WorldWideScience

Sample records for wind shock heating

  1. Shock heating of the solar wind plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whang, Y. C.; Liu, Shaoliang; Burlaga, L. F.

    1990-01-01

    The role played by shocks in heating solar-wind plasma is investigated using data on 413 shocks which were identified from the plasma and magnetic-field data collected between 1973 and 1982 by Pioneer and Voyager spacecraft. It is found that the average shock strength increased with the heliocentric distance outside 1 AU, reaching a maximum near 5 AU, after which the shock strength decreased with the distance; the entropy of the solar wind protons also reached a maximum at 5 AU. An MHD simulation model in which shock heating is the only heating mechanism available was used to calculate the entropy changes for the November 1977 event. The calculated entropy agreed well with the value calculated from observational data, suggesting that shocks are chiefly responsible for heating solar wind plasma between 1 and 15 AU.

  2. Electron heating at interplanetary shocks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feldman, W.C.; Asbridge, J.R.; Bame, S.J.; Gosling, J.T.; Zwickl, R.D.

    1982-01-01

    Data for 41 forward interplanetary shocks measured between August 1978 and December 1979 show that the ratio of downstream to upstream electron temperatures, T/sub e/(d/u) is variable in the range between 1.0 (isothermal) and 3.0. On average, (T/sub e/(d/u) = 1.5 with a standard deviation, sigma e = 0.5. This ratio is less than the average ratio of proton temperatures across the same shocks, (T/sub p/(d/u)) = 3.3 with sigma p = 2.5 as well as the average ratio of electron temperatures across the earth's bow shock. Individual samples of T/sub e/(d/u) and T/sub p/(d/u) appear to be weakly correlated with the number density ratio. However the amounts of electron and proton heating are well correlated with each other as well as with the bulk velocity difference across each shock. The stronger shocks appear to heat the protons relatively more efficiently than they heat the electrons

  3. Bidirectional solar wind electron heat flux events

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gosling, J.T.; Baker, D.N.; Bame, S.J.; Feldman, W.C.; Zwickl, R.D.; Smith, E.J.

    1987-01-01

    Normally the approx. >80-eV electrons which carry the solar wind electron heat flux are collimated along the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) in the direction pointing outward away from the sun. Occasionally, however, collimated fluxes of approx. >80-eV electrons are observed traveling both parallel and antiparallel to the IMF. Here we present the results of a survey of such bidirectional electron heat flux events as observed with the plasma and magnetic field experiments aboard ISEE 3 at times when the spacecraft was not magnetically connected to the earth's bow shock. The onset of a bidirectional electron heat flux at ISEE 3 usually signals spacecraft entry into a distinct solar wind plasma and field entity, most often characterized by anomalously low proton and electron temperatures, a strong, smoothly varying magnetic field, a low plasma beta, and a high total pressure. Significant field rotations often occur at the beginning and/or end of bidirectional heat flux events, and, at times, the large field rotations characteristic of ''magnetic clouds'' are present. Approximately half of all bidirectional heat flux events are associated with and follow interplanetary shocks, while the other events have no obvious shock associations

  4. Interaction of the interplanetary shock and tangential discontinuity in the solar wind

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goncharov, Oleksandr; Koval, Andriy; Safrankova, Jana; Nemecek, Zdenek; Prech, Lubomir; Szabo, Adam; Zastenker, Georgy N.

    2017-04-01

    Collisionless shocks play a significant role in the solar wind interaction with the Earth. Fast forward interplanetary (IP) shocks driven by coronal mass ejections or by interaction of fast and slow solar wind streams can be encountered in the interplanetary space, while the bow shock is a standing fast reverse shock formed by the interaction of the supersonic solar wind with Earth's magnetic field. Both types of shocks are responsible for a transformation of a part of the energy of the directed solar wind motion to plasma heating and to acceleration of reflected particles to high energies. It is well known that the interaction of tangential discontinuities with the bow shock can create hot flow anomalies but interactions between IP shocks and tangential discontinuities in the solar wind are studied to a lesser extent due to lack of observations. A fortunate position of many spacecraft (Wind, ACE, DSCOVR, THEMIS, Spektr-R) on June 22, 2015 allows us detailed observations of an IP shock modification due to this interaction. We present an analysis of the event supported with MHD modeling that reveals basic features of the observed IP shock ramp splitting. However, a good matching of modeling and observations was found for DSCOVR and Spektr-R located above the ecliptic plane, whereas a timing of observations below this plane demonstrates problems of modeling of highly inclined discontinuities.

  5. Interaction of Accretion Shocks with Winds Kinsuk Acharya , Sandip ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    R. Narasimhan (Krishtel eMaging) 1461 1996 Oct 15 13:05:22

    Abstract. Accretion shocks are known to oscillate in presence of cool- ing processes in the disk. This oscillation may also cause quasi-periodic oscillations of black holes. In the presence of strong winds, these shocks have oscillations in vertical direction as well. We show examples of shock oscillations under the influence of ...

  6. On the electron temperature downstream of the solar wind termination shock

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. V. Chashei

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we study the temperatures of electrons convected with the solar wind to large solar distances and finally transported over the solar wind termination shock. Nearly nothing, unless at high energies in the cosmic ray regime, is known about the thermodynamical behaviour of these distant electrons from in~situ plasma observations. Hence it is tacitly assumed these electrons, due to their adiabatic behaviour and vanishing heat conduction or energization processes, have rapidly cooled off to very low temperatures once they eventually arrive at the solar wind termination shock (at about 100 AU. In this paper we show that such electrons, however, at their passage over the termination shock due to the shock–electric field action undergo an over-adiabatic heating and therefore appear on the downstream side as a substantially heated plasma species. Looking quantitatively into this heating process we find that solar wind electrons achieve temperatures of the order of 2–4 × 106 K downstream of the termination shock, depending on the upstream solar wind bulk velocity and the shock compression ratio. Hence these electrons therewith play an important dynamical role in structuring this shock and determining the downstream plasma flow properties. Furthermore, they present an additional ionization source for incoming neutral interstellar hydrogen and excite X-ray emission. They also behave similar to cosmic ray electrons and extend to some limited region upstream of the shock of the order of 0.1 AU by spatial diffusion and thereby also modify the upstream solar wind properties.

  7. Biophoton emission induced by heat shock.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katsuhiro Kobayashi

    Full Text Available Ultraweak biophoton emission originates from the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS that are produced in mitochondria as by-products of cellular respiration. In healthy cells, the concentration of ROS is minimized by a system of biological antioxidants. However, heat shock changes the equilibrium between oxidative stress and antioxidant activity, that is, a rapid rise in temperature induces biophoton emission from ROS. Although the rate and intensity of biophoton emission was observed to increase in response to elevated temperatures, pretreatment at lower high temperatures inhibited photon emission at higher temperatures. Biophoton measurements are useful for observing and evaluating heat shock.

  8. Heat shock protein 90: the cancer chaperone

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2007-04-02

    Apr 2, 2007 ... Heat shock protein 90 (Hsp90) is a molecular chaperone required for the stability and function of a number of conditionally activated and/or expressed signalling proteins, as well as multiple mutated, chimeric, and/or over-expressed signalling proteins, that promote cancer cell growth and/or survival. Hsp90 ...

  9. Heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein K inhibits heat shock-induced transcriptional activity of heat shock factor 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hee-Jung; Lee, Jae-Jin; Cho, Jin-Hwan; Jeong, Jaeho; Park, A Young; Kang, Wonmo; Lee, Kong-Joo

    2017-08-04

    When cells are exposed to heat shock and various other stresses, heat shock factor 1 (HSF1) is activated, and the heat shock response (HSR) is elicited. To better understand the molecular regulation of the HSR, we used 2D-PAGE-based proteome analysis to screen for heat shock-induced post-translationally modified cellular proteins. Our analysis revealed that two protein spots typically present on 2D-PAGE gels and containing heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein K (hnRNP K) with trioxidized Cys 132 disappeared after the heat shock treatment and reappeared during recovery, but the total amount of hnRNP K protein remained unchanged. We next tested whether hnRNP K plays a role in HSR by regulating HSF1 and found that hnRNP K inhibits HSF1 activity, resulting in reduced expression of hsp70 and hsp27 mRNAs. hnRNP K also reduced binding affinity of HSF1 to the heat shock element by directly interacting with HSF1 but did not affect HSF1 phosphorylation-dependent activation or nuclear localization. hnRNP K lost its ability to induce these effects when its Cys 132 was substituted with Ser, Asp, or Glu. These findings suggest that hnRNP K inhibits transcriptional activity of HSF1 by inhibiting its binding to heat shock element and that the oxidation status of Cys 132 in hnRNP K is critical for this inhibition. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  10. Heat shock protein 88 and Aspergillus infection.

    OpenAIRE

    Burnie, J P; Matthews, R C

    1991-01-01

    Immunoblotting was used to dissect the antibody responses in the sera of 50 patients with proven invasive aspergillosis, 28 patients with suspected invasive aspergillosis, 35 patients with allergic bronchopulmonary aspergillosis, and 10 patients with an aspergilloma. This demonstrated the immunodominance of antigenic bands at 88, 84, 51, and 40 kDa. Monoclonal antibodies against the heat shock protein 90 complexes of Candida albicans and the water mold Achlya ambisexualis identified these fou...

  11. Heat shock proteins: facts, thoughts, and dreams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Maio, A

    1999-01-01

    The most primitive mechanism of cellular protection involves the expression of a polypeptide family named heat shock or stress proteins (hsps). Some of these hsps are present in unstressed cells and play an important role in the folding and translocation of polypeptides across membranes. Thus, they have been termed molecular chaperones. Hsps are expressed in response to an array of stresses, including hyperthermia, oxygen radicals, heavy metals, ethanol, and amino acid analogues. In addition, the heat shock response is induced during clinically relevant situations such as ischemia/reperfusion and circulatory and hemorrhagic shock. All of the above stresses have in common that they disturb the tertiary structure of proteins and have adverse effects on cellular metabolism. Pretreatment of cells with a mild stress, sufficient to induce the expression of hsps, results in protection to subsequent insults. This phenomenon has been coined "stress tolerance" and is apparently caused by the resolubilization of proteins that were denatured during the stress. In addition, cellular structures (microfilaments and centrosomes) and processes (transcription, splicing, and translation) are stabilized or repaired during a second stress in stress tolerant cells and organisms. There is a great body of evidence indicating a direct role of hsps in the stabilization of these events. The intrinsic capacity of hsps to protect cells has potential relevance as a natural mechanism of organ protection during harmful environmental conditions and operative procedures, and in the combat against pathogens.

  12. DNA transformation via local heat shock

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Sha; Meadow Anderson, L.; Yang, Jui-Ming; Lin, Liwei; Yang, Haw

    2007-07-01

    This work describes transformation of foreign DNA into bacterial host cells by local heat shock using a microfluidic system with on-chip, built-in platinum heaters. Plasmid DNA encoding ampicillin resistance and a fluorescent protein can be effectively transformed into the DH5α chemically competent E. coli using this device. Results further demonstrate that only one-thousandth of volume is required to obtain transformation efficiencies as good as or better than conventional practices. As such, this work complements other lab-on-a-chip technologies for potential gene cloning/therapy and protein expression applications.

  13. Mechanisms of heat-shock gene activation in higher eukaryotes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bienz, M.; Pelham, H.R.B.

    1987-01-01

    Heat-shock genes are activated under conditions of heat shock or other environmental stresses. This gene activation is rapid and reversible, resulting in a transition from hardly detectable levels of transcription to extremely high transcription rates causing heat-shock proteins (HSP) to accumulate to high levels. In this review, the components of the heat-shock gene activation systems, including the cis-acting elements and the trans-acting factors, are considered. Data on how these components act together to result in transcription activation and how multiple controls are achieved are summarized. Finally, the questions of how the cell detects the environmental stimulus and translates it into gene activation and how the functions of the gene products relate to this process are addressed. The article focuses on heat-shock gene activation in higher eukaryotes. Only those aspects of heat-shock genes and proteins which are relevant to the question of gene activation are included

  14. Heat shock transcription factors regulate heat induced cell death in a ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2007-03-29

    Hsps) which is strictly regulated by different members of heat shock transcription factors (HSFs). We previously reported that a rat histiocytoma, BC-8 failed to synthesize Hsps when subjected to typical heat shock conditions (42°C, ...

  15. Mobile phones, heat shock proteins and cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    French, P W; Penny, R; Laurence, J A; McKenzie, D R

    2001-06-01

    There are several reports which indicate that electromagnetic radiation (such as from mobile phones) at non-thermal levels may elicit a biological effect in target cells or tissues. Whether or not these biological effects lead to adverse health effects, including cancer, is unclear. To date there is limited scientific evidence of health issues, and no mechanism by which mobile phone radiation could influence cancer development. In this paper, we develop a theoretical mechanism by which radiofrequency radiation from mobile phones could induce cancer, via the chronic activation of the heat shock response. Upregulation of heat shock proteins (Hsps) is a normal defence response to a cellular stress. However, chronic expression of Hsps is known to induce or promote oncogenesis, metastasis and/or resistance to anticancer drugs. We propose that repeated exposure to mobile phone radiation acts as a repetitive stress leading to continuous expression of Hsps in exposed cells and tissues, which in turn affects their normal regulation, and cancer results. This hypothesis provides the possibility of a direct association between mobile phone use and cancer, and thus provides an important focus for future experimentation.

  16. The Crab nebula's ''wisps'' as shocked pulsar wind

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gallant, Y.A.; Arons, J.; Langdon, A.B.

    1992-01-01

    The Crab synchrotron nebula has been successfully modelled as the post-shock region of a relativistic, magnetized wind carrying most of the spindown luminosity from the central pulsar. While the Crab is the best-studied example, most of the highest spindown luminosity pulsars are also surrounded by extended synchrotron nebulae, and several additional supernova remnants with ''plerionic'' morphologies similar to the Crab are known where the central object is not seen. All these objects have nonthermal, power-law spectra attributable to accelerated high-energy particles thought to originate in a Crab-like relativistic pulsar wind. However, proposed models have so far treated the wind shock as an infinitesimally thin discontinuity, with an arbitrarily ascribed particle acceleration efficiency. To make further progress, investigations resolving the shock structure seemed in order. Motivated by these considerations, we have performed ''particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations of perpendicularly magnetized shocks in electron-positron and electron-positron-ion plasmas. The shocks in pure electron-positron plasmas were found to produce only thermal distributions downstream, and are thus poor candidates as particle acceleration sites. When the upstream plasma flow also contained a smaller population of positive ions, however, efficient acceleration of positrons, and to a lesser extent of electrons, was observed in the simulations

  17. Cosmic Ray Acceleration from Multiple Galactic Wind Shocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cotter, Cory; Bustard, Chad; Zweibel, Ellen

    2018-01-01

    Cosmic rays still have an unknown origin. Many mechanisms have been suggested for their acceleration including quasars, pulsars, magnetars, supernovae, supernova remnants, and galactic termination shocks. The source of acceleration may be a mixture of these and a different mixture in different energy regimes. Using numerical simulations, we investigate multiple shocks in galactic winds as potential cosmic rays sources. By having shocks closer to the parent galaxy, more particles may diffuse back to the disk instead of being blown out in the wind, as found in Bustard, Zweibel, and Cotter (2017, ApJ) and also Merten, Bustard, Zweibel, and Tjus (to be submitted to ApJ). Specifically, this flux of cosmic rays could contribute to the unexplained "shin" region between the well-known "knee" and "ankle" of the cosmic ray spectrum. We would like to acknowledge support from the National Science Foundation (NSF) Graduate Research Fellowship Program under grant No. DGE-125625 and NSF grant No. AST-1616037.

  18. Leukemia: Derived heat shock protein gp96-peptide complex ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Leukemia: Derived heat shock protein gp96-peptide complex contribution to T cell and dendritic cell activation. ... Therefore, gp96-peptide complex derived from the tumor cells potentially represents an immunization therapy for the elimination of residual leukemia cells. Key words: Leukemia, heat shock protein gp96, ...

  19. An overview on the small heat shock proteins

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    USER

    2010-02-15

    Feb 15, 2010 ... the cell to toxins, starvation, oxygen, and water deprivation, among others. Heat shock proteins (HSPs) ... six structurally conserved classes according to their molecular weight namely, HSP100, HSP90, HSP70,. HSP60, small heat shock ..... The age-related loss of skeletal muscle mass and strength, now ...

  20. An overview on the small heat shock proteins | Mahmood | African ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In eukaryotes, different heat shock genes are expressed uncoordinatedly, whereas in prokaryote, heat shock genes form a regulon and appear simultaneously. sHSPs are associated with nuclei, cytoskeleton and membranes. They bind partially to denatured proteins, preventing irreversible protein aggregation during stress.

  1. Impact of heat shock step on bacterial transformation efficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahimzadeh, Maral; Sadeghizadeh, Majid; Najafi, Farhood; Arab, Seyed; Mobasheri, Hamid

    2016-12-01

    CaCl 2 treatment followed by heat shock is the most common method for artificial transformation. Here, the cells were transformed using CaCl 2 treatment either with heat shock (standard protocol) or without heat shock (lab protocol) to comprehend the difference in transformation efficiency. The BL21 strain of Escherichia coli ( E. coli ) was being susceptible using CaCl 2 treatment. Some Cells were kept at -80 o C while the others were kept at 4 ˚C. Afterwards the susceptible cells were transformed using either standard or lab protocol. The transformation efficiency between cells experienced heat shock and those were not influenced by heat shock was almost the same. Moreover, regardless of transformation protocol, the cells kept at 4 ˚C were transformed more efficiently in compared to those were kept at -80 o C.

  2. Heat shock treatment improves Trametes versicolor laccase production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Feng; Guo, Chen; Wei, Tao; Zhang, Tian; Liu, Chun-Zhao

    2012-09-01

    An efficient heat shock strategy has been developed to improve laccase production in submerged Trametes versicolor cultures. The optimized heat shock strategy consists of subjecting T. versicolor mycelial pellets to three heat shock treatments at 45 °C for 45 min, starting at culture day 0, with a 24-h interval between treatments. Laccase production increased by more than 1.6-fold relative to the control in both flasks and a 5-L bioreactor because the expression of the laccase gene was enhanced by heat shock induction. The present work demonstrates that heat shock induction is a promising method because it both improves fungal laccase production and has a good potential in industrial application.

  3. Riboflavin protects mice against liposaccharide-induced shock through expression of heat shock protein 25

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riboflavin (vitamin B2) is a water-soluble vitamin essential for normal cellular functions, growth and development. The study was aimed at investigating the effects of vitamin B2 on the survival rate, and expressions of tissue heat shock protein 25 (HSP25) and heat shock factor 1 (HSF1) in mice und...

  4. Heat shock transcription factors regulate heat induced cell death in a ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Madhu Sudhan

    2007-03-29

    Mar 29, 2007 ... We are reporting for the first time that HSF2 is heat inducible and functions in heat shock induced autophagic cell death in BC-8 tumor cells. [Prasad K V, Taiyab A, Jyothi D, Srinivas U K and Sreedhar A S 2007 Heat shock transcription factors regulate heat induced cell death in a rat histiocytoma; J. Biosci.

  5. Wind and IMP 8 Solar Wind, Magnetosheath and Shock Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this project was to provide the community access to magnetosheath data near Earth. We provided 27 years of IMP 8 magnetosheath proton velocities, densities, and temperatures with our best (usually 1-min.) time resolution. IMP 8 crosses the magnetosheath twice each 125 day orbit, and we provided magnetosheath data for the roughly 27 years of data for which magnetometer data are also available (which are needed to reliably pick boundaries). We provided this 27 years of IMP 8 magnetosheath data to the NSSDC; this data is now integrated with the IMP 8 solar wind data with flags indicating whether each data point is in the solar wind, magnetosheath, or at the boundary between the two regions. The plasma speed, density, and temperature are provided for each magnetosheath point. These data are also available on the MIT web site ftp://space .mit.edu/pub/plasma/imp/www/imp.html. We provide ASCII time-ordered rows of data giving the observation time, the spacecraft position in GSE, the velocity is GSE, the density and temperature for protons. We also have analyzed and archived on our web site the Wind magnetosheath plasma parameters. These consist of ascii files of the proton and alpha densities, speeds, and thermal speeds. These data are available at ftp://space.mit.edu/pub/plasma/wind/sheath These are the two products promised in the work statement and they have been completed in full.

  6. Ion Thermalization and Electron Heating across Quasi-Perpendicular Shocks Observed by the MMS Mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, L. J.; Wilson, L. B., III; Wang, S.; Bessho, N.; Figueroa-Vinas, A.; Lai, H.; Russell, C. T.; Schwartz, S. J.; Hesse, M.; Moore, T. E.; Burch, J.; Gershman, D. J.; Giles, B. L.; Torbert, R. B.; Ergun, R.; Dorelli, J.; Strangeway, R. J.; Paterson, W. R.; Lavraud, B.; Khotyaintsev, Y. V.

    2017-12-01

    Collisionless shocks often involve intense plasma heating in space and astrophysical systems. Despite decades of research, a number of key questions concerning electron and ion heating across collisionless shocks remain unanswered. We `image' 20 supercritical quasi-perpendicular bow shocks encountered by the Magnetospheric Multiscale (MMS) spacecraft with electron and ion distribution functions to address how ions are thermalized and how electrons are heated. The continuous burst measurements of 3D plasma distribution functions from MMS reveal that the primary thermalization phase of ions occurs concurrently with the main temperature increase of electrons as well as large-amplitude wave fluctuations. Approaching the shock from upstream, the ion temperature (Ti) increases due to the reflected ions joining the incoming solar wind population, as recognized by prior studies, and the increase of Ti precedes that of the electrons. Thermalization in the form of merging between the decelerated solar wind ions and the reflected component often results in a decrease in Ti. In most cases, the Ti decrease is followed by a gradual increase further downstream. Anisotropic, energy-dependent, and/or nongyrotropic electron energization are observed in association with large electric field fluctuations in the main electron temperature (Te) gradient, motivating a renewed scrutiny of the effects from the electrostatic cross-shock potential and wave fluctuations on electron heating. Particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations are carried out to assist interpretations of the MMS observations. We assess the roles of instabilities and the cross-shock potential in thermalizing ions and heating electrons based on the MMS measurements and PIC simulation results. Challenges will be posted for future computational studies and laboratory experiments on collisionless shocks.

  7. Heat Shock Proteins, Autoimmunity, and Cancer Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stuart K. Calderwood

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Heat shock proteins (HSPs have been linked to the therapy of both cancer and inflammatory diseases, approaches that utilize contrasting immune properties of these proteins. It would appear that HSP family members Hsp60 and Hsp70, whether from external sources or induced locally during inflammation, can be processed by antigen-presenting cells and that HSP-derived epitopes then activate regulatory T cells and suppress inflammatory diseases. These effects also extend to the HSP-rich environments of cancer cells where elevated HSP concentrations may participate in the immunosuppressive tumor milieu. However, HSPs can also be important mediators of tumor immunity. Due to their molecular chaperone properties, some HSPs can bind tumor-specific peptides and deliver them deep into the antigen-processing pathways of antigen-presenting cells (APCs. In this context, HSP-based vaccines can activate tumor-specific immunity, trigger the proliferation and CTL capabilities of cancer-specific CD8+ T cells, and inhibit tumor growth. Further advances in HSP-based anticancer immunotherapy appear to involve improving the properties of the molecular chaperone vaccines by enhancing their antigen-binding properties and combating the immunosuppressive tumor milieu to permit programming of active CTL capable of penetrating the tumor milieu and specifically targeting tumor cells.

  8. Multi-level interactions between HEAT SHOCK FACTORS, HEAT SHOCK PROTEINS and the redox system regulate acclimation to heat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicky eDriedonks

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available High temperature has become a global concern because it seriously affects the growth and reproduction of plants. Exposure of plant cells to high temperatures result in cellular damage and can even lead to cell death. Part of the damage can be ascribed to the action of reactive oxygen species (ROS, which accumulate during abiotic stresses such as heat stress. ROS are toxic and can modify other biomacromolecules including membrane lipids, DNA and proteins. In order to protect the cells, ROS scavenging is essential. In contrast with their inherent harms, ROS also function as signaling molecules, inducing stress tolerance mechanisms. This review examines the evidence for crosstalk between the classical heat stress response, which consists of HEAT SHOCK FACTORS (HSFs and HEAT SHOCK PROTEINS (HSPs, with the ROS network at multiple levels in the heat response process. Heat stimulates HSF activity directly, but also indirectly via ROS. HSFs in turn stimulate the expression of HSP chaperones and also affect ROS scavenger gene expression. In the short term, HSFs repress expression of superoxide dismutase scavenger genes via induction of miRNA398, while they also activate scavenger gene expression and stabilize scavenger protein activity via HSP induction. We propose that these contrasting effects allow for the boosting of the heat stress response at the very onset of the stress, while preventing subsequent oxidative damage. The described model on HSFs, HSPs, ROS and ROS scavenger interactions seems applicable to responses to stresses other than heat and may explain the phenomenon of cross-acclimation.

  9. Induction of Triploidy in Clarias Gariepinus by Heat Shock of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Eggs and milt were collected from female and male Clarias gariepinus respectively. Fertilized eggs were given heat-shock at 40 and 41oC for 4.5 minutes duration. The eggs were shocked at different post fertilization periods viz: immediately after fertilization, 2, 3, 4, 5 and 6 mins after fertilization. Percentage hatchability for ...

  10. Post-Shock Sampling of Shock-Heated Hydrocarbon Fuels

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-07-07

    has four analytical columns, which allow for the precise measurement of permanent gases (e.g. O2, N2, CO, CO2, CH4), clear separation (and therefore...12211 Research Triangle Park, NC 27709-2211 Gas sampling, shock tube, jet fuel, gas chromatography REPORT DOCUMENTATION PAGE 11. SPONSOR/MONITOR’S...four analytical columns, which allow for the precise measurement of permanent gases (e.g. O2, N2, CO, CO2, CH4), clear separation (and therefore

  11. TRANSPORT OF SOLAR WIND H{sup +} AND He{sup ++} IONS ACROSS EARTH’S BOW SHOCK

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parks, G. K.; Lin, N. [Space Sciences Laboratory, University of California, Berkeley, CA (United States); Lee, E. [School of Space Research and Institute of Natural Sciences, Kyung Hee University, Yongin (Korea, Republic of); Fu, S. Y.; Ma, Y. Q. [Institute of Space Science, Peking University, Beijing (China); Kim, H. E.; Hong, J. [School of Space Research, Kyung Hee University, Yongin (Korea, Republic of); Yang, Z. W.; Liu, Y. [Key Laboratory for Space Weather, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing (China); Canu, P. [Plasma Physics Laboratory, Ecole Polytechnique, Paris (France); Dandouras, I.; Rème, H. [IRAP, Paul Sabatier University and CNRS, Toulouse (France); Goldstein, M. L., E-mail: parks@ssl.berkeley.edu [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD (United States)

    2016-07-10

    We have investigated the dependence of mass, energy, and charge of solar wind (SW) transport across Earth’s bow shock. An examination of 111 crossings during quiet SW in both quasi-perpendicular and quasi-parallel shock regions shows that 64 crossings had various degrees of heating and thermalization of SW. We found 22 crossings where the SW speed was <400 km s{sup −1}. The shock potential of a typical supercritical quasi-perpendicular shock estimated from deceleration of the SW and cutoff energy of electron flat top distribution is ∼50 Volts. We find that the temperatures of H{sup +} and He{sup ++} beams that penetrate the shock can sometimes be nearly the same in the upstream and downstream regions, indicating little or no heating had occurred crossing the bow shock. None of the models predict that the SW can cross the bow shock without heating. Our observations are important constraints for new models of collisionless shocks.

  12. Kappa-Electrons Downstream of the Solar Wind Termination Shock

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fahr, H. J.

    2017-12-01

    A theoretical description of the solar wind electron distribution function downstream of the termination shock under the influence of the shock-induced injection of overshooting KeV-energetic electrons will be presented. A kinetic phasespace transport equation in the bulk frame of the heliosheath plasma flow is developed for the solar wind electrons, taking into account shock-induced electron injection, convective changes, magnetic cooling processes and whistler wave-induced energy diffusion. Assuming that the local electron distribution under the prevailing Non-LTE conditions can be represented by a local kappa function with a local kappa parameter that varies with the streamline coordinates, we determine the parameters of the resulting, initial kappa distribution for the downstream electrons. From this initial function spectral electron fluxes can be derived and can be compared with those measured by the VOYAGER-1 spacecraft in the range between 40 to 70 KeV. It can then be shown that with kappa values around kappa = 6 one can in fact fit these data very satisfactorily. In addition it is shown that for isentropic electron flows kappa-distributed electrons have to undergo simultaneous changes of both parameters, i.e. kappa and theta, of the electron kappa function. It is also shown then that under the influence of energy sinks and sources the electron flux becomes non-isentropic with electron entropies changing along the streamline.

  13. Heat shock response in photosynthetic organisms: membrane and lipid connections.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Horvath, I.; Glatz, A.; Nakamoto, H.; Mishkind, M.L.; Munnik, T.; Saidi, Y.; Goloubinoff, P.; Harwood, J.L.; Vigh, L.

    2012-01-01

    The ability of photosynthetic organisms to adapt to increases in environmental temperatures is becoming more important with climate change. Heat stress is known to induce heat-shock proteins (HSPs) many of which act as chaperones. Traditionally, it has been thought that protein denaturation acts as

  14. Acceleration and heating of the solar wind

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnes, A.

    1978-01-01

    Some of the competing theories of solar wind acceleration and heating are reviewed, and the observations that are required to distinguish among them are discussed. In most cases what is required is measurement of plasma velocity and temperature and magnetic field, as near the sun as possible and certainly inside 20 solar radii; another critical aspect of this question is determining whether a turbulent envelope exists in this inner region, and if so, defining its properties. Plasma and magnetic observations from the proposed Solar Probe mission would thus yield a quantum jump in our understanding of the dynamics of the solar wind.

  15. Molecular cloning, phylogenetic analysis and heat shock response of Babesia gibsoni heat shock protein 90.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamasaki, Masahiro; Tsuboi, Yoshihiro; Taniyama, Yusuke; Uchida, Naohiro; Sato, Reeko; Nakamura, Kensuke; Ohta, Hiroshi; Takiguchi, Mitsuyoshi

    2016-09-01

    The Babesia gibsoni heat shock protein 90 (BgHSP90) gene was cloned and sequenced. The length of the gene was 2,610 bp with two introns. This gene was amplified from cDNA corresponding to full length coding sequence (CDS) with an open reading frame of 2,148 bp. A phylogenetic analysis of the CDS of HSP90 gene showed that B. gibsoni was most closely related to B. bovis and Babesia sp. BQ1/Lintan and lies within a phylogenetic cluster of protozoa. Moreover, mRNA transcription profile for BgHSP90 exposed to high temperature were examined by quantitative real-time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction. BgHSP90 levels were elevated when the parasites were incubated at 43°C for 1 hr.

  16. Global MHD Simulations of the Earth's Bow Shock Shape and Motion Under Variable Solar Wind Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mejnertsen, L.; Eastwood, J. P.; Hietala, H.; Schwartz, S. J.; Chittenden, J. P.

    2018-01-01

    Empirical models of the Earth's bow shock are often used to place in situ measurements in context and to understand the global behavior of the foreshock/bow shock system. They are derived statistically from spacecraft bow shock crossings and typically treat the shock surface as a conic section parameterized according to a uniform solar wind ram pressure, although more complex models exist. Here a global magnetohydrodynamic simulation is used to analyze the variability of the Earth's bow shock under real solar wind conditions. The shape and location of the bow shock is found as a function of time, and this is used to calculate the shock velocity over the shock surface. The results are compared to existing empirical models. Good agreement is found in the variability of the subsolar shock location. However, empirical models fail to reproduce the two-dimensional shape of the shock in the simulation. This is because significant solar wind variability occurs on timescales less than the transit time of a single solar wind phase front over the curved shock surface. Empirical models must therefore be used with care when interpreting spacecraft data, especially when observations are made far from the Sun-Earth line. Further analysis reveals a bias to higher shock speeds when measured by virtual spacecraft. This is attributed to the fact that the spacecraft only observes the shock when it is in motion. This must be accounted for when studying bow shock motion and variability with spacecraft data.

  17. Shock layer vacuum UV spectroscopy in an arc-jet wind tunnel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palumbo, G.

    1990-01-01

    An experimental program is being developed to obtain measurements of the incident surface radiation in the 1000 A to 2000 A range from the shock stagnation region of a blunt model in the Ames 20 MW Arc-Jet Wind Tunnel. The setup consists of a water-cooled blunt model, with a magnesium fluoride forward-viewing window. Radiation incident on the window is optically imaged via an evacuated system and reflective optical elements onto the entrance slit of a spectrograph. The model will be exposed to the supersonic plasma stream from the exit nozzle of the arc-jet tunnel. The resulting bow shock radiation will be measured. It is expected that this experiment will help evaluate the importance of atomic N and O lines to the radiative heating of future Aeroassist Space Transfer Vehicles (ASTVs).

  18. Decay of Solar Wind Turbulence behind Interplanetary Shocks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pitňa, Alexander; Šafránková, Jana; Němeček, Zdeněk; Franci, Luca

    2017-01-01

    We investigate the decay of magnetic and kinetic energies behind IP shocks with motivation to find a relaxation time when downstream turbulence reaches a usual solar wind value. We start with a case study that introduces computation techniques and quantifies a contribution of kinetic fluctuations to the general energy balance. This part of the study is based on high-time (31 ms) resolution plasma data provided by the Spektr-R spacecraft. On the other hand, a statistical part is based on 92 s Wind plasma and magnetic data and its results confirm theoretically established decay laws for kinetic and magnetic energies. We observe the power-law behavior of the energy decay profiles and we estimated the power-law exponents of both kinetic and magnetic energy decay rates as −1.2. We found that the decay of MHD turbulence does not start immediately after the IP shock ramp and we suggest that the proper decay of turbulence begins when a contribution of the kinetic processes becomes negligible. We support this suggestion with a detailed analysis of the decay of turbulence at the kinetic scale.

  19. Decay of Solar Wind Turbulence behind Interplanetary Shocks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pitňa, Alexander; Šafránková, Jana; Němeček, Zdeněk [Charles University, Faculty of Mathematics and Physics, V Holesovickach 2, Prague, CZ-18000 (Czech Republic); Franci, Luca, E-mail: offelius@gmail.com [Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia, Universita degli Studi di Firenze, I-50125 Firenze (Italy)

    2017-07-20

    We investigate the decay of magnetic and kinetic energies behind IP shocks with motivation to find a relaxation time when downstream turbulence reaches a usual solar wind value. We start with a case study that introduces computation techniques and quantifies a contribution of kinetic fluctuations to the general energy balance. This part of the study is based on high-time (31 ms) resolution plasma data provided by the Spektr-R spacecraft. On the other hand, a statistical part is based on 92 s Wind plasma and magnetic data and its results confirm theoretically established decay laws for kinetic and magnetic energies. We observe the power-law behavior of the energy decay profiles and we estimated the power-law exponents of both kinetic and magnetic energy decay rates as −1.2. We found that the decay of MHD turbulence does not start immediately after the IP shock ramp and we suggest that the proper decay of turbulence begins when a contribution of the kinetic processes becomes negligible. We support this suggestion with a detailed analysis of the decay of turbulence at the kinetic scale.

  20. AGN Heating Through Cavities and Shocks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nulsen, P.E.J.; Jones, C.; Forman, W.R.; David, L.P.; McNamara, B.R.; Rafferty, D.A.; Bîrzan, L.; Wise, M.

    2007-01-01

    Three comments are made on AGN heating of cooling flows. A simple physical argument is used to show that the enthalpy of a buoyant radio lobe is converted to heat in its wake. Thus, a significant part of ``cavity'' enthalpy is likely to end up as heat. Second, the properties of the repeated weak

  1. Wavelet transform analysis of chromatin texture changes during heat shock.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herbomel, G; Grichine, A; Fertin, A; Delon, A; Vourc'h, C; Souchier, C; Usson, Y

    2016-06-01

    Texture analysis can be a useful tool to investigate the organization of chromatin. Approaches based on multiscale analysis and in particular the 'à trou' wavelet analysis has already been used for microscopy (Olivo Marin). In order to analyse texture changes, the statistical properties of the wavelet coefficient images were summarized by the first four statistical orders: mean, standard deviation, skewness and kurtosis of the coefficient image histogram. The 'à trou' transform provided a representation of the wavelet coefficients and texture parameters with the same statistical robustness throughout the scale spaces. It was applied for quantifying chromatin texture and heat-induced chromatin changes in living cells. We investigated the changes by both laser scanning and spinning disk confocal microscopies and compared the texture parameters before and after increasing duration of heat shock exposure (15 min, 30 min and 1 h). Furthermore, as activation of the heat shock response also correlates with a rapid localization of HSF1 within a few nuclear structures termed nuclear stress bodies (nSBs), we compared the dynamics of nSBs formation with that of textural changes during 1 h of continuous heat shock. Next, we studied the recovery phase following a 1-h heat shock. Significant differences were observed, particularly affecting the perinucleolar region, even for the shortest heat shock time affecting mostly the skewness and standard deviation. Furthermore, progressive changes could be observed according to the duration of heat shock, mostly affecting fine details (pixel-wise changes) as revealed by the parameters, obtained from the first- and second-order wavelet coefficients. 'A trou' wavelet texture analysis provided a sensitive and efficient tool to investigate minute changes of chromatin. © 2015 The Authors Journal of Microscopy © 2015 Royal Microscopical Society.

  2. Heat Shock Proteins in Tendinopathy: Novel Molecular Regulators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neal L. Millar

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Tendon disorders—tendinopathies—are the primary reason for musculoskeletal consultation in primary care and account for up to 30% of rheumatological consultations. Whilst the molecular pathophysiology of tendinopathy remains difficult to interpret the disease process involving repetitive stress, and cellular load provides important mechanistic insight into the area of heat shock proteins which spans many disease processes in the autoimmune community. Heat shock proteins, also called damage-associated molecular patterns (DAMPs, are rapidly released following nonprogrammed cell death, are key effectors of the innate immune system, and critically restore homeostasis by promoting the reconstruction of the effected tissue. Our investigations have highlighted a key role for HSPs in tendion disease which may ultimately affect tissue rescue mechanisms in tendon pathology. This paper aims to provide an overview of the biology of heat shock proteins in soft tissue and how these mediators may be important regulators of inflammatory mediators and matrix regulation in tendinopathy.

  3. Heat Shock Proteins in Tendinopathy: Novel Molecular Regulators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Millar, Neal L.; Murrell, George A. C.

    2012-01-01

    Tendon disorders—tendinopathies—are the primary reason for musculoskeletal consultation in primary care and account for up to 30% of rheumatological consultations. Whilst the molecular pathophysiology of tendinopathy remains difficult to interpret the disease process involving repetitive stress, and cellular load provides important mechanistic insight into the area of heat shock proteins which spans many disease processes in the autoimmune community. Heat shock proteins, also called damage-associated molecular patterns (DAMPs), are rapidly released following nonprogrammed cell death, are key effectors of the innate immune system, and critically restore homeostasis by promoting the reconstruction of the effected tissue. Our investigations have highlighted a key role for HSPs in tendion disease which may ultimately affect tissue rescue mechanisms in tendon pathology. This paper aims to provide an overview of the biology of heat shock proteins in soft tissue and how these mediators may be important regulators of inflammatory mediators and matrix regulation in tendinopathy. PMID:23258952

  4. Atomic Physics of Shocked Plasma in Winds of Massive Stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leutenegger, Maurice A.; Cohen, David H.; Owocki, Stanley P.

    2012-01-01

    High resolution diffraction grating spectra of X-ray emission from massive stars obtained with Chandra and XMM-Newton have revolutionized our understanding of their powerful, radiation-driven winds. Emission line shapes and line ratios provide diagnostics on a number of key wind parameters. Modeling of resolved emission line velocity profiles allows us to derive independent constraints on stellar mass-loss rates, leading to downward revisions of a factor of a few from previous measurements. Line ratios in He-like ions strongly constrain the spatial distribution of Xray emitting plasma, confirming the expectations of radiation hydrodynamic simulations that X-ray emission begins moderately close to the stellar surface and extends throughout the wind. Some outstanding questions remain, including the possibility of large optical depths in resonance lines, which is hinted at by differences in line shapes of resonance and intercombination lines from the same ion. Resonance scattering leads to nontrivial radiative transfer effects, and modeling it allows us to place constraints on shock size, density, and velocity structure

  5. Modelling Near-IR polarization to constrain stellar wind bow shocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neilson, Hilding R.; Ignace, R.; Shrestha, M.; Hoffman, J. L.; Mackey, J.

    2013-06-01

    Bow shocks formed from stellar winds are common phenomena observed about massive and intermediate-mass stars such as zeta Oph, Betelgeuse and delta Cep. These bow shocks provide information about the motion of the star, the stellar wind properties and the density of the ISM. Because bow shocks are asymmetric structures, they also present polarized light that is a function of their shape and density. We present a preliminary work modeling dust polarization from a Wilkin (1996) analytic bow shock model and explore how the polarization changes as a function of stellar wind properties.

  6. Heat shock and herpes virus: enhanced reactivation without untargeted mutagenesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lytle, C.D.; Carney, P.G.

    1988-01-01

    Enhanced reactivation of Ultraviolet-irradiated virus has been reported to occur in heat-shocked host cells. Since enhanced virus reactivation is often accompanied by untargeted mutagenesis, we investigated whether such mutagenesis would occur for herpes simplex virus (HSV) in CV-1 monkey kidney cells subjected to heat shock. In addition to expressing enhanced reactivation, the treated cells were transiently more susceptible to infection by unirradiated HSV. No mutagenesis of unirradiated HSV was found whether infection occurred at the time of increased susceptibility to infection or during expression of enhanced viral reactivation

  7. Wind-powered heat pump experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regan, D. C.

    1983-05-01

    An evaluation of an automotive type freon compressor demonstrated that such a device could be operated at slow speeds (600 to 1200 rpm) and still produce useful amounts of heat transfer. This device was evaluated and output measured by temprature measurements made on tanks of water in which the condenser and evaporator coils were immersed. The second portion of the project was to have a demonstration using a wind turbine as the motive power and construction of a full scale system. However, after several different attempts to construct a working system, the work had to be terminated because the device to convert the wind power to mechanical power for turning the compressor could never be successfully operated for any extended perod of time. A description of the work completed and the reasons for failures of the concept are delineated.

  8. Two-state ion heating at quasi-parallel shocks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomsen, M.F.; Gosling, J.T.; Bame, S.J.; Onsager, T.G.; Russell, C.T.

    1990-01-01

    In a previous study of ion heating at quasi-parallel shocks, the authors showed a case in which the ion distributions downstream from the shock alternated between a cooler, denser, core/shoulder type and a hotter, less dense, more Maxwellian type. In this paper they further document the alternating occurrence of two different ion states downstream from several quasi-parallel shocks. Three separate lines of evidence are presented to show that the two states are not related in an evolutionary sense, but rather both are produced alternately at the shock: (1) the asymptotic downstream plasma parameters (density, ion temperature, and flow speed) are intermediate between those characterizing the two different states closer to the shock, suggesting that the asymptotic state is produced by a mixing of the two initial states; (2) examples of apparently interpenetrating (i.e., mixing) distributions can be found during transitions from one state to the other; and (3) examples of both types of distributions can be found at actual crossings of the shock ramp. The alternation between the two different types of ion distribution provides direct observational support for the idea that the dissipative dynamics of at least some quasi-parallel shocks is non-stationary and cyclic in nature, as demonstrated by recent numerical simulations. Typical cycle times between intervals of similar ion heating states are ∼2 upstream ion gyroperiods. Both the simulations and the in situ observations indicate that a process of coherent ion reflection is commonly an important part of the dissipation at quasi-parallel shocks

  9. Heat shock genes – integrating cell survival and death

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Madhu Sudhan

    cellular activity and physiology, the most remarkable event in stressed cells is the production of a highly conserved set of proteins, the Heat Shock or Stress Proteins (Hsps). (Schlesinger et al 1982) and certain non-coding RNAs, like the hsrω transcripts in Drosophila and the satellite III transcripts in humans (Lakhotia 2003; ...

  10. Three-dimensional structure of heat shock protein 90 from ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Madhu Sudhan

    2007-04-02

    Apr 2, 2007 ... Heat shock protein 90 (Hsp90) is a molecular chaperone with essential functions in several organisms ranging from bacteria to protozoa to higher eukaryotes. Although it is not essential for cell survival in Escherichia coli, it is indispensable for viability in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae (Borkovich et al ...

  11. The small heat shock proteins family : The long forgotten chaperones

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Garrido, C.; Paul, C.; Seigneuric, R.; Kampinga, H. H.

    2012-01-01

    Small heat shock proteins are a rather heterogeneous family of ATP-independent chaperones, some of which have been proven to block protein aggregation and help the cells to survive stressful conditions. Although much less studied than high molecular weight HSPs like HSP70/HSPA or HSP90/HSPC, their

  12. Heat shock response improves heterologous protein secretion in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hou, Jin; Österlund, Tobias; Liu, Zihe

    2013-01-01

    The yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae is a widely used platform for the production of heterologous proteins of medical or industrial interest. However, heterologous protein productivity is often low due to limitations of the host strain. Heat shock response (HSR) is an inducible, global, cellular st...

  13. Heat shock genes – integrating cell survival and death

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Madhu Sudhan

    As a consequence of being alive, cells of all organisms continuously suffer a variety of “damages” from internal as well as external physico-chemical and biotic factors. Therefore, living systems have evolved a variety of strategies to repair the damage and/or eliminate the damaged components. Heat shock or stress ...

  14. A SIMPLE EXPERIMENTAL MODEL OF HEAT SHOCK RESPONSE IN RATS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tufi Neder Meyer

    1998-10-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To obtain a simple model for the elicitation of the heat shock response in rats. Design: Laboratory study. Setting: University research laboratories. Sample: Seventy-nine adult male albino rats (weight range 200 g to 570 g. Procedures: Exposure to heat stress by heating animals in a warm bath for 5 min after their rectal temperatures reached 107.60 F (420 C. Liver and lung samples were collected for heat-shock protein 70 (HSP70 detection (Western analysis. Results: Western analysis was positive for HSP70 in the liver and in the lungs of heated animals. There was a temporal correlation between heating and HSP70 detection: it was strongest 1 day after heating and reduced afterwards. No heated animals died. Conclusion: These data show that heating rats in a warm (45o C bath, according to parameters set in this model, elicits efficiently the heat shock response.OBJETIVO: Obter um modelo simples para tentar esclarecer a resposta ao choque térmico em ratos. LOCAL: Laboratório de pesquisa da Universidade. MÉTODO: Amostra: 79 ratos albinos, adultos, entre 200g a 570g. Procedimentos: Exposição ao calor, em banho quente, por 5 minutos, após a temperatura retal chegar a 42 graus centigrados. Biópsias de fígado e pulmão foram obtidas para detectar a proteina 70 (HSP 70, pelo "Western blot". RESULTADOS: As análises foram positivas nos animais aquecidos, com uma correlação entre aquecimento e constatação da HSP 70. Foi mais elevada no primeiro dia e não houve óbitos nos animais aquecidos. CONCLUSÃO: Os ratos aquecidos a 45 graus centígrados respondem eficientemente ao choque térmico.

  15. Adiabatic, Shock, and Plastic Work Heating of Solids and the Cylinder Test

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Ruden, E

    2000-01-01

    Solids subjected to high pressures, shocks, and/or deformation experience an increase in internal energy density and temperature due to adiabatic compression, shock heating, and plastic work heating, respectively...

  16. A comparison of shock-cloud and wind-cloud interactions: the longer survival of clouds in winds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldsmith, K. J. A.; Pittard, J. M.

    2017-09-01

    The interaction of a hot, high-velocity wind with a cold, dense molecular cloud has often been assumed to resemble the evolution of a cloud embedded in a post-shock flow. However, no direct comparative study of these two processes currently exists in the literature. We present 2D adiabatic hydrodynamical simulations of the interaction of a Mach 10 shock with a cloud of density contrast χ = 10 and compare our results with those of a commensurate wind-cloud simulation. We then investigate the effect of varying the wind velocity, effectively altering the wind Mach number Mwind, on the cloud's evolution. We find that there are significant differences between the two processes: 1) the transmitted shock is much flatter in the shock-cloud interaction; 2) a low-pressure region in the wind-cloud case deflects the flow around the edge of the cloud in a different manner to the shock-cloud case; 3) there is far more axial compression of the cloud in the case of the shock. As Mwind increases, the normalized rate of mixing is reduced. Clouds in winds with higher Mwind also do not experience a transmitted shock through the cloud's rear and are more compressed axially. In contrast with shock-cloud simulations, the cloud mixing time normalized by the cloud-crushing time-scale tcc increases for increasing Mwind until it plateaus (at tmix ≃ 25 tcc) at high Mwind, thus demonstrating the expected Mach scaling. In addition, clouds in high Mach number winds are able to survive for long durations and are capable of being moved considerable distances.

  17. Expression of the heat shock gene clpL of Streptococcus thermophilus is induced by both heat and cold shock

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naclerio Gino

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Heat and cold shock response are normally considered as independent phenomena. A small amount of evidence suggests instead that interactions may exist between them in two Lactococcus strains. Results We show the occurrence of molecular relationships between the mechanisms of cold and heat adaptations in Streptococcus thermophilus, a lactic acid bacterium widely used in dairy fermentation, where it undergoes both types of stress. We observed that cryotolerance is increased when cells are pre-incubated at high temperature. In addition, the production of a protein, identified as ClpL, a member of the heat-shock ATPase family Clp A/B, is induced at both high and low temperature. A knock-out clpL mutant is deficient in both heat and cold tolerance. However lack of production of this protein does not abolish the positive effect of heat pre-treatment towards cryotolerance. Conclusion Dual induction of ClpL by cold and heat exposure of cells and reduced tolerance to both temperature shocks in a clpL mutant indicates that the two stress responses are correlated in S. thermophilus. However this protein is not responsible by itself for cryotolerance of cells pre-treated at high temperature, indicating that ClpL is necessary for the two phenomena, but does not account by itself for the relationships between them.

  18. Shock Heating of the Merging Galaxy Cluster A521

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourdin, H.; Mazzotta, P.; Markevitch, M.; Giacintucci, S.; Brunetti, G.

    2013-01-01

    A521 is an interacting galaxy cluster located at z = 0.247, hosting a low-frequency radio halo connected to an eastern radio relic. Previous Chandra observations hinted at the presence of an X-ray brightness edge at the position of the relic, which may be a shock front. We analyze a deep observation of A521 recently performed with XMM-Newton in order to probe the cluster structure up to the outermost regions covered by the radio emission. The cluster atmosphere exhibits various brightness and temperature anisotropies. In particular, two cluster cores appear to be separated by two cold fronts. We find two shock fronts, one that was suggested by Chandra and that is propagating to the east, and another to the southwestern cluster outskirt. The two main interacting clusters appear to be separated by a shock-heated region, which exhibits a spatial correlation with the radio halo. The outer edge of the radio relic coincides spatially with a shock front, suggesting that this shock is responsible for the generation of cosmic-ray electrons in the relic. The propagation direction and Mach number of the shock front derived from the gas density jump, M = 2.4 +/- 0.2, are consistent with expectations from the radio spectral index, under the assumption of Fermi I acceleration mechanism.

  19. Activation of mitogen-activated protein kinase by heat shock treatment in Drosophila.

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, F; Torres, M; Duncan, R F

    1995-01-01

    Heat shock treatment of Drosophila melanogaster tissue culture cells causes increased tyrosine phosphorylation of several 44 kDa proteins, which are identified as Drosophila mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinases. Tyrosine phosphorylation occurs within 5 min, and is maintained at high levels during heat shock. It decreases to basal levels during recovery, concurrent with the repression of heat shock transcription and heat-shock-protein synthesis. The increased MAP kinase tyrosine phosphoryla...

  20. Noncoordinate histone synthesis in heat-shocked Drosophila cells is regulated at multiple levels.

    OpenAIRE

    Farrell-Towt, J; Sanders, M M

    1984-01-01

    Transferring Drosophila tissue culture cells from 25 to 37 degrees C (heat shock) causes histone protein synthesis to become noncoordinate. To determine the level at which this is controlled, the synthesis, degradation, and translation of individual histone mRNAs was studied under both heat shock and control conditions. The increased synthesis of histone H2b protein during heat shock appears to be controlled primarily at the level of translation. During heat shock, H2b mRNA is transcribed at ...

  1. On the propagation of sound waves in a stellar wind traversed by periodic strong shocks

    OpenAIRE

    Pijpers, F. P.

    1994-01-01

    It has been claimed that in stellar winds traversed by strong shocks the mechanism for driving the wind by sound wave pressure cannot operate because sound waves cannot propagate past the shocks. It is shown here that sound waves can propagate through shocks in one direction and that this is a sufficient condition for the sound wave pressure mechanism to work. A strong shock amplifies a sound wave passing through it and can drag the sound wave away from the star. It is immaterial for the soun...

  2. The potential of heat shock response in the treatment of theileriosis ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Although the actual mechanism of this approach remains enigmatic, it might be linked with the protective role of heat shock response observed in several conditions. This prompts for closer look into the possible protective mechanisms of heat shock response against theileriosis. By gaining insight into how the heat shock ...

  3. Role of heat shock protein 70 in innate alloimmunity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Walter G. eLand

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This article briefly describes our own experience with the proven demonstration of heat shock protein 70 in reperfused renal allografts from brain-deaddonors and reflects about its potential role as a typical damage-associated molecular pattern (DAMP in the setting of innate alloimmunity. In fact, our group was able to demonstrate a dramatic up-regulation of heat shock protein 70 expression after postischemic reperfusion of renal allografts. Of note, up-regulation of this stress protein expression, although to a lesser extent, was already observed after cold storage of the organ indicating that this molecule is already induced in the stressed organism of a brain-dead donor. However, whether or not the dramatic up-regulation of heat shock protein 70 expression contributes to mounting an innate alloimmune response cannot be judged in view of these clinical findings.Nevertheless, heat shock protein 70, since generated in association with postischemic reperfusion-induced allograft injury, can be called a typical DAMP - as can everymolecule be termed a DAMP that is generated in associationwith any stressful tissue injury regardless of its final positive or negative regulatory function within the innate immune response elicited by it.In fact, as we discuss in this article, the context-dependent, even contradistinctive activities of heat shock protein 70 reflect the biological phenomenon that, throughout evolution, mammals have developed an elaborate network of positive and negative regulatory mechanisms, which provide balance between defensive and protective measures against unwarranted destruction of the host. In this sense, up-regulated expression of heat shock protein 70 in an injured allograft might reflect a pure protective response against the severe oxidative injury of a reperfused donor organ. On the other hand, up-regulated expression of this stress protein in an injured allograft might reflect a(futile attempt of the innate immune system to

  4. Heat shock transcription factors regulate heat induced cell death in a ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2007-03-29

    Mar 29, 2007 ... Inhibiting HSF1 proteolysis by reversible proteasome inhibition failed to inhibit heat shock induced autophagy. Compromising HSF2 expression but not HSF1 resulted in the inhibition of autophagy, suggesting HSF2 dependent activation of autophagy. We are reporting for the first time that HSF2 is heat ...

  5. Rapid increases in inositol trisphosphate and intracellular Ca++ after heat shock

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stevenson, M.A.; Calderwood, S.K.; Hahn, G.M.

    1986-01-01

    Heat shock (45 0 C) caused a rapid ( ++ . In addition to the heat induced rise in intracellular free Ca ++ , an increase in 45 Ca ++ influx was observed following nonlethal heat shock (45 0 C/10 min). The heat-induced increase in 45 Ca ++ influx was linearly related to membrane accumulation of phosphatidic acid, phosphoinositide metabolite that may be involved in Ca ++ gating (1). These results suggest that the membrane may be the proximal target of heat shock

  6. Heat Shock Factor 1 Mediates Latent HIV Reactivation

    OpenAIRE

    Xiao-Yan Pan; Wei Zhao; Xiao-Yun Zeng; Jian Lin; Min-Min Li; Xin-Tian Shen; Shu-Wen Liu

    2016-01-01

    HSF1, a conserved heat shock factor, has emerged as a key regulator of mammalian transcription in response to cellular metabolic status and stress. To our knowledge, it is not known whether HSF1 regulates viral transcription, particularly HIV-1 and its latent form. Here we reveal that HSF1 extensively participates in HIV transcription and is critical for HIV latent reactivation. Mode of action studies demonstrated that HSF1 binds to the HIV 5?-LTR to reactivate viral transcription and recruit...

  7. Adaptive response in Drosophila melanogaster heat shock proteins mutant strains

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shaposhnikov, M.V.; Moskalev, A.A.; Turysheva, E.V.

    2007-01-01

    Complete text of publication follows. The members of the heat shock proteins (Hsp) family function as molecular chaperones and assist intracellular folding of newly synthesized proteins. Also it is possible that molecular chaperones are induced during adaptive response to oxidative stress and radiation. The aim of our research was to exam the role of heat shock proteins in adaptive response to oxidative stress after low dose rate gamma-irradiation in Drosophila melanogaster. Drosophilamelanogaster strains were kindly provided by Bloomington Drosophila Stock Center (University of state of Indiana, Bloomington, USA). We used wild type strain (CS), heat shock protein mutant strains (Hsp22, Hsp70, Hsp83), and heat shock factor mutant strain (Hsf). Strains were chronically exposured to adaptive dose of gamma-irradiation in dose rate of 0.17 cGy/h during all stages of life history (from the embrional stage to the stage of matured imago). The rate of absorbed dose was 60 cGy. For oxidative-stress challenge twodays old flies were starved in empty vials for 6 h and then transferred to vials containing only filter paper soaked with 20 mM paraquat in 5% sucrose solution. Survival data were collected after 26 h of treatment. Dead flies were counted daily. The obtained data were subjected to survival analysis by Kaplan and Meier method and presented as survival curves. Statistical analysis was held by non-parametric methods. To test the significance of the difference between the two age distributions Kolmogorov-Smirnov test was applied. Gehan-Braslow- Wilcoxon and Cox-Mantel tests were used for estimation of median life span differences. In addition the minimal and maximal life span, time of 90% death, and mortality rate doubling time (MRDT) were estimated. The obtained results will be discussed in presentation.

  8. Implication of Heat Shock Factors in Tumorigenesis: Therapeutical Potential

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thonel, Aurelie de [INSERM U866, Dijon (France); Faculty of Medicine and Pharmacy, University of Burgundy, 21033 Dijon (France); Mezger, Valerie, E-mail: valerie.mezger@univ-paris-diderot.fr [CNRS, UMR7216 Epigenetics and Cell Fate, Paris (France); University Paris Diderot, 75013 Paris (France); Garrido, Carmen, E-mail: valerie.mezger@univ-paris-diderot.fr [INSERM U866, Dijon (France); Faculty of Medicine and Pharmacy, University of Burgundy, 21033 Dijon (France); CHU, Dijon BP1542, Dijon (France)

    2011-03-07

    Heat Shock Factors (HSF) form a family of transcription factors (four in mammals) which were named according to the discovery of their activation by a heat shock. HSFs trigger the expression of genes encoding Heat Shock Proteins (HSPs) that function as molecular chaperones, contributing to establish a cytoprotective state to various proteotoxic stresses and in pathological conditions. Increasing evidence indicates that this ancient transcriptional protective program acts genome-widely and performs unexpected functions in the absence of experimentally defined stress. Indeed, HSFs are able to re-shape cellular pathways controlling longevity, growth, metabolism and development. The most well studied HSF, HSF1, has been found at elevated levels in tumors with high metastatic potential and is associated with poor prognosis. This is partly explained by the above-mentioned cytoprotective (HSP-dependent) function that may enable cancer cells to adapt to the initial oncogenic stress and to support malignant transformation. Nevertheless, HSF1 operates as major multifaceted enhancers of tumorigenesis through, not only the induction of classical heat shock genes, but also of “non-classical” targets. Indeed, in cancer cells, HSF1 regulates genes involved in core cellular functions including proliferation, survival, migration, protein synthesis, signal transduction, and glucose metabolism, making HSF1 a very attractive target in cancer therapy. In this review, we describe the different physiological roles of HSFs as well as the recent discoveries in term of non-cogenic potential of these HSFs, more specifically associated to the activation of “non-classical” HSF target genes. We also present an update on the compounds with potent HSF1-modulating activity of potential interest as anti-cancer therapeutic agents.

  9. Thermotolerance and Human Performance: Role of Heat Shock Proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-10-01

    stress response, can be achieved with mild pretreatment and Hsp responses correlate with this tolerance. In the developing embryo , the heat shock...or other stressors without any negative impacts in the developing embryos is largely unknown. Significant research has focused on the role, induction...rats, hamsters, guinea pigs, rabbits, sheep , pigs, and monkeys (Edwards et al 2003). However, the type and severity of the fetal defects were dependent

  10. Magnetogasdynamic spherical shock wave in a non-ideal gas under gravitational field with conductive and radiative heat fluxes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nath, G.; Vishwakarma, J. P.

    2016-11-01

    Similarity solutions are obtained for the flow behind a spherical shock wave in a non-ideal gas under gravitational field with conductive and radiative heat fluxes, in the presence of a spatially decreasing azimuthal magnetic field. The shock wave is driven by a piston moving with time according to power law. The radiation is considered to be of the diffusion type for an optically thick grey gas model and the heat conduction is expressed in terms of Fourier's law for heat conduction. Similarity solutions exist only when the surrounding medium is of constant density. The gas is assumed to have infinite electrical conductivity and to obey a simplified van der Waals equation of state. It is shown that an increase of the gravitational parameter or the Alfven-Mach number or the parameter of the non-idealness of the gas decreases the compressibility of the gas in the flow-field behind the shock, and hence there is a decrease in the shock strength. The pressure and density vanish at the inner surface (piston) and hence a vacuum is formed at the center of symmetry. The shock waves in conducting non-ideal gas under gravitational field with conductive and radiative heat fluxes can be important for description of shocks in supernova explosions, in the study of a flare produced shock in the solar wind, central part of star burst galaxies, nuclear explosion etc. The solutions obtained can be used to interpret measurements carried out by space craft in the solar wind and in neighborhood of the Earth's magnetosphere.

  11. The Role of Heat Shock Proteins in Leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kliková, K; Pilchova, I; Stefanikova, A; Hatok, J; Dobrota, D; Racay, P

    2016-01-01

    Heat shock proteins (HSPs) HSP27, HSP70 and HSP90 are molecular chaperones; their expression is increased after exposure of cells to conditions of environmental stress, including heat shock, heavy metals, oxidative stress, or pathologic conditions, such as ischemia, infection, and inflammation. Their protective function is to help the cell cope with lethal conditions. The HSPs are a class of proteins which, in normal cells, are responsible for maintaining homeostasis, interacting with diverse protein substrates to assist in their folding, and preventing the appearance of folding intermediates that lead to misfolded or damaged molecules. They have been shown to interact with different key apoptotic proteins and play a crucial role in regulating apoptosis. Several HSPs have been demonstrated to directly interact with various components of tightly regulated caspase-dependent programmed cell death. These proteins also affect caspase-independent apoptosis by interacting with apoptogenic factors. Heat shock proteins are aberrantly expressed in hematological malignancies. Because of their prognostic implications and functional role in leukemias, HSPs represent an interesting target for antileukemic therapy. This review will describe different molecules interacting with anti-apoptotic proteins HSP70 and HSP90, which can be used in cancer therapy based on their inhibition.

  12. Heat Shock Factor 1 Deficiency Affects Systemic Body Temperature Regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ingenwerth, Marc; Noichl, Erik; Stahr, Anna; Korf, Horst-Werner; Reinke, Hans; von Gall, Charlotte

    2016-01-01

    Heat shock factor 1 (HSF1) is a ubiquitous heat-sensitive transcription factor that mediates heat shock protein transcription in response to cellular stress, such as increased temperature, in order to protect the organism against misfolded proteins. In this study, we analysed the effect of HSF1 deficiency on core body temperature regulation. Body temperature, locomotor activity, and food consumption of wild-type mice and HSF1-deficient mice were recorded. Prolactin and thyroid-stimulating hormone levels were measured by ELISA. Gene expression in brown adipose tissue was analysed by quantitative real-time PCR. Hypothalamic HSF1 and its co-localisation with tyrosine hydroxylase was analysed using confocal laser scanning microscopy. HSF1-deficient mice showed an increase in core body temperature (hyperthermia), decreased overall locomotor activity, and decreased levels of prolactin in pituitary and blood plasma reminiscent of cold adaptation. HSF1 could be detected in various hypothalamic regions involved in temperature regulation, suggesting a potential role of HSF1 in hypothalamic thermoregulation. Moreover, HSF1 co-localises with tyrosine hydroxylase, the rate-limiting enzyme in dopamine synthesis, suggesting a potential role of HSF1 in the hypothalamic control of prolactin release. In brown adipose tissue, levels of prolactin receptor and uncoupled protein 1 were increased in HSF1-deficient mice, consistent with an up-regulation of heat production. Our data suggest a role of HSF1 in systemic thermoregulation. © 2015 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  13. Global transcriptome analysis of the heat shock response ofshewanella oneidensis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gao, Haichun; Wang, Sarah; Liu, Xueduan; Yan, Tinfeng; Wu, Liyou; Alm, Eric; Arkin, Adam P.; Thompson, Dorothea K.; Zhou, Jizhong

    2004-04-30

    Shewanella oneidensis is an important model organism for bioremediation studies because of its diverse respiratory capabilities. However, the genetic basis and regulatory mechanisms underlying the ability of S. oneidensis to survive and adapt to various environmentally relevant stresses is poorly understood. To define this organism's molecular response to elevated growth temperatures, temporal gene expression profiles were examined in cells subjected to heat stress using whole-genome DNA microarrays for S. oneidensis MR-1. Approximately 15 percent (711) of the predicted S. oneidensis genes represented on the microarray were significantly up- or down-regulated (P < 0.05) over a 25-min period following shift to the heat shock temperature (42 C). As expected, the majority of S. oneidensis genes exhibiting homology to known chaperones and heat shock proteins (Hsps) were highly and transiently induced. In addition, a number of predicted genes encoding enzymes in glycolys is and the pentose cycle, [NiFe] dehydrogenase, serine proteases, transcriptional regulators (MerR, LysR, and TetR families), histidine kinases, and hypothetical proteins were induced in response to heat stress. Genes encoding membrane proteins were differentially expressed, suggesting that cells possibly alter their membrane composition or structure in response to variations in growth temperature. A substantial number of the genes encoding ribosomal proteins displayed down-regulated co-expression patterns in response to heat stress, as did genes encoding prophage and flagellar proteins. Finally, based on computational comparative analysis of the upstream promoter regions of S.oneidensis heat-inducible genes, a putative regulatory motif, showing high conservation to the Escherichia coli sigma 32-binding consensus sequence, was identified.

  14. A Self-consistent Model of the Coronal Heating and Solar Wind Acceleration Including Compressible and Incompressible Heating Processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shoda, Munehito; Yokoyama, Takaaki; Suzuki, Takeru K.

    2018-02-01

    We propose a novel one-dimensional model that includes both shock and turbulence heating and qualify how these processes contribute to heating the corona and driving the solar wind. Compressible MHD simulations allow us to automatically consider shock formation and dissipation, while turbulent dissipation is modeled via a one-point closure based on Alfvén wave turbulence. Numerical simulations were conducted with different photospheric perpendicular correlation lengths {λ }0, which is a critical parameter of Alfvén wave turbulence, and different root-mean-square photospheric transverse-wave amplitudes δ {v}0. For the various {λ }0, we obtain a low-temperature chromosphere, high-temperature corona, and supersonic solar wind. Our analysis shows that turbulence heating is always dominant when {λ }0≲ 1 {Mm}. This result does not mean that we can ignore the compressibility because the analysis indicates that the compressible waves and their associated density fluctuations enhance the Alfvén wave reflection and therefore the turbulence heating. The density fluctuation and the cross-helicity are strongly affected by {λ }0, while the coronal temperature and mass-loss rate depend weakly on {λ }0.

  15. Integrative analysis of the heat shock response in Aspergillus fumigatus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brakhage Axel A

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Aspergillus fumigatus is a thermotolerant human-pathogenic mold and the most common cause of invasive aspergillosis (IA in immunocompromised patients. Its predominance is based on several factors most of which are still unknown. The thermotolerance of A. fumigatus is one of the traits which have been assigned to pathogenicity. It allows the fungus to grow at temperatures up to and above that of a fevered human host. To elucidate the mechanisms of heat resistance, we analyzed the change of the A. fumigatus proteome during a temperature shift from 30°C to 48°C by 2D-fluorescence difference gel electrophoresis (DIGE. To improve 2D gel image analysis results, protein spot quantitation was optimized by missing value imputation and normalization. Differentially regulated proteins were compared to previously published transcriptome data of A. fumigatus. The study was augmented by bioinformatical analysis of transcription factor binding sites (TFBSs in the promoter region of genes whose corresponding proteins were differentially regulated upon heat shock. Results 91 differentially regulated protein spots, representing 64 different proteins, were identified by mass spectrometry (MS. They showed a continuous up-, down- or an oscillating regulation. Many of the identified proteins were involved in protein folding (chaperones, oxidative stress response, signal transduction, transcription, translation, carbohydrate and nitrogen metabolism. A correlation between alteration of transcript levels and corresponding proteins was detected for half of the differentially regulated proteins. Interestingly, some previously undescribed putative targets for the heat shock regulator Hsf1 were identified. This provides evidence for Hsf1-dependent regulation of mannitol biosynthesis, translation, cytoskeletal dynamics and cell division in A. fumigatus. Furthermore, computational analysis of promoters revealed putative binding sites for an AP-2alpha

  16. Polarized bow shocks reveal features of the winds and environments of massive stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shrestha, Manisha

    2018-01-01

    Massive stars strongly affect their surroundings through their energetic stellar winds and deaths as supernovae. The bow shock structures created by fast-moving massive stars contain important information about the winds and ultimate fates of these stars as well as their local interstellar medium (ISM). Since bow shocks are aspherical, the light scattered in the dense shock material becomes polarized. Analyzing this polarization reveals details of the bow shock geometry as well as the composition, velocity, density, and albedo of the scattering material. With these quantities, we can constrain the properties of the stellar wind and thus the evolutionary state of the star, as well as the dust composition of the local ISM.In my dissertation research, I use a Monte Carlo radiative transfer code that I optimized to simulate the polarization signatures produced by both resolved and unresolved stellar wind bow shocks (SWBS) illuminated by a central star and by shock emission. I derive bow shock shapes and densities from published analytical calculations and smooth particle hydrodynamic (SPH) models. In the case of the analytical SWBS and electron scattering, I find that higher optical depths produce higher polarization and position angle rotations at specific viewing angles compared to theoretical predictions for low optical depths. This is due to the geometrical properties of the bow shock combined with multiple scattering effects. For dust scattering, the polarization signature is strongly affected by wavelength, dust grain properties, and viewing angle. The behavior of the polarization as a function of wavelength in these cases can distinguish among different dust models for the local ISM. In the case of SPH density structures, I investigate how the polarization changes as a function of the evolutionary phase of the SWBS. My dissertation compares these simulations with polarization data from Betelgeuse and other massive stars with bow shocks. I discuss the

  17. Heat Shock Protein 70 Modulates Influenza A Virus Polymerase Activity*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manzoor, Rashid; Kuroda, Kazumichi; Yoshida, Reiko; Tsuda, Yoshimi; Fujikura, Daisuke; Miyamoto, Hiroko; Kajihara, Masahiro; Kida, Hiroshi; Takada, Ayato

    2014-01-01

    The role of heat shock protein 70 (Hsp70) in virus replication has been discussed for many viruses. The known suppressive role of Hsp70 in influenza virus replication is based on studies conducted in cells with various Hsp70 expression levels. In this study, we determined the role of Hsp70 in influenza virus replication in HeLa and HEK293T cells, which express Hsp70 constitutively. Co-immunoprecipitation and immunofluorescence studies revealed that Hsp70 interacted with PB2 or PB1 monomers and PB2/PB1 heterodimer but not with the PB1/PA heterodimer or PB2/PB1/PA heterotrimer and translocated into the nucleus with PB2 monomers or PB2/PB1 heterodimers. Knocking down Hsp70 resulted in reduced virus transcription and replication activities. Reporter gene assay, immunofluorescence assay, and Western blot analysis of nuclear and cytoplasmic fractions from infected cells demonstrated that the increase in viral polymerase activity during the heat shock phase was accompanied with an increase in Hsp70 and viral polymerases levels in the nuclei, where influenza virus replication takes place, whereas a reduction in viral polymerase activity was accompanied with an increase in cytoplasmic relocation of Hsp70 along with viral polymerases. Moreover, significantly higher levels of viral genomic RNA (vRNA) were observed during the heat shock phase than during the recovery phase. Overall, for the first time, these findings suggest that Hsp70 may act as a chaperone for influenza virus polymerase, and the modulatory effect of Hsp70 appears to be a sequel of shuttling of Hsp70 between nuclear and cytoplasmic compartments. PMID:24474693

  18. Testing the Wind-shock Paradigm for B-Type Star X-Ray Production with θ Car

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doyle, T. F.; Petit, V.; Cohen, D.; Leutenegger, M.

    2017-11-01

    We present Chandra X-ray grating spectroscopy of the B0.2V star, θ Carina. θ Car is in a critical transition region between the latest O-type and earliest B-type stars, where some stars are observed to have UV-determined wind densities much lower than theoretically expected (e.g., Marcolino et al. 2009). In general, X-ray emission in this low-density wind regime should be less prominent than for O-stars (e.g., Martins et al. 2005), but observations suggest a higher than expected X-ray emission filling factor (Lucy 2012; Huenemoerder et al. 2012); if a larger fraction of the wind is shock-heated, it could explain the weak UV wind signature seen in weak wind stars, but this might severely challenge predictions of radiatively-driven wind theory. We measured the line widths of several He-, H-like and Fe ions and the f/i ratio of He-like ions in the X-ray spectrum, which improves upon the results from Nazé et al. (2008) (XMM-Newton RGS) with additional measurements (Chandra HETG) of Mgxi and Sixiii by further constraining the X-ray emission location. The f/i ratio is modified by the proximity to the UV-emitting stellar photosphere, and is therefore a diagnostic of the radial location of the X-ray emitting plasma. The measured widths of X-ray lines are narrow, <300 km s-1 and the f/i ratios place the X-rays relatively close to the surface, both implying θ Car is a weak wind star. The measured widths are also consistent with other later-type stars in the weak wind regime, β Cru (Cohen et al. 2008), for example, and are smaller on average than earlier weak wind stars such as μ Col (Huenemoerder et al. 2012). This could point to a spectral type divide, where one hypothesis, low density, works for early-B type stars and the other hypothesis, a larger fraction of shock-heated gas, explains weak winds in late-O type stars. Archival IUE data still needs to be analyzed to determine the mass loss rate and hydrodynamical simulations will be compared with observations to

  19. Cosmic Ray Acceleration by a Versatile Family of Galactic Wind Termination Shocks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bustard, Chad; Zweibel, Ellen G. [Physics Department, University of Wisconsin–Madison, 1150 University Avenue, Madison, WI 53706 (United States); Cotter, Cory, E-mail: bustard@wisc.edu [Department of Astronomy, University of Wisconsin–Madison, 2535 Sterling Hall, 475 N. Charter Street, Madison, WI 53706 (United States)

    2017-01-20

    There are two distinct breaks in the cosmic ray (CR) spectrum: the so-called “knee” around 3 × 10{sup 15} eV and the so-called “ankle” around 10{sup 18} eV. Diffusive shock acceleration (DSA) at supernova remnant (SNR) shock fronts is thought to accelerate galactic CRs to energies below the knee, while an extragalactic origin is presumed for CRs with energies beyond the ankle. CRs with energies between 3 × 10{sup 15} and 10{sup 18} eV, which we dub the “shin,” have an unknown origin. It has been proposed that DSA at galactic wind termination shocks, rather than at SNR shocks, may accelerate CRs to these energies. This paper uses the galactic wind model of Bustard et al. to analyze whether galactic wind termination shocks may accelerate CRs to shin energies within a reasonable acceleration time and whether such CRs can subsequently diffuse back to the Galaxy. We argue for acceleration times on the order of 100 Myr rather than a few billion years, as assumed in some previous works, and we discuss prospects for magnetic field amplification at the shock front. Ultimately, we generously assume that the magnetic field is amplified to equipartition. This formalism allows us to obtain analytic formulae, applicable to any wind model, for CR acceleration. Even with generous assumptions, we find that very high wind velocities are required to set up the necessary conditions for acceleration beyond 10{sup 17} eV. We also estimate the luminosities of CRs accelerated by outflow termination shocks, including estimates for the Milky Way wind.

  20. Destabilization and recovery of a yeast prion after mild heat shock

    OpenAIRE

    Newnam, Gary P.; Birchmore, Jennifer L.; Chernoff, Yury O.

    2011-01-01

    Yeast prion [PSI+] is a self-perpetuating amyloid of the translational termination factor Sup35. Although [PSI+] propagation is modulated by heat shock proteins (Hsps), high temperature was previously reported to have little or no effect on [PSI+]. Our results show that short-term exposure of exponentially growing yeast culture to mild heat shock, followed by immediate resumption of growth, leads to [PSI+] destabilization, sometimes persisting for several cell divisions after heat shock. Prio...

  1. DNA damage-responsive Drosophila melanogaster gene is also induced by heat shock

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vivino, A.A.; Smith, M.D.; Minton, K.W.

    1986-01-01

    A gene isolated by screening Drosophila melanogaster tissue culture cells for DNA damage regulation was also found to be regulated by heat shock. After UV irradiation or heat shock, induction is at the transcriptional level and results in the accumulation of a 1.0-kilobase polyadenylated transcript. The restriction map of the clone bears no resemblance to the known heat shock genes, which are shown to be uninduced by UV irradiation

  2. Ion heating and energy partition at the heliospheric termination shock: hybrid simulations and analytical model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gary, S Peter [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Winske, Dan [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Wu, Pin [BOSTON UNIV.; Schwadron, N A [BOSTON UNIV.; Lee, M [UNIV OF NEW HAMPSHIRE

    2009-01-01

    The Los Alamos hybrid simulation code is used to examine heating and the partition of dissipation energy at the perpendicular heliospheric termination shock in the presence of pickup ions. The simulations are one-dimensional in space but three-dimensional in field and velocity components, and are carried out for a range of values of pickup ion relative density. Results from the simulations show that because the solar wind ions are relatively cold upstream, the temperature of these ions is raised by a relatively larger factor than the temperature of the pickup ions. An analytic model for energy partition is developed on the basis of the Rankine-Hugoniot relations and a polytropic energy equation. The polytropic index {gamma} used in the Rankine-Hugoniot relations is varied to improve agreement between the model and the simulations concerning the fraction of downstream heating in the pickup ions as well as the compression ratio at the shock. When the pickup ion density is less than 20%, the polytropic index is about 5/3, whereas for pickup ion densities greater than 20%, the polytropic index tends toward 2.2, suggesting a fundamental change in the character of the shock, as seen in the simulations, when the pickup ion density is large. The model and the simulations both indicate for the upstream parameters chosen for Voyager 2 conditions that the pickup ion density is about 25% and the pickup ions gain the larger share (approximately 90%) of the downstream thermal pressure, consistent with Voyager 2 observations near the shock.

  3. Stable expression of functional CBP70 lectin during heat shock.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rousseau, C; Felin, M; Sève, A P

    2000-04-01

    CBP70 is a glycoslylated lectin that interacts through either glycan-lectin or protein-protein interactions. In addition, depending on its cellular localization, this lectin has different partners, for example, galectin-3, an 82-kDa ligand in the nucleus, or Bcl-2 in the cytoplasm. In this study, we observed the persistence of plurilocalized lectin CBP70 after two heat-shock treatments conducted either under mild conditions, i.e., incubating the cells for 1 h at 42 degrees C then for 1, 3, 5, 7, or 9 h at 37 degrees C, or harsh conditions, i.e., incubation at 42 degrees C for 1, 2, 4, 6, 8, or 10 h. By combining the information collected from biochemical, fluorocytometric, confocal, and affinity-chromatography analyses, we concluded that CBP70 persisted in HL60 cells and its N-acetylglucosamine-binding sites remained active after all the heat-shock treatments tested. These data and the previously published findings reviewed in this report concur in supporting the hypothesis that CBP70 could function as an organizer of multimeric assembly, leading to the formation of various complexes in different cellular compartments, according to the needs of the cell. Copyright 2000 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  4. Heat shock proteins and cancer: How can nanomedicine be harnessed?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sauvage, Félix; Messaoudi, Samir; Fattal, Elias; Barratt, Gillian; Vergnaud-Gauduchon, Juliette

    2017-02-28

    Heat shock protein (hsp90) is an interesting target for cancer therapy because it is involved in the folding and stabilization of numerous proteins, including many that contribute to the development of cancer. It is part of the chaperone machinery that includes other heat shock proteins (hsp70, hsp27, hsp40) and is mainly localized in the cytosol, although many analogues or isoforms can be found in mitochondrion, endoplasmic reticulum and the cell membrane. Many potential inhibitors of hsp90 have been tested for cancer therapy but their usefulness is limited by their poor solubility in water and their ability to reach the target cells and the correct intracellular compartment. Nanomedicine, the incorporation of active molecules into an appropriate delivery system, could provide a solution to these drawbacks. In this review, we explain the rationale for using nanomedicine for this sort of cancer therapy, considering the properties of the chaperone machinery and of the different hsp90 analogues. We present some results that have already been obtained and put forward some strategies for delivery of hsp90 analogues to specific organelles. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Regulation of protein turnover by heat shock proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bozaykut, Perinur; Ozer, Nesrin Kartal; Karademir, Betul

    2014-12-01

    Protein turnover reflects the balance between synthesis and degradation of proteins, and it is a crucial process for the maintenance of the cellular protein pool. The folding of proteins, refolding of misfolded proteins, and also degradation of misfolded and damaged proteins are involved in the protein quality control (PQC) system. Correct protein folding and degradation are controlled by many different factors, one of the most important of which is the heat shock protein family. Heat shock proteins (HSPs) are in the class of molecular chaperones, which may prevent the inappropriate interaction of proteins and induce correct folding. On the other hand, these proteins play significant roles in the degradation pathways, including endoplasmic reticulum-associated degradation (ERAD), the ubiquitin-proteasome system, and autophagy. This review focuses on the emerging role of HSPs in the regulation of protein turnover; the effects of HSPs on the degradation machineries ERAD, autophagy, and proteasome; as well as the role of posttranslational modifications in the PQC system. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Transcriptional regulation of the Chlamydia heat shock stress response in an intracellular infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanson, Brett R; Tan, Ming

    2015-09-01

    Bacteria encode heat shock proteins that aid in survival during stressful growth conditions. In addition, the major heat shock proteins of the intracellular bacterium Chlamydia trachomatis have been associated with immune pathology and disease. We developed a ChIP-qPCR method to study the regulation of chlamydial heat shock gene regulation during an intracellular infection. This approach allowed us to show that chlamydial heat shock genes are regulated by the transcription factor HrcA within an infected cell, providing validation for previous in vitro findings. Induction of chlamydial heat shock gene expression by elevated temperature was due to loss of HrcA binding to heat shock promoters, supporting a mechanism of derepression. This heat shock response was rapid, whereas recovery of HrcA binding and return to non-stress transcript levels occurred more slowly. We also found that control of heat shock gene expression was differentially regulated over the course of the intracellular Chlamydia infection. There was evidence of HrcA-mediated regulation of heat shock genes throughout the chlamydial developmental cycle, but the level of repression was lower at early times. This is the first study of Chlamydia-infected cells showing the effect of an environmental signal on transcription factor-DNA binding and target gene expression in the bacterium. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. Hormonal modulation of the heat shock response: insights from fish with divergent cortisol stress responses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    LeBlanc, Sacha; Höglund, Erik; Gilmour, Kathleen M.

    2012-01-01

    but provided insight into stress-coping styles and environmental stress. HR fish also had a significantly greater and faster heat shock response and less oxidative protein damage than LR fish. Despite these clear differences in the physiological and cellular responses to heat shock, there were no differences......Acute temperature stress in animals results in increases in heat shock proteins (HSPs) and stress hormones. There is evidence that stress hormones influence the magnitude of the heat shock response; however, their role is equivocal. To determine whether and how stress hormones may affect the heat...... shock response, we capitalized on two lines of rainbow trout specifically bred for their high (HR) and low (LR) cortisol response to stress. We predicted that LR fish, with a low cortisol but high catecholamine response to stress, would induce higher levels of HSPs after acute heat stress than HR trout...

  8. Intermittency and local heating in the solar wind.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osman, K T; Matthaeus, W H; Wan, M; Rappazzo, A F

    2012-06-29

    Evidence for nonuniform heating in the solar wind plasma near current sheets dynamically generated by magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) turbulence is obtained using measurements from the ACE spacecraft. These coherent structures only constitute 19% of the data, but contribute 50% of the total plasma internal energy. Intermittent heating manifests as elevations in proton temperature near current sheets, resulting in regional heating and temperature enhancements extending over several hours. The number density of non-Gaussian structures is found to be proportional to the mean proton temperature and solar wind speed. These results suggest magnetofluid turbulence drives intermittent dissipation through a hierarchy of coherent structures, which collectively could be a significant source of coronal and solar wind heating.

  9. Heat Shock Proteins as Danger Signals for Cancer Detection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seigneuric, Renaud; Mjahed, Hajare; Gobbo, Jessica; Joly, Anne-Laure; Berthenet, Kevin; Shirley, Sarah; Garrido, Carmen

    2011-01-01

    First discovered in 1962, heat shock proteins (HSPs) are highly studied with about 35,500 publications on the subject to date. HSPs are highly conserved, function as molecular chaperones for a large panel of “client” proteins and have strong cytoprotective properties. Induced by many different stress signals, they promote cell survival in adverse conditions. Therefore, their roles have been investigated in several conditions and pathologies where HSPs accumulate, such as in cancer. Among the diverse mammalian HSPs, some members share several features that may qualify them as cancer biomarkers. This review focuses mainly on three inducible HSPs: HSP27, HPS70, and HSP90. Our survey of recent literature highlights some recurring weaknesses in studies of the HSPs, but also identifies findings that indicate that some HSPs have potential as cancer biomarkers for successful clinical applications.

  10. Structural model of dodecameric heat-shock protein Hsp21

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rutsdottir, Gudrun; Härmark, Johan; Weide, Yoran

    2017-01-01

    Small heat-shock proteins (sHsps) prevent aggregation of thermosensitive client proteins in a first line of defense against cellular stress. The mechanisms by which they perform this function have been hard to define due to limited structural information; currently, there is only one high......-resolution structure of a plant sHsp published, that of the cytosolic Hsp16.9. We took interest in Hsp21, a chloroplast-localized sHsp crucial for plant stress resistance, which has even longer N-terminal arms than Hsp16.9, with a functionally important and conserved methionine-rich motif. To provide a framework...... for investigating structure-function relationships of Hsp21 and understanding these sequence variations, we developed a structural model of Hsp21 based on homology modeling, cryo-EM, cross-linking mass spectrometry, NMR, and small-angle X-ray scattering. Our data suggest a dodecameric arrangement of two trimer...

  11. Heat Shock Protein 90 regulates encystation in Entamoeba

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meetali eSingh

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Enteric protozoan Entamoeba histolytica is a major cause of debilitating diarrheal infection worldwide with high morbidity and mortality. Even though the clinical burden of this parasite is very high, this infection is categorized as a neglected disease. Parasite is transmitted through feco-oral route and exhibit two distinct stages namely – trophozoites and cysts. Mechanism and regulation of encystation is not clearly understood. Previous studies have established the role of Heat shock protein 90 (Hsp90 in regulating stage transition in various protozoan parasites like Giardia, Plasmodium, Leishmania and Toxoplasma. Our study for the first time reports that Hsp90 plays a crucial role in life cycle of Entamoeba as well. We identify Hsp90 to be a negative regulator of encystation in Entamoeba. We also show that Hsp90 inhibition interferes with the process of phagocytosis in Entamoeba. Overall, we show that Hsp90 plays an important role in virulence and transmission of Entamoeba.

  12. Heat Shock Protein 90 regulates encystation in Entamoeba

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Meetali; Sharma, Shalini; Bhattacharya, Alok; Tatu, Utpal

    2015-01-01

    Enteric protozoan Entamoeba histolytica is a major cause of debilitating diarrheal infection worldwide with high morbidity and mortality. Even though the clinical burden of this parasite is very high, this infection is categorized as a neglected disease. Parasite is transmitted through feco-oral route and exhibit two distinct stages namely – trophozoites and cysts. Mechanism and regulation of encystation is not clearly understood. Previous studies have established the role of Heat shock protein 90 (Hsp90) in regulating stage transition in various protozoan parasites like Giardia, Plasmodium, Leishmania, and Toxoplasma. Our study for the first time reports that Hsp90 plays a crucial role in life cycle of Entamoeba as well. We identify Hsp90 to be a negative regulator of encystation in Entamoeba. We also show that Hsp90 inhibition interferes with the process of phagocytosis in Entamoeba. Overall, we show that Hsp90 plays an important role in virulence and transmission of Entamoeba. PMID:26528271

  13. Analysis of in vivo binding of yeast heat shock factor to promoter DNA

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    SERVER

    2008-04-17

    Apr 17, 2008 ... Cooperative binding of Drosophila heat shock factor to arrays of a conserved 5 bp unit. Cell. 64: 585-593. Yamamoto A, Mizukami Y, Sakurai H (2005). Identification of a Novel. Class of Target Genes and a Novel Type of Binding Sequence of. Heat Shock Transcription Factor in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. J.

  14. Elevated serum levels of heat shock protein 70 can be detected after radiofrequency ablation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haen, Sebastian P; Gouttefangeas, Cécile; Schmidt, Diethard; Boss, Andreas; Clasen, Stephan; von Herbay, Alexandra; Kosan, Bora; Aebert, Hermann; Pereira, Philippe L; Rammensee, Hans-Georg

    2011-09-01

    Due to their adjuvant effect and their ability to chaperone tumor-associated peptides, heat shock proteins constitute a potent alarm signal for the immune system and can lead to activation of anti-tumor T-cell immunity. Radiofrequency ablation has been reported to induce heat shock protein expression especially that of heat shock protein 70 in sublethally damaged tumor cells. In this study, we evaluated the release of heat shock protein 70 into the serum of cancer-bearing patients directly after radiofrequency ablation. Sera of 22 patients undergoing radiofrequency ablation for the treatment of primary and secondary malignancies of the liver, kidney, and lung, as well as control sera of 20 patients undergoing diagnostic liver biopsy were analyzed using a manufactured heat shock protein 70 ELISA. A significant increase in serum levels of heat shock protein 70 was detectable in the patient cohort 1 day after radiofrequency ablation. More than a twofold increase was observed in nine out of 22 patients, which tended to correlate with favorable clinical outcome. No patient of the control group revealed a comparable increase. Radiofrequency ablation can lead to a release of heat shock protein 70 into the serum, which is transiently detectable 1 day after treatment. Elevated heat shock protein 70 serum levels may constitute a biomarker for favorable clinical outcome.

  15. Acquired Thermotolerance and Heat Shock Proteins in Thermophiles from the Three Phylogenetic Domains

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Trent, Jonathan D.; Gabrielsen, Mette; Jensen, Bo

    1994-01-01

    Thermophilic organisms from each of the three phylogenetic domains (Bacteria, Archaea, and Eucarya) acquired thermotolerance after heat shock. Bacillus caldolyticus grown at 60 degrees C and heat shocked at 69 degrees C for 10 min showed thermotolerance at 74 degrees C, Sulfolobus shibatae grown...

  16. [Protective effects of heat shock preconditioning on the experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis rats].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jin-Feng; Huang, Rong; Xu, Jun; Jin, Shi-Jie; Yang, Yu-Jia

    2007-12-01

    To study the effects of heat shock preconditioning on the expression of heat shock protein-70 (HSP70) and apoptosis of the neuron in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) rats. Thirty-six Wistar rats were randomly divided into control, EAE and heat shock preconditioning groups (n=12 each). The EAE animal model was induced with guinea pig myelin basic protein. Heat shock preconditioning was performed 24 hrs prior to the EAE model inducement. No treatment was done in the control group. The neurological signs were observed after immunization. The spinal cords were removed and stained with hematoxylin and eosin. HSP70 was detected by immunohistochemistry. Apoptosis of the neuron was measured by TUNEL. Heat shock preconditioning significantly alleviated clinical signs and neuronal injury. HSP70 expression in the heat shock preconditioning group was significantly higher than in the untreated EAE group (21.08 +/- 0.87 vs 10.17 +/- 0.51; P < 0.01). Heat shock preconditioning suppressed apoptosis of the neuron compared with the EAE group (apoptosis rate: 21.92 +/- 1.00% vs 58.92 +/- 1.67%; P < 0.01). Heat shock preconditioning might improve the neurological outcome in EAE rats, possibly through the induction of HSP70 synthesis and the reduction of apoptosis of the neuron in spinal cords.

  17. A family of related proteins is encoded by the major Drosophila heat shock gene family

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wadsworth, S.C.

    1982-01-01

    At least four proteins of 70,000 to 75,000 molecular weight (70-75K) were synthesized from mRNA which hybridized with a cloned heat shock gene previously shown to be localized to the 87A and 87C heat shock puff sites. These in vitro-synthesized proteins were indistinguishable from in vivo-synthesized heat shock-induced proteins when analyzed on sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gels. A comparison of the pattern of this group of proteins synthesized in vivo during a 5-min pulse or during continuous labeling indicates that the 72-75K proteins are probably not kinetic precursors to the major 70K heat shock protein. Partial digestion products generated with V8 protease indicated that the 70-75K heat shock proteins are closely related, but that there are clear differences between them. The partial digestion patterns obtained from heat shock proteins from the Kc cell line and from the Oregon R strain of Drosophila melanogaster are very similar. Genetic analysis of the patterns of 70-75K heat shock protein synthesis indicated that the genes encoding at least two of the three 72-75K heat shock proteins are located outside of the major 87A and 87C puff sites

  18. Interaction of Accretion Shocks with Winds Kinsuk Acharya , Sandip ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    R. Narasimhan (Krishtel eMaging) 1461 1996 Oct 15 13:05:22

    Black hole physics—accretion—winds—shock waves— hydrodynamics. 1. Introduction. In a black hole accretion, the flow must be sub-Keplerian close to the horizon and the specific angular momentum is almost constant. As a result, the centrifugal force dominates over gravity and a centrifugal barrier dominated boundary ...

  19. Automated interplanetary shock detection and its application to Wind observations

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Krupařová, Oksana; Maksimovic, M.; Šafránková, J.; Němeček, Z.; Santolík, Ondřej; Krupař, Vratislav

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 118, č. 8 (2013), 4793–4803 ISSN 2169-9380 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GAP209/12/2394 Institutional support: RVO:68378289 Keywords : Interplanetary shocks * instruments and techniques Subject RIV: BN - Astronomy, Celestial Mechanics, Astrophysics Impact factor: 3.440, year: 2013 http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/jgra.50468/abstract

  20. The hexameric structures of human heat shock protein 90.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheng-Chung Lee

    Full Text Available The human 90-kDa heat shock protein (HSP90 functions as a dimeric molecular chaperone. HSP90 identified on the cell surface has been found to play a crucial role in cancer invasion and metastasis, and has become a validated anti-cancer target for drug development. It has been shown to self-assemble into oligomers upon heat shock or divalent cations treatment, but the functional role of the oligomeric states in the chaperone cycle is not fully understood.Here we report the crystal structure of a truncated HSP90 that contains the middle segment and the carboxy-terminal domain, termed MC-HSP90. The structure reveals an architecture with triangular bipyramid geometry, in which the building block of the hexameric assembly is a dimer. In solution, MC-HSP90 exists in three major oligomer states, namely dimer, tetramer and hexamer, which were elucidated by size exclusion chromatography and analytical ultracentrifugation. The newly discovered HSP90 isoform HSP90N that lacks the N-terminal ATPase domain also exhibited similar oligomerization states as did MC-HSP90.While lacking the ATPase domain, both MC-HSP90 and HSP90N can self-assemble into a hexameric structure, spontaneously. The crystal structure of MC-HSP90 reveals that, in addition to the C-terminal dimerization domain, the residue W320 in the M domain plays a critical role in its oligomerization. This study not only demonstrates how the human MC-HSP90 forms a hexamer, but also justifies the similar formation of HSP90N by using 3D modeling analysis.

  1. Heat shock factor 1 promotes TERRA transcription and telomere protection upon heat stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koskas, Sivan; Decottignies, Anabelle; Dufour, Solenne; Pezet, Mylène; Verdel, André; Vourc'h, Claire; Faure, Virginie

    2017-06-20

    In response to metabolic or environmental stress, cells activate powerful defense mechanisms to prevent the formation and accumulation of toxic protein aggregates. The main orchestrator of this cellular response is HSF1 (heat shock factor 1), a transcription factor involved in the up-regulation of protein-coding genes with protective roles. It has become very clear that HSF1 has a broader function than initially expected. Indeed, our previous work demonstrated that, upon stress, HSF1 activates the transcription of a non-coding RNA, named Satellite III, at pericentromeric heterochromatin. Here, we observe that the function of HSF1 extends to telomeres and identify subtelomeric DNA as a new genomic target of HSF1. We show that the binding of HSF1 to subtelomeric regions plays an essential role in the upregulation of non-coding TElomeric Repeat containing RNA (TERRA) transcription upon heat shock. Importantly, our data show that telomere integrity is impacted by heat shock and that telomeric DNA damages are markedly enhanced in HSF1 deficient cells. Altogether, our findings reveal a new direct and essential function of HSF1 in the transcriptional activation of TERRA and in telomere protection upon stress. © The Author(s) 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  2. Proteome analysis in the study of the bacterial heat-shock response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosen, Ran; Ron, Eliora Z

    2002-01-01

    In recent years, it has become clear that, in addition to the regulation of the expression of specific genes, there are global regulatory systems that control the simultaneous expression of a large number of genes in response to a variety of environmental stresses. The first of these global control systems, and of substantial importance, is the heat-shock response. The heat-shock response is characterized by the induction of a large set of proteins (heat-shock proteins-HSPs) upon shifts to higher temperature and upon exposure to conditions in which proteins are denatured (i.e., alcohols, heavy metals). The heat-shock response is universal and many of the heat-shock proteins are highly conserved among species. In bacteria, the heat-shock response has been studied extensively in several Gram-positive bacteria (Bacillus subtilis) and in the Gram-negative bacteria (i.e., Escherichia coli, Agrobacterium tumefaciens). The first recognition of the molecular abundance of the bacterial heat-shock proteins took place with the introduction of high-resolution two-dimensional polyacrylamide gels (2D gels) to analyze complex mixtures of cellular proteins. Two-dimensional gels, followed by mass spectrometry, were used to define the heat-shock stimulons in several bacteria, and to study the regulatory elements that control the heat-shock response. Here, we review the heat-shock response and its regulation in bacteria. The review will emphasize the use of proteome analysis in the study of this response, and will point out those open questions that can be investigated with proteomics, including mass spectrometry techniques. Copyright 2003 Wiley Periodicals, Inc., Mass Spec Rev 21:244-265, 2002; Published online in Wiley InterScience (www.interscience.wiley.com). DOI 10.1002/mas.10031

  3. The expression and induction of heat shock proteins in molluscs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Dongwu; Chen, Zhiwei

    2013-05-01

    Living cells respond to stress stimuli by triggering rapid changes in the protein profiles, and the induction of heat shock proteins (HSPs) plays an important part in this process. HSPs, mainly acting as molecular chaperones, are constitutively expressed in cells and involved in protein folding, assembly, degradation, and intracellular localization. The overexpression of HSPs represents a ubiquitous molecular mechanism to cope with stress. Compared to vertebrates, molluscs have a biphasic life cycle where pelagic larvae go through settlement and metamorphosis. HSPs may play an important role in the survival strategy of molluscs during the biphasic life stages. Since aquatic environments are highly dynamic, molluscs may be subject to a variety of sources of stress and HSPs might play a more important role in the adaptation of these animals. Moreover, the mechanisms of stress tolerance in molluscs can offer fundamental insights into the adaptation of organisms for a wide range of environmental challenges. The cDNA of HSPs has been cloned from some molluscs, and HSPs can be induced by heat stress, hypoxia, heavy metal contamination, and aestivation, etc. The expression of HSPs was detected in the neuroendocrine system, mollusc development, and reproductive process. Furthermore, the induction of HSPs is related with the phosphorylation of stress-activated p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (p38 MAPK) and cJun-N-terminal kinases (JNKs) in molluscs.

  4. Heating of the interstellar medium by the solar wind

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kunc, J. A.; Wu, F. M.; Judge, D. L.

    1983-01-01

    The heating of inflowing interstellar gas by the solar wind is calculated. The experimental differential cross sections have been used for calculating electron-H(He) and proton-H(He) elastic scattering rate coefficients. The solar wind is assumed to be a two-component (protons and electrons), steady, spherically symmetric stream moving radially outward, with the inflowing gas following Keplerian trajectories. The spatial distributions of effective temperature increase within interplanetary space have been obtained.

  5. Multispacecraft observations of the terrestrial bow shock and magnetopause during extreme solar wind disturbances

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tatrallyay, M.; Erdos, G.; Nemeth, Z.

    2012-01-01

    of three magnetopause and four bow shock models which describe them in considerably different ways using statistical methods based on observations. A new 2-D magnetopause model is introduced (based on Verigin et al., 2009) which takes into account the pressure of the compressed magnetosheath field raised...... by the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) component transverse to the solar wind flow. The observed magnetopause crossings could be predicted with a reasonable accuracy (0.1-0.2 RE) by one of the presented models at least. For geosynchronous magnetopause crossings observed by the GOES satellites, (1) the new model...... by the Cluster spacecraft were best predicted by the 3-D model of Lin et al. (2010). The applied empirical bow shock models and the 3-D semi-empiric bow shock model combined with magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) solution proved to be insufficient for predicting the observed unusual bow shock locations during large...

  6. Mathematical Modeling of the Heat-Shock Response in HeLa Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-07-01

    concentration as a representative of damage because free misfolded proteins are known to play a critical cytotoxic role in the response to hyperthermia...heat-shock protein dynamics in the long-term heat-shock response. In addition, our model was able to consis- tently predict the extent of damage produced...mech- anism to mitigate the cytotoxic effects of damaged or mis- folded proteins . In addition to heat stress, a variety of other physiological

  7. Wind stress and heat fluxes over a Brazilian Coastal Upwelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dourado, Marcelo; Candella, Rogério

    2017-04-01

    Coastal upwelling zones have been intensively studied in the last decades especially due to their importance to the biological cycle. The coastal upwelling system of the Cabo Frio region (east coast of the Rio de Janeiro state, Brazil) keeps the surface water cold during most part of the year, what induces a stable atmospheric boundary layer associated to northeast winds. The main goal of this study is to investigate the wind stress and heat fluxes exchanges between the ocean and the atmosphere in that area. For this purpose, a set of hourly data meteorological and oceanographic data collected by a Wavescan metocean buoy anchored at 23o59S; 42oW, were used, as well as solar radiation and relative humidity from a terrestrial meteorological station from the Instituto Nacional de Meteorologia (InMet). COARE 3.0 algorithm was used to calculate the latent and sensible heat fluxes. In this discussion, positive values represent fluxes towards the ocean. The average net heat flux over our study period is 88 W m-2. The reduction of the net heat flux is due to the increase of the ocean latent heat loss, although a reduction in incoming shortwave radiation and an increase in ocean long wave cooling also contributes. The latent heat is 20 times larger than the sensible heat flux, but the mean value of the latent heat flux, 62 W m-2, is half the typical value found in open ocean. The temporal variability of both sensible and latent heat fluxes reflects their dependence on wind speed and air-sea temperature differences. When upwelling events, here periods when diurnal SST is lower than 18oC, are compared with undisturbed (without upwelling) events, it can be noted the sensible heat fluxes are positives and 10 times greater in magnitude. This is related to an increment, during these upwelling events, of the air-sea temperature difference and an increasing of the wind speed. The cold waters of the upwelling increase the air-sea temperature gradient and, also, the horizontal land

  8. Errors in macromolecular synthesis after stress : a study of the possible protective role of the small heat shock proteins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Marin Vinader, L.

    2006-01-01

    The general goal of this thesis was to gain insight in what small heat shock proteins (sHsps) do with respect to macromolecular synthesis during a stressful situation in the cell. It is known that after a non-lethal heat shock, cells are better protected against a subsequent more severe heat shock,

  9. BH3-only protein BIM mediates heat shock-induced apoptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahajan, Indra M; Chen, Miao-Der; Muro, Israel; Robertson, John D; Wright, Casey W; Bratton, Shawn B

    2014-01-01

    Acute heat shock can induce apoptosis through a canonical pathway involving the upstream activation of caspase-2, followed by BID cleavage and stimulation of the intrinsic pathway. Herein, we report that the BH3-only protein BIM, rather than BID, is essential to heat shock-induced cell death. We observed that BIM-deficient cells were highly resistant to heat shock, exhibiting short and long-term survival equivalent to Bax(-/-)Bak(-/-) cells and better than either Bid(-/-) or dominant-negative caspase-9-expressing cells. Only Bim(-/-) and Bax(-/-)Bak(-/-) cells exhibited resistance to mitochondrial outer membrane permeabilization and loss of mitochondrial inner membrane potential. Moreover, while dimerized caspase-2 failed to induce apoptosis in Bid(-/-) cells, it readily did so in Bim(-/-) cells, implying that caspase-2 kills exclusively through BID, not BIM. Finally, BIM reportedly associates with MCL-1 following heat shock, and Mcl-1(-/-) cells were indeed sensitized to heat shock-induced apoptosis. However, pharmacological inhibition of BCL-2 and BCL-X(L) with ABT-737 also sensitized cells to heat shock, most likely through liberation of BIM. Thus, BIM mediates heat shock-induced apoptosis through a BAX/BAK-dependent pathway that is antagonized by antiapoptotic BCL-2 family members.

  10. THE FORMATION OF SECONDARY STELLAR GENERATIONS IN MASSIVE YOUNG STAR CLUSTERS FROM RAPIDLY COOLING SHOCKED STELLAR WINDS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wünsch, R.; Palouš, J.; Ehlerová, S.; Tenorio-Tagle, G.

    2017-01-01

    We study a model of rapidly cooling shocked stellar winds in young massive clusters and estimate the circumstances under which secondary star formation, out of the reinserted winds from a first stellar generation (1G), is possible. We have used two implementations of the model: a highly idealized, computationally inexpensive, spherically symmetric semi-analytic model, and a complex, three-dimensional radiation-hydrodynamic, simulation; they are in a good mutual agreement. The results confirm our previous findings that, in a cluster with 1G mass 10 7 M ⊙ and half-mass–radius 2.38 pc, the shocked stellar winds become thermally unstable, collapse into dense gaseous structures that partially accumulate inside the cluster, self-shield against ionizing stellar radiation, and form the second generation (2G) of stars. We have used the semi-analytic model to explore a subset of the parameter space covering a wide range of the observationally poorly constrained parameters: the heating efficiency, η he , and the mass loading, η ml . The results show that the fraction of the 1G stellar winds accumulating inside the cluster can be larger than 50% if η he ≲ 10%, which is suggested by the observations. Furthermore, for low η he , the model provides a self-consistent mechanism predicting 2G stars forming only in the central zones of the cluster. Finally, we have calculated the accumulated warm gas emission in the H30 α recombination line, analyzed its velocity profile, and estimated its intensity for super star clusters in interacting galaxies NGC4038/9 (Antennae) showing that the warm gas should be detectable with ALMA.

  11. THE FORMATION OF SECONDARY STELLAR GENERATIONS IN MASSIVE YOUNG STAR CLUSTERS FROM RAPIDLY COOLING SHOCKED STELLAR WINDS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wünsch, R.; Palouš, J.; Ehlerová, S. [Astronomical Institute, Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic, Boční II 1401, 141 31 Prague (Czech Republic); Tenorio-Tagle, G. [Instituto Nacional de Astrofísica Optica y Electrónica, AP 51, 72000 Puebla, México (Mexico)

    2017-01-20

    We study a model of rapidly cooling shocked stellar winds in young massive clusters and estimate the circumstances under which secondary star formation, out of the reinserted winds from a first stellar generation (1G), is possible. We have used two implementations of the model: a highly idealized, computationally inexpensive, spherically symmetric semi-analytic model, and a complex, three-dimensional radiation-hydrodynamic, simulation; they are in a good mutual agreement. The results confirm our previous findings that, in a cluster with 1G mass 10{sup 7} M {sub ⊙} and half-mass–radius 2.38 pc, the shocked stellar winds become thermally unstable, collapse into dense gaseous structures that partially accumulate inside the cluster, self-shield against ionizing stellar radiation, and form the second generation (2G) of stars. We have used the semi-analytic model to explore a subset of the parameter space covering a wide range of the observationally poorly constrained parameters: the heating efficiency, η {sub he}, and the mass loading, η {sub ml}. The results show that the fraction of the 1G stellar winds accumulating inside the cluster can be larger than 50% if η {sub he} ≲ 10%, which is suggested by the observations. Furthermore, for low η {sub he}, the model provides a self-consistent mechanism predicting 2G stars forming only in the central zones of the cluster. Finally, we have calculated the accumulated warm gas emission in the H30 α recombination line, analyzed its velocity profile, and estimated its intensity for super star clusters in interacting galaxies NGC4038/9 (Antennae) showing that the warm gas should be detectable with ALMA.

  12. Wind Tunnel Model Design for Sonic Boom Studies of Nozzle Jet with Shock Interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cliff, Susan E.; Denison, Marie; Sozer, Emre; Moini-Yekta, Shayan

    2016-01-01

    NASA and Industry are performing vehicle studies of configurations with low sonic boom pressure signatures. The computational analyses of modern configuration designs have matured to the point where there is confidence in the prediction of the pressure signature from the front of the vehicle, but uncertainty in the aft signatures with often greater boundary layer effects and nozzle jet pressures. Wind tunnel testing at significantly lower Reynolds numbers than in flight and without inlet and nozzle jet pressures make it difficult to accurately assess the computational solutions of flight vehicles. A wind tunnel test in the NASA Ames 9- by 7-Foot Supersonic Wind Tunnel from Mach 1.6 to 2.0 will be used to assess the effects of shocks from components passing through nozzle jet plumes on the sonic boom pressure signature and provide datasets for comparison with CFD codes. A large number of high-fidelity numerical simulations of wind tunnel test models with a variety of shock generators that simulate horizontal tails and aft decks have been studied to provide suitable models for sonic boom pressure measurements using a minimally intrusive pressure rail in the wind tunnel. The computational results are presented and the evolution of candidate wind tunnel models is summarized and discussed in this paper.

  13. Post-transcriptional regulation of the trypanosome heat shock response by a zinc finger protein.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dorothea Droll

    Full Text Available In most organisms, the heat-shock response involves increased heat-shock gene transcription. In Kinetoplastid protists, however, virtually all control of gene expression is post-transcriptional. Correspondingly, Trypanosoma brucei heat-shock protein 70 (HSP70 synthesis after heat shock depends on regulation of HSP70 mRNA turnover. We here show that the T. brucei CCCH zinc finger protein ZC3H11 is a post-transcriptional regulator of trypanosome chaperone mRNAs. ZC3H11 is essential in bloodstream-form trypanosomes and for recovery of insect-form trypanosomes from heat shock. ZC3H11 binds to mRNAs encoding heat-shock protein homologues, with clear specificity for the subset of trypanosome chaperones that is required for protein refolding. In procyclic forms, ZC3H11 was required for stabilisation of target chaperone-encoding mRNAs after heat shock, and the HSP70 mRNA was also decreased upon ZC3H11 depletion in bloodstream forms. Many mRNAs bound to ZC3H11 have a consensus AUU repeat motif in the 3'-untranslated region. ZC3H11 bound preferentially to AUU repeats in vitro, and ZC3H11 regulation of HSP70 mRNA in bloodstream forms depended on its AUU repeat region. Tethering of ZC3H11 to a reporter mRNA increased reporter expression, showing that it is capable of actively stabilizing an mRNA. These results show that expression of trypanosome heat-shock genes is controlled by a specific RNA-protein interaction. They also show that heat-shock-induced chaperone expression in procyclic trypanosome enhances parasite survival at elevated temperatures.

  14. Capillary-composited microfluidic device for heat shock transformation of Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sha, Jun; Wang, Yaolei; Wang, Jianchun; Ren, Li; Tu, Qin; Liu, Wenming; Wang, Xueqin; Liu, Ajing; Wang, Lei; Wang, Jinyi

    2011-10-01

    This work describes chemical heat shock transformation of foreign plasmid DNA into bacterial host Escherichia coli cells using a capillary-composited microfluidic device. Transformation processes of the loading, mixing, heat shock and recovery of the transformation mixture were carried out automatically in a linear fashion. In addition, by utilizing the capillary with a hollow cylindrical chamber as heating source, simple, low cost local heat shock with accurate heat shock time to transformation mixture was obtained on the microdevice. Results demonstrated that plasmid DNA could be effectively transformed into E. coli, and the transformation efficiency and frequency were as the same level or better than conventional tube-based method. This work complements other microfluidic technologies for potential gene cloning and functional genomics studies. Copyright © 2011 The Society for Biotechnology, Japan. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. [Safty action of heat shock protein 27 in reperfusion after spinal marrow ischemia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Jian-Ping; Guo, Wen-Rong; Lin, Guo-Bing

    2012-10-01

    Heat shock protein 27 belongs to the heat shock protein family in the small molecular weight family. This review collected a number of literature to analyze the expression meaning and mechanism of HSP27,expounded HSP27 with inhibition of NO production, maintenance of cell protein stability and accelerated cell damage repair function. At the same time, HSP27 also has a resistance to apoptosis, protecting mitochondria, inhibiting activation of nuclear factor and other related functions. The heat shock protein 27 has protection in spinal cord ischemia-reperfusion.

  16. Analysis of heat shock gene expression in Lactococcus lactis MG1363

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arnau, José; Sørensen, Kim; Appel, Karen Fuglede

    1996-01-01

    The induction of the heat shock response in Lactococcus lactis subsp. cremoris strain MG1363 was analysed at the RNA level using a novel RNA isolation procedure to prevent degradation. Cloning of the dnaJ and groEL homologous was carried out. Nothern blot analysis showed a similar induction pattern...... in the heat shock response in L. lactis MG1363 is presented. A gene located downstream of the dnaK operon in strain MG1363, named orf4, was shown not to be regulated by heat shock....

  17. The role of heat shock protein 90 in the regulation of tumor cell apoptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaigorodova, E V; Ryazantseva, N V; Novitskii, V V; Belkina, M V; Maroshkina, A N

    2011-02-01

    Programmed death of Jurkat tumor cells was studied under conditions of culturing with 17-AAG selective inhibitor of heat shock protein with a molecular weight of 90 kDa and etoposide. Apoptosis realization was evaluated by fluorescent microscopy with FITC-labeled annexin V and propidium iodide. Activity of caspase-3 was evaluated spectrophotometrically. Inhibition of heat shock protein with a molecular weight of 90 kDa activated the apoptotic program in Jurkat tumor cells and etoposide-induced apoptosis. The heat shock protein with a molecular weight of 90 kDa acted as apoptosis inhibitor in tumor cells.

  18. Heat Shock Factor 1 Mediates Latent HIV Reactivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Xiao-Yan; Zhao, Wei; Zeng, Xiao-Yun; Lin, Jian; Li, Min-Min; Shen, Xin-Tian; Liu, Shu-Wen

    2016-05-18

    HSF1, a conserved heat shock factor, has emerged as a key regulator of mammalian transcription in response to cellular metabolic status and stress. To our knowledge, it is not known whether HSF1 regulates viral transcription, particularly HIV-1 and its latent form. Here we reveal that HSF1 extensively participates in HIV transcription and is critical for HIV latent reactivation. Mode of action studies demonstrated that HSF1 binds to the HIV 5'-LTR to reactivate viral transcription and recruits a family of closely related multi-subunit complexes, including p300 and p-TEFb. And HSF1 recruits p300 for self-acetylation is also a committed step. The knockout of HSF1 impaired HIV transcription, whereas the conditional over-expression of HSF1 improved that. These findings demonstrate that HSF1 positively regulates the transcription of latent HIV, suggesting that it might be an important target for different therapeutic strategies aimed at a cure for HIV/AIDS.

  19. Circulating Heat Shock Protein 70 in Health, Aging and Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Demanet Christian

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Heat shock proteins (Hsp are ubiquitously synthesised in virtually all species and it is hypothesised that they might have beneficial health effects. Recent studies have identified circulating Hsp as an important mediator in inflammation - the effects of low-grade inflammation in the aging process are overwhelming. While much is known about intracellular Hsp70, scant data exist on circulating Hsp70 in the aging context. Therefore, the objectives of this study were to investigate the effect of age and disease on circulating Hsp70 and, in particular, to evaluate the association between circulating Hsp70 and inflammatory parameters. Results Serum Hsp70, Interleukin (IL -10, IL-6 and Tumor Necrosis Factor (TNF alpha concentrations were determined in 90 hospitalised geriatric patients (aged 83 ± 6 years and in 200 community-dwelling control subjects (100 elderly, aged 74 ± 5 years, and 100 young, aged 23 ± 3 years. In the community-dwelling elderly, serum Hsp70 and IL-10 concentrations were significantly lower and IL-6 was significantly higher when compared to healthy young control subjects. Elderly patients presenting inflammation (CRP serum levels ≥5 mg/L showed significantly (p = 0.007 higher Hsp70 values; and Hsp70 correlated positively (p Conclusions The present data provide new evidence that serum concentration of Hsp70 decreases with age in a normal population. Our study also shows that higher levels of Hsp70 are associated with inflammation and frailty in elderly patients.

  20. Wind Turbines and Heat Pumps. Balancing wind power fluctuations using flexible demand

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Warmer, C.J.; Hommelberg, M.P.F.; Kamphuis, I.G.; Derszi, Z.; Kok, J.K.

    2007-01-01

    In order to overcome portfolio imbalance for traders of variable power from wind we have built an 'Imbalance Reduction System' (IRS) and performed a real-world field test with it, in which imbalance is minimized within a real-time electricity market portfolio, consisting of wind power and industrial and residential consumers and producers (Combined Heat and Power for district heating; residential heat pumps; industrial cold store; emergency generators). IRS uses the PowerMatcher concept, a coordination system for supply and demand of electricity in a which multi-agent system is combined with microeconomic principles. IRS appears to offer opportunities for embedding less predictable generators such as wind power more smoothly in the portfolio. We describe the context and operation of the Imbalance Reduction System and discuss a number of results from the performed field test. Also we introduce a business model for the balance responsible party, based on the e3-value method

  1. Wind power integration using individual heat pumps – Analysis of different heat storage options

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hedegaard, Karsten; Mathiesen, Brian Vad; Lund, Henrik

    2012-01-01

    reductions in excess electricity production and fuel consumption than heat accumulation tanks. Moreover, passive heat storage is found to be significantly more cost-effective than heat accumulation tanks. In terms of reducing fuel consumption of the energy system, the installation of heat pumps is the most...... important step. Adding heat storages only moderately reduces the fuel consumption. Model development has been made to facilitate a technical optimisation of individual heat pumps and heat storages in integration with the energy system........ Heat accumulation tanks and passive heat storage in the construction are investigated as two alternative storage options in terms of their ability to increase wind power utilisation and to provide cost-effective fuel savings. Results show that passive heat storage can enable equivalent to larger...

  2. Changes in the transcriptome of morula-stage bovine embryos caused by heat shock: relationship to developmental acquisition of thermotolerance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sakatani Miki

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background While initially sensitive to heat shock, the bovine embryo gains thermal resistance as it progresses through development so that physiological heat shock has little effect on development to the blastocyst stage by Day 5 after insemination. Here, experiments using 3’ tag digital gene expression (3’DGE and real-time PCR were conducted to determine changes in the transcriptome of morula-stage bovine embryos in response to heat shock (40 degrees C for 8 h that could be associated with thermotolerance. Results Using 3’DGE, expression of 173 genes were modified by heat shock, with 94 genes upregulated by heat shock and 79 genes downregulated by heat shock. A total of 38 differentially-regulated genes were associated with the ubiquitin protein, UBC. Heat shock increased expression of one heat shock protein gene, HSPB11, and one heat shock protein binding protein, HSPBP1, tended to increase expression of HSPA1A and HSPB1, but did not affect expression of 64 other genes encoding heat shock proteins, heat shock transcription factors or proteins interacting with heat shock proteins. Moreover, heat shock increased expression of five genes associated with oxidative stress (AKR7A2, CBR1, GGH, GSTA4, and MAP2K5, decreased expression of HIF3A, but did not affect expression of 42 other genes related to free radical metabolism. Heat shock also had little effect on genes involved in embryonic development. Effects of heat shock for 2, 4 and 8 h on selected heat shock protein and antioxidant genes were also evaluated by real-time PCR. Heat shock increased steady-state amounts of mRNA for HSPA1A (PHSP90AA1 (PSOD1 or CAT. Conclusions Changes in the transcriptome of the heat-shocked bovine morula indicate that the embryo is largely resistant to effects of heat shock. As a result, transcription of genes involved in thermal protection is muted and there is little disruption of gene networks involved in embryonic development. It is likely that

  3. THERMAL X-RAY EMISSION FROM THE SHOCKED STELLAR WIND OF PULSAR GAMMA-RAY BINARIES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zabalza, V.; Paredes, J. M. [Departament d' Astronomia i Meteorologia, Institut de Ciencies del Cosmos (ICC), Universitat de Barcelona (IEEC-UB), Marti i Franques 1, E08028 Barcelona (Spain); Bosch-Ramon, V., E-mail: vzabalza@am.ub.es [Dublin Institute for Advanced Studies, 31 Fitzwilliam Place, Dublin 2 (Ireland)

    2011-12-10

    Gamma-ray-loud X-ray binaries are binary systems that show non-thermal broadband emission from radio to gamma rays. If the system comprises a massive star and a young non-accreting pulsar, their winds will collide producing broadband non-thermal emission, most likely originated in the shocked pulsar wind. Thermal X-ray emission is expected from the shocked stellar wind, but until now it has neither been detected nor studied in the context of gamma-ray binaries. We present a semi-analytic model of the thermal X-ray emission from the shocked stellar wind in pulsar gamma-ray binaries, and find that the thermal X-ray emission increases monotonically with the pulsar spin-down luminosity, reaching luminosities of the order of 10{sup 33} erg s{sup -1}. The lack of thermal features in the X-ray spectrum of gamma-ray binaries can then be used to constrain the properties of the pulsar and stellar winds. By fitting the observed X-ray spectra of gamma-ray binaries with a source model composed of an absorbed non-thermal power law and the computed thermal X-ray emission, we are able to derive upper limits on the spin-down luminosity of the putative pulsar. We applied this method to LS 5039, the only gamma-ray binary with a radial, powerful wind, and obtain an upper limit on the pulsar spin-down luminosity of {approx}6 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 36} erg s{sup -1}. Given the energetic constraints from its high-energy gamma-ray emission, a non-thermal to spin-down luminosity ratio very close to unity may be required.

  4. Heat shock suppresses mating and sperm transfer in the rice leaf folder Cnaphalocrocis medinalis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, H J; Qian, Q; Liu, X D

    2014-06-01

    Temperature is a key environmental factor in determining the population size of Cnaphalocrocis medinalis in summer. High temperatures inhibit survival, development and fecundity of this insect. However, biological responses of female and male adults to heat shock, and physiological mechanism of high temperature suppressing population development are still ambiguous. We experimentally tested the impact of heat shock (5 h day-1) on biological traits, spermatogenesis and sperm transfer of adults of C. medinalis. The result showed that heat exposure to 39 and 40 °C for 5 h reduced longevity and copulation frequency of adults, and hatchability of eggs. Immediate survival rate of males was lower than that of females after 3 days of exposure to 41 °C. The oviposition period, copulation frequency, fecundity of adults and hatchability of eggs were significantly lower when male adults were exposed to 40 or 41 °C for 3 days. Heat shock decreased frequency and success rate of mating when males were exposed, and it also resulted in postponement of mating behaviour and prolongation of mating duration as both the female and male adults were exposed. Heat shock did not affect spermatogenesis, but significantly inhibited sperms maturation. Moreover, males could not ejaculate sperm into females during copulation when these male moths received heat shock. Heat shock remarkably suppressed mating behaviour and sperm transfer, which led to a dramatic decline of rice leaf folder populations.

  5. Analysis of heat shock gene expression in Lactococcus lactis MG1363

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arnau, José; Sørensen, Kim; Appel, Karen Fuglede

    1996-01-01

    The induction of the heat shock response in Lactococcus lactis subsp. cremoris strain MG1363 was analysed at the RNA level using a novel RNA isolation procedure to prevent degradation. Cloning of the dnaJ and groEL homologous was carried out. Nothern blot analysis showed a similar induction pattern......, although maximum induction was observed earlier for orf1 and grpE. Novel transcript sizes were detected in heat-shocked cells. The induction kinetics observed for ftsH suggested a different regulation for this gene. Experimental evidence for a prenounced transcriptional regulation being involved...... in the heat shock response in L. lactis MG1363 is presented. A gene located downstream of the dnaK operon in strain MG1363, named orf4, was shown not to be regulated by heat shock....

  6. The role of the heat shock response in the cytoprotection of the intestinal epithelium

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Malago, Joshua Joseph

    2003-01-01

    Under normal conditions, the intestinal epithelial cells produce constitutive amount of heat shock proteins (Hsps) that are elevated following stressful stimuli. As the intestine is constantly exposed to variety of agents like diet, normal flora, infectious microorganisms, chemicals, and immune

  7. Secretory Heat Shock Protein - gp96-Ig Chaperoned her-2/New Vaccines

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Podack, Eckhard

    2001-01-01

    ...: First, using tumor cells that secrete a genetically engineered form of a heat shock protein, gp96-Ig, we showed that CD8 cells expanded and generated specific memory in vivo without the need for CD4 help...

  8. Mechanism of protonophores-mediated induction of heat-shock response in Escherichia coli

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saha Swati

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Protonophores are the agents that dissipate the proton-motive-force (PMF across E. coli plasma membrane. As the PMF is known to be an energy source for the translocation of membrane and periplasmic proteins after their initial syntheses in cell cytoplasm, protonophores therefore inhibit the translocation phenomenon. In addition, protonophores also induce heat-shock-like stress response in E. coli cell. In this study, our motivation was to investigate that how the protonophores-mediated phenomena like inhibition of protein translocation and induction of heat-shock proteins in E. coli were correlated. Results Induction of heat-shock-like response in E. coli attained the maximum level after about 20 minutes of cell growth in the presence of a protonophore like carbonyl cyanide m-chloro phenylhydrazone (CCCP or 2, 4-dinitrophenol (DNP. With induction, cellular level of the heat-shock regulator protein sigma-32 also increased. The increase in sigma-32 level was resulted solely from its stabilization, not from its increased synthesis. On the other hand, the protonophores inhibited the translocation of the periplasmic protein alkaline phosphatase (AP, resulting its accumulation in cell cytosol partly in aggregated and partly in dispersed form. On further cell growth, after withdrawal of the protonophores, the previously accumulated AP could not be translocated out; instead the AP-aggregate had been degraded perhaps by an induced heat-shock protease ClpP. Moreover, the non-translocated AP formed binary complex with the induced heat-shock chaperone DnaK and the excess cellular concentration of DnaK disallowed the induction of heat-shock response by the protonophores. Conclusion Our experimental results suggested that the protonophores-mediated accumulation and aggregation of membrane proteins (like AP in cell cytosol had signaled the induction of heat-shock proteins in E. coli and the non-translocated protein aggregates were possibly

  9. Effect of heat shock on hot water plumbing microbiota and Legionella pneumophila control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Pan; Rhoads, William J; Edwards, Marc A; Pruden, Amy

    2018-02-09

    Heat shock is a potential control strategy for Legionella pneumophila in hot water plumbing systems. However, it is not consistently effective, with little understanding of its influence on the broader plumbing microbiome. Here, we employed a lab-scale recirculating hot water plumbing rig to compare the pre- and post-"heat shock" (i.e., 40 → 60 → 40 °C) microbiota at distal taps. In addition, we used a second plumbing rig to represent a well-managed system at 60 °C and conducted a "control" sampling at 60 °C, subsequently reducing the temperature to 40 °C to observe the effects on Legionella and the microbiota under a simulated "thermal disruption" scenario. According to 16S rRNA gene amplicon sequencing, in the heat shock scenario, there was no significant difference or statistically significant, but small, difference in the microbial community composition at the distal taps pre- versus post-heat shock (both biofilm and water; weighted and unweighted UniFrac distance matrices). While heat shock did lead to decreased total bacteria numbers at distal taps, it did not measurably alter the richness or evenness of the microbiota. Quantitative PCR measurements demonstrated that L. pneumophila relative abundance at distal taps also was not significantly different at 2-month post-heat shock relative to the pre-heat shock condition, while relative abundance of Vermamoeba vermiformis, a known Legionella host, did increase. In the thermal disruption scenario, relative abundance of planktonic L. pneumophila (quantitative PCR data) increased to levels comparable to those observed in the heat shock scenario within 2 months of switching long-term operation at 60 to 40 °C. Overall, water use frequency and water heater temperature set point exhibited a stronger effect than one-time heat shock on the microbial composition and Legionella levels at distal taps. While heat shock may be effective for instantaneous Legionella control and reduction in total

  10. ACCRETION OF SUPERSONIC WINDS ONTO BLACK HOLES IN 3D: STABILITY OF THE SHOCK CONE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gracia-Linares, M.; Guzmán, F. S. [Instituto de Física y Matemáticas, Universidad Michoacana de San Nicolás de Hidalgo. Edificio C-3, Cd. Universitaria, 58040 Morelia, Michoacán, México (Mexico)

    2015-10-10

    Using numerical simulations we present the accretion of supersonic winds onto a rotating black hole in three dimensions. We study five representative directions of the wind with respect to the axis of rotation of the black hole and focus on the evolution and stability of the high-density shock cone that is formed during the process. We explore both the regime in which the shock cone is expected to be stable in order to confirm previous results obtained with two-dimensional simulations, and the regime in which the shock cone is expected to show a flip–flop (FF) type of instability. The methods used to attempt a triggering of the instability were (i) the accumulation of numerical errors and (ii) the explicit application of a perturbation on the velocity field after the shock cone was formed. The result is negative, that is, we did not find the FF instability within the parameter space we explored, including cases that are expected to be unstable.

  11. Heat Shock-Enhanced Conjugation Efficiency in Standard Campylobacter jejuni Strains

    OpenAIRE

    Zeng, Ximin; Ardeshna, Devarshi; Lin, Jun

    2015-01-01

    Campylobacter jejuni, the leading bacterial cause of human gastroenteritis in the United States, displays significant strain diversity due to horizontal gene transfer. Conjugation is an important horizontal gene transfer mechanism contributing to the evolution of bacterial pathogenesis and antimicrobial resistance. It has been observed that heat shock could increase transformation efficiency in some bacteria. In this study, the effect of heat shock on C. jejuni conjugation efficiency and the ...

  12. cDNA cloning and mRNA expression of heat shock protein 70 gene ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In this study, the full-length heat shock protein 70 of Tegillarca granosa was cloned from cDNA library by rapid amplification of cDNA end (RACE). The open reading frame (ORF) of heat shock protein 70 was 1968 bp, and it encoded a protein of 655 amino acids with a predicted molecular weight of 71.48 kDa and an ...

  13. Plasminogen and angiostatin interact with heat shock proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dudani, Anil K; Mehic, Jelica; Martyres, Anthony

    2007-06-01

    Previous studies from this laboratory have demonstrated that plasminogen and angiostatin bind to endothelial cell (EC) surface-associated actin via their kringles in a specific manner. Heat shock proteins (hsps) like hsp 27 are constitutively expressed by vascular ECs and regulate actin polymerization, cell growth, and migration. Since many hsps have also been found to be highly abundant on cell surfaces and there is evidence that bacterial surface hsps may interact with human plasminogen, the purpose of this study was to determine whether human plasminogen and angiostatin would interact with human hsps. ELISAs were developed in our laboratory to assess these interactions. It was observed that plasminogen bound to hsps 27, 60, and 70. In all cases, binding was inhibited (85-90%) by excess (50 mM) lysine indicating kringle involvement. Angiostatin predominantly bound to hsp 27 and to hsp 70 in a concentration- and kringle-dependent manner. As observed previously for actin, there was concentration-dependent inhibition of angiostatin's interaction with hsp 27 by plasminogen. In addition, 30-fold molar excess actin inhibited (up to 50%), the interaction of plasminogen with all hsps. However, 30-fold molar excess actin could only inhibit the interaction of angiostatin with hsp 27 by 15-20%. Collectively, these data indicate that (i) while plasminogen interacts specifically with hsp 27, 60, and 70, angiostatin interacts predominantly with hsp 27 and to some extent with hsp 70; (ii) plasminogen only partially displaces angiostatin's binding to hsp 27 and (iii) actin only partially displaces plasminogen/angiostatin binding to hsps. It is conceivable therefore that surface-associated hsps could mediate the binding of these ligands to cells like ECs.

  14. Detection and architecture of small heat shock protein monomers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pierre Poulain

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Small Heat Shock Proteins (sHSPs are chaperone-like proteins involved in the prevention of the irreversible aggregation of misfolded proteins. Although many studies have already been conducted on sHSPs, the molecular mechanisms and structural properties of these proteins remain unclear. Here, we propose a better understanding of the architecture, organization and properties of the sHSP family through structural and functional annotations. We focused on the Alpha Crystallin Domain (ACD, a sandwich fold that is the hallmark of the sHSP family. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We developed a new approach for detecting sHSPs and delineating ACDs based on an iterative Hidden Markov Model algorithm using a multiple alignment profile generated from structural data on ACD. Using this procedure on the UniProt databank, we found 4478 sequences identified as sHSPs, showing a very good coverage with the corresponding PROSITE and Pfam profiles. ACD was then delimited and structurally annotated. We showed that taxonomic-based groups of sHSPs (animals, plants, bacteria have unique features regarding the length of their ACD and, more specifically, the length of a large loop within ACD. We detailed highly conserved residues and patterns specific to the whole family or to some groups of sHSPs. For 96% of studied sHSPs, we identified in the C-terminal region a conserved I/V/L-X-I/V/L motif that acts as an anchor in the oligomerization process. The fragment defined from the end of ACD to the end of this motif has a mean length of 14 residues and was named the C-terminal Anchoring Module (CAM. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: This work annotates structural components of ACD and quantifies properties of several thousand sHSPs. It gives a more accurate overview of the architecture of sHSP monomers.

  15. Heat shock proteins and hypometabolism: adaptive strategy for proteome preservation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Storey KB

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Kenneth B Storey, Janet M StoreyDepartments of Biology and Chemistry, Carleton University, Ottawa, ON, CanadaAbstract: To survive under harsh environmental conditions many organisms retreat into hypometabolic states where metabolic rate may be reduced by 80% or more and energy use is reprioritized to emphasize key functions that sustain viability and provide cytoprotection. ATP-expensive activities, such as gene expression, protein turnover (synthesis and degradation, and the cell cycle, are largely shut down. As a consequence, mechanisms that stabilize the existing cellular proteome can become critical for long-term survival. Heat shock proteins (HSPs are well-known for their actions as chaperones that act to fold new proteins or refold proteins that are damaged. Indeed, they are part of the “minimal stress proteome” that appears to be a ubiquitous response by all cells as they attempt, successfully or unsuccessfully, to deal with stress. The present review summarizes evidence that HSPs are also a conserved feature of natural animal hypometabolism including the phenomena of estivation, hibernation, diapause, cold-hardiness, anaerobiosis, and anhydrobiosis. That is, organisms that retreat into dormant or torpid states in anticipation that environmental conditions may become too difficult for normal life also integrate the use of HSPs to protect their proteome while hypometabolic. Multiple studies show a common upregulation of expression of hsp genes and/or HSP proteins prior to or during hypometabolism in organisms as diverse as ground squirrels, turtles, land snails, insects, and brine shrimp and in situations of both preprogrammed dormancies (eg, seasonal or life stage specific and opportunistic hypometabolism (eg, triggered by desiccation or lack of oxygen. Hence, HSPs are not just a “shock” response that attempts to rescue cells from damaging stress but are a key protective strategy that is an integral component of natural states of

  16. [Regulation of heat shock gene expression in response to stress].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garbuz, D G

    2017-01-01

    Heat shock (HS) genes, or stress genes, code for a number of proteins that collectively form the most ancient and universal stress defense system. The system determines the cell capability of adaptation to various adverse factors and performs a variety of auxiliary functions in normal physiological conditions. Common stress factors, such as higher temperatures, hypoxia, heavy metals, and others, suppress transcription and translation for the majority of genes, while HS genes are upregulated. Transcription of HS genes is controlled by transcription factors of the HS factor (HSF) family. Certain HSFs are activated on exposure to higher temperatures or other adverse factors to ensure stress-induced HS gene expression, while other HSFs are specifically activated at particular developmental stages. The regulation of the main mammalian stress-inducible factor HSF1 and Drosophila melanogaster HSF includes many components, such as a variety of early warning signals indicative of abnormal cell activity (e.g., increases in intracellular ceramide, cytosolic calcium ions, or partly denatured proteins); protein kinases, which phosphorylate HSFs at various Ser residues; acetyltransferases; and regulatory proteins, such as SUMO and HSBP1. Transcription factors other than HSFs are also involved in activating HS gene transcription; the set includes D. melanogaster GAF, mammalian Sp1 and NF-Y, and other factors. Transcription of several stress genes coding for molecular chaperones of the glucose-regulated protein (GRP) family is predominantly regulated by another stress-detecting system, which is known as the unfolded protein response (UPR) system and is activated in response to massive protein misfolding in the endoplasmic reticulum and mitochondrial matrix. A translational fine tuning of HS protein expression occurs via changing the phosphorylation status of several proteins involved in translation initiation. In addition, specific signal sequences in the 5'-UTRs of some HS

  17. The effects of drying following heat shock exposure of the desert moss Syntrichia caninervis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu Shujun; Liu Chunjiang; Jiang Pingan; Cai Weimin; Wang Yan

    2009-01-01

    Desert mosses are components of biological soil crusts (BSCs) and their ecological functions make assessment and protection of these mosses a high-ranking management priority in desert regions. Drying is thought to be useful for desert mosses surviving heat shock. In this study, we investigated the role of drying by monitoring the responses of physiological characters and asexual reproduction in the typical desert moss Syntrichia caninervis. Heat significantly decreased chlorophyll content and weakened rapid recovery of photochemical activity, and increased carotenoid content and membrane permeability. Lethal temperatures significantly destroyed shoot regeneration potential. In comparison with heat alone, drying significantly increased protonema emergence time and depressed protonema emergence area. Drying combined with heat accelerated water loss, followed by a decrease of photosynthetic activity. Drying had different influences on membrane permeability at different temperatures. When moss leaves were subjected to a combined stress of drying and heat shock, photosynthesis was maintained mainly due to the effects of drying on physiological activity although the cellular morphological integrity was affected. Drying caused opposing effects on moss physiological and reproductive characteristics. On the one hand, drying caused a positive synergistic effect with heat shock when the temperature was below 40 deg. C. On the other hand, drying showed antagonism with heat shock when the moss was subjected to temperatures higher than 40 deg. C. These findings may help in understanding the survival mechanism of dessert mosses under heat shock stress which will be helpful for the artificial reconstruction of BSCs

  18. The effects of drying following heat shock exposure of the desert moss Syntrichia caninervis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Shu-Jun; Liu, Chun-Jiang; Jiang, Ping-An; Cai, Wei-Min; Wang, Yan

    2009-03-15

    Desert mosses are components of biological soil crusts (BSCs) and their ecological functions make assessment and protection of these mosses a high-ranking management priority in desert regions. Drying is thought to be useful for desert mosses surviving heat shock. In this study, we investigated the role of drying by monitoring the responses of physiological characters and asexual reproduction in the typical desert moss Syntrichia caninervis. Heat significantly decreased chlorophyll content and weakened rapid recovery of photochemical activity, and increased carotenoid content and membrane permeability. Lethal temperatures significantly destroyed shoot regeneration potential. In comparison with heat alone, drying significantly increased protonema emergence time and depressed protonema emergence area. Drying combined with heat accelerated water loss, followed by a decrease of photosynthetic activity. Drying had different influences on membrane permeability at different temperatures. When moss leaves were subjected to a combined stress of drying and heat shock, photosynthesis was maintained mainly due to the effects of drying on physiological activity although the cellular morphological integrity was affected. Drying caused opposing effects on moss physiological and reproductive characteristics. On the one hand, drying caused a positive synergistic effect with heat shock when the temperature was below 40 degrees C. On the other hand, drying showed antagonism with heat shock when the moss was subjected to temperatures higher than 40 degrees C. These findings may help in understanding the survival mechanism of dessert mosses under heat shock stress which will be helpful for the artificial reconstruction of BSCs.

  19. Numerical study of the viscous heat-conducting gas flow in a long shock tube

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kudryavtsev, Alexey; Khotyanovsky, Dmitry

    2017-10-01

    The results of numerical simulations of the propagation of the shock wave in a cylindrical shock tube of large length are presented. The results of the numerical computations agree well with the experimental data of Duff. The effects of viscous friction and heat conduction cause significant difference of the shock wave velocity from its inviscid theoretical value. The results of the computations at the considered flow parameters show that the shock wave and the contact surface, starting from a certain moment of time, propagate with equal speeds.

  20. Use of conditioned media is critical for studies of regulation in response to rapid heat shock.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahat, Dig B; Lis, John T

    2017-01-01

    Heat shock response (HSR) maintains and restores protein homeostasis when cells are exposed to proteotoxic heat stress. Heat shock (HS) triggers a rapid and robust change in genome-wide transcription, protein synthesis, and chaperone activity; and therefore, the HSR has been widely used as a model system in these studies. The conventional method of performing instantaneous HS in the laboratory uses heated fresh media to induce HSR when added to cells. However, addition of fresh media to cells may evoke additional cellular responses and signaling pathways. Here, we compared the change in global transcription profile when HS is performed with either heated fresh media or heated conditioned media. We found that the use of heated fresh media induces transcription of hundreds of genes that HS alone does not induce, and masks or partially masks HS-mediated downregulation of thousands of genes. The fresh-media-dependent upregulated genes encode ribosomal subunit proteins involved in translation and RNA processing factors. More importantly, fresh media also induce transcription of several heat shock protein genes (Hsps) in a heat shock factor 1 (HSF1)-independent manner. Thus, we conclude that a conventional method of HS with heated fresh media causes changes in transcription regulation that confound the actual change caused solely by elevated temperature of cells.

  1. Wind Tunnel Model Design for Sonic Boom Studies of Nozzle Jet Flows with Shock Interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cliff, Susan E.; Denison, Marie; Moini-Yekta, Shayan; Morr, Donald E.; Durston, Donald A.

    2016-01-01

    NASA and the U.S. aerospace industry are performing studies of supersonic aircraft concepts with low sonic boom pressure signatures. The computational analyses of modern aircraft designs have matured to the point where there is confidence in the prediction of the pressure signature from the front of the vehicle, but uncertainty remains in the aft signatures due to boundary layer and nozzle exhaust jet effects. Wind tunnel testing without inlet and nozzle exhaust jet effects at lower Reynolds numbers than in-flight make it difficult to accurately assess the computational solutions of flight vehicles. A wind tunnel test in the NASA Ames 9- by 7-Foot Supersonic Wind Tunnel is planned for February 2016 to address the nozzle jet effects on sonic boom. The experiment will provide pressure signatures of test articles that replicate waveforms from aircraft wings, tails, and aft fuselage (deck) components after passing through cold nozzle jet plumes. The data will provide a variety of nozzle plume and shock interactions for comparison with computational results. A large number of high-fidelity numerical simulations of a variety of shock generators were evaluated to define a reduced collection of suitable test models. The computational results of the candidate wind tunnel test models as they evolved are summarized, and pre-test computations of the final designs are provided.

  2. Network analysis of oyster transcriptome revealed a cascade of cellular responses during recovery after heat shock.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lingling Zhang

    Full Text Available Oysters, as a major group of marine bivalves, can tolerate a wide range of natural and anthropogenic stressors including heat stress. Recent studies have shown that oysters pretreated with heat shock can result in induced heat tolerance. A systematic study of cellular recovery from heat shock may provide insights into the mechanism of acquired thermal tolerance. In this study, we performed the first network analysis of oyster transcriptome by reanalyzing microarray data from a previous study. Network analysis revealed a cascade of cellular responses during oyster recovery after heat shock and identified responsive gene modules and key genes. Our study demonstrates the power of network analysis in a non-model organism with poor gene annotations, which can lead to new discoveries that go beyond the focus on individual genes.

  3. CARINA OB STARS: X-RAY SIGNATURES OF WIND SHOCKS AND MAGNETIC FIELDS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gagne, Marc; Fehon, Garrett; Savoy, Michael R.; Cohen, David H.; Townsley, Leisa K.; Broos, Patrick S.; Povich, Matthew S.; Corcoran, Michael F.; Walborn, Nolan R.; Remage Evans, Nancy; Moffat, Anthony F. J.; Naze, Yael; Oskinova, Lida M.

    2011-01-01

    The Chandra Carina Complex contains 200 known O- and B-type stars. The Chandra survey detected 68 of the 70 O stars and 61 of 127 known B0-B3 stars. We have assembled a publicly available optical/X-ray database to identify OB stars that depart from the canonical L X /L bol relation or whose average X-ray temperatures exceed 1 keV. Among the single O stars with high kT we identify two candidate magnetically confined wind shock sources: Tr16-22, O8.5 V, and LS 1865, O8.5 V((f)). The O4 III(fc) star HD 93250 exhibits strong, hard, variable X-rays, suggesting that it may be a massive binary with a period of >30 days. The visual O2 If* binary HD 93129A shows soft 0.6 keV and hard 1.9 keV emission components, suggesting embedded wind shocks close to the O2 If* Aa primary and colliding wind shocks between Aa and Ab. Of the 11 known O-type spectroscopic binaries, the long orbital-period systems HD 93343, HD 93403, and QZ Car have higher shock temperatures than short-period systems such as HD 93205 and FO 15. Although the X-rays from most B stars may be produced in the coronae of unseen, low-mass pre-main-sequence companions, a dozen B stars with high L X cannot be explained by a distribution of unseen companions. One of these, SS73 24 in the Treasure Chest cluster, is a new candidate Herbig Be star.

  4. Heat shock protein90 in lobular neoplasia of the breast

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patsouris Efstratios

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Heat shock protein 90 (Hsp90 overexpression has been implicated in breast carcinogenesis, with putative prognostic and therapeutic implications. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the immunohistochemical expression of Hsp90 and to examine whether Hsp90 expression is associated with estrogen receptor alpha (ER-alpha and beta (ER-beta immunostaining in lobular neoplasia (LN of the breast. Methods Tissue specimens were taken from 44 patients with LN. Immunohistochemical assessment of Hsp90, ER-alpha and ER-beta was performed both in the lesion and the adjacent normal breast ducts and lobules; the latter serving as control. As far as Hsp90 evaluation is concerned: i the percentage of positive cells, and ii the intensity was separately analyzed. Additionally, the Allred score was adopted and calculated. Accordingly, Allred score was separately evaluated for ER-alpha and ER-beta. The intensity was treated as an ordinal variable-score (0: negative, low: 1, moderate: 2, high: 3. Statistical analysis followed. Results Hsp90 immunoreactivity was mainly cytoplasmic in both the epithelial cells of normal breast (ducts and lobules and LN. Some epithelial cells of LN also showed nuclear staining, but all the LN foci mainly disclosed a positive cytoplasmic immunoreaction for Hsp90. In addition, rare intralobular inflammatory cells showed a slight immunoreaction. The percentage of Hsp90 positive cells in the LN areas was equal to 67.1 ± 12.2%, whereas the respective percentage in the normal adjacent breast tissue was 69.1 ± 11.6%; the difference was not statistically significant. The intensity score of Hsp90 staining was 1.82 ± 0.72 in LN foci, while in the normal adjacent tissue the intensity score was 2.14 ± 0.64. This difference was statistically significant (p = 0.029, Wilcoxon matched-pairs signed-ranks test. The Hsp90 Allred score was 6.46 ± 1.14 in the LN foci, significantly lower than in the normal adjacent tissue (6.91

  5. Heat Shock-Enhanced Conjugation Efficiency in Standard Campylobacter jejuni Strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Ximin; Ardeshna, Devarshi; Lin, Jun

    2015-07-01

    Campylobacter jejuni, the leading bacterial cause of human gastroenteritis in the United States, displays significant strain diversity due to horizontal gene transfer. Conjugation is an important horizontal gene transfer mechanism contributing to the evolution of bacterial pathogenesis and antimicrobial resistance. It has been observed that heat shock could increase transformation efficiency in some bacteria. In this study, the effect of heat shock on C. jejuni conjugation efficiency and the underlying mechanisms were examined. With a modified Escherichia coli donor strain, different C. jejuni recipient strains displayed significant variation in conjugation efficiency ranging from 6.2 × 10(-8) to 6.0 × 10(-3) CFU per recipient cell. Despite reduced viability, heat shock of standard C. jejuni NCTC 11168 and 81-176 strains (e.g., 48 to 54°C for 30 to 60 min) could dramatically enhance C. jejuni conjugation efficiency up to 1,000-fold. The phenotype of the heat shock-enhanced conjugation in C. jejuni recipient cells could be sustained for at least 9 h. Filtered supernatant from the heat shock-treated C. jejuni cells could not enhance conjugation efficiency, which suggests that the enhanced conjugation efficiency is independent of secreted substances. Mutagenesis analysis indicated that the clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats system and the selected restriction-modification systems (Cj0030/Cj0031, Cj0139/Cj0140, Cj0690c, and HsdR) were dispensable for heat shock-enhanced conjugation in C. jejuni. Taking all results together, this study demonstrated a heat shock-enhanced conjugation efficiency in standard C. jejuni strains, leading to an optimized conjugation protocol for molecular manipulation of this organism. The findings from this study also represent a significant step toward elucidation of the molecular mechanism of conjugative gene transfer in C. jejuni. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  6. Olfactory conditioning in the third instar larvae of Drosophila melanogaster using heat shock reinforcement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khurana, Sukant; Robinson, Brooks G; Wang, Zihe; Shropshire, William C; Zhong, Allen C; Garcia, Laura E; Corpuz, Jonathan; Chow, Jonathan; Hatch, Michael M; Precise, Eric F; Cady, Amanda; Godinez, Ryan M; Pulpanyawong, Terapat; Nguyen, Andrew T; Li, Wen-Ke; Seiter, Max; Jahanian, Kambiz; Sun, Jeffrey C; Shah, Ruchita; Rajani, Sunaina; Chen, William Y; Ray, Sofia; Ryazanova, Natalie V; Wakou, Dorah; Prabhu, Rohith K; Atkinson, Nigel S

    2012-01-01

    Adult Drosophila melanogaster has long been a popular model for learning and memory studies. Now the larval stage of the fruit fly is also being used in an increasing number of classical conditioning studies. In this study, we employed heat shock as a novel negative reinforcement for larvae and obtained high learning scores following just one training trial. We demonstrated heat-shock conditioning in both reciprocal and non-reciprocal paradigms and observed that the time window of association for the odor and heat shock reinforcement is on the order of a few minutes. This is slightly wider than the time window for electroshock conditioning reported in previous studies, possibly due to lingering effects of the high temperature. To test the utility of this simplified assay for the identification of new mutations that disrupt learning, we examined flies carrying mutations in the dnc gene. While the sensitivity to heat shock, as tested by writhing, was similar for wild type and dnc homozygotes, dnc mutations strongly diminished learning. We confirmed that the learning defect in dnc flies was indeed due to mutation in the dnc gene using non-complementation analysis. Given that heat shock has not been employed as a reinforcement for larvae in the past, we explored learning as a function of heat shock intensity and found that optimal learning occurred around 41 °C, with higher and lower temperatures both resulting in lower learning scores. In summary, we have developed a very simple, robust paradigm of learning in fruit fly larvae using heat shock reinforcement.

  7. Heat-shock effects on photosynthesis and sink-source dynamics in wheat (Triticum aestivum L.)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schapendonk, A.H.C.M.; Xu, H.Y.; Putten, van der P.E.L.; Spiertz, J.H.J.

    2007-01-01

    To assess the mechanisms causing genotypic differences in heat tolerance of wheat (Triticum aestivum L.), physiological responses to a heat shock in a vegetative (`end of tillering¿) or a reproductive (`early grain filling¿) stage were studied. Three cultivars ¿ Lavett, Ciano-79 and Attila ¿

  8. Requirements for chromatin reassembly during transcriptional downregulation of a heat shock gene in S. cerevisiae

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Mette Moesgaard; Christensen, Marianne Skovgaard; Bonven, Bjarne Juul

    2008-01-01

    Heat shock genes respond to moderate heat stress by a wave of transcription. The induction phase is accompanied by massive eviction of histones, which later reassemble with DNA during the ensuing phase of transcription downregulation. Here, we identify determinants of this reassembly throughout...

  9. Heat-flow equation motivated by the ideal-gas shock wave.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holian, Brad Lee; Mareschal, Michel

    2010-08-01

    We present an equation for the heat-flux vector that goes beyond Fourier's Law of heat conduction, in order to model shockwave propagation in gases. Our approach is motivated by the observation of a disequilibrium among the three components of temperature, namely, the difference between the temperature component in the direction of a planar shock wave, versus those in the transverse directions. This difference is most prominent near the shock front. We test our heat-flow equation for the case of strong shock waves in the ideal gas, which has been studied in the past and compared to Navier-Stokes solutions. The new heat-flow treatment improves the agreement with nonequilibrium molecular-dynamics simulations of hard spheres under strong shockwave conditions.

  10. Heat-flow equation motivated by the ideal-gas shock wave

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holian, Brad Lee; Mareschal, Michel

    2010-08-01

    We present an equation for the heat-flux vector that goes beyond Fourier’s Law of heat conduction, in order to model shockwave propagation in gases. Our approach is motivated by the observation of a disequilibrium among the three components of temperature, namely, the difference between the temperature component in the direction of a planar shock wave, versus those in the transverse directions. This difference is most prominent near the shock front. We test our heat-flow equation for the case of strong shock waves in the ideal gas, which has been studied in the past and compared to Navier-Stokes solutions. The new heat-flow treatment improves the agreement with nonequilibrium molecular-dynamics simulations of hard spheres under strong shockwave conditions.

  11. Shock initiation of the TATB-based explosive PBX 9502 heated to 130 degrees C

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gustavsen, R. L.; Bartram, B. D.; Gibson, L. L.; Pacheco, A. H.; Jones, J. D.; Goodbody, A. B.

    2017-06-01

    We present gas-gun driven plate-impact shock initiation experiments on the explosive PBX 9502 (95 weight % triaminotrinitrobenzene, 5 weight % Kel-F 800 binder) heated to 130 + / - 2 degrees C. PBX 9502 samples were heated using resistive elements, temperatures were monitored using embedded and surface mounted type-E thermocouples, and the shock to detonation transition was measured using embedded electromagnetic particle velocity gauges. Results indicate that shock sensitivity increases regularly as the temperature increases. For a fixed initial pressure, the time and distance to onset of detonation are shorter for the heated explosive than for the explosive initially at 23 degrees C. For PBX 9502 heated to 130 degrees C, the ``Pop-plot'' or distance to detonation, xD, vs. impact pressure, P, is log10(xD) = 2.82 - 2.19log10(P) .

  12. Development of a Wind Directly Forced Heat Pump and Its Efficiency Analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Ching-Song Jwo; Zi-Jie Chien; Yen-Lin Chen; Chao-Chun Chien

    2013-01-01

    The requirements of providing electric energy through the wind-forced generator to the heat pump for water cooling and hot water heating grow significantly by now. This study proposes a new technique to directly adopt the wind force to drive heat pump systems, which can effectively reduce the energy conversion losses during the processes of wind force energy converting to electric energy and electric energy converting to kinetic energy. The operation of heat pump system transfers between chil...

  13. Arctigenin from Fructus Arctii is a novel suppressor of heat shock response in mammalian cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishihara, Keiichi; Yamagishi, Nobuyuki; Saito, Youhei; Takasaki, Midori; Konoshima, Takao; Hatayama, Takumi

    2006-01-01

    Because heat shock proteins (Hsps) are involved in protecting cells and in the pathophysiology of diseases such as inflammation, cancer, and neurodegenerative disorders, the use of regulators of the expression of Hsps in mammalian cells seems to be useful as a potential therapeutic modality. To identify compounds that modulate the response to heat shock, we analyzed several natural products using a mammalian cell line containing an hsp promoter-regulated reporter gene. In this study, we found that an extract from Fructus Arctii markedly suppressed the expression of Hsp induced by heat shock. A component of the extract arctigenin, but not the component arctiin, suppressed the response at the level of the activation of heat shock transcription factor, the induction of mRNA, and the synthesis and accumulation of Hsp. Furthermore, arctigenin inhibited the acquisition of thermotolerance in mammalian cells, including cancer cells. Thus, arctigenin seemed to be a new suppressive regulator of heat shock response in mammalian cells, and may be useful for hyperthermia cancer therapy. PMID:16817321

  14. Impaired heat shock response in cells expressing full-length polyglutamine-expanded huntingtin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sidhartha M Chafekar

    Full Text Available The molecular mechanisms by which polyglutamine (polyQ-expanded huntingtin (Htt causes neurodegeneration in Huntington's disease (HD remain unclear. The malfunction of cellular proteostasis has been suggested as central in HD pathogenesis and also as a target of therapeutic interventions for the treatment of HD. We present results that offer a previously unexplored perspective regarding impaired proteostasis in HD. We find that, under non-stress conditions, the proteostatic capacity of cells expressing full length polyQ-expanded Htt is adequate. Yet, under stress conditions, the presence of polyQ-expanded Htt impairs the heat shock response, a key component of cellular proteostasis. This impaired heat shock response results in a reduced capacity to withstand the damage caused by cellular stress. We demonstrate that in cells expressing polyQ-expanded Htt the levels of heat shock transcription factor 1 (HSF1 are reduced, and, as a consequence, these cells have an impaired a heat shock response. Also, we found reduced HSF1 and HSP70 levels in the striata of HD knock-in mice when compared to wild-type mice. Our results suggests that full length, non-aggregated polyQ-expanded Htt blocks the effective induction of the heat shock response under stress conditions and may thus trigger the accumulation of cellular damage during the course of HD pathogenesis.

  15. Development of solar wind shock models with tensor plasma pressure for data analysis. Final technical report, 1 Aug 1970--31 Dec 1975

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abraham-shrauner, B.

    1975-01-01

    The development of solar wind shock models with tensor plasma pressure and the comparison of some of the shock models with the satellite data from Pioneer 6 through Pioneer 9 are reported. Theoretically, difficulties were found in non-turbulent fluid shock models for tensor pressure plasmas. For microscopic shock theories nonlinear growth caused by plasma instabilities was frequently not clearly demonstrated to lead to the formation of a shock. As a result no clear choice for a shock model for the bow shock or interplanetary tensor pressure shocks emerged

  16. Overexpression of the HspL Promotes Agrobacterium tumefaciens Virulence in Arabidopsis Under Heat Shock Conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Hau-Hsuan; Liu, Yin-Tzu; Huang, Si-Chi; Tung, Chin-Yi; Huang, Fan-Chen; Tsai, Yun-Long; Cheng, Tun-Fang; Lai, Erh-Min

    2015-02-01

    Agrobacterium tumefaciens transfers a specific DNA fragment from the resident tumor-inducing (Ti) plasmid and effector virulence (Vir) proteins to plant cells during infection. A. tumefaciens VirB1-11 and VirD4 proteins assemble as the type IV secretion system (T4SS), which mediates transfer of the T-DNA and effector Vir protein into plant cells, thus resulting in crown gall disease in plants. Previous studies revealed that an α-crystallin-type, small heat-shock protein (HspL) is a more effective VirB8 chaperone than three other small heat-shock proteins (HspC, HspAT1, and HspAT2). Additionally, HspL contributes to efficient T4SS-mediated DNA transfer and tumorigenesis under room-temperature growth. In this study, we aimed to characterize the impact of HspL on Agrobacterium-mediated transformation efficiency under heat-shock treatment. During heat shock, transient transformation efficiency and VirB8 protein accumulation were lower in the hspL deletion mutant than in the wild type. Overexpression of HspL in A. tumefaciens enhanced the transient transformation efficiency in root explants of both susceptible and recalcitrant Arabidopsis ecotypes. In addition, the reduced transient transformation efficiency during heat stress was recovered by overexpression of HspL in A. tumefaciens. HspL may help maintain VirB8 homeostasis and elevate Agrobacterium-mediated transformation efficiency under both heat-shock and nonheat-shock growth.

  17. Compound A, a Selective Glucocorticoid Receptor Modulator, Enhances Heat Shock Protein Hsp70 Gene Promoter Activation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beck, Ilse M.; Drebert, Zuzanna J.; Hoya-Arias, Ruben; Bahar, Ali A.; Devos, Michael; Clarisse, Dorien; Desmet, Sofie; Bougarne, Nadia; Ruttens, Bart; Gossye, Valerie; Denecker, Geertrui; Lievens, Sam; Bracke, Marc; Tavernier, Jan; Declercq, Wim; Gevaert, Kris; Berghe, Wim Vanden; Haegeman, Guy; De Bosscher, Karolien

    2013-01-01

    Compound A possesses glucocorticoid receptor (GR)-dependent anti-inflammatory properties. Just like classical GR ligands, Compound A can repress NF-κB-mediated gene expression. However, the monomeric Compound A-activated GR is unable to trigger glucocorticoid response element-regulated gene expression. The heat shock response potently activates heat shock factor 1 (HSF1), upregulates Hsp70, a known GR chaperone, and also modulates various aspects of inflammation. We found that the selective GR modulator Compound A and heat shock trigger similar cellular effects in A549 lung epithelial cells. With regard to their anti-inflammatory mechanism, heat shock and Compound A are both able to reduce TNF-stimulated IκBα degradation and NF-κB p65 nuclear translocation. We established an interaction between Compound A-activated GR and Hsp70, but remarkably, although the presence of the Hsp70 chaperone as such appears pivotal for the Compound A-mediated inflammatory gene repression, subsequent novel Hsp70 protein synthesis is uncoupled from an observed CpdA-induced Hsp70 mRNA upregulation and hence obsolete in mediating CpdA’s anti-inflammatory effect. The lack of a Compound A-induced increase in Hsp70 protein levels in A549 cells is not mediated by a rapid proteasomal degradation of Hsp70 or by a Compound A-induced general block on translation. Similar to heat shock, Compound A can upregulate transcription of Hsp70 genes in various cell lines and BALB/c mice. Interestingly, whereas Compound A-dependent Hsp70 promoter activation is GR-dependent but HSF1-independent, heat shock-induced Hsp70 expression alternatively occurs in a GR-independent and HSF1-dependent manner in A549 lung epithelial cells. PMID:23935933

  18. Riluzole increases the amount of latent HSF1 for an amplified heat shock response and cytoprotection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jingxian Yang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Induction of the heat shock response (HSR and increased expression of the heat shock proteins (HSPs provide mechanisms to ensure proper protein folding, trafficking, and disposition. The importance of HSPs is underscored by the understanding that protein mis-folding and aggregation contribute centrally to the pathogenesis of neurodegenerative diseases. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We used a cell-based hsp70-luciferease reporter gene assay system to identify agents that modulate the HSR and show here that clinically relevant concentrations of the FDA-approved ALS drug riluzole significantly increased the heat shock induction of hsp70-luciferse reporter gene. Immuno-Western and -cytochemical analysis of HSF1 show that riluzole increased the amount of cytosolic HSF1 to afford a greater activation of HSF1 upon heat shock. The increased HSF1 contributed centrally to the cytoprotective activity of riluzole as hsf1 gene knockout negated the synergistic activity of riluzole and conditioning heat shock to confer cell survival under oxidative stress. Evidence of a post-transcriptional mechanism for the increase in HSF1 include: quantitation of mRNA(hsf1 by RT-PCR showed no effect of either heat shock or riluzole treatment; riluzole also increased the expression of HSF1 from a CMV-promoter; analysis of the turnover of HSF1 by pulse chase and immunoprecipitation show that riluzole slowed the decay of [(35S]labeled-HSF1. The effect of riluzole on HSF1 was qualitatively different from that of MG132 and chloroquine, inhibitors of the proteasome and lysosome, respectively, and appeared to involve the chaperone-mediated autophagy pathway as RNAi-mediated knockdown of CMA negated its effect. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: We show that riluzole increased the amount of HSF1 to amplify the HSR for cytoprotection. Our study provides novel insight into the mechanism that regulates HSF1 turnover, and identifies the degradation of HSF1 as a target for

  19. Heat flux and shock shape measurements on an Aeroassist Flight Experiment model in a high enthalpy free piston shock tunnel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gai, S. L.; Mudford, N. R.; Hackett, C.

    1992-01-01

    This paper describes measurements of heat flux and shock shapes made on a 2.08 percent scale model of the proposed Aeroassist Flight Experiment model in a high enthalpy free piston shock tunnel T3 at the Australian National University in Canberra, Australia. The enthalpy and Reynolds number range covered were 7.5 MJ/kg to 20 MJ/kg and 150,000 to 270,000 per meter respectively. The test Mach number varied between 7.5 and 8. Two test gases, air and nitrogen, were used and the model angle of attack varied from -10 deg to +10 deg to the free stream. The results are discussed and compared to the Mach 10 cold hypersonic air data as obtained in the Langley 31 inch Mach 10 Facility as well as the perfect gas CFD calculations of NASA LaRC.

  20. Increased expression of heat shock protein 70 and heat shock factor 1 in chronic dermal ulcer tissues treated with laser-aided therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Jian-da; Luo, Cheng-qun; Xie, Hui-qing; Nie, Xin-min; Zhao, Yan-zhong; Wang, Shao-hua; Xu, Yi; Pokharel, Pashupati Babu; Xu, Dan

    2008-07-20

    Chronic dermal ulcers are also referred to as refractory ulcers. This study was conducted to elucidate the therapeutic effect of laser on chronic dermal ulcers and the induced expression of heat shock factor 1 (HSF1) and heat shock protein 70 (HSP70) in wound tissues. Sixty patients with 84 chronic dermal ulcers were randomly divided into traditional therapy and laser therapy groups. Laser treatment was performed in addition to traditional therapy in the laser therapy group. The treatment efficacy was evaluated after three weeks. Five tissue sections of healing wounds were randomly collected along with five normal skin sections as controls. HSP70-positive cells from HSP70 immunohistochemical staining were counted and the gray scale of positive cells was measured for statistical analysis. Reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and Western blotting were performed to determine the mRNA and protein expressions of HSF1 and HSP70. The cure rate of the wounds and the total efficacy in the laser therapy group were significantly higher than those in the traditional therapy group (P ulcers plays a facilitating role in healing due to the mechanism of laser-activated endogenous heat shock protection in cells in wound surfaces.

  1. Monitoring the Induction of Heat Shock Factor 1/Heat Shock Protein 70 Expression following 17-Allylamino-Demethoxygeldanamycin Treatment by Positron Emission Tomography and Optical Reporter Gene Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mikhail Doubrovin

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The cell response to proteotoxic cell stresses is mediated primarily through activation of heat shock factor 1 (HSF1. This transcription factor plays a major role in the regulation of the heat shock proteins (HSPs, including HSP70. We demonstrate that an [124I]iodide-pQHNIG70 positron emission tomography (PET reporter system that includes an inducible HSP70 promoter can be used to image and monitor the activation of the HSF1/HSP70 transcription factor in response to drug treatment (17-allylamino-demethoxygeldanamycin [17-AAG]. We developed a dual imaging reporter (pQHNIG70 for noninvasive imaging of the heat shock response in cell culture and living animals previously and now study HSF1/HSP70 reporter activation in both cell culture and tumor-bearing animals following exposure to 17-AAG. 17-AAG (10–1,000 nM induced reporter expression; a 23-fold increase was observed by 60 hours. Good correspondence between reporter expression and HSP70 protein levels were observed. MicroPET imaging based on [124I]iodide accumulation in pQHNIG70-transduced RG2 xenografts showed a significant 6.2-fold reporter response to 17-AAG, with a corresponding increase in tumor HSP70 and in tumor human sodium iodide symporter and green fluorescent protein reporter proteins. The HSF1 reporter system can be used to screen anticancer drugs for induction of cytotoxic stress and HSF1 activation both in vitro and in vivo.

  2. Overcoming heat shock protein inhibition at critical temperature vital ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Bengyella

    2012-06-12

    Jun 12, 2012 ... (http://cpri.ernet.in/varieties.html). The prevailing temperature increase during potato farming seasons is more threatening when heat-stress coincides with senescence stages of growth. Heat stress proteins (HSPs) expression and related cognates are geared to protect cells or organisms from harmful stress.

  3. Heat and Flux Configurations on Offshore Wind Farms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kucuksahin, D; Bot, E T G

    2014-01-01

    This study aims to determine the best configurations of the Heat and Flux concept for more profitable and utilizable settings in a wind farm in terms of increase in the energy yield and reduction in loadings. The computations are performed with alteration of a single parameter at a time. The reference farm for this study is EWTW, the ECN test farm in Wieringermeer, as this farm was also the reference for the validation of both the Heat and Flux concept and the software tool FarmFlow. All the studies are performed with FarmFlow developed by ECN, which computes wake deficits and turbulence intensities, resulting in the energy yield of all turbines in the farm

  4. Heat shock factor 1 upregulates transcription of Epstein-Barr Virus nuclear antigen 1 by binding to a heat shock element within the BamHI-Q promoter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Feng-Wei [The State Key Laboratory of Oncology in South China, Cancer Center, Sun Yat-Sen University, Guangzhou (China); Wu, Xian-Rui [Department of Surgery, Sixth Affiliated Hospital, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou (China); Liu, Wen-Ju; Liao, Yi-Ji [The State Key Laboratory of Oncology in South China, Cancer Center, Sun Yat-Sen University, Guangzhou (China); Lin, Sheng [Laboratory of Integrated Biosciences, School of Life Science, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou (China); Zong, Yong-Sheng; Zeng, Mu-Sheng; Zeng, Yi-Xin [The State Key Laboratory of Oncology in South China, Cancer Center, Sun Yat-Sen University, Guangzhou (China); Mai, Shi-Juan, E-mail: maishj@sysucc.org.cn [The State Key Laboratory of Oncology in South China, Cancer Center, Sun Yat-Sen University, Guangzhou (China); Xie, Dan, E-mail: xied@mail.sysu.edu.cn [The State Key Laboratory of Oncology in South China, Cancer Center, Sun Yat-Sen University, Guangzhou (China)

    2011-12-20

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) nuclear antigen 1 (EBNA1) is essential for maintenance of the episome and establishment of latency. In this study, we observed that heat treatment effectively induced EBNA1 transcription in EBV-transformed B95-8 and human LCL cell lines. Although Cp is considered as the sole promoter used for the expression of EBNA1 transcripts in the lymphoblastoid cell lines, the RT-PCR results showed that the EBNA1 transcripts induced by heat treatment arise from Qp-initiated transcripts. Using bioinformatics, a high affinity and functional heat shock factor 1 (HSF1)-binding element within the - 17/+4 oligonucleotide of the Qp was found, and was determined by electrophoretic mobility shift assay and chromatin immunoprecipitation assay. Moreover, heat shock and exogenous HSF1 expression induced Qp activity in reporter assays. Further, RNA interference-mediated HSF1 gene silencing attenuated heat-induced EBNA1 expression in B95-8 cells. These results provide evidence that EBNA1 is a new target for the transcription factor HSF1.

  5. The Asymmetric Bow Shock/Pulsar Wind Nebula of PSR J2124–3358

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romani, Roger W.; Slane, Patrick; Green, Andrew W.

    2017-12-01

    We describe new measurements of the remarkable Hα/UV/X-ray bow shock and pulsar wind nebula (PWN) of the isolated millisecond pulsar (MSP) PSR J2124‑3358. Chandra X-ray Observatory imaging shows a one-sided jet structure with a softer equatorial outflow. KOALA integral field unit spectroscopy shows that non-radiative emission dominates the bow shock and that the Hα nebula is asymmetric about the pulsar velocity with an elongation into the plane of the sky. We extend analytic models of the contact discontinuity to accommodate such shapes and compare these to the data. Using Hubble Space Telescope UV detections of the pulsar and bow shock, radio timing distance, proper motion measurements, and the CXO-detected projected spin axis, we model the 3D PWN momentum flux distribution. The integrated momentum flux depends on the ionization of the ambient ISM, but for an expected ambient warm neutral medium, we infer I=2.4× {10}45 {{g}} {{cm}}2. This implies {M}{NS}=1.6{--}2.1 {M}ȯ , depending on the equation of state, which in turn suggests that the MSP gained significant mass during recycling and then lost its companion. However, this conclusion is at present tentative, since lower ionization allows ∼ 30 % lower masses, and uncertainty in the parallax allows up to 50% error.

  6. A comparison of shock-cloud and wind-cloud interactions: effect of increased cloud density contrast on cloud evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldsmith, K. J. A.; Pittard, J. M.

    2018-05-01

    The similarities, or otherwise, of a shock or wind interacting with a cloud of density contrast χ = 10 were explored in a previous paper. Here, we investigate such interactions with clouds of higher density contrast. We compare the adiabatic hydrodynamic interaction of a Mach 10 shock with a spherical cloud of χ = 103 with that of a cloud embedded in a wind with identical parameters to the post-shock flow. We find that initially there are only minor morphological differences between the shock-cloud and wind-cloud interactions, compared to when χ = 10. However, once the transmitted shock exits the cloud, the development of a turbulent wake and fragmentation of the cloud differs between the two simulations. On increasing the wind Mach number, we note the development of a thin, smooth tail of cloud material, which is then disrupted by the fragmentation of the cloud core and subsequent `mass-loading' of the flow. We find that the normalized cloud mixing time (tmix) is shorter at higher χ. However, a strong Mach number dependence on tmix and the normalized cloud drag time, t_{drag}^' }, is not observed. Mach-number-dependent values of tmix and t_{drag}^' } from comparable shock-cloud interactions converge towards the Mach-number-independent time-scales of the wind-cloud simulations. We find that high χ clouds can be accelerated up to 80-90 per cent of the wind velocity and travel large distances before being significantly mixed. However, complete mixing is not achieved in our simulations and at late times the flow remains perturbed.

  7. Test of a new heat-flow equation for dense-fluid shock waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holian, Brad Lee; Mareschal, Michel; Ravelo, Ramon

    2010-09-01

    Using a recently proposed equation for the heat-flux vector that goes beyond Fourier's Law of heat conduction, we model shockwave propagation in the dense Lennard-Jones fluid. Disequilibrium among the three components of temperature, namely, the difference between the kinetic temperature in the direction of a planar shock wave and those in the transverse directions, particularly in the region near the shock front, gives rise to a new transport (equilibration) mechanism not seen in usual one-dimensional heat-flow situations. The modification of the heat-flow equation was tested earlier for the case of strong shock waves in the ideal gas, which had been studied in the past and compared to Navier-Stokes-Fourier solutions. Now, the Lennard-Jones fluid, whose equation of state and transport properties have been determined from independent calculations, allows us to study the case where potential, as well as kinetic contributions are important. The new heat-flow treatment improves the agreement with nonequilibrium molecular-dynamics simulations under strong shock wave conditions, compared to Navier-Stokes.

  8. A minimal titration model of the mammalian dynamical heat shock response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sivéry, Aude; Courtade, Emmanuel; Thommen, Quentin

    2016-12-01

    Environmental stress, such as oxidative or heat stress, induces the activation of the heat shock response (HSR) and leads to an increase in the heat shock proteins (HSPs) level. These HSPs act as molecular chaperones to maintain cellular proteostasis. Controlled by highly intricate regulatory mechanisms, having stress-induced activation and feedback regulations with multiple partners, the HSR is still incompletely understood. In this context, we propose a minimal molecular model for the gene regulatory network of the HSR that reproduces quantitatively different heat shock experiments both on heat shock factor 1 (HSF1) and HSPs activities. This model, which is based on chemical kinetics laws, is kept with a low dimensionality without altering the biological interpretation of the model dynamics. This simplistic model highlights the titration of HSF1 by chaperones as the guiding line of the network. Moreover, by a steady states analysis of the network, three different temperature stress regimes appear: normal, acute, and chronic, where normal stress corresponds to pseudo thermal adaption. The protein triage that governs the fate of damaged proteins or the different stress regimes are consequences of the titration mechanism. The simplicity of the present model is of interest in order to study detailed modelling of cross regulation between the HSR and other major genetic networks like the cell cycle or the circadian clock.

  9. Test of a new heat-flow equation for dense-fluid shock waves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holian, Brad Lee; Mareschal, Michel; Ravelo, Ramon

    2010-09-21

    Using a recently proposed equation for the heat-flux vector that goes beyond Fourier's Law of heat conduction, we model shockwave propagation in the dense Lennard-Jones fluid. Disequilibrium among the three components of temperature, namely, the difference between the kinetic temperature in the direction of a planar shock wave and those in the transverse directions, particularly in the region near the shock front, gives rise to a new transport (equilibration) mechanism not seen in usual one-dimensional heat-flow situations. The modification of the heat-flow equation was tested earlier for the case of strong shock waves in the ideal gas, which had been studied in the past and compared to Navier-Stokes-Fourier solutions. Now, the Lennard-Jones fluid, whose equation of state and transport properties have been determined from independent calculations, allows us to study the case where potential, as well as kinetic contributions are important. The new heat-flow treatment improves the agreement with nonequilibrium molecular-dynamics simulations under strong shock wave conditions, compared to Navier-Stokes.

  10. Potential for increased wind-generated electricity utilization using heat pumps in urban areas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Waite, Michael; Modi, Vijay

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Large-scale wind power and increased electric heat pumps were evaluated. • A deterministic model of wind power and electricity demand was developed. • Sub-models for space heating and domestic hot water demand were developed. • Increased use of heat pumps can improve the viability of large-scale wind power. • Larger wind power capacity can meet a target utilization rate with more heat pumps. - Abstract: The U.S. has substantial wind power potential, but given wind’s intermittent availability and misalignment with electricity demand profiles, large-scale deployment of wind turbines could result in high electricity costs due to energy storage requirements or low utilization rates. While fuel switching and heat pumps have been proposed as greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions and energy reduction strategies at the building scale, this paper shows that heat pump adoption could have additional system-wide benefits by increasing the utilization of wind-generated electricity. A model was developed to evaluate the effects of coupling large-scale wind power installations in New York State with increased use of electric heat pumps to meet a portion of space heating and domestic hot water (DHW) demands in New York City. The analysis showed significant increases in wind-generated electricity utilization with increased use of heat pumps, allowing for higher installed capacity of wind power. One scenario indicates that 78.5% annual wind-generated electricity utilization can be achieved with 3 GW of installed wind power capacity generated electricity equal to 20% of existing NYC annual electricity demand; if 20% of space heating and DHW demands are provided by heat pumps, the 78.5% utilization rate can be achieved with an increase of total wind power capacity to 5 GW. Therefore, this integrated supply–demand approach could provide additional system-wide emissions reductions

  11. Heating coronal holes and accelerating the solar wind

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, E. N.

    1992-01-01

    The special energy requirements of a coronal hole combined with current knowledge of the limited dissipation of Alfven and fast mode MHD waves in the solar corona suggest a unique source of heat for the coronal hole. The near coronal hole requires approximately 3 - 4 x 10 exp 5 ergs/sq cm s, which can come only from the fluid jets, fast particles, and short period MHD waves from the network activity. The high speed streams of solar wind from coronal holes show that there is substantial heating, of 1 - 2 x 10 exp 5 ergs/sq cm s, beyond the sonic point in the wind, which can come only from the dissipation by thermal conduction of long period (approximately equal or greater than 100 sec) MHD waves from subphotospheric convection. Although the Alfven wave flux from the photosphere is generally taken for granted in the literature, we point out that it is a crucial phenomenon that has yet to be established on either a theoretical or observational scientific basis.

  12. Plume and Shock Interaction Effects on Sonic Boom in the 1-foot by 1-foot Supersonic Wind Tunnel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castner, Raymond; Elmiligui, Alaa; Cliff, Susan; Winski, Courtney

    2015-01-01

    The desire to reduce or eliminate the operational restrictions of supersonic aircraft over populated areas has led to extensive research at NASA. Restrictions are due to the disturbance of the sonic boom, caused by the coalescence of shock waves formed by the aircraft. A study has been performed focused on reducing the magnitude of the sonic boom N-wave generated by airplane components with a focus on shock waves caused by the exhaust nozzle plume. Testing was completed in the 1-foot by 1-foot supersonic wind tunnel to study the effects of an exhaust nozzle plume and shock wave interaction. The plume and shock interaction study was developed to collect data for computational fluid dynamics (CFD) validation of a nozzle plume passing through the shock generated from the wing or tail of a supersonic vehicle. The wing or tail was simulated with a wedgeshaped shock generator. This test entry was the first of two phases to collect schlieren images and off-body static pressure profiles. Three wedge configurations were tested consisting of strut-mounted wedges of 2.5- degrees and 5-degrees. Three propulsion configurations were tested simulating the propulsion pod and aft deck from a low boom vehicle concept, which also provided a trailing edge shock and plume interaction. Findings include how the interaction of the jet plume caused a thickening of the shock generated by the wedge (or aft deck) and demonstrate how the shock location moved with increasing nozzle pressure ratio.

  13. Asymmetric shock heating and the terrestrial magma ocean origin of the Moon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karato, Shun-ichiro

    2014-01-01

    One of the difficulties of the current giant impact model for the origin of the Moon is to explain the marked similarity in the isotopic compositions and the substantial differences in the major element chemistry. Physics of shock heating is analyzed to show that the degree of heating is asymmetric between the impactor and the target, if the target (the proto-Earth) had a magma-ocean but the impactor did not. The magma ocean is heated much more than the solid impactor and the vapor-rich jets come mainly from the magma-ocean from which the Moon might have been formed. In this scenario, the similarity and differences in the composition between the Moon and Earth would be explained as a natural consequence of a collision in the later stage of planetary formation. Including the asymmetry in shock heating is the first step toward explaining the chemical composition of the Moon.

  14. Numerical Study of Erosion, Heating, and Acceleration of the Magnetic Cloud as Impacted by Fast Shock

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mao, Shoudi; He, Jiansen; Yang, Liping; Wang, Linghua [School of Earth and Space Sciences, Peking University No. 5 Yiheyuan Road, Haidian District Beijing, 100871 (China); Zhang, Lei, E-mail: jshept@gmail.com [SIGMA Weather Group, State Key Laboratory of Space Weather, Center for Space Science and Applied Research, Chinese Academy of Sciences No.1 Nanertiao, Zhongguancun, Haidian district Beijing, 100190 (China)

    2017-06-20

    The impact of an overtaking fast shock on a magnetic cloud (MC) is a pivotal process in CME–CME (CME: coronal mass ejection) interactions and CME–SIR (SIR: stream interaction region) interactions. MC with a strong and rotating magnetic field is usually deemed a crucial part of CMEs. To study the impact of a fast shock on an MC, we perform a 2.5 dimensional numerical magnetohydrodynamic simulation. Two cases are run in this study: without and with impact by fast shock. In the former case, the MC expands gradually from its initial state and drives a relatively slow magnetic reconnection with the ambient magnetic field. Analyses of forces near the core of the MC as a whole body indicates that the solar gravity is quite small compared to the Lorentz force and the pressure gradient force. In the second run, a fast shock propagates, relative to the background plasma, at a speed twice that of the perpendicular fast magnetosonic speed, catches up with and takes over the MC. Due to the penetration of the fast shock, the MC is highly compressed and heated, with the temperature growth rate enhanced by a factor of about 10 and the velocity increased to about half of the shock speed. The magnetic reconnection with ambient magnetic field is also sped up by a factor of two to four in reconnection rate as a result of the enhanced density of the current sheet, which is squeezed by the forward motion of the shocked MC.

  15. Wind power integration with heat pumps, heat storages, and electric vehicles – Energy systems analysis and modelling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hedegaard, Karsten

    The fluctuating and only partly predictable nature of wind challenges an effective integration of large wind power penetrations. This PhD thesis investigates to which extent heat pumps, heat storages, and electric vehicles can support the integration of wind power. Considering the gaps in existing...... in an energy system context. Energy systems analyses reveal that the heat pumps can even without flexible operation contribute significantly to facilitating larger wind power investments and reducing system costs, fuel consumption, and CO2 emissions. When equipping the heat pumps with heat storages, only...... moderate additional benefits are achieved. Hereof, the main benefit is that the need for investing in peak/reserve capacities can be reduced through peak load shaving. It is more important to ensure flexible operation of electric vehicles than of individual heat pumps, due to differences in the load...

  16. Heat-shock-protein-27(HSP27) expression in ovarian carcinoma : Relation in response to chemotherapy and prognosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Arts, HJG; Hollema, H; Lemstra, W; Willemse, PHB; De Vries, EGE; Kampinga, HH; Van der Zee, AGJ

    1999-01-01

    Heat-shock protein 27 (hsp27) is one of the small heat-shock proteins. Its expression in ovarian- and breast-cancer cell lines has been associated with resistance to cisplatin and doxorubicin. In addition, hsp27 expression appears to facilitate cellular growth, differentiation and motility. In

  17. HEAT SHOCK FACTOR 1-MEDIATED THERMOTOLERANCE PREVENTS CELL DEATH AND RESULTS IN G2/M CELL CYCLE ARREST

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mammalian cells respond to stress by activating heat shock transcription factors (e.g., HSF1) that regulate increased synthesis of heat shock proteins (HSPs). HSPs mediate protection from deleterious effects of stress by preventing permanent disruption of normal cellular mitosis...

  18. Differential heat shock response of primary human cell cultures and established cell lines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Richter, W W; Issinger, O G

    1986-01-01

    degrees C treatment, whereas in immortalized cell lines usually 90% of the cells were found in suspension. Enhanced expression of the major heat shock protein (hsp 70) was found in all heat-treated cells. In contrast to the primary cell cultures, established and transformed cell lines synthesized...... a protein with an apparent molecular mass of 70 kDa and an isoelectric pH of 7.0 as early as 3 h after the initial hyperthermal treatment....

  19. Wind effects on convective heat loss from a cavity receiver for a parabolic concentrating solar collector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ma, R.Y. [California State Polytechnic Univ., Pomoma, CA (United States). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering

    1993-09-01

    Tests were performed to determine the convective heat loss characteristics of a cavity receiver for a parabolid dish concentrating solar collector for various tilt angles and wind speeds of 0-24 mph. Natural (no wind) convective heat loss from the receiver is the highest for a horizontal receiver orientation and negligible with the reveler facing straight down. Convection from the receiver is substantially increased by the presence of side-on wind for all receiver tilt angles. For head-on wind, convective heat loss with the receiver facing straight down is approximately the same as that for side-on wind. Overall it was found that for wind speeds of 20--24 mph, convective heat loss from the receiver can be as much as three times that occurring without wind.

  20. Retaspimycin hydrochloride (IPI-504): a novel heat shock protein inhibitor as an anticancer agent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanson, Britt Erika; Vesole, David H

    2009-09-01

    Heat shock proteins are vital to cell survival under conditions of stress. They bind client proteins to assist in protein stabilization, translocation of polypeptides across cell membranes and recovery of proteins from aggregates. Heat shock protein inhibitors are a diverse group of novel agents that have been demonstrated to have pro-apoptotic effects on malignant cells through inhibition of ATP binding on the ATP/ADP-binding pocket of the heat shock protein. Initial development of heat shock protein 90 inhibitors, geldanamycin and 17-AAG, were limited by hepatotoxicity and the need for solvent carrying agents. In contrast, retaspimycin, or IPI-504, a derivative of geldanamycin and 17-AAG, is highly soluble in water and generally well tolerated. In Phase I/II trials, retaspimycin has shown activity in NSCLC and gastrointestinal stromal tumor. The most promising activity was observed in gastrointestinal stromal tumors. Phase I/II trials are currently underway to evaluate the dosing schedules and activity of IPI-504 in breast cancer. Given the in vitro activity in diffuse large B-cell lymphoma, mantle cell lymphoma, melanoma, leukemia and pancreatic cancer, current and future trials are of clinical interest. This article reviews IPI-504 and its utility in a wide variety of cancer phenotypes.

  1. Genetic responses of the marine copepod Acartia tonsa (Dana) to heat shock and epibiont infestation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petkeviciute, Egle; Kania, Per Walter; Skovgaard, Alf

    2015-01-01

    Expression of stress-related genes was investigated in the marine copepod Acartia tonsa in relation to heat shock at two different salinities (10 and 32‰), and it was furthermore investigated whether experimentally induced epibiont infestation led to elevated expression of stress-related genes...

  2. Dietary heme adversely affects experimental colitis in rats, despite heat-shock protein induction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schepens, Marloes A. A.; Vink, Carolien; Schonewille, Arjan J.; Dijkstra, Gerard; van der Meer, Roelof; Bovee-Oudenhoven, Ingeborg M. J.

    Objective: Research on dietary modulation of inflammatory bowel disease is in its infancy. Dietary heme, mimicking red meat, is cytotoxic to colonic epithelium and thus may aggravate colitis. Alternatively, heme-induced colonic stress might also result in potential protective heat-shock proteins

  3. Members of the heat-shock protein 70 family promote cancer cell growth by distinct mechanisms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rohde, Mikkel; Daugaard, Mads; Jensen, Mette Hartvig

    2005-01-01

    Whereas the stress-inducible heat-shock protein 70 (Hsp70) has gained plenty of attention as a putative target for tumor therapy, little is known about the role of other Hsp70 proteins in cancer. Here we present the first thorough analysis of the expression and function of the cytosolic Hsp70 pro...

  4. Heat shock and salicylic acid on postharvest preservation of organic strawberries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sidiane Coltro

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Heat shock and salicylic acid have been studied on shelf-life extension of fruits. The benefits of these techniques have been related to their effect on inducing physiological defense responses against the oxidative stress and pathogen development. The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of heat shock and salicylic acid on the postharvest preservation and contents of total phenolics, anthocyanins, ascorbic acid, fresh weight loss and microbiological quality of organic strawberries cv. Dover. Strawberries produced organically and stored at 5 ºC were subjected to heat shock (45 ºC ± 3 ºC for 3 h, application of salicylic acid (soaking in 2.0 mmol L-1 solution, heat shock in combination with salicylic acid and control. After treatment, the fruits were packed and stored in a climatic chamber at 5 ºC ± 2 ºC. At 1, 7 and 14 days, the experimental units were removed from refrigeration and kept at room temperature of approximately 20 ºC for two days. There was no effect of treatments on fresh weight loss, incidence of pathogens or chemical variations in strawberry fruits during the storage period. In natural conditions, organically grown strawberries remained in good condition for sale up to seven days of storage in all treatments.

  5. Periodic heat shock accelerated the chondrogenic differentiation of human mesenchymal stem cells in pellet culture.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing Chen

    Full Text Available Osteoarthritis (OA is one of diseases that seriously affect elderly people's quality of life. Human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs offer a potential promise for the joint repair in OA patients. However, chondrogenic differentiation from hMSCs in vitro takes a long time (∼ 6 weeks and differentiated cells are still not as functionally mature as primary isolated chondrocytes, though chemical stimulations and mechanical loading have been intensively studied to enhance the hMSC differentiation. On the other hand, thermal stimulations of hMSC chondrogenesis have not been well explored. In this study, the direct effects of mild heat shock (HS on the differentiation of hMSCs into chondrocytes in 3D pellet culture were investigated. Periodic HS at 41 °C for 1 hr significantly increased sulfated glycosaminoglycan in 3D pellet culture at Day 10 of chondrogenesis. Immunohistochemical and Western Blot analyses revealed an increased expression of collagen type II and aggrecan in heat-shocked pellets than non heat-shocked pellets on Day 17 of chondrogenesis. In addition, HS also upregulated the expression of collagen type I and X as well as heat shock protein 70 on Day 17 and 24 of differentiation. These results demonstrate that HS accelerated the chondrogenic differentiation of hMSCs and induced an early maturation of chondrocytes differentiated from hMSCs. The results of this study will guide the design of future protocols using thermal treatments to facilitate cartilage regeneration with human mesenchymal stem cells.

  6. Urinary heat shock protein 72 as a biomarker of acute kidney injury in dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruchim, Yaron; Avital, Yochai; Horowitz, Michal; Mazaki-Tovi, Michal; Aroch, Itamar; Segev, Gilad

    2017-07-01

    Early recognition of acute kidney injury (AKI) is important, as therapy is potentially more efficacious if instituted early in the course of disease. Urinary heat shock protein-72 to urinary creatinine ratio (uHSP72/uCr) was assessed as a diagnostic and prognostic marker in AKI in dogs. Fifty-three dogs were enrolled in five groups: healthy controls (n=11), urinary tract infection (n=10), chronic kidney disease (CKD; n=11), AKI (n=13), and acute decompensating CKD (n=8). Urinary heat shock protein-72 to urinary creatinine ratio was highest in the AKI group (P0.05 compared to each of the other two groups). The area under the curve (AUC) for the receiver operator characteristic (ROC) analysis of uHSP72/uCr to predict AKI, compared to the control group, was 0.97. A cutoff value of 0.20ng/mg corresponded to sensitivity and specificity of 100% and 82%, respectively. Urinary heat shock protein-72 to urinary creatinine ratio was significantly lower in dogs categorized as survivors vs. non-survivors of AKI; ROC AUC, 0.91 (95% confidence intervals, 0.74-1.0). Urinary heat shock protein-72 to urinary creatinine ratio is a potentially useful diagnostic and prognostic biomarker of AKI in dogs. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Induction of heat shock response protects the heart against atrial fibrillation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brundel, Bianca J. J. M.; Shiroshita-Takeshita, Akiko; Qi, XiaoYan; Yeh, Yung-Hsin; Chartier, Denis; van Gelder, Isabelle C.; Henning, Robert H.; Kampinga, Harm H.; Nattel, Stanley

    2006-01-01

    There is evidence suggesting that heat shock proteins (HSPs) may protect against clinical atrial fibrillation (AF). We evaluated the effect of HSP induction in an in vitro atrial cell line (HL-1) model of tachycardia remodeling and in tachypaced isolated canine atrial cardiomyocytes. We also

  8. Heat shock protein expression in the eye and in uveal melanoma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Missotten, Guy S.; Journée-de Korver, Johanna G.; de Wolff-Rouendaal, Didi; Keunen, Jan E.; Schlingemann, Reinier O.; Jager, Martine J.

    2003-01-01

    PURPOSE: Expression of heat shock proteins (HSPs) is of prognostic significance in several tumor types, whereas HSPs may also have clinical use as stimulators in tumor vaccination. HSP expression levels were determined in normal eyes and in uveal melanoma and tested whether HSPs expression was

  9. Intracellular localization of Xenopus small heat shock protein, hsp30, in A6 kidney epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gellalchew, Mekonnen; Heikkila, John J

    2005-03-01

    Small heat shock proteins (shsps) are molecular chaperones that are inducible by environmental stress. In this study, immunocytochemical analysis and laser scanning confocal microscopy revealed that the shsp family, hsp30, was localized primarily in the cytoplasm of Xenopus A6 kidney epithelial cells after heat shock or sodium arsenite treatment. Heat shock-induced hsp30 was enriched in the perinuclear region with some immunostaining in the nucleus but not in the nucleolus. In sodium arsenite-treated cells hsp30 was enriched towards the cytoplasmic periphery as well as showing some immunostaining in the nucleus. At higher heat shock temperatures (35 degrees C) or after 10 microM sodium arsenite treatment, the actin cytoskeleton displayed some disorganization that co-localized with areas of hsp30 enrichment. Treatment of A6 cells with 50 microM sodium arsenite induced a collapse of the cytoskeleton around the nucleus. These results coupled with previous studies suggest that stress-inducible hsp30 acts as a molecular chaperone primarily in the cytoplasm and may interact with cytoskeletal proteins.

  10. Expressed sequence tags from heat-shocked seagrass Zostera noltii (Hornemann) from its southern distribution range

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Massa, Sonia I.; Pearson, Gareth A.; Aires, Tania; Kube, Michael; Olsen, Jeanine L.; Reinhardt, Richard; Serrao, Ester A.; Arnaud-Haond, Sophie

    Predicted global climate change threatens the distributional ranges of species worldwide. We identified genes expressed in the intertidal seagrass Zostera midi during recovery from a simulated low tide heat-shock exposure. Five Expressed Sequence Tag (EST) libraries were compared, corresponding to

  11. Induced Levels of Heat Shock Proteins in dnaK mutants of Lactococcus lactis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Koch, Birgit; Hammer, Karin; Vogensen, Finn K.

    1998-01-01

    of the inferred substrate binding site of the DnaK protein, exhibits a pronounced temperature sensitive phenotype and shows altered regulation of the heat shock response. The expression of the heat shock proteins are increased at the normal growth temperature measured both as protein synthesis rates and m......The bacterial heat shock response is characterized by the elevated expression of a number of chaperone complexes and proteases including the DnaK-GrpE-DnaJ and the GroELS chaperone complexes. In order to investigate the importance of the DnaK chaperone complex for the growth and the heat shock...... regulation in Lactococcus lactis we have constructed two dnaK mutants with C-terminal deletions in dnaK. The minor deletion of 65 amino acids in the dnaK2 mutant, results in a slightly temperature sensitive phenotype. BK6 containing the larger deletion of 174 amino acids (dnaK1) removing the major part...

  12. [The influence of heat shock proteins on hepatic ischaemia reperfusion injury].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rostás, Andrea; Sabry, Ahmed; Ghosh, Subhamay

    2016-10-01

    Hepatic ischemia-reperfusion injury as a result of inflow obstruction is a major cause of morbidity and mortality associated with liver pathologies and surgery. Heat shock proteins, a family of stress-inducible proteins involved in maintaining cell homeostasis and regulating the immune system play a major role in liver regeneration. They serve as crucial indicators of ischemia-reperfusion injury in human liver and influence liver function and recovery. The primary objectives of this article are to review the potential role of heat shock proteins as a diagnostic marker for liver diseases and therapeutic target in critical illness. The review will start by focusing on the essentials of heat shock proteins as an endogenous system as it relates to hepatic injury. It will elucidate the influence of heat shock protein-70 on hepatic diseases and ischemia-reperfusion. It will then look at their potential diagnostic role and finally highlights its activities as a possible therapeutic tool. Orv. Hetil., 2016, 157(42), 1659-1666.

  13. Interference heating from interactions of shock waves with turbulent boundary layers at Mach 6

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, C. B.; Kaufman, L. G., II

    1974-01-01

    An experimental investigation of interference heating resulting from interactions of shock waves and turbulent boundary layers was conducted. Pressure and heat-transfer distributions were measured on a flat plate in the free stream and on the wall of the test section of the Langley Mach 6 high Reynolds number tunnel for Reynolds numbers ranging from 2 million to 400 million. Various incident shock strengths were obtained by varying a wedge-shock generator angle (from 10 deg to 15 deg) and by placing a spherical-shock generator at different vertical positions above the instrumented flat plate and tunnel wall. The largest heating-rate amplification factors obtained for completely turbulent boundary layers were 22.1 for the flat plate and 11.6 for the tunnel wall experiments. Maximum heating correlated with peak pressures using a power law with a 0.85 exponent. Measured pressure distributions were compared with those calculated using turbulent free-interaction pressure rise theories, and separation lengths were compared with values calculated by using different methods.

  14. Whistler waves, core ion heating, and nonstationarity in oblique collisionless shocks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scholer, Manfred; Burgess, David

    2007-01-01

    One-dimensional full particle simulations of supercritical collisionless shocks with an ion and electron beta of 0.1 (particle to magnetic field pressure) over a wide Alfven Mach number range and range of shock normal-magnetic field angles between Θ Bn =60 deg. and Θ Bn =80 deg. are presented. The whistler critical Mach number M w , below which a linear phase-standing whistler can exist, is proportional to the square root of the ion-to-electron mass ratio and to cos Θ Bn . In small mass ratio simulations of oblique shocks, M w can be artificially small and close to the first critical Mach number M c , above which the process of ion reflection is needed in order to achieve shock dissipation. We use in the simulations the physical ion-to-electron mass ratio so that M c and M w are well separated. This also allows excitation of the modified two-stream instability (MTSI) between incoming ions and electrons. We find that in oblique but close to perpendicular (Θ Bn ≥80 deg.) shocks, upstream whistler waves do occur, but reformation is due to accumulation of reflected-gyrating ions at the upstream edge of the foot. In less oblique shocks above the whistler critical Mach number, the whistler amplitude in the foot upstream of the ramp grows, leading to vortices of the incoming ions and the reflected ions in velocity phase space, and eventually to phase mixing. The shock re-forms at the upstream edge of the whistler wave train, which is particularly evident in very high Mach number shocks where the scale of the foot is large compared with the whistler wave train. After reformation, the region with phase-mixed incoming and reflected ions constitutes a hot core downstream of the shock ramp. In this whistler induced reformation process, the MTSI results mainly in heating of the incoming ions in the foot

  15. A relaxation-projection method for compressible flows. Part II: Artificial heat exchanges for multiphase shocks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petitpas, Fabien; Franquet, Erwin; Saurel, Richard; Le Metayer, Olivier

    2007-01-01

    The relaxation-projection method developed in Saurel et al. [R. Saurel, E. Franquet, E. Daniel, O. Le Metayer, A relaxation-projection method for compressible flows. Part I: The numerical equation of state for the Euler equations, J. Comput. Phys. (2007) 822-845] is extended to the non-conservative hyperbolic multiphase flow model of Kapila et al. [A.K. Kapila, Menikoff, J.B. Bdzil, S.F. Son, D.S. Stewart, Two-phase modeling of deflagration to detonation transition in granular materials: reduced equations, Physics of Fluids 13(10) (2001) 3002-3024]. This model has the ability to treat multi-temperatures mixtures evolving with a single pressure and velocity and is particularly interesting for the computation of interface problems with compressible materials as well as wave propagation in heterogeneous mixtures. The non-conservative character of this model poses however computational challenges in the presence of shocks. The first issue is related to the Riemann problem resolution that necessitates shock jump conditions. Thanks to the Rankine-Hugoniot relations proposed and validated in Saurel et al. [R. Saurel, O. Le Metayer, J. Massoni, S. Gavrilyuk, Shock jump conditions for multiphase mixtures with stiff mechanical relaxation, Shock Waves 16 (3) (2007) 209-232] exact and approximate 2-shocks Riemann solvers are derived. However, the Riemann solver is only a part of a numerical scheme and non-conservative variables pose extra difficulties for the projection or cell average of the solution. It is shown that conventional Godunov schemes are unable to converge to the exact solution for strong multiphase shocks. This is due to the incorrect partition of the energies or entropies in the cell averaged mixture. To circumvent this difficulty a specific Lagrangian scheme is developed. The correct partition of the energies is achieved by using an artificial heat exchange in the shock layer. With the help of an asymptotic analysis this heat exchange takes a similar form as

  16. A relaxation-projection method for compressible flows. Part II: Artificial heat exchanges for multiphase shocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petitpas, Fabien; Franquet, Erwin; Saurel, Richard; Le Metayer, Olivier

    2007-08-01

    The relaxation-projection method developed in Saurel et al. [R. Saurel, E. Franquet, E. Daniel, O. Le Metayer, A relaxation-projection method for compressible flows. Part I: The numerical equation of state for the Euler equations, J. Comput. Phys. (2007) 822-845] is extended to the non-conservative hyperbolic multiphase flow model of Kapila et al. [A.K. Kapila, Menikoff, J.B. Bdzil, S.F. Son, D.S. Stewart, Two-phase modeling of deflagration to detonation transition in granular materials: reduced equations, Physics of Fluids 13(10) (2001) 3002-3024]. This model has the ability to treat multi-temperatures mixtures evolving with a single pressure and velocity and is particularly interesting for the computation of interface problems with compressible materials as well as wave propagation in heterogeneous mixtures. The non-conservative character of this model poses however computational challenges in the presence of shocks. The first issue is related to the Riemann problem resolution that necessitates shock jump conditions. Thanks to the Rankine-Hugoniot relations proposed and validated in Saurel et al. [R. Saurel, O. Le Metayer, J. Massoni, S. Gavrilyuk, Shock jump conditions for multiphase mixtures with stiff mechanical relaxation, Shock Waves 16 (3) (2007) 209-232] exact and approximate 2-shocks Riemann solvers are derived. However, the Riemann solver is only a part of a numerical scheme and non-conservative variables pose extra difficulties for the projection or cell average of the solution. It is shown that conventional Godunov schemes are unable to converge to the exact solution for strong multiphase shocks. This is due to the incorrect partition of the energies or entropies in the cell averaged mixture. To circumvent this difficulty a specific Lagrangian scheme is developed. The correct partition of the energies is achieved by using an artificial heat exchange in the shock layer. With the help of an asymptotic analysis this heat exchange takes a similar form as

  17. Heat shock and prolonged heat stress attenuate neurotoxin and sporulation gene expression in group I Clostridium botulinum strain ATCC 3502.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selby, Katja; Mascher, Gerald; Somervuo, Panu; Lindström, Miia; Korkeala, Hannu

    2017-01-01

    Foodborne pathogenic bacteria are exposed to a number of environmental stresses during food processing, storage, and preparation, and in the human body. In order to improve the safety of food, the understanding of molecular stress response mechanisms foodborne pathogens employ is essential. Many response mechanisms that are activated during heat shock may cross-protect bacteria against other environmental stresses. To better understand the molecular mechanisms Clostridium botulinum, the causative agent of botulism, utilizes during acute heat stress and during adaptation to stressfully high temperature, the C. botulinum Group I strain ATCC 3502 was grown in continuous culture at 39°C and exposed to heat shock at 45°C, followed by prolonged heat stress at 45°C to allow adaptation of the culture to the high temperature. Growth in continuous culture was performed to exclude secondary growth phase effects or other environmental impacts on bacterial gene transcription. Changes in global gene expression profiles were studied using DNA microarray hybridization. During acute heat stress, Class I and III heat shock genes as well as members of the SOS regulon were activated. The neurotoxin gene botA and genes encoding the neurotoxin-associated proteins were suppressed throughout the study. Prolonged heat stress led to suppression of the sporulation machinery whereas genes related to chemotaxis and motility were activated. Induced expression of a large proportion of prophage genes was detected, suggesting an important role of acquired genes in the stress resistance of C. botulinum. Finally, changes in the expression of a large number of genes related to carbohydrate and amino acid metabolism indicated remodeling of the cellular metabolism.

  18. Heat shock modulates the subcellular localization, stability, and activity of HIPK2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Upadhyay, Mamta; Bhadauriya, Pratibha; Ganesh, Subramaniam, E-mail: sganesh@iitk.ac.in

    2016-04-15

    The homeodomain-interacting protein kinase-2 (HIPK2) is a highly conserved serine/threonine kinase and is involved in transcriptional regulation. HIPK2 is a highly unstable protein, and is kept at a low level under normal physiological conditions. However, exposure of cells to physiological stress – such as hypoxia, oxidative stress, or UV damage – is known to stabilize HIPK2, leading to the HIPK2-dependent activation of p53 and the cell death pathway. Therefore HIPK2 is also known as a stress kinase and as a stress-activated pro-apoptotic factor. We demonstrate here that exposure of cells to heat shock results in the stabilization of HIPK2 and the stabilization is mediated via K63-linked ubiquitination. Intriguingly, a sub-lethal heat shock (42 °C, 1 h) results in the cytoplasmic localization of HIPK2, while a lethal heat shock (45 °C, 1 h) results in its nuclear localization. Cells exposed to the lethal heat shock showed significantly higher levels of the p53 activity than those exposed to the sub-lethal thermal stress, suggesting that both the level and the nuclear localization are essential for the pro-apoptotic activity of HIPK2 and that the lethal heat shock could retain the HIPK2 in the nucleus to promote the cell death. Taken together our study underscores the importance of HIPK2 in stress mediated cell death, and that the HIPK2 is a generic stress kinase that gets activated by diverse set of physiological stressors.

  19. Heat shock modulates the subcellular localization, stability, and activity of HIPK2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Upadhyay, Mamta; Bhadauriya, Pratibha; Ganesh, Subramaniam

    2016-01-01

    The homeodomain-interacting protein kinase-2 (HIPK2) is a highly conserved serine/threonine kinase and is involved in transcriptional regulation. HIPK2 is a highly unstable protein, and is kept at a low level under normal physiological conditions. However, exposure of cells to physiological stress – such as hypoxia, oxidative stress, or UV damage – is known to stabilize HIPK2, leading to the HIPK2-dependent activation of p53 and the cell death pathway. Therefore HIPK2 is also known as a stress kinase and as a stress-activated pro-apoptotic factor. We demonstrate here that exposure of cells to heat shock results in the stabilization of HIPK2 and the stabilization is mediated via K63-linked ubiquitination. Intriguingly, a sub-lethal heat shock (42 °C, 1 h) results in the cytoplasmic localization of HIPK2, while a lethal heat shock (45 °C, 1 h) results in its nuclear localization. Cells exposed to the lethal heat shock showed significantly higher levels of the p53 activity than those exposed to the sub-lethal thermal stress, suggesting that both the level and the nuclear localization are essential for the pro-apoptotic activity of HIPK2 and that the lethal heat shock could retain the HIPK2 in the nucleus to promote the cell death. Taken together our study underscores the importance of HIPK2 in stress mediated cell death, and that the HIPK2 is a generic stress kinase that gets activated by diverse set of physiological stressors.

  20. Putative cis-regulatory elements associated with heat shock genes activated during excystation of Cryptosporidium parvum.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamin Cohn

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Cryptosporidiosis is a ubiquitous infectious disease, caused by the protozoan parasites Cryptosporidium hominis and C. parvum, leading to acute, persistent and chronic diarrhea worldwide. Although the complications of this disease can be serious, even fatal, in immunocompromised patients of any age, they have also been found to lead to long term effects, including growth inhibition and impaired cognitive development, in infected immunocompetent children. The Cryptosporidium life cycle alternates between a dormant stage, the oocyst, and a highly replicative phase that includes both asexual vegetative stages as well as sexual stages, implying fine genetic regulatory mechanisms. The parasite is extremely difficult to study because it cannot be cultured in vitro and animal models are equally challenging. The recent publication of the genome sequence of C. hominis and C. parvum has, however, significantly advanced our understanding of the biology and pathogenesis of this parasite. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Herein, our goal was to identify cis-regulatory elements associated with heat shock response in Cryptosporidium using a combination of in silico and real time RT-PCR strategies. Analysis with Gibbs-Sampling algorithms of upstream non-translated regions of twelve genes annotated as heat shock proteins in the Cryptosporidium genome identified a highly conserved over-represented sequence motif in eleven of them. RT-PCR analyses, described herein and also by others, show that these eleven genes bearing the putative element are induced concurrent with excystation of parasite oocysts via heat shock. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our analyses suggest that occurrences of a motif identified in the upstream regions of the Cryptosporidium heat shock genes represent parts of the transcriptional apparatus and function as stress response elements that activate expression of these genes during excystation, and possibly at other stages in the life

  1. Multiple transonic solutions with a new class of shock transitions in steady isothermal solar and stellar winds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Habbal, S.R.; Tsinganos, K.

    1983-01-01

    A new class of shock transitions are shown to arise in the transonic solutions of the steady isothermal solar wind equations when, for example, momentum deposition gives rise to multiple critical points in the flow. These shock transitions between critical solutions occur for a certain range of the parameters characterizing the momentum deposition function. In the presence of such shock transitions, the isothermal wind equations admit multiple transonic solutions, namely a continuous solution passing through an inner critical point and solutions involving a shock transition between critical solutions. These multiple transonic solutions have the same flow speed at the base but different supersonic flow speeds at infinity. An additional interesting feature of the isothermal equations is the equivalence of nonradial flow tube divergence and momentum addition in giving rise to multiple critical points and hence to multiple transonic solutions with shock transitions. The physical relevance of these properties for astrophysical systems such as the inner solar wind, flows in extragalactic jets and accretion discs are discussed

  2. Effect of Temperature Shock and Inventory Surprises on Natural Gas and Heating Oil Futures Returns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, John Wei-Shan; Lin, Chien-Yu

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to examine the impact of temperature shock on both near-month and far-month natural gas and heating oil futures returns by extending the weather and storage models of the previous study. Several notable findings from the empirical studies are presented. First, the expected temperature shock significantly and positively affects both the near-month and far-month natural gas and heating oil futures returns. Next, significant temperature shock has effect on both the conditional mean and volatility of natural gas and heating oil prices. The results indicate that expected inventory surprises significantly and negatively affects the far-month natural gas futures returns. Moreover, volatility of natural gas futures returns is higher on Thursdays and that of near-month heating oil futures returns is higher on Wednesdays than other days. Finally, it is found that storage announcement for natural gas significantly affects near-month and far-month natural gas futures returns. Furthermore, both natural gas and heating oil futures returns are affected more by the weighted average temperature reported by multiple weather reporting stations than that reported by a single weather reporting station. PMID:25133233

  3. Expression of the small heat shock protein gene, hsp30, in Rana catesbeiana fibroblasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulligan-Tuttle, Anne; Heikkila, John J

    2007-10-01

    In the present study, we examined the expression of the Rana catesbeiana small heat shock protein gene, hsp30, in an FT fibroblast cell line. Northern and western blot analyses revealed that hsp30 mRNA or HSP30 protein was not present constitutively but was strongly induced at a heat shock temperature of 35 degrees C. However, treatment of FT cells with sodium arsenite at concentrations that induced hsp gene expression in other amphibian systems caused cell death. Non-lethal concentrations of sodium arsenite (10 microM) induced only minimal accumulation of hsp30 mRNA or protein after 12 h. Immunocytochemical analyses employing laser scanning confocal microscopy detected the presence of heat-inducible HSP30, in a granular or punctate pattern. HSP30 was enriched in the nucleus with more diffuse localization in the cytoplasm. The nuclear localization of HSP30 was more prominent with continuous heat shock. These heat treatments did not alter FT cell shape or disrupt actin cytoskeletal organization. Also, HSP30 did not co-localize with the actin cytoskeleton.

  4. Effect of temperature shock and inventory surprises on natural gas and heating oil futures returns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, John Wei-Shan; Hu, Yi-Chung; Lin, Chien-Yu

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to examine the impact of temperature shock on both near-month and far-month natural gas and heating oil futures returns by extending the weather and storage models of the previous study. Several notable findings from the empirical studies are presented. First, the expected temperature shock significantly and positively affects both the near-month and far-month natural gas and heating oil futures returns. Next, significant temperature shock has effect on both the conditional mean and volatility of natural gas and heating oil prices. The results indicate that expected inventory surprises significantly and negatively affects the far-month natural gas futures returns. Moreover, volatility of natural gas futures returns is higher on Thursdays and that of near-month heating oil futures returns is higher on Wednesdays than other days. Finally, it is found that storage announcement for natural gas significantly affects near-month and far-month natural gas futures returns. Furthermore, both natural gas and heating oil futures returns are affected more by the weighted average temperature reported by multiple weather reporting stations than that reported by a single weather reporting station.

  5. Theoretical analysis of a wind heating conversion and long distance transmission system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheng, Wen-Long; Han, Bing-Chuan; Nian, Yong-Le; Han, Bing-Bing

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • A novel long distance wind power heating system was proposed. • Heat losses could be reduced effectively due to latent heat transmission. • Power consumption and cost would drop greatly compared to hot water convey system. • The maximum transmission distance is 10 times that of conventional system. - Abstract: As a clean and renewable energy, wind power gets a rapid growth in recent years. With the increasing proportion of wind power generation, the fluctuation and intermittency of wind energy impedes the safe and stable operation of national power grids, which causes wind curtailment and energy waste, hindering further development of wind power industry in China. To solve this problem, wind heating conversion was proposed. However, long distance transmission between wind fields and residential areas for thermal energy is an urgent issue for wind heating. This paper presents a novel wind heating conversion and long distance transmission system. A simple device was utilized for wind heating conversion in the present system, then thermal energy was transported to heat demand site through latent heat transmission of the working fluids. A model of the novel system was built and thermodynamics analysis showed that maximum transmission distance of the novel system could extended to 240 km, 9.6 times of that of typical hot water transmission system. And the novel system also could cut down the cost by greatly reducing pump work and pipe diameter. In addition, efficiency and circulation ratio was almost unchanged while wind power density increased from 350 W/m 2 to 650 W/m 2 .

  6. Cosmic radio-noise absorption bursts caused by solar wind shocks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Osepian

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available Bursts of cosmic noise absorption observed at times of sudden commencements (SC of geomagnetic storms are examined. About 300SC events in absorption for the period 1967-1990 have been considered. It is found that the response of cosmic radio-noise absorption to the passage of an interplanetary shock depends on the level of the planetary magnetic activity preceding the SC event and on the magnitude of the magnetic field perturbation associated with the SC (as measured in the equatorial magnetosphere. It is shown that for SC events observed against a quiet background (Kp<2, the effects of the SC on absorption can be seen only if the magnitude of the geomagnetic field perturbation caused by the solar wind shock exceeds a threshold value ΔBth. It is further demonstrated that the existence of this threshold value, ΔBth, deduced from experimental data, can be related to the existence of a threshold for exciting and maintaining the whistler cyclotron instability, as predicted by quasi-linear theory. SC events observed against an active background (Kp<2 are accompanied by absorption bursts for all magnetic field perturbations, however small. A quantitative description of absorption bursts associated with SC events is provided by the whistler cyclotron instability theory.

  7. Global Analysis of Heat Shock Response in Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chhabra, S.R.; He, Q.; Huang, K.H.; Gaucher, S.P.; Alm, E.J.; He,Z.; Hadi, M.Z.; Hazen, T.C.; Wall, J.D.; Zhou, J.; Arkin, A.P.; Singh, A.K.

    2005-09-16

    Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough belongs to a class ofsulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) and is found ubiquitously in nature.Given the importance of SRB-mediated reduction for bioremediation ofmetal ion contaminants, ongoing research on D. vulgaris has been in thedirection of elucidating regulatory mechanisms for this organism under avariety of stress conditions. This work presents a global view of thisorganism's response to elevated growth temperature using whole-celltranscriptomics and proteomics tools. Transcriptional response (1.7-foldchange or greater; Z>1.5) ranged from 1,135 genes at 15 min to 1,463genes at 120 min for a temperature up-shift of 13oC from a growthtemperature of 37oC for this organism and suggested both direct andindirect modes of heat sensing. Clusters of orthologous group categoriesthat were significantly affected included posttranslationalmodifications; protein turnover and chaperones (up-regulated); energyproduction and conversion (down-regulated), nucleotide transport,metabolism (down-regulated), and translation; ribosomal structure; andbiogenesis (down-regulated). Analysis of the genome sequence revealed thepresence of features of both negative and positive regulation whichincluded the CIRCE element and promoter sequences corresponding to thealternate sigma factors ?32 and ?54. While mechanisms of heat shockcontrol for some genes appeared to coincide with those established forEscherichia coli and Bacillus subtilis, the presence of unique controlschemes for several other genes was also evident. Analysis of proteinexpression levels using differential in-gel electrophoresis suggestedgood agreement with transcriptional profiles of several heat shockproteins, including DnaK (DVU0811), HtpG (DVU2643), HtrA (DVU1468), andAhpC (DVU2247). The proteomics study also suggested the possibility ofposttranslational modifications in the chaperones DnaK, AhpC, GroES(DVU1977), and GroEL (DVU1976) and also several periplasmic ABCtransporters.

  8. Heat Shock Proteins 70kDa, Eosinophil Cationic Protein, and Nitric Oxide During Chronic Superficial Keratitis in Dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urban-Chmiel, Renata; Balicki, Ireneusz; Wernicki, Andrzej

    2017-03-01

    The objective of the study is to determine the levels of eosinophil cationic protein (ECP), heat shock proteins 70, and nitric oxide ions measured as nitrite ions (Griess reaction) in dogs with chronic superficial keratitis (CSK). The study was conducted on 24 dogs with CSK. Blood sera from the animals were tested for concentrations of heat shock proteins 70, ECP, and nitrite ions before treatment and again 5 weeks and 6 months after treatment. Dogs with CSK were treated for 6 months with various regimes involving the use of ophthalmic drops containing dexamethasone, dimethyl sulfoxide, and cyclosporine. The control group consisted of 16 clinically healthy German Shepherds. The results obtained indicated a significant (P ≤ 0.05) elevation in the concentrations of heat shock proteins 70 and nitrite ions in dogs with CSK in comparison to healthy dogs and dogs after 5 weeks of therapy. After 6 months of treatment, concentrations of heat shock proteins 70, ECP, and nitrite ions had fallen below pretreatment values. Significant correlations were found between concentrations of heat shock proteins 70, ECP, and nitrite ions in healthy animals and animals with CSK. The elevated concentrations of heat shock proteins 70, ECP, and nitrite ions in dogs with CSK may indicate that the disease was both localized and systemic. The significant correlation between levels of heat shock proteins 70 and nitrite ions suggests that these parameters may be used as indirect indicators of CSK. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Heat shock induced change in protein ubiquitination in Chlamydomonas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shimogawara, K.; Muto, S.

    1989-01-01

    Ubiquitin was purified from pea (Pisum sativum L.) and its antibody was produced. Western blot analysis showed that the antibody cross-reacted with ubiquitins from a green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, a brown alga Laminaria angustata and a red alga Porphyridium cruentum but not with ubiquitin from a blue-green alga Synechococcus sp. In Chlamydomonas, the antibody also reacted with some ubiquitinated proteins including 28- and 31-kDa polypeptides. The isoelectric points of Chlamydomonas ubiquitin and the 28- and 31-kDa ubiquitinated proteins were 8.0, 8.9 and 10.3, respectively. The ubiquitinated proteins, including the 28- and 31-kDa polypeptides were detected after in vitro ATP-dependent ubiquitination of Chlamydomonas cell extract with l25 I-labeled bovine ubiquitin. Heat treatment of Chlamydomonas cells (>40°C) caused drastic increase of ubiquitinated proteins with high mol wt (>60kDa), and coordinated redistribution or decrease of other ubiquitinated proteins and free ubiquitin. Quantitative analysis revealed that the 28- and 31-kDa ubiquitinated proteins showed different responses against heat stress, i.e. the former being more sensitive than the latter. (author)

  10. The role of the membrane-initiated Heat Shock Response in cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zohar eBromberg

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The heat shock response (HSR is a cellular response to diverse environmental and physiological stressors resulting in the induction of genes encoding molecular chaperones, proteases and other proteins that are essential for protection and recovery from cellular damage. Since different perturbations cause accumulation of misfolded proteins, cells frequently encounter fluctuations in the environment which alter proteostasis. Since tumor cells use their natural adaptive mechanism of coping with stress and misfolded proteins, in recent years, the proteostasis network became a promising target for anti-tumor therapy. The membrane is the first to be affected by heat shock and therefore may be the first one to sense heat shock. The membrane also connects between the extracellular and the intracellular signals. Hence, there is a cross talk between the HSR and the membranes since heat shock can induce changes in the fluidity of membranes, leading to membrane lipid remodeling that occurs in several diseases such as cancer. During the last decade, a new possible therapy has emerged in which an external molecule is used that could induce membrane lipid re-organization. Since at the moment there are very few substances that regulate the HSR effectively, an alternative way has been searched to modulate chaperone activities through the plasma membrane. Recently, we suggested that the use of the membrane Transient Receptor Potential Vanilloid-1 (TRPV1 modulators regulated the HSR in cancer cells. However, the primary targets of the signal transduction pathway are yet un-known. This review provides an overview of the current literature regarding the role of HSR in membrane remodeling in cancer since a deep understanding of the membrane biology in cancer and the membrane heat sensing pathway is essential to design novel efficient therapies.

  11. Mapping temperature-induced conformational changes in the Escherichia coli heat shock transcription factor sigma 32 by amide hydrogen exchange

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rist, Wolfgang; Jørgensen, Thomas J D; Roepstorff, Peter

    2003-01-01

    Stress conditions such as heat shock alter the transcriptional profile in all organisms. In Escherichia coli the heat shock transcription factor, sigma 32, out-competes upon temperature up-shift the housekeeping sigma-factor, sigma 70, for binding to core RNA polymerase and initiates heat shock...... gene transcription. To investigate possible heat-induced conformational changes in sigma 32 we performed amide hydrogen (H/D) exchange experiments under optimal growth and heat shock conditions combined with mass spectrometry. We found a rapid exchange of around 220 of the 294 amide hydrogens at 37...... promoters. The correlated exchange is shown to constitute a reversible unfolding with a half-life of about 30 min due to a temperature-dependent decrease in stabilization energy. We propose that this gradual decrease in stabilization energy of domain sigma 2 with increasing temperatures facilitates...

  12. CLINICAL SIGNIFICANCE OF SERUM AND URINARY HEAT SHOCK PROTEIN 70 LEVEL ASSESSMENT IN PATIENTS WITH CHRONIC GLOMERULONEPHRITIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. V. Chebotaryova

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The levels of urinary heat shock protein-70 and serum antibodies to the heat shock protein-70 were assessed in 79 patients with different course variants of the chronic glomerulonephritis. The indices studied were higher in patients with an active course of the disease (expressed urinary and nephritic syndromes, especially if associated with transient renal disturbances which reflected the degree of lesion and activation of the renal self-defence system. Decrease of the serum level of antibodies to the heat shock protein-70 was an unfavorable factor of the nephrotic syndrome persistence despite the immunosuppressive therapy.

  13. Sensitive test for ion-cyclotron resonant heating in the solar wind.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasper, Justin C; Maruca, Bennett A; Stevens, Michael L; Zaslavsky, Arnaud

    2013-03-01

    Plasma carrying a spectrum of counterpropagating field-aligned ion-cyclotron waves can strongly and preferentially heat ions through a stochastic Fermi mechanism. Such a process has been proposed to explain the extreme temperatures, temperature anisotropies, and speeds of ions in the solar corona and solar wind. We quantify how differential flow between ion species results in a Doppler shift in the wave spectrum that can prevent this strong heating. Two critical values of differential flow are derived for strong heating of the core and tail of a given ion distribution function. Our comparison of these predictions to observations from the Wind spacecraft reveals excellent agreement. Solar wind helium that meets the condition for strong core heating is nearly 7 times hotter than hydrogen on average. Ion-cyclotron resonance contributes to heating in the solar wind, and there is a close link between heating, differential flow, and temperature anisotropy.

  14. Comparison of Recombinant Proteins of Kinesin 39, Heat Shock Protein 70, Heat Shock Protein 83, and Glycoprotein 63 for Antibody Detection of Leishmania martiniquensis Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siripattanapipong, Suradej; Kato, Hirotomo; Tan-Ariya, Peerapan; Mungthin, Mathirut; Leelayoova, Saovanee

    2017-11-01

    Leishmania martiniquensis, a zoonotic hemoflagellate, is a causative agent of cutaneous (CL) and visceral leishmaniasis (VL) among humans and animals. This organism, first reported in Martinique Island, now has become an emerging infectious agent in Thailand. Symptomatic cases of L. martiniquensis infection among humans have continuously increased. In the meantime, asymptomatic infection of this novel species has seriously created national public health awareness and concern to prevent and control disease transmission. The unsuccessful serological test using the commercial rK39 dipstick based on antigen from Leishmania donovani to detect the antibodies against VL among infected Thai patients has encouraged us to further explore a new sensitive and specific antigenic epitope. In this study, we determined the sequences and expressed recombinant proteins of kinesin 39 (k39), heat shock protein 70 (hsp70), heat shock protein 83 (hsp83), and glycoprotein 63 (gp63) of L. martiniquensis to evaluate the diagnostic efficiency to detect antibodies against L. martiniquensis in patient sera. The preliminary results from western blot analysis have suggested that K39 is the most sensitive recombinant protein to detect L. martiniquensis. Moreover, this recombinant protein reacts with antibodies against L. donovani and Leishmania infantum, making it a promising antigen for further development of a universal rapid diagnostic tool for VL. © 2017 The Author(s) Journal of Eukaryotic Microbiology © 2017 International Society of Protistologists.

  15. Heat Shock Protein-Inducing Property of Diarylheptanoid Containing Chalcone Moiety from Alpinia katsumadai

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joo-Won Nam

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available A new diarylheptanoid containing a chalcone moiety, katsumain H (1, was isolated from the seeds of Alpinia katsumadai. The structure was elucidated using a combination of 1D/2D NMR spectroscopy and mass spectrometry data analysis. The absolute configurations of C-3, C-5, and C-7 in 1 were assigned based on its optical rotation and after comparing its NMR chemical shifts with those of its diastereoisomers, katsumain E and katsumain F, which were previously isolated from this plant and characterized. In this study, the stimulatory effects of compounds 1 and 2 were evaluated on heat shock factor 1 (HSF1, heat shock protein 27 (HSP27, and HSP70. Compounds 1 and 2 increased the expression of HSF1 (1.056- and 1.200-fold, respectively, HSP27 (1.312- and 1.242-fold, respectively, and HSP70 (1.234- and 1.271-fold, respectively, without increased cytotoxicity.

  16. On the brotherhood of the mitochondrial chaperones mortalin and heat shock protein 60

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deocaris, Custer C.; Kaul, Sunil C.; Wadhwa, Renu

    2006-01-01

    The heat shock chaperones mortalin/mitochondrial heat shock protein 70 (mtHsp70) and Hsp60 are found in multiple subcellular sites and function in the folding and intracellular trafficking of many proteins. The chaperoning activity of these 2 proteins involves different structural and functional mechanisms. In spite of providing an excellent model for an evolutionarily conserved molecular “brotherhood,” their individual functions, although overlapping, are nonredundant. As they travel to various locations, both chaperones acquire different binding partners and exert a more divergent involvement in tumorigenesis, cellular senescence, and immunology. An understanding of their functional biology may lead to novel designing and development of therapeutic strategies for cancer and aging. PMID:16817317

  17. Octamer and heat shock elements regulate transcription from the AcMNPV polyhedrin gene promoter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, M Senthil; Ramachandran, Aruna; Hasnain, Seyed E; Bashyam, Murali Dharan

    2009-01-01

    The baculovirus expression vector system exploits the polyhedrin (polh) promoter for high expression of foreign proteins in insect cells. The mechanism of basal and hyperactivated transcription from this promoter, however, remains poorly understood. We have analyzed the 4-kb upstream region of the polh promoter; deletion of two separate parts of the 4-kb upstream region, harboring the Oct binding site and the heat shock element, respectively, resulted in significant reduction of reporter gene expression regulated by the polh promoter. Insect cell host factors could bind to these elements in vitro. Moreover, these elements could activate polh transcription during viral infection when present upstream of a minimal polh promoter in transient expression reporter assays. Our results suggest the possible existence of transcription factors belonging to the POU and heat shock transcription factor family in Spodoptera frugiperda cells and support the hypothesis that host proteins may play a major role in activating transcription from the polh promoter.

  18. Heat Shock Followed by Priming Increases the Quality of Agropyron elongatum Seeds under Accelerated Ageing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Malihe AKBARPOUR BAHREH

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The present study was carried out to examine the possibilities of obtaining primed seeds that maintain high germination quality and the same longevity as the untreated seeds. For Tall wheatgrass tested, we found that the desired longevity could be obtained by keeping the seeds under heat shock for a period of several hours, after a priming treatment. Decreasing germination and seedling vigour in BAP 25 and 50 ppm, for 24 priming, did not happen again due to such a treatment. In addition, following priming, heat shock affects the initial quality of primed seeds in some treatments. Optimal temperature was strongly duration dependent. The method was applied to obtain primed seeds without the loss of storability, which is similar to those procedures used to induce desiccation tolerance in germinated seeds and acquire thermo tolerance in plant vegetative tissues.

  19. MEASUREMENT OF THE SHOCK-HEATED MELT CURVE OF LEAD USING PYROMETRY AND REFLECTOMETRY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D. Partouche-Sebban and J. L. Pelissier, Commissariat a` l' Energie Atomique, F. G. Abeyta, Los Alamos National Laboratory; W. W. Anderson, Los Alamos National Laboratory; M. E. Byers, Los Alamos National Laboratory; D. Dennis-Koller, Los Alamos National Laboratory; J. S. Esparza, Los Alamos National Laboratory; S. D. Borror, Bechtel Nevada; C. A. Kruschwitz, Bechtel Nevada

    2004-01-01

    Data on the high-pressure melting temperatures of metals is of great interest in several fields of physics including geophysics. Measuring melt curves is difficult but can be performed in static experiments (with laser-heated diamond-anvil cells for instance) or dynamically (i.e., using shock experiments). However, at the present time, both experimental and theoretical results for the melt curve of lead are at too much variance to be considered definitive. As a result, we decided to perform a series of shock experiments designed to provide a measurement of the melt curve of lead up to about 50 GPa in pressure. At the same time, we developed and fielded a new reflectivity diagnostic, using it to make measurements on tin. The results show that the melt curve of lead is somewhat higher than the one previously obtained with static compression and heating techniques.

  20. Evolutionarily conserved domain of heat shock transcription factor negatively regulates oligomerization and DNA binding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ota, Azumi; Enoki, Yasuaki; Yamamoto, Noritaka; Sawai, Maki; Sakurai, Hiroshi

    2013-09-01

    Heat shock transcription factor (HSF) regulates the expression of genes encoding molecular chaperones and stress-responsive proteins. Conversion of HSF from a monomer to a homotrimer or heterotrimer is essential for its binding to heat shock elements (HSEs) comprised of inverted repeats of the pentamer nGAAn. Here, we constructed various human HSF1 derivatives and analyzed their transcriptional activity through the continuously and discontinuously arranged nGAAn units. We identified a short stretch of amino acids that inhibits the activation ability of HSF1, especially through discontinuous HSEs. This stretch is conserved in HSFs of various organisms, interacts with the hydrophobic repeat regions that mediate HSF oligomerization, and impedes homotrimer formation and DNA binding. This conserved domain plays an important role in maintaining HSF in an inactive monomeric form. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Transformation of plasmid DNA into E. coli using the heat shock method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Froger, Alexandrine; Hall, James E

    2007-01-01

    Transformation of plasmid DNA into E. coli using the heat shock method is a basic technique of molecular biology. It consists of inserting a foreign plasmid or ligation product into bacteria. This video protocol describes the traditional method of transformation using commercially available chemically competent bacteria from Genlantis. After a short incubation in ice, a mixture of chemically competent bacteria and DNA is placed at 42 degrees C for 45 seconds (heat shock) and then placed back in ice. SOC media is added and the transformed cells are incubated at 37 degrees C for 30 min with agitation. To be assured of isolating colonies irrespective of transformation efficiency, two quantities of transformed bacteria are plated. This traditional protocol can be used successfully to transform most commercially available competent bacteria. The turbocells from Genlantis can also be used in a novel 3-minute transformation protocol, described in the instruction manual.

  2. Imaging Heat Shock Protein 90 (Hsp90) Activity in Hormone-Refractory Prostate Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    vivo by electrostatic interaction between the sulfonic acid group of the dye and the e-amine groups of the lysine residues of albumin. The strong...Brown KM. Effects of beta-estradiol and bisphenol A on heat shock protein levels and localization in the mouse uterus are antagonized by the...carcinoma cells potentiate metastasis by facilitating invasion and movement across the blood vessels. The avb3 integrin, which binds to Arginine -Glycine

  3. Identification, tissue distribution and characterization of two heat shock factors (HSFs) in goldfish (Carassius auratus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, So-Sun; Chang, Ziwei; Park, Jang-Su

    2015-04-01

    Heat shock proteins (HSPs) are synthesized rapidly in response to a variety of physiological or environmental stressors, whereas the transcriptional activation of HSPs is regulated by a family of heat shock factors (HSFs). In vertebrates, multiple HSFs (HSF1-4) have been reported to have different roles in response to a range of stresses. This paper reports the cDNA cloning of two goldfish (Carassius auratus) HSF gene families, HSF1 and three isoforms of HSF2. Both HSF1 and HSF2s showed high homology to the known HSFs from other organisms, particularly the zebrafish. Different patterns of HSF1 and HSF2 mRNA expression were detected in several goldfish tissues, highlighting their distinct roles. In cadmium (Cd)-treated tissues, the responses of HSP70 showed less difference. However, the increase in HSF1 and HSF2 in these tissues differs considerable. In particular, HSF2 was induced strongly in the heart and liver. On the other hand, in heart tissue, HSF1 showed the smallest increment. These results suggest the potential role of HSF2 in assisting HSF1 in these tissues. In another in vitro experiment of hepatocyte cultures, Cd exposure caused similar patterns of goldfish HSF1 and HSF2 mRNA expression and induction of the HSP70 protein. On the other hand, an examination of the characterization of recombinant proteins showed that HSF1 undergoes a conformation change induced by heat shock above 30 °C and approaches each other in the trimer, whereas HSF2 could not sense thermal stress directly. Furthermore, immune-blot analysis of HSFs showed that both monomers and trimmers of HSF1 were observed in cadmium-induced tissues, whereas HSF2 were all in monomeric. These results show that HSF1 and HSF2 play different roles in the transcription of heat shock proteins. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Management of the endoplasmic reticulum stress by activation of the heat shock response in yeast

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hou, Jin; Tang, Hongting; Liu, Zihe

    2014-01-01

    In yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, accumulation of misfolded proteins in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) causes ER stress and activates the unfolded protein response (UPR), which is mediated by Hac1p. The heat shock response (HSR) mediated by Hsf1p, mainly regulates cytosolic processes and protects...... and secretion. We also find that HSR coordinates multiple stress–response pathways, including the repression of the overall transcription and translation....

  5. Heat shock protein concentration and clarity of porcine lenses incubated at elevated temperatures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dzialoszynski, T M; Milne, K J; Trevithick, J R; Noble, E G

    2016-01-01

    To quantify the concentration of heat shock proteins in lenses in lens organ culture at elevated temperatures, and to examine the relation between elevated temperature and lens clarity. Pig lenses obtained from a local abattoir were dissected aseptically and incubated in medium M199 without serum for 4 days to stabilize, and lenses with protein leakage of less than 10 mg/l were obtained for heat shock exposure. Heat shock was performed by incubation for 1 h in M199 without serum at various temperatures ranging from 37 °C to 55 °C. After incubation for 24 h, cataract blurring of the images was assessed using Scantox™ and Scion Image analysis of the lens photographs. Lens homogenates were subsequently analyzed for Hsp70 and Hsp27 with western blotting. The degree of cataract blurring of the images increased with increasing temperature, but the two functional measures provided different results. Focal length inconsistency, as assessed with the back vertex distance standard error of the mean (BVD SEM; the variability in focal lengths measured at 20 equally spaced locations across the lens, Scantox™), increased nearly linearly with the heat treatment temperature. In contrast, decreased clarity, evident by a fuzzy image with lower contrast, was not markedly altered as the temperature rose until a threshold of approximately 47.5 °C. The inducible isoform of the Hsp70 family (Hsp70) of heat shock proteins was increased at all temperatures above the control except those above 50 °C. Changes in Hsp27 were less clear as the protein content increased only at the incubation temperatures of 39 °C and 48.5 °C. The porcine lens demonstrates subtle changes in the variability of the focal length, and the variability increases as the incubation temperature rises. In contrast, lens clarity is relatively stable at temperatures up to 47.5 °C, above which dramatic changes, indicative of the formation of cataracts, occur. The lens content of Hsp70 was elevated in lenses

  6. Comparative Membrane Proteomics Reveals a Nonannotated E. coli Heat Shock Protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Peijia; D'Lima, Nadia G; Slavoff, Sarah A

    2018-01-09

    Recent advances in proteomics and genomics have enabled discovery of thousands of previously nonannotated small open reading frames (smORFs) in genomes across evolutionary space. Furthermore, quantitative mass spectrometry has recently been applied to analysis of regulated smORF expression. However, bottom-up proteomics has remained relatively insensitive to membrane proteins, suggesting they may have been underdetected in previous studies. In this report, we add biochemical membrane protein enrichment to our previously developed label-free quantitative proteomics protocol, revealing a never-before-identified heat shock protein in Escherichia coli K12. This putative smORF-encoded heat shock protein, GndA, is likely to be ∼36-55 amino acids in length and contains a predicted transmembrane helix. We validate heat shock-regulated expression of the gndA smORF and demonstrate that a GndA-GFP fusion protein cofractionates with the cell membrane. Quantitative membrane proteomics therefore has the ability to reveal nonannotated small proteins that may play roles in bacterial stress responses.

  7. Heat Shock Proteins: Intestinal Gatekeepers that Are Influenced by Dietary Components and the Gut Microbiota

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haoyu Liu

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Trillions of microorganisms that inhabit the intestinal tract form a diverse and intricate ecosystem with a deeply embedded symbiotic relationship with their hosts. As more detailed information on gut microbiota complexity and functional diversity accumulates, we are learning more about how diet-microbiota interactions can influence the immune system within and outside the gut and host health in general. Heat shock proteins are a set of highly conserved proteins that are present in all types of cells, from microbes to mammals. These proteins carry out crucial intracellular housekeeping functions and unexpected extracellular immuno-regulatory features in order to maintain the mucosal barrier integrity and gut homeostasis. It is becoming evident that the enteric microbiota is one of the major determinants of heat shock protein production in intestinal epithelial cells. This review will focus on the interactions between diet, gut microbiota and their role for regulating heat shock protein production and, furthermore, how these interactions influence the immune system and the integrity of the mucosal barrier.

  8. Module-based analysis of robustness tradeoffs in the heat shock response system.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiroyuki Kurata

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available Biological systems have evolved complex regulatory mechanisms, even in situations where much simpler designs seem to be sufficient for generating nominal functionality. Using module-based analysis coupled with rigorous mathematical comparisons, we propose that in analogy to control engineering architectures, the complexity of cellular systems and the presence of hierarchical modular structures can be attributed to the necessity of achieving robustness. We employ the Escherichia coli heat shock response system, a strongly conserved cellular mechanism, as an example to explore the design principles of such modular architectures. In the heat shock response system, the sigma-factor sigma32 is a central regulator that integrates multiple feedforward and feedback modules. Each of these modules provides a different type of robustness with its inherent tradeoffs in terms of transient response and efficiency. We demonstrate how the overall architecture of the system balances such tradeoffs. An extensive mathematical exploration nevertheless points to the existence of an array of alternative strategies for the existing heat shock response that could exhibit similar behavior. We therefore deduce that the evolutionary constraints facing the system might have steered its architecture toward one of many robustly functional solutions.

  9. Heat Shock Protein A2 (HSPA2): Regulatory Roles in Germ Cell Development and Sperm Function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nixon, Brett; Bromfield, Elizabeth G; Cui, Jinwei; De Iuliis, Geoffry N

    2017-01-01

    Among the numerous families of heat shock protein (HSP) that have been implicated in the regulation of reproductive system development and function, those belonging to the 70 kDa HSP family have emerged as being indispensable for male fertility. In particular, the testis-enriched heat shock 70 kDa protein 2 (HSPA2) has been shown to be critical for the progression of germ cell differentiation during spermatogenesis in the mouse model. Beyond this developmentally important window, mounting evidence has also implicated HSPA2 in the functional transformation of the human sperm cell during their ascent of the female reproductive tract. Specifically, HSPA2 appears to coordinate the remodelling of specialised sperm domains overlying the anterior region of the sperm head compatible with their principle role in oocyte recognition. The fact that levels of the HSPA2 protein in mature spermatozoa tightly correlate with the efficacy of oocyte binding highlight its utility as a powerful prognostic biomarker of male fertility. In this chapter, we consider the unique structural and biochemical characteristics of HSPA2 that enable this heat shock protein to fulfil its prominent roles in orchestrating the morphological differentiation of male germ cells during spermatogenesis as well as their functional transformation during post-testicular sperm maturation.

  10. Protective functions of intracellular heat-shock protein (HSP) 70-expression in patients with severe sepsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruemmer-Smith, S; Stüber, F; Schroeder, S

    2001-12-01

    Intracellular expression of heat-shock-protein 70 (HSP70) arose early in evolutionary development as a tool to protect cellular homeostasis. HSP70 detects proteins that are incorrectly folded or denatured. They form a complex with such proteins which can lead to correct folding, compartmentalization in organelles, or to proteolytic degradation. HSP70 also appears to protect proteins from degeneration. Intracellular HSP70-expression is induced by a wide variety of stimuli including heat, fever, hypoxia, oxygen radicals, endotoxins, cytokines, and heavy metal ions. Pre-emptive induction of HSP70-expression reduces organ dysfunction and mortality in animal models of sepsis.

  11. Influence of individual heat pumps on wind power integration – Energy system investments and operation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hedegaard, Karsten; Münster, Marie

    2013-01-01

    Individual heat pumps are expected to constitute a significant electricity demand in future energy systems. This demand becomes flexible if investing in complementing heat storage capabilities. In this study, we analyse how the heat pumps can influence the integration of wind power by applying...... an energy system model that optimises both investments and operation, and covers various heat storage options. The Danish energy system by 2030 with around 50–60% wind power is used as a case study. Results show that the heat pumps, even without flexible operation, can contribute significantly...... to facilitating larger wind power investments and reducing system costs, fuel consumption, and CO2 emissions. Investments in heat storages can provide only moderate system benefits in these respects. The main benefit of the flexible heat pump operation is a reduced need for peak/reserve capacity, which is also...

  12. Wind Turbine Waste Heat Recovery—A Short-Term Heat Loss Forecasting Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    George Xydis

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The transition from the era of massive renewable energy deployment to the era of cheaper energy needed has made scientists and developers more careful with respect to energy planning compared with a few years ago. The focus is—and will be—placed on retrofitting and on extracting the maximum amount of locally generated energy. The question is not only how much energy can be generated, but also what kind of energy and how it can be utilized efficiently. The waste heat coming from wind farms (WFs when in operation—which until now was wasted—was thoroughly studied. A short-term forecasting methodology that can provide the operator with a better view of the expected heat losses is presented. The majority of mechanical (due to friction and electro-thermal (i.e., generator losses takes place at the nacelle while a smaller part of this thermal source is located near the foundation of the wind turbine (WT where the power electronics and the transformers are usually located. That thermal load can be easily collected via a working fluid and then be transported to the nearest local community or nearby agricultural or small scale industrial units using the necessary piping.

  13. Heat Shock Protein 90 Inhibitor (17-AAG) Induces Apoptosis and Decreases Cell Migration/Motility of Keloid Fibroblasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yun, In Sik; Lee, Mi Hee; Rah, Dong Kyun; Lew, Dae Hyun; Park, Jong-Chul; Lee, Won Jai

    2015-07-01

    The regulation of apoptosis, proliferation, and migration of fibroblasts is altered in keloids. The 90-kDa heat shock protein (heat shock protein 90) is known to play a key role in such regulation. Therefore, the authors investigated whether the inhibition of heat shock protein 90 in keloid fibroblasts could induce apoptosis and attenuate keloid fibroblast proliferation and migration. The authors evaluated heat shock protein 90 expression in keloid tissues with immunohistochemistry. The authors used cell viability [3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide] assays and annexin V/propidium iodide staining for apoptosis, a wound healing model and cell tracking system to assess cell migration, and Akt Western blotting analysis in keloid fibroblasts after inhibition of heat shock protein 90 with 17-allylaminodemethoxygeldanamycin (17-AAG). The expression of heat shock protein 90 in keloid tissues was significantly increased compared with normal tissues. The 17-AAG-treated keloid fibroblasts showed significantly decreased proliferation, promotion of apoptosis, and decreased expression of Akt. Furthermore, a dose-dependent decrease in cell migration was noted after 17-AAG treatment of keloid fibroblasts. The 17-AAG-treated keloid fibroblasts had less directionality to the wound center and migrated a shorter distance. The authors confirmed that the inhibition of heat shock protein 90 in keloid fibroblasts could promote apoptosis and attenuate proliferation and migration of keloid fibroblasts. Therefore, the authors think that the inhibition of heat shock protein 90 is a key factor in the regulation of biological processes in keloids. With further preclinical study, the authors will be able to apply these results clinically for keloid treatment.

  14. CORONAL HEATING BY SURFACE ALFVEN WAVE DAMPING: IMPLEMENTATION IN A GLOBAL MAGNETOHYDRODYNAMICS MODEL OF THE SOLAR WIND

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Evans, R. M. [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Space Weather Lab, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Opher, M. [Astronomy Department, Boston University, 675 Commonwealth Avenue, Boston, MA 02215 (United States); Oran, R.; Van der Holst, B.; Sokolov, I. V.; Frazin, R.; Gombosi, T. I. [Center for Space Environment Modeling, University of Michigan, 2455 Hayward Street, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States); Vasquez, A., E-mail: Rebekah.e.frolov@nasa.gov [Instituto de Astronomia y Fisica del Espacio (CONICET-UBA) and FCEN (UBA), CC 67, Suc 28, Ciudad de Buenos Aires (Argentina)

    2012-09-10

    The heating and acceleration of the solar wind is an active area of research. Alfven waves, because of their ability to accelerate and heat the plasma, are a likely candidate in both processes. Many models have explored wave dissipation mechanisms which act either in closed or open magnetic field regions. In this work, we emphasize the boundary between these regions, drawing on observations which indicate unique heating is present there. We utilize a new solar corona component of the Space Weather Modeling Framework, in which Alfven wave energy transport is self-consistently coupled to the magnetohydrodynamic equations. In this solar wind model, the wave pressure gradient accelerates and wave dissipation heats the plasma. Kolmogorov-like wave dissipation as expressed by Hollweg along open magnetic field lines was presented in van der Holst et al. Here, we introduce an additional dissipation mechanism: surface Alfven wave (SAW) damping, which occurs in regions with transverse (with respect to the magnetic field) gradients in the local Alfven speed. For solar minimum conditions, we find that SAW dissipation is weak in the polar regions (where Hollweg dissipation is strong), and strong in subpolar latitudes and the boundaries of open and closed magnetic fields (where Hollweg dissipation is weak). We show that SAW damping reproduces regions of enhanced temperature at the boundaries of open and closed magnetic fields seen in tomographic reconstructions in the low corona. Also, we argue that Ulysses data in the heliosphere show enhanced temperatures at the boundaries of fast and slow solar wind, which is reproduced by SAW dissipation. Therefore, the model's temperature distribution shows best agreement with these observations when both dissipation mechanisms are considered. Lastly, we use observational constraints of shock formation in the low corona to assess the Alfven speed profile in the model. We find that, compared to a polytropic solar wind model, the wave

  15. Multilevel comparative analysis of the contributions of genome reduction and heat shock to the Escherichia coli transcriptome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ying Bei-Wen

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Both large deletions in genome and heat shock stress would lead to alterations in the gene expression profile; however, whether there is any potential linkage between these disturbances to the transcriptome have not been discovered. Here, the relationship between the genomic and environmental contributions to the transcriptome was analyzed by comparing the transcriptomes of the bacterium Escherichia coli (strain MG1655 and its extensive genomic deletion derivative, MDS42 grown in regular and transient heat shock conditions. Results The transcriptome analysis showed the following: (i there was a reorganization of the transcriptome in accordance with preferred chromosomal periodicity upon genomic or heat shock perturbation; (ii there was a considerable overlap between the perturbed regulatory networks and the categories enriched for differentially expressed genes (DEGs following genome reduction and heat shock; (iii the genes sensitive to genome reduction tended to be located close to genomic scars, and some were also highly responsive to heat shock; and (iv the genomic and environmental contributions to the transcriptome displayed not only a positive correlation but also a negatively compensated relationship (i.e., antagonistic epistasis. Conclusion The contributions of genome reduction and heat shock to the Escherichia coli transcriptome were evaluated at multiple levels. The observations of overlapping perturbed networks, directional similarity in transcriptional changes, positive correlation and epistatic nature linked the two contributions and suggest somehow a crosstalk guiding transcriptional reorganization in response to both genetic and environmental disturbances in bacterium E. coli.

  16. Genetic and phenotypic characterization of the heat shock response in Pseudomonas putida

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, Fumihiro; Tamiya, Takayuki; Ohtsu, Iwao; Fujimura, Makoto; Fukumori, Fumiyasu

    2014-01-01

    Molecular chaperones function in various important physiological processes. Null mutants of genes for the molecular chaperone ClpB (Hsp104), and those that encode J-domain proteins (DnaJ, CbpA, and DjlA), which may act as Hsp40 co-chaperones of DnaK (Hsp70), were constructed from Pseudomonas putida KT2442 (KT) to elucidate their roles. The KTΔclpB mutant showed the same heat shock response (HSR) as the wild-type, both in terms of heat-shock protein (Hsp) synthesis (other than ClpB) and in hsp gene expression; however, the mutant was quite sensitive to high temperatures and was unable to disaggregate into thermo-mediated protein aggregates, indicating that ClpB is important for cell survival after heat stress and essential for solubilization of protein aggregates. On the other hand, the KTΔdnaJ mutant was temperature-sensitive, and formed more protein aggregates (especially of high molecular weight) upon heat stress than did KT. P. putida CbpA, a probable Hsp, partially substituted the functions of DnaJ in cell growth and solubilization of thermo-mediated protein aggregates, and might be involved in the HSR which was regulated by a fine-tuning system(s) that could sense subtle changes in the ambient temperature and control the levels of σ32 activity and quantity, as well as the mRNA levels of hsp genes. PMID:25303383

  17. Heating of the Solar Wind Beyond 1 AU by Turbulent Dissipation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Charles

    The deposition of energy into the solar wind is argued to result from the dissipation of low frequency magnetohydrodynamic turbulence via kinetic processes at spatial scales comparable to the ion gyroradius. We present a theory for heating the solar wind that relies on uid processes such as wind shear inside about 10 AU and the pickup of interstellar ions and the associated generation of waves and turbulence beyond the ionization cavity to serve as energy sources for the heating. We compare the predictions of this theory to the observed magnetic turbulence levels and solar wind temperature measured by Voyager 2 beyond 1 AU. The contribution to the heating of the solar wind provided by interstellar pickup ions is a key feature of this theory and is chie y responsible for the excellent agreement between theory and observation that is seen beyond 10 AU.

  18. Genetic responses of the marine copepod Acartia tonsa (Dana to heat shock and epibiont infestation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Egle Petkeviciute

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Expression of stress-related genes was investigated in the marine copepod Acartia tonsa in relation to heat shock at two different salinities (10 and 32‰, and it was furthermore investigated whether experimentally induced epibiont infestation led to elevated expression of stress-related genes. Expression of the genes ferritin, Hsp90 and Hsp70 were analyzed in adult copepods by conducting reverse transcription-quantitative real time PCR (RT-qPCR. The expression of Hsp70 and Hsp90 was significantly up-regulated after heat shock and the expression levels were higher in copepods cultivated at 10‰ salinity seawater than in copepods cultivated at 32‰. Significant up-regulation of ferritin (3.3 fold increase was observed as a response to infestation with the epibiotic euglenid Colacium vesiculosum. Results suggest that (i A. tonsa responds more pronounced to thermal shock when cultivated in low salinity seawater (10‰ as compared to optimal salinity seawater (32‰ and (ii epibiont infestation does cause a measureable physiological response in the host.

  19. Enhanced re-activation of u. v. -light-irradiated adenovirus 2 in HeLa cells after heat shock

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Piperakis, S.M.; McLennan, A.G. (Liverpool Univ. (UK))

    1983-08-01

    The effect of heat treatment of HeLa cells on the survival of infecting u.v.-irradiated adenovirus 2 was studied. A 10-minute heat shock at 45/sup 0/C to the HeLa cells considerably enhanced the survival of u.v.-irradiated virus. The optimal delay between heat shock and infection was 36 h; this resulted in a reactivation factor of 9. The enhanced reactivation was sensitive to cycloheximide only when added to the cell growth medium during the first three hours after heat treatment; this indicates that the synthesis of new proteins necessary for the expression of enhanced reactivation occurs at an early stage after heat shock.

  20. Heat-shock responses in two leguminous plants: a comparative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortiz, C; Cardemil, L

    2001-08-01

    Relative growth rates, basal and acclimated thermotolerance, membrane damage, fluorescence emission, and relative levels of free and conjugated ubiquitin and HSP70 were compared after 2 h of treatment at different temperatures between Prosopis chilensis and Glycine max (soybean), cv. McCall, to evaluate if the thermotolerance of these two plants was related to levels of accumulation of heat shock proteins. Seedlings of P. chilensis germinated at 25 degrees C and at 35 degrees C and grown at temperatures above germination temperature showed higher relative growth than soybean seedlings treated under the same conditions. The lethal temperature of both species was 50 degrees C after germination at 25 degrees C. However, they were able to grow at 50 degrees C after germination at 35 degrees C. Membrane damage determinations in leaves showed that P. chilensis has an LT(50) 6 degrees C higher than that of soybean. There were no differences in the quantum yield of photosynthesis (F(v)/F(m)), between both plants when the temperatures were raised. P. chilensis showed higher relative levels of free ubiquitin, conjugated ubiquitin and HSP70 than soybean seedlings when the temperatures were raised. Time-course studies of accumulation of these proteins performed at 40 degrees C showed that the relative accumulation rates of ubiquitin, conjugated ubiquitin and HSP70 were higher in P. chilensis than in soybean. In both plants, free ubiquitin decreased during the first 5 min and increased after 30 min of heat shock, conjugated ubiquitin increased after 30 min and HSP70 began to increase dramatically after 20 min of heat shock. From these data it is concluded that P. chilensis is more tolerant to acute heat stress than soybean.

  1. Similarity solution for the flow behind a shock wave in a non-ideal gas with heat conduction and radiation heat-flux in magnetogasdynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nath, G.; Vishwakarma, J. P.

    2014-05-01

    The propagation of a spherical (or cylindrical) shock wave in a non-ideal gas with heat conduction and radiation heat-flux, in the presence of a spacially decreasing azimuthal magnetic field, driven out by a moving piston is investigated. The heat conduction is expressed in terms of Fourier's law and the radiation is considered to be of the diffusion type for an optically thick grey gas model. The thermal conductivity K and the absorption coefficient αR are assumed to vary with temperature and density. The gas is assumed to have infinite electrical conductivity and to obey a simplified van der Waals equation of state. The shock wave moves with variable velocity and the total energy of the wave is non-constant. Similarity solutions are obtained for the flow-field behind the shock and the effects of variation of the heat transfer parameters, the parameter of the non-idealness of the gas, both, decreases the compressibility of the gas and hence there is a decrease in the shock strength. Further, it is investigated that with an increase in the parameters of radiative and conductive heat transfer the tendency of formation of maxima in the distributions of heat flux, density and isothermal speed of sound decreases. The pressure and density vanish at the inner surface (piston) and hence a vacuum is form at the center of symmetry. The shock waves in conducting non-ideal gas with conductive and radiative heat fluxes can be important for description of shocks in supernova explosions, in the study of central part of star burst galaxies, nuclear explosion, chemical detonation, rupture of a pressurized vessels, in the analysis of data from exploding wire experiments, and cylindrically symmetric hypersonic flow problems associated with meteors or reentry vehicles, etc. The findings of the present works provided a clear picture of whether and how the non-idealness parameter, conductive and radiative heat transfer parameters and the magnetic field affect the flow behind the shock

  2. Comparison of the heat shock response induced by conventional heating and two methods of delivery of pulsed radiofrequency energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laurence, J.A.; University of Sydney, NSW; McKenzie, D.R.; Veas, L.; French, P.W.

    2002-01-01

    Full text: In 2001, we published a (hypothetical) mechanism by which radiofrequency (RF) radiation from mobile phones could induce cancer, via the chronic induction of the heat shock response (HSR). This hypothesis provides the focus for our research. Other groups have reported induction of the HSR by RF at apparently non thermal levels. The aim of this study was to determine whether the HSR induced by RF is (a) truly non thermal and (b) quantitatively or qualitatively different from that induced by conventional heating of cells. A rat mast cell line, RBL-2H3, was chosen as the target RBL-2H3 cells were exposed in an air incubator at 41.1 deg C for 45 minutes and 75 minutes, and then returned to a 37 deg C incubator. Sham exposures were performed in the same air incubator at 37 deg C. Cells were exposed for 1 hour in the two pulsed RF exposure systems. The first was a converted 750W microwave oven that emits a short burst of 2.45GHz pulses at the start of each contiguous six minute period. This exposes cells to an average specific energy absorption rate (SAR) of 20W/kg. The second system was a TEM cell, which simulates. GSM pulses - the earner frequency is 0.9GHz pulse modulated at 217Hz. The SAR was approx 0.1W/kg. Both of these exposure systems are housed in incubators maintained at 37 deg C. Sham exposures were performed in the two systems with the same conditions but with no RF radiation present. Cell samples for the conventional heating and microwave exposures were taken 0, 2. 5, 5 and 20 hours after exposure, and expression of heat shock proteins hsp 110, 90, 70, 60 and 56 were determined by Western Blotting and compared between exposures

  3. Heat shock effects on the viability of Cronobacter sakazakii during the dehydration, fermentation, and storage of lactic cultured milk products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan-Ling, Hsiao; Chang, Chia-Hsiang; Chou, Cheng-Chun

    2010-04-01

    In the present study, the viability of heat-shocked and non-shocked Cronobacter sakazakii, a foodborne pathogen, after drying and during the fermentation as well as storage of lactic cultured milk was evaluated. It was found that heat shock increased the viability of C. sakazakii. The pure culture of C. sakazakii, regardless of heat shock, grew rapidly in skim milk with a viable population of ca. 8.59-8.70 log cfu/ml after ca. 48 h of cultivation. Thereafter, the viable population of C. sakazakii remained stable. While in the mix culture with Streptococcus thermophilus or Lactobacillus bulgaricus, a marked reduction in the viable population of C. sakazakii was noted after 24 h of cultivation in skim milk. Nevertheless, at the end of fermentation, the heat-shocked C. sakazakii had a viable population of 5.93-6.01 log cfu/ml, which is significantly higher (P milk. Additionally, heat shock was found to enhance the survival of C. sakazakii after freeze-drying or spray-drying and during the storage of the lactic fermented milk products (pH 4.3) at 5 degrees C for 48 h.

  4. Resveratrol Reactivates Latent HIV through Increasing Histone Acetylation and Activating Heat Shock Factor 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Xiaoyun; Pan, Xiaoyan; Xu, Xinfeng; Lin, Jian; Que, Fuchang; Tian, Yuanxin; Li, Lin; Liu, Shuwen

    2017-06-07

    The persistence of latent HIV reservoirs presents a significant challenge to viral eradication. Effective latency reversing agents (LRAs) based on "shock and kill" strategy are urgently needed. The natural phytoalexin resveratrol has been demonstrated to enhance HIV gene expression, although its mechanism remains unclear. In this study, we demonstrated that resveratrol was able to reactivate latent HIV without global T cell activation in vitro. Mode of action studies showed resveratrol-mediated reactivation from latency did not involve the activation of silent mating type information regulation 2 homologue 1 (SIRT1), which belonged to class-3 histone deacetylase (HDAC). However, latent HIV was reactivated by resveratrol mediated through increasing histone acetylation and activation of heat shock factor 1 (HSF1). Additionally, synergistic activation of the latent HIV reservoirs was observed under cotreatment with resveratrol and conventional LRAs. Collectively, this research reveals that resveratrol is a natural LRA and shows promise for HIV therapy.

  5. Association of coral algal symbionts with a diverse viral community responsive to heat shock

    KAUST Repository

    Brüwer, Jan D.

    2017-08-17

    Stony corals provide the structural foundation of coral reef ecosystems and are termed holobionts given they engage in symbioses, in particular with photosynthetic dinoflagellates of the genus Symbiodinium. Besides Symbiodinium, corals also engage with bacteria affecting metabolism, immunity, and resilience of the coral holobiont, but the role of associated viruses is largely unknown. In this regard, the increase of studies using RNA sequencing (RNA-Seq) to assess gene expression provides an opportunity to elucidate viral signatures encompassed within the data via careful delineation of sequence reads and their source of origin.Here, we re-analyzed an RNA-Seq dataset from a cultured coral symbiont (Symbiodinium microadriaticum, Clade A1) across four experimental treatments (control, cold shock, heat shock, dark shock) to characterize associated viral diversity, abundance, and gene expression. Our approach comprised the filtering and removal of host sequence reads, subsequent phylogenetic assignment of sequence reads of putative viral origin, and the assembly and analysis of differentially expressed viral genes. About 15.46% (123 million) of all sequence reads were non-host-related, of which <1% could be classified as archaea, bacteria, or virus. Of these, 18.78% were annotated as virus and comprised a diverse community consistent across experimental treatments. Further, non-host related sequence reads assembled into 56,064 contigs, including 4856 contigs of putative viral origin that featured 43 differentially expressed genes during heat shock. The differentially expressed genes included viral kinases, ubiquitin, and ankyrin repeat proteins (amongst others), which are suggested to help the virus proliferate and inhibit the algal host\\'s antiviral response.Our results suggest that a diverse viral community is associated with coral algal endosymbionts of the genus Symbiodinium, which prompts further research on their ecological role in coral health and resilience.

  6. Analysis of counter flow of corona wind for heat transfer enhancement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Dong Ho; Baek, Soo Hong; Ko, Han Seo

    2018-03-01

    A heat sink for cooling devices using the counter flow of a corona wind was developed in this study. Detailed information about the numerical investigations of forced convection using the corona wind was presented. The fins of the heat sink using the counter flow of a corona wind were also investigated. The corona wind generator with a wire-to-plate electrode arrangement was used for generating the counter flow to the fin. The compact and simple geometric characteristics of the corona wind generator facilitate the application of the heat sink using the counter flow, demonstrating the heat sink is effective for cooling electronic devices. Parametric studies were performed to analyze the effect of the counter flow on the fins. Also, the velocity and temperature were measured experimentally for the test mock-up of the heat sink with the corona wind generator to verify the numerical results. From a numerical study, the type of fin and its optimal height, length, and pitch were suggested for various heat fluxes. In addition, the correlations to calculate the mass of the developed heat sink and its cooling performance in terms of the heat transfer coefficient were derived. Finally, the cooling efficiencies corresponding to the mass, applied power, total size, and noise of the devices were compared with the existing commercial central processing unit (CPU) cooling devices with rotor fans. As a result, it was confirmed that the heat sink using the counter flow of the corona wind showed appropriate efficiencies for cooling electronic devices, and is a suitable replacement for the existing cooling device for high power electronics.

  7. The heat-shock protein/chaperone network and multiple stress resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacob, Pierre; Hirt, Heribert; Bendahmane, Abdelhafid

    2017-04-01

    Crop yield has been greatly enhanced during the last century. However, most elite cultivars are adapted to temperate climates and are not well suited to more stressful conditions. In the context of climate change, stress resistance is a major concern. To overcome these difficulties, scientists may help breeders by providing genetic markers associated with stress resistance. However, multistress resistance cannot be obtained from the simple addition of single stress resistance traits. In the field, stresses are unpredictable and several may occur at once. Consequently, the use of single stress resistance traits is often inadequate. Although it has been historically linked with the heat stress response, the heat-shock protein (HSP)/chaperone network is a major component of multiple stress responses. Among the HSP/chaperone 'client proteins', many are primary metabolism enzymes and signal transduction components with essential roles for the proper functioning of a cell. HSPs/chaperones are controlled by the action of diverse heat-shock factors, which are recruited under stress conditions. In this review, we give an overview of the regulation of the HSP/chaperone network with a focus on Arabidopsis thaliana. We illustrate the role of HSPs/chaperones in regulating diverse signalling pathways and discuss several basic principles that should be considered for engineering multiple stress resistance in crops through the HSP/chaperone network. © 2016 The Authors. Plant Biotechnology Journal published by Society for Experimental Biology and The Association of Applied Biologists and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. Inhibiting heat shock factor 1 in human cancer cells with a potent RNA aptamer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H Hans Salamanca

    Full Text Available Heat shock factor 1 (HSF1 is a master regulator that coordinates chaperone protein expression to enhance cellular survival in the face of heat stress. In cancer cells, HSF1 drives a transcriptional program distinct from heat shock to promote metastasis and cell survival. Its strong association with the malignant phenotype implies that HSF1 antagonists may have general and effective utilities in cancer therapy. For this purpose, we had identified an avid RNA aptamer for HSF1 that is portable among different model organisms. Extending our previous work in yeast and Drosophila, here we report the activity of this aptamer in human cancer cell lines. When delivered into cells using a synthetic gene and strong promoter, this aptamer was able to prevent HSF1 from binding to its DNA regulation elements. At the cellular level, expression of this aptamer induced apoptosis and abolished the colony-forming capability of cancer cells. At the molecular level, it reduced chaperones and attenuated the activation of the MAPK signaling pathway. Collectively, these data demonstrate the advantage of aptamers in drug target validation and support the hypothesis that HSF1 DNA binding activity is a potential target for controlling oncogenic transformation and neoplastic growth.

  9. A Maine romance. [Solar heating, wind power and cliff erosion control at a Maine site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adams, J.A.

    1979-09-01

    The construction of a house on the coast of Maine included terracing of the bluff for erosion control, installation of water solar collectors for space and water heating, and construction of a wind turbine for electric power generation. A total of 4,027 ft/sup 2/ of house area is heated by a system of 10 collectors and 4,000 gal water storage. Insulation values are R-19 in the walls, R-40 in the ceiling, R-26 in the floors, and R-14 in the basement. South-facing windows provide additional heat gain. The wind turbine and generator system supplies alternating current to the house and also heats auxiliary water storage when necessary. The house, collectors, and wind turbine are designed to supply 85% of the heating load.

  10. [Suppressive Effects of Extract of Cedar Wood on Heat-induced Expression of Cellular Heat Shock Protein].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyakoshi, Junji; Matsubara, Eri; Narita, Eijiro; Koyama, Shin; Shimizu, Yoko; Kawai, Shuichi

    2018-01-01

     In recent years, highly antimicrobial properties of cedar heartwood essential oil against the wood-rotting fungi and pathogenic fungi have been reported in several papers. Antimicrobial properties against oral bacteria by hinokitiol contained in Thujopsis have been also extensively studied. The relation of naturally derived components and human immune system has been studied in some previous papers. In the present study, we focused on Japanese cedar, which has the widest artificial afforestation site in the country among various tree species. Extract oil was obtained from mixture of sapwood and heartwood of about 40-year cedar grown in Oguni, Kumamoto, Japan. We examined the influence of extract components from Japanese cedar woods on the expression of heat shock protein 70 (Hsp70) during heating, and on the micronucleus formation induced by the treatment of bleomycin as a DNA damaging agent. Cell lines used in this study were human fetal glial cells (SVGp12) and human glioma cells (MO54). Remarkable suppression of the Hsp70 expression induced by heating at 43°C was detected by the treatment of cedar extract in both SVGp12 and MO54 cells. We also found that cedar extract had an inhibitory tendency to reduce the micronucleus formation induced by bleomycin. From these results, the extract components from Japanese cedar woods would have an inhibitory effect of the stress response as a suppression of the heat-induced Hsp70 expression, and might have a reductive effect on carcinogenicity.

  11. Effects of heat stress on serum insulin, adipokines, AMP-activated protein kinase, and heat shock signal molecules in dairy cows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Min, Li; Cheng, Jian-bo; Shi, Bao-lu; Yang, Hong-jian; Zheng, Nan; Wang, Jia-qi

    2015-06-01

    Heat stress affects feed intake, milk production, and endocrine status in dairy cows. The temperature-humidity index (THI) is employed as an index to evaluate the degree of heat stress in dairy cows. However, it is difficult to ascertain whether THI is the most appropriate measurement of heat stress in dairy cows. This experiment was conducted to investigate the effects of heat stress on serum insulin, adipokines (leptin and adiponectin), AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK), and heat shock signal molecules (heat shock transcription factor (HSF) and heat shock proteins (HSP)) in dairy cows and to research biomarkers to be used for better understanding the meaning of THI as a bioclimatic index. To achieve these objectives, two experiments were performed. The first experiment: eighteen lactating Holstein dairy cows were used. The treatments were: heat stress (HS, THI average=81.7, n=9) and cooling (CL, THI average=53.4, n=9). Samples of HS were obtained on August 16, 2013, and samples of CL were collected on April 7, 2014 in natural conditions. The second experiment: HS treatment cows (n=9) from the first experiment were fed for 8 weeks from August 16, 2013 to October 12, 2013. Samples for moderate heat stress, mild heat stress, and no heat stress were obtained, respectively, according to the physical alterations of the THI. Results showed that heat stress significantly increased the serum adiponectin, AMPK, HSF, HSP27, HSP70, and HSP90 (Pstressed dairy cows. When heat stress treatment lasted 8 weeks, a higher expression of HSF and HSP70 was observed under moderate heat stress. Serum HSF and HSP70 are sensitive and accurate in heat stress and they could be potential indicators of animal response to heat stress. We recommend serum HSF and HSP70 as meaningful biomarkers to supplement the THI and evaluate moderate heat stress in dairy cows in the future.

  12. Different responses to heat shock stress revealed heteromorphic adaptation strategy of Pyropia haitanensis (Bangiales, Rhodophyta).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Qijun; Zhu, Zhenggang; Zhu, Zhujun; Yang, Rui; Qian, Feijian; Chen, Haimin; Yan, Xiaojun

    2014-01-01

    Pyropia has a unique heteromorphic life cycle with alternation stages between thallus and conchocelis, which lives at different water temperatures in different seasons. To better understand the different adaptation strategies for temperature stress, we tried to observe comparative biochemical changes of Pyropia haitanensis based on a short term heat shock model. The results showed that: (1) At normal temperature, free-living conchocelis contains significantly higher levels of H2O2, fatty acid-derived volatiles, the copy number of Phrboh and Phhsp70 genes,the activities of NADPH oxidase and floridoside than those in thallus. The released H2O2 and NADPH oxidase activity of conchocelis were more than 7 times higher than those of thallus. The copy number of Phrboh in conchocelis was 32 times that in thallus. (2) After experiencing heat shock at 35°C for 30 min, the H2O2 contents, the mRNA levels of Phrboh and Phhsp70, NADPH oxidase activity and the floridoside content in thallus were all significantly increased. The mRNA levels of Phrboh increased 5.78 times in 5 min, NADPH oxidase activity increased 8.45 times in 20 min. (3) Whereas, in conchocelis, the changes in fatty acids and their down-stream volatiles predominated, significantly increasing levels of saturated fatty acids and decreasing levels of polyunsaturated fatty acids occurred, and the 8-carbon volatiles were accumulated. However, the changes in H2O2 content and expression of oxidant-related genes and enzymatic activity were not obvious. Overall, these results indicate that conchocelis maintains a high level of active protective apparatus to endure its survival at high temperature, while thallus exhibit typical stress responses to heat shock. It is concluded that Pyropia haitanensis has evolved a delicate strategy for temperature adaptation for its heteromorphic life cycle.

  13. Different responses to heat shock stress revealed heteromorphic adaptation strategy of Pyropia haitanensis (Bangiales, Rhodophyta.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qijun Luo

    Full Text Available Pyropia has a unique heteromorphic life cycle with alternation stages between thallus and conchocelis, which lives at different water temperatures in different seasons. To better understand the different adaptation strategies for temperature stress, we tried to observe comparative biochemical changes of Pyropia haitanensis based on a short term heat shock model. The results showed that: (1 At normal temperature, free-living conchocelis contains significantly higher levels of H2O2, fatty acid-derived volatiles, the copy number of Phrboh and Phhsp70 genes,the activities of NADPH oxidase and floridoside than those in thallus. The released H2O2 and NADPH oxidase activity of conchocelis were more than 7 times higher than those of thallus. The copy number of Phrboh in conchocelis was 32 times that in thallus. (2 After experiencing heat shock at 35°C for 30 min, the H2O2 contents, the mRNA levels of Phrboh and Phhsp70, NADPH oxidase activity and the floridoside content in thallus were all significantly increased. The mRNA levels of Phrboh increased 5.78 times in 5 min, NADPH oxidase activity increased 8.45 times in 20 min. (3 Whereas, in conchocelis, the changes in fatty acids and their down-stream volatiles predominated, significantly increasing levels of saturated fatty acids and decreasing levels of polyunsaturated fatty acids occurred, and the 8-carbon volatiles were accumulated. However, the changes in H2O2 content and expression of oxidant-related genes and enzymatic activity were not obvious. Overall, these results indicate that conchocelis maintains a high level of active protective apparatus to endure its survival at high temperature, while thallus exhibit typical stress responses to heat shock. It is concluded that Pyropia haitanensis has evolved a delicate strategy for temperature adaptation for its heteromorphic life cycle.

  14. The small heat shock proteins from Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans: gene expression, phylogenetic analysis, and structural modeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ribeiro Daniela A

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans is an acidophilic, chemolithoautotrophic bacterium that has been successfully used in metal bioleaching. In this study, an analysis of the A. ferrooxidans ATCC 23270 genome revealed the presence of three sHSP genes, Afe_1009, Afe_1437 and Afe_2172, that encode proteins from the HSP20 family, a class of intracellular multimers that is especially important in extremophile microorganisms. Results The expression of the sHSP genes was investigated in A. ferrooxidans cells submitted to a heat shock at 40°C for 15, 30 and 60 minutes. After 60 minutes, the gene on locus Afe_1437 was about 20-fold more highly expressed than the gene on locus Afe_2172. Bioinformatic and phylogenetic analyses showed that the sHSPs from A. ferrooxidans are possible non-paralogous proteins, and are regulated by the σ32 factor, a common transcription factor of heat shock proteins. Structural studies using homology molecular modeling indicated that the proteins encoded by Afe_1009 and Afe_1437 have a conserved α-crystallin domain and share similar structural features with the sHSP from Methanococcus jannaschii, suggesting that their biological assembly involves 24 molecules and resembles a hollow spherical shell. Conclusion We conclude that the sHSPs encoded by the Afe_1437 and Afe_1009 genes are more likely to act as molecular chaperones in the A. ferrooxidans heat shock response. In addition, the three sHSPs from A. ferrooxidans are not recent paralogs, and the Afe_1437 and Afe_1009 genes could be inherited horizontally by A. ferrooxidans.

  15. Aberrant regulation and modification of heat shock factor 1 in senescent human diploid fibroblasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Yoon Kwang; Liu, Diana J; Lu, Jiebo; Chen, Kuang Yu; Liu, Alice Y-C

    2009-02-01

    Induction of the heat shock response (HSR), determined by hsp70-luciferase reporter and HSP70 protein expression, is attenuated as a function of age of the IMR-90 human diploid fibroblasts. To better understand the underlying mechanism, we evaluated changes in the regulation and function of the HSF1 transcription factor. We show that the activation of HSF1 both in vivo and in vitro was decreased as a function of age, and this was attributable to a change in the regulation of HSF1 as the abundance of HSF1 protein and mRNA was unaffected. HSF1 was primarily cytosolic in young cells maintained at 37 degrees C, and heat shock promoted its quantitative nuclear translocation and trimerization. In old cells, some HSF1 was nuclear sequestered at 37 degrees C, and heat shock failed to promote the quantitative trimerization of HSF1. These changes in HSF1 could be reproduced by treating young cells with H2O2 to stunt them into premature senescence. Flow cytometry measurement of peroxide content showed higher levels in old cells and H2O2-induced premature senescent cells as compared to young cells. Experiments using isoelectric focusing and Western blot showed age-dependent changes in the mobility of HSF1 in a pattern consistent with its S-glutathiolation and S-nitrosylation; these changes could be mimicked by treating young cells with H2O2. Our results demonstrated dynamic age-dependent changes in the regulation but not the amount of HSF1. These changes are likely mediated by oxidative events that promote reversible and irreversible modification of HSF1 including S-glutathiolation and S-nitrosylation.

  16. The importance of seed mass for the tolerance to heat shocks of savanna and forest tree species

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ribeiro, L.C.; Barbosa, E.R.M.; Langevelde, van F.; Borghetti, F.

    2015-01-01

    Questions: Does seed mass influence the tolerance of seeds to the effects of heating in fires? Is the tolerance to heat shocks during fire events dependent mostly on seed mass itself or to other traits linked to the species ecological origin, e.g. non-fire-prone (forest) and fire-prone (savanna)

  17. INDUCIBLE HEAT SHOCK PROTEIN (HSP70-1) PROTECTS MCF-7 CELLS FROM THE CYTOTOXIC AND GENOTOXIC EFFECTS OF ARSENITE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heat shock proteins (HSPs) belong to the highly conserved family of stress proteins and are induced following exposure to arsenic. Elevated HSPs protect against cellular damage from heat but it is unclear wether HSP induction alters the damaging effects of environmental chemical ...

  18. Influence of wind power, plug-in electric vehicles, and heat storages on power system investments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kiviluoma, Juha; Meibom, Peter

    2010-01-01

    Due to rising fuel costs, the substantial price for CO 2 emissions and decreasing wind power costs, wind power might become the least expensive source of power for an increasing number of power systems. This poses the questions of how wind power might change optimal investments in other forms of power production and what kind of means could be used to increase power system flexibility in order to incorporate the variable power production from wind power in a cost-effective manner. We have analysed possible effects using an investment model that combines heat and power production and simulates electric vehicles. The model runs in an hourly time scale in order to accommodate the impact of variable power production from wind power. Electric vehicles store electricity for later use and can thus serve to increase the flexibility of the power system. Flexibility can also be upgraded by using heat storages with heat from heat pumps, electric heat boilers and combined heat and power (CHP) plants. Results show that there is great potential for additional power system flexibility in the production and use of heat. (author)

  19. New evidence for efficient collisionless heating of electrons at the reverse shock of a young supernova remnant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamaguchi, Hiroya; Petre, Robert; Eriksen, Kristoffer A.; Badenes, Carles; Hughes, John P.; Brickhouse, Nancy S.; Foster, Adam R.; Patnaude, Daniel J.; Slane, Patrick O.; Smith, Randall K.

    2014-01-01

    Although collisionless shocks are ubiquitous in astrophysics, certain key aspects of them are not well understood. In particular, the process known as collisionless electron heating, whereby electrons are rapidly energized at the shock front, is one of the main open issues in shock physics. Here, we present the first clear evidence for efficient collisionless electron heating at the reverse shock of Tycho's supernova remnant (SNR), revealed by Fe K diagnostics using high-quality X-ray data obtained by the Suzaku satellite. We detect Kβ (3p → 1s) fluorescence emission from low-ionization Fe ejecta excited by energetic thermal electrons at the reverse shock front, which peaks at a smaller radius than Fe Kα (2p → 1s) emission dominated by a relatively highly ionized component. Comparisons with our hydrodynamical simulations imply instantaneous electron heating to a temperature 1000 times higher than expected from Coulomb collisions alone. The unique environment of the reverse shock, which is propagating with a high Mach number into rarefied ejecta with a low magnetic field strength, puts strong constraints on the physical mechanism responsible for this heating and favors a cross-shock potential created by charge deflection at the shock front. Our sensitive observation also reveals that the reverse shock radius of this SNR is about 10% smaller than the previous measurement using the Fe Kα morphology from the Chandra observations. Since strong Fe Kβ fluorescence is expected only from low-ionization plasma where Fe ions still have many 3p electrons, this feature is key to diagnosing the plasma state and distribution of the immediate postshock ejecta in a young SNR.

  20. New Evidence for Efficient Collisionless Heating of Electrons at the Reverse Shock of a Young Supernova Remnant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamaguchi, Hiroya; Eriksen, Kristoffer A.; Badenes, Carles; Hughes, John P.; Brickhouse, Nancy S.; Foster, Adam R.; Patnaude, Daniel J.; Petre, Robert; Slane, Patrick O.; Smith, Randall K.

    2013-01-01

    Although collisionless shocks are ubiquitous in astrophysics, certain key aspects of them are not well understood. In particular, the process known as collisionless electron heating, whereby electrons are rapidly energized at the shock front, is one of the main open issues in shock physics. Here, we present the first clear evidence for efficient collisionless electron heating at the reverse shock of Tycho's supernova remnant (SNR), revealed by Fe K diagnostics using high-quality X-ray data obtained by the Suzaku satellite. We detect K beta (3p yields 1s) fluorescence emission from low-ionization Fe ejecta excited by energetic thermal electrons at the reverse shock front, which peaks at a smaller radius than Fe K alpha (2p yields 1s) emission dominated by a relatively highly ionized component. Comparisons with our hydrodynamical simulations imply instantaneous electron heating to a temperature 1000 times higher than expected from Coulomb collisions alone. The unique environment of the reverse shock, which is propagating with a high Mach number into rarefied ejecta with a low magnetic field strength, puts strong constraints on the physical mechanism responsible for this heating and favors a cross-shock potential created by charge deflection at the shock front. Our sensitive observation also reveals that the reverse shock radius of this SNR is about 10% smaller than the previous measurement using the Fe K alpha morphology from the Chandra observations. Since strong Fe K beta fluorescence is expected only from low-ionization plasma where Fe ions still have many 3p electrons, this feature is key to diagnosing the plasma state and distribution of the immediate postshock ejecta in a young SNR.

  1. HSP70-Inducible hNIS-IRES-eGFP Reporter Imaging: Response to Heat Shock

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiantu Che

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available A retroviral vector pQHSP70/hNIS-IRES-eGFP (pQHNIG70 was constructed containing the hNIS-IRES-eGFP dual-reporter genes under the control of an inducible human heat shock protein (HSP70 promoter and RG2-pQHSP70/hNIS-IRES-eGFP (RG2-pQHNIG70 transduced cells were generated. Heat-induced expression of both reporter genes in RG2-pQHNIG70 cells was validated by enhanced green fluorescent protein (eGFP fluorescence-activated cell sorter, in vitro radiotracer assays, and immunoblot and immunocytochemistry. A 2.2- to 6.1-fold (131I−, a 6.1- to 14.4-fold (99mTcO4−, and a 5.1- to 39-fold (fluorescence increase above baseline was observed in response to graded hyperthermia (39–43°C. Increases in eGFP fluorescence and radiotracer uptake were first noted at 6 hours, reached a maximum at 24 hours, and fell toward baseline at 72 hours. A stable ratio of radiotracer uptake to eGFP fluorescence and to heat shock protein (HSP70 protein was demonstrated over a wide range of expression levels, induced by different levels of heating. We also demonstrate that the local application of heat on RG2-pQHNIG70 xenografts can effectively induce hNIS and eGFP gene expression in vivo and that this expression can be efficiently visualized by fluorescence, scintigraphic, and micro–positron emission tomography imaging. Endogenous HSP70 protein and reporter expression was confirmed by postmortem tissue evaluations (immunoblot and immunohistochemistry. The pQHNIG70 reporter system can be used to study stress and drug responses in transduced cells and tissues.

  2. Heat shock protein 90α is a potential serological biomarker of acute rejection after renal transplantation.

    OpenAIRE

    Maehana, Takeshi

    2016-01-01

    臓器移植における拒絶反応とHeat Shock Protein 90α(HSP90α)の関係を解析した, 血清HSP90α値は腎移植後急性拒絶反応, 特に血管炎を伴う重度の急性拒絶反応の病態を反映するバイオマーカーとなり得る事が示唆された,

  3. Isolation, characterization, and sequence of an Escherichia coli heat shock gene, htpX.

    OpenAIRE

    Kornitzer, D; Teff, D; Altuvia, S; Oppenheim, A B

    1991-01-01

    We isolated and characterized a new Escherichia coli gene, htpX. The htpX gene has been localized at min 40.3 on the chromosome. We determined its transcription and translation start site. htpX expresses a 32-kDa protein from a monocistronic transcript; expression of this protein is induced by temperature upshift. htpX is expressed from a sigma 32-dependent promoter and is thus part of the heat shock regulon. Cells carrying a htpX gene disruption grow well at all temperatures and under all co...

  4. Heat shock protein translocation and expression response is attenuated in response to repeated eccentric exercise

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vissing, K.; Bayer, M.L.; Overgaard, K.

    2009-01-01

    This study hypothesized that heat shock protein (HSP) translocation and upregulation is more probable to occur after eccentric exercise than after concentric exercise or repeated eccentric exercise. Fourteen young, healthy, untrained male subjects completed two bench-stepping exercise bouts with 8...... and cytoskeletal protein fractions. The first bout of exercise reduced muscle strength and increased muscle soreness predominantly in the eccentric leg (P repeated eccentric exercise bout (P repeated bout adaptation. Increases in inducible...... HSP70 and HSP27 protein content in cytoskeletal fractions were observed exclusively after eccentric exercise (P repeated eccentric exercise bout...

  5. Human major histocompatibility complex contains genes for the major heat shock protein HSP70.

    OpenAIRE

    Sargent, C A; Dunham, I; Trowsdale, J; Campbell, R D

    1989-01-01

    Little is known as to why a large number of human diseases are influenced by the major histocompatibility complex. In some cases, a direct involvement of the products of the polymorphic class I and class II, aas well as the less variable products of the class III, genes has been proposed. During characterization of the class III region for the presence of additional loci, we have located a duplicated locus encoding the major heat shock protein HSP70 between the complement and tumor necrosis f...

  6. [Heat shock protein 90--modulator of TNFalpha-induced apoptosis of Jurkat tumor cells].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaĭgorodova, E V; Riazantseva, N V; Novitskiĭ, V V; Moroshkina, A N; Belkina, M V; Iakushina, V D

    2011-01-01

    rTNFalpha-induced programmed death of Jurkat tumor cells cultured with 17-AAG, a selective inhibitor of heat shock protein (Hsp90), was studied by fluorescent microscopy with the use of FITC-labeled annexin V and propidium iodide. Caspase-3 and -8 activities were determined by spectrophotometry using a caspase- 3 and -8 colorimetric assay kit. It was shown that inhibition of Hsp90 leads to activation of Jurkat cell apoptosis while Hsp90 itself suppresses this process. 17-AAG enhances rTNFa-induced apoptosis of tumor cells.

  7. Secreted heat shock protein 90 promotes prostate cancer stem cell heterogeneity

    OpenAIRE

    Nolan, Krystal D.; Kaur, Jasmine; Isaacs, Jennifer S.

    2016-01-01

    Heat-shock protein 90 (Hsp90), a highly conserved molecular chaperone, is frequently upregulated in tumors, and remains an attractive anti-cancer target. Hsp90 is also found extracellularly, particularly in tumor models. Although extracellular Hsp90 (eHsp90) action is not well defined, eHsp90 targeting attenuates tumor invasion and metastasis, supporting its unique role in tumor progression. We herein investigated the potential role of eHsp90 as a modulator of cancer stem-like cells (CSCs) in...

  8. Accumulation of Stable Full-Length Circular Group I Intron RNAs during Heat-Shock

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Kasper L.; Beckert, Bertrand; Masquida, Benoit

    2016-01-01

    Group I introns in nuclear ribosomal RNA of eukaryotic microorganisms are processed by splicing or circularization. The latter results in formation of full-length circular introns without ligation of the exons and has been proposed to be active in intron mobility. We applied qRT-PCR to estimate...... the copy number of circular intron RNA from the myxomycete Didymium iridis. In exponentially growing amoebae, the circular introns are nuclear and found in 70 copies per cell. During heat-shock, the circular form is up-regulated to more than 500 copies per cell. The intron harbours two ribozymes that have...

  9. IGFBP2 plays an important role in heat shock protein 27-mediated cancer progression and metastasis

    OpenAIRE

    Hung, Chin-Sheng; Huang, Chien-Yu; Lee, Chia-Hwa; Chen, Wei-Yu; Huang, Ming-Te; Wei, Po-Li; Chang, Yu-Jia

    2017-01-01

    Heat shock protein 27 (Hsp27) is a key chaperone that interacts with over 200 client proteins. The expression of Hsp27 might be correlated with poor outcome in many types of cancer. Previous study indicated that Hsp27 might be an important biomarker in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). However, the detailed mechanism is less well understood. The shRNA-mediated silencing of Hsp27 decreased the proliferation, migration and invasion of HCC cells. In a xenograft model, the silencing of Hsp27 reduce...

  10. Effect of Heat Shock Treatment and Aloe Vera Coating to Chilling Injury Symptom in Tomato (Lycopersicon asculantum Mill.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sutrisno

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available This research was undertaken to determine the effect of length in heat shock and edible coating as pre-storage treatment to Chilling Injury (CI symptom reflected by ion leakage induced and quality properties in tomato (Lycopersicon asculantum Mill.. Heat Shock Treatment (HST was conducted at three different levels of length, which were, 20; 40 and 60 min. Edible coating was conducted using aloe vera gel. The result showed that HST and Aloe Vera Coating (AVC were more effective to reduce CI symptom at lower chilling storage. Prolong exposure to heated water may delay climacteric peak. The length of heat shock, AVC treatment and low temperature storage significantly affected the tomato quality parameter but not significantly different for each treatment except weight loss. HST for 20 min at ambient temperature was significantly different to other treatment.

  11. Influence of wind power, plug-in electric vehicles, and heat storages on power system investments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kiviluoma, Juha; Meibom, Peter

    2010-01-01

    electric vehicles. The model runs in an hourly time scale in order to accommodate the impact of variable power production from wind power. Electric vehicles store electricity for later use and can thus serve to increase the flexibility of the power system. Flexibility can also be upgraded by using heat......Due to rising fuel costs, the substantial price for CO2 emissions and decreasing wind power costs, wind power might become the least expensive source of power for an increasing number of power systems. This poses the questions of how wind power might change optimal investments in other forms...... of power production and what kind of means could be used to increase power system flexibility in order to incorporate the variable power production from wind power in a cost-effective manner. We have analysed possible effects using an investment model that combines heat and power production and simulates...

  12. Influence of heat shock-treated cells on the production of glycerol and other metabolites in alcoholic fermentation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sofoklis Petropoulos

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Sofoklis Petropoulos1,2, Paul R Grbin2, Vladimir Jiranek21SEMELI SA, Stamata Attica, Greece; 1,2School of Agriculture, Food and Wine, The University of Adelaide, South Australia, AustraliaAbstract: The impact of heat shock on the formation of sensorily important fermentation metabolites was investigated. Initially the heat tolerance of six commercial Saccharomyces cerevisiae yeast strains was evaluated under various conditions of time and temperature (heat shock at 40°C, 50°C, and 60°C for a duration of 20, 40, and 60 minutes, respectively. A chemically defined grape juice medium was inoculated from the surviving colonies, and microferments were conducted. Two strains were selected for further evaluation due to their heat shock tolerance and enhanced glycerol production. The experiment was repeated in standard laboratory scale fermentations under aerobic and anaerobic conditions, and the medium was inoculated directly after the heat shock treatment and after recovery from the heat shock on yeast peptone dextrose plates. All fermentations were further analyzed for higher alcohol, organic acid, and ethyl ester content using gas chromatography mass spectrometry. Elevated glycerol production (increase of 17% under aerobic conditions and 8% under anaerobic conditions was reported only in one strain and only after direct inoculation of the fermentation medium. With both strains, direct inoculation of the heated cells caused a 2-day delay in the commencement of the fermentation, but after recovery, the fermentation progress was increased. Volatile analysis showed that apart from changes in organic acids, all other volatile compounds analyzed exhibited an alteration mainly due to strain differences and the presence of oxygen.Keywords: heat shock, glycerol, higher alcohols, wine, Saccharomyces

  13. On Intermittent Turbulence Heating of the Solar Wind: Differences between Tangential and Rotational Discontinuities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xin; Tu, Chuanyi; He, Jiansen; Marsch, Eckart; Wang, Linghua

    2013-08-01

    The intermittent structures in solar wind turbulence, studied by using measurements from the WIND spacecraft, are identified as being mostly rotational discontinuities (RDs) and rarely tangential discontinuities (TDs) based on the technique described by Smith. Only TD-associated current sheets (TCSs) are found to be accompanied with strong local heating of the solar wind plasma. Statistical results show that the TCSs have a distinct tendency to be associated with local enhancements of the proton temperature, density, and plasma beta, and a local decrease of magnetic field magnitude. Conversely, for RDs, our statistical results do not reveal convincing heating effects. These results confirm the notion that dissipation of solar wind turbulence can take place in intermittent or locally isolated small-scale regions which correspond to TCSs. The possibility of heating associated with RDs is discussed.

  14. Combined scheduling of electricity and heat in a microgrid with volatile wind power

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Xu, Lizhong; Yang, Guang Ya; Xu, Zhao

    2011-01-01

    An optimization model is developed for scheduling electricity and heat production in a microgrid under a day-ahead market environment considering the operation constraints and the volatility of wind power generation. The model optimizes the total operation costs from energy and heating consumptio...

  15. Novel Ways of Heat Removal from Highly Irradiated Superconducting Windings in Accelerator Magnets

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bielert, Erwin; Verweij, Arjan P.; ten Kate, Herman H.J.

    2012-01-01

    Novel ideas of heat removal from superconducting windings in accelerator type magnets are investigated with the help of a recently developed and validated thermal model of a magnet cold mass implemented in COMSOL Multiphysics. Here the focus is on how to improve heat removal from the midplane of a

  16. The heat shock protein/chaperone network and multiple stress resistance

    KAUST Repository

    Jacob, Pierre

    2016-11-15

    Crop yield has been greatly enhanced during the last century. However, most elite cultivars are adapted to temperate climates and are not well suited to more stressful conditions. In the context of climate change, stress resistance is a major concern. To overcome these difficulties, scientists may help breeders by providing genetic markers associated with stress resistance. However, multi-stress resistance cannot be obtained from the simple addition of single stress resistance traits. In the field, stresses are unpredictable and several may occur at once. Consequently, the use of single stress resistance traits is often inadequate. Although it has been historically linked with the heat stress response, the heat shock protein (HSP)/chaperone network is a major component of multiple stress responses. Among the HSP/chaperone

  17. PERAN HEAT SHOCK PROTEINS (HSP DALAM PATOGENESIS PENYAKIT OTOIMUN DI DALAM RONGGA MULUT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Endang W. Bachtiar

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Heat Shock Proteins (HSP are highly conserved immunoreactive group of proteins found in microorganisms and animal/human tissue. In addition to heat, other stressful conditiions also induce stressed proteins, especially anorexia, heavy metal ion, exposure to H2O2 and infection by DNA or RNA viruses. Recent studies suggest the involvement of HSPs as autoantigens in autoimmune diseases, including rheumatoid arthritis, systemic lupus erythematosus, Bechet's syndrome, recurrent oral uclers, oral lichen planus and other. The HSPs 60 - 65 KDa might be involved in the pathogenesis of autoimmune diseases such as Bechet's syndrome, recurrent oral ulcers, and oral lichen planus. This paper will discuss the immunopathogenesis mechanism of those diseases induced by HSPs.

  18. The Role of Heat Shock Response in Insulin Resistance and Diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatsuya Kondo

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The expansion of life-style related diseases, such as metabolic syndrome (MS and type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM, appears to be unstoppable. It is also difficult to cease their complications in spite of many antidiabetic medications or intervention of public administration. We and our collaborators found that physical medicine using simultaneous stimulation of heat with mild electric current activates heat shock response, thereby reducing visceral adiposity, insulin resistance, chronic inflammation and improving glucose homeostasis in mice models of T2DM, as well as in humans with MS or T2DM. This combination therapy exerts novel action on insulin signaling, β-cell protection and body compositions, and may provide a new therapeutic alternative in diabetic treatment strategy.

  19. The role of heat shock response in insulin resistance and diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kondo, Tatsuya; Motoshima, Hiroyuki; Igata, Motoyuki; Kawashima, Junji; Matsumura, Takeshi; Kai, Hirofumi; Araki, Eiichi

    2014-04-01

    The expansion of life-style related diseases, such as metabolic syndrome (MS) and type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM), appears to be unstoppable. It is also difficult to cease their complications in spite of many antidiabetic medications or intervention of public administration. We and our collaborators found that physical medicine using simultaneous stimulation of heat with mild electric current activates heat shock response, thereby reducing visceral adiposity, insulin resistance, chronic inflammation and improving glucose homeostasis in mice models of T2DM, as well as in humans with MS or T2DM. This combination therapy exerts novel action on insulin signaling, β-cell protection and body compositions, and may provide a new therapeutic alternative in diabetic treatment strategy.

  20. Inorganic zinc supplementation modulates heat shock and immune response in heat stressed peripheral blood mononuclear cells of periparturient dairy cows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheikh, Aasif Ahmad; Aggarwal, Anjali; B, Indu; Aarif, Ovais

    2017-06-01

    Thermal stress in India is one of the major constraints affecting dairy cattle productivity. Every attempt should be made to ameliorate the heat and calving related stress in high producing dairy cows for higher economic returns. In the current study, inorganic zinc was tried to alleviate the adverse effects of thermal stress in periparturient cows. Twelve cows, six each of Sahiwal and Karan Fries (KF) in their second parity with confirmed pregnancy were chosen for the experiment. The blood samples were collected periparturiently on three occasions viz. -21, 0 and +21 days relative to calving. The in vitro study was conducted after isolating peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) from whole blood. The cultured PBMC were subjected to three different levels of exposures viz. 37°C as control, 42°C to induce thermal stress and 42°C + zinc to ameliorate the adverse effects of high temperature. Heat shock lead to a significant (PZinc treatment to thermally stressed PBMC caused a fall in the HSP concentration in both the breeds during periparturient period. Moreover, heat stress increased significantly (Pzinc supplementation to PBMC. IL-6 levels decreased periparturiently. Heat and calving related stress caused a fall in the IL-12 levels which increased significantly (Pzinc supplementation. These findings suggest that zinc supplementation attenuates the HSP response and augments immunity in PBMC of periparturient dairy cows. The study could help to alleviate the heat stress and potentiate immunity by providing mineral supplements in periparturient dairy cattle habituating tropics. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. What are the relative roles of heating and cooling in generating solar wind temperature anisotropies?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maruca, B A; Kasper, J C; Bale, S D

    2011-11-11

    Temperature anisotropy in the solar wind results from a combination of mechanisms of anisotropic heating (e.g., cyclotron-resonant heating and dissipation of kinetic Alfvén waves) and cooling (e.g., Chew-Goldberger-Low double-adiabatic expansion). In contrast, anisotropy-driven instabilities such as the cyclotron, mirror, and firehose instabilities limit the allowable departure of the plasma from isotropy. This study used data from the Faraday cups on the Wind spacecraft to examine scalar temperature and temperature components of protons. Plasma unstable to the mirror or firehose instability was found to be about 3-4 times hotter than stable plasma. Since anisotropy-driven instabilities are not understood to heat the plasma, these results suggest that heating processes are more effective than cooling processes at creating and maintaining proton temperature anisotropy in the solar wind.

  2. Heat shock transcriptional factors in Malus domestica: identification, classification and expression analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giorno Filomena

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Heat shock transcriptional factors (Hsfs play a crucial role in plant responses to biotic and abiotic stress conditions and in plant growth and development. Apple (Malus domestica Borkh is an economically important fruit tree whose genome has been fully sequenced. So far, no detailed characterization of the Hsf gene family is available for this crop plant. Results A genome-wide analysis was carried out in Malus domestica to identify heat shock transcriptional factor (Hsf genes, named MdHsfs. Twenty five MdHsfs were identified and classified in three main groups (class A, B and C according to the structural characteristics and to the phylogenetic comparison with Arabidopsis thaliana and Populus trichocarpa. Chromosomal duplications were analyzed and segmental duplications were shown to have occurred more frequently in the expansion of Hsf genes in the apple genome. Furthermore, MdHsfs transcripts were detected in several apple organs, and expression changes were observed by quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR analysis in developing flowers and fruits as well as in leaves, harvested from trees grown in the field and exposed to the naturally increased temperatures. Conclusions The apple genome comprises 25 full length Hsf genes. The data obtained from this investigation contribute to a better understanding of the complexity of the Hsf gene family in apple, and provide the basis for further studies to dissect Hsf function during development as well as in response to environmental stimuli.

  3. The Response to Heat Shock and Oxidative Stress in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morano, Kevin A.; Grant, Chris M.; Moye-Rowley, W. Scott

    2012-01-01

    A common need for microbial cells is the ability to respond to potentially toxic environmental insults. Here we review the progress in understanding the response of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae to two important environmental stresses: heat shock and oxidative stress. Both of these stresses are fundamental challenges that microbes of all types will experience. The study of these environmental stress responses in S. cerevisiae has illuminated many of the features now viewed as central to our understanding of eukaryotic cell biology. Transcriptional activation plays an important role in driving the multifaceted reaction to elevated temperature and levels of reactive oxygen species. Advances provided by the development of whole genome analyses have led to an appreciation of the global reorganization of gene expression and its integration between different stress regimens. While the precise nature of the signal eliciting the heat shock response remains elusive, recent progress in the understanding of induction of the oxidative stress response is summarized here. Although these stress conditions represent ancient challenges to S. cerevisiae and other microbes, much remains to be learned about the mechanisms dedicated to dealing with these environmental parameters. PMID:22209905

  4. M. paratuberculosis Heat Shock Protein 65 and Human Diseases: Bridging Infection and Autoimmunity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Coad Thomas Dow

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis (MAP is the known infectious cause of Johne’s disease, an enteric inflammatory disease mostly studied in ruminant animals. MAP has also been implicated in the very similar Crohn’s disease of humans as well as sarcoidosis. Recently, MAP has been associated with juvenile sarcoidosis (Blau syndrome, autoimmune diabetes, autoimmune thyroiditis, and multiple sclerosis. While it is intuitive to implicate MAP in granulomatous diseases where the microbe participates in the granuloma, it is more difficult to assign a role for MAP in diseases where autoantibodies are a primary feature. MAP may trigger autoimmune antibodies via its heat shock proteins. Mycobacterial heat shock protein 65 (HSP65 is an immunodominant protein that shares sequential and conformational elements with several human host proteins. This molecular mimicry is the proposed etiopathology by which MAP stimulates autoantibodies associated with autoimmune (type 1 diabetes, autoimmune (Hashimoto’s thyroiditis, and multiple sclerosis. This paper proposes that MAP is a source of mycobacterial HSP65 and acts as a trigger of autoimmune disease.

  5. Heat shock transcription factor 1-deficiency attenuates overloading-associated hypertrophy of mouse soleus muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koya, Tomoyuki; Nishizawa, Sono; Ohno, Yoshitaka; Goto, Ayumi; Ikuta, Akihiro; Suzuki, Miho; Ohira, Tomotaka; Egawa, Tatsuro; Nakai, Akira; Sugiura, Takao; Ohira, Yoshinobu; Yoshioka, Toshitada; Beppu, Moroe; Goto, Katsumasa

    2013-01-01

    Hypertrophic stimuli, such as mechanical stress and overloading, induce stress response, which is mediated by heat shock transcription factor 1 (HSF1), and up-regulate heat shock proteins (HSPs) in mammalian skeletal muscles. Therefore, HSF1-associated stress response may play a key role in loading-associated skeletal muscle hypertrophy. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of HSF1-deficiency on skeletal muscle hypertrophy caused by overloading. Functional overloading on the left soleus was performed by cutting the distal tendons of gastrocnemius and plantaris muscles for 4 weeks. The right muscle served as the control. Soleus muscles from both hindlimbs were dissected 2 and 4 weeks after the operation. Hypertrophy of soleus muscle in HSF1-null mice was partially inhibited, compared with that in wild-type (C57BL/6J) mice. Absence of HSF1 partially attenuated the increase of muscle wet weight and fiber cross-sectional area of overloaded soleus muscle. Population of Pax7-positive muscle satellite cells in HSF1-null mice was significantly less than that in wild-type mice following 2 weeks of overloading (pmuscle hypertrophy might be attributed to the greater and prolonged enhancement of IL-6 expression. HSF1 and/or HSF1-mediated stress response may, in part, play a key role in loading-induced skeletal muscle hypertrophy.

  6. The functional range of heat shock proteins to combat environmental toxicity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mahmood, K.; Mahmood, Q.; Pervez, A.; Nasreen, S.

    2012-01-01

    Almost all the organisms possess a system to cope with the harsh physiochemical factors of environment. Such a system is based on a group of stress genes, which show rapid responses in form of stress proteins, especially heat shock proteins, when cells are confronted with insult. Heat shock proteins are now known to express in response to variety of toxic and stress conditions including diseases. As a molecular chaperone, against cytotoxicity, these ensure the functional ability of cells by repairing the denatured proteins, cellular structures like cytoskeleton and centrosomes and processes dealing with protein synthesis are stabilized or repaired during a second stress in stress tolerant cells and organisms. In unstressed cells these play an imperative role in the synthesis and transport of normal proteins. Their role in certain diseases reveals their potential application in medical field. Certain Hsp are helpful in coping carcinogenicity caused environmental pollutants and have been suggested to have anti-apoptotic, anti stress and anti-allergic function. Their expression is tissue and species specific with respect to type, intensity and duration of a toxicant. These are developmentally regulated and help in process of differentiation and thus their abnormal regulation impairs the normal development. However, their role as bio marker in risk assessment of environmental pollution warrants further research. Due to broad functional range, therefore, present review is embracing the functional aspects of smaller and Hsp 70 families expressing in animals under toxic conditions. (author)

  7. Allosteric heat shock protein 70 inhibitors block hepatitis C virus assembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khachatoorian, Ronik; Riahi, Rana; Ganapathy, Ekambaram; Shao, Hao; Wheatley, Nicole M.; Sundberg, Christopher; Jung, Chun-Ling; Ruchala, Piotr; Dasgupta, Asim; Arumugaswami, Vaithilingaraja; Gestwicki, Jason E.; French, Samuel W.

    2016-01-01

    The human molecular chaperones heat shock protein 70 (Hsp70) and heat shock cognate protein 70 (Hsc70) bind to the hepatitis C viral nonstructural protein 5A (NS5A) and regulate its activity. Specifically, Hsp70 is involved in NS5A-augmented internal ribosomal entry site (IRES)-mediated translation of the viral genome, whilst Hsc70 appears to be primarily important for intracellular infectious virion assembly. To better understand the importance of these two chaperones in the viral life cycle, infected human cells were treated with allosteric Hsp70/Hsc70 inhibitors (AHIs). Treatment with AHIs significantly reduced the production of intracellular virus at concentrations that were non-toxic to human hepatoma Huh7.5 cells. The supernatant of treated cultures was then used to infect naïve cells, revealing that AHIs also lowered levels of secreted virus. In contrast to their effects on virion assembly, AHIs did not impact the stability of NS5A or viral protein translation in IRES assays. These results suggest that Hsc70 plays a particularly important and sensitive role in virion assembly. Indeed, it was found that combination of AHIs with a peptide-based viral translation inhibitor exhibited additive antiviral activity. Together these results suggest that the host Hsc70 is a new antiviral target and that its inhibitors utilise a new mechanism of action. PMID:27013001

  8. Molecular characterization of the first heat shock protein 70 from a reef coral.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tom, M; Douek, J; Yankelevich, I; Bosch, T C; Rinkevich, B

    1999-08-19

    The branching coral Stylophora pistillata, one of the most abundant hermatypic corals along the coasts of the Red Sea, has been used for many years as a model species for coral biological studies. Here we characterize the first coral heat shock protein 70 gene (SP-HSP70), cloned from S. pistillata, to be used as a tool for studying coral stress response. The cloning was carried out by a combination of PCR methods using heterologous, degenerate HSP70-based primers, followed by plaque-lift screening of a genomic library. The sequenced clone (5212 bp), contains a complete 1953 bp, intronless open reading frame, and 5' and 3' flanking regions of 1,935 and 1,324 bp, respectively. TATA, CAAT, and ATF boxes as well as 11 putative heat shock elements were identified in the SP-HSP70 5' flanking region. A polyadenylation site was identified in the 3' flanking region. SP-HSP70 protein sequence resembles the cytosolic/nuclear HSP70 cluster. RT-PCR studies confirmed SP-HSP70 mRNA expression in corals grown within their normal physiological conditions. Furthermore, SP-HSP70 has been shown to belong to the coral genome and not to its symbiotic algae one, as revealed by SP-HSP70 PCR amplification, using purified algal and coral DNA templates. Copyright 1999 Academic Press.

  9. Proteomics applied on plant abiotic stresses: role of heat shock proteins (HSP).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timperio, Anna Maria; Egidi, Maria Giulia; Zolla, Lello

    2008-10-07

    The most crucial function of plant cell is to respond against stress induced for self-defence. This defence is brought about by alteration in the pattern of gene expression: qualitative and quantitative changes in proteins are the result, leading to modulation of certain metabolic and defensive pathways. Abiotic stresses usually cause protein dysfunction. They have an ability to alter the levels of a number of proteins which may be soluble or structural in nature. Nowadays, in higher plants high-throughput protein identification has been made possible along with improved protein extraction, purification protocols and the development of genomic sequence databases for peptide mass matches. Thus, recent proteome analysis performed in the vegetal Kingdom has provided new dimensions to assess the changes in protein types and their expression levels under abiotic stress. As reported in this review, specific and novel proteins, protein-protein interactions and post-translational modifications have been identified, which play a role in signal transduction, anti-oxidative defence, anti-freezing, heat shock, metal binding etc. However, beside specific proteins production, plants respond to various stresses in a similar manner by producing heat shock proteins (HSPs), indicating a similarity in the plant's adaptive mechanisms; in plants, more than in animals, HSPs protect cells against many stresses. A relationship between ROS and HSP also seems to exist, corroborating the hypothesis that during the course of evolution, plants were able to achieve a high degree of control over ROS toxicity and are now using ROS as signalling molecules to induce HSPs.

  10. Small heat shock proteins protect against α-synuclein-induced toxicity and aggregation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Outeiro, Tiago Fleming; Klucken, Jochen; Strathearn, Katherine E.; Liu Fang; Nguyen, Paul; Rochet, Jean-Christophe; Hyman, Bradley T.; McLean, Pamela J.

    2006-01-01

    Protein misfolding and inclusion formation are common events in neurodegenerative diseases, such as Parkinson's disease (PD), Alzheimer's disease (AD) or Huntington's disease (HD). α-Synuclein (aSyn) is the main protein component of inclusions called Lewy bodies (LB) which are pathognomic of PD, Dementia with Lewy bodies (DLB), and other diseases collectively known as LB diseases. Heat shock proteins (HSPs) are one class of the cellular quality control system that mediate protein folding, remodeling, and even disaggregation. Here, we investigated the role of the small heat shock proteins Hsp27 and αB-crystallin, in LB diseases. We demonstrate, via quantitative PCR, that Hsp27 messenger RNA levels are ∼2-3-fold higher in DLB cases compared to control. We also show a corresponding increase in Hsp27 protein levels. Furthermore, we found that Hsp27 reduces aSyn-induced toxicity by ∼80% in a culture model while αB-crystallin reduces toxicity by ∼20%. In addition, intracellular inclusions were immunopositive for endogenous Hsp27, and overexpression of this protein reduced aSyn aggregation in a cell culture model

  11. Expression of the major heat shock proteins DnaK and GroEL in Streptococcus pyogenes: a comparison to Enterococcus faecalis and Staphylococcus aureus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laport, M S; de Castro, A C; Villardo, A; Lemos, J A; Bastos, M C; Giambiagi-deMarval, M

    2001-04-01

    One of the outstanding problems in the field of heat shock response has been to elucidate the mechanism underlying the induction of heat shock proteins (HSPs). In this work, we initiate an analysis of the expression of heat shock groEL and dnaK genes and their promoters in S. pyogenes. The synthesis of total cellular proteins was studied upon transfer of a log-phase culture from 37 degrees C to 42 degrees C by performing 5-min pulse-labeling experiments with (35)S-Met. The heat shock responses in the pathogenic Gram-positive cocci, Enterococcus faecalis and Staphylococcus aureus, were also analyzed.

  12. Effects of heat transfer coefficient treatments on thermal shock fracture prediction for LWR fuel claddings in water quenching

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Youho; Lee, Jeong Ik; Cheon, Hee [KAIST, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-05-15

    Accurate modeling of thermal shock induced stresses has become ever most important to emerging accident-tolerant ceramic cladding concepts, such as silicon carbide (SiC) and SiC coated zircaloy. Since fractures of ceramic (entirely ceramic or coated) occur by excessive tensile stresses with linear elasticity, modeling transient stress distribution in the material provides a direct indication of the structural integrity. Indeed, even for the current zircaloy cladding material, the oxide layer formed on the surface - where cracks starts to develop upon water quenching - essentially behaves as a brittle ceramic. Hence, enhanced understanding of thermal shock fracture of a brittle material would fundamentally contribute to safety of nuclear reactors for both the current fuel design and that of the coming future. Understanding thermal shock fracture of a brittle material requires heat transfer rate between the solid and the fluid for transient temperature fields of the solid, and structural response of the solid under the obtained transient temperature fields. In water quenching, a solid experiences dynamic time-varying heat transfer rates with phase changes of the fluid over a short quenching period. Yet, such a dynamic change of heat transfer rates during the water quenching transience has been overlooked in assessments of mechanisms, predictability, and uncertainties for thermal shock fracture. Rather, a time-constant heat transfer coefficient, named 'effective heat transfer coefficient' has become a conventional input to thermal shock fracture analysis. No single constant heat transfer could suffice to depict the actual stress evolution subject to dynamic heat transfer coefficient changes with fluid phase changes. Use of the surface temperature dependent heat transfer coefficient will remarkably increase predictability of thermal shock fracture of brittle materials and complete the picture of stress evolution in the quenched solid. The presented result

  13. Acceleration of solar wind ions to 1 MeV by electromagnetic structures upstream of the Earth's bow shock

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stasiewicz, K.; Markidis, S.; Eliasson, B.; Strumik, M.; Yamauchi, M.

    2013-05-01

    We present measurements from the ESA/NASA Cluster mission that show in situ acceleration of ions to energies of 1 MeV outside the bow shock. The observed heating can be associated with the presence of electromagnetic structures with strong spatial gradients of the electric field that lead to ion gyro-phase breaking and to the onset of chaos in ion trajectories. It results in rapid, stochastic acceleration of ions in the direction perpendicular to the ambient magnetic field. The electric potential of the structures can be compared to a field of moguls on a ski slope, capable of accelerating and ejecting the fast running skiers out of piste. This mechanism may represent the universal mechanism for perpendicular acceleration and heating of ions in the magnetosphere, the solar corona and in astrophysical plasmas. This is also a basic mechanism that can limit steepening of nonlinear electromagnetic structures at shocks and foreshocks in collisionless plasmas.

  14. Combined Heat and Power Dispatch Considering Heat Storage of Both Buildings and Pipelines in District Heating System for Wind Power Integration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ping Li

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The strong coupling between electric power and heat supply highly restricts the electric power generation range of combined heat and power (CHP units during heating seasons. This makes the system operational flexibility very low, which leads to heavy wind power curtailment, especially in the region with a high percentage of CHP units and abundant wind power energy such as northeastern China. The heat storage capacity of pipelines and buildings of the district heating system (DHS, which already exist in the urban infrastructures, can be exploited to realize the power and heat decoupling without any additional investment. We formulate a combined heat and power dispatch model considering both the pipelines’ dynamic thermal performance (PDTP and the buildings’ thermal inertia (BTI, abbreviated as the CPB-CHPD model, emphasizing the coordinating operation between the electric power and district heating systems to break the strong coupling without impacting end users’ heat supply quality. Simulation results demonstrate that the proposed CPB-CHPD model has much better synergic benefits than the model considering only PDTP or BTI on wind power integration and total operation cost savings.

  15. Heat Transfer Enhancement of the Air-Cooling Tower with Rotating Wind Deflectors under Crosswind Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xueping Du

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available To investigate the effect of wind deflectors on air flow and heat transfer performance of an air-cooling tower under crosswind conditions, an experimental system based on a surface condenser aluminum exchanger-type indirect air-cooling tower is established at a 1:100 proportional reduction. A 3-D computational fluid dynamics simulation model is built to study the air flow and temperature fields. The air flow rate into the cooling tower and the heat transfer rate of the radiators are used to evaluate cooling performance. Rotating wind deflectors are adopted to reduce the influence of crosswind on the cooling tower performance. The effects of the rotating wind deflectors on the thermal-hydraulic characteristics of the air-cooling tower under different environmental crosswind speeds are studied. Results indicate that the wind direction in the tower reverses as the rotating speed of the wind deflectors increases. The thermal performance of an air-cooling tower under crosswind conditions can be improved by using rotating wind deflectors. The heat transfer rate of a cooling tower with eight wind deflectors begins to increase when the rotating speed exceeds 2 r/min.

  16. Hybrid Model of Inhomogeneous Solar Wind Plasma Heating by Alfven Wave Spectrum: Parametric Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ofman, L.

    2010-01-01

    Observations of the solar wind plasma at 0.3 AU and beyond show that a turbulent spectrum of magnetic fluctuations is present. Remote sensing observations of the corona indicate that heavy ions are hotter than protons and their temperature is anisotropic (T(sub perpindicular / T(sub parallel) >> 1). We study the heating and the acceleration of multi-ion plasma in the solar wind by a turbulent spectrum of Alfvenic fluctuations using a 2-D hybrid numerical model. In the hybrid model the protons and heavy ions are treated kinetically as particles, while the electrons are included as neutralizing background fluid. This is the first two-dimensional hybrid parametric study of the solar wind plasma that includes an input turbulent wave spectrum guided by observation with inhomogeneous background density. We also investigate the effects of He++ ion beams in the inhomogeneous background plasma density on the heating of the solar wind plasma. The 2-D hybrid model treats parallel and oblique waves, together with cross-field inhomogeneity, self-consistently. We investigate the parametric dependence of the perpendicular heating, and the temperature anisotropy in the H+-He++ solar wind plasma. It was found that the scaling of the magnetic fluctuations power spectrum steepens in the higher-density regions, and the heating is channeled to these regions from the surrounding lower-density plasma due to wave refraction. The model parameters are applicable to the expected solar wind conditions at about 10 solar radii.

  17. Genome-wide identification, classification and analysis of heat shock transcription factor family in maize

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhu Su-Wen

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Heat shock response in eukaryotes is transcriptionally regulated by conserved heat shock transcription factors (Hsfs. Hsf genes are represented by a large multigene family in plants and investigation of the Hsf gene family will serve to elucidate the mechanisms by which plants respond to stress. In recent years, reports of genome-wide structural and evolutionary analysis of the entire Hsf gene family have been generated in two model plant systems, Arabidopsis and rice. Maize, an important cereal crop, has represented a model plant for genetics and evolutionary research. Although some Hsf genes have been characterized in maize, analysis of the entire Hsf gene family were not completed following Maize (B73 Genome Sequencing Project. Results A genome-wide analysis was carried out in the present study to identify all Hsfs maize genes. Due to the availability of complete maize genome sequences, 25 nonredundant Hsf genes, named ZmHsfs were identified. Chromosomal location, protein domain and motif organization of ZmHsfs were analyzed in maize genome. The phylogenetic relationships, gene duplications and expression profiles of ZmHsf genes were also presented in this study. Twenty-five ZmHsfs were classified into three major classes (class A, B, and C according to their structural characteristics and phylogenetic comparisons, and class A was further subdivided into 10 subclasses. Moreover, phylogenetic analysis indicated that the orthologs from the three species (maize, Arabidopsis and rice were distributed in all three classes, it also revealed diverse Hsf gene family expression patterns in classes and subclasses. Chromosomal/segmental duplications played a key role in Hsf gene family expansion in maize by investigation of gene duplication events. Furthermore, the transcripts of 25 ZmHsf genes were detected in the leaves by heat shock using quantitative real-time PCR. The result demonstrated that ZmHsf genes exhibit different

  18. Reduced heat shock response in human mononuclear cells during aging and its association with polymorphisms in HSP70 genes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Singh, Ripudaman; Kølvraa, Steen; Bross, Peter

    2006-01-01

    was measured by genotyping the subjects for 3 single nucleotide polymorphisms, HSPA1A(A-110C), HSPA1B(A1267G), and HSPA1L(T2437C), 1 each in the 3 HSP70 genes. A significant age-related decrease in the induction of Hsp70 occurred after heat shock in both monocytes and lymphocytes. The noninducible......Age-dependent changes in heat shock response (HSR) were studied in mononuclear cells (monocytes and lymphocytes) collected from young (mean age = 22.6 +/- 1.7 years) and middle-aged (mean age = 56.3 +/- 4.7 years) subjects after 1 hour of heat shock at 42 degrees C. Genotype-specific HSR...... and inducible forms of Hsp70 decreased 1.3-fold (P induction than TT carriers in both monocytes...

  19. Heat shock response in yeast involves changes in both transcription rates and mRNA stabilities.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laia Castells-Roca

    Full Text Available We have analyzed the heat stress response in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae by determining mRNA levels and transcription rates for the whole transcriptome after a shift from 25 °C to 37 °C. Using an established mathematical algorithm, theoretical mRNA decay rates have also been calculated from the experimental data. We have verified the mathematical predictions for selected genes by determining their mRNA decay rates at different times during heat stress response using the regulatable tetO promoter. This study indicates that the yeast response to heat shock is not only due to changes in transcription rates, but also to changes in the mRNA stabilities. mRNA stability is affected in 62% of the yeast genes and it is particularly important in shaping the mRNA profile of the genes belonging to the environmental stress response. In most cases, changes in transcription rates and mRNA stabilities are homodirectional for both parameters, although some interesting cases of antagonist behavior are found. The statistical analysis of gene targets and sequence motifs within the clusters of genes with similar behaviors shows that both transcriptional and post-transcriptional regulons apparently contribute to the general heat stress response by means of transcriptional factors and RNA binding proteins.

  20. Knowledge of coronal heating and solar-wind acceleration obtained from observations of the solar wind near 1 AU

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neugebauer, M.

    1992-01-01

    Clues to the nature of the mechanisms responsible for heating the corona and accelerating the solar wind can be obtained by contrasting the properties of the quasi-stationary and transient states of the solar wind. Substantial differences exist in the proton temperatures and anisotropies, the entropy, the field strength, the Alfvenicity of fluctuations in the field, the distribution of MHD discontinuities, and the helium abundance of the two types of flow. Those differences are displayed as a function of the solar wind speed. Several signals of wave acceleration can be found in the data for quasi-stationary flows. The relatively smooth velocity dependences of proton temperature, helium abundance, and frequency of occurrence of rotational discontinuities suggest that the acceleration mechanisms for flow from coronal holes, coronal streamers, and the quasi-stationary low-speed flows between them may be basically the same, differing only in degree.

  1. Whistler Mode Waves and the Electron Heat Flux in the Solar Wind: Cluster Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lacombe, C.; Alexandrova, O.; Matteini, L.; Santolík, O.; Cornilleau-Wehrlin, N.; Mangeney, A.; de Conchy, Y.; Maksimovic, M.

    2014-11-01

    The nature of the magnetic field fluctuations in the solar wind between the ion and electron scales is still under debate. Using the Cluster/STAFF instrument, we make a survey of the power spectral density and of the polarization of these fluctuations at frequencies f in [1, 400] Hz, during five years (2001-2005), when Cluster was in the free solar wind. In ~10% of the selected data, we observe narrowband, right-handed, circularly polarized fluctuations, with wave vectors quasi-parallel to the mean magnetic field, superimposed on the spectrum of the permanent background turbulence. We interpret these coherent fluctuations as whistler mode waves. The lifetime of these waves varies between a few seconds and several hours. Here, we present, for the first time, an analysis of long-lived whistler waves, i.e., lasting more than five minutes. We find several necessary (but not sufficient) conditions for the observation of whistler waves, mainly a low level of background turbulence, a slow wind, a relatively large electron heat flux, and a low electron collision frequency. When the electron parallel beta factor β e∥ is larger than 3, the whistler waves are seen along the heat flux threshold of the whistler heat flux instability. The presence of such whistler waves confirms that the whistler heat flux instability contributes to the regulation of the solar wind heat flux, at least for β e∥ >= 3, in slow wind at 1 AU.

  2. Whistler mode waves and the electron heat flux in the solar wind: cluster observations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lacombe, C.; Alexandrova, O.; Cornilleau-Wehrlin, N.; Mangeney, A.; De Conchy, Y.; Maksimovic, M. [LESIA, Observatoire de Paris, PSL Research University, CNRS, UPMC Université Paris 06, Université Paris-Diderot, 5 Place Jules Janssen, F-92190 Meudon (France); Matteini, L. [Imperial College, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom); Santolík, O. [Institute of Atmospheric Physics ASCR, 141 31 Prague (Czech Republic)

    2014-11-20

    The nature of the magnetic field fluctuations in the solar wind between the ion and electron scales is still under debate. Using the Cluster/STAFF instrument, we make a survey of the power spectral density and of the polarization of these fluctuations at frequencies f in [1, 400] Hz, during five years (2001-2005), when Cluster was in the free solar wind. In ∼10% of the selected data, we observe narrowband, right-handed, circularly polarized fluctuations, with wave vectors quasi-parallel to the mean magnetic field, superimposed on the spectrum of the permanent background turbulence. We interpret these coherent fluctuations as whistler mode waves. The lifetime of these waves varies between a few seconds and several hours. Here, we present, for the first time, an analysis of long-lived whistler waves, i.e., lasting more than five minutes. We find several necessary (but not sufficient) conditions for the observation of whistler waves, mainly a low level of background turbulence, a slow wind, a relatively large electron heat flux, and a low electron collision frequency. When the electron parallel beta factor β {sub e∥} is larger than 3, the whistler waves are seen along the heat flux threshold of the whistler heat flux instability. The presence of such whistler waves confirms that the whistler heat flux instability contributes to the regulation of the solar wind heat flux, at least for β {sub e∥} ≥ 3, in slow wind at 1 AU.

  3. Assessment of the role of oxygen and mitochondria in heat shock induction of radiation and thermal resistance in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mitchel, R.E.J.; Morrison, D.P.

    1983-01-01

    In response to a heat shock, the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae undergoes a large increase in its resistance to heat and, by the induction of its recombinational DNA repair capacity, a corresponding increase in resistance to radiation. Yeast which lack mitochondrial DNA, mitochondria-controlled protein synthetic apparatus, aerobic respiration, and electron transport (rho 0 strain) were used to assess the role of O 2 , mitochondria, and oxidative processes controlled by mitochondria in the induction of these resistances. We have found that rho 0 yeast grown and heat shocked in either the presence or absence of O 2 are capable of developing both radiation and heat resistance. We conclude that neither the stress signal nor its cellular consequences of induced heat and radiation resistance are directly dependent on O 2 , mitochondrial DNA, or mitochondria-controlled protein synthetic or oxidative processes

  4. Heat shock protein 70-dependent protective effect of polaprezinc on acetylsalicylic acid-induced apoptosis of rat intestinal epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Ying; Naito, Yuji; Handa, Osamu; Hayashi, Natsuko; Kuki, Aiko; Mizushima, Katsura; Omatsu, Tatsushi; Tanimura, Yuko; Morita, Mayuko; Adachi, Satoko; Fukui, Akifumi; Hirata, Ikuhiro; Kishimoto, Etsuko; Nishikawa, Taichiro; Uchiyama, Kazuhiko; Ishikawa, Takeshi; Takagi, Tomohisa; Yagi, Nobuaki; Kokura, Satoshi; Yoshikawa, Toshikazu

    2011-11-01

    Protection of the small intestine from mucosal injury induced by nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs including acetylsalicylic acid is a critical issue in the field of gastroenterology. Polaprezinc an anti-ulcer drug, consisting of zinc and L-carnosine, provides gastric mucosal protection against various irritants. In this study, we investigated the protective effect of polaprezinc on acetylsalicylic acid-induced apoptosis of the RIE1 rat intestinal epithelial cell line. Confluent rat intestinal epithelial cells were incubated with 70 µM polaprezinc for 24 h, and then stimulated with or without 15 mM acetylsalicylic acid for a further 15 h. Subsequent cellular viability was quantified by fluorometric assay based on cell lysis and staining. Acetylsalicylic acid-induced cell death was also qualified by fluorescent microscopy of Hoechst33342 and propidium iodide. Heat shock proteins 70 protein expression after adding polaprezinc or acetylsalicylic acid was assessed by western blotting. To investigate the role of Heat shock protein 70, Heat shock protein 70-specific small interfering RNA was applied. Cell viability was quantified by fluorometric assay based on cell lysis and staining and apoptosis was analyzed by fluorescence-activated cell sorting. We found that acetylsalicylic acid significantly induced apoptosis of rat intestinal epithelial cells in a dose- and time-dependent manner. Polaprezinc significantly suppressed acetylsalicylic acid-induced apoptosis of rat intestinal epithelial cells at its late phase. At the same time, polaprezinc increased Heat shock protein 70 expressions of rat intestinal epithelial cells in a time-dependent manner. However, in Heat shock protein 70-silenced rat intestinal epithelial cells, polaprezinc could not suppress acetylsalicylic acid -induced apoptosis at its late phase. We conclude that polaprezinc-increased Heat shock protein 70 expression might be an important mechanism by which polaprezinc suppresses acetylsalicylic

  5. Nitric oxide-heat shock protein axis in menopausal hot flushes: neglected metabolic issues of chronic inflammatory diseases associated with deranged heat shock response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miragem, Antônio Azambuja; Homem de Bittencourt, Paulo Ivo

    2017-09-01

    Although some unequivocal underlying mechanisms of menopausal hot flushes have been demonstrated in animal models, the paucity of similar approaches in humans impedes further mechanistic outcomes. Human studies might show some as yet unexpected physiological mechanisms of metabolic adaptation that permeate the phase of decreased oestrogen levels in both symptomatic and asymptomatic women. This is particularly relevant because both the severity and time span of hot flushes are associated with increased risk of chronic inflammatory disease. On the other hand, oestrogen induces the expression of heat shock proteins of the 70 kDa family (HSP70), which are anti-inflammatory and cytoprotective protein chaperones, whose expression is modulated by different types of physiologically stressful situations, including heat stress and exercise. Therefore, lower HSP70 expression secondary to oestrogen deficiency increases cardiovascular risk and predisposes the patient to senescence-associated secretory phenotype (SASP) that culminates in chronic inflammatory diseases, such as obesities, type 2 diabetes, neuromuscular and neurodegenerative diseases. This review focuses on HSP70 and its accompanying heat shock response (HSR), which is an anti-inflammatory and antisenescent pathway whose intracellular triggering is also oestrogen-dependent via nitric oxide (NO) production. The main goal of the manuscript was to show that the vasomotor symptoms that accompany hot flushes may be a disguised clue for important neuroendocrine alterations linking oestrogen deficiency to the anti-inflammatory HSR. Results from our own group and recent evidence on hypothalamic control of central temperature guided a search on PubMed and Google Scholar websites. Oestrogen elicits rapid production of the vasodilatory gas NO, a powerful activator of HSP70 expression. Whence, part of the protective effects of oestrogen over cardiovascular and neuroendocrine systems is tied to its capacity of inducing the NO

  6. Modeling Protein Aggregation and the Heat Shock Response in ALS iPSC-Derived Motor Neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seminary, Emily R; Sison, Samantha L; Ebert, Allison D

    2018-01-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a devastating neurodegenerative disorder caused by the selective loss of the upper and lower motor neurons. Only 10% of all cases are caused by a mutation in one of the two dozen different identified genes, while the remaining 90% are likely caused by a combination of as yet unidentified genetic and environmental factors. Mutations in C9orf72, SOD1 , or TDP-43 are the most common causes of familial ALS, together responsible for at least 60% of these cases. Remarkably, despite the large degree of heterogeneity, all cases of ALS have protein aggregates in the brain and spinal cord that are immunopositive for SOD1, TDP-43, OPTN, and/or p62. These inclusions are normally prevented and cleared by heat shock proteins (Hsps), suggesting that ALS motor neurons have an impaired ability to induce the heat shock response (HSR). Accordingly, there is evidence of decreased induction of Hsps in ALS mouse models and in human post-mortem samples compared to unaffected controls. However, the role of Hsps in protein accumulation in human motor neurons has not been fully elucidated. Here, we generated motor neuron cultures from human induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC) lines carrying mutations in SOD1, TDP-43 , or C9orf72 . In this study, we provide evidence that despite a lack of overt motor neuron loss, there is an accumulation of insoluble, aggregation-prone proteins in iPSC-derived motor neuron cultures but that content and levels vary with genetic background. Additionally, although iPSC-derived motor neurons are generally capable of inducing the HSR when exposed to a heat stress, protein aggregation itself is not sufficient to induce the HSR or stress granule formation. We therefore conclude that ALS iPSC-derived motor neurons recapitulate key early pathological features of the disease and fail to endogenously upregulate the HSR in response to increased protein burden.

  7. Identification of Heat Shock Transcription Factor Genes Involved in Thermotolerance of Octoploid Cultivated Strawberry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Wan-Yu; Lin, Lee-Fong; Jheng, Jing-Lian; Wang, Chun-Chung; Yang, Jui-Hung; Chou, Ming-Lun

    2016-12-17

    Heat shock transcription factors (HSFs) are mainly involved in the activation of genes in response to heat stress as well as other abiotic and biotic stresses. The growth, development, reproduction, and yield of strawberry are strongly limited by extreme temperatures and droughts. In this study, we used Illumina sequencing and obtained transcriptome data set from Fragaria × ananassa Duchessne cv. Toyonoka. Six contigs and three unigenes were confirmed to encode HSF proteins (FaTHSFs). Subsequently, we characterized the biological functions of two particularly selected unigenes, FaTHSFA2a and FaTHSFB1a , which were classified into class A2 and B HSFs, respectively. Expression assays revealed that FaTHSFA2a and FaTHSFB1a expression was induced by heat shock and correlated well with elevated ambient temperatures. Overexpression of FaTHSFA2a and FaTHSFB1a resulted in the activation of their downstream stress-associated genes, and notably enhanced the thermotolerance of transgenic Arabidopsis plants. Besides, both FaTHSFA2a and FaTHSFB1a fusion proteins localized in the nucleus, indicating their similar subcellular distributions as transcription factors. Our yeast one-hybrid assay suggested that FaTHSFA2a has trans-activation activity, whereas FaTHSFB1a expresses trans-repression function. Altogether, our annotated transcriptome sequences provide a beneficial resource for identifying most genes expressed in octoploid strawberry. Furthermore, HSF studies revealed the possible insights into the molecular mechanisms of thermotolerance, thus rendering valuable molecular breeding to improve the tolerance of strawberry in response to high-temperature stress.

  8. Crystal structure of a small heat-shock protein from Xylella fastidiosa reveals a distinct high-order structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fonseca, Emanuella Maria Barreto; Scorsato, Valéria; Dos Santos, Marcelo Leite; Júnior, Atilio Tomazini; Tada, Susely Ferraz Siqueira; Dos Santos, Clelton Aparecido; de Toledo, Marcelo Augusto Szymanski; de Souza, Anete Pereira; Polikarpov, Igor; Aparicio, Ricardo

    2017-04-01

    Citrus variegated chlorosis is a disease that attacks economically important citrus plantations and is caused by the plant-pathogenic bacterium Xylella fastidiosa. In this work, the structure of a small heat-shock protein from X. fastidiosa (XfsHSP17.9) is reported. The high-order structures of small heat-shock proteins from other organisms are arranged in the forms of double-disc, hollow-sphere or spherical assemblies. Unexpectedly, the structure reported here reveals a high-order architecture forming a nearly square cavity.

  9. Heat shock factors in tomatoes: genome-wide identification, phylogenetic analysis and expression profiling under development and heat stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xuedong Yang

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The HSF (heat shock factor gene family contains highly conserved plant-specific transcription factors that play an important role in plant high-temperature stress responses. The present study aimed to characterize the HSF transcription factor genes in tomato (Solanum lycopersicum, which is an important vegetable crop worldwide and the model plant for fruit development studies. Twenty-six SlyHSF genes were identified in tomato, and the phylogenetic analysis showed the possible evolution profile of subgroups among in the plant kingdom. A new group O was identified that involved HSF genes in primitive plant species, like in the green algae, mosses and lycophytes. The gene structure and motifs of each SlyHSF were comprehensively analyzed. We identified orthologous, co-orthologous and paralogous HSF gene pairs in tomato, Arabidopsis and rice, and constructed a complex interaction network among these genes. The SlyHSF genes were expressed differentially in different species and at a higher level in mature fruits. The qPCR analysis was performed and showed SlyHSF genes greatly participate in plant heat tolerant pathways. Our comprehensive genome-wide analysis provided insights into the HSF gene family of tomatoes.

  10. Non-lethal heat shock increased Hsp70 and immune protein transcripts but not Vibrio tolerance in the white-leg shrimp.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nguyen Hong Loc

    Full Text Available Non-lethal heat shock boosts bacterial and viral disease tolerance in shrimp, possibly due to increases in endogenous heat shock protein 70 (Hsp70 and/or immune proteins. To further understand the mechanisms protecting shrimp against infection, Hsp70 and the mRNAs encoding the immune-related proteins prophenoloxidase (proPO, peroxinectin, penaeidin, crustin and hemocyanin were studied in post-larvae of the white-leg shrimp Litopenaeus vannamei, following a non-lethal heat shock. As indicated by RT-qPCR, a 30 min abrupt heat shock increased Hsp70 mRNA in comparison to non-heated animals. Immunoprobing of western blots and quantification by ELISA revealed that Hsp70 production after heat shock was correlated with enhanced Hsp70 mRNA. proPO and hemocyanin mRNA levels were augmented, whereas peroxinectin and crustin mRNA levels were unchanged following non-lethal heat shock. Penaeidin mRNA was decreased by all heat shock treatments. Thirty min abrupt heat shock failed to improve survival of post-larvae in a standardized challenge test with Vibrio harveyi, indicating that under the conditions of this study, L. vannamei tolerance to Vibrio infection was influenced neither by Hsp70 accumulation nor the changes in the immune-related proteins, observations dissimilar to other shrimp species examined.

  11. Effects of desiccation and starvation on thermal tolerance and the heat-shock response in forest ants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Andrew D; DeNovellis, Kerri; Resendez, Skyler; Pustilnik, Jeremy D; Gotelli, Nicholas J; Parker, Joel D; Cahan, Sara Helms

    2017-12-01

    Temperature increases associated with global climate change are likely to be accompanied by additional environmental stressors such as desiccation and food limitation, which may alter how temperature impacts organismal performance. To investigate how interactions between stressors influence thermal tolerance in the common forest ant, Aphaenogaster picea, we compared the thermal resistance of workers to heat shock with and without pre-exposure to desiccation or starvation stress. Knockdown (KD) time at 40.5 °C of desiccated ants was reduced 6% compared to controls, although longer exposure to desiccation did not further reduce thermal tolerance. Starvation, in contrast, had an increasingly severe effect on thermal tolerance: at 21 days, average KD time of starved ants was reduced by 65% compared to controls. To test whether reduction in thermal tolerance results from impairment of the heat-shock response, we measured basal gene expression and transcriptional induction of two heat-shock proteins (hsp70 and hsp40) in treated and control ants. We found no evidence that either stressor impaired the Hsp response: both desiccation and starvation slightly increased basal Hsp expression under severe stress conditions and did not affect the magnitude of induction under heat shock. These results suggest that the co-occurrence of multiple environmental stressors predicted by climate change models may make populations more vulnerable to future warming than is suggested by the results of single-factor heating experiments.

  12. Solar wind heating by an embedded quasi-isothermal pick-up ion fluid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. J. Fahr

    Full Text Available It is well known that the solar wind plasma consists of primary ions of solar coronal origin and secondary ions of interstellar origin. Interstellar H-atoms penetrate into the inner heliosphere and when ionized there are converted into secondary ions. These are implanted into the magnetized solar wind flow and are essentially enforced to co-move with this flow. By nonlinear interactions with wind-entrained Alfvén waves the latter are processed in the co-moving velocity space. This pick-up process, however, also causes actions back upon the original solar wind flow, leading to a deceleration, as well as a heating of the solar wind plasma. The resulting deceleration is not only due to the loading effect, but also due to the action of the pressure gradient. To calculate the latter, it is important to take into account the stochastic acceleration that suffers at their convection out of the inner heliosphere by the quasi-linear interactions with MHD turbulences. Only then can the presently reported VOYAGER observations of solar wind decelerations and heatings in the outer heliosphere be understood in terms of the current, most likely values of interstellar gas parameters. In a consistent view of the thermodynamics of the solar wind plasma, which is composed of secondary ions and solar wind protons, we also derive that the latter are globally heated at their motion to larger solar distances. The arising heat transfer is due to the action of suprathermal ions which drive MHD waves that are partially absorbed by solar wind protons and thereby establish their observed quasi-polytropy. We obtain a quantitative expression for the solar wind proton pressure as a function of solar distance. This expression clearly shows the change from an adiabatic to a quasi-polytropic behaviour with a decreasing polytropic index at increasing distances, as has been observed by the VOYAGERS. This also allows one to calculate the average percentage of the intitial energy

  13. Solar wind heating by an embedded quasi-isothermal pick-up ion fluid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. J. Fahr

    2002-10-01

    Full Text Available It is well known that the solar wind plasma consists of primary ions of solar coronal origin and secondary ions of interstellar origin. Interstellar H-atoms penetrate into the inner heliosphere and when ionized there are converted into secondary ions. These are implanted into the magnetized solar wind flow and are essentially enforced to co-move with this flow. By nonlinear interactions with wind-entrained Alfvén waves the latter are processed in the co-moving velocity space. This pick-up process, however, also causes actions back upon the original solar wind flow, leading to a deceleration, as well as a heating of the solar wind plasma. The resulting deceleration is not only due to the loading effect, but also due to the action of the pressure gradient. To calculate the latter, it is important to take into account the stochastic acceleration that suffers at their convection out of the inner heliosphere by the quasi-linear interactions with MHD turbulences. Only then can the presently reported VOYAGER observations of solar wind decelerations and heatings in the outer heliosphere be understood in terms of the current, most likely values of interstellar gas parameters. In a consistent view of the thermodynamics of the solar wind plasma, which is composed of secondary ions and solar wind protons, we also derive that the latter are globally heated at their motion to larger solar distances. The arising heat transfer is due to the action of suprathermal ions which drive MHD waves that are partially absorbed by solar wind protons and thereby establish their observed quasi-polytropy. We obtain a quantitative expression for the solar wind proton pressure as a function of solar distance. This expression clearly shows the change from an adiabatic to a quasi-polytropic behaviour with a decreasing polytropic index at increasing distances, as has been observed by the VOYAGERS. This also allows one to calculate the average percentage of the intitial energy

  14. Turbulence-driven coronal heating and improvements to empirical forecasting of the solar wind

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woolsey, Lauren N.; Cranmer, Steven R.

    2014-01-01

    Forecasting models of the solar wind often rely on simple parameterizations of the magnetic field that ignore the effects of the full magnetic field geometry. In this paper, we present the results of two solar wind prediction models that consider the full magnetic field profile and include the effects of Alfvén waves on coronal heating and wind acceleration. The one-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic code ZEPHYR self-consistently finds solar wind solutions without the need for empirical heating functions. Another one-dimensional code, introduced in this paper (The Efficient Modified-Parker-Equation-Solving Tool, TEMPEST), can act as a smaller, stand-alone code for use in forecasting pipelines. TEMPEST is written in Python and will become a publicly available library of functions that is easy to adapt and expand. We discuss important relations between the magnetic field profile and properties of the solar wind that can be used to independently validate prediction models. ZEPHYR provides the foundation and calibration for TEMPEST, and ultimately we will use these models to predict observations and explain space weather created by the bulk solar wind. We are able to reproduce with both models the general anticorrelation seen in comparisons of observed wind speed at 1 AU and the flux tube expansion factor. There is significantly less spread than comparing the results of the two models than between ZEPHYR and a traditional flux tube expansion relation. We suggest that the new code, TEMPEST, will become a valuable tool in the forecasting of space weather.

  15. Detection of anti-Babesia gibsoni heat shock protein 70 antibody and anti-canine heat shock protein 70 antibody in sera from Babesia gibsoni-infected dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamasaki, Masahiro; Ishida, Mikiko; Nakamura, Kensuke; Sasaki, Noboru; Murakami, Masahiro; Kumara, Wickramasekara Rajapakshage Bandula; Tamura, Yu; Lim, Sue Yee; Ohta, Hiroshi; Takiguchi, Mitsuyoshi

    2011-08-25

    Antibodies that recognized either Babesia gibsoni or canine red blood cell (RBC) 70-kilodalton (kDa) protein were detected in serum from acutely and chronically B. gibsoni-infected. In those sera, antibodies that reacted with recombinant B. gibsoni and canine heat shock protein 70 (rBgHsp70 and rcHsp70) were detected; therefore, B. gibsoni and canine RBC 70-kDa proteins seemed to be BgHsp70 and cHsp70, respectively. In infected dogs, the amounts of these antibodies increased after infection. Interestingly, polyclonal antibody raised against rBgHsp70 in two rabbits reacted not only with rBgHsp70 but also with rcHsp70 and native cHsp70 from canine RBCs. Because BgHsp70 showed high homology with cHsp70 (70.8%), anti-rBgHsp70 antibody might cross-react with cHsp70. Additionally, the localizations of both BgHsp70 and cHsp70 were observed by indirect fluorescence assay. As a result, cHsp70 was not found on the membrane surface of erythrocytes, suggesting that erythrocytes would not be targets of anti-cHsp70 antibody. Meanwhile, only exoerythrocytic parasites were stained by anti-rBgHsp70 antibody. This result showed that BgHsp70 would be expressed on the surface of parasites during the exoerythrocytic stage. These results indicated that BgHsp70 was a highly immunogenic protein in canine B. gibsoni infection, and that exoerythrocytic parasites might be targets of anti-BgHsp70 antibody. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Combined scheduling of electricity and heat in a microgrid with volatile wind power

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Xu, Lizhong; Yang, Guang Ya; Xu, Zhao

    2011-01-01

    An optimization model is developed for scheduling electricity and heat production in a microgrid under a day-ahead market environment considering the operation constraints and the volatility of wind power generation. The model optimizes the total operation costs from energy and heating consumption...... into a mixed-integer programming (MIP) problem. Numerical simulations present the efficacy of the proposed model for day-ahead scheduling of a microgrid with wind penetration under the deregulated environment. © 2011 State Grid Electrtic Resarch Institute Press....

  17. Large carbon cluster thin film gauges for measuring aerodynamic heat transfer rates in hypersonic shock tunnels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Srinath, S; Reddy, K P J

    2015-01-01

    Different types of Large Carbon Cluster (LCC) layers are synthesized by a single-step pyrolysis technique at various ratios of precursor mixture. The aim is to develop a fast responsive and stable thermal gauge based on a LCC layer which has relatively good electrical conduction in order to use it in the hypersonic flow field. The thermoelectric property of the LCC layer has been studied. It is found that these carbon clusters are sensitive to temperature changes. Therefore suitable thermal gauges were developed for blunt cone bodies and were tested in hypersonic shock tunnels at a flow Mach number of 6.8 to measure aerodynamic heating. The LCC layer of this thermal gauge encounters high shear forces and a hostile environment for test duration in the range of a millisecond. The results are favorable to use large carbon clusters as a better sensor than a conventional platinum thin film gauge in view of fast responsiveness and stability. (paper)

  18. Heat Shock Proteins in Vascular Diabetic Complications: Review and Future Perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefania Bellini

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Heat shock proteins (HSPs are a large family of proteins highly conserved throughout evolution because of their unique cytoprotective properties. Besides assisting protein refolding and regulating proteostasis under stressful conditions, HSPs also play an important role in protecting cells from oxidative stress, inflammation, and apoptosis. Therefore, HSPs are crucial in counteracting the deleterious effects of hyperglycemia in target organs of diabetes vascular complications. Changes in HSP expression have been demonstrated in diabetic complications and functionally related to hyperglycemia-induced cell injury. Moreover, associations between diabetic complications and altered circulating levels of both HSPs and anti-HSPs have been shown in clinical studies. HSPs thus represent an exciting therapeutic opportunity and might also be valuable as clinical biomarkers. However, this field of research is still in its infancy and further studies in both experimental diabetes and humans are required to gain a full understanding of HSP relevance. In this review, we summarize current knowledge and discuss future perspective.

  19. Calcium release and development of heat-shocked porcine oocytes after nucleus-ooplasm reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tseng, Jung-Kai; Liu, Han-Ken; Lin, Tzu-An; Yang, Chun-Ru; Yang, Xiangzhong; Ju, Jyh-Cherng

    2009-12-01

    We determined the effect of heat shock (HS) on the alterations of development and calcium releasing capacity of nuclear-ooplasmic reconstructed porcine oocytes stimulated by thimerosal. The non-HS (39 degrees C) and the HS2h (41.5 degrees C for 2 h) matured oocytes were enucleated and their spindles/chromosomes were exchanged between these two groups followed by parthenogenetic activation. In the Control group (Csp-Coop), the non-HS spindle (Csp) was transferred to the non-HS ooplasm (Coop). Blastocyst and cleavage rates were higher in both Csp-HSoop (non-HS spindle transferred to the HS ooplasm) and HSsp-Coop (HS spindle transferred to non-HS ooplasm) reconstructed oocytes, but no difference was detected in the average cell number per blastocyst. However, intracellular calcium concentrations ([Ca(2+)](i)) generally declined (p calcium release in the cloned porcine oocytes.

  20. Heat Shock Proteins and Autophagy Pathways in Neuroprotection: from Molecular Bases to Pharmacological Interventions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Botond Penke

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Neurodegenerative diseases (NDDs such as Alzheimer’s disease, Parkinson’s disease and Huntington’s disease (HD, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, and prion diseases are all characterized by the accumulation of protein aggregates (amyloids into inclusions and/or plaques. The ubiquitous presence of amyloids in NDDs suggests the involvement of disturbed protein homeostasis (proteostasis in the underlying pathomechanisms. This review summarizes specific mechanisms that maintain proteostasis, including molecular chaperons, the ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS, endoplasmic reticulum associated degradation (ERAD, and different autophagic pathways (chaperon mediated-, micro-, and macro-autophagy. The role of heat shock proteins (Hsps in cellular quality control and degradation of pathogenic proteins is reviewed. Finally, putative therapeutic strategies for efficient removal of cytotoxic proteins from neurons and design of new therapeutic targets against the progression of NDDs are discussed.

  1. EGTA treatment causes the synthesis of heat shock proteins in sea urchin embryos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roccheri, M C; Onorato, K; Tipa, C; Casano, C

    2000-05-01

    Paracentrotus lividus embryos, at post-blastular stage, when subjected to a rise in temperature from physiologic (20 degrees C) to 31 degrees C, synthesize a large group of heat shock proteins (hsps), and show a severe inhibition of bulk protein synthesis. We show, by mono- and two-dimensional electrophoresis, that also EGTA (ethylene glycol-bis[beta-aminoethyl ether] tetraacetic acid) treatment induces in sea urchin embryos both marked inhibition of bulk protein synthesis and the synthesis of the entire set of hsps. Furthermore, EGTA-treated sea urchin embryos are able to survive at a temperature otherwise lethal (35 degrees C) becoming thermotolerant. Because incubation with a different calcium-chelator, EDTA (ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid), or in calcium-free medium did not induce hsps synthesis we conclude that the stress response caused by EGTA is not related to its calcium chelator function. Copyright 2000 Academic Press.

  2. [Heat shock-induced changes in the respiration of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rikhvanov, E G; Varakina, N N; Rusaleva, T M; Rachenko, E I; Kiseleva, V A; Voĭnikov, V K

    2001-01-01

    The incubation of Saccharomyces cerevisiae at elevated temperature (45 degrees C) stimulated the respiration of yeast cells and decreased their survival rate. The respiration-deficient mutant of this yeast was found to be more tolerant to the elevated temperature than the wild-type strain. At the same time, the cultivation of the wild-type strain in an ethanol-containing medium enhanced the respiration, catalase activity, and thermotolerance of yeast cells, as compared with their growth in a glucose-containing medium. It is suggested that the enhanced respiration of yeast cells at 45 degrees C leads to an intense accumulation of reactive oxygen species, which may be one of the reasons for the heat shock-induced cell death.

  3. Heat-shock protein dysregulation is associated with functional and pathological TDP-43 aggregation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Hsiang-Yu; Hou, Shin-Chen; Way, Tzong-Der; Wong, Chi-Huey; Wang, I.-Fan

    2013-11-01

    Conformational disorders are involved in various neurodegenerative diseases. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are the major contributors to neurodegenerative disease; however, ROS that affect the structural changes in misfolded disease proteins have yet to be well characterized. Here we demonstrate that the intrinsic propensity of TDP-43 to aggregate drives the assembly of TDP-43-positive stress granules and soluble toxic TDP-43 oligomers in response to a ROS insult via a disulfide crosslinking-independent mechanism. Notably, ROS-induced TDP-43 protein assembly correlates with the dynamics of certain TDP-43-associated chaperones. The heat-shock protein (HSP)-90 inhibitor 17-AAG prevents ROS-induced TDP-43 aggregation, alters the type of TDP-43 multimers and reduces the severity of pathological TDP-43 inclusions. In summary, our study suggests that a common mechanism could be involved in the pathogenesis of conformational diseases that result from HSP dysregulation.

  4. Human major histocompatibility complex contains genes for the major heat shock protein HSP70

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sargent, C.A.; Dunham, I.; Campbell, R.D.; Trowsdale, J.

    1989-01-01

    Little is known as to why a large number of human diseases are influenced by the major histocompatibility complex. In some cases, a direct involvement of the products of the polymorphic class I and class II, as well as the less variable products of the class III, genes has been proposed. During characterization of the class III region for the presence of additional loci, the authors have located a duplicated locus encoding the major heat shock protein HSP70 between the complement and tumor necrosis factor genes. The HSP70 loci are 12 kilobases apart and lie 92 kilobases telomeric of the C2 gene. As HSP70 proteins have been linked with a protective role during and after cellular stress, and HSP70 analogues are often presented as antigens in bacterial and protozoal infections, this finding may have major implications with regard to the major histocompatibility complex and associated diseases

  5. Human major histocompatibility complex contains genes for the major heat shock protein HSP70

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sargent, C.A.; Dunham, I.; Campbell, R.D. (Medical Research Council Immunochemistry Unit , Oxford (England)); Trowsdale, J. (Imperial Cancer Research Fund, London (England))

    1989-03-01

    Little is known as to why a large number of human diseases are influenced by the major histocompatibility complex. In some cases, a direct involvement of the products of the polymorphic class I and class II, as well as the less variable products of the class III, genes has been proposed. During characterization of the class III region for the presence of additional loci, the authors have located a duplicated locus encoding the major heat shock protein HSP70 between the complement and tumor necrosis factor genes. The HSP70 loci are 12 kilobases apart and lie 92 kilobases telomeric of the C2 gene. As HSP70 proteins have been linked with a protective role during and after cellular stress, and HSP70 analogues are often presented as antigens in bacterial and protozoal infections, this finding may have major implications with regard to the major histocompatibility complex and associated diseases.

  6. Targeting heat shock protein 90 for the treatment of malignant pheochromocytoma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessio Giubellino

    Full Text Available Metastatic pheochromocytoma represents one of the major clinical challenges in the field of neuroendocrine oncology. Recent molecular characterization of pheochromocytoma suggests new treatment options with targeted therapies. In this study we investigated the 90 kDa heat shock protein (Hsp90 as a potential therapeutic target for advanced pheochromocytoma. Both the first generation, natural product Hsp90 inhibitor 17-allylamino-17-demethoxygeldanamycin (17-AAG, tanespimycin, and the second-generation synthetic Hsp90 inhibitor STA-9090 (ganetespib demonstrated potent inhibition of proliferation and migration of pheochromocytoma cell lines and induced degradation of key Hsp90 clients. Furthermore, ganetespib induced dose-dependent cytotoxicity in primary pheochromocytoma cells. Using metastatic models of pheochromocytoma, we demonstrate the efficacy of 17-AAG and ganetespib in reducing metastatic burden and increasing survival. Levels of Hsp70 in plasma from the xenograft studies served as a proximal biomarker of drug treatment. Our study suggests that targeting Hsp90 may benefit patients with advanced pheochromocytoma.

  7. [Changes in the redox potential and pO2 in heat shock to Escherichia coli].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oktiabr'skiĭ, O N; Pshenichnov, R A

    1982-01-01

    When the growing culture of Escherichia coli was subjected to a temperature above 37 degrees C, the pO2 fell abruptly at 42 degrees C; a reversible decrease in the redox potential (ROP) down to the range of negative values was detected if the growth ceased at 46 degrees C. The drop in the ROP took from 6 to 10 min, with the maximal deviation of 42.5 mV. Such changes in the pO2 and ROP were not caused by a heat shock in the stationary cultures. The change in the ROP was not due to a change in the pH and pO2 of the medium. The authors believe that the effect should be attributed to an elimination of the ionic gradients and the electrochemical gradient delta muH+.

  8. Transportation Stress and Expression of Heat Shock Protein Affecting Pork Quality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shu Tang, , , and

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The relationship between heat shock protein (Hsp expression and meat quality were assessed in pigs. Carcasses from 2 h- and 6 h-transported pigs had higher temperatures and lower pH and water holding capacity values in the longissimus dorsi and gluteus maximus superficialis muscles. Long journeys were associated with increased creatine kinase (CK levels. Higher CK levels are indicative of physical stress, as the enzyme is released from muscle fibers as a result of intense muscular exertion. These physiological and enzymatic changes were correlated with increased Hsp70 and decreased Hsp90 expression levels in both skeletal muscles. Animals whose cells contained high levels of Hsp may have had an advantage due to the protective role conferred by Hsp. Reduced Hsp levels were indicative of a higher meat quality and a good welfare of the transported pigs. The stress response declined over time in response to the same stress, such as a 6-h transport stress.

  9. Protective effects of heat shock protein 70 on the acute lung injury of rats with heat stroke and its mechanism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan GENG

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective To investigate the protective effect of heat shock protein (HSP 70 on the acute lung injury (ALI of rats with heat stroke. Methods Sixty four rats were randomly (by employing a random number table assigned into a sham-heated group (Sham group, heat stress group (HS group, and HS plus gluttamine treatment group (HS+GLN group and HS plus quercet in treatment group (HS+QU group, 16 each. All rats were housed in a artificial climate chamber, with the rats in the sham groups exposed to a temperature of 23℃ and humidity of 55%±5%, while the rats of HS, HS+GLN and HS+QU groups to an ambient temperature of 39℃ and humidity of 65%. During heat stress or sham heating, rectal temperature (Tr, systolic blood pressure (SBP and pulse rate (PR were monitored to observe the difference in heat stress response among the groups. The time point at which the SBP started to drop from the peak level was taken as the point of HS onset. At the onset of HS, heat exposure was terminated, then the rats were immediately removed from the chamber, and returned to room temperature. The rats were scarified 0h and 6h after HS onset respectively. After bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF was collected, the lungs of all animals were harvested for pathological examination of lung injury. The concentrations of IL-1β, TNF-α and IL-6 in BALF and HSP70 in lung homogenate were measured by using an enzyme linked immunosorbent assay kit. Results Compared with HS and HS+QU groups, the rats in HS+GLN group required significantly greater heat load to induce HS (P<0.001, and had longer survival time span after HS onset. Compared with Sham group, the concentration of HSP70 in lung homogenate in HS group increased in a time-dependent manner (P<0.001. In comparison with HS group, the concentration of HSP70 in lung homogenate from HS+GLN group was significantly elevated at each time point (P<0.001, while the treatment with QU significantly inhibited the expression of HSP70 (P<0

  10. Effect of sequential heat and cold shocks on nuclear phenotypes of the blood-sucking insect, Panstrongylus megistus (Burmeister (Hemiptera, Reduviidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Garcia Simone L

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Thermal shocks induce changes in the nuclear phenotypes that correspond to survival (heterochromatin decondensation, nuclear fusion or death (apoptosis, necrosis responses in the Malpighian tubules of Panstrongylus megistus. Since thermal tolerance increased survival and molting rate in this species following sequential shocks, we investigated whether changes in nuclear phenotypes accompanied the insect survival response to sequential thermal shocks. Fifth instar nymphs were subjected to a single heat (35 or 40°C, 1 h or cold (5 or 0°C, 1 h shock and then subjected to a second shock for 12 h at 40 or 0°C, respectively, after 8, 18, 24 and 72 h at 28°C (control temperature. As with specimen survival, sequential heat and cold shocks induced changes in frequency of the mentioned nuclear phenotypes although their patterns differed. The heat shock tolerance involved decrease in apoptosis simultaneous to increase in cell survival responses. Sequential cold shocks did not involve cell/nuclear fusion and even elicited increase in necrosis with advancing time after shocks. The temperatures of 40 and 0ºC were more effective than the temperatures of 35 and 5ºC in eliciting the heat and cold shock tolerances, respectively, as shown by cytological analysis of the nuclear phenotypes. It is concluded that different sequential thermal shocks can trigger different mechanisms of cellular protection against stress in P. megistus, favoring the insect to adapt to various ecotopes.

  11. Plasmodium falciparum encodes a single cytosolic type I Hsp40 that functionally interacts with Hsp70 and is upregulated by heat shock

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Botha, M

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Heat shock protein 70 (Hsp70) and heat shock protein 40 (Hsp40) function as molecular chaperones during the folding and trafficking of proteins within most cell types. However, the Hsp70–Hsp40 chaperone partnerships within the malaria parasite...

  12. Heating and Acceleration of Solar Wind Ions by Turbulent Wave Spectrum in Inhomogeneous Expanding Plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ofman, Leon; Ozak, Nataly; Vinas, Adolfo F.

    2016-01-01

    Near the Sun (acceleration, heating, and propagation of the solar wind are likely affected by the background inhomogeneities of the magnetized plasma. The heating and the acceleration of the solar wind ions by turbulent wave spectrum in inhomogeneous plasma is studied using a 2.5D hybrid model. The hybrid model describes the kinetics of the ions, while the electrons are modeled as massless neutralizing fluid in an expanding box approach. Turbulent magnetic fluctuations dominated by power-law frequency spectra, which are evident from in-situ as well as remote sensing measurements, are used in our models. The effects of background density inhomogeneity across the magnetic field on the resonant ion heating are studied. The effect of super- Alfvenic ion drift on the ion heating is investigated. It is found that the turbulent wave spectrum of initially parallel propagating waves cascades to oblique modes, and leads to enhanced resonant ion heating due to the inhomogeneity. The acceleration of the solar wind ions is achieved by the parametric instability of large amplitude waves in the spectrum, and is also affected by the inhomogeneity. The results of the study provide the ion temperature anisotropy and drift velocity temporal evolution due to relaxation of the instability. The non-Maxwellian velocity distribution functions (VDFs) of the ions are modeled in the inhomogeneous solar wind plasma in the acceleration region close to the Sun.

  13. LDH inhibition impacts on heat shock response and induces senescence of hepatocellular carcinoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manerba, Marcella; Di Ianni, Lorenza; Govoni, Marzia; Roberti, Marinella; Recanatini, Maurizio; Di Stefano, Giuseppina

    2017-07-15

    In normal cells, heat shock response (HSR) is rapidly induced in response to a variety of harmful conditions and represents one of the most efficient defense mechanism. In cancer tissues, constitutive activation converts HSR into a life-threatening process, which plays a major role in helping cell survival and proliferation. Overexpression of heat shock proteins (HSPs) has been widely reported in human cancers and was found to correlate with tumor progression. Hepatocellular carcinoma is one of the conditions in which HSR activation was shown to have the highest clinical significance. Transcription of HSPs is induced by HSF-1, which also activates glycolytic metabolism and increases the expression of LDH-A, the master regulator of the Warburg effect. In this paper, we tried to explore the relationship between HSR and LDH-A. In cultured hepatocellular carcinoma cells, by using two enzyme inhibitors (oxamate and galloflavin), we found that the reduction of LDH-A activity led to decreased level and function of the major HSPs involved in tumorigenesis. Galloflavin (a polyphenol) also inhibited the ATPase activity of two of the examined HSPs. Finally, hindering HSR markedly lowered the alpha-fetoprotein cellular levels and induced senescence. Specific inhibitors of single HSPs are currently under evaluation in different neoplastic diseases. However, one of the effects usually observed during treatment is a compensatory elevation of other HSPs, which decreases treatment efficacy. Our results highlight a connection between LDH and HSR and suggest LDH inhibition as a way to globally impact on this tumor promoting process. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Small heat shock proteins are necessary for heart migration and laterality determination in zebrafish

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lahvic, Jamie L.; Ji, Yongchang; Marin, Paloma; Zuflacht, Jonah P.; Springel, Mark W.; Wosen, Jonathan E.; Davis, Leigh; Hutson, Lara D.; Amack, Jeffrey D.; Marvin, Martha J.

    2013-01-01

    Small heat shock proteins (sHsps) regulate cellular functions not only under stress, but also during normal development, when they are expressed in organ-specific patterns. Here we demonstrate that two small heat shock proteins expressed in embryonic zebrafish heart, hspb7 and hspb12, have roles in the development of left-right asymmetry. In zebrafish, laterality is determined by the motility of cilia in Kupffer’s vesicle (KV), where hspb7 is expressed; knockdown of hspb7 causes laterality defects by disrupting the motility of these cilia. In embryos with reduced hspb7, the axonemes of KV cilia have a 9+0 structure, while control embyros have a predominately 9+2 structure. Reduction of either hspb7 or hspb12 alters the expression pattern of genes that propagate the signals that establish left-right asymmetry: the nodal-related gene southpaw (spaw) in the lateral plate mesoderm, and its downstream targets pitx2, lefty1 and lefty2. Partial depletion of hspb7 causes concordant heart, brain and visceral laterality defects, indicating that loss of KV cilia motility leads causes coordinated but randomized laterality. Reducing hspb12 leads to similar alterations in the expression of downstream laterality genes, but at a lower penetrance. Simultaneous reduction of hspb7 and hspb12 randomizes heart, brain and visceral laterality, suggesting that these two genes have partially redundant functions in the establishment of left-right asymmetry. In addition, both hspb7 and hspb12 are expressed in the precardiac mesoderm and in the yolk syncytial layer, which supports the migration and fusion of mesodermal cardiac precursors. In embryos in which the reduction of hspb7 or hspb12 was limited to the yolk, migration defects predominated, suggesting that the yolk expression of these genes rather than heart expression is responsible for the migration defects. PMID:24140541

  15. Heat shock protein 27 (HSPB1) suppresses the PDGF-BB-induced migration of osteoblasts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kainuma, Shingo; Tokuda, Haruhiko; Yamamoto, Naohiro; Kuroyanagi, Gen; Fujita, Kazuhiko; Kawabata, Tetsu; Sakai, Go; Matsushima-Nishiwaki, Rie; Kozawa, Osamu; Otsuka, Takanobu

    2017-01-01

    Heat shock protein 27 (HSP27/HSPB1), one of the small heat shock proteins, is constitutively expressed in various tissues. HSP27 and its phosphorylation state participate in the regulation of multiple physiological and pathophysiological cell functions. However, the exact roles of HSP27 in osteoblasts remain unclear. In the present study, we investigated the role of HSP27 in the platelet-derived growth factor-BB (PDGF-BB)-stimulated migration of osteoblast-like MC3T3-E1 cells. PDGF-BB by itself barely upregulated the expression of HSP27 protein, but stimulated the phosphorylation of HSP27 in these cells. The PDGF-BB-induced cell migration was significantly downregulated by HSP27 overexpression. The PDGF-BB-induced migrated cell numbers of the wild-type HSP27-overexpressing cells and the phospho-mimic HSP27-overexpressing (3D) cells were less than those of the unphosphorylatable HSP27-overexpressing (3A) cells. PD98059, an inhibitor of MEK1/2, SB203580, an inhibitor of p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase, and SP600125, an inhibitor of stress-activated protein kinase/c-Jun N-terminal kinase (SAPK/JNK) reduced the PDGF-BB-induced migration of these cells, whereas Akt inhibitor or rapamycin, an inhibitor of upstream kinase of p70 S6 kinase (mTOR), barely affected the migration. However, the PDGF-BB-induced phosphorylation of p44/p42 MAPK, p38 MAPK and SAPK/JNK was not affected by HSP27 overexpression. There were no significant differences in the phosphorylation of p44/p42 MAPK, p38 MAP kinase or SAPK/JNK between the 3D cells and the 3A cells. These results strongly suggest that HSP27 functions as a negative regulator in the PDGF-BB-stimulated migration of osteoblasts, and the suppressive effect is amplified by the phosphorylation state of HSP27. PMID:28902366

  16. Heat shock transcription factor 1-deficiency attenuates overloading-associated hypertrophy of mouse soleus muscle.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomoyuki Koya

    Full Text Available Hypertrophic stimuli, such as mechanical stress and overloading, induce stress response, which is mediated by heat shock transcription factor 1 (HSF1, and up-regulate heat shock proteins (HSPs in mammalian skeletal muscles. Therefore, HSF1-associated stress response may play a key role in loading-associated skeletal muscle hypertrophy. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of HSF1-deficiency on skeletal muscle hypertrophy caused by overloading. Functional overloading on the left soleus was performed by cutting the distal tendons of gastrocnemius and plantaris muscles for 4 weeks. The right muscle served as the control. Soleus muscles from both hindlimbs were dissected 2 and 4 weeks after the operation. Hypertrophy of soleus muscle in HSF1-null mice was partially inhibited, compared with that in wild-type (C57BL/6J mice. Absence of HSF1 partially attenuated the increase of muscle wet weight and fiber cross-sectional area of overloaded soleus muscle. Population of Pax7-positive muscle satellite cells in HSF1-null mice was significantly less than that in wild-type mice following 2 weeks of overloading (p<0.05. Significant up-regulations of interleukin (IL-1β and tumor necrosis factor mRNAs were observed in HSF1-null, but not in wild-type, mice following 2 weeks of overloading. Overloading-related increases of IL-6 and AFT3 mRNA expressions seen after 2 weeks of overloading tended to decrease after 4 weeks in both types of mice. In HSF1-null mice, however, the significant overloading-related increase in the expression of IL-6, not ATF3, mRNA was noted even at 4th week. Inhibition of muscle hypertrophy might be attributed to the greater and prolonged enhancement of IL-6 expression. HSF1 and/or HSF1-mediated stress response may, in part, play a key role in loading-induced skeletal muscle hypertrophy.

  17. Chaperone heat shock protein 90 mobilization and hydralazine cytoprotection against acrolein-induced carbonyl stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burcham, Philip C; Raso, Albert; Kaminskas, Lisa M

    2012-11-01

    Toxic carbonyls such as acrolein participate in many degenerative diseases. Although the nucleophilic vasodilatory drug hydralazine readily traps such species under "test-tube" conditions, whether these reactions adequately explain its efficacy in animal models of carbonyl-mediated disease is uncertain. We have previously shown that hydralazine attacks carbonyl-adducted proteins in an "adduct-trapping" reaction that appears to take precedence over direct "carbonyl-sequestering" reactions, but how this reaction conferred cytoprotection was unclear. This study explored the possibility that by increasing the bulkiness of acrolein-adducted proteins, adduct-trapping might alter the redistribution of chaperones to damaged cytoskeletal proteins that are known targets for acrolein. Using A549 lung adenocarcinoma cells, the levels of chaperones heat shock protein (Hsp) 40, Hsp70, Hsp90, and Hsp110 were measured in intermediate filament extracts prepared after a 3-h exposure to acrolein. Exposure to acrolein alone modestly increased the levels of all four chaperones. Coexposure to hydralazine (10-100 μM) strongly suppressed cell ATP loss while producing strong adduct-trapping in intermediate filaments. Most strikingly, hydralazine selectively boosted the levels of cytoskeletal-associated Hsp90, including a high-mass species that was sensitive to the Hsp90 inhibitor 17-N-allylamino-17-demethoxygeldanamycin. Biochemical fractionation of acrolein- and hydralazine-treated cells revealed that hydralazine likely promoted Hsp90 migration from cytosol into other subcellular compartments. A role for Hsp90 mobilization in cytoprotection was confirmed by the finding that brief heat shock treatment suppressed acute acrolein toxicity in A549 cells. Taken together, these findings suggest that by increasing the steric bulk of carbonyl-adducted proteins, adduct-trapping drugs trigger the intracellular mobilization of the key molecular chaperone Hsp90.

  18. Specific Genetic Immunotherapy Induced by Recombinant Vaccine Alpha-Fetoprotein-Heat Shock Protein 70 Complex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiaoping; Lin, Huanping; Wang, Qiaoxia

    Purposes: To construct a recombinant vaccine alpha-fetoprotein (AFP)-heat shock protein (HSP70) complex, and study its ability to induce specific CTL response and its protective effect against AFP-producing tumor. Material/Methods: A recombinant vaccine was constructed by conjugating mouse alpha-fetoprotein to heat shock protein 70. By way of intracutaneous injection, mice were primed and boosted with recombinant vaccine mAFP/HSP70, whereas single mAFP or HSP70 injection as controls. The ELISPOT and ELISA were used to measure the frequency of cells producing the cytokine IFN-γ in splenocytes and the level of anti-AFP antibody of serum from immunized mice respectively. In vivo tumor challenge were carried out to assess the immune effect of the recombinant vaccine. Results: By recombinant mAFP/HSP70 vaccine immunization, the results of ELISPOT and ELISA showed that the number of splenic cells producing IFN-γ and the level of anti-AFP antibody of serum were significantly higher in mAFP/HSP70 group than those in mAFP and HSP70 groups (108.50±11.70 IFN-γ spots/106 cells vs 41.60±10.40 IFN-γ spots/106 cells, 7.32±3.14 IFN-γ spots/106 cells, Pimmune adjuvant. Sequential immunization with recombinant mAFP/HSP70 vaccine could generate effective antitumor immunity on AFP-producing tumor. The recombined mAFP/HSP70 vaccine may be suitable for serving as an immunotherapy for hepatocellular carcinoma.

  19. The Mesenchymal Precursor Cell Marker Antibody STRO-1 Binds to Cell Surface Heat Shock Cognate 70.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitter, Stephen; Gronthos, Stan; Ooi, Soo Siang; Zannettino, Andrew C W

    2017-04-01

    Since its discovery more than 25 years ago, the STRO-1 antibody has played a fundamental role in defining the hierarchical nature of mesenchymal precursor cells (MPC) and their progeny. STRO-1 antibody binding remains a hallmark of immature pluripotent MPC. Despite the significance of STRO-1 in the MPC field, the identity of the antigen has remained elusive. Using a combination of two-dimensional gel electrophoresis, coupled with Western blotting and Tandem mass spectroscopy, we have identified the STRO-1 antigen as heat shock cognate 70 (HSC70;HSPA8). STRO-1 binds to immune-precipitated HSC70 and siRNA-mediated knock down of HSPA8 reduced STRO-1 binding. STRO-1 surface binding does not correlate with HSC70 expression and sequestration of cholesterol reduces STRO-1 surface binding, suggesting that the plasma membrane lipid composition may be an important determinant in the presentation of HSC70 on the cell surface. HSC70 is present on the surface of STRO-1 + but not STRO-1 - cell lines as assessed by cell surface biotinylation and recombinant HSC70 blocks STRO-1 binding to the cell surface. The STRO-1 epitope on HSC70 was mapped to the ATPase domain using a series of deletion mutants in combination with peptide arrays. Deletion of the first four amino acids of the consensus epitope negated STRO-1 binding. Notably, in addition to HSC70, STRO-1 cross-reacts with heat shock protein 70 (HSP70), however all the clonogenic cell activity is restricted to the STRO-1 BRIGHT /HSP70 - fraction. These results provide important insight into the properties that define multipotent MPC and provide the impetus to explore the role of cell surface HSC70 in MPC biology. Stem Cells 2017;35:940-951. © 2016 AlphaMed Press.

  20. Chalcones from Angelica keiskei: Evaluation of Their Heat Shock Protein Inducing Activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kil, Yun-Seo; Choi, Seul-Ki; Lee, Yun-Sil; Jafari, Mahtab; Seo, Eun-Kyoung

    2015-10-23

    Five new chalcones, 4,2',4'-trihydroxy-3'-[(2E,5E)-7-methoxy-3,7-dimethyl-2,5-octadienyl]chalcone (1), (±)-4,2',4'-trihydroxy-3'-[(2E)-6-hydroxy-7-methoxy-3,7-dimethyl-2-octenyl]chalcone (2), 4,2',4'-trihydroxy-3'-[(2E)-3-methyl-5-(1,3-dioxolan-2-yl)-2-pentenyl]chalcone (3), 2',3'-furano-4-hydroxy-4'-methoxychalcone (4), and (±)-4-hydroxy-2',3'-(2,3-dihydro-2-methoxyfurano)-4'-methoxychalcone (5), were isolated from the aerial parts of Angelica keiskei Koidzumi together with eight known chalcones, 6-13, which were identified as (±)-4,2',4'-trihydroxy-3'-[(6E)-2-hydroxy-7-methyl-3-methylene-6-octenyl]chalcone (6), xanthoangelol (7), xanthoangelol F (8), xanthoangelol G (9), 4-hydroxyderricin (10), xanthoangelol D (11), xanthoangelol E (12), and xanthoangelol H (13), respectively. Chalcones 1-13 were evaluated for their promoter activity on heat shock protein 25 (hsp25, murine form of human hsp27). Compounds 1 and 6 activated the hsp25 promoter by 21.9- and 29.2-fold of untreated control at 10 μM, respectively. Further protein expression patterns of heat shock factor 1 (HSF1), HSP70, and HSP27 by 1 and 6 were examined. Compound 6 increased the expression of HSF1, HSP70, and HSP27 by 4.3-, 1.5-, and 4.6-fold of untreated control, respectively, without any significant cellular cytotoxicities, whereas 1 did not induce any expression of these proteins. As a result, 6 seems to be a prospective HSP inducer.

  1. Deciphering human heat shock transcription factor 1 regulation via post-translational modification in yeast.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liliana Batista-Nascimento

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Heat shock transcription factor 1 (HSF1 plays an important role in the cellular response to proteotoxic stresses. Under normal growth conditions HSF1 is repressed as an inactive monomer in part through post-translation modifications that include protein acetylation, sumoylation and phosphorylation. Upon exposure to stress HSF1 homotrimerizes, accumulates in nucleus, binds DNA, becomes hyper-phosphorylated and activates the expression of stress response genes. While HSF1 and the mechanisms that regulate its activity have been studied for over two decades, our understanding of HSF1 regulation remains incomplete. As previous studies have shown that HSF1 and the heat shock response promoter element (HSE are generally structurally conserved from yeast to metazoans, we have made use of the genetically tractable budding yeast as a facile assay system to further understand the mechanisms that regulate human HSF1 through phosphorylation of serine 303. We show that when human HSF1 is expressed in yeast its phosphorylation at S303 is promoted by the MAP-kinase Slt2 independent of a priming event at S307 previously believed to be a prerequisite. Furthermore, we show that phosphorylation at S303 in yeast and mammalian cells occurs independent of GSK3, the kinase primarily thought to be responsible for S303 phosphorylation. Lastly, while previous studies have suggested that S303 phosphorylation represses HSF1-dependent transactivation, we now show that S303 phosphorylation also represses HSF1 multimerization in both yeast and mammalian cells. Taken together, these studies suggest that yeast cells will be a powerful experimental tool for deciphering aspects of human HSF1 regulation by post-translational modifications.

  2. Deciphering human heat shock transcription factor 1 regulation via post-translational modification in yeast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batista-Nascimento, Liliana; Neef, Daniel W; Liu, Phillip C C; Rodrigues-Pousada, Claudina; Thiele, Dennis J

    2011-01-06

    Heat shock transcription factor 1 (HSF1) plays an important role in the cellular response to proteotoxic stresses. Under normal growth conditions HSF1 is repressed as an inactive monomer in part through post-translation modifications that include protein acetylation, sumoylation and phosphorylation. Upon exposure to stress HSF1 homotrimerizes, accumulates in nucleus, binds DNA, becomes hyper-phosphorylated and activates the expression of stress response genes. While HSF1 and the mechanisms that regulate its activity have been studied for over two decades, our understanding of HSF1 regulation remains incomplete. As previous studies have shown that HSF1 and the heat shock response promoter element (HSE) are generally structurally conserved from yeast to metazoans, we have made use of the genetically tractable budding yeast as a facile assay system to further understand the mechanisms that regulate human HSF1 through phosphorylation of serine 303. We show that when human HSF1 is expressed in yeast its phosphorylation at S303 is promoted by the MAP-kinase Slt2 independent of a priming event at S307 previously believed to be a prerequisite. Furthermore, we show that phosphorylation at S303 in yeast and mammalian cells occurs independent of GSK3, the kinase primarily thought to be responsible for S303 phosphorylation. Lastly, while previous studies have suggested that S303 phosphorylation represses HSF1-dependent transactivation, we now show that S303 phosphorylation also represses HSF1 multimerization in both yeast and mammalian cells. Taken together, these studies suggest that yeast cells will be a powerful experimental tool for deciphering aspects of human HSF1 regulation by post-translational modifications.

  3. Experimental methods of shock wave research

    CERN Document Server

    Seiler, Friedrich

    2016-01-01

    This comprehensive and carefully edited volume presents a variety of experimental methods used in Shock Waves research. In 14 self contained chapters this 9th volume of the “Shock Wave Science and Technology Reference Library” presents the experimental methods used in Shock Tubes, Shock Tunnels and Expansion Tubes facilities. Also described is their set-up and operation. The uses of an arc heated wind tunnel and a gun tunnel are also contained in this volume. Whenever possible, in addition to the technical description some typical scientific results obtained using such facilities are described. Additionally, this authoritative book includes techniques for measuring physical properties of blast waves and laser generated shock waves. Information about active shock wave laboratories at different locations around the world that are not described in the chapters herein is given in the Appendix, making this book useful for every researcher involved in shock/blast wave phenomena.

  4. The expression and function of hsp30-like small heat shock protein genes in amphibians, birds, fish, and reptiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heikkila, John J

    2017-01-01

    Small heat shock proteins (sHSPs) are a superfamily of molecular chaperones with important roles in protein homeostasis and other cellular functions. Amphibians, reptiles, fish and birds have a shsp gene called hsp30, which was also referred to as hspb11 or hsp25 in some fish and bird species. Hsp30 genes, which are not found in mammals, are transcribed in response to heat shock or other stresses by means of the heat shock factor that is activated in response to an accumulation of unfolded protein. Amino acid sequence analysis revealed that representative HSP30s from different classes of non-mammalian vertebrates were distinct from other sHSPs including HSPB1/HSP27. Studies with amphibian and fish recombinant HSP30 determined that they were molecular chaperones since they inhibited heat- or chemically-induced aggregation of unfolded protein. During non-mammalian vertebrate development, hsp30 genes were differentially expressed in selected tissues. Also, heat shock-induced stage-specific expression of hsp30 genes in frog embryos was regulated at the level of chromatin structure. In adults and/or tissue culture cells, hsp30 gene expression was induced by heat shock, arsenite, cadmium or proteasomal inhibitors, all of which enhanced the production of unfolded/damaged protein. Finally, immunocytochemical analysis of frog and chicken tissue culture cells revealed that proteotoxic stress-induced HSP30 accumulation co-localized with aggresome-like inclusion bodies. The congregation of damaged protein in aggresomes minimizes the toxic effect of aggregated protein dispersed throughout the cell. The current availability of probes to detect the presence of hsp30 mRNA or encoded protein has resulted in the increased use of hsp30 gene expression as a marker of proteotoxic stress in non-mammalian vertebrates. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. The Stress Granule RNA-Binding Protein TIAR-1 Protects Female Germ Cells from Heat Shock in Caenorhabditis elegans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriela Huelgas-Morales

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available In response to stressful conditions, eukaryotic cells launch an arsenal of regulatory programs to protect the proteome. One major protective response involves the arrest of protein translation and the formation of stress granules, cytoplasmic ribonucleoprotein complexes containing the conserved RNA-binding proteins TIA-1 and TIAR. The stress granule response is thought to preserve mRNA for translation when conditions improve. For cells of the germline—the immortal cell lineage required for sexual reproduction—protection from stress is critically important for perpetuation of the species, yet how stress granule regulatory mechanisms are deployed in animal reproduction is incompletely understood. Here, we show that the stress granule protein TIAR-1 protects the Caenorhabditis elegans germline from the adverse effects of heat shock. Animals containing strong loss-of-function mutations in tiar-1 exhibit significantly reduced fertility compared to the wild type following heat shock. Analysis of a heat-shock protein promoter indicates that tiar-1 mutants display an impaired heat-shock response. We observed that TIAR-1 was associated with granules in the gonad core and oocytes during several stressful conditions. Both gonad core and oocyte granules are dynamic structures that depend on translation; protein synthesis inhibitors altered their formation. Nonetheless, tiar-1 was required for the formation of gonad core granules only. Interestingly, the gonad core granules did not seem to be needed for the germ cells to develop viable embryos after heat shock. This suggests that TIAR-1 is able to protect the germline from heat stress independently of these structures.

  6. Alterations in gene expression as an index of neuronal injury: heat shock and the immediate early gene response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharp, F R; Sagar, S M

    1994-01-01

    The c-fos immediate early gene is induced by normal stimuli including light, stress, hyperosmolar solutions, and hormones. Ischemia, hypoxia, seizures, cortical injury, nerve section and other pathological stimuli can also induce c-fos. The induction can occur via increases in intracellular calcium that act through a Ca2+/cAMP element on its promoter, or via trophic and other factors that act through a serum response element (SRE) on its promoter. Several studies show that calcium entry via voltage sensitive calcium channels (VSCCs) is important for inducing c-fos. We have shown that calcium entry via the NMDA receptor is important for induction of c-fos mRNA by glutamate and cAMP in cultured cortical neurons. Moreover, the NMDA receptor appears to regulate translation of c-fos mRNA to Fos protein when cells are stimulated with other types of stimuli including vasoactive intestinal peptide, zinc, and fibroblast growth factor. These results suggest that toxins that elevate intracellular calcium will likely induce the c-fos gene in brain. The heat shock or stress genes are induced by a wide variety of stimuli including heavy metals, heat, oxidative and ischemic stress, prolonged seizures, hypoglycemia, calcium ionophores, and certain toxins. It is believed that denatured proteins stimulate heat shock factors to bind to heat shock elements on the promoters of all heat shock genes to induce gene transcription. We and others have shown that global and focal ischemia induce the hsp70 heat shock gene in brain. Mild ischemia induces hsp70 mRNA and HSP70 protein in neurons only.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  7. ELECTRON ACCELERATION IN PULSAR-WIND TERMINATION SHOCKS: AN APPLICATION TO THE CRAB NEBULA GAMMA-RAY FLARES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kroon, John J.; Becker, Peter A.; Dermer, Charles D. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, George Mason University, Fairfax, VA 22030-4444 (United States); Finke, Justin D., E-mail: jkroon@gmu.edu, E-mail: pbecker@gmu.edu, E-mail: charlesdermer@outlook.com, E-mail: justin.finke@nrl.navy.mil [Space Science Division, Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, DC 20375 (United States)

    2016-12-20

    The γ -ray flares from the Crab Nebula observed by AGILE and Fermi -LAT reaching GeV energies and lasting several days challenge the standard models for particle acceleration in pulsar-wind nebulae because the radiating electrons have energies exceeding the classical radiation-reaction limit for synchrotron. Previous modeling has suggested that the synchrotron limit can be exceeded if the electrons experience electrostatic acceleration, but the resulting spectra do not agree very well with the data. As a result, there are still some important unanswered questions about the detailed particle acceleration and emission processes occurring during the flares. We revisit the problem using a new analytical approach based on an electron transport equation that includes terms describing electrostatic acceleration, stochastic wave-particle acceleration, shock acceleration, synchrotron losses, and particle escape. An exact solution is obtained for the electron distribution, which is used to compute the associated γ -ray synchrotron spectrum. We find that in our model the γ -ray flares are mainly powered by electrostatic acceleration, but the contributions from stochastic and shock acceleration play an important role in producing the observed spectral shapes. Our model can reproduce the spectra of all the Fermi -LAT and AGILE flares from the Crab Nebula, using magnetic field strengths in agreement with the multi-wavelength observational constraints. We also compute the spectrum and duration of the synchrotron afterglow created by the accelerated electrons, after they escape into the region on the downstream side of the pulsar-wind termination shock. The afterglow is expected to fade over a maximum period of about three weeks after the γ -ray flare.

  8. Application of a Heat Flux Sensor in Wind Power Electronics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elvira Baygildina

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper proposes and investigates the application of the gradient heat flux sensor (GHFS for measuring the local heat flux in power electronics. Thanks to its thinness, the sensor can be placed between the semiconductor module and the heat sink. The GHFS has high sensitivity and yields direct measurements without an interruption to the normal power device operation, which makes it attractive for power electronics applications. The development of systems for monitoring thermal loading and methods for online detection of degradation and failure of power electronic devices is a topical and crucial task. However, online condition monitoring (CM methods, which include heat flux sensors, have received little research attention so far. In the current research, an insulated-gate bipolar transistor (IGBT module-based test setup with the GHFS implemented on the base plate of one of the IGBTs is introduced. The heat flux experiments and the IGBT power losses obtained by simulations show similar results. The findings give clear evidence that the GHFS can provide an attractive condition monitoring method for the thermal loading of power devices.

  9. Convective heat transfer and experimental icing aerodynamics of wind turbine blades

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xin

    The total worldwide base of installed wind energy peak capacity reached 94 GW by the end of 2007, including 1846 MW in Canada. Wind turbine systems are being installed throughout Canada and often in mountains and cold weather regions, due to their high wind energy potential. Harsh cold weather climates, involving turbulence, gusts, icing and lightning strikes in these regions, affect wind turbine performance. Ice accretion and irregular shedding during turbine operation lead to load imbalances, often causing the turbine to shut off. They create excessive turbine vibration and may change the natural frequency of blades as well as promote higher fatigue loads and increase the bending moment of blades. Icing also affects the tower structure by increasing stresses, due to increased loads from ice accretion. This can lead to structural failures, especially when coupled to strong wind loads. Icing also affects the reliability of anemometers, thereby leading to inaccurate wind speed measurements and resulting in resource estimation errors. Icing issues can directly impact personnel safety, due to falling and projected ice. It is therefore important to expand research on wind turbines operating in cold climate areas. This study presents an experimental investigation including three important fundamental aspects: (1) heat transfer characteristics of the airfoil with and without liquid water content (LWC) at varying angles of attack; (2) energy losses of wind energy while a wind turbine is operating under icing conditions; and (3) aerodynamic characteristics of an airfoil during a simulated icing event. A turbine scale model with curved 3-D blades and a DC generator is tested in a large refrigerated wind tunnel, where ice formation is simulated by spraying water droplets. A NACA 63421 airfoil is used to study the characteristics of aerodynamics and convective heat transfer. The current, voltage, rotation of the DC generator and temperature distribution along the airfoil

  10. HSF1-dependent and -independent regulation of the mammalian in vivo heat shock response and its impairment in Huntington's disease mouse models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neueder, Andreas; Gipson, Theresa A; Batterton, Sophie; Lazell, Hayley J; Farshim, Pamela P; Paganetti, Paolo; Housman, David E; Bates, Gillian P

    2017-10-02

    The heat shock response (HSR) is a mechanism to cope with proteotoxic stress by inducing the expression of molecular chaperones and other heat shock response genes. The HSR is evolutionarily well conserved and has been widely studied in bacteria, cell lines and lower eukaryotic model organisms. However, mechanistic insights into the HSR in higher eukaryotes, in particular in mammals, are limited. We have developed an in vivo heat shock protocol to analyze the HSR in mice and dissected heat shock factor 1 (HSF1)-dependent and -independent pathways. Whilst the induction of proteostasis-related genes was dependent on HSF1, the regulation of circadian function related genes, indicating that the circadian clock oscillators have been reset, was independent of its presence. Furthermore, we demonstrate that the in vivo HSR is impaired in mouse models of Huntington's disease but we were unable to corroborate the general repression of transcription that follows a heat shock in lower eukaryotes.

  11. The heat shock protein response following eccentric exercise in human skeletal muscle is unaffected by local NSAID infusion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mikkelsen, U R; Paulsen, G; Schjerling, P

    2013-01-01

    Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are widely consumed in relation to pain and injuries in skeletal muscle, but may adversely affect muscle adaptation probably via inhibition of prostaglandin synthesis. Induction of heat shock proteins (HSP) represents an important adaptive response...

  12. The human genome encodes ten alpha-crystallin-related small heat shock proteins: HspB1-10

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kappé, G.; Franck, E.; Verschuure, P.; Boelens, W.C.; Leunissen, J.A.M.; Jong, de W.W.

    2003-01-01

    To obtain an inventory of all human genes that code for alpha-crystallin-related small heat shock proteins (sHsps), the databases available from the public International Human Genome Sequencing Consortium (IHGSC) and the private Celera human genome project were exhaustively searched. Using the human

  13. The aphid Acyrthosiphon pisum exhibits a greater survival after a heat shock when parasitized by the wasp Aphidius ervi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trotta, Vincenzo; Forlano, Pierluigi; Falabella, Patrizia; Battaglia, Donatella; Fanti, Paolo

    2018-02-01

    The pea aphid Acyrthosiphon pisum is a common pest of many species of legumes and its parasitoid Aphidius ervi is regarded as a successful biocontrol agent. In this study, we report a greater survival rate of parasitized aphids compared with unparasitized ones, after exposure to a very high temperature (39°C for 30min). After the heat shock, the survival of unparasitized aphids decreases according to their age at the heat shock treatment, suggesting a different adaptation of the aphid life stage to the different microclimatic conditions they experience. Survival of parasitized aphids does not change according to the time of the heat shock treatment, but it is always significantly higher compared with the unparasitized ones. Parasitized aphids are very quickly subjected to a wide range of physiological modifications and the observed increased survival could be a consequence of these modifications before the heat shock treatment. The possible explanations as well as the possible adaptive nature of the observed phenomenon are discussed. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. TARGETED DELETION OF INDUCIBLE HEAT SHOCK PROTEIN 70 ABROGATES THE LATE INFARCT-SPARING EFFECT OF MYOCARDIAL ISCHEMIC PRECONDITIONING

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abstract submitted for 82nd annual meeting of the American Association for Thoracic Surgery, May 4-8, 2002 in Washington D.C.Targeted Deletion of Inducible Heat Shock Protein 70 Abrogates the Late Infarct-Sparing Effect of Myocardial Ischemic PreconditioningCraig...

  15. Effects of a heat shock protein inducer on the atrial fibrillation substrate caused by acute atrial ischaemia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sakabe, Masao; Shiroshita-Takeshita, Akiko; Maguy, Ange; Brundel, Bianca J. J. M.; Fujiki, Akira; Inoue, Hiroshi; Nattel, Stanley

    2008-01-01

    Aims Heat shock proteins (HSPs) are a set of endogenous cytoprotective factors activated by various pathological conditions. This study addressed the effects of geranylgeranylacetone (GGA), an orally active HSP inducer, on the atrial fibrillation (AF) substrate associated with acute atria( ischaemia

  16. Wheat Mds-1 encodes a heat-shock protein and governs susceptibility towards the Hessian fly gall midge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plant pests including insects must manipulate plants in order to utilize the nutrition and environment of the host. Here, we show that the heat-shock protein gene Mayetiola destructor susceptibility gene-1 (Mds-1) is a major susceptibility gene in wheat that allows the gall midge M. destructor, com...

  17. A novel computational approach of image analysis to quantify behavioural response to heat shock in Chironomus Ramosus larvae (Diptera: Chironomidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bimalendu B. Nath

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available All living cells respond to temperature stress through coordinated cellular, biochemical and molecular events known as “heat shock response” and its genetic basis has been found to be evolutionarily conserved. Despite marked advances in stress research, this ubiquitous heat shock response has never been analysed quantitatively at the whole organismal level using behavioural correlates. We have investigated behavioural response to heat shock in a tropical midge Chironomus ramosus Chaudhuri, Das and Sublette. The filter-feeding aquatic Chironomus larvae exhibit characteristic undulatory movement. This innate pattern of movement was taken as a behavioural parameter in the present study. We have developed a novel computer-aided image analysis tool “Chiro” for the quantification of behavioural responses to heat shock. Behavioural responses were quantified by recording the number of undulations performed by each larva per unit time at a given ambient temperature. Quantitative analysis of undulation frequency was carried out and this innate behavioural pattern was found to be modulated as a function of ambient temperature. Midge larvae are known to be bioindicators of aquatic environments. Therefore, the “Chiro” technique can be tested using other potential biomonitoring organisms obtained from natural aquatic habitats using undulatory motion as a behavioural parameter.

  18. Polymorphism of the gene of heat shock protein hsp70 in lines of rats with normal and hypertensive status

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Adarichev, V A; Dymshits, G M; Krivenko, A A; Ostapchuk, Ia V; Ostaptchouk, Jana

    1998-01-01

    RFLP in the hsp70 gene encoding a major heat shock protein was analyzed in rat strains with high and normal arterial blood pressure. Dimorphism in the sets of DNA fragments was revealed after hybridization of the hsp gene leader sequence with rat DNA digested with BamHI restriction endonuclease.

  19. Level of heat shock proteins decreases in individuals carrying B-chromosomes in the grasshopper Eyprepocnemis plorans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Teruel, M; Sørensen, Jesper Givskov; Loeschcke, Volker

    2010-01-01

    We analyzed the effect of B-chromosome presence on expression level of heat shock protein 70 (Hsp70) in cerebral ganglion and gonad in both males and females of the grasshopper Eyprepocnemis plorans. Two natural Spanish populations, Salobreña (Granada) and Torrox (Málaga) were assayed, the former...

  20. RhoA Activation Sensitizes Cells to Proteotoxic Stimuli by Abrogating the HSF1-Dependent Heat Shock Response

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meijering, Roelien A. M.; Wiersma, Marit; van Marion, Denise M. S.; Zhang, Deli; Hoogstra-Berends, Femke; Dijkhuis, Anne-Jan; Schmidt, Martina; Wieland, Thomas; Kampinga, Harm H.; Henning, Robert H.; Brundel, Bianca J. J. M.

    2015-01-01

    Background The heat shock response (HSR) is an ancient and highly conserved program of stress-induced gene expression, aimed at reestablishing protein homeostasis to preserve cellular fitness. Cells that fail to activate or maintain this protective response are hypersensitive to proteotoxic stress.

  1. Close correlation between heat shock response and cytotoxicity in Neurospora crassa treated with aliphatic alcohols and phenols

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meyer, U.; Schweim, P.; Fracella, F.; Rensing, L. [Univ. of Bremen (Germany)

    1995-03-01

    In Neurospora crassa the aliphatic alcohols methanol, ethanol, 1-propanol, 2-propanol, 1-butanol, 2-butanol, isobutanol, ethylene glycol, glycerol, and allyl alcohol and the phenolic compounds phenol, hydroquinone, resorcinol, pyrogallol, phloroglucinol, sodium salicylate, and acetylsalicylic acid were analyzed with respect to their capacities to induce heat shock proteins (HSP) and to inhibit protein synthesis. Both the alcohols and phenols showed the greatest levels of HSP induction at concentrations which inhibited the overall protein synthesis by about 50%. The abilities of the different alcohols to induce the heat shock response are proportional to their lipophilicities: the lipophilic alcohol isobutanol is maximally inductive at about 0.6 M, whereas the least lipophilic alcohol, methanol, causes maximal induction at 5.7 M. The phenols, in general, show a higher capability to induce the heat shock response. The concentrations for maximal induction range between 25 mM (sodium salicylate) and 100 mM (resorcinol). Glycerol (4.1 M) shifted the concentration necessary for maximal HSP induction by hydroquinone from 50 to 200 mM. The results reveal that the induction of HSP occurs under conditions which considerably constrain cell metabolism. The heat shock response, therefore, does not represent a sensitive marker for toxicity tests but provides a good estimate for the extent of cell damage.

  2. Heat shock factor activation in human muscles following a demanding intermittent exercise protocol is attenuated with hyperthermia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Palomero, J; Broome, C S; Rasmussen, P

    2008-01-01

    AIM: The present study investigated whether increased activation of heat shock factors (HSF) following exercise relates primarily to the increased muscle temperature or to exercise in general. METHODS: Six subjects completed 40 min of intermittent cycling (15s:15s exercise:recovery at 300 +/- 22 W...

  3. Exogenous heat shock cognate protein 70 pretreatment attenuates cardiac and hepatic dysfunction with associated anti-inflammatory responses in experimental septic shock.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Jong-Hau; Yang, Rei-Cheng; Lin, Shih-Jen; Liou, Shu-Fen; Dai, Zen-Kong; Yeh, Jwu-Lai; Wu, Jiunn-Ren

    2014-12-01

    It has been recently demonstrated that intracellular heat shock cognate protein 70 (HSC70) can be released into extracellular space with physiologic effects. However, its extracellular function in sepsis is not clear. In this study, we hypothesize that extracellular HSC70 can protect against lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced myocardial and hepatic dysfunction because of its anti-inflammatory actions. In Wistar rats, septic shock developed with hypotension, tachycardia, and myocardial and hepatic dysfunction at 4 h following LPS administration (10 mg/kg, i.v.). Pretreatment with recombinant bovine HSC70 (20 μg/kg, i.v.) attenuated LPS-induced hypotension and tachycardia by 21% and 23%, respectively (P shock cognate protein 70 also prevented LPS-induced hypoglycemia (217 vs. 59 mg/dL, P shock, extracellular HSC70 conveys pleiotropic protection on myocardial, hepatic, and systemic derangements, with associated inhibition of proinflammatory mediators including tumor necrosis factor α, nitric oxide, cyclooxygenase 2, and matrix metalloproteinase 9, through mitogen-activated protein kinase/nuclear factor κB signaling pathways. Therefore, extracellular HSC70 may have a promising role in the prophylactic treatment of sepsis.

  4. More Wind Power Integration with Adjusted Energy Carriers for Space Heating in Northern China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianjun He

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available In Northern China, due to the high penetration of coal-fired cogeneration facilities, which are generally equipped with extraction-condensing steam turbines, lots of wind power resources may be wasted during the heating season. In contrast, considerable coal is consumed in the power generation sector. In this article, firstly it is revealed that there exists a serious divergence in the ratio of electrical to thermal energy between end users’ demand and the cogenerations’ production during off-peak load at night, which may negate active power-balancing of the electric power grid. Secondly, with respect to this divergence only occurring during off-peak load at night, a temporary proposal is given so as to enable the integration of more wind power. The authors suggest that if the energy carrier for part of the end users’ space heating is switched from heating water to electricity (e.g., electric heat pumps (EHPs can provide space heating in the domestic sector, the ratio of electricity to heating water load should be adjusted to optimize the power dispatch between cogeneration units and wind turbines, resulting in fuel conservation. With this proposal, existing infrastructures are made full use of, and no additional ones are required. Finally a numerical simulation is performed in order to illustrate both the technical and economic feasibility of the aforementioned proposal, under ongoing infrastructures as well as electricity and space heating tariff conditions without changing participants’ benefits. The authors aim to persuade Chinese policy makers to enable EHPs to provide space heating to enable the integration of more wind power.

  5. Synergies of wind power and electrified space heating: case study for Beijing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xinyu; Lu, Xi; McElroy, Michael B; Nielsen, Chris P; Kang, Chongqing

    2014-01-01

    Demands for electricity and energy to supply heat are expected to expand by 71% and 47%, respectively, for Beijing in 2020 relative to 2009. If the additional electricity and heat are supplied solely by coal as is the current situation, annual emissions of CO2 may be expected to increase by 59.6% or 99 million tons over this interval. Assessed against this business as usual (BAU) background, the present study indicates that significant reductions in emissions could be realized using wind-generated electricity to provide a source of heat, employed either with heat pumps or with electric thermal storage (ETS) devices. Relative to BAU, reductions in CO2 with heat pumps assuming 20% wind penetration could be as large as 48.5% and could be obtained at a cost for abatement of as little as $15.6 per ton of avoided CO2. Even greater reductions, 64.5%, could be realized at a wind penetration level of 40% but at a higher cost, $29.4 per ton. Costs for reduction of CO2 using ETS systems are significantly higher, reflecting the relatively low efficiency for conversion of coal to power to heat.

  6. Theoretical and experimental insights into effects of wind on leaf heat and gas exchange

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schymanski, Stanislaus J.; Or, Dani

    2014-05-01

    Transpiration and heat exchange by plant leaves are coupled physiological processes of significant importance for surface-climate interactions and ecohydrology. The common practice of modelling transpiration as an isothermal process (assuming equal leaf and air temperatures) may introduce significant bias into estimates of transpiration rates and water use efficiency (WUE, the amount of carbon gained by photosynthesis per unit of water lost by transpiration). In contrast, explicit consideration of stomatal and leaf boundary layer resistances in series and the leaf energy balance in a physically-based model led to some surprising results, such as suppressed transpiration rates for increasing wind speed at constant stomatal conductance. The model predicts that for high wind velocities, the same leaf conductance (for water vapour and carbon dioxide) can be maintained with less evaporative losses. If this leaf-scale effect is consistent across most leaves, it may have profound implications for canopy-scale water use efficiency under globally decreasing wind speeds. This presentation reports the results of a systematic study of the effect of wind speed on leaf heat and gas exchange rates and introduces a novel experimental design to verify the modelling results using an insulated wind tunnel and artificial leaves with defined pore geometries, allowing to measure leaf-scale latent and sensible heat fluxes independently. First experimental results and new insights will be highlighted.

  7. RhoA Activation Sensitizes Cells to Proteotoxic Stimuli by Abrogating the HSF1-Dependent Heat Shock Response.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roelien A M Meijering

    Full Text Available The heat shock response (HSR is an ancient and highly conserved program of stress-induced gene expression, aimed at reestablishing protein homeostasis to preserve cellular fitness. Cells that fail to activate or maintain this protective response are hypersensitive to proteotoxic stress. The HSR is mediated by the heat shock transcription factor 1 (HSF1, which binds to conserved heat shock elements (HSE in the promoter region of heat shock genes, resulting in the expression of heat shock proteins (HSP. Recently, we observed that hyperactivation of RhoA conditions cardiomyocytes for the cardiac arrhythmia atrial fibrillation. Also, the HSR is annihilated in atrial fibrillation, and induction of HSR mitigates sensitization of cells to this disease. Therefore, we hypothesized active RhoA to suppress the HSR resulting in sensitization of cells for proteotoxic stimuli.Stimulation of RhoA activity significantly suppressed the proteotoxic stress-induced HSR in HL-1 atrial cardiomyocytes as determined with a luciferase reporter construct driven by the HSF1 regulated human HSP70 (HSPA1A promoter and HSP protein expression by Western Blot analysis. Inversely, RhoA inhibition boosted the proteotoxic stress-induced HSR. While active RhoA did not preclude HSF1 nuclear accumulation, phosphorylation, acetylation, or sumoylation, it did impair binding of HSF1 to the hsp genes promoter element HSE. Impaired binding results in suppression of HSP expression and sensitized cells to proteotoxic stress.These results reveal that active RhoA negatively regulates the HSR via attenuation of the HSF1-HSE binding and thus may play a role in sensitizing cells to proteotoxic stimuli.

  8. A Novel mouse model of enhanced proteostasis: Full-length human heat shock factor 1 transgenic mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pierce, Anson; Wei, Rochelle; Halade, Dipti; Yoo, Si-Eun; Ran, Qitao; Richardson, Arlan

    2010-01-01

    Research highlights: → Development of mouse overexpressing native human HSF1 in all tissues including CNS. → HSF1 overexpression enhances heat shock response at whole-animal and cellular level. → HSF1 overexpression protects from polyglutamine toxicity and favors aggresomes. → HSF1 overexpression enhances proteostasis at the whole-animal and cellular level. -- Abstract: The heat shock response (HSR) is controlled by the master transcriptional regulator heat shock factor 1 (HSF1). HSF1 maintains proteostasis and resistance to stress through production of heat shock proteins (HSPs). No transgenic model exists that overexpresses HSF1 in tissues of the central nervous system (CNS). We generated a transgenic mouse overexpressing full-length non-mutant HSF1 and observed a 2-4-fold increase in HSF1 mRNA and protein expression in all tissues studied of HSF1 transgenic (HSF1 +/0 ) mice compared to wild type (WT) littermates, including several regions of the CNS. Basal expression of HSP70 and 90 showed only mild tissue-specific changes; however, in response to forced exercise, the skeletal muscle HSR was more elevated in HSF1 +/0 mice compared to WT littermates and in fibroblasts following heat shock, as indicated by levels of inducible HSP70 mRNA and protein. HSF1 +/0 cells elicited a significantly more robust HSR in response to expression of the 82 repeat polyglutamine-YFP fusion construct (Q82YFP) and maintained proteasome-dependent processing of Q82YFP compared to WT fibroblasts. Overexpression of HSF1 was associated with fewer, but larger Q82YFP aggregates resembling aggresomes in HSF1 +/0 cells, and increased viability. Therefore, our data demonstrate that tissues and cells from mice overexpressing full-length non-mutant HSF1 exhibit enhanced proteostasis.

  9. Quercetin suppresses heat shock-induced nuclear translocation of Hsp72

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antoni Gawron

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available The effect of quercetin and heat shock on the Hsp72 level and distribution in HeLa cells was studied by Western blotting, indirect immunofluorescence and immunogold electron microscopy. In control cells and after quercetin treatment, Hsp72 was located both in the cytoplasm and in the nucleus in comparable amounts. After hyperthermia, the level of nuclear Hsp72 raised dramatically. Expression of Hsp72 in cytoplasm was also higher but not to such extent as that observed in the nucleus. Preincubation of heated cells with quercetin inhibited strong Hsp72 expression observed after hyperthermia and changed the intracellular Hsp72 distribution. The cytoplasmic level of protein exceeded the nuclear one, especially around the nucleus, where the coat of Hsp72 was noticed. Observations indicating that quercetin was present around and in the nuclear envelope suggested an involvement of this drug in the inhibition of nuclear translocation. Our results indicate that pro-apoptotic activity of quercetin may be correlated not only with the inhibition of Hsp72 expression but also with suppression of its migration to the nucleus.

  10. Investigating the Chaperone Properties of a Novel Heat Shock Protein, Hsp70.c, from Trypanosoma brucei

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adélle Burger

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The neglected tropical disease, African Trypanosomiasis, is fatal and has a crippling impact on economic development. Heat shock protein 70 (Hsp70 is an important molecular chaperone that is expressed in response to stress and Hsp40 acts as its co-chaperone. These proteins play a wide range of roles in the cell and they are required to assist the parasite as it moves from a cold blooded insect vector to a warm blooded mammalian host. A novel cytosolic Hsp70, from Trypanosoma brucei, TbHsp70.c, contains an acidic substrate binding domain and lacks the C-terminal EEVD motif. The ability of a cytosolic Hsp40 from Trypanosoma brucei J protein 2, Tbj2, to function as a co-chaperone of TbHsp70.c was investigated. The main objective was to functionally characterize TbHsp70.c to further expand our knowledge of parasite biology. TbHsp70.c and Tbj2 were heterologously expressed and purified and both proteins displayed the ability to suppress aggregation of thermolabile MDH and chemically denatured rhodanese. ATPase assays revealed a 2.8-fold stimulation of the ATPase activity of TbHsp70.c by Tbj2. TbHsp70.c and Tbj2 both demonstrated chaperone activity and Tbj2 functions as a co-chaperone of TbHsp70.c. In vivo heat stress experiments indicated upregulation of the expression levels of TbHsp70.c.

  11. Regulation and function of small heat shock protein genes during amphibian development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heikkila, John J

    2004-11-01

    Small heat shock proteins (shsps) are molecular chaperones that are inducible by environmental stress such as elevated temperature or exposure to heavy metals or arsenate. Recent interest in shsps has been propelled by the finding that shsp synthesis or mutations are associated with various human diseases. While much is known about shsps in cultured cells, less is known about their expression and function during early animal development. In amphibian model systems, shsp genes are developmentally regulated under both normal and environmental stress conditions. For example, in Xenopus, the shsp gene family, hsp30, is repressed and not heat-inducible until the late neurula/early tailbud stage whereas other hsps are inducible at the onset of zygotic genome activation at the midblastula stage. Furthermore, these shsp genes are preferentially induced in selected tissues. Recent studies suggest that the developmental regulation of these shsp genes is controlled, in part, at the level of chromatin structure. Some shsps including Xenopus and Rana hsp30 are synthesized constitutively in selected tissues where they may function in the prevention of apoptosis. During environmental stress, amphibian multimeric shsps bind to denatured target protein, inhibittheir aggregation and maintain them in a folding-competent state until reactivated by other cellular chaperones. Phosphorylation of shsps appears to play a major role in the regulation of their function.

  12. Alfvén wave heating of heavy ions in the expanding solar wind: Hybrid simulations

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hellinger, Petr; Velli, M.; Trávníček, Pavel; Gary, S. P.; Goldstein, B. E.; Liewer, P. C.

    2005-01-01

    Roč. 110, - (2005), A12109/1-A12109/11 ISSN 0148-0227 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA3042403 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z30420517 Keywords : Alfvén waves * solar wind heating * microinstabilities Subject RIV: DG - Athmosphere Sciences, Meteorology Impact factor: 2.784, year: 2005

  13. Intermittent heating of the corona as an alternative to generate fast solar wind flows

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grappin, R.; Mangeney, A.; Schwartz, S.J.; Feldman, W.C.

    1999-01-01

    We discuss a new alternative to the generation of fast streams which does not require momentum addition beyond the critical point. We consider the consequences on the solar wind of temporally intermittent heat depositions at the base of the wind. With the help of 1d hydrodynamic simulations we show that the instantaneous wind velocity profile fluctuates around an average profile well above the one corresponding to the Parker solution with a coronal temperature equal to the average coronal temperature imposed at the bottom of the numerical domain. The origin of this result lies in a previously overlooked phenomenon, the overexpansion of hot plasma regions in the subsonic wind. copyright 1999 American Institute of Physics

  14. Overexpression of small heat shock protein LimHSP16.45 in Arabidopsis enhances tolerance to abiotic stresses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Changjun Mu

    Full Text Available Small heat shock proteins (smHSPs play important and extensive roles in plant defenses against abiotic stresses. We cloned a gene for a smHSP from the David Lily (Lilium davidii (E. H. Wilson Raffill var. Willmottiae, which we named LimHSP16.45 based on its protein molecular weight. Its expression was induced by many kinds of abiotic stresses in both the lily and transgenic plants of Arabidopsis. Heterologous expression enhanced cell viability of the latter under high temperatures, high salt, and oxidative stress, and heat shock granules (HSGs formed under heat or salinity treatment. Assays of enzymes showed that LimHSP16.45 overexpression was related to greater activity by superoxide dismutase and catalase in transgenic lines. Therefore, we conclude that heterologous expression can protect plants against abiotic stresses by preventing irreversible protein aggregation, and by scavenging cellular reactive oxygen species.

  15. Parametric Study of Preferential Ion Heating Due to Intermittent Magnetic Fields in the Solar Wind

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carbajal Gomez, L.; Chapman, S. C.; Dendy, R. O.; Watkins, N. W.

    2014-12-01

    In situ observations and remote measurements of the solar wind show strong preferential heating of ions along the ambient magnetic field. Understanding the mechanism for this heating process is an open problem. The observed broad-band spectrum of Alfven waves permeating the fast solar wind provide a candidate mechanism for this preferential heating through wave-particle interactions on ion kinetic scales. Previous analytical and numerical studies have considered a single pump wave [1, 2] or a turbulent, broad-band spectra of Alfven waves [3, 4, 5] to drive the ion heating. The latter studies investigated the effects on ion heating due to different initial 1/fγpower spectral exponents and number of modes and the signals were random phase. However, the observed solar wind fluctuations are intermittent so that the phases of the modes comprising the power spectrum are not random. Non-Gaussian fluctuations are seen both on scales identified with the inertial range of Alfvenic turbulence [6], and on longer scales typified by '1/f' spectra [7]. We present results of the first parametric numerical simulations on the effects of different levels of intermittency of the broad-band spectra of Alfven waves on the preferential heating of ions in the solar wind. We performed hybrid simulations for the local heating of the solar wind, which resolves the full kinetic physics of the ions and treats the electrons as a charge-neutralizing fluid. Our simulations evolve the full vector velocities and electromagnetic fields in one configuration space coordinate and in time.We compare the efficiency of different levels of intermittency of the initial turbulent fields and their effect on the efficiency of the wave-particle interactions which are a mechanism for driving preferential ion heating in the solar wind. [1] J. A. Araneda, E. Marsh, A. F. Viñas, J. Geophys. Res. 112, A04104 (2007). [2] J. A. Araneda, E. Marsh, A. F. Viñas, Phys. Rev. Lett. 100, 125003 (2008) [3] Y. G. Maneva, A

  16. The Transcriptional Heat Shock Response of Salmonella Typhimurium Shows Hysteresis and Heated Cells Show Increased Resistance to Heat and Acid Stress

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pin, C.; Hansen, Trine; Munoz-Cuevas, M.

    2012-01-01

    We investigated if the transcriptional response of Salmonella Typhimurium to temperature and acid variations was hysteretic, i.e. whether the transcriptional regulation caused by environmental stimuli showed memory and remained after the stimuli ceased. The transcriptional activity of non.......e., they remained up-regulated after the environmental stress ceased. At 25uC the transcriptional regulation of genes encoding for heat shock proteins was determined by the previous environment. Gene networks constructed with up-regulated genes were significantly more modular than those of down-regulated genes......H 4.5 were not affected. The exposure to pH 5 only caused up-regulation of 12 genes and this response was neither hysteretic nor accompanied of increased resistance to inactivation conditions. Cellular memory at the transcriptional level may represent a mechanism of adaptation to the environment...

  17. O Star Wind Mass-Loss Rates and Shock Physics from X-ray Line Profiles in Archival XMM RGS Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, David

    O stars are characterized by their dense, supersonic stellar winds. These winds are the site of X-ray emission from shock-heated plasma. By analyzing high-resolution X-ray spectra of these O stars, we can learn about the wind-shock heating and X-ray production mechanism. But in addition, the X-rays can also be used to measure the mass-loss rate of the stellar wind, which is a key observational quantity whose value affects stellar evolution and energy, momentum, and mass input to the Galactic interstellar medium. We make this X-ray based mass-loss measurement by analyzing the profile shapes of the X-ray emission lines observed at high resolution with the Chandra and XMM-Newton grating spectrometers. One advantage of our method is that it is insensitive to small-scale clumping that affects density-squared diagnostics. We are applying this analysis technique to O stars in the Chandra archive, and are finding mass-loss rates lower than those traditionally assumed for these O stars, and in line with more recent independent determinations that do account for clumping. By extending this analysis to the XMM RGS data archive, we will make significant contributions to the understanding of both X-ray production in O stars and to addressing the issue of the actual mass-loss rates of O stars. The XMM RGS data archive provides several extensions and advantages over the smaller Chandra HETGS archive: (1) there are roughly twice as many O and early B stars in the XMM archive; (2) the longer wavelength response of the RGS provides access to diagnostically important lines of nitrogen and carbon; (3) the very long, multiple exposures of zeta Pup provide the opportunity to study this canonical O supergiant's X-ray spectrum in unprecedented detail, including looking at the time variability of X-ray line profiles. Our research team has developed a sophisticated empirical line profile model as well as a computational infrastructure for fitting the model to high-resolution X-ray spectra

  18. Heat Shock Protein 90 Ensures Efficient Mumps Virus Replication by Assisting with Viral Polymerase Complex Formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katoh, Hiroshi; Kubota, Toru; Nakatsu, Yuichiro; Tahara, Maino; Kidokoro, Minoru; Takeda, Makoto

    2017-03-15

    Paramyxoviral RNAs are synthesized by a viral RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp) consisting of the large (L) protein and its cofactor phosphoprotein (P protein). The L protein is a multifunctional protein that catalyzes RNA synthesis, mRNA capping, and mRNA polyadenylation. Growing evidence shows that the stability of several paramyxovirus L proteins is regulated by heat shock protein 90 (Hsp90). In this study, we demonstrated that Hsp90 activity was important for mumps virus (MuV) replication. The Hsp90 activity was required for L-protein stability and activity because an Hsp90-specific inhibitor, 17-allylamino-17-demethoxygeldanamycin (17-AAG), destabilized the MuV L protein and suppressed viral RNA synthesis. However, once the L protein formed a mature polymerase complex with the P protein, Hsp90 activity was no longer required for the stability and activity of the L protein. When the Hsp90 activity was inhibited, the MuV L protein was degraded through the CHIP (C terminus of Hsp70-interacting protein)-mediated proteasomal pathway. High concentrations of 17-AAG showed strong cytotoxicity to certain cell types, but combined use of an Hsp70 inhibitor, VER155008, potentiated degradation of the L protein, allowing a sufficient reduction of 17-AAG concentration to block MuV replication with minimum cytotoxicity. Regulation of the L protein by Hsp90 and Hsp70 chaperones was also demonstrated for another paramyxovirus, the measles virus. Collectively, our data show that the Hsp90/Hsp70 chaperone machinery assists in the maturation of the paramyxovirus L protein and thereby in the formation of a mature RdRp complex and efficient viral replication. IMPORTANCE Heat shock protein 90 (Hsp90) is nearly universally required for viral protein homeostasis. Here, we report that Hsp90 activity is required for efficient propagation of mumps virus (MuV). Hsp90 functions in the maintenance of the catalytic subunit of viral polymerase, the large (L) protein, prior to formation of a

  19. Experimental assessment of the performance of ablative heat shield materials from plasma wind tunnel testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Löhle, S.; Hermann, T.; Zander, F.

    2017-12-01

    A method for assessing the performance of typical heat shield materials is presented in this paper. Three different material samples, the DLR material uc(Zuram), the Airbus material uc(Asterm) and the carbon preform uc(Calcarb) were tested in the IRS plasma wind tunnel PWK1 at the same nominal condition. State of the art diagnostic tools, i.e., surface temperature with pyrometry and thermography and boundary layer optical emission spectroscopy were completed by photogrammetric surface recession measurements. These data allow the assessment of the net heat flux for each material. The analysis shows that the three materials each have a different effect on heat flux mitigation with ASTERM showing the largest reduction in surface heat flux. The effect of pyrolysis and blowing is clearly observed and the heat flux reduction can be determined from an energy balance.

  20. Nonlinear interactions in superfluid dynamics: Nonstationary heat transfer due to second sound shock waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liepmann, H. W.; Torczynski, J. R.

    1983-01-01

    Second sound techniques were used to study superfluid helium. Second sound shock waves produced relative velocities in the bulk fluid. Maximum counterflow velocities produced in this way are found to follow the Langer-Fischer prediction for the fundamental critical velocity in its functional dependence on temperature and pressure. Comparison of successive shock and rotating experiments provides strong evidence that breakdown results in vorticity production in the flow behind the shock. Schlieren pictures have verified the planar nature of second sound shocks even after multiple reflections. The nonlinear theory of second sound was repeatedly verified in its prediction of double shocks and other nonlinear phenomena.

  1. A consistent thermodynamics of the MHD wave-heated two-fluid solar wind

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. V. Chashei

    2003-07-01

    Full Text Available We start our considerations from two more recent findings in heliospheric physics: One is the fact that the primary solar wind protons do not cool off adiabatically with distance, but appear to be heated. The other one is that secondary protons, embedded in the solar wind as pick-up ions, behave quasi-isothermal at their motion to the outer heliosphere. These two phenomena must be physically closely connected with each other. To demonstrate this we solve a coupled set of enthalpy flow conservation equations for the two-fluid solar wind system consisting of primary and secondary protons. The coupling of these equations comes by the heat sources that are relevant, namely the dissipation of MHD turbulence power to the respective protons at the relevant dissipation scales. Hereby we consider both the dissipation of convected turbulences and the dissipation of turbulences locally driven by the injection of new pick-up ions into an unstable mode of the ion distribution function. Conversion of free kinetic energy of freshly injected secondary ions into turbulence power is finally followed by partial reabsorption of this energy both by primary and secondary ions. We show solutions of simultaneous integrations of the coupled set of differential thermodynamic two-fluid equations and can draw interesting conclusions from the solutions obtained. We can show that the secondary proton temperature with increasing radial distance asymptotically attains a constant value with a magnitude essentially determined by the actual solar wind velocity. Furthermore, we study the primary proton temperature within this two-fluid context and find a polytropic behaviour with radially and latitudinally variable polytropic indices determined by the local heat sources due to dissipated turbulent wave energy. Considering latitudinally variable solar wind conditions, as published by McComas et al. (2000, we also predict latitudinal variations of primary proton temperatures at

  2. A consistent thermodynamics of the MHD wave-heated two-fluid solar wind

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. V. Chashei

    Full Text Available We start our considerations from two more recent findings in heliospheric physics: One is the fact that the primary solar wind protons do not cool off adiabatically with distance, but appear to be heated. The other one is that secondary protons, embedded in the solar wind as pick-up ions, behave quasi-isothermal at their motion to the outer heliosphere. These two phenomena must be physically closely connected with each other. To demonstrate this we solve a coupled set of enthalpy flow conservation equations for the two-fluid solar wind system consisting of primary and secondary protons. The coupling of these equations comes by the heat sources that are relevant, namely the dissipation of MHD turbulence power to the respective protons at the relevant dissipation scales. Hereby we consider both the dissipation of convected turbulences and the dissipation of turbulences locally driven by the injection of new pick-up ions into an unstable mode of the ion distribution function. Conversion of free kinetic energy of freshly injected secondary ions into turbulence power is finally followed by partial reabsorption of this energy both by primary and secondary ions. We show solutions of simultaneous integrations of the coupled set of differential thermodynamic two-fluid equations and can draw interesting conclusions from the solutions obtained. We can show that the secondary proton temperature with increasing radial distance asymptotically attains a constant value with a magnitude essentially determined by the actual solar wind velocity. Furthermore, we study the primary proton temperature within this two-fluid context and find a polytropic behaviour with radially and latitudinally variable polytropic indices determined by the local heat sources due to dissipated turbulent wave energy. Considering latitudinally variable solar wind conditions, as published by McComas et al. (2000, we also predict latitudinal variations of primary proton temperatures at

  3. The role of heat shock protein (HSP as inhibitor apoptosis in hypoxic conditions of bone marrow stem cell culture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sri Wigati Mardi Mulyani

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: The concept of stem cell therapy is one of the new hope as a medical therapy on salivary gland defect. However, the lack of viability of the transplanted stem cells survival rate led to the decrease of effectiveness of stem cell therapy. The underlying assumption in the decrease of viability and function of stem cells is an increase of apoptosis incidence. It suggests that the microenvironment in the area of damaged tissues is not conducive to support stem cell viability. One of the microenvironment is the hypoxia condition. Several scientific journals revealed that the administration of hypoxic cell culture can result in stress cells but on the other hand the stress condition of the cells also stimulates heat shock protein 27 (HSP 27 as antiapoptosis through inhibition of caspase 9. Purpose: The purpose of this study was to examine the role of heat shock protein 27 as inhibitor apoptosis in hypoxic conditions of bone marrow stem cell culture. Methods: Stem cell culture was performed in hypoxic conditions (O2 1% and measured the resistance to apoptosis through HSP 27 and caspase 9 expression of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells by using immunoflorecence and real time PCR. Results: The result of study showed that preconditioning hypoxia could inhibit apoptosis through increasing HSP 27 and decreasing level of caspase 9. Conclusion: The study suggested that hypoxic precondition could reduce apoptosis by increasing amount of heat shock protein 27 and decreasing caspase 9.Latar belakang: Konsep terapi stem cell merupakan salah satu harapan baru sebagai terapi medis kelainan kelenjar ludah. Namun, rendahnya viabilitas stem cell yang ditransplantasikan menyebabkan penurunan efektivitas terapi. Asumsi yang mendasari rendahnya viabilitas dan fungsi stem cell adalah tingginya kejadian apoptosis. Hal ini menunjukkan bahwa lingkungan mikro di daerah jaringan yang rusak tidak kondusif untuk mendukung viabilitas stem cell. Salah satu lingkungan

  4. Heat shock protein 90 has roles in intracellular calcium homeostasis, protein tyrosine phosphorylation regulation, and progesterone-responsive sperm function in human sperm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Kun; Xue, Yamei; Chen, Aijun; Jiang, Youfang; Xie, Haifeng; Shi, Qixian; Zhang, Songying; Ni, Ya

    2014-01-01

    Heat shock protein 90 plays critical roles in client protein maturation, signal transduction, protein folding and degradation, and morphological evolution; however, its function in human sperm is not fully understood. Therefore, our objective in this study was to elucidate the mechanism by which heat shock protein 90 exerts its effects on human sperm function. By performing indirect immunofluorescence staining, we found that heat shock protein 90 was localized primarily in the neck, midpiece, and tail regions of human sperm, and that its expression increased with increasing incubation time under capacitation conditions. Geldanamycin, a specific inhibitor of heat shock protein 90, was shown to inhibit this increase in heat shock protein 90 expression in western blotting analyses. Using a multifunctional microplate reader to examine Fluo-3 AM-loaded sperm, we observed for the first time that inhibition of heat shock protein 90 by using geldanamycin significantly decreased intracellular calcium concentrations during capacitation. Moreover, western blot analysis showed that geldanamycin enhanced tyrosine phosphorylation of several proteins, including heat shock protein 90, in a dose-dependent manner. The effects of geldanamycin on human sperm function in the absence or presence of progesterone was evaluated by performing chlortetracycline staining and by using a computer-assisted sperm analyzer. We found that geldanamycin alone did not affect sperm capacitation, hyperactivation, and motility, but did so in the presence of progesterone. Taken together, these data suggest that heat shock protein 90, which increases in expression in human sperm during capacitation, has roles in intracellular calcium homeostasis, protein tyrosine phosphorylation regulation, and progesterone-stimulated sperm function. In this study, we provide new insights into the roles of heat shock protein 90 in sperm function.

  5. ZmHSP16.9, a cytosolic class I small heat shock protein in maize (Zea mays), confers heat tolerance in transgenic tobacco.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Liping; Liu, Yang; Kong, Xiangpei; Zhang, Dan; Pan, Jiaowen; Zhou, Yan; Wang, Li; Li, Dequan; Yang, Xinghong

    2012-08-01

    Various organisms produce HSPs in response to high temperature and other stresses. The function of heat shock proteins, including small heat shock protein (sHSP), in stress tolerance is not fully explored. To improve our understanding of sHSPs, we isolated ZmHSP16.9 from maize. Sequence alignments and phylogenetic analysis reveal this to be a cytosolic class I sHSP. ZmHSP16.9 expressed in root, leaf and stem tissues under 40 °C treatment, and was up-regulated by heat stress and exogenous H₂O₂. Overexpression of ZmHSP16.9 in transgenic tobacco conferred tolerance to heat and oxidative stresses by increased seed germination rate, root length, and antioxidant enzyme activities compared with WT plants. These results support the positive role of ZmHSP16.9 in response to heat stress in plant. The overexpression of ZmHSP16.9 enhanced tolerance to heat and oxidative stress in transgenic tobacco.

  6. Recent wind-driven change in Subantarctic Mode Water and its impact on ocean heat storage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Libao; Rintoul, Stephen R.; Yu, Weidong

    2018-01-01

    The subduction and export of Subantarctic Mode Water (SAMW) supplies the upper limb of the overturning circulation and makes an important contribution to global heat, freshwater, carbon and nutrient budgets1-5. Upper ocean heat content has increased since 2006, helping to explain the so-called global warming hiatus between 1998 and 2014, with much of the ocean warming concentrated in extratropical latitudes of the Southern Hemisphere in close association with SAMW and Antarctic Intermediate Water (AAIW)6,7. Here we use Argo observations to assess changes in the thickness, depth and heat content of the SAMW layer. Between 2005 and 2015, SAMW has thickened (3.6 ± 0.3 m yr-1), deepened (2.4 ± 0.2 m yr-1) and warmed (3.9 ± 0.3 W m-2). Wind forcing, rather than buoyancy forcing, is largely responsible for the observed trends in SAMW. Most (84%) of the increase in SAMW heat content is the result of changes in thickness; warming by buoyancy forcing (increased heat flux to the ocean) accounts for the remaining 16%. Projected increases in wind stress curl would drive further deepening of SAMW and increase in heat storage in the Southern Hemisphere oceans.

  7. Experimental Study of a Small Scale Hydraulic System for Mechanical Wind Energy Conversion into Heat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tadas Zdankus

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Significant potential for reducing thermal energy consumption in buildings of moderate and cold climate countries lies within wind energy utilisation. Unlike solar irradiation, character of wind speeds in Central and Northern Europe correspond to the actual thermal energy demand in buildings. However, mechanical wind energy undergoes transformation into electrical energy before being actually used as thermal energy in most wind energy applications. The study presented in this paper deals with hydraulic systems, designed for small-scale applications to eliminate the intermediate energy transformation as it converts mechanical wind energy into heat directly. The prototype unit containing a pump, flow control valve, oil tank and piping was developed and tested under laboratory conditions. Results of the experiments showed that the prototype system is highly efficient and adjustable to a broad wind velocity range by modifying the definite hydraulic system resistance. Development of such small-scale replicable units has the potential to promote “bottom-up” solutions for the transition to a zero carbon society.

  8. Molecular Biological Analysis of Retinal and Streptococcal Heat-shock Protein 60.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka; Suzuki; Yamakawa; Usui

    2000-11-01

    Purpose: The observation of recurrent oral aphtha preceding ocular inflammation in patients with Behçet's disease suggests a role of oral Streptococcus in the etiology of this disease. Heat-treated Streptoccus antigen can induce ocular inflammation or systemic symptoms in Behçet's disease patients. Furthermore, the presence of an autoantibody against retinal heat-shock protein 60 (HSP 60) has been detected in the sera of these patients. Injection of extracted retinal HSP 60 also induces experimental uveitis in treated rats. The characteristics of retinal HSP 60 and HSP 60 from S. pyogenes were evaluated using a molecular biological approach.Methods: The gene encoding HSP 60 was isolated by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) from a bovine retinal cDNA library and from S. pyogenes DNA. The DNA sequence of the HSP 60 coding region was determined, and the amino acid sequences of the encoded proteins were predicted from the DNA sequence. The synthetic peptide (50 nmol) was emulsified with Freund's complete adjuvant and injected into rats.Results: Comparison of the amino acid sequences of Streptococcal and bovine retinal HSP 60 revealed about 200 residue regions with 47% homology. Experimental uveitis was mainly induced in rats inoculated with retinal HSP 60-derived peptide or Streptococcus HSP 60-derived peptide that is equivalent to residues 245-259 of human HSP 65.Discussion: The retinal and Streptococcal HSP 60 amoino acid composition is thought to be important and useful for investigating the mechanisms involved in the induction of Behçet's disease

  9. Small heat shock proteins and the postharvest chilling tolerance of tomato fruit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ré, Martín D; Gonzalez, Carla; Escobar, Mariela R; Sossi, María Laura; Valle, Estela M; Boggio, Silvana B

    2017-02-01

    Plants have the largest number of small heat shock proteins (sHsps) (15-42 kDa) among eukaryotes, but little is known about their function in vivo. They accumulate in response to different stresses, and specific sHsps are also expressed during developmental processes such as seed development, germination, and ripening. The presence of organelle-specific sHsps appears to be unique to plants. The sHsps expression is regulated by heat stress transcription factors (Hsfs). In this work, it was explored the role of sHsps in the chilling injury of tomato fruit. The level of transcripts and proteins of cytoplasmic and organellar sHsps was monitored in fruit during ripening and after cold storage (4 weeks at 4°C). Expression of HsfA1, HsfA2, HsfA3, and HsfB1 was also examined. Two cultivars of tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) contrasting in chilling tolerance were assayed: Micro-Tom (chilling-tolerant) and Minitomato (chilling-sensitive). Results showed that sHsps were induced during ripening in fruit from both cultivars. However, sHsps were induced in Micro-Tom fruit but not in Minitomato fruit after storage at a low temperature. In particular, sHsp 17.4-CII and sHsp23.8-M transcripts strongly accumulated in Micro-Tom fruit and HsfA3 transcript diminished after cold storage. These data suggest that sHsps may be involved in the protection mechanisms against chilling stress and substantiate the hypothesis that sHsps may participate in the mechanism of tomato genotype chilling tolerance. © 2016 Scandinavian Plant Physiology Society.

  10. Examination the expression pattern of HSP70 heat shock protein in chicken PGCs and developing genital ridge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahek Anand

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Chicken Primordial Germ cells (PGCs are emerging pioneers in the field of applied embryology and stem cell technology. Now-a-days transgenic chickens are promising models to study human disease pathophysiology and drug designing. However, most of the molecular mechanism, which govern the stemness and pluripotency of chicken PGCs, not known in details. Recent studies have indicated the role of HSP70 in early embryonic development in many vertebrate species. Exposure of chicken to heat stress result in activation of heat shock factors which activate the transcription of HSP70. Exposure chicken eggs to acute heat stress effects HSP70 expression in PGCs and gonads. HSP70 helps in maintaining the integrity of chicken PGCs. A new emerging role of HSP70 in apoptosis has emerged. In our lab, we aim to characterize the expression of cHsp70 in chicken PGCs and gonads during embryonic development by subjecting the parents to acute levels of heat stress. Chickens whose parents subjected to heat stress showed varied expression of cHsp70 and also improved thermo tolerance. In the future we plan to study other factors and miRNAs, which is characterized as an emerging player in regulating heat shock protein response in chicken and also plays an important role in apoptosis.

  11. Role of heat-shock protein 90 in hepatitis E virus capsid trafficking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Zi-Zheng; Miao, Ji; Zhao, Min; Tang, Ming; Yeo, Anthony E T; Yu, Hai; Zhang, Jun; Xia, Ning-Shao

    2010-07-01

    p239 is a virus-like particle constituted from hepatitis E virus (HEV) recombinant proteins. It can be used as a surrogate for HEV and as an investigative tool to study cellular interactions because of its ability to adsorb to and penetrate HepG2 cellular membranes. Our objective was to use p239 to define the role of HEV capsid proteins during the early stages of infection. Pull-down and MALDI-TOF MS experiments identified three host-cell proteins, Grp 78/Bip, alpha-tubulin and heat-shock protein 90 (HSP90), and the latter was investigated further. Antibodies to p239 alone or HSP90 alone could detect p239 or HSP90, suggesting the formation of a complex between p239 and HSP90. In the HepG2 cell, geldanamycin (GA), an HSP90-specific inhibitor, blocked intracellular transportation of p239, but had no effect on the binding and cellular entry of p239, suggesting that HSP90 was important for HEV capsid intracellular transportation. RT-PCR results showed that the efficiency of wild-type HEV infection was inhibited significantly by GA treatment, suggesting the importance of HSP90 in virus infectivity. It was concluded that HSP90 plays a crucial role in the intracellular transportation of viral capsids in the early stage of HEV infection.

  12. Small heat shock proteins potentiate amyloid dissolution by protein disaggregases from yeast and humans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin L Duennwald

    Full Text Available How small heat shock proteins (sHsps might empower proteostasis networks to control beneficial prions or disassemble pathological amyloid is unknown. Here, we establish that yeast sHsps, Hsp26 and Hsp42, inhibit prionogenesis by the [PSI+] prion protein, Sup35, via distinct and synergistic mechanisms. Hsp42 prevents conformational rearrangements within molten oligomers that enable de novo prionogenesis and collaborates with Hsp70 to attenuate self-templating. By contrast, Hsp26 inhibits self-templating upon binding assembled prions. sHsp binding destabilizes Sup35 prions and promotes their disaggregation by Hsp104, Hsp70, and Hsp40. In yeast, Hsp26 or Hsp42 overexpression prevents [PSI+] induction, cures [PSI+], and potentiates [PSI+]-curing by Hsp104 overexpression. In vitro, sHsps enhance Hsp104-catalyzed disaggregation of pathological amyloid forms of α-synuclein and polyglutamine. Unexpectedly, in the absence of Hsp104, sHsps promote an unprecedented, gradual depolymerization of Sup35 prions by Hsp110, Hsp70, and Hsp40. This unanticipated amyloid-depolymerase activity is conserved from yeast to humans, which lack Hsp104 orthologues. A human sHsp, HspB5, stimulates depolymerization of α-synuclein amyloid by human Hsp110, Hsp70, and Hsp40. Thus, we elucidate a heretofore-unrecognized human amyloid-depolymerase system that could have applications in various neurodegenerative disorders.

  13. [Role of heat shock proteins in the cardioprotection of regular moderate alcohol consumption].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guisasola, Maria Concepción

    2016-04-01

    To study whether the cardioprotective effect of regular alcohol consumption can be explained by the heat shock proteins (HSP), given their pathogenic role in atherosclerosis. Cross-sectional epidemiological study on 452 men and women aged 40-60. Clinical history, epidemiological survey (frequency of average alcohol consumption) and biochemical analysis was performed; Task Force Chart was applied for classification according to the risk of vascular disease. Intracellular HSPA1A, circulating HSPA1A and HSPD1, and anti-Hsp70/anti-Hsp60 antibodies were quantified by ELISA. Two hundred and thirty-eight (52.7%) were abstemious or drank60 g/d (5.5%). Two hundred and thirty-nine had no vascular risk (VR) factor or a risk60 g/d especially in subjects with moderate VR, and female drinkers of 40-60 g/d. The cardioprotective effect of 40-60 g/d of alcohol consumption could be due in part, to increased intracellular HSPA1A, a potent anti-inflammatory protein. Excessive intake of alcohol increases antibodies anti-Hsp60, stimulating proinflammatory cytokines. This fact may explain the mortality from cardiovascular disease in heavy drinkers. The clinical application of antibody anti-Hsps quantification has been proposed in patients at risk in order to detect atherosclerotic disease. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  14. Aberrant expression and secretion of heat shock protein 90 in patients with bullous pemphigoid.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefan Tukaj

    Full Text Available The cell stress chaperone heat shock protein 90 (Hsp90 has been implicated in inflammatory responses and its inhibition has proven successful in different mouse models of autoimmune diseases, including epidermolysis bullosa acquisita. Here, we investigated expression levels and secretory responses of Hsp90 in patients with bullous pemphigoid (BP, the most common subepidermal autoimmune blistering skin disease. In comparison to healthy controls, the following observations were made: (i Hsp90 was highly expressed in the skin of BP patients, whereas its serum levels were decreased and inversely associated with IgG autoantibody levels against the NC16A immunodominant region of the BP180 autoantigen, (ii in contrast, neither aberrant levels of circulating Hsp90 nor any correlation of this protein with serum autoantibodies was found in a control cohort of autoimmune bullous disease patients with pemphigus vulgaris, (iii Hsp90 was highly expressed in and restrictedly released from peripheral blood mononuclear cells of BP patients, and (iv Hsp90 was potently induced in and restrictedly secreted from human keratinocyte (HaCaT cells by BP serum and isolated anti-BP180 NC16A IgG autoantibodies, respectively. Our results reveal an upregulated Hsp90 expression at the site of inflammation and an autoantibody-mediated dysregulation of the intracellular and extracellular distribution of this chaperone in BP patients. These findings suggest that Hsp90 may play a pathophysiological role and represent a novel potential treatment target in BP.

  15. Soluble heat shock protein 70 members in patients undergoing allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirza, Nora; Prokop, Lea; Kowalewski, Daniel; Gouttefangeas, Cécile; Faul, Christoph; Bethge, Wolfgang A; Vogel, Wichard; Kanz, Lothar; Rammensee, Hans-Georg; Haen, Sebastian P

    2016-05-01

    Heat shock proteins (HSP) are highly conserved immunogenic proteins serving as potent danger signals. They are upregulated under stress conditions like fever and hypoxia. Extracellular HSP are involved in antigen presentation, cytokine release and maturation of antigen presenting cells. The release of the inducible members of the HSP70 family, Hsp72 and Hsp70B', into the serum of 20 patients undergoing allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation and 20 healthy donors was evaluated using enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) kits. Eight patients (40%) did not receive anti-thymocyte globulin (ATG) for prophylaxis of graft versus host disease (GvHD). These patients had no detectable or low serum levels of Hsp72 (n=3, 0.03 to 1.92ng/ml) which were in line with levels detected in 20 healthy individuals (p=0.07). Measurable HSP was not associated with any medication or transplantation-related procedures. In twelve patients (60%) receiving ATG, detected high levels of HSP reflected cross-reactivity of the rabbit-derived ATG with the anti-rabbit antibody used in the ELISA. Assumed HSP70 expression detected such ELISA has to be regarded carefully after ATG application. Neither radiochemotherapy, nor inflammation or sepsis during aplasia induced HSP70 release into the serum. Thus, soluble HSP70 may not be involved in the pathogenesis of acute GvHD. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Epitopes of microbial and human heat shock protein 60 and their recognition in myalgic encephalomyelitis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amal Elfaitouri

    Full Text Available Myalgic encephalomyelitis (ME, also called Chronic Fatigue Syndrome, a common disease with chronic fatigability, cognitive dysfunction and myalgia of unknown etiology, often starts with an infection. The chaperonin human heat shock protein 60 (HSP60 occurs in mitochondria and in bacteria, is highly conserved, antigenic and a major autoantigen. The anti-HSP60 humoral (IgG and IgM immune response was studied in 69 ME patients and 76 blood donors (BD (the Training set with recombinant human and E coli HSP60, and 136 30-mer overlapping and targeted peptides from HSP60 of humans, Chlamydia, Mycoplasma and 26 other species in a multiplex suspension array. Peptides from HSP60 helix I had a chaperonin-like activity, but these and other HSP60 peptides also bound IgG and IgM with an ME preference, theoretically indicating a competition between HSP60 function and antibody binding. A HSP60-based panel of 25 antigens was selected. When evaluated with 61 other ME and 399 non-ME samples (331 BD, 20 Multiple Sclerosis and 48 Systemic Lupus Erythematosus patients, a peptide from Chlamydia pneumoniae HSP60 detected IgM in 15 of 61 (24% of ME, and in 1 of 399 non-ME at a high cutoff (p<0.0001. IgM to specific cross-reactive epitopes of human and microbial HSP60 occurs in a subset of ME, compatible with infection-induced autoimmunity.

  17. Actin cytoskeleton and small heat shock proteins: how do they interact?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mounier, Nicole; Arrigo, André-Patrick

    2002-01-01

    Actin and small heat shock proteins (sHsps) are ubiquitous and multifaceted proteins that exist in 2 reversible forms, monomers and multimers, ie, the microfilament of the cytoskeleton and oligomers of the sHsps, generally, supposed to be in a spherical and hollow form. Two situations are described in the literature, where the properties of actin are modulated by sHsps; the actin polymerization is inhibited in vitro by some sHsps acting as capping proteins, and the actin cytoskeleton is protected by some sHsps against the disruption induced by various stressful conditions. We propose that a direct actin-sHsp interaction occurs to inhibit actin polymerization and to participate in the in vivo regulation of actin filament dynamics. Protection of the actin cytoskeleton would result from an F-actin–sHsp interaction in which microfilaments would be coated by small oligomers of phosphorylated sHsps. Both proteins share common structural motives suggesting direct binding sites, but they remain to be demonstrated. Some sHsps would behave with the actin cytoskeleton as actin-binding proteins capable of either capping a microfilament when present as a nonphosphorylated monomer or stabilizing and protecting the microfilament when organized in small, phosphorylated oligomers. PMID:12380684

  18. Heat shock protein 27 is spatially distributed in the human placenta and decreased during labor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdulsid, Akrem; Fletcher, Alexander; Lyall, Fiona

    2013-01-01

    Placental oxidative stress is a feature of human labor. Heat shock proteins (HSPs) play a key role in cellular stress. We hypothesized that placental expression of the small HSP 27 would be altered during labor and expression would vary in different regions of the placenta. Six women in labor who delivered vaginally and 6 women not in labor, who were delivered by Cesarean section, were recruited. Four equally spaced pieces were sampled from the inner, middle and outer regions of each placenta (total 12 samples per placenta). HSP 27 expression was investigated by Western blot analysis and RT-PCR. For non-labor, there was less HSP 27 protein in the inner placenta region compared with both the middle region (plabor, there was also less HSP 27 protein in the inner region compared with both the middle (plabor versus labor there was less HSP 27 in the labor group at both the inner (plabor. Similar to HSP 27 protein, there was less HSP 27 mRNA in the labor group in both the inner region (plabor. This study suggests that placental HSP 27 may play a role in labor and is spatially controlled. The results have important implications for how data obtained from studies in the placenta can be influenced by sampling methods.

  19. P53 and heat shock protein 70 expressions in colorectal adenocarcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shotar, Ali M.

    2005-01-01

    To examine the localization and over expression of heat shock protein 70 (HSP70) and p53 in patients with colorectal cancer and compared it with control tissue (including normal colon tissue). This was a retrospective study of 60 patients with colorectal adenocarcinoma at the Jordan University of Science and Technology (JUST), Irbid, Jordan from 1997 to 2000. The Pathology Department at JUST is the chief provider of surgical pathology services in the north of Jordan. It receives specimens from both government and private hospitals. Immunohistochemistry was the technique of choice. The HSP70 was over expressed more highly in colorectal cancers than in the control tissue. Immuno-histochemistry showed that over expression of HSP70 had no statistically significant difference with any of the different prognostic factors assessed, mainly the grade and the stage. The p53 was over expressed in 60% of the cases. Control tissue (normal colon) was negative, p53, cell-cycle-related oncogene product, was strongly over expressed in the nuclei of the cancer cells of the cancer tissue. We found no significant difference in terms of size, patient age, lymph node state, and stage. The rate of expression was significantly less in high grade tumors than in intermediate and low grade ones. The strong expression however, may be valuable in estimating a prognosis for patients with colo-rectal carcinoma. (author)

  20. Identification of heat shock protein 32 (Hsp32) as a novel target in acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerny-Reiterer, Sabine; Meyer, Renata A; Herrmann, Harald; Peter, Barbara; Gleixner, Karoline V; Stefanzl, Gabriele; Hadzijusufovic, Emir; Pickl, Winfried F; Sperr, Wolfgang R; Melo, Junia V; Maeda, Hiroshi; Jäger, Ulrich; Valent, Peter

    2014-03-15

    Heat shock proteins (Hsp) are increasingly employed as therapeutic targets in oncology. We have shown that Hsp32, also known as heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1), serves as survival factor and potential target in Ph+ chronic myeloid leukemia. We here report that primary cells and cell lines derived from patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) express Hsp32 mRNA and the Hsp32 protein in a constitutive manner. Highly enriched CD34+/CD38- ALL stem cells also expressed Hsp32. Two Hsp32-targeting drugs, pegylated zinc protoporphyrine (PEG-ZnPP) and styrene maleic acid-micelle-encapsulated ZnPP (SMA-ZnPP), induced apoptosis and growth arrest in the BCR/ABL1+ cell lines, in Ph- lymphoblastic cell lines and in primary Ph+ and Ph- ALL cells. The effects of PEG-ZnPP and SMA-ZnPP on growth of leukemic cells were dose-dependent. In Ph+ ALL, major growth-inhibitory effects of the Hsp32-targeting drugs were observed in imatinib-sensitive and imatinib-resistant cells. Hsp32-targeting drugs were found to synergize with imatinib, nilotinib, and bendamustine in producing growth inhibition and apoptosis in Ph+ ALL cells. A siRNA against Hsp32 was found to inhibit growth and survival of ALL cells and to synergize with imatinib in suppressing the growth of ALL cells. In conclusion, Hsp32 is an essential survival factor and potential new target in ALL.

  1. Heat-shock protein fusion vectors for improved expression of soluble recombinant proteins in Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kyratsous, Christos A; Panagiotidis, Christos A

    2012-01-01

    Molecular chaperones or heat-shock proteins (HSPs) are protein machines that interact with unfolded or partially folded polypeptides and assist them in attaining their proper conformation. The folding reaction relies on a complex array of scaffolding effects and ATP-driven conformational changes that mediate the temporary unfolding and subsequent refolding of protein substrates. DnaK and GroEL are the two major Escherichia coli chaperones. They belong to the HSP70 and HSP60 families of proteins, respectively, and play a major role in protein folding. Here, we describe a set of bacterial expression vectors that permits the fusion of a protein of interest to DnaK or GroEL and its subsequent quantitative expression in a soluble, easily purifiable form. We also provide a set of compatible co-chaperone expression constructs that permit the simultaneous co-expression of the DnaK and GroEL physiological partners to further increase protein solubility. The system was successfully tested using the murine prion protein (PrP). Although PrP is normally insoluble when expressed in E. coli, we show that utilizing our vectors it can be produced in a soluble form as a DnaK or GroEL fusion. This system is useful for the production of a large array of proteins that fail to fold properly when expressed in E. coli.

  2. Heat shock proteins (HSP70 and HSP27) as markers of epithelial dysplasia in oral leukoplakia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seoane, Juan M; Varela-Centelles, Pablo I; Ramirez, José R; Cameselle-Teijeiro, José; Romero, Maria A; Aguirre, José Manuel

    2006-10-01

    Heat shock proteins (HSPs) play a significant role in cell proliferation, differentiation, and oncogenesis. HSP70 and HSP27 are constitutively and gradually expressed in a broad range of normal tissues and neoplasms, and their expression has been assessed as markers for oral epithelial dysplasia. The study involved 43 patients with oral leukoplakia (OL): 23 were categorized as nondysplastic and 20 as dysplastic OLs. Immunohistochemistry was carried out with the monoclonal antibodies HSP70 and HSP27. The presence of epithelial dysplasia and its histologic grading was evaluated according to the World Health Organization classification: mild, moderate, and severe squamous epithelial dysplasia. Expression of HSPs within the epithelium was also evaluated. The difference in the percentage of HSP70 positive nuclei in nondysplastic and dysplastic OL reached statistical significance(Equation is included in full-text article.)95% confidence interval = 17.74-43.82; P = 0.000). None of the 43 specimens analyzed showed positive nuclear immunostaining for anti-HSP27 antibody. No significant difference for HSP27 cytoplasmic expression could be identified between OL with or without epithelial dysplasia(Equation is included in full-text article.)95% confidence interval = 0.44-3.95; P = 0.89). It is concluded that the nuclear HSP70 immunoexpression could be an objective marker for the presence of the epithelial dysplasia in OL.

  3. Stem cell protection mechanisms in planarians: the role of some heat shock genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isolani, Maria-Emilia; Conte, Maria; Deri, Paolo; Batistoni, Renata

    2012-01-01

    Planarians contain a large population of stem cells, named neoblasts, and use these for continuous turnover of all cell types. In addition, thanks to the amazing flexibility of these cells, planarians respond well to the effects of stressful situations, for example activating regeneration after trauma. How neoblasts respond to stress and support continuous proliferation, maintaining long-term stability, is still an open question. Heat shock proteins (HSPs) are a complex protein family with key roles in maintaining protein homeostasis, as well as in apoptosis and growth-related processes. We recently characterized some planarian homologs of hsp genes that are highly expressed in mammalian stem cells, and observed that some of them are critical for neoblast survival/maintenance. The results of these studies support the notion that some HSPs play crucial roles in the modulation of pathways regulating stem cell activity, regeneration and tissue repair. In this review we compare the evidence available for planarian hsp genes and focus on questions emerging from these results.

  4. Heat shock protein 90 in plants: molecular mechanisms and roles in stress responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Zhao-Shi; Li, Zhi-Yong; Chen, Yang; Chen, Ming; Li, Lian-Cheng; Ma, You-Zhi

    2012-11-23

    The heat shock protein 90 (Hsp90) family mediates stress signal transduction, and plays important roles in the control of normal growth of human cells and in promoting development of tumor cells. Hsp90s have become a currently important subject in cellular immunity, signal transduction, and anti-cancer research. Studies on the physiological functions of Hsp90s began much later in plants than in animals and fungi. Significant progress has been made in understanding complex mechanisms of HSP90s in plants, including ATPase-coupled conformational changes and interactions with cochaperone proteins. A wide range of signaling proteins interact with HSP90s. Recent studies revealed that plant Hsp90s are important in plant development, environmental stress response, and disease and pest resistance. In this study, the plant HSP90 family was classified into three clusters on the basis of phylogenetic relationships, gene structure, and biological functions. We discuss the molecular functions of Hsp90s, and systematically review recent progress of Hsp90 research in plants.

  5. Heat shock protein 90β: A novel mediator of vitamin D action

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Angelo, Giana; Lamon-Fava, Stefania; Sonna, Larry A.; Lindauer, Meghan L.; Wood, Richard J.

    2008-01-01

    We investigated the role of Heat shock protein 90 (Hsp90) in vitamin D action in Caco-2 cells using geldanamycin (GA) to block Hsp90 function and RNA interference to reduce Hsp90β expression. When cells were exposed to GA, vitamin D-mediated gene expression and transcriptional activity were inhibited by 69% and 54%, respectively. Gel shift analysis indicated that GA reduced vitamin D-mediated DNA binding activity of the vitamin D receptor (VDR). We tested the specific role of Hsp90β by knocking down its expression with stably expressed short hairpin RNA. Vitamin D-induced gene expression and transcriptional activity were reduced by 90% and 80%, respectively, in Hsp90β-deficient cells. Nuclear protein for VDR and RXRα, its heterodimer partner, were not reduced in Hsp90β-deficient cells. These findings indicate that Hsp90β is needed for optimal vitamin D responsiveness in the enterocyte and demonstrate a specific role for Hsp90β in VDR signaling

  6. Heat shock protein 70-mediated sensitization of cells to apoptosis by Carboxyl-Terminal Modulator Protein

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sack Ragna

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The serine/threonine protein kinase B (PKB/Akt is involved in insulin signaling, cellular survival, and transformation. Carboxyl-terminal modulator protein (CTMP has been identified as a novel PKB binding partner in a yeast two-hybrid screen, and appears to be a negative PKB regulator with tumor suppressor-like properties. In the present study we investigate novel mechanisms by which CTMP plays a role in apoptosis process. Results CTMP is localized to mitochondria. Furthermore, CTMP becomes phosphorylated following the treatment of cells with pervanadate, an insulin-mimetic. Two serine residues (Ser37 and Ser38 were identified as novel in vivo phosphorylation sites of CTMP. Association of CTMP and heat shock protein 70 (Hsp70 inhibits the formation of complexes containing apoptotic protease activating factor 1 and Hsp70. Overexpression of CTMP increased the sensitivity of cells to apoptosis, most likely due to the inhibition of Hsp70 function. Conclusion Our data suggest that phosphorylation on Ser37/Ser38 of CTMP is important for the prevention of mitochondrial localization of CTMP, eventually leading to cell death by binding to Hsp70. In addition to its role in PKB inhibition, CTMP may therefore play a key role in mitochondria-mediated apoptosis by localizing to mitochondria.

  7. Heat Shock Response Associated with Hepatocarcinogenesis in a Murine Model of Hereditary Tyrosinemia Type I

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    Angileri, Francesca; Morrow, Geneviève; Roy, Vincent; Orejuela, Diana; Tanguay, Robert M., E-mail: robert.tanguay@ibis.ulaval.ca [Laboratory of Cell and Developmental Genetics, Department of Molecular Biology, Medical Biochemistry and Pathology, Institut de Biologie Intégrative et des Systèmes (IBIS) and PROTEO, 1030 avenue de la médecine, Université Laval, Québec G1V 0A6 (Canada)

    2014-04-23

    Hereditary Tyrosinemia type 1 (HT1) is a metabolic liver disease caused by genetic defects of fumarylacetoacetate hydrolase (FAH), an enzyme necessary to complete the breakdown of tyrosine. The severe hepatic dysfunction caused by the lack of this enzyme is prevented by the therapeutic use of NTBC (2-[2-nitro-4-(trifluoromethyl)benzoyl]cyclohexane-1,3-dione). However despite the treatment, chronic hepatopathy and development of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) are still observed in some HT1 patients. Growing evidence show the important role of heat shock proteins (HSPs) in many cellular processes and their involvement in pathological diseases including cancer. Their survival-promoting effect by modulation of the apoptotic machinery is often correlated with poor prognosis and resistance to therapy in a number of cancers. Here, we sought to gain insight into the pathophysiological mechanisms associated with liver dysfunction and tumor development in a murine model of HT1. Differential gene expression patterns in livers of mice under HT1 stress, induced by drug retrieval, have shown deregulation of stress and cell death resistance genes. Among them, genes coding for HSPB and HSPA members, and for anti-apoptotic BCL-2 related mitochondrial proteins were associated with the hepatocarcinogenetic process. Our data highlight the variation of stress pathways related to HT1 hepatocarcinogenesis suggesting the role of HSPs in rendering tyrosinemia-affected liver susceptible to the development of HCC.

  8. Small Heat Shock Protein Responses Differ between Chaparral Shrubs from Contrasting Microclimates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charles A. Knight

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Small heat shock protein (sHsp responses were studied for two evergreen perennial shrubs in the northern California chaparral; one common on warm, south-facing slopes (Ceanothus cuneatus, and the other on cooler, north-facing slopes (Prunus ilicifolia. Small Hsp expression was induced experimentally for field collected leaves. Leaf collections were made where the species co-occur. Small Hsp expression was quantified using two antibodies, one specific to a chloroplast 22 kD sHsp and another that detects a broad range of sHsps. Differences between chloroplast sHsp accumulation, which protects thermally labile proteins in PSII, and the general sHsp response were examined. The species from the cooler microclimate, Prunus, had a lower induction temperature and accumulated greater levels of sHsps at low temperatures. Both Prunus and Ceanothus reached peak sHsp expression at 42∘C. The species from the warmer microclimate, Ceanothus, had greater sHsp expression at higher temperatures. Chloroplast sHsp expression generally tracked sHsp expression in Ceanothus, but in Prunus general Hsps were elevated before chloroplast sHsps. Variation between species for sHsp expression (induction temperatures, accumulation levels, and the duration of expression coupled with the costs of Hsp synthesis, may contribute to differences in the abundance and distribution of plants across environmental gradients.

  9. Targeting heat shock proteins mitigates ventilator induced diaphragm muscle dysfunction in an age-dependent manner

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hannah Ogilvie

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Intensive care unit (ICU patients are often overtly subjected to mechanical ventilation and immobilization, which leads to impaired limb and respiratory muscle function. The latter, termed ventilator-induced diaphragm dysfunction (VIDD has recently been related to compromised heat shock protein (Hsp activation. The administration of a pharmacological drug BGP-15 acting as a Hsp chaperone co-inducer has been found to partially alleviate VIDD in young rats. Considering that the mean age in the ICU is increasing, we aimed to explore whether the beneficial functional effects are also present in old rats. For that, we exposed young (7-8 months and old (28-32 months rats to five-day controlled mechanical ventilation and immobilization with or without systemic BGP-15 administration. We then dissected diaphragm muscles, membrane–permeabilized bundles and evaluated the contractile function at single fiber level. Results confirmed that administration of BGP-15 restored the force-generating capacity of isolated muscle cells from young rats in conjunction with an increased expression of Hsp72. On the other hand, our results highlighted that old rats did not positively respond to the BGP-15 treatment. Therefore, it is of crucial importance to comprehend in more depth the effect of VIDD on diaphragm function and ascertain any further age-related differences.

  10. Heat shock protein HSP60 and the perspective for future using as vaccine antigens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joanna Bajzert

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Heat Shock Proteins (HSPs are widely spread in nature, highly conserved proteins, found in all prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells. HSPs have been classified in 10 families, one of them is the HSP60 family. HSP60 function in the cytoplasm as ATP-dependent molecular chaperones by assisting the folding of newly synthesised polypeptides and the assembly of multiprotein complexes. There is a large amount of evidence which demonstrate that HSP60 is expressed on the cell surface. Especially in bacteria the expression on the surface occurs constitutively and increases remarkably during host infection. HSP60 also play an important role in biofilm formation. In the extracellular environment, HSP60 alone or with self or microbial proteins can acts not only as a link between immune cells, but also as a coordinator of the immune system activity. This protein could influence the immune system in a different way because they act as an antigen, a carrier of other functional molecules or as a ligand for receptor. They are able to stimulate both cells of the acquired (naïve, effector, regulatory T lymphocyte, B lymphocyte and the innate (macrophages, monocytes, dendritic cells immune system. HSPs have been reported to be potent activators of the immune system and they are one of the immunodominant bacterial antigens they could be a good candidate for a subunit vaccine or as an adjuvant.

  11. Immunization with heat shock protein 105-pulsed dendritic cells leads to tumor rejection in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yokomine, Kazunori; Nakatsura, Tetsuya; Minohara, Motozumi; Kira, Jun-ichi; Kubo, Tatsuko; Sasaki, Yutaka; Nishimura, Yasuharu

    2006-04-28

    Recently, we reported that heat shock protein 105 (HSP105) DNA vaccination induced anti-tumor immunity. In this study, we set up a preclinical study to investigate the usefulness of dendritic cells (DCs) pulsed with mouse HSP105 as a whole protein for cancer immunotherapy in vivo. The recombinant HSP105 did not induce DC maturation, and the mice vaccinated with HSP105-pulsed BM-DCs were markedly prevented from the growth of subcutaneous tumors, accompanied with a massive infiltration of both CD4+ T cells and CD8+ T cells into the tumors. In depletion experiments, we proved that both CD4+ T cells and CD8+ T cells play a crucial role in anti-tumor immunity. Both CD4+ T cells and CD8+ T cells specific to HSP105 were induced by stimulation with HSP105-pulsed DCs. As a result, vaccination of mice with BM-DCs pulsed with HSP105 itself could elicit a stronger tumor rejection in comparison to DNA vaccination.

  12. Inhibiting Heat Shock Proteins Can Potentiate the Cytotoxic Effect of Cannabidiol in Human Glioma Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Katherine A; Dennis, Jayne L; Dalgleish, Angus G; Liu, Wai M

    2015-11-01

    Cannabinoids possess a number of characteristics that make them putative anticancer drugs, and their value as such is currently being explored in a number of clinical studies. To further understand the roles that cannabinoids may have, we performed gene expression profiling in glioma cell lines cultured with cannabidiol (CBD) and/or Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), and pursued targets identified by this screening. Results showed that a large number of genes belonging to the heat shock protein (HSP) super-family were up-regulated following treatment, specifically with CBD. Increases were observed both at the gene and protein levels and arose as a consequence of increased generation of ROS by CBD, and correlated with an increase in a number of HSP client proteins. Furthermore, increases impeded the cytotoxic effect of CBD; an effect that was improved by co-culture with pharmacalogical inhibitors of HSPs. Similarly, culturing glioma cells with CBD and HSP inhibitors increased radiosensitivity when compared to CBD-alone. Taken together, these data indicate that the cytotoxic effects of CBD can be diminished by HSPs that indirectly rise as a result of CBD use, and that the inclusion of HSP inhibitors in CBD treatment regimens can enhance the overall effect. Copyright© 2015 International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. John G. Delinassios), All rights reserved.

  13. Role of heat shock protein hsp90 in formation of protective reactions in acute toxic stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glushkova, O V; Novoselova, T V; Khrenov, M O; Parfenyuk, S B; Lunin, S M; Fesenko, E E; Novoselova, E G

    2010-06-01

    The involvement of heat shock protein Hsp90 in pro-inflammatory response in male NMRI mice under conditions of acute toxic stress, caused by lipopolysaccharide from Gram negative bacteria, was studied using geldanamycin, a specific blocker of the activity of this protein. It is shown that the introduction of geldanamycin lowers total intoxication of the organism upon acute toxic stress caused by endotoxin. Thus, a decrease in cytokine TNF-alpha, IFN-gamma, IL-1, and IL-10 concentrations in blood serum of the geldanamycin-treated animals with acute toxic stress was found along with normalization of functional activity of nitric oxide producing peritoneal macrophages. Studying expression of receptor protein Tlr-4 as well of proteins of two signal cascades, NF-kappaB and SAPK/JNK, has shown that mechanisms of the geldanamycin protective effect are realized at the level of inhibition of Tlr-4 receptor expression, which provides for endotoxin-to-cell binding, and due to lowering the endotoxin-stimulated activation of signal cascades NF-kappaB and SAPK/JNK. The results suggest Hsp90 might be a therapeutic target in diseases accompanied by acute toxic stress.

  14. The heat shock protein 90 inhibitor, 17-AAG, attenuates thioacetamide induced liver fibrosis in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abu-Elsaad, Nashwa M; Serrya, Marwa S; El-Karef, Amr M; Ibrahim, Tarek M

    2016-04-01

    Heat shock protein 90 (Hsp90) is proposed to be involved in liver disorders. This study was conducted to test effect of 17-N-allylamino-17-demethoxygeldanamycin (17-AAG), an inhibitor of Hsp90, on attenuating thioacetamide induced liver fibrosis in vivo. Four groups of Swiss albino male mice (CD-1 strain) were used as follows: control group; thioacetamide group (received 100mg/kg thioacetamide, ip injection, 3 times/week for 8 weeks); thioacetamide plus 17-AAG groups (received 100mg/kg thioacetamide, ip injection, 3 times/week for 8 weeks plus 25 or 50mg/kg 17-AAG, ip injection, 5 days/week along the last 4 weeks). Fibrosis was quantified by measuring hydroxyproline level and by morphometry and oxidative stress biomarkers were assigned. Relative hepatic mRNA expressions of α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA), collagen-1-alpha-1 (Col1A1) and tissue inhibitor metalloproteinase-1 (TIMP-1) mRNAs were measured by RT-PCR. Levels of the apoptotic markers caspase-3, factor related apoptosis (Fas) and Hsp-90 were assigned in tissue homogenate. 17-AAG (50mg/kg) significantly decreased fibrosis percentage significantly (pAAG (50mg/kg) compared to other groups. The Hsp90 inhibitor, 17-AAG, can attenuate thioacetamide hepatotoxicity through oxidative stress counterbalance, reducing stellate cells activity and inducing apoptosis. Copyright © 2015 Institute of Pharmacology, Polish Academy of Sciences. Published by Elsevier Urban & Partner Sp. z o.o. All rights reserved.

  15. A potential role for Helicobacter pylori heat shock protein 60 in gastric tumorigenesis

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    Lin, Chen-Si [Department of Biological Science and Technology, National Chiao-Tung University, Hsin-Chu, Taiwan (China); School of Veterinary Medicine, National Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan (China); He, Pei-Juin [Department of Biological Science and Technology, National Chiao-Tung University, Hsin-Chu, Taiwan (China); Tsai, Nu-Man [School of Medical Laboratory and Biotechnology, Chung Shan Medical University, Taichung, Taiwan (China); Li, Chi-Han; Yang, Shang-Chih; Hsu, Wei-Tung [Department of Biological Science and Technology, National Chiao-Tung University, Hsin-Chu, Taiwan (China); Wu, Ming-Shiang [Department of Internal Medicine, College of Medicine, National Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Wu, Chang-Jer [Department of Food Science, National Taiwan Ocean University, Keelung, Taiwan (China); Cheng, Tain-Lu [Department of Biotechnology, Kaohsiung Medical University, Kaohsiung, Taiwan (China); Liao, Kuang-Wen, E-mail: kitchhen@yahoo.com.tw [Department of Biological Science and Technology, National Chiao-Tung University, Hsin-Chu, Taiwan (China)

    2010-02-05

    Helicobacter pylori has been found to promote the malignant process leading to gastric cancer. Heat shock protein 60 of H. pylori (HpHSP60) was previously been identified as a potent immunogene. This study investigates the role of HpHSP60 in gastric cancer carcinogenesis. The effect of HpHSP60 on cell proliferation, anti-death activity, angiogenesis and cell migration were explored. The results showed that HpHSP60 enhanced migration by gastric cancer cells and promoted tube formation by umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs); however, HpHSP60 did not increase cell proliferation nor was this protein able to rescue gastric cancer cells from death. Moreover, the results also indicated HpHSP60 had different effects on AGS gastric cancer cells or THP-1 monocytic cells in terms of their expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines, which are known to be important to cancer development. We propose that HpHSP60 may trigger the initiation of carcinogenesis by inducing pro-inflammatory cytokine release and by promoting angiogenesis and metastasis. Thus, this extracellular pathogen-derived HSP60 is potentially a vigorous virulence factor that can act as a carcinogen during gastric tumorigenesis.

  16. EEVD motif of heat shock cognate protein 70 contributes to bacterial uptake by trophoblast giant cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kim Suk

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The uptake of abortion-inducing pathogens by trophoblast giant (TG cells is a key event in infectious abortion. However, little is known about phagocytic functions of TG cells against the pathogens. Here we show that heat shock cognate protein 70 (Hsc70 contributes to bacterial uptake by TG cells and the EEVD motif of Hsc70 plays an important role in this. Methods Brucella abortus and Listeria monocytogenes were used as the bacterial antigen in this study. Recombinant proteins containing tetratricopeptide repeat (TPR domains were constructed and confirmation of the binding capacity to Hsc70 was assessed by ELISA. The recombinant TPR proteins were used for investigation of the effect of TPR proteins on bacterial uptake by TG cells and on pregnancy in mice. Results The monoclonal antibody that inhibits bacterial uptake by TG cells reacted with the EEVD motif of Hsc70. Bacterial TPR proteins bound to the C-terminal of Hsc70 through its EEVD motif and this binding inhibited bacterial uptake by TG cells. Infectious abortion was also prevented by blocking the EEVD motif of Hsc70. Conclusions Our results demonstrate that surface located Hsc70 on TG cells mediates the uptake of pathogenic bacteria and proteins containing the TPR domain inhibit the function of Hsc70 by binding to its EEVD motif. These molecules may be useful in the development of methods for preventing infectious abortion.

  17. Heat Shock Protein 47: A Novel Biomarker of Phenotypically Altered Collagen-Producing Cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taguchi, Takashi; Nazneen, Arifa; Al-Shihri, Abdulmonem A.; Turkistani, Khadijah A.; Razzaque, Mohammed S.

    2011-01-01

    Heat shock protein 47 (HSP47) is a collagen-specific molecular chaperone that helps the molecular maturation of various types of collagens. A close association between increased expression of HSP47 and the excessive accumulation of collagens is found in various human and experimental fibrotic diseases. Increased levels of HSP47 in fibrotic diseases are thought to assist in the increased assembly of procollagen, and thereby contribute to the excessive deposition of collagens in fibrotic areas. Currently, there is not a good universal histological marker to identify collagen-producing cells. Identifying phenotypically altered collagen-producing cells is essential for the development of cell-based therapies to reduce the progression of fibrotic diseases. Since HSP47 has a single substrate, which is collagen, the HSP47 cellular expression provides a novel universal biomarker to identify phenotypically altered collagen-producing cells during wound healing and fibrosis. In this brief article, we explained why HSP47 could be used as a universal marker for identifying phenotypically altered collagen-producing cells

  18. Heat shock protein 27 phosphorylation state is associated with cancer progression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria eKatsogiannou

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Understanding the mechanisms that control stress-induced survival is critical to explain how tumors frequently resist to treatment and to improve current anti-cancer therapies. Cancer cells are able to cope with stress and escape drug toxicity by regulating heat shock proteins (Hsps expression and function. Hsp27 (HSPB1, a member of the small Hsp family, represents one of the key players of many signaling pathways contributing to tumorigenicity, treatment resistance and apoptosis inhibition. Hsp27 is overexpressed in many types of cancer and its functions are regulated by post-translational modifications, such as phosphorylation. Protein phosphorylation is the most widespread signaling mechanism in eukaryotic cells, and it is involved in all fundamental cellular processes. Aberrant phosphorylation of Hsp27 has been associated with several diseases such as cancer but the molecular mechanisms by which it is implicated in cancer development and progression remain undefined. This review focuses on the role of phosphorylation in Hsp27 functions in cancer cells and its potential usefulness as therapeutic target in cancer.

  19. Brain death induces renal expression of heme oxygenase-1 and heat shock protein 70

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    van Dullemen Leon FA

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Kidneys derived from brain dead donors have lower graft survival and higher graft-function loss compared to their living donor counterpart. Heat Shock Proteins (HSP are a large family of stress proteins involved in maintaining cell homeostasis. We studied the role of stress-inducible genes Heme Oxygenase-1 (HO-1, HSP27, HSP40, and HSP70 in the kidney following a 4 hour period of brain death. Methods Brain death was induced in rats (n=6 by inflating a balloon catheter in the epidural space. Kidneys were analysed for HSPs using RT-PCR, Western blotting, and immunohistochemistry. Results RT-PCR data showed a significant increase in gene expression for HO-1 and HSP70 in kidneys of brain dead rats. Western blotting revealed a massive increase in HO-1 protein in brain dead rat kidneys. Immunohistochemistry confirmed these findings, showing extensive HO-1 protein expression in the renal cortical tubules of brain dead rats. HSP70 protein was predominantly increased in renal distal tubules of brain dead rats treated for hypotension. Conclusion Renal stress caused by brain death induces expression of the cytoprotective genes HO-1 and HSP70, but not of HSP27 and HSP40. The upregulation of these cytoprotective genes indicate that renal damage occurs during brain death, and could be part of a protective or recuperative mechanism induced by brain death-associated stress.

  20. Heat shock protein-90-beta facilitates enterovirus 71 viral particles assembly

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Robert Y.L., E-mail: yuwang@mail.cgu.edu.tw [Research Center for Emerging Viral Infections, College of Medicine, Chang Gung University, Tao-Yuan 333, Taiwan (China); Department of Biomedical Sciences, College of Medicine, Chang Gung University, Tao-Yuan 333 Taiwan (China); Kuo, Rei-Lin [Research Center for Emerging Viral Infections, College of Medicine, Chang Gung University, Tao-Yuan 333, Taiwan (China); Department of Medical Biotechnology and Laboratory Science and Graduate Program of Biomedical Sciences, College of Medicine, Chang Gung University, Tao-Yuan 333, Taiwan (China); Ma, Wei-Chieh [Department of Biomedical Sciences, College of Medicine, Chang Gung University, Tao-Yuan 333 Taiwan (China); Huang, Hsing-I [Research Center for Emerging Viral Infections, College of Medicine, Chang Gung University, Tao-Yuan 333, Taiwan (China); Department of Medical Biotechnology and Laboratory Science and Graduate Program of Biomedical Sciences, College of Medicine, Chang Gung University, Tao-Yuan 333, Taiwan (China); Yu, Jau-Song [Department of Cell and Molecular Biology, College of Medicine, Chang Gung University, Tao-Yuan 333, Taiwan (China); Molecular Medicine Research Center, Chang Gung University, Tao-Yuan 333, Taiwan (China); Yen, Sih-Min [Department of Biomedical Sciences, College of Medicine, Chang Gung University, Tao-Yuan 333 Taiwan (China); Huang, Chi-Ruei [Research Center for Emerging Viral Infections, College of Medicine, Chang Gung University, Tao-Yuan 333, Taiwan (China); Department of Biomedical Sciences, College of Medicine, Chang Gung University, Tao-Yuan 333 Taiwan (China); Shih, Shin-Ru [Research Center for Emerging Viral Infections, College of Medicine, Chang Gung University, Tao-Yuan 333, Taiwan (China); Department of Medical Biotechnology and Laboratory Science and Graduate Program of Biomedical Sciences, College of Medicine, Chang Gung University, Tao-Yuan 333, Taiwan (China)

    2013-09-01

    Molecular chaperones are reported to be crucial for virus propagation, but are not yet addressed in Human Enterovirus 71 (EV71). Here we describe the specific association of heat shock protein-90-beta (Hsp90β), but not alpha form (Hsp90α), with EV71 viral particles by the co-purification with virions using sucrose density gradient ultracentrifugation, and by the colocalization with viral particles, as assessed by immunogold electron microscopy. The reduction of the Hsp90β protein using RNA interference decreased the correct assembly of viral particles, without affecting EV71 replication levels. Tracking ectopically expressed Hsp90β protein associated with EV71 virions revealed that Hsp90β protein was transmitted to new host cells through its direct association with infectious viral particles. Our findings suggest a new antiviral strategy in which extracellular Hsp90β protein is targeted to decrease the infectivity of EV71 and other enteroviruses, without affecting the broader functions of this constitutively expressed molecular chaperone. - Highlights: • Hsp90β is associated with EV71 virion and is secreted with the release virus. • Hsp90β effects on the correct assembly of viral particles. • Viral titer of cultured medium was reduced in the presence of geldanamycin. • Viral titer was also reduced when Hsp90β was suppressed by siRNA treatment. • The extracellular Hsp90β was also observed in other RNA viruses-infected cells.

  1. Heat shock protein-90-beta facilitates enterovirus 71 viral particles assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Robert Y.L.; Kuo, Rei-Lin; Ma, Wei-Chieh; Huang, Hsing-I; Yu, Jau-Song; Yen, Sih-Min; Huang, Chi-Ruei; Shih, Shin-Ru

    2013-01-01

    Molecular chaperones are reported to be crucial for virus propagation, but are not yet addressed in Human Enterovirus 71 (EV71). Here we describe the specific association of heat shock protein-90-beta (Hsp90β), but not alpha form (Hsp90α), with EV71 viral particles by the co-purification with virions using sucrose density gradient ultracentrifugation, and by the colocalization with viral particles, as assessed by immunogold electron microscopy. The reduction of the Hsp90β protein using RNA interference decreased the correct assembly of viral particles, without affecting EV71 replication levels. Tracking ectopically expressed Hsp90β protein associated with EV71 virions revealed that Hsp90β protein was transmitted to new host cells through its direct association with infectious viral particles. Our findings suggest a new antiviral strategy in which extracellular Hsp90β protein is targeted to decrease the infectivity of EV71 and other enteroviruses, without affecting the broader functions of this constitutively expressed molecular chaperone. - Highlights: • Hsp90β is associated with EV71 virion and is secreted with the release virus. • Hsp90β effects on the correct assembly of viral particles. • Viral titer of cultured medium was reduced in the presence of geldanamycin. • Viral titer was also reduced when Hsp90β was suppressed by siRNA treatment. • The extracellular Hsp90β was also observed in other RNA viruses-infected cells

  2. Stepwise construction of a metabolic network in Event-B: The heat shock response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanwal, Usman; Petre, Luigia; Petre, Ion

    2017-12-01

    There is a high interest in constructing large, detailed computational models for biological processes. This is often done by putting together existing submodels and adding to them extra details/knowledge. The result of such approaches is usually a model that can only answer questions on a very specific level of detail, and thus, ultimately, is of limited use. We focus instead on an approach to systematically add details to a model, with formal verification of its consistency at each step. In this way, one obtains a set of reusable models, at different levels of abstraction, to be used for different purposes depending on the question to address. We demonstrate this approach using Event-B, a computational framework introduced to develop formal specifications of distributed software systems. We first describe how to model generic metabolic networks in Event-B. Then, we apply this method for modeling the biological heat shock response in eukaryotic cells, using Event-B refinement techniques. The advantage of using Event-B consists in having refinement as an intrinsic feature; this provides as a final result not only a correct model, but a chain of models automatically linked by refinement, each of which is provably correct and reusable. This is a proof-of-concept that refinement in Event-B is suitable for biomodeling, serving for mastering biological complexity. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Specific protein homeostatic functions of small heat-shock proteins increase lifespan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vos, Michel J; Carra, Serena; Kanon, Bart; Bosveld, Floris; Klauke, Karin; Sibon, Ody C M; Kampinga, Harm H

    2016-04-01

    During aging, oxidized, misfolded, and aggregated proteins accumulate in cells, while the capacity to deal with protein damage declines severely. To cope with the toxicity of damaged proteins, cells rely on protein quality control networks, in particular proteins belonging to the family of heat-shock proteins (HSPs). As safeguards of the cellular proteome, HSPs assist in protein folding and prevent accumulation of damaged, misfolded proteins. Here, we compared the capacity of all Drosophila melanogaster small HSP family members for their ability to assist in refolding stress-denatured substrates and/or to prevent aggregation of disease-associated misfolded proteins. We identified CG14207 as a novel and potent small HSP member that exclusively assisted in HSP70-dependent refolding of stress-denatured proteins. Furthermore, we report that HSP67BC, which has no role in protein refolding, was the most effective small HSP preventing toxic protein aggregation in an HSP70-independent manner. Importantly, overexpression of both CG14207 and HSP67BC in Drosophila leads to a mild increase in lifespan, demonstrating that increased levels of functionally diverse small HSPs can promote longevity in vivo. © 2015 The Authors. Aging Cell published by the Anatomical Society and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. Hsp70 displaces small heat shock proteins from aggregates to initiate protein refolding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Żwirowski, Szymon; Kłosowska, Agnieszka; Obuchowski, Igor; Nillegoda, Nadinath B; Piróg, Artur; Ziętkiewicz, Szymon; Bukau, Bernd; Mogk, Axel; Liberek, Krzysztof

    2017-03-15

    Small heat shock proteins (sHsps) are an evolutionary conserved class of ATP-independent chaperones that protect cells against proteotoxic stress. sHsps form assemblies with aggregation-prone misfolded proteins, which facilitates subsequent substrate solubilization and refolding by ATP-dependent Hsp70 and Hsp100 chaperones. Substrate solubilization requires disruption of sHsp association with trapped misfolded proteins. Here, we unravel a specific interplay between Hsp70 and sHsps at the initial step of the solubilization process. We show that Hsp70 displaces surface-bound sHsps from sHsp-substrate assemblies. This Hsp70 activity is unique among chaperones and highly sensitive to alterations in Hsp70 concentrations. The Hsp70 activity is reflected in the organization of sHsp-substrate assemblies, including an outer dynamic sHsp shell that is removed by Hsp70 and a stable core comprised mainly of aggregated substrates. Binding of Hsp70 to the sHsp/substrate core protects the core from aggregation and directs sequestered substrates towards refolding pathway. The sHsp/Hsp70 interplay has major impact on protein homeostasis as it sensitizes substrate release towards cellular Hsp70 availability ensuring efficient refolding of damaged proteins under favourable folding conditions. © 2017 The Authors.

  5. Targeting heat shock proteins in metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azad, Arun A; Zoubeidi, Amina; Gleave, Martin E; Chi, Kim N

    2015-01-01

    The survival of malignant cells is constantly threatened by a myriad of cellular insults. In the context of such proteotoxic stress, cancer cells activate cytoprotective adaptive pathways. Heat shock proteins (HSPs) are highly conserved molecular chaperones that are expressed at low levels under normal conditions, but upregulated by cellular stress. As molecular chaperones, HSPs control the stability and function of client proteins, preventing aggregation of misfolded proteins, facilitating intracellular protein trafficking, maintaining protein conformation to enable ligand binding, phosphorylating proteins in signalling complexes and degrading severely damaged proteins via the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway. A key client protein of several HSPs is the androgen receptor (AR). HSPs facilitate binding of dihydrotestosterone to the AR, and enhance AR-mediated transcriptional activity. The integral role of HSPs in AR function speaks to their potential utility as therapeutic targets in castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC), a disease state characterized by persistent activation of the androgen-AR axis. Inhibition of HSPs has the additional benefit of potentially modulating signalling and transcriptional networks that are associated with HSP client proteins in CRPC cells. As a consequence, HSPs represent highly attractive targets in the development of treatments for CRPC.

  6. Expression of one important chaperone protein, heat shock protein 27, in neurodegenerative diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xuekai; Shi, Jing; Tian, Jinzhou; Robinson, Andrew C; Davidson, Yvonne S; Mann, David M

    2014-01-01

    Many neurodegenerative diseases are characterised by accumulations of misfolded proteins that can colocalise with chaperone proteins (for example, heat shock protein 27 (HSP27)), which might act as modulators of protein aggregation. The role of HSP27 in the pathogenesis of neurodegenerative disorders such as frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD), Alzheimer's disease (AD) and motor neuron disease (MND) was investigated. We used immunohistochemical and Western blot analysis to determine the distribution and amount of this protein in the frontal and temporal cortices of diseased and control subjects. HSP27 immunostaining presented as accumulations of granules within neuronal and glial cell perikarya. Patients with AD and FTLD were affected more often, and showed greater immunostaining for HSP27, than patients with MND and controls. In FTLD, there was no association between HSP27 and histological type. The neuropathological changes of FTLD, AD and MND were not immunoreactive to HSP27. Western blot analysis revealed higher HSP27 expression in FTLD than in controls, but without qualitative differences in banding patterns. The pattern of HSP27 immunostaining observed may reflect the extent of ongoing neurodegeneration in affected brain areas and is not specific to FTLD, AD or MND. It may represent an accumulation of misfolded, damaged or unwanted proteins, awaiting or undergoing degradation.

  7. A contribution to the investigation of the heat load of shock absorbers of semi-active suspensions in motor vehicles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miroslav D. Demić

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Dynamic simulation, based on modeling, has a significant role during the process of vehicle development. It is especially important in the first stages of vehicle design, when relevant vehicle parameters are to be defined. Shock absorbers as executive parts of vehicle semi-active suspension systems suffer thermal loads, which may result in damage and degradation of ther characteristics. Therefore,this paper shows an attempt to analyze converting of mechanical work into heat by using the dynamic simulation method. Introduction Shock absorbers are integral elements of semi-active suspension systems for vehicles (hereinafter SASS. They directly affect the active vehicle safety. The role of shock absorbers is to absorb mechanical vibrations transferred from the road and to ensure the safety of passengers in a vehicle. The kinetic energy of vehicle vibrations transforms into mechanical work or heat in shock absorbers. In practice, in the first stage of vehicle development, the shock absorber parameters are chosen from the condition of damping vibrations of vehicles, but their thermal shock loads should be also taken into account. Motor vehicles have complex dynamic characteristics manifested by spatial movement, parameters change during operation, a number of disturbing influences, backlash, friction, hysteresis, etc. The above-mentioned dynamic phenomena, especially vibration, lead to fatigue of driver and users, reduce the life of the vehicle and its systems, etc. The main objective of the system is to reduce the reliance of the above-mentioned negative effects, improving the vehicle behavior on the road and allow the exploitation of vehicles in a wide range of service conditions. Classical systems cannot satisfiy these conditions, so there was a need to introduce new suspension systems with controlled characteristics (briefly called "semi-active", or "active" systems. Oscillatory model of vehicle The differential equations of vibratory motion of

  8. Faroe Islands Wind-Powered Space Heating Microgrid Using Self-Excited 220 kW Induction Generator

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Bjarti; Guerrero, Josep M.; Thogersen, Paul

    2014-01-01

    energy and required space heating and mismatches can be reduced by using simple water tanks as heat storages. A traditional Danish induction generator wind turbine has been erected on the island of Nólsoy to produce energy for space heating. The system is designed as a stand-alone Microgrid which needs...

  9. Evaluation of PNS-computed heating and hypersonic shock tunnel data on sharp and inclined blunt cones

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hudson, M.L.

    1988-01-01

    As part of the ongoing development and verification of the Parabolized Navier-Stokes (PNS) technique, computed heat transfer rates have been compared with recently acquired experimental data. The flow fields were computer for laminar and turbulent flow over sharp, blunt tripped sphere-cones at 0/degree/ to 20/degree/ angle of attack in a hypersonic shock tunnel flow at Mach numbers of 11, 13, and 16. Grid refinement studies were performed and minimum smoothing parameters were sought. The average percent difference between the measured mean heat transfer rate and the PNS-computed value was 12% for the sharp and blunt cones at 0/degree/ angle of attack. For the blunt cones at angle of attack, the average percent difference was 11% on the windward ray and 36% on the leeward ray. PNS-predicted flow physics such as boundary layer thickness, shock standoff distance, and crossflow separation were examined. 15 refs., 12 figs

  10. Heat shock protein 70, oxidative stress, and antioxidant status in periparturient crossbred cows supplemented with α-tocopherol acetate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aggarwal, Anjali; Ashutosh; Chandra, Gulab; Singh, Anil Kumar

    2013-01-01

    The study was conducted to investigating the effect of α-tocopherol acetate on heat shock protein 70 (Hsp70), oxidative stress, and antioxidant status during periparturient period in medium body condition score crossbred cows. Twenty crossbred Karan Fries cows with confirmed pregnancy were selected 2 months before expected date of calving. The cows were randomly distributed in to two groups: 10 cows were kept as control and 10 were supplemented with α-tocopherol acetate during dry period for 2 months. Blood samples were collected at -20, -10, -5, 0, 5, 10, and 20 days in relation to the expected date of calving. Superoxide dismutase, catalase, and total immunoglobulin were significantly higher (P stress, heat shock protein Hsp70 levels, improved antioxidant, and improved immunity status indicating beneficial effect of α-tocopherol acetate treatment.

  11. [Effect of Heat Shock Protein 90 Inhibitor 17-DMAG on Proliferation and Apoptosis of Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia Cell Line Jurkat].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ge, Fang-Fang; Guo, Rong; Tian, Wen-Liang; Gao, Feng-Cai; Sun, Ling; Jiang, Zhong-Xing

    2017-08-01

    To explore the effect of heat shock protein 90(HSP90) inhibitor 17-DMAG, an inhibitor specific for heat shock protein 90, on the proliferation and apoptosis of acute lymphocytic leukemia cell lines Jurkat. Jurkat cells were collected, then were treated with 17-DMAG. The expression of HSP90 was examined by semi-quantitative RT-PCR analysis, the effect of 17-DMAG on cell proliferation were detected by using WST, and cell apoptosis were detected by using flow cytometry with Annexin V/PI double stenining. After Jurkat cells were treated with different concentrations of 17-DMAG for 48 hours, the HSP90 mRNA expression decreased significantly in dose dependent manner (r=0.9530, PJurkat cells were treated with 17-DMAG for 48 h; after treating Jurkat cell with 17-DMAG, the cell proliferation was inhibited(r=0.9903, PJurkat cell proliferation and induce the Jurkat cell apoptosis.

  12. Intergenic sequence between Arabidopsis caseinolytic protease B-cytoplasmic/heat shock protein100 and choline kinase genes functions as a heat-inducible bidirectional promoter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishra, Ratnesh Chandra; Grover, Anil

    2014-11-01

    In Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana), the At1g74310 locus encodes for caseinolytic protease B-cytoplasmic (ClpB-C)/heat shock protein100 protein (AtClpB-C), which is critical for the acquisition of thermotolerance, and At1g74320 encodes for choline kinase (AtCK2) that catalyzes the first reaction in the Kennedy pathway for phosphatidylcholine biosynthesis. Previous work has established that the knockout mutants of these genes display heat-sensitive phenotypes. While analyzing the AtClpB-C promoter and upstream genomic regions in this study, we noted that AtClpB-C and AtCK2 genes are head-to-head oriented on chromosome 1 of the Arabidopsis genome. Expression analysis showed that transcripts of these genes are rapidly induced in response to heat stress treatment. In stably transformed Arabidopsis plants harboring this intergenic sequence between head-to-head oriented green fluorescent protein and β-glucuronidase reporter genes, both transcripts and proteins of the two reporters were up-regulated upon heat stress. Four heat shock elements were noted in the intergenic region by in silico analysis. In the homozygous transfer DNA insertion mutant Salk_014505, 4,393-bp transfer DNA is inserted at position -517 upstream of ATG of the AtClpB-C gene. As a result, AtCk2 loses proximity to three of the four heat shock elements in the mutant line. Heat-inducible expression of the AtCK2 transcript was completely lost, whereas the expression of AtClpB-C was not affected in the mutant plants. Our results suggest that the 1,329-bp intergenic fragment functions as a heat-inducible bidirectional promoter and the region governing the heat inducibility is possibly shared between the two genes. We propose a model in which AtClpB-C shares its regulatory region with heat-induced choline kinase, which has a possible role in heat signaling. © 2014 American Society of Plant Biologists. All Rights Reserved.

  13. Small heat-shock proteins and leaf cooling capacity account for the unusual heat tolerance of the central spike leaves in Agave tequilana var. Weber.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luján, Rosario; Lledías, Fernando; Martínez, Luz María; Barreto, Rita; Cassab, Gladys I; Nieto-Sotelo, Jorge

    2009-12-01

    Agaves are perennial crassulacean acid metabolism (CAM) plants distributed in tropical and subtropical arid environments, features that are attractive for studying the heat-shock response. In agaves, the stress response can be analysed easily during leaf development, as they form a spirally shaped rosette, having the meristem surrounded by folded leaves in the centre (spike) and the unfolded and more mature leaves in the periphery. Here, we report that the spike of Agave tequilana is the most thermotolerant part of the rosette withstanding shocks of up to 55 degrees C. This finding was inconsistent with the patterns of heat-shock protein (Hsp) gene expression, as maximal accumulation of Hsp transcripts was at 44 degrees C in all sectors (spike, inner, middle and outer). However, levels of small HSP (sHSP)-CI and sHSP-CII proteins were conspicuously higher in spike leaves at all temperatures correlating with their thermotolerance. In addition, spike leaves showed a higher stomatal density and abated more efficiently their temperature several degrees below that of air. We propose that the greater capacity for leaf cooling during the day in response to heat stress, and the elevated levels of sHSPs, constitute part of a set of strategies that protect the SAM and folded leaves of A. tequilana from high temperatures.

  14. Light and the recovery from heat shock induce the synthesis of 38 kDa mitochondrial proteins in Neurospora crassa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohler, W; Rensing, L

    1992-01-01

    The effect of light on the protein synthesis pattern in the mitochondria of Neurospora crassa was examined by in vivo labelling with [35S]-methionine and two-dimensional gel electrophoresis. A brief 5-min illumination induced the rapid and transient synthesis of a 38-kDa protein. White collar-mutants were not stimulated to synthesize this protein by light. A protein of a similar molecular weight and isoelectrical point was synthesized during recovery from heat shock.

  15. Hyperglycemia adversely modulates endothelial nitric oxide synthase during anesthetic preconditioning through tetrahydrobiopterin- and heat shock protein 90-mediated mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amour, Julien; Brzezinska, Anna K; Jager, Zachary; Sullivan, Corbin; Weihrauch, Dorothee; Du, Jianhai; Vladic, Nikolina; Shi, Yang; Warltier, David C; Pratt, Phillip F; Kersten, Judy R

    2010-03-01

    Endothelial nitric oxide synthase activity is regulated by (6R-)5,6,7,8-tetrahydrobiopterin (BH4) and heat shock protein 90. The authors tested the hypothesis that hyperglycemia abolishes anesthetic preconditioning (APC) through BH4- and heat shock protein 90-dependent pathways. Myocardial infarct size was measured in rabbits in the absence or presence of APC (30 min of isoflurane), with or without hyperglycemia, and in the presence or absence of the BH4 precursor sepiapterin. Isoflurane-dependent nitric oxide production was measured (ozone chemiluminescence) in human coronary artery endothelial cells cultured in normal (5.5 mm) or high (20 mm) glucose conditions, with or without sepiapterin (10 or 100 microm). APC decreased myocardial infarct size compared with control experiments (26 +/- 6% vs. 46 +/- 3%, respectively; P < 0.05), and this action was blocked by hyperglycemia (43 +/- 4%). Sepiapterin alone had no effect on infarct size (46 +/- 3%) but restored APC during hyperglycemia (21 +/- 3%). The beneficial actions of sepiapterin to restore APC were blocked by the nitric oxide synthase inhibitor N (G)-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (47 +/- 2%) and the BH4 synthesis inhibitor N-acetylserotonin (46 +/- 3%). Isoflurane increased nitric oxide production to 177 +/- 13% of baseline, and this action was attenuated by high glucose concentrations (125 +/- 6%). Isoflurane increased, whereas high glucose attenuated intracellular BH4/7,8-dihydrobiopterin (BH2) (high performance liquid chromatography), heat shock protein 90-endothelial nitric oxide synthase colocalization (confocal microscopy) and endothelial nitric oxide synthase activation (immunoblotting). Sepiapterin increased BH4/BH2 and dose-dependently restored nitric oxide production during hyperglycemic conditions (149 +/- 12% and 175 +/- 9%; 10 and 100 microm, respectively). The results indicate that tetrahydrobiopterin and heat shock protein 90-regulated endothelial nitric oxide synthase activity play a central

  16. Peripheral blood mononuclear cell responses to heat shock proteins and their derived synthetic peptides in juvenile idiopathic arthritis patients

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Sedláčková, L.; Velek, Jiří; Vavřincová, P.; Hromadníková, I.

    2006-01-01

    Roč. 55, č. 4 (2006), s. 153-159 ISSN 1023-3830 Grant - others:Transeurope(XE) QLK3-2002-01936; Transnet(XE) MRTN-CT-2004-512253 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40550506 Keywords : heat shock proteins * proliferative response * juvenile idiopathic arthritis * Hsp-derived synthetic peptides Subject RIV: CC - Organic Chemistry Impact factor: 1.485, year: 2006

  17. The relationship between heat shock protein 72 expression in skeletal muscle and insulin sensitivity is dependent on adiposity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henstridge, Darren C; Forbes, Josephine M; Penfold, Sally A

    2010-01-01

    Decreased gene expression of heat shock protein 72 (HSP72) in skeletal muscle is associated with insulin resistance in humans. We aimed to determine whether HSP72 protein expression in insulin-sensitive tissues is related to criterion standard measures of adiposity and insulin resistance in a you...... with rodent data suggesting that HSP72 stimulates fat oxidation with consequent reduction in fat storage and adiposity....

  18. Heat shock protein (HSP70) as a marker of epithelial dysplasia in oral dysplastic lesions: A clinicopathological study

    OpenAIRE

    Preeti Patil; Kirty Nandimath; Sudeendra Prabhu; Venkatesh G Naikmasur

    2015-01-01

    Objective: In the present study, expression of heat shock protein (HSP70) was evaluated and compared in oral dysplastic lesions, in particular leukoplakia (study group) and in normal mucosal tissues (control group). Additionally, correlation of HSP70 expression with clinical disease status was investigated. Subjects and Methods: A total of 60 fresh tissue specimens were obtained from the oral cavity, consisting of 30 dysplastic cases and 30 normal mucosal tissues. The presence of epithelial d...

  19. Accumulation of small heat shock proteins, including mitochondrial HSP22, induced by oxidative stress and adaptive response in tomato cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Banzet, N.; Richaud, C.; Deveaux, Y.; Kazmaier, M.; Gagnon, J.; Triantaphylides, C.

    1998-01-01

    Changes in gene expression, by application of H2O2, O2.- generating agents (methyl viologen, digitonin) and gamma irradiation to tomato suspension cultures, were investigated and compared to the well-described heat shock response. Two-dimensional gel protein mapping analyses gave the first indication that at least small heat shock proteins (smHSP) accumulated in response to application of H2O2 and gamma irradiation, but not to O2.- generating agents. While some proteins seemed to be induced specifically by each treatment, only part of the heat shock response was observed. On the basis of Northern hybridization experiments performed with four heterologous cDNA, corresponding to classes I-IV of pea smHSP, it could be concluded that significant amounts of class I and II smHSP mRNA are induced by H2O2 and by irradiation. Taken together, these results demonstrate that in plants some HSP genes are inducible by oxidative stresses, as in micro-organisms and other eukaryotic cells. HSP22, the main stress protein that accumulates following H2O2 action or gamma irradiation, was also purified. Sequence homology of amino terminal and internal sequences, and immunoreactivity with Chenopodium rubrum mitochondrial smHSP antibody, indicated that the protein belongs to the recently discovered class of plant mitochondrial smHSP. Heat shock or a mild H2O2 pretreatment was also shown to lead to plant cell protection against oxidative injury. Therefore, the synthesis of these stress proteins can be considered as an adaptive mechanism in which mitochondrial protection could be essential

  20. Identification and changes in the seasonal concentrations of heat shock proteins in roe deer (Capreolus capreolus) epididymides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majewska, A M; Kordan, W; Koziorowska-Gilun, M; Wysocki, P

    2017-02-01

    Heat shock proteins (HSPs) act as molecular chaperones with important regulatory functions. HSPs are considered to be essential factors in animal reproduction. In view of seasonal variations in the secretory activity of the reproductive tract of mature roe deer (Capreolus capreolus), the aims of this study were to identify HSPs in the epididymides and compare the expression of the identified proteins in three periods of the reproductive season. Two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis revealed the highest number of polypeptides in homogenates of epididymal tissues and in caput, corpus and cauda epididymal fluids throughout the reproductive season. Epididymal tissue homogenates and epididymal fluids were analysed by tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) to reveal 31 polypeptides with enzymatic activity, including polypeptides with antioxidant properties, structural and cell signalling functions. Moreover, among the identified polypeptides, five of them were similar to heat shock proteins: endoplasmin (Grp94); heat shock protein 90 kDa (HSP90); 78-kDa glucose-regulated protein (Grp78); chain A, the crystal structure of the human HSP70 ATPase domain and heat shock protein beta-1 isoform X. The concentrations of the analysed polypeptides, expressed in optical density units (ODU), differed significantly (p ≤ .05) across the examined periods of the reproductive season. The highest ODU values for almost all analysed proteins were observed during the rutting period. The presence of HSPs in the epididymal tissues and fluids of roe deer in different periods of the reproductive season could indicate that those proteins play an important role in sperm maturation in the epididymis. © 2016 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  1. The role of turbulence in coronal heating and solar wind expansion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cranmer, Steven R; Asgari-Targhi, Mahboubeh; Miralles, Mari Paz; Raymond, John C; Strachan, Leonard; Tian, Hui; Woolsey, Lauren N

    2015-05-13

    Plasma in the Sun's hot corona expands into the heliosphere as a supersonic and highly magnetized solar wind. This paper provides an overview of our current understanding of how the corona is heated and how the solar wind is accelerated. Recent models of magnetohydrodynamic turbulence have progressed to the point of successfully predicting many observed properties of this complex, multi-scale system. However, it is not clear whether the heating in open-field regions comes mainly from the dissipation of turbulent fluctuations that are launched from the solar surface, or whether the chaotic 'magnetic carpet' in the low corona energizes the system via magnetic reconnection. To help pin down the physics, we also review some key observational results from ultraviolet spectroscopy of the collisionless outer corona. © 2015 The Author(s) Published by the Royal Society. All rights reserved.

  2. Heat transfer enhancement in a convective field by applying ionic wind

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tada, Y.; Takimoto, A.; Hayashi, Y.

    1991-01-01

    This paper reports that this study has been conducted to pursue the heat transfer enhancement in a convective field by applying electric field. Firstly, aimed at thinning boundary layer, swirl motions were caused by utilizing the ionic wind in a channel flow with parallel wire-electrode arrangement. Secondly, ionic wind was induced at right angle to the primary flow at regular intervals by using cross wire-electrode arrangement. Thirdly, to utilize the dynamical effect of adding particles under the Coulomb force, electric field was applied to gas-solid suspensions flow field. On the basis of these results, fundamental characteristics of the combined flow structure and the heat transfer in the EHD field were clarified, and the possibility of the practical application will be insighted

  3. Halo Emission of the Cat's Eye Nebula, NGC 6543 Shock Excitation by Fast Stellar Winds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siek Hyung

    2002-09-01

    Full Text Available Images taken with the Chandra X-ray telescope have for the the first time revealed the central, wind-driven, hot bubble (Chu et al. 2001, while Hubble Space Telescope (HST WFPC2 images of the Cat's Eye nebula, NGC 6543, show that the temperature of the halo region of angular radius ~ 20'', is much higher than that of the inner bright H II region. With the coupling of a photoionization calculation to a hydrodynamic simulation, we predict the observed [O III] line intensities of the halo region with the same O abundance as in the core H II region: oxygen abundance gradient does not appear to exist in the NGC 6543 inner halo. An interaction between a (leaky fast stellar wind and halo gas may cause the higher excitation temperatures in the halo region and the inner hot bubble region observed with the Chandra X-ray telescope.

  4. Regulation of heat shock protein message in Jurkat cells cultured under serum-starved and gravity-altered conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, M. L.; Hughes-Fulford, M.

    2000-01-01

    Although our understanding of effects of space flight on human physiology has advanced significantly over the past four decades, the potential contribution of stress at the cellular and gene regulation level is not characterized. The objective of this ground-based study was to evaluate stress gene regulation in cells exposed to altered gravity and environmentally suboptimal conditions. We designed primers to detect message for both the constitutive and inducible forms of the heat shock protein, HSP-70. Applying the reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), we probed for HSP-70 message in human acute T-cell leukemia cells, Jurkat, subjected to three types of environmental stressors: (1) altered gravity achieved by centrifugation (hypergravity) and randomization of the gravity vector in rotating bioreactors, (2) serum starvation by culture in medium containing 0.05% serum, and (3) temperature elevation (42 degrees C). Temperature elevation, as the positive control, significantly increased HSP-70 message, while centrifugation and culture in rotating bioreactors did not upregulate heat shock gene expression. We found a fourfold increase in heat shock message in serum-starved cells. Message for the housekeeping genes, actin and cyclophilin, were constant and comparable to unstressed controls for all treatments. We conclude that gravitational perturbations incurred by centrifugal forces, exceeding those characteristic of a Space Shuttle launch (3g), and culture in rotating bioreactors do not upregulate HSP-70 gene expression. In addition, we found RT-PCR useful for evaluating stress in cultured cells. Copyright 2000 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  5. Caloric restriction induces heat shock response and inhibits B16F10 cell tumorigenesis both in vitro and in vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novelle, Marta G.; Davis, Ashley; Price, Nathan L.; Ali, Ahmed; Fürer-Galvan, Stefanie; Zhang, Yongqing; Becker, Kevin; Bernier, Michel; de Cabo, Rafael

    2015-01-01

    Caloric restriction (CR) without malnutrition is one of the most consistent strategies for increasing mean and maximal lifespan and delaying the onset of age-associated diseases. Stress resistance is a common trait of many long-lived mutants and life-extending interventions, including CR. Indeed, better protection against heat shock and other genotoxic insults have helped explain the pro-survival properties of CR. In this study, both in vitro and in vivo responses to heat shock were investigated using two different models of CR. Murine B16F10 melanoma cells treated with serum from CR-fed rats showed lower proliferation, increased tolerance to heat shock and enhanced HSP-70 expression, compared to serum from ad libitum-fed animals. Similar effects were observed in B16F10 cells implanted subcutaneously in male C57BL/6 mice subjected to CR. Microarray analysis identified a number of genes and pathways whose expression profile were similar in both models. These results suggest that the use of an in vitro model could be a good alternative to study the mechanisms by which CR exerts its anti-tumorigenic effects. PMID:25948793

  6. Wind Tunnel Measurements of Shuttle Orbiter Global Heating with Comparisons to Flight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berry, Scott A.; Merski, N. Ronald; Blanchard, Robert C.

    2002-01-01

    An aerothermodynamic database of global heating images was acquired of the Shuttle Orbiter in the NASA Langley Research Center 20-Inch Mach 6 Air Tunnel. These results were obtained for comparison to the global infrared images of the Orbiter in flight from the infrared sensing aeroheating flight experiment (ISAFE). The most recent ISAFE results from STS-103, consisted of port side images, at hypersonic conditions, of the surface features that result from the strake vortex scrubbing along the side of the vehicle. The wind tunnel results were obtained with the phosphor thermography system, which also provides global information and thus is ideally suited for comparison to the global flight results. The aerothermodynamic database includes both windward and port side heating images of the Orbiter for a range of angles of attack (20 to 40 deg), freestream unit Reynolds number (1 x 10(exp 6))/ft to 8 x 10(exp 6)/ft, body flap deflections (0, 5, and 10 deg), speed brake deflections (0 and 45 deg), as well as with boundary layer trips for forced transition to turbulence heating results. Sample global wind tunnel heat transfer images were extrapolated to flight conditions for comparison to Orbiter flight data. A windward laminar case for an angle of attack of 40 deg was extrapolated to Mach 11.6 flight conditions for comparison to STS-2 flight thermocouple results. A portside wind tunnel image for an angle of attack of 25 deg was extrapolated for Mach 5 flight conditions for comparison to STS-103 global surface temperatures. The comparisons showed excellent qualitative agreement, however the extrapolated wind tunnel results over-predicted the flight surface temperatures on the order of 5% on the windward surface and slightly higher on the portside.

  7. Propagation of a spherical shock wave in mixture of non-ideal gas and small solid particles under the influence of gravitational field with conductive and radiative heat fluxes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nath, G.

    2016-01-01

    Self-similar solutions are obtained for one-dimensional unsteady adiabatic flow behind a spherical shock wave propagating in a dusty gas with conductive and radiative heat fluxes under the influence of a gravitational field. The shock is assumed to be driven out by a moving piston and the dusty gas to be a mixture of non-ideal gas and small solid particles, in which solid particles are uniformly distributed. It is assumed that the equilibrium flow-conditions are maintained and variable energy input is continuously supplied by the piston. The heat conduction is expressed in terms of Fourier's law and the radiation is considered to be of the diffusion type for an optically thick grey gas model. The thermal conductivity K and the absorption coefficient αR are assumed to vary with temperature and density. The medium is assumed to be under the influence of a gravitational field due to central mass ( bar{m} ) at the origin (Roche Model). It is assumed that the gravitational effect of the mixture itself can be neglected compared with the attraction of the central mass. The initial density of the ambient medium is taken to be always constant. The effects of the variation of the gravitational parameter and nonidealness of the gas in the mixture are investigated. Also, the effects of an increase in (i) the mass concentration of solid particles in the mixture and (ii) the ratio of the density of solid particles to the initial density of the gas on the flow variables are investigated. It is shown that due to an increase in the gravitational parameter the compressibility of the medium at any point in the flow-field behind the shock decreases and all other flow variables and the shock strength are increased. Further, it is found that the presence of gravitational field increases the compressibility of the medium, due to which it is compressed and therefore the distance between the piston and the shock surface is reduced. The shock waves in dusty gas under the influence of a

  8. A renewable energy scenario for Aalborg Municipality based on low-temperature geothermal heat, wind power and biomass

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Østergaard, Poul Alberg; Mathiesen, Brian Vad; Möller, Bernd

    2010-01-01

    Aalborg Municipality, Denmark, wishes to investigate the possibilities of becoming independent of fossil fuels. This article describes a scenario for supplying Aalborg Municipality’s energy needs through a combination of low-temperature geothermal heat, wind power and biomass. Of particular focus...... in the scenario is how low-temperature geothermal heat may be utilised in district heating (DH) systems. The analyses show that it is possible to cover Aalborg Municipality’s energy needs through the use of locally available sources in combination with significant electricity savings, heat savings, reductions...... in industrial fuel use and savings and fuel-substitutions in the transport sector. With biomass resources being finite, the two marginal energy resources in Aalborg are geothermal heat and wind power. If geothermal heat is utilised more, wind power may be limited and vice versa. The system still relies...

  9. Role of Heat Shock Factor 1 in Conserving Cholesterol Transportation in Leydig Cell Steroidogenesis via Steroidogenic Acute Regulatory Protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oka, Shintaro; Shiraishi, Koji; Fujimoto, Mitsuaki; Katiyar, Arpit; Takii, Ryosuke; Nakai, Akira; Matsuyama, Hideyasu

    2017-08-01

    Testicular testosterone synthesis begins with cholesterol transport into mitochondria via steroidogenic acute regulatory (StAR) protein in Leydig cells. Acute heat stress is known to obstruct testicular steroidogenesis by transcriptional repression of StAR. In contrast, chronic heat stress such as cryptorchidism or varicocele generally does not affect testicular steroidogenesis, suggesting that Leydig cells adapt to heat stress and retain their steroid synthesis ability. However, the mechanisms of the stress response in steroid-producing cells are unclear. We examined the relationship between the heat stress response and heat shock factor 1 (HSF1), which protects cells from proteotoxic stress by inducing heat shock protein as a molecular chaperone. The influences of HSF1 deficiency on cholesterol transport by StAR and the expression of steroidogenic enzymes under chronic heat stress were studied in testes of HSF1-knockout (HSF1KO) mice with experimental cryptorchidism. StAR protein in wild-type-cryptorchid mice was transiently decreased after induction of cryptorchidism and then gradually returned to basal levels. In contrast, StAR protein in HSF1KO mice continued to decrease and failed to recover, resulting in impaired serum testosterone. StAR messenger RNA was not decreased with cryptorchidism, indicating that posttranslational modification of StAR, not its transcription, was obstructed in cryptorchidism. Other steroidogenic enzymes, including CYP11A1, 3β-HSD, and CYP17A1, were not decreased. Lipid droplets were increased in the cytosol of HSF1KO-cryptorchid mice, suggesting dysfunctional cholesterol transportation. These findings provide insight into the role of HSF1 in Leydig cell steroidogenesis, suggesting that it maintains cholesterol transport by recovering StAR under chronic heat stress. Copyright © 2017 Endocrine Society.

  10. The role of heat shock protein 70 in mediating age-dependent mortality in sepsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McConnell, Kevin W; Fox, Amy C; Clark, Andrew T; Chang, Nai-Yuan Nicholas; Dominguez, Jessica A; Farris, Alton B; Buchman, Timothy G; Hunt, Clayton R; Coopersmith, Craig M

    2011-03-15

    Sepsis is primarily a disease of the aged, with increased incidence and mortality occurring in aged hosts. Heat shock protein (HSP) 70 plays an important role in both healthy aging and the stress response to injury. The purpose of this study was to determine the role of HSP70 in mediating mortality and the host inflammatory response in aged septic hosts. Sepsis was induced in both young (6- to 12-wk-old) and aged (16- to 17-mo-old) HSP70(-/-) and wild-type (WT) mice to determine whether HSP70 modulated outcome in an age-dependent fashion. Young HSP70(-/-) and WT mice subjected to cecal ligation and puncture, Pseudomonas aeruginosa pneumonia, or Streptococcus pneumoniae pneumonia had no differences in mortality, suggesting HSP70 does not mediate survival in young septic hosts. In contrast, mortality was higher in aged HSP70(-/-) mice than aged WT mice subjected to cecal ligation and puncture (p = 0.01), suggesting HSP70 mediates mortality in sepsis in an age-dependent fashion. Compared with WT mice, aged septic HSP70(-/-) mice had increased gut epithelial apoptosis and pulmonary inflammation. In addition, HSP70(-/-) mice had increased systemic levels of TNF-α, IL-6, IL-10, and IL-1β compared with WT mice. These data demonstrate that HSP70 is a key determinant of mortality in aged, but not young hosts in sepsis. HSP70 may play a protective role in an age-dependent response to sepsis by preventing excessive gut apoptosis and both pulmonary and systemic inflammation.

  11. Heat Shock Protein 90α Is a Potential Serological Biomarker of Acute Rejection after Renal Transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maehana, Takeshi; Tanaka, Toshiaki; Kitamura, Hiroshi; Fukuzawa, Nobuyuki; Ishida, Hideki; Harada, Hiroshi; Tanabe, Kazunari; Masumori, Naoya

    2016-01-01

    Heat shock protein 90 (HSP90), a molecular chaperone associated with the activation of client proteins, was recently reported to play an important role in immunologic reactions. To date, the role of HSP90 in solid organ transplantations has remained unknown. The aim of this study was to evaluate the relationship between serum HSP90α levels and acute allograft rejection after organ and tissue transplantation using serum samples from kidney allograft recipients, an in vitro antibody-mediated rejection model, and a murine skin transplantation. Serum HSP90α levels were significantly higher in kidney recipients at the time of acute rejection (AR) than in those with no evidence of rejection. In most cases with AR, serum HSP90 decreased to baseline after the treatment. On the other hand, serum HSP90α was not elevated as much in patients with chronic rejection, calcineurin inhibitor nephrotoxicity, or BK virus nephropathy as in AR patients. In vitro study showed that HSP90α concentration in the supernatant was significantly higher in the supernatant of human aortic endothelial cells cocultured with specific anti-HLA IgG under complement attack than in that of cells cocultured with nonspecific IgG. In mice receiving skin transplantation, serum HSP90α was elevated when the first graft was rejected and the level further increased during more severe rejection of the second graft. The results suggest that HSP90α is released into the serum by cell damage due to AR in organ and tissue transplantation, and it is potentially a new biomarker to help detect AR in kidney recipients.

  12. Biomechanical, biochemical, and morphological mechanisms of heat shock-mediated germination in Carica papaya seed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webster, Rachel E; Waterworth, Wanda M; Stuppy, Wolfgang; West, Christopher E; Ennos, Roland; Bray, Clifford M; Pritchard, Hugh W

    2016-12-01

    Carica papaya (papaya) seed germinate readily fresh from the fruit, but desiccation induces a dormant state. Dormancy can be released by exposure of the hydrated seed to a pulse of elevated temperature, typical of that encountered in its tropical habitat. Carica papaya is one of only a few species known to germinate in response to heat shock (HS) and we know little of the mechanisms that control germination in tropical ecosystems. Here we investigate the mechanisms that mediate HS-induced stimulation of germination in pre-dried and re-imbibed papaya seed. Exogenous gibberellic acid (GA 3 ≥250 µM) overcame the requirement for HS to initiate germination. However, HS did not sensitise seeds to GA 3 , indicative that it may act independently of GA biosynthesis. Seed coat removal also overcame desiccation-imposed dormancy, indicative that resistance to radicle emergence is coat-imposed. Morphological and biomechanical studies identified that neither desiccation nor HS alter the physical structure or the mechanical strength of the seed coat. However, cycloheximide prevented both seed coat weakening and germination, implicating a requirement for de novo protein synthesis in both processes. The germination antagonist abscisic acid prevented radicle emergence but had no effect on papaya seed coat weakening. Desiccation therefore appears to reduce embryo growth potential, which is reversed by HS, without physically altering the mechanical properties of the seed coat. The ability to germinate in response to a HS may confer a competitive advantage to C. papaya, an opportunistic pioneer species, through detection of canopy removal in tropical forests. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Experimental Biology.

  13. Enzyme-treated asparagus extract promotes expression of heat shock protein and exerts antistress effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, Tomohiro; Maeda, Takahiro; Goto, Kazunori; Miura, Takehito; Wakame, Koji; Nishioka, Hiroshi; Sato, Atsuya

    2014-03-01

    A novel enzyme-treated asparagus extract (ETAS) has been developed as a functional material produced from asparagus stem. Studies were conducted to determine the effect of ETAS on heat shock protein 70 (HSP70) expression and alleviation of stress. HeLa cells were treated with ETAS, and HSP70 mRNA and protein levels were measured using a reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) assay and an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), respectively. ETAS showed significant increases in HSP70 mRNA at more than 0.125 mg/mL and the protein at more than 1.0 mg/mL. The antistress effect was evaluated in a murine sleep-deprivation model. A sleep-deprivation stress load resulted in elevation of blood corticosterone and lipid peroxide concentrations, while supplementation with ETAS at 200 and 1000 mg/kg body weight was associated with significantly reduced levels of both stress markers, which were in the normal range. The HSP70 protein expression level in mice subjected to sleep-deprivation stress and supplemented with ETAS was significantly enhanced in stomach, liver, and kidney, compared to ETAS-untreated mice. A preliminary and small-sized human study was conducted among healthy volunteers consuming up to 150 mg/d of ETAS daily for 7 d. The mRNA expression of HSP70 in peripheral leukocytes was significantly elevated at intakes of 100 or 150 mg/d, compared to their baseline levels. Since HSP70 is known to be a stress-related protein and its induction leads to cytoprotection, the present results suggest that ETAS might exert antistress effects under stressful conditions, resulting from enhancement of HSP70 expression. © 2014 Institute of Food Technologists®

  14. Human platelets express heat shock protein receptors and regulate dendritic cell maturation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilf, Norbert; Singh-Jasuja, Harpreet; Schwarzmaier, Petra; Gouttefangeas, Cécile; Rammensee, Hans-Georg; Schild, Hansjörg

    2002-05-15

    Immunizations using the endoplasmic reticulum-resident heat shock protein Gp96 induce specific immune responses. Specificity is based on the major histocompatibility complex class I-restricted cross-presentation of Gp96-associated peptides derived from endogenous proteins. Initiation of the immune response depends on the ability of Gp96 to induce the production of proinflammatory cytokines by macrophages and dendritic cells (DCs) and of their maturation in a fashion presumably independent of associated peptide. Both events are mediated by Gp96 receptors on antigen-presenting cells. It is known that Gp96 is released from cells at necrosis induced, for example, by virus infection. Although this event supports the efficient induction of immune responses, it might also interfere with processes that are susceptible to chronic inflammation, such as wound healing after tissue damage. Therefore, Gp96-mediated stimulation of the immune system requires tight regulation. Here we show that human thrombocytes specifically interact with Gp96 and that binding of Gp96 to platelets is enhanced more than 10-fold on activation by thrombin. Gp96 interferes with neither thrombin-induced platelet activation nor platelet aggregation. However, the presence of platelets during Gp96-mediated DC activation reduces the secretion of proinflammatory cytokines and the activation of DCs. This effect is independent of soluble platelet factors and cell-to-cell contact between DCs and thrombocytes. Thus, we provide evidence for a regulatory mechanism that neutralizes Gp96 molecules systemically, especially in the blood. This effect might be of significance in wounds in which chronic inflammation and immune responses against autoantigens have to be prevented.

  15. Plasmodium falciparum signal peptide peptidase cleaves malaria heat shock protein 101 (HSP101). Implications for gametocytogenesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baldwin, Michael; Russo, Crystal; Li, Xuerong; Chishti, Athar H.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • PfSPP is an ER resident protease. • PfSPP is expressed both as a monomer and dimer. • The signal peptide of HSP101 is the first known substrate of PfSPP. • Reduced PfSPP activity may significantly affect ER homeostasis. - Abstract: Previously we described the identification of a Plasmodium falciparum signal peptide peptidase (PfSPP) functioning at the blood stage of malaria infection. Our studies also demonstrated that mammalian SPP inhibitors prevent malaria parasite growth at the late-ring/early trophozoite stage of intra-erythrocytic development. Consistent with its role in development, we tested the hypothesis that PfSPP functions at the endoplasmic reticulum of P.falciparum where it cleaves membrane-bound signal peptides generated following the enzyme activity of signal peptidase. The localization of PfSPP to the endoplasmic reticulum was confirmed by immunofluorescence microscopy and immunogold electron microscopy. Biochemical analysis indicated the existence of monomer and dimer forms of PfSPP in the parasite lysate. A comprehensive bioinformatics screen identified several candidate PfSPP substrates in the parasite genome. Using an established transfection based in vivo luminescence assay, malaria heat shock protein 101 (HSP101) was identified as a substrate of PfSPP, and partial inhibition of PfSPP correlated with the emergence of gametocytes. This finding unveils the first known substrate of PfSPP, and provides new perspectives for the function of intra-membrane proteolysis at the erythrocyte stage of malaria parasite life cycle

  16. The Role of the Heat Shock Protein B8 (HSPB8) in Motoneuron Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rusmini, Paola; Cristofani, Riccardo; Galbiati, Mariarita; Cicardi, Maria E; Meroni, Marco; Ferrari, Veronica; Vezzoli, Giulia; Tedesco, Barbara; Messi, Elio; Piccolella, Margherita; Carra, Serena; Crippa, Valeria; Poletti, Angelo

    2017-01-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy (SBMA) are two motoneuron diseases (MNDs) characterized by aberrant protein behavior in affected cells. In familial ALS (fALS) and in SBMA specific gene mutations lead to the production of neurotoxic proteins or peptides prone to misfold, which then accumulate in form of aggregates. Notably, some of these proteins accumulate into aggregates also in sporadic ALS (sALS) even if not mutated. To prevent proteotoxic stresses detrimental to cells, misfolded and/or aggregated proteins must be rapidly removed by the protein quality control (PQC) system. The small heat shock protein B8 (HSPB8) is a chaperone induced by harmful events, like proteasome inhibition. HSPB8 is expressed both in motoneuron and muscle cells, which are both targets of misfolded protein toxicity in MNDs. In ALS mice models, in presence of the mutant proteins, HSPB8 is upregulated both in spinal cord and muscle. HSPB8 interacts with the HSP70 co-chaperone BAG3 and enhances the degradation of misfolded proteins linked to sALS, or causative of fALS and of SBMA. HSPB8 acts by facilitating autophagy, thereby preventing misfolded protein accumulation in affected cells. BAG3 and BAG1 compete for HSP70-bound clients and target them for disposal to the autophagy or proteasome, respectively. Enhancing the selective targeting of misfolded proteins by HSPB8-BAG3-HSP70 to autophagy may also decrease their delivery to the proteasome by the BAG1-HSP70 complex, thereby limiting possible proteasome overwhelming. Thus, approaches aimed at potentiating HSPB8-BAG3 may contribute to the maintenance of proteostasis and may delay MNDs progression.

  17. The Role of the Heat Shock Protein B8 (HSPB8 in Motoneuron Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paola Rusmini

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS and spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy (SBMA are two motoneuron diseases (MNDs characterized by aberrant protein behavior in affected cells. In familial ALS (fALS and in SBMA specific gene mutations lead to the production of neurotoxic proteins or peptides prone to misfold, which then accumulate in form of aggregates. Notably, some of these proteins accumulate into aggregates also in sporadic ALS (sALS even if not mutated. To prevent proteotoxic stresses detrimental to cells, misfolded and/or aggregated proteins must be rapidly removed by the protein quality control (PQC system. The small heat shock protein B8 (HSPB8 is a chaperone induced by harmful events, like proteasome inhibition. HSPB8 is expressed both in motoneuron and muscle cells, which are both targets of misfolded protein toxicity in MNDs. In ALS mice models, in presence of the mutant proteins, HSPB8 is upregulated both in spinal cord and muscle. HSPB8 interacts with the HSP70 co-chaperone BAG3 and enhances the degradation of misfolded proteins linked to sALS, or causative of fALS and of SBMA. HSPB8 acts by facilitating autophagy, thereby preventing misfolded protein accumulation in affected cells. BAG3 and BAG1 compete for HSP70-bound clients and target them for disposal to the autophagy or proteasome, respectively. Enhancing the selective targeting of misfolded proteins by HSPB8-BAG3-HSP70 to autophagy may also decrease their delivery to the proteasome by the BAG1-HSP70 complex, thereby limiting possible proteasome overwhelming. Thus, approaches aimed at potentiating HSPB8-BAG3 may contribute to the maintenance of proteostasis and may delay MNDs progression.

  18. Reactive oxygen species promote heat shock protein 90-mediated HBV capsid assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Yoon Sik; Seo, Hyun Wook; Jung, Guhung

    2015-01-01

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection induces reactive oxygen species (ROS) production and has been associated with the development of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). ROS are also an important factor in HCC because the accumulated ROS leads to abnormal cell proliferation and chromosome mutation. In oxidative stress, heat shock protein 90 (Hsp90) and glutathione (GSH) function as part of the defense mechanism. Hsp90 prevents cellular component from oxidative stress, and GSH acts as antioxidants scavenging ROS in the cell. However, it is not known whether molecules regulated by oxidative stress are involved in HBV capsid assembly. Based on the previous study that Hsp90 facilitates HBV capsid assembly, which is an important step for the packing of viral particles, here, we show that ROS enrich Hsp90-driven HBV capsid formation. In cell-free system, HBV capsid assembly was facilitated by ROS with Hsp90, whereas it was decreased without Hsp90. In addition, GSH inhibited the function of Hsp90 to decrease HBV capsid assembly. Consistent with the result of cell-free system, ROS and buthionine sulfoximine (BS), an inhibitor of GSH synthesis, increased HBV capsid formation in HepG2.2.15 cells. Thus, our study uncovers the interplay between ROS and Hsp90 during HBV capsid assembly. - Highlights: • We examined H 2 O 2 and GSH modulate HBV capsid assembly. • H 2 O 2 facilitates HBV capsid assembly in the presence of Hsp90. • GSH inhibits function of Hsp90 in facilitating HBV capsid assembly. • H 2 O 2 and GSH induce conformation change of Hsp90

  19. Reactive oxygen species promote heat shock protein 90-mediated HBV capsid assembly

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Yoon Sik, E-mail: yumshak@naver.com; Seo, Hyun Wook, E-mail: suruk@naver.com; Jung, Guhung, E-mail: drjung@snu.ac.kr

    2015-02-13

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection induces reactive oxygen species (ROS) production and has been associated with the development of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). ROS are also an important factor in HCC because the accumulated ROS leads to abnormal cell proliferation and chromosome mutation. In oxidative stress, heat shock protein 90 (Hsp90) and glutathione (GSH) function as part of the defense mechanism. Hsp90 prevents cellular component from oxidative stress, and GSH acts as antioxidants scavenging ROS in the cell. However, it is not known whether molecules regulated by oxidative stress are involved in HBV capsid assembly. Based on the previous study that Hsp90 facilitates HBV capsid assembly, which is an important step for the packing of viral particles, here, we show that ROS enrich Hsp90-driven HBV capsid formation. In cell-free system, HBV capsid assembly was facilitated by ROS with Hsp90, whereas it was decreased without Hsp90. In addition, GSH inhibited the function of Hsp90 to decrease HBV capsid assembly. Consistent with the result of cell-free system, ROS and buthionine sulfoximine (BS), an inhibitor of GSH synthesis, increased HBV capsid formation in HepG2.2.15 cells. Thus, our study uncovers the interplay between ROS and Hsp90 during HBV capsid assembly. - Highlights: • We examined H{sub 2}O{sub 2} and GSH modulate HBV capsid assembly. • H{sub 2}O{sub 2} facilitates HBV capsid assembly in the presence of Hsp90. • GSH inhibits function of Hsp90 in facilitating HBV capsid assembly. • H{sub 2}O{sub 2} and GSH induce conformation change of Hsp90.

  20. Heat Shock Protein 90α Is a Potential Serological Biomarker of Acute Rejection after Renal Transplantation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takeshi Maehana

    Full Text Available Heat shock protein 90 (HSP90, a molecular chaperone associated with the activation of client proteins, was recently reported to play an important role in immunologic reactions. To date, the role of HSP90 in solid organ transplantations has remained unknown. The aim of this study was to evaluate the relationship between serum HSP90α levels and acute allograft rejection after organ and tissue transplantation using serum samples from kidney allograft recipients, an in vitro antibody-mediated rejection model, and a murine skin transplantation.Serum HSP90α levels were significantly higher in kidney recipients at the time of acute rejection (AR than in those with no evidence of rejection. In most cases with AR, serum HSP90 decreased to baseline after the treatment. On the other hand, serum HSP90α was not elevated as much in patients with chronic rejection, calcineurin inhibitor nephrotoxicity, or BK virus nephropathy as in AR patients. In vitro study showed that HSP90α concentration in the supernatant was significantly higher in the supernatant of human aortic endothelial cells cocultured with specific anti-HLA IgG under complement attack than in that of cells cocultured with nonspecific IgG. In mice receiving skin transplantation, serum HSP90α was elevated when the first graft was rejected and the level further increased during more severe rejection of the second graft.The results suggest that HSP90α is released into the serum by cell damage due to AR in organ and tissue transplantation, and it is potentially a new biomarker to help detect AR in kidney recipients.

  1. Implication of Bemisia tabaci heat shock protein 70 in Begomovirus-whitefly interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Götz, Monika; Popovski, Smadar; Kollenberg, Mario; Gorovits, Rena; Brown, Judith K; Cicero, Joseph M; Czosnek, Henryk; Winter, Stephan; Ghanim, Murad

    2012-12-01

    The whitefly Bemisia tabaci (Gennadius) is a major cosmopolitan pest capable of feeding on hundreds of plant species and transmits several major plant viruses. The most important and widespread viruses vectored by B. tabaci are in the genus Begomovirus, an unusual group of plant viruses owing to their small, single-stranded DNA genome and geminate particle morphology. B. tabaci transmits begomoviruses in a persistent circulative nonpropagative manner. Evidence suggests that the whitefly vector encounters deleterious effects following Tomato yellow leaf curl virus (TYLCV) ingestion and retention. However, little is known about the molecular and cellular basis underlying these coevolved begomovirus-whitefly interactions. To elucidate these interactions, we undertook a study using B. tabaci microarrays to specifically describe the responses of the transcriptomes of whole insects and dissected midguts following TYLCV acquisition and retention. Microarray, real-time PCR, and Western blot analyses indicated that B. tabaci heat shock protein 70 (HSP70) specifically responded to the presence of the monopartite TYLCV and the bipartite Squash leaf curl virus. Immunocapture PCR, protein coimmunoprecipitation, and virus overlay protein binding assays showed in vitro interaction between TYLCV and HSP70. Fluorescence in situ hybridization and immunolocalization showed colocalization of TYLCV and the bipartite Watermelon chlorotic stunt virus virions and HSP70 within midgut epithelial cells. Finally, membrane feeding of whiteflies with anti-HSP70 antibodies and TYLCV virions showed an increase in TYLCV transmission, suggesting an inhibitory role for HSP70 in virus transmission, a role that might be related to protection against begomoviruses while translocating in the whitefly.

  2. Effects of chronic portal hypertension on small heat-shock proteins in mesenteric arteries.

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    Chen, Xuesong; Zhang, Hai-Ying; Pavlish, Kristin; Benoit, Joseph N

    2005-04-01

    Previous studies have shown that impaired vasoconstrictor function in chronic portal hypertension is mediated via cAMP-dependent events. Recent data have implicated two small heat-shock proteins (HSP), namely HSP20 and HSP27, in the regulation of vascular tone. Phosphorylation of HSP20 is associated with vasorelaxation, whereas phosphorylation of HSP27 is associated with vasoconstriction. We hypothesized that alterations in the expression and/or phosphorylation of small HSPs may play a role in impaired vasoconstriction in portal hypertension. A rat model of prehepatic chronic portal hypertension was used. Studies were conducted in small mesenteric arteries isolated from normal and portal hypertensive rats. Protein levels of HSP20 and HSP27 were detected by Western blot analysis. Protein phosphorylation was analyzed by isoelectric focusing. HSP20 mRNA expression was determined by RT-PCR. To examine the role of cAMP in the regulation of small HSP phosphorylation and expression, we treated both normal and portal hypertensive vessels with a PKA inhibitor Rp-cAMPS. We found both an increased HSP20 phosphorylation and a decreased HPS20 protein level in portal hypertension, both of which were restored to normal by PKA inhibition. However, PKA did not change HSP20 mRNA expression. We conclude that decreased HSP20 protein level is mediated by cAMP-dependent pathway and that impaired vasoconstrictor function in portal hypertension may be partially explained by decreased expression of HSP20. We also suggest that the phosphorylation of HSP20 by PKA may alter HSP20 turnover.

  3. The Role of Heat Shock Proteins in Pathogenesis of Oral Squamous Cell Carcinoma

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    Adi Prayitno

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Cell in the distress situation, denaturation of proteins may occur, and may also respond by expressing stress proteins. However, such homeostasis effort does not always succeed and even may lead to disease, including cancer. In distress situation also ensue much protein misfolding. Objective: This research were to explain the role of heat shock protein 40 (Hsp40 and Hsp70 in pathogenesis of occurred oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC patient which realized human papilloma virus (HPV infection. Material and Method: Tissue biopsy frozen section were taken from BOSC and OSCC patients was cut into three part. Parrafin blocks were made from cutting I, which was subsequently stains with HE to ascertain the type of neoplasm. Cutting II was subjected to DNA isolation. The DNA isolation results were subjected to PCR to amplify L1-HPV gene for fixed the HPV stressoor. Protein isolation was treated from Cutting III, folloewd with Blottdot test by using antibody monoclonal anti Hsp40 and Hsp70 and continued with measurement using densitometer to find the concentration of Hsp40 and Hsp70. The collected data were analyzed with F Test (Manova and discriminant analysis. Result: This experiment showed the differences in concentration of Hsp40 (p<=0,070 and Hsp70 (p<=0,006 between beningn oral squamous cell (BOSC and OSCC patients which realized HPV infection. Conclusion: This experiment proved that OSCC patients which realized HPV infection indicated an up regulated of Hsp70 concentration, so that there was occurs misfolding of the proteins cell. The misfolding was ensue obstacle of apoptosis and to raise cell proliferation which to storm carcinogenesis. An up regulated of Hsp40 was role as co-chaperone.DOI: 10.14693/jdi.v16i2.91 

  4. Heat shock protein Hsp90-2 expression in the Arabidopsis thaliana seedlings under clinorotation

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    Kozeko, Liudmyla

    Heat shock proteins 90 kDa (Hsp90) are abundant under normal conditions and induced by stress. This family is distinguished from other chaperones in that most of its substrates are signal transduction proteins. Previously, we determined some time-dependent increase in the Hsp90 level in pea seedlings in response to simulated microgravity that indicated a stress-reaction. However, expression of the individual members of the Hsp90 family have specific pattern. The purpose of this study was to investigate possible alterations in the gene expression pattern of cytosolic Hsp90-2 in Arabidopsis thaliana seedlings under 2D-clinorotation. To obtain detailed expression pattern of the HSP90-2 genes we used seeds that provides a resource of loss-of-function mutations gene expression patterns via translational fusions with the reporter gene, GUS (a line N 166718, NASC). There were two variants of the experiment: 1) seedlings grew under clinorotation for 10, 12, 14 d; 2) seedlings grew in the stationary conditions for 10 d followed by clinorotation for 3 h -at 22o C and 16h light cycle. The seedlings grown in the stationary conditions were used as a control. GUS staining showed that HSP90-2 expression was regulated during seedling development and affected by clinorotation in the heterozygous mutant plants. In the homozygous for the mutation plants, HSP90-2 expression was stable during seedling development and not affected by clinorotation. GUS staining was observed in cotyledons, leaves and hypocotyls of the seedlings (especially intense in vascular bundles), indicating intensive cellular processes with participation of this chaperone. Possible pathways of influence of clinorotation on HSP90-2 expression are discussed.

  5. Heat-Shock Protein 70 Overexpression in Adipose-Derived Stem Cells Enhances Fat Graft Survival.

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    Feng, Hao; Qiu, Lihong; Zhang, Teng; Yu, Houyou; Ma, Xianjie; Su, Yingjun; Zheng, Hui; Wang, Yong; Yi, Chenggang

    2017-04-01

    Autologous fat grafting is a prevalent technique used for soft-tissue augmentation; however, the poor survival rate of the grafted tissue remains a drawback of this method. Although adipose-derived stem cells (ASCs) are an attractive candidate for enhancing graft retention, the poor posttransplantation viability of these cells limits their application. Here we investigated whether overexpression of the antiapoptotic protein heat-shock protein 70 (Hsp70) could enhance ASCs' therapeutic potential for fat transplant survival. Recombinant adenoviral vectors were used to overexpress Hsp70 in ASCs isolated from a healthy woman. The Hsp70 expression was assessed by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction and Western blot analyses. The adipose tissue granules aspirated from another woman were mixed with ASCs expressing green fluorescent protein (GFP)-tagged Hsp70 (group A) or GFP alone (group B), untreated ASCs (group C), and phosphate-buffered saline (group D). Fat mixtures were then injected subcutaneously into the backs of nude mice, and graft survival was compared after 3 months. Adipose-derived stem cells transduced with recombinant adenoviral vectors exhibited significantly increased Hsp70 expression in vitro. Meanwhile, weight retention analyses demonstrated that fat grafts using the group A cell population exhibited significantly higher survival rates than the other treatment groups in vivo. Moreover, histological analyses revealed that fat grafts containing GFP-Hsp70-expressing ASCs yielded significantly lower levels of tissue fibrosis and fat cysts/vacuoles, higher capillary densities, and increased numbers of viable adipocytes than the control groups. Our data indicate that Hsp70 overexpression enhances the efficacy of ASC therapy by improving the survival and quality of the transplanted fat tissues.

  6. Vaccination with recombinant heat shock protein 60 from Histoplasma capsulatum protects mice against pulmonary histoplasmosis.

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    Gomez, F J; Allendoerfer, R; Deepe, G S

    1995-07-01

    HIS-62 is a glycoprotein that has been isolated from the cell wall and cell membrane fraction of the pathogenic fungus Histoplasma capsulatum. It is a target of the cellular immune response to this fungus, and it protects mice against a lethal intravenous inoculum of H. capsulatum yeast cells. In this study, we cloned the gene encoding this antigen to reveal its biological nature and studied the immunological activity of recombinant antigen. The amino acid sequences of the NH2 terminus and internal peptides were obtained by Edman degradation. Degenerate oligonucleotides were used to isolate a gene fragment of HIS-62 by PCR. One 680-bp segment that corresponded to the known peptide sequence was amplified from H. capsulatum DNA. This DNA was used to screen a genomic library, and the full-length gene was isolated and sequenced. The deduced amino acid sequence of the gene demonstrated approximately 70 and approximately 50% identity to heat shock protein 60 (hsp 60) from Saccharomyces cerevisiae and hsp 60 from Escherichia coli, respectively. A cDNA was synthesized by reverse transcription PCR and was expressed in E. coli. Recombinant protein reacted with a monospecific polyclonal rabbit antiserum raised against native HIS-62, with monoclonal HIS-62-reactive T cells, and with splenocytes from mice immunized with viable yeast cells. Moreover, vaccination with the recombinant protein conferred protection in mice against a lethal intranasal inoculation with yeast cells. Thus, HIS-62 is a member of the hsp 60 family, and the recombinant hsp 60 is protective against pulmonary histoplasmosis in mice.

  7. Evaluation of heat shock protein (HSP-60) induction on accumulation of carbohydrate in Isochrysis galbana

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olsen, H.; Wolfe, M.; Tell, J.; Tjeerdema, R.

    1995-01-01

    Primary levels of the marine food chain may play an important role in the fate of petroleum hydrocarbons in both chemically dispersed and un-dispersed oil spills. HSP-60 proteins, members of the chaperonin family of stress proteins, are induced in response to a wide variety of environmental agents, including UV light, heavy metals, and xenobiotics. Increased production and storage of carbohydrate in I. galbana has been associated with aging and stress. Thus, HSP-60 and carbohydrate storage were selected as sublethal endpoints of exposure to the primary producer, I. galbana, a golden brown, unicellular algae, and a significant component of the marine phytoplankton community. The authors have found that I. galbana cultures exposed to water-accommodated fractions (WAF) of Prudhoe Bay Crude Oil (PBCO), and PBCO/dispersant preparations efficiently induce HSP-60. Studies indicated that WAF produced a dose-related response in I. galbana, which increased as a function of time. Dispersant alone showed the greatest induction, while combined WAF-dispersant showed less induction, suggesting a possible competition between crude oil and algae for dispersant interaction. In addition, they have demonstrated that I. galbana accumulates carbohydrates in response to exposure to WAF and PBCO/dispersant preparations and therefore represents another index of stress in this organism. They were interested in determining if induction of stress proteins and HSP60 in particular represented an adaptive-mechanism, allowing this algae to better cope with exposure to petroleum hydrocarbons released in the marine environment during an oil spill. In an effort to determine if stress protein induction serves as a protective adaptive response to exposure to petroleum hydrocarbons they examined the effect of heat shock induction on the accumulation of carbohydrates by these organisms in response to exposure to WAF and dispersed oil preparations

  8. Preclinical antitumor activity of the orally available heat shock protein 90 inhibitor NVP-BEP800.

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    Massey, Andrew J; Schoepfer, Joseph; Brough, Paul A; Brueggen, Josef; Chène, Patrick; Drysdale, Martin J; Pfaar, Ulrike; Radimerski, Thomas; Ruetz, Stephan; Schweitzer, Alain; Wood, Mike; Garcia-Echeverria, Carlos; Jensen, Michael Rugaard

    2010-04-01

    Heat shock protein 90 (Hsp90) is a ubiquitously expressed molecular chaperone with ATPase activity involved in the conformational maturation and stability of key signaling molecules involved in cell proliferation, survival, and transformation. Through its ability to modulate multiple pathways involved in oncogenesis, Hsp90 has generated considerable interest as a therapeutic target. NVP-BEP800 is a novel, fully synthetic, orally bioavailable inhibitor that binds to the NH(2)-terminal ATP-binding pocket of Hsp90. NVP-BEP800 showed activity against a panel of human tumor cell lines and primary human xenografts in vitro at nanomolar concentrations. In A375 melanoma and BT-474 breast cancer cell lines, NVP-BEP800 induced client protein degradation (including ErbB2, B-Raf(V600E), Raf-1, and Akt) and Hsp70 induction. Oral administration of NVP-BEP800 was well tolerated and induced robust antitumor responses in tumor xenograft models, including regression in the BT-474 breast cancer model. In these tumor models, NVP-BEP800 modulated Hsp90 client proteins and downstream signaling pathways at doses causing antitumor activity. NVP-BEP800 showed in vivo activity in a variety of dosing regimens covering daily to weekly schedules, potentially providing a high degree of flexibility in dose and schedule within the clinical setting. Overall, given the mechanism of action, preclinical activity profile, tolerability, and pharmaceutical properties, NVP-BEP800 is an exciting new oral Hsp90 inhibitor warranting further development. Mol Cancer Ther; 9(4); 906-19. (c)2010 AACR.

  9. SPRINT-INTERVAL TRAINING INDUCES HEAT SHOCK PROTEIN 72 IN RAT SKELETAL MUSCLES

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    Yuji Ogura

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Previous studies have demonstrated that endurance exercise training increases the level of heat shock proteins (HSPs in skeletal muscles. However, little attention has been drawn to the effects of high intensity-short duration exercise, or sprint- interval training (SIT on HSP72 level in rat skeletal muscles. This study performed to test the hypothesis that the SIT would induce the HSP72 in fast and slow skeletal muscles of rats. Young male Wistar rats (8 weeks old were randomly assigned to a control (CON or a SIT group (n = 8/group. Animals in the SIT group were trained (1 min/sprint, 6~10 sets/day and 5~6 days/week on a treadmill for 9 weeks. After the training period, HSP72 levels in the plantaris (fast and soleus (slow muscles were analyzed by Western blotting method. Enzyme activities (hexokinase, phosphofructokinase and citrate synthase and histochemical properties (muscle fiber type compositions and cross sectional area in both muscles were also determined. The SIT resulted in significantly (p < 0.05 higher levels of HSP72 in both the plantaris and soleus muscles compared to the CON group, with the plantaris producing a greater HSP72 increase than the soleus (plantaris; 550 ± 116%, soleus; 26 ± 8%, p < 0.05. Further, there were bioenergetic improvements, fast-to-slow shift of muscle fiber composition and hypertrophy in the type IIA fiber only in the plantaris muscle. These findings indicate that the SIT program increases HSP72 level of the rat hindlimb muscles, and the SIT-induced accumulation of HSP72 differs between fast and slow muscles

  10. The Heat Shock Protein Inhibitor Quercetin Attenuates Hepatitis C Virus Production

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    Gonzalez, Oscar; Fontanes, Vanessa; Raychaudhuri, Santanu; Loo, Rachel; Loo, Joseph; Arumugaswami, Vaithilingaraja; Sun, Ren; Dasgupta, Asim; French, Samuel W.

    2009-01-01

    The hepatitis C viral (HCV) genome is translated through an internal ribosome entry site (IRES) as a single polyprotein precursor that is subsequently cleaved into individual mature viral proteins. Non-structural protein 5A (NS5A) is one of these proteins that has been implicated in regulation of viral genome replication, translation from the viral IRES and viral packaging. We sought to identify cellular proteins that interact with NS5A and determine whether these interactions may play a role in viral production. Mass spectrometric analysis of coimmunoprecipitated NS5A complexes from cell extracts identified heat shock proteins (HSPs) 40 and 70.Weconfirmed anNS5A/HSPinteraction by confocal microscopy demonstrating colocalization of NS5A with HSP40 and with HSP70. Western analysis of coimmunoprecipitated NS5A complexes further confirmed interaction of HSP40 and HSP70 with NS5A.Atransient transfection, luciferase-based, tissue culture IRES assay demonstrated NS5A augmentation of HCV IRES-mediated translation, and small interfering RNA (siRNA)-mediated knockdown of HSP70 reduced this augmentation. Treatment with an inhibitor of HSP synthesis, Quercetin, markedly reduced baseline IRES activity and its augmentation by NS5A. HSP70 knockdown also modestly reduced viral protein accumulation, whereas HSP40 and HSP70 knockdown both reduced infectious viral particle production in an HCV cell culture system using the J6/JFH virus fused to the Renilla luciferase reporter. Treatment with Quercetin reduced infectious particle production at nontoxic concentrations. The marked inhibition of virus production by Quercetin may partially be related to reduction of HSP40 and HSP70 and their potential involvement in IRES translation, as well as viral morphogenesis or secretion. Conclusion Quercetin may allow for dissection of the viral life cycle and has potential therapeutic use to reduce virus production with low associated toxicity. PMID:19839005

  11. An overview of cytokines and heat shock response in polytraumatized patients.

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    Guisasola, Maria Concepción; Alonso, Berta; Bravo, Beatriz; Vaquero, Javier; Chana, Francisco

    2017-11-03

    Early after injury, local tissue damage induces a local and systemic inflammatory response that activates the immune system and leads to the development of systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS). This post-traumatic response often results in uncontrolled release of inflammatory mediators and over-activation of the immune system, which occasionally results in multiple organ dysfunction syndrome (MODS). In parallel, a state of immunosuppression develops. This counter-regulating suppression of different cellular and humoral immune functions has been termed "compensatory anti-inflammatory response syndrome (CARS)." Both SIRS and CARS occur simultaneously even in the initial phase after injury. Pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines have been suggested to play a major role in development of SIRS, although the degree of involvement of the different cytokines is quite disparate. While TNF-α and IL-1β are quite irrelevant for predicting organ dysfunction, IL-6 is the parameter that best predicts mortality. The hyperinflammatory state seems to be the cause of post-traumatic immunosuppression and heat shock proteins (HSPs), which have been proposed as one of the endogenous stimuli for the deterioration of the immune system acting as danger-associated molecular patterns (DAMPs). Extracellular HSPA1A released from injured tissues increase up to ten times immediately after trauma and even more in patients with MODS. It has powerful immune properties that could contribute to post-traumatic immunosuppression through several mechanisms that have been previously described, so HSPs could represent trauma-associated immunomodulatory mediators. For this reason, HSPA1A has been suggested to be a helpful early prognostic biomarker of trauma after severe injury: serial quantification of serum HSPA1A and anti-Hsp70 concentrations in the first hours after trauma is proposed to be used as a predictive biomarker of MODS and immunosuppression development in polytraumatized patients.

  12. Enhanced expression of heat shock proteins in activated polymorphonuclear leukocytes in patients with sepsis.

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    Hashiguchi, N; Ogura, H; Tanaka, H; Koh, T; Nakamori, Y; Noborio, M; Shiozaki, T; Nishino, M; Kuwagata, Y; Shimazu, T; Sugimoto, H

    2001-12-01

    Heat shock proteins (HSPs) in cells, as molecular chaperons, have been reported to regulate cell functions. The objective of this study was to investigate the HSP expression in polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNLs) from severe septic patients and the relation between the expression of HSPs and PMNL function. In blood samples from 21 patients with sepsis and serum C-reactive protein levels more than 10 mg/dL, we used flow cytometry to measure expressions of HSP27, HSP60, HSP70, and HSP90; oxidative activity; and levels of apoptosis in PMNLs during sepsis. In in vitro studies, we used cells from 14 healthy volunteers to examine the relation between the expression of HSP70 and PMNL function. Quercetin (30 microM), a suppressor of HSP, and sodium arsenite (100 microM), an inducer of HSP, were used to regulate the expression of HSP70 in PMNLs, and oxidative activity and apoptosis in these cells were measured. In patients with sepsis, the expressions of HSP27, HSP60, HSP70, and HSP90 and oxidative activity in PMNLs were significantly increased. Apoptosis of these PMNLs was markedly inhibited. In the in vitro studies, administration of sodium arsenite enhanced the expression of HSP70, significantly increased oxidative activity, and inhibited apoptosis. Administration of quercetin before sodium arsenite prevented the expression of HSP70, the increase in oxidative activity, and the inhibition of apoptosis. Sepsis causes the enhanced expression of HSPs in activated PMNLs. In PMNLs with enhanced expression of HSP70, oxidative activity is increased and apoptosis is inhibited. The enhanced expression of HSPs may play a role in regulating PMNL function in patients with sepsis.

  13. Heat Shock Protein 90 is a Rational Therapeutic Target in Diffuse Large B-cell Lymphoma

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    Abramson, Jeremy S.; Chen, Wen; Takahashi, Hidenobu; Juszczynski, Przemyslaw; Takeyama, Kunihiko; Kutok, Jeffery L.; Shipp, Margaret A.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Heat Shock Protein 90 (HSP90) is a molecular chaperone which stabilizes critical client proteins in multiple cancers. Herein, we assess the role of HSP90 and likely client proteins in the pathogenesis of diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL), and evaluate the activity of HSP90 inhibitors in this disease. Experimental design We utilized gene expression profiling to characterize HSP90 α and β isoform expression in previously defined subsets of primary human DLBCLs. Thereafter, we assessed the activity of the novel HSP90 inhibitor, IPI-504, in DLBCL cell lines as monotherapy and in rational combinations, and identified likely client proteins responsible for drug activity. Results HSP90 α and β isoforms were differentially expressed in primary “BCR” and “OxPhos” DLBCLs. IPI-504, which interacts with the conserved ATP-binding site in both HSP90 isoforms, inhibited proliferation and induced apoptosis in the majority of DLBCL cell lines at low micromolar concentrations. IPI-504-sensitive cell lines expressed high levels of the HSP90 client protein, pAKT, and exhibited dose-dependent decreases in pAKT levels following IPI-504 treatment and significantly reduced proliferation following AKT RNAi. The combination of low-dose (<1 µM) IPI-504 and the AKT/Pi3K pathway inhibitor, LY24009, was synergistic in IPI-504-sensitive DLBCL cell lines. Low-dose IPI-504 was also synergistic with the chemotherapeutic agent, doxorubicin. Increasing doses of IPI-504, alone and in combination with doxorubicin, induced expression of HSP70, a known mechanism of resistance to HSP90 inhibitors. Conclusions The HSP90 inhibitor IPI-504 warrants further investigation in DLBCL alone and in combination with rational target inhibitors. PMID:19036086

  14. Plasmodium falciparum signal peptide peptidase cleaves malaria heat shock protein 101 (HSP101). Implications for gametocytogenesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baldwin, Michael; Russo, Crystal; Li, Xuerong [Department of Developmental, Molecular and Chemical Biology, Tufts University School of Medicine, Boston, MA 02111 (United States); Chishti, Athar H., E-mail: athar.chishti@tufts.edu [Department of Developmental, Molecular and Chemical Biology, Tufts University School of Medicine, Boston, MA 02111 (United States); Sackler School of Graduate Biomedical Sciences, Programs in Physiology, Pharmacology, and Microbiology, Tufts University School of Medicine, Boston, MA 02111 (United States)

    2014-08-08

    Highlights: • PfSPP is an ER resident protease. • PfSPP is expressed both as a monomer and dimer. • The signal peptide of HSP101 is the first known substrate of PfSPP. • Reduced PfSPP activity may significantly affect ER homeostasis. - Abstract: Previously we described the identification of a Plasmodium falciparum signal peptide peptidase (PfSPP) functioning at the blood stage of malaria infection. Our studies also demonstrated that mammalian SPP inhibitors prevent malaria parasite growth at the late-ring/early trophozoite stage of intra-erythrocytic development. Consistent with its role in development, we tested the hypothesis that PfSPP functions at the endoplasmic reticulum of P.falciparum where it cleaves membrane-bound signal peptides generated following the enzyme activity of signal peptidase. The localization of PfSPP to the endoplasmic reticulum was confirmed by immunofluorescence microscopy and immunogold electron microscopy. Biochemical analysis indicated the existence of monomer and dimer forms of PfSPP in the parasite lysate. A comprehensive bioinformatics screen identified several candidate PfSPP substrates in the parasite genome. Using an established transfection based in vivo luminescence assay, malaria heat shock protein 101 (HSP101) was identified as a substrate of PfSPP, and partial inhibition of PfSPP correlated with the emergence of gametocytes. This finding unveils the first known substrate of PfSPP, and provides new perspectives for the function of intra-membrane proteolysis at the erythrocyte stage of malaria parasite life cycle.

  15. Biomechanical, biochemical, and morphological mechanisms of heat shock-mediated germination in Carica papaya seed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webster, Rachel E.; Waterworth, Wanda M.; Stuppy, Wolfgang; West, Christopher E.; Ennos, Roland; Bray, Clifford M.; Pritchard, Hugh W.

    2016-01-01

    Carica papaya (papaya) seed germinate readily fresh from the fruit, but desiccation induces a dormant state. Dormancy can be released by exposure of the hydrated seed to a pulse of elevated temperature, typical of that encountered in its tropical habitat. Carica papaya is one of only a few species known to germinate in response to heat shock (HS) and we know little of the mechanisms that control germination in tropical ecosystems. Here we investigate the mechanisms that mediate HS-induced stimulation of germination in pre-dried and re-imbibed papaya seed. Exogenous gibberellic acid (GA3 ≥250 µM) overcame the requirement for HS to initiate germination. However, HS did not sensitise seeds to GA3, indicative that it may act independently of GA biosynthesis. Seed coat removal also overcame desiccation-imposed dormancy, indicative that resistance to radicle emergence is coat-imposed. Morphological and biomechanical studies identified that neither desiccation nor HS alter the physical structure or the mechanical strength of the seed coat. However, cycloheximide prevented both seed coat weakening and germination, implicating a requirement for de novo protein synthesis in both processes. The germination antagonist abscisic acid prevented radicle emergence but had no effect on papaya seed coat weakening. Desiccation therefore appears to reduce embryo growth potential, which is reversed by HS, without physically altering the mechanical properties of the seed coat. The ability to germinate in response to a HS may confer a competitive advantage to C. papaya, an opportunistic pioneer species, through detection of canopy removal in tropical forests. PMID:27811004

  16. Induction of Heat Shock Protein 70 Ameliorates Ultraviolet-Induced Photokeratitis in Mice

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    Yukihiro Horie

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Acute ultraviolet (UV B exposure causes photokeratitis and induces apoptosis in corneal cells. Geranylgeranylacetone (GGA is an acyclic polyisoprenoid that induces expression of heat shock protein (HSP70, a soluble intracellular chaperone protein expressed in various tissues, protecting cells against stress conditions. We examined whether induction of HSP70 has therapeutic effects on UV-photokeratitis in mice. C57 BL/6 mice were divided into four groups, GGA-treated (500 mg/kg/mouse and UVB-exposed (400 mJ/cm2, GGA-untreated UVB-exposed (400 mJ/cm2, GGA-treated (500 mg/kg/mouse but not exposed and naive controls. Eyeballs were collected 24 h after irradiation, and corneas were stained with hematoxylin and eosin (H&E and terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL. HSP70, reactive oxygen species (ROS production, nuclear factor kappa-light-chain-enhancer of activated B cells (NF-κB and protein kinase B (Akt expression were also evaluated. Irradiated corneal epithelium was significantly thicker in the eyes of mice treated with GGA compared with those given the vehicle alone (p < 0.01. Significantly fewer TUNEL-positive cells were observed in the eyes of GGA-treated mice than controls after irradiation (p < 0.01. Corneal HSP70 levels were significantly elevated in corneas of mice treated with GGA (p < 0.05. ROS signal was not affected by GGA. NF-κB activation was reduced but phospho-(Ser/Ther Akt substrate expression was increased in corneas after irradiation when treated with GGA. GGA-treatment induced HSP70 expression and ameliorated UV-induced corneal damage through the reduced NF-κB activation and possibly increased Akt phosphorilation.

  17. Heat Stress Modulates Mycelium Growth, Heat Shock Protein Expression, Ganoderic Acid Biosynthesis, and Hyphal Branching of Ganoderma lucidum via Cytosolic Ca2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xue; Ren, Ang; Li, Meng-Jiao; Cao, Peng-Fei; Chen, Tian-Xi; Zhang, Guang; Shi, Liang; Jiang, Ai-Liang; Zhao, Ming-Wen

    2016-07-15

    Heat stress (HS) influences the growth and development of organisms. Thus, a comprehensive understanding of how organisms sense HS and respond to it is required. Ganoderma lucidum, a higher basidiomycete with bioactive secondary metabolites, has become a potential model system due to the complete sequencing of its genome, transgenic systems, and reliable reverse genetic tools. In this study, we found that HS inhibited mycelium growth, reduced hyphal branching, and induced the accumulation of ganoderic acid biosynthesis and heat shock proteins (HSPs) in G. lucidum Our data showed that HS induced a significant increase in cytosolic Ca(2+) concentration. Further evidence showed that Ca(2+) might be a factor in the HS-mediated regulation of hyphal branching, ganoderic acid (GA) biosynthesis, and the accumulation of HSPs. Our results further showed that the calcium-permeable channel gene (cch)-silenced and phosphoinositide-specific phospholipase gene (plc)-silenced strains reduced the HS-induced increase in HSP expression compared with that observed for the wild type (WT). This study demonstrates that cytosolic Ca(2+) participates in heat shock signal transduction and regulates downstream events in filamentous fungi. Ganoderma lucidum, a higher basidiomycete with bioactive secondary metabolites, has become a potential model system for evaluating how environmental factors regulate the development and secondary metabolism of basidiomycetes. Heat stress (HS) is an important environmental challenge. In this study, we found that HS inhibited mycelium growth, reduced hyphal branching, and induced HSP expression and ganoderic acid biosynthesis in G. lucidum Further evidence showed that Ca(2+) might be a factor in the HS-mediated regulation of hyphal branching, GA biosynthesis, and the accumulation of HSPs. This study demonstrates that cytosolic Ca(2+) participates in heat shock signal transduction and regulates downstream events in filamentous fungi. Our research offers a new

  18. Heat Stress Modulates Mycelium Growth, Heat Shock Protein Expression, Ganoderic Acid Biosynthesis, and Hyphal Branching of Ganoderma lucidum via Cytosolic Ca2+

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xue; Ren, Ang; Li, Meng-Jiao; Cao, Peng-Fei; Chen, Tian-Xi; Zhang, Guang; Shi, Liang; Jiang, Ai-Liang

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Heat stress (HS) influences the growth and development of organisms. Thus, a comprehensive understanding of how organisms sense HS and respond to it is required. Ganoderma lucidum, a higher basidiomycete with bioactive secondary metabolites, has become a potential model system due to the complete sequencing of its genome, transgenic systems, and reliable reverse genetic tools. In this study, we found that HS inhibited mycelium growth, reduced hyphal branching, and induced the accumulation of ganoderic acid biosynthesis and heat shock proteins (HSPs) in G. lucidum. Our data showed that HS induced a significant increase in cytosolic Ca2+ concentration. Further evidence showed that Ca2+ might be a factor in the HS-mediated regulation of hyphal branching, ganoderic acid (GA) biosynthesis, and the accumulation of HSPs. Our results further showed that the calcium-permeable channel gene (cch)-silenced and phosphoinositide-specific phospholipase gene (plc)-silenced strains reduced the HS-induced increase in HSP expression compared with that observed for the wild type (WT). This study demonstrates that cytosolic Ca2+ participates in heat shock signal transduction and regulates downstream events in filamentous fungi. IMPORTANCE Ganoderma lucidum, a higher basidiomycete with bioactive secondary metabolites, has become a potential model system for evaluating how environmental factors regulate the development and secondary metabolism of basidiomycetes. Heat stress (HS) is an important environmental challenge. In this study, we found that HS inhibited mycelium growth, reduced hyphal branching, and induced HSP expression and ganoderic acid biosynthesis in G. lucidum. Further evidence showed that Ca2+ might be a factor in the HS-mediated regulation of hyphal branching, GA biosynthesis, and the accumulation of HSPs. This study demonstrates that cytosolic Ca2+ participates in heat shock signal transduction and regulates downstream events in filamentous fungi. Our research

  19. Galactic wind X-ray heating of the intergalactic medium during the Epoch of Reionization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meiksin, Avery; Khochfar, Sadegh; Paardekooper, Jan-Pieter; Dalla Vecchia, Claudio; Kohn, Saul

    2017-11-01

    The diffuse soft X-ray emissivity from galactic winds is computed during the Epoch of Reionization (EoR). We consider two analytic models, a pressure-driven wind and a superbubble model, and a 3D cosmological simulation including gas dynamics from the First Billion Years (FiBY) project. The analytic models are normalized to match the diffuse X-ray emissivity of star-forming galaxies in the nearby Universe. The cosmological simulation uses physically motivated star formation and wind prescriptions, and includes radiative transfer corrections. The models and the simulation all are found to produce sufficient heating of the intergalactic medium to be detectable by current and planned radio facilities through 21 cm measurements during the EoR. While the analytic models predict a 21 cm emission signal relative to the cosmic microwave backgroundsets in by ztrans ≃ 8-10, the predicted signal in the FiBY simulation remains in absorption until reionization completes. The 21 cm absorption differential brightness temperature reaches a minimum of ΔT ≃ -130 to -200 mK, depending on model. Allowing for additional heat from high-mass X-ray binaries pushes the transition to emission to ztrans ≃ 10-12, with shallower absorption signatures having a minimum of ΔT ≃ -110 to -140 mK. The 21 cm signal may be a means of distinguishing between the wind models, with the superbubble model favouring earlier reheating. While an early transition to emission may indicate X-ray binaries dominate the reheating, a transition to emission as early as ztrans > 12 would suggest the presence of additional heat sources.

  20. Suspension culture process of MethA tumor cell for the production of heat-shock protein glycoprotein 96: process optimization in spinner flasks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Ya-Jie; Li, Hong-Mei; Hamel, Jean-François P

    2007-01-01

    Heat-shock proteins (HSPs) act like "chaperones", making sure that the cell's proteins are in the right shape and in the right place at the right time. Heat-shock protein glycoprotein 96 (gp96) is a member of the HSP90 protein family, which chaperones a number of molecules in protein folding and transportation. Heat-shock protein gp96 serves as a natural adjuvant for chaperoning antigenic peptides into the immune surveillance pathways. Currently, heat-shock protein gp96 was only isolated from murine and human tissues and cell lines. An animal cell suspension culture process for the production of heat-shock protein gp96 by MethA tumor cell was developed for the first time in spinner flasks. Effects of culture medium and condition were studied to enhance the MethA tumor cell density and the production and productivity of heat-shock protein gp96. Initial glucose concentration had a significant effect on the heat-shock protein gp96 accumulation, and an initial glucose level of 7.0 g/L was desirable for MethA tumor cell growth and heat-shock protein gp96 production and productivity. Cultures at an initial glutamine concentration of 3 and 6 mM were nutritionally limited by glutamine. At an initial glutamine concentration of 6 mM, the maximal viable cell density of 19.90 x 10(5) cells/mL and the maximal heat-shock protein gp96 production of 4.95 mg/L was obtained. The initial concentration of RPMI 1640 and serum greatly affected the MethA tumor cell culture process. Specifically cultures with lower initial concentration of RPMI 1640 resulted in lower viable cell density and lower heat-shock protein gp96 production. At an initial serum concentration of 8%, the maximal viable cell density of 19.18 x 10(5) cells/mL and the maximal heat-shock protein gp96 production of 5.67 mg/L was obtained. The spin rate significantly affected the cell culture process in spinner flasks, and a spin rate of 150 rpm was desirable for MethA tumor cell growth and heat-shock protein gp96

  1. Wind power integration in Aalborg Municipality using compression heat pumps and geothermal absorption heat pumps

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Østergaard, Poul Alberg

    2013-01-01

    -temperature geothermal resources. The analyses have also demonstrated that the municipality will still rely heavily on surrounding areas for electric load balancing assistance. With a departure in a previously elaborated 100% renewable energy scenario, this article investigates how absorption heat pumps (AHP...

  2. Genome-wide cloning, identification, classification and functional analysis of cotton heat shock transcription factors in cotton (Gossypium hirsutum).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jun; Sun, Na; Deng, Ting; Zhang, Lida; Zuo, Kaijing

    2014-11-06

    Heat shock transcriptional factor