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Sample records for windsor connecticut ce

  1. Confirmatory Survey Results For Portions Of The ABB Combustion Engineering Site In Windsor, Connecticut During The Fall Of 2011

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adams, Wade C.

    2011-01-01

    From the mid-1950s until mid-2000, the Combustion Engineering, Inc. (CE) site in Windsor, Connecticut (Figure A-1) was involved in the research, development, engineering, production, and servicing of nuclear fuels, systems, and services. The site is currently undergoing decommissioning that will lead to license termination and unrestricted release in accordance with the requirements of the License Termination Rule in 10 CFR Part 20, Subpart E. Asea Brown Boveri Incorporated (ABB) has been decommissioning the CE site since 2001.

  2. CONFIRMATORY SURVEY RESULTS FOR PORTIONS OF THE ABB COMBUSTION ENGINEERING SITE IN WINDSOR, CONNECTICUT DURING THE FALL OF 2011

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wade C. Adams

    2011-12-09

    From the mid-1950s until mid-2000, the Combustion Engineering, Inc. (CE) site in Windsor, Connecticut (Figure A-1) was involved in the research, development, engineering, production, and servicing of nuclear fuels, systems, and services. The site is currently undergoing decommissioning that will lead to license termination and unrestricted release in accordance with the requirements of the License Termination Rule in 10 CFR Part 20, Subpart E. Asea Brown Boveri Incorporated (ABB) has been decommissioning the CE site since 2001.

  3. "CONFIRMATORY SURVEY RESULTS FOR THE ABB COMBUSTION ENGINEERING SITE WINDSOR, CONNECTICUT DCN 5158-SR-02-2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    ADAMS, WADE C

    2013-03-25

    The objectives of the confirmatory activities were to provide independent contractor field data reviews and to generate independent radiological data for use by the NRC in evaluating the adequacy and accuracy of the contractor's procedures and FSS results. ORAU reviewed ABB CE's decommissioning plan, final status survey plan, and the applicable soil DCGLs, which were developed based on an NRC-approved radiation dose assessment. The surveys include gamma surface scans, gamma direct measurements, and soil sampling.

  4. Estimation of uranium and cobalt-60 distribution coefficients and uranium-235 enrichment at the Combustion Engineering Company site in Windsor, Connecticut

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Y.; Orlandini, K.A.; Yu, C.

    1996-05-01

    Site-specific distribution coefficients for uranium isotopes and cobalt-60 (Co-60) and the fraction of uranium-235 (U-235) enrichment by mass were estimated for environmental samples collected from the Combustion Engineering Company site in Windsor, CT. This site has been identified for remedial action under the US Department of Energy's (DOE) Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program. The authority of DOE at the Combustion Engineering site is limited to (1) Building 3; (2) other activities or areas associated exclusively with Building 3 (such as sewer lines); or (3) contamination that is exclusively highly enriched uranium. In this study, 16 samples were collected from the Combustion Engineering site, including 8 soil, 4 sediment, 3 water, and 1 water plus sludge sample. These samples were analyzed for isotopic uranium by alpha spectrometry and for Co-60 by gamma spectrometry. The site-specific distribution coefficient for each isotope was estimated as the ratio of extractable radionuclide activity in the solid phase to the activity in the contact solution following a 19-day equilibration. The uranium activity measurements indicate that uranium-234 (U-234) and uranium-238 (U-238) were in secular equilibrium in two soil samples and that soil and sediment samples collected from other sampling locations had higher U-234 activity than U-238 activity in both the solid and solution phases. The site-specific distribution coefficient (Kd) ranged from 82 to 44,600 mL/g for U-238 and from 102 to 65,900 mL/g for U-234. Calculation of U-235 enrichment by mass indicated that four soil samples had values greater than 0.20; these values were 0.37, 0.38, 0.46, and 0.68. Cobalt-60 activity was detected in only three sediment samples. The measured Co-60 activity in the solid phase ranged from 0.15 to 0.45 pCi/g and that in the water phase of all three samples combined was 4 pCi/L. The Kd value for Co-60 in the site brook sediment was calculated to be 70 mL/g

  5. Final Report-Confirmatory Survey Results for the ABB Combustion Engineering Site, Windsor, Connecticut; Revision 1 (DCN 5158-SR-02-1) (Docket No. 030-03754; RFTA No. 12-003)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    ADAMS, WADE C

    2013-01-28

    The objectives of the confirmatory activities were to provide independent contractor field data reviews and to generate independent radiological data for use by the NRC in evaluating the adequacy and accuracy of the contractor's procedures and FSS results. ORAU reviewed ABB CE's decommissioning plan, final status survey plan, and the applicable soil DCGLs, which were developed based on an NRC-approved radiation dose assessment. The surveys included gamma surface scans, gamma direct measurements, and soil sampling.

  6. VT Data - Zoning Overlay 20150324, Windsor

    Data.gov (United States)

    Vermont Center for Geographic Information — Windsor has one overlay district; Downtown Design District. This has two “subdistricts” – “Main Street” and “Rails to Riverfront”. Re-adopted as part of the April...

  7. Proceedings of the 1996 Windsor workshop on alternative fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-10-01

    This document contains information which was presented at the 1996 Windsor Workshop on Alternative Fuels. Topics include: international links; industry topics and infrastructure issues; propane; engine developments; the cleanliness of alternative fuels; heavy duty alternative fuel engines; California zev commercialization efforts; and in-use experience.

  8. 76 FR 67181 - Windsor Machinery Co., Inc.; Notice of Preliminary Permit Application Accepted for Filing and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-31

    ... DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission [Project No. 14256-000] Windsor Machinery Co., Inc.; Notice of Preliminary Permit Application Accepted for Filing and Soliciting Comments, Motions To Intervene, and Competing Applications On August 15, 2011, Windsor Machinery Co., Inc. filed an application for a preliminary permit,...

  9. Connecticut Marketing Education Handbook.

    Science.gov (United States)

    West Haven Board of Education, CT.

    This revised marketing education handbook is intended to assist marketing education teachers and administrators in Connecticut in preparing students to enter meaningful careers in marketing, merchandising, and management positions. The 17 units of this reference guide cover the following topics: introduction; mission and scope of marketing…

  10. Teaching "United States v. Windsor": The Defense of Marriage Act and Its Constitutional Implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciocchetti, Corey

    2014-01-01

    This article represents background material that can be used e along with the "United States v. Windsor" case to teach Constitutional Law (particularly federalism, due process, and equal protection) and the legal debate surrounding same-sex marriage in America. Professors may assign it as background reading before or after a…

  11. Geologic and geotechnical investigation of the Windsor Park subdivision North Las Vegas, Nevada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Linnert, L.M.; Werle, J.L.; Stilley, A.N.; Olsen, B.L.

    1994-01-01

    The Windsor Park subdivision in North Las Vegas, Nevada has received widespread attention for damage to the homes and infrastructure from fissures, land subsidence and adverse soil conditions. Between March and July, 1992, Converse Consultants Southwest, Inc. conducted a geologic and geotechnical investigation for the Windsor Park Revitalization Project. The purpose of the work was to investigate the probable factors contributing to the reported damage and distress in the area, evaluate the potential for future damage, and assess the feasibility of possible mitigation and repair. The site is constructed on the juncture of at least two subsidence-related fault scarps, and earth fissures have been extensively mapped in the Windsor Park and surrounding area. A total of twenty-one trenches and fifteen borings were located within the subdivision and around the perimeter to observe subsurface geologic features and to collect samples for laboratory testing. The primary causes of damage within the development were found to be (1) earth fissuring and (2) expansive clays. The risk of future damage to structures at the Windsor Park site was also evaluated. A high potential for fissuring was found at the site, and future structural distress in the area will likely be similar to past damage. Although engineering upgrades will reduce the risk posed by underlying expansive clays, they cannot totally eliminate the risk from fissuring. 10 refs., 8 figs., 1 tab

  12. 76 FR 40688 - Foreign-Trade Zone 71-Windsor Locks, CT Application for Expansion

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-11

    ... DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE Foreign-Trade Zones Board [Docket 47-2011] Foreign-Trade Zone 71--Windsor Locks, CT Application for Expansion An application has been submitted to the Foreign-Trade Zones Board... application was submitted pursuant to the provisions of the Foreign- Trade Zones Act, as amended (19 U.S.C...

  13. 77 FR 15356 - Expansion of Foreign-Trade Zone 71; Windsor Locks, CT

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-15

    ... DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE Foreign-Trade Zones Board [Order No. 1818] Expansion of Foreign-Trade Zone 71; Windsor Locks, CT Pursuant to its authority under the Foreign-Trade Zones Act of June 18, 1934, as amended (19 U.S.C. 81a-81u), the Foreign-Trade Zones Board (the Board) adopts the following Order...

  14. Sports Institute for Research/Change Agent Research (SIR/CAR) Windsor Minor Hockey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moriarty, Dick; Duthie, James

    This organizational analysis of Windsor minor hockey was conducted as a pilot study into the policy decision making process in a sports organization. The study was divided into three phases. In the first phase the organization was audited and provided with information about various feedback channels. In phase two observations, available…

  15. Change Agent Research: Phase I-Organizational Audit and Communication Feedback Applied to Windsor Minor Lacrosse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moriarty, Dick; Jones, Patti

    This study reports the results of a pilot Change Agent Research (CAR) project initiated in the summer of 1975 by the Sports Institute for Research (SIR) for the Windsor Minor Lacrosse Association. The purpose of the project was to audit the association to diagnose the nature of its organizational problems and assist in initiating change in order…

  16. Grief, Anger, Social Action: Experiences of the Windsor Chapter, Mothers against Drunk Driving (MADD).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kroeker, B. J.; And Others

    1994-01-01

    The experiences of the Windsor, Ontario, Canada, chapter of Mothers Against Drunk Driving (MADD), in its development and progress through the grief-anger-social action continuum, are described. This article also portrays a model for problem resolution which emphasizes incorporating the respective strengths and efficiencies of self-help groups and…

  17. 33 CFR 117.205 - Connecticut River.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Connecticut River. 117.205 Section 117.205 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Connecticut § 117.205 Connecticut River. (a) The...

  18. Residential Energy Efficiency Potential: Connecticut

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilson, Eric J [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2017-11-16

    Energy used by Connecticut single-family homes that can be saved through cost-effective improvements. Prepared by Eric Wilson and Noel Merket, NREL, and Erin Boyd, U.S. Department of Energy Office of Energy Policy and Systems Analysis.

  19. Dynamics of Connecticut hemlock stands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeffrey S. Ward; David M. Smith

    2000-01-01

    The stand dynamics and production of two one-acre plots of eastern hemlock (Tsuga canadensis L) in Connecticut have been followed for more than six decades. Data were recorded for all individual trees. One plot (Saltonstall) was established in 1924 after the removal of a hardwood overstory. This stand had a nearly pure, almost fully closed understory...

  20. NOAA coastal Connecticut infrared (IR) orthorectified mosaic image tiles, Connecticut, 2004 (NODC Accession 0086838)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The NOAA Coastal Services Center purchased digital ADS40 imagery and digital elevation models of the Connecticut coastline in 2004. The Coastal Connecticut project...

  1. NOAA coastal Connecticut true color RGB orthorectified mosaic image tiles, Connecticut, 2004 (NODC Accession 0086893)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The NOAA Coastal Services Center purchased digital ADS40 imagery and digital elevation models of the Connecticut coastline in 2004. The Coastal Connecticut project...

  2. National Program for Inspection of Non-Federal Dams. Goss Brook Dam (CT 00465), Thames River Basin, Ashford, Connecticut. Phase I Inspection Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-09-01

    A. J. MF, CCHI , A ENG iRS A. J / cc. State of Connecticut Water Resources Comission State Office Building Lzrtford, Connecticut B- 14 Ce !ater -’v’jr...appeared to be satisfactory. Very truly yours, A. J. CCHI /,ENGINEERS H 1~AH0tMAN, P. E. B/ , / / ,. iI B- 26 ,J. M A C C H I E N G I N E E R S D.R

  3. Cable in Connecticut; a Citizen's Handbook.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cleland, Margaret

    This handbook for Connecticut cable television consumers addresses a variety of topics, including: (1) a definition of cable television services; (2) the public stake in cable television; (3) program variety; (4) pay cable service; (5) public satellites; (6) government regulation; (7) proposed regulation; (8) role of the Connecticut Public…

  4. Connecticut church passes genetics resolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Culliton, B J

    1984-11-09

    The Connecticut Conference of the United Church of Christ, which represents the largest Protestant denomination in the state, has passed a resolution affirming an ethical duty to do research on human gene therapy and is planning to form local church groups to study the scientific and ethical issues involved. The resolution is intended to counter an earlier one proposed by Jeremy Rifkin to ban all efforts at engineering specific traits into the human germline. The Rifkin proposal had been endorsed by a large number of religious leaders, including the head of the U.S. United Church of Christ, but was subsequently characterized by many of the church leaders as overly restrictive.

  5. Windsor and Perry: Reactions of Siblings in Same-Sex and Heterosexual Couples

    OpenAIRE

    Clark, Jennifer B; Riggle, Ellen DB; Rostosky, Sharon S; Rothblum, Esther D; Balsam, Kimberly F

    2015-01-01

    The U.S. Supreme Court decisions in U.S. v. Windsor (570 U.S. 307) and Hollingsworth v. Perry (570 U.S. 399) created a focal point for public discussion of marriage equality for same-sex couples. This article reports the results of an exploratory study of the reactions of individuals currently or previously in same-sex couple relationships and a heterosexual sibling who is currently or previously married (N = 371) to the Supreme Court decisions. Thematic content analysis was used to explore p...

  6. Fracture overprinting history using Markov chain analysis: Windsor-Kennetcook subbasin, Maritimes Basin, Canada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snyder, Morgan E.; Waldron, John W. F.

    2018-03-01

    The deformation history of the Upper Paleozoic Maritimes Basin, Atlantic Canada, can be partially unraveled by examining fractures (joints, veins, and faults) that are well exposed on the shorelines of the macrotidal Bay of Fundy, in subsurface core, and on image logs. Data were collected from coastal outcrops and well core across the Windsor-Kennetcook subbasin, a subbasin in the Maritimes Basin, using the circular scan-line and vertical scan-line methods in outcrop, and FMI Image log analysis of core. We use cross-cutting and abutting relationships between fractures to understand relative timing of fracturing, followed by a statistical test (Markov chain analysis) to separate groups of fractures. This analysis, previously used in sedimentology, was modified to statistically test the randomness of fracture timing relationships. The results of the Markov chain analysis suggest that fracture initiation can be attributed to movement along the Minas Fault Zone, an E-W fault system that bounds the Windsor-Kennetcook subbasin to the north. Four sets of fractures are related to dextral strike slip along the Minas Fault Zone in the late Paleozoic, and four sets are related to sinistral reactivation of the same boundary in the Mesozoic.

  7. 2015 USACE NAE Topobathy Lidar DEM: Connecticut

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — These data were collected for the USACE New England District (NAE). The data set is made up of 13 small projects in Connecticut. These projects are: Bridgeport,...

  8. Applying transportation asset management in Connecticut.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-12-01

    The study consists primarily of a detailed review of those states that utilize transportation asset management (TAM) systems that may be applicable for Connecticuts consideration, and includes as well the identification of a comprehensive pavement...

  9. Identification of potential regional sources of atmospheric total gaseous mercury in Windsor, Ontario, Canada using hybrid receptor modeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    X. Xu

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Windsor (Ontario, Canada experiences trans-boundary air pollution as it is located on the border immediately downwind of industrialized regions of the United States of America. A study was conducted in 2007 to identify the potential regional sources of total gaseous mercury (TGM and investigate the effects of regional sources and other factors on seasonal variability of TGM concentrations in Windsor.

    TGM concentration was measured at the University of Windsor campus using a Tekran® 2537A Hg vapour analyzer. An annual mean of 2.02±1.63 ng/m3 was observed in 2007. The average TGM concentration was high in the summer (2.48±2.68 ng/m3 and winter (2.17±2.01 ng/m3, compared to spring (1.88±0.78 ng/m3 and fall (1.76±0.58 ng/m3. Hybrid receptor modeling potential source contribution function (PSCF was used by incorporating 72-h backward trajectories and measurements of TGM in Windsor. The results of PSCF were analyzed in conjunction with the Hg emissions inventory of North America (by state/province to identify regions affecting Windsor. In addition to annual modeling, seasonal PSCF modeling was also conducted. The potential source region was identified between 24–61° N and 51–143° W. Annual PSCF modeling identified major sources southwest of Windsor, stretching from Ohio to Texas. The emissions inventory also supported the findings, as Hg emissions were high in those regions. Results of seasonal PSCF modeling were analyzed to find the combined effects of regional sources, meteorological conditions, and surface re-emissions, on seasonal variability of Hg concentrations. It was found that the summer and winter highs of atmospheric Hg can be attributed to areas where large numbers of coal fired power plants are located in the USA. Weak atmospheric dispersion due to low winds and high re-emission from surfaces due to higher temperatures also contributed to high concentrations in

  10. Gender Identity and Gender Performativity in Shakespeare’s Selected Plays: Macbeth, Hamlet and Merry Wives of Windsor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehdi Amiri

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The main argument of this article is focused on three plays by William Shakespeare, Macbeth, Hamlet and Merry Wives of Windsor. There are several points in these plays which deal with woman and their rights. This article deals with Shakespeare’s plays in relation to feminism, which pays more attention to the rights of women and their true identity. In all societies women are defined in terms of their relations to men as the center of power to which women have limited or no access. Judith Butler's performativity is significance on understandings of gender identity. Butler believes that gender is produced in society; also it can be changed in society. Feminism should aim to create a society in which, one's sexual anatomy is irrelevant to who one is, and what one does. Shakespeare’s view of a woman is shown through his representation of female characters in his plays specifically in Macbeth, Hamlet and Merry Wives of Windsor.

  11. Agribusiness Management. The Connecticut Vocational Agriculture Curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    EASTCONN Regional Educational Services Center, North Windham, CT.

    These materials in agribusiness management for the Connecticut Vocational Agriculture Curriculum were designed for use in the following areas: Animal Science; Plant Science; Agricultural Mechanics; and Natural Resources and Aquaculture. Each unit of this competency-based guide contains title of unit, unit length, grade level, objectives, teacher…

  12. Numerical modeling of eastern connecticut's visual resources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniel L. Civco

    1979-01-01

    A numerical model capable of accurately predicting the preference for landscape photographs of selected points in eastern Connecticut is presented. A function of the social attitudes expressed toward thirty-two salient visual landscape features serves as the independent variable in predicting preferences. A technique for objectively assigning adjectives to landscape...

  13. Evaluation of Connecticut's Interdistrict Magnet Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cobb, Casey D.; Bifulco, Robert; Bell, Courtney

    2009-01-01

    As of October 2007, 54 interdistrict magnet schools enrolling 18,928 students were operating in Connecticut. The bulk of these schools are located in the Hartford and New Haven areas--21 in the Hartford area and 17 in the New Haven area. Interdistrict magnets also serve significant numbers of students in the Waterbury region. In keeping with the…

  14. School Finance Reform: The Challenge Facing Connecticut.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jennings, John F.

    1979-01-01

    Traces the presence of tax burden equity and educational funding equity interests in recent court rulings in order to place Connecticut's Horton vs Meskill in context. Also describes the California and New Jersey state legislatures' responses to similar state Supreme Court rulings on school finance. (Author/IRT)

  15. 76 FR 35978 - Drawbridge Operation Regulations; Connecticut River, Old Lyme, CT

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-21

    ... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 117 Drawbridge Operation Regulations; Connecticut River, Old Lyme, CT... of the Amtrak Railroad Bridge at mile 3.4, across the Connecticut River at Old Lyme, Connecticut. The... INFORMATION: The Amtrak Railroad Bridge, across the Connecticut River at mile 3.4, at Old Lyme, Connecticut...

  16. Sexual Networking and Partner Characteristics Among Single, African, Caribbean, and Black Youth in Windsor, Ontario.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerr, Jelani; Maticka-Tyndale, Eleanor; Bynum, Shalanda; Mihan, Robert

    2017-10-01

    The disproportionate HIV burden shared by African, Caribbean, and Black (ACB) populations in Canada has not been explained by unique sexual behaviors in this population. This study investigates partner selection and sexual networking as potential contributors to HIV vulnerability. The study examines variations in the characteristics of sexual partners and sexual networking across groups based on differences in ethno-religious identity, gender, and length of Canadian residency among single, 16- to 27-year old, heterosexual-identified, ACB individuals living in Windsor, Ontario, Canada. Respondent-driven sampling maximized the representativeness of the sample of 250 (45 % male; 55 % female) youth with penile-vaginal intercourse experience who completed surveys. Logistic regression and analysis of variance compared groups with respect to number of lifetime partners, concurrency of sexual relationships, non-relational and age disparate partnering, and intra-ethnic sexual networking. For vulnerability associated with number of partners, concurrency and non-relational sex, women, newcomers to Canada, and African-Muslim participants were at lower vulnerability for HIV infection than their comparator groups. For vulnerability associated with sexual networking within a group with higher HIV prevalence, women and newcomers to Canada were at higher vulnerability to HIV infection than their comparator groups. There were insufficient data on age disparate partnering to support analysis. These results point to the importance of considering characteristics of partners and sexual networking both in further research and in developing policies and programs to curtail the spread of HIV and other sexually transmitted infections.

  17. Windsor and Perry: reactions of siblings in same-sex and heterosexual couples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Jennifer B; Riggle, Ellen D B; Rostosky, Sharon S; Rothblum, Esther D; Balsam, Kimberly F

    2015-01-01

    The U.S. Supreme Court decisions in U.S. v. Windsor (570 U.S. 307) and Hollingsworth v. Perry (570 U.S. 399) created a focal point for public discussion of marriage equality for same-sex couples. This article reports the results of an exploratory study of the reactions of individuals currently or previously in same-sex couple relationships and a heterosexual sibling who is currently or previously married (N = 371) to the Supreme Court decisions. Thematic content analysis was used to explore participants' responses to an open-ended question on a survey. Reactions of individuals from same-sex couples revealed the following themes: (1) longitudinal perspectives on the advancement of rights for same-sex couples; (2) emotional responses celebrating the decisions or expressing relief; (3) affirmation of their relationship or rights; (4) practical consequences of the extension of rights; and (5) minority stress related to anticipation of future prejudice or discrimination. Themes in the heterosexual siblings' responses were (1) ally support; (2) flat support without emotion or elaboration; (3) indifference to or ignorance about the decisions; and (4) disapproval of the decisions. These themes are compared and discussed in light of prior research on reactions to marriage restriction debates and marriage (in)equality and family relationships.

  18. Babesia microti, human babesiosis, and Borrelia burgdorferi in Connecticut.

    OpenAIRE

    Anderson, J F; Mintz, E D; Gadbaw, J J; Magnarelli, L A

    1991-01-01

    Babesia microti was isolated from a white-footed mouse (Peromyscus leucopus) that was captured in southeastern Connecticut in 1988, when the first human case of babesiosis acquired in Connecticut was recognized. To date, 13 cases of babesiosis have been reported in Connecticut, the largest number of human cases reported on the mainland United States. Two of nine patients quiried remembered a prior tick bite. Since Babesia parasites are known to be vectored only by ticks, we surmise that 12 of...

  19. Survey of Connecticut Nurse-Midwives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holland, Margaret L; Holland, Eliza S

    2007-01-01

    Descriptive data on nurse-midwifery income, workload, job definitions, employment benefits, and clinical practices are limited. Information about nurse-midwifery practice today is important for the growth of the profession and for future policy initiatives. A survey of nurse-midwives in Connecticut was conducted in 2005. This article reports state-specific data about income, workload, job definitions, employment benefits, and clinical issues, such as vaginal birth after cesarean. Full-time midwives in Connecticut worked an average of 77 hours per week, had a mean salary of 79,554 dollars, and 87% had on-call responsibilities. A "typical" Connecticut midwife had an "average" full-time work week consisting of two 24-hour call days and three 7-hour office days, seeing 19 to 24 patients per office day. Most held Master of Science in Nursing degrees, worked in physician-owned practices, and attended births in hospitals or medical centers. Health insurance, paid sick time, and retirement plans were offered to most respondents. Almost all respondents provide gynecologic, antepartum, and postpartum care, but few offer newborn care. There is significant variation in restrictions on midwives offering vaginal birth after cesarean and on length of scheduled appointments. Data on expanded practices, such as first-assisting caesarean sections and endometrial biopsies, are reported for the first time.

  20. 77 FR 68798 - Connecticut; Emergency and Related Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-11-16

    ... determined that the emergency conditions in the State of Connecticut resulting from Hurricane Sandy beginning... State of Connecticut have been designated as adversely affected by this declared emergency: All counties... Assistance (DUA); 97.046, Fire Management Assistance Grant; 97.048, Disaster Housing Assistance to...

  1. 76 FR 61373 - Connecticut; Emergency and Related Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-04

    ... determined that the emergency conditions in the State of Connecticut resulting from Hurricane Irene beginning... designated as adversely affected by this declared emergency: All eight counties in the State of Connecticut... Management Assistance Grant; 97.048, Disaster Housing Assistance to Individuals and Households In...

  2. A SIR/CAR Systems Analysis of the Longitudinal Changes in Little League Baseball Comparing Windsor with the Rest of Ontario and Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zarebski, John; Moriarty, Dick

    The trends and changes occurring in Windsor District 5 Little League Baseball between 1971 and 1978 were closely monitored in order for researchers to discern the results of Sports Institute for Research/Change Agent Research (SIR/CAR) intervention in these programs. Comparisons of the 1972, 1976, and 1978 studies reveal that the values focus of…

  3. Gun Violence, mental health, and Connecticut physicians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dodds, Peter R; Anderson, Caitlyn O; Dodds, Jon H

    2014-01-01

    While there is a public perception that gun violence is associated with mental illness we present evidence that it is a complex public health problem which defies simple characterizations and solutions. Only a small percentage of individuals with mental illness are at risk for extreme violence and they account for only a small percentage of gun-related homicides. Individuals who are at risk for gun violence are difficult to identify and successfully treat. The incidence, and perhaps the demographics, of gun violence vary substantially from state to state. We make a case for Connecticut physicians to study gun violence at the state level. We recommend that Connecticut physicians promote and expand upon the American Academy of Pediatrics' recommendation for creating a "safe home environment. "We suggest that guns be secured in all homes in which there are children. In addition we suggest that guns be voluntarily removed from homes in which there are individuals with a history of violence, threats of violence, depression, drug and/or alcohol abuse, and individuals with major mental illnesses who are not cooperating with therapy.

  4. Deposition of a saline giant in the Mississippian Windsor Group, Nova Scotia, and the nascent Late Paleozoic Ice Age

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacNeil, Laura A.; Pufahl, Peir K.; James, Noel P.

    2018-01-01

    Saline giants are vast marine evaporite deposits that currently have no modern analogues and remain one of the most enigmatic of chemical sedimentary rocks. The Mississippian Windsor Group (ca. 345 Ma), Maritimes Basin, Atlantic Canada is a saline giant that consists of two evaporite-rich sedimentary sequences that are subdivided into five subzones. Sequence 1 is composed almost entirely of thick halite belonging to Subzone A (Osagean). Sequence 2 is in unconformable contact and comprised of stacked carbonate-evaporite peritidal cycles of Subzones B through E (Meramecian). Subzone B, the focus of research herein, documents the transition from wholly evaporitic to open marine conditions and thus, preserves an exceptional window into the processes forming saline giants. Lithofacies stacking patterns in Subzone B reveal that higher-order fluctuations in relative sea level produced nine stacked parasequences interpreted to reflect high frequency glacioeustatic oscillations during the onset of the Late Paleozoic Ice Age. Each parasequence reflects progradation of intertidal and sabkha sediments over subtidal carbonate and evaporite deposits. Dissimilarities in cycle composition between sub-basins imply the development of contrasting brine chemistries from differing recharge rates with the open ocean. What the Windsor Group shows is that evaporite type is ostensibly linked to the amplitude and frequency of sea level rise and fall during deposition. True saline giants, like the basinwide evaporites of Sequence 1, apparently require low amplitude, long frequency changes in sea level to promote the development of stable brine pools that are only periodically recharged with seawater. By contrast, the high amplitude, short frequency glacioeustatic variability in sea level that controlled the accumulation of peritidal evaporites in Subzone B produce smaller, subeconomic deposits with more complex facies relationships.

  5. Connecticut ITS/CVO business plan : final report

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998-06-01

    This document describes: goals and objectives for Connecticut ITS/CVO deployment; current regulatory structure and activities; envisioned process changes enabled by ITS/CVO technologies; how motor carriers perceive the value of ITS/CVO services; bene...

  6. Connecticut Transit (CTTRANSIT) Fuel Cell Transit Bus Preliminary Evaluation Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-10-16

    This report describes operations at Connecticut Transit (CTTRANSIT) in Hartford for one prototype fuel cell bus and three new diesel buses operating from the same location. The report discusses the planned fuel cell bus demonstration and equipment us...

  7. Connecticut Statewide LiDAR 2016 - Blocks 1-7

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This metadata record describes the Classified Point Cloud (LAS) for the 2016 Connecticut LiDAR project covering approximately 5240 square miles in seven blocks. The...

  8. Geospatial relationships of air pollution and acute asthma events across the Detroit-Windsor international border: study design and preliminary results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemke, Lawrence D; Lamerato, Lois E; Xu, Xiaohong; Booza, Jason C; Reiners, John J; Raymond Iii, Delbert M; Villeneuve, Paul J; Lavigne, Eric; Larkin, Dana; Krouse, Helene J

    2014-07-01

    The Geospatial Determinants of Health Outcomes Consortium (GeoDHOC) study investigated ambient air quality across the international border between Detroit, Michigan, USA and Windsor, Ontario, Canada and its association with acute asthma events in 5- to 89-year-old residents of these cities. NO2, SO2, and volatile organic compounds (VOCs) were measured at 100 sites, and particulate matter (PM) and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) at 50 sites during two 2-week sampling periods in 2008 and 2009. Acute asthma event rates across neighborhoods in each city were calculated using emergency room visits and hospitalizations and standardized to the overall age and gender distribution of the population in the two cities combined. Results demonstrate that intra-urban air quality variations are related to adverse respiratory events in both cities. Annual 2008 asthma rates exhibited statistically significant positive correlations with total VOCs and total benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene and xylene (BTEX) at 5-digit zip code scale spatial resolution in Detroit. In Windsor, NO2, VOCs, and PM10 concentrations correlated positively with 2008 asthma rates at a similar 3-digit postal forward sortation area scale. The study is limited by its coarse temporal resolution (comparing relatively short term air quality measurements to annual asthma health data) and interpretation of findings is complicated by contrasts in population demographics and health-care delivery systems in Detroit and Windsor.

  9. Cost-Effectiveness Analysis of the Residential Provisions of the 2015 IECC for Connecticut

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mendon, Vrushali V. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Zhao, Mingjie [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Taylor, Zachary T. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Poehlman, Eric A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2016-02-15

    The 2015 IECC provides cost-effective savings for residential buildings in Connecticut. Moving to the 2015 IECC from the 2009 IECC base code is cost-effective for residential buildings in all climate zones in Connecticut.

  10. Comparison of the use of notched wedge joints vs. traditional butt joints in Connecticut

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-11-07

    Performance of Hot Mix Asphalt (HMA) longitudinal joints have been an item of increasing scrutiny in : Connecticut. The traditional butt joint has typically been the method used in Connecticut. These joints : have been reportedly opening up, creating...

  11. Under Connecticut Skies: Exploring 100 Years of Astronomy at Van Vleck Observatory in Middletown, Connecticut

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilgard, Roy E.; Williams, Amrys; Erickson, Paul; Herbst, William; Redfield, Seth

    2017-01-01

    Under Connecticut Skies examines the history of astronomy at Van Vleck Observatory, located on the campus of Wesleyan University in Middletown, Connecticut. Since its dedication in June of 1916, Van Vleck has been an important site of astronomical research, teaching, and public outreach. Over a thousand visitors pass through the observatory each year, and regular public observing nights happen year-round in cooperation with the Astronomical Society of Greater Hartford. Our project explores the place-based nature of astronomical research, the scientific instruments, labor, and individuals that have connected places around the world in networks of observation, and the broader history of how observational astronomy has linked local people, amateur observers, professional astronomers, and the tools and objects that have facilitated their work under Connecticut’s skies over the past 100 years. Our research team has produced a historical exhibition to help commemorate the observatory’s centennial that opened to the public in May of 2016. Our work included collecting, documenting, and interpretting this history through objects, archival documents, oral histories, photographs, and more. The result is both a museum and a working history "laboratory" for use by student and professional researchers. In addition to the exhibit itself, we have engaged in new interpretive programs to help bring the history of astronomy to life. Future work will include digitization of documents and teaching slides, further collection of oral histories, and expanding the collection to the web for use by off-site researches.

  12. The State of Connecticut: The Report of the Governor's Commission on Tax Reform. Summary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Governor's Commission on Tax Reform, Hartford, CT.

    The Commission evaluated a wide variety of alternative tax sources and examined the existing structure in Connecticut. It specifically evaluated inequities resulting from Connecticut taxes as they affect various classes of citizens and examined the impact of the Connecticut tax structure on business with a view to encouraging economic expansion.…

  13. 77 FR 6465 - Drawbridge Operation Regulations; Connecticut River, Old Lyme, CT

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-08

    ... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 117 Drawbridge Operation Regulations; Connecticut River, Old Lyme, CT... of the Old Saybrook-Old Lyme RR Bridge, mile 3.4, across the Connecticut River at Old Lyme... INFORMATION: The Old Saybrook-Old Lyme RR Bridge at mile 3.4, across the Connecticut River at Old Lyme...

  14. Quaternary Geologic Map of Connecticut and Long Island Sound Basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stone, Janet Radway; Schafer, John P.; London, Elizabeth Haley; DiGiacomo-Cohen, Mary L.; Lewis, Ralph S.; Thompson, Woodrow B.

    2005-01-01

    The Quaternary geologic map (sheet 1) and explanatory figures and cross sections (sheet 2) portray the geologic features formed in Connecticut during the Quaternary Period, which includes the Pleistocene (glacial) and Holocene (postglacial) Epochs. The Quaternary Period has been a time of development of many details of the landscape and of all the surficial deposits. At least twice in the late Pleistocene, continental ice sheets swept across Connecticut. Their effects are of pervasive importance to the present occupants of the land. The Quaternary geologic map illustrates the geologic history and the distribution of depositional environments during the emplacement of glacial and postglacial surficial deposits and the landforms resulting from those events.

  15. Water resources inventory of Connecticut Part 7: upper Connecticut River basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryder, Robert B.; Thomas, Mendall P.; Weiss, Lawrence A.

    1981-01-01

    The 508 square miles of the upper Connecticut River basin in north-central Connecticut include the basins of four major tributaries: the Scantic, Park, and Hockanum Rivers, and the Farmington River downstream from Tariffville. Precipitation over this area averaged 44 inches per year during 1931-60. In this period, an additional 3,800 billion gallons of water per year entered the basin in the main stem of the Connecticut River at the Massachusetts state line, about 230 billion gallons per year in the Farmington River at Tariffville, and about 10 billion gallons per year in the Seantic River at the Massachusetts state line. Some water was also imported from outside the basin by water-supply systems. About half the precipitation, 22.2 inches, was lost from the basin by evapotranspiration; the remainder flowed out of the study area in the Connecticut River at Portland. Variations in streamflow at 41 long-term continuous-record gaging stations are summarized in standardized graphs and tables that can be used to estimate streamflow characteristics at other sites. For example, mean-flow and two low-flow characteristics: (1) the 7-day annual minimum flow for 2-year and (2) 10-year recurrence intervals, have been determined for many partial-record stations throughout the basin. Of the 30 principal lakes, ponds, and reservoirs, two have usable storage capacities of more than 1 billion gallons. The maximum safe draft rate (regulated flow) of the largest of these, Shenipsit Lake at Rockville, is 6.5 million gallons per day for the 2-year and 30-year recurrence intervals (median and lowest annual flow). Floods have occurred within each month of the year but in different years. The greatest known flood on the Connecticut River was in March 1936; it had a peak flow of 130,000 cubic feet per second at Hartford. Since then, major floods have been reduced by flood-control measures. The major aquifers underlying the basin are composed of unconsolidated materials (stratified drift and

  16. (2012 30 Windsor Y B Access Just 103 A VIEW FROM WITHIN: RECONCEPTUALIZING MEDIATOR INTERACTIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Debbie De Girolamo

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper explores mediator interactions from within the mediation process. It is difficult to obtain access to mediations due to issues of confidentiality and litigation privilege, thus restricting direct empirical research. During a yearlong ethnographic study during which the author was a participant-observer of a number of commercial mediations, the nature of mediations was explored from an independent observational perspective – separate from the process yet within the process. In this study, real life patterns of interactions are examined through case study analysis. It offers a reconceptualization of the nature of mediator interventions, one that moves beyond the accepted understanding of third party intervention. It suggests that the mediator has a fugitive identity in mediation, reflecting a traditional neutral third party intervener role, a party role and an adviser role. Dans le présent document, l‟auteure explore les interactions des médiateurs dans le cadre du processus de médiation. Il est difficile d‟obtenir l‟accès aux séances de médiation en raison du secret professionnel et du privilège relatif au litige, et cette difficulté limite la recherche empirique directe. Au cours d‟une étude ethnographique qui s‟est déroulée sur une année et à laquelle l‟auteure a participé comme observatrice d‟un certain nombre de médiations commerciales, la nature des médiations a été explorée d‟un point de vue observationnel indépendant – distinct du processus bien qu‟au sein du processus. Dans la présente étude, des situations réelles d‟interaction sont examinées au moyen de l‟analyse d‟études de cas. L‟auteure offre une reconceptualisation de la nature des interventions du médiateur, qui va au-delà de ce qui est reconnu comme l‟intervention d‟une tierce partie. Le médiateur aurait une identité fugace dans le processus de médiation, cette identité s‟expliquant par un r

  17. Digital Learning Compass: Distance Education State Almanac 2017. Connecticut

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seaman, Julia E.; Seaman, Jeff

    2017-01-01

    This brief report uses data collected under the U.S. Department of Education's National Center for Educational Statistics (NCES) Integrated Postsecondary Education Data System (IPEDS) Fall Enrollment survey to highlight distance education data in the state of Connecticut. The sample for this analysis is comprised of all active, degree-granting…

  18. Connecticut School Integration: Moving Forward as the Northeast Retreats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orfield, Gary

    2015-01-01

    This report analyzes the data on changes in patterns of racial segregation and their education consequences over a quarter century, from l987 to 2012. It examines a major transition in the racial and ethnic composition of Connecticut and the changes in integration and segregation in the schools of the state and its urban communities and it…

  19. Connecticut Children's Medical Center multi-year branding campaign.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Botvin, J

    2000-01-01

    As the only children's hospital in the state, Connecticut Children's Medical Center was challenged by the inherent complacency of parents. It met the challenge through a multi-level marketing effort which included television and radio, community outreach and strong media relations. By emphasizing the unique nature of children, the campaign affirms the need for a specialized children's health center.

  20. Connecticut Public Higher Education: 2011 System Trends. Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connecticut Department of Higher Education (NJ1), 2011

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents the public higher education system trends in Connecticut for 2011. This report contains the following sections: (1) Higher Education in a Statewide Context; (2) Expenditure Trends; (3) Comparative Funding Indicators; (4) Enrollment Trends; (5) Position Trends; (6) Tuition and Fees; (7) Student and State Share of Costs; and (8)…

  1. Connecticut Public Higher Education: 2009 System Trends. Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connecticut Department of Higher Education (NJ1), 2009

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents the public higher education system trends in Connecticut for 2009. This report contains the following sections: (1) Higher Education in a Statewide Context; (2) Expenditure Trends; (3) Comparative Funding Indicators; (4) Enrollment Trends; (5) Degrees Conferred; (6) Position Trends; (7) Tuition and Fees; (8) Student and State…

  2. 27 CFR 9.122 - Western Connecticut Highlands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... Town of Barkhamstead (Litchfield-Hartford County line); (5) The boundary then goes south approximately 25 miles along the Litchfield-Hartford County line to the southeast corner of the Town of Plymouth... the Litchfield-New Haven County line to Connecticut Route #8 at Waterville in the Town of Waterbury...

  3. Learning Communities: Animal Science at the University of Connecticut

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zinn, Anne T.; Foreman, Melissa D.; Masso, Lauren Griffin; Ouimette, David T.; Zinn, Steven A.

    2015-01-01

    The University of Connecticut (UConn) is a public Carnegie Foundation Research institution with 14 schools and colleges that enrolls more than 18,000 undergraduate students at the main campus in Storrs, CT. Beginning in 1999, First-Year Experience (FYE) seminars were offered to entering freshman students. Since that time, the size of the program…

  4. 77 FR 68800 - Connecticut; Major Disaster and Related Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-11-16

    ... resulting from Hurricane Sandy beginning on October 27, 2012, and continuing, is of sufficient severity and... section 310(a), Priority to Certain Applications for Public Facility and Public Housing Assistance, 42 U.S... Connecticut have been designated as adversely affected by this major disaster: Fairfield, Middlesex, New Haven...

  5. Babesia microti, human babesiosis, and Borrelia burgdorferi in Connecticut.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, J F; Mintz, E D; Gadbaw, J J; Magnarelli, L A

    1991-12-01

    Babesia microti was isolated from a white-footed mouse (Peromyscus leucopus) that was captured in southeastern Connecticut in 1988, when the first human case of babesiosis acquired in Connecticut was recognized. To date, 13 cases of babesiosis have been reported in Connecticut, the largest number of human cases reported on the mainland United States. Two of nine patients quiried remembered a prior tick bite. Since Babesia parasites are known to be vectored only by ticks, we surmise that 12 of these infections were acquired via tick bites; 1 was obtained by blood transfusion (the patient was 46 years of age) from an endemically infected donor. The ages of the patients with tick-acquired babesiosis ranged from 61 to 95 years. Two patients died with active infections, and one patient died from chronic obstructive pulmonary disease soon after treatment with clindamycin and quinine. Indirect fluorescent-antibody titers of blood samples drawn at the time of hospitalization for 11 patients and at the time of active infection for 1 asymptomatic person ranged from 1:1,024 to 1:4,096. Five of eight patients with babesiosis also had significant immunoglobulin G or immunoglobulin M titers (1:640 to 1:5,120) to Borrelia burgdorferi. B. microti was isolated in Syrian hamsters inoculated with blood from 7 of 12 patients tested and was also isolated from mice captured in six towns. The peridomestic nature of the disease was demonstrated by isolating the parasite from white-footed mice captured in or near the yards of eight different patients. Of 59 mice tested, 27 were positive and 25 were coinfected with B. burgdorferi. The isolation of B. microti from a white-footed mouse captured in north-central Connecticut (West Hartford), away from the focus of human infections in southeastern Connecticut, suggests that this pathogen may spread into other areas where Ixodes dammini, the tick vector, becomes established.

  6. Confirmatory Survey Results for the Emergency Operations Facility (EOF) at the Connecticut Yankee Haddam Neck Plant, Haddam, Connecticut

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    W. C. Adams

    2007-01-01

    The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) requested that the Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE) perform a confirmatory survey on the Emergency Operations Facility (EOF) at the Connecticut Yankee Haddam Neck Plant (HNP) in Haddam, Connecticut. The US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) requested that the Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE) perform a confirmatory survey on the Emergency Operations Facility (EOF) at the Connecticut Yankee Haddam Neck Plant (HNP) in Haddam, Connecticut. The EOF building was used for emergency operations, a training center, and as an in-processing center for the HNP site. Whole body counters and the respirator fit test facility were also located in the EOF. Currently, the EOF is used as office space for the decommissioning project and recently, the Health Physics (HP) Count Room and Final Status Survey (FSS) instrumentation calibration activities were relocated to this facility. The EOF has always been located outside of the Radiological Control Area (RCA). The only known licensed radioactive materials used or stored in the facility were sealed calibration/check sources used for HP instruments and the Whole Body Counter and soil samples containing small amounts of radioactivity. During the free release surveys (FRS), Connecticut Yankee Atomic Power Company (CYAPCO) personnel identified several areas of elevated activity; most of the areas of identified elevated activity were deemed to be from naturally occurring radioactive materials (NORM) within clay tiles. One location of site-generated elevated activity was determined on the floor in the north hallway. At this location, a portion of the carpet was removed for further evaluation by gamma spectroscopy and the results indicated cesium-137 (Cs-137) and cobalt-60 (Co-60) contamination within the carpet. It was suspected that the contamination entered the facility by adhering to the bottom of a workers shoe and was transferred to the carpet. The

  7. Connecticut – Sexual Orientation and Gender Identity Law and Documentation of Discrimination

    OpenAIRE

    Sears, Brad

    2009-01-01

    A Connecticut statute bans employment discrimination on the basis of sexual orientation. No Connecticut statutes prohibit discrimination on the basis of gender identity or expression. In November 2000, the Connecticut Commission on Human Rights and Opportunities – the agency responsible for administering the anti-discrimination statutes and for processing discrimination complaints – ruled that statutes prohibiting sex discrimination also banned discrimination on the basis of gender identity. ...

  8. Costs of non-helmeted motorcycle riding in Connecticut.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eltorai, Adam E M; Daniels, Alan H; Grauer, Jonathan N; Browner, Bruce D; Born, Christopher T

    2014-02-01

    Motorcycle-related head injuries and fatalities are a serious public health concern that can be reduced with helmet use. Caring for crash victims places additional economic stress on the healthcare system. The current Connecticut motorcycle helmet law does not require all motorcyclists to wear helmets. Universal motorcycle helmet laws increase helmet use. Efforts to increase helmet use through education and legislation should be considered for review, given the number of deaths and injuries that could be prevented.

  9. 40 CFR 81.184 - Northwestern Connecticut Intrastate Air Quality Control Region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 17 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Northwestern Connecticut Intrastate Air Quality Control Region. 81.184 Section 81.184 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION... Designation of Air Quality Control Regions § 81.184 Northwestern Connecticut Intrastate Air Quality Control...

  10. 76 FR 16358 - Approval and Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans; Connecticut, Maine, New Hampshire...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-23

    ... enforceable emission limits on ozone precursors; any judgment about whether those emission limits discharge... attainment demonstration modeling efforts conducted by the Ozone Transport Commission. Connecticut, Maine... Implementation Plans; Connecticut, Maine, New Hampshire and Rhode Island; Infrastructure SIPs for the 1997 Ozone...

  11. 76 FR 752 - Approval and Promulgation of Implementation Plans; Connecticut: Prevention of Significant...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-06

    ... Promulgation of Implementation Plans; Connecticut: Prevention of Significant Deterioration; Greenhouse Gas... changes impacting Connecticut's New Source Review (NSR) Prevention of Significant Deterioration (PSD... Regional Office, Office of Ecosystem Protection, 5 Post Office Square-- Suite 100 (Mail code OEP05-2...

  12. 76 FR 26933 - Approval and Promulgation of Implementation Plans; Connecticut: Prevention of Significant...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-10

    ... Promulgation of Implementation Plans; Connecticut: Prevention of Significant Deterioration; Greenhouse Gas... Significant Deterioration (PSD) program. First, the revision provides Connecticut with authority to issue PSD... Regional Office, Office of Ecosystem Protection, Air Permits, Toxics, and Indoor Air Programs Unit, 5 Post...

  13. Can Interdistrict Choice Boost Student Achievement? The Case of Connecticut's Interdistrict Magnet School Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bifulco, Robert; Cobb, Casey D.; Bell, Courtney

    2009-01-01

    Connecticut's interdistrict magnet schools offer a model of choice-based desegregation that appears to satisfy current legal constraints. This study presents evidence that interdistrict magnet schools have provided students from Connecticut's central cities access to less racially and economically isolated educational environments and estimates…

  14. CE-BEMS

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mohamed, Nader; Lazarova-Molnar, Sanja; Al-Jaroodi, Jameela

    2016-01-01

    Energy consumption in smart buildings is monitored and controlled using Building Energy Management Systems (BEMS). A BEMS provides a set of methods to monitor and control a building's energy needs while maintaining a good quality of living in all of the building's spaces. Energy efficiency...... and costs savings in smart buildings significantly depend on the monitoring and control methods used in the installed BEMS. This paper proposes a Cloud-Enabled BEMS (CE-BEMS) for Smart Buildings. This system can utilize cloud computing to provide enhanced management mechanisms and features for energy...... savings in smart buildings. This system is connected to the cloud to have access to a number of advanced cloud-based services to enhance energy management in smart buildings. In this paper, we discuss the current limitations of BEMS, the conceptual design of the proposed system, and the advantages...

  15. The Utilization of Inquiry-Based Science Instruction in Connecticut

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bozzuto, David M.

    The purpose of this study was to explore the perspectives of practitioners of inquiry-based instruction from 35 Connecticut school districts. The source of the participants, Connecticut State Science Assessment Advisory Committee members, and their involvement in science education acted to bound the research. Using a multiple case study design, data were gathered from 28 participants: teachers n = 21, curriculum leaders n = 4, professional development experts n = 2, and state education advisor/ teacher preparation expert n = 1 involved with Connecticut schools. Each participant was asked to complete an online demographic and inquiry utilization questionnaire. From the results of the questionnaires, a cadre of 11 participants was selected to participate in semi-structured interviews. A round of follow-up interviews of five key participants was conducted to further clarify the phenomenon. Two of the follow up interviewees were observed using the EQUIP rubric to assess inquiry implementation. Artifacts such as minutes, PowerPoint presentations, and a reflexive journal were collected throughout the study. An inductive approach to content analysis of data from the survey and interviews was used to explore constructs, themes, and patterns. After segmentation took place, the data were categorized to allow patterns and constructs to emerge. The data were reduced based on the emergent design and those reductions, or themes, were informed by ongoing data collection using constant comparison as different levels of codes emerge. Data collection further informed data analysis and future data collection. Initial coding of patterns was reduced until theoretical saturation occurred and the data allowed five thematic findings to emerge from the data. The five themes were: teach, process, impasse, develop, and support. The significance of each theme and its implication for practitioners and researchers were discussed and offered, respectively.

  16. CE and nanomaterials - Part II: Nanomaterials in CE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adam, Vojtech; Vaculovicova, Marketa

    2017-10-01

    The scope of this two-part review is to summarize publications dealing with CE and nanomaterials together. This topic can be viewed from two broad perspectives, and this article is trying to highlight these two approaches: (i) CE of nanomaterials, and (ii) nanomaterials in CE. The second part aims at summarization of publications dealing with application of nanomaterials for enhancement of CE performance either in terms of increasing the separation resolution or for improvement of the detection. To increase the resolution, nanomaterials are employed as either surface modification of the capillary wall forming open tubular column or as additives to the separation electrolyte resulting in a pseudostationary phase. Moreover, nanomaterials have proven to be very beneficial for increasing also the sensitivity of detection employed in CE or even they enable the detection (e.g., fluorescent tags of nonfluorescent molecules). © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  17. Water resources of the Hartford-New Britain area, Connecticut

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cushman, Robert Vittum; Tanski, D.; Thomas, M.P.

    1964-01-01

    The Hartford-New Britain area includes the metropolitan areas of Hartford and New Britain and parts of several adjoining towns. Water used in the area is withdrawn from the principal streams and aquifers at an average rate of 463.5 mgd (million gallons per day). Sufficient water is available from these sources to meet present requirements and those for many years to come, although local shortages may develop in some areas as the result of problems of distribution and treatment. About 98 percent of all water used in 1957 was from surface sources. More than 425 mgd was required by industry, and about 23 mgd was for domestic water supply. The Farmington River upstream from Collinsville is the chief source of water for public supply in the Hartford-New Britain area, whereas the Connecticut River is the chief source of water for industry. An average of about 40 mgd is withdrawn from the upper Farmington River for public supply, and about 404 mgd is withdrawn by industry from the Connecticut River for nonconsumptive use and returned directly to the stream. The Connecticut River is the source of the largest quantity of water in the area. The flow of the stream at Thompsonville may be expected to equal or exceed about 2,000 mgd 95 percent of the time, and the flow should not be less than this amount for periods longer than 12 days. The flow below Thompsonville is increased by additions from the Scantic, Farmington, Park, and Hockanum Rivers and from numerous smaller tributary streams. The available streamflow data for the aforementioned rivers have been summarized graphically in the report. The chemical quality of water in the Connecticut River is good, except for short periods when the iron concentration is high. In addition to the removal of iron some other treatment may be necessary if water from the Connecticut River is used for special purposes. The chemical quality of the tributary streams is good, except the quality of the Park River, which is poor. Thus the

  18. Weighted likelihood copula modeling of extreme rainfall events in Connecticut

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiaojing; Gebremichael, Mekonnen; Yan, Jun

    2010-08-01

    SummaryCopulas have recently emerged as a practical method for multivariate modeling. To date, only limited amount of work has been done to apply copula-based modeling in the context of extreme rainfall analysis, and no work exists on modeling multiple characteristics of rainfall events from data at resolutions finer than hourly. In this study, trivariate copula-based modeling is applied to annual extreme rainfall events constructed from 15-min time series precipitation data at 12 stations within the state of Connecticut. Three characteristics (volume, duration, and peak intensity) are modeled by a multivariate distribution specified by three marginal distributions and a dependence structure via copula. A major issue in this application is that, because the 15-min precipitation data are only available fairly recently, the sample size at most stations is small, ranging from 10 to 33 years. For each station, we estimate the model parameters by maximizing a weighted likelihood, which assigns weight to data at stations nearby, borrowing strengths from them. The weights are assigned by a kernel function whose bandwidth is chosen by cross-validation in terms of predictive loglikelihood. The fitted model and sampling algorithms provide new knowledge on design storms and risk assessment in Connecticut.

  19. The joint EC/EPA mid-Connecticut test program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kilgroe, J.D.; Brna, T.G.

    1991-01-01

    In early 1989, Environment Canada and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency sponsored a comprehensive test program on a refuse-derived fuel (RDF) unit of the Mid-Connecticut facility in Hartford. The program, conducted in cooperation with the Connecticut Resource Recovery Authority (CRRA), the facility's operator, included characterization and performance test phases. The results of the characterization tests were used in defining both the combustion and flue gas cleaning system operating conditions for the performance tests. The results of the performance tests are emphasized in this paper and are summarized in three parts. First, the combustion tests results will be addressed and related to good combustion practice for RDF combustors. Then, the performance of the lime spray dryer absorber/fabric filter system in controlling acid gas (hydrogen chloride, sulfur dioxide), trace organic [polychlorinated dibenzodioxin (PCDD) and polychlorinated dibenzofuran (PCDF)], trace metal [arsenic (as), cadmium (Cd), chromium (Cr), lead (Pb), mercury (Hg), nickel (Ni), and zinc (Zn)], and particulate matter (PM) emissions will be discussed. Finally, the results of ash/residue analyses will be presented

  20. Integration of fall prevention into state policy in Connecticut.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Terrence E; Baker, Dorothy I; Leo-Summers, Linda S; Bianco, Luann; Gottschalk, Margaret; Acampora, Denise; King, Mary B

    2013-06-01

    To describe the ongoing efforts of the Connecticut Collaboration for Fall Prevention (CCFP) to move evidence regarding fall prevention into clinical practice and state policy. A university-based team developed methods of networking with existing statewide organizations to influence clinical practice and state policy. We describe steps taken that led to funding and legislation of fall prevention efforts in the state of Connecticut. We summarize CCFP's direct outreach by tabulating the educational sessions delivered and the numbers and types of clinical care providers that were trained. Community organizations that had sustained clinical practices incorporating evidence-based fall prevention were subsequently funded through mini-grants to develop innovative interventional activities. These mini-grants targeted specific subpopulations of older persons at high risk for falls. Building collaborative relationships with existing stakeholders and care providers throughout the state, CCFP continues to facilitate the integration of evidence-based fall prevention into clinical practice and state-funded policy using strategies that may be useful to others.

  1. Modeling Waves and Coastal Flooding along the Connecticut Coast

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cifuentes-Lorenzen, A.; Howard-Strobel, M. M.; Fake, T.; McCardell, G.; O'Donnell, J.; Asthita, M.

    2015-12-01

    We have used a hydrodynamic- wave coupled numerical model (FVCOM-SWAVE) to simulate flooding at the Connecticut coastline during severe storms. The model employed a one-way nesting scheme and an unstructured grid. The parent domain spanned most of the southern New England shelf and the fine resolution grid covered Long Island Sound (LIS) and extended across the Connecticut coast to the 10m elevation contour. The model results for sea level, current and wave statistics from the parent grid have been tested with data from several field campaigns at different locations spanning the western, central and eastern portions of LIS. Waves are fetch limited and improvements to the model-data comparison required modifications to spectral coefficients in the wave model. Finally, the nested results were validated with two field campaigns in shallow water environments (i.e. New Haven and Old Saybrook). To assess the spatial variability of storm wave characteristics the domain was forced with the hindcast winds obtained from meteorological models (NAM and WRF) for 13 severe weather events that affected LIS in the past 15 years. We have also forced the system with a simulation of Superstorm Sandy in a warmer climate to assess the impact a climate change on the character of flooding. The nested grid is currently being used to map flooding risks under severe weather events including the effects of precipitation on river flow and discharge.

  2. Level II scour analysis for Bridge 33 (WWINTH00300033) on Town Highway 30, crossing Mill Brook, West Windsor, Vermont

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wild, Emily C.; Flynn, Robert H.

    1998-01-01

    This report provides the results of a detailed Level II analysis of scour potential at structure WWINTH00300033 on Town Highway 30 crossing Mill Brook, West Windsor, Vermont (Figures 1–8). A Level II study is a basic engineering analysis of the site, including a quantitative analysis of stream stability and scour (FHWA, 1993). Results of a Level I scour investigation also are included in appendix E of this report. A Level I investigation provides a qualitative geomorphic characterization of the study site. Information on the bridge, gleaned from Vermont Agency of Transportation (VTAOT) files, was compiled prior to conducting Level I and Level II analyses and is found in appendix D. The site is in the New England Upland section of the New England physiographic province in east-central Vermont. The 24.9-mi2 drainage area is in a predominantly rural and forested basin. In the vicinity of the study site, the surface cover is pasture upstream of the bridge while the immediate banks have dense woody vegetation. Downstream of the bridge is forested. In the study area, Mill Brook has an incised, sinuous channel with a slope of approximately 0.004 ft/ft, an average channel top width of 58 ft and an average bank height of 5 ft. The channel bed material ranges from sand to boulder with a median grain size (D50) of 65.7 mm (0.215 ft). The geomorphic assessment at the time of the Level I and Level II site visit on June 5, 1996, indicated that the reach was stable. The Town Highway 30 crossing of the Mill Brook is a 46-ft-long, one-lane covered bridge consisting of a 40-foot wood-beam span (Vermont Agency of Transportation, written communication, March 23, 1995). The opening length of the structure parallel to the bridge face is 36.3 ft. The bridge is supported by vertical, concrete capped laid-up stone abutments with wingwalls. The channel is skewed approximately 10 degrees to the opening while the opening-skew-to-roadway is zero degrees. The only scour protection measure at

  3. Level II scour analysis for Bridge 34 (WWINTH00370034) on Town Highway 37, crossing Mill Brook, West Windsor, Vermont

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boehmler, Erick M.; Wild, Emily C.

    1998-01-01

    This report provides the results of a detailed Level II analysis of scour potential at structure WWINTH00370034 on Town Highway 37 crossing Mill Brook, West Windsor, Vermont (figures 1–8). A Level II study is a basic engineering analysis of the site, including a quantitative analysis of stream stability and scour (FHWA, 1993). Results of a Level I scour investigation also are included in appendix E of this report. A Level I investigation provides a qualitative geomorphic characterization of the study site. Information on the bridge, gleaned from Vermont Agency of Transportation (VTAOT) files, was compiled prior to conducting Level I and Level II analyses and is found in appendix D. The site is in the New England Upland section of the New England physiographic province in east-central Vermont. The 16.6-mi2 drainage area is in a predominantly rural and forested basin. In the vicinity of the study site, the surface cover is pasture except for the upstream left bank where there is mostly shrubs and brush. In the study area, Mill Brook has a sinuous channel with a slope of approximately 0.003 ft/ ft, an average channel top width of 52 ft and an average bank height of 5 ft. The channel bed material ranges from sand to cobbles with a median grain size (D50) of 43.4 mm (0.142 ft). The geomorphic assessment at the time of the Level I and Level II site visit on June 5, 1996, indicated that the reach was laterally unstable. Point bars were observed upstream and downstream of this site. Furthermore, slip failure of the bank material was noted downstream at a cut-bank on the left side of the channel across from a point bar. The Town Highway 37 crossing of Mill Brook is a 37-ft-long, one-lane covered bridge consisting of one 32-foot wood thru-truss span (Vermont Agency of Transportation, written communication, March 23, 1995). The opening length of the structure parallel to the bridge face is 29.6 ft. The bridge is supported by vertical, laid-up stone abutment walls with

  4. (2012 30 Windsor Y B Access Just 225 RE-EVALUATING INDEPENDENCE: THE EMERGING PROBLEM OF CROWN-POLICE ALIGNMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeremy Tatum

    2012-10-01

    La partie II fera ressortir les rôles distincts de la police et des procureurs de la poursuite et fournira quelques renseignements généraux sur la question de l’alignement des fonctions de la Couronne et de la police. La partie III examinera un nombre d’affaires récentes où des bureaux et des procureurs qui exercaient leurs fonctions de poursuivants, semblent avoir agi dans l’intérêt de la police plutôt que dans l’intérêt public. Finalement, parce que le problème de l’alignement des fonctions de la Couronne et la de police est, par nature, provincial et localisé, l’auteur tentera de démontrer, dans la partie IV, le rôle crucial que les barreaux et d’autres administrations publiques jouent lorsqu’il s’agit de surveiller le déroulement des poursuites et de veiller à ce que les procureurs généraux voient effectivement à ce que les affaires publiques soient administrées en conformité avec le droit.

  5. The 3D Elevation Program: summary for Connecticut

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carswell, William J.

    2015-01-01

    Elevation data are essential to a broad range of applications, including forest resources management, wildlife and habitat management, national security, recreation, and many others. For the State of Connecticut, elevation data are critical for coastal zone management, flood risk management, natural resources conservation, agriculture and precision farming, sea level rise and subsidence, and other business uses. Today, high-density light detection and ranging (lidar) data are the primary sources for deriving elevation models and other datasets. Federal, State, Tribal, and local agencies work in partnership to (1) replace data that are older and of lower quality and (2) provide coverage where publicly accessible data do not exist. A joint goal of State and Federal partners is to acquire consistent, statewide coverage to support existing and emerging applications enabled by lidar data.

  6. Nuclear instrument upgrade at Connecticut Yankee Atomic Power Station

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brothers, M.H.; Flynn, B.J.; Shugars, H.G.

    1989-01-01

    After 20 years of commercial operation, the Connecticut Yankee Atomic Power Station decided to replace the original nuclear instrument system. The plant was motivated primarily by reliability and maintainability problems, the former attributed to equipment wearout and discrete component failure, and the latter to the unavailability of qualified spare parts, another effect of the equipment's age. In replacing the system, the plant also had to address current regulatory, design, and plant technical specification requirements, including physical separation, signal isolation, and changes in equipment qualification. This paper discusses the motivation for the system's replacement, the challenges to the plant engineers and equipment designers, the ways in which the new design met the challenges, the test results of the new system, and other potential benefits supported by the test results

  7. A Science Framework for Connecticut River Watershed Sustainability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rideout, Stephen; Nicolson, Craig; Russell-Robinson, Susan L.; Mecray, Ellen L.

    2005-01-01

    Introduction: This document outlines a research framework for water resource managers and land-use planners in the four-state Connecticut River Watershed (CRW). It specifically focuses on developing the decision-support tools and data needed by managers in the watershed. The purpose of the Science Framework is to identify critical research issues and information required to better equip managers to make decisions on desirable changes in the CRW. This Science Framework is the result of a cooperative project between the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), the University of Massachusetts at Amherst (UMass-Amherst), and the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (FWS). The cooperative project was guided by a Science Steering Committee (SC) and included several focus groups, a 70-person workshop in September 2004, and an open collaborative process by which the workshop outcomes were synthesized, written up, and then progressively refined through peer review. This document is the product of that collaborative process.

  8. Rhode Island, Connecticut, New York, and New Jersey ESI: INVERT (Invertebrate Polygons)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set contains sensitive biological resource data for marine, estuarine, and terrestrial invertebrate species in coastal Rhode Island, Connecticut, New York,...

  9. Social Vulnerability Index (SoVI) for Connecticut based on 2000 Census Block Groups

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data depicts the social vulnerability of Connecticut census block groups to environmental hazards. Data were culled primarily from the 2000 Decennial Census.

  10. Weatherization Makes Headlines in Connecticut: Weatherization Assistance Close-Up Fact Sheet

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D& R International

    2001-10-10

    Connecticut demonstrates its commitment to technology and efficiency through the Weatherization Program. Weatherization uses advanced technologies and techniques to reduce energy costs for low-income families by increasing the energy efficiency of their homes.

  11. Connecticut State Briefing Book for low-level radioactive-waste management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-06-01

    The Connecticut State Briefing Book is one of a series of state briefing books on low-level radioactive waste management practices. It has been prepared to assist state and federal agency officials in planning for safe low-level radioactive waste disposal. The report contains a profile of low-level radioactive waste generators in Connecticut. The profile is the result of a survey of Nuclear Regulatory Commission licensees in Connecticut. The briefing book also contains a comprehensive assessment of low-level radioactive waste management issues and concerns as defined by all major interested parties including industry, government, the media, and interest groups. The assessment was developed through personal communications with representatives of interested parties, and through a review of media sources. Lastly, the briefing book provides demographic and socioeconomic data and a discussion of relevant government agencies and activities, all of which may affect waste management practices in Connecticut

  12. 2016 Coastal Connecticut MLLW ADS80 4-Band 16 Bit Imagery

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Project: NOAA 2016 Multispectral Coastal Imagery Project - Connecticut Shoreline Orthoimagery Contract No. EA133C11CQ0010 Reference No. NCNP0000-16-01163 Woolpert...

  13. Rhode Island, Connecticut, New York, and New Jersey ESI: FISHL (Fish Lines)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set contains sensitive biological resource data for anadromous fish species in coastal Rhode Island, Connecticut, New York, and New Jersey. Vector arcs in...

  14. Rhode Island, Connecticut, New York, and New Jersey ESI: M_MAMMAL (Marine Mammal Polygons)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set contains sensitive biological resource data for seals, whales, and dolphins in coastal Rhode Island, Connecticut, and the New York/New Jersey...

  15. History of Connecticut's short-term strain program for evaluation of steel bridges : July 2009.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-07-01

    Non-destructive strain monitoring has been used for two decades on Connecticuts bridges to : supplement visual field inspections. These studies have addressed a wide range of problems, : including fatigue cracking in diaphragm connections, cracked...

  16. Rhode Island, Connecticut, New York, and New Jersey ESI: M_MAMPT (Marine Mammal Points)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set contains sensitive biological resource data for seal haul-out sites in coastal Rhode Island, Connecticut, New York, and New Jersey. Vector points in...

  17. Rhode Island, Connecticut, New York, and New Jersey ESI: T_MAMMAL (Terrestrial Mammal Polygons)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set contains sensitive biological resource data for small mammal species in coastal Rhode Island, Connecticut, New York, and New Jersey. Vector polygons in...

  18. Rhode Island, Connecticut, New York, and New Jersey ESI: FISH (Fish Polygons)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set contains sensitive biological resource data for marine, estuarine, and anadromous fish species in coastal Rhode Island, Connecticut, New York, and New...

  19. Rhode Island, Connecticut, New York, and New Jersey ESI: INVERTPT (Invertebrate Points)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set contains sensitive biological resource data for rare terrestrial invertebrates in coastal Rhode Island, Connecticut, New York, and New Jersey. Vector...

  20. Rhode Island, Connecticut, New York, and New Jersey ESI: NESTS (Nest Points)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set contains sensitive biological resource data for nesting birds in coastal Rhode Island, Connecticut, New York, and New Jersey. Vector points in this...

  1. NOAA Digital Orthophotography for the Coasts of Connecticut and Long Island, NY

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Project: NOAA Digital Orthophotography for the Coasts of Main/New Hampshire, Massachusetts/Rhode Island/Connecticut, and Hudson River/Long Island /NY/NJ Contract No....

  2. Connecticut State Briefing Book for low-level radioactive-waste management

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1981-06-01

    The Connecticut State Briefing Book is one of a series of state briefing books on low-level radioactive waste management practices. It has been prepared to assist state and federal agency officials in planning for safe low-level radioactive waste disposal. The report contains a profile of low-level radioactive waste generators in Connecticut. The profile is the result of a survey of Nuclear Regulatory Commission licensees in Connecticut. The briefing book also contains a comprehensive assessment of low-level radioactive waste management issues and concerns as defined by all major interested parties including industry, government, the media, and interest groups. The assessment was developed through personal communications with representatives of interested parties, and through a review of media sources. Lastly, the briefing book provides demographic and socioeconomic data and a discussion of relevant government agencies and activities, all of which may affect waste management practices in Connecticut.

  3. Rhode Island, Connecticut, New York, and New Jersey ESI: HABPT (Habitat and Plant Points)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set contains sensitive biological resource data for rare terrestrial plants in coastal Rhode Island, Connecticut, New York, and New Jersey. Vector points...

  4. Connecticut State University System Initiative for Nanotechnology-Related Equipment, Faculty Development and Curriculum Development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Broadbridge, Christine C. [Southern Connecticut State University

    2013-03-28

    DOE grant used for partial fulfillment of necessary laboratory equipment for course enrichment and new graduate programs in nanotechnology at the four institutions of the Connecticut State University System (CSUS). Equipment in this initial phase included variable pressure scanning electron microscope with energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy elemental analysis capability [at Southern Connecticut State University]; power x-ray diffractometer [at Central Connecticut State University]; a spectrophotometer and spectrofluorimeter [at Eastern Connecticut State University; and a Raman Spectrometer [at Western Connecticut State University]. DOE's funding was allocated for purchase and installation of this scientific equipment and instrumentation. Subsequently, DOE funding was allocated to fund the curriculum, faculty development and travel necessary to continue development and implementation of the System's Graduate Certificate in Nanotechnology (GCNT) program and the ConnSCU Nanotechnology Center (ConnSCU-NC) at Southern Connecticut State University. All of the established outcomes have been successfully achieved. The courses and structure of the GCNT program have been determined and the program will be completely implemented in the fall of 2013. The instrumentation has been purchased, installed and has been utilized at each campus for the implementation of the nanotechnology courses, CSUS GCNT and the ConnSCU-NC. Additional outcomes for this grant include curriculum development for non-majors as well as faculty and student research.

  5. Public School Principals' Experiences with Interpreting and Implementing Connecticut's Anti-Bullying Law (Connecticut General Statute Section 10-222d): A Statewide Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    LaRocco, Diana J.; Nestler-Rusack, Donna; Freiberg, Jo Ann

    2007-01-01

    Background: In June 2002, the State of Connecticut General Assembly (CGA) passed Public Act 02-119, An Act Concerning Bullying Behavior in Schools and Concerning the Pledge of Allegiance. Section 1 mandated that each local and regional board of education (school district) develop a policy to address bullying in its schools. Conn. Gen. Statute…

  6. The Puerto Ricans: On the Island, On the Mainland, In Connecticut. The Peoples of Connecticut Multicultural Ethnic Heritage Series, Number Four.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burdette, Barbara; Echevarria, Francisco

    This 11-unit curriculum guide on Puerto Rican culture is intended for both Puerto Rican and and non-Puerto Rican teachers and students living in Connecticut. Although the materials are written for use in grades six through nine, they can be adapted for older or younger students. Topics include Puerto Rican history, ethnology, geography, economy,…

  7. The Jews: Their Origins, in America, in Connecticut. A Curriculum Guide. The Peoples of Connecticut Multicultural Ethnic Heritage Series No. 3. Second Edition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klitz, Sally Innis

    This curriculum guide explores the Jewish ethnic and religious community in the United States generally, and specifically in Connecticut. Intended as a resource tool for studying the Jewish cultural heritage and traditions, the material may be used among Jews and non-Jews. The guide is divided into three parts. Part one is a detailed account of…

  8. An Examination of the Information Literacy Expectations and Practices of Librarians in Connecticut State Colleges and Universities and Connecticut Public High Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schofield, Cindy K.

    2012-01-01

    This study examined the perceptions of Connecticut librarians at the secondary and post-secondary education levels regarding Information Literacy (IL) resources and instruction at the two levels; the competencies of their high school seniors and university/college first-year students; their familiarity with their respective institutions' IL…

  9. Multiple Fentanyl Overdoses - New Haven, Connecticut, June 23, 2016.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomassoni, Anthony J; Hawk, Kathryn F; Jubanyik, Karen; Nogee, Daniel P; Durant, Thomas; Lynch, Kara L; Patel, Rushaben; Dinh, David; Ulrich, Andrew; D'Onofrio, Gail

    2017-02-03

    On the evening of June 23, 2016, a white powder advertised as cocaine was purchased off the streets from multiple sources and used by an unknown number of persons in New Haven, Connecticut. During a period of less than 8 hours, 12 patients were brought to the emergency department (ED) at Yale New Haven Hospital, experiencing signs and symptoms consistent with opioid overdose. The route of intoxication was not known, but presumed to be insufflation ("snorting") in most cases. Some patients required doses of the opioid antidote naloxone exceeding 4 mg (usual initial dose = 0.1-0.2 mg intravenously), and several patients who were alert after receiving naloxone subsequently developed respiratory failure. Nine patients were admitted to the hospital, including four to the intensive care unit (ICU); three required endotracheal intubation, and one required continuous naloxone infusion. Three patients died. The white powder was determined to be fentanyl, a drug 50 times more potent than heroin, and it included trace amounts of cocaine. The episode triggered rapid notification of public health and law enforcement agencies, interviews of patients and their family members to trace and limit further use or distribution of the fentanyl, immediate naloxone resupply and augmentation for emergency medical services (EMS) crews, public health alerts, and plans to accelerate naloxone distribution to opioid users and their friends and families. Effective communication and timely, coordinated, collaborative actions of community partners reduced the harm caused by this event and prevented potential subsequent episodes.

  10. Breakup ice control structure for the Salmon River in Connecticut

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tuthill, A.M.; White, K.D.

    1997-01-01

    The Salmon River ice jam problem was investigated and a conceptual design for a breakup ice control structure was developed. Historical ice jam events were reviewed and an ice observation program was conducted during the winter of 1994-95. The factors affecting ice jam frequency and severity were examined. The factors included daily temperature, rainfall quantity and intensity, Salmon River stage and discharge, and Connecticut River tide levels. First, a numerical model was developed to simulate a worst case scenario for ice jams, followed by a conceptual design for a concrete pier ice control structure under two ice breakup scenarios. The first scenario assumed that a semi-intact ice sheet would rest against the piers and retain a floating equilibrium jam upstream, allowing water discharge to pass beneath. The second scenario was based on the assumption that a grounded ice jam in direct contact with the piers would divert water flow around the structure via an armored channel in the overbank area. An ice retention structure consisting of a row of concrete piers, spaced across the main channel, 60 m upstream of an existing dam, was proposed. 11 refs., 6 figs

  11. Familism and Social Inclusion: Hispanics in New London, Connecticut

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Amparo Cruz-Saco

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper analyzes the financial support and inclusiveness within Hispanic families in New London, Connecticut, and the causes of their social exclusion in the larger society. We designed and administered a survey of 114 items that was answered by 148 participants representing 1.3% of the non-Puerto Rican Hispanic population. Using factor analysis, we reduced a large number of items in two familism scores to four latent factors: "Financial Support for Family", "Obligation to Family", "Plan to Return", and "Filial Responsibility". We found that financial support for family and obligation to family are strongly endorsed by participants. Approximately one-half would return back to their home countries where they believe to be happier. One-fifth rejects this option. Three-quarters of participants remit money to family, parents in particular, who reside in countries of origin. In contrast to other studies, remitting money is not affected by any given personal characteristic such as gender, income or level of education. Similarly, participants remit irrespective of their degree of self-reported familism measured by scores on the latent factors. A large incidence of poverty among this population, lack of English proficiency, low skills, immigration status, and a lack of voice and political representation inhibit their social inclusion.

  12. Evidence of natural reproduction of Atlantic sturgeon in the Connecticut River from unlikely sources.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tom Savoy

    Full Text Available Atlantic Sturgeon is listed under the U.S. Endangered Species Act as five Distinct Population Segments (DPS. The "endangered" New York Bight (NYB DPS is thought to only harbor two populations; one in the Hudson River and a second smaller one in the Delaware River. Historically, the Connecticut River probably supported a spawning population of Atlantic Sturgeon that was believed extirpated many decades ago. In 2014, we successfully collected pre-migratory juvenile specimens from the lower Connecticut River which were subjected to mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA control region sequence and microsatellite analyses to determine their genetic relatedness to other populations coastwide. Haplotype and allelic frequencies differed significantly between the Connecticut River collection and all other populations coastwide. Sibship analyses of the microsatellite data indicated that the Connecticut River collection was comprised of a small number of families that were likely the offspring of a limited number of breeders. This was supported by analysis of effective population size (Ne and number of breeders (Nb. STRUCTURE analysis suggested that there were 11 genetic clusters among the coastwide collections and that from the Connecticut River was distinct from those in all other rivers. This was supported by UPGMA analyses of the microsatellite data. In AMOVA analyses, among region variation was maximized, and among population within regions variation minimized when the Connecticut River collection was separate from the other two populations in the NYB DPS indicating the dissimilarity between the Connecticut River collection and the other two populations in the NYB DPS. Use of mixed stock analysis indicated that the Connecticut River juvenile collection was comprised of specimens primarily of South Atlantic and Chesapeake Bay DPS origins. The most parsimonious explanation for these results is that the Connecticut River hosted successful natural reproduction in 2013

  13. Sex Education in Connecticut High Schools: Teachers' Reports of Content and Importance Ratings According to the SIECUS Guidelines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obloj, Wallace; Lynn, Donna

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine Connecticut teachers' reports of the sex education content taught to high school students as well as teachers' reports of the degree of importance for Connecticut high school students to understand according to the SIECUS Guidelines. The data revealed that participants (N=125) reported teaching 72% of the…

  14. State of Connecticut middle data collection program. Final report, August 1, 1979-May 31, 1980

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salamandra, J.; Wilson, R.

    1980-01-01

    The Connecticut Office of Policy and Management, Energy Division, conducted a heating oil monitoring program of Connecticut fuel oil suppliers and dealers. From August 1979, through May 1980, the Energy Division conducted a biweekly price and inventory survey for No. 2 fuel oil and kerosene. The purpose of the survey has been to provide data necessary for the US Department of Energy's Energy Information Administration to execute its role in monitoring cost and price movements within the US petroleum industry and in performing analyses and projections related to energy supplies, demands, and prices for No. 2 fuel oil. The survey has also provided the state of Connecticut with a current, consistent, and reliable set of figures on heating oil prices and inventories and provided a mechanism for handling consumer inquiries concerning price and supply conditions.

  15. Helmet use in Connecticut motorcycle crashes: a state without a universal helmet law.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landman, Adam B; Phipps, Michael S; Jawin, Kimberly; Bolton, Lauri; Van Gelder, Carin M; Kamin, Richard; Teel, Bill; Vaca, Federico E

    2011-05-01

    Assess the association of helmet use with motorcycle crash mortality and identify characteristics of riders who do not wear helmets in Connecticut crashes. Police crash data for Connecticut motorcycle crashes 2001-2007 were analyzed. Bivariate analysis and multivariable logistic regressions were performed including age, gender, seating position, road type, season, time of day, and recklessness. Of the 9,214 crashes with helmet use data available, helmets were worn in 4072 (44.2%). Non-helmeted riders, age > or =18, riding interstate or state roads, in the evening or at night, and who were riding recklessly were associated with higher odds of fatality. Predictors of nonhelmet use included males, passengers, age helmets reduce fatal crashes in Connecticut. A set of factors help predict nonhelmeted riders to whom safety training could be targeted.

  16. Recurrent mass mortalities of the blueback herring, Alosa aestivalis, in the lower Connecticut River

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moss, S.A.; Leggett, W.C.; Boyd, W.A.

    1976-01-01

    The authors studied 5 mass mortalities of blueback herring, Alosa aestivalis between 1965 and 1971. The reach of the Connecticut River in which the mortalities were observed includes the region thermally influenced by cooling water effluents from the Connecticut Yankee Atomic Power Plant. This warm water effluent has not been related to catastrophic blueback herring mortalities to the present time. The mortalities observed in 1965, 1966, and 1967 occurred before the plant became operational. The years of no abnormal mortalities, 1968, 1969, and 1970 coincided with periods of near-maximum generating output by this power plant. Only in June, 1971, did power plant operation coincide with a mass mortality of herring. Nevertheless, the occurrence of herring mortalities in four years out of seven observed suggests that further deterioration of water quality in the Connecticut River may threaten the continued spawning success of this fish. 9 references, 4 figures, 4 tables

  17. Bibliography of Connecticut Advanced Nuclear Engineering Laboratory reports

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1965-12-01

    This report, published in two volumes, is a bibliography of the reports published at the Connecticut Advanced Nuclear Engineering Laboratory (CANEL). The reports cover the period 1952 through 1965 and include the Aircraft Nuclear Propulsion program, the Advanced Liquid Metal Cooled Reactor program, the Advanced Reactor Materials program and the SNAP-50 program. The bibliography contains the report number, title, author, date published, and classification. In some cases where the writing of a report was a group effort, and in some reports containing compilations of certain types of data, the author column is not applicable. This is indicated by a {open_quotes}n.a.{close_quotes} in the author column. The following types of reports are included: PWAC`s, TIM`s, CNLM`s, FXM`s and miscellaneous reports. PWAC and TIM reports conform to the requirements of AEC Manual Chapter 3202-041 and 3202-042, respectively. Most of the technical information of interest generated by this project is documented in these reports. CNLM and FXM reports were written primarily for internal distribution. However, these reports contain enough information of technical interest to warrant their inclusion. All CNLM`s and those FXM`s considered to be of interest are included in this bibliography. The MPR`s (Monthly Progress Reports) are the most important of the miscellaneous categories of reports. The other miscellaneous categories relate primarily to equipment and reactor specifications. The Division of Technical Information Extension (DTIE) at Oak Ridge, Tennessee has been designated as the primary recipient of the reports in the CANEL library. When more than one copy of a report was available, the additional copies were delivered to the Lawrence Radiation Laboratory, Livermore, California.

  18. Bibliography of Connecticut Advanced Nuclear Engineering Laboratory reports

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1965-12-01

    This report, published in two, volumes, is a bibliography of the reports published at the Connecticut Advanced Nuclear Engineering Laboratory (CANEL). The reports cover the period 1952 through 1965 and include the Aircraft Nuclear Propulsion program, the Advanced Liquid Metal Cooled Reactor program, the Advanced Reactor Materials program and the SNAP-50 program. The bibliography contains the report number, title, author, date published, and classification. In some cases where the writing of a report was a group effort, and in some reports containing compilations of certain types of data, the author column is not applicable. This is indicated by a {open_quotes}n.a.{close_quotes} in the author column. The following types of reports are included: PWAC`s, TIM`s, CNLM`s. FXM`s and miscellaneous reports. PWAC and TIM reports conform to the requirements of AEC Manual Chapter 3202-041 and 3202-042, respectively. Most of the technical information of interest generated by this project is documented in these reports, CNLM and FXM reports were written primarily for internal distribution. However, these reports contain enough information of technical interest to warrant their inclusion. All CNLM`s and those FXM`s considered to be of interest are included in this bibliography. The MPR`s (Monthly Progress Reports) are the most important of the miscellaneous categories of reports. The other miscellaneous categories relate primarily to equipment and reactor specifications. The Division of Technical Information Extension (DTIE) at Oak Ridge, Tennessee has been designated as the primary recipient of the reports in the CANEL library. When more than one copy of a report was available, the additional copies were delivered to the Lawrence Radiation Laboratory, Livermore, California.

  19. National Uranium Resource Evaluation: Albany Quadrangle, Massachusetts, New York, Connecticut, Vermont, and New Hampshire

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Field, M.T.; Truesdell, D.B.

    1982-09-01

    The Albany 1 0 x 2 0 Quadrangle, Massachusetts, New York, Connecticut, Vermont, and New Hampshire, was evaluated to a depth of 1500 m for uranium favorability using National Uranium Resource Evaluation criteria. Areas of favorable geology and aeroradioactivity anomalies were examined and sampled. Most Triassic and Jurassic sediments in the Connecticut Basin, in the central part of the quadrangle, were found to be favorable for sandstone uranium deposits. Some Precambrian units in the southern Green Mountains of Vermont were found favorable for uranium deposits in veins in metamorphic rocks

  20. ASME XI stroke time testing of solenoid valves at Connecticut Yankee Station

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martin, C.W.

    1996-12-01

    Connecticut Yankee Atomic Power Company has developed the capability of measuring the stroke times of AC and DC solenoid valves. This allows the station to measure the stroke time of any solenoid valve in the plant, even those valves which do not have valve stem position indicators. Connecticut Yankee has adapted the ITI MOVATS Checkmate 3 system, using a signal input from a Bruel and Kjaer (B&K) Model 4382 acoustic accelerometer and the Schaumberg Campbell Associates (SCA) Model SCA-1148 dual sensor, which is a combined accelerometer and gaussmeter.

  1. ASME XI stroke time testing of solenoid valves at Connecticut Yankee Station

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martin, C.W.

    1996-01-01

    Connecticut Yankee Atomic Power Company has developed the capability of measuring the stroke times of AC and DC solenoid valves. This allows the station to measure the stroke time of any solenoid valve in the plant, even those valves which do not have valve stem position indicators. Connecticut Yankee has adapted the ITI MOVATS Checkmate 3 system, using a signal input from a Bruel and Kjaer (B ampersand K) Model 4382 acoustic accelerometer and the Schaumberg Campbell Associates (SCA) Model SCA-1148 dual sensor, which is a combined accelerometer and gaussmeter

  2. Insane acquittees and insane convicts: the rationalization of policy in nineteenth-century Connecticut.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodheart, Lawrence B

    2017-12-01

    A current situation in Connecticut of whether a violent insane acquittee should be held in a state prison or psychiatric facility raises difficult issues in jurisprudence and medical ethics. Overlooked is that the present case of Francis Anderson reiterates much of the debate over rationalization of policy during the formative nineteenth century. Contrary to theories of social control and state absolutism, governance in Connecticut was largely episodic, indecisive and dilatory over much of the century. The extraordinary urban and industrial transformation at the end of the Gilded Age finally forced a coherent response in keeping with longstanding legal and medical perspectives.

  3. Sweeping out Home Economics: Curriculum Reform at Connecticut College for Women, 1952-1962

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marthers, Paul Philip

    2011-01-01

    At the moment of its founding in 1911, Connecticut College for Women exhibited a curricular tension between an emphasis on the liberal arts, which mirrored the elite men's and women's colleges of the day, and vocational aspects, which made it a different type of women's college, one designed to prepare women for the kind of lives they would lead…

  4. 76 FR 41530 - Connecticut Yankee Atomic Power Company, Haddam Neck Plant; Notice of Consideration of Approval...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-14

    ... Atomic Power Company, Haddam Neck Plant; Notice of Consideration of Approval of Application Regarding..., the public can gain entry into ADAMS, which provides text and image files of the NRC's public... No. DPR-61 for the Haddam Neck Plant, currently held by Connecticut Yankee Atomic Power Company...

  5. 77 FR 71140 - Approval and Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans; Connecticut; NOX

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-11-29

    ... Modification United States Groton. 1, 8201CC. Naval Submarine Base. 8230 Jacobs Vehicle Bloomfield. Systems.... Naugatuck. 8118 Modification South Norwalk Norwalk. Electrical Works. 8130 Modification Connecticut Newtown... ``Improving Air Quality With Economic Incentive Programs'' (EIP Guidance). (See EPA-452/R-01-001, January 2001...

  6. 77 FR 32898 - Safety & Security Zones; OPSAIL 2012 Connecticut, Thames River, New London, CT

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-04

    ... 1625-AA00; AA87 Safety & Security Zones; OPSAIL 2012 Connecticut, Thames River, New London, CT AGENCY... 20, 2012 the Coast Guard published a notice of proposed rulemaking entitled Safety & Security Zones... Homeland Security Delegation No. 0170.1, which collectively authorize the Coast Guard to define safety and...

  7. Fish Consumption in Connecticut, Florida, Minnesota, and North Dakota (Final Report)

    Science.gov (United States)

    In August 2013, EPA announced the availability of the final report,Fish Consumption in Connecticut, Florida, Minnesota, and North Dakota. Many state and local health agencies throughout the United States conduct area-specific surveys that monitor and evaluate contaminant ...

  8. 78 FR 6819 - Patient Safety Organizations: Voluntary Relinquishment From The Connecticut Hospital Association...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-31

    ... Organizations: Voluntary Relinquishment From The Connecticut Hospital Association Federal Patient Safety Organization AGENCY: Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ), HHS. ACTION: Notice of delisting..., 42 U.S.C. 299b-21--b-26, provides for the formation of Patient Safety Organizations (PSOs), which...

  9. 78 FR 54962 - Approval and Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans; Connecticut; NOX

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-09

    ... ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY 40 CFR Part 52 [EPA-R01-OAR-2012-0198; A-1-FRL-9900-63-Region1] Approval and Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans; Connecticut; NOX Emission Trading Orders as Single Source SIP Revisions AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). ACTION: Final rule. SUMMARY...

  10. 78 FR 58467 - Approval and Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans; Connecticut; Redesignation of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-24

    ..., is not placed on the Internet and will be publicly available only in hard copy form. Publicly... (CT DEEP) submitted a request for EPA to redesignate the Connecticut portion of the New York-N. New... redesignation request, CT DEEP asked EPA to withdraw the SIP-approved 2009 motor vehicle emissions budgets...

  11. 78 FR 27161 - Approval and Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans; Connecticut; Ozone Attainment...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-09

    ... and made available on the Internet. If you submit an electronic comment, EPA recommends that you... the Internet and will be publicly available only in hard copy form. Publicly available docket... Connecticut Department of Energy and Environmental Protection (CT DEEP) submitted a letter withdrawing this...

  12. 2008 update on addiction medicine/psychiatry in the State of Connecticut. Part II of II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraus, Mark L

    2008-05-01

    No other health or social problem impacts our society so widely and profoundly as substance abuse. Investment in Connecticut's substance abuse service system is an investment in improved health and wellness its cities as well as its citizens. Since 2004 Connecticut's addiction treatment and recovery community have worked together to reduce the pain and suffering of those individuals with addiction disorders. The State of Connecticut is a national leader in addiction medicine scientific research and education, emergencyroom care, and public policy; and the Community of Addiction Recovery (CCAR) has emerged as a national leader for the recovery movement. As Chairperson ofthe CSMS's Committee on Alcohol and Other Drug Dependency Education, I am proud of the accomplishments of the Committee and the work of our statewide addiction medicine/psychiatryleaders and recovery community. I am equally proud and appreciative of the ongoing relationship of the CSMS, the addiction treatment and recovery community with DMHAS. Under the leadership of Commissioner Thomas Kirk, DMHAS has opened its arms to embrace the communities' providers. The work of these leaders is presented here to give readers an update on Addiction Medicine/Psychiatry in the State of Connecticut 2008.

  13. Evaluating Child and Youth Homelessness: The Example of New Haven, Connecticut

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kidd, Sean A.; Scrimenti, Kathryn

    2004-01-01

    Following a review of approaches taken to generate accurate estimates of the scale of child and youth homelessness in America, this article documents the methods and results of a multipronged count of homeless children and youth in New Haven, Connecticut. The survey used in this count accessed demographics and service needs, and was administered…

  14. Acts of Racism and Intolerance at Connecticut Colleges and Universities 1993.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connecticut State Dept. of Higher Education, Hartford.

    This report contains a summary of information submitted by public and independent colleges and universities in Connecticut concerning incidents of racism and intolerance that occurred on campuses during 1993. It reviews the number, type, and disposition of incidents that occurred and describes programs and activities undertaken to promote…

  15. Trace elements and radionuclides in the Connecticut River and Amazon River estuary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dion, E.P.

    1983-01-01

    The Connecticut River, its estuary, and the Amazon River estuary were studied to elucidate some of the processes which control river water chemistry and the flux of elements to the sea. The approach taken was to identify inputs to the Connecticut River and to investigate geochemical processes which modify the dissolved load. The form and quantity of nuclides which are in turn supplied to the estuary are altered by processes unique to that transition zone to the ocean. The Connecticut River estuary was sampled on a seasonal basis to investigate the role of the estuary in controlling the flux of elements to the sea. The knowledge gained from the Connecticut River study was applied to the quantitatively more significant Amazon River estuary. There a variety of samples were analyzed to understand the processes controlling the single greatest flux of elements to the Atlantic Ocean. The results indicate that estimates of the total flux of nuclides to the oceans can best be calculated based on groundwater inputs. Unless significant repositories for nuclides exist in the river-estuarine system, the groundwater flux of dissolved nuclides is that which will eventually be delivered to the ocean despite the reactions which were shown to occur in both rivers and estuaries. 153 references, 63 figures, 28 tables

  16. 77 FR 776 - Agenda and Notice of Public Meeting of the Connecticut Advisory Committee

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-06

    .... Commission on Civil Rights (Commission), and the Federal Advisory Committee Act (FACA), that a planning... convene at 12:00 noon (EST) Friday, January 13, 2012. The purpose of the planning meeting is to work to... COMMISSION ON CIVIL RIGHTS Agenda and Notice of Public Meeting of the Connecticut Advisory...

  17. 76 FR 37780 - Agenda and Notice of Public Meeting of the Connecticut Advisory Committee

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-28

    .... Commission on Civil Rights (Commission) and the Federal Advisory Committee Act (FACA), that an orientation... Wednesday, July 20, 2011, at the University of Connecticut, School of Law, Faculty Lounge, 55 Elizabeth Street, Hartford, CT 06105. The purpose of the orientation meeting is to review the rules of operation...

  18. Foreign Student Orientation Needs at the University of Connecticut: Results of a Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfau, Richard H.

    Views of 48 foreign students concerning orientation needs at the University of Connecticut were surveyed. The following orientation activities were identified as most important, and are listed in the approximate order of importance: (1) U.S. government regulations (about visas, immigration, social security, and taxes); (2) needs of the spouse…

  19. 78 FR 31459 - Approval and Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans; Connecticut; Reasonably Available...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-24

    ... equipment is required to control VOC emissions by one of the following methods: Use of an enclosed gun... keeping; air pollution control equipment requirements; surface preparation requirements; and spray gun... and Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans; Connecticut; Reasonably Available Control...

  20. Connecticut's Evolving Interactive Distance Learning Network in the Cable and Telecommunications Industries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pietras, Jesse John

    This paper describes the state of interactive distance learning in Connecticut, particularly the current and future provision of these services by the telecommunications and cable television industries. The overview examines questions of where obligation and responsibility lie (with schools, local exchange companies, cable franchises, etc.) in…

  1. Water resources inventory of Connecticut Part 8: Quinnipiac River basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazzaferro, David L.; Handman, Elinor H.; Thomas, Mendall P.

    1978-01-01

    The Quinnipiac River basin area in southcentral Connecticut covers 363 square miles, and includes all drainage basins that enter Long Island Sound from the Branford to the Wepawaug Rivers. Its population in 1970 was estimated at 535,000. Precipitation averages 47 inches per year and provides an abundant supply of water. Twenty-one inches returns to the atmosphere as evapotranspiration; the remainder flows directly to streams or percolates to the water table and discharges to Long Island Sound. Small amounts of water are exported from the basin by the New Britain Water Department, and small amounts are imported to the basin by the New Haven Water Company. The amount of water that can be developed at a given place depends upon precipitation, variability of streamflow, hydraulic properties and areal extent of the aquifers, and hydraulic connection between the aquifers and major streams. The quality of the water is determined by the physical environment and the effects of man. Stratified drift is the only aquifer capable of large sustained yields of water to individual wells. Yields of 64 screened wells tapping stratified drift range from 17 to 2,000 gpm (gallons per minute); their median yield is 500 gpm. Till is widespread and generally provides only small amounts of water. Wells in till normally yield only a few hundred gallons of water daily and commonly are inadequate during dry periods. Till is generally used only as an emergency or secondary source of water. Bedrock aquifers underlie the entire report area and include sedimentary, igneous, and metamorphic rock types. These aquifers supply small but reliable quantities of water to wells throughout the basin and are the chief source for many nonurban homes and farms. About 90 percent of the wells tapping bedrock yield at least 2 pgm, and much larger yields are occasionally reported. Maximum well yields of 305 gpm for sedimentary, 75 gpm for igneous, and 200 gpm for metamorphic bedrock have been reported. Water

  2. Validating and assessing integrity of troubled bridges in Connecticut : monitoring cable tensions for the Arrigoni Bridge, Middletown, CT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-01

    This report provides information on a study of the Arrigoni Bridge in Middletown, Connecticut, : where vibration measurements are used to determine the tension among various suspender : cables in the structure. Actual vibration data on 134 cables und...

  3. 2010 U.S. Department of Agriculture- Natural Resources Conservation Service (USDA-NRCS) Topographic Lidar: Eastern Connecticut

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Earth Eye collected LiDAR data for approximately 4,589 square kilometers that partially cover the Connecticut counties of Hartford, Tolland, Windham, Middlesex and...

  4. Rhode Island, Connecticut, New York, and New Jersey ESI: ESI (Environmental Sensitivity Index Shoreline Types - Polygons and Lines)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set contains vector lines and polygons representing the shoreline and coastal habitats of Rhode Island, Connecticut, New York, and New Jersey, classified...

  5. 2011 U.S. Department of Agriculture- Natural Resources Conservation Service (USDA-NRCS) Topographic Lidar: North West Connecticut

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Earth Eye collected LiDAR data for approximately 1,703 square kilometers that partially cover the Connecticut counties of Litchfield and Fairfield. The nominal pulse...

  6. Safe Shores and Resilient Transit Corridors: Using Science, Design, and Stakeholder Partnerships to Address Connecticut's Coastal Vulnerabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    French, R. A.; Felson, A. J.; Kirmmse, E.; Hagemann, K.

    2015-12-01

    Connecticut's densely developed coastline is highly vulnerable to sea level rise and coastal storms. 95% of the state's entire population lives within 50 miles of the shore. Connecticut has more than $542 billion in insured assets in harms way, only Florida has a greater exposure. As part of the state of Connecticut Phase 1 application for the HUD National Disaster Resilience Competition, the Connecticut Institute for Resilience and Climate Adaptation (CIRCA) at the University of Connecticut undertook an assessment of coastal vulnerabilities, including the impacts of sea level rise on the frequency of flooding, socioeconomic factors, critical infrastructure, and housing using data collected from federal, state, and municipal sources. Connecticut's unique geology, characterized by a glaciated coastline with highly erodible former deltas and elevated ridgelines extending out to rocky headlands, became the basis of the climate adaptation approach. Together with a nine state agency workgroup, municipal and regional government, and non-profit and industry representatives, CIRCA and the Yale UED lab developed a long-term urban redevelopment solution of resilient access and egress corridors layered over ridgelines and resilient zones of transit oriented economic development linked to shoreline communities. This concept can be applied in both Connecticut's coastal cities like New Haven and its smaller towns. The process demonstrated the effective partnership between the universities and state agencies in bringing the science of flood modeling and mapping together with innovative design to create solutions for climate adaptation. However, it also revealed significant gaps in data availability to analyze the economic and social drivers for adopting different adaptation strategies. Furthermore, the accuracy of current flood mapping tools needs to be improved to predict future flooding at the municipal project scale. As Connecticut and other states move forward with resilience

  7. Assisted reproductive technology use, embryo transfer practices, and birth outcomes after infertility insurance mandates: New Jersey and Connecticut.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crawford, Sara; Boulet, Sheree L; Jamieson, Denise J; Stone, Carol; Mullen, Jewel; Kissin, Dmitry M

    2016-02-01

    To explore whether recently enacted infertility mandates including coverage for assisted reproductive technology (ART) treatment in New Jersey (2001) and Connecticut (2005) increased ART use, improved embryo transfer practices, and decreased multiple birth rates. Retrospective cohort study using data from the National ART Surveillance System. We explored trends in ART use, embryo transfer practices and birth outcomes, and compared changes in practices and outcomes during a 2-year period before and after passing the mandate between mandate and non-mandate states. Not applicable. Cycles of ART performed in the United States between 1996 and 2013. Infertility insurance mandates including coverage for ART treatment passed in New Jersey (2001) and Connecticut (2005). Number of ART cycles performed, number of embryos transferred, multiple live birth rates. Both New Jersey and Connecticut experienced an increase in ART use greater than the non-mandate states. The mean number of embryos transferred decreased significantly in New Jersey and Connecticut; however, the magnitudes were not significantly different from non-mandate states. There was no significant change in ART birth outcomes in either mandate state except for an increase in live births in Connecticut; the magnitude was not different from non-mandate states. The infertility insurance mandates passed in New Jersey and Connecticut were associated with increased ART treatment use but not a decrease in the number of embryos transferred or the rate of multiples; however, applicability of the mandates was limited. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  8. Legal obstacles and incentives to the development of small scale hydroelectric power in Connecticut

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None,

    1980-05-01

    The legal and institutional obstacles to the development of small-scale hydroelectric power in Connecticut are discussed. The Federal government also exercises extensive regulatory authority in the area and this dual system is examined from the standpoint of the appropriate legal doctrine, the law of pre-emption, application of the law to the case of hydroelectric development, and an inquiry into the practical use of the doctrine by the FERC. Connecticut follows the riparian theory of water law. Under this theory of the water law, private rights in rivers and streams are confined to the use of flowing water. A riparian proprietor does not own the water that flows by his estate. Licensing, permitting, and review procedures are discussed followed by discussion on public utilities regulation and indirect considerations.

  9. Clinical and epidemiological characterization of histoplasmosis cases in a nonendemic area, Connecticut, United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azar, Marwan M; Zhang, Xuchen; Assi, Roland; Hage, Chadi; Wheat, L Joseph; Malinis, Maricar F

    2017-12-08

    We performed a retrospective analysis of histoplasmosis cases diagnosed at our institution in New Haven, Connecticut, from 2005 to 2015. Among 12 cases of active histoplasmosis, seven were immunosuppressed and five had human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). Eleven patients reported travel to potentially endemic areas at a median of 105 days prior to presentation; travel to the Caribbean was most common (n = 6). Median time to diagnosis from symptom onset and first Histoplasma antigen testing were 41 and 28 days, respectively. Consistent with reports from other non-endemic areas, our findings suggest that the epidemiology of histoplasmosis may differ in Connecticut, potentially contributing to delayed diagnoses. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The International Society for Human and Animal Mycology. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  10. Water resources inventory of Connecticut Part 9: Farmington River basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Handman, Elinor H.; Haeni, F. Peter; Thomas, Mendall P.

    1986-01-01

    The Farmington River basin covers 435 square miles in north-central Connecticut upstream from Tariffville and downstream of the Massachusetts state line. Most water in the basin is derived from precipitation, which averages 48 inches (366 billion gallons) per year. An additional 67 billion gallons of water per year enters the basin from Massachusetts in the West Branch of the Farmington River, Hubbard River, Valley Brook and some smaller streams. Of the total 433 billion gallons, 174 billion gallons returns to the atmosphere through evaporation and transpiration. 239 billion gallons flows out of the study area in the Farmington River at Tariffville, and 20 billion gallons is diverted for Hartford water supply. Variations in streamflow at 23 continuous-record gaging stations are summarized in standardized graphs and tables that can be used to estimate streamflow characteristics at other sites. For example, mean flow and low-flow characteristics such as the 7-day annual minimum flow for 2-year and 10-year recurrence intervals, have been determined for many partial-record stations from the data for the 23 continuous-record stations. Of the 31 principal lakes, ponds, and reservoirs in the basin, eight have usable storage capacities of more than 1 billion gallons. Two of the largest, Colebrook River Lake and Barkhamsted Reservoir, have more than 30 billion gallons usable storage. Floods have occurred in the area in every month of the year. The greatest known flood on the Farmington River was in August 1955, which had a peak flow of 140,000 cubic feet per second at Collinsville. Since then, three major floodcontrol reservoirs have been constructed to reduce the hazards of high streamflow. The major aquifers underlying the basin are composed of unconsolidated materials (stratified drift and till) and bedrock (sedimentary, igneous, and metamorphic). Stratified drift overlies till and bedrock in valleys and lowlands; it averages about 90 feet in thickness, and is capable of

  11. New Haven, Connecticut: Targeting Low-Income Household Energy Savings (City Energy: From Data to Decisions)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Strategic Priorities and Impact Analysis Team, Office of Strategic Programs

    2017-11-01

    This fact sheet "New Haven, Connecticut: Targeting Low-Income Household Energy Savings" explains how the City of New Haven used data from the U.S. Department of Energy's Cities Leading through Energy Analysis and Planning (Cities-LEAP) and the State and Local Energy Data (SLED) programs to inform its city energy planning. It is one of ten fact sheets in the "City Energy: From Data to Decisions" series.

  12. Too Big, Too Small, or Just Right? Cost-Efficiency of Environmental Inspection Services in Connecticut.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Jeffrey P; Checko, Patricia J

    2017-12-01

    To assess optimal activity size/mix of Connecticut local public health jurisdictions, through estimating economies of scale/scope/specialization for environmental inspections/services. Connecticut's 74 local health jurisdictions (LHJs) must provide environmental health services, but their efficiency or reasons for wide cost variation are unknown. The public health system is decentralized, with variation in organizational structure/size. We develop/compile a longitudinal dataset covering all 74 LHJs, annually from 2005 to 2012. We estimate a public health services/inspections cost function, where inputs are translated into outputs. We consider separate estimates of economies of scale/scope/specialization for four mandated inspection types. We obtain data from Connecticut Department of Public Health databases, reports, and other publicly available sources. There has been no known previous utilization of this combined dataset. On average, regional districts, municipal departments, and part-time LHJs are performing fewer than the efficient number of inspections. The full-time municipal departments and regional districts are more efficient but still not at the minimum efficient scale. The regional districts' elasticities of scale are larger, implying they are more efficient than municipal health departments. Local health jurisdictions may enhance efficiency by increasing inspections and/or sharing some services. © Health Research and Educational Trust.

  13. Arsenic and uranium in private wells in Connecticut, 2013-15

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flanagan, Sarah M.; Brown, Craig J.

    2017-05-03

    The occurrence of arsenic and uranium in groundwater at concentrations that exceed drinking-water standards is a concern because of the potential adverse effects on human health. Some early studies of arsenic occurrence in groundwater considered anthropogenic causes, but more recent studies have focused on sources of naturally occurring arsenic to groundwater, such as minerals within aquifer materials that are in contact with groundwater. Arsenic and uranium in groundwater in New England have been shown to have a strong association to the geologic setting and nearby streambed sediment concentrations. In New Hampshire and Massachusetts, arsenic and uranium concentrations greater than human-health benchmarks have shown distinct spatial patterns when related to the bedrock units mapped at the local scale.The Connecticut Department of Public Health (DPH) reported that there are about 322,600 private wells in Connecticut serving approximately 823,000 people, or 23 percent of the State’s population. The State does not require that existing private wells be routinely tested for arsenic, uranium, or other contaminants; consequently, private wells are only sampled at the well owner’s discretion or when they are newly constructed. The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), in cooperation with the DPH, completed an assessment in 2016 on the distribution of concentrations of arsenic and uranium in groundwater from bedrock in Connecticut. This report presents the major findings for arsenic and uranium concentrations from water samples collected from 2013 to 2015 from private wells.

  14. Chemically abrupt interface between Ce oxide and Fe films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, H.G.; Lee, D.; Kim, S.; Kim, S.G.; Hwang, Chanyong

    2005-01-01

    A chemically abrupt Fe/Ce oxide interface can be formed by initial oxidation of an Fe film followed by deposition of Ce metal. Once a Ce oxide layer is formed on top of Fe, it acts a passivation barrier for oxygen diffusion. Further deposition of Ce metal followed by its oxidation preserve the abrupt interface between Ce oxide and Fe films. The Fe and Ce oxidation states have been monitored at each stage using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy

  15. Pyrazolates advance cerium chemistry: a CeIII/CeIV redox equilibrium with benzoquinone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werner, Daniel; Deacon, Glen B; Junk, Peter C; Anwander, Reiner

    2017-05-16

    Two stable cerium(iv) 3,5-dialkylpyrazolate complexes are presented, namely dimeric [Ce(Me 2 pz) 4 ] 2 (Me 2 pz = 3,5-dimethylpyrazolate) and monomeric Ce(tBu 2 pz) 4 (tBu 2 pz = 3,5-di-tert-butylpyrazolate) along with their trivalent counterparts [Ce(Me 2 pz) 3 ] and [Ce(tBu 2 pz) 3 ] 2 . All complexes were obtained from protonolysis reactions employing the silylamide precursors Ce[N(SiHMe 2 ) 2 ] 4 and Ce[N(SiMe 3 ) 2 ] 3 . Treatment of homoleptic Ce IV and Ce III Me 2 pz complexes with 1,4-hydroquinone (H 2 hq) or 1,4-benzoquinone (bq), respectively, ultimately gave the same trimetallic Ce III species via a cerium redox equilibrium. The Ce III complex Ce 3 (Me 2 pz) 5 (pchd) 2 (L) (pchd = 1,4-bis(3,5-dimethylpyrazol-1-yl)cyclohex-2,5-diene-1,4-diolato; L = Me 2 pzH or (thf) 2 ) results from a di-1,4-pyrazolyl attack on pre-coordinated bq. The reduction of bq by [Ce(Me 2 pz) 3 (thf)] 2 , and re-oxidation by the resulting Ce IV species was supported by UV-vis spectroscopic investigations. Comparisons with the redox-innocent complexes [Ln(Me 2 pz) 3 (thf)] 2 (Ln = La and Pr) revealed far less selective reactions with bq, giving hexametallic and octametallic rare-earth metal side products containing 2-Me 2 pz substituted hq ligands.

  16. (EC+β+) decay of 130Ce

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu Shuwei; Zhang Tianmei; Xie Yuanxiang; Ma Ruichang; Ge Yuanxiu; Guo Yingxiang; Wang Chunfang; Li Zhankui; Guo Bing; Xing Jianping; Guo Tianrui; Zhu Shaofei; Xu Wang; Du Jinzhou

    1996-01-01

    The nuclide 130 Ce was produced by a ( 16 O, 4n) reaction on an enriched 118 Sn target. Reaction products were transported to a shielded location by using a helium-jet tape transport system. A 22.9 min activity in chemically separated cerium sample was identified as 130 Ce. The (EC+β + ) decay scheme of 130 Ce was proposed for the first time. This scheme includes 108 γ-lines, 107 γ-lines among them being new. More than 13 1 + low-lying states of 130 La are populated in the decay of 130 Ce. Two new isomers with half-life of 77±10 ns and 17±5 ns were observed by means of delayed γ-γ coincidence measurements. (orig.). With 5 figs., 3 tabs

  17. Solute diffusion in Pu and Ce

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marbach, Gabriel; Charissoux, Christian; Janot, Christian

    1976-01-01

    The diffusion rate of Co, Au and Ag in the bcc phases of Pu and Ce is studied. In the bcc delta phase of Pu, Au and Ag have the same diffusion rate that the matrix and Co is a very rapid solute. In the bcc phase of Ce, the diffusion coefficients of the three metals are remarkably high. This phenomenon is also observed in certain metallic matrices (Pb, Sn, [fr

  18. Metamagnetism in Ce(Ga,Al)2

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. Effect of Al substitution on the magnetic properties of Ce(Ga1−x Alx )2 (x = 0, 0.1 and. 0.5) system has been studied. The magnetic state of CeGa2 is found to be FM with a TC of 8 K, whereas the compounds with x =0.1 and 0.5 are AFM and possess TN of about 9 K. These two com- pounds undergo metamagnetic ...

  19. Ce O2-Zr O2 tetragonal ceramics (Ce-TZP): mechanical properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nono, Maria do Carmo de Andrade

    1994-01-01

    This work presents the development and the characterization of Ce O 2 -stabilized tetragonal Zr O 2 polycrystals (Ce-TZP ceramics), since it is considered candidate material for applications as structural high performance ceramics, an as substitute of some metallic materials. Ce-TZP ceramics attain remarkable increasing in strength and fracture toughness. Sintered ceramics were fabricated from mixtures of powders containing different Ce O 2 content prepared by conventional mechanical technique. It were adopted the bending strength, Vickers hardness and fracture toughness techniques to the determination of the mechanical parameters. These results were discussed and compared to those published in international literature. (author)

  20. "You Say Tomato, I Say Solanum Lycopersicum Containing Beta-ionone and Phenylacetaldehyde": an Analysis of Connecticut's GMO Labeling Legislation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nunziato, Travis

    2014-01-01

    "You Say Tomato, I Say Solanum Lycopersicum Containing Beta-ionone and Phenylacetaldehyde" discusses the importance of requiring labels on products that contain genetically modified organisms, focusing on Connecticut's GMO Labeling statutes, as it is they are the first of their kind in the nation. The article will compare Connecticut's law to the legislation found in Australia, highlighting the positive aspects of Connecticut's bill and identifying its key weaknesses, namely the "trigger clause" found in the statute. Part I will provide an overview of Genetic Modification and provide a brief history of Biotechnology. It will also provide a brief overview of the federal regulatory framework in biotechnology, as well as evaluate the United States Food and Drug Association's role of regulating genetic modification. Part I will conclude by discussing how the American public has shown that labeling GMOs is important, and something that should occur. Part II of this article will explore Connecticut's recent legislation requiring labels on products that contain GMOs. Part III will explore Australia's legislation requiring labels on products containing GMOs, comparing Australia's law to Connecticut's legislation.

  1. The Tab: How Connecticut Can Fix Its Dysfunctional Education Spending System to Reward Success, Incentivize Choice and Boost Student Achievement. A ConnCAN/Public Impact Research Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassel, Bryan C.; Doyle, Daniela

    2009-01-01

    Thirty years ago, the Connecticut Supreme Court forced our state to take stock of its system for funding schools. Our poorest towns had thousands of dollars less per child to spend. Today, our poorest districts spend roughly the same as our richest, but Connecticut's poor children still score far below their wealthy peers. Our school finance…

  2. Fabrication of Nano-CeO2 and Application of Nano-CeO2 in Fe Matrix Composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tiebao, W.; Chunxiang, C.; Xiaodong, W.; Guobin, L.

    2010-01-01

    It is expatiated that nano-CeO2 is fabricated by the direct sedimentation method. The components and particles diameter of nano-CeO2 powders are analyzed by XRD and SEM . The thermodynamic analysis and acting mechanism of nano-CeO2 with Al in Fe matrix composites are researched, which shows that the reaction is generated between CeO2 and Al in the composite, that is, 3CeO2+4Al - 2Al2O3+3[Ce], which obtains Al2O3 and active [Ce] during the sintering process. The active [Ce] can improve the performance of CeO2/Fe matrix composites. The suitable amount of CeO2 is about 0.05% in CeO2/Fe matrix composites. SEM fracture analysis shows that the toughness sockets in nano-CeO2/Fe matrix composites are more than those in no-added nano-CeO2 composites, which can explain that adding nano-CeO2 into Fe matrix composite, the toughness of the composite is improved significantly. Applied nano-CeO2 to Fe matrix diamond saw blades shows that Fe matrix diamond saw blade is sharper and of longer cutting life than that with no-added nano-CeO2.

  3. Providing Flood Risk Science for Resilient Transportation Infrastructure Decisions in Connecticut

    Science.gov (United States)

    French, R.; Cifuentes-Lorenzen, A.; Kooris, D.; O'Donnell, J.

    2017-12-01

    The Connecticut Institute for Resilience and Climate Adaptation (CIRCA) provides actionable science to accelerate adaptation and resilience strategies for Connecticut's inland and coastal waterways communities. Connecticut's coastal area has some of the most valuable real estate in the United States due to the Metro North and Shoreline East commuter rail line that connects all 24 coastal municipalities through transit hubs to the New York City metropolitan region. On its way to NY, the rail runs through neighborhoods and coastal marshes and crosses local and state roads. During coastal storms and increasingly at high tides as the sea level rises, the rail line may act like a berm, but also cuts off coastal neighborhoods from the upland. When it crosses a road in a marsh setting, the clearance restriction also severely limits communities' options for moving or elevating the roadway. These flooded roadways and vulnerable transit hubs are already a challenge for municipalities and will continue to be in the future. However, given scarce resources, it is not sufficient to simply know that they are vulnerable using existing low resolution mapping tools. Communities need site-specific, exact estimates of frequency of flooding, incorporating future sea level rise, to make cost determinations and accurately project the useful life of their investment. To address this need CIRCA developed high-resolution dynamic coastal flood risk models and partnered with municipal staff, regional planning bodies and the state to apply them to infrastructure decision-making. We will present three case studies of this approach: 1) the implementation of the US HUD National Disaster Resilience Competition pilot project of road elevation and berm construction in partnership with the Department of Housing and the City of Bridgeport; 2) the City of New London's first rail and ferry transit hub vulnerability assessment for sea level rise and storms and 3) the flooding frequency of a state road

  4. The effect of helmets on motorcycle outcomes in a level I trauma center in Connecticut.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiznia, Daniel H; Kim, Chang-Yeon; Dai, Feng; Goel, Alex; Leslie, Michael P

    2016-08-17

    The State of Connecticut has a partial motorcycle helmet law, which has been linked to one of the lowest helmet compliance rates in the Northeast. We examine the clinical and financial impact of low motorcycle helmet use in the State of Connecticut. A retrospective cohort study comparing the outcomes between helmeted and nonhelmeted motorcycle crash victims over a 12.5-year period, from July 2, 2002, to December 31, 2013. All patients who were admitted to the hospital after a motorcycle crash were included in the study. Patients were stratified into helmeted and nonhelmeted cohorts. Group differences were compared using t-test or Wilcoxon rank test for continuous variables and chi-square test for dichotomous outcomes. Regression models were created to evaluate predictors of helmet use, alcohol and drugs as confounding variables, and factors that influenced hospital costs. The registry included 986 eligible patients. Of this group, 335 (34%) were helmeted and 651 (66%) were nonhelmeted. Overall, nonhelmeted patients had a worse clinical presentation, with lower Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS; P helmeted patients incurred $14,970 (P =.18). ISS, GCS, and ICU length of stay were significantly correlated with increased hospital costs (P helmet was a significant predictor of mortality (P =.04) after adjusting for alcohol/drug use and age. Helmet use is associated with lower injury severity and increased survival after a motorcycle crash. These outcomes remained consistent even after controlling for age and alcohol and drug use. The medical and financial impact of Connecticut's partial helmet law should be carefully evaluated to petition for increased education and enforcement of helmet use.

  5. Trace elements and radionuclides in the Connecticut River and Amazon River estuary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dion, E.P.

    1983-01-01

    The Connecticut River, its estuary and the Amazon River plume were studied to elucidate processes which control the flux of nuclides to the sea. Major ions (Ca, Mg, Na, Cl, Bicarbonate) and selected trace elements (Ra, Ba, Cu, Si) are introduced to the Connecticut River in proportion to the total dissolved load of various groundwaters. Si, Ra, and Ba are subject to removal from solution by seasonal diatom productivity; whereas the other groundwater-derived elements are found in proportion to TDS both time and space. These nuclides are released in the estuary when a portion of the Ra, Ba, and Si in riverine biogenic detritus is trapped in salt marshes and coves bordering the estuary where it redissolves and is exported to the main river channel at ebb tide. In the Amazon River estuary, the Ra and Ba are released in mid-salinity waters. Ra and Ba together with Si are subsequently removed by diatom productivity as reflected in increased Ra and Ba in the suspended particles and depleted dissolved nuclide concentrations in samples from the high productivity zone. In both the Connecticut River system and the Amazon River plume, Cu behaves conservatively; whereas the fates of Fe and Al are linked to soil-derived humic acids. Trace elements in Amazon plume sediments are found simply in proportion to the percentage of fine-grained size materials, despite low Th-228/Ra-228 mean residence times in the plume and the presence of Cs-137 in the sediment column. Estimates of the total flux of nuclides to the oceans can best be calculated on a mass balance basis using groundwater inputs. Unless significant repositories for nuclides exist in the river-estuarine system, the groundwater flux of dissolved nuclides is net flux to the ocean despite the reactions which occur in both rivers and estuaries

  6. Determining training effectiveness: a model developed for use at Connecticut Yankee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mulligna, R.R.

    1983-01-01

    The purpose (or intent) of training, in the Nuclear Power Industry, is to provide an operating/support organization capable of safely and efficiently operating a nuclear power plant throughout its operating lifetime. (ANSI/ANS-3.1 - 1981). It stands, then, that the extent of fulfillment of this purpose, the extent of accomplishment of this desired result, needs to be determined. (The question How well, also needs to be answered). Evolve, the Determining Training Effectiveness Program. This paper presents an Effective Training Model and discusses the construct of the Determining Training Effectiveness Program at Connecticut Yankee

  7. Geologic features of the Connecticut Valley, Massachusetts, as related to recent floods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jahns, Richard Henry

    1947-01-01

    This report gives the results of a geologic study of certain features that bear upon the recent flood behavior of rivers flowing in the Massachusetts part of the Connecticut Valley. It is in part an outline of the physiographic history of the Connecticut River, a 'history that is treated in progressively greater detail as it concerns events occurring from Mesozoic time to the present, and in part a discussion of erosional and depositional processes associated with the extraordinary floods of March 1936 and September 1938. The Connecticut River flows southward through Massachusetts in a broad lowland area of more than 400 square miles and is joined in this area by four large tributaries, the Deerfield and Westfield Rivers from the west and the Millers and Chicopee Rivers from the east. The lowland area, or :Connecticut Valley province, is flanked on the west by the Berkshire Hills, a, deeply incised uplifted plateau, and on the east by the central upland, or Worcester .County plateau, a lower upland marked by rolling topography. Most of the broad, relatively flat valley floor is underlain by Triassic sedimentary rocks. Rising above it, however, are the prominent Holyoke-Mount Tom and Deerfield Ranges, which consist in large part of dark-colored igneous rocks, also of Triassic age. There is evidence of several cycles of erosion in central western Massachusetts, the last two of which are of Tertiary age and appear to have reached nature and very youthful stages of topographic development, respectively. Immediately prior to the glacial epoch, therefore, the Connecticut River flowed in a fairly narrow, deep gorge, which it had incised in the rather flat 5ottom of the valley that it had formed at an earlier stage. A Pleistocene crustal subsidence probably of several hundred feet, for which there has been only partial compensation in postglacial time, was responsible for the present position of much of this gorge below sea level. That an estuary does not now occupy the

  8. Life cycle costs for disposal and assured isolation of low-level radioactive waste in Connecticut

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chau, B.; Sutherland, A.A.; Baird, R.D.

    1998-03-01

    This document presents life cycle costs for a low-level radioactive disposal facility and a comparable assured isolation facility. Cost projections were based on general plans and assumptions, including volume projections and operating life, provided by the Connecticut Hazardous Waste Management Service, for a facility designed to meet the State's needs. Life cycle costs include the costs of pre-construction activities, construction, operations, closure, and post-closure institutional control. In order to provide a better basis for understanding the relative magnitude of near-term costs and future costs, the results of present value analysis of ut-year costs are provided

  9. National environmental/energy workforce assessment. Connecticut. Final report on phase 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-12-01

    This study is one of 70 volumes assessing the workforce needs (manpower needs) for pollution control and abatement in the United States for the five-year period of 1976 through 1981. Seven fields for pollution control -- air, noise, pesticides, potable water, radiation, solid waste, and wastewater -- are analyzed, together with energy-related programs currently accentuated by the national effort to solve energy supply problems. The report identifies existing workforce levels, training programs, career opportunities, and future staffing level projections (1976 to 1982) based on the information available for the state of Connecticut

  10. Physico-chemical properties of (U,Ce)O2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamada, K.; Yamanaka, S.; Katsura, M.

    1998-01-01

    The high-temperature X-ray diffraction analysis of (U,Ce)O 2 with CeO 2 contents ranging from 0 to 20 mol.% CeO 2 was performed to obtain the variation of the linear thermal expansion coefficient with the CeO 2 content. Ultrasonic pulse-echo measurements were also carried out from room temperature to 673 K to estimate the change in the mechanical properties of (U,Ce)O 2 with the CeO 2 content. The variation in the linear thermal expansion coefficient at the low CeO 2 content region is more steep than that expected from the linear thermal expansion coefficient of UO 2 and CeO 2 . The Young's and shear moduli of all (U,Ce)O 2 were found to decrease with rising temperature. This was due to the increase of the bond length accompanied by the thermal expansion. Although the lattice parameter decreased with CeO 2 content, the moduli of (U,Ce)O 2 were found to decrease with increasing CeO 2 content at room temperature. These results show that in the range from 0 to 20 mol.% of CeO 2 , as CeO 2 content increases, the bottom of the potential energy in (U,Ce)O 2 is shallower and broader. (orig.)

  11. Cyclic voltammetry study of Ce(IV/Ce(III redox couple and Ce(IV-F complex in sulfuric acid medium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. G. He

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available In this paper the electrochemical behaviors of Ce(IV/Ce(III redox couple and Ce(IV - F complex in sulfuric acid medium were studied by cyclic voltammetry using a platinum electrode. Both of the Ce(IV/Ce(III couple in Ce(IV solution and Ce(IV - F complex is a quasi-reversible process, and gives a linear correlation between the peak potentials and square root of scan rates, showing that the kinetics of the overall process is diffusion controlled. The complexation of cerium(IV and fluoride is favorable for the oxidation of Ce(III. The kinetic parameters such as diffusion coefficients, anodic transfer coefficients and rate constants were studied.

  12. Renormalized electronic structures of CeSi{sub 2}, CeRu{sub 2} and CeAl{sub 2}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Costa-Quintana, J. [Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona (Spain). Grup d`Electromagnetisme; Gonzalez-Leon, E. [Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona (Spain). Grup d`Electromagnetisme; Lopez-Aguilar, F. [Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona (Spain). Grup d`Electromagnetisme; Puig-Puig, L. [Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona (Spain). Grup d`Electromagnetisme; Sanchez-Lopez, M.M. [Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona (Spain). Grup d`Electromagnetisme

    1995-02-01

    The renormalized density of states of some Ce compounds is analyzed by considering self-energy effects. We study the influence of the hybridization introduced by the self-energy and how it can affect the shape of the characteristic lower, upper and middle-energy resonance. ((orig.)).

  13. Ce-valence state and hydrogen-induced volume effects in Ce-based intermetallic compounds and their hydrides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stange, M.; Paul-Boncour, V.; Latroche, M.; Percheron-Guegan, A.; Isnard, O.; Yartys, V.A.

    2005-01-01

    An average Ce-valence state (v) of two types of Ce-containing intermetallic compounds, equiatomic CeNiX (X= Al, Ga, Sn) and CeM 3 (M= Ni, Co, Mn), and their hydrides was estimated from X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) and analysed in parallel with hydrogen-induced volume changes on hydrogenation. The largest valence states in the initial compounds were found in CeM 3(v=3.32-3.36) followed by CeNiAl 1-x Ga x (v=3.25-3.27). This contrasts to CeNiSn, which is close to a pure trivalent state (v=3.07). On hydrogenation, a conversion from mixed-valent CeNiAl 1-x Ga x , x=0.5, 1, to pure Ce III hydrides takes place (ΔV /V=19.6-20.0 %). In CeNiSnD z (z=1, 1.8, ΔV/V=3.0, 8.0%) the changes in the valence state towards Ce III are very small. The situation for the CeM 3 -hydrides is complex. For CeNi 3 D 2.8 , CeNi 2.75 Mn 0.25 D 3.4 and CeCo 3 D 3.4 (ΔV /V=24-32%) where rather similar electronic properties can be expected, a decrease in the contribution of Ce IV for CeNi 3 D 3 and CeNi 2.75 Mn 0.25 D 3.4 (v=3.18 and 3.12, respectively) contrasts to the behaviour of CeCo 3 D 3.4 where the hydrogen induced valence change is very small (v=3.32)

  14. From cure to custodianship of the insane poor in nineteenth-century Connecticut.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodheart, Lawrence B

    2010-01-01

    Connecticut was the exception among the Northeastern and Middle Atlantic states in not founding a public institution for the insane until after the Civil War when it opened the Hospital for the Insane at Middletown in 1868, a facility previously neglected by scholars. The state had relied on the expedient of subsidizing the impoverished at the private Hartford Retreat for the Insane that overtaxed that institution and left hundreds untreated. Despite abundant evidence to the contrary, well meaning officials oversold the idea that the Middletown site would promote cures and be cost effective. A number of unanticipated consequences occurred that mirrored fundamental changes in nineteenth-century psychiatry. The new hospital swelled by 1900 to over 2,000 patients, the largest in New England. Custodianship at the monolithic hospital became the norm. The hegemony of monopoly capitalism legitimated the ruling idea that bigger institutions were better and was midwife to the birth of eugenic responses. Class based psychiatry--the few rich at the Retreat and the many poor at Middletown--was standard as it was in other aspects of the Gilded Age. Public policy toward the insane poor in Connecticut represents an outstanding example of the transition from antebellum romanticism to fin de siècle fatalism.

  15. Connecticut's Value-Based Insurance Plan Increased The Use Of Targeted Services And Medication Adherence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirth, Richard A; Cliff, Elizabeth Q; Gibson, Teresa B; McKellar, M Richard; Fendrick, A Mark

    2016-04-01

    In 2011 Connecticut implemented the Health Enhancement Program for state employees. This voluntary program followed the principles of value-based insurance design (VBID) by lowering patient costs for certain high-value primary and chronic disease preventive services, coupled with requirements that enrollees receive these services. Nonparticipants in the program, including those removed for noncompliance with its requirements, were assessed a premium surcharge. The program was intended to curb cost growth and improve health through adherence to evidence-based preventive care. To evaluate its efficacy in doing so, we compared changes in service use and spending after implementation of the program to trends among employees of six other states. Compared to employees of other states, Connecticut employees were similar in age and sex but had a slightly higher percentage of enrollees with chronic conditions and substantially higher spending at baseline. During the program's first two years, the use of targeted services and adherence to medications for chronic conditions increased, while emergency department use decreased, relative to the situation in the comparison states. The program's impact on costs was inconclusive and requires a longer follow-up period. This novel combination of VBID principles and participation requirements may be a tool that can help plan sponsors increase the use of evidence-based preventive services. Project HOPE—The People-to-People Health Foundation, Inc.

  16. Impact of Connecticut Legislation Incentivizing Elimination of Unhealthy Competitive Foods on National School Lunch Program Participation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luedicke, Joerg; Dorsey, Marice; Fiore, Susan S.; Henderson, Kathryn E.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives. We analyzed the impact of Connecticut legislation incentivizing voluntary school district–level elimination of unhealthy competitive foods on National School Lunch Program (NSLP) participation. Methods. We analyzed data on free, reduced, and paid participation in the NSLP from 904 schools within 154 Connecticut school districts from the 2004–2005 to the 2009–2010 school year, resulting in 5064 observations of annual school-level meal participation. We used multilevel regression modeling techniques to estimate the impact of the state competitive food legislation on the count of NSLP lunches served per student in each school. Results. Overall, the state statute was associated with an increase in school lunch participation. We observed increases between 7% and 23% for middle- and high-school meal programs, and a slight decrease of 2.5% for the elementary school free meal eligibility category, leading to an estimated revenue increase of roughly $30 000 for an average school district per school year. Conclusions. This study provides support for national implementation of proposed rigorous competitive food standards that can improve the health of students while supporting local school district finances. PMID:23678930

  17. Joint Regulation of Radionuclides at Connecticut Yankee Haddam Neck Plant - Finding Common Ground and Lessons Learned

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peters, J.; Glucksberg, N.; Fogg, A.; Couture, B.

    2006-01-01

    During the site closure of nuclear facilities where both radionuclides and chemicals are present in environmental media, state and federal regulatory agencies other than the Nuclear Regulatory Commission often have a stake in the regulation of the site closure process. At the Connecticut Yankee Atomic Power Company (CYAPCO) Haddam Neck Plant in Haddam, Connecticut, the site closure process includes both radiological and chemical cleanup which is regulated by two separate divisions within the state and two federal agencies. Each of the regulatory agencies has unique closure criteria which pertain to radionuclides and, consequently, there is overlapping and in some cases disparate regulation of radionuclides. Considerable effort has been expended by CYAPCO to find common ground in meeting the site closure requirements for radionuclides required by each of the agencies. This paper discusses the approaches that have been used by CYAPCO to address radionuclide site closure requirements. Significant lessons learned from these approaches include the demonstration that public health cleanup criteria for most radionuclides of concern at nuclear power generation facilities are protective for chemical toxicity concerns and are protective for ecological receptors and, consequently, performing a baseline ecological risk assessment for radionuclides at power generation facilities is not generally necessary. (authors)

  18. Combining Mineral Identification Techniques to Help Homeowners of Northeastern Connecticut Diagnose Pyrrhotite Laced Concrete Foundations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gourley, J. R.; Geiss, C. E.

    2017-12-01

    Crumbling concrete linked to the mineral pyrrhotite is an emerging home owner crisis in northeastern Connecticut as new home foundations are failing within only several years. Potentially thousands of homes that have been built between the mid 1980's and 2016 are affected. Homes have been rendered worthless as basement concrete is crumbling and the cost of repair often exceeds the value of the home. In all of the failing concrete cases the presence of pyrrhotite from a local quarry is the common denominator. Testing for pyrrhotite, until now, has been costly and often invasive, with large core samples required. In working with a local advocacy group, The Connecticut Coalition Against Crumbling Basements (CCACB), we have developed a rapid analysis method that uses a combination of magnetic susceptibility and high resolution X-ray diffraction to identify both the mineral pyrrhotite and/or its expansive product mineral, ettringite. The goal of this method to give homeowners a reliable diagnosis that could help in mitigation decisions and/or the determination of the resale value of their homes. The partnership of Trinity College's Environmental Science Program with the CCACB has built a rewarding bridge between education and the community. Faculty, students and local advocates are collaborating to solve a problem that will help homeowners diagnose a potentially devastating non-natural "geo" hazard that can adversely affect home values where concrete is of an unknown provenance.

  19. Anterior Deep Bite Malocclusion Treated with Connecticut Intrusion Arch: Biomechanical Consideration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bansal, Abhishek; Sami, Laique; Tapashetti, Roopali; Gaikwad, Shashank

    2014-01-01

    Most Class II division 2 malocclusion manifest a severe deep bite, the orthodontic correction of deep overbite can be achieved with several mechanisms one such mechanics is true intrusion of anterior teeth. Deep overbite correction by intrusion of anterior teeth affords a number of advantages which includes simplifying control of the vertical dimension and allowing forward rotation of mandible to aid in Class II correction. It also aid in correction of a high gingival smile line. This case report presents the patient of a 14-year-old boy with Class II division 2 subdivision malocclusion treated with connecticut intrusion arch and also highlights the biomechanical aspect of this appliance. Intrusion of anterior teeth is difficult. An appropriate, effective and clinically manageable biomechanical system is required. The treatment approach shown in this case can treat the deep overbite precisely with incisor intrusion. The article shows the versatility of Connecticut Intrusion Arch and by applying the sound biomechanical principles we can execute the planned mechanics with minimal side effects. PMID:24995261

  20. Integrated Multibeam and LIDAR Bathymetry Data Offshore of New London and Niantic, Connecticut

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poppe, L.J.; Danforth, W.W.; McMullen, K.Y.; Parker, Castle E.; Lewit, P.G.; Doran, E.F.

    2010-01-01

    Nearshore areas within Long Island Sound are of great interest to the Connecticut and New York research and resource management communities because of their ecological, recreational, and commercial importance. Although advances in multibeam echosounder technology permit the construction of high-resolution representations of sea-floor topography in deeper waters, limitations inherent in collecting fixed-angle multibeam data make using this technology in shallower waters (less than 10 meters deep) difficult and expensive. These limitations have often resulted in data gaps between areas for which multibeam bathymetric datasets are available and the adjacent shoreline. To address this problem, the geospatial data sets released in this report seamlessly integrate complete-coverage multibeam bathymetric data acquired off New London and Niantic Bay, Connecticut, with hydrographic Light Detection and Ranging (LIDAR) data acquired along the nearshore. The result is a more continuous sea floor representation and a much smaller gap between the digital bathymetric data and the shoreline than previously available. These data sets are provided online and on CD-ROM in Environmental Systems Research Institute (ESRI) raster-grid and GeoTIFF formats in order to facilitate access, compatibility, and utility.

  1. Classifying the Health of Connecticut Streams Using Benthic Macroinvertebrates with Implications for Water Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellucci, Christopher J.; Becker, Mary E.; Beauchene, Mike; Dunbar, Lee

    2013-06-01

    Bioassessments have formed the foundation of many water quality monitoring programs throughout the United States. Like many state water quality programs, Connecticut has developed a relational database containing information about species richness, species composition, relative abundance, and feeding relationships among macroinvertebrates present in stream and river systems. Geographic Information Systems can provide estimates of landscape condition and watershed characteristics and when combined with measurements of stream biology, provide a useful visual display of information that is useful in a management context. The objective of our study was to estimate the stream health for all wadeable stream kilometers in Connecticut using a combination of macroinvertebrate metrics and landscape variables. We developed and evaluated models using an information theoretic approach to predict stream health as measured by macroinvertebrate multimetric index (MMI) and identified the best fitting model as a three variable model, including percent impervious land cover, a wetlands metric, and catchment slope that best fit the MMI scores (adj- R 2 = 0.56, SE = 11.73). We then provide examples of how modeling can augment existing programs to support water management policies under the Federal Clean Water Act such as stream assessments and anti-degradation.

  2. Classifying the health of Connecticut streams using benthic macroinvertebrates with implications for water management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellucci, Christopher J; Becker, Mary E; Beauchene, Mike; Dunbar, Lee

    2013-06-01

    Bioassessments have formed the foundation of many water quality monitoring programs throughout the United States. Like many state water quality programs, Connecticut has developed a relational database containing information about species richness, species composition, relative abundance, and feeding relationships among macroinvertebrates present in stream and river systems. Geographic Information Systems can provide estimates of landscape condition and watershed characteristics and when combined with measurements of stream biology, provide a useful visual display of information that is useful in a management context. The objective of our study was to estimate the stream health for all wadeable stream kilometers in Connecticut using a combination of macroinvertebrate metrics and landscape variables. We developed and evaluated models using an information theoretic approach to predict stream health as measured by macroinvertebrate multimetric index (MMI) and identified the best fitting model as a three variable model, including percent impervious land cover, a wetlands metric, and catchment slope that best fit the MMI scores (adj-R (2) = 0.56, SE = 11.73). We then provide examples of how modeling can augment existing programs to support water management policies under the Federal Clean Water Act such as stream assessments and anti-degradation.

  3. Predictors of Nutrition Quality in Early Child Education Settings in Connecticut.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andreyeva, Tatiana; Kenney, Erica L; O'Connell, Meghan; Sun, Xiaohan; Henderson, Kathryn E

    2018-02-23

    This study assessed the dietary quality of lunches and feeding practices (family-style service, teacher role modeling) in Connecticut child care centers and made comparisons by center participation in the federal Child and Adult Care Food Program (CACFP). Plate waste methods and visual observation of lunches served and consumed. A total of 97 randomly selected licensed Connecticut child care centers (53 CACFP and 44 non-CACFP). A total of 838 preschool-aged children. Total energy intake, macronutrient intake, and intake by CACFP meal component as well as use of family-style dining, management of additional helpings, and whether and what teachers consumed in view of children. Child dietary intake at lunch was compared with dietary and CACFP recommendations using a mixed linear regression model. The CACFP centers were more likely to offer family-style service and have staff eat the same foods as the children. Children in non-CACFP centers consumed more saturated fat (4.1 vs 2.7 g; P advantages in terms of provider behavior during meals, characteristics of food offerings, and child intake. Current feeding practices in child care settings require further exploration in the context of serving children at risk for food insecurity and in light of recent work on responsive feeding. Copyright © 2018 Society for Nutrition Education and Behavior. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. CeO2-stabilized tetragonal ZrO2 polycrystals (Ce-TZP ceramics)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andrade Nono, M.C. de.

    1990-12-01

    This work presents the development and the characterization of CeO 2 -stabilized tetragonal ZrO 2 polycrystals (Ce-TZP ceramics), since it is considered candidate material for applications as structural high performance ceramics. Sintered ceramics were fabricated from mixtures of powders containing different CeO 2 content prepared by conventional and nonconventional techniques. These powders and their resultant sintered ceramics were specified by chemical and physical characterization, compactation state and mechanical properties. The chemical characteristics were determined by chemical analysis and the physical characteristics were evaluated by phase content, particle and agglomerate size and aspect, and powder porosity. (author)

  5. Production of 139Ce by the 139La(p,n)139Ce reaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishioka, Noriko S.; Sekine, Toshiaki; Izumo, Mishiroku; Hashimoto, Kazuyuki; Kobayashi, Katsutoshi; Matsuoka, Hiromitsu

    2002-01-01

    To produce a carrier-free 139 Ce to be used as an efficiency-calibration source for Ge detectors, a target-preparation method and a chemical separation method were studied. It was found that commercially available powders of lanthanum-oxide and lanthanum metal are applicable to a target material in the nuclear reaction 139 La(p,n) 139 Ce. In the separation of 139 Ce from an irradiated lanthanum target, a solvent-extraction method and an ion-exchange method gave final products in good chemical purity. (author)

  6. Water-quality characteristics of selected public recreational lakes and ponds in Connecticut

    Science.gov (United States)

    Healy, D.F.; Kulp, K.P.

    1995-01-01

    Reconnaissance limnological and lakebed-sediment surveys were conducted in Connecticut during 1989-91 by the U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Connecticut Department of Environmental Protec- tion, to evaluate water-quality characteristics of selected public recreational lakes and ponds in the State. Limnological surveys were conducted on 49 lakes and ponds selected from a list of 105 publicly owned waterbodies that qualified for water- quality assessments under Section 314 of the Federal Clean Water Act. Lakebed-sediment surveys were conducted in 9 river impoundments and 1 riverine lake below industrial areas and 2 headwater lakes in relatively pristine areas. The limnological surveys consisted of two sampling events--during spring turnover and during the summer stratifi- cation. Each sampling event included depth profiles of water temperature, specific conductance, hydrogen-ion activity, and dissolved oxygen concen- trations; measurements of Secchi disc transparency; and the collection of samples for the analyses of alkalinity, chlorophyll, phosphorus, and nitrogen concentrations. Areal extent and population density of the dominant aquatic macrophytes were qualita- tively noted during the summer sampling event. These water-quality data were used to determine the trophic classification and acidification status of the 49 lakes. The trophic classification yielded the following results: 2 oligotrophic, 8 early mesotrophic, 13 mesotrophic, 5 late mesotrophic, 10 eutrophic, and 11 highly eutrophic lakes. In terms of acidification status, 7 lakes were classified as acid threatened and 42 as not threatened. A Wilcoxon two-tailed signed rank test was used to compare data for 13 lakes and ponds from the present survey with data from the 1973-75 or 1978-79 surveys conducted by the Connecticut Agricultural Experiment Station and Connecticut Department of Environmental Protection. The test showed no significant difference at the 90 percent confidence level for

  7. Microneedle Array Interface to CE on Chip

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lüttge, Regina; Gardeniers, Johannes G.E.; Vrouwe, E.X.; van den Berg, Albert; Northrup, M.A.; Jensen, K.F; Harrison, D.J.

    2003-01-01

    This paper presents a microneedle array sampler interfaced to a capillary electrophoresis (CE) glass chip with integrated conductivity detection electrodes. A solution of alkali ions was electrokinetically loaded through the microneedles onto the chip and separation was demonstrated compared to a

  8. Metamagnetism in Ce(Ga,Al)2

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Metamagnetism in Ce(Ga,Al)2. K G SURESH1,∗. , S RADHA2 and A K NIGAM3. 1Department of Physics, Indian Institute of Technology, Mumbai 400 076, India. 2Department of Physics, Mithibai College, Mumbai 400 056, India. 3Tata Institute of Fundamental Research, Homi Bhabha Road, Mumbai 400 005, India. ∗.

  9. (Ln = Ce, Pr and Nd) microwave ceramics

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    125–128. c Indian Academy of Sciences. Influence of lead oxide addition on LnTiTaO6 (Ln = Ce, Pr and Nd) ... A number of samples with improved microwave dielectric properties were obtained on all the systems suitable for practical ... circuits due to their compactness, thermal stability, low cost of production, high efficiency ...

  10. Nitrogen concentrations and loads for the Connecticut River at Middle Haddam, Connecticut, computed with the use of autosampling and continuous measurements of water quality for water years 2009 to 2014

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mullaney, John R.; Martin, Joseph W.; Morrison, Jonathan

    2018-03-20

    The daily and annual loads of nitrate plus nitrite and total nitrogen for the Connecticut River at Middle Haddam, Connecticut, were determined for water years 2009 to 2014. The analysis was done with a combination of methods, which included a predefined rating curve method for nitrate plus nitrite and total nitrogen for water years 2009 to 2011 and a custom rating curve method that included sensor measurements of nitrate plus nitrite nitrogen concentration and turbidity along with mean daily flow to determine total nitrogen loads for water years 2011 to 2014. Instantaneous concentrations of total nitrogen were estimated through the use of a regression model based on sensor measurements at 15-minute intervals of nitrate plus nitrite nitrogen and turbidity for water years 2011 to 2014.Annual total nitrogen loads at the Connecticut River at Middle Haddam ranged from 12,900 to 19,200 metric tons, of which about 42 to 49 percent was in the form of nitrate plus nitrite. The mean 95-percent prediction intervals on daily total nitrogen load estimates were smaller from the custom model, which used sensor data, than those calculated by the predefined model.Annual total nitrogen load estimates at the Connecticut River at Middle Haddam were compared with the upstream load estimates at the Connecticut River at Thompsonville, Conn. Annual gains in total nitrogen loads between the two stations ranged from 3,430 to 6,660 metric tons. These increases between the two stations were attributed to the effects of increased urbanization and to combined annual discharges of 1,540 to 2,090 metric tons of nitrogen from 24 wastewater treatment facilities in the drainage area between the two stations. The contribution of total nitrogen from wastewater discharge between the two stations had declined substantially before the beginning of this study and accounted for from 31 to 52 percent of the gain in nitrogen load between the Thompsonville and Middle Haddam sites.

  11. Motorcycle Helmets: The Economic Burden of an Incomplete Helmet Law to Medical Care in the State of Connecticut.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiznia, Daniel H; Averbukh, Leon; Kim, Chang-Yeon; Goel, Alex; Leslie, Michael P

    2015-09-01

    The lack of a mandatory motorcycle helmet law leads to increased injury severity and increased health care costs. This study presents a financial model to estimate how the lack of a mandatory helmet law impacts the cost of health care in the state of Connecticut. The average cost to treat a helmeted rider and a nonhelmeted rider was $3,112 and $5,746 respectively (cost adjusted for year 2014). The total hospital treatment cost in the state of Connecticut from 2003 through 2012 was $73,106,197, with $51,508,804 attributed to nonhelmeted riders and $21,597,393 attributed to helmeted riders. The total Medicaid cost to the state of Connecticut for treating nonhelmeted patients was $18,277,317. This model demonstrates that the lack of a mandatory helmet law increases overall health care costs to the state of Connecticut, and provides a framework by which hospital costs can be reduced to contribute to the economic stability of health care economics in the state.

  12. Geologic evolution of the lower Connecticut River valley: Influence of bedrock geology, glacial deposits, and sea level

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stone, Janet R.; Lewis, Ralph S.

    2016-01-01

    This fieldtrip illustrates the character of the lower Connecticut River bedrock valley, in particular its depth, and the lithology and structure of bedrock units it crosses. It examines the character and distribution of the glaciodeltaic terraces that partially fill the valley and discusses the depth of postglacial incision into them.

  13. An Examination of Mental Health Content in Course Work and Field Experiences in Connecticut Educational Leadership Preparation Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papa, Dorothy P.

    2017-01-01

    This exploratory mixed method convergent parallel study examined Connecticut Educational leadership preparation programs for the existence of mental health content to learn the extent to which pre-service school leaders are prepared for addressing student mental health. Interviews were conducted with school mental health experts and Connecticut…

  14. The Forests of Southern New England, 2007: A report on the forest resources of Connecticut, Massachusetts, and Rhode Island

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brett J. Butler; Charles J. Barnett; Susan J. Crocker; Grant M. Domke; Dale Gormanson; William N. Hill; Cassandra M. Kurtz; Tonya Lister; Christopher Martin; Patrick D. Miles; Randall Morin; W. Keith Moser; Mark D. Nelson; Barbara O' Connell; Bruce Payton; Charles H. Perry; Ronald J. Piva; Rachel Riemann; Christopher W. Woodall

    2011-01-01

    This report summarizes the results of the fifth forest inventory of the forests of Southern New England, defined as Connecticut, Massachusetts, and Rhode Island, conducted by the U.S. Forest Service, Forest Inventory and analysis program. Information on forest attributes, ownership, land use change, carbon, timber products, forest health, and statistics and quality...

  15. 75 FR 14634 - Dominion Nuclear Connecticut, Inc.; Millstone Power Station, Unit Nos. 1, 2, and 3; Environmental...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-26

    ...-49, issued to Dominion Nuclear Connecticut, Inc. (DNC or the licensee) for operation of Millstone... with certain new requirements contained in 10 CFR 73.55 by the March 31, 2010, deadline. DNC has... beyond the date required by 10 [[Page 14635

  16. 75 FR 16517 - Dominion Nuclear Connecticut, Inc.; Millstone Power Station, Unit Nos 1, 2, and 3; Exemption

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... Dominion Nuclear Connecticut, Inc. (DNC or the licensee) is the holder of Facility Operating License Nos... from two of these new requirements that DNC now seeks an exemption from the March 31, 2010... supplemented by letter dated January 12, 2010 (ADAMS Accession No. ML100131115), DNC requested an exemption in...

  17. Correlated electronic structure of CeN

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Panda, S.K., E-mail: swarup.panda@physics.uu.se [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Uppsala University, P.O. Box 516, SE-751 20 Uppsala (Sweden); Di Marco, I. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Uppsala University, P.O. Box 516, SE-751 20 Uppsala (Sweden); Delin, A. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Uppsala University, P.O. Box 516, SE-751 20 Uppsala (Sweden); KTH Royal Institute of Technology, School of Information and Communication Technology, Department of Materials and Nano Physics, Electrum 229, SE-164 40 Kista (Sweden); KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Swedish e-Science Research Center (SeRC), SE-100 44 Stockholm (Sweden); Eriksson, O., E-mail: olle.eriksson@physics.uu.se [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Uppsala University, P.O. Box 516, SE-751 20 Uppsala (Sweden)

    2016-04-15

    Highlights: • The electronic structure of CeN is studied within the GGA+DMFT approach using SPTF and Hubbard I approximation. • 4f spectral functions from SPTF and Hubbard I are coupled to explain the various spectroscopic manifestations of CeN. • The calculated XPS and BIS spectra show good agreement with the corresponding experimental spectra. • The contribution of the various l-states and the importance of cross-sections for the photoemission process are analyzed. - Abstract: We have studied in detail the electronic structure of CeN including spin orbit coupling (SOC) and electron–electron interaction, within the dynamical mean-field theory combined with density-functional theory in generalized gradient approximation (GGA+DMFT). The effective impurity problem has been solved through the spin-polarized T-matrix fluctuation-exchange (SPTF) solver and the Hubbard I approximation (HIA). The calculated l-projected atomic partial densities of states and the converged potential were used to obtain the X-ray-photoemission-spectra (XPS) and Bremstrahlung Isochromat spectra (BIS). Following the spirit of Gunnarsson–Schonhammer model, we have coupled the SPTF and HIA 4f spectral functions to explain the various spectroscopic manifestations of CeN. Our computed spectra in such a coupled scheme explain the experimental data remarkably well, establishing the validity of our theoretical model in analyzing the electronic structure of CeN. The contribution of the various l-states in the total spectra and the importance of cross sections are also analyzed in detail.

  18. Crystal structures of isotypic aluminides CeRuAl and CeRhAl

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gribanov, A.V.; Tursina, A.I.; Grytsiv, A.V.; Murashova, E.V.; Bukhan'ko, N.G.; Rogl, P.; Seropegin, Y.D.; Giester, G.

    2008-01-01

    The crystal structures of the compounds CeRuAl and CeRhAl were studied by single crystal X-ray diffraction. Both compounds crystallize in the orthorhombic LaNiAl type with space group Pnma (No. 62) and are related to the structure types of hexagonal ZrNiAl and orthorhombic TiNiSi. Parameters for CeRuAl and CeRhAl are: a = 7.2057(2) A, b = 4.0589(1) A, c = 15.8728(5) A; R F = 0.023; a = 7.107(2) A, b = 4.2237(10) A, c = 15.965(3) A; R F 0.032, respectively

  19. Tuning Ce distribution for high performanced Nd-Ce-Fe-B sintered magnets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fan, Xiaodong [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Xi’an University of Technology, Xi’an 710048 (China); Key Laboratory of Magnetic Materials and Devices, Ningbo Institute of Material Technology and Engineering, Chinese Academy of Science, Ningbo 315201 (China); Guo, Shuai; Chen, Kan; Chen, Renjie; Lee, Don [Key Laboratory of Magnetic Materials and Devices, Ningbo Institute of Material Technology and Engineering, Chinese Academy of Science, Ningbo 315201 (China); You, Caiyin, E-mail: caiyinyou@xaut.edu.cn [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Xi’an University of Technology, Xi’an 710048 (China); Yan, Aru, E-mail: aruyan@nimte.ac.cn [Key Laboratory of Magnetic Materials and Devices, Ningbo Institute of Material Technology and Engineering, Chinese Academy of Science, Ningbo 315201 (China)

    2016-12-01

    A dual-alloy method was applied to tune the distribution of Ce for enhancing the performance of Nd-Ce-Fe-B sintered magnets with a nominal composition of (Nd{sub 0.75}Ce{sub 0.25}){sub 30.5}Fe{sub bal}Al{sub 0.1}Cu{sub 0.1}B. In comparison to the single alloy of (Nd{sub 0.75}Ce{sub 0.25}){sub 30.5}Fe{sub bal}Al{sub 0.1}Cu{sub 0.1}B, the coercivity was enhanced from 10.3 kOe to 12.1 kOe and the remanence was increased from 13.1 kG to 13.3 kG for the magnets with a dual-alloy method. In addition, the remanence temperature coefficient α and coercivity temperature coefficient β were also slightly improved for the magnet with the dual alloys. The results of microstructure characterizations show the uniform distribution of Ce for the magnet with a single alloy, and the coexistence of the Ce-rich and Ce-lean regions for the magnet with the dual alloys. In combinations with the nucleation of reversal domains and magnetic recoil curves, the property enhancement of magnets with a dual-alloy method was well explained. - Highlights: • Improved magnetic properties were obtained in dual-alloy magnet. • This is due to the tuning of Ce distribution and the change in microstructure. • The magnetic hardening effect can be observed in dual-alloy magnet.

  20. Regional Regression Equations to Estimate Flow-Duration Statistics at Ungaged Stream Sites in Connecticut

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahearn, Elizabeth A.

    2010-01-01

    Multiple linear regression equations for determining flow-duration statistics were developed to estimate select flow exceedances ranging from 25- to 99-percent for six 'bioperiods'-Salmonid Spawning (November), Overwinter (December-February), Habitat Forming (March-April), Clupeid Spawning (May), Resident Spawning (June), and Rearing and Growth (July-October)-in Connecticut. Regression equations also were developed to estimate the 25- and 99-percent flow exceedances without reference to a bioperiod. In total, 32 equations were developed. The predictive equations were based on regression analyses relating flow statistics from streamgages to GIS-determined basin and climatic characteristics for the drainage areas of those streamgages. Thirty-nine streamgages (and an additional 6 short-term streamgages and 28 partial-record sites for the non-bioperiod 99-percent exceedance) in Connecticut and adjacent areas of neighboring States were used in the regression analysis. Weighted least squares regression analysis was used to determine the predictive equations; weights were assigned based on record length. The basin characteristics-drainage area, percentage of area with coarse-grained stratified deposits, percentage of area with wetlands, mean monthly precipitation (November), mean seasonal precipitation (December, January, and February), and mean basin elevation-are used as explanatory variables in the equations. Standard errors of estimate of the 32 equations ranged from 10.7 to 156 percent with medians of 19.2 and 55.4 percent to predict the 25- and 99-percent exceedances, respectively. Regression equations to estimate high and median flows (25- to 75-percent exceedances) are better predictors (smaller variability of the residual values around the regression line) than the equations to estimate low flows (less than 75-percent exceedance). The Habitat Forming (March-April) bioperiod had the smallest standard errors of estimate, ranging from 10.7 to 20.9 percent. In

  1. Neutron scattering from α-Ce at epithermal neutron energies

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    tures (~10 K), whereas CeSn3 is an α-Ce-like (valence fluctuation) system (TK ~ 35. meV) that remains paramagnetic down to low temperatures. Figure 1 shows the magnetic response from CeIn3 at 20 K [9]. A broad, well-defined crystal field exci- tation and a central quasielastic distribution are observed in this compound.

  2. Facile hydrothermal synthesis of CeO2 nanopebbles

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Administrator

    Abstract. Cerium oxide (CeO2) nanopebbles have been synthesized using a facile hydrothermal method. X-ray diffraction pattern (XRD) and transmission electron microscopy analyses confirm the presence of CeO2 nanopebbles. XRD shows the formation of cubic fluorite CeO2 and the average particle size estimated from.

  3. Metamagnetism in Ce (Ga, Al) 2

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Strongly Correlated Electron Systems Volume 58 Issue 5-6 May-June 2002 pp 769-771 ... The magnetic state of CeGa2 is found to be FM with a C of 8 K, whereas the compounds with =0.1 and 0.5 are AFM and possess N of about 9 K. These two compounds undergo metamagnetic transition and the critical fields are ...

  4. Building Connecticut's clinical biodosimetry laboratory surge capacity to mitigate the health consequences of radiological and nuclear disasters: A collaborative approach between the state biodosimetry laboratory and Connecticut's medical infrastructure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Albanese, Joseph; Martens, Kelly; Arnold, Jeffrey L.; Kelley, Katherine; Kristie, Virginia; Forte, Elaine; Schneider, Mark; Dainiak, Nicholas

    2007-01-01

    Biodosimetry, based on the analysis of dicentric chromosomes in circulating mononuclear cells, is considered the 'gold standard' for estimating radiation dose and is used to make informed decisions regarding the medical management of irradiated persons. This paper describes the development of biodosimetry laboratory surge capacity for the health consequences of radiological and nuclear disasters in Connecticut, including: (1) establishment of the Biodosimetry Laboratory for the timely assessment of radiation dosage in biodosimetry specimens; (2) identification of clinical laboratories qualified and willing to process biodosimetry specimens from a large number of victims; (3) training of clinical laboratorians in initial biodosimetry specimen processing; and (4) conducting a functional drill that evaluated the effectiveness of these elements. Descriptive information was obtained from: (1) personal observations; (2) a needs assessment of clinical laboratories in Connecticut; (3) records from a training program of clinical laboratorians in biodosimetry specimen processing that was developed and provided by the Yale New Haven Center for Emergency Preparedness and Disaster Response; and (4) records from a statewide functional drill in biodosimetry specimen processing that was developed and conducted by the State of Connecticut Biodosimetry Laboratory. A needs assessment of clinical laboratories in Connecticut identified 30 of 32 clinical laboratories qualified and willing to perform initial biodosimetry specimen processing. Currently, 79 clinical laboratorians in 19 of these qualified clinical laboratories have been trained in biodosimetry specimen processing. A functional exercise was conducted involving 37 of these trained clinical laboratorians in 18 qualified laboratories as well as the Biodosimetry Laboratory. The average turnaround time for biodosimetry specimen processing in this drill was 199 min. Exercise participants provided feedback which will be used to

  5. How ``Natural'' are inland wetlands? an example from the trail wood audubon sanctuary in Connecticut, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thorson, Robert M.; Harris, Sandra L.

    1991-09-01

    We examined the geology of a small inland wetland in Hampton, Connecticut to determine its postglacial history and to assess the severity of human impact at this remote wooded site. Using stratigraphic evidence, we dernonstrate that the present wetland was created when sediment pollution from a 19th-century railroad filled a preexisting artificial reservoir, and that the prehistoric wetland was a narrow drainage swale along Hampton Brook. This same, severely impacted wetland was interpreted by the Pulitzer Prize-winning naturalist Edwin Way Teale as a beautiful wilderness area of particular interest. These conflicting perceptions indicate that artificial wetlands can be naturally mitigated in less than a century of healing, even in the absence of deliberate management. We also point out that the “wilderness” value of the Teale wetland was in the eye of the beholder and that unseen human impacts may have improved the aesthetic experience.

  6. Correctional nursing competency development in the Connecticut Correctional Managed Health Care program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shelton, Deborah; Weiskopf, Constance; Nicholson, Michael

    2010-10-01

    This article reports on a work group process that aimed to articulate the American Nurses Association (ANA) standards of correctional nursing practice in the Connecticut Department of Correction. When recruiting nurses for prison health care, few candidates possess enough experience in all of the related fields, and even experienced nurses are seldom prepared for the environment and its challenging population. A public-academic partnership provided a model for collaboration. Workforce development methods used in the United Kingdom for correctional nursing were combined with the ANA professional development model. An incremental implementation plan was designed. Orientation checklists and methods to assure entry-level baseline competencies, resource manuals, supervisor packets, and evaluation strategies were developed. The group process was as important as the products it developed. The pathway toward the future of the correctional nursing workforce begins with articulation of correctional nursing competencies.

  7. Ew, that's icky: Assessing children's attitudes towards the insects of Connecticut

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weeks, Faith Jean-Ellen

    This study investigated children's attitudes towards insects, focusing on how attitudes change from fascination to repulsion as the children age. This study involved 127 elementary students (grades 4-6) and 139 high school students (grades 9-12) from New Haven public schools. Students were administered Likert type surveys to evaluate their attitudes after viewing photos of 8 common insects of Connecticut; the butterfly, ladybug, dragonfly, ant, moth, cricket, beetle, and fly. Scores from elementary school students were compared with high school students to determine if attitudes towards insects became less favorable as the children age. The results were also analyzed to determine if attitudinal changes were consistent between girls and boys. It was found that elementary school students did not hold more negative attitudes than high school students, but girls did hold more negative attitudes towards insects than boys.

  8. Body mass index, weight change, and survival in non-Hodgkin lymphoma patients in Connecticut women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Xuesong; Stevens, June; Bradshaw, Patrick T

    2013-01-01

    Evidence is emerging that obesiy and weight gain may affect the prognosis of several types of cancer. We investigated the impact of body mass index (BMI) as well as pre-and postdiagnosis weight changes on non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL) prognosis. A cohort of 573 female incident NHL cases diagnosed during 1996-2000 in Connecticut was followed for a median of 7.8 yr. Self-reported height and weight at 3 time points before and after diagnosis were collected. Hazard ratios (HR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) were estimated using proportional hazard models adjusting for factors believed to be associated with overall survival of NHL. Underweight (BMI treatment were found to have a poorer survival.

  9. Advanced Placement Scores for Black Male Students from Connecticut, Florida, Maryland, Massachetts, and Texas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeanine L. Wilson

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Differences in student performance were analyzed for Black males in Connecticut, Florida, Maryland, Massachusetts, and Texas on the Advanced Placement English Language and Composition, Calculus AB, Biology, and United States History examinations from the 2001 through the 2012 exam years. All analyses included in the comparisons of overall examination scores and U.S. History examination scores were statistically significant. Of the 48 individual examination comparisons, 26 yielded evidence of a statistically significant difference among the Black male students from the selected states. Massachusetts was the state with the highest percentages of Black male students who achieved an AP score of 4 or 5. Conversely, Texas was the state with the highest percentages of Black male students who failed to achieve an AP score of 4 or 5. Implications for policy regarding advanced placement testing as an avenue for preparing students for college and recommendations for future research are discussed.

  10. Comparison of genetic diversity in the recently founded Connecticut River Atlantic salmon population to that of its primary donor stock, Maine's Penobscot River

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spidle, A.P.; King, T.L.; Letcher, B.H.

    2004-01-01

    Anadromous Atlantic salmon returning to the Connecticut River (CR) from 1996 to 1999 were assayed for variability at nine microsatellite DNA loci. Heterozygosity and allele frequencies were compared to the anadromous Atlantic salmon returning to Maine's Penobscot River from 1998 to 2000. The Penobscot River was the primary source of the salmon used to found the previously extirpated population in the Connecticut River. While there were no significant differences in heterozygosity between the source population and the Connecticut River sea-run spawners, microsatellite allele frequencies were significantly different between the populations. Two techniques of estimating effective population size (Ne) suggested a healthy level of genetic variation in the Connecticut River population of anadromous Atlantic salmon. This is significant because the sea-run population is maintained almost entirely through hatchery production. Healthy ratios of Ne to N indicate that hatchery production has not resulted in excessive inbreeding to date. ?? 2003 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. NOAA Digital Oblique Imagery Collection for the Coasts of Main/New Hampshire, Massachusetts/Rhode Island/Connecticut, and Hudson River/Long Island /NY/NJ

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Project: NOAA Digital Orthophotography and Ancillary Oblique Imagery Collection for the Coasts of Main/New Hampshire, Massachusetts/Rhode Island/Connecticut, and...

  12. Phytophthora species recovered from the Connecticut River Valley in Massachusetts, USA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brazee, Nicholas J; Wick, Robert L; Hulvey, Jonathan P

    2016-01-01

    Little is currently known about the assemblage of Phytophthora species in northeastern North America, representing a gap in our understanding of species incidence. Therefore, Phytophthora species were surveyed at 20 sites in Massachusetts, with 16 occurring in the Connecticut River Valley. Many of the sampled waterways were adjacent to active agricultural lands, yet were buffered by mature floodplain forests composed of Acer, Platanus, Populus and Ulmus. Isolates were recovered with three types of baits (rhododendron leaves, pear, green pepper) in 2013 and water filtration in 2014. Overall, 457 isolates of Phytophthora were recovered and based on morphological characters and rDNA internal transcribed spacer (ITS), β-tubulin (β-tub) and cytochrome oxidase c subunit I (cox1) sequences, 18 taxa were identified, including three new species: P. taxon intercalaris, P. taxon caryae and P. taxon pocumtuck. In addition, 49 isolates representing five species of Phytopythium also were identified. Water filtration captured a greater number of taxa (18) compared to leaf and fruit baits (12). Of the three bait types rhododendron leaves yielded the greatest number of isolates and taxa, followed by pear and green pepper, respectively. Despite the proximity to agricultural lands, none of the Phytophthora species baited are considered serious pathogens of vegetable crops in the region. However, many of the recovered species are known woody plant pathogens, including four species in the P. citricola s.l. complex that were identified: P. plurivora, P. citricola III, P. pini and a putative novel species, referred to here as P. taxon caryae. An additional novel species, P. taxon pocumtuck, is a close relative of P. borealis based on cox1 sequences. The results illustrate a high level of Phytophthora species richness in the Connecticut River Valley and that major rivers can serve as a source of inoculum for pathogenic Phytophthora species in the northeast. © 2016 by The Mycological

  13. Thermodynamic stability studies of Ce-Sb compounds with Fe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Yi; Zhang, Jinsuo; Benson, Michael T.; Mariani, Robert D.

    2018-02-01

    Lanthanide fission products can migrate to the fuel periphery and react with cladding, causing fuel-cladding chemical interaction (FCCI). Adding a fuel additive dopant, such as Sb, can bind lanthanide, such as Ce, into metallic compounds and thus prevent migration. The present study focuses on the thermodynamic stability of Ce-Sb compounds when in contact with the major cladding constituent Fe by conducting diffusion couple tests. Ce-Sb compounds have shown high thermodynamic stability as they did not react with Fe. When Fe-Sb compounds contacted with Ce, Sb was separated out of Fe-Sb compounds and formed the more stable Ce-Sb compounds.

  14. Itinerant f-electron behavior in Ce and U compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crabtree, G.W.

    1985-04-01

    The experimentally observed Fermi surface properties in URh 3 , UIr 3 , UGe 3 , CeSn 3 , CeB 6 , U 3 As 4 , U 3 P 4 , and CeSb are reviewed. For the compounds with no magnetic order, band structure models of the Fermi surface geometry are confirmed and f-ligand hybridization is found to be dominant. For CeB 6 , U 3 As 4 , and U 3 P 4 the experiments show that both local moments and f hybridization are important. In CeSb new data can be explained by a purely local model with no f-hybridization

  15. Prevalence of agglutinating antibodies to Toxoplasma gondii in striped skunks (Mephitis mephitis), opossums (Didelphis virginiana), and raccoons (Procyon lotor) from Connecticut

    OpenAIRE

    Mitchell, S. M.; Richardson, D. J.; Lindsay, D. S.

    2006-01-01

    The prevalence of agglutinating antibodies to Toxoplasma gondii was examined in striped skunks (Mephitis mephitis), opossums (Didelphis virginiana), and raccoons (Procyon lotor) from 8 cities in Connecticut. Ten (42%) of the 24 striped skunks, 2 of 7 (29%) opossums, and 12 of 12 (100%) raccoons were positive at dilutions of 1:50 or greater. These results suggest that T. gondii is prevalent in the environment, or prey items, or both, of these omnivores in Connecticut.

  16. Prevalence of agglutinating antibodies to Toxoplasma gondii in striped skunks (Mephitis mephitis), opossums (Didelphis virginiana), and raccoons (Procyon lotor) from Connecticut.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Sheila M; Richardson, Dennis J; Lindsay, David S

    2006-06-01

    The prevalence of agglutinating antibodies to Toxoplasma gondii was examined in striped skunks (Mephitis mephitis), opossums (Didelphis virginiana), and raccoons (Procyon lotor) from 8 cities in Connecticut. Ten (42%) of the 24 striped skunks, 2 of 7 (29%) opossums, and 12 of 12 (100%) raccoons were positive at dilutions of 1:50 or greater. These results suggest that T. gondii is prevalent in the environment, or prey items, or both, of these omnivores in Connecticut.

  17. Spin reorientation and Ce-Mn coupling in antiferromagnetic oxypnictide CeMnAsO

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaknin, David; Zhang, Qiang; Peterson, Spencer; Dennis, Kevin; Tian, Wei

    2015-03-01

    Structure and complex magnetic properties of CeMnAsO, a parent compound of the ``1111''-type oxypnictides, have been investigated using neutron powder diffraction and magnetization measurements. Whereas there is no structural transition from the P4/nmm tetragonal phase below 420 K, CeMnAsO undergoes a C-type antiferromagnetic order with Mn2+ (S = 5 / 2) moments pointing along the c-axis below a relatively high Néel temperature of TN = 345 K. Below TSR = 35 K, two instantaneous transitions occur where the Mn moments reorient to the ab-plane preserving the C-type magnetic order, and Ce moments undergo long-range AFM ordering with moments in the ab-plane. Another transition to a noncollinear magnetic structure occurs below 7 K. We find that CeMnAsO primarily falls into the category of a local-moment antiferromagnetic insulator in which the nearest-neighbor interaction (J1) is dominant. The spin reorientation transition driven by the coupling between rare earth Ce and transition metal seems to be common to Mn, Fe and Cr ion,but not to Co and Ni ions in the iso-structural oxypnictides. Supported by the Office of Basic Energy Sciences, US-DOE, Number DE-AC02-07CH11358.

  18. [Effects of Arbuscular Mycorrhizal Fungi on the Growth and Ce Uptake of Maize Grown in Ce-contaminated Soils].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Fang; Guo, Weil; Ma, Peng-kun; Pan, Liang; Zhang, Jun

    2016-01-15

    A greenhouse pot experiment was conducted to investigate the effects of arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi Glomus aggregatum (GA) and Funneliformis mosseae (FM) on AM colonization rate, biomass, nutrient uptake, C: N: P stoichiometric and Ce uptake and transport by maize (Zea mays L.) grown in soils with different levels of Ce-contaminated (100, 500 and 1000 mg x kg(-1)). The aim was to provide basic data and technical support for the treatment of soils contaminated by rare earth elements. The results indicated that symbiotic associations were successfully established between the two isolates and maize, and the average AM colonization rate ranged from 7. 12% to 74.47%. The increasing concentration of Ce in soils significantly decreased the mycorrhizal colonization rate, biomass, nutrition contents and transport rate of Ce from root to shoot of maize, and significantly increased C: P and N: P ratios and Ce contents in shoot and root of maize. Both AM fungi inoculations promoted the growth of maize, but the promoting role of FM was more significant than that of GA in severe Ce-contaminated soils. There were no significant differences in the growth of maize between two AM fungi in mild and moderate Ce-contaminated soils. Inoculation with AM fungi significantly improved nutritional status of maize by increasing nutrient uptake and decreasing C: N: P ratios. GA was more efficient than FM in enhancing nutrient uptake in mild and moderate Ce-contaminated soils, while FM was more efficient in severe Ce-contaminated soils. Moreover, inoculation with AM fungi significantly increased Ce contents of shoot and root in mild Ce-contaminated soils, but had no significant effect on Ce contents of maize in moderate and severe Ce-contaminated soils, and promoted the transport of Ce from root to shoot. The experiment demonstrates that AM fungi can alleviate toxic effects of Ce on plants and have a potential role in the phytoremediation of soils contaminated by rare earth elements.

  19. Spin reorientation and Ce-Mn coupling in antiferromagnetic oxypnictide CeMnAsO

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Qiang; Tian, Wei; Peterson, Spencer G.; Dennis, Kevin W.; Vaknin, David

    2014-01-01

    Structure and magnetic properties of high-quality polycrystlline CeMnAsO, a parent compound of the "1111"-type oxypnictides, have been investigated using neutron powder diffraction and magnetization measurements. We find that CeMnAsO undergoes a C-type antiferromagnetic order with Mn$^{2+}$ ($S=5/2$) moments pointing along the \\textit{c}-axis below a relatively high N\\'{e}el temperature of $T_{\\rm N} = 345$ K. Below $T_{\\rm SR} = 35$ K, two instantaneous transitions occur where the Mn moments...

  20. Neutron emission following muon capture in Ce-142, Ce-140, Ba-138, and Sn-120.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucas, G. R., Jr.; Martin, P.; Welsh, R. E.; Jenkins, D. A.; Powers, R. J.; Kunselman, A. R.; Miller, G. H.

    1973-01-01

    Branching ratios to excited nuclear states formed after muon capture have been measured with Ge(Li) detectors. The delayed gamma rays were observed in studies of muonic Ce-142, Ce-140, Ba-138, and Sn-120, using separated isotopes. The resulting isotopes formed indicate at least a 60% probability of neutron emission upon muon capture, with the most likely product resulting from single-neutron emission. No evidence for delayed proton emission with a probability higher than 2% was found. Using our more precise energies for the observed nuclear transitions, we present revised energy levels schemes for La-141, La-139, Cs-137, and In-119.

  1. Transient analysis capabilities at ABB-CE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kling, C.L.

    1992-01-01

    The transient capabilities at ABB-Combustion Engineering (ABB-CE) Nuclear Power are a function of the computer hardware and related network used, the computer software that has evolved over the years, and the commercial technical exchange agreements with other related organizations and customers. ABB-CEA is changing from a mainframe/personal computer network to a distributed workstation/personal computer local area network. The paper discusses computer hardware, mainframe computing, personal computers, mainframe/personal computer networks, workstations, transient analysis computer software, design/operation transient analysis codes, safety (licensed) analysis codes, cooperation with ABB-Atom, and customer support

  2. The Impact of Medicaid Reform on Children?s Dental Care Utilization in Connecticut, Maryland, and Texas

    OpenAIRE

    Nasseh, Kamyar; Vujicic, Marko

    2014-01-01

    Objective To measure the impact of Medicaid reforms, in particular increases in Medicaid dental fees in Connecticut, Maryland, and Texas, on access to dental care among Medicaid-eligible children. Data 2007 and 2011?2012 National Survey of Children?s Health. Study Design Difference-in-differences and triple differences models were used to measure the impact of reforms. Principal Findings Relative to Medicaid-ineligible children and all children from a group of control states, preventive denta...

  3. Making It Work Without a Family Drug Court: Connecticut's Approach to Parental Substance Abuse in the Child Welfare System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ungemack, Jane; Giovannucci, Marilou; Moy, Samuel; Ohrenberger, Karen; Dematteo, Thomas; Smith, Staceyann

    2015-01-01

    Parental substance abuse presents, complex challenges for the child welfare system and courts. This article describes the State of Connecticut's experience implementing the Recovery Specialist Voluntary Program (RSVP), a recovery support program designed to confront the problem of parental substance abuse within the child welfare system without, a family drug court. The state-level collaboration efforts, system changes, factors affecting development and implementation of RSVP, program participants, and preliminary outcomes are described.

  4. Northern range expansion of the Asian tiger mosquito (Aedes albopictus): Analysis of mosquito data from Connecticut, USA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armstrong, Philip M; Andreadis, Theodore G; Shepard, John J; Thomas, Michael C

    2017-05-01

    The Asian tiger mosquito (Aedes albopictus) is an invasive species and important arbovirus vector that was introduced into the U.S. in the 1980's where it continues to expand its range. Winter temperature is an important constraint to its northward expansion, with potential range limits located between the 0° and -5°C mean cold month isotherm. Connecticut is located within this climatic zone and therefore, Ae. albopictus was monitored statewide to assess its northern range expansion and to delineate where populations can stably persist. Ae. albopictus females were monitored at fixed trapping sites throughout Connecticut from June-October over a 20-year period, 1997-2016. In addition, Ae. albopictus larvae and pupae were collected from tire habitats and tires were retrieved from the field in the spring and flooded to evaluate overwintering success of hatching larvae. Ae. albopictus was first detected during statewide surveillance when a single adult female was collected in 2006. This species was not collected again until 2010 and was subsequently detected each successive year with increasing abundance and distribution except following the unusually cold winters of 2014 and 2015. Ae. albopictus mosquitoes were most abundant in urban and suburban locations along the southwestern shoreline of Connecticut; however, single specimens were occasionally detected in central parts of the state. Field-collected females were also screened for arbovirus infection yielding two isolations of Cache Valley virus and one isolation of West Nile virus, highlighting the threat posed by this mosquito. Ae. albopictus overwintered in Connecticut under mild winter conditions as shown by recovery of hatched larvae from field collected tires in spring and by early season detection of larvae and pupae. This study documents the establishment and expansion of Ae. albopictus at the northern boundary of its range in the northeastern U.S. and provides a baseline for monitoring the future spread

  5. Northern range expansion of the Asian tiger mosquito (Aedes albopictus: Analysis of mosquito data from Connecticut, USA.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philip M Armstrong

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available The Asian tiger mosquito (Aedes albopictus is an invasive species and important arbovirus vector that was introduced into the U.S. in the 1980's where it continues to expand its range. Winter temperature is an important constraint to its northward expansion, with potential range limits located between the 0° and -5°C mean cold month isotherm. Connecticut is located within this climatic zone and therefore, Ae. albopictus was monitored statewide to assess its northern range expansion and to delineate where populations can stably persist.Ae. albopictus females were monitored at fixed trapping sites throughout Connecticut from June-October over a 20-year period, 1997-2016. In addition, Ae. albopictus larvae and pupae were collected from tire habitats and tires were retrieved from the field in the spring and flooded to evaluate overwintering success of hatching larvae. Ae. albopictus was first detected during statewide surveillance when a single adult female was collected in 2006. This species was not collected again until 2010 and was subsequently detected each successive year with increasing abundance and distribution except following the unusually cold winters of 2014 and 2015. Ae. albopictus mosquitoes were most abundant in urban and suburban locations along the southwestern shoreline of Connecticut; however, single specimens were occasionally detected in central parts of the state. Field-collected females were also screened for arbovirus infection yielding two isolations of Cache Valley virus and one isolation of West Nile virus, highlighting the threat posed by this mosquito. Ae. albopictus overwintered in Connecticut under mild winter conditions as shown by recovery of hatched larvae from field collected tires in spring and by early season detection of larvae and pupae.This study documents the establishment and expansion of Ae. albopictus at the northern boundary of its range in the northeastern U.S. and provides a baseline for monitoring

  6. Synthesis and characterization of Ce doped MFI zeolite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kalita, Banani [Department of Chemistry, Gauhati University, Guwahati, Assam 781014 (India); Talukdar, Anup K., E-mail: anup_t@sify.com [Department of Chemistry, Gauhati University, Guwahati, Assam 781014 (India)

    2012-04-16

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Cerium was incorporated into the tetrahedral position of MFI zeolite structure. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Unit cell volume increases with an increase of Ce content in the framework of MFI. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A band at 310 nm in the UV-vis spectra indicates Ce incorporation in MFI structure. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The mass loss (%) in the region 373-423 K decreases with increase of Ce in MFI. - Abstract: Ce doped MFI (mobil five) zeolites with different Si to (Ce + Al) and different Ce to Al ratios were synthesized by a hydrothermal synthesis method. All the samples were characterized by different techniques such as X-ray diffraction, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), UV-vis diffuse reflectance spectroscopy (DRS) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The results showed that almost pure MFI phase was obtained in all cases with incorporation of cerium metal into the framework. The increase in unit cell parameters observed with an increase in Ce content is indicative of incorporation of Ce into the framework structure of microporous material MFI. Corroboration of the framework incorporation of Ce into the MFI zeolite structure was also obtained from the UV-vis DRS spectra by the presence of an absorption band at 280 nm. TGA and SEM of the samples provide complementary evidence for Ce incorporation into the framework MFI structure.

  7. Oxidation of Ce(III) in Foam Decontaminant by Ozone

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jung, Chong Hun; Yoon, I. H.; Choi, W. K.; Moon, J. K.; Yang, H. B. [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Lee, J. S. [Gachon University, Seongnam (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-10-15

    A nanoparticle-based foam decontaminant is composed of a surfactant and nanoparticles for the generation and maintenance of foam, and a chemical decontamination agent made of Ce(IV) dissolved in nitric acid. Ce(IV) will be reduced to Ce(III) through the decontamination process. Oxidizing cerium(III) can be reused as a decontamination agent, Ce(IV). Oxidation treatment technology by ozone uses its strong oxidizing power. It can be regarded as an environmentally friendly process, because ozone cannot be stored and transported like other industrial gases (because it quickly decays into diatomic oxygen) and must therefore be produced on site, and used ozone can decompose immediately. The ozonation treatment of Ce(III) in foam decontaminant containing a surfactant is necessary for the effective regeneration of Ce(III). Thus, the present study was undertaken to determine the optimal conditions for ozonation treatment in the regeneration of Ce(III) into Ce(IV) in the nanoparticle-based foam decontaminant containing surfactant. This study was undertaken to determine the optimal conditions for ozonation treatment in the regeneration of Ce(III) to Ce(IV) in nanoparticle-based foam decontaminant containing a TBS surfactant. The oxidation conversion rate of Ce(III) was increased with an increase in the flow rate of the gas mixture and ozone injection amount. The oxidation time required for the 100% oxidation conversion of Ce(III) to Ce(IV) at a specific ozone injection amount can be predicted from these experimental data.

  8. Effects of changes in permit-to-purchase handgun laws in Connecticut and Missouri on suicide rates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crifasi, Cassandra K; Meyers, John Speed; Vernick, Jon S; Webster, Daniel W

    2015-10-01

    In 2013, more than 40,000 individuals died from suicide in the United States. Restricting access to lethal means has the potential to prevent suicide, as suicidal thoughts are often transient. Permit-to-purchase (PTP) laws for handguns could potentially reduce suicides by making it more difficult for persons at risk of suicide to purchase a handgun. We used a quasi-experimental research design with annual, state-level suicide data to evaluate changes to PTP laws in Connecticut and Missouri. Data were analyzed for 1981-2012. We used synthetic control modeling as the primary method to estimate policy effects. This methodology provided better prediction of pre-PTP-law-change trends in the two states with PTP law changes than econometric models and is thus likely to provide more accurate estimates of policy effects. The synthetic control model estimated a 15.4% reduction in firearm suicide rates associated with Connecticut's PTP law. Missouri's PTP law repeal was associated with a 16.1% increase in firearm suicide rates. Evidence that PTP laws were associated with non-firearm suicide rates was mixed in Connecticut and negative in Missouri. The findings are consistent with prior research linking firearm availability to increased risk of suicide and lower suicide risks associated with PTP handgun laws. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Dissolution of Ce from Cd Solution Containing U/Ce Elements by Electrolysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Si Hyung; Kim, Gha-Young; Lee, Seung-jai; Kim, Taek-Jin; Paek, Seungwoo; Ahn, Do-Hee

    2015-01-01

    The U-TRU metal alloy can be supplied by the Pyroprocessing, specifically UTRU recovery process using liquid cadmium cathode (LCC). In a certain case, a lot of rare earth (RE) element could be recovered on the LCC with the TRU element during the Pyroprocessing when the concentration of RE ions is higher than that of the TRU ions in the salt. In this case, most of the RE element needs to be removed from the Cd solution containing U/TRU/RE elements. RAR(Residual Actinides Recovery) technique used the mixed electrolytic-chemical process. In this study, only electrolysis technique was utilized to remove Ce element from Cd solution containing U/Ce elements. U-TRU alloy having less impurity is necessary for the fabrication of SFR fuel and these U-TRU elements can be prepared by Pyroprocessing. Electrolytic method was used to reduce the amount of Ce elements from the Cd solution containing U/Ce elements. It is judged from this study that electrolytic dissolution can be one of the methods to reduce RE elements from the Cd solution containing U-TRU-RE elements

  10. Public Data at CeSAM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreau, C.; Le Brun, V.; Agneray, F.; Gimenez, S.; Roehlly, Y.

    2014-05-01

    Modern large observational programs produce important amounts of data from various origins, and need high level data-quality control, fast data access via easy-to-use graphic interfaces, as well as possibility to cross-correlate informations coming from different observations. The Centre de donneS Astrophysique de Marseille (CeSAM) has for mission to provide support to the teams in charge of the observational programs (specifications, software development and infrastructures), to produce and give the final data by proposing tools increasing their scientific value. We present here the various datasets hosted by the CeSAM under the ANIS environment. Even if mainly oriented towards large spectro-photometric extragalactic samples, we host as well an exoplanet transit database, or resolved galaxy data. The main datasets are those from the VVDS final release (45000 spectra), the Herschel extragalactic surveys (HerMES, HRS, GOODS-Herschel, VNGS), the CFHTLS-WIDE photometric redshifts catalog (17 millions objects), or the HST-COSMOS information system, that allows request from any of the 6 and access to the corresponding values in the other catalogs.

  11. Neutron scattering from α-Ce at epithermal neutron energies

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    the constant-ω integration within an energy bandwidth of ±30 meV around. 170 meV [13]. The continuous curve through the data shows the Ce3+ mag- netic form factor. The doted line shows the calculated form factor for an itinerant 4f electron band for α-Ce [14]. et al [14] calculated within the itinerant 4f band model for Ce.

  12. CeO2-ZrO2 ceramic compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Melo, F.C.L.; Cairo, C.A.C.; Devezas, T.C.; Nono, M.C.A.

    1988-01-01

    In order to study the mechanical properties of tetragonal polycrystal zirconia stabilized with ceria various powder compositions with different CeO 2 content were made. Modulus of rupture for those compounds was measured. Tetragonal retained phase was determined for samples of CeO 2 -ZrO 2 ceramics with and without superficial mechanical treatment. The experimental results allowed us to evaluate the effects of CeO 2 content and sintering temperature in the mechanical properties and tetragonal transformed phase (t→ m) in ceramics of CeO 2 -ZrO 2 systems. (author) [pt

  13. High-Resolution Resonance Photoemission Study of CeNi

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sekiyama, A.; Kadono, K.; Iwasaki, T.; Imada, S.; Kasai, S.; Suga, S.; Araki, S.; Onuki, Y.

    2003-01-01

    We have performed the high-resolution Ce 3d - 4f resonance photoemission study of a considerably hybridized CeNi with the Kondo temperature of ∼ 150 K. The tail of the Kondo-resonance peak is predominantly observed in the bulk Ce 4f photoemission spectra, where its spin-orbit partner is suppressed compared with the so far reported surface-sensitive Ce 4d-4f resonance spectrum. Our results show that the bulk 4f electronic states are essentially understood by the single impurity Anderson model. (author)

  14. Inverted opal luminescent Ce-doped silica glasses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Scotti

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Inverted opal Ce-doped silica glasses (Ce : Si molar ratio 1 ⋅ 10−3 were prepared by a sol-gel method using opals of latex microspheres as templates. The rare earth is homogeneously dispersed in silica host matrix, as evidenced by the absence of segregated CeO2, instead present in monolithic Ce-doped SG with the same cerium content. This suggests that the nanometric dimensions of bridges and junctions of the host matrix in the inverted opal structures favor the RE distribution avoiding the possible segregation of CeO2.

  15. Aerial Photography and Imagery, Ortho-Corrected, Leaf-on September 2004 0.5m resolution RGB orthoimagery that covers Connecticut's coastal communities. Data were collected by Earth Data, under contract to NOAA, using a Leica ADS40 sensor., Published in 2004, University of Connecticut.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC Education | GIS Inventory — Aerial Photography and Imagery, Ortho-Corrected dataset current as of 2004. Leaf-on September 2004 0.5m resolution RGB orthoimagery that covers Connecticut's coastal...

  16. Aerial Photography and Imagery, Ortho-Corrected, Leaf-on September 2004 0.5m resolution CIR orthoimagery that covers Connecticut's coastal communities. Data were collected by Earth Data, under contract to NOAA, using a Leica ADS40 sensor., Published in 2004, University of Connecticut.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC Education | GIS Inventory — Aerial Photography and Imagery, Ortho-Corrected dataset current as of 2004. Leaf-on September 2004 0.5m resolution CIR orthoimagery that covers Connecticut's coastal...

  17. Study of the crystal field in CeF3 and CeF3:Pr3+

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shafikov F.F., Savinkov A.V., Tagirov M.S.

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The crystal field analysis based on calculations in the framework of the semi phenomenological exchange charge model was carried out. The set of crystal field parameters for Ce3+ and Pr3+ ions in the matrix CeF3 related to the crystallographic system of coordinates has been obtained and used to reproduce satisfactory the crystal field energies of Ce3+ and Pr3+ ions.

  18. Relationship of cancer incidence to terrestrial radiation and population density in Connecticut, 1935-1974

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walter, S.D.; Meigs, J.W.; Heston, J.F.

    1986-01-01

    The relationship of cancer incidence to terrestrial radiation and population density was investigated. Cancer incidence was obtained using 40 years of age-standardized data from the Connecticut Tumor Registry, and environmental radiation was estimated using data from an airborne gamma radiation survey of the entire state. These variables were examined ecologically, using the 169 towns of the state as the analytic units in a weighted regression analysis. The study design involves a large population base in a state having relatively high terrestrial radiation exposure levels overall and reasonable variation in exposure between towns. For all cancer combined, only one of the eight sex-specific analyses by decade yielded a significant radiation regression coefficient, and this was negative. In the sex- and site-specific analyses, almost all the coefficients for radiation were not significantly different from zero. In contrast, significant positive relationships of cancer incidence with population density were found for all cancer, for cancer of the lung for both sexes, for stomach, colonic, and prostatic cancer for males, and for lymphomas, thyroid, breast, and ovarian cancer for females. Both the radiation and population density relationships were adjusted for socioeconomic status. Socioeconomic status was significantly negatively associated with stomach and lung cancer in males and with cervical cancer in females; it was also positively associated with lymphomas and breast cancer in females. A power calculation revealed that, despite the relatively large size of this study, there was only a small probability of detecting a radiation effect of the strength anticipated from previous estimates

  19. E-cigarette Use Among High School and Middle School Adolescents in Connecticut.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishnan-Sarin, Suchitra; Morean, Meghan E; Camenga, Deepa R; Cavallo, Dana A; Kong, Grace

    2015-07-01

    There is limited evidence on electronic cigarette (e-cigarette) use among U.S. adolescents. Cross-sectional, anonymous surveys conducted in 4 high schools (HS; n = 3,614) and 2 middle schools (MS; n = 1,166) in Connecticut in November 2013 examined e-cigarette awareness, use patterns, susceptibility to future use, preferences, product components used (battery type, nicotine content, flavors), and sources of marketing and access. High rates of awareness (MS: 84.3%; HS: 92.0%) and of lifetime (3.5% MS, 25.2 % HS) and current (1.5% MS, 12% HS) use of e-cigarettes was observed. Among those who had not tried e-cigarettes, 26.4% of MS and 31.7% of HS students reported being susceptible to future use. Males (OR = 1.70, p flavors were most popular. Smokers preferred e-cigarettes to cigarettes. Current cigarette smokers were more likely to initiate with nicotine-containing e-cigarettes, and ever and never cigarette smokers to initiate with e-cigarettes without nicotine. Primary sources for e-cigarette advertisements were televisions and gas stations and, for acquiring e-cigarettes, were peers. Longitudinal monitoring of e-cigarette use among adolescents and establishment of policies to limit access are imperatively needed. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Research on Nicotine and Tobacco. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  20. Cost Effectiveness of ASHRAE Standard 90.1-2013 for the State of Connecticut

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hart, Philip R. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Athalye, Rahul A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Xie, YuLong [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Zhuge, Jing Wei [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Halverson, Mark A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Loper, Susan A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Rosenberg, Michael I. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Richman, Eric E. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2015-12-01

    Moving to the ASHRAE Standard 90.1-2013 (ASHRAE 2013) edition from Standard 90.1-2010 (ASHRAE 2010) is cost-effective for the State of Connecticut. The table below shows the state-wide economic impact of upgrading to Standard 90.1-2013 in terms of the annual energy cost savings in dollars per square foot, additional construction cost per square foot required by the upgrade, and life-cycle cost (LCC) per square foot. These results are weighted averages for all building types in all climate zones in the state, based on weightings shown in Table 4. The methodology used for this analysis is consistent with the methodology used in the national cost-effectiveness analysis. Additional results and details on the methodology are presented in the following sections. The report provides analysis of two LCC scenarios: Scenario 1, representing publicly-owned buildings, considers initial costs, energy costs, maintenance costs, and replacement costs—without borrowing or taxes. Scenario 2, representing privately-owned buildings, adds borrowing costs and tax impacts.

  1. Effects of Road Salt on Connecticut's Groundwater: A Statewide Centennial Perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cassanelli, James P; Robbins, Gary A

    2013-01-01

    This study examined the extent to which development and road salting has affected Connecticut's groundwater. We gathered water quality data from different time periods between 1894 and the present and analyzed the data using maps generated with ESRI ArcGIS. Historical reports illustrate a statewide baseline trend of decreasing chloride concentration northward across the State (average, 2 ppm). Since then, statewide chloride concentrations in ground water have increased by more than an order of magnitude on average. Analysis indicates spatial correlation between chloride impacts and major roadways. Furthermore, increases in statewide chloride concentration parallel increases in road salt application. Projected trends suggest that statewide baseline concentrations will increase by an amount equal to five times background levels between the present and the year 2030. The analytical process outlined herein can be readily applied to any region to investigate salt impacts on large spatial and temporal scales. Copyright © by the American Society of Agronomy, Crop Science Society of America, and Soil Science Society of America, Inc.

  2. Bridging the Response to Mass Shootings and Urban Violence: Exposure to Violence in New Haven, Connecticut.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santilli, Alycia; O'Connor Duffany, Kathleen; Carroll-Scott, Amy; Thomas, Jordan; Greene, Ann; Arora, Anita; Agnoli, Alicia; Gan, Geliang; Ickovics, Jeannette

    2017-03-01

    We have described self-reported exposure to gun violence in an urban community of color to inform the movement toward a public health approach to gun violence prevention. The Community Alliance for Research and Engagement at Yale School of Public Health conducted community health needs assessments to document chronic disease prevalence and risk, including exposure to gun violence. We conducted surveys with residents in six low-income neighborhoods in New Haven, Connecticut, using a neighborhood-stratified, population-based sample (n = 1189; weighted sample to represent the neighborhoods, n = 29 675). Exposure to violence is pervasive in these neighborhoods: 73% heard gunshots; many had family members or close friends hurt (29%) or killed (18%) by violent acts. Although all respondents live in low-income neighborhoods, exposure to violence differs by race/ethnicity and social class. Residents of color experienced significantly more violence than did White residents, with a particularly disparate increase among young Black men aged 18 to 34 years. While not ignoring societal costs of horrific mass shootings, we must be clear that a public health approach to gun violence prevention means focusing on the dual epidemic of mass shootings and urban violence.

  3. Community Energy Systems and the Law of Public Utilities. Volume Nine. Connecticut

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feurer, D A; Weaver, C L

    1981-01-01

    A detailed description of the laws and programs of the State of Connecticut governing the regulation of public energy utilities, the siting of energy generating and transmission facilities, the municipal franchising of public energy utilities, and the prescription of rates to be charged by utilities including attendant problems of cost allocations, rate base and operating expense determinations, and rate of return allowances. These laws and programs are analyzed to identify impediments which they may present to the implementation of Integrated Community Energy Systems (ICES). This report is one of fifty-one separate volumes which describe such regulatory programs at the Federal level and in each state as background to the report entitled Community Energy Systems and the Law of Public Utilities - Volume One: An Overview. This report also contains a summary of a strategy described in Volume One - An Overview for overcoming these impediments by working within the existing regulatory framework and by making changes in the regulatory programs to enhance the likelihood of ICES implementation.

  4. Evaluation of Haddam Neck (Connecticut Yankee) Nuclear Power Plant, environmental impact prediction, based on monitoring programs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gore, K.L.; Thomas, J.M.; Kannberg, L.D.; Mahaffey, J.A.; Waton, D.G.

    1976-12-01

    A study was undertaken by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) to evaluate the nonradiological environmental data obtained from three nuclear power plants operating for a period of one year or longer. The document presented reports the second of three nuclear power plants to be evaluated in detail by Battelle, Pacific Northwest Laboratories. Haddam Neck (Connecticut Yankee) Nuclear Power Plant nonradiological monitoring data were assessed to determine their effectiveness in the measurement of environmental impacts. Efforts were made to determine if: (1) monitoring programs, as designed, can detect environmental impacts, (2) appropriate statistical analyses were performed and if they were sensitive enough to detect impacts, (3) predicted impacts could be verified by monitoring programs, and (4) monitoring programs satisfied the requirements of the Environmental Technical Specifications. Both preoperational and operational monitoring data were examined to test the usefulness of baseline information in evaluating impacts. This included an examination of the methods used to measure ecological, chemical, and physical parameters, and an assessment of sampling periodicity and sensitivity where appropriate data sets were available. From this type of analysis, deficiencies in both preoperational and operational monitoring programs may be identified and provide a basis for suggested improvement.

  5. Evaluation of power outages in Connecticut during hypothetical future Hurricane Sandy scenarios

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wanik, D. W.; Anagnostou, E. N.; Astitha, M.; Frediani, M. E.; Yang, J.

    2015-12-01

    Reliable electric power is a staple of our modern society.The purpose of this work was to evaluate the occurrence of power outages under more intense, future Hurricane Sandy simulations in Connecticut. In addition, we also evaluated how many crews would be necessary to restore power in 7 days, and how different vegetation scenarios might contribute to a decrease in outages. We trained five pairwise models on each current Sandy runs (2012) as training using the random forest model (each validated using 10-fold cross-validation), and used each future Sandy run as an independent test. We predict that a future Sandy would have 2.5x as many outages as current Sandy, which would require 3.23x as many crews as current Sandy to restore power in 7 days. We also found that increased vegetation management might decrease outages, which has implications for both fair-weather and storm days of all types (i.e. blizzards, thunderstorms, ice storms). Although we have only evaluated outages for electric distribution networks, there are many other types (water supply, wastewater, telecommunications) that would likely benefit from an analysis of this type. In addition, given that we have the weather simulations already processed within our 2-km weather simulation domain, we would like to expand our vulnerability analyses to surrounding utilities in New Jersey, New York, Rhode Island, Massachusetts and New Hampshire to facilitate regional coordination among electric distribution networks.

  6. A New England bonesetter dynasty: the Porters of Farmington, Connecticut--Part II of II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kugelman, Thomas P

    2006-01-01

    Daniel Porter (d. 1690), a bonesetter/ chirurgeon, one of the early settlers of the Connecticut Colony, was the first and only doctor serving the Farmington valley during much of the second half of the 17th century. More than forty of his descendants, spanning eight generations and almost three centuries, practiced medicine and surgery, moving with the migration of the expanding population to towns throughout New England, New York State, and ultimately the midwest and west coast. Their notable accomplishments, apart from their consistent reputation for exceptional skill and endurance, include the training and independent practice as bonesetters of two of their wives. In 1796, Samuel Lee, Jr., (1773-1814), a fifth-generation descendant, received the first U.S. patent for a medication, "Samuel Lee's Genuine Windham Bilious Pills." The last Porter doctor to be identified, Charles Allen Porter (1866-1931), a pioneer Professor of Surgery at Harvard Medical School, was among the first to recognize the carcinogenic effects of radiation. In the absence of a comprehensive published genealogy of the Daniel Porter family, this essay identifies the relationships among his many descendants.

  7. A New England bonesetter dynasty: the Porters of Farmington, Connecticut--Part I of II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kugelman, Thomas P

    2006-10-01

    Daniel Porter (d. 1690), a bonesetter/ chirurgeon, one of the early settlers of the Connecticut Colony, was the first and only doctor serving the Farmington valley during much of the second half of the 17th century. More than 40 of his descendants, spanning eight generations and almost three centuries, practiced medicine and surgery, moving with the migration of the expanding population to towns throughout New England, New York State, and ultimately the midwest and west coast. Their notable accomplishments, apart from their consistent reputation for exceptional skill and endurance, include the training and independent practice as bonesetters of two of their wives. In 1796, Samuel Lee, Jr., (1773-1814), a fifth-generation descendant, received the first U.S. patent for a medication, "Samuel Lee's Genuine Windham Bilious Pills." The last Porter doctor to be identified, Charles Allen Porter (1866-1931), a pioneer Professor of Surgery at Harvard Medical School, was among the first to recognize the carcinogenic effects of radiation. In the absence of a comprehensive published genealogy of the Daniel Porter family, this essay identifies the relationships among his many descendants.

  8. Industrial hygiene survey report of Millstone Nuclear Power Station No. 3 construction site, Waterford, Connecticut

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zaebst, D.D.; Herrick, R.

    1985-11-01

    Personal and area air samples were analyzed for total dust, organic solvent vapors, and metals during spray, brush, and roller painting and paint removal operations at Millstone Nuclear Power Station Number 3 construction site, Waterford, Connecticut, March 1981. Solvent exposures were generally well below their relevant standards. Total dust exposures during paint removal ranged up to 1,000 milligrams per cubic meter (mg/m3) in the containment building. The OSHA standard for total dust is 15mg/m3. Exposures to lead dusts exceeded the OSHA standard of 0.05mg/m3 in the turbine, auxiliary, and containment buildings. Chromium exposures were generally below the OSHA standard of 1mg/m3, except for 2.4mg/m3 in a personal sample taken during paint removal in the containment building. Very few engineering controls other than 3M single use respirators were observed. The authors note that the chromium exposure data is difficult to interpret as the form of the chromium is not known. If the chromium existed as hexavalent chromium exposure was excessive. The authors conclude that in view of the measured exposures to total dust, lead, and chromium, engineering controls and respiratory protection are inadequate. Recommendations include implementing better controls and respiratory protection

  9. Dependence of the Ce(iii)/Ce(iv) ratio on intracellular localization in ceria nanoparticles internalized by human cells

    KAUST Repository

    Ferraro, Daniela

    2017-01-09

    CeO2 nanoparticles (CNPs) have been investigated as promising antioxidant agents with significant activity in the therapy of diseases involving free radicals or oxidative stress. However, the exact mechanism responsible for CNP activity has not been completely elucidated. In particular, in situ evidence of modification of the oxidative state of CNPs in human cells and their evolution during cell internalization and subsequent intracellular distribution has never been presented. In this study we investigated modification of the Ce(iii)/Ce(iv) ratio following internalization in human cells by X-ray absorption near edge spectroscopy (XANES). From this analysis on cell pellets, we observed that CNPs incubated for 24 h showed a significant increase in Ce(iii). By coupling on individual cells synchrotron micro-X-ray fluorescence (μXRF) with micro-XANES (μXANES) we demonstrated that the Ce(iii)/Ce(iv) ratio is also dependent on CNP intracellular localization. The regions with the highest CNP concentrations, suggested to be endolysosomes by transmission electron microscopy, were characterized by Ce atoms in the Ce(iv) oxidation state, while a higher Ce(iii) content was observed in regions surrounding these areas. These observations suggest that the interaction of CNPs with cells involves a complex mechanism in which different cellular areas play different roles.

  10. Dopant concentration dependence of radiation-induced positive hysteresis of Ce:GSO and Ce:GSOZ

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yanagida, Takayuki; Fujimoto, Yutaka; Watanabe, Kenichi

    2014-01-01

    Positive hysteresis and radiation tolerance to high-dose radiation exposure were investigated for Ce 0.5, 1, and 1.5%-doped Gd 2 SiO 5 (GSO) and for Zr co-doped GSO with the same Ce concentrations (GSOZ). When they were irradiated by 200–800 Gy 60 Co in 200 Gy steps, all Ce-doped GSO samples exhibited light yield enhancement (positive hysteresis). On the other hand, the light yield of GSOZ decreased greatly. Ce 0.5%-doped GSO showed the highest positive hysteresis, with ∼20% light yield enhancement. When the Ce concentration was increased, the positive hysteresis became weaker. - Highlights: • Positive hysteresis Ce 0.5, 1, and 1.5% doped GSO and GSOZ are studied. • Ce 0.5, 1, and 1.5% doped GSO show the positive hysteresis by 2–8 M rad 60 Co irradiation. • Ce 0.5, 1, and 1.5% doped GSOZ do not show the positive hysteresis. • By Zn co-doping, radiation tolerance of GSO becomes weaker. • By dense Ce doping, radiation tolerance of GSO and GSOZ are improved

  11. Impact of requiring influenza vaccination for children in licensed child care or preschool programs--Connecticut, 2012-13 influenza season.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadler, James L; Yousey-Hindes, Kimberly; Kudish, Kathy; Kennedy, Erin D; Sacco, Vincent; Cartter, Matthew L

    2014-03-07

    Preschool-aged children are at increased risk for severe influenza-related illness and complications. Congregate child care settings facilitate influenza transmission among susceptible children. To protect against influenza transmission in these settings, in September 2010, Connecticut became the second U.S. state (after New Jersey) to implement regulations requiring that all children aged 6-59 months receive at least 1 dose of influenza vaccine each year to attend a licensed child care program. To evaluate the impact of this regulation on vaccination levels and influenza-associated hospitalizations during the 2012-13 influenza season, vaccination data from U.S. and Connecticut surveys and the Emerging Infections Program (EIP) were analyzed. After the regulation took effect, vaccination rates among Connecticut children aged 6-59 months increased from 67.8% during the 2009-10 influenza season to 84.1% during the 2012-13 season. During the 2012-13 influenza season, among all 11 EIP surveillance sites, Connecticut had the greatest percentage decrease (12%) in the influenza-associated hospitalization rate from 2007-08 among children aged ≤4 years. Additionally, the ratio of the influenza-associated hospitalization rates among children aged ≤4 years to the overall population rate (0.53) was lower than for any other EIP site. Requiring vaccination for child care admission might have helped to increase vaccination rates in Connecticut and reduced serious morbidity from influenza.

  12. Traducerea: între ce se poate traduce și ce trebuie tradus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Magda Jeanrenaud

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Pornind de la o tulburătoare interpretare a lui Jacques Derrida, studiul de față își propune să investigheze și încearcă să explice blocajul ce intervine în versiunile englezești, franceze și românești (semnate de Antoine Berman, Alexis Nouss, Steven Rendall, Catrinel Pleșu etc. ale celebrului text al lui Walter Benjamin, Die Aufgabe des Übersetzers, atunci cînd traducătorii transpun în cele trei limbi țintă cele două citate cuprinse în acesta: un citat din Mallarmé, lăsat netradus de Benjamin însuși, și un altul, din Pannwitz. Într-un fel sau altul, ambele citate au o formă discursivă ce lasă să se întrevadă o sintaxă ce se abate deliberat de la normă, ca și cum ar fi deja niște „traduceri”. Analiza mai pune în evidență și comportamentul (cumva o dominantă a psihologiei traducătorilor? celor ce au transpus textul benjaminian, comportament marcat de obsesia lizibilității văzută ca o trăsătură congenitală a oricărei traduceri, chiar și atunci cînd textul original nu tinde spre aceasta. De unde și dilema, dureroasă, legată de spinoasa chestiune a intenționalității textului (nu doar de tradus...

  13. Projected shell model study of neutron- deficient 122Ce

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Recently, Smith et al [1] have communicated the existence of neutron-deficient 122Ce and its excited states have been reported up to spin 14¯h. The band has been as- signed to 122Ce by detecting γ-rays in coincidence with evaporated charged particles and neutrons. The nucleus is believed to have large ground state ...

  14. Facile hydrothermal synthesis of CeO2 nanopebbles

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Administrator

    XRD shows the formation of cubic fluorite CeO2 and the average particle size estimated from the Scherrer formula was found to be 6.69 nm. X-ray absorption spectrum of CeO2 nanopebbles exhibits two .... state.26 In our case, the valence of cerium ions will be mainly 4+ state, because the estimated particle size of.

  15. Three-Dimensional Structure of CeO2 Nanocrystals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tan, Joyce Pei Ying; Tan, Hui Ru; Boothroyd, Chris

    2011-01-01

    truncated octahedral CeO2 particles through a lattice matched interface generated irregular compressed truncated octahedral CeO2 nanoparticles. The formation of this irregular shape is attributed to the lower surface diffusion and slow incorporation of atoms on surfaces by step attachment of the fused...

  16. Ce que nous faisons | CRDI - Centre de recherches pour le ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Le CRDI appuie des travaux de recherche dans les pays en voie de développement en vue de produire un changement réel et durable. Ce savoir peut servir d'outil pour résoudre des problèmes mondiaux urgents. Nous partageons ce savoir avec les autres en :

  17. Low temperature synthesis of fluorite-type Ce-based oxides of ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    M MALATHI

    type) Ce-based oxides of compositions Ln2Ce2O7 (Ln = Pr, Nd and Eu). F-type oxides can be considered as multi-functional materials due to the deficiency of anions. Pr2Ce2O7 (PCO), Nd2Ce2O7 (NCO) and Eu2Ce2O7 (ECO) were prepared ...

  18. Seamless Ligation Cloning Extract (SLiCE) cloning method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yongwei; Werling, Uwe; Edelmann, Winfried

    2014-01-01

    SLiCE (Seamless Ligation Cloning Extract) is a novel cloning method that utilizes easy to generate bacterial cell extracts to assemble multiple DNA fragments into recombinant DNA molecules in a single in vitro recombination reaction. SLiCE overcomes the sequence limitations of traditional cloning methods, facilitates seamless cloning by recombining short end homologies (15-52 bp) with or without flanking heterologous sequences and provides an effective strategy for directional subcloning of DNA fragments from bacterial artificial chromosomes or other sources. SLiCE is highly cost-effective and demonstrates the versatility as a number of standard laboratory bacterial strains can serve as sources for SLiCE extract. We established a DH10B-derived E. coli strain expressing an optimized λ prophage Red recombination system, termed PPY, which facilitates SLiCE with very high efficiencies.

  19. Multimedia Experience on Web-Connected CE Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tretter, Dan; Liu, Jerry; Zhang, Xuemei; Gao, Yuli; Atkins, Brian; Chao, Hui; Xiao, Jun; Wu, Peng; Lin, Qian

    Consumer electronics (CE) are changing from stand-alone single-function devices to products with increasing connectivity, convergence of functionality, and a focus on customer experience. We discuss the features that characterize the new generation of CE and illustrate this new paradigm through an examination of how web services can be integrated with CE products to deliver an improved user experience. In particular, we focus on one aspect of the CE segment, digital photography. We introduce AutoPhotobook, an automatic photobook creation service and provide a detailed look at how it addresses the complexity of photobook authoring through a portfolio of automatic photo analysis and composition technologies. We then show how this collection of technologies is integrated into a larger ecosystem with other web services and web-connected CE devices to deliver an enhanced user experience.

  20. Photodynamic Processes in Fluoride Crystals Doped with Ce3+

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pavlov V.V.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Integrated studies of photoelectric phenomena and their associated photodynamic processes in LiCaAlF6, LiLuF4, LiYF4, LiY0,5Lu0,5F4, SrAlF5 crystals doped with Ce3+ ions have been carried out using the combination of the methods of optical and dielectric spectroscopy. The numerical values of the basic parameters of photodynamic processes and their spectral dependence in 240 – 310 nm spectral range are evaluated. It has been shown that the most probable process, which leads to the photoionization of Ce3+ ions in LiYxLu1-xF4:Ce3+ (x=0; 0,5; 1 and LiCaAlF6:Ce3+ crystals, is excited-state absorption to the states of mixed configurations of Ce3+ ions localized near/in the conduction band of crystal.

  1. CE APPROVAL IN ELECTRICAL HOUSEHOLD APPLIANCES AND A CASE STUDY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nazmi EKREN

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Due to the reason for rapidly developing technology, increasing competition medium, and awareness of the consumers, nowadays, the exigency of production with good quality has gained more and more significance. Certification of the quality and safety of the products to the consumers is compulsory in terms of producers. There are some documents to certify safety of the products. One of them is CE certificate. In this paper, basic information about CE mark is given and CE standards and tests required for electrical household appliances are mentioned. As an application, one of an electrical household appliance, toaster grill is treated and examined. To obtain CE certificate for toaster grill, required tests are made according to EN60335-2-9 and CE certificate is obtained.

  2. The mixed-valence state of Ce in the hexagonal CeNi sub 4 B compound

    CERN Document Server

    Tolinski, T; Pugaczowa-Michalska, M; Chelkowska, G

    2003-01-01

    Measurements of the magnetic susceptibility chi, x-ray photoemission spectra (XPS), electrical resistivity rho and electronic structure calculations for CeNi sub 4 B are reported. In the paramagnetic region, CeNi sub 4 B follows the Curie-Weiss law with mu sub e sub f sub f = 0.52 mu sub B /fu and theta -10.7 K. The effective magnetic moment is lower than the free Ce sup 3 sup + -ion value. The Ce(3d) XPS spectra have confirmed the mixed-valence state of Ce ions in CeNi sub 4 B. The f occupancy, n sub f , and the coupling DELTA between the f level and the conduction states were derived to be about 0.83 and 85 meV, respectively. Both susceptibility data and XPS spectra show that Ce ions in CeNi sub 4 B are in the intermediate-valence state. At low temperatures (below 12 K), the magnetic contribution to the electrical resistivity reveals a logarithmic slope characteristic of Kondo-like systems.

  3. Measuring chronic liver disease mortality using an expanded cause of death definition and medical records in Connecticut, 2004.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ly, Kathleen N; Speers, Suzanne; Klevens, R Monina; Barry, Vaughn; Vogt, Tara M

    2014-10-16

    Chronic liver disease (CLD) is a leading cause of death and is defined based on a specific set of underlying cause-of-death codes on death certificates. This conventional approach to measuring CLD mortality underestimates the true mortality burden because it does not consider certain CLD conditions like viral hepatitis and hepatocellular carcinoma. We measured how much the conventional CLD mortality case definition will underestimate CLD mortality and described the distribution of CLD etiologies in Connecticut. We used 2004 Connecticut death certificates to estimate CLD mortality two ways. One way used the conventional definition and the other used an expanded definition that included more conditions suggestive of CLD. We compared the number of deaths identified using this expanded definition with the number identified using the conventional definition. Medical records were reviewed to confirm CLD deaths. Connecticut had 29 314 registered deaths in 2004. Of these, 282 (1.0%) were CLD deaths identified by the conventional CLD definition while 616 (2.1%) were CLD deaths defined by the expanded definition. Medical record review confirmed that most deaths identified by the expanded definition were CLD-related (550/616); this suggested a 15.8 deaths/100 000 population mortality rate. Among deaths for which hepatitis B, hepatitis C and alcoholic liver disease were identified during medical record review, only 8.6%, 45.4% and 36.5%, respectively, had that specific cause-of-death code cited on the death certificate. An expanded CLD mortality case definition that incorporates multiple causes of death and additional CLD-related conditions will better estimate CLD mortality. Published 2014. This article is a U.S. Government work and is in the public domain in the USA.

  4. Possible Frustration Effects on a New Antiferromagnetic Compound Ce6Pd13Zn4 with the Octahedral Ce Sublattice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuoka, Eiichi; Oshima, Akihiro; Sugawara, Hitoshi; Sakurai, Takahiro; Ohta, Hitoshi

    2018-01-01

    Magnetization, specific heat, and electrical resistivity measurements have been performed on polycrystalline samples of a new cubic compound, Ce6Pd13Zn4. This compound exhibits metallic behavior and is classified as a Kondo-lattice system. The trivalent Ce ions are responsible for the antiferromagnetic transition at TN = 3.3 K and the phase transition at T'N = 1.3 K with the formation of superzone gaps. The increase in magnetic susceptibilities below TN and the considerably large value of the specific heat divided by temperature (1.25 J·Ce-mol-1·K-2) imply the existence of non-ordered Ce magnetic moments due to the geometrical frustration on the octahedral Ce sublattice.

  5. Tetragonal zirconia ceramics in Zr O2-Ce O2 system (Ce-TZP): preparation, characterization and mechanical properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andrade Nono, M.C. de.

    1992-01-01

    This paper describes and discusses the results achieved in a study about Ce-TZP ceramics prepared from conventional powder mixtures of Zr O 2 and Ce O 2 (with composition in the range of 8 to 16 mol% Ce O 2 ). Physical and chemical characteristics were related with the powder compaction behavior and with the sintering state. The sintered ceramics showed a level of high porosity (≅ 4%), mainly due to the fairly adequate powder characteristics and compaction. The crystalline phases were analysed from X-rays diffraction data and showed that these ceramics can present tetragonal-to-monoclinic stress induced transformation. The bending strength, fracture toughness and Vickers hardness results were influenced by Ce O 2 content microstructure and sintering temperature. These Ce-TZP ceramics showed mechanical strength results comparable to those published in the international literature. (author)

  6. Geology and hydrocarbon potential of the Hartford-Deerfield Basin, Connecticut and Massachusetts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coleman, James

    2016-01-01

    The Hartford-Deerfield basin, a Late Triassic to Early Jurassic rift basin located in central Connecticut and Massachusetts, is the northernmost basin of the onshore Mesozoic rift basins in the eastern United States. The presence of asphaltic petroleum in outcrops indicates that at least one active petroleum system has existed within the basin. However, to-date oil and gas wells have not been drilled in the basin to test any type of petroleum trap. There are good to excellent quality source rocks (up to 3.8% present day total organic carbon) within the Jurassic East Berlin and Portland formations. While these source rock intervals are fairly extensive and at peak oil to peak gas stages of maturity, individual source rock beds are relatively thin (typically less than 1 m) based solely on outcrop observations. Potential reservoir rocks within the Hartford-Deerfield basin are arkosic conglomerates, pebbly sandstones, and finer grained sandstones, shales, siltstones, and fractured igneous rocks of the Triassic New Haven and Jurassic East Berlin and Portland formations (and possibly other units). Sandstone porosity data from 75 samples range from less than 1% to 21%, with a mean of 5%. Permeability is equally low, except around joints, fractures, and faults. Seals are likely to be unfractured intra-formational shales and tight igneous bodies. Maturation, generation, and expulsion likely occurred during the late synrift period (Early Jurassic) accentuated by an increase in local geothermal gradient, igneous intrusions, and hydrothermal fluid circulation. Migration pathways were likely along syn- and postrift faults and fracture zones. Petroleum resources, if present, are probably unconventional (continuous) accumulations as conventionally accumulated petroleum is likely not present in significant volumes.

  7. The connecticut experiment: the role of ultrasound in the screening of women with dense breasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weigert, Jean; Steenbergen, Sarah

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the potential of screening breast ultrasound to improve breast cancer detection in women with mammographically normal, but dense breasts. Six Connecticut radiology practices with 12 total sites participated in a retrospective chart review. The total number of screening mammograms, screening ultrasounds broken down by BIRADS (Breast Imaging Reporting and Data System) codes, and the number of positive and negative biopsies were collected from November 2009 through November 2010. Demographic data on the patients with positive biopsies as well as cancer staging were also collected. Sensitivity, Specificity, Positive Predictive Value, and Negative Predictive Value were calculated. A total of 72,030 screening mammograms and 8,647 screening ultrasounds were performed at the research sites during the study period. Relevant research indicates that 41% of the female population has dense breasts. In this study, 12% (8,647/72,030) underwent follow-up breast ultrasound screening. A total of 86% (7,451/8,647) of the ultrasounds were BIRADS 1 or 2, 9% (767/8,647) were BIRADS 3, 5% (429/8,647) were BIRADS 4 or 5. Of those 429 recommended to undergo biopsy 418 were performed and 28 cancers were found. There was one false negative. Screening breast ultrasound in women with mammographically normal, but dense breasts has a Positive Predictive Value (PPV) of 6.7% (28/418), Negative Predictive Value (NPV) of 99.9% (7,450/7,451), sensitivity of 96.6% (28/29), and a specificity of 94.9% (7,450/7,851). Screening ultrasound had an additional yield of 3.25 per 1,000 cancers in women with dense breasts and normal mammograms and no additional risk factors. As with all screening tests, time, cost, and false positive risk must be considered. © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Suicide, guns, and buyback programs: An epidemiologic analysis of firearm-related deaths in Connecticut.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumann, Laura; Clinton, Heather; Berntsson, Rob; Williams, Susan S; Rovella, James C; Shapiro, David; Thaker, Shefali; Borrup, Kevin; Lapidus, Garry; Campbell, Brendan T

    2017-12-01

    Gun buyback programs aim to remove unwanted firearms from the community with the goal of preventing firearm injury and death. Buyback programs are held in many communities, but evidence demonstrating their effectiveness is lacking. The purpose of this study is to compare firearms collected at buyback events to crime guns and firearms used in homicides and suicides. Detailed firearm and case data were obtained from the Hartford Police Department and the Office of the Chief Medical Examiner from January through December of 2015. Information was reviewed for guns collected at buyback events, crime guns confiscated by police, and for weapons associated with firearm fatalities. Detailed firearm data included type, manufacturer, model, and caliber (small, ≤ 0.32 caliber; medium, 0.357 caliber to 9 mm; large, ≥ 0.40 caliber). χ analyses were used for comparisons between groups. In 2015, 224 crime guns were seized by the Hartford Police, 169 guns were collected at four community buyback events, and there were 187 firearm-related deaths statewide (105 suicides, 81 homicides, 1 legal intervention). Comparisons between buyback, crime, and fatality-related firearms are shown in the table below. Medium caliber handguns account for the majority of crime guns and fatalities, and buyback programs collected smaller caliber handguns. The demographics of individuals who turn in guns at buyback events and commit suicide are similar: age (buyback, 63 ± 11; suicide, 52 ± 18; homicide, 34 ± 12 years), sex (buyback, 81%; suicide, 91%; homicide, 84% men), and race (buyback, 80%; suicide, 97%; homicide, 47% white). Handguns account for the majority of crime guns and firearm-related fatalities in Connecticut. Buyback programs are both an opportunity to remove unwanted handguns from the community and to remove firearms from the homes of individuals at increased risk of suicide. Epidemiologic/therapeutic study, level IV.

  9. The formation of intermetallic compounds during interdiffusion of Mg–Al/Mg–Ce diffusion couples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dai, Jiahong; Jiang, Bin; Li, Xin; Yang, Qingshan; Dong, Hanwu; Xia, Xiangsheng; Pan, Fusheng

    2015-01-01

    Graphical abstract: Al–Ce intermetallic compounds (IMCs) formed in Mg–Al/Mg–Ce diffusion couples. During the whole diffusion process, Al was the dominant diffusing species, and it substituted for Mg atoms of the Mg–Ce substrate. Five Al–Ce IMCs of Al 4 Ce, Al 11 Ce 3 , Al 3 Ce, Al 2 Ce, and AlCe were formed via the reaction of Al and Ce. - Highlights: • Al–Ce IMCs formation in the Mg–Al/Mg–Ce diffusion couples was studied. • Formation of Al 4 Ce as the first phase was rationalized using the Gibbs free energy. • The activation energy for the growth of the diffusion reaction zones was 36.6 kJ/mol. - Abstract: The formation of Al–Ce intermetallic compounds (IMCs) during interdiffusion of Mg–Al/Mg–Ce diffusion couples prepared by solid–liquid contact method was investigated at 623 K, 648 K and 673 K for 24 h, 48 h and 72 h, respectively. During the whole diffusion process, Al was the dominant diffusing species, and it substituted for Mg of the Mg–Ce substrate. Five Al–Ce IMCs of Al 4 Ce, Al 11 Ce 3 , Al 3 Ce, Al 2 Ce and AlCe were formed via the reaction of Al and Ce. The formation of Al 4 Ce as the first kind of IMC was rationalized on the basis of an effective Gibbs free energy model. The activation energy for the growth of the total diffusion reaction layer was 36.6 kJ/mol

  10. A new adsorbent of a Ce ion-implanted metal-organic framework (MIL-96) with high-efficiency Ce utilization for removing fluoride from water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xuan; Deng, Shuangshuang; Peng, Fumin; Luo, Tao

    2017-02-14

    A novel Ce(iii) ion-implanted aluminum-trimesic metal-organic framework (Ce-MIL-96) was synthesized for the first time via alcohol-solvent incipient wetness impregnation. Compared to previously reported Ce-contained adsorbents, the fluoride adsorption performance of the new ion-implanted metal-organic framework demonstrated much higher adsorption capacity and more efficient regeneration of Ce. In a wide pH range of 3 to 10, Ce-MIL-96 maintained constant adsorption performance for fluoride, and the residual Ce and Al in the treated solution were below the safe limits in drinking water. The maximum adsorption capacity of Ce-MIL-96 was 38.65 mg g -1 at 298 K. Excluding the contribution of MIL-96, the maximum adsorption capacity of Ce ions was 269.75 mg g -1 , which demonstrated that the service efficiency of cerium in Ce-MIL-96 is about 6 times that in Ce 2 O 3 , nearly 10 times that in Ce-mZrp, and double that in Mn-Ce oxides. There was no significant influence on fluoride removal by Ce-MIL-96 due to the presence of chloride, nitrate, sulfate, bicarbonate or phosphate. Moreover, the adsorption capacity of Ce-MIL-96 remained at more than 70% after nine cycles of adsorption-desorption. Due to this excellent adsorption performance and its regeneration properties, Ce-MIL-96 is a promising adsorbent for the removal of fluoride from groundwater.

  11. HumanViCe: Host ceRNA network in virus infected cells in human

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suman eGhosal

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Host-virus interaction via host cellular components has been an important field of research in recent times. RNA interference mediated by short interfering RNAs and microRNAs (miRNA, is a widespread anti-viral defence strategy. Importantly, viruses also encode their own miRNAs. In recent times miRNAs were identified as key players in host-virus interaction. Furthermore, viruses were shown to exploit the host miRNA networks to suite their own need. The complex cross-talk between host and viral miRNAs and their cellular and viral targets forms the environment for viral pathogenesis. Apart from protein-coding mRNAs, non-coding RNAs may also be targeted by host or viral miRNAs in virus infected cells, and viruses can exploit the host miRNA mediated gene regulatory network via the competing endogenous RNA effect. A recent report showed that viral U-rich non-coding RNAs called HSUR, expressed in primate virus herpesvirus saimiri (HVS infected T cells, were able to bind to three host miRNAs, causing significant alteration in cellular level for one of the miRNAs. We have predicted protein coding and non protein-coding targets for viral and human miRNAs in virus infected cells. We identified viral miRNA targets within host non-coding RNA loci from AGO interacting regions in three different virus infected cells. Gene ontology (GO and pathway enrichment analysis of the genes comprising the ceRNA networks in the virus infected cells revealed enrichment of key cellular signalling pathways related to cell fate decisions and gene transcription, like Notch and Wnt signalling pathways, as well as pathways related to viral entry, replication and virulence. We identified a vast number of non-coding transcripts playing as potential ceRNAs to the immune response associated genes; e.g. APOBEC family genes, in some virus infected cells. All these information are compiled in HumanViCe, a comprehensive database that provides the potential ceRNA networks in virus

  12. Negative Ce anomalies in Mn oxides: The role of Ce4+ mobility during water-mineral interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loges, Anselm; Wagner, Thomas; Barth, Matthias; Bau, Michael; Göb, Susanne; Markl, Gregor

    2012-06-01

    We present one of the very rare natural examples of extremely negative Ce anomalies (up to 4 orders of magnitude) in manganese oxides, caused by higher mobility of Ce4+ compared to REE3+ in an aquatic environment. The young secondary Mn oxides formed together with fluorites and goethites during water-mineral interaction in a hydrothermal fluorite vein. Our findings are in contrast to the oxidative scavenging of Ce, which is commonly observed in Mn oxides. Comparison of REE patterns from modern mine waters with primary and secondary minerals demonstrates that this cannot be solely explained as a source-related feature or by immobilization of Ce, but must at least partially be the result of preferential mobilization of Ce4+ compared to REE3+. We propose that this very unusual behavior is due to strong complexation of Ce4+, most likely by siderophores or similar organic molecules, based on published complex formation constants. The presence of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) even in water samples outflowing at the deepest mine level lends support to this model. Recent experimental studies have also demonstrated that negative Ce anomalies develop in biogenic Mn oxides, but this effect has not yet been reported from a natural environment. Our findings emphasize the relevance of experimental results for natural systems and have considerable implications for the assessment of the mobility of tetravalent actinide elements (especially Pu4+) in earth surface environments or potential high-level permanent repositories.

  13. Prevalence of agglutinating antibodies to Sarcocystis neurona in skunks (Mephitis Mephitis), raccoons (Procyon lotor), and opossums (Didelphis Virginiana) from Connecticut.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Sheila M; Richardson, Dennis J; Cheadle, M Andy; Zajac, Anne M; Lindsay, David S

    2002-10-01

    Equine protozoal myeloencephalitis is the most important protozoan disease of horses in North America and is usually caused by Sarcocystis neurona. Natural cases of encephalitis caused by S. neurona have been reported in skunks (Mephitis mephitis) and raccoons (Procyon lotor). Opossums (Didelphis spp.) are the only known definitive host. Sera from 24 striped skunks, 12 raccoons, and 7 opossums (D. virginiana) from Connecticut were examined for agglutinating antibodies to S. neurona using the S. neurona agglutination test (SAT) employing formalin-fixed merozoites as antigen. The SAT was validated for skunk sera using pre- and postinfection serum samples from 2 experimentally infected skunks. Of the 24 (46%) skunks 11 were positive, and all 12 raccoons were positive for S. neurona antibodies. None of the 7 opossums was positive for antibodies to S. neurona. These results suggest that exposure to sporocysts of S. neurona by intermediate hosts is high in Connecticut. The absence of antibodies in opossums collected from the same areas is most likely because of the absence of systemic infection in the definitive host.

  14. CE-MS fingerprinting of Laurencia complex algae (Rhodophyta).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machín-Sánchez, María; Asensio-Ramos, María; Hernández-Borges, Javier; Gil-Rodríguez, María Candelaria

    2014-03-01

    The use of CE-ESI-MS has been considered as a new chemical strategy for the possible discernment of genera and species of the Laurencia complex. After the selection of the CE-MS and the extraction conditions, a total of 28 specimens of the complex, including different species of four genera (Laurencia, Laurenciella, Palisada, and Osmundea) collected from five intertidal locations on the Island of Tenerife (Canary Islands, Spain) were analyzed. CE-MS fingerprints revealed that CE-MS can be used as a useful tool for these studies in order to assess similarities and differences between them and that it constitutes an important starting point for further studies in the field. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  15. Performance evaluation of LaBr3: Ce scintillator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xie Ming; Lin Li; Liu Shihao; Xiao Peng; Xie Qingguo

    2012-01-01

    The cerium doped lanthanum bromide crystal (LaBr 3 : Ce) is a new kind of scintillator with many advantages such as good energy resolution, high light output, short decay time, good proportionality response. These properties make the LaBr 3 : Ce attractive substantial interest to use in the radiation detection. The energy resolution were investigated with Φ25 × 25 mm LaBr 3 : Ce coupled to a Hamamatsu R8900 photomultiplier tube. Energy resolution of 3.6% (FWHM) have been achieved for 511 keV photons ( 18 F source) at room temperature. Decay time constant of 20 ns have been acquired with a Hamamatsu fast-time-response R9800 photomultiplier tube. The results approve the excellent characterizations of LaBr 3 : Ce and imply its enormous potentiality in the radiation detectors of gamma-ray spectroscopy and PET. (authors)

  16. Temperature-independent photoluminescence response in ZnO:Ce ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2017-12-06

    Ce3+ nanophosphors prepared by combustion method and solid-state reaction method is presented in this study. The powder XRD exhibits hexagonal wurtzite phase and crystallite size falls in the nanometre range. The optical ...

  17. Uued IT-mõtted CeBITilt / Kai Simson

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Simson, Kai

    2006-01-01

    Riigi Infosüsteemide Arenduskeskuse (RIA) pressiesindaja Rica Semjonova vahendab Eesti stendistide muljeid Hannoveris toimunud IT-messilt CeBIT, kus Eestit tutvustasid nii riigiametid kui eraettevõtted

  18. Hydrogen-bridge Si(μ-H)3CeH and inserted H3SiCeH molecules: Matrix infrared spectra and DFT calculations for reaction products of silane with Ce atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Bing; Shi, Peipei; Huang, Tengfei; Wang, Xuefeng

    2017-10-01

    Reactions of laser-ablated cerium atoms with silane were investigated by matrix isolation infrared spectroscopy and theoretical calculations. The reaction products, Si(μ-H)3CeH, H3SiCeH, H2Si(μ-H)CeH and HSi(μ-H)2CeH were identified on the basis of the SiD4 isotopic substitutions and DFT frequency calculations. In the solid argon or krypton matrix, the inserted H3SiCeH molecule was observed as initial product on deposition, which rearranged to hydrogen bridge species Si(μ-H)3CeH on follow-up annealing through H2Si(μ-H)CeH and HSi(μ-H)2CeH species. The Sisbnd Hsbnd Ce hydrogen bridge was investigated by NBO and ELF analysis. Calculation suggested that in Si(μ-H)3CeH molecule Ce atom donated one electron to Si atom, resulting in electron-rich SiH3 subunit, which was confirmed by ESP and AIM analysis. The increased basicity of Sisbnd H bond facilitates the formation of hydrogen bridge bond between Si and Ce. For comparison only insertion H3CCeH structure was obtained from the reaction of Ce atoms with CH4.

  19. E-cigarette Use Among High School and Middle School Adolescents in Connecticut

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morean, Meghan E.; Camenga, Deepa R.; Cavallo, Dana A.; Kong, Grace

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: There is limited evidence on electronic cigarette (e-cigarette) use among U.S. adolescents. Methods: Cross-sectional, anonymous surveys conducted in 4 high schools (HS; n = 3,614) and 2 middle schools (MS; n = 1,166) in Connecticut in November 2013 examined e-cigarette awareness, use patterns, susceptibility to future use, preferences, product components used (battery type, nicotine content, flavors), and sources of marketing and access. Results: High rates of awareness (MS: 84.3%; HS: 92.0%) and of lifetime (3.5% MS, 25.2 % HS) and current (1.5% MS, 12% HS) use of e-cigarettes was observed. Among those who had not tried e-cigarettes, 26.4% of MS and 31.7% of HS students reported being susceptible to future use. Males (OR = 1.70, p < .01), older students (OR = 1.39, p < .05), Caucasians (OR = 2.01, p < .001), ever cigarette smokers (OR = 13.04, p < .001), and current cigarette smokers (OR = 65.11, p < .001) were more likely to be lifetime e-cigarette users and to report greater future susceptibility (males: OR = 1.30; Caucasians: OR = 1.14; ever cigarette smokers; OR = 3.85; current cigarette smokers; OR = 9.81; ps < .01–.001). Among MS students who were lifetime e-cigarette users, 51.2% reported that e-cigarette was the first tobacco product they had tried. E-cigarettes that were rechargeable and had sweet flavors were most popular. Smokers preferred e-cigarettes to cigarettes. Current cigarette smokers were more likely to initiate with nicotine-containing e-cigarettes, and ever and never cigarette smokers to initiate with e-cigarettes without nicotine. Primary sources for e-cigarette advertisements were televisions and gas stations and, for acquiring e-cigarettes, were peers. Conclusions: Longitudinal monitoring of e-cigarette use among adolescents and establishment of policies to limit access are imperatively needed. PMID:25385873

  20. Seamless Ligation Cloning Extract (SLiCE) Cloning Method

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Yongwei; Werling, Uwe; Edelmann, Winfried

    2014-01-01

    SLiCE (Seamless Ligation Cloning Extract) is a novel cloning method that utilizes easy to generate bacterial cell extracts to assemble multiple DNA fragments into recombinant DNA molecules in a single in vitro recombination reaction. SLiCE overcomes the sequence limitations of traditional cloning methods, facilitates seamless cloning by recombining short end homologies (15–52 bp) with or without flanking heterologous sequences and provides an effective strategy for directional subcloning of D...

  1. Description and Application of the CE-SE Scheme

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin KOSÍK

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available The CE-SE scheme is new numerical methodology for conservation laws. It was developed by Dr.Chang of NASA Glenn Research Center and his collaborators. The 1D and 2D variant of CE-SE scheme for scalar convection and for Euler equations for incompressible flows is described. The CESE scheme is compared with classical schemes in 1D. The solution to inviscid incompressible flow in GAMM channel in 2D is presented.

  2. Dissolved cerium contributes to uptake of Ce in the presence of differently sized CeO2-nanoparticles by three crop plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwabe, Franziska; Tanner, Simon; Schulin, Rainer; Rotzetter, Aline; Stark, Wendelin; von Quadt, Albrecht; Nowack, Bernd

    2015-03-01

    We investigated the uptake of cerium (Ce) dioxide nanoparticles (NPs) by hydroponically grown wheat, pumpkin and sunflower plants. The presence of plant roots in nutrient solution led to a substantial increase in the dissolution of CeO2-NP compared to plant-free medium. Experiments with Zr/CeOx-NP revealed that Ce was not only taken up in the form of NPs, but simultaneously to a significant degree also as dissolved Ce(iii) ions, which then re-precipitated in the form of CeO2-NPs inside the leaves. The contribution of dissolved Ce uptake was particularly large for particles smaller than 10 nm due to their higher dissolution rate. Our data also indicate that the translocation of Ce resulting from NP-root-exposure is species dependent. When Ce was supplied as dissolved ions, sunflower had the highest capacity of Ce-ion accumulation inside the leaves, while there was no significant difference between pumpkin and wheat. We found no Ce translocation from roots into shoots when only NPs bigger than 20 nm were applied. This study highlights that plant root activity can have a significant impact on the dissolution of CeO2-NPs in soil solution and that uptake of dissolved Ce(iii) followed by re-precipitation needs to be considered as an important pathway in studies of CeO2-NP uptake by plants.

  3. CeO{sub 2} nanoparticles deposited on carbon nanotubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zheng Guobin; Nomiyama, Ryoma; Sano, Hideaki; Uchiyama, Yasuo, E-mail: gbzheng@nagasaki-u.ac.jp [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Nagasaki University, Bunkyo machi 1-14, Nagasaki, 852-8521 (Japan)

    2011-10-29

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) with average diameter of 14 nm were modified by oxidation in nitric acid and followed by treatment in sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS). XPS analysis verified the introduction of carboxyl group and SDS molecules onto the CNT surface. The CeO{sub 2} coatings on CNTs were synthesized using two different processes; chemical precipitation method and solvothermal method. TEM observation showed that the coatings consisted of CeO{sub 2} nanoparticles with size of several nanometers. It is believed that in chemical precipitation method, the surface modification with carboxyl group and SDS provided nucleation sites of CeO{sub 2}, thus facilitating further growth and attachment of CeO{sub 2} nanoparticles. In solvothermal method, due to the interaction between graphene surface of CNTs and solvent pyridine, CeO{sub 2} particles could form on the pristine CNTs, and the surface modification decreased the nucleation sites of CeO{sub 2} and thus led to thinner or incomplete coating.

  4. Ce O{sub 2}-Zr O{sub 2} tetragonal ceramics (Ce-TZP): mechanical properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nono, Maria do Carmo de Andrade [Instituto Nacional de Pesquisas Espaciais (INPE), Sao Jose dos Campos, SP (Brazil). Laboratorio Associado de Sensores e Materiais

    1994-12-31

    This work presents the development and the characterization of Ce O{sub 2}-stabilized tetragonal Zr O{sub 2} polycrystals (Ce-TZP ceramics), since it is considered candidate material for applications as structural high performance ceramics, an as substitute of some metallic materials. Ce-TZP ceramics attain remarkable increasing in strength and fracture toughness. Sintered ceramics were fabricated from mixtures of powders containing different Ce O{sub 2} content prepared by conventional mechanical technique. It were adopted the bending strength, Vickers hardness and fracture toughness techniques to the determination of the mechanical parameters. These results were discussed and compared to those published in international literature. (author) 11 refs., 10 figs.

  5. Optical and scintillation properties of Ce-doped LuLiF{sub 4} with different Ce concentrations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yanagida, Takayuki, E-mail: yanagida@lsse.kyutech.ac.jp [Kyushu Institute of Technology, 2-4 Hibikino, Wakamatsu-ku, Kitakyushu, Fukuoka 808-0196 (Japan); Fujimoto, Yutaka [Kyushu Institute of Technology, 2-4 Hibikino, Wakamatsu-ku, Kitakyushu, Fukuoka 808-0196 (Japan); Fukuda, Kentaro [Tokuyama Corporation, Shibuya 3-chome, Shibuya-ku, Tokyo 150-8383 Japan (Japan); Chani, Valery [Tohoku Univ., 2-1-1 Katahira, Sendai 980-8577 (Japan)

    2013-11-21

    The crystals of 0.1, 0.5, and 1 mol% Ce-doped LuLiF{sub 4} (Ce:LLF) grown by the micro-pulling down (μ-PD) method were examined for their optical and scintillation properties. Ce:LLF crystals had ∼80% transparency at wavelengths longer than 300 nm. In photoluminescence spectra, they demonstrated intense emission peaks at 310 and 330 nm with the quantum yield of 60–90%. Ce{sup 3+} 5d–4f emission peaks were also detected at similar wavelengths of 310 and 330 nm in the radioluminescence spectra obtained under X-ray excitation. According to pulse height spectra recorded under γ-ray irradiation, the absolute light yield of Ce 0.1, 0.5, and 1% were 3600±400, 3000±300, and 1700±200 ph/MeV, respectively. Decay time kinetics was also inspected using a pulse X-ray equipped streak camera system. The decay time components of Ce:LLF were ∼70 ns and ∼1 μs for all the samples.

  6. Optical and scintillation properties of Ce-doped LuLiF4 with different Ce concentrations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yanagida, Takayuki; Fujimoto, Yutaka; Fukuda, Kentaro; Chani, Valery

    2013-01-01

    The crystals of 0.1, 0.5, and 1 mol% Ce-doped LuLiF 4 (Ce:LLF) grown by the micro-pulling down (μ-PD) method were examined for their optical and scintillation properties. Ce:LLF crystals had ∼80% transparency at wavelengths longer than 300 nm. In photoluminescence spectra, they demonstrated intense emission peaks at 310 and 330 nm with the quantum yield of 60–90%. Ce 3+ 5d–4f emission peaks were also detected at similar wavelengths of 310 and 330 nm in the radioluminescence spectra obtained under X-ray excitation. According to pulse height spectra recorded under γ-ray irradiation, the absolute light yield of Ce 0.1, 0.5, and 1% were 3600±400, 3000±300, and 1700±200 ph/MeV, respectively. Decay time kinetics was also inspected using a pulse X-ray equipped streak camera system. The decay time components of Ce:LLF were ∼70 ns and ∼1 μs for all the samples

  7. Influence of Ce-H bonding on the physical properties of the hydrides CeCoSiH1.0 and CeCoGeH1.0

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chevalier, B; Matar, S F; Menetrier, M; Marcos, J Sanchez; Fernandez, J Rodriguez

    2006-01-01

    The hydrides CeCoSiH 1.0 and CeCoGeH 1.0 which crystallize like the parent antiferromagnetic compounds CeCoSi and CeCoGe in the tetragonal CeFeSi-type structure, have been investigated by specific heat and thermoelectric power measurements and 1 H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). CeCoSiH 1.0 is an intermediate valence compound whereas CeCoGeH 1.0 can be considered as a nearly trivalent cerium compound. This behaviour is corroborated by the occurrence of a slight broadening of the 1 H NMR signal in the sequence CeCoSiH 1.0 → CeCoGeH 1.0 . The band structure calculations performed on these hydrides reveal the existence of strong bonding Ce-H interaction, found to be larger in CeCoSiH 1.0 than in CeCoGeH 1.0

  8. Effect of yttrium on electron–phonon coupling strength of 5d state of Ce3+ ion in LYSO:Ce crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ding, Dongzhou; Liu, Bo; Wu, Yuntao; Yang, Jianhua; Ren, Guohao; Chen, Junfeng

    2014-01-01

    This paper aims at an improved understanding of luminescence properties of (Lu 1−x Y x ) 2 SiO 5 :Ce (x=0 at%, 26 at%, 45 at%, 66 at% and 100 at%). Photoluminescence emission and excitation spectra as well as Raman spectra of (Lu 1−x Y x ) 2 SiO 5 :Ce were investigated as a function of yttrium (shortened as Y) content in it. Obtained Huang–Rhys factor S indicates that the coupling between Ce1 (7-oxygen-coordinated), Ce2 (6-oxygen-coordinated) and LYSO lattice is intermediate and strong, respectively. Besides, it was found that: with the increase of Y content, crystal field strength around Ce1 and Ce2 decreases, Stokes shift of Ce1 and Ce2 presents an increase trend, and S of Ce2 tends to decrease. These phenomena were explained by geometrical influence of Y 3+ /Lu 3+ on the crystal field splitting of the 5d levels of Ce 3+ and coupling strength. With the increase of Y content, the evolution of S and coupling energy ħω of Ce1 present a slight increase and decrease trend respectively, while S and coupling energy ħω of Ce2 present an obvious decrease and increase trend, respectively. - Highlights: • Crystal field strength around Ce1 decreases with increase of Y content in LYSO:Ce. • A diagram of Huang–Rhys factor S against Y content in LYSO:Ce was constructed. • A diagram of coupling energy ħω against Y content in LYSO:Ce was constructed. • A diagram of Stokes shift against Y content in LYSO:Ce was constructed

  9. Ce-doped nanoparticles of TiO2: Rutile-to-brookite phase transition and evolution of Ce local-structure studied with XRD and XANES

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kityakarn, Sutasinee; Worayingyong, Attera; Suramitr, Anwaraporn; Smith, M.F.

    2013-01-01

    The crystal and electronic structural changes undergone by TiO 2 nanoparticles when Ce is introduced were studied using X-ray diffraction (XRD) and X-ray absorption near-edge spectroscopy (XANES). A small amount of Ce (less than 1% molar concentration) resulted in i/a significant reduction of the average size of the TiO 2 nanoparticles and ii/a phase transition in which brookite replaced rutile as the minority phase component (anatase was the majority phase component at all Ce concentrations studied up to 10% molar concentration). The Ce L3 edge XANES revealed changes in the local environment of Ce impurities. As Ce concentration was increased the fraction of Ce that have formal valence of +3 decreased and, for the remaining Ce with valence +4, the 4f orbitals became less-strongly hybridized with the p-orbitals of oxygen neighbors. The results have implications for photocatalytic and gas sensing properties of Ce-doped TiO 2 . - Highlights: ► Ce-doping: TiO 2 nanoparticles shrink and minority phase changes rutile-> brookite. ► XANES reveals phase change for arbitrarily small particles (while XRD fails). ► As Ce added: fraction of Ce +3 dopants falls, hybridization of Ce +4 with O weakens

  10. Investigating the capability of ToF-SIMS to determine the oxidation state of Ce

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seed Ahmed, H. A. A.; Swart, H. C.; Kroon, R. E.

    2018-04-01

    The capability of time of flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (ToF-SIMS) to determine the oxidation state of Ce ions doped in a phosphor was investigated. Two samples of SiO2:Ce (4 mol%) with known Ce3+/Ce4+ relative concentrations were subjected to ToF-SIMS measurements. The spectra were very similar and no significant differences in the relative peak intensities were observed that would readily allow one to distinguish Ce3+ from Ce4+. Although ToF-SIMS was therefore not useful to distinguish the charge state of Ce ions doped in this phosphor material, the idea in principle was also tested on two other samples, namely CeF3 and CeF4 These contain Ce as part of the host (i.e. much higher concentration) and are fluorides, which is significant because ToF-SIMS has previously been reported to be able to distinguish Eu2+ from Eu3+ in Eu doped Sr5(PO4)3F phosphor. The spectrum of CeF4 contained a small peak related to Ce4+ which was not observed in the CeF3 spectrum, yet the peak related to the Ce3+ ions was found to be much more intense in the spectrum of CeF4 than CeF3, showing that the ToF-SIMS signals cannot be directly interpreted as retaining the charge state of the ions in the original material. Nevertheless, the significant differences in the Ce-related peaks in the ToF-SIMS spectra from CeF3 and CeF4 show that the charge state of Ce may be distinguished. This study shows that while in principle ToF-SIMS may be used to distinguish the charge state of Ce ions, this depends on the sample and it would not be easy to interpret the spectra without a standard or reference.

  11. Photocatalytic activity of Ce-modified SBA-15 for the degradation of ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    CeO2 or CeO2-based materials have also been found to be very important under environmental protection materials family. In particular, supported CeO2 and CeO2-based mixed oxides are effective catalysts for the ... made slurry in ethanol containing aluminum isopropoxide for 8 h at room temperature. The filtered ...

  12. Marine Geophysical Investigation of Selected Sites in Bridgeport Harbor, Connecticut, 2006

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Carole D.; White, Eric A.

    2007-01-01

    A marine geophysical investigation was conducted in 2006 to help characterize the bottom and subbottom materials and extent of bedrock in selected areas of Bridgeport Harbor, Connecticut. The data will be used by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers in the design of confined aquatic disposal (CAD) cells within the harbor to facilitate dredging of the harbor. Three water-based geophysical methods were used to evaluate the geometry and composition of subsurface materials: (1) continuous seismic profiling (CSP) methods provide the depth to water bottom, and when sufficient signal penetration can be achieved, delineate the depth to bedrock and subbottom materials; (2) continuous resistivity profiling (CRP) methods were used to define the electrical properties of the shallow subbottom, and to possibly determine the distribution of conductive materials, such as clay, and resistive materials, such as sand and bedrock; (3) and magnetometer data were used to identify conductive anomalies of anthropogenic sources, such as cables and metallic debris. All data points were located using global positioning systems (GPS), and the GPS data were used for real-time navigation. The results of the CRP, CSP, and magnetometer data are consistent with the conceptual site model of a bedrock channel incised beneath the present day harbor. The channel appears to follow a north-northwest to south-southeast trend and is parallel to the Pequannock River. The seismic record and boring data indicate that under the channel, the depth to bedrock is as much as 42.7 meters (m) below mean low-low water (MLLW) in the dredged part of the harbor. The bedrock channel becomes shallower towards the shore, where bedrock outcrops have been mapped at land surface. CSP and CRP data were able to provide a discontinuous, but reasonable, trace from the channel toward the west under the proposed southwestern CAD cell. The data indicate a high amount of relief on the bedrock surface, as well as along the water bottom

  13. Levels in 146Ce and the N = 88 isotones

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gowdy, G.M.; Chrien, R.E.; Chu, Y.Y.

    1981-01-01

    An investigation of the level structure of 146 Ce following the beta decay of the low-spin isomer of 146 La has been carried out at the ISOL facility TRISTAN at Brookhaven National Laboratory. The half-life for the low spin isomer was found to be 6.0 +- 0.4s. A partial level scheme for 146 Ce below 2 MeV is given. The level energies and some B(E2) values extracted from our data have been compared with IBA-2 calculations done entirely with extrapolated parameters from neighboring Z nuclei in order to check the predictive power of the model. Systematics of the Z = 58 isotopes and N = 88 isotones indicate that although 146 Ce is more deformed than its isotones with Z greater than or equal to 60, the transition to the well-deformed region can probably more correctly be thought to occur after 146 Ce, between N = 88 and N = 90, as it does for Z greater than or equal to 60. The abrupt onset of deformation present in the higher Z isotopes is not seen in the Ce isotopes where the trend is found to be rather smooth throughout

  14. An Update on NiCE Support for BISON

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McCaskey, Alex [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Billings, Jay Jay [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Deyton, Jordan H. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Wojtowicz, Anna [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2015-09-01

    The Nuclear Energy Advanced Modeling and Simulation program (NEAMS) from the Department of Energy s Office of Nuclear Energy has funded the development of a modeling and simulation workflow environment to support the various codes in its nuclear energy scientific computing toolkit. This NEAMS Integrated Computational Environment (NiCE) provides extensible tools and services that enable efficient code execution, input generation, pre-processing visualizations, and post-simulation data analysis and visualization for a large portion of the NEAMS Toolkit. A strong focus for the NiCE development team throughout FY 2015 has been support for the Multiphysics Object Oriented Simulation Environment (MOOSE) and the NEAMS nuclear fuel performance modeling application built on that environment, BISON. There is a strong desire in the program to enable and facilitate the use of BISON throughout nuclear energy research and industry. A primary result of this desire is the need for strong support for BISON in NiCE. This report will detail improvements to NiCE support for BISON. We will present a new and improved interface for interacting with BISON simulations in a variety of ways: (1) improved input model generation, (2) embedded mesh and solution data visualizations, and (3) local and remote BISON simulation launch. We will also show how NiCE has been extended to provide support for BISON code development.

  15. New Whole-House Solutions Case Study: Singer Village - A Cold Climate Zero Energy Ready Home, Derby, Connecticut

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2015-03-01

    After progressively incorporating ENERGY STAR for Homes Versions 1, 2, and 3 into its standard practices over the years, builder Brookside Development was seeking to build an even more sustainable product that would further increase energy efficiency, while also addressing indoor air quality, water conservation, renewable-ready, and resiliency. These objectives align with the framework of the U.S. Department of Energy Zero Energy Ready Home program, which builds upon the comprehensive building science requirements of ENERGY STAR for Homes Version 3 and proven Building America innovations and best practices. To meet this goal, Consortium for Advanced Residential Buildings partnered with Brookside Development to design and construct the first zero energy ready home in a development of seven new homes on the old Singer Estate in Derby, Connecticut.

  16. "I live by shooting hill"-a qualitative exploration of conflict and violence among urban youth in New Haven, Connecticut.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shuval, Kerem; Massey, Zohar; Caughy, Margaret O; Cavanaugh, Brenda; Pillsbury, Charles A; Groce, Nora

    2012-02-01

    To elucidate urban youths' perceptions of conflict and violence we conducted a qualitative study among minority urban youths in New Haven, Connecticut. We utilized the ecological framework to explore the multilevel nature of the findings, and triangulated results with a parallel quantitative study. We found risk factors for violence at multiple levels including lack of interpersonal anger management skills (individual level); parents not physically present in the household (relationship level); residence in crime and gang-ridden neighborhoods (community level); and socioeconomic inequalities between neighborhoods, as reflected by participants' perception of the inadequacy of neighborhood resources to provide safety (societal level). Neighborhood resources were perceived as sparse, and police were not regarded as a protective factor (sometimes rather as racially discriminatory). Participants' statements pertaining to feelings of isolation, racism, and violence without strong parental, neighborhood, and school support may impede prosocial attitudes and behaviors throughout adolescence and young adulthood.

  17. Integrated plant safety assessment: systematic evaluation program. Haddam Neck Plant, Connecticut Yankee Atomic Power Company. Docket No. 50-213

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1983-03-01

    The Systematic Evaluation Program was initiated in February 1977 by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission to review the designs of older operating nuclear reactor plants to confirm and document their safety. The review provides: (1) an assessment of how these plants compare with current licensing safety requirements relating to selected issues, (2) a basis for deciding on how these differences should be resolved in an integrated plant review, and (3) a documented evaluation of plant safety. This report documents the review of Haddam Neck Plant, operated by Connecticut Yankee Atomic Power Company. The Haddam Neck Plant is one of 10 plants reviewed under Phase II of this program. This report indicates how 137 topics selected for review under Phase I of the program were addressed. Equipment and procedural changes have been identified as a result of the review

  18. Water-quality assessment of the Connecticut, Housatonic, and Thames river basins study unit; analysis of available data on nutrients, suspended sediments, and pesticides, 1972-92

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimmerman, Marc James; Grady, S.J.; Trench, E.C.; Flanagan, S.M.; Nielsen, M.G.

    1996-01-01

    This retrospective report examines available nutrient, suspended sediment, and pesticide data in surface and ground water in the Connecticut, Housatonic and Thames Rivers Study Unit of the National Water-Quality Assessment Program. The purpose of this study is to improve the under- standing of natural and anthropogenic factors affecting water quality in the study unit. Water-quality data were acquired from various sources, primarily, the U.S. Geological Survey and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. The report examines data for water years 1972-92, focusing on 1980-92, although it also includes additional data from as early as 1905. The study unit lies within the New England Physiographic Province and altitudes range from sea level in coastal Connecticut to 6,288 feet above sea level at Mount Washington, New Hampshire. Two major aquifer types underlie the study unit--unconsolidated glacial deposits and fractured bedrock. The climate generally is temperate and humid, with four distinct seasons. Average annual precipitation ranges from 34 to 65 inches. The study unit has a population of about 4.5 million, which is most highly concentrated in southwestern Connecticut and along the south-central region of the Connecticut River Valley. Surface-water-quality data were screened to provide information about sites with adequate numbers of analyses (50) over sufficiently long periods (1980-90) to enable valid statistical analyses. In order to compare effects of different types of land use on surface-water quality, examination of data required application of several statistical and graphical techniques, including mapping, histograms, boxplots, concentration-discharge plots, trend analysis, and load estimation. Spatial and temporal analysis of surface-water-quality data indicated that, with a single exception, only/stations in the Connecticut water-quality network had sufficient data collected over adequately long time periods to use in detailed analyses. Ground

  19. Impact of fee increases on dental utilization rates for children living in Connecticut and enrolled in Medicaid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beazoglou, Tryfon; Douglass, Joanna; Myne-Joslin, Veronica; Baker, Patricia; Bailit, Howard

    2015-01-01

    In 2008, Connecticut's Medicaid program administration increased children's dental fees to match approximately the 70th percentile of what the market fees were for dental care in 2005. These Medicaid program changes occurred at the same time as a national economic recession, which took place from 2007 through 2009. The authors obtained Medicaid eligibility, claims, and provider data before and after the fee increase, in 2006 and 2009 through 2012, respectively. Their analysis examined changes in utilization rates, service mix, expenditures, and dentists' participation. The authors qualitatively assessed the general impact of the recession on utilization rate changes. The Medicaid fee increase, program improvements, and the recession resulted in a dramatic increase in utilization rates. For children continuously enrolled in Medicaid, utilization rates increased from 45.9% in 2006 to 71.6% in 2012. Rates increased across sex, race, ethnicity, and geographic areas. These increased utilization rates eliminated the disparities in access to dental services between children with private insurance and children receiving Medicaid benefits. Children enrolled in Medicaid now have utilization rates that are similar to or higher than privately insured children. Expenditures increased $62 million; this represents less than 1% of 2012 State Medicaid expenditures. Dentist participation increased by 72%. These results suggest that dentists will participate in the Medicaid program if adequately compensated, and low-income families will seek dental services. The Medicaid fee increase, program improvements, and the recession had a dramatic impact on reducing disparities in children's access to dental care in Connecticut. One solution to the substantial disparities in access to dental care is to increase Medicaid fees to competitive levels. Copyright © 2015 American Dental Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Variation in patient–provider communication by patient’s race and ethnicity, provider type, and continuity in and site of care: An analysis of data from the Connecticut Health Care Survey

    OpenAIRE

    Robert H Aseltine; Alyse Sabina; Gillian Barclay; Garth Graham

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: The purpose of this study is to examine the quality of patient-reported communication with their health care providers using data from a large, statewide survey of patients. We examine the relationship between patient?s race and ethnicity, type of health care provider, site of and continuity in care, and the quality of patient?provider communication. Methods: We analyze data from the Connecticut Health Care Survey, a representative telephone survey of 4608 Connecticut residents co...

  1. Luminance behavior of Ce3+ doped ZnS nanostructures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shanmugam, N; Cholan, S; Kannadasan, N; Sathishkumar, K; Viruthagiri, G

    2014-01-24

    We report the synthesis and characterization of undoped and various levels of Ce(3+) doped ZnS nanocrystal. The structure and size of the products were studied by X-ray diffraction (XRD). The existence of functional groups was identified by Fourier transform infrared spectrometry (FT-IR). The UV-Visible measurements reveal that the synthesized products are blue shifted when compared with bulk phase of ZnS as a result of quantum confinement effect. The PL studies show an enhancement in the intensity of emission band in the UV region on increased Ce(3+) doping. The morphology of the products was evaluated by Field emission scanning electron microscope (FESEM) and High resolution transmission electron microscopy (FESEM). The presence of Ce(3+) was confirmed by Energy dispersive spectral analysis (EDS). The thermal stability of pure and doped products was analyzed by thermo gravimetric and differential thermal analysis (TG-DTA). Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Homoleptic Ce(III) and Ce(IV) Nitroxide Complexes: Significant Stabilization of the 4+ Oxidation State

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bogart, Justin A.; Lewis, Andrew J.; Medling, Scott A.; Piro, Nicholas A.; Carroll, Patrick J.; Booth, Corwin H.; Schelter, Eric J.

    2014-06-25

    Electrochemical experiments performed on the complex Ce-IV[2-((BuNO)-Bu-t)py](4), where [2-((BuNO)-Bu-t)py](-) = N-tert-butyl-N-2-pyridylnitroxide, indicate a 2.51 V stabilization of the 4+ oxidation state of Ce compared to [(Bu4N)-Bu-n](2)[Ce(NO3)(6)] in acetonitrile and a 2.95 V stabilization compared to the standard potential for the ion under aqueous conditions. Density functional theory calculations suggest that this preference for the higher oxidation state is a result of the tetrakis(nitroxide) ligand framework at the Ce cation, which allows for effective electron donation into, and partial covalent overlap with, vacant 4f orbitals with delta symmetry. The results speak to the behavior of CeO2 and related solid solutions in oxygen uptake and transport applications, in particular an inherent local character of bonding that stabilizes the 4+ oxidation state. The results indicate a cerium(IV) complex that has been stabilized to an unprecedented degree through tuning of its ligand-field environment.

  3. Cooperative effects in CeCu2Si2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lang, M.; Modler, R.; Ahlheim, U.; Helfrich, R.; Reinders, P.H.P.; Steglich, F.; Assmus, W.; Sun, W.; Bruls, G.; Weber, D.; Luethi, B.

    1991-01-01

    Heavy-fermion superconductivity and other cooperative effects have been explored by thermal expansion, specific heat and ultrasound measurements on CeCu 2 Si 2 single crystals. Crystals annealed under Cu atmosphere show sharp superconducting transitions at Tc max =0.63 K. At the same temperature the ''as grown'', i.e., non-bulk-superconducting, crystals reveal a pronounced phase-transition anomaly, presumably of structural origin. This new transition is associated with an expansion of the volume upon cooling and gives rise to magnetic correlations. Our results indicate a complex interplay between lattice instability, magnetic phenomena and superconductivity in CeCu 2 Si 2 . (orig.)

  4. Magnetic Phase Transitions of CeSb. I

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fischer, Pernille Hertz; Lebech, Bente; Meier, G.

    1978-01-01

    The magnetic ordering of the anomalous antiferromagnet CeSb, which has a NaCl crystal structure, was determined in zero applied magnetic field by means of neutron diffraction investigations of single crystals and powder. Below the Neel temperature TN of (16.1+or-0.1)K, there exist six partially...... a first-order phase transition at TN. At approximately TN/2 there is a first-order phase transition to a FCC type IA low-temperature configuration. The unusual magnetic properties of CeSb, which result from anisotropic exchange and crystalline electric field effects, resemble those of certain actinide Na...

  5. Magnetic properties of Ce3+ in PbCeA (A= Te, Se, S)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isber, S.; Gratens, X.; Charar, S.; Golacki, Z.

    2013-01-01

    The magnetic susceptibility of Pb1-xCexA (A = S, Se and Te) crystals with 0.006 ≤ x ≤ 0.036 were studied in the temperature range from 20 mK up to room temperature. X-band (~9.5 GHz) Electron Paramagnetic Resonance (EPR) showed small shifts in the effective Landé factors that were attributed to crystal-field admixture. The EPR measurements were correlated with the magnetic susceptibility data and resulted in estimating the crystal-field splitting Δ = E(Γ8) - E(Γ7) of the lowest 2F5/2 manifold for Ce3+ ions in PbA (A = S, Se and Te) of about 340 K, 440 K and 540 K for Pb1-xCexTe, Pb1-xCexSe, and Pb1-xCexS, respectively. The values for the crystal-field splitting deduced from the magnetic data were found to be in agreement with the calculated ones based on the point charge model. Moreover, the deHaas van-Alphen magnetic oscillations in the susceptibility measurements of Pb1-xCexTe (x~ 0.05 and 0.07) were observed at ultra-low temperature (20 mK); The oscillations were investigated and the values of the oscillatory period for Pb1-xCexTe (x = 0.0048 and 0.007) are reported.

  6. Studies of the Ce(III)/Ce(IV) couple in multiphase systems containing a phase transfer reagent: Pt. 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pletcher, D.; Valdes, E.M.

    1988-01-01

    The oxidation of some toluenes and aromatic hydrocarbons by Ce(IV) in aqueous nitric acid/organic solvent emulsions containing a phase transfer reagent, tributylphosphate or tetrabutylammonium ion are reported. With toluenes, a number of products are formed and the relative yield depends most strongly on substituents; with p-xylene and p-methoxytoluene, reasonable yields of aldehydes were obtained with short reaction times. With anthracene and naphthalene, the reactions are again fast and good yields of quinones are observed. On the basis of these studies it is possible to select conditions for the indirect oxidation of some organic molecules in an emulsion and using Ce(III)/Ce(IV) as the redox mediator. (author)

  7. Effect of cerium on the corrosion behaviour of sintered (Nd,Ce)FeB magnet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Lijing; Bi, Mengxue; Jiang, Jianjun; Ding, Xuefeng; Zhu, Minggang; Li, Wei; Lv, Zhongshan; Song, Zhenlun

    2017-06-01

    For the balanced consumption of rare-earth elements, cerium (Ce) was partially used for NdFeB magnets instead of Nd. The corrosion behaviour of the (Nd,Ce)FeB magnet with different Ce contents in 3.5% NaCl solution was investigated by SEM, XRD, EDS and electrochemical tests. After immersion, the weight loss was calculated and the magnetic properties of the samples were measured. Results showed that Ce affected the corrosion of the (Nd,Ce)FeB magnet. Compared with the NdFeB magnet without Ce but of the same grade as the magnetic energy product, (Nd,Ce)FeB magnet showed better corrosion resistance. With increased Ce content, the corrosion resistances and magnetic properties of (Nd,Ce)FeB magnets were investigated.

  8. Optimization of the time response of LaBr3(Ce) detectors, and its dependence on Ce concentration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vedia, V.; Mach, H.; Fraile, L.M.; Udias, J.M.; Lalkovski, S.

    2015-01-01

    Fast inorganic scintillators that exhibit good spectroscopy performance, like LaBr 3 (Ce), are the crystals of choice for many applications; they play a crucial role in the Ultra Fast Timing technique by virtue of their good energy resolution and fast response. This method, which is very sensitive to the LaBr 3 (Ce) time resolution, allows measurements of nuclear level lifetimes down to few ps range. There are indications that the nominal Ce concentration does strongly influence on the timing properties as well as it varies the photon yield and the energy resolution. In this work we have searched for the best settings in order to optimize the time resolution of three cylindrical LaBr 3 (Ce) detectors equipped with crystals identical in volume and shape but with different Ce dopant concentration. The time resolution of every detector depends on the proper selection of the fast photomultiplier tube and the set up parameters that can be further optimized by fine-tuning of the Constant Fraction Discrimination (CFD) and the PMT bias voltage. Very good time resolution can be obtained with the ORTEC 935 CFD for very short time-delays. Timing properties of the three crystals were studied by delayed coincidence measurements against a reference BaF 2 detector, whose time response is well known. The LaBr 3 (Ce) detector and the reference unit were placed in a close geometry with the radioactive source in between. We report timing results measured at the 60 Co and 22 Na energies. (author)

  9. Non-aqueous CE-MS of cinchona alkaloids - characterizationof a novel CE-ESI-MS interface

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Frederik André; Hansen, Steen Honoré; Petersen, Nickolaj J.

    a submicron fracture in the capillary close the ESI tip. The fracture provides a zero dead volume and excellent conducting properties due to the large amount of ions in the electric double layer. Electric current exceeding the upper limit of CE instrumentation of up to 300 µA can easily be obtained...... the composition of alkaloids in Cinchona bark. One common problem for sheatless interfaces for CE-MS has been establishing a stable electric contact at the end of the separation capillary that does not induce band broadening or affect the spray stability. In our device the electric contact is generated through...

  10. Magnetic domains and frustration in metallic CePdAl

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lucas, Stefan; Huesges, Zita; Huang, Chien-Lung; Stockert, Oliver [Max Planck Institute CPfS, Dresden (Germany); Fritsch, Veronika; Sakai, Akito [EP 6, Electronic Correlations and Magnetism, University of Augsburg (Germany); Grube, Kai; Taubenheim, Christian; Loehneysen, Hilbert von [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (Germany)

    2016-07-01

    Magnetic frustration is an exciting topic in condensed matter physics, since it can lead to new ground states of materials, e.g. a spin liquid or spin glass state. Effects of magnetic frustration have been investigated intensively for insulating materials. However, the existence of magnetic frustration in metallic systems is still under debate. CePdAl is a metallic Kondo system, where geometric magnetic frustration arises from the formation of Ce ions on a distorted Kagome lattice. Neutron scattering experiments revealed, that only two thirds of the magnetic Ce moments order antiferromagnetically below T{sub N}=2.7 K, whereas the other third remains mainly disordered. Thermodynamic as well as neutron scattering measurements are presented to verify the existence of partial magnetic frustration in CePdAl. Recently neutron diffraction experiments under magnetic fields applied along two orthogonal directions in the magnetically hard basal plane were performed. They show opposite effects on the magnetic intensity of a selected magnetic domain depending on the field direction with respect to the propagation vector. If this is only an effect of different domain population or also due to a change in magnetic frustration shall be discussed.

  11. Preparation and properties of Pr /Ce :YAG phosphors using ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2015-09-01

    Sep 1, 2015 ... The relatively higher pH could decrease the loss of Ce and Pr in the precursors and increase the particle size of the obtained powders, which was beneficial to the enhancement of luminescent intensity. Therefore, the precursors directly converted to pure-phase YAG at 900◦C, and the phosphors calcined at ...

  12. Optical properties of CeO2 thin films

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    TECS

    The values of absorption coefficient, extinction coefficient, refractive index, dielectric constant, phase angle and loss angle have been calculated from the optical measurements. The X-ray diffraction of the film showed that the film is crystalline in nature. The crystallite size of CeO2 films have been evaluated and found to be.

  13. Antiferromagnetism and hot spots in CeIn3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grigoriev, Pavel; Gor'kov, Lev

    2006-03-01

    Enormous mass enhancement at ``hot spots'' on the Fermi surface (FS) of the antiferromagnetic CeIn3 has been reported at strong magnetic field near its antiferromagnetic quantum critical point [T. Ebihara et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 93, 246401 (2004)]. The effect was ascribed to anomalous spin fluctuations at these spots owing to peculiar strong many-body interactions. The ``hot spots'' lie at the positions on FS same as in non-magnetic LaIn3 where the narrow necks are protruded, thus, hinting on their possible relation. Assuming that in paramagnetic phase CeIn3 has similar spectrum, we study the influence of the antiferromagnetic ordering (AFM) on the energy spectrum of CeIn3 and show that its FS undergoes a topological change at the onset of AFM. The necks at the ``hot spots'' are truncated by the AFM, thus restoring the almost spherical d-part of the FS of CeIn3. Applied field suppresses the AFM and restores the necks on the FS (so-called 2.5-order phase transition) leading to logarithmic divergence of the dHvA effective mass when the electron trajectory passes near or through the restored necks. This effect fully explains the observed dHvA mass enhancement in the ``hot spots'' in the frameworks of one-particle approximation and leads to the predictions concerning the spin-dependence of the effective electron mass.

  14. Preparation and properties of Pr /Ce :YAG phosphors using ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2015-09-01

    Sep 1, 2015 ... 3+. :YAG phosphors using triethanolamine as dispersant and pH regulator. SHIHONG TONG. ∗. , JUNYAN ZHAO and XIU WEN. College of Sciences of Southwest Petroleum .... were weighted in the molar ratio of 0.015:0.06:2.925:5 and ... Pr3+/Ce3+:YAG powders were investigated by X-ray diffrac-.

  15. Diffusion of hydrogen in Pd-(Ce, Y, B) alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakamoto, Y.; Kaneko, H.; Tsukahara, T.; Hirata, S.

    1987-01-01

    The study has been carried out to determine the diffusivity of hydrogen in Pd alloys containing Ce, Y and B in atom fractions up to θ/sub μ/ = 0.1 by an electrochemical permeation method, and to examine the lattice dilation effect on the diffusivity in these alloys. Ce and Y have been chosen because the solid solubility of both in Pd is about 13 at% in spite of the very large atomic size-factor difference between Pd and the solutes, and thus the expansion of the Pd lattice by Ce and Y is much larger than by Ag. Furthermore, it is of interest that the partial enthalpy of the dissolved hydrogen at infinite dilution ΔH 0 /sub H/ for Ce and Y is much smaller than for Pd. On the other hand, B atom also expands the Pd lattice in a way similar to Y, and sometimes B atoms may dissolve in the octahedral interstitial sites in the same way as hydrogen atoms

  16. Nuclear data treatment for SAM-CE Monte Carlo calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lichtenstein, H.; Troubetzkoy, E.S.; Beer, M.

    1980-01-01

    The treatment of nuclear data by the SAM-CE Monte Carlo code system is presented. The retrieval of neutron, gamma production, and photon data from the ENDF/B fils is described. Integral cross sections as well as differential data are utilized in the Monte Carlo calculations, and the processing procedures for the requisite data are summarized

  17. Estimation of bulk transfer coefficient for latent heat flux (Ce)

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Sadhuram, Y.

    The bulk transfer coefficient for latent heat flux (Ce) has been estimated over the Arabian Sea from the moisture budget during the pre-monsoon season of 1988. The computations have been made over two regions (A: 0-8 degrees N: 60-68 degrees E: B: 0...

  18. A Sesame Equation of State for Dense Ce

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Greeff, Carl William [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Crockett, Scott [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-03-15

    We generated a new Sesame equation of state table for Ce. It is a single effective phase table for the high density phases α, α ', ϵ and liquid. Also, the EOS is meant to be used with a ramp to represent the initial low density γ phase.

  19. Information System through ANIS at CeSAM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreau, C.; Agneray, F.; Gimenez, S.

    2015-09-01

    ANIS (AstroNomical Information System) is a web generic tool developed at CeSAM to facilitate and standardize the implementation of astronomical data of various kinds through private and/or public dedicated Information Systems. The architecture of ANIS is composed of a database server which contains the project data, a web user interface template which provides high level services (search, extract and display imaging and spectroscopic data using a combination of criteria, an object list, a sql query module or a cone search interfaces), a framework composed of several packages, and a metadata database managed by a web administration entity. The process to implement a new ANIS instance at CeSAM is easy and fast : the scientific project has to submit data or a data secure access, the CeSAM team installs the new instance (web interface template and the metadata database), and the project administrator can configure the instance with the web ANIS-administration entity. Currently, the CeSAM offers through ANIS a web access to VO compliant Information Systems for different projects (HeDaM, HST-COSMOS, CFHTLS-ZPhots, ExoDAT,...).

  20. Optical properties of CeO2 thin films

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    TECS

    increase with increase in thickness. The values of absorp- tion coefficient, extinction coefficient, refractive index, dielectric constant, phase angle and loss angle were found to be in conformity with previous works. From the X-ray diffraction studies it is found that CeO2 thin film has crys- talline structure and a smaller crystallite ...

  1. Burstein Moss effect in nanocrystalline CaS: Ce

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Administrator

    Burstein Moss effect in nanocrystalline CaS: Ce. GEETA SHARMA*, PUJA CHAWLA, S P LOCHAB. † and NAFA SINGH. Department of Physics, Kurukshetra University, Kurukshetra 136 119, India. †. Inter University Accelerator Centre, Aruna Asaf Ali Marg, New Delhi 110 067, India. MS received 27 July 2009; revised 16 ...

  2. Itinerant magnetism in CeRh3B2

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eriksson, Olle; Johansson, Börje; Brooks, M. S. S.

    1989-01-01

    Spin-polarized energy-band calculations, including spin-orbit coupling in the band Hamiltonian, have been performed on CeRh3B2. Good agreement is obtained between theory and experiment concerning the magnetic moment. It is also found that the magnetic moment varies strongly with volume and from...

  3. Ce que PMNT finance Promotion d'une alimentation saine

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Ce que PMNT finance. Promotion d'une alimentation saine. Comprendre le contexte d'élaboration des politiques. Analyses situationnelles portant sur les politiques relatives à une alimentation saine : analyse situationnelle du niveau de mesures de lutte sont mises en œuvre (contrôle exercé sur la disponibilité, le prix de ...

  4. Properties of polyamorphous Ce75Al25 metallic glasses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zeng, Q.-S.; Struzhkin, Viktor V.; Fang, Y. Z.; Gao, C. X.; Luo, H. B.; Wang, X. D.; Lathe, C.; Mao, Wendy L.; Wu, F. M.; Mao, Ho-kwang; Jiang, J. Z.

    2010-08-17

    The thermal stability and electronic transport properties of polyamorphous Ce{sub 75} Al{sub 25} metallic glass (MG) have been investigated using in situ high-pressure, high-temperature, energy-dispersive synchrotron x-ray diffraction and in situ high-pressure and low-temperature, four-probe resistance measurements. The results are compared with the properties of La{sub 75} Al{sub 25} MG. The pressure dependence of the crystallization temperature and resistance of the Ce{sub 75} Al{sub 25} MG exhibited turning points at the polyamorphic transition pressure, 1.5 GPa, and they clearly presented different behaviors below and above 1.5 GPa. In contrast, no turning points were observed in the La{sub 75} Al{sub 25} MG (La has no 4f electron). Additionally, the pressure-tuned temperature coefficient of resistance of the Ce{sub 75} Al{sub 25} MG was observed. These results revealed switchable properties in the polyamorphous Ce{sub 75} Al{sub 25} MG that are linked with 4f electron delocalization.

  5. d-AO spherical aromaticity in Ce6O8.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Xiaohu; Oganov, Artem R; Popov, Ivan A; Boldyrev, Alexander I

    2016-01-05

    After the first introduction of π aromaticity in chemistry to explain the bonding, structure, and reactivity of benzene and its derivatives, this concept was further applied to many other compounds featuring other types of aromaticity (i.e., σ, δ). Thus far, there have been no reports on d-AO-based spherical σ aromaticity. Here, we predict a highly stable bare Ce6O8 cluster of a spherical shape using evolutionary algorithm USPEX and DFT + U calculations. Natural bond orbital analysis, adaptive natural density partitioning algorithm, electron localization function, and partial charge plots demonstrate that bare Ce6O8 cluster exhibits d-AO spherical σ aromaticity, thus explaining its exotic geometry and stability. Ce6O8 complex plays an important role in many reactions and is known to exist in many forms, such as in NH4[Ce6(μ(3)O)5(μ(3)OH)3(μ(2)-C6H5COO)9(NO3)3(DMF)3]*DMF*H2O compound, which is prepared under room temperature, and acts as an oxidizing agent. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Geometry modeling for SAM-CE Monte Carlo calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steinberg, H.A.; Troubetzkoy, E.S.

    1980-01-01

    Three geometry packages have been developed and incorporated into SAM-CE, for representing in three dimensions the transport medium. These are combinatorial geometry - a general (non-lattice) system, complex combinatorial geometry - a very general system with lattice capability, and special reactor geometry - a special purpose system for light water reactor geometries. Their different attributes are described

  7. Dynamical magnetic response of paramagnetic CeFe-2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rainford, B.D.; McK Paul, D.; Warwick Univ., Coventry

    1988-01-01

    Inelastic neutron scattering has been used to study the energy dependence of the paramagnetic response from CeFe 2 . Our results, when integrated over energy, are in excellent agreement with the polarised neutron experiments of Deportes et al., but the correlation length obtained by fitting the data to a double Lorentzian scattering function is significantly smaller than that derived previously

  8. Commensurate-commensurate magnetic phase transitions in CeSb

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lebech, Bente; Broholm, C.; Clausen, K.

    1986-01-01

    The q=2/3 to q=4/7 commensurate-commensurate phase transition in CeSb has been studied by neutron diffraction. On cooling the commensurate wave vector q changes abruptly from 2/3 to a higher-order commensurate value (≈14/23) at T1

  9. POLLiCE (POLLen in the iCE): climate history from Adamello ice cores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cristofori, Antonella; Festi, Daniela; Maggi, Valter; Casarotto, Christian; Bertoni, Elena; Vernesi, Cristiano

    2017-04-01

    Glaciers can be viewed as the most complete and effective past climate and environment archives severely threatened by climate change. These threats are particularly dramatic across European Alps. The Adamello glacier is the largest, 16.4 km2, and deepest, 270 m, Italian glacier. We aim at estimating biodiversity changes over the last centuries in relation to climate and human activities in the Adamello catchment area. We, therefore, recently launched the POLLiCE project (pollice.fmach.it) for specifically targeting the biological component (e.g. pollen, leaves, plant remains) trapped in ice cores. Classical morphological pollen analysis will be accompanied by DNA metabarcoding. This approach has the potential to provide a detailed taxonomical identification - at least genus level- thus circumventing the limitations of microscopic analysis such as time-consuming procedures and shared features of pollen grains among different taxa. Moreover, ice cores are subjected to chemical and physical analyses - stable isotopes, ions, hyperspectral imaging, etc.- for stratigraphic and climatic determination of seasonality. A pilot drilling was conducted on March 2015 and the resulting 5 m core has been analysed in terms of pollen spectrum, stable isotopes and ions in order to demonstrate the feasibility of the study. The first encouraging results showed that even in this superficial core a stratigraphy is evident with indication of seasonality as highlighted by both by pollen taxa and stable isotopes. Finally, DNA has been successfully extracted and amplified with specific DNA barcodes. A medium drilling was performed on April 2016 with the extraction of a 45 m ice core. The analysis of this core constitutes the subject of a specific research project, CALICE*, just funded by Euregio Science Fund (IPN57). The entire depth, 270 m, of the Adamello glacier is scheduled to be drilled in 2018 winter to secure the unique memory archived by the ice. * See EGU2017 poster by Festi et al

  10. Magnetic properties of Ce3+ in PbCeA (A= Te, Se, S

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Golacki Z.

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The magnetic susceptibility of Pb1-xCexA (A = S, Se and Te crystals with 0.006 ≤  x ≤ 0.036  were studied in the temperature range from 20 mK up to room temperature. X-band (~9.5 GHz Electron Paramagnetic Resonance (EPR showed small shifts in the effective Landé factors that were attributed to crystal-field admixture. The EPR measurements were correlated with the magnetic susceptibility data and resulted in estimating the crystal-field splitting Δ = E(Γ8 - E(Γ7 of the lowest 2F5/2 manifold for Ce3+ ions in PbA (A = S, Se and Te of about 340 K, 440 K and 540 K for Pb1-xCexTe, Pb1-xCexSe, and Pb1-xCexS, respectively. The values for the crystal-field splitting deduced from the magnetic data were found to be in agreement with the calculated ones based on the point charge model. Moreover, the deHaas van-Alphen magnetic oscillations in the susceptibility measurements of Pb1-xCexTe (x~ 0.05 and 0.07 were observed at ultra-low temperature (20 mK; The oscillations were investigated and the values of the oscillatory period for Pb1-xCexTe (x = 0.0048 and 0.007 are reported.

  11. Effects of Economic Conditions and Organizational Structure on Local Health Jurisdiction Revenue Streams and Personnel Levels in Connecticut, 2005-2012.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pallas, Sarah Wood; Kertanis, Jennifer; O'Keefe, Elaine; Humphries, Debbie L

    2015-01-01

    We investigated whether or not changes in economic conditions during the 2008-2010 U.S. recession were associated with changes in Connecticut local health jurisdictions' (LHJs') revenue or personnel levels. We analyzed Connecticut Department of Public Health 2005-2012 annual report data from 91 Connecticut LHJs, as well as publicly available data on economic conditions. We used fixed- and random-effect regression models to test whether or not LHJ per capita revenues and full-time equivalent (FTE) personnel differed during and post-recession compared with pre-recession, or varied with recession intensity, as measured by unemployment rates and housing permits. On average, total revenue per capita was significantly lower during and post-recession compared with pre-recession, with two-thirds of LHJs experiencing per capita revenue reductions. FTE personnel per capita were significantly lower post-recession. Changes in LHJ-level unemployment rates and housing permits did not explain the variation in revenue or FTE personnel per capita. Revenue and personnel differed significantly by LHJ organizational structure across all time periods. Economic downturns can substantially reduce resources available for local public health. LHJ organizational structure influences revenue levels and sources, with implications for the scope, quality, and efficiency of services delivered.

  12. Providence 10 x 20 NTMS area, Connecticut, Massachusetts, and Rhode Island: data report (abbreviated)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cook, J.R.

    1980-11-01

    Results of ground water and stream sediment reconnaissance in the National Topographic Map Series (NTMS) Providence 1 0 x 2 0 quadrangle are presented. Surface sediment samples were collected at 318 sites. Ground water samples were collected at 180 sites. Neutron activation analysis (NAA) results are given for uranium and 16 other elements in sediments, and for uranium and 8 other elements in ground water. Field measurements and observations are reported for each site. Analytical data and field measurements are presented in tables and maps. Data from ground water sites include: water chemistry measurements (pH, conductivity, and alkalinity), physical measurements where applicable (water temperature, well description, etc.), and elemental analyses (U, Al, Br, Cl, Dy, F, Mn, Na, and V). Data from sediment sites include: stream water chemistry measurements (pH, conductivity, and alkalinity), and elemental analyses for sediment samples (U, Th, Hf, Al, Ce, Dy, Eu, Fe, La, Lu, Mn, Sc, Sm, Na, Ti, V, and Yb). Sample site descriptors (stream characteristics, vegetation, etc.) are also tabulated. Areal distribution maps, histograms, and cumulative frequency plots for most elements and for U/Th and U/Hf ratios are included on the microfiche. Key data from stream water sites include: water quality measurements (pH, conductivity, and alkalinity), and elemental analyses (U, Al, Br, Ci, Dy, F, Mg, Mn, Na, and V). Uranium concentrations in the sediments ranged from 1.2 to 61.7 ppM with an average of 4.5 ppM. A group of high uranium concentrations was found in Barnstable County, Massachusetts. These sites also had high concentrations of thorium and rare-earth elements that indicate the presence of a sand with a high proportion of heavy minerals

  13. Crystal growth and scintillation properties of multi-component oxide single crystals: Ce:GGAG and Ce:La-GPS

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Yoshikawa, A.; Kamada, K.; Kurosawa, S.; Shoji, Y.; Yokota, Y.; Chani, V.I.; Nikl, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 169, Jan (2016), s. 387-393 ISSN 0022-2313. [International Conference on Luminescence and Optical Spectroscopy of Condensed Matter /17./. Wroclaw, 13.07.2014-18.07.2014] Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : scintillator * luminescent materials * Ce 3+ * radioluminescence Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 2.686, year: 2016

  14. Telescoping metamorphic isograds: Evidence from 40Ar/39A dating in the Orange-Milford belt, southern Connecticut

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kunk, Michael J.; Walsh, Gregory J.; Growdon, Martha L.; Wintsch, Robert P.

    2013-01-01

    New 40Ar/39Ar ages for hornblende and muscovite from the Orange-Milford belt in southern Connecticut reflect cooling from Acadian amphibolite facies metamorphism between ∼380 to 360 Ma followed by retrograde recrystallization of fabric-forming muscovite and chlorite during lower greenschist facies Alleghanian transpression at ∼280 Ma. Reported field temperature and pressure gradients are improbably high for these rocks and a NW metamorphic field gradient climbing from chlorite-grade to staurolite-grade occurs over less than 5 km. Simple tilting cannot account for this compressed isograd spacing given the geothermal gradient of ∼20 °C/km present at the time of regional metamorphism. However, post-metamorphic transpression could effectively telescope the isograds by stretching the belt at an oblique angle to the isograd traces. Textures in the field and in thin section reveal several older prograde schistosities overprinted by lower greenschist facies fabrics. The late cleavages commonly occur at the scale of ∼100 μm and these samples contain multiple age populations of white mica. 40Ar/39Ar analysis of these poly-metamorphic samples with mixed muscovite populations yield climbing or U-shaped age spectra. The ages of the low temperature steps are late Paleozoic, while the ages of the older steps are late Devonian. These results support our petrologic interpretation that the younger cleavage developed under metamorphic conditions below the closure temperature for Ar diffusion in muscovite, that is, in the lower greenschist facies. The correlation of a younger regionally reproducible age population with a pervasive retrograde muscovite ± chlorite cleavage reveals an Alleghanian (∼280 Ma) overprint on the Acadian metamorphic gradient (∼380 Ma). Outcrop-scale structures including drag folds and imbricate boudins suggest that Alleghanian deformation and cleavage development occurred in response to dextral transpression along a northeast striking boundary

  15. Instructional practices among science departments with high, moderate, and low gains on the Connecticut Academic Performance Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kachergis, Theodora R.

    The purpose of this study was to ascertain whether the instructional practices of performance-based, inquiry-based, and authentic-based learning strategies, and rubric use are related to improvement on the science portion of the Connecticut Academic Performance Test [CAPT], as indicated by CAPT gains from 1995--2001. Data were collected for this study by a survey/interview of 63 Connecticut high schools and their 118 certified biology teachers, who had participated in the science CAPT administration within that same school district during 1995--2001. Results from the analysis of the data indicate a significant relationship between strategy and rubric use and CAPT science score outputs. Those schools having the highest levels of strategy and rubric use also demonstrated high CAPT gains and increasing CAPT scores, over time. It was also determined that a strong relationship exists between the percentage of the ERG's goal for CAPT index and those ERGs, using strategies and/or rubrics proficiently. The major findings of the study reveal that teachers demonstrate a confusion of strategy/rubric meaning, as indicated by the low proficiency levels of their submitted strategy and rubric samples, despite high indicators of use for the three learning strategies and rubrics. In addition, rubrics are rated highly by the sample, but are not employed at the high levels of reported favorability. Further analysis determines that objective forms of assessment are used more frequently than strategy and rubric use, and may be implicated for the decreased use of rubrics. Although survey data indicate that 90% of the sample reported "Satisfactory" to "Excellent" levels of annual score updates within their respective districts, teachers requested a need for increased pre- and in-service professional development in the use of all three strategies and rubrics: particularly non-tenured teachers expressed a need for basic CAPT information and samples of strategy and rubric use, while

  16. The investigation of Ce doped ZnO crystal: The electronic, optical and magnetic properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Jun-Qing; Zhang, Jian-Min; Qiu, Ze-Gang; Yang, Xu; Li, Zhi-Qin

    2018-04-01

    The electronic, optical and magnetic properties of Ce doped ZnO crystal have been studied by using first principles method. The research of formation energies show that Ce doped ZnO is energetically stable, and the formation energies reduce from 6.25% to 12.5% for Ce molar percentage. The energy band is still direct band gap after Ce doped, and band gap increases with the increase of Cesbnd Ce distance. The Fermi level moves upward into conduction band and the DOS moves to lower energy with the increase of Ce concentration, which showing the properties of n-type semiconductor. The calculated optical properties imply that Ce doped causes a red-shift of absorption peaks, and enhances the absorption of the visible light. The transition from ferromagnetic to antiferromagnetic has been found in Ce doped ZnO.

  17. Ce3+ įtaka α-pusvandenio gipso susidarymui

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nora KYBARTIENĖ

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Lietuvoje gamtinio dvivandenio gipso, tinkamo gipsinių rišamųjų medžiagų gamybai, nėra. Jį galima būtų pakeisti fosfogipsu (pusvandeniu ar dvivandeniu, kuris susidaro fosforo rūgšties gamybos metu, skaidant fosfatines žaliavas sieros rūgštimi. Priklausomai nuo fosfatinėje žaliavoje esančių priemaišų susidaręs fosfogipsas skiriasi kristalų morfologija ir savybėmis. Fosfogipsas yra daugiakomponentis junginys. Siekiant atsiriboti nuo kitų junginių ir įvertinti Ln3+ įtaką pusvandenio fosfogipso kristalų morfologijai, tikslinga sudaryti modelinę dvikomponentę sistemą: dvivandenis gipsas – lantanoidai. Darbe tirta Ce3+ įtaka α-pusvandenio gipso susidarymui. Sudaryta modelinė sistema: CaSO4·2H2O–Ce2(SO43×8H2O. Į sistemą įmaišytas toks Ce2(SO43×8H2O kiekis, kad Ce2O3 koncentracija būtų 0,1; 0,5 ir 1 % ir būtų artima fosfatinėse žaliavose esančiam jų kiekiui. Sistema apdorota hidroterminėmis sąlygomis 128 oC ir 138 oC temperatūroje, izoterminio išlaikymo trukmė – 3 h. Produktas gautas iškaitinus 400 °C temperatūroje. Atlikta produkto rentgeno spinduliuotės difrakcinė analizė, FT-IR spektrinė analizė ir mikroskopinė analizė (SEM. Gauti rezultatai parodė, kad kuo didesnis Ce3+ kiekis yra sistemoje, tuo daugiau nedehidratavusio dvivandenio gipso lieka gautame produkte, o susidariusio α- pusvandenio gipso kristalai yra smulkūs, neaiškios, neapibrėžtos formos. Taigi, galima teigti, kad Ce3+ turi neigiamą įtaką dvivandenio gipso dehidratacijai, t. y. α- pusvandenio gipso susidarymui, ir pusvandenio gipso kristalų morfologijai.DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5755/j01.ms.18.4.3102

  18. Yb and Er co-doped Y2Ce2O7 nanoparticles: synthesis and ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Xu et al 2010). In addition, Er3+ ion has abundant energy level structure, so green and red upconversion emissions can be realized in Er3+-doped materials. .... Ce. Count. Engergy (KeV). Ce. O Y. Yb. Ce. Cu. Er. Figure 2. Energy dispersive spectra of Yb3+ and Er3+ co-doped. Y2Ce2O7 nanoparticles prepared for 4 h at ...

  19. Structure and phase composition of Al-Ce-Cu system alloys in range of quasi-binary Al-Al8CeCu4 section

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Belov, N.A.; Khvan, A.V.

    2007-01-01

    The phase diagram of the Al-Cu-Ce system in the quasibinary section area of Al-Al 8 CeCu 4 has been investigated by metallographic, thermal, micro-X-ray spectral and X-ray structural analyses. The parameters of the eutectic reaction L→(Al)+CeCu 4 Al 8 : T=610 Deg C were found out; the composition was 14% Cu and 7% Ce. This eutectics is of a disperse structure and the ternary compound contained is capable of fragmentation and spheroidizing in the heating process (starting from 540 Deg C). It was demonstrated that the area of optimal (Al)+CeCu 4 Al 8 eutectics-based alloy compositions was within the narrow limits. That is related to the fact that at a comparatively little variation of the Cu:Ce=2 ratio solidus sharply decreases and, as a result, the crystallization interval considerably extends [ru

  20. Ce3+/Eu2+ doped SrSc2O4 phosphors: Synthesis, luminescence and energy transfer from Ce3+ to Eu2+

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Jitao; Sun, Xiaoyu; Wang, Zhenqing

    2018-01-01

    Ce3+/Eu2+ doped SrSc2O4 phosphors were synthesized by a solid state reaction. The phase and luminescent properties of the synthesized phosphors were investigated. In SrSc2O4 host, Ce3+/Eu2+ substitute Sr2+ sites and form the solid solution. Ce3+/Eu2+ singly doped SrSc2O4 phosphors respectively show emission band locating in green and deep red regions and the emission peaks shift to longer wavelength with the increasing concentration due to the enhancements of crystal field. In Ce3+/Eu2+ codoped SrSc2O4 phosphors, the intensities of Ce3+ and Eu2+ emissions change with the changing Eu2+ concentrations due to energy transfer from Ce3+ to Eu2+.

  1. Energy transfer from Ce3+ to Eu3+ through Tb3+ chain in YPO4:Ce3+/Tb3+/Eu3+ phosphors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yuguo; Lv, Xianshun; Wei, Lei; Xu, Jianhua; Yu, Huajian; Hu, Yanyan; Zhang, Huadi; Liu, Bing; Wang, Xuping; Li, Qinggang

    2018-01-01

    We synthesized a series of YPO4:Ce3+/Tb3+/Eu3+ phosphors by a solid state reaction. All of phosphors have a single phase, showing that the doping ions could not change the phase of YPO4 host. The emission intensities of Ce3+, Tb3+ and Eu3+ ions clearly depend on the Tb3+ concentrations in YPO4:Ce3+/Tb3+/Eu3+ phosphors. The emission intensity of Ce3+ emission decreases gradually but the emission intensity of Eu3+ emission increases continuously with the increasing Tb3+ concentration because of the energy transfer from Ce3+ to Eu3+ through Tb3+. On the basis of the luminescent properties of YPO4:Ce3+/Tb3+/Eu3+ phosphors, the possible energy transfer mechanism was speculated.

  2. Effect of Ce on solidification and mechanical properties of A360 alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Voncina, Maja; Kores, Stanislav; Mrvar, Primoz; Medved, Jozef

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → We investigated the effect of Ce addition on the AA A360 alloy. → The purpose is to study the variations that occur during solidification and precipitation with different Ce additions, as well as their effect on the mechanical properties. → Ce addition decreases the eutectic (α Al + Mg 2 Si) temperature and eutectic recalescence and also solidus temperature. → The precipitation enthalpy decreases with the Ce addition, while precipitation takes place more rapidly and intensively, indicating increased reaction kinetics. → The mechanical properties like hardness and tensile strength also increase with the Ce addition. - Abstract: The effect of Ce addition on the AA A360 (Al-10%Si-0.5%Mg) alloy was investigated using equilibrium thermodynamic calculation, thermal analysis, differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The purpose is to study the variations that occur during solidification and precipitation with different Ce additions, as well as their effect on the mechanical properties. The results show that the Ce addition decreases the eutectic (α Al + Mg 2 Si) temperature. The solidus temperature also decreases with the increasing Ce addition. The precipitation enthalpy determined using DSC decreases with the Ce addition, while precipitation takes place more rapidly and intensively, indicating increased reaction kinetics. The mechanical properties like hardness and tensile strength also increase with the Ce addition. The phase that contributed to the hardness of the investigated alloy was composed of Al, Ce, Mg and Si.

  3. Laser-excited spectra of Lu2SiO5:Ce scintillator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Bo; Gu Mu; Qi Zeming; Shi Chaoshu; Yin, Min; Ren Guohao

    2007-01-01

    The emission spectra of Lu 2 SiO 5 :Ce single crystal under the excitation of 266 nm laser were investigated. The emission spectra of LSO single crystal show no temperature quenching from 20 to 300 K, under the excitation of 266 nm laser with 2 mJ pulse energy. With rising temperature, the Ce1 emission is slightly decreased, while the Ce2 emission is slightly increased. These results show the emissions of Ce1 and Ce2 is not only dependent on the concentration ratio but also influenced by the possible energy transfer processes, including Ce1 to Ce2, intrinsic STHs to Ce2 and the phonon-assisted transfer processes. The spectral thermal broadening and the spectral overlap become evident at high temperature, leading to the enhancement of energy transfer. When the excitation power lowers, the ratio of Ce1 and Ce2 emission increases, and is close to the Xe lamp ultraviolet (UV) excitation, suggesting that the energy transfer from Ce1 center to Ce2 center may be also dependent on the excitation power

  4. Study of structural and electronic transport properties of Ce-doped ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The structural and electronic transport properties of La1-CeMnO3 (=0.0-1.0) have been studied. All the samples exhibit orthorhombic crystal symmetry and the unit cell volume decreases with Ce doping. They also make a metal–insulator transition (MIT) and transition temperature increases with increase in Ce ...

  5. Redox enzyme-mimicking activities of CeO2nanostructures: Intrinsic influence of exposed facets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yushi; Mao, Zhou; Huang, Wenjie; Liu, Lihua; Li, Junli; Li, Jialiang; Wu, Qingzhi

    2016-10-17

    CeO 2 nanoparticles (NPs) have been well demonstrated as an antioxidant in protecting against oxidative stress-induced cellular damages and a potential therapeutic agent for various diseases thanks to their redox enzyme-mimicking activities. The Ce 3+ /Ce 4+ ratio and oxygen vacancies on the surface have been considered as the major originations responsible for the redox enzyme-mimicking activities of CeO 2 NPs. Herein, CeO 2 nanostructures (nanocubes and nanorods) exposed different facets were synthesized via a facile hydrothermal method. The characterizations by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, Raman spectroscopy, and UV-Vis spectroscopy show that the Ce 3+ /Ce 4+ ratio and oxygen vacancy content on the surfaces of as-synthesized CeO 2 nanostructures are nearly at the same levels. Meanwhile, the enzymatic activity measurements indicate that the redox enzyme-mimicking activities of as-synthesized CeO 2 nanostructures are greatly dependent on their exposed facets. CeO 2 nanocubes with exposed {100} facets exhibit a higher peroxidase but lower superoxide dismutase activity than those of the CeO 2 nanorods with exposed {110} facets. Our results provide new insights into the redox enzyme-mimicking activities of CeO 2 nanostructures, as well as the design and synthesis of inorganic nanomaterials-based artificial enzymes.

  6. Heteroaggregation, transformation and fate of CeO2 nanoparticles in wastewater treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barton, Lauren E.; Auffan, Melanie; Olivi, Luca; Bottero, Jean-Yves; Wiesner, Mark R.

    2015-01-01

    Wastewater Treatment Plants (WWTPs) are a key pathway by which nanoparticles (NPs) enter the environment following release from NP-enabled products. This work considers the fate and exposure of CeO 2 NPs in WWTPs in a two-step process of heteroaggregation with bacteria followed by the subsequent reduction of Ce(IV) to Ce(III). Measurements of NP association with solids in sludge were combined with experimental estimates of reduction rate constants for CeO 2 NPs in Monte Carlo simulations to predict the concentrations and speciation of Ce in WWTP effluents and biosolids. Experiments indicated preferential accumulation of CeO 2 NPs in biosolids where reductive transformation would occur. Surface functionalization was observed to impact both the distribution coefficient and the rates of transformation. The relative affinity of CeO 2 NPs for bacterial suspensions in sludge appears to explain differences in the observed rates of Ce reduction for the two types of CeO 2 NPs studied. - Highlights: • We combine experimental and computational methods to track CeO 2 NPs through WWTPs. • We investigate the importance of environmental transformations on NP exposure. • We estimate the concentrations of CeO 2 NPs and reductive transformation byproducts. - CeO 2 nanoparticles that are released to the waste stream will preferentially associate with the solid phase (∼96%), where they will undergo significant transformation (∼50%)

  7. Novel nanostructured CeO2 as efficient catalyst for energy and ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    CeO2 and CeO2 based hetero-nanocomposites for their suitability to important catalytic and energy-related applications. Keywords. CeO2; morphology; catalysis; soot oxidation; CO oxidation; ethanol electro-oxidation. 1. Introduction .... glycol)-poly(propylene glycol)-poly(ethylene glycol). (P123, Sigma-Aldrich) with a ...

  8. Homogeneously dispersed CeO2 nanoparticles on exfoliated hexaniobate nanosheets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marques, Thalles M. F.; Strayer, Megan E.; Ghosh, Anupama; Silva, Alexandre; Ferreira, Odair P.; Fujisawa, Kazunori; Alves da Cunha, Jose R.; Abreu, Guilherme J. P.; Terrones, Mauricio; Mallouk, Thomas E.; Viana, Bartolomeu C.

    2017-12-01

    Hexaniobate nanosheets derived from the parent compound K4Nb6O17 have been decorated with CeO2 nanoparticles by ion exchange with aqueous cerium (IV) solution. Very homogeneous CeO2 nanoparticle decoration of the hexaniobate sheets can be achieved by this method and the resulting composites may absorb visible light. HRTEM images show that ∼3.0 nm diameter CeO2 nanoparticles adhere to hexaniobate nanosheets that are exfoliated and then restacked prior to Ce deposition. The interfacial interaction between CeO2 nanoparticles and nanosheets would be due to an electrostatic attraction mechanism. Raman and XRD measurements have given strong evidence that CeO2 nanoparticles have fluorite structure. EDS, FTIR and XPS results suggest almost complete exchange of TBA+ and K+ by Ce4+. Cerium ion exchange on the acid exchanged parent compound, H2.9K1.1Nb6O17, revealed that the extent of Ce ion exchange is much greater in case of nanosheets, which may be rationalized by the larger surface area available after exfoliation. XPS measurements show that the ratio of Ce4+/Ce3+ is around 4.4, in agreement with the formation of fluorite structure (CeO2). Thus, these CeO2 nanoparticle/nanosheet composites may be useful for catalytic processes.

  9. AstroNomical Information System at CeSAM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gimenez, S.; Moreau, C.; Agneray, F.; Roehlly, Y.

    2014-05-01

    AstroNomical Information System (ANIS), developed by the Centre de donnéeS Astrophysique de Marseille (CeSAM), is a generic tool aimed at facilitating and homogenizing the implementation of astronomical data of various kinds and in dedicated Information Systems. ANIS provides high level services like: search, extract and display imaging and spectroscopic data using a combination of criteria, an object list, a sql query module or a cone search interfaces, as well as download of catalogs and complete datasets. With ANIS, the CeSAM offers web access to VO compliant Information Systems for different projects VVDS, HeDAM, ExoDat, HST-COSMOS, etc.), including ancillary data that are cross-matched before ingestion.

  10. Gamma-ray relative energy response of Ce: YAG crystal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Jianhua; Zhang Chuanfei; Hu Mengchun; Peng Taiping; Wang Zhentong; Tang Dengpan; Zhao Guangjun

    2010-01-01

    Gamma-ray relative energy response of Ce: YAG crystal, which is important for pulsed γ-ray measurement, was studied in this work.The Ce: YAG crystal, which was developed at Shanghai Institute of Optics and Fine Mechanics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, was aligned point by point with γ-rays scattered from an industrial 60 Co line source. The γ-ray relative energy response was calculated using the mass attenuation coefficient. The results show that the numerical calculation method of γ-ray relative energy response is reliable, and the experimental method with multi-energy point γ-ray by Compton scattering is also feasible, that can be used for checking up correctness of the numerical calculation results. (authors)

  11. Identification and Quality Assessment of Chrysanthemum Buds by CE Fingerprinting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoping Xing

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A simple and efficient fingerprinting method for chrysanthemum buds was developed with the aim of establishing a quality control protocol based on biochemical makeup. Chrysanthemum bud samples were successively extracted by water and alcohol. The fingerprints of the chrysanthemum buds samples were obtained using capillary electrophoresis and electrochemical detection (CE-ED employing copper and carbon working electrodes to capture all of the chemical information. 10 batches of chrysanthemum buds were collected from different regions and various factories to establish the baseline fingerprint. The experimental data of 10 batches electropherogram buds by CE were analyzed by correlation coefficient and the included angle cosine methods. A standard chrysanthemum bud fingerprint including 24 common peaks was established, 12 from each electrode, which was successfully applied to identify and distinguish between chrysanthemum buds from 2 other chrysanthemum species. These results demonstrate that fingerprint analysis can be used as an important criterion for chrysanthemum buds quality control.

  12. Bayesian nonparametric areal wombling for small-scale maps with an application to urinary bladder cancer data from Connecticut.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guhaniyogi, Rajarshi

    2017-11-10

    With increasingly abundant spatial data in the form of case counts or rates combined over areal regions (eg, ZIP codes, census tracts, or counties), interest turns to formal identification of difference "boundaries," or barriers on the map, in addition to the estimated statistical map itself. "Boundary" refers to a border that describes vastly disparate outcomes in the adjacent areal units, perhaps caused by latent risk factors. This article focuses on developing a model-based statistical tool, equipped to identify difference boundaries in maps with a small number of areal units, also referred to as small-scale maps. This article proposes a novel and robust nonparametric boundary detection rule based on nonparametric Dirichlet processes, later referred to as Dirichlet process wombling (DPW) rule, by employing Dirichlet process-based mixture models for small-scale maps. Unlike the recently proposed nonparametric boundary detection rules based on false discovery rates, the DPW rule is free of ad hoc parameters, computationally simple, and readily implementable in freely available software for public health practitioners such as JAGS and OpenBUGS and yet provides statistically interpretable boundary detection in small-scale wombling. We offer a detailed simulation study and an application of our proposed approach to a urinary bladder cancer incidence rates dataset between 1990 and 2012 in the 8 counties in Connecticut. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  13. Examination of stainless steel-clad Connecticut Yankee fuel assembly S004 after storage in borated water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Langstaff, D.C.; Bailey, W.J.; Johnson, A.B. Jr.; Landow, M.P.; Pasupathi, V.; Klingensmith, R.W.

    1982-09-01

    A Connecticut Yankee fuel assembly (S004) was tested nondestructively and destructively. It was concluded that no obvious degradation of the 304L stainless steel-clad spent fuel from assembly S004 occurred during 5 y of storage in borated water. Furthermore, no obvious degradation due to the pool environment occurred on 304 stainless steel-clad rods in assemblies H07 and G11, which were stored for shorter periods but contained operationally induced cladding defects. The seam welds in the cladding on fuel rods from assembly S004, H07, and G11 were similar in that they showed a wrought microstructure with grains noticeably smaller than those in the cladding base metal. The end cap welds showed a dendritically cored structure, typical of rapidly quenched austenitic weld metal. Some intergranular melting may have occurred in the heat-affected zone (HAZ) in the cladding adjacent to the end cap welds in rods from assemblies S004 and H07. However, the weld areas did not show evidence of corrosion-induced degradation

  14. Use of Dietary Vitamin Supplements and Risk of Thyroid Cancer: A Population-Based Case-Control Study in Connecticut.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Christopher; Huang, Huang; Zhao, Nan; Lerro, Catherine C; Dai, Min; Chen, Yingtai; Li, Ni; Ma, Shuangge; Udelsman, Robert; Zhang, Yawei

    2017-04-24

    Certain dietary supplements have been reported to increase the risk of some cancers. Over half of the US population regularly uses dietary supplements. Thyroid cancer incidence has increased over the past several decades. However, few studies have investigated the association between dietary supplements and thyroid cancer. Thus, it is essential to clarify any association between dietary supplements and risk of thyroid cancer. A population-based case-control study in Connecticut was conducted during 2010-2011 among 462 histologically confi rmed incident thyroid cancer cases and 498 population-based controls. Dietary supplement intake was ascertained through in-person interviews and a food frequency questionnaire. Multivariate unconditional logistic regression models were used to estimate the risk of thyroid cancer and dietary supplement use. Overall, no statistically signifi cant associations were observed between dietary supplementation and thyroid cancer risk. Stratifi ed analyses revealed a suggestive protective effect on risk of papillary microcarcinoma among longterm (> 10 years) use of multivitamins (OR = 0.59, 95 % CI: 0.33, 1.04) and calcium supplementation (OR = 0.45, 95 % CI: 0.22, 0.93). An increased risk of large papillary thyroid cancers (tumor size > 1 cm) was observed among short-term (supplements (OR = 2.24, 95 % CI: 1.30, 3.88). No signifi cant associations were observed between supplementation and overall thyroid cancer risk. The different associations between calcium supplements and risk of papillary thyroid cancer by tumor size warrant further investigation.

  15. What role do local grocery stores play in urban food environments? A case study of Hartford-Connecticut.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Katie S; Ghosh, Debarchana; Page, Martha; Wolff, Michele; McMinimee, Kate; Zhang, Mengyao

    2014-01-01

    Research on urban food environments emphasizes limited access to healthy food, with fewer large supermarkets and higher food prices. Many residents of Hartford, Connecticut, which is often considered a food desert, buy most of their food from small and medium-sized grocery stores. We examined the food environment in greater Hartford, comparing stores in Hartford to those in the surrounding suburbs, and by store size (small, medium, and large). We surveyed all small (over 1,000 ft2), medium, and large-sized supermarkets within a 2-mile radius of Hartford (36 total stores). We measured the distance to stores, availability, price and quality of a market basket of 25 items, and rated each store on internal and external appearance. Geographic Information System (GIS) was used for mapping distance to the stores and variation of food availability, quality, and appearance. Contrary to common literature, no significant differences were found in food availability and price between Hartford and suburban stores. However, produce quality, internal, and external store appearance were significantly lower in Hartford compared to suburban stores (all pfood deserts' may overlook the availability of healthy foods and low prices that exist within small and medium-sized groceries common in inner cities. Improving produce quality and store appearance can potentially impact the food purchasing decisions of low-income residents in Hartford.

  16. Predictors of middle school students' interest in participating in an incentive-based tobacco prevention and cessation program in connecticut.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morean, Meghan E; Camenga, Deepa R; Kong, Grace; Cavallo, Dana A; Schepis, Ty S; Krishnan-Sarin, Suchitra

    2014-01-01

    Behavioral incentives have been used to encourage smoking cessation in older adolescents, but the acceptability of incentives to promote a smoke-free lifestyle in younger adolescents is unknown. To inform the development of novel, effective, school-based interventions for youth, we assessed middle school students' interest in participating in an incentive-based tobacco abstinence program. We surveyed 988 students (grades 6-8) attending three Connecticut middle schools to determine whether interest in program participation varied as a function of (1) intrapersonal factors (i.e., demographic characteristics (sex, age, race), smoking history, and trait impulsivity) and/or (2) aspects of program design (i.e., prize type, value, and reward frequency). Primary analyses were conducted using multiple regression. A majority of students (61.8%) reported interest in program participation. Interest did not vary by gender, smoking risk status, or offering cash prizes. However, younger students, non-Caucasian students, behaviorally impulsive students, and students with higher levels of self-regulation were more likely to report interest. Inexpensive awards (e.g., video games) offered monthly motivated program interest. In sum, middle school students reported high levels of interest in an incentive-based program to encourage a tobacco-free lifestyle. These formative data can inform the design of effective, incentive-based smoking cessation and prevention programs in middle schools.

  17. Predictors of Middle School Students’ Interest in Participating in an Incentive-Based Tobacco Prevention and Cessation Program in Connecticut

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meghan E. Morean

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Behavioral incentives have been used to encourage smoking cessation in older adolescents, but the acceptability of incentives to promote a smoke-free lifestyle in younger adolescents is unknown. To inform the development of novel, effective, school-based interventions for youth, we assessed middle school students’ interest in participating in an incentive-based tobacco abstinence program. We surveyed 988 students (grades 6–8 attending three Connecticut middle schools to determine whether interest in program participation varied as a function of (1 intrapersonal factors (i.e., demographic characteristics (sex, age, race, smoking history, and trait impulsivity and/or (2 aspects of program design (i.e., prize type, value, and reward frequency. Primary analyses were conducted using multiple regression. A majority of students (61.8% reported interest in program participation. Interest did not vary by gender, smoking risk status, or offering cash prizes. However, younger students, non-Caucasian students, behaviorally impulsive students, and students with higher levels of self-regulation were more likely to report interest. Inexpensive awards (e.g., video games offered monthly motivated program interest. In sum, middle school students reported high levels of interest in an incentive-based program to encourage a tobacco-free lifestyle. These formative data can inform the design of effective, incentive-based smoking cessation and prevention programs in middle schools.

  18. Modeling migratory energetics of Connecticut River American shad (Alosa sapidissima): implications for the conservation of an iteroparous anadromous fish

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castro-Santos, Theodore; Letcher, Benjamin H.

    2010-01-01

    We present a simulation model in which individual adult migrant American shad (Alosa sapidissima) ascend the Connecticut River and spawn, and survivors return to the marine environment. Our approach synthesizes bioenergetics, reproductive biology, and behavior to estimate the effects of migratory distance and delays incurred at dams on spawning success and survival. We quantified both the magnitude of effects and the consequences of uncertainty in the estimates of input variables. Behavior, physiology, and energetics strongly affected both the distribution of spawning effort and survival to the marine environment. Delays to both upstream and downstream movements had dramatic effects on spawning success, determining total fecundity and spatial extent of spawning. Delays, combined with cues for migratory reversal, also determined the likelihood of survival. Spawning was concentrated in the immediate vicinity of dams and increased with greater migratory distance and delays to downstream migration. More research is needed on reproductive biology, behavior, energetics, and barrier effects to adequately understand the interplay of the various components of this model; it does provide a framework, however, that suggests that provision of upstream passage at dams in the absence of expeditious downstream passage may increase spawning success — but at the expense of reduced iteroparity. 

  19. Where in Connecticut Is the Best Location for a Split Tax? An Analysis of Land Assessment Equity in Several Cities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeffrey P. Cohen

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available The ability of local assessors to accurately estimate land values separately from structure values is important when considering a split tax. When the value of land is estimated with less variation, there is greater equity. We examine land ratios in New London, New Haven, and Hartford Connecticut and sub-groupings within these cities for 2006 to 2010. Overall, the land ratios coefficients of dispersion (COD, a measure of horizontal equity, are too large for an equitable split tax. We also look at land assessment equity among sub-groupings of properties near parks, highway exits, airports, Yale University (for New Haven, residential versus commercial properties, land with old versus new properties, and large versus small parcels and ‘expensive’ versus ‘less expensive’ properties (by examining price per square foot. Commercial properties near Hartford’s Brainard Airport are the best candidates for an equitable split tax. We also find that more frequent revaluations are necessary for an equitable split tax.

  20. Ru 4 ion in CeO 2 (Ce 0.95 Ru 0.05 O 2− ): A non-deactivating ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    A new WGS catalyst, Ce1−RuO2− (0 ≤ ≤ 0.1) was prepared by hydrothermal method using melamine as a complexing agent. The Catalyst does not require any pre-treatment. Among the several compositions prepared and tested, Ce0.95Ru0.05O2− (5% Ru4+ ion substituted in CeO2) showed very high WGS ...

  1. Nouvelle espèce des Syntomides (Lepidoptera Heterocera)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Snellen, P.C.T.

    1886-01-01

    Quatre mâles frais et bien conservés de 58—64 millim. d’envergure. Cette nouvelle espèce, gigantesque pour une Syntomide, appartient au genre Automolis, tel qu’il a été défini par Herrich-Schäffer, dans son ouvrage »Sammlung aussereuropäischer Schmetterlinge” (p. 21); le nom est emprunté au bien

  2. Identification and Quality Assessment of Chrysanthemum Buds by CE Fingerprinting

    OpenAIRE

    Xing, Xiaoping; Li, Dan

    2015-01-01

    A simple and efficient fingerprinting method for chrysanthemum buds was developed with the aim of establishing a quality control protocol based on biochemical makeup. Chrysanthemum bud samples were successively extracted by water and alcohol. The fingerprints of the chrysanthemum buds samples were obtained using capillary electrophoresis and electrochemical detection (CE-ED) employing copper and carbon working electrodes to capture all of the chemical information. 10 batches of chrysanthemum ...

  3. Optical spectroscopy of the Ce-doped multicomponent garnets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Canimoglu, A.; Karabulut, Y.; Ayvacikli, M.; Muresan, L.E.; Perhaita, I.; Barbu-Tudoran, L.; Garcia Guinea, J.; Karali, T.; Can, N.

    2016-01-01

    Here, we report our results referring to the preparation of Ce doped Y 2.22 MgGa 2 Al 2 SiO 12 , Y 1.93 MgAl 4 SiO 12 and Y 2.22 Gd 0.75 Ga 2 Al 3 O 12 using solid state reaction at high temperature. Several complementary methods (i.e. powder x-ray diffraction (XRPD), energy dispersive analysis of X-rays (EDX), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and Fourier transforms infrared spectroscopy (FTIR)) were studied to examine the effects of the synthesis procedure on the morphology and structure. XRD analyses revealed that all compounds include yttrium aluminate phase with garnet structure. Cathodoluminescence (CL), radioluminescence (RL) and photoluminescence (PL) measurements were carried out for clarification of relationship between host lattice defects and the spectral luminescence emissions. Luminescence emission of phosphors is peaked at 530 nm assigned to 5d-4f transitions of the dopant Ce 3+ ions with a broad emission band in 400–700 nm range. Under electron irradiation, the emission spectrum of Ce doped (YGd) 3 Ga 2 Al 3 O 12 is well defined and has a characteristic fairly narrow and sharp emission band peaking at 312 nm and 624 nm corresponding to transition of 6 P 7/2 → 8 S 7/2 and 6 G J → 6 P J (Gd 3+ ), respectively. We suggest some of phosphors might be excellent phototherapy phosphor materials under electron excitation. - Highlights: • Ce-doped Multicomponent Garnets were prepared solid state reaction method. • The shape and size of phosphor particles were examined. • The narrow band UV B emission due to Gd 3+ ions were observed.

  4. Proposal for product development model focused on ce certification methodology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nathalia Marcia Goulart Pinheiro

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a critical analysis comparing 21 product development models in order to identify whether these structures meet the demands Product Certification of the European Community (CE. Furthermore, it presents a product development model, comprising the steps in the models analyzed, including improvements in activities for referred product certification. The proposed improvements are justified by the growing quest for the internationalization of products and processes within companies.

  5. CeDAMar global database of abyssal biological sampling

    OpenAIRE

    Stuart, Carol T.; Arbizu, Pedro Martinez; Smith, Craig R.; Molodtsova, Tina; Brandt, Angelika; Etter, Ron J.; Escobar-briones, Elva; Fabri, Marie-claire; Rex, Michael A.

    2008-01-01

    The Census of the Diversity of Abyssal Marine Life (CeDAMar), a division of the Census of Marine Life, has compiled the first comprehensive global database of biological samples taken in the abyssal plains of the world ocean. It is an essential resource for planning future exploration of the abyss, for synthesizing patterns of biogeography and biodiversity, and for environmentally safe exploitation of natural resources. The database is described in this article, and made available to investig...

  6. Qu'est-ce que l'Univers ?

    CERN Document Server

    2001-01-01

    Les plus grans spécialistes français sont réunis dans ce quatrième volume. Ils éclairent les grandes questions que pose la cosmologie, le Système solaire, les étoiles et les galaxies, la Terre, les océans et le climat, la matière et son organisation, l'évolution des mathématiques, la complexité, les transformations chimiques.

  7. Temperature-independent photoluminescence response in ZnO:Ce ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2017-12-06

    Dec 6, 2017 ... tion of rare-earth ions. Nowadays, rare-earth-doped ZnO semiconductor is an interesting field of study because of its unique optical properties and promising applications in optoelectronic devices [13–19]. Since cerium oxide (CeO2) has a band gap of ∼3 eV and shows interesting prop- erties similar to that ...

  8. Scintillation properties of the Ce-doped multicomponent garnetepitaxial films

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Průša, Petr; Kučera, M.; Mareš, Jiří A.; Hanuš, M.; Beitlerová, Alena; Onderišinová, Z.; Nikl, Martin

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 35, č. 12 (2013), s. 2444-2448 ISSN 0925-3467 R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP204/12/0805 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : scintillator * liquid phase epitaxy method * photoelectron yield * garnet * Ce 3+ Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 2.075, year: 2013 http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.optmat.2013.06.051

  9. Radon gamma-ray spectrometry with YAP:Ce scintillator

    CERN Document Server

    Plastino, W; De Notaristefani, F

    2002-01-01

    The detection properties of a YAP:Ce scintillator (YAlO sub 3 :Ce crystal) optically coupled to a Hamamatsu H5784 photomultiplier with standard bialkali photocathode have been analyzed. In particular, the application to radon and radon-daughters gamma-ray spectrometry was investigated. The crystal response has been studied under severe extreme conditions to simulate environments of geophysical interest, particularly those found in geothermal and volcanic areas. Tests in water up to a temperature of 100 deg.C and in acids solutions such as HCl (37%), H sub 2 SO sub 4 (48%) and HNO sub 3 (65%) have been performed. The measurements with standard radon sources provided by the National Institute for Metrology of Ionizing Radiations (ENEA) have emphasized the non-hygroscopic properties of the scintillator and a small dependence of the light yield on temperature and HNO sub 3. The data collected in this first step of our research have pointed out that the YAP:Ce scintillator can allow high response stability for rad...

  10. F-centre luminescence in nanocrystalline CeO2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aškrabić, S; Dohčević-Mitrović, Z D; Araújo, V D; Ionita, G; De Lima, M M Jr; Cantarero, A

    2013-01-01

    Nanocrystalline CeO 2 powders were synthesized by two cost-effective methods: the self-propagating room temperature (SPRT) method and the precipitation method. Differently prepared samples exhibited different temperature-dependent photoluminescence (PL) in the ultraviolet and visible regions. The PL signals originated from different kinds of oxygen-deficient defect centres with or without trapped electrons (F 0 , F + or F ++ centres). The temperature-dependent PL spectra were measured using different excitation lines, below (457, 488 and 514 nm) or comparable (325 nm) to the ceria optical band gap energy, in order to investigate the positions of intragap localized defect states. Evidence for the presence of F + centres was supported by the signals observed in electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) measurements. Based on PL and EPR measurements it was shown that F + centres dominate in the CeO 2 sample synthesized by the SPRT method, whereas F 0 centres are the major defects in the CeO 2 sample synthesized by the precipitation method. The luminescence from F ++ states, as shallow trap states, was registered in both samples. Energy level positions of these defect states in the ceria band gap were proposed. (paper)

  11. F-centre luminescence in nanocrystalline CeO2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aškrabić, S.; Dohčević-Mitrović, Z. D.; Araújo, V. D.; Ionita, G.; de Lima, M. M., Jr.; Cantarero, A.

    2013-12-01

    Nanocrystalline CeO2 powders were synthesized by two cost-effective methods: the self-propagating room temperature (SPRT) method and the precipitation method. Differently prepared samples exhibited different temperature-dependent photoluminescence (PL) in the ultraviolet and visible regions. The PL signals originated from different kinds of oxygen-deficient defect centres with or without trapped electrons (F0, F+ or F++ centres). The temperature-dependent PL spectra were measured using different excitation lines, below (457, 488 and 514 nm) or comparable (325 nm) to the ceria optical band gap energy, in order to investigate the positions of intragap localized defect states. Evidence for the presence of F+ centres was supported by the signals observed in electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) measurements. Based on PL and EPR measurements it was shown that F+ centres dominate in the CeO2 sample synthesized by the SPRT method, whereas F0 centres are the major defects in the CeO2 sample synthesized by the precipitation method. The luminescence from F++ states, as shallow trap states, was registered in both samples. Energy level positions of these defect states in the ceria band gap were proposed.

  12. NMR study of CeTe at low temperatures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hinderer, J. [Laboratorium fuer Festkoerperphysik, ETH Zuerich, CH-8093 Zurich (Switzerland)]. E-mail: hinderer@phys.ethz.ch; Weyeneth, S.M. [Laboratorium fuer Festkoerperphysik, ETH Zuerich, CH-8093 Zurich (Switzerland); Weller, M. [Laboratorium fuer Festkoerperphysik, ETH Zuerich, CH-8093 Zurich (Switzerland); Gavilano, J.L. [Laboratorium fuer Festkoerperphysik, ETH Zuerich, CH-8093 Zurich (Switzerland); Felder, E. [Laboratorium fuer Festkoerperphysik, ETH Zuerich, CH-8093 Zurich (Switzerland); Hulliger, F. [Laboratorium fuer Festkoerperphysik, ETH Zuerich, CH-8093 Zurich (Switzerland); Ott, H.R. [Laboratorium fuer Festkoerperphysik, ETH Zuerich, CH-8093 Zurich (Switzerland)

    2006-05-01

    We present {sup 125}Te NMR measurements on CeTe powder at temperatures between 1 and 150K and in magnetic fields between 5 and 8T. CeTe is a rocksalt-type intermetallic compound. It orders antiferromagnetically at T{sub N}{approx}2.2K with a much reduced ordered moment [H.R. Ott, J.K. Kjems, F. Hulliger, Phys. Rev. Lett. 42 20 (1979) 1378]. From our low-temperature NMR spectra we infer the presence of at least three inequivalent Te sites at low temperatures. Considering the crystal structure this result is completely unexpected. The linewidths and the Knight shifts of the individual lines are significantly different and increase substantially with decreasing temperature. They follow the temperature dependence of the magnetic susceptibility above 20K. Above T{sub N}, hyperfine fields of 1.6, 0.8 and 0.0T at the three Te sites per Bohr magneton of Ce moment are deduced from Knight shift vs. magnetic susceptibility data. These values are typical for transferred hyperfine fields via conduction electrons.

  13. Determination of the differences in oxidation potentials for the Pr3+/Pr2+ and Ce3+/Ce2+ pairs in halide melts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mikheev, N.B.; Auerman, L.N.; Rumer, I.A.; D'yachkova, R.A.

    1983-01-01

    Cocrystallization has been used with the (PrOCl)/sub s. ph/ - (PrCl 2 , PrCl 3 , SrCl 2 ) melt system to examine the dependence of the cerium(III) cocrystallization coefficient on the X/sub Pr 2+ /X/sub Pr 3+ / ratio in the melt. Measurement has been made in this way of the difference in oxidation potentials for the pairs Pr 3+ /Pr 2+ and Ce 3+ /Ce 2+ : ΔE/sub Pr 3+ /Pr 2+0 -E/sub Ce 3+ /Ce 2+ / 0 , which is 0.08 +/- 0.04 V for chloride

  14. Characteristics of CeCoIn5/Al/AlOx/Nb and CeCoIn5/Al/AlOx/Al tunnel junctions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nevirkovets, I.P.; Chernyashevskyy, O.; Petrovic, C.; Hu Rongwei; Ketterson, J.B.; Sarma, Bimal K.

    2009-01-01

    We report characteristics of CeCoIn 5 /Al/AlO x /Nb and CeCoIn 5 /Al/AlO x /Al tunnel junctions fabricated on the (0 0 1) surface of CeCoIn 5 crystal platelets. The main result of this work is the observation of a low Josephson current (as compared with that expected from the Ambegaokar-Baratoff formula), which is consistent with idea that the order parameter in the heavy-fermion superconductor CeCoIn 5 has unconventional pairing symmetry.

  15. Physical, biochemical and genetic characterization of enterocin CE5-1 produced by Enterococcus faecium CE5-1 isolated from Thai indigenous chicken intestinal tract

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kraiyot Saelim

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Enterocin CE5-1 produced by Enterococcus faecium CE5-1 isolated from the chicken gastrointestinal tract was active in the wide range of pH 2-10 and temperature 30-100°C and sensitive to proteolytic enzymes and -amylase. It remained active after storage at -20°C for 2 months. Moreover, enterocin CE5-1 showed antibacterial activity against lactobacilli, bacilli, listeria, staphylococci and enterococci, especially antibiotic-resistant enterococci. In vitro study of enterocin CE5-1 decreased the population of Ent. faecalis VanB from 6.03 to 4.03 log CFU/ml. The lethal mode of action of enterocin CE5-1 appeared to be pore and filament formation in the cell wall. PCR sequencing analysis revealed the presence of two open reading frames (ORFs, containing enterocin CE5-1 (entCE5-1 and enterocin immunity (entI gene. Therefore, enterocin CE5-1 from Ent. faecium CE5-1 could possibly be used as an antimicrobial agent to control foodborne pathogen, spoilage bacteria and antibiotic-resistant enterococci in foods, feeds and the environments.

  16. Photocatalytic degradation of dye using CeO2/SCB composite catalysts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Channei, Duangdao; Nakaruk, Auppatham; Phanichphant, Sukon

    2017-08-01

    The main task of the present work is to enhance the photocatalytic degradation efficiency of methylene blue (MB) by using CeO2/sugarcane bagasse (SCB) composite catalysts. Homogeneous precipitation method was used to synthesis CeO2-SCB composite catalysts by adding SCB powder to precursor solution of Ce base-metal. The structural analytical data indicated the pure cubic fluorite structure of CeO2. Morphological images revealed the coating of CeO2 layer on high surface area of SCB core-shell. The chemical analysis presented spectrum of the Ce 3d in CeO2/SCB sample existed in the form of the Ce3 + and Ce4 + mixed- valence states. Optical spectra showed the shift of absorption edge towards longer visible region upon supporting CeO2 with SCB. The main chemical composition of the SCB was K, Ca, and Si. Furthermore, recombination of the photogenerated electrons and holes was identified by photoluminescence techniques (PL), the data suggested inhibition of electron-hole pairs recombination by the cations from SCB loaded in CeO2/SCB composite. Photocatalytic activity of CeO2/SCB catalyst was investigated via the degradation of MB under UV-A irradiation. Experimental kinetic data followed the pseudo-first order model. CeO2 supported with SCB adsorbent had higher photocatalytic activity in dye wastewater treatment compared to the pure CeO2. The proposed mechanism explaining the high photocatalytic efficiency of CeO2/SCB was associated with high surface properties and the suppression of recombination of the photogenerated electron-hole pairs by the SCB adsorbent.

  17. Microstructures and luminescent properties of Ce-doped transparent mica glass-ceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taruta, Seiichi; Iwasaki, Yoshitomo; Nishikiori, Hiromasa; Yamakami, Tomohiko; Yamaguchi, Tomohiro; Kitajima, Kunio; Okada, Kiyoshi

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Ce-doped transparent glass-ceramics and their parent glasses. ► TEM and STEM images for the microstructures. ► Each mica crystal did not contain Ce uniformly. ► Emission due to Ce 3+ ions in the glass phase and/or Ce 3+ ions in the mica crystals. - Abstract: Transparent mica glass-ceramics were prepared by heating parent glasses that had been doped with 0.5–15 mol% CeO 2 . During the melting and heat treatment, Ce 4+ ions in the specimens were reduced to Ce 3+ ions, and one or both of these ion species were then replaced with Li + ions in the interlayers of the separated mica crystals. However, scanning transmission electron microscope (STEM) and Z-contrast imaging revealed that the mica crystals did not contain the same amount of Ce. On excitation at 254 nm, the parent glasses and glass-ceramics emitted blue light, which originated from the 5d to 4f transition of the Ce 3+ ions. The emission of the glass-ceramic containing a smaller amount of Ce was attributed to the Ce 3+ ions in both the glass phase and the mica crystals, whereas that of the glass-ceramics containing a larger amount of Ce was caused mainly by Ce 3+ ions in the mica crystals. The dependence of the emission band of the parent glasses on the amount of Ce was a unique feature of the Ce-doped transparent mica glass-ceramics and was not observed in previous studies of Eu-doped parent glasses and mica glass-ceramics.

  18. Morphology-dependent bactericidal activities of Ag/CeO2 catalysts against Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lian; He, Hong; Yu, Yunbo; Sun, Li; Liu, Sijin; Zhang, Changbin; He, Lian

    2014-06-01

    Silver-loaded CeO2 nanomaterials (Ag/CeO2) including Ag/CeO2 nanorods, nanocubes, nanoparticles were prepared with hydrothermal and impregnation methods. Catalytic inactivation of Escherichia coli with Ag/CeO2 catalysts through the formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) was investigated. For comparison purposes, the bactericidal activities of CeO2 nanorods, nanocubes and nanoparticles were also studied. There was a 3-4 log order improvement in the inactivation of E. coli with Ag/CeO2 catalysts compared with CeO2 catalysts. Temperature-programmed reduction of H2 showed that Ag/CeO2 catalysts had higher catalytic oxidation ability than CeO2 catalysts, which was the reason for that Ag/CeO2 catalysts exhibited stronger bactericidal activities than CeO2 catalysts. Further, the bactericidal activities of CeO2 and Ag/CeO2 depend on their shapes. Results of 5,5-dimethyl-1-pyrroline-N-oxide spin-trapping measurements by electron spin resonance and addition of catalase as a scavenger indicated the formation of OH, O2(-), and H2O2, which caused the obvious bactericidal activity of catalysts. The stronger chemical bond between Ag and CeO2 nanorods led to lower Ag(+) elution concentrations. The toxicity of Ag(+) eluted from the catalysts did not play an important role during the bactericidal process. Experimental results also indicated that Ag/CeO2 induced the production of intracellular ROS and disruption of the cell wall and cell membrane. A possible production mechanism of ROS and bactericidal mechanism of catalytic oxidation were proposed. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Air, aqueous and thermal stabilities of Ce3+ ions in cerium oxide nanoparticle layers with substrates

    KAUST Repository

    Naganuma, Tamaki

    2014-01-01

    Abundant oxygen vacancies coexisting with Ce3+ ions in fluorite cerium oxide nanoparticles (CNPs) have the potential to enhance catalytic ability, but the ratio of unstable Ce3+ ions in CNPs is typically low. Our recent work, however, demonstrated that the abundant Ce3+ ions created in cerium oxide nanoparticle layers (CNPLs) by Ar ion irradiation were stable in air at room temperature. Ce valence states in CNPs correlate with the catalytic ability that involves redox reactions between Ce3+ and Ce4+ ions in given application environments (e.g. high temperature in carbon monoxide gas conversion and immersion conditions in biomedical applications). To better understand the mechanism by which Ce3+ ions achieve stability in CNPLs, we examined (i) extra-long air-stability, (ii) thermal stability up to 500 °C, and (iii) aqueous stability of Ce 3+ ions in water, buffer solution and cell culture medium. It is noteworthy that air-stability of Ce3+ ions in CNPLs persisted for more than 1 year. Thermal stability results showed that oxidation of Ce 3+ to Ce4+ occurred at 350 °C in air. Highly concentrated Ce3+ ions in ultra-thin CNPLs slowly oxidized in water within 1 day, but stability was improved in the cell culture medium. Ce 3+ stability of CNPLs immersed in the medium was associated with phosphorus adsorption on the Ce3+ sites. This study also illuminates the potential interaction mechanisms of stable Ce3+ ions in CNPLs. These findings could be utilized to understand catalytic mechanisms of CNPs with abundant oxygen vacancies in their application environments. © The Royal Society of Chemistry 2014.

  20. Touristes, tourismes : ce que des sciences sociales en disent (et ce que j’en pense.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Éric Boutouyrie

    2005-04-01

    Full Text Available Dernièrement, un ouvrage de l’équipe de géographes Mit (Équipe Mit , 2003 de l’Université de Paris 7 s’est fait l’écho d’un texte du philosophe et urbaniste Thierry Paquot publié en juillet 2001 dans le numéro 568 du Monde Diplomatique . Ce texte, intitulé « La tyrannie douce de l’air conditionné », se présentait comme une courte et dense réflexion sur le tourisme et le touriste. Les membres de l’Équipe Mit l’épinglent dans un chapitre consacré à ce ...

  1. CeBr3 as a room-temperature, high-resolution gamma-ray detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guss, Paul; Reed, Michael; Yuan Ding; Reed, Alexis; Mukhopadhyay, Sanjoy

    2009-01-01

    Cerium bromide (CeBr 3 ) has become a material of interest in the race for high-resolution gamma-ray spectroscopy at room temperature. This investigation quantified the potential of CeBr 3 as a room-temperature, high-resolution gamma-ray detector. The performance of CeBr 3 crystals was compared to other scintillation crystals of similar dimensions and detection environments. Comparison of self-activity of CeBr 3 to cerium-doped lanthanum tribromide (LaBr 3 :Ce) was performed. Energy resolution and relative intrinsic efficiency were measured and are presented.

  2. The γ rays sensitivity measurement of CeF3 scintillator detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hu Mengchun; Zhou Dianzhong; Li Rurong; Wang Zhentong; Yang Hongqiong; Zhang Jianhua; Hu Qingyuan; Peng Taiping

    2003-01-01

    The CeF 3 is an abio-scintillator developed in recent years, which are insensitive to neutron and sensitive to gamma rays and respond quickness. The relationship of CeF 3 scintillation detector gamma rays sensitivity with the change of crystal thickness was measured. The CeF 3 scintillation detector is composed by high liner current photomultiplier tube of CHφT3, CHφT5 and CeF 3 scintillator. The detector gamma rays sensitivity of purple photocell and common photocell with CeF 3 scintillator were measured too

  3. Controlled hydrothermal synthesis of CeO{sub 2} nanospheres and their excellent magnetic properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Niu, Xiaofei [Suzhou University, Anhui Key Laboratory of Spintronics and Nanomaterials Research, Suzhou, Anhui (China)

    2017-04-15

    Monodisperse spherical CeO{sub 2} nanostructures with irregular and rough surfaces have successfully been synthesized via a facile hydrothermal technology. XRD, SEM, XPS, Raman scattering, and M-H curves were employed to characterize the samples. The results showed that the spherical CeO{sub 2} nanostructures have a cubic fluorite structure and that there are Ce{sup 3+} ions and oxygen vacancies in the surface of the samples. The M-H curve of CeO{sub 2} nanospheres exhibits excellent room-temperature ferromagnetism (RT-FM), which is likely ascribed to the effects of the Ce{sup 3+} ions and oxygen vacancies. (orig.)

  4. Controlled hydrothermal synthesis of CeO2 nanospheres and their excellent magnetic properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niu, Xiaofei

    2017-04-01

    Monodisperse spherical CeO2 nanostructures with irregular and rough surfaces have successfully been synthesized via a facile hydrothermal technology. XRD, SEM, XPS, Raman scattering, and M-H curves were employed to characterize the samples. The results showed that the spherical CeO2 nanostructures have a cubic fluorite structure and that there are Ce3+ ions and oxygen vacancies in the surface of the samples. The M-H curve of CeO2 nanospheres exhibits excellent room-temperature ferromagnetism (RT-FM), which is likely ascribed to the effects of the Ce3+ ions and oxygen vacancies.

  5. The stable Ce.sup.4+./sup. center: a new tool to optimize Ce-doped oxide scintillators

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Nikl, Martin; Babin, Vladimir; Pejchal, Jan; Laguta, Valentyn; Buryi, Maksym; Mareš, Jiří A.; Kamada, K.; Kurosawa, S.; Yoshikawa, A.; Pánek, D.; Parkman, T.; Brůža, Petr; Mann, K.; Müller, M.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 63, č. 2 (2016), s. 433-438 ISSN 0018-9499 R&D Projects: GA ČR GJ15-18300Y; GA MŠk(CZ) LG13029 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : Ce 4+ * gamma-ray detection * LuAG * scintillator * X-ray detection Subject RIV: BH - Optics, Masers, Lasers Impact factor: 1.171, year: 2016

  6. Nanocrystalline Mn-Mo-Ce Oxide Anode Doped Rare Earth Ce and Its Selective Electro-catalytic Performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SHI Yan-hua

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The anode oxide of nanocrystalline Mn-Mo-Ce was prepared by anode electro-deposition technology, and its nanostructure and selective electro-catalytic performance were investigated using the SEM, EDS, XRD, HRTEM, electrochemical technology and oxygen evolution efficiency testing. Furthermore, the selective electro-catalytic mechanism of oxygen evolution and chlorine depression was discussed. The results show that the mesh-like nanostructure Mn-Mo-Ce oxide anode with little cerium doped is obtained, and the oxygen evolution efficiency for the anode in the seawater is 99.51%, which means a high efficiency for the selective electro-catalytic for the oxygen evolution. Due to the structural characteristics of γ-MnO2, the OH- ion is preferentially absorbed, while Cl- absorption is depressed. OH- accomplishes the oxygen evolution process during the valence transition electrocatalysis of Mn4+/Mn3+, completing the selective electro-catalysis process. Ce doping greatly increases the reaction activity, and promotes the absorption and discharge; the rising interplanar spacing between active (100 crystalline plane promotes OH- motion and the escape of newborn O2, so that the selective electro-catalytic property with high efficient oxygen evolution and chlorine depression is achieved from the nano morphology effect.

  7. Tetragonal Ce-based Ce-Sm(Fe, Co, Ti){sub 12} alloys for permanent magnets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martin-Cid, Andres; Salazar, Daniel [BCMaterials, Bizkaia Science and Tecnology Park, 48160 Derio (Spain); Gabay, Aleksandr M.; Hadjipanayis, George C. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Delaware, Newark, DE, 19716 (United States); Barandiaran, Jose Manuel [BCMaterials, Bizkaia Science and Tecnology Park, 48160 Derio (Spain); Department of Electricity and Electronics, University Basque Country (UPV/EHU), 48080 Bilbao (Spain)

    2016-12-15

    Abundance and relatively low cost of Ce provide a great incentive for its use in rare-earth permanent magnets. It has been recently reported that the tetragonal Ce(Fe,Co,Ti)12 compounds may exhibit application-worthy intrinsic magnetic properties. In this work the effect of the α-Fe phase formation due to the evaporation of Sm during alloy fabrication has been studied, as a previous step in the attempt to convert the intrinsic magnetic properties into functional properties of a permanent magnet. Ce{sub 0.5}Sm{sub 0.5}Fe{sub 9}Co{sub 2}Ti alloys based on the ThMn12-type crystal structure have been synthesized via melt-spinning with different Sm content. Coercive fields between 2.8 and 1.4 kOe have been found for α-Fe phase contents between 8 and 46% in volume, showing the influence of the α-Fe phase on the coercivity and exchange coupling between the hard and soft phase. (copyright 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  8. Effect of cerium on the corrosion behaviour of sintered (Nd,Ce)FeB magnet

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Lijing [CAS Key Laboratory of Magnetic Materials and Devices, Zhejiang Province Key Laboratory of Magnetic Materials and Application Technology, Ningbo Institute of Materials Technology and Engineering, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Ningbo 315201 (China); Bi, Mengxue [CAS Key Laboratory of Magnetic Materials and Devices, Zhejiang Province Key Laboratory of Magnetic Materials and Application Technology, Ningbo Institute of Materials Technology and Engineering, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Ningbo 315201 (China); Nano Science and Technology Institute, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei 230026 (China); Jiang, Jianjun; Ding, Xuefeng [CAS Key Laboratory of Magnetic Materials and Devices, Zhejiang Province Key Laboratory of Magnetic Materials and Application Technology, Ningbo Institute of Materials Technology and Engineering, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Ningbo 315201 (China); Zhu, Minggang; Li, Wei [Functional Materials Research Institute, Central Iron & Steel Research Institute, Beijing 100081 (China); Lv, Zhongshan [Ningbo Shuo Teng new material Co., Ltd., Cixi 315301 (China); Song, Zhenlun, E-mail: songzhenlun@nimte.ac.cn [CAS Key Laboratory of Magnetic Materials and Devices, Zhejiang Province Key Laboratory of Magnetic Materials and Application Technology, Ningbo Institute of Materials Technology and Engineering, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Ningbo 315201 (China)

    2017-06-15

    Highlights: • A little Ce could promote the magnets for a better corrosion resistance. • With increased Ce contents, the corrosion resistances of magnets decrease. • As the corrosion developed, the magnetic properties decreased. - Abstract: For the balanced consumption of rare-earth elements, cerium (Ce) was partially used for NdFeB magnets instead of Nd. The corrosion behaviour of the (Nd,Ce)FeB magnet with different Ce contents in 3.5% NaCl solution was investigated by SEM, XRD, EDS and electrochemical tests. After immersion, the weight loss was calculated and the magnetic properties of the samples were measured. Results showed that Ce affected the corrosion of the (Nd,Ce)FeB magnet. Compared with the NdFeB magnet without Ce but of the same grade as the magnetic energy product, (Nd,Ce)FeB magnet showed better corrosion resistance. With increased Ce content, the corrosion resistances and magnetic properties of (Nd,Ce)FeB magnets were investigated.

  9. Numerical simulation of the geometrical-optics reduction of CE2 and comparisons to quasilinear dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, Jeffrey B.

    2018-05-01

    Zonal flows have been observed to appear spontaneously from turbulence in a number of physical settings. A complete theory for their behavior is still lacking. Recently, a number of studies have investigated the dynamics of zonal flows using quasilinear (QL) theories and the statistical framework of a second-order cumulant expansion (CE2). A geometrical-optics (GO) reduction of CE2, derived under an assumption of separation of scales between the fluctuations and the zonal flow, is studied here numerically. The reduced model, CE2-GO, has a similar phase-space mathematical structure to the traditional wave-kinetic equation, but that wave-kinetic equation has been shown to fail to preserve enstrophy conservation and to exhibit an ultraviolet catastrophe. CE2-GO, in contrast, preserves nonlinear conservation of both energy and enstrophy. We show here how to retain these conservation properties in a pseudospectral simulation of CE2-GO. We then present nonlinear simulations of CE2-GO and compare with direct simulations of quasilinear (QL) dynamics. We find that CE2-GO retains some similarities to QL. The partitioning of energy that resides in the zonal flow is in good quantitative agreement between CE2-GO and QL. On the other hand, the length scale of the zonal flow does not follow the same qualitative trend in the two models. Overall, these simulations indicate that CE2-GO provides a simpler and more tractable statistical paradigm than CE2, but CE2-GO is missing important physics.

  10. Experimental and theoretical study about sulfur deactivation of Ni/ CeO{sub 2} and Rh/CeO{sub 2} catalysts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ocsachoque, Marco A., E-mail: ocmarco@quimica.unlp.edu.ar [Centro de Investigación y Desarrollo en Ciencias Aplicadas “Dr Jorge J. Ronco”, (CONICET, CCT La Plata), Departamento de Química, Facultad de Cs Exactas (UNLP), Calle 48 N° 257, 1900 La Plata (Argentina); Eugenio Russman, Juan I.; Irigoyen, Beatriz [Instituto de Tecnologías del Hidrógeno y Energías Sostenibles (ITHES), Departamento de Ingeniería Química, Facultad de Ingeniería (UBA), Buenos Aires (Argentina); Gazzoli, Delia [Dipartimento di Chimia, Universitá di Roma “La Sapienza”, Roma (Italy); González, María G. [Centro de Investigación y Desarrollo en Ciencias Aplicadas “Dr Jorge J. Ronco”, (CONICET, CCT La Plata), Departamento de Química, Facultad de Cs Exactas (UNLP), Calle 48 N° 257, 1900 La Plata (Argentina)

    2016-04-01

    Sulfur deactivation of Ni/CeO{sub 2} and Rh/CeO{sub 2} catalysts were examined through an experimental and theoretical study. These catalysts were characterized by N{sub 2} adsorption, X-ray diffraction, temperature programmed reaction, thermogravimetric analysis, Uv–visible spectroscopy and Raman spectroscopy, and tested under the methane dry reforming reaction in the presence of H{sub 2}S. On the other hand, different possible interactions of sulfur with Rh, Ni or surface sites of the CeO{sub 2} support were evaluated by performing energy calculations with the density functional theory (DFT). Overall, the results indicate that tolerance to sulfur of Rh/CeO{sub 2} catalyst is higher than that of Ni/CeO{sub 2} one. In this sense, TPR measurements show that reduction of CeO{sub 2} is promoted by the presence of Rh. This effect, probably caused by hydrogen spillover to CeO{sub 2} support during the reduction of RhO{sub x} species, could be linked to a high oxygen donation capacity of Rh/CeO{sub 2} catalysts. Accordingly, the O{sup 2−} species existing on Rh/CeO{sub 2} catalysts, revealed by Raman spectra of these samples, could favor sulfur oxidation and prevent Rh–S interactions. Likewise, the theoretical calculations show that desorption of S–O species from Rh/CeO{sub 2} system is more favorable than that from Ni/CeO{sub 2} one. Therefore, our experimental and theoretical study about sulfur deactivation of Ni and Rh supported on CeO{sub 2} allow us to postulate that Rh can help to desorb SO{sub x} species formed on the support, retarding sulfur poisoning of the Rh/CeO{sub 2} catalysts. - Highlights: • CeO{sub 2} support can act as a sacrifice trap decreasing sulfur poisoning. • Theoretical calculations indicate an important nickel affinity with sulfur. • Rh would favor desorption of S–O species formed on the support. • The O{sup 2−} species present on the Rh–CeO{sub 2} sample favor sulfur removal.

  11. Luminescent and scintillation properties of the Ce3+ doped Y3−xLuxAl5O12:Ce single crystalline films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zorenko, Yu.; Gorbenko, V.; Zorenko, T.; Popielarski, P.; Mosińska, L.; Fedorov, A.

    2016-01-01

    The work is related to the investigation of scintillation and luminescent properties of single crystalline films (SCF) of solid solutions of Ce 3+ doped Y 3−x Lu x Al 5 O 12 :Ce garnets with x value in the 0–3 range. We have shown a possibility of realization of high-energy shift of the Ce 3+ ion emission spectrum in these garnets up to 22 nm. We have also found that the light yield of the radioluminescence under α-particle excitation of LuAG:Ce SCF can exceed by 1.3 times the corresponding values for the YAG:Ce SCF counterpart. For investigation of the luminescent properties of Y 3−x Lu x Al 5 O 12 :Ce SCF at different x values the luminescent spectroscopy of these SCFs under excitation by synchrotron radiation in the VUV range was performed. - Highlights: • Single crystalline films of Y 3−x Lu x Al 5 O 12 garnets at x=0–3.0 were grown by LPE method onto YAG substrates. • Lattice constant of Y 3−x Lu x Al 5 O 12 :Ce film and the film/substrate misfit changed linearly with increasing of Lu content in the x=0–3.0 range. • High-energy shift of the Ce 3+ emission up to 22 nm in Y 3−x Lu x Al 5 O 12 film with increasing of Lu content in the x=0–3.0 range. • Light yield of Y 3−x Lu x Al 5 O 12 :Ce film decreases in the x=0–1.8 range and increases in the x=1.8–3.0 range. • Scintillation LY of Lu 3 Al 5 O 12 :Ce film can exceed by 1.3 times the LY for YAG:Ce film counterpart.

  12. Study of Ce-Cu mixed oxide catalysts by in situ electrical conductivity measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popescu, Ionel; Piumetti, Marco; Bensaid, Samir; Marcu, Ioan-Cezar

    2017-12-06

    Three Ce-Cu mixed oxides, namely Ce 0.95 Cu 0.05 , Ce 0.6 Cu 0.4 and Ce 0.15 Cu 0.85 , along with pure CeO 2 and CuO were characterized by in situ electrical conductivity measurements. Their electrical conductivity was studied as a function of temperature and oxygen partial pressure, and was followed with time during successive exposure to air, nitrogen and different gaseous mixtures containing propane as a VOC model molecule, under conditions close to those of their catalytic applications. CeO 2 and CuO appeared to be n-type and p-type semiconductors, respectively, while the semiconducting behavior of the Ce-Cu mixed oxides depended on the oxide composition. The semiconductive and redox properties of the samples were correlated with their catalytic behavior in CO oxidation, ethene total oxidation and soot combustion.

  13. Method for removing trace contaminants from multicurie amounts of 144Ce

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wagner, J.A.; Kanapilly, G.M.

    1976-01-01

    Removal of contaminants from stock solutions of 144 Ce(III) was required for large quantities of 144 Ce prior to incorporation into fused aluminosilicate particles for inhalation toxicology studies. Since available procedures for purification of 144 Ce could not be readily adapted to our laboratory conditions and requirements, a simple procedure was developed to purify 144 Ce in multicurie quantities of 144 Ce(III). This procedure consists of separation of 144 Ce from contaminants by precipitation and filtrations at different pH. Its simplicity and efficacy in providing a stock solution that would readily exchange into montmorillonite clay was demonstrated when it was used during the preparation of large amounts of 144 Ce in fused aluminosilicate particles

  14. Facile preparation of self-healing superhydrophobic CeO2 surface by electrochemical processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakayama, Katsutoshi; Hiraga, Takuya; Zhu, Chunyu; Tsuji, Etsushi; Aoki, Yoshitaka; Habazaki, Hiroki

    2017-11-01

    Herein we report simple electrochemical processes to fabricate a self-healing superhydrophobic CeO2 coating on Type 304 stainless steel. The CeO2 surface anodically deposited on flat stainless steel surface is hydrophilic, although high temperature-sintered and sputter-deposited CeO2 surface was reported to be hydrophobic. The anodically deposited hydrophilic CeO2 surface is transformed to hydrophobic during air exposure. Specific accumulation of contaminant hydrocarbon on the CeO2 surface is responsible for the transformation to hydrophobic state. The deposition of CeO2 on hierarchically rough stainless steel surface produces superhydrophobic CeO2 surface, which also shows self-healing ability; the surface changes to superhydrophilic after oxygen plasma treatment but superhydrophobic state is recovered repeatedly by air exposure. This work provides a facile method for preparing a self-healing superhydrophobic surface using practical electrochemical processes.

  15. Le Falstaff de Manfredo Maggioni et Michael Balfe : façonner un opéra italien pour le public anglais Adapting The Merry Wives of Windsor for the Italian Stage: Falstaff by Manfredo Maggioni and Michael Balfe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Céline Frigau

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Le Falstaff de Manfredo Maggioni et Michael Balfe constitue un cas à la fois exemplaire et unique de réécriture lyrique d’une œuvre de Shakespeare. Inspiré des Merry Wives of Windsor, l’opera buffa est écrit en 1838 pour le public de l’opéra italien de Londres, par un librettiste italien et un compositeur irlandais – une première dans un théâtre où l’on ne passe commande qu’auprès de maestri italiens. Des efforts de Maggioni et de Balfe résulte un véritable opéra italien qui respecte les codes structurels, les pratiques vocales et scéniques qui le rendent reconnaissable comme opera buffa sur la scène esthétique du temps. La question de la réécriture engage ici la réflexion sur les processus intimement liés de production et de réception précis, comme sur l’horizon d’attente du public londonien pour circonscrire les frontières d’une catégorie esthétique nommée « opéra italien » qui se définit aussi et peut-être avant tout loin de la péninsule, au contact de spectateurs non italophones, au fil d’échanges à l’échelle européenne.Based on Shakespeare’s Merry Wives of Windsor, Michael Balfe’s Falstaff, created in 1838 for London’s Italian opera audiences, was the work of an Italian librettist, Manfredo Maggioni, and an Irish composer, a first in a theatre where only Italian maestri were commissioned for new works. Balfe’s and Maggioni’s combined efforts resulted in a truly genuine Italian opera buffa. Not only is it sung in Italian but it also respects the structural codes, vocal and scenic practices which make it recognizable as an opera buffa on the aesthetic stage of the time, and above all on the English stage. The issue of rewriting implies here a reflection on the intimately linked processes of production and reception. Through the study of the libretto and score, its contextualization, as well as contemporary accounts, we will be concerned both with questioning the

  16. Manganese/cerium clusters spanning a range of oxidation levels and CeMn(8), Ce(2)Mn(4), and Ce(6)Mn(4) nuclearities: structural, magnetic, and EPR properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lampropoulos, Christos; Thuijs, Annaliese E; Mitchell, Kylie J; Abboud, Khalil A; Christou, George

    2014-07-07

    The syntheses, structures, and magnetic properties are reported for three new Ce/Mn clusters with different Ce/Mn ratios: [Ce6Mn4O12(O2CMe)10(NO3)4(py)4] (py = pyridine) (1), [CeMn8O8(O2CCH2(t)Bu)12(DMF)14] (DMF = dimethylformamide) (2), and [Ce2Mn4O2(O2CMe)6(NO3)4(hmp)4] (3; hmp(-) is the anion of 2-(hydroxymethyl)pyridine). 1 and 2 were obtained from the reaction of Ce(IV) with [Mn12O12(O2CMe)16(H2O)4] (Mn(III)8Mn(IV)4) and [Mn8O2(O2CCH2(t)Bu)14((t)BuCH2CO2H)4] (Mn(II)6Mn(III)2), respectively, whereas 3 resulted from the oxidation of Mn(II) acetate with Ce(IV) in the presence of hmpH. Cluster 1 possesses an unusual [Ce6Mn4O12](14+) core topology consisting of a [Ce6O8] face-capped octahedron, which is face-fused at each end to a [Ce(IV)2Mn(III)Mn(IV)O4] cubane. Cluster 2 possesses a nonplanar, saddlelike loop of eight Mn(III) atoms bridged by eight μ3-O(2-) ions to a central Ce(IV) atom. Cluster 3 is similar to 1 in possessing an octahedral core, but this is now a [Ce2Mn4] octahedron consisting of a Ce(III) atom on either side of a Mn4 parallelogram, with the metal atoms bridged by two μ4-O(2-) ions, the alkoxide arms of four hmp(-) groups, and six acetates. Clusters 1, 2, and 3 are thus at the Ce(IV)6Mn(III)2Mn(IV)2, Ce(IV)Mn(III)8, and Ce(III)2Mn(III)4 oxidation levels, respectively. Variable-temperature, solid-state direct current (DC) and alternating current (AC) magnetization studies on 1-3 in the 5.0-300 K range revealed predominantly antiferromagnetic exchange interactions within the complexes. For 1, fitting of the DC data to the theoretical expression for a dinuclear Mn(III)Mn(IV) complex derived using the Van Vleck equation and an isotropic spin Hamiltonian (ℋ = -2JŜi·Ŝj convention) gave a value for the exchange coupling parameter (J) of -60.4(7) cm(-1) and a Landé factor g = 2.00(1), indicating an S = 1/2 ground state. For 2, both DC and AC data indicate an S = 0 ground state, which is unprecedented for a member of the CeMn8 family and now

  17. Measurement of Ce(IV) Concentration in Foam Decontaminant containing Fluorosurfactant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jung, Chong Hun; Yang, H. B.; Yoon, I. H.; Choi, W. K.; Moon, J. K.; Lee, J. S.

    2016-01-01

    To improve the stability of the foam, surfactants and inorganic materials such as nanoparticles can be added. A nanoparticle-based foam decontaminant is composed of a surfactant and nanoparticles for the generation and maintenance of foam, and a chemical decontamination agent made of Ce(IV) dissolved in nitric acid. Ce(IV) will be reduced to Ce(III) through the decontamination process. Oxidizing the cerium (III) can be reused as a decontamination agent, Ce(IV). Oxidation treatment technology by ozone uses its strong oxidizing power. It can be regarded as an environmentally friendly process, because ozone cannot be stored and transported like other industrial gases (because it quickly decays into diatomic oxygen) and must therefore be produced on site, and used ozone can be decomposed immediately. A concentration analysis of Ce(IV) in foam decontaminant containing a surfactant is necessary prior to the derivation of optimal conditions for the regeneration of Ce(III) through ozonation treatment. A UV spectrometric method using the absorbance or potentiometric method with a potential difference in Ce(III)/Ce(IV), or a potentiometric titration method using Fe (II), can be used for a Ce(IV) concentration analysis. A UV spectrometric method has a problem receiving the influence of the surfactant, and a potentiometric method is difficult to use because of the problem of an insignificant change in the potential difference value of the Ce(III)/Ce(IV). Thus, the present study was undertaken to determine whether the potentiometric titration method can be used for an analysis of the Ce(IV) concentration in the nanoparticle-based foam decontaminant containing surfactant. It will be effectively used for the Ce(IV) concentration measurement, in relation to the subsequent research on the derivation of optimal conditions for the regeneration of Ce(III) through ozonation treatment.

  18. Measurement of Ce(IV) Concentration in Foam Decontaminant containing Fluorosurfactant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jung, Chong Hun; Yang, H. B.; Yoon, I. H.; Choi, W. K.; Moon, J. K. [KAERI, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Lee, J. S. [Gachon University, Seongnam (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-05-15

    To improve the stability of the foam, surfactants and inorganic materials such as nanoparticles can be added. A nanoparticle-based foam decontaminant is composed of a surfactant and nanoparticles for the generation and maintenance of foam, and a chemical decontamination agent made of Ce(IV) dissolved in nitric acid. Ce(IV) will be reduced to Ce(III) through the decontamination process. Oxidizing the cerium (III) can be reused as a decontamination agent, Ce(IV). Oxidation treatment technology by ozone uses its strong oxidizing power. It can be regarded as an environmentally friendly process, because ozone cannot be stored and transported like other industrial gases (because it quickly decays into diatomic oxygen) and must therefore be produced on site, and used ozone can be decomposed immediately. A concentration analysis of Ce(IV) in foam decontaminant containing a surfactant is necessary prior to the derivation of optimal conditions for the regeneration of Ce(III) through ozonation treatment. A UV spectrometric method using the absorbance or potentiometric method with a potential difference in Ce(III)/Ce(IV), or a potentiometric titration method using Fe (II), can be used for a Ce(IV) concentration analysis. A UV spectrometric method has a problem receiving the influence of the surfactant, and a potentiometric method is difficult to use because of the problem of an insignificant change in the potential difference value of the Ce(III)/Ce(IV). Thus, the present study was undertaken to determine whether the potentiometric titration method can be used for an analysis of the Ce(IV) concentration in the nanoparticle-based foam decontaminant containing surfactant. It will be effectively used for the Ce(IV) concentration measurement, in relation to the subsequent research on the derivation of optimal conditions for the regeneration of Ce(III) through ozonation treatment.

  19. Phase Equilibria and Magnetic Phases in the Ce-Fe-Co-B System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tian Wang

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Ce-Fe-Co-B is a promising system for permanent magnets. A high-throughput screening method combining diffusion couples, key alloys, Scanning Electron Microscope/Wavelength Dispersive X-ray Spectroscope (SEM/WDS, and Magnetic Force Microscope (MFM is used in this research to understand the phase equilibria and to explore promising magnetic phases in this system. Three magnetic phases were detected and their homogeneity ranges were determined at 900 °C, which were presented by the formulae: Ce2Fe14−xCoxB (0 ≤ x ≤ 4.76, CeCo4−xFexB (0 ≤ x ≤ 3.18, and Ce3Co11−x FexB4 (0 ≤ x ≤ 6.66. The phase relations among the magnetic phases in this system have been studied. Ce2(Fe, Co14B appears to have stronger magnetization than Ce(Co, Fe4B and Ce3(Co, Fe11B4 from MFM analysis when comparing the magnetic interactions of selected key alloys. Also, a non-magnetic CeCo12−xFexB6 (0 ≤ x ≤ 8.74 phase was detected in this system. A boron-rich solid solution with Ce13FexCoyB45 (32 ≤ x ≤ 39, 3 ≤ y ≤ 10 chemical composition was also observed. However, the crystal structure of this phase could not be found in the literature. Moreover, ternary solid solutions ε1 (Ce2Fe17−xCox (0 ≤ x ≤ 12.35 and ε2 (Ce2Co17−xFex (0 ≤ x ≤ 3.57 were found to form between Ce2Fe17 and Ce2Co17 in the Ce-Fe-Co ternary system at 900 °C.

  20. Ultraviolet and near-infrared luminescence of LaBO3:Ce3+,Yb3+

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Heng-Wei; Shao, Li-Ming; Jiao, Huan; Jing, Xi-Ping

    2018-01-01

    Ce3+ or Yb3+ singly doped LaBO3 and Ce3+-Yb3+ co-doped LaBO3 were prepared by conventional solid state reactions at 1100 °C and their photoluminescence (PL) properties were investigated. The emission spectrum of LaBO3:Ce3+,Yb3+ contains both the Ce3+ ultraviolet (UV) emissions (355 nm and 380 nm) and the Yb3+ near infrared (NIR) emission (975 nm) when excited by the UV light at 270 nm. By using the data of the Ce3+ decay curves and the PL intensities of both Ce3+ and Yb3+, the energy transfer efficiency (η) from Ce3+ to Yb3+, the actual energy transfer efficiency (AE) and the quantum efficiency (Q) of the Yb3+ emission were calculated. In the Ce3+-Yb3+ co-doped LaBO3, Ce3+ can transfer its absorbed energy to Yb3+ efficiently (η can be over 60%), and Yb3+ shows the Q value over 50% when it accepts the energy from Ce3+, which results in the low AE value ∼30%. The energy transfer process from Ce3+ to Yb3+ may be understood by the charge transfer mechanism: Ce3+ + Yb3+ ↔ Ce4+ + Yb2+. Particularly the Ce3+-Yb3+ co-doped LaBO3 phosphor gives the emissions mainly in the UV range and the NIR range with a portion of visible emissions in eye-insensitive range. This unique property may be suitable for applications in anti-counterfeiting techniques and public security affairs.

  1. Public health assessment for public health implications of radiation contamination at former clock factories located in Bristo (Hartford County), New Haven, (New Haven County), Thomaston (Litchfield County), and Waterbury (New Haven County), Connecticut, Region 1. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1999-01-01

    This public health assessment was developed (1) to evaluate the radiation data collected by the Connecticut Department of Environmental Protection (CT DEP) at structures that once housed clock factories in four Connecticut municipalities, and (2) to determine whether a public health hazard exists at any of these sites from the contamination. Contamination was detected at levels that may pose a health risk to current occupants at the former Waterbury Clock Factory, the former Lux Clock Factory, and the former Benrus Clock Company buildings in Waterbury; the former Sessions Clock Company in Bristol; and the former Seth Thomas Clock Company in Thomaston. However, none of the radiation levels detected pose an immediate health problem. The Connecticut Department of Public Health recommends that individuals be disassociated from areas with radiation at levels exceeding 15 mRem/year

  2. Thermoelectric transport properties of nanostructured FeSb 2 and Ce-based heavy-fermions CeCu and CeAl 3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pokharel, Mani R.

    Thermoelectric (TE) energy conversion is an all-solid-state technology which can convert waste thermal energy into useful electric power and cool ambience without using harmful gases like CFC. Due to their several advantages over traditional energy conversion technologies, thermoelectric generators (TEG) and coolers (TEC) have drawn enormous research efforts. The objective of this work is to find promising materials for thermoelectric cooling applications and optimize their thermoelectric performances. Finding a material with a good value for the thermoelectric figure-of-merit (ZT) at cryogenic temperatures, specifically below 77 K, has been of great interest. This work demonstrates that FeSb2 1, CeCu6 2 and CeAl3 3, all belonging to a class of materials with strongly correlated electron behavior; exhibit promising thermoelectric properties below 77 K. In general, ZT of a TE material can be increased using two basic approaches: lattice thermal conductivity reduction and power factor (PF) enhancement. The results of this study indicate that nanostructuring effectively decreases the thermal conductivity of FeSb2, CeCu6 and CeAl 3 leading to improved ZT. The approach of introducing point-defect scattering to further reduce the thermal conductivity is successfully implemented for Te-substituted FeSb2 nanostructured samples 4. A semiconductor/metal interface has long been proposed to exhibit enhanced thermoelectric properties. We use this technique by introducing Ag-nanoparticles in the host FeSb2 which further increases ZT by 70% 5. Additionally, a detailed investigation is made on the phonon-drag effect as a possible mechanism responsible for the large value of the Seebeck coefficient of FeSb2 6. We show that the phonon-drag mechanism contributes significantly to the large Seebeck effect in FeSb2 and hence this effect cannot be minor as was proposed in literatures previously. A model based on Kapitza-resistance and effective medium approach (EMA) is used to analyze

  3. Effects of Ce3+ concentration, beam voltage and current on the cathodoluminescence intensity of SiO2: Pr3+–Ce3+ nanophosphor

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Mhlongo, GH

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available SiO2:Pr3+–Ce3+ phosphor powders were successfully prepared using a sol–gel process. The concentration of Pr3+ was fixed at 0.2 mol% while that of Ce3+ was varied in the range of 0.2–2 mol%. High resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM...

  4. Abnormal variation of magnetic properties with Ce content in (PrNdCe)2Fe14B sintered magnets prepared by dual alloy method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue-Feng, Zhang; Jian-Ting, Lan; Zhu-Bai, Li; Yan-Li, Liu; Le-Le, Zhang; Yong-Feng, Li; Qian, Zhao

    2016-05-01

    Resource-saving (PrNdCe)2Fe14B sintered magnets with nominal composition (PrNd)15-x Ce x Fe77B8 (x = 0-10) were prepared using a dual alloy method by mixing (PrNd)5Ce10Fe77B8 with (PrNd)15Fe77B8 powders. For Ce atomic percent of 1% and 2%, coercivity decreases dramatically. With further increase of Ce atomic percent, the coercivity increases, peaks at 6.38 kOe in (PrNd)11Ce4Fe77B8, and then declines gradually. The abnormal dependence of coercivity is likely related to the inhomogeneity of rare earth chemical composition in the intergranular phase, where PrNd concentration is strongly dependent on the additive amount of (PrNd)5Ce10Fe77B8 powders. In addition, for Ce atomic percent of 8%, 7%, and 6% the coercivity is higher than that of magnets prepared by the conventional method, which shows the advantage of the dual alloy method in preparing high abundant rare earth magnets. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 51461033, 51571126, 51541105, and 11547032), the Natural Science Foundation of Inner Mongolia, China (Grant No. 2013MS0110), and the Inner Mongolia University of Science and Technology Innovation Fund, China.

  5. H2 production through steam reforming of ethanol over Pt/ZrO2, Pt/CeO2 and Pt/CeZrO2 catalysts

    OpenAIRE

    Noronha, Fábio Bellot; Silva, Adriana Maria da; Lima, Sonia M. de; Mattos, Lisiane Veiga; Cruz, Ivna O. da; Jacobs, Gary; Davis, Burtron H

    2008-01-01

    The effect of the support nature and metal dispersion on the performance of Pt catalysts during steam reforming of ethanol was studied. H2 and CO production was facilitated over Pt/CeO2 and Pt/CeZrO2, whereas the acetaldehyde and ethene formation was favored on Pt/ZrO2.

  6. Glass forming ability of the Al-Ce-Ni system; Avaliacao da capacidade de formacao vitrea do sistema Al-Ce-Ni

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Triveno Rios, C. [Engenharia Mecanica, Universidade Federal de Mato Grosso, Rondonopolis, MT (Brazil)], e-mail: triveno@ufmt.br; Surinach, S.; Baro, M.D. [Departamento de Engenharia de Materiais - Universidade Federal de Sao Carlos, SP (Brazil); Bolfarini, C.; Botta, W.J.; Kiminami, C.S. [Departamento de Fisica da Universidade Autonoma de Barcelona, Bellaterra (Spain)

    2010-07-01

    In the present work, the glass forming ability (GFA) and its compositional dependence on Al-Ni-Ce system alloys were investigated in function of several thermal parameters. Rapidly quenched Al{sub 85}Ni{sub 15}-{sub X}Ce{sub X} (X=4,5,6,7,10), Al{sub 90}Ni{sub 5}Ce{sub 5}, Al{sub 89}Ni{sub 2}.{sub 4}Ce{sub 8}.{sub 6}, Al{sub 80}Ni{sub 15.6}Ce{sub 4}.{sub 4} and Al{sub 78}Ni{sub 18.5}Ce{sub 3.5} amorphous ribbons were produced by melt-spinning and the structural transformation during heating was studied using a combination of X-ray diffraction (XRD) and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). The results showed that the GFA and the thermal stability in the Al-rich corner of Al- Ni-Ce system alloys were enhanced by increasing the solute content and specifically the Ce content (author)

  7. One-Pot Polyol Synthesis of Pt/CeO2 and Au/CeO2 Nanopowders as Catalysts for CO Oxidation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pilger, Frank; Testino, Andrea; Lucchini, Mattia Alberto; Kambolis, Anastasios; Tarik, Mohammed; El Kazzi, Mario; Arroyo, Yadira; Rossell, Marta D; Ludwig, Christian

    2015-05-01

    The facile one-pot synthesis of CeO2-based catalysts has been developed to prepare a relatively large amount of nanopowders with relevant catalytic activity towards CO oxidation. The method consists of a two-steps process carried out in ethylene glycol: in the first step, 5 nm well-crystallized pure CeO2 is prepared. In a subsequent second step, a salt of a noble metal is added to the CeO2 suspension and the deposition of the noble metal on the nanocrystalline CeO2 is induced by heating. Two catalysts were prepared: Pt/CeO2 and Au/CeO2. The as-prepared catalysts, the thermally treated catalysts, as well as the pure CeO2, are characterized by XRD, TGA, XPS, FTIR, HR-TEM, STEM, particle size distribution, and N2-physisorption. In spite of the identical preparation protocol, Au and Pt behave in a completely different way: Au forms rather large particles, most of them with triangular shape, easily identifiable and dispersed in the CeO2 matrix. In contrast, Pt was not identified as isolated particles. The high resolution X-ray diffraction carried out on the Pt/CeO2 thermally treated sample (500 degrees C for 1 h) shows a significant CeO2 lattice shrinkage, which can be interpreted as an at least partial incorporation of Pt into the CeO2 crystal lattice. Moreover, only Pt2+ and Pt4+ species were identified by XPS. In literature, the incorporation of Pt into the CeO2 lattice is supported by first-principle calculations and experimentally demonstrated only by combustion synthesis methods. To the best of our knowledge this is the first report where ionically dispersed Pt into the CeO2 lattice is obtained via a liquid synthesis method. The thermally treated Pt/CeO2 sample revealed good activity with 50% CO conversion at almost room temperature.

  8. A one-dimensional diffusion analogy model for estimation of tide heights in selected tidal marshes in Connecticut

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bjerklie, David M.; O’Brien, Kevin; Rozsa, Ron

    2013-01-01

    A one-dimensional diffusion analogy model for estimating tide heights in coastal marshes was developed and calibrated by using data from previous tidal-marsh studies. The method is simpler to use than other one- and two-dimensional hydrodynamic models because it does not require marsh depth and tidal prism information; however, the one-dimensional diffusion analogy model cannot be used to estimate tide heights, flow velocities, and tide arrival times for tide conditions other than the highest tide for which it is calibrated. Limited validation of the method indicates that it has an accuracy within 0.3 feet. The method can be applied with limited calibration information that is based entirely on remote sensing or geographic information system data layers. The method can be used to estimate high-tide heights in tidal wetlands drained by tide gates where tide levels cannot be observed directly by opening the gates without risk of flooding properties and structures. A geographic information system application of the method is demonstrated for Sybil Creek marsh in Branford, Connecticut. The tidal flux into this marsh is controlled by two tide gates that prevent full tidal inundation of the marsh. The method application shows reasonable tide heights for the gates-closed condition (the normal condition) and the one-gate-open condition on the basis of comparison with observed heights. The condition with all tide gates open (two gates) was simulated with the model; results indicate where several structures would be flooded if the gates were removed as part of restoration efforts or if the tide gates were to fail.

  9. Use of electromagnetic induction methods to monitor remediation at the University of Connecticut landfill: 2004–2011

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Carole D.; White, Eric A.; Joesten, Peter K.

    2012-01-01

    Time‐lapse geophysical surveys using frequency‐domain electromagnetics (FDEM) can indirectly measure time‐varying hydrologic parameters such as fluid saturation or solute concentration. Monitoring of these processes provides insight into aquifer properties and the effectiveness of constructed controls (such as leachate interceptor trenches), as well as aquifer responses to natural or induced stresses. At the University of Connecticut landfill, noninvasive, electromagnetic induction (EMI) methods were used to monitor changes in subsurface electrical conductivity that were related to the landfill‐closure activities. After the landfill was closed, EMI methods were used to monitor changes in water saturation and water quality. As part of a long‐term monitoring plan to observe changes associated with closure, redevelopment, and remediation of the former landfill, EMI data were collected to supplement information from groundwater samples collected in wells to the south and north of the landfill. In comparison to single‐point measurements that could have been collected by conventional installation of additional monitoring wells, the EMI methods provided increased spatial coverage, and were less invasive and therefore less destructive to the wetland north of the landfill. To monitor effects of closure activities on the subsurface conductivity, EMI measurements were collected from 2004 to 2011 along discrete transects north and south of the landfill prior to, during, and after the landfill closure. In general, the results indicated an overall decline in subsurface electrical conductivity with time and with distance from the former landfill. This decline in electrical conductivity indicated that the closure and remediation efforts reduced the amount of leachate that originated from the landfill and that entered the drainages to the north and south of the landfill.

  10. What role do local grocery stores play in urban food environments? A case study of Hartford-Connecticut.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katie S Martin

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Research on urban food environments emphasizes limited access to healthy food, with fewer large supermarkets and higher food prices. Many residents of Hartford, Connecticut, which is often considered a food desert, buy most of their food from small and medium-sized grocery stores. We examined the food environment in greater Hartford, comparing stores in Hartford to those in the surrounding suburbs, and by store size (small, medium, and large. METHODS: We surveyed all small (over 1,000 ft2, medium, and large-sized supermarkets within a 2-mile radius of Hartford (36 total stores. We measured the distance to stores, availability, price and quality of a market basket of 25 items, and rated each store on internal and external appearance. Geographic Information System (GIS was used for mapping distance to the stores and variation of food availability, quality, and appearance. RESULTS: Contrary to common literature, no significant differences were found in food availability and price between Hartford and suburban stores. However, produce quality, internal, and external store appearance were significantly lower in Hartford compared to suburban stores (all p<0.05. Medium-sized stores had significantly lower prices than small or large supermarkets (p<0.05. Large stores had better scores for internal (p<0.05, external, and produce quality (p<0.01. Most Hartford residents live within 0.5 to 1 mile distance to a grocery store. DISCUSSION: Classifying urban areas with few large supermarkets as 'food deserts' may overlook the availability of healthy foods and low prices that exist within small and medium-sized groceries common in inner cities. Improving produce quality and store appearance can potentially impact the food purchasing decisions of low-income residents in Hartford.

  11. Comparison between the Oxygen Reduction Reaction Activity of Pd5Ce and Pt5Ce

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tripkovic, Vladimir; Zheng, Jian; Rizzi, Gian Andrea

    2015-01-01

    if results on a several-fold activity increase of a series of Pt/rare-earth alloys hold also for Pd rare-earth alloys. Pd5Ce crystallizes in two phases, a so-called low-temperature phase, L-Pd5Ce, which has a cubic symmetry, and a high-temperature phase, H-Pd5Ce, with a hexagonal symmetry. In both cases......, in agreement with DFT results for the L-Pd5Ce phase. Although we did not discover a new promising Pd-based catalyst, we have shown that the activity for oxygen reduction is strongly influenced by the alloy crystal structure. Furthermore, we have qualitatively demonstrated that transformation from H-Pd5Ce to L...

  12. Public health assessment for US Naval Submarine Base, New London, Groton, New London County, Connecticut, Region 1. CERCLIS No. CTD980906515. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-01-01

    The New London Submarine Base was divided by the town boundaries of Groton to the south and Ledyard to the north in New London County, Connecticut. In 1983, the Navy identified 16 potential source areas of environmental contamination during their investigations. The submarine base was listed on the US Environmental Protection Agency's National Priorities List in August 1990 because of the potential for on-base groundwater contamination to migrate to off-base residential wells that are close to the New London Submarine Base

  13. Preliminary investigation of the effects of sea-level rise on groundwater levels in New Haven, Connecticut

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bjerklie, David M.; Mullaney, John R.; Stone, Janet R.; Skinner, Brian J.; Ramlow, Matthew A.

    2012-01-01

    Global sea level rose about 0.56 feet (ft) (170 millimeters (mm)) during the 20th century. Since the 1960s, sea level has risen at Bridgeport, Connecticut, about 0.38 ft (115 mm), at a rate of 0.008 ft (2.56 mm + or - 0.58 mm) per year. With regional subsidence, and with predicted global climate change, sea level is expected to continue to rise along the northeast coast of the United States through the 21st century. Increasing sea levels will cause groundwater levels in coastal areas to rise in order to adjust to the new conditions. Some regional climate models predict wetter climate in the northeastern United States under some scenarios. Scenarios for the resulting higher groundwater levels have the potential to inundate underground infrastructure in lowlying coastal cities. New Haven is a coastal city in Connecticut surrounded and bisected by tidally affected waters. Monitoring of water levels in wells in New Haven from August 2009 to July 2010 indicates the complex effects of urban influence on groundwater levels. The response of groundwater levels to recharge and season varied considerably from well to well. Groundwater temperatures varied seasonally, but were warmer than what was typical for Connecticut, and they seem to reflect the influence of the urban setting, including the effects of conduits for underground utilities. Specific conductance was elevated in many of the wells, indicating the influence of urban activities or seawater in Long Island Sound. A preliminary steady-state model of groundwater flow for part of New Haven was constructed using MODFLOW to simulate current groundwater levels (2009-2010) and future groundwater levels based on scenarios with a rise of 3 ft (0.91 meters (m)) in sea level, which is predicted for the end of the 21st century. An additional simulation was run assuming a 3-ft rise in sea level combined with a 12-percent increase in groundwater recharge. The model was constructed from existing hydrogeologic information for the

  14. Fast humidity sensors based on CeO2 nanowires

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fu, X Q; Wang, C; Yu, H C; Wang, Y G; Wang, T H

    2007-01-01

    Fast humidity sensors are reported that are based on CeO 2 nanowires synthesized by a hydrothermal method. Both the response and recovery time are about 3 s, and are independent of the humidity. The sensitivity increases gradually as the humidity increases, and is up to 85 at 97% RH. The resistance decreases exponentially with increasing humidity, implying ion-type conductivity as the humidity sensing mechanism. A model based on the morphology and surface energy of the nanowires is given to explain these results further. Our experimental results indicate a pathway to improving the performance of humidity sensors

  15. espèce de tilapia Sarotherodon melanotheron melanothero

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Sci-Nat

    melanotheron, objet du présent travail, dont l'aire de répartition s'étend de la Côte d'Ivoire au. Cameroun. En Côte d'Ivoire, ce poisson se rencontre dans les estuaires et eaux saumâtres, depuis le fleuve Cavally (à l'Ouest) à la lagune. Aby (à l'Est) mais aussi en amont du lac de barrage du fleuve Bia (Gourène et al., 1999).

  16. Decay pattern of the Pygmy Dipole Resonance in 140Ce

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isaak J.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The decay behavior of low-lying dipole states in 140Ce was investigated exploiting the γ3-setup at the HIγS facility using quasi-monochromatic photon beams. Branching ratios of individual excited states as well as average branching ratios to low-lying states have been extracted using γ – γ coincidence measurements. The comparison of the average branching ratios to QPM calculations shows a remarkable agreement between experiment and theory in the energy range from 5.0 to 8.5 MeV.

  17. Is Auger-free luminescence present in CeF₃?

    OpenAIRE

    Itoh, Minoru; Iri, Daisuke; Kitaura, Mamoru

    2009-01-01

    It is well known that Auger-free luminescence (AFL) is observable when the condition E-g>E-vc is satisfied, where E-g is the band-gap energy between the lowest unoccupied band and the highest occupied band and E-vc the energy difference between the top of the highest occupied band and the top of the next lower occupied band. From measurements of reflection and X-ray photoelectron spectra, CeF₃ is demonstrated to really satisfy this condition. No evidence for AFL is found, nevertheless. The ab...

  18. Programming Windows® Embedded CE 60 Developer Reference

    CERN Document Server

    Boling, Douglas

    2010-01-01

    Get the popular, practical reference to developing small footprint applications-now updated for the Windows Embedded CE 6.0 kernel. Written by an authority on embedded application development, this book focuses in on core operating concepts and the Win32 API. It delivers extensive code samples and sample projects-helping you build proficiency creating innovative Windows applications for a new generation of devices. Discover how to: Create complex applications designed for the unique requirements of embedded devicesManage virtual memory, heaps, and the stack to minimize your memory footprintC

  19. Catalytic reforming of toluene as tar model compound: effect of Ce and Ce-Mg promoter using Ni/olivine catalyst.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ruiqin; Wang, Huajian; Hou, Xiaoxue

    2014-02-01

    Tar produced by biomass gasification as a route of renewable energy must be removed before the gas can be used. This study was undertaken using toluene as a model tar compound for evaluating its steam reforming conversion with three Ni-based catalysts, Ni/olivine, Ni-Ce/olivine and Ni-Ce-Mg/olivine. Effects of Ce and Mg promoters on the reaction activity and coke deposition were studied. Overall the performance of Ce and Mg promoted Ni/olivine catalysts is better than that of only Ce promoter and Ni/olivine alone. The experimental results indicate that Ni-Ce-Mg/olivine catalysts could improve the resistance to carbon deposition, enhance energy gases yield and resist 10ppm H2S poison at 100mLmin(-1) for up to 400min. Furthermore, the activity of catalysts was related to the steam/carbon (S/C) ratios; at S/C ratio=5, T=790°C, space velocity=782h(-1) and t=2h, the Ni-Ce-Mg/olivine system yielded 89% toluene conversion, 5.6Lh(-1) product gas rate, 62.6mol% H2 content and 10% (mol useful gas mol(-1) toluene) energy yield. Moreover, at low S/C ratio, it had higher reaction activity and better ability to prevent coking. There is a small amount of carbon deposition in the form of amorphous carbon after 7h. Various characterization techniques such as XRD, FTIR and thermogravimetric were performed to investigate the coke deposition of Ni/olivine, Ni-Ce/olivine and Ni-Ce-Mg/olivine. It is suggested that 3% Ni-1% Ce-1% Mg/olivine was the most promising catalyst due to its minimum coke amount and the lower activation energy of coke burning. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  20. Scientific Objectives of China Chang E 4 CE-4 Lunar Far-side Exploration Mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hongbo; Zeng, Xingguo; Chen, Wangli

    2017-10-01

    China has achieved great success in the recently CE-1~CE-3 lunar missions, and in the year of 2018, China Lunar Exploration Program (CLEP) is going to launch the CE-4 mission. CE-4 satellite is the backup satellite of CE-3, so that it also consists of a Lander and a Rover. However, CE-4 is the first mission designed to detect the far side of the Moon in human lunar exploration history. So the biggest difference between CE-4 and CE-3 is that it will be equipped with a relay satellite in Earth-Moon-L2 Point for Earth-Moon Communication. And the scientific payloads carried on the Lander and Rover will also be different. It has been announced by the Chinese government that CE-4 mission will be equipped with some new international cooperated scientific payloads, such as the Low Frequency Radio Detector from Holland, Lunar Neutron and Radiation Dose Detector from Germany, Neutral Atom Detector from Sweden, and Lunar Miniature Optical Imaging Sounder from Saudi Arabia. The main scientific objective of CE-4 is to provide scientific data for lunar far side research, including: 1)general spatial environmental study of lunar far side;2)general research on the surface, shallow layer and deep layer of lunar far side;3)detection of low frequency radio on lunar far side using Low Frequency Radio Detector, which would be the first time of using such frequency band in lunar exploration history .

  1. Effects of Ce on Inclusions, Microstructure, Mechanical Properties, and Corrosion Behavior of AISI 202 Stainless Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Guojun; Li, Changsheng

    2015-10-01

    The sizes and morphologies of nonmetallic inclusions, microhardness, tensile strength, and Charpy impact toughness in AISI 202 stainless steel with different Ce contents were synthetically analyzed by means of SEM, TEM, microhardness tester, and tensile and Charpy impact tests. Effects of Ce addition on the corrosion behavior were investigated in 5 wt.% H2SO4 solution for different periods of time through measuring AC impedance. The EIS measurements indicate that the steels with Ce addition exhibit higher R p values than those without Ce, which illustrates the relative resistance to uniform corrosion is accompanied by an increasing Ce addition. Ce addition to AISI 202 stainless steel improves its uniform corrosion resistance owing to metamorphic inclusions and the improvement of electrode potential in matrix. Upon increasing Ce addition, the indentation morphology of samples transfers from sink-in types to pile-up types, explaining good machinability of steels containing Ce. It is witnessed from the fracture mode that Ce refines the grain size of steels, significantly increasing the strength; in the meantime, its plasticity is improved, thereby solving the contradiction between the strength and the plasticity of steels. It is concluded that AISI 202 stainless steel with 0.016 wt.% Ce addition in the mass fraction has the best mechanical properties and the uniform corrosion resistance.

  2. Microstructures and mechanical properties in B{sub 4}C-CeO{sub 2} ceramics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun Shuchen, E-mail: sunsc@smm.neu.edu.cn [School of Materials and Metallurgy, Northeastern University, Shenyang 110004 (China); Sakamoto, Tatsuaki; Nakai, Kiyomichi [Department of Materials Science and Biotechnology, Ehime University, 3Bunkyo-cho, Matsuyama 790-8577 (Japan); Kurishita, Hiroaki [International Research Center for Nuclear Materials Science, Institute for Materials Research, Tohoku University, Oarai, Ibaraki 311-1313 (Japan); Kobayashi, Sengo [Department of Materials Science and Biotechnology, Ehime University, 3Bunkyo-cho, Matsuyama 790-8577 (Japan); Xu Jingyu; Cao Hui; Gao Bo; Bianxue; Wu Wenyuan; Tu Ganfeng [School of Materials and Metallurgy, Northeastern University, Shenyang 110004 (China); Matsuda, Seiji [Department of Anatomy and Embryology, Ehime University, Shizugawa, Toon 791-0295 (Japan)

    2011-10-01

    B{sub 4}C-CeO{sub 2} composite ceramics with various concentrations of CeO{sub 2} were fabricated by hot press. The effects of CeO{sub 2} on the microstructures and mechanical properties of the B{sub 4}C-CeO{sub 2} ceramics have been investigated. During hot press, CeB{sub 6} was formed by the reaction between CeO{sub 2} and B{sub 4}C. The B{sub 4}C-CeO{sub 2} ceramics had higher levels of density, fracture toughness, flexural strength and Vickers hardness than those in monolithic B{sub 4}C. The microstructures of the B{sub 4}C-CeO{sub 2} ceramics were observed and analyzed by transmission electron microscopy. In-situ synthesized CeB{sub 6} indicated whisker-like shape and grew along the interface with B{sub 4}C, and different boron carbides with different content of C existed at/around the interface of CeB{sub 6} with B{sub 4}C in the composite ceramics. It made mechanical properties greatly improved.

  3. Systematic study of rotational energy formulae for superdeformed bands in La and Ce isotopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Honey; Mittal, H. M.

    2017-12-01

    The experimental rotational spectra of superdeformed (SD) bands of 130La, 131Ce(1,2), 132Ce(1,2,3) and 133Ce(1,2,3) in the A ∼ 130 mass region are systematically analyzed with the four parameter formula, power index formula, nuclear softness formula, and VMI model. It is observed that out of all the formulae, the four parameter formula suits best for the study of the 130La, 131Ce(1,2), 132Ce(2,3) and 133Ce(1,2,3) SD bands. The four parameter formula works efficiently in determining the band head spin of the 130La, 131Ce(1,2) 132Ce(2,3) and 133Ce(1,2,3) SD bands. Good agreement is seen between the calculated and observed transition energies whenever the accurate spin is assigned. In 132Ce(1), the power index formula is found to work better than the other three formulae. The dynamic moment of inertia is also calculated for all the formulae and its variation with the rotational frequency is investigated.

  4. Sonocatalytic degradation of diclofenac with FeCeOx particles in water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chong, Shan; Zhang, Guangming; Wei, Zhongheng; Zhang, Nan; Huang, Ting; Liu, Yucan

    2017-01-01

    This paper studies the sonocatalytic degradation of diclofenac in water using FeCeO x -catalyzed ultrasound. The effects of pre-adsorption and gas addition were investigated. Nitrogen adsorption/desorption, SEM, XRD, Raman and XPS analyses of FeCeO x before and after sonication were characterized. The proposed mechanism was based on the microstructure changes of FeCeO x and reactive-species-scavenging performances. The results show that FeCeO x has excellent performance in catalyzing an ultrasonic system in water, and 80% of diclofenac was removed in 30min ([Diclofenac]=20mg/L, FeCeO x amount=0.5g/L, pH=6, ultrasonic density=3.0W/cm 3 , ultrasonic frequency=20kHz, temperature=298K). The Fe, Ce, and O elements remained highly dispersed in the structure of FeCeO x , and the solid solution structure of FeCeO x remained stable after the reaction. Ce (III) was gradually oxidized to Ce (IV) and Fe (III) was gradually reduced to Fe (II) after the reaction, which indicates that Fe and Ce ions with different valences coexisted in dynamic equilibrium. The amount of oxygen vacancies in FeCeO x significantly decreased after the reaction, which indicates that oxygen vacancy participated in the ultrasonic process. Singlet oxygen 1 O 2 was the primary reactive species in the degradation process, and the hydroxyl radicals OH and superoxide radical anion O 2 - also participated in the reaction. FeCeO x had excellent chemical stability with negligible leaching ions in the ultrasonic process. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Synthesis, characterization, and ecotoxicity of CeO2 nanoparticles with differing properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alam, Bushra; Philippe, Allan; Rosenfeldt, Ricki R.; Seitz, Frank; Dey, Sonal; Bundschuh, Mirco; Schaumann, Gabriele E.; Brenner, Sara A.

    2016-10-01

    CeO2 nanoparticles with various characteristics find an increasing number of applications in the electronic, medical, and other industries and are therefore likely released in the environment. This calls for investigations linking the physicochemical properties of these particles with their potential environmental impacts. In this study, CeO2 nanoparticle powders were prepared using three different precursors [Ce(NO3)3, CeCl3, and Ce(CH3COO)3] and annealing temperatures (300, 500, and 700 °C). This procedure resulted in nine different types of nanoparticles with differing size (5-90 nm), morphology, surface Ce3+/Ce4+ ratio, and slightly different crystal structures as characterized using transmission electron microscopy, dynamic light scattering, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and X-ray diffraction measurements with Rietveld refinement. These CeO2 nanoparticles underwent toxicity testing at concentrations up to 64 mg L-1 using Daphnia magna. Toxic effects were observed for three particle types with EC50 values between 5 and 64 mg L-1. No clear correlation was observed between the physicochemical properties (size, shape, oxygen occupancy, Ce3+/Ce4+ ratio) of the nanoparticles and their toxicity. However, toxicity was correlated with the amount of Ce remaining suspended in the test medium after 24 h. This indicated that toxic effects may depend on the colloidal stability of CeO2 nanoparticles during the first day of exposure. Therefore, being readily suspended and remaining stable for several days in the aquatic media increases the likelihood that CeO2 nanoparticles will cause unwanted adverse effects.

  6. Highly active and durable Ca-doped Ce-SBA-15 catalyst for biodiesel production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thitsartarn, Warintorn; Maneerung, Thawatchai; Kawi, Sibudjing

    2015-01-01

    In this work, Ca-doped Ce-incorporated SBA-15 (Ca/CeS) catalyst was successfully synthesized by using direct synthesis of Ce-incorporated SBA-15 followed by impregnation of CaO (calcium oxide). The maximum Si/Ce molar ratio that Ce atoms can be incorporated successfully into the mesoporous framework was found to be 5 (CeS-5). After the impregnation of 30 wt. % Ca, the obtained 30Ca/CeS-5 catalysts showed the superior catalytic performance for transesterification reaction of palm oil with methanol and also the higher catalytic activity as compared to other supported catalysts, i.e. CaO/CeO 2 and CaO–CeO 2 /SBA-15. This can be attributed to the well-dispersion of CaO on the CeS-5 support surface. Furthermore, it was found that the leaching of Si, Ce and Ca from the catalyst into biodiesel produced was negligible (i.e. <1 ppm after 7 cycles), indicating the strong interaction between CaO and CeS-5 support. As a result, the 30Ca/CeS-5 catalyst can be reused at least 15 cycles with insignificant decrease in catalytic activity, offering the efficient CaO-based catalyst for biodiesel production. - Highlights: • Mesoporous Ca-based catalyst was successfully developed for biodiesel production. • Catalyst exhibited high activity towards transesterification (FAME yield > 98%). • Catalyst can be effectively re-used at least 15 cycles. • Extremely low catalyst contaminant (<1 ppm) was presented

  7. Hydrothermal synthesis of hexagonal CeO{sub 2} nanosheets and their room temperature ferromagnetism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meng, Fanming, E-mail: mrmeng@ahu.edu.cn [School of Physics and Materials Science, Anhui University, Hefei 230601 (China); Key Laboratory of Materials Modification by Laser, Ion and Electron Beams, Dalian University of Technology, Ministry of Education, Dalian 116024 (China); Zhang, Cheng; Fan, Zhenghua; Gong, Jinfeng; Li, Aixia; Ding, Zongling; Tang, Huaibao; Zhang, Miao; Wu, Guifang [School of Physics and Materials Science, Anhui University, Hefei 230601 (China)

    2015-10-25

    Hexagonal CeO{sub 2} nanosheets of 40–50 nm in thickness and 300–400 nm in side-length have been successfully synthesized via controlling the morphology of CeCO{sub 3}OH precursors by a facile hydrothermal technique using CeCl{sub 3}·7H{sub 2}O as cerium source, ammonium hydrogen carbonate as precipitants, and ethylenediamine as complexant. The reaction time and the amount of CeCl{sub 3}·7H{sub 2}O and ethylenediamine were systematically investigated. The as-synthesized hexagonal CeO{sub 2} nanosheets were examined by XRD, SEM, TEM, XPS, Raman scattering and magnetization measurements. It is found that the amount of CeCl{sub 3}·7H{sub 2}O and ethylenediamine are key parameters for controlling the final morphology. The hexagonal CeO{sub 2} nanosheets have a fluorite cubic structure and there are Ce{sup 3+} ions and oxygen vacancies in surface of samples. The synthesized CeO{sub 2} shows excellent room temperature optical properties. M–H curve exhibits excellent room-temperature ferromagnetism (RTFM) with saturation magnetization (M{sub s}) of 3.02 × 10{sup −2} emu/g, residual magnetization (M{sub r}) of 0.68 × 10{sup −2} emu/g and coercivity (H{sub c}) of 210 Oe, which is likely attributed to the effects of the Ce{sup 3+} ions and oxygen vacancies. - Highlights: • Hexagonal CeO{sub 2} nanosheets with superexerllent RTFM are synthesized by a facile hydrothermal method. • RTFM mechanism of CeO{sub 2} nanosheets can be attributed to the influences of oxygen vacancies and Ce{sup 3+} ions. • A defect driven dissolution–recrystallization mechanism is suggested to explain the transformation from nanowires to nanosheets.

  8. Synthesis, characterization, and ecotoxicity of CeO{sub 2} nanoparticles with differing properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alam, Bushra [Aero Shade Technologies Inc (United States); Philippe, Allan, E-mail: philippe@uni-landau.de; Rosenfeldt, Ricki R.; Seitz, Frank [University of Koblenz-Landau, Group of Environmental and Soil Chemistry, Institute for Environmental Sciences (Germany); Dey, Sonal [SUNY Polytechnic Institute, Colleges of Nanoscale Science and Engineering (United States); Bundschuh, Mirco; Schaumann, Gabriele E. [University of Koblenz-Landau, Group of Environmental and Soil Chemistry, Institute for Environmental Sciences (Germany); Brenner, Sara A. [SUNY Polytechnic Institute, Colleges of Nanoscale Science and Engineering (United States)

    2016-10-15

    CeO{sub 2} nanoparticles with various characteristics find an increasing number of applications in the electronic, medical, and other industries and are therefore likely released in the environment. This calls for investigations linking the physicochemical properties of these particles with their potential environmental impacts. In this study, CeO{sub 2} nanoparticle powders were prepared using three different precursors [Ce(NO{sub 3}){sub 3}, CeCl{sub 3}, and Ce(CH{sub 3}COO){sub 3}] and annealing temperatures (300, 500, and 700 °C). This procedure resulted in nine different types of nanoparticles with differing size (5–90 nm), morphology, surface Ce{sup 3+}/Ce{sup 4+} ratio, and slightly different crystal structures as characterized using transmission electron microscopy, dynamic light scattering, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and X-ray diffraction measurements with Rietveld refinement. These CeO{sub 2} nanoparticles underwent toxicity testing at concentrations up to 64 mg L{sup −1} using Daphnia magna. Toxic effects were observed for three particle types with EC50 values between 5 and 64 mg L{sup −1}. No clear correlation was observed between the physicochemical properties (size, shape, oxygen occupancy, Ce{sup 3+}/Ce{sup 4+} ratio) of the nanoparticles and their toxicity. However, toxicity was correlated with the amount of Ce remaining suspended in the test medium after 24 h. This indicated that toxic effects may depend on the colloidal stability of CeO{sub 2} nanoparticles during the first day of exposure. Therefore, being readily suspended and remaining stable for several days in the aquatic media increases the likelihood that CeO{sub 2} nanoparticles will cause unwanted adverse effects.

  9. Ce isotope systematics of island arc lavas from the Lesser Antilles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellot, Nina; Boyet, Maud; Doucelance, Régis; Pin, Christian; Chauvel, Catherine; Auclair, Delphine

    2015-11-01

    The La-Ce systematics has one of the longest half-lifes (T1/2 = 292.5 Ga) of radioactive decay systems used in isotope geochemistry. Variations of the 138Ce/142Ce ratio are expected to be small and the use of Ce as isotopic tracer requires a very precise measurement. Compared to Sm-Nd studies, the La-Ce decay system can provide additional information about the nature of sediments recycled in subduction zones, because unusually large Ce anomalies relative to the neighboring rare earth elements exist in marine sediments such as fish teeth or hydrothermal deposits. Here, we present a chemical purification technique for Ce, and mass spectrometric technique to perform accurate and reproducible analyses of Ce isotopes of natural samples. We report a large set of Ce isotope data including analysis of 2 Ce reference material solutions (AMES and JMC-304), 2 rock standards (BCR-2 and BHVO-2), 2 chondrites (the carbonaceous chondrite Allende and the enstatite chondrite Sahara 97072), 4 mid-ocean ridge basalts, 30 arc lavas from the Martinique Island and 5 oceanic sediments from DSDP-site 144 drilled on the Demerara rise. The long-term, external precision obtained on the AMES reference material is 80 ppm (2 s.d., 138Ce/142Ce = 0.0225732 ± 18, n = 89). However, we note an evolution of isotopic ratios measured in static mode over the duration of this study (33 months). When the reproducibility is calculated from the AMES reference material measured during the same analytical session, it averages 40 ppm. All the 138Ce/142Ce ratios have been normalized to the AMES value of 0.0225746 (measured in session 7, 2 s.d. = 14 ppm, n = 8), a session during which the chondritic value has been defined and the peak tailing was negligible. The 138Ce/142Ce ratio measured for the JMC-304 Ce reference reagent is 0.0225706 ± 9 (2 s.d. = 38 ppm, n = 10). The analytical precision on natural samples is improved by a factor of about 4 in relation to previous studies on island arcs (Tanaka et al

  10. Easy peak tracking in CE-UV and CE-UV-ESI-MS by incorporating temperature-correlated mobility scaling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li, Bin; Petersen, Nickolaj Jacob; Andersen, Line Hvass

    2013-01-01

    resistance of the buffer-filled capillary. The temperature-correlated mobility calculation eliminates the peak shifts due to the viscosity changes, improves the precision of peak identification using the observed temperature-correlated mobilities and allows a direct comparison of signals from different......A simple data reconstruction technique in capillary electrophoresis - ultraviolet - electrospray ionization - mass spectrometry (CE-UV-ESI-MS) is presented to overcome the drift in mobilities caused by various factors compromising the reproducibility of such data, e.g. Joule heating effects...

  11. Structural aspects of the new quasi-2-D heavy fermion materials CeIrIns and CeRhIns

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moshopoulou, E.G.; Moshopoulou, E.G.; Fisk, Z.; Sarrao, J.L.; Thompson, J.D.; Fisk, Z.

    2002-01-01

    The title compounds are new heavy fermion materials. They adopt a quasi two-dimensional crystal structure and exhibit unusual (for a heavy fermion system) low temperature properties. Although the study of their physical and structural behaviour at low temperatures and/or high pressures is still in progress, we present here some results concerning their average crystal structure, and we discuss very briefly their similarities and differences with the compounds CeIn3 and UTGa 5 (T: Co, Ni, Ir, Pd, Cu, Ru). (authors)

  12. La vérite sur ce qui nous motive

    CERN Document Server

    Pink, Daniel H

    2011-01-01

    Voici enfin la traduction française du best-seller international DRIVE ! Qu'est-ce qui nous motive vraiment ? Dans quels cas sommes-nous les plus performants et les plus enthousiastes ? La plupart d'entre nous sommes persuadés que les récompenses (salaire, primes...) sont notre meilleure motivation. La logique de la carotte et du bâton finalement... Et si nous faisions fausse route ? En s'appuyant sur quatre décennies d'études scientifiques et psychologiques sur la motivation humaine, Pink démontre que les entreprises dirigent très mal leurs équipes avec d'énormes conséquences sur notre vie (absence d'ambition, lassitude, morosité). Le secret de la performance (et de la satisfaction) dans les entreprises, l'enseignement ou dans notre vie personnelle , c'est le besoin profondément humain de diriger sa propre vie, d'apprendre, de créer de nouvelles choses et de s'améliorer. Dans ce livre, Pink examine les 3 éléments de la motivation, l'autonomie, la maîtrise et le besoin de donner un sens ...

  13. CE-4 Mission and Future Journey to Lunar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, Yongliao; Wang, Qin; Liu, Xiaoqun

    2016-07-01

    Chang'E-4 mission, being undertaken by phase two of China Lunar Exploration Program, represents China's first attempt to explore farside of lunar surface. Its probe includes a lander, a rover and a telecommunication relay which is scheduled to launch in around 2018. The scientific objectives of CE-4 mission will be implemented to investigate the lunar regional geological characteristics of landing and roving area, and also will make the first radio-astronomy measurements from the most radio-quiet region of near-earth space. The rover will opreate for at least 3 months, the lander for half a year, and the relay for no less than 3 years. Its scinetific instruments includes Cameras, infrared imaging spectrometer, Penetrating Radar onboard the rover in which is the same as the paylads on board the CE-3 rover, and a Dust-analyzer, a Temperature-instrument and a Wide Band Low Frequency Digital Radio Astronomical Station will be installed on board the lander. Our scientific goals of the future lunar exploration will aim at the lunar geology, resources and surface environments. A series of exploraion missions such as robotic exploration and non-manned lunar scientific station is proposed in this paper.

  14. Gapless Fermi surfaces in superconducting CeCoIn5

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barzykin, Victor; Gor'Kov, L. P.

    2007-07-01

    According to Tanatar [Phys. Rev. Lett. 95, 067002 (2005)], the low-temperature thermal conductivity in Ce1-xLaxCoIn5 , a multiband d -wave superconductor, reveals unexpected dependence on the concentration of defects as if one or more Fermi surface sheets remained ungapped below superconducting transition. The interior gap superfluidity mechanism, or unbalanced pairing, recently proposed by Liu and Wilczek [Phys. Rev. Lett. 90, 047002 (2003)] has been invoked as a possible origin of gaplessness. We indicate that the Fermi surface anisotropy in the real CeCoIn5 makes this explanation highly implausible. We emphasize the fundamental difference between unbalanced pairing of different Fermi entities and the formation of superconducting gaps on Fermi surfaces belonging to different bands. We also argue that interband interactions between electrons always induce a finite order parameter on all Fermi surfaces below the temperature of a superconducting transition. We calculate specific heat and thermal conductivity in a two-band model for a d -wave superconductor in the presence of defects. In our simple model, superconductivity originates on one Fermi surface, inducing a smaller gap on the other one. Impurities diminish the induced gap and increase the density of states, restoring rapidly the Wiedemann-Franz law for this Fermi surface. Our calculations are in agreement with experiment.

  15. The Asia-RiCE activity with data cube

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oyoshi, K.; Sobue, S.; LE Toan, T.; Lam, N. D.

    2017-12-01

    The Asia-RiCE initiative (http://www.asia-rice.org) has been organized to enhance rice production estimates through the use of Earth observation satellites data, and seeks to ensure that Asian rice crops are appropriately represented within GEO Global Agriculture Monitoring (GEO-GLAM) to support FAO Agriculture Market Information System (FAO-AMIS). Asia-RiCE is composed of national teams that are actively contributing to the Crop Monitor for AMIS and developing technical demonstrations of rice crop monitoring activities using both Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) data (Radarsat-2 from 2013; Sentinel-1 and ALOS-2 from 2015.From 2016 after the successful rice crop area and growing estimation using SAR in a technical demonstration site (provincial level), wall-to-wall (national scale) excurse as phase 2 has been implemented in Vietnam and Indonesia in cooperation with ministry of agriculture and space agencies. This paper reports this year activity of 2017 accomplishment and way forward, especially for analysis ready data (ARD) definition of SAR to ingest to CEOS data cube to provide national scale service in Vietnam and Indonesia.

  16. Magnetoresistance and magnetization anomalies in CeB6

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bogach, A.V.; Glushkov, V.V.; Demishev, S.V.; Samarin, N.A.; Paderno, Yu.B.; Dukhnenko, A.V.; Shitsevalova, N.Yu.; Sluchanko, N.E.

    2006-01-01

    High precision magnetoresistance (MR) Δρ/ρ(H,T) and magnetization M(H,T) measurements have been carried out for well known and typical strongly correlated electron system-cerium hexaboride. The detailed measurements have been fulfilled on single crystalline samples of CeB 6 over a wide temperature range T>=1.8K in magnetic fields up to 70kOe. It was shown that the MR anomalies in the magnetic heavy fermion compound under investigation can be consistently interpreted in the frameworks of a simple relation between resistivity and magnetization-Δρ/ρ∼M 2 obtained by Yosida [Phys. Rev. 107(1957)396]. A local magnetic susceptibility χ loc (T,H)=(1/H*(d(Δρ/ρ)/dH)) 1/2 was deduced directly from the MR Δρ(H,T) measurements and compared with the experimental data of magnetization M(H,T). The magnetic susceptibility dependences χ loc (T,H) and χ(T,H) obtained in this study for CeB 6 allow us to analyze the complicated H-T magnetic phase diagram of this so-called dense Kondo-system

  17. Ceļa servitūts

    OpenAIRE

    Livdāns, Dāvis

    2016-01-01

    Bakalaura darba tēma ir “Ceļa servitūts.” Bakalaura darba mērķis ir izpētīt ceļa servitūta nodibināšanas kārtību, iespējamās kļūdas, praksē nodibināto servitūtu problēmjautājumus un to risinājumus. Bakalaura darba tapšanas stadijā autors izmantoja zinātnisko literatūru, normatīvos aktus, kā arīi ar to tapšanu saistītos dokumentus un juridiskās prakses materiālus. Darbā ir apskatīti gan Civillikumā noteiktie servitūtu nodibināšanas pamati, gan citi iespējamie nodibināšanas pamati, pēc kā ir an...

  18. Otology at the Academy of Gondishapur 200-600 CE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruben, Robert J

    2017-12-01

    To investigate the way in which otology was practiced at the Academy of Gondishapur in ancient Persia from 200 to 600 CE. The pertinent literature, using German and English translations of Latin, Greek, Arabic, and Sanskrit documents, was identified and reviewed through the indices of available books and through a PDF search for the following topics: auricle, deaf, deafness, dizziness, ear, hearing, medicine, otitis, pinna, punishment-ear, speech, surgery, vertigo, and voice. The medical school at the Academy of Gondishapur followed the medical and surgical practices of Greece and Rome and, in the 6th century, incorporated those from India as detailed in the Shutra Samhita. This shutra, which originated during the first millennium BCE, detailed many interventions, among which one of the most unusual was the use of a pedicle cheek flap to restore the pinnae. The use of the pedicle flap for pinna restoration appears not have been reported in literature again until 1931, by Jacque Joseph. During the period of late antiquity, medical knowledge of both the east and west was preserved and taught in Persia. Among surgical interventions used during the first millennium BCE in India, knowledge of which passed, through the shutra, to the Sasanian Empire in the 6th century CE, was use of the pedicle cheek flap for pinna reconstruction. Even as late as the Renaissance, the pedicle flap was not known to surgeons in the West, and a pedicle flap, though not a cheek flap, was first incorporated into Western medical practice during the 1930s.

  19. Implantation sites of Ce and Gd in diamond

    CERN Document Server

    Bharuth-Ram, K; Hofsäss, H C; Ronning, C; Dietrich, M

    2002-01-01

    The implantation sites of rare earth (RE) probes /sup 141/Ce (t/sub 1 /2/=32 d) and /sup 149/Gd (t/sub 1/2/=9.28 d) in diamond have been investigated using the emission channeling (EC) technique. Parent isotopes /sup 141/Cs and /sup 149/Dy were implanted into type IIa, diamond samples at an energy of 60 keV at the online isotope separator ISOLDE at CERN. /sup 141/Cs decays through the chain /sup 141/Cs-/sup 141/Ba-/sup 141/La-/sup 141/Ce-/sup 141/ Pr. EC measurements were made on the 102 keV conversion electrons emitted in the decay of /sup 141/Pr to its ground state. The decay of /sup 149 /Dy follows the chain /sup 149/Dy-/sup 149/Tb-/sup 149/Gd-/sup 149 /Eu-/sup 149/Sm. EC measurements were made on the 101 keV electrons emitted in the decay of /sup 149/Eu. Two-dimensional channeling patterns of the conversion electrons were obtained along and axial directions by raster scans with a Si surface barrier detector. Comparison of the observed patterns with simulated spectra show that in diamond 45-50% of the RE...

  20. Irradiation effects in UO2 and CeO2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ye, Bei; Oaks, Aaron; Kirk, Mark; Yun, Di; Chen, Wei-Ying; Holtzman, Benjamin; Stubbins, James F.

    2013-01-01

    Single crystal CeO 2 , as a surrogate material to UO 2 , was irradiated with 500 keV xenon ions at 800 °C while being observed using in situ transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Experimental results show the formation and growth of defect clusters including dislocation loops and cavities as a function of increasing atomic displacement dose. At high dose, the dislocation loop structure evolves into an extended dislocation line structure, which appears to remain stable to the high dose levels examined in this study. A high concentration of cavities was also present in the microstructure. Despite high atomic displacement doses, the specimen remained crystalline to a cumulated dose of 5 × 10 15 ions/cm 2 , which is consistent with the known stability of the fluorite structure under high dose irradiation. Kinetic Monte Carlo calculations show that oxygen mobility is substantially higher in hypo-stoichiometric UO 2 /CeO 2 than hyper-stoichiometric systems. This result is consistent with the ability of irradiation damage to recover even at intermediate irradiation temperatures

  1. Genome Mining in Sorangium cellulosum So ce56

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ewen, Kerstin Maria; Hannemann, Frank; Khatri, Yogan; Perlova, Olena; Kappl, Reinhard; Krug, Daniel; Hüttermann, Jürgen; Müller, Rolf; Bernhardt, Rita

    2009-01-01

    Myxobacteria, especially members of the genus Sorangium, are known for their biotechnological potential as producers of pharmaceutically valuable secondary metabolites. The biosynthesis of several of those myxobacterial compounds includes cytochrome P450 activity. Although class I cytochrome P450 enzymes occur wide-spread in bacteria and rely on ferredoxins and ferredoxin reductases as essential electron mediators, the study of these proteins is often neglected. Therefore, we decided to search in the Sorangium cellulosum So ce56 genome for putative interaction partners of cytochromes P450. In this work we report the investigation of eight myxobacterial ferredoxins and two ferredoxin reductases with respect to their activity in cytochrome P450 systems. Intriguingly, we found not only one, but two ferredoxins whose ability to sustain an endogenous So ce56 cytochrome P450 was demonstrated by CYP260A1-dependent conversion of nootkatone. Moreover, we could demonstrate that the two ferredoxins were able to receive electrons from both ferredoxin reductases. These findings indicate that S. cellulosum can alternate between different electron transport pathways to sustain cytochrome P450 activity. PMID:19696019

  2. Effect of nano-CeO2 on microstructure properties of TiC/TiN+TiCN ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    TiC/TiN+TiCN-reinforced composite coatings were fabricated on Ti–6Al–4V alloy by laser cladding, ... Ce was able to refine the microstructure of laser-cladded .... According to the report by Tian et al. (2006), during the cladding process, a portion of CeO2 was decomposed as follows: CeO2 →Ce + O2 ↑. (2). Then, Ce was ...

  3. Particle-specific toxicity and bioavailability of cerium oxide (CeO{sub 2}) nanoparticles to Arabidopsis thaliana

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Xinping; Pan, Haopeng [College of Resources and Environmental Sciences, Nanjing Agricultural University, Nanjing 210095 (China); Wang, Peng, E-mail: p.wang3@uq.edu.au [College of Resources and Environmental Sciences, Nanjing Agricultural University, Nanjing 210095 (China); The University of Queensland, School of Agriculture and Food Sciences, St. Lucia, Queensland 4072 (Australia); Zhao, Fang-Jie [College of Resources and Environmental Sciences, Nanjing Agricultural University, Nanjing 210095 (China); Rothamsted Research, Harpenden, Hertfordshire AL5 2JQ (United Kingdom)

    2017-01-15

    Highlights: • The phytotoxicity and uptake of CeO{sub 2} NPs were examined in Arabidopsis. • CeO{sub 2} NPs stimulated plant growth at low doses but were toxic at high doses. • The toxicity was due to the NPs per se, rather than from the dissolved Ce ions. • A similar up-translocation factor was found for CeO{sub 2} NPs, bulk CeO{sub 2} and Ce ions. - Abstract: The use of manufactured cerium oxide nanoparticles (CeO{sub 2}-NPs) in consumer products has increased markedly over the past decade, and their release into natural ecosystems is unavoidable. This study investigated the phytotoxicity and uptake of CeO{sub 2}-NPs in Arabidopsis thaliana grown in an agar medium. Although low concentrations of CeO{sub 2}-NPs had stimulatory effects on plant growth, at higher concentrations, CeO{sub 2}-NPs reduced growth and had adverse effects on the antioxidant systems and photosystem. Importantly, the toxicity resulted from the nanoparticles per se, rather than from the dissolved Ce ions. CeO{sub 2}-NPs were taken up and subsequently translocated to shoot tissues, and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) showed the presence of a large number of needle-like particle aggregations in the intercellular regions and the cytoplasm of leaf cells. The up-translocation factor to shoots was independent of the concentrations of Ce in the roots and the supplied forms of Ce (i.e. CeO{sub 2}-NPs, CeO{sub 2}-bulk, and ionic Ce), suggesting that endocytosis is likely to be a general mechanism responsible for the translocation of these Ce compounds. These findings provide important information regarding the toxicity and uptake of CeO{sub 2}-NPs in plants, which needs to be considered in environmental risk assessment for the safe use and disposal of CeO{sub 2}-NPs.

  4. Excitation light source dependence of emission in Sn2+-Ce3+ codoped ZnO-P2O5 glasses

    OpenAIRE

    Masai, Hirokazu; Hino, Yusuke; Yanagida, Takayuki; Fujimoto, Yutaka; Fukuda, Kentaro; Yoko, Toshinobu

    2013-01-01

    Correlation between excitation light source and the emission property of Sn^{2+}-Ce^{3+} co-doped zinc phosphate glasses is examined. Although photoluminescence (PL) peaks of both Sn^{2+}and Ce^{3+} shifted with increasing amount of Ce^{3+}, there was little energy resonance between Sn^{2+} and Ce^{3+} emission centers. On the other hand, radioluminescence (RL) spectra excited by X-ray was independent of the Ce concentration, indicating that emission was mainly observed from Sn^{2+} emission ...

  5. Anisotropy of the Kondo insulator CeRu4Sn6

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paschen, S; Winkler, H; Nezu, T; Kriegisch, M; Hilscher, G; Custers, J; Prokofiev, A; Strydom, A

    2010-01-01

    The intermetallic compound CeRu 4 Sn 6 has tentatively been classified as Kondo insulator. Its tetragonal crystal structure places it inbetween the archetypal Kondo insulators like YbB 12 or Ce 3 Bi 4 Pt 3 , which are cubic, and the orthorhombic 'Kondo semimetals' CeNiSn and CeRhSb. It is of great interest to investigate possible anisotropies - or even nodes - of the Kondo insulating gap in CeRu 4 Sn 6 . We have succeeded, for the first time, to grow single crystals of this compound. Interestingly, we could not only reveal anisotropy between the tetragonal c direction and the tetragonal a-a plane but even within a quasi-cubic cell which happens to be formed in CeRu 4 Sn 6 because the length of the diagonal of the tetragonal plane c' = √2a differs from c by only 0.2%.

  6. Adsorption process of fluoride from drinking water with magnetic core-shell Ce-Ti@Fe3O4 and Ce-Ti oxide nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abo Markeb, Ahmad; Alonso, Amanda; Sánchez, Antoni; Font, Xavier

    2017-11-15

    Synthesized magnetic core-shell Ce-Ti@Fe 3 O 4 nanoparticles were tested, as an adsorbent, for fluoride removal and the adsorption studies were optimized. Adsorption capacity was compared with the synthesized Ce-Ti oxide nanoparticles. The adsorption equilibrium for the Ce-Ti@Fe 3 O 4 adsorbent was found to occur in Ti oxides and Ce-Ti@Fe 3 O 4 nanoparticles, respectively. The physical sorption mechanism was estimated using the Dubinin-Radushkevich model. An anionic exchange process between the OH - group on the surface of the Ce-Ti@Fe 3 O 4 nanomaterial and the F - was involved in the adsorption. Moreover, thermodynamic parameters proved the spontaneous process for the adsorption of fluoride on Ce-Ti@Fe 3 O 4 nanoparticles. The reusability of the material through magnetic recovery was demonstrated for five cycles of adsorption-desorption. Although the nanoparticles suffer slight structure modifications after their reusability, they keep their adsorption capacity. Likewise, the efficiency of the Ce-Ti@Fe 3 O 4 was demonstrated when applied to real water to obtain a residual concentration of F - below the maximum contaminated level, 1.5mg/L (WHO, 2006). Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Influence of synthesis conditions on the crystal structure of the powder formed in the ZrO2 - Ce2O3/CeO2 system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Popov, V V; Menushenkov, A P; Khubbutdinov, R M; Sharapov, A S; Svetogorov, R D; Zubavichus, Ya V; Kurilkin, V V

    2016-01-01

    Influence of synthesis conditions (type of atmosphere, reduction and oxidation, annealing temperature) on the chemical composition and structure of the compounds formed in the “ZrO 2 - Ce 2 O 3 / CeO 2 ” system has been investigated by X-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS) spectroscopy combined with X-ray diffraction (XRD) and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA). It is revealed that isothermal annealing of precursor at temperatures less than 1000 °C in air leads to formation of Ce 0.5 Zr 0.5 O 2 powders with cubic fluorite-type structure (Fm-3m). Further increase of annealing temperatures above 1000 °C causes decomposition of formed crystal structure into two phases: cubic and tetragonal. Annealing in reduction hydrogen atmosphere causes formation of Ce 4 + 2xCe 3 + 2-2xZr 2 O 7 + x compounds with intermediate valency of cerium, where value of x depends on the reducing conditions and treatment parameters of precursor. Annealing in vacuum at 1400 °C strongly reduces the content of Ce 4 + in a powder samples and leads to formation of pyrochlore structure (space group Fd-3 m ) with practically Ce 3+ valence state. (paper)

  8. Synthesis and Characterization of Ce-Doped Y3Al5O12 (YAG:Ce Nanopowders Used for Solid-State Lighting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Do Ngoc Chung

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Nano-Ce-doped Y3Al5O12 (YAG:Ce powders were synthesized by using a sol-gel low temperature combustion method, followed by thermal annealing. The annealing temperature for enriching nanoparticles was optimized and found to be 1000°C. The process for enriching uniform nanoparticles of YAG:Ce powder was carried out by using the nanosteam technique (NST. The nanoparticles obtained from this NST treatment had a size in the range of 9–20 nm. Measurements of the photoluminescence spectra of the dispersed YAG:Ce nanoparticles solutions showed a blue shift in the photoemission with a value of ca. 10 nm in the green region. WLEDs made from the blue LED chip coated with the nano-YAG:Ce + MEH-PPV composite epoxy exhibit white light with a broad band luminescent spectrum and a high color rending index (CRI. The photoluminescence spectra of the YAG:Ce nanoparticles showed a potential application of the prepared nanostructured YAG:Ce phosphor not only in energy-efficient solid-state lighting, but also in optoelectronic devices, including organic composite solar cells. In addition, it is suggested that NST can be applied for the enrichment of uniform inorganic nanoparticles.

  9. Laser clad Ni-base alloy added nano- and micron-size CeO 2 composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Shi Hong; Li, Ming Xi; Cho, Tong Yul; Yoon, Jae Hong; Lee, Chan Gyu; He, Yi Zhu

    2008-07-01

    Micron-size Ni-base alloy (NBA) powders are mixed with both 1.5 wt% (%) micron-CeO 2 (m-CeO 2) and also 1.0-3.0% nano-CeO 2 (n-CeO 2) powders. These mixtures are coated on low carbon steel (Q235) by 2.0 kW CO 2 laser cladding. The effects on microstructures, microhardness and wear resistance of the coating by the addition of m- and n-CeO 2 powders to NBA (m- and n-CeO 2/NBA) have been investigated. Addition to the primary phases of γ-Ni, Cr 23C 6 and Ni 3B of NBA coating, CeNi 3 shows up both in m- and n-CeO 2/NBA coatings and CeNi 5 appears only in n-CeO 2/NBA coating. Directional dendrite and coarse equiaxed dendrite are grown in m-CeO 2/NBA coating from interface to central zone, whereas multi-oriented dendrite and fine equiaxed dendrite growth by addition of n-CeO 2. The microhardness and wear resistance of coatings are greatly improved by CeO 2 powder addition, and compared to the addition of 1.0% and 3.0%, 1.5% n-CeO 2/NBA is the best. Hardness and wear resistance of the coating improves with decreasing CeO 2 size from micron to nano.

  10. Paramagnetic Ce3 + optical emitters in garnets: Optically detected magnetic resonance study and evidence of Gd-Ce cross-relaxation effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tolmachev, D. O.; Gurin, A. S.; Uspenskaya, Yu. A.; Asatryan, G. R.; Badalyan, A. G.; Romanov, N. G.; Petrosyan, A. G.; Baranov, P. G.; Wieczorek, H.; Ronda, C.

    2017-06-01

    Paramagnetic Ce3 +optical emitters have been studied by means of optically detected magnetic resonance (ODMR) via Ce3 + spin-dependent emission in cerium-doped garnet crystals which were both gadolinium free and contain gadolinium in a concentration from the lowest (0.1%) to 100%, i.e., to the superparamagnetic state. It has been shown that the intensity of photoluminescence excited by circularly polarized light into Ce3 + absorption bands can be used for selective monitoring the population of the Ce3 + ground-state spin sublevels. Direct evidence of the cross-relaxation effects in garnet crystals containing two electron spin systems, i.e., the simplest one of Ce3 + ions with the effective spin S =1/2 and the system of Gd3 + ions with the maximum spin S =7/2 , has been demonstrated. Magnetic resonance of Gd3 + has been found by monitoring Ce3 + emission in cerium-doped garnet crystals with gadolinium concentrations of 0.1 at. %, 4%-8%, and 100%, which implies the impact of the Gd3 + spin polarization on the optical properties of Ce3 +. Strong internal magnetic fields in superparamagnetic crystals were shown to modify the processes of recombination between UV-radiation-induced electron and hole centers that lead to the recombination-induced Ce3 + emission. Observation of spikes and subsequent decay in the cross-relaxation-induced ODMR signals under pulsed microwave excitation is suggested to be an informative method to investigate transient processes in the many-spin system of Ce3 +, Gd3 +, and electron and hole radiation-induced centers.

  11. Eu and Sr2CeO4 : Eu phosphors suitable for near ultraviolet excitation

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Administrator

    et al 2009). It absorbs ultraviolet radiation and emits white light, when activated by Eu2+ ions. It is anticipated that the dual behaviour of Sr2CeO4 : Eu3+ and Sr2CeO4 : Eu2+ phosphors ... in stoichiometric proportions (Sr : Ce is 2 : 1) and Eu2O3. (National ..... Zhang C X, Jiang W J and Yang X J 2009 J. Alloys Compd. 474.

  12. Electrical resistivity of CeTIn{sub 5} (T=Rh, Ir) under high pressure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muramatsu, Takaki; Kobayashi, Tatsuo C.; Shimizu, Katsuya; Amaya, Kiichi; Aoki, Dai; Haga, Yoshinori; Onuki, Yoshichika

    2003-05-15

    We have studied the superconducting properties of CeTIn{sub 5} (T=Rh, Ir) under high pressures by means of electrical resistivity measurements and determined the pressure-temperature phase diagrams for the superconducting transition. For both systems, the superconductivity exists in a wide pressure range, 1.5{<=}P{<=}6.5 GPa for CeRhIn{sub 5} and 0{<=}P{<=}5.2 GPa for CeIrIn{sub 5}.

  13. Scintillation response comparison among Ce-doped aluminum gartnes, perovskites and orthosilicates

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Mareš, Jiří A.; Nikl, Martin; Mihóková, Eva; Vedda, A.; D´Ambrosio, C.

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 55, č. 3 (2008), s. 1142-1147 ISSN 0018-9499 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR 1QS100100506 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100521 Keywords : scintillation response * Ce 3+ -doped aluminum perovskites * Ce 3+ -doped garnets, * Ce 3+ -doped orthosilicates Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 1.518, year: 2008

  14. Spray deposited CeO2–TiO2 counter electrode for electrochromic ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. Optically passive thin films of CeO2–TiO2 mixed oxides with molar ratio of Ce/Ti of 0.05 were deposited by the spray pyrolysis technique (SPT) on a glass and fluorine-doped tin oxide (FTO)-coated glass substrates. Precur- sor solution containing cerium nitrate hexahydrate (Ce(NO3)2·6H2O) and titanium ...

  15. Incommensurate antiferromagnetism and magnetic correlations in CeCu6-xAux

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stockert, O.; Lohneysen, H. von; Schröder, A.

    1997-01-01

    Magnetic ordering and correlations in single crystals of the heavy-fermion alloys CeCu5.8Au0.2 and CeCu5.9Au0.1 were investigated by elastic and inelastic neutron scattering. CeCu5.8Au0.2 orders with an incommensurate magnetic structure and a wave vector q = (+/- 0.79 0 0). Only dynamic...

  16. Nanocrystalline Ce1- x La x O2- δ Solid Solutions Synthesized by Hydrolyzing and Oxidizing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Xueling; Xue, Yun; Han, Ning; Lu, Qianqian; Wang, Xiaochen; Phan, Manh-Huong; Zhong, Yunbo

    2016-05-01

    We undertook a novel batch production approach for the synthesis of CeO2 nanopowders doped with rare earth elements. Solid solution nanopowders of Ce1- x La x O2- δ ( x = 0.15) were successfully synthesized in a large-scale and low-cost production by hydrolyzing and oxidizing Ce-La-C alloys at room temperature and subsequent calcining of their powders at different temperatures (873-1073 K) for 1 h. The Ce-La-C alloys were prepared in a vacuum induction melting furnace. The final products were characterized by x-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy, Brunner-Emmet-Teller (BET) surface area analyzer, and Raman spectroscopy. The calculated lattice parameters of the cubic fluorite-type phase of CeO2 tended to increase when La3+ was incorporated into CeO2. The F 2g band shift and the absence of a peak corresponding to La2O3 in the Raman spectra consistently confirmed the incorporation of the La3+ ion into CeO2, and the formation of Ce1- x La x O2- δ solid solutions as manifested by increased oxygen vacancy defects. High-quality Ce1- x La x O2- δ nanopowders of ~10-15 nm diameter with a high BET surface area of ~77 m2 g-1 were obtained. The average crystallite size of Ce1- x La x O2- δ was found to be smaller than that of CeO2 for the same calcination temperature of 1073 K, demonstrating that the introduction of La3+ into CeO2 can stabilize the host lattice and refine the grain size at high temperatures.

  17. Crystal structure and magnetic properties of the off-stoichiometric compounds CeNi sub 3 Cu sub 3 and CeNi sub 4 Cu sub 2

    CERN Document Server

    Moze, O; Brück, E; Buschow, K H J

    1998-01-01

    The crystallographic properties of the compounds CeNi sub 3 Cu sub 3 and CeNi sub 4 Cu sub 2 have been investigated by time-of-flight neutron diffraction. A Rietveld profile refinement of the data shows that these compounds crystallize in the hexagonal TbCu sub 7 -type structure and that Ni atoms have a greater preference as compared with Cu atoms for occupying the 2e dumb-bell site. A site preference of Cu atoms for the 2c sites is observed. Magnetic measurements made on these compounds show that the trivalent character of the Ce atoms increases with Cu concentration. (author)

  18. Thermal Variance Investigation and Scintillation Mechanisms of Cs2LiLaBr6-xClx:Ce (CLLBC) and Cs2LiYBr6:Ce (CLYB)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coupland, Daniel David Schechtman; Budden, Brent Scott; Stonehill, Laura Catherine

    2015-01-01

    We perform an investigation into the scintillation processes and performance of elpasolites Cs 2 LiLaBr 6-x Cl x :Ce (CLLBC) and Cs 2 LiYBr 6 :Ce (CLYB) using a thermal cycle over a range of -20 to +50°C. At 10° increments, we acquire data with both a waveform digitizer and charge-integrating electronics. We identify decay components and evaluate decay times, thermal neutron gamma-equivalent energy (GEE), and pulse shape discrimination (PSD) performance. Results are compared to common Cs 2 LiYCl 6 :Ce (CLYC).

  19. Metallic oxides supported in CeO{sub 2} and CeO{sub 2}-La{sub 2} O{sub 3} for low temperature shift reaction; Oxidos metalicos suportados em CeO{sub 2} e CeO{sub 2}-La{sub 2} O{sub 3} para reacao shift a baixa temperatura

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maluf, Silvia Salua; Assaf, Elisabete Moreira [Universidade de Sao Paulo (USP), Sao Carlos, SP (Brazil). Inst. de Quimica]. E-mail: sil_maluf@iqsc.usp.br

    2008-07-01

    This work studied copper and zinc oxides supported in CeO{sub 2} and CeO{sub 2}/La{sub 2}O{sub 3}. The catalytic tests for low temperature shift reaction, carried out for samples, showed the Cu-Ce catalyst presents the highest value of CO conversion (50%) and after the Cu-Ce-La catalysts (30%). The other catalysts showed CO conversion in range of 15%. This behavior is related with surface area, and also with the amount of Cu in the surface of samples (author)

  20. Untangling the cerium and iron contributions to the magnetism of Ce-doped yttrium iron garnet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herranz, G.; Casals, B.; Cichelero, R.; Fontcuberta, J.; Vasili, H. B.; Gargiani, P.; Valvidares, M.; Herrero-Martin, J.; Pellegrin, E.; Geshev, J.

    Due to their large magneto-optic responses, rare-earth-doped yttrium iron garnets, Y3Fe5O12 (YIG), are highly regarded for their potential in photonics and magnonics. Here we consider the case of Ce-doped YIG (Ce-YIG), in which substitutional Ce3+ ions are magnetic because of their 4f1 ground state. Hence, it is expected that Ce substitution can remarkably impact on the magnetization of YIG. However, it is not completely understood how exactly the Ce ions contribute to the macroscopic magnetic properties. Having this in mind, we have carried out magneto-optical and soft x-ray spectroscopy measurements on Ce-YIG thin films. In particular, we have used the element-specificity of XMCD to extract the individual magnetic hysteresis loops linked to Ce3+ and Fe3+ ions, respectively. Our results show that the doping of YIG with Ce causes a disruption of the electronic and magnetic properties of the parent compound, which results into a reduction of the magnetic coupling between the Ce and Fe magnetic moments, especially at low magnetic fields. Our results are relevant for the understanding of magnetism in rare-earth doped YIG and, eventually, may enable a quantitative evaluation of the magneto-optic properties of rare earth incorporation into YIG.

  1. Ce doped NiO nanoparticles as selective NO2 gas sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gawali, Swati R.; Patil, Vithoba L.; Deonikar, Virendrakumar G.; Patil, Santosh S.; Patil, Deepak R.; Patil, Pramod S.; Pant, Jayashree

    2018-03-01

    Metal oxide gas sensors are promising portable gas detection devices because of their advantages such as low cost, easy production and compact size. The performance of such sensors is strongly dependent on material properties such as morphology, structure and doping. In the present study, we report the effect of cerium (Ce) doping on nickel oxide (NiO) nano-structured thin film sensors towards various gases. Bare NiO and Ce doped NiO nanoparticles (Ce:NiO) were synthesized by sol-gel method. To understand the effect of Ce doping in nickel oxide, various molar percentages of Ce with respect to nickel were incorporated. The structure, phase, morphology and band-gap energy of as-synthesized nanoparticles were studied by XRD, SEM, EDAX and UV-vis spectroscopy. Thin film gas sensors of all the samples were prepared and subjected to various gases such as LPG, NH3, CH3COCH3 and NO2. A systematic and comparative study reveals an enhanced gas sensing performance of Ce:NiO sensors towards NO2 gas. The maximum sensitivity for NO2 gas is around 0.719% per ppm at moderate operating temperature of 150 °C for 0.5% Ce:NiO thin film gas sensor. The enhanced gas sensing performance for Ce:NiO is attributed to the distortion of crystal lattice caused by doping of Ce into NiO.

  2. Fabrication, optical and scintillation properties of transparent YAG:Ce ceramics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osipov, V. V.; Ishchenko, A. V.; Shitov, V. A.; Maksimov, R. N.; Lukyashin, K. E.; Platonov, V. V.; Orlov, A. N.; Osipov, S. N.; Yagodin, V. V.; Viktorov, L. V.; Shulgin, B. V.

    2017-09-01

    Highly transparent YAG:Ce ceramics (transmission of 72-82% for 2-mm-thick samples in 550-900 nm wavelength range) were fabricated by solid-state reactive sintering using a mixture of Ce2xY2-2xO3 (x = 0.001, 0.01, 0.03, and 0.05) and Al2O3 nanopowders synthesized by laser ablation with an additional round of pre-calcining before compaction. The synthesized YAG:Ce ceramic materials showed intense luminescence with a maximum at 525-545 nm. The measured absolute light yields of the synthesized YAG:Ce ceramics were 18-21 photon/MeV for 1-5 at.% Ce and 5 photon/MeV for 0.1 at.% Ce. The energy resolutions of the fabricated thin ceramic samples (2 mm) under 662 keV gamma ray were measured to be 10-15%. The decay curves of scintillations consisted of two components with the decay times depending on the Ce3+ concentration. The sample doped with 5 at.% of Ce exhibited the main fast component with 26 ns decay time. The measured data was compared to that of YAG:Ce and well-known CsI:Tl single crystal scintillators. The influence of dopant concentration on the optical, luminescence and scintillation properties was discussed.

  3. Investigation of the 600 C isothermal section of the Fe-Al-Ce ternary system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zheng, Huiyun; Yin, Fucheng [Xiangtan Univ., Hunan (China). School of Materials Science and Engineering; Xiangtan Univ., Hunan (China). Key Laboratory of Materials Design and Preparation Technology of Hunan Province; Li, Zhi [Xiangtan Univ., Hunan (China). School of Materials Science and Engineering; Xiangtan Univ., Hunan (China). Key Laboratory of Materials Design and Preparation Technology of Hunan Province; Xiangtan Univ., Hunan (China). Key Laboratory of Key Film Materials and Application for Equipment (Hunan province); Ji, Li [South China University of Technology, Guangdong (China). School of Materials Science and Engineering

    2017-01-15

    The isothermal section of the Fe-Al-Ce system at 600 C was determined by means of scanning electron microscopy coupled with energy dispersive spectroscopy and X-ray powder diffraction. Twenty three-phase regions were confirmed experimentally, and two three-phase regions could be deduced in this section. Five ternary compounds, i. e., τ{sub 1}, τ{sub 2}, τ{sub 3}, τ{sub 5}, and τ{sub 6}, exist at 600 C. The Fe{sub 2}Ce phase contains 6.6 at.% Al in the Fe-Al-Ce system. The Fe solubility in α-Al, αAl{sub 11}Ce{sub 3}, αAl{sub 3}Ce, Al{sub 2}Ce, AlCe, and AlCe{sub 3} is approximately 1.7 at.%, 1.1 at.%, 1.2 at.%, 1.3 at.%, 5.8 at.%, and 0.1 at.%, respectively, and the solubility of Ce in α-Al, FeAl{sub 3}, Fe{sub 2}Al{sub 5}, FeAl{sub 2}, and FeAl is approximately 0.1 at.%, 1.2 at.%, 1.9 at.%, 0.9 at.%, and 3.7 at.%, respectively.

  4. Effects of Ce, La and Ba addition on the electrochemical behavior of super duplex stainless steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoo, Yun-Ha; Choi, Yoon-Seok; Kim, Jung-Gu; Park, Yong-Soo

    2010-01-01

    The effects of rare earth metal (REM: Ce, La) and Ba addition on aqueous corrosion properties of super duplex stainless steels (SDSS) were investigated by electrochemical tests and surface analyses. The results of potentiodynamic test indicated that the passive range increased by the addition of Ce, La, and Ba, indicating increased relative resistance to localized corrosion. The EIS measurements showed that the Ce-La-Ba-bearing alloys exhibited higher R ct and R p values than the Ce-La-Ba-free alloy at the passive and breakdown states. Furthermore, the additions of REMs and Ba together promoted the formation of dense chromium-enriched passive film.

  5. Complex impedance study on nano-CeO2 coating TiO2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Mei; Wang Honglian; Wang Xidong; Li Wenchao

    2006-01-01

    Titanium dioxide (TiO 2 ) nanoparticles and cerium dioxide (CeO 2 ) nanoparticles coated titanium dioxide (TiO 2 ) nanoparticles (CeO 2 -TiO 2 nanoparticles) have been successfully synthesized by sol-gel method. The complex impedance of the materials was investigated. The grain resistance, boundary resistance and activation energy of the nanoparticles were calculated according to Arrhenius equation. According to calculating results, the active capacity of pure TiO 2 nanoparticles has been improved because of nano-CeO 2 coating. An optimal CeO 2 content of 4.9 mol% was achieved. The high resolution electron microscopy images of CeO 2 -TiO 2 nanoparticles showed that TiO 2 nanoparticles, as a core, were covered by CeO 2 nanoparticles. The average size of CeO 2 coating TiO 2 nanoparticles was about 70 nm. Scanning electron microscopy observation indicted that CeO 2 nanoparticle coating improved the separation, insulation, and stability the CeO 2 -TiO 2 nanoparticles, which was benefit to the activity of materials

  6. Thermopower studies of doped CeAl sub 2 and UAl sub 2

    CERN Document Server

    Park, J G

    1997-01-01

    We have studied the thermopower of U doped CeAl sub 2 and Ce and La doped UAl sub 2. Despite different ground state properties of CeAl sub 2 and UAl sub 2 , the former being an antiferromagnetic heavy-fermion compound and the latter non-magnetic, we have found that not only thermopower data for pure CeAl sub 2 and UAl sub 2 are similar but also the thermopower results of doped samples behave similarly. Although the similarity seen in pure systems is yet to be understood, we interpret the doping effects as the results of changes in energy dependent relaxation time with doping. (author)

  7. Classification of the alterations of beaver dams to headwater streams in northeastern Connecticut, U.S.A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burchsted, Denise; Daniels, Melinda D.

    2014-01-01

    Of the many types of barriers to water flow, beaver dams are among the smallest, typically lasting less than a decade and rarely exceeding 1.5 m in height. They are also among the most frequent and common obstructions in rivers, with a density often exceeding ten dams per km, a frequency of construction within a given network on a time scale of years, and a historic extent covering most of North America. Past quantification of the geomorphologic impact of beaver dams has primarily been limited to local impacts within individual impoundments and is of limited geographic scope. To assess the impact of beaver dams at larger scales, this study examines channel shape and sediment distribution in thirty river reaches in northeastern Connecticut, U.S.A. The study reaches fall within the broader categories of impounded and free-flowing segments, leaving a third segment class of beaver meadows requiring additional study. Each of the study reaches were classified at the reach scale as free-flowing, valley-wide beaver pond, in-channel beaver pond, and downstream of beaver dam. The bankfull channel width to depth ratios and channel widths normalized by watershed area vary significantly across the study reach classes. Additionally, reaches modified by beaver dams have finer sediment distributions. This paper provides the first quantitative geomorphic descriptions of the in-channel beaver pond and reaches downstream of beaver dams. Given the different channel shapes and sediment distributions, we infer that geomorphic processes are longitudinally decoupled by these frequent barriers that control local base level. These barriers generate heterogeneity within a river network by greatly increasing the range of channel morphology and by generating patches controlled by different processes. Therefore, in spite of the small size of individual beaver dams, the cumulative effect of multiple dams has the potential to modify processes at larger spatial scales. To improve assessment of the

  8. National Program for Inspection of Non-Federal Dams. Mashhpaug Pond Spillway (CT 00640), Dike (CT 01699), Dam (CT 01700), Quinebaug River Basin, Union, Connecticut. Phase I Inspection Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-03-01

    INSPECTION REPORT SECTION I - PROJECT INFORMATION 6 1.1 General: a. Authort: Public Law 92-367, August 8, 1972, authorized the Secretary of the Army...ARMY ENGINEER DIV. NEW ENGLAND MASHAPAUG POND DIKE coops OF r.� NATIONAL PROGRAM OF UNION, CONNECTICUT WALRA .ABO C~ SI TSIN SPEC TIO N O F C T

  9. Fermiology of Ce2 Rh3 Ge5

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wartenbe, Mark

    The competition between localized and delocalized f electrons in heavy fermion materials produces a wide variety of interesting physical phenomena. Among these compounds is Ce2Rh3Ge5. This heavy-fermion system undergoes an antiferromagnetic transition below 4K and exhibits an angle dependent magnetic phase transition around 25 tesla. In addition, RF conductivity measurements in pulsed field (65T) have revealed quantum oscillations. Temperature dependence at fixed angle indicates relatively heavy effective masses of values ranging from ~3me on up to ~10me. This indicates that the narrow f-electron density of states is partially hybridized close to the Fermi energy, but also places strict cryogenic constraints upon the measurement (3Helium temperatures are required). Fermi surface calculations have produced complex figures which lend validation to such rich behavior. Presented are updated measurements including magnetization and revised theoretical calculations..

  10. Qu'est-ce que la relativité ?

    CERN Document Server

    Vannucci, François

    2005-01-01

    Publiée en 1905 par Albert Einstein, la théorie de la relativité marqua profondément le XXe siècle. Ce que tout un chacun sait… sans jamais avoir bien compris pourquoi ! François Vannucci commence donc par nous décrypter E=mc2. Car cette fameuse formule résume la révolution qu’apporta la théorie : énergie et masse ne sont plus des quantités indépendantes, elles sont reliées par la vitesse de la lumière. Il nous explique alors en quoi la théorie de la relativité, en établissant le cadre d’une théorie globale de l’univers - une cosmologie -, a révolutionné notre compréhension de l’univers…

  11. Two-orbital model for CeB6

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Dheeraj Kumar

    2017-05-01

    We describe a two-orbital tight-binding model with bases belonging to the Γ8 quartet. It captures several characteristics of the Fermiology unravelled by the recent angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopic (ARPES) measurements on cerium hexaboride CeB6 samples cleaved along different high-symmetry crystallographic directions, which includes the ellipsoid-like Fermi surfaces (FSs) with major axes directed along Γ-X. We calculate various multipolar susceptibilities within the model and identify the susceptibility that shows the strongest divergence in the presence of standard onsite Coulomb interactions and discuss its possible implication and relevance with regard to the signature of strong ferromagnetic correlations existent in various phases as shown by the recent experiments.

  12. Table incremental slow injection CE-CT in lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshida, Shoji; Maeda, Tomoho; Morita, Masaru

    1988-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate tumor enhancement in lung cancer under the table incremental study with slow injection of contrast media. The early serial 8 sliced images during the slow injection (1.5 ml/sec) of contrant media were obtained. Following the early images, delayed 8 same sliced images were taken in 2 minutes later. Chacteristic enhanced patterns of the primary cancer and metastatic mediastinal lymphnode were recognized in this study. Enhancement of the primary lesion was classified in 4 patterns, irregular geographic pattern, heterogeneous pattern, homogeneous pattern and rim-enhanced pattern. In mediastinal metastatic lymphadenopathy, three enhanced patterns were obtained, heterogeneous, homogeneous and ring enhanced pattern. Some characteristic enhancement patterns according to the histopathological finding of the lung cancer were obtained. With using this incremental slow injection CE-CT, precise information about the relationship between lung cancer and adjacent mediastinal structure, and obvious staining patterns of the tumor and mediastinal lymphnode were recognized. (author)

  13. New limits on 2ε, εβ{sup +} and 2β{sup +} decay of {sup 136}Ce and {sup 138}Ce with deeply purified cerium sample

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Belli, P.; Bernabei, R. [INFN Sezione Roma ' ' Tor Vergata' ' , Rome (Italy); Universita di Roma ' ' Tor Vergata' ' , Dipartimento di Fisica, Rome (Italy); Boiko, R.S. [Institute for Nuclear Research, Kyiv (Ukraine); National University of Life and Environmental Sciences of Ukraine, Kyiv (Ukraine); Cappella, F. [INFN Sezione Roma, Rome (Italy); Cerulli, R.; Laubenstein, M. [INFN, Laboratori Nazionali del Gran Sasso, Assergi (Italy); Danevich, F.A.; Kropivyansky, B.N.; Polischuk, O.G.; Tretyak, V.I. [Institute for Nuclear Research, Kyiv (Ukraine); Incicchitti, A. [INFN Sezione Roma, Rome (Italy); Universita di Roma ' ' La Sapienza' ' , Dipartimento di Fisica, Rome (Italy); Mokina, V.M. [Institute for Nuclear Research, Kyiv (Ukraine); INFN Sezione Roma, Rome (Italy)

    2017-08-15

    A search for double electron capture (2ε), electron capture with positron emission (εβ{sup +}), and double positron emission (2β{sup +}) in {sup 136}Ce and {sup 138}Ce was realized with a 465 cm{sup 3} ultra-low background HP Ge γ spectrometer over 2299 h at the Gran Sasso underground laboratory. A 627 g sample of cerium oxide deeply purified by liquid-liquid extraction method was used as a source of γ quanta expected in double β decay of the cerium isotopes. New improved half-life limits were set on different modes and channels of double β decay of {sup 136}Ce and {sup 138}Ce at the level of T{sub 1/2} > 10{sup 17}-10{sup 18} yr. (orig.)

  14. Effect of Al deoxidation on the formation behavior of inclusions in Ce-added stainless steel melts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, Sun Kuk; Kong, Young-Min; Park, Joo Hyun

    2014-09-01

    The effect of Al deoxidation on the oxygen content and the inclusion properties (composition, size and morphology) of Ce-added stainless steel melts at 1873 K was investigated. The total oxygen content was about 310(±40) ppm before Al addition and slightly decreases with holding time when Al content was lower than 0.01%, whereas the oxygen content drastically decreased when Al content was greater than about 0.05%. Al content initially decreased, followed by an increase by addition of Ce, which originates from the reduction of Al2O3 in the refractory and/or inclusions by added Ce. The initial inclusions before Al addition were mainly Mn(Cr)-silicates. When Ce was added without Al deoxidation, small amounts of Ce oxide were detected after Ce addition. However, the content of Ce oxide decreased with holding time, and the inclusion composition reverted to the MnO-SiO2-Cr2O3 system. The initial Mn(Cr)-silicate inclusions transformed to Al2O3-rich inclusions by Al addition, and then Ce2O3 was enriched by Ce addition due to local enrichment of Ce around Al2O3 particles, resulting in the formation of AlCeO3-type inclusions. However, the Ce2O3 in the inclusions was continuously reduced by Al due to higher chemical potential of Al than Ce, finally forming the Al2O3-CeAl11O18 complex inclusions.

  15. Scintillation properties of Ce-doped LuLiF{sub 4} and LuScBO{sub 3}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yanagida, Takayuki, E-mail: t_yanagi@tagen.tohoku.ac.jp [IMRAM, Tohoku University, 2-1-1 Katahira, Aoba-ku, Sendai, Miyagi 980-8577 (Japan); Fujimoto, Yutaka [IMRAM, Tohoku University, 2-1-1 Katahira, Aoba-ku, Sendai, Miyagi 980-8577 (Japan); Kawaguchi, Noriaki [IMRAM, Tohoku University, 2-1-1 Katahira, Aoba-ku, Sendai, Miyagi 980-8577 (Japan); Tokuyama Corporation, Shibuya 3-chome, Shibuya-ku, Tokyo 150-8383 (Japan); Yokota, Yuui [IMRAM, Tohoku University, 2-1-1 Katahira, Aoba-ku, Sendai, Miyagi 980-8577 (Japan); Kamada, Kei [Materials Research Laboratory, Furukawa, Co. Ltd., 1-25-13 Kannondai, Tsukuba, Ibaragi 305-0856 (Japan); Totsuka, Daisuke [Nihon Kessho Kogaku Co., Ltd., 810-5 Nobe-cho, Tatebayashi, Gunma 374-0047 (Japan); Hatamoto, Shun-Ichi [Corporate Research and Development Center, Mitsui Mining and Smelting Co., Ltd., 1333-2 Haraichi, Ageo Saitama 362-0023 (Japan); Yoshikawa, Akira; Chani, Valery [IMRAM, Tohoku University, 2-1-1 Katahira, Aoba-ku, Sendai, Miyagi 980-8577 (Japan)

    2011-10-01

    The crystals of 1 mol% Ce-doped LuLiF{sub 4} (Ce:LLF) grown by the micro-pulling down ({mu}-PD) method and 1 mol% Ce-doped LuScBO{sub 3} (Ce:LSBO) grown by the conventional Czochralski (Cz) method were examined for their scintillation properties. Ce:LLF and Ce:LSBO demonstrated {approx}80% transparency at wavelengths longer than 300 and 400 nm, respectively. When excited by {sup 241}Am {alpha}-ray to obtain radioactive luminescence spectra, Ce{sup 3+} 5d-4f emission peaks were detected at around 320 nm for Ce:LLF and at around 380 nm for Ce:LSBO. In Ce:LSBO, the host luminescence was also observed at 260 nm. By recording pulse height spectra under {gamma}-ray irradiation, the absolute light yield of Ce:LLF and Ce:LSBO was measured to be 3600{+-}400 and 4200{+-}400 ph/MeV, respectively. Decay time kinetics was also investigated using a pulse X-ray equipped streak camera system. The main component of Ce:LLF was {approx}320 ns and that of Ce:LSBO was {approx}31 ns. In addition, the light yield non-proportionality and energy resolution against the {gamma}-ray energy were evaluated.

  16. Photoluminescence properties and energy-level diagrams in (Ce3+, Tb3+)-codoped KCl green phosphor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tosaka, Yuki; Adachi, Sadao

    2014-01-01

    KCl:Ce 3+ , Tb 3+ green phosphor was synthesized from an aqueous solution of KCl–CeCl 3 –TbCl 3 . The synthesized phosphor was investigated using X-ray diffraction analysis, electron probe microanalysis, diffuse reflectance measurements, photoluminescence (PL) analysis, PL excitation spectroscopy, and PL decay measurements. The KCl:Ce 3+ , Tb 3+ phosphor showed a strong Tb 3+ -related emission in the 480–700 nm spectral region. The Tb 3+ -related emission intensity in the codoped phosphor was enhanced more than 300 times compared to that in the Tb 3+ singly doped phosphor. This enhancement in the PL intensity could be attributed to an efficient energy transfer from Ce 3+ to Tb 3+ in the KCl host. The maximum transfer efficiency was η ∼92% for the sample synthesized at a solution of KCl:CeCl 3 :TbCl 3 =1:0.01:0.05 in molar ratio. The (Ce 3+ , Tb 3+ ) concentration dependences of the Ce 3+ - and Tb 3+ -emission decay times were determined. The temperature dependence of the Tb 3+ -related emission intensity was also measured and analyzed from T=20–450 K. - Highlights: • Simple method was developed for synthesizing KCl:Ce 3+ , Tb 3+ green phosphor. • Ce 3+ and Tb 3+ concentrations were optimized to obtain high efficient phosphor. • An efficient energy transfer was observed from Ce 3+ to Tb 3+ in KCl. • Detailed energy-level schemes for Ce 3+ and Tb 3+ ions in KCl were proposed

  17. Exposure of agricultural crops to nanoparticle CeO2in biochar-amended soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Servin, Alia D; De la Torre-Roche, Roberto; Castillo-Michel, Hiram; Pagano, Luca; Hawthorne, Joseph; Musante, Craig; Pignatello, Joseph; Uchimiya, Minori; White, Jason C

    2017-01-01

    Biochar is seeing increased usage as an amendment in agricultural soils but the significance of nanoscale interactions between this additive and engineered nanoparticles (ENP) remains unknown. Corn, lettuce, soybean and zucchini were grown for 28 d in two different soils (agricultural, residential) amended with 0-2000 mg engineered nanoparticle (ENP) CeO 2  kg -1 and biochar (350 °C or 600 °C) at application rates of 0-5% (w/w). At harvest, plants were analyzed for biomass, Ce content, chlorophyll and lipid peroxidation. Biomass from the four species grown in residential soil varied with species and biochar type. However, biomass in the agricultural soil amended with biochar 600 °C was largely unaffected. Biochar co-exposure had minimal impact on Ce accumulation, with reduced or increased Ce content occurring at the highest (5%) biochar level. Soil-specific and biochar-specific effects on Ce accumulation were observed in the four species. For example, zucchini grown in agricultural soil with 2000 mg CeO 2  kg -1 and 350 °C biochar (0.5-5%) accumulated greater Ce than the control. However, for the 600 °C biochar, the opposite effect was evident, with decreased Ce content as biochar increased. A principal component analysis showed that biochar type accounted for 56-99% of the variance in chlorophyll and lipid peroxidation across the plants. SEM and μ-XRF showed Ce association with specific biochar and soil components, while μ-XANES analysis confirmed that after 28 d in soil, the Ce remained largely as CeO 2 . The current study demonstrates that biochar synthesis conditions significantly impact interactions with ENP, with subsequent effects on particle fate and effects. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  18. Assessing the vulnerability of public-supply wells to contamination--Glacial aquifer system in Woodbury, Connecticut

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jagucki, Martha L.; Brown, Craig J.; Starn, J. Jeffrey; Eberts, Sandra M.

    2010-01-01

    This fact sheet highlights findings from the vulnerability study of a public-supply well in Woodbury, Connecticut. The well typically produces water at the rate of 72 gallons per minute from the glacial aquifer system in the Pomperaug River Basin. Water samples were collected at the public-supply well and at monitoring wells installed in or near the simulated zone of contribution to the supply well. Samples of untreated water from the public-supply wellhead contained several types of undesirable constituents, including 11 volatile organic compounds (VOCs), nitrate, pesticides, uranium, and radon. Most of these constituents were detected at concentrations below drinking-water standards, where such standards exist. Only concentrations of the VOC trichlorethylene exceeded the Maximum Contaminant Level (MCL) of 5 micrograms per liter (ug/L) established by U.S. Environmental Protection Agency for drinking water. Radon concentrations exceeded a proposed-but not finalized-MCL of 300 picocuries per liter (pCi/L). Overall, the study findings point to four main factors that affect the movement and fate of contaminants and the vulnerability of the public-supply well in Woodbury: (1) groundwater age (how long ago water entered, or recharged, the aquifer); (2) the percentage of recharge received through urban areas; (3) the percentage of recharge received through dry wells and their proximity to the public-supply well; and (4) natural geochemical processes occurring within the aquifer system; that is, processes that affect the amounts and distribution of chemical substances in aquifer sediments and groundwater. A computer-model simulation of groundwater flow to the public-supply well was used to estimate the age of water particles entering the well along the length of the well screen. About 90 percent of the simulated flow to the well consists of water that entered the aquifer 9 or fewer years ago. Such young water is vulnerable to contaminants resulting from human activities

  19. Active species of CeAl(4) in the CeCl(3)-doped sodium aluminium hydride and its enhancement on reversible hydrogen storage performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Xiulin; Xiao, Xuezhang; Chen, Lixin; Yu, Kairong; Wu, Zhe; Li, Shouquan; Wang, Qidong

    2009-11-28

    By directly doping CeAl(4) into sodium aluminium hydride, which probably serves as the active species in the hydriding and dehydriding processes of CeCl(3)-doped NaAlH(4), a high reversible hydrogen capacity of 4.77-4.92 wt% (close to expected capacity of 5.13 wt%) can be achieved in less than 20 min under moderate conditions.

  20. Muon spin relaxation study on itinerant ferromagnet CeCrGe₃ and the effect of Ti substitution on magnetism of CeCrGe₃.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Debarchan; Bhattacharyya, A; Anand, V K; Hillier, A D; Taylor, J W; Gruner, T; Geibel, C; Adroja, D T; Hossain, Z

    2015-01-14

    A Muon spin relaxation (µSR) study has been performed on the Kondo lattice heavy fermion itinerant ferromagnet CeCrGe3. Recent investigations of bulk properties have revealed a long-range ordering of Cr moments at Tc = 70 K in this compound. Our µSR investigation between 1.2 K and 125 K confirm the bulk magnetic order which is marked by a loss in initial asymmetry below 70 K accompanied with a sharp increase in the muon depolarization rate. Field dependent µSR spectra show that the internal field at the muon site is higher than 0.25 T apparently due to the ferromagnetic nature of ordering. The effect of Ti substitution on the magnetism in CeCrGe3 is presented. A systematic study has been made on polycrystalline CeCr(1-x)Ti(x)Ge3 (0 ⩽ x ⩽ 1) using magnetic susceptibility χ(T), isothermal magnetization M(H), specific heat C(T) and electrical resistivity ρ(T) measurements which clearly reveal that the substitution of Ti for Cr in CeCrGe3 strongly influences the exchange interaction and ferromagnetic ordering of Cr moments. The Cr moment ordering temperature is suppressed gradually with increasing Ti concentration up to x = 0.50 showing Tc = 7 K beyond which Ce moment ordering starts to dominate and a crossover between Cr and Ce moment ordering is observed with a Ce moment ordering Tc = 14 K for x = 1.0. The Kondo lattice behavior is evident from temperature dependence of ρ(T) in all CeCr(1-x)Ti(x)Ge3 samples.

  1. Satellite line mapping in Eu3+–Ce3+ and Pr3+–Ce3+ codoped Y2SiO5

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Serrano, D.; Karlsson, J.; Zheng, L.; Dong, Y.; Ferrier, A.; Goldner, P.; Walther, A.; Rippe, L.; Kröll, S.

    2016-01-01

    In this work we perform a high-resolution spectroscopic investigation of Eu 3+ –Ce 3+ and Pr 3+ –Ce 3+ codoped Y 2 SiO 5 crystals. Satellite line spectra were recorded at low temperatures around the Eu 3+ : 7 F 0 → 5 D 0 and the Pr 3+ : 3 H 4 → 1 D 2 transitions. It is observed that the incorporation of Ce 3+ as a codopant notably changes the Eu 3+ and Pr 3+ satellite line patterns. Satellite lines measured in singly doped Eu 3+ :Y 2 SiO 5 were found at the same spectral positions in Eu 3+ –Ce 3+ codoped crystals. These coincident lines were concluded to be due to pairs of Eu 3+ ions. Extra satellite lines appeared in the codoped crystals, which were assigned to Ce 3+ related structures such as Ce 3+ –Eu 3+ pairs. The analysis of the Pr 3+ satellite line spectra presents further challenges. Satellite lines associated to Pr 3+ pairs show weaker intensity, presumably due to the efficient quenching of the Pr 3+1 D 2 emission through cross-relaxation paths ( 1 D 2 → 1 G 4 ; 3 H 4 → 3 F 4 ). The investigation of the Eu 3+ and Pr 3+ satellite line patterns in Y 2 SiO 5 is particularly interesting for their exploitation in rare-earth based quantum computation schemes. - Highlights: • We recorded Eu and Pr satellite lines in Y 2 SiO 5 with and without Ce as a codopant. • The presence of Ce leads to the appearance of extra satellite lines in the spectra. • The satellite lines are associated to minor crystal sites such as ion pairs. • Less than 100 ion pairs were detected per satellite line. • The exploitation of the satellite line structure is proposed for quantum computing.

  2. A facile synthesis of high quality nanostructured CeO2 and Gd2O3-doped CeO2 solid electrolytes for improved electrochemical performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuo, Yu-Lin; Su, Yu-Ming; Chou, Hung-Lung

    2015-06-07

    This study describes the use of a composite nitrate salt solution as a precursor to synthesize CeO2 and Gd2O3-doped CeO2 (GDC) nanoparticles (NPs) using an atmospheric pressure plasma jet (APPJ). The microstructures of CeO2 and GDC NPs were found to be cubical and spherical shaped nanocrystallites with average particle sizes of 10.5 and 6.7 nm, respectively. Reactive oxygen species, detected by optical emission spectroscopy (OES), are believed to be the major oxidative agents for the formation of oxide materials in the APPJ process. Based on the material characterization and OES observations, the study effectively demonstrated the feasibility of preparing well-crystallized GDC NPs by the APPJ system as well as the gas-to-particle mechanism. Notably, the Bader charge of CeO2 and Ce0.9Gd0.1O2 characterized by density function theory (DFT) simulation and AC impedance measurements shows that Gd helps in increasing the charge on Ce0.9Gd0.1O2 NPs, thus improving their conductivity and making them candidate materials for electrolytes in solid oxide fuel cells.

  3. Photocatalytic activity of Ce-modified SBA-15 for the degradation of ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    als. Photocatalytic activity evaluation studies are made on all the samples for the degradation of isoproturon. Among them, 0.3 (wt%) Ce-modified Al-SBA-15 catalyst has shown a maximum activity in comparison with Ce-modified. SBA-15. The better activity is attributed to the synergistic effect of mesoporosity and the ...

  4. Toxicity of 144Ce inhaled in a relatively insoluble form by beagle dogs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boecker, B.B.; Hahn, F.F.; Muggenburg, B.A.; Mauderly, J.L.; McClellan, R.O.; Pickrell, J.A.

    1980-01-01

    The metabolism, dosimetry and effects of 144 Ce inhaled in fused aluminosilicate particles are being investigated in the beagle dog to assess the long-term biological consequences of release of relatively insoluble aerosol forms of 144 Ce that could occur in nuclear accidents. The effects resulting from the relatively protracted radiation dose patterns to the lung from this form of 144 Ce are being compared with effects of other radiation dose patterns to the lung. One hundred eleven dogs were exposed to aerosols of 144 Ce in fused aluminosilicate particles to yield initial lung burdens of 0.0024 to 210 μCi/kg body weight and 15 control dogs were exposed to nonradioactive fused aluminosilicate particles. To date, 65 144 Ce-exposed and 2 control dogs have died or were euthanized at 143 to 4578 days after inhalation of 144 Ce. Prominent findings in the 144 Ce-exposed dogs were radiation pneumonitis in 17 dogs that died at early times and neoplastic disease in 39 of the 48 dogs that died 750 days or later. Observations are continuing on the 46 144 Ce-exposed and 13 control dogs remaining alive at this time, at least 3337 days after exposure

  5. Toxicity of 144Ce inhaled in a relatively insoluble form by aged beagle dogs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boecker, B.B.; Hahn, F.F.; Muggenburg, B.A.; Mauderly, J.L.; McClellan, R.O.; Pickrell, J.A.

    1980-01-01

    The toxicity of relatively insoluble 144 Ce inhaled by 8- to 10.5-year-old beagle dogs is being investigated to provide information on possible age-related differences in the resulting long-term biological responses. Forty-two dogs were exposed, nose-only, to aerosols of 144 Ce in fused aluminosilicate particles to yield initial lung burdens of 2.2 to 75 μCi 144 Ce/kg body weight, and 12 control dogs were exposed to nonradioactive fused aluminosilicate particles. To date, 38 144 Ce-exposed dogs and 10 control dogs have died or were euthanized between 197 and 2375 days after inhalation of the 144 Ce. Prominent findings in the 144 Ce-exposed dogs were radiation pneumonitis in 19 dogs that died during the first 943 days post-exposure and neoplastic disease in seven of the 15 dogs. However, only one of these tumors killed the dog. No hemangiosarcomas have been observed in this study, although they were a prominent finding in immature or young adult dogs exposed to 144 Ce. Observations are continuing on the four surviving 144 Ce-exposed and two control dogs

  6. The influence of age on the retention of 141Ce in rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kargachin, B.; Kostial, K.

    1988-01-01

    The influence of age on 141 Ce retention after oral and intraperitoneal administration was studied in 1 and 6-7 week-old rats. Older rats received 141 Ce orally by stomach tube while sucklings received it by the method of artificial feeding with a dropper. Retention of 141 Ce was determined in the whole body, carcass and organs (liver, bone, kidneys, brain, skin) 6, 12 and 18 days after 141 Ce intraperitoneal application, 6 and 12 days after oral application in sucklings and 1 day after oral application in older rats. Present results show higher values of retention in younger than in older rats both after oral and intraperitoneal 141 Ce administration. The whole body retention in sucklings 18 days after 141 Ce intraperitoneal administration was 1.4 times higher than in older animals. Retention was also significantly higher in skin, brain, bone, and kidneys. Age-related difference in retention was even more pronounced after 141 Ce oral administration. 141 Ce retention in younger animals was 2-3 orders of magnitude higher than in older ones. Present study once again indicates the importance of age in radionuclide metabolism. (author). 4 refs.; 1 tab

  7. Ce que nous faisons | Page 134 | CRDI - Centre de recherches pour ...

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    Le CRDI appuie des travaux de recherche dans les pays en voie de développement en vue de produire un changement réel et durable. Ce savoir peut servir d'outil pour résoudre des problèmes mondiaux urgents. Nous partageons ce savoir avec les autres en :

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    Le CRDI appuie des travaux de recherche dans les pays en voie de développement en vue de produire un changement réel et durable. Ce savoir peut servir d'outil pour résoudre des problèmes mondiaux urgents. Nous partageons ce savoir avec les autres en :

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    Le CRDI appuie des travaux de recherche dans les pays en voie de développement en vue de produire un changement réel et durable. Ce savoir peut servir d'outil pour résoudre des problèmes mondiaux urgents. Nous partageons ce savoir avec les autres en :

  10. Charge dynamics in the Kondo insulator Ce3Bi4Pt3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bucher, B.; Schlesinger, Z.; Canfield, P.C.; Fisk, Z.

    1994-01-01

    We report the reflectivity and optical conductivity of the Kondo insulator Ce 3 Bi 4 Pt 3 . For temperatures less than 100 K, depletion of the conductivity below about 300 cm -1 signifies the development of a charge gap. The temperature dependence of the disappearance of the spectral weight scales with the quenching of the Ce 4f moments. ((orig.))

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  12. Ce que nous faisons | Page 132 | CRDI - Centre de recherches pour ...

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    Le CRDI appuie des travaux de recherche dans les pays en voie de développement en vue de produire un changement réel et durable. Ce savoir peut servir d'outil pour résoudre des problèmes mondiaux urgents. Nous partageons ce savoir avec les autres en :

  13. Spin-glass, antiferromagnetism and Kondo behavior in Ce2Au1 ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    report high pressure electrical resistivity of Ce2AuSi3, ac susceptibility (χ) and magnetoresistance of various alloys of this solid solution in order to gain better knowledge of the magnetism of these alloys. High pressure resistivity behavior is consistent with the proposal that Ce2AuSi3 lies at the left-hand side of the maximum ...

  14. Structure of negative parity yrast bands in odd mass 125−131Ce ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    4. — journal of. April 2010 physics pp. 525–539. Structure of negative parity yrast bands in odd mass 125−131Ce nuclei. ARUN BHARTI∗, SURAM SINGH and S K KHOSA. Department of ... in 125Ce have been extensively studied up to very high spins in recent years [3,4]. ... The detailed theory of PSM is given in [12].

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  18. Optical properties of pure and Ce3+ doped gadolinium gallium garnet crystals and epitaxial layers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Syvorotka, I.I.; Sugak, D.; Wierzbicka, A.; Wittlin, A.; Przybylińska, H.; Barzowska, J.; Barcz, A.; Berkowski, M.; Domagała, J.; Mahlik, S.; Grinberg, M.; Ma, Chong-Geng

    2015-01-01

    Results of X-ray diffraction and low temperature optical absorption measurements of cerium doped gadolinium gallium garnet single crystals and epitaxial layers are reported. In the region of intra-configurational 4f–4f transitions the spectra of the bulk crystals exhibit the signatures of several different Ce 3+ related centers. Apart from the dominant center, associated with Ce substituting gadolinium, at least three other centers are found, some of them attributed to the so-called antisite locations of rare-earth ions in the garnet host, i.e., in the Ga positions. X-ray diffraction data prove lattice expansion of bulk GGG crystals due to the presence of rare-earth antisites. The concentration of the additional Ce-related centers in epitaxial layers is much lower than in the bulk crystals. However, the Ce-doped layers incorporate a large amount of Pb from flux, which is the most probable source of nonradiative quenching of Ce luminescence, not observed in crystals grown by the Czochralski method. - Highlights: • Ce 3+ multicenters found in Gadolinium Gallium Garnet crystals and epitaxial layers. • High quality epitaxial layers of pure and Ce-doped GGG were grown. • Luminescence quenching of Ce 3+ by Pb ions from flux detected in GGG epitaxial layers. • X-ray diffraction allows measuring the amount of the rare-earth antisites in GGG

  19. Ce que nous faisons | Page 108 | CRDI - Centre de recherches pour ...

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  20. Recent advances in CE-MS: Synergy of wet chemistry and instrumentation innovations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pantůčková, Pavla; Gebauer, Petr; Boček, Petr; Křivánková, Ludmila

    2011-01-01

    CE with MS detection is a hyphenated technique which greatly improves the ability of CE to deal with real samples, especially with those coming from biology and medicine, where the target analytes are present as trace amounts in very complex matrices. CE-MS is now almost a routine technique performed on commercially available instruments. It faces currently a tremendous development of the technique itself as well as of its wide application area. Great interest in CE-MS is reflected in the scientific literature by many original research articles and also by numerous reviews. The review presented here has a general scope and belongs to a series of regularly published reviews on the topic. It covers the literature from the last 2 years, since January 2008 till June 2010. It brings a critical selection of related literature sorted into groups reflecting the main topics of actual scientific interest: (i) innovations in CE-ESI-MS, (ii) use of alternative interfaces, and (iii) ways to enhance sensitivity. Special attention is paid to novel electrolyte systems amenable to CE-MS including nonvolatile BGEs, to advanced CE separation principles such as MEKC, MEEKC, chiral CE, and to the use of preconcentration techniques. Copyright © 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.