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Sample records for wind-wind collision zone

  1. VLTI-AMBER Velocity-Resolved Aperture-Synthesis Imaging of Eta Carinae with a Spectral Resolution of 12 000: Studies of the Primary Star Wind and Innermost Wind-Wind Collision Zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weigelt, G.; Hofmann, K.-H.; Schertl, D.; Clementel, N.; Corcoran, M. F.; Damineli, A.; de Wit, W.-J.; Grellmann, R.; Groh, J.; Guieu, S.; hide

    2016-01-01

    The mass loss from massive stars is not understood well. Eta Carinae is a unique object for studying the massive stellar wind during the luminous blue variable phase. It is also an eccentric binary with a period of 5.54 yr. The nature of both stars is uncertain, although we know from X-ray studies that there is a wind-wind collision whose properties change with orbital phase. Aims. We want to investigate the structure and kinematics of Car's primary star wind and wind-wind collision zone with a high spatial resolution of approx.6 mas (approx.14 au) and high spectral resolution of R = 12 000. Methods. Observations of Car were carried out with the ESO Very Large Telescope Interferometer (VLTI) and the AMBER instrument between approximately five and seven months before the August 2014 periastron passage. Velocity-resolved aperture-synthesis images were reconstructed from the spectrally dispersed interferograms. Interferometric studies can provide information on the binary orbit, the primary wind, and the wind collision. Results. We present velocity-resolved aperture-synthesis images reconstructed in more than 100 di erent spectral channels distributed across the Br(gamma) 2.166 micron emission line. The intensity distribution of the images strongly depends on wavelength. At wavelengths corresponding to radial velocities of approximately -140 to -376 km/s measured relative to line center, the intensity distribution has a fan-shaped structure. At the velocity of -277 km/s, the position angle of the symmetry axis of the fan is 126. The fan-shaped structure extends approximately 8.0 mas (approx.18:8 au) to the southeast and 5.8 mas (approx.13:6 au) to the northwest, measured along the symmetry axis at the 16% intensity contour. The shape of the intensity distributions suggests that the obtained images are the first direct images of the innermost wind-wind collision zone. Therefore, the observations provide velocity-dependent image structures that can be used to test three

  2. VLTI-AMBER velocity-resolved aperture-synthesis imaging of η Carinae with a spectral resolution of 12 000. Studies of the primary star wind and innermost wind-wind collision zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weigelt, G.; Hofmann, K.-H.; Schertl, D.; Clementel, N.; Corcoran, M. F.; Damineli, A.; de Wit, W.-J.; Grellmann, R.; Groh, J.; Guieu, S.; Gull, T.; Heininger, M.; Hillier, D. J.; Hummel, C. A.; Kraus, S.; Madura, T.; Mehner, A.; Mérand, A.; Millour, F.; Moffat, A. F. J.; Ohnaka, K.; Patru, F.; Petrov, R. G.; Rengaswamy, S.; Richardson, N. D.; Rivinius, T.; Schöller, M.; Teodoro, M.; Wittkowski, M.

    2016-10-01

    Context. The mass loss from massive stars is not understood well. η Carinae is a unique object for studying the massive stellar wind during the luminous blue variable phase. It is also an eccentric binary with a period of 5.54 yr. The nature of both stars is uncertain, although we know from X-ray studies that there is a wind-wind collision whose properties change with orbital phase. Aims: We want to investigate the structure and kinematics of η Car's primary star wind and wind-wind collision zone with a high spatial resolution of ~6 mas (~14 au) and high spectral resolution of R = 12 000. Methods: Observations of η Car were carried out with the ESO Very Large Telescope Interferometer (VLTI) and the AMBER instrument between approximately five and seven months before the August 2014 periastron passage. Velocity-resolved aperture-synthesis images were reconstructed from the spectrally dispersed interferograms. Interferometric studies can provide information on the binary orbit, the primary wind, and the wind collision. Results: We present velocity-resolved aperture-synthesis images reconstructed in more than 100 different spectral channels distributed across the Brγ 2.166 μm emission line. The intensity distribution of the images strongly depends on wavelength. At wavelengths corresponding to radial velocities of approximately -140 to - 376 km s-1 measured relative to line center, the intensity distribution has a fan-shaped structure. At the velocity of - 277 km s-1, the position angle of the symmetry axis of the fan is ~126°. The fan-shaped structure extends approximately 8.0 mas (~18.8 au) to the southeast and 5.8 mas (~13.6 au) to the northwest, measured along the symmetry axis at the 16% intensity contour. The shape of the intensity distributions suggests that the obtained images are the first direct images of the innermost wind-wind collision zone. Therefore, the observations provide velocity-dependent image structures that can be used to test three

  3. He II {lambda}4686 IN {eta} CARINAE: COLLAPSE OF THE WIND-WIND COLLISION REGION DURING PERIASTRON PASSAGE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Teodoro, M.; Damineli, A. [Instituto de Astronomia, Geofisica e Ciencias Atmosfericas, Universidade de Sao Paulo, Rua do Matao 1226, Cidade Universitaria, Sao Paulo 05508-900 (Brazil); Arias, J. I. [Departamento de Fisica, Universidad de La Serena, Av. Cisternas 1200 Norte, La Serena (Chile); De Araujo, F. X.; Borges Fernandes, M.; Pereira, C. B. [Observatorio Nacional, Rua General Jose Cristino 77, Sao Cristovao, Rio de Janeiro 20921-400 (Brazil); Barba, R. H.; Gonzalez, J. F. [Instituto de Ciencias Astronomicas, de la Tierra, y del Espacio (ICATE-CONICET), Avenida Espana Sur 1512, J5402DSP San Juan (Argentina); Corcoran, M. F. [CRESST and X-ray Astrophysics Laboratory, NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Fernandez-Lajus, E.; Gamen, R. C.; Solivella, G. R. [Facultad de Ciencias Astronomicas y Geofisicas, Universidad Nacional de La Plata, Paseo del Bosque s/n, La Plata, BA, B1900FWA (Argentina); Fraga, L. [Southern Observatory for Astrophysical Research, Colina El Pino s/n, Casilla 603, La Serena (Chile); Groh, J. H. [Max-Planck-Institute fuer Radioastronomie, Auf dem Huegel 69, D-53121 Bonn (Germany); Marshall, J. L. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Texas A and M University, College Station, TX 77843-4242 (United States); McGregor, P. J.; Nicholls, D. C.; Parkin, E. R. [Research School of Astronomy and Astrophysics (RSAA), Mount Stromlo Observatory, Cotter Road, Weston, ACT 2611 (Australia); Morrell, N.; Phillips, M. M., E-mail: mairan@astro.iag.usp.br [Las Campanas Observatory, Observatories of the Carnegie Institution of Washington, Casilla 601, La Serena (Chile); and others

    2012-02-10

    The periodic spectroscopic events in {eta} Carinae are now well established and occur near the periastron passage of two massive stars in a very eccentric orbit. Several mechanisms have been proposed to explain the variations of different spectral features, such as an eclipse by the wind-wind collision (WWC) boundary, a shell ejection from the primary star or accretion of its wind onto the secondary. All of them have problems explaining all the observed phenomena. To better understand the nature of the cyclic events, we performed a dense monitoring of {eta} Carinae with five Southern telescopes during the 2009 low-excitation event, resulting in a set of data of unprecedented quality and sampling. The intrinsic luminosity of the He II {lambda}4686 emission line (L {approx} 310 L{sub Sun }) just before periastron reveals the presence of a very luminous transient source of extreme UV radiation emitted in the WWC region. Clumps in the primary's wind probably explain the flare-like behavior of both the X-ray and He II {lambda}4686 light curves. After a short-lived minimum, He II {lambda}4686 emission rises again to a new maximum, when X-rays are still absent or very weak. We interpret this as a collapse of the WWC onto the 'surface' of the secondary star, switching off the hard X-ray source and diminishing the WWC shock cone. The recovery from this state is controlled by the momentum balance between the secondary's wind and the clumps in the primary's wind.

  4. collision zone of an ISR

    CERN Multimedia

    This is a collision region from the world’s first proton collider, the Intersecting Storage Rings. The ISR was used at CERN from 1971-84 to study proton-proton collisions at the highest energy then available (60GeV). When operational, ISR collision regions were surrounded by detectors as shown in the photo. In 1972, the surprising discovery of fragments flying out sideways from head-on proton-proton collisions was the first evidence of quark-quark scattering inside the colliding protons . This was similar to Rutherford’s observation in 1911 of alpha particles scattering off the tiny nucleus inside atoms of gold. The ISR beamtubes had to be as empty as outer space, a vacuum 100 000 times better than other CERN machines at the time.

  5. Numerical models of slab migration in continental collision zones

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Magni

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Continental collision is an intrinsic feature of plate tectonics. The closure of an oceanic basin leads to the onset of subduction of buoyant continental material, which slows down and eventually stops the subduction process. In natural cases, evidence of advancing margins has been recognized in continental collision zones such as India-Eurasia and Arabia-Eurasia. We perform a parametric study of the geometrical and rheological influence on subduction dynamics during the subduction of continental lithosphere. In our 2-D numerical models of a free subduction system with temperature and stress-dependent rheology, the trench and the overriding plate move self-consistently as a function of the dynamics of the system (i.e. no external forces are imposed. This setup enables to study how continental subduction influences the trench migration. We found that in all models the slab starts to advance once the continent enters the subduction zone and continues to migrate until few million years after the ultimate slab detachment. Our results support the idea that the advancing mode is favoured and, in part, provided by the intrinsic force balance of continental collision. We suggest that the advance is first induced by the locking of the subduction zone and the subsequent steepening of the slab, and next by the sinking of the deepest oceanic part of the slab, during stretching and break-off of the slab. These processes are responsible for the migration of the subduction zone by triggering small-scale convection cells in the mantle that, in turn, drag the plates. The amount of advance ranges from 40 to 220 km and depends on the dip angle of the slab before the onset of collision.

  6. Potential field signatures along the Zagros collision zone in Iran

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abedi, Maysam; Fournier, Dominique; Devriese, Sarah G. R.; Oldenburg, Douglas W.

    2018-01-01

    The Zagros orogenic belt, known as an active fold-thrust belt, was formed in southwestern Iran due to the convergence of the Arabian and Eurasian plates. In this study, potential field data are inverted in 3D to image the variations of magnetic susceptibility and density contrast along the collision zone, resulting in better tectonic understanding of the studied region. Geophysical data measured by airborne magnetic and ground-based gravity systems are used to construct an integrated model that facilitates the interpretations of various tectonic zones across a 450-km line. This line intersects the main structural units from the SW portion of the Zagros belt. The constructed model reveals a contrast that indicates the transition between the two continental plates coinciding with the western boundaries of the Sanandaj-Sirjan Zone (SSZ) at the Main Zagros Thrust (MZT) fault. The subduction of the Arabian continental crust below the Iranian one is evident because of its lower susceptibility property and alternating sequence of high and low density regions. Higher susceptibility, magnetic remanence and density are the mainstays of the Urumieh-Dokhtar Magmatic Assemblage (UDMA) zone at the NE of the studied route, whereas lower values of these properties correspond to (1) the thin massive Tertiary-Neogene and Quaternary sediments of the central domain (CD) zone, and (2) the thick sedimentary and salt intrusion cover over the Zagros Fold-and-Thrust belt (ZFTB). Higher density of regions in the Arabian crust below the ZFTB implies that fault activities have caused significant vertical displacement of the basement. Finally, a simplified geological model is presented based upon the inversions of the geophysical data, in which the main geological units are divided along the studied route.

  7. Tectono-thermal evolution of the India-Asia collision zone based on ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Asia collision zone provide a tectono-thermal evolutionary scenario. The characteristic granodiorite of the Ladakh batholith near Leh yielded a plateau age of 46.3 ± 0.6Ma (2 ). Biotite from the same rock yielded a plateau age of 44.6 ± 0.3Ma ...

  8. Tectono-thermal evolution of the India-Asia collision zone based on ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    R. Narasimhan (Krishtel eMaging) 1461 1996 Oct 15 13:05:22

    Ar thermochronological results from the Ladakh region in the India-Asia collision zone provide a tectono-thermal evolutionary scenario. The characteristic granodiorite of the Ladakh batholith near Leh yielded a plateau age of 46.3 ± 0.6 Ma (2σ). Biotite from the same rock yielded a plateau age of 44.6 ± 0.3 Ma (2σ).

  9. Tectonic impact of anatexis on collision zones dynamics : insights from numerical modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Labrousse, Loic; Duretz, Thibault; Gerya, Taras

    2013-04-01

    Partial melting reactions constitute a first order weakening process in the continental crust involed in collision zones. It can act as a possible decoupling mechanism within the lithosphere and therefore influence the dynamics of continental subduction-collision. The Western Gneiss Region, Norwegian Caledonides, exhibits a direct relationship between eclogites occurrences and partial melting textures in the surrounding gneiss. This fact implies that partial melting is associated with part of the exhumation of High Pressure (HP) rocks. Several metamorphic reactions produce silicate melts at different PT conditions, depending mainly on the availability of aqueous fluids. Even if most of the partial melting textures observed in hot orogens relate to water-absent dehydration melting, evidences of water-present partial melting of gneiss and eclogites at HP in the Western Gneiss Region, suggest that water-present melting reactions may play a role in fostering HP metamorphic rocks exhumation. Another question arising from experimental rheological studies relies in quantifying the amount of liquid phase necessary to trigger strength drops of migmatites (i.e. the Rheologically Critical Melt Percentage, RCMP). Proposed values span from very low percentages close to 1% up to 20-30%, when migmatites turn to diatexites. In this study, we employ lithospheric scale numerical experiments, to compare the effects of water-present or dehydration partial melting reactions on continental collision systems. The two-dimensional thermo-mechanical experiments explore the extent of melt-weakening by allowing a wide range viscosity variations (9 orders of magnitude). The model set-up is representative of the Scandian collision and its sensitivity to the initial Moho temperature, the value of RCMP, and the buoyancy of the extracted melts, was investigated.

  10. Insights from 3D numerical simulations on the dynamics of the India-Asia collision zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pusok, A. E.; Kaus, B.; Popov, A.

    2013-12-01

    The dynamics of the India-Asia collision zone remains one of the most remarkable topics of the current research interest: the transition from subduction to collision and uplift, followed by the rise of the abnormally thick Tibetan plateau, and the deformation at its Eastern and Western syntaxes, are processes still not fully understood. Models that have addressed this topic include wholescale underthrusting of Indian lithospheric mantle under Tibet, distributed homogeneous shortening or the thin-sheet model, slip-line field model for lateral extrusion or lower crustal flow models for the exhumation of the Himalayan units and lateral spreading of the Tibetan plateau. Of these, the thin-sheet model has successfully illustrated some of the basic physics of continental collision and has the advantage of a 3D model being reduced to 2D, but one of its major shortcomings is that it cannot simultaneously represent channel flow and gravitational collapse of the mantle lithosphere, since these mechanisms require the lithosphere to interact with the underlying mantle, or to have a vertically non-homogeneous rheology. As a consequence, 3D models are emerging as powerful tools to understand the dynamics of coupled systems. However, because of yet recent developments and various complexities, the current 3D models simulating the dynamics of continent collision zones have relied on certain explicit assumptions, such as replacing part of the asthenosphere with various types of boundary conditions that mimic the effect of mantle flow, in order to focus on the lithospheric/crustal deformation. Here, we employ the parallel 3D code LaMEM (Lithosphere and Mantle Evolution Model), with a finite difference staggered grid solver, which is capable of simulating lithospheric deformation while simultaneously taking mantle flow and a free surface into account. We present qualitative results on lithospheric and upper-mantle scale simulations in which the Indian lithosphere is subducted and

  11. MT data inversion and sensitivity analysis to image electrical structure of Zagros collision zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Layegh Haghighi, T.; Montahaei, M.; Oskooi, B.

    2018-01-01

    Magnetotelluric (MT) data from 46 stations on a 470-km-long profile across the Zagros fold-thrust belt (ZFTB) that marks the Arabia-Eurasia collision zone were inverted to derive 2-D electrical resistivity structure between Busher on the coast of Persian Gulf and Posht-e-Badam, 160 km north east of Yazd. The model includes prominent anomalies in the upper and lower crust, beneath the brittle-ductile transition depth and mostly related to the fluid distribution and sedimentary layers beneath the profile. The conductivities and dimensions of the fault zone conductors (FZCs) and high conductivity zones (HCZs) as the major conductive anomalies in a fault zone conceptual model vary significantly below the different faults accommodated in this region. The enhanced conductivity below the site Z30 correlates well with the main Zagros thrust (MZT), located at the western boundary of Sanandaj-Sirjan zone (SSZ) and known as the transition between the two continents. The depth extent of the huge conductor beneath the south west of the profile, attributed to the thick sedimentary columns of the Arabian crust, cannot be resolved due to the smearing effect of the smoothness constraint employed in the regularized inversion procedure and the sensitivity of MT data to the conductance of the subsurface. We performed different tests to determine the range of 2-D models consistent with the data. Our approach was based on synthetic studies, comprising of hypothesis testing and the use of a priori information throughout the inversion procedure as well as forward modeling. We conclude that the minimum depth extent of the conductive layer beneath the southwest of the profile can be determined as approximately deeper than 15 km and also the screening effect of the conductive overburden is highly intense in this model and prevents the deep structures from being resolved properly.

  12. Preliminary results of characteristic seismic anisotropy beneath Sunda-Banda subduction-collision zone

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wiyono, Samsul H., E-mail: samsul.wiyono@bmkg.go.id [Study Program of Earth Sciences, Faculty of Earth Sciences and Technology, Institute of Technology Bandung, Bandung 40132 (Indonesia); Indonesia’s Agency for Meteorology Climatology and Geophysics, Jakarta 10610 (Indonesia); Nugraha, Andri Dian, E-mail: nugraha@gf.itb.ac.id [Indonesia’s Agency for Meteorology Climatology and Geophysics, Jakarta 10610 (Indonesia); Global Geophysics Research Group, Faculty of Mining and Petroleum Engineering, Institute of Technology Bandung, Bandung 40132, Indonesia, Phone: +62-22 2534137 (Indonesia)

    2015-04-24

    Determining of seismic anisotropy allowed us for understanding the deformation processes that occured in the past and present. In this study, we performed shear wave splitting to characterize seismic anisotropy beneath Sunda-Banda subduction-collision zone. For about 1,610 XKS waveforms from INATEWS-BMKG networks have been analyzed. From its measurements showed that fast polarization direction is consistent with trench-perpendicular orientation but several stations presented different orientation. We also compared between fast polarization direction with absolute plate motion in the no net rotation and hotspot frame. Its result showed that both absolute plate motion frame had strong correlation with fast polarization direction. Strong correlation between the fast polarization direction and the absolute plate motion can be interpreted as the possibility of dominant anisotropy is in the asthenosphere.

  13. Miocene burial and exhumation of the India-Asia collision zone in southern Tibet: response to slab dynamics and erosion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrapa, Barbara; Orme, D.A.; DeCelles, Peter G.; Kapp, Paul; Cosca, Michael A.; Waldrip, R.

    2014-01-01

    The India-Asia collision zone in southern Tibet preserves a record of geodynamic and erosional processes following intercontinental collision. Apatite fission-track and zircon and apatite (U-Th)/He data from the Oligocene–Miocene Kailas Formation, within the India-Asia collision zone, show a synchronous cooling signal at 17 ± 1 Ma, which is younger than the ca. 26–21 Ma depositional age of the Kailas Formation, constrained by U-Pb and 40Ar/39Ar geochronology, and requires heating (burial) after ca. 21 Ma and subsequent rapid exhumation. Data from the Gangdese batholith underlying the Kailas Formation also indicate Miocene exhumation. The thermal history of the Kailas Formation is consistent with rapid subsidence during a short-lived phase of early Miocene extension followed by uplift and exhumation driven by rollback and northward underthrusting of the Indian plate, respectively. Significant removal of material from the India-Asia collision zone was likely facilitated by efficient incision of the paleo–Indus River and paleo–Yarlung River in response to drainage reorganization and/or intensification of the Asian monsoon.

  14. Collision tectonics of the Central Indian Suture zone as inferred from a deep seismic sounding study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mall, D.M.; Reddy, P.R.; Mooney, W.D.

    2008-01-01

    The Central Indian Suture (CIS) is a mega-shear zone extending for hundreds of kilometers across central India. Reprocessing of deep seismic reflection data acquired across the CIS was carried out using workstation-based commercial software. The data distinctly indicate different reflectivity characteristics northwest and southeast of the CIS. Reflections northwest of the CIS predominantly dip southward, while the reflection horizons southeast of the CIS dip northward. We interpret these two adjacent seismic fabric domains, dipping towards each other, to represent a suture between two crustal blocks. The CIS itself is not imaged as a sharp boundary, probably due to the disturbed character of the crust in a 20 to 30-km-wide zone. The time sections also show the presence of strong bands of reflectors covering the entire crustal column in the first 65??km of the northwestern portion of the profile. These reflections predominantly dip northward creating a domal structure with the apex around 30??km northwest of the CIS. There are a very few reflections in the upper 2-2.5??s two-way time (TWT), but the reflectivity is good below 2.5??s TWT. The reflection Moho, taken as the depth to the deepest set of reflections, varies in depth from 41 to 46??km and is imaged sporadically across the profile with the largest amplitude occurring in the northwest. We interpret these data as recording the presence of a mid-Proterozoic collision between two micro-continents, with the Satpura Mobile Belt being thrust over the Bastar craton. ?? 2008.

  15. Different stages of collision zones on examples of Gujarat province (India) and Caucasus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zabelina, Irina; Koulakov, Ivan; Ranjan Kayal, Jnana; Pratap Singh, Ajay; Kumar, Santosh; Kukarina, Ekaterina; Amanatashvili, Iason

    2016-04-01

    initiation of a new collision zone. For the tomography inversion of the Kachchh region we selected the data of 4105 earthquakes with arrival times 29660 P and 30278 S waves. Based on the obtained seismic anomalies, we identify the left-lateral displacement to approximately 70 km along a hidden fault. We suggest that this fault can be associated with a series of ridges having the SW-NE direction, which are clearly seen on the bathymetry of the Indian Ocean bottom. Northwards displacement of the Indo-Australian Plate and contraction with Asia causes strong compression deformations in the broad areas of the Indian Plate. The curved geometry of the western boundary of the Indo-Australian plate and orientations of the fracture zones presume both shear and compressional displacements along faults. The presence of both thrust and strike-slip mechanisms of earthquakes in the Kachchh province may support the existence of such combined deformations leading to initiation of a new collision belt.

  16. Tomography of the upper mantle beneath the African/Iberian collision zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonnin, Mickael; Nolet, Guust; Thomas, Christine; Villaseñor, Antonio; Gallart, Josep; Levander, Alan

    2013-04-01

    In this study we take advantage of the dense broadband-station networks available in western Mediterranean region (IberArray, PICASSO and MOROCCO-MUENSTER networks) to develop a high-resolution 3D tomographic P velocity model of the upper mantle beneath the African/Iberian collision zone. This model is based on teleseismic arrival times recorded between 2008 and 2012 for which cross-correlation delays are measured with a new technique in different frequency bands centered between 0.03 and 1.0 Hz, and interpreted using multiple frequency tomography. Such a tomography is required to scrutinize the nature and extent of the thermal anomalies inferred beneath Northern Africa, especially in the Atlas ranges region and associated to sparse volcanic activities. Tomography is notably needed to help in determining the hypothetical connection between those hot anomalies and the Canary Island hotspot as proposed by geochemistry studies. It also provides new insights on the geometry of the subducting slab previously inferred from tomography, GPS measurements or shear-wave splitting patterns beneath the Alboran Sea and the Betic ranges and is indispensable for deciphering the complex geodynamic history of the Western Mediterranean region. We shall present the overall statistics of the delays, their geographical distribution, as well as the first inversion results.

  17. Geodynamic and Magmatic Evolution of the Eastern Anatolian-Arabian Collision Zone, Turkey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keskin, Mehmet

    2014-05-01

    The Eastern Anatolian-Arabian Collision Zone represents a crucial site within the Tethyan domain where a subduction system involving a volcanic arc (i.e. Cretaceous to Oligocene Pontide volcanic arc in the north) associated with a large subduction-accretion complex (i.e. Cretaceous to Oligocene Eastern Anatolian Accretionary Complex i.e. "EAAC" in the south) turned later into a major continental collision zone that experienced a series of geodynamic events including lithospheric delamination, slab-steepening & breakoff, regional domal uplift, widespread volcanism and tectonic escape via strike slip fault systems. The region includes some of the largest volcanic centers (e.g. Karacadaǧ, Aǧırkaya caldera, Ararat, Nemrut, Tendürek and Süphan volcanoes) and plateaus (e.g. The Erzurum-Kars Plateau) as well as the largest transform fault zones in the Mediterranean region. A recent geodynamic modeling study (Faccenna et al., 2013) has suggested that both the closure of the Tethys Ocean and the resultant collision were driven by a large scale and northerly directed asthenospheric mantle flow named the "Tethyan convection cell". This convection cell initiated around 25 Ma by combined effects of mantle upwelling of the Afar super plume located in the south, around 3,000 km away from the collision zone and the slab-pull of the Tethyan oceanic lithosphere beneath Anatolia in the north. The aforementioned mantle flow dragged Arabia to the north towards Eastern Anatolia with an average velocity of 2 cm/y for the last 20 My, twice as fast as the convergence of the African continent (i.e. 1 cm/y) with western and Central Turkey. This 1 cm/y difference resulted in the formation of the left lateral Dead Sea Strike Slip Fault between the African and Arabian plates. Not only did this mantle flow result in the formation of a positive dynamic topography in the west of Arabian block, but also created a dynamic tilting toward the Persian Gulf (Faccenna et al., 2013). Another

  18. Suture Dynamics of the Banda Arc Collision Zone: Geochemical and Age Analysis of Ultramafic and Mafic Bodies in Timor, Indonesia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valenza, J. M.; Harris, R. A.; Spencer, C. J.; Hoiland, C. W.; Flores, J. A.

    2013-12-01

    New age and geochemical data confirm that most ultramafic bodies on the north coast of Timor are derived from the distal reaches of the Australian continental margin lower plate that was exhumed by extension during Late Paleozoic to Mesozoic rifting. The ultramafic bodies were accreted to Timor during Late Miocene to present arc-continent collision. One of the lherzolitic ultramafic bodies near Caicua was previously unknown, but yields clear isotopic indicators that it is kin to the Hili Manu mafic and ultramafic complex further to the west. Zircon grains from metagabbro of the Hili Manu complex have cores with mostly Early Permian ages and rims of Latest Miocene ages. Isotopic analysis indicates abyssal plain, or passive margin affinity of the Caicua ultramafic body. One important exception to this pattern are mafic and ultramafic bodies associated with the Ocussi volcanics, which yield Miocene and Pliocene ages and supra-subduction zone chemical signatures. The Ocussi body is clearly part of the upper plate of the collision and formed after collision initiated further to the east. It is also structurally higher than the Hili Manu complex and has no affinities with the Australian plate. This study documents that both the upper and lower plates of the active arc-continent collision contribute mafic and ultramafic rocks to the evolving suture zone between the Indo-Australian and Asian plates in the Banda Arc region.

  19. The characteristics of mantle lithosphere buoyancy revealed from the northern Manila subduction zone to the active collision in Taiwan region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lo, Chung-Liang; Doo, Wen-Bin; Kuo-Chen, Hao; Hsu, Shu-Kun; Lin, Jing-Yi

    2017-04-01

    It has been widely studied on the complexity tectonic structure in the active Taiwan orogenesis, since the converging between the Philippine Sea plate (PSP) and the Eurasian plate (EU) along with the Manila subduction zone extended from the Philippine to offshore the southern Taiwan and the Ryukyu subduction zone in the east. Considering the separate contribution of the crust and the mantle lithosphere to the topography, we try to examine the mantle lithosphere buoyancy (Hm) behavior from the northern Manila subduction zone to the active collision in Taiwan region. In this study, we present several Hm profiles across the northern Manila subduction zone and the Taiwan island. In order to calculate the Hm, the crust structures are constrained by the forward gravity modeling, in which the density is provided from the multi-channel seismic data and on land seismic data (thanks to the Taiwan Integrated Geodynamic Research (TAIGER) project). The result shows that the Hm across the northern Manila subduction zone displays apparent undulations, and undulates more drastic approaching the north end of the subduction zone. It implies that the plate coupling between the PSP and the EU here is weak. The Hm across the southern Taiwan undulates still, but the amplitudes are smaller with relative gentle undulations. This reflects the contribution from the slab underneath while the initial collision occurs in south Taiwan. Into the central Taiwan, the Hm pattern behaves undulating mild comparing with that across the subduction zone because the slab structure effects not obvious. Besides, the Hm in the central Taiwan primarily is affects by both the thickening crust and high elevation caused by the strong lateral external compression stress.

  20. Short-lived brine infiltration during upper amphibolite facies metamorphism in the continental collision zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higashino, Fumiko; Kawakami, Tetsuo; Tsuchiya, Noriyoshi; Satish-Kumar, Madhusoodhan; Ishikawa, Masahiro; Grantham, Geoffrey; Sakata, Shuhei; Hirata, Takafumi

    2017-04-01

    The importance of brine is increasingly recognized because of its role on mass transportation at the mid- to lower-crustal pressure-temperature (P-T) conditions (e.g., Newton & Manning, 2010). However, the passage and residence times of brine are not well understood. This study deals with garnet-hornblende (Grt-Hbl) veins, discordantly cutting the gneissose structure of garnet-orthopyroxene-hornblende gneiss from the central Sør Rondane Mountains (SRM), East Antarctica. The Cl contents of hornblende and biotite, K content of hornblende, and the thickness of Na-richer rims of plagioclase decreased with distance from the Grt-Hbl vein. The P-T conditions of the vein formation were estimated to be 680 °C, 0.69 GPa (Higashino et al., under review). In the wall rock in the vicinity of the vein, addition of Li, Cu, Rb, Ba, Pb, and U, which tend to be mobile in brines rather than in melts is observed, using Zr as an immobile element (Higashino et al., 2015). This indicates that the Grt-Hbl vein was formed by the infiltration of NaCl-KCl brine. Trace element concentrations in the wall rock minerals decrease with distance from the vein, and in most cases show concave up/down profiles. Distances where these concentrations in each mineral species become constant are dependent on elements, and not on mineral species. These profiles can be best modelled by diffusion equations, suggesting that the diffusion is the major process transferring the trace elements perpendicular to the vein. Although plagioclase does not show significant trace element zoning within each single grain, the discontinuous drop of anorthite content at rims is preserved. Thin brine films in grain boundaries presumably caused dissolution-reprecipitation (e.g., Ruiz-Agudo et al., 2014), and lattice diffusion in plagioclase would have followed this to form homogeneous trace element zonings. Therefore, the main process of brine infiltration into the wall rock is possibly grain boundary diffusion in wet

  1. Petrogenesis of mafic collision zone magmatism: The Armenian sector of the Turkish-Iranian Plateau

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Neill, I.; Meliksetian, K.; Allen, M.B.; Navasardyan, G.; Kuiper, K.F.

    2015-01-01

    The Turkish-Iranian Plateau grew after the Middle Miocene following the initial Paleogene Arabia-Eurasia collision. Authors attribute uplift to break-off of the southern Neo-Tethys slab beneath the Bitlis-Zagros Suture at ~. 15-10. Ma, coupled with continued plate convergence and regional crustal

  2. Subduction and accretion of sedimentary rocks in the Yakutat collision zone, St. Elias orogen, Gulf of Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Avendonk, Harm J. A.; Gulick, Sean P. S.; Christeson, Gail L.; Worthington, Lindsay L.; Pavlis, Terry L.; Ridgway, Kenneth D.

    2013-11-01

    The collision of the Yakutat Block with the continental margin of North America in the Gulf of Alaska has intensified exhumation and erosion in the Chugach-St. Elias orogen over the last few million years. The resultant sediment flux and deposition of the glaciomarine Yakataga Formation on the continental shelf has filled a deep sedimentary basin offshore, where the Pamplona fold-thrust belt first deforms these strata. It is presently unclear whether the older sedimentary rocks of the Poul Creek and Kulthieth Formations are also accreted in the Pamplona Zone, or whether they are underthrusting the margin. In this paper we use marine seismic and well logging data to show that in the offshore Yakataga strata, porosity loss and lateral compaction can account for half of the convergence between the Yakutat Block and North America over the last 2 Myr. A lateral seismic velocity gradient in these syn-orogenic strata suggests that this layer-parallel shortening starts approximately 100 km outboard of the deformation front. Beneath the fold-and-thrust belt, where the seismic velocity is as high as 4.7 km/s, we image a large low-velocity zone (2.0-2.5 km/s) at 5 km depth. The dramatic decrease in seismic velocity with depth coincides with the boundary between the Yakataga and Poul Creek Formations in well data. Fine-grained and organic-rich Poul Creek strata possibly accommodate slip, such that older sedimentary rocks are entrained with the subducting Yakutat Block. Alternatively, the imaged low-velocity zone may have formed by increased fluid pressures in the hanging wall. In that case the décollement would lie beneath this low-velocity zone, possibly within the coal-bearing layers of the older and deeper Kulthieth Formation.

  3. Petrogenesis of mafic magmatism in Arabia-Eurasia collision zone: valley filling flows in Armenia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meliksetian, Khachatur; Neill, Iain; Allen, Mark; Navasardyan, Gevorg

    2015-04-01

    The Turkish- Armenian-Iranian orogenic plateau grew after the Middle Miocene following the initial Paleogene Arabia- Eurasia collision. It is widely accepted, that uplift of the plateau is related to break-off of the southern Neo-Tethys slab beneath the Bitlis-Zagros Suture at ~15-10 Ma, coupled with continued plate convergence and regional crustal shortening. Since this time there has also been a widespread mantle-derived collision magmatism over large parts of NW Iran, Eastern Anatolia and the Lesser Caucasus, potentially hundreds of kilometres from the site of southern Neo-Tethys slab break-off, >10 Myr after the proposed break-off event. Detailed wholer rock geochemistry and Sr-Nd-Pb-Hf isotope data are presented for ~2.5 Ma trachy-basalt to trachy-basaltic andesite lavas erupted in Armenia in the South Caucasus. These thick (up to 400 m) mafic flows generated several plateaux within the Lesser Caucasus: the Javakheti Plateau (S Georgia and NW Armenia), and the Lori and Kotayk Plateaux (Armenia). These basalts sequences also extend to the NE Kars-Erzurum Plateau in eastern Turkey. It is demonstrated that studied series formed by Neo-Tethys slab break-off 300-450 km to the south of the country. It is possible that Late Miocene break-off of a second (northern Neo-Tethys) slab beneath the Pontide Arc allowed asthenospheric upwelling over a much wider area than was affected by southern Neo-Tethyan break-off. Whole-scale delamination of mantle lithosphere can be ruled out due to the modest degrees of partial melting, a lack of asthenospheric components and limited crustal interaction of the Armenian magmas. Small-scale sub-lithospheric convection may be complementary to break-off, causing localised removal of lithospheric mantle and aiding the occurrence of volcanism for a significant time interval after the break-off event(s). Finally, collision magmas such as those in Armenia represent an under-appreciated juvenile addition to continental crust, with extreme

  4. Rheology of the Indian and Tarim plates in the Karakoram continent-to-continent collision zone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Caporali

    1997-06-01

    Full Text Available Bouguer gravity anomalies in the region of Western Himalayas, Karakoram and Tien Shan show large negative values, but classical isostatic models are insufficient to account for the detailed pattern of the observed anomalies. In the past years the gravimetric surveys in the Karakoram done by Marussi, Caputo and others in 1954 have been extended and intensified. The full body of available gravimetric data, including the pendulum observations by De Filippi and Hedin at the beginning of this century, have been re-analyzed. Terrain corrections have been computed systematically for all available data using a unique algorithm and Digital Terrain Model. The isostatic anomalies along a profile from the Indo-Gangetic foredeep, across the Karakoram range and terminating in the Tarim basin show the oscillating values already noted by Marussi. It is here proposed that this oscillatory pattern can be explained by a model in which the convergent boundaries of the Indian and Tarim plates deform by elastic flexure, besides isostasy. The gravity data constrain the numerical values of the model parameters, particularly the flexural rigidity of the plates. For the Indian plate the best fitting value of the flexural rigidity is D = 5 1024 N m, a value very similar to those reported in Central Himalaya. The flexural rigidity of the Tarim plate turns out to be considerably larger D = 7 1025 N m, which makes the Tarim more rigid than the neighboring Central Tibet. Both plates are loaded by an estimated shear stress of 7 1012 N m-1 located in a region corresponding to the Nanga Parbat Haramosh syntaxis. It is concluded that the Indo-Asian continental collision in the Western Himalaya and Karakoram resulted in the development of flexural basins on both sides, unlike the Central Himalaya where the collision produced a flexural basin, the Ganga basin, to the south and, to the north, the indentation of an isostatically supported Tibetan block with possible rheological

  5. A revisit to the Higo terrane, Kyushu, Japan: The eastern extension of the North China-South China collision zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suga, Kenshi; Yui, Tzen-Fu; Miyazaki, Kazuhiro; Sakata, Shuhei; Hirata, Takafumi; Fukuyama, Mayuko

    2017-08-01

    The Higo and Manotani high-T metamorphic rocks belong to the Higo terrane, central Kyushu, Japan. This terrane has been suggested as the eastern extension of the North China-South China collision zone based mainly on the similar petrological and geochronological data to the north Dabie high-grade rocks. In this study, detrital zircon U-Pb dating for the Higo metamorphic rocks yielded a maximum depositional age of 197 Ma with a prominent component at 193-284 Ma (62-95%) and a subsidiary peak at 1847-1875 Ma (19-28%); whereas for the Manotani metamorphic rocks, the maximum depositional age is 263 Ma with a prominent component at 263-304 Ma (98%). These results suggest that the protoliths of the Higo and Manotani metamorphic rocks might be equivalent to those of the early-middle Jurassic Chizu and late Triassic Suo high-P metamorphic rocks, southwest Japan, respectively. The absence of middle Neoproterozoic detrital zircon (c. 700-825 Ma) is incompatible with a proposition that the proto-Japan might have been located close to the South China craton, where Permian-Jurassic sedimentary rocks contain a significant amount of middle Neoproterozoic detrital zircon. The zircon provenance of the Higo terrane, as well as of the Chizu and Suo belts, could therefore be the North China craton, suggesting that the Suo metamorphic rocks, including the Manotani metamorphic rocks, have formed at the subduction plate boundary in the east, which changed into the contemporaneous North China-South China collision plate boundary in the west, likely passing through the Korean Peninsula. The transformation of the Chizu and Suo metamorphic rocks to the Higo and Manotani metamorphic rocks can be accounted for by the oceanward advance of the volcanic arc during trench retreating. The Cretaceous high-T metamorphism and related igneous intrusions of the Higo terrane would be regarded as the initial phase of the Ryoke event.

  6. The development of topographic plateaus in an India-Asia-like collision zone using 3D numerical simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pusok, Adina E.; Kaus, Boris; Popov, Anton

    2014-05-01

    The Himalayas and the adjacent Tibetan Plateau represent the most remarkable feature of the Earth's surface as the largest region of elevated topography and anomalously thick crust. Understanding the formation and evolution of the Himalayan-Tibetan region has become of high interest in the scientific community and different models have emerged over the last decades. They range from wholescale underthrusting of Indian lithospheric mantle under Tibet, distributed homogeneous shortening or the thin-sheet model, slip-line field model to the lower crustal flow model for the exhumation of the Himalayan units and lateral spreading of the Tibetan plateau. While some of these models have successfully illustrated some of the basic physics of continental collision, none can simultaneously represent active processes such as subduction, underthrusting, delamination, channel flow or extrusion, which are thought to be important during continental convergence, since these mechanisms require the lithosphere to interact with the underlying mantle. As such, 3D numerical models prove to be powerful tools in understanding the dynamics of coupled systems. However, because of yet recent developments and various complexities, the current 3D models simulating the dynamics of continental collision zones have relied on certain explicit assumptions, either focusing on crustal dynamics or slab-mantle dynamics. Here, we employ the parallel 3D code LaMEM (Lithosphere and Mantle Evolution Model), with a finite difference staggered grid solver, which is capable of simulating lithospheric deformation while simultaneously taking mantle flow and an internal free surface into account, which allows for the development of topography. We investigate the way deep processes affect continental tectonics at convergent margins, addressing the role continent subduction and collision have on the future of the subducting and overriding plates, and we discuss the implications these offer for the Asian tectonics

  7. Fluid flow and mud volcanism in the Eastern Mediterranean incipient collision zones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zitter, T. A. C.; Woodside, J. M.; Mascle, J.

    2003-04-01

    Fluid venting activity, either coupled with mud volcanism or along deep active faults or both, has been investigated in the Eastern Mediterranean Sea, mainly in two areas associated with the incipient collision process between Africa and Eurasia. Mud volcanoes are abundant on the crestal part of the Mediterranean Ridge accretionary prism, in association with thrusts, back-thrusts and transcurrent features. They are also found in the Anaximander Mountains/Florence Rise area, to the west of Cyprus, where a wrench system accommodates the pre-collisional deformation. Combined swath multibeam bathymetry and imagery, seismic profiling (ANAXIPROBE survey, 1995 and PRISMED II survey, 1998) and O.R.E.Tech sidescan sonar data (MEDINETH survey, 1999) indicate the genetic relationship between mud volcanoes and tectonics, particularly potential influence of strike-slip faulting. The in situ observations of mud volcanoes (MEDINAUT survey, 1998) have revealed common characteristics at cold seeps, such as carbonate crust constructions and specific chemosynthetic-based fauna. Ground-truth of the sonar data shows that the geophysical signature of mud volcanoes may be related to spatial and temporal evolution of mud volcanism activity, because the seafloor characteristics (surface of the mud flows, distribution and nature of the crusts) and the degree of colonization by benthic fauna vary with the intensity and age of the fluid seepage. Moreover, clay mineralogy studies on the mud matrix samples give insights into the depositional environment, age, and depth of the lithological unit from which the mud breccia is extruded. The shallow signature of the mud reservoir tends to indicate that the overpressured fluids originate from deeper strata than the solid phase of the expelled material.

  8. Incipient Crustal Stretching across AN Active Collision Belt: the Case of the Siculo-Calabrian Rift Zone (central Mediterranean)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catalano, S.; Tortorici, G.; Romagnoli, G.; Pavano, F.

    2012-12-01

    In the Central Mediterranean, the differential roll-back of the subducting Nubia Plate caused the Neogene-Quaternary extrusion of the Calabrian arc onto the oceanic Ionian slab, and the opening of the oceanic Tyrrhenian Basin, in the overriding Eurasia Plate. The differential motion at the edges of the arc was largely accommodated along transform faults that propagated across the orogenic belt. Since the Late Quaternary, the southern edge of the arc has been replaced by the roughly N-S oriented Siculo-Calabrian Rift Zone (SCRZ) that formed as the NNW-directed normal faults of NE Sicily, crossing the orogenic belt, have linked the NNE-oriented Tyrrhenian margin of southern Calabria with the NNW-trending Africa-Ionian boundary of southeastern Sicily. Our study focused on the Sicily shoulder of the SCRZ, where the transition zone between the extensional belt and the still active Nubia-Eurasia convergent margin is characterized by two distinct mobile crustal wedges, both lying on an upwarped Mantle, where a re-orientations of the σ1 is combined with volcanism (e.g. Etna, Aeolian islands) and a huge tectonic uplift. In southeastern Sicily, the Hyblean-Etnean region evolved, since about 0.85 Ma, as an indipendent crustal wedge, moving towards the NNW and pointing to the active Mt. Etna volcano. A local ENE crustal stretching accompanied the traslation of the block and pre-dated the ESE-oriented extension governing the propagation of the southernmost branch of the SCR, which started at about 330 ka B.P.. Similarly, the Peloritani-Aeolian region, flanked by the 125 ka-old NE-Sicily branch of the rift zone, represents a mostly submerged crustal wedge that migrates towards the NE, diverging from the rest of the Sicily collision zone and pointing to the Stromboli volcano. The Peloritani-Aeolian block is characterized by the occurrence of a wide central NE-oriented collapsed basin contoured by an actively uplifting region, whose tectonic boundaries are evidenced by a sharp

  9. New active faults on Eurasian-Arabian collision zone: Tectonic activity of Özyurt and Gülsünler faults (Eastern Anatolian Plateau, Van-Turkey)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dicle, S.; Üner, S.

    2017-11-01

    The Eastern Anatolian Plateau emerges from the continental collision between Arabian and Eurasian plates where intense seismicity related to the ongoing convergence characterizes the southern part of the plateau. Active deformation in this zone is shared by mainly thrust and strike-slip faults. The Özyurt thrust fault and the Gülsünler sinistral strike-slip fault are newly determined fault zones, located to the north of Van city centre. Different types of faults such as thrust, normal and strike-slip faults are observed on the quarry wall excavated in Quaternary lacustrine deposits at the intersection zone of these two faults. Kinematic analysis of fault-slip data has revealed coeval activities of transtensional and compressional structures for the Lake Van Basin. Seismological and geomorphological characteristics of these faults demonstrate the capability of devastating earthquakes for the area.

  10. Risk Analysis Of Collision Between Passenger Ferry And Chemical Tanker In The Western Zone Of The Baltic Sea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Przywarty Marcin

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents assumptions and process of the forming of a risk assessment model for collision between a passenger ferry departing from or approaching port of Świnoujście and a chemical tanker carrying a dangerous cargo. In order to assess navigational safety on the basis of data obtained from AIS system, were prepared probabilistic domains of ships, which made it possible to estimate number of navigational incidents as well as their spatial distribution, that consequently allowed to determine potentially dangerous areas. The next phase was formulation of a simulative model intended for the calculating of probability of collision between the ferry and chemical tanker as well as the determining of characteristic scenarios for such collision. This paper presents also an analysis of consequences of the collision with taking into consideration a damage of cargo tanks.

  11. Late Quaternary Explosive Volcanic Activities of the Mindanao-Molucca Sea Collision Zone in the Western Pacific as Inferred from Marine Tephrostratigraphy in the Celebes Sea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yueh-Ping Ku

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The giant piston core MD01-2387 taken from the eastern Celebes Sea basin provides a marine tephrostratigraphy with higher solution for inferring explosive volcanism in the area surrounding the basin for the past 350 kyr. The sequence contains 65 tephra layers com posed of volcanic minerals and glassy particles. The compositional characteristics of crystal enriched tephra layers and the 87Sr/86Sr of the glass particles (0.7039 to 0.7042 suggest that these ashes were re leased by the volcanoes in the Mindanao-Molucca Sea collision zone, including the south Philippine Arc system, the Sangehi Arc and the Halmahera Arc. The up ward decrease of tephra layers in this core indicates a declining trend of explosive volcanic activity of this collision zone, particularly, after ca. 180 ka in the late Middle Pleistocene. This record also suggests that the shoshonitic volcanism in Central Mindanao be came extinct at ca. 151 ka, which is much younger than what reported previously by onland investigations

  12. Provenance of Mesozoic clastic rocks within the Bangong-Nujiang suture zone, central Tibet: Implications for the age of the initial Lhasa-Qiangtang collision

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Shun; Guilmette, Carl; Ding, Lin; Xu, Qiang; Fu, Jia-Jun; Yue, Ya-Hui

    2017-10-01

    The Bangong-Nujiang suture zone, separating the Lhasa and Qiangtang blocks of the Tibetan Plateau, is marked by remnants of the Bangong-Nujiang oceanic basin. In the Gaize area of central Tibet, Mesozoic sedimentary strata recording the evolution of the basin and subsequent collision between these two blocks include the Upper Triassic-Lower Jurassic turbidites of the Mugagangri Group, the Upper Jurassic-Lower Cretaceous sandstone-dominated Wuga and Shamuluo formations, and the Upper Cretaceous molasse deposits of the Jingzhushan Formation. The Shamuluo and Jingzhushan formations rest unconformably on the underlying Mugagangri Group and Wuga Formation, respectively. In this contribution, we analyze petrographic components of sandstones and U-Pb-Hf isotopic compositions of detrital zircons from the Wuga and Jingzhushan formations for the first time. Based on the youngest detrital zircon ages, the maximum depositional ages of the Wuga and Jingzhushan formations are suggested to be ∼147-150 Ma and ∼79-91 Ma, respectively. Petrographic and isotopic results indicate that sediments in the Wuga Formation were mainly sourced from the accretionary complex (preserved as the Mugagangri Group) in the north, while sediments in the Jingzhushan Formation have mixed sources from the Lhasa block, the Qiangtang block and the intervening suture zone. Provenance analysis, together with regional data, suggests that the Upper Jurassic-Lower Cretaceous Wuga and Shamuluo formations were deposited in a peripheral foreland basin and a residual-sea basin, respectively, in response to the Lhasa-Qiangtang collision, whereas the Upper Cretaceous Jingzhushan Formation reflects continental molasse deposition during the post-collisional stage. The development of the peripheral foreland basin evidenced by deposition of the Wuga Formation reveals that the age of the initial Lhasa-Qiangtang collision might be the latest Jurassic (∼150 Ma).

  13. Finite strain calculations of continental deformation. I - Method and general results for convergent zones. II - Comparison with the India-Asia collision zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houseman, G.; England, P.

    1986-03-01

    The present investigation has the objective to perform numerical experiments on a rheologically simple continuum model for the continental lithosphere. It is attempted to obtain a better understanding of the dynamics of continental deformation. Calculations are presented of crustal thickness distributions, stress, strain, strain rate fields, latitudinal displacements, and finite rotations, taking into account as basis a model for continental collision which treats the litoshphere as a thin viscous layer subject to indenting boundary conditions. The results of this paper support the conclusions of England and McKenzie (1982) regarding the role of gravity in governing the deformation of a thin viscous layer subject to indenting boundary conditions. The results of the experiments are compared with observations of topography, stress and strain rate fields, and palaeomagnetic latitudinal displacements in Asia.

  14. A model for the termination of the Ryukyu subduction zone against Taiwan: A junction of collision, subduction/separation, and subduction boundaries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, F.T.; Liang, W.-T.; Lee, J.-C.; Benz, H.; Villasenor, A.

    2009-01-01

    The NW moving Philippine Sea plate (PSP) collides with the Eurasian plate (EUP) in the vicinity of Taiwan, and at the same time, it subducts toward the north along SW Ryukyu. The Ryukyu subduction zone terminates against eastern Taiwan. While the Ryukyu Trench is a linear bathym??trie low about 100 km east of Taiwan, closer to Taiwan, it cannot be clearly identified bathymetrically owing to the deformation related to the collision, making the location of the intersection of the Ryukyu with Taiwan difficult to decipher. We propose a model for this complex of boundaries on the basis of seismicity and 3-D velocity structures. In this model the intersection is placed at the latitude of about 23.7??N, placing the northern part of the Coastal Range on EUP. As PSP gets deeper along the subduction zone it collides with EUP on the Taiwan side only where they are in direct contact. Thus, the Eurasian plate on the Taiwan side is being pushed and compressed by the NW moving Philippine Sea plate, at increasing depth toward the north. Offshore of northeastern Taiwan the wedge-shaped EUP on top of the Ryukyu subducting plate is connected to the EUP on the Ryukyu side and coupled to the NW moving PSP by friction at the plate interface. The two sides of the EUP above the western end of the subduction zone are not subjected to the same forces, and a difference in motions can be expected. The deformation of Taiwan as revealed by continuous GPS measurements, geodetic movement along the east coast of Taiwan, and the formation of the Hoping Basin can be understood in terms of the proposed model. Copyright 2009 by the American Geophysical Union.

  15. Preliminary result of teleseismic double-difference relocation of earthquakes in the Molucca collision zone with a 3D velocity model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shiddiqi, Hasbi Ash, E-mail: h.a.shiddiqi@students.itb.ac.id, E-mail: h.a.shiddiqi@gmail.com [Earth Sciences Graduate Program, Faculty of Earth Sciences and Technology, Institut Teknologi Bandung, Jl. Ganesha 10, Bandung 40132 (Indonesia); Widiyantoro, Sri; Nugraha, Andri Dian [Global Geophysical Research Group, Faculty of Mining and Petroleum Engineering, Institut Teknologi Bandung, Jl. Ganesha 10, Bandung 40132 (Indonesia); Ramdhan, Mohamad; Wandono,; Sutiyono,; Handayani, Titi; Nugroho, Hendro [Agency for Meteorology, Climatology, and Geophysics (BMKG), Jl. Angkasa 1 No. 2, Kemayoran, Jakarta (Indonesia)

    2015-04-24

    We have relocated hypocenters of earthquakes occurring in the Molucca collision zone and surrounding region taken from the BMKG catalog using teleseismic double-difference relocation algorithm (teletomoDD). We used P-wave arrival times of local, regional, and teleseismic events recorded at 304 recording stations. Over 7,000 earthquakes were recorded by the BMKG seismographicnetworkin the study region from April, 2009 toJune, 2014. We used a 3D regional-global nested velocity modelresulting fromprevious global tomographystudy. In this study, the3D seismic velocity model was appliedto theIndonesian region, whilethe1D seismicvelocity model (ak135)wasused for regions outside of Indonesia. Our relocation results show a better improvement in travel-time RMS residuals comparedto those of the BMKG catalog.Ourresultsalso show that relocation shifts were dominated intheeast-west direction, whichmaybeinfluenced by theexistingvelocity anomaly related to the reversed V-shaped slabbeneaththestudy region. Our eventrelocation results refine the geometry of slabs beneath the Halmahera and Sangihe arcs.

  16. Magnetic basement and crustal structure in the Arabia-Eurasia collision zone from a combined gravity and magnetic model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mousavi, Naeim; Ebbing, Jörg

    2017-04-01

    In this study, we investigate the magnetic basement and crustal structure in the region of Iran by inverse and forward modeling of aeromagnetic data and gravity data. The main focus is on the definition of the magnetic top basement. The combination of multiple shallow magnetic sources and an assumed shallow Curie isotherm depth beneath the Iranian Plateau creates a complex magnetic architecture over the area. Qualitative analysis, including pseudo gravity, wavelength filtering and upward continuation allowed a first separation of probable deep and shallow features, like the Sanandaj Sirjan zone, Urumieh Dokhtar Magmatic Assemblage, Kopet Dagh structural unit and Central Iran domain. In the second step, we apply inverse modeling to generate an estimate of the top basement geometry. The initial model was established from top basement to (a) constant depth of 25 km and (b) Moho depth. The inversion result was used as starting model for more detailed modelling in 3D to evaluate the effect of susceptibility heterogeneities in the crust. Subsequently, the model was modified with respect to tectonic and geological characterization of the region. Further modification of model in regards more details of susceptibility distribution was led to separating upper crust to different magnetic domains. In addition, we refined the top basement geometry by using terrestrial gravity observation as well. The best fitting model is consistent with the Curie isotherm depth as the base of magnetization. The Curie isotherm was derived from independent geophysical-petrological model.

  17. Preliminary Thermo-Chronometric and Paleo-Magnetic Results from the Western Margin of The Kırşehir Block: Implications for the Timing of Continental Collisions Occurred Along Neo-Tethyan Suture Zones (Central Anatolia, Turkey)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gülyüz, Erhan; Özkaptan, Murat; Langereis, Cor G.; Kaymakcı, Nuretdin

    2017-04-01

    Closures of Paleo- (largely Paleozoic) and Neo-Tethys (largely Mesozoic) Oceans developed between Europe, Africa and Arabia are the main driving mechanisms behind the post-Triassic tectonics, magmatism and metamorphism occurred in Anatolia. Although various scenarios have been suggested for the timing and characteristics of the subduction systems, it is largely accepted that these blocks are progressively collided and amalgamated along the northern (İzmir-Ankara-Erzincan suture zone; IAESZ) and the southern (Bitlis-Zagros suture zone; BZSZ) branches of Neo-Tethys Ocean. The geographic positions of these suture zones in Anatolia are marked by imbricated stacks of largely metamorphosed remnants of the Paleo- and Neo-Tethys Oceans. In addition to this tectonic frame, the existence of another suture zone within the northern branch of the Neo-Tethys separating the Kırşehir Block, a triangular (200km*200km*200km) continental domain represented by mainly high-pressure (HP) meta-sedimentary rocks, from the Taurides, is proposed and named as Intra-Tauride Suture Zone (ITSZ). Although traces of the Neo-Tethyan closure and continental collisions in the Central Anatolia are recorded (1) in sedimentary basins as fold and thrust belt developments (as northern Taurides fold and thrust belt along IAESZ and central Taurides fold and thrust belt along ITSZ), (2) on metamorphic rocks with Late Cretaceous to Late Paleocene peak metamorphism, and (3) on magmatic rocks with Late Cretaceous - Paleocene arc-related intrusions and post-Paleocene post-collisional magmatism, timing of these continental collisions are discussed in limited studies and furthermore they indicate a large time span (post-Paleocene to Miocene) for the collisions. This study aims to date continental collisions occurred in Central Anatolia qualitatively. In this regard, low-temperature thermo-chronometric and paleo-magnetic studies were conducted on the sedimentary units cropped-out along the western and north

  18. Collision Mechanics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Preben Terndrup; Servis, D.P.; Zhang, Shengming

    1999-01-01

    The first section of the present report describes the procedures that are being programmed at DTU for evaluation of the external collision dynamics. Then follows a detailed description of a comprehensive finite element analysis of one collision scenario for MS Dextra carried out at NTUA. The last...

  19. Spatial and temporal development of exhumation at the St. Elias syntaxis in the Yakutat-North American subduction-collision zone, SE Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falkowski, Sarah; Enkelmann, Eva; Pfänder, Jörg; Drost, Kerstin; Stübner, Konstanze; Ehlers, Todd

    2015-04-01

    Since the Mesozoic, the western North American margin has been built by the subduction-collision of several terranes. Currently, the 15-30 km thick, wedge-shaped oceanic plateau of the Yakutat microplate collides obliquely with North America at the bend of the southern Alaskan margin forming the Chugach-St. Elias Mountains. Glaciation of this orogen started 6-5 Ma and efficient glacial erosion has been reported over different timescales. Particularly rapid and deep exhumation occurs at the St. Elias syntaxis, where the plate boundary bends and the tectonic regime transitions from transpression to convergence and flat-slab subduction. This region comprises the highest topography and is almost completely covered by the Seward-Malaspina and Hubbard-Valerie glacial systems. Very young detrital zircon fission-track exhumation ages (track age distributions derived from 46 glacio-fluvial sand samples confine the area of rapid and deep exhumation on the resolution of catchments to an ~4800 km2 area on the North American Plate around the St. Elias syntaxis. To overcome the shortcoming of a decreased resolution of the provenance signal of sand, we present 22 new crystallization ages of cobble-sized detritus from the Seward-Malaspina Glacier. Zircon U-Th/He ages of the cobbles demonstrate that they originate from below the ice and their provenance is analyzed based on their petrographic information and zircon U/Pb data (30.8±0.8 to 277.1±7 Ma, 2σ). Furthermore, we gained 29 new cooling ages of multiple thermochronometers from the cobbles of the Seward-Malaspina and Hubbard-Valerie Glaciers (hornblende and biotite 40Ar/39Ar, zircon and apatite U-Th/He, apatite fission-track) that reveal different cooling histories for the rocks within the syntaxis. For most cobbles, we can determine the provenance within the glacial catchments of the syntaxis area. The results support previous conclusions of a larger part of the syntaxis being affected by rapid, deep exhumation because

  20. Advective collisions

    OpenAIRE

    Andersson, B.; Gustavsson, K.; Mehlig, B.; Wilkinson, M.

    2007-01-01

    Small particles advected in a fluid can collide (and therefore aggregate) due to the stretching or shearing of fluid elements. This effect is usually discussed in terms of a theory due to Saffman and Turner [J. Fluid Mech., 1, 16-30, (1956)]. We show that in complex or random flows the Saffman-Turner theory for the collision rate describes only an initial transient (which we evaluate exactly). We obtain precise expressions for the steady-state collision rate for flows with small Kubo number, ...

  1. Collision vulnerability of marine birds within the California Current System

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Four metrics were used to determine Collision Vulnerability: Diurnal and nocturnal flight activity, flight-height (defined as time spent in rotor sweep zone), and...

  2. Basins in ARC-continental collisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Draut, Amy E.; Clift, Peter D.; Busby, Cathy; Azor, Antonio

    2012-01-01

    Arc-continent collisions occur commonly in the plate-tectonic cycle and result in rapidly formed and rapidly collapsing orogens, often spanning just 5-15 My. Growth of continental masses through arc-continent collision is widely thought to be a major process governing the structural and geochemical evolution of the continental crust over geologic time. Collisions of intra-oceanic arcs with passive continental margins (a situation in which the arc, on the upper plate, faces the continent) involve a substantially different geometry than collisions of intra-oceanic arcs with active continental margins (a situation requiring more than one convergence zone and in which the arc, on the lower plate, backs into the continent), with variable preservation potential for basins in each case. Substantial differences also occur between trench and forearc evolution in tectonically erosive versus tectonically accreting margins, both before and after collision. We examine the evolution of trenches, trench-slope basins, forearc basins, intra-arc basins, and backarc basins during arc-continent collision. The preservation potential of trench-slope basins is low; in collision they are rapidly uplifted and eroded, and at erosive margins they are progressively destroyed by subduction erosion. Post-collisional preservation of trench sediment and trench-slope basins is biased toward margins that were tectonically accreting for a substantial length of time before collision. Forearc basins in erosive margins are usually floored by strong lithosphere and may survive collision with a passive margin, sometimes continuing sedimentation throughout collision and orogeny. The low flexural rigidity of intra-arc basins makes them deep and, if preserved, potentially long records of arc and collisional tectonism. Backarc basins, in contrast, are typically subducted and their sediment either lost or preserved only as fragments in melange sequences. A substantial proportion of the sediment derived from

  3. Embodied Archives as Contact Zones

    OpenAIRE

    Judit Vidiella

    2015-01-01

    This article proposes a reflection about affective politics from locating some theoretical and conceptual genealogies like «emotion», «affection», «zones of contact»…, that understand them as action and force fields. These contributions allow us to rethink the relation of affects with politics and strategies of archive linked to performance, and understood as zones of friction, collision, circulation and contact: performative writing, repertoire, memes…

  4. Embodied Archives as Contact Zones

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Judit Vidiella

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available This article proposes a reflection about affective politics from locating some theoretical and conceptual genealogies like «emotion», «affection», «zones of contact»…, that understand them as action and force fields. These contributions allow us to rethink the relation of affects with politics and strategies of archive linked to performance, and understood as zones of friction, collision, circulation and contact: performative writing, repertoire, memes…

  5. Multifragmentation and dynamics in heavy ion collisions

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    A midrapidity zone formed in heavy-ion collisions has been investigated through special selections of light .... lished from analysing charged particles emitted at velocities between those characteristic of projectilelike .... only, one low and one high, are displayed (more complete results are given in [15]). For the QP source ...

  6. Safety Zones

    Science.gov (United States)

    These are established primarily to reduce the accidental spread of hazardous substances by workers or equipment from contaminated areas to clean areas. They include the exclusion (hot) zone, contamination reduction (warm) zone, and support (cold) zone.

  7. Collision Repair Campaign

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Collision Repair Campaign targets meaningful risk reduction in the Collision Repair source category to reduce air toxic emissions in their communities. The Campaign also helps shops to work towards early compliance with the Auto Body Rule.

  8. Collision Risk and Damage after Collision

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Preben Terndrup; Hansen, Peter Friis; Nielsen, Lars Peter

    1996-01-01

    The paper presents a new and complete procedure for calculation of ship-ship collision rates on specific routes and the hull damage caused by such collisions.The procedure is applied to analysis of collision risks for Ro-Ro pasenger vessels. Given a collision the spatial probability distribution...... of the damage risk is calculated by a numerical procedure. These directly calculated distributions for hull damages are subsequently approximated by analytical expressions suited for probabilistic damage stability calculations similar to the procedure described in IMO regulation A.265.Numerical results...... are presented for threee different Ro-Ro passenger vessels of length 98 m 150 m and 180 m, respectively operating at three different routes. These routes are the Danish Great Belt route, a Finland-Sweden route and the Dover-Calais route....

  9. Fore-arc deformation at the transition between collision and subduction: insights from 3D thermo-mechanical laboratory experiments.

    OpenAIRE

    D. Boutelier; Onno Oncken; A. Cruden

    2012-01-01

    Three-dimensional thermomechanical laboratory experiments of arc-continent collision investigate the deformation of the fore arc at the transition between collision and subduction. The deformation of the plates in the collision area propagates into the subduction-collision transition zone via along-strike coupling of the neighboring segments of the plate boundary. In our experiments, the largest along-strike gradient of trench-perpendicular compression does not produce sufficiently localized ...

  10. LEXUS heavy ion collisions

    CERN Document Server

    Sang Yong Jeon

    1997-01-01

    We use a Glauber-like approach to describe very energetic nucleus- nucleus collisions as a sequence of binary nucleon-nucleon collisions. No free parameters are needed: all the information comes from simple parametrizations of nucleon-nucleon collision data. Produced mesons are assumed not to interact with each other or with the original baryons. Comparisons are made to published experimental measurements of baryon rapidity and transverse momentum distributions, negative hadron rapidity and transverse momentum distributions, average multiplicities of pions, kaons, hyperons, and antihyperons, and zero degree energy distributions for sulfur-sulfur collisions at 200 GeV/c per nucleon and for lead-lead collisions at 158 GeV/c per nucleon. Good agreement is found except that the number of strange particles produced, especially antihyperons, is too small compared with experiment. We call this model LEXUS: Linear EXtrapolation of Ultrarelativistic nucleon-nucleon Scattering to heavy ion collisions. (11 refs).

  11. Midair Collisions: Aeromedical Considerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    AVIATION ACCIDENTS , * COLLISION AVOIDANCE, FLIGHT CREWS, REACTION TIME, CASE STUDIES, INFLIGHT, HYPOXIA, VISION, VISUAL PERCEPTION, AVIATION SAFETY, VISUAL ACUITY, PSYCHOPHYSIOLOGY, AVIATION MEDICINE, GLARE.

  12. Yellow light dilemma zone researches: a review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yaping Zhang

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The yellow light dilemma zone is widely known as an area on the high-speed intersection approach, where vehicles neither safely stop before the stop line nor proceed through the intersection during amber interval. Within such an area, a vehicle might be involved in a right-angle crash or rear-end collision. This issue has been extensively discussed over five decades in traffic engineering field, covering from theory to practice. However, few comprehensive review literatures on the amber signal dilemma zone problems can be found. The objective of this paper is to summarize the evolution of yellow light dilemma zone researches. Basic definition and boundary of dilemma zone followed by driver behavior and dilemma zone hazard measurement are depicted. At last, the future directions of yellow light dilemma zone research are discussed.

  13. SMARTER Collision avoidance

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Keith Burton

    2017-01-01

    .... By 1981, researchers had developed the Traffic Collision Avoidance System, or TCAS, a box of electronics and software that transmits a radar signal that interrogates transponders on nearby planes...

  14. From collisions to clusters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Loukonen, Ville; Bork, Nicolai; Vehkamaki, Hanna

    2014-01-01

    The clustering of sulphuric acid with base molecules is one of the main pathways of new-particle formation in the Earth's atmosphere. First step in the clustering process is likely the formation of a (sulphuric acid)1(base)1(water)n cluster. Here, we present results from direct first......-principles molecular dynamics collision simulations of (sulphuric acid)1(water)0, 1 + (dimethylamine) → (sulphuric acid)1(dimethylamine)1(water)0, 1 cluster formation processes. The simulations indicate that the sticking factor in the collisions is unity: the interaction between the molecules is strong enough...... to overcome the possible initial non-optimal collision orientations. No post-collisional cluster break up is observed. The reasons for the efficient clustering are (i) the proton transfer reaction which takes place in each of the collision simulations and (ii) the subsequent competition over the proton...

  15. Electron-molecule collisions

    CERN Document Server

    Takayanagi, Kazuo

    1984-01-01

    Scattering phenomena play an important role in modern physics. Many significant discoveries have been made through collision experiments. Amongst diverse kinds of collision systems, this book sheds light on the collision of an electron with a molecule. The electron-molecule collision provides a basic scattering problem. It is scattering by a nonspherical, multicentered composite particle with its centers having degrees of freedom of motion. The molecule can even disintegrate, Le., dissociate or ionize into fragments, some or all of which may also be molecules. Although it is a difficult problem, the recent theoretical, experimental, and computational progress has been so significant as to warrant publication of a book that specializes in this field. The progress owes partly to technical develop­ ments in measurements and computations. No less important has been the great and continuing stimulus from such fields of application as astrophysics, the physics of the earth's upper atmosphere, laser physics, radiat...

  16. Evaluation Method of Collision Risk by Using True Motion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hayama Imazu

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available It is necessary to develop a useful application to use big data like as AIS for safety and efficiency of ship operation. AIS is very useful system to collect targets information, but this information is not effective use yet. The evaluation method of collision risk is one of the cause disturb. Usually the collision risk of ship is evaluated by the value of the Closest Point of Approach (CPA which is related to a relative motion. So, it becomes difficult to find out a safety pass in a congested water. Here, Line of Predicted Collision (LOPC and Obstacle Zone by Target (OZT for evaluation of collision risk are introduced, these values are related to a true motion and it became visible of dangerous place, so it will make easy to find out a safety pass in a congested water.

  17. Photon-photon collisions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burke, D.L.

    1982-10-01

    Studies of photon-photon collisions are reviewed with particular emphasis on new results reported to this conference. These include results on light meson spectroscopy and deep inelastic e..gamma.. scattering. Considerable work has now been accumulated on resonance production by ..gamma gamma.. collisions. Preliminary high statistics studies of the photon structure function F/sub 2//sup ..gamma../(x,Q/sup 2/) are given and comments are made on the problems that remain to be solved.

  18. NEARSHORE ZONE

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    hb"'/ H“ —_'~. Fig. l: Schematic plan showing the incident wave and subsequent breaking in the nearshore zone. The still-water line indicates the mean water level and .... obtained by taking the square of the high frequency velocity components.

  19. Mafic sill/dykes intruding into late Maastrichtian-early Paleocene calciclastic units, NE-Turkey: Petrographical and geochemical features of latest magmatic activity before collision in the eastern Sakarya zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aydin, Faruk; Oǧuz, Simge; Karsli, Orhan; Kandemir, Raif; Şen, Cüneyt; Uysal, İbrahim

    2017-04-01

    We present here new petrographical, mineralogical and whole-rock geochemical data for mafic sill/dykes intruding into late Maastrichtian-early Paleocene calciclastic units in the Düzköy (Trabzon) and Cankurtaran (Artvin) areas (NE Turkey) of the eastern Sakarya zone (ESZ) in order to decipher the latest magmatic activity in the final stage of subduction-related magmatism of the ESZ. U-Pb zircon dating for the mafic sill/dykes in the region yielded ages varying from 83.6 to 78.5Ma (i.e. Early Campanian). Mafic sill/dykes consist of mostly basalts and lesser basaltic-andesites with komatiitic basalts. Most of the dyke samples display aphyric to porphyritic texture with phenocrysts of plagioclase (mostly replaced by calcite), clinopyroxene (partly uralized), olivine (almost serpentinized), and amphibole (partly chloritized). Based on the MgO, Nb and Zr contents with Nb/Y ratio, the mafic dykes from Düzköy area are mainly classified as two subgroups (basalts and basaltic andesites) while those of Cankurtaran can be divided into three different groups (low- and high-Nb normal basalts and komatitic basalts). Düzköy basaltic dykes have higher MgO (3.8-7.8%) and lower Nb (3-4ppm) and Zr (53-62ppm) contents with Nb/Y ratio (˜0.2) than those of Düzköy basaltic-andesitic dykes (MgO: ˜1.8%, Nb: 6-15ppm, Zr: 106-145ppm, Nb/Y: 0.3-0.6). On the other hand, Cankurtaran mafic sill/dykes have relatively high MgO contents (˜4-20%). These sill/dykes with 15-20% of MgO and contents are called as komatiitic basalt which has relatively low K2O (contents with Nb/Y ratio (˜0.1-0.2). However, normal basalts from Cankurtaran have quite lower MgO contents (˜4-9%) than that of the komatiitic basalt. Also, they can be divided into two subgroups in terms of MgO (5.7-8.7% for group 1 and 4.0-4.4% for group 2), Nb (3-14ppm for group 1 and 19-21ppm for group 2), Zr (94-111ppm for group 1 and 125-140ppm for group 2) contents, and Nb/Y ratio (˜0.2-0.8 for group 1 and (˜1.0-1.2 for

  20. Sound Zones

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Martin Bo; Olsen, Martin

    2017-01-01

    Sound zones, i.e. spatially confined regions of individual audio content, can be created by appropriate filtering of the desired audio signals reproduced by an array of loudspeakers. The challenge of designing filters for sound zones is twofold: First, the filtered responses should generate...... an acoustic separation between the control regions. Secondly, the pre- and post-ringing as well as spectral deterioration introduced by the filters should be minimized. The tradeoff between acoustic separation and filter ringing is the focus of this paper. A weighted L2-norm penalty is introduced in the sound...

  1. About the Collision Repair Campaign

    Science.gov (United States)

    EPA developed the Collision Repair Campaign to focus on meaningful risk reduction in the Collision Repair source sector to complement ongoing community air toxics work and attain reductions at a faster rate.

  2. Ice particle collisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sampara, Naresh; Turnbull, Barbara; Hill, Richard; Swift, Michael

    2017-04-01

    Granular interactions of ice occur in a range of geophysical, astrophysical and industrial applications. For example, Saturn's Rings are composed of icy particles from micrometers to kilometres in size - inertial and yet too small to interact gravitationally. In clouds, ice crystals are smashed to pieces before they re-aggregate to for snow floccules in a process that is very much open to interpretation. In a granular flow of ice particles, the energy spent in collisions can lead to localized surface changes and wetting, which in turn can promote aggregation. To understand the induced wetting and its effects, we present two novel experimental methods which provide snippets of insight into the collisional behaviour of macroscopic ice particles. Experiment 1: Microgravity experiments provide minute details of the contact between the ice particles during the collision. A diamagnetic levitation technique, as alternative to the parabolic flight or falling tower experiments, was used to understand the collisional behaviour of individual macroscopic icy bodies. A refrigerated cylinder, that can control ambient conditions, was inserted into the bore of an 18 Tesla superconducting magnet and cooled to -10°C. Initial binary collisions were created, where one 4 mm ice particle was levitated in the magnet bore whilst another particle was dropped vertically from the top of the bore. The trajectories of both particles were captured by high speed video to provide the three-dimensional particle velocities and track the collision outcome. Introducing complexity, multiple particles were levitated in the bore and an azimuthal turbulent air flow introduced, allowing the particles to collide with other particles within a coherent fluid structure (mimicking Saturn's rings, or an eddy in a cloud). In these experiments, a sequence of collisions occur, each one different to the previous one due to the changes in surface characteristics created by the collisions themselves. Aggregation

  3. Spacecraft Collision Avoidance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bussy-Virat, Charles

    The rapid increase of the number of objects in orbit around the Earth poses a serious threat to operational spacecraft and astronauts. In order to effectively avoid collisions, mission operators need to assess the risk of collision between the satellite and any other object whose orbit is likely to approach its trajectory. Several algorithms predict the probability of collision but have limitations that impair the accuracy of the prediction. An important limitation is that uncertainties in the atmospheric density are usually not taken into account in the propagation of the covariance matrix from current epoch to closest approach time. The Spacecraft Orbital Characterization Kit (SpOCK) was developed to accurately predict the positions and velocities of spacecraft. The central capability of SpOCK is a high accuracy numerical propagator of spacecraft orbits and computations of ancillary parameters. The numerical integration uses a comprehensive modeling of the dynamics of spacecraft in orbit that includes all the perturbing forces that a spacecraft is subject to in orbit. In particular, the atmospheric density is modeled by thermospheric models to allow for an accurate representation of the atmospheric drag. SpOCK predicts the probability of collision between two orbiting objects taking into account the uncertainties in the atmospheric density. Monte Carlo procedures are used to perturb the initial position and velocity of the primary and secondary spacecraft from their covariance matrices. Developed in C, SpOCK supports parallelism to quickly assess the risk of collision so it can be used operationally in real time. The upper atmosphere of the Earth is strongly driven by the solar activity. In particular, abrupt transitions from slow to fast solar wind cause important disturbances of the atmospheric density, hence of the drag acceleration that spacecraft are subject to. The Probability Distribution Function (PDF) model was developed to predict the solar wind speed

  4. Metallogeny of subduction zones

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sorokhtin N. O.

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The paper deals with the multistage mechanism of the Earth's crust enrichment in ore elements in underthrust zones. The processes of metamorphism and the formation of hydrothermal solutions at pulling of the watered oceanic lithospheric plate into the subduction zone have been described. Some physical and chemical transformation regularities of structural-material complexes in these areas and mechanisms of the formation of ore deposits have been discussed. Spatio-temporal patterns of the localization of a number of endogenetic and exogenetic deposits have been described using metallogeny of the Ural and the Verkhoyansk-Kolyma Fold Belts as an example. It has been shown that in nature there are several effective mechanisms of the enrichment of the crust in ore minerals. One of them is the process of pulling into subduction zone of metalliferous sediments and ferromanganese crusts as well as seabed nodules, their metamorphic transformation, partial melting and transition of ore components into magmatic melts and mineralized fluids. In the future this leads to the release of ore material by magmas and hydrothermal solutions into the folded formations of island-arc and Andean types and the formation of igneous, metasomatic and hydrothermal deposits. Another, yet no less powerful natural mechanism of a conveyor enrichment of the crust in ore elements is the process of destruction and sedimentation of mineral deposits formed in the folded areas as well as the formation of placers and their transfer to the marginal parts of the continent. Later, during the collision of active and passive margins of two lithospheric plates, such as the collision of the Kolyma Massif with the eastern part of the Siberian craton in the middle of the Mesozoic there was a thrusting of a younger lithospheric plate over a more ancient one. As a result, the sedimentary sequences of the passive margin of the Siberian plate were submerged and partially melted by the basic magmas

  5. Photon-photon collisions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brodsky, S.J.

    1988-07-01

    Highlights of the VIIIth International Workshop on Photon-Photon Collisions are reviewed. New experimental and theoretical results were reported in virtually every area of ..gamma gamma.. physics, particularly in exotic resonance production and tests of quantum chromodynamics where asymptotic freedom and factorization theorems provide predictions for both inclusive and exclusive ..gamma gamma.. reactions at high momentum transfer. 73 refs., 12 figs.

  6. Droplet collisions in turbulence

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oldenziel, G.

    2014-01-01

    Liquid droplets occur in many natural phenomena and play an important role in a large number of industrial applications. One of the distinct properties of droplets as opposed to solid particles is their ability to merge, or coalesce upon collision. Coalescence of liquid drops is of importance in for

  7. CMS SEES FIRST COLLISIONS

    CERN Multimedia

      A very special moment.  On 23rd November, 19:40 we recorded our first collisions with 450GeV beams well centred in CMS.   If you have any comments / suggestions please contact Karl Aaron GILL (Editor)

  8. Vocal Fold Collision Modeling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Granados, Alba; Brunskog, Jonas; Misztal, M. K.

    2015-01-01

    When vocal folds vibrate at normal speaking frequencies, collisions occurs. The numerics and formulations behind a position-based continuum model of contact is an active field of research in the contact mechanics community. In this paper, a frictionless three-dimensional finite element model of t...

  9. Collisions in soccer kicking

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Thomas Bull; Dörge, Henrik C.; Thomsen, Franz Ib

    1999-01-01

    An equation to describe the velocity of the soccer ball after the collision with a foot was derived. On the basis of experimental results it was possible to exclude certain factors and only describe the angular momentum of the system, consisting of the shank, the foot and the ball, leading...

  10. Electrical Conductivity Images of South African Continental Collision Zones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weckmann, U.; Ritter, O.; Becken, M.; Pek, J.; de Wit, M.

    2008-12-01

    Within the framework of the German-South African geo-scientific research initiative Inkaba yeAfrica several magnetotelluric (MT) field experiments were conducted along the Agulhas-Karoo transect in South Africa. This 600km long transect is designed to cross the Cape Fold Belt, the Namaqua-Natal Mobile Belt (NNMB), the Karoo Basin and the transition into the Kaapvaal Craton. At the same time, the transect crosses the Beattie Magnetic Anomaly and the Southern Cape Conductive Belt, two of Earth's largest continental geophysical anomalies. In this presentation we will focus on the ~ 1.2-1.0 Ga old convergent margin represented by the Kaapvaal craton-bounding Proterozoic Namaqua-Natal orogenic belt. Along the northernmost segment of the transect, we deployed over 120 MT sites along the 250km profile with a site spacing of 2-4km. With our experiment we focussed on a high-resolution image of the Mobile Belt-Craton transition on lithospheric scale. The MT data show a predominantly 2D behaviour; however, some sites show strong 3D effects, which are consistently observed over a 15km long segment. Anisotropic and 3D modelling studies show that these effects are caused by the unique setting of the extremely resistive rocks of the Kaapvaal Craton in combination with very conductive shallow structures. 2D- and 3D inversion results exhibit a shallow conductivity anomaly: a sub-horizontal, high conductivity band in the upper 5km of the NNMB. In view of other MT data collected in the area, we can map this anomaly over an area of 400km2. Based on deep borehole information, we are able to correlate the conductive band with the black shale and pyrite rich Whitehill formation within the Karoo basin, which seems to wedge out in vicinity of the Craton transition. In mid to lower crustal levels, the MT models show the transition from the untypically conductive rocks of the Proterozoic mobile belt and the extremely resistive rocks of the Kaapvaal Craton.

  11. Collision Probability Analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Peter Friis; Pedersen, Preben Terndrup

    1998-01-01

    It is the purpose of this report to apply a rational model for prediction of ship-ship collision probabilities as function of the ship and the crew characteristics and the navigational environment for MS Dextra sailing on a route between Cadiz and the Canary Islands.The most important ship and crew...... characteristics are: ship speed, ship manoeuvrability, the layout of the navigational bridge, the radar system, the number and the training of navigators, the presence of a look out etc. The main parameters affecting the navigational environment are ship traffic density, probability distributions of wind speeds...... probability, i.e. a study of the navigator's role in resolving critical situations, a causation factor is derived as a second step.The report documents the first step in a probabilistic collision damage analysis. Future work will inlcude calculation of energy released for crushing of structures giving...

  12. The role of multiple parton collisions in hadron collisions

    CERN Document Server

    Walker, W D

    2000-01-01

    We have examined charged multiplicities arising from p-p and p-p collisions over the range of center of mass energies from 30 GeV to 1800 GeV. We find that a portion of each distribution does obey KNO scaling. Those parts of the distributions that do not scale are the result of multiparton collisions. Results from experiment E735 show not only double but also triple parton collisions. These multiparton collisions seem to account for a large part of the increase in the cross section in this energy domain. (4 refs).

  13. Road rage and collision involvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mann, Robert E; Zhao, Jinhui; Stoduto, Gina; Adlaf, Edward M; Smart, Reginald G; Donovan, John E

    2007-01-01

    To assess the contribution of road rage victimization and perpetration to collision involvement. The relationship between self-reported collision involvement and road rage victimization and perpetration was examined, based on telephone interviews with a representative sample of 4897 Ontario adult drivers interviewed between 2002 and 2004. Perpetrators and victims of both any road rage and serious road rage had a significantly higher risk of collision involvement than did those without road rage experience. This study provides epidemiological evidence that both victims and perpetrators of road rage experience increased collision risk. More detailed studies of the contribution of road rage to traffic crashes are needed.

  14. Topics in atomic collision theory

    CERN Document Server

    Geltman, Sydney; Brueckner, Keith A

    1969-01-01

    Topics in Atomic Collision Theory originated in a course of graduate lectures given at the University of Colorado and at University College in London. It is recommended for students in physics and related fields who are interested in the application of quantum scattering theory to low-energy atomic collision phenomena. No attention is given to the electromagnetic, nuclear, or elementary particle domains. The book is organized into three parts: static field scattering, electron-atom collisions, and atom-atom collisions. These are in the order of increasing physical complexity and hence necessar

  15. Development of Analytical Method for Finding the High Risk Collision Areas

    OpenAIRE

    Gen Fukuda; Ruri Shoji

    2017-01-01

    The traffic condition has been analyzed by models that are based on Gas model and Obstacle Zone by Target (OZT) by using 1 year AIS data for Tsunami measure. By applying Gas model based method, it is possible to analyze the area in terms of ships’ relative angle, size, speed and density. The OZT is originally developed to show the collision zone on the target ship’s course. By using this method to the marine traffic analysis, high possibility of collision areas are estimated. Moreover, ships ...

  16. Development of Analytical Method for Finding the High Risk Collision Areas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gen Fukuda

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The traffic condition has been analyzed by models that are based on Gas model and Obstacle Zone by Target (OZT by using 1 year AIS data for Tsunami measure. By applying Gas model based method, it is possible to analyze the area in terms of ships’ relative angle, size, speed and density. The OZT is originally developed to show the collision zone on the target ship’s course. By using this method to the marine traffic analysis, high possibility of collision areas are estimated. Moreover, ships that courses are heading to OZT are identified and studied their position and how long they proceed course heading to OZT.

  17. Molecular collision theory

    CERN Document Server

    Child, M S

    2010-01-01

    This high-level monograph offers an excellent introduction to the theory required for interpretation of an increasingly sophisticated range of molecular scattering experiments. There are five helpful appendixes dealing with continuum wavefunctions, Green's functions, semi-classical connection formulae, curve-crossing in the momentum representation, and elements of classical mechanics.The contents of this volume have been chosen to emphasize the quantum mechanical and semi-classical nature of collision events, with little attention given to purely classical behavior. The treatment is essentiall

  18. Outer Dynamics of Ship Collisions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Preben Terndrup

    1996-01-01

    The purpose is to present analysis procedures for the motion of ships during ship-ship collisions and for ship collisions with offshore structures. The aim is to estimate that part of the lost kinetic energy which will have to be absorbed by rupture and plastic damage of the colliding structures....

  19. A Changing Wind Collision

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nazé, Yaël; Koenigsberger, Gloria; Pittard, Julian M.; Parkin, Elliot Ross; Rauw, Gregor; Corcoran, Michael F.; Hillier, D. John

    2018-02-01

    We report on the first detection of a global change in the X-ray emitting properties of a wind–wind collision, thanks to XMM-Newton observations of the massive Small Magellenic Cloud (SMC) system HD 5980. While its light curve had remained unchanged between 2000 and 2005, the X-ray flux has now increased by a factor of ∼2.5, and slightly hardened. The new observations also extend the observational coverage over the entire orbit, pinpointing the light-curve shape. It has not varied much despite the large overall brightening, and a tight correlation of fluxes with orbital separation is found without any hysteresis effect. Moreover, the absence of eclipses and of absorption effects related to orientation suggests a large size for the X-ray emitting region. Simple analytical models of the wind–wind collision, considering the varying wind properties of the eruptive component in HD 5980, are able to reproduce the recent hardening and the flux-separation relationship, at least qualitatively, but they predict a hardening at apastron and little change in mean flux, contrary to observations. The brightness change could then possibly be related to a recently theorized phenomenon linked to the varying strength of thin-shell instabilities in shocked wind regions. Based on XMM-Newton and Chandra data.

  20. Collision in space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellis, S. R.

    2000-01-01

    On June 25, 1997, the Russian supply spacecraft Progress 234 collided with the Mir space station, rupturing Mir's pressure hull, throwing it into an uncontrolled attitude drift, and nearly forcing evacuation of the station. Like many high-profile accidents, this collision was the consequence of a chain of events leading to the final piloting errors that were its immediate cause. The discussion in this article does not resolve the relative contributions of the actions and decisions in this chain. Neither does it suggest corrective measures, many of which are straightforward and have already been implemented by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) and the Russian Space Agency. Rather, its purpose is to identify the human factors that played a pervasive role in the incident. Workplace stress, fatigue, and sleep deprivation were identified by NASA as contributory factors in the Mir-Progress collision (Culbertson, 1997; NASA, forthcoming), but other contributing factors, such as requiring crew to perform difficult tasks for which their training is not current, could potentially become important factors in future situations.

  1. Ship Collision and Grounding Analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Preben Terndrup

    2010-01-01

    It is the purpose of the paper to present a review of prediction and analysis tools for collision and grounding analyses and to outline a probabilistic procedure whereby these tools can be used by the maritime industry to develop performance based rules to reduce the risk associated with human, e......, environmental and economic costs of collision and grounding events. The main goal of collision and grounding research should be to identify the most economic risk control options associated with prevention and mitigation of collision and grounding events......It is the purpose of the paper to present a review of prediction and analysis tools for collision and grounding analyses and to outline a probabilistic procedure whereby these tools can be used by the maritime industry to develop performance based rules to reduce the risk associated with human...

  2. Modeling Vehicle Collision Angle in Traffic Crashes Based on Three-Dimensional Laser Scanning Data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyu, Nengchao; Huang, Gang; Wu, Chaozhong; Duan, Zhicheng; Li, Pingfan

    2017-02-28

    In road traffic accidents, the analysis of a vehicle's collision angle plays a key role in identifying a traffic accident's form and cause. However, because accurate estimation of vehicle collision angle involves many factors, it is difficult to accurately determine it in cases in which less physical evidence is available and there is a lack of monitoring. This paper establishes the mathematical relation model between collision angle, deformation, and normal vector in the collision region according to the equations of particle deformation and force in Hooke's law of classical mechanics. At the same time, the surface reconstruction method suitable for a normal vector solution is studied. Finally, the estimation model of vehicle collision angle is presented. In order to verify the correctness of the model, verification of multi-angle collision experiments and sensitivity analysis of laser scanning precision for the angle have been carried out using three-dimensional (3D) data obtained by a 3D laser scanner in the collision deformation zone. Under the conditions with which the model has been defined, validation results show that the collision angle is a result of the weighted synthesis of the normal vector of the collision point and the weight value is the deformation of the collision point corresponding to normal vectors. These conclusions prove the applicability of the model. The collision angle model proposed in this paper can be used as the theoretical basis for traffic accident identification and cause analysis. It can also be used as a theoretical reference for the study of the impact deformation of elastic materials.

  3. Modeling Vehicle Collision Angle in Traffic Crashes Based on Three-Dimensional Laser Scanning Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nengchao Lyu

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available In road traffic accidents, the analysis of a vehicle’s collision angle plays a key role in identifying a traffic accident’s form and cause. However, because accurate estimation of vehicle collision angle involves many factors, it is difficult to accurately determine it in cases in which less physical evidence is available and there is a lack of monitoring. This paper establishes the mathematical relation model between collision angle, deformation, and normal vector in the collision region according to the equations of particle deformation and force in Hooke’s law of classical mechanics. At the same time, the surface reconstruction method suitable for a normal vector solution is studied. Finally, the estimation model of vehicle collision angle is presented. In order to verify the correctness of the model, verification of multi-angle collision experiments and sensitivity analysis of laser scanning precision for the angle have been carried out using three-dimensional (3D data obtained by a 3D laser scanner in the collision deformation zone. Under the conditions with which the model has been defined, validation results show that the collision angle is a result of the weighted synthesis of the normal vector of the collision point and the weight value is the deformation of the collision point corresponding to normal vectors. These conclusions prove the applicability of the model. The collision angle model proposed in this paper can be used as the theoretical basis for traffic accident identification and cause analysis. It can also be used as a theoretical reference for the study of the impact deformation of elastic materials.

  4. Reversible simulations of elastic collisions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perumalla, Kalyan S.; Protopopescu, Vladimir A.

    2013-05-01

    Consider a system of N identical hard spherical particles moving in a d-dimensional box and undergoing elastic, possibly multi-particle, collisions. We develop a new algorithm that recovers the pre-collision state from the post-collision state of the system, across a series of consecutive collisions, \\textit{with essentially no memory overhead}. The challenge in achieving reversibility for an n-particle collision (where, in general, n<< N) arises from the presence of nd-d-1 degrees of freedom (arbitrary angles) during each collision, as well as from the complex geometrical constraints placed on the colliding particles. To reverse the collisions in a traditional simulation setting, all of the particular realizations of these degrees of freedom (angles) during the forward simulation must be tracked. This requires memory proportional to the number of collisions, which grows very fast with N and d, thereby severely limiting the \\textit{de facto} applicability of the scheme. This limitation is addressed here by first performing a pseudo-randomization of angles, which ensures determinism in the reverse path for any values of n and d. To address the more difficult problem of geometrical and dynamic constraints, a new approach is developed which correctly samples the constrained phase space. Upon combining the pseudo-randomization with correct phase space sampling, perfect reversibility of collisions is achieved, as illustrated for n<=3, d=2, and n=2, d=3. This result enables, for the first time, reversible simulations of elastic collisions with essentially zero memory accumulation. In principle, the approach presented here could be generalized to larger values of n, which would be of definite interest for molecular dynamics simulations at high densities.

  5. Sixteenth International Conference on the physics of electronic and atomic collisions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dalgarno, A.; Freund, R.S.; Lubell, M.S.; Lucatorto, T.B. (eds.)

    1989-01-01

    This report contains abstracts of papers on the following topics: photons, electron-atom collisions; electron-molecule collisions; electron-ion collisions; collisions involving exotic species; ion- atom collisions, ion-molecule or atom-molecule collisions; atom-atom collisions; ion-ion collisions; collisions involving rydberg atoms; field assisted collisions; collisions involving clusters and collisions involving condensed matter.

  6. Cooperative Retransmissions Through Collisions

    CERN Document Server

    Qureshi, Jalaluddin; Foh, Chuan Heng

    2011-01-01

    Interference in wireless networks is one of the key capacity-limiting factors. Recently developed interference-embracing techniques show promising performance on turning collisions into useful transmissions. However, the interference-embracing techniques are hard to apply in practical applications due to their strict requirements. In this paper, we consider utilising the interference-embracing techniques in a common scenario of two interfering sender-receiver pairs. By employing opportunistic listening and analog network coding (ANC), we show that compared to traditional ARQ retransmission, a higher retransmission throughput can be achieved by allowing two interfering senders to cooperatively retransmit selected lost packets at the same time. This simultaneous retransmission is facilitated by a simple handshaking procedure without introducing additional overhead. Simulation results demonstrate the superior performance of the proposed cooperative retransmission.

  7. Consumers’ Collision Insurance Decisions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Austin, Laurel; Fischhoff, Baruch

    Using interviews with 74 drivers, we elicit and analyse how people think about collision coverage and, more generally, about insurance decisions. We compare the judgments and behaviours of these decision makers to the predictions of a range of theoretical models: (a) A model developed by Lee (2007......), which refines EU theory to incorporate income and predicts that property insurance is a normal good; (b) a mental accounting model based on the idea that consumers budget their income across consumption categories (Thaler, 1985); and (c) the baseline, classic EU theory, which predicts that insurance...... is an inferior good (Mossin, 1968). The behaviour reported by subjects in our study suggests that insurance is a normal good, while their verbal reports reveal desires to balance two conflicting goals in deductible decisions, keeping premiums “affordable” and keeping deductibles “affordable,” which suggests...

  8. Are school zones effective? An examination of motor vehicle versus child pedestrian crashes near schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warsh, J; Rothman, L; Slater, M; Steverango, C; Howard, A

    2009-08-01

    To analyse the relationships between factors related to school location and motor vehicle versus child pedestrian collisions. Data on all police-reported motor vehicle collisions involving pedestrians less than 18 years of age that occurred in Toronto, Canada, between 2000 and 2005 were analysed. Geographic information systems (GIS) software was used to assess the distance of each collision relative to school location. The relationships between distance from school and collision-related factors such as temporal patterns of school travel times and crossing locations were analysed. Study data showed a total of 2717 motor vehicle versus child (school zones and decreased as distance from schools increased. The highest proportion of collisions (37.3%) occurred among 10-14-year-olds. Within school zones, collisions were more likely to occur among 5-9-year-old children as they travelled to and from school during months when school was in session. Most collisions within school zones occurred at midblock locations versus intersections. Focusing interventions around schools with attention to age, travel times, and crossing location will reduce the burden of injury in children. Future studies that take into account traffic and pedestrian volume surrounding schools would be useful for prevention efforts as well as for promotion of walking. These results will help identify priorities and emphasise the importance of considering spatial and temporal patterns in child pedestrian research.

  9. On Impact Mechanics in Ship Collisions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Preben Terndrup; Zhang, Shengming

    1998-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to present analytical, closed-form expressions for the energy released for crushing and the impact impulse during ship collisions. Ship-ship collisions, ship collisions with rigid walls and ship collisions with flexible offshore structures are considered. The derived ...

  10. Gyrokinetic linearized Landau collision operator

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Jens

    2013-01-01

    The full gyrokinetic electrostatic linearized Landau collision operator is calculated including the equilibrium operator, which represents the effect of collisions between gyrokinetic Maxwellian particles. First, the equilibrium operator describes energy exchange between different plasma species......, which is important in multiple ion-species plasmas. Second, the equilibrium operator describes drag and diffusion of the magnetic field aligned component of the vorticity associated with the E×B drift. Therefore, a correct description of collisional effects in turbulent plasmas requires the equilibrium...... operator, even for like-particle collisions....

  11. Seismotectonic zoning of Azerbaijan territory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kangarli, Talat; Aliyev, Ali; Aliyev, Fuad; Rahimov, Fuad

    2017-04-01

    Studying of the space-time correlation and consequences effect between tectonic events and other geological processes that have created modern earth structure still remains as one of the most important problems in geology. This problem is especially important for the East Caucasus-South Caspian geodynamic zone. Being situated at the eastern part of the Caucasian strait, this zone refers to a center of Alpine-Himalayan active folded belt, and is known as a complex tectonic unit with jointing heterogeneous structural-substantial complexes arising from different branches of the belt (Doburja-Caucasus-Kopetdag from the north and Pyrenean-Alborz from the south with Kura and South Caspian zone). According to GPS and precise leveling data, activity of regional geodynamic processes shows intensive horizontal and vertical movements of the Earth's crust as conditioned by collision of the Arabian and Eurasian continental plates continuing since the end of Miocene. So far studies related to the regional of geology-geophysical data, periodically used for the geological and tectonic modeling of the environment mainly based on the fixing ideology. There still remains a number of uncertainties in solution of issues related to regional geology, tectonics and magmatism, structure and interrelation of different structural zones, space-time interrelations between onshore and offshore complexes, etc. At the same time large dataset produced by surface geological surveys, deep geological mapping of on- and offshore areas with the use of seismic and electrical reconnaissance and geophysical field zoning methods, deep well drilling and remote sensing activities. Conducted new studies produced results including differentiation of formerly unknown nappe complexes of the different ages and scales within the structure of mountain-fold zones, identification of new zones containing ophiolites in their section, outlining of currently active faulting areas, geophysical interpretation of the deep

  12. On impact mechanics in ship collisions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Preben Terndrup; Zhang, Shengming

    1998-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to present analytical, closed-form expressions for the energy released for crushing and the impact impulse during ship collisions. Ship–ship collisions, ship collisions with rigid walls and ship collisions with flexible offshore structures are considered. The derived...... of illustrative examples are presented. The procedure presented in the paper is well suited for inclusion in a probabilistic calculation model for damage of ship structures due to collisions....

  13. Collision attack against Tav-128 hash function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hariyanto, Fajar; Hayat Susanti, Bety

    2017-10-01

    Tav-128 is a hash function which is designed for Radio Frequency Identification (RFID) authentication protocol. Tav-128 is expected to be a cryptographically secure hash function which meets collision resistance properties. In this research, a collision attack is done to prove whether Tav-128 is a collision resistant hash function. The results show that collisions can be obtained in Tav-128 hash function which means in other word, Tav-128 is not a collision resistant hash function.

  14. Seismotectonics of the southern boundary of Anatolia, Eastern Mediterranean region: subduction, collision, and arc jumping

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rotstein, Y.; Kafka, A.L.

    1982-09-10

    The pattern of seismicity and fault plane solutions of earthquakes are used to outline the tectonic features of the southern boundary of Anatolia in the eastern Mediterranean and southeastern Turkey. The results of this study show that this boundary is composed of two distinct parts. One, in southeastern Turkey and Syria, is a wide and complex zone of continental collision. The other, in the Levantine basin of the eastern Mediterranean, is a zone of oceanic subduction. In the region of continental collision three zones of seismicity are observed. Most of the seismic activity in this region follows the Bitlis zone and is associated with a zone of thrusting and mountain building. This appears to be the zone of most active deformation and plate consumption in the plate boundary region between Arabia and Turkey. A less active zone of seismicity to the north of the Bitlis zone is interpreted to have been more active in the past whereas another active zone of seismicity to the south is interpreted to be a zone which may be more active in the future as the main zone of plate consumption jumps to the south. In the subduction zone of the eastern Mediterranean the depth of the subducted slab and the rate of seismicity generally increease from east to west. The zone of present-day convergence between Africa and Turkey in the Levantine basin can be best outlined by the northern edge of the Mediterranean ridge. Deep seismic activity near the Gulf of Antalya is associated with a detached subducted slab north of the Anaximander Mountains that is distinctly different from the seismic trend which is associated with present-day active subduction. Most of the focal mechanisms of the earthquakes along the entire southern boundary of Anatolia indicate that N to NNW thrusting is the dominant mode of seismic deformation.

  15. Collision region of the ISR

    CERN Multimedia

    1970-01-01

    This is a collision region from the world’s first proton collider, the Intersecting Storage Rings. The ISR was used at CERN from 1971-84 to study proton-proton collisions at the highest energy then available (60GeV). When operational, ISR collision regions were surrounded by detectors as shown in the photo. In 1972, the surprising discovery of fragments flying out sideways from head-on proton-proton collisions was the first evidence of quark-quark scattering inside the colliding protons . This was similar to Rutherford’s observation in 1911 of alpha particles scattering off the tiny nucleus inside atoms of gold. The ISR beamtubes had to be as empty as outer space, a vacuum 100 000 times better than other CERN machines at the time.

  16. Neuromorphic UAS Collision Avoidance Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Using biologically-inspired neuromorphic optic flow algorithms is a novel approach in collision avoidance for UAS. Traditional computer vision algorithms rely on...

  17. Providing plastic zone extrusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manchiraju, Venkata Kiran; Feng, Zhili; David, Stan A.; Yu, Zhenzhen

    2017-04-11

    Plastic zone extrusion may be provided. First, a compressor may generate frictional heat in stock to place the stock in a plastic zone of the stock. Then, a conveyer may receive the stock in its plastic zone from the compressor and transport the stock in its plastic zone from the compressor. Next, a die may receive the stock in its plastic zone from the conveyer and extrude the stock to form a wire.

  18. Vadose zone microbiology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kieft, Thomas L.; Brockman, Fred J.

    2001-01-17

    The vadose zone is defined as the portion of the terrestrial subsurface that extends from the land surface downward to the water table. As such, it comprises the surface soil (the rooting zone), the underlying subsoil, and the capillary fringe that directly overlies the water table. The unsaturated zone between the rooting zone and the capillary fringe is termed the "intermediate zone" (Chapelle, 1993). The vadose zone has also been defined as the unsaturated zone, since the sediment pores and/or rock fractures are generally not completely water filled, but instead contain both water and air. The latter characteristic results in the term "zone of aeration" to describe the vadose zone. The terms "vadose zone," "unsaturated zone", and "zone of aeration" are nearly synonymous, except that the vadose zone may contain regions of perched water that are actually saturated. The term "subsoil" has also been used for studies of shallow areas of the subsurface immediately below the rooting zone. This review focuses almost exclusively on the unsaturated region beneath the soil layer since there is already an extensive body of literature on surface soil microbial communities and process, e.g., Paul and Clark (1989), Metting (1993), Richter and Markowitz, (1995), and Sylvia et al. (1998); whereas the deeper strata of the unsaturated zone have only recently come under scrutiny for their microbiological properties.

  19. Galaxy collisions: A preliminary study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, R.H.; Smith, B.F.

    1980-01-15

    Collisions of spherical galaxies were studied in a series of numerical experiments to see what happens when galaxies collide. Each experiment starts with two model galaxies, each consisting of 50,000 stars, moving toward each other along a specified orbit. Th series of experiments provides a systematic sampling of the parameter space spanned by the initial orbital energy and the initial angular momentum. Deeply penetrating collisions are emphasized. The collisions reported here scale to relative velocities as great as 500 km s/sup -1/, well into the range for collisions within clusters of galaxies. We find: (1) The galaxies contract momentarily to about half their original sizes shortly after close passage. This means that (a) the galaxies have ample time to respond dynamically during close passage; (b) energy first transfers into coherent mass flows within each galaxy; (c) in turn, (a) means that the impulsive and restricted three-body approximations, in which the response is ignored, are not valid for collisions of 1000 km s/sup -1/ or less. (2) The initial galaxies blend into a single dynamical system while they are near each other. This means that concepts such as energy transfer from orbital motion to internal degrees of freedom are not well defined until long after close approach, when two density maxima are well separated and each has settled down to a reasonably steady state.

  20. Automatic Collision Avoidance Technology (ACAT)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swihart, Donald E.; Skoog, Mark A.

    2007-01-01

    This document represents two views of the Automatic Collision Avoidance Technology (ACAT). One viewgraph presentation reviews the development and system design of Automatic Collision Avoidance Technology (ACAT). Two types of ACAT exist: Automatic Ground Collision Avoidance (AGCAS) and Automatic Air Collision Avoidance (AACAS). The AGCAS Uses Digital Terrain Elevation Data (DTED) for mapping functions, and uses Navigation data to place aircraft on map. It then scans DTED in front of and around aircraft and uses future aircraft trajectory (5g) to provide automatic flyup maneuver when required. The AACAS uses data link to determine position and closing rate. It contains several canned maneuvers to avoid collision. Automatic maneuvers can occur at last instant and both aircraft maneuver when using data link. The system can use sensor in place of data link. The second viewgraph presentation reviews the development of a flight test and an evaluation of the test. A review of the operation and comparison of the AGCAS and a pilot's performance are given. The same review is given for the AACAS is given.

  1. Cold molecules, collisions and reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hecker Denschlag, Johannes

    2016-05-01

    I will report on recent experiments of my group where we have been studying the formation of ultracold diatomic molecules and their subsequent inelastic/reactive collisions. For example, in one of these experiments we investigate collisions of triplet Rb2 molecules in the rovibrational ground state. We observe fast molecular loss and compare the measured loss rates to predictions based on universality. In another set of experiments we investigate the formation of (BaRb)+ molecules after three-body recombination of a single Ba+ ion with two Rb atoms in an ultracold gas of Rb atoms. Our investigations indicate that the formed (BaRb)+ molecules are weakly bound and that several secondary processes take place ranging from photodissociation of the (BaRb)+ molecule to reactive collisions with Rb atoms. I will explain how we can experimentally distinguish these processes and what the typical reaction rates are. Support from the German Research foundation DFG and the European Community is acknowledged.

  2. Collision matrix for Leo satellites

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKnight, Darren; Lorenzen, Gary

    The Low Earth Orbit (LEO) is becoming cluttered with thousands of satellites, rocket bodies, and a variety of space garbage. This collection of objects crossing paths at speeds on the order of 10 km/s is creating an increasing collision hazard to many operational systems. The effect that the destruction of LEO satellites will have on other users of the near-Earth environment is of great concern. A model is examined which quantifies the effect of one satellite fragmentation on neighboring satellites. This model is used to evaluate the interdependent hazard to a series of satellite systems. A number of space system fragmentation events are numerically simulated and the collision hazard to each is tabulated. Once all satellites in the matrix have been fragmented separately, a complete collision hazard representation can be depicted. This model has potential for developing an enhanced understanding of a number of aspects of the growing debris hazard in LEO.

  3. QCD in heavy ion collisions

    CERN Document Server

    Iancu, Edmond

    2014-04-10

    These lectures provide a modern introduction to selected topics in the physics of ultrarelativistic heavy ion collisions which shed light on the fundamental theory of strong interactions, the Quantum Chromodynamics. The emphasis is on the partonic forms of QCD matter which exist in the early and intermediate stages of a collision -- the colour glass condensate, the glasma, and the quark-gluon plasma -- and on the effective theories that are used for their description. These theories provide qualitative and even quantitative insight into a wealth of remarkable phenomena observed in nucleus-nucleus or deuteron-nucleus collisions at RHIC and/or the LHC, like the suppression of particle production and of azimuthal correlations at forward rapidities, the energy and centrality dependence of the multiplicities, the ridge effect, the limiting fragmentation, the jet quenching, or the dijet asymmetry.

  4. Semiholography for heavy ion collisions

    CERN Document Server

    Mukhopadhyay, Ayan

    2017-01-01

    The formation of QGP in heavy ion collisions gives us a great opportunity for learning about nonperturbative dynamics of QCD. Semiholography provides a new consistent framework to combine perturbative and non-perturbative effects in a coherent way and can be applied to obtain an effective description for heavy ion collisions. In particular, it allows us to include nonperturbative effects in existing glasma effective theory and QCD kinetic theory for the weakly coupled saturated degrees of freedom liberated by the collisions in the initial stages in a consistent manner. We argue why the full framework should be able to confront experiments with only a few phenomenological parameters and present feasibility tests for the necessary numerical computations. Furthermore, we discuss that semiholography leads to a new description of collective flow in the form of a generalised non-Newtonian fluid. We discuss some open questions which we hope to answer in the near future.

  5. Polarized Proton Collisions at RHIC

    CERN Document Server

    Bai, Mei; Alekseev, Igor G; Alessi, James; Beebe-Wang, Joanne; Blaskiewicz, Michael; Bravar, Alessandro; Brennan, Joseph M; Bruno, Donald; Bunce, Gerry; Butler, John J; Cameron, Peter; Connolly, Roger; De Long, Joseph; Drees, Angelika; Fischer, Wolfram; Ganetis, George; Gardner, Chris J; Glenn, Joseph; Hayes, Thomas; Hseuh Hsiao Chaun; Huang, Haixin; Ingrassia, Peter; Iriso, Ubaldo; Laster, Jonathan S; Lee, Roger C; Luccio, Alfredo U; Luo, Yun; MacKay, William W; Makdisi, Yousef; Marr, Gregory J; Marusic, Al; McIntyre, Gary; Michnoff, Robert; Montag, Christoph; Morris, John; Nicoletti, Tony; Oddo, Peter; Oerter, Brian; Osamu, Jinnouchi; Pilat, Fulvia Caterina; Ptitsyn, Vadim; Roser, Thomas; Satogata, Todd; Smith, Kevin T; Svirida, Dima; Tepikian, Steven; Tomas, Rogelio; Trbojevic, Dejan; Tsoupas, Nicholaos; Tuozzolo, Joseph; Vetter, Kurt; Wilinski, Michelle; Zaltsman, Alex; Zelenski, Anatoli; Zeno, Keith; Zhang, S Y

    2005-01-01

    The Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider~(RHIC) provides not only collisions of ions but also collisions of polarized protons. In a circular accelerator, the polarization of polarized proton beam can be partially or fully lost when a spin depolarizing resonance is encountered. To preserve the beam polarization during acceleration, two full Siberian snakes were employed in RHIC to avoid depolarizing resonances. In 2003, polarized proton beams were accelerated to 100~GeV and collided in RHIC. Beams were brought into collisions with longitudinal polarization at the experiments STAR and PHENIX by using spin rotators. RHIC polarized proton run experience demonstrates that optimizing polarization transmission efficiency and improving luminosity performance are significant challenges. Currently, the luminosity lifetime in RHIC is limited by the beam-beam effect. The current state of RHIC polarized proton program, including its dedicated physics run in 2005 and efforts to optimize luminosity production in beam-beam limite...

  6. Suture zones of the Urals as integral prospective ore-bearing tectonic structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koroteev, V. A.; Sazonov, V. N.; Ogorodnikov, V. N.; Polenov, Yu. A.

    2009-04-01

    Rift-related (1.2 Ga) and collision (380-240 Ma) suture zones of the Urals are described. The riftrelated suture zones comprise an ultramafic-gabbro complex with titanomagnetite mineralization, an ultramafic complex with chromite mineralization, and a complex of alkali granitoids with rare-metal (including REE) mineralization accompanied by K-feldspathites, albitites, and calcite metasomatic rocks. The collision suture zones are distinguished by early collision granitoids specialized for tungsten (scheelite) and gold, as well as by raremetal granites and such derivatives of them as pegmatite and greisen with rare-metal and colored-stone mineralization. The suture zones are characterized by long-term (up to 80 Ma or more) continuous-discontinuous periods of ore deposition; heterogeneous sources of ore matter and ore-bearing fluids; a polyelemental composition of lithogeochemical halos and an integral mineral composition of altered wall rocks; and the occurrence of mafic, intermediate, and felsic dikes at large gold deposits, as well as wide variations in PT parameters of the ore-forming process: T = 620-150°C and P = 3.2-0.6 kbar. Collision played a dual role in ore formation. On the one hand, collision led to deformation and metamorphism of precollision massive sulfide deposits and, to a lesser degree, Au-bearing Fe and Cu skarn and porphyry copper deposits, and, on the other hand, to the formation of new gold, rare-metal, quartz, colored-stone, talc, muscovite, and noble serpentine deposits. As a rule, this polygenetic mineralization differs in age and is related to collision volcanic and plutonic complexes. This diversity can be a good basis for metallogenic analysis, forecasting, and prospecting of various metallic deposits and industrial minerals. Polygenetic mineralization of various age known in suture zones is accompanied by integral lithogeochemical and metasomatic halos characterized by a continuous-discontinuous history. The complexity of ore

  7. Outreach Materials for the Collision Repair Campaign

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Collision Repair Campaign offers outreach materials to help collision repair shops reduce toxic air exposure. Materials include a DVD, poster, training video, and materials in Spanish (materiales del outreach en español).

  8. Collision Risk Analysis for HSC

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Urban, Jesper; Pedersen, Preben Terndrup; Simonsen, Bo Cerup

    1999-01-01

    High Speed Craft (HSC) have a risk profile, which is distinctly different from conventional ferries. Due to different hull building material, structural layout, compartmentation and operation, both frequency and consequences of collision and grounding accidents must be expected to be different from...... conventional ships. To reach a documented level of safety, it is therefore not possible directly to transfer experience with conventional ships. The purpose of this paper is to present new rational scientific tools to assess and quantify the collision risk associated with HSC transportation. The paper...

  9. Collision Analysis for MS DEXTRA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Preben Terndrup; Zhang, Shengming

    1999-01-01

    It is a major challenge for the maritime community to develop probability-based procedures for design against collision and grounding events. To quantify the risks involved in ship traffic in specific geographic areas implies that probabilities as well as inherent consequences of various collisio...... the more long term goal to develop probability-based codes for design against collision and grounding events, similar to the present development towards the use of reliability-based procedures for strength design of ships subjected to the traditional environmental loads....

  10. Root Apex Transition Zone as Oscillatory Zone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frantisek Baluska

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Root apex of higher plants shows very high sensitivity to environmental stimuli. The root cap acts as the most prominent plant sensory organ; sensing diverse physical parameters such as gravity, light, humidity, oxygen and critical inorganic nutrients. However, the motoric responses to these stimuli are accomplished in the elongation region. This spatial discrepancy was solved when we have discovered and characterized the transition zone which is interpolated between the apical meristem and the subapical elongation zone. Cells of this zone are very active in the cytoskeletal rearrangements, endocytosis and endocytic vesicle recycling, as well as in electric activities. Here we discuss the oscillatory nature of the transition zone which, together with several other features of this zone, suggest that it acts as some kind of command centre. In accordance with the early proposal of Charles and Francis Darwins, cells of this root zone receive sensory information from the root cap and instruct the motoric responses of cells in the elongation zone.

  11. NA49: lead-lead collision

    CERN Multimedia

    1996-01-01

    This is an image of an actual lead ion collision taken from tracking detectors on the NA49 experiment, part of the heavy ion project at CERN. These collisions produce a very complicated array of hadrons as the heavy ions break up. It is hoped that one of these collisions will eventually create a new state of matter known as quark-gluon plasma.

  12. Distraction-related road traffic collisions

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    is a sprouting serious road safety issue that causes a pro- portion of preventable deaths4,5. Pre-crash driver's dis- traction was reported to be responsible for about 80% of collisions and 65% of near-collisions6. We aimed to pro- spectively study distraction-related road traffic collision injuries, their contributory factors, ...

  13. Electrical conductivity images of active and fossil fault zones

    OpenAIRE

    Oliver Ritter; A. Hoffmann-Rothe; P. A. Bedrosian; Ute Weckmann; V. Haak;  ;  

    2005-01-01

    We compare recent magnetotelluric investigations of four large fault systems: (i) the actively deforming, ocean-continent interplate San Andreas Fault (SAF), (ii) the actively deforming, continent-continent interplate Dead Sea Transform (DST), (iii) the currently inactive, trench-linked intraplate West Fault (WF) in northern Chile, and (iv) the Waterberg Fault/Omaruru Lineament (WF/OL) in Namibia, a fossilized intraplate shear zone formed during early Proterozoic continental collision. These ...

  14. Zoning Districts - Volusia County HUB Zones

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC Local Govt | GIS Inventory — Historically Underutilized Business (HUB) Zones in Volusia County. Go to http://www.sba.gov/hubzone or contact the Department of Economic Development (386) 248-8048...

  15. Quarkonium production in hadronic collisions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gavai, R. [Tata Institute for Fundamental Research, Bombay (India); Schuler, G.A.; Sridhar, K. [CERN, Geneva (Switzerland)] [and others

    1995-07-01

    We summarize the theoretical description of charmonium and bottonium production in hadronic collisions and compare it to the available data from hadron-nucleon interactions. With the parameters of the theory established by these data, we obtain predictions for quarkonium production at RHIC and LHC energies.

  16. Duration of an Elastic Collision

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Izarra, Charles

    2012-01-01

    With a pedagogical goal, this paper deals with a study of the duration of an elastic collision of an inflatable spherical ball on a planar surface suitable for undergraduate studies. First, the force generated by the deformed spherical ball is obtained under assumptions that are discussed. The study of the motion of the spherical ball colliding…

  17. Outer Dynamics of Ship Collisions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Preben Terndrup

    1996-01-01

    The purpose of these notes is to present analysis procedures for the motion of ships during ship-ship collisions and for ship collisons with offshore structures. The aim is to estimate that part of the lost kinetic energy which will have to be absorbed by rupture and plastic damage of the colliding...

  18. Perspective on relativistic nuclear collisions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Glendenning, N.K.

    1979-05-01

    The importance of experiments detecting more than one particle is pointed out. The production of nuclei far from stability in peripheral collisions and the expectations for the explosive disassembly of dense nuclear matter (nuclear fireball) and some evidence for it are related. Pion interferometry concerns the measurement of correlations in the momentum and energy of two identical pions; the subject is discussed in relation to incoherent production, coherent production, partially coherent production, final-state interactions, impact parameter average, and outlook. Much of the paper deals with an assessment of the possibility of determining the form of the hadronic spectrum in the high-mass region through nuclear collisions at ultrarelativistic energies. The subject is developed under the following topics: perspective, the initial fireball, isoergic equilibrium expansion of the fireball, quasi-dynamical expansion, quark matter, and the mass degree of freedom. The quasi-dynamical model obtained indicates that certain parameters, such as the ..pi../N and K/N ratios at high kinetic energy, will survive the collision; therefore, a determination of the asymptotic form of the hadron spectrum probably can be made by studying nuclear collisions at very high energies (10 GeV/nucleon in the center of mass). 16 figures. (RWR)

  19. Dijet imbalance in hadronic collisions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boer, Daniel; Mulders, Piet J.; Pisano, Cristian

    2009-01-01

    The imbalance of dijets produced in hadronic collisions has been used to extract the average transverse momentum of partons inside the hadrons. In this paper we discuss new contributions to the dijet imbalance that could complicate or even hamper this extraction. They are due to polarization of

  20. Cern collisions light up Copenhagen

    CERN Multimedia

    Banks, Michael

    2010-01-01

    "Anyone passing by the Niels Bohr Institute in Copenhagen, Denmark, might be startled by some strange moving lights on the facade of the institute's main building. In fact, the dancing beams show, almost in real time, collisions form the Atlas experiment at Cern's Large Hadron Collider (LHC)" (1 paragraph)

  1. Atomic collisions involving pulsed positrons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Merrison, J. P.; Bluhme, H.; Field, D.

    2000-01-01

    instantaneous intensities be achieved with in-beam accumulation, but more importantly many orders of magnitude improvement in energy and spatial resolution can be achieved using positron cooling. Atomic collisions can be studied on a new energy scale with unprecedented precion and control. The use...... of accelerators for producing intense positron pulses will be discussed in the context of atomic physics experiments....

  2. Occupant injury protection in automobile collisions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peters, G A; Peters, B J

    1999-12-01

    Modern technology has produced automotive vehicles that have become both a luxury and a necessity in modern civilization. They have become highly useful, even more varied in form and function, and capable of high speeds on crowded roadways. One unfortunate consequence is the high frequency of accidents and the greater severity of injuries when collisions do occur. In response, modern technology has produced a variety of safety and health features, devices and designs intended for better occupant protection on in high speed vehicles. Injury reduction has become a prime design objective, but there are residual risks, which, as technology evolves, require effective communication to those risk. There can be little risk avoidance behavior without awareness of the hazards and effective communication to the vehicle occupant, as to what could and should be done for self-protection. For example, one out of three drivers apparently fails to understand the function of head restraints, few understand the 'safe zone' posture required for air bags and many believe safety features should be adjusted only for comfort. Some of the current residual injury producing problems in occupant systems are specifically described here in order to illustrate what is needed in terms of both design remedies and health promotion activities.

  3. The epidemiology of bicyclist's collision accidents

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, L. B.

    1994-01-01

    The number of bicyclists injured in the road traffic in collision accidents and treated at the emergency room at Odense University Hospital has increased 66% from 1980 to 1989. The aim of this study was to examine the epidemiology of bicyclist's collision accidents and identify risk groups...... of collision accidents with motor vehicles it is necessary to separate the bicyclists from the 'hard road traffic' especially at crossings. Preventive measures must also be directed at the bicyclists. Information must be given to warn the bicyclists against the risks, not only for collisions with motor...... injured in collision accidents, and 1502 bicyclists injured in single accidents was used as a reference group. The young bicyclists 10-19 years of age had the highest incidence of injuries caused by collision accidents. The collision accidents had different characteristics according to counterpart. One...

  4. Some characteristics of the seismicity and the stress field in the Panxi rift zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Jian-Zhong; Xu, Wen-Yue; Liu, Jin; Zou, Ying

    1987-02-01

    Some characteristics of the horizontal distribution of the earthquakes, the focus depth distribution, distribution of the earthquakes with time, b-values, fault slip rates and stress field in the Panxi rift zone have been investigated. The results are as follows: (1) Earthquakes with M ⩾ 4.7 occurred mainly along the major faults in the Panxi rift zone. Earthquake activity is greater along the sides of the Panxi rift zone than along its axis. Earthquakes with M ⩾ 6 occurred along the bounding faults of the Panxi rift zone. The small earthquakes exhibit a random distribution. (2) The focal depths along the axis of the Panxi rift zone are shallow (5-20 km), but the focal depths outside the rift zone are deeper (6-40 km). (3) The b-values in the Panxi rift zone are 0.58-0.75. (4) The correlation of the seismicity between the Panxi rift zone and the eastern India-Eurasian collision zone is high. (5) The fault planes in the Panxi rift zone are nearly vertical and strike-slip. The fault slip rates in the Panxi rift zone are 0.13-0.19 cm/yr. (6) The maximum principal compressive stress axis in the Panxi rift zone is nearly horizontal, NNW-SSE in direction. According to the above results, a dynamic model for the aborting process of the Panxi rift zone is suggested.

  5. Seismotectonics of the southern boundary of Anatolia, eastern Mediterranean region: Subduction, collision, and arc jumping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rotstein, Yair; Kafka, Alan L.

    1982-09-01

    The pattern of seismicity and fault plane solutions of earthquakes are used to outline the tectonic features of the southern boundary of Anatolia in the eastern Mediterranean and southeastern Turkey. The results of this study show that this boundary is composed of two distinct parts. One, in southeastern Turkey and Syria, is a wide and complex zone of continental collision. The other, in the Levantine basin of the eastern Mediterranean, is a zone of oceanic subduction. In the region of continental collision three zones of seismicity are observed. Most of the seismic activity in this region follows the Bitlis zone and is associated with a zone of thrusting and mountain building. This appears to be the zone of most active deformation and plate consumption in the plate boundary region between Arabia and Turkey. A less active zone of seismicity to the north of the Bitlis zone is interpreted to have been more active in the past whereas another active zone of seismicity to the south is interpreted to be a zone which may be more active in the future as the main zone of plate consumption jumps to the south. In the subduction zone of the eastern Mediterranean the depth of the subducted slab and the rate of seismicity generally increase from east to west. The zone of present-day convergence between Africa and Turkey in the Levantine basin can be best outlined by the northern edge of the Mediterranean ridge. The subduction zone in this area sequentially jumps to the south as small continental fragments collide with existing zones of subduction. Deep seismic activity near the Gulf of Antalya is associated with a detached subducted slab north of the Anaximander Mountains that is distinctly different from the seismic trend which is associated with present-day active subduction. The plate boundary between Africa and Turkey at the center of the Levantine basin appears to have shifted to the south of the Anaximander Mountains and Florence rise. Most of the focal mechanisms of the

  6. Coming and going in Slovakia: international labour mobility in the Central European 'buffer zone'

    OpenAIRE

    Allan M Williams; Vladimír Baláz; Daniel Kollár

    2001-01-01

    The collision between economic systems after 1989 led to significant new forms of mobility. East Central Europe became a legally and institutional ly constructed 'buffer zone' between Western Europe and the CIS, Commonwealth of Independent States -- the former USSR. The opportunities for and costs of migration in the buffer zone were shaped by the 'double territorial shock' of the transition: reinterationalisation and the withdrawal of massive state intervention in support of regional converg...

  7. Hard probes in heavy ion collisions at the LHC: PDFs, shadowing and $pA$ collisions

    CERN Document Server

    Accardi, Alberto; Botje, M.; Brodsky, S.J.; Cole, B.; Eskola, K.J.; Fai, George I.; Frankfurt, L.; Fries, R.J.; Geist, Walter M.; Guzey, V.; Honkanen, H.; Kolhinen, V.J.; Kovchegov, Yu.V.; McDermott, M.; Morsch, A.; Qiu, Jian-wei; Salgado, C.A.; Strikman, M.; Takai, H.; Tapprogge, S.; Vogt, R.; Zhang, X.f.

    2003-01-01

    This manuscript is the outcome of the subgroup ``PDFs, shadowing and $pA$ collisions'' from the CERN workshop ``Hard Probes in Heavy Ion Collisions at the LHC''. In addition to the experimental parameters for $pA$ collisions at the LHC, the issues discussed are factorization in nuclear collisions, nuclear parton distributions (nPDFs), hard probes as the benchmark tests of factorization in $pA$ collisions at the LHC, and semi-hard probes as observables with potentially large nuclear effects. Also, novel QCD phenomena in $pA$ collisions at the LHC are considered. The importance of the $pA$ program at the LHC is emphasized.

  8. Collisions engineering. Theory and applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fremond, Michel [Rome ' ' Tor Vergata' ' Univ. (Italy). Dept. of Civil Engineering and Computer Science

    2017-02-01

    This book investigates collisions occurring in the motion of solids, in the motion of fluids but also in the motion of pedestrians in crowds. The duration of these presented collisions is short compared to the whole duration of the motion: they are assumed instantaneous. The innovative concept demonstrated in this book is that a system made of two solids, is deformable because their relative position changes. The definition of the velocities of deformation of the system introduced in the classical developments of mechanics, the principle of the virtual work and the laws of thermodynamics, allows a large range of applications such as crowd motions, debris flow motions, and shape memory alloys motions. The set of the applications is even larger: social sciences and mechanics are unified to predict the motion of crowds with application to transport management and to evacuation of theaters management.

  9. Collisions engineering theory and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Frémond, Michel

    2017-01-01

    This book investigates collisions occurring in the motion of solids, in the motion of fluids but also in the motion of pedestrians in crowds. The duration of these presented collisions is short compared to the whole duration of the motion: they are assumed instantaneous. The innovative concept demonstrated in this book is that a system made of two solids, is deformable because their relative position changes. The definition of the velocities of deformation of the system introduced in the classical developments of mechanics, the principle of the virtual work and the laws of thermodynamics, allows a large range of applications such as crowd motions, debris flow motions, and shape memory alloys motions. The set of the applications is even larger: social sciences and mechanics are unified to predict the motion of crowds with application to transport management and to evacuation of theaters management.

  10. Chirality in molecular collision dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lombardi, Andrea; Palazzetti, Federico

    2018-02-01

    Chirality is a phenomenon that permeates the natural world, with implications for atomic and molecular physics, for fundamental forces and for the mechanisms at the origin of the early evolution of life and biomolecular homochirality. The manifestations of chirality in chemistry and biochemistry are numerous, the striking ones being chiral recognition and asymmetric synthesis with important applications in molecular sciences and in industrial and pharmaceutical chemistry. Chiral discrimination phenomena, due to the existence of two enantiomeric forms, very well known in the case of interaction with light, but still nearly disregarded in molecular collision studies. Here we review some ideas and recent advances about the role of chirality in molecular collisions, designing and illustrating molecular beam experiments for the demonstration of chiral effects and suggesting a scenario for a stereo-directional origin of chiral selection.

  11. Electron collisions with nitrous oxide

    OpenAIRE

    Winstead, Carl; McKoy, Vincent

    1998-01-01

    We have carried out theoretical studies of low-energy elastic electron collisions with nitrous oxide (N2O), obtaining differential, integral, and momentum-transfer cross sections. Polarization effects are incorporated in the electron-molecule scattering dynamics. A simple, objective, and physically motivated criterion is introduced for constructing a compact set of configurations that accurately accounts for polarization in resonant symmetries while avoiding overcorrelation. Our cross section...

  12. Collision-free coordination of fiber positioners in multi-object spectrographs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makarem, Laleh; Kneib, Jean-Paul; Gillet, Denis

    2016-07-01

    Many fiber-fed spectroscopic survey projects, such as DESI, PFS and MOONS, will use thousands of fiber positioners packed at a focal plane. To maximize observation time, the positioners need to move simultaneously and reach their targets swiftly. We have previously presented a motion planning method based on a decentralized navigation function for the collision-free coordination of the fiber positioners in DESI. In MOONS, the end effector of each positioner handling the fiber can reach the centre of its neighbours. There is therefore a risk of collision with up to 18 surrounding positioners in the chosen dense hexagonal configuration. Moreover, the length of the second arm of the positioner is almost twice the length of the first one. As a result, the geometry of the potential collision zone between two positioners is not limited to the extremity of their end-effector, but surrounds the second arm. In this paper, we modify the navigation function to take into account the larger collision zone resulting from the extended geometrical shape of the positioners. The proposed navigation function takes into account the configuration of the positioners as well as the constraints on the actuators, such as their maximal velocity and their mechanical clearance. Considering the fact that all the positioners' bases are fixed to the focal plane, collisions can occur locally and the risk of collision is limited to the 18 surrounding positioners. The decentralizing motion planning and trajectory generation takes advantage of this limited number of positioners and the locality of collisions, hence significantly reduces the complexity of the algorithm to a linear order. The linear complexity ensures short computation time. In addition, the time needed to move all the positioners to their targets is independent of the number of positioners. These two key advantages of the chosen decentralization approach turn this method to a promising solution for the collision-free motion

  13. QCD studies in ep collisions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, W.H. [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States). Physics Dept.

    1997-06-01

    These lectures describe QCD physics studies over the period 1992--1996 from data taken with collisions of 27 GeV electrons and positrons with 820 GeV protons at the HERA collider at DESY by the two general-purpose detectors H1 and ZEUS. The focus of these lectures is on structure functions and jet production in deep inelastic scattering, photoproduction, and diffraction. The topics covered start with a general introduction to HERA and ep scattering. Structure functions are discussed. This includes the parton model, scaling violation, and the extraction of F{sub 2}, which is used to determine the gluon momentum distribution. Both low and high Q{sup 2} regimes are discussed. The low Q{sup 2} transition from perturbative QCD to soft hadronic physics is examined. Jet production in deep inelastic scattering to measure {alpha}{sub s}, and in photoproduction to study resolved and direct photoproduction, is also presented. This is followed by a discussion of diffraction that begins with a general introduction to diffraction in hadronic collisions and its relation to ep collisions, and moves on to deep inelastic scattering, where the structure of diffractive exchange is studied, and in photoproduction, where dijet production provides insights into the structure of the Pomeron. 95 refs., 39 figs.

  14. Clusters Formation of Drops from Many Droplets Collisions: A 3D Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alejandro Acevedo-Malavé

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Here the SPH method is applied to simulate in the three-dimensional space the multiple hydrodynamics collisions and formation of clusters of equal-size liquid drops in a vacuum environment. For a range of velocity values from 0.2 mm/ms to 30.0 mm/ms we observe three possible scenarios, such as: coalescence and cluster formation of drops. When the collision velocity is too low the droplets interact only through their deformed surfaces. If this velocity is around 15.0 mm/ms the coalescence of the drops is observed, and after some time starting on t=0 a flat circular section is observed between the colliding drops. This interface disappears when the dynamics runs and the drops finally coalesce. The velocity vector fields were computed for the different scenarios showing some zones inside the drops where the fluid velocity is diminished and other zones where the SPH particles are accelerated.

  15. New results on Coulomb effects in meson production in relativistic heavy ion collisions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rybicki Andrzej

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We propose a new method of investigating the space-time evolution of meson production in heavy ion collisions, by making use of spectator-induced electromagnetic (“Coulomb” effects. The presence of two nuclear remnants (“spectator systems” in the non-central collision generates a strong Coulomb field, which modifies the trajectories of charged final state hadrons. This results in charge-dependent azimuthal anisotropies in final state meson emission. In our approach, this effect can be computed numerically by means of a high-statistics Monte Carlo simulation, using the distance between the meson formation zone and the spectator system as free parameter. Our simulation correctly describes the electromagnetic effect on azimuthal anisotropies observed for π+ and π−mesons in Au+Au collisions at lower RHIC energy, known from data recently reported by the STAR Collaboration. Similarly to our earlier studies of spectator-induced electromagnetic effects, also in the present study we find that these effects offer sensitivity to the position of the meson formation zone with respect to the spectator system. Therefore, we conclude that they can serve as a new tool to investigate the space-time evolution of meson production, and the dynamics of the heavy ion collision.

  16. Reaction texture and Fe-Mg zoning in granulite garnet from ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The latter is associated with a Pan-African tectono-metamorphic event that has been interpreted to represent a continent-continent collision followed by extensional collapse. Reaction-diffusion modeling of the compositional zoning of garnet associated with the development of reaction texture during M2 yields a time scale of ...

  17. A Collective Collision Operator for DSMC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    GALLIS,MICHAIL A.; TORCZYNSKI,JOHN R.

    2000-06-21

    A new scheme to simulate elastic collisions in particle simulation codes is presented. The new scheme aims at simulating the collisions in the highly collisional regime, in which particle simulation techniques typically become computationally expensive.The new scheme is based on the concept of a grid-based collision field. According to this scheme, the particles perform a single collision with the background grid during a time step. The properties of the background field are calculated from the moments of the distribution function accumulated on the grid. The collision operator is based on the Langevin equation. Based on comparisons with other methods, it is found that the Langevin method overestimates the collision frequency for dilute gases.

  18. The Concept of Collision-Free Motion Planning Using a Dynamic Collision Map

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keum-Bae Cho

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we address a new method for the collision-free motion planning of a mobile robot in dynamic environments. The motion planner is based on the concept of a conventional collision map (CCM, represented on the L(travel length-T(time plane. We extend the CCM with dynamic information about obstacles, such as linear acceleration and angular velocity, providing useful information for estimating variation in the collision map. We first analyse the effect of the dynamic motion of an obstacle in the collision region. We then define the measure of collision dispersion (MOCD. The dynamic collision map (DCM is generated by drawing the MOCD on the CCM. To evaluate a collision-free motion planner using the DCM, we extend the DCM with MOCD, then draw the unreachable region and deadlocked regions. Finally, we construct a collision-free motion planner using the information from the extended DCM.

  19. Investigating Aquatic Dead Zones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Testa, Jeremy; Gurbisz, Cassie; Murray, Laura; Gray, William; Bosch, Jennifer; Burrell, Chris; Kemp, Michael

    2010-01-01

    This article features two engaging high school activities that include current scientific information, data, and authentic case studies. The activities address the physical, biological, and chemical processes that are associated with oxygen-depleted areas, or "dead zones," in aquatic systems. Students can explore these dead zones through both…

  20. Work zone safety analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-01

    This report presents research performed analyzing crashes in work zones in the state of New Jersey so as to : identify critical areas in work zones susceptible to crashes and key factors that contribute to these crashes. A field : data collection on ...

  1. Nondestructive Measurement of Momentum Transfer Collision Frequency for Low Temperature Combustion Plasma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Douglas Letsholathebe

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Accurately measured momentum transfer collision frequency and electron density for fire plasma enable correct simulation of electromagnetic wave propagation in the medium. The simulation is essential for designing high-performance systems suitable for the environment. Despite this, momentum transfer collision frequency for fire plumes has always been an estimated quantity and/or crudely determined. There are anecdotal reports of severe line-of-sight (LOS radio frequency signal degradation on firegrounds. The problem has implications on safety of fire-fighters during wildfire suppression hence the need of high performance communication systems. In the experiment, a nonintrusive and direct method for measuring momentum transfer collision frequency in a fire plume was carried out. Using an automatic network analyser, x-band microwaves were caused to propagate combustion zones of eucalyptus and grass litter fires to measure the flames, scattering parameters. The parameters were then used to determine average collision frequencies for the plumes. The average collision frequencies for the eucalyptus and grass fire plumes were measured to be 5.84×1010 and 5.92×1010 rad/s, respectively.

  2. Suggested improvements for ship-installation collision risk models to reflect current collision avoidance systems

    OpenAIRE

    Flohberger, Margaret Loudon

    2010-01-01

    Master's thesis in Offshore technology Accurate quantification of risks for vessel-to-platform collisions has been a goal of the petroleum industry for many years; however, technological advances in collision avoidance systems have not been reflected in current models. Additionally, new modeling theories have been developed which capture the complexities of modern socio-technical systems. This paper recommends that a new collision model be developed to reflect current collision...

  3. Suggested improvements for ship-installation collision risk models to reflect current collision avoidance systems

    OpenAIRE

    Flohberger, Margaret Loudon

    2010-01-01

    Accurate quantification of risks for vessel-to-platform collisions has been a goal of the petroleum industry for many years; however, technological advances in collision avoidance systems have not been reflected in current models. Additionally, new modeling theories have been developed which capture the complexities of modern socio-technical systems. This paper recommends that a new collision model be developed to reflect current collision avoidance systems. Today’s navigati...

  4. Probabilities of Collisions of Migrating Small Bodies and Dust Particles with Planets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ipatov, Sergei I.

    2010-01-01

    Probabilities of collisions of migrating small bodies and dust particles produced by these bodies with all planets were studied based on the time variations of the orbital evolution of the bodies and particles. The evolution of orbits was integrated until all bodies or particles reached 2000 AU from the Sun or collided with the Sun. (Our papers devoted to the integration can be found on astro-ph and http://faculty.cua.edu/ipatov/list-publications.htm.) Various Jupiter-family comets (JFCs), Halley-type comets, long-period comets, trans-Neptunian objects, and asteroids were considered. The total probability of collisions of any considered body or particle with all planets didn't exceed 0.2. The obtained results testify in favor of that the total mass of water delivered from the feeding zone of the giant planets to Earth could be about the total mass of water in Earth's oceans. The ratio of the mass of water delivered to a planet by Jupiter-family comets or Halley-type comets to the mass of the planet can be greater for Mars, Venus, and Mercury, than that for the Earth. This larger mass fraction would result in relatively large ancient oceans on Mars and Venus. The probability of collisions of dust particles produced by comets and asteroids with the Earth, have a maximum 0.001-0.02 at diameters of particles 100 micron. Probabilities of collisions of considered particles with Venus were of the same order of magnitude as those with Earth, and those with Mars were about an order of magnitude smaller. Depending on a source of dust, probabilities of collision of particles with Mercury can be smaller or greater than with Mars. The probability of collisions of considered JFCs with the Sun was 0.02, and dynamical lifetimes of most JFCs didn't exceed 10 Myr. Collisions of bodies with a star can cause variations in observed brightness and spectrum of the star.

  5. Collision risk in white-tailed eagles. Modelling kernel-based collision risk using satellite telemetry data in Smoela wind-power plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    May, Roel; Nygaard, Torgeir; Dahl, Espen Lie; Reitan, Ole; Bevanger, Kjetil

    2011-05-15

    Large soaring birds of prey, such as the white-tailed eagle, are recognized to be perhaps the most vulnerable bird group regarding risk of collisions with turbines in wind-power plants. Their mortalities have called for methods capable of modelling collision risks in connection with the planning of new wind-power developments. The so-called 'Band model' estimates collision risk based on the number of birds flying through the rotor swept zone and the probability of being hit by the passing rotor blades. In the calculations for the expected collision mortality a correction factor for avoidance behaviour is included. The overarching objective of this study was to use satellite telemetry data and recorded mortality to back-calculate the correction factor for white-tailed eagles. The Smoela wind-power plant consists of 68 turbines, over an area of approximately 18 km2. Since autumn 2006 the number of collisions has been recorded on a weekly basis. The analyses were based on satellite telemetry data from 28 white-tailed eagles equipped with backpack transmitters since 2005. The correction factor (i.e. 'avoidance rate') including uncertainty levels used within the Band collision risk model for white-tailed eagles was 99% (94-100%) for spring and 100% for the other seasons. The year-round estimate, irrespective of season, was 98% (95-99%). Although the year-round estimate was similar, the correction factor for spring was higher than the correction factor of 95% derived earlier from vantage point data. The satellite telemetry data may provide an alternative way to provide insight into relative risk among seasons, and help identify periods or areas with increased risk either in a pre- or post construction situation. (Author)

  6. Telerobotics with whole arm collision avoidance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilhelmsen, K.; Strenn, S.

    1993-09-01

    The complexity of teleorbotic operations in a cluttered environment is exacerbated by the need to present collision information to the operator in an understandable fashion. In addition to preventing movements which will cause collisions, a system providing some form of virtual force reflection (VFR) is desirable. With this goal in mind, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) has installed a kinematically master/slave system and developed a whole arm collision avoidance system which interacts directly with the telerobotic controller. LLNL has also provided a structure to allow for automated upgrades of workcell models and provide collision avoidance even in a dynamically changing workcell.

  7. A Control of Collision and Deadlock Avoidance for Automated Guided Vehicles with a Fault-tolerance Capability

    OpenAIRE

    Qin Li; Alexander Pogromsky; Teun Adriaansen; Jan Tijmen Udding

    2016-01-01

    Based on a novel discrete-event zone-control model, in our previous papers [1, 2], we presented a time-efficient traffic control for automated guided vehicle (AGV) systems to exclude inter-vehicle collisions and system deadlocks, together with a case study on container terminals. The traffic control allows each vehicle in an AGV system to freely choose its routes for any finite sequence of zone-to-zone transportation tasks and the routes can be constructed in an online fashion. In this paper,...

  8. Probing the hot zone of colliding nuclei

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elmer, R.Aa.

    1995-11-01

    The hot zone created in intermediate energy heavy ion collisions has been studied. At energies between 20 A MeV and 300 A MeV the nuclear emulsion technique has been used to achieve a full 4 pi identification and momentum determination of all charged fragments, enabling a strict selection of central events based on multiplicity and the energy flow tensor. In connection with this a CCD-based track identification system has been developed, specially designed for charge identification of intermediate-mass fragments. The CCD-camera is connected to an image processing card in a microcomputer where the width of the track is determined by profile measurements on the pixel level. The results point to a presence of radial flow in central {sup 36}Ar + AgBr collisions at 65 A MeV, but not in {sup 16}O + AgBr collisions at 210 A MeV. At energies between 0.8 to 1.8 A GeV mesons produced in symmetric Ne + NaF, Ni + Ni and Au + Au, have been measured by plastic scintillator counter telescopes. The mass and angular dependence of the subthreshold production of kaons at a laboratory energy of 1.0 A GeV have been systematically extracted from three different experiment periods at GSI, Darmstadt. The results point to the presence of rescattering of kaons in the dense nuclear environment, thus increasing the cross section at large angles. More speculatively, an anisotropy in the production process could be conjectured. 61 refs, 15 figs.

  9. Simplified bionic solutions: a simple bio-inspired vehicle collision detection system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartbauer, Manfred

    2017-02-15

    Modern cars are equipped with both active and passive sensor systems that can detect potential collisions. In contrast, locusts avoid collisions solely by responding to certain visual cues that are associated with object looming. In neurophysiological experiments, I investigated the possibility that the 'collision-detector neurons' of locusts respond to impending collisions in films recorded with dashboard cameras of fast driving cars. In a complementary modelling approach, I developed a simple algorithm to reproduce the neuronal response that was recorded during object approach. Instead of applying elaborate algorithms that factored in object recognition and optic flow discrimination, I tested the hypothesis that motion detection restricted to a 'danger zone', in which frontal collisions on the motorways are most likely, is sufficient to estimate the risk of a collision. Furthermore, I investigated whether local motion vectors, obtained from the differential excitation of simulated direction-selective networks, could be used to predict evasive steering maneuvers and prevent undesired responses to motion artifacts. The results of the study demonstrate that the risk of impending collisions in real traffic scenes is mirrored in the excitation of the collision-detecting neuron (DCMD) of locusts. The modelling approach was able to reproduce this neuronal response even when the vehicle was driving at high speeds and image resolution was low (about 200  ×  100 pixels). Furthermore, evasive maneuvers that involved changing the steering direction and steering force could be planned by comparing the differences in the overall excitation levels of the simulated right and left direction-selective networks. Additionally, it was possible to suppress undesired responses of the algorithm to translatory movements, camera shake and ground shadows by evaluating local motion vectors. These estimated collision risk values and evasive steering vectors could be used as input

  10. Geological Structures Appearances and Its Relation to Mechanism of Arc-Continent Collision Northen Alor-Wetar Islands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Subarsyah Subarsyah

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Study area is located in South Banda Basin near the triple junction between Eurasian, Pacific and Indo-Australian Plates. This area is part of back-arc thrusting zone that evolved to compensate convergence between Australia Continent and Banda Arc. Based on seismic section in this area, geological structure analysis is characterized into three distinctive zones. There are Thrust Zone (TZ, Proto Thrust Zone (PTZ and Normal Fault Zone (NFZ. TZ is defined by distribution of numerous of thrust fault, PTZ contains a blind zone or folds instead of thrust fault, and NFZ defined by distribution of numerous normal fault in the upper portion of seismic section. PTZ identified at several seismic section along the bending zone of oceanic crust. The appearances of bending zone will be easily understood by comprehend the driving mechanism of Australia Continent to the Northeast. The bending zone also related to geometry and tectonic stress of collision. Based on this mechanism it was clearly understood why the western end of study area was not identified the bending zone but it probably the initial process of bending. Contradictive to the western end, the eastern part was clearly shown the bending zone that assumed to have the biggest tectonic stress at this moment. Map of structural analysis also explain that PTZ getting narrow towards the west as the indicator of less of tectonic stress.

  11. A Reconciliation of Collision Theory and Transition State Theory

    OpenAIRE

    Yi, Y. G.

    2001-01-01

    A statistical-mechanical treatment of collision leads to a formal connection with transition-state theory, suggesting that collision theory and transition-state theory might be joined ultimately as a collision induced transition state theory.

  12. Octree Bin-to-Bin Fractional-NTC Collisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-09-17

    Important Collisions in Spacecraft Propulsion: Discharge and Breakdown in FRC Collisional Radiative Cooling/Ionization Combustion Chemistry Common Features...PUBLIC RELEASE 3 / 15 IMPORTANCE OF COLLISION PHYSICS Important Collisions in Spacecraft Propulsion: Discharge and Breakdown in FRC Collisional

  13. VT Data - Zoning 20120709, Huntington

    Data.gov (United States)

    Vermont Center for Geographic Information — Zoning district data for the Town of Huntington, Vermont. For details regarding each zoning district refer to the current zoning regulations on town of Huntington's...

  14. VT Data - Zoning 20130529, Readsboro

    Data.gov (United States)

    Vermont Center for Geographic Information — Models a municipality’s zoning zones and related information. Data were originally created by John Whitman of Readsboro in 2004 as prooposed zoning, and were adopted...

  15. The Geomorphological Developments Along the East Anatolian Fault Zone, Turkey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saber, R.; Caglayan, A.; Isik, V.; Seyitoglu, G.

    2014-12-01

    The collision of Eurasia with Arabia has given rise to intracontinental shortening in SE Turkey and development of large scale fault zones. The East Anatolian Fault Zone (EAFZ), a major active fault zone over 700 km in length with NE-striking, defines the boundary zone between Eurasia plate and Anatolian micro-plate. Although the northeastern continuation of the zone merges into the North Anatolian Fault Zone at Karliova region, the southwestern continuation has been the subject of some debate. The zone is characterized by numerous, complex faults and segmented surface ruptures. It cuts and offsets several distinctive units in east and southeast Turkey. The portion of the EAFZ examined in this study extends from Celikhan to Turkoglu. Active fault strands in this portion of the EAFZ is termed the Erkenek and Golbasi segments. The zone is made of several NE-SW closely spaced strands cut across Mesozoic-to-Tertiary variable rock units and structures, indicating inception of strike-slip motion in Quaternary and characterized by a series of basins. Fault-related several morphological features have been mapped are within the study area, suggesting the left-lateral motion of fault strands along this part of the EAFZ. Offset streams, beheaded channels, pressure and shutter ridges, linear valleys and ridges and sag ponds are prominent morpho-tectonic features. Offset streams have been measured as few meters to hundreds of meters and show sinistral displacement along the fault zone. Fault scarps, several tens of metres high, are developed in fan deposits along the length of the fault strands. Forming the set of linear sag ponds in Golbasi reveals extentional activity of the EAFZ in this area. Motion of fault strands formed linear valleys and ridges parallel to the faults which is most remarkable features. Our geomorphic studies demonstrated the ongoing activity of the the EAFZ between Celikhan to Turkoglu regions.

  16. BLM Solar Energy Zones

    Data.gov (United States)

    Bureau of Land Management, Department of the Interior — Priority development areas for utility-scale solar energy facilities as identified in the Solar PEIS Record of Decision. An additional Solar Energy Zone identified...

  17. Optimal exploration target zones

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Debba, Pravesh

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available This research describes a quantitative methodology for deriving optimal exploration target zones based on a probabilistic mineral prospectivity map. In order to arrive at out objective, we provide a plausible answer to the following question: "Which...

  18. Buffer Zone Fact Sheets

    Science.gov (United States)

    New requirements for buffer zones and sign posting contribute to soil fumigant mitigation and protection for workers and bystanders. The buffer provides distance between the pesticide application site and bystanders, reducing exposure risk.

  19. Successive combination jet algorithm for hadron collisions

    CERN Document Server

    Ellis, S D; Ellis, Stephen D.; Soper, Davision E.

    1993-01-01

    Jet finding algorithms, as they are used in $e^+ e^-$ and hadron collisions, are reviewed and compared. It is suggested that a successive combination style algorithm, similar to that used in $e^+ e^-$ physics, might be useful also in hadron collisions, where cone style algorithms have been used previously.

  20. Mechanical Energy Changes in Perfectly Inelastic Collisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mungan, Carl E.

    2013-01-01

    Suppose a block of mass "m"[subscript 1] traveling at speed "v"[subscript 1] makes a one-dimensional perfectly inelastic collision with another block of mass "m"[subscript 2]. What else does one need to know to calculate the fraction of the mechanical energy that is dissipated in the collision? (Contains 1 figure.)

  1. Predicting Collision Damage and Resulting Consequences

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ravn, Erik Sonne; Friis-Hansen, Peter

    2004-01-01

    This paper presents an Artificial Neutral Network (ANN)that is trained to predict the structural damage in the shipside resulting from ship-ship collisions. The input to the ANN is the absorbed energy, the length of the involved ships, the draught of the struck ship, and the angle of collision. T...

  2. Reducing deaths in single vehicle collisions.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Adminaite, D. Jost, G. Stipdonk, H. & Ward, H.

    2017-01-01

    A third of road deaths in the EU are caused by collisions that involve a single motorised vehicle where the driver, rider and/or passengers are killed but no other road users are involved. These single vehicle collisions (SVCs), and how to prevent them occurring, are the subject of this report.

  3. Z to Muon Muon Collision Event Animation

    CERN Multimedia

    ATLAS experiment

    2010-01-01

    This animation was created of an actual ATLAS collision event in 2010. This animation shows from the particle view the race through the LHC, ending in the detector where the particle collision occurs. Candidate for an event with a Z boson decaying to two muons.

  4. Freestart collision for full SHA-1

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.M.J. Stevens (Marc); P. Karpman (Pierre); T. Peyrin (Thomas)

    2015-01-01

    htmlabstractWe present in this article a freestart collision example for SHA-1, i.e., a collision for its internal compression function. This is the first practical break of the full SHA-1, reaching all 80 out of 80 steps, while only 10 days of computation on a 64 GPU cluster were necessary to

  5. Simulating Collisions for Hydrokinetic Turbines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Richmond, Marshall C.; Romero Gomez, Pedro DJ; Rakowski, Cynthia L.

    2013-10-01

    Evaluations of blade-strike on an axial-flow Marine Hydrokinetic turbine were conducted using a conventional methodology as well as an alternative modeling approach proposed in the present document. The proposed methodology integrates the following components into a Computa- tional Fluid Dynamics (CFD) model: (i) advanced eddy-resolving flow simulations, (ii) ambient turbulence based on field data, (iii) moving turbine blades in highly transient flows, and (iv) Lagrangian particles to mimic the potential fish pathways. The sensitivity of blade-strike prob- ability to the following conditions was also evaluated: (i) to the turbulent environment, (ii) to fish size and (iii) to mean stream flow velocity. The proposed methodology provided fraction of collisions and offered the capability of analyzing the causal relationships between the flow envi- ronment and resulting strikes on rotating blades. Overall, the conventional methodology largely overestimates the probability of strike, and lacks the ability to produce potential fish and aquatic biota trajectories as they interact with the rotating turbine. By using a set of experimental corre- lations of exposure-response of living fish colliding on moving blades, the occurrence, frequency and intensity of the particle collisions was next used to calculate the survival rate of fish crossing the MHK turbine. This step indicated survival rates always greater than 98%. Although the proposed CFD framework is computationally more expensive, it provides the advantage of evaluating multiple mechanisms of stress and injury of hydrokinetic turbine devices on fish.

  6. Ground Collision Avoidance System (Igcas)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skoog, Mark A (Inventor); Prosser, Kevin (Inventor); Hook, Loyd (Inventor)

    2017-01-01

    The present invention is a system and method for aircraft ground collision avoidance (iGCAS) comprising a modular array of software, including a sense own state module configured to gather data to compute trajectory, a sense terrain module including a digital terrain map (DTM) and map manger routine to store and retrieve terrain elevations, a predict collision threat module configured to generate an elevation profile corresponding to the terrain under the trajectory computed by said sense own state module, a predict avoidance trajectory module configured to simulate avoidance maneuvers ahead of the aircraft, a determine need to avoid module configured to determine which avoidance maneuver should be used, when it should be initiated, and when it should be terminated, a notify Module configured to display each maneuver's viability to the pilot by a colored GUI, a pilot controls module configured to turn the system on and off, and an avoid module configured to define how an aircraft will perform avoidance maneuvers through 3-dimensional space.

  7. Replacement collision sequence studies in iron

    CERN Document Server

    Hou, M; Becquart, C S

    2002-01-01

    The properties of replacement collision sequences (RCS) in iron and their contribution to radiation damage are studied as they are generated in atomic collision cascades with the binary collision approximation Marlowe. Length distributions of RCS in collision cascades generated by primaries with a couple of ten keV kinetic energies are predicted short. Whatever the interatomic potential employed, at least 90% of the generated RCS have a length of no more than three successive collisions, whatever the directions. This property was found for all the known phases of iron at standard pressure (bcc and fcc). The RCS length distributions are not significantly influenced by the temperature nor by the accurate form of the model describing the energy loss in RCS. Close to 50% of the stable Frenkel pairs (FP) created result from RCS that are shorter than the vacancy-interstitial recombination distance estimated on the basis of molecular dynamics calculations. The other half results from longer RCS (about five successiv...

  8. SU-E-T-754: Three-Dimensional Patient Modeling Using Photogrammetry for Collision Avoidance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Popple, R; Cardan, R [Univ Alabama Birmingham, Birmingham, AL (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To evaluate photogrammetry for creating a three-dimensional patient model. Methods: A mannequin was configured on the couch of a CT scanner to simulate a patient setup using an indexed positioning device. A CT fiducial was placed on the indexed CT table-overlay at the reference index position. Two dimensional photogrammetry targets were placed on the table in known positions. A digital SLR camera was used to obtain 27 images from different positions around the CT table. The images were imported into a commercial photogrammetry package and a 3D model constructed. Each photogrammetry target was identified on 2 to 5 images. The CT DICOM metadata and the position of the CT fiducial were used to calculate the coordinates of the photogrammetry targets in the CT image frame of reference. The coordinates were transferred to the photogrammetry software to orient the 3D model. The mannequin setup was transferred to the treatment couch of a linear accelerator and positioned at isocenter using in-room lasers. The treatment couch coordinates were noted and compared with prediction. The collision free regions were measured over the full range of gantry and table motion and were compared with predictions obtained using a general purpose polygon interference algorithm. Results: The reconstructed 3D model consisted of 180000 triangles. The difference between the predicted and measured couch positions were 5 mm, 1 mm, and 1 mm for longitudinal, lateral, and vertical, respectively. The collision prediction tested 64620 gantry table combinations in 11.1 seconds. The accuracy was 96.5%, with false positive and negative results occurring at the boundaries of the collision space. Conclusion: Photogrammetry can be used as a tool for collision avoidance during treatment planning. The results indicate that a buffer zone is necessary to avoid false negatives at the boundary of the collision-free zone. Testing with human patients is underway. Research partially supported by a grant

  9. Simulation of a Collision between Passenger Car and Child Pedestrian

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zuzana Schejbalová

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available The Department of Forensic Experts in Transportation at the Faculty of Transportation Sciences performed a second set of dynamic passive safety tests of a passenger car (M1 category - Škoda Octavia II in a child pedestrian collision. The initial and test conditions were similar to those of the first set of tests in September 2009 (Škoda Roomster. The deformations of the contact zones on the frontal vehicle surface were analyzed by a 3D scanning technology (3D handy scanner. Head, thorax and pelvic resultant acceleration, acceleration of knee joint in sagittal direction and contact force on the femoral structure of the dummy (P6 dummy, 1.17m; 22kg were measured. The aim of these tests is to provide a detailed description of pedestrian kinematics and comparison of primary and secondary impact seriousness.KEY WORDSpassenger car, child pedestrian, primary and secondary impact, dummy instrumentation, injury criteria, 3D scanning

  10. Evaluating the impact of bike network indicators on cyclist safety using macro-level collision prediction models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osama, Ahmed; Sayed, Tarek

    2016-12-01

    Many cities worldwide are recognizing the important role that cycling plays in creating green and livable communities. However, vulnerable road users such as cyclists are usually subjected to an elevated level of injury risk which discourages many road users to cycle. This paper studies cyclist-vehicle collisions at 134 traffic analysis zones in the city of Vancouver to assess the impact of bike network structure on cyclist safety. Several network indicators were developed using Graph theory and their effect on cyclist safety was investigated. The indicators included measures of connectivity, directness, and topography of the bike network. The study developed several macro-level (zonal) collision prediction models that explicitly incorporated bike network indicators as explanatory variables. As well, the models incorporated the actual cyclist exposure (bike kilometers travelled) as opposed to relying on proxies such as population or bike network length. The macro-level collision prediction models were developed using generalized linear regression and full Bayesian techniques, with and without spatial effects. The models showed that cyclist collisions were positively associated with bike and vehicle exposure. The exponents of the exposure variables were less than one which supports the "safety in numbers" hypothesis. Moreover, the models showed positive associations between cyclist collisions and the bike network connectivity and linearity indicators. In contrast, negative associations were found between cyclist collisions and the bike network continuity and topography indicators. The spatial effects were statistically significant in all of the developed models. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. P-wave tomography of subduction zones around the central Philippines and its geodynamic implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Jianke; Zhao, Dapeng; Dong, Dongdong; Zhang, Guangxu

    2017-09-01

    High-resolution tomographic images are obtained by inverting a large number of arrival-time data of local earthquakes and teleseismic events to depict the 3-D crustal and upper mantle structure beneath the central Philippines. Our tomographic results show that the subducted South China Sea slab beneath the southern segment of the Manila Trench steepens and tears, resulting in migration of the locus of active volcanism in the Macolod Corridor, due to the collision between the Palawan microcontinental block and the Philippine Mobile Belt. The subduction of the Philippine Sea Plate along the Philippine Trench started at 10-12°N or south of 12°N, the central part of the trench, from at least ∼10 Ma estimated from our tomographic images. Our results reveal clearly a high-velocity anomaly in and around the mantle transition zone, which is interpreted as the subducted Proto South China Sea slab that sinks deeper southeastward, being well consistent with geological results that the age of collision between the Palawan microcontinental block and the Philippine Mobile Belt becomes younger from the south to the north. This collision zone can be divided into northern and southern segments, demarcated by the salient point of the collision zone, which is probably the boundary between the South China Sea slab and the Proto South China Sea slab, and may be ascribed to the complete consumption of the two slabs.

  12. A method of inferring collision ratio based on maneuverability of own ship under critical collision conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Youngjun You

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available In constructing a collision avoidance system, it is important to determine the time for starting collision avoidance maneuver. Many researchers have attempted to formulate various indices by applying a range of techniques. Among these indices, collision risk obtained by combining Distance to the Closest Point of Approach (DCPA and Time to the Closest Point of Approach (TCPA information with fuzzy theory is mostly used. However, the collision risk has a limit, in that membership functions of DCPA and TCPA are empirically determined. In addition, the collision risk is not able to consider several critical collision conditions where the target ship fails to take appropriate actions. It is therefore necessary to design a new concept based on logical approaches. In this paper, a collision ratio is proposed, which is the expected ratio of unavoidable paths to total paths under suitably characterized operation conditions. Total paths are determined by considering categories such as action space and methodology of avoidance. The International Regulations for Preventing Collisions at Sea (1972 and collision avoidance rules (2001 are considered to solve the slower ship's dilemma. Different methods which are based on a constant speed model and simulated speed model are used to calculate the relative positions between own ship and target ship. In the simulated speed model, fuzzy control is applied to determination of command rudder angle. At various encounter situations, the time histories of the collision ratio based on the simulated speed model are compared with those based on the constant speed model.

  13. Calculation of the Trubnikov and Nanbu Collision Kernels: Implications for Numerical Modeling of Coulomb Collisions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dimits, A M; Wang, C; Caflisch, R; Cohen, B I; Huang, Y

    2008-08-06

    We investigate the accuracy of and assumptions underlying the numerical binary Monte-Carlo collision operator due to Nanbu [K. Nanbu, Phys. Rev. E 55 (1997)]. The numerical experiments that resulted in the parameterization of the collision kernel used in Nanbu's operator are argued to be an approximate realization of the Coulomb-Lorentz pitch-angle scattering process, for which an analytical solution for the collision kernel is available. It is demonstrated empirically that Nanbu's collision operator quite accurately recovers the effects of Coulomb-Lorentz pitch-angle collisions, or processes that approximate these (such interspecies Coulomb collisions with very small mass ratio) even for very large values of the collisional time step. An investigation of the analytical solution shows that Nanbu's parameterized kernel is highly accurate for small values of the normalized collision time step, but loses some of its accuracy for larger values of the time step. Careful numerical and analytical investigations are presented, which show that the time dependence of the relaxation of a temperature anisotropy by Coulomb-Lorentz collisions has a richer structure than previously thought, and is not accurately represented by an exponential decay with a single decay rate. Finally, a practical collision algorithm is proposed that for small-mass-ratio interspecies Coulomb collisions improves on the accuracy of Nanbu's algorithm.

  14. Modeling hyporheic zone processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Runkel, Robert L.; McKnight, Diane M.; Rajaram, Harihar

    2003-01-01

    Stream biogeochemistry is influenced by the physical and chemical processes that occur in the surrounding watershed. These processes include the mass loading of solutes from terrestrial and atmospheric sources, the physical transport of solutes within the watershed, and the transformation of solutes due to biogeochemical reactions. Research over the last two decades has identified the hyporheic zone as an important part of the stream system in which these processes occur. The hyporheic zone may be loosely defined as the porous areas of the stream bed and stream bank in which stream water mixes with shallow groundwater. Exchange of water and solutes between the stream proper and the hyporheic zone has many biogeochemical implications, due to differences in the chemical composition of surface and groundwater. For example, surface waters are typically oxidized environments with relatively high dissolved oxygen concentrations. In contrast, reducing conditions are often present in groundwater systems leading to low dissolved oxygen concentrations. Further, microbial oxidation of organic materials in groundwater leads to supersaturated concentrations of dissolved carbon dioxide relative to the atmosphere. Differences in surface and groundwater pH and temperature are also common. The hyporheic zone is therefore a mixing zone in which there are gradients in the concentrations of dissolved gasses, the concentrations of oxidized and reduced species, pH, and temperature. These gradients lead to biogeochemical reactions that ultimately affect stream water quality. Due to the complexity of these natural systems, modeling techniques are frequently employed to quantify process dynamics.

  15. Symmetrical collision of multiple vortex rings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández, R. H.; Reyes, T.

    2017-10-01

    In this work, we investigate the motion, interaction, and simultaneous collision between many initially stable vortex rings arranged symmetrically in two initial configurations, three and six rings making an angle of 60 and 120° between their straight path lines, respectively. We report results for laminar vortex rings in air obtained through numerical simulations of the ring velocity, pressure, and vorticity fields, both in free flight and during the entire collision. Each collision was studied for small Reynolds numbers R e formed by laterally expanding dipolar arms with top and bottom secondary vortex rings. The case of six colliding rings produces, as secondary structures, two big rings moving in opposite directions, a process that reminds us of the head-on collision of two rings [T. T. Lim and T. B. Nickels, "Instability and reconnection in the head-on collision of two vortex rings," Nature 357, 225-227 (1992)] under a hypothetical time reversal transformation. Both collisions display a characteristic kinetic energy evolution where mean collision stages can be identified within the range of Reynolds numbers investigated here.

  16. Jet Production in p-Pb Collisions

    CERN Document Server

    Connors, Megan

    2014-01-01

    One of the major results from the study of high energy heavy ion collisions is the observation of jet quenching. The suppression of the number of jets observed in heavy ion collisions relative to pp collisions at the same energy scaled by the number of binary collisions, is attributed to partonic energy loss in the quark gluon plasma (QGP). However, cold nuclear matter effects due to the presence of a nucleus in the initial state could also influence this measurement. To disentangle these effects p-Pb collisions are studied, where QGP formation is not expected to occur and only cold nuclear matter effects are present. In addition to being an important baseline for understanding jet quenching, jets in p-Pb collisions may also be used to provide constraints on the nuclear parton distribution functions. Fully reconstructed jets measured using the ALICE tracking system and electro-magnetic calorimeter in p-Pb collisions at $\\sqrt{s_{NN}}=5.02$ TeV are reported. In addition to the spectra, studies of the jet fragm...

  17. Cold Collisions in a Molecular Synchrotron

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Poel, Aernout P. P.; Zieger, Peter C.; van de Meerakker, Sebastiaan Y. T.; Loreau, Jérôme; van der Avoird, Ad; Bethlem, Hendrick L.

    2018-01-01

    We study collisions between neutral, deuterated ammonia molecules (ND3 ) stored in a 50 cm diameter synchrotron and argon atoms in copropagating supersonic beams. The advantages of using a synchrotron in collision studies are twofold: (i) By storing ammonia molecules many round-trips, the sensitivity to collisions is greatly enhanced; (ii) the collision partners move in the same direction as the stored molecules, resulting in low collision energies. We tune the collision energy in three different ways: by varying the velocity of the stored ammonia packets, by varying the temperature of the pulsed valve that releases the argon atoms, and by varying the timing between the supersonic argon beam and the stored ammonia packets. These give consistent results. We determine the relative, total, integrated cross section for ND3+Ar collisions in the energy range of 40 - 140 cm-1 , with a resolution of 5 - 10 cm-1 and an uncertainty of 7%-15%. Our measurements are in good agreement with theoretical scattering calculations.

  18. CHARACTERIZATION OF WILD PIG VEHICLE COLLISIONS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mayer, J; Paul E. Johns, P

    2007-05-23

    Wild pig (Sus scrofa) collisions with vehicles are known to occur in the United States, but only minimal information describing these accidents has been reported. In an effort to better characterize these accidents, data were collected from 179 wild pig-vehicle collisions from a location in west central South Carolina. Data included accident parameters pertaining to the animals involved, time, location, and human impacts. The age structure of the animals involved was significantly older than that found in the population. Most collisions involved single animals; however, up to seven animals were involved in individual accidents. As the number of animals per collision increased, the age and body mass of the individuals involved decreased. The percentage of males was significantly higher in the single-animal accidents. Annual attrition due to vehicle collisions averaged 0.8 percent of the population. Wild pig-vehicle collisions occurred year-round and throughout the 24-hour daily time period. Most accidents were at night. The presence of lateral barriers was significantly more frequent at the collision locations. Human injuries were infrequent but potentially serious. The mean vehicle damage estimate was $1,173.

  19. Wireless vehicular networks for car collision avoidance

    CERN Document Server

    2013-01-01

    Wireless Vehicular Networks for Car Collision Avoidance focuses on the development of the ITS (Intelligent Transportation Systems) in order to minimize vehicular accidents. The book presents and analyses a range of concrete accident scenarios while examining the causes of vehicular collision and proposing countermeasures based on wireless vehicular networks. The book also describes the vehicular network standards and quality of service mechanisms focusing on improving critical dissemination of safety information. With recommendations on techniques and protocols to consider when improving road safety policies in order to minimize crashes and collision risks.

  20. ZoneLib

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jessen, Jan Jacob; Schiøler, Henrik

    2006-01-01

    We present a dynamic model for climate in a livestock building divided into a number of zones, and a corresponding modular Simulink library (ZoneLib). While most literature in this area consider air flow as a control parameter we show how to model climate dynamics using actual control signals...... for the ventilation equipment. To   overcome a shortcoming in Simulink to solve algebraic equations and matrix inversions, we have developed the library inspired by the so called dynamic node technique. We present simulation results using the presented library, and concludes with visions for further...

  1. Grid zone drone

    OpenAIRE

    McCarthy, Clive; Cooper, Graham; Field, James; Thayne, Martyn; Vickers, Richard

    2014-01-01

    From 16th – 19th October 2014, co_LAB presented its newest creation, Grid Zone Drone, at Kinetica – an international exhibition providing a global platform for galleries, curatorial groups, design studios and artists working with new media art. 2014 marked the third consecutive year that the University of Lincoln has been represented at the global art fair. Grid Zone Drone represents a continuation of the group’s research into ‘drone culture’, and explores the detachment of the drone withi...

  2. Optimal exploration target zones

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Debba, Pravesh

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available , Carranza, Stein, van der Meer Introduction to Remote Sensing Background and Objective of the study Methodology Results Optimal Exploration Target Zones Pravesh Debba1, Emmanual M.J. Carranza2, Alfred Stein2, Freek D. van der Meer2 1CSIR, Logistics... and Quantitative Methods, CSIR Built Environment 2International Institute for Geo-Information Science and Earth Observation (ITC), Hengelosestraat 99, P.O. Box 6, 7500AA Enschede, The Netherlands Optimal Exploration Target Zones Debba, Carranza, Stein, van der Meer...

  3. Zones of emotional labour

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Strøbæk, Pernille Solveig

    2011-01-01

    The paper suggests that due to the difficult nature of their work public family law caseworkers are to be included in the definition of emotional labour even though they are omitted by Hochschild. Based upon a review of the structures involved in emotional labour an explorative qualitative study...... is put forth among 25 Danish public family law caseworkers. The study points to personal, professional, and social zones of emotional labour through which the caseworkers carry out their work. Emotional labour zones mark emotion structures that may be challenging due to complex emotional intersections...

  4. Nucleus-Nucleus Collision as Superposition of Nucleon-Nucleus Collisions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Orlova, G.I.; Adamovich, M.I.; Aggarwal, M.M.; Alexandrov, Y.A.; Andreeva, N.P.; Badyal, S.K.; Basova, E.S.; Bhalla, K.B.; Bhasin, A.; Bhatia, V.S.; Bradnova, V.; Bubnov, V.I.; Cai, X.; Chasnikov, I.Y.; Chen, G.M.; Chernova, L.P.; Chernyavsky, M.M.; Dhamija, S.; Chenawi, K.El; Felea, D.; Feng, S.Q.; Gaitinov, A.S.; Ganssauge, E.R.; Garpman, S.; Gerassimov, S.G.; Gheata, A.; Gheata, M.; Grote, J.; Gulamov, K.G.; Gupta, S.K.; Gupta, V.K.; Henjes, U.; Jakobsson, B.; Kanygina, E.K.; Karabova, M.; Kharlamov, S.P.; Kovalenko, A.D.; Krasnov, S.A.; Kumar, V.; Larionova, V.G.; Li, Y.X.; Liu, L.S.; Lokanathan, S.; Lord, J.J.; Lukicheva, N.S.; Lu, Y.; Luo, S.B.; Mangotra, L.K.; Manhas, I.; Mittra, I.S.; Musaeva, A.K.; Nasyrov, S.Z.; Navotny, V.S.; Nystrand, J.; Otterlund, I.; Peresadko, N.G.; Qian, W.Y.; Qin, Y.M.; Raniwala, R.; Rao, N.K.; Roeper, M.; Rusakova, V.V.; Saidkhanov, N.; Salmanova, N.A.; Seitimbetov, A.M.; Sethi, R.; Singh, B.; Skelding, D.; Soderstrem, K.; Stenlund, E.; Svechnikova, L.N.; Svensson, T.; Tawfik, A.M.; Tothova, M.; Tretyakova, M.I.; Trofimova, T.P.; Tuleeva, U.I.; Vashisht, Vani; Vokal, S.; Vrlakova, J.; Wang, H.Q.; Wang, X.R.; Weng, Z.Q.; Wilkes, R.J.; Yang, C.B.; Yin, Z.B.; Yu, L.Z.; Zhang, D.H.; Zheng, P.Y.; Zhokhova, S.I.; Zhou, D.C

    1999-03-01

    Angular distributions of charged particles produced in {sup 16}O and {sup 32}S collisions with nuclear track emulsion were studied at momenta 4.5 and 200 A GeV/c. Comparison with the angular distributions of charged particles produced in proton-nucleus collisions at the same momentum allows to draw the conclusion, that the angular distributions in nucleus-nucleus collisions can be seen as superposition of the angular distributions in nucleon-nucleus collisions taken at the same impact parameter b{sub NA}, that is mean impact parameter between the participating projectile nucleons and the center of the target nucleus.

  5. Coherent source radius in ppbar collisions

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Q. H.; Li, X. Q.

    1997-01-01

    We use a recently derived result to extract from two-pion interferometry data from $p\\bar{p}$ collisions the radius of the coherent component in the source. We find a coherent source radius of about $2 fm$.

  6. Novel energy sharing collisions of multicomponent solitons

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    1) exhibit certain novel inelastic (energy sharing) collisions [11] in contrast to single-component NLS system. Kanna et al have obtained multisoliton solu- tions for the multicomponent Manakov system (2) using the Hirota's method [15]. Thus,.

  7. Evidence for collective phenomena in pp collisions

    CERN Document Server

    Chen, Zhenyu

    2017-01-01

    Observation of long-range ridge-like correlations in high-multiplicity pp collisions opened up new opportunities for exploring novel QCD dynamics in small collision systems. Based on data collected in 2015 and 2016 with the CMS detector at the LHC, the second-order ($v_{2}$) and third-order ($v_{3}$) azimuthal anisotropy harmonics of $K_{s}^{0}$, $\\Lambda$ and inclusive charged particles are extracted from long-range two-particle correlations as functions of particle multiplicity and transverse momentum. For the first time in pp collisions, the $v_{2}$ signals are also extracted from multi-particle correlations, providing direct evidence of the collective nature of observed particle correlations. These results provide new insights on the origin of observed long-range correlations in pp collisions, and may shed light on how quantum fluctuations affect the proton structure at a very short time scale.

  8. Active Collision Avoidance for Planetary Landers Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Advancements in radar technology have resulted in commercial, automotive collision avoidance radars. These radar systems typically use 37GHz or 77GHz interferometry...

  9. VT Vehicle-Animal Collisions - 2006

    Data.gov (United States)

    Vermont Center for Geographic Information — (Link to Metadata) This data (ROADKILL06) describes the locations of vehicle-animal collisions. This shapefile is a collection of collsion information collected by...

  10. LHC: Collisions on course for 2007

    CERN Multimedia

    2006-01-01

    In the LHC tunnel and caverns, a particle accelerator and detectors are rapidly taking shape. At last week's Council meeting, delegates took stock of the year's progress towards first collisions in 2007.

  11. Arid Zone Hydrology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arid zone hydrology encompasses a wide range of topics and hydro-meteorological and ecological characteristics. Although arid and semi-arid watersheds perform the same functions as those in humid environments, their hydrology and sediment transport characteristics cannot be readily predicted by inf...

  12. Zone of Nigeria

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Affected by Fertilizer in the Southern Guinea Savanna. Zone of Nigeria ... soybean varieties and the requirement by the exotic varieties ... Deficiencies of nitrogen and phosphorus ... maize at the time of sowing soybean. Maize ..... when cut open were pinkish red in colour. 56 ..... release from root of alfalfa and soybean grown.

  13. Coastal Zone of Cameroon

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    komla

    A biogeochemical model of water, salt and nutrients budgets for two estuarine systems within Cameroon's coastal zone (Latitudes 2°— 1 3°N, Longitudes ... along ecological food webs and the earth's along an approximate 25,000 km along ...... Cameroon. Cameroon Wildlife and. Conservation Society Consultancy Report.

  14. Zone of intrusion study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-15

    The Midwest Roadside Safety Facility (MwRSF) performed an analysis using LS-DYNA simulation to investigate the zone of intrusion (ZOI) of an NCHRP Report No. 350 2000p pickup truck when impacting a 40-in. high F-shape parapet. : The ZOI for the 40-in...

  15. Buffer Zone Sign Template

    Science.gov (United States)

    The certified pesticide applicator is required to post a comparable sign, designating a buffer zone around the soil fumigant application block in order to control exposure risk. It must include the don't walk symbol, product name, and applicator contact.

  16. ALICE: Simulated lead-lead collision

    CERN Document Server

    2003-01-01

    This track is an example of simulated data modelled for the ALICE detector on the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN, which will begin taking data in 2008. ALICE will focus on the study of collisions between nuclei of lead, a heavy element that produces many different particles when collided. It is hoped that these collisions will produce a new state of matter known as the quark-gluon plasma, which existed billionths of a second after the Big Bang.

  17. Updated Vertical Extent of Collision Damage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tagg, R.; Bartzis, P.; Papanikolaou, P.

    2002-01-01

    The probabilistic distribution of the vertical extent of collision damage is an important and somewhat controversial component of the proposed IMO harmonized damage stability regulations for cargo and passenger ships. The only pre-existing vertical distribution, currently used in the international...... cargo ship regulations, was based on a very simplified presumption of bow heights. This paper investigates the development of this damage extent distribution based on three independent methodologies; actual casualty measurements, world fleet bow height statistics, and collision simulation modeling...

  18. Malignant collision tumors in two dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Jacqueline E; Liptak, Julius M; Powers, Barbara E

    2017-10-15

    CASE DESCRIPTION A 13-year-old Labrador Retriever with a 4-cm-diameter ulcerated perianal mass and a 12-year-old Golden Retriever with a 5-cm-diameter ulcerated caudolateral abdominal mass were brought to a referral oncology practice for evaluation of the dermal masses. Both masses were resected with wide margins without reported postoperative complications. For both dogs, a diagnosis of collision tumor was made. The database of the Veterinary Diagnostic Laboratories at Colorado State University was searched for other examples of collision tumors in dogs. CLINICAL FINDINGS Histologic assessment of the masses revealed collision tumors in both patients. The perianal mass was diagnosed as a perianal gland carcinoma with adjacent hemangiosarcoma. The flank mass was diagnosed as a fibrosarcoma with an adjacent mast cell tumor. The university database search of sample submissions in 2008 through 2014 for the keywords collision, admixed, or adjacent yielded 37 additional cases of dogs with malignant nontesticular collision tumors. TREATMENT AND OUTCOME Both dogs were treated with surgery alone and received no adjunctive treatments. Both tumors were completely excised. There was no evidence of either local tumor recurrence or metastasis in the Labrador Retriever and the Golden Retriever at 1,009 and 433 days after surgery, respectively. CLINICAL RELEVANCE Collision tumors are rare, and there is minimal information regarding treatment recommendations and outcome for animals with collision tumors. On the basis of the 2 cases described in this report, the outcome associated with treatment of collision tumors may be similar to the expected outcome for treatment of any of the individual tumor types in dogs.

  19. Ultra-Peripheral Collisions in PHENIX

    CERN Document Server

    Conesa del Valle, Zaida

    2010-01-01

    Ultra-peripheral nuclei collisions provide means to study photon-induced interactions in a nuclear environment. We discuss the PHENIX collaboration results on J/ and e+e− photoproduction in Au+Au ultra-peripheral collisions at psNN = 200 GeV [1, 2]. Their production cross-section and transverse momentum spectra are presented. The results are compared and found to be consistent with various theoretical calculations.

  20. Global Λ hyperon polarization in nuclear collisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adamczyk, L.; Adkins, J. K.; Agakishiev, G.; Aggarwal, M. M.; Ahammed, Z.; Ajitanand, N. N.; Alekseev, I.; Anderson, D. M.; Aoyama, R.; Aparin, A.; Arkhipkin, D.; Aschenauer, E. C.; Ashraf, M. U.; Attri, A.; Averichev, G. S.; Bai, X.; Bairathi, V.; Behera, A.; Bellwied, R.; Bhasin, A.; Bhati, A. K.; Bhattarai, P.; Bielcik, J.; Bielcikova, J.; Bland, L. C.; Bordyuzhin, I. G.; Bouchet, J.; Brandenburg, J. D.; Brandin, A. V.; Brown, D.; Bunzarov, I.; Butterworth, J.; Caines, H.; de La Barca Sánchez, M. Calderón; Campbell, J. M.; Cebra, D.; Chakaberia, I.; Chaloupka, P.; Chang, Z.; Chankova-Bunzarova, N.; Chatterjee, A.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Chen, X.; Chen, J. H.; Chen, X.; Cheng, J.; Cherney, M.; Christie, W.; Contin, G.; Crawford, H. J.; Das, S.; de Silva, L. C.; Debbe, R. R.; Dedovich, T. G.; Deng, J.; Derevschikov, A. A.; Didenko, L.; Dilks, C.; Dong, X.; Drachenberg, J. L.; Draper, J. E.; Dunkelberger, L. E.; Dunlop, J. C.; Efimov, L. G.; Elsey, N.; Engelage, J.; Eppley, G.; Esha, R.; Esumi, S.; Evdokimov, O.; Ewigleben, J.; Eyser, O.; Fatemi, R.; Fazio, S.; Federic, P.; Federicova, P.; Fedorisin, J.; Feng, Z.; Filip, P.; Finch, E.; Fisyak, Y.; Flores, C. E.; Fulek, L.; Gagliardi, C. A.; Garand, D.; Geurts, F.; Gibson, A.; Girard, M.; Grosnick, D.; Gunarathne, D. S.; Guo, Y.; Gupta, A.; Gupta, S.; Guryn, W.; Hamad, A. I.; Hamed, A.; Harlenderova, A.; Harris, J. W.; He, L.; Heppelmann, S.; Heppelmann, S.; Hirsch, A.; Hoffmann, G. W.; Horvat, S.; Huang, T.; Huang, B.; Huang, X.; Huang, H. Z.; Humanic, T. J.; Huo, P.; Igo, G.; Jacobs, W. W.; Jentsch, A.; Jia, J.; Jiang, K.; Jowzaee, S.; Judd, E. G.; Kabana, S.; Kalinkin, D.; Kang, K.; Kauder, K.; Ke, H. W.; Keane, D.; Kechechyan, A.; Khan, Z.; Kikoła, D. P.; Kisel, I.; Kisiel, A.; Kochenda, L.; Kocmanek, M.; Kollegger, T.; Kosarzewski, L. K.; Kraishan, A. F.; Kravtsov, P.; Krueger, K.; Kulathunga, N.; Kumar, L.; Kvapil, J.; Kwasizur, J. H.; Lacey, R.; Landgraf, J. M.; Landry, K. D.; Lauret, J.; Lebedev, A.; Lednicky, R.; Lee, J. H.; Li, X.; Li, C.; Li, W.; Li, Y.; Lidrych, J.; Lin, T.; Lisa, M. A.; Liu, H.; Liu, P.; Liu, Y.; Liu, F.; Ljubicic, T.; Llope, W. J.; Lomnitz, M.; Longacre, R. S.; Luo, S.; Luo, X.; Ma, G. L.; Ma, L.; Ma, Y. G.; Ma, R.; Magdy, N.; Majka, R.; Mallick, D.; Margetis, S.; Markert, C.; Matis, H. S.; Meehan, K.; Mei, J. C.; Miller, Z. W.; Minaev, N. G.; Mioduszewski, S.; Mishra, D.; Mizuno, S.; Mohanty, B.; Mondal, M. M.; Morozov, D. A.; Mustafa, M. K.; Nasim, Md.; Nayak, T. K.; Nelson, J. M.; Nie, M.; Nigmatkulov, G.; Niida, T.; Nogach, L. V.; Nonaka, T.; Nurushev, S. B.; Odyniec, G.; Ogawa, A.; Oh, K.; Okorokov, V. A.; Olvitt, D.; Page, B. S.; Pak, R.; Pandit, Y.; Panebratsev, Y.; Pawlik, B.; Pei, H.; Perkins, C.; Pile, P.; Pluta, J.; Poniatowska, K.; Porter, J.; Posik, M.; Poskanzer, A. M.; Pruthi, N. K.; Przybycien, M.; Putschke, J.; Qiu, H.; Quintero, A.; Ramachandran, S.; Ray, R. L.; Reed, R.; Rehbein, M. J.; Ritter, H. G.; Roberts, J. B.; Rogachevskiy, O. V.; Romero, J. L.; Roth, J. D.; Ruan, L.; Rusnak, J.; Rusnakova, O.; Sahoo, N. R.; Sahu, P. K.; Salur, S.; Sandweiss, J.; Saur, M.; Schambach, J.; Schmah, A. M.; Schmidke, W. B.; Schmitz, N.; Schweid, B. R.; Seger, J.; Sergeeva, M.; Seyboth, P.; Shah, N.; Shahaliev, E.; Shanmuganathan, P. V.; Shao, M.; Sharma, A.; Sharma, M. K.; Shen, W. Q.; Shi, Z.; Shi, S. S.; Shou, Q. Y.; Sichtermann, E. P.; Sikora, R.; Simko, M.; Singha, S.; Skoby, M. J.; Smirnov, N.; Smirnov, D.; Solyst, W.; Song, L.; Sorensen, P.; Spinka, H. M.; Srivastava, B.; Stanislaus, T. D. S.; Strikhanov, M.; Stringfellow, B.; Sugiura, T.; Sumbera, M.; Summa, B.; Sun, Y.; Sun, X. M.; Sun, X.; Surrow, B.; Svirida, D. N.; Tang, A. H.; Tang, Z.; Taranenko, A.; Tarnowsky, T.; Tawfik, A.; Thäder, J.; Thomas, J. H.; Timmins, A. R.; Tlusty, D.; Todoroki, T.; Tokarev, M.; Trentalange, S.; Tribble, R. E.; Tribedy, P.; Tripathy, S. K.; Trzeciak, B. A.; Tsai, O. D.; Ullrich, T.; Underwood, D. G.; Upsal, I.; van Buren, G.; van Nieuwenhuizen, G.; Vasiliev, A. N.; Videbæk, F.; Vokal, S.; Voloshin, S. A.; Vossen, A.; Wang, G.; Wang, Y.; Wang, F.; Wang, Y.; Webb, J. C.; Webb, G.; Wen, L.; Westfall, G. D.; Wieman, H.; Wissink, S. W.; Witt, R.; Wu, Y.; Xiao, Z. G.; Xie, W.; Xie, G.; Xu, J.; Xu, N.; Xu, Q. H.; Xu, Y. F.; Xu, Z.; Yang, Y.; Yang, Q.; Yang, C.; Yang, S.; Ye, Z.; Ye, Z.; Yi, L.; Yip, K.; Yoo, I.-K.; Yu, N.; Zbroszczyk, H.; Zha, W.; Zhang, Z.; Zhang, X. P.; Zhang, J. B.; Zhang, S.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, Y.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, S.; Zhao, J.; Zhong, C.; Zhou, L.; Zhou, C.; Zhu, X.; Zhu, Z.; Zyzak, M.

    2017-08-01

    The extreme energy densities generated by ultra-relativistic collisions between heavy atomic nuclei produce a state of matter that behaves surprisingly like a fluid, with exceptionally high temperature and low viscosity. Non-central collisions have angular momenta of the order of 1,000ћ, and the resulting fluid may have a strong vortical structure that must be understood to describe the fluid properly. The vortical structure is also of particular interest because the restoration of fundamental symmetries of quantum chromodynamics is expected to produce novel physical effects in the presence of strong vorticity. However, no experimental indications of fluid vorticity in heavy ion collisions have yet been found. Since vorticity represents a local rotational structure of the fluid, spin-orbit coupling can lead to preferential orientation of particle spins along the direction of rotation. Here we present measurements of an alignment between the global angular momentum of a non-central collision and the spin of emitted particles (in this case the collision occurs between gold nuclei and produces Λ baryons), revealing that the fluid produced in heavy ion collisions is the most vortical system so far observed. (At high energies, this fluid is a quark-gluon plasma.) We find that Λ and hyperons show a positive polarization of the order of a few per cent, consistent with some hydrodynamic predictions. (A hyperon is a particle composed of three quarks, at least one of which is a strange quark; the remainder are up and down quarks, found in protons and neutrons.) A previous measurement that reported a null result, that is, zero polarization, at higher collision energies is seen to be consistent with the trend of our observations, though with larger statistical uncertainties. These data provide experimental access to the vortical structure of the nearly ideal liquid created in a heavy ion collision and should prove valuable in the development of hydrodynamic models that

  1. Conservative Bin-to-Bin Fractional Collisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-06-28

    Collisionless Tiny Early e− or Radical Populations Critical to Induction Delay Many types of Inelastic Collisions with Unknown Effects on Distribution...Transitions from Collisional to Collisionless Tiny Early e− or Radical Populations Critical to Induction Delay Many types of Inelastic Collisions with... Structures , Sort->Sums, v-Bounds, Morton curve) TURF: Np/Cell - Standard DSMC TURF: (Np/Cell) SWPM+Octree TURF: Np/Cell - Standard DSMC ROBERT MARTIN (AFRL

  2. Nuclear collisions at the Future Circular Collider

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Armesto, N., E-mail: nestor.armesto@usc.es [Departamento de Física de Partículas and IGFAE, Universidade de Santiago de Compostela, 15706 Santiago de Compostela, Galicia-Spain (Spain); Dainese, A. [INFN – Sezione di Padova, 35131 Padova (Italy); D' Enterria, D. [Physics Department, CERN, CH-1211 Genéve 23 (Switzerland); Masciocchi, S. [EMMI and GSI Helmholtzzentrum fuer Schwerionenforschung GmbH, Darmstadt (Germany); Roland, C. [Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA 02139-4307 (United States); Salgado, C.A. [Departamento de Física de Partículas and IGFAE, Universidade de Santiago de Compostela, 15706 Santiago de Compostela, Galicia-Spain (Spain); Leeuwen, M. van [Nikhef, National Institute for Subatomic Physics, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Institute for Subatomic Physics of Utrecht University, Utrecht (Netherlands); Wiedemann, U.A. [Physics Department, CERN, CH-1211 Genéve 23 (Switzerland)

    2016-12-15

    The Future Circular Collider is a new proposed collider at CERN with centre-of-mass energies around 100 TeV in the pp mode. Ongoing studies aim at assessing its physics potential and technical feasibility. Here we focus on updates in physics opportunities accessible in pA and AA collisions not covered in previous Quark Matter contributions, including Quark-Gluon Plasma and gluon saturation studies, novel hard probes of QCD matter, and photon-induced collisions.

  3. Nuclear collisions at the Future Circular Collider

    CERN Document Server

    Armesto, N.; d'Enterria, D.; Masciocchi, S.; Roland, C.; Salgado, C.A.; van Leeuwen, M.; Wiedemann, U.A.

    2016-01-01

    The Future Circular Collider is a new proposed collider at CERN with centre-of-mass energies around 100 TeV in the pp mode. Ongoing studies aim at assessing its physics potential and technical feasibility. Here we focus on updates in physics opportunities accessible in pA and AA collisions not covered in previous Quark Matter contributions, including Quark-Gluon Plasma and gluon saturation studies, novel hard probes of QCD matter, and photon-induced collisions.

  4. Distraction-related road traffic collisions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eid, Hani O; Abu-Zidan, Fikri M

    2017-06-01

    We aimed to prospectively study distraction-related road traffic collision injuries, their contributory factors, severity, and outcome. Data were prospectively collected on all hospitalized road traffic collision trauma patients in Al-Ain City who were drivers at the collision time over one and half years. Driver's inattentive behaviors preceding the collision were collected by interviewing the admitted drivers. There were 444 drivers, 330 of them were fully oriented patients, out of them only 44 (13%) were distracted. Nineteen (5.8%) drivers were distracted by using mobile phones, 12 (3.6%) were pre-occupied with deep thinking, six (1.8%) were talking with other passengers, four (1.2%) were picking things in the vehicle, and three (0.9%) were using entertainment systems. The maximum distraction occurred during the time of 6 am - 12 noon when the traffic was crowded. There were no significant differences between distracted and non-distracted drivers in demographical and physiological factors, injured regions, and outcomes. Distraction of alert drivers causes 13% of road traffic collisions in Al-Ain city. About 40 percent of the distracted drivers involved in road traffic collisions (RTC) were using mobile phones. Our study supports the ban of use of cell phones while driving.

  5. Empowerment Zones and Enterprise Districts - MDC_EnterpriseZone

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC Local Govt | GIS Inventory — Polygon feature class of Miami Dade County Enterprise Zones. Enterprise Zones are special areas in the county where certain incentives from the State are available...

  6. LHC Report: First collisions soon

    CERN Multimedia

    Jan Uythoven for the LHC team

    2012-01-01

    On the evening of Friday 16 March beams were accelerated in the LHC at 4 TeV for the first time: a new world record! According to the schedule for the machine restart it will take another three weeks before the stable beams mode – the requirement for the detectors to start taking data – is achieved.   During the beam commissioning period the equipment teams make sure that their systems – beam instrumentation, radio frequency, beam interlock, feedback on orbit and tune, etc. – are working flawlessly with beam. Confidence in the correct functioning of all the magnets, their settings and their alignment is obtained by detailed measurements of the optics and the physical aperture. The optics measurements include the beta* of the squeezed beam at the centre of the experiments where the collisions will soon take place. This year the aim is to have a smaller beta* of 60 cm for the ATLAS and CMS experiments. As a reminder, smaller values of beta* mean thinner and m...

  7. Constitutional collisions of criminal law

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergey M. Inshakov

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective to identify and resolve conflicts between the norms of constitutional and criminal law which regulate the issue of legal liability of senior officials of the state. Methods formallogical systematic comparativelegal. Results the article analyzes the embodiment of the principle of citizensrsquo equality under the law regarding the criminal responsibility of the President of the Russian Federation as one of the segments of the elite right other criminal and legal conflicts are considered associated with the creation of conditions for derogation from the principle of equality. Basing on this analysis the means of overcoming collisions between the norms of constitutional and criminal law are formulated. Scientific novelty in the article for the first time it has been shown that in the Russian criminal law there are exceptions to the principle of citizensrsquo equality under the law relating to the President of the Russian Federation the conflicts are identified between the norms of constitutional and criminal law regulating the issue of legal liability of senior officials of the state ways of overcoming conflicts are suggested. Practical significance the main provisions and conclusions of the article can be used in research and teaching in the consideration of issues of senior state officialsrsquo criminal liability.

  8. Collision prediction software for radiotherapy treatments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Padilla, Laura [Virginia Commonwealth University Medical Center, Richmond, Virginia 23298 (United States); Pearson, Erik A. [Techna Institute and the Princess Margaret Cancer Center, University Health Network, Toronto, Ontario M5G 2M9 (Canada); Pelizzari, Charles A., E-mail: c-pelizzari@uchicago.edu [Department of Radiation and Cellular Oncology, The University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois 60637 (United States)

    2015-11-15

    Purpose: This work presents a method of collision predictions for external beam radiotherapy using surface imaging. The present methodology focuses on collision prediction during treatment simulation to evaluate the clearance of a patient’s treatment position and allow for its modification if necessary. Methods: A Kinect camera (Microsoft, Redmond, WA) is used to scan the patient and immobilization devices in the treatment position at the simulator. The surface is reconstructed using the SKANECT software (Occipital, Inc., San Francisco, CA). The treatment isocenter is marked using simulated orthogonal lasers projected on the surface scan. The point cloud of this surface is then shifted to isocenter and converted from Cartesian to cylindrical coordinates. A slab models the treatment couch. A cylinder with a radius equal to the normal distance from isocenter to the collimator plate, and a height defined by the collimator diameter is used to estimate collisions. Points within the cylinder clear through a full gantry rotation with the treatment couch at 0° , while points outside of it collide. The angles of collision are reported. This methodology was experimentally verified using a mannequin positioned in an alpha cradle with both arms up. A planning CT scan of the mannequin was performed, two isocenters were marked in PINNACLE, and this information was exported to AlignRT (VisionRT, London, UK)—a surface imaging system for patient positioning. This was used to ensure accurate positioning of the mannequin in the treatment room, when available. Collision calculations were performed for the two treatment isocenters and the results compared to the collisions detected the room. The accuracy of the Kinect-Skanect surface was evaluated by comparing it to the external surface of the planning CT scan. Results: Experimental verification results showed that the predicted angles of collision matched those recorded in the room within 0.5°, in most cases (largest deviation

  9. On Collision Resistance of Generalized Cellular Automata

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. G. Klyucharev

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The author had previously developed the principles for creating the symmetric cryptoalgorithms based on the generalized cellular automata. In hardware implementation these cryptoalgorithms are of high efficiency. This work continues studies in this field. It investigates collisions arising during the operation of generalized cellular automata.The main objective of the work is to develop a method for creating the generalized cellular automata to be resistant to a certain type of collisions.Two various initial fillings of the generalized cellular machine gun differing in w categories and giving identical fillings after t steps shall be called a t-step collision of weight w. We notice that any t-step collision at the same time is also a step collision (t+u.It is obvious that collisions existing in generalized cellular automata, provided that there are efficient algorithms to detect them, sharply worsen cryptographic properties of the cryptoalgorithms based on it. Therefore methods for synthesis of generalized cellular automata, which are resistant to collisions are very important. This work studies resistance to the single-step collisions of weight 1.The work shows that for a lack of single-step collisions of weight 1 it is enough that any other cell is linearly dependent on each cell of the cellular automata. For this, it is sufficient that the knumbered edges with regard to any tops form, together with these tops, a 2-factor of the graph of the generalized cellular automata while a local function of relation has to be linear in k- numbered argument.Existence conditions of 2-factor are given. The method to find the 2-factor in this graph is given. It is based on the search algorithm of the maximum bipartite matching.Thus, the article develops a theory of the generalized cellular automata, free from single-step collisions of weight 1. Such automata are important for cryptographic applications. The method is developed to create such cellular

  10. CMS collision events: candidate Upsilons in heavy-ion collisions – Dec 2010

    CERN Multimedia

    McCauley, Thomas

    2011-01-01

    Candidate Upsilon decay to two muons observed in a lead-lead collision at the LHC. The two red lines (tracks) are the two muons, the mass of orange lines are tracks from other particles produced in the collision, whose energy is measured in the electromagnetic calorimeter (red cuboids) and the hadron calorimeter (blue cuboids).

  11. Evolution of stellar collision products in open clusters : II. A grid of low-mass collisions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Glebbeek, E.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/30483324X; Pols, O.R.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/111811155

    2008-01-01

    In a companion paper we studied the detailed evolution of stellar collision products that occurred in an N-body simulation of the old open cluster M 67 and compared our detailed models to simple prescriptions. In this paper we extend this work by studying the evolution of the collision products in

  12. Zoning Districts - MDC_ROZABoundary

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC Local Govt | GIS Inventory — The boundaries of the ROZA are defined in Chapter 33 of the Zoning Code, Section 33-420, ARTICLE XLI. The area is known as the ROCK MINING OVERLAY ZONING AREA (ROZA)...

  13. Ecological zones of California deserts

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The dataset delineates ecological zones within California deserts. We derived ecological zones by reclassifying LANDFIRE vegetation biophysical setting types, plus...

  14. Analysis of d/p ratio in Au+Au collisions from the E866 experiment at the AGS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shea, Y.; Garcia-Solis, E.J.; Stanskas, P.J. [Univ. of Maryland, College Park, MD (United States)

    1996-02-01

    High energy nucleus-nucleus collisions are a great interest as a means of creating a new state of matter. The transition of nuclear matter to quark matter is expected to result in a strongly interacting region that lives for a long time and expands to a large volume. In order to understand the properties of the collision region, it is important to gather information experimentally on the lifetime and thermodynamic attributes such as temperature, volume, density, and entropy of the collision region. Deuteron production by phase space coalescence is particularly interesting because it can be used as a probe in studying the space-time structure of the heavy ion collisions. In the hot and dense participant region, a proton and a neutron coalesce when their relative momentum is small. The deuteron density in momentum space is proportional to the proton density squared in momentum space at equal momenta per nucleon, assuming proton and neutron density to be identical. The motivation here is to study the properties of the coalesced deuterons formed in the participant region of Au-Au collisions at 11.6 GeV/c. The d/p ratio as a function of centrality is studied in hopes of gaining information about any change in the size of the participant zone which could lead to the effort of searching for the Quark-Gluon-Plasma at the AGS. The results shown here is very preliminary and the work is in progress.

  15. Ship Collision Avoidance by Distributed Tabu Search

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dong-Gyun Kim

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available More than 90% of world trade is transported by sea. The size and speed of ships is rapidly increasing in order to boost economic efficiency. If ships collide, the damage and cost can be astronomical. It is very difficult for officers to ascertain routes that will avoid collisions, especially when multiple ships travel the same waters. There are several ways to prevent ship collisions, such as lookouts, radar, and VHF radio. More advanced methodologies, such as ship domain, fuzzy theory, and genetic algorithm, have been proposed. These methods work well in one-on-one situations, but are more difficult to apply in multiple-ship situations. Therefore, we proposed the Distributed Local Search Algorithm (DLSA to avoid ship collisions as a precedent study. DLSA is a distributed algorithm in which multiple ships communicate with each other within a certain area. DLSA computes collision risk based on the information received from neighboring ships. However, DLSA suffers from Quasi-Local Minimum (QLM, which prevents a ship from changing course even when a collision risk arises. In our study, we developed the Distributed Tabu Search Algorithm (DTSA. DTSA uses a tabu list to escape from QLM that also exploits a modified cost function and enlarged domain of next-intended courses to increase its efficiency. We conducted experiments to compare the performance of DLSA and DTSA. The results showed that DTSA outperformed DLSA.

  16. Characteristics of Unequal Size Drop Collisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jungyong; Longmire, Ellen; Kim, Man Sik

    2009-11-01

    Pairs of water/glycerin drops were injected into silicone oil and traveled on downward trajectories before colliding. Unequal size drop collisions with drop size ratios (Ds/DL) of 0.7 and 0.5 were investigated. Simultaneous dual-field PIV measurements were obtained to characterize coalescence and rebounding behavior. The initial injection angle and tube height were adjusted to access appropriate impact parameters. In the current study, the collision angle of the large drop was, in general, shallower than that of the small drop, and a range of velocity ratios and impact parameters was examined. Coalescence occurs above We* = 11 similar to collision outcomes for equal size drops. As drop size ratio decreases, the intervening film deforms more. If the velocity ratio uL/us 1, the interface flattens before coalescence. The rupture location varies due to the asymmetry of the drops. As collision offset increases (B > 0), the film rupture time is shortened and mixing of the fluid within the drops is enhanced after coalescence. These results will be compared with the behavior observed previously for equal size drop collisions.

  17. Comparing the effects of rheology on the dynamics and topography of 3D subduction-collision models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pusok, Adina E.; Kaus, Boris; Popov, Anton

    2015-04-01

    Most of the major mountain belts and orogenic plateaus are found within the overlying plate of active or fossil subduction and/or collision zones. It is well known that they evolve differently from one another as the result of specific combinations of surface and mantle processes. The differences among the structures and evolutions of mountain belts arise for several reasons, such as different strengths of materials, different amounts of regional isostatic compensation, and different mechanisms by which forces are applied to the convergence plates. All these possible controlling factors can change with space and time. Of all the mountain belts and orogenic plateaus, the most striking example is the India-Asia collision zone, which gave rise to the Himalayas and the Tibetan Plateau, the largest region of elevated topography and anomalously thick crust on Earth. Understanding the formation and evolution of such a highly elevated region has been the focus of many tectonic and numerical models. While some of these models (i.e. thin sheet model) have successfully illustrated some of the basic physics of continental collision, none can simultaneously represent active processes such as subduction, underthrusting, channel flow or extrusion, for which fully 3D models are required. Here, we employed the 3D code LaMEM to investigate the role that subduction, continental collision and indentation play on lithosphere dynamics at convergent margins, and the implications they have for the Asian tectonics. Our model setup resembles a simplified tectonic map of the India-Asia collision zone and we performed long-term 3D simulations to analyse the dynamics and the conditions under which large topographic plateaus, such as the Tibetan Plateau can form in an integrated lithospheric and upper-mantle scale model. Results of models with linear viscous rheologies show different modes between the oceanic subduction side (continuous subduction, trench retreat and slab roll-back) and the

  18. It Takes Two to Tango: The Timing of the India -Eurasia Collision and the Origin of the Super-Fast India-Eurasia Convergence Rates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jagoutz, O. E.; Royden, L.; Holt, A.; Becker, T. W.

    2014-12-01

    The pre-collisional convergence history of India and Eurasia displays highly variable convergence rates, including anomalously high rates of ~120-180 mm/a between ~70 and 50 Ma. As the subduction zone forces play a key role in driving plate tectonic understanding the subduction zone configuration in the Tethyan ocean is essential to understand the observed variation in convergence rates. It has long been established that two subduction systems existed between India and Eurasia since the break up of Gondwana: An intra oceanic subduction system (in the equatorial part of the ocean) and a continental subduction system on the southern Eurasian margin. As relicts of both subduction systems are now incorporated in the Himalayan and Tibetan collision zone, reconstruction of the pre-collisional geometry and the timing of the collision between India and the different subduction system is challenging. However, in recent years it has become increasingly more obvious that India likely originally collided with the intra oceanic subduction system first and only subsequently with the Eurasia margin (e.g., Aitchison et al., 2007 JGR, Bouilhol et al, 2013 EPSL). In this presentation, we summarize the geological evidence that allows us to reconstruct the configuration of the subduction system in the Tehtyan ocean and the timing of the India-Arc and India Eurasia collision. These constraints guide 3D subduction zone models that are used to evaluate the role of two subduction zones for the variable India-Eurasia Convergence rates. Model convergence rates of up to 140 mm/yr are in agreement with observed rates from 120 Ma to present, except for a short-lived spike in rate at ~62-66 Ma, which may be attributed to the Reunion plume. The end of anomalously fast convergence is due to the entry of buoyant Indian continental lithosphere into this intra-oceanic subduction zone at 50 Ma and not to the collision of India with Eurasia, which had little effect before 40 Ma.

  19. Parapapillary atrophy: histological gamma zone and delta zone.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jost B Jonas

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: To examine histomorphometrically the parapapillary region in human eyes. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The histomorphometric study included 65 human globes (axial length:21-37 mm. On anterior-posterior histological sections, we measured the distance Bruch's membrane end (BME-optic nerve margin ("Gamma zone", BME-retinal pigment epithelium (RPE ("Beta zone", BME-beginning of non-occluded choriocapillaris, and BME-beginning of photoreceptor layer. "Delta zone" was defined as part of gamma zone in which blood vessels of at least 50 µm diameter were not present over a length of >300 µm. Beta zone (mean length:0.35±0.52 mm was significantly (P = 0.01 larger in the glaucoma group than in the non-glaucomatous group. It was not significantly (P = 0.28 associated with axial length. Beta zone was significantly (P = 0.004 larger than the region with occluded choriocapillaris. Gamma zone (mean length:0.63±1.25 mm was associated with axial length (P50 µm diameter within gamma zone was present only in highly axially elongated globes and was not related with glaucoma. Beta zone (Bruch's membrane without RPE was correlated with glaucoma but not with globe elongation. Since the region with occluded choriocapillaris was smaller than beta zone, complete loss of RPE may have occurred before complete choriocapillaris closure.

  20. Active Collision Avoidance for Planetary Landers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rickman, Doug; Hannan, Mike; Srinivasan, Karthik

    2014-01-01

    Present day robotic missions to other planets require precise, a priori knowledge of the terrain to pre-determine a landing spot that is safe. Landing sites can be miles from the mission objective, or, mission objectives may be tailored to suit landing sites. Future robotic exploration missions should be capable of autonomously identifying a safe landing target within a specified target area selected by mission requirements. Such autonomous landing sites must (1) 'see' the surface, (2) identify a target, and (3) land the vehicle. Recent advances in radar technology have resulted in small, lightweight, low power radars that are used for collision avoidance and cruise control systems in automobiles. Such radar systems can be adapted for use as active hazard avoidance systems for planetary landers. The focus of this CIF proposal is to leverage earlier work on collision avoidance systems for MSFC's Mighty Eagle lander and evaluate the use of automotive radar systems for collision avoidance in planetary landers.

  1. Application of hydrodynamics to heavy ion collisions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Felsberger, Lukas

    2014-12-02

    The Bjorken model is a simple tool for making rough predictions of the hydrodynamic evolution of the thermalized matter created in a heavy ion collision. The advantage of the model clearly lies in its simplicity, rather than accuracy. As it is still used for making rough estimations 'by hand', in this thesis, I investigate in which cases the Bjorken model gives useful results and in which it is not recommended. For central collisions, I show which critical size the nuclei should have so that the Bjorken model can be applied. For non-central collisions, I demonstrate that using Glauber initial conditions combined with the Bjorken evolution, leads to reasonable results up to large impact parameters. Finally, I study the case of a non-ideal (viscous) description of the thermalized matter which leads to strongly differing results if first- or second-order hydrodynamics is applied.

  2. Physics of Ultra-Peripheral Nuclear Collisions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bertulani, Carlos A.; Klein, Spencer R.; Nystrand, Joakim

    2005-02-02

    Moving highly-charged ions carry strong electromagnetic fields which act as a field of photons. In collisions at large impact parameters, hadronic interactions are not possible, and the ions interact through photon-ion and photon-photon collisions known as ultra-peripheral collisions (UPC). Hadron colliders like the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC), the Tevatron and the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) produce photonuclear and two-photon interactions at luminosities and energies beyond that accessible elsewhere; the LHC will reach a {gamma}p energy ten times that of the Hadron-Electron Ring Accelerator (HERA). Reactions as diverse as the production of anti-hydrogen, photoproduction of the {rho}{sup 0}, transmutation of lead into bismuth and excitation of collective nuclear resonances have already been studied. At the LHC, UPCs can study many types of ''new physics''.

  3. The asteroids as outcomes of catastrophic collisions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farinella, P. (Osservatorio Astronomico di Brera, Merate, Italy); Paolicchi, P.

    1982-12-01

    The role of catastrophic collisions in the evoloution of the asteroids is discussed in detail, employing extrapolations of experimental results on the outcome of high velocity-impacts. The probability of impacts with a given projectile-to-target mass ratio for asteroids of different sizes is derived, taking into account different mass distributions of the asteroid population at the beginning of the collision process. The extrapolations show that collisional breakup against solid-state cohesions must be a widespread process for asteroids. The influence of self-gravitation and transfer of angular momentum during collision is shown to depend strongly on the traget size, resulting in a variety of possible outcomes in the intermediate size range. Comparason of the theoretical results with observations of asteroid rotations and shapes yields favorable results.

  4. Smartphones and Time Zones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baird, William; Secrest, Jeffery; Padgett, Clifford; Johnson, Wayne; Hagrelius, Claire

    2016-09-01

    Using the Sun to tell time is an ancient idea, but we can take advantage of modern technology to bring it into the 21st century for students in astronomy, physics, or physical science classes. We have employed smartphones, Google Earth, and 3D printing to find the moment of local noon at two widely separated locations. By reviewing GPS time-stamped photos from each place, we are able to illustrate that local noon is longitude-dependent and therefore explain the need for time zones.

  5. Early Hydrodynamic Evolution of a Stellar Collision

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kushnir, Doron; Katz, Boaz

    2014-04-01

    The early phase of the hydrodynamic evolution following the collision of two stars is analyzed. Two strong shocks propagate from the contact surface and move toward the center of each star at a velocity that is a small fraction of the velocity of the approaching stars. The shocked region near the contact surface has a planar symmetry and a uniform pressure. The density vanishes at the (Lagrangian) surface of contact, and the speed of sound diverges there. The temperature, however, reaches a finite value, since as the density vanishes, the finite pressure is radiation dominated. For carbon-oxygen white dwarf (CO WD) collisions, this temperature is too low for any appreciable nuclear burning shortly after the collision, which allows for a significant fraction of the mass to be highly compressed to the density required for efficient 56Ni production in the detonation wave that follows. This property is crucial for the viability of collisions of typical CO WD as progenitors of type Ia supernovae, since otherwise only massive (>0.9 M ⊙) CO WDs would have led to such explosions (as required by all other progenitor models). The divergence of the speed of sound limits numerical studies of stellar collisions, as it makes convergence tests exceedingly expensive unless dedicated schemes are used. We provide a new one-dimensional Lagrangian numerical scheme to achieve this. A self-similar planar solution is derived for zero-impact parameter collisions between two identical stars, under some simplifying assumptions (including a power-law density profile), which is the planar version of previous piston problems that were studied in cylindrical and spherical symmetries.

  6. Population of metastable ionic states in electron-capture collisions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seim, W.; Mueller, A.; Salzborn, E.

    1981-07-01

    The population of metastable states of singly and doubly charged rare-gas ions created by electron capture in keV ion-atom collisions is investigated by means of a subsequent electron stripping or capture collision.

  7. Multiobjective Optimization Based Vessel Collision Avoidance Strategy Optimization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qingyang Xu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The vessel collision accidents cause a great loss of lives and property. In order to reduce the human fault and greatly improve the safety of marine traffic, collision avoidance strategy optimization is proposed to achieve this. In the paper, a multiobjective optimization algorithm NSGA-II is adopted to search for the optimal collision avoidance strategy considering the safety as well as economy elements of collision avoidance. Ship domain and Arena are used to evaluate the collision risk in the simulation. Based on the optimization, an optimal rudder angle is recommended to navigator for collision avoidance. In the simulation example, a crossing encounter situation is simulated, and the NSGA-II searches for the optimal collision avoidance operation under the Convention on the International Regulations for Preventing Collisions at Sea (COLREGS. The simulation studies exhibit the validity of the method.

  8. Applied atomic and collision physics special topics

    CERN Document Server

    Massey, H S W; Bederson, Benjamin

    1982-01-01

    Applied Atomic Collision Physics, Volume 5: Special Topics deals with topics on applications of atomic collisions that were not covered in the first four volumes of the treatise. The book opens with a chapter on ultrasensitive chemical detectors. This is followed by separate chapters on lighting, magnetohydrodynamic electrical power generation, gas breakdown and high voltage insulating gases, thermionic energy converters, and charged particle detectors. Subsequent chapters deal with the operation of multiwire drift and proportional chambers and streamer chambers and their use in high energy p

  9. Electron acceleration during streamer collisions in air

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Köhn, Christoph; Chanrion, Olivier; Neubert, Torsten

    2017-01-01

    during collisions of negative and a positive streamers. To explore this process, we have conducted the first self-consistent particle simulations of streamer encounters. Our simulation model is a 2-D, cylindrically symmetric, particle-in-cell code tracing the electron dynamics and solving the space...... charge fields, with a Monte Carlo scheme accounting for collisions and ionization. We present the electron density, the electric field, and the velocity distribution as functions of space and time. Assuming a background electric field 1.5 times the breakdown field, we find that the electron density...

  10. Holographic collisions in non-conformal theories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Attems, Maximilian; Casalderrey-Solana, Jorge; Mateos, David; Santos-Oliván, Daniel; Sopuerta, Carlos F.; Triana, Miquel; Zilhão, Miguel

    2017-01-01

    We numerically simulate gravitational shock wave collisions in a holographic model dual to a non-conformal four-dimensional gauge theory. We find two novel effects associated to the non-zero bulk viscosity of the resulting plasma. First, the hydrodynamization time increases. Second, if the bulk viscosity is large enough then the plasma becomes well described by hydrodynamics before the energy density and the average pressure begin to obey the equilibrium equation of state. We discuss implications for the quark-gluon plasma created in heavy ion collision experiments.

  11. Spatial Analysis Methods of Road Traffic Collisions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Loo, Becky P. Y.; Anderson, Tessa Kate

    Spatial Analysis Methods of Road Traffic Collisions centers on the geographical nature of road crashes, and uses spatial methods to provide a greater understanding of the patterns and processes that cause them. Written by internationally known experts in the field of transport geography, the book...... outlines the key issues in identifying hazardous road locations (HRLs), considers current approaches used for reducing and preventing road traffic collisions, and outlines a strategy for improved road safety. The book covers spatial accuracy, validation, and other statistical issues, as well as link...

  12. Guide to the collision avoidance rules

    CERN Document Server

    Cockcroft, A N

    2004-01-01

    A Guide to the Collision Avoidance Rules is the essential reference to the safe operation of all vessels at sea. Published continuously since 1965, this respected and expert guide is the classic text for all who need to, practically and legally, understand and comply with the Rules. This sixth edition incorporates all of the amendments to the International Regulations for Preventing Collisions at Sea which came into force in November 2003.The books sets out all of the Rules with clear explanation of their meaning, and gives detailed examples of how the rules have been used in practice

  13. Intelligent Sensor Tasking for Space Collision Mitigation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Olivier, S S; Pertica, A J; Henderson, J R

    2010-04-01

    Orbital collisions pose a hazard to space operations. Using a high performance computer modeling and simulation environment for space situational awareness, we explore a new paradigm for improving satellite conjunction analysis by obtaining more precise orbital information only for those objects that pose a collision risk greater than a defined threshold to a specific set of satellites during a specified time interval. In particular, we assess the improvement in the quality of the conjunction analysis that can be achieved using a distributed network of ground-based telescopes.

  14. Plasmas applied atomic collision physics, v.2

    CERN Document Server

    Barnett, C F

    1984-01-01

    Applied Atomic Collision Physics, Volume 2: Plasmas covers topics on magnetically confined plasmas. The book starts by providing the history of fusion research and describing the various approaches in both magnetically and inertially confined plasmas. The text then gives a general discussion of the basic concepts and properties in confinement and heating of a plasma. The theory of atomic collisions that result in excited quantum states, particularly highly ionized impurity atoms; and diverse diagnostic topics such as emission spectra, laser scattering, electron cyclotron emission, particle bea

  15. High energy particle collisions near black holes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaslavskii, O. B.

    2016-10-01

    If two geodesic particles collide near a rotating black hole, their energy in the centre of mass frame Ec.m. can become unbound under certain conditions (the so-called BSW effect). The special role is played here by so-called critical geodesics when one of particles has fine-tuned energy and angular momentum. The nature of geodesics reveals itself also in fate of the debris after collisions. One of particles moving to a remote observer is necessarily near-critical. We discuss, when such a collision can give rise not only unboud Ec.m. but also unbound Killing energy E (so-called super-Penrose process).

  16. [Current approach to zoning atomic shipbuilding plants].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blekher, A Ia

    2005-01-01

    The paper discusses the currently introduced radiation-and-hygienic system for zoning atomic shipbuilding plants, in accordance with which three radiation-and-hygienic zones (a strict regime zone, a controlled approach zone, and a free regime zone) are established at the plant site and two zones (a sanitary-and-protective zone and a follow-up zone) are also established outside the plant site.

  17. The Near Zone to Far Zone Transformation (N2F)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blackfield, Donald T. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Poole, Brian R. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2016-03-11

    N2F is a C/C++ code used to calculate the far zone electromagnetic (EM) field, given E and H near zone field data. The method used by N2F can be found in Ref. 1 and 2. N2F determines the far field EΦ and Eθ in spherical coordinates for near zone data calculated in either Cartesian or Cylindrical geometry.

  18. Empowerment Zones and Enterprise Districts - Volusia County Enterprise Zones

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC Local Govt | GIS Inventory — Florida's Enterprise Zone Program encourages economic growth and investment in distressed areas by offering tax advantages and incentives to businesses that are...

  19. A Control of Collision and Deadlock Avoidance for Automated Guided Vehicles with a Fault-Tolerance Capability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qin Li

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Based on a novel discrete-event zone-control model, in our previous papers [1, 2], we presented a time-efficient traffic control for automated guided vehicle (AGV systems to exclude inter-vehicle collisions and system deadlocks, together with a case study on container terminals. The traffic control allows each vehicle in an AGV system to freely choose its routes for any finite sequence of zone-to-zone transportation tasks and the routes can be constructed in an online fashion. In this paper, we extended our previous results with two practical goals: (1 to increase the utilization of the workspace area by reducing the minimally allowed area of each zone; (2 to avoid vehicle collisions and deadlocks with the occurrence of vehicle breakdowns. To achieve the first goal, we include one extra vehicle event that allows each vehicle to probe further ahead while it is moving on the guide-path. This leads to an extension of our previous discrete-event model and traffic control rules, which are presented in the first part of the paper. The second part of the paper concerns the second goal, for which an emergency traffic control scheme is designed as supplementary to the normal traffic control rules. As in our previous papers, the improved model and traffic control are applied to a simulation of quayside container transshipment at container terminals; our simulation results are compared with those from two interesting works in the literature.

  20. Land use and traffic collisions: A link-attribute analysis using Empirical Bayes method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Bruce Zi; Loo, Becky P Y

    2016-10-01

    Road traffic collisions represent one of the major public health problems among the leading causes of deaths globally. This paper examines several approaches in detecting hazardous road locations, and discusses the spatial distribution of these locations as well as their relationships with different land uses in Hong Kong. Two most commonly used methodologies in detecting hazardous road locations are used: the hot spot and hot zone methodologies. Both methodologies are performed using raw collision count, excess collision count and Empirical Bayes (EB) estimations. The EB estimation uses land use characteristics near the road network in defining the reference groups. Finally all the approaches are compared by a test to assess their stability. The results show that for different hazardous road location detection methodologies, the best fit estimation methods on sites are different. The results confirm some land use impacts in previous studies, and suggest some further patterns on road safety. The findings are useful in understanding the complex interrelationships between land use and road safety, and in facilitating planners and policy makers to build safer cities. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Smart Collision Avoidance and Hazard Routing Mechanism for Intelligent Transport Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Gurpreet; Gupta, Pooja; Wahab, Mohd Helmy Abd

    2017-08-01

    The smart vehicular ad-hoc network is the network that consists of vehicles for smooth movement and better management of the vehicular connectivity across the given network. This research paper aims to propose a set of solution for the VANETs consisting of the automatic driven vehicles, also called as the autonomous car. Such vehicular networks are always prone to collision due to the natural or un-natural reasons which must be solved before the large-scale deployment of the autonomous transport systems. The newly designed intelligent transport movement control mechanism is based upon the intelligent data propagation along with the vehicle collision and traffic jam prevention schema [8], which may help the future designs of smart cities to become more robust and less error-prone. In the proposed model, the focus is on designing a new dynamic and robust hazard routing protocol for intelligent vehicular networks for improvement of the overall performance in various aspects. It is expected to improve the overall transmission delay as well as the number of collisions or adversaries across the vehicular network zone.

  2. 3D numerical modeling of India-Asia-like collision

    Science.gov (United States)

    -Erika Püsök, Adina; Kaus, Boris; Popov, Anton

    2013-04-01

    One of the most striking features of plate tectonics and lithospheric deformation is the India-Asia collision zone, which formed when the Indian continent collided with Eurasia, around 50 million years ago. The rise of the abnormally thick Tibetan plateau, the deformation at its Eastern and Western syntaxes, the transition from subduction to collision and uplift and the interaction of tectonics and climate are processes not fully understood. Though various geophysical methods have been employed to shed light on the present structure of the Indian-Asian lithosphere, the driving mechanisms that uplifted the Tibetan plateau remain highly controversial and different hypotheses imply contradictory scenarios. Models for double crustal thickness include: wholescale underthrusting of Indian lithospheric mantle under Tibet (Argand model), distributed homogeneous shortening or the thin-sheet model (England and Houseman, 1986), slip-line field model to also explain extrusion of Eastern side of Tibet away from Indian indentor (Tapponier and Molnar, 1976) or lower crustal flow models for the exhumation of the Himalayan units and lateral spreading of the Tibetan plateau (Royden et al., 1998, Beaumont et al., 2004). The thin-sheet model has emerged as a more successful (or at least more widely used) model, but one of its major shortcomings is that it cannot simultaneously represent channel flow and gravitational collapse of the mantle lithosphere (Lechmann et al., 2011), since these mechanisms require the lithosphere to interact with the underlying mantle, or to have a vertically non-homogeneous rheology. Of those who favour a layered structure of the lithosphere beneath Tibet, some attribute the lack of substantial seismicity underneath the Moho as evidence that all the strength of the lithosphere resides in the upper crust and the mantle is weak - the crème brulée model (Jackson, 2002), while others point out that some processes can be well explained if the crust resides

  3. Probability of Grounding and Collision Events

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Preben Terndrup

    1996-01-01

    To quantify the risks involved in ship traffic, rational criteria for collision and grounding accidents have to be developed. This implies that probabilities as well as inherent consequences have to be analyzed and assessed.The present notes outline a method for evaluation of the probability...

  4. Probability of Grounding and Collision Events

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Preben Terndrup

    1996-01-01

    To quantify the risks involved in ship traffic, rational criteria for collision and grounding accidents are developed. This implies that probabilities as well as inherent consequences can be analysed and assessed. The presnt paper outlines a method for evaluation of the probability of ship...

  5. Vector boson production in hadron nuclear collisions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Walker, W.D. (Duke Univ., Durham, NC (USA)); Whitmore, J. (Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (USA). Lab. for Elementary Particle Science); Toothacker, W.S. (Pennsylvania State Univ., Mont Alto (USA)); Hill, J.C.; Neale, W.W. (Cambridge Univ. (UK)); Lucas, P.; Voyvodic, L. (Fermi National Accelerator Lab., Batavia, IL (USA)); Ammar, R.; Gress, J. (Kansas Univ., Lawrence (USA)); Bishop, J.M.; Biswas, N.N.; Cason, N.M.; Mattingly, M.C.K.; Ruchti, R.C.; Shephard, W.D. (Notre Dame Univ., IN (USA))

    1991-01-31

    We report a search for the production of light quark vector bosons in hadron-nucleus collisions at 100 GeV bombarding energy. We find surprisingly few of these resonances produced. The lack of these particles is though to be due to the absorption by the many modestly energetic nucleons and the few anti-nucleons in the final state. (orig.).

  6. Collision and Grounding, Committee V.3

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Paik, J.K.; Amdahl, J.; Barltrop, N.

    2003-01-01

    Concern for structural arrangements on ships and floating structures with regard to their integrity and adequacy in the events of collisions and grounding, taking into account the probabilistic and physical nature of such accidents. Consideration shall be given to the effectiveness of structural ...

  7. High energy nuclear collisions: Theory overview

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The Universe a few microseconds after the Big Bang was filled with a hot and dense phase of matter. We believe that quarks and gluons at those temperatures, above. 1012 K, were deconfined and existed as a quark gluon plasma (QGP). These ideas can be tested in collisions of nuclei at ultra-relativistic energies.

  8. Heavy quark production in pp collisions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McGaughey, P.L. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Quack, E. [Gesellschaft fuer Schwerionenforschung, Darmstadt (Germany); Ruuskanen, P.V. [Univ. of Helsinki (Finland)]|[Univ. of Jyvaeskylae (Finland)] [and others

    1995-07-01

    A systematic study of the inclusive single heavy quark and heavy-quark pair production cross sections in pp collisions is presented for RHIC and LHC energies. We compare with existing data when possible. The dependence of the rates on the renormalization and factorization scales is discussed. Predictions of the cross sections are given for two different sets of parton distribution functions.

  9. Global Lambda hyperon polarization in nuclear collisions

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Adamczyk, L.; Adkins, J. K.; Agakishiev, G.; Bielčík, J.; Bielčíková, Jana; Chaloupka, P.; Federič, Pavol; Federičová, P.; Harlenderová, A.; Kocmánek, Martin; Kvapil, J.; Lidrych, J.; Rusňák, Jan; Rusňáková, O.; Šaur, Miroslav; Šimko, Miroslav; Šumbera, Michal; Trzeciak, B. A.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 548, č. 7665 (2017), č. článku 23004. ISSN 0028-0836 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LG15001; GA MŠk LM2015054 Institutional support: RVO:61389005 Keywords : STAR collaboration * heavy ion collisions * vorticity Subject RIV: BG - Nuclear, Atomic and Molecular Physics, Colliders Impact factor: 40.137, year: 2016

  10. Electron-Atom Collisions in Gases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraftmakher, Yaakov

    2013-01-01

    Electron-atom collisions in gases are an aspect of atomic physics. Three experiments in this field employing a thyratron are described: (i) the Ramsauer-Townsend effect, (ii) the excitation and ionization potentials of xenon and (iii) the ion-electron recombination after interrupting the electric discharge.

  11. The way to collisions, step by step

    CERN Multimedia

    2009-01-01

    While the LHC sectors cool down and reach the cryogenic operating temperature, spirits are warming up as we all eagerly await the first collisions. No reason to hurry, though. Making particles collide involves the complex manoeuvring of thousands of delicate components. The experts will make it happen using a step-by-step approach.

  12. Rear end collision: Causes and avoidance techniques

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nekovee, Maziar; Bie, Jing; Naja, Rola

    2013-01-01

    Rear-end collision is one of the most frequent accidents occurring on roadways. This chapter investigates how vehicle’s local parameters in a platoon of cars (i.e., perception and information collection, vehicle speed, safe distance, braking parameters) affect the global behavior of the traffic

  13. Radio Frequency Electromagnetic Radiation From Streamer Collisions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luque, Alejandro

    2017-10-16

    We present a full electromagnetic model of streamer propagation where the Maxwell equations are solved self-consistently together with electron transport and reactions including photoionization. We apply this model to the collision of counter-propagating streamers in gaps tens of centimeters wide and with large potential differences of hundreds of kilovolts. Our results show that streamer collisions emit electromagnetic pulses that, at atmospheric pressure, dominate the radio frequency spectrum of an extended corona in the range from about 100 MHz to a few gigahertz. We also investigate the fast penetration, after a collision, of electromagnetic fields into the streamer heads and show that these fields are capable of accelerating electrons up to about 100 keV. By substantiating the link between X-rays and high-frequency radio emissions and by describing a mechanism for the early acceleration of runaway electrons, our results support the hypothesis that streamer collisions are essential precursors of high-energy processes in electric discharges.

  14. QCD and the physics of hadronic collisions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mangano, Michelangelo L [Theory Group, PH Department, CERN, Geneva (Switzerland)

    2010-05-11

    We review the basic principles underlying the use of quantum chromodynamics in understanding the structure of high-Q{sup 2} processes in high-energy hadronic collisions. Several applications relevant to the Tevatron and the LHC are illustrated. (reviews of topical problems)

  15. QCD in hadron-hadron collisions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Albrow, M.

    1997-03-01

    Quantum Chromodynamics provides a good description of many aspects of high energy hadron-hadron collisions, and this will be described, along with some aspects that are not yet understood in QCD. Topics include high E{sub T} jet production, direct photon, W, Z and heavy flavor production, rapidity gaps and hard diffraction.

  16. Radio Frequency Electromagnetic Radiation From Streamer Collisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luque, Alejandro

    2017-10-01

    We present a full electromagnetic model of streamer propagation where the Maxwell equations are solved self-consistently together with electron transport and reactions including photoionization. We apply this model to the collision of counter-propagating streamers in gaps tens of centimeters wide and with large potential differences of hundreds of kilovolts. Our results show that streamer collisions emit electromagnetic pulses that, at atmospheric pressure, dominate the radio frequency spectrum of an extended corona in the range from about 100 MHz to a few gigahertz. We also investigate the fast penetration, after a collision, of electromagnetic fields into the streamer heads and show that these fields are capable of accelerating electrons up to about 100 keV. By substantiating the link between X-rays and high-frequency radio emissions and by describing a mechanism for the early acceleration of runaway electrons, our results support the hypothesis that streamer collisions are essential precursors of high-energy processes in electric discharges.

  17. Efficient Collision Detection in a Simulated Hydrocyclone

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Eijkeren, D.F.; Krebs, T.; Hoeijmakers, Hendrik Willem Marie

    2015-01-01

    Hydrocyclones enhance oil–water separation efficiency compared to conventional separation methods. An efficient collision detection scheme with Np ln Np dependency on the number of particles is proposed. The scheme is developed to investigate the importance of particle–particle interaction for flow

  18. Dynamics of Droplet Collision and Flamefront Motion

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Law, Chung K

    2005-01-01

    ... of air bubbles entrained upon coalescence of the colliding droplets. (3) The dynamics of droplet-film collision, especially on the influence of the film thickness in effecting droplet bouncing versus absorption. (4) The dynamics of flame motion when it is subjected to the combined hydrodynamic and body-force instabilities and freestream vortical motion.

  19. 'Collision contest' draws in artists and physicists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banks, Michael

    2013-11-01

    Three winners have bagged the 2013 "collision contest" run by the Australia Research Council's Centre of Excellence for Particle Physics at the Terascale. More than 20 artists from around the world - together with a few physicists - entered the competition in which artists were asked to depict "new physics" and could choose any medium such as a painting or video for their artwork.

  20. The evolution of runaway stellar collision products

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Glebbeek, E.; Gaburov, E.; de Mink, S.E.; Pols, O.R.; Portegies Zwart, S.F.

    2009-01-01

    In the cores of young dense star clusters, repeated stellar collisions involving the same object can occur. It has been suggested that this leads to the formation of an intermediate-mass black hole. To verify this scenario we compute the detailed evolution of the merger remnant of three sequences,

  1. Fan Affinity Laws from a Collision Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharjee, Shayak

    2012-01-01

    The performance of a fan is usually estimated using hydrodynamical considerations. The calculations are long and involved and the results are expressed in terms of three affinity laws. In this paper we use kinetic theory to attack this problem. A hard sphere collision model is used, and subsequently a correction to account for the flow behaviour…

  2. Quarkonium production in heavy-ion collisions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arnaldi Roberta

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The production of quarkonium states plays a crucial role among the probes to investigate the formation of the plasma of quarks and gluons (QGP in heavy-ion collisions. A review of the charmonium and bottomonium production, mainly focussing on the latest results from the LHC experiments, is presented.

  3. GRACAT, Software for grounding and collision analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Friis-Hansen, Peter; Simonsen, Bo Cerup

    2002-01-01

    From 1998 to 2001 an integrated software package for grounding and collision analysis was developed at the Technical University of Denmark within the ISESO project at the cost of six man years (0.75M US$). The software provides a toolbox for a multitude of analyses related to collision and ground......From 1998 to 2001 an integrated software package for grounding and collision analysis was developed at the Technical University of Denmark within the ISESO project at the cost of six man years (0.75M US$). The software provides a toolbox for a multitude of analyses related to collision...... and grounding accidents. The software consists of three basic analysis modules and one risk mitigation module: 1) frequency, 2) damage, and 3) consequence. These modules can be used individually or in series and the analyses can be performed in deterministic or probabilistic mode. Finally, in the mitigation...... route where the result is the probability density functions for the cost of oil outflow in a given area per year for the two vessels. In this paper we describe the basic modelling principles and the capabilities of the software package. The software package can be downloaded for research purposes from...

  4. LHC Report: LHC smashes collision records

    CERN Multimedia

    Sarah Charley

    2016-01-01

    The Large Hadron Collider is now producing more than a billion proton-proton collisions per second.   The LHC is colliding protons at a faster rate than ever before: approximately 1 billion times per second. Since April 2016, the LHC has delivered more than 30 inverse femtobarns (fb-1) to both ATLAS and CMS. This means that around 2.4 quadrillion (2.4 million billion) collisions have been seen by each of the experiments this year. The inverse femtobarn is the unit of measurement for integrated luminosity, indicating the cumulative number of potential collisions. This compares with the total of 33.2 fb-1 produced between 2010 and 2015. The unprecedented performance this year is the result of both the incremental increases in collision rate and the sheer amount of time the LHC has been up and running. This comes after a slow start-up in 2015, when scientists and engineers still needed to learn how to operate the machine at a much higher energy. “With more energy, the machine is much more sen...

  5. Conservative discretization of the Landau collision integral

    CERN Document Server

    Hirvijoki, Eero

    2016-01-01

    We describe a density, momentum, and energy conserving discretization of the nonlinear Landau collision integral. Our algorithm is suitable for both the finite-element and discontinuous Galerkin methods and does not require structured meshes. The conservation laws for the discretization are proven algebraically and demonstrated numerically for an axially symmetric nonlinear relaxation problem.

  6. High energy nuclear collisions: Theory overview

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    We review some basic concepts of relativistic heavy-ion physics and discuss our understanding of some key results from the experimental program at the relativistic heavy-ion collider (RHIC). We focus in particular on the early time dynamics of nuclear collisions, some result from lattice QCD, hard probes and photons.

  7. Navigating ECA-Zones

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Carsten Ørts; Grønsedt, Peter; Hendriksen, Christian

    is the substantial impact of the current and future oil price on the optimal compliance strategies ship-owners choose when complying with the new air emission requirements for vessels. The oil price determines the attractiveness of investing in asset modification for compliance, given the capital investment required....... Operating on low-Sulphur fuels remains favourable with a low oil price, as the price spread between high- and low-Sulphur does not outweigh the price of asset investments. Ship-owners who are contemplating future compliance strategies should monitor the developments of the global oil price, and consider how......This report examines the effect that ECA-zone regulation has on the optimal vessel fuel strategies for compliance. The findings of this report are trifold, and this report is coupled with a calculation tool which is released to assist ship-owners in the ECA decision making. The first key insight...

  8. Saturated Zone Colloid Transport

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    H. S. Viswanathan

    2004-10-07

    This scientific analysis provides retardation factors for colloids transporting in the saturated zone (SZ) and the unsaturated zone (UZ). These retardation factors represent the reversible chemical and physical filtration of colloids in the SZ. The value of the colloid retardation factor, R{sub col} is dependent on several factors, such as colloid size, colloid type, and geochemical conditions (e.g., pH, Eh, and ionic strength). These factors are folded into the distributions of R{sub col} that have been developed from field and experimental data collected under varying geochemical conditions with different colloid types and sizes. Attachment rate constants, k{sub att}, and detachment rate constants, k{sub det}, of colloids to the fracture surface have been measured for the fractured volcanics, and separate R{sub col} uncertainty distributions have been developed for attachment and detachment to clastic material and mineral grains in the alluvium. Radionuclides such as plutonium and americium sorb mostly (90 to 99 percent) irreversibly to colloids (BSC 2004 [DIRS 170025], Section 6.3.3.2). The colloid retardation factors developed in this analysis are needed to simulate the transport of radionuclides that are irreversibly sorbed onto colloids; this transport is discussed in the model report ''Site-Scale Saturated Zone Transport'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 170036]). Although it is not exclusive to any particular radionuclide release scenario, this scientific analysis especially addresses those scenarios pertaining to evidence from waste-degradation experiments, which indicate that plutonium and americium may be irreversibly attached to colloids for the time scales of interest. A section of this report will also discuss the validity of using microspheres as analogs to colloids in some of the lab and field experiments used to obtain the colloid retardation factors. In addition, a small fraction of colloids travels with the groundwater without any significant

  9. Work Zone Data Collection Trailer

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Work Zone Data Collection Trailer was designed and constructed to enhance data collection and analysis capabilities for the "Evaluating Roadway Construction Work...

  10. Seismic Tomography of the Arabian-Eurasian Collision Zone and Surrounding Areas

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-20

    Black Sea, Caspian Sea, Arabian Gulf and Amu-Darya Basin , Tarim basin and Indian plain. In general, these mountains not only consist of many subplates...velocities exist in the Afghan Accreted Terranes and Hindu Kush. Central Tibet also has low velocity between two high velocity regions under Tarim basin ...under central Tibet between high Sn velocity regions under the Tarim basin and Indian Plate. This study shows more detailed structure in the Indian

  11. Numerical Investigation of Binary Droplet Collisions in All Relevant Collision Regimes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xing Gang Li

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available A numerical investigation of binary droplet collisions in a gaseous phase has been conducted. A volume of fluid (VOF based interface capturing method, which is characterized by introducing an extra artificial compression term into the volume-fraction transport equation, is employed to capture the liquid-gas interface. The full Navier-Stokes equations coupled with the volume-fraction transport equation are discretized on a fixed, uniform grid using the finite volume method. The solution of the volume-fraction transport equation is bounded by an explicit universal multidimensional limiter. The simulations cover five major regimes of binary droplet collisions: (I coalescence with minor deformation, (II bouncing, (III coalescence with major deformation, (IV reflexive separation and (V stretching separation. A ghost cell method is introduced in order to simulate bouncing and retarded coalescence in head-on collisions. Especially, for retarded coalescence collisions, the volume-fraction boundary condition on the symmetry plane is switched to numerically control coalescence at a critical time which is determined by tracking the interface front. The simulated results are compared with the attainable experimental data and provide detailed pictures exhibiting the droplet collision processes. The inter-droplet pressure, defined by the static pressure on the symmetry plane in head-on collisions, is also evaluated and analyzed.

  12. Collisions damage assessment of ships and jack-up rigs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Shengming; Pedersen, P. Terndrup; Ocakli, Hasan

    2015-01-01

    Ship collision with offshore installations is one of the key concerns in design and assess of platforms performance and safety. This paper presents an analysis on collision energy and structural damage in ship and offshore platform collisions for various collision scenarios. The platform or rig...... is treated as either rigid or flexible and its sensitivity on collision energy and structural damage is studied. An application example where an ice-strengthened supply vessel collides against a jack-up rig is analysed and the crushing resistance of the involved thin-walled structures is evaluated....

  13. Coastal river plumes: Collisions and coalescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warrick, Jonathan A.; Farnsworth, Katherine L.

    2017-02-01

    Plumes of buoyant river water spread in the ocean from river mouths, and these plumes influence water quality, sediment dispersal, primary productivity, and circulation along the world's coasts. Most investigations of river plumes have focused on large rivers in a coastal region, for which the physical spreading of the plume is assumed to be independent from the influence of other buoyant plumes. Here we provide new understanding of the spreading patterns of multiple plumes interacting along simplified coastal settings by investigating: (i) the relative likelihood of plume-to-plume interactions at different settings using geophysical scaling, (ii) the diversity of plume frontal collision types and the effects of these collisions on spreading patterns of plume waters using a two-dimensional hydrodynamic model, and (iii) the fundamental differences in plume spreading patterns between coasts with single and multiple rivers using a three-dimensional hydrodynamic model. Geophysical scaling suggests that coastal margins with numerous small rivers (watershed areas 100,000 km2). When two plume fronts meet, several types of collision attributes were found, including refection, subduction and occlusion. We found that the relative differences in pre-collision plume densities and thicknesses strongly influenced the resulting collision types. The three-dimensional spreading of buoyant plumes was found to be influenced by the presence of additional rivers for all modeled scenarios, including those with and without Coriolis and wind. Combined, these results suggest that plume-to-plume interactions are common phenomena for coastal regions offshore of the world's smaller rivers and for coastal settings with multiple river mouths in close proximity, and that the spreading and fate of river waters in these settings will be strongly influenced by these interactions. We conclude that new investigations are needed to characterize how plumes interact offshore of river mouths to better

  14. Atom trap loss, elastic collisions, and technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Booth, James

    2012-10-01

    The study of collisions and scattering has been one of the most productive approaches for modern physics, illuminating the fundamental structure of crystals, surfaces, atoms, and sub-atomic particles. In the field of cold atoms, this is no less true: studies of cold atom collisions were essential to the production of quantum degenerate matter, the formation of cold molecules, and so on. Over the past few years it has been my delight to investigate elastic collisions between cold atoms trapped in either a magneto-optical trap (MOT) or a magnetic trap with hot, background gas in the vacuum environment through the measurement of the loss of atoms from the trap. Motivated by the goal of creating cold atom-based technology, we are deciphering what the trapped atoms are communicating about their environment through the observed loss rate. These measurements have the advantages of being straightforward to implement and they provide information about the underlying, fundamental inter-atomic processes. In this talk I will present some of our recent work, including the observation of the trap depth dependence on loss rate for argon-rubidium collisions. The data follow the computed loss rate curve based on the long-range Van der Waals interaction between the two species. The implications of these findings are exciting: trap depths can be determined from the trap loss measurement under controlled background density conditions; observation of trap loss rate in comparison to models for elastic, inelastic, and chemical processes can lead to improved understanding and characterization of these fundamental interactions; finally the marriage of cold atoms with collision modeling offers the promise of creating a novel pressure sensor and pressure standard for the high and ultra-high vacuum regime.

  15. Fluid mechanics calculations in physics of droplets – IV: Head-on and off-center numerical collisions of unequal-size drops

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alejandro Acevedo-Malavé

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available In this study, the finite volume method is employed to simulate the coalescence collision between water drops immersed in a continuous phase (n-heptane. For that purpose, it is chosen a range of values for the velocity of collisions for the finite volume calculations may yield different possible outcomes of the collision process. It can be seen for head-on collisions that when the velocity of collision is 0.2 m/s and 3.5 m/s, the little drop induces the formation of a hole in the bigger drop, until the surface tension forces to restore the circular form of the resulting drop. For a velocity of collision of 16.0 m/s, the little drop deforms the bigger one, and the system is converted into a thin ligament with the evolution of the dynamics. In this case, a little mass of n-heptane is trapped between the two drops, but at the end of the dynamics it drains to the continuous phase. For off-center collisions, two different values for the velocity of collisions were chosen, and the drops exhibit a lot of waves on the droplets’ surface. The streamlines are calculated for the process of coalescence of drops. These streamlines allow the understanding of the dynamics of the droplets immersed on the n-heptane phase. The effect of the interfacial tension it is showed due to the oscillations that the droplet exhibits. When the coalescence has begun, the streamlines form circular patterns at the zone of contact between the drops which explain the increment of the thickness of the bridge structure of the fluid between the two drops. At the end of the dynamics, when the velocity is of 0.2 m/s, the bigger drop reaches a circular form approximately, but when the velocity is of 3.5 m/s the drop reaches an elongated form.

  16. Wave-induced collisions of thin floating disks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yiew, L. J.; Bennetts, L. G.; Meylan, M. H.; Thomas, G. A.; French, B. J.

    2017-12-01

    Collisions between two thin floating disks forced by regular water waves are studied for a range of wave amplitudes and lengths, using laboratory wave basin experiments and a mathematical model. Three collision regimes are identified from the experiments in terms of collision frequency and strength, and the collisions are shown to be caused by drift for short incident wavelengths and relative surge motion between the disks for longer incident waves. The model is based on slope-sliding theory for the wave-induced disk motions and rigid-body collisions. It is shown to predict collision frequencies and velocities accurately for intermediate-long incident wavelengths. Incorporating drift and wave scattering forces into the model is shown to capture the collision behaviours for short incident wavelengths.

  17. How Tiny Collisions Shape Mercury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2017-07-01

    If space rocks are unpleasant to encounter, space dust isnt much better. Mercurys cratered surface tells of billions of years of meteoroid impacts but its thin atmosphere is what reveals its collisional history with smaller impactors. Now new research is providing a better understanding of what were seeing.Micrometeoroids Ho!The inner solar system is bombarded by micrometeoroids, tiny particles of dust (on the scale of a tenth of a millimeter) emitted by asteroids and comets as they make their closest approach to the Sun. This dust doesnt penetrateEarths layers of atmosphere, but the innermost planet of our solar system, Mercury, doesnt have this convenient cushioning.Just as Mercury is affected by the impacts of large meteoroids, its also shaped by the many smaller-scale impacts it experiences. These tiny collisions are thought to vaporize atoms and molecules from the planets surface, which quickly dissociate. This process adds metals to Mercurys exosphere, the planets extremely tenuous atmosphere.Modeling PopulationsDistribution of the directions from which meteoroids originate before impacting Mercurys surface, as averaged over its entire orbit. Local time of 12 hr corresponds to the Sun-facing side. A significant asymmetry is seen between the dawn (6 hrs) and dusk (18 hrs) rates. [Pokorn et al. 2017]The metal distribution in the exosphere provides a way for us to measure the effect of micrometeoroid impacts on Mercury but this only works if we have accurate models of the process. A team of scientists led by Petr Pokorn (The Catholic University of America and NASA Goddard SFC) has now worked to improve our picture of micrometeoroid impact vaporization on Mercury.Pokorn and collaborators argue that two meteoroid populations Jupiter-family comets (short-period) and Halley-type comets (long-period) contribute the dust for the majority of micrometeoroid impacts on Mercury. The authors model the dynamics and evolution of these two populations, reproducing the

  18. Accurate Treatment of Collisions and Water-Delivery in Models of Terrestrial Planet Formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haghighipour, Nader; Maindl, Thomas; Schaefer, Christoph

    2017-10-01

    It is widely accepted that collisions among solid bodies, ignited by their interactions with planetary embryos is the key process in the formation of terrestrial planets and transport of volatiles and chemical compounds to their accretion zones. Unfortunately, due to computational complexities, these collisions are often treated in a rudimentary way. Impacts are considered to be perfectly inelastic and volatiles are considered to be fully transferred from one object to the other. This perfect-merging assumption has profound effects on the mass and composition of final planetary bodies as it grossly overestimates the masses of these objects and the amounts of volatiles and chemical elements transferred to them. It also entirely neglects collisional-loss of volatiles (e.g., water) and draws an unrealistic connection between these properties and the chemical structure of the protoplanetary disk (i.e., the location of their original carriers). We have developed a new and comprehensive methodology to simulate growth of embryos to planetary bodies where we use a combination of SPH and N-body codes to accurately model collisions as well as the transport/transfer of chemical compounds. Our methodology accounts for the loss of volatiles (e.g., ice sublimation) during the orbital evolution of their careers and accurately tracks their transfer from one body to another. Results of our simulations show that traditional N-body modeling of terrestrial planet formation overestimates the amount of the mass and water contents of the final planets by over 60% implying that not only the amount of water they suggest is far from being realistic, small planets such as Mars can also form in these simulations when collisions are treated properly. We will present details of our methodology and discuss its implications for terrestrial planet formation and water delivery to Earth.

  19. Zone refining of plutonium metal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blau, Michael S. [Univ. of Idaho, Moscow, ID (United States)

    1994-08-01

    The zone refining process was applied to Pu metal containing known amounts of impurities. Rod specimens of plutonium metal were melted into and contained in tantalum boats, each of which was passed horizontally through a three-turn, high-frequency coil in such a manner as to cause a narrow molten zone to pass through the Pu metal rod 10 times. The impurity elements Co, Cr, Fe, Ni, Np, U were found to move in the same direction as the molten zone as predicted by binary phase diagrams. The elements Al, Am, and Ga moved in the opposite direction of the molten zone as predicted by binary phase diagrams. As the impurity alloy was zone refined, {delta}-phase plutonium metal crystals were produced. The first few zone refining passes were more effective than each later pass because an oxide layer formed on the rod surface. There was no clear evidence of better impurity movement at the slower zone refining speed. Also, constant or variable coil power appeared to have no effect on impurity movement during a single run (10 passes). This experiment was the first step to developing a zone refining process for plutonium metal.

  20. Achieving That Elusive "Leadership Zone"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Ann M.

    2016-01-01

    Reaching the "leadership zone" happens when librarians tap into the extraordinary skills lying within to overcome obstacles and transform sometimes-difficult situations into meaningful outcomes. Maturing into an experienced leader who stays in the leadership zone requires knowledge, training, and practice. This article provides tactical…

  1. Instrumentation for coastal zone management

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Joseph, A.

    stream_size 11 stream_content_type text/plain stream_name Trg_Course_Coast_Zone_Manage_1993_91.pdf.txt stream_source_info Trg_Course_Coast_Zone_Manage_1993_91.pdf.txt Content-Encoding ISO-8859-1 Content-Type text/plain; charset...

  2. Management of coastal zone vegetation

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Untawale, A.G.

    stream_size 14 stream_content_type text/plain stream_name Trg_Course_Coast_Zone_Manage_1993_22.pdf.txt stream_source_info Trg_Course_Coast_Zone_Manage_1993_22.pdf.txt Content-Encoding ISO-8859-1 Content-Type text/plain; charset...

  3. An area-level model of vehicle-pedestrian injury collisions with implications for land use and transportation planning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wier, Megan; Weintraub, June; Humphreys, Elizabeth H; Seto, Edmund; Bhatia, Rajiv

    2009-01-01

    There is growing awareness among urban planning, public health, and transportation professionals that design decisions and investments that promote walking can be beneficial for human and ecological health. Planners need practical tools to consider the impact of development on pedestrian safety, a key requirement for the promotion of walking. Simple bivariate models have been used to predict changes in vehicle-pedestrian injury collisions based on changes in traffic volume. We describe the development of a multivariate, area-level regression model of vehicle-pedestrian injury collisions based on environmental and population data in 176 San Francisco, California census tracts. Predictor variables examined included street, land use, and population characteristics, including commute behaviors. The final model explained approximately 72% of the systematic variation in census-tract vehicle-pedestrian injury collisions and included measures of traffic volume, arterial streets without transit, land area, proportion of land area zoned for neighborhood commercial and residential-neighborhood commercial uses, employee and resident populations, proportion of people living in poverty and proportion aged 65 and older. We have begun to apply this model to predict area-level change in vehicle-pedestrian injury collisions associated with land use development and transportation planning decisions.

  4. Exotic hadrons from heavy ion collisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Sungtae; Hyodo, Tetsuo; Jido, Daisuke; Ko, Che Ming; Lee, Su Houng; Maeda, Saori; Miyahara, Kenta; Morita, Kenji; Nielsen, Marina; Ohnishi, Akira; Sekihara, Takayasu; Song, Taesoo; Yasui, Shigehiro; Yazaki, Koichi

    2017-07-01

    High energy heavy ion collisions are excellent ways for producing heavy hadrons and composite particles, including the light (anti)nuclei. With upgraded detectors at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) and the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), it has become possible to measure hadrons beyond their ground states. Therefore, heavy ion collisions provide a new method for studying exotic hadrons that are either molecular states made of various hadrons or compact system consisting of multiquarks. Because their structures are related to the fundamental properties of Quantum Chromodynamics (QCD), studying exotic hadrons is currently one of the most active areas of research in hadron physics. Experiments carried out at various accelerator facilities have indicated that some exotic hadrons may have already been produced. The present review is a summary of the current understanding of a selected set of exotic particle candidates that can be potentially measured in heavy ion collisions. It also includes discussions on the production of resonances, exotics and hadronic molecular states in these collisions based on the coalescence model and the statistical model. A more detailed discussion is given on the results from these models, leading to the conclusion that the yield of a hadron that is a compact multiquark state is typically an order of magnitude smaller than if it is an excited hadronic state with normal quark numbers or a loosely bound hadronic molecule. Attention is also given to some of the proposed heavy exotic hadrons that could be produced with sufficient abundance in heavy ion collisions because of the significant numbers of charm and bottom quarks that are produced at RHIC and even larger numbers at LHC, making it possible to study them in these experiments. Further included in the discussion are the general formalism for the coalescence model that involves resonance particles and its implication on the present estimated yield for resonance production. Finally

  5. Bending zone from mobilistic positions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dimitrijevic, M.D.

    1983-01-01

    Between the carbonate platform of Dinarid and the region of development of the diabase-hornfels formation (to the north and northeast), a transitional zone is observed with specific geological characteristics. It is called the ''bending zone'' and is viewed as an intermediate zone between the eugeosynclinal and myogeosynclinal regions and is the slope of the carbonate platform which is turned towards the region of Mesozoic magmatism. From the mobilistic viewpoint of geotectonics, it can be considered the boundary of the Adriatic microplate and the Tetis Sea. The geological position of the zone and the time of its existence (Triassic, Jurassic and later; ratio of it to the Senoman blend remains obscure) are examined. The zone is not considered to be very promising from an oil geological viewpoint.

  6. The Supergalactic Habitable Zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mason, Paul

    2018-01-01

    Habitability in the local universe is examined. Constrained by metal abundance and exposure to sterilizing events, life as we know it requires significantly long periods of stable environmental conditions. Planets within galaxies undergoing major mergers, active AGN, starburst episodes, and merging black holes pose serious threats to long-term habitability. Importantly, the development of several layers of protection from high-energy particles such as a thick atmosphere, a strong planetary magnetic field, an astrosphere, and a galactic magnetic field is of great benefit. Factors such as star type and activity, planet type and composition, the location of a planet within its host galaxy, and even the location within a supercluster of galaxies can affect the potential habitability of planets. We discuss the concept of the Supergalactic Habitable Zone introduced by Mason and Biermann in terms of habitability in the local universe and find that galaxies near the center of the Virgo cluster, for example, have a much lower probability for the development of life as we know it as compared to locations in the Milky Way.

  7. Collision of two rotating Hayward black holes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gwak, Bogeun [Sejong University, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-07-15

    We investigate the spin interaction and the gravitational radiation thermally allowed in a head-on collision of two rotating Hayward black holes. The Hayward black hole is a regular black hole in a modified Einstein equation, and hence it can be an appropriate model to describe the extent to which the regularity effect in the near-horizon region affects the interaction and the radiation. If one black hole is assumed to be considerably smaller than the other, the potential of the spin interaction can be analytically obtained and is dependent on the alignment of angular momenta of the black holes. For the collision of massive black holes, the gravitational radiation is numerically obtained as the upper bound by using the laws of thermodynamics. The effect of the Hayward black hole tends to increase the radiation energy, but we can limit the effect by comparing the radiation energy with the gravitational waves GW150914 and GW151226. (orig.)

  8. Theory of Electron-Ion Collisions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Griffin, Donald C

    2009-10-02

    Collisions of electrons with atoms and ions play a crucial role in the modeling and diagnostics of fusion plasmas. In the edge and divertor regions of magnetically confined plasmas, data for the collisions of electrons with neutral atoms and low charge-state ions are of particular importance, while in the inner region, data on highly ionized species are needed. Since experimental measurements for these collisional processes remain very limited, data for such processes depend primarily on the results of theoretical calculations. Over the period of the present grant (January 2006 - August 2009), we have made additional improvements in our parallel scattering programs, generated data of direct fusion interest and made these data available on The Controlled Fusion Atomic Data Center Web site at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. In addition, we have employed these data to do collsional-radiative modeling studies in support of a variety of experiments with magnetically confined fusion plasmas.

  9. Formation of Hypernuclei in Relativistic Ion Collisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Botvina, Alexander; Bleicher, Marcus; Pochodzalla, Josef; Steinheimer, Jan

    We develop a versatile model of hypernuclei production in relativistic hadron and ion collisions. Within a hybrid approach we use transport, coalescence and statistical models to describe the whole process. We demonstrate that heavy hypernuclei are coming mostly from projectile and target residues, whereas light hypernuclei can be produced at all rapidities. The yields of hypernuclei increase considerably above the energy threshold for the hyperon production, and there is a tendency to saturation of yields of hypernuclei with increasing the beam energy. There are unique opportunities in relativistic ion collisions which are difficult to realize in traditional hypernuclear experiments: The produced hypernuclei have a broad distribution in masses and isospin, and the production of multi-strange nuclei including new excited states is quite abundant. In addition, we can directly get an information on the hypermatter both at high and low temperatures.

  10. High energy particle collisions near black holes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zaslavskii O. B.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available If two geodesic particles collide near a rotating black hole, their energy in the centre of mass frame Ec.m. can become unbound under certain conditions (the so-called BSW effect. The special role is played here by so-called critical geodesics when one of particles has fine-tuned energy and angular momentum. The nature of geodesics reveals itself also in fate of the debris after collisions. One of particles moving to a remote observer is necessarily near-critical. We discuss, when such a collision can give rise not only unboud Ec.m. but also unbound Killing energy E (so-called super-Penrose process.

  11. Research on embedded automobile collision avoidance system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    TAO Feng

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Taking ARM embedded Linux operating system as the development platform,combined with AVR microcontroller,while optimizing the ranging algorithm and using air ultrasonic transducer,the measurement range of which can be up to 50 meter,this paper designs a high-precision,range far,low price,various models suitable automobile collision avoidance warning system.The system adopts Forlinx OK6410 development board for the master.AVR microcontroller is responsible for taking the data of traveling distance between vehicles,and with the ARM development board via RS232 communication transfers vehicle′s distance and speed information to the ARM development boards.The system uses the established collision avoidance model to get alarm information.Experiments show that the system can accurately send out alarm information within a certain range.It is innovative and practical.

  12. Anomalons, honey, and glue in nuclear collisions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gyulassy, M.

    1982-12-01

    In these lectures, selected topics in nuclear collisions in the energy range 10/sup -1/ to 10/sup 3/ GeV per nucleon are discussed. The evidence for anomalous projectile fragments with short mean free paths is presented. Theoretical speculations on novel topological nuclear excitation and on quark-nuclear complexes in connection with anomalons are discussed. Recent tests for pion field instabilities are presented. Then evidence for collective nuclear flow phenomena are reviewed. Global event analysis and cascade simulations are presented. We address the question of whether nuclear flow is like viscous honey. Finally, the criteria for the production of a quark-gluon plasma are discussed. Nuclear stopping power and longitudinal growth at high energies are considered. Results from cosmic ray data show that nuclear collision at TeV per nucleon energies are likely to product a plasma.

  13. Absorbed Energy in Ship Collisions and Grounding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Preben Terndrup; Zhang, Shengming

    1998-01-01

    is that the absorbed energy does not depend on the arrangement of the structure, the material properties, and the damage mode.The purpose of the present paper is to establish a new simple relation between the absorbed energy and the destroyed material volume, which can be used as a design tool for analysis of ship......Minorsky's well-known empirical formula, which relates the absorbed energy to the destroyed material volume, has been widely used in analyses of high energy collision and grounding accidents for nearly 40 years. The advantage of the method is its apparent simplcity. Obviously, its drawback...... collisions and grounding. The developed expressions reflect the structural arrangement, the material properties and different damage patterns.The present method is validated against a large number of existing experimental results and detailed numerical simulation results. Applications to full-sale ship...

  14. RNA polymerase II collision interrupts convergent transcription

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hobson, David J; Wei, Wu; Steinmetz, Lars M

    2012-01-01

    Antisense noncoding transcripts, genes-within-genes, and convergent gene pairs are prevalent among eukaryotes. The existence of such transcription units raises the question of what happens when RNA polymerase II (RNAPII) molecules collide head-to-head. Here we use a combination of biochemical...... and genetic approaches in yeast to show that polymerases transcribing opposite DNA strands cannot bypass each other. RNAPII stops but does not dissociate upon head-to-head collision in vitro, suggesting that opposing polymerases represent insurmountable obstacles for each other. Head-to-head collision in vivo...... also results in RNAPII stopping, and removal of collided RNAPII from the DNA template can be achieved via ubiquitylation-directed proteolysis. Indeed, in cells lacking efficient RNAPII polyubiquitylation, the half-life of collided polymerases increases, so that they can be detected between convergent...

  15. Positronium collisions with rare-gas atoms

    CERN Document Server

    Gribakin, G F; Wilde, R S; Fabrikant, I I

    2015-01-01

    We calculate elastic scattering of positronium (Ps) by the Xe atom using the recently developed pseudopotential method [Fabrikant I I and Gribakin G F 2014 Phys. Rev. A 90 052717] and review general features of Ps scattering from heavier rare-gas atoms: Ar, Kr and Xe. The total scattering cross section is dominated by two contributions: elastic scattering and Ps ionization (break-up). To calculate the Ps ionization cross sections we use the binary-encounter method for Ps collisions with an atomic target. Our results for the ionization cross section agree well with previous calculations carried out in the impulse approximation. Our total Ps-Xe cross section, when plotted as a function of the projectile velocity, exhibits similarity with the electron-Xe cross section for the collision velocities higher than 0.8 a.u., and agrees very well with the measurements at Ps velocities above 0.5 a.u.

  16. PHENIX Results in d + Au Collisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chin-Hao

    2016-04-01

    The PHENIX experiment at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider has performed a comprehensive set of measurements in d + Au collisions. Observables in d + Au collisions were originally conceived as a control experiment where no quark-gluon plasma is formed and one could isolate so-called cold nuclear matter effects, including nuclear modified parton distributions and parton multiple scattering. However, recent data from the PHENIX experiment in d + Au, in conjunction with new p + Pb results at the Large Hadron Collider, give strong evidence for a very different picture. We present new results that hint at the formation of a small quark-gluon plasma, that though short lived, leaves a fingerprint of evidence on final state observables. These new results will be discussed in the context of competing theoretical interpretations.

  17. Transplanckian Collisions at the LHC and Beyond

    CERN Document Server

    Giudice, Gian Francesco; Wells, J D; Giudice, Gian F.; Rattazzi, Riccardo; Wells, James D.

    2002-01-01

    Elastic collisions in the transplanckian region, where the center-of-mass energy is much larger than the fundamental gravity mass scale, can be described by linearized general relativity and known quantum-mechanical effects as long as the momentum transfer of the process is sufficiently small. For larger momentum transfer, non-linear gravitational effects become important and, although a computation is lacking, black-hole formation is expected to dominate the dynamics. We discuss how elastic transplanckian collisions can be used at high-energy colliders to study, in a quantitative and model-independent way, theories in which gravity propagates in flat extra dimensions. At LHC energies, however, incalculable quantum-gravity contributions may significantly affect the experimental signal.

  18. Two Improved Multiple-Differential Collision Attacks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    An Wang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In CHES 2008, Bogdanov proposed multiple-differential collision attacks which could be applied to the power analysis attacks on practical cryptographic systems. However, due to the effect of countermeasures on FPGA, there are some difficulties during the collision detection, such as local high noise and the lack of sampling points. In this paper, keypoints voting test is proposed for solving these problems, which can increase the success ratio from 35% to 95% on the example of one implementation. Furthermore, we improve the ternary voting test of Bogdanov, which can improve the experiment efficiency markedly. Our experiments show that the number of power traces required in our attack is only a quarter of the requirement of traditional attack. Finally, some alternative countermeasures against our attacks are discussed.

  19. 49 CFR 71.14 - Chamorro Zone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Chamorro Zone. 71.14 Section 71.14 Transportation Office of the Secretary of Transportation STANDARD TIME ZONE BOUNDARIES § 71.14 Chamorro Zone. The ninth zone, the Chamorro standard time zone, includes the Island of Guam and the Commonwealth of the Northern...

  20. Three-body collision contributions to recombination and collision-induced dissociation. 1: Cross sections

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pack, R.T.; Walker, R.B.; Kendrick, B.K.

    1998-04-10

    Atomic and molecular recombination and collision-induced dissociation (CID) reactions comprise two of the most fundamental types of chemical reactions. They are important in all gas phase chemistry; for example, about half of the 196 reactions identified as important in combustion chemistry are recombination or CID reactions. Many of the current chemical kinetics textbooks and kinetics papers treat atomic and molecular recombination and CID as occurring only via sequences of two-body collisions. Actually, there is considerable evidence from experiment and classical trajectory calculations for contributions by true three-body collisions to the recombination of atomic and diatomic radicals, and that evidence is reviewed. Then, an approximate quantum method treating both two-body and three-body collisions simultaneously and on equal footing is used to calculate cross sections for the reaction Ne{sub 2} + H {rightleftharpoons} Ne + Ne + H. The results provide clear quantum evidence that direct three-body collisions do contribute significantly to recombination and CID.

  1. Cross Sections for Electron Collisions with Acetylene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Mi-Young; Yoon, Jung-Sik; Cho, Hyuck; Karwasz, Grzegorz P.; Kokoouline, Viatcheslav; Nakamura, Yoshiharu; Tennyson, Jonathan

    2017-03-01

    Cross section data are compiled from the literature for electron collisions with the acetylene (HCCH) molecule. Cross sections are collected and reviewed for total scattering, elastic scattering, momentum transfer, excitations of rotational and vibrational states, dissociation, ionization, and dissociative attachment. The data derived from swarm experiments are also considered. For each of these processes, the recommended values of the cross sections are presented. The literature has been surveyed through early 2016.

  2. Collective dynamics in relativistic nuclear collisions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Niemi, Harri [Department of Physics, University of Jyväskylä, P.O. Box 35, FI-40014 University of Jyväskylä (Finland); Helsinki Institute of Physics, P.O. Box 64, FI-00014 University of Helsinki (Finland)

    2014-11-15

    I will review the current status of describing spacetime evolution of the relativistic nuclear collisions with fluid dynamics, and of determining the transport coefficients of strongly interacting matter. The fluid dynamical models suggest that shear viscosity to entropy density ratio of the matter is small. However, there are still considerable challenges in determining the transport coefficients, and especially their temperature dependence is still poorly constrained.

  3. Cross Sections for Electron Collisions with Methane

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song, Mi-Young, E-mail: mysong@nfri.re.kr; Yoon, Jung-Sik [Plasma Technology Research Center, National Fusion Research Institute, 814-2 Osikdo-dong, Gunsan, Jeollabuk-do 573-540 (Korea, Republic of); Cho, Hyuck [Department of Physics, Chungnam National University, Daejeon 305-764 (Korea, Republic of); Itikawa, Yukikazu [Institute of Space and Astronautical Science, Sagamihara 252-5210 (Japan); Karwasz, Grzegorz P. [Faculty of Physics, Astronomy and Applied Informatics, University Nicolaus Copernicus, Grudziadzka 5, 87100 Toruń (Poland); Kokoouline, Viatcheslav [Department of Physics, University of Central Florida, Orlando, Florida 32816 (United States); Nakamura, Yoshiharu [6-1-5-201 Miyazaki, Miyamae, Kawasaki 216-0033 (Japan); Tennyson, Jonathan [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University College London, Gower Street, London WC1E 6BT (United Kingdom)

    2015-06-15

    Cross section data are compiled from the literature for electron collisions with methane (CH{sub 4}) molecules. Cross sections are collected and reviewed for total scattering, elastic scattering, momentum transfer, excitations of rotational and vibrational states, dissociation, ionization, and dissociative attachment. The data derived from swarm experiments are also considered. For each of these processes, the recommended values of the cross sections are presented. The literature has been surveyed through early 2014.

  4. Direct photons in heavy-ion collisions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baeuchle, Bjoern

    2010-12-13

    Direct photon emission from heavy-ion collisions has been calculated and compared to available experimental data. Three different models have been combined to extract direct photons from different environments in a heavy-ion collision: Thermal photons from partonic and hadronic matter have been extracted from relativistic, non-viscous 3+1-dimensional hydrodynamic calculations. Thermal and non-thermal photons from hadronic interactions have been calculated from relativistic transport theory. The impact of different physics assumptions about the thermalized matter has been studied. The models used for the determination of photons from both hydrodynamic and transport calculations have been elucidated and their numerical properties tested. The origin of direct photons, itemised by emission stage, emission time, channel and baryon number density, has been investigated for various systems, as have the transverse momentum spectra and elliptic flow patterns of direct photons. Taking into account the full (vacuum) spectral function of the rho-meson decreases the direct photon emission by approximately 10% at low photon transverse momentum. In all systems that have been considered -- heavy-ion collisions at E{sub lab}=35 AGeV and 158 AGeV, (s{sub NN}){sup 1/2}=62.4 GeV, 130 GeV and 200 GeV -- thermal emission from a system with partonic degrees of freedom is greatly enhanced over that from hadronic systems, while the difference between the direct photon yields from a viscous and a non-viscous hadronic system (transport vs. hydrodynamics) is found to be very small. Predictions for direct photon emission in central U+U-collisions at 35 AGeV have been made. (orig.)

  5. NA35: sulphur-gold collision

    CERN Multimedia

    1991-01-01

    In this image the real particles produced by the collision of a 6400 GeV sulphur ion with a gold target can be seen as they pass through a streamer chamber. Streamer chambers consist of a gas chamber through which a strong pulsed electric field is passed, creating sparks as a charged particle passes through it. The NA35 experiment, which was in operation in the 1980s, was part of CERN's ongoing heavy ion project.

  6. Xenon-Xenon collision events in CMS

    CERN Multimedia

    Mc Cauley, Thomas

    2017-01-01

    One of the first-ever xenon-xenon collision events recorded by CMS during the LHC’s one-day-only heavy-ion run with xenon nuclei. The large number of tracks emerging from the centre of the detector show the many simultaneous nucleon-nucleon interactions that take place when two xenon nuclei, each with 54 protons and 75 neutrons, collide inside CMS.

  7. Collision-induced dissociation of aflatoxins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tóth, Katalin; Nagy, Lajos; Mándi, Attila; Kuki, Ákos; Mézes, Miklós; Zsuga, Miklós; Kéki, Sándor

    2013-02-28

    The aflatoxin mycotoxins are particularly hazardous to health when present in food. Therefore, from an analytical point of view, knowledge of their mass spectrometric properties is essential. The aim of the present study was to describe the collision-induced dissociation behavior of the four most common aflatoxins: B1, B2, G1 and G2. Protonated aflatoxins were produced using atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (APCI) mass spectrometry (MS) combined with high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). For the tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) experiments nitrogen was used as the collision gas and the collision energies were varied in the range of 9-44 eV (in the laboratory frame). The major APCI-MS/MS fragmentations of protonated aflatoxins occurred at 30 eV collision energy. The main fragmentation channels were found to be the losses of a series of carbon monoxide molecules and loss of a methyl radical, leading to the formation of radical-type product ions. In addition, if the aflatoxin molecule contained an ether- or lactone-oxygen atom linked to a saturated carbon atom, loss of a water molecule was observed from the [M + H](+) ion, especially in the case of aflatoxins G1 and G2. A relatively small modification in the structure of aflatoxins dramatically altered the fragmentation pathways and this was particularly true for aflatoxins B1 and B2. Due to the presence of a C = C double bond connected to the ether group in aflatoxin B1 no elimination of water was observed but, instead, formation of radical-type product ions occurred. Fragmentation of protonated aflatoxin B1 yielded the most abundant radical-type cations. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  8. b-flavour tagging in pp collisions

    CERN Multimedia

    Birnkraut, Alex

    2015-01-01

    An essential ingredient of all time-dependent CP violation studies of B mesons is the ability to tag the initial flavour of the B meson. The harsh environment of 7 and 8 TeV pp collisions makes this a particularly difficult enterprise. We report progresses in the flavour tagging of B0 and Bs mesons, including developments of novel techniques like the use of an opposite side charm tagger.

  9. Dynamics of reactive collisions by optical methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ureña, A. González; Vetter, R.

    This paper reviews recent developments in the study of reactive collisions using optical methods. Although the basic approach is from the experimental viewpoint, attention is paid to the conceptual and theoretical aspects of the physics underlying modern reaction dynamics. After a brief resume of basic concepts and definitions on both scalar and vectorial quantities characterizing the chemical reaction, a significant body of this paper describes the recent achievements using laser techniques, mainly via laser-induced fluorescence, and chemiluminescence. Both high-resolution crossed-beam and high-resolution bulb studies are presented in a complementary fashion, as they provide a detailed picture of reaction dynamics through the measurement of quantum state specific differential cross-sections. Specific examples include the use of Doppler resolved laser-induced fluorescence, multiphoton ionization or Cars studies. Some examples are also included based on the use of product imaging techniques, the novel approach of obtaining quantum state resolved differential cross-sections for chemical reactions. In addition, new data on the collision energy dependence of the collision cross-section, i.e. the excitation function, obtained by highly sensitive collision energy cross-beam techniques is also presented and reviewed. Another part of the paper is dedicated to recent advances in the study of reaction dynamics using electronically excited species. Emphasis is placed not only on the opening of new channels for chemical reactions but also on the possible outcome of the reaction products associated with the different symmetries of the excited potential energy surfaces. Finally, a section is dedicated to recent developments in studies carried out in the area of van der Waals and cluster reactions. The possibility of clocking the chemical act as well as very efficient trapping of reaction intermediates is illustrated with some examples. Throughout the whole paper care is taken to

  10. 2017 LHC test collisions in ATLAS

    CERN Multimedia

    ATLAS Collaboration

    2017-01-01

    Test collisions are one of the many steps on the way to the LHC restart. The beams are neither quiet nor stable enough to ramp up the pixel and SCT, but other subsystems are on. On 10.05.2017 the ATLAS shift crew counted many women responsible for overall coordination, run control, high level trigger, data quality, safety and subsystems such as LAr calorimeter and muon spectrometer.

  11. Hadron thermodynamics in relativistic nuclear collisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ammiraju, P.

    1985-01-01

    Various phenomenological models based on statistical thermodynamical considerations were used to fit the experimental data at high P sub T to a two temperature distribution. Whether this implies that the two temperatures belong to two different reaction mechanisms, or consequences of Lorentz-contraction factor, or related in a fundamental way to the intrinsic thermodynamics of Space-Time can only be revealed by further theoretical and experimental investigations of high P sub T phenomena in extremely energetic hadron-hadron collisions.

  12. Electromagnetic Radiations from Heavy Ion Collision

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Payal Mohanty

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In this review, we have discussed the different sources of photons and dileptons produced in heavy ion collision (HIC. The transverse momentum (pT spectra of photons for different collision energies are analyzed with a view of extracting the thermal properties of the system formed in HIC. We showed the effect of viscosity on pT spectra of produced thermal photons. The dilepton productions from hot hadrons are considered including the spectral change of light vector mesons in the thermal bath. We have analyzed the pT and invariant mass (M spectra of dileptons for different collision energies too. As the individual spectra are constrained by certain unambiguous hydrodynamical inputs, so we evaluated the ratio of photon to dilepton spectra, Rem, to overcome those quantities. We argue that the variation of the radial velocity extracted from Rem with M is indicative of a phase transition from the initially produced partons to hadrons. In the calculations of interferometry involving dilepton pairs, it is argued that the nonmonotonic variation of HBT radii with invariant mass of the lepton pairs signals the formation of quark gluon plasma in HIC. Elliptic flow (v2 of dilepton is also studied at sNN=2.76 TeV for 30–40% centrality using the (2+1d hydrodynamical model.

  13. Granting silence to avoid wireless collisions

    KAUST Repository

    Choi, Jung Il

    2010-10-01

    We describe grant-to-send, a novel collision avoidance algorithm for wireless mesh networks. Rather than announce packets it intends to send, a node using grant-to-send announces packets it expects to hear others send. We present evidence that inverting collision avoidance in this way greatly improves wireless mesh performance. Evaluating four protocols from 802.11 meshes and 802.15.4 sensor networks, we find that grant-to-send matches or outperforms CSMA and RTS/CTS in all cases. For example, in a 4-hop UDP flow, grantto- send can achieve 96% of the theoretical maximum throughput while maintaining a 99.9% packet delivery ratio. Grant-tosend is also general enough to replace protocol-specific collision avoidance mechanisms common to sensor network protocols. Grant-to-send is simple. For example, incorporating it into 802.11 requires only 11 lines of driver code and no hardware changes. Furthermore, as it reuses existing 802.11 mechanisms, grant-to-send inter-operates with current networks and can be incrementally deployed. © 2010 IEEE.

  14. Partial wave analysis of oriented collisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, A. L.; Amami, S.; Saxton, T.; Madison, D. H.

    2018-01-01

    We present fully differential cross sections (FDCSs) for two collision processes with oriented atoms. The first collision is electron-impact ionization of oriented Mg (3p), and the second collision is electron-impact excitation-ionization (EI) of helium with an oriented final state He+(2p0) ion. Surprisingly, the theoretical functional form of the FDCS is the same for both processes, despite the fact that the only physical similarity is an oriented excited state in both processes. We present FDCS as a function of orientation angle and ejected electron angle for both ionization of oriented Mg(3p) and EI of helium in order to explore possible physical similarities between the two processes. We examine the contributions to the FDCS of individual partial waves of the ionized electron and projectile. For the ionization of oriented Mg, we show that the FDCS are dominated by larger partial waves of the ejected electron, with the dominant partial waves having a dependence on scattering angle and outgoing electron energy sharing. For the EI process, the FDCS is dominated by the L = 2 partial wave, independent of scattering angle or energy sharing. Also, for EI it is possible to have angular momentum transferred from either the target helium atom or the incident projectile.

  15. Looming auditory collision warnings for driving.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray, Rob

    2011-02-01

    A driving simulator was used to compare the effectiveness of increasing intensity (looming) auditory warning signals with other types of auditory warnings. Auditory warnings have been shown to speed driver reaction time in rear-end collision situations; however, it is not clear which type of signal is the most effective. Although verbal and symbolic (e.g., a car horn) warnings have faster response times than abstract warnings, they often lead to more response errors. Participants (N=20) experienced four nonlooming auditory warnings (constant intensity, pulsed, ramped, and car horn), three looming auditory warnings ("veridical," "early," and "late"), and a no-warning condition. In 80% of the trials, warnings were activated when a critical response was required, and in 20% of the trials, the warnings were false alarms. For the early (late) looming warnings, the rate of change of intensity signaled a time to collision (TTC) that was shorter (longer) than the actual TTC. Veridical looming and car horn warnings had significantly faster brake reaction times (BRT) compared with the other nonlooming warnings (by 80 to 160 ms). However, the number of braking responses in false alarm conditions was significantly greater for the car horn. BRT increased significantly and systematically as the TTC signaled by the looming warning was changed from early to veridical to late. Looming auditory warnings produce the best combination of response speed and accuracy. The results indicate that looming auditory warnings can be used to effectively warn a driver about an impending collision.

  16. LHC Report: Towards stable beams and collisions

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN Bulletin

    2011-01-01

    Over the past two weeks, the LHC re-commissioning with beam has continued at a brisk pace. The first collisions of 2011 were produced on 2 March, with stable beams and collisions for physics planned for the coming days. Low intensity beams with just a few bunches of particles were used to test the energy ramp to 3.5 TeV and the squeeze. The results were successful and, as a by-product, the first collisions of 2011 were recorded 2 March. One of the main activities carried out by the operation teams has been the careful set-up of the collimation system, and the injection and beam dump protection devices. The collimation system provides essential beam cleaning, preventing stray particles from impacting other elements of the machine, particularly the superconducting magnets. In addition to the collimation system, also the injection and beam dump protection devices perform a vital machine protection role, as they detect any beam that might be mis-directed during rare, but not totally unavoidable, hardware hiccups...

  17. Progress in Computational Electron-Molecule Collisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rescigno, Tn

    1997-10-01

    The past few years have witnessed tremendous progress in the development of sophisticated ab initio methods for treating collisions of slow electrons with isolated small molecules. Researchers in this area have benefited greatly from advances in computer technology; indeed, the advent of parallel computers has made it possible to carry out calculations at a level of sophistication inconceivable a decade ago. But bigger and faster computers are only part of the picture. Even with today's computers, the practical need to study electron collisions with the kinds of complex molecules and fragments encountered in real-world plasma processing environments is taxing present methods beyond their current capabilities. Since extrapolation of existing methods to handle increasingly larger targets will ultimately fail as it would require computational resources beyond any imagined, continued progress must also be linked to new theoretical developments. Some of the techniques recently introduced to address these problems will be discussed and illustrated with examples of electron-molecule collision calculations we have carried out on some fairly complex target gases encountered in processing plasmas. Electron-molecule scattering continues to pose many formidable theoretical and computational challenges. I will touch on some of the outstanding open questions.

  18. Non-collision backgrounds in ATLAS

    CERN Document Server

    Gibson, S M; The ATLAS collaboration

    2012-01-01

    The proton-proton collision events recorded by the ATLAS experiment are on top of a background that is due to both collision debris and non-collision components. The latter comprises of three types: beam-induced backgrounds, cosmic particles and detector noise. We present studies that focus on the first two of these. We give a detailed description of beam-related and cosmic backgrounds based on the full 2011 ATLAS data set, and present their rates throughout the whole data-taking period. Studies of correlations between tertiary proton halo and muon backgrounds, as well as, residual pressure and resulting beam-gas events seen in beam-condition monitors will be presented. Results of simulations based on the LHC geometry and its parameters will be presented. They help to better understand the features of beam-induced backgrounds in each ATLAS sub-detector. The studies of beam-induced backgrounds in ATLAS reveal their characteristics and serve as a basis for designing rejection tools that can be applied in physic...

  19. Winter Storm Zones on Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hollingsworth, J. L.; Haberle, R. M.; Barnes, J. R.; Bridger, A. F. C.; Cuzzi, Jeffrey N. (Technical Monitor)

    1995-01-01

    Preferred regions of weather activity in Mars' winter middle latitudes-so called 'storm zones' are found in a general circulation model of Mars' atmospheric circulation. During northern winter, these storm zones occur in middle latitudes in the major planitia (low-relief regions) of the western and eastern hemisphere. In contrast, the highlands of the eastern hemisphere are mostly quiescent. Compared to Earth's storm zones where diabatic heating associated with land-sea thermal contrasts is crucial, orography on Mars is fundamental to the regionalization of weather activity. Future spacecraft missions aimed at assessing Mars' climate and its variability need to include such regions in observation strategies.

  20. Coalescence collision of liquid drops II: Off-center collisions of unequal-size drops

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alejandro Acevedo-Malavé

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available We applied the Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics method to simulate for first time in the three-dimensional space the hydrodynamic off-center collisions of unequal-size liquid drops in a vacuum environment. The Weber number for several conditions of the droplets dynamics is determined. Also the velocity vector fields inside the drops are shown in the collision process. The evolution of the kinetic and internal energy is shown for the permanent coalescence case. The resulting drops tend to deform, and depending of the Weber number two possible outcomes for the collision of droplets arise: either permanent coalescence or flocculation. In the permanent coalescence of the drops a fragmentation case is modeled, yielding the formation of little satellite droplets.

  1. Coalescence collision of liquid drops I: Off-center collisions of equal-size drops

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alejandro Acevedo-Malavé

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available The Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics method (SPH is used here to model off-center collisions of equal-size liquid drops in a three-dimensional space. In this study the Weber number is calculated for several conditions of the droplets dynamics and the velocity vector fields formed inside the drops during the collision process are shown. For the permanent coalescence the evolution of the kinetic and internal energy is shown and also the approaching to equilibrium of the resulting drop. Depending of the Weber number three possible outcomes for the collision of droplets is obtained: permanent coalescence, flocculation and fragmentation. The fragmentation phenomena are modeled and the formation of small satellite drops can be seen. The ligament that is formed follows the “end pinching” mechanism and it is transformed into a flat structure.

  2. Geometric modelling, collision detection, collision avoidance and path planning based on the Hough Transform

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernabeu, Enrique J.; Tornero, Josep

    2000-05-01

    This paper presents a new method based on the application of the Hough Transform for solving the robot motion problem and their intermediate steps: geometric modelling and collision detection. In terms of modelling, given a set of points, which is the representation of a given object, the maximum inner and the minimum outer spherically-extended polytopes (s-tope) are automatically generated. Collision detection is based on the computation of the translational penetration distance. Such a distance also allows to compute an intermediate point when collision avoidance is required. The set of intermediate points describes a solution to the path-planning problem. This new approach introduces an important decrease in the computational time required for robot motion planning.

  3. Separation Criteria for Off-Axis Binary Drop Collisions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mary D. Saroka

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Off-axis collisions of two equal size droplets are investigated numerically. Various governing processes in such collisions are discussed. Several commonly used theoretical models that predict the onset of separation after collision are evaluated based on the processes observed numerically. A separation criterion based on droplet deformation is found. The numerical results are used to assess the validity of some commonly used phenomenological models for drop separation after collision. Also, a critical Weber number for the droplet separation after grazing collision is reported. The effect of Reynolds number is investigated and regions of permanent coalescence and separation are plotted in a Weber-Reynolds number plane for high impact parameter collisions.

  4. Dielectron production in proton-proton collisions with ALICE

    CERN Document Server

    Koehler, Markus K

    Ultrarelativistic hadron collisions, such as delivered since a couple of years at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), provide new insights into the properties of strongly interacting matter at high temperatures and densities, which is expected to have existed a few of a millionth seconds after the big bang. Electromagnetic probes, such as leptons and photons, are emitted during the entire collision. Since they do not undergo strong interactions, they reflect the entire evolution of the collision.\\\\ Pairs of leptons, so called dileptons, have the advantage compared to real photons, that they do not only carry momentum, but also have a non-zero invariant mass. The invariant mass spectrum of dileptons is a superposition of several components and allows to address different characteristics of the medium.\\\\ To understand dielectron production in heavy-ion collisions, reference measurements in proton-proton (pp) collisions are necessary. pp collisions reflect the vacuum contribution of the particles produced in heavy-...

  5. Galaxy Collisions Forging New Worlds from Cosmic Crashes

    CERN Document Server

    Struck, Curtis

    2011-01-01

    Galaxy collisions are the key process in building galaxies, triggering the formation of stars and the build-up of heavy elements that allow the formation of planets and solar systems. This book presents the revolutionary research advances achieved in the last decade and lucidly explains the underlying dynamical processes. Galaxy Collisions takes a comprehensive trip through the visually spectacular world of galaxy collisions; investigates the interactions of stars, gas clouds, and dark matter in galaxy collisions; uses analogies and metaphors to help comprehend the bizarre world of galaxies; presents recent research results to enhance the understanding of galaxy formation and evolution; includes discoveries of minor collisions within our own group of galaxies; shows how a galaxy collision might affect a solar system, or a planet like ours.

  6. Localized heating of electrons in ionization zones: Going beyond the Penning-Thornton paradigm in magnetron sputtering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anders, Andre

    2014-12-07

    The fundamental question of how energy is supplied to a magnetron discharge is commonly answered by the Penning-Thornton paradigm invoking secondary electrons. Huo et al. (Plasma Sources Sci. Technol. 22, 045005, (2013)) used a global discharge model to show that electron heating in the electric field of the magnetic presheath is dominant. In this contribution, this concept is applied locally taking into account the electric potential structure of ionization zones. Images of ionization zones can and should be interpreted as diagrams of the localization of electric potential and related electron energy, where certain collisions promote or dampen their formation.

  7. ShoreZone Survey Data

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This dataset is a point file showing GPS trackline data collected during a ShoreZone aerial imaging survey. This flight trackline is recorded at 1-second intervals...

  8. NEPR Geographic Zone Map 2015

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This geographic zone map was created by interpreting satellite and aerial imagery, seafloor topography (bathymetry model), and the new NEPR Benthic Habitat Map...

  9. Offshore Wind Technology Depth Zones

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Coastal bathymetric depth, measured in meters at depth values of: -30, -60, -900 Shallow Zone (0-30m): Technology has been demonstrated on a commercial scale at...

  10. A Methodology for Assessing Alternatives to Reduce Ship Collisions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1979-05-01

    Collision occuzed (contiued) 03695 63670 350 314 Barqe o rtih 03696 63672 33 - Fisinq No ishinq vessels not counted. 03697 63672 33 - ishing No...Collision occurred Yacht off South Coronado Island, Mexico. 03321 63312 - - Motor Yes Assumed length -400 Craft feet 03322 63312 - - Barge No This barqe ...Coded :Actual Find Case Length Length Vessel Collision Location 1o. !No. (-t) (ft) Type. Counted Comment Long beach 00443160448 150 179 Barqe No

  11. Introduction to the study of collisions between heavy nuclei

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bayman, B.F.

    1980-01-01

    Current investigations concerning the collisions of nuclei governed by small de Broglie wavelengths are reviewed. The wave packets localize nuclei in regions small compared to their diameters. Cross sections are examined for potential scattering, elastic scattering, quasi-molecular states, peripheral particle-transfer reactions, fusion, and deep inelastic collisions. Theories of fusion and deep inelastic collisions are summarized. This paper is in the nature of a review-tutorial. 45 references, 51 figures, 2 tables. (RWR)

  12. Gluon field fluctuations in nuclear collisions: Multiplicity and eccentricity distributions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schenke, Björn [Physics Department, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973 (United States); Tribedy, Prithwish [Variable Energy Cyclotron Centre, 1/AF Bidhan Nagar, Kolkata 700064 (India); Venugopalan, Raju [Physics Department, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973 (United States)

    2014-06-15

    We discuss different sources of fluctuations in nuclear collisions and their realization in the IP-Glasma model. We present results for multiplicity distributions in p+p and p+A collisions and compare eccentricity (ε{sub 2}, ε{sub 3}, ε{sub 4}) distributions in A + A collisions to the v{sub n} distributions in 10 centrality classes measured by the ATLAS Collaboration.

  13. Extreme and First-Passage Time of Ship Collision Loads

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Søren R. K.; Thoft-Christensen, Palle

    1983-01-01

    The paper outlines a general theory from which the distribution function of the extreme peak collision load encountered during a certain intended lifetime can be cal culated assuming the arrival of ship collisions to be specified by a Poisson counting proces s.......The paper outlines a general theory from which the distribution function of the extreme peak collision load encountered during a certain intended lifetime can be cal culated assuming the arrival of ship collisions to be specified by a Poisson counting proces s....

  14. Squeezed States and Particle Production in High Energy Collisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bambah, Bindu A.

    1996-01-01

    Using the 'quantum optical approach' we propose a model of multiplicity distributions in high energy collisions based on squeezed coherent states. We show that the k-mode squeezed coherent state is the most general one in describing hadronic multiplicity distributions in particle collision processes, describing not only p(bar-p) collisions but e(+)e(-), vp and diffractive collisions as well. The reason for this phenomenological fit has been gained by working out a microscopic theory in which the squeezed coherent sources arise naturally if one considers the Lorentz squeezing of hadrons and works in the covariant phase space formalism.

  15. A New Aloha Anti-Collision Algorithm Based on CDMA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Enjian; Feng, Zhu

    The tags' collision is a common problem in RFID (radio frequency identification) system. The problem has affected the integrity of the data transmission during the process of communication in the RFID system. Based on analysis of the existing anti-collision algorithm, a novel anti-collision algorithm is presented. The new algorithm combines the group dynamic frame slotted Aloha algorithm with code division multiple access technology. The algorithm can effectively reduce the collision probability between tags. Under the same number of tags, the algorithm is effective in reducing the reader recognition time and improve overall system throughput rate.

  16. Quark vs Gluon jets in Heavy Ion Collisions

    CERN Document Server

    Drauksas, Simonas

    2017-01-01

    The project concerned quark and gluon jets which are often used as probes of Quantum Chromodynamics(QCD) matter created in nuclear collisions at collider energies. The goal is to look for differences between quark and gluon jets, study their substructure, look for distinguishing features in unquenched (pp collisions) and quenched (heavy ion collisions) jets by using multi-variate analysis which was carried out with the help of ROOT's \\href{https://root.cern.ch/tmva}{TMVA} tool. Mapping out the modification of jets due to medium interactions could give valuable input to constraining the time evolution of the Quark Gluon Plasma created in heavy ion collisions.

  17. ALICE results in p-Pb collisions at the LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Stocco, Diego

    2015-01-01

    ALICE studies the properties of the strongly interacting matter at the extreme energy densities reached in heavy-ion collisions at the LHC. In this context, the measurements in proton-proton and proton-nucleon collisions are mandatory: the former sets the reference, while the latter pro- vides further insight into the effects due to cold nuclear matter, which is crucial in the understand- ing of heavy-ion collisions. In this paper, a selection of the recent results in p–Pb collisions at the LHC will be presented.

  18. Climate change and dead zones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altieri, Andrew H; Gedan, Keryn B

    2015-04-01

    Estuaries and coastal seas provide valuable ecosystem services but are particularly vulnerable to the co-occurring threats of climate change and oxygen-depleted dead zones. We analyzed the severity of climate change predicted for existing dead zones, and found that 94% of dead zones are in regions that will experience at least a 2 °C temperature increase by the end of the century. We then reviewed how climate change will exacerbate hypoxic conditions through oceanographic, ecological, and physiological processes. We found evidence that suggests numerous climate variables including temperature, ocean acidification, sea-level rise, precipitation, wind, and storm patterns will affect dead zones, and that each of those factors has the potential to act through multiple pathways on both oxygen availability and ecological responses to hypoxia. Given the variety and strength of the mechanisms by which climate change exacerbates hypoxia, and the rates at which climate is changing, we posit that climate change variables are contributing to the dead zone epidemic by acting synergistically with one another and with recognized anthropogenic triggers of hypoxia including eutrophication. This suggests that a multidisciplinary, integrated approach that considers the full range of climate variables is needed to track and potentially reverse the spread of dead zones. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. Zoning, equity, and public health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maantay, J

    2001-01-01

    Zoning, the most prevalent land use planning tool in the United States, has substantial implications for equity and public health. Zoning determines where various categories of land use may go, thereby influencing the location of resulting environmental and health impacts. Industrially zoned areas permit noxious land uses and typically carry higher environmental burdens than other areas. Using New York City as a case study, the author shows that industrial zones have large residential populations within them or nearby. Noxious uses tend to be concentrated in poor and minority industrial neighborhoods because more affluent industrial areas and those with lower minority populations are rezoned for other uses, and industrial zones in poorer neighborhoods are expanded. Zoning policies, therefore, can have adverse impacts on public health and equity. The location of noxious uses and the pollution they generate have ramifications for global public health and equity; these uses have been concentrated in the world's poorer places as well as in poorer places within more affluent countries. Planners, policymakers, and public health professionals must collaborate on a worldwide basis to address these equity, health, and land use planning problems. PMID:11441726

  20. The global aftershock zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parsons, Thomas E.; Margaret Segou,; Warner Marzocchi,

    2014-01-01

    The aftershock zone of each large (M ≥ 7) earthquake extends throughout the shallows of planet Earth. Most aftershocks cluster near the mainshock rupture, but earthquakes send out shivers in the form of seismic waves, and these temporary distortions are large enough to trigger other earthquakes at global range. The aftershocks that happen at great distance from their mainshock are often superposed onto already seismically active regions, making them difficult to detect and understand. From a hazard perspective we are concerned that this dynamic process might encourage other high magnitude earthquakes, and wonder if a global alarm state is warranted after every large mainshock. From an earthquake process perspective we are curious about the physics of earthquake triggering across the magnitude spectrum. In this review we build upon past studies that examined the combined global response to mainshocks. Such compilations demonstrate significant rate increases during, and immediately after (~ 45 min) M > 7.0 mainshocks in all tectonic settings and ranges. However, it is difficult to find strong evidence for M > 5 rate increases during the passage of surface waves in combined global catalogs. On the other hand, recently published studies of individual large mainshocks associate M > 5 triggering at global range that is delayed by hours to days after surface wave arrivals. The longer the delay between mainshock and global aftershock, the more difficult it is to establish causation. To address these questions, we review the response to 260 M ≥ 7.0 shallow (Z ≤ 50 km) mainshocks in 21 global regions with local seismograph networks. In this way we can examine the detailed temporal and spatial response, or lack thereof, during passing seismic waves, and over the 24 h period after their passing. We see an array of responses that can involve immediate and widespread seismicity outbreaks, delayed and localized earthquake clusters, to no response at all. About 50% of the

  1. Impact of the overriding plate rheology on convergence zone dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hertgen, Solenn; Yamato, Philippe; Guillaume, Benjamin; van Hunen, Jeroen

    2017-04-01

    Most of deformation at the Earth's surface is localized at plate boundaries. This deformation can be accommodated in very different ways depending on the tectonic setting. In the case of convergence zones, the deformation is typically simplified and classified as follows: - intra-oceanic convergence, when convergence involves two oceanic lithospheres, which generally leads to the subduction/obduction initiation and to the formation of an island arc; - convergence between an oceanic and a continental lithosphere, which is mainly accommodated by subduction and can lead to the formation of a mountain range at the plate boundary; - convergence involving two continental lithospheres, which is accommodated by collision and leads to the formation of a mountain range produced by the stacking of crustal slices. Different materials are thus involved (i.e., oceanic crust, continental crust, sediments). Depending on the context (oceanic or continental subduction), they can form contrasted structures in terms of units size, morphology and metamorphism (e.g., Alps vs. Andes/Altiplano-Puna). Moreover, some convergent zones with apparently similar tectonic settings (e.g., continent/continent convergence) show very different patterns of deformation with either very localized deformation (e.g., the Alps) or, at the opposite, deformation distributed over thousands of kilometers (e.g, Himalayas/Tibet). Finally, other convergent zones from different tectonic settings seem to show similar structures (e.g., Tibet plateau and Altiplano-Puna plateaus). Although the mechanism of plate convergence appears to be the same in each case, the structures obtained at the surface seem to be unique. Rheology of both the subducting plate and of the plate interface is known to influence the convergence zones dynamics. However, very few studies have addressed the role of the overriding plate rheology in details, while it may also exert a large control on the deformation style at plate boundaries. In

  2. New collision attacks on SHA-1 based on optimal joint local-collision analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.M.J. Stevens (Marc); T. Johansson; P.Q. Nguyen

    2013-01-01

    textabstractThe main contributions of this paper are two-fold. Firstly, we present a novel direction in the cryptanalysis of the cryptographic hash function {\\SHA}. Our work builds on previous cryptanalytic efforts on {\\SHA} based on combinations of local collisions. Due to dependencies,

  3. Leading neutrons from polarized pp collisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kopeliovich, B. Z.; Potashnikova, I. K.; Schmidt, Ivan; Soffer, J.

    2008-10-01

    We calculate the cross section and single-spin azimuthal asymmetry, An(t) for inclusive neutron production in pp collisions at forward rapidities relative to the polarized proton. Absorptive corrections to the pion pole generate a relative phase between the spin-flip and non-flip amplitudes, which leads to an appreciable spin asymmetry. However, the asymmetry observed recently in the PHENIX experiment at RHIC at very small |t|˜0.01 GeV2 cannot be explained by this mechanism.

  4. Leading neutrons from polarized pp collisions

    OpenAIRE

    Kopeliovich, B.Z.; Potashnikova, I K; Schmidt, Ivan; Soffer, J

    2008-01-01

    We calculate the cross section and single-spin azimuthal asymmetry, A_n(t) for inclusive neutron production in pp collisions at forward rapidities relative to the polarized proton. Absorptive corrections to the pion pole generate a relative phase between the spin-flip and non-flip amplitudes, which leads to an appreciable spin asymmetry. However, the asymmetry observed recently in the PHENIX experiment at RHIC at very small |t|~0.01GeV^2 cannot be explained by this mechanism.

  5. Collision Avoidance Short Course Part I: Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hejduk, Matthew D.

    2017-01-01

    Satellite conjunction assessment is perhaps the fastest-growing area in space situational awareness and protection, with military, civil, and commercial satellite owner operators embracing more and more sophisticated processes to avoid the avoidable namely collisions between high-value space assets and orbital debris. NASA and CNES have collaborated to offer an introductory short course on all the major aspects of the conjunction assessment problem. This half-day course will cover satellite conjunction dynamics and theory, JSpOC conjunction data products, major risk assessment parameters and plots, conjunction remediation decision support, and present and future challenges. This briefing represents the NASA portion of the course.

  6. Spin Dependent Collision of Ultracold Metastable Atoms

    CERN Document Server

    Uetake, Satoshi; Doyle, John M; Takahashi, Yoshiro

    2015-01-01

    Spin-polarized metastable atoms of ultracold ytterbium are trapped at high density and their inelastic collisional properties are measured. We reveal that in collisions of Yb(3P2) with Yb(1S0) there is relatively weak inelastic loss, but with a significant spin-dependence consistent with Zeeman sublevel changes as being the dominant decay process. This is in strong contrast to our observations of Yb(3P2)-Yb(3P2) collisional loss, which are, at low field, much more rapid and have essentially no spin dependence. Our results give a guideline to use the 3P2 states in many possible applications.

  7. Using collisions and resonances to tilting Uranus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogoszinski, Zeeve; Hamilton, Douglas

    2018-01-01

    Uranus’ large obliquity (98°) is widely thought to have occurred from a polar strike with an Earth sized object. Morbidelli et al. (2012) argue that two or more collisions are required in order to explain the prograde motion of Uranus’ satellites. These impactors could have been less massive by about a factor of ten, but multiple polar strikes are still improbable as even larger mass impactors would be needed for more equatorial collisions. Here we explore an alternative non-collisional model inspired by the explanation to Saturn’s significant tilt (27°). Ward and Hamilton (2004) & Hamilton and Ward (2004) argue that a secular resonance currently between Saturn’s spin axis and Neptune’s orbital pole is responsible for Saturn’s large obliquity. Unfortunately, Uranus’ axial precession frequency today is too long to match any of the current planets’ fundamental frequencies. Boué and Laskar (2010) explain that Uranus may have harbored an improbably large moon in the past which could have sped up the planet’s axial precession frequency enough to resonate with the regression of its own orbital pole. We explore another scenario which requires only the interactions between the giant planets.Thommes et al. (1999, 2002, 2003) argue that at least the cores of Uranus and Neptune were formed in between Jupiter and Saturn, as the density of the protoplanetary disk was greater there. If Neptune was scattered outward before Uranus, then a secular spin-orbit resonance between the two planets is possible. However, driving Uranus’ obliquity to near 90° with a resonance capture requires a timescale on the order of 100 Myr. If Neptune migrated out quicker or its orbital inclination was initially larger, then we find that the resulting resonance kick can tilt Uranus more than 40° in a reasonable timespan. This could replace one of the impactors required in the collisional scenario described by Morbidelli et al. (2012), but in most situations the effect of such a

  8. RHIC operation with asymmetric collisions in 2015

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, C. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Aschenauer, C. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Atoian, G. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Blaskiewicz, M. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Brown, K. A. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Bruno, D. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Connolly, R. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Ottavio, T. D. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Drees, K. A. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Fischer, W. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Gardner, C. J. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Gu, X. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Hayes, T. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Huang, H. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Laster, J. S. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Luo, Y. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Makdisi, Y. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Marr, G. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Marusic, A. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Meot, F. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Mernick, K. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Michnoff, R. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Minty, M. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Montag, C. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Morris, J. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Narayan, G. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Nayak, S. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Nemesure, S. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Pile, P. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Poblaguev, A. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Ranjbar, V. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Robert-Demolaize, G. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Roser, T. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Schmidke, B. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Schoefer, V. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Severino, F. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Shrey, T. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Smith, K. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Steski, D. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Tepikian, S. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Trbojevic, D. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Tsoupas, N. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Wang, G. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); White, S. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Yip, K. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Zaltsman, A. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Zeno, K. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Zhang, S. Y. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States)

    2015-08-07

    To study low-x shadowing/saturation physics as well as other nuclear effects [1], [2], proton-gold (p-Au, for 5 weeks) and proton-Aluminum (p-Al, for 2 weeks) collisions were provided for experiments in 2015 at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC), with polarized proton beam in the Blue ring and Au/Al beam in the Yellow ring. The special features of the asymmetric run in 2015 will be introduced. The operation experience will be reviewed as well in the report.

  9. Hyperons polarization in heavy-ion collisions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baznat Mircea

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available We study the structure of vorticity and hydrodynamic helicity fields in peripheral heavy-ion collisions using the kinetic Quark-Gluon Strings Model. The angular momentum which is a source of P-odd observables is preserved within this model with a good accuracy. We observe the formation of specific toroidal structures of vorticity field. Their existence is mirrored in the polarization of hyperons of the percent order. The observed qualitative energy dependence of polarization was predicted earlier and is quantified now.

  10. H- - H Collision Induced Radiative Transitions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dadonova, A. V.; Devdariani, A. Z.

    2012-12-01

    Exchange interaction leads to the formation of gerade and ungerade states of temporary molecules (quasimolecules) formed during the H- +H slow collisions. The work deals with the radiation produced by optical transitions between those states. The main characteristics involved in the description of optical transitions in quasimolecules, i.e., energy terms, an optical dipole transition moments, have been calculated in the frame of zero-range potentials model. The main feature of calculations is that the results can be expressed analytically in closed forms via the Lambert W function.

  11. Action principle for Coulomb collisions in plasmas

    CERN Document Server

    Hirvijoki, Eero

    2015-01-01

    In this letter we derive an action principle for Coulomb collisions in plasmas. Although no natural Lagrangian exists for the Landau-Fokker-Planck equation, an Eulerian variational formulation is found considering the system of partial differential equations that couple the distribution function and the Rosenbluth potentials. Exact conservation laws are derived after generalizing the energy-momentum stress tensor for second order Lagrangians and, in the case of a test-particle population in a given plasma background, the action principle is shown to correspond to the Langevin equation for individual particles. Being suitable for discretization, the presented action allows construction of variational integrators. Numerical implementation is left for a future study.

  12. Jets in heavy ion collisions with CMS

    CERN Document Server

    Salur, Sevil

    2016-01-01

    Jet physics in heavy ion collisions is a rich field which has been rapidly evolving since the first observations of medium interactions at RHIC through back-to-back hadron correlations and at LHC via reconstructed jets. In order to completely characterize the final state via jet-medium interactions and distinguish between competing energy loss mechanisms complementary and robust jet observables are investigated. Latest developments of jet finding techniques and their applications to heavy ion environments are discussed with an emphasis given on experimental results from CMS experiment.

  13. Physics of Nuclear Collisions at High Energy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hwa, Rudolph C. [Univ. of Oregon, Eugene, OR (United States)

    2012-05-01

    A wide range of problems has been investigated in the research program during the period of this grant. Although the major effort has been in the subject of heavy-ion collisions, we have also studied problems in biological and other physical systems. The method of analysis used in reducing complex data in multiparticle production to simple descriptions can also be applied to the study of complex systems of very different nature. Phase transition is an important phenomenon in many areas of physics, and for heavy-ion collisions we study the fluctuations of multiplicities at the critical point. Human brain activities as revealed in EEG also involve fluctuations in time series, and we have found that our experience enables us to find the appropriate quantification of the fluctuations in ways that can differentiate stroke and normal subjects. The main topic that characterizes the research at Oregon in heavy-ion collisions is the recombination model for the treatment of the hadronization process. We have avoided the hydrodynamical model partly because there is already a large community engaged in it, but more significantly we have found the assumption of rapid thermalization unconvincing. Recent results in studying LHC physics lead us to provide more evidence that shower partons are very important even at low p_T, but are ignored by hydro. It is not easy to work in an environment where the conventional wisdom regards our approach as being incorrect because it does not adhere to the standard paradigm. But that is just what a vibrant research community needs: unconventional approach may find evidences that can challenge the orthodoxy. An example is the usual belief that elliptic flow in fluid dynamics gives rise to azimuthal anisotropy. We claim that it is only sufficient but not necessary. With more data from LHC and more independent thinkers working on the subject what is sufficient as a theory may turn out to be incorrect in reality. Another area of investigation that

  14. Eta Meson Production in NN Collisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haidenbauer, J.; Baru, V.; Gasparyan, A. M.; Hanhart, C.; Speth, J.

    A model calculation for near-threshold h meson production in nucleon-nucleon collisions is presented. The h meson production is described by elementary rescattering processes via MN ® hN, with M = p, r, h and s. Corresponding amplitudes are taken from a multi-channel meson-exchange model of the pN system developed by the Jgroup. Effects of the NN interaction in the final as well as in the initial state are taken into account microscopically.

  15. Studies of Fluctuation Processes in Nuclear Collisions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ayik, Sakir [Tennessee Technological Univ., Cookeville, TN (United States). Dept. of Physics

    2016-04-14

    The standard one-body transport approaches have been extensively applied to investigate heavy-ion collision dynamics at low and intermediate energies. At low energies the approach is the mean-field description of the time-dependent Hartree-Fock (TDHF) theory. At intermediate energies the approach is extended by including a collision term, and its application has been carried out mostly in the semi-classical framework of the Boltzmann-Uhling-Uhlenbeck (BUU) model. The standard transport models provide a good understanding of the average properties of the collision dynamics in terms of the effective interactions in both low and intermediate energies. However, the standard models are inadequate for describing the fluctuation dynamics of collective motion at low energies and disassembling of the nuclear system into fragments at intermediate energies resulting from the growth of density fluctuations in the spinodal region. Our tasks have been to improve the standard transport approaches by incorporating fluctuation mechanisms into the description. There are mainly two different mechanisms for fluctuations: (i) Collisional fluctuations generated by binary nucleon collisions, which provide the dominant mechanism at intermediate energies, and (ii) One-body mechanism or mean-field fluctuations, which is the dominant mechanism at low energies. In the first part of our project, the PI extended the standard transport model at intermediate energies by incorporating collisional mechanism according to the “Generalized Langevin Description” of Mori formalism. The PI and his collaborators carried out a number of applications for describing dynamical mechanism of nuclear multi fragmentations, and nuclear collective response in the semi-classical framework of the approach, which is known as the Boltzmann-Langevin model. In the second part of the project, we considered dynamical description at low energies. Because of the effective Pauli blocking, the collisional dissipation and

  16. Plasma potential of a moving ionization zone in DC magnetron sputtering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panjan, Matjaž; Anders, André

    2017-02-01

    Using movable emissive and floating probes, we determined the plasma and floating potentials of an ionization zone (spoke) in a direct current magnetron sputtering discharge. Measurements were recorded in a space and time resolved manner, which allowed us to make a three-dimensional representation of the plasma potential. From this information we could derive the related electric field, space charge, and the related spatial distribution of electron heating. The data reveal the existence of strong electric fields parallel and perpendicular to the target surface. The largest E-fields result from a double layer structure at the leading edge of the ionization zone. We suggest that the double layer plays a crucial role in the energization of electrons since electrons can gain several 10 eV of energy when crossing the double layer. We find sustained coupling between the potential structure, electron heating, and excitation and ionization processes as electrons drift over the magnetron target. The brightest region of an ionization zone is present right after the potential jump, where drifting electrons arrive and where most local electron heating occurs. The ionization zone intensity decays as electrons continue to drift in the Ez × B direction, losing energy by inelastic collisions; electrons become energized again as they cross the potential jump. This results in the elongated, arrowhead-like shape of the ionization zone. The ionization zone moves in the -Ez × B direction from which the to-be-heated electrons arrive and into which the heating region expands; the zone motion is dictated by the force of the local electric field on the ions at the leading edge of the ionization zone. We hypothesize that electron heating caused by the potential jump and physical processes associated with the double layer also apply to magnetrons at higher discharge power, including high power impulse magnetron sputtering.

  17. Quantifying sedimentation in extensional basins and magmatism during continental collision

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Andrić, N.

    2017-01-01

    Continental collision is one of the main tectonic processes responsible for the formation of mountain ranges and plays an important role in the overall crustal growth, i.e. in the creation of new crust. Understanding the processes operating during continental collision demands an integrated approach

  18. Accelerated Hierarchical Collision Detection for Simulation using CUDA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Jimmy Alison; Fugl, Andreas Rune; Petersen, Henrik Gordon

    2010-01-01

    In this article we present a GPU accelerated, hybrid, narrow phase collision detection algorithm for simulation purposes. The algorithm is based on hierarchical bounding volume tree structures of oriented bounding boxes (OBB) that in the past has shown to be efficient for collision detection. The...

  19. Collision tumors of the larynx: A critical review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Coca-Pelaz, A.; Triantafyllou, A.; Devaney, K.O.; Rinaldo, A.; Takes, R.P.; Ferlito, A.

    2016-01-01

    Problems related to definition of collision tumors are briefly examined in conjunction with etiology and natural history. Examples of genuine collision tumors in larynx are rare in the literature and are herein identified and tabulated. Aspects related to diagnosis and therapeutic strategies are

  20. SMOOTH SPALLATION RESULTING FROM COLLISIONS OF COPPER PLATES

    OpenAIRE

    Zakharenko, I.

    1988-01-01

    The author examines the processes occuring during the collision of the metal plates with the speed 800-400 m/s. The experiment showed the formation of smooth cracks due to the collision of heat-treated copper plates with equal thickness.

  1. Finite escape fraction for ultrahigh energy collisions around Kerr ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    We investigate the issue of observability of high-energy collisions around Kerr naked singularity and show that results are in contrast with the Kerr black hole case. We had shown that it would be possible to have ultrahigh energy collisions between the particles close to the location = M around the Kerr naked singularity if ...

  2. An Easy Way to One-Dimensional Elastic Collisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sztrajman, Jorge; Sztrajman, Alejandro

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to propose a method for solving head-on elastic collisions, without algebraic complications, to emphasize the use of the fundamental conservations laws. Head-on elastic collisions are treated in many physics textbooks as examples of conservation of momentum and kinetic energy.

  3. Cross sections for electron collisions with nitric oxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Itikawa, Yukikazu, E-mail: yukitikawa@nifty.com [Institute of Space and Astronautical Science, Sagamihara 252-5210 (Japan)

    2016-09-15

    Cross section data are reviewed for electron collisions with nitric oxide. Collision processes considered are total scattering, elastic scattering, momentum transfer, excitations of rotational, vibrational, and electronic states, ionization, and dissociative electron attachment. After a survey of the literature (up to the end of 2015), recommended values of the cross section are determined, as far as possible.

  4. Collision and recombination driven instabilities in variable charged ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    In line of this present situation our investigation revealed that the recombination is more important than dust-neutral collisions in laboratory plasma and fusion plasma, while the dust-neutral collision frequency is dominant in the interstellar plasmas. The effects of ion and dust densities and ion streaming on the recombination ...

  5. Toward a Physical Characterization of Raindrop Collision Outcome Regimes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Testik, F. Y.; Barros, Ana P.; Bilven, Francis L.

    2011-01-01

    A comprehensive raindrop collision outcome regime diagram that delineates the physical conditions associated with the outcome regimes (i.e., bounce, coalescence, and different breakup types) of binary raindrop collisions is proposed. The proposed diagram builds on a theoretical regime diagram defined in the phase space of collision Weber numbers We and the drop diameter ratio p by including critical angle of impact considerations. In this study, the theoretical regime diagram is first evaluated against a comprehensive dataset for drop collision experiments representative of raindrop collisions in nature. Subsequently, the theoretical regime diagram is modified to explicitly describe the dominant regimes of raindrop interactions in (We, p) by delineating the physical conditions necessary for the occurrence of distinct types of collision-induced breakup (neck/filament, sheet, disk, and crown breakups) based on critical angle of impact consideration. Crown breakup is a subtype of disk breakup for lower collision kinetic energy that presents distinctive morphology. Finally, the experimental results are analyzed in the context of the comprehensive collision regime diagram, and conditional probabilities that can be used in the parameterization of breakup kernels in stochastic models of raindrop dynamics are provided.

  6. Charged particle density distributions in Au+ Au collisions at ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    ... measured in Au + Au collisions using the BRAHMS detector at RHIC. The results are presented as a function of the collision centrality and the center of mass energy. They are compared to the predictions of different parton scattering models and the important role of hard scattering processes at RHIC energies is discussed ...

  7. Physics Opportunities in Ultraperipheral Heavy Ion Collisions at LHC

    OpenAIRE

    Baur, G.

    2001-01-01

    Due to coherence, there are strong electromagnetic fields of short duration in very peripheral heavy ion collisions. They give rise to photon-photon and photon-nucleus collisions with high flux. Photon-photon and photon-hadron physics at various invariant mass scales are discussed.

  8. Evaluation of new collision-pair selection models in DSMC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akhlaghi, Hassan; Roohi, Ehsan

    2017-10-01

    The current paper investigates new collision-pair selection procedures in a direct simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) method. Collision partner selection based on the random procedure from nearest neighbor particles and deterministic selection of nearest neighbor particles have already been introduced as schemes that provide accurate results in a wide range of problems. In the current research, new collision-pair selections based on the time spacing and direction of the relative movement of particles are introduced and evaluated. Comparisons between the new and existing algorithms are made considering appropriate test cases including fluctuations in homogeneous gas, 2D equilibrium flow, and Fourier flow problem. Distribution functions for number of particles and collisions in cell, velocity components, and collisional parameters (collision separation, time spacing, relative velocity, and the angle between relative movements of particles) are investigated and compared with existing analytical relations for each model. The capability of each model in the prediction of the heat flux in the Fourier problem at different cell numbers, numbers of particles, and time steps is examined. For new and existing collision-pair selection schemes, the effect of an alternative formula for the number of collision-pair selections and avoiding repetitive collisions are investigated via the prediction of the Fourier heat flux. The simulation results demonstrate the advantages and weaknesses of each model in different test cases.

  9. Theoretical Concepts for Ultra-Relativistic Heavy Ion Collisions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McLerran,L.

    2009-07-27

    Various forms of matter may be produced in ultra-relativistic heavy ion collisions. These are the Quark GluonPlasma, the Color Glass Condensate , the Glasma and Quarkyoninc Matter. A novel effect that may beassociated with topological charge fluctuations is the Chiral Magnetic Effect. I explain these concepts andexplain how they may be seen in ultra-relatvistic heavy ion collisions

  10. Finite escape fraction for ultrahigh energy collisions around Kerr ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. We investigate the issue of observability of high-energy collisions around Kerr naked singularity and show that results are in contrast with the Kerr black hole case. We had shown that it would be possible to have ultrahigh energy collisions between the particles close to the location r = M around the Kerr naked ...

  11. Heavy Quark Pair Production in Polarized Photon--Photon Collisions

    OpenAIRE

    Jikia, George; Tkabladze, Avto

    2000-01-01

    We present the next-to-leading-order cross sections of the heavy quark-antiquark pair production in polarized photon-photon collision for the general case of photon polarizations. The numerical results for top-antitop production cross sections together with production asymmetries are obtained for linearly polarized photon-photon collisions, including one-loop QCD radiative corrections.

  12. Collision warning system based on probability density functions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Broek, T.H.A. van den; Ploeg, J.

    2010-01-01

    In this paper, a collision warning method between the host vehicle and target object(s) is studied. A probabilistic collision warning method is proposed, which is, in particular, useful for objects, e.g. vulnerable road users, which trajectories can rapidly change heading and/or velocity with

  13. Crabbed Waist Collisions in DAFNE and Super-B Design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raimondi, P.; Alesini, D.; Biagini, M.E.; Biscari, C.; Boni, R.; Boscolo, M.; Bossi, F.; Buonomo, B.; Clozza, A.; Delle Monache, G.O.; Demma, T.; Di Pasquale, E.; Di Pirro, G.; Drago, A.; Gallo, A.; Ghigo, A.; Guiducci, S.; Ligi, C.; Marcellini, F.; Mazzitelli, Giovanni; Milardi, C.; /Frascati /Orsay, LAL /CERN /Rome III U. /Rome U. /Novosibirsk, IYF /KEK, Tsukuba /INFN, Pisa /INFN, Cosenza /SLAC /Frascati

    2011-11-02

    The new idea of increasing the luminosity of a collider with crab waist collisions and first experimental results from the DA{Phi}NE {Phi}-Factory at LNF, Frascati, using this concept are presented. Consequences for the design of future factories will be discussed. An outlook to the performance reach with crab waist collisions is given, with emphasis on future B Factories.

  14. On the elliptic flow for nearly symmetric collisions and nuclear ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    sent the anisotropic part of the transverse flow and appear only in the non-central heavy-ion collisions. The elliptic flow [10] has been proven to be one of the most fruitful probes for extracting the equation of state (EOS) and to study the dynamics of heavy-ion collisions that originate from the almond-shaped region of the ...

  15. Petri Net Approach of Collision Prevention Supervisor Design in Port Transport System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danko Kezić

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Modern port terminals are equipped with various localtransport systems, which have the main task to transport cargobetween local storehouses and transport resources (ships,trains, trucks in the fastest and most efficient way, and at thelowest possible cost. These local transport systems consist offully automated transport units (AGV- automatic guided vehiclewhich are controlled by the computer system. The portcomputer system controls the fully automated transport units inthe way to avoid possible deadlocks and collisions betweenthem. However, beside the fully automated local transportunits, there are human operated transport units (fork-lifttrucks, cranes etc. which cross the path oftheAGVfrom timeto time. The collision of human operated transp011 unit andA GV is possible due to human inattention. To solve this problem,it is necesswy to design a supe1vismy control system thatcoordinates and controls both human driven transport unit andA G V In other words, the human-machine interactions need tobe supen·ised. The supen•ising system can be realized in the waythat the port terminal is divided into zones. Vehicle movementsare supen•ised by a video system which detects the moving ofparticular l'ehicles as a discrete event. Based on detected events,dangerous moving of certain vehicles is blocked by the supe1visi11gsystem. The paper considers the design of collision preventionsupen•isor by using discrete event dynamic themy. The portterminal is modeled by using ordi1za1y Petri nets. The design ofcollision prevention supe1visor is cmTied out by using the P-inl'ariantmethod. The verification of the supervisor is done bycomputer simulation.

  16. Aerial vehicles collision avoidance using monocular vision

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balashov, Oleg; Muraviev, Vadim; Strotov, Valery

    2016-10-01

    In this paper image-based collision avoidance algorithm that provides detection of nearby aircraft and distance estimation is presented. The approach requires a vision system with a single moving camera and additional information about carrier's speed and orientation from onboard sensors. The main idea is to create a multi-step approach based on a preliminary detection, regions of interest (ROI) selection, contour segmentation, object matching and localization. The proposed algorithm is able to detect small targets but unlike many other approaches is designed to work with large-scale objects as well. To localize aerial vehicle position the system of equations relating object coordinates in space and observed image is solved. The system solution gives the current position and speed of the detected object in space. Using this information distance and time to collision can be estimated. Experimental research on real video sequences and modeled data is performed. Video database contained different types of aerial vehicles: aircrafts, helicopters, and UAVs. The presented algorithm is able to detect aerial vehicles from several kilometers under regular daylight conditions.

  17. Hydrodynamic fluctuations in thermostatted multiparticle collision dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Híjar, Humberto; Sutmann, Godehard

    2011-04-01

    In this work we study the behavior of mesoscopic fluctuations of a fluid simulated by Multiparticle Collision Dynamics when this is applied together with a local thermostatting procedure that constrains the strength of temperature fluctuations. We consider procedures in which the thermostat interacts with the fluid at every simulation step as well as cases in which the thermostat is applied only at regular time intervals. Due to the application of the thermostat temperature fluctuations are forced to relax to equilibrium faster than they do in the nonthermostatted, constant-energy case. Depending on the interval of application of the thermostat, it is demonstrated that the thermodynamic state changes gradually from isothermal to adiabatic conditions. In order to exhibit this effect we compute from simulations diverse correlation functions of the hydrodynamic fluctuating fields. These correlation functions are compared with those predicted by a linearized hydrodynamic theory of a simple fluid in which a thermostat is applied locally. We find a good agreement between the model and the numerical results, which confirms that hydrodynamic fluctuations in Multiparticle Collision Dynamics in the presence of the thermostat have the properties expected for spontaneous fluctuations in fluids in contact with a heat reservoir.

  18. Mobile Robot Collision Avoidance in Human Environments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lingqi Zeng

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Collision avoidance is a fundamental requirement for mobile robots. Avoiding moving obstacles (also termed dynamic obstacles with unpredictable direction changes, such as humans, is more challenging than avoiding moving obstacles whose motion can be predicted. Precise information on the future moving directions of humans is unobtainable for use in navigation algorithms. Furthermore, humans should be able to pursue their activities unhindered and without worrying about the robots around them. In this paper, both active and critical regions are used to deal with the uncertainty of human motion. A procedure is introduced to calculate the region sizes based on worst-case avoidance conditions. Next, a novel virtual force field-based mobile robot navigation algorithm (termed QVFF is presented. This algorithm may be used with both holonomic and nonholonomic robots. It incorporates improved virtual force functions for avoiding moving obstacles and its stability is proven using a piecewise continuous Lyapunov function. Simulation and experimental results are provided for a human walking towards the robot and blocking the path to a goal location. Next, the proposed algorithm is compared with five state-of-the-art navigation algorithms for an environment with one human walking with an unpredictable change in direction. Finally, avoidance results are presented for an environment containing three walking humans. The QVFF algorithm consistently generated collision-free paths to the goal.

  19. Proton-Nucleus Collisions in the LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Jowett, J M; Baudrenghien, P; Jacquet, D; Lamont, M; Manglunki, D; Redaelli, S; Sapinski, M; Schaumann, M; Solfaroli Camillocci, M; Tomás, R; Uythoven, J; Valuch, D; Versteegen, R; Wenninger, J

    2013-01-01

    Following the high integrated luminosity accumulated in the first two Pb-Pb collision runs in 2010 and 2011, the LHC heavy-ion physics community requested a first run with p-Pb collisions. This almost unprecedented mode of collider operation was not foreseen in the baseline design of the LHC whose two-in-one magnet design imposed equal rigidity and, hence, unequal revolution frequencies, during injection and ramp. Nevertheless, after a successful pilot physics fill in 2012, the LHC provided of p-Pb luminosity per experiment, at an energy of 5.02 TeV per colliding nucleon pair, with several variations of the operating conditions, in early 2013. Together with a companion p-p run at 2.76 TeV, this was the last physics before the present long shutdown. We summarise the beam physics, operational adaptations and strategy that resulted in extremely rapid commissioning. Finally, we give an account of the progress of the run and provide an analysis of the performance.

  20. Orbital Debris-Debris Collision Avoidance

    CERN Document Server

    Mason, James; Marshall, William; Levit, Creon

    2011-01-01

    We investigate the feasibility of using a medium-powered (5kW) ground-based laser combined with a ground-based telescope to prevent collisions between debris objects in low-Earth orbit (LEO), for which there is no current, effective mitigation strategy. The scheme utilizes photon pressure alone as a means to perturb the orbit of a debris object. Applied over multiple engagements, this alters the debris orbit sufficiently to reduce the risk of an upcoming conjunction. We employ standard assumptions for atmospheric conditions and the resulting beam propagation. Using case studies designed to represent the properties (e.g. area and mass) of the current debris population, we show that one could significantly reduce the risk of more than half of all debris-debris collisions using only one such laser/telescope facility. We speculate on whether this could mitigate the debris fragmentation rate such that it falls below the natural debris re-entry rate due to atmospheric drag, and thus whether continuous long-term ope...

  1. Accelerated Monte Carlo Methods for Coulomb Collisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosin, Mark; Ricketson, Lee; Dimits, Andris; Caflisch, Russel; Cohen, Bruce

    2014-03-01

    We present a new highly efficient multi-level Monte Carlo (MLMC) simulation algorithm for Coulomb collisions in a plasma. The scheme, initially developed and used successfully for applications in financial mathematics, is applied here to kinetic plasmas for the first time. The method is based on a Langevin treatment of the Landau-Fokker-Planck equation and has a rich history derived from the works of Einstein and Chandrasekhar. The MLMC scheme successfully reduces the computational cost of achieving an RMS error ɛ in the numerical solution to collisional plasma problems from (ɛ-3) - for the standard state-of-the-art Langevin and binary collision algorithms - to a theoretically optimal (ɛ-2) scaling, when used in conjunction with an underlying Milstein discretization to the Langevin equation. In the test case presented here, the method accelerates simulations by factors of up to 100. We summarize the scheme, present some tricks for improving its efficiency yet further, and discuss the method's range of applicability. Work performed for US DOE by LLNL under contract DE-AC52- 07NA27344 and by UCLA under grant DE-FG02-05ER25710.

  2. 20 years ago: first collisions (at LEP)

    CERN Multimedia

    2009-01-01

    It’s been 20 years since the first electron positron collision at LEP, and I have to confess to a little self-indulgence in my message this week. Back then I was a member of the OPAL collaboration, the first to see collisions at LEP just before midnight on 13 August 1989 and almost exactly one month after the first circulating beam. It was a historic moment, and the atmosphere in the OPAL control room, 100 metres underground, was one of anticipation and excitement. We reported back to the LEP control room, champagne duly arrived, and over the next few hours, all the experiments were recording data. The pilot run was as smooth as it could be, and within weeks we were announcing new physics. It’s interesting to contrast the start-up of LEP with that of the LHC. With the benefit of hindsight, LEP seems to have got going without a hitch, and indeed it was a smooth start. We circulated beam on 14 July, much to the joy of one of our host states, and it was just a month ...

  3. Ejection-collision orbits in the RTBP

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ollé, Mercè; Rodríguez, Òscar; Soler, Jaume

    2018-02-01

    In this paper we analyse the ejection-collision (EC) orbits of the planar restricted three body problem. Being μ ∈ (0, 0.5] the mass parameter, and taking the big (small) primary with mass 1 - μ (μ), an EC orbit will be an orbit that ejects from the big primary, does an excursion and collides with it. As it is well known, for any value of the mass parameter μ ∈ (0, 0.5] and sufficiently restricted Hill regions (that is, for big enough values of the Jacobi constant C), there are exactly four EC orbits. We check their existence and extend numerically these four orbits for μ ∈ (0, 0.5] and for smaller values of the Jacobi constant. We introduce the concept of n-ejection-collision orbits (n-EC orbits) and we explore them numerically for μ ∈ (0, 0.5] and values of the Jacobi constant such that the Hill bounded possible region of motion contains the big primary and does not contain the small one. We study the cases 1 ≤ n ≤ 10 and we analyse the continuation of families of such n-EC orbits, varying the energy, as well as the bifurcations that appear.

  4. Collision and composite tumors; radiologic and pathologic correlation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sung, Calvin T; Shetty, Anup; Menias, Christine O; Houshyar, Roozbeh; Chatterjee, Shreya; Lee, Thomas K; Tung, Paul; Helmy, Mohammed; Lall, Chandana

    2017-12-01

    The terms composite and collision tumors have been used interchangeably throughout radiological literature. Both composite and collision tumors involve two morphologically and immunohistochemically distinct neoplasms coexisting within a single organ. However, collision tumors lack the histological cellular intermingling seen in composite tumors. Composite tumors often arise from a common driver mutation that induces a divergent histology from a common neoplastic source while collision tumors may arise from coincidental neoplastic change. The purpose of this review is to provide an overview of abdominal composite and collision tumors by discussing hallmark radiographic and pathological presentations of rare hepatic, renal, and adrenal case studies. A better understanding of the presentation of each lesion is imperative for proper recognition, diagnosis, and management of these unique tumor presentations.

  5. Review and Application of Ship Collision and Grounding Analysis Procedures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Preben Terndrup

    2010-01-01

    It is the purpose of the paper to present a review of prediction and analysis tools for collision and grounding analyses and to outline a probabilistic procedure for which these tools can be used by the maritime industry to develop performance based rules to reduce the risk associated with human,......, environmental and economic costs of collision and grounding events. The main goal of collision and grounding research should be to identify the most economic risk control options associated with prevention and mitigation of collision and grounding events.......It is the purpose of the paper to present a review of prediction and analysis tools for collision and grounding analyses and to outline a probabilistic procedure for which these tools can be used by the maritime industry to develop performance based rules to reduce the risk associated with human...

  6. Collision avoidance for multiple Lagrangian dynamical systems with gyroscopic forces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lorenzo Sabattini

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This article introduces a novel methodology for dealing with collision avoidance for groups of mobile robots. In particular, full dynamics are considered, since each robot is modeled as a Lagrangian dynamical system moving in a three-dimensional environment. Gyroscopic forces are utilized for defining the collision avoidance control strategy: This kind of forces leads to avoiding collisions, without interfering with the convergence properties of the multi-robot system’s desired control law. Collision avoidance introduces, in fact, a perturbation on the nominal behavior of the system: We define a method for choosing the direction of the gyroscopic force in an optimal manner, in such a way that perturbation is minimized. Collision avoidance and convergence properties are analytically demonstrated, and simulation results are provided for validation purpose.

  7. The Root Apex of Arabidopsis thaliana Consists of Four Distinct Zones of Growth Activities: Meristematic Zone, Transition Zone, Fast Elongation Zone and Growth Terminating Zone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verbelen, Jean-Pierre; De Cnodder, Tinne; Le, Jie; Vissenberg, Kris; Baluska, Frantisek

    2006-11-01

    In the growing apex of Arabidopsis thaliana primary roots, cells proceed through four distinct phases of cellular activities. These zones and their boundaries can be well defined based on their characteristic cellular activities. The meristematic zone comprises, and is limited to, all cells that undergo mitotic divisions. Detailed in vivo analysis of transgenic lines reveals that, in the Columbia-0 ecotype, the meristem stretches up to 200 microm away from the junction between root and root cap (RCJ). In the transition zone, 200 to about 520 microm away from the RCJ, cells undergo physiological changes as they prepare for their fast elongation. Upon entering the transition zone, they progressively develop a central vacuole, polarize the cytoskeleton and remodel their cell walls. Cells grow slowly during this transition: it takes ten hours to triplicate cell length from 8.5 to about 35 microm in the trichoblast cell files. In the fast elongation zone, which covers the zone from 520 to about 850 microm from the RCJ, cell length quadruplicates to about 140 microm in only two hours. This is accompanied by drastic and specific cell wall alterations. Finally, root hairs fully develop in the growth terminating zone, where root cells undergo a minor elongation to reach their mature lengths.

  8. Methods for converting industrial zones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talipova, L.; Kosyakov, E.; Polyakova, Irina

    2017-10-01

    In this article, industrial zones of Saint Petersburg and Hong Kong were considered. Competitive projects aimed at developing the grey belt of Saint Petersburg were considered. The methodology of the survey of reconstruction of the industrial zone of Hong Kong is also analyzed. The potential of the city’s grey belt lies in its location on the border of the city’s historical centre. Rational use of this potential will make it possible to achieve numerous objectives, including development of the city’s transport infrastructure, positioning of business functions, and organization of housing and the city’s system of green public spaces.

  9. Fault-plane Solutions Determined by Waveform Modeling Confirm Tectonic Collision in the Eastern Adriatic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Louvari, E.; Kiratzi, A.; Papazachos, B.; Hatzidimitriou, P.

    - Source parameters for thirteen earthquakes in the SE Adriatic region have been determined using P and SH body-waveform inversion. The results of this modeling are combined with eleven other earthquakes with M>=5 whose focal mechanisms have been determined mainly by waveform modeling. The results confirm that movement on mainly low-angle reverse faults causes the deformation in coastal southern Yugoslavia through Albania up to the Lefkada Island in NW Greece. This zone of thrusting has a NW-SE trend (N34°W), follows the coastline, and dips towards the continent. The slip vectors of these events trend at N229° along the Dalmatian coasts, to N247° along Albania and NW Greece. The deformation is attributed to the continental collision between the Adriatic block to the west and Eurasia to the east. Along the mountain line in eastern Albania (Albanides Mts.) and in NW Greece (Hellenides Mts.), E-W extension is occurring. The E-W extension associated with the orogenic belt could be attributed to a variety of models such as: gravity, internal deformation of the thrust wedge, a probable down bulge of the dense lithosphere of the Adriatic block beneath the Eurasian lithospheric plate in combination with the compressional stresses applied along the collision belt.

  10. Study of Initial and Final State Effects in Ultrarelativistic Heavy Ion Collisions Using Hadronic Probes

    CERN Document Server

    Purwar, Anuj K

    2007-01-01

    It has been theorized that if heavy nuclei (e.g. Au, Pb) are collided at sufficiently high energies, we might be to recreate the conditions that existed in the universe a few microseconds after the Big Bang. The kinetic energy of the colliding nuclei gets converted into heat, leading to a phase transition into a new state of matter: the Quark-Gluon Plasma (QGP), in which quarks and gluons are deconfined. However, we never directly get to see the QGP because as the matter cools it recombines (hadronizes) into ordinary subatomic particles. We can only hope to infer its existence from indirect experimental signatures, after hadronization. In this dissertation we attempt to shed some light on: Properties of the final state of produced matter in Au+Au collisions at $\\sqrt{s_{NN}}=200$ GeV. As the hot, dense system of particles from the collision zone cools and expands, light nuclei like deuterons and anti-deuterons can be formed, with a probability proportional to the product of the phase space densities of its co...

  11. Effective equation of state of hot and dense matter in nuclear collisions around FAIR energy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bravina L.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The chemical and thermal equilibration in the central zone of heavy-ion collisions at energies around FAIR is studied within two microscopic models. Two systems are utilized for the analysis: (i central cubic cell of fixed volume V = 125 fm3 and (ii expanding central area of uniformly distributed energy density. It is found that kinetic, thermal, and chemical equilibration of the expanding hadronic matter are nearly approached in both systems for the period of 10–18 fm/c. The expansion proceeds almost isentropically. The extracted equation of state (EOS in P − ɛ plane has a linear dependence P = aɛ, where a ≡ c2s slightly increases with the collision energy from 0.12 to 0.145. Linear dependencies for the EOS are found also in T − μB and T − μS planes. The characteristic kinks observed in the last two phase diagrams are linked to inelastic freeze-out in the expanding fireball.

  12. Exposure to lateral collision in signalized intersections with protected left turn under different traffic control strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Midenet, Sophie; Saunier, Nicolas; Boillot, Florence

    2011-11-01

    This paper proposes an original definition of the exposure to lateral collision in signalized intersections and discusses the results of a real world experiment. This exposure is defined as the duration of situations where the stream that is given the right-of-way goes through the conflict zone while road users are waiting in the cross-traffic approach. This measure, obtained from video sensors, makes it possible to compare different operating conditions such as different traffic signal strategies. The data from a real world experiment is used, where the adaptive real-time strategy CRONOS (ContRol Of Networks by Optimization of Switchovers) and a time-plan strategy with vehicle-actuated ranges alternately controlled an isolated intersection near Paris. Hourly samples with similar traffic volumes are compared and the exposure to lateral collision is different in various areas of the intersection and various traffic conditions for the two strategies. The total exposure under peak hour traffic conditions drops by roughly 5 min/h with the CRONOS strategy compared to the time-plan strategy, which occurs mostly on entry streams. The results are analyzed through the decomposition of cycles in phase sequences and recommendations are made for traffic control strategies. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Geocoding police collision report data from California: a comprehensive approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Park Shin

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Collision geocoding is the process of assigning geographic descriptors, usually latitude and longitude coordinates, to a traffic collision record. On California police reports, relative collision location is recorded using a highway postmile marker or a street intersection. The objective of this study was to create a geocoded database of all police-reported, fatal and severe injury collisions in the California Statewide Integrated Traffic Records System (SWITRS for years 1997-2006 for use by public agencies. Results Geocoding was completed with a multi-step process. First, pre-processing was performed using a scripting language to clean and standardize street name information. A state highway network with postmile values was then created using a custom tool written in Visual Basic for Applications (VBA in ArcGIS software. Custom VBA functionality was also used to incorporate the offset direction and distance. Intersection and address geocoding was performed using ArcGIS, StreetMap Pro 2003 digital street network, and Google Earth Pro. A total of 142,007 fatal and severe injury collisions were identified in SWITRS. The geocoding match rate was 99.8% for postmile-coded collisions and 86% for intersection-coded collisions. The overall match rate was 91%. Conclusions The availability of geocoded collision data will be beneficial to clinicians, researchers, policymakers, and practitioners in the fields of traffic safety and public health. Potential uses of the data include studies of collision clustering on the highway system, examinations of the associations between collision occurrence and a variety of variables on environmental and social characteristics, including housing and personal demographics, alcohol outlets, schools, and parks. The ability to build maps may be useful in research planning and conduct and in the delivery of information to both technical and non-technical audiences.

  14. Collisions of dark matter axion stars with astrophysical sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eby, Joshua; Leembruggen, Madelyn; Leeney, Joseph; Suranyi, Peter; Wijewardhana, L. C. R.

    2017-04-01

    If QCD axions form a large fraction of the total mass of dark matter, then axion stars could be very abundant in galaxies. As a result, collisions with each other, and with other astrophysical bodies, can occur. We calculate the rate and analyze the consequences of three classes of collisions, those occurring between a dilute axion star and: another dilute axion star, an ordinary star, or a neutron star. In all cases we attempt to quantify the most important astrophysical uncertainties; we also pay particular attention to scenarios in which collisions lead to collapse of otherwise stable axion stars, and possible subsequent decay through number changing interactions. Collisions between two axion stars can occur with a high total rate, but the low relative velocity required for collapse to occur leads to a very low total rate of collapses. On the other hand, collisions between an axion star and an ordinary star have a large rate, Γ⊙ ˜ 3000 collisions/year/galaxy, and for sufficiently heavy axion stars, it is plausible that most or all such collisions lead to collapse. We identify in this case a parameter space which has a stable region and a region in which collision triggers collapse, which depend on the axion number ( N ) in the axion star, and a ratio of mass to radius cubed characterizing the ordinary star ( M s / R s 3 ). Finally, we revisit the calculation of collision rates between axion stars and neutron stars, improving on previous estimates by taking cylindrical symmetry of the neutron star distribution into account. Collapse and subsequent decay through collision processes, if occurring with a significant rate, can affect dark matter phenomenology and the axion star mass distribution.

  15. Hard collisions of few keV diatomic molecular ions with atomic gas targets: Collision induced dissociation and target ionization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, Nora G; Sayler, A M; McKenna, J; Gaire, B; Zohrabi, M; Berry, Ben; Carnes, K D; Ben-Itzhak, I [J. R. Macdonald Laboratory, Physics Department, Kansas State University, Manhattan, KS 66506 (United States); Wolff, Wania, E-mail: ibi@phys.ksu.ed [Instituto de Fisica, Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, Rio de Janeiro, 21945-970, RJ (Brazil)

    2009-11-01

    Target ionization in close encounters between few keV simple diatomic molecular ions and noble gas targets have been studied experimentally. Some of the projectile molecular ions fragment as a result of these violent collisions while others remain bound despite undergoing a 'hard' collision. The measured momenta shed light on the mechanisms responsible for this behavior.

  16. Dielectron production in proton-proton collisions with ALICE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koehler, Markus Konrad

    2015-10-01

    Ultrarelativistic hadron collisions, such as delivered since a couple of years at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), provide new insights into the properties of strongly interacting matter at high temperatures and densities, which is expected to have existed a few of a millionth seconds after the big bang. Electromagnetic probes, such as leptons and photons, are emitted during the entire collision. Since they do not undergo strong interactions, they reflect the entire evolution of the collision. Pairs of leptons, so called dileptons, have the advantage compared to real photons, that they do not only carry momentum, but also have a non-zero invariant mass. The invariant mass spectrum of dileptons is a superposition of several components and allows to address different characteristics of the medium. To understand dielectron production in heavy-ion collisions, reference measurements in proton-proton (pp) collisions are necessary. pp collisions reflect the vacuum contribution of the particles produced in heavy-ion collisions. The analysis of pp collisions is an essential step towards the extraction of medium influences on the vector meson spectral functions and the thermal radiation in heavy-ion collisions. In this thesis, the production of electron-positron pairs (dielectrons) in pp collisions at a collision energy of 7 TeV in the ALICE central barrel is analysed. ALICE has unique particle identification capabilities at low momentum. Electrons and positrons are identified with a high purity and combined to pairs. The invariant mass distribution of dielectrons is corrected for detector effects and the selection criteria in the analysis with Monte Carlo simulations. The dielectron invariant mass spectrum of known hadronic sources is calculated based on the cross sections measured in other decay channels using the known decay kinematics. This so called hadronic cocktail represents the dielectron spectrum at the moment of kinematic freeze-out and can be compared to the

  17. Zone refining of plutonium metal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate zone refining techniques for the purification of plutonium metal. The redistribution of 10 impurity elements from zone melting was examined. Four tantalum boats were loaded with plutonium impurity alloy, placed in a vacuum furnace, heated to 700{degrees}C, and held at temperature for one hour. Ten passes were made with each boat. Metallographic and chemical analyses performed on the plutonium rods showed that, after 10 passes, moderate movement of certain elements were achieved. Molten zone speeds of 1 or 2 inches per hour had no effect on impurity element movement. Likewise, the application of constant or variable power had no effect on impurity movement. The study implies that development of a zone refining process to purify plutonium is feasible. Development of a process will be hampered by two factors: (1) the effect on impurity element redistribution of the oxide layer formed on the exposed surface of the material is not understood, and (2) the tantalum container material is not inert in the presence of plutonium. Cold boat studies are planned, with higher temperature and vacuum levels, to determine the effect on these factors. 5 refs., 1 tab., 5 figs.

  18. ShoreZone Mapped Data

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set is a polyline file of mapped ShoreZone units which correspond with data records found in the Unit, Xshr, BioUnit, and BioBand tables of this...

  19. Building a Subduction Zone Observatory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomberg, Joan S.; Bodin, Paul; Bourgeois, Jody; Cashman, Susan; Cowan, Darrel; Creager, Kenneth C.; Crowell, Brendan; Duvall, Alison; Frankel, Arthur; Gonzalez, Frank; Houston, Heidi; Johnson, Paul; Kelsey, Harvey; Miller, Una; Roland, Emily C.; Schmidt, David; Staisch, Lydia; Vidale, John; Wilcock, William; Wirth, Erin

    2016-01-01

    Subduction zones contain many of Earth’s most remarkable geologic structures, from the deepest oceanic trenches to glacier-covered mountains and steaming volcanoes. These environments formed through spectacular events: Nature’s largest earthquakes, tsunamis, and volcanic eruptions are born here.

  20. Deciduous Forest Zone of Ghana

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Drainage becomes poorer towards the valley bottom, where soils gener- ally show loamy textures and redoximorphic features, but only Oda shows high base saturation and pH(CaCl). (5.8-5.9) throughout the profile. Key words: Catena, soil series, pedology, forest, soil. Introduction. The semi-deciduous forest Zone of Ghana.

  1. Objects as Temporary Autonomous Zones

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tim Morton

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available From Hakim Bey's instructions on creating temporary autonomous zones we see an oscillation "between performance art and politics, circus clowning and revolution." In this essay Tim Morton discusses anarchist politics as, "the creation of fresh objects in a reality without a top or a bottom object, or for that matter a middle object."

  2. ISOLDE target zone control room

    CERN Multimedia

    2016-01-01

    Operating the ISOLDE target handling robots from the dedicated control room in building 197. Monitors showing the movements of the robots (GPS in this case) in the target zone. The footage shows the actual operation by the operator as well as the different equipment such as camera electronics, camera motor controls, camera monitors and Kuka robot controls touch panel.

  3. The collision that changed the world

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wally Broecker

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract In connection with the Anthropocene, one might ask how climate is likely to evolve in the absence of man’s intervention and whether humans will be able to purposefully alter this course. In this commentary, I deal with the situation for very long time scales. I make a case that fifty million years ago, the collision between the northward drifting Indian land mass and Asia set the Earth’s climate on a new course. Ever since then, it has cooled. In the absence of some other dramatic disruption in the movement of the plates which make up our planet’s crust, on the time scale of tens of millions of years, this drift would cause the Earth to freeze over as it did during the late Precambrian. Evidence for this change in course comes from records of oxygen and lithium isotopic composition of foraminifer shells. It is reinforced by records of Mg to Ca in halite-hosted fluid inclusions and in marine CaCO3. In addition, the collision appears to have created abrupt changes in the sulfur isotope composition of marine barite and the carbon isotope composition of amber. Not only did this collision create the Himalaya, but more important, it led to a reorganization of the crustal plate motions. Through some combination of the building of mountains and lowering of sea level, these changes generated a mismatch between the supply of CO2 by planetary outgassing and that of calcium by the weathering of silicate rock. The tendency toward an oversupply of calcium has been compensated by a drawdown of the atmosphere’s CO2 content. This drawdown cooled the Earth, slowing down the supply of calcium. Although we are currently inadvertently compensating for this cooling by burning fossil fuels, the impacts of this CO2 on Earth climate will last no more than a tenth of a million years. So, if humans succeed in avoiding extinction, there will likely be a long-term effort to warm the planet.

  4. Fifty years of shear zones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graham, Rodney

    2017-04-01

    We are here, of course, because 1967 saw the publication of John Ramsay's famous book. Two years later a memorable field trip from Imperial College to the Outer Hebrides saw John on a bleak headland on the coast of North Uist where a relatively undeformed metadolerite within Lewisian (Precambrian) gneisses contained ductile shear zones with metamorphic fabrics in amphibolite facies. One particular outcrop was very special - a shear zone cutting otherwise completely isotropic, undeformed metadolerite, with an incremental foliation starting to develop at 45° to the deformation zone, and increasing in intensity as it approached the shear direction. Here was proof of the process of simple shear under ductile metamorphic conditions - the principles of simple shear outlined in John Ramsay's 1967 book clearly visible in nature, and verified by Ramsay's mathematical proofs in the eventual paper (Ramsay and Graham, 1970). Later work on the Lewisian on the mainland of Scotland, in South Harris, in Africa, and elsewhere applied Ramsay's simple shear principles more liberally, more imprecisely and on larger scale than at Caisteal Odair, but in retrospect it documented what seems now to be the generality of mid and lower crustal deformation. Deep seismic reflection data show us that on passive margins hyper-stretched continental crust (whether or not cloaked by Seaward Dipping Reflectors) seems to have collapsed onto the mantle. Crustal faults mostly sole out at or above the mantle - so the Moho is a detachment- an 'outer marginal detachment', if you like, and, of course, it must be a ductile shear. On non-volcanic margins this shear zone forms the first formed ocean floor before true sea floor spreading gets going to create real oceanic crust. Gianreto Manatschal, Marcel Lemoine and others realised that the serpentinites described in parts of the Alps are exposed remnants of this ductile shear zone. Associated ophicalcite breccias tell of sea floor exposure, while high

  5. Giant molecular cloud collisions as triggers of star formation. VI. Collision-induced turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Benjamin; Tan, Jonathan C.; Nakamura, Fumitaka; Christie, Duncan; Li, Qi

    2018-01-01

    We investigate collisions between giant molecular clouds (GMCs) as potential generators of their internal turbulence. Using magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulations of self-gravitating, magnetized, turbulent GMCs, we compare kinematic and dynamic properties of dense gas structures formed when such clouds collide compared to those that form in non-colliding clouds as self-gravity overwhelms decaying turbulence. We explore the nature of turbulence in these structures via distribution functions of density, velocity dispersions, virial parameters, and momentum injection. We find that the dense clumps formed from GMC collisions have higher effective Mach number, greater overall velocity dispersions, sustain near-virial equilibrium states for longer times, and are the conduit for the injection of turbulent momentum into high density gas at high rates.

  6. Effect of collisions on dust particle charging via particle-in-cell Monte-Carlo collision

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rovagnati, B.; Davoudabadi, M.; Lapenta, G.; Mashayek, F.

    2007-10-01

    In this paper, the effect of collisions on the charging and shielding of a single dust particle immersed in an infinite plasma is studied. A Monte-Carlo collision (MCC) algorithm is implemented in the particle-in-cell DEMOCRITUS code to account for the collisional phenomena which are typical of dusty plasmas in plasma processing, namely, electron-neutral elastic scattering, ion-neutral elastic scattering, and ion-neutral charge exchange. Both small and large dust particle radii, as compared to the characteristic Debye lengths, are considered. The trends of the steady-state dust particle potential at increasing collisionality are presented and discussed. The ions and electron energy distributions at various locations and at increasing collisionality in the case of large particle radius are shown and compared to their local Maxwellians. The ion-neutral charge-exchange collision is found to be by far the most important collisional phenomenon. For small particle radius, collisional effects are found to be important also at low level of collisionality, as more ions are collected by the dust particle due to the destruction of trapped ion orbits. For large particle radius, the major collisional effect is observed to take place in proximity of the presheath. Finally, the species energy distribution functions are found to approach their local Maxwellians at increasing collisionality.

  7. Total Probability of Collision as a Metric for Finite Conjunction Assessment and Collision Risk Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frigm, Ryan C.; Hejduk, Matthew D.; Johnson, Lauren C.; Plakalovic, Dragan

    2015-01-01

    On-orbit collision risk is becoming an increasing mission risk to all operational satellites in Earth orbit. Managing this risk can be disruptive to mission and operations, present challenges for decision-makers, and is time-consuming for all parties involved. With the planned capability improvements to detecting and tracking smaller orbital debris and capacity improvements to routinely predict on-orbit conjunctions, this mission risk will continue to grow in terms of likelihood and effort. It is very real possibility that the future space environment will not allow collision risk management and mission operations to be conducted in the same manner as it is today. This paper presents the concept of a finite conjunction assessment-one where each discrete conjunction is not treated separately but, rather, as a continuous event that must be managed concurrently. The paper also introduces the Total Probability of Collision as an analogous metric for finite conjunction assessment operations and provides several options for its usage in a Concept of Operations.

  8. Running Safety of Trains under Vessel-Bridge Collision

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yongle Li

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available To optimize the sensor placement of the health monitoring system, the dynamic behavior of the train-bridge system subjected to vessel-collision should be studied in detail firstly. This study thus focuses on the characteristics of a train-bridge system under vessel-bridge collision. The process of the vessel-bridge collision is simulated numerically with a reliable finite element model (FEM. The dynamic responses of a single car and a train crossing a cable-stayed bridge are calculated. It is shown that the collision causes significant increase of the train’s lateral acceleration, lateral wheelset force, wheel unloading rate, and derailment coefficient. The effect of the collision on the train’s vertical acceleration is much smaller. In addition, parametric studies with various train’s positions, ship tonnage, and train speed are performed. If the train is closer to the vessel-bridge collision position or the ship tonnage is larger, the train will be more dangerous. There is a relatively high probability of running danger at a low speed, resulting from longer stay of the train on the bridge. The train’s position, the ship tonnage, and the train speed must be considered when determining the most adverse conditions for the trains running on bridges under vessel-bridge collision.

  9. Heavy flavour production at CMS in heavy ion collisions

    CERN Document Server

    Nguyen, Matthew

    2015-01-01

    We review recent results relating to beauty production in heavy-ion collisions, in both the closed and open heavy flavor sectors, from the CMS experiment at the LHC. The sequential suppression of the ° states in PbPb collisions is thought to be evidence of the dissociation of quarkonia bound states in deconfined matter. Data from pPb collisions demonstrate that while cold nuclear effects appear to be subdominant in minimum bias collisions, there exists a non-trivial dependence on collision multiplicity that remains to be understood. The suppression of high p T particles in heavy-ion collisions, relative to the expectation from pp collisions, is typically interpreted in terms of energy loss of hard scattered parton in the dense nuclear medium. The flavor dependence of the energy loss may be accessed via measurements of b hadrons and b-tagged jets. Measurement of B mesons, via non-prompt J = y , at relatively low p T indicate a smaller suppression factor than D meson or inclusive charged hadrons. Data on b jet...

  10. Sensor-Based Collision Avoidance: Theory and Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seraji, Homayoun; Steele, Robert; Ivlev, Robert

    1996-01-01

    A new on-line control strategy for sensor-based collision avoidance of manipulators and supporting experimental results are presented in this article. This control strategy is based on nullification of virtual forces applied to the end-effector by a hypothetical spring-plus-damper attached to the object's surface. In the proposed approach, the real-time arm control software continuously monitors the object distance measured by the arm-mounted proximity sensors. When this distance is less than a preset threshold, the collision avoidance control action is initiated to inhibit motion toward the object and thus prevent collision. This is accomplished by employing an outer feedback loop to perturb the end-effector nominal motion trajectory in real-time based on the sensory data. The perturbation is generated by a proportional-plus-integral (PI) collision avoidance controller acting on the difference between the sensed distance and the preset threshold. This approach is computationally very fast, requires minimal modification to the existing manipulator positioning system, and provides the manipulator with an on-line collision avoidance capability to react autonomously and intelligently. A dexterous RRC robotic arm is instrumented with infrared proximity sensors and is operated under the proposed collision avoidance strategy. Experimental results are presented to demonstrate end-effector collision avoidance both with an approaching object and while reaching inside a constricted opening.

  11. Comparing Collision Avoidance Systems of Different Type of Transportation Mode

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Serkan ÖZDEMİR

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Different modes of transportation are often used in our daily lives. Therefore, how safe these modes are commonly researched by researchers. Many models and methods are developed to avoid collision with the development of technology. This development is aimed to improving the safety of life and property. The technological developments also aim to reduce the minimum level of the human error. Technological devices developed to prevent collision are applied in systematic way according to type of transportation mode. When comparatively examined, it is similar to each other technology used in different modes. In this respect, proposed model and methods are similar in general. These approaches are generally based on position of vehicles relative to each other and also rules have been developed taking into consideration the possibilities that may occur. Real-time sensors used to avoid collision in vehicles reduce risk of collision and provide significant achievements on behalf of avoiding collision. Besides this, it has been considered important a communication network between vehicles. As a result, the importance of the technological devices developed to ensure collision avoidance is increasing in our life. Thus, the study aims to explain and compare the methods, models and techniques used in the different transportation modes so as to avoid collision.

  12. Absence of jet quenching in peripheral nucleus-nucleus collisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loizides, Constantin; Morsch, Andreas

    2017-10-01

    Medium effects on the production of high-pT particles in nucleus-nucleus (AA) collisions are generally quantified by the nuclear modification factor (RAA), defined to be unity in absence of nuclear effects. Modeling particle production including a nucleon-nucleon impact parameter dependence, we demonstrate that RAA at midrapidity in peripheral AA collisions can be significantly affected by event selection and geometry biases. Even without jet quenching and shadowing, these biases cause an apparent suppression for RAA in peripheral collisions, and are relevant for all types of hard probes and all collision energies. Our studies indicate that calculations of jet quenching in peripheral AA collisions should account for the biases, or else they will overestimate the relevance of parton energy loss. Similarly, expectations of parton energy loss in light-heavy collision systems based on comparison with apparent suppression seen in peripheral RAA should be revised. Our interpretation of the peripheral RAA data would unify observations for lighter collision systems or lower energies where significant values of elliptic flow are observed despite the absence of strong jet quenching.

  13. Solitary waves in dimer binary collision model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahsan, Zaid; Jayaprakash, K. R.

    2017-01-01

    Solitary wave propagation in nonlinear diatomic (dimer) chains is a very interesting topic of research in the study of nonlinear lattices. Such waves were recently found to be supported by the essentially nonlinear granular lattice and Toda lattice. An interesting aspect of this discovery is attributed to the realization of a spectrum of the mass ratio (the only system parameter governing the dynamics) that supports the propagation of such waves corresponding to the considered interaction potential. The objective of this exposition is to explore solitary wave propagation in the dimer binary collision (BC) model. Interestingly, the dimer BC model supports solitary wave propagation at a discrete spectrum of mass ratios similar to those observed in granular and Toda dimers. Further, we report a qualitative and one-to-one correspondence between the spectrum of the mass ratio corresponding to the dimer BC model and those corresponding to granular and Toda dimer chains.

  14. Coalescence and Collisions of Gold Nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduardo Pérez-Tijerina

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available We study the assembling of small gold clusters subject to collisions and close contact coalescence by using molecular dynamics simulations to simulate events that occur typically in the sputtering process of synthesis. Our results support the notion that the kinetics of coalescence processes strongly determine the geometry and structure of the final particle. While impact velocities, relative orientations, and the initial shape of the interacting particles are unlikely to strictly determine the structural details of the newly formed particle, we found that high initial temperatures and/or impact velocities increase the probability of appearance of icosahedral-like structures, Wulff polyhedra are likely to be formed as a product of the interactions between nanospheres, while the appearance of fcc particles of approximately cuboctahedral shape is mainly due to the interaction between icosahedra.

  15. Vector correlations in rotationally inelastic molecular collisions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lemeshko, Mikhail

    2011-04-13

    The thesis presents an analytic model that describes scalar and vector properties of molecular collisions, both field-free and in fields. The model is based on the sudden approximation and treats molecular scattering as the Fraunhofer diffraction of matter waves from the hard-core part of the interaction potential. The theory has no fitting parameters and is inherently quantum, rendering fully state- and energy-resolved scattering amplitudes and all the quantities that unfold from them in analytic form. This allows to obtain complex polarization moments inherent to quantum stereodynamics, and to account for interference and other non-classical effects. The simplicity and analyticity of the model paves a way to understanding the origin of the features observed in experiment and exact computations, such as the angular oscillations in the state-to-state differential cross sections and the polarization moments, the rotational-state dependent variation of the integral cross sections, and change of these quantities as a function of the applied field. The theory was applied to study the k - k{sup '} vector correlation (differential cross section) for the following collision systems: Ar-NO(X{sup 2}{pi}) and Ne-OCS(X{sup 1}{sigma}) in an electrostatic field, Na{sup +}-N{sub 2}(X{sup 1}{sigma}) in a laser field, and He-CaH({sup 2}{sigma}), He-O{sub 2}(X{sup 3}{sigma}), and He-OH(X{sup 2}{pi}) in a magnetic field. The model was able to reproduce the behavior of the differential cross sections and their variation with field strength. Combining the Fraunhofer model with the quantum theory of vector correlations made it possible to study three- and four-vector properties. The model results for the k-k{sup '}-j{sup '} vector correlation in Ar-NO(X{sup 2}{pi}) and He-NO(X{sup 2}{pi}) scattering were found to be in good agreement with experiment and exact computations. This allowed to demonstrate that the stereodynamics of such collisions is contained solely in the

  16. Polarization, alignment, and orientation in atomic collisions

    CERN Document Server

    Andersen, Nils

    2017-01-01

    This book covers polarization, alignment, and orientation effects in atomic collisions induced by electron, heavy particle, or photon impact. The first part of the book presents introductory chapters on light and particle polarization, experimental and computational methods, and the density matrix and state multipole formalism. Examples and exercises are included. The second part of the book deals with case studies of electron impact and heavy particle excitation, electron transfer, impact ionization, and autoionization. A separate chapter on photo-induced processes by new-generation light sources has been added. The last chapter discusses related topics and applications. Part III includes examples of charge clouds and introductory summaries of selected seminal papers of tutorial value from the early history of the field (1925 – 1975). The book is a significant update to the previous (first) edition, particularly in experimental and computational methods, the inclusion of key results obtained during the pas...

  17. Efficient ALL vs. ALL collision risk analyses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Escobar, D.; Paskowitz, M.; Agueda, A.; Garcia, G.; Molina, M.

    2011-09-01

    In recent years, the space debris has gained a lot of attention due to the increasing amount of uncontrolled man-made objects orbiting the Earth. This population poses a significant and constantly growing thread to operational satellites. In order to face this thread in an independent manner, ESA has launched an initiative for the development of a European SSA System where GMV is participating via several activities. Apart from those activities financed by ESA, GMV has developed closeap, a tool for efficient conjunction assessment and collision probability prediction. ESÁs NAPEOS has been selected as computational engine and numerical propagator to be used in the tool, which can be considered as an add-on to the standard NAPEOS package. closeap makes use of the same orbit computation, conjunction assessment and collision risk algorithms implemented in CRASS, but at the same time both systems are completely independent. Moreover, the implementation in closeap has been validated against CRASS with excellent results. This paper describes the performance improvements implemented in closeap at algorithm level to ensure that the most time demanding scenarios (e.g., all catalogued objects are analysed against each other - all vs. all scenarios -) can be analysed in a reasonable amount of time with commercial-off-the-shelf hardware. However, the amount of space debris increases steadily due to the human activities. Thus, the number of objects involved in a full collision assessment is expected to increase notably and, consequently, the computational cost, which scales as the square of the number of objects, will increase as well. Additionally, orbit propagation algorithms that are computationally expensive might be needed to predict more accurately the trajectories of the space debris. In order to cope with such computational needs, the next natural step in the development of collision assessment tools is the use of parallelization techniques. In this paper we investigate

  18. Lattice gas with molecular dynamics collision operator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parsa, M. Reza; Wagner, Alexander J.

    2017-07-01

    We introduce a lattice gas implementation that is based on coarse-graining a molecular dynamics (MD) simulation. Such a lattice gas is similar to standard lattice gases, but its collision operator is informed by an underlying MD simulation. This can be considered an optimal lattice gas implementation because it allows for the representation of any system that can be simulated with MD. We show here that equilibrium behavior of the popular lattice Boltzmann algorithm is consistent with this optimal lattice gas. This comparison allows us to make a more accurate identification of the expressions for temperature and pressure in lattice Boltzmann simulations, which turn out to be related not only to the physical temperature and pressure but also to the lattice discretization. We show that for any spatial discretization, we need to choose a particular temporal discretization to recover the lattice Boltzmann equilibrium.

  19. Trending in Probability of Collision Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vallejo, J. J.; Hejduk, M. D.; Stamey, J. D.

    2015-01-01

    A simple model is proposed to predict the behavior of Probabilities of Collision (P(sub c)) for conjunction events. The model attempts to predict the location and magnitude of the peak P(sub c) value for an event by assuming the progression of P(sub c) values can be modeled to first order by a downward-opening parabola. To incorporate prior information from a large database of past conjunctions, the Bayes paradigm is utilized; and the operating characteristics of the model are established through a large simulation study. Though the model is simple, it performs well in predicting the temporal location of the peak (P(sub c)) and thus shows promise as a decision aid in operational conjunction assessment risk analysis.

  20. Jet Physics in Heavy Ion Collisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salur, Sevil

    2017-09-01

    Jet studies in heavy ion collisions have been rapidly evolving since the first observations of medium interactions at RHIC through back to back hadron correlations and at LHC via reconstructed jets. In order to completely characterize the final state via jet-medium interactions and distinguish between competing energy loss mechanisms, complementary and robust jet observables are investigated. In this talk, with an emphasis on experimental results from LHC, we will discuss the latest developments of jet finding techniques and their applications on new jet structure observables in heavy ion environments. These new measurements could be used to differentiate whether the medium affects the jet formation process from the hard process through hadronization, or whether the parton loses energy to the medium with the showers only affected at much later stages.

  1. Visio-motor prediction of collision.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yakimoff, N; Mitrani, L; Bocheva, N

    1981-01-01

    Visually presented moving stimuli were used in a collision prediction experiment aimed at revealing the ability of human subjects to estimate the velocity of motion. Spatial extent, velocity and exposure duration of movement were varied so that the correlation between these characteristics of the stimuli was low (about 0.5). The moving stimulus disappeared at a certain place on the screen. By pressing a button the subject had to estimate the moment the stimulus would reach a target in the visual field. A linear dependence between estimated and actual duration of concealed motion was obtained. It is concluded that spatial extent and duration of motion do not influence the performance of the task. Velocity estimation and individual characteristics of the mechanisms controlling the motor response are supposed to determine the linear dependences obtained for all subjects tested.

  2. Gravitational radiation in massless-particle collisions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spirin, Pavel [Institute of Theoretical and Computational Physics,Department of Physics, University of Crete,71003, Heraklion (Greece); Department of Theoretical Physics, Moscow State University,119899, Moscow (Russian Federation); Tomaras, Theodore N. [Institute of Theoretical and Computational Physics,Department of Physics, University of Crete,71003, Heraklion (Greece)

    2015-06-23

    The angular and frequency characteristics of the gravitational radiation emitted in collisions of massless particles is studied perturbatively in the context of classical General Relativity for small values of the ratio α≡2r{sub S}/b of the Schwarzschild radius over the impact parameter. The particles are described with their trajectories, while the contribution of the leading nonlinear terms of the gravitational action is also taken into account. The old quantum results are reproduced in the zero frequency limit ω≪1/b. The radiation efficiency ϵ≡E{sub rad}/2E outside a narrow cone of angle α in the forward and backward directions with respect to the initial particle trajectories is given by ϵ∼α{sup 2} and is dominated by radiation with characteristic frequency ω∼O(1/r{sub S}).

  3. Adiabatic theory for anisotropic cold molecule collisions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pawlak, Mariusz [Schulich Faculty of Chemistry, Technion–Israel Institute of Technology, Haifa 32000 (Israel); Faculty of Chemistry, Nicolaus Copernicus University in Toruń, Gagarina 7, 87-100 Toruń (Poland); Shagam, Yuval; Narevicius, Edvardas [Department of Chemical Physics, Weizmann Institute of Science, Rehovot 76100 (Israel); Moiseyev, Nimrod [Schulich Faculty of Chemistry, Technion–Israel Institute of Technology, Haifa 32000 (Israel); Faculty of Physics, Technion–Israel Institute of Technology, Haifa 32000 (Israel)

    2015-08-21

    We developed an adiabatic theory for cold anisotropic collisions between slow atoms and cold molecules. It enables us to investigate the importance of the couplings between the projection states of the rotational motion of the atom about the molecular axis of the diatom. We tested our theory using the recent results from the Penning ionization reaction experiment {sup 4}He(1s2s {sup 3}S) + HD(1s{sup 2}) → {sup 4}He(1s{sup 2}) + HD{sup +}(1s) + e{sup −} [Lavert-Ofir et al., Nat. Chem. 6, 332 (2014)] and demonstrated that the couplings have strong effect on positions of shape resonances. The theory we derived provides cross sections which are in a very good agreement with the experimental findings.

  4. Electromagnetic probes in heavy-ion collisions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    van Hees H.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Due to their penetrating nature, electromagnetic probes, i.e., lepton-antilepton pairs (dileptons and photons are unique tools to gain insight into the nature of the hot and dense medium of strongly-interacting particles created in relativistic heavy-ion collisions, including hints to the nature of the restoration of chiral symmetry of QCD. Of particular interest are the spectral properties of the electromagnetic current-correlation function of these particles within the dense and/or hot medium. The related theoretical investigations of the in-medium properties of the involved particles in both the partonic and hadronic part of the QCD phase diagram underline the importance of a proper understanding of the properties of various hadron resonances in the medium.

  5. Collision avoidance for aircraft in abort landing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathwig, Jarret

    We study the collision avoidance between two aircraft flying in the same vertical plane: a host aircraft on a glide path and an intruder aircraft on a horizontal trajectory below that of the host aircraft and heading in the opposite direction. Assuming that the intruder aircraft is uncooperative, the host aircraft executes an optimal abort landing maneuver: it applies maximum thrust setting and maximum angle of attack lifting the flight path over the original path, thereby increasing the timewise minimum distance between the two aircraft and, in this way, avoiding the potential collision. In the presence of weak constraints on the aircraft and/or the environment, the angle of attack must be brought to the maximum value and kept there until the maximin point is reached. On the other hand, in the presence of strong constraints on the aircraft and the environment, desaturation of the angle of attack might have to take place before the maximin point is reached. This thesis includes four parts. In the first part, after an introduction and review of the available literature, we reformulate and solve the one-subarc Chebyshev maximin problem as a two-subarc Bolza-Pontryagin problem in which the avoidance and the recovery maneuvers are treated simultaneously. In the second part, we develop a guidance scheme (gamma guidance) capable of approximating the optimal trajectory in real time. In the third part, we present the algorithms employed to solve the one-subarc and two-subarc problems. In the fourth part, we decompose the two-subarc Bolza-Pontryagin problem into two one-subarc problems: the avoidance problem and the recovery problem, to be solved in sequence; remarkably, for problems where the ratio of total maneuver time to avoidance time is sufficiently large (≥5), this simplified procedure predicts accurately the location of the maximin point as well as the maximin distance.

  6. Disturbed Zone and Piston Shock Ahead of Coronal Mass Ejection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eselevich, V.; Eselevich, M.

    2012-12-01

    The 2010 June 13 coronal mass ejection (CME) propagating toward the position angle P.A. ≈ 245° (measured counterclockwise from the Sun's north pole) was studied from the SDO/AIA and SOHO/LASCO C2, C3 data. We show that ahead of the CME frontal structure, as a result of its interaction with the undisturbed solar wind, a disturbed region (with an increased and disturbed plasma density), whose size increases as the CME travels away from the Sun, emerges gradually. Discontinuity formation at the disturbed zone front is observed in the narrow P.A. ≈ 245°-250° range. Its characteristics satisfy the properties of a piston collision shock. In the other directions relative to the CME motion axis (P.A. > 250° and P.A. piston shock formation ahead of a CME, which are as follows: (1) Shock formation ahead of a CME in a vicinity along its propagation axis may occur at various distances R = Ru from the Sun's center. Its formation is determined by fulfilling a local inequality u(R) > VA (R), where u(R) is a CME velocity relative to the surrounding solar wind and VA (R) is a local Alfvén velocity that is approximately equal to the velocity of fast magnetic sound in the solar corona. (2) At R ~ 10-15 R ⊙, one observes the formation of a new discontinuity δsstarf F Lt λ p wide at the head of the collision front. Within limits of error, δsstarf F does not depend on R and is determined to be δsstarf F ≈ 0.1-0.2 R ⊙ by the LASCO C3 spatial resolution and δsstarf F ≈ 0.03 R ⊙ for COR2. This discontinuity is identified with a collisionless shock.

  7. An approach toward understanding wildlife-vehicle collisions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Litvaitis, John A; Tash, Jeffrey P

    2008-10-01

    Among the most conspicuous environmental effects of roads are vehicle-related mortalities of wildlife. Research to understand the factors that contribute to wildlife-vehicle collisions can be partitioned into several major themes, including (i) characteristics associated with roadkill hot spots, (ii) identification of road-density thresholds that limit wildlife populations, and (iii) species-specific models of vehicle collision rates that incorporate information on roads (e.g., proximity, width, and traffic volume) and animal movements. We suggest that collision models offer substantial opportunities to understand the effects of roads on a diverse suite of species. We conducted simulations using collision models and information on Blanding's turtles (Emydoidea blandingii), bobcats (Lynx rufus), and moose (Alces alces), species endemic to the northeastern United States that are of particular concern relative to collisions with vehicles. Results revealed important species-specific differences, with traffic volume and rate of movement by candidate species having the greatest influence on collision rates. We recommend that future efforts to reduce wildlife-vehicle collisions be more proactive and suggest the following protocol. For species that pose hazards to drivers (e.g., ungulates), identify collision hot spots and implement suitable mitigation to redirect animal movements (e.g., underpasses, fencing, and habitat modification), reduce populations of problematic game species via hunting, or modify driver behavior (e.g., dynamic signage that warns drivers when animals are near roads). Next, identify those species that are likely to experience additive (as opposed to compensatory) mortality from vehicle collisions and rank them according to vulnerability to extirpation. Then combine information on the distribution of at-risk species with information on existing road networks to identify areas where immediate actions are warranted.

  8. Unsaturated Zone and Saturated Zone Transport Properties (U0100)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    J. Conca

    2000-12-20

    This Analysis/Model Report (AMR) summarizes transport properties for the lower unsaturated zone hydrogeologic units and the saturated zone at Yucca Mountain and provides a summary of data from the Busted Butte Unsaturated Zone Transport Test (UZTT). The purpose of this report is to summarize the sorption and transport knowledge relevant to flow and transport in the units below Yucca Mountain and to provide backup documentation for the sorption parameters decided upon for each rock type. Because of the complexity of processes such as sorption, and because of the lack of direct data for many conditions that may be relevant for Yucca Mountain, data from systems outside of Yucca Mountain are also included. The data reported in this AMR will be used in Total System Performance Assessment (TSPA) calculations and as general scientific support for various Process Model Reports (PMRs) requiring knowledge of the transport properties of different materials. This report provides, but is not limited to, sorption coefficients and other relevant thermodynamic and transport properties for the radioisotopes of concern, especially neptunium (Np), plutonium (Pu), Uranium (U), technetium (Tc), iodine (I), and selenium (Se). The unsaturated-zone (UZ) transport properties in the vitric Calico Hills (CHv) are discussed, as are colloidal transport data based on the Busted Butte UZTT, the saturated tuff, and alluvium. These values were determined through expert elicitation, direct measurements, and data analysis. The transport parameters include information on interactions of the fractures and matrix. In addition, core matrix permeability data from the Busted Butte UZTT are summarized by both percent alteration and dispersion.

  9. The Use of Microtechnology to Monitor Collision Performance in Professional Rugby Union.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacLeod, Simon J; Hagan, Chris; Egaña, Mikel; Davis, Jonny; Drake, David

    2018-02-12

    To determine if microtechnology - derived collision loads discriminate between collision performance and compare the physical and analytical components of collision performance between positional groups. Thirty-seven professional male rugby union players participated in this study. Collision events from 11 competitive matches were coded using specific tackle and carry classifications based on the ball-carrier's collision outcome. Collisions were automatically detected using 10Hz microtechnology units. Collision events were identified, coded (as tackle or carry) and timestamped at the collision contact point using game analysis software. Attacking and defensive performances of 1609 collision events were analysed. Collision loads were significantly greater during dominant compared with neutral and passive collisions (Ploads per collision and velocities at collision point than backs. Microtechnology devices can also accurately, sensitively and specifically identify collision events (93.3%, 93.8% and 92.8% respectively). Microtechnology is a valid means of discriminating between tackle and carry performance. Thus, microtechnology-derived collision load data can be utilised to track and monitor collision events in training and games.

  10. A literature review of risk assessment of ship-FPSO collisions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, Ge; Pedersen, Preben Terndrup

    2007-01-01

    This paper reviews the state of the art of the research and analysis on the risks of collision with offshore installations. The focus is placed on: existing criteria, FPSO collision accident, design scenarios for FPSO collision, mechanics of collision incidents, and consequences. The content...

  11. Soil structure interaction in offshore wind turbine collisions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Samsonovs, Artjoms; Giuliani, Luisa; Zania, Varvara

    2014-01-01

    after a ship collision, thus providing an insight on the consequences of a collision event and on the main aspects to be considered when designing for this load case. In particular, the role of the foundation soil properties (site conditions) on the response of the structural system is investigated....... Dynamic finite element analyses have been performed taking into account the geometric and material nonlinearity of the tower, and the effects of soil structure interaction (SSI) have been studied in two representative collision scenarios of a service vessel with the turbine: a moderate energy impact...

  12. Holography and off-center collisions of localized shock waves

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chesler, Paul M. [Department of Physics, Harvard University,Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Yaffe, Laurence G. [Department of Physics, University of Washington,Seattle, WA 98195 (United States)

    2015-10-12

    Using numerical holography, we study the collision, at non-zero impact parameter, of bounded, localized distributions of energy density chosen to mimic relativistic heavy ion collisions, in strongly coupled N=4 supersymmetric Yang-Mills theory. Both longitudinal and transverse dynamics in the dual field theory are properly described. Using the gravitational description, we solve 5D Einstein equations with no dimensionality reducing symmetry restrictions to find the asymptotically anti-de Sitter spacetime geometry. Implications of our results on the understanding of early stages of heavy ion collisions, including the development of transverse radial flow, are discussed.

  13. Holography and off-center collisions of localized shock waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chesler, Paul M.; Yaffe, Laurence G.

    2015-10-01

    Using numerical holography, we study the collision, at non-zero impact parameter, of bounded, localized distributions of energy density chosen to mimic relativistic heavy ion collisions, in strongly coupled N=4 supersymmetric Yang-Mills theory. Both longitudinal and transverse dynamics in the dual field theory are properly described. Using the gravitational description, we solve 5D Einstein equations with no dimensionality reducing symmetry restrictions to find the asymptotically anti-de Sitter spacetime geometry. Implications of our results on the understanding of early stages of heavy ion collisions, including the development of transverse radial flow, are discussed.

  14. Collision rates and impact velocities in the Main Asteroid Belt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farinella, Paolo; Davis, Donald R.

    1992-01-01

    Wetherill's (1967) algorithm is presently used to compute the mutual collision probabilities and impact velocities of a set of 682 asteroids with large-than-50-km radius representative of a bias-free sample of asteroid orbits. While collision probabilities are nearly independent of eccentricities, a significant decrease is associated with larger inclinations. Collisional velocities grow steeply with orbital eccentricity and inclination, but with curiously small variation across the asteroid belt. Family asteroids are noted to undergo collisions with other family members 2-3 times more often than with nonmembers.

  15. ALICE results from pp collisions at the LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Safarik, K

    2011-01-01

    The ALICE experiment, dedicated for heavy-ion collisions at the LHC, is taking data with proton-proton collisions since November 2009. This contribution summarizes initial operation and performance of the ALICE detector at the LHC as well as first results from pp collisions at 0.9 TeV and 7 TeV. The energy dependence of the charged-particle multiplicity and of the antiproton-proton production asymmetry at mid-rapidity is presented. The strangeness and charm production analysis is discussed.

  16. Low Saturation Intensities in Two-Photon Ultracold Collisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sukenik, C. I.; Hoffmann, D.; Bali, S.; Walker, T.

    1998-07-01

    We have observed violet photon emission resulting from energy-pooling collisions between ultracold Rb atoms illuminated by two colors of near-resonant infrared laser light. We have used this emission as a probe of doubly excited state ultracold collision dynamics. We have observed the lowest saturation intensity for light-induced ultracold collisions seen to date which we identify as due to depletion of incoming ground state flux. We have also varied the detuning of the lasers which allows us to clearly identify the effect of spontaneous emission and optical shielding.

  17. Gas lasers applied atomic collision physics, v.3

    CERN Document Server

    McDaniel, E W

    1982-01-01

    Applied Atomic Collision Physics, Volume 3: Gas Lasers describes the applications of atomic collision physics in the development of many types of gas lasers. Topics covered range from negative ion formation in gas lasers to high-pressure ion kinetics and relaxation of molecules exchanging vibrational energy. Ion-ion recombination in high-pressure plasmas is also discussed, along with electron-ion recombination in gas lasers and collision processes in chemical lasers.Comprised of 14 chapters, this volume begins with a historical summary of gas laser developments and an overview of the basic ope

  18. Water transfer and loss in hit-and-run collisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burger, C.; Maindl, T. I.; Schäfer, C.

    2017-09-01

    This work focuses on transfer and loss of volatiles, like water, in hit-and-run collisions, where especially the smaller one of the colliding pair is often stripped of considerable amounts of its initial volatile content, but still survives the encounter more or less intact. We find water losses up to 75 percent in a single collision, depending on various parameters, especially velocity, impact angle and mass ratio, but also on the total colliding mass. The physical state, especially vaporization of volatiles, is found to be particularly important in collisions of approximately Mars-sized bodies, with high impact energies, but still potentially easy volatile escape.

  19. Experimental review of quarkonium production in heavy-ion collisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zha, Wangmei; Tang, Zebo

    2017-08-01

    Quarkonium provides a sensitive probe to the properties of the quark-gluon plasma (QGP). Its production yield in heavy-ion collisions is modified by the color-screening effect, heavy quark (re)combination effect and cold nuclear matter effects. These effect have different sensitivity to various properties of the medium. Using quarkonium to experimentally study the properties of the QGP requires comprehensive measurements in heavy-ion collisions. In this article, we review the recent experimental measurements of different quarkonium states in heavy-ion collisions at the RHIC and the LHC.

  20. Condensed matter applied atomic collision physics, v.4

    CERN Document Server

    Datz, Sheldon

    1983-01-01

    Applied Atomic Collision Physics, Volume 4: Condensed Matter deals with the fundamental knowledge of collision processes in condensed media.The book focuses on the range of applications of atomic collisions in condensed matter, extending from effects on biological systems to the characterization and modification of solids. This volume begins with the description of some aspects of the physics involved in the production of ion beams. The radiation effects in biological and chemical systems, ion scattering and atomic diffraction, x-ray fluorescence analysis, and photoelectron and Auger spectrosc

  1. Electron neutral collision frequency measurement with the hairpin resonator probe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, David J.; Kraus, Philip; Chua, Thai Cheng; Larson, Lynda; Shannon, Steven C.

    2017-09-01

    Electron neutral collision frequency is measured using both grounded and floating hairpin resonator probes in a 27 MHz parallel plate capacitively coupled plasma. Operating conditions are 0.1-2 Torr (13.3-267 Pa) in Ar, He, and Ar-He gas mixtures. The method treats the hairpin probe as a two wire transmission line immersed in a dielectric medium. Measurements are obtained using a pressure and sheath correction process by sweeping over assumed collision frequencies in order to obtain the measured collision frequency. Results are compared to hybrid plasma equipment module simulations and show good agreement.

  2. Divisibility of quantum dynamical maps and collision models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filippov, S. N.; Piilo, J.; Maniscalco, S.; Ziman, M.

    2017-09-01

    The divisibility of dynamical maps is visualized by trajectories in the parameter space and analyzed within the framework of collision models. We introduce ultimate completely positive (CP) divisible processes, which lose CP divisibility under infinitesimal perturbations, and characterize Pauli dynamical semigroups exhibiting such a property. We construct collision models with factorized environment particles, which realize additivity and multiplicativity of generators of CP divisible maps. A mixture of dynamical maps is obtained with the help of correlated environment. The mixture of ultimate CP divisible processes is shown to result in a class of eternal CP indivisible evolutions. We explicitly find collision models leading to weakly and essentially non-Markovian Pauli dynamical maps.

  3. From subduction to arc-continent collision: Geodynamic modeling of strain partitioning and mountain building in the Indonesia Archipelago

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Y.; Liu, M.; Harris, R.

    2006-12-01

    The arc-continental collision in the eastern Indonesia archipelago began 3-5 million years ago. This process has been continuously building one of the youngest orogenic belts on Earth. Both GPS measurement and geological observation indicated westward weakening of crustal shortening in this region, correlating with the transition from continent-arc collision in the Timor trough to oceanic slab-arc convergence in the Java trench. We have developed a finite element model to investigate how the continent-ocean floor transition on the subducting Australian plate and rheologic heterogeneity of the Sunda region have controlled strain partitioning and mountain building in the overriding plate. To simulate the progressive oblique collision between the Indo- Australian plate and Southeast Asian plate, we constructed the model in 3D with nonlinear viscous rheology that also includes fault zones and rheological heterogeneity in both horizontal and vertical direction. Topographic loading is considered, and tectonic loading is calculated from the velocity boundary condition based on either Nuvel-1A or GPS measurements. Our model showed direct link between plate coupling and crustal shortening in the upper plate. When the coupling is weak, deformation concentrates near the trench. As coupling increases, more plate convergence is accommodated by crustal shorting in the upper plate. The initiation of the continent-arc collision in the eastern Timor could explain the cease of oceanic floor spreading in the south Banda basin and the development of back arc thrust. Slipping of the back arc thrusts played a critical role in uplift and tilting of the upper plate in the double-vergent Timor islands. Within a reasonable range of rheological parameters, our model is able to predict surface velocity, uplift rate, and stress states consistent with the GPS data, geological observation and earthquake mechanism solutions. Results of this model provide some useful insights into the evolution of

  4. Measurement of the elliptic anisotropy of charged particles produced in PbPb collisions at $\\sqrt{s_{NN}}$ = 2.76 TeV

    CERN Document Server

    Chatrchyan, Serguei; Sirunyan, Albert M; Tumasyan, Armen; Adam, Wolfgang; Bergauer, Thomas; Dragicevic, Marko; Erö, Janos; Fabjan, Christian; Friedl, Markus; Fruehwirth, Rudolf; Ghete, Vasile Mihai; Hammer, Josef; Hörmann, Natascha; Hrubec, Josef; Jeitler, Manfred; Kiesenhofer, Wolfgang; Krammer, Manfred; Liko, Dietrich; Mikulec, Ivan; Pernicka, Manfred; Rahbaran, Babak; Rohringer, Christine; Rohringer, Herbert; Schöfbeck, Robert; Strauss, Josef; Taurok, Anton; Teischinger, Florian; Wagner, Philipp; Waltenberger, Wolfgang; Walzel, Gerhard; Widl, Edmund; Wulz, Claudia-Elisabeth; Mossolov, Vladimir; Shumeiko, Nikolai; Suarez Gonzalez, Juan; Bansal, Sunil; Cerny, Karel; Cornelis, Tom; De Wolf, Eddi A; Janssen, Xavier; Luyckx, Sten; Maes, Thomas; Mucibello, Luca; Ochesanu, Silvia; Roland, Benoit; Rougny, Romain; Selvaggi, Michele; Van Haevermaet, Hans; Van Mechelen, Pierre; Van Remortel, Nick; Van Spilbeeck, Alex; Blekman, Freya; Blyweert, Stijn; D'Hondt, Jorgen; Gonzalez Suarez, Rebeca; Kalogeropoulos, Alexis; Maes, Michael; Olbrechts, Annik; Van Doninck, Walter; Van Mulders, Petra; Van Onsem, Gerrit Patrick; Villella, Ilaria; Charaf, Otman; Clerbaux, Barbara; De Lentdecker, Gilles; Dero, Vincent; Gay, Arnaud; Hreus, Tomas; Léonard, Alexandre; Marage, Pierre Edouard; Reis, Thomas; Thomas, Laurent; Vander Velde, Catherine; Vanlaer, Pascal; Adler, Volker; Beernaert, Kelly; Cimmino, Anna; Costantini, Silvia; Garcia, Guillaume; Grunewald, Martin; Klein, Benjamin; Lellouch, Jérémie; Marinov, Andrey; Mccartin, Joseph; Ocampo Rios, Alberto Andres; Ryckbosch, Dirk; Strobbe, Nadja; Thyssen, Filip; Tytgat, Michael; Vanelderen, Lukas; Verwilligen, Piet; Walsh, Sinead; Yazgan, Efe; Zaganidis, Nicolas; Basegmez, Suzan; Bruno, Giacomo; Ceard, Ludivine; Delaere, Christophe; Du Pree, Tristan; Favart, Denis; Forthomme, Laurent; Giammanco, Andrea; Hollar, Jonathan; Lemaitre, Vincent; Liao, Junhui; Militaru, Otilia; Nuttens, Claude; Pagano, Davide; Pin, Arnaud; Piotrzkowski, Krzysztof; Schul, Nicolas; Beliy, Nikita; Caebergs, Thierry; Daubie, Evelyne; Hammad, Gregory Habib; Alves, Gilvan; Correa Martins Junior, Marcos; De Jesus Damiao, Dilson; Martins, Thiago; Pol, Maria Elena; Henrique Gomes E Souza, Moacyr; Aldá Júnior, Walter Luiz; Carvalho, Wagner; Custódio, Analu; Melo Da Costa, Eliza; De Oliveira Martins, Carley; Fonseca De Souza, Sandro; Matos Figueiredo, Diego; Mundim, Luiz; Nogima, Helio; Oguri, Vitor; Prado Da Silva, Wanda Lucia; Santoro, Alberto; Silva Do Amaral, Sheila Mara; Soares Jorge, Luana; Sznajder, Andre; Souza Dos Anjos, Tiago; Bernardes, Cesar Augusto; De Almeida Dias, Flavia; Tomei, Thiago; De Moraes Gregores, Eduardo; Lagana, Caio; Da Cunha Marinho, Franciole; Mercadante, Pedro G; Novaes, Sergio F; Padula, Sandra; Genchev, Vladimir; Iaydjiev, Plamen; Piperov, Stefan; Rodozov, Mircho; Stoykova, Stefka; Sultanov, Georgi; Tcholakov, Vanio; Trayanov, Rumen; Vutova, Mariana; Dimitrov, Anton; Hadjiiska, Roumyana; Kozhuharov, Venelin; Litov, Leander; Pavlov, Borislav; Petkov, Peicho; Bian, Jian-Guo; Chen, Guo-Ming; Chen, He-Sheng; Jiang, Chun-Hua; Liang, Dong; Liang, Song; Meng, Xiangwei; Tao, Junquan; Wang, Jian; Wang, Jian; Wang, Xianyou; Wang, Zheng; Xiao, Hong; Xu, Ming; Zang, Jingjing; Zhang, Zhen; Asawatangtrakuldee, Chayanit; Ban, Yong; Guo, Shuang; Guo, Yifei; Li, Wenbo; Liu, Shuai; Mao, Yajun; Qian, Si-Jin; Teng, Haiyun; Wang, Siguang; Zhu, Bo; Zou, Wei; Avila, Carlos; Gomez Moreno, Bernardo; Osorio Oliveros, Andres Felipe; Sanabria, Juan Carlos; Godinovic, Nikola; Lelas, Damir; Plestina, Roko; Polic, Dunja; Puljak, Ivica; Antunovic, Zeljko; Dzelalija, Mile; Kovac, Marko; Brigljevic, Vuko; Duric, Senka; Kadija, Kreso; Luetic, Jelena; Morovic, Srecko; Attikis, Alexandros; Galanti, Mario; Mavromanolakis, Georgios; Mousa, Jehad; Nicolaou, Charalambos; Ptochos, Fotios; Razis, Panos A; Finger, Miroslav; Finger Jr, Michael; Assran, Yasser; Elgammal, Sherif; Ellithi Kamel, Ali; Khalil, Shaaban; Mahmoud, Mohammed; Radi, Amr; Kadastik, Mario; Müntel, Mait; Raidal, Martti; Rebane, Liis; Tiko, Andres; Azzolini, Virginia; Eerola, Paula; Fedi, Giacomo; Voutilainen, Mikko; Härkönen, Jaakko; Heikkinen, Mika Aatos; Karimäki, Veikko; Kinnunen, Ritva; Kortelainen, Matti J; Lampén, Tapio; Lassila-Perini, Kati; Lehti, Sami; Lindén, Tomas; Luukka, Panja-Riina; Mäenpää, Teppo; Peltola, Timo; Tuominen, Eija; Tuominiemi, Jorma; Tuovinen, Esa; Ungaro, Donatella; Wendland, Lauri; Banzuzi, Kukka; Korpela, Arja; Tuuva, Tuure; Besancon, Marc; Choudhury, Somnath; Dejardin, Marc; Denegri, Daniel; Fabbro, Bernard; Faure, Jean-Louis; Ferri, Federico; Ganjour, Serguei; Givernaud, Alain; Gras, Philippe; Hamel de Monchenault, Gautier; Jarry, Patrick; Locci, Elizabeth; Malcles, Julie; Millischer, Laurent; Nayak, Aruna; Rander, John; Rosowsky, André; Shreyber, Irina; Titov, Maksym; Baffioni, Stephanie; Beaudette, Florian; Benhabib, Lamia; Bianchini, Lorenzo; Bluj, Michal; Broutin, Clementine; Busson, Philippe; Charlot, Claude; Daci, Nadir; Dahms, Torsten; Dobrzynski, Ludwik; Granier de Cassagnac, Raphael; Haguenauer, Maurice; Miné, Philippe; Mironov, Camelia; Ochando, Christophe; Paganini, Pascal; Sabes, David; Salerno, Roberto; Sirois, Yves; Veelken, Christian; Zabi, Alexandre; Agram, Jean-Laurent; Andrea, Jeremy; Bloch, Daniel; Bodin, David; Brom, Jean-Marie; Cardaci, Marco; Chabert, Eric Christian; Collard, Caroline; Conte, Eric; Drouhin, Frédéric; Ferro, Cristina; Fontaine, Jean-Charles; Gelé, Denis; Goerlach, Ulrich; Juillot, Pierre; Karim, Mehdi; Le Bihan, Anne-Catherine; Van Hove, Pierre; Fassi, Farida; Mercier, Damien; Beauceron, Stephanie; Beaupere, Nicolas; Bondu, Olivier; Boudoul, Gaelle; Brun, Hugues; Chasserat, Julien; Chierici, Roberto; Contardo, Didier; Depasse, Pierre; El Mamouni, Houmani; Fay, Jean; Gascon, Susan; Gouzevitch, Maxime; Ille, Bernard; Kurca, Tibor; Lethuillier, Morgan; Mirabito, Laurent; Perries, Stephane; Sordini, Viola; Tosi, Silvano; Tschudi, Yohann; Verdier, Patrice; Viret, Sébastien; Tsamalaidze, Zviad; Anagnostou, Georgios; Beranek, Sarah; Edelhoff, Matthias; Feld, Lutz; Heracleous, Natalie; Hindrichs, Otto; Jussen, Ruediger; Klein, Katja; Merz, Jennifer; Ostapchuk, Andrey; Perieanu, Adrian; Raupach, Frank; Sammet, Jan; Schael, Stefan; Sprenger, Daniel; Weber, Hendrik; Wittmer, Bruno; Zhukov, Valery; Ata, Metin; Caudron, Julien; Dietz-Laursonn, Erik; Duchardt, Deborah; Erdmann, Martin; Güth, Andreas; Hebbeker, Thomas; Heidemann, Carsten; Hoepfner, Kerstin; Klimkovich, Tatsiana; Klingebiel, Dennis; Kreuzer, Peter; Lanske, Dankfried; Lingemann, Joschka; Magass, Carsten; Merschmeyer, Markus; Meyer, Arnd; Olschewski, Mark; Papacz, Paul; Pieta, Holger; Reithler, Hans; Schmitz, Stefan Antonius; Sonnenschein, Lars; Steggemann, Jan; Teyssier, Daniel; Weber, Martin; Bontenackels, Michael; Cherepanov, Vladimir; Davids, Martina; Flügge, Günter; Geenen, Heiko; Geisler, Matthias; Haj Ahmad, Wael; Hoehle, Felix; Kargoll, Bastian; Kress, Thomas; Kuessel, Yvonne; Linn, Alexander; Nowack, Andreas; Perchalla, Lars; Pooth, Oliver; Rennefeld, Jörg; Sauerland, Philip; Stahl, Achim; Aldaya Martin, Maria; Behr, Joerg; Behrenhoff, Wolf; Behrens, Ulf; Bergholz, Matthias; Bethani, Agni; Borras, Kerstin; Burgmeier, Armin; Cakir, Altan; Calligaris, Luigi; Campbell, Alan; Castro, Elena; Costanza, Francesco; Dammann, Dirk; Eckerlin, Guenter; Eckstein, Doris; Fischer, David; Flucke, Gero; Geiser, Achim; Glushkov, Ivan; Habib, Shiraz; Hauk, Johannes; Jung, Hannes; Kasemann, Matthias; Katsas, Panagiotis; Kleinwort, Claus; Kluge, Hannelies; Knutsson, Albert; Krämer, Mira; Krücker, Dirk; Kuznetsova, Ekaterina; Lange, Wolfgang; Lohmann, Wolfgang; Lutz, Benjamin; Mankel, Rainer; Marfin, Ihar; Marienfeld, Markus; Melzer-Pellmann, Isabell-Alissandra; Meyer, Andreas Bernhard; Mnich, Joachim; Mussgiller, Andreas; Naumann-Emme, Sebastian; Olzem, Jan; Perrey, Hanno; Petrukhin, Alexey; Pitzl, Daniel; Raspereza, Alexei; Ribeiro Cipriano, Pedro M; Riedl, Caroline; Rosin, Michele; Salfeld-Nebgen, Jakob; Schmidt, Ringo; Schoerner-Sadenius, Thomas; Sen, Niladri; Spiridonov, Alexander; Stein, Matthias; Walsh, Roberval; Wissing, Christoph; Autermann, Christian; Blobel, Volker; Bobrovskyi, Sergei; Draeger, Jula; Enderle, Holger; Erfle, Joachim; Gebbert, Ulla; Görner, Martin; Hermanns, Thomas; Höing, Rebekka Sophie; Kaschube, Kolja; Kaussen, Gordon; Kirschenmann, Henning; Klanner, Robert; Lange, Jörn; Mura, Benedikt; Nowak, Friederike; Pietsch, Niklas; Rathjens, Denis; Sander, Christian; Schettler, Hannes; Schleper, Peter; Schlieckau, Eike; Schmidt, Alexander; Schröder, Matthias; Schum, Torben; Seidel, Markus; Stadie, Hartmut; Steinbrück, Georg; Thomsen, Jan; Barth, Christian; Berger, Joram; Chwalek, Thorsten; De Boer, Wim; Dierlamm, Alexander; Feindt, Michael; Guthoff, Moritz; Hackstein, Christoph; Hartmann, Frank; Heinrich, Michael; Held, Hauke; Hoffmann, Karl-Heinz; Honc, Simon; Husemann, Ulrich; Katkov, Igor; Komaragiri, Jyothsna Rani; Martschei, Daniel; Mueller, Steffen; Müller, Thomas; Niegel, Martin; Nürnberg, Andreas; Oberst, Oliver; Oehler, Andreas; Ott, Jochen; Peiffer, Thomas; Quast, Gunter; Rabbertz, Klaus; Ratnikov, Fedor; Ratnikova, Natalia; Röcker, Steffen; Saout, Christophe; Scheurer, Armin; Schilling, Frank-Peter; Schmanau, Mike; Schott, Gregory; Simonis, Hans-Jürgen; Stober, Fred-Markus Helmut; Troendle, Daniel; Ulrich, Ralf; Wagner-Kuhr, Jeannine; Weiler, Thomas; Zeise, Manuel; Ziebarth, Eva Barbara; Daskalakis, Georgios; Geralis, Theodoros; Kesisoglou, Stilianos; Kyriakis, Aristotelis; Loukas, Demetrios; Manolakos, Ioannis; Markou, Athanasios; Markou, Christos; Mavrommatis, Charalampos; Ntomari, Eleni; Gouskos, Loukas; Mertzimekis, Theodoros; Panagiotou, Apostolos; Saoulidou, Niki; Evangelou, Ioannis; Foudas, Costas; Kokkas, Panagiotis; Manthos, Nikolaos; Papadopoulos, Ioannis; Patras, Vaios; Bencze, Gyorgy; Hajdu, Csaba; Hidas, Pàl; Horvath, Dezso; Krajczar, Krisztian; Radics, Balint; Sikler, Ferenc; Veszpremi, Viktor; Vesztergombi, Gyorgy; Beni, Noemi; Czellar, Sandor; Molnar, Jozsef; Palinkas, Jozsef; Szillasi, Zoltan; Karancsi, János; Raics, Peter; Trocsanyi, Zoltan Laszlo; Ujvari, Balazs; Beri, Suman Bala; Bhatnagar, Vipin; Dhingra, Nitish; Gupta, Ruchi; Jindal, Monika; Kaur, Manjit; Kohli, Jatinder Mohan; Mehta, Manuk Zubin; Nishu, Nishu; Saini, Lovedeep Kaur; Sharma, Archana; Singh, Jasbir; Singh, Supreet Pal; Ahuja, Sudha; Choudhary, Brajesh C; Kumar, Ashok; Kumar, Arun; Malhotra, Shivali; Naimuddin, Md; Ranjan, Kirti; Sharma, Varun; Shivpuri, Ram Krishen; Banerjee, Sunanda; Bhattacharya, Satyaki; Dutta, Suchandra; Gomber, Bhawna; Jain, Sandhya; Jain, Shilpi; Khurana, Raman; Sarkar, Subir; Abdulsalam, Abdulla; Choudhury, Rajani Kant; Dutta, Dipanwita; Kailas, Swaminathan; Kumar, Vineet; Mohanty, Ajit Kumar; Pant, Lalit Mohan; Shukla, Prashant; Aziz, Tariq; Ganguly, Sanmay; Guchait, Monoranjan; Gurtu, Atul; Maity, Manas; Majumder, Gobinda; Mazumdar, Kajari; Mohanty, Gagan Bihari; Parida, Bibhuti; Sudhakar, Katta; Wickramage, Nadeesha; Banerjee, Sudeshna; Dugad, Shashikant; Arfaei, Hessamaddin; Bakhshiansohi, Hamed; Etesami, Seyed Mohsen; Fahim, Ali; Hashemi, Majid; Hesari, Hoda; Jafari, Abideh; Khakzad, Mohsen; Mohammadi, Abdollah; Mohammadi Najafabadi, Mojtaba; Paktinat Mehdiabadi, Saeid; Safarzadeh, Batool; Zeinali, Maryam; Abbrescia, Marcello; Barbone, Lucia; Calabria, Cesare; Chhibra, Simranjit Singh; Colaleo, Anna; Creanza, Donato; De Filippis, Nicola; De Palma, Mauro; Fiore, Luigi; Iaselli, Giuseppe; Lusito, Letizia; Maggi, Giorgio; Maggi, Marcello; Marangelli, Bartolomeo; My, Salvatore; Nuzzo, Salvatore; Pacifico, Nicola; Pompili, Alexis; Pugliese, Gabriella; Selvaggi, Giovanna; Silvestris, Lucia; Singh, Gurpreet; Zito, Giuseppe; Abbiendi, Giovanni; Benvenuti, Alberto; Bonacorsi, Daniele; Braibant-Giacomelli, Sylvie; Brigliadori, Luca; Capiluppi, Paolo; Castro, Andrea; Cavallo, Francesca Romana; Cuffiani, Marco; Dallavalle, Gaetano-Marco; Fabbri, Fabrizio; Fanfani, Alessandra; Fasanella, Daniele; Giacomelli, Paolo; Grandi, Claudio; Guiducci, Luigi; Marcellini, Stefano; Masetti, Gianni; Meneghelli, Marco; Montanari, Alessandro; Navarria, Francesco; Odorici, Fabrizio; Perrotta, Andrea; Primavera, Federica; Rossi, Antonio; Rovelli, Tiziano; Siroli, Gianni; Travaglini, Riccardo; Albergo, Sebastiano; Cappello, Gigi; Chiorboli, Massimiliano; Costa, Salvatore; Potenza, Renato; Tricomi, Alessia; Tuve, Cristina; Barbagli, Giuseppe; Ciulli, Vitaliano; Civinini, Carlo; D'Alessandro, Raffaello; Focardi, Ettore; Frosali, Simone; Gallo, Elisabetta; Gonzi, Sandro; Meschini, Marco; Paoletti, Simone; Sguazzoni, Giacomo; Tropiano, Antonio; Benussi, Luigi; Bianco, Stefano; Colafranceschi, Stefano; Fabbri, Franco; Piccolo, Davide; Fabbricatore, Pasquale; Musenich, Riccardo; Benaglia, Andrea; De Guio, Federico; Di Matteo, Leonardo; Fiorendi, Sara; Gennai, Simone; Ghezzi, Alessio; Malvezzi, Sandra; Manzoni, Riccardo Andrea; Martelli, Arabella; Massironi, Andrea; Menasce, Dario; Moroni, Luigi; Paganoni, Marco; Pedrini, Daniele; Ragazzi, Stefano; Redaelli, Nicola; Sala, Silvano; Tabarelli de Fatis, Tommaso; Buontempo, Salvatore; Carrillo Montoya, Camilo Andres; Cavallo, Nicola; De Cosa, Annapaola; Dogangun, Oktay; Fabozzi, Francesco; Iorio, Alberto Orso Maria; Lista, Luca; Meola, Sabino; Merola, Mario; Paolucci, Pierluigi; Azzi, Patrizia; Bacchetta, Nicola; Bellan, Paolo; Biasotto, Massimo; Bisello, Dario; Branca, Antonio; Checchia, Paolo; Dorigo, Tommaso; Dosselli, Umberto; Gasparini, Fabrizio; Gozzelino, Andrea; Gulmini, Michele; Kanishchev, Konstantin; Lacaprara, Stefano; Lazzizzera, Ignazio; Margoni, Martino; Maron, Gaetano; Meneguzzo, Anna Teresa; Perrozzi, Luca; Pozzobon, Nicola; Ronchese, Paolo; Simonetto, Franco; Torassa, Ezio; Tosi, Mia; Vanini, Sara; Gabusi, Michele; Ratti, Sergio P; Riccardi, Cristina; Torre, Paola; Vitulo, Paolo; Bilei, Gian Mario; Fanò, Livio; Lariccia, Paolo; Lucaroni, Andrea; Mantovani, Giancarlo; Menichelli, Mauro; Nappi, Aniello; Romeo, Francesco; Saha, Anirban; Santocchia, Attilio; Taroni, Silvia; Azzurri, Paolo; Bagliesi, Giuseppe; Boccali, Tommaso; Broccolo, Giuseppe; Castaldi, Rino; D'Agnolo, Raffaele Tito; Dell'Orso, Roberto; Fiori, Francesco; Foà, Lorenzo; Giassi, Alessandro; Kraan, Aafke; Ligabue, Franco; Lomtadze, Teimuraz; Martini, Luca; Messineo, Alberto; Palla, Fabrizio; Palmonari, Francesco; Rizzi, Andrea; Serban, Alin Titus; Spagnolo, Paolo; Squillacioti, Paola; Tenchini, Roberto; Tonelli, Guido; Venturi, Andrea; Verdini, Piero Giorgio; Barone, Luciano; Cavallari, Francesca; Del Re, Daniele; Diemoz, Marcella; Fanelli, Cristiano; Grassi, Marco; Longo, Egidio; Meridiani, Paolo; Micheli, Francesco; Nourbakhsh, Shervin; Organtini, Giovanni; Pandolfi, Francesco; Paramatti, Riccardo; Rahatlou, Shahram; Sigamani, Michael; Soffi, Livia; Amapane, Nicola; Arcidiacono, Roberta; Argiro, Stefano; Arneodo, Michele; Biino, Cristina; Botta, Cristina; Cartiglia, Nicolo; Castello, Roberto; Costa, Marco; Demaria, Natale; Graziano, Alberto; Mariotti, Chiara; Maselli, Silvia; Migliore, Ernesto; Monaco, Vincenzo; Musich, Marco; Obertino, Maria Margherita; Pastrone, Nadia; Pelliccioni, Mario; Potenza, Alberto; Romero, Alessandra; Ruspa, Marta; Sacchi, Roberto; Sola, Valentina; Solano, Ada; Staiano, Amedeo; Vilela Pereira, Antonio; Belforte, Stefano; Cossutti, Fabio; Della Ricca, Giuseppe; Gobbo, Benigno; Marone, Matteo; Montanino, Damiana; Penzo, Aldo; Schizzi, Andrea; Heo, Seong Gu; Kim, Tae Yeon; Nam, Soon-Kwon; Chang, Sunghyun; Chung, Jin Hyuk; Kim, Dong Hee; Kim, Gui Nyun; Kong, Dae Jung; Park, Hyangkyu; Ro, Sang-Ryul; Son, Dong-Chul; Son, Taejin; Kim, Jae Yool; Kim, Zero Jaeho; Song, Sanghyeon; Jo, Hyun Yong; Choi, Suyong; Gyun, Dooyeon; Hong, Byung-Sik; Jo, Mihee; Kim, Hyunchul; Kim, Tae Jeong; Lee, Kyong Sei; Moon, Dong Ho; Park, Sung Keun; Seo, Eunsung; Choi, Minkyoo; Kang, Seokon; Kim, Hyunyong; Kim, Ji Hyun; Park, Chawon; Park, Inkyu; Park, Sangnam; Ryu, Geonmo; Cho, Yongjin; Choi, Young-Il; Choi, Young Kyu; Goh, Junghwan; Kim, Min Suk; Kwon, Eunhyang; Lee, Byounghoon; Lee, Jongseok; Lee, Sungeun; Seo, Hyunkwan; Yu, Intae; Bilinskas, Mykolas Jurgis; Grigelionis, Ignas; Janulis, Mindaugas; Juodagalvis, Andrius; Castilla-Valdez, Heriberto; De La Cruz-Burelo, Eduard; Heredia-de La Cruz, Ivan; Lopez-Fernandez, Ricardo; Magaña Villalba, Ricardo; Martínez-Ortega, Jorge; Sánchez-Hernández, Alberto; Villasenor-Cendejas, Luis Manuel; Carrillo Moreno, Salvador; Vazquez Valencia, Fabiola; Salazar Ibarguen, Humberto Antonio; Casimiro Linares, Edgar; Morelos Pineda, Antonio; Reyes-Santos, Marco A; Krofcheck, David; Bell, Alan James; Butler, Philip H; Doesburg, Robert; Reucroft, Steve; Silverwood, Hamish; Ahmad, Muhammad; Asghar, Muhammad Irfan; Hoorani, Hafeez R; Khalid, Shoaib; Khan, Wajid Ali; Khurshid, Taimoor; Qazi, Shamona; Shah, Mehar Ali; Shoaib, Muhammad; Brona, Grzegorz; Bunkowski, Karol; Cwiok, Mikolaj; Dominik, Wojciech; Doroba, Krzysztof; Kalinowski, Artur; Konecki, Marcin; Krolikowski, Jan; Bialkowska, Helena; Boimska, Bozena; Frueboes, Tomasz; Gokieli, Ryszard; Górski, Maciej; Kazana, Malgorzata; Nawrocki, Krzysztof; Romanowska-Rybinska, Katarzyna; Szleper, Michal; Wrochna, Grzegorz; Zalewski, Piotr; Almeida, Nuno; Bargassa, Pedrame; David Tinoco Mendes, Andre; Faccioli, Pietro; Ferreira Parracho, Pedro Guilherme; Gallinaro, Michele; Musella, Pasquale; Seixas, Joao; Varela, Joao; Vischia, Pietro; Afanasiev, Serguei; Belotelov, Ivan; Bunin, Pavel; Gavrilenko, Mikhail; Golutvin, Igor; Kamenev, Alexey; Karjavin, Vladimir; Kozlov, Guennady; Lanev, Alexander; Malakhov, Alexander; Moisenz, Petr; Palichik, Vladimir; Perelygin, Victor; Shmatov, Sergey; Smirnov, Vitaly; Volodko, Anton; Zarubin, Anatoli; Evstyukhin, Sergey; Golovtsov, Victor; Ivanov, Yury; Kim, Victor; Levchenko, Petr; Murzin, Victor; Oreshkin, Vadim; Smirnov, Igor; Sulimov, Valentin; Uvarov, Lev; Vavilov, Sergey; Vorobyev, Alexey; Vorobyev, Andrey; Andreev, Yuri; Dermenev, Alexander; Gninenko, Sergei; Golubev, Nikolai; Kirsanov, Mikhail; Krasnikov, Nikolai; Matveev, Viktor; Pashenkov, Anatoli; Tlisov, Danila; Toropin, Alexander; Epshteyn, Vladimir; Erofeeva, Maria; Gavrilov, Vladimir; Kossov, Mikhail; Lychkovskaya, Natalia; Popov, Vladimir; Safronov, Grigory; Semenov, Sergey; Stolin, Viatcheslav; Vlasov, Evgueni; Zhokin, Alexander; Belyaev, Andrey; Boos, Edouard; Ershov, Alexander; Gribushin, Andrey; Klyukhin, Vyacheslav; Kodolova, Olga; Korotkikh, Vladimir; Lokhtin, Igor; Markina, Anastasia; Obraztsov, Stepan; Perfilov, Maxim; Petrushanko, Sergey; Sarycheva, Ludmila; Savrin, Viktor; Snigirev, Alexander; Vardanyan, Irina; Andreev, Vladimir; Azarkin, Maksim; Dremin, Igor; Kirakosyan, Martin; Leonidov, Andrey; Mesyats, Gennady; Rusakov, Sergey V; Vinogradov, Alexey; Azhgirey, Igor; Bayshev, Igor; Bitioukov, Sergei; Grishin, Viatcheslav; Kachanov, Vassili; Konstantinov, Dmitri; Korablev, Andrey; Krychkine, Victor; Petrov, Vladimir; Ryutin, Roman; Sobol, Andrei; Tourtchanovitch, Leonid; Troshin, Sergey; Tyurin, Nikolay; Uzunian, Andrey; Volkov, Alexey; Adzic, Petar; Djordjevic, Milos; Ekmedzic, Marko; Krpic, Dragomir; Milosevic, Jovan; Aguilar-Benitez, Manuel; Alcaraz Maestre, Juan; Arce, Pedro; Battilana, Carlo; Calvo, Enrique; Cerrada, Marcos; Chamizo Llatas, Maria; Colino, Nicanor; De La Cruz, Begona; Delgado Peris, Antonio; Diez Pardos, Carmen; Domínguez Vázquez, Daniel; Fernandez Bedoya, Cristina; Fernández Ramos, Juan Pablo; Ferrando, Antonio; Flix, Jose; Fouz, Maria Cruz; Garcia-Abia, Pablo; Gonzalez Lopez, Oscar; Goy Lopez, Silvia; Hernandez, Jose M; Josa, Maria Isabel; Merino, Gonzalo; Puerta Pelayo, Jesus; Redondo, Ignacio; Romero, Luciano; Santaolalla, Javier; Senghi Soares, Mara; Willmott, Carlos; Albajar, Carmen; Codispoti, Giuseppe; de Trocóniz, Jorge F; Cuevas, Javier; Fernandez Menendez, Javier; Folgueras, Santiago; Gonzalez Caballero, Isidro; Lloret Iglesias, Lara; Piedra Gomez, Jonatan; Vizan Garcia, Jesus Manuel; Brochero Cifuentes, Javier Andres; Cabrillo, Iban Jose; Calderon, Alicia; Chuang, Shan-Huei; Duarte Campderros, Jordi; Felcini, Marta; Fernandez, Marcos; Gomez, Gervasio; Gonzalez Sanchez, Javier; Jorda, Clara; Lobelle Pardo, Patricia; Lopez Virto, Amparo; Marco, Jesus; Marco, Rafael; Martinez Rivero, Celso; Matorras, Francisco; Munoz Sanchez, Francisca Javiela; Rodrigo, Teresa; Rodríguez-Marrero, Ana Yaiza; Ruiz-Jimeno, Alberto; Scodellaro, Luca; Sobron Sanudo, Mar; Vila, Ivan; Vilar Cortabitarte, Rocio; Abbaneo, Duccio; Auffray, Etiennette; Auzinger, Georg; Baillon, Paul; Ball, Austin; Barney, David; Bernet, Colin; Bianchi, Giovanni; Bloch, Philippe; Bocci, Andrea; Bonato, Alessio; Breuker, Horst; Camporesi, Tiziano; Cerminara, Gianluca; Christiansen, Tim; Coarasa Perez, Jose Antonio; D'Enterria, David; De Roeck, Albert; Di Guida, Salvatore; Dobson, Marc; Dupont-Sagorin, Niels; Elliott-Peisert, Anna; Frisch, Benjamin; Funk, Wolfgang; Georgiou, Georgios; Giffels, Manuel; Gigi, Dominique; Gill, Karl; Giordano, Domenico; Giunta, Marina; Glege, Frank; Gomez-Reino Garrido, Robert; Govoni, Pietro; Gowdy, Stephen; Guida, Roberto; Hansen, Magnus; Harris, Philip; Hartl, Christian; Harvey, John; Hegner, Benedikt; Hinzmann, Andreas; Innocente, Vincenzo; Janot, Patrick; Kaadze, Ketino; Karavakis, Edward; Kousouris, Konstantinos; Lecoq, Paul; Lenzi, Piergiulio; Lourenco, Carlos; Maki, Tuula; Malberti, Martina; Malgeri, Luca; Mannelli, Marcello; Masetti, Lorenzo; Meijers, Frans; Mersi, Stefano; Meschi, Emilio; Moser, Roland; Mozer, Matthias Ulrich; Mulders, Martijn; Nesvold, Erik; Nguyen, Matthew; Orimoto, Toyoko; Orsini, Luciano; Palencia Cortezon, Enrique; Perez, Emmanuelle; Petrilli, Achille; Pfeiffer, Andreas; Pierini, Maurizio; Pimiä, Martti; Piparo, Danilo; Polese, Giovanni; Quertenmont, Loic; Racz, Attila; Reece, William; Rodrigues Antunes, Joao; Rolandi, Gigi; Rommerskirchen, Tanja; Rovelli, Chiara; Rovere, Marco; Sakulin, Hannes; Santanastasio, Francesco; Schäfer, Christoph; Schwick, Christoph; Segoni, Ilaria; Sekmen, Sezen; Sharma, Archana; Siegrist, Patrice; Silva, Pedro; Simon, Michal; Sphicas, Paraskevas; Spiga, Daniele; Spiropulu, Maria; Stoye, Markus; Tsirou, Andromachi; Veres, Gabor Istvan; Vlimant, Jean-Roch; Wöhri, Hermine Katharina; Worm, Steven; Zeuner, Wolfram Dietrich; Bertl, Willi; Deiters, Konrad; Erdmann, Wolfram; Gabathuler, Kurt; Horisberger, Roland; Ingram, Quentin; Kaestli, Hans-Christian; König, Stefan; Kotlinski, Danek; Langenegger, Urs; Meier, Frank; Renker, Dieter; Rohe, Tilman; Sibille, Jennifer; Bäni, Lukas; Bortignon, Pierluigi; Buchmann, Marco-Andrea; Casal, Bruno; Chanon, Nicolas; Chen, Zhiling; Deisher, Amanda; Dissertori, Günther; Dittmar, Michael; Dünser, Marc; Eugster, Jürg; Freudenreich, Klaus; Grab, Christoph; Lecomte, Pierre; Lustermann, Werner; Marini, Andrea Carlo; Martinez Ruiz del Arbol, Pablo; Mohr, Niklas; Moortgat, Filip; Nägeli, Christoph; Nef, Pascal; Nessi-Tedaldi, Francesca; Pape, Luc; Pauss, Felicitas; Peruzzi, Marco; Ronga, Frederic Jean; Rossini, Marco; Sala, Leonardo; Sanchez, Ann - Karin; Starodumov, Andrei; Stieger, Benjamin; Takahashi, Maiko; Tauscher, Ludwig; Thea, Alessandro; Theofilatos, Konstantinos; Treille, Daniel; Urscheler, Christina; Wallny, Rainer; Weber, Hannsjoerg Artur; Wehrli, Lukas; Aguilo, Ernest; Amsler, Claude; Chiochia, Vincenzo; De Visscher, Simon; Favaro, Carlotta; Ivova Rikova, Mirena; Millan Mejias, Barbara; Otiougova, Polina; Robmann, Peter; Snoek, Hella; Tupputi, Salvatore; Verzetti, Mauro; Chang, Yuan-Hann; Chen, Kuan-Hsin; Go, Apollo; Kuo, Chia-Ming; Li, Syue-Wei; Lin, Willis; Liu, Zong-Kai; Lu, Yun-Ju; Mekterovic, Darko; Singh, Anil; Volpe, Roberta; Yu, Shin-Shan; Bartalini, Paolo; Chang, Paoti; Chang, You-Hao; Chang, Yu-Wei; Chao, Yuan; Chen, Kai-Feng; Dietz, Charles; Grundler, Ulysses; Hou, George Wei-Shu; Hsiung, Yee; Kao, Kai-Yi; Lei, Yeong-Jyi; Lu, Rong-Shyang; Majumder, Devdatta; Petrakou, Eleni; Shi, Xin; Shiu, Jing-Ge; Tzeng, Yeng-Ming; Wang, Minzu; Adiguzel, Aytul; Bakirci, Mustafa Numan; Cerci, Salim; Dozen, Candan; Dumanoglu, Isa; Eskut, Eda; Girgis, Semiray; Gokbulut, Gul; Hos, Ilknur; Kangal, Evrim Ersin; Karapinar, Guler; 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Ross, Ian; Savin, Alexander; Smith, Wesley H; Swanson, Joshua

    2013-01-07

    The anisotropy of the azimuthal distributions of charged particles produced in PbPb collisions with a nucleon-nucleon center-of-mass energy of 2.76 TeV is studied with the CMS experiment at the LHC. The elliptic anisotropy parameter defined as the second coefficient in a Fourier expansion of the particle invariant yields, is extracted using the event-plane method, two- and four-particle cumulants, and Lee--Yang zeros. The anisotropy is presented as a function of transverse momentum (pt), pseudorapidity (eta) over a broad kinematic range: 0.3 < pt < 20 GeV, abs(eta) < 2.4, and in 12 classes of collision centrality from 0 to 80%. The results are compared to those obtained at lower center-of-mass energies, and various scaling behaviors are examined. When scaled by the geometric eccentricity of the collision zone, the elliptic anisotropy is found to obey a universal scaling with the transverse particle density for different collision systems and center-of-mass energies.

  5. Femtoscopy of $pp$ collisions at $\\sqrt{s}$=0.9 and 7 TeV at the LHC with two-pion Bose-Einstein correlations

    CERN Document Server

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Berceanu, I.; Bercuci, A.; Berdermann, E.; Berdnikov, Y.; Betev, L.; Bhasin, A.; Bhati, A.K.; Bianchi, L.; Bianchi, N.; Bianchin, C.; Bielcik, J.; Bielcikova, J.; Bilandzic, A.; Biolcati, E.; Blanc, A.; Blanco, F.; Blanco, F.; Blau, D.; Blume, C.; Boccioli, M.; Bock, N.; Bogdanov, A.; Boggild, H.; Bogolyubsky, M.; Boldizsar, L.; Bombara, M.; Bombonati, C.; Book, J.; Borel, H.; Bortolin, C.; Bose, S.; Bossu, F.; Botje, M.; Bottger, S.; Boyer, B.; Braun-Munzinger, P.; Bravina, L.; Bregant, M.; Breitner, T.; Broz, M.; Brun, R.; Bruna, E.; Bruno, G.E.; Budnikov, D.; Buesching, H.; Busch, O.; Buthelezi, Z.; Caffarri, D.; Cai, X.; Caines, H.; Calvo Villar, E.; Camerini, P.; Canoa Roman, V.; Cara Romeo, G.; Carena, F.; Carena, W.; Carminati, F.; Casanova Diaz, A.; Caselle, M.; Castillo Castellanos, J.; Catanescu, V.; Cavicchioli, C.; Cerello, P.; Chang, B.; Chapeland, S.; Charvet, J.L.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Cherney, M.; Cheshkov, C.; Cheynis, B.; Chiavassa, E.; Chibante Barroso, V.; Chinellato, D.D.; Chochula, P.; Chojnacki, M.; Christakoglou, P.; Christensen, C.H.; Christiansen, P.; Chujo, T.; Cicalo, C.; Cifarelli, L.; Cindolo, F.; Cleymans, J.; Coccetti, F.; Coffin, J.P.; Coli, S.; Conesa Balbastre, G.; Conesa del Valle, Z.; Constantin, P.; Contin, G.; Contreras, J.G.; Cormier, T.M.; Corrales Morales, Y.; Cortes Maldonado, I.; Cortese, P.; Cosentino, M.R.; Costa, F.; Cotallo, M.E.; Crescio, E.; Crochet, P.; Cuautle, E.; Cunqueiro, L.; Erasmo, G.D.; Dainese, A.; Dalsgaard, H.H.; Danu, A.; Das, D.; Das, I.; Dash, A.; Dash, S.; De, S.; De Azevedo Moregula, A.; de Barros, G.O.V.; De Caro, A.; De Cataldo, G.; de Cuveland, J.; De Falco, A.; De Gruttola, D.; De Marco, N.; De Pasquale, S.; De Remigis, R.; de Rooij, R.; Delagrange, H.; Delgado Mercado, Y.; Dellacasa, G.; Deloff, A.; Demanov, V.; Denes, E.; Deppman, A.; Di Bari, D.; Di Giglio, C.; Di Liberto, S.; Di Mauro, A.; Di Nezza, P.; Dietel, T.; Divia, R.; Djuvsland, O.; Dobrin, A.; Dobrowolski, T.; Dominguez, I.; Donigus, B.; Dordic, O.; Driga, O.; Dubey, A.K.; Ducroux, L.; Dupieux, P.; Dutta Majumdar, A.K.; Dutta Majumdar, M.R.; Elia, D.; Emschermann, D.; Engel, H.; Erdal, H.A.; Espagnon, B.; Estienne, M.; Esumi, S.; Evans, D.; Evrard, S.; Eyyubova, G.; Fabjan, C.W.; Fabris, D.; Faivre, J.; Falchieri, D.; Fantoni, A.; Fasel, M.; Fearick, R.; Fedunov, A.; Fehlker, D.; Fekete, V.; Felea, D.; Feofilov, G.; Fernandez Tellez, A.; Ferretti, A.; Ferretti, R.; Figueredo, M.A.S.; Filchagin, S.; Fini, R.; Finogeev, D.; Fionda, F.M.; Fiore, E.M.; Floris, M.; Foertsch, S.; Foka, P.; Fokin, S.; Fragiacomo, E.; Fragkiadakis, M.; Frankenfeld, U.; Fuchs, U.; Furano, F.; Furget, C.; Fusco Girard, M.; Gaardhoje, J.J.; Gadrat, S.; Gagliardi, M.; Gago, A.; Gallio, M.; Ganoti, P.; Garabatos, C.; Gemme, R.; Gerhard, J.; Germain, M.; Geuna, C.; Gheata, A.; Gheata, M.; Ghidini, B.; Ghosh, P.; Girard, M.R.; Giraudo, G.; Giubellino, P.; Gladysz-Dziadus, E.; Glassel, P.; Gomez, R.; Gonzalez-Trueba, L.H.; Gonzalez-Zamora, P.; Gonzalez Santos, H.; Gorbunov, S.; Gotovac, S.; Grabski, V.; Graczykowski, L.K.; Grajcarek, R.; Grelli, A.; Grigoras, A.; Grigoras, C.; Grigoriev, V.; Grigoryan, A.; Grigoryan, S.; Grinyov, B.; Grion, N.; Gros, P.; Grosse-Oetringhaus, J.F.; Grossiord, J.Y.; Grosso, R.; Guber, F.; Guernane, R.; Guerra Gutierrez, C.; Guerzoni, B.; Gulbrandsen, K.; Gulkanyan, H.; Gunji, T.; Gupta, A.; Gupta, R.; Gutbrod, H.; Haaland, O.; Hadjidakis, C.; Haiduc, M.; Hamagaki, H.; Hamar, G.; Harris, J.W.; Hartig, M.; Hasch, D.; Hasegan, D.; Hatzifotiadou, D.; Hayrapetyan, A.; Heide, M.; Heinz, M.; Helstrup, H.; Herghelegiu, A.; Hernandez, C.; Herrera Corral, G.; Herrmann, N.; Hetland, K.F.; Hicks, B.; Hille, P.T.; Hippolyte, B.; Horaguchi, T.; Hori, Y.; Hristov, P.; Hrivnacova, I.; Huang, M.; Huber, S.; Humanic, T.J.; Hwang, D.S.; Ichou, R.; Ilkaev, R.; Ilkiv, I.; Inaba, M.; Incani, E.; Innocenti, G.M.; Innocenti, P.G.; Ippolitov, M.; Irfan, M.; Ivan, C.; Ivanov, A.; Ivanov, M.; Ivanov, V.; Jacholkowski, A.; Jacobs, P.M.; Jancurova, L.; Jangal, S.; Janik, M.A.; Janik, R.; Jayarathna, S.P.; Jena, S.; Jirden, L.; Jones, G.T.; Jones, P.G.; Jovanovic, P.; Jung, H.; Jung, W.; Jusko, A.; Kalcher, S.; Kalinak, P.; Kalisky, M.; Kalliokoski, T.; Kalweit, A.; Kamermans, R.; Kanaki, K.; Kang, E.; Kang, J.H.; Kaplin, V.; Karavichev, O.; Karavicheva, T.; Karpechev, E.; Kazantsev, A.; Kebschull, U.; Keidel, R.; Khan, M.M.; Khanzadeev, A.; Kharlov, Y.; Kileng, B.; Kim, D.J.; Kim, D.S.; Kim, D.W.; Kim, H.N.; Kim, J.H.; Kim, J.S.; Kim, M.; Kim, M.; Kim, S.; Kim, S.H.; Kirsch, S.; Kisel, I.; Kiselev, S.; Kisiel, A.; Klay, J.L.; Klein, J.; Klein-Bosing, C.; Kliemant, M.; Klovning, A.; Kluge, A.; Knichel, M.L.; Koch, K.; Kohler, M.K.; Kolevatov, R.; Kolojvari, A.; Kondratiev, V.; Kondratyeva, N.; Konevskih, A.; Kornas, E.; Kottachchi Kankanamge Don, C.; Kour, R.; Kowalski, M.; Kox, S.; Koyithatta Meethaleveedu, G.; Kozlov, K.; Kral, J.; Kralik, I.; Kramer, F.; Kraus, I.; Krawutschke, T.; Kretz, M.; Krivda, M.; Krumbhorn, D.; Krus, M.; Kryshen, E.; Krzewicki, M.; Kucheriaev, Y.; Kuhn, C.; Kuijer, P.G.; Kurashvili, P.; Kurepin, A.; Kurepin, A.B.; Kuryakin, A.; Kushpil, S.; Kushpil, V.; Kweon, M.J.; Kwon, Y.; La Rocca, P.; Ladron de Guevara, P.; Lafage, V.; Lara, C.; Larsen, D.T.; Lazzeroni, C.; Le Bornec, Y.; Lea, R.; Lee, K.S.; Lee, S.C.; Lefevre, F.; Lehnert, J.; Leistam, L.; Lenhardt, M.; Lenti, V.; Leon Monzon, I.; Leon Vargas, H.; Levai, P.; Li, X.; Lietava, R.; Lindal, S.; Lindenstruth, V.; Lippmann, C.; Lisa, M.A.; Liu, L.; Loggins, V.R.; Loginov, V.; Lohn, S.; Lohner, D.; Loizides, C.; Lopez, X.; Lopez Noriega, M.; Lopez Torres, E.; Lovhoiden, G.; Lu, X.G.; Luettig, P.; Lunardon, M.; Luparello, G.; Luquin, L.; Luzzi, C.; Ma, K.; Ma, R.; Madagodahettige-Don, D.M.; Maevskaya, A.; Mager, M.; Mahapatra, D.P.; Maire, A.; Malaev, M.; Maldonado Cervantes, I.; Malinina, L.; Mal'Kevich, D.; Malzacher, P.; Mamonov, A.; Manceau, L.; Mangotra, L.; Manko, V.; Manso, F.; Manzari, V.; Mao, Y.; Mares, J.; Margagliotti, G.V.; Margotti, A.; Marin, A.; Martashvili, I.; Martinengo, P.; Martinez, M.I.; Martinez Davalos, A.; Martinez Garcia, G.; Martynov, Y.; Mas, A.; Masciocchi, S.; Masera, M.; Masoni, A.; Massacrier, L.; Mastromarco, M.; Mastroserio, A.; Matthews, Z.L.; Matyja, A.; Mayani, D.; Mazza, G.; Mazzoni, M.A.; Meddi, F.; Menchaca-Rocha, A.; Mendez Lorenzo, P.; Mercado Perez, J.; Mereu, P.; Miake, Y.; Midori, J.; Milano, L.; Milosevic, J.; Mischke, A.; Miskowiec, D.; Mitu, C.; Mlynarz, J.; Mohanty, B.; Molnar, L.; Montano Zetina, L.; Monteno, M.; Montes, E.; Morando, M.; Moreira De Godoy, D.A.; Moretto, S.; Morsch, A.; Muccifora, V.; Mudnic, E.; Muller, H.; Muhuri, S.; Munhoz, M.G.; Munoz, J.; Musa, L.; Musso, A.; Nandi, B.K.; Nania, R.; Nappi, E.; Nattrass, C.; Navach, F.; Navin, S.; Nayak, T.K.; Nazarenko, S.; Nazarov, G.; Nedosekin, A.; Nendaz, F.; Newby, J.; Nicassio, M.; Nielsen, B.S.; Nikolaev, S.; Nikolic, V.; Nikulin, S.; Nikulin, V.; Nilsen, B.S.; Nilsson, M.S.; Noferini, F.; Nooren, G.; Novitzky, N.; Nyanin, A.; Nyatha, A.; Nygaard, C.; Nystrand, J.; Obayashi, H.; Ochirov, A.; Oeschler, H.; Oh, S.K.; Oleniacz, J.; Oppedisano, C.; Ortiz Velasquez, A.; Ortona, G.; Oskarsson, A.; Ostrowski, P.; Otterlund, I.; Otwinowski, J.; Ovrebekk, G.; Oyama, K.; Ozawa, K.; Pachmayer, Y.; Pachr, M.; Padilla, F.; Pagano, P.; Paic, G.; Painke, F.; Pajares, C.; Pal, S.; Pal, S.K.; Palaha, A.; Palmeri, A.; Pappalardo, G.S.; Park, W.J.; Paticchio, V.; Pavlinov, A.; Pawlak, T.; Peitzmann, T.; Peresunko, D.; Perez Lara, C.E.; Perini, D.; Perrino, D.; Peryt, W.; Pesci, A.; Peskov, V.; Pestov, Y.; Peters, A.J.; Petracek, V.; Petris, M.; Petrov, P.; Petrovici, M.; Petta, C.; Piano, S.; Piccotti, A.; Pikna, M.; Pillot, P.; Pinazza, O.; Pinsky, L.; Pitz, N.; Piuz, F.; Piyarathna, D.B.; Platt, R.; Ploskon, M.; Pluta, J.; Pocheptsov, T.; Pochybova, S.; Podesta-Lerma, P.L.M.; Poghosyan, M.G.; Polak, K.; Polichtchouk, B.; Pop, A.; Pospisil, V.; Potukuchi, B.; Prasad, S.K.; Preghenella, R.; Prino, F.; Pruneau, C.A.; Pshenichnov, I.; Puddu, G.; Pulvirenti, A.; Punin, V.; Putis, M.; Putschke, J.; Quercigh, E.; Qvigstad, H.; Rachevski, A.; Rademakers, A.; Rademakers, O.; Radomski, S.; Raiha, T.S.; Rak, J.; Rakotozafindrabe, A.; Ramello, L.; Ramirez Reyes, A.; Rammler, M.; Raniwala, R.; Raniwala, S.; Rasanen, S.S.; Read, K.F.; Real, J.S.; Redlich, K.; Renfordt, R.; Reolon, A.R.; Reshetin, A.; Rettig, F.; Revol, J.P.; Reygers, K.; Ricaud, H.; Riccati, L.; Ricci, R.A.; Richter, M.; Riedler, P.; Riegler, W.; Riggi, F.; Rivetti, A.; Rodriguez Cahuantzi, M.; Rohr, D.; Rohrich, D.; Romita, R.; Ronchetti, F.; Rosinsky, P.; Rosnet, P.; Rossegger, S.; Rossi, A.; Roukoutakis, F.; Rousseau, S.; Roy, C.; Roy, P.; Rubio Montero, A.J.; Rui, R.; Rusanov, I.; Ryabinkin, E.; Rybicki, A.; Sadovsky, S.; Safarik, K.; Sahoo, R.; Sahu, P.K.; Saiz, P.; Sakai, S.; Sakata, D.; Salgado, C.A.; Samanta, T.; Sambyal, S.; Samsonov, V.; Sandor, L.; Sandoval, A.; Sano, M.; Sano, S.; Santo, R.; Santoro, R.; Sarkamo, J.; Saturnini, P.; Scapparone, E.; Scarlassara, F.; Scharenberg, R.P.; Schiaua, C.; Schicker, R.; Schmidt, C.; Schmidt, H.R.; Schreiner, S.; Schuchmann, S.; Schukraft, J.; Schutz, Y.; Schwarz, K.; Schweda, K.; Scioli, G.; Scomparin, E.; Scott, P.A.; Scott, R.; Segato, G.; Senyukov, S.; Seo, J.; Serci, S.; Serradilla, E.; Sevcenco, A.; Shabratova, G.; Shahoyan, R.; Sharma, N.; Sharma, S.; Shigaki, K.; Shimomura, M.; Shtejer, K.; Sibiriak, Y.; Siciliano, M.; Sicking, E.; Siemiarczuk, T.; Silenzi, A.; Silvermyr, D.; Simonetti, G.; Singaraju, R.; Singh, R.; Sinha, B.C.; Sinha, T.; Sitar, B.; Sitta, M.; Skaali, T.B.; Skjerdal, K.; Smakal, R.; Smirnov, N.; Snellings, R.; Sogaard, C.; Soloviev, A.; Soltz, R.; Son, H.; Song, M.; Soos, C.; Soramel, F.; Spyropoulou-Stassinaki, M.; Srivastava, B.K.; Stachel, J.; Stan, I.; Stefanek, G.; Stefanini, G.; Steinbeck, T.; Stenlund, E.; Steyn, G.; Stocco, D.; Stock, R.; Stolpovskiy, M.; Strmen, P.; Suaide, A.A.P.; Subieta Vasquez, M.A.; Sugitate, T.; Suire, C.; Sumbera, M.; Susa, T.; Swoboda, D.; Symons, T.J.M.; Szanto de Toledo, A.; Szarka, I.; Szostak, A.; Tagridis, C.; Takahashi, J.; J.Tapia Takaki, D.; Tauro, A.; Tavlet, M.; Tejeda Munoz, G.; Telesca, A.; Terrevoli, C.; Thader, J.; Thomas, D.; Thomas, J.H.; Tieulent, R.; Timmins, A.R.; Tlusty, D.; Toia, A.; Torii, H.; Toscano, L.; Tosello, F.; Traczyk, T.; Truesdale, D.; Trzaska, W.H.; Tumkin, A.; Turrisi, R.; Turvey, A.J.; Tveter, T.S.; Ulery, J.; Ullaland, K.; Uras, A.; Urban, J.; Urciuoli, G.M.; Usai, G.L.; Vacchi, A.; Vala, M.; Valencia Palomo, L.; Vallero, S.; van der Kolk, N.; van Leeuwen, M.; Vande Vyvre, P.; Vannucci, L.; Vargas, A.; Varma, R.; Vasileiou, M.; Vasiliev, A.; Vechernin, V.; Venaruzzo, M.; Vercellin, E.; Vergara, S.; Vernet, R.; Verweij, M.; Vickovic, L.; Viesti, G.; Vikhlyantsev, O.; Vilakazi, Z.; Villalobos Baillie, O.; Vinogradov, A.; Vinogradov, L.; Vinogradov, Y.; Virgili, T.; Viyogi, Y.P.; Vodopyanov, A.; Voloshin, K.; Voloshin, S.; Volpe, G.; von Haller, B.; Vranic, D.; Vrlakova, J.; Vulpescu, B.; Wagner, B.; Wagner, V.; Wan, R.; Wang, D.; Wang, Y.; Wang, Y.; Watanabe, K.; Wessels, J.P.; Westerhoff, U.; Wiechula, J.; Wikne, J.; Wilde, M.; Wilk, A.; Wilk, G.; Williams, M.C.S.; Windelband, B.; Yang, H.; Yasnopolskiy, S.; Yi, J.; Yin, Z.; Yokoyama, H.; Yoo, I.K.; Yuan, X.; Yushmanov, I.; Zabrodin, E.; Zampolli, C.; Zaporozhets, S.; Zarochentsev, A.; Zavada, P.; Zbroszczyk, H.; Zelnicek, P.; Zenin, A.; Zgura, I.; Zhalov, M.; Zhang, X.; Zhou, D.; Zhu, X.; Zichichi, A.; Zinovjev, G.; Zoccarato, Y.; Zynovyev, M.

    2011-01-01

    We report on the high statistics two-pion correlation functions from pp collisions at $\\sqrt{s}$=0.9 TeV and $\\sqrt{s}$=7 TeV, measured by the ALICE experiment at the Large Hadron Collider. The correlation functions as well as the extracted source radii scale with event multiplicity and pair momentum. When analyzed in the same multiplicity and pair transverse momentum range, the correlation is similar at the two collision energies. A three-dimensional femtoscopic analysis shows an increase of the emission zone with increasing event multiplicity as well as decreasing homogeneity lengths with increasing transverse momentum. The latter trend gets more pronounced as multiplicity increases. This suggests the development of space-momentum correlations, at least for collisions producing a high multiplicity of particles. We consider these trends in the context of previous femtoscopic studies in high-energy hadron and heavy-ion collisions, and discuss possible underlying physics mechanisms. Detailed analysis of the co...

  6. Resolving the ocean's euphotic zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marra, John F.; Lance, Veronica P.; Vaillancourt, Robert D.; Hargreaves, Bruce R.

    2014-01-01

    Measurements of net primary production (P) combined with calculated estimates of phytoplankton respiration (Rp) and gross primary production (G) are used to determine the depth of the ocean's euphotic zone, the autotrophic productive layer. The base of the euphotic zone, the compensation depth (where P=0 and G=Rp), is found to be consistently deeper than the traditionally assumed ‘1% light depth'. It is found to occur, however, at a depth that encompasses the depth range of all, or nearly all, autotrophic biomass. The estimated compensation depth also occurs near the depth of 1% of surface blue light (490 nm), supporting the determination of the ocean's productive layer from satellite ocean color sensors.

  7. 3D geodynamic models for the development of opposing continental subduction zones: The Hindu Kush-Pamir example

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Jie; Gerya, Taras; Thielmann, Marcel; Webb, A. Alexander G.; Kufner, Sofia-Katerina; Yin, An

    2017-12-01

    The development of opposing continental subduction zones remains scantly explored in three dimensions. The Hindu Kush-Pamir orogenic system at the western end of the Himalayan orogen provides a rare example of continental collision linked to two opposing intra-continental subduction zones. The subducted plates feature a peculiar 3D geometry consisting of two distinct lithospheric fragments with different polarities, subduction angles and slab-curvatures beneath the Hindu Kush and Pamir, respectively. Using 3D geodynamic modeling, we simulate possible development of two opposing continental subduction zones to understand the dynamic evolution of the Hindu Kush-Pamir orogenic system. Our geodynamic model reproduces the major tectonic elements observed: (1) the deeper subduction depth, the steeper dip angle and the southward offset of the Hindu Kush subduction zone relative to the Pamir naturally occur if convergence direction of the subducting Indian plate and dip-direction of the Hindu Kush subduction zone match. (2) The formation of the highly asymmetrically curved Pamir region and the south-dipping subduction is promoted by the initial geometry of the indenting Indian lithosphere together with the existence of a major strike-slip fault on the eastern margin of the Pamir region. (3) Subduction of only the lower continental crust during continental collision can occur if the coupling between upper and lower crusts is weak enough to allow a separation of these two components, and that (4) the subduction of mainly lower crust then facilitates that conditions for intermediate-depth seismicity can be reached. (5) The secondary tectonic features modeled here such as strike-slip-fault growth, north-northwest striking extension zone, and lateral flow of the thickened ductile upper crust are comparable to the current tectonics of the region. (6) Model results are further compared to the potentially similar orogenic system, i.e., the Alpine orogen, in terms of the curved

  8. The Influence of Orbital Resonances on the Water Transport to Objects in the Circumprimary Habitable Zone of Binary Star Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bancelin, David; Pilat-Lohinger, Elke; Maindl, Thomas I.; Ragossnig, Florian; Schäfer, Christoph

    2017-06-01

    We investigate the role of secular and mean motion resonances on the water transport from a belt of icy asteroids onto planets or embryos orbiting inside the circumprimary habitable zone (HZ) of a binary star system. In addition, the host-star has an accompanying gas giant planet. For a comparison, we perform two case studies where a secular resonance (SR) is located either inside the HZ close to 1.0 au (causing eccentric motion of a planet or embryos therein) or in the asteroid belt, beyond the snow line. In the latter case, a higher flux of icy objects moving toward the HZ is expected. Collisions between asteroids and objects in the HZ are treated analytically. Our purely dynamical study shows that the SR in the HZ boosts the water transport however, collisions can occur at very high impact speeds. In this paper, we treat for the first time, realistic collisions using a GPU 3D-SPH code to assess the water loss in the projectile. Including the water loss into the dynamical results, we get more realistic values for the water mass fraction of the asteroid during an impact. We highlight that collisions occurring at high velocities greatly reduce the water content of the projectile and thus the amount of water transported to planets or embryos orbiting inside the HZ. Moreover, we discuss other effects that could modify our results, namely the asteroid’s surface rate recession due to ice sublimation and the atmospheric drag contribution on the asteroids’ mass loss.

  9. Zone Denmark - gasell Taanist / Reet Krause

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Krause, Reet, 1967-

    2006-01-01

    Taanis Viborgis asuva firma Zone Company Denmark, kaubamärgi Zone Denmark ja firma disainerite tutvustus. Ettevõte valmistab disainitooteid roostevabast terasest, klaasist, puidust, kummist jm. Disainer Naja Utzon Popov endast, oma loomingust

  10. Zoning, 2004, East Baton Rouge Parish, Louisiana

    Data.gov (United States)

    Louisiana Geographic Information Center — This is a graphical polygon dataset depicting the zoning boundaries of the East Baton Rouge Parish of the State of Louisiana. Zoning can be defined as the range of...

  11. GIS modeling of introduction zones in Sochi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annenkova Irina Vladimirovna

    2014-11-01

    Defined the mean monthly temperature and precipitation for each zone. The diagram shows the dependence of the probability distribution of the three groups resistance from the mean annual temperature and mean annual precipitation. Describes the climatic conditions of the zones.

  12. United States Stateplane Zones - NAD83

    Data.gov (United States)

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — U.S. State Plane Zones (NAD 1983) represents the State Plane Coordinate System (SPCS) Zones for the 1983 North American Datum within United States.

  13. United States Stateplane Zones - NAD27

    Data.gov (United States)

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — U.S. State Plane Zones (NAD 1927) represents the State Plane Coordinate System (SPCS) Zones for the 1927 North American Datum within United States.

  14. Effectiveness of work zone intelligent transportation systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-01

    In the last decade, Intelligent Transportation Systems (ITS) have increasingly been deployed in work zones by state departments of transportation. Also known as smart work zone systems they improve traffic operations and safety by providing real-time...

  15. Buffer Zone Requirements for Soil Fumigant Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Updated pesticide product labels require fumigant users to establish a buffer zone around treated fields to reduce risks to bystanders. Useful information includes tarp testing guidance and a buffer zone calculator.

  16. Definition and Characterization of the Habitable Zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forget, F.; Turbet, M.; Selsis, F.; Leconte, J.

    2017-11-01

    We review the concept of habitable zone (HZ), why it is useful, and how to characterize it. The HZ could be nicknamed the "Hunting Zone" because its primary objective is now to help astronomers plan observations. This has interesting consequences.

  17. TASK 2: QUENCH ZONE SIMULATION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fusselman, Steve

    2015-09-30

    Aerojet Rocketdyne (AR) has developed an innovative gasifier concept incorporating advanced technologies in ultra-dense phase dry feed system, rapid mix injector, and advanced component cooling to significantly improve gasifier performance, life, and cost compared to commercially available state-of-the-art systems. A key feature of the AR gasifier design is the transition from the gasifier outlet into the quench zone, where the raw syngas is cooled to ~ 400°C by injection and vaporization of atomized water. Earlier pilot plant testing revealed a propensity for the original gasifier outlet design to accumulate slag in the outlet, leading to erratic syngas flow from the outlet. Subsequent design modifications successfully resolved this issue in the pilot plant gasifier. In order to gain greater insight into the physical phenomena occurring within this zone, AR developed a cold flow simulation apparatus with Coanda Research & Development with a high degree of similitude to hot fire conditions with the pilot scale gasifier design, and capable of accommodating a scaled-down quench zone for a demonstration-scale gasifier. The objective of this task was to validate similitude of the cold flow simulation model by comparison of pilot-scale outlet design performance, and to assess demonstration scale gasifier design feasibility from testing of a scaled-down outlet design. Test results did exhibit a strong correspondence with the two pilot scale outlet designs, indicating credible similitude for the cold flow simulation device. Testing of the scaled-down outlet revealed important considerations in the design and operation of the demonstration scale gasifier, in particular pertaining to the relative momentum between the downcoming raw syngas and the sprayed quench water and associated impacts on flow patterns within the quench zone. This report describes key findings from the test program, including assessment of pilot plant configuration simulations relative to actual

  18. Modeling Wave-Ice Interactions in the Marginal Ice Zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orzech, Mark; Shi, Fengyan; Bateman, Sam; Veeramony, Jay; Calantoni, Joe

    2015-04-01

    The small-scale (O(m)) interactions between waves and ice floes in the marginal ice zone (MIZ) are investigated with a coupled model system. Waves are simulated with the non-hydrostatic finite-volume model NHWAVE (Ma et al., 2012) and ice floes are represented as bonded collections of smaller particles with the discrete element system LIGGGHTS (Kloss et al., 2012). The physics of fluid and ice are recreated as authentically as possible, to allow the coupled system to supplement and/or substitute for more costly and demanding field experiments. The presentation will first describe the development and validation of the coupled system, then discuss the results of a series of virtual experiments in which ice floe and wave characteristics are varied to examine their effects on energy dissipation, MIZ floe size distribution, and ice pack retreat rates. Although Wadhams et al. (1986) suggest that only a small portion (roughly 10%) of wave energy entering the MIZ is reflected, dissipation mechanisms for the remaining energy have yet to be delineated or measured. The virtual experiments are designed to focus on specific properties and processes - such as floe size and shape, collision and fracturing events, and variations in wave climate - and measure their relative roles the transfer of energy and momentum from waves to ice. Questions to be examined include: How is energy dissipated by ice floe collisions, fracturing, and drag, and how significant is the wave attenuation associated with each process? Do specific wave/floe length scale ratios cause greater wave attenuation? How does ice material strength affect the rate of wave energy loss? The coupled system will ultimately be used to test and improve upon wave-ice parameterizations for large-scale climate models. References: >Kloss, C., C. Goniva, A. Hager, S. Amberger, and S. Pirker (2012). Models, algorithms and validation for opensource DEM and CFD-DEM. Progress in Computational Fluid Dynamics 12(2/3), 140-152. >Ma, G

  19. Management zones in coffee cultivation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    João L. Jacintho

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT This study aimed to apply precision agriculture techniques in coffee production, using correlation analysis in the definition of management zones. This work was carried out in a 22-ha area of coffee (Coffea arabica L., cv. ‘Topázio MG 1190’, which was sampled on a regular grid, using a topographic GPS, totaling 64 georeferenced samples (on average, 2.9 points per ha. Descriptive analysis was used in the data, followed by Pearson’s correlation analysis at 0.05 significance between soil chemical attributes, agronomic characteristics of the plants and altitude. It was possible to verify the correlation of soil chemical attributes, agronomic characteristics of the plants and altitude with coffee yield. Altitude was the variable most correlated with coffee yield through correlation analysis. Therefore, it was chosen as the best variable to define management zones and thematic maps capable to support coffee farmers. Three maps were generated to characterize the area in two, three and four management zones. There was a direct influence on mean yield.

  20. Life zone investigations in Wyoming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cary, Merritt

    1917-01-01

    Wyoming is among the foremost of our States in its wealth of natural scenery, culminating in the grandeur of Yellowstone National Park, one of the wonders of the world. In addition to this distinction it posseses vast open plains and lofty mountains whence flow the headwaters of mighty river systems emptying far away to the west into the Pacific Ocean, to the southeast into the Gulf of Mexico, and to the southwest into the Gulf of California. The various slope exposures of its mountain ranges, the fertility of its intervening valleys or basins, and the aridity of its desert spaces present a study of geographic and vertical distribution of wild life that is in many particulars unique.The study of geographic and vertical distribution of life with the governing factors and attendant problems is valuable as a matter of scientific research and in the attainment of practical knowledge. The Biological Survey has been making detailed investigations of the transcontinental life belts, or zones, of North America for some years, and this work has been carried on with special reference to their practical value. It has become increasingly evident that life zones furnish a fairly accurate index to average climatic conditions and, therefore, are useful as marking the limits of agricultural possibilities, so far as these are dependent upon climate. The knowledge thus gained has been published and made available as the investigations have progressed and the life zones have been mapped.1

  1. Experiential reflective learning and comfort zone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan Nehyba

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available The article deals with the issue of experiential reflective learning. Firstlyit aims to discuss the concept of comfort zone in this area. It goes beyond the usualdefinition of the domestic comfort zone and it reflects in terms of experiential reflectivelearning in the world. The conclusions point to possible parallels with the concept ofcomfort zones and K. Lewin theory. Overall, the article focuses on topics that help toexpand the view on the issue of comfort zone.

  2. Collisions Around a Black Hole Mean Mealtime

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2017-08-01

    reverses course and migrates outward again as a brown dwarf.Metzger and Stone demonstrate that the timescale for this process is shorter than the time delay expected between successive EMRIs. The likelihood is high, they show, that two consecutive EMRIs would collide while one is inspiraling and the other is outspiraling.Results of a CollisionSchematic diagram (not to scale) showing how two circular EMRI orbits can intersect as the main-sequence star migrates inward (blue) and the brown dwarf very slowly migrates outward (red). [Metzger Stone 2017]Because both stars are deep in the black holes gravitational well, they collide with enormous relative velocities ( 10% the speed of light!). If this collision is head-on, one or both stars will be completely destroyed. The resulting gas then accretes onto the black hole, producing a flare very similar to a classical tidal disruption event.If the stars instead meet on a grazing collision, Metzger and Stone show that this liberates gas from at least one of the stars. The gas forms an accretion disk around the black hole, causing a transient flare similar to some of the harder-to-explain flares weve observed that dont quite fit our models for tidal disruption events.In this latter scenario, the stars survive to encounter each other again, decades to millennia later. These grazing collisions between the pair can continue to produce quasi-periodic flares for thousands of years or longer.Metzger and Stone argue that EMRI collisions have the potential to explain some of the flares from supermassive black holes that we had previously attributed to tidal disruption events. More detailed modeling will allow us to explore this idea further in the future.CitationBrian D. Metzger and Nicholas C. Stone 2017 ApJ 844 75. doi:10.3847/1538-4357/aa7a16

  3. Prototype design of an engineer collision protection system

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-17

    This research program was sponsored by the Federal Railroad Administration (FRA) Office of Research and Development in support of the advancement of improved safety standards for passenger rail vehicles. In a train collision, the cab or locomotive en...

  4. ATLAS Event Display: Run 2 Heavy Ion Collision

    CERN Multimedia

    ATLAS Collaboration

    2018-01-01

    Event display of a lead-lead collision with a large transverse momentum photon. In this event, the expected balancing jet is not visible by eye, consistent with it being degraded by its passage through the quark-gluon plasma.

  5. An exceptional collision tumor: gastric calcified stromal tumor and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    An exceptional collision tumor: gastric calcified stromal tumor and pancreatic adenocarcinoma. Hicham Baba, Mohamed Elfahssi, Mohamed Said Belhamidi, Abderrahman Elhjouji, Ahmed Bounaim, Abdelmounaim Ait Ali, Khalid Sair, Aziz Zentar ...

  6. Multiple electron capture in close ion-atom collisions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schlachter, A.S.; Stearns, J.W.; Berkner, K.H.; Bernstein, E.M.; Clark, M.W.; DuBois, R.D.; Graham, W.G.; Morgan, T.J.; Mueller, D.W.; Stockli, M.P.; Tanis, J.A.; Woodland, W.T. (Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (USA); Western Michigan Univ., Kalamazoo, MI (USA); Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (USA); Queen' s Univ., Belfast, Northern Ireland (UK); Wesleyan Univ., Middletown, CT (USA); University of North Tex

    1989-07-24

    Collisions in which a fast highly charged ion passes within the orbit of K electron of a target gas atom are selected by emission of a K x-ray from the projectile or target. Measurement of the projectile charge state after the collision, in coincidence with the K x-ray, allows measurement of the charge-transfer probability during these close collisions. When the projectile velocity is approximately the same as that of target electrons, a large number of electrons can be transferred to the projectile in a single collision. The electron-capture probability is found to be a linear function of the number of vacancies in the projectile L shell for 47-MeV calcium ions in an Ar target. 18 refs., 9 figs.

  7. Binary collisions in popovici’s photogravitational model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mioc V.

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available The dynamics of bodies under the combined action of the gravitational attraction and the radiative repelling force has large and deep implications in astronomy. In the 1920s, the Romanian astronomer Constantin Popovici proposed a modified photogravitational law (considered by other scientists too. This paper deals with the collisions of the two-body problem associated with Popovici’s model. Resorting to McGehee-type transformations of the second kind, we obtain regular equations of motion and define the collision manifold. The flow on this boundary manifold is wholly described. This allows to point out some important qualitative features of the collisional motion: existence of the black-hole effect, gradientlikeness of the flow on the collision manifold, regularizability of collisions under certain conditions. Some questions, coming from the comparison of Levi-Civita’s regularizing transformations and McGehee’s ones, are formulated.

  8. Inelastic Vector Soliton Collisions: A Lattice-Based Quantum Representation

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Vahala, George; Vahala, Linda; Yepez, Jeffrey

    2004-01-01

    .... Under appropriate conditions the exact 2-soliton vector solutions yield in elastic soliton collisions, in agreement with the theoretical predictions of Radhakrishnan et al. (1997 Phys. Rev. E56, 2213...

  9. Atom Collision-Induced Resistivity of Carbon Nanotubes

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Hugo E. Romero; Kim Bolton; Arne Rosén; Peter C. Eklund

    2005-01-01

    We report the observation of unusually strong and systematic changes in the electron transport in metallic single-walled carbon nanotubes that are undergoing collisions with inert gas atoms or small molecules...

  10. On the global ship hull bending energy in ship collisions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Preben Terndrup; Li, Yujie

    2009-01-01

    During ship collisions part of the kinetic energy of the involved vessels immediately prior to contact is absorbed as energy dissipated by crushing of the hull structures, by friction and by elastic energy. The purpose of this report is to present an estimate of the elastic energy that can...... be stored in elastic hull vibrations during a ship collision. When a ship side is strengthened in order to improve the crashworthiness it has been argued in the scientific literature that a non-trivial part of the energy released for structural deformation during the collision can be absorbed as elastic...... energy in global ship hull vibrations, such that with strong ship sides less energy has to be spent in crushing of the striking ship bow and/or the struck ship side. In normal ship–ship collision analyses both the striking and struck ship are usually considered as rigid bodies where structural crushing...

  11. Probing superheavy quasimolecular collisions with incoming inner shell vacancies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Verma, P. [Atomphysik, GSI, Planckstrasse 1, D-64291 Darmstadt (Germany) and JMI University, New Delhi (India) and Vaish College, Rohtak (India)]. E-mail: P.Verma@gsi.de; Mokler, P.H. [Atomphysik, GSI, Planckstrasse 1, D-64291 Darmstadt (Germany); J. Liebig University, Giessen (Germany); Braeuning-Demian, A. [Atomphysik, GSI, Planckstrasse 1, D-64291 Darmstadt (Germany); Braeuning, H. [J. Liebig University, Giessen (Germany); Kozhuharov, C. [Atomphysik, GSI, Planckstrasse 1, D-64291 Darmstadt (Germany); Bosch, F. [Atomphysik, GSI, Planckstrasse 1, D-64291 Darmstadt (Germany); Liesen, D. [Atomphysik, GSI, Planckstrasse 1, D-64291 Darmstadt (Germany); Hagmann, S. [Atomphysik, GSI, Planckstrasse 1, D-64291 Darmstadt (Germany); J.W. Goethe University, Frankfurt (Germany); Stoehlker, Th. [Atomphysik, GSI, Planckstrasse 1, D-64291 Darmstadt (Germany); Stachura, Z. [Institute for Nuclear Physics, Cracow (Poland); Banas, D. [Atomphysik, GSI, Planckstrasse 1, D-64291 Darmstadt (Germany); Swietokrzyska Academy, Kielce (Poland); Orsic-Muthig, A. [Atomphysik, GSI, Planckstrasse 1, D-64291 Darmstadt (Germany); Schoeffler, M. [J.W. Goethe University, Frankfurt (Germany); Sierpowski, D. [Jagellonian University, Cracow (Poland); Spillmann, U. [Atomphysik, GSI, Planckstrasse 1, D-64291 Darmstadt (Germany); Tashenov, S. [Atomphysik, GSI, Planckstrasse 1, D-64291 Darmstadt (Germany); Toleikis, S. [Atomphysik, GSI, Planckstrasse 1, D-64291 Darmstadt (Germany); Wahab, M.A. [JMI University, New Delhi (India)

    2006-04-15

    With the advanced accelerator technologies used at the SIS/ESR heavy ion facility at GSI, the highest charge states (bare, H-like, etc.) even for the heaviest ions can be provided for experiments at moderate collision velocities (v {sub ion} < v {sub K}). Hence, inner shell vacancies can be provided prior to collisions for the innermost shells of transiently formed superheavy quasimolecules. However, projectile K-vacancies may be destroyed while penetrating solids. The goal of the present investigation is to establish how far at relatively low collision velocities, high incoming ionic charge states do survive in thin solid targets and hence, how far thin solid targets can be utilized for studying superheavy quasimolecules with well-defined, open, incoming, inner shell vacancy channels. The dependence of quasimolecular collisions on projectile charge state (q) and target thickness (t) is studied in very thin Au solid targets for 69 MeV/u U {sup q+} ions (73 {<=} q {<=} 91)

  12. Implementation of collisions on GPU architecture in the Vorpal code

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leddy, Jarrod; Averkin, Sergey; Cowan, Ben; Sides, Scott; Werner, Greg; Cary, John

    2017-10-01

    The Vorpal code contains a variety of collision operators allowing for the simulation of plasmas containing multiple charge species interacting with neutrals, background gas, and EM fields. These existing algorithms have been improved and reimplemented to take advantage of the massive parallelization allowed by GPU architecture. The use of GPUs is most effective when algorithms are single-instruction multiple-data, so particle collisions are an ideal candidate for this parallelization technique due to their nature as a series of independent processes with the same underlying operation. This refactoring required data memory reorganization and careful consideration of device/host data allocation to minimize memory access and data communication per operation. Successful implementation has resulted in an order of magnitude increase in simulation speed for a test-case involving multiple binary collisions using the null collision method. Work supported by DARPA under contract W31P4Q-16-C-0009.

  13. The degenerate-internal-states approximation for cold collisions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maan, A.C.; Tiesinga, E.; Stoof, H.T.C.; Verhaar, B.J.

    1990-01-01

    The Degenerate-Internal-States approximation as well as its first-order correction are shown to provide a convenient method for calculating elastic and inelastic collision amplitudes for low temperature atomic scattering.

  14. Jet studies in heavy ion collisions with the ATLAS detector

    CERN Document Server

    Slovak, Radim; The ATLAS collaboration

    2016-01-01

    In relativistic heavy ion collisions, a hot medium with a high density of unscreened color charges is produced. Jets are produced at the early stages of this collision and are known to become attenuated as they propagate through the hot matter. One manifestation of this energy loss is a lower yield of jets emerging from the medium than expected in the absence of medium effects. ATLAS has provided a quantification of this jet suppression by the jet Raa measurement in run 1 of LHC. A factor of two suppression was seen in central heavy ion collisions with respect to pp collisions. The Raa exhibited only a week, if any, rapidity dependence, and a slow rise with increasing jet momentum. This talk summarizes the run 1 results on the inclusive jet production and the new results on dijet measurements.

  15. Quarkonium production in p–Pb collisions with ALICE

    CERN Document Server

    Lakomov, Igor

    2016-01-01

    The production of quarkonia, bound states of quark and anti-quark pairs, is intensively studied both experimentally and theoretically. They are ideal probes of the Quark-Gluon Plasma (QGP) formed in heavy-ion collisions. At the beginning of 2013, data from p–Pb collisions at sNN=5.02 TeV have been collected by ALICE, which can be exploited to measure cold nuclear matter (CNM) effects on quarkonium production. These measurements are important in order to disentangle, in Pb–Pb collisions, hot and CNM effects. In this paper final ALICE results on the charmonium and bottomonium production in p–Pb collisions from Run I of the LHC are presented. ALICE measurements are compared to various models of CNM effects and to PHENIX measurements.

  16. Fast swept-volume distance for robust collision detection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xavier, P.G.

    1997-04-01

    The need for collision detection arises in several robotics areas, including motion-planning, online collision avoidance, and simulation. At the heart of most current methods are algorithms for interference detection and/or distance computation. A few recent algorithms and implementations are very fast, but to use them for accurate collision detection, very small step sizes can be necessary, reducing their effective efficiency. We present a fast, implemented technique for doing exact distance computation and interference detection for translationally-swept bodies. For rotationally swept bodies, we adapt this technique to improve accuracy, for any given step size, in distance computation and interference detection. We present preliminary experiments that show that the combination of basic and swept-body calculations holds much promise for faster accurate collision detection.

  17. Jets in heavy ion collisions with the ATLAS detector

    CERN Document Server

    Santos, Helena; The ATLAS collaboration

    2018-01-01

    Jets constitute a golden probe to study the quark gluon plasma produced in heavy ion collisions at the LHC. Being produced at the early stages of the collisions, they are expected to be modified as propagating through the hot and dense medium. A signature of the modification is the energy loss lowering the jet yields at a given transverse momentum. A factor of two suppression is observed in central Pb+Pb collisions with respect to pp collisions. Other signatures are the modification of the dijet momentum balance and the modification of fragmentation functions. This talk will present the currently available jet results from ATLAS in Run 2. The high statistical significance of this data sample collected by ATLAS in Run 2 allows precision measurements of these observables in a wide range of transverse momentum, centrality and rapidity intervals.

  18. Geo-referencing bird-window collisions for targeted mitigation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Scott Winton

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Bird collisions with windows are an important conservation concern. Efficient mitigation efforts should prioritize retrofitting sections of glass exhibiting the highest mortality of birds. Most collision studies, however, record location meta-data at a spatial scale too coarse (i.e., compass direction of facing façade to be useful for large buildings with complex geometries. Through spatial analysis of three seasons of survey data at a large building at a university campus, we found that GPS data were able to identify collision hotspots while compass directions could not. To demonstrate the broad applicability and utility of this georeferencing approach, we identified collision hotspots at two additional urban areas in North America. The data for this latter exercise were collected via the citizen science database, iNaturalist, which we review for its potential to generate the georeferenced data necessary for directing building retrofits and mitigating a major source of anthropogenic bird mortality.

  19. Geo-referencing bird-window collisions for targeted mitigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winton, R Scott; Ocampo-Peñuela, Natalia; Cagle, Nicolette

    2018-01-01

    Bird collisions with windows are an important conservation concern. Efficient mitigation efforts should prioritize retrofitting sections of glass exhibiting the highest mortality of birds. Most collision studies, however, record location meta-data at a spatial scale too coarse (i.e., compass direction of facing façade) to be useful for large buildings with complex geometries. Through spatial analysis of three seasons of survey data at a large building at a university campus, we found that GPS data were able to identify collision hotspots while compass directions could not. To demonstrate the broad applicability and utility of this georeferencing approach, we identified collision hotspots at two additional urban areas in North America. The data for this latter exercise were collected via the citizen science database, iNaturalist, which we review for its potential to generate the georeferenced data necessary for directing building retrofits and mitigating a major source of anthropogenic bird mortality.

  20. Molecular processes in plasmas collisions of charged particles with molecules

    CERN Document Server

    Itikawa, Yukikazu

    2007-01-01

    Molecular Processes in Plasmas describes elementary collision processes in plasmas, particularly those involving molecules or molecular ions. Those collision processes (called molecular processes) maintain plasmas, produce reactive species and emissions, and play a key role in energy balance in plasmas or more specifically in determining the energy distribution of plasma particles. Many books on plasma physics mention the elementary processes, but normally rather briefly. They only touch upon the general feature or fundamental concept of the collision processes. On the other hand, there are many books on atomic and molecular physics, but most of them are too general or too detailed to be useful to people in the application fields. The present book enumerates all the possible processes in the collisions of electrons, as well as ions, with molecules. For each process, a compact but informative description of its characteristics is given together with illustrative examples. Since the author has much experience a...

  1. Jets in heavy ion collisions with the ATLAS detector

    CERN Document Server

    Santos, Helena; The ATLAS collaboration

    2017-01-01

    Jets constitute a golden probe to study the quark gluon plasma produced in heavy ion collisions at the LHC. Being produced at the early stages of the collisions, they are expected to be modified as propagating through the hot and dense medium. A signature of the modification is the energy loss lowering the jet yields at a given transverse momentum. A factor of two suppression is observed in central Pb+Pb collisions with respect to pp collisions. Other signatures are the modification of the dijet momentum balance and the modification of fragmentation functions. This talk will present the currently available jet results from ATLAS in Run 2. The high statistical significance of this data sample collected by ATLAS in Run 2 allows precision measurements of these observables in a wide range of transverse momentum, centrality and rapidity intervals.

  2. How well does QCD work for photon-photon collisions?

    OpenAIRE

    Wengler, Thorsten

    2002-01-01

    The performance of QCD in describing hadronic photon-photon collisions is investigated in the light of recent measurements from LEP on di-jet production, light hadron transverse momentum spectra, and heavy quark production.

  3. Jets and Vector Bosons in Heavy Ion Collisions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    de la Cruz Begoña

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper reviews experimental results on jets and electroweak boson (photon,Wand Z production in heavy-ion collisions, from the CMS and ATLAS detectors, using data collected during 2011 PbPb run and pp data collected at an equivalent energy. By comparing the two collision systems, the energy loss of the partons propagating through the medium produced in PbPb collisions can be studied. Its characterization is done using dijet events and isolated photon-jet pairs. Since the electroweak gauge bosons do not participate in the strong interaction, and are thus unmodified by the nuclear medium, they serve as clean probes of the initial state in the collision.

  4. Structural evolution and U-Pb SHRIMP zircon ages of the Neoproterozoic Maria da Fé shear zone, central Ribeira Belt - SE Brazil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuquim, M. P. S.; Trouw, R. A. J.; Trouw, C. C.; Tohver, E.

    2011-03-01

    The Maria da Fé Shear Zone (MFSZ) is a sinistral strike-slip kilometric-scale structure developed in the late Neoproterozoic during the assembly of Gondwana. The MFSZ development is related to the NW-SE collision between the São Francisco Paleocontinent and the Rio Negro Magmatic Arc, which formed the Ribeira Belt. This paper describes the shear zone in detail, concluding that the orientation and age are consistent with NW-SE shortening during the afore mentioned collision. A U-Pb SHRIMP Concordia age of 586.9 ± 8.7 Ma is reported from zircon grains of a granitic dyke that crystallised synkinematically to the main tectonic activity of the shear zone. Another group of zircon grains from the same sample generated an upper intercept age of 2083 ± 43 Ma anchored in the younger Concordia age. These zircon grains are interpreted as relict grains of the basement from which the granite dyke was generated by partial melting. The temperature during mylonitization in the MFSZ was estimated in the range from 450 to 600 °C, based on microstructures in quartz and feldspar. An earlier collision in the same region, between 640 and 610 Ma, led to an extensive nappe-stack with tectonic transport to ENE, integrating the southern Brasilia Belt. One of the thrust zones between these nappes in the studied area is the Cristina Shear Zone with mylonites that were generated under upper amphibolite to granulite facies conditions. Brittle-ductile E-W metric-scale shear zones are superimposed on the MFSZ, which were active in similar, but probably slightly cooler, metamorphic conditions (≈500 °C).

  5. Tectonics of the IndoBurma Oblique Subduction Zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steckler, M. S.; Seeber, L.; Akhter, S. H.; Betka, P. M.; Cai, Y.; Grall, C.; Mondal, D. R.; Gahalaut, V. K.; Gaherty, J. B.; Maung Maung, P.; Ni, J.; Persaud, P.; Sandvol, E. A.; Tun, S. T.

    2016-12-01

    The Ganges-Brahmaputra Delta (GBD) is obliquely colliding with the IndoBurma subduction zone. Most of the 42 mm/y of arc-parallel motion is absorbed in a set of dextral to dextral-convergent faults, the Sagaing, Kabaw and Churachandpur-Mao Faults. The 13-17 mm/y of convergence with the delta has built a 250-km wide active accretionary prism. The upper part of the 19-km sediment thickness consists of a shallowing-up stack of prograding strata that has shifted the shelf edge 3-400 km since the Himalayan orogeny at 50 Ma. The upper 3-5 km sandy shelf to fluvial strata are deformed into a broad fold and thrust belt above an overpressured décollement. It forms a flat shallow roof thrust in the frontal accretionary prism. The structure of the deeper part of the accretionary prism, which must transfer the incoming sediments to the upper plate, is unknown. GPS indicates the downdip end of the megathrust locked zone is 25 km at 92.5°E. The deformation front, marked by nascent detachment folds above the shallow décollement reaches the megacity of Dhaka in the middle of the GBD. The seismogenic potential of this portion of the prism is unknown. Arc volcanism in Myanmar, 500 km east of the deformation front, is sparse. Limited geochemical data on the arc volcanics are consistent with hot slab conditions. One possibility is that the deep GBD slab and basement are metamorphosed and dewatered early in the subduction process whereby most of the fluids are transferred to the growing prism by buoyancy driven migration or accretion of fluid-rich strata. Since it is entirely subaerial this little-studied region crossing Bangladesh, India and Myanmar provides an opportunity for a detailed multidisciplinary geophysical and geological investigation. It has the potential to highlight the role of fluids in subduction zones, the tectonics of extreme accretion and their seismic hazards, and the interplay between driving and resistance forces of a subduction zone during a soft collision.

  6. Anatomy of an escape tectonic zone: Western Irian Jaya (Indonesia)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pubellier, Manuel; Ego, Frédéric

    2002-07-01

    The western fold-and-thrust belt of New Guinea in Irian Jaya is presently a complex boundary, dominated by the Bird's Head block escape from the collision between the Australian plate and the remnants of volcanic belts carried by the Pacific plate. The escape rate given by geodetic measurements is of the order of 7 cm/yr, and movement is accommodated by a broad shear zone. We analyze this shear pattern using fault slip analyses performed in the field from 1992 to 1996, combined with focal mechanism inversions, moment tensors summations, and surface trace of structures inferred from radar and multispectral satellite images. Time control of the deformation is attained by isotope dating of the recent syntectonic intrusives. The geometry of the macro and microstructures occurred in two stages from the early Pliocene to the Present. The first stage (5 to 2 Ma) is marked by flat-and-ramps structures guided by N60°E lateral ramps associated with a N60°E cleavage, affecting the whole of western Irian Jaya. The second stage (2 Ma to Present) shows the collapse of the western fold-and-thrust belt and the escape of the Bird's Head and the Lengguru belts along N60°E transtensile faults. In the latter stage, the strike-slip offset is distributed on the N60°E schistosity zone along which some fracture planes are reactivated as left-lateral transtensile faults. Shallow earthquakes moment tensors have been inverted for stress and summed to get strain rates to define contrasting structural provinces. The spatial variations in both stress and strain fields from earthquakes and microtectonics show that (1) they are consistent and are assumed to be coeval, (2) they reveal that oblique convergence is partitioned, and (3) they are influenced by the existence of a free boundary. We see no significant rotation of stress axes laterally along the escape zone. Instead, stresses change according to the different orientations of basement structures and thus undergo rapid spatial variations

  7. Does zoning winter recreationists reduce recreation conflict?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aubrey D. Miller; Jerry J. Vaske; John R. Squires; Lucretia E. Olson; Elizabeth K. Roberts

    2017-01-01

    Parks and protected area managers use zoning to decrease interpersonal conflict between recreationists. Zoning, or segregation, of recreation - often by nonmotorized and motorized activity - is designed to limit physical interaction while providing recreation opportunities to both groups. This article investigated the effectiveness of zoning to reduce recreation...

  8. Recent findings relating to firefighter safety zones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bret Butler; Russ Parsons; William Mell

    2015-01-01

    Designation of safety zones is a primary duty of all wildland firefighters. Unfortunately, information regarding what constitutes an adequate safety zone is inadequately defined. Measurements of energy release from wildland fires have been used to develop an empirically based safety zone guideline. The basis for this work is described here.

  9. Threat Alert and Collision Avoidance System (TCAS) Symposium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-07-22

    Inc. Air New Zeland Pan Am .MINC Delta Ozark Boeing Coimnercial Airplane Co. Frontier Air France Lockheed Calif. Co. Swiss Air Southwest RCA...and 21 airlines. This report contains the news release announcing the new approach to pro- viding protection against mid-air collisions, 10...would cost between $45,000 and $50,000. This new concept represents a new capability which draws on all FAA has learned about collision avoidance in its

  10. Consistent patterns of vehicle collision risk for six mammal species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Visintin, Casey; van der Ree, Rodney; McCarthy, Michael A

    2017-10-01

    The occurrence and rate of wildlife-vehicle collisions are related to both anthropocentric and environmental variables, however, few studies compare collision risks for multiple species within a model framework that is adaptable and transferable. Our research compares collision risk for multiple species across a large geographic area using a conceptually simple risk framework. We used six species of native terrestrial mammal often involved with wildlife-vehicle collisions in south-east Australia. We related collisions reported to a wildlife organisation to the co-occurrence of each species and a threatening process (presence and movement of road vehicles). For each species, we constructed statistical models from wildlife atlas data to predict occurrence across geographic space. Traffic volume and speed on road segments (also modelled) characterised the magnitude of threatening processes. The species occurrence models made plausible spatial predictions. Each model reduced the unexplained variation in patterns and distributions of species between 29.5% (black wallaby) and 34.3% (koala). The collision models reduced the unexplained variation in collision event data between 7.4% (koala) and 19.4% (common ringtail possum) with predictor variables correlating similarly with collision risk across species. Road authorities and environmental managers need simple and flexible tools to inform projects. Our model framework is useful for directing mitigation efforts (e.g. on road effects or species presence), predicting risk across differing spatial and temporal scales and target species, inferring patterns of threat, and identifying areas warranting additional data collection, analysis, and study. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. High p{sub T} jet production in pp collisions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eskola, K.J. [Univ. of Helsinki (Finland); Wang, X.N. [Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States)

    1995-07-01

    Production rates of large p{sub T} jets in pp collisions at RHIC and LHC energies are studied using the next-to-leading order calculation of S. D. Ellis, Z. Zunszt and D. Soper. The computed inclusive one-jet cross sections are compared against the CERN and Fermilab jet data from p{bar p} and pp collisions. The dependence of the results on the choice of the parton distributions and renormalization/factorization scales is investigated.

  12. A virtual simulator designed for collision prevention in proton therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jung, Hyunuk [Department of Health Sciences and Technology, SAIHST, Sungkyunkwan University, Seoul 06351 (Korea, Republic of); Kum, Oyeon [Heavy-Ion Medical Accelerator Development Center, Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences, Seoul 139-706 (Korea, Republic of); Han, Youngyih, E-mail: youngyih@skku.edu; Park, Hee Chul; Kim, Jin Sung; Choi, Doo Ho [Department of Radiation Oncology, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul 06351 (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-10-15

    Purpose: In proton therapy, collisions between the patient and nozzle potentially occur because of the large nozzle structure and efforts to minimize the air gap. Thus, software was developed to predict such collisions between the nozzle and patient using treatment virtual simulation. Methods: Three-dimensional (3D) modeling of a gantry inner-floor, nozzle, and robotic-couch was performed using SolidWorks based on the manufacturer’s machine data. To obtain patient body information, a 3D-scanner was utilized right before CT scanning. Using the acquired images, a 3D-image of the patient’s body contour was reconstructed. The accuracy of the image was confirmed against the CT image of a humanoid phantom. The machine components and the virtual patient were combined on the treatment-room coordinate system, resulting in a virtual simulator. The simulator simulated the motion of its components such as rotation and translation of the gantry, nozzle, and couch in real scale. A collision, if any, was examined both in static and dynamic modes. The static mode assessed collisions only at fixed positions of the machine’s components, while the dynamic mode operated any time a component was in motion. A collision was identified if any voxels of two components, e.g., the nozzle and the patient or couch, overlapped when calculating volume locations. The event and collision point were visualized, and collision volumes were reported. Results: All components were successfully assembled, and the motions were accurately controlled. The 3D-shape of the phantom agreed with CT images within a deviation of 2 mm. Collision situations were simulated within minutes, and the results were displayed and reported. Conclusions: The developed software will be useful in improving patient safety and clinical efficiency of proton therapy.

  13. Effect of Collision Angle on Binary Droplet Coalescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jungyong; Longmire, Ellen

    2006-11-01

    Drop pairs of water/glycerin solution were injected into silicone oil of lower density through opposing tubes at varying initial angles with the goal of controlling the eventual collision angles. Simultaneous dual-field PIV measurements were obtained in index-matched fluids to characterize coalescence and rebounding behavior. The larger field captured trajectories, and the smaller field captured the thin film region. Experiments were performed for Weber numbers [We] in the range of 1-50 and collision angles of 15-80 degrees below the horizontal. Above We ˜ 10, drops coalesced, with the rebounding/coalescence boundary shifting to higher We with increasing collision angle. Also, the collision angle affected the eventual location of film rupture. The rupture location moved higher in the thin film region as the collision angle increased. Interactions of vortex rings within drops and strong deformation associated with shallow collision angles and sufficient We encouraged coalescence. Details of these interactions will be discussed in the presentation. Supported by Petroleum Research Fund (42939-AC9) and NSF (CTS-0320327).

  14. Development of a Virtual Collision Sensor for Industrial Robots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Indri, Marina; Trapani, Stefano; Lazzero, Ivan

    2017-05-18

    Collision detection is a fundamental issue for the safety of a robotic cell. While several common methods require specific sensors or the knowledge of the robot dynamic model, the proposed solution is constituted by a virtual collision sensor for industrial manipulators, which requires as inputs only the motor currents measured by the standard sensors that equip a manipulator and the estimated currents provided by an internal dynamic model of the robot (i.e., the one used inside its controller), whose structure, parameters and accuracy are not known. The collision detection is achieved by comparing the absolute value of the current residue with a time-varying, positive-valued threshold function, including an estimate of the model error and a bias term, corresponding to the minimum collision torque to be detected. The value of such a term, defining the sensor sensitivity, can be simply imposed as constant, or automatically customized for a specific robotic application through a learning phase and a subsequent adaptation process, to achieve a more robust and faster collision detection, as well as the avoidance of any false collision warnings, even in case of slow variations of the robot behavior. Experimental results are provided to confirm the validity of the proposed solution, which is already adopted in some industrial scenarios.

  15. Development of a Virtual Collision Sensor for Industrial Robots

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marina Indri

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Collision detection is a fundamental issue for the safety of a robotic cell. While several common methods require specific sensors or the knowledge of the robot dynamic model, the proposed solution is constituted by a virtual collision sensor for industrial manipulators, which requires as inputs only the motor currents measured by the standard sensors that equip a manipulator and the estimated currents provided by an internal dynamic model of the robot (i.e., the one used inside its controller, whose structure, parameters and accuracy are not known. The collision detection is achieved by comparing the absolute value of the current residue with a time-varying, positive-valued threshold function, including an estimate of the model error and a bias term, corresponding to the minimum collision torque to be detected. The value of such a term, defining the sensor sensitivity, can be simply imposed as constant, or automatically customized for a specific robotic application through a learning phase and a subsequent adaptation process, to achieve a more robust and faster collision detection, as well as the avoidance of any false collision warnings, even in case of slow variations of the robot behavior. Experimental results are provided to confirm the validity of the proposed solution, which is already adopted in some industrial scenarios.

  16. Acciphilia on the road: An analysis of severe collisions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Factor, Roni; Yair, Gad; Mahalel, David

    2011-10-01

    Although prior studies of road traffic accidents have found between-group differences in risk, little attention has been given to the encounter between drivers involved in severe collisions. The present study empirically evaluates two different possible causes of "social accidents," which are defined as collisions between two or more drivers where some faulty social interaction might be assumed, and which are the most prevalent cause of road injuries. The analyses use merged Israeli collision records from 1983 to 2004 with data from two national censuses, thus providing an unprecedented empirical basis to study the social foundations of car accidents. The data are used to adjudicate between two alternative hypotheses: the heterogeneity hypothesis (socially different drivers tend to collide) versus the homogeneity hypothesis (socially similar drivers tend to collide). Multivariate analyses provide preliminary support for the latter hypothesis. Given an accident, there are more collisions among drivers from the same broad educational group, and the factors that influence this correlation are independent of geography. The paper thus leads to the idea that severe collisions reflect a sociological or ecological process that is akin to acciphilia. The preliminary findings suggest that variation between drivers may be preferable to similarity, since apparently there is a greater tendency toward collisions between similar drivers. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Multiparticle production in nuclear collisions using effective-energy approach

    CERN Document Server

    Mishra, Aditya Nath; Sarkisyan, Edward K. G.; Sakharov, Alexander S.

    2015-01-01

    The dependencies of charged particle pseudorapidity density and transverse energy pseudorapidity density at midrapidity on the collision energy and on the number of nucleon participants, or centrality, measured in nucleus-nucleus collisions are studied in the energy range spanning a few GeV to a few TeV per nucleon. The study is based on the earlier proposed model, combining the constituent quark picture together with Landau relativistic hydrodynamics and shown to interrelate the measurements from different types of collisions. Within this picture, the dependence on the number of participants in heavy-ion collisions are found to be well described in terms of the effective energy defined as a centrality-dependent fraction of the collision energy. The effective energy approach is shown to reveal a similarity in the energy dependence for the most central and centrality data in the entire available energy range. Predictions are made for the forthcoming higher-energy measurements in heavy-ion collisions at the LHC...

  18. Summary of Reported Whale-Vessel Collisions in Alaskan Waters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janet L. Neilson

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Here we summarize 108 reported whale-vessel collisions in Alaska from 1978–2011, of which 25 are known to have resulted in the whale's death. We found 89 definite and 19 possible/probable strikes based on standard criteria we created for this study. Most strikes involved humpback whales (86% with six other species documented. Small vessel strikes were most common (<15 m, 60%, but medium (15–79 m, 27% and large (≥80 m, 13% vessels also struck whales. Among the 25 mortalities, vessel length was known in seven cases (190–294 m and vessel speed was known in three cases (12–19 kn. In 36 cases, human injury or property damage resulted from the collision, and at least 15 people were thrown into the water. In 15 cases humpback whales struck anchored or drifting vessels, suggesting the whales did not detect the vessels. Documenting collisions in Alaska will remain challenging due to remoteness and resource limitations. For a better understanding of the factors contributing to lethal collisions, we recommend (1 systematic documentation of collisions, including vessel size and speed; (2 greater efforts to necropsy stranded whales; (3 using experienced teams focused on determining cause of death; (4 using standard criteria for validating collision reports, such as those presented in this paper.

  19. Peralkaline and alkaline magmatism of the Ossa-Morena Zone (SW Iberia): age, source and implications for the Paleozoic evolution of Gondwanan lithosphere

    OpenAIRE

    Diez-Fernandez, Ruben; Pereira, M. francisco; Foster, David

    2014-01-01

    The Ossa-Morena zone in SW Iberia represents a section of the northern margin of West Gondwana that formed part of a Cordilleran-type orogenic system during the Neoproterozoic (Cadomian orogeny). The crustal section in this zone preserves the record of rifting that led to the opening of the Rheic Ocean in the early Paleozoic and the collision of Gondwana and Laurussia in the late Paleozoic (Variscan orogeny). We present U-Pb zircon data from three alkaline to peralkaline syenites tha...

  20. 76 FR 18674 - Security Zones; Sector Southeastern New England Captain of the Port Zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-05

    ... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 165 RIN 1625-AA87 Security Zones; Sector Southeastern New England Captain... Southeastern New England Captain of the Port (COTP) Zone. These security zones are nearly identical to security... escorted by Coast Guard or law enforcement agencies assisting the Coast Guard. These zones are needed to...