, and their professionalism, expertise and dedication were greatly appreciated. Finally, we would like to thank all the participants for their lively and colourful contributions to making these conferences a success. Susan M Scott Chair, Local Organising Committee David E McClelland Deputy Chair, Local Organising Committee Centre for Gravitational Physics, The Australian National University, Australia Guest Editors Participants gather prior to opening ceremony Participants gather prior to opening ceremony Participants entering auditorium for opening ceremony Participants entering auditorium for opening ceremony Chair of Local Organising Committee Susan M Scott opening ceremony Chair of Local Organising Committee Susan M Scott opening ceremony President of the International Society on General Relativity and Gravitation Clifford M Will opening ceremony President of the International Society on General Relativity and Gravitation Clifford M Will opening ceremony Amusing moment at opening ceremony Amusing moment at opening ceremony Chair of the Gravitational Wave International Committee James Hough opening ceremony Chair of the Gravitational Wave International Committee James Hough opening ceremony Welcome to the land by traditional land owner Welcome to the land by traditional land owner Welcome to the land by traditional land owner Welcome to the land by traditional land owner First plenary speaker Stan E Whitcomb First plenary speaker Stan E Whitcomb Exhibition booth Australian National University College of Science Kimberley Heenan (left), Lachlan McCalman (right) Exhibition booth Australian National University College of Science Kimberley Heenan (left), Lachlan Mc

  17. Wing rock suppression using forebody vortex control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, T. T.; Ong, L. Y.; Suarez, C. J.; Malcolm, G. N.

    1991-01-01

    Static and free-to-roll tests were conducted in a water tunnel with a configuration that consisted of a highly-slender forebody and 78-deg sweep delta wings. Flow visualization was performed and the roll angle histories were obtained. The fluid mechanisms governing the wing rock of this configuration were identified. Different means of suppressing wing rock by controlling the forebody vortices using small blowing jets were also explored. Steady blowing was found to be capable of suppressing wing rock, but significant vortex asymmetries had to be induced at the same time. On the other hand, alternating pulsed blowing on the left and right sides of the forebody was demonstrated to be potentially an effective means of suppressing wing rock and eliminating large asymmetric moments at high angles of attack.

  18. Richard J. Hill, Picturing Scotland through the Waverley Novels: Walter Scott and the Origins of the Victorian Illustrated Novel.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacqueline Irene Cannata

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Richard J. Hill, Picturing Scotland through the Waverley Novels: Walter Scott and the Origins of the Victorian Illustrated Novel . Farnham, Surrey, and Burlington, VT: Ashgate, 2010. Pp. 236. ISBN 978-0-7546-6806-0. US$99.99.

  19. Case 3724 - Metochus abbreviatus Scott, 1874 (Insecta, Heteroptera): proposed precedence over Rhyparochromus erosus Walker, 1872 (currently Metochus erosus)

    Science.gov (United States)

    The purpose of this application, under Article 23.9.3 of the Code, is to conserve the widely used specific name Metochus abbreviatus Scott, 1874, for a species of rhyparochromid bugs from East Asia. The name is threatened by the senior subjective synonym Metochus erosus (Walker, 1872), which has bee...

  20. 100 years since Scott reached the pole: a century of learning about the physiological demands of Antarctica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halsey, Lewis G; Stroud, Mike A

    2012-04-01

    The 1910-1913 Terra Nova Expedition to the Antarctic, led by Captain Robert Falcon Scott, was a venture of science and discovery. It is also a well-known story of heroism and tragedy since his quest to reach the South Pole and conduct research en route, while successful was also fateful. Although Scott and his four companions hauled their sledges to the Pole, they died on their return journey either directly or indirectly from the extreme physiological stresses they experienced. One hundred years on, our understanding of such stresses caused by Antarctic extremes and how the body reacts to severe exercise, malnutrition, hypothermia, high altitude, and sleep deprivation has greatly advanced. On the centenary of Scott's expedition to the bottom of the Earth, there is still controversy surrounding whether the deaths of those five men could have, or should have, been avoided. This paper reviews present-day knowledge related to the physiology of sustained man-hauling in Antarctica and contrasts this with the comparative ignorance about these issues around the turn of the 20th century. It closes by considering whether, with modern understanding about the effects of such a scenario on the human condition, Scott could have prepared and managed his team differently and so survived the epic 1,600-mile journey. The conclusion is that by carrying rations with a different composition of macromolecules, enabling greater calorific intake at similar overall weight, Scott might have secured the lives of some of the party, and it is also possible that enhanced levels of vitamin C in his rations, albeit difficult to achieve in 1911, could have significantly improved their survival chances. Nevertheless, even with today's knowledge, a repeat attempt at his expedition would by no means be bound to succeed.

  1. Final Report for Grant No. DE-FG02-03ER54706 ''Support for the 7th Workshop on The Interrelationship between Plasma Experiment in Laboratory and Space''

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    C. Kletzing

    2005-01-01

    We describe the support given to support the 7th IPELS meeting which brings together space and laboratory based physicists. The meeting was a great success with more than 80 attendees and a significant number of young scientists. The major topics of discussion were magnetic reconnection, plasma turbulence, and waves in plasmas

  2. Consoil 2000 : 7th international FZK/TNO conference on contaminated soil, organized by Research Centre Karlsruhe (KZK, D), TNO, in cooperation with UFZ Leipzig, 18-22 Sept 2000. Vol. 1 en 2

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    2000-01-01

    These volumes present the proceedings of ConSoil 2000, the 7th international FZK/TNO conference on contaminated soil (in cooperation with UFZ Leipzig-Halle). This series of conferences focuses on policies, research and development, regulations, practical implementation and experiences related to

  3. Hovering hummingbird wing aerodynamics during the annual cycle. II. Implications of wing feather moult

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sapir, Nir; Elimelech, Yossef

    2018-01-01

    Birds usually moult their feathers in a particular sequence which may incur aerodynamic, physiological and behavioural implications. Among birds, hummingbirds are unique species in their sustained hovering flight. Because hummingbirds frequently hover-feed, they must maintain sufficiently high flight capacities even when moulting their flight feathers. A hummingbird wing consists of 10 primary flight feathers whose absence during moult may strongly affect wing performance. Using dynamic similarity rules, we compared time-accurate aerodynamic loads and flow field measurements over several wing geometries that follow the natural feather moult sequence of Calypte anna, a common hummingbird species in western North America. Our results suggest a drop of more than 20% in lift production during the early stages of the moult sequence in which mid-wing flight feathers are moulted. We also found that the wing's ability to generate lift strongly depended on the morphological integrity of the outer primaries and leading-edge. These findings may explain the evolution of wing morphology and moult attributes. Specifically, the high overlap between adjacent wing feathers, especially at the wing tip, and the slow sequential replacement of the wing feathers result in a relatively small reduction in wing surface area during moult with limited aerodynamic implications. We present power and efficiency analyses for hover flight during moult under several plausible scenarios, suggesting that body mass reduction could be a compensatory mechanism that preserves the energetic costs of hover flight. PMID:29515884

  4. The Role of a Relative Age Effect in the 7th International Children’s Winter Games 2016 and the Influence of Biological Maturity Status on Selection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, Lisa; Hildebrandt, Carolin; Raschner, Christian

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study was to analyse the role of a relative age effect (RAE) and to investigate the influence of biological maturity status on the RAE at the 7th International Children`s Winter Games. The birth dates of all 572 participants (365 males, 207 females) were analysed, and the biological maturity status of 384 athletes (243 males, 141 females) was assessed by the age at peak height velocity (APHV) method. A RAE was present in the total sample (χ2 = 67.81; p < 0.001), and among both male (χ2 = 49.02; p < 0.001) and female athletes (χ2 = 37.00; p < 0.001) as well as for strength- (χ2 = 56.46; p < 0.001), endurance- (χ2 = 20.48; p = 0.039) and technique-related types of sports (χ2 = 20.48; p = 0.041). No significant differences in biological maturity status were present between the male athletes of single relative age quarters. Among the female athletes a significant difference was present (F = 5.94, p < 0.001); relatively younger female athletes had significantly lower values in the APHV, which indicated that they were maturing earlier. However, when dividing the athletes into normal, early and late maturing athletes, it could be seen that among the relatively younger athletes, hardly any late maturing athletes were present. These findings revealed that relatively younger athletes seemed to only have a chance for selection if they were early maturing, whereas relatively older athletes had an increased likelihood for selection independent of their biological maturity status. In the future, the relative age and the biological maturity status should be considered in the talent development system for various types of winter sport, to contribute to more fairness and to not discriminate against relatively younger and less mature athletes. Key points The relative age strongly influenced the participation rate at the 7th ICG in 2016. A highly significant RAE was present among male and female participants and among athletes of all three groups of sport

  5. Eye abnormalities in the mouse fetus and postnatal mice caused by x-radiation of 150 R on the 7th day of gestation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hashimoto, Masaru

    1976-01-01

    X-ray of 150 R was irradiated once to the whole body of ddN mouse on the 7th day of gestation, and eye abnormalities in the mouse embryos of 18 days and in mouse youngs of 4 weeks after birth were observed externally and histologically. In the observation of the mouse embryos of 18 days, microphthalmus, anophthalmia, retinal reversion and distorsion due to eyecup insufficiency, and cornea abnormalities were recognized, and these eye abnormalities were also recognized in the mouse youngs of 4 weeks. Histological findings of congenital corneal opacity and accretion of the cornea and the crystalline lens in the mouse youngs and the mouse embryos of 18 days were the same kinds, and a common feature was the defect of the corneal parenchyma. These were caused by disorder of segregation from ectoblast of epidermis cuticle of crystalline lens. Histological findings equal to that of hereditary defect of the uvea were recognized after birth, and histological findings which seemed to be changes during the embryonal period were obtained. This was thought to be caused by eyecup insufficiency. Histological findings as same as those of clinical ''Retinal Dysplasia'' were obtained in mice after birth, and embryos with retinal distorsion, strong primary residue of the vitreous body, and defect of the choriod, which seemed to be changes of retinal dysplasia during the embryonal period, were recognized. This was thought to be caused by eyecup insufficiency. Anophthalmia was observed in the embryos and the youngs, there were some traces of eye tissues, and all cases were secondary anophthalmus. Aphacia which was found in the embryos was not recognized in any case of the young after birth. (tsunoda, M.)

  6. Cornelia de Lange syndrome and molecular implications of the cohesin complex: Abstracts from the 7th biennial scientific and educational symposium 2016.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kline, Antonie D; Krantz, Ian D; Deardorff, Matthew A; Shirahige, Katsuhiko; Dorsett, Dale; Gerton, Jennifer L; Wu, Meng; Mehta, Devanshi; Mills, Jason A; Carrico, Cheri S; Noon, Sarah; Herrera, Pamela S; Horsfield, Julia A; Bettale, Chiara; Morgan, Jeremy; Huisman, Sylvia A; Moss, Jo; McCleery, Joseph; Grados, Marco; Hansen, Blake D; Srivastava, Siddharth; Taylor-Snell, Emily; Kerr, Lynne M; Katz, Olivia; Calof, Anne L; Musio, Antonio; Egense, Alena; Haaland, Richard E

    2017-05-01

    Cornelia de Lange Syndrome (CdLS) is due to mutations in the genes for the structural and regulatory proteins that make up the cohesin complex, and is considered a cohesinopathy disorder or, more recently, a transcriptomopathy. New phenotypes have been recognized in this expanding field. There are multiple clinical issues facing individuals with all forms of CdLS, particularly in the neurodevelopmental system, but also gastrointestinal, cardiac, and musculoskeletal. Aspects of developmental and cell biology have found common endpoints in the biology of the cohesin complex, with improved understanding of the mechanisms, easier diagnostic tests, and the possibility of potential therapeutics, all major clinical implications for the individual with CdLS. The following abstracts are the presentations from the 7th Cornelia de Lange Syndrome Scientific and Educational Symposium, June 22-23, 2016, in Orlando, FL, in conjunction with the Cornelia de Lange Syndrome Foundation National Meeting. In addition to the scientific and clinical discussions, there were talks related to practical aspects of behavior including autism, transitions, communication, access to medical care, and databases. At the end of the symposium, a panel was held, which included several parents, affected individuals and genetic counselors, and discussed the greatest challenges in life and how this information can assist in guiding future research. The Research Committee of the CdLS Foundation organizes this meeting, reviews, and accepts abstracts, and subsequently disseminates the information to the families through members of the Clinical Advisory Board and publications. AMA CME credits were provided by Greater Baltimore Medical Center, Baltimore, MD. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Cornelia de Lange syndrome and molecular implications of the cohesin complex: Abstracts from the 7th biennial scientific and educational symposium 2016

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kline, Antonie D.; Krantz, Ian D.; Deardorff, Matthew A.; Shirahige, Katsuhiko; Dorsett, Dale; Gerton, Jennifer L.; Wu, Meng; Mehta, Devanshi; Mills, Jason A.; Carrico, Cheri S.; Noon, Sarah; Herrera, Pamela S.; Horsfield, Julia A.; Bettale, Chiara; Morgan, Jeremy; Huisman, Sylvia A.; Moss, Jo; McCleery, Joseph; Grados, Marco; Hansen, Blake D.; Srivastava, Siddharth; Taylor-Snell, Emily; Kerr, Lynne M.; Katz, Olivia; Calof, Anne L.; Musio, Antonio; Egense, Alena; Haaland, Richard E.

    2017-01-01

    Cornelia de Lange Syndrome (CdLS) is due to mutations in the genes for the structural and regulatory proteins that make up the cohesin complex, and is considered a cohesinopathy disorder or, more recently, a transcriptomopathy. New phenotypes have been recognized in this expanding field. There are multiple clinical issues facing individuals with all forms of CdLS, particularly in the neurodevelopmental system, but also gastrointestinal, cardiac, and musculoskeletal. Aspects of developmental and cell biology have found common endpoints in the biology of the cohesin complex, with improved understanding of the mechanisms, easier diagnostic tests, and the possibility of potential therapeutics, all major clinical implications for the individual with CdLS. The following abstracts are the presentations from the 7th Cornelia de Lange Syndrome Scientific and Educational Symposium, June 22–23, 2016, in Orlando, FL, in conjunction with the Cornelia de Lange Syndrome Foundation National Meeting. In addition to the scientific and clinical discussions, there were talks related to practical aspects of behavior including autism, transitions, communication, access to medical care, and databases. At the end of the symposium, a panel was held, which included several parents, affected individuals and genetic counselors, and discussed the greatest challenges in life and how this information can assist in guiding future research. The Research Committee of the CdLS Foundation organizes this meeting, reviews, and accepts abstracts, and subsequently disseminates the information to the families through members of the Clinical Advisory Board and publications. AMA CME credits were provided by Greater Baltimore Medical Center, Baltimore, MD. PMID:28190301

  8. Health evaluations in Africa – A review of the health strand held at the 7th Biennial Conference of the African Evaluation Association

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edna Berhane

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Although Africa has made significant progress in public health over the past several decades, it still faces a very high burden of disease compared to the rest of the world. This overwhelming disease burden is further aggravated by a lack of adequate financial and human resources for health, inequitable distribution of health services, and other social, economic and political factors. Given these constraints, it has become critical for African countries to ensure that health interventions are selected based on evidence and implemented efficiently and effectively to ensure desired outcomes and impact. This has led to an increasing appreciation for monitoring and evaluation as an integral element of programme planning, implementation and scale-up. The importance of M&E within the health sector was recently reflected in the fact that the health evaluation strand was the largest at AfrEA’s 7th Biennial International Conference, held over 3 days in March 2014 in Yaoundé, Cameroon. The health strand, which had nine sub-themes, was sponsored, managed, and supported by the USAID-funded AfricanStrategies for Health (ASH project. This review summarises the health strand presentations, and panel and roundtable discussions. The evaluations featured in the strand were diverse interms of health area focus, evaluation methodology, language and authors’ affiliation. More than 21 African countries from all regions of sub-Saharan Africa were represented. Among thekey recurrent messages highlighted during the conference were the importance of: data use for planning and improving health programmes, data quality, well-functioning M&E systems and identifying and sharing best/good practices.

  9. La Jolie Fille de Perth de Bizet  ou comment trahir et honorer Walter Scott Bizet’s Jolie Fille de Perth or How to Betray and Honour Walter Scott

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gilles Couderc

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available What remains of Walter Scott’s Fair Maid of Perth in Bizet’s 1867 Jolie Fille de Perth, an opera in 4acts on a libretto by Jules Adenis and Vernoy de Saint-Georges? Not much when compared to other Scott-inspired operas. Little historical context or local colour, even in Bizet’s music. Some characters remotely linked to Scott in a libretto that mostly abides by the rules of French opera or opéra-comique of the time and recycles the dramatic ingredients favoured by Saint-Georges, a purveyor of libretti for opera or the ballet second only to Scribe, who engendered such international successes as Flotow’s Martha and Balfe’s Bohemian Girl, whose gipsy, long before his Carmen, haunts Bizet’s “Scottish” opera. Yet the work pays indirect homage to Scott, whose historical novels contributed to the birth of the French “grand opera”, by rewriting scenes or situations drawn from Scott. In spite of borrowing freely from French grand opera and opéra-comique, Bizet here attempts to find his own musical expression and his opera reflects aspects of Second Empire French society and the roles it assigned to women, before the appearance of his revolutionary Carmen on the stage.Que reste t’il du roman de Walter Scott The Fair Maid of Perth dans la Jolie Fille de Perth de Bizet, opéra en 4 actes de 1867 sur un livret de Vernoy de Saint-Georges, vieux routier du théâtre lyrique, et Jules Adenis ? Pas grand-chose par rapport aux opéras inspirés par Scott. Peu d’Ecosse, une absence remarquable de couleur locale ou historique, des personnages vaguement inspirés de Scott pour un livret qui se plie surtout aux règles de l’opéra français et de l’opéra-comique à la manière de Scribe et recycle les ingrédients habituels des livrets de Saint-Georges, père de succès internationaux comme la Martha de Flotow et de la Bohemian Girl de Balfe, dont la figure exotique de la bohémienne, longtemps avant Carmen, hante l’opéra

  10. Semi-automated quantitative Drosophila wings measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loh, Sheng Yang Michael; Ogawa, Yoshitaka; Kawana, Sara; Tamura, Koichiro; Lee, Hwee Kuan

    2017-06-28

    Drosophila melanogaster is an important organism used in many fields of biological research such as genetics and developmental biology. Drosophila wings have been widely used to study the genetics of development, morphometrics and evolution. Therefore there is much interest in quantifying wing structures of Drosophila. Advancement in technology has increased the ease in which images of Drosophila can be acquired. However such studies have been limited by the slow and tedious process of acquiring phenotypic data. We have developed a system that automatically detects and measures key points and vein segments on a Drosophila wing. Key points are detected by performing image transformations and template matching on Drosophila wing images while vein segments are detected using an Active Contour algorithm. The accuracy of our key point detection was compared against key point annotations of users. We also performed key point detection using different training data sets of Drosophila wing images. We compared our software with an existing automated image analysis system for Drosophila wings and showed that our system performs better than the state of the art. Vein segments were manually measured and compared against the measurements obtained from our system. Our system was able to detect specific key points and vein segments from Drosophila wing images with high accuracy.

  11. Insect Wing Displacement Measurement Using Digital Holography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aguayo, Daniel D.; Mendoza Santoyo, Fernando; Torre I, Manuel H. de la; Caloca Mendez, Cristian I.

    2008-01-01

    Insects in flight have been studied with optical non destructive techniques with the purpose of using meaningful results in aerodynamics. With the availability of high resolution and large dynamic range CCD sensors the so called interferometric digital holographic technique was used to measure the surface displacement of in flight insect wings, such as butterflies. The wings were illuminated with a continuous wave Verdi laser at 532 nm, and observed with a CCD Pixelfly camera that acquire images at a rate of 11.5 frames per second at a resolution of 1392x1024 pixels and 12 Bit dynamic range. At this frame rate digital holograms of the wings were captured and processed in the usual manner, namely, each individual hologram is Fourier processed in order to find the amplitude and phase corresponding to the digital hologram. The wings displacement is obtained when subtraction between two digital holograms is performed for two different wings position, a feature applied to all consecutive frames recorded. The result of subtracting is seen as a wrapped phase fringe pattern directly related to the wing displacement. The experimental data for different butterfly flying conditions and exposure times are shown as wire mesh plots in a movie of the wings displacement

  12. In the wings of physics

    CERN Document Server

    Jacob, Maurice René Michel

    1995-01-01

    In physics research, many activities occur backstage or to continue the theatrical metaphor, in the wings of physics. This book focuses on two such activities: the editing of physics journals and the operation of physical societies. The author was editor of Physics Letters B for particle physics and then of Physics Reports for a total of 18 years, as well as being president of the French Physical Society and later of the European Physical Society. This book puts together papers dealing with such activities which he has written at various times in his career. It takes the reader into the inner circles of scientific editing and of physical societies. Each introduced by a foreword, these papers can be read separately.

  13. Moveable Leading Edge Device for a Wing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pitt, Dale M. (Inventor); Eckstein, Nicholas Stephen (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    A method and apparatus for managing a flight control surface system. A leading edge section on a wing of an aircraft is extended into a deployed position. A deformable section connects the leading edge section to a trailing section. The deformable section changes from a deformed shape to an original shape when the leading edge section is moved into the deployed position. The leading edge section on the wing is moved from the deployed position to an undeployed position. The deformable section changes to the deformed shape inside of the wing.

  14. Generic Wing-Body Aerodynamics Data Base

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holst, Terry L.; Olsen, Thomas H.; Kwak, Dochan (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The wing-body aerodynamics data base consists of a series of CFD (Computational Fluid Dynamics) simulations about a generic wing body configuration consisting of a ogive-circular-cylinder fuselage and a simple symmetric wing mid-mounted on the fuselage. Solutions have been obtained for Nonlinear Potential (P), Euler (E) and Navier-Stokes (N) solvers over a range of subsonic and transonic Mach numbers and angles of attack. In addition, each solution has been computed on a series of grids, coarse, medium and fine to permit an assessment of grid refinement errors.

  15. Thin tailored composite wing for civil tiltrotor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rais-Rohani, Masoud

    1994-01-01

    The tiltrotor aircraft is a flight vehicle which combines the efficient low speed (i.e., take-off, landing, and hover) characteristics of a helicopter with the efficient cruise speed of a turboprop airplane. A well-known example of such vehicle is the Bell-Boeing V-22 Osprey. The high cruise speed and range constraints placed on the civil tiltrotor require a relatively thin wing to increase the drag-divergence Mach number which translates into lower compressibility drag. It is required to reduce the wing maximum thickness-to-chord ratio t/c from 23% (i.e., V-22 wing) to 18%. While a reduction in wing thickness results in improved aerodynamic efficiency, it has an adverse effect on the wing structure and it tends to reduce structural stiffness. If ignored, the reduction in wing stiffness leads to susceptibility to aeroelastic and dynamic instabilities which may consequently cause a catastrophic failure. By taking advantage of the directional stiffness characteristics of composite materials the wing structure may be tailored to have the necessary stiffness, at a lower thickness, while keeping the weight low. The goal of this study is to design a wing structure for minimum weight subject to structural, dynamic and aeroelastic constraints. The structural constraints are in terms of strength and buckling allowables. The dynamic constraints are in terms of wing natural frequencies in vertical and horizontal bending and torsion. The aeroelastic constraints are in terms of frequency placement of the wing structure relative to those of the rotor system. The wing-rotor-pylon aeroelastic and dynamic interactions are limited in this design study by holding the cruise speed, rotor-pylon system, and wing geometric attributes fixed. To assure that the wing-rotor stability margins are maintained a more rigorous analysis based on a detailed model of the rotor system will need to ensue following the design study. The skin-stringer-rib type architecture is used for the wing

  16. AFM Study of Structure Influence on Butterfly Wings Coloration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dinara Sultanovna Dallaeva

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This study describes the structural coloration of the butterfly Vanessa Atalanta wings and shows how the atomic force microscopy (AFM can be applied to the study of wings morphology and wings surface behavior under the temperature. The role of the wings morphology in colors was investigated. Different colors of wings have different topology and can be identified by them. AFM in semi-contact mode was used to study the wings surface. The wing surface area, which is close to the butterfly body, has shiny brown color and the peak of surface roughness is about 600 nm. The changing of morphology at different temperatures is shown.

  17. Experimental and numerical analysis of the wing rock characteristics of a 'wing-body-tail' configuration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suarez, Carlos J.; Smith, Brooke C.; Malcolm, Gerald N.

    1993-01-01

    Free-to-roll wind tunnel tests were conducted and a computer simulation exercise was performed in an effort to investigate in detail the mechanism of wing rock on a configuration that consisted of a highly-slender forebody and a 78 deg swept delta wing. In the wind tunnel test, the roll angle and wing surface pressures were measured during the wing rock motion. A limit cycle oscillation was observed for angles of attack between 22 deg and 30 deg. In general, the wind tunnel test confirmed that the main flow phenomena responsible for the wing-body-tail wing rock are the interactions between the forebody and the wing vortices. The variation of roll acceleration (determined from the second derivative of the roll angle time history) with roll angle clearly showed the energy balance necessary to sustain the limit cycle oscillation. Pressure measurements on the wing revealed the hysteresis of the wing rock process. First, second and nth order models for the aerodynamic damping were developed and examined with a one degree of freedom computer simulation. Very good agreement with the observed behavior from the wind tunnel was obtained.

  18. The leading-edge vortex of swift-wing shaped delta wings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muir, Rowan; Arredondo-Galeana, Abel; Viola, Ignazio Maria

    2017-11-01

    Recent investigations on the aerodynamics of natural fliers have illuminated the significance of the Leading-Edge Vortex (LEV) for lift generation in a variety of flight conditions. In this investigation, a model non-slender delta shaped wing with a sharp leading-edge is tested at low Reynolds Number, along with a delta wing of the same design, but with a modified trailing edge inspired by the wing of a common swift Apus apus. The effect of the tapering swift wing on LEV development and stability is compared with the flow structure over the un-modified delta wing model through particle image velocimetry. For the first time, a leading-edge vortex system consisting of a dual or triple LEV is recorded on a swift-wing shaped delta wing, where such a system is found across all tested conditions. It is shown that the spanwise location of LEV breakdown is governed by the local chord rather than Reynolds Number or angle of attack. These findings suggest that the trailing-edge geometry of the swift wing alone does not prevent the common swift from generating an LEV system comparable with that of a delta shaped wing. This work received funding from the Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council [EP/M506515/1] and the Consejo Nacional de Ciencia y Tecnología (CONACYT).

  19. Parametric structural modeling of insect wings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mengesha, T E; Vallance, R R; Barraja, M; Mittal, R

    2009-01-01

    Insects produce thrust and lift forces via coupled fluid-structure interactions that bend and twist their compliant wings during flapping cycles. Insight into this fluid-structure interaction is achieved with numerical modeling techniques such as coupled finite element analysis and computational fluid dynamics, but these methods require accurate and validated structural models of insect wings. Structural models of insect wings depend principally on the shape, dimensions and material properties of the veins and membrane cells. This paper describes a method for parametric modeling of wing geometry using digital images and demonstrates the use of the geometric models in constructing three-dimensional finite element (FE) models and simple reduced-order models. The FE models are more complete and accurate than previously reported models since they accurately represent the topology of the vein network, as well as the shape and dimensions of the veins and membrane cells. The methods are demonstrated by developing a parametric structural model of a cicada forewing.

  20. Left-Wing Extremism: The Current Threat

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karl A. Seger

    2001-04-30

    Left-wing extremism is ''alive and well'' both in the US and internationally. Although the current domestic terrorist threat within the U. S. is focused on right-wing extremists, left-wing extremists are also active and have several objectives. Leftist extremists also pose an espionage threat to U.S. interests. While the threat to the U.S. government from leftist extremists has decreased in the past decade, it has not disappeared. There are individuals and organizations within the U.S. who maintain the same ideology that resulted in the growth of left-wing terrorism in this country in the 1970s and 1980s. Some of the leaders from that era are still communicating from Cuba with their followers in the U.S., and new leaders and groups are emerging.

  1. HC-130 Wing Life Raft Replacement Study

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Scher, Bob

    1997-01-01

    The U.S. Coast Guard (USCG) uses HC-130 aircraft for search and rescue (SAR) and other missions. The aircraft are presently equipped with two to four 20 person inflatable life rafts, stowed in cells in the wings...

  2. Process evaluation for a school-based physical activity intervention for 6th- and 7th-grade boys: reach, dose, and fidelity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robbins, Lorraine B; Pfeiffer, Karin Allor; Wesolek, Stacey M; Lo, Yun-Jia

    2014-02-01

    The purpose was to evaluate the reach, dose, and fidelity of Guys Only Activity for Life (G.O.A.L.), a 7-week pilot intervention conducted from February to March 2011 to increase 6th and 7th grade boys' moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (MVPA). One middle school was randomly assigned to the G.O.A.L. intervention and another from the same urban school district in the Midwestern U.S. to a comparison condition. Thirty boys, ages 10-14 years, participated in each school. The intervention, guided by the Health Promotion Model (HPM) and Self-Determination Theory (SDT), consisted of a 90-min after-school physical activity club 4 days/week and one motivational interviewing session with a registered (school) nurse. Data were gathered via attendance records, club observations, heart rate monitors, audio-taping of motivational interviewing sessions, and surveys. On average boys attended the club 2.11 days/week (SD=.86). A trained independent process evaluator reported that the physical activity club instructors provided the boys with the opportunity for a mean of 25.8 min/day of MVPA. Using a four-point Likert scale (1=disagree a lot; 4=agree a lot), the process evaluator perceived that the club was delivered with high fidelity and adherence to the underlying theories (M=3.48; SD=0.39). Sessions with the nurse lasted an average of 13 min, 29 s. All boys attended. Two trained independent coders indicated that the nurse demonstrated at least beginning proficiency for all tasks associated with motivational interviewing, with the exception of using sufficient open- as opposed to closed-ended questions and reflections compared to questions. Fidelity related to session delivery and adherence to the theories was high (M=3.83; SD=0.19). The process evaluation data indicated that strategies are needed to increase attendance and boys' MVPA during the club time. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. 7th International Seminar on Tropical Swine Production 2017 on the Occasion of the 45th Anniversary of Cuba's Swine Research Institute

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Royal Academy for Overseas Sciences

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available 7th International Seminar on Tropical Swine Production 2017 on the Occasion of the 45th Anniversary of Cuba's Swine Research Institute. Cet article analyse les facteurs qui influencent l'adoption du Mucuna pruriens en zone cotonnière ouest du Burkina Faso. Les données ont été collectées dans 3 villages par la méthode active de recherche participative et par enquête auprès de 50 exploitations impliquées dans le développement de techniques de production du mucuna adaptées aux systèmes de production locaux. La co-construction de ces techniques s'est faite de 2005 à 2015 selon une démarche de recherche-action en partenariat. Les résultats de la régression logistique révèlent que les variables qui influent positivement la décision d'adopter sont le nombre d'actifs et de fosses fumières, le sexe, l'accès au marché, l'expérimentation du M. pruriens, la pratique de l'embouche (P&amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;lt;0,1 et le nombre de participation aux réunions de la plateforme d'innovation par l'exploitant (P&amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;lt;0,05. Par contre la quantité d'urée appliquée par hectare et le revenu de l'exploitation affectent négativement l'adoption (P&amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;lt;0,1. La réussite des actions de développement de la culture des légumineuses fourragères passe par la prise en compte raisonnée de ces facteurs.

  4. Exposure to self-reported occupational noise and diabetes - A cross-sectional relationship in 7th European Social Survey (ESS7, 2014).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dzhambov, Angel Mario

    2017-06-19

    Almost nothing is known about the effect of occupational noise on diabetes, and this is particularly relevant given the wide spread of both noise exposure and diabetes. This study has aimed to determine whether occupational noise exposure is associated with higher risk of diabetes in Europe. This study is based on 7th European Social Survey (ESS7, 2014) - a multi-country population-based questionnaire survey, which covered 28 221 Europeans aged ≥ 15 years old. Data on self-reported noise exposure, diabetes and other sociodemographic and work-related factors was available. The odds of prevalent diabetes were explored using unconditional logistic regression. In the total sample (N = 23 486), participants ever exposed to very loud noise had no substantive increase in the odds of diabetes (odds ratio (OR) = 1.01, 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.78-1.32). There were subgroups with non-significantly increased odds: men (OR = 1.12, 95% CI: 0.87-1.45), the elderly (OR = 1.09, 95% CI: 0.91-1.31), ethnic minority members (OR = 1.55, 95% CI: 0.91-2.62), those with secondary education (OR = 1.05, 95% CI: 0.78-1.41) and those living in small cities/towns (OR = 1.07, 95% CI: 0.89-1.29). Low-skilled white-collar workers had OR = 1.34 (95% CI: 1.09-1.64). Among participants employed during the preceding 5 years the odds were OR = 1.24 (95% CI: 0.95-1.61). Self-reported occupational noise was not associated with increased odds of prevalent diabetes in the total sample. Sensitivity analyses revealed some subgroups with non-significantly higher odds. Our results suggest that further delve into the relationship between occupational noise and diabetes is feasible and warranted. Int J Occup Med Environ Health 2017;30(4):537-551. This work is available in Open Access model and licensed under a CC BY-NC 3.0 PL license.

  5. The Quest for Success and Power in F. Scott Fitzgerald's Novel The Beautiful and Damned

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ala Eddin Sadeq

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available This study aims at investigating the concepts of success and power, as depicted by F. Scott Fitzgerald in The Beautiful and Damned (2009. Cultural change motivates individuals to work harder to achieve success, which in turn makes them influential. The study reveals that the concepts of success and power are controversial, as their means vary from one theorist to another.  Waldo Emerson, for example, believes that success is connected to happiness.  He, therefore, lists down features that characterize successful people. To succeed, one must learn to follow their desires, an argument that is expounded by the ideology of the American Dream.  Friedrich Nietzsche, however, explains that individuals are motivated to lead due to the fact that power brings about the superman. To achieve the status of the superman, Nietzsche believes that individuals develop the will to power and are able to influence others (Nietzsche, 1968. Fitzgerald, on the other hand, makes it clear that power leads to liberty. The novel provides a deep analysis of the quest for power and success. The main characters are Gloria, Joseph, and Anthony who helps to demonstrate the quest for success and power. Richard Caramel is also a character whose role explains the pursuit of true happiness. He is depicted as powerful because he influences the society through his writings. He has a strong determination to be a writer, which motivates him to work hard and to seek further success.

  6. 1995 Emerging Leaders in Healthcare. The new leaders: Gita Budd, Colene Daniel, Elizabeth Gallup, Scott Wordelman.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Southwick, K

    1995-01-01

    Fierce pressures for cost containment. Demands for quality improvements. The drive toward patient-centered care. The push for community involvement. Insistent voices of payers, patients, consumers, physicians. Accumulated tensions amid the chaos of change. Balancing all of these demands while inspiring and encouraging the professionals and other workers within the healthcare organization requires a high level of leadership ability. One that insists on the best from everyone involved in a healthcare system--from physicians to staff, nurses to social workers. And then strives for more. The four young executives who are this year's Emerging Leaders in Healthcare have all pushed their systems beyond traditional boundaries into new territory, helping their patients, their employees, their physicians, and their communities rise to new levels of achievement. At the same time, these leaders emphasize teamwork and consensus-style management, so that their co-workers feel like they're participating in the changes, not being victimized by them. Gita Budd, Colene Daniel, Elizabeth Gallup, and Scott Wordelman are winners of the 1995 award from The Healthcare Forum and Korn/Ferry International that honors ¿dynamic, decisive young leaders (under 40) with the proven ability to nurture the growth of the industry.¿ Korn/Ferry International and The Healthcare Forum are proud to present 1995's Emerging Leaders.

  7. Deviations of the lepton mapping matrix form the harrison-perkins-scott form

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Friedberg, R.; Lee, T.D.

    2010-01-01

    We propose a simple set of hypotheses governing the deviations of the leptonic mapping matrix from the Harrison-Perkins-Scott (HPS) form. These deviations are supposed to arise entirely from a perturbation of the mass matrix in the charged lepton sector. The perturbing matrix is assumed to be purely imaginary (thus maximally T-violating) and to have a strength in energy scale no greater (but perhaps smaller) than the muon mass. As we shall show,it then follows that the absolute value of the mapping matrix elements pertaining to the tau lepton deviate by no more than O((m μ /m τ ) 2 ) ≅ 3.5 x 10 -3 from their HPS values. Assuming that(m μ /m τ ) 2 can be neglected, we derive two simple constraints on the four parameters θ12, θ23, θ31, and δ of the mapping matrix. These constraints are independent of the details of the imaginary T-violating perturbation of the charged lepton mass matrix. We also show that the e and μ parts of the mapping matrix have a definite form governed by two parameters α and β; any deviation of order m μ /m τ can be accommodated by adjusting these two parameters. (authors)

  8. STS-103 Pilot Scott Kelly and MS John Grunsfeld try on oxygen masks

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999-01-01

    In the bunker at Launch Pad 39B, STS-103 Pilot Scott J. Kelly (left) and Mission Specialist John M. Grunsfeld (Ph.D.) (right) try on oxygen masks during Terminal Countdown Demonstration Test (TCDT) activities. The TCDT provides the crew with emergency egress training, opportunities to inspect their mission payloads in the orbiter's payload bay, and simulated countdown exercises. Other crew members taking part are Commander Curtis L. Brown Jr. and Mission Specialists Steven L. Smith, C. Michael Foale (Ph.D.), and Jean-Frangois Clervoy of France and Claude Nicollier of Switzerland, who are with the European Space Agency. STS-103 is a 'call-up' mission due to the need to replace and repair portions of the Hubble Space Telescope, including the gyroscopes that allow the telescope to point at stars, galaxies and planets. The STS-103 crew will be replacing a Fine Guidance Sensor, an older computer with a new enhanced model, an older data tape recorder with a solid-state digital recorder, a failed spare transmitter with a new one, and degraded insulation on the telescope with new thermal insulation. The crew will also install a Battery Voltage/Temperature Improvement Kit to protect the spacecraft batteries from overcharging and overheating when the telescope goes into a safe mode. Four EVA's are planned to make the necessary repairs and replacements on the telescope. The mission is targeted for launch Dec. 6 at 2:37 a.m. EST.

  9. ROBERT VENTURI, DENISE SCOTT BROWN Y STEVEN IZENOUR: LEARNING FROM LAS VEGAS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ignacio Senra Fernández-Miranda

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available RESUMEN Poco tiene que ver la edición original de 1972 de Learning from las Vegas, the forgotten symbolism of the architectural form, con la edición revisada de 1977, que fue traducida al español y publicada por Gustavo Gili en 1978. El gran formato del libro original (38x28cm se justificaba por la importancia del material gráfico desplegado, un ejercicio de análisis que aspiraba a descubrir nuevas técnicas de representación capaces de reproducir una realidad tan compleja sensorialmente como la de la ciudad de las Vegas. La drástica transformación, impulsada por los propios autores, suponía un abaratamiento y por tanto una mayor difusión del libro, pero sobretodo trataba de acabar con el conflicto entre su crítica al diseño Bauhaus y el diseño Bauhaus tardío del libro original, como señaló la propia Denise Scott Brown en el prologo de la edición revisada de 1977.

  10. Review of behavioral health integration in primary care at Baylor Scott and White Healthcare, Central Region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jolly, John B; Fluet, Norman R; Reis, Michael D; Stern, Charles H; Thompson, Alexander W; Jolly, Gillian A

    2016-04-01

    The integration of behavioral health services in primary care has been referred to in many ways, but ultimately refers to common structures and processes. Behavioral health is integrated into primary care because it increases the effectiveness and efficiency of providing care and reduces costs in the care of primary care patients. Reimbursement is one factor, if not the main factor, that determines the level of integration that can be achieved. The federal health reform agenda supports changes that will eventually permit behavioral health to be fully integrated and will allow the health of the population to be the primary target of intervention. In an effort to develop more integrated services at Baylor Scott and White Healthcare, models of integration are reviewed and the advantages and disadvantages of each model are discussed. Recommendations to increase integration include adopting a disease management model with care management, planned guideline-based stepped care, follow-up, and treatment monitoring. Population-based interventions can be completed at the pace of the development of alternative reimbursement methods. The program should be based upon patient-centered medical home standards, and research is needed throughout the program development process.

  11. Butterfly wing color: A photonic crystal demonstration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Proietti Zaccaria, Remo

    2016-01-01

    We have theoretically modeled the optical behavior of a natural occurring photonic crystal, as defined by the geometrical characteristics of the Teinopalpus Imperialis butterfly. In particular, following a genetic algorithm approach, we demonstrate how its wings follow a triclinic crystal geometry with a tetrahedron unit base. By performing both photonic band analysis and transmission/reflection simulations, we are able to explain the characteristic colors emerging by the butterfly wings, thus confirming their crystal form.

  12. Butterflies: Photonic Crystals on the Wing

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-03-22

    green hairstreak , Callophrys rubi, suggested that the scales have a 3D cubic network organization (Fig. 9). An extensive analysis of the scales of a...Fig. 9. a Ventral side of the wings of the green hairstreak , Callophrys rubi. b Transmission electron micrograph of a small area of a single...Report 3. DATES COVERED (From – To) 15 March 2006 - 08-Jun-07 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Butterflies : Photonic Crystals on the Wing 5a. CONTRACT

  13. Studies on the presence and spatial distribution of anthropogenic pollutants in the glacial basin of Scott Glacier in the face of climate change (Fiord Bellsund, Spitsbergen)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehmann, Sara; Kociuba, Waldemar; Franczak, Łukasz; Gajek, Grzegorz; Łeczyński, Leszek; Kozak, Katarzyna; Szopińska, Małgorzata; Ruman, Marek; Polkowska, Żaneta

    2014-10-01

    The study area covered the NW part of the Wedel Jarlsberg Land (SW part of the Svalbard Archipelago). The primary study object was the catchment of the Scott Glacier in the vicinity of the Research Station of of Maria Curie-Skłodowska University in Lublin - Calypsobyen. The Scott River catchment (of glacial hydrological regime) has an area of approximately 10 km2, 40% of which is occupied by the valley Scott Glacier in the phase of strong recession. The present study concerns the determination of physical and chemical parameters (pH, conductivity, TOC) and concentrations of pollutants (phenols, aldehydes).

  14. Membrane wing aerodynamics for micro air vehicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lian, Yongsheng; Shyy, Wei; Viieru, Dragos; Zhang, Baoning

    2003-10-01

    The aerodynamic performance of a wing deteriorates considerably as the Reynolds number decreases from 10 6 to 10 4. In particular, flow separation can result in substantial change in effective airfoil shape and cause reduced aerodynamic performance. Lately, there has been growing interest in developing suitable techniques for sustained and robust flight of micro air vehicles (MAVs) with a wingspan of 15 cm or smaller, flight speed around 10 m/ s, and a corresponding Reynolds number of 10 4-10 5. This paper reviews the aerodynamics of membrane and corresponding rigid wings under the MAV flight conditions. The membrane wing is observed to yield desirable characteristics in delaying stall as well as adapting to the unsteady flight environment, which is intrinsic to the designated flight speed. Flow structures associated with the low Reynolds number and low aspect ratio wing, such as pressure distribution, separation bubble and tip vortex are reviewed. Structural dynamics in response to the surrounding flow field is presented to highlight the multiple time-scale phenomena. Based on the computational capabilities for treating moving boundary problems, wing shape optimization can be conducted in automated manners. To enhance the lift, the effect of endplates is evaluated. The proper orthogonal decomposition method is also discussed as an economic tool to describe the flow structure around a wing and to facilitate flow and vehicle control.

  15. STS-87 Mission Specialist Scott poses in his launch and entry spacesuit at LC 39B during TCDT

    Science.gov (United States)

    1997-01-01

    STS-87 Mission Specialist Winston Scott poses in his orange launch and entry spacesuit with NASA suit technicians at Launch Pad 39B during Terminal Countdown Demonstration Test (TCDT) activities. The crew of the STS-87 mission is scheduled for launch Nov. 19 aboard the Space Shuttle Columbia. Scott will be performing an extravehicular activity (EVA) spacewalk during the mission. The TCDT is held at KSC prior to each Space Shuttle flight providing the crew of each mission opportunities to participate in simulated countdown activities. The TCDT ends with a mock launch countdown culminating in a simulated main engine cut-off. The crew also spends time undergoing emergency egress training exercises at the pad and has an opportunity to view and inspect the payloads in the orbiter's payload bay.

  16. No Absolutism Here: Harm Predicts Moral Judgment 30× Better Than Disgust-Commentary on Scott, Inbar, & Rozin (2016).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray, Kurt; Schein, Chelsea

    2016-05-01

    Moral absolutism is the idea that people's moral judgments are insensitive to considerations of harm. Scott, Inbar, and Rozin (2016, this issue) claim that most moral opponents to genetically modified organisms are absolutely opposed-motivated by disgust and not harm. Yet there is no evidence for moral absolutism in their data. Perceived risk/harm is the most significant predictor of moral judgments for "absolutists," accounting for 30 times more variance than disgust. Reanalyses suggest that disgust is not even a significant predictor of the moral judgments of absolutists once accounting for perceived harm and anger. Instead of revealing actual moral absolutism, Scott et al. find only empty absolutism: hypothetical, forecasted, self-reported moral absolutism. Strikingly, the moral judgments of so-called absolutists are somewhat more sensitive to consequentialist concerns than those of nonabsolutists. Mediation reanalyses reveal that moral judgments are most proximally predicted by harm and not disgust, consistent with dyadic morality. © The Author(s) 2016.

  17. The leading-edge vortex of swift wing-shaped delta wings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muir, Rowan Eveline; Arredondo-Galeana, Abel; Viola, Ignazio Maria

    2017-08-01

    Recent investigations on the aerodynamics of natural fliers have illuminated the significance of the leading-edge vortex (LEV) for lift generation in a variety of flight conditions. A well-documented example of an LEV is that generated by aircraft with highly swept, delta-shaped wings. While the wing aerodynamics of a manoeuvring aircraft, a bird gliding and a bird in flapping flight vary significantly, it is believed that this existing knowledge can serve to add understanding to the complex aerodynamics of natural fliers. In this investigation, a model non-slender delta-shaped wing with a sharp leading edge is tested at low Reynolds number, along with a delta wing of the same design, but with a modified trailing edge inspired by the wing of a common swift Apus apus . The effect of the tapering swift wing on LEV development and stability is compared with the flow structure over the unmodified delta wing model through particle image velocimetry. For the first time, a leading-edge vortex system consisting of a dual or triple LEV is recorded on a swift wing-shaped delta wing, where such a system is found across all tested conditions. It is shown that the spanwise location of LEV breakdown is governed by the local chord rather than Reynolds number or angle of attack. These findings suggest that the trailing-edge geometry of the swift wing alone does not prevent the common swift from generating an LEV system comparable with that of a delta-shaped wing.

  18. Aeroelasticity of morphing wings using neural networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Natarajan, Anand

    In this dissertation, neural networks are designed to effectively model static non-linear aeroelastic problems in adaptive structures and linear dynamic aeroelastic systems with time varying stiffness. The use of adaptive materials in aircraft wings allows for the change of the contour or the configuration of a wing (morphing) in flight. The use of smart materials, to accomplish these deformations, can imply that the stiffness of the wing with a morphing contour changes as the contour changes. For a rapidly oscillating body in a fluid field, continuously adapting structural parameters may render the wing to behave as a time variant system. Even the internal spars/ribs of the aircraft wing which define the wing stiffness can be made adaptive, that is, their stiffness can be made to vary with time. The immediate effect on the structural dynamics of the wing, is that, the wing motion is governed by a differential equation with time varying coefficients. The study of this concept of a time varying torsional stiffness, made possible by the use of active materials and adaptive spars, in the dynamic aeroelastic behavior of an adaptable airfoil is performed here. Another type of aeroelastic problem of an adaptive structure that is investigated here, is the shape control of an adaptive bump situated on the leading edge of an airfoil. Such a bump is useful in achieving flow separation control for lateral directional maneuverability of the aircraft. Since actuators are being used to create this bump on the wing surface, the energy required to do so needs to be minimized. The adverse pressure drag as a result of this bump needs to be controlled so that the loss in lift over the wing is made minimal. The design of such a "spoiler bump" on the surface of the airfoil is an optimization problem of maximizing pressure drag due to flow separation while minimizing the loss in lift and energy required to deform the bump. One neural network is trained using the CFD code FLUENT to

  19. Hovering hummingbird wing aerodynamics during the annual cycle. I. Complete wing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Achache, Yonathan; Sapir, Nir; Elimelech, Yossef

    2017-08-01

    The diverse hummingbird family (Trochilidae) has unique adaptations for nectarivory, among which is the ability to sustain hover-feeding. As hummingbirds mainly feed while hovering, it is crucial to maintain this ability throughout the annual cycle-especially during flight-feather moult, in which wing area is reduced. To quantify the aerodynamic characteristics and flow mechanisms of a hummingbird wing throughout the annual cycle, time-accurate aerodynamic loads and flow field measurements were correlated over a dynamically scaled wing model of Anna's hummingbird ( Calypte anna ). We present measurements recorded over a model of a complete wing to evaluate the baseline aerodynamic characteristics and flow mechanisms. We found that the vorticity concentration that had developed from the wing's leading-edge differs from the attached vorticity structure that was typically found over insects' wings; firstly, it is more elongated along the wing chord, and secondly, it encounters high levels of fluctuations rather than a steady vortex. Lift characteristics resemble those of insects; however, a 20% increase in the lift-to-torque ratio was obtained for the hummingbird wing model. Time-accurate aerodynamic loads were also used to evaluate the time-evolution of the specific power required from the flight muscles, and the overall wingbeat power requirements nicely matched previous studies.

  20. Populists in Parliament : Comparing Left-Wing and Right-Wing Populism in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Otjes, Simon; Louwerse, Tom

    2015-01-01

    In parliament, populist parties express their positions almost every day through voting. There is great diversity among them, for instance between left-wing and right-wing populist parties. This gives rise to the question: is the parliamentary behaviour of populists motivated by their populism or by

  1. Reynolds number scalability of bristled wings performing clap and fling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacob, Skyler; Kasoju, Vishwa; Santhanakrishnan, Arvind

    2017-11-01

    Tiny flying insects such as thrips show a distinctive physical adaptation in the use of bristled wings. Thrips use wing-wing interaction kinematics for flapping, in which a pair of wings clap together at the end of upstroke and fling apart at the beginning of downstroke. Previous studies have shown that the use of bristled wings can reduce the forces needed for clap and fling at Reynolds number (Re) on the order of 10. This study examines if the fluid dynamic advantages of using bristled wings also extend to higher Re on the order of 100. A robotic clap and fling platform was used for this study, in which a pair of physical wing models were programmed to execute clap and fling kinematics. Force measurements were conducted on solid (non-bristled) and bristled wing pairs. The results show lift and drag forces were both lower for bristled wings when compared to solid wings for Re ranging from 1-10, effectively increasing peak lift to peak drag ratio of bristled wings. However, peak lift to peak drag ratio was lower for bristled wings at Re =120 as compared to solid wings, suggesting that bristled wings may be uniquely advantageous for Re on the orders of 1-10. Flow structures visualized using particle image velocimetry (PIV) and their impact on force production will be presented.

  2. Wing Torsional Stiffness Tests of the Active Aeroelastic Wing F/A-18 Airplane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lokos, William A.; Olney, Candida D.; Crawford, Natalie D.; Stauf, Rick; Reichenbach, Eric Y.

    2002-01-01

    The left wing of the Active Aeroelastic Wing (AAW) F/A-18 airplane has been ground-load-tested to quantify its torsional stiffness. The test has been performed at the NASA Dryden Flight Research Center in November 1996, and again in April 2001 after a wing skin modification was performed. The primary objectives of these tests were to characterize the wing behavior before the first flight, and provide a before-and-after measurement of the torsional stiffness. Two streamwise load couples have been applied. The wing skin modification is shown to have more torsional flexibility than the original configuration has. Additionally, structural hysteresis is shown to be reduced by the skin modification. Data comparisons show good repeatability between the tests.

  3. EDITORIAL: The 7th International Workshop on Micro and Nanotechnologies for Power Generation and Energy Conversion Applications (PowerMEMS 2007)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hebling, C.; Woias, P.

    2008-10-01

    This special issue of Journal of Micromechanics and Microengineering (JMM) contains a selection of papers from the 7th International Workshop on Micro and Nanotechnologies for Power Generation and Energy Conversion (PowerMEMS 2007). The workshop was held in Freiburg, Germany on 27-29 November 2007 under the joint organization of the Fraunhofer Institute for Solar Energy Systems (FhG-ISE), Freiburg and the Department of Microsystems Engineering (IMTEK) of the Albert-Ludwig-University of Freiburg. PowerMEMS 2007 continues a series of workshops initiated in 2000 in Japan to create an annual discussion forum in the emerging field of micro energy technology. With a single exception in 2001, the workshop has continued as an annual meeting ever since, with a continuous increase in the number of presentations and participants. The program of PowerMEMS 2007 was composed of 2 invited talks, 25 oral talks and 61 poster presentations. From these 88 presentations 16 have been selected for this special issue. It was at the end of 1959 when the Caltech physicist Richard Feynman gave his famous lecture entitled 'There Is Plenty of Room at the Bottom' in which he discussed the possibilities of miniaturization for both storage capacity ('Encyclopaedia Britannica on the head of a pin') as well as micro machining ('rearranging the atoms'), although there were absolutely no technological possibilities in sight for an adequate realization of such ideas. Now, nearly 50 years later, we not only have incredible knowledge about the nanoworld, but even more we are now able to generate microelectromechanical devices which, next to their electronic properties, can integrate physical and analytical functions. Today, Feynman might easily have added a second lecture entitled 'There is Plenty of Energy at the Bottom'. Micro energy technology has seen a tremendous rise in MEMS and material sciences and is regarded today as one of their hot topics. Also, there are more and more companies in this

  4. The Italian validation of the Salford-Scott Nursing Values Questionnaire.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mecugni, Daniela; Albinelli, Patrizia; Pellegrin, Joellemarie; Finotto, Stefano

    2015-03-01

    To properly direct nursing training and to improve the professional practice to become more effective, it is important to understand students' values. Literature review has shown that there have been changes in students' values in the last 20 years. In contemporary students, a general decrease in altruism has been observed, but also a larger appreciation for honesty toward patients has been declared. The analyzed literature did not find validated tools available in Italian that explore personal and professional values of nursing students. This study was an Italian linguistic and cultural adaptation of a research tool. The authors aimed to validate, for the Italian context, the Salford-Scott Nursing Values Questionnaire, enhanced by Johnson to explore the nursing profession's values. The Beaton Model was used as well as Valmi's. These models require five phases, with the goal of producing a pre-final version of the instrument for it to then be administered to a sample of the target and expert population. The study was approved by the Council of the Nursing Degree University course of the Modena and Reggio Emilia University, Reggio Emilia site, and the identity of the subjects was protected at every moment of the testing. Face validation was achieved since the clarity percentile for each item was 100%. Content validity was also reached, measured from the content validity index and the scale validity index. The study has confirmed the reliability of the instrument's internal consistence with a value of Cronbach's alpha on 0.95 of total of items. The reliability of the test-retest confirms the stability of the instrument in time (r = 0.908; p = 0.01). The study concludes that the instrument is ready to be administered to the target population, a sample group of nursing students. © The Author(s) 2014.

  5. Spermiogenesis and sperm ultrastructure in Calicotyle affinis Scott, 1911 (Platyhelminthes, Monogenea, Monopisthocotylea, Monocotylidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruňanská M.

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Spermatological characteristics of Calicotyle affinis Scott, 1911, an endoparasitic monocotylid monogenean from the cloaca of a holocephalan fish Chimaera monstrosa L, have been investigated by means of transmission electron microscopy for the first time. Spermiogenesis exhibits features basically similar to those of the congeneric Calicotyle kroyeri and Calicotyle australiensis, but there are some new findings with respect to the formation and fine structure of the spermatozoon including the remarkable complex end-piece (EP. Morphogenesis of the EP, which is located at the anterior (proximal region of the late spermatid, includes two stages: (1 the centriolar region is continuous with a cytoplasmic mass of the zone of differentiation, the electron-dense surface of the spermatid undergoes significant changes in the sculpturing and the inner core of developing spermatid is electron-lucent; (2 after central fusion of the arching membranes a definitive structure of the EP is subsequently evolved, finally comprising 3 – 4 electron-dense discs attached to a central common electron-lucent column. The EP is considered as a synapomorphy of the genera Calicotyle + Dictyocotyle. The mature spermatozoon of C. affinis comprises the EP, two parallel axonemes of almost equal lengths with the 9 + “1” trepaxonematan pattern, mitochondrion, nucleus, and a reduced number of parallel cortical microtubules (1 – 3. The posterior (distal extremity of the mature spematozoon contains a single tapering axoneme. Ultrastructural characteristics of the mature spermatozoon of C. affinis coincide mostly with those of congeneric C. australiensis. Variations of the spermatological characters within the genus Calicotyle, between Calicotyle and enigmatic Dictyocotyle as well as other monocotylid monogeneans are discussed.

  6. Hedonism And Materialism As Negative Effects Of Social Changes In American Society Potrayed In The Novel This Side Of Paradise Written By F. Scott Fitzgerald

    OpenAIRE

    Elysia, Irene Nyssa

    2015-01-01

    Judul skripsi ini adalah ‘HEDONISM AND MATERIALISM AS NEGATIVE EFFECTS OF SOCIAL CHANGES IN AMERICAN SOCIETY POTRAYED IN THE NOVEL THIS SIDE OF PARADISE WRITTEN BY F. SCOTT FITZGERALD’. Sesuai dengan judulnya, skripsi ini membahas tentang fenomena hedonisme dan materialisme yang terjadi di Amerika pada awal tahun 1920an, sebagai dampak negatif dari Perang Dunia I. Fenomena ini dapat dibuktikan dari gambaran yang dipaparkan oleh Scott melalui novel ini, yaitu tentang kondisi masyarakat terutam...

  7. Flow field of flexible flapping wings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sallstrom, Erik

    The agility and maneuverability of natural fliers would be desirable to incorporate into engineered micro air vehicles (MAVs). However, there is still much for engineers to learn about flapping flight in order to understand how such vehicles can be built for efficient flying. The goal of this study is to develop a methodology for capturing high quality flow field data around flexible flapping wings in a hover environment and to interpret it to gain a better understanding of how aerodynamic forces are generated. The flow field data was captured using particle image velocimetry (PIV) and required that measurements be taken around a repeatable flapping motion to obtain phase-averaged data that could be studied throughout the flapping cycle. Therefore, the study includes the development of flapping devices with a simple repeatable single degree of freedom flapping motion. The acquired flow field data has been examined qualitatively and quantitatively to investigate the mechanisms behind force production in hovering flight and to relate it to observations in previous research. Specifically, the flow fields have been investigated around a rigid wing and several carbon fiber reinforced flexible membrane wings. Throughout the whole study the wings were actuated with either a sinusoidal or a semi-linear flapping motion. The semi-linear flapping motion holds the commanded angular velocity nearly constant through half of each half-stroke while the sinusoidal motion is always either accelerating or decelerating. The flow fields were investigated by examining vorticity and vortex structures, using the Q criterion as the definition for the latter, in two and three dimensions. The measurements were combined with wing deflection measurements to demonstrate some of the key links in how the fluid-structure interactions generated aerodynamic forces. The flow fields were also used to calculate the forces generated by the flapping wings using momentum balance methods which yielded

  8. [Wing 1 radiation survey and contamination report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olsen, K.

    1991-01-01

    We have completed the 5480.11 survey for Wing 1. All area(s)/item(s) requested by the 5480.11 committee have been thoroughly surveyed and documented. Decontamination/disposal of contaminated items has been accomplished. The wing 1 survey was started on 8/13/90 and completed 9/18/90. However, the follow-up surveys were not completed until 2/18/91. We received the final set of smear samples for wing 1 on 1/13/91. A total of 5,495 smears were taken from wing 1 and total of 465 smears were taken during the follow-up surveys. There were a total 122 items found to have fixed contamination and 4 items with smearable contamination in excess of the limits specified in DOE ORDER 5480.11 (AR 3-7). The following area(s)/item(s) were not included in the 5480.11 survey: Hallways, Access panels, Men's and women's change rooms, Janitor closets, Wall lockers and item(s) stored in wing 1 hallways and room 1116. If our contract is renewed, we will include those areas in our survey according to your request of April 15, 1991

  9. Gliding swifts attain laminar flow over rough wings.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Lentink

    Full Text Available Swifts are among the most aerodynamically refined gliding birds. However, the overlapping vanes and protruding shafts of their primary feathers make swift wings remarkably rough for their size. Wing roughness height is 1-2% of chord length on the upper surface--10,000 times rougher than sailplane wings. Sailplanes depend on extreme wing smoothness to increase the area of laminar flow on the wing surface and minimize drag for extended glides. To understand why the swift does not rely on smooth wings, we used a stethoscope to map laminar flow over preserved wings in a low-turbulence wind tunnel. By combining laminar area, lift, and drag measurements, we show that average area of laminar flow on swift wings is 69% (n = 3; std 13% of their total area during glides that maximize flight distance and duration--similar to high-performance sailplanes. Our aerodynamic analysis indicates that swifts attain laminar flow over their rough wings because their wing size is comparable to the distance the air travels (after a roughness-induced perturbation before it transitions from laminar to turbulent. To interpret the function of swift wing roughness, we simulated its effect on smooth model wings using physical models. This manipulation shows that laminar flow is reduced and drag increased at high speeds. At the speeds at which swifts cruise, however, swift-like roughness prolongs laminar flow and reduces drag. This feature gives small birds with rudimentary wings an edge during the evolution of glide performance.

  10. Fixed-Wing Micro Air Vehicles with Hovering Capabilities

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Bataille, Boris; Poinsot, Damien; Thipyopas, Chinnapat; Moschetta, Jean-Marc

    2007-01-01

    Fixed-wing micro air vehicles (MAV) are very attractive for outdoor surveillance missions since they generally offer better payload and endurance capabilities than rotorcraft or flapping-wing vehicles of equal size...

  11. Active Twist Control for a Compliant Wing Structure, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Blended wing body (BWB) aircraft provide an aerodynamically superior solution over traditional tube-and-wing designs for a number of mission profiles. These...

  12. Stability and transition on swept wings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stuckert, Greg; Herbert, Thorwald; Esfahanian, Vahid

    1993-01-01

    This paper describes the extension and application of the Parabolized Stability Equations (PSE) to the stability and transition of the supersonic three-dimensional laminar boundary layer on a swept wing. The problem formulation uses a general coordinate transformation for arbitrary curvilinear body-fitted computational grids. Some testing using these coordinates is briefly described to help validate the software used for the investigation. The disturbance amplitude ratios as a function of chord position for supersonic (Mach 1.5) boundary layers on untapered, untwisted wings of different sweep angles are then presented and compared with those obtained from local parallel analyses.

  13. Flutter analysis of low aspect ratio wings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parnell, L. A.

    1986-01-01

    Several very low aspect ratio flat plate wing configurations are analyzed for their aerodynamic instability (flutter) characteristics. All of the wings investigated are delta planforms with clipped tips, made of aluminum alloy plate and cantilevered from the supporting vehicle body. Results of both subsonic and supersonic NASTRAN aeroelastic analyses as well as those from another version of the program implementing the supersonic linearized aerodynamic theory are presented. Results are selectively compared with the experimental data; however, supersonic predictions of the Mach Box method in NASTRAN are found to be erratic and erroneous, requiring the use of a separate program.

  14. Three-dimensional flow about penguin wings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noca, Flavio; Sudki, Bassem; Lauria, Michel

    2012-11-01

    Penguins, contrary to airborne birds, do not need to compensate for gravity. Yet, the kinematics of their wings is highly three-dimensional and seems exceedingly complex for plain swimming. Is such kinematics the result of an evolutionary optimization or is it just a forced adaptation of an airborne flying apparatus to underwater swimming? Some answers will be provided based on flow dynamics around robotic penguin wings. Updates will also be presented on the development of a novel robotic arm intended to simulate penguin swimming and enable novel propulsion devices.

  15. Wing Leading Edge Concepts for Noise Reduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shmilovich, Arvin; Yadlin, Yoram; Pitera, David M.

    2010-01-01

    This study focuses on the development of wing leading edge concepts for noise reduction during high-lift operations, without compromising landing stall speeds, stall characteristics or cruise performance. High-lift geometries, which can be obtained by conventional mechanical systems or morphing structures have been considered. A systematic aerodynamic analysis procedure was used to arrive at several promising configurations. The aerodynamic design of new wing leading edge shapes is obtained from a robust Computational Fluid Dynamics procedure. Acoustic benefits are qualitatively established through the evaluation of the computed flow fields.

  16. The case of Scott Ortiz: a clash between criminal justice and public health

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tobia Maria S

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The criminal justice system creates particular challenges for persons with HIV and Hepatitis C, many of whom have a history of injection drug use. The case of Scott Ortiz, taken from public trial and sentencing transcripts, reveals the manner in which incarceration may delay learning of important health problems such as Hepatitis C infection. In addition, the case of Mr. Ortiz suggests the bias in sentencing that a former injection drug user may face. Collaboration between the Montefiore Medical Center residency in Social Medicine and a Bronx legal services agency, Bronx Defenders, yielded the discovery that a decade after diagnosis with HIV and after long term incarceration, Mr. Ortiz was infected with Hepatitis C. Mr. Ortiz only became aware of his advanced Hepatitis C and liver damage during his trial. The second important aspect of this case centers on the justification for lengthy sentence for a burglary conviction. The presiding Judge in Mr. Ortiz's case acknowledged that because of his advanced illness, Mr. Ortiz posed no threat to society as a burglar (the crime for which he was convicted. But the Judge elected to use his discretion to sentence Mr. Ortiz to a term of 15 years to life (as opposed to a minimum of two to four years based on the idea that the public health would be served by preventing Mr. Ortiz from returning to the life of a street addict, sharing dirty needles with others. Mr. Ortiz reports distant injection drug use, no evidence of current or recent drug use was presented during Mr. Ortiz's trial and he reports no injection drug use for over a decade. In this case, bias against a former injection drug user, masquerading as concern for public health, is used to justify a lengthier sentence. Mr. Ortiz's lack of awareness of his Hepatitis C infection despite long term incarceration, combined with the justification for his dramatically increased sentence, provide examples of how persons within the criminal justice

  17. PREFACE PASREG: The 7th International Workshop on the Processing and Applications of Superconducting (RE)BCO Large Grain Materials (Washington DC, 29-31 July 2010) PASREG: The 7th International Workshop on the Processing and Applications of Superconducting (RE)BCO Large Grain Materials (Washington DC, 29-31 July 2010)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freyhardt, Herbert; Cardwell, David; Strasik, Mike

    2010-12-01

    Large grain, (RE)BCO bulk superconductors fabricated by top seeded melt growth (TSMG) are able to generate large magnetic fields compared to conventional, iron-based permanent magnets. Following 20 years of development, these materials are now beginning to realize their considerable potential for a variety of engineering applications such as magnetic separators, flywheel energy storage and magnetic bearings. MgB2 has also continued to emerge as a potentially important bulk superconducting material for engineering applications below 20 K due to its lack of granularity and the ease with which complex shapes of this material can be fabricated. This issue of Superconductor Science and Technology contains a selection of papers presented at the 7th International Workshop on the Processing and Applications of Superconducting (RE)BCO Large Grain Materials, including MgB2, held 29th-31sy July 2010 at the Omni Shoreham Hotel, Washington DC, USA, to report progress made in this field in the previous three year period. The workshop followed those held previously in Cambridge, UK (1997), Morioka, Japan (1999), Seattle, USA (2001), Jena, Germany (2003), Tokyo, Japan (2005) and again in Cambridge, UK (2007). The scope of the seventh PASREG workshop was extended to include processing and characterization aspects of the broader spectrum of bulk high temperature superconducting (HTS) materials, including melt-cast Bi-HTS and bulk MgB2, recent developments in the field and innovative applications of bulk HTS. A total of 38 papers were presented at this workshop, of which 30 were presented in oral form and 8 were presented as posters. The organizers wish to acknowledge the efforts of Sue Butler of the University of Houston for her local organization of the workshop. The eighth PASREG workshop will be held in Taiwan in the summer of 2012.

  18. Spanwise transition section for blended wing-body aircraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawley, Arthur V. (Inventor)

    1999-01-01

    A blended wing-body aircraft includes a central body, a wing, and a transition section which interconnects the body and the wing on each side of the aircraft. The two transition sections are identical, and each has a variable chord length and thickness which varies in proportion to the chord length. This enables the transition section to connect the thin wing to the thicker body. Each transition section has a negative sweep angle.

  19. Ornithopter Type Flapping Wings for Autonomous Micro Air Vehicles

    OpenAIRE

    Sutthiphong Srigrarom; Woei-Leong Chan

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, an ornithopter prototype that mimics the flapping motion of bird flight is developed, and the lift and thrust generation characteristics of different wing designs are evaluated. This project focused on the spar arrangement and material used for the wings that could achieves improved performance. Various lift and thrust measurement techniques are explored and evaluated. Various wings of insects and birds were evaluated to understand how these natural flyers with flapping wings a...

  20. Multidimensional analysis of Drosophila wing variation in Evolution ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2008-12-23

    Dec 23, 2008 ... the different components of phenotypic variation of a complex trait: the wing. ... of Drosophila wing variation in. Evolution Canyon. J. Genet. 87, 407–419]. Introduction ..... identify the effect of slope on wing shape (figure 2,c). All.

  1. Colors and pterin pigmentation of pierid butterfly wings

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wijnen, B.; Leertouwer, H. L.; Stavenga, D. G.

    2007-01-01

    The reflectance of pierid butterfly wings is principally determined by the incoherent scattering of incident light and the absorption by pterin pigments in the scale structures. Coherent scattering causing iridescence is frequently encountered in the dorsal wings or wing tips of male pierids. We

  2. Spectral reflectance properties of iridescent pierid butterfly wings

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wilts, Bodo D.; Pirih, Primoz; Stavenga, Doekele G.; Pirih, Primož

    The wings of most pierid butterflies exhibit a main, pigmentary colouration: white, yellow or orange. The males of many species have in restricted areas of the wing upper sides a distinct structural colouration, which is created by stacks of lamellae in the ridges of the wing scales, resulting in

  3. How swifts control their glide performance with morphing wings

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lentink, D.; Muller, U. K.; Stamhuis, E. J.; de Kat, R.; van Gestel, W.; Veldhuis, L. L. M.; Henningsson, P.; Hedenstrom, A.; Videler, J. J.

    2007-01-01

    Gliding birds continually change the shape and size of their wings(1-6), presumably to exploit the profound effect of wing morphology on aerodynamic performance(7-9). That birds should adjust wing sweep to suit glide speed has been predicted qualitatively by analytical glide models(2,10), which

  4. Scott y Zelda Fitzgerald y el psicoanálisis: la construcción de "Suave es la noche"

    OpenAIRE

    Esteve Díaz, Nuria

    2016-01-01

    Esta tesis aporta una investigación original que pretende analizar la novela Suave es la noche (Tender is the Night, 1934) del escritor norteamericano Francis Scott Key Fitzgerald desde la perspectiva de las humanidades médicas y de manera particular, de las relaciones entre medicina y literatura. En Suave es la noche existen amplias referencias médicas y conceptos psicoanalíticos relacionados con la psiquiatría europea de finales del siglo XIX y comienzos del XX, por lo que cobra especial in...

  5. Possible Mafic Patches in Scott Crater Highlight the Need for Resource Exploration on the Lunar South Polar Region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, Bonnie L.

    2007-01-01

    Possible areas of mafic material on the rim and floor of Scott crater (82.1 deg S, 48.5 deg E) are suggested by analysis of shadow-masked Clementine false-color-ratio images. Mafic materials common in mare and pyroclastic materials can produce more oxygen than can highlands materials, and mafic materials close to the south pole may be important for propellant production for a future lunar mission. If the dark patches are confirmed as mafic materials, this finding would suggest that other mafic patches may exist, even closer to the poles, which were originally mapped as purely anorthositic.

  6. La diaspora americana in Europa: il caso degli espatriati in Tender is the Night di F. Scott Fitzgerald

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elisa A. Pantaleo

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available From 1921 to 1930, F. Scott Fitzgerald travelled to Europe four times, and he spent almost four years in France and one year in Switzerland. While living abroad in the multicultural environment of Paris and of the French Riviera, his attitude towards Europe underwent a major change. Tender is the Night marks a significant transition from the narrow nationalism of Fitzgerald’s first travel correspondence to an increased sensitivity towards European otherness. The cultural encounter with Europe – that in the novel is rendered through an hybridization of the language and the characters –helped the author to reinterpret his identity in a cosmopolitan perspective.

  7. Morphing Wing: Experimental Boundary Layer Transition Determination and Wing Vibrations Measurements and Analysis =

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tondji Chendjou, Yvan Wilfried

    This Master's thesis is written within the framework of the multidisciplinary international research project CRIAQ MDO-505. This global project consists of the design, manufacture and testing of a morphing wing box capable of changing the shape of the flexible upper skin of a wing using an actuator system installed inside the wing. This changing of the shape generates a delay in the occurrence of the laminar to turbulent transition area, which results in an improvement of the aerodynamic performances of the morphed wing. This thesis is focused on the technologies used to gather the pressure data during the wind tunnel tests, as well as on the post processing methodologies used to characterize the wing airflow. The vibration measurements of the wing and their real-time graphical representation are also presented. The vibration data acquisition system is detailed, and the vibration data analysis confirms the predictions of the flutter analysis performed on the wing prior to wind tunnel testing at the IAR-NRC. The pressure data was collected using 32 highly-sensitive piezoelectric sensors for sensing the pressure fluctuations up to 10 KHz. These sensors were installed along two wing chords, and were further connected to a National Instrument PXI real-time acquisition system. The acquired pressure data was high-pass filtered, analyzed and visualized using Fast Fourier Transform (FFT) and Standard Deviation (SD) approaches to quantify the pressure fluctuations in the wing airflow, as these allow the detection of the laminar to turbulent transition area. Around 30% of the cases tested in the IAR-NRC wind tunnel were optimized for drag reduction by the morphing wing procedure. The obtained pressure measurements results were compared with results obtained by infrared thermography visualization, and were used to validate the numerical simulations. Two analog accelerometers able to sense dynamic accelerations up to +/-16g were installed in both the wing and the aileron boxes

  8. Machine Learning for Flapping Wing Flight Control

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Goedhart, Menno; van Kampen, E.; Armanini, S.F.; de Visser, C.C.; Chu, Q.

    2018-01-01

    Flight control of Flapping Wing Micro Air Vehicles is challenging, because of their complex dynamics and variability due to manufacturing inconsistencies. Machine Learning algorithms can be used to tackle these challenges. A Policy Gradient algorithm is used to tune the gains of a

  9. Conceptual Study of Rotary-Wing Microrobotics

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-03-27

    Low Frequency LIGA Lithographie Galvanoformung Abformung (German) LPCVD Low Pressure Chemical Vapor Deposition LRC Inductor- Resistor -Capacitor MAV...record MAV endurance flexible wing design first ever battery power MAV integrated sensor package piezo - electric unimorph actuators...capable of hovering piezo - electric actuators *Theoretical Value Only 2.5 Flying MEMS-Based Robots In 1993, Kubo, et al published a study on

  10. Can Wing Tip Vortices Be Accurately Simulated?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-01

    Aerodynamics , Flow Visualization, Numerical Investigation, Aero Suite 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: Unclassified 17. LIMITATION OF ABSTRACT 18...additional tail buffeting.2 In commercial applications, winglets have been installed on passenger aircraft to minimize vortex formation and reduce lift...air. In military applications, wing tip In commercial applications, winglets have been installed on passenger aircraft to minimize increases with downstream distances.

  11. Oblique-Flying-Wing Supersonic Transport Airplane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Der Velden, Alexander J. M.

    1992-01-01

    Oblique-flying-wing supersonic airplane proposed as possible alternative to B747B (or equivalent). Tranports passengers and cargo as fast as twice speed of sound at same cost as current subsonic transports. Flies at same holding speeds as present supersonic transports but requires only half takeoff distance.

  12. Aerodynamic comparison of a butterfly-like flapping wing-body model and a revolving-wing model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Kosuke; Yoshino, Masato

    2017-06-01

    The aerodynamic performance of flapping- and revolving-wing models is investigated by numerical simulations based on an immersed boundary-lattice Boltzmann method. As wing models, we use (i) a butterfly-like model with a body and flapping-rectangular wings and (ii) a revolving-wing model with the same wings as the flapping case. Firstly, we calculate aerodynamic performance factors such as the lift force, the power, and the power loading of the two models for Reynolds numbers in the range of 50-1000. For the flapping-wing model, the power loading is maximal for the maximum angle of attack of 90°, a flapping amplitude of roughly 45°, and a phase shift between the flapping angle and the angle of attack of roughly 90°. For the revolving-wing model, the power loading peaks for an angle of attack of roughly 45°. In addition, we examine the ground effect on the aerodynamic performance of the revolving-wing model. Secondly, we compare the aerodynamic performance of the flapping- and revolving-wing models at their respective maximal power loadings. It is found that the revolving-wing model is more efficient than the flapping-wing model both when the body of the latter is fixed and where it can move freely. Finally, we discuss the relative agilities of the flapping- and revolving-wing models.

  13. On the Distinct Effects of Left-Wing and Right-Wing Populism on Democratic Quality

    OpenAIRE

    Huber, Robert A.; Schimpf, Christian H.

    2017-01-01

    This study examines the differences and commonalities of how populist parties of the left and right relate to democracy. The focus is narrowed to the relationship between these parties and two aspects of democratic quality, minority rights and mutual constraints. Our argument is twofold: first, we contend that populist parties can exert distinct influences on minority rights, depending on whether they are left-wing or right-wing populist parties. Second, by contrast, we propose that the assoc...

  14. The 8th edition of the American Joint Committee on Cancer tumor-node-metastasis staging system for gastric cancer is superior to the 7th edition: results from a Chinese mono-institutional study of 1663 patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Xin; Bu, Zhao-De; Yan, Yan; Li, Zi-Yu; Wu, Ai-Wen; Zhang, Lian-Hai; Zhang, Ji; Wu, Xiao-Jiang; Zong, Xiang-Long; Li, Shuang-Xi; Shan, Fei; Jia, Zi-Yu; Ji, Jia-Fu

    2017-11-22

    We investigated the superiority of the 8th edition of the tumor-node-metastasis (TNM) system for patients in China with gastric cancer. The survival outcomes of 1663 patients with gastric cancer undergoing radical resection were analyzed. In the 8th edition system, homogeneous 5-year survival rates among different pathological TNM (pTNM) categories belonging to the same stage were observed. However, in the 7th edition system, the differences of 5-year survival rate among pTNM categories belonging to the same stage were observed in stages IIB (P = 0.010), IIIB (P = 0.004), and IIIC (P < 0.001). For patients in the pT1-3 (P < 0.001) and pT4a (P < 0.001) categories, there were significant differences in survival between patients in the pN3a and pN3b categories. Furthermore, partial cases (pT4bN0M0/T4aN2M0) of stage IIIB were downstaged to stage IIIA in the 8th edition system, and the 5-year survival rate of these patients was significantly better than that of patients in stage IIIB in the 8th edition system. Similarly, the 5-year survival rate of patients in p4bN2M0/T4aN3aM0 downstaged from stage IIIC to IIIB was significantly better than that of patients in stage IIIC. Compared with the 7th edition system, the 8th edition system had a higher likelihood ratio and linear trend chi-squared score and a smaller Akaike information criteria value. The 8th edition system is superior to the 7th edition system in terms of homogeneity, discriminatory ability, and monotonicity of gradients for Chinese patients with gastric cancer.

  15. The Hospital Microbiome Project: Meeting Report for the 1st Hospital Microbiome Project Workshop on sampling design and building science measurements, Chicago, USA, June 7th-8th 2012.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Daniel; Alverdy, John; An, Gary; Coleman, Maureen; Garcia-Houchins, Sylvia; Green, Jessica; Keegan, Kevin; Kelley, Scott T; Kirkup, Benjamin C; Kociolek, Larry; Levin, Hal; Landon, Emily; Olsiewski, Paula; Knight, Rob; Siegel, Jeffrey; Weber, Stephen; Gilbert, Jack

    2013-04-15

    This report details the outcome of the 1st Hospital Microbiome Project workshop held on June 7th-8th, 2012 at the University of Chicago, USA. The workshop was arranged to determine the most appropriate sampling strategy and approach to building science measurement to characterize the development of a microbial community within a new hospital pavilion being built at the University of Chicago Medical Center. The workshop made several recommendations and led to the development of a full proposal to the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation as well as to the creation of the Hospital Microbiome Consortium.

  16. Multiple cues for winged morph production in an aphid metacommunity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohsen Mehrparvar

    Full Text Available Environmental factors can lead individuals down different developmental pathways giving rise to distinct phenotypes (phenotypic plasticity. The production of winged or unwinged morphs in aphids is an example of two alternative developmental pathways. Dispersal is paramount in aphids that often have a metapopulation structure, where local subpopulations frequently go extinct, such as the specialized aphids on tansy (Tanacetum vulgare. We conducted various experiments to further understand the cues involved in the production of winged dispersal morphs by the two dominant species of the tansy aphid metacommunity, Metopeurum fuscoviride and Macrosiphoniella tanacetaria. We found that the ant-tended M. fuscoviride produced winged individuals predominantly at the beginning of the season while the untended M. tanacetaria produced winged individuals throughout the season. Winged mothers of both species produced winged offspring, although in both species winged offspring were mainly produced by unwinged females. Crowding and the presence of predators, effects already known to influence wing production in other aphid species, increased the percentage of winged offspring in M. tanacetaria, but not in M. fuscoviride. We find there are also other factors (i.e. temporal effects inducing the production of winged offspring for natural aphid populations. Our results show that the responses of each aphid species are due to multiple wing induction cues.

  17. The biomechanical origin of extreme wing allometry in hummingbirds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skandalis, Dimitri A; Segre, Paolo S; Bahlman, Joseph W; Groom, Derrick J E; Welch, Kenneth C; Witt, Christopher C; McGuire, Jimmy A; Dudley, Robert; Lentink, David; Altshuler, Douglas L

    2017-10-19

    Flying animals of different masses vary widely in body proportions, but the functional implications of this variation are often unclear. We address this ambiguity by developing an integrative allometric approach, which we apply here to hummingbirds to examine how the physical environment, wing morphology and stroke kinematics have contributed to the evolution of their highly specialised flight. Surprisingly, hummingbirds maintain constant wing velocity despite an order of magnitude variation in body weight; increased weight is supported solely through disproportionate increases in wing area. Conversely, wing velocity increases with body weight within species, compensating for lower relative wing area in larger individuals. By comparing inter- and intraspecific allometries, we find that the extreme wing area allometry of hummingbirds is likely an adaptation to maintain constant burst flight capacity and induced power requirements with increasing weight. Selection for relatively large wings simultaneously maximises aerial performance and minimises flight costs, which are essential elements of humming bird life history.

  18. Dynamics of the Davydov–Scott soliton with location or velocity mismatch of its high-frequency component

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blyakhman, L.G.; Gromov, E.M.; Onosova, I.V.; Tyutin, V.V., E-mail: vtyutin@hse.ru

    2017-05-03

    The dynamics of a two-component Davydov–Scott (DS) soliton with a small mismatch of the initial location or velocity of the high-frequency (HF) component was investigated within the framework of the Zakharov-type system of two coupled equations for the HF and low-frequency (LF) fields. In this system, the HF field is described by the linear Schrödinger equation with the potential generated by the LF component varying in time and space. The LF component in this system is described by the Korteweg–de Vries equation with a term of quadratic influence of the HF field on the LF field. The frequency of the DS soliton's component oscillation was found analytically using the balance equation. The perturbed DS soliton was shown to be stable. The analytical results were confirmed by numerical simulations. - Highlights: • The dynamics of the Davydov–Scott soliton with initial location or velocity mismatch of the HF component was investigated. • The study was performed within the framework of coupled linear Schrödinger and KdV equations for the HF and LF fields. • Analytical and numerical approaches were used. • The frequency of the DS soliton component oscillation was found. • Stability of the perturbed DS solitons was demonstrated.

  19. Adapting Scott and Bruce's General Decision-Making Style Inventory to Patient Decision Making in Provider Choice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, Sophia; Soyez, Katja; Gurtner, Sebastian

    2015-05-01

    Research testing the concept of decision-making styles in specific contexts such as health care-related choices is missing. Therefore, we examine the contextuality of Scott and Bruce's (1995) General Decision-Making Style Inventory with respect to patient choice situations. Scott and Bruce's scale was adapted for use as a patient decision-making style inventory. In total, 388 German patients who underwent elective joint surgery responded to a questionnaire about their provider choice. Confirmatory factor analyses within 2 independent samples assessed factorial structure, reliability, and validity of the scale. The final 4-dimensional, 13-item patient decision-making style inventory showed satisfactory psychometric properties. Data analyses supported reliability and construct validity. Besides the intuitive, dependent, and avoidant style, a new subdimension, called "comparative" decision-making style, emerged that originated from the rational dimension of the general model. This research provides evidence for the contextuality of decision-making style to specific choice situations. Using a limited set of indicators, this report proposes the patient decision-making style inventory as valid and feasible tool to assess patients' decision propensities. © The Author(s) 2015.

  20. Environmental Assessment of the Gering-Stegall 115-kV Transmission Line Consolidation Project, Scotts Bluff County, Nebraska

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-05-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE), Western Area Power Administration (Western) proposes to consolidate segments of two transmission lines near the Gering Substation in Gering, Nebraska. The transmission lines are both located in Scotts Bluff County, Nebraska. The transmission lines are both located in Scotts Bluff County, Nebraska, within the city of Gering. Presently, there are three parallel 115-kilovolt (kV) transmission lines on separate rights-of-way (ROW) that terminate at the Gering Substation. The project would include dismantling the Archer-Gering wood-pole transmission line and rebuilding the remaining two lines on single-pole steel double circuit structures. The project would consolidate the Gering-Stegall North and Gering-Stegall South 115-kV transmission lines on to one ROW for a 1.33-mile segment between the Gering Substation and a point west of the Gering Landfill. All existing wood-pole H-frame structures would be removed, and the Gering-Stegall North and South ROWs abandoned. Western is responsible for the design, construction, operation, and maintenance of the line. Western prepared an environmental assessment (EA) that analyzed the potential environmental impacts of the proposed construction, operation, and maintenance of the 115-kV transmission line consolidation. Based on the analyses in the EA, the DOE finds that the proposed action is not a major Federal action significantly affecting the quality of the human environment, within the meaning of the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 (NEPA).

  1. Environmental Assessment of the Gering-Stegall 115-kV Transmission Line Consolidation Project, Scotts Bluff County, Nebraska

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-05-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE), Western Area Power Administration (Western) proposes to consolidate segments of two transmission lines near the Gering Substation in Gering, Nebraska. The transmission lines are both located in Scotts Bluff County, Nebraska. The transmission lines are both located in Scotts Bluff County, Nebraska, within the city of Gering. Presently, there are three parallel 115-kilovolt (kV) transmission lines on separate rights-of-way (ROW) that terminate at the Gering Substation. The project would include dismantling the Archer-Gering wood-pole transmission line and rebuilding the remaining two lines on single-pole steel double circuit structures. The project would consolidate the Gering-Stegall North and Gering-Stegall South 115-kV transmission lines on to one ROW for a 1.33-mile segment between the Gering Substation and a point west of the Gering Landfill. All existing wood-pole H-frame structures would be removed, and the Gering-Stegall North and South ROWs abandoned. Western is responsible for the design, construction, operation, and maintenance of the line. Western prepared an environmental assessment (EA) that analyzed the potential environmental impacts of the proposed construction, operation, and maintenance of the 115-kV transmission line consolidation. Based on the analyses in the EA, the DOE finds that the proposed action is not a major Federal action significantly affecting the quality of the human environment, within the meaning of the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 (NEPA)

  2. Effect of wing mass in free flight by a butterfly-like 3D flapping wing-body model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Kosuke; Okada, Iori; Yoshino, Masato

    2016-11-01

    The effect of wing mass in free flight of a flapping wing is investigated by numerical simulations based on an immersed boundary-lattice Boltzmann method. We consider a butterfly-like 3D flapping wing-model consisting of two square wings with uniform mass density connected by a rod-shaped body. We simulate free flights of the wing-body model with various mass ratios of the wing to the whole of the model. As a result, it is found that the lift and thrust forces decrease as the mass ratio increases, since the body with a large mass ratio experiences large vertical and horizontal oscillations in one period and consequently the wing tip speed relatively decreases. In addition, we find the critical mass ratio between upward flight and downward flight for various Reynolds numbers. This work was supported by JSPS KAKENHI Grant Number JP16K18012.

  3. The optimal design of UAV wing structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Długosz, Adam; Klimek, Wiktor

    2018-01-01

    The paper presents an optimal design of UAV wing, made of composite materials. The aim of the optimization is to improve strength and stiffness together with reduction of the weight of the structure. Three different types of functionals, which depend on stress, stiffness and the total mass are defined. The paper presents an application of the in-house implementation of the evolutionary multi-objective algorithm in optimization of the UAV wing structure. Values of the functionals are calculated on the basis of results obtained from numerical simulations. Numerical FEM model, consisting of different composite materials is created. Adequacy of the numerical model is verified by results obtained from the experiment, performed on a tensile testing machine. Examples of multi-objective optimization by means of Pareto-optimal set of solutions are presented.

  4. Optimization of aerodynamic efficiency for twist morphing MAV wing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N.I. Ismail

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Twist morphing (TM is a practical control technique in micro air vehicle (MAV flight. However, TM wing has a lower aerodynamic efficiency (CL/CD compared to membrane and rigid wing. This is due to massive drag penalty created on TM wing, which had overwhelmed the successive increase in its lift generation. Therefore, further CL/CDmax optimization on TM wing is needed to obtain the optimal condition for the morphing wing configuration. In this paper, two-way fluid–structure interaction (FSI simulation and wind tunnel testing method are used to solve and study the basic wing aerodynamic performance over (non-optimal TM, membrane and rigid wings. Then, a multifidelity data metamodel based design optimization (MBDO process is adopted based on the Ansys-DesignXplorer frameworks. In the adaptive MBDO process, Kriging metamodel is used to construct the final multifidelity CL/CD responses by utilizing 23 multi-fidelity sample points from the FSI simulation and experimental data. The optimization results show that the optimal TM wing configuration is able to produce better CL/CDmax magnitude by at least 2% than the non-optimal TM wings. The flow structure formation reveals that low TV strength on the optimal TM wing induces low CD generation which in turn improves its overall CL/CDmax performance.

  5. Quantifying the dynamic wing morphing of hovering hummingbird.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maeda, Masateru; Nakata, Toshiyuki; Kitamura, Ikuo; Tanaka, Hiroto; Liu, Hao

    2017-09-01

    Animal wings are lightweight and flexible; hence, during flapping flight their shapes change. It has been known that such dynamic wing morphing reduces aerodynamic cost in insects, but the consequences in vertebrate flyers, particularly birds, are not well understood. We have developed a method to reconstruct a three-dimensional wing model of a bird from the wing outline and the feather shafts (rachides). The morphological and kinematic parameters can be obtained using the wing model, and the numerical or mechanical simulations may also be carried out. To test the effectiveness of the method, we recorded the hovering flight of a hummingbird ( Amazilia amazilia ) using high-speed cameras and reconstructed the right wing. The wing shape varied substantially within a stroke cycle. Specifically, the maximum and minimum wing areas differed by 18%, presumably due to feather sliding; the wing was bent near the wrist joint, towards the upward direction and opposite to the stroke direction; positive upward camber and the 'washout' twist (monotonic decrease in the angle of incidence from the proximal to distal wing) were observed during both half-strokes; the spanwise distribution of the twist was uniform during downstroke, but an abrupt increase near the wrist joint was found during upstroke.

  6. CFD Analysis of UAV Flying Wing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vasile PRISACARIU

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Numerical methods for solving equations describing the evolution of 3D fluid experienced a significant development closely related to the progress of information systems. Today, especially in the field of fluid mechanics, numerical simulations allow the study of gas-thermodynamic confirmed by experimental techniques in wind tunnel conditions and actual flight tests for modeling complex aircraft. The article shows a case of numerical analysis of the lifting surface on the UAV type flying wing.

  7. Mother Nature inspires new wind turbine wing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sønderberg Petersen, L.

    2007-01-01

    The sight of a bird of prey hanging immobile in the air while its wings continuously adjust themselves slightly in relation to the wind in order to keep the bird in the same position in the air, is a sight that most of us have admired, including the windenergy scientists at Risø DTU. They have...... started transferring the principle to wind turbine blades to make them adaptive...

  8. Topology Optimization of an Aircraft Wing

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-06-11

    which selected as the most prevalent independent structure in the wing. The tank location and shape was interpreted from the high material volume...Engineering Inc., 1820 E. Big Beaver Rd, Troy, MI 48083, Optistruct 12.0 User’s Guide, 2013. 126 10. T. Megson and H. Gordon, Aircraft structures for...software enhances the design of transportation,” Forbes Online, 2013. 13. Altair Engineering Inc., 1820 E. Big Beaver Rd, Troy, MI 48083, Hypermesh

  9. Tracing the evolution of avian wing digits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Xing; Mackem, Susan

    2013-06-17

    It is widely accepted that birds are a subgroup of dinosaurs, but there is an apparent conflict: modern birds have been thought to possess only the middle three fingers (digits II-III-IV) of an idealized five-digit tetrapod hand based on embryological data, but their Mesozoic tetanuran dinosaur ancestors are considered to have the first three digits (I-II-III) based on fossil evidence. How could such an evolutionary quirk arise? Various hypotheses have been proposed to resolve this paradox. Adding to the confusion, some recent developmental studies support a I-II-III designation for avian wing digits whereas some recent paleontological data are consistent with a II-III-IV identification of the Mesozoic tetanuran digits. A comprehensive analysis of both paleontological and developmental data suggests that the evolution of the avian wing digits may have been driven by homeotic transformations of digit identity, which are more likely to have occurred in a partial and piecemeal manner. Additionally, recent genetic studies in mouse models showing plausible mechanisms for central digit loss invite consideration of new alternative possibilities (I-II-IV or I-III-IV) for the homologies of avian wing digits. While much progress has been made, some advances point to the complexity of the problem and a final resolution to this ongoing debate demands additional work from both paleontological and developmental perspectives, which will surely yield new insights on mechanisms of evolutionary adaptation. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Unsteady fluid dynamics around a hovering wing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishna, Swathi; Green, Melissa; Mulleners, Karen

    2017-11-01

    The unsteady flow around a hovering flat plate wing has been investigated experimentally using particle image velocimetry and direct force measurements. The measurements are conducted on a wing that rotates symmetrically about the stroke reversal at a reduced frequency of k = 0.32 and Reynolds number of Re = 220 . The Lagrangian finite-time Lyapunov exponent method is used to analyse the unsteady flow fields by identifying dynamically relevant flow features such as the primary leading edge vortex (LEV), secondary vortices, and topological saddles, and their evolution within a flapping cycle. The flow evolution is divided into four stages that are characterised by the LEV (a)emergence, (b)growth, (c)lift-off, and (d)breakdown and decay. Tracking saddle points is shown to be helpful in defining the LEV lift-off which occurs at the maximum stroke velocity. The flow fields are correlated with the aerodynamic forces revealing that the maximum lift and drag are observed just before LEV lift-off. The end of wing rotation in the beginning of the stroke stimulates a change in the direction of the LEV growth and the start of rotation at the end of the stroke triggers the breakdown of the LEV.

  11. The wings of Bombyx mori develop from larval discs exhibiting an ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    presumptive wing blade domains unlike in Drosophila, where it is confined to the hinge and the wing pouch. ... events are different and the wing discs behave like presumptive wing buds .... emerge with the fore- and the hind-wings (figure 1e, j) on ... phosis (compare c with d, and h with i) during the larval to pupal transition.

  12. Physics-based Morphology Analysis and Adjoint Optimization of Flexible Flapping Wings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-08-30

    production, power consumption , and efficiency. Novel tools for studying wing morphing during complicated flapping flights have been developed to...23 Figure 14. Transverse plane cut at mid-downstroke. (a) Cut through wing and body (b) Cut through the near wake (no wings...between wing surfaces and corresponding least square planes . The distances are normalized by wing mid chord length

  13. PORTER S FIVE FORCES MODEL SCOTT MORTON S FIVE FORCES MODEL BAKOS TREACY MODEL ANALYZES STRATEGIC INFORMATION SYSTEMS MANAGEMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Indra Gamayanto

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Wollongong City Council (WCC is one of the most progressive and innovative local government organizations in Australia. Wollongong City Council use Information Technology to gain the competitive advantage and to face a global economy in the future. Porter's Five Force model is one of the models that can be using at Wollongong City Council because porter's five Forces model has strength in relationship between buyer and suppliers (Bargaining power of suppliers and bargaining power of buyers. Other model such as Scott Morton's Five Forces model has strength to analyze the social impact factor, so to gain competitive advantage in the future and have a good IT/IS strategic planning; this model can be use also. Bakos & Treacy model almost the same as Porter's model but Bakos & Treacy model can also be applying into Wollongong City Council to improve the capability in Transforming organization, efficiency, and effectiveness.

  14. Absence of a Scott correction for the total binding energy of noninteracting fermions in a smooth potential well

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huxtable, B.D.

    1988-01-01

    It is shown, for V in a particular class of smooth functions, that the total binding energy, E(Z), of Z noninteracting Fermions in the potential well Z 4/3 V(Z 1/3 X) obeys E(Z) = c TF (V)Z 7/3 + O(Z 5/3 ) as Z → ∞. Here c TF (V) is the coefficient predicted by Thomas-Fermi theory. This result is consistent with the conjectured Scott correction, which occurs at order Z 2 , to the total binding energy of an atomic number Z. This correction is thought to arise only because V(x)∼ - |x| -1 near x = 0 in the atomic problem, and so V is not a smooth function

  15. Measurement of shape and deformation of insect wing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Duo; Wei, Zhen; Wang, Zeyu; Zhou, Changqiu

    2018-01-01

    To measure the shape and deformation of an insect wing, a scanning setup adopting laser triangulation and image matching was developed. Only one industry camera with two light sources was employed to scan the transparent insect wings. 3D shape and point to point full field deformation of the wings could be obtained even when the wingspan is less than 3 mm. The venation and corrugation could be significantly identified from the results. The deformation of the wing under pin loading could be seen clearly from the results as well. Calibration shows that the shape and deformation measurement accuracies are no lower than 0.01 mm. Laser triangulation and image matching were combined dexterously to adapt wings' complex shape, size, and transparency. It is suitable for insect flight research or flapping wing micro-air vehicle development.

  16. Modeling and Optimization for Morphing Wing Concept Generation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skillen, Michael D.; Crossley, William A.

    2007-01-01

    This report consists of two major parts: 1) the approach to develop morphing wing weight equations, and 2) the approach to size morphing aircraft. Combined, these techniques allow the morphing aircraft to be sized with estimates of the morphing wing weight that are more credible than estimates currently available; aircraft sizing results prior to this study incorporated morphing wing weight estimates based on general heuristics for fixed-wing flaps (a comparable "morphing" component) but, in general, these results were unsubstantiated. This report will show that the method of morphing wing weight prediction does, in fact, drive the aircraft sizing code to different results and that accurate morphing wing weight estimates are essential to credible aircraft sizing results.

  17. Multi-wing hyperchaotic attractors from coupled Lorenz systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grassi, Giuseppe; Severance, Frank L.; Miller, Damon A.

    2009-01-01

    This paper illustrates an approach to generate multi-wing attractors in coupled Lorenz systems. In particular, novel four-wing (eight-wing) hyperchaotic attractors are generated by coupling two (three) identical Lorenz systems. The paper shows that the equilibria of the proposed systems have certain symmetries with respect to specific coordinate planes and the eigenvalues of the associated Jacobian matrices exhibit the property of similarity. In analogy with the original Lorenz system, where the two-wings of the butterfly attractor are located around the two equilibria with the unstable pair of complex-conjugate eigenvalues, this paper shows that the four-wings (eight-wings) of these attractors are located around the four (eight) equilibria with two (three) pairs of unstable complex-conjugate eigenvalues.

  18. Patterning of a compound eye on an extinct dipteran wing

    OpenAIRE

    Dinwiddie, April; Rachootin, Stan

    2010-01-01

    We have discovered unexpected similarities between a novel and characteristic wing organ in an extinct biting midge from Baltic amber, Eohelea petrunkevitchi, and the surface of a dipteran's compound eye. Scanning electron microscope images now reveal vestigial mechanoreceptors between the facets of the organ. We interpret Eohelea's wing organ as the blending of these two developmental systems: the formation and patterning of the cuticle in the eye and of the wing.

  19. Reactive Flow Control of Delta Wing Vortex (Postprint)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-08-01

    wing aircraft. A substantial amount of research has been dedicated to the control of aerodynamic flows using both passive and active control mechanisms...Passive vortex control devices such as vortex generators and winglets attach to the wing and require no energy input. Passive vortex control...leading edges is also effective for changing the aerodynamic characteristics of delta wings [2] [3]. Gutmark and Guillot [5] proposed controlling

  20. PEGIDA : fearful patriots or right-wing radicals?

    OpenAIRE

    Glasmeier, Ruth Katharina

    2016-01-01

    Right-wing movements have become more popular in recent years. This shows in the increase of right-wing populist or right-wing radical parties in different European governments. Despite this European wide trend, Germany did not have a successful right-wing movement. This changed with the creation of PEGIDA and the AfD. Since this type of movement is relatively new in Germany, this thesis aims to understand PEGIDA. The thesis aims to answer the question of Who are PEGIDA? To do so, it will...

  1. Functional Gustatory Role of Chemoreceptors in Drosophila Wings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raad, Hussein; Ferveur, Jean-François; Ledger, Neil; Capovilla, Maria; Robichon, Alain

    2016-05-17

    Neuroanatomical evidence argues for the presence of taste sensilla in Drosophila wings; however, the taste physiology of insect wings remains hypothetical, and a comprehensive link to mechanical functions, such as flight, wing flapping, and grooming, is lacking. Our data show that the sensilla of the Drosophila anterior wing margin respond to both sweet and bitter molecules through an increase in cytosolic Ca(2+) levels. Conversely, genetically modified flies presenting a wing-specific reduction in chemosensory cells show severe defects in both wing taste signaling and the exploratory guidance associated with chemodetection. In Drosophila, the chemodetection machinery includes mechanical grooming, which facilitates the contact between tastants and wing chemoreceptors, and the vibrations of flapping wings that nebulize volatile molecules as carboxylic acids. Together, these data demonstrate that the Drosophila wing chemosensory sensilla are a functional taste organ and that they may have a role in the exploration of ecological niches. Copyright © 2016 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. A análise de redes na sociologia e nos estudos sobre grupos econômicos: entrevista com John Scott

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodolfo Palazzo Dias

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Com o objetivo de tornar mais acessível ao público brasileiro a área de Análise de Redes Sociais (ARS, Em Tese realizou uma entrevista com Jonh Scott, renomado autor dessa área.

  3. Runoff Variability in the Scott River (SW Spitsbergen in Summer Seasons 2012–2013 in Comparison with the Period 1986–2009

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Franczak Łukasz

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available River runoff variability in the Scott River catchment in the summer seasons 2012 and 2013 has been presented in comparison to the multiannual river runoff in 1986–2009. Both in particular seasons and in the analysed multiannual, high variability of discharge rate was recorded. In the research periods 2012–2013, a total of 11 952 water stages and 20 flow rates were measured in the analysed cross-section for the determination of 83 daylong discharges. The mean multiannual discharge of the Scott River amounted to 0.96 m3·s−1. The value corresponds to a specific runoff of 94.6 dm3·s−1·km2, and the runoff layer 937 mm. The maximum values of daily discharge amounted to 5.07 m3·s−1, and the minimum values to 0.002 m3·s−1. The highest runoff occurs in the second and third decade of July, and in the first and second decade of August. The regime of the river is determined by a group of factors, and particularly meteorological conditions affecting the intensity of ablation, and consequently river runoff volume. We found a significant correlation (0.60 in 2012 and 0.67 in 2013 between the air temperature and the Scott River discharge related to the Scott Glacier ice melt.

  4. The Third Turn toward the Social: Nancy Welch's "Living Room," Tony Scott's "Dangerous Writing," and Rhetoric and Composition's Turn toward Grassroots Political Activism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinney, Kelly; Girshin, Thomas; Bowlin, Barrett

    2013-01-01

    This review essay examines recent texts by Nancy Welch and Tony Scott, both of which use embodied activism as a starting point for their inquiries. Taken together, these works point to a distinct shift in composition studies' turn toward the social, one that calls on workers both within and outside the academy to actively engage in grassroots…

  5. Demonstration of an in situ morphing hyperelliptical cambered span wing mechanism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Manzo, Justin; Garcia, Ephrahim

    2010-01-01

    Research on efficient shore bird morphology inspired the hyperelliptical cambered span (HECS) wing, a crescent-shaped, aft-swept wing with vertically oriented wingtips. The wing reduces vorticity-induced circulation loss and outperforms an elliptical baseline when planar. Designed initially as a rigid wing, the HECS wing makes use of morphing to transition from a planar to a furled configuration, similar to that of a continuously curved winglet, in flight. A morphing wing concept mechanism is presented, employing shape memory alloy actuators to create a discretized curvature approximation. The aerodynamics for continuous wing shapes is validated quasi-statically through wind tunnel testing, showing enhanced planar HECS wing lift-to-drag performance over an elliptical wing, with the furled HECS wing showing minimal enhancements beyond this point. Wind tunnel tests of the active morphing wing prove the mechanism capable of overcoming realistic loading, while further testing may be required to establish aerodynamic merits of the HECS wing morphing maneuver

  6. Biomechanics of smart wings in a bat robot: morphing wings using SMA actuators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Colorado, J; Barrientos, A; Rossi, C; Breuer, K S

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents the design of a bat-like micro aerial vehicle with actuated morphing wings. NiTi shape memory alloys (SMAs) acting as artificial biceps and triceps muscles are used for mimicking the morphing wing mechanism of the bat flight apparatus. Our objective is twofold. Firstly, we have implemented a control architecture that allows an accurate and fast SMA actuation. This control makes use of the electrical resistance measurements of SMAs to adjust morphing wing motions. Secondly, the feasibility of using SMA actuation technology is evaluated for the application at hand. To this purpose, experiments are conducted to analyze the control performance in terms of nominal and overloaded operation modes of the SMAs. This analysis includes: (i) inertial forces regarding the stretchable wing membrane and aerodynamic loads, and (ii) uncertainties due to impact of airflow conditions over the resistance–motion relationship of SMAs. With the proposed control, morphing actuation speed can be increased up to 2.5 Hz, being sufficient to generate lift forces at a cruising speed of 5 m s −1 . (paper)

  7. Conical Euler solution for a highly-swept delta wing undergoing wing-rock motion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Elizabeth M.; Batina, John T.

    1990-01-01

    Modifications to an unsteady conical Euler code for the free-to-roll analysis of highly-swept delta wings are described. The modifications involve the addition of the rolling rigid-body equation of motion for its simultaneous time-integration with the governing flow equations. The flow solver utilized in the Euler code includes a multistage Runge-Kutta time-stepping scheme which uses a finite-volume spatial discretization on an unstructured mesh made up of triangles. Steady and unsteady results are presented for a 75 deg swept delta wing at a freestream Mach number of 1.2 and an angle of attack of 30 deg. The unsteady results consist of forced harmonic and free-to-roll calculations. The free-to-roll case exhibits a wing rock response produced by unsteady aerodynamics consistent with the aerodynamics of the forced harmonic results. Similarities are shown with a wing-rock time history from a low-speed wind tunnel test.

  8. On the Distinct Effects of Left-Wing and Right-Wing Populism on Democratic Quality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert A. Huber

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available This study examines the differences and commonalities of how populist parties of the left and right relate to democracy. The focus is narrowed to the relationship between these parties and two aspects of democratic quality, minority rights and mutual constraints. Our argument is twofold: first, we contend that populist parties can exert distinct influences on minority rights, depending on whether they are left-wing or right-wing populist parties. Second, by contrast, we propose that the association between populist parties and mutual constraints is a consequence of the populist element and thus, we expect no differences between the left-wing and right-wing parties. We test our expectations against data from 30 European countries between 1990 and 2012. Our empirical findings support the argument for the proposed differences regarding minority rights and, to a lesser extent, the proposed similarities regarding mutual constraints. Therefore we conclude that, when examining the relationship between populism and democracy, populism should not be considered in isolation from its host ideology.

  9. Unsteady surface pressure measurements on a slender delta wing undergoing limit cycle wing rock

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arena, Andrew S., Jr.; Nelson, Robert C.

    1991-01-01

    An experimental investigation of slender wing limit cycle motion known as wing rock was investigated using two unique experimental systems. Dynamic roll moment measurements and visualization data on the leading edge vortices were obtained using a free to roll apparatus that incorporates an airbearing spindle. In addition, both static and unsteady surface pressure data was measured on the top and bottom surfaces of the model. To obtain the unsteady surface pressure data a new computer controller drive system was developed to accurately reproduce the free to roll time history motions. The data from these experiments include, roll angle time histories, vortex trajectory data on the position of the vortices relative to the model's surface, and surface pressure measurements as a function of roll angle when the model is stationary or undergoing a wing rock motion. The roll time history data was numerically differentiated to determine the dynamic roll moment coefficient. An analysis of these data revealed that the primary mechanism for the limit cycle behavior was a time lag in the position of the vortices normal to the wing surface.

  10. Biomechanics of smart wings in a bat robot: morphing wings using SMA actuators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colorado, J; Barrientos, A; Rossi, C; Bahlman, J W; Breuer, K S

    2012-09-01

    This paper presents the design of a bat-like micro aerial vehicle with actuated morphing wings. NiTi shape memory alloys (SMAs) acting as artificial biceps and triceps muscles are used for mimicking the morphing wing mechanism of the bat flight apparatus. Our objective is twofold. Firstly, we have implemented a control architecture that allows an accurate and fast SMA actuation. This control makes use of the electrical resistance measurements of SMAs to adjust morphing wing motions. Secondly, the feasibility of using SMA actuation technology is evaluated for the application at hand. To this purpose, experiments are conducted to analyze the control performance in terms of nominal and overloaded operation modes of the SMAs. This analysis includes: (i) inertial forces regarding the stretchable wing membrane and aerodynamic loads, and (ii) uncertainties due to impact of airflow conditions over the resistance-motion relationship of SMAs. With the proposed control, morphing actuation speed can be increased up to 2.5 Hz, being sufficient to generate lift forces at a cruising speed of 5 m s(-1).

  11. SUPERDENSE MASSIVE GALAXIES IN WINGS LOCAL CLUSTERS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Valentinuzzi, T.; D'Onofrio, M.; Fritz, J.; Poggianti, B. M.; Bettoni, D.; Fasano, G.; Moretti, A.; Omizzolo, A.; Varela, J.; Cava, A.; Couch, W. J.; Dressler, A.; Moles, M.; Kjaergaard, P.; Vanzella, E.

    2010-01-01

    Massive quiescent galaxies at z > 1 have been found to have small physical sizes, and hence to be superdense. Several mechanisms, including minor mergers, have been proposed for increasing galaxy sizes from high- to low-z. We search for superdense massive galaxies in the WIde-field Nearby Galaxy-cluster Survey (WINGS) of X-ray selected galaxy clusters at 0.04 10 M sun , are mostly S0 galaxies, have a median effective radius (R e ) = 1.61 ± 0.29 kpc, a median Sersic index (n) = 3.0 ± 0.6, and very old stellar populations with a median mass-weighted age of 12.1 ± 1.3 Gyr. We calculate a number density of 2.9 x 10 -2 Mpc -3 for superdense galaxies in local clusters, and a hard lower limit of 1.3 x 10 -5 Mpc -3 in the whole comoving volume between z = 0.04 and z = 0.07. We find a relation between mass, effective radius, and luminosity-weighted age in our cluster galaxies, which can mimic the claimed evolution of the radius with redshift, if not properly taken into account. We compare our data with spectroscopic high-z surveys and find that-when stellar masses are considered-there is consistency with the local WINGS galaxy sizes out to z ∼ 2, while a discrepancy of a factor of 3 exists with the only spectroscopic z > 2 study. In contrast, there is strong evidence for a large evolution in radius for the most massive galaxies with M * > 4 x 10 11 M sun compared to similarly massive galaxies in WINGS, i.e., the brightest cluster galaxies.

  12. Optimization of composite tiltrotor wings with extensions and winglets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kambampati, Sandilya

    Tiltrotors suffer from an aeroelastic instability during forward flight called whirl flutter. Whirl flutter is caused by the whirling motion of the rotor, characterized by highly coupled wing-rotor-pylon modes of vibration. Whirl flutter is a major obstacle for tiltrotors in achieving high-speed flight. The conventional approach to assure adequate whirl flutter stability margins for tiltrotors is to design the wings with high torsional stiffness, typically using 23% thickness-to-chord ratio wings. However, the large aerodynamic drag associated with these high thickness-to-chord ratio wings decreases aerodynamic efficiency and increases fuel consumption. Wingtip devices such as wing extensions and winglets have the potential to increase the whirl flutter characteristics and the aerodynamic efficiency of a tiltrotor. However, wing-tip devices can add more weight to the aircraft. In this study, multi-objective parametric and optimization methodologies for tiltrotor aircraft with wing extensions and winglets are investigated. The objectives are to maximize aircraft aerodynamic efficiency while minimizing weight penalty due to extensions and winglets, subject to whirl flutter constraints. An aeroelastic model that predicts the whirl flutter speed and a wing structural model that computes strength and weight of a composite wing are developed. An existing aerodynamic model (that predicts the aerodynamic efficiency) is merged with the developed structural and aeroelastic models for the purpose of conducting parametric and optimization studies. The variables of interest are the wing thickness and structural properties, and extension and winglet planform variables. The Bell XV-15 tiltrotor aircraft the chosen as the parent aircraft for this study. Parametric studies reveal that a wing extension of span 25% of the inboard wing increases the whirl flutter speed by 10% and also increases the aircraft aerodynamic efficiency by 8%. Structurally tapering the wing of a tiltrotor

  13. Folding in and out: passive morphing in flapping wings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stowers, Amanda K; Lentink, David

    2015-03-25

    We present a new mechanism for passive wing morphing of flapping wings inspired by bat and bird wing morphology. The mechanism consists of an unactuated hand wing connected to the arm wing with a wrist joint. Flapping motion generates centrifugal accelerations in the hand wing, forcing it to unfold passively. Using a robotic model in hover, we made kinematic measurements of unfolding kinematics as functions of the non-dimensional wingspan fold ratio (2-2.5) and flapping frequency (5-17 Hz) using stereo high-speed cameras. We find that the wings unfold passively within one to two flaps and remain unfolded with only small amplitude oscillations. To better understand the passive dynamics, we constructed a computer model of the unfolding process based on rigid body dynamics, contact models, and aerodynamic correlations. This model predicts the measured passive unfolding within about one flap and shows that unfolding is driven by centrifugal acceleration induced by flapping. The simulations also predict that relative unfolding time only weakly depends on flapping frequency and can be reduced to less than half a wingbeat by increasing flapping amplitude. Subsequent dimensional analysis shows that the time required to unfold passively is of the same order of magnitude as the flapping period. This suggests that centrifugal acceleration can drive passive unfolding within approximately one wingbeat in small and large wings. Finally, we show experimentally that passive unfolding wings can withstand impact with a branch, by first folding and then unfolding passively. This mechanism enables flapping robots to squeeze through clutter without sophisticated control. Passive unfolding also provides a new avenue in morphing wing design that makes future flapping morphing wings possibly more energy efficient and light-weight. Simultaneously these results point to possible inertia driven, and therefore metabolically efficient, control strategies in bats and birds to morph or recover

  14. Video change detection for fixed wing UAVs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartelsen, Jan; Müller, Thomas; Ring, Jochen; Mück, Klaus; Brüstle, Stefan; Erdnüß, Bastian; Lutz, Bastian; Herbst, Theresa

    2017-10-01

    In this paper we proceed the work of Bartelsen et al.1 We present the draft of a process chain for an image based change detection which is designed for videos acquired by fixed wing unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs). From our point of view, automatic video change detection for aerial images can be useful to recognize functional activities which are typically caused by the deployment of improvised explosive devices (IEDs), e.g. excavations, skid marks, footprints, left-behind tooling equipment, and marker stones. Furthermore, in case of natural disasters, like flooding, imminent danger can be recognized quickly. Due to the necessary flight range, we concentrate on fixed wing UAVs. Automatic change detection can be reduced to a comparatively simple photogrammetric problem when the perspective change between the "before" and "after" image sets is kept as small as possible. Therefore, the aerial image acquisition demands a mission planning with a clear purpose including flight path and sensor configuration. While the latter can be enabled simply by a fixed and meaningful adjustment of the camera, ensuring a small perspective change for "before" and "after" videos acquired by fixed wing UAVs is a challenging problem. Concerning this matter, we have performed tests with an advanced commercial off the shelf (COTS) system which comprises a differential GPS and autopilot system estimating the repetition accuracy of its trajectory. Although several similar approaches have been presented,23 as far as we are able to judge, the limits for this important issue are not estimated so far. Furthermore, we design a process chain to enable the practical utilization of video change detection. It consists of a front-end of a database to handle large amounts of video data, an image processing and change detection implementation, and the visualization of the results. We apply our process chain on the real video data acquired by the advanced COTS fixed wing UAV and synthetic data. For the

  15. How wing kinematics affect power requirements and aerodynamic force production in a robotic bat wing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bahlman, Joseph W; Swartz, Sharon M; Breuer, Kenneth S

    2014-01-01

    Bats display a wide variety of behaviors that require different amounts of aerodynamic force. To control and modulate aerodynamic force, bats change wing kinematics, which, in turn, may change the power required for wing motion. There are many kinematic mechanisms that bats, and other flapping animals, can use to increase aerodynamic force, e.g. increasing wingbeat frequency or amplitude. However, we do not know if there is a difference in energetic cost between these different kinematic mechanisms. To assess the relationship between mechanical power input and aerodynamic force output across different isolated kinematic parameters, we programmed a robotic bat wing to flap over a range of kinematic parameters and measured aerodynamic force and mechanical power. We systematically varied five kinematic parameters: wingbeat frequency, wingbeat amplitude, stroke plane angle, downstroke ratio, and wing folding. Kinematic values were based on observed values from free flying Cynopterus brachyotis, the species on which the robot was based. We describe how lift, thrust, and power change with increases in each kinematic variable. We compare the power costs associated with generating additional force through the four kinematic mechanisms controlled at the shoulder, and show that all four mechanisms require approximately the same power to generate a given force. This result suggests that no single parameter offers an energetic advantage over the others. Finally, we show that retracting the wing during upstroke reduces power requirements for flapping and increases net lift production, but decreases net thrust production. These results compare well with studies performed on C. brachyotis, offering insight into natural flight kinematics. (paper)

  16. Variable Geometry Aircraft Wing Supported by Struts And/Or Trusses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melton, John E. (Inventor); Dudley, Michael R. (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    The present invention provides an aircraft having variable airframe geometry for accommodating efficient flight. The aircraft includes an elongated fuselage, an oblique wing pivotally connected with said fuselage, a wing pivoting mechanism connected with said oblique wing and said fuselage, and a brace operably connected between said oblique wing and said fuselage. The present invention also provides an aircraft having an elongated fuselage, an oblique wing pivotally connected with said fuselage, a wing pivoting mechanism connected with said oblique wing and said fuselage, a propulsion system pivotally connected with said oblique wing, and a brace operably connected between said propulsion system and said fuselage.

  17. Numerical simulation of X-wing type biplane flapping wings in 3D using the immersed boundary method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tay, W B; Van Oudheusden, B W; Bijl, H

    2014-01-01

    The numerical simulation of an insect-sized ‘X-wing’ type biplane flapping wing configuration is performed in 3D using an immersed boundary method solver at Reynolds numbers equal to 1000 (1 k) and 5 k, based on the wing's root chord length. This X-wing type flapping configuration draws its inspiration from Delfly, a bio-inspired ornithopter MAV which has two pairs of wings flapping in anti-phase in a biplane configuration. The objective of the present investigation is to assess the aerodynamic performance when the original Delfly flapping wing micro-aerial vehicle (FMAV) is reduced to the size of an insect. Results show that the X-wing configuration gives more than twice the average thrust compared with only flapping the upper pair of wings of the X-wing. However, the X-wing's average thrust is only 40% that of the upper wing flapping at twice the stroke angle. Despite this, the increased stability which results from the smaller lift and moment variation of the X-wing configuration makes it more suited for sharp image capture and recognition. These advantages make the X-wing configuration an attractive alternative design for insect-sized FMAVS compared to the single wing configuration. In the Reynolds number comparison, the vorticity iso-surface plot at a Reynolds number of 5 k revealed smaller, finer vortical structures compared to the simulation at 1 k, due to vortices’ breakup. In comparison, the force output difference is much smaller between Re = 1 k and 5 k. Increasing the body inclination angle generates a uniform leading edge vortex instead of a conical one along the wingspan, giving higher lift. Understanding the force variation as the body inclination angle increases will allow FMAV designers to optimize the thrust and lift ratio for higher efficiency under different operational requirements. Lastly, increasing the spanwise flexibility of the wings increases the thrust slightly but decreases the efficiency. The thrust result is similar

  18. Use of wing morphometry for the discrimination of some Cerceris ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The outline analysis, in which geometric and traditional morphometry potentials are insufficient, was performed by using the Fourier transformation. As a result of the comprehensive wing morphometry study, it was found that both Cerceris species can be distinguished according to their wing structures and the metric ...

  19. Unsteady Aerodynamics of Flapping Wing of a Bird

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Agoes Moelyadi

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The unsteady flow behavior and time-dependent aerodynamic characteristics of the flapping motion of a bird’s wing were investigated using a computational method. During flapping, aerodynamic interactions between bird wing surfaces and surrounding flow may occur, generating local time-dependent flow changes in the flow field and aerodynamic load of birds. To study the effect of flapping speed on unsteady aerodynamic load, two kinds of computational simulations were carried out, namely a quasi-steady and an unsteady simulation. To mimic the movement of the down-stroke and the upstroke of a bird, the flapping path accorded to a sinus function, with the wing attitude changing in dihedral angle and time. The computations of time-dependent viscous flow were based on the solution of the Reynolds Averaged Navier-Stokes equations by applying the k-e turbulence model. In addition, the discretization for the computational domain around the model used multi-block structured grid to provide more accuracy in capturing viscous flow, especially in the vicinity of the wing and body surfaces, to obtain a proper wing-body geometry model. For this research, the seagull bird was chosen, which has high aspect ratio wings with pointed wing-tips and a high camber wing section. The results include mesh movement, velocity contours as well as aerodynamic coefficients of the flapping motion of the bird at various flapping frequencies.

  20. Closed-type wing for drones: positive and negative characteristics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leonid I. Gretchihin

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents the aerodynamics of a wing of a closed oval ellipsoidal shape, designed with the use of the molecular-kinetic theory. The positive and negative characteristics of aircraft - drones with an oval wing are described. The theoretical calculations have been experimentally checked.

  1. Flapping-wing mechanical butterfly on a wheel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godoy-Diana, Ramiro; Thiria, Benjamin; Pradal, Daniel

    2009-11-01

    We examine the propulsive performance of a flapping-wing device turning on a ``merry-go-round'' type base. The two-wing flapper is attached to a mast that is ball-bearing mounted to a central shaft in such a way that the thrust force produced by the wings makes the flapper turn around this shaft. The oscillating lift force produced by the flapping wings is aligned with the mast to avoid vibration of the system. A turning contact allows to power the motor that drives the wings. We measure power consumption and cruising speed as a function of flapping frequency and amplitude as well as wing flexibility. The design of the wings permits to change independently their flexibility in the span-wise and chord-wise directions and PIV measurements in various planes let us examine the vorticity field around the device. A complete study of the effect of wing flexibility on the propulsive performance of the system will be presented at the conference.

  2. Stable structural color patterns displayed on transparent insect wings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shevtsova, Ekaterina; Hansson, Christer; Janzen, Daniel H; Kjærandsen, Jostein

    2011-01-11

    Color patterns play central roles in the behavior of insects, and are important traits for taxonomic studies. Here we report striking and stable structural color patterns--wing interference patterns (WIPs)--in the transparent wings of small Hymenoptera and Diptera, patterns that have been largely overlooked by biologists. These extremely thin wings reflect vivid color patterns caused by thin film interference. The visibility of these patterns is affected by the way the insects display their wings against various backgrounds with different light properties. The specific color sequence displayed lacks pure red and matches the color vision of most insects, strongly suggesting that the biological significance of WIPs lies in visual signaling. Taxon-specific color patterns are formed by uneven membrane thickness, pigmentation, venation, and hair placement. The optically refracted pattern is also stabilized by microstructures of the wing such as membrane corrugations and spherical cell structures that reinforce the pattern and make it essentially noniridescent over a large range of light incidences. WIPs can be applied to map the micromorphology of wings through direct observation and are useful in several fields of biology. We demonstrate their usefulness as identification patterns to solve cases of cryptic species complexes in tiny parasitic wasps, and indicate their potentials for research on the genetic control of wing development through direct links between the transregulatory wing landscape and interference patterns we observe in Drosophila model species. Some species display sexually dimorphic WIPs, suggesting sexual selection as one of the driving forces for their evolution.

  3. Gliding Swifts Attain Laminar Flow over Rough Wings

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lentink, D.; Kat, de R.

    2014-01-01

    Swifts are among the most aerodynamically refined gliding birds. However, the overlapping vanes and protruding shafts of their primary feathers make swift wings remarkably rough for their size. Wing roughness height is 1–2% of chord length on the upper surface—10,000 times rougher than sailplane

  4. Non-linear dynamics of wind turbine wings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Jesper Winther; Nielsen, Søren R.K.

    2006-01-01

    The paper deals with the formulation of non-linear vibrations of a wind turbine wing described in a wing fixed moving coordinate system. The considered structural model is a Bernoulli-Euler beam with due consideration to axial twist. The theory includes geometrical non-linearities induced...

  5. Energy-based Aeroelastic Analysis and Optimisation of Morphing Wings

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Breuker, R.

    2011-01-01

    Morphing aircraft can change their shape radically when confronted with a variety of conflicting flight conditions throughout their mission. For instance the F-14 Tomcat fighter aircraft, known from the movie Top Gun, was able to sweep its wings from a straight wing configuration to a highly swept

  6. Aerodynamic tailoring of the Learjet Model 60 wing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandrasekharan, Reuben M.; Hawke, Veronica M.; Hinson, Michael L.; Kennelly, Robert A., Jr.; Madson, Michael D.

    1993-01-01

    The wing of the Learjet Model 60 was tailored for improved aerodynamic characteristics using the TRANAIR transonic full-potential computational fluid dynamics (CFD) code. A root leading edge glove and wing tip fairing were shaped to reduce shock strength, improve cruise drag and extend the buffet limit. The aerodynamic design was validated by wind tunnel test and flight test data.

  7. Wing flexibility effects in clap-and-fling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Percin, M.; Hu, Y.; Van Oudheusden, B.W.; Remes, B.; Scarano, F.

    2011-01-01

    The work explores the use of time-resolved tomographic PIV measurements to study a flapping-wing model, the related vortex generation mechanisms and the effect of wing flexibility on the clap-and-fling movement in particular. An experimental setup is designed and realized in a water tank by use of a

  8. Vortex coupling in trailing vortex-wing interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, C.; Wang, Z.; Gursul, I.

    2018-03-01

    The interaction of trailing vortices of an upstream wing with rigid and flexible downstream wings has been investigated experimentally in a wind tunnel, using particle image velocimetry, hot-wire, force, and deformation measurements. Counter-rotating upstream vortices exhibit increased meandering when they are close to the tip of the downstream wing. The upstream vortex forms a pair with the vortex shed from the downstream wing and then exhibits large displacements around the wing tip. This coupled motion of the pair has been found to cause large lift fluctuations on the downstream wing. The meandering of the vortex pair occurs at the natural meandering frequency of the isolated vortex, with a low Strouhal number, and is not affected by the frequency of the large-amplitude wing oscillations if the downstream wing is flexible. The displacement of the leading vortex is larger than that of the trailing vortex; however, it causes highly correlated variations of the core radius, core vorticity, and circulation of the trailing vortex with the coupled meandering motion. In contrast, co-rotating vortices do not exhibit any increased meandering.

  9. Mixed ice accretion on aircraft wings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janjua, Zaid A.; Turnbull, Barbara; Hibberd, Stephen; Choi, Kwing-So

    2018-02-01

    Ice accretion is a problematic natural phenomenon that affects a wide range of engineering applications including power cables, radio masts, and wind turbines. Accretion on aircraft wings occurs when supercooled water droplets freeze instantaneously on impact to form rime ice or runback as water along the wing to form glaze ice. Most models to date have ignored the accretion of mixed ice, which is a combination of rime and glaze. A parameter we term the "freezing fraction" is defined as the fraction of a supercooled droplet that freezes on impact with the top surface of the accretion ice to explore the concept of mixed ice accretion. Additionally we consider different "packing densities" of rime ice, mimicking the different bulk rime densities observed in nature. Ice accretion is considered in four stages: rime, primary mixed, secondary mixed, and glaze ice. Predictions match with existing models and experimental data in the limiting rime and glaze cases. The mixed ice formulation however provides additional insight into the composition of the overall ice structure, which ultimately influences adhesion and ice thickness, and shows that for similar atmospheric parameter ranges, this simple mixed ice description leads to very different accretion rates. A simple one-dimensional energy balance was solved to show how this freezing fraction parameter increases with decrease in atmospheric temperature, with lower freezing fraction promoting glaze ice accretion.

  10. New aeroelastic studies for a morphing wing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruxandra Mihaela BOTEZ*

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available For this study, the upper surface of a rectangular finite aspect ratio wing, with a laminar airfoil cross-section, was made of a carbon-Kevlar composite material flexible skin. This flexible skin was morphed by use of Shape Memory Alloy actuators for 35 test cases characterized by combinations of Mach numbers, Reynolds numbers and angles of attack. The Mach numbers varied from 0.2 to 0.3 and the angles of attack ranged between -1° and 2°. The optimized airfoils were determined by use of the CFD XFoil code. The purpose of this aeroelastic study was to determine the flutter conditions to be avoided during wind tunnel tests. These studies show that aeroelastic instabilities for the morphing configurations considered appeared at Mach number 0.55, which was higher than the wind tunnel Mach number limit speed of 0.3. The wind tunnel tests could thus be performed safely in the 6’×9’ wind tunnel at the Institute for Aerospace Research at the National Research Council Canada (IAR/NRC, where the new aeroelastic studies, applied on morphing wings, were validated.

  11. Patterning of a compound eye on an extinct dipteran wing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dinwiddie, April; Rachootin, Stan

    2011-04-23

    We have discovered unexpected similarities between a novel and characteristic wing organ in an extinct biting midge from Baltic amber, Eohelea petrunkevitchi, and the surface of a dipteran's compound eye. Scanning electron microscope images now reveal vestigial mechanoreceptors between the facets of the organ. We interpret Eohelea's wing organ as the blending of these two developmental systems: the formation and patterning of the cuticle in the eye and of the wing. Typically, only females in the genus carry this distinctive, highly organized structure. Two species were studied (E. petrunkevitchi and E. sinuosa), and the structure differs in form between them. We examine Eohelea's wing structures for modes of fabrication, material properties and biological functions, and the effective ecological environment in which these midges lived. We argue that the current view of the wing organ's function in stridulation has been misconstrued since it was described half a century ago.

  12. Static aeroelastic behavior of an adaptive laminated piezoelectric composite wing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weisshaar, T. A.; Ehlers, S. M.

    1990-01-01

    The effect of using an adaptive material to modify the static aeroelastic behavior of a uniform wing is examined. The wing structure is idealized as a laminated sandwich structure with piezoelectric layers in the upper and lower skins. A feedback system that senses the wing root loads applies a constant electric field to the piezoelectric actuator. Modification of pure torsional deformaton behavior and pure bending deformation are investigated, as is the case of an anisotropic composite swept wing. The use of piezoelectric actuators to create an adaptive structure is found to alter static aeroelastic behavior in that the proper choice of the feedback gain can increase or decrease the aeroelastic divergence speed. This concept also may be used to actively change the lift effectiveness of a wing. The ability to modify static aeroelastic behavior is limited by physical limitations of the piezoelectric material and the manner in which it is integrated into the parent structure.

  13. Experimental Investigation of a Wing-in-Ground Effect Craft

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Mobassher Tofa

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The aerodynamic characteristics of the wing-in-ground effect (WIG craft model that has a noble configuration of a compound wing was experimentally investigated and Universiti Teknologi Malaysia (UTM wind tunnel with and without endplates. Lift and drag forces, pitching moment coefficients, and the centre of pressure were measured with respect to the ground clearance and the wing angle of attack. The ground effect and the existence of the endplates increase the wing lift-to-drag ratio at low ground clearance. The results of this research work show new proposed design of the WIG craft with compound wing and endplates, which can clearly increase the aerodynamic efficiency without compromising the longitudinal stability. The use of WIG craft is representing an ambitious technology that will help in reducing time, effort, and money of the conventional marine transportation in the future.

  14. Experimental investigation of a wing-in-ground effect craft.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tofa, M Mobassher; Maimun, Adi; Ahmed, Yasser M; Jamei, Saeed; Priyanto, Agoes; Rahimuddin

    2014-01-01

    The aerodynamic characteristics of the wing-in-ground effect (WIG) craft model that has a noble configuration of a compound wing was experimentally investigated and Universiti Teknologi Malaysia (UTM) wind tunnel with and without endplates. Lift and drag forces, pitching moment coefficients, and the centre of pressure were measured with respect to the ground clearance and the wing angle of attack. The ground effect and the existence of the endplates increase the wing lift-to-drag ratio at low ground clearance. The results of this research work show new proposed design of the WIG craft with compound wing and endplates, which can clearly increase the aerodynamic efficiency without compromising the longitudinal stability. The use of WIG craft is representing an ambitious technology that will help in reducing time, effort, and money of the conventional marine transportation in the future.

  15. Numerical study on aerodynamics of banked wing in ground effect

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qing Jia

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Unlike conventional airplane, a WIG craft experiences righting moment and adverse yaw moment in banked turning in ground effect. Numerical simulations are carried out to study the aerodynamics of banked wing in ground effect. Configurations of rectangular wing and delta wing are considered, and performance of endplates and ailerons during banking are also studied. The study shows that righting moment increase nonlinearly with heeling angle, and endplates enhance the righting. The asymmetric aerodynamic distribution along span of wing with heeling angle introduces adverse yaw moment. Heeling in ground effect with small ground clearance increases the vertical aerodynamic force and makes WIG craft climb. Deflections of ailerons introduce lift decrease and a light pitching motion. Delta wing shows advantage in banked turning for smaller righting moment and adverse yaw moment during banking.

  16. Formation of broad Balmer wings in symbiotic stars

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang, Seok-Jun; Heo, Jeong-Eun; Hong, Chae-Lin; Lee, Hee-Won

    2016-01-01

    Symbiotic stars are binary systems composed of a hot white dwarf and a mass losing giant. In addition to many prominent emission lines symbiotic stars exhibit Raman scattered O VI features at 6825 and 7088 Å. Another notable feature present in the spectra of many symbiotics is the broad wings around Balmer lines. Astrophysical mechanisms that can produce broad wings include Thomson scattering by free electrons and Raman scattering of Ly,β and higher series by neutral hydrogen. In this poster presentation we produce broad wings around Hα and H,β adopting a Monte Carlo techinique in order to make a quantitative comparison of these two mechanisms. Thomson wings are characterized by the exponential cutoff given by the termal width whereas the Raman wings are dependent on the column density and continuum shape in the far UV region. A brief discussion is provided. (paper)

  17. 7(th) International Immunoglobulin Conference: Poster presentations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warnatz, K; Ballow, M; Stangel, M; Bril, V

    2014-12-01

    Immunoglobulin (Ig) therapy is the mainstay of treatment for primary antibody deficiency disorders and has proved to be efficacious in specific autoimmune and inflammatory diseases. Additionally, due to the role of Ig in complement activation, it is being used increasingly in solid organ transplantation. Furthermore, Ig is the primary or secondary treatment in some immune-mediated neuropathies such as chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy (CIDP) or multifocal motor neuropathy (MMN). This session discusses trends of Ig use in Europe, proposed mechanisms of action, adverse effects and the potential role of Ig therapy in transplantation. Dr Šedivá reported that Ig therapy is available in all European countries, although dosing is not always optimal, due partly to reimbursement plans. Subcutaneous immunoglobulin (SCIg) has become increasingly accessible in recent years; however, the chosen route of administration still varies widely between countries. Dr Berger's presentation on optimization of Ig therapy in neuropathies, and Dr Rojavin's report on a pharmacometric model to determine the serum IgG levels achieved by different dosing regimens in primary antibody deficiency (PAD) patients, led to the challenging concept of using individualized dosing strategies. Dr Klehmet reported on the potential benefit of using antigen-specific T cell responses as a biomarker of IVIg responsiveness in CIDP patients, while Dr von Gunten provided an insight into the mechanisms of action of Ig preparations, suggesting that the immunoregulatory effects of IgG may be mediated by IgG antibodies against glycans. Dr Basta reported on the potential thrombogenic adverse effects associated with Ig therapy. Although these adverse events are rare, further studies are needed to clarify the relationship between Ig replacement and immunomodulatory therapy and these adverse reactions. In transplantation, Dr Carbone described that prophylactic IVIg treatment was found to decrease the incidence of severe infection in IgG hypogammaglobulinaemia patients undergoing heart transplantations. Furthermore, Dr Clatworthy reported that inactivating polymorphisms in the inhibitory receptor FcγRIIB do not impact upon kidney allograft survival. © 2014 British Society for Immunology.

  18. 7th Symposium on Computational Statistics

    CERN Document Server

    Lauro, N; Rizzi, A

    1986-01-01

    When dealing with the design or with the application of any technical system, which is not quite simple and trivial, one has to face to the problem to determine the allowable de­ viations of the system functions and the optimal vector of system parameter tolerances. The need for the solution of this problem is stimulated with various serious economic and maite­ nance aspects, between them the tendency to reach the minimal production cost, the maximal system operation reliability are the most frequent. Suppose that we are dealing with an system S, consisting of N components represented by the system parame­ ters xi' i = 1, 2 . . . N, which are arranged in certain structu­ re so, that the K, system functions F k' k = 1, 2 . . . IG , expres­ sing the considered system properties, fullfil the condition F-FO~ AF, /1/ \\'Ihere F = l F k} Ie is the set of the actual system functions, FO = lFOk}~ is the set of the nominal system functions and A F = l A F k 1(;. } is the set 0 f the a 11 0 w a b 1 e s emf y s t u ...

  19. 7th ICT Innovations 2015 Conference

    CERN Document Server

    Koceski, Saso

    2016-01-01

    This book offers a collection of selected papers presented at the Seventh International Conference on ICT Innovations held in October 2015, in Ohrid, Macedonia, with main topic Emerging Technologies for Better Living. The conference gathered academics, professionals and industrial practitioners that work on developing the emerging technologies, systems, applications in the industrial and business arena especially innovative commercial implementations, novel application of technology, and experience in applying recent ICT research advances to practical solutions.

  20. 7th International Symposium on Gaseous Dielectrics

    CERN Document Server

    James, David

    1994-01-01

    The Seventh International Symposium on Gaseous Dielectrics was held in Knoxville, Tennessee, U. S. A. , on April 24-28, 1994. The symposium continued the interdisciplinary character and comprehensive approach of the preceding six symposia. Gaseous DielecIries VII is a detailed record of the symposium proceedings. It covers recent advances and developments in a wide range of basic, applied and industrial areas of gaseous dielectrics. It is hoped that Gaseous DielecIries VII will aid future research and development in, and encourage wider industrial use of, gaseous dielectrics. The Organizing Committee of the Seventh International Symposium on Gaseous Dielectrics consisted of G. Addis (U. S. A. ), L. G. Christophorou (U. S. A. ), F. Y. Chu (Canada), A. H. Cookson (U. S. A. ), O. Farish (U. K. ), I. Gallimberti (Italy) , A. Garscadden (U. S. A. ), D. R. James (U. S. A. ), E. Marode (France), T. Nitta (Japan), W. Pfeiffer (Germany), Y. Qiu (China), I. Sauers (U. S. A. ), R. J. Van Brunt (U. S. A. ), and W. Zaengl...

  1. 7th drug hypersensitivity meeting: part one

    OpenAIRE

    Carr, Daniel F.; Chung, Wen-Hung; Jenkiins, Rosalind E.; Chaponda, Mas; Nwikue, Gospel; Cornejo Castro, Elena M.; Antoine, Daniel J.; Pirmohamed, Munir; Wuillemin, Natascha; Dina, Dolores; Eriksson, Klara K.; Yerly, Daniel; Pavlos, Rebecca; Mckinnin, Elizabeth; Ostrov, David

    2016-01-01

    Table of contents Oral Abstracts O1 Functionally distinct HMGB1 isoforms correlate with physiological processes in drug-induced SJS/TEN Daniel F. Carr, Wen-Hung Chung, Rosalind E. Jenkiins, Mas Chaponda, Gospel Nwikue, Elena M. Cornejo Castro, Daniel J. Antoine, Munir Pirmohamed O2 Hypersensitivity reactions to beta-lactams, does the t cell recognition pattern influence the clinical picture? Natascha Wuillemin, Dolores Dina, Klara K. Eriksson, Daniel Yerly O3 Specific binding characteristics ...

  2. 7th International Robotic Sailing Conference

    CERN Document Server

    Tynan, Dermot

    2015-01-01

    An autonomous sailboat robot is a boat that only uses the wind on its sail as the propelling force, without remote control or human assistance to achieve its mission. Robotic sailing offers the potential of long range and long term autonomous wind propelled, solar or wave-powered carbon neutral devices. Robotic sailing devices could contribute to monitoring of environmental, ecological, meteorological, hydrographic and oceanographic data. These devices can also be used in traffic monitoring, border surveillance, security, assistance and rescue. The dependency on changing winds and sea conditions presents a considerable challenge for short and long term route and stability planning, collision avoidance and boat control. Building a robust and seaworthy sailing robot presents a truly complex and multi-disciplinary challenge for boat designers, naval architects, systems/electrical engineers and computer scientists. Over the last decade, several events such as Sailbot, World Robotic Sailing Championship and the In...

  3. 7th International Conference on Sensing Technology

    CERN Document Server

    Mukhopadhyay, Subhas; Jayasundera, Krishanthi

    2015-01-01

    This book contains a collection of selected works stemming from the 2013 International Conference on Sensing Technology (ICST), which was held in Wellington, New Zealand. The purpose of the book is to distill the highlights of the conference, and therefore track the latest developments in sensing technologies. The book contents are broad, since sensors can be applied in many different areas. Therefore the book gives a broad overview of the latest developments, in addition to discussing the process through which researchers go through in order to develop sensors, or related systems, which will become more widespread in the future.The book is written for academic and industry professionals working in the field of sensing, instrumentation and related fields, and is positioned to give a snapshot of the current state of the art in sensing technology, particularly from the applied perspective. 

  4. 7th International Symposium on Ambient Intelligence

    CERN Document Server

    Paz, Juan; Novais, Paulo; Fernández-Caballero, Antonio; Yoe, Hyun; Ramírez, Andres; Villarrubia, Gabriel

    2016-01-01

    Ambient Intelligence (AmI) is a recent paradigm emerging from Artificial Intelligence, where computers are used as proactive tools assisting people with their day-to-day activities, making everyone’s life more comfortable. Another main concern of AmI originates from the human computer interaction domain and focuses on offering ways to interact with systems in a more natural way by means user friendly interfaces. This field is evolving quickly as can be witnessed by the emerging natural language and gesture based types of interaction. The inclusion of computational power and communication technologies in everyday objects is growing and their embedding into our environments should be as invisible as possible. In order for AmI to be successful, human interaction with computing power and embedded systems in the surroundings should be smooth and happen without people actually noticing it. The only awareness people should have arises from AmI: more safety, comfort and wellbeing, emerging in a natural and inherent...

  5. 7th International Workshop on Statistical Simulation

    CERN Document Server

    Mignani, Stefania; Monari, Paola; Salmaso, Luigi

    2014-01-01

    The Department of Statistical Sciences of the University of Bologna in collaboration with the Department of Management and Engineering of the University of Padova, the Department of Statistical Modelling of Saint Petersburg State University, and INFORMS Simulation Society sponsored the Seventh Workshop on Simulation. This international conference was devoted to statistical techniques in stochastic simulation, data collection, analysis of scientific experiments, and studies representing broad areas of interest. The previous workshops took place in St. Petersburg, Russia in 1994, 1996, 1998, 2001, 2005, and 2009. The Seventh Workshop took place in the Rimini Campus of the University of Bologna, which is in Rimini’s historical center.

  6. The 7th European gasification conference

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2006-07-01

    The theme of the conference was 'extending resources for clean energy'. Sessions covered coal gasification, gasification of biomass and waste, hydrogen and CO{sub 2} capture and storage, and development. The poster papers are also included. Selected papers have been abstracted separately on the Coal Abstracts database.

  7. 7th high energy heavy ion study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bock, R.; Gutbrod, H.H.; Stock, R.

    1985-03-01

    These proceedings contain the articles presented at the named conference. They deal with relativistic heavy ion reactions, the expansion and freeze-out of nuclear matter, anomalon experiments, and multifragmentation and particle correlations in heavy ion reactions. See hints under the relevant topics. (HSI)

  8. 7th International Crop Science Congress Announcement

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2016-01-01

    August 14–19,2016 Beijing,China Crop Science—Innovation and SustainabilityInternational Crop Science Congress(ICSC)is a regular forum for crop scientists from around the world to integrate current knowledge into a global context and international applications.The Congress is organized about every four years beginning in July,1992.The International Crop Science Society has primary oversight for general

  9. AFRILEX 7TH International Conference: Abstract

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Riette Ruthven

    glossaries to feed into the national dictionary corpora by using a case-study approach to investigate the processes that ... gaps in a way that may necessarily exclude cultural terms. The provision of .... (The literal translation is that soldiers were ...

  10. Instrumental methods of analysis, 7th edition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Willard, H.H.; Merritt, L.L. Jr.; Dean, J.A.; Settle, F.A. Jr.

    1988-01-01

    The authors have prepared an organized and generally polished product. The book is fashioned to be used as a textbook for an undergraduate instrumental analysis course, a supporting textbook for graduate-level courses, and a general reference work on analytical instrumentation and techniques for professional chemists. Four major areas are emphasized: data collection and processing, spectroscopic instrumentation and methods, liquid and gas chromatographic methods, and electrochemical methods. Analytical instrumentation and methods have been updated, and a thorough citation of pertinent recent literature is included

  11. 7th International Munich Chassis Symposium 2016

    CERN Document Server

    2017-01-01

    In chassis development, the three aspects of safety, vehicle dynamics and ride comfort are at the top of the list of challenges to be faced. Addressing this triad of challenges becomes even more complex when the chassis is required to interact with assistance systems and other systems for fully automated driving. What is more, new demands are created by the introduction of modern electric and electronic architectures. All these requirements must be met by the chassis, together with its subsystems, the steering, brakes, tires and wheels. At the same time, all physical relationships and interactions have to be taken into account. Contents New chassis systems.- New chassis systems and methods.- Simulation.- Vehicle handling optimization and control.- Chassis architectures.- Simulators.- Highly automated driving.- Functional safety.- Brake development methods.- Future brake systems and technologies.- Tire technology and trends.- Components of the chassis.- Steering feel and steer-by-wire.- New requirements and so...

  12. 7th International Conference on General Inequalities

    CERN Document Server

    Everitt, William; Losonczi, Laszlo; Walter, Wolfgang

    1997-01-01

    Inequalities continue to play an essential role in mathematics. The subject is per­ haps the last field that is comprehended and used by mathematicians working in all the areas of the discipline of mathematics. Since the seminal work Inequalities (1934) of Hardy, Littlewood and P6lya mathematicians have laboured to extend and sharpen the earlier classical inequalities. New inequalities are discovered ev­ ery year, some for their intrinsic interest whilst others flow from results obtained in various branches of mathematics. So extensive are these developments that a new mathematical periodical devoted exclusively to inequalities will soon appear; this is the Journal of Inequalities and Applications, to be edited by R. P. Agar­ wal. Nowadays it is difficult to follow all these developments and because of lack of communication between different groups of specialists many results are often rediscovered several times. Surveys of the present state of the art are therefore in­ dispensable not only to mathematici...

  13. 7th International Conference on Sensing Technology

    CERN Document Server

    Mukhopadhyay, Subhas; Jayasundera, Krishanthi

    2015-01-01

    This book is written for academic and industry professionals working in the field of sensing, instrumentation and related fields, and is positioned to give a snapshot of the current state of the art in sensing technology, particularly from the applied perspective. The book is intended to give broad overview of the latest developments, in addition to discussing the process through which researchers go through in order to develop sensors, or related systems, which will become more widespread in the future.

  14. 7th International Conference on Complex Systems

    CERN Document Server

    Braha, Dan; Bar-Yam, Yaneer

    2012-01-01

    The International Conference on Complex Systems (ICCS) creates a unique atmosphere for scientists of all fields, engineers, physicians, executives, and a host of other professionals to explore common themes and applications of complex system science. With this new volume, Unifying Themes in Complex Systems continues to build common ground between the wide-ranging domains of complex system science.

  15. 7th REGENT semi-annual report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schlechtendahl, E.G.

    1975-08-01

    The project REGENT (German acronym for CAD, computer aided design) was started early 1972 by the Institut fuer Reaktorentwicklung. The seventh semi-annual progress report summarizes the results achieved up to March 31, 1975, in particular with respect to the development of the REGENT system nucleus and its application for the first REGENT subsystems. The development of the REGENT nucleus and of a graphical subsystem has become a part of the project CAD since mid 1974. Other subsystems are being developed within the framework of the project PNS (Project Nuclear Safety). (orig.) [de

  16. Preliminary development of a wing in ground effect vehicle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abidin, Razali; Ahamat, Mohamad Asmidzam; Ahmad, Tarmizi; Saad, Mohd Rasdan; Hafizi, Ezzat

    2018-02-01

    Wing in ground vehicle is one of the mode of transportation that allows high speed movement over water by travelling few meters above the water level. Through this manouver strategy, a cushion of compressed air exists between the wing in ground vehicle wings and water. This significantly increase the lift force, thus reducing the necessity in having a long wing span. Our project deals with the development of wing in ground vehicle with the capability of transporting four people. The total weight of this wing in ground vehicle was estimated at 5.4 kN to enable the prediction on required wing area, minimum takeoff velocity, drag force and engine power requirement. The required takeoff velocity is decreases as the lift coefficient increases, and our current mathematical model shows the takeoff velocity at 50 m/s avoid the significant increase in lift coefficient for the wing area of 5 m2. At the velocity of 50 m/s, the drag force created by this wing in ground vehicle is well below 1 kN, which required a 100-120 kW of engine power if the propeller has the efficiency of 0.7. Assessment on the stresses and deflection of the hull structural indicate the capability of plywood to withstand the expected load. However, excessive deflection was expected in the rear section which requires a minor structural modification. In the near future, we expect that the wind tunnel tests of this wing in ground vehicle model would enable more definite prediction on the important parameters related to its performance.

  17. Aerodynamic performance of a hovering hawkmoth with flexible wings: a computational approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakata, Toshiyuki; Liu, Hao

    2012-02-22

    Insect wings are deformable structures that change shape passively and dynamically owing to inertial and aerodynamic forces during flight. It is still unclear how the three-dimensional and passive change of wing kinematics owing to inherent wing flexibility contributes to unsteady aerodynamics and energetics in insect flapping flight. Here, we perform a systematic fluid-structure interaction based analysis on the aerodynamic performance of a hovering hawkmoth, Manduca, with an integrated computational model of a hovering insect with rigid and flexible wings. Aerodynamic performance of flapping wings with passive deformation or prescribed deformation is evaluated in terms of aerodynamic force, power and efficiency. Our results reveal that wing flexibility can increase downwash in wake and hence aerodynamic force: first, a dynamic wing bending is observed, which delays the breakdown of leading edge vortex near the wing tip, responsible for augmenting the aerodynamic force-production; second, a combination of the dynamic change of wing bending and twist favourably modifies the wing kinematics in the distal area, which leads to the aerodynamic force enhancement immediately before stroke reversal. Moreover, an increase in hovering efficiency of the flexible wing is achieved as a result of the wing twist. An extensive study of wing stiffness effect on aerodynamic performance is further conducted through a tuning of Young's modulus and thickness, indicating that insect wing structures may be optimized not only in terms of aerodynamic performance but also dependent on many factors, such as the wing strength, the circulation capability of wing veins and the control of wing movements.

  18. Information geometric analysis of phase transitions in complex patterns: the case of the Gray-Scott reaction–diffusion model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Har-Shemesh, Omri; Quax, Rick; Hoekstra, Alfons G; Sloot, Peter M A

    2016-01-01

    The Fisher–Rao metric from information geometry is related to phase transition phenomena in classical statistical mechanics. Several studies propose to extend the use of information geometry to study more general phase transitions in complex systems. However, it is unclear whether the Fisher–Rao metric does indeed detect these more general transitions, especially in the absence of a statistical model. In this paper we study the transitions between patterns in the Gray-Scott reaction–diffusion model using Fisher information. We describe the system by a probability density function that represents the size distribution of blobs in the patterns and compute its Fisher information with respect to changing the two rate parameters of the underlying model. We estimate the distribution non-parametrically so that we do not assume any statistical model. The resulting Fisher map can be interpreted as a phase-map of the different patterns. Lines with high Fisher information can be considered as boundaries between regions of parameter space where patterns with similar characteristics appear. These lines of high Fisher information can be interpreted as phase transitions between complex patterns. (paper: disordered systems, classical and quantum)

  19. Multi-time-over-threshold technique for photomultiplier signal processing: Description and characterization of the SCOTT ASIC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferry, S.; Guilloux, F.; Anvar, S.; Chateau, F.; Delagnes, E.; Gautard, V.; Louis, F.; Monmarthe, E.; Le Provost, H.; Russo, S.; Schuller, J.-P.; Stolarczyk, Th.; Vallage, B.; Zonca, E.

    2012-01-01

    KM3NeT aims to build a cubic-kilometer scale neutrino telescope in the Mediterranean Sea based on a 3D array of photomultiplier tubes. A dedicated ASIC, named SCOTT, has been developed for the readout electronics of the PMTs: it uses up to 16 adjustable thresholds to digitize the signals with the multi-time-over-threshold technique. Digital outputs of discriminators feed a circular sampling memory and a “first in first out” digital memory for derandomization. At the end of the data processing, the ASIC produces a digital waveform sampled at 800 MHz. A specific study was carried out to process PMT data and has showed that five specifically chosen thresholds are suited to reach the required timing precision. A dedicated method based on the duration of the signal over a given threshold allows an equivalent timing precision at any charge. A charge estimator using the information from the thresholds allows a charge determination within less than 20% up to 60 pe.

  20. Multi-time-over-threshold technique for photomultiplier signal processing: Description and characterization of the SCOTT ASIC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferry, S.; Guilloux, F.; Anvar, S.; Chateau, F.; Delagnes, E.; Gautard, V.; Louis, F.; Monmarthe, E.; Le Provost, H.; Russo, S.; Schuller, J.-P.; Stolarczyk, Th.; Vallage, B.; Zonca, E.; Representing the KM3NeT Consortium

    2012-12-01

    KM3NeT aims to build a cubic-kilometer scale neutrino telescope in the Mediterranean Sea based on a 3D array of photomultiplier tubes. A dedicated ASIC, named SCOTT, has been developed for the readout electronics of the PMTs: it uses up to 16 adjustable thresholds to digitize the signals with the multi-time-over-threshold technique. Digital outputs of discriminators feed a circular sampling memory and a “first in first out” digital memory for derandomization. At the end of the data processing, the ASIC produces a digital waveform sampled at 800 MHz. A specific study was carried out to process PMT data and has showed that five specifically chosen thresholds are suited to reach the required timing precision. A dedicated method based on the duration of the signal over a given threshold allows an equivalent timing precision at any charge. A charge estimator using the information from the thresholds allows a charge determination within less than 20% up to 60 pe.

  1. Aarskog-Scott syndrome: clinical update and report of nine novel mutations of the FGD1 gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orrico, A; Galli, L; Faivre, L; Clayton-Smith, J; Azzarello-Burri, S M; Hertz, J M; Jacquemont, S; Taurisano, R; Arroyo Carrera, I; Tarantino, E; Devriendt, K; Melis, D; Thelle, T; Meinhardt, U; Sorrentino, V

    2010-02-01

    Mutations in the FGD1 gene have been shown to cause Aarskog-Scott syndrome (AAS), or facio-digito-genital dysplasia (OMIM#305400), an X-linked disorder characterized by distinctive genital and skeletal developmental abnormalities with a broad spectrum of clinical phenotypes. To date, 20 distinct mutations have been reported, but little phenotypic data are available on patients with molecularly confirmed AAS. In the present study, we report on our experience of screening for mutations in the FGD1 gene in a cohort of 60 European patients with a clinically suspected diagnosis of AAS. We identified nine novel mutations in 11 patients (detection rate of 18.33%), including three missense mutations (p.R402Q; p.S558W; p.K748E), four truncating mutations (p.Y530X; p.R656X; c.806delC; c.1620delC), one in-frame deletion (c.2020_2022delGAG) and the first reported splice site mutation (c.1935+3A>C). A recurrent mutation (p.R656X) was detected in three independent families. We did not find any evidence for phenotype-genotype correlations between type and position of mutations and clinical features. In addition to the well-established phenotypic features of AAS, other clinical features are also reported and discussed. Copyright 2010 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  2. Aircraft Wing for Over-The-Wing Mounting of Engine Nacelle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hahn, Andrew S. (Inventor); Kinney, David J. (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    An aircraft wing has an inboard section and an outboard section. The inboard section is attached (i) on one side thereof to the aircraft's fuselage, and (ii) on an opposing side thereof to an inboard side of a turbofan engine nacelle in an over-the-wing mounting position. The outboard section's leading edge has a sweep of at least 20 degrees. The inboard section's leading edge has a sweep between -15 and +15 degrees, and extends from the fuselage to an attachment position on the nacelle that is forward of an index position defined as an imaginary intersection between the sweep of the outboard section's leading edge and the inboard side of the nacelle. In an alternate embodiment, the turbofan engine nacelle is replaced with an open rotor engine nacelle.

  3. Digital Morphing Wing: Active Wing Shaping Concept Using Composite Lattice-Based Cellular Structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenett, Benjamin; Calisch, Sam; Cellucci, Daniel; Cramer, Nick; Gershenfeld, Neil; Swei, Sean; Cheung, Kenneth C

    2017-03-01

    We describe an approach for the discrete and reversible assembly of tunable and actively deformable structures using modular building block parts for robotic applications. The primary technical challenge addressed by this work is the use of this method to design and fabricate low density, highly compliant robotic structures with spatially tuned stiffness. This approach offers a number of potential advantages over more conventional methods for constructing compliant robots. The discrete assembly reduces manufacturing complexity, as relatively simple parts can be batch-produced and joined to make complex structures. Global mechanical properties can be tuned based on sub-part ordering and geometry, because local stiffness and density can be independently set to a wide range of values and varied spatially. The structure's intrinsic modularity can significantly simplify analysis and simulation. Simple analytical models for the behavior of each building block type can be calibrated with empirical testing and synthesized into a highly accurate and computationally efficient model of the full compliant system. As a case study, we describe a modular and reversibly assembled wing that performs continuous span-wise twist deformation. It exhibits high performance aerodynamic characteristics, is lightweight and simple to fabricate and repair. The wing is constructed from discrete lattice elements, wherein the geometric and mechanical attributes of the building blocks determine the global mechanical properties of the wing. We describe the mechanical design and structural performance of the digital morphing wing, including their relationship to wind tunnel tests that suggest the ability to increase roll efficiency compared to a conventional rigid aileron system. We focus here on describing the approach to design, modeling, and construction as a generalizable approach for robotics that require very lightweight, tunable, and actively deformable structures.

  4. Repeatable Manufacture of Wings for Flapping Wing Micro Air Vehicles Using Microelectromechanical System (MEMS) Fabrication Techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-01

    51 Figure 29: Original SU8 -on-titanium crude test moth wing and its ink-on-transparency mask...out of what materials the researchers could find, normally carbon fiber spars with a polymer membrane. Testing, while well-planned, was improvised...photoresist polymers from a controlled UV light exposure, in order to control which portions of the substrate remain masked from a given etchant

  5. Ornithopter Type Flapping Wings for Autonomous Micro Air Vehicles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sutthiphong Srigrarom

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, an ornithopter prototype that mimics the flapping motion of bird flight is developed, and the lift and thrust generation characteristics of different wing designs are evaluated. This project focused on the spar arrangement and material used for the wings that could achieves improved performance. Various lift and thrust measurement techniques are explored and evaluated. Various wings of insects and birds were evaluated to understand how these natural flyers with flapping wings are able to produce sufficient lift to fly. The differences in the flapping aerodynamics were also detailed. Experiments on different wing designs and materials were conducted and a paramount wing was built for a test flight. The first prototype has a length of 46.5 cm, wing span of 88 cm, and weighs 161 g. A mechanism which produced a flapping motion was fabricated and designed to create flapping flight. The flapping flight was produced by using a single motor and a flexible and light wing structure. A force balance made of load cell was then designed to measure the thrust and lift force of the ornithopter. Three sets of wings varying flexibility were fabricated, therefore lift and thrust measurements were acquired from each different set of wings. The lift will be measured in ten cycles computing the average lift and frequency in three different speeds or frequencies (slow, medium and fast. The thrust measurement was measure likewise but in two cycles only. Several observations were made regarding the behavior of flexible flapping wings that should aid in the design of future flexible flapping wing vehicles. The wings angle or phase characteristic were analyze too and studied. The final ornithopter prototype weighs only 160 g, has a wing span of 88.5 cm, that could flap at a maximum flapping frequency of 3.869 Hz, and produce a maximum thrust and lift of about 0.719 and 0.264 N respectively. Next, we proposed resonance type flapping wing utilizes the near

  6. Achieving bioinspired flapping wing hovering flight solutions on Mars via wing scaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bluman, James E; Pohly, Jeremy; Sridhar, Madhu; Kang, Chang-Kwon; Landrum, David Brian; Fahimi, Farbod; Aono, Hikaru

    2018-05-29

    Achieving atmospheric flight on Mars is challenging due to the low density of the Martian atmosphere. Aerodynamic forces are proportional to the atmospheric density, which limits the use of conventional aircraft designs on Mars. Here, we show using numerical simulations that a flapping wing robot can fly on Mars via bioinspired dynamic scaling. Trimmed, hovering flight is possible in a simulated Martian environment when dynamic similarity with insects on earth is achieved by preserving the relevant dimensionless parameters while scaling up the wings three to four times its normal size. The analysis is performed using a well-validated two-dimensional Navier-Stokes equation solver, coupled to a three-dimensional flight dynamics model to simulate free flight. The majority of power required is due to the inertia of the wing because of the ultra-low density. The inertial flap power can be substantially reduced through the use of a torsional spring. The minimum total power consumption is 188 W/kg when the torsional spring is driven at its natural frequency. © 2018 IOP Publishing Ltd.

  7. Flapping and flexible wings for biological and micro air vehicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shyy, Wei; Berg, Mats; Ljungqvist, Daniel

    1999-07-01

    Micro air vehicles (MAVs) with wing spans of 15 cm or less, and flight speed of 30-60 kph are of interest for military and civilian applications. There are two prominent features of MAV flight: (i) low Reynolds number (10 4-10 5), resulting in unfavorable aerodynamic conditions to support controlled flight, and (ii) small physical dimensions, resulting in certain favorable scaling characteristics including structural strength, reduced stall speed, and low inertia. Based on observations of biological flight vehicles, it appears that wing motion and flexible airfoils are two key attributes for flight at low Reynolds number. The small size of MAVs corresponds in nature to small birds, which do not glide like large birds, but instead flap with considerable change of wing shape during a single flapping cycle. With flapping and flexible wings, birds overcome the deteriorating aerodynamic performance under steady flow conditions by employing unsteady mechanisms. In this article, we review both biological and aeronautical literatures to present salient features relevant to MAVs. We first summarize scaling laws of biological and micro air vehicles involving wing span, wing loading, vehicle mass, cruising speed, flapping frequency, and power. Next we discuss kinematics of flapping wings and aerodynamic models for analyzing lift, drag and power. Then we present issues related to low Reynolds number flows and airfoil shape selection. Recent work on flexible structures capable of adjusting the airfoil shape in response to freestream variations is also discussed.

  8. Recent progress in the analysis of iced airfoils and wings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cebeci, Tuncer; Chen, Hsun H.; Kaups, Kalle; Schimke, Sue

    1992-01-01

    Recent work on the analysis of iced airfoils and wings is described. Ice shapes for multielement airfoils and wings are computed using an extension of the LEWICE code that was developed for single airfoils. The aerodynamic properties of the iced wing are determined with an interactive scheme in which the solutions of the inviscid flow equations are obtained from a panel method and the solutions of the viscous flow equations are obtained from an inverse three-dimensional finite-difference boundary-layer method. A new interaction law is used to couple the inviscid and viscous flow solutions. The newly developed LEWICE multielement code is amplified to a high-lift configuration to calculate the ice shapes on the slat and on the main airfoil and on a four-element airfoil. The application of the LEWICE wing code to the calculation of ice shapes on a MS-317 swept wing shows good agreement with measurements. The interactive boundary-layer method is applied to a tapered iced wing in order to study the effect of icing on the aerodynamic properties of the wing at several angles of attack.

  9. Ecdysone signaling underlies the pea aphid transgenerational wing polyphenism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vellichirammal, Neetha Nanoth; Gupta, Purba; Hall, Tannice A; Brisson, Jennifer A

    2017-02-07

    The wing polyphenism of pea aphids is a compelling laboratory model with which to study the molecular mechanisms underlying phenotypic plasticity. In this polyphenism, environmental stressors such as high aphid density cause asexual, viviparous adult female aphids to alter the developmental fate of their embryos from wingless to winged morphs. This polyphenism is transgenerational, in that the pea aphid mother experiences the environmental signals, but it is her offspring that are affected. Previous research suggested that the steroid hormone ecdysone may play a role in this polyphenism. Here, we analyzed ecdysone-related gene expression patterns and found that they were consistent with a down-regulation of the ecdysone pathway being involved in the production of winged offspring. We therefore predicted that reduced ecdysone signaling would result in more winged offspring. Experimental injections of ecdysone or its analog resulted in a decreased production of winged offspring. Conversely, interfering with ecdysone signaling using an ecdysone receptor antagonist or knocking down the ecdysone receptor gene with RNAi resulted in an increased production of winged offspring. Our results are therefore consistent with the idea that ecdysone plays a causative role in the regulation of the proportion of winged offspring produced in response to crowding in this polyphenism. Our results also show that an environmentally regulated maternal hormone can mediate phenotype production in the next generation, as well as provide significant insight into the molecular mechanisms underlying the functioning of transgenerational phenotypic plasticity.

  10. Computational Optimization of a Natural Laminar Flow Experimental Wing Glove

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartshom, Fletcher

    2012-01-01

    Computational optimization of a natural laminar flow experimental wing glove that is mounted on a business jet is presented and discussed. The process of designing a laminar flow wing glove starts with creating a two-dimensional optimized airfoil and then lofting it into a three-dimensional wing glove section. The airfoil design process does not consider the three dimensional flow effects such as cross flow due wing sweep as well as engine and body interference. Therefore, once an initial glove geometry is created from the airfoil, the three dimensional wing glove has to be optimized to ensure that the desired extent of laminar flow is maintained over the entire glove. TRANAIR, a non-linear full potential solver with a coupled boundary layer code was used as the main tool in the design and optimization process of the three-dimensional glove shape. The optimization process uses the Class-Shape-Transformation method to perturb the geometry with geometric constraints that allow for a 2-in clearance from the main wing. The three-dimensional glove shape was optimized with the objective of having a spanwise uniform pressure distribution that matches the optimized two-dimensional pressure distribution as closely as possible. Results show that with the appropriate inputs, the optimizer is able to match the two dimensional pressure distributions practically across the entire span of the wing glove. This allows for the experiment to have a much higher probability of having a large extent of natural laminar flow in flight.

  11. Prostate carcinoma mimicking a sphenoid wing meningioma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradley, Lucas H; Burton, Matthew; Gokden, Murat; Serletis, Demitre

    2015-01-01

    We report here on a rare case of a large, lateral sphenoid wing tumor with radiographic and intraoperative findings highly suggestive of meningioma, yet pathology was in fact consistent with metastatic prostate adenocarcinoma. An 81 year-old male presented with expressive dysphasia, right-sided weakness and headaches. Imaging revealed a heterogeneously-enhancing lesion based on the left lateral sphenoid wing. The presumed diagnosis was strongly in favor of meningioma, and the patient underwent complete resection of the dural-based lesion. Final pathology confirmed the unexpected finding of a metastatic prostate adenocarcinoma. Although he tolerated surgery well, the patient was subsequently referred for palliative therapy given findings of widespread systemic disease. Intracranial metastases may involve the dura, at times presenting with rare radiographic features highly suggestive for meningioma, as in our case here. This makes differentiation, at least based on imaging, a challenge. Elderly patients presenting with neurological deficits secondary to a newly-diagnosed, dural-based lesion should thus be considered for metastasis, prompting additional imaging studies (including body CT, MRI or PET) to rule out a primary lesion elsewhere. In some cases, this may affect the overall decision to proceed with surgical resection, or alternatively, to proceed directly to palliative therapy (the latter decision made in the context of widespread metastatic disease). We conclude that dural-based metastatic lesions may mimic meningiomas, warranting thorough pre-operative work-up to exclude the possibility of metastasis. In certain cases, identification of widespread disease might preclude surgery and favor palliation, instead. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  12. Butterfly wing coloration studied with a novel imaging scatterometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stavenga, Doekele

    2010-03-01

    Animal coloration functions for display or camouflage. Notably insects provide numerous examples of a rich variety of the applied optical mechanisms. For instance, many butterflies feature a distinct dichromatism, that is, the wing coloration of the male and the female differ substantially. The male Brimstone, Gonepteryx rhamni, has yellow wings that are strongly UV iridescent, but the female has white wings with low reflectance in the UV and a high reflectance in the visible wavelength range. In the Small White cabbage butterfly, Pieris rapae crucivora, the wing reflectance of the male is low in the UV and high at visible wavelengths, whereas the wing reflectance of the female is higher in the UV and lower in the visible. Pierid butterflies apply nanosized, strongly scattering beads to achieve their bright coloration. The male Pipevine Swallowtail butterfly, Battus philenor, has dorsal wings with scales functioning as thin film gratings that exhibit polarized iridescence; the dorsal wings of the female are matte black. The polarized iridescence probably functions in intraspecific, sexual signaling, as has been demonstrated in Heliconius butterflies. An example of camouflage is the Green Hairstreak butterfly, Callophrys rubi, where photonic crystal domains exist in the ventral wing scales, resulting in a matte green color that well matches the color of plant leaves. The spectral reflection and polarization characteristics of biological tissues can be rapidly and with unprecedented detail assessed with a novel imaging scatterometer-spectrophotometer, built around an elliptical mirror [1]. Examples of butterfly and damselfly wings, bird feathers, and beetle cuticle will be presented. [4pt] [1] D.G. Stavenga, H.L. Leertouwer, P. Pirih, M.F. Wehling, Optics Express 17, 193-202 (2009)

  13. True Grit: In Tracking down the Real Story of a Legendary Hero of the Old West, Vaunda Micheaux Nelson also Nabbed the Coretta Scott King Award

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleishhacker, Joy

    2010-01-01

    When Vaunda Micheaux Nelson donned a black Stetson to become the biographer of Deputy U.S. Marshal Bass Reeves, she had no idea that her square-shooting book about an unsung African-American hero of the Old West would win over a posse of fans and earn her the prestigious 2010 Coretta Scott King (CSK) Author Award. "Bad News for Outlaws"…

  14. Features of ozone intraannual variability in polar regions based on ozone sounding data obtained at the Resolute and Amundsen-Scott stations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gruzdev, A.N.; Sitnov, S.A. (AN SSSR, Institut Fiziki Atmosfery, Moscow (USSR))

    1991-04-01

    Ozone sounding data obtained at the Resolute and Amundsen-Scott stations are used to analyze ozone intraannual variability in Southern and Northern polar regions. For the Arctic, in particular, features associated with winter stratospheric warmings, stratospheric-tropospheric exchange, and the isolated evolution of surface ozone are noted. Correlative connections between ozone and temperature making it possible to concretize ozone variability mechanisms are analyzed. 31 refs.

  15. Pilot studying about the role of anti-drug addiction documentary movies and caricature in changing the views of Tehran’s 7th disrict high school male/female students toward drug addiction as well as comparing them

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2004-05-01

    Full Text Available In this research, the effect of movie and caricature on students’ attitude toward drug addiction is measured.124 students(61 male and 63 female from Tehran’s 7th district high schools were selected by using muli-stage cluster sampling method. The samples were randomly distibuted in three 21-member groups including control group, caricature group and documentary movie. All groups were pre-tested by using addiction attitude measuring scale (Form A. Then, the test goups were represented with dependent variables of movie and caricature but the control group received no variable. After two weeks, all groups were post-tesed by using addiction attitude measuring scale (Form B. The assumptions were analyzed by applying correlated t-tests , two-way variance analysis and Tucki’s pursuance test The results indicated that movie and caricature are effective in changing students’ attitudes toward addiction, the effects of movie differed from the effects of caricature but there was no difference between them in changing the attitude of male and female students.

  16. The Correlation Study of Interest at Physics and Knowledge of Mathematics Basic Concepts towards the Ability to Solve Physics Problems of 7th Grade Students at Junior High School in Ambon Maluku Province, Indonesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Izaak Hendrik Wenno

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the study is to determine the relation between interest at Physics and knowledge of Mathematics basic concepts with the ability to solve Physics problems. The populations are all students in the 7th grade at the junior high school in Ambon, Maluku, Indonesia. The used sample schools are Junior High Schools 8, 9, and 10 during 2013/2014 academic year with 44 students per school. Two independent variables and one dependent variable are studied. The independent variables are the interest at Physics (X1 and the knowledge of Mathematics basic concepts (X2, while the dependent variable is the ability to solve Physics problems (Y. Data collection technique for X1 is an interview with questionnaire instrument, while for the X2 and Y is using the test technique with test items instrument. The obtained data from the measurements were analyzed with descriptive analysis and inferential analysis. The results show that there is a positive relation between interest at Physics and knowledge of Mathematics basic concepts with students’ ability to solve Physics problems.

  17. Unsteady transonic flow analysis for low aspect ratio, pointed wings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimble, K. R.; Ruo, S. Y.; Wu, J. M.; Liu, D. Y.

    1973-01-01

    Oswatitsch and Keune's parabolic method for steady transonic flow is applied and extended to thin slender wings oscillating in the sonic flow field. The parabolic constant for the wing was determined from the equivalent body of revolution. Laplace transform methods were used to derive the asymptotic equations for pressure coefficient, and the Adams-Sears iterative procedure was employed to solve the equations. A computer program was developed to find the pressure distributions, generalized force coefficients, and stability derivatives for delta, convex, and concave wing planforms.

  18. Winging of scapula due to serratus anterior tear

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Varun Singh Kumar

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available 【Abstract】Winging of scapula occurs most commonly due to injury to long thoracic nerve supplying serratus anterior muscle. Traumatic injury to serratus anterior muscle itself is very rare. We reported a case of traumatic winging of scapula due to tear of serratus anterior muscle in a 19-year-old male. Winging was present in neutral position and in extension of right shoulder joint but not on "push on wall" test. Patient was managed conservatively and achieved satisfactory result. Key words: Serratus anterior tear; Scapula; Wounds and injuries

  19. Optimisation of the Sekwa blended-wing-Body research UAV

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Broughton, BA

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available qualities constraints during the aerodynamic design process. NOMENCLATURE g2009g2868g3013 zero-lift angle of attack AoA α, angle of attack AR aspect ratio BWB blended-wing-body g1829g3005,g2868 zero-lift drag coefficient g1829g3005,g3036 induced drag... coefficient g1829g3005,g3047 total drag coefficient g1829g3040,g2868 zero-lift pitching moment coefficient CG centre of gravity F objective function to be minimised g1845actual actual wing area g1845 reference wing area, as projected into xy-plane 1...

  20. Dynamics and control of robotic aircraft with articulated wings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paranjape, Aditya Avinash

    There is a considerable interest in developing robotic aircraft, inspired by birds, for a variety of missions covering reconnaissance and surveillance. Flapping wing aircraft concepts have been put forth in light of the efficiency of flapping flight at small scales. These aircraft are naturally equipped with the ability to rotate their wings about the root, a form of wing articulation. This thesis covers some problems concerning the performance, stability and control of robotic aircraft with articulated wings in gliding flight. Specifically, we are interested in aircraft without a vertical tail, which would then use wing articulation for longitudinal as well as lateral-directional control. Although the dynamics and control of articulated wing aircraft share several common features with conventional fixed wing aircraft, the presence of wing articulation presents several unique benefits as well as limitations from the perspective of performance and control. One of the objective of this thesis is to understand these features using a combination of theoretical and numerical tools. The aircraft concept envisioned in this thesis uses the wing dihedral angles for longitudinal and lateral-directional control. Aircraft with flexible articulated wings are also investigated. We derive a complete nonlinear model of the flight dynamics incorporating dynamic CG location and the changing moment of inertia. We show that symmetric dihedral configuration, along with a conventional horizontal tail, can be used to control flight speed and flight path angle independently of each other. This characteristic is very useful for initiating an efficient perching maneuver. It is shown that wing dihedral angles alone can effectively regulate sideslip during rapid turns and generate a wide range of equilibrium turn rates while maintaining a constant flight speed and regulating sideslip. We compute the turning performance limitations that arise due to the use of wing dihedral for yaw control

  1. Structural Health Monitoring Analysis for the Orbiter Wing Leading Edge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yap, Keng C.

    2010-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation reviews Structural Health Monitoring Analysis for the Orbiter Wing Leading Edge. The Wing Leading Edge Impact Detection System (WLE IDS) and the Impact Analysis Process are also described to monitor WLE debris threats. The contents include: 1) Risk Management via SHM; 2) Hardware Overview; 3) Instrumentation; 4) Sensor Configuration; 5) Debris Hazard Monitoring; 6) Ascent Response Summary; 7) Response Signal; 8) Distribution of Flight Indications; 9) Probabilistic Risk Analysis (PRA); 10) Model Correlation; 11) Impact Tests; 12) Wing Leading Edge Modeling; 13) Ascent Debris PRA Results; and 14) MM/OD PRA Results.

  2. Controlling Listeria monocytogenes Scott A on Surfaces of Fully Cooked Turkey Deli Product Using Organic Acid-Containing Marinades as Postlethality Dips.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casco, Gerardo; Johnson, Jennifer L; Taylor, T Matthew; Gaytán, Carlos N; Brashears, Mindy M; Alvarado, Christine Z

    2015-01-01

    This study evaluated the efficacy of organic acids applied singly or in combination as postlethality dips to sliced uncured turkey deli loaves to inhibit the growth of Listeria monocytogenes (Lm) Scott A. Treatments consisted of sodium lactate (SL; 3.6%), potassium lactate (PL; 3.6%), sodium citrate (SC; 0.75%), a combination of SL and sodium diacetate (SDA; 0.25%), and a combination of SL/PL/SDA, alongside appropriate negative and positive controls. Products were inoculated with 10(4)-10(5) CFU/mL streptomycin-resistant (1500 μg/mL) Lm Scott A prior to treatment. Products were then stored at ~4°C and sampled at 0, 7, 14, 21, 28, 42, and 56 d. The SL/SDA combination applied to turkey slices extended the lag phase through 21 days of refrigerated storage. Numbers of Lm Scott A rose by 0.7 log10 CFU/g through the 56 d storage period. The application of the SL/PL/SDA treatment to turkey product surfaces extended the lag phase through 42 d, with pathogen numbers declining after 21 d. Combination organic acid dips prolonged the lag phase for 2 to 6 wk on turkey product surfaces and can be useful as antimicrobial agents for Lm control on postlethality exposed sliced deli products.

  3. A Model for Selection of Eyespots on Butterfly Wings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sekimura, Toshio; Venkataraman, Chandrasekhar; Madzvamuse, Anotida

    2015-01-01

    The development of eyespots on the wing surface of butterflies of the family Nympalidae is one of the most studied examples of biological pattern formation.However, little is known about the mechanism that determines the number and precise locations of eyespots on the wing. Eyespots develop around signaling centers, called foci, that are located equidistant from wing veins along the midline of a wing cell (an area bounded by veins). A fundamental question that remains unsolved is, why a certain wing cell develops an eyespot, while other wing cells do not. We illustrate that the key to understanding focus point selection may be in the venation system of the wing disc. Our main hypothesis is that changes in morphogen concentration along the proximal boundary veins of wing cells govern focus point selection. Based on previous studies, we focus on a spatially two-dimensional reaction-diffusion system model posed in the interior of each wing cell that describes the formation of focus points. Using finite element based numerical simulations, we demonstrate that variation in the proximal boundary condition is sufficient to robustly select whether an eyespot focus point forms in otherwise identical wing cells. We also illustrate that this behavior is robust to small perturbations in the parameters and geometry and moderate levels of noise. Hence, we suggest that an anterior-posterior pattern of morphogen concentration along the proximal vein may be the main determinant of the distribution of focus points on the wing surface. In order to complete our model, we propose a two stage reaction-diffusion system model, in which an one-dimensional surface reaction-diffusion system, posed on the proximal vein, generates the morphogen concentrations that act as non-homogeneous Dirichlet (i.e., fixed) boundary conditions for the two-dimensional reaction-diffusion model posed in the wing cells. The two-stage model appears capable of generating focus point distributions observed in

  4. A Model for Selection of Eyespots on Butterfly Wings.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toshio Sekimura

    Full Text Available The development of eyespots on the wing surface of butterflies of the family Nympalidae is one of the most studied examples of biological pattern formation.However, little is known about the mechanism that determines the number and precise locations of eyespots on the wing. Eyespots develop around signaling centers, called foci, that are located equidistant from wing veins along the midline of a wing cell (an area bounded by veins. A fundamental question that remains unsolved is, why a certain wing cell develops an eyespot, while other wing cells do not.We illustrate that the key to understanding focus point selection may be in the venation system of the wing disc. Our main hypothesis is that changes in morphogen concentration along the proximal boundary veins of wing cells govern focus point selection. Based on previous studies, we focus on a spatially two-dimensional reaction-diffusion system model posed in the interior of each wing cell that describes the formation of focus points. Using finite element based numerical simulations, we demonstrate that variation in the proximal boundary condition is sufficient to robustly select whether an eyespot focus point forms in otherwise identical wing cells. We also illustrate that this behavior is robust to small perturbations in the parameters and geometry and moderate levels of noise. Hence, we suggest that an anterior-posterior pattern of morphogen concentration along the proximal vein may be the main determinant of the distribution of focus points on the wing surface. In order to complete our model, we propose a two stage reaction-diffusion system model, in which an one-dimensional surface reaction-diffusion system, posed on the proximal vein, generates the morphogen concentrations that act as non-homogeneous Dirichlet (i.e., fixed boundary conditions for the two-dimensional reaction-diffusion model posed in the wing cells. The two-stage model appears capable of generating focus point distributions

  5. Pitch, roll, and yaw moment generator for insect-like tailless flapping-wing MAV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phan, Hoang Vu; Park, Hoon Cheol

    2016-04-01

    In this work, we proposed a control moment generator, which is called Trailing Edge Change (TEC) mechanism, for attitudes change in hovering insect-like tailless flapping-wing MAV. The control moment generator was installed to the flapping-wing mechanism to manipulate the wing kinematics by adjusting the wing roots location symmetrically or asymmetrically. As a result, the mean aerodynamic force center of each wing is relocated and control moments are generated. The three-dimensional wing kinematics captured by three synchronized high-speed cameras showed that the flapping-wing MAV can properly modify the wing kinematics. In addition, a series of experiments were performed using a multi-axis load cell to evaluate the forces and moments generation. The measurement demonstrated that the TEC mechanism produced reasonable amounts of pitch, roll and yaw moments by shifting position of the trailing edges at the wing roots of the flapping-wing MAV.

  6. Waiting in the wings: what can we learn about gene co-option from the diversification of butterfly wing patterns?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiggins, Chris D; Wallbank, Richard W R; Hanly, Joseph J

    2017-02-05

    A major challenge is to understand how conserved gene regulatory networks control the wonderful diversity of form that we see among animals and plants. Butterfly wing patterns are an excellent example of this diversity. Butterfly wings form as imaginal discs in the caterpillar and are constructed by a gene regulatory network, much of which is conserved across the holometabolous insects. Recent work in Heliconius butterflies takes advantage of genomic approaches and offers insights into how the diversification of wing patterns is overlaid onto this conserved network. WntA is a patterning morphogen that alters spatial information in the wing. Optix is a transcription factor that acts later in development to paint specific wing regions red. Both of these loci fit the paradigm of conserved protein-coding loci with diverse regulatory elements and developmental roles that have taken on novel derived functions in patterning wings. These discoveries offer insights into the 'Nymphalid Ground Plan', which offers a unifying hypothesis for pattern formation across nymphalid butterflies. These loci also represent 'hotspots' for morphological change that have been targeted repeatedly during evolution. Both convergent and divergent evolution of a great diversity of patterns is controlled by complex alleles at just a few genes. We suggest that evolutionary change has become focused on one or a few genetic loci for two reasons. First, pre-existing complex cis-regulatory loci that already interact with potentially relevant transcription factors are more likely to acquire novel functions in wing patterning. Second, the shape of wing regulatory networks may constrain evolutionary change to one or a few loci. Overall, genomic approaches that have identified wing patterning loci in these butterflies offer broad insight into how gene regulatory networks evolve to produce diversity.This article is part of the themed issue 'Evo-devo in the genomics era, and the origins of morphological

  7. Road Bridges and Culverts, MDTA Culverts, Culverts on John F. Kennedy Highway (I95), Baltimore Harbor Tunnel Throughway, Francis Scott Key Bridge, Bay bridge, Nice Bridge, Published in 2010, 1:1200 (1in=100ft) scale, Maryland Transportation Authority.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC State | GIS Inventory — Road Bridges and Culverts dataset current as of 2010. MDTA Culverts, Culverts on John F. Kennedy Highway (I95), Baltimore Harbor Tunnel Throughway, Francis Scott Key...

  8. Performance Comparison of the Optimized Inverted Joined Wing Airplane Concept and Classical Configuration Airplanes

    OpenAIRE

    Sieradzki Adam; Dziubiński Adam; Galiński Cezary

    2016-01-01

    The joined wing concept is an unconventional airplane configuration, known since the mid-twenties of the last century. It has several possible advantages, like reduction of the induced drag and weight due to the closed wing concept. The inverted joined wing variant is its rarely considered version, with the front wing being situated above the aft wing. The following paper presents a performance prediction of the recently optimized configuration of this airplane. Flight characteristics obtaine...

  9. Variable camber wing based on pneumatic artificial muscles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Weilong; Liu, Libo; Chen, Yijin; Leng, Jinsong

    2009-07-01

    As a novel bionic actuator, pneumatic artificial muscle has high power to weight ratio. In this paper, a variable camber wing with the pneumatic artificial muscle is developed. Firstly, the experimental setup to measure the static output force of pneumatic artificial muscle is designed. The relationship between the static output force and the air pressure is investigated. Experimental result shows the static output force of pneumatic artificial muscle decreases nonlinearly with increasing contraction ratio. Secondly, the finite element model of the variable camber wing is developed. Numerical results show that the tip displacement of the trailing-edge increases linearly with increasing external load and limited with the maximum static output force of pneumatic artificial muscles. Finally, the variable camber wing model is manufactured to validate the variable camber concept. Experimental result shows that the wing camber increases with increasing air pressure and that it compare very well with the FEM result.

  10. Silent and Efficient Supersonic Bi-Directional Flying Wing

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — We propose a Phase I study for a novel concept of a supersonic bi-directional (SBiDir) flying wing (FW) that has the potential to revolutionize supersonic flight...

  11. Exploiting Formation Flying for Fuel Saving Supersonic Oblique Wing Aircraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-07-01

    used and developed during recent wing / winglet / morphing design programmes (Refs.13-14). By exploiting this method, we have assessed the aerodynamics ...parameters, Propulsion Issues, Size Issues, Aero-elastic effects 15. SUBJECT TERMS EOARD, Control System, Aerodynamics 16...

  12. New findings of twisted-wing parasites (Strepsiptera) in Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mcdermott, Molly

    2016-01-01

    Strepsipterans are a group of insects with a gruesome life history and an enigmatic evolutionary past. Called ‘twisted-wing parasites’, they are minute parasitoids with a very distinct morphology (Figure 1). Alternatively thought to be related to ichneumon wasps, Diptera (flies), Coleoptera (beetles), and even Neuroptera (net-winged insects) (Pohl and Beutel, 2013); the latest genetic and morphological data support the sister order relationship of Strepsiptera and Coleoptera (Niehuis et al., 2012). Strepsipterans are highly modified, males having two hind wings and halteres instead of front wings or elytra. Unlike most parasitoids, they develop inside active, living insects who are sexually sterilized but not killed until or after emergence (Kathirithamby et al., 2015).

  13. Study of structural colour of Hebomoia glaucippe butterfly wing scales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shur, V. Ya; Kuznetsov, D. K.; Pryakhina, V. I.; Kosobokov, M. S.; Zubarev, I. V.; Boymuradova, S. K.; Volchetskaya, K. V.

    2017-10-01

    Structural colours of Hebomoia glaucippe butterfly wing scales have been studied experimentally using high resolution scanning electron microscopy. Visualization of scales structures and computer simulation allowed distinguishing correlation between nanostructures on the scales and their colour.

  14. Comparative Analysis of Uninhibited and Constrained Avian Wing Aerodynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cox, Jordan A.

    The flight of birds has intrigued and motivated man for many years. Bird flight served as the primary inspiration of flying machines developed by Leonardo Da Vinci, Otto Lilienthal, and even the Wright brothers. Avian flight has once again drawn the attention of the scientific community as unmanned aerial vehicles (UAV) are not only becoming more popular, but smaller. Birds are once again influencing the designs of aircraft. Small UAVs operating within flight conditions and low Reynolds numbers common to birds are not yet capable of the high levels of control and agility that birds display with ease. Many researchers believe the potential to improve small UAV performance can be obtained by applying features common to birds such as feathers and flapping flight to small UAVs. Although the effects of feathers on a wing have received some attention, the effects of localized transient feather motion and surface geometry on the flight performance of a wing have been largely overlooked. In this research, the effects of freely moving feathers on a preserved red tailed hawk wing were studied. A series of experiments were conducted to measure the aerodynamic forces on a hawk wing with varying levels of feather movement permitted. Angle of attack and air speed were varied within the natural flight envelope of the hawk. Subsequent identical tests were performed with the feather motion constrained through the use of externally-applied surface treatments. Additional tests involved the study of an absolutely fixed geometry mold-and-cast wing model of the original bird wing. Final tests were also performed after applying surface coatings to the cast wing. High speed videos taken during tests revealed the extent of the feather movement between wing models. Images of the microscopic surface structure of each wing model were analyzed to establish variations in surface geometry between models. Recorded aerodynamic forces were then compared to the known feather motion and surface

  15. Wings of the butterfly: Sunspot groups for 1826-2015

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leussu, R.; Usoskin, I. G.; Senthamizh Pavai, V.; Diercke, A.; Arlt, R.; Denker, C.; Mursula, K.

    2017-03-01

    The spatio-temporal evolution of sunspot activity, the so-called Maunder butterfly diagram, has been continously available since 1874 using data from the Royal Greenwich Observatory, extended by SOON network data after 1976. Here we present a new extended butterfly diagram of sunspot group occurrence since 1826, using the recently digitized data from Schwabe (1826-1867) and Spörer (1866-1880). The wings of the diagram are separated using a recently developed method based on an analysis of long gaps in sunspot group occurrence in different latitude bands. We define characteristic latitudes, corresponding to the start, end, and the largest extent of the wings (the F, L, and H latitudes). The H latitudes (30°-45°) are highly significantly correlated with the strength of the wings (quantified by the total sum of the monthly numbers of sunspot groups). The F latitudes (20°-30°) depict a weak tendency, especially in the southern hemisphere, to follow the wing strength. The L latitudes (2°-10°) show no clear relation to the wing strength. Overall, stronger cycle wings tend to start at higher latitudes and have a greater wing extent. A strong (5-6)-cycle periodic oscillation is found in the start and end times of the wings and in the overlap and gaps between successive wings of one hemisphere. While the average wing overlap is zero in the southern hemisphere, it is two to three months in the north. A marginally significant oscillation of about ten solar cycles is found in the asymmetry of the L latitudes. The new long database of butterfly wings provides new observational constraints to solar dynamo models that discuss the spatio-temporal distribution of sunspot occurrence over the solar cycle and longer. Digital data for Fig. 1 are available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (http://130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/599/A131

  16. CFD Analysis of a T-38 Wing Fence

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-06-01

    or making major adjustments to the existing airframe. The answer lies in flow control. Flow control devices like vortex generators, winglets , and wing...fences have been used to improve the aerodynamic performance of hundreds of aircraft. Flow control is commonly added after the final phase of design...proposed by the Air Force Test Pilot School. The driving force for considering a wing fence as opposed to vane vortex generators or winglets 3 was a row of

  17. Simulating Bird Strike on Aircraft Composite Wing Leading Edge.

    OpenAIRE

    Ericsson, Max

    2012-01-01

    In this master thesis project the possibility to model the response of a wing when subjected to bird strike using finite elements is analyzed. Since this transient event lasts only a few milliseconds the used solution method is explicit time integration. The wing is manufactured using carbon fiber laminate. Carbon fiber laminates have orthotropic material properties with different stiffness in different directions. Accordingly, there are damage mechanisms not considered when using metal that ...

  18. Structural colours of nickel bioreplicas of butterfly wings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tolenis, Tomas; Swiontek, Stephen E.; Lakhtakia, Akhlesh

    2017-04-01

    The two-angle conformally evaporated-film-by-rotation technique (TA-CEFR) was devised to coat the wings of the monarch butterfly with nickel in order to form a 500-nm thick bioreplica thereof. The bioreplica exhibits structural colours that are completely obscured in actual wings by pigmental colours. Thus, the TA-CEFR technique provides a way to replicate, study and exploit hidden morphologies of biological surfaces.

  19. 59th Medical Wing Protection of Vulnerable Populations: Ombudsman Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-04-20

    REPORT TYPE 20/04/2018 poster 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE 59th Medical Wing Protection of Vulnerable Populations: Ombudsman Program 6. AUTHOR(S...13. SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES 2018 Annual AAHRPP Conference April 20-22, 2018 Denver, CO 14. ABSTRACT 1S. SUBJECT TERMS 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF...59th Medical Wing Protection of Vulnerable Populations: Ombudsman Program Wayne DeutschDDS1, MPH, Michele Tavish LYN, PMP, CCRC 1 Brenda

  20. Do the Golden-winged Warbler and Blue-winged Warbler Exhibit Species-specific Differences in their Breeding Habitat Use?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura L. Patton

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available We compared habitat features of Golden-winged Warbler (Vermivora chrysoptera territories in the presence and absence of the Blue-winged Warbler (V. cyanoptera on reclaimed coal mines in southeastern Kentucky, USA. Our objective was to determine whether there are species specific differences in habitat that can be manipulated to encourage population persistence of the Golden-winged Warbler. When compared with Blue-winged Warblers, Golden-winged Warblers established territories at higher elevations and with greater percentages of grass and canopy cover. Mean territory size (minimum convex polygon was 1.3 ha (se = 0.1 for Golden-winged Warbler in absence of Blue-winged Warbler, 1.7 ha (se = 0.3 for Golden-winged Warbler coexisting with Blue-winged Warbler, and 2.1 ha (se = 0.3 for Blue-winged Warbler. Territory overlap occurred within and between species (18 of n = 73 territories, 24.7%. All Golden-winged and Blue-winged Warblers established territories that included an edge between reclaimed mine land and mature forest, as opposed to establishing territories in open grassland/shrubland habitat. The mean distance territories extended from a forest edge was 28.0 m (se = 3.8 for Golden-winged Warbler in absence of Blue-winged Warbler, 44.7 m (se = 5.7 for Golden-winged Warbler coexisting with Blue-winged Warbler, and 33.1 m (se = 6.1 for Blue-winged Warbler. Neither territory size nor distances to forest edges differed significantly between Golden-winged Warbler in presence or absence of Blue-winged Warbler. According to Monte Carlo analyses, orchardgrass (Dactylis glomerata, green ash (Fraxinus pennsylvanica seedlings and saplings, and black locust (Robinia pseudoacacia saplings were indicative of sites with only Golden-winged Warblers. Sericea lespedeza, goldenrod (Solidago spp., clematis vine (Clematis spp., and blackberry (Rubus spp. were indicative of sites where both species occurred. Our findings complement recent genetic studies and add