WorldWideScience

Sample records for wind shear profiles

  1. Prescribed wind shear modelling with the actuator line technique

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mikkelsen, Robert Flemming; Sørensen, Jens Nørkær; Troldborg, Niels

    2007-01-01

    A method for prescribing arbitrary steady atmospheric wind shear profiles combined with CFD is presented. The method is furthermore combined with the actuator line technique governing the aerodynamic loads on a wind turbine. Computation are carried out on a wind turbine exposed to a representative...... steady atmospheric wind shear profile with and without wind direction changes up through the atmospheric boundary layer. Results show that the main impact on the turbine is captured by the model. Analysis of the wake behind the wind turbine, reveal the formation of a skewed wake geometry interacting...

  2. Small-scale wind shear definition for aerospace vehicle design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fichtl, G. H.

    1972-01-01

    Rawinsonde wind profile data provide adequate wind shear information for vertical height intervals greater than 1 km. To specify wind shears for intervals below 1 km for space vehicle design, detailed wind-profile information like that provided by the FPS-16 Radar/Jimsphere system or an extrapolation procedure is required. This paper is concerned with the latter alternative. It is assumed that any realization from an ensemble of wind profiles can be represented in terms of a Fourier integral. This permits the calculation of the ensemble standard deviation and mean of the corresponding shear ensemble for any altitude and shear interval in terms of the power spectrum of the ensemble of wind profiles. The results of these calculations show that the mean and standard deviation of the wind shear ensemble, as well as the wind shear for any percentile, asymptotically behave like the vertical interval to the 0.7 power. This result is in excellent agreement with shear data from Cape Kennedy, Fla.

  3. Modeling and implementation of wind shear data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frost, Walter

    1987-01-01

    The problems of implementing the JAWS wind shear data are discussed. The data sets are described from the view of utilizing them in an aircraft performance computer program. Then, some of the problems of nonstandard procedures are described in terms of programming the equations of aircraft motion when the effects of temporal and spatially variable winds are included. Finally, some of the computed effects of the various wind shear terms are shown.

  4. Offshore vertical wind shear: Final report on NORSEWInD’s work task 3.1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pena Diaz, Alfredo; Mikkelsen, Torben; Gryning, Sven-Erik

    This document reports on the analysis performed by the work task 3.1 of the EU NORSEWInD project and includes the following deliverables: 3.2 Calculated vertical wind shears 3.3 Multi-variational correlation analysis 3.4 NWP data for wind shear model 3.5 Vertical extrapolation methodology 3...... of power outputs. Background related to the parametrization of the vertical wind speed profile and the behavior of the vertical wind shear in and beyond the atmospheric surface layer is presented together with the application of the long-term atmospheric stability parameters for the analysis of the long......-term vertical wind speed profile. Observed vertical wind shears are illustrated for all NORSEWInD wind lidar and meteorological stations in terms of wind shear roses, distributions, and diurnal and monthly evolutions. A multi-variational correlation analysis is performed to study the vertical wind shear...

  5. Problems pilots face involving wind shear

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melvin, W. W.

    1977-01-01

    Educating pilots and the aviation industry about wind shears presents a major problem associated with this meteorological phenomenon. The pilot's second most pressing problem is the need for a language to discuss wind shear encounters with other pilots so that the reaction of the aircraft to the wind shear encounter can be accurately described. Another problem is the flight director which gives a centered pitch command for a given angular displacement from the glide slope. It was suggested that they should instead be called flight path command and should not center unless the aircraft is actually correcting to the flight path.

  6. Wind shear extremes at possible offshore wind turbine locations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Kurt Schaldemose; Larsen, Gunner Chr.

    2003-01-01

    Positive and negative short-term extreme wind shear distributions (conditioned on the mean wind speed) are determined and compared for a number of offshore sites. The analysis is based on rapidly sampled field measurements (1-8 Hz) extracted from the "Database on Wind Characteristics" (www.windda...... seems to be rather conservative for an offshore location, compared to the estimated values based on measurements.......Positive and negative short-term extreme wind shear distributions (conditioned on the mean wind speed) are determined and compared for a number of offshore sites. The analysis is based on rapidly sampled field measurements (1-8 Hz) extracted from the "Database on Wind Characteristics" (www.......winddata.com). Three different averaging periods (2, 5 and 10 seconds) are considered, and for each averaging period a relation between the resulting extreme shear distributions and the averaging time are presented. The short-term extreme shear analysis is based on different spatial distances, and extrapolation...

  7. Wind Profiling Radar

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Clutter present in radar return signals as used for wind profiling is substantially removed by carrying out a Daubechies wavelet transformation on a time series of...

  8. Robust Kalman filter design for predictive wind shear detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stratton, Alexander D.; Stengel, Robert F.

    1991-01-01

    Severe, low-altitude wind shear is a threat to aviation safety. Airborne sensors under development measure the radial component of wind along a line directly in front of an aircraft. In this paper, optimal estimation theory is used to define a detection algorithm to warn of hazardous wind shear from these sensors. To achieve robustness, a wind shear detection algorithm must distinguish threatening wind shear from less hazardous gustiness, despite variations in wind shear structure. This paper presents statistical analysis methods to refine wind shear detection algorithm robustness. Computational methods predict the ability to warn of severe wind shear and avoid false warning. Comparative capability of the detection algorithm as a function of its design parameters is determined, identifying designs that provide robust detection of severe wind shear.

  9. Sensing the wind profile

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pena, A.

    2009-03-15

    This thesis consists of two parts. The first is a synopsis of the theoretical progress of the study that is based on a number of journal papers. The papers, which constitute the second part of the report, aim to analyze, measure, and model the wind prole in and beyond the surface layer by combining observations from cup anemometers with lidars. The lidar is necessary to extend the measurements on masts at the Horns Rev offshore wind farm and over at land at Hoevsoere, Denmark. Both sensing techniques show a high degree of agreement for wind speed measurements performed at either sites. The wind speed measurements are averaged for several stability conditions and compare well with the surface-layer wind profile. At Hoevsoere, it is sufficient to scale the wind speed with the surface friction velocity, whereas at Horns Rev a new scaling is added, due to the variant roughness length. This new scaling is coupled to wind prole models derived for flow over the sea and tested against the wind proles up to 160 m at Horns Rev. The models, which account for the boundary-layer height in stable conditions, show better agreement with the measurements than compared to the traditional theory. Mixing-length parameterizations for the neutral wind prole compare well with length-scale measurements up to 300 m at Hoevsoere and 950 m at Leipzig. The mixing-length-derived wind proles strongly deviate from the logarithmic wind prole, but agree better with the wind speed measurements. The length-scale measurements are compared to the length scale derived from a spectral analysis performed up to 160 m at Hoevsoere showing high agreement. Mixing-length parameterizations are corrected to account for stability and used to derive wind prole models. These compared better to wind speed measurements up to 300 m at Hoevsoere than the surface-layer wind prole. The boundary-layer height is derived in nearneutral and stable conditions based on turbulent momentum uxes only and in unstable conditions

  10. Sensing the wind profile

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pena Diaz, Alfredo

    This thesis consists of two parts. The first is a synopsis of the theoretical progress of the study that is based on a number of journal papers. The papers, which constitute the second part of the report, aim to analyze, measure, and model the wind prole in and beyond the surface layer by combining...... measurements are averaged for several stability conditions and compare well with the surface-layer wind profile. At Høvsøre, it is sufficient to scale the wind speed with the surface friction velocity, whereas at Horns Rev a new scaling is added, due to the variant roughness length. This new scaling is coupled...

  11. The influence of the Wind Speed Profile on Wind Turbine Performance Measurements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wagner, Rozenn; Antoniou, Ioannis; Pedersen, Søren M.

    2009-01-01

    . Assuming a certain turbine hub height, the profiles with hub-height wind speeds between 6 m s-1 and 8 m s-1 are normalized at 7 m s-1 and grouped to a number of mean shear profiles. The energy in the profiles varies considerably for the same hub-height wind speed. These profiles are then used as input...... the swept rotor area would allow the determination of the electrical power as a function of an equivalent wind speed where wind shear and turbulence intensity are taken into account. Electrical power is found to correlate significantly better to the equivalent wind speed than to the single point hub...

  12. Wind Shear Characteristics at Central Plains Tall Towers (presentation)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schwartz, M.; Elliott, D.

    2006-06-05

    The objectives of this report are: (1) Analyze wind shear characteristics at tall tower sites for diverse areas in the central plains (Texas to North Dakota)--Turbines hub heights are now 70-100 m above ground and Wind measurements at 70-100+ m have been rare. (2) Present conclusions about wind shear characteristics for prime wind energy development regions.

  13. Model of wind shear conditional on turbulence and its impact on wind turbine loads

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dimitrov, Nikolay Krasimirov; Natarajan, Anand; Kelly, Mark C.

    2015-01-01

    fatigue load is achieved. The proposed wind shear model based on the wind measurements is thereby probabilistic in definition, with shear jointly distributed with wind turbulence. A simplified model for the wind shear exponent is further derived from the full stochastic model. The fatigue loads over......We analyse high-frequency wind velocity measurements from two test stations over a period of several years and at heights ranging from 60 to 200 m, with the objective to validate wind shear predictions as used in load simulations for wind turbine design. A validated wind shear model is thereby...... different turbine components are evaluated under the full wind measurements, using the developed wind shear model and with standard wind conditions prescribed in the IEC 61400-1 ed. 3. The results display the effect of the Wöhler exponent and reveal that under moderate turbulence, the effect of wind shear...

  14. Comparison of wind and wind shear climatologies derived from high-resolution radiosondes and the ECMWF model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houchi, K.; Stoffelen, A.; Marseille, G. J.; de Kloe, J.

    2010-11-01

    The climatology of atmospheric horizontal wind and its vertical gradient, i.e., wind shear, is characterized as a function of climate region. For a better representation of the average atmospheric wind and shear and their variabilities, high-resolution radiosonde wind profiles up to about 30 km altitude are compared with the collocated operational ECMWF model for short-range forecast winds. Statistics of zonal and meridional winds are established from both data sets. The results show mainly similarity in the probability distributions of the modeled and observed horizontal winds, practically at all levels of the atmosphere, while at the same time the vertical shear of the wind is substantially underestimated in the model. The comparison of shear statistics of radiosonde and ECMWF model winds shows that the model wind shear mean and variability are on average a factor of 2.5 (zonal) and 3 (meridional) smaller than of radiosondes in the free troposphere, while in the stratosphere, the planetary boundary layer results are more variable. By applying vertical averaging to the radiosonde data, it is found that the effective vertical resolution of the ECMWF model is typically 1.7 km. Moreover, it is found for individually collocated radiosonde model wind and shear profiles that the model wind may lack in some cases variability larger than 5 m s-1 and 0.015 s-1, respectively, due mainly to the effect of lacking vertical resolution, in particular near the jets. Besides the general importance of this study in highlighting the difference in the representation of the atmospheric wind shear by model and observations, it is more specifically relevant for the future Atmospheric Dynamics Mission (ADM-Aeolus) of the European Space Agency due for launch in 2012. The results presented here are used to generate a realistic global atmospheric database, which is necessary to conduct simulations of the Aeolus Doppler wind lidar in order optimize its vertical sampling and processing.

  15. Optimal recovery from microburst wind shear

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulgund, Sandeep S.

    1993-01-01

    Severe low-altitude wind variability represents an infrequent but significant hazard to aircraft taking off or landing. During the period from 1964 to 1985, microburst wind shear was a contributing factor in at least 26 civil aviation accidents involving nearly 500 fatalities and over 200 injuries. A microburst is a strong localized downdraft that strikes the ground, creating winds that diverge radially from the impact point. The physics of microbursts have only been recently understood in detail, and it has been found that effective recovery from inadvertent encounters may require piloting techniques that are counter-intuitive to flight crews. The goal of this work was to optimize the flight path of a twin-jet transport aircraft encountering a microburst during approach to landing. The objective was to execute an escape maneuver that maintained safe ground clearance and an adequate stall margin during the climb-out portion of the trajectory.

  16. Accounting for the speed shear in wind turbine power performance measurement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wagner, Rozenn

    The power curve of a wind turbine is the primary characteristic of the machine as it is the basis of the warranty for it power production. The current IEC standard for power performance measurement only requires the measurement of the wind speed at hub height and the air density to characterise...... the vertical wind shear and the turbulence intensity. The work presented in this thesis consists of the description and the investigation of a simple method to account for the wind speed shear in the power performance measurement. Ignoring this effect was shown to result in a power curve dependant on the shear...... condition, therefore on the season and the site. It was then proposed to use an equivalent wind speed accounting for the whole speed profile in front of the turbine. The method was first tested with aerodynamic simulations of a multi-megawatt wind turbine which demonstrated the decrease of the scatter...

  17. Simulation of shear and turbulence impact on wind turbine performance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wagner, Rozenn; Courtney, Michael; Larsen, Torben J.

    of a uniform inflow. Secondly, a similar analysis was done for cases with direction shear. In each case, we derived a standard power curve (function of the wind speed at hub height) and power curves obtained with various definitions of equivalent wind speed in order to reduce the scatter due to shear. Thirdly...

  18. Calculating wind profiles above a pine forest

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murphy, C.E.; Dexter, A.H.

    1978-01-01

    A major part of the environmental transport work at the Savannah River Laboratory (SRL) involves the dispersion of airborne pollutants (aerosols and gases). A major part of the Savannah River Plant (SRP) site is covered with pine forests. Because forests are ''rough'' surfaces which increase turbulence and surface shear stress and, hence, alter the dispersion patterns, the nature of the wind profiles above the forests is being investigated. Two methods for determining the surface shear caused by the atmospheric wind field over a pine plantation were compared. Friction velocity [the square root of the ratio of shearing stress over the density of air; U/sub */ = (stress/density)1/2] calculated by eddy correlation was compared with friction velocity calculated from wind profiles. Data from the first five meters above the pine forest were compared. The data indicated that there was no significant difference in the mean friction velocity measured by each method. However, there were large differences in individual values calculated by the two methods for many of the measurement periods. An attempt was made to reconcile the differences in the measured values, but no satisfactory method was found

  19. Impact of Vertical Wind Shear on Tropical Cyclone Rainfall

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cecil, Dan; Marchok, Tim

    2014-01-01

    While tropical cyclone rainfall has a large axisymmetric component, previous observational and theoretical studies have shown that environmental vertical wind shear leads to an asymmetric component of the vertical motion and precipitation fields. Composites consistently depict a precipitation enhancement downshear and also cyclonically downwind from the downshear direction. For consistence with much of the literature and with Northern Hemisphere observations, this is subsequently referred to as "Downshear-Left". Stronger shear magnitudes are associated with greater amplitude precipitation asymmetries. Recent work has reinforced the prior findings, and explored details of the response of the precipitation and kinematic fields to environmental vertical wind shear. Much of this research has focused on tropical cyclones away from land, to limit the influence of other processes that might distort the signal related to vertical wind shear. Recent evidence does suggest vertical wind shear can also play a major role in precipitation asymmetries during and after landfall.

  20. On the Escarpment Wind Profile

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Niels Otto; Peterson, E. W.

    1978-01-01

    It is shown that miscellaneous theories for flow over low ridges give results consistent with each other and that these results can be used to quantify certain observed features of the wind profile downwind from an escarpment...

  1. On the Escarpment Wind Profile

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Niels Otto; Peterson, E. W.

    1978-01-01

    It is shown that miscellaneous theories for flow over low ridges give results consistent with each other and that these results can be used to quantify certain observed features of the wind profile downwind from an escarpment......It is shown that miscellaneous theories for flow over low ridges give results consistent with each other and that these results can be used to quantify certain observed features of the wind profile downwind from an escarpment...

  2. The Impact of Variable Wind Shear Coefficients on Risk Reduction of Wind Energy Projects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomson, Allan; Yoonesi, Behrang; McNutt, Josiah

    2016-01-01

    Estimation of wind speed at proposed hub heights is typically achieved using a wind shear exponent or wind shear coefficient (WSC), variation in wind speed as a function of height. The WSC is subject to temporal variation at low and high frequencies, ranging from diurnal and seasonal variations to disturbance caused by weather patterns; however, in many cases, it is assumed that the WSC remains constant. This assumption creates significant error in resource assessment, increasing uncertainty in projects and potentially significantly impacting the ability to control gird connected wind generators. This paper contributes to the body of knowledge relating to the evaluation and assessment of wind speed, with particular emphasis on the development of techniques to improve the accuracy of estimated wind speed above measurement height. It presents an evaluation of the use of a variable wind shear coefficient methodology based on a distribution of wind shear coefficients which have been implemented in real time. The results indicate that a VWSC provides a more accurate estimate of wind at hub height, ranging from 41% to 4% reduction in root mean squared error (RMSE) between predicted and actual wind speeds when using a variable wind shear coefficient at heights ranging from 33% to 100% above the highest actual wind measurement. PMID:27872898

  3. The Structure of Vertical Wind Shear in Tropical Cyclone Environments: Implications for Forecasting and Predictability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finocchio, Peter M.

    The vertical wind shear measured between 200 and 850 hPa is commonly used to diagnose environmental interactions with a tropical cyclone (TC) and to forecast the storm's intensity and structural evolution. More often than not, stronger vertical shear within this deep layer prohibits the intensification of TCs and leads to predictable asymmetries in precipitation. But such bulk measures of vertical wind shear can occasionally mislead the forecaster. In the first part of this dissertation, we use a series of idealized numerical simulations to examine how a TC responds to changing the structure of unidirectional vertical wind shear while fixing the 200-850-hPa shear magnitude. These simulations demonstrate a significant intensity response, in which shear concentrated in shallow layers of the lower troposphere prevents vortex intensification. We attribute the arrested development of TCs in lower-level shear to the intrusion of mid-level environmental air over the surface vortex early in the simulations. Convection developing on the downshear side of the storm interacts with the intruding air so as to enhance the downward flux of low-entropy air into the boundary layer. We also construct a two-dimensional intensity response surface from a set of simulations that sparsely sample the joint shear height-depth parameter space. This surface reveals regions of the two-parameter space for which TC intensity is particularly sensitive. We interpret these parameter ranges as those which lead to reduced intensity predictability. Despite the robust response to changing the shape of a sheared wind profile in idealized simulations, we do not encounter such sensitivity within a large set of reanalyzed TCs in the Northern Hemisphere. Instead, there is remarkable consistency in the structure of reanalyzed wind profiles around TCs. This is evident in the distributions of two new parameters describing the height and depth of vertical wind shear, which highlight a clear preference for

  4. Wind speed and direction shears with associated vertical motion during strong surface winds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexander, M. B.; Camp, D. W.

    1984-01-01

    Strong surface winds recorded at the NASA 150-Meter Ground Winds Tower facility at Kennedy Space Center, Florida, are analyzed to present occurrences representative of wind shear and vertical motion known to be hazardous to the ascent and descent of conventional aircraft and the Space Shuttle. Graphical (percentage frequency distributions) and mathematical (maximum, mean, standard deviation) descriptions of wind speed and direction shears and associated updrafts and downdrafts are included as functions of six vertical layers and one horizontal distance for twenty 5-second intervals of parameters sampled simultaneously at the rate of ten per second during a period of high surface winds.

  5. Effects of extreme wind shear on aeroelastic modal damping of wind turbines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skjoldan, P.F.; Hansen, Morten Hartvig

    2013-01-01

    Wind shear is an important contributor to fatigue loads on wind turbines. Because it causes an azimuthal variation in angle of attack, it can also affect aerodynamic damping. In this paper, a linearized model of a wind turbine, based on the nonlinear aeroelastic code BHawC, is used to investigate...

  6. Wind shear estimation and wake detection by rotor loads — First wind tunnel verification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schreiber, J.; Cacciola, S.; Campagnolo, F.; Petrović, V.; Mourembles, D.; Bottasso, C. L.

    2016-09-01

    The paper describes a simple method for detecting presence and location of a wake affecting a downstream wind turbine operating in a wind power plant. First, the local wind speed and shear experienced by the wind turbine are estimated by the use of rotor loads and other standard wind turbine response data. Then, a simple wake deficit model is used to determine the lateral position of the wake with respect to the affected rotor. The method is verified in a boundary layer wind tunnel using two instrumented scaled wind turbine models, demonstrating its effectiveness.

  7. Doppler weather radar with predictive wind shear detection capabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuntman, Daryal

    1991-01-01

    The status of Bendix research on Doppler weather radar with predictive wind shear detection capability is given in viewgraph form. Information is given on the RDR-4A, a fully coherent, solid state transmitter having Doppler turbulence capability. Frequency generation data, plans, modifications, system characteristics and certification requirements are covered.

  8. Wind profiler installed in Antarctica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balsley, B. B.; Carey, J.; Woodman, R. F.; Sarango, M.; Urbina, J.; Rodriguez, R.; Ragaini, E.

    A VHF (50 MHz) wind profiler was installed in Antarctica at the Peruvian Base “Machu Picchu” on King George Island from January 21 to 26. The wind profiler will provide a first look at atmospheric dynamics over the region.The profiler—the first of its kind in Antarctica—is a National Science Foundationsponsored cooperative project of the University of Colorado, the Geophysical Institute of Peru, the University of Piura (Peru), and the Peruvian Navy. This venture was also greatly facilitated by Peru's Comision Nacional de Asuntos Antartidos and Consejo Nacional de Ciencias y Tecnologia, with additional logis tics support provided by the Argentinean Navy and the Uruguayan Air Force.

  9. Response of wind shear warning systems to turbulence with implication of nuisance alerts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowles, Roland L.

    1988-01-01

    The objective was to predict the inherent turbulence response characteristics of candidate wind shear warning system concepts and to assess the potential for nuisance alerts. Information on the detection system and associated signal processing, physical and mathematical models, wind shear factor root mean square turbulence response and the standard deviation of the wind shear factor due to turbulence is given in vugraph form.

  10. The classification of wind shears from the point of view of aerodynamics and flight mechanics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seidler, Fritz; Hensel, Gunter

    1987-01-01

    A study of international statistical data shows that in about three quarters of all serious accidents which occurred with jet propelled airliners wind shear was either one of the main causes of the accident or represented a major contributory cause. Wind shear related problems are examined. The necessity of a use of different concepts, definitions, and divisions is explained, and the concepts and definitions required for the division of wind and wind shear into different categories is discussed. A description of the context between meteorological and aerodynamics-flight mechanics concepts, definitions, and divisions is also provided. Attention is given to wind and wind components, general characteristics of wind shear and the meteorological terms, the basic types of wind shear for aerodynamics-flight mechanics investigations, special types of wind shear for aerodynamics-flight mechanics investigations, and possibilities regarding a change of the wind component.

  11. Wind shear proportional errors in the horizontal wind speed sensed by focused, range gated lidars

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindelöw, Per Jonas Petter; Courtney, Michael; Parmentier, R.

    2008-01-01

    altitude. The altitude errors of focused range gated lidars are likely to arise partly from an unaccounted shift of the weighting functions, describing the sample volume, due to the range dependent collection efficiency of the focused telescope. Possibilities of correcting the lidar measurements both...... an altitude dependent relation between the lidar error and the wind shear. A likely explanation for this relation is an error in the intended sensing altitude. At most this error is estimated to 9 in which induced errors in the horizontal wind velocity of up to 0.5 m/s as compared to a cup at the intended...... for wind velocity and wind shear dependent errors are discussed. The 2-parametric regression analysis described in this paper is proven to be a better approach when acceptance testing and calibrating lidars....

  12. Roles of wind shear at different vertical levels: Cloud system organization and properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Qian; Fan, Jiwen; Hagos, Samson; Gustafson, William I.; Berg, Larry K.

    2015-07-01

    Understanding critical processes that contribute to the organization of mesoscale convective systems (MCSs) is important for accurate weather forecasts and climate predictions. In this study, we investigate the effects of wind shear at different vertical levels on the organization and properties of convective systems using the Weather Research and Forecasting model with spectral bin microphysics. Based on a control run for a MCS with weak wind shear (Ctrl), we find that increasing wind shear at the lower troposphere (L-shear) leads to a more organized quasi-line convective system. Strong wind shear in the middle troposphere (M-shear) tends to produce large vorticity and form a mesocyclone circulation and an isolated strong storm that leans toward supercellular structure. By increasing wind shear at the upper vertical levels only (U-shear), the organization of the convection is not changed much, but the convective intensity is weakened. Increasing wind shear in the middle troposphere for the selected case results in a significant drying, and the drying is more significant when conserving moisture advection at the lateral boundaries, contributing to the suppressed convective strength and precipitation relative to Ctrl. Precipitation in the L-shear and U-shear does not change much from Ctrl. Evident changes of cloud macrophysical and microphysical properties in the strong wind shear cases are mainly due to large changes in convective organization and water vapor. The insights obtained from this study help us better understand the major factors contributing to convective organization and precipitation.

  13. BOREAS AFM-06 Mean Wind Profile Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilczak, James; Hall, Forrest G. (Editor); Newcomer, Jeffrey A. (Editor); Smith, David E. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The Boreal Ecosystem-Atmosphere Study (BOREAS) Airborne Fluxes and Meteorology (AFM)-6 team from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration/Environment Technology Laboratory (NOAA/ETL) operated a 915-MHz wind/Radio Acoustic Sounding System (RASS) profiler system in the Southern Study Area (SSA) near the Old Jack Pine (OJP) tower from 21 May 1994 to 20 Sep 1994. The data set provides wind profiles at 38 heights, containing the variables of wind speed; wind direction; and the u-, v-, and w-components of the total wind. The data are stored in tabular ASCII files. The mean wind profile data are available from the Earth Observing System Data and Information System (EOSDIS) Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Distributed Active Archive Center (DAAC). The data files are available on a CD-ROM (see document number 20010000884).

  14. Simulations of large winds and wind shears induced by gravity wave breaking in the mesosphere and lower thermosphere (MLT region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    X. Liu

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Using a fully nonlinear two-dimensional (2-D numerical model, we simulated gravity waves (GWs breaking and their contributions to the formation of large winds and wind shears in the mesosphere and lower thermosphere (MLT. An eddy diffusion coefficient is used in the 2-D numerical model to parameterize realistic turbulent mixing. Our study shows that the momentum deposited by breaking GWs accelerates the mean wind. The resultant large background wind increases the GW's apparent horizontal phase velocity and decreases the GW's intrinsic frequency and vertical wavelength. Both the accelerated mean wind and the decreased GW vertical wavelength contribute to the enhancement of wind shears. This, in turn, creates a background condition that favors the occurrence of GW instability, breaking, and momentum deposition, as well as mean wind acceleration, which further enhances the wind shears. We find that GWs with longer vertical wavelengths and faster horizontal phase velocity can induce larger winds, but they may not necessarily induce larger wind shears. In addition, the background temperature can affect the time and height of GW breaking, thus causing accelerated mean winds and wind shears.

  15. Shear and Turbulence Estimates for Calculation of Wind Turbine Loads and Responses Under Hurricane Strength Winds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kosovic, B.; Bryan, G. H.; Haupt, S. E.

    2012-12-01

    Schwartz et al. (2010) recently reported that the total gross energy-generating offshore wind resource in the United States in waters less than 30m deep is approximately 1000 GW. Estimated offshore generating capacity is thus equivalent to the current generating capacity in the United States. Offshore wind power can therefore play important role in electricity production in the United States. However, most of this resource is located along the East Coast of the United States and in the Gulf of Mexico, areas frequently affected by tropical cyclones including hurricanes. Hurricane strength winds, associated shear and turbulence can affect performance and structural integrity of wind turbines. In a recent study Rose et al. (2012) attempted to estimate the risk to offshore wind turbines from hurricane strength winds over a lifetime of a wind farm (i.e. 20 years). According to Rose et al. turbine tower buckling has been observed in typhoons. They concluded that there is "substantial risk that Category 3 and higher hurricanes can destroy half or more of the turbines at some locations." More robust designs including appropriate controls can mitigate the risk of wind turbine damage. To develop such designs good estimates of turbine loads under hurricane strength winds are essential. We use output from a large-eddy simulation of a hurricane to estimate shear and turbulence intensity over first couple of hundred meters above sea surface. We compute power spectra of three velocity components at several distances from the eye of the hurricane. Based on these spectra analytical spectral forms are developed and included in TurbSim, a stochastic inflow turbulence code developed by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL, http://wind.nrel.gov/designcodes/preprocessors/turbsim/). TurbSim provides a numerical simulation including bursts of coherent turbulence associated with organized turbulent structures. It can generate realistic flow conditions that an operating turbine

  16. Modelling of the urban wind profile

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gryning, Sven-Erik; Batchvarova, Ekaterina

    2008-01-01

    Analysis of meteorological measurements from tall masts in rural and urban areas show that the height of the boundary layer influences the wind profile even in the lowest hundreds of meters. A parameterization of the wind profile for the entire boundary layer is formulated with emphasis...... on the lowest 200-300 m and presented here. Results are shown from applying the parameterization of the wind profile on independent measurements from an urban experimental campaign that was carried out in Sofia, Bulgaria in 2003....

  17. Investigations of Wind Shear Distribution on the Baltic Shore of Latvia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bezrukovs, V.; Zacepins, A.; Bezrukovs, Vl.; Komashilovs, V.

    2016-06-01

    The paper presents a review of wind parameter measurement complexes and investigation methods used for potential wind energy evaluation. Based on results of long-term investigations of wind shear distribution regularities are shown up to 160 m height on the Baltic Sea shore. Distribution of potential wind energy in Latvia is shown as a map and table of average and average cubic wind speed values. Database of wind parameter measurements is available at a public website.

  18. Wind profiler observations of a monsoon low-level jet over a tropical Indian station

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. C. R. Kalapureddy

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Three-year high-resolution wind observations of the wind profiler have been utilized to characterize the diurnal and seasonal features of the monsoon Low-Level Jet (LLJ over a tropical station, Gadanki (13.5° N, 79.2° E, with a focus on the diurnal variability of low-level winds. The Boreal summer monsoon winds show a conspicuously strong westerly LLJ with average wind speed exceeding 20 m s−1. The L-band wind profiler measurements have shown an advantage of better height and time resolutions over the conventional radiosonde method for diurnal wind measurements. An interesting diurnal oscillation of LLJ core has been observed. It is varying in the height range of 1.8±0.6 km with the maximum and minimum intensity noticed during the early morning and afternoon hours, respectively. The jet core (wind maxima height is observed to coincide with the inversion height. Strong wind shears are normally located beneath the LLJ core. The sole wind profiler observations are capable of identifying the monsoon phases, such as onset, break and active spells, etc. The mutual influence between the LLJ and the boundary layer has been discussed. One notices that the observed LLJ diurnal structures depend on the local convective activity, wind shears and turbulence activity associated with boundary layer winds. The day-to-day change in the LLJ structure depends on the latitudinal position of the LLJ core.

  19. Drift Wave Test Particle Transport in Reversed Shear Profile

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horton, W.; Park, H.B.; Kwon, J.M.; Stronzzi, D.; Morrison, P.J.; Choi, D.I.

    1998-01-01

    Drift wave maps, area preserving maps that describe the motion of charged particles in drift waves, are derived. The maps allow the integration of particle orbits on the long time scale needed to describe transport. Calculations using the drift wave maps show that dramatic improvement in the particle confinement, in the presence of a given level and spectrum of E x B turbulence, can occur for q(r)-profiles with reversed shear. A similar reduction in the transport, i.e. one that is independent of the turbulence, is observed in the presence of an equilibrium radial electric field with shear. The transport reduction, caused by the combined effects of radial electric field shear and both monotonic and reversed shear magnetic q-profiles, is also investigated

  20. Optimal nonlinear estimation for aircraft flight control in wind shear

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulgund, Sandeep S.

    1994-01-01

    The most recent results in an ongoing research effort at Princeton in the area of flight dynamics in wind shear are described. The first undertaking in this project was a trajectory optimization study. The flight path of a medium-haul twin-jet transport aircraft was optimized during microburst encounters on final approach. The assumed goal was to track a reference climb rate during an aborted landing, subject to a minimum airspeed constraint. The results demonstrated that the energy loss through the microburst significantly affected the qualitative nature of the optimal flight path. In microbursts of light to moderate strength, the aircraft was able to track the reference climb rate successfully. In severe microbursts, the minimum airspeed constraint in the optimization forced the aircraft to settle on a climb rate smaller than the target. A tradeoff was forced between the objectives of flight path tracking and stall prevention.

  1. High Resolution Shear Profile Measurements in Entangled Polymers

    KAUST Repository

    Hayes, Keesha A.

    2008-11-17

    We use confocal microscopy and particle image velocimetry to visualize motion of 250-300 nm. fluorescent tracer particles in entangled polymers subject to a rectilinear shear flow. Our results show linear velocity profiles in polymer solutions spanning a wide range of molecular weights and number of entanglements (8≤Z≤56), but reveal large differences between the imposed and measured shear rates. These findings disagree with recent reports that shear banding is a characteristic flow response of entangled polymers, and instead point to interfacial slip as an important source of strain loss. © 2008 The American Physical Society.

  2. Synthetic atmospheric turbulence and wind shear in large eddy simulations of wind turbine wakes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Keck, Rolf-Erik; Mikkelsen, Robert Flemming; Troldborg, Niels

    2014-01-01

    of the synthetic methods is found to be adequate to model atmospheric turbulence, and the wake flow results of the model are in good agreement with field data. An investigation is also carried out to estimate the wake transport velocity, used to model wake meandering in lower-order models. The conclusion......A method of generating a synthetic ambient wind field in neutral atmosphere is described and verified for modelling the effect of wind shear and turbulence on a wind turbine wake using the flow solver EllipSys3D. The method uses distributed volume forces to represent turbulent fluctuations...... is that the appropriate transport velocity of the wake lies somewhere between the centre velocity of the wake deficit and the free stream velocity. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd....

  3. Improved Estimates of Moments and Winds from Radar Wind Profiler

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Helmus, Jonathan [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Ghate, Virendra P. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)

    2017-01-02

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility (ACRF) operates nine radar wind profilers (RWP) across its sites. These RWPs operate at 915 MHz or 1290 MHz frequency and report the first three moments of the Doppler spectrum. The operational settings of the RWP were modified in summer, 2015 to have single pulse length setting for the wind mode and two pulse length settings for the precipitation mode. The moments data collected during the wind mode are used to retrieve horizontal winds. The vendor-reported winds are available at variable time resolution (10 mins, 60 mins, etc.) and contain a significant amount of contamination due to noise and clutter. In this data product we have recalculated the moments and the winds from the raw radar Doppler spectrum and have made efforts to mitigate the contamination due to instrument noise in the wind estimates. Additionally, the moments and wind data has been reported in a harmonized layout identical for all locations and sites.

  4. Friction velocity estimation using Reynolds shear stress profile data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volino, Ralph; Schultz, Michael

    2017-11-01

    A method for using profiles of the mean streamwise velocity and the Reynolds shear stress to estimate the friction velocity, uτ, is presented. The Reynolds averaged two-dimensional streamwise momentum equation is solved for the Reynolds shear stress term. The remaining terms in the equation are separated into those which depend on the local gradient of the mean streamwise velocity profile and those which do not. Using only the terms retained with the Couette flow assumption, the Reynolds shear stress profile can be matched in the inner 10 percent of the boundary layer with the appropriate choice of uτ. Including the other terms which do not depend on the streamwise velocity profile gradient, the fit can be extended to the inner 30 percent of the boundary layer. Using all terms the full Reynolds shear stress profile can be fit. The method is verified using laminar solutions for zero and non-zero pressure gradient boundary layers, and with ZPG turbulent DNS results. It is then applied to zero, favorable and adverse pressure gradient experimental data from smooth and rough walls. Results obtained for local friction velocities agree well with those obtained by other techniques. The method may prove useful when other methods are not practical or fully appropriate. Sponsored by the Office of Naval Research.

  5. Evaluating winds and vertical wind shear from Weather Research and Forecasting model forecasts using seven planetary boundary layer schemes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Draxl, Caroline; Hahmann, Andrea N.; Pena Diaz, Alfredo

    2014-01-01

    with different PBL parameterizations at one coastal site over western Denmark. The evaluation focuses on determining which PBL parameterization performs best for wind energy forecasting, and presenting a validation methodology that takes into account wind speed at different heights. Winds speeds at heights...... regarding wind energy at these levels partly depends on the formulation and implementation of planetary boundary layer (PBL) parameterizations in these models. This study evaluates wind speeds and vertical wind shears simulated by theWeather Research and Forecasting model using seven sets of simulations...

  6. Lidar for Wind and Optical Turbulence Profiling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fastig Shlomo

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available A field campaign for the comparison investigation of systems to measure wind and optical turbulence profiles was conducted in northern Germany. The experimental effort was to compare the performance of the LIDAR, SODAR-RASS and ultrasonic anemometers for the measurement of the above mentioned atmospheric parameters. Soreq's LIDAR is a fiber laser based system demonstrator for the vertical profiling of the wind and turbulence, based on the correlation of aerosol density variations. It provides measurements up to 350m with 20m resolution.

  7. Impact of Wind Shear and Tower Shadow Effects on Power System with Large Scale Wind Power Penetration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hu, Weihao; Su, Chi; Chen, Zhe

    2011-01-01

    presents a simulation model of a variable speed wind farm with permanent magnet synchronous generators (PMSGs) and fullscale back-to-back converters in the simulation tool of DIgSILENT/PowerFactory. In this paper, the impacts of wind shear and tower shadow effects on the small signal stability of power...

  8. Wind profiles for Space Shuttle loads analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adelfang, S. I.

    1978-01-01

    The small scale wind velocity perturbations in vertical wind profiles at Cape Kennedy, Florida were analyzed in order to derive information for simulations of space shuttle ascent through the perturbed atmosphere. The available statistical data does not permit specification of various aspects of idealized singularities and wavelike perturbations with a reasonable degree of confidence. The information developed as a result of the analysis described in Section 3 of this report is suitable for the further development of idealized models. The term perturbation is used instead of the more common term, gust. According to the conventional approach, a gust profile is calculated by applying a high pass digital filter to a Jimsphere profile; all the speeds in the filtered profile are defined as gusts. The high pass filtered profile is defined as a residual profile and the maximum residual in the vicinity of a specified reference height is defined as the gust. Gusts defined in this manner represent the perturbation peaks. A detailed discussion of the calculation of residual profiles and gusts is given. The meteorological coordinate system, the data sample, and Jimsphere profiles are also described. Recommendations and conclusions are presented.

  9. Power spectral density analysis of wind-shear turbulence for related flight simulations. M.S. Thesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laituri, Tony R.

    1988-01-01

    Meteorological phenomena known as microbursts can produce abrupt changes in wind direction and/or speed over a very short distance in the atmosphere. These changes in flow characteristics have been labelled wind shear. Because of its adverse effects on aerodynamic lift, wind shear poses its most immediate threat to flight operations at low altitudes. The number of recent commercial aircraft accidents attributed to wind shear has necessitated a better understanding of how energy is transferred to an aircraft from wind-shear turbulence. Isotropic turbulence here serves as the basis of comparison for the anisotropic turbulence which exists in the low-altitude wind shear. The related question of how isotropic turbulence scales in a wind shear is addressed from the perspective of power spectral density (psd). The role of the psd in related Monte Carlo simulations is also considered.

  10. Quality assessment of weather radar wind profiles during bird migration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Holleman, I.; van Gasteren, H.; Bouten, W.

    2008-01-01

    Wind profiles from an operational C-band Doppler radar have been combined with data from a bird tracking radar to assess the wind profile quality during bird migration. The weather radar wind profiles (WRWPs) are retrieved using the well-known volume velocity processing (VVP) technique. The X-band

  11. Retrieval of vertical wind profiles during monsoon from satellite ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    algorithm which ensures the retrieval of vertical profiles of winds using satellite tracked cloud motion vector winds. Under the assumption that accurate measurements of wind are available at the above mentioned levels, the r.m.s. error of retrieval of each component of wind is estimated to range between. 2 msю1 and 6 ...

  12. Shear optimization experiments with current profile control on JET

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-01-01

    A record performance on JET has been obtained with shear optimization scenarios. A neutron yield of 5.6x10 16 s -1 in deuterium discharges, and a global energy confinement improvement above the ITER-89 L-mode scaling with H ≤ 2.5 in L-mode and H ≤ 3 in H-mode have been achieved. The tailoring of plasma current, density and heating power waveforms and current profile control with lower hybrid current drive and ICRF phasing have been essential. Internal energy, particle and momentum transport barriers develop spontaneously upon heating above a threshold power of about 15 MW with neutral beams and ICRH into a low-density target plasma, with a wide central region of slightly negative or flat magnetic shear with q > 1 everywhere. An additional H-mode transition can also raise the pressure in the region between internal and edge transport barriers. The ion heat conductivity falls to the neoclassical level in the improved core confinement region. Pressure profile control through power deposition feedback control makes it possible to work close to the marginal stability boundary for pressure-driven MHD modes. First experiments in deuterium/tritium plasmas, with up to 75% tritium target concentration, have established internal transport barriers already with heating powers at the lowest threshold of pure deuterium plasmas, resulting in a fusion power output of P fusion = 2 MW. (author)

  13. Lidar Wind Profiler for the NextGen Airportal Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — MassTech, Inc. proposes to develop a Lidar Wind Profiler for standoff sensing of concurrent 3-component wind velocities using an eye-safe, rugged, reliable optical...

  14. A bistatic sodar for precision wind profiling in complex terrain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bradley, Stuart; Hünerbein, Sabine Von; Mikkelsen, Torben

    2012-01-01

    A new ground-based wind profiling technology-a scanned bistatic sodar-is described. The motivation for this design is to obtain a "mastlike"wind vector profile in a single atmospheric column extending from the ground to heights of more than 200 m. The need for this columnar profiling arises from ...

  15. Offshore wind profiling using light detection and ranging measurements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pena Diaz, Alfredo; Hasager, Charlotte Bay; Gryning, Sven-Erik

    2009-01-01

    The advantages and limitations of the ZephlR (R), a continuous-wave, focused light detection and ranging (LiDAR) wind profiler, to observe offshore winds and turbulence characteristics were tested during a 6 month campaign at the tronsformer/platform of Hams Rev, the world's largest wind form....... The LiDAR system is a ground-based sensing technique which avoids the use of high and costly meteorological masts. Three different inflow conditions were selected to perform LiDAR wind profiling. Comparisons of LiDAR mean wind speeds against cup anemometers from different masts showed high correlations...... for the open sea sectors and good agreement with their longitudinal turbulence characteristics. Cup anemometer mean wind speed profiles were extended with LiDAR profiles up to 161 m on each inflow sector. The extension resulted in a good profile match for the three surrounding masts. These extended profiles...

  16. Quality Control of Wind Data from 50-MHz Doppler Radar Wind Profiler

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vacek, Austin

    2016-01-01

    Upper-level wind profiles obtained from a 50-MHz Doppler Radar Wind Profiler (DRWP) instrument at Kennedy Space Center are incorporated in space launch vehicle design and day-of-launch operations to assess wind effects on the vehicle during ascent. Automated and manual quality control (QC) techniques are implemented to remove spurious data in the upper-level wind profiles caused from atmospheric and non-atmospheric artifacts over the 2010-2012 period of record (POR). By adding the new quality controlled profiles with older profiles from 1997-2009, a robust database will be constructed of upper-level wind characteristics. Statistical analysis will determine the maximum, minimum, and 95th percentile of the wind components from the DRWP profiles over recent POR and compare against the older database. Additionally, this study identifies specific QC flags triggered during the QC process to understand how much data is retained and removed from the profiles.

  17. The wind profile up to 300 meters over flat terrain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gryning, S-E; Joergensen, H; Larsen, S; Batchvarova, E

    2007-01-01

    Analysis of profiles of meteorological measurements from a 160 m high mast at the National Test Site for wind turbines at Hoevsoere (rural, Denmark) shows that the wind profile based on surface-layer theory and Monin-Obukhov scaling is valid up to a height of 50 to 80 m. At higher levels deviations from the measurements progressively occur. The measurements also indicated that the height of the boundary layer influences the wind profile even in the lowest hundreds of meters. A parameterization of the wind profile for the entire boundary layer is formulated, with emphasis on the lowest 200 - 300 meters

  18. Wind turbine blade shear web disbond detection using rotor blade operational sensing and data analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myrent, Noah; Adams, Douglas E; Griffith, D Todd

    2015-02-28

    A wind turbine blade's structural dynamic response is simulated and analysed with the goal of characterizing the presence and severity of a shear web disbond. Computer models of a 5 MW offshore utility-scale wind turbine were created to develop effective algorithms for detecting such damage. Through data analysis and with the use of blade measurements, a shear web disbond was quantified according to its length. An aerodynamic sensitivity study was conducted to ensure robustness of the detection algorithms. In all analyses, the blade's flap-wise acceleration and root-pitching moment were the clearest indicators of the presence and severity of a shear web disbond. A combination of blade and non-blade measurements was formulated into a final algorithm for the detection and quantification of the disbond. The probability of detection was 100% for the optimized wind speed ranges in laminar, 30% horizontal shear and 60% horizontal shear conditions. © 2015 The Author(s) Published by the Royal Society. All rights reserved.

  19. Brief communication: On the influence of vertical wind shear on the combined power output of two model wind turbines in yaw

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Schottler

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The effect of vertical wind shear on the total power output of two aligned model wind turbines as a function of yaw misalignment of the upstream turbine is studied experimentally. It is shown that asymmetries of the power output of the downstream turbine and the combined power of both with respect to the upstream turbine's yaw misalignment angle can be linked to the vertical wind shear of the inflow.

  20. CAMEX-4 MIPS 915 MHZ DOPPLER WIND PROFILER V1

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The CAMEX-4 MIPS 915 MHZ Doppler Wind Profiler dataset was collected by the University of Alabama in Huntsville (UAH) Mobile Integrated Profiling System (MIPS),...

  1. The Low-Level Wind Shear Alert System (LLWSAS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-05-01

    Weather (Meteorology) 19. Security Clasif . (of this report) 20. Security Clssif. (of this page) 21. No. of Pages 22. Price Unclassified Unclassified...sections to loosen, resulting in tower collapse. A heavier duty, three-legged tower with steel rod legs and welded steel crossmembers on a frangible base...runways 36L-18R. The sensor is atop a steel pipe which is affixed to a transmissometer tower. There is some sheltering with west winds because of

  2. Wind Shear and the Strength of Severe Convective Phenomena—Preliminary Results from Poland in 2011–2015

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wojciech Pilorz

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Severe convective phenomena cause significant loss in the economy and, primarily, casualties. Therefore, it is essential to forecast such extreme events to avoid or minimize the negative consequences. Wind shear provides an updraft-downdraft separation in the convective cell, which extends the cell lifetime. Wind shears between a few different air layers have been examined in all damaging convective cases in Poland, taken from the European Severe Weather Database between 2011 and 2015, in order to find their values and patterns according to the intensity of this phenomenon. Each severe weather report was assigned wind shear values from the nearest sounding station, and subsequently the presented summary was made. It was found that wind shear values differ between the given phenomena and their intensity. This regularity is particularly visible in shears containing 0 km wind. The highest shears occur within wind reports. Lower values are associated with hail reports. An important difference between weak and F1+ tornadoes was found in most of the wind shears. Severe phenomena probability within 0–6 km and 0–1 km shears show different patterns according to the phenomena and their intensity. This finding has its application in severe weather forecasting.

  3. Role of upper-level wind shear on the structure and maintenance of derecho-producing convective systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coniglio, Michael Charles

    Common large-scale environments associated with the development of derecho-producing convective systems from a large number of events are identified using statistical clustering of the 500-mb geopotential heights as guidance. The majority of the events (72%) fall into three main patterns that include a well-defined upstream trough (40%), a ridge (20%), and a zonal, low-amplitude flow (12%), which is defined as an additional warm-season pattern that is not identified in past studies of derecho environments. Through an analysis of proximity soundings, discrepancies are found in both low-level and deep-tropospheric shear parameters between observations and the shear profiles considered favorable for strong, long-lived convective systems in idealized simulations. To explore the role of upper-level shear in derecho environments, a set of two-dimensional simulations of density currents within a dry, neutrally stable environment are used to examine the ability of a cold pool to lift environmental air within a vertically sheared flow. The results confirm that the addition of upper-level shear to a wind profile with weak to moderate low-level shear increases the vertical displacement of low-level parcels despite a decrease in the vertical velocity along the cold pool interface, as suggested by previous studies. Parcels that are elevated above the surface (1-2 km) overturn and are responsible for the deep lifting in the deep-shear environments. This deep overturning caused by the upper-level shear helps to maintain the tilt of the convective systems in more complex two-dimensional and three dimensional simulations. The overturning also is shown to greatly increase the size of the convective systems in the three-dimensional simulations by facilitating the initiation and maintenance of convective cells along the cold pool. When combined with estimates of the cold pool motion and the storm-relative hodograph, these results may best be used for the prediction of the demise of

  4. The influence of humidity fluxes on offshore wind speed profiles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barthelmie, Rebecca Jane; Sempreviva, Anna Maria; Pryor, Sara

    2010-01-01

    extrapolation from lower measurements. With humid conditions and low mechanical turbulence offshore, deviations from the traditional logarithmic wind speed profile become significant and stability corrections are required. This research focuses on quantifying the effect of humidity fluxes on stability corrected...... wind speed profiles. The effect on wind speed profiles is found to be important in stable conditions where including humidity fluxes forces conditions towards neutral. Our results show that excluding humidity fluxes leads to average predicted wind speeds at 150 m from 10 m which are up to 4% higher...... than if humidity fluxes are included, and the results are not very sensitive to the method selected to estimate humidity fluxes....

  5. Long-Term Mean Wind Profiles Based on Similarity Theory

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kelly, Mark C.; Gryning, Sven-Erik

    2010-01-01

    We provide general forms for long-term mean wind profiles from similarity-based wind profiles, beginning with a probabilistic adaptation of Monin–Obukhov similarity theory. We develop an analytical formulation for the stability distributions prevailing in the atmospheric surface layer, which...

  6. Risø 1978: Further Investigations into the Effects of Local Terrain Irregularties on Tower-Measured Wind Profiles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Peterson, E. W.; Taylor, P. A.; Højstrup, Jørgen

    1980-01-01

    Observations of flow over complex terrain taken at Risø during June–July 1978 and numerical studies confirm earlier findings that small variations in surface elevation have significant effects on mean wind profiles. Measured shear stresses in the nonequilibrium region of the flow are consistent w...

  7. Relationship between types of surface shear stress profiles and membrane fouling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, C C V; Bérubé, P R; Hall, E R

    2011-12-01

    Shear stress has been recognized as an important parameter in controlling particle back-transport from membrane surfaces. However, little is known of the relationship between transient shear conditions induced by air sparging and fouling control near membrane surfaces. In this paper, the different types of surface shear stress profiles that had beneficial effects on minimizing reversible surface fouling were examined. The relationship between different statistical shear parameters (e.g. time-averaged shear, standard deviation of shear and amplitude of shear) and fouling control that have been used by others were examined as well. It was found that the fouling rate for membranes subjected to transient shear conditions was lower than for membranes subjected to constant shear conditions. The magnitude, duration and frequency of the shear conditions were found to have an impact on the fouling rate of membranes. It was also found that although some statistical shear parameters could generally be used to relate shear and fouling, they were inadequate to relate surface shear stress to fouling, for all transient shear conditions examined. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Transition Marshall Space Flight Center Wind Profiler Splicing Algorithm to Launch Services Program Upper Winds Tool

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauman, William H., III

    2014-01-01

    NASAs LSP customers and the future SLS program rely on observations of upper-level winds for steering, loads, and trajectory calculations for the launch vehicles flight. On the day of launch, the 45th Weather Squadron (45 WS) Launch Weather Officers (LWOs) monitor the upper-level winds and provide forecasts to the launch team via the AMU-developed LSP Upper Winds tool for launches at Kennedy Space Center (KSC) and Cape Canaveral Air Force Station. This tool displays wind speed and direction profiles from rawinsondes released during launch operations, the 45th Space Wing 915-MHz Doppler Radar Wind Profilers (DRWPs) and KSC 50-MHz DRWP, and output from numerical weather prediction models.The goal of this task was to splice the wind speed and direction profiles from the 45th Space Wing (45 SW) 915-MHz Doppler radar Wind Profilers (DRWPs) and KSC 50-MHz DRWP at altitudes where the wind profiles overlap to create a smooth profile. In the first version of the LSP Upper Winds tool, the top of the 915-MHz DRWP wind profile and the bottom of the 50-MHz DRWP were not spliced, sometimes creating a discontinuity in the profile. The Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) Natural Environments Branch (NE) created algorithms to splice the wind profiles from the two sensors to generate an archive of vertically complete wind profiles for the SLS program. The AMU worked with MSFC NE personnel to implement these algorithms in the LSP Upper Winds tool to provide a continuous spliced wind profile.The AMU transitioned the MSFC NE algorithms to interpolate and fill data gaps in the data, implement a Gaussian weighting function to produce 50-m altitude intervals in each sensor, and splice the data together from both DRWPs. They did so by porting the MSFC NE code written with MATLAB software into Microsoft Excel Visual Basic for Applications (VBA). After testing the new algorithms in stand-alone VBA modules, the AMU replaced the existing VBA code in the LSP Upper Winds tool with the new

  9. Performance analysis and technical assessment of coherent lidar systems for airborne wind shear detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huffaker, R. Milton; Targ, Russell

    1988-01-01

    Detailed computer simulations of the lidar wind-measuring process have been conducted to evaluate the use of pulsed coherent lidar for airborne windshear monitoring. NASA data fields for an actual microburst event were used in the simulation. Both CO2 and Ho:YAG laser lidar systems performed well in the microburst test case, and were able to measure wind shear in the severe weather of this wet microburst to ranges in excess of 1.4 km. The consequent warning time gained was about 15 sec.

  10. Evolution and Growth Competition of Salt Fingers in Saline Lake with Slight Wind Shear

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Ray-Yeng; Hwung, Hwung-Hweng; Shugan, Igor

    2010-05-01

    Since the discover of double-diffusive convection by Stommel, Arons & Blanchard (1956), 'evidence has accumulated for the widespread presence of double-diffusion throughout the ocean' and for its 'significant effects on global water-mass structure and the thermohaline convection' (Schmitt, 1998). The salt-fingering form of double-diffusion has particularly attracted interest because of salt-finger convection being now widely recognized as an important mechanism for mixing heat and salt both vertically and laterally in the ocean and saline lake. In oceanographic situations or saline lake where salt fingers may be an important mechanism for the transport of heat and salt in the vertical, velocity shears may also be present. Salt finger convection is analogous to Bénard convection in that the kinetic energy of the motions is obtained from the potential energy stored in the unstable distribution of a stratifying component. On the basis of the thermal analogy it is of interest to discover whether salt fingers are converted into two-dimensional sheets by the wind shear, and how the vertical fluxes of heat and salt are changed by the wind shear. Salt finger convection under the effect of steady wind shear is theoretically examined in this paper. The evolution of developing in the presence of a vertical density gradient disturbance and the horizontal Couette flow is considered near the onset of salt fingers in the saline lake under a moderate rate of wind shear. We use velocity as the basic variable and solve the pressure Poisson equation in terms of the associated Green function. Growth competition between the longitudinal rolls (LR) and the transverse rolls (TR), whose axes are respectively in the direction parallel to and perpendicular to the Couette flow, is investigated by the weakly nonlinear analysis of coupled-mode equations. The results show that the TR mode is characterized in some range of the effective Rayleigh number, and that the stability is dominated by

  11. Estimating a wind shear detection range for different altitude levels in the troposphere

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. A. Gorodnichev

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A so-called wind shear (a vector difference of wind speeds in two points of the space referred to the distance between them is of essential practical interest to air force. The wind shear is a hidden and cliffhanging phenomenon. The growth of aircraft incidents at their taking off and landing have drawn attention to this phenomenon.Laser methods are one of the advanced remote techniques to measure a speed and detect a wind shear. Remote laser methods of wind speed measurement are divided into Doppler and correlation ones. More simple (and, respectively, demanding less expensive equipment are correlation methods and near to them non-Doppler techniques.Today almost all existing wind correlation lidars run in the visible range. However, in terms of safety for an eye, other ranges: near infrared (IK and ultra-violet (UF ones are also of interest.The work assesses a sounding range of the aircraft lidar in UF, visible, and near IK spectral ranges to solve a problem of wind shear detection for different altitude levels in the troposphere.Results of calculations show that the sounding ranges decrease with increasing flight altitude (at lidar parameters used in calculations to be in range from ~ 2.7-3.3 km (the lowest atmospheric layer height ~ 0 to ~ 200 - 300 m (a flight altitude of 10 km. And the main reduction of the sounding range vs height is within the range of heights of 5-10 km. Such dependence is caused by the strong reduction of aerosol extinction and atmosphere scattering with the altitude increase in this altitude range.In a ground layer of the terrestrial atmosphere (height ~ 0 the greatest sounding range is realized for a wave length of 0.532 microns. With increasing flight altitude a difference in sounding ranges for the wave lengths of 0.355; 9.532 and 1.54 microns decreases, and at big heights the greatest range of sounding is realized for a wave length of 1.54 microns.

  12. Profiling the regional wind power fluctuation in China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu Dayang; Liang Jun; Han Xueshan; Zhao Jianguo

    2011-01-01

    As China starts to build 6 10-GW wind zones in 5 provinces by 2020, accommodating the wind electricity generated from these large wind zones will be a great challenge for the regional grids. Inadequate wind observing data hinders profiling the wind power fluctuations at the regional grid level. This paper proposed a method to assess the seasonal and diurnal wind power patterns based on the wind speed data from the NASA GEOS-5 DAS system, which provides data to the study of climate processes including the long-term estimates of meteorological quantities. The wind power fluctuations for the 6 largest wind zones in China are presented with both the capacity factor and the megawatt wind power output. The measured hourly wind output in a regional grid is compared to the calculating result to test the analyzing model. To investigate the offsetting effect of dispersed wind farms over large regions, the regional correlations of hourly wind power fluctuations are calculated. The result illustrates the different offsetting effects of minute and hourly fluctuations.

  13. Constitutive Curve and Velocity Profile in Entangled Polymers during Start-Up of Steady Shear Flow

    KAUST Repository

    Hayes, Keesha A.

    2010-05-11

    Time-dependent shear stress versus shear rate, constitutive curve, and velocity profile measurements are reported in entangled polymer solutions during start-up of steady shear flow. By combining confocal microscopy and particle image velocimetry (PIV), we determine the time-dependent velocity profile in polybutadiene and polystyrene solutions seeded with fluorescent 150 nm silica and 7.5 μm melamine particles. By comparing these profiles with time-dependent constitutive curves obtained from experiment and theory, we explore the connection between transient nonmonotonic regions in the constitutive curve for an entangled polymer and its susceptibility to unstable flow by shear banding [Adams et al. Phys. Rev. Lett. 2009, 102, 067801-4]. Surprisingly, we find that even polymer systems which exhibit transient, nonmonotonic shear stress-shear rate relationships in bulk rheology experiments manifest time-dependent velocity profiles that are decidedly linear and show no evidence of unstable flow. We also report that interfacial slip plays an important role in the steady shear flow behavior of entangled polymers at shear rates above the reciprocal terminal relaxation time but has little, if any, effect on the shape of the velocity profile. © 2010 American Chemical Society.

  14. Acute shear stress direction dictates adherent cell remodeling and verifies shear profile of spinning disk assays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fuhrmann, Alexander; Engler, Adam J

    2015-01-01

    Several methods have been developed to quantify population level changes in cell attachment strength given its large heterogeneity. One such method is the rotating disk chamber or ‘spinning disk’ in which a range of shear forces are applied to attached cells to quantify detachment force, i.e. attachment strength, which can be heterogeneous within cell populations. However, computing the exact force vectors that act upon cells is complicated by complex flow fields and variable cell morphologies. Recent observations suggest that cells may remodel their morphology and align during acute shear exposure, but contrary to intuition, shear is not orthogonal to the radial direction. Here we theoretically derive the magnitude and direction of applied shear and demonstrate that cells, under certain physiological conditions, align in this direction within minutes. Shear force magnitude is also experimentally verified which validates that for spread cells shear forces and not torque or drag dominate in this assay, and demonstrates that the applied force per cell area is largely independent of initial morphology. These findings suggest that direct quantified comparison of the effects of shear on a wide array of cell types and conditions can be made with confidence using this assay without the need for computational or numerical modeling. (paper)

  15. Sodar data about wind profiles in Moscow city

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mikhail A. Lokoshchenko

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available The results of wind measurements in the lowermost 500 m air layer above Moscow by Doppler sodar 'MODOS' produced by METEK firm are presented for the period from 2004 to 2008. General features both of the annual cycle of wind profiles and of the diurnal one are being discussed. In average, the highest wind speed values are observed in autumn and in winter, the least ones in spring and in summer. The recordable maximal value of the wind speed averaged over 10 minutes in Moscow city has been found as nearly 31 m/s. The distributions of wind speed values regularly show a positive asymmetry and are close to the logarithmically normal law. For the first time, seasonal dynamics of the skewness coefficient and of the kurtosis of wind distributions are analyzed. The most frequently detected wind directions are South-Western and Western-South-Western; the rarest are directions with an Eastern component. The crossover height of wind profiles varies in average from 60-80 m in autumn and in winter to nearly of 100 m in summer. For the first time, mean values of wind turning during the passing of atmospheric fronts have been received and are studied by sodar data. It was found that right-hand (clockwise turning of wind at cold fronts is more and occurs more quickly compared to warm fronts. The occlusion fronts show intermediate mean values of wind turning.

  16. Factors Contributing to the Interrupted Decay of Hurricane Joaquin (2015) in a Moderate Vertical Wind Shear Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-06-01

    CONTRIBUTING TO THE INTERRUPTED DECAY OF HURRICANE JOAQUIN (2015) IN A MODERATE VERTICAL WIND SHEAR ENVIRONMENT by Adam C. Jorgensen June 2017...OF HURRICANE JOAQUIN (2015) IN A MODERATE VERTICAL WIND SHEAR ENVIRONMENT 5. FUNDING NUMBERS 6. AUTHOR(S) Adam C. Jorgensen 7. PERFORMING...maximum 200 words) This study investigates the environmental factors and the internal processes that contributed to the interrupted rapid decay of

  17. Retrieval of vertical wind profiles during monsoon from satellite ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    large number of radiosonde observations of wind profiles over the Indian Ocean during the monsoon months. It has been found that the first ... include several sources of both systematic and random errors. Among them cloud top height .... highly correlated with the pseudo-winds at levels between 850mb and 600mb (r ј 0:8) ...

  18. Field test of a lidar wind profiler

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kunz, G.J.

    1996-01-01

    Wind speeds and wind directions are measured remotely using an incoherent backscatter lidar system operating at a wavelength of 1.06 mm with a maximum repetition rate of 13 Hz. The principle of the measurements is based on following detectable atmospheric structures, which are transported by the

  19. On the use of horizontal acoustic doppler profilers for continuous bed shear stress monitoring

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vermeulen, B.; Hoitink, A.J.F.; Sassi, M.G.

    2013-01-01

    Continuous monitoring of bed shear stress in large river systems may serve to better estimate alluvial sediment transport to the coastal ocean. Here we explore the possibility of using a horizontally deployed acoustic Doppler current profiler (ADCP) to monitor bed shear stress, applying a prescribed

  20. Wake Flow Simulation of a Vertical Axis Wind Turbine Under the Influence of Wind Shear

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendoza, Victor; Goude, Anders

    2017-05-01

    The current trend of the wind energy industry aims for large scale turbines installed in wind farms. This brings a renewed interest in vertical axis wind turbines (VAWTs) since they have several advantages over the traditional Horizontal Axis Wind Tubines (HAWTs) for mitigating the new challenges. However, operating VAWTs are characterized by complex aerodynamics phenomena, presenting considerable challenges for modeling tools. An accurate and reliable simulation tool for predicting the interaction between the obtained wake of an operating VAWT and the flow in atmospheric open sites is fundamental for optimizing the design and location of wind energy facility projects. The present work studies the wake produced by a VAWT and how it is affected by the surface roughness of the terrain, without considering the effects of the ambient turbulence intensity. This study was carried out using an actuator line model (ALM), and it was implemented using the open-source CFD library OpenFOAM to solve the governing equations and to compute the resulting flow fields. An operational H-shaped VAWT model was tested, for which experimental activity has been performed at an open site north of Uppsala-Sweden. Different terrains with similar inflow velocities have been evaluated. Simulated velocity and vorticity of representative sections have been analyzed. Numerical results were validated using normal forces measurements, showing reasonable agreement.

  1. Use of ground-based wind profiles in mesoscale forecasting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlatter, Thomas W.

    1985-01-01

    A brief review is presented of recent uses of ground-based wind profile data in mesoscale forecasting. Some of the applications are in real time, and some are after the fact. Not all of the work mentioned here has been published yet, but references are given wherever possible. As Gage and Balsley (1978) point out, sensitive Doppler radars have been used to examine tropospheric wind profiles since the 1970's. It was not until the early 1980's, however, that the potential contribution of these instruments to operational forecasting and numerical weather prediction became apparent. Profiler winds and radiosonde winds compare favorably, usually within a few m/s in speed and 10 degrees in direction (see Hogg et al., 1983), but the obvious advantage of the profiler is its frequent (hourly or more often) sampling of the same volume. The rawinsonde balloon is launched only twice a day and drifts with the wind. In this paper, I will: (1) mention two operational uses of data from a wind profiling system developed jointly by the Wave Propagation and Aeronomy Laboratories of NOAA; (2) describe a number of displays of these same data on a workstation for mesoscale forecasting developed by the Program for Regional Observing and Forecasting Services (PROFS); and (3) explain some interesting diagnostic calculations performed by meteorologists of the Wave Propagation Laboratory.

  2. Wind profiles in Moscow city by the sodar data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lokoshchenko, M A; Yavlyaeva, E A

    2008-01-01

    The results of wind measurements in the low 500 m air layer above Moscow by Doppler sodar 'MODOS' have been presented for period from 2004 to 2008. General features of both annual course and the diurnal one of wind profiles have been discussed. The most wind speed values are observed in average in autumn and in winter, the least ones - in spring and in summer. The most frequent wind direction is south-western; the rarest one is northern. The crossover height of wind profiles has been analyzed. As it was found it consists of 60-80 m in average in warm period. For the first time, mean values of wind turning during passing of atmospheric fronts have been received and studied by sodar data. It was found that right-hand (clockwise) turning of wind at cold fronts is more and occurs more quickly in time in the comparison with warm fronts. The occlusion fronts demonstrate intermediate mean values of wind turning

  3. Effects of tailing dam profiles on relative wind erosion rates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coffey, P.S.; Scott, W.D.; Summers, K.J.

    Erosion from mine treatment and associated residue areas can pose a significant environmental problem for surrounding locations from dust and other transported materials. The shape of such residue areas can influence windfield behavior by causing significant wind speed increases. Residue areas are often unprotected so that increasing the speed of wind passing over these areas will cause extra erosion. Values of wind speed-up predicted by an empirical model for wind flow over hills of low slope were compared with measured values over approach slopes to a tailings dam. Hunt's model used in this study relates wind speed from a point on the hill to that observed if there was no hill. Measured values are in agreement with those predicted by the model. Shear stress values calculated from the wind flow model are then used to determine the friction velocity which, in turn, predict the relative rates of erosion. This prediction is based on the cubic relation between the friction velocity and erosion rate observed by Bagnold. These calculations are repeated for the various possible hill shapes allowed by the plant layout and the need to integrate long term spoil heaps with existing topography. A strategy for minimizing erosion of mine tailings through shape selection can then form part of the environmental considerations associated with tailings dams.

  4. Sonic Detection and Ranging (SODAR) Wind Profiler Instrument Handbook

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coulter, Richard L. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)

    2016-04-01

    The SODAR (Sonic Detection and Ranging) wind profiler measures wind profiles and backscattered signal strength between (nominally) 15 meters (m) and 500 m. It operates by transmitting acoustic energy into the atmosphere and measuring the strength and frequency of backscattered energy. The strength of the backscattered signal is determined by the strength of temperature inhomogeneities with size on the order of 10 centimeters (cm). Assuming the scattering elements in the atmosphere are moving with the mean wind, the horizontal wind field can be derived. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)’s Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility Mobile Facility (AMF) has a system developed by Scintec, Inc. that transmits a sequence of frequencies to enhance signal determination.

  5. Design and Performance of a Miniature Lidar Wind Profiler (MLWP)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cornwell, Donald M., Jr.; Miodek, Mariusz J.

    1998-01-01

    The directional velocity of the wind is one of the most critical components for understanding meteorological and other dynamic atmospheric processes. Altitude-resolved wind velocity measurements, also known as wind profiles or soundings, are especially necessary for providing data for meteorological forecasting and overall global circulation models (GCM's). Wind profiler data are also critical in identifying possible dangerous weather conditions for aviation. Furthermore, a system has yet to be developed for wind profiling from the surface of Mars which could also meet the stringent requirements on size, weight, and power of such a mission. Obviously, a novel wind profiling approach based on small and efficient technology is required to meet these needs. A lidar system based on small and highly efficient semiconductor lasers is now feasible due to recent developments in the laser and detector technologies. The recent development of high detection efficiency (50%), silicon-based photon-counting detectors when combined with high laser pulse repetition rates and long receiver integration times has allowed these transmitter energies to be reduced to the order of microjoules per pulse. Aerosol lidar systems using this technique have been demonstrated for both Q-switched, diode-pumped solid-state laser transmitters (lambda = 523 nm) and semiconductor diode lasers (lambda = 830 nm); however, a wind profiling lidar based on this technique has yet to be developed. We will present an investigation of a semiconductor-laser-based lidar system which uses the "edge-filter" direct detection technique to infer Doppler frequency shifts of signals backscattered from aerosols in the planetary boundary layer (PBL). Our investigation will incorporate a novel semiconductor laser design which mitigates the deleterious effects of frequency chirp in pulsed diode lasers, a problem which has limited their use in such systems in the past. Our miniature lidar could be used on a future Mars

  6. The Orlando TDWR testbed and airborne wind shear date comparison results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Steven; Berke, Anthony; Matthews, Michael

    1992-01-01

    The focus of this talk is on comparing terminal Doppler Weather Radar (TDWR) and airborne wind shear data in computing a microburst hazard index called the F factor. The TDWR is a ground-based system for detecting wind shear hazards to aviation in the terminal area. The Federal Aviation Administration will begin deploying TDWR units near 45 airports in late 1992. As part of this development effort, M.I.T. Lincoln Laboratory operates under F.A.A. support a TDWR testbed radar in Orlando, FL. During the past two years, a series of flight tests has been conducted with instrumented aircraft penetrating microburst events while under testbed radar surveillance. These tests were carried out with a Cessna Citation 2 aircraft operated by the University of North Dakota (UND) Center for Aerospace Sciences in 1990, and a Boeing 737 operated by NASA Langley Research Center in 1991. A large data base of approximately 60 instrumented microburst penetrations has been obtained from these flights.

  7. Structural characterization of wind-sheared turbulent flow using self-organized mapping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Nicholas V.; Handler, Robert A.

    2016-05-01

    A nonlinear cluster analysis algorithm is used to characterize the spatial structure of a wind-sheared turbulent flow obtained from the direct numerical simulation (DNS) of the three-dimensional temperature and momentum fields. The application of self-organizing mapping to DNS data for data reduction is utilized because of the dimensional similitude in structure between DNS data and remotely sensed hyperspectral and multispectral data where the technique has been used extensively. For the three Reynolds numbers of 150, 180, and 220 used in the DNS, self-organized mapping is successful in the extraction of boundary layer streaky structures from the turbulent temperature and momentum fields. In addition, it preserves the cross-wind scale structure of the streaks exhibited in both fields which loosely scale with the inverse of the Reynolds number. Self-organizing mapping of the along wind component of the helicity density shows a layer of the turbulence field which is spotty suggesting significant direct coupling between the large and small-scale turbulent structures. The spatial correlation of the temperature and momentum fields allows for the possibility of the remote extrapolation of the momentum structure from thermal structure.

  8. Numerical Analysis of Composite Steel Concrete Structural Shear Walls with Steel Encased Profiles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Dan

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The use of common reinforced concrete shear walls in high rise buildings is sometimes limited because of the large amount of reinforcement localized at the end of the element. A good alternative in avoiding this disadvantage is to use composite steel concrete structural shear walls with steel encased profiles. This solution used for high rise buildings, offers to designers lateral stiffness, shear capacity and high bending resisting moment of structural walls. The encasement of the steel shapes in concrete is applied also for the following purposes: flexural stiffening and strengthening of compression elements; fire protection; potentially easier repairs after moderate damage; economy with respect both to material and construction. Until now in the national and international literature poor information about nonlinear behaviour of composite steel concrete structural shear walls with steel encased profiles is available. A theoretical and experimental program related to the behaviour of steel concrete structural shear walls with steel encased profiles is developed at “Politehnica” University of Timişoara. The program refers to six different elements, which differ by the shape of the steel encased profile and also by the arrangement of steel shapes on the cross section of the element. In order to calibrate the elements for experimental study some numerical analysis were made. The paper presents the results of numerical analysis with details of stress distribution, crack distribution, structural stiffness at various loads, and load bearing capacity of the elements.

  9. Quality Control Algorithms for the Kennedy Space Center 50-Megahertz Doppler Radar Wind Profiler Winds Database

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbre, Robert E., Jr.

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents the process used by the Marshall Space Flight Center Natural Environments Branch (EV44) to quality control (QC) data from the Kennedy Space Center's 50-MHz Doppler Radar Wind Profiler for use in vehicle wind loads and steering commands. The database has been built to mitigate limitations of using the currently archived databases from weather balloons. The DRWP database contains wind measurements from approximately 2.7-18.6 km altitude at roughly five minute intervals for the August 1997 to December 2009 period of record, and the extensive QC process was designed to remove spurious data from various forms of atmospheric and non-atmospheric artifacts. The QC process is largely based on DRWP literature, but two new algorithms have been developed to remove data contaminated by convection and excessive first guess propagations from the Median Filter First Guess Algorithm. In addition to describing the automated and manual QC process in detail, this paper describes the extent of the data retained. Roughly 58% of all possible wind observations exist in the database, with approximately 100 times as many complete profile sets existing relative to the EV44 balloon databases. This increased sample of near-continuous wind profile measurements may help increase launch availability by reducing the uncertainty of wind changes during launch countdown

  10. Microscopic dynamics and velocity profiles of bacterial superfluids under oscillatory shear

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Xiang; Guo, Shuo; Samanta, Devranjan; Peng, Yi; Xu, Xinliang

    Bacterial suspensions a premier example of active fluids show an unusual response to shear stresses. Rather than increasing the viscosity of the suspending fluid, swimming bacteria can self-organize into collective flows under shear, turning the suspension into a ``superfluid'' with zero apparent viscosity. Although the existence of the bacterial superfluid has been demonstrated in bulk rheology measurements, little is known about the microscopic dynamics of such an exotic phase. Here, by combining sensitive rheology measurements with high-speed confocal microscopy, we study the detailed 3D dynamics of concentrated bacterial suspensions confined in narrow gaps under oscillatory shear. We find that sheared bacterial suspensions in the superfluidic phase exhibit velocity profiles with strong spatial heterogeneity, unexpected from the established hydrodynamic theory of active fluids. We quantitatively explain the observed velocity profiles by considering a balance of active stresses and shear stresses in an ensemble average. Our experiments reveal a profound influence of shear flows on bacterial locomotion and provide new insights to the origin of the unique flow behaviors of active fluids.

  11. 915-MHz Radar Wind Profiler (915RWP) Handbook

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coulter, R

    2005-01-01

    The 915 MHz radar wind profiler/radio acoustic sounding system (RWP/RASS) measures wind profiles and backscattered signal strength between (nominally) 0.1 km and 5 km and virtual temperature profiles between 0.1 km and 2.5 km. It operates by transmitting electromagnetic energy into the atmosphere and measuring the strength and frequency of backscattered energy. Virtual temperatures are recovered by transmitting an acoustic signal vertically and measuring the electromagnetic energy scattered from the acoustic wavefront. Because the propagation speed of the acoustic wave is proportional to the square root of the virtual temperature of the air, the virtual temperature can be recovered by measuring the Doppler shift of the scattered electromagnetic wave.

  12. Pairwise frictional profile between particles determines discontinuous shear thickening transition in non-colloidal suspensions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Comtet, Jean; Chatté, Guillaume; Niguès, Antoine; Bocquet, Lydéric; Siria, Alessandro; Colin, Annie

    2017-05-31

    The process by which sheared suspensions go through a dramatic change in viscosity is known as discontinuous shear thickening. Although well-characterized on the macroscale, the microscopic mechanisms at play in this transition are still poorly understood. Here, by developing new experimental procedures based on quartz-tuning fork atomic force microscopy, we measure the pairwise frictional profile between approaching pairs of polyvinyl chloride and cornstarch particles in solvent. We report a clear transition from a low-friction regime, where pairs of particles support a finite normal load, while interacting purely hydrodynamically, to a high-friction regime characterized by hard repulsive contact between the particles and sliding friction. Critically, we show that the normal stress needed to enter the frictional regime at nanoscale matches the critical stress at which shear thickening occurs for macroscopic suspensions. Our experiments bridge nano and macroscales and provide long needed demonstration of the role of frictional forces in discontinuous shear thickening.

  13. Modified power law equations for vertical wind profiles. [in investigation of windpower plant siting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spera, D. A.; Richards, T. R.

    1979-01-01

    In an investigation of windpower plant siting, equations are presented and evaluated for a wind profile model which incorporates both roughness and wind speed effects, while retaining the basic simplicity of the Hellman power law. These equations recognize the statistical nature of wind profiles and are compatible with existing analytical models and recent wind profile data. Predictions of energy output based on the proposed profile equations are 10% to 20% higher than those made with the 1/7 power law. In addition, correlation between calculated and observed blade loads is significantly better at higher wind speeds when the proposed wind profile model is used than when a constant power model is used.

  14. GPM Ground Validation High Altitude Imaging Wind and Rain Airborne Profiler (HIWRAP) OLYMPEX V1a

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The High Altitude Wind and Rain Airborne Profiler (HIWRAP) instrument is a Doppler radar designed to measure tropospheric winds through deriving Doppler profiles...

  15. NASA airborne radar wind shear detection algorithm and the detection of wet microbursts in the vicinity of Orlando, Florida

    Science.gov (United States)

    Britt, Charles L.; Bracalente, Emedio M.

    1992-01-01

    The algorithms used in the NASA experimental wind shear radar system for detection, characterization, and determination of windshear hazard are discussed. The performance of the algorithms in the detection of wet microbursts near Orlando is presented. Various suggested algorithms that are currently being evaluated using the flight test results from Denver and Orlando are reviewed.

  16. On the relationship between wind profiles and the STS ascent structural loads

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Orvel E.; Adelfang, Stanley I.; Whitehead, Douglas S.

    1989-01-01

    The response of STS ascent structural load indicators to the wind profile is analyzed. The load indicator values versus Mach numbers are calculated with algorithms using trajectory information. The ascent load minimum margin concept is used to show that the detailed wind profile structure measured by the Jimsphere wind system is not needed to assess the STS rigid body structural wind loads.

  17. Prolonged application of high fluid shear to chondrocytes recapitulates gene expression profiles associated with osteoarthritis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fei Zhu

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Excessive mechanical loading of articular cartilage producing hydrostatic stress, tensile strain and fluid flow leads to irreversible cartilage erosion and osteoarthritic (OA disease. Since application of high fluid shear to chondrocytes recapitulates some of the earmarks of OA, we aimed to screen the gene expression profiles of shear-activated chondrocytes and assess potential similarities with OA chondrocytes. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Using a cDNA microarray technology, we screened the differentially-regulated genes in human T/C-28a2 chondrocytes subjected to high fluid shear (20 dyn/cm(2 for 48 h and 72 h relative to static controls. Confirmation of the expression patterns of select genes was obtained by qRT-PCR. Using significance analysis of microarrays with a 5% false discovery rate, 71 and 60 non-redundant transcripts were identified to be ≥2-fold up-regulated and ≤0.6-fold down-regulated, respectively, in sheared chondrocytes. Published data sets indicate that 42 of these genes, which are related to extracellular matrix/degradation, cell proliferation/differentiation, inflammation and cell survival/death, are differentially-regulated in OA chondrocytes. In view of the pivotal role of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2 in the pathogenesis and/or progression of OA in vivo and regulation of shear-induced inflammation and apoptosis in vitro, we identified a collection of genes that are either up- or down-regulated by shear-induced COX-2. COX-2 and L-prostaglandin D synthase (L-PGDS induce reactive oxygen species production, and negatively regulate genes of the histone and cell cycle families, which may play a critical role in chondrocyte death. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Prolonged application of high fluid shear stress to chondrocytes recapitulates gene expression profiles associated with osteoarthritis. Our data suggest a potential link between exposure of chondrocytes/cartilage to abnormal mechanical loading and the pathogenesis

  18. Wavelet based methods for improved wind profiler signal processing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Lehmann

    2001-08-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we apply wavelet thresholding for removing automatically ground and intermittent clutter (airplane echoes from wind profiler radar data. Using the concept of discrete multi-resolution analysis and non-parametric estimation theory, we develop wavelet domain thresholding rules, which allow us to identify the coefficients relevant for clutter and to suppress them in order to obtain filtered reconstructions.Key words. Meteorology and atmospheric dynamics (instruments and techniques – Radio science (remote sensing; signal processing

  19. Three-beam aerosol backscatter correlation lidar for wind profiling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasad, Narasimha S.; Radhakrishnan Mylapore, Anand

    2017-03-01

    The development of a three-beam aerosol backscatter correlation (ABC) light detection and ranging (lidar) to measure wind characteristics for wake vortex and plume tracking applications is discussed. This is a direct detection elastic lidar that uses three laser transceivers, operating at 1030-nm wavelength with ˜10-kHz pulse repetition frequency and nanosec class pulse widths, to directly obtain three components of wind velocities. By tracking the motion of aerosol structures along and between three near-parallel laser beams, three-component wind speed profiles along the field-of-view of laser beams are obtained. With three 8-in. transceiver modules, placed in a near-parallel configuration on a two-axis pan-tilt scanner, the lidar measures wind speeds up to 2 km away. Optical flow algorithms have been adapted to obtain the movement of aerosol structures between the beams. Aerosol density fluctuations are cross-correlated between successive scans to obtain the displacements of the aerosol features along the three axes. Using the range resolved elastic backscatter data from each laser beam, which is scanned over the volume of interest, a three-dimensional map of aerosol density can be generated in a short time span. The performance of the ABC wind lidar prototype, validated using sonic anemometer measurements, is discussed.

  20. Passive A-band Wind Sounder (PAWS) for measuring tropospheric wind velocity profile

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miecznik, Grzegorz; Pierce, Robert; Huang, Pei; Slaymaker, Philip A.; Kaptchen, Paul; Roark, Shane; Johnson, Brian R.; Heath, Donald F.

    2007-09-01

    The Passive A-Band Wind Sounder (PAWS) was funded through NASA's Instrument Incubator Program (IIP) to determine the feasibility of measuring tropospheric wind speed profiles from Doppler shifts in absorption O II A-band. It is being pursued as a low-cost and low-risk alternative capable of providing better wind data than is currently available. The instrument concept is adapted from the Wind Imaging Interferometer (WINDII) sensor on the Upper Atmosphere Research Satellite. The operational concept for PAWS is to view an atmospheric limb over an altitude range from the surface to 20 km with a Doppler interferometer in a sun-synchronous low-earth orbit. Two orthogonal views of the same sampling volume will be used to resolve horizontal winds from measured line-of-sight winds. A breadboard instrument was developed to demonstrate the measurement approach and to optimize the design parameters for the subsequent engineering unit and future flight sensor. The breadboard instrument consists of a telescope, collimator, filter assembly, and Michelson interferometer. The instrument design is guided by a retrieval model, which helps to optimize key parameters, spectral filter and optical path difference in particular.

  1. Effect of Tower Shadow and Wind Shear in a Wind Farm on AC Tie-Line Power Oscillations of Interconnected Power Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tan, Jin; Hu, Weihao; Wang, Xiaoru

    2013-01-01

    This paper describes a frequency domain approach for evaluating the impact of tower shadow and wind shear effects (TSWS) on tie-line power oscillations. A simplified frequency domain model of an interconnected power system with a wind farm is developed. The transfer function, which relates the tie......-line power variation to the mechanical power variation of a wind turbine, and the expression of the maximum magnitude of tie-line power oscillations are derived to identify the resonant condition and evaluate the potential risk. The effects of the parameters on the resonant magnitude of the tie-line power...... are also discussed. The frequency domain analysis reveals that TSWS can excite large tie-line power oscillations if the frequency of TSWS approaches the tie-line resonant frequency, especially in the case that the wind farm is integrated into a relatively small grid and the tie-line of the interconnected...

  2. High-resolution humidity profiles retrieved from wind profiler radar measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saïd, Frédérique; Campistron, Bernard; Di Girolamo, Paolo

    2018-03-01

    The retrieval of humidity profiles from wind profiler radars has already been documented in the past 30 years and is known to be neither as straightforward and nor as robust as the retrieval of the wind velocity. The main constraint to retrieve the humidity profile is the necessity to combine measurements from the wind profiler and additional measurements (such as observations from radiosoundings at a coarser time resolution). Furthermore, the method relies on some assumptions and simplifications that restrict the scope of its application. The first objective of this paper is to identify the obstacles and limitations and solve them, or at least define the field of applicability. To improve the method, we propose using the radar capacity to detect transition levels, such as the top level of the boundary layer, marked by a maximum in the radar reflectivity. This forces the humidity profile from the free troposphere and from the boundary layer to coincide at this level, after an optimization of the calibration coefficients, and reduces the error. The resulting mean bias affecting the specific humidity profile never exceeds 0.25 g kg-1. The second objective is to explore the capability of the algorithm to retrieve the humidity vertical profiles for an operational purpose by comparing the results with observations from a Raman lidar.

  3. Shape, shear and flexion: an analytic flexion formalism for realistic mass profiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lasky, P. D.; Fluke, C. J.

    2009-07-01

    Flexion is a non-linear gravitational lensing effect that arises from gradients in the convergence and shear across an image. We derive a formalism that describes non-linear gravitational lensing by a circularly symmetric lens in the thin-lens approximation. This provides us with relatively simple expressions for first- and second-flexion in terms of only the surface density and projected mass distribution of the lens. We give details of exact lens models, in particular providing flexion calculations for a Sérsic-law profile, which has become increasingly popular over recent years. We further provide a single resource for the analytic forms of convergence, shear, first- and second-flexion for the following mass distributions: a point mass, singular isothermal sphere (SIS); Navarro-Frenk-White (NFW) profile; Sérsic-law profile. We quantitatively compare these mass distributions and show that the convergence and first-flexion are better indicators of the Sérsic shape parameter, while for the concentration of NFW profiles the shear and second-flexion terms are preferred. Research undertaken as part of the Commonwealth Cosmology Initiative (CCI:http://www.thecci.org), an international collaboration supported by the Australian Research Council. E-mail: plasky@astro.swin.edu.au (PDL); cfluke@astro.swin.edu.au (CJF)

  4. Application of wind-profiling radar data to the analysis of dust weather in the Taklimakan Desert.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Minzhong; Wei, Wenshou; Ruan, Zheng; He, Qing; Ge, Runsheng

    2013-06-01

    The Urumqi Institute of Desert Meteorology of the China Meteorological Administration carried out an atmospheric scientific experiment to detect dust weather using a wind-profiling radar in the hinterland of the Taklimakan Desert in April 2010. Based on the wind-profiling data obtained from this experiment, this paper seeks to (a) analyze the characteristics of the horizontal wind field and vertical velocity of a breaking dust weather in a desert hinterland; (b) calculate and give the radar echo intensity and vertical distribution of a dust storm, blowing sand, and floating dust weather; and (c) discuss the atmosphere dust counts/concentration derived from the wind-profiling radar data. Studies show that: (a) A wind-profiling radar is an upper-air atmospheric remote sensing system that effectively detects and monitors dust. It captures the beginning and ending of a dust weather process as well as monitors the sand and dust being transported in the air in terms of height, thickness, and vertical intensity. (b) The echo intensity of a blowing sand and dust storm weather episode in Taklimakan is about -1~10 dBZ while that of floating dust -1~-15 dBZ, indicating that the dust echo intensity is significantly weaker than that of precipitation but stronger than that of clear air. (c) The vertical shear of horizontal wind and the maintenance of low-level east wind are usually dynamic factors causing a dust weather process in Taklimakan. The moment that the low-level horizontal wind field finds a shear over time, it often coincides with the onset of a sand blowing and dust storm weather process. (d) When a blowing sand or dust storm weather event occurs, the atmospheric vertical velocity tends to be of upward motion. This vertical upward movement of the atmosphere supported with a fast horizontal wind and a dry underlying surface carries dust particles from the ground up to the air to form blown sand or a dust storm.

  5. Wind Power Meteorology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lundtang Petersen, Erik; Mortensen, Niels Gylling; Landberg, Lars

    Wind power meteorology has evolved as an applied science, firmly founded on boundary-layer meteorology, but with strong links to climatology and geography. It concerns itself with three main areas: siting of wind turbines, regional wind resource assessment, and short-term prediction of the wind...... resource. The history, status and perspectives of wind power meteorology are presented, with emphasis on physical considerations and on its practical application. Following a global view of the wind resource, the elements of boundary layer meteorology which are most important for wind energy are reviewed......: wind profiles and shear, turbulence and gust, and extreme winds. The data used in wind power meteorology stem mainly from three sources: onsite wind measurements, the synoptic networks, and the re-analysis projects. Wind climate analysis, wind resource estimation and siting further require a detailed...

  6. First wind shear observation in PMSE with the tristatic EISCAT VHF radar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mann, I.; Häggström, I.; Tjulin, A.; Rostami, S.; Anyairo, C. C.; Dalin, P.

    2016-11-01

    The Polar Summer Mesosphere has the lowest temperatures that occur in the entire Earth system. Water ice particles below the optically observable size range participate there in the formation of strong radar echoes (Polar Mesospheric Summer Echoes, PMSE). To study PMSE we carried out observations with the European Incoherent Scatter (EISCAT) VHF and EISCAT UHF radar simultaneously from a site near Tromsø (69.58°N, 19.2272°E) and observed VHF backscattering also with the EISCAT receivers in Kiruna (67.86°N, 20.44°E) and Sodankylä (67.36°N, 26.63°E). This is one of the first tristatic measurements with EISCAT VHF, and we therefore describe the observations and geometry in detail. We present observations made on 26 June 2013 from 7:00 to 13:00 h UT where we found similar PMSE patterns with all three VHF receivers and found signs of wind shear in PMSE. The observations suggest that the PMSE contains sublayers that move in different directions horizontally, and this points to Kelvin-Helmholtz instability possibly playing a role in PMSE formation. We find no signs of PMSE in the UHF data. The electron densities that we derive from observed incoherent scatter at UHF are at PMSE altitudes close to the noise level but possibly indicate reduced electron densities directly above the PMSE.

  7. Marli: Mars Lidar for Global Wind Profiles and Aerosol Profiles from Orbit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abshire, J. B.; Guzewich, S. D.; Smith, M. D.; Riris, H.; Sun, X.; Gentry, B. M.; Yu, A.; Allan, G. R.

    2016-01-01

    The Mars Exploration Analysis Group's Next Orbiter Science Analysis Group (NEXSAG) has recently identified atmospheric wind measurements as one of 5 top compelling science objectives for a future Mars orbiter. To date, only isolated lander observations of martian winds exist. Winds are the key variable to understand atmospheric transport and answer fundamental questions about the three primary cycles of the martian climate: CO2, H2O, and dust. However, the direct lack of observations and imprecise and indirect inferences from temperature observations leave many basic questions about the atmospheric circulation unanswered. In addition to addressing high priority science questions, direct wind observations from orbit would help validate 3D general circulation models (GCMs) while also providing key input to atmospheric reanalyses. The dust and CO2 cycles on Mars are partially coupled and their influences on the atmospheric circulation modify the global wind field. Dust absorbs solar infrared radiation and its variable spatial distribution forces changes in the atmospheric temperature and wind fields. Thus it is important to simultaneously measure the height-resolved wind and dust profiles. MARLI provides a unique capability to observe these variables continuously, day and night, from orbit.

  8. Demonstration of a Basis for Tall Wind Turbine Design, EUDP Project Final Report

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Natarajan, Anand; Dimitrov, Nikolay Krasimirov; Madsen, Peter Hauge

    Wind turbine design using calibrated wind models have been proposed to be used in conjunction with load cases which lead to reduced uncertainties in the design of wind turbines with hub heights above 60m. These recommended wind profiles have been made for shear, wind directional change and turbul......Wind turbine design using calibrated wind models have been proposed to be used in conjunction with load cases which lead to reduced uncertainties in the design of wind turbines with hub heights above 60m. These recommended wind profiles have been made for shear, wind directional change...

  9. Simultaneous fine structure observation of wind and temperature profiles by the Arecibo 430-MHz radar and in situ measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, D.; Bertin, F.; Petitdidier, M.; Teitelbaum, H.; Woodman, R. F.

    1986-01-01

    A simultaneous campaign of balloon and radar measurements took place on March 14 to 16, 1984, above the Arecibo 430-MHz radar. This radar was operating with a vertical resolution of 150 m following two antenna beam directions: 15 deg. from the zenith, respectively, in the N-S and E-W directions. The main results concerning the comparison between the flight and simultaneous radar measurements obtained on March 15, 1984 are analyzed. The radar return power profile (S/N ratio in dB) exhibits maxima which are generally well correlated with step-like structures in the potential temperature profile. These structures are generally considered as the consequence of the mixing processes induced by the turbulence. A good correlation appears in the altitude range 12.5 to 19 km between wind shears induced by a wave structure observed in the meridional wind and the radar echo power maxima. This wave structure is characterized by a vertical wavelength of about 2.5 km, and a period in the range 30 to 40 hours. These characteristics are deduced from the twice daily rawinsonde data launched from the San Juan Airport by the National Weather Service. These results pointed out an example of the interaction between wave and turbulence in the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere. Turbulent layers are observed at locations where wind shears related to an internal inertia-gravity wave are maxima.

  10. Mixing height measurements from UHF wind profiling radar

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Angevine, W.M.; Grimsdell, A.W. [CIRES, Univ. of Colorado, and NOAA Aeronomy Lab., Boulder, Colorado (United States)

    1997-10-01

    Mixing height in convective boundary layers can be detected by wind profiling radars (profilers) operating at or near 915 MHZ. We have made such measurements in a variety of settings including Alabama in 1992; Nova Scotia, Canada, during the North Atlantic Regional Experiment (NARE) 1993; Tennessee during the Southern Oxidant Study (SOS) 1994; near a 450 m tower in Wisconsin in 1995; and extensively in Illinois during the Flatland95, `96, and `97 experiments, as well as continuous operations at the Flatland Atmospheric Observatory. Profiler mixing height measurements, like all measurements, are subject to some limitations. The most important of these are due to rainfall, minimum height, and height resolution. Profilers are very sensitive to rain, which dominates the reflectivity and prevents the mixing height from being detected. Because the best height resolution is currently 60 m and the minimum height is 120-150 m AGL, the profiler is not suited for detecting mixing height in stable or nocturnal boundary layers. Problems may also arise in very dry or cold environments. (au) 12 refs.

  11. GPM GROUND VALIDATION ENVIRONMENT CANADA (EC) WIND PROFILER GCPEX V1

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The GPM Ground Validation Environment Canada (EC) Wind Profiler GCPEx dataset provides post-processed consensus winds and daily quick look plots from the Vaisala...

  12. Accounting for the speed shear in wind turbine power performance measurement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wagner, Rozenn; Courtney, Michael; Gottschall, Julia

    2011-01-01

    The current IEC standard for wind turbine power performance measurement only requires measurement of the wind speed at hub height assuming this wind speed to be representative for the whole rotor swept area. However, the power output of a wind turbine depends on the kinetic energy flux, which...

  13. The Skipheia Wind Measurement Station. Instrumentation, Wind Speed Profiles and Turbulence Spectra

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aasen, S.E.

    1995-10-01

    This thesis describes the design of a measurement station for turbulent wind and presents results from an analysis of the collected data. The station is located at Skipheia near the south-west end of Froeya, an island off the coast of Mid-Norway. The station is unique for studies of turbulent winds because of the large numbers of sensors, which are located at various heights above ground up to 100 m, a sampling rate of 0.85 Hz and storage of the complete time series. The frequency of lightning and atmospheric discharges to the masts are quite high and much effort has gone into minimizing the damage caused by lightning activity. A major part of the thesis deals with data analysis and modelling. There are detailed discussions on the various types of wind sensors and their calibration, the data acquisition system and operating experiences with it, the database, data quality control, the wind speed profile and turbulence. 40 refs., 78 figs., 17 tabs.

  14. Automatic detection of low altitude wind shear due to gust fronts in the terminal Doppler weather radar operational demonstration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klingle-Wilson, Diana

    1990-01-01

    A gust front is the leading edge of the cold air outflow from a thunderstorm. Wind shears and turbulence along the gust front may produce potentially hazardous conditions for an aircraft on takeoff or landing such that runway operations are significantly impacted. The Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) has therefore determined that the detection of gust fronts in the terminal environment be an integral part of the Terminal Doppler Weather Radar (TDWR) system. Detection of these shears by the Gust Front Algorithm permits the generation of warnings that can be issued to pilots on approach and departure. In addition to the detection capability, the algorithm provides an estimate of the wind speed and direction following the gust front (termed wind shift) and the forecasted location of the gust front up to 20 minutes before it impacts terminal operations. This has shown utility as a runway management tool, alerting runway supervisors to approaching wind shifts and the possible need to change runway configurations. The formation and characteristics of gust fronts and their signatures in Doppler radar data are discussed. A brief description of the algorithm and its products for use by Air Traffic Control (ATC), along with an assessment of the algorithm's performance during the 1988 Operational Test and Evaluation, is presented.

  15. Formation of compositional gradient profiles by using shear-induced polymer migration phenomenon under Couette flow field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Im, Sang Hyuk; Lee, Su Jin [Kyung Hee University, Yongin (Korea, Republic of); Suh, Duck Jong; Park, O Ok [Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology (KAIST), Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Kwon, Moo Hyun [Woosuk University, Wanju (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-07-15

    We investigated whether a graded-index profile, specified by the polymer compositional gradient, could be formed using shear-induced polymer migration phenomenon in a polymer solution. For the presented model system, we generated a shear flow by rotating a glass rod at the center of a polystyrene/methylmethacrylate (PS/MMA) solution and measured the degree of polymer migration by the shear flow field by examining the concentration of polymer solution along the radial direction from the rotating axis to the periphery. Through model experiments, we formed a compositional gradient and controlled its profile in the solution by varying the concentration of polymer solution, molecular weight of polymer, and shear rate. Finally, we solidified the gradient profiles by the polymerization of the PS/MMA solution and confirmed that the gradient profiles were maintained with a compositional gradient twice larger than the mother PS/MMA solution.

  16. Robust Shear-Velocity Profiles Within Oceanic Lithosphere and Asthenosphere: Implications for Thermal and Compositional Structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lynch, P.; Schaeffer, A. J.; Lebedev, S.

    2011-12-01

    The temperature contrast between the cold oceanic lithosphere and the hot asthenosphere beneath it is reflected in the pronounced drop in seismic velocities at the lithosphere-asthenosphere boundary. In addition to the immediate effect of temperature, however, other factors may influence the observed seismic velocities, including partial melting or higher volatile content in the asthenosphere relative to the lithosphere. Because temperature changes, partial melting and volatile content all have a strong effect on viscosity as well, their characteristics and relative significance have important implications for the models of the dynamics of the oceanic plates. We measure phase velocities of surface waves across central Pacific using pairs of permanent seismic stations and a combination of cross-correlation and multimode-waveform-inversion approaches. Robust, accurate Rayleigh- and Love-wave dispersion curves in broad period ranges are averaged from tens to hundreds of one-event measurements. The dispersion curves are then inverted for isotropic-average shear-velocity profiles and radial anisotropy. Regional-scale stratification of azimuthal anisotropy can also be constrained. The high accuracy and broad period ranges of the phase-velocity measurements and the small size and simplicity of the inverse problems that relate them to shear velocities enable us to determine particularly robust shear-velocity profiles. We discuss the implications of the detailed models of isotropic and anisotropic layering for thermal and compositional models and, also, lateral variations in lithospheric properties, including those between the Hawaiian and normal-ocean lithosphere.

  17. The Mathematical Representation of Wind Speed and Temperature Profiles in the Unstable Atmospheric Surface Layer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Paulson, C.A.

    1970-01-01

    Analytical expressions which specify non-dimensionalized wind speed and potential temperature gradients as functions of stability are integrated. The integrated equations are tested against Swinhank's wind and temperature profiles measured at Kerang, Australia. It is found that a representation...... suggested independently by Businger and by Dyer gives the best fit to temperature profiles and describes the wind profiles equally as well as a relation suggested by Panofsky et al....

  18. Uncertainty in vertical extrapolation of wind statistics: shear-exponent and WAsP/EWA methods

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kelly, Mark C.

    This report provides formulations for estimation of uncertainties involved in vertical extrapolation of winds, as well as the total uncertainty incurred when winds observed at one height are extrapolated to turbine hub height for wind resource assessment. This includes new derivations for uncerta......This report provides formulations for estimation of uncertainties involved in vertical extrapolation of winds, as well as the total uncertainty incurred when winds observed at one height are extrapolated to turbine hub height for wind resource assessment. This includes new derivations...

  19. Quality-Controlled Wind Data from the Kennedy Space Center 915 Megahertz Doppler Radar Wind Profiler Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dryden, Rachel L.

    2011-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration s (NASA) Kennedy Space Center (KSC) has installed a five-instrument 915-Megahertz (MHz) Doppler Radar Wind Profiler (DRWP) system that records atmospheric wind profile properties. The purpose of these profilers is to fill data gaps between the top of the KSC wind tower network and the lowest measurement altitude of the KSC 50-MHz DRWP. The 915-MHz DRWP system has the capability to generate three-dimensional wind data outputs from approximately 150 meters (m) to 6,000 m at roughly 15-minute (min) intervals. NASA s long-term objective is to combine the 915-MHz and 50-MHz DRWP systems to create complete vertical wind profiles up to 18,300 m to be used in trajectory and loads analyses of space vehicles and by forecasters on day-of-launch (DOL). This analysis utilizes automated and manual quality control (QC) processes to remove erroneous and unrealistic wind data returned by the 915-MHz DRWP system. The percentage of data affected by each individual QC check in the period of record (POR) (i.e., January to April 2006) was computed, demonstrating the variability in the amount of data affected by the QC processes. The number of complete wind profiles available at given altitude thresholds for each profiler in the POR was calculated and outputted graphically, followed by an assessment of the number of complete wind profiles available for any profiler in the POR. A case study is also provided to demonstrate the QC process on a day of a known weather event.

  20. Vertical velocity and turbulence aspects during Mistral events as observed by UHF wind profilers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.-L. Caccia

    2004-11-01

    Full Text Available The general purpose of this paper is to experimentally study mesoscale dynamical aspects of the Mistral in the coastal area located at the exit of the Rhône-valley. The Mistral is a northerly low-level flow blowing in southern France along the Rhône-valley axis, located between the French Alps and the Massif Central, towards the Mediterranean Sea. The experimental data are obtained by UHF wind profilers deployed during two major field campaigns, MAP (Mesoscale Alpine Program in autumn 1999, and ESCOMPTE (Expérience sur Site pour COntraindre les Modèles de Pollution atmosphériques et de Transports d'Emission in summer 2001. Thanks to the use of the time evolution of the vertical profile of the horizontal wind vector, recent works have shown that the dynamics of the Mistral is highly dependent on the season because of the occurrence of specific synoptic patterns. In addition, during summer, thermal forcing leads to a combination of sea breeze with Mistral and weaker Mistral due to the enhanced friction while, during autumn, absence of convective turbulence leads to substantial acceleration as low-level jets are generated in the stably stratified planetary boundary layer. At the exit of the Rhône valley, the gap flow dynamics dominates, whereas at the lee of the Alps, the dynamics is driven by the relative contribution of "flow around" and "flow over" mechanisms, upstream of the Alps. This paper analyses vertical velocity and turbulence, i.e. turbulent dissipation rate, with data obtained by the same UHF wind profilers during the same Mistral events. In autumn, the motions are found to be globally and significantly subsident, which is coherent for a dry, cold and stable flow approaching the sea, and the turbulence is found to be of pure dynamical origin (wind shears and mountain/lee wave breaking, which is coherent with non-convective situations. In summer, due to the ground heating and to the interactions with thermal circulation, the

  1. Comparing mixing-length models of the diabatic wind profile over homogeneous terrain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pena Diaz, Alfredo; Gryning, Sven-Erik; Hasager, Charlotte Bay

    2010-01-01

    Models of the diabatic wind profile over homogeneous terrain for the entire atmospheric boundary layer are developed using mixing-length theory and are compared to wind speed observations up to 300 m at the National Test Station for Wind Turbines at Høvsøre, Denmark. The measurements are performed...

  2. Weibull-k Revisited: “Tall” Profiles and Height Variation of Wind Statistics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kelly, Mark C.; Troen, Ib; Ejsing Jørgensen, Hans

    2014-01-01

    The Weibull distribution is commonly used to describe climatological wind-speed distributions in the atmospheric boundary layer. While vertical profiles of mean wind speed in the atmospheric boundary layer have received significant attention, the variation of the shape of the wind distribution wi...

  3. On the extension of the wind profile over homogeneous terrain beyond the surface boundary layer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gryning, Sven-Erik; Batchvarova, Ekaterina; Brümmer, B.

    2007-01-01

    Analysis of profiles of meteorological measurements from a 160 m high mast at the National Test Site for wind turbines at H phi vs phi re (Denmark) and at a 250 m high TV tower at Hamburg (Germany) shows that the wind profile based on surface-layer theory and Monin-Obukhov scaling is valid up to ...

  4. Charnock's Roughness Length Model and Non-dimensional Wind Profiles Over the Sea

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pena Diaz, Alfredo; Gryning, Sven-Erik

    2008-01-01

    An analysis tool for the study of wind speed profiles over the water has been developed. The profiles are analysed using a modified dimensionless wind speed and dimensionless height, assuming that the sea surface roughness can be predicted by Charnock's roughness length model. In this form, the r...

  5. On the relationship between hurricane cost and the integrated wind profile

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, S.; Toumi, R.

    2016-11-01

    It is challenging to identify metrics that best capture hurricane destructive potential and costs. Although it has been found that the sea surface temperature and vertical wind shear can both make considerable changes to the hurricane destructive potential metrics, it is still unknown which plays a more important role. Here we present a new method to reconstruct the historical wind structure of hurricanes that allows us, for the first time, to calculate the correlation of damage with integrated power dissipation and integrated kinetic energy of all hurricanes at landfall since 1988. We find that those metrics, which include the horizontal wind structure, rather than just maximum intensity, are much better correlated with the hurricane cost. The vertical wind shear over the main development region of hurricanes plays a more dominant role than the sea surface temperature in controlling these metrics and therefore also ultimately the cost of hurricanes.

  6. Improved observations of turbulence dissipation rates from wind profiling radars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. McCaffrey

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Observations of turbulence dissipation rates in the planetary boundary layer are crucial for validation of parameterizations in numerical weather prediction models. However, because dissipation rates are difficult to obtain, they are infrequently measured through the depth of the boundary layer. For this reason, demonstrating the ability of commonly used wind profiling radars (WPRs to estimate this quantity would be greatly beneficial. During the XPIA field campaign at the Boulder Atmospheric Observatory, two WPRs operated in an optimized configuration, using high spectral resolution for increased accuracy of Doppler spectral width, specifically chosen to estimate turbulence from a vertically pointing beam. Multiple post-processing techniques, including different numbers of spectral averages and peak processing algorithms for calculating spectral moments, were evaluated to determine the most accurate procedures for estimating turbulence dissipation rates using the information contained in the Doppler spectral width, using sonic anemometers mounted on a 300 m tower for validation. The optimal settings were determined, producing a low bias, which was later corrected. Resulting estimations of turbulence dissipation rates correlated well (R2 = 0. 54 and 0. 41 with the sonic anemometers, and profiles up to 2 km from the 449 MHz WPR and 1 km from the 915 MHz WPR were observed.

  7. Weibull- k Revisited: "Tall" Profiles and Height Variation of Wind Statistics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Mark; Troen, Ib; Jørgensen, Hans E.

    2014-07-01

    The Weibull distribution is commonly used to describe climatological wind-speed distributions in the atmospheric boundary layer. While vertical profiles of mean wind speed in the atmospheric boundary layer have received significant attention, the variation of the shape of the wind distribution with height is less understood. Previously we derived a probabilistic model based on similarity theory for calculating the effects of stability and planetary boundary-layer depth upon long-term mean wind profiles. However, some applications (e.g. wind energy estimation) require the Weibull shape parameter ( k), as well as mean wind speed. Towards the aim of improving predictions of the Weibull- profile, we develop expressions for the profile of long-term variance of wind speed, including a method extending our probabilistic wind-profile theory; together these two profiles lead to a profile of Weibull-shape parameter. Further, an alternate model for the vertical profile of Weibull shape parameter is made, improving upon a basis set forth by Wieringa (Boundary-Layer Meteorol, 1989, Vol. 47, 85-110), and connecting with a newly-corrected corollary of the perturbed geostrophic-drag theory of Troen and Petersen (European Wind Atlas, 1989, Risø National Laboratory, Roskilde). Comparing the models for Weibull- k profiles, a new interpretation and explanation is given for the vertical variation of the shape of wind-speed distributions. Results of the modelling are shown for a number of sites, with a discussion of the models' efficacy and applicability. The latter includes a comparative evaluation of Wieringa-type empirical models and perturbed-geostrophic forms with regard to surface-layer behaviour, as well as for heights where climatological wind-speed variability is not dominated by surface effects.

  8. Magnitude of shear stress on the san andreas fault: implications of a stress measurement profile at shallow depth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zoback, M D; Roller, J C

    1979-10-26

    A profile of measurements of shear stress perpendicular to the San Andreas fault near Palmdale, California, shows a marked increase in stress with distance from the fault. The pattern suggests that shear stress on the fault increases slowly with depth and reaches a value on the order of the average stress released during earthquakes. This result has important implications for both long- and shortterm prediction of large earthquakes.

  9. Solar-wind turbulence and shear: a superposed-epoch analysis of corotating interaction regions at 1 AU

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borovsky, Joseph E [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Denton, Michael H [LANCASTER UNIV.

    2009-01-01

    A superposed-epoch analysis of ACE and OMNI2 measurements is performed on 27 corotating interaction regions (CIRs) in 2003-2008, with the zero epoch taken to be the stream interface as determined by the maximum of the plasma vorticity. The structure of CIRs is investigated. When the flow measurements are rotated into the local-Parker-spiral coordinate system the shear is seen to be abrupt and intense, with vorticities on the order of 10{sup -5}-10{sup -4} sec{sup -1}. Converging flows perpendicular to the stream interface are seen in the local-Parker-spiral coordinate system and about half of the CIRs show a layer of divergent rebound flow away from the stream interface. Arguments indicate that any spreading of turbulence away from the region where it is produced is limited to about 10{sup 6} km, which is very small compared with the thickness of a CrR. Analysis of the turbulence across the CrRs is performed. When possible, the effects of discontinuities are removed from the data. Fluctuation amplitudes, the Alfvenicity, and the level of Alfvenic correlations all vary smoothly across the CrR. The Alfven ratio exhibits a decrease at the shear zone of the stream interface. Fourier analysis of 4.5-hr subintervals of ACE data is performed and the results are superposed averaged as an ensemble of realizations. The spectral slopes of the velocity, magnetic-field, and total-energy fluctuations vary smoothly across the CIR. The total-energy spectral slope is {approx} 3/2 in the slow and fast wind and in the CrRs. Analysis of the Elsasser inward-outward fluctuations shows a smooth transition across the CrR from an inward-outward balance in the slow wind to an outward dominance in the fast wind. A number of signatures of turbulence driving at the shear zone are sought (entropy change, turbulence amplitude, Alfvenicity, Alfven ratio, spectral slopes, in-out nature): none show evidence of driving of turbulence by shear.

  10. Synergism between profile and cross section shape optimization for negative central shear advanced tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Turnbull, A.D.; Taylor, T.S.; Lao, L.L.

    1996-01-01

    The Advanced Tokamak (AT) concept is aimed at achieving high beta, high confinement, and a well aligned high bootstrap current fraction in a tokamak configuration consistent with steady state operation. The required improvements over the simple O-D scaling laws, normally used to predict standard, pulsed tokamak performance, axe obtained by taking into account the dependence of the stability and confinement on the 2-D equilibrium; the planned TPX experiment was designed to take full advantage of both advanced profiles and advanced cross-section shaping. Systematic stability studies of the promising Negative Central Shear (NCS) configuration have been performed for a wide variety of cross-section shapes and profile variations. The ideal MHD beta limit is found to be strongly dependent on both and, in fact, there is a clear synergistic relationship between the gains in beta from optimizing the profiles and optimizing the shape. Specifically, for a circular cross-section with highly peaked profiles, β is limited to normalized β values of β N = β/(I/aB) ∼ 2% (mT/MA). A small gain in beta can be achieved by broadening the pressure; however, the root-mean-square beta (β*) is slightly reduced. With peaked pressure profiles, a small increase in β N over that in a circular cross-section is also obtained by strong shaping. At fixed q, this translates to a much larger gain in β and β*. With both optimal profiles and strong shaping, however, the gain in all the relevant fusion performance parameters is dramatic; β and β* can be increased a factor 5 for example. Moreover, the bootstrap alignment is improved. For an optimized strongly shaped configuration, confinement, beta values, and bootstrap alignment adequate for a practical AT power plant appear to be realizable. Data from DIII-D supports these predictions and analysis of the DIII-D data will be presented

  11. Generation of Random Wind Speed Profiles for Evaluation of Stress in WT Power Converters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pigazo, Alberto; Qin, Zian; Liserre, Marco

    2013-01-01

    Wind turbines are subjected to wind speed variations that cause a power profile that will stress the overall system. This stress is tranfered to the power converter, resulting in temperature variations of the power devices and, hence, causing the reduction of the lifetime. The lifetime expectation...... changes depending on the real wind speed once the wind turbine is operating. Usually, the real wind speed profiles are employed to evaluate this stress but they do not consider all possible operation conditions and require intensive computations. To solve these issues, this paper proposes the generation...... of random wind speed profiles, based on the measured ones, in order to evaluate the thermal stress of the power devices based on a simplified statistical approach....

  12. Quality and Impact of Indian Doppler Weather Radar Wind Profiles: A Diagnostic Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandeep, A.; Prasad, V. S.; Johny, C. J.

    2017-07-01

    In the tropics, efficient weather forecasts require high-quality vertical profiles of winds to overcome improper coupling of mass and wind fields and balance relationships in the region. The India Meteorological Department (IMD) operates the network of Doppler Weather Radar (DWR) in microwave frequencies (S-band or C-band) at various locations in India. The National Centre for Medium Range Weather Forecasting (NCMRWF) receives the volume velocity processing (VVP) wind profiles from all DWRs through the Global Telecommunication System (GTS) network in near real time. The radar VVP wind is a mean horizontal wind derived at different heights from radial velocities suitable for numerical weather prediction applications. Three numerical experiments, CNTL (without VVP winds), 3DVAR and HYBRID with the assimilation of VVP winds by means of 3-dimensional variational (3dvar) and hybrid data assimilation systems were conducted using the NCMRWF Global Forecast System (NGFS) model. This study had two objectives: (1) quality assessment of VVP winds and (2) investigation of the impact of VVP wind profiles on NGFS model forecast. The quality of VVP wind profiles was assessed against the NGFS model background and radiosonde wind profiles. The absolute values of zonal and meridional wind observation minus background (O-B) increased with the pressure for all DWRs. All radars exhibited the accepted (rejected) ratio as a decreasing (increasing) function of pressure. The resemblance between the zonal and meridional O-B statistics for 3DVAR and HYBRID experiments is apparently remarkable. The accepted VVP winds and radiosonde winds in both experiments (3DVAR and HYBRID) were consistent. The correlation coefficient ( R) was higher at Patna (Patiala) for zonal (meridional) winds in the 3DVAR experiment and at Patna (Jaipur) in the HYBRID experiment. At Chennai, the R value was lower in both the experiments for both wind components. However, because of the assimilation of VVP winds by

  13. Quality Control Algorithms and Proposed Integration Process for Wind Profilers Used by Launch Vehicle Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Decker, Ryan; Barbre, Robert E., Jr.

    2011-01-01

    Impact of winds to space launch vehicle include Design, Certification Day-of-launch (DOL) steering commands (1)Develop "knockdowns" of load indicators (2) Temporal uncertainty of flight winds. Currently use databases from weather balloons. Includes discrete profiles and profile pair datasets. Issues are : (1)Larger vehicles operate near design limits during ascent 150 discrete profiles per month 110-217 seasonal 2.0 and 3.5-hour pairs Balloon rise time (one hour) and drift (up to 100 n mi) Advantages of the Alternative approach using Doppler Radar Wind Profiler (DRWP) are: (1) Obtain larger sample size (2) Provide flexibility for assessing trajectory changes due to winds (3) Better representation of flight winds.

  14. Mitigating the negative impacts of tall wind turbines on bats: Vertical activity profiles and relationships to wind speed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wellig, Sascha D; Nusslé, Sébastien; Miltner, Daniela; Kohle, Oliver; Glaizot, Olivier; Braunisch, Veronika; Obrist, Martin K; Arlettaz, Raphaël

    2018-01-01

    Wind turbines represent a source of hazard for bats, especially through collision with rotor blades. With increasing technical development, tall turbines (rotor-swept zone 50-150 m above ground level) are becoming widespread, yet we lack quantitative information about species active at these heights, which impedes proposing targeted mitigation recommendations for bat-friendly turbine operation. We investigated vertical activity profiles of a bat assemblage, and their relationships to wind speed, within a major valley of the European Alps where tall wind turbines are being deployed. To monitor bat activity we installed automatic recorders at sequentially increasing heights from ground level up to 65 m, with the goal to determine species-specific vertical activity profiles and to link them to wind speed. Bat call sequences were analysed with an automatic algorithm, paying particular attention to mouse-eared bats (Myotis myotis and Myotis blythii) and the European free-tailed bat (Tadarida teniotis), three locally rare species. The most often recorded bats were the Common pipistrelle (Pipistrellus pipistrellus) and Savi's pipistrelle (Hypsugo savii). Mouse-eared bats were rarely recorded, and mostly just above ground, appearing out of risk of collision. T. teniotis had a more evenly distributed vertical activity profile, often being active at rotor level, but its activity at that height ceased above 5 ms-1 wind speed. Overall bat activity in the rotor-swept zone declined with increasing wind speed, dropping below 5% above 5.4 ms-1. Collision risk could be drastically reduced if nocturnal operation of tall wind turbines would be restricted to wind speeds above 5 ms-1. Such measure should be implemented year-round because T. teniotis remains active in winter. This operational restriction is likely to cause only small energy production losses at these tall wind turbines, although further analyses are needed to assess these losses precisely.

  15. USAF TPS L-23 Shear Wind Observed Optimized Path Investigation for NASA (SENIOR ShWOOPIN)

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Gordon, Randy; Fails, Robert; Baase, Solomon; Eckberg, Jason; Ryan, Charles; Smith, Chris

    2006-01-01

    The SENIOR ShWOOPIN TMP was conducted at the request of the USAF TPS as part of a NASA investigation into the viability of aircraft endurance enhancement through the extraction of energy from horizontal wind gradients...

  16. Study on Rayleigh Wave Inversion for Estimating Shear-wave Velocity Profile

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T.A. Sanny

    2003-05-01

    Full Text Available Rayleigh wave or ground roll is a noise in seismic body waves. However, how to use this noise for soil characterization is very interesting since Rayleigh wave phase velocity is a function of compression-wave velocity, shear-wave velocity, density and layer thickness. In layered-medium Rayleigh wave velocity also depends on wavelength or frequency, and this phenomenon is called dispersion. Inversion procedure to get shear-wave velocity profile needs a priori information about the solution of the problem to limit the unknown parameters. The Lagrange multiplier method was used to solve the constrained optimization problems or well known as a smoothing parameter in inversion problems. The advantage of our inversion procedure is that it can guarantee the convergence of solution even though the field data is incomplete, insufficient, and inconsistent. The addition of smoothing parameter can reduce the time to converge. Beside numerical stability, the statistical stability is also involved in inversion procedure. In field experiment we extracted ground roll data from seismic refraction record. The dispersion curves had been constructed by applying f-k analysis and f-k dip filtering. The dispersion curves show the dependence of Rayleigh wave phase velocities in layered media to frequency. The synthetic models also demonstrate the stability and the speed of inversion procedure.

  17. Measurements and modeling of the wind profile up to 600 meters at a flat coastal site

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Batchvarova, Ekaterina; Gryning, Sven-Erik; Floors, Rogier Ralph

    2014-01-01

    This study shows long-term ABL wind profile features by comparing long-range wind lidar measurements and the output from a mesoscale model. The study is based on one-year pulsed lidar (Wind Cube 70) measurements of wind speed and direction from 100 to 600 meters with vertical resolution of 50......) and shape (k) parameters of the Weibull dis-tribution above 100 m. The latter signifies that the model suggests a wider distri-bution in the wind speed compared to measurements....... meters and time resolution of 10 minutes at a coastal site on the West coast of Denmark and WRF ARW (NCAR) simulations for the same period. The model evaluation is performed based on wind speed, wind direction, as well as statistical parameters of the Weibull distribution of the wind speed time series...

  18. Three-Dimensional Wind Profiling of Offshore Wind Energy Areas With Airborne Doppler Lidar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koch, Grady J.; Beyon, Jeffrey Y.; Cowen, Larry J.; Kavaya, Michael J.; Grant, Michael S.

    2014-01-01

    A technique has been developed for imaging the wind field over offshore areas being considered for wind farming. This is accomplished with an eye-safe 2-micrometer wavelength coherent Doppler lidar installed in an aircraft. By raster scanning the aircraft over the wind energy area (WEA), a three-dimensional map of the wind vector can be made. This technique was evaluated in 11 flights over the Virginia and Maryland offshore WEAs. Heights above the ocean surface planned for wind turbines are shown to be within the marine boundary layer, and the wind vector is seen to show variation across the geographical area of interest at turbine heights.

  19. Profiles of Wind and Turbulence in the Coastal Atmospheric Boundary Layer of Lake Erie

    KAUST Repository

    Wang, H

    2014-06-16

    Prediction of wind resource in coastal zones is difficult due to the complexity of flow in the coastal atmospheric boundary layer (CABL). A three week campaign was conducted over Lake Erie in May 2013 to investigate wind characteristics and improve model parameterizations in the CABL. Vertical profiles of wind speed up to 200 m were measured onshore and offshore by lidar wind profilers, and horizontal gradients of wind speed by a 3-D scanning lidar. Turbulence data were collected from sonic anemometers deployed onshore and offshore. Numerical simulations were conducted with the Weather Research Forecasting (WRF) model with 2 nested domains down to a resolution of 1-km over the lake. Initial data analyses presented in this paper investigate complex flow patterns across the coast. Acceleration was observed up to 200 m above the surface for flow coming from the land to the water. However, by 7 km off the coast the wind field had not yet reached equilibrium with the new surface (water) conditions. The surface turbulence parameters over the water derived from the sonic data could not predict wind profiles observed by the ZephlR lidar located offshore. Horizontal wind speed gradients near the coast show the influence of atmospheric stability on flow dynamics. Wind profiles retrieved from the 3-D scanning lidar show evidence of nocturnal low level jets (LLJs). The WRF model was able to capture the occurrence of LLJ events, but its performance varied in predicting their intensity, duration, and the location of the jet core.

  20. Wind profile radar for study of Antarctic air circulation. Progetto di un radar 'wind-profiler' per lo studio della circolazione atmosferica antartica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ragaini, E.; Sarango, M.F.; Vasquez, E.H.

    1992-10-01

    After a brief discussion of meteorological methods used in the Antarctic, the paper gives an outline of a coordinated international research project whose objective is to set up a wind profiler radar station that would give meteorologists information regarding Antarctic atmospheric dynamics useful in their investigation of the causes and effects of the hole in the ozone layer. The radar instrumentation is to provide continuous readings of wind velocity at varying altitudes above the polar continent.

  1. Seasonality in onshore normalized wind profiles above the surface layer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nissen, Jesper Nielsen; Gryning, Sven-Erik

    2010-01-01

    This work aims to study the seasonal difference in normalized wind speed above the surface layer as it is observed at the 160 m high mast at the coastal site Høvsøre at winds from the sea (westerly). Normalized and stability averaged wind speeds above the surface layer are observed to be 20 to 50......% larger in the winter/spring seasons compared to the summer/autumn seasons at winds from west within the same atmospheric stability class. A method combining the mesoscale model, COAMPS, and observations of the surface stability of the marine boundary layer is presented. The objective of the method...... is to reconstruct the seasonal signal in normalized wind speed and identify the physical process behind. The method proved reasonably successful in capturing the relative difference in wind speed between seasons, indicating that the simulated physical processes are likely candidates to the observed seasonal signal...

  2. Wind lidar profile measurements in the coastal boundary layer: comparison with WRF modelling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Floors, Rogier; Pena Diaz, Alfredo; Vincent, Claire Louise

    2012-01-01

    We use measurements from a pulsed wind lidar to study the wind speed profile in the planetary boundary layer (PBL) up to 600 m above the surface at a coastal site. Due to the high availability and quality of wind lidar data and the high vertical range of the measurements, it is possible to study...... of the smooth-to-rough transition at the coastline. When using a more representative roughness than the default, the biases in the surface friction velocity and heat flux are reduced and the wind speed is slightly improved. Both PBL schemes show too much mixing during stable conditions and an underestimation...... in the amount of observed low level jet. The wind speed predicted by WRF does not improve when a higher resolution is used. Therefore, both the inhomogeneous (westerly) and homogeneous (easterly) flow contribute to a large negative bias in the mean wind speed profile at heights between 100 and 200 m....

  3. A new paradigm for intensity modification of tropical cyclones: thermodynamic impact of vertical wind shear on the inflow layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riemer, M.; Montgomery, M. T.; Nicholls, M. E.

    2009-05-01

    An important roadblock to improved intensity forecasts for tropical cyclones (TCs) is our incomplete understanding of the interaction of a TC with the environmental flow. In this paper we re-visit the classical idealised numerical experiment of tropical cyclones (TCs) in vertical wind shear on an f-plane. We employ a set of simplified model physics - a simple bulk aerodynamic boundary layer scheme and "warm rain" microphysics - to foster better understanding of the dynamics and thermodynamics that govern the modification of TC intensity. A suite of experiments is performed with intense TCs in moderate to strong vertical shear. In all experiments the TC is resilient to shear but significant differences in the intensity evolution occur. The ventilation of the TC core with dry environmental air at mid-levels and the dilution of the upper-level warm core are two prevailing hypotheses for the adverse effect of vertical shear on storm intensity. Here we propose an alternative and arguably more effective mechanism how cooler and drier (lower θe) air - "anti-fuel" for the TC power machine - can enter the core region of the TC. Strong and persistent downdrafts flux low θe air from the lower and middle troposphere into the boundary layer, significantly depressing the θe values in the storm's inflow layer. Air with lower θe values enters the eyewall updrafts, considerably reducing eyewall θe values in the azimuthal mean. When viewed from the perspective of an idealised Carnot-cycle heat engine a decrease of storm intensity can thus be expected. Although the Carnot cycle model is - if at all - only valid for stationary and axisymmetric TCs, a strong correlation between the downward transport of low θe into the boundary layer and the intensity evolution offers further evidence in support of our hypothesis. The downdrafts that flush the inflow layer with low θe air are associated with a quasi-stationary region of convective activity outside the TC's eyewall. We show

  4. Characterization of undrained shear strength profiles for soft clays at six sites in Texas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-01-01

    TxDOT frequently uses Texas Cone Penetrometer (TCP) blow counts to estimate undrained shear strength. : However, the current correlations between TCP resistance and undrained shear strength have been developed primarily for : significantly stronger s...

  5. An analytic study of the magnetohydrodynamic stability of inverse shear profiles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gimblett, C.G.; Hastie, R.J.; Hender, T.C.

    1996-01-01

    This paper reports on the ideal magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) stability of tokamak field profiles that have a non-monotonic safety factor q(r). An analytic criterion is obtained for these open-quote open-quote inverse shear close-quote close-quote profiles by expanding in inverse aspect ratio and assuming that the minimum in q is slightly less than the m/n value of the mode under examination (m and n being the principal poloidal and toroidal mode numbers of the instability). Three terms are identified as controlling the stability of this open-quote open-quote double kink close-quote close-quote; two of them are stabilizing and due, respectively, to field line bending and the interaction of average favorable curvature with the pressure gradient. The possibility of instability comes from the third term which is due to toroidal coupling and is ballooning in character. The analytic results are compared with those from a fully toroidal stability code

  6. Interaction of suprathermal solar wind electron fluxes with sheared whistler waves: fan instability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Krafft

    Full Text Available Several in situ measurements performed in the solar wind evidenced that solar type III radio bursts were some-times associated with locally excited Langmuir waves, high-energy electron fluxes and low-frequency electrostatic and electromagnetic waves; moreover, in some cases, the simultaneous identification of energetic electron fluxes, Langmuir and whistler waves was performed. This paper shows how whistlers can be excited in the disturbed solar wind through the so-called "fan instability" by interacting with energetic electrons at the anomalous Doppler resonance. This instability process, which is driven by the anisotropy in the energetic electron velocity distribution along the ambient magnetic field, does not require any positive slope in the suprathermal electron tail and thus can account for physical situations where plateaued reduced electron velocity distributions were observed in solar wind plasmas in association with Langmuir and whistler waves. Owing to linear calculations of growth rates, we show that for disturbed solar wind conditions (that is, when suprathermal particle fluxes propagate along the ambient magnetic field, the fan instability can excite VLF waves (whistlers and lower hybrid waves with characteristics close to those observed in space experiments.

    Key words. Space plasma physics (waves and instabilities – Radio Science (waves in plasma – Solar physics, astrophysics and astronomy (radio emissions

  7. Interaction of suprathermal solar wind electron fluxes with sheared whistler waves: fan instability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Krafft

    2003-07-01

    Full Text Available Several in situ measurements performed in the solar wind evidenced that solar type III radio bursts were some-times associated with locally excited Langmuir waves, high-energy electron fluxes and low-frequency electrostatic and electromagnetic waves; moreover, in some cases, the simultaneous identification of energetic electron fluxes, Langmuir and whistler waves was performed. This paper shows how whistlers can be excited in the disturbed solar wind through the so-called "fan instability" by interacting with energetic electrons at the anomalous Doppler resonance. This instability process, which is driven by the anisotropy in the energetic electron velocity distribution along the ambient magnetic field, does not require any positive slope in the suprathermal electron tail and thus can account for physical situations where plateaued reduced electron velocity distributions were observed in solar wind plasmas in association with Langmuir and whistler waves. Owing to linear calculations of growth rates, we show that for disturbed solar wind conditions (that is, when suprathermal particle fluxes propagate along the ambient magnetic field, the fan instability can excite VLF waves (whistlers and lower hybrid waves with characteristics close to those observed in space experiments.Key words. Space plasma physics (waves and instabilities – Radio Science (waves in plasma – Solar physics, astrophysics and astronomy (radio emissions

  8. A Study of Wind Shear Effects on Aircraft Operations and Safety in Australia,

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-03-01

    basic observational data are often too obsolete to be of much assistance. At Auckland and Bahrain, ATCs record the wind speed at 2000 ft as advised...included here. Tropical cyclones, and on a much smaller scale, tornadoes . willy-willies and dust devils are phenomena of intense atmospheric activity

  9. GRIP HIGH ALTITUDE IMAGING WIND AND RAIN AIRBORNE PROFILER (HIWRAP) V1

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The High-Altitude Imaging Wind and Rain Airborne Profiler (HIWRAP) is a dual-frequency (Ka- and Ku-band) conical scan system, configured with a nadir viewing antenna...

  10. Classification of Rotor Induced Shearing Events in the Near Wake of a Wind Turbine Array Boundary Layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Sarah; Viggiano, Bianca; Ali, Naseem; Cal, Raul Bayoan

    2017-11-01

    Flow perturbation induced by a turbine rotor imposes considerable turbulence and shearing effects in the near wake of a turbine, altering the efficiency of subsequent units within a wind farm array. Previous methods have characterized near wake vorticity of a turbine and recovery distance of various turbine array configurations. This study aims to build on previous analysis with respect to a turbine rotor within an array and develop a model to examine stress events and energy contribution in the near wake due to rotational effects. Hot wire anemometry was employed downstream of a turbine centrally located in the third row of a 3x3 array. Data considered points planar to the rotor and included simultaneous streamwise and wall-normal velocities as well as concurrent streamwise and transverse velocities. Conditional analysis of Reynolds stresses induced by the rotor agree with former near wake research, and examination of stresses in terms of streamwise and transverse velocity components depicts areas of significant rotational effects. Continued analysis includes spectral decomposition and conditional statistics to further characterize shearing events at various points considering the swept area of the rotor.

  11. One Year of Vertical Wind Profiles Measurements at a Mediterranean Coastal Site of South Italy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Calidonna, Claudia Roberta; Gullì, Daniel; Avolio, Elenio

    2015-01-01

    To exploit wind energy both onshore and offshore in coastal area the effect of the coastal discontinuity is important. The shape of the vertical wind profiles and the related c parameter of the Weibull distribution are impacted by the atmospheric internal boundary layers developing from the coast...

  12. Wind Profiles and Change of Terrain Roughness at Risø

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Panofsky, H. A.; Lundtang Petersen, Erik

    1972-01-01

    The Risø 125 m tower is situated on a narrow peninsula, surrounded by bays of varying width. The resulting surface roughness changes are clearly reflected by ‘kinks’ in the measured wind profiles, whose characteristics depend on the wind direction. The height of the lowest kink for water-to-land ...

  13. On the length-scale of the wind profile

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pena Diaz, Alfredo; Gryning, Sven-Erik; Mann, Jakob

    2010-01-01

    We present the results of an analysis of simultaneous sonic anemometer observations of wind speed and velocity spectra over flat and homogeneous terrain from 10 up to 160 m height performed at the National Test Station for Wind Turbines at Høvsøre, Denmark. The mixing length, l, derived from the ...

  14. Vertical velocity and turbulence aspects during Mistral events as observed by UHF wind profilers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.-L. Caccia

    2004-11-01

    Full Text Available The general purpose of this paper is to experimentally study mesoscale dynamical aspects of the Mistral in the coastal area located at the exit of the Rhône-valley. The Mistral is a northerly low-level flow blowing in southern France along the Rhône-valley axis, located between the French Alps and the Massif Central, towards the Mediterranean Sea. The experimental data are obtained by UHF wind profilers deployed during two major field campaigns, MAP (Mesoscale Alpine Program in autumn 1999, and ESCOMPTE (Expérience sur Site pour COntraindre les Modèles de Pollution atmosphériques et de Transports d'Emission in summer 2001.

    Thanks to the use of the time evolution of the vertical profile of the horizontal wind vector, recent works have shown that the dynamics of the Mistral is highly dependent on the season because of the occurrence of specific synoptic patterns. In addition, during summer, thermal forcing leads to a combination of sea breeze with Mistral and weaker Mistral due to the enhanced friction while, during autumn, absence of convective turbulence leads to substantial acceleration as low-level jets are generated in the stably stratified planetary boundary layer. At the exit of the Rhône valley, the gap flow dynamics dominates, whereas at the lee of the Alps, the dynamics is driven by the relative contribution of "flow around" and "flow over" mechanisms, upstream of the Alps. This paper analyses vertical velocity and turbulence, i.e. turbulent dissipation rate, with data obtained by the same UHF wind profilers during the same Mistral events.

    In autumn, the motions are found to be globally and significantly subsident, which is coherent for a dry, cold and stable flow approaching the sea, and the turbulence is found to be of pure dynamical origin (wind shears and mountain/lee wave breaking, which is coherent with non-convective situations.

    Wind shear and wet and dry thermodynamic indices as predictors of thunderstorm motion and severity and application to the AVE 4 experimental data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connell, J. R.; Ey, L.

    1977-01-01

    Two types of parameters are computed and mapped for use in assessing their individual merits as predictors of occurrence and severity of thunderstorms. The first group is comprised of equivalent potential temperature, potential temperature, water vapor mixing ratio, and wind speed. Equivalent potential temperature maxima and strong gradients of equivalent potential temperature at the surface correlate well with regions of thunderstorm activity. The second type, comprised of the energy index, shear index, and energy shear index, incorporates some model dynamics of thunderstorms, including nonthermodynamic forcing. The energy shear index is found to improve prediction of tornadic and high-wind situations slightly better than other indices. It is concluded that further development and refinement of nonthermodynamic aspects of predictive indices are definitely warranted.

  15. Ground-Based Remote or In Situ Measurement of Vertical Profiles of Wind in the Lower Troposphere

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clifton, Andrew; Newman, Jennifer

    2017-02-24

    Knowledge of winds in the lower troposphere is essential for a range of applications, including weather forecasting, transportation, natural hazards, and wind energy. This presentation focuses on the measurement of vertical profiles of wind in the lower troposphere for wind energy applications. This presentation introduces the information that wind energy site development and operations require, how it used, and the benefits and problems of current measurements from in-situ measurements and remote sensing. The development of commercial Doppler wind lidar systems over the last 10 years are shown, along with the lessons learned from this experience. Finally, potential developments in wind profiling aimed at reducing uncertainty and increasing data availability are introduced.

  16. Lidar Wind Profiler for the NextGen Airportal Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The development of a standoff sensor that can measure 3D components of wind velocity in the vicinity of an airport has the potential to improve airport throughput,...

  17. High Temporal Resolution Tropospheric Wind Profile Observations at NASA Kennedy Space Center During Hurricane Irma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Decker, Ryan K.; Barbre, Robert E., Jr.; Huddleston, Lisa; Brauer, Thomas; Wilfong, Timothy

    2018-01-01

    The NASA Kennedy Space Center (KSC) operates a 48-MHz Tropospheric/Stratospheric Doppler Radar Wind Profiler (TDRWP) on a continual basis generating wind profiles between 2-19 km in the support of space launch vehicle operations. A benefit of the continual operability of the system is the ability to provide unique observations of severe weather events such as hurricanes. Over the past two Atlantic Hurricane seasons the TDRWP has made high temporal resolution wind profile observations of Hurricane Irma in 2017 and Hurricane Matthew in 2016. Hurricane Irma was responsible for power outages to approximately 2/3 of Florida's population during its movement over the state(Stein,2017). An overview of the TDRWP system configuration, brief summary of Hurricanes Irma and Matthew storm track in proximity to KSC, characteristics of the tropospheric wind observations from the TDRWP during both events, and discussion of the dissemination of TDRWP data during the event will be presented.

  18. The Wind Profile in the Coastal Boundary Layer: Wind Lidar Measurements and Numerical Modelling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Floors, Rogier; Vincent, Claire Louise; Gryning, Sven-Erik

    2013-01-01

    Traditionally it has been difficult to verify mesoscale model wind predictions against observations in the planetary boundary layer (PBL). Here we used measurements from a wind lidar to study the PBL up to 800 m above the surface at a flat coastal site in Denmark during a one month period in autu...

  19. CAMEX-4 MIPS 915 MHZ DOPPLER WIND PROFILER V1

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The University of Alabama in Huntsville (UAH) Mobile Integrated Profiling System (MIPS) is a mobile atmospheric profiling system. It includes a 915 MHz Doppler...

  1. Simultaneous measurements of the thermospheric wind profile at three separate positions in the dusk auroral oval

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mikkelsen, I.S.; Friis-Christensen, E.; Larsen, M.F.; Kelley, M.C.; Vickrey, J.; Meriwether, J.; Shih, P.

    1987-01-01

    On March 20, 1985, two rockets were launched from Soendre Stroemfjord, Greenland, into the dusk auroral oval. Three trimethyl aluminium trails were released to measure the neutral wind profiles between 95 and 190 km of altitude at two points separated by 190 km normal to the invariant latitude circles and at a third point separated from the first two by 300 km along the invariant latitude circles. Two barium/strontium clouds were released at 250 km of altitude, extending two of the neutral wind profiles to this altitude. In the E region the tip of the wind vector traced an ellipse as a function of increasing altitude with maximum wind speeds of 100-150 m/s in the southeastward and northwestward directions. The F region winds were southward with speeds of 100-200 m/s. The zonal wind component between 115 and 140 km of altitude had a horizontal gradient in the southeastward direction, whereas the meridional wind component at the same heights was constant over the spatial extent covered by the measurements. The authors interpret the observed E region wind field as being part of a gravity wave with a period of 3 hours as estimated from the ellipticity of the wind hodograms. The wind vectors rotated 540 degree clockwise with increasing height, indicating that the wave energy is propagating upward. The Fabry-Perot interferometer at Soendre Stroemfjord was first able to detect the F region winds 45 min after the releases and measured winds of 100-400 m/s mainly in the southeastward or antisunward direction. The geomagnetic conditions were quiet, with Kp not exceeding 2 for the 24 hours preceding the experiment. The incoherent scatter radar at Soendre Stroemfjord observed a contracted plasma convection pattern associated with positive B y and B z components of the interplanetary magnetic field

  2. Mixed convective-dynamic roll vortices and their effects on initial wind and temperature profiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haack, Tracy; Shirer, Hampton N.

    1992-01-01

    A new nonlinear 14-coefficient spectral model of two-dimensional shallow Boussinesq flow is developed and used to investigate the onset and development of both dynamically and convectively forced boundary-layer rolls. The model is developed to accept arbitrary basic-state wind profiles as dynamic forcing, using an Ekman profile to provide a means for easy comparison with other studies. The results are qualitatively compared with those of previous theoretical and observational investigations. The rolls are shown to significantly alter the initial wind profile in the sense found by Faller and Kaylor (1967) and Brown (1970), but via a mechanism independent of the Coriolis force.

  3. GPM GROUND VALIDATION HIGH ALTITUDE IMAGING WIND AND RAIN AIRBORNE PROFILER (HIWRAP) MC3E V1

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The GPM Ground Validation High Altitude Imaging Wind and Rain Airborne Profiler (HIWRAP) MC3E dataset was collected by the High-Altitude Imaging Wind and Rain...

  4. Shear stress peaks in a superconductor cable during the winding of a large toroidal field coil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zehlein, H.

    1983-01-01

    The paper presents a simplified elastica conductor model (SECM) built by a finite chain of intervals with constant bending moment and curvature. The problem does not allow to linearize the curvature. A bilinear moment-curvature relationship as derived from bending experiments was used to describe the elastoplastic behaviour of the cable under different tension forces acting on the ''free'' end near the supply spool. Due to the geometric and material nonlinearities mentioned no direct solution is possible. The paper describes the discrete model as well as the iterative shooting method which finds the equilibrium shape of the conductor. The distributions of bending moment and shear forces on the D-shaped contour as well as along the conductor are given. They show a pronounced influence of the tension force in the relevant range of 1 to 40 kN. An inconsistency due to compromising model simplifications is shown which occurs at the contour points where the curvature radius suddenly changes. Remarks on the elastic springback of the superconductor observed there conclude the paper

  5. Imaging doppler lidar for wind turbine wake profiling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bossert, David J.

    2015-11-19

    An imaging Doppler lidar (IDL) enables the measurement of the velocity distribution of a large volume, in parallel, and at high spatial resolution in the wake of a wind turbine. Because the IDL is non-scanning, it can be orders of magnitude faster than conventional coherent lidar approaches. Scattering can be obtained from naturally occurring aerosol particles. Furthermore, the wind velocity can be measured directly from Doppler shifts of the laser light, so the measurement can be accomplished at large standoff and at wide fields-of-view.

  6. Changes in Jupiter's Zonal Wind Profile Preceding and During the Juno Mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tollefson, Joshua; Wong, Michael H.; de Pater, Imke; Simon, Amy A.; Orton, Glenn S.; Rogers, John H.; Atreya, Sushil K.; Cosentino, Richard G.; Januszewski, William; Morales-Juberias, Raul; hide

    2017-01-01

    We present five epochs of WFC3 HST Jupiter observations taken between 2009-2016 and extract global zonal wind profiles for each epoch. Jupiter's zonal wind field is globally stable throughout these years, but significant variations in certain latitude regions persist. We find that the largest uncertainties in the wind field are due to vortices or hot-spots, and show residual maps which identify the strongest vortex flows. The strongest year-to-year variation in the zonal wind profiles is the 24 deg N jet peak. Numerous plume outbreaks have been observed in the Northern Temperate Belt and are associated with decreases in the zonal velocity and brightness. We show that the 24 deg N jet peak velocity and brightness decreased in 2012 and again in late 2016, following outbreaks during these years. Our February 2016 zonal wind profile was the last highly spatially resolved measurement prior to Juno s first science observations. The final 2016 data were taken in conjunction with Juno's perijove 3 pass on 11 December 2016, and show the zonal wind profile following the plume outbreak at 24 deg N in October 2016.

  7. Combining microwave radiometer and wind profiler radar measurements to improve accuracy and resolution of atmospheric humidity profiling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bianco, L.; Cimini, D.; Ware, R.; Marzano, F.

    2003-04-01

    An algorithm to compute high-resolution atmospheric humidity profiling by synergetic use of microwave radiometer and wind profiler radar is illustrated. Wind profiler radar data are input for the computation of the potential refractivity gradient profiles, and combined with radiometer estimates of temperature profiles, which are needed to fully retrieve humidity gradient profiles. The algorithm makes use of recent developments in Wind Profiler Radar (WPR) signal processing, computing the zeroth, first, and second moments of WPR Doppler spectra via a fuzzy logic method (Bianco and Wilczak, 2002), which provides quality control of radar data in the spectral domain. The zeroth, first, and second moments are employed to compute the structure parameter of potential refractivity (C_φ^2), the horizontal wind (V_h), and the structure parameter of vertical velocity (C_w^2) respectively (Stankov et al. 2002). In addition, the algorithm uses a formula proposed by White (White et al. 1999) for the computation of C_w^2, to account for the spatial and temporal filtering effects on the Doppler spectrum. C_φ^2, V_h, and C_w^2 are then combined together to retrieve the potential refractivity gradient profiles. On the radiometric side, a first attempt is made using low resolution temperature profile estimates obtained following the algorithm described by Han and Westwater (1995), which make use of ground-based sensors, including a dual channel microwave radiometer (MWR), and other surface meteorological instruments. Then, the advantages of using estimates of temperature and humidity profiles from a multichannel microwave radiometer profiler (MWRP) are evaluated. Finally, the combined algorithm performances in retrieving humidity profiles are tested with simultaneous radiosonde "in situ" measurements. The empirical sets of WPR and MWR data were provided by the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program, and collected at the ARM Southern Great Plains (SGP) site (latitude: 36^o

  8. Development of a procedure to model high-resolution wind profiles from smoothed or low-frequency data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camp, D. W.

    1977-01-01

    The derivation of simulated Jimsphere wind profiles from low-frequency rawinsonde data and a generated set of white noise data are presented. A computer program is developed to model high-resolution wind profiles based on the statistical properties of data from the Kennedy Space Center, Florida. Comparison of the measured Jimsphere data, rawinsonde data, and the simulated profiles shows excellent agreement.

  9. A new paradigm for intensity modification of tropical cyclones: thermodynamic impact of vertical wind shear on the inflow layer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Riemer

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available An important roadblock to improved intensity forecasts for tropical cyclones (TCs is our incomplete understanding of the interaction of a TC with the environmental flow. In this paper we re-visit the canonical problem of a TC in vertical wind shear on an f-plane. A suite of numerical experiments is performed with intense TCs in moderate to strong vertical shear. We employ a set of simplified model physics – a simple bulk aerodynamic boundary layer scheme and "warm rain" microphysics – to foster better understanding of the dynamics and thermodynamics that govern the modification of TC intensity. In all experiments the TC is resilient to shear but significant differences in the intensity evolution occur.

    The ventilation of the TC core with dry environmental air at mid-levels and the dilution of the upper-level warm core are two prevailing hypotheses for the adverse effect of vertical shear on storm intensity. Here we propose an alternative and arguably more effective mechanism how cooler and drier (lower θe air – "anti-fuel" for the TC power machine – can enter the core region of the TC. Strong and persistent, shear-induced downdrafts flux low θe air into the boundary layer from above, significantly depressing the θe values in the storm's inflow layer. Air with lower θe values enters the eyewall updrafts, considerably reducing eyewall θe values in the azimuthal mean. When viewed from the perspective of an idealised Carnot-cycle heat engine a decrease of storm intensity can thus be expected. Although the Carnot cycle model is – if at all – only valid for stationary and axisymmetric TCs, a close association of the downward transport of low θe into the boundary layer and the intensity evolution offers further evidence in support of our hypothesis.

    The downdrafts that flush the boundary layer with low

  10. Real-time Wind Profile Estimation using Airborne Sensors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    In 't Veld, A.C.; De Jong, P.M.A.; Van Paassen, M.M.; Mulder, M.

    2011-01-01

    Wind is one of the major contributors to uncertainty in continuous descent approach operations. Especially when aircraft that are flying low or idle thrust approaches are issued a required time of arrival over the runway threshold, as is foreseen in some of the future ATC scenarios, the on-board

  11. Mixed convective/dynamic roll vortices and their effects on initial wind and temperature profiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haack, Tracy; Shirer, Hampton N.

    1991-01-01

    The onset and development of both dynamically and convectively forced boundary layer rolls are studied with linear and nonlinear analyses of a truncated spectral model of shallow Boussinesq flow. Emphasis is given here on the energetics of the dominant roll modes, on the magnitudes of the roll-induced modifications of the initial basic state wind and temperature profiles, and on the sensitivity of the linear stability results to the use of modified profiles as basic states. It is demonstrated that the roll circulations can produce substantial changes to the cross-roll component of the initial wind profile and that significant changes in orientation angle estimates can result from use of a roll-modified profile in the stability analysis. These results demonstrate that roll contributions must be removed from observed background wind profiles before using them to investigate the mechanisms underlying actual secondary flows in the boundary layer. The model is developed quite generally to accept arbitrary basic state wind profiles as dynamic forcing. An Ekman profile is chosen here merely to provide a means for easy comparison with other theoretical boundary layer studies; the ultimate application of the model is to study observed boundary layer profiles. Results of the analytic stability analysis are validated by comparing them with results from a larger linear model. For an appropriate Ekman depth, a complete set of transition curves is given in forcing parameter space for roll modes driven both thermally and dynamically. Preferred orientation angles, horizontal wavelengths and propagation frequencies, as well as energetics and wind profile modifications, are all shown to agree rather well with results from studies on Ekman layers as well as with studies on near-neutral and convective atmospheric boundary layers.

  12. Predicting the liquefaction phenomena from shear velocity profiling: Empirical approach to 6.3 Mw, May 2006 Yogyakarta earthquake

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartantyo, Eddy; Brotopuspito, Kirbani S.; Sismanto, Waluyo

    2015-04-01

    The liquefactions phenomena have been reported after a shocking 6.5Mw earthquake hit Yogyakarta province in the morning at 27 May 2006. Several researchers have reported the damage, casualties, and soil failure due to the quake, including the mapping and analyzing the liquefaction phenomena. Most of them based on SPT test. The study try to draw the liquefaction susceptibility by means the shear velocity profiling using modified Multichannel Analysis of Surface Waves (MASW). This paper is a preliminary report by using only several measured MASW points. The study built 8-channel seismic data logger with 4.5 Hz geophones for this purpose. Several different offsets used to record the high and low frequencies of surface waves. The phase-velocity diagrams were stacked in the frequency domain rather than in time domain, for a clearer and easier dispersion curve picking. All codes are implementing in Matlab. From these procedures, shear velocity profiling was collected beneath each geophone's spread. By mapping the minimum depth of shallow water table, calculating PGA with soil classification, using empirical formula for saturated soil weight from shear velocity profile, and calculating CRR and CSR at every depth, the liquefaction characteristic can be identify in every layer. From several acquired data, a liquefiable potential at some depth below water table was obtained.

  13. Predicting the liquefaction phenomena from shear velocity profiling: Empirical approach to 6.3 Mw, May 2006 Yogyakarta earthquake

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hartantyo, Eddy, E-mail: hartantyo@ugm.ac.id [PhD student, Physics Department, FMIPA, UGM. Sekip Utara Yogyakarta 55281 Indonesia (Indonesia); Brotopuspito, Kirbani S.; Sismanto; Waluyo [Geophysics Laboratory, FMIPA, Universitas Gadjah Mada, Sekip Utara Yogyakarta 55281 (Indonesia)

    2015-04-24

    The liquefactions phenomena have been reported after a shocking 6.5Mw earthquake hit Yogyakarta province in the morning at 27 May 2006. Several researchers have reported the damage, casualties, and soil failure due to the quake, including the mapping and analyzing the liquefaction phenomena. Most of them based on SPT test. The study try to draw the liquefaction susceptibility by means the shear velocity profiling using modified Multichannel Analysis of Surface Waves (MASW). This paper is a preliminary report by using only several measured MASW points. The study built 8-channel seismic data logger with 4.5 Hz geophones for this purpose. Several different offsets used to record the high and low frequencies of surface waves. The phase-velocity diagrams were stacked in the frequency domain rather than in time domain, for a clearer and easier dispersion curve picking. All codes are implementing in Matlab. From these procedures, shear velocity profiling was collected beneath each geophone’s spread. By mapping the minimum depth of shallow water table, calculating PGA with soil classification, using empirical formula for saturated soil weight from shear velocity profile, and calculating CRR and CSR at every depth, the liquefaction characteristic can be identify in every layer. From several acquired data, a liquefiable potential at some depth below water table was obtained.

  14. Mission-profile based multi-objective optimization of power electronics converter for wind turbines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gohil, Ghanshyamsinh; Teodorescu, Remus; Kerekes, Tamas

    2017-01-01

    To help mitigate some of the challenges associated with the wide spread adoption of the stochastic wind power, wind turbine with full-scale power converter (Type D) is preferred. Since full power is processed by the power converter in a type D wind turbine, it is important to improve its efficiency...... and reduce the cost per kW to achieve lower cost of energy. The power produced by the wind turbine varies in a wide range and the conventional design approach of optimizing converter at a specific loading condition may be sub-optimal. To overcome this challenge, a mission-profile based multi......-objective optimization approach for designing power converter is presented. The objective is to minimize the energy loss for a given load profile as against the conventional approach of minimizing power loss at specific loading conditions. The proposed approach is illustrated by designing a grid-side power converter...

  15. Results of the NASA Kennedy Space Center 50-MHz Doppler Radar Wind Profiler Operational Acceptance Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbre', Robert E., Jr.; Decker, Ryan K.; Leahy, Frank B.; Huddleston, Lisa

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents results of the new Kennedy Space Center (KSC) 50-MHz Doppler Radar Wind Profiler (DRWP) Operational Acceptance Test (OAT). The goal of the OAT was to verify the data quality of the new DRWP against the performance of the previous DRWP in order to use wind data derived by the new DRWP for space launch vehicle operations support at the Eastern Range. The previous DRWP was used as a situational awareness asset for mission operations to identify rapid changes in the wind environment that weather balloons cannot depict. The Marshall Space Flight Center's Natural Environments Branch assessed data from the new DRWP collected during Jan-Feb 2015 against a specified set of test criteria. Data examination verified that the DRWP provides complete profiles every five minutes from 1.8-19.5 km in vertical increments of 150 m. Analysis of 49 concurrent DRWP and balloon profiles presented root mean square wind component differences around 2.0 m/s. Evaluation of the DRWP's coherence between five-minute wind pairs found the effective vertical resolution to be Nyquist-limited at 300 m for both wind components. In addition, the sensitivity to rejecting data that do not have adequate signal was quantified. This paper documents the data, quality control procedures, methodology, and results of each analysis.

  16. Numerical investigations on the influence of wind shear and turbulence on aircraft trailing vortices; Numerische Untersuchungen zum Einfluss von Windscherung und Turbulenz auf Flugzeugwirbelschleppen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hofbauer, T.

    2003-07-01

    In several aspects, the behaviour of aircraft wake vortices under situations of vertical wind shear is significantly different from non-shear scenarios and its operational real-time forcast is challenging. By means of numerical investigations of idealized scenarios, the influence of wind shear on the lateral and vertical transport of vortices is analysed both, phenomenologically as well as in the scope of a sensitivity study. The results allow for the verification of controversial views and the benchmark of modelling approaches. Case studies of turbulent shear flows focus on the persistence of vortices. A detailed analysis of the flow fields evidence that unequal vortex decay rates can be attributed to the asymmetric distribution of secondary vorticity structures. The results moreover suggest that extended vortex lifespans can be expected under situations of wind shear. The unusual vortex behaviour observed by means of a LIDAR measurement is reproduced by realistic simulations and permits to reveal potential causes. (orig.) [German] Das Wirbelschleppenverhalten unterscheidet sich in Situationen vertikaler Windscherung in mehrfacher Hinsicht signifikant von scherungsfreien Szenarien und stellt eine besondere Herausforderung fuer eine operationelle Echtzeitvorhersage dar. Mittels numerischer Untersuchungen idealisierter Szenarien wird zunaechst der Einfluss von Windscherung auf den lateralen und vertikalen Wirbeltransport sowohl phaenomenologisch als auch quantitativ im Rahmen einer Sensitivitaetsstudie analysiert. Anhand der gewonnenen Ergebnisse werden auseinandergehende Erklaerungsansaetze geprueft und Modellierungsansaetze bewertet. Fallstudien turbulenter Scherstroemungen zur Wirbelpersistenz stellen einen weiteren Schwerpunkt dieser Arbeit dar. Durch die ausfuehrliche Analyse der Stroemungsfelder wird der Nachweis erbracht, dass sich unterschiedliche Zerfallsraten der Wirbel auf die asymmetrische Verteilung von sekundaeren Vorticity-Strukturen zurueckfuehren

  17. The development of convective instability, wind shear, and vertical motion in relation to convection activity and synoptic systems in AVE 4

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, J. G.; Scoggins, J. R.

    1981-01-01

    Data from the Fourth Atmospheric Variability Experiment were used to investigate conditions/factors responsible for the development (local time rate-of-change) of convective instability, wind shear, and vertical motion in areas with varying degrees of convective activity. AVE IV sounding data were taken at 3 or 6 h intervals during a 36 h period on 24-25 April 1975 over approximately the eastern half of the United States. An error analysis was performed for each variable studied.

  18. Clear air boundary layer spaced antenna wind measurement with the Multiple Antenna Profiler (MAPR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. A. Cohn

    Full Text Available Spaced antenna (SA wind measurement techniques are applied to Multiple Antenna Profiler (MAPR data to evaluate its performance in clear air conditions. MAPR is a multiple antenna 915 MHz wind profiler developed at the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR and described in Cohn et al. (1997, designed to make high resolution wind measurements. Previous reported measurements with MAPR were restricted to precipitation because of low signal to noise (SNR and signal to ground-clutter (SCR ratios. By using a standard pulse-coding technique and upgrading the profiler control software, increases in average power and SNR were achieved, making routine measurements in clear air possible. Comparison of winds measured by MAPR and by a sonic anemometer on a nearby 300 m tower show correlation coefficients in the range of R2 = 0.75 – 0.80, and an average absolute error of ~ 1.4 m s - 1 . This compares favorably with the agreement typically found in wind profiler comparisons. We also consider the use of the parameter ah , which is related to the value of the cross-correlation function at its zero crossing. This parameter is a data quality indicator and possibly a key component in a ground clutter removal technique.

    Key words. Meteorology and atmospheric dynamics (mesoscale meteorology; instruments and techniques – Radio science (remote sensing

  19. Transcription profiling of S. cerevisiae cultures grown under low shear-modeled microgravity

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The goal of this study was to assess whether low shear-modeled microgravity (LSMMG) effects yeast ,genomic expression patterns using the powerful tool of whole...

  20. Effects of the wind profile at night on wind turbine sound

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Berg, GP

    2004-01-01

    Since the start of the operation of a 30 MW, 17 turbine wind park, residents living 500 in and more from the park have reacted strongly to the noise; residents up to 1900 in distance expressed annoyance. To assess actual sound immission, long term measurements (a total of over 400 night hours in 4

  1. QBO effects manifesting in ozone, temperature, and wind profiles

    OpenAIRE

    Sitnov, S. A.

    2004-01-01

    On the basis of ozonesonde records up to 1998 the responses on the equatorial quasi-biennial oscillation (QBO), manifesting in ozone, temperature, and wind (QBO effects) were isolated in the region from the ground to altitudes as high as 35km at 22 stations located in Europe (7), North America (7), Japan (4), Hawaii (1), Australia (2), and Antarctic (1).

    The vertical structures of the QBO effects of ozone are represented as an alternati...

  2. QBO effects manifesting in ozone, temperature, and wind profiles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. A. Sitnov

    2004-04-01

    Full Text Available On the basis of ozonesonde records up to 1998 the responses on the equatorial quasi-biennial oscillation (QBO, manifesting in ozone, temperature, and wind (QBO effects were isolated in the region from the ground to altitudes as high as 35km at 22 stations located in Europe (7, North America (7, Japan (4, Hawaii (1, Australia (2, and Antarctic (1. The vertical structures of the QBO effects of ozone are represented as an alternation of layers of well-developed quasi-biennial signals, whose phases gradually change with height and thin transitional layers of ill-developed signals, whose phases change abruptly with height. The amplitudes of the effects depend on height and reach the maxima of 3–6nbar in the lower stratosphere. At the majority of sites the effects are found to be approximately in phase between 20 and 23km. Two types of the vertical structures of the temperature QBO effects are found. At most of the sites located equatorward of about 50° the stratospheric temperature anomalies are characterized by downward propagation, whereas at sites situated poleward of about 50° they look as column-like structures. Near the tropopause the effects frequently reveal dipole-like structure, when the stratospheric and tropospheric anomalies are of opposite signs. The amplitudes of the effects are in the range of 0.5–1°C. The vertical structures of the QBO effects of horizontal wind components reveal a diversity of patterns. The amplitudes of the QBO effects of the meridional and zonal winds are comparable and lie in the range of 0.5–2m s–1. As a rule, the maxima of the effects are noticed slightly below the tropopause, as well as in the middle stratosphere. In general, a statistical assurance of the obtained QBO effects is rather poor. However, a considerable part of them reveal similarity, which can be hardly explained by chance. Furthermore, the results agree with possible physical mechanisms of off-equatorial influence of the QBO, as well

  3. Aerodynamic roughness height for gravel-mantled megaripples, with implications for wind profiles near TARs on Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimbelman, J. R.; Scheidt, S. P.; de Silva, S. L.; Bridges, N. T.; Spagnuolo, M. G.; Neely, E. M.

    2016-03-01

    Aerodynamic roughness heights of 1-3 cm were obtained from measured wind profiles collected among fields of gravel-mantled megaripples in the high desert of the Puna region of northwestern Argentina. Roughness height appears to be relatively insensitive to the angle at which the wind was incident upon the bedforms throughout the study sites. The results represent the first wind profiling measurements for large megaripples, but they also demonstrate the importance of a careful evaluation of many potential effects that can influence the utility of wind profiling data. The same effects that influence collection of fieldwork data must also be considered in any prediction of wind profiles anticipated to occur near Transverse Aeolian Ridges and other aeolian features on Mars that are intermediate in scale between wind ripples and small sand dunes.

  4. Optimization design of airfoil profiles based on the noise of wind turbines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cheng, Jiangtao; Chen, Jin; Cheng, Jiangtao

    2012-01-01

    Based on design theory of airfoil profiles and airfoil self-noise prediction model, a new method with the target of the airfoil average efficiency-noise ratio of design ranges for angle of attack had been developed for designing wind turbine airfoils. The airfoil design method was optimized for a...

  5. Wind and thermodynamic profiler observations of a late-mature gust ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Common meteoro- logical variables at surface were sampled with 1 Hz temporal resolution. A 12-channel Microwave Pro- filer Radiometer (MPR) was used to derive verti- cal profiles of temperature (T) and water vapour mixing ratio (rv), with 4 min temporal resolution. Vertical velocities and horizontal wind field (tem-.

  6. The influence of thermal effects on the wind speed profile of the coastal marine boundary layer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lange, B.; Larsen, Søren Ejling; Højstrup, Jørgen

    2004-01-01

    The wind speed profile in a coastal marine environment is investigated with observations from the measurement program Rodsand, where meteorological data are collected with a 50 m high mast in the Danish Baltic Sea, about 11 km from the coast. When compared with the standard Monin-Obukhov theory t...

  7. One year of vertical wind profiles measurements at a Mediterranean coastal site of South Italy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calidonna, Claudia Roberta; Avolio, Elenio; Federico, Stefano; Gullì, Daniel; Lo Feudo, Teresa; Sempreviva, Anna Maria

    2015-04-01

    In order to develop wind farms projects is challenging to site them on coastal areas both onshore and offshore as suitable sites. Developing projects need high quality databases under a wide range of atmospheric conditions or high resolution models that could resolve the effect of the coastal discontinuity in the surface properties. New parametrizations are important and high quality databases are also needed for formulating them. Ground-based remote sensing devices such as lidars have been shown to be functional for studying the evolution of the vertical wind structure coastal atmospheric boundary layer both on- and offshore. Here, we present results from a year of vertical wind profiles, wind speed and direction, monitoring programme at a site located in the Italian Calabria Region, Central Mediterranean, 600m from the Thyrrenian coastline, where a Lidar Doppler, ZephIr (ZephIr ltd) has been operative since July 2013. The lidar monitors wind speed and direction from 10m up to 300m at 10 vertical levels with an average of 10 minutes and it is supported by a metmast providing: Atmospheric Pressure, Solar Radiation, Precipitation, Relative Humidity, Temperature,Wind Speed and Direction at 10m. We present the characterization of wind profiles during one year period according to the time of the day to transition periods night/day/night classified relating the local scale, breeze scale, to the large scale conditions. The dataset is also functional for techniques for short-term prediction of wind for the renewable energy integration in the distribution grids. The site infrastructure is funded within the Project "Infrastructure of High Technology for Environmental and Climate Monitoring" (I-AMICA) (PONa3_00363) by the Italian National Operative Program (PON 2007-2013) and European Regional Development Fund. Real-time data are show on http://www.i-amica.it/i-amica/?page_id=1122.

  8. QBO effects manifesting in ozone, temperature, and wind profiles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. A. Sitnov

    2004-04-01

    Full Text Available On the basis of ozonesonde records up to 1998 the responses on the equatorial quasi-biennial oscillation (QBO, manifesting in ozone, temperature, and wind (QBO effects were isolated in the region from the ground to altitudes as high as 35km at 22 stations located in Europe (7, North America (7, Japan (4, Hawaii (1, Australia (2, and Antarctic (1.

    The vertical structures of the QBO effects of ozone are represented as an alternation of layers of well-developed quasi-biennial signals, whose phases gradually change with height and thin transitional layers of ill-developed signals, whose phases change abruptly with height. The amplitudes of the effects depend on height and reach the maxima of 3–6nbar in the lower stratosphere. At the majority of sites the effects are found to be approximately in phase between 20 and 23km.

    Two types of the vertical structures of the temperature QBO effects are found. At most of the sites located equatorward of about 50° the stratospheric temperature anomalies are characterized by downward propagation, whereas at sites situated poleward of about 50° they look as column-like structures. Near the tropopause the effects frequently reveal dipole-like structure, when the stratospheric and tropospheric anomalies are of opposite signs. The amplitudes of the effects are in the range of 0.5–1°C.

    The vertical structures of the QBO effects of horizontal wind components reveal a diversity of patterns. The amplitudes of the QBO effects of the meridional and zonal winds are comparable and lie in the range of 0.5–2m s–1. As a rule, the maxima of the effects are noticed slightly below the tropopause, as well as in the middle stratosphere.

    In general, a statistical assurance of the obtained QBO effects is rather poor. However, a considerable part of them reveal similarity

  9. Scale-down of a high-shear pelletisation process : Flow profile and growth kinetics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ramaker, JS; Jelgersma, MA; Vonk, P; Kossen, NWF

    1998-01-01

    For the predictive modelling of the high-shear pelletisation process it is necessary to have a better understanding of the underlying mechanisms. Therefore, pelletisation experiments were carried out with microcrystalline cellulose and lactose in a coffee grinder (small-scale) and in a Gral 10

  10. Probabilistic stability and "tall" wind profiles: theory and method for use in wind resource assessment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kelly, Mark C.; Troen, Ib

    2016-01-01

    to the methodology. Results of the modeling are shown for a number of sites, with discussion of the models’ efficacy and the relative improvement shown by the new model, for situations where a user lacks local heat flux information, as well as performance of the new model using measured flux statistics. Further......, the uncertainty in vertical extrapolation is characterized for the EWA model contained in standard (i.e., WAsP) wind resource assessment, as well as for the new model. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd....

  11. Optimization design of airfoil profiles based on the noise of wind turbines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cheng, Jiangtao; Chen, Jin; Cheng, Jiangtao

    2012-01-01

    Based on design theory of airfoil profiles and airfoil self-noise prediction model, a new method with the target of the airfoil average efficiency-noise ratio of design ranges for angle of attack had been developed for designing wind turbine airfoils. The airfoil design method was optimized...... for a relative thickness of 21% and a new airfoil was obtained. To illustrate the optimization method, the aerodynamic characteristics and noise of the optimized airfoil were calculated and analyzed. Through performance comparison of a DU93-W-210 airfoil and a FFA-W3-211 airfoil which are widely used in wind...

  12. Complementarity of hydro and wind power: Improving the risk profile of energy inflows

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Denault, Michel; Dupuis, Debbie; Couture-Cardinal, Sebastien

    2009-01-01

    The complementarity of two renewable energy sources, namely hydro and wind, is investigated. We consider the diversification effect of wind power to reduce the risk of water inflow shortages, an important energy security concern for hydropower-based economic zones (e.g. Quebec and Norway). Our risk measure is based on the probability of a production deficit, in a manner akin to the value-at-risk, simulation analysis of financial portfolios. We examine whether the risk level of a mixed hydro-and-wind portfolio of generating assets improves on the risk of an all-hydro portfolio, by relaxing the dependence on water inflows and attenuating the impact of droughts. Copulas are used to model the dependence between the two sources of energy. The data considered, over the period 1958-2003, are for the province of Quebec, which possesses large hydro and wind resources. Our results indicate that for all scenarios considered, any proportion of wind up to 30% improves the production deficit risk profile of an all-hydro system. We can also estimate the value, in TW h, of any additional one percent of wind in the portfolio. (author)

  13. Integrating Wind Profiling Radars and Radiosonde Observations with Model Point Data to Develop a Decision Support Tool to Assess Upper-Level Winds for Space Launch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauman, William H., III; Flinn, Clay

    2013-01-01

    On the day of launch, the 45th Weather Squadron (45 WS) Launch Weather Officers (LWOs) monitor the upper-level winds for their launch customers. During launch operations, the payload/launch team sometimes asks the LWOs if they expect the upper-level winds to change during the countdown. The LWOs used numerical weather prediction model point forecasts to provide the information, but did not have the capability to quickly retrieve or adequately display the upper-level observations and compare them directly in the same display to the model point forecasts to help them determine which model performed the best. The LWOs requested the Applied Meteorology Unit (AMU) develop a graphical user interface (GUI) that will plot upper-level wind speed and direction observations from the Cape Canaveral Air Force Station (CCAFS) Automated Meteorological Profiling System (AMPS) rawinsondes with point forecast wind profiles from the National Centers for Environmental Prediction (NCEP) North American Mesoscale (NAM), Rapid Refresh (RAP) and Global Forecast System (GFS) models to assess the performance of these models. The AMU suggested adding observations from the NASA 50 MHz wind profiler and one of the US Air Force 915 MHz wind profilers, both located near the Kennedy Space Center (KSC) Shuttle Landing Facility, to supplement the AMPS observations with more frequent upper-level profiles. Figure 1 shows a map of KSC/CCAFS with the locations of the observation sites and the model point forecasts.

  14. Examination of objective analysis precision using wind profiler and radiosonde network data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mace, G.G.; Ackerman, T.P. [Penn State Univ., University Park, PA (United States)

    1996-04-01

    One of the principal research strategies that has emerged from the science team of the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program is the use of a single column model (SCM). The basic assumption behind the SCM approach is that a cloud and radiation parameterization embedded in a general circulation model can be effectively tested and improved by extracting that column parameterization from the general circulation model and then driving this single column at the lateral boundaries of the column with diagnosed large-scale atmospheric forcing. A second and related assumption is that the large-scale atmospheric state, and hence the associated forcing, can be characterized directly from observations. One of the primary reasons that the Southern Great Plains (SGP) site is located in Lamont, Oklahoma, is because Lamont is at the approximate center of the NOM Wind Profiler Demonstration Array (WPDA). The assumption was that hourly average wind profiles provided by the 7 wind profilers (one Lamont and six surrounding it in a hexagon) coupled with radiosonde launches every three hours at 5 sites (Lamont plus four of the six profiler locations forming the hexagon) would be sufficient to characterize accurately the large-scale forcing at the site and thereby provide the required forcing for the SCM. The goal of this study was to examine these three assumptions.

  15. KSC 50-MHz Doppler Radar Wind Profiler (DRWP) Operational Acceptance Test (OAT) Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbre, Robert E.

    2015-01-01

    This report documents analysis results of the Kennedy Space Center updated 50-MHz Doppler Radar Wind Profiler (DRWP) Operational Acceptance Test (OAT). This test was designed to demonstrate that the new DRWP operates in a similar manner to the previous DRWP for use as a situational awareness asset for mission operations at the Eastern Range to identify rapid changes in the wind environment that weather balloons cannot depict. Data examination and two analyses showed that the updated DRWP meets the specifications in the OAT test plan and performs at least as well as the previous DRWP. Data examination verified that the DRWP provides complete profiles every five minutes from 1.8-19.5 km in vertical increments of 150 m. Analysis of 5,426 wind component reports from 49 concurrent DRWP and balloon profiles presented root mean square (RMS) wind component differences around 2.0 m/s. The DRWP's effective vertical resolution (EVR) was found to be 300 m for both the westerly and southerly wind component, which the best EVR possible given the DRWP's vertical sampling interval. A third analysis quantified the sensitivity to rejecting data that do not have adequate signal by assessing the number of first-guess propagations at each altitude. This report documents the data, quality control procedures, methodology, and results of each analysis. It also shows that analysis of the updated DRWP produced results that were at least as good as the previous DRWP with proper rationale. The report recommends acceptance of the updated DRWP for situational awareness usage as per the OAT's intent.

  16. Strongly-sheared wind-forced currents in the nearshore regions of the central Southern California Bight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noble, Marlene A.; Rosenberger, Kurt; Robertson, George L.

    2015-01-01

    Contrary to many previous reports, winds do drive currents along the shelf in the central portion of the Southern California Bight (SCB). Winds off Huntington Beach CA are the dominant forcing for currents over the nearshore region of the shelf (water depths less than 20 m). Winds control about 50–70% of the energy in nearshore alongshelf surface currents. The wind-driven current amplitudes are also anomalously high. For a relatively weak 1 dyne/cm2 wind stress, the alongshelf surface current amplitudes in this region can reach 80 cm/s or more. Mid-depth current amplitudes for the same wind stress are around 30–40 cm/s. These wind-driven surface current amplitudes are much larger than previously measured over other nearshore shelf regions, perhaps because this program is one of the few that measured currents within a meter of the surface. The near-bed cross-shelf currents over the nearshore region of the Huntington Beach shelf have an Ekman response to winds in that they upwell (downwell) for down (up) coast winds. This response disappears further offshore. Hence, there is upwelling in the SCB, but it does not occur across the entire shelf. Subthermocline water in the nearshore region that may contain nutrients and plankton move onshore when winds are southeastward, but subthermocline water over the shelf break is not transported to the beach. The currents over the outer shelf are not predominately controlled by winds, consistent with previous reports. Instead, they are mainly driven by cross-shelf pressure gradients that are independent of local wind stress.

  17. Development of the High-Altitude Imaging Wind and Rain Airborne Profiler (HIWRAP)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heymsfield, G. M.; Carswell, J. R.; Li, L.; Schaubert, D.; Heymsfield, J. C.

    2006-12-01

    A dual-wavelength (Ku and Ka band) High-Altitude Imaging Wind and Rain Airborne Profiler (HIWRAP) is under development for measuring tropospheric winds within precipitation regions and ocean surface winds in rain-free to light rain regions. This instrument is being designed for operation on high-altitude manned aircraft and the Global Hawk UAV. Proposed lidar-based systems provide measurements in cloud-free regions globally. Since many of the weather systems are in disturbed regions that contain precipitation and clouds, microwave based techniques are more suitable in these regions. Airborne radars at NASA and elsewhere have shown the ability to measure winds in precipitation and clouds. These radars have not generally been suitable for deriving the full horizontal wind from above cloud systems (high-altitude or space) that would require conical scan. HIWRAP is conical scan radar that uses new technologies that utilize solid state rather than tube based transmitters. The presentation will discuss the motivation for the instrument, key system level technologies, status, and planned flight testing of the prototype sensor on the high-altitude WB-57 aircraft to demonstrate the system level performance of the instrument.

  18. Thermal Loading and Lifetime Estimation for Power Device Considering Mission Profiles in Wind Power Converter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ma, Ke; Liserre, Marco; Blaabjerg, Frede

    2015-01-01

    As a key component in the wind turbine system, the power electronic converter and its power semiconductors suffer from complicated power loadings related to environment, and are proven to have high failure rates. Therefore, correct lifetime estimation of wind power converter is crucial for the re......As a key component in the wind turbine system, the power electronic converter and its power semiconductors suffer from complicated power loadings related to environment, and are proven to have high failure rates. Therefore, correct lifetime estimation of wind power converter is crucial....... Consequently, a relative more advanced approach is proposed in this paper, which is based on the loading and strength analysis of devices and takes into account different time constants of the thermal behaviors in power converter. With the established methods for loading and lifetime estimation for power...... devices, more detailed information of the lifetime-related performance in wind power converter can be obtained. Some experimental results are also included to validate the thermal behavior of power device under different mission profiles....

  19. Seasonal and diurnal changes in wind variability from Flatland VHF profiler observations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nastrom, G.D. [Saint Cloud State Univ., MN (United States). Dept. of Earth Sci.; Clark, W.L. [National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Boulder, CO (United States). Aeronomy Lab.; Zandt, T.E. van [National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Boulder, CO (United States). Aeronomy Lab.; Warnock, J.M. [National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Boulder, CO (United States). Aeronomy Lab.

    1996-02-01

    Climatological results are presented on the hourly variance of the wind observed in the mid-troposphere (3 to 9 km MSL). This quantity roughly indicates the energy in the atmospheric wind field for variations with periods roughly less than 1 hour. Observations are from the Flatland VHF research wind profiler, located near Champaign/Urbana, Illinois, well away from significant orographic features. The period of record covers two years, September 1990 through August 1992. The values of the variance of the winds along vertical and oblique (15 degrees from zenith in the cardinal directions) beams are presented versus height, season, time-of-day, and beam pointing direction. It is found that the hourly variance values have approximately lognormal frequency distribution. The mean hourly variance is significantly larger for the oblique wind observations than for the vertical. Mean wind variances also tend to be larger in the east/west steering plane than in the north/south plane. The mean variance generally increases with height, but faster than would be expected if it were due solely to the decrease in atmospheric density, implying the presence of local source/sinks of wind energy. The rate of change with height is noticeably different for the vertical and oblique beams, being much less for the vertical beam, in some seasons even decreasing with height. With respect to season, the mean hourly variance is smallest in the summer and largest in the winter. With respect to diurnal changes, the variance is maximum during the afternoon for spring, summer, and autumn, with the maximum up to a factor of two larger than the minimum. In winter, the diurnal change is much smaller, with little indication of an afternoon maximum. (orig.)

  20. Shear layer approximation of Navier-Stokes steady equations for non-axisymmetric wind turbine wakes: Description, verification and first application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trabucchi, Davide; Vollmer, Lukas; Kühn, Martin

    2016-09-01

    The number of turbines installed in offshore wind farms has strongly increased in the last years and at the same time the need for more precise estimation of the wind farm efficiency. For this reason, the wind energy community could benefit from more accurate models for multiple wakes. Existing engineering models can only simulate single wakes, which are superimposed if they are interacting in a wind farm. This method is a practical solution, but it is not fully supported by a physical background. The limitation to single wakes is given by the assumption that the wake is axisymmetric. As alternative, we propose a new shear model which is based on the existing engineering wake models, but is extended to simulate also non- axisymmetric wakes. In this paper, we present the theoretical background of the model and two application cases. First, we proved that for axisymmetric wakes the new model is equivalent to a commonly used engineering model. Then, we evaluated the improvements of the new model for the simulation of a non-axisymmetric wake using a large eddy simulation as reference. The results encourage the further development of the model, and promise a successful application for the simulation of multiple wakes.

  1. Airborne Wind Profiling Algorithms for the Pulsed 2-Micron Coherent Doppler Lidar at NASA Langley Research Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beyon, Jeffrey Y.; Koch, Grady J.; Kavaya, Michael J.; Ray, Taylor J.

    2013-01-01

    Two versions of airborne wind profiling algorithms for the pulsed 2-micron coherent Doppler lidar system at NASA Langley Research Center in Virginia are presented. Each algorithm utilizes different number of line-of-sight (LOS) lidar returns while compensating the adverse effects of different coordinate systems between the aircraft and the Earth. One of the two algorithms APOLO (Airborne Wind Profiling Algorithm for Doppler Wind Lidar) estimates wind products using two LOSs. The other algorithm utilizes five LOSs. The airborne lidar data were acquired during the NASA's Genesis and Rapid Intensification Processes (GRIP) campaign in 2010. The wind profile products from the two algorithms are compared with the dropsonde data to validate their results.

  2. GPM GROUND VALIDATION HIGH ALTITUDE IMAGING WIND AND RAIN AIRBORNE PROFILER (HIWRAP) MC3E V1

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The High-Altitude Imaging Wind and Rain Airborne Profiler (HIWRAP) is a dual-frequency (Ka- and Ku-band) conical scan system, configured with a nadir viewing antenna...

  3. A comparison between Warner-Bratzler shear force measurement and texture profile analysis of meat and meat products: a review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novaković, S.; Tomašević, I.

    2017-09-01

    Texture is one of the most important characteristics of meat and we can explain it as the human physiological-psychological awareness of a number of rheological and other properties of foods and their relations. In this paper, we discuss instrumental measurement of texture by Warner-Bratzler shear force (WBSF) and texture profile analysis (TPA). The conditions for using the device are detailed in WBSF measurements, and the influence of different parameters on the execution of the method and final results are shown. After that, the main disadvantages are reflected in the non-standardized method. Also, we introduce basic texture parameters which connect and separate TPA and WBSF methods and mention contemporary methods with their main advantage.

  4. Assessing the vegetation canopy influences on wind flow using wind ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The effectiveness of vegetation in reducing wind ... Wind erosion; roughness length; shear velocity ratio; shear stress ratio; roughness density; wind tunnel. J. Earth .... flow direction induced by its kinematic viscosity. An increase in shear stress causes a proportional increase in the height-dependent change in wind velocity.

  5. Three-Dimensional Temperature and Wind Profiles Obtained Using UAV-Based Acoustic Atmospheric Tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finn, A.

    2017-12-01

    The natural sound generated by an unmanned aerial vehicle is used in conjunction with tomography to remotely sense atmospheric temperature and wind profiles simultaneously. Sound fields recorded onboard the aircraft and by an array of microphones on the ground are compared and converted to sound speed estimates for the ray paths intersecting the intervening medium. Tomographic inversion is then used to transform these sound speed values into vertical cross-sections and 3D volumes of virtual temperature and wind vectors, which enables the atmosphere to be visualised and monitored over time up to altitudes of 1,200m and over baselines of up to 600m. This paper reports on results from two short campaigns during which 2D and 3D profiles of wind and temperature obtained in this way were compared to: measurements taken by co-located mid-range Doppler SODAR and LIDAR; and temperature measurements made by instruments carried by unmanned aircraft flying through the intervening atmosphere. Large eddy simulation of daytime atmospheric boundary layers were also used to examine the anticipated performance of the instruments and the nature of any errors. The observations obtained using all systems are shown to correspond closely.

  6. Energy profiling of demersal fish: a case-study in wind farm artificial reefs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Troch, Marleen; Reubens, Jan T; Heirman, Elke; Degraer, Steven; Vincx, Magda

    2013-12-01

    The construction of wind farms introduces artificial hard substrates in sandy sediments. As Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua) and pouting (Trisopterus luscus) tend to aggregate in order to feed around these reefs, energy profiling and trophic markers were applied to study their feeding ecology in a wind farm in the Belgian part of the North Sea. The proximate composition (carbohydrates, proteins and lipids) differed significantly between liver and muscle tissue but not between fish species or between their potential prey species. Atlantic cod showed to consume more energy than pouting. The latter had a higher overall energy reserve and can theoretically survive twice as long on the available energy than cod. In autumn, both fish species could survive longer on their energy than in spring. Polyunsaturated fatty acids were found in high concentrations in fish liver. The prey species Jassa and Pisidia were both rich in EPA while Jassa had a higher DHA content than Pisidia. Energy profiling supported the statement that wind farm artificial reefs are suitable feeding ground for both fish species. Sufficient energy levels were recorded and there is no indication of competition.

  7. Background Pressure Profiles for Sonic Boom Vehicle Testing in the NASA Glenn 8- by 6-Foot Supersonic Wind Tunnel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castner, Raymond; Shaw, Stephen; Adamson, Eric; Simerly, Stephanie

    2013-01-01

    In an effort to identify test facilities that offer sonic boom measurement capabilities, an exploratory test program was initiated using wind tunnels at NASA research centers. The subject of this report is the sonic boom pressure rail data collected in the Glenn Research Center 8- by 6-Foot Supersonic Wind Tunnel. The purpose is to summarize the lessons learned based on the test activity, specifically relating to collecting sonic boom data which has a large amount of spatial pressure variation. The wind tunnel background pressure profiles are presented as well as data which demonstrated how both wind tunnel Mach number and model support-strut position affected the wind tunnel background pressure profile. Techniques were developed to mitigate these effects and are presented.

  8. Long-Term Profiles of Wind and Weibull Distribution Parameters up to 600 m in a Rural Coastal and an Inland Suburban Area

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gryning, Sven-Erik; Batchvarova, Ekaterina; Floors, Rogier Ralph

    2014-01-01

    An investigation of the long-term variability of wind profiles for wind energy applications is presented. The observations consists of wind measurements obtained from a ground-based wind lidar at heights between 100 and 600 m, in combination with measurements from tallmeteorological towers at a f...

  9. 915-MHz Wind Profiler for Cloud Forecasting at Brookhaven National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jensen, M. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Bartholomew, M. J. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Giangrande, S. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States)

    2016-03-01

    When considering the amount of shortwave radiation incident on a photovoltaic solar array and, therefore, the amount and stability of the energy output from the system, clouds represent the greatest source of short-term (i.e., scale of minutes to hours) variability through scattering and reflection of incoming solar radiation. Providing estimates of this short-term variability is important for determining and regulating the output from large solar arrays as they connect with the larger power infrastructure. In support of the installation of a 37-MW solar array on the grounds of Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), a study of the impacts of clouds on the output of the solar array has been undertaken. The study emphasis is on predicting the change in surface solar radiation resulting from the observed/forecast cloud field on a 5-minute time scale. At these time scales, advection of cloud elements over the solar array is of particular importance. As part of the BNL Aerosol Life Cycle Intensive Operational Period (IOP), a 915-MHz Radar Wind Profiler (RWP) was deployed to determine the profile of low-level horizontal winds and the depth of the planetary boundary layer. The initial deployment mission of the 915-MHz RWP for cloud forecasting has been expanded the deployment to provide horizontal wind measurements for estimating and constraining cloud advection speeds. A secondary focus is on the observation of dynamics and microphysics of precipitation during cold season/winter storms on Long Island. In total, the profiler was deployed at BNL for 1 year from May 2011 through May 2012.

  10. 915-Mhz Wind Profiler for Cloud Forecasting at Brookhaven National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jensen, M. [Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Bartholomew, M. J. [Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Giangrande, S. [Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), Upton, NY (United States)

    2016-03-01

    When considering the amount of shortwave radiation incident on a photovoltaic solar array and, therefore, the amount and stability of the energy output from the system, clouds represent the greatest source of short-term (i.e., scale of minutes to hours) variability through scattering and reflection of incoming solar radiation. Providing estimates of this short-term variability is important for determining and regulating the output from large solar arrays as they connect with the larger power infrastructure. In support of the installation of a 37-MW solar array on the grounds of Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), a study of the impacts of clouds on the output of the solar array has been undertaken. The study emphasis is on predicting the change in surface solar radiation resulting from the observed/forecast cloud field on a 5-minute time scale. At these time scales, advection of cloud elements over the solar array is of particular importance. As part of the BNL Aerosol Life Cycle Intensive Operational Period (IOP), a 915-MHz Radar Wind Profiler (RWP) was deployed to determine the profile of low-level horizontal winds and the depth of the planetary boundary layer. The initial deployment mission of the 915-MHz RWP for cloud forecasting has been expanded the deployment to provide horizontal wind measurements for estimating and constraining cloud advection speeds. A secondary focus is on the observation of dynamics and microphysics of precipitation during cold season/winter storms on Long Island. In total, the profiler was deployed at BNL for 1 year from May 2011 through May 2012.

  11. Wind Profiling from a New Compact, Pulsed, 2-Micron, Coherent-Detection Doppler Lidar Transceiver during Wind Measurement Intercomparison

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Upendra N.; Koch, Grady J.; Kavaya, Michael J.; Yu, Jirong; Beyon, Jeffrey Y.; Demoz, B.; Veneable, D.

    2009-01-01

    NASA Langley Research Center has a long history of developing 2-micron laser transmitter for wind sensing. With support from NASA Laser Risk Reduction Program (LRRP) and Instrument Incubator Program (IIP), NASA Langley Research Center has developed a state-of-the-art compact lidar transceiver for a pulsed coherent Doppler lidar system for wind measurement. This lidar system was recently deployed at Howard University facility in Beltsville, Maryland, along with other wind lidar systems. Coherent Doppler wind lidar ground-based wind measurements and comparisons with other lidars and other sensors will be presented.

  12. A brief history of the development of wind-profiling or MST radars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. E. Van Zandt

    2000-07-01

    Full Text Available The history of the development of the wind-profiling or MST radar technique is reviewed from its inception in the late 1960s to the present. Extensions of the technique by the development of boundary-layer radars and the radio-acoustic sounding system (RASS technique to measure temperature are documented. Applications are described briefly, particularly practical applications to weather forecasting, with data from networks of radars, and scientific applications to the study of rapidly varying atmospheric phenomena such as gravity waves and turbulence.Key words: Meteorology and atmospheric dynamics (instruments and techniques · Radio science (remote sensing; instruments and techniques

  13. Size effects in winding roll formed profiles: A study of carcass production for flexible pipes in offshore industry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Peter Søe; Nielsen, Morten Storgaard; Bay, Niels

    2013-01-01

    Carcass production of flexible offshore oil and gas pipes implies winding and interlocking of a roll formed stainless steel profile around a mandrel in a spiral shape. The location of the dividing point between the left and right half of the s-shaped profile in the finished carcass is very...... important as it directly influences carcass flexibility. The target location of the dividing point can be difficult to achieve since undesired degrees of freedom in the winding stage allows the profile to change geometry. The present work investigates this issue by performing production tests of a single...

  14. Combined wind profiler-weather radar observations of orographic rainband around Kyushu, Japan in the Baiu season

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Umemoto

    2004-11-01

    Full Text Available A special observation campaign (X-BAIU, using various instruments (wind profilers, C-band weather radars, X-band Doppler radars, rawinsondes, etc., was carried out in Kyushu (western Japan during the Baiu season, from 1998 to 2002. In the X-BAIU-99 and -02 observations, a line-shaped orographic rainband extending northeastward from the Koshikijima Islands appeared in the low-level strong wind with warm-moist airs. The weather radar observation indicated that the rainband was maintained for 11h. The maximum length and width of the rainband observed in 1999 was ~200km and ~20km, respectively. The rainband observed in 2002 was not so developed compared with the case in 1999. The Froude number averaged from sea level to the top of the Koshikijima Islands (~600m was large (>1, and the lifting condensation level was below the tops of the Koshikijima Islands. Thus, it is suggested that the clouds organizing the rainband are formed by the triggering of the mountains on the airflow passing over them. The vertical profile of horizontal wind in/around the rainband was investigated in the wind profiler observations. In the downdraft region 60km from the Koshikijima Islands, strong wind and its clockwise rotation with increasing height was observed below 3km altitude. In addition, a strong wind component perpendicular to the rainband was observed when the rainband was well developed. These wind behaviors were related to the evolution of the rainband.

  15. Comparison of wind turbine wake properties in non‐sheared inflow predicted by different computational fluid dynamics rotor models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Troldborg, Niels; Zahle, Frederik; Réthoré, Pierre-Elouan

    2015-01-01

    The wake of the 5MW reference wind turbine designed by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) is simulated using computational fluid dynamics with a fully resolved rotor geometry, an actuator line method and an actuator disc method, respectively. Simulations are carried out prescribing...

  16. Data Quality Assessment Methods for the Eastern Range 915 MHz Wind Profiler Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lambert, Winifred C.; Taylor, Gregory E.

    1998-01-01

    The Eastern Range installed a network of five 915 MHz Doppler Radar Wind Profilers with Radio Acoustic Sounding Systems in the Cape Canaveral Air Station/Kennedy Space Center area to provide three-dimensional wind speed and direction and virtual temperature estimates in the boundary layer. The Applied Meteorology Unit, staffed by ENSCO, Inc., was tasked by the 45th Weather Squadron, the Spaceflight Meteorology Group, and the National Weather Service in Melbourne, Florida to investigate methods which will help forecasters assess profiler network data quality when developing forecasts and warnings for critical ground, launch and landing operations. Four routines were evaluated in this study: a consensus time period check a precipitation contamination check, a median filter, and the Weber-Wuertz (WW) algorithm. No routine was able to effectively flag suspect data when used by itself. Therefore, the routines were used in different combinations. An evaluation of all possible combinations revealed two that provided the best results. The precipitation contamination and consensus time routines were used in both combinations. The median filter or WW was used as the final routine in the combinations to flag all other suspect data points.

  17. Wind Field Reconstruction from Nacelle-Mounted Lidars Short Range Measurements

    OpenAIRE

    Borraccino, Antoine; Schlipf, David; Haizmann, Florian; Wagner, Rozenn

    2017-01-01

    Profiling nacelle lidars probe the wind at several heights and several distances upstream of the rotor. The development of such lidar systems is relatively recent, and it is still unclear how to condense the lidar raw measurements into useful wind field characteristics such as speed, direction, vertical and longitudinal gradients (wind shear). In this paper, we demonstrate an innovative method to estimate wind field characteristics using nacelle lidar measurements taken within the induction z...

  18. PMSE and wind profiles from observations above EISCAT Tromsø site

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mann, Ingrid; Nozawa, Satonori; Haeggstroem, Ingemar; Tjulin, Anders; Dalin, Peter; Hall, Chris; Anyairo, Charles; Rostami, Sina

    2017-04-01

    One of the processes that are linked to the entry of cosmic dust in atmosphere is the formation of Polar Mesospheric Summer Echoes (PMSE). PMSE are strong radar echoes that are observed in the polar summer mesosphere. They are caused by spatial variations in the plasma refractive index which arise in the presence of electrically charged ice particles. The ice particles that are linked to PMSE are often below the optically observable size range and are assumed to form by water ice condensing onto meteoric smoke particles at around 80 to 90 km altitude. The atmosphere at PMSE altitude is influenced by solar radiative forcing from above and gravity waves from below, and while ionization is small, it is highly variable due to a number of different processes. A straightforward quantitative description of the physics leading to PMSE formation is at present still missing. With one of the first tri-static PMSE observations with the EISCAT VHF radar we found signs of wind shear in PMSE. The observations suggest that the PMSE contains sublayers that move in different directions horizontally, and this points to Kelvin-Helmholtz instability possibly playing a role in PMSE process. We compare the EISCAT observations to wind observations carried with other radar at the same location and discuss implications for future observations. We acknowledge Chris Meek and Alan Manson who provided MF radar data. EISCAT is an international association supported by research organizations in Norway (NFR), Sweden (VR), Finland (SA), Japan (NIPR and STEL), China (CRIPR), and the United Kingdom (NERC); data are available under http://www. eiscat.se/madrigal/.

  19. Height profile of particle concentration in an aeolian saltating cloud: A wind tunnel investigation by PIV MSD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Zhibao; Wang, Hongtao; Zhang, Xiaohang; Ayrault, Michael

    2003-10-01

    Attempt is made to define the particle concentration in an aeolian saltating cloud and its variation with height using artificial spherical quartz sand in a wind tunnel. The height profiles of the relative particle concentration in aeolian saltating cloud at three wind velocities were detected by the state of the art PIV (Particle Image Velocimetry) MSD (Mie Scattering Diffusion) technique, and converted to actual concentration based on sand transport rate and the variation with height of velocity of the saltating cloud. The particle concentration was found to decay exponentially with height and to increase with wind velocity. It decayed more rapidly when the wind velocity decreased. The volume/volume concentration in the near-surface layer was at the order of 10-4. The results obtained by PIV MSD technique were in good agreement with those derived from the sand flux and velocity profiles, the former being about 15% greater than the later.

  20. Wind effect in turbulence parametrization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colombini, M.; Stocchino, A.

    2005-09-01

    The action of wind blowing over a closed basin ultimately results in a steady shear-induced circulation pattern and in a leeward rising of the free surface—and a corresponding windward lowering—known as wind set-up. If the horizontal dimensions of the basin are large with respect to the average flow depth, the occurrence of local quasi-equilibrium conditions can be expected, i.e. the flow can be assumed to be locally driven only by the wind stress and by the opposing free surface gradient due to set-up. This wind-induced flow configuration shows a strong similarity with turbulent Couette-Poiseuille flow, the one dimensional flow between parallel plates generated by the simultaneous action of a constant pressure gradient and of the shear induced by the relative motion of the plates. A two-equation turbulence closure is then employed to perform a numerical study of turbulent Couette-Poiseuille flows for different values of the ratio of the shear stresses at the two walls. The resulting eddy viscosity vertical distributions are analyzed in order to devise analytical profiles of eddy viscosity that account for the effect of wind. The results of this study, beside allowing for a physical insight on the turbulence process of this class of flows, will allow for a more accurate description of the wind effect to be included in the formulation of quasi-3D and 3D models of lagoon hydrodynamics.

  1. Wind profiler data in a mesoscale experiment from a meteorological perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zipser, E. J.; Augustine, J.; Cunning, J.

    1986-01-01

    During May and June of 1985, the Oklahoma-Kansas Preliminary Regional Experiment of STORM-Central (OK PRE-STORM) was carried out, with the major objectives of learning more about mesoscale convective systems (MCSs) and gaining experience in the use of new sensing systems and measurement strategies that will improve the design of STORM-Central. Three 50-MHz wind profilers were employed in a triangular array with sides about 275 km. It is far too soon to report any results of this effort, for it has barely begun. The purpose here is to show some examples of the data, some of the surrounding conventional data, and to discuss some of the issues important to meteorologists in evaluating the contribution of the profiler data. The case of 10 to 11 June 1985, featuring a major squall line system which crossed the dense observing network from northwest to southeast, passing the Liberal site about 2230 GMT/10 June, the McPherson site about 0100 GMT/11 June, and Wichita about 0300 GMT/11 June is discussed. Radar and satellite data show that the system was growing rapidly when it passed Liberal, and was large and mature when it passed through McPherson and Wichita. The radar depiction of the system during this stage is given, with the McPherson site in the intense convective echoes near the leading edge at 01 GMT and in the stratiform precipitation at 03 GMT. The profiler wind data for a 9-hour period encompassing the squall line passage at each site are given.

  2. Advanced intermittent clutter filtering for radar wind profiler: signal separation through a Gabor frame expansion and its statistics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Lehmann

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available A new signal processing method is presented for the suppression of intermittent clutter echoes in radar wind profilers. This clutter type is a significant problem during the seasonal bird migration and often results in large discrepancies between profiler wind measurements and independent reference data. The technique presented makes use of a discrete Gabor frame expansion of the coherently averaged time series data in combination with a statistical filtering approach to exploit the different signal characteristics between signal and clutter. The rationale of this algorithm is outlined and the mathematical methods used are presented in due detail. A first test using data obtained with an operational 482 MHz wind profiler indicates that the method outperforms the previously used clutter suppression algorithm.

  3. Airborne Wind Profiling With the Data Acquisition and Processing System for a Pulsed 2-Micron Coherent Doppler Lidar System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beyon, Jeffrey Y.; Koch, Grady J.; Kavaya, Michael J.

    2012-01-01

    A pulsed 2-micron coherent Doppler lidar system at NASA Langley Research Center in Virginia flew on the NASA's DC-8 aircraft during the NASA Genesis and Rapid Intensification Processes (GRIP) during the summer of 2010. The participation was part of the project Doppler Aerosol Wind Lidar (DAWN) Air. Selected results of airborne wind profiling are presented and compared with the dropsonde data for verification purposes. Panoramic presentations of different wind parameters over a nominal observation time span are also presented for selected GRIP data sets. The realtime data acquisition and analysis software that was employed during the GRIP campaign is introduced with its unique features.

  4. Rotor equivalent wind speed for power curve measurement – comparative exercise for IEA Wind Annex 32

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wagner, Rozenn; Cañadillas, B.; Clifton, A.

    2014-01-01

    A comparative exercise has been organised within the International Energy Agency (IEA) Wind Annex 32 in order to test the Rotor Equivalent Wind Speed (REWS) method under various conditions of wind shear and measurement techniques. Eight organisations from five countries participated in the exercise....... Each member of the group has derived both the power curve based on the wind speed at hub height and the power curve based on the REWS. This yielded results for different wind turbines, located in diverse types of terrain and where the wind speed profile was measured with different instruments (mast...... was the definition of the segment area used as weighting for the wind speeds measured at the various heights in the calculation of the REWS. This comparative exercise showed that the REWS method results in a significant difference compared to the standard method using the wind speed at hub height in conditions...

  5. Wind noise under a pine tree canopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raspet, Richard; Webster, Jeremy

    2015-02-01

    It is well known that infrasonic wind noise levels are lower for arrays placed in forests and under vegetation than for those in open areas. In this research, the wind noise levels, turbulence spectra, and wind velocity profiles are measured in a pine forest. A prediction of the wind noise spectra from the measured meteorological parameters is developed based on recent research on wind noise above a flat plane. The resulting wind noise spectrum is the sum of the low frequency wind noise generated by the turbulence-shear interaction near and above the tops of the trees and higher frequency wind noise generated by the turbulence-turbulence interaction near the ground within the tree layer. The convection velocity of the low frequency wind noise corresponds to the wind speed above the trees while the measurements showed that the wind noise generated by the turbulence-turbulence interaction is near stationary and is generated by the slow moving turbulence adjacent to the ground. Comparison of the predicted wind noise spectrum with the measured wind noise spectrum shows good agreement for four measurement sets. The prediction can be applied to meteorological estimates to predict the wind noise under other pine forests.

  6. Investigation of competition within the international wind power market. Supplementary report 1. Supplement 1: Actor profiles. Supplement 2: Note on India. Supplement 3: Statistics - tables

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-10-01

    The supplement to the report with the same title presents profiles of some wind turbine manufacturers located in European countries, U.S.A. and Japan, notes on wind power in India, and statistics and tables relevant to the wind power market. (AB)

  7. Summary of Jimsphere wind profiles: Programs, data, comments, part 1. [for use in aeronautical vehicle design and engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willett, J. A.

    1979-01-01

    Jimsphere wind profiles are documented for the following ranges and installations: Eastern Test Range, Cape Kennedy, Florida; Western Test Range; Point Mugu, California; White Sands Missile Range, New Mexico; Wallops Island, Virginia; Green River, Utah; and Vandenberg Air Force Base, California. Profile information for 1964-1977 includes data summaries, computer formats, frequency distributions, composite listings, etc., for use in establishing and interpreting natural environment criteria for aeronautical vehicle design and engineering operations.

  8. Application of 50 MHz doppler radar wind profiler to launch operations at Kennedy Space Center and Cape Canaveral Air Station

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schumann, Robin S.; Taylor, Gregory E.; Smith, Steve A.; Wilfong, Timothy L.

    1994-01-01

    This paper presents a case study where a significant wind shift, not detected by jimspheres, was detected by the 50 MHz DRWP (Doppler Radar Wind Profiler) and evaluated to be acceptable prior to the launch of a Shuttle. This case study illustrates the importance of frequent upper air wind measurements for detecting significant rapidly changing features as well as for providing confidence that the features really exist and are not due to instrumentation error. Had the release of the jimsphere been timed such that it would have detected the entire wind shift, there would not have been sufficient time to release another jimsphere to confirm the existence of the feature prior to the scheduled launch. We found that using a temporal median filter on the one minute spectral estimates coupled with a constraining window about a first guess velocity effectively removes nearly all spurious signals from the velocity profile generated by NASA's 50 MHz DRWP while boosting the temporal resolution to as high as one profile every 3 minutes. The higher temporal resolution of the 50 MHz DRWP using the signal processing algorithm described in this paper ensures the detection of rapidly changing features as well as provides the confidence that the features are genuine. Further benefit is gained when the profiles generated by the DRWP are examined in relation to the profiles measured by jimspheres and/or rawinsondes. The redundancy offered by using two independent measurements can dispel or confirm any suspicion regarding instrumentation error or malfunction and wind profiles can be examined in light of their respective instruments' strengths and weaknesses.

  9. Research on improved design of airfoil profiles based on the continuity of airfoil surface curvature of wind turbines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chen, Jin; Cheng, Jiangtao; Shen, Wenzhong

    2013-01-01

    Aerodynamic of airfoil performance is closely related to the continuity of its surface curvature, and airfoil profiles with a better aerodynamic performance plays an important role in the design of wind turbine. The surface curvature distribution along the chord direction and pressure distributio...

  10. Wind-Tunnel Investigations on a Changed Mustang Profile with Nose Flap Force and Pressure-Distribution Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krueger, W.

    1947-01-01

    Measurements are described which were taken in the large wind tunnel of the AVA on a rectangular wing "Mustang 2" with nose flap of a chord of 10 percent. Besides force measurements the results of pressure-distribution measurements are given and compared with those on the same profile "without" nose flap.

  11. A comparison of mixing depths observed by ground-based wind profilers and an airborne lidar

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    White, A.B.; Senff, C. [Univ. of Colorado/NOAA Environmental Technology Lab., Cooperative Inst. for Research in Environmental Sciences, Boulder, CO (United States); Banta, R.M. [NOAA Environmental Technology Lab., Boulder, CO (United States)

    1997-10-01

    The mixing depth is one of the most important parameters in air pollution studies because it determines the vertical extent of the `box` in which pollutants are mixed and dispersed. During the 1995 Southern Oxidants Study (SOS95), scientists from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Environmental Technology Laboratory (NOAA/ETL) deployed four 915-MHz boundary-layer radar/wind profilers (hereafter radars) in and around the Nashville, Tennessee metropolitan area. Scientists from NOAA/ETL also operated an ultraviolet differential absorption lidar (DIAL) onboard a CASA-212 aircraft. Profiles from radar and DIAL can be used to derive estimates of the mixing depth. The methods used for both instruments are similar in that they depend on information derived from the backscattered power. However, different scattering mechanisms for the radar and DIAL mean that different tracers of mixing depth are measured. In this paper we compare the mixing depth estimates obtained from the radar and DIAL and discuss the similarities and differences that occur. (au)

  12. Remotely measuring the wind using turbine-mounted lidars: Application to power performance testing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borraccino, Antoine

    of the wind field reconstruction methods. Two wind models were developed in this thesis. The first one employs lidar measurement at a single distance – but several heights –, accounts for shear through a power law profile, and estimates hub height wind speed, direction and the shear exponent. The second model...... combines the wind model with a simple one-dimensional induction model. The lidar inputs were line-of-sight velocity measurements taken at multiple distances close to the rotor, from 0.5 to 1.25 rotor diameters. Using the combined wind-induction model, hub height free stream wind characteristics...... uncertainties were also quantified. Further, the annual energy production (AEP) was computed for a range of annual mean wind speeds. At 8ms−1, the lidar-estimated AEP was within 1% to the one obtained with the cup anemometer. The combined wind-induction reconstruction technique represents a paradigm shift...

  13. Comparison of the effect of easterly and westerly vertical wind shear on tropical cyclone intensity change over the western North Pacific

    Science.gov (United States)

    Na, Wei; Xinghai, Zhang; Lianshou, Chen; Hao, Hu

    2018-03-01

    The effects of vertical wind shear (VWS) with different directions on tropical cyclone (TC) intensity change are compared in this statistical study based on TCs occurring between 1982 and 2015 over the western North Pacific (WNP). Results show that a westerly VWS has a much higher correlation (‑0.36) with change in TC intensity than an easterly VWS (‑0.07) over the WNP, especially south-westerly VWS (‑0.43). Sea surface temperature (SST) is found to modulate the effect of VWS on TC intensity change as it has a close relationship with zonal VWS (‑0.48). The favorable effect of SST, which increases with increase in easterly VWS, could offset the detrimental effect of VWS, leading to a relatively low correlation coefficient between easterly VWS and TC intensity change. By contrast, westerly VWS increases with decreasing SST, and the largest correlation coefficient appears when SST is around 301 K. Therefore, it is suggested that the direction of VWS as well as its value is taken into consideration in models used to predict TC intensity.

  14. Rotor equivalent wind speed for power curve measurement - comparative exercise for IEA Wind Annex 32

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, R.; Cañadillas, B.; Clifton, A.; Feeney, S.; Nygaard, N.; Poodt, M.; St. Martin, C.; Tüxen, E.; Wagenaar, J. W.

    2014-06-01

    A comparative exercise has been organised within the International Energy Agency (IEA) Wind Annex 32 in order to test the Rotor Equivalent Wind Speed (REWS) method under various conditions of wind shear and measurement techniques. Eight organisations from five countries participated in the exercise. Each member of the group has derived both the power curve based on the wind speed at hub height and the power curve based on the REWS. This yielded results for different wind turbines, located in diverse types of terrain and where the wind speed profile was measured with different instruments (mast or various lidars). The participants carried out two preliminary steps in order to reach consensus on how to implement the REWS method. First, they all derived the REWS for one 10 minute wind speed profile. Secondly, they all derived the power curves for one dataset. The main point requiring consensus was the definition of the segment area used as weighting for the wind speeds measured at the various heights in the calculation of the REWS. This comparative exercise showed that the REWS method results in a significant difference compared to the standard method using the wind speed at hub height in conditions with large shear and low turbulence intensity.

  15. Wind Energy Japan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Komatsubara, Kazuyo [Embassy of the Kingdom of the Netherlands, Tokyo (Japan)

    2012-06-15

    An overview is given of wind energy in Japan: Background; Wind Energy in Japan; Japanese Wind Energy Industry; Government Supports; Useful Links; Major Japanese Companies; Profiles of Major Japanese Companies; Major Wind Energy Projects in Japan.

  16. Shear machines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Astill, M.; Sunderland, A.; Waine, M.G.

    1980-01-01

    A shear machine for irradiated nuclear fuel elements has a replaceable shear assembly comprising a fuel element support block, a shear blade support and a clamp assembly which hold the fuel element to be sheared in contact with the support block. A first clamp member contacts the fuel element remote from the shear blade and a second clamp member contacts the fuel element adjacent the shear blade and is advanced towards the support block during shearing to compensate for any compression of the fuel element caused by the shear blade (U.K.)

  17. Boundary layer evolution over the central Himalayas from radio wind profiler and model simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Narendra; Solanki, Raman; Ojha, Narendra; Janssen, Ruud H. H.; Pozzer, Andrea; Dhaka, Surendra K.

    2016-08-01

    We investigate the time evolution of the Local Boundary Layer (LBL) for the first time over a mountain ridge at Nainital (79.5° E, 29.4° N, 1958 m a.m.s.l.) in the central Himalayan region, using a radar wind profiler (RWP) during November 2011 to March 2012, as a part of the Ganges Valley Aerosol Experiment (GVAX). We restrict our analysis to clear-sunny days, resulting in a total of 78 days of observations. The standard criterion of the peak in the signal-to-noise ratio (S / N) profile was found to be inadequate in the characterization of mixed layer (ML) top at this site. Therefore, we implemented a criterion of S / N > 6 dB for the characterization of the ML and the resulting estimations are shown to be in agreement with radiosonde measurements over this site. The daytime average (05:00-10:00 UTC) observed boundary layer height ranges from 440 ± 197 m in November (late autumn) to 766 ± 317 m above ground level (a.g.l.) in March (early spring). The observations revealed a pronounced impact of mountain topography on the LBL dynamics during March, when strong winds (> 5.6 m s-1) lead to LBL heights of 650 m during nighttime. The measurements are further utilized to evaluate simulations from the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model. WRF simulations captured the day-to-day variations up to an extent (r2 = 0.5), as well as the mean diurnal variations (within 1σ variability). The mean biases in the daytime average LBL height vary from -7 % (January) to +30 % (February) between model and observations, except during March (+76 %). Sensitivity simulations using a mixed layer model (MXL/MESSy) indicated that the springtime overestimation of LBL would lead to a minor uncertainty in simulated surface ozone concentrations. However, it would lead to a significant overestimation of the dilution of black carbon aerosols at this site. Our work fills a gap in observations of local boundary layer over this complex terrain in the Himalayas, and highlights the need for

  18. Boundary layer evolution over the central Himalayas from radio wind profiler and model simulations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Singh

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available We investigate the time evolution of the Local Boundary Layer (LBL for the first time over a mountain ridge at Nainital (79.5° E, 29.4° N, 1958 m a.m.s.l. in the central Himalayan region, using a radar wind profiler (RWP during November 2011 to March 2012, as a part of the Ganges Valley Aerosol Experiment (GVAX. We restrict our analysis to clear–sunny days, resulting in a total of 78 days of observations. The standard criterion of the peak in the signal-to-noise ratio (S ∕ N profile was found to be inadequate in the characterization of mixed layer (ML top at this site. Therefore, we implemented a criterion of S ∕ N > 6 dB for the characterization of the ML and the resulting estimations are shown to be in agreement with radiosonde measurements over this site. The daytime average (05:00–10:00 UTC observed boundary layer height ranges from 440 ± 197 m in November (late autumn to 766 ± 317 m above ground level (a.g.l. in March (early spring. The observations revealed a pronounced impact of mountain topography on the LBL dynamics during March, when strong winds (> 5.6 m s−1 lead to LBL heights of 650 m during nighttime. The measurements are further utilized to evaluate simulations from the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF model. WRF simulations captured the day-to-day variations up to an extent (r2 = 0.5, as well as the mean diurnal variations (within 1σ variability. The mean biases in the daytime average LBL height vary from −7 % (January to +30 % (February between model and observations, except during March (+76 %. Sensitivity simulations using a mixed layer model (MXL/MESSy indicated that the springtime overestimation of LBL would lead to a minor uncertainty in simulated surface ozone concentrations. However, it would lead to a significant overestimation of the dilution of black carbon aerosols at this site. Our work fills a gap in observations of local boundary layer

  19. Lifetime estimation for the power semiconductors considering mission profiles in wind power converter

    OpenAIRE

    Ma, Ke; Liserre, Marco; Blaabjerg, Frede

    2013-01-01

    As a key component in the wind turbine system, power electronic converter and its power semiconductors suffer from adverse power loadings related to environment, and are proven to have certain failure rates. Therefore, correct lifetime estimation of wind power converter is crucial for the reliability improvement and also for cost reduction of wind power technology. Unfortunately, the existing lifetime estimation methods for the power electronic converter are not yet suitable in the wind power...

  20. Features of energetic particle radial profiles inferred from geosynchronous responses to solar wind dynamic pressure enhancements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Shi

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Determination of the radial profile of phase space density of relativistic electrons at constant adiabatic invariants is crucial for identifying the source for them within the outer radiation belt. The commonly used method is to convert flux observed at fixed energy to phase space density at constant first, second and third adiabatic invariants, which requires an empirical global magnetic field model and thus might produce some uncertainties in the final results. From a different perspective, in this paper we indirectly infer the shape of the radial profile of phase space density of relativistic electrons near the geosynchronous region by statistically examining the geosynchronous energetic flux response to 128 solar wind dynamic pressure enhancements during the years 2000 to 2003. We thus avoid the disadvantage of using empirical magnetic field models. Our results show that the flux response is species and energy dependent. For protons and low-energy electrons, the primary response to magnetospheric compression is an increase in flux at geosynchronous orbit. For relativistic electrons, the dominant response is a decrease in flux, which implies that the phase space density decreases toward increasing radial distance at geosynchronous orbit and leads to a local peak inside of geosynchronous orbit. The flux response of protons and non-relativistic electrons could result from a phase density that increases toward increasing radial distance, but this cannot be determined for sure due to the particle energization associated with pressure enhancements. Our results for relativistic electrons are consistent with previous results obtained using magnetic field models, thus providing additional confirmation that these results are correct and indicating that they are not the result of errors in their selected magnetic field model.

  1. Monte Carlo simulations of the detailed iron absorption line profiles from thermal winds in X-ray binaries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomaru, Ryota; Done, Chris; Odaka, Hirokazu; Watanabe, Shin; Takahashi, Tadayuki

    2018-05-01

    Blueshifted absorption lines from highly ionized iron are seen in some high inclination X-ray binary systems, indicating the presence of an equatorial disc wind. This launch mechanism is under debate, but thermal driving should be ubiquitous. X-ray irradiation from the central source heats disc surface, forming a wind from the outer disc where the local escape velocity is lower than the sound speed. The mass-loss rate from each part of the disc is determined by the luminosity and spectral shape of the central source. We use these together with an assumed density and velocity structure of the wind to predict the column density and ionization state, then combine this with a Monte Carlo radiation transfer to predict the detailed shape of the absorption (and emission) line profiles. We test this on the persistent wind seen in the bright neutron star binary GX 13+1, with luminosity L/LEdd ˜ 0.5. We approximately include the effect of radiation pressure because of high luminosity, and compute line features. We compare these to the highest resolution data, the Chandra third-order grating spectra, which we show here for the first time. This is the first physical model for the wind in this system, and it succeeds in reproducing many of the features seen in the data, showing that the wind in GX13+1 is most likely a thermal-radiation driven wind. This approach, combined with better streamline structures derived from full radiation hydrodynamic simulations, will allow future calorimeter data to explore the detail wind structure.

  2. Monte-Carlo simulations of the detailed iron absorption line profiles from thermal winds in X-ray binaries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomaru, Ryota; Done, Chris; Odaka, Hirokazu; Watanabe, Shin; Takahashi, Tadayuki

    2018-02-01

    Blue-shifted absorption lines from highly ionised iron are seen in some high inclination X-ray binary systems, indicating the presence of an equatorial disc wind. This launch mechanism is under debate, but thermal driving should be ubiquitous. X-ray irradiation from the central source heats disc surface, forming a wind from the outer disc where the local escape velocity is lower than the sound speed. The mass loss rate from each part of the disc is determined by the luminosity and spectral shape of the central source. We use these together with an assumed density and velocity structure of the wind to predict the column density and ionisation state, then combine this with a Monte-Carlo radiation transfer to predict the detailed shape of the absorption (and emission) line profiles. We test this on the persistent wind seen in the bright neutron star binary GX 13+1, with luminosity L/LEdd ˜ 0.5. We approximately include the effect of radiation pressure because of high luminosity, and compute line features. We compare these to the highest resolution data, the Chandra third order grating spectra, which we show here for the first time. This is the first physical model for the wind in this system, and it succeeds in reproducing many of the features seen in the data, showing that the wind in GX13+1 is most likely a thermal-radiation driven wind. This approach, combined with better streamline structures derived from full radiation hydrodynamic simulations, will allow future calorimeter data to explore the detail wind structure.

  3. Determining the power-law wind-profile exponent under near-neutral stability conditions at sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, S. A.; Meindl, Eric A.; Gilhousen, David B.

    1994-01-01

    On the basis of 30 samples from near-simultaneous overwater measurements by pairs of anemometers located at different heights in the Gulf of Mexico and off the Chesapeake Bay, Virginia, the mean and standard deviation for the exponent of the power-law wind profile over the ocean under near-neutral atmospheric stability conditions were determined to be 0.11 +/- 0.03. Because this mean value is obtained from both deep and shallow water environments, it is recommended for use at sea to adjust the wind speed measurements at different heights to the standard height of 10 m above the mean sea surface. An example to apply this P value to estimate the momentum flux or wind stress is provided.

  4. Results of the Updated NASA Kennedy Space Center 50-MHz Doppler Radar Wind Profiler Operational Acceptance Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbre', Robert E., Jr.; Deker, Ryan K.; Leahy, Frank B.; Huddleston, Lisa

    2016-01-01

    We present here the methodology and results of the Operational Acceptance Test (OAT) performed on the new Kennedy Space Center (KSC) 50-MHz Doppler Radar Wind Profiler (DRWP). On day-of-launch (DOL), space launch vehicle operators have used data from the DRWP to invalidate winds in prelaunch loads and trajectory assessments due to the DRWP's capability to quickly identify changes in the wind profile within a rapidly-changing wind environment. The previous DRWP has been replaced with a completely new system, which needs to undergo certification testing before being accepted for use in range operations. The new DRWP replaces the previous three-beam system made of coaxial cables and a copper wire ground plane with a four-beam system that uses Yagi antennae with enhanced beam steering capability. In addition, the new system contains updated user interface software while maintaining the same general capability as the previous system. The new DRWP continues to use the Median Filter First Guess (MFFG) algorithm to generate a wind profile from Doppler spectra at each range gate. DeTect (2015) contains further details on the upgrade. The OAT is a short-term test designed so that end users can utilize the new DRWP in a similar manner to the previous DRWP during mission operations at the Eastern Range in the midst of a long-term certification process. This paper describes the Marshall Space Flight Center Natural Environments Branch's (MSFC NE's) analyses to verify the quality and accuracy of the DRWP's meteorological data output as compared to the previous DRWP. Ultimately, each launch vehicle program has the responsibility to certify the system for their own use.

  5. Analysis on atmospheric pressure, temperature, and wind speed profiles during total solar eclipse 9 March 2016 using time series clustering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Septem Riza, Lala; Wihardi, Yaya; Nurdin, Enjang Ali; Dwi Ardi, Nanang; Puji Asmoro, Cahyo; Wijaya, Agus Fany Chandra; Aria Utama, Judhistira; Bayu Dani Nandiyanto, Asep

    2016-11-01

    Air temperature, pressure, and wind speed measurements on the surface taken during the Total Solar Eclipse (TSE) of March 9, 2016, are made. They were taken in Terentang Beach, Bangka Island, Indonesia. In this paper, we propose to analyze them by using time series clustering. The following steps are conducted: data collecting, splitting, smoothing, distance calculation, and clustering. The final results show cluster memberships of the three parameters on 3 time frames: one day before, the TSE day, and one day after. After doing some simulations, it can be seen that the profiles of temperature and pressure on the TSE day are on the same cluster while the wind-speed profile on the TSE day is the same as on the one day after.

  6. The Profile Envision and Splice Tool (PRESTO): Developing an Atmospheric Wind Analysis Tool for Space Launch Vehicles Using Python

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orcutt, John M.; Barbre, Robert E., Jr.; Brenton, James C.; Decker, Ryan K.

    2017-01-01

    Tropospheric winds are an important driver of the design and operation of space launch vehicles. Multiple types of weather balloons and Doppler Radar Wind Profiler (DRWP) systems exist at NASA's Kennedy Space Center (KSC), co-located on the United States Air Force's (USAF) Eastern Range (ER) at the Cape Canaveral Air Force Station (CCAFS), that are capable of measuring atmospheric winds. Meteorological data gathered by these instruments are being used in the design of NASA's Space Launch System (SLS) and other space launch vehicles, and will be used during the day-of-launch (DOL) of SLS to aid in loads and trajectory analyses. For the purpose of SLS day-of-launch needs, the balloons have the altitude coverage needed, but take over an hour to reach the maximum altitude and can drift far from the vehicle's path. The DRWPs have the spatial and temporal resolutions needed, but do not provide complete altitude coverage. Therefore, the Natural Environments Branch (EV44) at Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) developed the Profile Envision and Splice Tool (PRESTO) to combine balloon profiles and profiles from multiple DRWPs, filter the spliced profile to a common wavelength, and allow the operator to generate output files as well as to visualize the inputs and the spliced profile for SLS DOL operations. PRESTO was developed in Python taking advantage of NumPy and SciPy for the splicing procedure, matplotlib for the visualization, and Tkinter for the execution of the graphical user interface (GUI). This paper describes in detail the Python coding implementation for the splicing, filtering, and visualization methodology used in PRESTO.

  7. Program to determine space vehicle response to wind turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkening, H. D.

    1972-01-01

    Computer program was developed as prelaunch wind monitoring tool for Saturn 5 vehicle. Program accounts for characteristic wind changes including turbulence power spectral density, wind shear, peak wind velocity, altitude, and wind direction using stored variational statistics.

  8. Lifetime estimation for the power semiconductors considering mission profiles in wind power converter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ma, Ke; Liserre, Marco; Blaabjerg, Frede

    2013-01-01

    As a key component in the wind turbine system, power electronic converter and its power semiconductors suffer from adverse power loadings related to environment, and are proven to have certain failure rates. Therefore, correct lifetime estimation of wind power converter is crucial for the reliabi......As a key component in the wind turbine system, power electronic converter and its power semiconductors suffer from adverse power loadings related to environment, and are proven to have certain failure rates. Therefore, correct lifetime estimation of wind power converter is crucial...

  9. Lidar Wind Profiler for the NextGen Airportal, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The development of a standoff sensor that can measure 3D components of wind velocity in the vicinity of an airport has the potential to improve airport throughput,...

  10. Study of vertical wind profiles in an urban area with complex terrain ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    periods, and may lead to severe air quality prob- lems as the valley may prevent horizontal ventila- tion. In an urban ... in a stratified environment might have created shear layers. The metropolitan area of Tehran acts ..... and was not published in international journals.) Existence of this drainage flow and its height shows.

  11. First middle-atmospheric zonal wind profile measurements with a new ground-based microwave Doppler-spectro-radiometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rüfenacht, Rolf; Kämpfer, Niklaus; Murk, Axel

    2013-04-01

    Today, the wind data for the upper stratosphere and lower mesosphere are commonly extrapolated using models or calculated from measurements of the temperature field, but are not measured directly. Still, such measurements would allow direct observations of dynamic processes and thus provide a better understanding of the circulation in this altitude region where the zonal wind speed reaches a maximum. Observations of middle-atmospheric winds are also expected to provide deeper insight in the coupling between the upper and the lower atmosphere, especially in the case of sudden stratospheric warming events. Furthermore, as the local chemical composition of the middle atmosphere can be measured with high accuracy, wind data could be beneficial for the interpretation of the associated transport processes. In future, middle-atmospheric wind measurements could help to improve atmospheric circulation models. Aiming to contribute to the closing of this data gap the Institute of Applied Physics of the University of Bern built a new ground-based 142 GHz Doppler-spectro-radiometer with the acronym WIRA (WInd RAdiometer) specifically designed for the measurement of middle-atmospheric wind. Until now wind speeds in five levels between 30 and 79 km can be retrieved what made WIRA the first instrument continuously measuring profiles of horizontal wind in this altitude range. On the altitude levels where our measurement can be compared to ECMWF very good agreement has been found in the long-term statistics, with WIRA = (0.98±0.02) × ECMWF + (0.44±0.91) m/s on average, as well as in short time structures with a duration of a few days. WIRA uses a passive heterodyne receiver together with a digital Fourier transform spectrometer for the data acquisition. A big advantage of the radiometric approach is that such instruments can also operate under adverse weather conditions and thus provide a continuous time series for the given location. The optics enables the instrument to scan a

  12. Statistical Model of Extreme Shear

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Kurt Schaldemose; Larsen, Gunner Chr.

    2005-01-01

    In order to continue cost-optimisation of modern large wind turbines, it is important to continuously increase the knowledge of wind field parameters relevant to design loads. This paper presents a general statistical model that offers site-specific prediction of the probability density function...... (PDF) of turbulence driven short-term extreme wind shear events, conditioned on the mean wind speed, for an arbitrary recurrence period. The model is based on an asymptotic expansion, and only a few and easily accessible parameters are needed as input. The model of the extreme PDF is supplemented...... by a model that, on a statistically consistent basis, describes the most likely spatial shape of an extreme wind shear event. Predictions from the model have been compared with results from an extreme value data analysis, based on a large number of full-scale measurements recorded with a high sampling rate...

  13. Statistical Model of Extreme Shear

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Gunner Chr.; Hansen, Kurt Schaldemose

    2004-01-01

    In order to continue cost-optimisation of modern large wind turbines, it is important to continously increase the knowledge on wind field parameters relevant to design loads. This paper presents a general statistical model that offers site-specific prediction of the probability density function...... (PDF) of turbulence driven short-term extreme wind shear events, conditioned on the mean wind speed, for an arbitrary recurrence period. The model is based on an asymptotic expansion, and only a few and easily accessible parameters are needed as input. The model of the extreme PDF is supplemented...... by a model that, on a statistically consistent basis, describe the most likely spatial shape of an extreme wind shear event. Predictions from the model have been compared with results from an extreme value data analysis, based on a large number of high-sampled full-scale time series measurements...

  14. Shear-wave elastography and immunohistochemical profiles in invasive breast cancer: Evaluation of maximum and mean elasticity values

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ganau, Sergi; Andreu, Francisco Javier; Escribano, Fernanda; Martín, Amaya; Tortajada, Lidia; Villajos, Maite

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: •Shear wave elastography provides a quantitative assessment of the hardness of breast lesions. •The hardness of breast lesions correlates with lesion size: larger lesions are harder than smaller ones. •Histologic type and grade do not correlate clearly with elastography parameters. •HER2, luminal B HER2+, and triple-negative tumors have lower maximum hardness and mean hardness than other tumor types. •Half the tumors classified as BI-RADS 3 were luminal A and half were HER2. -- Abstract: Purpose: To evaluate the correlations of maximum stiffness (Emax) and mean stiffness (Emean) of invasive carcinomas on shear-wave elastography (SWE) with St. Gallen consensus tumor phenotypes. Methods: We used an ultrasound system with SWE capabilities to prospectively study 190 women with 216 histologically confirmed invasive breast cancers. We obtained one elastogram for each lesion. We correlated Emax and Emean with tumor size, histologic type and grade, estrogen and progesterone receptors, HER2 expression, the Ki67 proliferation index, and the five St. Gallen molecular subtypes: luminal A, luminal B without HER2 overexpression (luminal B HER2−), luminal B with HER2 overexpression (luminal B HER2+), HER2, and triple negative. Results: Lesions larger than 20 mm had significantly higher Emax (148.04 kPa) and Emean (118.32 kPa) (P = 0.005) than smaller lesions. We found no statistically significant correlations between elasticity parameters and histologic type and grade or molecular subtypes, although tumors with HER2 overexpression regardless whether they expressed hormone receptors (luminal B HER2+ and HER2 phenotypes) and triple-negative tumors had lower Emax and Emean than the others. We assessed the B-mode ultrasound findings of the lesions with some of the Emax or Emean values less than or equal to 80 kPa; only four of these had ultrasound findings suggestive of a benign lesion (two with luminal A phenotype and two with HER2 phenotype). Conclusions: We

  15. Shear-wave elastography and immunohistochemical profiles in invasive breast cancer: Evaluation of maximum and mean elasticity values

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ganau, Sergi, E-mail: sganau@tauli.cat [Women' s Imaging Department, UDIAT-Centre Diagnòstic, Institut Universitari Parc Taulí – UAB, Parc Taulí, 1, 08205 Sabadell, Barcelona (Spain); Andreu, Francisco Javier, E-mail: xandreu@tauli.cat [Pathology Department, UDIAT-Centre Diagnòstic, Institut Universitari Parc Taulí – UAB, Parc Taulí, 1, 08205 Sabadell, Barcelona (Spain); Escribano, Fernanda, E-mail: fescribano@tauli.cat [Women' s Imaging Department, UDIAT-Centre Diagnòstic, Institut Universitari Parc Taulí – UAB, Parc Taulí, 1, 08205 Sabadell, Barcelona (Spain); Martín, Amaya, E-mail: amartino@tauli.cat [Women' s Imaging Department, UDIAT-Centre Diagnòstic, Institut Universitari Parc Taulí – UAB, Parc Taulí, 1, 08205 Sabadell, Barcelona (Spain); Tortajada, Lidia, E-mail: ltortajada@tauli.cat [Women' s Imaging Department, UDIAT-Centre Diagnòstic, Institut Universitari Parc Taulí – UAB, Parc Taulí, 1, 08205 Sabadell, Barcelona (Spain); Villajos, Maite, E-mail: mvillajos@tauli.cat [Women' s Imaging Department, UDIAT-Centre Diagnòstic, Institut Universitari Parc Taulí – UAB, Parc Taulí, 1, 08205 Sabadell, Barcelona (Spain); and others

    2015-04-15

    Highlights: •Shear wave elastography provides a quantitative assessment of the hardness of breast lesions. •The hardness of breast lesions correlates with lesion size: larger lesions are harder than smaller ones. •Histologic type and grade do not correlate clearly with elastography parameters. •HER2, luminal B HER2+, and triple-negative tumors have lower maximum hardness and mean hardness than other tumor types. •Half the tumors classified as BI-RADS 3 were luminal A and half were HER2. -- Abstract: Purpose: To evaluate the correlations of maximum stiffness (Emax) and mean stiffness (Emean) of invasive carcinomas on shear-wave elastography (SWE) with St. Gallen consensus tumor phenotypes. Methods: We used an ultrasound system with SWE capabilities to prospectively study 190 women with 216 histologically confirmed invasive breast cancers. We obtained one elastogram for each lesion. We correlated Emax and Emean with tumor size, histologic type and grade, estrogen and progesterone receptors, HER2 expression, the Ki67 proliferation index, and the five St. Gallen molecular subtypes: luminal A, luminal B without HER2 overexpression (luminal B HER2−), luminal B with HER2 overexpression (luminal B HER2+), HER2, and triple negative. Results: Lesions larger than 20 mm had significantly higher Emax (148.04 kPa) and Emean (118.32 kPa) (P = 0.005) than smaller lesions. We found no statistically significant correlations between elasticity parameters and histologic type and grade or molecular subtypes, although tumors with HER2 overexpression regardless whether they expressed hormone receptors (luminal B HER2+ and HER2 phenotypes) and triple-negative tumors had lower Emax and Emean than the others. We assessed the B-mode ultrasound findings of the lesions with some of the Emax or Emean values less than or equal to 80 kPa; only four of these had ultrasound findings suggestive of a benign lesion (two with luminal A phenotype and two with HER2 phenotype). Conclusions: We

  16. Study of vertical wind profiles in an urban area with complex terrain ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    periods, and may lead to severe air quality prob- lems as the valley may prevent horizontal ventila- tion. In an urban area the local slope winds when combined with the urban heat-island circulation may re-circulate the urban air, especially during winter and night-time, when vertical diffusion is small (Atkinson 1981).

  17. Observations of Downwind Development of Wind Speed and Variance Profiles at Bognaes and Comparison with Theory

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Niels Otto; Højstrup, Jørgen; Peterson, E. W.

    1979-01-01

    Observations of atmospheric flow over a change in surface roughness are reported. Both wind speed and turbulence characteristics were measured. Although the observation site departed from the ideal assumed in roughness change models, it was found that the predictions of `second-order closure' mod...

  18. Solar line Lsub(α) profile and an interstellar wind dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burgin, M.S.

    1978-01-01

    Analytical theory of interstellar hydrogen atom motion into the region of solar Lsub(α)-radiation is given. Hydrogen distribution in the Solar system is calculated with an account of the Lsub(α) solar line profile difference from a flat one. The effect of the profile form on the scattered radiation intensity is estimated. Calculation errors of the scattered radiation intensity, connected with the difference between a line profile and a flat one, do not exceed 5% for the real Lsub(α) solar line profile

  19. Wind and thermodynamic profiler observations of a late-mature gust ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    High temporal and vertical resolutions of kinematic and thermodynamic characteristics of a late-mature gust front are presented using the Mobile Integrated Profiling System andWeather Surveillance Radar 88 Doppler data. As the gust front passed over the Mobile Integrated Profiling System vertical velocities and the ...

  20. Performance of Wind Pump Prototype

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Mulu

    performance of the wind pump. One year wind speed data collected at 10 m height was extrapolated to the wind pump hub height using wind shear coefficient. The model assumed balanced rotor power and reciprocating pump, hence did not consider the effect of pump size. The theoretical model estimated the average ...

  1. The impact of in-canopy wind profile formulations on heat flux estimation in an open orchard using the remote sensing-based two-source model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Cammalleri

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available For open orchard and vineyard canopies containing significant fractions of exposed soil (>50%, typical of Mediterranean agricultural regions, the energy balance of the vegetation elements is strongly influenced by heat exchange with the bare soil/substrate. For these agricultural systems a "two-source" approach, where radiation and turbulent exchange between the soil and canopy elements are explicitly modelled, appears to be the only suitable methodology for reliably assessing energy fluxes. In strongly clumped canopies, the effective wind speed profile inside and below the canopy layer can strongly influence the partitioning of energy fluxes between the soil and vegetation components. To assess the impact of in-canopy wind profile on model flux estimates, an analysis of three different formulations is presented, including algorithms from Goudriaan (1977, Massman (1987 and Lalic et al. (2003. The in-canopy wind profile formulations are applied to the thermal-based two-source energy balance (TSEB model developed by Norman et al. (1995 and modified by Kustas and Norman (1999. High resolution airborne remote sensing images, collected over an agricultural area located in the western part of Sicily (Italy comprised primarily of vineyards, olive and citrus orchards, are used to derive all the input parameters needed to apply the TSEB. The images were acquired from June to October 2008 and include a relatively wide range of meteorological and soil moisture conditions. A preliminary sensitivity analysis of the three wind profile algorithms highlights the dependence of wind speed just above the soil/substrate to leaf area index and canopy height over the typical range of canopy properties encountered in these agricultural areas. It is found that differences among the models in wind just above the soil surface are most significant under sparse and medium fractional cover conditions (15–50%. The TSEB model heat flux estimates are compared with micro

  2. A comparison of boundary-layer heights inferred from wind-profiler backscatter profiles with diagnostic calculations using regional model forecasts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baltink, H.K.; Holtslag, A.A.M. [Royal Netherlands Meteorological Inst., KNMI, De Bilt (Netherlands)

    1997-10-01

    From October 1994 through January 1997 the Tropospheric Energy Budget Experiment (TEBEX) was executed by KNMI. The main objectives are to study boundary layer processes and cloud variability on the sub-grid scale of present Global Climate Models and to improve the related sub-grid parametrizations. A suite of instruments was deployed to measure a large number of variables. Measurements to characterize ABL processes were focussed around the 200 m high meteorological observation tower of the KNMI in Cabauw. In the framework of TEBEX a 1290 MHz wind-profiler/RASS was installed in July 1994 at 300 m from tower. Data collected during TEBEX are used to assess the performance of a Regional Atmospheric Climate Model (RACMO). This climate model runs also in a operational forecast mode once a day. The diagnostic ABL-height (h{sub model}) is calculated from the RACMO forecast output. A modified Richardson`s number method extended with an excess parcel temperature is applied for all stability conditions. We present the preliminary results of a comparison of h{sub model} from forecasts with measured h{sub TS} derived from profiler and sodar data for July 1995. (au)

  3. Wind turbines and bat mortality: Doppler shift profiles and ultrasonic bat-like pulse reflection from moving turbine blades.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Chloe V; Flint, James A; Lepper, Paul A

    2010-10-01

    Bat mortality resulting from actual or near-collision with operational wind turbine rotors is a phenomenon that is widespread but not well understood. Because bats rely on information contained in high-frequency echoes to determine the nature and movement of a target, it is important to consider how ultrasonic pulses similar to those used by bats for echolocation may be interacting with operational turbine rotor blades. By assessing the characteristics of reflected ultrasonic echoes, moving turbine blades operating under low wind speed conditions (<6 m s(-1)) were found to produce distinct Doppler shift profiles at different angles to the rotor. Frequency shifts of up to ±700-800 Hz were produced, which may not be perceptible by some bat species. Monte Carlo simulation of bat-like sampling by echolocation revealed that over 50 rotor echoes could be required by species such as Pipistrellus pipistrellus for accurate interpretation of blade movement, which may not be achieved in the bat's approach time-window. In summary, it was found that echoes returned from moving blades had features which could render them attractive to bats or which might make it difficult for the bat to accurately detect and locate blades in sufficient time to avoid a collision.

  4. Simulative Winding of Roll Formed Profile in Carcass Production for Flexible Pipes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Peter Søe; Ormstrup, Casper Alexander; Hartz, Benjamin Arnold Krekeler

    2015-01-01

    In carcass production for flexible pipe systems roll formed profiles are wound around a mandrel forming an interlocking, flexible structure able to withstand collapse from outside water pressure or mechanical crushing. Carcass is often produced in lengths of several kilometres, which implies...

  5. A Study on the Effect of Nudging on Long-Term Boundary Layer Profiles of Wind and Weibull Distribution Parameters in a Rural Coastal Area

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gryning, Sven-Erik; Batchvarova, Ekaterina; Floors, Rogier

    2013-01-01

    By use of 1 yr of measurements performed with a wind lidar up to 600-m height, in combination with a tall meteorological tower, the impact of nudging on the simulated wind profile at a flat coastal site (Høvsøre) in western Denmark using the Advanced Research version of the Weather Research...... the scatter between the simulated and measured wind speeds, expressed by the root-mean-square error, by about 20% between altitudes of 100 and 500 m. The root-mean-square error was nearly constant with height for the nudged case (~2.2 m s−1) and slightly increased with height for the nonnudged one, reaching 2.......8 m s−1 at 300 and 500 m. In studying the long-term wind speed variability with the Weibull distribution, it was found that nudging had a minor effect on the scale parameter profile, which is closely connected to the mean wind speed. Improvement by nudging was seen on the profile of the shape...

  6. Wind Field Reconstruction from Nacelle-Mounted Lidars Short Range Measurements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borraccino, Antoine; Schlipf, David; Haizmann, Florian

    2017-01-01

    IR Dual Mode). The reconstructed wind speed was within 0.5 % of the wind speed measured with a mast-top-mounted cup anemometer at 2.5 rotor diameters upstream of the turbine. The technique described in this paper overcomes measurement range limitations of the currently available nacelle lidar technology.......Profiling nacelle lidars probe the wind at several heights and several distances upstream of the rotor. The development of such lidar systems is relatively recent, and it is still unclear how to condense the lidar raw measurements into useful wind field characteristics such as speed, direction......, vertical and longitudinal gradients (wind shear). In this paper, we demonstrate an innovative method to estimate wind field characteristics using nacelle lidar measurements taken within the induction zone. Model-fitting wind field reconstruction techniques are applied to nacelle lidar measurements taken...

  7. Towards an automatic wind speed and direction profiler for Wide Field adaptive optics systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sivo, G.; Turchi, A.; Masciadri, E.; Guesalaga, A.; Neichel, B.

    2018-05-01

    Wide Field Adaptive Optics (WFAO) systems are among the most sophisticated adaptive optics (AO) systems available today on large telescopes. Knowledge of the vertical spatio-temporal distribution of wind speed (WS) and direction (WD) is fundamental to optimize the performance of such systems. Previous studies already proved that the Gemini Multi-Conjugated AO system (GeMS) is able to retrieve measurements of the WS and WD stratification using the SLOpe Detection And Ranging (SLODAR) technique and to store measurements in the telemetry data. In order to assess the reliability of these estimates and of the SLODAR technique applied to such complex AO systems, in this study we compared WS and WD values retrieved from GeMS with those obtained with the atmospheric model Meso-NH on a rich statistical sample of nights. It has previously been proved that the latter technique provided excellent agreement with a large sample of radiosoundings, both in statistical terms and on individual flights. It can be considered, therefore, as an independent reference. The excellent agreement between GeMS measurements and the model that we find in this study proves the robustness of the SLODAR approach. To bypass the complex procedures necessary to achieve automatic measurements of the wind with GeMS, we propose a simple automatic method to monitor nightly WS and WD using Meso-NH model estimates. Such a method can be applied to whatever present or new-generation facilities are supported by WFAO systems. The interest of this study is, therefore, well beyond the optimization of GeMS performance.

  8. High resolution vertical profiles of wind, temperature and humidity obtained by computer processing and digital filtering of radiosonde and radar tracking data from the ITCZ experiment of 1977

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danielson, E. F.; Hipskind, R. S.; Gaines, S. E.

    1980-01-01

    Results are presented from computer processing and digital filtering of radiosonde and radar tracking data obtained during the ITCZ experiment when coordinated measurements were taken daily over a 16 day period across the Panama Canal Zone. The temperature relative humidity and wind velocity profiles are discussed.

  9. An Estimate of Solar Wind Velocity Profiles in a Coronal Hole and a Coronal Streamer Area (6-40 R(radius symbol)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patzold, M.; Tsurutani, B. T.; Bird, M. K.

    1995-01-01

    Total electron content data obtained from the Ulysses Solar Corona Experiment (SCE) in 1991 were used to select two data sets, one associated with a coronal hole and the other with coronal streamer crossings. (This is largely equatorial data shortly after solar maximum.) The solar wind velocity profile is estimated for these areas.

  10. The effect of unsteady and baroclinic forcing on predicted wind profiles in Large Eddy Simulations: Two case studies of the daytime atmospheric boundary layer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Jesper Grønnegaard; Kelly, Mark C.; Gryning, Sven-Erik

    2013-01-01

    and in relevant atmospheric fields (e.g. temperature) that occur at larger scales must be imposed through boundary conditions or as external forcing. In this work we study the influence of such variations on the wind profile in Large Eddy Simulations of daytime atmospheric boundary layers, by comparing...

  11. Millimeter Wave Radar for Atmospheric Turbulence Characterization and Wind Profiling for Improved Naval Operations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-12-29

    Profiling for Improved Naval Operations Benjamin Rock Bahman hafizi RichaRd fischeR Beam Physics Branch Plasma Physics Division antonio ting...Bahman Hafizi and Rich Fischer Plasma Physics Division, U.S. Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, DC 20375 Tony Ting Research Support Instruments...which will be discussed in turn and then compared. A. Rayleigh Scattering In clear unperturbed air, the reflection of electromagnetic waves is

  12. Flexible Micropost Arrays for Shear Stress Measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wohl, Christopher J.; Palmieri, Frank L.; Hopkins, John W.; Jackson, Allen M.; Connell, John W.; Lin, Yi; Cisotto, Alexxandra A.

    2015-01-01

    of delicate micro-electromechanical devices impede the use of most direct shear sensors. Similarly, the cavity required for sensing element displacement is sensitive to particulate obstruction. This work was focused on developing a shear stress sensor for use in subsonic wind tunnel test facilities applicable to an array of test configurations. The non-displacement shear sensors described here have minimal packaging requirements resulting in minimal or no disturbance of boundary layer flow. Compared to previous concepts, device installation could be simple with reduced cost and down-time. The novelty lies in the creation of low profile (nanoscale to 100 µm) micropost arrays that stay within the viscous sub-layer of the airflow. Aerodynamic forces, which are related to the surface shear stress, cause post deflection and optical property changes. Ultimately, a reliable, accurate shear stress sensor that does not disrupt the airflow has the potential to provide high value data for flow physics researchers, aerodynamicists, and aircraft manufacturers leading to greater flight efficiency arising from more in-depth knowledge on how aircraft design impacts near surface properties.

  13. Lidar profilers in the context of wind energy–a verification procedure for traceable measurements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gottschall, Julia; Courtney, Michael; Wagner, Rozenn

    2012-01-01

    for lidar profilers that enables us to achieve the required traceability. The procedure is based on a direct comparison of the measurements from the lidar and reference sensors mounted on a mast at various height levels. First, the data are corrected and filtered to obtain a representative data set ensuring......, the existing standards only permit the use of cup anemometers as standard instruments. The main issue preventing the use of remote sensors in such standards is the need to maintain the traceability of the measurements in the international standard system. In this paper, we describe a verification procedure...

  14. A canopy-type similarity model for wind farm optimization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markfort, Corey D.; Zhang, Wei; Porté-Agel, Fernando

    2013-04-01

    The atmospheric boundary layer (ABL) flow through and over wind farms has been found to be similar to canopy-type flows, with characteristic flow development and shear penetration length scales (Markfort et al., 2012). Wind farms capture momentum from the ABL both at the leading edge and from above. We examine this further with an analytical canopy-type model. Within the flow development region, momentum is advected into the wind farm and wake turbulence draws excess momentum in from between turbines. This spatial heterogeneity of momentum within the wind farm is characterized by large dispersive momentum fluxes. Once the flow within the farm is developed, the area-averaged velocity profile exhibits a characteristic inflection point near the top of the wind farm, similar to that of canopy-type flows. The inflected velocity profile is associated with the presence of a dominant characteristic turbulence scale, which may be responsible for a significant portion of the vertical momentum flux. Prediction of this scale is useful for determining the amount of available power for harvesting. The new model is tested with results from wind tunnel experiments, which were conducted to characterize the turbulent flow in and above model wind farms in aligned and staggered configurations. The model is useful for representing wind farms in regional scale models, for the optimization of wind farms considering wind turbine spacing and layout configuration, and for assessing the impacts of upwind wind farms on nearby wind resources. Markfort CD, W Zhang and F Porté-Agel. 2012. Turbulent flow and scalar transport through and over aligned and staggered wind farms. Journal of Turbulence. 13(1) N33: 1-36. doi:10.1080/14685248.2012.709635.

  15. HURRICANE AND SEVERE STORM SENTINEL (HS3) HIGH-ALTITUDE IMAGING WIND AND RAIN AIRBORNE PROFILER (HIWRAP) V1

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Hurricane and Severe Storm Sentinel (HS3) High-Altitude Imaging Wind and Rain dataset was collected from the High-altitude Imaging Wind and Rain Airborne...

  16. Installation and Initial Operation of DOE's 449-MHz Wind Profiling Radars on the U.S. West Coast

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Flaherty, Julia E. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Shaw, William J. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Morris, Victor R. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Wilczak, J. M. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); White, A. B. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Ayers, Tom [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Jordan, Jim [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); King, Clark W. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2015-10-30

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), in collaboration with the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), has recently completed the installation of three new wind profiling radars on the Washington and Oregon coasts. These systems operate at a frequency of 449 MHz and provide mean wind profiles to a height of roughly 8 km, with the maximum measurement height depending on time-varying atmospheric conditions. This is roughly half the depth of the troposphere at these latitudes. Each system is also equipped with a radio acoustic sounding system (RASS), which provides a measure of the temperature profile to heights of approximately 2 km. Other equipment deployed alongside the radar includes a surface meteorological station and GPS for column water vapor. This project began in fiscal year 2014, starting with equipment procurements and site selection. In addition, environmental reviews, equipment assembly and testing, site access agreements, and infrastructure preparations have been performed. Finally, with equipment deployment with data collection and dissemination, the primary tasks of this project have been completed. The three new wind profiling radars have been deployed at airports near Coos Bay, OR, and Astoria, OR, and at an industrial park near Forks, WA. Data are available through the NOAA Earth Systems Research Laboratory Data Display website, and will soon be made available through the DOE Atmosphere to Electrons data archive and portal as well.

  17. Machine Learing Applications on a Radar Wind Profiler Deployment During the ARM GoAmazon2014/5 Campaign

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giangrande, S. E.; WANG, D.; Hardin, J. C.; Mitchell, J.

    2017-12-01

    As part of the 2 year Department of Energy Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Observations and Modeling of the Green Ocean Amazon (GoAmazon2014/5) campaign, the ARM Mobile Facility (AMF) collected a unique set of observations in a region of strong climatic significance near Manacapuru, Brazil. An important example for the beneficial observational record obtained by ARM during this campaign was that of the Radar Wind Profiler (RWP). This dataset has been previously documented for providing critical convective cloud vertical air velocity retrievals and precipitation properties (e.g., calibrated reflectivity factor Z, rainfall rates) under a wide variety of atmospheric conditions. Vertical air motion estimates to within deep convective cores such as those available from this RWP system have been previously identified as critical constraints for ongoing global climate modeling activities and deep convective cloud process studies. As an extended deployment within this `green ocean' region, the RWP site and collocated AMF surface gauge instrumentation experienced a unique hybrid of tropical and continental precipitation conditions, including multiple wet and dry season precipitation regimes, convective and organized stratiform storm dynamics and contributions to rainfall accumulation, pristine aerosol conditions of the locale, as well as the effects of the Manaus, Brazil, mega city pollution plume. For hydrological applications and potential ARM products, machine learning methods developed using this dataset are explored to demonstrate advantages in geophysical retrievals when compared to traditional methods. Emphasis is on performance improvements when providing additional information on storm structure and regime or echo type classifications. Since deep convective cloud dynamic insights (core updraft/downdraft properties) are difficult to obtain directly by conventional radars that also observe radar reflectivity factor profiles similar to RWP systems, we also

  18. Wind turbine rotor aerodynamics : The IEA MEXICO rotor explained

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhang, Y.

    2017-01-01

    Wind turbines are operating under very complex and uncontrolled environmental conditions, including atmospheric turbulence, atmospheric boundary layer effects, directional and spatial variations in wind shear, etc. Over the past decades, the size of a commercial wind turbine has increased

  19. Extreme wind estimate for Hornsea wind farm

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsén, Xiaoli Guo

    The purpose of this study is to provide estimation of the 50-year winds of 10 min and 1-s gust value at hub height of 100 m, as well as the design parameter shear exponent for the Hornsea offshore wind farm. The turbulence intensity required for estimating the gust value is estimated using two ap....... The greatest sector-wise extreme winds are from west to northwest. Different data, different periods and different methods have provided a range of values of the 50-year wind and accordingly the gust values, as summarized in Table 15.......The purpose of this study is to provide estimation of the 50-year winds of 10 min and 1-s gust value at hub height of 100 m, as well as the design parameter shear exponent for the Hornsea offshore wind farm. The turbulence intensity required for estimating the gust value is estimated using two...... approaches. One is through the measurements from the wind Doppler lidar, WindCube, which implies serious uncertainty, and the other one is through similarity theory for the atmospheric surface layer where the hub height is likely to belong to during strong storms. The turbulence intensity for storm wind...

  20. DOE's 449 MHz Wind Profiling Radars on the U.S. West Coast: Annual Report for Fiscal Year 2016

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Flaherty, Julia E.; Wilczak, J. M.; King, Clark W.; Shaw, William J.; White, A. B.; Ayers, Tom

    2016-09-30

    The three coastal wind profilers and associated meteorological instruments located in Forks, WA, Astoria, OR, and North Bend, OR, provide important observations at high temporal and vertical spatial resolution to characterize the meteorological inflow to the western region of the United States. These instruments have been operating for a year or more, and furnish boundary conditions for the modeling efforts of the WFIP2 project. The data have been delivered to archives at both NOAA and the DOE A2e DAP at a data recovery rate in excess of 98%. Site maintenance activities have been relatively minor, with a few component replacements and repairs to RASS foam. Bird mortality surveys have found no bird nests or carcasses, and the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service has regularly been provided survey reports. This project represents a successful collaboration between PNNL and NOAA to procure, test, deploy, maintain, and operate three 449 MHz radar wind profilers.

  1. Average profiles of the solar wind and outer radiation belt during the extreme flux enhancement of relativistic electrons at geosynchronous orbit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Kataoka

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available We report average profiles of the solar wind and outer radiation belt during the extreme flux enhancement of relativistic electrons at geosynchronous orbit (GEO. It is found that seven of top ten extreme events at GEO during solar cycle 23 are associated with the magnetosphere inflation during the storm recovery phase as caused by the large-scale solar wind structure of very low dynamic pressure (<1.0 nPa during rapid speed decrease from very high (>650 km/s to typical (400–500 km/s in a few days. For the seven events, the solar wind parameters, geomagnetic activity indices, and relativistic electron flux and geomagnetic field at GEO are superposed at the local noon period of GOES satellites to investigate the physical cause. The average profiles support the "double inflation" mechanism that the rarefaction of the solar wind and subsequent magnetosphere inflation are one of the best conditions to produce the extreme flux enhancement at GEO because of the excellent magnetic confinement of relativistic electrons by reducing the drift loss of trapped electrons at dayside magnetopause.

  2. Multi-MW wind turbine power curve measurements using remote sensing instruments - the first Hoevsoere campaign

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wagner, R.; Courtney, M.

    2009-02-15

    Power curve measurement for large wind turbines requires taking into account more parameters than only the wind speed at hub height. Based on results from aerodynamic simulations, an equivalent wind speed taking the wind shear into account was defined and found to reduce the scatter in the power curve significantly. Two LiDARs and a SoDAR are used to measure the wind profile in front of a wind turbine. These profiles are used to calculate the equivalent wind speed. LiDAR are found to be more accurate than SoDAR and therefore more suitable for power performance measurement. The equivalent wind speed calculated from LiDAR profile measurements gave a small reduction of the power curve uncertainty. Several factors can explain why this difference is smaller than expected, including the experimental design and errors pertaining to the LiDAR at that time. This first measurement campaign shows that used of the equivalent wind speed at least results in a power curve with no more scatter than using the conventional method. (au)

  3. Some challenges of wind modelling for modern wind turbines: The Weibull distribution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gryning, Sven-Erik; Batchvarova, Ekatarina; Floors, Rogier

    2012-01-01

    Wind power assessments, as well as forecast of wind energy production, are key issues in wind energy and grid related studies. However the hub height of today’s wind turbines is well above the surface layer. Wind profiles studies based on mast data show that the wind profile above the surface layer...

  4. Smart Wind Turbine : Analysis and Autonomous Flap

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bernhammer, L.O.

    2015-01-01

    Wind turbines convert kinetic energy of the wind into electrical energy. Unfortunately, this process is everything but constant, as the wind source shows large fluctuations with high and low frequencies. This turbulence, together with the wind shear and yawed inflow, excites the turbine structure,

  5. Turbulence Dissipation Rates in the Planetary Boundary Layer from Wind Profiling Radars and Mesoscale Numerical Weather Prediction Models during WFIP2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bianco, L.; McCaffrey, K.; Wilczak, J. M.; Olson, J. B.; Kenyon, J.

    2016-12-01

    When forecasting winds at a wind plant for energy production, the turbulence parameterizations in the forecast models are crucial for understanding wind plant performance. Recent research shows that the turbulence (eddy) dissipation rate in planetary boundary layer (PBL) parameterization schemes introduces significant uncertainty in the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model. Thus, developing the capability to measure dissipation rates in the PBL will allow for identification of weaknesses in, and improvements to the parameterizations. During a preliminary field study at the Boulder Atmospheric Observatory in spring 2015, a 915-MHz wind profiling radar (WPR) measured dissipation rates concurrently with sonic anemometers mounted on a 300-meter tower. WPR set-up parameters (e.g., spectral resolution), post-processing techniques (e.g., filtering for non-atmospheric signals), and spectral averaging were optimized to capture the most accurate Doppler spectra for measuring spectral widths for use in the computation of the eddy dissipation rates. These encouraging results lead to the implementation of the observing strategy on a 915-MHz WPR in Wasco, OR, operating as part of the Wind Forecasting Improvement Project 2 (WFIP2). These observations are compared to dissipation rates calculated from the High-Resolution Rapid Refresh model, a WRF-based mesoscale numerical weather prediction model run for WFIP2 at 3000 m horizontal grid spacing and with a nest, which has 750-meter horizontal grid spacing, in the complex terrain region of the Columbia River Gorge. The observed profiles of dissipation rates are used to evaluate the PBL parameterization schemes used in the HRRR model, which are based on the modeled turbulent kinetic energy and a tunable length scale.

  6. Wind Profile, Drag Coefficient and Cross-Section over the Coastal Zone for Quasi-Homogeneous Conditions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Geernaert, G. L.; Astrup, P.

    1999-01-01

    Proceedings of the Symposium on the Wind-Driven Air-Sea Interface. Electromagnetic and Acoustic Sensing, Wave Dynamics and Turbulent Fluxes, Sydney, Australia, 11-15 January 1999.......Proceedings of the Symposium on the Wind-Driven Air-Sea Interface. Electromagnetic and Acoustic Sensing, Wave Dynamics and Turbulent Fluxes, Sydney, Australia, 11-15 January 1999....

  7. Thermal profile analysis of Doubly-Fed induction generator based wind power converter with air and liquid cooling methods

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhou, Dao; Blaabjerg, Frede; Lau, Mogens

    2013-01-01

    Today, wind power generation system keeps on moving from onshore to offshore and also upscaling in size. As the lifetime of the wind power converter is prolonged to 20–25 years, this paper will investigate and compare different cooling methods for power modules — the air cooling and the liquid co...

  8. Role of Surface Energy Exchange for Simulating Wind Turbine Inflow: A Case Study in the Southern Great Plains, USA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sonia Wharton

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF model is used to investigate choice of land surface model (LSM on the near surface wind profile, including heights reached by multi-megawatt (MW wind turbines. Simulations of wind profiles and surface energy fluxes were made using five LSMs of varying degrees of sophistication in dealing with soil–plant–atmosphere feedbacks for the Department of Energy (DOE Southern Great Plains (SGP Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program (ARM Central Facility in Oklahoma, USA. Surface flux and wind profile measurements were available for validation. WRF was run for three, two-week periods covering varying canopy and meteorological conditions. The LSMs predicted a wide range of energy flux and wind shear magnitudes even during the cool autumn period when we expected less variability. Simulations of energy fluxes varied in accuracy by model sophistication, whereby LSMs with very simple or no soil–plant–atmosphere feedbacks were the least accurate; however, the most complex models did not consistently produce more accurate results. Errors in wind shear were also sensitive to LSM choice and were partially related to energy flux accuracy. The variability of LSM performance was relatively high suggesting that LSM representation of energy fluxes in WRF remains a large source of model uncertainty for simulating wind turbine inflow conditions.

  9. Comparison of the atmospheric stability and wind profiles at two wind farm sites over a long marine fetch in the North Sea

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sathe, Ameya; Gryning, Sven-Erik; Pena Diaz, Alfredo

    2011-01-01

    that represent long marine fetch are considered. It was observed that within a long marine fetch, the conditions in the North Sea are dominated by unstable [41% at Egmond aan Zee Offshore Wind Farm (OWEZ) and 33% at HR] and near-neutral conditions (49% at OWEZ and 47% at HR), and stable conditions (10% at OWEZ...... was not noticeable. Copyright © 2011 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd....

  10. Wind energy renewable energy and the environment

    CERN Document Server

    Nelson, Vaughn

    2013-01-01

    As the demand for energy increases, and fossil fuels continue to decrease, Wind Energy: Renewable Energy and the Environment, Second Edition considers the viability of wind as an alternative renewable energy source. This book examines the wind industry from its start in the 1970s until now, and introduces all aspects of wind energy. The phenomenal growth of wind power for utilities is covered along with applications such as wind-diesel, village power, telecommunications, and street lighting.. It covers the characteristics of wind, such as shear, power potential, turbulence, wind resource, wind

  11. Profile of the horizontal wind variance near the ground in near neutral flow – K-theory and the transport of the turbulent kinetic energy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Yahaya

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper deals with the characteristics of the atmospheric turbulent flow in the vicinity of the ground, and particularly with the profile of the horizontal wind variance. The study is based on experimental measurements performed with fast cup anemometers located near the ground at 5 different levels (from 0.25 to 4 m and sampled at 1 Hz. The experiment was carried over two agricultural plots with various tillage treatments in a fallow semiarid area (Central Aragon, Spain. The results of this study reveal that near the ground surface and under moderate wind, the horizontal wind variance logarithmically increases with height, in direct relationship with the friction velocity and the roughness length scale. A theoretical development has allowed us to link this behaviour to the modeling of the turbulent kinetic energy (TKE transport through the eddy diffusivity. Thus, the study proposes a formulation of the similarity universal function of the horizontal wind variance. Besides, the formulation offers a new method for the determination of the friction velocity and the roughness length scale and can be used for the evaluation of the TKE transport rate.

  12. The Impact of Coastal Terrain on Offshore Wind and Implications for Wind Energy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strobach, Edward Justin

    The development of offshore wind energy is moving forward as one of several options for carbon-free energy generation along the populous US east coast. Accurate assessments of the wind resource are essential and can significantly lower financing costs that have been a barrier to development. Wind resource assessment in the Mid-Atlantic region is challenging since there are no long-term measurements of winds across the rotor span. Features of the coastal and inland terrain, such as such as the Appalachian mountains and the Chesapeake Bay, are known to lead to complex mesoscale wind regimes onshore, including low-level jets (LLJs), downslope winds and sea breezes. Little is known, however, about whether or how the inland physiography impacts the winds offshore. This research is based on the first comprehensive set of offshore wind observations in the Maryland Wind Energy Area gathered during a UMBC measurement campaign. The presentation will include a case study of a strong nocturnal LLJ that persisted for several hours before undergoing a rapid breakdown and loss of energy to smaller scales. Measurements from an onshore wind profiler and radiosondes, together with North American Regional Analysis (NARR) and a high resolution Weather Research and Forecast (WRF) model simulation, are used to untangle the forcing mechanisms on synoptic, regional and local scales that led to the jet and its collapse. The results suggest that the evolution of LLJs were impacted by a downslope wind from the Appalachians that propagated offshore riding atop a shallow near-surface boundary layer across the coastal plain. Baroclinic forcing from low sea surface temperatures (SSTs) due to coastal upwelling is also discussed. Smaller scale details of the LLJ breakdown are analyzed using a wave/mean flow/turbulence interaction approach. The case study illustrates several characteristics of low-level winds offshore that are important for wind energy, including LLJs, strong wind shear, turbulence

  13. Rapid Weakening of Hurricane Joaquin in Strong Vertical Wind Shear and Cold SSTs: Numerical Simulations with Assimilation of High-Definition Sounding System Dropsondes During Tropical Cyclone Intensity Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pu, Z.; Zhang, S.

    2017-12-01

    Observations from High-Definition Sounding System (HDSS) Dropsondes, collected for Hurricane Joaquin (2005) during the Office of Naval Research Tropical Cyclone Intensity (TCI) Experiment in 2015, are assimilated into the Gridpoint Statistical Interpolation (GSI)-based hybrid data assimilation systems embedded in the NCEP Hurricane Weather Research and Forecasting (HWRF) system. A three-dimensional and a four-dimensional ensemble-variational hybrid (3DEnVAR and 4DEnVar) data assimilation configuration are used. It is found that the experiments with assimilation of the HDSS dropsonde observations capture well the intensity changes during the rapid weakening (RW) of Hurricane Joaquin. Compared with 3DEnVAR, 4DEnVar leads to better assimilation results and subsequent forecasts and thus offers a set of simulations to diagnose the processes associated with the RW of Hurricane Joaquin. A drastic increase in the vertical wind shear (VWS, with a magnitude of 12 m s-1) is found before the RW. This high VWS is persistent during the 0-12 h period of RW, inducing changes in the vortex structure of Hurricane Joaquin through dry air intrusion in the mid-level and the dilution of the upper-level warm core. The transport of low air from above into the boundary layer occurs at the same time, resulting in depressed values in the storm inflow layer and reduced eyewall values through the updraft. As a consequence, downdrafts flush the boundary layer with low air, leading to the weakening of inflow in the boundary layers. When Hurricane Joaquin moves over an area where the SSTs are below 28oC within the hurricane inner core during the 18-30 h period of RW, the cold SSTs significantly inhibit latent and sensible heat release within the hurricane inner core and its vicinity, thus resulting in the continuous weakening of Hurricane Joaquin.

  14. Migrating birds : assessment of impact on 915-MHz radar wind profiler performance at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program's southern great plains

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pekour, M. S.

    2002-01-01

    The U. S. Department of Energy's Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program is running a small network of 915-MHz radar wind profilers (RWPs) at its Southern Great Plains Cloud and Radiation Testbed site in northern Oklahoma and southern Kansas. Seasonal migration of passerines may cause significant interference with the operation of 915-MHz RWPs. The extent of this ''bird jamming'' depends on the radar's parameters, the place of deployment, the season, and the time of day. This poster presents a new diagnostic method for detecting possible bird contamination in RWP data, along with an evaluation of the method using a three-year data set for two RWPs

  15. First middle-atmospheric zonal wind profile measurements with a new ground-based microwave Doppler-spectro-radiometer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Rüfenacht

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available We report on the wind radiometer WIRA, a new ground-based microwave Doppler-spectro-radiometer specifically designed for the measurement of middle-atmospheric horizontal wind by observing ozone emission spectra at 142.17504 GHz. Currently, wind speeds in five levels between 30 and 79 km can be retrieved which makes WIRA the first instrument able to continuously measure horizontal wind in this altitude range. For an integration time of one day the measurement error on each level lies at around 25 m s−1. With a planned upgrade this value is expected to be reduced by a factor of 2 in the near future. On the altitude levels where our measurement can be compared to wind data from the European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF very good agreement in the long-term statistics as well as in short time structures with a duration of a few days has been found.

    WIRA uses a passive double sideband heterodyne receiver together with a digital Fourier transform spectrometer for the data acquisition. A big advantage of the radiometric approach is that such instruments can also operate under adverse weather conditions and thus provide a continuous time series for the given location. The optics enables the instrument to scan a wide range of azimuth angles including the directions east, west, north, and south for zonal and meridional wind measurements. The design of the radiometer is fairly compact and its calibration does not rely on liquid nitrogen which makes it transportable and suitable for campaign use. WIRA is conceived in a way that it can be operated remotely and does hardly require any maintenance.

    In the present paper, a description of the instrument is given, and the techniques used for the wind retrieval based on the determination of the Doppler shift of the measured atmospheric ozone emission spectra are outlined. Their reliability was tested using Monte Carlo simulations. Finally, a time series of 11

  16. Validation of mixing height determined from vertical profiles of wind and temperature from the DMI-HIRLAM NWP model in comparison with readiosoundings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rasmussen, A.; Soerensen, J.H.; Nielsen, N.W. [Danish Meteorological Inst., DMI, Copenhagen (Denmark)

    1997-10-01

    A sensitivity study is performed of vertical profiles from the numerical weather prediction model DMI-HIRLAM (DMI-HIgh Resolution Limited Area Model). The study involves profiles of horizontal wind, temperature and humidity in the lower troposphere up to 2500 meter. Detailed comparisons of analysed as well as forecast profiles are made with measured data from several radio-sonde stations throughout Europe. Methods for estimating the Mixing Height (MH) based on a bulk Richardson number method, the Vogelezang and Holtslag method and parcel methods are also studied. The methods are inter-compared, and MH based on data from DMI-HIRLAM are compared with the corresponding MH based on radiosonde data. For convective conditions the MH estimates are also compared with subjective estimates of the MH. In this paper preliminary results mainly based on data from Jaegersborg (Copenhagen) are presented. Results based on data from 1994-95 show that the resemblance between measured profiles and the DMI-HIRLAM profiles is fairly good in general. Also the estimates of the MH based on DMI-HIRLAM data is in general of nearly the same quality as estimations based on observed data. However, especially in convective conditions there is a tendency by DMI-HIRLAM to underestimate the strength of the mixing and thereby relatively large errors in the estimates of the MH can occur. (au)

  17. Possible ionospheric preconditioning by shear flow leading to equatorial spread F

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. L. Hysell

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available Vertical shear in the zonal plasma drift speed is apparent in incoherent and coherent scatter radar observations of the bottomside F region ionosphere made at Jicamarca from about 1600–2200 LT. The relative importance of the factors controlling the shear, which include competition between the E and F region dynamos as well as vertical currents driven in the E and F regions at the dip equator, is presently unknown. Bottom-type scattering layers arise in strata where the neutral and plasma drifts differ widely, and periodic structuring of irregularities within the layers is telltale of intermediate-scale waves in the bottomside. These precursor waves appear to be able to seed ionospheric interchange instabilities and initiate full-blown equatorial spread F. The seed or precursor waves may be generated by a collisional shear instability. However, assessing the viability of shear instability requires measurements of the same parameters needed to understand shear flow quantitatively - thermospheric neutral wind and off-equatorial conductivity profiles. Keywords. Ionosphere (Equatorial ionosphere; ionospheric irregularities – Space plasma physics (Waves and instabilities

  18. Wind Turbines Wake Aerodynamics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vermeer, L.; Sørensen, Jens Nørkær; Crespo, A.

    2003-01-01

    The aerodynamics of horizontal axis wind turbine wakes is studied. The contents is directed towards the physics of power extraction by wind turbines and reviews both the near and the far wake region. For the near wake, the survey is restricted to uniform, steady and parallel flow conditions......, thereby excluding wind shear, wind speed and rotor setting changes and yawed conditions. The emphasis is put on measurements in controlled conditions.For the far wake, the survey focusses on both single turbines and wind farm effects, and the experimental and numerical work are reviewed; the main interest...... is to study how the far wake decays downstream, in order to estimate the effect produced in downstream turbines.The article is further restricted to horizontal axis wind turbines and excludes all other types of turbines....

  19. Evaluation of shear bond strength of orthodontic brackets using trans-illumination technique with different curing profiles of LED light-curing unit in posterior teeth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heravi, Farzin; Moazzami, Saied Mostafa; Ghaffari, Negin; Jalayer, Javad; Bozorgnia, Yasaman

    2013-11-21

    Although using light-cured composites for bonding orthodontic brackets has become increasingly popular, curing light cannot penetrate the metallic bulk of brackets and polymerization of composites is limited to the edges. Limited access and poor direct sight may be a problem in the posterior teeth. Meanwhile, effectiveness of the trans-illumination technique is questionable due to increased bucco-lingual thickness of the posterior teeth. Light-emitting diode (LED) light-curing units cause less temperature rise and lower risk to the pulpal tissue. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the clinical effectiveness of trans-illumination technique in bonding metallic brackets to premolars, using different light intensities and curing times of an LED light-curing unit. Sixty premolars were randomly divided into six groups. Bonding of brackets was done with 40- and 80-s light curing from the buccal or lingual aspect with different intensities. Shear bond strengths of brackets were measured using a universal testing machine. Data were analyzed by one-way analysis of variance test and Duncan's post hoc test. The highest shear bond belonged to group 2 (high intensity, 40 s, buccal) and the lowest belonged to group 3 (low intensity, 40 s, lingual). Bond strength means in control groups were significantly higher than those in experimental groups. In all experimental groups except group 6 (80 s, high intensity, lingual), shear bond strength was below the clinically accepted values. In clinical limitations where light curing from the same side of the bracket is not possible, doubling the curing time and increasing the light intensity during trans-illumination are recommended for achieving acceptable bond strengths.

  20. Assessing the vegetation canopy influences on wind flow using wind ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Service. References. Brown S, Nickling W G and Gillies J A 2008 A wind tunnel examination of shear stress partitioning for an assortment of surface roughness distribution; J. Geophys. Res. 113. F02S06, doi: 10.1029/2007JF000790. Buckley R 1987 The effect of sparse vegetation on the transport of dune sand by wind; ...

  1. [Biomechanic shear stress in carotid arteries and atherosclerosis development].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaźmierski, Radosław

    2003-01-01

    One of the major hemodynamic forces acting on blood vessels is shear stress, which is, the friction force between the endothelial cell surface and flowing blood. Arterial shear stress within physiologic range (15-70 dyne/cm2) induces endothelial quiescence and an atheroprotective gene expression profile. Low shear stress ( 70 dyne/cm2) induce prothrombotic state.

  2. Profiles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2004-01-01

    Profiles is a synthetic overview of more than 100 national energy markets in the world, providing insightful facts and key energy statistics. A Profile is structured around 6 main items and completed by key statistics: Ministries, public agencies, energy policy are concerned; main companies in the oil, gas, electricity and coal sectors, status, shareholders; reserve, production, imports and exports, electricity and refining capacities; deregulation of prices, subsidies, taxes; consumption trends by sector, energy market shares; main energy projects, production and consumption prospects. Statistical Profiles are present in about 3 pages the main data and indicators on oil, gas, coal and electricity. (A.L.B.)

  3. Wind conditions and resource assessment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lundtang Petersen, Erik; Troen, Ib

    2012-01-01

    The development of wind power as a competitive energy source requires resource assessment of increasing accuracy and detail (including not only the long-term ‘raw’ wind resource, but also turbulence, shear, and extremes), and in areas of increasing complexity. This in turn requires the use...

  4. The Role of Surface Energy Exchange for Simulating Wind Inflow: An Evaluation of Multiple Land Surface Models in WRF for the Southern Great Plains Site Field Campaign Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wharton, Sonia [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Simpson, Matthew [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Osuna, Jessica [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Newman, Jennifer [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Biraud, Sebastien [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2016-05-01

    The Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model is used to investigate choice of land surface model (LSM) on the near-surface wind profile, including heights reached by multi-megawatt wind turbines. Simulations of wind profiles and surface energy fluxes were made using five LSMs of varying degrees of sophistication in dealing with soil-plant-atmosphere feedbacks for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility’s Southern Great Plains (SGP) Central Facility in Oklahoma. Surface-flux and wind-profile measurements were available for validation. The WRF model was run for three two-week periods during which varying canopy and meteorological conditions existed. The LSMs predicted a wide range of energy-flux and wind-shear magnitudes even during the cool autumn period when we expected less variability. Simulations of energy fluxes varied in accuracy by model sophistication, whereby LSMs with very simple or no soil-plant-atmosphere feedbacks were the least accurate; however, the most complex models did not consistently produce more accurate results. Errors in wind shear also were sensitive to LSM choice and were partially related to the accuracy of energy flux data. The variability of LSM performance was relatively high, suggesting that LSM representation of energy fluxes in the WRF model remains a significant source of uncertainty for simulating wind turbine inflow conditions.

  5. SHEAR ACCELERATION IN EXPANDING FLOWS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rieger, F. M. [ZAH, Institut für Theoretische Astrophysik, Universität Heidelberg, Philosophenweg 12, D-69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Duffy, P., E-mail: frank.rieger@mpi-hd.mpg.de, E-mail: peter.duffy@ucd.ie [University College Dublin, Belfield, Dublin 4 (Ireland)

    2016-12-10

    Shear flows are naturally expected to occur in astrophysical environments and potential sites of continuous non-thermal Fermi-type particle acceleration. Here we investigate the efficiency of expanding relativistic outflows to facilitate the acceleration of energetic charged particles to higher energies. To this end, the gradual shear acceleration coefficient is derived based on an analytical treatment. The results are applied to the context of the relativistic jets from active galactic nuclei. The inferred acceleration timescale is investigated for a variety of conical flow profiles (i.e., power law, Gaussian, Fermi–Dirac) and compared to the relevant radiative and non-radiative loss timescales. The results exemplify that relativistic shear flows are capable of boosting cosmic-rays to extreme energies. Efficient electron acceleration, on the other hand, requires weak magnetic fields and may thus be accompanied by a delayed onset of particle energization and affect the overall jet appearance (e.g., core, ridge line, and limb-brightening).

  6. Quantitative detection of mass concentration of sand-dust storms via wind-profiling radar and analysis of Z- M relationship

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Minzhong; Ming, Hu; Ruan, Zheng; Gao, Lianhui; Yang, Di

    2018-02-01

    With the aim to achieve quantitative monitoring of sand-dust storms in real time, wind-profiling radar is applied to monitor and study the process of four sand-dust storms in the Tazhong area of the Taklimakan Desert. Through evaluation and analysis of the spatial-temporal distribution of reflectivity factor, it is found that reflectivity factor ranges from 2 to 18 dBz under sand-dust storm weather. Using echo power spectrum of radar vertical beams, sand-dust particle spectrum and sand-dust mass concentration at the altitude of 600 ˜ 1500 m are retrieved. This study shows that sand-dust mass concentration reaches 700 μg/m3 under blowing sand weather, 2000 μg/m3 under sand-dust storm weather, and 400 μg/m3 under floating dust weather. The following equations are established to represent the relationship between the reflectivity factor and sand-dust mass concentration: Z = 20713.5 M 0.995 under floating dust weather, Z = 22988.3 M 1.006 under blowing sand weather, and Z = 24584.2 M 1.013 under sand-dust storm weather. The retrieval results from this paper are almost consistent with previous monitoring results achieved by former researchers; thus, it is implied that wind-profiling radar can be used as a new reference device to quantitatively monitor sand-dust storms.

  7. Characteristics of ozone vertical profile observed in the boundary layer around Beijing in autumn.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Zhiqiang; Zhang, Xiaoling; Xu, Jing; Zhao, Xiujuan; Meng, Wei

    2011-01-01

    In the autumn of 2008, the vertical profiles of ozone and meteorological parameters in the low troposphere (0-1000 m) were observed at two sites around Beijing, specifically urban Nanjiao and rural Shangdianzi. At night and early morning, the lower troposphere divided into two stratified layers due to temperature inversion. Ozone in the lower layer showed a large gradient due to the titration of NO. Air flow from the southwest brought ozone-rich air to Beijing, and the ozone profiles were marked by a continuous increase in the residual layer at night. The accumulated ozone in the upper layer played an important role in the next day's surface peak ozone concentration, and caused a rapid increase in surface ozone in the morning. Wind direction shear and wind speed shear exhibited different influences on ozone profiles and resulted in different surface ozone concentrations in Beijing.

  8. Astronomical site survey report on dust measurement, wind profile, optical turbulence, and their correlation with seeing over IAO-Hanle. Astronomical site survey report over IAO-Hanle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ningombam, Shantikumar S.; Kathiravan, S.; Parihar, P. S.; L. Larson, E. J.; Mohanan, Sharika; Angchuk, Dorje; Jorphel, Sonam; Rangarajan, K. E.; Prabhu, K.

    2017-04-01

    The present work discusses astronomical site survey reports on dust content, vertical distribution of atmospheric turbulence, precipitable water vapor (PWV), surface and upper-air data, and their effects on seeing over the Indian Astronomical Observatory (IAO) Hanle. Using Laser Particulate Counter, ambient dust measurements at various sizes (0.3 μm to 25 μm) were performed at various locations at the site during November 2015. Estimated volume concentration for the particle size at 0.5 μm was around 10,000 per cubic foot, which is equivalent to ten thousand class of clean room standard protocol. During the measurement, surface wind speed varied from 0-20 m s -1, while estimated aerosol optical depth (AOD) using Sky radiometer (Prede) varied from 0.02-0.04 at 500 nm, which indicates the site is fairly clean. The two independent measurements of dust content and aerosol concentrations at the site agreed well. The turbulence or wind gust at the site was studied with wind profiles at three different heights above the ground. The strength of the wind gust varies with time and altitude. Nocturnal temperature across seasons varied with a moderate at summer (6-8 ∘C) and lower in winter (4-5 ∘C). However, the contrast between the two is significantly small due to cold and extremely dry typical climatic conditions of the site. The present study also examined the effects of surface and upper-air data along with Planetary Boundary Layer (PBL) dynamics with seeing measurement over the site. Further, a comparative study of such observed parameters was conducted with other high altitude astronomical observatories across the globe.

  9. The benefit of wind atlases in wind energy and their verification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bethke, Julia; Kampmeyer, Jens; Mengelkamp, Heinz-Theo

    2014-05-01

    1 INTRODUCTION Wind atlases such as reanalysis data and downscaled data sets are widely used in the wind energy sector, e.g. for long-term correlation of short-term measurements or initial site search. Due to the financial impact of statements derived from wind atlases, their verification is of high importance. Here, different wind atlases are verified in-depth with numerous certified high-quality mast measurements covering a broad range of heights up to 200 m. In contrast to the commonly used weather stations, high masts allow for an evaluation of vertical profiles and atmospheric stability. The following questions will be addressed: What are wind atlases? How well are they performing? Which benefit do wind atlases have in wind energy? 2 APPROACH The performance of commonly used reanalysis data, e.g. MERRA, ERA-Interim, and two data sets downscaled from MERRA reanalysis data is investigated. The first downscaled data set is derived by the mesoscale model MM5 and has a spatial and temporal resolution of 20 km and 10 min, respectively. The second downscaled data set is derived by the WRF model and has a spatial and temporal resolution of 3 km and 10 min, respectively. Certified high-quality measurements of 45 met masts with 160 anemometers covering a range of complexity types, measurement heights between 30 m and 200 m and a time period of 2 years are compared to the wind atlases. Hourly values are analysed. 3 RESULTS The correlation with hourly measurements of wind speed is very good for all data sets. Correlation increases with decreasing terrain complexity. Wind directions are also met very well by all data sets. The frequency distributions of wind speed and therefore, the Weibull parameters are reproduced very well by the downscaled data sets for a broad range of velocities, however underestimating higher velocities. MERRA generally strongly overestimates wind speed. Diurnal and annual cycles as well as vertical profiles are reproduced more accurately by the

  10. The Profile Envision and Splicing Tool (PRESTO): Developing an Atmospheric Wind Analysis Tool for Space Launch Vehicles Using Python

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orcutt, John M.; Barbre, Robert E., Jr.; Brenton, James C.; Decker, Ryan K.

    2017-01-01

    Launch vehicle programs require vertically complete atmospheric profiles. Many systems at the ER to make the necessary measurements, but all have different EVR, vertical coverage, and temporal coverage. MSFC Natural Environments Branch developed a tool to create a vertically complete profile from multiple inputs using Python. Forward work: Finish Formal Testing Acceptance Testing, End-to-End Testing. Formal Release

  11. Influence of curing profile and fibre architecture on the fatigue resistance of composite materials for wind turbine blades

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mikkelsen, Lars Pilgaard

    The fatigue performance of unidirectional glass fibre reinforced epoxy is found to be highly dependent on the manufacturing conditions, where a low manufacturing temperature, for the investigated wind turbine relevant composite material system, is found to improve the tension/tension fatigue life......-ray computer tomography. Thereby, it has been found during ex-situ fatigue studies, that the fatigue failure mechanism is highly influenced by transverse cracking in the so-called backing bundles which is present in order to ease the handling during the dry fabric layup during wind turbine blade manufacturing....... It is a failure mechanism which is judge to be highly influenced by the magnitude of the residual stresses exhibit in the matrix material and therefore also in the secondary oriented backing bundles. Using fibre Bragg grated optical fibres2; the build-up of the cure-induced strains in the fibre-reinforcement has...

  12. Wind Climate Parameters for Wind Turbine Fatigue Load Assessment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Toft, Henrik Stensgaard; Svenningsen, Lasse; Moser, Wolfgang

    2016-01-01

    established from the on-site distribution functions of the horizontal mean wind speeds, the 90% quantile of turbulence along with average values of vertical wind shear and air density and the maximum flow inclination. This paper investigates the accuracy of fatigue loads estimated using this equivalent wind...... climate required by the current design standard by comparing damage equivalent fatigue loads estimated based on wind climate parameters for each 10 min time-series with fatigue loads estimated based on the equivalent wind climate parameters. Wind measurements from Boulder, CO, in the United States...... and Høvsøre in Denmark have been used to estimate the natural variation in the wind conditions between 10 min time periods. The structural wind turbine loads have been simulated using the aero-elastic model FAST. The results show that using a 90% quantile for the turbulence leads to an accurate assessment...

  13. Wind field reconstruction from nacelle-mounted lidar short-range measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Borraccino

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Profiling nacelle lidars probe the wind at several heights and several distances upstream of the rotor. The development of such lidar systems is relatively recent, and it is still unclear how to condense the lidar raw measurements into useful wind field characteristics such as speed, direction, vertical and longitudinal gradients (wind shear. In this paper, we demonstrate an innovative method to estimate wind field characteristics using nacelle lidar measurements taken within the induction zone. Model-fitting wind field reconstruction techniques are applied to nacelle lidar measurements taken at multiple distances close to the rotor, where a wind model is combined with a simple induction model. The method allows robust determination of free-stream wind characteristics. The method was applied to experimental data obtained with two different types of nacelle lidar (five-beam Demonstrator and ZephIR Dual Mode. The reconstructed wind speed was within 0.5 % of the wind speed measured with a mast-top-mounted cup anemometer at 2.5 rotor diameters upstream of the turbine. The technique described in this paper overcomes measurement range limitations of the currently available nacelle lidar technology.

  14. Hub Height Ocean Winds over the North Sea Observed by the NORSEWInD Lidar Array: Measuring Techniques, Quality Control and Data Management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew Stickland

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available In the North Sea, an array of wind profiling wind lidars were deployed mainly on offshore platforms. The purpose was to observe free stream winds at hub height. Eight lidars were validated prior to offshore deployment with observations from cup anemometers at 60, 80, 100 and 116 m on an onshore met mast situated in flat terrain. The so-called “NORSEWInD standard” for comparing lidar and mast wind data includes the criteria that the slope of the linear regression should lie within 0.98 and 1.01 and the linear correlation coefficient higher than 0.98 for the wind speed range 4–16 m∙s−1. Five lidars performed excellently, two slightly failed the first criterion and one failed both. The lidars were operated offshore from six months to more than two years and observed in total 107 months of 10-min mean wind profile observations. Four lidars were re-evaluated post deployment with excellent results. The flow distortion around platforms was examined using wind tunnel experiments and computational fluid dynamics and it was found that at 100 m height wind observations by the lidars were not significantly influenced by flow distortion. Observations of the vertical wind profile shear exponent at hub height are presented.

  15. Analysis of extreme wind events at Høvsøre and the effect on wind turbine loads

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hannesdóttir, Ásta; Kelly, Mark C.; Mann, Jakob

    used to simulate wind turbine response in time domain. The simulations are made for the DTU 10 MW reference wind turbine. Load analysis shows that the maximum tilt moment on the tower yaw bearing correlates well with the wind shear of the measurements. When these loads are compared with the extreme...... wind shear load case of the IEC standards, it is seen that they are of similar magnitude and in one case even higher....

  16. Wind turbine pitch optimization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Biegel, Benjamin; Juelsgaard, Morten; Stoustrup, Jakob

    2011-01-01

    We consider a static wind model for a three-bladed, horizontal-axis, pitch-controlled wind turbine. When placed in a wind field, the turbine experiences several mechanical loads, which generate power but also create structural fatigue. We address the problem of finding blade pitch profiles......% compared to any constant pitch profile while sacrificing at most 7% of the maximum attainable output power. Using iterative learning, we show that very similar performance can be achieved by using only load measurements, with no knowledge of the wind field or wind turbine model....... for maximizing power production while simultaneously minimizing fatigue loads. In this paper, we show how this problem can be approximately solved using convex optimization. When there is full knowledge of the wind field, numerical simulations show that force and torque RMS variation can be reduced by over 96...

  17. Ascent structural wind loads for the National Space Transportation System (NSTS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, O. E.; Adelfang, S. I.; Brown, R. P.

    1988-01-01

    An aerospace vehicle must withstand the design ascent structural load or be within any flight constraint to safely reach orbit. For the NSTS an assessment for flight readiness is made for each mission. This assessment for ascent loads and performance parameters is stated in terms of launch probability derived from samples of Jimsphere wind profiles. For the day of launch operations an allowance is made for the ascent load variability due to the wind profile variability over a 3.5-hour period. This is the current time period required to obtain a Jimsphere measurement and perform a complete load simulation prior to launch time. The load variability is derived from a sample of 3.5-hour Jimsphere wind profile pairs. It is applied as a conditional percentile value given the wind load at 3.5 hours prior to launch time. Probability models are used for these analyses. Application of the univariate, bivariate and conditional forms of the extreme value (Gumbel) probability distribution to the analysis of extreme wind speeds, wind shears and vehicle loads is described.

  18. O Star Wind Mass-Loss Rates and Shock Physics from X-ray Line Profiles in Archival XMM RGS Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, David

    O stars are characterized by their dense, supersonic stellar winds. These winds are the site of X-ray emission from shock-heated plasma. By analyzing high-resolution X-ray spectra of these O stars, we can learn about the wind-shock heating and X-ray production mechanism. But in addition, the X-rays can also be used to measure the mass-loss rate of the stellar wind, which is a key observational quantity whose value affects stellar evolution and energy, momentum, and mass input to the Galactic interstellar medium. We make this X-ray based mass-loss measurement by analyzing the profile shapes of the X-ray emission lines observed at high resolution with the Chandra and XMM-Newton grating spectrometers. One advantage of our method is that it is insensitive to small-scale clumping that affects density-squared diagnostics. We are applying this analysis technique to O stars in the Chandra archive, and are finding mass-loss rates lower than those traditionally assumed for these O stars, and in line with more recent independent determinations that do account for clumping. By extending this analysis to the XMM RGS data archive, we will make significant contributions to the understanding of both X-ray production in O stars and to addressing the issue of the actual mass-loss rates of O stars. The XMM RGS data archive provides several extensions and advantages over the smaller Chandra HETGS archive: (1) there are roughly twice as many O and early B stars in the XMM archive; (2) the longer wavelength response of the RGS provides access to diagnostically important lines of nitrogen and carbon; (3) the very long, multiple exposures of zeta Pup provide the opportunity to study this canonical O supergiant's X-ray spectrum in unprecedented detail, including looking at the time variability of X-ray line profiles. Our research team has developed a sophisticated empirical line profile model as well as a computational infrastructure for fitting the model to high-resolution X-ray spectra

  19. Diurnal Evolution and Annual Variability of Boundary Layer Height in the Columbia River Gorge through the `Eye' of Wind Profiling Radars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bianco, L.; Djalalova, I.; Konopleva-Akish, E.; Kenyon, J.; Olson, J. B.; Wilczak, J. M.

    2016-12-01

    The Second Wind Forecast Improvement Project (WFIP2) is a DoE- and NOAA-sponsored program whose goal is to improve the accuracy of numerical weather prediction (NWP) forecasts in complex terrain. WFIP2 consists of an 18-month (October 2015 - March 2017) field campaign held in the Columbia River basin, in the Pacific Northwest of the U.S. As part of WFIP2 a large suite of in-situ and remote sensing instrumentation has been deployed, including, among several others, a network of eight 915-MHz wind profiling radars (WPRs) equipped with radio acoustic sounding systems (RASSs), and many surface meteorological stations. The diurnal evolution and annual variability of boundary layer height in the area of WFIP2 will be investigated through the `eye' of WPRs, employing state-of-the-art automated algorithms, based on fuzzy logic and artificial intelligence. The results will be used to evaluate possible errors in NWP models in this area of complex terrain.

  20. The Upshear Environment-Outflow Interface of a Sheared, Rapidly Intensifying Tropical Cyclone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryglicki, D.; Doyle, J. D.; Jin, Y.; Hodyss, D.; Viner, K.

    2017-12-01

    An idealized, simulated tropical cyclone (TC) which undergoes rapid intensification in moderate vertical wind shear is shown to exhibit structural similarities to observed TCs of this class. Due to a complex vortex tilt evolution, enhanced convection causes enhanced outflow from the TC which subsequently serves to block and to divert environmental flow around the TC. This allows for the TC to come back into vertical alignment and undergo rapid intensification. A trajectory analysis indicates that blocking is limited to a narrow range of heights, indicating that the vertical profile of environmental winds is a key factor for permitting this evolution. Satellite observations indicate the presence of upper-level arcs extending upshear beyond the TC. Synthetic satellite imagery of the simulated TC indicates this is the termination of the outflow. Using a Helmholtz decomposition, it is found that the divergent component of the outflow extends 1000 km upshear into the environment, potentially explaining the 1000-km clearing seen in satellite observations.

  1. Structural Health and Prognostics Management for Offshore Wind Turbines: Sensitivity Analysis of Rotor Fault and Blade Damage with O&M Cost Modeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Myrent, Noah J. [Vanderbilt Univ., Nashville, TN (United States). Lab. for Systems Integrity and Reliability; Barrett, Natalie C. [Vanderbilt Univ., Nashville, TN (United States). Lab. for Systems Integrity and Reliability; Adams, Douglas E. [Vanderbilt Univ., Nashville, TN (United States). Lab. for Systems Integrity and Reliability; Griffith, Daniel Todd [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States). Wind Energy Technology Dept.

    2014-07-01

    Operations and maintenance costs for offshore wind plants are significantly higher than the current costs for land-based (onshore) wind plants. One way to reduce these costs would be to implement a structural health and prognostic management (SHPM) system as part of a condition based maintenance paradigm with smart load management and utilize a state-based cost model to assess the economics associated with use of the SHPM system. To facilitate the development of such a system a multi-scale modeling and simulation approach developed in prior work is used to identify how the underlying physics of the system are affected by the presence of damage and faults, and how these changes manifest themselves in the operational response of a full turbine. This methodology was used to investigate two case studies: (1) the effects of rotor imbalance due to pitch error (aerodynamic imbalance) and mass imbalance and (2) disbond of the shear web; both on a 5-MW offshore wind turbine in the present report. Sensitivity analyses were carried out for the detection strategies of rotor imbalance and shear web disbond developed in prior work by evaluating the robustness of key measurement parameters in the presence of varying wind speeds, horizontal shear, and turbulence. Detection strategies were refined for these fault mechanisms and probabilities of detection were calculated. For all three fault mechanisms, the probability of detection was 96% or higher for the optimized wind speed ranges of the laminar, 30% horizontal shear, and 60% horizontal shear wind profiles. The revised cost model provided insight into the estimated savings in operations and maintenance costs as they relate to the characteristics of the SHPM system. The integration of the health monitoring information and O&M cost versus damage/fault severity information provides the initial steps to identify processes to reduce operations and maintenance costs for an offshore wind farm while increasing turbine availability

  2. Wind energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1992-01-01

    This chapter discusses the role wind energy may have in the energy future of the US. The topics discussed in the chapter include historical aspects of wind energy use, the wind energy resource, wind energy technology including intermediate-size and small wind turbines and intermittency of wind power, public attitudes toward wind power, and environmental, siting and land use issues

  3. Effects of shear coupling on shear properties of wood

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jen Y. Liu

    2000-01-01

    Under pure shear loading, an off-axis element of orthotropic material such as pure wood undergoes both shear and normal deformations. The ratio of the shear strain to a normal strain is defined as the shear coupling coefficient associated with the direction of the normal strain. The effects of shear coupling on shear properties of wood as predicted by the orthotropic...

  4. Separate structure of two branches of sheared slab ηi mode and effects of plasma rotation shear in weak magnetic shear region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jiquan Li; Kishimoto, Y.; Tuda, T.

    2000-01-01

    The separate structure of two branches of the sheared slab η i mode near the minimum-q magnetic surface is analysed and the effects of plasma rotation shears are considered in the weak magnetic shear region. Results show that the separation condition depends on the non-monotonous q profile and the deviation of rational surface from the minimum-q surface. Furthermore, it is found that the diamagnetic rotation shear may suppress the perturbation of the sheared slab η i mode at one side of the minimum-q surface, the poloidal rotation shear from the sheared E-vector x B-vector flow has a similar role to the slab mode structure when it possesses a direction same as the diamagnetic shear. A plausible interrelation between the separate structures of the two branches of the sheared slab mode and the discontinuity or gap of the radially global structure of the drift wave near the minimum-q surface observed in the toroidal particle simulation (Kishimoto Y et al 1998 Plasma Phys. Control. Fusion 40 A663) is discussed. It seems to support such a viewpoint: the double or/and global branches of the sheared slab η i mode near the minimum-q surface may become a bridge to connect the radially global structures of the drift wave at two sides of the minimum-q surface and the discontinuity may originate from the separate structures of these slab modes for a flatter q profile. (author)

  5. Aeroelastic large eddy simulations using vortex methods: unfrozen turbulent and sheared inflow

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Branlard, Emmanuel Simon Pierre; Papadakis, G.; Gaunaa, Mac

    2015-01-01

    Vortex particles methods are applied to the aeroelastic simulation of a wind turbine in sheared and turbulent inflow. The possibility to perform large-eddy simulations of turbulence with the effect of the shear vorticity is demonstrated for the first time in vortex methods simulations. Most vortex...... methods formulation of shear, including segment formulations, assume a frozen shear. It is here shown that these formulations omit two source terms in the vorticity equation. The current paper also present unfrozen simulation of shear. The infinite support of the shear vorticity is accounted for using...

  6. Wind Tunnel Measurements at LM Wind Power

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bertagnolio, Franck

    2012-01-01

    The optimization of airfoil profiles specifically designed for wind turbine application was initiated in the late 80’s [67, 68, 30, 15]. The first attempts to reduce airfoil noise for wind turbines made use of airfoil trailing edge serration. Themodification of airfoil shapes targeted at noise...... reduction is more recent. An important effort was produced in this direction within the SIROCCO project. This latter work involved measurements on full size wind turbines and showed that trailing edge serration may proved a viable solution for mitigating wind turbine noise though it has not been implemented...... on commercial wind turbine yet. It should be mentioned here that the attenuation of turbulent inflow noise using wavy leading edge has recently been investigated [55], but this technique has still to be further validated for practical applications. In this paper, it is proposed to optimize an airfoil which...

  7. Experimental study of shear rate dependence in perpetually sheared granular matter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Sophie Yang; Guillard, François; Marks, Benjy; Rognon, Pierre; Einav, Itai

    2017-06-01

    We study the shear behaviour of various granular materials by conducting novel perpetual simple shear experiments over four orders of magnitude of relatively low shear rates. The newly developed experimental apparatus employed is called "3D Stadium Shear Device" which is an extended version of the 2D Stadium Shear Device [1]. This device is able to provide a non-radial dependent perpetual shear flow and a nearly linear velocity profile between two oppositely moving shear walls. Using this device, we are able to test a large variety of granular materials. Here, we demonstrate the applicability of the device on glass beads (diameter 1 mm, 3 mm, and 14 mm) and rice. We particularly focus on studying these materials at very low inertial number I ranging from 10-6 to 10-2. We find that, within this range of I, the friction coefficient μ of glass beads has no shear rate dependence. A particularly appealing observation comes from testing rice, where the attainment of critical state develops under much longer duration than in other materials. Initially during shear we find a value of μ similar to that found for glass beads, but with time this value decreases gradually towards the asymptotic critical state value. The reason, we believe, lies in the fact that rice grains are strongly elongated; hence the time to achieve the stable μ is primarily controlled by the time for particles to align themselves with respect to the shear walls. Furthermore, the initial packing conditions of samples also plays a role in the evolution of μ when the shear strain is small, but that impact will eventually be erased after sufficient shear strain.

  8. Experimental study of shear rate dependence in perpetually sheared granular matter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liu Sophie Yang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available We study the shear behaviour of various granular materials by conducting novel perpetual simple shear experiments over four orders of magnitude of relatively low shear rates. The newly developed experimental apparatus employed is called “3D Stadium Shear Device” which is an extended version of the 2D Stadium Shear Device [1]. This device is able to provide a non-radial dependent perpetual shear flow and a nearly linear velocity profile between two oppositely moving shear walls. Using this device, we are able to test a large variety of granular materials. Here, we demonstrate the applicability of the device on glass beads (diameter 1 mm, 3 mm, and 14 mm and rice. We particularly focus on studying these materials at very low inertial number I ranging from 10−6 to 10−2. We find that, within this range of I, the friction coefficient μ of glass beads has no shear rate dependence. A particularly appealing observation comes from testing rice, where the attainment of critical state develops under much longer duration than in other materials. Initially during shear we find a value of μ similar to that found for glass beads, but with time this value decreases gradually towards the asymptotic critical state value. The reason, we believe, lies in the fact that rice grains are strongly elongated; hence the time to achieve the stable μ is primarily controlled by the time for particles to align themselves with respect to the shear walls. Furthermore, the initial packing conditions of samples also plays a role in the evolution of μ when the shear strain is small, but that impact will eventually be erased after sufficient shear strain.

  9. The Wind Integration National Dataset (WIND) toolkit (Presentation)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Caroline Draxl: NREL

    2014-01-01

    Regional wind integration studies require detailed wind power output data at many locations to perform simulations of how the power system will operate under high penetration scenarios. The wind datasets that serve as inputs into the study must realistically reflect the ramping characteristics, spatial and temporal correlations, and capacity factors of the simulated wind plants, as well as being time synchronized with available load profiles.As described in this presentation, the WIND Toolkit fulfills these requirements by providing a state-of-the-art national (US) wind resource, power production and forecast dataset.

  10. Remarks on impact shearing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klepaczko, J. R.

    1998-10-01

    A review is presented on recent progress in shear testing of materials at high and very high strain rates. Some experimental techniques are discussed which allow for materials testing in shear up to 10 6 ls. More detailed informations are provided on experimental techniques based on the Modified Double Shear specimen loaded by direct impact. This technique has been applied so far to test a variety of materials, including construction, armor and inoxidable steels, and also aluminum alloys. The double shear configuration has also been applied to test sheet metals, mostly used in the automotive industry, in a wide range of strain rates. Details of both techniques, including measuring systems and elastic wave propagation in tubes, are discussed. In addition, a new experimental configuration which can be applied for experimental studies of adiabatic shear propagation and high speed machining is discussed. The role of adiabatic heating at different rates of shearing is also discussed, including transition from pure isothermal to pure adiabatic deformation. It appears that the initial impact velocity is an important parameter in development of plastic localization. Finally, a new development is discussed in determination of the Critical Impact Velocity in shear. A comparison is shown between recent experimental findings and a simple analytic estimation. The CIV in shear is a certain mode of adiabatic failure which occurs at relatively high shear velocities of adjacent material layers. Numerical simulations support the existence of the CIV in shear which can be recognized to some extent as a material constant.

  11. Water Vapor, Temperature and Wind Profiles within Maize Canopy under in-Field Rainwater Harvesting with Wide and Narrow Runoff Strips

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weldemichael A. Tesfuhuney

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Micrometeorological measurements were used to evaluate heat and water vapor to describe the transpiration (Ev and soil evaporation (Es processes for wide and narrow runoff strips under in-field rainwater harvesting (IRWH system. The resulting sigmoid-shaped water vapor (ea in wide and narrow runoff strips varied in lower and upper parts of the maize canopy. In wide runoff strips, lapse conditions of ea extended from lowest measurement level (LP to the upper middle section (MU and inversion was apparent at the top of the canopy. The virtual potential temperature (θv profile showed no difference in middle section, but the lower and upper portion (UP had lower  in narrow, compared to wide, strips, and LP-UP changes of 0.6 K and 1.2 K were observed, respectively. The Ev and Es within the canopy increased the ea concentration as determined by the wind order of magnitude. The ea concentration reached peak at about 1.6 kPa at a range of wind speed value of 1.4–1.8 m∙s−1 and 2.0–2.4 m∙s−1 for wide and narrow treatments, respectively. The sparse maize canopy of the wide strips could supply more drying power of the air in response to atmospheric evaporative demand compared to narrow strips. This is due to the variation in air flow in wide and narrow runoff strips that change gradients in ea for evapotranspiration processes.

  12. Shear Stress Sensing with Elastic Microfence Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cisotto, Alexxandra; Palmieri, Frank L.; Saini, Aditya; Lin, Yi; Thurman, Christopher S; Kim, Jinwook; Kim, Taeyang; Connell, John W.; Zhu, Yong; Gopalarathnam, Ashok; hide

    2015-01-01

    In this work, elastic microfences were generated for the purpose of measuring shear forces acting on a wind tunnel model. The microfences were fabricated in a two part process involving laser ablation patterning to generate a template in a polymer film followed by soft lithography with a two-part silicone. Incorporation of a fluorescent dye was demonstrated as a method to enhance contrast between the sensing elements and the substrate. Sensing elements consisted of multiple microfences prepared at different orientations to enable determination of both shear force and directionality. Microfence arrays were integrated into an optical microscope with sub-micrometer resolution. Initial experiments were conducted on a flat plate wind tunnel model. Both image stabilization algorithms and digital image correlation were utilized to determine the amount of fence deflection as a result of airflow. Initial free jet experiments indicated that the microfences could be readily displaced and this displacement was recorded through the microscope.

  13. Load alleviation of wind turbines by yaw misalignment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kragh, Knud Abildgaard; Hansen, Morten Hartvig

    2014-01-01

    Vertical wind shear is one of the dominating causes of load variations on the blades of a horizontal axis wind turbine. To alleviate the varying loads, wind turbine control systems have been augmented with sensors and actuators for individual pitch control. However, the loads caused by a vertical...... wind shear can also be affected through yaw misalignment. Recent studies of yaw control have been focused on improving the yaw alignment to increase the power capture at below rated wind speeds. In this study, the potential of alleviating blade load variations induced by the wind shear through yaw...... be applied without power loss for wind speeds above rated wind speed. In deterministic inflow, it is shown that the range of the steady-state blade load variations can be reduced by up to 70%. For turbulent inflows, it is shown that the potential blade fatigue load reductions depend on the turbulence level...

  14. Spatially-resolved microstructure in shear banding wormlike micellar solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Helgeson, Matthew E.; Reichert, Matthew D.; Wagner, Norman J.; Kaler, Eric W.

    2008-01-01

    Recently proposed theories for shear banding in wormlike micellar solutions (WLMs) rely on a shear-induced isotropic-nematic (I-N) phase separation as the mechanism for banding. Critical tests of such theories require spatially-resolved measurements of flow-kinematics and local mesoscale microstructure within the shear bands. We have recently developed such capabilities using a short gap Couette cell for flow-small angle neutron scattering (flow-SANS) measurements in the 1-2 plane of shear with collaborators at the NIST Center for Neutron Research. This work combines flow-SANS measurements with rheology, rheo-optics and velocimetry measurements to present the first complete spatially-resolved study of WLMs through the shear banding transition for a model shear banding WLM solution near the I-N phase boundary. The shear rheology is well-modeled by the Giesekus constitutive equation, with incorporated stress diffusion to predict shear banding. By fitting the stress diffusivity at the onset of banding, the model enables prediction of velocity profiles in the shear banded state which are in quantitative agreement with measured flow-kinematics. Quantitative analysis of the flow-SANS measurements shows a critical segmental alignment for banding and validates the Giesekus model predictions, linking segmental orientation to shear banding and providing the first rigorous evidence for the shear-induced I-N transition mechanism for shear banding

  15. Shear rheology of molten crumb chocolate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, J E; Van Damme, I; Johns, M L; Routh, A F; Wilson, D I

    2009-03-01

    The shear rheology of fresh molten chocolate produced from crumb was studied over 5 decades of shear rate using controlled stress devices. The Carreau model was found to be a more accurate description than the traditional Casson model, especially at shear rates between 0.1 and 1 s(-1). At shear rates around 0.1 s(-1) (shear stress approximately 7 Pa) the material exhibited a transition to a solid regime, similar to the behavior reported by Coussot (2005) for other granular suspensions. The nature of the suspension was explored by investigating the effect of solids concentration (0.20 chocolate was then compared with the rheology of (1) a synthetic chocolate, which contained sunflower oil in place of cocoa butter, and (2) a suspension of sugar of a similar size distribution (volume mean 15 mum) in cocoa butter and emulsifier. The chocolate and synthetic chocolate showed very similar rheological profiles under both steady shear and oscillatory shear. The chocolate and the sugar suspension showed similar Krieger-Dougherty dependency on volume fraction, and a noticeable transition to a stiff state at solids volume fractions above approximately 0.5. Similar behavior has been reported by Citerne and others (2001) for a smooth peanut butter, which had a similar particle size distribution and solids loading to chocolate. The results indicate that the melt rheology of the chocolate is dominated by hydrodynamic interactions, although at high solids volume fractions the emulsifier may contribute to the departure of the apparent viscosity from the predicted trend.

  16. Wind Statistics from a Forested Landscape

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arnqvist, Johan; Segalini, Antonio; Dellwik, Ebba

    2015-01-01

    An analysis and interpretation of measurements from a 138-m tall tower located in a forested landscape is presented. Measurement errors and statistical uncertainties are carefully evaluated to ensure high data quality. A 40(Formula presented.) wide wind-direction sector is selected as the most...... representative for large-scale forest conditions, and from that sector first-, second- and third-order statistics, as well as analyses regarding the characteristic length scale, the flux-profile relationship and surface roughness are presented for a wide range of stability conditions. The results are discussed...... characteristics are however not detected in the presented analysis. Dimensionless gradients are shown to follow theoretical curves up to 100 m in stable conditions despite surface-layer approximations being invalid. This is attributed to a balance of momentum decay and reduced shear length scale growth...

  17. Variability of Wind Speeds and Power over Europe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tambke, J.; von Bremen, L.; de Decker, J.; Schmidt, M.; Steinfeld, G.; Wolff, J.-O.

    2010-09-01

    This study comprises two parts: First, we describe the vertical wind speed and turbulence profiles that result from our improved PBL scheme and compare it to observations and 1-dimensional approaches (Monin-Obukhov etc.). Second, we analyse the spatio-temporal correlations in our meso-scale simulations for the years 2004 to 2007 over entire Europe, with special focus on the Irish, North and Baltic Sea. 1.) Vertical Wind Speed Profiles The vertical wind profile above the sea has to be modelled with high accuracy for tip heights up to 160m in order to achieve precise wind resource assessments, to calculate loads and wakes of wind turbines as well as for reliable short-term wind power forecasts. We present an assessment of different models for wind profiles in unstable, neutral and stable thermal stratification. The meso-scale models comprise MM5, WRF and COSMO-EU (LME). Both COSMO-EU from the German Weather Service DWD and WRF use a turbulence closure of 2.5th order - and lead to similar results. Especially the limiting effect of low boundary layer heights on the wind shear in very stable stratification is well captured. In our new WRF-formulation for the mixing length in the Mellor-Yamada-Janjic (MYJ) parameterisation of the Planetary Boundary Layer (PBL-scheme), the master length scale itself depends on the Monin-Obukhov-Length as a parameter for the heat flux effects on the turbulent mixing. This new PBL-scheme shows a better performance for all weather conditions than the original MYJ-scheme. Apart from the low-boundary-layer-effect in very stable situations (which are seldom), standard Monin-Obukhov formulations in combination with the Charnock relation for the sea surface roughness show good agreement with the FINO1-data (German Bight). Interesting results were achieved with two more detailed micro-scale approaches: - the parameterization proposed by Pena, Gryning and Hasager [BLM 2008] that depends on the boundary layer height - our ICWP-model, were the flux

  18. The boundary layer of Tropical Storm Erika (2015) observed by airborne Doppler Wind Lidar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, J.; Emmitt, G. D.; Atlas, R. M.; Bucci, L. R.; Ryan, K. E.; O'Handley, C.; Marks, F.

    2016-12-01

    This talk presents analysis of the Doppler Wind Lidar (DWL) measured wind profiles in Tropical Storm (TS) Erika (2015) by NOAA's P3 aircraft. This work was funded by NOAA's Sandy Supplemental Program that supports new technologies such as the DWL for hurricane research. It is for the first time, the DWL onboard a NOAA P3 has become operational in hurricane reconnaissance missions and collected high-quality wind profile data. The DWL wind profiles were first verified against the collocated dropsonde and Doppler radar observations, showing good agreement. To the authors' knowledge, the DWL data collected in TS Erika provided the best data coverage in the boundary layer of any given TS. This data set allows us to investigate the detailed boundary layer structure, including the boundary layer height, the strength of the inflow and outflow, and their asymmetric distributions. Composite analysis of the DWL data shows that the axisymmetric boundary layer structure of TS Erika is largely different from that of a typical hurricane from previous dropsonde observations. The vorticity budget conducted using the DWL data suggests that the boundary layer of TS Erika is far from being in vorticity balance. The large magnitude of boundary-layer divergence and the small magnitude of mass flux above the boundary layer may explain why TS Erika did not intensify during the period of observation. The boundary-layer structure asymmetry is found to be tied to the vortex tilt that is induced by the environmental vertical wind shear.

  19. Metric of the 2–6 day sea-surface temperature response to wind stress in the Tropical Pacific and its sensitivity to the K-Profile Parameterization of vertical mixing

    KAUST Repository

    Wagman, Benjamin M.

    2014-05-04

    Uncertainty in wind forcing has long hampered direct tests of ocean model output against observations for the purpose of refining the boundary layer K-Profile Parameterization (KPP) of oceanic vertical mixing. Considered here is a short-term metric that could be sensitive to the ways in which the KPP directly affects the adjustment of sea surface temperatures for a given change in wind stress. In particular a metric is developed based on the lagged correlation between the 2–6 day filtered wind stress and sea surface temperature. The metric is normalized by estimated observational and model uncertainties such that the significance of differences may be assessed. For this purpose multiple wind reanalysis products and their blended combinations were used to represent the range of forcing uncertainty, while perturbed KPP parameter model runs explore the sensitivity of the metric to the parameterization of vertical mixing. The correlation metric is sensitive to perturbations to most KPP parameters, in ways that accord with expectations, although only a few parameters show a sensitivity on the same order as the sensitivity to switching between wind products. This suggests that uncertainties in wind forcing continue to be a significant limitation for applying direct observational tests of KPP physics. Moreover, model correlations are biased high, suggesting that the model lacks or does not resolve sources of variability on the 2–6 day time scale.

  20. Shear Thinning in Xenon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergm Robert F.; Moldover, Michael R.; Yao, Minwu; Zimmerli, Gregory A.

    2009-01-01

    We measured shear thinning, a viscosity decrease ordinarily associated with complex liquids such as molten plastics or ketchup, near the critical point of xenon. The data span a wide range of dimensionless shear rate: the product of the shear rate and the relaxation time of critical fluctuations was greater than 0.001 and was less than 700. As predicted by theory, shear thinning occurred when this product was greater than 1. The measurements were conducted aboard the Space Shuttle Columbia to avoid the density stratification caused by Earth's gravity.

  1. Aeroservoelasticity of wind turbines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Skovmose Kallesoee, B.

    2007-12-14

    This thesis deals with the fundamental aeroelastic interaction between structural motion, Pitch action and control for a wind turbine blade. As wind turbines become larger, the interaction between pitch action, blade motion, aerodynamic forces, and control become even more important to understand and address. The main contribution of this thesis is the development of an aeroelastic blade model which on the one hand includes the important effects of steady state blade deformation, gravity and pitch action, and on the other it is transparent, suitable for analytical analysis and parameter studies, and furthermore linear and therefore suitable for control design. The development of the primary aeroelastic blade model is divided into four steps: 1) Nonlinear partial differential equations (PDEs) of structural blade motion are derived together with equations of pitch action and rotor speed; the individual terms in these equations are discussed and given physical interpretations; 2) Steady state blade deformation and induced velocities are computed by combining the PDEs with a steady state aerodynamic model; 3) Aeroelastic modes of motion are computed by combining the linearized PDEs with a linear unsteady aerodynamic model; this model is used to analyze how blade deformation effects the modes of motion; and 4) the linear aeroelastic blade model is derived by a modal expansion of the linearized PDEs combined with a linear unsteady aerodynamic model. The aeroelastic blade model has many similarities to a 2D blade section model, and it can be used instead of this in many applications, giving a transparent connection to a real wind turbine blade. In this work the aeroelastic blade model is used to analyze interaction between pitch action, blade motion and wind speed variations. Furthermore the model is used to develop a state estimator for estimating the wind speed and wind shear, and to suggest a load reducing controller. The state estimator estimates the wind shear very

  2. Wind models for the NSTS ascent trajectory biasing for wind load alleviation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, O. E.; Adelfang, S. I.; Batts, G. W.

    1990-01-01

    New concepts are presented for aerospace vehicle ascent wind profile biasing. The purpose for wind biasing the ascent trajectory is to provide ascent wind loads relief and thus decrease the probability for launch delays due to wind loads exceeding critical limits. Wind biasing trajectories to the the profile of monthly mean winds have been widely used for this purpose. The wind profile models presented give additional alternatives for wind biased trajectories. They are derived from the properties of the bivariate normal probability function using the available wind statistical parameters for the launch site. The analytical expressions are presented to permit generalizations. Specific examples are given to illustrate the procedures. The wind profile models can be used to establish the ascent trajectory steering commands to guide the vehicle through the first stage. For the National Space Transportation System (NSTS) program these steering commands are called I-loads.

  3. Sensitivity of Turbine-Height Wind Speeds to Parameters in Planetary Boundary-Layer and Surface-Layer Schemes in the Weather Research and Forecasting Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Ben; Qian, Yun; Berg, Larry K.; Ma, Po-Lun; Wharton, Sonia; Bulaevskaya, Vera; Yan, Huiping; Hou, Zhangshuan; Shaw, William J.

    2016-07-21

    We evaluate the sensitivity of simulated turbine-height winds to 26 parameters applied in a planetary boundary layer (PBL) scheme and a surface layer scheme of the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model over an area of complex terrain during the Columbia Basin Wind Energy Study. An efficient sampling algorithm and a generalized linear model are used to explore the multiple-dimensional parameter space and quantify the parametric sensitivity of modeled turbine-height winds. The results indicate that most of the variability in the ensemble simulations is contributed by parameters related to the dissipation of the turbulence kinetic energy (TKE), Prandtl number, turbulence length scales, surface roughness, and the von Kármán constant. The relative contributions of individual parameters are found to be dependent on both the terrain slope and atmospheric stability. The parameter associated with the TKE dissipation rate is found to be the most important one, and a larger dissipation rate can produce larger hub-height winds. A larger Prandtl number results in weaker nighttime winds. Increasing surface roughness reduces the frequencies of both extremely weak and strong winds, implying a reduction in the variability of the wind speed. All of the above parameters can significantly affect the vertical profiles of wind speed, the altitude of the low-level jet and the magnitude of the wind shear strength. The wind direction is found to be modulated by the same subset of influential parameters. Remainder of abstract is in attachment.

  4. Propagation of low-level jet's signals across the wind turbine structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutierrez, Walter; Ruiz-Columbie, Arquimedes; Tutkun, Murat; Castillo, Luciano

    2017-11-01

    Low-level jets (LLJs) are identified as relative maxima in the vertical profile of the horizontal wind speed at the top of the stable boundary layer. Such peaks constitute major power resources, since they are observed at altitudes within the heights of commercial-size wind turbines (e.g., 40m and 100 m). However, the stronger wind speed and the stronger wind shear below the peak altitude can also increase the mechanical loading on the wind turbine. Moreover, LLJs can act as a carrier of firm frequencies that can excite several of the turbine's parts. How those loads and frequencies are replicated along the turbine's structure has not been thoroughly studied. Using high-frequency data of actual atmospheric LLJ as input for the NREL aeroelastic simulator FAST, together with spectral analysis, we determine how the signal from the incoming wind is first created at the elements facing the wind and then transported across all turbine's parts. We found that the tower is the main source of perturbation breaking the symmetry of many of the turbine's responses. Results from this research can provide a better understanding of how several LLJ's features act to exacerbate or mitigate the damages on turbine's parts. NSF-CBET #1157246, NSF-CMMI #1100948, and NSF-OISE-1243482.

  5. Advancements in Wind Integration Study Data Modeling: The Wind Integration National Dataset (WIND) Toolkit; Preprint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Draxl, C.; Hodge, B. M.; Orwig, K.; Jones, W.; Searight, K.; Getman, D.; Harrold, S.; McCaa, J.; Cline, J.; Clark, C.

    2013-10-01

    Regional wind integration studies in the United States require detailed wind power output data at many locations to perform simulations of how the power system will operate under high-penetration scenarios. The wind data sets that serve as inputs into the study must realistically reflect the ramping characteristics, spatial and temporal correlations, and capacity factors of the simulated wind plants, as well as be time synchronized with available load profiles. The Wind Integration National Dataset (WIND) Toolkit described in this paper fulfills these requirements. A wind resource dataset, wind power production time series, and simulated forecasts from a numerical weather prediction model run on a nationwide 2-km grid at 5-min resolution will be made publicly available for more than 110,000 onshore and offshore wind power production sites.

  6. Two improvements to the dynamic wake meandering model: including the effects of atmospheric shear on wake turbulence and incorporating turbulence build-up in a row of wind turbines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Keck, Rolf-Erik; de Mare, Martin Tobias; Churchfield, Matthew J.

    2015-01-01

    The dynamic wake meandering (DWM) model is an engineering wake model designed to physically model the wake deficit evolution and the unsteady meandering that occurs in wind turbine wakes. The present study aims at improving two features of the model: The effect of the atmospheric boundary layer s...

  7. Influence of the wind direction on the chloride profiles of structures close to the Caribbean Sea. The case of the Turiguanó- Coco Key Viaduct in Cuba

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pérez García, E. J.

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available Interpretation of chlorides profiles is important to predict concrete structures service life, among other factors. However, reported results are, in general, from small specimens exposed to specific atmospheres instead of real structures. The objective of this work was the obtention and interpretation of the chlorides profiles forms from several bridges of the Turiguanó-Coco Key viaduct in Cuba. The results verified data from other authors but on different structural elements and similar atmospheres. The form of the chloride profile for structures similar to those in the viaduct bridges, exposed to tropical marine atmosphere, is consistent and changes in intensity with the winds direction and the blocking to them by parts of the structure. The possible effect of the wet and drying process is also discussed.

    En años recientes se le ha dado importancia a la interpretación de los perfiles de cloruros en el hormigón armado con fines de predicción de vida útil, entre otros. Sin embargo, los datos que se han constatado pertenecen, por lo general, a experimentos sobre probetas que han sido expuestas, por un tiempo determinado, a atmósferas específicas más que a estructuras reales. El objetivo de este trabajo fue la obtención e interpretación de la forma de los perfiles de cloruros de varios puentes del viaducto Turiguanó-Cayo Coco en Cuba. Los resultados ratificaron los datos encontrados por otros autores en otros elementos y ambientes similares, pero en un tipo de estructura diferente. En todos los casos estudiados se pudo verificar que, la forma del perfil de concentración de cloruros para estructuras similares a los puentes del viaducto estudiado expuestas a un ambiente tropical marino, es consistente y cambia de intensidad con la dirección de los vientos y del apantallamiento a los mismos por parte de la estructura y de sus partes. Se discute el posible efecto del mojado y secado.

  8. On the asymmetric distribution of shear-relative typhoon rainfall

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Si; Zhai, Shunan; Li, Tim; Chen, Zhifan

    2018-02-01

    The Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) 3B42 precipitation, the National Centers for Environmental Prediction (NCEP) Final analysis and the Regional Specialized Meteorological Center (RSMC) Tokyo best-track data during 2000-2015 are used to compare spatial rainfall distribution associated with Northwest Pacific tropical cyclones (TCs) with different vertical wind shear directions and investigate possible mechanisms. Results show that the maximum TC rainfall are all located in the downshear left quadrant regardless of shear direction, and TCs with easterly shear have greater magnitudes of rainfall than those with westerly shear, consistent with previous studies. Rainfall amount of a TC is related to its relative position and proximity from the western Pacific subtropical high (WPSH) and the intensity of water vapor transport, and low-level jet is favorable for water vapor transport. The maximum of vertically integrated moisture flux convergence (MFC) are located on the downshear side regardless of shear direction, and the contribution of wind convergence to the total MFC is far larger than that of moisture advection. The cyclonic displacement of the maximum rainfall relative to the maximum MFC is possibly due to advection of hydrometeors by low- and middle-level cyclonic circulation of TCs. The relationship between TC rainfall and the WPSH through water vapor transport and vertical wind shear implies that TC rainfall may be highly predictable given the high predictability of the WPSH.

  9. An integrated modeling method for wind turbines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fadaeinedjad, Roohollah

    To study the interaction of the electrical, mechanical, and aerodynamic aspects of a wind turbine, a detailed model that considers all these aspects must be used. A drawback of many studies in the area of wind turbine simulation is that either a very simple mechanical model is used with a detailed electrical model, or vice versa. Hence the interactions between electrical and mechanical aspects of wind turbine operation are not accurately taken into account. In this research, it will be shown that a combination of different simulation packages, namely TurbSim, FAST, and Simulink can be used to model the aerodynamic, mechanical, and electrical aspects of a wind turbine in detail. In this thesis, after a review of some wind turbine concepts and software tools, a simulation structure is proposed for studying wind turbines that integrates the mechanical and electrical components of a wind energy conversion device. Based on the simulation structure, a comprehensive model for a three-bladed variable speed wind turbine with doubly-fed induction generator is developed. Using the model, the impact of a voltage sag on the wind turbine tower vibration is investigated under various operating conditions such as power system short circuit level, mechanical parameters, and wind turbine operating conditions. It is shown how an electrical disturbance can cause more sustainable tower vibrations under high speed and turbulent wind conditions, which may disrupt the operation of pitch control system. A similar simulation structure is used to model a two-bladed fixed speed wind turbine with an induction generator. An extension of the concept is introduced by adding a diesel generator system. The model is utilized to study the impact of the aeroelastic aspects of wind turbine (i.e. tower shadow, wind shears, yaw error, turbulence, and mechanical vibrations) on the power quality of a stand-alone wind-diesel system. Furthermore, an IEEE standard flickermeter model is implemented in a

  10. Colloidal Aggregate Structure under Shear by USANS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatterjee, Tirtha; van Dyk, Antony K.; Ginzburg, Valeriy V.; Nakatani, Alan I.

    2015-03-01

    Paints are complex formulations of polymeric binders, inorganic pigments, dispersants, surfactants, colorants, rheology modifiers, and other additives. A commercially successful paint exhibits a desired viscosity profile over a wide shear rate range from 10-5 s-1 for settling to >104 s-1 for rolling, and spray applications. Understanding paint formulation structure is critical as it governs the paint viscosity profile. However, probing paint formulation structure under shear is a challenging task due to the formulation complexity containing structures with different hierarchical length scales and their alterations under the influence of an external flow field. In this work mesoscale structures of paint formulations under shear are investigated using Ultra Small-Angle Neutron Scattering (rheo-USANS). Contrast match conditions were utilized to independently probe the structure of latex binder particle aggregates and the TiO2 pigment particle aggregates. Rheo-USANS data revealed that the aggregates are fractal in nature and their self-similarity dimensions and correlations lengths depend on the chemistry of the binder particles, the type of rheology modifier present and the shear stress imposed upon the formulation. These results can be explained in the framework of diffusion and reaction limited transient aggregates structure evolution under simple shear.

  11. Wind energy renewable energy and the environment

    CERN Document Server

    Nelson, Vaughn; Nelson, Vaughn

    2009-01-01

    Due to the mounting demand for energy and increasing population of the world, switching from nonrenewable fossil fuels to other energy sources is not an option-it is a necessity. Focusing on a cost-effective option for the generation of electricity, Wind Energy: Renewable Energy and the Environment covers all facets of wind energy and wind turbines. The book begins by outlining the history of wind energy, before providing reasons to shift from fossil fuels to renewable energy. After examining the characteristics of wind, such as shear, power potential, and turbulence, it discusses the measur

  12. Shear thinning in non-Brownian suspensions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatté, Guillaume; Comtet, Jean; Niguès, Antoine; Bocquet, Lydéric; Siria, Alessandro; Ducouret, Guylaine; Lequeux, François; Lenoir, Nicolas; Ovarlez, Guillaume; Colin, Annie

    2018-02-14

    We study the flow of suspensions of non-Brownian particles dispersed into a Newtonian solvent. Combining capillary rheometry and conventional rheometry, we evidence a succession of two shear thinning regimes separated by a shear thickening one. Through X-ray radiography measurements, we show that during each of those regimes, the flow remains homogeneous and does not involve particle migration. Using a quartz-tuning fork based atomic force microscope, we measure the repulsive force profile and the microscopic friction coefficient μ between two particles immersed into the solvent, as a function of normal load. Coupling measurements from those three techniques, we propose that (1) the first shear-thinning regime at low shear rates occurs for a lubricated rheology and can be interpreted as a decrease of the effective volume fraction under increasing particle pressures, due to short-ranged repulsive forces and (2) the second shear thinning regime after the shear-thickening transition occurs for a frictional rheology and can be interpreted as stemming from a decrease of the microscopic friction coefficient at large normal load.

  13. Self-organization of large-scale ULF electromagnetic wave structures in their interaction with nonuniform zonal winds in the ionospheric E region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aburjania, G. D.; Chargazia, Kh. Z.

    2011-01-01

    A study is made of the generation and subsequent linear and nonlinear evolution of ultralow-frequency planetary electromagnetic waves in the E region of a dissipative ionosphere in the presence of a nonuniform zonal wind (a sheared flow). Hall currents flowing in the E region and such permanent global factors as the spatial nonuniformity of the geomagnetic field and of the normal component of the Earth’s angular velocity give rise to fast and slow planetary-scale electromagnetic waves. The efficiency of the linear amplification of planetary electromagnetic waves in their interaction with a nonuniform zonal wind is analyzed. When there are sheared flows, the operators of linear problems are non-self-conjugate and the corresponding eigenfunctions are nonorthogonal, so the canonical modal approach is poorly suited for studying such motions and it is necessary to utilize the so-called nonmodal mathematical analysis. It is shown that, in the linear evolutionary stage, planetary electromagnetic waves efficiently extract energy from the sheared flow, thereby substantially increasing their amplitude and, accordingly, energy. The criterion for instability of a sheared flow in an ionospheric medium is derived. As the shear instability develops and the perturbation amplitude grows, a nonlinear self-localization mechanism comes into play and the process ends with the self-organization of nonlinear, highly localized, solitary vortex structures. The system thus acquires a new degree of freedom, thereby providing a new way for the perturbation to evolve in a medium with a sheared flow. Depending on the shape of the sheared flow velocity profile, nonlinear structures can be either purely monopole vortices or vortex streets against the background of the zonal wind. The accumulation of such vortices can lead to a strongly turbulent state in an ionospheric medium.

  14. Wind height distribution influence on offshore wind farm feasibility study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benassai, Guido; Della Morte, Renata; Matarazzo, Antonio; Cozzolino, Luca

    2015-04-01

    The economic feasibility of offshore wind power utilization depends on the favourable wind conditions offshore as compared to sites on land. The higher wind speeds have to compensate the additional cost of offshore developments. However, not only the mean wind speed is different, but the whole flow regime, as can be seen in the vertical wind speed profile. The commonly used models to describe this profile have been developed mainly for land sites, so they have to be verified on the basis of field data. Monin-Obukhov theory is often used for the description of the wind speed profile at a different height with respect to a measurement height. Starting from the former, , the profile is predicted using two parameters, Obukhov length and sea surface roughness. For situations with near-neutral and stable atmospheric stratification and long (>30km) fetch, the wind speed increase with height is larger than what is predicted from Monin-Obukhov theory. It is also found that this deviation occurs at wind speeds important for wind power utilization, mainly at 5-9 ms-1. In the present study the influence of these aspects on the potential site productivity of an offshore wind farm were investigated, namely the deviation from the theory of Monin-Obukhov due to atmospheric stability and the influence of the fetch length on the Charnock model. Both these physical effects were discussed and examined in view of a feasibility study of a site for offshore wind farm in Southern Italy. Available data consisted of time histories of wind speeds and directions collected by National Tidegauge Network (Rete Mareografica Nazionale) at the height of 10m a.s.l. in ports. The theory of Monin-Obukhov was used to extrapolate the data to the height of the wind blades, while the Charnock model was used to extend the wind speed on the sea surface from the friction velocity on the ground. The models described were used to perform calculations for a feasibility study of an offshore wind farm in Southern

  15. The vertical structure of airflow turbulence characteristics within a boundary layer during wind blown sand transport over a beach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Z. S.; Baas, A. C.; Jackson, D.; Cooper, J. A.; Lynch, K.; Delgado-Fernandez, I.; Beyers, M.

    2010-12-01

    Recent studies have suggested the significant role of boundary layer turbulence and coherent flow structures on sand transport by wind over beaches and desert dunes. Widespread use of sonic anemometry and high-frequency sand transport sensors and traps have facilitated a move beyond the basic monitoring of shear velocities and bulk sediment transport to more detailed measurements at much higher spatio-temporal resolutions. In this paper we present results of a small-scale point-location field study of boundary layer turbulence and shear stresses conducted under obliquely onshore winds over a beach at Magilligan Strand, Northern Ireland. High-frequency (25 Hz) 3D wind vector measurements were collected at five different heights between 0.13 and 1.67 metres above the bed using sonic anemometry for durations of several hours, and the associated sand transport response was measured using an array of Safires. The wind data are used to investigate the vertical structure of Reynolds shear stresses and burst-sweep event characteristics, as well as a comparison with the standard logarithmic (law-of-the-wall) wind profile. The study explores the identification and selection of a characteristic event duration based on integral time-scales as well as spectral analysis, and includes an assessment of the issues involved with data rotations for yaw, pitch, and roll corrections relative to flow streamlines, and the subsequently derived turbulence parameters based on fluctuating vector components (u’, v’, w’). Results show how the contributions to shear stress and the average pitch of bursts and sweeps changes as a function of height above the bed, indicating the transformation of top-down turbulent eddies as they travel toward the surface. A comparison between the turbulence data and the synchronous sand transport events, meanwhile, reveals the potential effects of enhanced saltation layer roughness feedback on eddies close to the bed.

  16. Wind Energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodriguez D, J.M.

    1998-01-01

    The general theory of the wind energy conversion systems is presented. The availability of the wind resource in Colombia and the ranges of the speed of the wind in those which is possible economically to use the wind turbines are described. It is continued with a description of the principal technological characteristics of the wind turbines and are split into wind power and wind-powered pumps; and its use in large quantities grouped in wind farms or in autonomous systems. Finally, its costs and its environmental impact are presented

  17. Early stages of wind wave and drift current generation under non-stationary wind conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robles-Diaz, Lucia; Ocampo-Torres, Francisco J.; Branger, Hubert

    2016-04-01

    Generation and amplification mechanisms of ocean waves are well understood under constant wind speed or limited fetch conditions. Under these situations, the momentum and energy transfers from air to water are also quite well known. However during the wind field evolution over the ocean, we may observe sometime high wind acceleration/deceleration situations (e.g. Mexican Tehuano or Mediterranean Mistral wind systems). The evolution of wave systems under these conditions is not well understood. The purpose of these laboratory experiments is to better understand the early stages of water-waves and surface-drift currents under non-stationary wind conditions and to determine the balance between transfers creating waves and surface currents during non-equilibrium situations. The experiments were conducted in the Institut Pythéas wind-wave facility in Marseille-France. The wave tank is 40 m long, 2.7 m wide and 1 m deep. The air section is 50 m long, 3 m wide and 1.8 m height. We used 11 different resistive wave-gauges located along the tank. The momentum fluxes in the air column were estimated from single and X hot-film anemometer measurements. The sampling frequency for wind velocity and surface displacement measurements was 256 Hz. Water-current measurements were performed with a profiling velocimeter. This device measures the first 3.5 cm of the water column with a frequency rate of 100Hz. During the experiments, the wind intensity was abruptly modified with a constant acceleration and deceleration over time. We observed that wind drag coefficient values for accelerated wind periods are lower than the ones reported in previous studies for constant wind speed (Large and Pond 1981; Ocampo-Torres et al. 2010; Smith 1980; Yelland and Taylor 1996). This is probably because the turbulent boundary layer is not completely developed during the increasing-wind sequence. As it was reported in some theoretical studies (Miles 1957; Phillips 1957; Kahma and Donelan 1988), we

  18. Wind Characteristics of Three Meteorological Stations in China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Yang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available With rapid economic development of China, demand for energy is growing rapidly. Many experts have begun to pay attention on exploiting wind energy. Wind characteristics of three meteorological stations in China were analyzed to find out if or not it is possible to build a wind farm in this paper. First of all, studies about the wind characteristics and potential wind energy were summarized. Then ways of collecting and manipulating wind data were introduced. Wind-generation potential was assessed by the method of Weibull distribution. Wind shear exponent, extreme wind speed in 50 years, and turbulence intensity were calculated. The wind characteristics were summarized and assessment of wind-generation potential was given. At last, the wind was simulated with autoregressive method by Matlab software.

  19. Wind Turbines Adaptation to the Variability of the Wind Field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulianov, Yuriy; Martynenko, Gennadii; Misaylov, Vitaliy; Soliannikova, Iuliia

    2010-05-01

    WIND TURBINES ADAPTATION TO THE VARIABILITY OF THE WIND FIELD The subject of our scientific research is wind power turbines (WPT) with the horizontal axis which were now common in the world. Efficient wind turbines work is largely determined by non-stationarity of the wind field, expressed in its gustiness, the presence of vertical and horizontal shifts of wind speed and direction. At critical values of the wind parameters WPT has aerodynamic and mechanical overload, leading to breakdowns, premature wear and reduce the life of the wind turbine. To prevent accidents at the peak values of wind speed it is used the regulatory system of windwheels. WPT control systems provide a process orientation of the wind turbine rotor axis in the line of the mean wind. Wind turbines are also equipped with braking device used to protect against breakdowns when a significant increase in the wind. In general, all these methods of regulation are not always effective. Thus, in practice there may be situations when the wind speed is many times greater than the stated limit. For example, if there are microbursts in the atmospheric boundary layer, low-level wind shears caused by its gust front, storms, etc. It is required for a wind power turbine adaptation to intensive short-term wind impulses and considerable vertical wind shifts that the data about them shall be obtained ahead of time. To do this it is necessary to have the information on the real structure of the wind field in the area of the blade sweep for the minimum range against the wind that is determined by the mean speed and the system action time. The implementation of acoustic and laser traditional wind sounding systems is limited by ambient acoustic noise, by heavy rain, snowfall and by fog. There are free of these disadvantages the inclined radioacoustic sounding (IRASS) technique which works for a system of remote detection and control of wind gusts. IRASS technique is realized as low-potential Doppler pulse radar

  20. Nonlocal response functions for predicting shear flow of strongly inhomogeneous fluids. I. Sinusoidally driven shear and sinusoidally driven inhomogeneity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glavatskiy, Kirill S; Dalton, Benjamin A; Daivis, Peter J; Todd, B D

    2015-06-01

    We present theoretical expressions for the density, strain rate, and shear pressure profiles in strongly inhomogeneous fluids undergoing steady shear flow with periodic boundary conditions. The expressions that we obtain take the form of truncated functional expansions. In these functional expansions, the independent variables are the spatially sinusoidal longitudinal and transverse forces that we apply in nonequilibrium molecular-dynamics simulations. The longitudinal force produces strong density inhomogeneity, and the transverse force produces sinusoidal shear. The functional expansions define new material properties, the response functions, which characterize the system's nonlocal response to the longitudinal force and the transverse force. We find that the sinusoidal longitudinal force, which is mainly responsible for the generation of density inhomogeneity, also modulates the strain rate and shear pressure profiles. Likewise, we find that the sinusoidal transverse force, which is mainly responsible for the generation of sinusoidal shear flow, can also modify the density. These cross couplings between density inhomogeneity and shear flow are also characterized by nonlocal response functions. We conduct nonequilibrium molecular-dynamics simulations to calculate all of the response functions needed to describe the response of the system for weak shear flow in the presence of strong density inhomogeneity up to the third order in the functional expansion. The response functions are then substituted directly into the truncated functional expansions and used to predict the density, velocity, and shear pressure profiles. The results are compared to the directly evaluated profiles from molecular-dynamics simulations, and we find that the predicted profiles from the truncated functional expansions are in excellent agreement with the directly computed density, velocity, and shear pressure profiles.

  1. Nonlocal response functions for predicting shear flow of strongly inhomogeneous fluids. I. Sinusoidally driven shear and sinusoidally driven inhomogeneity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glavatskiy, Kirill S.; Dalton, Benjamin A.; Daivis, Peter J.; Todd, B. D.

    2015-06-01

    We present theoretical expressions for the density, strain rate, and shear pressure profiles in strongly inhomogeneous fluids undergoing steady shear flow with periodic boundary conditions. The expressions that we obtain take the form of truncated functional expansions. In these functional expansions, the independent variables are the spatially sinusoidal longitudinal and transverse forces that we apply in nonequilibrium molecular-dynamics simulations. The longitudinal force produces strong density inhomogeneity, and the transverse force produces sinusoidal shear. The functional expansions define new material properties, the response functions, which characterize the system's nonlocal response to the longitudinal force and the transverse force. We find that the sinusoidal longitudinal force, which is mainly responsible for the generation of density inhomogeneity, also modulates the strain rate and shear pressure profiles. Likewise, we find that the sinusoidal transverse force, which is mainly responsible for the generation of sinusoidal shear flow, can also modify the density. These cross couplings between density inhomogeneity and shear flow are also characterized by nonlocal response functions. We conduct nonequilibrium molecular-dynamics simulations to calculate all of the response functions needed to describe the response of the system for weak shear flow in the presence of strong density inhomogeneity up to the third order in the functional expansion. The response functions are then substituted directly into the truncated functional expansions and used to predict the density, velocity, and shear pressure profiles. The results are compared to the directly evaluated profiles from molecular-dynamics simulations, and we find that the predicted profiles from the truncated functional expansions are in excellent agreement with the directly computed density, velocity, and shear pressure profiles.

  2. The Use of MERRA-2 Near Surface Meteorology to Understand the Behavior of Planetary Boundary Layer heights Derived from Wind Profiler Data Over the US Great Plains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molod, A.; Salmun, H.; Collow, A.

    2017-12-01

    The atmospheric general circulation model (GCM) that underlies the MERRA-2 reanalysis includesa suite of physical parameterizations that describe the processes that occur in theplanetary boundary layer (PBL). The data assimilation system assures that the atmosphericstate variables used as input to these parameterizations are constrained to the bestfit to all of the available observations. Many studies, however, have shown that the GCM-based estimates of MERRA-2 PBL heights are biased high, and so are not reliable forapplication related to constituent transport or the carbon cycle.A new 20-year record of PBL heights was derived from Wind Profiler (WP) backscatter data measuredat a wide network of stations throughout the US Great Plains and has been validated against independent estimates. The behavior of these PBL heights shows geographical and temporalvariations that are difficult to attribute to particular physical processes withoutadditional information that are not part of the observational record.In the present study, we use information on physical processes from MERRA-2 to understand the behavior of the WP derived PBL heights. The behavior of the annual cycle of both MERRA-2 and WP PBL heights shows three classes of behavior: (i) canonical, where the annual cyclefollows the annual cycle of the sun, (ii) delayed, where the PBL height reaches its annual maximum after the annual maximum of the solar insolation, and (iii) double maxima, wherethe PBL height begins to rise with the solar insolation but falls sometimes during the the summer and then rises again. Although the magnitude of these types of variations isdescribed by the WP PBL record, the explanation for these behaviors and the relationshipto local precipitation, temperature, hydrology and sensible and latent heat fluxes is articulated using information from MERRA-2.

  3. Bed shear stress distribution in straight channels with arbitrary cross section

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Henrik Bo; Fredsøe, Jørgen

    1998-01-01

    The bed shear stress distribution in straight open channels is affected by mechanisms as bed curvature of the cross section profile, shear diffusion, and secondary currents. This paper compares some analytical and numerical methods to estimate the bed shear stress distribution. The methods...

  4. Influence of wind conditions on wind turbine loads and measurement of turbulence using lidars

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sathe, A.R.

    2012-01-01

    Variations in wind conditions influence the loads on wind turbines significantly. In order to determine these loads it is important that the external conditions are well understood. Wind lidars are well developed nowadays to measure wind profiles upwards from the surface. But how turbulence can be

  5. Assessment of Wind Parameter Sensitivity on Ultimate and Fatigue Wind Turbine Loads: Preprint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robertson, Amy N [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Sethuraman, Latha [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Jonkman, Jason [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Quick, Julian [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2018-02-13

    Wind turbines are designed using a set of simulations to ascertain the structural loads that the turbine could encounter. While mean hub-height wind speed is considered to vary, other wind parameters such as turbulence spectra, sheer, veer, spatial coherence, and component correlation are fixed or conditional values that, in reality, could have different characteristics at different sites and have a significant effect on the resulting loads. This paper therefore seeks to assess the sensitivity of different wind parameters on the resulting ultimate and fatigue loads on the turbine during normal operational conditions. Eighteen different wind parameters are screened using an Elementary Effects approach with radial points. As expected, the results show a high sensitivity of the loads to the turbulence standard deviation in the primary wind direction, but the sensitivity to wind shear is often much greater. To a lesser extent, other wind parameters that drive loads include the coherence in the primary wind direction and veer.

  6. A New Approach for Offshore Wind Farm Energy Yields Calculation with Mixed Hub Height Wind Turbines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hou, Peng; Hu, Weihao; Soltani, Mohsen

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, a mathematical model for calculating the energy yields of offshore wind farm with mixed types of wind turbines is proposed. The Jensen model is selected as the base and developed to a three dimension wake model to estimate the energy yields. Since the wind turbines are with differe...... hub heights, the wind shear effect is also taken into consideration. The results show that the proposed wake model is effective in calculating the wind speed deficit. The calculation framework is applicable for energy yields calculation in offshore wind farms.......In this paper, a mathematical model for calculating the energy yields of offshore wind farm with mixed types of wind turbines is proposed. The Jensen model is selected as the base and developed to a three dimension wake model to estimate the energy yields. Since the wind turbines are with different...

  7. Assessment of Wind Parameter Sensitivity on Extreme and Fatigue Wind Turbine Loads

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robertson, Amy N [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Sethuraman, Latha [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Jonkman, Jason [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Quick, Julian [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2018-01-12

    Wind turbines are designed using a set of simulations to ascertain the structural loads that the turbine could encounter. While mean hub-height wind speed is considered to vary, other wind parameters such as turbulence spectra, sheer, veer, spatial coherence, and component correlation are fixed or conditional values that, in reality, could have different characteristics at different sites and have a significant effect on the resulting loads. This paper therefore seeks to assess the sensitivity of different wind parameters on the resulting ultimate and fatigue loads on the turbine during normal operational conditions. Eighteen different wind parameters are screened using an Elementary Effects approach with radial points. As expected, the results show a high sensitivity of the loads to the turbulence standard deviation in the primary wind direction, but the sensitivity to wind shear is often much greater. To a lesser extent, other wind parameters that drive loads include the coherence in the primary wind direction and veer.

  8. On the self-organizing process of large scale shear flows

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Newton, Andrew P. L. [Department of Applied Maths, University of Sheffield, Sheffield, Yorkshire S3 7RH (United Kingdom); Kim, Eun-jin [School of Mathematics and Statistics, University of Sheffield, Sheffield, Yorkshire S3 7RH (United Kingdom); Liu, Han-Li [High Altitude Observatory, National Centre for Atmospheric Research, P. O. BOX 3000, Boulder, Colorado 80303-3000 (United States)

    2013-09-15

    Self organization is invoked as a paradigm to explore the processes governing the evolution of shear flows. By examining the probability density function (PDF) of the local flow gradient (shear), we show that shear flows reach a quasi-equilibrium state as its growth of shear is balanced by shear relaxation. Specifically, the PDFs of the local shear are calculated numerically and analytically in reduced 1D and 0D models, where the PDFs are shown to converge to a bimodal distribution in the case of finite correlated temporal forcing. This bimodal PDF is then shown to be reproduced in nonlinear simulation of 2D hydrodynamic turbulence. Furthermore, the bimodal PDF is demonstrated to result from a self-organizing shear flow with linear profile. Similar bimodal structure and linear profile of the shear flow are observed in gulf stream, suggesting self-organization.

  9. Analytical shear and flexion of Einasto dark matter haloes

    OpenAIRE

    Retana-Montenegro, E.; Frutos-Alfaro, F.; Baes, M.

    2012-01-01

    N-body simulations predict that dark matter haloes are described by specific density profiles on both galactic- and cluster-sized scales. Weak gravitational lensing through the measurements of their first and second order properties, shear and flexion, is a powerful observational tool for investigating the true shape of these profiles. One of the three-parameter density profiles recently favoured in the description of dark matter haloes is the Einasto profile. We present exact expressions for...

  10. Validation of Sodar Measurements for Wind Power

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Kurt Schaldemose

    2006-01-01

    A ground-based SODAR has been tested for 1½ years together with a traditional measurement set-up consisting of cups and vanes for measuring wind data for wind power assessment at a remote location. Many problems associated to the operation of a remote located SODAR have been solved during...... the project and a new remote power system has been designed. A direct comparison between SODAR and cup measurements revealed a limitation for the SODAR measurements during different weather conditions, especially since the SODAR was not able to measure wind speeds above 15 m/s due to an increasing back......-ground noise. Instead, using the SODAR as a profiler to establish representative wind speed profiles was successful. These wind speed profiles are combined with low height reference measurements to establish reliable hub height wind speed distributions. Representative wind speed profiles can be establish...

  11. Observations of Near-Surface Current Shear Help Describe Oceanic Oil and Plastic Transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laxague, Nathan J. M.; Ö-zgökmen, Tamay M.; Haus, Brian K.; Novelli, Guillaume; Shcherbina, Andrey; Sutherland, Peter; Guigand, Cédric M.; Lund, Björn; Mehta, Sanchit; Alday, Matias; Molemaker, Jeroen

    2018-01-01

    Plastics and spilled oil pose a critical threat to marine life and human health. As a result of wind forcing and wave motions, theoretical and laboratory studies predict very strong velocity variation with depth over the upper few centimeters of the water column, an observational blind spot in the real ocean. Here we present the first-ever ocean measurements of the current vector profile defined to within 1 cm of the free surface. In our illustrative example, the current magnitude averaged over the upper 1 cm of the ocean is shown to be nearly four times the average over the upper 10 m, even for mild forcing. Our findings indicate that this shear will rapidly separate pieces of marine debris which vary in size or buoyancy, making consideration of these dynamics essential to an improved understanding of the pathways along which marine plastics and oil are transported.

  12. Stochastic parametric resonance in shear flows

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. J. Poulin

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Time-periodic shear flows can give rise to Parametric Instability (PI, as in the case of the Mathieu equation (Stoker, 1950; Nayfeh and Mook, 1995. This mechanism results from a resonance between the oscillatory basic state and waves that are superimposed on it. Farrell and Ioannou (1996a, b explain that PI occurs because the snap-shots of the velocity profile are subject to transient growth. If the flows were purely steady the transient growth would subside and not have any long lasting effect. However, the coupling between transient growth and the time variation of the basic state create PI. Mathematically, transient growth, and therefore PI, are due to the nonorthogonal eigenspace in the linearized system. Poulin et al. (2003 studied a time-periodic barotropic shear flow that exhibited PI, and thereby produced mixing at the interface between Potential Vorticity (PV fronts. The instability led to the formation of vortices that were stretched. A later study of an oscillatory current in the Cape Cod Bay illustrated that PI can occur in realistic shear flows (Poulin and Flierl, 2005. These studies assumed that the basic state was periodic with a constant frequency and amplitude. In this work we study a shear flow similar to that found in Poulin et al. (2003, but now where the magnitude of vorticity is a stochastic variable. We determine that in the case of stochastic shear flows the transient growth of perturbations of the snapshots of the basic state still generate PI.

  13. Wind Power in Georgia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2012-11-01

    Georgia has good wind power potential. Preliminary analyses show that the technical wind power potential in Georgia is good. Meteorological data shows that Georgia has four main areas in Georgia with annual average wind speeds of over 6 m/s and two main areas with 5-6 m/s at 80m. The most promising areas are the high mountain zone of the Great Caucasus, The Kura river valley, The South-Georgian highland and the Southern part of the Georgian Black Sea coast. Czech company Wind Energy Invest has recently signed a Memorandum of Understanding with Georgian authorities for development of the first wind farm in Georgia, a 50MW wind park in Paravani, Southern Georgia, to be completed in 2014. Annual generation is estimated to 170.00 GWh and the investment estimated to 101 million US$. Wind power is suited to balance hydropower in the Georgian electricity sector Electricity generation in Georgia is dominated by hydro power, constituting 88% of total generation in 2009. Limited storage capacity and significant spring and summer peaks in river flows result in an uneven annual generation profile and winter time shortages that are covered by three gas power plants. Wind power is a carbon-free energy source well suited to balance hydropower, as it is available (often strongest) in the winter and can be exported when there is a surplus. Another advantage with wind power is the lead time for the projects; the time from site selection to operation for a wind power park (approximately 2.5 years) is much shorter than for hydro power (often 6-8 years). There is no support system or scheme for renewable sources in Georgia, so wind power has to compete directly with other energy sources and is in most cases more expensive to build than hydro power. In a country and region with rapidly increasing energy demands, the factors described above nevertheless indicate that there is a commercial niche and a role to play for Georgian wind power. Skra: An example of a wind power development

  14. Wind Structure and Wind Loading

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brorsen, Michael

    The purpose of this note is to provide a short description of wind, i.e. of the flow in the atmosphere of the Earth and the loading caused by wind on structures. The description comprises: causes to the generation of windhe interaction between wind and the surface of the Earthhe stochastic nature...... of windhe interaction between wind and structures, where it is shown that wind loading depends strongly on this interaction...

  15. Comparisons of Crosswind Velocity Profile Estimates Used in Fast-Time Wake Vortex Prediction Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pruis, Mathew J.; Delisi, Donald P.; Ahmad, Nashat N.

    2011-01-01

    Five methods for estimating crosswind profiles used in fast-time wake vortex prediction models are compared in this study. Previous investigations have shown that temporal and spatial variations in the crosswind vertical profile have a large impact on the transport and time evolution of the trailing vortex pair. The most important crosswind parameters are the magnitude of the crosswind and the gradient in the crosswind shear. It is known that pulsed and continuous wave lidar measurements can provide good estimates of the wind profile in the vicinity of airports. In this study comparisons are made between estimates of the crosswind profiles from a priori information on the trajectory of the vortex pair as well as crosswind profiles derived from different sensors and a regional numerical weather prediction model.

  16. Assessment of wind energy potential and cost estimation of wind-generated electricity at hilltops surrounding the city of Maroua in Cameroon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaoga, Dieudonné Kidmo; Bogno, Bachirou; Aillerie, Michel; Raidandi, Danwe; Yamigno, Serge Doka; Hamandjoda, Oumarou; Tibi, Beda

    2016-07-01

    In this work, 28 years of wind data, measured at 10m above ground level (AGL), from Maroua meteorological station is utilized to assess the potential of wind energy at exposed ridges tops of mountains surrounding the city of Maroua. The aim of this study is to estimate the cost of wind-generated electricity using six types of wind turbines (50 to 2000 kW). The Weibull distribution function is employed to estimate Weibull shape and scale parameters using the energy pattern factor method. The considered wind shear model to extrapolate Weibull parameters and wind profiles is the empirical power law correlation. The results show that hilltops in the range of 150-350m AGL in increments of 50, fall under Class 3 or greater of the international system of wind classification and are deemed suitable to outstanding for wind turbine applications. A performance of the selected wind turbines is examined as well as the costs of wind-generated electricity at the considered hilltops. The results establish that the lowest costs per kWh are obtained using YDF-1500-87 (1500 kW) turbine while the highest costs are delivered by P-25-100 (90 kW). The lowest costs (US) per kWh of electricity generated are found to vary between a minimum of 0.0294 at hilltops 350m AGL and a maximum of 0.0366 at hilltops 150m AGL, with corresponding energy outputs that are 6,125 and 4,932 MWh, respectively. Additionally, the matching capacity factors values are 38.05% at hilltops 150m AGL and 47.26% at hilltops 350m AGL. Furthermore, YDF-1500-87 followed by Enercon E82-2000 (2000 kW) wind turbines provide the lowest cost of wind generated electricity and are recommended for use for large communities. Medium wind turbine P-15-50 (50 kW), despite showing the best coefficients factors (39.29% and 48.85% at hilltops 150 and 350m AGL, in that order), generates electricity at an average higher cost/kWh of US0.0547 and 0.0440 at hilltops 150 and 350m AGL, respectively. P-15-50 is deemed a more advantageous option

  17. South Baltic Wind Atlas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pena Diaz, Alfredo; Hahmann, Andrea N.; Hasager, Charlotte Bay

    A first version of a wind atlas for the South Baltic Sea has been developed using the WRF mesoscale model and verified by data from tall Danish and German masts. Six different boundary-layer parametrization schemes were evaluated by comparing the WRF results to the observed wind profiles...... at the masts. The WRF modeling was done in a nested domain of high spatial resolution for 4 years. In addition the longterm wind statistics using the NCAR-NCEP reanalysis data were performed during 30 years to provide basis for a long-term adjustment of the results and the final WRF results include a weighting...... for the long-term trends variability in the South Baltic Sea. Observations from Earth observing satellites were used to evaluate the spatial resolution of the WRF model results near the surface. The QuikSCAT and the WRF results compared well whereas the Envisat ASAR mean wind map showed some variation...

  18. WHIRL WIND DETECTION AND IDENTIFICATION IN INDONESIA UTILIZING SINGLE POLARIZATION DOPPLER WEATHER RADAR VOLUMETRIC DATA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Ali

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Whirl wind occurrence frequency in Indonesia tends increasing in the last five years. Geospatial data from National Agency for Disaster Management (BNPB recorded 72 cases with the impact of the two victims died, ten injured, 485 people were evacuated, and 1285 buildings were destroyed at period of January-June 2015. Based on the impact, early warning through remote sensing by using single polarization Doppler weather radar is need to be efforted. Whirl wind detection is done by identifying the characteristic pattern of the rotating convective cloud system by hook echo, analyzing the exsistance of vortex and rotation, and the strength of turbulence. The results show horizontal wind profile with a rotational pattern at CAPPI (V and HWIND (V by the altitude of 0.5 km, strong turbulence through product CAPPI (W 0.5 km ranged of 1.75-2.05 ms-1, the vertical wind profile by product VVP (V with a maximum value updraft reaches more than 20 knots at a 100-200 meters height, strong horizontal wind shear through HSHEAR (V and CAPPI (HSHEAR altitude of 0.5 km with a range of 6.23 to 10.12 ms-1/km. SWI and SSA show that the cloud base height is very low ranged from 200-600 meters with a maximum reflectivity reached 61.5 dBZ by top cloud height reached 14 km, while the product CAPPI (Z 0.5 km and CMAX (Z is very difficult to identify patterns hook echo. The results of remote sensing are very representative with the physical properties of whirl wind even whirl wind in a smaller scale.

  19. Diagnosis of wind turbine rotor system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Niemann, Hans Henrik; Mirzaei, Mahmood; Henriksen, Lars Christian

    2016-01-01

    This paper describes a model free method for monitoring and fault diagnosis of the elements in a rotor system for a wind turbine. The diagnosis as well as the monitoring is done without using any model of the wind turbine and the applied controller or a description of the wind profile. The method...

  20. FACTS Devices for Large Wind Power Plants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Adamczyk, Andrzej Grzegorz; Teodorescu, Remus; Rodriguez, Pedro

    2010-01-01

    Growing number of wind turbines is changing electricity generation profile all over the world. However, high wind energy penetration affects power system safety and stability. For this reason transmission system operators (TSO) impose more stringent connection requirements on the wind power plant...

  1. Plasticity Approach to Shear Design

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hoang, Cao Linh; Nielsen, Mogens Peter

    1998-01-01

    The paper presents some plastic models for shear design of reinforced concrete beams. Distinction is made between two shear failure modes, namely web crushing and crack sliding. The first mentioned mode is met in beams with large shear reinforcement degrees. The mode of crack sliding is met in non......-shear reinforced beams as well as in lightly shear reinforced beams. For such beams the shear strength is determined by the recently developed crack sliding model. This model is based upon the hypothesis that cracks can be transformed into yield lines, which have lower sliding resistance than yield lines formed...

  2. Coexistence and transition between shear zones in slow granular flows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moosavi, Robabeh; Shaebani, M Reza; Maleki, Maniya; Török, János; Wolf, Dietrich E; Losert, Wolfgang

    2013-10-04

    We report experiments on slow granular flows in a split-bottom Couette cell that show novel strain localization features. Nontrivial flow profiles have been observed which are shown to be the consequence of simultaneous formation of shear zones in the bulk and at the boundaries. The fluctuating band model based on a minimization principle can be fitted to the experiments over a large variation of morphology and filling height with one single fit parameter, the relative friction coefficient μ(rel) between wall and bulk. The possibility of multiple shear zone formation is controlled by μ(rel). Moreover, we observe that the symmetry of an initial state, with coexisting shear zones at both side walls, breaks spontaneously below a threshold value of the shear velocity. A dynamical transition between two asymmetric flow states happens over a characteristic time scale which depends on the shear strength.

  3. Shear-induced inflation of coronal magnetic fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klimchuk, J.A.

    1990-01-01

    Using numerical models of force-free magnetic fields, the shearing of footprints in arcade geometries leading to an inflation of the coronal magnetic field was examined. For each of the shear profiles considered, all of the field lines become elevated compared with the potential field. This includes cases where the shear is concentrated well away from the arcade axis, such that B(sub z), the component of field parallel to the axis, increases outward to produce an inward B(sub z) squared/8 pi magnetic pressure gradient force. These results contrast with an earlier claim, shown to be incorrect, that field lines can sometimes become depressed as a result of shear. It is conjectured that an inflation of the entire field will always result from the shearing of simple arcade configurations. These results have implications for prominence formation, the interplanetary magnetic flux, and possibly also coronal holes. 38 refs

  4. Sheared Electroconvective Instability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwak, Rhokyun; Pham, Van Sang; Lim, Kiang Meng; Han, Jongyoon

    2012-11-01

    Recently, ion concentration polarization (ICP) and related phenomena draw attention from physicists, due to its importance in understanding electrochemical systems. Researchers have been actively studying, but the complexity of this multiscale, multiphysics phenomenon has been limitation for gaining a detailed picture. Here, we consider electroconvective(EC) instability initiated by ICP under pressure-driven flow, a scenario often found in electrochemical desalinations. Combining scaling analysis, experiment, and numerical modeling, we reveal unique behaviors of sheared EC: unidirectional vortex structures, its size selection and vortex propagation. Selected by balancing the external pressure gradient and the electric body force, which generates Hagen-Poiseuille(HP) flow and vortical EC, the dimensionless EC thickness scales as (φ2 /UHP)1/3. The pressure-driven flow(or shear) suppresses unfavorably-directed vortices, and simultaneously pushes favorably-directed vortices with constant speed, which is linearly proportional to the total shear of HP flow. This is the first systematic characterization of sheared EC, which has significant implications on the optimization of electrodialysis and other electrochemical systems.

  5. Sheared solid materials

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    cores eventually breaks the Peierls potential leading to slow relaxations in the stress and the free energy (aging). .... Figure 1 displays the stress–strain curves at constant shear rate ˙γ applied for t > 0 in units of µ0 and τ−1 ..... In particular, the slow structural relaxations evidently arise from migration of the free volume.

  6. Scaling of turbulence spectra measured in strong shear flow near the Earth’s surface

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mikkelsen, Torben Krogh; Larsen, Søren Ejling; Ejsing Jørgensen, Hans

    2017-01-01

    Within the lowest kilometer of the Earth's atmosphere, in the so-called atmospheric boundary layer, winds are often gusty and turbulent. Nearest to the ground, the turbulence is predominately generated by mechanical wall-bounded wind shear, whereas at higher altitudes turbulent mixing of heat......) their generation; (2) the cascade of energy across the spectrum from large- to small-scale; and (3) the eventual decay of turbulence into heat owing to viscosity effects on the Kolmogorov microscale, in which the eddy size is only a fraction of a millimeter. This paper addresses atmospheric turbulence spectra...... in the lowest part of the atmospheric boundary layer—the so-called surface layer—where the wind shear is strong owing to the nonslip condition at the ground. Theoretical results dating back to Tchen's early work in 1953 'on the spectrum of energy in turbulent shear flow' led Tchen to predict a shear production...

  7. A methodology for the design and testing of atmospheric boundary layer models for wind energy applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Sanz Rodrigo

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available The GEWEX Atmospheric Boundary Layer Studies (GABLS 1, 2 and 3 are used to develop a methodology for the design and testing of Reynolds-averaged Navier–Stokes (RANS atmospheric boundary layer (ABL models for wind energy applications. The first two GABLS cases are based on idealized boundary conditions and are suitable for verification purposes by comparing with results from higher-fidelity models based on large-eddy simulation. Results from three single-column RANS models, of 1st, 1.5th and 2nd turbulence closure order, show high consistency in predicting the mean flow. The third GABLS case is suitable for the study of these ABL models under realistic forcing such that validation versus observations from the Cabauw meteorological tower are possible. The case consists on a diurnal cycle that leads to a nocturnal low-level jet and addresses fundamental questions related to the definition of the large-scale forcing, the interaction of the ABL with the surface and the evaluation of model results with observations. The simulations are evaluated in terms of surface-layer fluxes and wind energy quantities of interest: rotor equivalent wind speed, hub-height wind direction, wind speed shear and wind direction veer. The characterization of mesoscale forcing is based on spatially and temporally averaged momentum budget terms from Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF simulations. These mesoscale tendencies are used to drive single-column models, which were verified previously in the first two GABLS cases, to first demonstrate that they can produce similar wind profile characteristics to the WRF simulations even though the physics are more simplified. The added value of incorporating different forcing mechanisms into microscale models is quantified by systematically removing forcing terms in the momentum and heat equations. This mesoscale-to-microscale modeling approach is affected, to a large extent, by the input uncertainties of the mesoscale

  8. Winds observed in the Northern European seas with wind lidars, meteorological masts and satellite

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hasager, Charlotte Bay; Stein, D.; Peña, Alfredo

    2013-01-01

    of them for up to two years when the project campaign ended. The NORSEWInD database on lidar data in total contains around 11 years worth of observations (> 280.000 10 min data). The wind lidars were mounted such that winds were mapped at or very near 100 m above sea level. The lidars provide wind profile...... directional bins. The latter resulted in so-called ‘alpha roses’, similar to wind roses but with the values of alpha given. Satellite ocean surface winds were collected from synthetic aperture radar (SAR), scatterometer and passive microwave instruments. All satellite wind data provide winds at 10 m above sea...

  9. Reinforced aerodynamic profile

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2010-01-01

    The present invention relates to the prevention of deformations in an aerodynamic profile caused by lack of resistance to the bending moment forces that are created when such a profile is loaded in operation. More specifically, the invention relates to a reinforcing element inside an aerodynamic...... profile and a method for the construction thereof. The profile is intended for, but not limited to, useas a wind turbine blade, an aerofoil device or as a wing profile used in the aeronautical industry....

  10. MODELING OF NONLINEAR CYCLIC LOAD BEHAVIOR OF I-SHAPED COMPOSITE STEEL-CONCRETE SHEAR WALLS OF NUCLEAR POWER PLANTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    AHMER ALI

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available In recent years steel-concrete composite shear walls have been widely used in enormous high-rise buildings. Due to high strength and ductility, enhanced stiffness, stable cycle characteristics and large energy absorption, such walls can be adopted in the auxiliary building; surrounding the reactor containment structure of nuclear power plants to resist lateral forces induced by heavy winds and severe earthquakes. This paper demonstrates a set of nonlinear numerical studies on I-shaped composite steel-concrete shear walls of the nuclear power plants subjected to reverse cyclic loading. A three-dimensional finite element model is developed using ABAQUS by emphasizing on constitutive material modeling and element type to represent the real physical behavior of complex shear wall structures. The analysis escalates with parametric variation in steel thickness sandwiching the stipulated amount of concrete panels. Modeling details of structural components, contact conditions between steel and concrete, associated boundary conditions and constitutive relationships for the cyclic loading are explained. Later, the load versus displacement curves, peak load and ultimate strength values, hysteretic characteristics and deflection profiles are verified with experimental data. The convergence of the numerical outcomes has been discussed to conclude the remarks.

  11. Glass panel under shear loading: use of glass envelopes in building stabilization

    OpenAIRE

    Mocibob, Danijel; Lebet, Jean-Paul

    2009-01-01

    The latest trends in contemporary architecture are fully transparent pavilions: a single storey building free of any steel or concrete frame, where glass panels are used as unique vertical structural elements to support the roof and as wind bracing to stabilize and stiffen the building. In this application, individual glass panel is supported on two sides (roof and foundation) and subjected to in-plane shear force (lateral wind), out-of-plane distributed load (perpendicular wind) and in-plane...

  12. Glass panel under shear loading: use of glass envelopes in building stabilization

    OpenAIRE

    Mocibob, Danijel

    2008-01-01

    The latest trends in contemporary architecture are fully transparent pavilions: a single storey building free of any steel or concrete frame, where glass panels are used as unique vertical structural elements to support the roof and as wind bracing to stabilize and stiffen the building. In this application, individual glass panel is supported on two sides (roof and foundation) and subjected to in-plane shear force (lateral wind), out-of-plane distributed load (perpendicular wind) and in-plane...

  13. Experiments on sheet metal shearing

    OpenAIRE

    Gustafsson, Emil

    2013-01-01

    Within the sheet metal industry, different shear cutting technologies are commonly used in several processing steps, e.g. in cut to length lines, slitting lines, end cropping etc. Shearing has speed and cost advantages over competing cutting methods like laser and plasma cutting, but involves large forces on the equipment and large strains in the sheet material.Numerical models to predict forces and sheared edge geometry for different sheet metal grades and different shear parameter set-ups a...

  14. Large-eddy simulation of the atmospheric boundary layer: Influence of unsteady forcing, baroclinicity, inversion strength and stability on the wind profile

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Jesper Grønnegaard

    above the atmospheric surface layer. Continuous and detailed measurements of mean winds and turbulence above the surface layer are expensive and difficult to obtain. Computational fluid dynamics modelling of the atmospheric flow can be an attractive alternative or supplement to field experiments...

  15. Wind power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gipe, P.

    2007-01-01

    This book is a translation of the edition published in the USA under the title of ''wind power: renewable energy for home, farm and business''. In the wake of mass blackouts and energy crises, wind power remains a largely untapped resource of renewable energy. It is a booming worldwide industry whose technology, under the collective wing of aficionados like author Paul Gipe, is coming of age. Wind Power guides us through the emergent, sometimes daunting discourse on wind technology, giving frank explanations of how to use wind technology wisely and sound advice on how to avoid common mistakes. Since the mid-1970's, Paul Gipe has played a part in nearly every aspect of wind energy development from installing small turbines to promoting wind energy worldwide. As an American proponent of renewable energy, Gipe has earned the acclaim and respect of European energy specialists for years, but his arguments have often fallen on deaf ears at home. Today, the topic of wind power is cropping up everywhere from the beaches of Cape Cod to the Oregon-Washington border, and one wind turbine is capable of producing enough electricity per year to run 200 average American households. Now, Paul Gipe is back to shed light on this increasingly important energy source with a revised edition of Wind Power. Over the course of his career, Paul Gipe has been a proponent, participant, observer, and critic of the wind industry. His experience with wind has given rise to two previous books on the subject, Wind Energy Basics and Wind Power for Home and Business, which have sold over 50,000 copies. Wind Power for Home and Business has become a staple for both homeowners and professionals interested in the subject, and now, with energy prices soaring, interest in wind power is hitting an all-time high. With chapters on output and economics, Wind Power discloses how much you can expect from each method of wind technology, both in terms of energy and financial savings. The book updated models

  16. Offshore winds using remote sensing techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pena, Alfredo; Hasager, Charlotte Bay; Gryning, Sven-Erik; Courtney, Michael; Antoniou, Ioannis; Mikkelsen, Torben; Soerensen, Paul

    2007-01-01

    Ground-based remote sensing instruments can observe winds at different levels in the atmosphere where the wind characteristics change with height: the range of heights where modern turbine rotors are operating. A six-month wind assessment campaign has been made with a LiDAR (Light Detection And Ranging) and a SoDAR (Sound Detection and Ranging) on the transformer/platform of the world's largest offshore wind farm located at the West coast of Denmark to evaluate their ability to observe offshore winds. The high homogeneity and low turbulence levels registered allow the comparison of LiDAR and SoDAR with measurements from cups on masts surrounding the wind farm showing good agreement for both the mean wind speed and the longitudinal component of turbulence. An extension of mean wind speed profiles from cup measurements on masts with LiDAR observations results in a good match for the free sectors at different wind speeds. The log-linear profile is fitted to the extended profiles (averaged over all stabilities and roughness lengths) and the deviations are small. Extended profiles of turbulence intensity are also shown for different wind speeds up to 161 m. Friction velocities and roughness lengths calculated from the fitted log-linear profile are compared with the Charnock model which seems to overestimate the sea roughness for the free sectors

  17. Comparação do perfil de vento medido por Radiossondas e por um SODAR durante o experimento DRYTOWET-AMC/LBA Comparison between wind profiles collected by SODAR and RADIOSONDES during the DRYTOWET-AMC/LBA experiment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cláudio Moisés Santos e Silva

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Foram comparados perfis do vento horizontal medidos por radiossondagens e por um equipamento SODAR durante experimento DRYTOWET-AMC/LBA. em 2002, no Estado de Rondônia. As análises foram feitas para três camadas, a saber: da superfície até 500 m, de 500 m até 1000 m e de 1000 m até 1500 m. Na primeira camada os campos apresentaram boa concordância, porém, a correlação entre as medidas diminuiu de forma significativa nas outras duas camadas. Os resultados sugerem que os dados do SODAR poderiam ser mais bem aproveitados se na instalação do instrumento fosse dada prioridade a uma camada menos profunda (até 500 m e com uma resolução vertical maior.The horizontal wind profiles measured by a SODAR and radiosondes during the DRYTOWET-AMC/LBA experiment are compared. The analysis were made considering three layers: from surface up to 500 m, from 500 up to 1000 m and from 1000 to 1500 m. In the first layer the wind field profiles are in good agreement, however, the correlation values between SODAR and radiosonde data, gets significantly lower for the other two layers. The results suggest that the SODAR data should better be used if operating from surface up to 500 m and with greater vertical resolution.

  18. Size Segregation in Sheared Jammed Colloids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mbi, Armstrong; Blair, Daniel

    2013-03-01

    It is well known that granular materials can spontaneously size segregate when continuously driven. However, in jammed colloidal suspensions, this phenomenon is not well understood. Colloidal dispersions provide a unique system to study the structure and dynamics of jammed matter. In this talk, we present results of size segregation of a continuously sheared binary colloidal suspension well above point J. Our colloidal system is comprised of indexed-matched bi-disperse silica particles with diameters a = { 2 . 3 μm and 3 . 2 μm } and at ϕ 61 % , well above the colloidal glass transition. We apply a highly controlled shear at a constant shear rate through the use of a rheometer. By coupling our rheometer with a high-speed laser scanning confocal microscope, we directly image the structure and flow profiles of the suspension as it un-jams. We observe migration of the small and large species; large particles move to the top while the small particles move toward the bottom conserving the total volume fraction in all regions. Moreover, we find that an associating feature of segregation is a sustained shear band. Our results are consistent with a recently proposed void filling and squeeze expulsion mechanism. Funding is provided by NSF DMR #0847490.

  19. Shear Behavior of Concrete Beams Reinforced with GFRP Shear Reinforcement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heecheul Kim

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the shear capacities of concrete beams reinforced with glass fiber reinforced polymer (GFRP plates as shear reinforcement. To examine the shear performance, we manufactured and tested a total of eight specimens. Test variables included the GFRP strip-width-to-spacing ratio and type of opening array. The specimen with a GFRP plate with a 3×2 opening array showed the highest shear strength. From the test results, the shear strength increased as the strip-width-to-strip-spacing ratio increased. Also, we used the experimental results to evaluate whether the shear strength equations of ACI 318-14 and ACI 440.1R can be applied to the design of GFRP shear reinforcement. In the results, the ACI 440 equation underestimated the experimental results more than that of ACI 318.

  20. Repetitive model predictive approach to individual pitch control of wind turbines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Adegas, Fabiano Daher; Stoustrup, Jakob; Odgaard, Peter Fogh

    2011-01-01

    Wind turbines are inherently exposed to nonuniform wind fields with of wind shear, tower shadow, and possible wake contributions. Asymmetrical aerodynamic rotor loads are a consequence of such periodic, repetitive wind disturbances experienced by the blades. A controller may estimate and use this....... A simulation comparison betweeen the proposed controller and an industry-standard PID controller shows better mitigation of drive-train, blade and tower loads.......Wind turbines are inherently exposed to nonuniform wind fields with of wind shear, tower shadow, and possible wake contributions. Asymmetrical aerodynamic rotor loads are a consequence of such periodic, repetitive wind disturbances experienced by the blades. A controller may estimate and use...... this peculiar disturbance pattern to better attenuate loads and regulate power by controlling the blade pitch angles individually. A novel model predictive (MPC) approach for individual pitch control of wind turbines is proposed in this paper. A repetitive wind disturbance model is incorporated into the MPC...

  1. Gusts and Shear in an Idealized LES-modeled Hurricane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Worsnop, R.; Lundquist, J. K.; Bryan, G. H.; Damiani, R.; Musial, W.

    2016-12-01

    Tropical cyclone winds can cause extreme loading and damage to coastal structures such as buildings and energy infrastructure. Offshore wind energy development is underway along the US East Coast where hurricanes pose a substantial risk. Understanding wind gusts, gust factor, shear, and veer in the hurricane boundary layer (HBL) can help manufacturers assess risk and design wind turbines to better withstand these extreme wind conditions. Because of the paucity of observational data at low-levels (200 m and below), we use the Cloud Model Version I (CM1) large-eddy simulation numerical model to simulate high spatial- (10 m) and temporal- (0.1 s) resolution data. This unique dataset is used to answer the following questions: do severe mean wind speeds and gusts that exceed current design limits occur?; how does the gust factor vary with distance from the eye?; and lastly, how does wind direction vary horizontally and with height? We find that mean winds and gusts near the eyewall can exceed current turbine design thresholds of 50 m s-1 and 70 m s-1, respectively. Gust factors are greatest at the eye-eyewall interface just inward of the peak gust location and can exceed the 1.4 value used to convert a 50 m s-1 reference wind speed to a 50-year 3-second gust. Strong veer (15-30 degrees) across a 120 m-layer suggests that veer should be assessed against standard design prescriptions. Lastly, wind directions can shift 10-25 degrees in durations shorter than 10 minutes, which can challenge structures designed to endure winds from a consistent direction for periods longer than 10 minutes, including wind turbines.

  2. European wind turbine catalogue

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-01-01

    The THERMIE European Community programme is designed to promote the greater use of European technology and this catalogue contributes to the fulfillment of this aim by dissemination of information on 50 wind turbines from 30 manufacturers. These turbines are produced in Europe and are commercially available. The manufacturers presented produce and sell grid-connected turbines which have been officially approved in countries where this approval is acquired, however some of the wind turbines included in the catalogue have not been regarded as fully commercially available at the time of going to print. The entries, which are illustrated by colour photographs, give company profiles, concept descriptions, measured power curves, prices, and information on design and dimension, safety systems, stage of development, special characteristics, annual energy production, and noise pollution. Lists are given of wind turbine manufacturers and agents and of consultants and developers in the wind energy sector. Exchange rates used in the conversion of the prices of wind turbines are also given. Information can be found on the OPET network (organizations recognised by the European Commission as an Organization for the Promotion of Energy Technologies (OPET)). An article describes the development of the wind power industry during the last 10-15 years and another article on certification aims to give an overview of the most well-known and acknowledged type approvals currently issued in Europe. (AB)

  3. Shear-thinning Fluid

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-01-01

    Whipped cream and the filling for pumpkin pie are two familiar materials that exhibit the shear-thinning effect seen in a range of industrial applications. It is thick enough to stand on its own atop a piece of pie, yet flows readily when pushed through a tube. This demonstrates the shear-thinning effect that was studied with the Critical Viscosity of Xenon Experiment (CVX-2) on the STS-107 Research 1 mission in 2002. CVX observed the behavior of xenon, a heavy inert gas used in flash lamps and ion rocket engines, at its critical point. The principal investigator was Dr. Robert Berg of the National Institutes of Standards and Technology in Gaithersburg, MD.

  4. Forflytning: shear og friktion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2005-01-01

    friktion). Formålet med filmprojektet er: At give personalet i Apopleksiafsnittet viden om shear og friktion, så det motiveres til forebyggelse. Mål At udarbejde et enkelt undervisningsmateriale til bed-side-brug Projektbeskrivelse (resume) Patienter med apopleksi er særligt udsatte for tryksår, fordi de...... ofte er immobile, har svært ved at opretholde en god siddestilling eller ligger tungt i sengen som følger efter apopleksien Hvis personalet bruger forkert lejrings-og forflytningsteknik, udsættes patienterne for shear og friktion. Målgruppen i projektet er de personer, der omgås patienterne, dvs...

  5. Shear Roll Mill Reactivation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-13

    pneumatically operated paste dumper and belt conveyor system , the loss in weight feeder system , the hydraulically operated shear roll mill, the pellet...out feed belt conveyor , and the pack out system comprised of the metal detector, scale, and pack out empty and full drum roller conveyors . Page | 4...process equipment sprinkler protection systems , and the 5 psig steam supply serving the building heating and make-up air systems . It also included

  6. Unifying role of radial electric field shear in the confinement trends of transitionless regimes in TFTR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ernst, D.R.; Beer, M.; Batha, S.

    2001-01-01

    Turbulence suppression by radial electric field shear (E r ) is shown to be important in the enhanced confinement of TFTR supershot plasmas. Simulations of supershot ion temperature profiles are performed using an existing parameterization of transport due to toroidal ion temperature gradient modes, extended to include suppression by E r shear. New spectroscopic measurements of E r differ significantly from prior neoclassical estimates. Supershot temperature profiles appear to be consistent with a criterion describing near-complete turbulence suppression by intrinsically generated E r shear. Helium spoiling and xenon puffing experiments are simulated to illustrate the role of E r shear in the confinement changes observed. (author)

  7. Unifying role of radial electric field shear in the confinement trends of transitionless regimes in TFTR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ernst, D.R.; Beer, M.; Batha, S.

    1999-01-01

    Turbulence suppression by radial electric field shear (E r ) is shown to be important in the enhanced confinement of TFTR supershot plasmas. Simulations of supershot ion temperature profiles are performed using an existing parameterization of transport due to toroidal ion temperature gradient modes, extended to include suppression by E r shear. New spectroscopic measurements of E r differ significantly from prior neoclassical estimates. Supershot temperature profiles appear to be consistent with a criterion describing near-complete turbulence suppression by intrinsically generated E r shear. Helium spoiling and xenon puffing experiments are simulated to illustrate the role of E r shear in the confinement changes observed. (author)

  8. Electrostatic Solitary Waves in the Solar Wind: Evidence for Instability at Solar Wind Current Sheets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malaspina, David M.; Newman, David L.; Wilson, Lynn Bruce; Goetz, Keith; Kellogg, Paul J.; Kerstin, Kris

    2013-01-01

    A strong spatial association between bipolar electrostatic solitary waves (ESWs) and magnetic current sheets (CSs) in the solar wind is reported here for the first time. This association requires that the plasma instabilities (e.g., Buneman, electron two stream) which generate ESWs are preferentially localized to solar wind CSs. Distributions of CS properties (including shear angle, thickness, solar wind speed, and vector magnetic field change) are examined for differences between CSs associated with ESWs and randomly chosen CSs. Possible mechanisms for producing ESW-generating instabilities at solar wind CSs are considered, including magnetic reconnection.

  9. Comparison of different methods for evaluation of wind turbine power production based on wind measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bezrukovs Valerijs

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Investigations of the wind shear up to the height of 200 (m on the Latvian coast of the Baltic Sea have been carried out using a Pentalum SpiDAR laser measuring complex. Based on wind speeds measurements for three levels – 30, 40 and 50 (m, assessment of the operational efficiency of the wind turbines for heights 100, 140 and 180 (m have been performed. For comparison, this analysis involves five different approaches: the Rayleigh frequency distribution, three different Weibull frequency distributions and method based on approximation of the cubic wind speed. Results are compared with measurements on the corresponding heights.

  10. Doppler Lidar in the Wind Forecast Improvement Projects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pichugina Yelena

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper will provide an overview of some projects in support of Wind Energy development involving Doppler lidar measurement of wind flow profiles. The high temporal and vertical resolution of these profiles allows the uncertainty of Numerical Weather Prediction models to be evaluated in forecasting dynamic processes and wind flow phenomena in the layer of rotor-blade operation.

  11. Rheometry-PIV of shear-thickening wormlike micelles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marín-Santibañez, Benjamín M; Pérez-Gonzalez, José; de Vargas, Lourdes; Rodríguez-Gonzalez, Francisco; Huelsz, Guadalupe

    2006-04-25

    The shear-thickening behavior of an equimolar semidilute aqueous solution of 40 mM/L cetylpyridinium chloride and sodium salicylate was studied in this work by using a combined method of rheometry and particle image velocimetry (PIV). Experiments were conducted at 27.5 degrees C with Couette, vane-bob, and capillary rheometers in order to explore a wide shear stress range as well as the effect of boundary conditions and time of flow on the creation and destruction of shear-induced structures (SIS). The use of the combined method of capillary rheometry with PIV allowed the detection of fast spatial and temporal variations in the flow kinematics, which are related to the shear-thickening behavior and the dynamics of the SIS but are not distinguished by pure rheometrical measurements. A rich-in-details flow curve was found for this solution, which includes five different regimes. Namely, at very low shear rates a Newtonian behavior was found, followed by a shear thinning one in the second regime. In the third, shear banding was observed, which served as a precursor of the SIS and shear-thickening. The fourth and fifth regimes in the flow curve were separated by a spurtlike behavior, and they clearly evidenced the existence of shear-thickening accompanied by stick-slip oscillations at the wall of the rheometer, which subsequently produced variations in the shear rate under shear stress controlled flow. Such a stick-slip phenomenon prevailed up to the highest shear stresses used in this work and was reflected in asymmetric velocity profiles with spatial and temporal variations linked to the dynamics of creation and breakage of the SIS. The presence of apparent slip at the wall of the rheometer provides an energy release mechanism which leads to breakage of the SIS, followed by their further reformation during the stick part of the cycles. In addition, PIV measurements allowed the detection of apparent slip at the wall, as well as mechanical failures in the bulk of the

  12. Effects of Yaw Error on Wind Turbine Running Characteristics Based on the Equivalent Wind Speed Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuting Wan

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Natural wind is stochastic, being characterized by its speed and direction which change randomly and frequently. Because of the certain lag in control systems and the yaw body itself, wind turbines cannot be accurately aligned toward the wind direction when the wind speed and wind direction change frequently. Thus, wind turbines often suffer from a series of engineering issues during operation, including frequent yaw, vibration overruns and downtime. This paper aims to study the effects of yaw error on wind turbine running characteristics at different wind speeds and control stages by establishing a wind turbine model, yaw error model and the equivalent wind speed model that includes the wind shear and tower shadow effects. Formulas for the relevant effect coefficients Tc, Sc and Pc were derived. The simulation results indicate that the effects of the aerodynamic torque, rotor speed and power output due to yaw error at different running stages are different and that the effect rules for each coefficient are not identical when the yaw error varies. These results may provide theoretical support for optimizing the yaw control strategies for each stage to increase the running stability of wind turbines and the utilization rate of wind energy.

  13. Sensitivity of Turbine-Height Wind Speeds to Parameters in Planetary Boundary-Layer and Surface-Layer Schemes in the Weather Research and Forecasting Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Ben; Qian, Yun; Berg, Larry K.; Ma, Po-Lun; Wharton, Sonia; Bulaevskaya, Vera; Yan, Huiping; Hou, Zhangshuan; Shaw, William J.

    2017-01-01

    We evaluate the sensitivity of simulated turbine-height wind speeds to 26 parameters within the Mellor-Yamada-Nakanishi-Niino (MYNN) planetary boundary-layer scheme and MM5 surface-layer scheme of the Weather Research and Forecasting model over an area of complex terrain. An efficient sampling algorithm and generalized linear model are used to explore the multiple-dimensional parameter space and quantify the parametric sensitivity of simulated turbine-height wind speeds. The results indicate that most of the variability in the ensemble simulations is due to parameters related to the dissipation of turbulent kinetic energy (TKE), Prandtl number, turbulent length scales, surface roughness, and the von Kármán constant. The parameter associated with the TKE dissipation rate is found to be most important, and a larger dissipation rate produces larger hub-height wind speeds. A larger Prandtl number results in smaller nighttime wind speeds. Increasing surface roughness reduces the frequencies of both extremely weak and strong airflows, implying a reduction in the variability of wind speed. All of the above parameters significantly affect the vertical profiles of wind speed and the magnitude of wind shear. The relative contributions of individual parameters are found to be dependent on both the terrain slope and atmospheric stability.

  14. Wind Effects on Retention Time in Highway Ponds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bentzen, Thomas Ruby; Larsen, Torben; Rasmussen, Michael R.

    2007-01-01

    is to evaluate the quality of long term simulations based on historical rain series of the pollutant discharges from roads and highways. The idea of this paper is to evaluate the effects of wind on the retention time and compare the retention time for the situation of a spatial uniform wind shear stress...

  15. Wind Effects on Retention Time in Highway Ponds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bentzen, Thomas Ruby; Larsen, Torben; Rasmussen, Michael R.

    2008-01-01

    is to evaluate the quality of long term simulations based on historical rain series of the pollutant discharges from roads and highways. The idea of this paper is to evaluate the effects of wind on the retention time and compare the retention time for the situation of a spatial uniform wind shear stress...

  16. Effects of opening in shear walls of 30- storey building

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruchi Sharma

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Tall towers and multi-storey buildings have fascinated mankind from the beginning of civilization, their construction being initially for defense and subsequently for ecclesiastical purposes. These tall buildings because of its height, is affected by lateral forces due to wind or earthquake actions tends to snap the building in shear and push it over in bending. In general, the rigidity (i.e. Resistance to lateral deflection and stability (i.e. Resistance to overturning moments requirement become more important. Shear walls (Structural walls contribute significant lateral stiffness, strength, and overall ductility and energy dissipation capacity. In many structural walls a regular pattern of openings has to be provided due to various functional requirements such as to accommodate doors, windows and service ducts. Such type of openings reduces the stiffness of the shear wall to some extent depending on the shape and size of the opening. In the present parametric study, efforts are made to investigate and critically assess the effects of various size of openings in shear walls on the responses and behaviors of multi-storey buildings. The 30 storey Prototype buildings with different types of openings in shear wall with and without incorporating the volume of shear wall reduced in the boundary elements are analyzed using software E-TABS using Response spectrum method (1893(Part-1-2002 and Time history method.

  17. Small Wind Energy Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Simoes, Marcelo; Farret, Felix Alberto; Blaabjerg, Frede

    2015-01-01

    devices, and a centralized distribution control. In order to establish a small wind energy system it is important to observe the following: (i) Attending the energy requirements of the actual or future consumers; (ii) Establishing civil liabilities in case of accidents and financial losses due to shortage...... or low quality of energy; (iii) Negotiating collective conditions to interconnect the microgrid with the public network or with other sources of energy that is independent of wind resources; (iv) Establishing a performance criteria of power quality and reliability to end-users, in order to reduce costs...... and guaranteeing an acceptable energy supply. This paper discuss how performance is affected by local conditions and random nature of the wind, power demand profiles, turbine related factors, and presents the technical issues for implementing a self-excited induction generator system, or a permanent magnet based...

  18. Mitigation of Power System Oscillation Caused by Wind Power Fluctuation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Su, Chi; Hu, Weihao; Chen, Zhe

    2013-01-01

    Wind power is increasingly integrated in modern power grids, which brings new challenges to the power system operation. Wind power is fluctuating because of the uncertain nature of wind, whereas wind shear and tower shadow effects also cause periodic fluctuations. These may lead to serious forced...... oscillation when the frequencies of the periodic fluctuations are close to the natural oscillation frequencies of the connected power system. By using modal analysis and time-domain simulations, this study studies the forced oscillation caused by the wind shear and tower shadow effects. Three forced...... oscillation mitigation controllers are proposed and compared. A model of direct-drive-full-convertor-based wind farm connected to the IEEE 10-machine 39-bus system is adopted as the test system. The calculations and simulations are conducted in DIgSILENT PowerFactory 14.0. Results are presented to show...

  19. UARS Wind Imaging Interferometer (WINDII) Level 3AL V001

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Wind Imaging Interferometer (WINDII) Level 3AL data product consists of daily, 4 degree increment latitude-ordered vertical profiles of meridional and zonal wind...

  20. UARS Wind Imaging Interferometer (WINDII) Level 3AT V001

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Wind Imaging Interferometer (WINDII) Level 3AT data product consists of daily, 65.536 second interval time-ordered vertical profiles of meridional and zonal wind...

  1. Improving Maryland’s Offshore Wind Energy Resource Estimate Using Doppler Wind Lidar Technology to Assess Microtmeteorology Controls

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pé Alexandra St.

    2016-01-01

    Compared to lidar measurements, power law extrapolation estimates and operational National Weather Service models underestimated hub-height wind speeds in the WEA. In addition, lidar observations suggest the frequent development of a low-level wind maximum (LLWM, with high turbinelayer wind shear and low turbulence intensity within a turbine’s rotor layer (40m-160m. Results elucidate the advantages of using Doppler wind lidar technology to improve offshore wind resource estimates and its ability to monitor under-sampled offshore meteorological controls impact on a potential turbine’s ability to produce power.

  2. Designing shear-thinning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Arif Z.; Ewoldt, Randy H.

    2017-11-01

    Design in fluid mechanics often focuses on optimizing geometry (airfoils, surface textures, microfluid channels), but here we focus on designing fluids themselves. The dramatically shear-thinning ``yield-stress fluid'' is currently the most utilized non-Newtonian fluid phenomenon. These rheologically complex materials, which undergo a reversible transition from solid-like to liquid-like fluid flow, are utilized in pedestrian products such as paint and toothpaste, but also in emerging applications like direct-write 3D printing. We present a paradigm for yield-stress fluid design that considers constitutive model representation, material property databases, available predictive scaling laws, and the many ways to achieve a yield stress fluid, flipping the typical structure-to-rheology analysis to become the inverse: rheology-to-structure with multiple possible materials as solutions. We describe case studies of 3D printing inks and other flow scenarios where designed shear-thinning enables performance remarkably beyond that of Newtonian fluids. This work was supported by Wm. Wrigley Jr. Company and the National Science Foundation under Grant No. CMMI-1463203.

  3. Magnetorheological dampers in shear mode

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wereley, N M; Cho, J U; Choi, Y T; Choi, S B

    2008-01-01

    In this study, three types of shear mode damper using magnetorheological (MR) fluids are theoretically analyzed: linear, rotary drum, and rotary disk dampers. The damping performance of these shear mode MR dampers is characterized in terms of the damping coefficient, which is the ratio of the equivalent viscous damping at field-on status to the damping at field-off status. For these three types of shear mode MR damper, the damping coefficient or dynamic range is derived using three different constitutive models: the Bingham–plastic, biviscous, and Herschel–Bulkley models. The impact of constitutive behavior on shear mode MR dampers is theoretically presented and compared

  4. Extrapolating Satellite Winds to Turbine Operating Heights

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Badger, Merete; Pena Diaz, Alfredo; Hahmann, Andrea N.

    2016-01-01

    Ocean wind retrievals from satellite sensors are typically performed for the standard level of 10 m. This restricts their full exploitation for wind energy planning, which requires wind information at much higher levels where wind turbines operate. A new method is presented for the vertical...... extrapolation of satellitebased wind maps. Winds near the sea surface are obtained from satellite data and used together with an adaptation of the Monin–Obukhov similarity theory to estimate the wind speed at higher levels. The thermal stratification of the atmosphere is taken into account through a long...... effects and also, to some extent, for the limited number of satellite samples. The satellite-based and NWP-simulated wind profiles are almost equally accurate with respect to those from the mast. However, the satellite-based maps have a higher spatial resolution, which is particularly important...

  5. Using machine learning to predict wind turbine power output

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clifton, A; Kilcher, L; Lundquist, J K; Fleming, P

    2013-01-01

    Wind turbine power output is known to be a strong function of wind speed, but is also affected by turbulence and shear. In this work, new aerostructural simulations of a generic 1.5 MW turbine are used to rank atmospheric influences on power output. Most significant is the hub height wind speed, followed by hub height turbulence intensity and then wind speed shear across the rotor disk. These simulation data are used to train regression trees that predict the turbine response for any combination of wind speed, turbulence intensity, and wind shear that might be expected at a turbine site. For a randomly selected atmospheric condition, the accuracy of the regression tree power predictions is three times higher than that from the traditional power curve methodology. The regression tree method can also be applied to turbine test data and used to predict turbine performance at a new site. No new data are required in comparison to the data that are usually collected for a wind resource assessment. Implementing the method requires turbine manufacturers to create a turbine regression tree model from test site data. Such an approach could significantly reduce bias in power predictions that arise because of the different turbulence and shear at the new site, compared to the test site. (letter)

  6. Integration of wind generation forecasts. Volume 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahlstrom, M.; Zavadil, B.; Jones, L.

    2005-01-01

    WindLogics is a company that specializes in atmospheric modelling, visualization and fine-scale forecasting systems for the wind power industry. A background of the organization was presented. The complexities of wind modelling were discussed. Issues concerning location and terrain, shear, diurnal and interannual variability were reviewed. It was suggested that wind power producers should aim to be mainstream, and that variability should be considered as intrinsic to fuel supply. Various utility operating impacts were outlined. Details of an Xcel NSP wind integration study were presented, as well as a studies conducted in New York state and Colorado. It was concluded that regulations and load following impacts with wind energy integration are modest. Overall impacts are dominated by costs incurred to accommodate wind generation variability and uncertainty in the day-ahead time frame. Cost impacts can be reduced with adjustments to operating strategies, improvements in wind forecasting and access to real-time markets. Details of WindLogic's wind energy forecast system were presented, as well as examples of day ahead and hour ahead forecasts and wind speed and power forecasts. Screenshots of control room integration, EMS integration and simulations were presented. Details of a utility-scale wind energy forecasting system funded by Xcel Renewable Development Fund (RDF) were also presented. The goal of the system was to optimize the way that wind forecast information is integrated into the control room environment. Project components were outlined. It was concluded that accurate day-ahead forecasting can lead to significant asset optimization. It was recommended that wind plants share data, and aim to resolve issues concerning grid codes and instrumentation. refs., tabs., figs

  7. WIND VARIABILITY IN BZ CAMELOPARDALIS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Honeycutt, R. K.; Kafka, S.; Robertson, J. W.

    2013-01-01

    Sequences of spectra of the nova-like cataclysmic variable (CV) BZ Cam were acquired on nine nights in 2005-2006 in order to study the time development of episodes of wind activity known to occur frequently in this star. We confirm the results of Ringwald and Naylor that the P-Cygni absorption components of the lines mostly evolve from higher expansion velocity to lower velocity as an episode progresses. We also commonly find blueshifted emission components in the Hα line profile, whose velocities and durations strongly suggest that they are also due to the wind. Curiously, Ringwald and Naylor reported common occurrences of redshifted Hα emission components in their BZ Cam spectra. We have attributed these emission components in Hα to occasions when gas concentrations in the bipolar wind (both front side and back side) become manifested as emission lines as they move beyond the disk's outer edge. We also suggest, based on changes in the P-Cygni profiles during an episode, that the progression from larger to smaller expansion velocities is due to the higher velocity portions of a wind concentration moving beyond the edge of the continuum light of the disk first, leaving a net redward shift of the remaining absorption profile. We derive a new orbital ephemeris for BZ Cam, using the radial velocity of the core of the He I λ5876 line, finding P = 0.15353(4). Using this period, the wind episodes in BZ Cam are found to be concentrated near the inferior conjunction of the emission line source. This result helps confirm that the winds in nova-like CVs are often phase dependent, in spite of the puzzling implication that such winds lack axisymmetry. We argue that the radiation-driven wind in BZ Cam receives an initial boost by acting on gas that has been lifted above the disk by the interaction of the accretion stream with the disk, thereby imposing flickering timescales onto the wind events, as well as leading to an orbital modulation of the wind due to the non

  8. Lithology and shear-wave velocity in Memphis, Tennessee

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomberg, J.; Waldron, B.; Schweig, E.; Hwang, H.; Webbers, A.; Van Arsdale, R.; Tucker, K.; Williams, R.; Street, R.; Mayne, P.; Stephenson, W.; Odum, J.; Cramer, C.; Updike, R.; Hutson, S.; Bradley, M.

    2003-01-01

    We have derived a new three-dimensional model of the lithologic structure beneath the city of Memphis, Tennessee, and examined its correlation with measured shear-wave velocity profiles. The correlation is sufficiently high that the better-constrained lithologic model may be used as a proxy for shear-wave velocities, which are required to calculate site-amplification for new seismic hazard maps for Memphis. The lithologic model and its uncertainties are derived from over 1200 newly compiled well and boring logs, some sampling to 500 m depth, and a moving-least-squares algorithm. Seventy-six new shear-wave velocity profiles have been measured and used for this study, most sampling to 30 m depth or less. All log and velocity observations are publicly available via new web sites.

  9. Development of a Wind Plant Large-Eddy Simulation with Measurement-Driven Atmospheric Inflow: Preprint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Quon, Eliot; Churchfield, Matthew; Cheung, Lawrence; Kern, Stefan

    2017-02-01

    This paper details the development of an aeroelastic wind plant model with large-eddy simulation (LES). The chosen LES solver is the Simulator for Wind Farm Applications (SOWFA) based on the OpenFOAM framework, coupled to NREL's comprehensive aeroelastic analysis tool, FAST. An atmospheric boundary layer (ABL) precursor simulation was constructed based on assessments of meteorological tower, lidar, and radar data over a 3-hour window. This precursor was tuned to the specific atmospheric conditions that occurred both prior to and during the measurement campaign, enabling capture of a night-to-day transition in the turbulent ABL. In the absence of height-varying temperature measurements, spatially averaged radar data were sufficient to characterize the atmospheric stability of the wind plant in terms of the shear profile, and near-ground temperature sensors provided a reasonable estimate of the ground heating rate describing the morning transition. A full aeroelastic simulation was then performed for a subset of turbines within the wind plant, driven by the precursor. Analysis of two turbines within the array, one directly waked by the other, demonstrated good agreement with measured time-averaged loads.

  10. LES-based generation of high-frequency fluctuation in wind turbulence obtained by meteorological model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamura, Tetsuro; Kawaguchi, Masaharu; Kawai, Hidenori; Tao, Tao

    2017-11-01

    The connection between a meso-scale model and a micro-scale large eddy simulation (LES) is significant to simulate the micro-scale meteorological problem such as strong convective events due to the typhoon or the tornado using LES. In these problems the mean velocity profiles and the mean wind directions change with time according to the movement of the typhoons or tornadoes. Although, a fine grid micro-scale LES could not be connected to a coarse grid meso-scale WRF directly. In LES when the grid is suddenly refined at the interface of nested grids which is normal to the mean advection the resolved shear stresses decrease due to the interpolation errors and the delay of the generation of smaller scale turbulence that can be resolved on the finer mesh. For the estimation of wind gust disaster the peak wind acting on buildings and structures has to be correctly predicted. In the case of meteorological model the velocity fluctuations have a tendency of diffusive variation without the high frequency component due to the numerically filtering effects. In order to predict the peak value of wind velocity with good accuracy, this paper proposes a LES-based method for generating the higher frequency components of velocity and temperature fields obtained by meteorological model.

  11. Shear strength of non-shear reinforced concrete elements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hoang, Cao linh

    1997-01-01

    The report deals with the shear strength of statically indeterminate reinforced concrete beams without shear reinforcement. Solutions for a number of beams with different load and support conditions have been derived by means of the crack sliding model developed by Jin- Ping Zhang.This model is b...

  12. Wind energy availability above gaps in a forest

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sogachev, Andrey; Mann, Jakob; Dellwik, Ebba

    2009-01-01

    installation strategies. The canopy-planetary boundary-layer model SCADIS is used to investigate the effect of forest gap size (within the diameter range of 3 - 75 tree heights, h) on wind energy related variables. A wind turbine was assumed with following features: the hub height and rotor diameter of 3.5h......There is a lack of data on availability of wind energy above a forest disturbed by clear-cuts, where a wind energy developer may find an opportunity to install a wind farm. Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) models can provide spatial patterns of wind and turbulence, and help to develop optimal...... and 3h, respectively; this provides the clearance between the rotor and ground of 2h which is similar to the value obtained by the rule of thumb. Spatial variations of wind energy production, the average wind speed shear and cumulative TKE inside the layer of 2h - 5h above the ground around the gaps...

  13. Wind energy

    CERN Document Server

    Woll, Kris

    2016-01-01

    Across the country, huge open spaces are covered in gently turning wind turbines. In Wind Energy, explore how these machines generate electricity, learn about the history of wind power, and discover the latest advances in the field. Easy-to-read text, vivid images, and helpful back matter give readers a clear look at this subject. Features include a table of contents, infographics, a glossary, additional resources, and an index. Aligned to Common Core Standards and correlated to state standards. Core Library is an imprint of Abdo Publishing, a division of ABDO.

  14. Kelvin--Helmholtz-like instability of a shear layer subject to free boundary conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mjolsness, R.C.

    1979-01-01

    For free boundary conditions a shear layer with linear velocity profile supports irrotational disturbances, one mode being unstable when its wavelength lambda>2.619 times the thickness h of the shear layer. For long wavelengths the dispersion relation of the mode approaches the Kelvin--Helmholtz form

  15. Solar wind stream interfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gosling, J.T.; Asbridge, J.R.; Bame, S.J.; Feldman, W.C.

    1978-01-01

    Measurements aboard Imp 6, 7, and 8 reveal that approximately one third of all high-speed solar wind streams observed at 1 AU contain a sharp boundary (of thickness less than approx.4 x 10 4 km) near their leading edge, called a stream interface, which separates plasma of distinctly different properties and origins. Identified as discontinuities across which the density drops abruptly, the proton temperature increases abruptly, and the speed rises, stream interfaces are remarkably similar in character from one stream to the next. A superposed epoch analysis of plasma data has been performed for 23 discontinuous stream interfaces observed during the interval March 1971 through August 1974. Among the results of this analysis are the following: (1) a stream interface separates what was originally thick (i.e., dense) slow gas from what was originally thin (i.e., rare) fast gas; (2) the interface is the site of a discontinuous shear in the solar wind flow in a frame of reference corotating with the sun; (3) stream interfaces occur at speeds less than 450 km s - 1 and close to or at the maximum of the pressure ridge at the leading edges of high-speed streams; (4) a discontinuous rise by approx.40% in electron temperature occurs at the interface; and (5) discontinuous changes (usually rises) in alpha particle abundance and flow speed relative to the protons occur at the interface. Stream interfaces do not generally recur on successive solar rotations, even though the streams in which they are embedded often do. At distances beyond several astronomical units, stream interfaces should be bounded by forward-reverse shock pairs; three of four reverse shocks observed at 1 AU during 1971--1974 were preceded within approx.1 day by stream interfaces. Our observations suggest that many streams close to the sun are bounded on all sides by large radial velocity shears separating rapidly expanding plasma from more slowly expanding plasma

  16. World Wind

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — World Wind allows any user to zoom from satellite altitude into any place on Earth, leveraging high resolution LandSat imagery and SRTM elevation data to experience...

  17. A Piezoelectric Shear Stress Sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Taeyang; Saini, Aditya; Kim, Jinwook; Gopalarathnam, Ashok; Zhu, Yong; Palmieri, Frank L.; Wohl, Christopher J.; Jiang, Xiaoning

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, a piezoelectric sensor with a floating element was developed for shear stress measurement. The piezoelectric sensor was designed to detect the pure shear stress suppressing effects of normal stress generated from the vortex lift-up by applying opposite poling vectors to the: piezoelectric elements. The sensor was first calibrated in the lab by applying shear forces and it showed high sensitivity to shear stress (=91.3 +/- 2.1 pC/Pa) due to the high piezoelectric coefficients of PMN-33%PT (d31=-1330 pC/N). The sensor also showed almost no sensitivity to normal stress (less than 1.2 pC/Pa) because of the electromechanical symmetry of the device. The usable frequency range of the sensor is 0-800 Hz. Keywords: Piezoelectric sensor, shear stress, floating element, electromechanical symmetry

  18. 78 FR 29364 - Exelon Corporation, Exelon Wind 1, LLC, Exelon Wind 2, LLC, Exelon Wind 3, LLC, Exelon Wind 4...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-20

    ...-005, QF07-257-004] Exelon Corporation, Exelon Wind 1, LLC, Exelon Wind 2, LLC, Exelon Wind 3, LLC, Exelon Wind 4, LLC, Exelon Wind 5, LLC, Exelon Wind 6, LLC, Exelon Wind 7, LLC, Exelon Wind 8, LLC, Exelon Wind 9, LLC, Exelon Wind 10, LLC, Exelon Wind 11, LLC, High Plains Wind Power, LLC v. Xcel Energy...

  19. Current Status and Challenges in Wind Energy Assessment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gryning, Sven-Erik; Badger, Jake; Hahmann, Andrea N.

    2014-01-01

    Here we discuss the status and challenges in the development of atlases for the assessment of the regional and global wind resources. The text more specifically describes a methodology that is under development at DTU Wind Energy in Denmark. As the wind assessment is based on mesoscale modelling......, some of the specific challenges in mesoscale modelling for wind energy purposes are discussed such as wind profiles and long-term statistics of the wind speed time series. Solutions to these challenges will help secure an economic and effective deployment of wind energy....

  20. Multi-MW wind turbine power curve measurements using remote sensing instruments – the first Høvsøre campaign

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wagner, Rozenn; Courtney, Michael

    Power curve measurement for large wind turbines requires taking into account more parameters than only the wind speed at hub height. Based on results from aerodynamic simulations, an equivalent wind speed taking the wind shear into account was defined and found to reduce the scatter in the power...

  1. Global gyrokinetic simulations of toroidal electron temperature gradient driven mode in reversed shear tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Idomura, Y.; Tokuda, S.; Kishimoto, Y.

    2005-01-01

    Using a global gyrokinetic toroidal particle code, the toroidal electron temperature gradient driven (ETG) turbulence is studied in positive and reversed shear tokamaks. In the positive shear configuration, the ETG mode shows a ballooning structure, and its envelope width Δr/ρ te , which is limited by a global ω te *-shearing effect, is proportional to ρ* -1/2 , where ω te * is the electron diamagnetic frequency and ρ* is the electron Larmor radius ρ te divided by the minor radius a. In the reversed shear configuration, the mode width of a slab like ETG mode, which is determined by a global magnetic field structure around the q min surface, does not depend on ρ*. According to the mixing length theory, a ballooning mode gives a Bohm like ρ*-scaling, while a slab like mode shows a gyro-Bohm like ρ*-scaling. In realistic small ρ* tokamaks, the saturation level of the ETG mode in the positive shear configuration is order of magnitude higher than that in the reversed shear configuration. In the nolinear turbulent state, the ETG turbulence in the positive and reversed shear configurations show quite different structure formations. In the positive shear configuration, the ETG turbulence is dominated by streamers which have a ballooning type structure, and the electron temperature T e profile is quickly relaxed to the marginally stable state in a turbulent time scale. In the reversed shear configuration, quasi-steady zonal flows are produced in the negative shear region, while the positive shear region is characterized by streamers. Accordingly, the electron thermal diffusivity χ e has a gap structure across the q min surface, and the T e gradient is sustained above the marginal value for a long time in the quasi-steady phase. The results suggest a stiffness of the T e profile in positive shear tokamaks, and a possibility of the T e transport barrier in reversed shear tokamaks. (author)

  2. Atributos de qualidade da carne de paca (Agouti paca: perfil sensorial e força de cisalhamento Quality attributes of paca meat (Agouti paca: sensory profile and shear force

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Gomes

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Avaliaram-se as características sensoriais e determinou-se a força de cisalhamento de cortes de carne de paca (Agouti paca. As análises foram realizadas nos cortes desossados de paleta, lombo e pernil de nove pacas, preparados por cocção até a temperatura interna de 70ºC. A avaliação de aspecto, cor, sabor, odor e maciez foi realizada pela aplicação de teste afetivo a 146 provadores, utilizando-se escala hedônica, e a força de cisalhamento foi determinada pela técnica Warner Bratzler. Na avaliação sensorial, os cortes de paleta, lombo e pernil de paca mostraram diferença significativa (p0,05 entre os cortes, que se mostraram igualmente macios. A carne de paca apresentou-se sensorialmente semelhante à carne suína e com boa aceitação pelos consumidores. O estudo evidenciou o potencial da paca como uma espécie silvestre para a produção comercial de carne para o mercado de carnes vermelhas ou exóticas.Sensory characteristics and shear force of paca meat (Agouti paca were assessed in this study. Analyses were performed in the bonelessshoulder,loin andhamobtained from nine paca carcassesprepared by cookinguntil reaching the internal temperatureof 70°C. The evaluation of flavor, aroma, color, appearance and tenderness was carried out by the application of an affective test using the hedonic scaleand a 146 consumer panel. Shear force was determined by the Warner-Bratzler technique. Shoulder, loin and ham had significant differences (p 0.05 among the cuts, which were similarly tender. Paca meat was found to resemble pork meat in sensory evaluation and had good acceptance by consumers. This study showed the potential of paca (Agouti paca asa wild species for meat production in the red or exotic meat market.

  3. Displacement-length scaling of brittle faults in ductile shear.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grasemann, Bernhard; Exner, Ulrike; Tschegg, Cornelius

    2011-11-01

    Within a low-grade ductile shear zone, we investigated exceptionally well exposed brittle faults, which accumulated antithetic slip and rotated into the shearing direction. The foliation planes of the mylonitic host rock intersect the faults approximately at their centre and exhibit ductile reverse drag. Three types of brittle faults can be distinguished: (i) Faults developing on pre-existing K-feldspar/mica veins that are oblique to the shear direction. These faults have triclinic flanking structures. (ii) Wing cracks opening as mode I fractures at the tips of the triclinic flanking structures, perpendicular to the shear direction. These cracks are reactivated as faults with antithetic shear, extend from the parent K-feldspar/mica veins and form a complex linked flanking structure system. (iii) Joints forming perpendicular to the shearing direction are deformed to form monoclinic flanking structures. Triclinic and monoclinic flanking structures record elliptical displacement-distance profiles with steep displacement gradients at the fault tips by ductile flow in the host rocks, resulting in reverse drag of the foliation planes. These structures record one of the greatest maximum displacement/length ratios reported from natural fault structures. These exceptionally high ratios can be explained by localized antithetic displacement along brittle slip surfaces, which did not propagate during their rotation during surrounding ductile flow.

  4. Displacement–length scaling of brittle faults in ductile shear

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grasemann, Bernhard; Exner, Ulrike; Tschegg, Cornelius

    2011-01-01

    Within a low-grade ductile shear zone, we investigated exceptionally well exposed brittle faults, which accumulated antithetic slip and rotated into the shearing direction. The foliation planes of the mylonitic host rock intersect the faults approximately at their centre and exhibit ductile reverse drag. Three types of brittle faults can be distinguished: (i) Faults developing on pre-existing K-feldspar/mica veins that are oblique to the shear direction. These faults have triclinic flanking structures. (ii) Wing cracks opening as mode I fractures at the tips of the triclinic flanking structures, perpendicular to the shear direction. These cracks are reactivated as faults with antithetic shear, extend from the parent K-feldspar/mica veins and form a complex linked flanking structure system. (iii) Joints forming perpendicular to the shearing direction are deformed to form monoclinic flanking structures. Triclinic and monoclinic flanking structures record elliptical displacement–distance profiles with steep displacement gradients at the fault tips by ductile flow in the host rocks, resulting in reverse drag of the foliation planes. These structures record one of the greatest maximum displacement/length ratios reported from natural fault structures. These exceptionally high ratios can be explained by localized antithetic displacement along brittle slip surfaces, which did not propagate during their rotation during surrounding ductile flow. PMID:26806996

  5. Non-gyrotropic pressure anisotropy induced by velocity shear.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tenerani, A.; Del Sarto, D.; Pegoraro, F.; Califano, F.

    2015-12-01

    We discuss how, in a collisionless magnetized plasma, a sheared velocity field may lead to the anisotropization of an initial Maxwellian state. By including the full pressure tensor dynamics in a fluid plasma model, we show, analytically and numerically, that a sheared velocity field makes an initial isotropic state anisotropic and non-gyrotropic [1], i.e., makes the plasma pressure tensor anisotropic also in the plane perpendicular to the magnetic field. The propagation of transverse magneto-elastic waves in the anisotropic plasma affects the process of formation of a non-gyrotropic pressure and can lead to its spatial filamentation. This plasma dynamics implies in particular that isotropic MHD equilibria cease to be equilibria in presence of a stationary sheared flow. Similarly, in the case of turbulence, where small-scale spatial inhomogeneities are naturally developed during the direct cascade, we may expect that isotropic turbulent states are not likely to exist whenever a full pressure tensor evolution is accounted for. These results may be relevant to understanding the agyrotropic pressure configurations which are well documented in solar wind measurements and possibly correlated to plasma flows (see e.g. Refs.[2,3]), and which have also been measured in Vlasov simulations of Alfvenic turbulence [4]. [1] D. Del Sarto, F. Pegoraro, F. Califano, "Pressure anisotropy and small spatial scales induced by a velocity shear", http://arxiv.org/abs/1507.04895 [2] H.F. Astudillo, E. Marsch, S. Livi, H. Rosenbauer, "TAUS measurements of non-gyrotropic distribution functions of solar wind alpha particles", AIP Conf. Proc. 328, 289 (1996). [3] A. Posner, M.W. Liemhon, T.H. Zurbuchen, "Upstream magnetospheric ion flux tube within a magnetic cloud: Wind/STICS", Geophys. Res. Lett. 30, (2003). [4] S. Servidio, F. Valentini, F. Califano, P. Veltri, "Local kinetic effects in Two-Dimensional Plasma Turbulence", Phys. Rev. Lett. 108, 045001 (2012).

  6. Estimates of Shear Stress and Measurements of Water Levels in the Lower Fox River near Green Bay, Wisconsin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westenbroek, Stephen M.

    2006-01-01

    Turbulent shear stress in the boundary layer of a natural river system largely controls the deposition and resuspension of sediment, as well as the longevity and effectiveness of granular-material caps used to cover and isolate contaminated sediments. This report documents measurements and calculations made in order to estimate shear stress and shear velocity on the Lower Fox River, Wisconsin. Velocity profiles were generated using an acoustic Doppler current profiler (ADCP) mounted on a moored vessel. This method of data collection yielded 158 velocity profiles on the Lower Fox River between June 2003 and November 2004. Of these profiles, 109 were classified as valid and were used to estimate the bottom shear stress and velocity using log-profile and turbulent kinetic energy methods. Estimated shear stress ranged from 0.09 to 10.8 dynes per centimeter squared. Estimated coefficients of friction ranged from 0.001 to 0.025. This report describes both the field and data-analysis methods used to estimate shear-stress parameters for the Lower Fox River. Summaries of the estimated values for bottom shear stress, shear velocity, and coefficient of friction are presented. Confidence intervals about the shear-stress estimates are provided.

  7. Controlled meteorological (CMET free balloon profiling of the Arctic atmospheric boundary layer around Spitsbergen compared to ERA-Interim and Arctic System Reanalyses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. J. Roberts

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Observations from CMET (Controlled Meteorological balloons are analysed to provide insights into tropospheric meteorological conditions (temperature, humidity, wind around Svalbard, European High Arctic. Five Controlled Meteorological (CMET balloons were launched from Ny-Ålesund in Svalbard (Spitsbergen over 5–12 May 2011 and measured vertical atmospheric profiles over coastal areas to both the east and west. One notable CMET flight achieved a suite of 18 continuous soundings that probed the Arctic marine boundary layer (ABL over a period of more than 10 h. Profiles from two CMET flights are compared to model output from ECMWF Era-Interim reanalysis (ERA-I and to a high-resolution (15 km Arctic System Reanalysis (ASR product. To the east of Svalbard over sea ice, the CMET observed a stable ABL profile with a temperature inversion that was reproduced by ASR but not captured by ERA-I. In a coastal ice-free region to the west of Svalbard, the CMET observed a stable ABL with strong wind shear. The CMET profiles document increases in ABL temperature and humidity that are broadly reproduced by both ASR and ERA-I. The ASR finds a more stably stratified ABL than observed but captured the wind shear in contrast to ERA-I. Detailed analysis of the coastal CMET-automated soundings identifies small-scale temperature and humidity variations with a low-level flow and provides an estimate of local wind fields. We demonstrate that CMET balloons are a valuable approach for profiling the free atmosphere and boundary layer in remote regions such as the Arctic, where few other in situ observations are available for model validation.

  8. On the vertical structure of wind gusts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Suomi, I.; Gryning, Sven-Erik; Floors, Rogier Ralph

    2015-01-01

    The increasing size of wind turbines, their height and the area swept by their blades have revised the need for understanding the vertical structure of wind gusts. Information is needed for the whole profile. In this study, we analyzed turbulence measurements from a 100m high meteorological mast...

  9. The Long distance wake behind Horns Rev I studied using large eddy simulations and a wind turbine parameterization in WRF

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eriksson, O.; Baltscheffsky, M.; Breton, S.-P.; Söderberg, S.; Ivanell, S.

    2017-05-01

    The aim of the present paper is to obtain a better understanding of long distance wakes generated by wind farms as a first step towards a better understanding of farm to farm interaction. The Horns Rev I (HR) wind farm is considered for this purpose, where comparisons are performed between microscale Large Eddy Simulations (LES) using an Actuator Disc model (ACD), mesoscale simulations in the Weather Research and Forecasting Model (WRF) using a wind turbine parameterization, production data as well as wind measurements in the wind farm wake. The LES is manually set up according to the wind conditions obtained from the mesoscale simulation as a first step towards a meso/microscale coupling. The LES using an ACD are performed in the EllipSys3D code. A forced boundary layer (FBL) approach is used to introduce the desired wind shear and the atmospheric turbulence field from the Mann model. The WRF uses a wind turbine parameterization based on momentum sink. To make comparisons with the LESs and the site data possible an idealized setup of WRF is used in this study. The case studied here considers a westerly wind direction sector (at hub height) of 270 ± 2.5 degrees and a wind speed of 8 ± 0.5 m/s. For both the simulations and the site data a neutral atmosphere is considered. The simulation results for the relative production as well as the wind speed 2 km and 6 km downstream from the wind farm are compared to site data. Further comparisons between LES and WRF are also performed regarding the wake recovery and expansion. The results are also compared to an earlier study of HR using LES as well as an earlier comparison of LES and WRF. Overall the results in this study show a better agreement between LES and WRF as well as better agreement between simulations and site data. The procedure of using the profile from WRF as inlet to LES can be seen as a simplified coupling of the models that could be developed further to combine the methods for cases of farm to farm

  10. Improving Interlaminar Shear Strength

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Justin

    2015-01-01

    To achieve NASA's mission of space exploration, innovative manufacturing processes are being applied to the fabrication of complex propulsion elements.1 Use of fiber-reinforced, polymeric composite tanks are known to reduce weight while increasing performance of propulsion vehicles. Maximizing the performance of these materials is needed to reduce the hardware weight to result in increased performance in support of NASA's missions. NASA has partnered with the Mississippi State University (MSU) to utilize a unique scalable approach of locally improving the critical properties needed for composite structures. MSU is responsible for the primary development of the concept with material and engineering support provided by NASA. The all-composite tank shown in figure 1 is fabricated using a prepreg system of IM7 carbon fiber/CYCOM 5320-1 epoxy resin. This is a resin system developed for out-of-autoclave applications. This new technology is needed to support the fabrication of large, all composite structures and is currently being evaluated on a joint project with Boeing for the Space Launch System (SLS) program. In initial efforts to form an all composite pressure vessel using this prepreg system, a 60% decrease in properties was observed in scarf joint regions. Inspection of these areas identified interlaminar failure in the adjacent laminated structure as the main failure mechanism. This project seeks to improve the interlaminar shear strength (ILSS) within the prepreg layup by locally modifying the interply region shown in figure 2.2

  11. Fifty years of shear zones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graham, Rodney

    2017-04-01

    We are here, of course, because 1967 saw the publication of John Ramsay's famous book. Two years later a memorable field trip from Imperial College to the Outer Hebrides saw John on a bleak headland on the coast of North Uist where a relatively undeformed metadolerite within Lewisian (Precambrian) gneisses contained ductile shear zones with metamorphic fabrics in amphibolite facies. One particular outcrop was very special - a shear zone cutting otherwise completely isotropic, undeformed metadolerite, with an incremental foliation starting to develop at 45° to the deformation zone, and increasing in intensity as it approached the shear direction. Here was proof of the process of simple shear under ductile metamorphic conditions - the principles of simple shear outlined in John Ramsay's 1967 book clearly visible in nature, and verified by Ramsay's mathematical proofs in the eventual paper (Ramsay and Graham, 1970). Later work on the Lewisian on the mainland of Scotland, in South Harris, in Africa, and elsewhere applied Ramsay's simple shear principles more liberally, more imprecisely and on larger scale than at Caisteal Odair, but in retrospect it documented what seems now to be the generality of mid and lower crustal deformation. Deep seismic reflection data show us that on passive margins hyper-stretched continental crust (whether or not cloaked by Seaward Dipping Reflectors) seems to have collapsed onto the mantle. Crustal faults mostly sole out at or above the mantle - so the Moho is a detachment- an 'outer marginal detachment', if you like, and, of course, it must be a ductile shear. On non-volcanic margins this shear zone forms the first formed ocean floor before true sea floor spreading gets going to create real oceanic crust. Gianreto Manatschal, Marcel Lemoine and others realised that the serpentinites described in parts of the Alps are exposed remnants of this ductile shear zone. Associated ophicalcite breccias tell of sea floor exposure, while high

  12. Wall shear stress evolution in carotid artery bifurcation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernad, S. I.; Bosioc, A. I.; Totorean, A. F.; Petre, I.; Bernad, E. S.

    2017-07-01

    The steady flow in an anatomically realistic human carotid bifurcation was simulated numerically. Main parameters such as wall shear stress (WSS), velocity profiles and pressure distributions are investigated in the carotid artery, namely in bifurcation and sinusoidal enlargement regions. Flow in the carotid sinus is dominated by a single secondary vortex motion accompanied by a strong helical flow. This type of flow is induced primarily by the curvature and asymmetry of the in vivo geometry. Low wall shear stress concentration occurs at both the anterior and posterior aspects of the proximal internal bulb.

  13. WIND TURBINES FOR WIND POWER INSTALLATIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barladean A.S.

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available The problem of wind turbine choice for wind power stations is examined in this paper. It is shown by comparison of parameters and characteristics of wind turbines, that for existing modes and speeds of wind in territory of Republic of Moldova it is necessary to use multi-blade small speed rotation wind turbines of fan class.

  14. Parametric Study of Rockbolt Shear Behaviour by Double Shear Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, L.; Hagan, P. C.; Saydam, S.; Hebblewhite, B.; Li, Y.

    2016-12-01

    Failure of rockbolts as a result of shear or bending loads can often be found in underground excavations. The response of rock anchorage systems has been studied in shear, both by laboratory tests as well as numerical modelling in this study. A double shear test was developed to examine the shear behaviour of a bolt installed across two joints at different angles. To investigate the influence of various parameters in the double shear test, a numerical model of a fully grouted rockbolt installed in concrete was constructed and analysed using FLAC3D code. A number of parameters were considered including concrete strength, inclination between rockbolt and joints and rockbolt diameter. The numerical model considered three material types (steel, grout and concrete) and three interfaces (concrete-concrete, grout-concrete and grout-rockbolt). The main conclusions drawn from the study were that the level of bolt resistance to shear was influenced by rock strength, inclination angle, and diameter of the rockbolt. The numerical simulation of the bolt/grout interaction and deformational behaviour was found to be in close agreement with earlier experimental test results.

  15. Cone Penetrometer Shear Strength Measurements of Sludge Waste in Tanks 241-AN-101 and 241-AN-106

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Follett, Jordan R.

    2014-03-06

    This document presents the resulting shear strength profiles for sludge waste in Tanks 241-AN-101 and 241-AN-106, as determined with a full-flow cone penetrometer. Full-flow penetrometer measurements indicate shear strength profiles that increase roughly uniformly with depth. For Tank 241-AN-101, the undrained shear strength was calculated to range from 500 Pa near the sludge surface to roughly 3,300 Pa at 15 inches above the tank bottom. For 241-AN-106, the undrained shear strength was calculated to range from 500 Pa near the sludge surface to roughly 5,000 Pa at 15 inches above the tank bottom.

  16. Wind turbine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheney, Jr., Marvin C.

    1982-01-01

    A wind turbine of the type having an airfoil blade (15) mounted on a flexible beam (20) and a pitch governor (55) which selectively, torsionally twists the flexible beam in response to wind turbine speed thereby setting blade pitch, is provided with a limiter (85) which restricts unwanted pitch change at operating speeds due to torsional creep of the flexible beam. The limiter allows twisting of the beam by the governor under excessive wind velocity conditions to orient the blades in stall pitch positions, thereby preventing overspeed operation of the turbine. In the preferred embodiment, the pitch governor comprises a pendulum (65,70) which responds to changing rotor speed by pivotal movement, the limiter comprising a resilient member (90) which engages an end of the pendulum to restrict further movement thereof, and in turn restrict beam creep and unwanted blade pitch misadjustment.

  17. SEDflume - High Shear Stress Flume

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers High Shear Stress flume (SEDflume) is designed for estimating erosion rates of fine-grained and mixed fine/coarse grained sediments...

  18. Multi Resonance Shear Mode Transducers

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-11-21

    engineering in the single crystal lead magnesium niobate-lead titanate (PMNT) system has uncovered a very unique piezoelectric shear mode. Contrary to...ABSTRACT Crystallographic engineering of single crystal relaxor-based ferroelectrics was used to design broadband, compact, high power, low frequency...utilize the d36 shear piezoelectric coefficient, which has advantages for compact low frequency sonar transducers. The d36 cut is unique in that large

  19. Shear Alfven waves in tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kieras, C.E.

    1982-12-01

    Shear Alfven waves in an axisymmetric tokamak are examined within the framework of the linearized ideal MHD equations. Properties of the shear Alfven continuous spectrum are studied both analytically and numerically. Implications of these results in regards to low frequency rf heating of toroidally confined plasmas are discussed. The structure of the spatial singularities associated with these waves is determined. A reduced set of ideal MHD equations is derived to describe these waves in a very low beta plasma

  20. Nebraska wind resource assessment first year results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hurley, P.J.F.; Vilhauer, R. [RLA Consulting, Inc., Bothell, WA (United States); Stooksbury, D. [Univ. of Nebraska, Lincoln, NE (United States)

    1996-12-31

    This paper presents the preliminary results from a wind resource assessment program in Nebraska sponsored by the Nebraska Power Association. During the first year the measured annual wind speed at 40 meters ranged from 6.5 - 7.5 m/s (14.6 - 16.8 mph) at eight stations across the state. The site selection process is discussed as well as an overview of the site characteristics at the monitoring locations. Results from the first year monitoring period including data recovery rate, directionality, average wind speeds, wind shear, and turbulence intensity are presented. Results from the eight sites are qualitatively compared with other midwest and west coast locations. 5 figs., 2 tabs.

  1. Social Acceptance of Wind: A Brief Overview (Presentation)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lantz, E.

    2015-01-01

    This presentation discusses concepts and trends in social acceptance of wind energy, profiles recent research findings, and discussions mitigation strategies intended to resolve wind power social acceptance challenges as informed by published research and the experiences of individuals participating in the International Energy Agencies Working Group on Social Acceptance of Wind Energy

  2. Nonlocal response functions for predicting shear flow of strongly inhomogeneous fluids. II. Sinusoidally driven shear and multisinusoidal inhomogeneity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalton, Benjamin A; Glavatskiy, Kirill S; Daivis, Peter J; Todd, B D

    2015-07-01

    We use molecular-dynamics computer simulations to investigate the density, strain-rate, and shear-pressure responses of a simple model atomic fluid to transverse and longitudinal external forces. We have previously introduced a response function formalism for describing the density, strain-rate, and shear-pressure profiles in an atomic fluid when it is perturbed by a combination of longitudinal and transverse external forces that are independent of time and have a simple sinusoidal spatial variation. In this paper, we extend the application of the previously introduced formalism to consider the case of a longitudinal force composed of multiple sinusoidal components in combination with a single-component sinusoidal transverse force. We find that additional harmonics are excited in the density, strain-rate, and shear-pressure profiles due to couplings between the force components. By analyzing the density, strain-rate, and shear-pressure profiles in Fourier space, we are able to evaluate the Fourier coefficients of the response functions, which now have additional components describing the coupling relationships. Having evaluated the Fourier coefficients of the response functions, we are then able to accurately predict the density, velocity, and shear-pressure profiles for fluids that are under the influence of a longitudinal force composed of two or three sinusoidal components combined with a single-component sinusoidal transverse force. We also find that in the case of a multisinusoidal longitudinal force, it is sufficient to include only pairwise couplings between different longitudinal force components. This means that it is unnecessary to include couplings between three or more force components in the case of a longitudinal force composed of many Fourier components, and this paves the way for a highly accurate but tractable treatment of nonlocal transport phenomena in fluids with density and strain-rate inhomogeneities on the molecular length scale.

  3. Reduction of the performance of a noise screen due to screen-induced wind-speed gradients: numerical computations and wind-tunnel experiments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Salomons, E.M.

    1999-01-01

    Downwind sound propagation over a noise screen is investigated by numerical computations and scale model experiments in a wind tunnel. For the computations, the parabolic equation method is used, with a range-dependent sound-speed profile based on wind-speed profiles measured in the wind tunnel and

  4. Wind power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2006-06-01

    This road-map proposes by the Group Total aims to inform the public on the wind power. It presents the principles, the technology takes off, its applications and technology focus, the global market trends and the outlooks and Total commitments in the domain. (A.L.B.)

  5. Wind energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Portilla S, L.A.

    1995-01-01

    The wind energy or eolic energy is a consequence of solar energy, the one which is absorbed by the atmosphere and is transformed into energy of movement of large bulks of air. In this process the atmosphere acts as the filter to the solar radiation and demotes the ultraviolet beams that result fatal to life in the Earth. The ionosphere is the most external cap and this is ionized by means of absorption process of ultraviolet radiation arising to the Sun. The atmosphere also acts as a trap to the infrared radiation, it that results from the continual process of energetic degradation. In this way, the interaction between Earth - Atmospheres, is behaved as a great greenhouse, maintaining the constant temperatures, including in the dark nights. Processes as the natural convection (that occur by the thermodynamic phenomenon), equatorial calmness, trade winds and against trade winds and global distribution of the air currents are described. The other hand, techniques as the transformation of the wind into energy and its parameters also are shown

  6. Influence of atmospheric stability on wind turbine loads

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sathe, Ameya; Mann, Jakob; Barlas, Thanasis K.

    2013-01-01

    at the turbine hub height. The loads are quantified as the cumulative sum of the damage equivalent load for different wind speeds that are weighted according to the wind speed and stability distribution. Four sites with a different wind speed and stability distribution are used for comparison. The turbulence...... turbulent energy. The tower base loads are mainly influenced by diabatic turbulence, whereas the rotor loads are influenced by diabatic wind profiles. The blade loads are influenced by both, diabatic wind profile and turbulence, that leads to nullifying the contrasting influences on the loads...

  7. Influence of stability on the flux-profile relationships for wind speed, Φm, and temperature, Φh, for the stable atmospheric boundary layer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Yagüe

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Data from SABLES98 experimental campaign have been used in order to study the influence of stability (from weak to strong stratification on the flux-profile relationships for momentum, Φm, and heat, Φh. Measurements from 14 thermocouples and 3 sonic anemometers at three levels (5.8, 13.5 and 32 m for the period from 10 to 28 September 1998 were analysed using the framework of the local-scaling approach (Nieuwstadt, 1984a; 1984b, which can be interpreted as an extension of the Monin-Obukhov similarity theory (Obukhov, 1946. The results show increasing values of Φm and Φh with increasing stability parameter ζ=z/Λ, up to a value of ζ≈1–2, above which the values remain constant. As a consequence of this levelling off in Φm and Φh for strong stability, the turbulent mixing is underestimated when linear similarity functions (Businger et al., 1971 are used to calculate surface fluxes of momentum and heat. On the other hand when Φm and Φh are related to the gradient Richardson number, Ri, a different behaviour is found, which could indicate that the transfer of momentum is greater than that of heat for high Ri. The range of validity of these linear functions is discussed in terms of the physical aspects of turbulent intermittent mixing.

  8. National Offshore Wind Energy Grid Interconnection Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Daniel, John P. [ABB Inc; Liu, Shu [ABB Inc; Ibanez, Eduardo [National Renewable Energy Laboratory; Pennock, Ken [AWS Truepower; Reed, Greg [University of Pittsburgh; Hanes, Spencer [Duke Energy

    2014-07-30

    The National Offshore Wind Energy Grid Interconnection Study (NOWEGIS) considers the availability and potential impacts of interconnecting large amounts of offshore wind energy into the transmission system of the lower 48 contiguous United States. A total of 54GW of offshore wind was assumed to be the target for the analyses conducted. A variety of issues are considered including: the anticipated staging of offshore wind; the offshore wind resource availability; offshore wind energy power production profiles; offshore wind variability; present and potential technologies for collection and delivery of offshore wind energy to the onshore grid; potential impacts to existing utility systems most likely to receive large amounts of offshore wind; and regulatory influences on offshore wind development. The technologies considered the reliability of various high-voltage ac (HVAC) and high-voltage dc (HVDC) technology options and configurations. The utility system impacts of GW-scale integration of offshore wind are considered from an operational steady-state perspective and from a regional and national production cost perspective.

  9. Optimizing transmission from distant wind farms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pattanariyankool, Sompop; Lave, Lester B.

    2010-01-01

    We explore the optimal size of the transmission line from distant wind farms, modeling the tradeoff between transmission cost and benefit from delivered wind power. We also examine the benefit of connecting a second wind farm, requiring additional transmission, in order to increase output smoothness. Since a wind farm has a low capacity factor, the transmission line would not be heavily loaded, on average; depending on the time profile of generation, for wind farms with capacity factor of 29-34%, profit is maximized for a line that is about 3/4 of the nameplate capacity of the wind farm. Although wind generation is inexpensive at a good site, transmitting wind power over 1600 km (about the distance from Wyoming to Los Angeles) doubles the delivered cost of power. As the price for power rises, the optimal capacity of transmission increases. Connecting wind farms lowers delivered cost when the wind farms are close, despite the high correlation of output over time. Imposing a penalty for failing to deliver minimum contracted supply leads to connecting more distant wind farms.

  10. Shear viscosity of an ordering latex suspension

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Vorst, A.M.; van der Vorst, B.; van den Ende, Henricus T.M.; Aelmans, N.J.J.; Mellema, J.

    1997-01-01

    The shear viscosity of a latex which is ordered at rest is studied as a function of the shear rate and volume fraction. At low shear rates and for moderate to high volume fractions, the flow curves show dynamic yield behavior which disappears below a volume fraction of 8%. At high shear rates, the

  11. Experimental observation of shear thickening oscillation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nagahiro, Shin-ichiro; Nakanishi, Hiizu; Mitarai, Namiko

    2013-01-01

    We report experimental observations of the shear thickening oscillation, i.e. the spontaneous macroscopic oscillation in the shear flow of severe shear thickening fluid. Using a density-matched starch-water mixture, in the cylindrical shear flow of a few centimeters flow width, we observed...

  12. Effect of atmospheric turbulence on wind turbine wakes: An LES study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Y. T.; Porté-Agel, F.

    2012-04-01

    A comprehensive numerical study of atmospheric turbulence effect on wind-turbine wakes is presented. Large-eddy simulations of neutrally-stratified boundary layers developed over different flat surfaces (forest, farmland, grass, and snow) are performed to investigate the structure of turbine wakes in cases where the incident flows to the wind turbine have the same mean velocity at the hub height but different mean wind shears and turbulence intensity levels. The simulation results show that the different wind shears and turbulence intensity levels of the incoming flow lead to considerable influence on the spatial distribution of the mean velocity deficit, turbulence intensity, and turbulent shear stress in the wake region downstream of the turbine. In general, the recovery of the turbine-induced wake (velocity deficit) is faster and the turbulence intensity level is higher and has its maximum closer to the turbine for wakes of turbines over rougher terrain. In order to isolate the effect of turbulence intensity from that of wind shear, simulations have also been performed with synthetic inflow velocity fields that have the same mean wind shear but different turbulence intensity levels. We find that the effect of the inflow turbulence intensity on the wake recovery and turbulence levels is stronger than that of the mean shear.

  13. Statistical Modelling of Wind Proles - Data Analysis and Modelling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jónsson, Tryggvi; Pinson, Pierre

    The aim of the analysis presented in this document is to investigate whether statistical models can be used to make very short-term predictions of wind profiles.......The aim of the analysis presented in this document is to investigate whether statistical models can be used to make very short-term predictions of wind profiles....

  14. Estimated Production Potential Types of Wind Turbines Connected to the Network Using Random Numbers Simulation

    OpenAIRE

    Saeid Nahi; Seyed Mohammad Hossein Nabavi

    2011-01-01

    Nowadays, power systems, energy generation by wind has been very important. Noting that the production of electrical energy by wind turbines on site to several factors (such as wind speed and profile site for the turbines, especially off the wind input speed, wind rated speed and wind output speed disconnect) is dependent. On the other hand, several different types of turbines in the market there. Therefore, selecting a turbine that its capacity could also answer the need...

  15. Study on the Wake of a Miniature Wind Turbine Using the Reynolds Stress Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianxiao Hu

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The Reynolds Stress Model (RSM is adopted to simulate the wind turbine wake and the simulation results are compared with the wind tunnel test data, simulation results from the standard k-ε model and a modified k-ε model. RSM shows good performance in predicting the turbine wakes velocity, turbulence intensity and the kinetic shear stress, while the k-ε based models fail to predict either wakes velocity or turbulence intensity. Simulation results show that the wake velocity will be recovered up to 90% at around 10 D downstream of the turbine (D denotes turbine rotor diameter and it stops at 91% at around 16 D downstream. The wake turbulence intensity reaches a maximum at around 5 D downstream of turbine. Further investigation shows that the horizontal profile of the wakes velocity can be approximated by a Gaussian distribution, and the turbulence intensity can be approximated by a bimodal distribution. The influence of the wakes effect is limited to within ±D in the across-wind direction. The turbine wakes show clear anisotropy, which could explain the incorrect estimation on the turbulence intensity with the extended k-ε model.

  16. Wind Loads on Structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dyrbye, Claes; Hansen, Svend Ole

    Wind loads have to be taken into account when designing civil engineering structures. The wind load on structures can be systematised by means of the wind load chain: wind climate (global), terrain (wind at low height), aerodynamic response (wind load to pressure), mechanical response (wind...... pressure to structural response) and design criteria. Starting with an introduction of the wind load chain, the book moves on to meteorological considerations, atmospheric boundary layer, static wind load, dynamic wind load and scaling laws used in wind-tunnel tests. The dynamic wind load covers vibrations...... induced by wind turbulence, vortex shedding, flutter and galloping. The book gives a comprehensive treatment of wind effects on structures and it will be useful for consulting engineers designing wind-sensitive structures. It will also be valuable for students of civil engineering as textbook...

  17. Application and improvement of Raupach's shear stress partitioning model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walter, B. A.; Lehning, M.; Gromke, C.

    2012-12-01

    Aeolian processes such as the entrainment, transport and redeposition of sand, soil or snow are able to significantly reshape the earth's surface. In times of increasing desertification and land degradation, often driven by wind erosion, investigations of aeolian processes become more and more important in environmental sciences. The reliable prediction of the sheltering effect of vegetation canopies against sediment erosion, for instance, is a clear practical application of such investigations to identify suitable and sustainable counteractive measures against wind erosion. This study presents an application and improvement of a theoretical model presented by Raupach (Boundary-Layer Meteorology, 1992, Vol.60, 375-395 and Journal of Geophysical Research, 1993, Vol.98, 3023-3029) which allows for quantifying the sheltering effect of vegetation against sediment erosion. The model predicts the shear stress ratios τS'/τ and τS''/τ. Here, τS is the part of the total shear stress τ that acts on the ground beneath the plants. The spatial peak τS'' of the surface shear stress is responsible for the onset of particle entrainment whereas the spatial mean τS' can be used to quantify particle mass fluxes. The precise and accurate prediction of these quantities is essential when modeling wind erosion. Measurements of the surface shear stress distributions τS(x,y) on the ground beneath live vegetation canopies (plant species: lolium perenne) were performed in a controlled wind tunnel environment to determine the model parameters and to evaluate the model performance. Rigid, non-porous wooden blocks instead of the plants were additionally tested for the purpose of comparison, since previous wind tunnel studies used exclusively artificial plant imitations for their experiments on shear stress partitioning. The model constant c, which is needed to determine the total stress τ for a canopy of interest and which remained rather unspecified to date, was found to be c ≈ 0

  18. Observation and modeling of tide- and wind-induced surface currents in Galway Bay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lei Ren

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available A high-frequency radar system has been deployed in Galway Bay, a semi-enclosed bay on the west coast of Ireland. The system provides surface currents with fine spatial resolution every hour. Prior to its use for model validation, the accuracy of the radar data was verified through comparison with measurements from acoustic Doppler current profilers (ADCPs and a good correlation between time series of surface current speeds and directions obtained from radar data and ADCP data. Since Galway Bay is located on the coast of the Atlantic Ocean, it is subject to relatively windy conditions, and surface currents are therefore strongly wind-driven. With a view to assimilating the radar data for forecasting purposes, a three-dimensional numerical model of Galway Bay, the Environmental Fluid Dynamics Code (EFDC, was developed based on a terrain-following vertical (sigma coordinate system. This study shows that the performance and accuracy of the numerical model, particularly with regard to tide- and wind-induced surface currents, are sensitive to the vertical layer structure. Results of five models with different layer structures are presented and compared with radar measurements. A variable vertical structure with thin layers at the bottom and the surface and thicker layers in the middle of the water column was found to be the optimal layer structure for reproduction of tide- and wind-induced surface currents. This structure ensures that wind shear can properly propagate from the surface layer to the sub-surface layers, thereby ensuring that wind forcing is not overdamped by tidal forcing. The vertical layer structure affects not only the velocities at the surface layer but also the velocities further down in the water column.

  19. Observation and modeling of tide- and wind-induced surface currents in Galway Bay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lei REN

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available A high-frequency radar system has been deployed in Galway Bay, a semi-enclosed bay on the west coast of Ireland. The system provides surface currents with fine spatial resolution every hour. Prior to its use for model validation, the accuracy of the radar data was verified through comparison with measurements from acoustic Doppler current profilers (ADCPs and a good correlation between time series of surface current speeds and directions obtained from radar data and ADCP data. Since Galway Bay is located on the coast of the Atlantic Ocean, it is subject to relatively windy conditions, and surface currents are therefore strongly wind-driven. With a view to assimilating the radar data for forecasting purposes, a three-dimensional numerical model of Galway Bay, the Environmental Fluid Dynamics Code (EFDC, was developed based on a terrain-following vertical (sigma coordinate system. This study shows that the performance and accuracy of the numerical model, particularly with regard to tide- and wind-induced surface currents, are sensitive to the vertical layer structure. Results of five models using different layer structures are presented and compared with radar measurements. A variable vertical structure with thin layers at the bottom and the surface and thicker layers in the middle of the water column was found to be the optimal layer structure for reproduction of tide- and wind-induced surface currents. This structure ensures that wind shear can properly propagate from the surface layer to the sub-surface layers, thereby ensuring that wind forcing is not overdamped by tidal forcing. The vertical layer structure affects not only the velocities at the surface layer but also the velocities further down in the water column.

  20. Wind Tunnel Modeling Of Wind Flow Over Complex Terrain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banks, D.; Cochran, B.

    2010-12-01

    , vortex shedding, and local turbulence intensity and wind shear values. To achieve accurate results, attention must of course be paid to issues such as ensuring Reynolds number independence, avoiding blockage issues, and properly matching the velocity power spectrum, but once this is done, the laws of fluid mechanics take care of the rest. There will not be an overproduction of turbulent kinetic energy at the top of escarpments, or unacceptable dissipation of inlet turbulence levels. Modern atmospheric boundary layer wind tunnels are also often used to provide validation data for evaluating the performance of CFD model in complex flow environments. Present day computers have further increased the quality and quantity of data that can be economically obtained in a timely manner, for example through wind speed measurement using a computer controlled 3-D measurement positioning system Given this accuracy and widespread acceptance, it is perhaps surprising that ours was the only wind tunnel model in the Bolund blind experiment, an indication of how seldom physical modelling is used when estimating terrain effect for wind farms. In demonstrating how the Bolund test was modeled, this presentation will provide background on wind tunnel testing, including the governing scaling parameters. And we’ll see how our results compared to the full scale tests.

  1. Energy buildup in sheared force-free magnetic fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolfson, Richard; Low, Boon C.

    1992-01-01

    Photospheric displacement of the footpoints of solar magnetic field lines results in shearing and twisting of the field, and consequently in the buildup of electric currents and magnetic free energy in the corona. The sudden release of this free energy may be the origin of eruptive events like coronal mass ejections, prominence eruptions, and flares. An important question is whether such an energy release may be accompanied by the opening of magnetic field lines that were previously closed, for such open field lines can provide a route for matter frozen into the field to escape the sun altogether. This paper presents the results of numerical calculations showing that opening of the magnetic field is permitted energetically, in that it is possible to build up more free energy in a sheared, closed, force-free magnetic field than is in a related magnetic configuration having both closed and open field lines. Whether or not the closed force-free field attains enough energy to become partially open depends on the form of the shear profile; the results presented compare the energy buildup for different shear profiles. Implications for solar activity are discussed briefly.

  2. Focusing of Shear Shock Waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giammarinaro, Bruno; Espíndola, David; Coulouvrat, François; Pinton, Gianmarco

    2018-01-01

    Focusing is a ubiquitous way to transform waves. Recently, a new type of shock wave has been observed experimentally with high-frame-rate ultrasound: shear shock waves in soft solids. These strongly nonlinear waves are characterized by a high Mach number, because the shear wave velocity is much slower, by 3 orders of magnitude, than the longitudinal wave velocity. Furthermore, these waves have a unique cubic nonlinearity which generates only odd harmonics. Unlike longitudinal waves for which only compressional shocks are possible, shear waves exhibit cubic nonlinearities which can generate positive and negative shocks. Here we present the experimental observation of shear shock wave focusing, generated by the vertical motion of a solid cylinder section embedded in a soft gelatin-graphite phantom to induce linearly vertically polarized motion. Raw ultrasound data from high-frame-rate (7692 images per second) acquisitions in combination with algorithms that are tuned to detect small displacements (approximately 1 μ m ) are used to generate quantitative movies of gel motion. The features of shear shock wave focusing are analyzed by comparing experimental observations with numerical simulations of a retarded-time elastodynamic equation with cubic nonlinearities and empirical attenuation laws for soft solids.

  3. Stellar winds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weymann, R.J.

    1978-01-01

    It is known that a steady outflow of material at comparable rates of mass loss but vastly different speeds is now known to be ubiquitous phenomenon among both the luminous hot stars and the luminous but cool red giants. The flows are probably massive enough in both cases to give rise to significant effects on stellar evolution and the mass balance between stars and the interstellar medium. The possible mechanisms for these phenomena as well as the methods of observation used are described. In particular, the mass-loss processes in stars other than the sun that also involve a steady flow of matter are considered. The evidence for their existence is described, and then the question of whether the process thought to produce the solar wind is also responsible for producing these stellar winds is explored

  4. Maintenance of coastal surface blooms by surface temperature stratification and wind drift.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mary Carmen Ruiz-de la Torre

    Full Text Available Algae blooms are an increasingly recurrent phenomenon of potentially socio-economic impact in coastal waters globally and in the coastal upwelling region off northern Baja California, Mexico. In coastal upwelling areas the diurnal wind pattern is directed towards the coast during the day. We regularly found positive Near Surface Temperature Stratification (NSTS, the resulting density stratification is expected to reduce the frictional coupling of the surface layer from deeper waters and allow for its more efficient wind transport. We propose that the net transport of the top layer of approximately 2.7 kilometers per day towards the coast helps maintain surface blooms of slow growing dinoflagellate such as Lingulodinium polyedrum. We measured: near surface stratification with a free-rising CTD profiler, trajectories of drifter buoys with attached thermographs, wind speed and direction, velocity profiles via an Acoustic Doppler Current Profiler, Chlorophyll and cell concentration from water samples and vertical migration using sediment traps. The ADCP and drifter data agree and show noticeable current shear within the first meters of the surface where temperature stratification and high cell densities of L. polyedrum were found during the day. Drifters with 1m depth drogue moved towards the shore, whereas drifters at 3 and 5 m depth showed trajectories parallel or away from shore. A small part of the surface population migrated down to the sea floor during night thus reducing horizontal dispersion. The persistent transport of the surface bloom population towards shore should help maintain the bloom in favorable environmental conditions with high nutrients, but also increasing the potential socioeconomic impact of the blooms. The coast wise transport is not limited to blooms but includes all dissolved and particulate constituents in surface waters.

  5. Nonlinear evolution of layered stratified shear flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Victoria; Caulfield, Colm-Cille

    2000-11-01

    We investigate numerically and theoretically the nonlinear evolution of a parallel shear flow at moderate Reynolds number which has embedded within it a mixed layer of intermediate fluid. Linear stability theory predicts that such flows are unstable to stationary vortical disturbances which are a generalization of an inviscid instability first considered by G. I. Taylor. We investigate the behaviour of these Taylor modes at finite amplitude through numerical simulations. Through considering the long-time evolution of such flows, we investigate how secondary instabilities, and the layered background density profile, affect merging between neighbouring Taylor billows, and alter the irreversible mixing of the background stratification as the flow undergoes transition to small-scale disorder.

  6. Ice Accretion on Wind Turbine Blades

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hudecz, Adriána; Koss, Holger; Hansen, Martin Otto Laver

    2013-01-01

    forces were monitored as ice was building up on the airfoil for glaze, rime and mixed ice. In the first part of the numerical analysis, the resulted ice profiles of the wind tunnel tests were compared to profiles estimated by using the 2D ice accretion code TURBICE. In the second part, Ansys Fluent...

  7. Wind conditions for wind turbine design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maribo Pedersen, B.

    1999-04-01

    Delegates from Europe and USA attended the meeting and discussed general aspects of wind conditions for wind turbine design. The subjects and the presented papers covered a very broad range of aspects of wind conditions and related influence on the wind turbine. (EHS)

  8. Surface shear stress dependence of gas transfer velocity parameterizations using DNS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fredriksson, S. T.; Arneborg, L.; Nilsson, H.; Handler, R. A.

    2016-10-01

    Air-water gas-exchange is studied in direct numerical simulations (DNS) of free-surface flows driven by natural convection and weak winds. The wind is modeled as a constant surface-shear-stress and the gas-transfer is modeled via a passive scalar. The simulations are characterized via a Richardson number Ri=Bν/u*4 where B, ν, and u* are the buoyancy flux, kinematic viscosity, and friction velocity respectively. The simulations comprise 0water gas-exchange, (ii) determine, for a given buoyancy flux, the wind speed at which gas transfer becomes primarily shear driven, and (iii) find an expression for the gas-transfer velocity for flows driven by both convection and shear. The evaluated gas transfer-velocity parametrizations are based on either the rate of turbulent kinetic energy dissipation, the surface flow-divergence, the surface heat-flux, or the wind-speed. The parametrizations based on dissipation or divergence show an unfavorable Ri dependence for flows with combined forcing whereas the parametrization based on heat-flux only shows a limited Ri dependence. The two parametrizations based on wind speed give reasonable estimates for the transfer-velocity, depending however on the surface heat-flux. The transition from convection- to shear-dominated gas-transfer-velocity is shown to be at Ri≈0.004. Furthermore, the gas-transfer is shown to be well represented by two different approaches: (i) additive forcing expressed as kg,sum =AShearu*|Ri/Ric+1| 1/4Sc-n where Ric=|AShear/ABuoy|4, and (ii) either buoyancy or shear dominated expressed as, kg=ABuoy|Bν| 1/4Sc-n, Ri>Ric or kg=AShearu*Sc-n, Riwater surface-characteristics.

  9. Generic calibration procedures for nacelle-based profiling lidars

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borraccino, Antoine; Courtney, Michael; Wagner, Rozenn

    In power performance testing, it has been demonstrated that the effects of wind speed and direction variations over the rotor disk can no longer be neglected for large wind turbines [1]. A new generation of commercial nacelle-based lidars is now available, offering wind profiling capabilities...... to calibrate profiling nacelle lidars....

  10. High fluid shear strain causes injury in silver shark: Preliminary implications for Mekong hydropower turbine design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baumgartner, L. J. [New South Wales Department of Primary Industries, Narrandera Fisheries Centre, Narrandera NSW Australia; Institute of Land, Water and Society, Charles Sturt University, Albury NSW Australia; Thorncraft, G. [Faculty of Agriculture, Forestry and Fisheries, National University of Laos, Vientiane Lao People’s Democratic Republic; Phonekhampheng, O. [Faculty of Agriculture, Forestry and Fisheries, National University of Laos, Vientiane Lao People’s Democratic Republic; Boys, C. [New South Wales Department of Primary Industries, Port Stephens Fisheries Institute, Nelson Bay NSW Australia; Navarro, A. [Institute of Land, Water and Society, Charles Sturt University, Albury NSW Australia; Robinson, W. [Institute of Land, Water and Society, Charles Sturt University, Albury NSW Australia; Brown, R. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland WA USA; Deng, Z. D. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland WA USA

    2017-02-09

    Fluid shear arises when two bodies of water, travelling at different velocities, intersect. Fish entrained at the interface of these two water masses will experience shear stress; which can be harmful. The stress magnitude is dependent on waterbody mass and velocity; with the fish impact largely related to body size. Elevated shear stress occurs where rapidly flowing water passes near spillways, across screens, within turbine draft tubes or other passage routes. A flume was used to determine critical tolerances of silver shark (Balantiocheilos melanopterus) to different shear stress rates generated by a high velocity jet. Fish experienced higher levels of injury and mortality as shear stress was increased. Excessive shear forces had damaging impacts on fish. Mortality occurred at shear levels higher that 600/s. It is important that developers should attempt to model potential shear profiles expected during turbine passage in selected designs. These data will be critical to determine potential impacts on fish. If the likelihood of adverse impact is high, then alternative designs which have lower shear stress could be explored.

  11. Bottom shear stress and salinity distribution in a windy Mediterranean lagoon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alekseenko, Elena; Roux, Bernard; Kuznetsov, Konstantin

    2017-04-01

    This work concerns the wind influence on bottom shear stress and salinity levels in a Mediterranean semi-enclosed coastal lagoon (Etang de Berre), with respect to a replanting program of Zostera noltii. The MARS3D numerical model is used to analyze the 3D current, salinity and temperature distribution induced by three meteorological, oceanic and anthropogenic forcings in this lagoon. The numerical model has been carefully validated by comparison with daily observations of the vertical salinity and temperature profiles at three mooring stations, for one year. Then, two modelling scenarios are considered. The first scenario (scen.#1), starting with an homogeneous salinity of S=20 PSU and without wind forcing, studies a stratification process under the influence of a periodic seawater inflow and a strong freshwater inflow from an hydropower plant (250 m3/s). Then, in the second scenario (scen.#2), we study how a strong wind of 80 km/h can mix the haline stratification obtained at the end of scen.#1. The most interesting results concern four nearshore replanting areas ; two are situated on the eastern side of EB and two on the western side. The results of scen.#2 show that all these areas are subject to a downwind coastal jet. Concerning bottom salinity, the destratification process is very beneficial; it always remains greater than 12 PSU for a N-NW wind of 80 km/h and a hydropower runoff of 250 m3/s. Special attention is devoted to the bottom shear stress (BSS) for different values of the bottom roughness parameter (for gravels, sands and silts), and to the bottom salinity. BSS presents a maximum near the shoreline and decreases along transects perpendicular to the shoreline. There exists a zone, parallel to the shoreline, where BSS presents a minimum (close to zero). When comparing the BSS value at the four replanting areas with the critical value, BSScr, at which the sediment mobility would occur, we see that for the smaller roughness values (ranging from z0=3.5 e

  12. Wind energy. Market prospects to 2006

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huckle, R.

    2002-01-01

    Renewable energy is becoming an increasingly significant source in the energy portfolio of most countries. Several sources of renewable energy are now being pursued commercially and wind energy is the most advanced in terms of installed electricity generation capacity. Of all types of renewable energy wind energy is the one with which there is the greatest experience - wind wheels and windmills have been used in various forms for hundreds of years. Chapter 1 is an introduction to the market study. Chapter 2 begins with a review of the wind energy industry. Topics included here are the case for wind energy (sustainability, security, non-polluting etc), market structure (the relationship between developers, operators, manufacturers, consortia etc) and environmental issues. This is followed by a discussion of the wind energy market for major countries in terms of installed wind power capacity. Within each country market there is an account of government policy, major wind energy programmes, major projects with information on developers and wind turbine manufacturers. A market analysis is given which includes an economic review, wind energy targets (where they exist) and forecasts to 2006. Chapter 3 is a review of wind turbine applications covering electricity generation for public supply networks, stand alone/community applications, water pumping and water desalination. Chapter 4 provides the basic principles of wind turbine operation and associated technologies. A brief account is given of the development of wind turbines and the main components such as the tower, rotor blades, gearbox, generator and electrical controls. Electricity generation and control are outlined and the challenge of electricity storage is also discussed. Meteorological factors (wind speed etc) and the move towards off-shore wind farms are also covered. Chapter 5 contains profiles of leading wind project developers and wind turbine manufacturers. A selection of existing and proposed wind farms

  13. Squirming through shear thinning fluids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Datt, Charu; Zhu, Lailai; Elfring, Gwynn J.; Pak, On Shun

    2015-11-01

    Many microorganisms find themselves surrounded by fluids which are non-Newtonian in nature; human spermatozoa in female reproductive tract and motile bacteria in mucosa of animals are common examples. These biological fluids can display shear-thinning rheology whose effects on the locomotion of microorganisms remain largely unexplored. Here we study the self-propulsion of a squirmer in shear-thinning fluids described by the Carreau-Yasuda model. The squirmer undergoes surface distortions and utilizes apparent slip-velocities around its surface to swim through a fluid medium. In this talk, we will discuss how the nonlinear rheological properties of a shear-thinning fluid affect the propulsion of a swimmer compared with swimming in Newtonian fluids.

  14. Shear Brillouin light scattering microscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Moonseok; Besner, Sebastien; Ramier, Antoine; Kwok, Sheldon J J; An, Jeesoo; Scarcelli, Giuliano; Yun, Seok Hyun

    2016-01-11

    Brillouin spectroscopy has been used to characterize shear acoustic phonons in materials. However, conventional instruments had slow acquisition times over 10 min per 1 mW of input optical power, and they required two objective lenses to form a 90° scattering geometry necessary for polarization coupling by shear phonons. Here, we demonstrate a confocal Brillouin microscope capable of detecting both shear and longitudinal phonons with improved speeds and with a single objective lens. Brillouin scattering spectra were measured from polycarbonate, fused quartz, and borosilicate in 1-10 s at an optical power level of 10 mW. The elastic constants, phonon mean free path and the ratio of the Pockels coefficients were determined at microscopic resolution.

  15. Structural Aspects of Railway Truss Bridges Affecting Transverse Shear Forces in Steel-Concrete Composite Decks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siekierski Wojciech

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available At the steel-concrete interface, the horizontal shear forces that are transverse to cross beams occur due to joint action of the steel-concrete composite deck and the truss girders. Numerical analysis showed that values of the forces are big in comparison to the longitudinal shear forces. In both cases extreme force values occur near side edges of a slab. The paper studies possibilities of reduction of these shear forces by structural alterations of the following: rigidity of a concrete slab, arrangement of a wind bracing, arrangement of concrete slab expansion joints. An existing railway truss bridge span has been analysed. Numerical analysis shows that it is possible to reduce the values of shear forces transverse to cross beams. It may reach 20% near the side edges of slabs and 23% in the centre of slab width.

  16. Air permeability for a concrete shear wall after a damaging seismic load simulation cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Girrens, S.P.; Farrar, C.R.

    1991-01-01

    A study was initiated to estimate air leakage, driven by wind-generated pressure gradients, from a seismically damaged concrete structure. This paper describes an experiment performed to measure the air permeability in a reinforced concrete shear wall, both before and after simulated seismic loading. Static load-cycle testing was used to simulate earthquake loading. Permeability measurements were made by pressurizing one side of the shear wall above atmospheric conditions and recording the transient-pressure decay. Air permeability measurements made on the shear wall before loading fell within the range of values for concrete permeability published in the literature. As long as the structure exhibited linear load-displacement response, no variation in the air permeability was detected. However, experimental results indicate that the air permeability in the shear wall increased by a factor of 40 after the wall had been damaged (cracked)

  17. Atmospheric stability and its influence on wind turbine loads

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sathe, Ameya; Mann, Jakob; Barlas, Thanasis K.

    2012-01-01

    Simulations of wind turbine loads for the NREL 5 MW reference wind turbine under diabatic wind conditions are performed for mean wind speeds between 3 { 16 m/s at the turbine hub height. The loads are quantified as the cumulative sum of the damage equivalent load for different wind speeds...... that are weighted according to the wind speed and stability distribution. It is observed that atmospheric stability influences the tower and rotor loads. The difference in the calculated tower loads using diabatic wind conditions and those obtained assuming neutral conditions only is approximately 16%, whereas...... the difference for the rotor loads is up to 11%. The blade loads are hardly influenced by atmospheric stability, where the difference between the calculated loads using diabatic and neutral input wind conditions is less than 1%. The wind profiles and turbulence under diabatic conditions have contrasting...

  18. Shear rheology of extended nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petersen, Matt K.; Lane, J. Matthew D.; Grest, Gary S.

    2010-07-01

    Nonequilibrium molecular-dynamics simulations are presented for the shear rheology of suspensions of extended “jack”-shaped nanoparticles in an explicit solvent. The shear viscosity is measured for two jack-shaped nanoparticle suspensions for volume fractions from 0.01 to 0.15 and compared to spherical nanoparticles of the same mass. Large differences, in some cases, orders of magnitude, are observed for both the equilibrium viscosity and diffusion constant as the shape of the nanoparticle is varied. The source of enhanced viscosity is the very large effective volume swept out by these extended nanoparticles which allows them to become highly entangled even at low volume fraction.

  19. Shear strength of non-shear reinforced concrete elements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hoang, Cao linh

    1997-01-01

    . The position of the crack in which sliding takes place is determined by the crack sliding model developed by Jin-Ping Zhang. The theoretical calculations are compared with test results reported in the literature. A good agreement has been found.A simplified method to calculate the shear capacity of T...

  20. Wind Technologies & Evolving Opportunities (Presentation)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robichaud, R.

    2014-07-01

    This presentation covers opportunities for wind technology; wind energy market trends; an overview of the National Wind Technology Center near Boulder, Colorado; wind energy price and cost trends; wind turbine technology improvements; and wind resource characterization improvements.