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Sample records for wind strength temperature

  1. Wireless Concrete Strength Monitoring of Wind Turbine Foundations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcus Perry

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Wind turbine foundations are typically cast in place, leaving the concrete to mature under environmental conditions that vary in time and space. As a result, there is uncertainty around the concrete’s initial performance, and this can encourage both costly over-design and inaccurate prognoses of structural health. Here, we demonstrate the field application of a dense, wireless thermocouple network to monitor the strength development of an onshore, reinforced-concrete wind turbine foundation. Up-to-date methods in fly ash concrete strength and maturity modelling are used to estimate the distribution and evolution of foundation strength over 29 days of curing. Strength estimates are verified by core samples, extracted from the foundation base. In addition, an artificial neural network, trained using temperature data, is exploited to demonstrate that distributed concrete strengths can be estimated for foundations using only sparse thermocouple data. Our techniques provide a practical alternative to computational models, and could assist site operators in making more informed decisions about foundation design, construction, operation and maintenance.

  2. Wireless Concrete Strength Monitoring of Wind Turbine Foundations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perry, Marcus; Fusiek, Grzegorz; Niewczas, Pawel; Rubert, Tim; McAlorum, Jack

    2017-12-16

    Wind turbine foundations are typically cast in place, leaving the concrete to mature under environmental conditions that vary in time and space. As a result, there is uncertainty around the concrete's initial performance, and this can encourage both costly over-design and inaccurate prognoses of structural health. Here, we demonstrate the field application of a dense, wireless thermocouple network to monitor the strength development of an onshore, reinforced-concrete wind turbine foundation. Up-to-date methods in fly ash concrete strength and maturity modelling are used to estimate the distribution and evolution of foundation strength over 29 days of curing. Strength estimates are verified by core samples, extracted from the foundation base. In addition, an artificial neural network, trained using temperature data, is exploited to demonstrate that distributed concrete strengths can be estimated for foundations using only sparse thermocouple data. Our techniques provide a practical alternative to computational models, and could assist site operators in making more informed decisions about foundation design, construction, operation and maintenance.

  3. Fatigue strength ofcomposite wind turbine blade structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ardila, Oscar Gerardo Castro

    Wind turbines are normally designed to withstand 20-30 years of life. During this period, the blades, which are the main rotating structures of a wind turbine, are subjected to high fluctuating load conditions as a result of a combination of gravity, inertia, and aeroelastic forces. For this reason......, fatigue is one of the foremost concerns during the design of these structures. However, current standard fatigue methods used for designing wind turbine blades seem not to be completely appropriate for these structures because they are still based on methods developed for metals and not for composite...... materials from which the blades are made. In this sense, the aim of this work is to develop more accurate and reliable fatigue-life prediction models for composite wind turbine blades. In this project, two types of fatigue models are implemented: fatigue-life models and damage mechanics models. In the first...

  4. On high temperature strength of carbon steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ichinose, Hiroyuki; Tamura, Manabu; Kanero, Takahiro; Ihara, Yoshihito

    1977-01-01

    In the steels for high temperature use, the oxidation resistance is regarded as important, but carbon steels show enough oxidation resistance to be used continuously at the temperature up to 500 deg. C if the strength is left out of consideration, and up to 450 deg. C even when the strength is taken into account. Moreover, the production is easy, the workability and weldability are good, and the price is cheap in carbon steels as compared with alloy steels. In the boilers for large thermal power stations, 0.15-0.30% C steels are used for reheater tubes, main feed water tubes, steam headers, wall water tubes, economizer tubes, bypass pipings and others, and they account for 70% of all steel materials used for the boilers of 350 MW class and 30% in 1000 MW class. The JIS standard for the carbon steels for high temperature use and the related standards in foreign countries are shown. The high temperature strength of carbon steels changes according to the trace elements, melting and heat treatment as well as the main compositions of C, Si and Mn. Al and N affect the high temperature strength largely. The characteristics of carbon steels after the heating for hours, the factors controlling the microstructure and high temperature strength, and the measures to improve the high temperature strength of carbon steels are explained. (Kako, I.)

  5. Strength properties of concrete at elevated temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Freskakis, G.N.; Burrow, R.C.; Debbas, E.B.

    1979-01-01

    A study is presented concerning the compressive strength, modulus of elasticity, and stress-strain relationships of concrete at elevated temperatures. A review of published results provides information for the development of upper and lower bound relationships for compressive strength and the modulus of elasticity and establishes exposure conditions for a lower bound thermal response. The relationships developed from the literature review are confirmed by the results of a verification test program. The strength and elasticity relationships provide a basis for the development of design stress-strain curves for concrete exposed to elevated temperatures

  6. An equatorial temperature and wind anomaly (ETWA)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raghavarao, R.; Wharton, L.E.; Mayr, H.G.; Brace, L.H.; Spencer, N.W.

    1991-01-01

    Data obtained from the WATS (Wind and Temperature Spectrometer) and LP (Langmuir Probe) experiments on board DE-2 (Dynamic Explorer) during high solar activity show evidence of anomalous latitudinal variations in the zonal winds and temperature at low latitudes. The zonal winds exhibit a broad maximum centered around the dip equator, flanked by minima on either side around 25 degrees; while the temperature exhibits a pronounced bowl-shaped minimum at the dip equator which is flanked by maxima. The two minima in the zonal winds and the corresponding maxima in the temperature are nearly collocated with the crests of the well known Equatorial Ionization Anomaly (EIA). The maximum in the zonal winds and the minimum in the gas temperature are collected with the trough of the EIA. The differences between the maxima and minima in temperature and zonal winds, on many occasions, are observed to exceed 100 K and 100 m/s, respectively. The characteristics of this new phenomenon have eluded present day empirical models of thermospheric temperature and winds. The connection among these variables can be understood from the ion-neutral drag effect on the motions of the neutrals that in turn affect their energy balance

  7. Musical Intonation of Wind Instruments and Temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zendri, G.; Valdan, M.; Gratton, L. M.; Oss, S.

    2015-01-01

    Wind musical instruments are affected in their intonation by temperature. We show how to account for these effects in a simple experiment, and provide results in languages accessible to both physics and music professionals.

  8. Shear and Turbulence Estimates for Calculation of Wind Turbine Loads and Responses Under Hurricane Strength Winds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kosovic, B.; Bryan, G. H.; Haupt, S. E.

    2012-12-01

    Schwartz et al. (2010) recently reported that the total gross energy-generating offshore wind resource in the United States in waters less than 30m deep is approximately 1000 GW. Estimated offshore generating capacity is thus equivalent to the current generating capacity in the United States. Offshore wind power can therefore play important role in electricity production in the United States. However, most of this resource is located along the East Coast of the United States and in the Gulf of Mexico, areas frequently affected by tropical cyclones including hurricanes. Hurricane strength winds, associated shear and turbulence can affect performance and structural integrity of wind turbines. In a recent study Rose et al. (2012) attempted to estimate the risk to offshore wind turbines from hurricane strength winds over a lifetime of a wind farm (i.e. 20 years). According to Rose et al. turbine tower buckling has been observed in typhoons. They concluded that there is "substantial risk that Category 3 and higher hurricanes can destroy half or more of the turbines at some locations." More robust designs including appropriate controls can mitigate the risk of wind turbine damage. To develop such designs good estimates of turbine loads under hurricane strength winds are essential. We use output from a large-eddy simulation of a hurricane to estimate shear and turbulence intensity over first couple of hundred meters above sea surface. We compute power spectra of three velocity components at several distances from the eye of the hurricane. Based on these spectra analytical spectral forms are developed and included in TurbSim, a stochastic inflow turbulence code developed by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL, http://wind.nrel.gov/designcodes/preprocessors/turbsim/). TurbSim provides a numerical simulation including bursts of coherent turbulence associated with organized turbulent structures. It can generate realistic flow conditions that an operating turbine

  9. Stochastic models for strength of wind turbine blades using tests

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Toft, H.S.; Sørensen, John Dalsgaard

    2008-01-01

    The structural cost of wind turbine blades is dependent on the values of the partial safety factors which reflect the uncertainties in the design values, including statistical uncertainty from a limited number of tests. This paper presents a probabilistic model for ultimate and fatigue strength...... of wind turbine blades especially considering the influence of prior knowledge and test results and how partial safety factors can be updated when additional full-scale tests are performed. This updating is performed by adopting a probabilistic design basis based on Bayesian statistical methods....

  10. Strength and fatigue of wind turbine rotor laminates and subcomponents

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nijssen, R.X.T.; Westphal, T.; Stammes, E.; Sari, J.K.

    2010-01-01

    This paper gives an overview of current wind turbine rotor blade composite materials research carried out in the material's laboratory of WMC within the framework of European projects. It outlines the collection and analysis of reference data, research into the effect of temperature and frequency on

  11. Strength versus temperature anomalies in metals

    CERN Document Server

    Fisher, D J

    2015-01-01

    Perhaps the best-known aspect of the behavior of metals, and indeed of most materials, is that they weaken with temperature. This weakening is however a problem in some applications. Only tungsten for instance, with its naturally high melting-point, was suitable for the manufacture of the filaments of incandescent light-bulbs. Even then, it was necessary to add oxide particles having a yethigher melting-point in order to prevent the weakening effect of grain-growth. These are alloys however which can be said to be weakened by heat, but nevertheless 'hang on' to enough strength to perform their

  12. Ultimate strength of a large wind turbine blade

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Find Mølholt

    2009-01-01

    reinforcements helping to prevent undesired structural elastic mechanisms are presented. The functionality of two of the suggested structural reinforcements was demonstrated in full-scale tests and the rest trough FE-studies. The blade design under investigation consisted of an aerodynamic airfoil and a load...... carrying box girder. In total, five full-scale tests have been performed involving one complete blade and two shortened box girders. The second box girder was submitted to three independent tests covering different structural reinforcement alternatives. The advantages and disadvantages of testing......The present PhD project contains a study of the structural static strength of wind turbine blades loaded in flap-wise direction. A combination of experimental and numerical work has been used to address the most critical failure mechanisms and to get an understanding of the complex structural...

  13. Effect of microstructure on the high temperature strength of nitride

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Effect of microstructure on the high temperature strength of nitride bonded silicon carbide composite. J Rakshit P K Das. Composites Volume ... The effect of these parameters on room temperature and high temperature strength of the composite up to 1300°C in ambient condition were studied. The high temperature flexural ...

  14. Ultimate strength of a large wind turbine blade

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moelholt Jensen, Find

    2008-05-15

    The present PhD project contains a study of the structural static strength of wind turbine blades loaded in flap-wise direction. A combination of experimental and numerical work has been used to address the most critical failure mechanisms and to get an understanding of the complex structural behaviour of wind turbine blades. Four failure mechanisms observed during the fullscale tests and the corresponding FE-analysis are presented. Elastic mechanisms associated with failure, such as buckling, localized bending and the Brazier effect, are studied. Six different types of structural reinforcements helping to prevent undesired structural elastic mechanisms are presented. The functionality of two of the suggested structural reinforcements was demonstrated in full-scale tests and the rest trough FE-studies. The blade design under investigation consisted of an aerodynamic airfoil and a load carrying box girder. In total, five full-scale tests have been performed involving one complete blade and two shortened box girders. The second box girder was submitted to three independent tests covering different structural reinforcement alternatives. The advantages and disadvantages of testing a shortened load carrying box girder vs. an entire blade are discussed. Changes in the boundary conditions, loads and additional reinforcements, which were introduced in the box girder tests in order to avoid undesired structural elastic mechanisms, are presented. New and advanced measuring equipment was used in the fullscale tests to detect the critical failure mechanisms and to get an understanding of the complex structural behaviour. Traditionally, displacement sensors and strain gauges in blade tests are arranged based on an assumption of a Bernoulli-Euler beam structural response. In the present study it is shown that when following this procedure important information about distortions of the cross sections is lost. In the tests presented here, one of the aims was to measure distortion

  15. An Integrated Structural Strength Analysis Method for Spar Type Floating Wind Turbine

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    胡志强; 刘毅; 王晋

    2016-01-01

    An integrated structural strength analysis method for a Spar type floating wind turbine is proposed in this paper, and technical issues related to turbine structure modeling and stress combination are also addressed. The NREL-5MW “Hywind” Spar type wind turbine is adopted as study object. Time-domain dynamic coupled simulations are performed by a fully-coupled aero-hydro-servo-elastic tool, FAST, on the purpose of obtaining the dynamic characteristics of the floating wind turbine, and determining parameters for design load cases of finite element calculation. Then design load cases are identified, and finite element analyses are performed for these design load cases. The structural stresses due to wave-induced loads and wind-induced loads are calculated, and then combined to assess the structural strength of the floating wind turbine. The feasibility of the proposed structural strength analysis method for floating wind turbines is then validated.

  16. Temperature dependency of tensile properties of GFRP composite for wind turbine blades

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huh, Yong Hak; Kim, Jong Il; Kim, Dong Jin; Lee, Gun Chang [Korea Research Institute of Standards and Science, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-09-15

    In this study, the temperature dependency of the tensile properties of a glass fiber reinforced plastic (GFRP) used in wind turbine blades was examined. The tensile strength, elastic modulus, and Poisson's ratio of the tensile specimen manufactured from uniaxial (0 .deg.) and triaxial (0/{+-}45.deg) laminate composite plates were measured at four different testing temperatures-room temperature, -30 .deg. C, -50 .deg. C, and 60 .deg. C. It was found that the tensile strengths and elastic moduli of the uniaxial laminates were greater than those of the triaxial laminates over the testing temperature range. The tensile strength of the two laminates was significantly dependent on the testing temperature, while the dependency of the elastic modulus on the temperature was insignificant. Furthermore, it could be considered that the Poisson's ratio changed slightly with a change in the testing temperature.

  17. Temperature dependency of tensile properties of GFRP composite for wind turbine blades

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huh, Yong Hak; Kim, Jong Il; Kim, Dong Jin; Lee, Gun Chang

    2012-01-01

    In this study, the temperature dependency of the tensile properties of a glass fiber reinforced plastic (GFRP) used in wind turbine blades was examined. The tensile strength, elastic modulus, and Poisson's ratio of the tensile specimen manufactured from uniaxial (0 .deg.) and triaxial (0/±45.deg) laminate composite plates were measured at four different testing temperatures-room temperature, -30 .deg. C, -50 .deg. C, and 60 .deg. C. It was found that the tensile strengths and elastic moduli of the uniaxial laminates were greater than those of the triaxial laminates over the testing temperature range. The tensile strength of the two laminates was significantly dependent on the testing temperature, while the dependency of the elastic modulus on the temperature was insignificant. Furthermore, it could be considered that the Poisson's ratio changed slightly with a change in the testing temperature

  18. Braze alloy process and strength characterization studies for 18 nickel grade 200 maraging steel with application to wind tunnel models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradshaw, James F.; Sandefur, Paul G., Jr.; Young, Clarence P., Jr.

    1991-01-01

    A comprehensive study of braze alloy selection process and strength characterization with application to wind tunnel models is presented. The applications for this study include the installation of stainless steel pressure tubing in model airfoil sections make of 18 Ni 200 grade maraging steel and the joining of wing structural components by brazing. Acceptable braze alloys for these applications are identified along with process, thermal braze cycle data, and thermal management procedures. Shear specimens are used to evaluate comparative shear strength properties for the various alloys at both room and cryogenic (-300 F) temperatures and include the effects of electroless nickel plating. Nickel plating was found to significantly enhance both the wetability and strength properties for the various braze alloys studied. The data are provided for use in selecting braze alloys for use with 18 Ni grade 200 steel in the design of wind tunnel models to be tested in an ambient or cryogenic environment.

  19. Effects of Elevated Temperature on Compressive Strength Of Concrete

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study presents the results of investigation of the effects of elevated temperatures on the compressive strength of Grade 40 concrete. A total of thirty cube specimens were cast, cured in water at ambient temperature in the laboratory and subjected to various temperature regimes before testing. A concrete mix of 1:1:3 ...

  20. The structure and strength of public attitudes towards wind farm development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bidwell, David Charles

    A growing social science literature seeks to understand why, despite broad public support for wind energy, proposals for specific projects are often met with strong local opposition. This gap between general and specific attitudes is viewed as a significant obstacle to the deployment of wind energy technologies. This dissertation applies theoretical perspectives and methodological tools from social psychology to provide insights on the structure and strength of attitudes towards the potential development of commercial wind farm in three coastal areas of Michigan. A survey of attitudes was completed by 375 residents in these communities and structural equation modeling was used to explore the relationship among variables. The analysis found that attitudes towards wind farm development are shaped by anticipated economic benefits to the community, but expectations of economic benefit are driven by personal values. Social psychology has long recognized that all attitudes are not created equal. Weak attitudes are fleeting and prone to change, while strong attitudes are stable over time and resistant to change. There are two fundamental paths to strong attitudes: repeated experience with an attitude object or the application of deeply held principles or values to that object. Structural equation models were also used to understand the strength of attitudes among the survey respondents. Both the anticipated effects of wind farm development and personal values were found to influence the strength of attitudes towards wind farms. However, while expectations that wind farm development will have positive effects on the economy bolster two measures of attitude strength (collective identity and importance), these expectations are associated with a decline in a third measure (confidence). A follow-up survey asking identical questions was completed by completed by 187 respondents to the initial survey. Linear regressions models were used to determine the effects of attitude

  1. The detection of wind turbine shaft misalignment using temperature monitoring

    OpenAIRE

    Tonks, Oliver; Wang, Qing

    2016-01-01

    Temperature is a parameter increasingly monitored in wind turbine systems. This paper details a potential temperature monitoring technique for use on shaft couplings. Such condition monitoring methods aid fault detection in other areas of wind turbines. However, application to shaft couplings has not previously been widely researched. A novel temperature measurement technique is outlined, using an infra-red thermometer which can be applied to online condition monitoring. The method was va...

  2. Microchip Electrophoresis at Elevated Temperatures and High Separation Field Strengths

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitra, Indranil; Marczak, Steven P.; Jacobson, Stephen C.

    2014-01-01

    We report free-solution microchip electrophoresis performed at elevated temperatures and high separation field strengths. We used microfluidic devices with 11-cm long separation channels to conduct separations at temperatures between 22 (ambient) and 45 °C and field strengths from 100 to 1000 V/cm. To evaluate separation performance, N-glycans were used as a model system and labeled with 8-aminopyrene-1,3,6-trisulfonic acid to impart charge for electrophoresis and render them fluorescent. Typically, increased diffusivity at higher temperatures leads to increased axial dispersion and poor separation performance; however, we demonstrate that sufficiently high separation field strengths can be used to offset the impact of increased diffusivity in order to maintain separation efficiency. Efficiencies for these free-solution separations are the same at temperatures of 25, 35, and 45 °C with separation field strengths ≥500 V/cm. PMID:24114979

  3. Natural Ventilation Driven by Wind and Temperature Difference

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Tine Steen

    Natural ventilation is a commonly used principle when buildings are being ventilated. It can be controlled by openings in the building envelope, which open or close depending on the need of air inside the building. It can also be the simple action of just opening a door or a window to let the fresh...... driving forces are still wind pressure and temperature differences as with cross-ventilation, but here the turbulence in the wind and the pulsating flow near the opening also affect the flow through the opening. From earlier work, some design expressions already exist, but none of these include...... the incidence angle of the wind, which is an important parameter in this type of ventilation. Several wind tunnel experiments are made and from the results of these, a new design expression is made which includes the wind pressure, temperature difference, incidence angle of the wind and the fluctuations...

  4. High temperature co-axial winding transformers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Divan, Deepakraj M.; Novotny, Donald W.

    1993-01-01

    The analysis and design of co-axial winding transformers is presented. The design equations are derived and the different design approaches are discussed. One of the most important features of co-axial winding transformers is the fact that the leakage inductance is well controlled and can be made low. This is not the case in conventional winding transformers. In addition, the power density of co-axial winding transformers is higher than conventional ones. Hence, using co-axial winding transformers in a certain converter topology improves the power density of the converter. The design methodology used in meeting the proposed specifications of the co-axial winding transformer specifications are presented and discussed. The final transformer design was constructed in the lab. Co-axial winding transformers proved to be a good choice for high power density and high frequency applications. They have a more predictable performance compared with conventional transformers. In addition, the leakage inductance of the transformer can be controlled easily to suit a specific application. For space applications, one major concern is the extraction of heat from power apparatus to prevent excessive heating and hence damaging of these units. Because of the vacuum environment, the only way to extract heat is by using a cold plate. One advantage of co-axial winding transformers is that the surface area available to extract heat from is very large compared to conventional transformers. This stems from the unique structure of the co-axial transformer where the whole core surface area is exposed and can be utilized for cooling effectively. This is a crucial issue here since most of the losses are core losses.

  5. Comparison of Observed Temperature and Wind in Mountainous and Coastal Regions in Korea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Y. S.

    2015-12-01

    For more than one year, temperature and wind are observed at several levels in three different environments in Korea. First site is located in a ski jump stadium in a mountain area and observations are performed at 5 heights. Second site is located in an agricultural land 1.4km inland from the seaside and the observing tower is 300m tall. Third site is located in the middle of sea 30km away from the seaside and the tower is 100m tall. The vertical gradients of air temperature are compared on the daily and seasonal bases. Not only the strengths of atmospheric stability are analyzed but also the times when the turnover of the signs of vertical gradients of temperature are occurred. The comparison is also applied to vertical gradients of wind speed and turning of wind direction due to surface slope and sea/land breeze. This study may suggest characteristics of local climate over different environments quantitatively.

  6. Effect of elevated temperature on the compressive strength of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Based on results of tests, partial replacement of cement with 10 % PSMS is recommended for use in concrete production and resistance to elevated temperature. The studies show that at this replacement, the concrete compressive strength is not adversely affected when the elevated temperature reaches 500°C. Keywords: ...

  7. Effect of Curing Temperature Histories on the Compressive Strength Development of High-Strength Concrete

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keun-Hyeok Yang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This study examined the relative strength-maturity relationship of high-strength concrete (HSC specifically developed for nuclear facility structures while considering the economic efficiency and durability of the concrete. Two types of mixture proportions with water-to-binder ratios of 0.4 and 0.28 were tested under different temperature histories including (1 isothermal curing conditions of 5°C, 20°C, and 40°C and (2 terraced temperature histories of 20°C for an initial age of individual 1, 3, or 7 days and a constant temperature of 5°C for the subsequent ages. On the basis of the test results, the traditional maturity function of an equivalent age was modified to consider the offset maturity and the insignificance of subsequent curing temperature after an age of 3 days on later strength of concrete. To determine the key parameters in the maturity function, the setting behavior, apparent activation energy, and rate constant of the prepared mixtures were also measured. This study reveals that the compressive strength development of HSC cured at the reference temperature for an early age of 3 days is insignificantly affected by the subsequent curing temperature histories. The proposed maturity approach with the modified equivalent age accurately predicts the strength development of HSC.

  8. A Wind Energy Powered Wireless Temperature Sensor Node

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chuang Zhang

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available A wireless temperature sensor node composed of a piezoelectric wind energy harvester, a temperature sensor, a microcontroller, a power management circuit and a wireless transmitting module was developed. The wind-induced vibration energy harvester with a cuboid chamber of 62 mm × 19.6 mm × 10 mm converts ambient wind energy into electrical energy to power the sensor node. A TMP102 temperature sensor and the MSP430 microcontroller are used to measure the temperature. The power management module consists of LTC3588-1 and LT3009 units. The measured temperature is transmitted by the nRF24l01 transceiver. Experimental results show that the critical wind speed of the harvester was about 5.4 m/s and the output power of the harvester was about 1.59 mW for the electrical load of 20 kΩ at wind speed of 11.2 m/s, which was sufficient to power the wireless sensor node to measure and transmit the temperature every 13 s. When the wind speed increased from 6 m/s to 11.5 m/s, the self-powered wireless sensor node worked normally.

  9. Solar wind velocity and temperature in the outer heliosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gazis, P. R.; Barnes, A.; Mihalov, J. D.; Lazarus, A. J.

    1994-01-01

    At the end of 1992, the Pioneer 10, Pioneer 11, and Voyager 2 spacecraft were at heliocentric distances of 56.0, 37.3, and 39.0 AU and heliographic latitudes of 3.3 deg N, 17.4 deg N, and 8.6 deg S, respectively. Pioneer 11 and Voyager 2 are at similar celestial longitudes, while Pioneer 10 is on the opposite side of the Sun. All three spacecraft have working plasma analyzers, so intercomparison of data from these spacecraft provides important information about the global character of the solar wind in the outer heliosphere. The averaged solar wind speed continued to exhibit its well-known variation with solar cycle: Even at heliocentric distances greater than 50 AU, the average speed is highest during the declining phase of the solar cycle and lowest near solar minimum. There was a strong latitudinal gradient in solar wind speed between 3 deg and 17 deg N during the last solar minimum, but this gradient has since disappeared. The solar wind temperature declined with increasing heliocentric distance out to a heliocentric distance of at least 20 AU; this decline appeared to continue at larger heliocentric distances, but temperatures in the outer heliosphere were suprisingly high. While Pioneer 10 and Voyager 2 observed comparable solar wind temperatures, the temperature at Pioneer 11 was significantly higher, which suggests the existence of a large-scale variation of temperature with heliographic longitude. There was also some suggestion that solar wind temperatures were higher near solar minimum.

  10. High Temperature Strength of Oxide Dispersion Strengthened Aluminium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clauer, A.H.; Hansen, Niels

    1984-01-01

    constant (except for the material with the lowest oxide content). The high temperature values of the modulus-corrected yield stresses are approximately two-thirds of the low temperature value. During high temperature creep, there is a definite indication of a threshold stress. This threshold stress......The tensile flow stress of coarse-grained dispersion strengthened Al-Al2O3 materials were measured as a function of temperature (77–873 K) and volume fraction (0.19-0.92 vol.%) of aluminium oxide. For the same material, the creep strength was determined as a function of temperature in the range 573......–873 K. The modulus-corrected yield stress (0.01 offset) is found to be temperature independent at low temperature (195–472 K). Between 473 and 573 K, the yield stress starts to decrease with increasing temperature. At high temperatures (573–873 K), the modulus-corrected yield stress is approximately...

  11. Offshore Wind Energy: Wind and Sea Surface Temperature from Satellite Observations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karagali, Ioanna

    as the entire atmosphere above. Under conditions of light winds and strong solar insolation, warming of the upper oceanic layer may occur. In this PhD study, remote sensing from satellites is used to obtain information for the near-surface ocean wind and the sea surface temperature over the North Sea......, demonstrate that wind information from SAR is more appropriate when small scale local features are of interest, not resolved by scatterometers. Hourly satellite observations of the sea surface temperature, from a thermal infra-red sensor, are used to identify and quantify the daily variability of the sea...

  12. Thermal cyclic strength of molybdenum monocrystal at high temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strizhalo, V.A.; Uskov, E.I.

    1975-01-01

    The results of the investigation of the thermocyclic creep and low-cycle fatigue of a molybdenum single crystal are discussed. The strength of a molybdenum single crystal under nonisothermal stressing has been investigated by using two different regimes of temperature and load variation. The temperature limits of the cycle were the same for the two testing regimes, the maximum temperature being 1700degC and the minimum 350degC. At higher temperatures (above 1500degC) the short-term strength of single-crystal molybdenum is comparable with that of commercial molybdenum and the refractory alloys, while the ductility is considerably higher. It should be noted that the failure of single-crystal molybdenum under rigid alternating loading is preceded by intensive distortion of the specimen, owing to directional cyclic creep of the metal in zones of bulging and thinning

  13. Hurricane Wind Speed Estimation Using WindSat 6 and 10 GHz Brightness Temperatures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lei Zhang

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The realistic and accurate estimation of hurricane intensity is highly desired in many scientific and operational applications. With the advance of passive microwave polarimetry, an alternative opportunity for retrieving wind speed in hurricanes has become available. A wind speed retrieval algorithm for wind speeds above 20 m/s in hurricanes has been developed by using the 6.8 and 10.7 GHz vertically and horizontally polarized brightness temperatures of WindSat. The WindSat measurements for 15 category 4 and category 5 hurricanes from 2003 to 2010 and the corresponding H*wind analysis data are used to develop and validate the retrieval model. In addition, the retrieved wind speeds are also compared to the Remote Sensing Systems (RSS global all-weather product and stepped-frequency microwave radiometer (SFMR measurements. The statistical results show that the mean bias and the overall root-mean-square (RMS difference of the retrieved wind speeds with respect to the H*wind analysis data are 0.04 and 2.75 m/s, respectively, which provides an encouraging result for retrieving hurricane wind speeds over the ocean surface. The retrieved wind speeds show good agreement with the SFMR measurements. Two case studies demonstrate that the mean bias and RMS difference are 0.79 m/s and 1.79 m/s for hurricane Rita-1 and 0.63 m/s and 2.38 m/s for hurricane Rita-2, respectively. In general, the wind speed retrieval accuracy of the new model in hurricanes ranges from 2.0 m/s in light rain to 3.9 m/s in heavy rain.

  14. Solar wind temperature observations in the outer heliosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gazis, P. R.; Barnes, A.; Mihalov, J. D.; Lazarus, A. J.

    1992-01-01

    The Pioneer 10, Pioneer 11, and Voyager 2 spacecraft are now at heliocentric distances of 50, 32 and 33 AU, and heliographic latitudes of 3.5 deg N, 17 deg N, and 0 deg N, respectively. Pioneer 11 and Voyager 2 are at similar celestial longitudes, while Pioneer l0 is on the opposite side of the sun. The baselines defined by these spacecraft make it possible to resolve radial, longitudinal, and latitudinal variations of solar wind parameters. The solar wind temperature decreases with increasing heliocentric distance out to a distance of 10-15 AU. At larger heliocentric distances, this gradient disappears. These high solar wind temperatures in the outer heliosphere have persisted for at least 10 years, which suggests that they are not a solar cycle effect. The solar wind temperature varied with heliographic latitude during the most recent solar minimum. The solar wind temperature at Pioneer 11 and Voyager 2 was higher than that seen at Pioneer 10 for an extended period of time, which suggests the existence of a large-scale variation of temperature with celestial longitude, but the contribution of transient phenomena is yet to be clarified.

  15. Long-term high temperature strength of 316FR steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takahashi, Yukio

    1995-01-01

    As low-carbon medium-nitrogen type 316 stainless steel (316FR) was selected as a primary candidate for main structural material of a next fast reactor plant in Japan, its long-term high-temperature strength gains much interest from many organizations involved in design activities of the plant. Central Research Institute of Electric Power Industry (CRIEPI), as a research organization for electric power industry in Japan, has been conducting a multi-year project under the sponsorship of Ministry of International Trade and Industry (MITI) for studying the long-term high temperature strength of this steel. Data obtained by various strength tests, including short-time tensile, fatigue, creep and creep-fatigue tests for this steel are given in this paper. The results of study on creep-fatigue life prediction methods are also presented. It was found that modified ductility exhaustion method previously proposed by the author has satisfactory accuracy in creep-fatigue life estimation

  16. Tensile Strength of Finger Joints at Elevated Temperatures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Peter C.; Olesen, Frits Bolonius

    A series of test s aimed a t establishing the effect of temperature upon the tensile strength parallel-to-grain of finger jointed laminae for glulam has been conducted in the Fire Research Laboratory at Aalborg University Centre. The objective of this report is to present the background...

  17. Centennial-Scale Relationship Between the Southern Hemisphere Westerly Winds and Temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hodgson, D. A.; Perren, B.; Roberts, S. J.; Sime, L. C.; Verleyen, E.; Van Nieuwenhuyze, W.; Vyverman, W.

    2017-12-01

    Recent changes in the intensity and position of the Southern Hemisphere Westerly Winds (SHW) have been implicated in a number of important physical changes in the Southern High Latitudes. These include changes in the efficiency of the Southern Ocean CO2 sink through alterations in ocean circulation, the loss of Antarctic ice shelves through enhanced basal melting, changes in Antarctic sea ice extent, and warming of the Antarctic Peninsula. Many of these changes have far-reaching implications for global climate and sea level rise. Despite the importance of the SHW in global climate, our current understanding of the past and future behaviour of the westerly winds is limited by relatively few reconstructions and measurements of the SHW in their core belt over the Antarctic Circumpolar Current; the region most relevant to Southern Ocean air-sea gas exchange. The aim of this study was to reconstruct changes in the relative strength of the SHW at Marion Island, one of a small number of sub-Antarctic islands that lie in the core of the SHWs. We applied independent diatom- and geochemistry- based methods to track past changes in relative wind intensity. This mutiproxy approach provides a validation that the proxies are responding to the external forcing (the SHW) rather than local (e.g. precipitation ) or internal dynamics. Results show that that the strength of the SHW are intrinsically linked to extratropical temperatures over centennial timescales, with warmer temperatures driving stronger winds. Our findings also suggest that large variations in the path and intensity of the westerly winds are driven by relatively small variations in temperature over these timescales. This means that with continued climate warming, even in the absence of anthropogenic ozone-depletion, we should anticipate large shifts in the SHW, causing stronger, more poleward-intensified winds in the decades and centuries to come, with attendant impacts on ocean circulation, ice shelf stability, and

  18. Mechanical behavior of high strength ceramic fibers at high temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tressler, R. E.; Pysher, D. J.

    1991-01-01

    The mechanical behavior of commercially available and developmental ceramic fibers, both oxide and nonoxide, has been experimentally studied at expected use temperatures. In addition, these properties have been compared to results from the literature. Tensile strengths were measured for three SiC-based and three oxide ceramic fibers for temperatures from 25 C to 1400 C. The SiC-based fibers were stronger but less stiff than the oxide fibers at room temperature and retained more of both strength and stiffness to high temperatures. Extensive creep and creep-rupture experiments have been performed on those fibers from this group which had the best strengths above 1200 C in both single filament tests and tests of fiber bundles. The creep rates for the oxides are on the order of two orders of magnitude faster than the polymer derived nonoxide fibers. The most creep resistant filaments available are single crystal c-axis sapphire filaments. Large diameter CVD fabricated SiC fibers are the most creep and rupture resistant nonoxide polycrystalline fibers tested to date.

  19. Effects of electrons on the solar wind proton temperature anisotropy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Michno, M. J.; Lazar, M.; Schlickeiser, R.; Yoon, P. H.

    2014-01-01

    Among the kinetic microinstabilities, the firehose instability is one of the most efficient mechanisms to restrict the unlimited increase of temperature anisotropy in the direction of an ambient magnetic field as predicted by adiabatic expansion of collision-poor solar wind. Indeed, the solar wind proton temperature anisotropy detected near 1 AU shows that it is constrained by the marginal firehose condition. Of the two types of firehose instabilities, namely, parallel and oblique, the literature suggests that the solar wind data conform more closely to the marginal oblique firehose condition. In the present work, however, it is shown that the parallel firehose instability threshold is markedly influenced by the presence of anisotropic electrons, such that under some circumstances, the cumulative effects of both electron and proton anisotropies could describe the observation without considering the oblique firehose mode.

  20. Modeling and control of temperature of heat-calibration wind tunnel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Yunhua

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper investigates the temperature control of the heat air-flow wind tunnel for sensor temperature-calibration and heat strength experiment. Firstly, a mathematical model was established to describe the dynamic characteristics of the fuel supplying system based on a variable frequency driving pump. Then, based on the classical cascade control, an improved control law with the Smith predictive estimate and the fuzzy proportional-integral-derivative was proposed. The simulation result shows that the control effect of the proposed control strategy is better than the ordinary proportional-integral-derivative cascade control strategy.

  1. Non-hoop winding effect on bonding temperature of laser assisted tape winding process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaami, Amin; Baran, Ismet; Akkerman, Remko

    2018-05-01

    One of the advanced methods for production of thermoplastic composite methods is laser assisted tape winding (LATW). Predicting the temperature in LATW process is very important since the temperature at nip-point (bonding line through width) plays a pivotal role in a proper bonding and hence the mechanical performance. Despite the hoop-winding where the nip-point is the straight line, non-hoop winding includes a curved nip-point line. Hence, the non-hoop winding causes somewhat a different power input through laser-rays and-reflections and consequently generates unknown complex temperature profile on the curved nip-point line. Investigating the temperature at the nip-point line is the point of interest in this study. In order to understand this effect, a numerical model is proposed to capture the effect of laser-rays and their reflections on the nip-point temperature. To this end, a 3D optical model considering the objects in LATW process is considered. Then, the power distribution (absorption and reflection) from the optical analysis is used as an input (heat flux distribution) for the thermal analysis. The thermal analysis employs a fully-implicit advection-diffusion model to calculate the temperature on the surfaces. The results are examined to demonstrate the effect of winding direction on the curved nip-point line (tape width) which has not been considered in literature up to now. Furthermore, the results can be used for designing a better and more efficient setup in the LATW process.

  2. Measurements of Coastal Winds and Temperature. Sensor Evaluation, Data Quality, and Wind Structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heggem, Tore

    1997-12-31

    The long Norwegian coastline has excellent sites for wind power production. This thesis contains a documentation of a measurement station for maritime meteorological data at the coast of Mid-Norway, and analysis of temperature and wind data. It discusses experience with different types of wind speed and wind direction sensors. Accurate air temperature measurements are essential to obtain information about the stability of the atmosphere, and a sensor based on separately calibrated thermistors is described. The quality of the calibrations and the measurements is discussed. A database built up from measurements from 1982 to 1995 has been available. The data acquisition systems and the programs used to read the data are described, as well as data control and gap-filling methods. Then basic statistics from the data like mean values and distributions are given. Quality control of the measurements with emphasis on shade effects from the masts and direction alignment is discussed. The concept of atmospheric stability is discussed. The temperature profile tends to change from unstable to slightly stable as maritime winds passes land. Temperature spectra based on two-year time series are presented. Finally, there is a discussion of long-term turbulence spectra calculated from 14 years of measurements. The lack of a gap in the one-hour region of the spectra is explained from the overweight of unstable atmospheric conditions in the dominating maritime wind. Examples of time series with regular 40-minute cycles, and corresponding effect spectra are given. The validity of local lapse rate as a criterion of atmospheric stability is discussed. 34 refs., 86 figs., 11 tabs.

  3. Measurements of Coastal Winds and Temperature. Sensor Evaluation, Data Quality, and Wind Structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heggem, Tore

    1998-12-31

    The long Norwegian coastline has excellent sites for wind power production. This thesis contains a documentation of a measurement station for maritime meteorological data at the coast of Mid-Norway, and analysis of temperature and wind data. It discusses experience with different types of wind speed and wind direction sensors. Accurate air temperature measurements are essential to obtain information about the stability of the atmosphere, and a sensor based on separately calibrated thermistors is described. The quality of the calibrations and the measurements is discussed. A database built up from measurements from 1982 to 1995 has been available. The data acquisition systems and the programs used to read the data are described, as well as data control and gap-filling methods. Then basic statistics from the data like mean values and distributions are given. Quality control of the measurements with emphasis on shade effects from the masts and direction alignment is discussed. The concept of atmospheric stability is discussed. The temperature profile tends to change from unstable to slightly stable as maritime winds passes land. Temperature spectra based on two-year time series are presented. Finally, there is a discussion of long-term turbulence spectra calculated from 14 years of measurements. The lack of a gap in the one-hour region of the spectra is explained from the overweight of unstable atmospheric conditions in the dominating maritime wind. Examples of time series with regular 40-minute cycles, and corresponding effect spectra are given. The validity of local lapse rate as a criterion of atmospheric stability is discussed. 34 refs., 86 figs., 11 tabs.

  4. Kinetic instabilities in the solar wind driven by temperature anisotropies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Peter H.

    2017-12-01

    The present paper comprises a review of kinetic instabilities that may be operative in the solar wind, and how they influence the dynamics thereof. The review is limited to collective plasma instabilities driven by the temperature anisotropies. To limit the scope even further, the discussion is restricted to the temperature anisotropy-driven instabilities within the model of bi-Maxwellian plasma velocity distribution function. The effects of multiple particle species or the influence of field-aligned drift will not be included. The field-aligned drift or beam is particularly prominent for the solar wind electrons, and thus ignoring its effect leaves out a vast portion of important physics. Nevertheless, for the sake of limiting the scope, this effect will not be discussed. The exposition is within the context of linear and quasilinear Vlasov kinetic theories. The discussion does not cover either computer simulations or data analyses of observations, in any systematic manner, although references will be made to published works pertaining to these methods. The scientific rationale for the present analysis is that the anisotropic temperatures associated with charged particles are pervasively detected in the solar wind, and it is one of the key contemporary scientific research topics to correctly characterize how such anisotropies are generated, maintained, and regulated in the solar wind. The present article aims to provide an up-to-date theoretical development on this research topic, largely based on the author's own work.

  5. ON THE HIGH TEMPERATURE BENDING STRENGTH OF CASTABLES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    JIŘÍ HAMÁČEK

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available The hot moduli of rupture (HMOR measurements have been performed for the low-cement castable (LCC, the ultra-low cement castable (ULCC, and the no-cement castable (NCC. All castables contained SiO2-Al2O3 based aggregates (burned fireclay and kaolin. The experimental data points have been described using the model based on the Varshni approach within the temperature region 1000-1200°C and by the model based on the Adam-Gibbs theory above 1400°C. A smooth but distinct transition between both temperature regions has been observed. The limits and applicability of the models have been analyzed. At lower temperature the loss of strength of castables was attributed to weakening of bonds most probably in the frontal process zone of cracking. At higher temperature, the liquid phase causes slowing down of the crack propagation by formation of the viscous bridging in the following wake region. And finally, at very high temperatures, the castable behaves as very viscous suspension which can be described using models originally developed for molten glasses.

  6. Electron temperature anisotropy constraints in the solar wind

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Štverák, Štěpán; Trávníček, Pavel M.; Maksimovic, M.; Marsch, E.; Fazakerley, A.; Scime, E. E.

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 113, A3 /2008/ (2008), A03103/1-A03103/10 ISSN 0148-0227 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA300420602 Grant - others:EU(XE) ESA-PECS project No. 98024 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10030501; CEZ:AV0Z30420517 Keywords : solar wind electrons * temperature anisotropy * radial Subject RIV: BN - Astronomy, Celestial Mechanics, Astrophysics Impact factor: 3.147, year: 2008

  7. Tantalum strength model incorporating temperature, strain rate and pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Hojun; Battaile, Corbett; Brown, Justin; Lane, Matt

    Tantalum is a body-centered-cubic (BCC) refractory metal that is widely used in many applications in high temperature, strain rate and pressure environments. In this work, we propose a physically-based strength model for tantalum that incorporates effects of temperature, strain rate and pressure. A constitutive model for single crystal tantalum is developed based on dislocation kink-pair theory, and calibrated to measurements on single crystal specimens. The model is then used to predict deformations of single- and polycrystalline tantalum. In addition, the proposed strength model is implemented into Sandia's ALEGRA solid dynamics code to predict plastic deformations of tantalum in engineering-scale applications at extreme conditions, e.g. Taylor impact tests and Z machine's high pressure ramp compression tests, and the results are compared with available experimental data. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  8. Solar wind proton temperature anisotropy: Linear theory and WIND/SWE observations

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hellinger, Petr; Trávníček, Pavel; Kasper, J. C.; Lazarus, A. J.

    2006-01-01

    Roč. 33, č. 9 (2006), L09101/1-L09101/4 ISSN 0094-8276 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR(CZ) IAA3042403 Grant - others:ESA(XE) PECS 98024; NASA (US) NAG-10915 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z30420517 Keywords : proton temperature anisotropy * solar wind * in situ observations Subject RIV: DG - Athmosphere Sciences, Meteorology Impact factor: 2.602, year: 2006

  9. Solar Wind Proton Temperature Anisotropy: Linear Theory and WIND/SWE Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hellinger, P.; Travnicek, P.; Kasper, J. C.; Lazarus, A. J.

    2006-01-01

    We present a comparison between WIND/SWE observations (Kasper et al., 2006) of beta parallel to p and T perpendicular to p/T parallel to p (where beta parallel to p is the proton parallel beta and T perpendicular to p and T parallel to p are the perpendicular and parallel proton are the perpendicular and parallel proton temperatures, respectively; here parallel and perpendicular indicate directions with respect to the ambient magnetic field) and predictions of the Vlasov linear theory. In the slow solar wind, the observed proton temperature anisotropy seems to be constrained by oblique instabilities, by the mirror one and the oblique fire hose, contrary to the results of the linear theory which predicts a dominance of the proton cyclotron instability and the parallel fire hose. The fast solar wind core protons exhibit an anticorrelation between beta parallel to c and T perpendicular to c/T parallel to c (where beta parallel to c is the core proton parallel beta and T perpendicular to c and T parallel to c are the perpendicular and parallel core proton temperatures, respectively) similar to that observed in the HELIOS data (Marsch et al., 2004).

  10. Low cycle fatigue strength of some austenitic stainless steels at room temperature and elevated temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Type 304, 316, and 316L stainless steels were tested from room temperature to 650 0 C using two kinds of bending test specimens. Particularly, Type 304 was tested at several cyclic rates and 550 0 and 650 0 C, and the effect of cyclic rate on its fatigue strength was investigated. Test results are summarized as follows: (1) The bending fatigue strength at room temperature test shows good agreement with the axial fatigue one, (2) Manson--Coffin's fatigue equation can be applied to the results, (3) the ratio of crack initiation to failure life becomes larger at higher stress level, and (4) the relation between crack propagation life and total strain range or elastic strain range are linear in log-log scale. This relation also agrees with the equations which were derived from some crack propagation laws. It was also observed at the elevated temperature test: (1) The reduction of fatigue strength is not noticeable below 500 0 C, but it is noted at higher temperature. (2) The cycle rate does not affect on fatigue strength in faster cyclic rate than 20 cpm and below 100,000 cycles life range. (3) Type 316 stainless steel shows better fatigue property than type 304 and 316L stainless steels. 30 figures

  11. Arctic Strato-Mesospheric Temperature and Wind Variations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidlin, F. J.; Goldberg, R. A.

    2004-01-01

    Upper stratosphere and mesosphere rocket measurements are actively used to investigate interaction between the neutral, electrical, and chemical atmospheres and between lower and upper layers of these regions. Satellite temperature measurements from HALOE and from inflatable falling spheres complement each other and allow illustrations of the annual cycle to 85 km altitude. Falling sphere wind and temperature measurements reveal variability that differs as a function of altitude, location, and time. We discuss the state of the Arctic atmosphere during the summer 2002 (Andoya, Norway) and winter 2003 (ESRANGE, Sweden) campaigns of MaCWAVE. Balloon-borne profiles to 30 km altitude and sphere profiles between 50 and 90 km show unique small-scale structure. Nonetheless, there are practical implications that additional measurements are very much needed to complete the full vertical profile picture. Our discussion concentrates on the distribution of temperature and wind and their variability. However, reliable measurements from other high latitude NASA programs over a number of years are available to help properly calculate mean values and the distribution of the individual measurements. Since the available rocket data in the Arctic's upper atmosphere are sparse the results we present are basically a snapshot of atmospheric structure.

  12. Solar wind control of stratospheric temperatures in Jupiter's auroral regions?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinclair, James Andrew; Orton, Glenn; Kasaba, Yasumasa; Sato, Takao M.; Tao, Chihiro; Waite, J. Hunter; Cravens, Thomas; Houston, Stephen; Fletcher, Leigh; Irwin, Patrick; Greathouse, Thomas K.

    2017-10-01

    Auroral emissions are the process through which the interaction of a planet’s atmosphere and its external magnetosphere can be studied. Jupiter exhibits auroral emission at a multitude of wavelengths including the X-ray, ultraviolet and near-infrared. Enhanced emission of CH4 and other stratospheric hydrocarbons is also observed coincident with Jupiter’s shorter-wavelength auroral emission (e.g. Caldwell et al., 1980, Icarus 44, 667-675, Kostiuk et al., 1993, JGR 98, 18823). This indicates that auroral processes modify the thermal structure and composition of the auroral stratosphere. The exact mechanism responsible for this auroral-related heating of the stratosphere has however remained elusive (Sinclair et al., 2017a, Icarus 292, 182-207, Sinclair et al., 2017b, GRL, 44, 5345-5354). We will present an analysis of 7.8-μm images of Jupiter measured by COMICS (Cooled Mid-Infrared Camera and Spectrograph, Kataza et al., 2000, Proc. SPIE(4008), 1144-1152) on the Subaru telescope. These images were acquired on January 11th, 12th, 13th, 14th, February 4, 5th and May 17th, 18th, 19th and 20th in 2017, allowing the daily variability of Jupiter’s auroral-related stratospheric heating to be tracked. Preliminary results suggest lower stratospheric temperatures are directly forced by the solar wind dynamical pressure. The southern auroral hotspot exhibited a significant increase in brightness temperature over a 24-hour period. Over the same time period, a solar wind propagation model (Tao et al. 2005, JGR 110, A11208) predicts a strong increase in the solar wind dynamical pressure at Jupiter.

  13. Indoor ran don concentration. Temperature and wind effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sesana, L.; Benigni, S.

    2000-01-01

    The present study analyses and discusses the behaviour of the indoor radon concentration in a research house. Hourly measurements were carried out in the basement of the house from November 1998 up to June 1999. In many sequences of days radon concentration in the room under analysis shows strong variation all day long with accumulation in the evening and overnight and decrease in the morning and in the afternoon. Measurements of wind velocity, indoor and outdoor temperatures and outdoor-indoor pressure difference were performed and their trend is compared with the observed radon concentration. The exhalation of radon from walls, floor and ceiling and the pressure difference driven exhalation from the soil are discussed, particularly the relation with the temperature differences. The air exchange rates between the house and the outdoor air are studied [it

  14. Strength and fatigue testing of large size wind turbines rotors. Vol. II: Full size natural vibration and static strength test, a reference case

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arias, F.; Soria, E.

    1996-12-01

    This report shows the methods and procedures selected to define a strength test for large size wind turbine, anyway in particular it application on a 500 kW blade and it results obtained in the test carried out in july of 1995 in Asinel`s test plant (Madrid). Henceforth, this project is designed in an abbreviate form whit the acronym SFAT. (Author)

  15. Strength and fatigue testing of large size wind turbines rotors. Volume II. Full size natural vibration and static strength test, a reference case

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arias, F.; Soria, E.

    1996-01-01

    This report shows the methods and procedures selected to define a strength test for large size wind turbine, anyway in particularly it application on a 500 kW blade and it results obtained in the test carried out in july of 1995 in Asinel test plant (Madrid). Henceforth, this project is designed in an abbreviate form whit the acronym SFAT. (Author)

  16. Characteristics of Wind Velocity and Temperature Change Near an Escarpment-Shaped Road Embankment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Young-Moon Kim

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Artificial structures such as embankments built during the construction of highways influence the surrounding airflow. Various types of damage can occur due to changes in the wind velocity and temperature around highway embankments. However, no study has accurately measured micrometeorological changes (wind velocity and temperature due to embankments. This study conducted a wind tunnel test and field measurement to identify changes in wind velocity and temperature before and after the construction of embankments around roads. Changes in wind velocity around an embankment after its construction were found to be influenced by the surrounding wind velocity, wind angle, and the level difference and distance from the embankment. When the level difference from the embankment was large and the distance was up to 3H, the degree of wind velocity declines was found to be large. In changes in reference wind velocities around the embankment, wind velocity increases were not proportional to the rate at which wind velocities declined. The construction of the embankment influenced surrounding temperatures. The degree of temperature change was large in locations with large level differences from the embankment at daybreak and during evening hours when wind velocity changes were small.

  17. Review on fatigue behavior of high-strength concrete after high temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Dongfu; Jia, Penghe; Gao, Haijing

    2017-06-01

    The fatigue of high-strength concrete after high temperature has begun to attract attention. But so far the researches work about the fatigue of high-strength concrete after high temperature have not been reported. This article based on a large number of literature. The research work about the fatigue of high-strength concrete after high temperature are reviewed, analysed and expected, which can provide some reference for the experimental study of fatigue damage analysis.

  18. Strength and Reliability of Wood for the Components of Low-cost Wind Turbines: Computational and Experimental Analysis and Applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mishnaevsky, Leon; Freere, Peter; Sharma, Ranjan

    2009-01-01

    of experiments and computational investigations. Low cost testing machines have been designed, and employed for the systematic analysis of different sorts of Nepali wood, to be used for the wind turbine construction. At the same time, computational micromechanical models of deformation and strength of wood......This paper reports the latest results of the comprehensive program of experimental and computational analysis of strength and reliability of wooden parts of low cost wind turbines. The possibilities of prediction of strength and reliability of different types of wood are studied in the series...... are developed, which should provide the basis for microstructure-based correlating of observable and service properties of wood. Some correlations between microstructure, strength and service properties of wood have been established....

  19. Single-sided natural ventilation driven by wind pressure and temperature difference

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Tine Steen; Heiselberg, Per

    2008-01-01

    -scale wind tunnel experiments have been made with the aim of making a new expression for calculation of the airflow rate in single-sided natural ventilation. During the wind tunnel experiments it was found that the dominating driving force differs between wind speed and temperature difference depending......Even though opening a window for ventilation of a room seems very simple, the flow that occurs in this situation is rather complicated. The amount of air going through the window opening will depend on the wind speed near the building, the temperatures inside and outside the room, the wind...

  20. Effective longitudinal strength of high temperature metal-matrix composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Craddock, J.N.; Savvides, I.

    1991-01-01

    Several models for predicting the longitudinal strength of fiber composites are presented, ranging from a simple netting analysis to a model incorporating curvilinear strain hardening for all the components. Results from these models are presented for tungsten fiber reinforced superalloys, FeCrAlY and MARM200. It is shown that a simple elastic limit micromechanical model does not always adequately describe the useful strength of the composites. The methods proposed here are shown to be more appropriate for predicting the effective composite strength. 2 refs

  1. Comparison of AMSR-2 wind speed and sea surface temperature ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    68

    characteristics and variable features where the wind circulation pattern is ..... is extended to understand the quality of AMSR-2 wind speed in a constructive ...... New Disclosures (potential conflicts of interest, funding, acknowledgements):.

  2. Comparison of AMSR-2 wind speed and sea surface temperature ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The SST–wind relation is analyzed using data both from the buoy and satellite. As a result, the low- SST is associated with low-wind condition (positive slope) in the northern part of the Bay of Bengal (BoB), while low SST values are associated with high wind conditions (negative slope) over the southern BoB. Moreover, the ...

  3. Impact of cold temperatures on the shear strength of Norway spruce joints glued with different adhesives

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, Xiaodong; Hagman, Olle; Sundqvist, Bror

    2015-01-01

    As wood construction increasingly uses engineered wood products worldwide, concerns arise about the integrity of the wood and adhesives used. Bondline strength is a crucial issue for engineered wood applications, especially in cold climates. In this study, Norway spruce (Picea abies) joints (150 mm...... adhesive was tested at six temperatures: 20, −20, −30, −40, −50 and −60 °C. Generally, within the temperature test range, temperature changes significantly affected the shear strength of solid wood and wood joints. As the temperature decreased, the shear strength decreased. PUR adhesive in most cases...... resulted in the strongest shear strength and MUF adhesive resulted in the weakest. MF and PRF adhesives responded to temperature changes in a similar manner to that of the PUR adhesive. The shear strengths of wood joints with PVAc and EPI adhesives were more sensitive to temperature change. At low...

  4. Al based ultra-fine eutectic with high room temperature plasticity and elevated temperature strength

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tiwary, C.S., E-mail: cst311@gmail.com [Department of Materials Engineering, Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore 560012, Karnataka (India); Kashyap, S. [Department of Materials Engineering, Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore 560012, Karnataka (India); Kim, D.H. [Center for Non-Crystalline Materials, Department of Metallurgical Engineering, Yonsei University, Seoul 120-749 (Korea, Republic of); Chattopadhyay, K. [Department of Materials Engineering, Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore 560012, Karnataka (India)

    2015-07-15

    Developments of aluminum alloys that can retain strength at and above 250 °C present a significant challenge. In this paper we report an ultrafine scale Al–Fe–Ni eutectic alloy with less than 3.5 at% transition metals that exhibits room temperature ultimate tensile strength of ~400 MPa with a tensile ductility of 6–8%. The yield stress under compression at 300 °C was found to be 150 MPa. We attribute it to the refinement of the microstructure that is achieved by suction casting in copper mold. The characterization using scanning and transmission electron microscopy (SEM and TEM) reveals an unique composite structure that contains the Al–Al{sub 3}Ni rod eutectic with spacing of ~90 nm enveloped by a lamellar eutectic of Al–Al{sub 9}FeNi (~140 nm). Observation of subsurface deformation under Vickers indentation using bonded interface technique reveals the presence of extensive shear banding during deformation that is responsible for the origin of ductility. The dislocation configuration in Al–Al{sub 3}Ni eutectic colony indicates accommodation of plasticity in α-Al with dislocation accumulation at the α-Al/Al{sub 3}Ni interface boundaries. In contrast the dislocation activities in the intermetallic lamellae are limited and contain set of planner dislocations across the plates. We present a detailed analysis of the fracture surface to rationalize the origin of the high strength and ductility in this class of potentially promising cast alloy.

  5. Combined effects of air temperature, wind, and radiation on the resting metabolism of avian raptors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hayes, S.R.

    1978-01-01

    American kestrels, Falco sparverius; red-tailed hawks, Buteo jamaicensis; and golden eagles, Aquila chrysaetos, were perched in a wind tunnel and subjected to various combinations of air temperature, wind, and radiation. Oxygen consumption was measured under the various combinations of environmental variables, and multiple regression equations were developed to predict resting metabolism as a function of body mass, air temperature, wind speed, and radiation load

  6. Strength evaluation test of pressureless-sintered silicon nitride at room temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsusue, K.; Takahara, K.; Hashimoto, R.

    1984-01-01

    In order to study strength characteristics at room temperature and the strength evaluating method of ceramic materials, the following tests were conducted on pressureless sintered silicon nitride specimens: bending tests, the three tensile tests of rectangular plates, holed plates, and notched plates, and spin tests of centrally holed disks. The relationship between the mean strength of specimens and the effective volume of specimens are examined using Weibull's theory. The effect of surface grinding on the strength of specimens is discussed.

  7. Experimental investigation on ultimate strength and failure response of composite box beams used in wind turbine blades

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tang, Jing; Chen, Xiao

    2018-01-01

    This study focuses on the ultimate strength and failure response of composite box beams under three-point bending. The box beams consist of spar caps and shear webs and they are typically used in wind turbine blades as load-carrying members. Different spar cap configurations and loading directions...

  8. Effects of Different Environment Temperatures on Some Motor Characteristics and Muscle Strength

    Science.gov (United States)

    Çakir, Ergün; Yüksek, Selami; Asma, Bülent; Arslanoglu, Erkal

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was determine the effects of different environment temperatures on motor characteristics and muscle strength. 15 athletes participated to study. Flexibility, vertical jump, hand grip-leg strength, 30m sprint, 20-meter shuttle run and coordination-agility tests were measured in five different environment temperatures. (22°C,…

  9. Elastic and strength properties of Hanford concrete mixes at room and elevated temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abrams, M.S.; Gillen, M.; Campbell, D.H.

    1979-03-01

    The effects of long-term exposure to elevated temperatures on the physical properties of concrete mixes used in Hanford radioactive waste storage tanks were determined. Temperature had a significant effect on the elastic modulus of concretes. Poisson's ratio determined by the sonic method remained relatively constant. The splitting tensile strength increased rapidly up to 190 days of age. Then strength decreased to about 350 days and either leveled off or increased from that point on. Compressive strength data were erratic

  10. Diurnal experiment data report, 19-20 March 1974. [temperature and wind data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidlin, F. J.; Yamasaki, Y.; Motta, A.; Brynsztein, S.

    1975-01-01

    Temperature and wind data are presented from 70 small meteorological sounding rockets launched from eight selected launch sites in the Western Hemisphere. Table 1 gives a complete listing of the launch sites involved and the altitude of temperature and wind observations successfully completed.

  11. Evaluation of Surface Fatigue Strength Based on Surface Temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Gang; Nakanishi, Tsutomu

    Surface temperature is considered to be an integrated index that is dependent on not only the load and the dimensions at the contact point but also the sliding velocity, rolling velocity, surface roughness, and lubrication conditions. Therefore, the surface durability of rollers and gears can be evaluated more exactly and simply by the use of surface temperature rather than Hertzian stress. In this research, surface temperatures of rollers under different rolling and sliding conditions are measured using a thermocouple. The effects of load P, mean velocity Vm and sliding velocity Vs on surface temperature are clarified. An experimental formula, which expresses the linear relationship between surface temperature and the P0.86Vs1.31Vm-0.83 value, is used to determine surface temperature. By comparing calculated and measured temperature on the tooth surface of a gear, this formula is confirmed to be applicable for gear tooth surface temperature calculation.

  12. Solar cell contact pull strength as a function of pull-test temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasui, R. K.; Berman, P. A.

    1972-01-01

    Four types of solar cell contacts were given pull-strength tests at temperatures between -173 and +165 C. Contacts tested were: (1) solder-coated titanium-silver contacts on n-p cells, (2) palladium-containing titanium-silver contacts on n-p cells, (3) titanium-silver contacts on 0.2-mm-thick n-p cells, and (4) solder-coated electroless-nickel-plated contacts on p-n cells. Maximum pull strength was demonstrated at temperatures significantly below the air mass zero cell equilibrium temperature of +60 C. At the lowest temperatures, the chief failure mechanism was silicon fracture along crystallographic planes; at the highest temperatures, it was loss of solder strength. In the intermediate temperatures, many failure mechanisms operated. Pull-strength tests give a good indication of the suitability of solar cell contact systems for space use. Procedures used to maximize the validity of the results are described.

  13. Econometric analysis of the changing effects in wind strength and significant wave height on the probability of casualty in shipping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knapp, Sabine; Kumar, Shashi; Sakurada, Yuri; Shen, Jiajun

    2011-05-01

    This study uses econometric models to measure the effect of significant wave height and wind strength on the probability of casualty and tests whether these effects changed. While both effects are in particular relevant for stability and strength calculations of vessels, it is also helpful for the development of ship construction standards in general to counteract increased risk resulting from changing oceanographic conditions. The authors analyzed a unique dataset of 3.2 million observations from 20,729 individual vessels in the North Atlantic and Arctic regions gathered during the period 1979-2007. The results show that although there is a seasonal pattern in the probability of casualty especially during the winter months, the effect of wind strength and significant wave height do not follow the same seasonal pattern. Additionally, over time, significant wave height shows an increasing effect in January, March, May and October while wind strength shows a decreasing effect, especially in January, March and May. The models can be used to simulate relationships and help understand the relationships. This is of particular interest to naval architects and ship designers as well as multilateral agencies such as the International Maritime Organization (IMO) that establish global standards in ship design and construction. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. effect of elevated temperature on the compressive strength

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    HOD

    reducing cost whilst maintaining structural integrity. [1–4].The solid ... density and surface appearance are affected by temperature .... Table 1: Physical properties of Sand, Granite, cement .... The relationship between weight loss and elevated.

  15. The influence of annealing temperature on the strength of TRISO coated particles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rooyen, I.J. van, E-mail: Isabel.vanrooyen@pbmr.co.z [Pebble Bed Modular Reactor (Pty) Ltd., 1279 Mike Crawford Avenue, Centurion (South Africa); Department of Physics, Nelson Mandela Metropolitan University, Port Elizabeth (South Africa); Neethling, J.H. [Department of Physics, Nelson Mandela Metropolitan University, Port Elizabeth (South Africa); Rooyen, P.M. van [Pebble Bed Modular Reactor (Pty) Ltd., 1279 Mike Crawford Avenue, Centurion (South Africa)

    2010-07-31

    The integrity of the Pebble Bed Modular Reactor (PBMR) fuel, and specifically the SiC layer system of the Tristructural Isotropic (TRISO) coated particle (CP), namely inner pyrolytic carbon, silicon carbide and outer pyrolytic carbon (I-PyC-SiC-O-PyC), determines the containment of fission products. The PBMR fuel consists of TRISO coated particles (CPs) embedded in a graphite matrix. One of the characterization techniques investigated by PBMR is the determination of strength of CPs. It is a well known metallurgical fact that temperature, amongst many other parameters, may influence the strength of a material. A recently developed method for measuring the strength of the TRISO coated particles was used and is briefly described in this article. The advantages of this method are demonstrated by the comparison of strength measurements of five experimental PBMR CP batches as a function of annealing temperature. Significant modification of strength after annealing was measured with increased temperature within the range 1000-2100 {sup o}C. The interesting feature of decreasing standard deviation of the strength with increasing temperature will also be discussed with a possible explanation. A significant difference in coated particle strength is also demonstrated for two CP batches with layer thickness on the extremities of the SiC layer thickness specification. The effect of long duration annealing on these strength values will also be demonstrated by comparing results from 1 h to 100 h annealing periods of coated particles at a temperature of 1600 {sup o}C.

  16. The influence of annealing temperature on the strength of TRISO coated particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rooyen, I.J. van; Neethling, J.H.; Rooyen, P.M. van

    2010-01-01

    The integrity of the Pebble Bed Modular Reactor (PBMR) fuel, and specifically the SiC layer system of the Tristructural Isotropic (TRISO) coated particle (CP), namely inner pyrolytic carbon, silicon carbide and outer pyrolytic carbon (I-PyC-SiC-O-PyC), determines the containment of fission products. The PBMR fuel consists of TRISO coated particles (CPs) embedded in a graphite matrix. One of the characterization techniques investigated by PBMR is the determination of strength of CPs. It is a well known metallurgical fact that temperature, amongst many other parameters, may influence the strength of a material. A recently developed method for measuring the strength of the TRISO coated particles was used and is briefly described in this article. The advantages of this method are demonstrated by the comparison of strength measurements of five experimental PBMR CP batches as a function of annealing temperature. Significant modification of strength after annealing was measured with increased temperature within the range 1000-2100 o C. The interesting feature of decreasing standard deviation of the strength with increasing temperature will also be discussed with a possible explanation. A significant difference in coated particle strength is also demonstrated for two CP batches with layer thickness on the extremities of the SiC layer thickness specification. The effect of long duration annealing on these strength values will also be demonstrated by comparing results from 1 h to 100 h annealing periods of coated particles at a temperature of 1600 o C.

  17. "Ultra"-Fast Fracture Strength of Advanced Structural Ceramic Materials Studied at Elevated Temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Sung R.; Gyekenyesi, John P.

    1999-01-01

    The accurate determination of inert strength is important in reliable life prediction of structural ceramic components. At ambient temperature, the inert strength of a brittle material is typically regarded as free of the effects of slow crack growth due to stress corrosion. Therefore, the inert strength can be determined either by eliminating active species, especially moisture, with an appropriate inert medium, or by using a very high test rate. However, at elevated temperatures, the concept or definition of the inert strength of brittle ceramic materials is not clear, since temperature itself is a degrading environment, resulting in strength degradation through slow crack growth and/or creep. Since the mechanism to control strength is rate-dependent viscous flow, the only conceivable way to determine the inert strength at elevated temperatures is to utilize a very fast test rate that either minimizes the time for or eliminates slow crack growth. Few experimental studies have measured the elevated-temperature, inert (or "ultra"-fast fracture) strength of advanced ceramics. At the NASA Lewis Research Center, an experimental study was initiated to better understand the "ultra"-fast fracture strength behavior of advanced ceramics at elevated temperatures. Fourteen advanced ceramics - one alumina, eleven silicon nitrides, and two silicon carbides - have been tested using constant stress-rate (dynamic fatigue) testing in flexure with a series of stress rates including the "ultra"-fast stress rate of 33 000 MPa/sec with digitally controlled test frames. The results for these 14 advanced ceramics indicate that, notwithstanding possible changes in flaw populations as well as flaw configurations because of elevated temperatures, the strength at 33 000 MPa/sec approached the room-temperature strength or reached a higher value than that determined at the conventional test rate of 30 MPa/sec. On the basis of the experimental data, it can be stated that the elevated-temperature

  18. Some atmospheric dispersion, wind and temperature statistics from Jervis Bay, Australian Capital Territory 1972 to 1974

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clark, G.H.

    1985-07-01

    A meteorological study of winds, temperatures and Pasquill stability categories was conducted in the coastal conditions at Jervis Bay. Three Pasquill stability categorisation schemes were compared. These indicated a predominance of neutral to slightly unstable conditions. During the daytime, north bay breezes and north-east sea breezes were most common together with on-shore south-east winds. Off-shore south-west winds prevailed during winter and were observed most frequently at night

  19. Effect of elevated temperature on the mechanical strength of HEPA filters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elfawal, M.M.; Eladham, K.A.; Hammed, F.H.; Abdrabbo, M.F.

    1993-01-01

    The effect of elevated temperature on the mechanical strength of HEPA filters was studied in order to evaluate and improve their performance under high temperature conditions. As part of this study the mechanical strength of HEPA filter medium which is the limiting factor in terms of the filter strength was experimentally studied at elevated temperature up to 400 degree C, and thermal exposure times ranged from 2 min to 4 h. The failure pressures of HEPA filter units after long exposure to 250 degree C were also investigated. The test results show that the medium strength decreases with increase in temperature challenge and thermal exposure time due to burnout of the organic binder used to improve the strength and flexibility of the medium. The test results also show that the tensile strength of the conventional filter medium drops to about 40 % of the value at room temperature after exposure to 250 degree C for 6 h; therefore, the continuous exposure of the conventional filter medium to this temperature is critical. The average failure differential pressures of all commercial tested filters were found to lie between 9 and 18 kPa at ambient temperature and between 6 and 11 kPa after thermal challenge at 250 degree C for 100 h. It was found that swelling and capture of the ends of individual pleats has led to filter failure.3 fig., 2 tab

  20. The rupture strength of dissimilar joints in high temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Groenwall, B.

    1992-05-01

    In dissimilar joints between austenitic stainless steels and ferritic steels the heat affected zone in the ferritic steel always is the weakest link. Two different joints where the ferritic steel has been 10CrMo910 (2.25Cr1Mo) and X20CrMoV121 respectively (162Cr1Mo0.3V) has been investigated through thermal cycling and isothermal creep testing. In this case the purpose has been to investigate the weakest link and therefore both 10CrMo910 and X20CrMoV121 have been welded to themselves using the TIG-method with Inconel 82 (70Cr20Cr3Mn2). 5Nb as filler wire. Crossweld specimens have been taken from the joints. To accelerate the testing the tip temperature at thermal cycling and the temperature at isothermal creep testing has been in the region 600-650 degrees C. Low ductile fracture, which is typical for failures in practice, has been obtained by using a moderate tensile stress, 63 N/mm 2 . In the high temperature range, 650 degrees C, the thermal cycling compared to the isothermal testing had no influence but in lower temperatures the cycling caused decreased time to rupture. The time to rupture in thermal cycling as well as in isothermal testing as a function of testing temperature can be fitted to exponential curve of type t = a x e bT (where t and T are time and temperature respectively). Through extrapolation of the measured data it has been found that 10CrMo910 in hard conditions that is thermal cycling has a life time at 500 degrees C of about 100 000 h. If the operational temperature is constant the life time will be about four times longer. The X20CrMoV121 on the other hand has a life time at thermal cycling at 500 degrees C and moderate tensile stress of about 3 000 000 h. This means that the tensile stress can be increased considerably. The cracks appear in 10CrMo910 closely to the fusion line but in the X20CrMoV121 steel cracking and fracture arise in the heat affected zone some millimeters from the fusion line. (au)

  1. Effect of test temperature on the fatigue strength of the 12GN2MFAYu tempered steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goritskij, V.M.; Terent'ev, V.F.; Bobyleva, L.A.

    1979-01-01

    The cyclic strength, variation of dislocation structure and fractography of specimen fractures were investigated depending on testing temperature. The specimens were tested at temperatures of 20, 350, 450, 550 deg C. The increase of testing temperature, according to the experimental data obtained, is accompanied by an insignificant reduction of fatigue strength. The testing temperature in the range from 350 to 550 deg C has a weak effect on the fatigue strength of the quenched and tempered steel. A change in the dislocation structure occurs under all tested temperatures in the 12 GN2MFAYu steel during fatigue. The intensity of the rearrangement of dislocation structure increases as the testing temperature increases to 550 deg C causing a decrease of the limited life-time at increased stress amplitudes

  2. Short Circuits of a 10 MW High Temperature Superconducting Wind Turbine Generator

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Song, X.; Polinder, H.; Liu, D.; Mijatovic, Nenad; Holbøll, Joachim; Jensen, Bogi Bech

    Direct drive high temperature superconducting (HTS) wind turbine generators have been proposed to tackle challenges for ever increasing wind turbine ratings. Due to smaller reactances in HTS generators, higher fault currents and larger transient torques could occur if sudden short circuits happen at

  3. Thermal Stir Welding of High Strength and High Temperature Alloys for Aerospace Applications, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Keystone and MSU team propose to demonstrate the feasibility of solid-state joining high strength and temperature alloys utilizing the Thermal Stir Welding...

  4. Residual Tensile Strength and Bond Properties of GFRP Bars after Exposure to Elevated Temperatures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Devon S. Ellis

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available The use of fiber reinforced polymer (FRP bars in reinforced concrete members enhances corrosion resistance when compared to traditional steel reinforcing bars. Although there is ample research available on the behavior of FRP bars and concrete members reinforced with FRP bars under elevated temperatures (due to fire, there is little published information available on their post-fire residual load capacity. This paper reports residual tensile strength, modulus of elasticity, and bond strength (to concrete of glass fiber reinforced polymer (GFRP bars after exposure to elevated temperatures of up to 400 °C and subsequent cooling to an ambient temperature. The results showed that the residual strength generally decreases with increasing temperature exposure. However, as much as 83% of the original tensile strength and 27% of the original bond strength was retained after the specimens were heated to 400 °C and then cooled to ambient temperature. The residual bond strength is a critical parameter in post-fire strength assessments of GFRP-reinforced concrete members.

  5. Residual Tensile Strength and Bond Properties of GFRP Bars after Exposure to Elevated Temperatures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellis, Devon S; Tabatabai, Habib; Nabizadeh, Azam

    2018-02-27

    The use of fiber reinforced polymer (FRP) bars in reinforced concrete members enhances corrosion resistance when compared to traditional steel reinforcing bars. Although there is ample research available on the behavior of FRP bars and concrete members reinforced with FRP bars under elevated temperatures (due to fire), there is little published information available on their post-fire residual load capacity. This paper reports residual tensile strength, modulus of elasticity, and bond strength (to concrete) of glass fiber reinforced polymer (GFRP) bars after exposure to elevated temperatures of up to 400 °C and subsequent cooling to an ambient temperature. The results showed that the residual strength generally decreases with increasing temperature exposure. However, as much as 83% of the original tensile strength and 27% of the original bond strength was retained after the specimens were heated to 400 °C and then cooled to ambient temperature. The residual bond strength is a critical parameter in post-fire strength assessments of GFRP-reinforced concrete members.

  6. Assessment of ECISS draft standard for derivation of high temperature proof strength values

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Linde, L.; Sandstroem, R.

    1996-03-01

    New European material standards are under development and modern data evaluation techniques must be able to supply these standards with accurate design values. A draft standard for the derivation of high temperature proof strength values has been proposed. This standard (EDS) has been used to calculate strength values for six steels; one unalloyed steel, one 12 % Cr steel and four austenitic stainless steels. Although large data sets were available, it was not possible to satisfy the requirement in the EDS of 80 % temperature coverage in the proof strength data for several steels. It suggests that temperature coverage specified in the EDS is unrealistically high. Due to the limited number of heats satisfying the temperature coverage requirements for each steel, the statistical error in the derived values exceeds 10-20 % which must be considered as unacceptably high. Instead it is recommended that the full data sets are used irrespective of temperature coverage. The variation of proof strength values represented by the analysed heats did not cover the corresponding variation in the larger data set available. This was the case even for the steel where 16 heats satisfied the temperature coverage requirement. Thus a limited number of heats can not be expected to be a good representation of more complete data sets. This has the consequence that absolute strength values can not be derived without access to a standardised proof strength at room temperature. Two derivation methods investigated in this report are both based on the ISO 2605/III procedure for proof strength assessments at elevated temperature. Method I and II use an essentially temperature independent and temperature dependent reduction term respectively. The methods have been assessed by the same data sets for the six steels. One or both methods gave satisfactory results for most of the investigated steels. Presented results are based on work carried out in ECISS TC22 WG1. 17 refs, 20 figs, 7 tabs.

  7. High-temperature strength of AISI 316 steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Antunes, A.E.B.; Monteiro, S.N.

    1975-01-01

    The mechanical properties, especially elastic limit and strain hardening of AISI-316 austenitic stainless steel were investigated within the temperature range 150-800 0 C for two strain rates. The results showed anomalous behaviour between 200 and 650 0 C, over which range there was an increase in maximum strenght and hardening, with a tendency to show peaks. These apparentley three in number, may be connected with the effects of interaction between point defects and dislocations leading to dinamic aging phenomena. The mechanisms responsible for this anomalous behaviour produce a negative dependence on strain rate [pt

  8. Strength and deformability of graphite under cyclic stresses and temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Umanskij, Eh.S.; Uskov, E.I.; Bogomolov, A.V.; Aleksyuk, M.M.

    1978-01-01

    Presented are the results of investigations into a durability of two types of reactor graphites with the average density of 1.8 and 1.65 g/cm 2 under static and cyclic stresses (0.65-0.75 kg/mm 2 ) and temperatures (800 deg C, 250 reversible 800 deg C 250 reversible 1500 deg C). The considerable anisotropy is stated: the durability of the samples under study cut out parallel to the billet axis, is more than twice higher in comparison with that of samples cut out normal to it

  9. Estimate of Hurricane Wind Speed from AMSR-E Low-Frequency Channel Brightness Temperature Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lei Zhang

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Two new parameters (W6H and W6V were defined that represent brightness temperature increments for different low-frequency channels due to ocean wind. We developed a new wind speed retrieval model inside hurricanes based on W6H and W6V using brightness temperature data from AMSR-E. The AMSR-E observations of 12 category 3–5 hurricanes from 2003 to 2011 and corresponding data from the H*wind analysis system were used to develop and validate the AMSR-E wind speed retrieval model. The results show that the mean bias and the overall root-mean-square (RMS difference of the AMSR-E retrieved wind speeds with respect to H*wind (HRD Real-time Hurricane Wind Analysis System analysis data were −0.01 m/s and 2.66 m/s, respectively. One case study showed that W6H and W6V were less sensitive to rain than the observed AMSR-E C-band and X-band brightness temperature data. The AMSR-E retrieval model was further validated by comparing the retrieved wind speeds against stepped-frequency microwave radiometer (SFMR measurements. The comparison showed an RMS difference of 3.41 m/s and a mean bias of 0.49 m/s.

  10. Wind effect on PV module temperature: Analysis of different techniques for an accurate estimation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwingshackl, Clemens; Petitta, Marcello; Ernst Wagner, Jochen; Belluardo, Giorgio; Moser, David; Castelli, Mariapina; Zebisch, Marc; Tetzlaff, Anke

    2013-04-01

    In this abstract a study on the influence of wind to model the PV module temperature is presented. This study is carried out in the framework of the PV-Alps INTERREG project in which the potential of different photovoltaic technologies is analysed for alpine regions. The PV module temperature depends on different parameters, such as ambient temperature, irradiance, wind speed and PV technology [1]. In most models, a very simple approach is used, where the PV module temperature is calculated from NOCT (nominal operating cell temperature), ambient temperature and irradiance alone [2]. In this study the influence of wind speed on the PV module temperature was investigated. First, different approaches suggested by various authors were tested [1], [2], [3], [4], [5]. For our analysis, temperature, irradiance and wind data from a PV test facility at the airport Bolzano (South Tyrol, Italy) from the EURAC Institute of Renewable Energies were used. The PV module temperature was calculated with different models and compared to the measured PV module temperature at the single panels. The best results were achieved with the approach suggested by Skoplaki et al. [1]. Preliminary results indicate that for all PV technologies which were tested (monocrystalline, amorphous, microcrystalline and polycrystalline silicon and cadmium telluride), modelled and measured PV module temperatures show a higher agreement (RMSE about 3-4 K) compared to standard approaches in which wind is not considered. For further investigation the in-situ measured wind velocities were replaced with wind data from numerical weather forecast models (ECMWF, reanalysis fields). Our results show that the PV module temperature calculated with wind data from ECMWF is still in very good agreement with the measured one (R² > 0.9 for all technologies). Compared to the previous analysis, we find comparable mean values and an increasing standard deviation. These results open a promising approach for PV module

  11. Dependence of electric strength on the ambient temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Čaja, Alexander; Nemec, Patrik; Malcho, Milan

    2014-01-01

    At present, the volume concentration of electronic components in their miniaturization to different types of microchips and increasing their performance raises the problem of cooling such elements due to the increasing density of heat flow of heat loss. Compliance with safe operating temperature of active semiconductor element is very closely related to the reliability and durability not only components, but also the entire device. Often it is also necessary to electrically isolate the unit from the side of the cooler air. Cooling demand by natural convection is typical for applications with high operating reliability. To the reliability of the system for removing heat loss increased, it is necessary to minimize need to use the mechanically or electrically powered elements, such as circulation pumps or fans. Experience to date with applications of heat pipe in specific systems appears to be the most appropriate method of cooling

  12. Voyager observations of solar wind proton temperature - 1-10 AU

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gazis, P. R.; Lazarus, A. J.

    1982-01-01

    Simultaneous measurements are made of the solar wind proton temperatures by the Voyager 1 and 2 spacecraft, far from earth, and the IMP 8 spacecraft in earth orbit. This technique permits a separation of radial and temporal variations of solar wind parameters. The average value of the proton temperature between 1 and 9 AU is observed to decrease as r (the heliocentric radius) to the -(0.7 + or - 0.2). This is slower than would be expected for adiabatic expansion. A detailed examination of the solar wind stream structure shows that considerable heating occurs at the interface between high and low speed streams.

  13. Emissions and temperature benefits: The role of wind power in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, Hongbo

    2017-01-01

    As a non-fossil technology, wind power has an enormous advantage over coal because of its role in climate change mitigation. Therefore, it is important to investigate how substituting wind power for coal-fired electricity will affect emission reductions, changes in radiative forcing and rising temperatures, particularly in the context of emission limits. We developed an integrated methodology that includes two parts: an energy-economy-environmental (3E) integrated model and an emission-temperature response model. The former is used to simulate the dynamic relationships between economic output, wind energy and greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions; the latter is used to evaluate changes in radiative forcing and warming. Under the present development projection, wind energy cannot serve as a major force in curbing emissions, even under the strictest space-restraining scenario. China's temperature contribution to global warming will be up to 21.76% if warming is limited to 2 degrees. With the wind-for-coal power substitution, the corresponding contribution to global radiative forcing increase and temperature rise will decrease by up to 10% and 6.57%, respectively. Substituting wind power for coal-fired electricity has positive effects on emission reductions and warming control. However, wind energy alone is insufficient for climate change mitigation. It forms an important component of the renewable energy portfolio used to combat global warming. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Study on the effect of testing machine rigidity on strength and ductility temperature dependences obtained

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krashchenko, V.P.; Statsenko, V.E.; Rudnitskij, N.P.

    1984-01-01

    Investigation procedures are described for rigidity of testing machines and mechanical properties of tantalum and nickel in the temperature range 293-1873K. Temperature dependences are presented for strength characteristics of the investigated materials obtained with the use of installations of different rigidity. Dependence analysis is carried out and recommendations are given as to the characteristics application

  15. Concrete for PCRVs: strength of concrete under triaxial loading and creep at elevated temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Linse, D.; Aschl, H.; Stoeckl, S.

    1975-01-01

    To provide detailed information for the calculation of prestressed concrete reactor vessels, investigations of the behaviour of concrete under multiaxial loading and on creep at elevated temperatures were made at the Institut fuer Massivbau of the Technical University of Munich. The strength of concrete under triaxial compression is dependent on the stress ratio. The less the stresses differ from hydrostatic compression the more strength increases. Triaxial compression increases very much the deformability of concrete. Plastic deformations of +-10% and more (all stresses compression, but not equal, strains compression or tension) are possible without large cracks. The creep deformations are considerably dependent on the temperature. Creep at 80 0 C is about three to four times higher than at 20 0 C. The Poisson's ratio of creep at elevated temperature seems to be bigger than at normal temperatures at a rate of loading of 35% and 50% of the ultimate strength. (Auth.)

  16. Emissions and temperature benefits: The role of wind power in China

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duan, Hongbo, E-mail: hbduan@ucas.ac.cn

    2017-01-15

    Background: As a non-fossil technology, wind power has an enormous advantage over coal because of its role in climate change mitigation. Therefore, it is important to investigate how substituting wind power for coal-fired electricity will affect emission reductions, changes in radiative forcing and rising temperatures, particularly in the context of emission limits. Methods: We developed an integrated methodology that includes two parts: an energy-economy-environmental (3E) integrated model and an emission-temperature response model. The former is used to simulate the dynamic relationships between economic output, wind energy and greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions; the latter is used to evaluate changes in radiative forcing and warming. Results: Under the present development projection, wind energy cannot serve as a major force in curbing emissions, even under the strictest space-restraining scenario. China's temperature contribution to global warming will be up to 21.76% if warming is limited to 2 degrees. With the wind-for-coal power substitution, the corresponding contribution to global radiative forcing increase and temperature rise will decrease by up to 10% and 6.57%, respectively. Conclusions: Substituting wind power for coal-fired electricity has positive effects on emission reductions and warming control. However, wind energy alone is insufficient for climate change mitigation. It forms an important component of the renewable energy portfolio used to combat global warming. - Highlights: • We assess the warming benefits associated with substitution of wind power for coal. • The effect of emission space limits on climate responses is deeply examined. • China is responsible for at most 21.76% of global warming given the 2-degree target. • Wind power alone may not be sufficient to face the challenge of climate change. • A fertile policy soil and an aggressive plan are necessary to boost renewables.

  17. Emissions and temperature benefits: The role of wind power in China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duan, Hongbo

    2017-01-01

    Background: As a non-fossil technology, wind power has an enormous advantage over coal because of its role in climate change mitigation. Therefore, it is important to investigate how substituting wind power for coal-fired electricity will affect emission reductions, changes in radiative forcing and rising temperatures, particularly in the context of emission limits. Methods: We developed an integrated methodology that includes two parts: an energy-economy-environmental (3E) integrated model and an emission-temperature response model. The former is used to simulate the dynamic relationships between economic output, wind energy and greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions; the latter is used to evaluate changes in radiative forcing and warming. Results: Under the present development projection, wind energy cannot serve as a major force in curbing emissions, even under the strictest space-restraining scenario. China's temperature contribution to global warming will be up to 21.76% if warming is limited to 2 degrees. With the wind-for-coal power substitution, the corresponding contribution to global radiative forcing increase and temperature rise will decrease by up to 10% and 6.57%, respectively. Conclusions: Substituting wind power for coal-fired electricity has positive effects on emission reductions and warming control. However, wind energy alone is insufficient for climate change mitigation. It forms an important component of the renewable energy portfolio used to combat global warming. - Highlights: • We assess the warming benefits associated with substitution of wind power for coal. • The effect of emission space limits on climate responses is deeply examined. • China is responsible for at most 21.76% of global warming given the 2-degree target. • Wind power alone may not be sufficient to face the challenge of climate change. • A fertile policy soil and an aggressive plan are necessary to boost renewables.

  18. Temperature and moisture content effects on compressive strength parallel to the grain of paricá

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manuel Jesús Manríquez Figueroa

    Full Text Available The aim of this study is to evaluate the effect of the temperature and moisture content on the compressive strength parallel to the grain of paricá (Schizolobium amazonicum Huber ex. Ducke from cultivated forests. The experiments were carried out on 3 timber samples under different conditions: heated (HT, thermal treatment (TT and water saturated (WS. The HT sample consisted of 105 clear specimens assembled in 15 groups, the TT consisted of 90 clear specimens assembled in 15 groups and the WS consisted of 90 clear specimens assembled in 9 groups. The specimens from HT and WS samples were tested at a temperature range from 20 to 230 ºC and 20 to 100 ºC, respectively. The HT specimens were tested at ambient temperature, but after being submitted to thermal treatment. The HT, TT and WS samples present a decrease in the compressive strength, reaching 65%, 76% and 59% of the compressive strength at room temperature, respectively. The decrease in the compressive strength of the HT and WS samples can be associated to the thermal degradation of wood polymers and the moisture content. For the TT sample, the strength increased for a pre-heating temperature of up to 170 °C due to the reduction in the moisture content of the specimens.

  19. Creep Behavior of High-Strength Concrete Subjected to Elevated Temperatures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Minho; Kim, Gyuyong; Kim, Youngsun; Lee, Taegyu; Choe, Gyeongcheol; Hwang, Euichul; Nam, Jeongsoo

    2017-07-11

    Strain is generated in concrete subjected to elevated temperatures owing to the influence of factors such as thermal expansion and design load. Such strains resulting from elevated temperatures and load can significantly influence the stability of a structure during and after a fire. In addition, the lower the water-to-binder (W-B) ratio and the smaller the quantity of aggregates in high-strength concrete, the more likely it is for unstable strain to occur. Hence, in this study, the compressive strength, elastic modulus, and creep behavior were evaluated at target temperatures of 100, 200, 300, 500, and 800 °C for high-strength concretes with W-B ratios of 30%, 26%, and 23%. The loading conditions were set as non-loading and 0.33f cu . It was found that as the compressive strength of the concrete increased, the mechanical characteristics deteriorated and transient creep increased. Furthermore, when the point at which creep strain occurred at elevated temperatures after the occurrence of transient creep was considered, greater shrinkage strain occurred as the compressive strength of the concrete increased. At a heating temperature of 800 °C, the 80 and 100 MPa test specimens showed creep failure within a shrinkage strain range similar to the strain at the maximum load.

  20. Creep Behavior of High-Strength Concrete Subjected to Elevated Temperatures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Minho Yoon

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Strain is generated in concrete subjected to elevated temperatures owing to the influence of factors such as thermal expansion and design load. Such strains resulting from elevated temperatures and load can significantly influence the stability of a structure during and after a fire. In addition, the lower the water-to-binder (W–B ratio and the smaller the quantity of aggregates in high-strength concrete, the more likely it is for unstable strain to occur. Hence, in this study, the compressive strength, elastic modulus, and creep behavior were evaluated at target temperatures of 100, 200, 300, 500, and 800 °C for high-strength concretes with W–B ratios of 30%, 26%, and 23%. The loading conditions were set as non-loading and 0.33fcu. It was found that as the compressive strength of the concrete increased, the mechanical characteristics deteriorated and transient creep increased. Furthermore, when the point at which creep strain occurred at elevated temperatures after the occurrence of transient creep was considered, greater shrinkage strain occurred as the compressive strength of the concrete increased. At a heating temperature of 800 °C, the 80 and 100 MPa test specimens showed creep failure within a shrinkage strain range similar to the strain at the maximum load.

  1. Observing Equatorial Thermospheric Winds and Temperatures with a New Mapping Technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faivre, M. W.; Meriwether, J. W.; Sherwood, P.; Veliz, O.

    2005-12-01

    Application of the Fabry-Perot interferometer (FPI) at Arequipa, Peru (16.4S, 71.4 W) to measure the Doppler shifts and Doppler broadenings in the equatorial O(1D) 630-nm nightglow has resulted in numerous detections of a large-scale thermospheric phenomenon called the Midnight Temperature Maximum (MTM). A recent detector upgrade with a CCD camera has improved the accuracy of these measurements by a factor of 5. Temperature increases of 50 to 150K have been measured during nights in April and July, 2005, with error bars less than 10K after averaging in all directions. Moreover, the meridional wind measurements show evidence for a flow reversal from equatorward to poleward near local midnight for such events. A new observing strategy based upon the pioneering work of Burnside et al.[1981] maps the equatorial wind and temperature fields by observing in eight equally-spaced azimuth directions, each with a zenith angle of 60 degrees. Analysis of the data obtained with this technique gives the mean wind velocities in the meridional and zonal directions as well as the horizontal gradients of the wind field for these directions. Significant horizontal wind gradients are found for the meridional direction but not for the zonal direction. The zonal wind blows eastward throughout the night with a maximum speed of ~150 m/s near the middle of the night and then decreases towards zero just before dawn. In general, the fastest poleward meridional wind is observed near mid-evening. By the end of the night, the meridional flow tends to be more equatorward at speeds of about 50 m/s. Using the assumption that local time and longitude are equivalent over a period of 30 minutes, a map of the horizontal wind field vector field is constructed over a range of 12 degrees latitude centered at 16.5 S. Comparison between MTM nights and quiet nights (no MTM) revealed significant differences in the horizontal wind fields. Using the method of Fourier decomposition of the line-of-sight winds

  2. Adaptive Backstepping Control Based on Floating Offshore High Temperature Superconductor Generator for Wind Turbines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feng Yang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available With the rapid development of offshore wind power, the doubly fed induction generator and permanent magnet synchronous generator cannot meet the increasing request of power capacity. Therefore, superconducting generator should be used instead of the traditional motor, which can improve generator efficiency, reduce the weight of wind turbines, and increase system reliability. This paper mainly focuses on nonlinear control in the offshore wind power system which is consisted of a wind turbine and a high temperature superconductor generator. The proposed control approach is based on the adaptive backstepping method. Its main purpose is to regulate the rotor speed and generator voltage, therefore, achieving the maximum power point tracking (MPPT, improving the efficiency of a wind turbine, and then enhancing the system’s stability and robustness under large disturbances. The control approach can ensure high precision of generator speed tracking, which is confirmed in both the theoretical analysis and numerical simulation.

  3. Compressive and flexural strength of expanded perlite aggregate mortar subjected to high temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zulkifeli, Muhamad Faqrul Hisham bin Mohd; Saman@Hj Mohamed, Hamidah binti Mohd

    2017-08-01

    Work on thermal resistant of outer structures of buildings is one of the solution to reduce death, damages and properties loss in fire cases. Structures protected with thermal resistant materials can delay or avoid failure and collapse during fire. Hence, establishment of skin cladding with advance materials to protect the structure of buildings is a necessary action. Expanded perlite is a good insulation material which can be used as aggregate replacement in mortar. This study is to study on mortar mechanical properties of flexural and compressive strength subjected to elevated temperatures using expanded perlite aggregate (EPA). This study involved experimental work which was developing mortar with sand replacement by volume of 0%, 10%, 20%, 30% and 40% of EPA and cured for 56 days. The mortars then exposed to 200°C, 400 °C, 700 °C and 1000 °C. Flexural and compressive strength of the mortar were tested. The tests showed that there were increased of flexural and compressive strength at 200°C, and constantly decreased when subjected to 400°C, 700°C and 1000 °C. There were also variation of strengths at different percentages of EPA replacement. Highest compressive strength and flexural strength recorded were both at 200 °C with 65.52 MPa and 21.34 MPa respectively. The study conclude that by using EPA as aggregate replacement was ineffective below elevated temperatures but increased the performance of the mortar at elevated temperatures.

  4. Tensile properties and temperature-dependent yield strength prediction of GH4033 wrought superalloy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ma, Jianzuo [State Key Laboratory of Coal Mine Disaster Dynamics and Control and College of Aerospace Engineering, Chongqing University, Chongqing 400030 (China); Li, Weiguo, E-mail: wgli@cqu.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Coal Mine Disaster Dynamics and Control and College of Aerospace Engineering, Chongqing University, Chongqing 400030 (China); Zhang, Xianhe; Kou, Haibo; Shao, Jiaxing; Geng, Peiji; Deng, Yong [State Key Laboratory of Coal Mine Disaster Dynamics and Control and College of Aerospace Engineering, Chongqing University, Chongqing 400030 (China); Fang, Daining [LTCS and College of Engineering, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China)

    2016-10-31

    The tensile properties of superalloy GH4033 have been evaluated at temperatures ranging from room temperature to 1000 °C. Fracture surfaces and precipitation were observed using a field-emission scanning electron microscope (FE-SEM). The alloy mainly consisted of γ’ precipitate particles homogeneously dispersed in the γ matrix interior. The effects of dynamic strain aging and precipitation on the strength were verified. A temperature-dependent yield strength model was developed to describe the temperature and precipitation effects on the alloy's yield behaviour. The model is able to consider the effect of precipitation strengthening on the yield strength. The yield behaviour of the precipitation-strengthened superalloy was demonstrated to be adequately predictable over a wide range of temperatures. Note that this model reflects the quantitative relationship between the yield strength of the precipitation-strengthened superalloy and the temperature, the elastic modulus, the specific heat capacity at constant pressure, Poisson's ratio, the precipitate particle size and the volume fraction of the particles.

  5. Strength and low temperature toughness of Fe-13%Ni-Mo alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishikawa, Keisuke; Maruyama, Norio; Tsuya, Kazuo

    1978-01-01

    Mechanical tests were made on newly developed Fe-13%Ni-Mo alloys for eryogenic service. The effects of the additional elements were investigated from the viewpoint of the strength and the low temperature toughness. The alloys added by Al, Ti or V have the better balance of these properties. They did not show low temperature brittleness induced by cleavage fracture in Charpy impact test at 77 K. The microfractography showed the utterly dimple rupture patterns on the broken surface of all specimens. It would be supposed that the cleavage fracture stress is considerably higher than the flow stress. These alloys are superior to some commercial structural materials for low temperature use in the balance between the strength at 300 K and the toughness at 77 K. Additionally, it is noted that these experimental alloys have a good advantage in getting high strength and high toughness by the rather simple heat treatment. (auth.)

  6. A 1290 MHZ profiler with RASS for monitoring wind and temperature in the boundary layer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Engelbart, D. [Deutscher Wetterdienst, Lindenberg (Germany). Meteorol. Obs.; Steinhagen, H. [Deutscher Wetterdienst, Lindenberg (Germany). Meteorol. Obs.; Goersdorf, U. [Deutscher Wetterdienst, Lindenberg (Germany). Meteorol. Obs.; Lippmann, J. [Deutscher Wetterdienst, Lindenberg (Germany). Meteorol. Obs.; Neisser, J. [Deutscher Wetterdienst, Lindenberg (Germany). Meteorol. Obs.

    1996-02-01

    A boundary layer wind profiler with RASS is described operating at 1290 MHz in a quasi-operational mode at the Meteorological Observatory Lindenberg of the German Weather Service (DWD). It provides vertical profiles of wind and temperature from the lower atmosphere with a height resolution of 50 m to 400 m and a time resolution of about 1 to 60 minutes. For an estimation of the system reliability, the availability of the measurements for all different height levels is analyzed. With regard to the data quality, a comparison of wind profiler/RASS and rawinsonde data is presented based on 856 wind and 451 temperature profiles. It reveals reasonable conformity of both sounding systems. Finally, case studies are shown, demonstrating the system ability to analyze some characteristic phenomena in the lower troposphere, which are unresolved temporally and spatially by the routine rawinsonde network. (orig.)

  7. Prediction of concrete compressive strength considering humidity and temperature in the construction of nuclear power plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kwon, Seung Hee; Jang, Kyung Pil [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Myongji University, Yongin (Korea, Republic of); Bang, Jin-Wook [Department of Civil Engineering, Chungnam National University, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Jang Hwa [Structural Engineering Research Division, Korea Institute of Construction Technology (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Yun Yong, E-mail: yunkim@cnu.ac.kr [Structural Engineering Research Division, Korea Institute of Construction Technology (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-08-15

    Highlights: • Compressive strength tests for three concrete mixes were performed. • The parameters of the humidity-adjusted maturity function were determined. • Strength can be predicted considering temperature and relative humidity. - Abstract: This study proposes a method for predicting compressive strength developments in the early ages of concretes used in the construction of nuclear power plants. Three representative mixes with strengths of 6000 psi (41.4 MPa), 4500 psi (31.0 MPa), and 4000 psi (27.6 MPa) were selected and tested under various curing conditions; the temperature ranged from 10 to 40 °C, and the relative humidity from 40 to 100%. In order to consider not only the effect of the temperature but also that of humidity, an existing model, i.e. the humidity-adjusted maturity function, was adopted and the parameters used in the function were determined from the test results. A series of tests were also performed in the curing condition of a variable temperature and constant humidity, and a comparison between the measured and predicted strengths were made for the verification.

  8. Estimation of wind speeds inside Super Typhoon Nepartak from AMSR2 low-frequency brightness temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Lei; Yin, Xiaobin; Shi, Hanqing; Wang, Zhenzhan; Xu, Qing

    2018-04-01

    Accurate estimations of typhoon-level winds are highly desired over the western Pacific Ocean. A wind speed retrieval algorithm is used to retrieve the wind speeds within Super Typhoon Nepartak (2016) using 6.9- and 10.7-GHz brightness temperatures from the Japanese Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer 2 (AMSR2) sensor on board the Global Change Observation Mission-Water 1 (GCOM-W1) satellite. The results show that the retrieved wind speeds clearly represent the intensification process of Super Typhoon Nepartak. A good agreement is found between the retrieved wind speeds and the Soil Moisture Active Passive wind speed product. The mean bias is 0.51 m/s, and the root-mean-square difference is 1.93 m/s between them. The retrieved maximum wind speeds are 59.6 m/s at 04:45 UTC on July 6 and 71.3 m/s at 16:58 UTC on July 6. The two results demonstrate good agreement with the results reported by the China Meteorological Administration and the Joint Typhoon Warning Center. In addition, Feng-Yun 2G (FY-2G) satellite infrared images, Feng-Yun 3C (FY-3C) microwave atmospheric sounder data, and AMSR2 brightness temperature images are also used to describe the development and structure of Super Typhoon Nepartak.

  9. THz limb sounder (TLS) for lower thermospheric wind, oxygen density, and temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Dong L.; Yee, Jeng-Hwa; Schlecht, Erich; Mehdi, Imran; Siles, Jose; Drouin, Brian J.

    2016-07-01

    Neutral winds are one of the most critical measurements in the lower thermosphere and E region ionosphere (LTEI) for understanding complex electrodynamic processes and ion-neutral interactions. We are developing a high-sensitivity, low-power, noncryogenic 2.06 THz Schottky receiver to measure wind profiles at 100-140 km. The new technique, THz limb sounder (TLS), aims to measure LTEI winds by resolving the wind-induced Doppler shift of 2.06 THz atomic oxygen (OI) emissions. As a transition between fine structure levels in the ground electronic state, the OI emission is in local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE) at altitudes up to 350 km. This LTE property, together with day-and-night capability and small line-of-sight gradient, makes the OI limb sounding a very attractive technique for neutral wind observations. In addition to the wind measurement, TLS can also retrieve [OI] density and neutral temperature in the LTEI region. TLS leverages rapid advances in THz receiver technologies including subharmonically pumped (SHP) mixers and Schottky-diode-based power multipliers. Current SHP Schottky receivers have produced good sensitivity for THz frequencies at ambient environment temperatures (120-150 K), which are achievable through passively cooling in spaceflight. As an emerging technique, TLS can fill the critical data gaps in the LTEI neutral wind observations to enable detailed studies on the coupling and dynamo processes between charged and neutral molecules.

  10. A Pole Pair Segment of a 2-MW High-Temperature Superconducting Wind Turbine Generator

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Song, Xiaowei (Andy); Mijatovic, Nenad; Kellers, Jürgen

    2017-01-01

    A 2-MW high-temperature superconducting (HTS) generator with 24 pole pairs has been designed for the wind turbine application. In order to identify potential challenges and obtain practical knowledge prior to production, a full-size stationary experimental setup, which is one pole pair segment...... and the setup in terms of the flux density, the operating condition of the HTS winding, and the force-generation capability. Finite element (FE) software MagNet is used to carry out numerical simulations. The findings show that the HTS winding in the setup is a good surrogate for these that would be used...

  11. A Pole Pair Segment of a 2 MW High Temperature Superconducting Wind Turbine Generator

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Song, Xiaowei (Andy); Mijatovic, Nenad; Kellers, Jürgen

    2016-01-01

    A 2 MW high temperature superconducting (HTS) generator with 24 pole pairs has been designed for the wind turbine application. In order to identify potential challenges and obtain practical knowledge prior to production, a fullsize stationary experimental set-up, which is one pole pair segment...... generator and the set-up in terms of the flux density, the operating condition of the HTS winding, and the force-generation capability. Finite element (FE) software MagNet is used to carry out numerical simulations. The findings show that the HTS winding in the set-up is a good surrogate...

  12. Size effects in olivine control strength in low-temperature plasticity regime

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumamoto, K. M.; Thom, C.; Wallis, D.; Hansen, L. N.; Armstrong, D. E. J.; Goldsby, D. L.; Warren, J. M.; Wilkinson, A. J.

    2017-12-01

    The strength of the lithospheric mantle during deformation by low-temperature plasticity controls a range of geological phenomena, including lithospheric-scale strain localization, the evolution of friction on deep seismogenic faults, and the flexure of tectonic plates. However, constraints on the strength of olivine in this deformation regime are difficult to obtain from conventional rock-deformation experiments, and previous results vary considerably. We demonstrate via nanoindentation that the strength of olivine in the low-temperature plasticity regime is dependent on the length-scale of the test, with experiments on smaller volumes of material exhibiting larger yield stresses. This "size effect" has previously been explained in engineering materials as a result of the role of strain gradients and associated geometrically necessary dislocations in modifying plastic behavior. The Hall-Petch effect, in which a material with a small grain size exhibits a higher strength than one with a large grain size, is thought to arise from the same mechanism. The presence of a size effect resolves discrepancies among previous experimental measurements of olivine, which were either conducted using indentation methods or were conducted on polycrystalline samples with small grain sizes. An analysis of different low-temperature plasticity flow laws extrapolated to room temperature reveals a power-law relationship between length-scale (grain size for polycrystalline deformation and contact radius for indentation tests) and yield strength. This suggests that data from samples with large inherent length scales best represent the plastic strength of the coarse-grained lithospheric mantle. Additionally, the plastic deformation of nanometer- to micrometer-sized asperities on fault surfaces may control the evolution of fault roughness due to their size-dependent strength.

  13. Strength Analysis of a Large-Size Supporting Structure for an Offshore Wind Turbine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Niklas Karol

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available The offshore wind power industry is the branch of electric energy production from renewable sources which is most intensively developed in EU countries. At present, there is a tendency to install larger-power wind turbines at larger distances from the seashore, on relatively deep waters. Consequently, technological solutions for new supporting structures intended for deeper water regions are undergoing rapid development now. Various design types are proposed and analysed, starting from gravitational supports (GBS, through monopiles and 3D frame structures (jackets, tripods, and ending with floating and submerged supports anchored to the seabed by flexible connectors, including TLP type solutions.

  14. Does the recent warming hiatus exist over northern Asia for winter wind chill temperature?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Ying

    2017-04-01

    Wind chill temperature (WCT) describes the joint effect of wind velocity and air temperature on exposed body skin and could support policy makers in designing plans to reduce the risks of notably cold and windy weather. This study examined winter WCT over northern Asia during 1973-2013 by analyzing in situ station data. The winter WCT warming rate over the Tibetan Plateau slowed during 1999-2013 (-0.04 °C/decade) compared with that during 1973-1998 (0.67 °C/decade). The winter WCT warming hiatus has also been observed in the remainder of Northern Asia with trends of 1.11 °C/decade during 1973-1998 but -1.02 °C/decade during 1999-2013, except for the Far East of Russia (FE), where the winter WCT has continued to heat up during both the earlier period of 1973-1998 (0.54 °C/decade) and the recent period of 1999-2013 (0.75 °C/decade). The results indicate that the influence of temperature on winter WCT is greater than that of wind speed over northern Asia. Atmospheric circulation changes associated with air temperature and wind speed were analyzed to identify the causes for the warming hiatus of winter WCT over northern Asia. The distributions of sea level pressure and 500 hPa height anomalies during 1999-2013 transported cold air from the high latitudes to middle latitudes, resulting in low air temperature over Northern Asia except for the Far East of Russia. Over the Tibetan Plateau, the increase in wind speed offset the increase in air temperature during 1999-2013. For the Far East, the southerly wind from the Western Pacific drove the temperature up during the 1999-2013 period via warm advection.

  15. Temperature And Wind Velocity Oscillations Along a Gentle Slope During Sea-Breeze Events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bastin, Sophie; Drobinski, Philippe

    2005-03-01

    The flow structure on a gentle slope at Vallon d’Ol in the northern suburbs of Marseille in southern France has been documented by means of surface wind and temperature measurements collected from 7 June to 14 July 2001 during the ESCOMPTE experiment. The analysis of the time series reveals temperature and wind speed oscillations during several nights (about 60--90 min oscillation period) and several days (about 120-180 min oscillation period) during the whole observing period. Oscillating katabatic winds have been reported in the literature from theoretical, experimental and numerical studies. In the present study, the dynamics of the observed oscillating katabatic winds are in good agreement with the theory.In contrast to katabatic winds, no daytime observations of oscillating anabatic upslope flows have ever been published to our knowledge, probably because of temperature inversion break-up that inhibits upslope winds. The present paper shows that cold air advection by a sea breeze generates a mesoscale horizontal temperature gradient, and hence baroclinicity in the atmosphere, which then allows low-frequency oscillations, similar to a katabatic flow. An expression for the oscillation period is derived that accounts for the contribution of the sea-breeze induced mesoscale horizontal temperature gradient. The theoretical prediction of the oscillation period is compared to the measurements, and good agreement is found. The statistical analysis of the wind flow at Vallon d’Ol shows a dominant north-easterly to easterly flow pattern for nighttime oscillations and a dominant south-westerly flow pattern for daytime oscillations. These results are consistent with published numerical simulation results that show that the air drains off the mountain along the maximum slope direction, which in the studied case is oriented south-west to north-east.

  16. Temporal and radial variation of the solar wind temperature-speed relationship

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elliott, H. A.; Henney, C. J.; McComas, D. J.; Smith, C. W.; Vasquez, B. J.

    2012-09-01

    The solar wind temperature (T) and speed (V) are generally well correlated at ˜1 AU, except in Interplanetary Coronal Mass Ejections where this correlation breaks down. We perform a comprehensive analysis of both the temporal and radial variation in the temperature-speed (T-V) relationship of the non-transient wind, and our analysis provides insight into both the causes of the T-V relationship and the sources of the temperature variability. Often at 1 AU the speed-temperature relationship is well represented by a single linear fit over a speed range spanning both the slow and fast wind. However, at times the fast wind from coronal holes can have a different T-V relationship than the slow wind. A good example of this was in 2003 when there was a very large and long-lived outward magnetic polarity coronal hole at low latitudes that emitted wind with speeds as fast as a polar coronal hole. The long-lived nature of the hole made it possible to clearly distinguish that some holes can have a different T-V relationship. In an earlier ACE study, we found that both the compressions and rarefactions T-V curves are linear, but the compression curve is shifted to higher temperatures. By separating compressions and rarefactions prior to determining the radial profiles of the solar wind parameters, the importance of dynamic interactions on the radial evolution of the solar wind parameters is revealed. Although the T-V relationship at 1 AU is often well described by a single linear curve, we find that the T-V relationship continually evolves with distance. Beyond ˜2.5 AU the differences between the compressions and rarefactions are quite significant and affect the shape of the overall T-V distribution to the point that a simple linear fit no longer describes the distribution well. Since additional heating of the ambient solar wind outside of interaction regions can be associated with Alfvénic fluctuations and the turbulent energy cascade, we also estimate the heating rate

  17. New results on equatorial thermospheric winds and the midnight temperature maximum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Meriwether

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Optical observations of thermospheric winds and temperatures determined with high resolution measurements of Doppler shifts and Doppler widths of the OI 630-nm equatorial nightglow emission have been made with improved accuracy at Arequipa, Peru (16.4° S, 71.4° W with an imaging Fabry-Perot interferometer. An observing procedure previously used at Arecibo Observatory was applied to achieve increased spatial and temporal sampling of the thermospheric wind and temperature with the selection of eight azimuthal directions, equally spaced from 0 to 360°, at a zenith angle of 60°. By assuming the equivalence of longitude and local time, the data obtained using this technique is analyzed to determine the mean neutral wind speeds and mean horizontal gradients of the wind field in the zonal and meridional directions. The new temperature measurements obtained with the improved instrumental accuracy clearly show the midnight temperature maximum (MTM peak with amplitudes of 25 to 200 K in all directions observed for most nights. The horizontal wind field maps calculated from the mean winds and gradients show the MTM peak is always preceded by an equatorward wind surge lasting 1–2 h. The results also show for winter events a meridional wind abatement seen after the MTM peak. On one occasion, near the September equinox, a reversal was observed during the poleward transit of the MTM over Arequipa. Analysis inferring vertical winds from the observed convergence yielded inconsistent results, calling into question the validity of this calculation for the MTM structure at equatorial latitudes during solar minimum. Comparison of the observations with the predictions of the NCAR general circulation model indicates that the model fails to reproduce the observed amplitude by a factor of 5 or more. This is attributed in part to the lack of adequate spatial resolution in the model as the MTM phenomenon takes place within a scale of 300–500 km and ~45 min in

  18. Fatigue life prediction and strength degradation of wind turbine rotor blade composites

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nijssen, R.P.L.

    2006-01-01

    Wind turbine rotor blades are subjected to a large number of highly variable loads, but life predictions are typically based on constant amplitude fatigue behaviour. Therefore, it is important to determine how service life under variable amplitude fatigue can be estimated from constant amplitude

  19. The chemical composition and compression strengths of refractory ceramics, tested for 3 curing temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wan Khairuddin bin Wan Ali

    1994-01-01

    An investigation was carried out to determine and compile the mechanical strength of a refractory ceramic made of ground fire bricks and refractory fire mortar. Three different compositions were studied for the compression strength and it was found that the composition with 50% fire bricks and 50% fire mortar gives the best mechanical strength. With this composition the maximum failure compression stress is 3.2 MPa. and the Young Modulus is 403.5 MPa. The investigation also shows that the curing temperatures and the composition percentages play an important role in determining the strength of the ceramic. The trend obtained from the investigation shows that there is the possibility that an optimum value of composition percentage exist

  20. Influence of Temperature on Workability and Compressive Strength of Ordinary Concrete with High Calcium Fly Ash

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gołaszewski Jacek

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The rheological properties of fresh ordinary concrete are closely affected by temperature and time. The paper presents the study of consistency of fresh concrete mixtures made with Portland cement and cement with calcareous fly ash. Two types of admixtures were used. It was proven that the temperature has a clear effect on workability and compressive strength concrete. Influence on workability can be reduced by selecting the appropriate superplasticizer and cement.

  1. Chemically vapor-deposited tungsten: its high temperature strength and ductility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bryant, W.A.

    1977-01-01

    The high temperature tensile ductility (as measured by total elongation normal to the growth direction) of chemically vapor-deposited tungsten was found to be significantly greater than previously reported. A correlation was found between ductility and void content. However, voids were found to have essentially no effect on the high temperature strength of this material, which is considerably weaker than powder metallurgy tungsten. (Auth.)

  2. Effect of Temperature and Age of Concrete on Strength – Porosity Relation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Zadražil

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available The compressive strengths of unsealed samples of concrete at the age of 180 days and have been measured at temperatures 20 °C, 300 °C, 600 °C and 900 °C. All of tests were performed for cold material. We compared our results with those obtained in [10] for the same type of concrete (age 28, resp. 90 days and measured at temperature ranging from 20 °C to 280 °C. Dependencies of compressive strength and porosity were correlated together and compared for the samples of age 28, 90 and 180 days. Behaviour of concrete of the age 90, resp. 180 days confirms generally accepted hypothesis that with increasing porosity strength of the concrete decreases. It has to be stressed out, howerer, that concrete samples of the age 28 days exhibit totally opposite dependency. 

  3. Evaluation of weldment creep and fatigue strength-reduction factors for elevated-temperature design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Corum, J.M.

    1989-01-01

    New explicit weldment strength criteria in the form of creep and fatigue strength-reduction factors were recently introduced into the American Society of Mechanical Engineers Code Case N-47, which governs the design of elevated-temperature nuclear plants components in the United States. This paper provides some of the background and logic for these factors and their use, and it describes the results of a series of long-term, confirmatory, creep-rupture and fatigue tests of simple welded structures. The structures (welded plates and tubes) were made of 316 stainless steel base metal and 16-8-2 weld filler metal. Overall, the results provide further substantiation of the validity of the strength-reduction factor approach for ensuring adequate life in elevated-temperature nuclear component weldments. 16 refs., 7 figs

  4. Processing and characterization of transformation-toughened ceramics with strength retention to elevated temperatures. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cutler, R.A.; Brinkpeter, C.B.; Vircar, A.V.; Shetty, D.K.

    1994-09-01

    Monolithic and three-layered Al 2 O 3 -- 15 vol % ZrO 2 composites were fabricated by slip casting aqueous slurries. The outer and inner layers of three-layer composites contained unstabilized and partially stabilized ZrO 2 , respectively. Transformation of part of the unstabilized ZrO 2 led to surface compressive stresses in the outer layers. Strain gage, x-ray, indentation crack length, and strength measurements were used to determine the magnitude of residual stresses in the composites. The strength of the three-layer composites (∼1200 MPa) was 500--700 MPa higher than that of the monolithic outer layer composites at room temperature and 350 MPa higher at 750 degree C. The strength differential decreased rapidly above the m → t transformation temperature. Three-layered composites showed excellent damage resistance and improved reliability. Cam follower rollers were fabricated to demonstrate the applicability of this technique for making automotive components

  5. Decadal Patterns of Westerly Winds, Temperatures, Ocean Gyre Circulations and Fish Abundance: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Candace Oviatt

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this review is to describe the global scope of the multidecadal climate oscillations that go back at least, through several hundred years. Literature, historic data, satellite data and global circulation model output have been used to provide evidence for the zonal and meridional jet stream patterns. These patterns were predominantly zonal from the 1970s to 1990s and switched since the 1990s to a meridional wind phase, with weakening jet streams forming Rossby waves in the northern and southern hemispheres. A weakened northern jet stream has allowed northerly winds to flow down over the continents in the northern hemisphere during the winter period, causing some harsh winters and slowing anthropogenic climate warming regionally. Wind oscillations impact ocean gyre circulation affecting upwelling strength and pelagic fish abundance with synchronous behavior in sub Arctic gyres during phases of the oscillation and asynchronous behavior in subtropical gyres between the Atlantic and Pacific oceans.

  6. Yield strength of molybdenum, tantalum and tungsten at high strain rates and very high temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Škoro, G.P.; Bennett, J.R.J.; Edgecock, T.R.; Booth, C.N.

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► New experimental data on the yield strength of molybdenum, tantalum and tungsten. ► High strain rate effects at record high temperatures (up to 2700 K). ► Test of the consistency of the Zerilli–Armstrong model at very high temperatures. - Abstract: Recently reported results of the high strain rate, high temperature measurements of the yield strength of tantalum and tungsten have been analyzed along with new experimental results on the yield strength of molybdenum. Thin wires are subjected to high stress by passing a short, fast, high current pulse through a thin wire; the amplitude of the current governs the stress and the repetition rate of the pulses determines the temperature of the wire. The highest temperatures reached in the experiments were 2100 °C (for molybdenum), 2250 °C (for tantalum) and 2450 °C (for tungsten). The strain-rates in the tests were in the range from 500 to 1500 s −1 . The parameters for the constitutive equation developed by Zerilli and Armstrong have been determined from the experimental data and the results have been compared with the data obtained at lower temperatures. An exceptionally good fit is obtained for the deformation of tungsten.

  7. Thermodynamics for proton binding of phytate in KNO3(aq) at different temperatures and ionic strengths

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bretti, Clemente; De Stefano, Concetta; Lando, Gabriele; Sammartano, Silvio

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: • Protonation data were modeled in a wide range of temperatures and ionic strengths. • Protonation values decrease with increasing ionic strength and temperature. • In KNO 3 proton binding process is slightly exothermic, but less than in NaCl. • The major contribution for the proton association is entropic in nature. • Results are in agreement with previous findings for KCl and NaCl. - Abstract: Potentiometric measurements were performed in KNO 3(aq) , to determine the apparent protonation constants of phytate at different temperatures (278.15 ≤ T (K) ≤ 323.15) and ionic strengths (0.25 ≤ I (mol) dm −3 ≤ 3.0) values. In general, the protonation constants decrease with increasing both temperature and ionic strength. The data reported were critically compared with previous results obtained in KCl and the values are in a good agreement, considering the experimental errors and slight differences between the activity coefficients of the various species in KCl and KNO 3 . Experimental data were then modeled as a function of temperature and ionic strength using, with comparable results, two approaches: the extended Debye–Hückel equation and the specific ion interaction theory (SIT). The single specific ion interaction coefficients, ε, were also determined. The corresponding values are higher than those in Na + media. The protonation constants were also analyzed considering a simplified weak interaction model using an empirical equation that contains an additional term which takes into account the formation of weak complexes. The results obtained for the modeling of the protonation constants are in agreement with the literature findings. Thermodynamic protonation parameters were also obtained at different temperatures and ionic strengths. The proton association process is slightly exothermic and the enthalpic contribution is less negative than that in NaCl solution. As observed in other cases for phytate anion, the major contribution for

  8. Wind measurements with SODAR during strong temperature inversions near the ground

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomas, P.; Vogt, S.

    1989-08-01

    SODAR (Sound Detection and Ranging) equipment has been increasingly used to measure vertical wind profiles with little expenditure in terms of staff, continuously over time and with a good spatial resolution. These informations serve as input variables for atmospheric transport and dispersion models, environmental monitoring of industrial facilities and, generally, for investigating a broad spectrum of meteorological phenomena. The SODAR principle has proved its suitability since long provided that the data recorded with SODAR have served to establish wind statistics valid for extended periods of time. At industrial sites potentially releasing substances prejudicial to health, e.g., chemical plants, nuclear power plants, etc., a SODAR must, moreover, be capable of measuring reliable the wind conditions also during short periods of release. This would, e.g., be important during accidental releases. Especially interesting situations for pollutant dispersion are distinct temperature inversions. It will be examined in this paper whether a SODAR is capable of measuring reliably the wind conditions also during those inversions. The selection of the situations of inversion as well as the direct intercomparison of data supplied by SODAR and conventional wind measuring instruments (anemometer and wind vane) are possible at the 200 m meteorological tower erected at the Karlsruhe Nuclear Research Center. The comparison between SODAR and the meteorological tower has shown that a SODAR is able to measure reliably the wind data also in situations characterized by strong ground-based and elevated inversions, respectively. (orig./KW) [de

  9. Short Circuits of a 10 MW High Temperature Superconducting Wind Turbine Generator

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Song, Xiaowei (Andy); Liu, Dong; Polinder, Henk

    2016-01-01

    Direct drive high temperature superconducting (HTS) wind turbine generators have been proposed to tackle challenges for ever increasing wind turbine ratings. Due to smaller reactances in HTS generators, higher fault currents and larger transient torques could occur if sudden short circuits happen...... at generator terminals. In this paper, a finite element model that couples magnetic fields and the generator’s equivalent circuits is developed to simulate short circuit faults. Afterwards, the model is used to study the transient performance of a 10 MW HTS wind turbine generator under four different short...... that the short circuits pose great challenges to the generator, and careful consideration should be given to protect the generator. The results presented in this paper would be beneficial to the design, operation and protection of an HTS wind turbine generator....

  10. Short Circuits of a 10-MW High-Temperature Superconducting Wind Turbine Generator

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Song, Xiaowei (Andy); Liu, Dong; Polinder, Henk

    2017-01-01

    Direct Drive high-temperature superconducting (HTS) wind turbine generators have been proposed to tackle challenges for ever increasing wind turbine ratings. Due to smaller reactances in HTS generators, higher fault currents and larger transient torques could occur if sudden short circuits take...... place at generator terminals. In this paper, a finite element model that couples magnetic fields and the generator's equivalent circuits is developed to simulate short-circuit faults. Afterward, the model is used to study the transient performance of a 10-MW HTS wind turbine generator under four...... show that the short circuits pose great challenges to the generator, and careful consideration should be given to protect the generator. The findings presented in this paper would be beneficial to the design, operation and protection of an HTS wind turbine generator....

  11. Effect of preliminary plastic deformation on low temperature strength of carbon steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gur'ev, A.V.; Alkhimenkov, T.B.

    1979-01-01

    Considered is the effect of preliminary plastic deformation on the following low-temperature strength (at -196 deg C) of structural carbon steels at the room temperature. The study of regularities of microheterogenetic deformations by alloy structure elements at room and low temperatures shows that the transition on low -temperature loading is built on the base of inheritance of the general mechanism of plastic deformation, which took place at preliminary deformation; in this effect the ''memory'' of metal to the history of loading is shown. It is established that physical strengthening (cold hardening), received by the metal during preliminary loading at the room temperature is put over the strengthening connected only with decrease of test temperature

  12. Temperature Effects on Adhesive Bond Strengths and Modulus for Commonly Used Spacecraft Structural Adhesives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ojeda, Cassandra E.; Oakes, Eric J.; Hill, Jennifer R.; Aldi, Dominic; Forsberg, Gustaf A.

    2011-01-01

    A study was performed to observe how changes in temperature and substrate material affected the strength and modulus of an adhesive bondline. Seven different adhesives commonly used in aerospace bonded structures were tested. Aluminum, titanium and Invar adherends were cleaned and primed, then bonded using the manufacturer's recommendations. Following surface preparation, the coupons were bonded with the adhesives. The single lap shear coupons were then pull tested per ASTM D 1002 Standard Test Method for Apparent Shear Strength of Single- Lap-Joint over a temperature range from -150 deg C up to +150 deg C. The ultimate strength was calculated and the resulting data were converted into B-basis design allowables. Average and Bbasis results were compared. Results obtained using aluminum adherends are reported. The effects of using different adherend materials and temperature were also studied and will be reported in a subsequent paper. Dynamic Mechanical Analysis (DMA) was used to study variations in adhesive modulus with temperature. This work resulted in a highly useful database for comparing adhesive performance over a wide range of temperatures, and has facilitated selection of the appropriate adhesive for spacecraft structure applications.

  13. Search for the sources of the solar wind in the 9.1 cm brightness temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    George, R.G.

    1975-01-01

    The sources of solar wind streams have been the object of intensive research for many years, but the various ideas of where and how streams originate on the sun are still incomplete and contradictory. The present study is an attempt to find the solar wind sources by mathematically approximating the 9.1 cm brightness temperature which would be expected at the foot of spacecraft-measured solar wind streams and by then comparing it with actual radio brightness temperature measurements. Several significant results were found from an analysis of the correlation results. Most plasma emanating from the sun was found to come from high solar latitudes and to deviate significantly from the normally expected east-west path in the low corona. Magnetic channelng causes correlation studies to fail when the sun's magnetic configuration is unstable. The travel time of the plasma from the sun's 9.1 cm emission level to the earth is often more than a month

  14. High temperature creep strength of Advanced Radiation Resistant Oxide Dispersion Strengthened Steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Noh, Sanghoon; Kim, Tae Kyu [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-05-15

    Austenitic stainless steel may be one of the candidates because of good strength and corrosion resistance at the high temperatures, however irradiation swelling well occurred to 120dpa at high temperatures and this leads the decrease of the mechanical properties and dimensional stability. Compared to this, ferritic/martensitic steel is a good solution because of excellent thermal conductivity and good swelling resistance. Unfortunately, the available temperature range of ferritic/martensitic steel is limited up to 650 .deg. C. ODS steel is the most promising structural material because of excellent creep and irradiation resistance by uniformly distributed nano-oxide particles with a high density which is extremely stable at the high temperature in ferritic/martensitic matrix. In this study, high temperature strength of advanced radiation resistance ODS steel was investigated for the core structural material of next generation nuclear systems. ODS martensitic steel was designed to have high homogeneity, productivity and reproducibility. Mechanical alloying, hot isostactic pressing and hot rolling processes were employed to fabricate the ODS steels, and creep rupture test as well as tensile test were examined to investigate the behavior at high temperatures. ODS steels were fabricated by a mechanical alloying and hot consolidation processes. Mechanical properties at high temperatures were investigated. The creep resistance of advanced radiation resistant ODS steels was more superior than those of ferritic/ martensitic steel, austenitic stainless steel and even a conventional ODS steel.

  15. Preliminary study of the offshore wind and temperature profiles at the North of the Yucatan Peninsula

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soler-Bientz, Rolando; Watson, Simon; Infield, David; Ricalde-Cab, Lifter

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → This is the first study that reports the properties of the vertical wind resources for the offshore conditions of the North coast of the Yucatan Peninsula. → A significant and detailed analysis of the thermal patterns has revealed a complex structure of the atmospheric boundary layer close to the shore. → The structure of the diurnal wind patterns was assessed to produce an important reference for the wind resource availability in the study region. → It was identified that the sea breeze blows in directions almost parallel to the shoreline of the North of the Yucatan Peninsula during the majority of the 24 h cycle. → The analysis of the offshore data revealed a persistent non-uniform surface boundary layer developed as result of the advection of a warn air over a cold sea. - Abstract: The stability conditions in the atmospheric boundary layer, the intensity of the wind speeds and consequently the energy potential available in offshore conditions are highly influenced by the distance from the coastline and the differences between the air and sea temperatures. This paper presents a preliminary research undertook to study the offshore wind and temperature vertical profiles at the North-West of the Yucatan Peninsula coast. Ten minute averages were recorded over approximately 2 years from sensors installed at two different heights on a communication tower located at 6.65 km from the coastline. The results have shown that the offshore wind is thermally driven by differential heating of land and sea producing breeze patterns which veer to blow parallel to the coast under the action of the Coriolis force. To investigate further, a dataset of hourly sea surface temperatures derived from GEOS Satellite thermal maps was combined with the onsite measured data to study its effect on the vertical temperature profile. The results suggested largely unstable conditions and the potentially development of a shallow Stable Internal Boundary Layer which occurs

  16. Sporulation of Bremia lactucae affected by temperature, relative humidity, and wind in controlled conditions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Su, H.; Bruggen, van A.H.C.; Subbarao, K.V.; Scherm, H.

    2004-01-01

    The effects of temperature (5 to 25degreesC), relative humidity (81 to 100%), wind speed (0 to 1.0 in s(-1)), and their interactions on sporulation of Bremia lactucae on lettuce cotyledons were investigated in controlled conditions. Sporulation was affected significantly (P <0.0001) by

  17. Granger causality estimate of information flow in temperature fields is consistent with wind direction

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Jajcay, Nikola; Hlinka, Jaroslav; Hartman, David; Paluš, Milan

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 16, - (2014), EGU2014-12768 ISSN 1607-7962. [EGU General Assembly /11./. 27.04.2014-02.05.2014, Vienna] Institutional support: RVO:67985807 Keywords : Granger causality * climate * information flow * surface air temperature * wind Subject RIV: BB - Applied Statistics, Operational Research

  18. The electron temperature and anisotropy in the solar wind. Comparison of the core and halo populations

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Pierrard, V.; Lazar, M.; Poedts, S.; Štverák, Štěpán; Maksimovic, M.; Trávníček, Pavel M.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 291, č. 7 (2016), s. 2165-2179 ISSN 0038-0938 Institutional support: RVO:68378289 Keywords : solar wind * electron velocity distributions * temperature anisotropy Subject RIV: BL - Plasma and Gas Discharge Physics Impact factor: 2.682, year: 2016 http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s11207-016-0961-7

  19. The Electron Temperature and Anisotropy in the Solar Wind. Comparison of the Core and Halo Populations

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Pierrard, V.; Lazar, M.; Poedts, S.; Štverák, Štěpán; Maksimovic, M.; Trávníček, Pavel M.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 291, č. 7 (2016), s. 2165-2179 ISSN 0038-0938 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA15-17490S Institutional support: RVO:67985815 Keywords : solar wind * electron velocity distributions * temperature anisotropy Subject RIV: BN - Astronomy, Celestial Mechanics, Astrophysics Impact factor: 2.682, year: 2016

  20. Effect of injection current and temperature on signal strength in a laser diode optical feedback interferometer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al Roumy, Jalal; Perchoux, Julien; Lim, Yah Leng; Taimre, Thomas; Rakić, Aleksandar D; Bosch, Thierry

    2015-01-10

    We present a simple analytical model that describes the injection current and temperature dependence of optical feedback interferometry signal strength for a single-mode laser diode. The model is derived from the Lang and Kobayashi rate equations, and is developed both for signals acquired from the monitoring photodiode (proportional to the variations in optical power) and for those obtained by amplification of the corresponding variations in laser voltage. The model shows that both the photodiode and the voltage signal strengths are dependent on the laser slope efficiency, which itself is a function of the injection current and the temperature. Moreover, the model predicts that the photodiode and voltage signal strengths depend differently on injection current and temperature. This important model prediction was proven experimentally for a near-infrared distributed feedback laser by measuring both types of signals over a wide range of injection currents and temperatures. Therefore, this simple model provides important insight into the radically different biasing strategies required to achieve optimal sensor sensitivity for both interferometric signal acquisition schemes.

  1. High temperature strength and aging behavior of 12%Cr-15%Mn austenitic steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miyahara, Kazuya; Bae, Dong-Su; Sakai, Hidenori; Hosoi, Yuzo

    1993-01-01

    High Mn-Cr austenitic steels are still considered to be an important high temperature structural material from the point of view of reduced radio-activation. The objective of the present study is to make a fundamental research of mechanical properties and microstructure of 12%Cr-15%Mn austenitic steels. Especially the effects of alloying elements of V and Ti on the mechanical properties and microstructure evolution of high Mn-Cr steels were studied. Precipitation behaviors of carbides, nitrides and σ phase are investigated and their remarkable effects on the high temperature strength are found. The addition of V was very effective for strengthening the materials with the precipitation of fine VN. Ti was also found to be beneficial for the improvement of high temperature strength properties. The results of high temperature strengths of the 12Cr-15Mn austenitic steels were compared with those of the other candidate and/or reference materials, for example, JFMS (modified 9Cr-2Mo ferritic stainless steel) and JPCAs (modified 316 austenitic stainless steels). (author)

  2. Effect of elevated temperature on the tensile strength of Napier/glass-epoxy hybrid reinforced composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ridzuan, M. J. M.; Majid, M. S. Abdul; Afendi, M.; Firdaus, A. Z. Ahmad; Azduwin, K.

    2017-11-01

    The effects of elevated temperature on the tensile strength of Napier/glass-epoxy hybrid reinforced composites and its morphology of fractured surfaces are discussed. Napier/glass-epoxy hybrid reinforced composites were fabricated by using vacuum infusion method by arranging Napier fibres in between sheets of woven glass fibres. Napier and glass fibres were laminated with estimated volume ratios were 24 and 6 vol. %, respectively. The epoxy resin was used as matrix estimated to 70 vol. %. Specimens were tested to failure under tension at a cross-head speed of 1 mm/min using Universal Testing Machine (Instron) with a load cell 100 kN at four different temperatures of RT, 40°C, 60°C and 80°C. The morphology of fractured surface of hybrid composites was investigated by field emission scanning electron microscopy. The result shows reduction in tensile strength at elevated temperatures. The increase in the temperature activates the process of diffusion, and generates critical stresses which cause the damage at first-ply or at the centre of the hybrid plate, as a result lower the tensile strength. The observation of FESEM images indicates that the fracture mode is of evolution of localized damage, from fibre/matrix debonding, matric cracking, delamination and fibre breakage.

  3. High-temperature strength of TiC-coated SUS316 stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaneko, K.; Furuya, Y.; Kikuchi, M.

    1992-01-01

    Some ceramics-coated metals are nominated as first-wall material. TiC-coated type 316 stainless steel is expected to be superior to other materials in high-temperature strength and in its endurance properties at heavy irradiation. Delamination between ceramics layer and base-metal is considered to be one of the most important problems when such ceramics-coated metals are used in a temperature field with a gradient such as that of the first wall. In this report, the high-temperature strength of TiC-coated type 316 stainless steel, which should be that of the first wall of the fusion reactor, is investigated experimentally and computationally. A simple and precise thermal-stress testing system is developed. The effects of surface roughness as well as of the thermal stress and the residual stress on the bonding strength are investigated. The experimental and numerical results on the residual-stress distribution are compared with each other to confirm the reliability of the inelastic analysis using the finite-element method (FEM). It is expected that a suitable surface roughness makes the residual stress in the coated film small. The optimum range for the TiC-coating temperature is found using inelastic FEM analysis at the heating conditions used in the experiments. (orig.)

  4. In situ observations of the influence of a large onshore wind farm on near-surface temperature, turbulence intensity and wind speed profiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Craig M.; Barthelmie, R. J.; Pryor, S. C.

    2013-09-01

    Observations of wakes from individual wind turbines and a multi-megawatt wind energy installation in the Midwestern US indicate that directly downstream of a turbine (at a distance of 190 m, or 2.4 rotor diameters (D)), there is a clear impact on wind speed and turbulence intensity (TI) throughout the rotor swept area. However, at a downwind distance of 2.1 km (26 D downstream of the closest wind turbine) the wake of the whole wind farm is not evident. There is no significant reduction of hub-height wind speed or increase in TI especially during daytime. Thus, in high turbulence regimes even very large wind installations may have only a modest impact on downstream flow fields. No impact is observable in daytime vertical potential temperature gradients at downwind distances of >2 km, but at night the presence of the wind farm does significantly decrease the vertical gradients of potential temperature (though the profile remains stably stratified), largely by increasing the temperature at 2 m.

  5. In situ observations of the influence of a large onshore wind farm on near-surface temperature, turbulence intensity and wind speed profiles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, Craig M; Barthelmie, R J; Pryor, S C

    2013-01-01

    Observations of wakes from individual wind turbines and a multi-megawatt wind energy installation in the Midwestern US indicate that directly downstream of a turbine (at a distance of 190 m, or 2.4 rotor diameters (D)), there is a clear impact on wind speed and turbulence intensity (TI) throughout the rotor swept area. However, at a downwind distance of 2.1 km (26 D downstream of the closest wind turbine) the wake of the whole wind farm is not evident. There is no significant reduction of hub-height wind speed or increase in TI especially during daytime. Thus, in high turbulence regimes even very large wind installations may have only a modest impact on downstream flow fields. No impact is observable in daytime vertical potential temperature gradients at downwind distances of >2 km, but at night the presence of the wind farm does significantly decrease the vertical gradients of potential temperature (though the profile remains stably stratified), largely by increasing the temperature at 2 m. (letter)

  6. Four-Point Bending Strength Testing of Pultruded Fiberglass Composite Wind Turbine Blade Sections

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Musial, W.; Bourne, B; Hughes, S; Zuteck, M. D.

    2001-01-01

    The ultimate strength of the PS Enterprises pultruded blade section was experimentally determined under four-point bending at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory. Thirteen 8-foot long full-scale blade segments were individually tested to determine their maximum moment carrying capability. Three airfoil-bending configurations were tested: high- and low-pressure skin buckling, and low pressure skin buckling with foam interior reinforcement. Maximum strain was recorded for each sample on the compressive and tensile surfaces of each test blade. Test data are compared to the results of three analytical buckling prediction methods. Based on deviations from the linear strain versus load curve, data indicate a post-buckling region. High-pressure side buckling occurred sooner than low-pressure side buckling. The buckling analyses were conservative for both configurations, but high-pressure side buckling in particular was substantially under-predicted. Both high- and low-pressure buckling configurations had very similar failure loads. These results suggests that a redundant load path may be providing strength to the section in the post-buckling region, making the onset of panel buckling a poor predictor of ultimate strength for the PS Enterprises pultrusion

  7. The Radial Variation of the Solar Wind Temperature-Speed Relationship

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elliott, H. A.; McComas, D. J.

    2010-12-01

    Generally, the solar wind temperature (T) and speed (V) are well correlated except in Interplanetary Coronal Mass Ejections where this correlation breaks down. We have shown that at 1 AU the speed-temperature relationship is often well represented by a linear fit for a speed range spanning both the slow and fast wind. By examining all of the ACE and OMNI measurements, we found that when coronal holes are large the fast wind can have a different T-V relationship than the slow wind. The best example of this was in 2003 when there was a very large and long-lived outward polarity coronal hole at low latitudes. The long-lived nature of the hole made it possible to clearly distinguish that large holes can have a different T-V relationship. We found it to be rare that holes are large enough and last long enough to have enough data points to clearly demonstrate this effect. In this study we compare the 2003 coronal hole observations from ACE with the Ulysses polar coronal hole measurements. In an even earlier ACE study we found that both the compressions and rarefactions curves are linear, but the compression curve is shifted to higher temperatures. In this presentation we use Helios, Ulysses, and ACE measurements to examine how the T-V relationship varies with distance. The dynamic evolution of the solar wind parameters is revealed when we first separate compressions and rarefactions and then determine the radial profiles of the solar wind parameters. We find that T-V relationship varies with distance and in particular beyond 3 AU the differences between the compressions and rarefactions are quite important and at such distances a simple linear fit does not represent the T-V distribution very well.

  8. Effect of grain size and cold working on high temperature strength of Hastelloy X

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujioka, J.; Murase, H.; Matsuda, S.

    1980-01-01

    Effect of grain size and cold working on creep, creep rupture, low cycle fatigue and tensile strengths of Hastelloy X were studied at temperatures ranging from 800 to 1000 0 C. In order to apply these data to design, the allowable design stresses were estimated by expanding the criteria of ASME Code Case 1592 to such a high temperature range. The allowable design stress increased, on the other hand, the low cycle fatigue life decreased with increasing grain size. Cold working up to a ratio of 5 per cent may not be a serious problem in design, because the allowable design stress and the fatigue life were little affected. The cause of these variations in strength was discussed by examining the initiation and growth of cracks, and the microstructures. (author)

  9. Temperature dependence of deformation vs. strength properties of radiation-crosslinked polyethylene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matusevich, Yu.I.; Krul', L.P.

    1992-01-01

    The authors have studied the deformation vs. strength properties of radiation-crosslinked low-density polyethylene irradiated by γ irradiation up to doses from 5.0 sm-bullet 10 4 to 1.0 sm-bullet 10 6 Gy. The authors present the elongation diagrams taken at temperatures below and above the melting point of the polymer. The authors have obtained the dependences of the breaking stress and the pre-break elongation of the polymer on the irradiation doses and the testing temperature. Based on the kinetic lifetime equation, The authors calculated the values of the activation energy for mechanical fracture and the structure-sensitive coefficient γ. The authors show that in the crystalline state the strength of radiation-crosslinked polyethylene is determined by the chemical interactions along the chain of polymer macromolecules; and in molten polyethylene, by the crosslinks between the macromolecules. 8 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab

  10. Interrelationship betwen material strength and component design under elevated temperature for FBR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakagawa, Y.

    Structural design under elevated temperature for fast breeder reactor plant is very troublesome compared to that of for lower temperature. This difficulty can be mainly discussed from two different stand points. One is design and design code, another is material strength. Components in FBR are operated under creep regime and time dependent creep behaviour should be elevated properly. This means the number and combinations of design code and material strength are significantly large and makes these systems very complicated. Material selection is, in no words, not an easy job. This should be done by not only material development but also component design stand point. With valuable experience of construction and research on FBR, a lot of information on component design and material behaviour is available. And it is a time to choose the ''best material'' from the entire stand points of component construction. (author)

  11. Improved high temperature superconductor materials for wind turbine generators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mozhaev, P.B.; Khoryushin, A.V.; Mozhaeva, J.E.; Bindslev Hansen, J.; Jacobsen, Claus S. (Technical Univ. of Denmark (DTU). Physics Dept., Kgs. Lyngby (Denmark)); Andersen, Niels H.; Grivel, J.-C. (Technical Univ. of Denmark (DTU). Risoe National Lab. for Sustainable Energy, Roskilde (Denmark))

    2011-05-15

    Effects of yttria addition on the structural and electrical properties of the YBCO thin films are studied. The films were deposited on (LaAlO{sub 3}){sub .3}-(Sr{sub 2}AlTaO{sub 8}){sub .7} substrates by pulsed laser ablation from targets with different elemental composition. The contents of elements in the film depend mainly on the yttrium content in the target. An increase of yttrium content leads to formation of a porous film with significant improvement of current-carrying capabilities (critical current density reaches 35 kA/cm2 at 77 K, 5 T, and exceeds 2 MA/cm2 at 50 K, 5 T). The Y-enriched YBCO film remains c-oriented up to 600 nm thickness with no suppression of the critical current density in the film. Yttria decoration of the substrate surface prior to deposition resulted in formation of YBCO films with low strain and high crystal perfection. In contrast to the Y-enriched YBCO films, the films on yttria layers are dense. At temperatures of 77 K and above the YBCO films on yttria-decorated substrates exhibit critical current densities comparable to or better than that of the Y-enriched films. (Author)

  12. Change of notch impact strength depending on radiation dose and test temperature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Bednarik

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The main purpose of this paper has been determine the effect of radiation crosslinking on the notch impact strength of polyamides filled with fiberglass. These properties were examined in dependence on the dosage of the ionizing beta radiation (non-irradiated samples and those irradiated by dosage 66 and 132 kGy were compared and on the test temperature (23–150 °C.

  13. Creep Behavior of High-Strength Concrete Subjected to Elevated Temperatures

    OpenAIRE

    Minho Yoon; Gyuyong Kim; Youngsun Kim; Taegyu Lee; Gyeongcheol Choe; Euichul Hwang; Jeongsoo Nam

    2017-01-01

    Strain is generated in concrete subjected to elevated temperatures owing to the influence of factors such as thermal expansion and design load. Such strains resulting from elevated temperatures and load can significantly influence the stability of a structure during and after a fire. In addition, the lower the water-to-binder (W?B) ratio and the smaller the quantity of aggregates in high-strength concrete, the more likely it is for unstable strain to occur. Hence, in this study, the compressi...

  14. Strength, ductility, and ductile-brittle transition temperature for MFR [magnetic fusion reactor] candidate vanadium alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loomis, B.A.; Lee, R.H.; Smith, D.L.; Peterson, J.R.

    1987-09-01

    The dependence of the yield strength, tensile strength, elongation, and reduction in area on temperature for the V-15Ti-7.5Cr, V-20Ti, V-15Cr-5Ti, V-12Cr-5Ti, V-10Cr-5Ti, and V-3Ti-1Si alloys was determined from tensile tests at temperatures ranging from 25 to 700 0 C. The strength of the alloys increased with an increase of the combined Cr and Ti concentration. The total elongation for the alloys ranged between 20% and 38%. The reduction in area ranged from 30% to 90%. The DBTT, which was determined from the temperature dependence of the reduction in area, was less than 25 0 C for the V-15Ti-7.5Cr, V-20Ti, and V-3Ti-1Si alloys. The DBTT for the V-10Cr-5Ti, V-12Cr-5Ti, and V-15Cr-5Ti alloys was also less than 25 0 C if these alloys were annealed to reduce the hydrogen concentration prior to the tensile test. If these latter alloys were not annealed prior to the tensile test, the DBTT ranged from 40 0 C to 90 0 C and the DBTT increased with an increase of the Cr concentration. A Cr/Ti concentration ratio of 0 to 0.5 in these alloys was found to cause the alloys to be less susceptible to hydrogen embrittlement. 14 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs

  15. Strength, ductility, and ductile-brittle transition temperature for MFR candidate vanadium alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loomis, B.A.; Lee, R.H.; Smith, D.L.

    1988-01-01

    The dependence of the yield strength, tensile strength, elongation, and reduction in area on temperature for the V-15Ti-7.5Cr, V-20Ti, V-15Cr-5Ti, V-12Cr-5Ti, V-10Cr-5Ti, and V-3Ti-1Si alloys was determined from tensile tests at temperatures ranging from 25 to 700 0 C. The strength of the alloys increased with an increase of the combined Cr and Ti concentration. The total elongation for the alloys ranged between 20 and 38%. The reduction in area ranged from 30 to 90%. The DBTT, which was determined from the temperature dependence of the reduction in area, was less than 25 0 C for the V-15Ti-7.5Cr, V-20Ti, and V-3Ti-1Si alloys. The DBTT for the V-10Cr-5Ti, V-12Cr-5Ti, and V-15Cr-5Ti alloys was also less than 25 0 C if these alloys were annealed to reduce the hydrogen concentration prior to the tensile test. If these latter alloys were not annealed prior to the tensile test, the DBTT ranged from 40 to 90 0 C and the DBTT increased with an increase of the Cr concentration. A Cr/Ti concentration ratio of 0-0.5 in these alloys was found to cause the alloys to be less susceptible to hydrogen embrittlement. (orig.)

  16. Design of high-temperature high-strength Al-Ti-V-Zr alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, H.M.

    1990-01-01

    This paper reports that it seems plausible to develop high-strength Al-base alloys useful up to 698K in view of the behavior of nickel base superalloys which resist degradation of mechanical properties to 75 pct of their absolute melting temperature. For high temperature Al alloys, the dispersed hardening phase must not undergo phase transformation to an undesirable phase during long time exposure at the temperature of interest. An additional factor to be considered is the stability of the hardening phase with respect to Ostwald ripening. This coarsening resistance is necessary so that the required strength level can be maintained after the long-time service at high temperatures. The equilibrium crystal structures of Al 3 Ti, Al 3 V and Al 3 Zr are tetragonal D0 22 , D0 22 and D0 23 , respectively. At the temperatures of interest, around 698K, vanadium and titanium are mutually substitutable in the form of Al 3 (Ti, V). Much of titanium and vanadium can be substituted for zirconium in the D0 23 - type Al 3 Zr compound, creating Al 3 (Ti, Zr) and Al 3 (V, Zr), respectively. In particular, it has been reported that fcc L1 2 -structured Al 3 M dispersoids form in the rapidly solidified Al-V-Zr and Al-Ti-Zr systems and both L1 2 and D0 23 -structured Al 3 M phases showed slow coarsening kinetics

  17. Thermal Processing Effects on the Adhesive Strength of PS304 High Temperature Solid Lubricant Coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    DellaCorte, Christopher; Edmonds, Brian J.; Benoy, Patricia A.

    2001-01-01

    In this paper the effects of post deposition heat treatments on the cohesive and adhesive strength properties of PS304, a plasma sprayed nickel-chrome based, high temperature solid lubricant coating deposited on stainless steel, are studied. Plasma spray deposited coating samples were exposed in air at temperatures from 432 to 650 C for up to 500 hr to promote residual stress relief, enhance particle to particle bonding and increase coating to substrate bond strength. Coating pull-off strength was measured using a commercial adhesion tester that utilizes 13 mm diameter aluminum pull studs attached to the coating surface with epoxy. Pull off force was automatically recorded and converted to coating pull off strength. As deposited coating samples were also tested as a baseline. The as-deposited (untreated) samples either delaminated at the coating-substrate interface or failed internally (cohesive failure) at about 17 MPa. Samples heat treated at temperatures above 540 C for 100 hr or at 600 C or above for more than 24 hr exhibited strengths above 31 MPa, nearly a two fold increase. Coating failure occurred inside the body of the coating (cohesive failure) for nearly all of the heat-treated samples and only occasionally at the coating substrate interface (adhesive failure). Metallographic analyses of heat-treated coatings indicate that the Nickel-Chromium binder in the PS304 appears to have segregated into two phases, a high nickel matrix phase and a high chromium precipitated phase. Analysis of the precipitates indicates the presence of silicon, a constituent of a flow enhancing additive in the commercial NiCr powder. The exact nature and structure of the precipitate phase is not known. This microstructural change is believed to be partially responsible for the coating strength increase. Diffusion bonding between particles may also be playing a role. Increasing the heat treatment temperature, exposure time or both accelerate the heat treatment process. Preliminary

  18. Design study of high-temperature superconducting generators for wind power systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maki, N [Technova Inc. 13th Fl. Imperial Hotel Tower, 1-chome, Chiyoda-ku, Tokyo 100-0011 (Japan)], E-mail: naokmaki@technova.co.jp

    2008-02-15

    Design study on high-temperature superconducting machines (HTSM) for wind power systems was carried out using specially developed design program. Outline of the design program was shown and the influence of machine parameters such as pole number, rotor outer diameter and synchronous reactance on the machine performance was clarified. Three kinds of generator structure are considered for wind power systems and the HTSM operated under highly magnetic saturated conditions with conventional rotor and stator has better performance than the other types of HTSM. Furthermore, conceptual structure of 8 MW, 20 pole HTSM adopting salient-pole rotor as in the case of water turbine generators and race-truck shaped HTS field windings like Japanese Maglev was shown.

  19. Design study of high-temperature superconducting generators for wind power systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maki, N

    2008-01-01

    Design study on high-temperature superconducting machines (HTSM) for wind power systems was carried out using specially developed design program. Outline of the design program was shown and the influence of machine parameters such as pole number, rotor outer diameter and synchronous reactance on the machine performance was clarified. Three kinds of generator structure are considered for wind power systems and the HTSM operated under highly magnetic saturated conditions with conventional rotor and stator has better performance than the other types of HTSM. Furthermore, conceptual structure of 8 MW, 20 pole HTSM adopting salient-pole rotor as in the case of water turbine generators and race-truck shaped HTS field windings like Japanese Maglev was shown

  20. The effect of temperature on compressive and tensile strengths of commonly used luting cements: an in vitro study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patil, Suneel G; Sajjan, Mc Suresh; Patil, Rekha

    2015-02-01

    The luting cements must withstand masticatory and parafunctional stresses in the warm and wet oral environment. Mouth temperature and the temperature of the ingested foods may induce thermal variation and plastic deformation within the cements and might affect the strength properties. The objectives of this study were to evaluate the effect of temperature on the compressive and diametral tensile strengths of two polycarboxylate, a conventional glass ionomer and a resin modified glass ionomer luting cements and, to compare the compressive strength and the diametral tensile strength of the selected luting cements at varying temperatures. In this study, standardized specimens were prepared. The temperature of the specimens was regulated prior to testing them using a universal testing machine at a crosshead speed of 1 mm/min. Six specimens each were tested at 23°C, 37°C and 50°C for both the compressive and diametral tensile strengths, for all the luting cements. All the luting cements showed a marginal reduction in their compressive and diametral tensile strengths at raised temperatures. Fuji Plus was strongest in compression, followed by Fuji I > Poly F > Liv Carbo. Fuji Plus had the highest diametral tensile strength values, followed by Poly F = Fuji I = Liv Carbo, at all temperatures. An increase in the temperature caused no significant reduction in the compressive and diametral tensile strengths of the cements evaluated. The compressive strength of the luting cements differed significantly from one another at all temperatures. The diametral tensile strength of resin modified glass ionomers differed considerably from the other cements, whereas there was no significant difference between the other cements, at all the temperatures.

  1. Atmospheric pressure, density, temperature and wind variations between 50 and 200 km

    Science.gov (United States)

    Justus, C. G.; Woodrum, A.

    1972-01-01

    Data on atmospheric pressure, density, temperature and winds between 50 and 200 km were collected from sources including Meteorological Rocket Network data, ROBIN falling sphere data, grenade release and pitot tube data, meteor winds, chemical release winds, satellite data, and others. These data were analyzed by a daily difference method and results on the distribution statistics, magnitude, and spatial structure of the irregular atmospheric variations are presented. Time structures of the irregular variations were determined by the analysis of residuals from harmonic analysis of time series data. The observed height variations of irregular winds and densities are found to be in accord with a theoretical relation between these two quantities. The latitude variations (at 50 - 60 km height) show an increasing trend with latitude. A possible explanation of the unusually large irregular wind magnitudes of the White Sands MRN data is given in terms of mountain wave generation by the Sierra Nevada range about 1000 km west of White Sands. An analytical method is developed which, based on an analogy of the irregular motion field with axisymmetric turbulence, allows measured or model correlation or structure functions to be used to evaluate the effective frequency spectra of scalar and vector quantities of a spacecraft moving at any speed and at any trajectory elevation angle.

  2. PWV, Temperature and Wind Statistics at Sites Suitable For mm and Sub-mm Wavelengths Astronomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otarola, Angel; Travouillon, Tony; De Breuck, Carlos; Radford, Simon; Matsushita, Satoki; Pérez-Beaupuits, Juan P.

    2018-01-01

    Atmospheric water vapor is the main limiting factor of atmospheric transparency in the mm and sub-mm wavelength spectral windows. Thus, dry sites are needed for the installation and successful operation of radio astronomy observatories exploiting those spectral windows. Other parameters that play an important role in the mechanical response of radio telescopes exposed to the environmental conditions are: temperature, and in particular temperature gradients that induce thermal deformation of mechanical structures, as well as wind magnitude that induce pointing jitter affecting this way the required accuracy in the ability to point to a cosmic source during the observations. Temperature and wind are variables of special consideration when planning the installation and operations of large aperture radio telescopes. This work summarizes the statistics of precipitable water vapor (PWV), temperature and wind monitored at sites by the costal mountain range, as well as on t he west slope of the Andes mountain range in the region of Antofagasta, Chile. This information could prove useful for the planning of the Atacama Large-Aperture Submm/mm Telescope (AtLast).

  3. Temperature and pinning strength dependence of the critical current of a superconductor with a square periodic array of pinning sites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benkraouda, M.; Obaidat, I.M.; Al Khawaja, U.

    2006-01-01

    We have conducted extensive series of molecular dynamic simulations on driven vortex lattices interacting with periodic square arrays of pinning sites. In solving the over damped equation of vortex motion we took into account the vortex-vortex repulsion interaction, the attractive vortex-pinning interaction, and the driving Lorentz force at several values of temperature. We have studied the effect of varying the driving Lorentz force and varying the pinning strength on the critical current for several pinning densities, and temperature values. We have found that the pinning strength play an important role in enhancing the critical current over the whole temperature range. At low temperatures, the critical current was found to increase linearly with increasing the pinning strengths for all pinning densities. As the temperature increases, the effect of small pinning strengths diminishes and becomes insignificant at high temperatures

  4. Coordinated observations of postmidnight irregularities and thermospheric neutral winds and temperatures at low latitudes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dao, Tam; Otsuka, Yuichi; Shiokawa, Kazuo; Nishioka, Michi; Yamamoto, Mamoru; Buhari, Suhaila M.; Abdullah, Mardina; Husin, Asnawi

    2017-07-01

    We investigated a postmidnight field-aligned irregularity (FAI) event observed with the Equatorial Atmosphere Radar at Kototabang (0.2°S, 100.3°E, dip latitude 10.4°S) in Indonesia on the night of 9 July 2010 using a comprehensive data set of both neutral and plasma parameters. We examined the rate of total electron content change index (ROTI) obtained from GPS receivers in Southeast Asia, airglow images detected by an all-sky imager, and thermospheric neutral winds and temperatures obtained by a Fabry-Perot interferometer at Kototabang. Altitudes of the F layer (h'F) observed by ionosondes at Kototabang, Chiang Mai, and Chumphon were also surveyed. We found that the postmidnight FAIs occurred within plasma bubbles and coincided with kilometer-scale plasma density irregularities. We also observed an enhancement of the magnetically equatorward thermospheric neutral wind at the same time as the increase of h'F at low-latitude stations, but h'F at a station near the magnetic equator remained invariant. Simultaneously, a magnetically equatorward gradient of thermospheric temperature was identified at Kototabang. The convergence of equatorward neutral winds from the Northern and Southern Hemispheres could be associated with a midnight temperature maximum occurring around the magnetic equator. Equatorward neutral winds can uplift the F layer at low latitudes and increase the growth rate of Rayleigh-Taylor instabilities, causing more rapid extension of plasma bubbles. The equatorward winds in both hemispheres also intensify the eastward Pedersen current, so a large polarization electric field generated in the plasma bubble might play an important role in the generation of postmidnight FAIs.

  5. Bootstrap calculation of ultimate strength temperature maxima for neutron irradiated ferritic/martensitic steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obraztsov, S. M.; Konobeev, Yu. V.; Birzhevoy, G. A.; Rachkov, V. I.

    2006-12-01

    The dependence of mechanical properties of ferritic/martensitic (F/M) steels on irradiation temperature is of interest because these steels are used as structural materials for fast, fusion reactors and accelerator driven systems. Experimental data demonstrating temperature peaks in physical and mechanical properties of neutron irradiated pure iron, nickel, vanadium, and austenitic stainless steels are available in the literature. A lack of such an information for F/M steels forces one to apply a computational mathematical-statistical modeling methods. The bootstrap procedure is one of such methods that allows us to obtain the necessary statistical characteristics using only a sample of limited size. In the present work this procedure is used for modeling the frequency distribution histograms of ultimate strength temperature peaks in pure iron and Russian F/M steels EP-450 and EP-823. Results of fitting the sums of Lorentz or Gauss functions to the calculated distributions are presented. It is concluded that there are two temperature (at 360 and 390 °C) peaks of the ultimate strength in EP-450 steel and single peak at 390 °C in EP-823.

  6. Processing and characterization of transformation-toughened ceramics with strength retention to elevated temperatures. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cutler, R.A.; Brinkpeter, C.B. [Ceramatec, Inc., Salt Lake City, UT (United States); Vircar, A.V.; Shetty, D.K. [Univ. of Utah (United States)

    1994-09-01

    Monolithic and three-layered Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} -- 15 vol % ZrO{sub 2} composites were fabricated by slip casting aqueous slurries. The outer and inner layers of three-layer composites contained unstabilized and partially stabilized ZrO{sub 2}, respectively. Transformation of part of the unstabilized ZrO{sub 2} led to surface compressive stresses in the outer layers. Strain gage, x-ray, indentation crack length, and strength measurements were used to determine the magnitude of residual stresses in the composites. The strength of the three-layer composites ({approx}1200 MPa) was 500--700 MPa higher than that of the monolithic outer layer composites at room temperature and 350 MPa higher at 750{degree}C. The strength differential decreased rapidly above the m {yields} t transformation temperature. Three-layered composites showed excellent damage resistance and improved reliability. Cam follower rollers were fabricated to demonstrate the applicability of this technique for making automotive components.

  7. Interaction of radionickel with diatomite as a function of pH, ionic strength and temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xue Wang

    2013-01-01

    Sequestration of Ni(II) on diatomite as a function of reaction time, pH, ionic strength, foreign ions and temperature were investigated by batch sorption technique. The results indicated that the sorption of Ni(II) on diatomite was quickly in the first contact time of 2 h and then slowly with increasing contact time. The interaction of Ni(II) with diatomite was strongly pH- and ionic strength-dependent at low pH values (i.e., which was dominated by ion exchange or outer-sphere surface complexation), while the pH-dependent and ionic strength-independent sorption at high pH suggested that inner-sphere or multinuclear surface complexation was the main sorption mechanism. With increasing temperature, the sorption of Ni(II) on diatomite increased and the experimental data were well fitted by Langmuir model. The sorption samples at pH 6.8 and 10.0 were also characterized by XPS spectroscopy, and the results suggested that Si atoms also participated in Ni(II) sorption on diatomite. The results are important to evaluate the physicochemical behavior of Ni(II) and other similar radionuclides and heavy metal ions in the environment. (author)

  8. Effects of temperature and sliding rate on frictional strength of granite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lockner, D.A.; Summers, R.; Byerlee, J.D.

    1986-01-01

    Layers of artificial granite gouge have been deformed on saw-cut granite surfaces inclined 30?? to the sample axes. Samples were deformed at a constant confining pressure of 250 MPa and temperatures of 22 to 845??C. The velocity dependence of the steady-state coefficient of friction (??ss) was determined by comparing sliding strengths at different sliding rates. The results of these measurements are consistent with those reported by Solberg and Byerlee (1984) at room temperature and Stesky (1975) between 300 and 400??C. Stesky found that the slip-rate dependence of (??ss) increased above 400??C. In the present study, however, the velocity dependence of (??ss) was nearly independent of temperature. ?? 1986 Birkha??user Verlag.

  9. Low temperature processing of tungsten-fibre high-strength composite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Semrau, W.M.

    2001-01-01

    A tungsten nickel/iron compound with a high tungsten content up to over 90 percent by volume of tungsten and an ideal distribution of the nickel-iron multilayer-matrix avoiding tungsten - tungsten interfaces, has been processed without the use of any sintering process and thus resulted in avoiding temperatures of above 700 o C during the entire manufacturing process. An electrochemical coating of coarse tungsten powder with alternating layers of nickel and iron and a forging process at temperatures not exceeding 650 o C resulted in a high strength compound, which easily could be altered into a tungsten fiber compound with a fiber-length to fiber-diameter ratio of more than 10 3 . From the viewpoint of the metallurgist, easier handling systems are obtained when both a liquid phase and high temperatures with their risks for grain structures and grain boundaries are lacking. (author)

  10. The Composition and Temperature Effects on the Ultra High Strength Stainless Steel Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, W.; Del Castillo, P. E. J. Rivera Díaz; van der Zwaag, S.

    Alloy composition and heat treatment are of paramount importance to determining alloy properties. Their control is of great importance for new alloy design and industrial fabrication control. A base alloy utilizing MX carbide is designed through a theory guided computational approach coupling a genetic algorithm with optimization criteria based on thermodynamic, kinetic and mechanical principles. The combined effects of 11 alloying elements (Al, C, Co, Cr, Cu, Mo, Nb, Ni, Si, Ti and V) are investigated in terms of the composition optimization criteria: the martensite start (Ms) temperature, the suppression of undesirable phases, the Cr concentration in the matrix and the potency of the precipitation strengthening contribution. The results show the concentration sensitivities of each component and also point out new potential composition domains for further strength increase. The aging temperature effect is studied and the aging temperature industrially followed is recovered.

  11. Temperature-dependent residual shear strength characteristics of smectite-rich landslide soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shibasaki, Tatsuya; Matsuura, Sumio; Okamoto, Takashi

    2015-04-01

    On gentle clayey slopes in weathered argillaceous rock areas, there exist many landslides which repeatedly reactivate with slow movement. The slip surface soils of these landslides are sometimes composed dominantly of swelling clay mineral (smectite) which is well known to show extremely low residual friction angle. From field data monitored at landslide sites in Japan, it has become clear that some landslides with relatively shallow slip surface begin to move and become active in late autumn or early winter every year. In such cases, the triggering mechanisms of landslides have not been understood well enough, because landslide initiation and movement are not always clearly linked with rises in pore water pressures (ground water levels). In this study, we focus on the influence of seasonal variation in ground temperature on slope stability and have investigated the effect of temperature on the shear strength of slip surface soils. Undisturbed soil samples were collected by boring from the Busuno landslide in Japan. We performed box shear experiments on undisturbed slip surface soils at low temperature ranges (approximately 5-25 °C). XRD analysis revealed that these soils contain high fraction of smectite. Slickensided slip surface within test specimen was coincided with the shearing plane of the shear box and shear displacement was applied precisely along the localized slip surface. Experiments were performed under slow shearing rate condition (0.005mm/min) and the results showed that shear strength decreased with decreasing temperature. Temperature effect was rather significant on frictional angle than on cohesion. Ring shear experiments were also performed on normally-consolidated remoulded samples. Under residual strength condition, temperature-change experiments (cooling-event tests) ranging approximately from 5 to 25 °C were performed on smectite-rich landslide soils and commercial bentonites. As well as the results by box shear test, shear weakening

  12. Effects of consolidation temperature, strength and microstructure on fracture toughness of nanostructured ferritic alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miao, P.; Odette, G.R.; Yamamoto, T.; Alinger, M.; Hoelzer, D.; Gragg, D.

    2007-01-01

    Fully consolidated nanostructured ferritic alloys (NFAs) were prepared by attritor milling pre-alloyed Fe-14Cr-3W-0.4Ti and 0.3 wt% Y 2 O 3 powders, followed by hot isostatic pressing (HIPing) at 1000 o C or 1150 o C at 200 MPa for 4 h. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) revealed similar bimodal distributions of fine and coarse ferrite grains in both cases. However, as expected, the alloy microhardness decreased with increasing in HIPing temperature. Three point bend tests on single edge notched specimens, with a nominal root radius ρ = 0.15 mm, were used to measure the notch fracture toughness, K ρ , as a function of test temperature. The K ρ curves were found to be similar for both processing conditions. It appears that the coarser ferrite grains control cleavage fracture, in a way that is independent of alloy strength and HIPing temperature

  13. Analysis of Temperature and Wind Measurements from the TIMED Mission: Comparison with UARS Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Frank; Mayr, Hans; Killeen, Tim; Russell, Jim; Reber, Skip

    2004-01-01

    We report on an analysis of temperature and wind data based respectively on measurements with the SABER (Sounding of the Atmosphere using Broadband Emission Radiometry) and TIDI (TIMED Doppler Interferometer) instruments on the TIMED (Thermosphere-Ionosphere-Mesosphere-Energetics and Dynamics) mission. Comparisons are made with corresponding results obtained from the HRDI (High Resolution Doppler Imager), MLS (Microwave Limb Sounder) and CLAES (Cryogenic Limb Array Etalon Spectrometer) instruments on the UARS (Upper Atmosphere Research Satellite) spacecraft. The TIMED and UARS instruments have important common and uncommon properties in their sampling of the data as a function local solar time. For comparison between the data from the two satellite missions, we present the derived diurnal tidal and zonal-mean variations of temperature and winds, obtained as functions of season, latitude, and altitude. The observations are also compared with results from the Numerical Spectral Model (NSM).

  14. Quantifying the effects of LUCCs on local temperatures, precipitation, and wind using the WRF model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lian, Lishu; Li, Baofu; Chen, Yaning; Chu, Cuicui; Qin, Yanhua

    2017-09-11

    Land use/cover changes (LUCCs) are an important cause of regional climate changes, but the contribution of LUCCs to regional climate changes is not clear. In this study, the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model and statistical methods were used to investigate changes in meteorologic variables in January, April, July, and October 2013 due to local LUCCs from 1990 to 2010 in southern Shandong province, China. The results indicate that the WRF model simulates temperatures in the region well, with high correlation coefficients (0.86-0.97, p wind speed and direction substantially during these four months: average wind speeds increased by 0.02 and 0.01 m/s in January and October, respectively, and decreased by 0.02 and 0.05 m/s in April and July, respectively. Overall, The LUCCs affected spring temperatures the least and summer precipitation the most.

  15. Prediction of windings temperature rise in induction motors supplied with distorted voltage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gnacinski, P. [Gdynia Maritime University, Department of Ship Electrical Power Engineering, Morska Street 83, 81-225 Gdynia (Poland)

    2008-04-15

    One of the features of ship power systems is a different level and intensity of disturbances appearing during routine operation - the rms voltage value and frequency deviation, voltage unbalance and waveform voltage distortion. As a result, marine induction machines are exposed to overheating due to the lowered voltage quality. This paper is devoted to windings temperature rise prediction in marine induction cage machines supplied with distorted voltage, which means real voltage conditions. The proposed method of prediction does not require detailed knowledge of the thermal properties of a machine. Although the method was developed for marine induction motors, it is applicable for industry machines supplied with distorted voltage. It can also be generalized and used for estimation of the steady state windings temperature rise of any electrical machinery in various work conditions. (author)

  16. Prediction of windings temperature rise in induction motors supplied with distorted voltage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gnacinski, P.

    2008-01-01

    One of the features of ship power systems is a different level and intensity of disturbances appearing during routine operation - the rms voltage value and frequency deviation, voltage unbalance and waveform voltage distortion. As a result, marine induction machines are exposed to overheating due to the lowered voltage quality. This paper is devoted to windings temperature rise prediction in marine induction cage machines supplied with distorted voltage, which means real voltage conditions. The proposed method of prediction does not require detailed knowledge of the thermal properties of a machine. Although the method was developed for marine induction motors, it is applicable for industry machines supplied with distorted voltage. It can also be generalized and used for estimation of the steady state windings temperature rise of any electrical machinery in various work conditions

  17. Winding transitions at finite energy and temperature: An O(3) model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Habib, S.; Mottola, E.; Tinyakov, P.

    1996-01-01

    Winding number transitions in the two-dimensional softly broken O(3) nonlinear σ model are studied at finite energy and temperature. New periodic instanton solutions which dominate the semiclassical transition amplitudes are found analytically at low energies, and numerically for all energies up to the sphaleron scale. The Euclidean period β of these finite energy instantons increases with energy, contrary to the behavior found in the Abelian Higgs model or simple one-dimensional systems. This results in a sharp crossover from instanton-dominated tunneling to sphaleron-dominated thermal activation at a certain critical temperature. Since this behavior is traceable to the soft breaking of conformal invariance by the mass term in the σ model, semiclassical winding number transition amplitudes in the electroweak theory in 3+1 dimensions should exhibit a similar sharp crossover. We argue that this is indeed the case in the standard model for M H W . copyright 1996 The American Physical Society

  18. Influence of Wind Strength and Duration on Relative Hypoxia Reductions by Opposite Wind Directions in an Estuary with an Asymmetric Channel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ping Wang

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Computer model experiments are applied to analyze hypoxia reductions for opposing wind directions under various speeds and durations in the north–south oriented, two-layer-circulated Chesapeake estuary. Wind’s role in destratification is the main mechanism in short-term reduction of hypoxia. Hypoxia can also be reduced by wind-enhanced estuarine circulation associated with winds that have down-estuary straining components that promote bottom-returned oxygen-rich seawater intrusion. The up-bay-ward along-channel component of straining by the southerly or easterly wind induces greater destratification than the down-bay-ward straining by the opposite wind direction, i.e., northerly or westerly winds. While under the modulation of the west-skewed asymmetric cross-channel bathymetry in the Bay’s hypoxic zone, the westward cross-channel straining by easterly or northerly winds causes greater destratification than its opposite wind direction. The wind-induced cross-channel circulation can be completed much more rapidly than the wind-induced along-channel circulation, and the former is usually more effective than the latter in destratification and hypoxia reduction in an early wind period. The relative importance of cross-channel versus along-channel circulation for a particular wind direction can change with wind speed and duration. The existence of month-long prevailing unidirectional winds in the Chesapeake is explored, and the relative hypoxia reductions among different prevailing directions are analyzed. Scenarios of wind with intermittent calm or reversing directions on an hourly scale are also simulated and compared.

  19. Bending Strength of EN AC-44200 – Al2O3 Composites at Elevated Temperatures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kurzawa A.

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents results of bend tests at elevated temperatures of aluminium alloy EN AC-44200 (AlSi12 based composite materials reinforced with aluminium oxide particles. The examined materials were manufactured by squeeze casting. Preforms made of Al2O3 particles, with volumetric fraction 10, 20, 30 and 40 vol.% of particles joined with sodium silicate bridges were used as reinforcement. The preforms were characterised by open porosity ensuring proper infiltration with the EN AC-44200 (AlSi12 liquid alloy. The largest bending strength was found for the materials containing 40 vol.% of reinforcing ceramic particles, tested at ambient temperature. At increased test temperature, bending strength Rg of composites decreased in average by 30 to 50 MPa per 100°C of temperature increase. Temperature increase did not significantly affect cracking of the materials. Cracks propagated mainly along the interfaces particle/matrix, with no effect of the particles falling-out from fracture surfaces. Direction of cracking can be affected by a small number of agglomerations of particles or of non-reacted binder. In the composites, the particles strongly restrict plastic deformation of the alloy, which leads to creation of brittle fractures. At elevated temperatures, however mainly at 200 and 300°C, larger numbers of broken, fragmented particles was observed in the vicinity of cracks. Fragmentation of particles occurred mainly at tensioned side of the bended specimens, in the materials with smaller fraction of Al2O3 reinforcement, i.e. 10 and 20 vol.%.

  20. Experimental Analysis of Concrete Strength at High Temperatures and after Cooling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Klingsch

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, the cement industry has been criticized for emitting large amounts of carbon dioxide; hence it is developing environment-friendly cement, e.g., blended, supersulfated slag cement (SSC. This paper presents an experimental analysis of the compressive strength development of concrete made from blended cement in comparison to ordinary cement at high temperature. Three different types of cement were used during these tests, an ordinary portland cement (CEM I, a portland limestone cement (CEM II-A-LL and a new, supersulfated slag cement (SSC. The compressive strength development for a full thermal cycle, including cooling down phase, was investigated on concrete cylinders. It is shown that the SSC concrete specimens perform similar to ordinary cement specimens. 

  1. Influence of Fly Ash on the Compressive Strength of Foamed Concrete at Elevated Temperature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmad H.

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Foamed concrete is a lightweight concrete that is widely used in the construction industry recently. This study was carried out to investigate the influence of fly ash as a cement replacement material to the residual compressive strength of foamed concrete subjected to elevated temperature. For this study, the foamed concrete density was fixed at 1300 kg/m3 and the sand-cement ratio and water-cement was set at 1:2 and 0.45, respectively. The samples were prepared and tested at the age of 28 days. Based on the results, it has been found that with 25% inclusion of fly ash, the percentage of compressive strength loss was decreased by 3 – 50%.

  2. Effect of unbalanced voltage on windings temperature, operational life and load carrying capacity of induction machine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gnacinski, P. [Gdynia Maritime University, Department of Ship Electrical Power Engineering, Morska Street 83, 81-225 Gdynia (Poland)

    2008-04-15

    This paper investigates the influence of the CVUF angle on the windings temperature rise and the derating factor of an induction machine supplied with unbalanced voltage. The effect of simultaneous voltage unbalance and harmonics on its operational life is analyzed as well. The results of calculations and experimental investigations are presented for two induction cage machines of rated power 3 and 5.5 kW. (author)

  3. High Resolution Mapping of Wind Speed Using Active Distributed Temperature Sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sayde, C.; Thomas, C. K.; Wagner, J.; Selker, J. S.

    2013-12-01

    We present a novel approach to continuously measure wind speed simultaneously at thousands of locations using actively heated fiber optics with a distributed temperature sensing system (DTS). Analogous to a hot-wire anemometer, this approach is based on the principal of velocity-dependent heat transfer from a heated surface: The temperature difference between the heated surface and ambient air is a function of the convective cooling of the air flowing past the surface. By knowing the thermal properties of the heated surface, the heating input, and ambient temperature, wind speed can be calculated. In our case, the heated surface consists of a thin stainless steel tube that can exceed several km in length. A fiber optic is enclosed within the stainless steel tube to report the heated tube temperature, which in this case was sampled every 0.125 m. Ambient temperature were measured by an independent fiber optic cable located proximally to the stainless steel tube. We will present the theoretical bases of measuring wind speed using heated fiber optic as well as validation of this method in the field. In the field testing, more than 5000 simultaneous wind speed measurements were obtained every 5.5 second at 3 elevations (2m, 1m, and 0.5 m) every 0.125 m along a 230 m transects located across a shallow gulley in Nunn, CO. This method, which provides both air temperature and wind speed spanning four orders of magnitude in spatial scale (0.1 - 1,000m) opens up many important opportunities for testing basic theories in micro-meteorology regarding spatial scales of turbulent length scales as a function of distance from the earth, development of internal boundary layers, applicability of Taylors hypothesis, etc. The equipment employed, including the heating system, which is available to all US scientists, was provided by CTEMPs.org thanks to the generous grant support from the National Science Foundation under Grant Number 1129003. Any opinions, findings, and conclusions or

  4. Wind and Temperature Spectrometry of the Upper Atmosphere in Low-Earth Orbit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrero, Federico

    2011-01-01

    Wind and Temperature Spectrometry (WATS) is a new approach to measure the full wind vector, temperature, and relative densities of major neutral species in the Earth's thermosphere. The method uses an energy-angle spectrometer moving through the tenuous upper atmosphere to measure directly the angular and energy distributions of the air stream that enters the spectrometer. The angular distribution gives the direction of the total velocity of the air entering the spectrometer, and the energy distribution gives the magnitude of the total velocity. The wind velocity vector is uniquely determined since the measured total velocity depends on the wind vector and the orbiting velocity vector. The orbiting spectrometer moves supersonically, Mach 8 or greater, through the air and must point within a few degrees of its orbital velocity vector (the ram direction). Pointing knowledge is critical; for example, pointing errors 0.1 lead to errors of about 10 m/s in the wind. The WATS method may also be applied without modification to measure the ion-drift vector, ion temperature, and relative ion densities of major ionic species in the ionosphere. In such an application it may be called IDTS: Ion-Drift Temperature Spectrometry. A spectrometer-based coordinate system with one axis instantaneously pointing along the ram direction makes it possible to transform the Maxwellian velocity distribution of the air molecules to a Maxwellian energy-angle distribution for the molecular flux entering the spectrometer. This implementation of WATS is called the gas kinetic method (GKM) because it is applied to the case of the Maxwellian distribution. The WATS method follows from the recognition that in a supersonic platform moving at 8,000 m/s, the measurement of small wind velocities in the air on the order of a few 100 m/s and less requires precise knowledge of the angle of incidence of the neutral atoms and molecules. The same is true for the case of ion-drift measurements. WATS also

  5. Effect of ion irradiation on tensile ductility, strength and fictive temperature in metallic glass nanowires

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Magagnosc, D.J.; Kumar, G.; Schroers, J.; Felfer, P.; Cairney, J.M.; Gianola, D.S.

    2014-01-01

    Ion irradiation of thermoplastically molded Pt 57.5 Cu 14.3 Ni 5.7 P 22.5 metallic glass nanowires is used to study the relationship between glass structure and tensile behavior across a wide range of structural states. Starting with the as-molded state of the glass, ion fluence and irradiated volume fraction are systematically varied to rejuvenate the glass, and the resulting plastic behavior of the metallic glass nanowires probed by in situ mechanical testing in a scanning electron microscope. Whereas the as-molded nanowires exhibit high strength, brittle-like fracture and negligible inelastic deformation, ion-irradiated nanowires show tensile ductility and quasi-homogeneous plastic deformation. Signatures of changes to the glass structure owing to ion irradiation as obtained from electron diffraction are subtle, despite relatively large yield strength reductions of hundreds of megapascals relative to the as-molded condition. To reconcile changes in mechanical behavior with glass properties, we adapt previous models equating the released strain energy during shear banding to a transit through the glass transition temperature by incorporating the excess enthalpy associated with distinct structural states. Our model suggests that ion irradiation increases the fictive temperature of our glass by tens of degrees – the equivalent of many orders of magnitude change in cooling rate. We further show our analytical description of yield strength to quantitatively describe literature results showing a correlation between severe plastic deformation and hardness in a single glass system. Our results highlight not only the capacity for room temperature ductile plastic flow in nanoscaled metallic glasses, but also processing strategies capable of glass rejuvenation outside of the realm of traditional thermal treatments

  6. Strength and Anisotropy in Tournemire Shale: Temperature, Pressure and Time Dependences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonnelye, A.; Schubnel, A.; Zhi, G.; David, C.; Dick, P.

    2017-12-01

    Time and temperature dependent rock deformation has both scientific and socio-economic implications for natural hazards, the oil and gas industry and nuclear waste disposal. During the past decades, most studies on brittle creep have focused on igneous rocks and porous sedimentary rocks. To our knowledge, only few studies have been carried out on the brittle creep behavior of shale. We conducted a series of creep experiments on shale specimens coming from the French Institute for Nuclear Safety (IRSN) underground research laboratory located in Tournemire, France, under two different temperatures (26°C, 75°C) and confining pressures (10 MPa, 80 MPa), for three orientations (σ1along, perpendicular and 45° to bedding). In these long-term experiments (approximately 10 days), stress and strains were recorded continuously, while ultrasonic acoustic velocities were recorded every 1 15 minutes. The brittle creep failure stress of our Tournemire shale samples was systematically observed 50% higher than its short-term peak strength, with larger final axial strain accumulated. During creep, ultrasonic wave velocities first decreased, and then increased gradually. The magnitude of elastic wave velocity variations showed an important orientation and temperature dependence: velocities measured perpendicular to bedding showed increased variation, variation that was enhanced at higher temperature and higher pressure. The case of complete elastic anisotropy reversal was observed for sample deformed perpendicular to bedding, with amount of axial strain needed to reach anisotropy reversal reduced at higher temperature. SEM observations highlight the competition between crack growth, sealing/healing, and possibly mineral rotation, pressure solution or anisotropic compaction during creep defromation. Our study highlights that the short-term peak strength has little meaning in shale material, which can over-consolidate importantly by `plastic' flow. In addition, we show that elastic

  7. Temperature dependence of the fracture toughness and the cleavage fracture strength of a pressure vessel steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kotilainen, H.

    1980-01-01

    A new model for the temperature dependence of the fracture toughness has been sought. It is based on the yielding processes at the crack tip, which are thought to be competitive with fracture. Using this method a good correlation between measured and calculated values of fracture toughness has been found for a Cr-Mo-V pressure vessel steel as well as for A533B. It has been thought that the application of this method can reduce the number of surveillance specimens in nuclear reactors. A method for the determination of the cleavage fracture strength has been proposed. 28 refs

  8. Strength and Density of Geopolymer Mortar Cured at Ambient Temperature for Use as Repair Material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warid Wazien, A. Z.; Bakri Abdullah, Mohd Mustafa Al; Abd. Razak, Rafiza; Mohd Remy Rozainy, M. A. Z.; Faheem Mohd Tahir, Muhammad

    2016-06-01

    Geopolymers produced by synthesizing aluminosilicate source materials with an alkaline activator solution promised an excellent properties akin to the existing construction material. This study focused on the effect of various binder to sand ratio on geopolymer mortar properties. Mix design of geopolymer mortar was produced using NaOH concentration of 12 molars, ratio of fly ash/alkaline activator and ratio Na2SiO3/NaOH of 2.0 and 2.5 respectively. Samples subsequently ware cured at ambient temperature. The properties of geopolymer mortar were analysed in term of compressive strength and density at different period which are on the 3rd and 7th day of curing. Experimental results revealed that the addition of sand slightly increase the compressive strength of geopolymer. The optimum compressive strength obtained was up to 31.39 MPa on the 7th day. The density of geopolymer mortar was in the range between 2.0 g/cm3 to 2.23 g/cm3. Based on this findings, the special properties promoted by geopolymer mortar display high potential to be implemented in the field of concrete patch repair.

  9. Creep strength of hastelloy X TIG-welded cylinder under internal pressure at elevated temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Udoguchi, Teruyoshi; Indo, Hirosato; Isomura, Kazuyuki; Kobatake, Kiyokazu; Nakanishi, Tsuneo.

    1981-01-01

    Creep tests on circumferentially TIG-welded Hastelloy x cylinders were carried out under internal pressure for the investigation of structural behavior of welded components in high temperature environment. The creep rupture strength of TIG-welded cylinders was much lower than that of non-welded cylinders, while such reduction was not found in uniaxial creep tests on TIG-welded bars. It was deduced that the reduction was due to the low ductility (ranging from 1 to 5%) of the weld metal to which enhanced creep was induced by the adjacent base metal whose creep strain rate was much higher than that of the weld metal. Therefore, uniaxial creep tests on bar specimens is not sufficient for proper assessment of the creep rupture strength of welded components. Both creep strain rate and creep ductility should be concerned for the assessment. Creep tests by using components such as cylinder under internal pressure are recommendable for the confirmation of creep strength of welded structures and components. (author)

  10. Characterization of membrane foulants at ambient temperature anaerobic membrane bioreactor treating low-strength industrial wastewater

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zarebska, Agata; Kjerstadius, Hamse; Petrinic, Irena

    2016-01-01

    The large volume of industrial low-strength wastewaters has a potential for biogas production through conventional anaerobic digestion (AD), limited though by the need of heating and concentrating of the wastewaters. The use of anaerobic membrane bioreactor (AnMBR) combining membrane filtration...... with anaerobic biological treatment at low temperature could not only reduce the operational cost of AD, but also alleviate environmental problems. However, at low temperature the AnMBR may suffer more fouling due to the increased extracellular polymeric substances production excreted by bacteria hampering...... the application of the process for the industrial wastewater treatment. In order to solve or reduce the fouling problem it is necessary to have a good insight into the processes that take place both on and in the membrane pores during filtration. Therefore, the objective of this study is to contribute to a better...

  11. An analysis of the effects of temperatures and circulations on the strength of the low-level jet in the Turkana Channel in East Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartman, Adam T.

    2018-05-01

    The Turkana Low-Level Jet (LLJ) was discovered in the early 1980s, yet there are still questions about the primary forcing mechanisms that drive and sustain the jet throughout the year. A few studies have addressed these questions, but most focus on numerical simulations of mechanical forcing mechanisms, such as orography, channeling flow, and monsoon background flow. No studies have shown the effects of thermal forcing from differential heating in the regions in and around the Turkana Channel. This paper uses National Centers for Environmental Prediction (NCEP) Climate Forecast System Reanalysis (CFSR) data and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Modern-Era Retrospective Analysis for Research and Applications (MERRA) data in order to analyze and find relationships between temperature gradients and the strength of the Turkana LLJ. In addition to temperature, potential temperature, divergence, wind magnitude, wind fields, and vertical motion are also examined. This analysis attempts to show that thermal forcing is one of the most important factors, if not the primary factor, in the initiation and maintenance of the jet and propose that more research and model simulations should be implemented to determine the contributions from thermal forcing.

  12. Precipitation, temperature and wind in Norway: dynamical downscaling of ERA40

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barstad, I.; Sorteberg, A.; Flatoey, F. [Bjerknes Centre for Climate Research, Bergen (Norway); Deque, M. [Meteo France, EAC/GMGEC/CNRM, Toulouse (France)

    2009-11-15

    A novel downscaling approach of the ERA40 (ECMWF 40-years reanalysis) data set has been taken and results for comparison with observations in Norway are shown. The method applies a nudging technique in a stretched global model, focused in the Norwegian Sea (67 N, 5 W). The effective resolution is three times the one of the ERA40, equivalent to about 30 km grid spacing in the area of focus. Longer waves (winds and precipitation. The comparison to observations incorporate numerous station data points of (1) precipitation (357), (2) temperature (98) and (3) wind (10), and for the period 1961-1990, the downscaled data set shows large improvements over ERA40. The daily precipitation shows considerable reduction in bias (from 50 to 11%), and twofold reduction at the 99.9 percentile (from -59 to -29%). The daily temperature showed a bias reduction of about a degree in most areas, and relative large RMSE reduction (from 7.5 to 5.0 C except winter). The wind comparison showed a slight improvement in bias, and significant improvements in RMSE. (orig.)

  13. Effects of vernal equinox solar eclipse on temperature and wind direction in Switzerland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eugster, Werner; Emmel, Carmen; Wolf, Sebastian; Buchmann, Nina; McFadden, Joseph P.; Whiteman, Charles David

    2017-12-01

    The vernal equinox total solar eclipse of 20 March 2015 produced a maximum occultation of 65.8-70.1 % over Switzerland during the morning hours (09:22 to 11:48 CET). Skies were generally clear over the Swiss Alps due to a persistent high-pressure band between the UK and Russia associated with a rather weak pressure gradient over the continent. To assess the effects of penumbral shading on near-surface meteorology across Switzerland, air temperature data measured at 10 min intervals at 184 MeteoSwiss weather stations were used. Wind speed and direction data were available from 165 of these stations. Additionally, six Swiss FluxNet eddy covariance flux (ECF) sites provided turbulent measurements at 20 Hz resolution. During maximum occultation, the temperature drop was up to 5.8 K at a mountain site where cold air can pool in a topographic depression. The bootstrapped average of the maximum temperature drops of all 184 MeteoSwiss sites during the solar eclipse was 1.51 ± 0.02 K (mean ± SE). A detailed comparison with literature values since 1834 showed a temperature decrease of 2.6 ± 1.7 K (average of all reports), with extreme values up to 11 K. On fair weather days under weak larger-scale pressure gradients, local thermo-topographic wind systems develop that are driven by small-scale pressure and temperature gradients. At one ECF site, the penumbral shading delayed the morning transition from down-valley to up-valley wind conditions. At another site, it prevented this transition from occurring at all. Data from the 165 MeteoSwiss sites measuring wind direction did not show a consistent pattern of wind direction response to the passing of the penumbral shadow. These results suggest that the local topographic setting had an important influence on the temperature drop and the wind flow patterns during the eclipse. A significant cyclonic effect of the passing penumbral shadow was found in the elevation range ≈ 1700-2700 m a. s. l., but not at lower

  14. Effects of vernal equinox solar eclipse on temperature and wind direction in Switzerland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. Eugster

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The vernal equinox total solar eclipse of 20 March 2015 produced a maximum occultation of 65.8–70.1 % over Switzerland during the morning hours (09:22 to 11:48 CET. Skies were generally clear over the Swiss Alps due to a persistent high-pressure band between the UK and Russia associated with a rather weak pressure gradient over the continent. To assess the effects of penumbral shading on near-surface meteorology across Switzerland, air temperature data measured at 10 min intervals at 184 MeteoSwiss weather stations were used. Wind speed and direction data were available from 165 of these stations. Additionally, six Swiss FluxNet eddy covariance flux (ECF sites provided turbulent measurements at 20 Hz resolution. During maximum occultation, the temperature drop was up to 5.8 K at a mountain site where cold air can pool in a topographic depression. The bootstrapped average of the maximum temperature drops of all 184 MeteoSwiss sites during the solar eclipse was 1.51 ± 0.02 K (mean ± SE. A detailed comparison with literature values since 1834 showed a temperature decrease of 2.6 ± 1.7 K (average of all reports, with extreme values up to 11 K. On fair weather days under weak larger-scale pressure gradients, local thermo-topographic wind systems develop that are driven by small-scale pressure and temperature gradients. At one ECF site, the penumbral shading delayed the morning transition from down-valley to up-valley wind conditions. At another site, it prevented this transition from occurring at all. Data from the 165 MeteoSwiss sites measuring wind direction did not show a consistent pattern of wind direction response to the passing of the penumbral shadow. These results suggest that the local topographic setting had an important influence on the temperature drop and the wind flow patterns during the eclipse. A significant cyclonic effect of the passing penumbral shadow was found in the elevation range

  15. Remote sensing of temperature and wind using acoustic travel-time measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barth, Manuela; Fischer, Gabi; Raabe, Armin; Weisse, Frank [Leipzig Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Meteorologie; Ziemann, Astrid [Technische Univ. Dresden (Germany). Professur fuer Meteorologie

    2013-04-15

    A remote sensing technique to detect area-averaged temperature and flow properties within an area under investigation, utilizing acoustic travel-time measurements, is introduced. This technique uses the dependency of the speed of acoustic signals on the meteorological parameters temperature and wind along the propagation path. The method itself is scalable: It is applicable for investigation areas with an extent of some hundred square metres as well as for small-scale areas in the range of one square metre. Moreover, an arrangement of the acoustic transducers at several height levels makes it possible to determine profiles and gradients of the meteorological quantities. With the help of two examples the potential of this remote sensing technique for simultaneously measuring averaged temperature and flow fields is demonstrated. A comparison of time histories of temperature and wind values derived from acoustic travel-time measurements with point measurements shows a qualitative agreement whereas calculated root-mean-square errors differ for the two example applications. They amount to 1.4 K and 0.3 m/s for transducer distances of 60 m and 0.4 K and 0.2 m/s for transducer distances in the range of one metre. (orig.)

  16. Topology Optimization of a High-Temperature Superconducting Field Winding of a Synchronous Machine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pozzi, Matias; Mijatovic, Nenad; Jensen, Bogi Bech

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents topology optimization (TO) of the high-temperature superconductor (HTS) field winding of an HTS synchronous machine. The TO problem is defined in order to find the minimum HTS material usage for a given HTS synchronous machine design. Optimization is performed using a modified...... genetic algorithm with local optimization search based on on/off sensitivity analysis. The results show an optimal HTS coil distribution, achieving compact designs with a maximum of approximately 22% of the available space for the field winding occupied with HTS tape. In addition, this paper describes...... potential HTS savings, which could be achieved using multiple power supplies for the excitation of the machine. Using the TO approach combined with two excitation currents, an additional HTS saving of 9.1% can be achieved....

  17. Collecting the Missing Piece of the Puzzle: The Wind Temperatures of Arcturus (K2 III) and Aldeberan (K5 III)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harper, Graham

    2017-08-01

    Unravelling the poorly understood processes that drive mass loss from red giant stars requires that we empirically constrain the intimately coupled momentum and energy balance. Hubble high spectral resolution observations of wind scattered line profiles, from neutral and singly ionized species, have provided measures of wind acceleration, turbulence, terminal speeds, and mass-loss rates. These wind properties inform us about the force-momentum balance, however, the spectra have not yielded measures of the much needed wind temperatures, which constrain the energy balance.We proposed to remedy this omission with STIS E140H observations of the Si III 1206 Ang. resonance emission line for two of the best studied red giants: Arcturus (alpha Boo: K2 III) and Aldebaran (alpha Tau: K5 III), both of which have detailed semi-empirical wind velocity models. The relative optical depths of wind scattered absorption in Si III 1206 Ang., O I 1303 Ang. triplet., C II 1335 Ang., and existing Mg II h & k and Fe II profiles give the wind temperatures through the thermally controlled ionization balance. The new temperature constraints will be used to test existing semi-empirical models by comparision with multi-frequency JVLA radio fluxes, and also to constrain the flux-tube geometry and wave energy spectrum of magnetic wave-driven winds.

  18. Optical sensors for mapping temperature and winds in the thermosphere from a CubeSat platform

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sullivan, Stephanie Whalen

    The thermosphere is the region between approximately 80 km and 320 or more km above the earth's surface. While many people consider this elevation to be space rather than atmosphere, there is a small quantity of gasses in this region. The behavior of these gasses influences the orbits of satellites, including the International Space Station, causes space weather events, and influences the weather closer to the surface of the earth. Due to the location and characteristics of the thermosphere, even basic properties such as temperature are very difficult to measure. High spatial and temporal resolution data on temperatures and winds in the thermosphere are needed by both the space weather and earth climate modeling communities. To address this need, Space Dynamics Laboratory (SDL) started the Profiling Oxygen Emissions of the Thermosphere (POET) program. POET consists of a series of sensors designed to fly on sounding rockets, CubeSats, or larger platforms, such as IridiumNEXT SensorPODS. While each sensor design is different, they all use characteristics of oxygen optical emissions to measure space weather properties. The POET program builds upon the work of the RAIDS, Odin, and UARS programs. Our intention is to dramatically reduce the costs of building, launching, and operating spectrometers in space, thus allowing for more sensors to be in operation. Continuous long-term data from multiple sensors is necessary to understand the underlying physics required to accurately model and predict weather in the thermosphere. While previous spectrometers have been built to measure winds and temperatures in the thermosphere, they have all been large and expensive. The POET sensors use new focal plane technology and optical designs to overcome these obstacles. This thesis focuses on the testing and calibration of the two POET sensors: the Oxygen Profiling of the Atmospheric Limb (OPAL) temperature sensor and the Split-field Etalon Doppler Imager (SEDI) wind sensor.

  19. Development and evaluation of a HEPA filter for increased strength and resistance to elevated temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gilbert, H.; Bergman, W.; Fretthold, J.K.

    1992-01-01

    We have developed an improved HEPA filter for increased strength and resistance to elevated temperature to improve the reliability of HEPA filters under accident conditions. The improvements to the HEPA filter consist of a silicone rubber sealant and a new HEPA medium reinforced with a glass cloth. Several prototype filters were built and evaluated for temperature and pressure resistance and resistance to rough handling. The temperature resistance test consisted of exposing the HEPA filter to 1,000 scan at 700 degrees F for five minutes. The pressure resistance test consisted of exposing the HEPA filter to a differential pressure of 10 in. w.g. using a water saturated air flow at 95 degrees F. For the rough handling test, we used a vibrating machine designated the Q110. DOP filter efficiency tests were performed before and after each of the environmental tests. In addition to following the standard practice of using a separate new filter for each environmental test, we also subjected the same filter to the elevated temperature test followed by the pressure resistance test. The efficiency test results show that the improved HEPA filter is significantly better than the standard HEPA filter

  20. Development and evaluation of a HEPA filter for increased strength and resistance to elevated temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gilbert, H.; Bergman, W.; Fretthold, J.K.

    1993-01-01

    We have completed a preliminary study of an improved HEPA filter for increased strength and resistance to elevated temperature to improve the reliability of the standard deep pleated HEPA filter under accident conditions. The improvements to the HEPA filter consist of a silicone rubber sealant and a new HEPA medium reinforced with a glass cloth. Three prototype filters were built and evaluated for temperature and pressure resistance and resistance to rough handling. The temperature resistance test consisted of exposing the HEPA filter to 1,000 scan (1,700 m 3 /hr) at 700 degrees F (371 degrees C) for five minutes.The pressure resistance test consisted of exposing the HEPA filter to a differential pressure of 10 in. w.g. (2.5 kPa) using a water saturated air flow at 95 degrees F (35 degrees C). For the rough handling test, we used a vibrating machine designated the Q110. DOP filter efficiency tests were performed before and after each of the environmental tests. In addition to following the standard practice of using a separate new filter for each environmental test, we also subjected the same filter to the elevated temperature test followed by the pressure resistance test. The efficiency test results show that the improved HEPA filter is significantly better than the standard HEPA filter. Further studies are recommended to evaluate the improved HEPA filter and to assess its performance under more severe accident conditions

  1. Strength and Permeability Evolution of Compressed Bentonite in Response to Salinity and Temperature Changes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winnard, B. R.; Mitchell, T. M.; Browning, J.; Cuss, R. J.; Norris, S.; Meredith, P. G.

    2017-12-01

    Deep geological repositories are the preferred solution to dispose of radioactive waste; design concepts for these disposal facilities include compacted, saturated bentonite as a buffer between waste canister and host rock. Bentonite is favoured for its high swelling capacity, low permeability, and radionuclide retention properties. However, its thermo-hydro-mechanical tolerances must be thoroughly tested to ensure adequate long term performance. Climate variations are likely to induce periods of permafrost, and consequently, changes in groundwater salinity at depth. We performed laboratory experiments investigating effects of temperature and salinity change on uniaxial compressive strength (UCS), and permeability of compacted MX-80 bentonite cylinders. These specimens (moisture content = 22.9±0.1%, dry density = 1.66±0.02 g.cm-3) were compacted with deionised water, and a range of wt% NaCl, CaCl2, or KCl, to compare the effects of compaction fluid. Samples of compressed bentonite were cooled to -20 °C, and heated to 90 ºC, a possible temperature forecast for a repository dependent on factors such as geographical location, waste type, and facility design. Tests were all performed at room temperature, however in situ temperature tests are planned. The UCS of samples that experienced freeze thaw, and 40 ºC treatment failed at 6.5 MPa, with 4% strain, maintaining the same values as untreated bentonite compacted with deionised water. Samples compacted with saline solutions also yielded similar strengths, of 7 MPa, and failed at 4%. However, the 90 ºC, regardless of compaction fluid, failed at 15-18 MPa, at just 2% strain. In all experiments, the spread of strain accommodated varied inconsistently, however, peak stress was uniform. Further experiments into heterogeneity are needed to understand the responsible mechanisms. To obtain permeability, we utilised the pore pressure oscillation (PPO) technique with argon as the pore fluid. We also tested water as the pore

  2. Effect of test temperature and strain rate on the tensile properties of high-strength, high-conductivity copper alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zinkle, S.J.; Eatherly, W.S. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1997-04-01

    The unirradiated tensile properties of wrought GlidCop AL25 (ITER grade zero, IGO) solutionized and aged CuCrZr, and cold-worked and aged and solutionized and aged Hycon 3HP{trademark} CuNiBe have been measured over the temperature range of 20-500{degrees}C at strain rates between 4 x 10{sup {minus}4} s{sup {minus}1} and 0.06 s{sup {minus}1}. The measured room temperature electrical conductivity ranged from 64 to 90% IACS for the different alloys. All of the alloys were relatively insensitive to strain rate at room temperature, but the strain rate sensitivity of GlidCop Al25 increased significantly with increasing temperature. The CuNiBe alloys exhibited the best combination of high strength and high conductivity at room temperature. The strength of CuNiBe decreased slowly with increasing temperature. However, the ductility of CuNiBe decreased rapidly with increasing temperature due to localized deformation near grain boundaries, making these alloy heats unsuitable for typical structural applications above 300{degrees}C. The strength and uniform elongation of GlidCop Al25 decreased significantly with increasing temperature at a strain rate of 1 x 10{sup {minus}3} s{sup {minus}1}, whereas the total elongation was independent of test temperature. The strength and ductility of CuCrZr decreased slowly with increasing temperature.

  3. Temperature dependence of bending strength for plasma sprayed zirconia coating; Plasuma yosha zirconia himaku no magetsuyosa no ondo izonsei

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arai, M.; Sakuma, T. [Central Research Inst. of Electric Power Industry, Tokyo (Japan)] Mizutani, T. [Tokyo Inst. of Tech. (Japan)] Kishimoto, K. [Tokyo Inst. of Tech. (Japan). Faculty of Engineering] Saito, M. [Toshiba Corp. (Japan). Heavy Apparatus Engineering Lab.

    1998-02-01

    Plasma sprayed zirconia applying to the thermal barrier coating in gas turbine has been developing for protecting the hot parts such as blades and nozzles from high-temperature enviroments. In this paper, four point bending tests under various temperature conditions are conducted on plasma sprayed zirconia and its mechanical properties are examined. Results show that the bending strength at room temperature for plasma sprayed zirconia is much lower than that of sintered zirconia and is decreased with the increase in temperature. However, Weibull modulus at each temperature is relatively large and the dispersion of bending strength is very small in comparison with that of sintered zirconia. It is also clarified by the SEM observations of fracture surface that many defects such as debonding and microcrack are responsible for the lower bending strength. 9 refs., 8 figs., 1 tab.

  4. Mechanical strength and thermophysical properties of PM212: A high temperature self-lubricating powder metallurgy composite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, Phillip M.; Sliney, Harold E.; Dellacorte, Christopher; Whittenberger, J. Daniel; Martineau, Robert R.

    1990-01-01

    A powder metallurgy composite, PM212, composed of metal bonded chromium carbide and solid lubricants is shown to be self-lubricating to a maximum application temperature of 900 C. The high temperature compressive strength, tensile strength, thermal expansion and thermal conductivity data needed to design PM212 sliding contact bearings and seals are reported for sintered and isostatically pressed (HIPed) versions of PM212. Other properties presented are room temperature density, hardness, and elastic modulus. In general, both versions appear to have adequate strength to be considered as sliding contact bearing materials, but the HIPed version, which is fully dense, is much stronger than the sintered version which contains about 20 percent pore volume. The sintered material is less costly to make, but the HIPed version is better where high compressive strength is important.

  5. Effects of Elevated Temperatures on the Compressive Strength Capacity of Concrete Cylinders Confined with FRP Sheets: An Experimental Investigation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sherif El-Gamal

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Due to their high strength, corrosion resistance, and durability, fiber reinforced polymers (FRP are very attractive for civil engineering applications. One of these applications is the strengthening of concrete columns with FRP sheets. The performance of this strengthening technique at elevated temperature is still questionable and needs more investigations. This research investigates the effects of exposure to high temperatures on the compressive strength of concrete cylinders wrapped with glass and carbon FRP sheets. Test specimens consisted of 30 unwrapped and 60 wrapped concrete cylinders. All specimens were exposed to temperatures of 100, 200, and 300°C for periods of 1, 2, and 3 hours. The compressive strengths of the unwrapped concrete cylinders were compared with their counterparts of the wrapped cylinders. For the unwrapped cylinders, test results showed that the elevated temperatures considered in this study had almost no effect on their compressive strength; however, the wrapped specimens were significantly affected, especially those wrapped with GFRP sheets. The compressive strength of the wrapped specimens decreased as the exposure period and the temperature level increased. After three hours of exposure to 300°C, a maximum compressive strength loss of about 25.3% and 37.9%, respectively, was recorded in the wrapped CFRP and GFRP specimens.

  6. System and method for monitoring and controlling stator winding temperature in a de-energized AC motor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Bin [Kenosha, WI; Luebke, Charles John [Sussex, WI; Habetler, Thomas G [Snellville, GA; Zhang, Pinjia [Atlanta, GA; Becker, Scott K [Oak Creek, WI

    2011-12-27

    A system and method for measuring and controlling stator winding temperature in an AC motor while idling is disclosed. The system includes a circuit having an input connectable to an AC source and an output connectable to an input terminal of a multi-phase AC motor. The circuit further includes a plurality of switching devices to control current flow and terminal voltages in the multi-phase AC motor and a controller connected to the circuit. The controller is configured to activate the plurality of switching devices to create a DC signal in an output of the motor control device corresponding to an input to the multi-phase AC motor, determine or estimate a stator winding resistance of the multi-phase AC motor based on the DC signal, and estimate a stator temperature from the stator winding resistance. Temperature can then be controlled and regulated by DC injection into the stator windings.

  7. Strength of Geopolymer Cement Curing at Ambient Temperature by Non-Oven Curing Approaches: An Overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wattanachai, Pitiwat; Suwan, Teewara

    2017-06-01

    At the present day, a concept of environmentally friendly construction materials has been intensively studying to reduce the amount of releasing greenhouse gases. Geopolymer is one of the cementitious binders which can be produced by utilising pozzolanic wastes (e.g. fly ash or furnace slag) and also receiving much more attention as a low-CO2 emission material. However, to achieve excellent mechanical properties, heat curing process is needed to apply to geopolymer cement in a range of temperature around 40 to 90°C. To consume less oven-curing energy and be more convenience in practical work, the study on geopolymer curing at ambient temperature (around 20 to 25°C) is therefore widely investigated. In this paper, a core review of factors and approaches for non-oven curing geopolymer has been summarised. The performance, in term of strength, of each non-oven curing method, is also presented and analysed. The main aim of this review paper is to gather the latest study of ambient temperature curing geopolymer and to enlarge a feasibility of non-oven curing geopolymer development. Also, to extend the directions of research work, some approaches or techniques can be combined or applied to the specific properties for in-field applications and embankment stabilization by using soil-cement column.

  8. Solar wind: A possible factor driving the interannual sea surface temperature tripolar mode over North Atlantic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Ziniu; Li, Delin

    2016-06-01

    The effect of solar wind (SW) on the North Atlantic sea surface temperature (SST) in boreal winter is examined through an analysis of observational data during 1964-2013. The North Atlantic SSTs show a pronounced meridional tripolar pattern in response to solar wind speed (SWS) variations. This pattern is broadly similar to the leading empirical orthogonal function (EOF) mode of interannual variations in the wintertime SSTs over North Atlantic. The time series of this leading EOF mode of SST shows a significant interannual period, which is the same as that of wintertime SWS. This response also appears as a compact north-south seesaw of sea level pressure and a vertical tripolar structure of zonal wind, which simultaneously resembles the North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO) in the overlying atmosphere. As compared with the typical low SWS winters, during the typical high SWS winters, the stratospheric polar night jet (PNJ) is evidently enhanced and extends from the stratosphere to the troposphere, even down to the North Atlantic Ocean surface. Notably, the North Atlantic Ocean is an exclusive region in which the SW signal spreads downward from the stratosphere to the troposphere. Thus, it seems that the SW is a possible factor for this North Atlantic SST tripolar mode. The dynamical process of stratosphere-troposphere coupling, together with the global atmospheric electric circuit-cloud microphysical process, probably accounts for the particular downward propagation of the SW signal.

  9. PAIR INFLUENCE OF WIND SPEED AND MEAN RADIANT TEMPERATURE ON OUTDOOR THERMAL COMFORT OF HUMID TROPICAL ENVIRONMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sangkertadi Sangkertadi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The purposes of this article is to explore knowledge of outdoor thermal comfort in humid tropical environment for urban activities especially for people in walking activity, and those who stationary/seated with moderate action. It will be characterized the pair influence of wind speed and radiant temperature on the outdoor thermal comfort. Many of researchers stated that those two microclimate variables give significant role on outdoor thermal comfort in tropical humid area. Outdoor Tropical Comfort (OTC model was used for simulation in this study. The model output is comfort scale that refers on ASHRAE definition. The model consists of two regression equations with variables of air temperature, globe temperature, wind speed, humidity and body posture, for two types of activity: walking and seated. From the results it can be stated that there is significant role of wind speed to reduce mean radiant temperature and globe temperature, when the velocity is elevated from 0.5 m/s to 2 m/s. However, the wind has not play significant role when the speed is changed from 2 m/s to 3.5 m/s. The results of the study may inspire us to implement effectiveness of electrical-fan equipment for outdoor space in order to get optimum wind speed, coupled with optimum design of shading devices to minimize radiant temperature for thermal comfort.

  10. Shaping the solar wind electron temperature anisotropy by the interplay of core and suprathermal populations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaaban Hamd, S. M.; Lazar, M.; Poedts, S.; Pierrard, V.; Štverák

    2017-12-01

    We present the results of an advanced parametrization of the temperature anisotropy of electrons in the slow solar wind and the electromagnetic instabilities resulting from the interplay of their thermal core and suprathermal halo populations. A large set of observational data (from the Ulysses, Helios and Cluster missions) is used to parametrize these components and establish their correlations. Comparative analysis demonstrates for the first time a particular implication of the suprathermal electrons which are less dense but hotter than thermal electrons. The instabilities are significantly stimulated by the interplay of the core and halo populations, leading to lower thresholds which shape the observed limits of the temperature anisotropy for both the core and halo populations. This double agreement strongly suggests that the selfgenerated instabilities play the major role in constraining the electron anisotropy.

  11. Influence of manganese, carbon and nitrogen on high-temperature strength of Fe-Cr-Mn austenitic alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hosoi, Y.; Okazaki, Y.; Wade, N.; Miyahara, K.

    1990-01-01

    High Mn-Cr-Fe base alloys are candidates for the first wall material of fusion reactors because of rapid decay of radioactivity of the alloys after neutron irradiation compared with that of Ni-Cr-Fe base alloys. Their high temperature properties, however, are not clearly understood at present. In this paper, a study has been made of the effects of Mn, C and N content on the high-temperature tensile strength and creep properties of a 12% CR-Fe base alloy. Mn tends to decrease tensile strength and proof stress at intermediate temperatures. At higher temperatures in the austenite range, however, tensile properties scarcely depend on Mn content. C and N additions improve the tensile properties markedly. The combined addition of 0.2%C and 0.2%N to a 12%Cr-15%Mn-Fe base alloy makes the strength at 873K as high as that of a modified type 316 stainless steel. Combined alloying with C and N also improves the creep strength. Cold working is very useful in increasing the creep strength because of the finely dispersed precipitates in the matrix during creep. From these results, Fe-12%Cr-15%Mn-15%Mn-0.2%c-0.2%N is recommended as one of the most suitable alloys in this system for high temperature usage. (author)

  12. Measurement of temperature and pressure on the surface of a blunt cone using FBG sensor in hypersonic wind tunnel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasad, A. S. Guru; Sharath, U.; Nagarjun, V.; Hegde, G. M.; Asokan, S.

    2013-09-01

    Measurement of temperature and pressure exerted on the leeward surface of a blunt cone specimen has been demonstrated in the present work in a hypersonic wind tunnel using fiber Bragg grating (FBG) sensors. The experiments were conducted on a 30° apex-angle blunt cone with 51 mm base diameter at wind flow speeds of Mach 6.5 and 8.35 in a 300 mm hypersonic wind tunnel of Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore. A special pressure insensitive temperature sensor probe along with the conventional bare FBG sensors was used for explicit temperature and aerodynamic pressure measurement respectively on the leeward surface of the specimen. computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulation of the flow field around the blunt cone specimen has also been carried out to obtain the temperature and pressure at conditions analogous to experiments. The results obtained from FBG sensors and the CFD simulations are found to be in good agreement with each other.

  13. Measurement of temperature and pressure on the surface of a blunt cone using FBG sensor in hypersonic wind tunnel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guru Prasad, A S; Sharath, U; Asokan, S; Nagarjun, V; Hegde, G M

    2013-01-01

    Measurement of temperature and pressure exerted on the leeward surface of a blunt cone specimen has been demonstrated in the present work in a hypersonic wind tunnel using fiber Bragg grating (FBG) sensors. The experiments were conducted on a 30° apex-angle blunt cone with 51 mm base diameter at wind flow speeds of Mach 6.5 and 8.35 in a 300 mm hypersonic wind tunnel of Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore. A special pressure insensitive temperature sensor probe along with the conventional bare FBG sensors was used for explicit temperature and aerodynamic pressure measurement respectively on the leeward surface of the specimen. computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulation of the flow field around the blunt cone specimen has also been carried out to obtain the temperature and pressure at conditions analogous to experiments. The results obtained from FBG sensors and the CFD simulations are found to be in good agreement with each other. (paper)

  14. A real time measurement of junction temperature variation in high power IGBT modules for wind power converter application

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ghimire, Pramod; Pedersen, Kristian Bonderup; de Vega, Angel Ruiz

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents a real time measurement of on-state forward voltage and estimating the junction temperature for a high power IGBT module during a power converter operation. The power converter is realized as it can be used for a wind turbine system. The peak of the junction temperature is dec...

  15. Intra-seasonal Oscillations (ISO of zonal-mean meridional winds and temperatures as measured by UARS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. T. Huang

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available Based on an empirical analysis of measurements with the High Resolution Doppler Imager (HRDI on the UARS spacecraft in the upper mesosphere (95km, persistent and regular intra-seasonal oscillations (ISO with periods of about 2 to 4 months have recently been reported in the zonal-mean meridional winds. Similar oscillations have also been discussed independently in a modeling study, and they were attributed to wave-mean-flow interactions. The observed and modeled meridional wind ISOs were largely confined to low latitudes. We report here on an analysis of concurrent UARS temperature measurements, which produces oscillations similar to those seen in the meridional winds. Although the temperature oscillations are observed at lower altitudes (55km, their phase variations with latitude are qualitatively consistent with the inferred properties seen in the meridional winds and thus provide independent evidence for the existence of ISOs in the mesosphere.

  16. Crossed, Small-Deflection Energy Analyzer for Wind/Temperature Spectrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrero, Federico A.; Finne, Theodore T.

    2010-01-01

    Determination of neutral winds and ion drifts in low-Earth-orbit missions requires measurements of the angular and energy distributions of the flux of neutrals and ions entering the satellite from the ram direction. The magnitude and direction of the neutral-wind (or ion-drift) determine the location of the maximum in the angular distribution of the flux. Knowledge of the angle of maximum flux with respect to satellite coordinates (pointing) is essential to determine the wind (or ion-drift) vector. The crossed Small-Deflection Energy Analyzer (SDEA) spectrometer (see Figure 1) occupies minimal volume and consumes minimal power. Designed for upper atmosphere/ionosphere investigations at Earth altitudes above 100 km, the spectrometer operates by detecting the angular and energy distributions of neutral atoms/molecules and ions in two mutually perpendicular planes. In this configuration, the two detection planes actually cross at the spectrometer center. It is possible to merge two SDEAs so they share a common optical axis and alternate measurements between two perpendicular planes, and reduce the number of ion sources from two to one. This minimizes the volume and footprint significantly and reduces the ion source power by a factor of two. The area of the entrance aperture affects the number of ions detected/second and also determines the energy resolution. Thermionic emitters require heater power of about 100 mW to produce 1 mA of electron beam current. Typically, electron energy is about 100 eV and requires a 100-V supply for electron acceleration to supply an additional 100 mW of power. Thus, ion source power is at most 200 mW. If two ion sources were to be used, the ion source power would be, at most, 400 mW. Detector power, deflection voltage power, and microcontroller and other functions require less than 150 mW. A WTS (wind/ temperature spectrometer) with two separate optical axes would consume about 650 mW, while the crossed SDEA described here consumes about

  17. Temperature and Wind Measurements in Venus Lower Thermosphere between 2007 and 2015

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krause, Pia; Sornig, Manuela; Wischnewski, Carolin; Sonnabend, Guido; Stangier, Tobias; Herrmann, Maren; Kostiuk, Theodor; Livengood, Timothy A.; Pätzold, Martin

    2016-10-01

    The structure of Venus atmosphere and its thermal and dynamical behavior was intensely studied during the past decade by groundbased and the space mission Venus Express. A comprehensive understanding of the atmosphere, however, is still missing. Direct measurements of atmospheric parameters on various time scales and at different locations across the planet are essential for better understanding and to validate global circulation models. Line-resolved spectroscopy of infrared CO2 transitions provides a powerful tool to accomplish measurements of temperature and wind speed within the neutral atmosphere, using Doppler line-broadening and Doppler shift. Temperature is the motor to drive circulation, and wind speed is the result. Measuring both provides both the basis and an empirical test for circulation models. Non-LTE emission lines at 10 µm that originate from a pressure level of 1μbar, ~110 km altitude, probe the lower thermosphere and are measurable at high spectral resolution using the infrared heterodyne spectrometers THIS (University of Cologne), HIPWAC (NASA GSFC) and MILAHI (Tohoku University).Thermal and dynamical structures on the Venus day side are retrieved using a newly developed method that considers the influence of the spectrometer field-of-view (FoV) and the dispersion of spectral properties across the FoV. New conclusions from the ground-based observing campaigns between 2007 and 2015 will be presented based on this retrieval methodology. The spatial resolution on the planetary disk is different for each campaign, depending on the apparent diameter of the planet and the diffraction-limited FoV of the telescope. Previously, a comparison of the observing campaigns was limited due to the difference in spatial resolution. The new retrieval method enables comparing observations with different observing geometry. The observations yield a large quantity of temperature and wind measurements at different positions on the planetary disk, which supports

  18. Perception of temperature and wind by users of public outdoor spaces: relationships with weather parameters and personal characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrade, Henrique; Alcoforado, Maria-João; Oliveira, Sandra

    2011-09-01

    We aim to understand the relationship between people's declared bioclimatic comfort, their personal characteristics (age, origin, clothing, activity and motivation, etc.) and the atmospheric conditions. To attain this goal, questionnaire surveys were made concurrently with weather measurements (air temperature, relative humidity, solar and long-wave radiation and wind speed) in two open leisure areas of Lisbon (Portugal), during the years 2006 and 2007. We analysed the desire expressed by the interviewees to decrease, maintain or increase the values of air temperature and wind speed, in order to improve their level of comfort. Multiple logistic regression was used to analyse the quantitative relation between preference votes and environmental and personal parameters. The preference for a different temperature depends on the season and is strongly associated with wind speed. Furthermore, a general decrease of discomfort with increasing age was also found. Most people declared a preference for lower wind speed in all seasons; the perception of wind shows significant differences depending on gender, with women declaring a lower level of comfort with higher wind speed. It was also found that the tolerance of warmer conditions is higher than of cooler conditions, and that adaptive strategies are undertaken by people to improve their level of comfort outdoors.

  19. OGCM Simulations of Equatorial Pacific Current and Temperature to ERS-1, FSU and NMC Surface Winds and to Assimilation of Subsurface Temperature Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halpern, David

    1995-01-01

    The relative accuracies of three surface wind data products for the tropical Pacific Ocean during April 1992 to March 1994 were examined by analyzing temperature and current fields along the equator, which were simulated with an ocean general circulation model. Simulations were made with and without assimilation of surface and subsurface temperature data. Simulated currents were compared with observations at three sites (170oW, 140oW, 110oW) at the equator. Model-generated currents and temperatures indicated that the ERS-1 westward wind speeds were low compared to the FSU and NMC winds. With data assimilation, the agreement between simulated and observed currents was highest at 170oW and lowest at 110oW.

  20. Initial Studies of Low Temperature Ablation in a Helium Hypersonic Wind Tunnel. Draft

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kohlman, D. L.; Elias, L.; Orlik-Ruckemann, K.

    1969-06-15

    A study of the feasibility of investigating the effects of ablation in a helium hypersonic wind tunnel was performed. Exploratory experiments were carried out at Mach 16.4 and at 600 psi stagnation pressure using (a) metal models at room temperature, (b) models with copper inserts, cooled to -140 deg C, and (c) models with carbon dioxide inserts. All models were flat plates at zero incidence, with a sharp leading edge in front of the insert. Surface temperature, surface recession rates and pitot pressure profiles were determined at several longitudinal stations. Suitable model fabrication and experimental techniques have been developed. A simple theoretical method of predicting recession rates and surface temperatures has been proposed. It has been demonstrated that the ablation of carbon dioxide into an unheated Mach 16.4 helium flow at 600 psi stagnation pressure is significant enough to result in measurable flat plate recession rates and measurable changes in pitot pressure profiles. In addition, it has been shown that it is possible to distinguish between the effects on pitot pressure of reduction in surface temperature and of mass addition through sublimation of carbon dioxide. It was also found that the first order theoretical analysis predicts proper trends and correct approximate magnitude of sublimation rates.

  1. Wind Shear and the Strength of Severe Convective Phenomena—Preliminary Results from Poland in 2011–2015

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wojciech Pilorz

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Severe convective phenomena cause significant loss in the economy and, primarily, casualties. Therefore, it is essential to forecast such extreme events to avoid or minimize the negative consequences. Wind shear provides an updraft-downdraft separation in the convective cell, which extends the cell lifetime. Wind shears between a few different air layers have been examined in all damaging convective cases in Poland, taken from the European Severe Weather Database between 2011 and 2015, in order to find their values and patterns according to the intensity of this phenomenon. Each severe weather report was assigned wind shear values from the nearest sounding station, and subsequently the presented summary was made. It was found that wind shear values differ between the given phenomena and their intensity. This regularity is particularly visible in shears containing 0 km wind. The highest shears occur within wind reports. Lower values are associated with hail reports. An important difference between weak and F1+ tornadoes was found in most of the wind shears. Severe phenomena probability within 0–6 km and 0–1 km shears show different patterns according to the phenomena and their intensity. This finding has its application in severe weather forecasting.

  2. Variations of Sea Surface Temperature, Wind Stress, and Rainfall over the Tropical Atlantic and South America.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nobre, Paulo; Srukla, J.

    1996-10-01

    Empirical orthogonal functions (E0Fs) and composite analyses are used to investigate the development of sea surface temperature (SST) anomaly patterns over the tropical Atlantic. The evolution of large-scale rainfall anomaly patterns over the equatorial Atlantic and South America are also investigated. 71e EOF analyses revealed that a pattern of anomalous SST and wind stress asymmetric relative to the equator is the dominant mode of interannual and longer variability over the tropical Atlantic. The most important findings of this study are as follows.Atmospheric circulation anomalies precede the development of basinwide anomalous SST patterns over the tropical Atlantic. Anomalous SST originate off the African coast simultaneously with atmospheric circulation anomalies and expand westward afterward. The time lag between wind stress relaxation (strengthening) and maximum SST warming (cooling) is about two months.Anomalous atmospheric circulation patterns over northern tropical Atlantic are phase locked to the seasonal cycle. Composite fields of SLP and wind stress over northern tropical Atlantic can be distinguished from random only within a few months preceding the March-May (MAM) season. Observational evidence is presented to show that the El Niño-Southern Oscillation phenomenon in the Pacific influences atmospheric circulation and SST anomalies over northern tropical Atlantic through atmospheric teleconnection patterns into higher latitudes of the Northern Hemisphere.The well-known droughts over northeastern Brazil (Nordeste) are a local manifestation of a much larger-scale rainfall anomaly pattern encompassing the whole equatorial Atlantic and Amazon region. Negative rainfall anomalies to the south of the equator during MAM, which is the rainy season for the Nordeste region, are related to an early withdrawal of the intertropical convergence zone toward the warm SST anomalies over the northern tropical Atlantic. Also, it is shown that precipitation anomalies

  3. Lap shear strength of selected adhesives (epoxy, varnish, B-stage glass cloth) in liquid nitrogen and at room temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Froelich, K.J.; Fitzpatrick, C.M.

    1976-12-01

    The adhesives included several epoxy resins, a varnish, and a B-stage glass cloth (a partially cured resin in a fiberglass cloth matrix). Several parameters critical to bond strength were varied: adhesive and adherend differences, surface preparation, coupling agents, glass cloth, epoxy thickness, fillers, and bonding pressure and temperature. The highest lap shear strengths were obtained with the B-shear glass cloth at both liquid nitrogen and room temperatures with values of approximately 20 MPa (3000 psi) and approximately 25.5 MPa (3700 psi) respectively

  4. Influence of the tilting reflection mirror on the temperature and wind velocity retrieved by a polarizing atmospheric Michelson interferometer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Chunmin; Li, Ying

    2012-09-20

    The principles of a polarizing atmospheric Michelson interferometer are outlined. The tilt of its reflection mirror results in deflection of the reflected beam and affects the intensities of the observed inteferogram. This effect is systematically analyzed. Both rectangular and circular apertures are considered. The theoretical expression of the modulation depth and phase of the interferogram are derived. These parameters vary with the inclination angle of the mirror and the distance between the deflection center and the optical axis and significantly influence the retrieved temperature and wind speed. If the wind and temperature errors are required to be less than 3 m/s and 5 K, the deflection angle must be less than 0.5°. The errors are also dependent on the shape of aperture. If the reflection mirror is deflected in one direction, the temperature error is smaller for a circular aperture (1.3 K) than for a rectangular one (2.6 K), but the wind velocity errors are almost the same (less than 3 m/s). If the deflection center and incident light beam are coincident, the temperature errors are 3 × 10(-4) K and 0.45 K for circular and rectangular apertures, respectively. The wind velocity errors are 1.2 × 10(-3) m/s and 0.06 m/s. Both are small. The result would be helpful for theoretical research and development of the static polarization wind imaging interferometer.

  5. Correlation between sea surface temperature and wind speed in Greenland Sea and their relationships with NAO variability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bo Qu

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available The North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO is one of the major causes of many recent changes in the Arctic Ocean. Generally, it is related to wind speed, sea surface temperature (SST, and sea ice cover. In this study, we analyzed the distributions of and correlations between SST, wind speed, NAO, and sea ice cover from 2003 to 2009 in the Greenland Sea at 10°W to 10°E, 65°N to 80°N. SST reached its peak in July, while wind speed reached its minimum in July. Seasonal variability of SST and wind speed was different for different regions. SST and wind speed mainly had negative correlations. Detailed correlation research was focused on the 75°N to 80°N band. Regression analysis shows that in this band, the variation of SST lagged three months behind that of wind speed. Ice cover and NAO had a positive correlation, and the correlation coefficient between ice cover and NAO in the year 2007 was 0.61. SST and NAO also had a positive correlation, and SST influenced NAO one month in advance. The correlation coefficients between SST and NAO reached 0.944 for the year 2005, 0.7 for the year 2008, and 0.74 for the year 2009 after shifting SST one month later. NAO also had a positive correlation with wind speed, and it also influenced wind speed one month in advance. The correlation coefficients between NAO and wind speed reached 0.783, 0.813, and 0.818 for the years 2004, 2005, and 2008, respectively, after shifting wind speed one month earlier.

  6. Effect of temperature on the uniform field breakdown strength of electronegative gases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Christophorou, L.G.; Mathis, R.A.; Hunter, S.R.; Carter, J.G.

    1987-03-01

    In general, the electron attachment rate constant, k/sub a/ ( ,Υ), as a function of the mean electron energy and temperature Υ for electronegative gases which attach electrons nondissociatively decreases greatly with Υ from room temperature to Υ ≤ 600K, while that for electronegative gases which attach electrons dissociatively increases with increasing Υ. Based on recent studies in our laboratory on k/sub a/ ( ,Υ), we investigated the variation with Υ (∼295-575K) of the uniform field breakdown strength, (E/N)/sub lim/, for three classes of electronegative gases: (a) gases such as c-C 4 F 8 (and c-C 4 F 6 , 1-C 3 F 6 ) which attach strongly low-energy (≤ 1 eV) electrons nondissociatively and for which k/sub a/ ( ,Υ), decreases precipitously with Υ above ambient; (b) gases such as C 2 F 6 and CF 3 Cl which attach electrons exclusively dissociatively and whose k/sub a/ ( ,Υ) increases with Υ; and (c) gases such as C 3 F 8 and n-C 4 F 10 which attach electrons both nondissociatively and dissociatively over a common low-energy range and whose k/sub a/ ( ,Υ) first decreases and then increases with Υ above ambient. The (E/N)/sub lim/(Υ) has been found to decrease significantly with Υ for (a), to decrease slowly with Υ for (c), and to increase slightly with Υ for (b). These changes in (E/N)/sub lim/ follow those in k/sub a/ ( ,Υ). A similar behavior is expected for other electronegative gaseous dielectrics in the respective three groups

  7. Influence of austenization temperature on microstructure and mechanical properties of a new ultra-high strength low alloyed steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feng, Ya-Ya; Xu, Chi; Su, Xiang; Sun, Yu-Lin; Pan, Xi; Cao, Yue-De; Chen, Guang [Nanjing Univ. of Science and Technology, Nanjing (China). Engineering Research Center of Materials Behavior and Design

    2017-07-01

    The effects of austenization temperature on the microstructures and mechanical properties of a newly designed ultra-high strength low alloy martensitic steel were systematically studied. The microstructures of the martensitic steels which were quenched from different temperatures between 860 and 980 C were investigated by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) and discussed. The results showed that the martensite laths were found to coarsen slowly and the carbide precipitates dissolved gradually with increasing austenization temperature. As the austenization temperature increased from 860 to 980 C, the volume of retained austenite and the numerical ratio of high angle grain boundaries (HAGBs) were observed to increase while the numerical ratio of low angle grain boundaries (LAGBs) decreased. Rockwell C hardness (HRC), tensile strength and yield strength increased at first and then decreased, while impact toughness was greatly improved with increasing austenization temperature. The fracture mechanism was brittle fracture when austenitized at low temperatures, while it was ductile fracture when austenitized at high temperatures. The mechanical properties were significantly influenced by the formation of retained austenite, the dissolution of carbides, and the numerical ratio of HAGBs and LAGBs.

  8. Experimental strength evaluation of cylinders with a flat head subjected to internal pressure at elevated temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suzuki, Mitsuru; Makino, Yutaka

    1978-01-01

    The experiments using component test models such as a cylinder with a flat head and F.E.M. elastic analyses to investigate the secondary stress, peak stress and creep-fatigue interaction effect are described. The comparison of uniaxial stress with multiaxial stress about deformation and strength at elevated temperatures are also described here. The results of experiments and analysis are summarized as follows: (1) The maximum stress as the equivalent stress is the most suitable for the prediction of the creep failure life of cylinders subjected to internal pressure using the uniaxial creep test results. And the Mises's equivalent stress is the suitable for this prediction using the data of the onset of the uniaxial tertiary creep. (2) In the creep characteristics of the cylinder there, is no tertiary creep stage, and the rupture elongation of the cylinder accords with the elongation of the onset of the uniaxial tertiary creep. (3) It was recognized that the secondary stress occurred at the corner of the cylinder with a flat head has a little effect on creep and creep-fatigue life. (4) The life reduction effect due to the creep-fatigue interaction around the corner was recognized by the linear damage rule and compared with the value of Code Case 1592. (5) A difference of failure modes by imposed conditions for vessel with the size-discontinuity section was recognized by the cyclic internal pressure tests with hold time. (author)

  9. No-insulation multi-width winding technique for high temperature superconducting magnet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hahn, Seungyong; Kim, Youngjae; Keun Park, Dong; Kim, Kwangmin; Voccio, John P; Bascuñán, Juan; Iwasa, Yukikazu

    2013-10-21

    We present a No-Insulation ( NI ) Multi-Width ( MW ) winding technique for an HTS (high temperature superconductor) magnet consisting of double-pancake (DP) coils. The NI enables an HTS magnet self-protecting and the MW minimizes the detrimental anisotropy in current-carrying capacity of HTS tape by assigning tapes of multiple widths to DP coils within a stack, widest tape to the top and bottom sections and the narrowest in the midplane section. This paper presents fabrication and test results of an NI-MW HTS magnet and demonstrates the unique features of the NI-MW technique: self-protecting and enhanced field performance, unattainable with the conventional technique.

  10. Effect of power quality on windings temperature of marine induction motors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gnacinski, P. [Gdynia Maritime University, Department of Ship Electrical Power Engineering, Morska Str. 83, 81-225 Gdynia (Poland)], E-mail: piotrg@am.gdynia.pl

    2009-10-15

    Marine induction machines are exposed to various power quality disturbances appearing simultaneously in ship power systems: frequency and voltage rms value deviation, voltage unbalance and voltage waveform distortions. As a result, marine induction motors can be seriously overheated due to lowered supply voltage quality. Improvement of the protection of marine induction machines requires an appropriate method of power quality assessment and modification of the power quality regulations of ship classification societies. This paper presents an analytical model of an induction cage machine supplied with voltage of lowered quality, used in part II of the work (effect of power quality on windings temperature of marine induction motors. Part II. Results of investigations and recommendations for related regulations) for power quality assessment in ship power systems, and for justification of the new power quality regulations proposal. The presented model is suitable for implementation in an on-line measurement system.

  11. Effect of power quality on windings temperature of marine induction motors. Part I: Machine model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gnacinski, P. [Gdynia Maritime Univ., Dept. of Ship Electrical Power Engineering, Morska Str. 83, 81-225 Gdynia (Poland)

    2009-10-15

    Marine induction machines are exposed to various power quality disturbances appearing simultaneously in ship power systems: frequency and voltage rms value deviation, voltage unbalance and voltage waveform distortions. As a result, marine induction motors can be seriously overheated due to lowered supply voltage quality. Improvement of the protection of marine induction machines requires an appropriate method of power quality assessment and modification of the power quality regulations of ship classification societies. This paper presents an analytical model of an induction cage machine supplied with voltage of lowered quality, used in part II of the work (effect of power quality on windings temperature of marine induction motors. Part II. Results of investigations and recommendations for related regulations) for power quality assessment in ship power systems, and for justification of the new power quality regulations proposal. The presented model is suitable for implementation in an on-line measurement system. (author)

  12. Medical Meteorology: the Relationship between Meteorological Parameters (Humidity, Rainfall, Wind, and Temperature and Brucellosis in Zanjan Province

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yousefali Abedini

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Brucellosis (Malta fever is a major contagious zoonotic disease, with economic and public health importance. Methods To assess the effect of meteorological (temperature, rainfall, humidity, and wind and climate parameters on incidence of brucellosis, brucellosis distribution and meteorological zoning maps of Zanjan Province were prepared using Inverse Distance Weighting (IDW and Kriging technique in Arc GIS medium. Zoning maps of mean temperature, rainfall, humidity, and wind were compared to brucellosis distribution maps. Results: Correlation test showed no relationship between the mean number of patients with brucellosis and any of the four meteorological parameters. Conclusion: It seems that in Zanjan province there is no correlation between brucellosis and meteorological parameters.

  13. On the Effect of Natural Aging Prior to Low Temperature ECAP of a High-Strength Aluminum Alloy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sebastian Fritsch

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Severe plastic deformation (SPD can be used to generate ultra-fine grained microstructures and thus to increase the strength of many materials. Unfortunately, high strength aluminum alloys are generally hard to deform, which puts severe limits on the feasibility of conventional SPD methods. In this study, we use low temperature equal-channel angular pressing (ECAP to deform an AA7075 alloy. We perform ECAP in a custom-built, cooled ECAP-tool with an internal angle of 90° at −60 °C and with an applied backpressure. In previous studies, high-strength age hardening aluminum alloys were deformed in a solid solution heat treated condition to improve the mechanical properties in combination with subsequent (post-ECAP aging. In the present study, we systematically vary the initial microstructure—i.e., the material condition prior to low temperature ECAP—by (pre-ECAP natural aging. The key result of the present study is that precipitates introduced prior to ECAP speed up grain refinement during ECAP. Longer aging times lead to accelerated microstructural evolution, to increasing strength, and to a transition in fracture behavior after a single pass of low temperature ECAP. These results demonstrate the potential of these thermo-mechanical treatments to produce improved properties of high-strength aluminum alloys.

  14. Probabilistic Material Strength Degradation Model for Inconel 718 Components Subjected to High Temperature, Mechanical Fatigue, Creep and Thermal Fatigue Effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bast, Callie Corinne Scheidt

    1994-01-01

    This thesis presents the on-going development of methodology for a probabilistic material strength degradation model. The probabilistic model, in the form of a postulated randomized multifactor equation, provides for quantification of uncertainty in the lifetime material strength of aerospace propulsion system components subjected to a number of diverse random effects. This model is embodied in the computer program entitled PROMISS, which can include up to eighteen different effects. Presently, the model includes four effects that typically reduce lifetime strength: high temperature, mechanical fatigue, creep, and thermal fatigue. Statistical analysis was conducted on experimental Inconel 718 data obtained from the open literature. This analysis provided regression parameters for use as the model's empirical material constants, thus calibrating the model specifically for Inconel 718. Model calibration was carried out for four variables, namely, high temperature, mechanical fatigue, creep, and thermal fatigue. Methodology to estimate standard deviations of these material constants for input into the probabilistic material strength model was developed. Using the current version of PROMISS, entitled PROMISS93, a sensitivity study for the combined effects of mechanical fatigue, creep, and thermal fatigue was performed. Results, in the form of cumulative distribution functions, illustrated the sensitivity of lifetime strength to any current value of an effect. In addition, verification studies comparing a combination of mechanical fatigue and high temperature effects by model to the combination by experiment were conducted. Thus, for Inconel 718, the basic model assumption of independence between effects was evaluated. Results from this limited verification study strongly supported this assumption.

  15. The role of elevated temperature exposure on structural evolution and fatigue strength of eutectic AlSi12 alloys

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Konečná, R.; Nicoletto, G.; Kunz, Ludvík; Riva, E.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 83, č. 1 (2016), s. 24-35 ISSN 0142-1123 Institutional support: RVO:68081723 Keywords : Piston * Al-Si alloy * Elevated temperature * Fatigue strength Subject RIV: JL - Materials Fatigue, Friction Mechanics Impact factor: 2.899, year: 2016

  16. Determination of electric field strength and kinetic temperature in the cathode fall region of a hollow cathode discharge

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De la Rosa, M I; Perez, C; Gruetzmacher, K [Universidad de Valladolid, Facultad de Ciencias, 47071 Valladolid (Spain); Gonzalo, A B; Del Val, J A, E-mail: delarosa@opt.uva.e [Universidad de Salamanca, Escuela Politecnica Superior, 05003 Avila (Spain)

    2010-05-01

    In this work, we demonstrate the high potential of two-photon excitation of the 1S -2S transition of atomic hydrogen followed by optogalvanic detection, for measuring under identical experimental conditions, the kinetic temperature and the electric field strength in the cathode sheath region of a hollow cathode discharge. The first obtained results for both parameters are discussed in this paper.

  17. Horizontal and vertical winds and temperatures in the equatorial thermosphere: measurements from Natal, Brazil during August-September 1982

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biondi, M.A.

    1985-01-01

    Fabry-Perot interferometer measurements of Doppler shifts and widths of the 630.0 nm nightglow line have been used to determine the neutral winds and temperatures in the equatorial thermosphere over Natal, Brazil during August-September 1982. During this period, in the early night (2130 U.T.) the average value of the horizontal wind vector was 95 m s -1 at 100 0 azimuth, and the temperature varied from a low of 950 K during geomagnetically quiet conditions to a high of approx. 1400 K during a storm (6 September). The meridional winds were small, -1 , and the eastward zonal winds reached a maximum value 1-3 h after sunset, in qualitative agreement with TGCM predictions. On 26 August, an observed persistent convergence in the horizontal meridional flow was accompanied by a downward vertical velocity and an increase in the thermospheric temperature measured overhead. Oscillations with periods of 40-45 min in both the zonal and vertical wind velocities were observed during the geomagnetic storm of 6 September, suggesting gravity wave modulation of the equatorial thermospheric flow. (author)

  18. Influence of Eco-Friendly Mineral Additives on Early Age Compressive Strength and Temperature Development of High-Performance Concrete

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaszynska, Maria; Skibicki, Szymon

    2017-12-01

    High-performance concrete (HPC) which contains increased amount of both higher grade cement and pozzolanic additives generates more hydration heat than the ordinary concrete. Prolonged periods of elevated temperature influence the rate of hydration process in result affecting the development of early-age strength and subsequent mechanical properties. The purpose of the presented research is to determine the relationship between the kinetics of the heat generation process and the compressive strength of early-age high performance concrete. All mixes were based on the Portland Cement CEM I 52.5 with between 7.5% to 15% of the cement mass replaced by the silica fume or metakaolin. Two characteristic for HPC water/binder ratios of w/b = 0.2 and w/b = 0.3 were chosen. A superplasticizer was used to maintain a 20-50 mm slump. Compressive strength was determined at 8h, 24h, 3, 7 and 28 days on 10x10x10 cm specimens that were cured in a calorimeter in a constant temperature of T = 20°C. The temperature inside the concrete was monitored continuously for 7 days. The study determined that the early-age strength (t<24h) of concrete with reactive mineral additives is lower than concrete without them. This is clearly visible for concretes with metakaolin which had the lowest compressive strength in early stages of hardening. The amount of the superplasticizer significantly influenced the early-age compressive strength of concrete. Concretes with additives reached the maximum temperature later than the concretes without them.

  19. Long-term strength of claddings made of E110 in the temperature range of 400-570 degrees C

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kobylyansky, G.; Shamardin, V.; Eremin, S.

    2003-01-01

    This paper presents the data on the initial stage of the in-sight into the mechanism of long-term strength of spent fuel rod claddings in the temperature range 400-570 0 C and also their comparison with corresponding mechanism of irradiated in the inert environment specimens and unirradiated ones. A set of test results in the temperature range 400-570 0 C of non-irradiated and irradiated in BOR-60 specimens and also of the WWER-1000 fuel element claddings irradiated up to a burnup of 29-47 MWd/kgU is approximated by Larson-Miller parametric dependence in the first approximation that allows the long-term strength data to be extrapolated and interpolated onto the unknown value regions of stress, temperature and time. The time before damage of the fuel element claddings irradiated up to ∼ 29MWd/kgU in the temperature range 540-570 0 C is higher than that of non-irradiated tubular specimens and irradiated ones up to fast neutron fluence (1-2)x10 22 cm -2 (E >0.1 MeV). With temperature decreasing to 673 K, the long-term strength of the claddings irradiated up to ∼ 47 MWd/kgU is lower than it can be expected from the extrapolation of high-temperature data obtained with the irradiated specimens. Now, the bulk of experimental data on the long-term strength of the claddings made of E110 alloy makes it possible to provide only preliminary estimation for the validation of parameters typical of the deviation from the normal operation conditions; emergencies and accidental situations; dry and wet storage and also transportation. The experiments should be continued to accumulate missing data, in particular, tests of fuel element claddings irradiated up to high burnup at temperatures ranging 300-400 0 C and stresses, which are significantly lower than the yield stress

  20. A renewable energy scenario for Aalborg Municipality based on low-temperature geothermal heat, wind power and biomass

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Østergaard, Poul Alberg; Mathiesen, Brian Vad; Möller, Bernd

    2010-01-01

    Aalborg Municipality, Denmark, wishes to investigate the possibilities of becoming independent of fossil fuels. This article describes a scenario for supplying Aalborg Municipality’s energy needs through a combination of low-temperature geothermal heat, wind power and biomass. Of particular focus...... in the scenario is how low-temperature geothermal heat may be utilised in district heating (DH) systems. The analyses show that it is possible to cover Aalborg Municipality’s energy needs through the use of locally available sources in combination with significant electricity savings, heat savings, reductions...... in industrial fuel use and savings and fuel-substitutions in the transport sector. With biomass resources being finite, the two marginal energy resources in Aalborg are geothermal heat and wind power. If geothermal heat is utilised more, wind power may be limited and vice versa. The system still relies...

  1. Production of small diameter high-temperature-strength refractory metal wires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrasek, D. W.; Signorelli, R. A.; King, G. W.

    1973-01-01

    Special thermomechanical techniques (schedules) have been developed to produce small diameter wire from three refractory metal alloys: colombian base alloy, tantalum base alloy, and tungsten base alloy. High strengths of these wires indicate their potential for contributing increased strength to metallic composites.

  2. Physicochemical Processes and the Evolution of Strength in Calcite Fault Gouge at Room Temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carpenter, B. M.; Viti, C.; Collettini, C.

    2015-12-01

    The presence of calcite in and near faults, as the dominant material, cement, or vein fill, indicates that the mechanical behavior of carbonate-dominated material likely plays an important role in shallow- and mid-crustal faulting. Furthermore, a variety of physical and chemical processes control the evolution of strength and style of slip along seismogenic faults and thus play a critical role in the seismic cycle. Determining the role and contributions of these types of mechanisms is essential to furthering our understanding of the processes and timescales that lead to the strengthening of faults during interseismic periods and their behavior during the earthquake nucleation process. To further our understanding of these processes, we performed laboratory-shearing experiments on calcite gouge at normal stresses from 1 to 100 MPa, under conditions of saturation and at room temperature. We performed velocity stepping (0.1-1000μm/s) and slide-hold-slide (1-3000s) tests, to measure the velocity dependence of friction and the amount of frictional strengthening respectively, under saturated conditions with pore fluid that was in equilibrium with CaCO3. At 5 MPa normal stress, we also varied the environmental conditions by performing experiments under conditions of 5% RH and 50 % RH, and saturation with: silicone oil, demineralized water, and the equilibrated solution combined with 0.5M NaCl. Finally, we collected post experimental samples for microscopic analysis. Our combined analyses of rate-dependence, strengthening behavior, and microstructures show that calcite fault gouge transitions from brittle to semi-brittle behavior at high normal stress and low sliding velocities. Furthermore, our results also highlight how changes in pore water chemistry can have significant influence on the mechanical behavior of calcite gouge in both the laboratory and in natural faults. Our observations have important implications for earthquake nucleation and propagation on faults in

  3. Relationship of magnetic field strength and brightness of fine-structure elements in the solar temperature minimum region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, J. W.; Ewing, J. A.

    1990-01-01

    A quantitative relationship was determined between magnetic field strength (or magnetic flux) from photospheric magnetograph observations and the brightness temperature of solar fine-structure elements observed at 1600 A, where the predominant flux source is continuum emission from the solar temperature minimum region. A Kitt Peak magnetogram and spectroheliograph observations at 1600 A taken during a sounding rocket flight of the High Resolution Telescope and Spectrograph from December 11, 1987 were used. The statistical distributions of brightness temperature in the quiet sun at 1600 A, and absolute value of magnetic field strength in the same area were determined from these observations. Using a technique which obtains the best-fit relationship of a given functional form between these two histogram distributions, a quantitative relationship was determined between absolute value of magnetic field strength B and brightness temperature which is essentially linear from 10 to 150 G. An interpretation is suggested, in which a basal heating occurs generally, while brighter elements are produced in magnetic regions with temperature enhancements proportional to B.

  4. Evolution of the solar wind proton temperature anisotropy from 0.3 to 2.5 AU

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Matteini, L.; Landi, S.; Hellinger, Petr; Pantellini, F.; Maksimovic, M.; Velli, M.; Goldstein, B. E.; Marsch, E.

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 34, č. 20 (2007), L20105/1-L20105/5 ISSN 0094-8276 Grant - others:ASI(IT) I/015/07/0 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z30420517 Keywords : Proton temperature anisotropy * solar wind * radial evolution * observations Subject RIV: BL - Plasma and Gas Discharge Physics Impact factor: 2.744, year: 2007

  5. Using sonic anemometer temperature to measure sensible heat flux in strong winds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. P. Burns

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Sonic anemometers simultaneously measure the turbulent fluctuations of vertical wind (w' and sonic temperature (Ts', and are commonly used to measure sensible heat flux (H. Our study examines 30-min heat fluxes measured with a Campbell Scientific CSAT3 sonic anemometer above a subalpine forest. We compared H calculated with Ts to H calculated with a co-located thermocouple and found that, for horizontal wind speed (U less than 8 m s−1, the agreement was around ±30 W m−2. However, for U ≈ 8 m s−1, the CSAT H had a generally positive deviation from H calculated with the thermocouple, reaching a maximum difference of ≈250 W m−2 at U ≈ 18 m s−1. With version 4 of the CSAT firmware, we found significant underestimation of the speed of sound and thus Ts in high winds (due to a delayed detection of the sonic pulse, which resulted in the large CSAT heat flux errors. Although this Ts error is qualitatively similar to the well-known fundamental correction for the crosswind component, it is quantitatively different and directly related to the firmware estimation of the pulse arrival time. For a CSAT running version 3 of the firmware, there does not appear to be a significant underestimation of Ts; however, a Ts error similar to that of version 4 may occur if the CSAT is sufficiently out of calibration. An empirical correction to the CSAT heat flux that is consistent with our conceptual understanding of the Ts error is presented. Within a broader context, the surface energy balance is used to evaluate the heat flux measurements, and the usefulness of side-by-side instrument comparisons is discussed.

  6. Summer planetary-scale oscillations: aura MLS temperature compared with ground-based radar wind

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. E. Meek

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available The advent of satellite based sampling brings with it the opportunity to examine virtually any part of the globe. Aura MLS mesospheric temperature data are analysed in a wavelet format for easy identification of possible planetary waves (PW and aliases masquerading as PW. A calendar year, 2005, of eastward, stationary, and westward waves at a selected latitude is shown in separate panels for wave number range −3 to +3 for period range 8 h to 30 days (d. Such a wavelet analysis is made possible by Aura's continuous sampling at all latitudes 82° S–82° N. The data presentation is suitable for examination of years of data. However this paper focuses on the striking feature of a "dish-shaped" upper limit to periods near 2 d in mid-summer, with longer periods appearing towards spring and fall, a feature also commonly seen in radar winds. The most probable cause is suggested to be filtering by the summer jet at 70–80 km, the latter being available from ground based medium frequency radar (MFR. Classically, the phase velocity of a wave must be greater than that of the jet in order to propagate through it. As an attempt to directly relate satellite and ground based sampling, a PW event of period 8d and wave number 2, which appears to be the original rather than an alias, is compared with ground based radar wind data. An appendix discusses characteristics of satellite data aliases with regard to their periods and amplitudes.

  7. Effect of temperature on structural quality of the cement paste and high-strength concrete with silica fume

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Janotka, Ivan; Nuernbergerova, Terezia

    2005-01-01

    Experimental investigation conducted to study the thermo-mechanical properties of concrete at Temelin (Czech Republic), Mochovce (Slovakia), and Penly (France) nuclear power plants reveals structural integrity degradation between 100 and 200 deg C due to both a loss of water bound in hydrated cement minerals and subsequently air void formation. Test results indicate changes in strength, average pore radius and calculated permeability coefficients for Mochovce specimens exposed to temperatures up to 400 deg C. It demonstrates that the permeability coefficient measured on the basis of pore sizes using mercury intrusion porosimetry is suitable technique for the evaluation of concrete quality. It confirms that strength and permeability coefficient are equivalent structural quality variables of concrete. At 400 deg C gel-like hydration products are decomposed, at 600 deg C Ca(OH) 2 is dehydroxylated, and CaCO 3 dissociation to CaO and CO 2 accompanied with the re-crystallisation of non-binding phases from hydrated cement under re-combustion are dominant processes between 600 and 800 deg C. This stage of concrete is characterised by the collapse of its structural integrity, revealing residual compressive strength. This paper reports high-strength concrete behaviour subjected to temperatures up to 200 deg C. In accordance with previous results, research studies of structure-property relation show the changes in strength, dynamic modulus of elasticity, strain-stress behaviour, and shrinkage-induced deformations influenced by a hydrate phase decomposition. Volume reduction of the hydrate phase due to the loss of bound water mass is the cause of air void formation, and pore structure coarsening. The main attention is herein devoted to the evaluation of utility property decrease of high-strength concrete and microstructure degradation of the cement paste with the same composition than that in concrete when attacked by elevated temperatures

  8. Medical Meteorology: the Relationship between Meteorological Parameters (Humidity, Rainfall, Wind, and Temperature) and Brucellosis in Zanjan Province

    OpenAIRE

    Yousefali Abedini; Nahideh Mohammadi; Koorosh Kamali; Mohsen Ahadnejad; Mehdi Azari

    2016-01-01

    Background: Brucellosis (Malta fever) is a major contagious zoonotic disease, with economic and public health importance. Methods To assess the effect of meteorological (temperature, rainfall, humidity, and wind) and climate parameters on incidence of brucellosis, brucellosis distribution and meteorological zoning maps of Zanjan Province were prepared using Inverse Distance Weighting (IDW) and Kriging technique in Arc GIS medium. Zoning maps of mean temperature, rainfall, humidity, and win...

  9. Effect of hot extrusion, other constituents, and temperature on the strength and fracture of polycrystalline MgO

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rice, R.W. (W.R. Grace and Co.-Conn, Columbia, MD (United States))

    1993-12-01

    Improved agreement was confirmed between the Petch intercept and single-crystal yield stresses at 22 C. Hot-extruded MgO crystal specimens stressed parallel with the resultant axial texture (1) gave the highest and least-scattered strength-grain size results at 22 C, (2) showed direct fractographic evidence of microplastic initiated fracture at 22 C and showed macroscopic yield at 1,315 and especially 1,540 C, and (3) fractured entirely via transgranular cleavage, except for intergranular failure initiation from one or a few grain boundary surfaces exposed on the subsequent fracture surface, mainly at 1,540 C. Hot-extruded, hot-pressed MgO billets gave comparable strength when fracture initiated transgranularly, but lower strength when fracture initiated from one or especially a few grain boundary surfaces exposed on the fracture. The extent and frequency of such boundary fracture increased with test temperature. While oxide additions of [<=] 5% or impurities in hot-pressed or hot-extruded MgO can make limited strength increases at larger grain sizes, those having limited solubility can limit strength at finer grain sizes, as can coarser surface finish. Overall, MgO strength is seen as a balance between flaw and microplastic controlled failure, with several parameters shifting the balance.

  10. Wind-sea surface temperature-sea ice relationship in the Chukchi-Beaufort Seas during autumn

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jing; Stegall, Steve T.; Zhang, Xiangdong

    2018-03-01

    Dramatic climate changes, especially the largest sea ice retreat during September and October, in the Chukchi-Beaufort Seas could be a consequence of, and further enhance, complex air-ice-sea interactions. To detect these interaction signals, statistical relationships between surface wind speed, sea surface temperature (SST), and sea ice concentration (SIC) were analyzed. The results show a negative correlation between wind speed and SIC. The relationships between wind speed and SST are complicated by the presence of sea ice, with a negative correlation over open water but a positive correlation in sea ice dominated areas. The examination of spatial structures indicates that wind speed tends to increase when approaching the ice edge from open water and the area fully covered by sea ice. The anomalous downward radiation and thermal advection, as well as their regional distribution, play important roles in shaping these relationships, though wind-driven sub-grid scale boundary layer processes may also have contributions. Considering the feedback loop involved in the wind-SST-SIC relationships, climate model experiments would be required to further untangle the underlying complex physical processes.

  11. High Time-Resolved Kinetic Temperatures of Solar Wind Minor Ions Measured with SOHO/CELIAS/CTOF

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janitzek, N. P.; Berger, L.; Drews, C.; Wimmer-Schweingruber, R. F.

    2017-12-01

    Solar wind heavy ions with an atomic number Z > 2 are referred to as minor ions since they represent a fraction of less than one percent of all solar wind ions. They can be therefore regarded as test particles, only reacting to but not driving the dynamics of the solar wind plasma, which makes them a unique diagnostic tool for plasma wave phenomena both in the solar atmosphere and the extended heliosphere. In the past, several studies have investigated the kinetic temperatures of minor ions, but due to low counting statistics these studies are based on ion velocity distribution functions (VDFs) recorded over time periods of several hours. The Charge Time-Of-Flight (CTOF) mass spectrometer as part of the Charge, ELement and Isotope Analysis System (CELIAS) onboard the SOlar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO) provides solar wind heavy ion 1D radial VDFs with excellent charge state separation, an unprecedented cadence of 5 minutes and very high counting statistics, exceeding similar state-of-the-art instruments by a factor of ten. In our study, based on CTOF measurements at Langrangian point L1 between DOY 150 and DOY 220 in 1996, we investigate systematically the influence of the VDF time resolution on the derived kinetic temperatures for solar wind silicon and iron ions. The selected ion set spans a wide range of mass-per-charge from 3 amu/e heavy ions with ion-cyclotron waves.

  12. The Effect Of Processing Temperature On Bending Strength Of Coated Steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hishamuddin Husain; Abdul Razak Daud; Muhamad Daud; Zaifol Samsu; Julie Andrianny Murshidi

    2014-01-01

    Steel is the most common materials used as structural materials in industries. It is due its strength and low cost. There are several methods used in protecting steels against corrosion. One of them is through hot dipped coating. In this study, mechanical properties of stainless steel type 304, 316L and mild steel before and after hot dipped aluminising was investigated. The bending strength was determined by using three-point bend test and the hardness of the samples was determined by hardness test. Finally, the microstructure of the samples was investigated by using optical microscope. From the result obtained, we can conclude that strength of heated samples was decreased by heating but showed increment after application of coating. Although the strength for coated layer would decrease as compared to bare steel, it has great potential to increase the corrosion protection. (author)

  13. Leaf temperature and transpiration of rice plants in relation to short-wave radiation and wind speed

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ito, D.; Haseba, T.

    1984-01-01

    Leaf temperature and transpiration amount of rice plants were measured in a steady environment in a laboratory and in field situations. The plants set in Wagner pots were used. Experiments were carried out at the tillering and booting stages, and on the date of maturity. Measured leaf temperatures and transpiration rates were analyzed in connection with incident short-wave radiation on a leaf and wind speed measured simultaneously.Instantaneous supplying and turning-off of steady artificial light caused cyclic changes in leaf temperature and transpiration. Leaf temperature dropped in feeble illumination compared with the steady temperature in the preceeding dark.On the date of maturity, a rice plant leaf was warmer than the air, even in feeble light. Then, the leaf-air temperature difference and transpiration rate showed approximately linear increases with short-wave radiation intensity. On the same date, an increase in wind speed produced a decrease in leaf-air temperature difference, i.e., leaf temperature dropped, and an increase in transpiration rate. The rates of both changes in leaf temperature and transpiration rate were fairly large in a range of wind speed below about 1m/s.For rice plants growing favorably from the tillering stage through the booting stage, the leaves were considerably cooler than the air, even in an intense light and/or solar radiation. The leaf temperature showed the lowest value at short-wave radiations between 0.15 and 0.20ly/min, at above which the leaf temperature rised with an increase in short-wave radiation until it approached the air temperature. Transpiration rate of rice plants increased rapidly with an increase in short-wave radiation ranging below 0.2 or 0.3ly/min, at above which the increase in transpiration rate slowed.The relationships between leaf temperature and/or transpiration rate and wind speed and/or incident short-wave radiation (solar radiation) which were obtained experimentally, supported the relationships

  14. Influence of atmospheric pressure low-temperature plasma treatment on the shear bond strength between zirconia and resin cement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, Yuki; Okawa, Takahisa; Fukumoto, Takahiro; Tsurumi, Akiko; Tatsuta, Mitsuhiro; Fujii, Takamasa; Tanaka, Junko; Tanaka, Masahiro

    2016-10-01

    Zirconia exhibits excellent strength and high biocompatibility in technological applications and it is has therefore been investigated for clinical applications and research. Before setting prostheses, a crown prosthesis inner surface is sandblasted with alumina to remove contaminants and form small cavities. This alumina sandblasting causes stress-induced phase transition of zirconia. Atmospheric-pressure low-temperature plasma has been applied in the dental industry, particularly for adhesives, as a surface treatment to activate the surface energy and remove contaminants. The purpose of this study was to examine the influence of atmospheric-pressure low-temperature plasma treatment on the shear bond strength between zirconia and adhesive resin cement. The surface treatment method was classified into three groups: untreated (Cont group), alumina sandblast treatment (Sb group), and atmospheric-pressure low-temperature plasma treatment (Ps group). Adhesive resin cement was applied to stainless steel and bonded to zirconia. Shear adhesion tests were performed after complete hardening of the cement. Multiple comparisons were performed using a one-way analysis of variance and the Bonferroni method. X-ray diffractometry was used to examine the change in zirconia crystal structure. Statistically significant differences were noted between the control and Sb groups and between the control and Ps groups. In contrast, no statistically significant differences were noted for the Ps and Sb bond strength. Atmospheric-pressure low-temperature plasma treatment did not affect the zirconia crystal structure. Atmospheric-pressure low-temperature plasma treatment improves the bonding strength of adhesive resin cement as effectively as alumina sandblasting, and does not alter the zirconia crystal structure. Copyright © 2016 Japan Prosthodontic Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. The Effects of Industrial Protective Gloves and Hand Skin Temperatures on Hand Grip Strength and Discomfort Rating

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed Z. Ramadan

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Daily working activities and functions require a high contribution of hand and forearm muscles in executing grip force. To study the effects of wearing different gloves on grip strength, under a variety of hand skin temperatures, an assessment of the maximum grip strength was performed with 32 healthy male workers with a mean age (standard deviation of 30.44 (5.35 years wearing five industrial gloves at three hand skin temperatures. Their ages and anthropometric characteristics including body mass index (BMI, hand length, hand width, hand depth, hand palm, and wrist circumference were measured. The hand was exposed to different bath temperatures (5 °C, 25 °C, and 45 °C and hand grip strength was measured using a Jamar hydraulic hand dynamometer with and without wearing the gloves (chemical protection glove, rubber insulating glove, anti-vibration impact glove, cotton yarn knitted glove, and RY-WG002 working glove. The data were analyzed using the Shapiro–Wilk test, Pearson correlation coefficient, Tukey test, and analysis of variance (ANOVA of the within-subject design analysis. The results showed that wearing gloves significantly affected the maximum grip strength. Wearing the RY-WG002 working glove produced a greater reduction on the maximum grip when compared with the bare hand, while low temperatures (5 °C had a significant influence on grip when compared to medium (25 °C and high (45 °C hand skin temperatures. In addition, participants felt more discomfort in both environmental extreme conditions. Furthermore, they reported more discomfort while wearing neoprene, rubber, and RY-WG002 working gloves.

  16. The Effects of Industrial Protective Gloves and Hand Skin Temperatures on Hand Grip Strength and Discomfort Rating.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramadan, Mohamed Z

    2017-12-04

    Daily working activities and functions require a high contribution of hand and forearm muscles in executing grip force. To study the effects of wearing different gloves on grip strength, under a variety of hand skin temperatures, an assessment of the maximum grip strength was performed with 32 healthy male workers with a mean age (standard deviation) of 30.44 (5.35) years wearing five industrial gloves at three hand skin temperatures. Their ages and anthropometric characteristics including body mass index (BMI), hand length, hand width, hand depth, hand palm, and wrist circumference were measured. The hand was exposed to different bath temperatures (5 °C, 25 °C, and 45 °C) and hand grip strength was measured using a Jamar hydraulic hand dynamometer with and without wearing the gloves (chemical protection glove, rubber insulating glove, anti-vibration impact glove, cotton yarn knitted glove, and RY-WG002 working glove). The data were analyzed using the Shapiro-Wilk test, Pearson correlation coefficient, Tukey test, and analysis of variance (ANOVA) of the within-subject design analysis. The results showed that wearing gloves significantly affected the maximum grip strength. Wearing the RY-WG002 working glove produced a greater reduction on the maximum grip when compared with the bare hand, while low temperatures (5 °C) had a significant influence on grip when compared to medium (25 °C) and high (45 °C) hand skin temperatures. In addition, participants felt more discomfort in both environmental extreme conditions. Furthermore, they reported more discomfort while wearing neoprene, rubber, and RY-WG002 working gloves.

  17. Ultimate Tensile Strength as a Function of Test Rate for Various Ceramic Matrix Composites at Elevated Temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Sung R.; Bansal, Narottam P.; Gyekenyesi, John P.

    2002-01-01

    Ultimate tensile strength of five different continuous fiber-reinforced ceramic composites, including SiC/BSAS (2D 2 types), SiC/MAS-5 (2D), SiC/SiC (2D enhanced), and C/SiC(2D) was determined as a function of test rate at I 100 to 1200 'C in air. All five composite materials exhibited a significant dependency of ultimate strength on test rate such that the ultimate strength decreased with decreasing test rate, similar to the behavior observed in many advanced monolithic ceramics at elevated temperatures. The application of the preloading technique as well as the prediction of life from one loading configuration (constant stress rate) to another (constant stress loading) for SiC/BSAS suggested that the overall macroscopic failure mechanism of the composites would be the one governed by a power-law type of damage evolution/accumulation, analogous to slow crack growth commonly observed in advanced monolithic ceramics.

  18. Influence of magnetic arc oscillation and current pulsing on microstructure and high temperature tensile strength of alloy 718 TIG weldments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sivaprasad, K.; Ganesh Sundara Raman, S.; Mastanaiah, P.; Madhusudhan Reddy, G.

    2006-01-01

    The aim of the present work is to study the effect of magnetic arc oscillation and current pulsing on the microstructure and high temperature tensile strength of alloy 718 tungsten inert gas weldments. The magnetic arc oscillation technique resulted in refined Laves phase with lesser interconnectivity. The full benefits of current pulsing in breaking the dendrites could not be realized in the present study due to relatively higher heat input used in the welding process. In the direct aged condition weldments prepared using magnetic arc oscillation technique exhibited higher tensile strength due to the presence of refined and lesser-interconnected Laves particles. In the solution treated and aged condition, magnetic arc oscillated weldments exhibited lower tensile strength compared with the weldments made without arc oscillation due to the presence of large amounts of finer δ needles

  19. The effect of addition of primary positive salts, complex salt, on the ionic strength and rate constant at various temperatures by reaction kinetics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurade, S. S.; Ramteke, A. A.

    2018-05-01

    In this work, we have investigated the rate of reaction by using ionic strength at different temperatures. The main goal of this experiment is to determine the relation between ionic strength with reaction rate, reaction time and rate constant with temperature. It is observed that the addition of positive salt indicate the increasing ionic strength with increase in run time at various temperatures. Thus the temperature affects the speed of reaction and mechanism by which chemical reaction occurs and time variable plays vital role in the progress of reaction at different temperatures.

  20. Comprehensive wind correction for a Rayleigh Doppler lidar from atmospheric temperature and pressure influences and Mie contamination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shangguan Ming-Jia; Xia Hai-Yun; Dou Xian-Kang; Wang Chong; Qiu Jia-Wei; Zhang Yun-Peng; Shu Zhi-Feng; Xue Xiang-Hui

    2015-01-01

    A correction considering the effects of atmospheric temperature, pressure, and Mie contamination must be performed for wind retrieval from a Rayleigh Doppler lidar (RDL), since the so-called Rayleigh response is directly related to the convolution of the optical transmission of the frequency discriminator and the Rayleigh–Brillouin spectrum of the molecular backscattering. Thus, real-time and on-site profiles of atmospheric pressure, temperature, and aerosols should be provided as inputs to the wind retrieval. Firstly, temperature profiles under 35 km and above the altitude are retrieved, respectively, from a high spectral resolution lidar (HSRL) and a Rayleigh integration lidar (RIL) incorporating to the RDL. Secondly, the pressure profile is taken from the European Center for Medium range Weather Forecast (ECMWF) analysis, while radiosonde data are not available. Thirdly, the Klett–Fernald algorithms are adopted to estimate the Mie and Rayleigh components in the atmospheric backscattering. After that, the backscattering ratio is finally determined in a nonlinear fitting of the transmission of the atmospheric backscattering through the Fabry–Perot interferometer (FPI) to a proposed model. In the validation experiments, wind profiles from the lidar show good agreement with the radiosonde in the overlapping altitude. Finally, a continuous wind observation shows the stability of the correction scheme. (paper)

  1. How severe plastic deformation at cryogenic temperature affects strength, fatigue, and impact behaviour of grade 2 titanium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mendes, Anibal; Kliauga, Andrea M; Ferrante, Maurizio; Sordi, Vitor L

    2014-01-01

    Samples of grade 2 Ti were processed by Equal Channel Angular Pressing (ECAP), either isolated or followed by further deformation by rolling at room temperature and at 170 K. The main interest of the present work was the evaluation of the effect of cryogenic rolling on tensile strength, fatigue limit and Charpy impact absorbed energy. Results show a progressive improvement of strength and endurance limit in the following order: ECAP; ECAP followed by room temperature rolling and ECAP followed by cryogenic rolling. From the examination of the fatigued samples a ductile fracture mode was inferred in all cases; also, the sample processed by cryogenic rolling showed very small and shallow dimples and a small fracture zone, confirming the agency of strength on the fatigue behaviour. The Charpy impact energy followed a similar pattern, with the exception that ECAP produced only a small improvement over the coarse-grained material. Motives for the efficiency of cryogenic deformation by rolling are the reduced grain size and the association of strength and ductility. The production of favourable deformation textures must also be considered

  2. How severe plastic deformation at cryogenic temperature affects strength, fatigue, and impact behaviour of grade 2 titanium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendes, Anibal; Kliauga, Andrea M.; Ferrante, Maurizio; Sordi, Vitor L.

    2014-08-01

    Samples of grade 2 Ti were processed by Equal Channel Angular Pressing (ECAP), either isolated or followed by further deformation by rolling at room temperature and at 170 K. The main interest of the present work was the evaluation of the effect of cryogenic rolling on tensile strength, fatigue limit and Charpy impact absorbed energy. Results show a progressive improvement of strength and endurance limit in the following order: ECAP; ECAP followed by room temperature rolling and ECAP followed by cryogenic rolling. From the examination of the fatigued samples a ductile fracture mode was inferred in all cases; also, the sample processed by cryogenic rolling showed very small and shallow dimples and a small fracture zone, confirming the agency of strength on the fatigue behaviour. The Charpy impact energy followed a similar pattern, with the exception that ECAP produced only a small improvement over the coarse-grained material. Motives for the efficiency of cryogenic deformation by rolling are the reduced grain size and the association of strength and ductility. The production of favourable deformation textures must also be considered.

  3. Hydrolysis, formation and ionization constants at 250C, and at high temperature-high ionic strength

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Phillips, S.L.; Phillips, C.A.; Skeen, J.

    1985-02-01

    Thermochemical data for nuclear waste disposal are compiled. The resulting computerized database consists of critically evaluated data on Gibbs energy of formation, enthalpy of formation, entropy and heat capacity of selected substances for about 16 elements at 25 0 C and zero ionic strength. Elements covered are Am, As, Br, C, Cl, F, I, Mo, Np, N, O, P, Pu, Si, Sr, S, and U. Values of these thermodynamic properties were used to calculate equilibrium quotients for hydrolysis, complexation and ionization reactions up to 300 0 C and 3 ionic strength, for selected chemical reactions

  4. Microstructural effects on the yield strength and its temperature dependence in a bainitic precipitation hardened Cr-Mo-V steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toerroenen, K.; Kotilainen, H.; Nenonen, P.

    1980-03-01

    The plastic deformation behaviour of a precipitation hardened bainitic Cr-Mo-V steel is analyzed at ambient and low temperatures. The temperature dependent component of the yield strength is composed of the Peierls-Nabarro force and also partly of the strengthening contribution of the lath- and cell boundaries or the solid solution hardening. The temperature dependence below 230 K is in accordance with the models presented by Yanoshevich and Ryvkina as well as Dorn and Rajnak. The temperature independent component can be calculated merely from the dislocation density, which is stabilized by the vanadium-rich carbides. The linear additivity cannot be used for the superposition of the strengthening effects of various strengthening parameters, By using the phenomenological approach starting from the dislocation movement mechanisms upon yielding the laws for the superposition are discussed. (author)

  5. Stratospheric temperature measurement with scanning Fabry-Perot interferometer for wind retrieval from mobile Rayleigh Doppler lidar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Haiyun; Dou, Xiankang; Shangguan, Mingjia; Zhao, Ruocan; Sun, Dongsong; Wang, Chong; Qiu, Jiawei; Shu, Zhifeng; Xue, Xianghui; Han, Yuli; Han, Yan

    2014-09-08

    Temperature detection remains challenging in the low stratosphere, where the Rayleigh integration lidar is perturbed by aerosol contamination and ozone absorption while the rotational Raman lidar is suffered from its low scattering cross section. To correct the impacts of temperature on the Rayleigh Doppler lidar, a high spectral resolution lidar (HSRL) based on cavity scanning Fabry-Perot Interferometer (FPI) is developed. By considering the effect of the laser spectral width, Doppler broadening of the molecular backscatter, divergence of the light beam and mirror defects of the FPI, a well-behaved transmission function is proved to show the principle of HSRL in detail. Analysis of the statistical error of the HSRL is carried out in the data processing. A temperature lidar using both HSRL and Rayleigh integration techniques is incorporated into the Rayleigh Doppler wind lidar. Simultaneous wind and temperature detection is carried out based on the combined system at Delhi (37.371°N, 97.374°E; 2850 m above the sea level) in Qinghai province, China. Lower Stratosphere temperature has been measured using HSRL between 18 and 50 km with temporal resolution of 2000 seconds. The statistical error of the derived temperatures is between 0.2 and 9.2 K. The temperature profile retrieved from the HSRL and wind profile from the Rayleigh Doppler lidar show good agreement with the radiosonde data. Specifically, the max temperature deviation between the HSRL and radiosonde is 4.7 K from 18 km to 36 km, and it is 2.7 K between the HSRL and Rayleigh integration lidar from 27 km to 34 km.

  6. Armature reaction effects on a high temperature superconducting field winding of an synchronous machine: experimental results

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mijatovic, Nenad; Jensen, Bogi Bech

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents experimental results from the Superwind laboratory setup. Particular focus in the paper has been placed on describing and quantifying the influence of armature reaction on performance of the HTS filed winding. Presented experimental results have confirmed the HTS field winding...

  7. A Fully Transparent Flexible Sensor for Cryogenic Temperatures Based on High Strength Metallurgical Graphene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryszard Pawlak

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Low-temperature electronics operating in below zero temperatures or even below the lower limit of the common −65 to 125 °C temperature range are essential in medical diagnostics, in space exploration and aviation, in processing and storage of food and mainly in scientific research, like superconducting materials engineering and their applications—superconducting magnets, superconducting energy storage, and magnetic levitation systems. Such electronic devices demand special approach to the materials used in passive elements and sensors. The main goal of this work was the implementation of a fully transparent, flexible cryogenic temperature sensor with graphene structures as sensing element. Electrodes were made of transparent ITO (Indium Tin Oxide or ITO/Ag/ITO conductive layers by laser ablation and finally encapsulated in a polymer coating. A helium closed-cycle cryostat has been used in measurements of the electrical properties of these graphene-based temperature sensors under cryogenic conditions. The sensors were repeatedly cooled from room temperature to cryogenic temperature. Graphene structures were characterized using Raman spectroscopy. The observation of the resistance changes as a function of temperature indicates the potential use of graphene layers in the construction of temperature sensors. The temperature characteristics of the analyzed graphene sensors exhibit no clear anomalies or strong non-linearity in the entire studied temperature range (as compared to the typical carbon sensor.

  8. Tensile Adhesion Strength of Biomass Ash Deposits: Effect of the Temperature Gradient and Ash Chemistry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laxminarayan, Yashasvi; Nair, Akhilesh Balachandran; Jensen, Peter Arendt

    2018-01-01

    Replacing coal with biomass in power plants is a viable option for reducing net CO2 emissions and combating climate change. However, biomass combustion in boilers may exacerbate problems related to ash deposition and corrosion, demanding effective deposit removal. The tensile adhesion strength...

  9. Effects of trade-wind strength and direction on the leeside circulations and rainfall of the island of Hawaii

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang Yang; Yi-Leng Chen; Francis M. Fujioka

    2009-01-01

    The leeside circulations and weather of the island of Hawaii were studied from the fifth-generation Pennsylvania State University–NCAR Mesoscale Model (MM5) land surface model simulations for eight strong (∼7.9 m s−1) and eight weak (∼5.2 m s−1) trade-wind days and for five days with southeasterly trades (∼7.1 m s

  10. The determining impact of coiling temperature on the microstructure and mechanical properties of a titanium-niobium ultrahigh strength microalloyed steel: Competing effects of precipitation and bainite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Natarajan, V.V.; Challa, V.S.A. [Laboratory for Excellence in Advanced Steel Research, Materials Science and Engineering Program, Department of Metallurgical, Materials and Biomedical Engineering, 500 W. University Avenue, University of Texas at El Paso, El Paso, TX 79968 (United States); Misra, R.D.K., E-mail: dmisra2@utep.edu [Laboratory for Excellence in Advanced Steel Research, Materials Science and Engineering Program, Department of Metallurgical, Materials and Biomedical Engineering, 500 W. University Avenue, University of Texas at El Paso, El Paso, TX 79968 (United States); Sidorenko, D.M.; Mulholland, M.D.; Manohar, M.; Hartmann, J.E. [ArcelorMittal Global R& D Center, 3001 East Columbus Drive, East Chicago, IN 46312 (United States)

    2016-05-17

    We elucidate here the influence of coiling temperature on the microstructure and mechanical properties, in an ultrahigh strength titanium-niobium microalloyed steel. The objective was to underscore the impact of coiling temperature on the nature and distribution of microstructural constituents (including different phases, precipitates, and dislocation structure) that significantly contributed to differences in the yield and tensile strength of these steels. Depending on the coiling temperature, the microstructure consisted of either a combination of fine lath-type bainite and polygonal ferrite or polygonal ferrite together with the precipitation of microalloyed carbides of size ~2–10 nm in the matrix and at dislocations. The microstructure of steel coiled at lower temperature predominantly consisted of bainitic ferrite with lower yield strength compared to the steel coiled at higher temperature, and the yield to tensile strength ratio was 0.76. The steel coiled at higher temperature consisted of polygonal ferrite and extensive precipitation of carbides and was characterized by higher yield strength and with yield strength/tensile strength ratio of 0.936. The difference in the tensile strength was insignificant for the two coiling temperatures. The observed microstructure was consistent with the continuous cooling transformation diagram.

  11. ION KINETIC ENERGY CONSERVATION AND MAGNETIC FIELD STRENGTH CONSTANCY IN MULTI-FLUID SOLAR WIND ALFVÉNIC TURBULENCE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matteini, L.; Horbury, T. S.; Schwartz, S. J. [The Blackett Laboratory, Imperial College London, SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom); Pantellini, F. [LESIA, Observatoire de Paris, CNRS, UPMC, Universit Paris-Diderot, 5 Place Jules Janssen, F-92195 Meudon (France); Velli, M. [Department of Earth, Planetary, and Space Sciences, UCLA, California (United States)

    2015-03-20

    We investigate the properties of plasma fluid motion in the large-amplitude, low-frequency fluctuations of highly Alfvénic fast solar wind. We show that protons locally conserve total kinetic energy when observed from an effective frame of reference comoving with the fluctuations. For typical properties of the fast wind, this frame can be reasonably identified by alpha particles which, due to their drift with respect to protons at about the Alfvén speed along the magnetic field, do not partake in the fluid low-frequency fluctuations. Using their velocity to transform the proton velocity into the frame of Alfvénic turbulence, we demonstrate that the resulting plasma motion is characterized by a constant absolute value of the velocity, zero electric fields, and aligned velocity and magnetic field vectors as expected for unidirectional Alfvénic fluctuations in equilibrium. We propose that this constraint, via the correlation between velocity and magnetic field in Alfvénic turbulence, is the origin of the observed constancy of the magnetic field; while the constant velocity corresponding to constant energy can only be observed in the frame of the fluctuations, the corresponding constant total magnetic field, invariant for Galilean transformations, remains the observational signature in the spacecraft frame of the constant total energy in the Alfvén turbulence frame.

  12. Statistical modeling of temperature, humidity and wind fields in the atmospheric boundary layer over the Siberian region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lomakina, N. Ya.

    2017-11-01

    The work presents the results of the applied climatic division of the Siberian region into districts based on the methodology of objective classification of the atmospheric boundary layer climates by the "temperature-moisture-wind" complex realized with using the method of principal components and the special similarity criteria of average profiles and the eigen values of correlation matrices. On the territory of Siberia, it was identified 14 homogeneous regions for winter season and 10 regions were revealed for summer. The local statistical models were constructed for each region. These include vertical profiles of mean values, mean square deviations, and matrices of interlevel correlation of temperature, specific humidity, zonal and meridional wind velocity. The advantage of the obtained local statistical models over the regional models is shown.

  13. EFFECT OF ELEVATED TEMPERATURE ON COMPRESSIVE STRENGTH OF FIBER REINFORCED CONCRETE

    OpenAIRE

    Prashant shinkar*, Prof. Deepak kakade, Dr.A.P.Wadekar

    2017-01-01

    This paper deals with the mechanical properties of concrete with steel fibers subjected to temperatures up to 500°C. Now a day concrete are being used extensively in the construction that might be subjected to elevated temperatures. The behavior of concrete structures at elevated temperatures is of significant importance in predicting the safety of structures in response to certain accidents or particular service conditions. Concrete mixes of M 50 have been designed along with steel fibers fr...

  14. Heat and corrosion resistant cast CN-12 type stainless steel with improved high temperature strength and ductility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazias, Philip J.; McGreevy, Tim; Pollard,Michael James; Siebenaler, Chad W.; Swindeman, Robert W.

    2007-08-14

    A cast stainless steel alloy and articles formed therefrom containing about 0.5 wt. % to about 10 wt. % manganese, 0.02 wt. % to 0.50 wt. % N, and less than 0.15 wt. % sulfur provides high temperature strength both in the matrix and at the grain boundaries without reducing ductility due to cracking along boundaries with continuous or nearly-continuous carbides. Alloys of the present invention also have increased nitrogen solubility thereby enhancing strength at all temperatures because nitride precipitates or nitrogen porosity during casting are not observed. The solubility of nitrogen is dramatically enhanced by the presence of manganese, which also retains or improves the solubility of carbon thereby providing additional solid solution strengthening due to the presence of manganese and nitrogen, and combined carbon. Such solution strengthening enhances the high temperature precipitation-strengthening benefits of fine dispersions of NbC. Such solid solution effects also enhance the stability of the austenite matrix from resistance to excess sigma phase or chrome carbide formation at higher service temperatures. The presence of sulfides is substantially eliminated.

  15. EN AW-4032 T6 Piston Alloy After High-Temperature Exposure: Residual Strength and Microstructural Features

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balducci, Eleonora; Ceschini, Lorella; Morri, Alessandro; Morri, Andrea

    2017-08-01

    This study aims to evaluate the effects of prolonged thermal exposure on both microstructural evolution and mechanical properties of the EN AW-4032 T6 piston alloy. For the purpose, the experimental activities have been carried out on samples machined from forged and heat-treated automotive pistons. The effects of overaging have been investigated in the temperature range of 140-290 °C, firstly by evaluating the time-temperature-hardness curves and then by carrying out room-temperature tensile tests on overaged samples. The material softening was substantial and extremely rapid when the soaking temperature exceeded 250 °C. During overaging, both the tensile strength and the residual hardness considerably decreased, and a relationship between these parameters has been established. The alloy behavior in the plastic field has been modeled according to the Hollomon's equation, showing that both the strain hardening exponent and the strength coefficient are a function of the residual hardness. The results were finally related to the corresponding microstructural changes: OM and FEG-SEM metallographic and fractographic analyses on overaged samples gave evidence of coarsened precipitates along the grain boundaries.

  16. An experimental study on the effects of temperature and magnetic field strength on the magnetorheological fluid stability and MR effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabbani, Yahya; Ashtiani, Mahshid; Hashemabadi, Seyed Hassan

    2015-06-14

    In this study, the stability and rheological properties of a suspension of carbonyl iron microparticles (CIMs) in silicone oil were investigated within a temperature range of 10 to 85 °C. The effect of adding two hydrophobic (stearic and palmitic) acids on the stability and magnetorheological effect of a suspension of CIMs in silicone oil was studied. According to the results, for preparing a stable and efficient magnetorheological (MR) fluid, additives should be utilized. Therefore, 3 wt% of stearic acid was added to the MR fluid which led to an enhancement of the fluid stability over 92% at 25 °C. By investigating shear stress variation due to the changes in the shear rate for acid-based MR fluids, the maximum yield stress was obtained by fitting the Bingham plastic rheological model at high shear rates. Based on the existing correlations of yield stress and either temperature or magnetic field strength, a new model was fitted to the experimental data to monitor the simultaneous effect of magnetic field strength and temperature on the maximum yield stress. The results demonstrated that as the magnetic field intensified or the temperature decreased, the maximum yield stress increased dramatically. In addition, when the MR fluid reached its magnetic saturation, the viscosity of fluid depended only on the shear rate.

  17. High-temperature strength of Nb-1%Zr alloy for irradiation-capsules inner-shell

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nomura, Yasushi; Nakata, Hirokatsu; Tanaka, Mitsuo; Fukaya, Kiyoshi.

    1978-04-01

    Coated fuel particles in capsules will be irradiated at about 1600 0 C in JMTR. Nb-1%Zr alloy was chosen for inner shell material of the capsules because of its sufficient strength at 1000 0 C and low induced radioactivity. Nb-1%Zr ingot produced by electron beam melting was formed into seamless tubes by hollowing and swaging, followed by annealing. Creep test in helium flow and tensile test in vacuum were made to examine mechanical strength of the Nb-1%Zr tubes at 1000 0 C. Following are the results; 1) 0.2% yield stress at 1000 0 C is about 6 kg/mm 2 . 2) 3000 hr creep rupture stress at 1000 0 C is about 6 kg/mm 2 . (auth.)

  18. Effect of grain-boundary crystallization on the high-temperature strength of silicon nitride

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierce, L. A.; Mieskowski, D. M.; Sanders, W. A.

    1986-01-01

    Si3N4 specimens having the composition 88.7 wt pct Si3N4-4.9 wt pct SiO2-6.4 wt pct Y2O3 were sintered at 2140 C under 25 atm N2 for 1 h and then subjected to a 5 h anneal at 1500 C. Crystallization of an amorphous grain-boundary phase resulted in the formation of Y2Si2O7. The short-time 1370 C strength of this material was compared with that of material of the same composition having no annealing treatment. No change in strength was noted. This is attributed to the refractory nature of the yttrium-rich grain-boundary phase (apparently identical in both glassy and crystalline phases) and the subsequent domination of the failure process by common processing flaws.

  19. Intermediate strength alloys for high temperature service in liquid-salt cooled energy systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muralidharan, Govindarajan; Wilson, Dane Francis; Holcomb, David Eugene

    2017-06-20

    An alloy consists essentially of, in terms of weight percent: 6 to 8.5 Cr, 5.5 to 13.5 Mo, 0.4 to 7.5 W, 1 to 2 Ti, 0.7 to 0.85 Mn, 0.05 to 0.3 Al, up to to 0.1 Co, 0.08 to 0.5 C, 1 to 5 Ta, 1 to 4 Nab, 1 to 3 Hf, balance Ni. The alloy is characterized by, at 850.degree. C., a yield strength of at least 36 Ksi, a tensile strength of at least 40 Ksi, a creep rupture life at 12 Ksi of at least 72.1 hours, and a corrosion rate, expressed in weight loss [g/(cm2sec)].times.10.sup.-11 during a 1000 hour immersion in liquid FLiNaK at 850.degree. C., in the range of 8 to 25.

  20. The negative effect of Zr addition on the high temperature strength in alumina-forming austenitic stainless steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moon, Joonoh; Jang, Min-Ho; Kang, Jun-Yun; Lee, Tae-Ho

    2014-01-01

    The effect of a Zr addition on the precipitation behavior and mechanical properties in Nb-containing alumina-forming austenitic (AFA) stainless steels was investigated using tensile tests, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) analysis. The TEM observation showed that a Zr addition led to the formation of a (Nb,Zr)(C,N) complex particle, which coarsened the Nb-rich carbonitride. Tensile tests were performed at an elevated temperature (700 °C), and both the tensile and yield strengths decreased with a Zr addition. This unexpected result of a Zr addition was due to the reduction of the precipitation strengthening by particle coarsening. - Highlights: • The effect of Zr on high temperature strength in AFA steel containing Nb was studied. • Both the tensile and yield strengths of an AFA steel decreased with Zr-addition. • This is due to the reduction of precipitation strengthening by particle coarsening. • Nb(C,N) and (Nb,Zr)(C,N) particles were precipitated in an AFA and Zr-added AFA steel. • The size of (Nb,Zr)(C,N) particle is much bigger than that of Nb(C,N) particle

  1. The effect of low temperatures on the fatigue of high-strength structural grade steels

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Walters, C.L.

    2014-01-01

    It is well-known that for fracture, ferritic steels undergo a sudden transition from ductile behavior at higher temperatures to brittle cleavage failure at lower temperatures. However, this phenomenon has not received much attention in the literature on fatigue. The so-called Fatigue Ductile-Brittle

  2. Metallographic anlaysis and strength investigation of different Be-Cu joints in the temperature range RT-3500C

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gervash, A.A.; Giniatouline, R.N.; Mazul, I.V.

    1995-01-01

    The goal of this work is to estimate the strength and structure of different Be-Cu joining techniques. Brazing, diffusion bonding and joint rolling methods were chosen as ITER Be-Cu joint method candidates. Selected for ITER application Be-Cu joints were produced as technological plates (30-50 mm x 50-100 mm x thickness). AR samples for farther investigations were cutted out from initial technological plates. To compare mechanical strength of selected Be-Cu joints tensile and shearing tests of chosen candidates were carried out in the temperature range RT - 350 degrees C. The metallographic analysis of Be-Cu crosssection was also done. Preliminary results of these tests as well as metallographic analysis data are presented. The industrial possibilities of producing required for ITER full scale Be-Cu joints are discussed

  3. Examining the influence of injection speed and mould temperature on the tensile strength of polypropylene and ABS

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aarøe, Esben Raahede; Blaimschein, Karl Stephan; Deker, Lasse

    This report is the final task of course “41738 Experimental Plastics Technology” in the three weeks period of June 2009 at DTU, IPL. The aim of this project has been to investigate the ultimate tensile strength behaviour of two different polymers, with different structural composition, by varying...... the injection speed and the mold temperature independently while keeping all other process parameters fixed. In addition the scaling from production of large to small geometries has been investigated by doing two parallel productions and test setups of respectively injection moulded and micro injection moulded...... specimens. After production and tensile testing the specimens were examined with a microscope to underpin conclusions from the tensile test data. It was experienced that the injection speed in general increased the the tensile strength by orienting the polymeric-chains lengthwise in the specimens and thus...

  4. Precise measurement of coupling strength and high temperature quantum effect in a nonlinearly coupled qubit-oscillator system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ge, Li; Zhao, Nan

    2018-04-01

    We study the coherence dynamics of a qubit coupled to a harmonic oscillator with both linear and quadratic interactions. As long as the linear coupling strength is much smaller than the oscillator frequency, the long time behavior of the coherence is dominated by the quadratic coupling strength g 2. The coherence decays and revives at a period , with the width of coherence peak decreasing as the temperature increases, hence providing a way to measure g 2 precisely without cooling. Unlike the case of linear coupling, here the coherence dynamics never reduces to the classical limit in which the oscillator is classical. Finally, the validity of linear coupling approximation is discussed and the coherence under Hahn-echo is evaluated.

  5. Extraction of wind and temperature information from hybrid 4D-Var assimilation of stratospheric ozone using NAVGEM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Douglas R.; Hoppel, Karl W.; Kuhl, David D.

    2018-03-01

    Extraction of wind and temperature information from stratospheric ozone assimilation is examined within the context of the Navy Global Environmental Model (NAVGEM) hybrid 4-D variational assimilation (4D-Var) data assimilation (DA) system. Ozone can improve the wind and temperature through two different DA mechanisms: (1) through the flow-of-the-day ensemble background error covariance that is blended together with the static background error covariance and (2) via the ozone continuity equation in the tangent linear model and adjoint used for minimizing the cost function. All experiments assimilate actual conventional data in order to maintain a similar realistic troposphere. In the stratosphere, the experiments assimilate simulated ozone and/or radiance observations in various combinations. The simulated observations are constructed for a case study based on a 16-day cycling truth experiment (TE), which is an analysis with no stratospheric observations. The impact of ozone on the analysis is evaluated by comparing the experiments to the TE for the last 6 days, allowing for a 10-day spin-up. Ozone assimilation benefits the wind and temperature when data are of sufficient quality and frequency. For example, assimilation of perfect (no applied error) global hourly ozone data constrains the stratospheric wind and temperature to within ˜ 2 m s-1 and ˜ 1 K. This demonstrates that there is dynamical information in the ozone distribution that can potentially be used to improve the stratosphere. This is particularly important for the tropics, where radiance observations have difficulty constraining wind due to breakdown of geostrophic balance. Global ozone assimilation provides the largest benefit when the hybrid blending coefficient is an intermediate value (0.5 was used in this study), rather than 0.0 (no ensemble background error covariance) or 1.0 (no static background error covariance), which is consistent with other hybrid DA studies. When perfect global ozone is

  6. Extraction of wind and temperature information from hybrid 4D-Var assimilation of stratospheric ozone using NAVGEM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. R. Allen

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Extraction of wind and temperature information from stratospheric ozone assimilation is examined within the context of the Navy Global Environmental Model (NAVGEM hybrid 4-D variational assimilation (4D-Var data assimilation (DA system. Ozone can improve the wind and temperature through two different DA mechanisms: (1 through the flow-of-the-day ensemble background error covariance that is blended together with the static background error covariance and (2 via the ozone continuity equation in the tangent linear model and adjoint used for minimizing the cost function. All experiments assimilate actual conventional data in order to maintain a similar realistic troposphere. In the stratosphere, the experiments assimilate simulated ozone and/or radiance observations in various combinations. The simulated observations are constructed for a case study based on a 16-day cycling truth experiment (TE, which is an analysis with no stratospheric observations. The impact of ozone on the analysis is evaluated by comparing the experiments to the TE for the last 6 days, allowing for a 10-day spin-up. Ozone assimilation benefits the wind and temperature when data are of sufficient quality and frequency. For example, assimilation of perfect (no applied error global hourly ozone data constrains the stratospheric wind and temperature to within ∼ 2 m s−1 and ∼ 1 K. This demonstrates that there is dynamical information in the ozone distribution that can potentially be used to improve the stratosphere. This is particularly important for the tropics, where radiance observations have difficulty constraining wind due to breakdown of geostrophic balance. Global ozone assimilation provides the largest benefit when the hybrid blending coefficient is an intermediate value (0.5 was used in this study, rather than 0.0 (no ensemble background error covariance or 1.0 (no static background error covariance, which is consistent with other hybrid DA studies. When

  7. Time-Dependent Stress Rupture Strength Degradation of Hi-Nicalon Fiber-Reinforced Silicon Carbide Composites at Intermediate Temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sullivan, Roy M.

    2016-01-01

    The stress rupture strength of silicon carbide fiber-reinforced silicon carbide composites with a boron nitride fiber coating decreases with time within the intermediate temperature range of 700 to 950 degree Celsius. Various theories have been proposed to explain the cause of the time-dependent stress rupture strength. The objective of this paper is to investigate the relative significance of the various theories for the time-dependent strength of silicon carbide fiber-reinforced silicon carbide composites. This is achieved through the development of a numerically based progressive failure analysis routine and through the application of the routine to simulate the composite stress rupture tests. The progressive failure routine is a time-marching routine with an iterative loop between a probability of fiber survival equation and a force equilibrium equation within each time step. Failure of the composite is assumed to initiate near a matrix crack and the progression of fiber failures occurs by global load sharing. The probability of survival equation is derived from consideration of the strength of ceramic fibers with randomly occurring and slow growing flaws as well as the mechanical interaction between the fibers and matrix near a matrix crack. The force equilibrium equation follows from the global load sharing presumption. The results of progressive failure analyses of the composite tests suggest that the relationship between time and stress-rupture strength is attributed almost entirely to the slow flaw growth within the fibers. Although other mechanisms may be present, they appear to have only a minor influence on the observed time-dependent behavior.

  8. Enhancement of delamination strength in Cu-stabilized coated conductor tapes through additional treatments under transverse tension at room temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shin, Hyung Seop; Bautista, Zhierwinjay [Andong National University, Andong (Korea, Republic of); Moon, Seung Hyun; Lee, Jae Hun; Mean, Byoung Jean [SuNAM Co Ltd., Anseong (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-06-15

    In superconducting coil applications particularly in wet wound coils, coated conductor (CC) tapes are subjected to different type of stresses that could affect its electromechanical transport property. These include hoop stress acting along the length of the CC tape and the Lorentz force acting perpendicular to the CC tape’s surface. Since the latter is commonly associated with the delamination problem of multi-layered REBCO CC tapes, more understanding and attention on the delamination phenomena induced in the case of coil applications are needed. Difference on the coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE) of each constituent layer of the CC tape, the bobbin, and the impregnating materials is the main causes of delamination in CC tapes when subjected to thermal and mechanical cycling. In the design of degradation-free superconducting coils, therefore, characterization of the delamination behaviors including mechanism and strength in the multi-layered REBCO CC tapes becomes a critical issue. Various trials to increase the delamination strength by improving interface characteristics at interlayers have been performed. In this study, in order to investigate the influences of laser cleaning and Ag annealing treated at the substrate side surface, transverse tensile tests were conducted under different sample configurations using 4.5mm x 8 mm upper anvil. The mechanical delamination strength of differently processed CC samples was examined at room temperature (RT). As a result, the Sample 1 with the additional laser cleaning and Ag annealing processes and the Sample 2 with additional Ag annealing process only showed higher mechanical delamination strength as compared to the Sample 3 without such additional treatments. Sample 3 showed quite different behavior when the loading direction is to the substrate side where the delamination strength much lower as compared to other cases.

  9. Evidence for a weakening strength of temperature-corn yield relation in the United States during 1980–2010

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leng, Guoyong

    2017-12-01

    Temperature is known to be correlated with crop yields, causing reduction of crop yield with climate warming without adaptations or CO2 fertilization effects. The historical temperature-crop yield relation has often been used for informing future changes. This relationship, however, may change over time following alternations in other environmental factors. Results show that the strength of the relationship between the interannual variability of growing season temperature and corn yield (RGST_CY) has declined in the United States between 1980 and 2010 with a loss in the statistical significance. The regression slope which represents the anomalies in corn yield that occur in association with 1 degree temperature anomaly has decreased significantly from -6.9%/K of the first half period to -2.4%/K~-3.5%/K of the second half period. This implies that projected corn yield reduction will be overestimated by a fact of 2 in a given warming scenario, if the corn-temperature relation is derived from the earlier historical period. Changes in RGST_CY are mainly observed in Midwest Corn Belt and central High Plains, and are well reproduced by 11 process-based crop models. In Midwest rain-fed systems, the decrease of negative temperature effects coincides with an increase in water availability by precipitation. In irrigated areas where water stress is minimized, the decline of beneficial temperature effects is significantly related to the increase in extreme hot days. The results indicate that an extrapolation of historical yield response to temperature may bias the assessment of agriculture vulnerability to climate change. Efforts to reduce climate impacts on agriculture should pay attention not only to climate change, but also to changes in climate-crop yield relations. There are some caveats that should be acknowledged as the analysis is restricted to the changes in the linear relation between growing season mean temperature and corn yield for the specific study period.

  10. The influence of the scale effect and high temperatures on the strength and strains of high performance concrete

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Korsun Vladimyr Ivanovych

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The most effective way to reduce the structure mass, labor input and expenses for its construction is to use modern high-performance concrete of the classes С50/60… С90/105, which possess high physical and mathematic characteristics. One of the constraints for their implementation in mass construction in Ukraine is that in design standards there are no experimental data on the physical and mathematic properties of concrete of the classes more than С50/60. Also there are no exact statements on calculating reinforced concrete structures made of high-performance concretes.The authors present the results of experimental research of the scale effect and short-term and long-term heating up to +200 ° C influence on temperature and shrinkage strain, on strength and strain characteristics under compression and tensioning of high-strength modified concrete of class C70/85. The application of high performance concretes is challenging in the process of constructing buildings aimed at operating in high technological temperatures: smoke pipes, coolers, basins, nuclear power plants' protective shells, etc. Reducing cross-sections can lead to reducing temperature drops and thermal stresses in the structures.

  11. Effect of heat bed temperature of 3D bioprinter to hardness and compressive strength of scaffold bovine hydroxyapatite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Triyono, Joko; Pratama, Aditya; Sukanto, Heru; Nugroho, Yohanes; Wijayanta, Agung Tri

    2018-02-01

    This study aimed to investigate the effect of heat bed temperature of 3D bioprinter toward compressive strength and hardness bovine bone hydroxyapatite scaffold for bone filler applications. BHA-glycerin mixed with a ratio of 1:1, and keep it for 24 hours. After the homogenization process acquired, bio-Ink with shaped slurry will be used as a material for a 3D printer. The printing process with a temperature variation have performed by setting up heat bed temperature. After printing process was completed, the 3D scaffold was detained on the heat bed for 10 minutes before being picked up. The test results in this study had the lowest hardness value of 9.82±0.62 VHN and the highest number of 24.32±0.99 VHN. The compressive strength testing had the lowest value of 1.62±0.16 MPa with the highest number of 5.67±0.39 MPa. Pore observation using a scanning electron microscope. The result shows that the size of the pores were not much different, that was ±100-200 µm. This observation also indicated that the pore form was square pores.

  12. Land surface skin temperature climatology: benefitting from the strengths of satellite observations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jin Menglin; Dickinson, Robert E

    2010-01-01

    Surface skin temperature observations (T skin ), as obtained by satellite remote sensing, provide useful climatological information of high spatial resolution and global coverage that enhances the traditional ground observations of surface air temperature (T air ) and so, reveal new information about land surface characteristics. This letter analyzes nine years of moderate-resolution imaging spectroradiometer (MODIS) skin temperature observations to present monthly skin temperature diurnal, seasonal, and inter-annual variations at a 0.05 deg. latitude/longitude grid over the global land surface and combines these measurements with other MODIS-based variables in an effort to understand the physical mechanisms responsible for T skin variations. In particular, skin temperature variations are found to be closely related to vegetation cover, clouds, and water vapor, but to differ from 2 m surface T air in terms of both physical meaning and magnitude. Therefore, the two temperatures (T skin and T air ) are complementary in their contribution of valuable information to the study of climate change.

  13. Quantitative study on the effect of high-temperature curing at an early age on strength development of concrete. Experiment with mortar using moderate-heat portland cement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sugiyama, Hisashi; Chino, Shigeo

    1999-01-01

    The effect of high-temperature curing at an early age on the strength development of concrete using moderate-heat portland cement was quantitatively studied. High-temperature curing conditions were set so as to give systematic variations in the temperature-time factors. As a result, the integrated value of curing temperature during the period having a significant effect on the strength development was proposed as a parameter that expressed the degree of high-temperature curing. The effect of high-temperature curing on the strength development of concrete using moderate-heat portland cement could be exactly predicted with the integrated value of curing temperature during the period from 0 to 3 days. (author)

  14. Aging and Curing Temperature Effects on Compressive Strength of Mortar Containing Lime Stone Quarry Dust and Industrial Granite Sludge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Nasir Amin

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available In this study, the researchers investigated the potential use of locally available waste materials from the lime stone quarry and the granite industry as a partial replacement of cement. Quarry sites and granite industry in the eastern province of Saudi Arabia produces tons of powder wastes in the form of quarry dust (QD and granite sludge (GS, respectively, causing serious environmental problems along with frequent dust storms in the area. According to ASTM C109, identical 50-mm3 specimens were cast throughout this study to evaluate the compressive strength development of mortars (7, 28 and 91 days containing these waste materials. Experimental variables included different percentage replacement of cement with waste materials (GS, QD, fineness of GS, various curing temperatures (20, 40 and 60 °C as local normal and hot environmental temperatures and curing moisture (continuously moist and partially moist followed by air curing. Finally, the results of mortar containing waste materials were compared to corresponding results of control mortar (CM and mortar containing fly ash (FA. The test results indicated that under normal curing (20 °C, moist cured, the compressive strength of mortar containing the different percentage of waste materials (QD, GS, FA and their combinations remained lower than that of CM at all ages. However, the compressive strength of mortar containing waste materials slightly increased with increased fineness of GS and significantly increased under high curing temperatures. It was recommended that more fineness of GS be achieved to use its high percentage replacement with cement (30% or more incorporating local environmental conditions.

  15. High strength alloys for high temperature service in liquid-salt cooled energy systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holcomb, David E.; Muralidharan, Govindarajan; Wilson, Dane F.

    2017-01-10

    An essentially cobalt-free alloy consists essentially of, in terms of weight percent: 6.3 to 7.2 Cr, 0.5 to 2 Al, 0 to 5 Fe, 0.7 to 0.8 Mn, 9 to 12.5 Mo, 0 to 6 Ta, 0.75 to 3.5 Ti, 0.01 to 0.25 Nb, 0.2 to 0.6 W, 0.02 to 0.04 C, 0 to 0.001 B, 0.0001 to 0.002 N, balance Ni. The alloy is characterized by a .gamma.' microstructural component in the range of 3 to 17.6 weight percent of the total composition. The alloy is further characterized by, at 850.degree. C., a yield strength of at least 60 Ksi, a tensile strength of at least 70 Ksi, a creep rupture life at 12 Ksi of at least 700 hours, and a corrosion rate, expressed in weight loss [g/(cm.sup.2sec)]10.sup.-11 during a 1000 hour immersion in liquid FLiNaK at 850.degree. C., in the range of 5.5 to 17.

  16. High strength alloys for high temperature service in liquid-salt cooled energy systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holcomb, David E.; Muralidharan, Govindarajan; Wilson, Dane F.

    2017-01-10

    An essentially cobalt-free alloy consists essentially of, in terms of weight percent: 6.3 to 7.2 Cr, 0.5 to 2 Al, 0 to 5 Fe, 0.7 to 0.8 Mn, 9 to 12.5 Mo, 0 to 6 Ta, 0.75 to 3.5 Ti, 0.01 to 0.25 Nb, 0.2 to 0.6 W, 0.02 to 0.04 C, 0 to 0.001 B, 0.0001 to 0.002 N, balance Ni. The alloy is characterized by a .gamma.' microstructural component in the range of 3 to 17.6 weight percent of the total composition. The alloy is further characterized by, at 850.degree. C., a yield strength of at least 60 Ksi, a tensile strength of at least 70 Ksi, a creep rupture life at 12 Ksi of at least 700 hours, and a corrosion rate, expressed in weight loss [g/(cm.sup.2sec)]10.sup.-11 during a 1000 hour immersion in liquid FLiNaK at 850.degree. C., in the range of 5.5 to 17.

  17. Identification of low cycle fatigue parameters of high strength low-alloy (HSLA steel at room temperature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Bulatović

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Low cycle fatigue test was performed in ambient atmosphere at room temperature. Cycle loading of material, in case of High strength low-alloy steel, entails modifications of its properties and in this paper is therefore shown behavior of fatigue life using low cycle fatigue parameters. More precisely, crack initiation life of tested specimens was computed using theory of Coffin-Manson relation during the fatigue loading. The geometry of the stabilized hysteresis loop of welded joint HSLA steel, marked as Nionikral 70, is also analyzed. This stabilized hysteresis loop is very important for determination of materials properties.

  18. Atomic size and local order effects on the high temperature strength of binary Mg alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abaspour, Saeideh, E-mail: s.abaspour78@gmail.com [ARC-Centre of Excellence for Design in Light Metals, Materials Engineering, School of Engineering, The University of Queensland, Brisbane QLD 4072 (Australia); Queensland Centre for Advanced Materials Processing and Manufacturing (AMPAM), The University of Queensland (Australia); Zambelli, Victor [ARC-Centre of Excellence for Design in Light Metals, Materials Engineering, School of Engineering, The University of Queensland, Brisbane QLD 4072 (Australia); Dargusch, Matthew [Queensland Centre for Advanced Materials Processing and Manufacturing (AMPAM), The University of Queensland (Australia); Cáceres, Carlos H. [ARC-Centre of Excellence for Design in Light Metals, Materials Engineering, School of Engineering, The University of Queensland, Brisbane QLD 4072 (Australia)

    2016-09-15

    The solid solution strengthening introduced by Ca (0.6 and 0.9 at%) and Sn 0.5–2.5 at%) was studied through tensile, compression and stress relaxation tests at room temperature, 373 K (100 °C) and 453 K (180 °C) on solution heat-treated and quenched specimens and compared with existing data for binary alloys containing Ca, Sn, Y, Gd, Nd, Zn and Al as well as for AZ91 alloy. At room temperature the solution-hardening rate introduced by Ca and Sn was much higher than that of Al, matching those of Y, Gd and Zn. Calcium also reduced the tension/compression asymmetry. At high temperature Ca effectively prevented stress relaxation, nearly matching Y, Gd and Nd. Tin was less effective, but still outperformed Al and AZ91 at low stresses. The effects at room and high temperature introduced by Ca and Sn appeared consistent with the presence of short-range order, in line with those introduced by Y, Nd, Gd and Zn. The larger than Mg atom size of Ca, Nd, Gd and Y can be expected to intensify the local order by strengthening the atomic bonds through its effects on the local electron density, accounting for their greater strengthening at high temperature. For given difference in atomic size, the effects on the local order are expected to be lesser for smaller sized atoms like Sn and Zn, hence their more subdued effects.

  19. GHRSST Level 2P Gridded Global Subskin Sea Surface Temperature from WindSat polarimetric radiometer on the Coriolis satellite (GDS version 1)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This dataset contains sea surface temperature derived from observations made by the WindSat Polarimetric Radiometer developed by the Naval Research Laboratory (NRL)...

  20. Curing temperature effect on mechanical strength of smokeless fuel briquettes prepared with humates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    M.J. Blesa; J.L. Miranda; M.T. Izquierdo; R. Moliner; A. Arenillas; F. Rubiera [Instituto de Carboquimica (CSIC), Zaragoza (Spain)

    2003-04-01

    The effect of curing temperature on smokeless fuel briquettes has been studied by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), mass spectrometry (MS), and temperature programmed decomposition (TPD). These techniques help to predict the final properties of these briquettes which were prepared with a low-rank coal, sawdust, and olive stone as biomasses and humates as binder. The best mechanical properties are reached with both the mildest thermal curing at 95{sup o}C and the cocarbonized at 600{sup o}C of Maria coal (M2) and sawdust (S) due to the fibrous texture of sawdust. The temperature of curing causes the release of a certain amount of oxygenate structures and the decrease of the mechanical resistance. 15 refs., 7 figs., 3 tabs.

  1. Evaluation of creep-fatigue strength of P122 high temperature boiler material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pumwa, John

    2003-01-01

    In components, which operate at high temperatures, changes in conditions at the beginning and end of operation or during operation result in transient temperature gradients. If these transients are repeated, the differential thermal expansion during each transient may result in thermally induced cyclic stresses. The extent of the resulting fatigue damage depends on the nature and frequency of the transient, the thermal gradient in the component, and the material properties. Components, which are subjected to thermally induced stresses generally, operate within the creep range so that damage due to both fatigue and creep has to be taken into account. In order to select the correct materials for these hostile operating environmental conditions, it is vitally important to understand the behaviour of mechanical properties such as creep-fatigue properties of these materials. This paper reports the results of standard creep-fatigue tests conducted using P122 (HCM12A or 12Cr-1.8W-1.5Cu) high temperature boiler material. P122 is one of the latest developed materials for high temperature environments, which has the potential to be successful in such hostile operation environments. The tests were conducted at temperatures ranging from 550degC to 700degC at 50degC intervals with strain ranges of ±1.5 to ±3.0% at 0.5% intervals and a strain rate of 4 x 10 -3 s -1 with an application of 10-minute tensile hold time using a closed-loop hydraulic Instron material testing machine with a servo hydraulic controller. The results confirm that P122 is comparable to conventional high temperature steels. (author)

  2. Effect of elevated temperatures on heavy concrete structural strength in Qinshan phase 3 CANDU 6 reactor buildings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alikhan, S.; Khan, A.F.; Chen, S.

    2005-01-01

    Heavy concrete is commonly used inside the Qinshan Phase 3 CANDU 6 reactor buildings for radiation shielding functions in order to provide access to key areas during reactor operation. In some cases, the heavy concrete elements are also structural elements. Concerns have been raised about the functional performance of the heavy concrete structural elements, specifically the primary heat transport pump (PHTS) supporting slabs, surrounding the feeder cabinets when subjected to elevated temperatures between 42 degree C and 121 degree C and their corresponding temperature gradients on a long-term basis during the normal operation of the plant. This paper presents the results of a test investigation on the strength of heavy concrete under elevated temperature conditions being experienced by the heavy concrete structural elements around the feeder cabinet to confirm that these structural elements meet their functional requirements. The loading conditions consist subjecting the specimens to the elevated temperatures and temperature gradient noted during commissioning, including the effect of epoxy coating. The heavy concrete mix proportion and materials of the test samples (ilmenite aggregate and Portland cement) are identical to those used for heavy concrete structural elements surrounding the feeder cabinet. Subsequent to the confirmation of the functional requirements of the heavy concrete structural elements, alarm limits are recommended for these structural elements. (authors)

  3. MEASURING NEBULAR TEMPERATURES: THE EFFECT OF NEW COLLISION STRENGTHS WITH EQUILIBRIUM AND {kappa}-DISTRIBUTED ELECTRON ENERGIES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nicholls, David C.; Dopita, Michael A.; Sutherland, Ralph S.; Kewley, Lisa J. [Research School of Astronomy and Astrophysics, Australian National University, Cotter Rd., Weston ACT 2611 (Australia); Palay, Ethan, E-mail: david@mso.anu.edu.au [Department of Astronomy, Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43210 (United States)

    2013-08-15

    In this paper we develop tools for observers to use when analyzing nebular spectra for temperatures and metallicities, with two goals: to present a new, simple method to calculate equilibrium electron temperatures for collisionally excited line flux ratios, using the latest atomic data; and to adapt current methods to include the effects of possible non-equilibrium ''{kappa}'' electron energy distributions. Adopting recent collision strength data for [O III], [S III], [O II], [S II], and [N II], we find that existing methods based on older atomic data seriously overestimate the electron temperatures, even when considering purely Maxwellian statistics. If {kappa} distributions exist in H II regions and planetary nebulae as they do in solar system plasmas, it is important to investigate the observational consequences. This paper continues our previous work on the {kappa} distribution. We present simple formulaic methods that allow observers to (1) measure equilibrium electron temperatures and atomic abundances using the latest atomic data, and (2) to apply simple corrections to existing equilibrium analysis techniques to allow for possible non-equilibrium effects. These tools should lead to better consistency in temperature and abundance measurements, and a clearer understanding of the physics of H II regions and planetary nebulae.

  4. Strength and reliability of low temperature transient liquid phase bonded Cu-Sn-Cu interconnects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brincker, Mads; Söhl, Stefan; Eisele, Ronald

    2017-01-01

    As power electronic devices have tendencies to operate at higher temperatures and current densities, the demand for reliable and efficient packaging technologies are ever increasing. This paper reports the studies on application of transient liquid phase (TLP) bonding of CuSnCu systems...

  5. Body Temperature Controlled Optical and Thermal Information Storage Light Scattering Display with Fluorescence Effect and High Mechanical Strength.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Si; Tong, Xiaoqian; He, Huiwen; Ma, Meng; Shi, Yanqin; Wang, Xu

    2017-04-05

    A kind of body temperature controlled optical and thermal information storage light scattering display based on super strong liquid crystalline physical gel with special "loofah-like gel network" was successfully prepared. Such liquid crystal (LC) gel was obtained by mixing a dendritic gelator (POSS-G1-BOC), an azobenzene compound (2Azo2), and a phosphor tethered liquid crystalline host (5CB), which could show its best contrast ratio at around human body temperature under UV light because of the phosphor's fluorescence effect. The gel also has quite strong mechanical strength, which could be used in wearable device field especially under sunlight, even under the forcing conditions as harsh as being centrifuged for 10 min at the speed of 2000 r/min. The whole production process of such a display is quite simple and could lead to displays at any size through noncontact writing. We believe it will have wide applications in the future.

  6. The Effect of Nb Addition on the Microstructure and the High-Temperature Strength of Fe3Al Aluminide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kratochvíl, Petr; Švec, Martin; Král, Robert; Veselý, Jozef; Lukáč, Pavel; Vlasák, Tomáš

    2018-02-01

    The microstructural and high-temperature mechanical properties of Fe-26Al-xNb (x = 3 and 5 at. pct) are compared. The alloys were investigated "as cast" and after hot rolling at 1473 K (1200 °C). Scanning electron microscopes equipped with EDS and EBSD were used for the microstructure and phase identification. The addition of 3 at. pct of Nb into the Fe3Al matrix leads to the formation of C14 λ—Laves phase (Fe,Al)2Nb (LP) particles spread in the Fe3Al matrix, while an eutectic with thin lamellae of LP C14 λ—Laves phase (Fe,Al)2Nb and matrix is also formed in the iron aluminide with 5 at. pct of Nb. The presence of incoherent precipitates is connected with the enhancement of the high-temperature strength and creep resistance.

  7. Large Scale Variability of Phytoplankton Blooms in the Arctic and Peripheral Seas: Relationships with Sea Ice, Temperature, Clouds, and Wind

    Science.gov (United States)

    Comiso, Josefino C.; Cota, Glenn F.

    2004-01-01

    Spatially detailed satellite data of mean color, sea ice concentration, surface temperature, clouds, and wind have been analyzed to quantify and study the large scale regional and temporal variability of phytoplankton blooms in the Arctic and peripheral seas from 1998 to 2002. In the Arctic basin, phytoplankton chlorophyll displays a large symmetry with the Eastern Arctic having about fivefold higher concentrations than those of the Western Arctic. Large monthly and yearly variability is also observed in the peripheral seas with the largest blooms occurring in the Bering Sea, Sea of Okhotsk, and the Barents Sea during spring. There is large interannual and seasonal variability in biomass with average chlorophyll concentrations in 2002 and 2001 being higher than earlier years in spring and summer. The seasonality in the latitudinal distribution of blooms is also very different such that the North Atlantic is usually most expansive in spring while the North Pacific is more extensive in autumn. Environmental factors that influence phytoplankton growth were examined, and results show relatively high negative correlation with sea ice retreat and strong positive correlation with temperature in early spring. Plankton growth, as indicated by biomass accumulation, in the Arctic and subarctic increases up to a threshold surface temperature of about 276-277 degree K (3-4 degree C) beyond which the concentrations start to decrease suggesting an optimal temperature or nutrient depletion. The correlation with clouds is significant in some areas but negligible in other areas, while the correlations with wind speed and its components are generally weak. The effects of clouds and winds are less predictable with weekly climatologies because of unknown effects of averaging variable and intermittent physical forcing (e.g. over storm event scales with mixing and upwelling of nutrients) and the time scales of acclimation by the phytoplankton.

  8. Dynamical relationship between wind speed magnitude and meridional temperature contrast: Application to an interannual oscillation in Venusian middle atmosphere GCM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Masaru; Takahashi, Masaaki

    2018-03-01

    We derive simple dynamical relationships between wind speed magnitude and meridional temperature contrast. The relationship explains scatter plot distributions of time series of three variables (maximum zonal wind speed UMAX, meridional wind speed VMAX, and equator-pole temperature contrast dTMAX), which are obtained from a Venus general circulation model with equatorial Kelvin-wave forcing. Along with VMAX and dTMAX, UMAX likely increases with the phase velocity and amplitude of a forced wave. In the scatter diagram of UMAX versus dTMAX, points are plotted along a linear equation obtained from a thermal-wind relationship in the cloud layer. In the scatter diagram of VMAX versus UMAX, the apparent slope is somewhat steep in the high UMAX regime, compared with the low UMAX regime. The scatter plot distributions are qualitatively consistent with a quadratic equation obtained from a diagnostic equation of the stream function above the cloud top. The plotted points in the scatter diagrams form a linear cluster for weak wave forcing, whereas they form a small cluster for strong wave forcing. An interannual oscillation of the general circulation forming the linear cluster in the scatter diagram is apparent in the experiment of weak 5.5-day wave forcing. Although a pair of equatorial Kelvin and high-latitude Rossby waves with a same period (Kelvin-Rossby wave) produces equatorward heat and momentum fluxes in the region below 60 km, the equatorial wave does not contribute to the long-period oscillation. The interannual fluctuation of the high-latitude jet core leading to the time variation of UMAX is produced by growth and decay of a polar mixed Rossby-gravity wave with a 14-day period.

  9. Modified heat treatment for lower temperature improvement of the mechanical properties of two ultrahigh strength low alloy steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomita, Yoshiyuki; Okabayashi, Kunio

    1985-01-01

    In the previous papers, a new heat treatment for improving the lower temperature mechanical propertise of the ultrahigh strength low alloy steels was suggested by the authors which produces a mixed structure of 25 vol pct lower bainite and 75 vol pct martensite through isothermal transformation at 593 K for a short time followed by water quenching (after austenitization at 1133 K). In this paper, two commercial Japanese ultrahigh strength steels, 0.40 pct C-Ni-Cr-Mo (AISI 4340 type) and 0.40 pct C-Cr-Mo (AISI 4140 type), have been studied to determine the effect of the modified heat treatment, coupled above new heat treatment with γ ⇆ α' repctitive heat treatment, on the mechanical properties from ambient temperature (287 K) to 123 K. The results obtained for various test temperatures have been compared with those for the new heat treatment reported previously and the conventional 1133 K direct water quenching treatment. The incorporation of intermediate four cyclic γ ⇆ α' repctitive heat treatment steps (after the initial austenitization at 1133 K and oil quenching) into the new heat treatment reported previously, as compared with the conventional 1133 K direct water quenching treatment, significantly improved 0.2 pct proof stress as well as notch toughness of the 0.40 pct C-Ni-Cr-Mo ultrahigh strength steel at similar fracture ductility levels from 287 to 123 K. Also, this heat treatment, as compared with the conventional 1133 K direct water quenching treatment, significantly improved both 0.2 pct proof stress and notch toughness of the 0.40 pct C-Cr-Mo ultrahigh strength steel with increased fracture ductility at 203 K and above. The microstructure consists of mixed areas of ultrafine grained martensite, within which is the refined blocky, highly dislocated structure, and the second phase lower bainite (about 15 vol pct), which appears in acicular form and partitions prior austenite grains. This newly developed heat treatment makes it possible to modify

  10. Effect of Alumina Addition to Zirconia Nano-composite on Low Temperature Degradation Process and Biaxial Strength

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moluk Aivazi

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Ceramic dental materials have been considered as alternatives to metals for dental implants application. In this respect, zirconia tetragonal stabilized with %3 yttrium, is of great importance among the ceramic materials for endosseous dental implant application. Because of its good mechanical properties and color similar to tooth. The aim and novelty of this study was to design and prepare Y-TZP nano-composite to reduce the degradation process at low temperature by alumina addition and maintaining submicron grain sized. Also, flexural strength of nano-composite samples was evaluated. Toward this purpose, alumina-Y-TZP nano-composites containing 0–30 vol% alumina (denoted as A-Y-TZP 0-30 were fabricated using α-alumina and Y-TZP nano-sized by sintering pressure less method. The synthesized samples were characterized using x-ray diffraction, field emission scanning electron microscopy equipped with energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy techniques. Nano-composite samples with high density (≥96% and grain sized of ≤ 400 nm was obtained by sintering at 1270 °C for 170 min. After low temperature degradation test (LTD, A-Y-TZP20 and A-Y-TZP30 not showed monoclinic phase and the flexural strength in all of samples were higher than A-Y-TZP0. It was concluded that the grains were remained in submicron sized and A-Y-TZP20 and A-Y-TZP30 did not present biaxial strength reduction after LTD test.

  11. Batch scale strength of garlic by irradiation combined with natural low temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cho, H.O.; Kwon, J.H.; Byun, M.W.

    1984-01-01

    An attempt was made on the development of a commercial scale storage method of garlic by irradiation. Irradiated garlics with 50, 100 and 150 Gy were stored at natural low temperature storage room (12±6°C, 75-85% RH) and the physicochemical properties during the 10 months storage were investigated. The unirradiated garlic was mostly sprouted after 8 months storage, whereas the sprouting of all irradiated groups was completely inhibited until 10 months storage, The rotting rate and weigh loss of garlic after 10 months storage were reduced by 25 to 54% at 100 Gy irradiation compared with those of an unirradiated group. The moisture content remained relatively constant during the whole storage period. The total sugar content was increased with storage period. Ascorbic acid content was also decreased until 8 months storage but its content was rapidly increased along with sprouting. Garlic was marketable after 10 months storage by 100 Gy irradiation combined with natural low temperature. (author)

  12. High-temperature reverse-bend fatigue strength of Inconel Alloy 625

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purohit, A.; Greenfield, I.G.; Park, K.B.

    1983-06-01

    Inconel 625 has been selected as the clad material for Upgraded Transient Reactor Test Facility (TREAT Upgrade or TU) fuel assemblies. The range of temperatures investigated is 900 to 1100 0 C. A reverse-bend fatigue test program was selected as the most-effective method of determining the fatigue characteristics of Inconel alloy 625 sheet metal. The paper describes the reverse bend fatigue experiments, the results obtained, and the analysis of data

  13. Bending Strength of EN AC-44200 – Al2O3 Composites at Elevated Temperatures

    OpenAIRE

    Kurzawa A.; Kaczmar J. W.

    2017-01-01

    The paper presents results of bend tests at elevated temperatures of aluminium alloy EN AC-44200 (AlSi12) based composite materials reinforced with aluminium oxide particles. The examined materials were manufactured by squeeze casting. Preforms made of Al2O3 particles, with volumetric fraction 10, 20, 30 and 40 vol.% of particles joined with sodium silicate bridges were used as reinforcement. The preforms were characterised by open porosity ensuring proper infiltration with the EN AC-44200 (A...

  14. Evaluating strength at ultra-high temperatures-Methods and results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Voelkl, Rainer; Fischer, Bernd; Beschliesser, Manuel; Glatzel, Uwe

    2008-01-01

    Proprietary equipment for mechanical testing at ultra-high temperatures by ohmic heating is outlined. Strain is measured with a video extensometer with an accuracy of up to Δε-bar∼±0.00025%. Stability and accuracy of the test system are evaluated on Pt- and refractory alloys. These specially designed and built test facilities are compared to commercially available high-vacuum test chambers with tungsten heater

  15. Sonic Detection and Ranging (SODAR) Wind Profiler Instrument Handbook

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coulter, Richard L. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)

    2016-04-01

    The SODAR (Sonic Detection and Ranging) wind profiler measures wind profiles and backscattered signal strength between (nominally) 15 meters (m) and 500 m. It operates by transmitting acoustic energy into the atmosphere and measuring the strength and frequency of backscattered energy. The strength of the backscattered signal is determined by the strength of temperature inhomogeneities with size on the order of 10 centimeters (cm). Assuming the scattering elements in the atmosphere are moving with the mean wind, the horizontal wind field can be derived. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)’s Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility Mobile Facility (AMF) has a system developed by Scintec, Inc. that transmits a sequence of frequencies to enhance signal determination.

  16. Understanding size effects on the strength of single crystals through high-temperature micropillar compression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soler, Rafael; Wheeler, Jeffrey M.; Chang, Hyung-Jun; Segurado, Javier; Michler, Johann; Llorca, Javier; Molina-Aldareguia, Jon M.

    2014-01-01

    Compression tests of 〈1 1 1〉-oriented LiF single-crystal micropillars 1–5 μm in diameter were carried out from 25 °C to 250 °C. While the flow stress at ambient temperature was independent of the micropillar diameter, a strong size effect developed with elevated temperature. This behavior was explained by rigorously accounting for the different contributions to the flow stress of the micropillars as a function of temperature and pillar diameter: the lattice resistance, the forest hardening; and the size-dependent contribution as a result of the operation of single-arm dislocation sources. This was possible because the micropillars were obtained by chemically etching away the surrounding matrix in directionally solidified LiF–NaCl and LiF–KCl eutectics, avoiding any use of focused ion beam methods, yielding micropillars with a controlled dislocation density, independent of the sample preparation technique. In particular, the role of the lattice resistance on the size effect of micrometer-size single crystals was demonstrated unambiguously for the first time. This result rationalizes the different values of power-law exponent for the size effect found in the literature for face-centered cubic and body-centered cubic metals as well as for covalent and ionic solids

  17. Effects of the Relaxation of Upwelling-Favorable Winds on the Diurnal and Semidiurnal Water Temperature Fluctuations in the Santa Barbara Channel, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aristizábal, María. F.; Fewings, Melanie R.; Washburn, Libe

    2017-10-01

    In the Santa Barbara Channel, California, and around the Northern Channel Islands, water temperature fluctuations in the diurnal and semidiurnal frequency bands are intermittent, with amplitudes that vary on time scales of days to weeks. The cause of this intermittency is not well understood. We studied the effects of the barotropic tide, vertical stratification, propagation of coastal-trapped waves, regional wind relaxations, and diurnal-band winds on the intermittency of the temperature fluctuations during 1992-2015. We used temperature data from 43 moorings in 10-200 m water depth and wind data from two buoys and one land station. Subtidal-frequency changes in vertical stratification explain 20-40% of the intermittency in diurnal and semidiurnal temperature fluctuations at time scales of days to weeks. Along the mainland north of Point Conception and at the Northern Channel Islands, the relaxation of upwelling-favorable winds substantially increases vertical stratification, accounting for up to 55% of the subtidal-frequency variability in stratification. As a result of the enhanced stratification, wind relaxations enhance the diurnal and semidiurnal temperature fluctuations at those sites, even though the diurnal-band wind forcing decreases during wind relaxation. A linear model where the background stratification is advected vertically explains a substantial fraction of the temperature fluctuations at most sites. The increase of vertical stratification and subsequent increase in diurnal and semidiurnal temperature fluctuations during wind relaxation is a mechanism that can supply nutrients to the euphotic zone and kelp forests in the Channel in summer when upwelling is weak.

  18. Influence of Cutting Temperature on the Tensile Strength of a Carbon Fiber-Reinforced Polymer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jérémy Delahaigue

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Carbon fiber-reinforced plastics (CFRP have seen a significant increase in use over the years thanks to their specific properties. Despite continuous improvements in the production methods of laminated parts, a trimming operation is still necessary to achieve the functional dimensions required by engineering specifications. Laminates made of carbon fibers are very abrasive and cause rapid tool wear, and require high cutting temperatures. This creates damage to the epoxy matrix, whose glass-transition temperature is often recognized to be about 180 °C. This study aims to highlight the influence of the cutting temperature generated by tool wear on the surface finish and mechanical properties obtained from tensile tests. Trimming operations were performed on a quasi-isotropic 24-ply carbon/epoxy laminate, of 3.6 mm thickness, with a 6 flutes diamond-coated (CVD cutter. The test specimens of 6 mm and 12 mm wide were obtained by trimming. The reduced width of the coupons allowed amplification of the effect of defects on the measured properties by increasing the proportion of coupon cross-section occupied by the defects. A new tool and a tool in an advanced state of wear were used to generate different cutting temperatures. Results showed a cutting temperature of 300 °C for the new tool and 475 °C for the worn tool. The analysis revealed that the specimens machined with the new tool have no thermal damage and the cut is clean. The plies oriented at −45° presented the worst surface finish according to the failure mode of the fiber. For the worn tool, the surface was degraded and the matrix was carbonized. After cutting, observations showed a degraded resin spread on the machined surface, which reduced the surface roughness and hid the cutting defects. In support of these observations, the tensile tests showed no variation of the mechanical properties for the 12 mm-wide specimens, but did show a 10% loss in mechanical properties for the 6 mm

  19. Influence of Temperature on Mechanical Behavior During Static Restore Processes of Al-Zn-Mg-Cu High Strength Aluminum Alloy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ZHANG Kun

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Flow stress behaviors of as-cast Al-Zn-Mg-Cu high strength aluminum alloy during static restore processes were investigated by: Isothermal double-pass compression tests at temperatures of 300-400℃, strain rates of 0.01-1 s-1, strains of 33% +20% with the holding times of 0~900 s after the first pass compression. The results indicate that the deformation temperature has a dramatical effect on mechanical behaviors during static restore processes of the alloy. (1 At 300 ℃ and 330 ℃ lower temperatures, the recovery during the deformation is slow, and deformation energy stored in matrix is higher, flow stresses at the second pass deformation decreased during the recovery and recrystallization, and the stress softening phenomena is observed. Stress softening is increased with the increasing holding time; Precipitation during the holding time inhibites the stress softening. (2 At 360 ℃ and 400 ℃ higher temperatures, the recovery during deformation is rapid, and deformation energy stored in matrix is lower. Solid solubility is higher after holding, so that flow stress at the second pass deformation is increased, stress hardening phenomena is observed. Stress hardening decreased with the increasing holding time duo to the recovery and recrystallization during holding period at 360 ℃; Precipitation during holding also inhibited the stress softening. However, Stress hardening remains constant with the increasing holding time duo to the reasanenal there are no recovery and recrystallization during holding period at 400 ℃.

  20. On the nature of anomalies in temperature dependence of the OKh18N1OT steel yield strength after thermal cycling in the low temperature range

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Medvedev, E.M.; Lavrent'ev, F.F.; Kurmanova, T.N.

    1978-01-01

    Investigated were structural transformations in 0Kh18N10T steel as a result of heating and cooling and of deformation within the range of temperatures between 300 and 77 K, the quantity relationships between the said transformations and the variation of the yield limit with the temperature. The studies were conducted by metallography and mechanical test methods. It was shown that an increase in the number of heating and cooling cycles correlates with a loss in strength of the steel while deformation at 77 K. This anomaly in the temperature relationship of the yield limit is related to the appearance in the course of deformation of α-martensite with a BCC lattice. Deformation at 300 K increases the amount ea of epsilon-martensite, a decrses the effectve size of grain and, in consequence, increases the yield limit. The relationship between the yield limit and the grain size at the temperature of 300 K is described adequately by the Hall-Petch equation

  1. MIXING THE SOLAR WIND PROTON AND ELECTRON SCALES: EFFECTS OF ELECTRON TEMPERATURE ANISOTROPY ON THE OBLIQUE PROTON FIREHOSE INSTABILITY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maneva, Y.; Lazar, M.; Poedts, S. [Centre for Mathematical Plasma Astrophysics, Celestijnenlaan 200B, 3001 Heverlee (Belgium); Viñas, A., E-mail: yana.maneva@wis.kuleuven.be [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Heliophysics Science Division, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States)

    2016-11-20

    The double adiabatic expansion of the nearly collisionless solar wind plasma creates conditions for the firehose instability to develop and efficiently prevent the further increase of the plasma temperature in the direction parallel to the interplanetary magnetic field. The conditions imposed by the firehose instability have been extensively studied using idealized approaches that ignore the mutual effects of electrons and protons. Recently, more realistic approaches have been proposed that take into account the interplay between electrons and protons, unveiling new regimes of the parallel oscillatory modes. However, for oblique wave propagation the instability develops distinct branches that grow much faster and may therefore be more efficient than the parallel firehose instability in constraining the temperature anisotropy of the plasma particles. This paper reports for the first time on the effects of electron plasma properties on the oblique proton firehose (PFH) instability and provides a comprehensive vision of the entire unstable wave-vector spectrum, unifying the proton and the smaller electron scales. The plasma β and temperature anisotropy regimes considered here are specific for the solar wind and magnetospheric conditions, and enable the electrons and protons to interact via the excited electromagnetic fluctuations. For the selected parameters, simultaneous electron and PFH instabilities can be observed with a dispersion spectrum of the electron firehose (EFH) extending toward the proton scales. Growth rates of the PFH instability are markedly boosted by the anisotropic electrons, especially in the oblique direction where the EFH growth rates are orders of magnitude higher.

  2. Mixing the Solar Wind Proton and Electron Scales: Effects of Electron Temperature Anisotropy on the Oblique Proton Firehose Instability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maneva, Y.; Lazar, M.; Vinas, A.; Poedts, S.

    2016-01-01

    The double adiabatic expansion of the nearly collisionless solar wind plasma creates conditions for the firehose instability to develop and efficiently prevent the further increase of the plasma temperature in the direction parallel to the interplanetary magnetic field. The conditions imposed by the firehose instability have been extensively studied using idealized approaches that ignore the mutual effects of electrons and protons. Recently, more realistic approaches have been proposed that take into account the interplay between electrons and protons,? unveiling new regimes of the parallel oscillatory modes. However, for oblique wave propagation the instability develops distinct branches that grow much faster and may therefore be more efficient than the parallel firehose instability in constraining the temperature anisotropy of the plasma particles. This paper reports for the first time on the effects of electron plasma properties on the oblique proton firehose (PFH) instability and provides a comprehensive vision of the entire unstable wave-vector spectrum, unifying the proton and the smaller electron scales. The plasma ß and temperature anisotropy regimes considered here are specific for the solar wind and magnetospheric conditions, and enable the electrons and protons to interact via the excited electromagnetic fluctuations. For the selected parameters, simultaneous electron and PFH instabilities can be observed with a dispersion spectrum of the electron firehose (EFH) extending toward the proton scales. Growth rates of the PFH instability are markedly boosted by the anisotropic electrons, especially in the oblique direction where the EFH growth rates are orders of magnitude higher.

  3. Temperature and ionic strength influences on actinide(VI)/(V) redox potentials for carbonate limiting complexes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Capdevila, H.; Vitorge, P.

    1998-01-01

    Actinide behaviour was studied in two limiting aqueous solutions: acidic and carbonate. Cyclic voltametry was validated with well-known U redox system. SIT was used to account for I influence. Taylor's series expansions to the second order were used to account for T influence. Redox potentials of actinide couples had previously been measured in non complexing media. The above data treatments give standard values for redox potential E 0 , for the corresponding entropy ΔS 0 , enthalpy ΔH 0 and heat capacity ΔC p 0 changes, and also for the corresponding excess values (i.e. the variation of these thermodynamic constants with ionic strength). This methodology was here used in carbonate media to measure the potential of the redox couple PuO 2 (CO 3 ) 3 4- /PuO 2 (CO 3 ) 3 5- from 5 to 70 degC and from I = 0.5 to 4.5 M in Na 2 CO 3 , NaClO 4 media. Experimental details and full results are given for Pu. Only final results are given for Np. Previous and/or published data for U and Am are discussed. E and ΔS variations with T or I were enough to be measured. The values obtained for the fitted SIT coefficients Δε, and for ΔS and ΔCp are similar for U, Np and Pu redox reactions. Using this analogy for Am missing data is discussed. β 3 V /β 3 VI formation constant ratio of the carbonate limiting complexes were deduced from the potential shift from complexing to non complexing media for the Actinide(VI)/Actinide(V) redox couples. β 3 V (U and Pu) and β 3 VI (Np) were finally proposed using published β3 VI (U and Pu) and β 3 V (Np). For Am, this data treatment was used to discuss the AmO 2 2+ / AmO 2 + redox potential

  4. Microcontroller based Stator Winding Resistance Determination of Induction Motor Drive on Temperature Variations

    OpenAIRE

    Siraj Ahmed T; Sukhdeo Sao; K.S.R Anjaneyulu

    2014-01-01

    In this paper an experiment has been conducted to determine the online stator winding resistance of an induction motor, in industries as well as domestic purpose induction motors is largely utilized, as it has both applications of variable and constant torque operation nature. The major requirement of an electric drive system is its independent control of torque and speed; this is achieved in DC motor Drive but has more disadvantages. With the help of fast acting switching devices it is possi...

  5. Elevated Temperature, Residual Compressive Strength of Impact-Damaged Sandwich Structure Manufactured Out-of-Autoclave

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grimsley, Brian W.; Sutter, James K.; Burke, Eric R.; Dixon, Genevieve D.; Gyekenyesi, Thomas G.; Smeltzer, Stanley S.

    2012-01-01

    Several 1/16th-scale curved sandwich composite panel sections of a 10 m diameter barrel were fabricated to demonstrate the manufacturability of large-scale curved sections using minimum gauge, [+60/-60/0]s, toughened epoxy composite facesheets co-cured with low density (50 kilograms per cubic meters) aluminum honeycomb core. One of these panels was fabricated out of autoclave (OoA) by the vacuum bag oven (VBO) process using Cycom(Registered Trademark) T40-800b/5320-1 prepreg system while another panel with the same lay-up and dimensions was fabricated using the autoclave-cure, toughened epoxy prepreg system Cycom(Registered Trademark) IM7/977-3. The resulting 2.44 m x 2 m curved panels were investigated by non-destructive evaluation (NDE) at NASA Langley Research Center (NASA LaRC) to determine initial fabrication quality and then cut into smaller coupons for elevated temperature wet (ETW) mechanical property characterization. Mechanical property characterization of the sandwich coupons was conducted including edge-wise compression (EWC), and compression-after-impact (CAI) at conditions ranging from 25 C/dry to 150 C/wet. The details and results of this characterization effort are presented in this paper.

  6. Kinetics of the oxidation of hydrogen sulfite by hydrogen peroxide in aqueous solution:. ionic strength effects and temperature dependence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maaß, Frank; Elias, Horst; Wannowius, Klaus J.

    Conductometry was used to study the kinetics of the oxidation of hydrogen sulfite, HSO -3, by hydrogen peroxide in aqueous non-buffered solution at the low concentration level of 10 -5-10 -6 M, typically found in cloud water. The kinetic data confirm that the rate law reported for the pH range 3-6 at higher concentration levels, rate= kH·[H +]·[HSO -3]·[H 2O 2], is valid at the low concentration level and at low ionic strength Ic. At 298 K and Ic=1.5×10 -4 M, third-order rate constant kH was found to be kH=(9.1±0.5)×10 7 M -2 s -1. The temperature dependence of kH led to an activation energy of Ea=29.7±0.9 kJ mol -1. The effect of the ionic strength (adjusted with NaCl) on rate constant kH was studied in the range Ic=2×10 -4-5.0 M at pH=4.5-5.2 by conductometry and stopped-flow spectrophotometry. The dependence of kH on Ic can be described with a semi-empirical relationship, which is useful for the purpose of comparison and extrapolation. The kinetic data obtained are critically compared with those reported earlier.

  7. Validation of mixing height determined from vertical profiles of wind and temperature from the DMI-HIRLAM NWP model in comparison with readiosoundings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rasmussen, A.; Soerensen, J.H.; Nielsen, N.W. [Danish Meteorological Inst., DMI, Copenhagen (Denmark)

    1997-10-01

    A sensitivity study is performed of vertical profiles from the numerical weather prediction model DMI-HIRLAM (DMI-HIgh Resolution Limited Area Model). The study involves profiles of horizontal wind, temperature and humidity in the lower troposphere up to 2500 meter. Detailed comparisons of analysed as well as forecast profiles are made with measured data from several radio-sonde stations throughout Europe. Methods for estimating the Mixing Height (MH) based on a bulk Richardson number method, the Vogelezang and Holtslag method and parcel methods are also studied. The methods are inter-compared, and MH based on data from DMI-HIRLAM are compared with the corresponding MH based on radiosonde data. For convective conditions the MH estimates are also compared with subjective estimates of the MH. In this paper preliminary results mainly based on data from Jaegersborg (Copenhagen) are presented. Results based on data from 1994-95 show that the resemblance between measured profiles and the DMI-HIRLAM profiles is fairly good in general. Also the estimates of the MH based on DMI-HIRLAM data is in general of nearly the same quality as estimations based on observed data. However, especially in convective conditions there is a tendency by DMI-HIRLAM to underestimate the strength of the mixing and thereby relatively large errors in the estimates of the MH can occur. (au)

  8. The effects of wind and temperature on cuticular transpiration of Picea abies and Pinus cembra and their significance in dessication damage at the alpine treeline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baig, M N; Tranquillini, W

    1980-01-01

    The importance of high winter winds and plant temperatures as causes of winter desiccation damage at the alpine treeline were studied in the Austrian Alps. Samples of 1- and 2-year twigs of Picea abies and Pinus cembra were collected from the valley bottom (1,000 m a.s.l.), forestline (1,940 m a.s.l.), kampfzone (2.090 m a.s.l.), wind-protected treeline (2,140 m a.s.l.), and wind-exposed treeline (2,140 m a.s.l.). Cuticular transpiration was measured at three different levels of wind speed (4, 10, and 15 ms -1 ) and temperature (15°, 20°, and 25° C). At elevated wind speeds slight increases in water loss were observed, whereas at higher temperatures much greater increases occurred. Studies on winter water relations show a significant decline in the actual moisture content and osmotic potentials of twigs, especially in the kampfzone and at treeline. The roles of high winds and temperatures in depleting the winter water economy and causing desiccation damage in the alpine treeline environment are discussed.

  9. Influence of wind velocity fluctuation on air temperature difference between the fan and ground levels and the effect of frost protective fan operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Araki, T.; Matsuo, K.; Miyama, D.; Sumikawa, O.; Araki, S.

    2008-01-01

    We invested the influence of wind velocity fluctuation on air temperature difference between the fan (4.8 m) and ground levels (0.5 m) and the effect of frost protective fan operation in order to develop a new method to reduce electricity consumption due to frost protective fan operation. The results of the investigations are summarized as follows: (1) Air temperature difference between the fan (4.8 m) and ground levels (0.5 m) was decreased following an increase in wind velocity, and the difference was less than 1°C for a wind velocity more than 3.0 m/s at a height of 6.5 m. (2) When the wind velocity was more than 2-3 m/s, there was hardly any increase in the temperature of the leaves. In contrast, when the wind velocity was less than 2-3 m/s, an increase in the temperature of the leaves was observed. Based on these results, it is possible that when the wind velocity is greater than 2-3 m, it prevents thermal inversion. Therefore, there would be no warmer air for the frost protective fan to return to the tea plants and the air turbulence produced by the frost protective fan would not reach the plants under the windy condition

  10. A GIS Approach to Wind,SST(Sea Surface Temperature) and CHL(Chlorophyll) variations in the Caspian Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirkhalili, Seyedhamzeh

    2016-07-01

    Chlorophyll is an extremely important bio-molecule, critical in photosynthesis, which allows plants to absorb energy from light. At the base of the ocean food web are single-celled algae and other plant-like organisms known as Phytoplankton. Like plants on land, Phytoplankton use chlorophyll and other light-harvesting pigments to carry out photosynthesis. Where Phytoplankton grow depends on available sunlight, temperature, and nutrient levels. In this research a GIS Approach using ARCGIS software and QuikSCAT satellite data was applied to visualize WIND,SST(Sea Surface Temperature) and CHL(Chlorophyll) variations in the Caspian Sea.Results indicate that increase in chlorophyll concentration in coastal areas is primarily driven by terrestrial nutrients and does not imply that warmer SST will lead to an increase in chlorophyll concentration and consequently Phytoplankton abundance.

  11. Comparison of different modelling approaches of drive train temperature for the purposes of wind turbine failure detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tautz-Weinert, J.; Watson, S. J.

    2016-09-01

    Effective condition monitoring techniques for wind turbines are needed to improve maintenance processes and reduce operational costs. Normal behaviour modelling of temperatures with information from other sensors can help to detect wear processes in drive trains. In a case study, modelling of bearing and generator temperatures is investigated with operational data from the SCADA systems of more than 100 turbines. The focus is here on automated training and testing on a farm level to enable an on-line system, which will detect failures without human interpretation. Modelling based on linear combinations, artificial neural networks, adaptive neuro-fuzzy inference systems, support vector machines and Gaussian process regression is compared. The selection of suitable modelling inputs is discussed with cross-correlation analyses and a sensitivity study, which reveals that the investigated modelling techniques react in different ways to an increased number of inputs. The case study highlights advantages of modelling with linear combinations and artificial neural networks in a feedforward configuration.

  12. Observations of C-Band Brightness Temperature and Ocean Surface Wind Speed and Rain Rate in Hurricanes Earl And Karl (2010)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Timothy; James, Mark; Roberts, Brent J.; Biswax, Sayak; Uhlhorn, Eric; Black, Peter; Linwood Jones, W.; Johnson, Jimmy; Farrar, Spencer; Sahawneh, Saleem

    2012-01-01

    Ocean surface emission is affected by: a) Sea surface temperature. b) Wind speed (foam fraction). c) Salinity After production of calibrated Tb fields, geophysical fields wind speed and rain rate (or column) are retrieved. HIRAD utilizes NASA Instrument Incubator Technology: a) Provides unique observations of sea surface wind, temp and rain b) Advances understanding & prediction of hurricane intensity c) Expands Stepped Frequency Microwave Radiometer capabilities d) Uses synthetic thinned array and RFI mitigation technology of Lightweight Rain Radiometer (NASA Instrument Incubator) Passive Microwave C-Band Radiometer with Freq: 4, 5, 6 & 6.6 GHz: a) Version 1: H-pol for ocean wind speed, b) Version 2: dual ]pol for ocean wind vectors. Performance Characteristics: a) Earth Incidence angle: 0deg - 60deg, b) Spatial Resolution: 2-5 km, c) Swath: approx.70 km for 20 km altitude. Observational Goals: WS 10 - >85 m/s RR 5 - > 100 mm/hr.

  13. Enhancement of High Temperature Strength of 2219 Alloys Through Small Additions of Nb and Zr and a Novel Heat Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mondol, S.; Makineni, S. K.; Kumar, S.; Chattopadhyay, K.

    2018-05-01

    This paper presents a detailed investigation on the effect of small amount of Nb and Zr additions to 2219 Al alloy coupled with a novel three-stage heat treatment process. The main aim of the work is to increase the high temperature strength of 2219 alloy by introducing thermally stable L12 type ordered precipitates in the matrix as well as by reducing the coarsening of metastable strengthening θ″ and θ' precipitates. To achieve this, small amounts of Nb and Zr are added to 2219 alloy melt and retained in solid solution by suction casting in a water-cooled copper mould having a cooling rate of 102 to 103 K/s. The suction cast alloy is directly aged at 673 K (400 °C) to form L12 type ordered coherent Al3Zr precipitates. Subsequently, the alloy is solution treated at 808 K (535 °C) for 30 minutes to get supersaturation of Cu in the matrix without significantly affecting the Al3Zr precipitates. Finally, the alloy is aged at 473 K (200 °C), which results in the precipitation of θ″ and θ'. Microstructural characterization reveals that θ″ and θ' are heterogeneously precipitated on pre-existing uniformly distributed Al3Zr precipitates, which leads to a higher number density of these precipitates. This results in a significant increase in strength at room temperature as well as at 473 K (200 °C) as compared to the 2219 alloy. Furthermore, the alloy remains thermally stable after prolonged exposure at 473 K (200 °C), which is attributed to the elastic strain energy minimization by the conjoint Al3Zr/θ' or Al3Zr/θ″ precipitates, and the high Zr and Nb solute-vacancy binding energy, retarding the growth and coarsening of θ″ and θ' precipitates.

  14. First Simultaneous and Common-Volume Lidar Observations of Na and Fe Metals, Temperatures, and Vertical Winds in Antarctica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, X.

    2017-12-01

    A new STAR Na Doppler lidar will be installed to Arrival Heights near McMurdo Station, Antarctica in October 2017. This new lidar will be operated next to an existing Fe Boltzmann lidar to make simultaneous and common-volume measurements of metal Na and Fe layers, neutral temperatures, and vertical winds in the mesosphere and thermosphere, up to nearly 200 km. These measurements will be used to study a variety of science topics, e.g., the meteoric metal layers, wave dynamics, polar mesospheric clouds, constituent and heat fluxes, and cosmic dust. The discoveries of thermospheric neutral Fe layers and persistent gravity waves by the Fe Boltzmann lidar observations has opened a new door to explore the space-atmosphere interactions with ground-based instruments, especially in the least understood but crucially important altitude range of 100-200 km. These neutral metal layers provide excellent tracers for modern resonance lidars to measure the neutral wind and temperature directly. Even more exciting, the neutral metal layers in the thermosphere provide a natural laboratory to test our fundamental understandings of the atmosphere-ionosphere-magnetosphere coupling and processes. This paper will report the first summer results from the simultaneous Na and Fe lidar observations from Antarctica, and highlight important discoveries made by the Fe lidar during its first seven years of campaign at McMurdo. A thermosphere-ionosphere Fe/Fe+ (TIFe) model will be introduced to explain the TIFe layers in Antarctica.

  15. Extratropical Influence of Sea Surface Temperature and Wind on Water Recycling Rate Over Oceans and Coastal Lands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Hua; Liu, W. Timothy

    1999-01-01

    Water vapor and precipitation are two important parameters confining the hydrological cycle in the atmosphere and over the ocean surface. In the extratropical areas, due to variations of midlatitude storm tracks and subtropical jetstreams, water vapor and precipitation have large variability. Recently, a concept of water recycling rate defined previously by Chahine et al. (GEWEX NEWS, August, 1997) has drawn increasing attention. The recycling rate of moisture is calculated as the ratio of precipitation to total precipitable water (its inverse is the water residence time). In this paper, using multi-sensor spacebased measurements we will study the role of sea surface temperature and ocean surface wind in determining the water recycling rate over oceans and coastal lands. Response of water recycling rate in midlatitudes to the El Nino event will also be discussed. Sea surface temperature data are derived from satellite observations from the Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) blended with in situ measurements, available for the period 1982-1998. Global sea surface wind observations are obtained from spaceborne scatterometers aboard on the European Remote-Sensing Satellite (ERS1 and 2), available for the period 1991-1998. Global total precipitable water provided by the NASA Water Vapor Project (NVAP) is available for the period 1988-1995. Global monthly mean precipitation provided by the Global Precipitation Climatology Project (GPCP) is available for the period 1987-1998.

  16. An induction/synchronous motor with high temperature superconductor/normal conductor hybrid double-cage rotor windings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakamura, T; Nagao, K; Nishimura, T; Matsumura, K

    2009-01-01

    We propose hybrid double-cage rotor windings that consist of a high temperature superconductor (HTS) and a normal conductor, which are introduced into an HTS induction/synchronous motor (HTS-ISM). The motor rotates as a conventional induction motor when the operating temperature of the hybrid rotor is above the critical temperature of the HTS bars, i.e., in the normal conducting state. On the other hand, the HTS-ISM rotates as a synchronous motor when the temperature is below the critical temperature, i.e., in the superconducting (zero resistance) state. In other words, we do not always need to take care of the cooling conditions, if the HTS-ISM is automatically, as well as appropriately, controlled, depending upon the rotation mode. Namely, the above-mentioned hybrid double-cage HTS-ISM is possibly a breakthrough in solving the cooling problems of HTS rotating machines, especially for industrial applications. The experimental results of the aforementioned motor are reported. An example of an operation flowchart of the motor is also presented and discussed.

  17. Yield and strength properties of the Ti-6-22-22S alloy over a wide strain rate and temperature range

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krueger, L.; Kanel, G.I.; Razorenov, S.V.; Bezrouchko, G.S.; Meyer, L.

    2002-01-01

    A mechanical behavior of the Ti-6-22-22S alloy was studied under uniaxial strain conditions at shock-wave loading and under uniaxial compressive stress conditions over a strain rate range of 10-4 s-1 to 103 s-1. The test temperature was varied from -175 deg. C to 620 deg. C. The strain-rate and the temperature dependencies of the yield stress obtained from the uniaxial stress tests and from the shock-wave experiments are in a good agreement and demonstrate a significant decrease in the yield strength as the temperature increases. This indicates the thermal activation mechanism of plastic deformation of the alloy is maintained at strain rates up to 106 s-1. Variation of sample thickness from 2.24 to 10 mm results in relatively small variations in the dynamic yield strength and the spall strength over the whole temperature range

  18. Mesospheric Temperatures and Winds measured by a VHF Meteor Radar at King Sejong Station (62.2S, 58.8W), Antarctica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Yongha; Kim, Jeong-Han; Jee, Geonwha; Lee, Chang-Sup

    2010-05-01

    A VHF radar at King Sejong Station, Antarctica has been measuring meteor echoes since March 2007. Temperatures near the mesopause are derived from meteor decay times with an improved method of selecting meteor echo samples, and compared with airglow temperatures simultaneously observed by a spectral airglow temperature imager (SATI). The temperatures derived from meteor decay times are mostly consistent with the rotational temperatures of SATI OH(6-2) and O2(0-1) emissions from March through October. During southern summer when SATI cannot be operated due to brief night time, the meteor radar observation shows cold mesospheric temperatures, significantly lower than the CIRA86 model. The meteor radar observation also provides wind field information between 80 and 100 km of altitude. The measured meridional winds seem to follow the summer pole to winter pole circulation, and thus are correlated with the measured seasonal temperature change. However, the correlation between meridional winds and temperatures is not found in day by day base, as a previous study reported. Tidal characteristics of both zonal and meridional winds will also be compared with those of other Antarctic stations.

  19. High temperature strength analysis of welded joint of RAF's by small punch test

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kato, T. [Muroran Institute of Technology, Dept. of Materials Science and Engineeering, Hokkaido (Japan); Komazaki, S.; Kohno, Y. [Muroran Institute of Technology, Muroran (Japan); Tanigawa, H. [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Naga-gun, Ibaraki-ken (Japan); Kohyama, A. [Kyoto Univ., Institute of Advanced Energy (Japan)

    2007-07-01

    Full text of publication follows: Nucleation and growth of microvoids and/or small cracks in fine-grained heat affected zone (HAZ) after long-term service operation, which is recognized as Type IV creep damage, has recently been a worldwide issue for high Cr ferritic steels. In our group, a small punch (SP) creep test has been successfully applied to evaluate this damage of low alloy ferritic steel. However, the HAZ of fusion reactor material welded by electron-beam (EB) welding is so narrow that it is not easy to evaluate its mechanical properties by conventional tests including the SP creep test with a plate-type specimen (10 x 10 x 0.5 mm{sup 3}). In this study, the SP creep test using a further miniaturized specimen was developed and applied to the welded joint of reduced activation ferritic steels (RAFs), F82H-IEA (Fe-8Cr-2W-0.2V-0.02Ta), for measuring creep properties of the HAZ. For the SP creep test, TEM disk-type samples (diam. 3.0 x 0.30 mm) were removed from the base metal (BM), weld metal (WM) and HAZ, respectively. The specimen surfaces were polished up to a 0.05 {mu}m alumina powder finish and the specimen's thickness was finally adjusted to 0.25 mm. The SP creep tests were performed at temperatures of 823{approx}973 K and under loads ranging from 20 to 200 N. A constant load was applied to the center of the specimen through the Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} bail (diam. 1.0 mm) using the electric servo motor. The central deflection of the specimen was monitored by measuring the displacement of the compression rod. The tests were carried out in an argon gas atmosphere and the gas was continuously passed through during the test to prevent severe oxidation of the specimen. The differences in SP creep properties such as rupture time and minimum creep rate between the BM, WM and HAZ were discussed in terms of microstructural changes during welding thermal cycles. In addition, the result obtained from the BM was correlated with those of uniaxial creep test

  20. Impact of High-Temperature, High-Pressure Synthesis Conditions on the Formation of the Grain Structure and Strength Properties of Intermetallic Ni3Al

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ovcharenko, V. E.; Ivanov, K. V.; Boyangin, E. N.; Krylova, T. A.; Pshenichnikov, A. P.

    2018-01-01

    The impact of the preliminary load on 3Ni+Al powder mixture and the impact of the duration of the delay in application of compacting pressure to synthesis product under the conditions of continuous heating of the mixture up to its self-ignition on the grain size and strength properties of the synthesized Ni3Al intermetallide material have been studied. The grain structure of the intermetallide synthesized under pressure was studied by means of metallography, transmission electron microscopy and EBSD analysis, with the dependence of ultimate tensile strength on the grain size in the synthesized intermetallide having been investigated at room temperature and at temperatures up to 1000°C. It is shown that an increase in the pressure preliminarily applied to the initial mixture compact results in reduced grain size of the final intermetallide, whereas an increase in pre-compaction time makes the grain size increased. A decrease in the grain size increases the ultimate tensile strength of the intermetallide. The maximum value of the ultimate tensile strength in the observed anomalous temperature dependence of this strength exhibits a shift by 200°C toward higher temperatures, and the ultimate strength of the synthesized intermetallide at 1000°C increases roughly two-fold.

  1. Electro-thermal Modeling for Junction Temperature Cycling-Based Lifetime Prediction of a Press-Pack IGBT 3L-NPC-VSC Applied to Large Wind Turbines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Senturk, Osman Selcuk; Munk-Nielsen, Stig; Teodorescu, Remus

    2011-01-01

    Reliability is a critical criterion for multi-MW wind turbines, which are being employed with increasing numbers in wind power plants, since they operate under harsh conditions and have high maintenance cost due to their remote locations. In this study, the wind turbine grid-side converter...... reliability is investigated regarding IGBT lifetime based on junction temperature cycling for the grid-side press-pack IGBT 3L-NPC-VSC, which is a state-of-the art high reliability solution. In order to acquire IGBT junction temperatures for given wind power profiles and to use them in IGBT lifetime...... prediction, the converter electro-thermal model including electrical, power loss, and dynamical thermal models is developed with the main focus on the thermal modeling regarding converter topology, switch technology, and physical structure. Moreover, these models are simplified for their practical...

  2. Estimation of the variations of ventilation rate and indoor radon concentration using the observed wind velocity and indoor-outdoor temperature difference

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagano, Katsuhiro; Inose, Yuichi; Kojima, Hiroshi

    2006-01-01

    The indoor radon concentration in the building depends on the ventilation rate. Measurement results of indoor-outdoor pressure difference showed the ventilation rate correlated closely with the indoor-outdoor pressure difference. The observation results showed that one of factor of indoor-outdoor pressure difference was the wind velocity. When the wind velocity is small, the ventilation rate is affected by the indoor-outdoor temperature difference and the effect depends on the wind velocity. The temporal variation of indoor radon concentration was predicted by the time depending indoor radon balance model and the ventilation rate estimated from the wind velocity and the indoor-outdoor temperature difference. The temporal variations of predicted radon concentration gave good agreement with the experimental values. The measurement method, indoor radon concentration and ventilation rate, factors of temporal variation of ventilation rate, and prediction of indoor radon concentration are reported. (S.Y.)

  3. Effect of High-Temperature Curing Methods on the Compressive Strength Development of Concrete Containing High Volumes of Ground Granulated Blast-Furnace Slag

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wonsuk Jung

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper investigates the effect of the high-temperature curing methods on the compressive strength of concrete containing high volumes of ground granulated blast-furnace slag (GGBS. GGBS was used to replace Portland cement at a replacement ratio of 60% by binder mass. The high-temperature curing parameters used in this study were the delay period, temperature rise, peak temperature (PT, peak period, and temperature down. Test results demonstrate that the compressive strength of the samples with PTs of 65°C and 75°C was about 88% higher than that of the samples with a PT of 55°C after 1 day. According to this investigation, there might be optimum high-temperature curing conditions for preparing a concrete containing high volumes of GGBS, and incorporating GGBS into precast concrete mixes can be a very effective tool in increasing the applicability of this by-product.

  4. Weather and climate needs for Lidar observations from space and concepts for their realization. [wind, temperature, moisture, and pressure data needs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atlas, D.; Korb, C. L.

    1980-01-01

    The spectrum of weather and climate needs for Lidar observations from space is discussed with emphasis on the requirements for wind, temperature, moisture, and pressure data. It is shown that winds are required to realistically depict all atmospheric scales in the tropics and the smaller scales at higher latitudes, where both temperature and wind profiles are necessary. The need for means to estimate air-sea exchanges of sensible and latent heat also is noted. A concept for achieving this through a combination of Lidar cloud top heights and IR cloud top temperatures of cloud streets formed during cold air outbreaks over the warmer ocean is outlined. Recent theoretical feasibility studies concerning the profiling of temperatures, pressure, and humidity by differential absorption Lidar (DIAL) from space and expected accuracies are reviewed. An alternative approach to Doppler Lidar wind measurements also is presented. The concept involves the measurement of the displacement of the aerosol backscatter pattern, at constant heights, between two successive scans of the same area, one ahead of the spacecraft and the other behind it a few minutes later. Finally, an integrated space Lidar system capable of measuring temperature, pressure, humidity, and winds which combines the DIAL methods with the aerosol pattern displacement concept is described.

  5. Effect of HIP temperature on microstructure and low cycle fatigue strength of CuCrZr alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishi, Hiroshi; Enoeda, Mikio

    2011-10-01

    In order to investigate the effect of the HIP cycle temperatures on the metallurgic degradation and the mechanical properties of CuCrZr alloy, assessments of the microstructure, tensile test, Charpy impact test and low cycle fatigue test are performed for various heat treated CuCrZr alloys, which were solution-annealed followed by water-quenched and aged state of CuCrZr with simulated HIP cycle at temperatures of 980 and 1045 °C. Grain growth occurred on 1045 °C HIP CuCrZr, though slightly on 980 °C HIP CuCrZr. Metallurgic degradation such as voids was not found by optical and SEM observations. There were coarse precipitates in all the CuCrZr and the precipitates did not easily dissolve at 980 °C. The low cycle fatigue strength of 1045 °C HIP CuCrZr was lower than that of other CuCrZr because of the metallurgic degradation caused by the heat cycle, while that of other CuCrZr was corresponding to the best fit curve of ITER MPH.

  6. Effect of HIP temperature on microstructure and low cycle fatigue strength of CuCrZr alloy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nishi, Hiroshi, E-mail: nishi.hiroshi88@jaea.go.jp [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Naka-shi, Ibaraki-ken 311-0193 (Japan); Enoeda, Mikio [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Naka-shi, Ibaraki-ken 311-0193 (Japan)

    2011-10-01

    In order to investigate the effect of the HIP cycle temperatures on the metallurgic degradation and the mechanical properties of CuCrZr alloy, assessments of the microstructure, tensile test, Charpy impact test and low cycle fatigue test are performed for various heat treated CuCrZr alloys, which were solution-annealed followed by water-quenched and aged state of CuCrZr with simulated HIP cycle at temperatures of 980 and 1045 deg. C. Grain growth occurred on 1045 deg. C HIP CuCrZr, though slightly on 980 deg. C HIP CuCrZr. Metallurgic degradation such as voids was not found by optical and SEM observations. There were coarse precipitates in all the CuCrZr and the precipitates did not easily dissolve at 980 deg. C. The low cycle fatigue strength of 1045 deg. C HIP CuCrZr was lower than that of other CuCrZr because of the metallurgic degradation caused by the heat cycle, while that of other CuCrZr was corresponding to the best fit curve of ITER MPH.

  7. Effect of HIP temperature on microstructure and low cycle fatigue strength of CuCrZr alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishi, Hiroshi; Enoeda, Mikio

    2011-01-01

    In order to investigate the effect of the HIP cycle temperatures on the metallurgic degradation and the mechanical properties of CuCrZr alloy, assessments of the microstructure, tensile test, Charpy impact test and low cycle fatigue test are performed for various heat treated CuCrZr alloys, which were solution-annealed followed by water-quenched and aged state of CuCrZr with simulated HIP cycle at temperatures of 980 and 1045 deg. C. Grain growth occurred on 1045 deg. C HIP CuCrZr, though slightly on 980 deg. C HIP CuCrZr. Metallurgic degradation such as voids was not found by optical and SEM observations. There were coarse precipitates in all the CuCrZr and the precipitates did not easily dissolve at 980 deg. C. The low cycle fatigue strength of 1045 deg. C HIP CuCrZr was lower than that of other CuCrZr because of the metallurgic degradation caused by the heat cycle, while that of other CuCrZr was corresponding to the best fit curve of ITER MPH.

  8. The effect of temperature, matrix alloying and substrate coatings on wettability and shear strength of Al/Al2O3 couples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sobczak, N.; Ksiazek, M.; Radziwill, W.; Asthana, R.; Mikulowski, B.

    2004-03-01

    A fresh approach has been advanced to examine in the Al/Al2O3 system the effects of temperature, alloying of Al with Ti or Sn, and Ti and Sn coatings on the substrate, on contact angles measured using a sessile-drop test, and on interface strength measured using a modified push-off test that allows shearing of solidified droplets with less than 90 deg contact angle. In the modified test, the solidified sessile-drop samples are bisected perpendicular to the drop/Al2O3 interface at the midplane of the contact circle to obtain samples that permit bond strength measurement by stress application to the flat surface of the bisected couple. The test results show that interface strength is strongly influenced by the wetting properties; low contact angles correspond to high interface strength, which also exhibits a strong temperature dependence. An increase in the wettability test temperature led to an increase in the interface strength in the low-temperature range where contact angles were large and wettability was poor. The room-temperature shear tests conducted on thermally cycled sessile-drop test specimens revealed the effect of chemically formed interfacial oxides; a weakening of the thermally cycled Al/Al2O3 interface was caused under the following conditions: (1) slow contact heating and short contact times in the wettability test, and (2) fast contact heating and longer contact times. The addition of 6 wt pct Ti or 7 wt pct Sn to Al only marginally influenced the contact angle and interfacial shear strength. However, Al2O3 substrates having thin (<1 µm) Ti coatings yielded relatively low contact angles and high bond strength, which appears to be related to the dissolution of the coating in Al and formation of a favorable interface structure.

  9. Effects of cooling rate, austenitizing temperature and austenite deformation on the transformation behavior of high-strength boron steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mun, Dong Jun; Shin, Eun Joo; Choi, Young Won; Lee, Jae Sang; Koo, Yang Mo

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Non-equilibrium segregation of B in steel depends strongly on the cooling rate. ► A higher austenitization temperature reduced the B hardenability effect. ► An increase in B concentration at γ grain boundaries accelerates the B precipitation. ► The loss of B hardenability effect is due to intragranular borocarbide precipitation. ► The controlled cooling after hot deformation increased the B hardenability effect. - Abstract: The phase transformation behavior of high-strength boron steel was studied considering the segregation and precipitation behavior of boron (B). The effects of cooling rate, austenitizing temperature and austenite deformation on the transformation behavior of B-bearing steel as compared with B-free steel were investigated by using dilatometry, microstructural observations and analysis of B distribution. The effects of these variables on hardenability were discussed in terms of non-equilibrium segregation mechanism and precipitation behavior of B. The retardation of austenite-to-ferrite transformation by B addition depends strongly on cooling rate (CR); this is mainly due to the phenomenon of non-equilibrium grain boundary segregation of B. The hardenability effect of B-bearing steel decreased at higher austenitizing temperature due to the precipitation of borocarbide along austenite grain boundaries. Analysis of B distribution by second ion mass spectroscopy confirmed that the grain boundary segregation of B occurred at low austenitizing temperature of 900 °C, whereas B precipitates were observed along austenite grain boundaries at high austenitizing temperature of 1200 °C. The significant increase in B concentration at austenite grain boundaries due to grain coarsening and a non-equilibrium segregation mechanism may lead to the B precipitation. In contrast, solute B segregated to austenite grain boundaries during cooling after heavy deformation became more stable because the increase in boundary area by grain

  10. High Temperature Strength and Hot Working Technology for As-Cast Mg–1Zn–1Ca (ZX11 Alloy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kamineni Pitcheswara Rao

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Cast Mg–1Zn–1Ca alloy (ZX11 has been tested to evaluate its compressive strength between 25 °C and 250 °C, and workability in the range of 260–500 °C. The ultimate compressive strength of this alloy is about 30% higher than that of creep-resistant alloy Mg–3Sn–2Ca (TX32 between 25 °C and 200 °C, and exhibits a plateau between 100 °C and 175 °C, similar to TX32. This is attributed to Mg2Ca particles present at grain boundaries that reduce their sliding. The processing map, developed between 260 and 420 °C in the strain rate limits of 0.0003 s−1 to 1 s−1, exhibited two domains in the ranges: (1 280–330 °C and 0.0003–0.01 s−1 and (2 330–400 °C and 0.0003–0.1 s−1. In these domains, dynamic recrystallization occurs, with basal slip dominating in the first domain and prismatic slip in the second, while the recovery mechanism being climb of edge dislocations in both. The activation energy estimated using standard kinetic rate equation is 191 kJ/mol, which is higher than the value for lattice self-diffusion in magnesium indicating that a large back stress is created by the presence of Ca2Mg6Zn3 intermetallic particles in the matrix. It is recommended that the alloy be best processed at 380 °C and 0.1 s−1 at which prismatic slip is favored due to Zn addition. At higher strain rates, the alloy exhibits flow instability and adiabatic shear band formation at <340 °C while flow localization and cracking at grain boundaries occurs at temperatures >400 °C.

  11. A note on the correlation between circular and linear variables with an application to wind direction and air temperature data in a Mediterranean climate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lototzis, M.; Papadopoulos, G. K.; Droulia, F.; Tseliou, A.; Tsiros, I. X.

    2018-04-01

    There are several cases where a circular variable is associated with a linear one. A typical example is wind direction that is often associated with linear quantities such as air temperature and air humidity. The analysis of a statistical relationship of this kind can be tested by the use of parametric and non-parametric methods, each of which has its own advantages and drawbacks. This work deals with correlation analysis using both the parametric and the non-parametric procedure on a small set of meteorological data of air temperature and wind direction during a summer period in a Mediterranean climate. Correlations were examined between hourly, daily and maximum-prevailing values, under typical and non-typical meteorological conditions. Both tests indicated a strong correlation between mean hourly wind directions and mean hourly air temperature, whereas mean daily wind direction and mean daily air temperature do not seem to be correlated. In some cases, however, the two procedures were found to give quite dissimilar levels of significance on the rejection or not of the null hypothesis of no correlation. The simple statistical analysis presented in this study, appropriately extended in large sets of meteorological data, may be a useful tool for estimating effects of wind on local climate studies.

  12. A method of optimized neural network by L-M algorithm to transformer winding hot spot temperature forecasting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, B. G.; Wu, X. Y.; Yao, Z. F.; Huang, H.

    2017-11-01

    Transformers are essential devices of the power system. The accurate computation of the highest temperature (HST) of a transformer’s windings is very significant, as for the HST is a fundamental parameter in controlling the load operation mode and influencing the life time of the insulation. Based on the analysis of the heat transfer processes and the thermal characteristics inside transformers, there is taken into consideration the influence of factors like the sunshine, external wind speed etc. on the oil-immersed transformers. Experimental data and the neural network are used for modeling and protesting of the HST, and furthermore, investigations are conducted on the optimization of the structure and algorithms of neutral network are conducted. Comparison is made between the measured values and calculated values by using the recommended algorithm of IEC60076 and by using the neural network algorithm proposed by the authors; comparison that shows that the value computed with the neural network algorithm approximates better the measured value than the value computed with the algorithm proposed by IEC60076.

  13. Climatology of mesopause region nocturnal temperature, zonal wind, and sodium density observed by sodium lidar over Hefei, China (32°N, 117°E)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, T.; Ban, C.; Fang, X.; Li, J.; Wu, Z.; Xiong, J.; Feng, W.; Plane, J. M. C.

    2017-12-01

    The University of Science and Technology of China narrowband sodium temperature/wind lidar, located in Hefei, China (32°N, 117°E), was installed in November 2011 and have made routine nighttime measurements since January 2012. We obtained 154 nights ( 1400 hours) of vertical profiles of temperature, sodium density, and zonal wind, and 83 nights ( 800 hours) of vertical flux of gravity wave (GW) zonal momentum in the mesopause region (80-105 km) during the period of 2012 to 2016. In temperature, it is likely that the diurnal tide dominates below 100 km in spring, while the semidiurnal tide dominates above 100 km throughout the year. A clear semiannual variation in temperature is revealed near 90 km, likely related to the tropical mesospheric semiannual oscillation (MSAO). The variability of sodium density is positively correlated with temperature, suggesting that in addition to dynamics, the chemistry may also play an important role in the formation of sodium atoms. The observed sodium peak density is 1000 cm-3 higher than that simulated by the model. In zonal wind, the diurnal tide dominates in both spring and fall, while semidiurnal tide dominates in winter. The observed semiannual variation in zonal wind near 90 km is out-of-phase with that in temperature, consistent with tropical MSAO. The GW zonal momentum flux is mostly westward in fall and winter, anti-correlated with eastward zonal wind. The annual mean flux averaged over 87-97 km is -0.3 m2/s2 (westward), anti-correlated with eastward zonal wind of 10 m/s. The comparisons of lidar results with those observed by satellite, nearby radar, and simulated by model show generally good agreements.

  14. A Full-size High Temperature Superconducting Coil Employed in a Wind Turbine Generator Set-up

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Song, Xiaowei (Andy); Mijatovic, Nenad; Kellers, Jürgen

    2016-01-01

    A full-size stationary experimental set-up, which is a pole pair segment of a 2 MW high temperature superconducting (HTS) wind turbine generator, has been built and tested under the HTS-GEN project in Denmark. The performance of the HTS coil is crucial to the set-up, and further to the development...... is tested in LN2 first, and then tested in the set-up so that the magnetic environment in a real generator is reflected. The experimental results are reported, followed by a finite element simulation and a discussion on the deviation of the results. The tested and estimated Ic in LN2 are 148 A and 143 A...

  15. Small-Scale Gravity Waves in ER-2 MMS/MTP Wind and Temperature Measurements during CRYSTAL-FACE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, L.; Alexander, M. J.; Bui, T. P.; Mahoney, M. J.

    2006-01-01

    Lower stratospheric wind and temperature measurements made from NASA's high-altitude ER-2 research aircraft during the CRYSTAL-FACE campaign in July 2002 were analyzed to retrieve information on small scale gravity waves (GWs) at the aircraft's flight level (typically approximately 20 km altitude). For a given flight segment, the S-transform (a Gaussian wavelet transform) was used to search for and identify small horizontal scale GW events, and to estimate their apparent horizontal wavelengths. The horizontal propagation directions of the events were determined using the Stokes parameter method combined with the cross S-transform analysis. The vertical temperature gradient was used to determine the vertical wavelengths of the events. GW momentum fluxes were calculated from the cross S-transform. Other wave parameters such as intrinsic frequencies were calculated using the GW dispersion relation. More than 100GW events were identified. They were generally high frequency waves with vertical wavelength of approximately 5 km and horizontal wavelength generally shorter than 20 km. Their intrinsic propagation directions were predominantly toward the east, whereas their ground-based propagation directions were primarily toward the west. Among the events, approximately 20% of them had very short horizontal wavelength, very high intrinsic frequency, and relatively small momentum fluxes, and thus they were likely trapped in the lower stratosphere. Using the estimated GW parameters and the background winds and stabilities from the NCAR/NCEP reanalysis data, we were able to trace the sources of the events using a simple reverse ray-tracing. More than 70% of the events were traced back to convective sources in the troposphere, and the sources were generally located upstream of the locations of the events observed at the aircraft level. Finally, a probability density function of the reversible cooling rate due to GWs was obtained in this study, which may be useful for cirrus

  16. Small-scale gravity waves in ER-2 MMS/MTP wind and temperature measurements during CRYSTAL-FACE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Wang

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Lower stratospheric wind and temperature measurements made from NASA's high-altitude ER-2 research aircraft during the CRYSTAL-FACE campaign in July 2002 were analyzed to retrieve information on small scale gravity waves (GWs at the aircraft's flight level (typically ~20 km altitude. For a given flight segment, the S-transform (a Gaussian wavelet transform was used to search for and identify small horizontal scale GW events, and to estimate their apparent horizontal wavelengths. The horizontal propagation directions of the events were determined using the Stokes parameter method combined with the cross S-transform analysis. The vertical temperature gradient was used to determine the vertical wavelengths of the events. GW momentum fluxes were calculated from the cross S-transform. Other wave parameters such as intrinsic frequencies were calculated using the GW dispersion relation. More than 100GW events were identified. They were generally high frequency waves with vertical wavelength of ~5 km and horizontal wavelength generally shorter than 20 km. Their intrinsic propagation directions were predominantly toward the east, whereas their ground-based propagation directions were primarily toward the west. Among the events, ~20% of them had very short horizontal wavelength, very high intrinsic frequency, and relatively small momentum fluxes, and thus they were likely trapped in the lower stratosphere. Using the estimated GW parameters and the background winds and stabilities from the NCAR/NCEP reanalysis data, we were able to trace the sources of the events using a simple reverse ray-tracing. More than 70% of the events were traced back to convective sources in the troposphere, and the sources were generally located upstream of the locations of the events observed at the aircraft level. Finally, a probability density function of the reversible cooling rate due to GWs was obtained in this study, which may be useful for cirrus cloud models.

  17. A comparative study to determine strength of autopolymerizing acrylic resin and autopolymerizing composite resin influenced by temperature during polymerization: An In Vitro study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anuj Chhabra

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: Temporary coverage of a prepared tooth is an important step during various stages of the fixed dental prosthesis. Provisional restorations should satisfy proper mechanical requirements to resist functional and nonfunctional loads. A few studies are carried out regarding the comparison of the effect of curing environment, air and water, on mechanical properties of autopolymerizing acrylic and composite resin. Hence, the aim of this study was to compare the transverse strength of autopolymerizing acrylic resin and autopolymerizing composite resin as influenced by the temperature of air and water during polymerization. Materials and Methods: Samples of autopolymerizing acrylic resin and composite resin were prepared by mixing as per manufacturer's instructions and were placed in a preformed stainless steel mold. The mold containing the material was placed under different controlled conditions of water temperature and air at room temperature. Polymerized samples were then tested for transverse strength using an Instron universal testing machine. Results: Alteration of curing condition during polymerization revealed a significant effect on the transverse strength. The transverse strength of acrylic resin specimens cured at 60°C and composite resin specimens cured at 80°C was highest. Polymerizing the resin in cold water at 10°C reduced the mechanical strength. Conclusions: Polymerization of the resin in hot water greatly increased its mechanical properties. The method of placing resin restoration in hot water during polymerization may be useful for improving the mechanical requirements and obtaining long-lasting performance.

  18. Microstructural, mechanical and tribological investigation of 30CrMnSiNi2A ultra-high strength steel under various tempering temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arslan Hafeez, Muhammad; Farooq, Ameeq

    2018-01-01

    The aim of the research was to investigate the variation in microstructural, mechanical and tribological characteristics of 30CrMnSiNi2A ultra-high strength steel as a function of tempering temperatures. Steel was quenched at 880 °C and tempered at five different tempering temperatures ranging from 250 °C to 650 °C. Optical microscopy and pin on disc tribometer was used to evaluate the microstructural and wear properties. Results show that characteristics of 30CrMnSiNi2A are highly sensitive to tempering temperatures. Lathe and plate shaped martensite obtained by quenching transform first into ε-carbide, second cementite, third coarsened and spheroidized cementite and finally into recovered ferrite and austenite. Hardness, tensile and yield strengths decreased while elongation increased with tempering temperatures. On the other hand, wear rate first markedly decreased and then increased. Optimum amalgamation of characteristics was achieved at 350 °C.

  19. Link between western Arabian sea surface temperature and summer monsoon strength and high-latitude abrupt climate events

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Naidu, P.D.

    Artificial Neural Networks (ANN's) based on quantitative analyses of planktic foraminifera. High seasonal SST contrast between winter and summer during the last glacial period indicates weak upwelling and strong cold northeasterly winds. Minimum seasonal SST...

  20. Strength and rupture-life transitions caused by secondary carbide precipitation in HT-9 during high-temperature low-rate mechanical testing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DiMelfi, R.J.; Gruber, E.E.; Kramer, J.M.; Hughes, T.H.

    1992-01-01

    The martensitic-ferritic alloy HT-9 is slated for long-term use as a fuel-cladding material in the Integral Fast Reactor. Analysis of published high-temperature mechanical property data suggests that secondary carbide precipitation would occur during service life causing substantial strengthening of the as-heat-treated material. Aspects of the kinetics of this precipitation process are extracted from calculations of the back stress necessary to produce the observed strengthening effect under various creep loading conditions. The resulting Arrhenius factor is shown to agree quantitatively with shifts to higher strength of crept material in reference to the intrinsic strength of HT-9. The results of very low constant strain-rate high-temperature tensile tests on as-heat-treated HT-9 that focus on the transition in strength with precipitation will be presented and related to rupture-life

  1. Effect of cement/wood ratios and wood storage conditions on hydration temperature, hydration time, and compressive strength of wood-cement mixtures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andy W.C. Lee; Zhongli Hong; Douglas R. Phillips; Chung-Yun Hse

    1987-01-01

    This study investigated the effect of cement/wood ratios and wood storage conditions on hydration temperature, hydration time, and compressive strength of wood-cement mixtures made from six wood species: southern pine, white oak, southern red oak, yellow-poplar, sweetgum, and hickory. Cement/wood ratios varied from 13/1 to 4/1. Wood storage conditions consisted of air-...

  2. Seasonal Variability of Saturn's Tropospheric Temperatures, Winds and Para-H2 from Cassini Far-IR Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fletcher, Leigh N.; Irwin, P. G. J; Achterberg, R. K.; Orton, G. S.; Flasar, F. M.

    2015-01-01

    temperatures, para-H2 and winds. Quantitative differences between the Cassini and Voyager epochs suggest that the oscillation is not in phase with the seasonal cycle at these tropospheric depths (i.e., it should be described as quasi-periodic rather than 'semi annual'). Variability in the zonal wind field derived from latitudinal thermal gradients is small (less than 10 m/s per scale height near the tropopause) and mostly affects the broad retrograde jets, with the notable exception of large variability on the northern flank of the equatorial jet. The meridional potential vorticity (PV) gradient, and hence the 'staircase of PV' associated with spatial variations in the vigour of vertical mixing, has varied over the course of the mission but maintained its overall shape. PV gradients in latitude and altitude are used to estimate the atmospheric refractive index for the propagation of stationary planetary (Rossby) waves, predicting that such wave activity would be confined to regions of real refractivity (tropical regions plus bands at 35-45 in both hemispheres). The penetration depth of these regions into the upper troposphere is temporally variable (potentially associated with stratification changes), whereas the latitudinal structure is largely unchanged over time (associated with the zonal jet system).

  3. Big Ship Data: Using vessel measurements to improve estimates of temperature and wind speed on the Great Lakes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fries, Kevin; Kerkez, Branko

    2017-05-01

    The sheer size of many water systems challenges the ability of in situ sensor networks to resolve spatiotemporal variability of hydrologic processes. New sources of vastly distributed and mobile measurements are, however, emerging to potentially fill these observational gaps. This paper poses the question: How can nontraditional measurements, such as those made by volunteer ship captains, be used to improve hydrometeorological estimates across large surface water systems? We answer this question through the analysis of one of the largest such data sets: an unprecedented collection of one million unique measurements made by ships on the North American Great Lakes from 2006 to 2014. We introduce a flexible probabilistic framework, which can be used to integrate ship measurements, or other sets of irregular point measurements, into contiguous data sets. The performance of this framework is validated through the development of a new ship-based spatial data product of water temperature, air temperature, and wind speed across the Great Lakes. An analysis of the final data product suggests that the availability of measurements across the Great Lakes will continue to play a large role in the confidence with which these large surface water systems can be studied and modeled. We discuss how this general and flexible approach can be applied to similar data sets, and how it will be of use to those seeking to merge large collections of measurements with other sources of data, such as physical models or remotely sensed products.

  4. A New Prediction Model for Transformer Winding Hotspot Temperature Fluctuation Based on Fuzzy Information Granulation and an Optimized Wavelet Neural Network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Zhang

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Winding hotspot temperature is the key factor affecting the load capacity and service life of transformers. For the early detection of transformer winding hotspot temperature anomalies, a new prediction model for the hotspot temperature fluctuation range based on fuzzy information granulation (FIG and the chaotic particle swarm optimized wavelet neural network (CPSO-WNN is proposed in this paper. The raw data are firstly processed by FIG to extract useful information from each time window. The extracted information is then used to construct a wavelet neural network (WNN prediction model. Furthermore, the structural parameters of WNN are optimized by chaotic particle swarm optimization (CPSO before it is used to predict the fluctuation range of the hotspot temperature. By analyzing the experimental data with four different prediction models, we find that the proposed method is more effective and is of guiding significance for the operation and maintenance of transformers.

  5. High resolution vertical profiles of wind, temperature and humidity obtained by computer processing and digital filtering of radiosonde and radar tracking data from the ITCZ experiment of 1977

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danielson, E. F.; Hipskind, R. S.; Gaines, S. E.

    1980-01-01

    Results are presented from computer processing and digital filtering of radiosonde and radar tracking data obtained during the ITCZ experiment when coordinated measurements were taken daily over a 16 day period across the Panama Canal Zone. The temperature relative humidity and wind velocity profiles are discussed.

  6. Effect of power quality on windings temperature of marine induction motors. Part II: Results of investigations and recommendations for related regulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gnacinski, P.; Mindykowski, J.; Tarasiuk, T.

    2009-01-01

    This paper deals with the effect of lowered voltage quality in ship power systems on windings temperature of low-power induction cage machines. The results of investigations carried out with experimental and analytical methods are presented. The thermal impact of power quality disturbances permitted by ship classification societies is discussed. A proposal of new power quality regulations for ship classification societies is made.

  7. Heat treatment for improvement in lower temperature mechanical properties of 0.40 pct C-Cr-Mo ultrahigh strength steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomita, Yoshiyuki; Okabayashi, Kunio

    1983-11-01

    In the previous paper, it was reported that isothermal heat treatment of a commercial Japanese 0.40 pct C-Ni-Cr-Mo ultrahigh strength steel (AISI 4340 type) at 593 K for a short time followed by water quenching, in which a mixed structure of 25 vol pct lower bainite and 75 vol pct martensite is produced, results in the improvement of low temperature mechanical properties (287 to 123 K). The purpose of this paper is to study whether above new heat treatment will still be effective in commercial practice for improving low temperature mechanical properties of the ultrahigh strength steel when applied to a commercial Japanese 0.40 pct C-Cr-Mo ultrahigh strength steel which is economical because it lacks the expensive nickel component (AISI 4140 type). At and above 203 K this new heat treatment, as compared with the conventional 1133 K direct water quenching treatment, significantly improved the strength, tensile ductility, and notch toughness of the 0.40 pct C-Cr-Mo ultrahigh strength steel. At and above 203 K the new heat treatment also produced superior fracture ductility and notch toughness results at similar strength levels as compared to those obtained by using γ α' repetitive heat treatment for the same steel. However, the new heat treatment remarkably decreased fracture ductility and notch toughness of the 0.40 pct C-Cr-Mo ultrahigh strength steel below 203 K, and thus no significant improvement in the mechanical properties was noticeable as compared with the properties produced by the conventional 1133 K direct water quenching treatment and the γ α' repetitive heat treatment. This contrasts with the fact that the new heat treatment, as compared with the conventional 1133 K direct water quenching treatment and the γ α' repetitive heat treatment, dramatically improved the notch toughness of the 0.40 pct C-Ni-Cr-Mo ultrahigh strength steel, providing a better combination of strength and ductility throughout the 287 to 123 K temperature range. The difference

  8. Experimental determination of line strengths for selected carbon monoxide and carbon dioxide absorption lines at temperatures between 295 and 1250 K

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Medvecz, P.J.; Nichols, K.M.

    1994-01-01

    Fourier transform infrared absorption spectroscopy has been used for the determination of the line strengths of 41 CO and CO 2 absorption lines at temperatures between 295 and 1250 K. The CO vibrational-rotational lines were from the P branch of the fundamental absorption band (2150--1950 cm -1 ) while the CO 2 vibrational-rotational lines were from the far wing of the R branch of the ν 3 fundamental band (2395--2380 cm -1 ). The intensities of the lines were measured from absorption spectra recorded in a high-temperature gas cell containing known concentrations of CO/CO 2 /N 2 gas mixtures at atmospheric pressure. Absorption spectra were recorded through the cell with the use of a moderate-resolution Fourier transform infrared spectrometer. The absorption spectra were mathematically corrected for distortions resulting from the finite resolution of the spectrometer and for peak overlap. Line strength measurements were made from the corrected peaks by using the Bouguer-Lambert law and assuming a Lorentzian line profile. The experimentally obtained line strengths were evaluated by statistical calculations, by consideration of the validity of the Bouguer-Lambert assumption for these data, by comparison with existing room-temperature and high-temperature data, and by comparison with theoretical calculations. For CO, the statistical analysis suggests that the reported values have an uncertainty of ±10--12%, which is similar to the observed discrepancies with other reported values at room temperature. At high temperatures, the difference between these data and previously reported data and theoretical predictions is less than 10%. For CO 2 , the statistical uncertainty associated with the line strength calculations is less than 5%, which is also the approximate level of agreement with existing room-temperature data

  9. Effects of tempering temperature on microstructural evolution and mechanical properties of high-strength low-alloy D6AC plasma arc welds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, Chun-Ming, E-mail: chunming@ntut.edu.tw [Department of Mechanical Engineering, National Taipei University of Technology, Taipei 10608, Taiwan (China); Lu, Chi-Hao [Department of Mechanical Engineering, National Taiwan University of Science and Technology, Taipei 10673, Taiwan (China)

    2016-10-31

    This study prepared high-strength low-alloy (HSLA) D6AC weldments using a plasma arc welding (PAW) process. The PAW weldments were then tempered at temperatures of 300 °C, 450 °C, and 600 °C for 1000 min. Microstructural characteristics of the weld in as-welded HSLA-D6AC, tempered D6AC, and tensile-tested D6AC were observed via optical microscopy (OM). We also investigated the hardness, tensile strength, and V-notched tensile strength (NTS) of the tempered specimens using a Vickers hardness tester and a universal testing machine. The fracture surfaces of the specimens were observed using a scanning electron microscope (SEM). Our results show that the mechanical properties and microstructural features of the HSLA weldments are strongly dependent on tempering temperature. An increase in tempering temperature led to a decrease in the hardness and tensile strength of the weldments but led to an increase in ductility. These effects can be attributed to the transformation of the microstructure and its effect on fracture characteristics. The specimens tempered at 300 °C and 450 °C failed in a ductile-brittle manner due to the presence of inter-lath austenite in the microstructure. After tempering at a higher temperature of 600 °C, martensite embrittlement did not occur, such that specimens failure was predominantly in a ductile manner. In the NTS specimens, an increase in tempering temperature led to a reduction in tensile strength due to notch embrittlement and the effects of grain boundary thickening and sliding. Our findings provide a valuable reference for the application of HSLA-D6AC steel in engineering and other fields.

  10. A novel no-insulation winding technique of high temperature-superconducting racetrack coil for rotating applications: A progress report in Korea university.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Y H; Song, J B; Yang, D G; Kim, Y G; Hahn, S; Lee, H G

    2016-10-01

    This paper presents our recent progress on core technology development for a megawatt-class superconducting wind turbine generator supported by the international collaborative R&D program of the Korea Institute of Energy Technology Evaluation and Planning. To outperform the current high-temperature-superconducting (HTS) magnet technology in the wind turbine industry, a novel no-insulation winding technique was first proposed to develop the second-generation HTS racetrack coil for rotating applications. Here, we briefly report our recent studies on no-insulation (NI) winding technique for GdBCO coated conductor racetrack coils in the following areas: (1) Charging-discharging characteristics of no-insulation GdBCO racetrack coils with respect to external pressures applied to straight sections; (2) thermal and electrical stabilities of no-insulation GdBCO racetrack coils encapsulated with various impregnating materials; (3) quench behaviors of no-insulation racetrack coils wound with GdBCO conductor possessing various lamination layers; (4) electromagnetic characteristics of no-insulation GdBCO racetrack coils under time-varying field conditions. Test results confirmed that this novel NI winding technique was highly promising. It could provide development of a compact, mechanically dense, and self-protecting GdBCO magnet for use in real-world superconducting wind turbine generators.

  11. A novel no-insulation winding technique of high temperature-superconducting racetrack coil for rotating applications: A progress report in Korea university

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Y. H.; Song, J. B.; Yang, D. G.; Kim, Y. G.; Hahn, S.; Lee, H. G.

    2016-10-01

    This paper presents our recent progress on core technology development for a megawatt-class superconducting wind turbine generator supported by the international collaborative R&D program of the Korea Institute of Energy Technology Evaluation and Planning. To outperform the current high-temperature-superconducting (HTS) magnet technology in the wind turbine industry, a novel no-insulation winding technique was first proposed to develop the second-generation HTS racetrack coil for rotating applications. Here, we briefly report our recent studies on no-insulation (NI) winding technique for GdBCO coated conductor racetrack coils in the following areas: (1) Charging-discharging characteristics of no-insulation GdBCO racetrack coils with respect to external pressures applied to straight sections; (2) thermal and electrical stabilities of no-insulation GdBCO racetrack coils encapsulated with various impregnating materials; (3) quench behaviors of no-insulation racetrack coils wound with GdBCO conductor possessing various lamination layers; (4) electromagnetic characteristics of no-insulation GdBCO racetrack coils under time-varying field conditions. Test results confirmed that this novel NI winding technique was highly promising. It could provide development of a compact, mechanically dense, and self-protecting GdBCO magnet for use in real-world superconducting wind turbine generators.

  12. Structures of self-assembled amphiphilic peptide-heterodimers: effects of concentration, pH, temperature and ionic strength

    KAUST Repository

    Luo, Zhongli

    2010-01-01

    The amphiphilic double-tail peptides AXG were studied regarding secondary structure and self-assembly in aqueous solution. The two tails A = Ala 6 and G = Gly6 are connected by a central pair X of hydrophilic residues, X being two aspartic acids in ADG, two lysines in AKG and two arginines in ARG. The peptide AD (Ala6Asp) served as a single-tail reference. The secondary structure of the four peptides was characterized by circular dichroism spectroscopy under a wide range of peptide concentrations (0.01-0.8 mM), temperatures (20-98 °C), pHs (4-9.5) and ionic strengths. In salt-free water both ADG and AD form a β-sheet type of structure at high concentration, low pH and low temperature, in a peptide-peptide driven assembly of individual peptides. The transition has a two-state character for ADG but not for AD, which indicates that the added tail in ADG makes the assembly more cooperative. By comparison the secondary structures of AKG and ARG are comparatively stable over the large range of conditions covered. According to dynamic light scattering the two-tail peptides form supra-molecular aggregates in water, but high-resolution AFM-imaging indicate that ordered (self-assembled) structures are only formed when salt (0.1 M NaCl) is added. Since the CD-studies indicate that the NaCl has only a minor effect on the peptide secondary structure we propose that the main role of the added salt is to screen the electrostatic repulsion between the peptide building blocks. According to the AFM images ADG and AKG support a correlation between nanofibers and a β-sheet or unordered secondary structure, whereas ARG forms fibers in spite of lacking β-sheet structure. Since the AKG and ARG double-tail peptides self-assemble into distinct nanostructures while their secondary structures are resistant to environment factors, these new peptides show potential as robust building blocks for nano-materials in various medical and nanobiotechnical applications. © 2010 The Royal Society

  13. Indoor randon concentration. Temperature and wind effects; Concentrazione di radon indoor. Effetto del vento e della temperatura

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sesana, L.; Benigni, S. [Milan Univ., Milan (Italy). Ist. di Fisica Generale Applicata

    2000-12-01

    The present study analyses and discusses the behaviour of the indoor radon concentration in a research house. Hourly measurements were carried out in the basement of the house from November 1998 up to June 1999. In many sequences of days radon concentration in the room under analysis shows strong variation all day long with accumulation in the evening and overnight and decrease in the morning and in the afternoon. Measurements of wind velocity, indoor and outdoor temperatures and outdoor-indoor pressure difference were performed and their trend is compared with the observed radon concentration. The exhalation of radon from walls, floor and ceiling and the pressure difference driven exhalation from the soil are discussed, particularly the relation with the temperature differences. The air exchange rates between the house and the outdoor air are studied. [Italian] Si analizza e si discute il comportamento della concentrazione di radon indoor nel seminterrato di una casa di ricerca. Misure orarie sono state effettuate da novembre 1998 a giugno 1999. In molte sequenze di giorni la concentrazione del radon nel locale in analisi presenta forti variazioni nel corso della giornata con un accumulo notturno e decrescita nelle ore diurne. Sono state eseguite misure della velocita' del vento, delle temperature outdoor e indoor e della differenza di pressione outdoor-indoor e il loro andamento e' stato confrontato con quello della concentrazione del radon. Vengono discusse l'esalazione del radon dalle pareti, dal pavimento e dal soffitto e l'esalazione pressure difference driven dal suolo. Il rateo dei ricambi d'aria tra il locale e l'aria outdoor e' studiato.

  14. Temperature Field-Wind Velocity Field Optimum Control of Greenhouse Environment Based on CFD Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yongbo Li

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The computational fluid dynamics technology is applied as the environmental control model, which can include the greenhouse space. Basic environmental factors are set to be the control objects, the field information is achieved via the division of layers by height, and numerical characteristics of each layer are used to describe the field information. Under the natural ventilation condition, real-time requirements, energy consumption, and distribution difference are selected as index functions. The optimization algorithm of adaptive simulated annealing is used to obtain optimal control outputs. A comparison with full-open ventilation shows that the whole index can be reduced at 44.21% and found that a certain mutual exclusiveness exists between the temperature and velocity field in the optimal course. All the results indicate that the application of CFD model has great advantages to improve the control accuracy of greenhouse.

  15. Thermal expansion, modulus of elasticity, shrinkage, creep and residual strength of concrete for PCRVs at uniaxial stress state and elevated temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aschl, H.; Stoeckl, S.

    1981-01-01

    At the Institut fuer Massivbau of the Technical University of Munich testing machines were built, which allow to test sealed and unsealed cylinders with uniaxial stress state at elevated temperatures till 523 K (250 0 C). With this equipment tests were carried out at predried, unsealed and sealed specimens to study - thermal expansion coefficient - modulus of elasticity - shrinkage and - creep of concrete at elevated temperatures of 353 K (80 0 C) and 393 K (120 0 C) and at a normal temperature of 293 K (20 0 C). In addition the residual strength of all specimens was measured. In the worst case (unsealed, i.e. drying specimens) some showed a maximum decrease in strength up to 60%. (orig.) [de

  16. High throughput measurement of high temperature strength of ceramics in controlled atmosphere and its use on solid oxide fuel cell anode supports

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frandsen, Henrik Lund; Curran, Declan; Rasmussen, Steffen

    2014-01-01

    In the development of structural and functional ceramics for high temperature electrochemical conversion devices such as solid oxide fuel cells, their mechanical properties must be tested at operational conditions, i.e. at high temperature and controlled atmospheres. Furthermore, characterization...... for testing multiple samples at operational conditions providing a high throughput and thus the possibility achieve high reliability. Optical methods are used to measure deformations contactless, frictionless load measuring is achieved, and multiple samples are handled in one heat up. The methodology...... is validated at room temperature, and exemplified by measurement of the strength of solid oxide fuel cell anode supports at 800 C. © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved....

  17. Dependency of Shear Strength on Test Rate in SiC/BSAS Ceramic Matrix Composite at Elevated Temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Sung R.; Bansal, Narottam P.; Gyekenyesi, John P.

    2003-01-01

    Both interlaminar and in-plane shear strengths of a unidirectional Hi-Nicalon(TM) fiber-reinforced barium strontium aluminosilicate (SiC/BSAS) composite were determined at 1100 C in air as a function of test rate using double notch shear test specimens. The composite exhibited a significant effect of test rate on shear strength, regardless of orientation which was either in interlaminar or in in-plane direction, resulting in an appreciable shear-strength degradation of about 50 percent as test rate decreased from 3.3 10(exp -1) mm/s to 3.3 10(exp -5) mm/s. The rate dependency of composite's shear strength was very similar to that of ultimate tensile strength at 1100 C observed in a similar composite (2-D SiC/BSAS) in which tensile strength decreased by about 60 percent when test rate varied from the highest (5 MPa/s) to the lowest (0.005 MPa/s). A phenomenological, power-law slow crack growth formulation was proposed and formulated to account for the rate dependency of shear strength of the composite.

  18. Numerical modeling of the equatorial ionization anomaly (EIA), equatorial temperature and wind anomaly (ETWA) and equatorial electron temperature anomaly (EETA) on the basis of the GSM TIP

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klimenko, M. V.; Klimenko, V. V.; Bryukhanov, V. V.

    On the basis of Global Self-consistent Model of Thermosphere Ionosphere and Protonosphere GSM TIP developed in WD IZMIRAN the calculations of the behavior of thermosphere F-region and upper ionosphere parameters at middle and low geomagnetic latitudes are carried out The calculations were carried out with use the new block of the calculation of electric fields in the ionosphere in which the decision of the three-dimensional equation describing the law of the conservation of the full current density in the ionosphere of the Earth is realized by adduction it to the two-dimensional by integration on the thickness of the current conductive layer of the ionosphere along equipotential geomagnetic field lines The calculations of the neutral atmosphere composition and temperature were executed with use of the MSIS model The quite geomagnetic conditions of the equinox were considered in the minimum of the solar activity There are presented the calculated global distributions of the critical frequency of the F2-layer of ionosphere for the different moments UT the latitudinal course of the N e and T e in the F-region and upper ionosphere in the vicinity of geomagnetic equator and unrolling on UT of the calculated velocities of zonal component of the thermospheric wind and ion temperature in the F-region of ionosphere as well as critical frequency and height of the F2-layer maximum of the ionosphere at three longitude chains of the stations Brazilian -- Fortaleza 4 0 r S 38 0 r W Jicamarca 11 9 r S 76 0 r W Cachoeira

  19. Changes in the flexural strength of engineering ceramics after high temperature sodium corrosion test. Influence after sodium exposure for 1000 hours

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hayashi, Kazunori; Tachi, Yoshiaki; Kano, Shigeki; Hirakawa, Yasushi; Komine, Ryuji; Yoshida, Eiichi

    1998-02-01

    Engineering ceramics have excellent properties such as high strength, high hardness and high heat resistance compared with metallic materials. To apply the ceramic in fast reactor environment, it is necessary to evaluate the sodium compatibility and the influence of sodium on the mechanical properties of ceramics. In this study, the influence of high temperature sodium on the mechanical properties of sintered ceramics of conventional and high purity Al 2 O 3 , SiC, SiAlON, AlN and unidirectional solidified ceramics of Al 2 O 3 /YAG eutectic composite were investigated by means of flexure tests. Test specimens were exposed in liquid sodium at 823K and 923K for 3.6Ms. There were no changes in the flexural strength of the conventional and high purity Al 2 O 3 , AlN and Al 2 O 3 /YAG eutectic composite after the sodium exposure at 823K. On the contrary, the decrease in the flexural strength was observed in SiC and SiAlON. After the sodium exposure at 923K, there were also no changes in the flexural strength of AlN and Al 2 O 3 /YAG eutectic composite. In the conventional and high purity Al 2 O 3 and SiC, the flexural strength decreased and signs of grain boundary corrosion were detected by surface observation. The flexural strength of SiAlON after the sodium exposure at 923K increased instead of severe corrosion. In the specimens those showed no changes in the flexural strength, further exposure in sodium is needed to verify whether the mechanical properties degrade or not. For SiAlON, it is necessary to clarify the reason for the increased strength after the sodium exposure at 923K. (author)

  20. Effect of heat curing methods on the temperature history and strength development of slab concrete for nuclear power plant structures in cold climates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Gun Cheol; Han, Min Cheol; Baek, Dae Hyun; Koh, Kyung Taek

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this study was to experimentally investigate the effect of heat curing methods on the temperature history and strength development of slab concrete exposed to -10 degrees Celsius. The goal was to determine proper heat curing methods for the protection of nuclear power plant structures against early-age frost damage under adverse (cold) conditions. Two types of methods were studied: heat insulation alone and in combination with a heating cable. For heat curing with heat insulation alone, either sawdust or a double layer bubble sheet (2-BS) was applied. For curing with a combination of heat insulation and a heating cable, an embedded heating cable was used with either a sawdust cover, a 2-BS cover, or a quadruple layer bubble sheet (4-BS) cover. Seven different slab specimens with dimensions of 1200, 600, 200 mm and a design strength of 27 MPa were fabricated and cured at -10 degrees Celsius for 7 d. The application of sawdust and 2-BS allowed the concrete temperature to fall below 0 degrees Celsius within 40 h after exposure to -10 degrees Celsius, and then, the temperature dropped to -10 degrees Celsius and remained there for 7 d owing to insufficient thermal resistance. However, the combination of a heating cable plus sawdust or 2-BS maintained the concrete temperature around 5 degrees Celsius for 7 d. Moreover, the combination of the heating cable and 4-BS maintained the concrete temperature around 10 degrees Celsius for 7 d. This was due to the continuous heat supply from the heating cable and the prevention of heat loss by the 4-BS. For maturity development, which is an index of early-age frost damage, the application of heat insulation materials alone did not allow the concrete to meet the minimum maturity required to protect against early-age frost damage after 7 d, owing to poor thermal resistance. However, the combination of the heating cable and the heat insulating materials allowed the concrete to attain the minimum maturity level after

  1. Zonal wind observations during a geomagnetic storm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, N. J.; Spencer, N. W.

    1986-01-01

    In situ measurements taken by the Wind and Temperature Spectrometer (WATS) onboard the Dynamics Explorer 2 spacecraft during a geomagnetic storm display zonal wind velocities that are reduced in the corotational direction as the storm intensifies. The data were taken within the altitudes 275 to 475 km in the dusk local time sector equatorward of the auroral region. Characteristic variations in the value of the Dst index of horizontal geomagnetic field strength are used to monitor the storm evolution. The detected global rise in atmospheric gas temperature indicates the development of thermospheric heating. Concurrent with that heating, reductions in corotational wind velocities were measured equatorward of the auroral region. Just after the sudden commencement, while thermospheric heating is intense in both hemispheres, eastward wind velocities in the northern hemisphere show reductions ranging from 500 m/s over high latitudes to 30 m/s over the geomagnetic equator. After 10 hours storm time, while northern thermospheric heating is diminishing, wind velocity reductions, distinct from those initially observed, begin to develop over southern latitudes. In the latter case, velocity reductions range from 300 m/s over the highest southern latitudes to 150 m/s over the geomagnetic equator and extend into the Northern Hemisphere. The observations highlight the interhemispheric asymmetry in the development of storm effects detected as enhanced gas temperatures and reduced eastward wind velocities. Zonal wind reductions over high latitudes can be attributed to the storm induced equatorward spread of westward polar cap plasma convection and the resulting plasma-neutral collisions. However, those collisions are less significant over low latitudes; so zonal wind reductions over low latitudes must be attributed to an equatorward extension of a thermospheric circulation pattern disrupted by high latitude collisions between neutrals transported via eastward winds and ions

  2. A study on the swelling characteristics of a potential buffer material : Effect of ionic strength and temperature on the swelling pressure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Jae Owan; Cho, Won Jin; Chun, Kwan Sik [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejon (Korea)

    1999-04-01

    This study is intended to investigate the effect of ionic strength and temperature on the swelling pressure of bentonite. The dry density for compacted bentonite was adjusted between 1.4 Mg/m{sup 3} - 1.8 Mg/m{sup 3}. The effect of temperature was tested at 20 deg C, 40 deg C, 60 deg C, 80 deg C, and the effect of ionic strength with distilled water, synthetic ground water, and 0.01 M - 0.1 M NaCl solution. The swelling pressure decreased with increasing ionic strength, and its dependency got lower at high dry density. Temperature had negligible effect on the swelling pressure of compacted bentonite, which could be explained by the change in hydration pressure, osmotic pressure, and pore water pressure in accordance with temperature. The swelling pressure of compacted bentonite with low dry density was dominated mainly by osmosis. However, hydration was thought to become important at higher dry density, compared with the osmosis. 32 refs., 11 figs., 4 tabs. (Author)

  3. Mapping near-surface air temperature, pressure, relative humidity and wind speed over Mainland China with high spatiotemporal resolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Tao; Zheng, Xiaogu; Dai, Yongjiu; Yang, Chi; Chen, Zhuoqi; Zhang, Shupeng; Wu, Guocan; Wang, Zhonglei; Huang, Chengcheng; Shen, Yan; Liao, Rongwei

    2014-09-01

    As part of a joint effort to construct an atmospheric forcing dataset for mainland China with high spatiotemporal resolution, a new approach is proposed to construct gridded near-surface temperature, relative humidity, wind speed and surface pressure with a resolution of 1 km×1 km. The approach comprises two steps: (1) fit a partial thin-plate smoothing spline with orography and reanalysis data as explanatory variables to ground-based observations for estimating a trend surface; (2) apply a simple kriging procedure to the residual for trend surface correction. The proposed approach is applied to observations collected at approximately 700 stations over mainland China. The generated forcing fields are compared with the corresponding components of the National Centers for Environmental Prediction (NCEP) Climate Forecast System Reanalysis dataset and the Princeton meteorological forcing dataset. The comparison shows that, both within the station network and within the resolutions of the two gridded datasets, the interpolation errors of the proposed approach are markedly smaller than the two gridded datasets.

  4. An innovative thermodynamic model for performance evaluation of photovoltaic systems: Effect of wind speed and cell temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaushik, S.C.; Rawat, Rahul; Manikandan, S.

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • A novel thermodynamic modelling of photovoltaic energy system has been proposed. • The entropy, optical, thermal, spectral and fill factor losses are assessed. • The expression of energetic and exergetic efficiencies have been derived. • Reversible, endoreversible, exoreversible and irreversible systems are presented. - Abstract: The photovoltaic energy conversion is a thermodynamic system which converts the solar energy to the electrical and thermal energy. In this paper, a novel thermodynamic model of photovoltaic energy conversion system has been proposed on the basis of the first and second law of thermodynamics including entropy generation, optical, thermal, spectral and fill factor losses. Based on the irreversibilities, the proposed model has been classified into four cases i.e. reversible, endoreversible, exoreversible and irreversible systems, for which, the expressions of energetic and exergetic efficiencies have been derived. The upper limit efficiency of an ideal photovoltaic module placed in an irreversible environment, i.e. endoreversible system, is determined to be 82.8%. The effect of wind speed and module temperature on the energetic and exergetic efficiencies, thermodynamic losses and irreversibilities has also been presented.

  5. Relationships Between the Bulk-Skin Sea Surface Temperature Difference, Wind, and Net Air-Sea Heat Flux

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emery, William J.; Castro, Sandra L.; Lindstrom, Eric (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The primary purpose of this project was to evaluate and improve models for the bulk-skin temperature difference to the point where they could accurately and reliably apply under a wide variety of environmental conditions. To accomplish this goal, work was conducted in three primary areas. These included production of an archive of available data sets containing measurements of the skin and bulk temperatures and associated environmental conditions, evaluation of existing skin layer models using the compiled data archive, and additional theoretical work on the development of an improved model using the data collected under diverse environmental conditions. In this work we set the basis for a new physical model of renewal type, and propose a parameterization for the temperature difference across the cool skin of the ocean in which the effects of thermal buoyancy, wind stress, and microscale breaking are all integrated by means of the appropriate renewal time scales. Ideally, we seek to obtain a model that will accurately apply under a wide variety of environmental conditions. A summary of the work in each of these areas is included in this report. A large amount of work was accomplished under the support of this grant. The grant supported the graduate studies of Sandra Castro and the preparation of her thesis which will be completed later this year. This work led to poster presentations at the 1999 American Geophysical Union Fall Meeting and 2000 IGARSS meeting. Additional work will be presented in a talk at this year's American Meteorological Society Air-Sea Interaction Meeting this May. The grant also supported Sandra Castro during a two week experiment aboard the R/P Flip (led by Dr. Andrew Jessup of the Applied Physics Laboratory) to help obtain additional shared data sets and to provide Sandra with a fundamental understanding of the physical processes needed in the models. In a related area, the funding also partially supported Dr. William Emery and Daniel

  6. Thermal and Pressure Characterization of a Wind Tunnel Force Balance Using the Single Vector System. Experimental Design and Analysis Approach to Model Pressure and Temperature Effects in Hypersonic Wind Tunnel Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lynn, Keith C.; Commo, Sean A.; Johnson, Thomas H.; Parker, Peter A,

    2011-01-01

    Wind tunnel research at NASA Langley Research Center s 31-inch Mach 10 hypersonic facility utilized a 5-component force balance, which provided a pressurized flow-thru capability to the test article. The goal of the research was to determine the interaction effects between the free-stream flow and the exit flow from the reaction control system on the Mars Science Laboratory aeroshell during planetary entry. In the wind tunnel, the balance was exposed to aerodynamic forces and moments, steady-state and transient thermal gradients, and various internal balance cavity pressures. Historically, these effects on force measurement accuracy have not been fully characterized due to limitations in the calibration apparatus. A statistically designed experiment was developed to adequately characterize the behavior of the balance over the expected wind tunnel operating ranges (forces/moments, temperatures, and pressures). The experimental design was based on a Taylor-series expansion in the seven factors for the mathematical models. Model inversion was required to calculate the aerodynamic forces and moments as a function of the strain-gage readings. Details regarding transducer on-board compensation techniques, experimental design development, mathematical modeling, and wind tunnel data reduction are included in this paper.

  7. Variations in the microstructure and properties of Mn-Ti multiple-phase steel with high strength under different tempering temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Dazhao; Li, Xiaonan; Cui, Tianxie; Li, Jianmin; Wang, Yutian; Fu, Peimao

    2015-03-01

    There are few relevant researches on coils by tempering, and the variations of microstructure and properties of steel coil during the tempering process also remain unclear. By using thermo-mechanical control process(TMCP) technology, Mn-Ti typical HSLA steel coils with yield strength of 920 MPa are produced on the 2250 hot rolling production line. Then, the samples are taken from the coils and tempered at the temperatures of 220 °C, 350 °C, and 620 °C respectively. After tempering the strength, ductility and toughness of samples are tested, and meanwhile microstructures are investigated. Precipitates initially emerge inside the ferrite laths and the density of the dislocation drops. Then, the lath-shaped ferrites begin to gather, and the retained austenite films start to decompose. Finally, the retained austenite films are completely decomposed into coarse and short rod-shape precipitates composed of C and Ti compounds. The yield strength increases with increasing tempering temperature due to the pinning effect of the precipitates, and the dislocation density decreases. The yield strength is highest when the steel is tempered at 220 °C because of pinning of the precipitates to dislocations. The total elongation increases in all samples because of the development of ferrites during tempering. The tensile strength and impact absorbed energy decline because the effect of impeding crack propagation weakens as the retained austenite films completely decompose and the precipitates coarsen. This paper clarifies the influence of different tempering temperatures on phase transformation characteristics and process of Mn-Ti typical multiphase steels, as well as its resulting performance variation rules.

  8. Effect of Heat-Pressing Temperature and Holding Time on the Microstructure and Flexural Strength of Lithium Disilicate Glass-Ceramics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Jing; Wang, Hui; Chen, Jihua

    2015-01-01

    The present study aimed to evaluate the influence of various heat-pressing procedures (different holding time and heat pressing temperature) on the microstructure and flexural strength of lithium disilicate glass ceramic. An experimental lithium silicate glass ceramic (ELDC) was prepared from the SiO2-Li2O-K2O-Al2O3-ZrO2-P2O5 system and heat-pressed following different procedures by varying temperature and holding time. The flexural strength was tested and microstructure was analyzed. The relationships between the microstructure, mechanical properties and heat-pressing procedures were discussed in-depth. Results verified the feasibility of the application of dental heat-pressing technique in processing the experimental lithium disilicate glass ceramic. Different heat-pressing procedures showed significant influence on microstructure and flexural strength. ELDC heat-pressed at 950℃ with holding time of 15 min achieved an almost pore-free microstructure and the highest flexural strength, which was suitable for dental restorative application. PMID:25985206

  9. Effect of aluminizing of Cr-containing ferritic alloys on the seal strength of a novel high-temperature solid oxide fuel cell sealing glass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chou, Yeong-Shyung; Stevenson, Jeffry W.; Singh, Prabhakar

    A novel high-temperature alkaline earth silicate sealing glass was developed for solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) applications. The glass was used to join two metallic coupons of Cr-containing ferritic stainless steel for seal strength evaluation. In previous work, SrCrO 4 was found to form along the glass/steel interface, which led to severe strength degradation. In the present study, aluminization of the steel surface was investigated as a remedy to minimize or prevent the strontium chromate formation. Three different processes for aluminization were evaluated with Crofer22APU stainless steel: pack cementation, vapor-phase deposition, and aerosol spraying. It was found that pack cementation resulted in a rough surface with occasional cracks in the Al-diffused region. Vapor-phase deposition yielded a smoother surface, but the resulting high Al content increased the coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE), resulting in the failure of joined coupons. Aerosol spraying of an Al-containing salt resulted in the formation of a thin aluminum oxide layer without any surface damage. The room temperature seal strength was evaluated in the as-fired state and in environmentally aged conditions. In contrast to earlier results with uncoated Crofer22APU, the aluminized samples showed no strength degradation even for samples aged in air. Interfacial and chemical compatibility was also investigated. The results showed aluminization to be a viable candidate approach to minimize undesirable chromate formation between alkaline earth silicate sealing glass and Cr-containing interconnect alloys for SOFC applications.

  10. Effect of heat-pressing temperature and holding time on the microstructure and flexural strength of lithium disilicate glass-ceramics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fu Wang

    Full Text Available The present study aimed to evaluate the influence of various heat-pressing procedures (different holding time and heat pressing temperature on the microstructure and flexural strength of lithium disilicate glass ceramic. An experimental lithium silicate glass ceramic (ELDC was prepared from the SiO2-Li2O-K2O-Al2O3-ZrO2-P2O5 system and heat-pressed following different procedures by varying temperature and holding time. The flexural strength was tested and microstructure was analyzed. The relationships between the microstructure, mechanical properties and heat-pressing procedures were discussed in-depth. Results verified the feasibility of the application of dental heat-pressing technique in processing the experimental lithium disilicate glass ceramic. Different heat-pressing procedures showed significant influence on microstructure and flexural strength. ELDC heat-pressed at 950℃ with holding time of 15 min achieved an almost pore-free microstructure and the highest flexural strength, which was suitable for dental restorative application.

  11. Increasing strength, ductility and impact toughness of ultrafine-grained 6063 aluminium alloy by combining ECAP and a high-temperature short-time aging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meyer, L W; Schoenherr, R; Hockauf, M

    2010-01-01

    Since fully-dense ultrafine or nanocrystalline bulk materials can be processed, there has been an increasing scientific interest in several plastic deformation (SPD) procedures, particularly in the last decade. Especially the equal-channel angular pressing (ECAP) has widely been investigated due to its ability of producing billets sufficiently large for industrial applications in functional or structural components. The significant strength increase based on grain refinement is typically accompanied by a significant decrease in ductility and toughness. Within this work, a new methodology was applied for combining ECAP with a subsequent high-temperature short-time aging for the 6063 aluminium alloy. An increase in strength, ductility as well as impact toughness regarding its coarse grained counterparts was reached. More precisely, ultimate tensile strength, elongation to failure and impact toughness were increased by 46%, 21% and 40% respectively. This was observed after only one run of ECAP at room temperature in a solid-solution treated condition and an aging at 170 0 C for 18 minutes. The regular aging time for maximum strength at 170 0 C is around 6 hours. Longer exposure times lead to recrystallisation and, as for regular aging, it leads to overaging, both causing a decrease of properties. The work demonstrates a strategy for an efficient processing of commercial Al-Mg-Si alloys with outstanding mechanical properties.

  12. Experimental and finite element study of the effect of temperature and moisture on the tangential tensile strength and fracture behavior in timber logs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Finn; Ormarsson, Sigurdur

    2014-01-01

    Timber is normally dried by kiln drying, in the course of which moisture-induced stresses and fractures can occur. Cracks occur primarily in the radial direction due to tangential tensile strength (TSt) that exceeds the strength of the material. The present article reports on experiments and nume......Timber is normally dried by kiln drying, in the course of which moisture-induced stresses and fractures can occur. Cracks occur primarily in the radial direction due to tangential tensile strength (TSt) that exceeds the strength of the material. The present article reports on experiments...... and numerical simulations by finite element modeling (FEM) concerning the TSt and fracture behavior of Norway spruce under various climatic conditions. Thin log disc specimens were studied to simplify the description of the moisture flow in the samples. The specimens designed for TS were acclimatized...... to a moisture content (MC) of 18% before TSt tests at 20°C, 60°C, and 90°C were carried out. The maximum stress results of the disc simulations by FEM were compared with the experimental strength results at the same temperature levels. There is a rather good agreement between the results of modeling...

  13. Method to increase the transition temperature and for the critical magnetic field strength of the known intermetallic compounds of vanadium or niobium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Winter, H.

    1977-01-01

    The invention deals with a method to raise the transition temperature and critical magnetic field strength of superconducting, intermetallic compounds of vanadium and niobium. For example, a niobium alloy with 4 wt.% Al in melted in vacuum electric arc and formed into a sheet of about 1 mm thick. Strips of this sheet are electrically heated up to 1,900 0 C for one hour in a high-vacuum oven. The strips are then annealed in evacuated quartz ampoules for 120 hours at 800 0 C. These strips have a transition temperature of 24 K and a critical magnetic field strength of 600 kg; the critical current density was 5 x 10 4 A/cm 2 . (HPOE) [de

  14. Effects of temperature and loading speed on interface-dominated strength in fibre/polymer composites: An evaluation for in-situ environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sethi, Sanghamitra; Rathore, Dinesh Kumar; Ray, Bankim Chandra

    2015-01-01

    Graphical abstract: Some microcracks turn to potential cracks at low loading rates and cause significant reduction in interlaminar shear strength of the composite system while as the loading rate increases the time available to propagate the microcracks is less. This can be attributed to higher ILSS at higher loading rates at these above-ambient temperatures. - Highlights: • Effect of temperature and loading rate has been studied. • Three different types of fibres are used for fabrication. • Flexural and fractography behaviour were studied. • T g was affected by types of fibre and matrix used. - Abstract: The present investigation intends to study the influence of crosshead velocity and in-situ environmental conditioning i.e. high temperature and cryogenic temperature on micromechanical performance of glass fibre/epoxy, carbon fibre/epoxy and Kevlar fibre/epoxy polymer composites. 3-point short beam shear tests were conducted on the conditioned specimens to evaluate the interfacial properties and failure modes which are related to mechanical properties of the composites. The effect of crosshead velocity (within the range 1-10 3 mm/min) on the interlaminar shear strength (ILSS) of all the three composite systems at different temperatures was studied. The glass transition temperature (T g ) of conditioned samples were measured by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) in the temperature range of 25 °C to 150 °C temperature. At 1 mm/min loading rate, for both glass/epoxy and carbon/epoxy composites maximum increase in ILSS value was about 85.72% with respect to ambient, while for Kevlar/epoxy composite 31.77% reduction in ILSS was observed at -100 °C temperature

  15. [Dust storms trend in the Capital Circle of China over the past 50 years and its correlation with temperature, precipitation and wind].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yu-fu; Tang, Hai-ping

    2005-01-01

    The trends of number of dust storm days of the selected 11 meteorological stations from their established year to 2000 as well as their correlations with temperature, precipitation and wind are revealed. The number of dust storm days of the Capital Circle of China is distinctly variable in space and time. The numbers of dust storm days of the western area are far more than those of the eastern area. The interannual variability of number of dust storm days is remarkable. The number of dust storm days of the following 7 stations, Erlianhaote, Abaga, Xilinhaote, Fengning, Zhangjiakou, Huailai and Beijing, declined along the past decades, but those of the other four stations had no significant upward or downward trends. There is a marked seasonality of the number of dust storm days, and the maximum was in April. The correlation between number of dust storm days and number of days of mean wind velocity > 5 m/s, which is critical wind velocity to entrain sand into the air, was strongest among the three climatic factor. There were significant positive correlations between the number of dust storm days and number of days of mean wind velocity > 5 m/s in 6 stations. The second strongest climatic factor correlated with the number of dust storm days is temperature. There are significant negative correlations between the number of dust storm days and mean annual temperature, mean winter temperature, mean spring temperature in 3 or 4 stations. The correlation between the number of dust storm days and precipitation is weakest. Only one station, Zhurihe, showes significant negative correlation between the number of dust storm days and spring rainfall. There are 4 stations whose number of dust storm days don't significantly correlate with the climate. In the end, the spatial-temporal variability of dust storms and its relation with climate in the Capital Circle of China were discussed thoroughly.

  16. On the Origins of the Intercorrelations Between Solar Wind Variables

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borovsky, Joseph E.

    2018-01-01

    It is well known that the time variations of the diverse solar wind variables at 1 AU (e.g., solar wind speed, density, proton temperature, electron temperature, magnetic field strength, specific entropy, heavy-ion charge-state densities, and electron strahl intensity) are highly intercorrelated with each other. In correlation studies of the driving of the Earth's magnetosphere-ionosphere-thermosphere system by the solar wind, these solar wind intercorrelations make determining cause and effect very difficult. In this report analyses of solar wind spacecraft measurements and compressible-fluid computer simulations are used to study the origins of the solar wind intercorrelations. Two causes are found: (1) synchronized changes in the values of the solar wind variables as the plasma types of the solar wind are switched by solar rotation and (2) dynamic interactions (compressions and rarefactions) in the solar wind between the Sun and the Earth. These findings provide an incremental increase in the understanding of how the Sun-Earth system operates.

  17. Temperature and orientation dependence of the short-term strength characteristics, Young's modulus, and linear expansion coefficient of ZhS6F alloy single crystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Svetlov, I L; Sukhanov, N N; Krivko, A I; Roshchina, I N; Khatsinskaia, I M

    1987-01-01

    Experimental data are presented on the temperature dependence of the short- term strength characteristics, Young's modulus, and linear expansion coefficients of single crystals of a nickel alloy, ZhS6F, with crystallographic orientations along the 001, 111, 011, and 112 lines. It is found that the mechanical properties and Young's modulus of the alloy crystals exibit anisotropy in the temperature range 20-900 C. The linear thermal expansion coefficient is isotropic up to 900 C and equal to that of the equiaxed alloy. 10 references.

  18. Ageing temperature effect on inclination of martensite high strength steels EhP699, EhP678, EhP679 to corrosion cracking

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rozenfel'd, I.L.; Spiridonov, V.B.; Konradi, M.V.; Krasnorutskaya, I.B.; Fridman, V.S.

    1979-01-01

    Stated are the data permitting to judge of the role of ageing temperature in the total number of factors, determining the inclination to corrosion cracking of high strength maraging steels, which contain chromium as a main alloying element. The inclination of the EhP699, EhP678, EhP679 steels to corrosion cracking was estimated on smooth stressed specimens in 3 % NaCl solution with the use of electrochemical polarization. The tensile stress resulted from deflection; anode and cathode current density was 10 mA/cm 2 . It is shown, that resistance to corrosion cracking depends on the ageing temperature: maximum sensitivity to corrosion cracking the steels manifest at the ageing temperatures, providing for maximum strength (470-500 deg). At the ageing temperatures by 20-30 deg over the temperature of this maximum the sensitivity to corrosion cracking disappears, which may result from the loss of coherence of strengthening phase in a matrix, from particle coagulation and stress relaxation in the crack peak

  19. Extreme wind estimate for Hornsea wind farm

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsén, Xiaoli Guo

    The purpose of this study is to provide estimation of the 50-year winds of 10 min and 1-s gust value at hub height of 100 m, as well as the design parameter shear exponent for the Hornsea offshore wind farm. The turbulence intensity required for estimating the gust value is estimated using two...... approaches. One is through the measurements from the wind Doppler lidar, WindCube, which implies serious uncertainty, and the other one is through similarity theory for the atmospheric surface layer where the hub height is likely to belong to during strong storms. The turbulence intensity for storm wind...... strength is taken as 0.1. The shear exponents at several heights were calculated from the measurements. The values at 100 m are less than the limit given by IEC standard for all sectors. The 50-year winds have been calculated from various global reanalysis and analysis products as well as mesoscale models...

  20. A Modified Constitutive Model for Tensile Flow Behaviors of BR1500HS Ultra-High-Strength Steel at Medium and Low Temperature Regions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Jun; Quan, Guo-Zheng; Pan, Jia; Wang, Xuan; Wu, Dong-Sen; Xia, Yu-Feng

    2018-01-01

    Constitutive model of materials is one of the most requisite mathematical model in the finite element analysis, which describes the relationships of flow behaviors with strain, strain rate and temperature. In order to construct such constitutive relationships of ultra-high-strength BR1500HS steel at medium and low temperature regions, the true stress-strain data over a wide temperature range of 293-873 K and strain rate range of 0.01-10 s-1 were collected from a series of isothermal uniaxial tensile tests. The experimental results show that stress-strain relationships are highly non-linear and susceptible to three parameters involving temperature, strain and strain rate. By considering the impacts of strain rate and temperature on strain hardening, a modified constitutive model based on Johnson-Cook model was proposed to characterize flow behaviors in medium and low temperature ranges. The predictability of the improved model was also evaluated by the relative error (W(%)), correlation coefficient (R) and average absolute relative error (AARE). The R-value and AARE-value for modified constitutive model at medium and low temperature regions are 0.9915 & 1.56 % and 0.9570 & 5.39 %, respectively, which indicates that the modified constitutive model can precisely estimate the flow behaviors for BR1500HS steel in the medium and low temperature regions.

  1. Soy Glycenin: Influence of pH and Ionic Strength on Solubility and Molecular Structure at Ambient Temperatures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lakemond, C.M.M.; Jongh, de H.H.J.; Hessing, M.; Gruppen, H.; Voragen, A.G.J.

    2000-01-01

    This study describes the relationship between the solubility of glycinin, a major soy protein, and its structural properties at a quaternary, tertiary, and secondary folding level under conditions representative for food products. When the ionic strength is lowered from 0.5 to 0.2 or 0.03, the basic

  2. INFLUENCE OF SILANE HEAT TREATMENT ON THE TENSILE BOND STRENGTH BETWEEN EX-3 SYNTHETIC VENEERING PORCELAIN AND COMPOSITE RESIN USING FIVE DIFFERENT ACTIVATION TEMPERATURES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Spartak Yanakiev

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The purpose of the present study is to assess the effect of five different silane activation temperatures and eight activation methods on the tensile bond strength between one veneering porcelain and one composite resin material. Material and methods: A total of 81 ceramic rods were made of EX-3 veneering ceramic (Kuraray Noritake Dental, Japan. Sintered ceramic bars were grinded with diamond disks to size 10x2x2mm ± 0,05mm. The front part of each bar was polished. After ultrasonic cleaning in distilled water, the specimens were divided into nine groups. Silane was activated with air at room temperature, 38º С, 50º С, 100º С, 120º С using a custom made blow drier. In a silicone mold, a composite resin Z250 (3М ESPE, St. Paul, USA was condensed toward the bond ceramic surface. A total of 81 specimens approximately 2,0 cm long were prepared for tensile bond testing. One way ANOVA, followed by Bonferroni and Games-Howell tests were used for statistical analysis. Results: The lowest tensile bond strength was observed in the control group (3,51MPa. Group 2 yielded the highest bond strength among all groups (19,54MPa. Silane heat treatment enhanced the bond strength for all treatment methods. Within the polished specimens, the highest bond strength was yielded with warm air at 120ºС (11,31MPa. Conclusion: The most effective method for bonding Z250 composite resin to EX-3 veneering ceramic includes HF etching, silane, and adhesive resin. The most effective heat treatment method for bonding is hot air at 120ºС.

  3. Effect of power quality on windings temperature of marine induction motors. Part II: Results of investigations and recommendations for related regulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gnacinski, P.; Mindykowski, J.; Tarasiuk, T. [Gdynia Maritime Univ., Dept. of Ship Electrical Power Engineering, Morska Str. 83, 81-225 Gdynia (Poland)

    2009-10-15

    This paper deals with the effect of lowered voltage quality in ship power systems on windings temperature of low-power induction cage machines. The results of investigations carried out with experimental and analytical methods are presented. The thermal impact of power quality disturbances permitted by ship classification societies is discussed. A proposal of new power quality regulations for ship classification societies is made. (author)

  4. Influence of the final temperature of investment healting on the tensile strength and Vickers hardness of CP Ti and Ti-6Al-4V alloy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedro César Garcia Oliveira

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the work was to evaluate the influence of the temperature of investment healting on the tensile strength and Vickers hardness of CP Ti and Ti-6Al-4V alloy casting. Were obtained for the tensile strength test dumbbell rods that were invested in the Rematitan Plus investment and casting in the Discovery machine cast. Thirty specimens were obtained, fiftten to the CP Titanium and fifteen to the Ti-6Al-4V alloy, five samples to each an of the three temperatures of investment: 430ºC (control group, 480ºC and 530ºC. The tensile test was measured by means of a universal testing machine, MTS model 810, at a strain of 1.0 mm/min. After the tensile strenght test the specimens were secctioned, embedded and polished to hardness measurements, using a Vickers tester, Micromet 2100. The means values to tensile tests to the temperatures 430ºC, 480 and 530: CP Ti (486.1 - 501.16 - 498.14 -mean 495.30 MPa and Ti-6Al-4V alloy (961.33 - 958.26 - 1005.80 - mean 975.13 MPa while for the Vickers hardness the values were (198.06, 197.85, 202.58 - mean 199.50 and (352.95, 339.36, 344.76 - mean 345.69, respectively. The values were submitted to Analysis of Variance (ANOVA and Tukey,s Test that indicate differences significant only between the materials, but not between the temperature, for both the materias. It was conclued that increase of the temperature of investment its not chance the tensile strength and the Vickers hardness of the CP Titanium and Ti-6Al-4V alloy.

  5. 915-MHz Radar Wind Profiler (915RWP) Handbook

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coulter, R

    2005-01-01

    The 915 MHz radar wind profiler/radio acoustic sounding system (RWP/RASS) measures wind profiles and backscattered signal strength between (nominally) 0.1 km and 5 km and virtual temperature profiles between 0.1 km and 2.5 km. It operates by transmitting electromagnetic energy into the atmosphere and measuring the strength and frequency of backscattered energy. Virtual temperatures are recovered by transmitting an acoustic signal vertically and measuring the electromagnetic energy scattered from the acoustic wavefront. Because the propagation speed of the acoustic wave is proportional to the square root of the virtual temperature of the air, the virtual temperature can be recovered by measuring the Doppler shift of the scattered electromagnetic wave.

  6. Enhancing elevated temperature strength of copper containing aluminium alloys by forming L12 Al3Zr precipitates and nucleating θ″ precipitates on them.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar Makineni, Surendra; Sugathan, Sandeep; Meher, Subhashish; Banerjee, Rajarshi; Bhattacharya, Saswata; Kumar, Subodh; Chattopadhyay, Kamanio

    2017-09-11

    Strengthening by precipitation of second phase is the guiding principle for the development of a host of high strength structural alloys, in particular, aluminium alloys for transportation sector. Higher efficiency and lower emission demands use of alloys at higher operating temperatures (200 °C-250 °C) and stresses, especially in applications for engine parts. Unfortunately, most of the precipitation hardened aluminium alloys that are currently available can withstand maximum temperatures ranging from 150-200 °C. This limit is set by the onset of the rapid coarsening of the precipitates and consequent loss of mechanical properties. In this communication, we present a new approach in designing an Al-based alloy through solid state precipitation route that provides a synergistic coupling of two different types of precipitates that has enabled us to develop coarsening resistant high-temperature alloys that are stable in the temperature range of 250-300 °C with strength in excess of 260 MPa at 250 °C.

  7. Development of a high temperature high strength Al alloy by addition of small amounts of Sc and Mg to 2219 alloy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mondol, S. [Department of Materials Engineering, Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore 560012 (India); Alam, T.; Banerjee, R. [Advanced Materials and Manufacturing Processes Institute and Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of North Texas, Denton, TX 76203-5017 (United States); Kumar, S. [Department of Materials Engineering, Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore 560012 (India); Chattopadhyay, K., E-mail: kamanio@materials.iisc.ernet.in [Department of Materials Engineering, Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore 560012 (India)

    2017-02-27

    The paper reports a significant improvement in tensile properties, in particular at 200 °C, of commercial 2219 Al alloy by addition of small amounts of Sc (0.8 wt%) and Mg (0.45 wt%), and employing copper mould suction casting followed by natural ageing and cold rolling. Microstructural examination and measurement of hardness were performed in order to explain the effects of Sc and Mg at each processing step. It is found that the remarkable improvement of room temperature strength occurs due to fine grain size, Al{sub 3}Sc and Al{sub 3}(Sc,Zr) dispersoids, GP zones on {100} and {111} planes, and work hardening. On exposure at 200 °C, the GP zones transform primarily to θ′ precipitates and a few Ω precipitates. Sc and Mg atoms segregate at the θ′/matrix interface, which suppress the coarsening of θ′ precipitates and make them stable at higher temperatures. Thus, the work reports extremely high 0.2% proof stress of 542 MPa at room temperature, 378 MPa at 200 °C and 495 MPa at room temperature after 200 h exposure at 200 °C accompanied by reasonable ductility. Theoretical yield strength is calculated on the basis of the observed microstructure and is found to be in good agreement with the experimentally obtained value.

  8. Development of a high temperature high strength Al alloy by addition of small amounts of Sc and Mg to 2219 alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mondol, S.; Alam, T.; Banerjee, R.; Kumar, S.; Chattopadhyay, K.

    2017-01-01

    The paper reports a significant improvement in tensile properties, in particular at 200 °C, of commercial 2219 Al alloy by addition of small amounts of Sc (0.8 wt%) and Mg (0.45 wt%), and employing copper mould suction casting followed by natural ageing and cold rolling. Microstructural examination and measurement of hardness were performed in order to explain the effects of Sc and Mg at each processing step. It is found that the remarkable improvement of room temperature strength occurs due to fine grain size, Al 3 Sc and Al 3 (Sc,Zr) dispersoids, GP zones on {100} and {111} planes, and work hardening. On exposure at 200 °C, the GP zones transform primarily to θ′ precipitates and a few Ω precipitates. Sc and Mg atoms segregate at the θ′/matrix interface, which suppress the coarsening of θ′ precipitates and make them stable at higher temperatures. Thus, the work reports extremely high 0.2% proof stress of 542 MPa at room temperature, 378 MPa at 200 °C and 495 MPa at room temperature after 200 h exposure at 200 °C accompanied by reasonable ductility. Theoretical yield strength is calculated on the basis of the observed microstructure and is found to be in good agreement with the experimentally obtained value.

  9. Effect of cooling rate during solidification of Sn-9Zn lead-free solder alloy on its microstructure, tensile strength and ductile-brittle transition temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prabhu, K.N., E-mail: prabhukn_2002@yahoo.co.in [Department of Metallurgical and Materials Engineering, National Institute of Technology Karnataka, Surathkal, Mangalore 575 025 (India); Deshapande, Parashuram; Satyanarayan [Department of Metallurgical and Materials Engineering, National Institute of Technology Karnataka, Surathkal, Mangalore 575 025 (India)

    2012-01-30

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Effect of cooling rate on tensile and impact properties of Sn-9Zn alloy was assessed. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Both DBTT and UTS of the solder alloy increased with increase in cooling rate. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer An optimum cooling rate during solidification would minimize DBTT and maximize UTS. - Abstract: Solidification rate is an important variable during processing of materials, including soldering, involving solidification. The rate of solidification controls the metallurgical microstructure at the solder joint and hence the mechanical properties. A high tensile strength and a lower ductile-brittle transition temperature are necessary for reliability of solder joints in electronic circuits. Hence in the present work, the effect of cooling rate during solidification on microstructure, impact and tensile properties of Sn-9Zn lead-free solder alloy was investigated. Four different cooling media (copper and stainless steel moulds, air and furnace cooling) were used for solidification to achieve different cooling rates. Solder alloy solidified in copper mould exhibited higher cooling rate as compared to other cooling media. The microstructure is refined as the cooling rate was increased from 0.03 to 25 Degree-Sign C/s. With increase in cooling rate it was observed that the size of Zn flakes became finer and distributed uniformly throughout the matrix. Ductile-to-brittle transition temperature (DBTT) of the solder alloy increased with increase in cooling rate. Fractured surfaces of impact test specimens showed cleavage like appearance and river like pattern at very low temperatures and dimple like appearance at higher temperatures. The tensile strength of the solder alloy solidified in Cu and stainless moulds were higher as compared to air and furnace cooled samples. It is therefore suggested that the cooling rate during solidification of the solder alloy should be optimum to maximize the strength and minimize the

  10. Effect of cooling rate during solidification of Sn–9Zn lead-free solder alloy on its microstructure, tensile strength and ductile–brittle transition temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prabhu, K.N.; Deshapande, Parashuram; Satyanarayan

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Effect of cooling rate on tensile and impact properties of Sn–9Zn alloy was assessed. ► Both DBTT and UTS of the solder alloy increased with increase in cooling rate. ► An optimum cooling rate during solidification would minimize DBTT and maximize UTS. - Abstract: Solidification rate is an important variable during processing of materials, including soldering, involving solidification. The rate of solidification controls the metallurgical microstructure at the solder joint and hence the mechanical properties. A high tensile strength and a lower ductile–brittle transition temperature are necessary for reliability of solder joints in electronic circuits. Hence in the present work, the effect of cooling rate during solidification on microstructure, impact and tensile properties of Sn–9Zn lead-free solder alloy was investigated. Four different cooling media (copper and stainless steel moulds, air and furnace cooling) were used for solidification to achieve different cooling rates. Solder alloy solidified in copper mould exhibited higher cooling rate as compared to other cooling media. The microstructure is refined as the cooling rate was increased from 0.03 to 25 °C/s. With increase in cooling rate it was observed that the size of Zn flakes became finer and distributed uniformly throughout the matrix. Ductile-to-brittle transition temperature (DBTT) of the solder alloy increased with increase in cooling rate. Fractured surfaces of impact test specimens showed cleavage like appearance and river like pattern at very low temperatures and dimple like appearance at higher temperatures. The tensile strength of the solder alloy solidified in Cu and stainless moulds were higher as compared to air and furnace cooled samples. It is therefore suggested that the cooling rate during solidification of the solder alloy should be optimum to maximize the strength and minimize the DBTT.

  11. Heat treatment on keruing and light red meranti: The effect of heat exposure at different levels of temperature on bending strength properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noh, Nur Ilya Farhana Md; Ahmad, Zakiah

    2017-11-01

    Heat treatment on timbers is a process of applying heat to modify and equip the timbers with new improvised characteristics. It is environmental friendly compared to the common practice of treating timber by chemical preservatives. Malaysian hardwood timbers namely Keruing and Light Red Meranti which are in green condition were heat treated at temperature 150°C, 170°C, 190°C and 210°C, in a specially designed electronic furnace within one hour duration. The objectives were to determine the effect of heat treatment on bending strength properties of heat treated timbers in terms of Modulus of Elasticity (MOE) and Modulus of Rupture (MOR) and to examine the significance changes at each temperature level. Untreated samples for each species were used as a control sample. The results indicated that the bending strength properties for both species of timbers were affected by the heat exposure. Both MOE and MOR values for heat treated Keruing were increased when subjected to the temperature levels at 150°C, 170°C and 190°C except at 210°C. Heat treated Light Red Meranti shows the same pattern of increment on its MOE and MOR values after exposure to heat at three temperature levels applied and the values dropped at 210°C. However, for both of species, even though there were decrement occurred at 210°C, the value is still higher compared to the control sample. The increments of MOE and MOR values are an indicator that heat treatment had successfully improvised the bending strength properties of these two species of hardwood timber.

  12. Temperature field in the hot-top during casting a new super-high strength Al-Zn-Mg-Cu alloy by low frequency electromagnetic process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yubo ZUO

    2005-08-01

    Full Text Available The billets of a new super-high strength Al-Zn-Mg-Cu alloy in 200 mm diameter were produced by the processed of low frequency electromagnetic casting (LFEC and conventional direct chill(DCcasting, respectively. The effects of low frequency electromagnetic field on temperature field of the melt in the hot-top were investigated by temperature thermocouples into the casting during the processes. The results show that during LFEC process the temperature field in the melt applying the hot-top is very uniform, which is helpful to reduce the difference of thermal gradients between the surface and the center, and then to reduce the thermal stress and to eliminate casting crack.

  13. Solar wind stagnation near comets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Galeev, A.A.; Cravens, T.E.; Gombosi, T.I.

    1983-03-01

    The nature of the solar wind flow near comets is examined analytically. In particular, the typical values for the stagnation pressure and magnetic barrier strength are estimated, taking into account the magnetic field line tension and the charge exchange cooling of the mass loaded solar wind. Knowledge of the strength of the magnetic barrier is required in order to determine the location of the contact discontinuity which separates the contaminated solar wind plasma and the outflowing plasma of the cometary ionosphere. (author)

  14. Materials of large wind turbine blades: Recent results in testing and modeling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mishnaevsky, Leon; Brøndsted, Povl; Nijssen, Rogier

    2012-01-01

    The reliability of rotor blades is the pre-condition for the development and wide use of large wind turbines. In order to accurately predict and improve the wind turbine blade behavior, three main aspects of the reliability and strength of rotor blades were considered: (i) development of methods...... of the effect of the microstructure of wind turbine blade composites on their strength and ways of microstructural optimization of the materials. By testing reference coupons, the effect of testing parameters (temperature and frequency) on the lifetime of blade composites was investigated, and the input data...... clustering, misalignments, interface properties and other factors on the strength and lifetime of the wind turbine blade materials were investigated in the micromechanical finite element simulations. The results described in this paper stem from the Rotor Structure and Materials task of the UPWIND project...

  15. Index Bioclimatic "Wind-Chill"

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teodoreanu Elena

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents an important bioclimatic index which shows the influence of wind on the human body thermoregulation. When the air temperature is high, the wind increases thermal comfort. But more important for the body is the wind when the air temperature is low. When the air temperature is lower and wind speed higher, the human body is threatening to freeze faster. Cold wind index is used in Canada, USA, Russia (temperature "equivalent" to the facial skin etc., in the weather forecast every day in the cold season. The index can be used and for bioclimatic regionalization, in the form of skin temperature index.

  16. Temperature-dependent tensile strength, surface roughness diagnostics, and magnetic support and positioning of polymer ICF shells. Final report, October 1, 1993--April 30, 1995

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Honig, A.

    1995-01-01

    During the course of this grant, we perfected emissivity and accommodation coefficient measurements on polymer ICF shells in the temperature range 250 to 350 K. Values for polystyrene shells are generally between 10 -2 and 10 -3 , which are very advantageous for ICF at cryogenic temperatures. Preliminary results on Br doped target shells indicate an accommodation coefficient, presumably associated with surface roughness on an atomic scale, about an order of magnitude larger than for ordinary polystyrene target shells. We also constructed apparatus with optical access for low temperature tensile strength and emissivity measurements, and made preliminary tests on this system. Magnetic shells were obtained both from GDP coating and from doping styrene with 10 manometer size ferromagnetic particles. The magnetic properties were measured through electron spin resonance (ESR). These experiments confirm the applicability of the Curie law, and establish the validity of using ESR measurements to determine shell temperature in the low temperature regime from 4K to 250K, thus complementing our presently accessible range. The high electron spin densities (> 10 20 /CM 3 ) suggest magnetic levitation should be feasible at cryogenic temperatures. This work has resulted in two conference presentations, a Technical Report, a paper to be published in Fusion Technology, and a Master's Thesis

  17. Current direction, benthic organisms, temperature, and wind direction data from moored current meter casts in the Gulf of Mexico during the Brine Disposal project, 22 September 1977 - 30 November 1978 (NODC Accession 7900110)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Current direction, benthic organisms, temperature, and wind direction data were collected using moored current meter casts in the Gulf of Mexico from September 22,...

  18. Wind and temperature data from current meter in the TOGA - Pacific Ocean (30 N to 30 S) as part of the Equatorial Pacific Ocean Climate Studies (EPOCS), 28 May 1994 to 21 March 1995 (NODC Accession 9800041)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Wind and temperature data were collected using current meter in the TOGA Area - Pacific Ocean (30 N to 30 S) from May 28, 1994 to March 21, 1995. Data were submitted...

  19. Temperature, wind direction, and salinity data from moored current meter casts in the Gulf of Mexico during the Brine Disposal project, 01 January 1981 - 01 January 1981 (NODC Accession 8100474)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Temperature, wind direction, and salinity data were collected using moored current meter casts in the Gulf of Mexico from January 1, 1981 to January 1, 1981. Data...

  20. Current direction, wind direction, temperature, and salinity data from moored current meter casts in the Gulf of Mexico during the Brine Disposal project, 01 February 1981 - 01 February 1981 (NODC Accession 8100516)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Current direction, temperature, wind direction, and salinity data were collected using moored current meter casts in the Gulf of Mexico from February 1, 1981 to...

  1. Temperature, wind direction, and salinity data from moored current meter casts in the Gulf of Mexico during the Brine Disposal project, 01 December 1980 - 01 December 1980 (NODC Accession 8100457)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Temperature, wind direction, and salinity data were collected using moored current meter casts in the Gulf of Mexico from December 1, 1980 to December 1, 1980. Data...

  2. High-Temperature Tensile Strength of Al10Co25Cr8Fe15Ni36Ti6 Compositionally Complex Alloy (High-Entropy Alloy)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daoud, H. M.; Manzoni, A. M.; Wanderka, N.; Glatzel, U.

    2015-06-01

    Homogenizing at 1220°C for 20 h and subsequent aging at 900°C for 5 h and 50 h of a novel Al10Co25Cr8Fe15Ni36Ti6 compositionally complex alloy (high-entropy alloy) produces a microstructure consisting of an L12 ordered γ' phase embedded in a face-centered cubic solid-solution γ matrix together with needle-like B2 precipitates (NiAl). The volume fraction of γ' phase is ~46% and of needle-like B2 precipitates database; Thermo-Calc Software, Stockholm, Sweden). The high-temperature tensile tests were carried out at room temperature, 600°C, 700°C, 800°C, and 1000°C. The tensile strength as well as the elongation to failure of both heat-treated specimens is very high at all tested temperatures. The values of tensile strength has been compared with literature data of well-known Alloy 800H and Inconel 617, and is discussed in terms of the observed microstructure.

  3. Temperature effect on corrosion fatigue strength of coated ship structural steel; Zosen`yoko tosozai no fushoku hiro kyodo ni okeru ondo no eikyo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takanashi, M.; Fuji, A.; Kojima, M.; Kitagawa, M. [Ishikawajima-Harima Heavy Industries Co. Ltd., Tokyo (Japan); Kobayashi, Y. [Ship Research Inst., Tokyo (Japan); Kumakura, Y.

    1997-08-01

    The corrosion fatigue life was obtained using uncoated and tar epoxy resin specimens to clarify the temperature effect. The life curve for corrosion fatigue of machined and uncoated steel in the air and sea was obtained. The fatigue strength of uncoated steel largely decreases in the sea and breaks even in the nominal stress range of less than 1/2 of the fatigue limit in the air. The effect of temperature on the coated steel is represented by a corrosion coefficient. The steel coated at 25{degree}C is 1/1.03 to 1/1.13 at 40 to 60{degree}C. This showed that the fatigue strength decreases when the temperature exceeds 25{degree}C. However, it has not such tendency and significance that are represented quantitatively. There is a slight difference in the short-life area between the crack generation life and breaking life. However, the long-life area has no significance that influences the whole evaluation. In the long-life corrosion fatigue, the crack occurs from the corrosion pit due to the exposure below the coated film and progresses in the base material before the coated film is destroyed. The effect of the corrosion pit remarkably appears at a low-stress level. 14 refs., 14 figs., 4 tabs.

  4. Effect of quenching temperature on martensite multi-level microstructures and properties of strength and toughness in 20CrNi2Mo steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Long, Shao-lei [College of Materials Science and Metallurgical Engineering, Guizhou University (China); Guizhou Key Laboratory for Mechanical Behavior and Microstructure of Materials (China); National & Local Joint Engineering Laboratory for High-performance Metal Structure Material and Advanced Manufacturing Technology (China); Liang, Yi-long, E-mail: liangyilong@126.com [College of Materials Science and Metallurgical Engineering, Guizhou University (China); Guizhou Key Laboratory for Mechanical Behavior and Microstructure of Materials (China); National & Local Joint Engineering Laboratory for High-performance Metal Structure Material and Advanced Manufacturing Technology (China); Jiang, Yun [Guizhou Key Laboratory for Mechanical Behavior and Microstructure of Materials (China); National & Local Joint Engineering Laboratory for High-performance Metal Structure Material and Advanced Manufacturing Technology (China); Liang, Yu; Yang, Ming; Yi, Yan-liang [College of Materials Science and Metallurgical Engineering, Guizhou University (China); Guizhou Key Laboratory for Mechanical Behavior and Microstructure of Materials (China); National & Local Joint Engineering Laboratory for High-performance Metal Structure Material and Advanced Manufacturing Technology (China)

    2016-10-31

    The martensite multi-level microstructures of 20CrNi2Mo steel, which were quenched at the different temperatures of 900–1200 °C and tempered at 200 °C, were investigated by optical microscope (OM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), electron backscattering diffraction (EBSD) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and the relationship between the microstructures and properties of strength and toughness was discussed by the classic formula of Hall–Petch. The results show that the size of prior austenite grain (d{sub r}), martensite packet (d{sub p}) and block (d{sub b}) increase with increasing of the quenching temperature, while the martensite lath (d{sub l}) size is opposite. On another hand, the confusion degree of the martensite packets changes from disorder to order. The boundaries of prior austenite grain, packet, block and the martensite lath are high angle boundaries (HBs) and low angle boundaries (LBs), respectively, and the ratio of the low angle boundaries increase with the quenching temperature by calculating to the multi-level microstructure size with the mathematical model established by myself. In addition, the relationship between the packet/block and strength follows the classical formula of Hall–Petch, and the size of d{sub b} is far lower than the size of d{sub p}, d{sub b} is the effective control unit of the strength. Meanwhile, d{sub l} is the effective control unit of toughness because it strongly impacts the crack initiation and propagation and follows also the Hall-Petch with toughness in 20CrNi2Mo steel.

  5. Three-dimensional rigid multiphase networks providing high-temperature strength to cast AlSi10Cu5Ni1-2 piston alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Asghar, Z.; Requena, G.; Boller, E.

    2011-01-01

    The three-dimensional (3-D) architecture of rigid multiphase networks present in AlSi10Cu5Ni1 and AlSi10Cu5Ni2 piston alloys in as-cast condition and after 4 h spheroidization treatment is characterized by synchrotron tomography in terms of the volume fraction of rigid phases, interconnectivity, contiguity and morphology. The architecture of both alloys consists of α-Al matrix and a rigid long-range 3-D network of Al 7 Cu 4 Ni, Al 4 Cu 2 Mg 8 Si 7 , Al 2 Cu, Al 15 Si 2 (FeMn) 3 and AlSiFeNiCu aluminides and Si. The investigated architectural parameters of both alloys studied are correlated with room-temperature and high-temperature (300 deg. C) strengths as a function of solution treatment time. The AlSi10Cu5Ni1 and AlSi10Cu5Ni2 alloys behave like metal matrix composites with 16 and 20 vol.% reinforcement, respectively. Both alloys have similar strengths in the as-cast condition, but the AlSi10Cu5Ni2 is able to retain ∼15% higher high temperature strength than the AlSi10Cu5Ni1 alloy after more than 4 h of spheroidization treatment. This is due to the preservation of the 3-D interconnectivity and the morphology of the rigid network, which is governed by the higher degree of contiguity between aluminides and Si.

  6. Hurricane Imaging Radiometer (HIRAD) Observations of Brightness Temperatures and Ocean Surface Wind Speed and Rain Rate During NASA's GRIP and HS3 Campaigns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Timothy L.; James, M. W.; Roberts, J. B.; Jones, W. L.; Biswas, S.; Ruf, C. S.; Uhlhorn, E. W.; Atlas, R.; Black, P.; Albers, C.

    2012-01-01

    HIRAD flew on high-altitude aircraft over Earl and Karl during NASA s GRIP (Genesis and Rapid Intensification Processes) campaign in August - September of 2010, and plans to fly over Atlantic tropical cyclones in September of 2012 as part of the Hurricane and Severe Storm Sentinel (HS3) mission. HIRAD is a new C-band radiometer using a synthetic thinned array radiometer (STAR) technology to obtain spatial resolution of approximately 2 km, out to roughly 30 km each side of nadir. By obtaining measurements of emissions at 4, 5, 6, and 6.6 GHz, observations of ocean surface wind speed and rain rate can be retrieved. The physical retrieval technique has been used for many years by precursor instruments, including the Stepped Frequency Microwave Radiometer (SFMR), which has been flying on the NOAA and USAF hurricane reconnaissance aircraft for several years to obtain observations within a single footprint at nadir angle. Results from the flights during the GRIP and HS3 campaigns will be shown, including images of brightness temperatures, wind speed, and rain rate. Comparisons will be made with observations from other instruments on the campaigns, for which HIRAD observations are either directly comparable or are complementary. Features such as storm eye and eye-wall, location of storm wind and rain maxima, and indications of dynamical features such as the merging of a weaker outer wind/rain maximum with the main vortex may be seen in the data. Potential impacts on operational ocean surface wind analyses and on numerical weather forecasts will also be discussed.

  7. Wind energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1992-01-01

    This chapter discusses the role wind energy may have in the energy future of the US. The topics discussed in the chapter include historical aspects of wind energy use, the wind energy resource, wind energy technology including intermediate-size and small wind turbines and intermittency of wind power, public attitudes toward wind power, and environmental, siting and land use issues

  8. An investigation into mechanical strength of exoskeleton of hydrothermal vent shrimp (Rimicaris exoculata) and shallow water shrimp (Pandalus platyceros) at elevated temperatures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Verma, Devendra; Tomar, Vikas, E-mail: tomar@purdue.edu

    2015-04-01

    This investigation reports a comparison of the exoskeleton mechanical strength of deep sea shrimp species Rimicaris exoculata and shallow water shrimp species Pandalus platyceros at temperatures ranging from 25 °C to 80 °C using nanoindentation experiments. Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) observations suggest that both shrimp exoskeletons have the Bouligand structure. Differences in the structural arrangement and chemical composition of both shrimps are highlighted by SEM and EDX (Energy Dispersive X-ray) analyses. The variation in the elastic moduli with temperature is found to be correlated with the measured compositional differences. The reduced modulus of R. exoculata is 8.26 ± 0.89 GPa at 25 °C that reduces to 7.61 ± 0.65 GPa at 80 °C. The corresponding decrease in the reduced modulus of P. platyceros is from 27.38 ± 2.3 GPa at 25 °C to 24.58 ± 1.71 GPa at 80 °C. The decrease in reduced moduli as a function of temperature is found to be dependent on the extent of calcium based minerals in exoskeleton of both types of shrimp exoskeletons. - Highlights: • Shrimp species Pandalus platyceros and Rimicaris exoculata exoskeletons are analyzed. • Temperature dependent properties of shrimp exoskeleton are compared. • Mechanical properties are correlated with structure and composition of exoskeleton. • Mechanical properties reduce with increase in temperature. • Presence of biominerals gives better thermal stability to structure.

  9. An investigation into mechanical strength of exoskeleton of hydrothermal vent shrimp (Rimicaris exoculata) and shallow water shrimp (Pandalus platyceros) at elevated temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Verma, Devendra; Tomar, Vikas

    2015-01-01

    This investigation reports a comparison of the exoskeleton mechanical strength of deep sea shrimp species Rimicaris exoculata and shallow water shrimp species Pandalus platyceros at temperatures ranging from 25 °C to 80 °C using nanoindentation experiments. Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) observations suggest that both shrimp exoskeletons have the Bouligand structure. Differences in the structural arrangement and chemical composition of both shrimps are highlighted by SEM and EDX (Energy Dispersive X-ray) analyses. The variation in the elastic moduli with temperature is found to be correlated with the measured compositional differences. The reduced modulus of R. exoculata is 8.26 ± 0.89 GPa at 25 °C that reduces to 7.61 ± 0.65 GPa at 80 °C. The corresponding decrease in the reduced modulus of P. platyceros is from 27.38 ± 2.3 GPa at 25 °C to 24.58 ± 1.71 GPa at 80 °C. The decrease in reduced moduli as a function of temperature is found to be dependent on the extent of calcium based minerals in exoskeleton of both types of shrimp exoskeletons. - Highlights: • Shrimp species Pandalus platyceros and Rimicaris exoculata exoskeletons are analyzed. • Temperature dependent properties of shrimp exoskeleton are compared. • Mechanical properties are correlated with structure and composition of exoskeleton. • Mechanical properties reduce with increase in temperature. • Presence of biominerals gives better thermal stability to structure

  10. Method for determining thermo-physical properties of specimens. [photographic recording of changes in thin film phase-change temperature indicating material in wind tunnel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, R. A. (Inventor)

    1974-01-01

    The square root of the product of thermophysical properties q, c and k, where p is density, c is specific heat and k is thermal conductivity, is determined directly on a test specimen such as a wind tunnel model. The test specimen and a reference specimen of known specific heat are positioned at a given distance from a heat source. The specimens are provided with a coating, such as a phase change coating, to visually indicate that a given temperature was reached. A shutter interposed between the heat source and the specimens is opened and a motion picture camera is actuated to provide a time record of the heating step. The temperature of the reference specimen is recorded as a function of time. The heat rate to which both the test and reference specimens were subjected is determined from the temperature time response of the reference specimen by the conventional thin-skin calorimeter equation.

  11. Simulation of ideal-gas flow by nitrogen and other selected gases at cryogenic temperatures. [transonic flow in cryogenic wind tunnels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, R. M.; Adcock, J. B.

    1981-01-01

    The real gas behavior of nitrogen, the gas normally used in transonic cryogenic tunnels, is reported for the following flow processes: isentropic expansion, normal shocks, boundary layers, and interactions between shock waves and boundary layers. The only difference in predicted pressure ratio between nitrogen and an ideal gas which may limit the minimum operating temperature of transonic cryogenic wind tunnels occur at total pressures approaching 9 atm and total temperatures 10 K below the corresponding saturation temperature. These pressure differences approach 1 percent for both isentropic expansions and normal shocks. Alternative cryogenic test gases were also analyzed. Differences between air and an ideal diatomic gas are similar in magnitude to those for nitrogen and should present no difficulty. However, differences for helium and hydrogen are over an order of magnitude greater than those for nitrogen or air. It is concluded that helium and cryogenic hydrogen would not approximate the compressible flow of an ideal diatomic gas.

  12. The Effects of Finish Rolling Temperature and Niobium Microalloying on the Microstructure and Properties of a Direct Quenched High-Strength Steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaijalainen A.

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper comprehends the effects of finish rolling temperature (FRT and Nb-microalloying on the microstructural evolution and resultant properties of a low carbon direct quenched steel in the yield strength category of ≥900 MPa. Results indicate that a decrease in FRT close to Ar3 temperature significantly influenced the microstructure following phase transformation, especially at the subsurface (~50-400 μm of the rolled strip. On decreasing the FRT, the subsurface microstructure revealed a fine mixture of ferrite and bainite obviously as a result of strain-induced transformation, whereas the structure at the centreline remained essentially martensitic. Further, Nb-microalloying promoted the formation of ferrite and bainite even at higher FRTs, thus influencing the mechanical properties. The microstructures of the hot-rolled strips were further corroborated with the aid of CCT diagrams.

  13. The Grilled Effect of Particle's Distribution of Calsine Coke's at 900oC Temperature upon the Electric Resistivity, Hardness and CompressiveStrength Analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    NS, Kasilani; D, Imam; Dwi-Herwidhi

    2000-01-01

    Investigation of Calsine Coke's particle's distribution by grilledtreatment at 900 o C temperature upon the electric resistivity, hardness andcompressive strength analysis had been done. The Calsine Coke's were crushedand sieved to get a particle size about 63; 90; 106 μm, then mixed thevariety size particle with 33 % tar pitch 125 μm, be heated, shaped andpressed to be pellet. The pellets were grilled at 900 o C temperature during30 minutes and then these were analyzed. The whole analysis using 2-b mixedwas the best, particle ratio were 63:106 = 1:2 and pointed the electricresistivity 2.63 Ωm, the hardness 5.9 kg/mm 2 and the compressivestrength 1600 N. (author)

  14. Analyses of experimental observations of electron temperatures in the near wake of a model in a laboratory-simulated solar wind plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Intriligator, D.S.; Steele, G.R.

    1985-01-01

    Laboratory experiments have been performed that show the effect on the electron temperature of inserting a spherical conducting model, larger than the Debye length, into a free-streaming high-energy (1 kv) unmagnetized hydrogen plasma. These experiments are the first electron temperature experiments conducted at energies and compositions directly relevant to solar wind and astrophysical plasma phenomena. The incident plasma parameters were held constant. A large number of axial profiles of the electron temperature ratios T/sub e//sub in// T/sub e//sub out/ behind the model downstream in the model wake are presented. A rigorous statistical approach is used in the analysis of the electron temperature ratio data in both our experimental laboratory data and in our reanalysis of the published data of others. The following new results ae obtained: (1) In energetic plasma flow there is no overall temperature enhancement in the near wake since the best fit to the T/sub e//sub i/n/ T/sub e//sub out/ data is a horizontal straight line having a mean value of 1.05; (2) No statistically significant electron temperature enhancement peaks or depressions exist in the near-wake region behind a model at zero potential in a high-energy plasma even at distances less than or equal to Ma, where M is the acoustic Mach number and a is the model radius. This implies a ''filling in'' of electrons in the wake region which may be due to the higher mobility of these energetic electrons. This mechanism may permit the solar wind electrons to significantly contribute to the maintenance of the nightside ionosphere at Venus

  15. Sorption of Ni(II) on GMZ bentonite: effects of pH, ionic strength, foreign ions, humic acid and temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Shitong; Li, Jiaxing; Lu, Yi; Chen, Yixue; Wang, Xiangke

    2009-09-01

    Bentonite has been widely studied in nuclear waste management because of its special physicochemical properties. In this work, the sorption of Ni(II) from aqueous solution onto GMZ bentonite as a function of contact time, pH, ionic strength, foreign ions, humic acid (HA) and temperature was investigated under ambient conditions. The results indicated that the pseudo-second-order rate equation simulated the kinetic sorption process well. The sorption of Ni(II) on GMZ bentonite was strongly dependent on pH and on ionic strength. At low pH, the sorption of Ni(II) was dominated by outer-sphere surface complexation and ion exchange with Na(+)/H(+) on GMZ bentonite surfaces, whereas inner-sphere surface complexation was the main sorption mechanism at high pH. A positive effect of HA on Ni(II) sorption was found at pH8. The Langmuir, Freundlich, and D-R models were used to simulate the sorption isotherms of Ni(II) at three different temperatures: 303.15, 318.15 and 333.15K. The thermodynamic parameters (DeltaH(0), DeltaS(0) and DeltaG(0)) of Ni(II) sorption on GMZ bentonite at the three different temperatures were calculated from the temperature-dependent sorption isotherms. The results indicated that the sorption process of Ni(II) on GMZ bentonite was endothermic and spontaneous. Experimental results indicate that GMZ bentonite is a suitable sorbent for pre-concentration and solidification of Ni(II) from large volume solutions.

  16. Sorption of Ni(II) on GMZ bentonite: Effects of pH, ionic strength, foreign ions, humic acid and temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang Shitong; Li Jiaxing; Lu Yi; Chen Yixue; Wang Xiangke

    2009-01-01

    Bentonite has been widely studied in nuclear waste management because of its special physicochemical properties. In this work, the sorption of Ni(II) from aqueous solution onto GMZ bentonite as a function of contact time, pH, ionic strength, foreign ions, humic acid (HA) and temperature was investigated under ambient conditions. The results indicated that the pseudo-second-order rate equation simulated the kinetic sorption process well. The sorption of Ni(II) on GMZ bentonite was strongly dependent on pH and on ionic strength. At low pH, the sorption of Ni(II) was dominated by outer-sphere surface complexation and ion exchange with Na + /H + on GMZ bentonite surfaces, whereas inner-sphere surface complexation was the main sorption mechanism at high pH. A positive effect of HA on Ni(II) sorption was found at pH 8. The Langmuir, Freundlich, and D-R models were used to simulate the sorption isotherms of Ni(II) at three different temperatures: 303.15, 318.15 and 333.15 K. The thermodynamic parameters (ΔH 0 , ΔS 0 and ΔG 0 ) of Ni(II) sorption on GMZ bentonite at the three different temperatures were calculated from the temperature-dependent sorption isotherms. The results indicated that the sorption process of Ni(II) on GMZ bentonite was endothermic and spontaneous. Experimental results indicate that GMZ bentonite is a suitable sorbent for pre-concentration and solidification of Ni(II) from large volume solutions.

  17. Welding Residual Stress Analysis and Fatigue Strength Assessment at Elevated Temperature for Multi-pass Dissimilar Material Weld Between Alloy 617 and P92 Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Juhwa; Hwang, Jeongho; Bae, Dongho

    2018-03-01

    In this paper, welding residual stress analysis and fatigue strength assessment were performed at elevated temperature for multi-pass dissimilar material weld between Alloy 617 and P92 steel, which are used in thermal power plant. Multi-pass welding between Alloy 617 and P92 steel was performed under optimized welding condition determined from repeated pre-test welding. In particular, for improving dissimilar material weld-ability, the buttering welding technique was applied on the P92 steel side before multi-pass welding. Welding residual stress distribution at the dissimilar material weld joint was numerically analyzed by using the finite element method, and compared with experimental results which were obtained by the hole-drilling method. Additionally, fatigue strength of dissimilar material weld joint was assessed at the room temperature (R.T), 300, 500, and 700 °C. In finite element analysis results, numerical peak values; longitudinal (410 MPa), transverse (345 MPa) were higher than those of experiments; longitudinal (298 MPa), transverse (245 MPa). There are quantitatively big differences between numerical and experimental results, due to some assumption about the thermal conductivity, specific heat, effects of enforced convection of the molten pool, dilution, and volume change during phase transformation caused by actual shield gas. The low fatigue limit at R.T, 300 °C, 500 °C and 700 °C was assessed to be 368, 276, 173 and 137 MPa respectively.

  18. Welding Residual Stress Analysis and Fatigue Strength Assessment at Elevated Temperature for Multi-pass Dissimilar Material Weld Between Alloy 617 and P92 Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Juhwa; Hwang, Jeongho; Bae, Dongho

    2018-07-01

    In this paper, welding residual stress analysis and fatigue strength assessment were performed at elevated temperature for multi-pass dissimilar material weld between Alloy 617 and P92 steel, which are used in thermal power plant. Multi-pass welding between Alloy 617 and P92 steel was performed under optimized welding condition determined from repeated pre-test welding. In particular, for improving dissimilar material weld-ability, the buttering welding technique was applied on the P92 steel side before multi-pass welding. Welding residual stress distribution at the dissimilar material weld joint was numerically analyzed by using the finite element method, and compared with experimental results which were obtained by the hole-drilling method. Additionally, fatigue strength of dissimilar material weld joint was assessed at the room temperature (R.T), 300, 500, and 700 °C. In finite element analysis results, numerical peak values; longitudinal (410 MPa), transverse (345 MPa) were higher than those of experiments; longitudinal (298 MPa), transverse (245 MPa). There are quantitatively big differences between numerical and experimental results, due to some assumption about the thermal conductivity, specific heat, effects of enforced convection of the molten pool, dilution, and volume change during phase transformation caused by actual shield gas. The low fatigue limit at R.T, 300 °C, 500 °C and 700 °C was assessed to be 368, 276, 173 and 137 MPa respectively.

  19. Application of rapid solidification powder metallurgy processing to prepare Cu–Al–Ni high temperature shape memory alloy strips with high strength and high ductility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vajpai, S.K., E-mail: vajpaisk@gmail.com [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology, Kanpur 208016, Uttar Pradesh (India); Dube, R.K., E-mail: rkd@iitk.ac.in [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology, Kanpur 208016, Uttar Pradesh (India); Sangal, S., E-mail: sangals@iitk.ac.in [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology, Kanpur 208016, Uttar Pradesh (India)

    2013-05-15

    Cu–Al–Ni high temperature shape memory alloy (HTSMA) strips were successfully prepared from rapid solidified water atomized Cu–Al–Ni pre-alloyed powders via hot densification rolling of unsheathed sintered powder preforms. Finished heat-treated Cu–Al–Ni alloy strips had fine-grained structure, average grain size approximately 16 μm, and exhibited a combination of high strength and high ductility. It has been demonstrated that the redistribution of nano-sized alumina particles, present on the surface as well as inside the starting water atomized Cu–Al–Ni pre-alloyed powder particles, due to plastic deformation of starting powder particles during hot densification rolling resulted in the fine grained microstructure in the finished SMA strips. The finished SMA strips were almost fully martensitic in nature, consisting of a mixture of β{sub 1}{sup ′} and γ{sub 1}{sup ′} martensite. The average fracture strength and fracture strain of the finished SMA strips were 810 MPa and 12%, respectively, and the fractured specimens exhibited primarily micro-void coalescence type ductile nature of fracture. Finished Cu–Al–Ni SMA strips exhibited high characteristic transformation temperatures and an almost 100% one-way shape recovery was obtained in the specimens up to 4% applied deformation pre-strain. The retained two-way shape memory recovery increased with increasing applied training pre-strain, achieving a maximum value of 16.25% at 5% applied training pre-strain.

  20. Microstructure, Lattice Misfit, and High-Temperature Strength of γ'-Strengthened Co-Al-W-Ge Model Superalloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zenk, Christopher H.; Bauer, Alexander; Goik, Philip; Neumeier, Steffen; Stone, Howard J.; Göken, Mathias

    2016-05-01

    The quaternary alloy system Co-Al-W-Ge was investigated and it was found that a continuous γ /γ ^' two-phase field extends between the systems Co-Al-W and Co-Ge-W. All alloys examined comprised cuboidal L1_2 precipitates coherently embedded in an A1 matrix. Differential scanning calorimetry measurements revealed that the liquidus, solidus, and γ ^' -solvus temperatures decrease when the Ge content is increased. The lower liquidus temperature and the capability of γ ^' -strengthening in the Ge-rich alloys make them interesting as potential candidates for brazing applications of Co-base superalloys. The γ /γ ^' lattice misfit was determined by high-resolution X-ray diffraction and found to be positive for all alloys investigated, decreasing with increasing Ge content. The mechanical properties of the Al-rich alloys surpass those rich in Ge.

  1. Effects of spring temperatures on the strength of selection on timing of reproduction in a long-distance migratory bird.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcel E Visser

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Climate change has differentially affected the timing of seasonal events for interacting trophic levels, and this has often led to increased selection on seasonal timing. Yet, the environmental variables driving this selection have rarely been identified, limiting our ability to predict future ecological impacts of climate change. Using a dataset spanning 31 years from a natural population of pied flycatchers (Ficedula hypoleuca, we show that directional selection on timing of reproduction intensified in the first two decades (1980-2000 but weakened during the last decade (2001-2010. Against expectation, this pattern could not be explained by the temporal variation in the phenological mismatch with food abundance. We therefore explored an alternative hypothesis that selection on timing was affected by conditions individuals experience when arriving in spring at the breeding grounds: arriving early in cold conditions may reduce survival. First, we show that in female recruits, spring arrival date in the first breeding year correlates positively with hatch date; hence, early-hatched individuals experience colder conditions at arrival than late-hatched individuals. Second, we show that when temperatures at arrival in the recruitment year were high, early-hatched young had a higher recruitment probability than when temperatures were low. We interpret this as a potential cost of arriving early in colder years, and climate warming may have reduced this cost. We thus show that higher temperatures in the arrival year of recruits were associated with stronger selection for early reproduction in the years these birds were born. As arrival temperatures in the beginning of the study increased, but recently declined again, directional selection on timing of reproduction showed a nonlinear change. We demonstrate that environmental conditions with a lag of up to two years can alter selection on phenological traits in natural populations, something that has

  2. Silica–silica Polyimide Buffered Optical Fibre Irradiation and Strength Experiment at Cryogenic Temperatures for 355 nm Pulsed Lasers

    CERN Document Server

    Takala, E; Bordini, B; Bottura, L; Bremer, J; Rossi, L

    2012-01-01

    A controlled UV-light delivery system is envisioned to be built in order to study the stability properties of superconducting strands. The application requires a wave guide from room temperature to cryogenic temperatures. Hydrogen loaded and unloaded polyimide buffered silica–silica 100 microm core fibres were tested at cryogenic temperatures. A thermal stress test was done at 1.9 K and at 4.2 K which shows that the minimal mechanical bending radius for the fibre can be 10 mm for testing (transmission was not measured). The cryogenic transmission loss was measured for one fibre to assess the magnitude of the transmission decrease due to microbending that takes place during cooldown. UV-irradiation degradation measurements were done for bent fibres at 4.2 K with a deuterium lamp and 355 nm pulsed lasers. The irradiation tests show that the fibres have transmission degradation only for wavelengths smaller than 330 nm due to the two photon absorption. The test demonstrates that the fibres are suitable for the ...

  3. A 100 m x 10 m Sonic to observe area averaged wind and temperature data in comparison to FTIR line integrated measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schleichardt, A; Barth, M; Raabe, A; Schaefer, K

    2008-01-01

    An acoustic tomographic system has been used to estimate area averaged wind and temperature data within an area of 97 m x 12 m considering the dependence of sound speed on meteorological conditions To obtain information about vertical structure of meteorological data, eight sound sources and receivers were placed in two different heights above the ground (0.5 m and 2.7 m). Spatially, the acoustic measurements correspond to line integrated N 2 O concentration measurements (98 m) using FTIR-spectrometers Taking stability of atmospheric layering into account, acoustic tomographic measurements serve as basis for estimating vertical fluxes of momentum and sensible heat

  4. Elevated temperature tensile properties of borated 304 stainless steel: Effect of boride dispersion on strength and ductility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stephens, J.J.; Sorenson, K.B.; McConnell, P.

    1991-01-01

    This paper has documented the increase in strain to fracture and yield strength obtained with Grade A versions of types 304B5 and 304B7 relative to their respective Grade B, counterparts. The apparent microstructural reason for these property increases is the finer dispersion of boride in the Grade A material, obtained by means of a Powder Metallurgy process, relative to the conventional Grade B material which is produced using an Ingot Metallurgy process. The area size distribution of borides can be well approximated using a log-normal distribution, with the largest boride particles in the Grade B material having areas in the range of 450--600 μm 2 . By comparison, the largest boride particles in the Grade A material have areas nearly an order of magnitude smaller than the largest particles in their Grade B counterparts. A Section III ASME B ampersand PV code case inquiry has been initiated for non-welded versions of 304B4A, 3045A and 3046A ,material

  5. Wind energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Portilla S, L.A.

    1995-01-01

    The wind energy or eolic energy is a consequence of solar energy, the one which is absorbed by the atmosphere and is transformed into energy of movement of large bulks of air. In this process the atmosphere acts as the filter to the solar radiation and demotes the ultraviolet beams that result fatal to life in the Earth. The ionosphere is the most external cap and this is ionized by means of absorption process of ultraviolet radiation arising to the Sun. The atmosphere also acts as a trap to the infrared radiation, it that results from the continual process of energetic degradation. In this way, the interaction between Earth - Atmospheres, is behaved as a great greenhouse, maintaining the constant temperatures, including in the dark nights. Processes as the natural convection (that occur by the thermodynamic phenomenon), equatorial calmness, trade winds and against trade winds and global distribution of the air currents are described. The other hand, techniques as the transformation of the wind into energy and its parameters also are shown

  6. Temperature dependent and applied field strength dependent magnetic study of cobalt nickel ferrite nano particles: Synthesized by an environmentally benign method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sontu, Uday Bhasker; G, Narsinga Rao; Chou, F. C.; M, V. Ramana Reddy

    2018-04-01

    Spinel ferrites have come a long way in their versatile applications. The ever growing applications of these materials demand detailed study of material properties and environmental considerations in their synthesis. In this article, we report the effect of temperature and applied magnetic field strength on the magnetic behavior of the cobalt nickel ferrite nano powder samples. Basic structural properties of spinel ferrite nano particles, that are synthesized by an environmentally benign method of auto combustion, are characterized through XRD, TEM, RAMAN spectroscopy. Diffuse Reflectance Spectroscopy (DRS) is done to understand the nickel substitution effect on the optical properties of cobalt ferrite nano particles. Thermo magnetic studies using SQUID in the temperature range 5 K to 400 K and room temperature (300 K) VSM studies are performed on these samples. Fields of 0Oe (no applied field: ZF), 1 kOe (for ZFC and FC curves), 5 kOe (0.5 T), 50 kOe (5T) (for M-H loop study) are used to study the magnetic behavior of these nano particles. The XRD,TEM analysis suggest 40 nm crystallites that show changes in the cation distribution and phase changes in the spinel structure with nickel substitution. Raman micrographs support phase purity changes and cation redistributions with nickel substitution. Diffuse reflectance study on powder samples suggests two band gap values for nickel rich compounds. The Magnetic study of these sample nano particles show varied magnetic properties from that of hard magnetic, positive multi axial anisotropy and single-magnetic-domain structures at 5 K temperature to soft magnetic core shell like structures at 300 K temperature. Nickel substitution effect is non monotonous. Blocking temperature of all the samples is found to be higher than the values suggested in the literature.

  7. Deformability and strength of granite under the influence of stress, temperature, rate of loading and water environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shivkumar, K.; Nagaraja Rao, G.M.

    1995-01-01

    The design of nuclear waste repository in geological formation is a unique rock mechanics problem for at least two reasons. These are the usually long service life and the relatively high service temperature. These play a major role in rock deformation. Laboratory simulation studies under the anticipated environmental conditions for waste disposal vaults, and the data generated through these investigations will be helpful in designing a theoretical/experimental model for the repository. Towards this end, some efforts were made to understand the mechanical behaviour of granites. (author)

  8. Venus's winds and temperatures during the MESSENGER's flyby: towards a three-dimensional instantaneous state of the atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peralta, J.; Lee, Y. J.; Hueso, R.; Clancy, R. T.; Sandor, B. J.; Sánchez-Lavega, A.; Lellouch, E.; Rengel, M.; Machado, P.; Omino, M.; Piccialli, A.; Imamura, T.; Horinouchi, T.; Murakami, S.; Ogohara, K.; Luz, D.; Peach, D.

    2017-09-01

    The atmosphere of the Earth or Mars globally rotates with a speed similar to the rotation of the planet (approximately 24 h). The rotation of Venus is of about 243 days, much slower than the Earth, but when scientists measured the winds by tracking the clouds of Venus, they discovered that the atmosphere rotates 60 times faster! No one has explained yet what originates this "superrotation", and we do not know well what happens either above or below the clouds. The technique of "Doppler shift" has been used to measure winds above the clouds, but results are "chaotic" and different to interpret. Thanks to a worldwide collaboration in June 2007 between NASA (MESSENGER), ESA (Venus Express), and many observatories (VLT in Chile, JCMT in Hawaii, HHSMT in Arizona, or IRAM in Spain), the authors combined the different data to obtain, for the first time, the instantaneous 3-D structure of the winds on Venus at the clouds and also above, very important for new Venus models to start "forecasts" of the Venus weather with "data assimilation". We also discovered that the superrotation seems unexpectedly different on the night of Venus and that it varies its altitude depending on the day.

  9. Overcoming the Fundamental Challenges in Improving the Impact Strength and Crystallinity of PLA Biocomposites: Influence of Nucleating Agent and Mold Temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagarajan, Vidhya; Zhang, Kunyu; Misra, Manjusri; Mohanty, Amar K

    2015-06-03

    Poly(lactic acid) (PLA), one of the widely studied renewable resource based biopolymers, has yet to gain a strong commercial standpoint because of certain property limitations. This work is a successful attempt in achieving PLA biocomposites that showed concurrent improvements in impact strength and heat deflection temperature (HDT). Biocomposites were fabricated from a super toughened ternary blend of PLA, poly(ether-b-amide) elastomeric copolymer and ethylene-methyl acrylate-glycidyl methacrylate and miscanthus fibers. The effects of varying the processing parameters and addition of various nucleating agents were investigated. Crystallinity was controlled by optimizing the mold temperature and cycle time of the injection process. With the addition of 1 wt % aromatic sulfonate derivative (Lak-301) as a nucleating agent at a mold temperature of 110 °C, PLA biocomposites exhibited dramatic reduction in crystallization half time to 1.3 min with crystallinity content of 42%. Mechanical and thermal properties assessment for these biocomposites revealed a 4-fold increase in impact strength compared to neat PLA. The HDT of PLA biocomposites increased to 85 °C from 55 °C compared to neat PLA. Crystallization behavior was studied in detail using differential scanning calorimetry and was supported with observations from wide-angle X-ray diffraction profiles and polarized optical microscopy. The presence of a nucleating agent did not alter the crystal structure of PLA; however, a significant difference in spherulite size, crystallization rate and content was observed. Fracture surface morphology and distribution of nucleating agent in the PLA biocomposites were investigated through scanning electron microscopy.

  10. Coastal upwelling by wind-driven forcing in Jervis Bay, New South Wales: A numerical study for 2011

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Youn-Jong; Jalón-Rojas, Isabel; Wang, Xiao Hua; Jiang, Donghui

    2018-06-01

    The Princeton Ocean Model (POM) was used to investigate an upwelling event in Jervis Bay, New South Wales (SE Australia), with varying wind directions and strengths. The POM was adopted with a downscaling approach for the regional ocean model one-way nested to a global ocean model. The upwelling event was detected from the observed wind data and satellite sea surface temperature images. The validated model reproduced the upwelling event showing the input of bottom cold water driven by wind to the bay, its subsequent deflection to the south, and its outcropping to the surface along the west and south coasts. Nevertheless, the behavior of the bottom water that intruded into the bay varied with different wind directions and strengths. Upwelling-favorable wind directions for flushing efficiency within the bay were ranked in the following order: N (0°; northerly) > NNE (30°; northeasterly) > NW (315°; northwesterly) > NE (45°; northeasterly) > ENE (60°; northeasterly). Increasing wind strengths also enhance cold water penetration and water exchange. It was determined that wind-driven downwelling within the bay, which occurred with NNE, NE and ENE winds, played a key role in blocking the intrusion of the cold water upwelled through the bay entrance. A northerly wind stress higher than 0.3 N m-2 was required for the cold water to reach the northern innermost bay.

  11. Statistical characterization of high-to-medium frequency mesoscale gravity waves by lidar-measured vertical winds and temperatures in the MLT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Xian; Chu, Xinzhao; Li, Haoyu; Chen, Cao; Smith, John A.; Vadas, Sharon L.

    2017-09-01

    We present the first statistical study of gravity waves with periods of 0.3-2.5 h that are persistent and dominant in the vertical winds measured with the University of Colorado STAR Na Doppler lidar in Boulder, CO (40.1°N, 105.2°W). The probability density functions of the wave amplitudes in temperature and vertical wind, ratios of these two amplitudes, phase differences between them, and vertical wavelengths are derived directly from the observations. The intrinsic period and horizontal wavelength of each wave are inferred from its vertical wavelength, amplitude ratio, and a designated eddy viscosity by applying the gravity wave polarization and dispersion relations. The amplitude ratios are positively correlated with the ground-based periods with a coefficient of 0.76. The phase differences between the vertical winds and temperatures (φW -φT) follow a Gaussian distribution with 84.2±26.7°, which has a much larger standard deviation than that predicted for non-dissipative waves ( 3.3°). The deviations of the observed phase differences from their predicted values for non-dissipative waves may indicate wave dissipation. The shorter-vertical-wavelength waves tend to have larger phase difference deviations, implying that the dissipative effects are more significant for shorter waves. The majority of these waves have the vertical wavelengths ranging from 5 to 40 km with a mean and standard deviation of 18.6 and 7.2 km, respectively. For waves with similar periods, multiple peaks in the vertical wavelengths are identified frequently and the ones peaking in the vertical wind are statistically longer than those peaking in the temperature. The horizontal wavelengths range mostly from 50 to 500 km with a mean and median of 180 and 125 km, respectively. Therefore, these waves are mesoscale waves with high-to-medium frequencies. Since they have recently become resolvable in high-resolution general circulation models (GCMs), this statistical study provides an important

  12. Extreme winds in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, L.; Rathmann, O.; Hansen, S.O.

    2000-01-01

    (Technical Report, Danish Technical press, 1970) and by Abild (Technical Report R-522 (EN), Riso National Laboratory, 1994). A short discussion of the wind storm on the 3rd of December 1999 is included. It is demonstrated how the data can be applied to non-standard situations where the roughness length......Wind-speed data from four sites in Denmark have been analyzed in order to obtain estimates of the basic wind velocity, defined as the 50 yr wind speed (10 min averages) under standard conditions, i.e., 10 m over a homogeneous terrain with the roughness length 0.05 m, The sites are Skjern (15 yr......), Kegnaes (7 yr), Sprogo (20 yr), and Tystofte (16 yr). The measured data are wind speed, wind direction, temperature and pressure. The wind records are cleaned for terrain effects by means of WASP (Mortensew ct al., Technical Report I-666 (EN), Riso National Laboratory, 1993. Vol. 2. User's Guide...

  13. Polymer concrete composites for the production of high strength pipe and linings in high temperature corrosive environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeldin, A.; Carciello, N.; Fontana, J.; Kukacka, L.

    High temperature corrosive resistant, non-aqueous polymer concrete composites are described. They comprise about 12 to 20% by weight of a water-insoluble polymer binder polymerized in situ from a liquid monomer mixture consisting essentially of about 40 to 70% by weight of styrene, about 25 to 45% by weight acrylonitrile and about 2.5 to 7.5% by weight acrylamide or methacrylamide and about 1 to 10% by weight of a crosslinking agent. This agent is selected from the group consisting of trimethylolpropane trimethacrylate and divinyl benzene; and about 80 to 88% by weight of an inert inorganic filler system containing silica sand and portland cement, and optionally Fe/sub 2/O/sub 3/ or carbon black or mica. A free radical initiator such as di-tert-butyl peroxide, azobisisobutyronitrile, benzoyl peroxide, lauryl peroxide, other organic peroxides and combinations thereof to initiate crosspolymerization of the monomer mixture in the presence of said inorganic filler.

  14. Wind: new wind markets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cameron, A.

    2005-01-01

    The June 2005 edition of 'Wind Force 12' suggests that wind could generate 12% of global electricity requirements by 2020. But what moves a potential market into an emerging one? Geographical factors include a good wind resource, plenty of open space and the ability to get the generated electricity to end-users. A country's political framework is equally important, with fixed price systems, renewable quota systems and political will all playing a part. Some potential wind markets around the world are thought to have the conditions necessary to become key players in the wind industry. The emerging markets in countries such as Australia, Brazil, Canada, France, Japan and the Philippines are highlighted as examples

  15. Renewable Energy Essentials: Wind

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2008-07-01

    Subjects for further research, specific to wind energy technology, include more refined resource assessment; materials with higher strength to mass ratios; advanced grid integration and power quality and control technologies; standardisation and certification; development of low-wind regime turbines; improved forecasting; increased fatigue resistance of major components such as gearboxes; better models for aerodynamics and aeroelasticity; generators based on superconductor technology; deep-offshore foundations; and high-altitude 'kite' concepts.

  16. Development of a procedure for estimating the high cycle fatigue strength of some high temperature structural alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soo, P.; Chow, J.G.Y.

    1979-01-01

    The generation of strain controlled fatigue data, for the standard strain rate of 4 x 10 -3 sec -1 , presents a problem when the cycles to failure exceed 10 5 because of the prohibitively long test times involved. In an attempt to circumvent this difficulty an evaluation has been made of a test procedure involving a fast cycling rate (40 Hz) and load controlled conditions. The validity of this procedure for extending current fatigue curves from 10 5 to 10 8 cycles and beyond, hinges upon the selection of an appropriate effective strain value, since the strain usually changes rapidly during the early stage of fatigue. Results from annealed 2 1/4 Cr-1 Mo, type 304 stainless steel, Incoloy 800H and Hastelloy X, tested over a wide range of temperatures, show that the strain measured N/sub f/2 is a reasonable estimate since it gives an excellent correlation between the strain and load controlled tests in the 10 5 cycle range where the data overlap. It seems clear that the differences in cycling rate and early stress-strain history for the two tests do not significantly affect the correlation. It may, therefore, be concluded that such load control test procedures may be used as a valid fast way for extending currently available fatigue curves from 10 5 to 10 8 cycles, and beyond

  17. Removal of radiocobalt from aqueous solutions by kaolinite affected by solid content, pH, ionic strength, contact time and temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kan Li; Zhengjie Liu; Lei Chen; Yunhui Dong; Jun Hu; Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei

    2013-01-01

    The kaolinite sample was characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) and X-ray powder diffraction, and was applied as adsorbent for the removal of radiocobalt ions from radioactive wastewater. The results demonstrated that the sorption of Co(II) was strongly dependent on pH and ionic strength at low pH values, and independent of pH and ionic strength at high pH values. The sorption of Co(II) was dominated by outer-sphere surface complexation or ion exchange at low pH values, whereas inner-sphere surface complexation was the main sorption mechanism at high pH values. The sorption isotherms were well described by Langmuir, Freundlich and Dubinin-Radushkevich models. The thermodynamic parameters (i.e., ΔGdeg, ΔSdeg, ΔHdeg) calculated from the temperature-dependent sorption isotherms indicated that the sorption of Co(II) on kaolinite was an endothermic and spontaneous process. The results of high sorption capacity of kaolinite suggested that the kaolinite sample was a suitable material for the preconcentration of Co(II) from large volumes of aqueous solutions and as backfill materials in nuclear waste management. (author)

  18. Sorption properties of Th(IV) on the raw diatomite-Effects of contact time, pH, ionic strength and temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sheng Guodong; Hu Jun [Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, P.O. Box 1126, Hefei 230031 (China); Wang Xiangke [Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, P.O. Box 1126, Hefei 230031 (China)], E-mail: xkwang@ipp.ac.cn

    2008-10-15

    Diatomite has a number of unique physicochemical properties and has diversified industrial uses. Natural diatomite has been tested as a potential sorbent for the removal of Th(IV) from aqueous solutions. The results indicate that sorption of Th(IV) is strongly dependent on ionic strength at pH<3, and is independent of ionic strength at pH>3. Outer-sphere complexation or ion exchange may be the main sorption mechanism of Th(IV) to diatomite at low pH values, whereas the sorption of Th(IV) at pH>3 is mainly dominated by inner-sphere complexation or precipitation. The competition for Th(IV) between aqueous or surface adsorbed anions (e.g., herein ClO{sub 4}{sup -}, NO{sub 3}{sup -} and Cl{sup -}) and surface functional groups of diatomite is important for Th(IV) sorption. The thermodynamic data ({delta}H{sup 0}, {delta}S{sup 0}, {delta}G{sup 0}) are calculated from the temperature-dependent sorption isotherms. The results suggest that sorption process of Th(IV) on diatomite is spontaneous and endothermic.

  19. Impact Strength of Austenitic and Ferritic-Austenitic Cr-Ni Stainless Cast Steel in -40 and +20°C Temperature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kalandyk B.

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Studies described in this paper relate to common grades of cast corrosion resistant Cr-Ni steel with different matrix. The test materials were subjected to heat treatment, which consisted in the solution annealing at 1060°C followed by cooling in water. The conducted investigations, besides the microstructural characteristics of selected cast steel grades, included the evaluation of hardness, toughness (at a temperature of -40 and +20oC and type of fracture obtained after breaking the specimens on a Charpy impact testing machine. Based on the results of the measured volume fraction of ferrite, it has been found that the content of this phase in cast austenitic steel is 1.9%, while in the two-phase ferritic-austenitic grades it ranges from 50 to 58%. It has been demonstrated that within the scope of conducted studies, the cast steel of an austenitic structure is characterised by higher impact strength than the two-phase ferritic-austenitic (F-A grade. The changing appearance of the fractures of the specimens reflected the impact strength values obtained in the tested materials. Fractures of the cast austenitic Cr-Ni steel obtained in these studies were of a ductile character, while fractures of the cast ferritic-austenitic grade were mostly of a mixed character with the predominance of brittle phase and well visible cleavage planes.

  20. Biosorption removal of benzene and toluene by three dried macroalgae at different ionic strength and temperatures: Algae biochemical composition and kinetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flores-Chaparro, Carlos E; Chazaro Ruiz, Luis Felipe; Alfaro de la Torre, Ma Catalina; Huerta-Diaz, Miguel Angel; Rangel-Mendez, Jose Rene

    2017-05-15

    Release of low-molecular aromatic hydrocarbons (HC) into natural waters brings severe consequences to our environment. Unfortunately very limited information is available regarding the treatment of these pollutants. This work evaluated the use of brown, green and red macroalgae biomass as biosorbents of benzene and toluene, two of the most soluble HC. Raw seaweed biomasses were completely characterized, then evaluated under different temperatures and ionic strengths to assess their potential as biosorbents and to elucidate the biosorption mechanisms involved. Brown macroalgae registered the highest removal capacities for benzene and toluene (112 and 28 mg·g -1 , respectively), and these were not affected at ionic strength < 0.6 M. Langmuir and Sips isotherm equations well described biosorption data, and the pseudo-second order model provided the best fit to the kinetics rate. Hydrocarbons are adsorbed onto the diverse chemical components of the cell wall by London forces and hydrophobic interactions. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Development of plate-fin heat exchanger for intermediate heat exchanger of high-temperature gas cooled reactor. Fabrication process, high-temperature strength and creep-fatigue life prediction of plate-fin structure made of Hastelloy X

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mizokami, Yorikata; Igari, Toshihide; Nakashima, Keiichi; Kawashima, Fumiko; Sakakibara, Noriyuki; Kishikawa, Ryouji; Tanihira, Masanori

    2010-01-01

    The helium/helium heat exchanger (i.e., intermediate heat exchanger: IHX) of a high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) system with nuclear heat applications is installed between a primary system and a secondary system. IHX is operated at the highest temperature of 950degC and has a high capacity of up to 600 MWt. A plate-fin-type heat exchanger is the most suitable for IHX to improve construction cost. The purpose of this study is to develop an ultrafine plate-fin-type heat exchanger with a finer pitch fin than a conventional technology. In the first step, fabrication conditions of the ultrafine plate fin were optimized by press tests. In the second step, a brazing material was selected from several candidates through brazing tests of rods, and brazing conditions were optimized for plate-fin structures. In the third step, tensile strength, creep rupture, fatigue, and creep-fatigue tests were performed as typical strength tests for plate-fin structures. The obtained data were compared with those of the base metal and plate-fin element fabricated from SUS316. Finally, the accuracy of the creep-fatigue life prediction using both the linear cumulative damage rule and the equivalent homogeneous solid method was confirmed through the evaluation of creep-fatigue test results of plate-fin structures. (author)

  2. Effect of temperature and humidity on post-gel shrinkage, cusp deformation, bond strength and shrinkage stress - Construction of a chamber to simulate the oral environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bicalho, Aline Aredes; de Souza, Silas Júnior Boaventura; de Rosatto, Camila Maria Peres; Tantbirojn, Daranee; Versluis, Antheunis; Soares, Carlos José

    2015-12-01

    Evaluate the effect of environment on post-gel shrinkage (Shr), cuspal strains (CS), microtensile bond strength (μTBS), elastic modulus (E) and shrinkage stress in molars with large class II restorations. Sixty human molars received standardized Class II mesio-oclusal-distal cavity preparations. Restorations were made with two composites (CHA, Charisma Diamond, Heraus Kulzer and IPS Empress Direct, Ivoclar-Vivadent) using three environment conditions (22°C/50% humidity, 37°C/50% humidity and 37°C/90% humidity) simulated in custom developed chamber. Shr was measured using the strain gauge technique (n=10). CS was measured using strain gauges. Half of the teeth (n=5) were used to assess the elastic modulus (E) and Knoop hardness (KHN) at different depths using microhardness indentation. The other half (n=5) was used to measure the μTBS. The composites and environment conditions were simulated in a two-dimensional finite element analysis of a tooth restoration. Polymerization shrinkage was modeled using Shr data. The Shr, CS, μTBS, KHN and E data were statistically analyzed using two-way ANOVA and Tukey test (significance level: 0.05). Both composites had similar Shr, CS, μTBS and shrinkage stress. CHA had higher elastic modulus than IPS. Increasing temperature and humidity significantly increased Shr, CS and shrinkage stress. μTBS were similar for groups with lower humidity, irrespective of temperature, and higher with higher humidity. E and KHN were constant through the depth for CHA. E and KHN values were affected by environment only for IPS, mainly deeper in the cavity. Shrinkage stress at dentin/composite interface had high inverse correlation with μTBS. Shrinkage stress in enamel had high correlation with CS. Increasing temperature and humidity caused higher post-gel shrinkage and cusp deformation with higher shrinkage stresses in the tooth structure and tooth/restoration interface for both composites tested. The chamber developed for simulating the

  3. Solar-wind system powers mountain clean-up

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2001-03-01

    By using a hybrid solar-wind system, the Japanese have tackled the problem of human excrement left by tourists in mountain lodges and in natural parks by installing flush toilets and wastewater treatment plants. The solar array (4.9 kW{sub p}) consists of 76 panels of single-crystal photovoltaic cells each with an output of 64 Wp. The wind turbines (total capacity 2.1 kW) operate whatever the wind strength or direction. Storage batteries prevent any dip in power which would result from low ambient temperatures. The system can still function at temperatures as low as minus 25{sup o}C. Between November and April when the lodge is closed, the waste is decomposed biologically. A block diagram shows the elements of the system, and details of cost are given. The system won the 1999 New Energy Award.

  4. The influence of wind on the temperature of PV modules in tropical environments, evaluated on an hourly basis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veldhuis, A.J.; Nobre, A.; Reindl, T.; Ruther, R.; Reinders, Angelina H.M.E.

    2013-01-01

    It is well known that the efficiency of PV modules decreases with increasing module temperatures. Many studies have paid attention to the development and validation of heuristic models to calculate the PV module temperature in higher latitudes, however only a few focus on the thermal behaviour of PV

  5. Prediction of hottest spot temperature in power transformer windings with non-directed and directed oil-forced cooling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taghikhani, M.A.; Gholami, A. [Electrical Engineering Department, Iran University of Science and Technology (IUST), Narmak, 16846 Tehran (Iran)

    2009-09-15

    Power transformer outages have a considerable economic impact on the operation of an electrical network. One of the most important parameters governing transformer's life expectancy is the hottest spot temperature (HST) value. The classical approach has been to consider the hottest spot temperature as the sum of the ambient temperature, the top-oil temperature rise, and the hottest spot to top-oil temperature gradient. The authors proposed a numerical method based on heat transfer theory using the finite element method and they only needed to solve heat conduction equation. The transformer selected for simulation was a 32 MVA transformer with non-directed oil-forced (NDOF) cooling and directed oil-forced (DOF) cooling. A comparison of the authors results with those obtained from finite integral transform and experimental test confirms the validity and accuracy of the proposed method. (author)

  6. Three-phase AC synchronous motor with high-temperature superconductor (HTS) rotor windings and HTS bearings. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neumueller, H.W.; Nick, W.; Frank, M.; Massek, P.; Hasselt, P. van; Thummes, G.; Haefner, H.U.; Kummeth, P.; Werfel, F.; Frauenhofer, J.; Senger, R.; Schmidt, W.

    2003-06-01

    The project involved the design, construction and testing of a 3000 kW converter-fed synchronous motor as a development prototype with - HTS rotor windings, - closed-circuit cooling system, - stator air-gap winding and - high-gradient HTS magnetic bearing. The project objective was to create the conditions necessary for the construction of an application-oriented model(∼2 MW) that would be suitable for field tests and provide a starting point for subsequent series expansion. The main focus was fixed on feasibility and function issues relating to the various components, particularly during operation of the overall system in the test bay. These ambitious targets were achieved within the scope of project-based cooperation. This has been demonstrated especially in test bed operation of the machine since spring 2001, in the course of which the motor produced a maximum continuous rating of 450 kW - significantly above the specified value - while the short-time rating could be increased up to 600 kW. Throughout testing the motor demonstrated excellent performance characteristics that are markedly indifferent to load fluctuations and indicative of important operating advantages to subsequent users of such HTS motors. Loss calculations showed that, in terms of efficiency, this prototype already represents an approximately 1% improvement over the conventional motors or generators currently available. The robustness of the cooling concept developed as part of the project was also convincingly demonstrated during the comprehensive test phase, which has been ongoing since spring 2001. The innovative pulse-tube coolers developed by our partner companies Leybold and TransMIT promise further advantages over current commercial GM-coolers. Despite considerable problems with materials the team successfully built and operated a contactless HTS magnet bearing (based on YBCO stator cylinders from partner company ATZ) that is currently one of the world's largest in terms of bearing

  7. The roles of vertical mixing, solar radiation, and wind stress in a model simulation of the sea surface temperature seasonal cycle in the tropical Pacfic Ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Dake; Busalacchi, Antonio J.; Rothstein, Lewis M.

    1994-01-01

    The climatological seasonal cycle of sea surface temperature (SST) in the tropical Pacific is simulated using a newly developed upper ocean model. The roles of vertical mixing, solar radiation, and wind stress are investigated in a hierarchy of numerical experiments with various combinations of vertical mixing algorithms and surface-forcing products. It is found that the large SST annual cycle in the eastern equatorial Pacific is, to a large extent, controlled by the annually varying mixed layer depth which, in turn, is mainly determined by the competing effects of solar radiation and wind forcing. With the application of our hybrid vertical mixing scheme the model-simulated SST annual cycle is much improved in both amplitude and phase as compared to the case of a constant mixed layer depth. Beside the strong effects on vertical mixing, solar radiation is the primary heating term in the surface layer heat budget, and wind forcing influences SST by driving oceanic advective processes that redistribute heat in the upper ocean. For example, the SST seasonal cycle in the western Pacific basically follows the semiannual variation of solar heating, and the cycle in the central equatorial region is significantly affected by the zonal advective heat flux associated with the seasonally reversing South Equatorial Current. It has been shown in our experiments that the amount of heat flux modification needed to eliminate the annual mean SST errors in the model is, on average, no larger than the annual mean uncertainties among the various surface flux products used in this study. Whereas a bias correction is needed to account for remaining uncertainties in the annual mean heat flux, this study demonstrates that with proper treatment of mixed layer physics and realistic forcing functions the seasonal variability of SST is capable of being simulated successfully in response to external forcing without relying on a relaxation or damping formulation for the dominant surface heat

  8. Simultaneous observations of SAO and QBO in winds, temperature and ozone in the tropical middle atmosphere over Thumba (8.5 N, 77 E)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumar, Karanam Kishore; Swain, Debadatta; John, Sherine Rachel; Ramkumar, Geetha [Vikram Sarabhai Space Center, Space Physics Laboratory, Thiruvananthapuram (India)

    2011-11-15

    Owing to the importance of middle atmosphere, recently, a Middle Atmospheric Dynamics (MIDAS) program was carried out during the period 2002-2007 at Thumba (8.5 N, 77 E). The measurements under this program, involving regular radiosonde/rocket flights as well as atmospheric radars, provided long period observations of winds and temperature in the middle atmospheric region from which waves and oscillations as well as their forcing mechanisms particularly in the low-latitude middle atmosphere could be analyzed. However, a detailed analysis of the forcing mechanisms remains incomplete due to the lack of important measurements like ozone which is a significant contributor to atmospheric dynamics. Presently, profiles of ozone are available from TIMED/SABER (Thermosphere, Ionosphere, Mesosphere Energetics and Dynamics/Sounding of the Atmosphere using Broad Emission Radiometry) satellite globally from about 15 to 100 km, over multiple years since 2002. In this regard, a comprehensive study has been carried out on ozone and its variability at Quasi Biennial Oscillation (QBO) and Semiannual Oscillation (SAO) scales using TIMED/SABER ozone observations during the MIDAS campaign period. Before using the TIMED/SABER ozone measurements, an inter-comparison has been carried out with in situ measurements of ozone obtained under the Southern Hemisphere Additional Ozonesondes (SHADOZ) campaign for the year 2007 at few stations. The inter-comparison showed very good agreement between SABER and ozonesonde derived ozone profiles. After validating the SABER observations, ozone profiles are used extensively to study the QBO and SAO along with temperature and winds in the 20-100 km height region. It is known that the SAO in mesosphere and stratosphere are in opposite phases, but the present study for the first time reports the aspect of opposite phases in the mesosphere itself. Thus, the present work attempts to study the long-period oscillations in stratosphere and mesosphere in ozone

  9. Correlation Between Microstructure and Low-Temperature Impact Toughness of Simulated Reheated Zones in the Multi-pass Weld Metal of High-Strength Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Yongjoon; Park, Gitae; Jeong, Seonghoon; Lee, Changhee

    2018-01-01

    A large fraction of reheated weld metal is formed during multi-pass welding, which significantly affects the mechanical properties (especially toughness) of welded structures. In this study, the low-temperature toughness of the simulated reheated zone in multi-pass weld metal was evaluated and compared to that of the as-deposited zone using microstructural analyses. Two kinds of high-strength steel welds with different hardenabilities were produced by single-pass, bead-in-groove welding, and both welds were thermally cycled to peak temperatures above Ac3 using a Gleeble simulator. When the weld metals were reheated, their toughness deteriorated in response to the increase in the fraction of detrimental microstructural components, i.e., grain boundary ferrite and coalesced bainite in the weld metals with low and high hardenabilities, respectively. In addition, toughness deterioration occurred in conjunction with an increase in the effective grain size, which was attributed to the decrease in nucleation probability of acicular ferrite; the main cause for this decrease changed depending on the hardenability of the weld metal.

  10. High temperature strength data-base of SUS304 steel and a study on life prediction method under ceep-fatigue interaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsubara, Masaaki; Nitta, Akito; Ogata, Takashi; Kuwabara, Kazuo

    1985-01-01

    As a part of ''Study for practical use of Tank Type FBR'', ''Practical use of inelastic analysis method to FBR structural design'' is carried out as a cooperative study for three years from 1984. In this cooperative study, to establish the life prediction method under creep-fatigue interaction is one of the most important theme. To attain this purpose, many different type tests are planned and then conducted. By the way, to use these many data rapidly and effectively, it is necessary to make a data base. So in this work, we developed the simple data base of high temperature strength. And the data of SUS304 obtained at this place to this day are inputted into this data base. Next, we investigated about five life prediction methods under creep-fatigue interaction, Frequency Modified Method, Ostergren Method, Strain Range Partitioning Method, Damage Rate Approach and Strain Energy Parameter Method. As a result, Strain Range Partitioning Method can predict the lives within Factor of 2. In the other four methods, it is supported that material constants in the prediction formula are dependent on temperature. (author)

  11. Raman spectroscopic determination of the length, strength, compressibility, Debye temperature, elasticity, and force constant of the C-C bond in graphene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, X X; Li, J W; Zhou, Z F; Wang, Y; Yang, L W; Zheng, W T; Sun, Chang Q

    2012-01-21

    From the perspective of bond relaxation and bond vibration, we have formulated the Raman phonon relaxation of graphene, under the stimuli of the number-of-layers, the uni-axial strain, the pressure, and the temperature, in terms of the response of the length and strength of the representative bond of the entire specimen to the applied stimuli. Theoretical unification of the measurements clarifies that: (i) the opposite trends of the Raman shifts, which are due to the number-of-layers reduction, of the G-peak shift and arises from the vibration of a pair of atoms, while the D- and the 2D-peak shifts involve the z-neighbor of a specific atom; (ii) the tensile strain-induced phonon softening and phonon-band splitting arise from the asymmetric response of the C(3v) bond geometry to the C(2v) uni-axial bond elongation; (iii) the thermal softening of the phonons originates from bond expansion and weakening; and (iv) the pressure stiffening of the phonons results from bond compression and work hardening. Reproduction of the measurements has led to quantitative information about the referential frequencies from which the Raman frequencies shift as well as the length, energy, force constant, Debye temperature, compressibility and elastic modulus of the C-C bond in graphene, which is of instrumental importance in the understanding of the unusual behavior of graphene.

  12. A modified Gaussian model for the thermal plume from a ground-based heat source in a cross-wind

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Selander, W.N.; Barry, P.J.; Robertson, E.

    1990-06-01

    An array of propane burners operating at ground level in a cross-wind was used as a heat source to establish a blown-over thermal plume. A three-dimensional array of thermocouples was used to continuously measure the plume temperature downwind from the source. The resulting data were used to correlate the parameters of a modified Gaussian model for plume rise and dispersion with source strength, wind speed, and atmospheric dispersion parameters

  13. Gap Winds in a Fjord: Howe Sound, British Columbia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Peter L.

    1993-01-01

    Gap, outflow, or Squamish wind, is the cold low level seaward flow of air through fjords which dissect the coastal mountain barrier of northwestern North America. These flows, occurring mainly during winter, can be strong, threatening safety, economic activity and comfort. Howe Sound gap winds were studied using a combination of observations and several types of models. Observations of winds in Howe Sound showed that gap wind strength varied considerably along the channel, across the channel and vertically. Generally, winds increase down the channel, are strongest along the eastern side, and are below 1000 m depth. Observations were unable to answer all questions about gap winds due to data sparseness, particularly in the vertical direction. Therefore, several modelling approaches were used. The modelling began with a complete 3-dimensional quasi-Boussinesq model (CSU RAMS) and ended with the creation and testing of models which are conceptually simpler, and more easily interpreted and manipulated. A gap wind simulation made using RAMS was shown to be mostly successful by statistical evaluation compared to other mesoscale simulations, and by visual inspection of the fields. The RAMS output, which has very high temporal and spatial resolution, provided much additional information about the details of gap flow. In particular, RAMS results suggested a close analogy between gap wind and hydraulic channel flow, with hydraulic features such as supercritical flow and hydraulic jumps apparent. These findings imply gap wind flow could potentially be represented by much simpler models. The simplest possible models containing pressure gradient, advection and friction but not incorporating hydraulic effects, were created, tested, and found lacking. A hydraulic model, which in addition incorporates varying gap wind height and channel geometry, was created and shown to successfully simulate gap winds. Force balance analysis from RAMS and the hydraulic model showed that pressure

  14. Case Study of the California Low Level Coastal Jet Comparisons Between Observed and Model-Estimated Winds and Temperatures using WRF and COAMPS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomé, Ricardo; Semedo, Alvaro; Ranjha, Raza; Tjernström, Michael; Svensson, Gunilla

    2010-05-01

    A low level coastal jet (LLCJ) is a low-troposphereic wind feature driven by the pressure gradient produced by a sharp contrast between high temperatures over land and lower temperatures over sea. This feature has been identified and studied in several areas of the world, where such a land-sea temperature contrast exist: off the coast of Somalia, near Lima, Peru, off the Mediterranean coast of Spain, in the Southwest coast of Africa, or in the South China Sea coast. Nevertheless, the California LLCJ is probably the most studied coastal jet in the world, with several studies available in the literature. Coastal jets have a notorious impact on coastal areas. Climatologically they are associated with coastal upwelling processes. The major coastal fishing grounds in the world are usually in areas of upwelling, and the abundance of fish at the surface is supported by the upwelled nutrient-rich waters from deeper levels. The effect of this upwelled water to the fishing industry and to the habitat of an enormous diversity of marine life is of paramount importance, and has led to numerous studies in this field. Littoral areas are usually densely populated, and often airports are built in areas where a LLCJ may occur. Thus, aviation operations are deeply influenced by this weather feature, which has a significant impact on the takeoff and landing of airplanes. Therefore the forecasting of LLCJ features is very important for several reasons.The forecasting skills of mesoscale models, while challenging in any region, become particularly complex near coastlines, where processes associated with the coastal boundary add additional complexity: interaction of the flow with the coastal orography, sharp sea-land temperature gradients, highly baroclinic environment, complex air-sea exchanging processes, etc. The purpose of this study is to assess the forecasting skills of the limited-area models WRF (Weather Research and Forecasting) and COAMPS® (Coupled Ocean-Atmosphere Mesoscale

  15. IMFREX impact of the anthropic changes on the frequency of the extreme phenomena of the wind, the temperature and the rainfall. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2007-01-01

    The aim of Imfrex was to evaluate the impact of a climatic change on the frequency of extreme phenomena of wind and rainfall in France. The study is based on an hypothesis proposed by the GIEC and called scenario A2. A first simulation, low resolution 300 km, using a coupled model ocean-atmosphere allowed to provide an evolution scenario for the temperature of the sea surface and the ice field area. A second simulation, high resolution 50 km, provided a daily evolution of the climate during 140 years. Imfrex was organized in five work-packages: the constitution of the data base, the validation of the models, the direct approach the statistical approach and the dynamical approach. (A.L.B.)

  16. The effect of aging treatment on the high temperature fatigue strength and fatigue fracture behaviour of friction welded domestic heat resisting steels (SUH3-SUS303)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, K.Y.; Oh, S.K.; Kim, H.J.

    1981-01-01

    In this study the experiment was carried out as the high temperature rotary bending fatigue testing under the condition of 700 0 C high temperature to the friction welded domestic heat resisting steels, SUH3-SUS303, which were 10 hr., 100 hr. aging heat treated at 700 0 C after solution treatment 1 hr. at 1060 0 C for the purpose of observing the effects of the high temperature fatigue strength and fatigue fracture behaviours as well as with various mechanical properties of welded joints. The results obtained are summarized as follows: 1) Through mechanical tests and microstructural examinations, the determined optimum welding conditions, rotating speed 2420 rpm, heating pressure 8 kg/mm 2 , upsetting pressure 22 kg/mm 2 , the amount of total upset 7 mm (heating time 3 sec and upsetting time 2 sec) were satisfied. 2) The solution treated material SUH3, SUS303 and SUH3-SUS303, have the highest inclination gradiant on S-N curve due to the high temperature fatigue testing for long time at 700 0 C. 3) The optimum aging time of friction welded SUH3-SUS303, has been recognized near the 10 hr. at 700 0 C after the solution treatment of 1 hr. at 1060 0 C. 4) The high temperature fatigue limits of aging treated materials were compared with those of raw material according to the extender of aging time, on 10 hr. aging, fatigue limits were increased by SUH3 75.4%, SUS303 28.5%, friction welded joints SUH3-SUS303 44.2% and 100 hr. aging the rate were 64.9%, 30.4% and 36.6% respectively. 5) The fatigue fractures occurred at the side of the base metal SUS303 of the friction welded joints SUH3-SUS303 and it is difficult to find out fractures at the friction welding interfaces. 6) The cracking mode of SUS303, SUH3-SUS303 is intergranular in any case, but SUH3 is fractured by transgranular cracking. (author)

  17. Metric of the 2–6 day sea-surface temperature response to wind stress in the Tropical Pacific and its sensitivity to the K-Profile Parameterization of vertical mixing

    KAUST Repository

    Wagman, Benjamin M.

    2014-05-04

    Uncertainty in wind forcing has long hampered direct tests of ocean model output against observations for the purpose of refining the boundary layer K-Profile Parameterization (KPP) of oceanic vertical mixing. Considered here is a short-term metric that could be sensitive to the ways in which the KPP directly affects the adjustment of sea surface temperatures for a given change in wind stress. In particular a metric is developed based on the lagged correlation between the 2–6 day filtered wind stress and sea surface temperature. The metric is normalized by estimated observational and model uncertainties such that the significance of differences may be assessed. For this purpose multiple wind reanalysis products and their blended combinations were used to represent the range of forcing uncertainty, while perturbed KPP parameter model runs explore the sensitivity of the metric to the parameterization of vertical mixing. The correlation metric is sensitive to perturbations to most KPP parameters, in ways that accord with expectations, although only a few parameters show a sensitivity on the same order as the sensitivity to switching between wind products. This suggests that uncertainties in wind forcing continue to be a significant limitation for applying direct observational tests of KPP physics. Moreover, model correlations are biased high, suggesting that the model lacks or does not resolve sources of variability on the 2–6 day time scale.

  18. Metric of the 2–6 day sea-surface temperature response to wind stress in the Tropical Pacific and its sensitivity to the K-Profile Parameterization of vertical mixing

    KAUST Repository

    Wagman, Benjamin M.; Jackson, Charles S.; Yao, Fengchao; Zedler, Sarah; Hoteit, Ibrahim

    2014-01-01

    Uncertainty in wind forcing has long hampered direct tests of ocean model output against observations for the purpose of refining the boundary layer K-Profile Parameterization (KPP) of oceanic vertical mixing. Considered here is a short-term metric that could be sensitive to the ways in which the KPP directly affects the adjustment of sea surface temperatures for a given change in wind stress. In particular a metric is developed based on the lagged correlation between the 2–6 day filtered wind stress and sea surface temperature. The metric is normalized by estimated observational and model uncertainties such that the significance of differences may be assessed. For this purpose multiple wind reanalysis products and their blended combinations were used to represent the range of forcing uncertainty, while perturbed KPP parameter model runs explore the sensitivity of the metric to the parameterization of vertical mixing. The correlation metric is sensitive to perturbations to most KPP parameters, in ways that accord with expectations, although only a few parameters show a sensitivity on the same order as the sensitivity to switching between wind products. This suggests that uncertainties in wind forcing continue to be a significant limitation for applying direct observational tests of KPP physics. Moreover, model correlations are biased high, suggesting that the model lacks or does not resolve sources of variability on the 2–6 day time scale.

  19. Wind Energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodriguez D, J.M.

    1998-01-01

    The general theory of the wind energy conversion systems is presented. The availability of the wind resource in Colombia and the ranges of the speed of the wind in those which is possible economically to use the wind turbines are described. It is continued with a description of the principal technological characteristics of the wind turbines and are split into wind power and wind-powered pumps; and its use in large quantities grouped in wind farms or in autonomous systems. Finally, its costs and its environmental impact are presented

  20. Development of Meandering Winding Magnetometer (MWM (Register Trademark)) Eddy Current Sensors for the Health Monitoring, Modeling and Damage Detection of High Temperature Composite Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russell, Richard; Washabaugh, Andy; Sheiretov, Yanko; Martin, Christopher; Goldfine, Neil

    2011-01-01

    The increased use of high-temperature composite materials in modern and next generation aircraft and spacecraft have led to the need for improved nondestructive evaluation and health monitoring techniques. Such technologies are desirable to improve quality control, damage detection, stress evaluation and temperature measurement capabilities. Novel eddy current sensors and sensor arrays, such as Meandering Winding Magnetometers (MWMs) have provided alternate or complimentary techniques to ultrasound and thermography for both nondestructive evaluation (NDE) and structural health monitoring (SHM). This includes imaging of composite material quality, damage detection and .the monitoring of fiber temperatures and multidirectional stresses. Historically, implementation of MWM technology for the inspection of the Space Shuttle Orbiter Reinforced Carbon-Carbon Composite (RCC) leading edge panels was developed by JENTEK Sensors and was subsequently transitioned by NASA as an operational pre and post flight in-situ inspection at the Kennedy Space Center. A manual scanner, which conformed'automatically to the curvature of the RCC panels was developed and used as a secondary technique if a defect was found during an infrared thermography screening, During a recent proof of concept study on composite overwrapped pressure vessels (COPV's), three different MWM sensors were tested at three orientations to demonstrate the ability of the technology to measure stresses at various fiber orientations and depths. These results showed excellent correlation with actual surface strain gage measurements. Recent advancements of this technology have been made applying MWM sensor technology for scanning COPVs for mechanical damage. This presentation will outline the recent advance in the MWM.technology and the development of MWM techniques for NDE and SHM of carbon wraped composite overwrapped pressure vessels (COPVs) including the measurement of internal stresses via a surface mounted sensor

  1. Wind climate estimation using WRF model output: method and model sensitivities over the sea

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hahmann, Andrea N.; Vincent, Claire Louise; Peña, Alfredo

    2015-01-01

    setup parameters. The results of the year-long sensitivity simulations show that the long-term mean wind speed simulated by the WRF model offshore in the region studied is quite insensitive to the global reanalysis, the number of vertical levels, and the horizontal resolution of the sea surface...... temperature used as lower boundary conditions. Also, the strength and form (grid vs spectral) of the nudging is quite irrelevant for the mean wind speed at 100 m. Large sensitivity is found to the choice of boundary layer parametrization, and to the length of the period that is discarded as spin-up to produce...... a wind climatology. It is found that the spin-up period for the boundary layer winds is likely larger than 12 h over land and could affect the wind climatology for points offshore for quite a distance downstream from the coast....

  2. Inverse Relationship of Marine Aerosol and Dust in Antarctic Ice with Fine-Grained Sediment in the South Atlantic Ocean: Implications for Sea-Ice Coverage and Wind Strength

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharon L. Kanfoush

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available This research seeks to test the hypothesis that natural gamma radiation (NGR from Ocean Drilling Program Site 1094, which displays variability over the last glacial-interglacial cycle similar to dust in the Vostok ice core, reflects fine-grained terrigenous sediment delivered by eolian processes. Grain size was measured on 400 samples spanning 0–20 m in a composite core. Accumulation of the <63μ size fraction at Site 1094 and dust in Vostok exhibit a negative correlation, suggesting the fine sediments are not dominantly eolian. However the technique used for grain size measurements cannot distinguish between terrigenous and biogenous materials; therefore it is possible much fine-grained material is diatoms. An inverse correlation between fine sediments and NGR supports this interpretation, and implies terrigenous materials were at times diluted by microfossils from high biological productivity. Fine marine sediments correlate positively with temperature and negatively with marine aerosol Na+ in Vostok. One plausible explanation is extensive sea-ice of cold intervals steepened ocean-continent temperature gradients, intensified winds, and led to increased transport of dust and marine aerosol to Antarctica yet also reduced biological productivity at Site 1094. Such a reduction despite increases in NGR, potentially representing Fe-rich dust influx, would require light limitation or stratification associated with sea-ice.

  3. GHRSST Level 3U Global Subskin Sea Surface Temperature from the WindSat Polarimetric Radiometer on the Coriolis satellite (GDS version 2)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The WindSat Polarimetric Radiometer, launched on January 6, 2003 aboard the Department of Defense Coriolis satellite, was designed to measure the ocean surface wind...

  4. Sorption properties of Th(IV) on the raw diatomite-Effects of contact time, pH, ionic strength and temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sheng Guodong; Hu Jun; Wang Xiangke

    2008-01-01

    Diatomite has a number of unique physicochemical properties and has diversified industrial uses. Natural diatomite has been tested as a potential sorbent for the removal of Th(IV) from aqueous solutions. The results indicate that sorption of Th(IV) is strongly dependent on ionic strength at pH 3. Outer-sphere complexation or ion exchange may be the main sorption mechanism of Th(IV) to diatomite at low pH values, whereas the sorption of Th(IV) at pH>3 is mainly dominated by inner-sphere complexation or precipitation. The competition for Th(IV) between aqueous or surface adsorbed anions (e.g., herein ClO 4 - , NO 3 - and Cl - ) and surface functional groups of diatomite is important for Th(IV) sorption. The thermodynamic data (ΔH 0 , ΔS 0 , ΔG 0 ) are calculated from the temperature-dependent sorption isotherms. The results suggest that sorption process of Th(IV) on diatomite is spontaneous and endothermic

  5. Sorption properties of Th(IV) on the raw diatomite--effects of contact time, pH, ionic strength and temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheng, Guodong; Hu, Jun; Wang, Xiangke

    2008-10-01

    Diatomite has a number of unique physicochemical properties and has diversified industrial uses. Natural diatomite has been tested as a potential sorbent for the removal of Th(IV) from aqueous solutions. The results indicate that sorption of Th(IV) is strongly dependent on ionic strength at pH3. Outer-sphere complexation or ion exchange may be the main sorption mechanism of Th(IV) to diatomite at low pH values, whereas the sorption of Th(IV) at pH>3 is mainly dominated by inner-sphere complexation or precipitation. The competition for Th(IV) between aqueous or surface adsorbed anions (e.g., herein ClO(4)(-), NO(3)(-) and Cl(-)) and surface functional groups of diatomite is important for Th(IV) sorption. The thermodynamic data (DeltaH(0), DeltaS(0), DeltaG(0)) are calculated from the temperature-dependent sorption isotherms. The results suggest that sorption process of Th(IV) on diatomite is spontaneous and endothermic.

  6. Wind speed perception and risk.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Duzgun Agdas

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: How accurately do people perceive extreme wind speeds and how does that perception affect the perceived risk? Prior research on human-wind interaction has focused on comfort levels in urban settings or knock-down thresholds. No systematic experimental research has attempted to assess people's ability to estimate extreme wind speeds and perceptions of their associated risks. METHOD: We exposed 76 people to 10, 20, 30, 40, 50, and 60 mph (4.5, 8.9, 13.4, 17.9, 22.3, and 26.8 m/s winds in randomized orders and asked them to estimate wind speed and the corresponding risk they felt. RESULTS: Multilevel modeling showed that people were accurate at lower wind speeds but overestimated wind speeds at higher levels. Wind speed perceptions mediated the direct relationship between actual wind speeds and perceptions of risk (i.e., the greater the perceived wind speed, the greater the perceived risk. The number of tropical cyclones people had experienced moderated the strength of the actual-perceived wind speed relationship; consequently, mediation was stronger for people who had experienced fewer storms. CONCLUSION: These findings provide a clearer understanding of wind and risk perception, which can aid development of public policy solutions toward communicating the severity and risks associated with natural disasters.

  7. Wind speed perception and risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agdas, Duzgun; Webster, Gregory D; Masters, Forrest J

    2012-01-01

    How accurately do people perceive extreme wind speeds and how does that perception affect the perceived risk? Prior research on human-wind interaction has focused on comfort levels in urban settings or knock-down thresholds. No systematic experimental research has attempted to assess people's ability to estimate extreme wind speeds and perceptions of their associated risks. We exposed 76 people to 10, 20, 30, 40, 50, and 60 mph (4.5, 8.9, 13.4, 17.9, 22.3, and 26.8 m/s) winds in randomized orders and asked them to estimate wind speed and the corresponding risk they felt. Multilevel modeling showed that people were accurate at lower wind speeds but overestimated wind speeds at higher levels. Wind speed perceptions mediated the direct relationship between actual wind speeds and perceptions of risk (i.e., the greater the perceived wind speed, the greater the perceived risk). The number of tropical cyclones people had experienced moderated the strength of the actual-perceived wind speed relationship; consequently, mediation was stronger for people who had experienced fewer storms. These findings provide a clearer understanding of wind and risk perception, which can aid development of public policy solutions toward communicating the severity and risks associated with natural disasters.

  8. Wind Speed Perception and Risk

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agdas, Duzgun; Webster, Gregory D.; Masters, Forrest J.

    2012-01-01

    Background How accurately do people perceive extreme wind speeds and how does that perception affect the perceived risk? Prior research on human–wind interaction has focused on comfort levels in urban settings or knock-down thresholds. No systematic experimental research has attempted to assess people's ability to estimate extreme wind speeds and perceptions of their associated risks. Method We exposed 76 people to 10, 20, 30, 40, 50, and 60 mph (4.5, 8.9, 13.4, 17.9, 22.3, and 26.8 m/s) winds in randomized orders and asked them to estimate wind speed and the corresponding risk they felt. Results Multilevel modeling showed that people were accurate at lower wind speeds but overestimated wind speeds at higher levels. Wind speed perceptions mediated the direct relationship between actual wind speeds and perceptions of risk (i.e., the greater the perceived wind speed, the greater the perceived risk). The number of tropical cyclones people had experienced moderated the strength of the actual–perceived wind speed relationship; consequently, mediation was stronger for people who had experienced fewer storms. Conclusion These findings provide a clearer understanding of wind and risk perception, which can aid development of public policy solutions toward communicating the severity and risks associated with natural disasters. PMID:23226230

  9. Distinct wind convergence patterns in the Mexico City basin due to the interaction of the gap winds with the synoptic flow

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. de Foy

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Mexico City lies in a high altitude basin where air quality and pollutant fate is strongly influenced by local winds. The combination of high terrain with weak synoptic forcing leads to weak and variable winds with complex circulation patterns. A gap wind entering the basin in the afternoon leads to very different wind convergence lines over the city depending on the meteorological conditions. Surface and upper-air meteorological observations are analysed during the MCMA-2003 field campaign to establish the meteorological conditions and obtain an index of the strength and timing of the gap wind. A mesoscale meteorological model (MM5 is used in combination with high-resolution satellite data for the land surface parameters and soil moisture maps derived from diurnal ground temperature range. A simple method to map the lines of wind convergence both in the basin and on the regional scale is used to show the different convergence patterns according to episode types. The gap wind is found to occur on most days of the campaign and is the result of a temperature gradient across the southern basin rim which is very similar from day to day. Momentum mixing from winds aloft into the surface layer is much more variable and can determine both the strength of the flow and the pattern of the convergence zones. Northerly flows aloft lead to a weak jet with an east-west convergence line that progresses northwards in the late afternoon and early evening. Westerlies aloft lead to both stronger gap flows due to channelling and winds over the southern and western basin rim. This results in a north-south convergence line through the middle of the basin starting in the early afternoon. Improved understanding of basin meteorology will lead to better air quality forecasts for the city and better understanding of the chemical regimes in the urban atmosphere.

  10. Distinct wind convergence patterns in the Mexico City basin due to the interaction of the gap winds with the synoptic flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Foy, B.; Clappier, A.; Molina, L. T.; Molina, M. J.

    2006-04-01

    Mexico City lies in a high altitude basin where air quality and pollutant fate is strongly influenced by local winds. The combination of high terrain with weak synoptic forcing leads to weak and variable winds with complex circulation patterns. A gap wind entering the basin in the afternoon leads to very different wind convergence lines over the city depending on the meteorological conditions. Surface and upper-air meteorological observations are analysed during the MCMA-2003 field campaign to establish the meteorological conditions and obtain an index of the strength and timing of the gap wind. A mesoscale meteorological model (MM5) is used in combination with high-resolution satellite data for the land surface parameters and soil moisture maps derived from diurnal ground temperature range. A simple method to map the lines of wind convergence both in the basin and on the regional scale is used to show the different convergence patterns according to episode types. The gap wind is found to occur on most days of the campaign and is the result of a temperature gradient across the southern basin rim which is very similar from day to day. Momentum mixing from winds aloft into the surface layer is much more variable and can determine both the strength of the flow and the pattern of the convergence zones. Northerly flows aloft lead to a weak jet with an east-west convergence line that progresses northwards in the late afternoon and early evening. Westerlies aloft lead to both stronger gap flows due to channelling and winds over the southern and western basin rim. This results in a north-sout